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Citrus County chronicle ( May 18, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 18, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03125

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 18, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03125

Full Text



Nail-biter: Rays withstand O's in series opener /B1


CITRU-S


COUNTY


Partly cloudy and
warn.
PAGE A4


County courting sports tourism


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
With an established net-
work of athletic parks and
an extensive hospitality in-
dustry, sports tourism seems
a natural niche for Citrus
County to explore.
And early efforts have


proved positive.
Since March, the county
has hosted visiting tourna-
ments in several youth
sports, attracting partici-
pants from all over the state.
It has also supported local
dragon boat racing efforts to
grow and attract more
teams.


The direction is the result
of an endeavor by County
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays, who chairs the
Tourism Development
Council, Assistant County
Administrator Cathy Pear-
son and Marla Chancey, di-
rector of the Visitors and
Convention Bureau.


"We've been looking at
how we are going to diver-
sify," Pearson said. "We
were looking at other areas
and what we could be doing
differently and this kind of
hit us sports tourism."
This led to a partnership
with Parks and Recreation,
which manages the county
hosting locations and
grounds maintenance,
which keeps the facilities at


a competitive level. It has
grown to include the school
district with its network of
sports facilities.
"Basically, you have to go
out there and get your name
out and let the organizations
know we're open for busi-
ness," county Parks and Cathy
Recreation Manager Jeff Pearson
Gordon said. assistant
county
See Page A2 administrator.


Inverness begins recycling


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Waste Management driver Derris Fray operates a recycle truck in Inverness's Windemere neighborhood Wednesday morning.
The recycling program in Inverness is a new one and some older residents have voiced their concern regarding handling the large
containers.

Some residents express concern after two weeks of the new program


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS It's been two weeks
since city of Inverness residents began
their Waste Management recycling pro-
gram and the angry phone calls to city
officials have mostly died down.
That doesn't mean everybody is
happy
In the quiet community of Winder-


mere, off Turner Camp Road near the
Withlacoochee State Trail, the buzz
among the residents, most of them re-
tirees, indicates that messing with their
trash isn't something many of them are
taking lightly
At Thursday's regular Windermere
Homeowners Association meeting,
Dale Malm, Inverness director of com-
munity development, was in the hot
seat, fielding questions and attempting


to calm frustrations and fears that
ranged from not being able to fit the two
trash containers in a one-car garage to
one-day-only garbage pickup leading to
roaches and rats in hot garages.
'Almost every waste management type
of company in the nation is going to au-
tomation, so it's not an issue of whether
you will do it, but when," Malm said.

See Page A2


Boats



OK;



RVs no


Couple's rule

challenge fails
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A Crystal River couple re-
cently lost a legal challenge to a
city ordinance they deem
unconstitutional.
Leonard and Karen Church
were cited by city officials in
February for parking their
recreational vehicle (RV) in
their driveway a violation of
the city code.
Jackie Gorman, the city's di-
rector of planning and commu-
nity development, said the
ordinance only allows RVs if
they are parked in a completely
enclosed building, under a car-
port or in a side or rear yard.
"But it can't be in the drive-
way in the front," Gorman said.
However, boats are allowed
in the front in driveways.
Church and his wife took ex-
ception to the rule and went be-
fore a hearing officer in April,
calling the law unconstitutional
and seeking to invalidate it.
But the hearing officer told the
couple he lacked the authority to
declare a city law invalid or un-
constitutional. The Churches
were given 30 days to correct the
violation or face a fine of $100 per
day with the risk of a lien being
placed on their property
The couple appealed the case
See Page A2


Record Powerball jackpot inspires office pools


In observance of
Armed Forces Day, Amer-
ican flags should be flown
at half staff until noon
today.




To see a selection of
the past week's photo-
graphs, go to www.
chronicleonline.com and
click on the "This Week in
Photos" slideshow.


Officials urge caution with co-workers


Associated Press
In workplaces across the na-
tion, Americans are inviting their
colleagues to chip in $2 for a
Powerball ticket and a shared
daydream.
The office lottery pool is a way
to improve your odds and have a
little fun with co-workers. And
besides, who wants to be the only
person at work the next day when
everyone quits?


With $600 million on the line,
this is the time to play It's the
largest-ever Powerball jackpot
and the second-largest world
jackpot of all time. And it could
get even bigger before Saturday's
drawing.
The Multi-State Lottery Associ-
ation recognizes the popularity of
work pools, especially when the
stakes are so high. In the last few
years, lottery officials have of-
fered tips for organizing pools.


POWERBALL
* JACKPOT: $600 million and could get bigger by tonight.
* CHANCES OF WINNING: 1 in 175.2 million odds.
* WHEN: The drawing is Saturday at 10:59 p.m.


Know the rules
Lottery officials encourage
pool organizers to lay down rules,
put them in writing and distrib-
ute the details to all participants
before the winning numbers are
drawn.
Linda Golden, of Gettysburg,


Pa., may set the bar for how to
manage an office lottery pool. An
employee for more than three
decades at a printing company
called Quad Graphics, Golden
has organized a pool for years
and requires everyone to sign in,
See Page A9


Classifieds . . . .
Com ics .........
s Crossword . . . .


Community ...... .C5
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .A4


Horoscope . . . .A4


Lottery Numbers ..
Lottery Payouts . .
Movies ..........


Obituaries ....... .A6
TV Listings ....... C6


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


LOCAL DEALER DECIDES TO

PAY CUSTOMER CAR PAYMENTS


Crystal Automotive Group
Homosassa, FL
Everyone wants a new vehicle, especially if
someone is offering to make those pay-
ments until next year for you.
This is exactly what local car dealer, Crys-
tal Automotive Group has agreed to do.
Making the payments for the customer
until 2014.
During the promotion, if a customer pur-
chases a new or used vehicle prior to
Wednesday, May 22nd, Crystal Automo-
tive Group will make their car payments
for until 2014.
OOEZR


"We just want to show customers how easy
it is to purchase a new vehicle today and we
could not think of a better way than to
agree to make their car payments for
them," said Justin Lamb, Director of Op-
erations for the company.
To qualify for the promotion, customers
must simply purchase a vehicle from one of
the five Crystal Dealerships. They offer
convenient locations: Chevrolet in Ho-
mosassa, Nissan in Homosassa and
Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in Inverness,
Brooksville and Homosassa. Crystal has


set up a hotline so customers can call and
have any and all questions answered. That
number is 1-800-584-8755 ext. 2014.
Skeptical shoppers may think the deal
seems too good to be true. When asked
"What's the catch?", Crystal's Finance Di-
rector, Ted Nipper replied, "The customer
must be able to finance the vehicle for 6
years with an interest rate not exceeding
2.99%. To take advantage of Crystal Au-
tomotive Group making your car payment
for you, you must purchase a vehicle at one
of our five locations by May 22nd. Also re-


member, offers may not be combined." Ac-
cording to Nipper, "There are very few ve-
hicles that do not qualify for the
promotion. However, almost everyone will
qualify for a loan during the promotion."
With an event this large, Crystal is expect-
ing a large customer turnout. When asked
further about the event, Justin Lamb
stated, "It's exciting to offer such a unique
benefit. We're pulling out all the stops to
make this easy for our customers. We've
decided to bring in additional vehicles for
this event to give them the best selection."


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
89
LOW
65


Officials want to attract more tournaments


rT





A2 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


RECYCLE
Continued from Page Al

Every residence within
the city limits recently re-
ceived one 96-gallon cart
on wheels for solid waste
and one 64-gallon cart for
recycling items paper,
glass, plastic, metal and
cardboard.
If they get damaged,
Waste Management will
replace them at no cost to
the customer
Winderemere resi-
dents, upon appeal to the
city, received a smaller,
64-gallon solid waste con-
tainer in addition to the
64-gallon single-stream
recycling container.
Citywide, Wednesday is
designated Green Day,
with both recycling and
yard waste being col-
lected, with yard waste
cans being placed curb-
side in large plastic bags
or in residents' old
garbage cans.
Currently, pickup is
semi-automated, still with
two or three people on a
truck with an automatic
lift. Within an estimated
six months, the program
will be fully automated,
just a driver on a truck
with a fully-automated
lift.
Waste Management
hopes to recover the cost
of providing more than
7,000 containers to city
residents over a five-year
period through man-
power savings.
Concerns about the pro-
gram are varied.
Some of the driveways
in the Inverness High-
lands are steep and some
residents are infirm. What
about an 85-year-old
widow with fibromyalgia
who lives alone and uses
a walker? What about
someone in a wheelchair
or an amputee?
Doug McCoy from Waste
Management said people
with legitimate limitations


SPORTS
Continued from Page X1

Making Citrus County
competitive as a tourna-
ment location has ex-
panded to involve an
event coordinator, TDC
seed money, hotels,
restaurants and attrac-
tions, and Crystal River
Little League.
"It's really becoming
quite a community effort,"
Pearson said. "We're get-
ting better use of our fa-
cilities and we're also
testing the market to see
what we are missing.
"What are we going to
be the expert in? We're
trying to find out what our
niche will be."
To do that, the county
has put out a request to de-
termine if a firm or indi-
vidual would want to come
in and determine what the
assets are and what the
county is missing.
As examples, she cited
the necessity of having a
rubber-surfaced track in-
stalled for hosting track
meets and taking advan-
tage of having the largest
horseshoe facility in the
state. The Florida Horse-
shoe Pitchers Association
will have its 2014 champi-
onship tournament in Cit-
rus County
Gordon said the effort
has involved reaching out
to Crystal River and
Inverness.
"Not only are we all
sharing in this," he said,
"we're all sharing in
bringing business and
folks into Citrus County"
He has charted the im-
pact of tournaments to
date for increased num-
State BRIEF

Officials


tranquilize bear
TAMPA-A Tampa man
got more than he bargained
for when he opened his door
to let the dog out. A black
bear was in his backyard.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
ported 70-year-old Eloy Perez
pulled his barking dog back
inside and dialed 911. When
Hillsborough County Sheriff's
deputies arrived, they found
the bear atop a tree in Diaz'
backyard.
Wildlife officials shot the bear
with tranquilizer darts. After two
darts he fell from the tree onto
pads set out to cushion his fall.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dunnellon utility



$10M in debt


Greenlight has struggled since city bought it


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Derris Fray, driver for Waste Management, operates a
truck that automatically sorts recyclables recently in


Inverness.
can submit a letter from
their doctor to the city of
Inverness and they will be
accommodated.
"We will do anything we
can to provide whatever
service is needed for
these situations," he said.
Across the county in
Crystal River, city resi-
dents have had single-
stream recycling for
years, first with Waste
Management and cur-
rently with FDS.
"It's been well-accepted
here, with high participa-
tion," said Andy Houston,
Crystal River city manager
One major difference
between the two cities'
programs: Crystal River
residents provide their
own solid waste contain-
ers, which is what some
Inverness residents wish
they could do.
Malm told the Winder-

bers in hotel room stays.
They have also surveyed
participants to evaluate
the event as well as their
overall visit.
"The best advertising
we have is the word of
mouth of the teams," Gor-
don said. "They share
their favorable impres-
sions with other teams.
Every team here felt like
they were wanted."
Plus, every tournament
visitor gets a welcome bag
with coupons and infor-
mation on county busi-
nesses, restaurants and
attractions.
Pearson said the thrust
has given Parks and
Recreation a new vision.
It is looking at avoiding
duplication of services
such as summer camp
and instead specializing,
such as the upcoming pro-
grams in archery and
kayaking. The county also
is looking into sports
training camps.


mere residents Thursday
that in other communities
similar to theirs that have
switched to the same
trash pickup program,
residents have found cre-
ative ways to handle it.
"What happens, neigh-
bors come together," he
said. "Those who can ma-
neuver the carts take
their neighbors' trash out
Neighbors who only have
a little bit of trash share a
container. In close-knit
communities such as this,
what you see is neighbors
helping each other to
make the program work.
"We have to have a stan-
dard for everybody,"
he said. "There's no per-
fect solution for 7,200
residents."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. corn

Pearson said they
are also focusing on tak-
ing advantage of the
county's water resources,
possibly adding another
dragon boat race and at-
tracting more big fishing
tournaments.
"We're only at the begin-
ning," said Gordon. "We
want to start bringing in
week-long, two-week-long
tournaments to populate
the hotels during the week
as well as on weekends."


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213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
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(352) 503-2011


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
DUNNELLON
Greenlight Dunnellon
Communications has hit
the iceberg and is taking
on water quickly, to the
tune of a $230,000 loss -
and counting-per month.
Currently, the fiber-
to-the-home program
launched in November
2010 is more than $10 mil-
lion in the red, which in-
cludes its debt services,
the city's audit, conducted
by Powell & Jones, CPA,
revealed.
"It's a real number,"
Mayor Nathan Whitt said
about the Greenlight
deficit. "When I first saw
it, I said 'whoa!' But we
have a real number."
Greenlight, which has
struggled since its incep-
tion, is $2.7 million short
thus far in the fiscal year
Add the $8.8 million in
bond and loan obligations,
and city officials made it
clear they have tough deci-
sions ahead regarding not
only Greenlight, but the
city as well.
How to solve the finan-
cial problems will be the
first task of many for Pier-
pont Consultants, which is



RV
Continued from Page Al

in the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit in Citrus County.
Last Monday, Judge Patri-
cia Thomas dismissed the
Churches' petition, saying it
"does not show prima facia
case for relief," meaning
there is insufficient evi-
dence to support a legal
claim in civil court.
City council member
Ken Brown brought up the
couple's case that same


slated to give an executive
summary of its study and
its findings. A task force
has been created to help
the city tackle each issue,
one by one.
"We will find out more
when (consultants) present
their findings and make
their recommendations,"
Whitt said. "I have a feel-
ing we have a lot of work
ahead of us."
Overall, the city finds it-
self with a debt of $27
million-plus, which in-
cludes the Greenlight total.
Most of the debt includes
bond payments, or debt
services. Also included in
the $27 million total is the
$6-million plus the city
borrowed in December
2011 to purchase the Rain-
bow Springs and Juliette
Falls utility systems.
The biggest concern
among the council was
Greenlight's staggering loss
of operating income, which
continues to add up on a
month-by-month basis. A
feasibility study conducted
by former City Manager
LisaAlgiere in 2010 showed
Greenlight had the poten-
tial to be a money-making
initiative within two years
of its launch with the ability
to serve more than 7,000


customers.
The study stated the city
could likely net up to 3,000
customers in the Rainbow
Springs area, which might
have happened had it not
been for the city's 25 per-
cent surcharge imple-
mented when officials
bought the utility systems.
A majority of Rainbow
Springs' residents launched
a boycott of the city's fiber-
to-the-home program in
January 2011 in protest of
the surcharge, and those
residents have stuck to their
guns in opting not to use
Greenlight despite limited
options for cable television
and Internet
Vice Mayor Dennis
Evans asked Richard
Jones of the city's audit
firm Powell & Jones CPA if
it was possible for his firm
to conduct a line-by-line
audit of "cash in, cash
out," of Greenlight to see if
any problems exist with
expenditures. Jones told
the vice mayor it was pos-
sible to do so; however, a
complete audit could take
up to three months.
No further action was
taken, but the council did
note it would revisit the
matter at an upcoming
meeting.


Monday during the council
meeting and suggested the
panel should look at ad-
dressing why it is OK to
have a boat in one's drive-
way, but not an RV
"What's the difference
between an 18-foot boat
and an 18-foot RV?" Brown
asked.


Gorman, however, said
when the council insti-
tuted the ordinance, boats
were allowed because a lot
of the city's residents were
boaters.
The Churches have until
June 10 to remove the RV
from their front yard, ac-
cording to Gorman.


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Judge Patricia Thomas dismissed
the Churches' petition, saying it
"does not show prima facia case
for relief ...


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LOCAI/STATE







Page A3-SATURDAY, MAY18,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Citrus unemployment drops to 7.6 pct


Chronicle
The jobless rate in April for
the Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties region was 7.5 percent,
down 0.3 percentage points over
the month and 2.1 percent lower
than the same time last year,
according to Workforce
Connection.
The unemployment rate for the
region is the lowest since June
2008 when it was 7.7 percent.
According to Friday's release
of the April 2013 unemployment
rates by the Florida Department
of Economic Opportunity (DEO),
Citrus County posted an unem-
ployment rate of 7.6 percent, a
drop of 0.3 percent over the
month and the lowest since June


2008 when it was 8.1 percent
Marion County's rate also fell
by 0.3 percent, to 7.5 percent
over the month, and Levy
County's rate dropped 0.1 per-
cent to 8.1 percent, both the low-
est since June 2008.
Local rates are not seasonally
adjusted.
Florida's non-seasonally ad-
justed unemployment rate in
April was 6.8 percent and the na-
tional rate was 7.1 percent.
Out of a regional labor force of
206,773, which remained virtu-
ally unchanged over the month,
there were 15,535 unemployed,
down 572 over the month and
down 4,205 since April 2012.
Here is how the employment
numbers break down for each


county in the Workforce Connec-
tion region:
Citrus County's labor force
grew by 83 to 56,493, the number
of employed rose by 220 to 52,187
while the number of jobless fell
by 137 to 4,306. One year ago, the
unemployment rate was 9.5 per-
cent with 5,330 unemployed and
two years ago, Citrus County's
unemployment rate was 11 per-
cent with 6,209 people out of
work.
Marion County's labor force
expanded by 1,016 to 134,085, the
number of those with jobs rose
by 1,435 to 124,083 and those who
were unemployed fell by 419 to
10,002. That represents an over-
the-year increase of 4,508 of
those with jobs and a decrease


of 2,915 in the number of unem-
ployed when the unemployment
rate was 9.7 percent. Two years
ago, the unemployment rate was
11.7 percent, when 15,616 were
without jobs.
Levy County's labor re-
mained virtually unchanged,
growing by one to 16,195 since
March, employment rose by 17 to
14,968 and the number of unem-
ployed dropped by 16 to 1,227. In
April 2012, the unemployment
rate was 9.1 percent and the
number of unemployed was
1,493. Two years ago, the jobless
rate was 10.3 percent with 1,740
people unemployed.
Rusty Skinner, Workforce Con-
nection's chief executive officer,
said the data indicates that "this


has been another positive month
in our trending related to an ex-
panding labor force, expanding
employment and reduced unem-
ployment. In all three counties,
there is positive movement in
each of these areas."
For the fifth consecutive
month, the Ocala/Marion County
metropolitan area led the state
with the fastest job-growth rate
at 3.2 percent, with 2,900 new
jobs over the year. Florida's job-
growth rate during the same pe-
riod was 1.6 percent.
Among Florida's 67 counties,
Citrus County remained 11th
highest, Marion County dropped
one place to 14th highest and
Levy County rose from 17th to
13th highest.


Around the
COUNTY

Flotilla slates
safety checks
Homosassa U.S. Coast
Guard Flotilla 15-4 will offer
free vessel safety checks
beginning at 8 a.m. today at
Homosassa Walmart on
U.S. 19 off Cardinal Street.
Vessels passing safety
checks are awarded a U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary 2013
decal. The 2013 decal in-
forms boating law enforce-
ment agencies that a boat
was in full compliance with
all federal and Florida state
boating laws during a safety
check for that year.
20/20 directors
set to meet
The Citrus 20/20 Board
of Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, May 20,
in room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are asked to
attend. All interested per-
sons are welcome.
For more information
about Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit
www.citrus2020.org or call
352-201-0149.
Music in Park
scheduled today
From 4 to 6 p.m. today -
which is Armed Forces Day
- Crystal River's Music in
the Park will pay tribute to
armed forces personnel
and first-responders, both
active and retired.
There will be an individ-
ual recognition of each of
the armed services in the
way of each branch's
theme song.
Patriotic songs will be
performed by Paul and
Jackie Stevio (Phantastic
Sounds) and their students.
Some relics of the 9/11
attack on the Twin Towers
will be on hand for display,
and an Honor Guard will
post the colors.
Organizers of this tribute
have reached out particu-
larly to Purple Heart recipi-
ents for special recognition.
The public is encouraged
to come out and bring lawn
chairs and American flags.
Benefit sale
today for child
There is a bake sale/yard
sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today at Exit Realty in Crys-
tal River to help offset ex-
penses incurred by the
family of Tiana Corcoran, a
local child being treated at
All Childrens Hospital, suf-
fering from seizures.
Donate pet food
for community
Citrus County Animal
Services is asking for pet
food donations to local food
banks or to the Animal
Services shelter in Inver-
ness. Dog food is especially
in short supply. For informa-
tion on how to help, call
352-746-8400. Monetary
donations may be mailed
to: Citrus County Animal
Services, 4030 S. Airport
Road, Inverness, FL 34450.
The shelter is at the end of
Airport Road, off U.S. 41
between the Inverness
Airport and the county
auditorium/fairgrounds.
-From staff reports


Exceptional students


ir%,Aii


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
The CREST graduating class of 2013 give the thumbs-up Thursday as they await the start of their graduation ceremony at Lecanto High
School. The CREST Class of 2013 includes Joseph Matthew Feldman, Cody Timothy Gordon, Joshua Lloyd Hill, Kirsten Ann LaVoy, Dylan
Paul Patton, Jonathan Michael Ricci, Alysssa Michelle Schnarrs and Michael Andrew Stephens.

Graduation for CREST Class of2013 a celebration ofaccomplishments


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
LECANTO
Family, friends and emotions came
out for graduation.
The Class of 2013 is moving on.
There was no doubt it was gradu-
ation night at CREST, Citrus Resources
for Exceptional Students in Transition
School. The gym was decorated with blue
and white balloons, a glowing archway
was set up for the student processional
and "2013" in strings of lights glowed
above the stage.
Portraits of the graduates were dis-
played on a table as approximately 160
people filed into the audience.
"Pomp and Circumstance" played, cam-


eras flashed and the students entered in
their blue caps and gowns.
The girls had white corsages and boys
wore boutonnieres.
After the presentation of colors by
Lecanto High School ROTC, class mem-
ber Joseph Matthew Feldman led the
Pledge of Allegiance.
Principal Richard Hilgert recognized
various members of the crowd, especially
noting parents and family members.
Guest speaker Nancy Haynes shared a
little information about each student -
their character, talents and ambitions.
She had known some of them since
preschool.
She remarked her task was easy, be-
cause each student was special.
Diplomas were awarded and each stu-


dent posed for pictures. Then it was time
for the turning of the tassels.
"Never allow yourself to be discour-
aged," Hilgert said in his closing remarks.
"The most important part of you is who is
inside of you."
The recessional was exuberant as stu-
dents waved their diplomas, the audience
applauded and cameras continued to
flash.
The CREST Class of 2013 is Joseph
Matthew Feldman, Cody Timothy Gordon,
Joshua Lloyd Hill, Kirsten Ann LaVoy,
Dylan Paul Patton, Jonathan Michael
Ricci, Alysssa Michelle Schnarrs and
Michael Andrew Stephens.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty
at 352-564-2924 or pfaherty@chronicle
online.com.



State BRIEFS


33 more charged
in accident probe
WEST PALM BEACH -
Authorities in South Florida
said 33 more people have
been charged in a three-year
crackdown on staged auto ac-
cidents used to defraud insur-
ance companies out of
millions of dollars.
Miami U.S. Attorney
Wifredo Ferrer said Thursday
those charged included doc-
tors, chiropractic clinic owners
and therapists in Palm Beach
and Miami-Dade counties.
Ferrer said the group
staged auto accidents be-
tween 2006 and 2012, sub-
mitting false insurance claims
through 21 clinics that were
part of the conspiracy.
Man accused of
faking invasion
DELTONA-A Central
Florida man is in jail after
deputies say he wore a dis-
guise while slashing his wife's
face, then made up a story
about a home invasion to
cover up his actions.
But Volusia County Sheriff's
investigators said 29-year-old
Timorthy Hunter confessed
after they confronted him with
inconsistencies in his story.
He remained in the Volusia


County Jail without bond on
Friday.
The Daytona Beach News-
Journal reported deputies
found Kristin Sottosanti with
multiple cuts on her face after
she called 911 Wednesday
night. She told them a masked
man had come into her house
and slashed her face.
Hunter is charged with ag-
gravated battery and tamper-
ing with evidence.
Police find felon
hiding under bed
MIAMI -A convicted felon
who was recently released
from prison hid under a
woman's bed after she let him
into her house by mistake
while police were searching
for him.
The unlikely turn of events
happened Thursday in Miami
following a high-speed pur-
suit. It began when police
started chasing a vehicle that
matched the description of a
car involved in a robbery. The
suspect crashed into several
vehicles before fleeing on
foot.
The Miami Herald reported
he knocked on the back door
of a house. A woman let him
in, thinking it was her daugh-
ter's father.
-From wire reports


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
Two residents of Baja Court in Crys-
tal River, one of whom was armed and
the subject of a SWAT unit and helicop-
ter search Thursday, have been charged
with theft, according to a report of the
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
Matthew Dillion Eaves, 19, and
Jonathan Lee Gonzalez, 25, are each fac-
ing grand theft charges. Their bonds are
$2,000 each.
Eaves and Gonzalez are accused of,
among other things, stealing a vehicle
transmission unit, tire rims, an alu-
minum piece to a boat and other pieces
of aluminum.
According to the report, the owner of
the stolen materials was able to track
them to Eaves' residence.
When investigators arrived on the
scene, they found Gonzalez and two
other people who denied any knowl-
edge of the theft
However, shoe impressions at the
scene of the theft matched those Gonza-
lez was wearing.
When detectives quizzed Gonzalez
further, he told them it was Eaves who
masterminded everything and that
Eaves grabbed his shotgun and fled into
the woods, vowing not to go jail. Gonza-
lez also told investigators he heard a
single gun shot moments earlier from
the direction of the woods.


A search was launched to find Eaves.
The search included SWAT, a helicopter
and a K-9 unit. Eaves was later appre-
hended without incident, with a shot-
gun.
Meanwhile, Gonzalez was reportedly
telling investigators how the stolen
items ended up at Eaves' residence.
He told detectives Eaves hatched the
plan and Gonzalez turned him down,
but came to visit Eaves and saw the
transmission at his residence. Eaves
was not home. Figuring Eaves must
have gone through with his plan, Gon-
zalez decided to go to the yard Eaves
mentioned and found Eaves stealing the
tire rims.
When investigators spoke to Eaves
after a two-hour search, he reportedly
admitted to stealing the items for scrap
and that Gonzalez was with him
throughout.
Eaves told detectives he sneaked out
of his residence when the owner of the
stolen items pulled up and that he only
took his gun with him because of snakes
in the woods. He said the single shot
heard by Gonzalez and others happened
when he shot at a tree because he was
upset.
The two were arrested and trans-
ported to the Citrus County Detention
Center.
Contact Chronicle reporter AB.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Search subject, second


man charged in theft


*






A4 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Today's Birthday There's a strong
possibility in coming months you will
become involved in an endeavor that
requires secrecy. It could either bomb
or turn out better than you anticipate.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Unless
you think for yourself, others will do your
brainwork for you. You might not be too
happy about what they come up with.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Think
through your moves carefully when it
comes to financial dealings. Impulsive
behavior will instigate numerous errors.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) What
others think of you might be more im-
portant than usual. Be careful you
don't do anything that could lower the
high esteem in which you're now held.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Follow a
previously conceived plan for a project
to the letter. On-the-spot changes
could seriously gum up the works.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) By being
too inquisitive, you are likely to ask
questions whose answers you don't
want to hear. What you don't know
can't hurt you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Success is
likely if you continue to use the same
methods that have worked well in the
past. Making revisions could throw you
off course.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Don't let
your ego cause you to take an unsup-
portable position. Your pride can get
you in some extremely hot water, if
you're not careful.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Mat-
ters that affect your earnings must be
given top priority. If something of a friv-
olous nature should pop up, put it on
the back burner where it belongs.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Even
though you might not get the last word
in every instance, don't let it frustrate
you. If you're patient, you'll still be able
to make your most important points.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You'll
make good progress on your goals,
though few will be completed. Be
grateful for whatever headway you do
end up making.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) When
socializing with friends, find the bal-
ance between cheapness and extrava-
gance. Don't spend more than you can
afford, but don't hold back, either.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -A situa-
tion that has been souring a close rela-
tionship with a friend can be resolved,
if you're motivated to do it. Both parties
must be forthright.


ENTERTAINMENT


Play to be shown in
NJ nursing home
NEW YORK A special audi-
ence will get to see Helen Mir-
ren onstage
next month in
London in the
play "The Au-
dience" -
some retired
show business
veterans in a
Helen New Jersey
Mirren nursing home.
The live cinema event com-
pany BY Experience said Friday
it will show a live performance of
Peter Morgan's play with resi-
dents of the The Lillian Booth
Actors Home in New Jersey.
BY Experience has donated
the high-tech digital projector
equipment needed for the broad-
cast and is permanently in-
stalling it in one of the home's
community space. Residents will
now be able to catch all subse-
quent broadcasts by National
Theatre Live.
The play stars Helen Mirren
as Queen Elizabeth II, and fo-
cuses on the queen's relation-
ship with the 12 prime ministers
of her 60-year reign. Its title de-
notes the weekly meetings the
two hold at Buckingham Palace.

White House show to
honor Carole King
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama is putting on a
show at the
White House
next week for
S, singer-song-
writer Carole
King.

She is the
C-arole first woman to
KiCarolng receive the
Gershwin
Prize for Popular Song from the
Library of Congress.


Associated Press
This undated image shows Sonic, left, and sidekick, Tails, in
the 2006 video game "Sonic the Hedgehog," for the Xbox 360
and PlayStation 3. Sega says it will exclusively release the
next three games starring the iconic blue critter on Nintendo
platforms. The first title will be called "Sonic Lost World" and
is set for release on the Wii U and Nintendo 3DS later this
year.


The White House said Obama
will present the award to King
during a concert Wednesday.
The program will include per-
formances by King, Gloria Este-
fan, Billy Joel, Jesse
McCartney, Emeli Sand6,
James Taylor and Trisha
Yearwood.
Wednesday's concert will be
the latest in the "In Performance at
the White House" series. It will be
streamed live on www.white
house.gov, and broadcast nation-
ally by PBS stations on May 28.

George Michael
injured in car crash
LONDON George
Michael was being treated at a
hospital Friday for what his pub-
licist called minor injuries after
being a passenger in a car


crash near London.
A statement released Friday
said the singer was in an accident
on Thursday night and suffered
"superficial cuts and bruises."

Colossal sculptures
grace Botanical Garden
NEW YORK The New York
Botanical Garden in the Bronx
has a fanciful new sculpture ex-
hibition that's hard to miss.
Four colossal fiberglass sculp-
tures of human heads dominate
the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory
Courtyard. Their features are
made of faux vegetation includ-
ing fruit, bark, flowers and twigs.
Each head depicts one of the
four seasons.
The sculptures are on view
through Oct. 27.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, May 18, the
138th day of 2013. There are 227
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 18, 1933, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a
measure creating the Tennessee
Valley Authority.
On this date:
In 1642, the Canadian city of
Montreal was founded by French
colonists.
Ten years ago: A Hamas sui-
cide attacker disguised as an ob-
servant Jew killed seven Israeli
bus passengers.
Five years ago: President
George W. Bush lectured the Arab
world about everything from political
repression to the denial of women's
rights in a speech at the Egyptian
resort of Sharm El-Sheik.
One year ago: Social network
Facebook made its trading debut
with one of the most highly antici-
pated IPOs in Wall Street history;
however, by day's end, Facebook
stock closed up only 23 cents from
its initial pricing of $38.
Today's Birthdays: Actor Bill
Macy is 91. Hall-of-Fame sports-
caster Jack Whitaker is 89. Baseball
Hall-of-Famer Brooks Robinson is
76. Bluegrass singer-musician Rod-
ney Dillard (The Dillards) is 71.
Baseball Hall-of-Famer Reggie
Jackson is 67. Actress Candice Az-
zara is 66. Country singer Joe Bon-
sall (The Oak Ridge Boys) is 65.
Country singer George Strait is 61.
Actor Chow Yun-Fat is 58. Contem-
porary Christian musician Barry
Graul (MercyMe) is 52. Contempo-
rary Christian singer Michael Tait is
47. Comedian-writer Tina Fey is 43.
Rock singer Jack Johnson is 38.
Actor Matt Long is 33. Actor Allen
Leech (TV: "Downton Abbey") is 32.
Christian-rock musician Kevin
Huguley (Rush of Fools) is 31.
Christian singer Francesca Battis-
telli is 28.
Thought for Today: "The hard-
est job kids face today is learning
good manners without seeing any."
- Fred Astaire, American dancer-
actor (1899-1987).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR,[ ,- HI LO PR .HI LO PI
NA NA NA r 91-62 NA tK J92 64 NA


91 65 NA 90 63 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK xclusivedaly
forecast by: .
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 89 Low: 65
Partly cloudy; warm.

SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 88 Low: 67
Partly cloudy; isolated showers possible.

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
I L High: 88 Low: 69
Partly cloudy with a 30% chance for showers in
1 the afternoon.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 90/62
Record 98/52
Normal 90/62
Mean temp. 76
Departure from mean +0
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.50 in.
Total for the year 5.80 in.
Normal for the year 13.63 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 6
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 48
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Ragweed, grasses, oak
Today's count: 4.3/12
Sunday's count: 5.5
Monday's count: 4.0
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/18 SATURDAY 12:32 6:45 12:56 7:07
5/19 SUNDAY 1:17 7:28 1:40 7:51
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:17 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:37 A.M.
O 0 1 1 MOONRISE TODAY...........................1:51 P.M.
MAY 18 MAY 25 MAY 31 JUNE 8 MOONSET TODAY............................ 1:56 A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 12:51 p/7:55 a /8:37 p
Crystal River** 11:12 a/5:17 a 11:03 p/5:59 p
Withlacoochee* 8:59 a/3:05 a 8:50 p/3:47 p
Homosassa*** 12:01 p/6:54 a 11:52 p/7:36 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
12:42 a9:00 a 1:47 p/9:55 p
12:08 p/6:22 a ---/7:17 p
9:55 a/4:10 a 10:19 p/5:05 p
12:57 p/7:59 a /8:54 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
86 69
86 76
91 71
90 65
87 72
87 67
86 79
91 71
86 72


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
pc
pc
pc
pc
ts
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK
South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 Gulf water
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a temperature
light chop. Slight chance of thunder-
storms today. 80T 0


Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.75 27.75 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.86 36.86 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.49 37.49 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.46 38.46 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday
H LPcp.
70 47
87 57
79 53
81 65
77 50
93 75
82 55
61 51 .12
79 68 .52
66 54
70 54
66 44
67 48
88 65
81 57
85 58
70 55
81 57 .01
72 55
89 63
80 62
69 47
90 72
88 53
81 63
73 50
95 65
74 64 .01
76 51
71 56
89 73
79 63 .31
83 71 .01
85 70
84 66 .30
71 62
78 64
81 66 .17
56 46 .49
66 57 .23
85 67
87 64
70 63 .43


Saturday
Fcst H L
pc 75 50
pc 82 55
ts 76 58
ts 82 66
ts 68 56
pc 95 72
ts 72 57
sh 65 49
ts 82 68
pc 70 42
pc 66 50
pc 75 56
pc 72 46
ts 84 68
ts 79 62
ts 83 64
pc 72 61
ts 77 63
pc 74 56
ts 87 65
pc 77 63
pc 71 44
pc 92 71
ts 77 49
pc 86 67
pc 75 55
s 90 65
ts 81 64
ts 71 57
pc 76 48
pc 88 72
pc 77 63
pc 87 68
s 87 69
pc 86 69
pc 68 60
ts 78 64
ts 87 72
pc 64 53
ts 82 68
pc 85 67
ts 85 67
ts 81 67


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:bO P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 85 73 pc 86 71
New York City 72 58 pc 74 57
Norfolk 77 65 ts 77 64
Oklahoma City 73 60 pc 91 69
Omaha 86 66 pc 88 68
Palm Springs 90 70 s 92 65
Philadelphia 76 60 ts 73 57
Phoenix 94 71 s 92 69
Pittsburgh 80 57 c 77 58
Portland, ME 66 45 pc 64 44
Portland, Ore 66 49 sh 60 50
Providence, R.I. 72 48 pc 72 48
Raleigh 86 61 ts 80 66
Rapid City 79 47 ts 75 54
Reno 70 48 s 73 47
Rochester, NY 66 41 pc 74 55
Sacramento 77 51 s 82 57
St. Louis 77 66 .27 pc 85 68
St. Ste. Marie 66 37 pc 66 46
Salt Lake City 66 57 sh 67 46
San Antonio 97 75 pc 94 73
San Diego 69 62 pc 68 60
San Francisco 64 53 pc 70 51
Savannah 84 63 ts 86 69
Seattle 63 53 .02 sh 60 51
Spokane 68 45 pc 66 45
Syracuse 66 41 pc 76 52
Topeka 81 60 pc 88 69
Washington 83 63 ts 71 60
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 106 San Angelo, Texas LOW 30
Leadville, Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/78/pc
Amsterdam 57/48/c
Athens 84/67/s
Beijing 91/68/pc
Berlin 67/49/sh
Bermuda 72/68/c
Cairo 101/74/s
Calgary 61/45As
Havana 87/72As
Hong Kong 80/77As
Jerusalem 87/67/c


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


63/49/pc
62/45/c
58/41/sh
82/63/ts
70/52/s
80/53/pc
68/44/sh
70/64/ts
70/63/s
64/48/pc
70/60/pc
66/52/pc
77/58/sh


CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP

To register for the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office's CodeRED weather program, visit
www.sheriffcitrus.org/EM/ and click on the
"Emergency Management" menu item.
Choose "CodeRED Registration" and enter
the location to be monitored and your contact
details if using a cellphone, you may
choose to receive text alerts, but standard
text messaging rates may apply.
Choose which types of warnings to receive:
general notifications and/or severe weather
warning about tornadoes, severe thunder-
storms or flash floods.


CCCITRUS LICOUNTY



CHRONICLE
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


State BRIEF


Domestic
battery arrests
Billy Brown, 41, at 5:45 p.m.
Tuesday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Ashley Tanguay, 21, of Ho-
mosassa, at 5:42 p.m. Tuesday on
misdemeanor charges of domes-
tic battery and resisting an officer
without violence. No bond.
Other arrests
Nicholas Smith, 21, of White
Boulevard, Inverness, at
11:20 p.m. Monday on a Citrus
County warrant for violation of pro-
bation on an original felony charge
of dealing in stolen property. No
bond.
Michael Matkey, 63, of
Southwest 156th Place, Dunnel-
Ion, at 3:44 p.m. Tuesday on a
misdemeanor charge of retail petit


theft. Bond $250.
Michael Wetzel, 27, of East
Glassboro Court, Hemando, at
3:59 p.m. Tuesday on a misde-
meanor charge of using fraudulent
urine testing equipment and urine
for a drug test and violation of pro-
bation on an original felony charge
of possession of methampheta-
mine. No bond.
Justice Lucas, 18, of Bev-
erly Hills, at 7:56 p.m. Tuesday on
a misdemeanor charge of battery.
Bond $500.
Kendra Hurrell, 24, of Plaza
Street, Beverly Hills, at 8:11 p.m.
Tuesday on a Marion County war-
rant for a felony charge of grand
theft. Bond $2,000.
Jonathan Rafaniello, 29, of
North Redwood Avenue, Her-
nando, at 8:58 p.m. Tuesday on
felony charges of petit theft, grand


theft and soliciting another to com-
mit an offense prohibited by law
and violation of probation on an
original felony charge of retail
theft. According to his arrest affi-
davit, he is accused of stealing
multiple items from Walmart, in-
cluding 10 cases of beer, diapers
and a vacuum cleaner. No bond.
Dustin Lyons, 23, of State
Road 52, Land 0' Lakes, at
3:59 a.m. Wednesday on a felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance (methampheta-
mine) and possession of
paraphernalia. Bond $5,250.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglary
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 9:16 a.m. Thursday, May
16, in the 1600 block of S.E. Par-


adise Circle, Crystal River.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported at
10:09 a.m. Thursday, May 16, in
the 7200 block of W. Village Drive,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was reported at
11:50 a.m. May 16 in the area of
W. Baja Court and N. Elm Drive,
Crystal River.
A petit theft was reported at
5:26 p.m. May 16 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
A grand theft was reported at
6:25 p.m. May 16 in the 9300
block of W. Tonto Drive, Crystal
River.
Vandalism
A vandalism was reported at
1:01 a.m. Thursday, May 16, in the
400 block of Wright St., Inverness.


Governor signs manufacturing
tax break into law
TAMPA-- One of Gov. Rick Scott's top priori-
ties this year is now law.
Scott on Friday signed a bill that creates a tax
break for the state's manufacturers. The gover-
nor made it official during a stop at a Tampa
manufacturing firm.
The measure (HB 7007) exempts manufac-
turers from having to pay sales taxes on equip-
ment purchases for three years. The tax break
starts in April 2014 and runs until April 2017.
The new law also creates a new nonprofit
corporation to oversee money awarded to the
state from lawsuits connected to the Deepwater
Horizon oil spill.
Some have raised legal questions, however,
because the bill did not pass by a supermajority.
Top legislators, however, have insisted that the
supermajority vote was not needed.
-From wire reports


SSummer Camp Fun
Pope John Paul II Catholic School
4341 W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto
352-746-2020
Open to children entering preschool 3 through 5th Grade
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Cost: $85 Weekly, $20 Daily 'si1 a
Sessions: June 10-14, June 17-21, June 24-28, !B
July 1-5 NO CAMP, July 8-12,
July 15-19, July 22-26,
July 29-August 2, August 5-9 ,,


Manatee Paddle Summer Camp!
Stand Up Paddling (SUP), Exploring, Manatee Snorkeling,
Rainbow River Field Trips and More!!
S* 9:00 am 2:00 pm -Ages 8-16
I $135/Week (Mon.-Fri) Lunch Provided
WEEKS AVAILABLE
June: 10- 14, 17- 21, 24- 28
July: 8-12, 15-19, 22- 26, 29- Aug. 2
Register at
www.manateepaddle.com/summer-camp
544 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River. (352) 564-0901
,,Jw w .. m a n a tie eSp.a d IdI e .. c.].orm


EH IScRhfi
HOMOEF55R


WILDLIFE PRRK

(352) 628-5343
Visitor Center on US 19. Homosassa Springs

The Wildlife Park is now better than ever and
families are flocking to join the fun.
Watch manatees from the expanded
boardwalk. Enjoy our daily wildlife programs
and visit the new shorebird aviary.
www.floridastateparks.org/homosassasprings


p --


-. q


s a~ ate 2
s^ 20% OFF


HOMORegular Admission
I With this ad for up to 6 in party.
Not to be used with other offers.
SWILLIFE PR. R i Expires 10/31/13 CCC-SSYE
-- <-----------------


P Four Summer dance Camp
Weeks June 10-14: A Pirate's Life June 17-21: Dr. Seuss
of FUN July8-12: U.S.A. July 15-19: At the Beach
for Everyone! Daily Rates:


Center Stage Dance Academ9
Summer Dance Camps offer fun, creative ways for your child to explore different styles of
dance while socializing and forging friendships with new and old friends!
Each week is focused on a different theme, with daily snacks, activities and crafts related
to each one.
Students will participate in dance workshops varying in dance styles: (including: Hip Hop,
Tap, Jazz, Tumbling & Ballet).
Daily camp activity times are from 9:30 3:30.
(One hour before and aftercare is available at no additional charge.)
All activities are suiltable for both girls and boys ages 6-15.


37 NW Hwy. 19 Crystal River 352-794-0006
www.csdacademy@gmail.com


$30.00 per day
(if signed up and paid one week before camp day)
$35.00 per day (if paid on the day of camp)


Weekly Rates:
$135.00 (M-F)

$125.00 (M-F)
(if signed up and paid
before June 1st
for June weeks
& July 1st for
July weeks)


Please note: Since attendance varies from day to day age groups may be combined on some days. Schedule subject
to change based on enrollment There are no refunds or make-ups for days paid for, but not attended.


the






THE SUMMER TO DISCOVER

CITRUS COUNTY YMCA SUMMER CAMP 2013
MAY 28TH-AUGUST 2ND
Kids ages 5 11 will have a blast at the Y's Youth Summer Camp where they can make new friends, learn new things and
take exciting field trips to places like MOSI, Chassahowitzka Camp Ground, a Tampa Bay Rays Game and much more.
Campers will enjoy swimming, bowling, putt-putt golf, recreational activities, sports and having lots of fun! This year's
focus is on health and wellness and kids will participate in activities that will stimulate their minds and their muscles.
Teens will enjoy our new camp, E.P.I.C., an exciting summer program that incorporates a volunteer service initiative
for ages 12-14.
Swim Lessons at Central Ridge Community pool begin 3une 3rd for all ages. Sign up today!
YMCA of the Suncoast Citrus County Branch
3909 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Crystal River Middle School I Lecanto Middle School
(352) 637-0132 www.ymcasuncoast.org Pleasant Grove Elementary School
YMCA Mission: To put Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all.


INTERGENERATIONAL
VACATION BIBLE
SCHOOL
June 17th through
June 21st, 2013
8:30 a.m. to 12 noon
at
St. Anne's Church
9870 West Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-2176
*Child Safety Trained Staff and Crew Leaders
*Preschool Crew for ages 3 through 5 and Crews for all ages
*Epic Bible Adventures Imagination Station -Tournament Games -Sing & Play
Rock Music -The King's Kitchen Energetic Openings & Closings Mission
Projects -Adult Bible Study during games
*Please join us, and bring your family and friends. There is no charge.
*Registration forms are available at all three churches listed below.
Sponsored by St. Anne's Church (352) 795-2176,
First Presbyterian Church in Crystal River (352) 795-2259
and St. Timothy Lutheran Church (352) 795-5325


"I Rciv
a 106iln
Dicon f


LOCAI/STATE


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 A5


OEWH





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Arthur 'Danny'
Akins, 61
CRYSTAL RIVER
Arthur Daniel "Danny"
Akins, 61, passed away Fri-
day, May 17, 2013.
We are celebrating the
life of Danny Akins. He
was born Nov 28, 1951, in
North Miami, Fla., to Leon
B. and Mary Katherine
(Slaughter) Akins Sr He
lived in Perry, Fla., and
Crystal River most of his
life. He was an avid fisher-
man and hunter Danny
loved to sing and play the
piano. He was a pipefit-
ter/welder and commer-
cial fisherman by trade.
He loved going to church
and he loved the Lord. He
was a kind, gentle loving
man to everyone he met.
He was a member of the
Gulf to Lake Church. He
loved Pastor Lloyd Bertine
and his church family. In
his life, Danny was a great
witness for the Lord. The
last words he could speak,
he was witnessing for the
Lord and won his night
nurse over to the Lord.
He is survived by his
parents, Leon and Mary
Katherine Akins Sr of
Crystal River; his wife,
Judy Akins of Crystal
River; a son, Bryant Akins
(Eva); a daughter, Lori
Maddox (Scott), all of
Perry; a brother, Leon B.
Akins Jr (Phyllis) of Crystal
River; a sister, Kathy For-
rest (Chris) of St. Augus-
tine; five granddaughters,
Melissa Archer (Micah),
Kaylee Akins, Kristina
Akins, Amber Rose
Thompson and Neenah
Maddox; one grandson,
Joseph McElveen all of
Perry; four great-
granddaughters, Sybil
Archer, Tristian Archer,
Karly Akins, Emma Akins;
and one great-grandson,
Malachi Archer, all of
Perry; seven nephews,
Matthew Akins (Kylie) of
Ocala, Jonothan, Jeremy,
and Jordan Hatfield, all of
Crystal River, Jason For-
rest (Beth), Sean Forrest
(Sidney) and Joshua For-
rest, all of St Augustine; a
niece, Jolie Maddox (Mike)
of Ocala; two stepsons,
Todd Flores (Dawn) of Gulf
Breeze and Brad Flores of
Perry; five step-grandsons,
Jacob, Alex, Shane, Trent
and Trevan Flores; and
one step-granddaughter,
Rosie Flores, all of Perry
Danny also leaves his very
special friends Danny and
Sherry Bishop of Crystal
River and Randy Ratliff of
Perry
Rest in peace, Mullet
Head, we love you, fly with
the angels.
A visitation will be 6 to 8
p.m. Sunday, May 19, 2013,
at the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, where a funeral
service will be conducted
at 11 a.m. Monday, May 20,
2013, with the Reverends
Lloyd Bertine and Leon B.
Akins Sr officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at the
Woodlawn Cemetery
Perry, at 3 p.m.

Nancy
Jones, 67
HOMOSASSA
Nancy Carol Jones, 67,
Homosassa, died May 16,
2013, under Hospice of Cit-
rus County care.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.

DEADLINES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


Annabelle
Miller, 90
BUSHNELL
Annabelle W Miller, 90,
of Bushnell, died Tuesday,
May 14, 2013, at Inverness.
A memorial service will
be at Florida National
Cemetery at 11:30 a.m. Fri-
day, May 24, 2013.

Rudolph
Raper, 75
DUNNELLON
Rudolph E. Raper, 75, of
Dunnellon, died May 15,
2013, under the care of his
family and Hospice of Mar-
ion County in Dunnellon.
Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.

Jeff
Scurlock, 56
HERNANDO
Jeff Scurlock, 56, of Her-
nando, Fla., passed away
Sunday, May 12, 2013.
Jeff was born June 18,
1956, in
Dayton,
Ohio, to
Donald
a n d
Wanda
(Hopping)
Scurlock.
Jeff was a
1974 grad- Jeff
uate of Scurlock
Alter High
School, Kettering, Ohio,
and attended Antioch Uni-
versity, Yellow Springs,
Ohio. Jeff had a lifelong
love for the game of soccer,
and he was heavily in-
volved in the Citrus
County Youth Soccer Pro-
gram, coaching for a num-
ber of years and later went
on to become an assistant
coach for the Citrus High
Hurricanes (boys and girls)
soccer teams. Jeff was a
loving husband, father and
friend. He loved the Citrus
County community and
will be missed by many
Jeff was preceded in
death by his father, Donald
Scurlock. Survivors in-
clude his wife of 25 years,
Cara (Ray) Scurlock;
daughter, Jessica Scurlock
of Tampa; son, Nicholas
Scurlock of Hernando;
mother, Wanda (Hopping)
Scurlock of Kettering,
Ohio; sister, Victoria Scur-
lock (Robert) of Honolulu,
Hawaii; brothers, Anthony
Scurlock of Dayton, Ohio,
and Joseph Scurlock of
Mout Dora; and uncle,
Michael Flinta (Susan) of
Fort Lauderdale.
A celebration of Jeff's
love for life, family and
community will be from
noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, May
19, 2013, at Dillon's Irish
Pub, 108 N. Pine Ave., In-
verness. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
the American Diabetes As-
sociation or the American
Cancer Society
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Elizabeth
Vedder, 61
CRYSTAL RIVER
Elizabeth Jane Vedder,
61, Crystal River, died May
14, 2013.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
private arrangements.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


Dark clouds hang over air shows


Budget cuts

taking toll

Associated Press

BRUNSWICK, Maine-
Patty Wagstaff is a Holly-
wood stunt pilot, three-
time U.S. aerobatic
champion, inductee to the
National Aviation Hall of
Fame and favorite on the
air show circuit. One of
her tricked-out planes is
on display at the Smith-
sonian National Air and
Space Museum.
But this weekend, she's
grounded.
Federal budget cuts
that eliminated military
flying acts triggered the
cancellation of dozens of
air shows, meaning lost
income for performers,
air show announcers, con-
cessionaires, vendors and
others who depend on air
shows and the millions of
spectators.
The cancellations also
mean disappointed fans,
fewer events that celebrate
aviation and inspire young-
sters and lost military re-
cruiting opportunities.
"This is as American as
apple pie," said Sean
Tucker, another top aero-
batic pilot, from Salinas,
Calif. "It's the Indianapo-
lis 500, the Fourth of July,
and 'Top Gun' rolled into
one."
Air shows pump about
$1.5 billion into the econ-
omy and draw nearly three
times more spectators than
NASCAR events, accord-
ing to the International
Council of Air Shows.
And the biggest acts are
the Navy Blue Angels and
Air Force Thunderbirds,
the precision flying teams
whose performances were
abruptly canceled April 1,
along with the Army sky-
diving team, military fly-
overs, demonstration
flights and even static
displays.
The cancellations
caused by automatic
budget cuts known as se-
questration sent ripples
through the industry, be-
cause the jet teams an-
chor most shows in which
they perform.
Without them, organiz-
ers of major air shows
such as Wings over Wayne
at Seymour Johnson Air
Force Base in North Car-
olina and Skyfest 2013 at
Fairchild Air Force Base
in Washington state
scheduled for this week-
end, coincidentally on
Armed Forces Day, opted
to cancel.
Large air shows like
those feature pilots
pulling seemingly death-
defying maneuvers in all
manner of aircraft from
biplanes to jets, preci-
sion formation flying,
skydivers jumping from
planes and, of
course, screeching mili-
tary jets pulling high-G
maneuvers.
One of Wagstaff's sig-
nature moves is to use
her plane's propeller to
clip a ribbon that's
stretched 22 feet above
the runway while fly-
ing upside down.
"The whole thing is just
sad," said Wagstaff, of St.
Augustine, Fla., who was
scheduled to perform at


Associated Press
Patty Wagstaff, top, and Sean D. Tucker fly over the National Museum of the U.S. Air
Force and the National Aviation Hall of Fame on July 16, 2009, in Dayton, Ohio.
Federal budget cuts that eliminated military flying acts triggered the cancellation of
dozens of air shows, causing lost income for performers such as Wagstaff, along with
air show announcers, concessionaires, vendors and others who depend on air shows
and the millions of spectators.


Wings over Wayne. "I really
believe that air shows are
good for aviation. They ex-
pose kids to aviation, and
it's the only place where
you can go and touch an
airplane, sit in the cockpit,
talk to the pilots."
All told, 64 air shows
have been canceled, ac-
counting for a loss of
nearly a third of air show
revenue, and the figure
could go as high as 100,
said John Cudahy, the air
show council's executive
director
Industry insiders be-
lieve the military jet
teams will be flying again
next year, but there's no
guarantee from the mili-
tary or Congress.
It's a huge disappoint-
ment to fans such as Can-
dace Muehleisen, a real
estate broker who has at-
tended nearly 20 air shows
through the years in Cali-
fornia and Maine, where
she now lives, always ar-
riving early to ensure she's
on the front row.
Military jet pilots in-
spire spectators with their
awe-inspiring skill while
showing off the military's
capabilities for taxpayers,
Muehleisen said.
"It's a very positive
thing for young people,
just to see the skill and the
beauty of what these guys
can do and the training
they get. It's a really, really
good thing," she said.
Not everyone shares
that view.
Critics like Bruce
Gagnon say air shows pol-
lute the environment,
waste money and glorify
war
"It's a recruiting gim-
mick a very expensive



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recruiting gimmick, and
we think it's part of this,
sadly, growing culture of
militarism in our coun-
try," said Gagnon, a peace
activist from Bath who
served in the Air Force in
the Vietnam era.
Not all air shows are
being canceled. And many
in the air show business
will do fine this summer
Tucker, who's perform-
ing during Memorial Day
weekend at the Jones
Beach Air Show in New
York, said corporate spon-
sors are trying to line up
smaller events to fill his
schedule after eight of his
20 shows were canceled.
For others, it's a bigger
deal.
In Tallahassee, Fla.,
Bob Anderson and his
family operate a six-figure
business selling T-shirts at
air shows. Business was so
good for his product line
that focused almost exclu-
sively on the Blue Angels
and Thunderbirds that he
upgraded to a motor home
for his seasonal business
travel.
Instead, the motor
home is parked, and he's
installing floors.
"People are very bitter
now," he said. "I'm very
saddened by everything
that's going on because
we've worked hard to get
to where we are, and
we've been shut down by
no fault of our own."
Air show announcer
Rob Reider, of Cincinnati,
lost half his season, which
is his primary source of
income.
"Am I angry? Yes, be-
cause it's hurting me," he
said. "If something doesn't
brighten up by the end of

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Graveside Service: Mon. 2:00 PM
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DAVID LUMPKINS
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HUBERT FORBUS
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this year, I'll be looking to
do other things and air
shows will become a back-
burner business."
The losses carry on
down the line to the con-
cessionaires who feed
spectators, vendors who
provide hundreds of
portable toilets, rental car
companies that supply ve-
hicles, hotels that house
pilots and crews, and
providers of aviation fuel.
In Brunswick, the can-
celed Great State of
Maine Air Show had a
budget of about $750,000.
Last year's show paid out
$31,000 for motel rooms
for Air Force Thunder-
birds team alone.
"It's a little issue on a na-
tional level, but it's a big
issue locally It's a big week-
end for us," said Steve
Levesque, executive direc-
tor of the agency that or-
ganizes the show. 'A lot of
people were angry that we
shut it down, but we didn't
have any other choice."
For Reider and the pilots
like Tucker and Wagstaff,
the air shows cancellations
mean losses that aren't eas-
ily calculated.
The shows tend to in-
spire young people, serve
as a demonstration and
recruiting tool for the mil-
itary, and provide whole-
some entertainment for
families, they said.
"The metaphor of flight
is about pushing bound-
aries; that's what we do as
Americans," Tucker said.
"It really disappoints me
that because of politics,
opportunities to be patri-
otic have been lost to mil-
lions and millions of
people. What's the price
of that?"




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A6 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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1,680 ......................... S& P 500
,4,, Close: 1,667.47
Change: 17.00 (1.0%)
1,600 10 DAYS .........
1 ,6 8 0 ............................................................................

1,600 . ..

1,520. .... ....... ........................

1,440.. ........................

1,36 0 ; ............. ...... F ..... .. ............ ...


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,377
3,412
2207
836
454
27


NASD
1,760
1,895
1708
751
260
17


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15357.40
6549.73
516.80
9578.35
3499.21
1667.47
1212.00
17599.95
996.47


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


1 i 10 DAYS


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,354.40
Change: 121.18 (0.8%)


16 ,0 0 0 ............. ............. ........... ....... .... ..............
15,200 ...........0
14,400.. ..
13 ,6 0 0 ....................... ... ............ ............ ............
12 ,8 0 0 ......................... ............ ............ ..... ....... .
S" '".".' I :F I r r


LOW
15234.75
6475.81
511.87
9502.54
3473.04
1652.45
1202.10
17423.25
986.93


CLOSE
15354.40
6549.16
516.70
9576.42
3498.97
1667.47
1211.54
17599.95
996.28


CHG.
+121.18
+81.47
+4.83
+87.11
+33.73
+17.00
+11.81
+176.70
+10.94


%CHG.
+0.80%
+1.26%
+0.94%
+0.92%
+0.97%
+1.03%
+0.98%
+1.01%
+1.11%


YTD
+17.17%
+23.41%
+14.04%
+13.42%
+15.88%
+16.92%
+18.73%
+17.37%
+17.30%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 7.18 3.36 +.06 +1.8 V A A -27.0 -49.2 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 39.00 37.44 +.06 +0.2 A V A +11.1 +18.0 28 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 43.46 43.36 +.64 +1.5 A A +15.4 +30.4 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 -- 101.86 96.37 -.35 -0.4 V V V +10.3 +40.7 2.21 e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 13.55 13.43 +.07 +0.5 A A A +15.7 +88.5 31 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 --0- 12.64 11.68 -.10 -0.8 V V V +2.7 +71.5 90
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 -0- 43.43 37.67 +.22 +0.6 A A A -3.7 +4.0 27 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 0 51.45 51.45 +.84 +1.7 A A A +30.1 +88.2 15 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -0- 25.25 20.49 +.06 +0.3 A V V +29.4 +18.2 85 1.00
Disney DIS 43.51 0 67.89 66.58 +.11 +0.2 7 A A +33.7 +49.1 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 75.46 71.62 +.46 +0.6 A V V +12.3 +15.7 21 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0 61.00 60.55 +.59 +1.0 A A A +31.3 +45.9 25 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 91.76 +1.06 +1.2 A A A +6.0 +13.2 9 2.52f
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.85 15.08 +.44 +3.0 A A A +16.4 +47.0 11 0.40
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 23.46 +.19 +0.8 A A A +11.8 +26.3 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 78.54 76.86 +.11 +0.1 A A A +24.3 +60.0 26 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0- 27.75 24.04 +.10 +0.4 V A A +16.6 -6.2 12 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 215.90 208.44 +3.75 +1.8 A A V +8.8 +4.2 14 3.80f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 15.72 0 25.44 25.68 +.43 +1.7 A A A +21.7 +39.7 29
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 43.55 42.67 -.09 -0.2 A A A +20.1 +48.0 25 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 --0- 103.70 101.54 +.42 +0.4 A A A +15.1 +13.8 19 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 0 34.15 34.87 +.79 +2.3 A A A +30.6 +17.0 18 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 --0 64.72 57.84 +.31 +0.5 A V V +3.9 +20.0 18 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 64.31 0 82.65 81.10 +.67 +0.8 A A A +17.2 +26.4 20 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 13.55 --- 34.99 18.01 -.78 -4.2 A A A -8.6 -29.8 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 21.09 20.86 +.02 +0.1 A A A +15.6 +28.4 45 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 9.19 9.05 +.10 +1.1 A A A +26.9 +43.4 11 0.12f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --0 68.77 57.52 -.02 ... A A A +39.1 +21.7 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 105.18 102.58 -.74 -0.7 V V A +18.9 +35.8 22 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.32 0 7.40 7.32 +.04 +0.5 V A A +29.1 +203.3 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 37.36 36.77 +.17 +0.5 V A A +19.0 +25.1 22 1.12
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 61.73 60.71 -.01 ... V A A +26.9 +75.2 19 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 95.18 96.50 +1.73 +1.8 A A A +31.6 +64.2 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.48 54.31 53.35 +.15 +0.3 A A A +23.3 +35.1 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 30.80 30.23 +.08 +0.3 A A A +20.0 +18.2 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 58.92 0 79.96 77.87 -.63 -0.8 V V A +14.1 +35.6 15 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 50.50 49.61 +.78 +1.6 A A A +34.0 +53.0 22 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c -Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates





The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 1.95
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Crude oil settled
above $96 per
barrel for the
first time this
week on expec-
tations for stron-
ger demand.
Gold fell to its
lowest settle-
ment price in a
month, hurt by a
stronger dollar.





EMi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .08
6-month T-bill .07 0.07 ... .14
52-wk T-bill .10 0.10 ... .18
2-year T-note .25 0.24 +0.01 .30
5-year T-note .83 0.79 +0.04 .73
10-year T-note 1.95 1.88 +0.07 1.70
30-year T-bond 3.17 3.10 +0.07 2.79


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.87 2.78 +0.09 2.52
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.11 4.10 +0.01 4.38
Barclays USAggregate 1.84 1.89 -0.05 2.03
Barclays US High Yield 5.25 5.24 +0.01 7.24
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.85 3.93 -0.08 3.73
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.11 1.07 +0.04 .99
Barclays US Corp 2.68 2.73 -0.05 3.31


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 96.02
Ethanol (gal) 2.68
Heating Oil (gal) 2.94
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.06
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.91
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1364.90
Silver (oz) 22.34
Platinum (oz) 1468.00
Copper (Ib) 3.32
Palladium (oz) 739.50
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.19
Coffee (Ib) 1.36
Corn (bu) 6.53
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 315.80
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.42
Soybeans (bu) 14.49
Wheat (bu) 6.83


PVS.
95.16
2.64
2.91
3.93
2.88
PVS.
1387.10
22.64
1485.60
3.29
740.00
PVS.
1.20
1.38
6.42
0.86
314.30
1.44
14.28
6.88


%CHG
+0.90
+0.30
+0.97
+3.13
+0.86
%CHG
-1.60
-1.34
-1.18
+0.88
-0.07
%CHG
-0.42
-1.99
+1.75
+0.44
+0.48
-1.59
+1.47
-0.65


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.85 +.16 +12.5 +24.0 +13.7 +6.7
CaplncBuA m 57.87 +.14 +10.6 +21.3 +12.7 +3.5
CpWIdGrIA m 42.00 +.19 +13.4 +32.0 +13.2 +2.1
EurPacGrA m 44.98 +.11 +9.1 +28.0 +10.4 +0.6
FnInvA m 47.41 +.45 +16.6 +32.6 +15.4 +4.0
GrthAmA m 39.84 +38 +16.0 +32.3 +14.3 +3.9
IncAmerA m 19.98 +.09 +11.6 +23.1 +13.8 +6.1
InvCoAmA m 35.17 +.35 +17.1 +30.7 +14.0 +4.8
NewPerspA m 35.45 +.20 +13.4 +30.5 +14.2 +4.2
WAMutlnvA m 36.46 +.36 +17.4 +29.5 +16.5 +5.5
Dodge & Cox Income 13.89 -.03 +1.0 +5.1 +5.9 +6.8
IntlStk 38.91 +.15 +12.3 +37.4 +11.2 +0.7
Stock 144.19 +1.12 +18.8 +39.9+15.7 +4.1
Fidelity Contra 89.30 +.72 +16.2 +26.0 +15.9 +5.7
LowPriStk d 46.32 +.44 +17.3 +33.5 +16.4 +7.9
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 59.23 +.61 +17.9 +30.7 +16.0 +5.5
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.38 +.01 +8.9 +21.1 +11.9 +5.9
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.66 ... +3.6 +16.8 +7.6 +9.7
GIBondAdv 13.61 ... +3.7 +16.9 +7.8 +10.0
Harbor Intllnstl 67.40 +.30 +8.5 +27.6 +12.6 -0.1
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.23 -.03 +0.8 +5.8 +6.2 +7.3
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 30.96 +31 +17.6 +33.8 +14.5 +5.3
GrowStk 43.72 +.49 +15.7 +25.6 +16.4 +6.3
Vanguard 500Adml 154.12 +1.57 +17.9 +30.7 +16.1 +5.5
5001nv 154.10 +1.57 +17.8 +30.5 +15.9 +5.4
GNMAAdml 10.75 -.05 -0.5 +0.6 +4.3 +5.4
MulntAdml 14.36 -.01 +1.0 +3.7 +5.5 +5.3
STGradeAd 10.81 -.01 +0.7 +3.4 +3.3 +4.0
Tgtet2025 15.00 +.08 +10.4 +21.6 +11.6 +4.5
TotBdAdml 10.97 -.03 0.0 +2.0 +4.9 +5.5
Totlntl 16.11 +.08 +7.8 +28.5 +9.5 -1.6
TotStlAdm 41.90 +.43 +18.1 +31.3 +16.2 +6.1
TotStldx 41.88 +.43 +18.0 +31.2 +16.0 +6.0
Welltn 37.68 +.19 +12.0 +22.1 +12.7 +6.5
WelltnAdm 65.09 +.33 +12.0 +22.2 +12.8 +6.6
*-Annualize; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x- fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Encouraging economic reports
on Friday sent the Standard &
Poor's 500 index to its 10th gain
in the last 12 days. Energy
stocks and other industries
whose profits are heavily de-
pendent on the strength of the
economy had the day's biggest
gains.

J.C. Penney JCP
Close: $18.01 V-0.78 or -4.2%
Still reeling from its former CEO's
turnaround plan, the department-
store chain said that its loss in the
first quarter widened.


'

52-week range
$13.55 $32.55


Vol.:25.3m (1.2x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $3.96 b


PE:...
Yield:...


Stage Stores SSI
Close:$24.19V-1.89 or -7.2%
The department store operator's
first-quarter loss widened as it spent
to consolidate some facilities and
struggled to get shoppers in its doors.
$30

2'i
2 F r 1 r 1
52-week range
$15.74 $29.59
Vol.: 2.4m (4.7x avg.) PE: 20.3
Mkt. Cap:$790 m Yield: 1.7%
Nordstrom JWN
Close:$60.68V-0.45 or -0.7%
The retailer's first-quarter net income
fell, due to weak demand for spring
merchandise and softer performance
in the Northeast and Midwest.



'' r r rl
52-week range
$46.27 a $61.81
Vol.:4.5m (2.4x avg.) PE: 17.1
Mkt. Cap:$11.88 b Yield: 2.0%
Autodesk ADSK
Close:$37.11 V-2.67 or -6.7%
The design software company re-
ported first-quarter results that disap-
pointed investors, citing mixed eco-
nomic conditions worldwide.
41,




52-week range
$27.70 $41.42
Vol.:17.0m (5.5x avg.) PE:34.7
Mkt. Cap:$8.32 b Yield:...
SINA SINA
Close:$59.57A0.76 or 1.3%
The operator of a popular Chinese
Internet portal said that it narrowed
its first-quarter loss on improved rev-
enue.





52-week range
$41.14 $70.00
Vol.:5.8m (2.3x avg.) PE: 85.1
Mkt. Cap:$3.96 b Yield:...


Stocks rise


Associated Press

NEW YORK- Encour-
aging news about the U.S.
economy extended the
stock market's rally Friday
A gauge of future eco-
nomic activity rose more
than analysts had expected,
as did a measure of con-
sumer confidence, adding
to evidence that the econ-
omy is steadily recovering.
Stocks closed higher for a
fourth straight week. In-
dexes are at record levels
after surging this year on
optimism about the econ-
omy and record corporate
earnings. The market is also
being supported by ongoing
stimulus from the Federal
Reserve, which is keeping
long-term borrowing costs
at historically low levels.
"This slow but relatively
steady growth, that keeps
inflation in check and
keeps interest rates low, is
actually a pretty healthy
environment for the stock
market," said Liz Ann Son-
ders, chief investment
strategist at Charles
Schwab & Co. "Right now
we are very optimistic."
General Motors rose
$1.03, or 3.2 percent, to
$33.42. The automaker's
stock is trading above the
$33 price of its November,
2010 initial public offering
for the first time in two


World markets
How key international stock
markets performed:
Amsterdam Milan
AEX FTSE MIB
1 365.37 17,544.01
+0.7% 368.08 +0.4% 17,604.61
Brussels Paris
BEL20 CAC40
* 2,727.51 3,979.07
+0.2% 2,732.29 +0.6% 4,001.27
Frankfurt Sydney
DAX ASX All Ordinaries
1 8,369.87 5,144.20
+0.3% 8,398.00 +0.3% 5,159.80
Hong Kong Tokyo
Hang Seng Nikkei
* 23,044.24 15,037.24
+0.2% 23,082.68 +0.7% 15,138.12
London Zurich
FTSE 100 Swiss Market Index
_ 6,687.80 8,256.15
+0.5% 6,723.06 +0.3% 8,280.25
-W-* Previous close
% change Today's close
AP

years.
Northrop Grumman
gained $3.17, or 3.2 per-
cent, to $82.19 after the de-
fense contractor said its
board approved the repur-
chase of another $4 billion
in stock, and that it plans
to buy back a quarter of its
outstanding shares by the
end of 2015.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average rose 121.18


points, or 0.8 percent, to
15,354.40. The index
gained 1.6 percent for the
week and is up 17.2 per-
cent for the year.
The index started
higher, then drifted
through the rest of the
morning. The index added
to its gains in the after-
noon, climbing about 70
points in the last two hours
of the day
The Standard & Poor 500
index climbed 15.65 points,
or 1 percent, to 1,666.12. The
gauge is up 2 percent this
week and has gained 16.8
percent this year
After some lackluster re-
ports on the economy
Thursday, including slow-
ing manufacturing and an
increase in applications
for unemployment bene-
fits, Friday's reports were
a tonic for investors.
The Conference Board
said its index of leading
economic indicators rose
0.6 percent last month
after a revised decline of
0.2 percent in March. The
index is intended to pre-
dict how the economy will
be doing in three to six
months.
The University of Michi-
gan's preliminary survey of
consumer confidence
climbed to 83.7. Economists
had predicted that the
gauge would climb to 76.8.


One year after IPO


gjj


Associated Press
Facebook founder, chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, center, rings the opening bell
of the Nasdaq stock market May 18, 2012, from Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park,
Calif. Much has changed at Facebook in a year, including the addition of mobile
advertisements, the launch of a search feature and unveiling of a branded smartphone.


Facebook aims to be advertising colossus


BARBARA ORTUTAY
AP technology writer

NEW YORK It was
supposed to be our IPO,
the people's public
offering.
Facebook, the brain-
child of a young CEO who
sauntered into Wall Street
meetings in a hoodie, was
going to be bigger than
Amazon, bigger than Mc-
Donald's, bigger than
Coca-Cola. And it was all
made possible by our
friendships, photos and
family ties.
Then came the IPO, and
it flopped. Facebook's
stock finished its first day
of trading just 23 cents
higher than its $38 IPO
price. It hasn't been that
high since.
Even amid the hype and
excitement surrounding
Facebook's May 18 stock
market debut a year ago,
there were looming
doubts. Investors won-
dered whether the social
network could increase
advertising revenue with-
out alienating users, espe-
cially those using
smartphones and tablet
computers.
The worries intensified
just days before the IPO
when General Motors said
it would stop paying for
advertisements on the site.
The symbolic exit cast a
shroud over Facebook that
still exists. Facebook's
market value is $63 billion,
some two-thirds of what it
was the morning it first
began trading. At around
$27 per share, the com-
pany's stock is down
roughly 30 percent from its
IPO price. Meanwhile, the
Standard & Poor's 500
index is up 27 percent over
the same period.
Despite its disappoint-


We aspire to have ads,

to show ads that improve

the content experience

over time.


ing stock market perform-
ance, the company has de-
livered strong financial
results. Net income in-
creased 7 percent to $219
million in the most recent
quarter, compared with
the previous year, and rev-
enue was up 38 percent to
$1.46 billion.
The world's biggest on-
line social network has
also kept growing to 1.1 bil-
lion users. Some 665 mil-
lion people check in every
day to share photos, com-
ment on news articles and
play games. Millions of
people around the world
who don't own a computer
use Facebook, in Malawi,
Malaysia and Martinique.
And much has changed
at Facebook in a year. The
company's executives and
engineers have quietly ad-
dressed the very doubts
that dogged the company
for so long. Facebook
began showing mobile ad-
vertisements for the first
time last spring. It
launched a search feature
in January and unveiled a
branded Facebook smart-
phone in April. The com-
pany also introduced ways
for advertisers to gauge
the effectiveness of their
ads.
Even GM has returned
as a paying advertiser.
Now, Facebook is look-
ing to its next challenge:
convincing big brand-
name consumer compa-
nies that advertisements


Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook CEO.

on a social network are as
important and as effec-
tive as television spots.
"We aspire to have ads,
to show ads that improve
the content experience
over time," Facebook CEO
Mark Zuckerberg told ana-
lysts recently "And if we
continue making progress
on this, then one day we
can get there."
To achieve those aims,
the company has rolled
out tools to help advertis-
ers target their messages
more precisely than they
can in print or on televi-
sion. Companies can sin-
gle out 18- to 24-year-old
male Facebook users who
are likely to buy a car in
the next six months. They
can target 30-year-old
women who are research-
ing Caribbean getaways.
Analytic tools like these
weren't available a year
ago. But last fall Facebook
hired several companies
that collect and analyze
data related to people's
online and offline behav-
ior. Facebook's advertisers
can now assess whether a
Crest ad you saw on Face-
book likely led you to buy
of a tube of toothpaste in
the drugstore.
The services take what
Facebook knows about you
and what ads you saw and
combine this with the in-
formation retailers have
about you and what you've
purchased through loyalty
cards and the like.


I


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013



PINION


"The essence of friendship is entireness,
a total magnanimity and trust."
Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1841


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................publisher
H Mike Arnold ................ ................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................... ........ citizen m ember
0 Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SELECTIVE SCRUTINY






Public





trust





betrayed


The statutory authority
entrusted to the Inter-
nal Revenue Service
(IRS) for enforcing federal
tax law can be an extremely
intimidating power. Accord-
ingly, it is imperative the IRS
diligently fulfills its mission
statement to "enforce the law
with integrity and fairness."
Under the
IRS's statutory
authority, it's THE I1
responsible for IRS targ
assuring tax- conse
exempt status is gro
not granted to
social-welfare OUR OF
groups whose pri-
mary focus is An egi
electoral politics, abuse c
However, as con-
firmed by this
week's release of a Treasury
Department inspector gen-
eral report, the IRS failed
miserably in carrying out this
responsibility with integrity
and fairness.
Faced with the impending
release of the inspector gen-
eral's report, the head of the
IRS's tax-exempt organiza-
tion office, Lois Lerner, ad-
mitted and apologized for the
office's targeting of conserva-
tive groups applying for tax-
exempt status since 2010.
Lerner's mea culpa por-
trayed the abuse of power as
being nothing more than a
little-known operation in the
Cincinnati office by low-level
employees. Several days
later, The Washington Postre-
ported IRS officials in Wash-
ington and at least two other
offices were involved in sin-
gling out conservative groups
for intense scrutiny, making


Zero debt
Kudos to Frank DiGiovanni and
his staff. I wonder if Inverness is
the only municipality in the state
of Florida that has zero debt.
And being the great person that
he is, he's going to use the
money saved from retiring that
debt to pay the county's
share of maintenance
for the Whispering 0
Pines Park, which the
county has been paying
for over 20 years but
has decided not to pay,
even though most peo-
ple using the park are
county residents. Hat's i
off to Frank DiGiovanni CAL
and his great staff.
Krieger kudos 563-
I would like to thank
Roger Krieger for his wonderful
letter in today's Chronicle on
Tuesday, May 7. He did a won-
derful job in bringing out what he
calls "Actions troubling" by Brad
Thorpe with all kinds of things to
deal with the dump and now the
commissioners having to discuss
MSBUs and MSTUs to cover up
this terrible incident and curbing
the tax problems with the local


clear that the effort reached
well beyond the Cincinnati
office.
If Lerner's less-than-
forthcoming mea culpa isn't
bad enough, the March 2012
claim by then-IRS Commis-
sioner Doug Shulman before
Congress that the agency was
not targeting conservative


SSUE:
getting of
rvative
ups.

PINION:
regious
of power.


I


(


groups in any way
was deceptively
false. As disputed
by The Associated
Press, senior IRS
officials were no-
tified about the
targeting of con-
servative groups
as early as 2011.
Whether the
appearance of
partisanship or


internal mismanagement cre-
ated an organizational cul-
ture that allowed the
selective scrutiny of conser-
vative groups, it is an egre-
gious abuse of the agency's
power that is both a chilling
and indefensible betrayal of
the public trust. Even more
chilling and indefensible is
the apparent willingness of
senior IRS officials to con-
done it by looking the other
way and intentionally deceiv-
ing Congress and the public.
Given the seriousness of
the IRS's abuse of power and
the demonstrated indiffer-
ence displayed by IRS offi-
cials, President Obama
cannot accept anything less
than a forthright investiga-
tion and full accountability
for all involved, especially
given the public's growing
distrust and cynicism toward
government.


elected supplier. Thank you
again, Roger Krieger. You're
doing a great job in the commu-
nity and we do hope that the
commissioners are listening to
what you have to say.
Remembering Ashley
I read an article on Ashley
Strass, who was a little
JIND girl who passed away
two years ago, in your
low newspaper. It's so sad to
hear this little story and
I remember your front-
page article that out-
lined the medical
problems and the loss
of her life. And we wish
her parents and her
S579 brothers better times
and God bless them.
Relying on tips
"Tips are a perk, not a prom-
ise." How would you like to be in
their house at Christmas?
Abuse seems obvious
Today is (May 7). I'm reading
the front page of the Chronicle,
"DCF: No sign of abuse." So
why is an innocent 2-year-old
baby dead?


A hard rain a-comin'


after disappearing during
his term in office and
bringing scandal to his
family and state, former South
Carolina governor Mark San-
ford is going to Washington,
having won election
to Congress. And
that's far from the
worst story reflecting
the current character
of our nation.
In Washington,
D.C., a doctor tells
the Washington Post
he's willing to let a
baby who survives an
abortion die, and Kathr
calls the pro-life ac- Lo
tivist who released a OTI
video of him making VOI
similar remarks a
"terrorist." The trial
of abortionist and accused mur-
derer Kermit Gosnell in
Philadelphia serves as a ghoul-
ish backdrop to this level of cal-
lous indifference.
It does happen to feel like the
end is near
And that just could be
awesome.
"Figuring out how to make
the world better is hard," my
National Review colleague
Kevin D. Williamson wrote in
his new book titled "The End Is
Near and It's Going to Be Awe-
some." "What works in theory
often does not work in practice,
and angrily insisting that it
should work does not make it
work."
Oh, but how we do insist! In
politics, we tend to adopt an
ideology and stick with it, re-
gardless of the results. We insist
government do things it can't
plausibly handle, and then ig-
nore the fact that it's not doing
the things it could and should
be doing.
While having respect for a
great many people in govern-
ment, Williamson nonetheless
contends: "(P)olitics as an insti-
tution fails first and foremost
because it cannot manage the
complex processes of modern


y

H
I4


life, because doing so would re-
quire politicians to be able to
gather and process amounts of
information so vast that they
are literally incalculable."
Politicians make promises
government can't
possibly keep and we
get swept up in the
insistence that there
is a legislative an-
swer to everything.
Our civil discourse
-2. all too often clings to
government and
- market-based an-
swers, ignoring the
n Jean truth that when me-
)ez dating institutions
ER families, religious
CES communities and
charities flourish,
individuals can soar,
giving credibility to the claims
of American exceptionalism.
These are who will be picking
up the pieces when the end
comes.
Williamson argued the unsus-
tainability of our current tra-
jectory necessitates a starting
over. We'll have no choice in the
matter. "The U.S government
has, for example, promised its
citizens certain health-care and
retirement benefits, the un-
funded liabilities of which at
present amount to a little more
than twice the annual economic
output of human civilization."
Needless to say, that's not
going to work.
But his key insight is: "Our
problem is not only how we gov-
ern, but how we live."
Conservatives claim to be a
"family values" crowd and yet no
one successfully talked Mark
Sanford out of running (and I got
way too many emails for my taste,
celebrating his recent victory).
We pray to God when terror
strikes, but we relegate religion
to a mere Sunday church serv-
ice as a matter of federal policy
We talk about women's health
and freedom, but the eu-
phemisms wind up screening
us from the horrific realities of


late-term abortions and the
warped moral climate that has
been the product of the sexual
revolution.
"The historic challenge of
our time," Williamson wrote, "is
to anticipate as best we can the
coming changes and to begin
developing alternative institu-
tions and social practices to en-
sure the continuation of a
society that is humane, secure,
free, and prosperous."
Williamson made another im-
portant insight about humility
and its rarity in politics. "Hu-
mility is not only a private
virtue it is a social technol-
ogy. By keeping in mind that we
may be wrong that we are in
fact very likely to be wrong in
important ways we help each
other and ourselves to become
less wrong over time." At its
best, life whether on politi-
cal, cultural or personal fronts
- is about learning from mis-
takes. Encourage the good, help
with healing, pick up and start
again. Some of those who model
this best are motivated by a
sense of purpose that's not
rooted in temporal power or
merely personal gain, but an
eternal summons.
The end is actually a begin-
ning. To rebuild a culture that
understands sacrifice, suffering
and hard work are at the heart
of what makes society work. In
humility, we can all admit to
having made contributions to
the oversimplifications and in-
tractability of debates, and try
to do better. That's not an im-
possible promise. That's the au-
dacity to hope there is
awesomeness yet to come and
that we each play a role in help-
ing one another get things less
wrong.

Kathryn Lopez is the
editor-at-large ofNational
Review Online
wwwna tionalreview com.
She can be contacted at
klopez@na tionalreview com.


1 AA R0 ELATIONGRIP
WI THAT MAN!


CLINTON CAWVAL, FAe2T


SLETTERS to the Editor


National EMS Week
is May 19 to 25
It takes a special kind of per-
son to respond well in an
emergency, to be ready at a
moment's notice and to remain
calm and focused in difficult
circumstances. If you've ever
called 9-1-1, been in an acci-
dent or rushed to the emer-
gency room, you've seen
people like this in action.
Our local emergency med-
ical services professionals at
Nature Coast EMS are always
prepared and ready to help
those in need. They are people
you can count on, who have the
knowledge and expertise to
handle life-threatening emer-
gencies. They treat others with
respect and compassion, and
soothe fears and worries.
May 19 to 25 is National
Emergency Medical Services
Week, a time for local commu-
nities and medical personnel
to come together to publicize
safety and honor these hard-
working individuals. Many of
these men and women work on
call and on holidays, dedicat-
ing their lives to ensuring the
safety and welfare of people in


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Citrus County, so they deserve
special recognition.
Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center thanks our part-
ners in EMS for their enduring
commitment and service and
asks you to join us in honoring
and celebrating them during
this time.
Joyce Brancato
chief executive officer
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center
Crystal River


Nelson's thinking
backward
Dear Sen. Nelson,
Thank you for your reply to
my letter (email). However,
what I suggested was to give in-
creases in Social Security as
dollars and cents and not as
percentages. A $3 increase is a
whole lot different than a 3-
percent increase.
If you really want to be cost
efficient and stop the spending
and destructive spiral then you
have got to change your think-
ing. You must elevate yourself
out of the Washington, D.C.,
thinking and start to think like
a businessman. The Washing-
ton thinking rut will surely
bury this country if it is al-
lowed to continue. We elected
you to do what is best for us
and your current thinking is
wrong.
I will be looking forward to
hearing from you again and
hope that my thoughts will
have some influence on you,
your thinking and your voting
record.
Alfred E. Mason
Crystal River


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Commuter trains collide in Conn.


At least 60 injured 5 critical


Associated Press
FAIRFIELD, Conn. -
Two commuter trains serv-
ing New York City collided
in Connecticut during Fri-
day's evening rush hour,
sending 60 people to the
hospital, including five crit-
ically injured and one very
critically injured, Gov Dan-
nel Malloy said. There were
no reports of fatalities.
The Metro-North Rail-
road, a commuter line
serving the northern sub-
urbs, referred in a news
release to a "major derail-
ment" near Fairfield, just
outside Bridgeport. It said
emergency workers were
at the scene of the acci-
dent, which came shortly
after 6 p.m.
"We're most concerned
about the injured and ulti-
mately reopening the sys-
tem," Malloy said from the
scene about three hours
after the crash. He said
there was no reason to be-
lieve it was anything other
than an accident.
Malloy said that most
people were not seriously
hurt. He said there was ex-
tensive damage to the
train cars and the track,
and it could take until


Monday for normal service
to be restored.
He said the area where
the accident happened
was down to two tracks be-
cause of repair work and
that the accident will have
a "big impact on the
Northeast Corridor"
Bill Kaempffer, a
spokesman for Bridgeport
public safety, told The As-
sociated Press that about
250 people were on board
the two trains.
Photos taken at the
scene showed a train car
askew on the rails, with its
end smashed up and
brushing against another
train. Amtrak suspended
service indefinitely be-
tween New York and
Boston.
"At this stage, we don't
know if this is a mechanical
failure, an accident or
something deliberate,"
Fairfield police spokesman
Lt. James Perez told the
Connecticut Post
The railroad said a train
that departed New York
City's Grand Central sta-
tion en route to New
Haven derailed. A west-
bound train on an adjacent
track then struck the de-
railed train. Some cars on


Associated Press/CHRISTIAN ABRAHAM/The Connecticut Post
Emergency personnel work at the scene where two Metro North commuter trains collided Friday near Fairfield, Conn.
Bill Kaempffer, a spokesman for Bridgeport public safety, told The Associated Press approximately 49 people were
injured, including four with serious injuries. About 250 people were on board the two trains, he said.


the second train also de-
railed as a result of the col-
lision.
Bridgeport Police Chief
Joseph Gaudett said


everybody who


needed


treatment had been at-
tended to, and authorities
were beginning to turn
their attention to investi-
gating the cause.
"Everybody seemed


pretty calm," he said.
"Everybody was thankful
they didn't get seriously
hurt They were anxious to
get home to their fami-
lies."


The Metropolitan Trans-
portation Authority oper-
ates the Metro-North
Railroad, the second-
largest commuter railroad
in the nation.


Nation BRIEF


POWERBALL
Continued from Page Al

showing they contributed. She had
14 co-workers on board when the
jackpot pushed past $200 million in
late March.
They only won $4. But instead of
distributing what would have
amounted to about 27 cents a per-
son, Golden bought more tickets for
the $1 million Powerball drawing on
March 27 without telling the others.
She hit the jackpot and never gave a
thought to keeping the winnings all
for herself. One co-worker was a
woman who used a walker because
of a foot problem. Another had just
been to the emergency room be-


cause of a knee problem.
"I say it over and over again. That
ticket we won was meant for those
two ladies and the rest of (the group)
is there for the ride," she said.
After taxes, each person ended up
with about $50,000.
The good and the ugly
If you're the person buying the
tickets, make sure co-workers are
aware if you plan to buy personal
tickets on the side.
That didn't happen in Indianapo-
lis, where a hairdresser became in-
volved in a lawsuit with seven of her
former co-workers.
Christina Shaw claims the win-
ning ticket wasn't part of an office
pool. The hairstylists said they
had all verbally agreed to share


any winnings from any tickets pur-
chased at the same time as those
for the pool.
Planning for the impossible
It's smart to plan. But it also can
feel silly to plan for something that
is nearly impossible to win. Or is it?
The chances of winning the lat-
est jackpot are about 1 in 175.2
million. That's how many ways a
person can combine the numbers
to make a play. But Sinins said it's
still important to consider what
would happen if you somehow
overcame the odds.
"If there was no chance, you
wouldn't do it," he said. "And you ob-
viously want to do it So you want to
make sure that there's no problem
afterward."


Birth of anteater
puzzles zoo staff
GREENWICH, Conn. -
An anteater has given birth
at a Connecticut conserva-
tion center, prompting offi-
cials there to wonder how
the mother conceived.
Officials at the LEO Zoo-
logical Conservation Center
told the Greenwich Time
they had removed the only
male anteater from the en-
closure in August, long be-
fore the six-month gestation
period for baby Archie would


Hours M-Th


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have begun.
They feared that male, Alf,
would kill another baby in the
pen.
That left the mother Ar-
mani, and the young female,
Alice, in the enclosure.
But little Archie was born
in April anyway.
Marcella Leone, founder
and director of the conserva-
tion center, suspects this
might be a rare case of de-
layed implantation, when fertil-
ized eggs remain dormant in
the uterus for a period of time.
-From wire reports


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SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 A9


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NATION


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Nation BRIEFS

New cub


Associated Press
The new Amur tiger cub
at the Pittsburgh Zoo and
PPG Aquarium is shown
in a restricted area at the
zoo. The cub is still too
small to display in the
zoo's outside yard, so
visitors have to settle for
viewing him on a video
monitor at a window into
the outdoor display.

17-year-old
charged in deaths
of Ohio brothers
TOLEDO, Ohio-A 17-
year-old who told authori-
ties last week where they
could find the bodies of two
teenage brothers has been
charged in their deaths, and
prosecutors want to try him
as an adult.
The aggravated murder
charges announced Friday
against Michael Fay came
just over a week after he
and the teens were named
in an Amber Alert issued
after the slain brothers'
mother discovered a gun
and blood inside a trailer
home where the three boys
lived with their mothers.
The mother frantically
called 911 on May 9, telling
authorities to "please hurry."
The brothers, 14-year-old
Blaine Romes and 17-year-
old Blake Romes, were
found dead several hours
later.
Fay told officers the
Romes brothers were dead
and pointed authorities to
their bodies after he was
found with a stolen car at a
gas station in Columbus.
Calif. doc with
'cancer cure' gets
14 years prison
LOS ANGELES A Cali-
fornia doctor has been sen-
tenced to 14 years in federal
prison for bilking her pa-
tients out of more than $1
million by promising that an
herbal supplement could
cure late-stage cancer and
other diseases.
U.S. District Judge
Robert Timlin sentenced 58-
year-old Christine Daniel on
Friday. He also ordered her
to pay about $1.3 million.
Daniel was found guilty of
11 counts, including wire
fraud, tax evasion and wit-
ness tampering.
She charged patients as
much as $100,000 for a six-
month treatment program
that she claimed could cure
cancer, diabetes and multi-
ple sclerosis.
Some of her patients,
however, died from compli-
cations of cancer within
three to six months after
taking the supplement.
Failing student
accused of faking
kidnapping
JOHNS CREEK, Ga. -
A college student in subur-
ban Atlanta is accused of
faking his own kidnapping
to avoid telling his parents
he was failing a class.
John's Creek city
spokesman Doug Nurse
said 19-year-old Aftab
Aslam bought a cellphone
and texted his parents a
story about being kid-
napped April 27. Nurse said
Aslam camped for about a
week in an undeveloped
area in Forsyth County, but
the weather turned cold and
rainy and he went home.
Nurse said Aslam left
home because he didn't
want to tell his parents he
was failing an English class
at Georgia Gwinnett
College.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Questioning on Capil

Ousted IRS


chief regrets

treatment of

teaparty

Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
ousted head of the Internal
Revenue Service apolo-
gized to Congress on Friday
for his agency's tougher
treatment of tea party and
other conservative groups
seeking tax-exempt status.
He said they resulted from
a misguided effort to handle
a flood of applications, not
political bias.
"I want to apologize on
behalf of the Internal Rev-
enue Service for the mis-
takes that we made and the
poor service we provided,"
Steven Miller, who has been
acting IRS commissioner,
told the House Ways and
Means Committee as the


Associated Press
Steven Miller, the ousted chief of the Internal Revenue
Service, answers questions Friday on Capitol Hill in
Washington from the House Ways and Means Committee
as it holds a hearing on the extra scrutiny the IRS gave
Tea Party and other conservative groups that applied for
tax-exempt status.


panel held Congress' first
hearing on the episode.
"The affected organizations
and the American public
deserve better Partisanship
and even the perception of
partisanship have no place
at the Internal Revenue
Service."
At a hearing that saw law-


Kai'


Pa. coffee run

leads to hatchet

hitchhiker arrest

Associated Press
ELIZABETH, N.J. Life on the
run for the Internet sensation
known as Kai the hatchet-wielding
hitchhiker ended when he asked
for a cup of coffee.
An employee at a Starbucks in
Philadelphia was credited Friday
with recognizing 24-year-old Caleb
"Kai" McGillvary, whose fledgling
celebrity took a turn toward notori-
ety when authorities announced
this week he was wanted in the
beating death of a New Jersey
lawyer nearly three times his age.
The unlikely pair met amid the
neon lights of Times Square over
the weekend and headed back to
the squat brick home of 73-year-old
Joseph Galfy Jr on a quiet cul-de-
sac, authorities say On Monday,
Galfy was found beaten to death in
his bedroom, wearing only his
socks and underwear. McGillvary
was arrested Thursday in Philadel-
phia and charged with his murder
McGillvary gained a measure of
fame in February after intervening
in an attack on a California utility
worker In an interview viewed mil-
lions of times online, he described
using a hatchet he was carrying to
repeatedly hit a man who had
struck a worker with his car, fend-
ing off a further attack, and thus be-
came known as "Kai the
hatchet-wielding hitchhiker"
On Thursday, McGillvary went
into the Starbucks, and the em-
ployee who waited on him recog-
nized him and called 911.
McGillvary took off before police
arrived, Philadelphia Police Com-
missioner Charles Ramsey said,
and without his coffee. But an offi-
cer went to a nearby bus terminal
and found McGillvary, who was
arrested there.
McGillvary was being held on $3
million bail and awaited extradi-
tion Friday on charges in Galfy's


makers from both parties
harshly criticize his agency,
Miller conceded that "fool-
ish mistakes were made" by
IRS officials trying to han-
dle a flood of groups seek-
ing tax-exempt status. He
said the process that re-
sulted in conservatives
being targeted, "while intol-


tol Hill
erable, was a mistake and
not an act of partisanship."
Though Miller and an-
other top IRS official are
stepping down, the chair-
man of the committee said
that would not be enough.
"The reality is this is not
a personnel problem. This
is a problem of the IRS
being too large, too power-
ful, too intrusive and too
abusive of honest, hard-
working taxpayers," said
Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich.
Friday's hearing is the
first of what are expected to
be many on the subject by
congressional panels. Un-
derscoring the seriousness
of the episode, Miller was
sworn in as a witness, an
unusual step for the Ways
and Means panel and one
that could put Miller in
jeopardy if he is later
shown to have misled law-
makers with his testimony
When the hearing ended
after nearly four hours,
Camp said, "I promise the
American people, this in-
vestigation has just begun."


captured


Associated Press
Caleb "Kai' Lawrence McGillvary, 24, was arrested at a Philadelphia
bus station Thursday evening and charged with the murder of Joseph
Galfy Jr., a 73-year-old attorney. The homeless hitchhiker had previously
gained Internet and TV celebrity status by using a hatchet to intervene
in an attack in California on a utility worker on Feb. 1.


killing. It's not clear whether
McGillvary has a lawyer The pub-
lic defender's office in Philadel-
phia had no record of him.
McGillvary will be sent back to
New Jersey in the coming days,
said Union County Prosecutor
Theodore J. Romankow.
"Everyone is a little safer with
this person off the streets,"
Romankow said.
Statements posted on McGill-
vary's Facebook page following the
homicide were "sexual in nature,"
Romankow said.
McGillvary's last post, dated
Tuesday, asks "what would you
do?" if you awoke in a stranger's
house and found you'd been
drugged and sexually assaulted.
One commenter suggests hitting
him with a hatchet and McGill-
vary's final comment on the post
says, "I like your idea."
It was a hatchet that helped give
McGillvary a brief taste of fame in
February when he gave a rambling,
profanity-laced interview to a
Fresno, Calif., television station
about thwarting an unprovoked


attack on a Pacific Gas & Electric
employee. The interview went
viral, with one version viewed
more than 3.9 million times on
YouTube. McGillvary later traveled
to Los Angeles to appear on ABC's
'Jimmy Kimmel Live!"
Romankow declined to say what
object was used in Galfy's beating.
Romankow said McGillvary, who
said in his TV appearance he
prefers to be called "home-free" in-
stead of homeless, traded on his
newfound prominence to meet fans
across the country
Authorities know he was in
Times Square based on witness ac-
counts, the prosecutor said.
"He was well-known," Ro-
mankow said.
On Tuesday, McGillvary boarded
a train in New Jersey bound for
Philadelphia, Romankow said.
Noting that his photo had been
all over, Ramsey said it apparently
wasn't difficult to recognize
McGillvary
"Being on YouTube too much,"
Ramsey said, "is not always a good
thing."


Bombings kill at least 76 in Iraq


Associated Press


BAGHDAD Bombs
struck Sunni areas in Bagh-
dad and surrounding areas
Friday, killing at least 76
people in the deadliest day
in Iraq in more than eight
months, officials said, as a
spike in violence has raised
fears the country could be
on the path to a new round
of sectarian bloodshed.
The attacks in Baghdad
and surrounding areas
pushed the three-day Iraqi
death toll to 130, including
Shiites at bus stops and out-
door markets in scenes
reminiscent of the retalia-
tory attacks between the Is-
lamic sects that pushed the


country to the brink of civil
war in 2006-2007.
Tensions have been in-
tensifying since Sunnis
began protesting what they
say is mistreatment at the
hands of the Shiite-led gov-
ernment, including random
detentions and neglect The
protests, which began in
December, have largely
been peaceful, but the num-
ber of attacks rose sharply
after a deadly security
crackdown on a Sunni
protest camp in the coun-
try's north on April 23.
The deadliest blast on
Friday struck worshippers
as they were leaving the
main Sunni mosque in
Baqouba, a former Sunni


insurgent stronghold 35
miles northeast of Baghdad.
Another explosion went off
shortly afterward as people
gathered to help the
wounded, leaving at least 41
dead and 56 wounded, ac-
cording to police and hospi-
tal officials. Bloodied
bodies were strewn across
the road outside the
mosque.
Later Friday, a roadside
bomb exploded during a
Sunni funeral procession in
Madain, about 12 miles
south of Baghdad, killing
eight mourners and wound-
ing 11, police said. Two
medical officials confirmed
the casualties.
Another explosion struck


a caf6 in Fallujah, 40 miles
west of Baghdad, killing two
people and wounding nine,
according to police and hos-
pital officials.
In Baghdad, a bomb ex-
ploded near a shopping
center during evening rush
hour in the mainly Sunni
neighborhood ofAmariyah,
killing 21 people and
wounding 32. That was fol-
lowed by another bomb in a
commercial district in
Dora, another Sunni neigh-
borhood, which killed four
people and wounded 22, ac-
cording to officials.
It was the deadliest day
since Sept 9 when 92 peo-
ple were killed, according
to an Associated Press tally


World BRIEFS

Prayer


Associated Press
An Indian Muslim
devotee prays Friday at
the shrine of Sufi saint
Khwaja Moinuddin
Chishti during the Urs
festival in Ajmer, India.
Thousands of Sufi
devotees from different
parts of India travel to the
shrine for the annual
festival, marking the
death anniversary of the
saint.

Mystery over
Japanese chef's
island death
BERLIN Germany's
swanky resort island of Sylt
has been shaken by the
death of a Japanese chef fol-
lowing a fight with two cus-
tomers who had complained
about his food.
Miki Nozawa died Monday
from a brain hemorrhage
after a brawl with the two
men at a nightclub near his
restaurant in the North Sea
island's main town of
Westerland.
Prosecutors are waiting for
a second autopsy report to
determine whether Nozawa
-who had opened his
restaurant less than three
months earlier died as a
result of the fight or due to an
existing medical condition.
German tabloid newspa-
per Bild reported the men,
who are under investigation
but have yet to be arrested
or charged, had refused to
pay for a dish of fried rice
with vegetables and beef.
$1 million in
jewelry stolen
near Cannes
PARIS Thieves ripped
a safe from the wall of a hotel
room near the Cannes Film
Festival and made off with
around $1 million worth of
jewelry, in a brazen late-night
burglary just hours after the
screening of a film about
break-ins at the homes of
Hollywood celebrities,
French officials said Friday.
The apparently well-
planned robbery at the Novo-
tel hotel took place in the
room of an employee of
Chopard, a Swiss-based
watch and jewelry maker
and festival sponsor that was
hosting a splashy gala event
in a far ritzier hotel around
the same time, officials said.
Chopard has loaned jew-
elry to A-list stars who walk
on the festival's famed red
carpet under rapid-fire
flashes of photographers'
cameras. Already this year,
model Carla Delevingne and
actress Julianne Moore have
walked the carpet in
Chopard gems.
Bombs kill 9
inside Afghan
housing complex
KABUL, Afghanistan -
Two bombs hidden in a mo-
torcycle and a car exploded
inside an elite gated com-
munity linked to the family
of Afghan President Hamid
Karzai on Friday evening,
killing at least nine people
and wounding more than 70
near the southern city of
Kandahar, an official said.
The blasts happened in-
side Aino Mina, a housing
complex on the northern
outskirts of the city that was
developed in part by Mah-
mood Karzai, the presi-
dent's younger brother
No one immediately
claimed responsibility for
the attack, but striking in-
side a powerful symbol of
wealth and influence would
be a publicity coup for the
Taliban insurgency.
-From wire reports









St B RTS MAY ,203
PORTS


Yankees
blank
Blue
Jays
5-0.
/B4

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Auto Racing/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Golf/B3
0 Basketball/B3
0 Hockey/B3
0 Baseball/B4


Rays hold on to win opener in Baltimore


Tampa Bay slugs out

17 hits in 12-10

AL East road victory

Associated Press
BALTIMORE Kelly Johnson hit a
three-run homer and an RBI single, and
the Tampa Bay Rays held on for a 12-10
victory over the slumping Baltimore
Orioles on Friday night.
Johnson and Yunel Escobar had three
hits apiece in Tampa Bay's highest scor-
ing game of the season. Escobar also drove
in three runs and Desmond Jennings
added two hits and two RBIs.
The Orioles surrendered a season-high
17 hits for the second straight game and
gave up their most runs in any game this
season. Baltimore has allowed 27 runs


and 52 hits while losing four of its last five
games.
Chris Dickerson hit a three-run homer
in Baltimore's six-run eighth inning, but
the Orioles' rally stalled from there.
Jeremy Hellickson (2-2) was charged
with eight runs and 10 hits in 7 2/3 innings,
but still managed to get the win. Joel Per-
alta got four outs for his first save.
Johnson drove a full-count pitch from
Jason Hammel (5-2) over the wall in right
in the third, capping Tampa Bay's four-
run outburst with his sixth homer John-
son singled in James Loney, Escobar
doubled home a run and Jennings had a
two-run single in the fifth, helping the
Rays open a 9-3 lead.
Hammel (5-2) allowed a season-high
seven runs and 10 hits in 4 2/3 innings with
four strikeouts and two walks in his first
loss since April 7. The right-hander's ERA
has increased from 4.10 to 5.72 after al-
lowing 13 runs and 18 hits over his last two
starts.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's Yunel Escobar is safe at the plate Friday as Baltimore catcher Matt
Wieters tries to make the tag in Baltimore.


Dress rehearsal

Defense shines in

CR scrimmage
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Defense outper-
formed the offenses in Crystal River's
Blue and Gold spring exhibition Friday as
the Blue squad which contained more
defensive starters- defeated Gold 18-6 at
Earl Bramlett Stadium.
Junior-to-be Austin Stephens picked off
a pair of passes, returning one for a
20-yard touchdown on the game's first
possession, and senior Destin Dawsy ran
85 yards for a score to put the Blues up
12-0 in the first quarter
Blue quarterback Sam Mueller, a soph-
omore next season, connected with
Stephens for a 70-yard pass to set up a
3-yard TD run by Reese Bresson in the
second quarter, while the defenses, aided
by a pair of picks by Gold senior Ty
Reynolds as well as a goal-line intercep-
tion by Bresson, thwarted potential scor-
ing drives on several occasions.
Reynolds caught a 31-yard pass from
junior Collin Ryan in the fourth quarter
before Ryan scrambled 12 yards to set up
an 8-yard scoring rush by Rodney Vickers.
Afterward, first-year head coach Nate
Varnadore noted his team's extensive in-
juries heading into the scrimmage, espe-
cially on the offensive side of the ball.
"The defense is still ahead of the of-
fense," said Varnadore, who is incorpo-
rating a more pass-oriented attack than
recent Crystal River squads. "Confidence
is key for them after losing a lot of key
guys from last year Guys are trying to find
their niche and you have to see how bad
they want it The kids are excited about
the schemes we're doing, and the defense STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
is a very intense group." Crystal River running back Destin Dawsy is tackled in the Blue and Gold intrasquad
The Pirates host Hernando this Friday game Friday night in Earl Bramlett Stadium at Crystal River High School. Dawsy ran for
at 7:30 p.m. for their Spring Classic. an 85 yard touchdown in the first quarter to put the Blue team up by a score of 12-0.


Seven Rivers Christian concludes springperiod with scrimmage


JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
LECANTO On a warm, breezy day
on the Seven Rivers Christian School
campus, the Warriors battled each
other
The Seven Rivers middle and high
school football teams took part in an in-
trasquad scrimmage to conclude their
spring practice period Friday evening
in 7-on-7 formations on the school's
70-yard practice field.


The Warriors are foregoing a spring
football game due to low numbers.
Warriors head coach Dave Iwaniec
said his young players followed the
plan "as best as they could" consider-
ing the limited amount of time some
had spent on the gridiron.
"This was only the fifth day in pads
for some of the kids," he said, "and
some of these kids never played a down
of football before.
"You can't get anyone ready in five
practices to play a game."


For the intrasquad scrimmage, the
middle schoolers lined up in tight run-
ning formations and faced a 4-3 front
with no defensive backs, while the var-
sity was in 7-on-7 passing formations -
led by rising junior quarterback Ster-
ling Gardner with no linemen.
The offense started each series on its
own 10-yard line and got 10 plays to tra-
verse 60 yards for a touchdown.
The middle school players were able


S/Page B3


Orb is


favored


to set up


Triple try

Associated Press
BALTIMORE Everything's a
go for Orb.
The Kentucky Derby winner
was in a playful mood the day be-
fore the Preakness, making faces
for photographers between nib-
bles of grass outside his stall at
Pimlico Race Course.
"He's really settled in well. He
seems to be energetic about what
he's doing, so I couldn't be more
pleased," trainer Shug Mc-
Gaughey said on a warm and
sunny Friday morning. "We're
excited about giving him a whirl
to see if we can get it done and go
on to the next step."
Getting it done would mean
defeating eight rivals in the 1
3/16-mile Preakness to set up a
Triple Crown try in the Belmont
Stakes three weeks from Satur-
day Orb is the even-money fa-
vorite, and there's a growing
feeling that this 3-year-old bay
colt may be special enough to
give thoroughbred racing its first
Triple Crown champion since
Affirmed in 1978.
"We'd sure love to have that
opportunity," said McGaughey,
seeming relaxed and confident.
"Probably the racing world
would love to see it, too. It brings
a lot more attention to what we're
doing from all standpoints."
Orb extended his winning
streak to five with a thrilling vic-
tory in the Derby two weeks ago,
when jockey Joel Rosario pa-
tiently guided the colt from 17th
to first in the final half mile.
In the Preakness, Orb will
break from the No. 1 post, a spot
that has seen only one winner -
Tabasco Cat in 1994-since 1961.
While Orb will take his shot at
becoming the 34th horse with a
chance at the Triple Crown, sev-
eral other historic milestones are
in play Rosie Napravnik will be
aboard 5-1 second choice Mylute
in an attempt to become the first
female to the win the Preakness
and Kevin Krigger, who rides
Goldencents, looks to become the
first black jockey to win since
Willie Simms with Sly Fox in
1898.


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DUE AT SIGNING, EXCLUDES TAX.TAGTITLE AND $599.50 DEALER FEE. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. ^0% APR FOR WELL QUAL FIED BUYERS WITH APPROVED CREDIT






AUTo RACING


Different series on tap at Speedway


FUPS, S.ECKS.

headline tonight's

racing at CCS

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Non-locals invade the Citrus
County Speedway today as
Florida United Promoters Series
(FUPS) rolls out 50-lap features
for its Open Wheel Modified,
Trucks and Sportsman classes,
while the South East Champ Kart
Series (S.E.C.KS.) makes its first
run at the Citrus track and Pro
Figure 8s race for just the second
time this season.
It's the third event of the year
for the three FUPS groups, which
- along with Super Late Models,
Legends and Bandoleros -
bounce between the Auburndale


(Winter Haven), Bronson and Cit-
rus speedways.
Most of the drivers in today's
FUPS classes are not regulars to
the Inverness track, but Seffier's
L.J. Grimm (No. 25 car), who sits
two points back from Josh Todd
(No. 22) for third place in the FUPS
Open Wheel Modified standings,
does have a second-place finish at
Citrus this season. Lake Alfred's
Travis Roland (No. 10) leads Todd
by 10 points with a feature win, and
also has a fourth-place finish this
year at the speedway
With a heat win and a third-place
feature finish among his three Cit-
rus appearances, Largo's Roger
Blevins (No. 1 car) -fourth place in
FUPS has the most experience
of the FUPS Open Wheel drivers at
the speedway this season.
Zephyrhills' Devin McLeod
(No. 21) finished third in the May
4 feature at Citrus, and joins
Roland as the only other driver to
win a feature in FUPS Open


Wheel Mods this season.
Brandon Morris (No. 56, fea-
ture win) leads the FUPS Sports-
man division with 105 points from
a pair of races this season. James
Wright III (No. 156, 98 points) nar-
rowly holds the second position
ahead of Craig Cuzzone (No. 88w,
97 points) and Bobby Mobley (No.
4, feature win, 96 points).
Steve Darvalics (No. 41, 54
points) and Jessica Green (No. 16,
44 points) each have feature wins
in FUPS Trucks and currently
hold the top two spots, respec-
tively, in a relatively competitive
class this season. Jessica Murphy
(No. 26) is just two points behind
Green and one point ahead of
Dylan Martin (No. 7) at third.
The S.E.C.K.S. and Pro Figure
8s were rained out on their last
scheduled date on April 20. In the
only Pro Figure 8 race of the sea-
son, Joey Catarelli (No. 6), a for-
mer Sportsman points champion
and a two-time Figure 8 champ,


beat out Thomas Peet (No. 85)
and Eric Sharrone (No. 32) -
both of Floral City for the fea-
ture win.
In the Kart series, which also
runs at Auburndale and Clearwa-
ter's Showtime Speedway, Ron
Sanford (No. 29, 406 points)
boasts an 80-point lead over a
second-place Phil Harp (No. 77)
after two races, while 2009 champ
Dustin Chisholm (No. 7) occupies
third place with 271 points.
Grandstand gates open at 4
p.m. and heat races begin at 5:30
p.m. Grandstand admission
prices are $13 for adults, $9 for
seniors and students, and $5 for
children age 11 and under (chil-
dren under 42 inches are free).
Passes are also available for fam-
ilies and the pits.
For more on S.E.C.K.S., see
www.newsecksracing.com.
For more on FU.PS., see
www.floridaunitedpromoters
series.com.


an with the plan


=_-. .,-..--. -. .

Photos by BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Dunnellon racer Clint Foley (7) has three wins in four Modified Mini Stock starts at the Citrus County Speedway in 2013. The division, which
Foley won points titles in 2009, 2010 and 2011, will race again on Saturday, May 25.


Despite limited starts, Foley leads Modified Mini Stock


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

With a division-leading three
feature wins in four outings this
season, the only thing likely keep-
ing Clint Foley out of the points
lead in his Modified Mini Stock
division are a couple of missed
races.
When asked about the no-
shows, the Dunnellon driver
smiled while giving an honest -
and light-heartedly confident -
answer
"I figured I'd give someone else
a chance," he said. "They said I
was ruining the class, really, so I
backed off a little bit"
Foley was certainly a thorn in
the side of his competitors when
he won three consecutive points
championships starting in 2009.
He said he's won races all over
the state at tracks such as Winter
Haven's Auburndale Speedway,
the New Smyrna Speedway and
Clearwater's Showtime Speed-
way, and he has a couple of points
championships at the Bronson
Speedway, where he got his start
in a more modest ride.
"I started out at Bronson with a
pink (Ford) Pinto in 1995," said
the former Chronicle Driver of
the Year "My dad and I put it to-


gether for the Modified Mini
Stock class and I went out and
ran decent. We traveled the
Florida Mini Stock Challenge Se-
ries for a couple years back when
we didn't have the funding and
had some good finishes.
"Then I hooked up with HHH
Chassis and it was all history
from there," added Foley, who
gets his motors from South Car-
olina's Johnson Racing Engines.
Foley's father also Clint -
echoed his son's emphasis on the
critical role played by HHH
Chassis, and said he's witnessed
a progression for his son on the


track though the years. However,
he did recall there being a spark
from the beginning.
"He was kind of a natural at it,"
said the elder Foley, who previ-
ously drag-raced with his son.
"He started out well in the first
car we ever had, and then we
built the pink Pinto and it went
from there."
Despite Foley's history at Bron-
son, he considers the Citrus
County Speedway his home track,
noting that Citrus' Mod Mini car
counts remained relatively strong
while Bronson's has dwindled
over the years.


with three victories


Foley, who turns 42 this July,
said his team had a difficult cou-
ple of weeks prepping his No. 7
car after wrecking at Auburndale
three weeks ago, but it didn't stop
him from picking up his third fea-
ture win of the season after start-
ing from the back of the field.
Championships or not, he's en-
joying his time on the track from
week to week.
"We're just coming out to win
races and put a show on for the
fans," he said.
Foley's Mod Mini Stock class is
scheduled to race again on Satur-
day, May 25.


B2 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


Edwards wins All-Star Race pole


Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. Carl Ed-
wards captured the pole for the
Sprint All-Star race at Char-
lotte Motor Speedway, paying
tribute to the late Dick Trickle
along the way.
Edwards, the 2011 winner in
the exhibition event, completed
three laps and a four-tire pit stop
Friday night in 1 minute, 51.297
seconds.
Kurt Busch will start alongside
Edwards on the front row Satur-
day night. Greg Biffle, Kyle
Busch and Joey Logano round
out the top five.
Edwards had Trickle's name
written just above his window, a
tribute to the 71-year-old former
NASCAR driver who died Thurs-
day of what authorities said was
a self-inflicted gunshot wound in
Boger City, N.C.

Carl Edwards captured the pole
Friday for tonight's Sprint All-Star
Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway.
Associated Press


For the first time since 2000,
NASCAR waived the pit-road
speed limit, allowing drivers to
enter and leave the pits at high
rates of speed.
Judging the speed needed to
stop in the pit stall threw off
some drivers.
Defending All-Star race cham-
pion Jimmie Johnson was
among a handful of drivers who
skidded past his pit stop when
his brakes locked up. He was
forced to back up, losing valu-
able time.
Kevin Harvick's pit stop was
even worse. He overshot his pit
stall and didn't back up far enough
before his crew jumped the wall
and began working on a tire
change with his car still slightly
over the line. His time was disal-
lowed and he'll start at the back of
the field tonight
Dale Earnhardt Jr was in sec-
ond place after 16 cars but a
loose lug nut cost him a 5-second
penalty and dropped him out of
the top 10.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Citrus County
Speedway points
Super Late Models
Car No. Name Points
110 Steve Dorer 421
98 Herb Neumann Jr. 419
23 Todd Brown 403
1 Dale Sanders 397
123 Jon Brown 362
Open Wheel Modifieds
Car No. Name Points
01 Herb Neumann Jr. 509
0 Troy Robinson 502
2 Steven Hise 484
18 Shane Butler 458
289 Richie Smith 414
Mod Mini Stocks
Car No. Name Points
33 Chris Allen 630
44 Michael Lawhorn 598
24 Phil Edwards 597
99 Leroy Moore 570
98 James Ellis 520
Sportsman
Car No. Name Points
17 Mike Bell 519
73 Mark Peterson 517
4 Jay Witfoth 511
114 John Buzinec 476
66 Andy Nicholls 464
Street Stocks
Car No. Name Points
3 Curtis Flanagan 745
48 Dora Throne 702
16 J.D. Goff 607
5 James Peters 396
26 Bradley Lyon 371
Pure Stocks
Car No. Name Points
72 Karlin Ray 738
45 James Johnston 679
32 Mike Autenrieth 678
44 Glen Colyer 626
3 Jason Waller 609
Mini Stocks
Car No. Name Points
98 Kevin Stone 936
73 Jason Terry 883
11 Jerry Daniels 880
20 Shannon Kennedy 813
22 Mark Patterson 697
Pro Figure 8s
Car No. Name Points
6 Joey Catarelli 100
85 Thomas Peet 98
32 Eric Sharrone 96
13 Neil Herne 94
94 Charlie Meyer 92
Figure 8s
Car No. Name Points
82 Jimmy Kruse 196
6 Ronnie Schrefiels 192
85 Pnut Higginbotham 190
33 Travis Nichols 186
32 Mike Autenrieth 186
Upcoming
Speedway schedule
Racing key
SLM: Super Late Models (50 Lap Features)
OWM: Open Wheel Modifieds
SP: Sportsman
MMS: Mod Mini Stocks
SS: Street Stocks
MS: Mini Stocks
PS: Pure Stocks
HD: Hornet Division
PF8: Pro Figure-8s
F8: Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure-8s
FUPS: Florida United Promoters Series
(Super Late Models, 100 Lap Features)
TBARA: TampaBayAreaRacingAssociation
(Sprints)
DAARA: Daytona Antique Auto Racing Asso-
ciation
S.E.C.K.S.: South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS: FI 3/4 Midgets
Dates
May 18 -TRUCKs (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
OWM (50 Laps), PF8, S.E.C.K.S.
May 25 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, F8
June 1 SS (50 Laps), MS, HD, OWM, SP,
Pro-Challenge
June 8 FUPS (Powell Memorial), MMS,
PS, MS, DWARFs
June 15-- OWM, SP SS, MS, PF8
June 22 -TBARA, MMS, SS, PS, HD, F8,
MIDGETS
June 29 DAARA (Rest to be announced)
July 6 CLOSED
July 13 SLM, MMS (50 Laps), SS, PS,
DWARFs, HD
July 20 CLOSED
July 27 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, HD, F8
Aug. 3 OWM, SP, SS, PS, Pro-Challenge
Aug.10 FUP MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs, HD
Aug. 17 OWM (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
SS, PS, PF8
Aug. 24 CLOSED
Aug. 31 CLOSED
Sept. 7-TRUCKs (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
OWM (50 Laps), MS, PS
Sept. 14 -FUPS, MMS, SS, PS, F8, DWARFs
Sept. 21 OWM, SP SS, PS (50 Laps), MS,
PF8
Sept. 28 FLAG POLE, BOAT & TRAILER,
SUITCASE RACE, F8, MS, PS
Oct. 5 -OWM (50 Laps), TRUCKs (50 Laps),
SP (50 Laps), Pro-Challenge, DWARFs
Oct.12-SLM, SS, MMS, MS, HD
Oct. 19 -TBARA, (Frank Stromquist) SS (57
Laps), PS, F8, MIDGETS
Oct. 26 -OWM, SP SS, PS, MS, PF8
Nov 2-FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD
Nov 9-OWM, SP MS, PS, DWARFs, Robert
Aaron F8 Special 50 Laps no-points






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



PGA-Byron Nelson
Friday, At TPC Four Seasons Resort
Irving, Texas; Purse: $6.7 million
Yardage: 7,166, Par: 70
Second Round, (a-amateur):
Note: Only players who made cut
Keegan Bradley 60-69-129 -11
Tom Gillis 69-63-132 -8
Sang-Moon Bae 66-66-132 -8
John Huh 69-64-133 -7
Ryan Palmer 65-68- 133 -7
Charl Schwartzel 63-70 133 -7
Graham DeLaet 67-67-134 -6
Angel Cabrera 65-69- 134 -6
Ted Potter, Jr. 64-70 -134 -6
Scott Piercy 66-68-134 -6
Gary Woodland 69-65- 134 -6
Harris English 64-70- 134 -6
Erik Compton 72-63- 135 -5
Stephen Ames 67-68- 135 -5
Nathan Green 67-68- 135 -5
Martin Kaymer 68-67-135 -5
CamiloVillegas 65-70-135 -5
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Alexandre Rocha 67-68- 135 -5
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Jimmy Walker 68-68-136 -4
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ChezReavie 69-67-136 -4
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Charles Howell III 67-69-136 -4
Joe Ogilvie 68-69-137 -3
Brian Harman 68-69- 137 -3
D.A. Points 69-68- 137 -3
Louis Oosthuizen 67-70 137 -3
Jordan Spieth 69-68-137 -3
William McGirt 68-69-137 -3
Steve Marino 68-69-137 -3
John Daly 71-66-137 -3
Matt Bettencourt 73-64-137 -3
Freddie Jacobson 68-69- 137 -3
David Mathis 70-67-137 -3
BrendonTodd 69-68-137 -3
D.H. Lee 68-69-137 -3
Michael Bradley 68-70- 138 -2
Jeff Overton 68-70- 138 -2
Tag Ridings 68-70-138 -2
Justin Bolli 69-69- 138 -2
Vijay Singh 71-67-138 -2
John Rollins 74-64-138 -2
Colt Knost 68-70 -138 -2
Gary Christian 69-69-138 -2
ZackFischer 73-65- 138 -2
Henrik Norlander 71-67-138 -2
Ricky Barnes 68-71 -139 -1
Jerry Kelly 69-70-139 -1
Wes Short, Jr. 68-71 -139 -1
Ryo Ishikawa 71-68- 139 -1
Chad Campbell 67-72-139 -1
Andrew Svoboda 69-70- 139 -1
Will Claxton 66-73 -139 -1
Justin Hicks 69-70-139 -1
MattKuchar 69-70-139 -1
Charlie Beljan 70-69-139 -1
Stuart Appleby 69-70-139 -1
Jason Bohn 71-68- 139 -1
James Driscoll 67-72-139 -1
Seung-Yul Noh 68-71 -139 -1
Pat Perez 70-69 -139 -1
Tim Herron 70-70-140 E
Jason Day 72-68-140 E
Patrick Reed 67-73-140 E
Padraig Harrington 70-70-140 E
Justin Leonard 70-70-140 E
Ted Purdy 70-70-140 E
Jesper Parnevik 70-70-140 E
GregOwen 70-70-140 E
Charlie Wi 73-67-140 E
Brian Stuard 71-69-140 E
Scott Langley 71-69-140 E
Jason Dufner 70-70 -140 E
Kenny Perry 71-69-140 E
Rory Sabbatini 69-71-140 E
Morgan Hoffmann 69-71 -140 E
Brad Fritsch 69-71 -140 E



MLB box scores

Pirates 5, Astros 4
Houston Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Grssmncf 4 21 0 SMarte If 4 01 0
Elmore2b 3 0 1 1 Sniderrf 5 1 0 0
JCastro c 2 0 0 1 McCtch cf 5 2 3 1
Carter rf 3 0 1 0 GJoneslb 2 0 1 1
Paredspr 0 0 0 0 Ingeph-lb 2 00 0
JMrtnzl If 3 0 0 0 Walker2b 4 1 1 0
Clemns p 0 0 0 0 RMartn c 5 0 2 0
Wrght p 1 0 0 0 PAIvrz 3b 4 1 2 2
Ambriz p 0 0 0 0 Barmes ss 2 0 0 0
EGnzlzp 0 00 0 Mazzarp 0 00 0
C.Penalb 3 0 1 0 GSnchzph 0 0 0 0
Dmngz 3b 4 1 1 1 Watson p 0 00 0
MGnzlz ss 4 1 1 0 Tabata ph 1 0 0 0
Lylesp 1 00 0 JuWlsnp 0 00 0
Blacklyp 0 00 0 JGomzp 1 00 0
Crowelf 1 1 01 0 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 29 473 Totals 38510 4
Houston 100 030 000 4
Pittsburgh 100 001 021 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-E.Gonzalez (1), Carter (2), Paredes (1),
Barmes (5), Walker (3). LOB-Houston 6,
Pittsburgh 11. 2B-Grossman (5), McCutchen
(10), G.Jones (10). HR-Dominguez (3), Mc-
Cutchen (6), PAIvarez (7). CS-Elmore (1),
Crowe (1), S.Marte (4). S-Elmore, Lyles.
SF-J.Castro.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Lyles 5 4 2 1 2 4
BlackleyH,5 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
ClemensH,2 1 1 0 0 1 0
W.WrightH,2 1/3 1 1 1 0 0
AmbrizBS,2-2 1 1 1 1 0 0
E.Gonzalez L,0-1 2/3 2 1 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
J.Gomez 42/35 4 3 2 1
Mazzaro 11/30 0 0 1 3
Watson 2 2 0 0 1 2
Ju.WilsonW,4-0 1 0 0 0 1 1
Cardinals 7,
Brewers 6
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Aokirf 4 1 3 0 MCrpnt2b 5 2 3 0
Segurass 4 2 1 0 Beltranrf 5 0 0 0
Braun If 3 1 1 0 Hollidy If 4 1 2 2
ArRmr3b 4 2 2 6 Craiglb 3 2 3 0
CGomzcf 4 0 1 0 YMolinc 4 1 1 0
YBtncrlb 4 0 0 0 Jaycf 4 0 1 1
Weeks2b 4 00 0 Freese3b 4 1 1 4
Maldndc 4 00 0 Kozmass 4 02 0
WPerltp 2 0 0 0 JGarcip 3 0 0 0
Axfordp 0 00 0 Manessp 0 00 0
LSchfrph 1 00 0 Rosnthlp 0 00 0
Badnhpp 0 00 0 MAdmsph 1 00 0
McGnzlp 0 00 0 Mujicap 0 00 0
Totals 34 686 Totals 37713 7
Milwaukee 000 303 000 6
St. Louis 501 100 00x 7


E-Braun (2), Segura (5). DP-St. Louis 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 2, St. Louis 7. 2B-Aoki (9),
M.Carpenter (14). HR-Ar.Ramirez 2 (3),
Freese (1). SB-C.Gomez (9). CS-Braun (5).
IP H RERBBSO


Milwaukee
W.Peralta L,3-4
Axford
Badenhop
Mic.Gonzalez
St. Louis
J.Garcia W,5-2
Maness H,1
Rosenthal H,12
Mujica S,12-12


5 11 7
1 2 0
1 0 0
1 0 0
51/36 6
12/31 0
1 1 0
1 0 0


NBA playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
Thursday, May 16
New York 85, Indiana 75, Indiana leads se-


SCOREBOARD


FOr the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:


Thursday's winning
numbers and payouts:
Fantasy 5: 6-13-19-27-30
5-of-5 4 winners $51,304.76
A f C; iOirp ft'A A


CASH 3 (early)
1-1-1
CASH 3 (late)
9-1-4
PLAY 4 (early)
7-4-7-1
PLAY 4 (late)
0-5-0-0
FANTASY 5
1-5-9-16-29
MEGA MONEY
2-4-11-32
MEGA BALL
8
MEGA MILLIONS
11- 15 35 43 49


-T-1 zo "i MEGA BALL
3-of-5 9,124 $10 41
Players should verify winning numbers by calling
850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Racing Indianapolis 500 Qualify-
ing Sessions
5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Kansas Nationals,
Qualifying (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
11 a.m. (FSNFL) Central Florida at East Carolina
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas A&M at Tennessee
MLB BASEBALL
4 p.m. (FOX) Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona Diamondbacks at Miami Marlins
NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND
8 p.m. (ESPN) New York Knicks at Indiana Pacers, game 6
BICYCLING
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of California, Stage 7
BOXING
10:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Pablo Cesar Cano vs. Shane Mosley
HORSE RACING
4:30 p.m. (NBC) 138th Preakness Stakes
GOLF
6 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Volvo World Match Play
Championship, Round of 16
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour HP Byron Nelson Championship,
Third Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour HP Byron Nelson Championship,
Third Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Web.com: BMW Charity Pro-Am,
Third Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Mobile Bay Classic, Third Round
NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND
1 p.m. (NBC) Detroit Red Wings at Chicago Blackhawks,
game 2
9 p.m. (NBCSPT) Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks,
game 3
COLLEGE LACROSSE
12:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Men's NCAA Tournament- Cornell vs.
Ohio State
2 p.m. (SUN) Women's NCAA Tournament, Quarterfinal -
Florida at Syracuse
3 p.m. (ESPN2) Men's NCAA Tournament- Syracuse vs.
Yale
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament, Regional: Teams TBA
5:30 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Tournament, Regional: Teams TBA

RADIO
3:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
4:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore
Orioles

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


ries 3-2
San Antonio 94, Golden State 82, San Anto-
nio wins series 4-2
Today
NewYork at Indiana, 8p.m.
Monday, May 20
x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 19
Memphis at San Antonio, 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 21
Memphis at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 22
NewYork OR Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.



NHL playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Thursday, May 16
Boston 3, N.Y Rangers 2, OT, Boston leads
series 1-0
Los Angeles 4, San Jose 3, Los Angeles
leads series 2-0
Friday, May 17
Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 3, Pittsburgh leads se-
ries 2-0
Today
Detroit at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 9 p.m.
Sunday, May 19
N.Y Rangers at Boston, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.



NASCAR-Sprint Cup
NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 145.556 mph.
2. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 144.068.
3. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 143.737.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 143.676.
5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 143.374.
6. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 142.612.
7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 142.456.
8. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 142.104.
9. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 142.064.
10. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 141.688.
11. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 141.218.
12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 140.883.
13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 140.407.
14. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 139.407.
15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet, 138.237.
16. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 134.943.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 132.727.
18. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 130.16.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.


Sprint Showdown Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Saturday
At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 193.424 mph.
2. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 192.699.
3. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
192.342.
4. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 192.28.
5. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 190.88.
6. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 190.154.
7. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 190.061.
8. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 189.86.
9. (36) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 189.447.
10. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 188.963.
11. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 188.818.
12. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 188.732.
13. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, 188.58.
14. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 188.186.
15. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 187.696.
16. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 187.435.
17. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 187.305.
18. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 187.013.
19. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 186.696.
20. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, 185.861.
21. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 184.011.
22. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 183.767.
23. (52) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, 181.458.


Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Chicago -140 NewYork +130
at Philadelphia-105 Cincinnati -105
Arizona -150 at Miami +140
at Atlanta -175 Los Angeles +165
at St. Louis -165 Milwaukee +155
at Colorado -110 San Francisco +100
Washington -155 at San Diego +145
American League
at Cleveland -150 Seattle +140
at New York -120 Toronto +110
at Baltimore -110 Tampa Bay +100
at Los Angeles-130 Chicago +120
Boston -130 at Minnesota +120
Detroit -130 at Texas +120
at Oakland -130 Kansas City +120
Interleague
at Pittsburgh -220 Houston +200
NBA Playoffs
Tonight
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
at Indiana 4Y2 (17712) New York
Tomorrow
at San Antonio 4 18312) Memphis
Odds to Win Series
San Antonio -135 Memphis +115
NHL Playoffs
Today
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Chicago -200 Detroit +170
at San Jose -130 Los Angeles +110
Tomorrow
at Boston -125 N.Y Rangers +105
Pittsburgh -140 at Ottawa +120


Penguins 4, Senators 3
PITTSBURGH Sidney Crosby had
his second career playoff hat trick and the
Pittsburgh Penguins beat the Ottawa Sen-
ators 4-3 on Friday night to take a 2-0 lead
in the Eastern Conference semifinals.
Brenden Morrow added his first playoff
goal in more than five years, Tomas Vok-
oun made 19 saves and the Penguins
rode their superstar captain to their fourth
straight victory.
Crosby beat Craig Anderson three times
in the game's first 22 minutes, sending the
goalie to the bench after stopping 18 of 21
shots.
Kyle Turris, Colin Greening and Jean-
Gabriel Pageau scored for the Senators.
Game 3 is Sunday in Ottawa.


Late Thursday night
Spurs 94, Warriors 82
OAKLAND, Calif. The San Antonio
Spurs held off a furious final rally to beat the
Golden State Warriors 94-82 in Game 6 and
advance to the Western Conference finals.
Tim Duncan had 19 points and six re-
bounds, Kawhi Leonard scored 16 points
and the Spurs won the series in six games.
Stephen Curry shot 10 of 25 from the
floor to score 22 points on a nagging left
ankle. Jarrett Jack had 15 points as the in-
jury-saddled Warriors wore down.
San Antonio will open the conference fi-
nals at home against Memphis on Sunday.




WARRIORS
Continued from Page BI

to tackle, while in the varsity series,
plays were blown dead once significant
contact was made.
The setup was more to streamline
the process for first-time players and
also prevent any injuries.
Iwaniec said although his team's not


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 B3


K -- --- ---n

Associated Press
Charl Schwartzel of South Africa chips onto the 14th green Friday during the
second round of the Byron Nelson Championship in Irving, Texas. Schwartzel
ended the day at 7 under par.




Bradley remains on



top at Byron Nelson


Associated Press

IRVING, Texas Keegan Bradley
shot a 1-under 69 on Friday in a round
that started and ended with bogeys,
good enough for a three-stroke lead
after two rounds in the Byron Nelson
Championship.
A day after setting the TPC Four
Seasons course record with a 60, also
with two bogeys, Bradley went into
the weekend at 11-under 129. That is
the lowest 36-hole total at the Nelson
since 2001.
Tom Gillis, who shot 63 in the first
group of the day off the No. 10 tee, and
Sang-Moon Bae were tied for second.
Bae had a 66.
Another stroke back were 2012 PGA
Tour rookie of the year John Huh,
Ryan Palmer and Charl Schwartzel.
Huh shot 64, Palmer 68 and
Schwartzel 70.
Defending champion Jason Dufner,
playing with Bradley, had his second
consecutive 70.
Venturi, US Open champion
and CBS analyst, dies
Former U.S. Open champion Ken Ven-
turi has died just 12 days after he was in-
ducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame.
He was 82.
His son, Matt Venturi, says he died Fri-
day afternoon in a hospital in Rancho Mi-
rage, Calif. Venturi had been hospitalized
the last two months for a spinal infection,
pneumonia and an intestinal infection.
Venturi was all about overcoming the
odds. He won the 1964 U.S. Open at Con-
gressional despite playing with severe de-
hydration. He overcame a stuttering
problem as a kid in San Francisco to
spend 35 years in the broadcast booth
with CBS Sports. He also was the Presi-
dents Cup captain in 2000.
Venturi was inducted into the Hall of
Fame on May 6.


World Match Play
KAVARNA, Bulgaria lan Poulter was
eliminated from the World Match Play
Championship after losing another round-
robin match.
Poulter lost to Thomas Aiken, 1 up, at the
Thracian Cliffs course when he bogeyed
the last hole after missing the fairway.
Poulter lost to Thongchai Jaidee on
Thursday.
Jaidee is one of only four players to win
both early matches, joining Francesco Moli-
nari, Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano and
Scott Jamieson.
European Tour
SANTO DA SERRA, Madeira Islands -
Scotland's Craig Lee took a one-stroke lead
over American Peter Uihlein and Chile's
Mark Tullo during the suspended second
round of the Madeira Islands Open.
Lee shot a 4-under 68 to reach 9-under
135 at Santo da Serra Golf Club.
Uihlein, the former Oklahoma State star
who won the 2010 U.S. Amateur, settled for
a 64 after playing the first 12 holes in 10
under with an eagle and eight birdies.
LPGA Tour
MOBILE, Ala. Jessica Korda shot a
7-under 65 to take a one-stroke lead over
Hall of Famer Karrie Webb after the second
round of the Mobile Bay LPGA Classic.
Korda, the 2012 Women's Australian
Open winner, had seven birdies in her sec-
ond straight bogey-free round to reach 13
under on The Crossings course at the
Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail's Magnolia
Grove complex.
Webb also had a bogey-free round,
birdieing the last three holes for a 63.
Chella Choi was two strokes back at 11
under after a 66, and Sydnee Michaels had
a 62 to join Pornanong Phatlum and Thidapa
Suwannapura at 10 under.
Defending champion Stacy Lewis was 4
under after her second straight 70.


Late Thursday night
Bruins 3, Rangers 2, OT
BOSTON Brad Marchand scored
with 4:20 left in the first overtime and the
Boston Bruins beat the New York Rangers
3-2 in the first playoff game in 40 years be-
tween the Original Six teams.
Kings 4, Sharks 3
LOS ANGELES Captain Dustin
Brown tied it with 1:43 left and Trevor Lewis
scored the tiebreaking power-play goal 22
seconds later, propelling the Los Angeles
Kings to a stunning 4-3 victory over the
San Jose Sharks and a 2-0 series lead.
Brown scored during a 5-on-3 advan-
tage and Lewis provided the winner on a
loose puck with 1:21 left.


Knicks 85, Pacers 75
NEW YORK Carmelo Anthony
scored 28 points to help the New York
Knicks stay alive in the Eastern Confer-
ence semifinals with an 85-75 victory over
the Indiana Pacers in Game 5.
Reserves J.R. Smith and Chris
Copeland each had 13 points for the
Knicks, who trail 3-2 and will need a victory
today in Indiana to force a seventh game
back here Monday. They are trying to be-
come the ninth NBA team to overcome a
3-1 deficit to win a series.
Paul George had 23 points, six re-
bounds and six assists for the Pacers.


a threat to line up in the spread forma-
tion anytime soon, he would like to see
his Warriors throw the ball more in the
fall. Seven Rivers are trying to replace
the bulk of its offense from departing
1,800-yard rusher John Iwaniec.
"We were so run-heavy last year,"
Iwaniec said, "but we want to be able
to put the ball in the air
"I don't like wasting a lot of practice
time on 7-on-7 if we're not going to use
it in a game."


NHL BRIEFS


NBA BRIEFS






B4 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


New York
Boston
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
9 --
5 lY2 --
1 2Y2 --
2 4Y2 2
5 9 61/2


East Division
GB WC
1- 4
' 1 2Y2
6 3/2 5
) 6 7/2
2 1212 14


NL

Braves 8, Dodgers 5
Los Angeles Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Crwfrd If 5 0 1 1 Smmns ss 5 3 1 0
Punto 2b 4 0 2 0 Heywrd rf 4 2 2 1
Belisarip 0 0 0 0 J.Upton If 4 1 1 5
Howellp 0 0 0 0 FFrmnib 2 0 1 1
Ethierph 1 0 0 0 CJhnsn3b 4 0 1 0
Kemp cf 5 00 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0
AdGnzlb 4 00 0 OFIhrtp 0 0 0 0
A.Ellisc 3 2 1 0 RJhnsnph 1 0 0 0
VnSlyk rf 4 2 2 2 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
L.Cruz 3b 4 1 1 0 McCnnc 3 0 0 0
DGordn ss 4 0 0 1 Uggla2b 3 0 0 0
Ryup 2 01 1 BUptoncf 4 00 0
Fdrwczph 1 0 1 0 Mahlm p 2 0 1 0
Guerrirp 0 0 0 0 JSchafrph 1 1 1 0
PRdrgzp 0 0 0 0 R.Pena3b 1 1 1 0
Schmkr 2b 1 01 0
Totals 38 5105 Totals 348 9 7
Los Angeles 010 201 010 5
Atlanta 002 004 20x 8
E-C.Crawford (2), L.Cruz (2), Uggla (6). LOB-
Los Angeles 7, Atlanta 9. 2B-A.Ellis (7), Hey-
ward (3). 3B-R.Pena (1). HR-Van Slyke 2 (3),
J.Upton (14). SB-Punto (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
Ryu 5 5 2 2 5 5
GuerrierH,3 1/3 1 2 1 0 1
PRodriguez L,0-2 2/3 1 2 2 2 1
Belisario 11/32 2 0 0 1
Howell 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Atlanta
MaholmW,5-4 6 8 4 2 1 3
AvilanH,5 1 0 0 0 0 1
O'Flaherty 1 1 1 1 0 1
KimbrelS,12-15 1 1 0 0 0 2
T-2:53. A-43,238 (49,586).

Diamondbacks 9,
Marlins 2
Arizona Miami
ab rhbi ab rhbi
GParra rf 5 1 3 0 Pierre If 2 0 0 0
Gregrsss 4 2 1 0 Hchvrrss 4 0 0 0
Gldschib 5 4 4 4 Dietrch2b 3 0 0
ErChvz3b 5 1 4 2 Ozunarf 4 0 1 0
Pnngtn pr 0 00 0 Ruggincf 4 00 0
C.Rosslf 4 1 1 2 Dobbslb 4 2 3 0
MMntrc 4 0 0 0 Polanc3b 4 0 2 1
Prado2b 5 0 3 1 Brantlyc 4 0 1 1
Pollockcf 4 00 0 Sloweyp 0 00 0
Cahillp 4 0 0 0 LeBlncp 1 0 0 0
WHarrs p 0 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 0 0 0
Rauch p 0 0 0 0
Webb p 0 0 0 0
Totals 40 9169 Totals 31 2 7 2
Arizona 303 000 102 9
Miami 000 000 101 2
DP-Arizona 3, Miami 2. LOB-Arizona 7,
Miami 6. 2B-G.Parra (14), Goldschmidt (12),
Dobbs (4). HR-Goldschmidt 2 (12), Er.Chavez
(5). SB-Pierre (13). SF-C.Ross.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
CahillW,3-4 8 5 1 1 4 4
W.Harris 1 2 1 1 0 1
Miami
Slowey L,1-4 3 7 6 6 1 1
LeBlanc 4 5 1 1 0 2
Rauch 1 4 2 2 1 1
Webb 1 0 0 0 0 0
Rauch pitched to 4 batters in the 9th.
T-2:41. A-13,444 (37,442).

Mets 3, Cubs 2


New York
ab r hb
Vldspn rf 2 0 0
Byrd ph-rf 1 0 0
DnMrp2b 4 1 1 -
DWrght3b 4 1 3 1
I.Davis lb 4 0 1 0
Duda If 4 0 1 0
Parnell p 0 0 0
Buckc 4 0 0
Ankielcf 4 1 1 0
RTejad ss 4 0 0 0
Harvey p 3 0 1 1
ie ip 0 0 0 0


Chicago
)i go ab rh bi
) DeJesscf 4 0 1 0
) SCastro ss 4 1 2 0
I Rizzolb 4 1 1 0
I ASorin f 4 01 1
) Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0
) Valuen 3b 3 0 0 0
) Castillo c 3 00 0
) Barney 2b 3 0 1 0
0 EJcksn p 2 0 0 0
) Russell p 0 0 0 0
I Borbon ph 0 0 0 0
0 Fniikw 0 0 0 0


i pU U r UJI uW P U U U U
Burke p 0 0 0 0
Baxter If 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 383 Totals 31 2 6 1
NewYork 100 100 100 3
Chicago 200 000 000 2
E-R.Tejada (7), A.Soriano (2), Rizzo (2). DP-
Chicago 1. LOB-New York 5, Chicago 3.2B--
Ankiel (2), Rizzo (12). HR-Dan.Murphy (3),
D.Wright (6). SB-D.Wright (9). S-Borbon.
IP H RERBBSO


New York
Harvey W,5-0
Rice H,4
Burke H,1
Parnell S,5-7
Chicago
E.Jackson L,1-6
Russell
Fujikawa


71/35 2
1/3 1 0
1/3 0 0
1 0 0


62/37 3 3 1 4
11/31 0 0 0 2
1 0 0 0 0 2


T-2:56. A-34,890 (41,019).
Phillies 5, Reds 3
Cincinnati Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choocf 4 0 0 0 Rollins ss 3 1 1 2
Cozartss 5 0 1 0 Utley2b 4 00 0
Vottolb 4 1 2 1 MYong3b 1 1 1 1
Phillips2b 3 1 1 0 Howard lb 4 1 1 0
Bruce rf 4 1 2 2 DYong rf 3 0 0 0
Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 Revere pr-cf 0 0 0 0
Mesorc c 4 0 1 0 DBrwn If 4 0 0 0
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Ruiz c 3 0 1 1
DRonsn If 3 0 1 0 Mayrry cf-rf 4 0 1 0
Paulph 0 0 0 Lee p 2 21 0
Cingrnp 1 0 0 0 L.Nixph 1 0 0 0
Ondrskp 0 0 0 0 Bastrdp 0 0 0 0
Lutz ph 1 0 0 0 DeFrts p 0 0 0 0
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0
SMrshllp 0 000
Hanignc 1 000
Totals 34 383 Totals 295 6 4
Cincinnati 000 002 010 3
Philadelphia 002 010 02x 5
E-Phillips (2). LOB-Cincinnati 8, Philadelphia
6. 2B-Phillips (11), Lee (1). 3B-M.Young (2).
HR-Votto (5), Bruce (4), Rollins (3). S-Cin-
grani, Rollins. SF-Ruiz.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Cingrani 5 5 3 3 2 4
Ondrusek 1 0 0 0 0 0
LeCure 1 0 0 0 0 2
S.Marshall L,0-1 1/3 1 2 1 1 1
Broxton 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
Lee 7 6 2 2 2 7
Bastardo BS,2-2 1/3 2 1 1 0 1
De FratusW,2-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
Papelbon S,8-8 1 0 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Broxton (D.Young). WP-Papelbon.
T-2:53. A-43,129 (43,651).


Str Home
W-1 14-9
W-2 13-10
L-3 9-9
W-1 14-8
L-1 9-12



Str Home
W-1 10-5
W-1 12-9
W-1 10-11
W-2 9-12
L-6 5-15


Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
17 .575 7
17 .564 Y2 4
17 .541 1Y2 1 3
19 .486 3Y2 3 5
21 .462 4Y2 4 6


Str Home
W-2 12-8
L-2 13-7
W-1 10-8
L-2 9-10
W-3 8-9


W
Texas 27
Oakland 20
Seattle 20
Los Angeles 15
Houston 11


NATIONAL LEAGUE


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Milwaukee


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
14 .659 7-3
17 .595 212 7-3
17 .595 212 7-3
24 .415 10 712 6-4
24 .400 1012 8 2-8


Str Home
W-1 13-7
L-1 16-6
W-4 14-8
L-1 9-13
L-4 10-11


San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
14 .659 -
22 .476 7/2 31/2 2
22 .476 7Y2 3Y2 5
26 .366 12 8
31 .262 16Y2 12Y2 ;


West Division
L Pct GB WC
17 .585 --
18 .571 Y2 1
20 .512 3 3Y2
22 .450 5Y2 6
23 .425 6Y2 7


Str Home
W-3 12-4
L-2 10-10
L-1 11-9
L-2 8-12
L-1 6-16



Str Home
W-1 15-7
W-3 12-11
L-2 11-8
L-1 10-9
L-1 11-13


Tampa Bay Baltimore
ab r h bi
Jnnngs cf 6 0 2 2 McLoth dh
Joyce rf 5 1 1 0 Machd 3b
Zobrist 2b 5 1 2 0 Markks rf
Longori 3b 3 2 2 1 A.Jones cf
Loneylb 4 2 2 1 C.Davislb
Scott dh 2 2 1 1 Wieters c
KJhnsn If 5 2 3 4 Hardy ss
Fuld If 0 0 0 0 Dickrsn If
Loaton c 4 1 1 0 YNavrr 2b
YEscorss 5 1 3 3
Totals 39121712 Totals


Tampa Bay 104 043 000 12
Baltimore 210 010 060 10
E-A.Jones (2). DP-Tampa Bay 1, Baltimore 1.
LOB-Tampa Bay 8, Baltimore 3. 2B-Zobrist
(9), Longoria (11), K.Johnson (4), Lobaton (3),
YEscobar (7), Machado (18), C.Davis (15). 3B-
McLouth (1), YNavarro (1). HR-K.Johnson (6),
Hardy (8), Dickerson (1). SF-Longoria, Loney,
Scott.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
HellicksonW,2-2 72/310 8 8 1 4
Farnsworth 0 3 2 2 0 0
Jo.PeraltaS,1-1 11/30 0 0 0 0
Baltimore
HammelL,5-2 42/310 7 7 2 4
AI.Burnett 1/3 3 3 3 2 1
Patton 2 4 2 2 1 1
Matusz 1 0 0 0 0 1
Strop 1 0 0 0 0 0
Al.Burnett pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Farnsworth pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
PB-Wieters.
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First, Gerry
Davis; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Dan las-
sogna.
T-3:19. A-38,061 (45,971).


e -a- a. .. -. --


Associated Press
New York Yankee David Adams scores Friday on a sacrifice fly by Jayson Nix as Toronto catcher J.P.
Arencibia waits for the ball during the fifth inning at Yankee Stadium in New York.




Yankees blank Blue Jays


Upton's grand


slam lifts Braves


past Dodgers 8-5

Associated Press

NEW YORK Hiroki Kuroda
pitched two-hit ball for eight dom-
inant innings and the New York
Yankees again beat Mark Buehrle
and the Toronto Blue Jays, 5-0 on
Friday night.
Austin Romine and Brett Gard-
ner had run-scoring hits, Robin-
son Cano hit an RBI grounder and
Jayson Nix had two sacrifice flies
in dropping Buehrle to 1-10 in 15
starts against the Yankees. The
left-hander hasn't beaten New
York since April 10, 2004, when he
was with the Chicago White Sox.
The AL East-leading Yankees
defeated last-place Toronto for
the fifth straight time this season
in New York and for the seventh
time in eight games overall.
Kuroda (6-2) struck out five and
walked one in cooling off a club
that had scored 33 runs in its pre-
vious three games and had won a
season-high four in a row.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Indians 6,
Mariners 3, 10 inn.
CLEVELAND Jason Kipnis'
three-run homer in the 10th inning
gave the Cleveland Indians a 6-3 win
over the Seattle Mariners.
Kipnis' home run came on an 0-1
pitch from Lucas Luetge and capped a
two-out rally that began with a walk
and an infield hit.
The Indians have won 15 of 19 and
are 10-2 at Progressive Field since
April 30.
Vinnie Pestano (1-0), activated from
the disabled list before the game,
worked around a one-out walk in the
10th.
Drew Stubbs, who homered in the
fifth, drew a walk off Luetge (0-1).
Stubbs broke for second with a 1-2
count on Michael Bourn, and Luetge
threw to first baseman Justin Smoak,
but Stubbs beat the throw to shortstop
Brendan Ryan.
Bourn hit a slow roller past the
mound and second baseman Dustin
Ackley's throw to first was late. Kipnis
followed with his seventh homer.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Braves 8, Dodgers 5
ATLANTA- Justin Upton gave At-
lanta the lead with a sixth-inning grand
slam and the Braves finally unveiled
their full-strength lineup, beating the
Los Angeles Dodgers 8-5.
Upton drove in five runs hitting be-
hind Jason Heyward, who had two hits
with a RBI in his first game back after
having his appendix removed April 22.
It was the first time this season the
Braves had Heyward in the lineup
along with catcher Brian McCann, who
missed the first 30 games while recov-
ering from offseason shoulder surgery.
Scott Van Slyke hit two homers for
the Dodgers, who led 4-2 before
Upton's third career grand slam.
Paul Maholm (5-4) allowed eight hits
and four runs two earned in six


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Seattle 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 3
Texas 10, Detroit 4
Chicago White Sox 5, L.A. Angels 4
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 4
Cleveland 6, Seattle 3, 10 innings
Tampa Bay 12, Baltimore 10
N.Y Yankees 5, Toronto 0
Detroit at Texas, late
Boston at Minnesota, late
Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, late
Kansas City at Oakland, late
Today
Seattle (J.Saunders 3-4) at Cleveland (McAllister
3-3), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 1-2) at N.Y.Yankees (D.Phelps 1-2),
1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-2) at L.A. Angels
(Blanton 0-7), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 2-4) at Baltimore (Jur-
rjens 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 0-2) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 3-4),
7:05 p.m.
Boston (Dempster 2-4) at Minnesota (Diamond 3-3),
7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 4-3) at Texas (Grimm 2-3), 8:05
p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 3-2) at Oakland (Milone
3-5), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Seattle at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Boston at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
N.Y Mets 5, St. Louis 2
Pittsburgh 7, Milwaukee 1
Cincinnati 5, Miami 3, 10 innings
San Francisco 8, Colorado 6
Washington 6, San Diego 2
Friday's Games
N.Y Mets 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Philadelphia 5, Cincinnati 3
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 4
Arizona 9, Miami 2
Atlanta 8, L.A. Dodgers 5
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 6
San Francisco at Colorado, late
Washington at San Diego, late
Today
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 0-4) at Chicago Cubs (Feldman 3-3),
1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-4) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-1),
4:05 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 0-2) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 3-4),
7:05 p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 0-3) at Miami (Koehler0-1), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 1-2) at Atlanta (Medlen 1-5),
7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 3-2) at St. Louis (Lynn 6-1), 7:15
p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 3-2) at Colorado (Nicasio 3-1),
8:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 7-1) at San Diego (Stults
3-3), 8:40 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Arizona at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
Washington at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.

innings, and Craig Kimbrel pitched the
ninth for his 12th save.

Diamondbacks 9,
Marlins 2
MIAMI Paul Goldschmidt home-
red twice, had four hits and drove in
four runs to lead the Arizona Diamond-
backs over the Miami Marlins 9-2.
Eric Chavez homered and also had
four hits, and Gerardo Parra and Mar-
tin Prado had three hits apiece for Ari-
zona, which had 16 hits in all and won
its third straight game.
Trevor Cahill (3-4) won for the third
time in four decisions following an 0-3
start, allowing one run and five hits in
eight innings.
At 11-31, last-place Miami matched


the 2006 Marlins for the worst 42-
game start in franchise history, accord-
ing to STATS.

Phillies 5, Reds 3
PHILADELPHIA- Domonic Brown
drove in the tiebreaking run on an in-
field grounder in the eighth and the
Philadelphia Phillies snapped the
Cincinnati Reds' six-game winning
streak with a 5-3 victory.
Jimmy Rollins hit a two-run homer
and Cliff Lee threw seven sharp in-
nings for the Phillies, who've won four
of five.
Joey Votto hit a tying solo homer off
Antonio Bastardo in the eighth, and
Jay Bruce hit a two-run shot for
Cincinnati.
Lee gave up two runs and six hits,
striking out seven. Justin De Fratus
(2-0) got two batters out in the eighth
and Jonathan Papelbon finished for
his eighth save in eight tries.

Mets 3, Cubs 2
CHICAGO Matt Harvey won his
fifth straight decision, allowing five hits
in 7 1/3 innings and singling in the go-
ahead run in the seventh inning to
lead the New York Mets over the
Chicago Cubs 3-2.
Daniel Murphy and David Wright
homered for the Mets and right fielder
Marion Byrd preserved the lead by
throwing out a runner at the plate in
the eighth inning. The Mets won con-
secutive games for the first time since
May 1 and 3.
Harvey (5-0) won his first four starts
of the year, then failed to get a deci-
sion in his next four starts.

Cardinals 7, Brewers 6
ST. LOUIS David Freese hit a
grand slam for his first homer of the
season, and the St. Louis Cardinals
used a five-run first inning to beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 7-6.
The Brewers made it close on a
pair of three-run homers by Aramis
Ramirez off Jaime Garcia before los-
ing for the 13th time in 15 games. The
bottom four spots in the lineup were a
combined 0 for 15.
The NL Central-leading Cardinals
had five hits and a walk while batting
around against Wily Peralta in the first,
but the right-hander was still in the
game when Garcia (5-2) was chased
with one out in the sixth. Milwaukee
got one hit in 3 2/3 innings against
three relievers, with Edward Mujica
working the ninth for his 12th save in
12 chances.

INTERLEAGUE
Pirates 5, Astros 4
PITTSBURGH Jimmy Paredes
dropped Russell Martin's bases-
loaded fly ball when he collided with
second baseman Jake Elmore with
two outs in the ninth inning, the sec-
ond missed catch by a Houston right
fielder, and the Pittsburgh Pirates ral-
lied past the Astros 5-4.
Down 4-1, Pittsburgh started its
comeback in the sixth when Chris
Carter, usually a designated hitter,
dropped Andrew McCutchen's fly ball
for a three-base error and Garrett
Jones followed with a double.
Pedro Alvarez hit a two-run homer
in the eighth, a 462-foot drive that
cleared the right-field stands and
went into the Allegheny River on one
hop.


Toronto

MeCarr If
Bautist rf
Encrnc lb
Arencii c
Lind dh
Lawrie 3b
Rasms cf
Bonifac 2b
Kawsk ss
Totals
Toronto
NewYork


Yankees 5,
Blue Jays 0
New York
ab rh bi a
4 0 2 0 Gardnr cf
4 0 0 0 J.Nixss
4 0 2 0 Cano 2b
4 0 0 0 V.Wells If
3 0 0 0 BFrncs dh
3 0 0 0 Overaylb
3 0 0 0 DAdms3b
3 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf
2 0 0 0 AuRmnc
30 040 Totals
000 000 000
100 010 30x


DP-Toronto 1. LOB-Toronto 4, New York 5.
2B-Me.Cabrera (8), Encarnacion (4), D.Adams
(2), Au.Romine (2). 3B-Gardner (3). SB-J.Nix
(2). SF-J.Nix 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
BuehrleL,1-3 6 6 5 5 3 4
Loup 1 1 0 0 0 0
E.Rogers 1 1 0 0 0 2
NewYork
KurodaW,6-2 8 2 0 0 1 5
Claiborne 1 2 0 0 0 1
Buehrle pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
WP-E.Rogers.
Umpires-Home, David Rackley; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Joe West.
T-2:28. A-40,008 (50,291).

Indians 6,
Mariners 3, 10 inn.


ab rhbi ab rhbi
MSndrs cf 5 0 0 0 Bourn cf 5 1 3 0
Ackley 2b 5 0 1 0 Kipnis 2b 4 1 2 3
Seager3b 3 0 1 0 ACarerss 4 0 0 0
KMorls dh 5 1 1 1 Swisherlb 3 1 0 0
Smoaklb 4 1 1 0 CSantnc 3 1 1 0
Ibanez If 5 1 3 2 Giambi dh 2 0 0 1
Shppchc 3 0 0 0 MrRynl3b 4 00 0
EnChvz rf 4 0 1 0 Brantly If 4 0 0 0
Ryan ss 4 0 2 0 Stubbs rf 3 2 1 1
Totals 38 3103 Totals 32 6 7 5
Seattle 000 102 000 0 3
Cleveland 020 010 000 3 6
Two outs when winning run scored.
DP-Seattle 2, Cleveland 1. LOB-Seattle 10,
Cleveland 3.2B-Ryan (1), C.Santana (12).
HR-K.Morales (5), Ibanez (7), Kipnis (7),
Stubbs (3). SB-Ackley (1), Stubbs (5). CS-
Kipnis (4). S-Shoppach. SF-Giambi.
IP H RERBBSO


Seattle
Maurer
Furbush
Capps
Luetge L,0-1
Cleveland
U.Jimenez
R.Hill BS,1-1
Allen
Shaw
C.Perez
PestanoW,1-0


U.Jimenez pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP-Maurer.
Umpires-Home, Tim Timmons; First, Mike Win-
ters; Second, MarkWegner; Third, Laz Diaz.
T-3:37. A-34,282 (42,241).

Late Thursday
Red Sox 4, Rays 3


Boston

Ellsury cf
Victorn rf
JGoms If
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortiz dh
Ciriaco pr
Napoli lb
Nava If-rf
Drew ss
Mdlrks 3b
Sltlmch c


Totals 31 444 Totals 3437 3
Boston 000 100 003 4
Tampa Bay 010 002 000 3
LOB-Boston 6, Tampa Bay 12. 2B-Victorino
(4), Middlebrooks (11). HR-R.Roberts (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Doubront 5 3 2 2 6 7
Mortensen 1/3 1 1 1 2 0
A.Miller 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 0
TazawaW,3-2 2 2 0 0 0 2
Tampa Bay
Cobb 61/33 1 1 2 6
McGeeH,8 2/3 0 0 0 0 0


Jo.Peralta H,10
Rodney L,1-2
Al Torres


Rays schedule
May 18 at Baltimore
May 19 at Baltimore
May 20 at Toronto
May 21 at Toronto
May 22 at Toronto
May 24 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 25 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 26 vs N.Y. Yankees
May27vs Miami
May 28 vs Miami
May 29 at Miami
May 30 at Miami
May 31 at Cleveland
June 1 at Cleveland
June 2 at Cleveland
June 4 at Detroit
June 5 at Detroit
June 6 at Detroit
June 7 vs Baltimore
June 8 vs Baltimore


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 12, Orioles 10


ab rh bi
5 22 0
5 1 1 2
5 0 1 0
5 1 1 0
4 1 2 2
4 1 1 2
3 2 2 1
4 1 1 3
4 1 2 0

39101310


b r hbi
3 1 2 1
0 00 2
4 0 0 1
4 00 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 22 0
3 1 1 0
3 1 2 1
295 8 5
0
5


Seattle


Cleveland


6 5 3
12/30 0
12/30 0
1/3 2 3


Tampa Bay
r h bi
0 0 0 Jnnngscf
1 1 0 Scott dh
0 0 0 Fuld pr
1 1 0 Zobrist rf
0 1 1 Longori 3b
1 0 0 YEscorss
0 0 0 Loneylb
1 0 0 SRdrgz If
0 0 0 Joyce ph-lf
0 1 3 Loatonc
0 0 0 JMolin c
RRorts 2b


ab rh bi

4 0 3 1
0 00
3 2100
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 3100

2 0000
3 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
3 1 1 1


1 0 0 0 0 0
2/3 1 3 3 4 2
1/3 0 0 0 0 0












RELIGION


A


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Homefront harmony


MATT HUBER/Commercial-News
Dan First, right, and his family, from left, son Aleksander, 5, wife Brandy, daughter Jordan, 14, son Iggy, 10 and daughter Charity, 10,
pose for a photo at their home in Danville, III. Dan is a singer, songwriter and local Christian acoustic guitarist who has a lot of heart
for music. He has taught music to his wife and children, and their instruments include the keyboard, guitar and drums. Not included in
the photo is 17-year-old son Nolan.


Musical family

MARY KAY SWEIKAR
(Danville) Commercial-News
DANVILLE, Ill.
an First of Danville is a
singer, songwriter and
local Christian acoustic
guitarist who has a lot of heart
for music.
He began writing songs at
age 19 about a year after his
conversion to Christianity -
so he could share his faith
with others.
Move ahead 15 years to pres-
ent-day Danville. Dan and his
wife, Brandy, are raising their
family of five children in the
same Christian spirit he
brought into his life at age 19.


uses artistic talents to share their faith with the world


Music and the church are at
the core of this family's exis-
tence, but they are also active
and live life to the fullest.
Their children are Nolan,
17, Jordan, 14, Iggy, 10, Charity,
9, and Alexander, 5. Each of
the children also has a Bibli-
cal middle name of special sig-
nificance. Dan sometimes goes
into an explanation of these
names as a good conversation
starter with other people.
During the years Dan has
performed his guitar music in
churches and at fundraisers,
coffeehouses, community
events, and college campuses
in order to reach out to others
with the message of God.


His song lyrics are challeng-
ing, yet grace-filled and hum-
ble and they are meant to
serve as a lesson for all peo-
ple. Taking his inspiration
from the Bible, Dan said, "I
want to comfort the afflicted
and afflict the comfortable
through my music."
Dan has composed more
than 50 Christian songs
through the years, and his CD
called "'Jesus Pariah" was
recorded by Todd Reynolds of
Danville and the Tate Music
Group of Oklahoma.
Dan has taught music to his
wife and children, and their in-
struments include the key-
board, guitar and drums.


Brandy said, "We feel it's impor-
tant to appreciate music and
give our children that benefit,
because you never know what
direction life will take them."
In addition to his music, Dan
stays busy working two jobs. He
is associate pastor at the
Hoopeston Church of God, a
non-denominational church.
Because he lives in Danville,
this minister is readily available
to visit church members who
are hospitalized in Danville.
Dan and Brandy participate
in most of the church activi-
ties, and Brandy does a per-
sonal Bible study with their
See Page C2


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Time to


recharge
True fact: I am not a
profess on al
photographer
Another true fact: I am
in desperate need of -
something.
As I write this I'm sit-
ting in a park pavilion
early on a Saturday
morning. I'm supposed
to be taking photos of a
kids' triathlon for the
newspaper, but right
now, as the littlest kids
are in the pool and on
their bikes and running
their little legs off, I'm
NOT taking their
pictures.
Recently, I bought a
jazzy new camera, a red
one, with a zoomy lens.
With our limited news
staff, we reporters are
taking more photos
these days, which is fun
as long as the pictures
turn out usable and not
terrible.
But right now as I
write this I'm not even
taking "not terrible" pic-
tures of cute kids. In-
stead, I'm sitting on a
bench in a park pavilion.
With a dead camera
battery
If I were a profes-
sional photographer or
even someone not in
desperate need of
See Page C2


Church donates to 'World's Greatest Baby Shower'


Special to the Chronicle
Two moms were each
blessed with a chest of
drawers packed full of
baby items at this year's
World's Greatest Baby
Shower, courtesy of the
congregation of St. Timo-
thy Lutheran Church in
Crystal River
For the past four or five
years, this small congrega-
tion has generously do-
nated baby items to fill a
dresser This year they
gave enough for two.
Diapers, blankets, baby
clothes, "onesies" -
"everything but the baby,"


Summer fun
Children ages 3 through
sixth grade are invited to "Tell
It On The Mountain" VBS
from 9 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, June 10 to 14,
at Faith Lutheran Church, 935
S. Crystal Glen Drive (in Crys-
tal Glen Subdivision),
Lecanto. Register at faith
lecanto.com or at the church
office, or by calling 352-527-
3325 or email office-faith
lecanto@tampabay.rr.com.
This is a Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans sponsored event.
First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon will offer
its 3rd annual "SPARK Sum-
mer Camp," from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. June 10 through
Aug. 2. This program also ac-
cepts children with special
needs. There are different
themes, crafts and games for
each week. The church is at
21501 W. State Road 40,
Dunnellon.
Children ages 4 to 6 are
invited to Heritage Baptist


said Doris Moore, member
of Timothy's.
Moore, together with
Sandie Warren, heads the
baby shower donations
drive at the church. Baby
items are written on paper
booties and put in a basket
for church members to
take, purchase the items
and bring them back to
church, much like an angel
tree at Christmas time.
The women said they
marvel at the generosity of
their fellow church
members.
"We're a small congrega-
tion, but we do a lot of out-
reach," Moore said.


Church in Beverly Hills Vaca-
tion Bible School from 6:15 to
8 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, June 10 to 14. The
theme is "Investigation Des-
tination: Follow Clues to the
King of Kings." Call the
church at 352-746-6171.
St. Anne's Church, at
9870 W. Fort Island Trail in
Crystal River, will host Vaca-
tion Bible School from
8:30 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, June 17 to 21.
This year's theme is "King-
dom Rock where we
stand strong for God." This
ecumenical outreach offers an
outstanding program for ages
3 through adults.
Invite your family and
friends. There is no fee. Call
352-795-2176 to register. St.
Anne's, First Presbyterian and
St. Timothy Lutheran
Churches in Crystal River
sponsor this VBS.
Register for "Kingdom
Rock Vacation Bible
School" at First Presbyterian
Church of Inverness. VBS is


Special to the Chronicle
Sandie Warren and Doris Moore, members of St. Timothy Lutheran Church in Crystal
River, were on hand Monday at the World's Greatest Baby Shower. The church donated
two chests of drawers packed full of baby items. Two moms each won one in a
drawing at the event.


Religion NOTES

from 9 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, June 17 to 21.
There will be a closing cele-
bration Friday evening, June
21. At Kingdom Rock, kids
discover how to stand strong
for God. Each day is filled
with incredible Bible-learning
experiences and tons of fun.
Everything is hands-on, so
send them in their play
clothes. Register by calling
352-637-0770 or online at
groupvbspro.com/vbs/
ez/fpcinv.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene invites children
ages 3 through sixth grade to
"Sonrise National Park Va-
cation Bible School" from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday, June 17 to 21.
Take a daily trek with new
friends and discover extreme
challenges as you learn to de-
pend on God's promises. To
register, call the church office
at 352-726-6144. There will
be a closing program for par-
ents at 6 p.m. Sunday, June
23. The church is at 2101 N.


Florida Ave., off U.S. 41 in
Hernando.
Bible Olympics is taking
Rock Crusher Road Church
of God on a mission. As part
of its summer children's pro-
gram, the church is going on
a mission that's possible be-
cause God is its leader. It is
celebrating the 10th anniver-
sary of the Bible Olympics
program and are inviting the
public to be part of the team
to help make this the best
year of Bible Olympics ever.
The challenge runs through
Sunday, Aug. 25, with a clos-
ing program. Children ages 2
years through eighth grade
will meet from 10 to 11:15
a.m. Sunday and 6:15 to
7:30 p.m. Wednesday with
the Bible Olympics competi-
tion weekend being July 26
and 27. Participants will have
lessons about Bible charac-
ters that were given impossi-
ble missions (in their eyes)
but with God's help the mis-
sions became possible. They
even have the Bible charac-


ters coming each Sunday
morning to tell us about their
mission. The deadline to sign
up to be a part of the competi-
tive team is Sunday, May 26.
The church is at 419 N. Rock
Crusher Road, Crystal River.
Call the church office at 352-
795-5553 or visit www.rock
crusherchurch.com.
As part of its annual
Summer Missions Project,
Rock Crusher Road First
Church of God has set a
"God-size" goal of contributing
500 hours of time in commu-
nity service. Members can
serve as volunteers anywhere
in the community. The reason
behind the goal is to get the
church outside of the building
and into the community where
congregants can help make a
difference.
The church is at419 N.
Rock Crusher Road, Crystal
River. Call the church office at
352-795-5553 or visit
www.rockcrusherchurch.com.

See Page C2


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Atree


grew in


Eden

Many of us are fa-
miliar with the
story of the Gar-
den of Eden, the beauti-
ful paradise where the
Creator put the first hu-
mans, Adam and Eve.
The story is told in the
Book of Genesis that Eve
offered a fruit to Adam
from the Tree of Knowl-
edge of Good and Evil.
And in this modern age
of the computer, the fruit
has also become the logo
of a computer company
Are the two ideas
related?
Some people feel that
this fruit was an apple,
hence the term "Adam's
apple" referring to the
prominence of the neck
in males caused by the
angle of the thyroid car-
tilage surrounding the
larynx. It has been
thought that a piece of
the so-called fruit, i.e.
apple, got caught in
Adam's throat hence the
rather romantic name
for this common feature.
But was it really an
apple, or a misreading of
the text?
The text itself says the
word preee," which just
means fruit, but it was
the fanciful artistic li-
cense of the Middle Ages
that depicted Eve

See Page C3





C2 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


FAMILY
Continued from Page C1

children every day. Mem-
bership in the church has
grown in the past years,
and today the congregation
numbers about 350 people.
"We try to hold events
especially for young fami-
lies for people who
maybe never attended a
church before," Dan said.
He also preaches at other
churches in the area and
performed his music lo-
cally in honor of the Na-
tional Day of Prayer
Dan recently marked his
one-year anniversary as
co-owner of the Integrity
Vending Co. in Danville.
"Since we bought this
company, the business has
quadrupled," he said. "We
are one of only two vending
companies based in
Danville, and it's nice to
see that some of the new
businesses in town are
keeping their vending
business local."
The couple married
when they were both stu-
dents at Anderson Univer-
sity in Indiana. Brandy is
originally from Portage,
Ind., and Dan has lived in
Danville all his life.
Brandy has worked the
night shift at Walgreens
Accounting for the past
five and a half years, but
she also has another full-
time job during the day:
She home-schools all of
the children, except
Nolan, who is attending
Danville High School so he
can play varsity baseball.
Brandy and Dan feel that
home-schooling works well
for their family The chil-
dren attend some co-op
classes for special subjects,
such as science, history
and public speaking, that
are taught by other home-
school parents.
They also are in a variety
of extracurricular activities.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dan is involved with the
children's sports coach-
ing American Legion base-
ball and driving them to
everything from tae kwon
do to gymnastics, dance,
and baseball. Brandy also
attends the children's
events as often as she can.
"I figure that we have an
extra 10 years of time to
spend with all our chil-
dren by home-schooling
them," Dan said, "and
when you're a close-knit
family like ours, this extra
time is important. We are
also better able to teach
them our values and be-
liefs this way"
Dan said his children
are not lacking in social
activities because they are
home-schooled.
"In fact, they're some-
times in more activities than
we can handle," he added.
When Nolan was only 3
years old, Brandy and Dan
decided to become li-
censed as foster parents.
They did mainly respite
care, where the goal is to
get the children back to
their parents.
Dan said, "The Bible says
that we are supposed to
help the widows and the or-
phans, and we felt that fos-
tering children was a good
way to fulfill this ministry."
Dan and Brandy
adopted Jordan when she
was a year old, but they
had been her foster par-
ents since she was 28 days
old. Today, the teen is ac-
tive in Super Soccer and
the AMBUCS Challenge
baseball program.
Dan and Brandy feel it's
important to reserve time
just for each other, so they
schedule a date night
every week. They also
have a weekly family night,
when they usually watch a
movie together
In the summer, the fam-
ily enjoys going to amuse-
ment parks such as Six
Flags, Disney World and
Cedar Point, Ohio.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

something, I would have
checked the night before
to see if my battery was
charged.
But lately, I've been
going, going, going, too
preoccupied to notice
things like dying batteries
- mine and my camera's.
Yesterday, driving home
from work, I was behind
my husband's car, think-
ing about something, not
paying attention, going too
fast
He made a quick turn to
get away from the idiot
moron driver behind him
driving on his tail. Later
he told me he was horri-
fied to discover that the
idiot moron driver was his
own wife.
Last night I dreamed I
was crying. I dreamed I
was in desperate need of
something, and that made
me cry I forgot about it as
soon as I woke up and just
grabbed my camera bag
and raced out the door.
But right now I'm not
racing anywhere. Instead,
I'm sitting on a bench in a


NOTES
Continued from Page Cl

Special events
Everyone is invited to a
Bible study on "Great sto-
ries from the Bible" at
6 p.m. Saturday at Calvary
Chapel, 960 S. U.S. 41, In-
verness. Free coffee and
dessert available. Call 352-
726-1480 or visit.
First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills is launching the
Helping Hands Food
Pantry from 9 to 11 a.m. the
third Saturday monthly begin-
ning today at 4950 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly


park pavilion next to an
electrical outlet, charging
my battery my camera's
and my own.
I had actually gone to
the pool earlier with my
jazzy red camera and took
two photos. After that, the
camera battery died and I
panicked, which is what I
often do when I finally dis-
cover I'm out of juice and
realize I can't continue.
So, I packed up my gear
and walked all over the
park, looking for a place to
recharge. By the time I
found the pavilion I was
sweaty and ready for -
something.
Once I plugged my bat-
tery charger into the elec-
trical outlet, that's when
the thought struck me:
Now what do I do? It's
probably going to take at
least an hour for the green
light on the battery
charger to stop blinking,
and I don't have a book
with me to read or even
my phone to play with.
Heck, I can't even play
with my jazzy red camera
and take practice shots of
the squirrels running up
the trees.
All I can do is sit while I
recharge.

Hills. The pantry will serve
Beverly Hills, Lecanto and
Citrus Springs Proof of resi-
dency is required. Call 352-
746-2970.
The public is invited to
celebrate the anniversary of
the signing of the Emancipa-
tion Proclamation from 2 to 5
p.m. Sunday at Mount Zion
AME Methodist Church, 2532
Calomonden Lane, Her-
nando. There will be four
speakers and four worship
teams. Pastor Robert Sim-
mons will lead the celebration
in coordination with Citrus
County Christian Coalition
(C4). Free hot dogs will be
served.
The public is invited to


So, here I sit.
Off in the distance I can
hear kids, but mostly all I
hear is quiet and the
whispering voice of God
saying things like: "Come
to me, all you who labor
and are heavy-laden and
overburdened, and I will
cause you to rest. I will
ease and relieve and re-
fresh your souls"
(Matthew 11:28, Amplified
Bible).
I hear him saying, "He
maketh me lie down in
green pastures. He lead-
eth me beside the still wa-
ters. He restoreth my
soul" (Psalm 23:2-3). I feel
myself quieting down,
straining to hear more of
his voice.
Sometimes God makes
us lie down. He forces us
to rest so he can restore
our souls.
Right now, that's all I
can do, sit here in the
quiet while my camera
battery recharges.
While God rechargeth
me.
I realize it's been a long,
long time. Too long, and
I've been in desperate
need of this.
People say everything
happens for a reason.

free movie nights at
6:30 p.m. Friday in Holy
Grounds Cafe at Calvary
Chapel, 960 S. U.S. 41, In-
verness. Free popcorn and
sodas. This week's movie is
"The Secret of Jonathan
Sperry." Call 352-726-1480.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church in Dunnellon
will host a Women's Em-
maus Retreat Friday through
Sunday, May 24 to 26. All
women seeking spiritual re-
newal are invited to attend.
Call the office at 352-489-
3166 or email mail@stjohn
cc.com for more information.
SA special event is
planned by Lighthouse Bap-
tist Church on the corner of


My friend recently told
me about getting a flat tire,
and after a series of annoy-
ing, irritating events trying
to get it fixed he learned
that had his tire not been
flat he would have been at
the exact spot of a massive
multi-car accident at the
exact time it happened.
God spared him from that
My camera battery
dying isn't even a fraction
as dramatic, but I believe
God knew I desperately
needed something; my
soul needed an hour away
from everything but him, a
slight, cool breeze blow-
ing, with nothing to dis-
tract me so he can make
me rest. The photos will
wait. I'll get what I need,
as soon as I get what I
need right now.

Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria- IKnow the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or
via email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online., com.

Citrus Springs Boulevard and
Martinelli Drive. A missionary
and her husband from South
America will speak at the
church at 5:30 p.m. Sunday,
May 26.
The missionaries have a
church of 14,000 people and
are known for their work with
the needy and missionary
work working in South Amer-
ica for 30 years.
First Baptist Church of
Crystal River and Rock
Crusher Road First Church of
God are planning a joint mis-
sion trip to Yo Creek Vil-
lage, Belize, to work with an
area church. The dates of the

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA i


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M. 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE 7]
SALVATION '
ARMY CITRUS COUNTY
N CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller





t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


- Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko

Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon



ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................ 10:30 A.M.
I I r,,l- ,,.i. t ,i . r t

-IZ



ST. ANNE'S
T CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west ofPlantation Inn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


0 ^ 0
"The
Church

Heart







Church ofthe
Homosassanity
with a
Heart
for the
Community"





DFirst BaptistC

Church ofo


"Come Worship ni li Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Alen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group -
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


Attend

the worship


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am

DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CKIJN FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

C KYTNL
RIVE -
VNITCD
METHODIST o
CH UKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
_. A Stephen Ministry Provider ,


B0 Crystal
E River

Foursquare

Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



r West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565


SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


0T Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


r Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

CASUAL
Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30, &
11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 & 10:45 am
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors

A Stephen
Ministry
Church
Office Hours
8:30 am
To
4:30 pm
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org


RELIGION


Wetffitr'us
Church o





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDEN
Continued from Page C1

holding out an apple to
Adam. Had the fruit been
an apple, the text would
have rendered the word
"tapuach," but like many
legends and misconceptions
through the ages, the icon of
the apple seemed to be a de-
piction of the forbidden
fruit.
Jewish sages, of course,
have their own interpreta-
tions. There are varying
opinions of the subject in
both the Talmud and the
Midrash (commentary).
Rabbis Nechemia and Jose
both believed the fruit was
a fig, for Adam and Eve re-
paired the misdeed of their
sin by covering their bodies
with fig leaves to cover their
nakedness.
They accomplished this
by sewing the rather large
leaves of the fig tree into a
form of a covering for strate-
gic sexual parts. I kind of
like this interpretation, be-
cause the fig tree is one of
the species mentioned in
the Torah as symbolic of the
Land of Israel and it is fea-
tured in the Bible in beauti-


RELIGION


ful quotes by the prophets
in their visions of a peace-
time when all will "sit
under their vine and fig tree
in peace."
As the old joke goes, with
three Jews you get four
opinions. Throw a few rab-
bis into the mix, and even
more controversy arises.
Rabbi Abba of Akko be-
lieved the fruit was a citron,
a kind of lemon-like fruit
used for ritual purposes on
the harvest festival of
Sukkot. In the Talmud,
Rabbi Judah ben Illai said
the fruit was a grape, since
it is wine that causes hu-
mans so much trouble.
Rabbi Meir's opinion was
that it was wheat This idea
came from the idea that
when a person lacks knowl-
edge, it means they have not
eaten from the bread of
wheat
As for how wheat could be
mistaken for a tree, it was
explained that the wheat in
the Garden of Eden grew as
lofty as the cedars of
Lebanon. While bread may
be the "staff of life," I do be-
lieve that this interpretation
is way off base. I can hardly
believe that a cultivated
crop like wheat would have
been growing in the Garden


of Eden in such lush
abundance.
It is not Jewish opinion
that the forbidden fruit was
an apple. It might have been
a fig, grapes, citron or
wheat, according to Jewish
commentary sources. As for
the computer logo, it was
said that Steve Jobs,
founder of Apple Comput-
ers, worked on a farm in
Oregon where he came up
with a name he thought was
simple and would have no
copyright restrictions. A
music lover, it is also
thought he was influenced
by the recording label for
the Beatles, which was
Apple Records.
Whatever the case, this
column could not have been
written without that
'Apple," and there is surely
much to gain by using a
computer to learn about
good and evil. As for me, I'll
take a nice, crisp Pink Lady,
fresh off the tree from North
Carolina.

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached atniejudis
@yahoo. com.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

mission are Feb. 11 to 17,
2014. The cost of the trip is
$1,750. They will be in-
volved in construction proj-
ects, children and youth
ministry, and community
outreach. They will also
have the opportunity to
work with a local school.
Application deadline is Sun-
day. Completed applica-
tions and a $150 deposit
are due at this time. Infor-
mation packets and appli-
cations are available by
calling Jo Ann Lapp at Rock
Crusher Road First Church
of God at 352-795-5553 or
by email: office@rock
crusherchurch.com.
Community Christian
Karate Club (CCKC) offers
a Citrus County group for
learning karate skills, work-
ing on cardio and meeting
new friends. Three different
classes for three different
age groups are offered: the
4- to 7-year-old class, 8- to
12-year-old class, and the
teen/adult class. Classes
take place Tuesday


evenings at New Hope
Baptist Church, 8635 W.
Goodman Lane, Ho-
mosassa. Cost is $25 a
month with discounts for
families. For more informa-
tion, contact 5th degree
black belt instructor Greg
Gunn at 352-428-6348 or
email ggunn14@gmail.com
or visit www.topgunn
karate.com.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church offers
bingo at 11:30 a.m. Tues-
days and 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday featuring reg-
ular, double and special
bingos, together with a
jackpot and "pickle" game.
Doors open at 10 a.m.
Tuesday and 4 p.m.
Wednesday. Kitchen fea-
tures "homemade" soups
and sandwiches. The
church is on U.S. 41, three
miles north of Dunnellon.
Everyone is invited to
a free "Family Fun Night"
at 5:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at Joy
Lutheran Church on S.W.
State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala. This is an
hour of fun, devotion, food
and games followed by a
contemporary worship serv-


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 C3

ice at 6:45 p.m. RSVP by
mailing arab2horses@
yahoo.com or elhjr@
embarqmail.com. Call the
church office at 352-854-
4509, ext. 221.
Sale away
The Altar & Rosary So-
ciety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will have
its semiannual flea market
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today
in Father Stegeman Hall on
the corner of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40 East in Dun-
nellon. Doors will open at
8 a.m. The famous jewelry
boutique table will again be
featured. Light refresh-
ments will be served for a
nominal fee. The public is
welcome to attend.
Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church in Beverly
Hills will host its monthly
outdoor flea market from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
May 25, on the church
property at 6 Roosevelt
Boulevard in Beverly Hills
off North Lecanto Highway
(County Road 491). Shop-
pers are welcome. Up to 50
commercial and private

See NOTES/Page C4


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!! T

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY,


_ Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.comrn


Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM..................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM ................. Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev.Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1'2 mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL.34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Homosassa Springs
l SEVENH-IYADVEISICHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed.I/Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
......y Floral City, FL.


Sherpherd
of the Hills
Episcopal
Church
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Wednesday
Healing Service
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052


Lutheran
Church (M
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
({ .t9;orm h otlmw..
4ag,,,w go^(e .


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders



KI7^


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

oe




Oow

.... .. ...ry for Chilren and Families"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1/2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the comer of SR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813

First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


0

)


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

352-74-71611


,,A9Wl---
Homnd, L3444





C4 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

vendors are expected to dis-
play their wares. Commercial
vendors and private individu-
als are welcome to bring and
sell goods. Spaces are avail-
able for $10. Coffee, dough-
nuts and hotdogs will be
available for breakfast and
lunch. The next flea market is
Sept. 7. The September flea
market will mark a change to
the first Saturday monthly. For
more information or to reserve
a space, call Rose Mary at


352-527-6459 or e-mail
wjeselso@tampabay.rr.com.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Music & more
Buddy Helm, master
drummer from California, will
lead a healing drum medita-
tion session at 4 p.m. Satur-
day, May 25, at the Nature


Coast Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship, 7633 N. Florida
Ave., Citrus Springs. Helm will
lead a calming, but fun, 90
minutes with ceremonial
singing and powerful stories.
This will be followed by a
potluck and drum circle. The
fee is $20, or what you can af-
ford. Reserve now with cash
or a check made out to Buddy
Helm. Drums will be provided.
No musical ability is needed.
More information can be
found at BuddyHelm.com.
Helm will also conduct the UU
Sunday service at 10:30 a.m.
May 26. Private sessions can
be held Sunday afternoon


with advance arrangement.
Call 352-746-0655.
The Amazing Steel
Drum Band Ensemble will
be in concert from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 25, at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church.
Enjoy a dinner featuring ro-
maine salad, ziti casserole
and dessert while listening to
the toe-tapping, body-swaying
strains of steel drums music.
This concert is a fundraiser for
the July 20-27 Friends in
Service Mission trip to Hope
Village in Minot, N.D., by the
combined team of St. Anne's
and Shepherd of the Hills
churches. Tickets ($10) are


on sale at both churches. Call
352-795-2176 for home
delivery.
Food & fellowship
Floral City United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to enjoy its "Com-
munity Breakfast" and a
time of fellowship from 8 to
11 a.m. Saturday, June 1.
Enjoy biscuits and sausage
gravy, scrambled eggs, fresh
fruit and coffee. Cost is $5.
The church is on East Marvin
Street across from the ele-
mentary school. Call 352-
344 1771.
Enjoy pancakes and all


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

the fixings at the "Pancake
Breakfast Fundraiser" from
8:30 to 10:30 a.m. today in
the fellowship hall at Calvary
Chapel of Inverness. All dona-
tions go to a Peru missions
trip.
The third Saturday night
supper and mystery theater
will take place at 4:30 p.m.
today in the Dewain Farris
Fellowship Hall at Community
Congregational Christian
Church, 9220 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs.
Menu includes spaghetti with
sausage, garlic knots, salad,
See NOTES/Page C8


t "FirstFor Christ"..John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS H
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
344-1908


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!




First Unite

Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion
9:45 AM
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Contemporary
SPraise & Worship


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School............9:00
Worship...................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452
| |

of o Pastor,
na .yS hDairold


Rushing









e Nur^sery Available^^


PRIMER IGLESIA
NHISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711




of Lake, kouaseaw-,
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: -, .r .. I ,, .1,,
Check us out on Facebook



S tglesia Bautista
SNueva Vida
Ahumbrando CE La L=z De Crigo
y Midpd.o EaOb Ue DI Do.
SERVICIO DOMINICAL:
2:00 P.M.
(Servicio para adults y ninos)
MARTES:
6:00 P.M.
STUDIOS BIBLICOS
(Clases para adults,
jovenes y pdrvulos)
SABADO:
9:30 A.M.
ORACION E INTERSECTION
Pastor.: Josd Arivalo
4950 N Lecanto Hwy
Beverly Hills, Florida 34465
(352) 613-4452








oad

ist

1ch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30-3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


Pastor
Tom Walker

INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca cornn


At
Victory
Baptist Church
General Conference
Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


Sindl.i, Evening 6:00 PM


Wednesday


7:00 PM


Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place too,t. I l 1,,, I, ',,,;n.'


Come To S
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


0


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 M
Sunday School.................9:30 M
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 M
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes .................... 7:00
Boys and Girls Brigade... .7:00 P
Teens ............................. 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Attend

the worship

service of

your

choice...
















VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.r to 3:15 P.r Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
h. .catholicweb.com .:


IRST Bringing Christ
F IR Ix^ Ito Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
A J 9:00 AM.
726-1637
F Missouri Synod
e www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson

COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260






First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com








Hwy. 44E@
* Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services *
* Traditional 0
11:00 AM
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service .
* Tapes & CD' s Available U
0 Sunday School for all ages 0
0 9:30 AM 0
Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group0
0 5 to7PM
0 Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
0 Podcast: FPC inv.com 0
*
Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and

harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


Attend


the worship


service of


your


choice...







Page C5 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Public welcome
at health fair
Crystal River Health &
Rehab at 136 N.E. 12th
Ave. will host a free My
Generation: Knowledge is
Power Health Fair from 1 to
4 p.m. Wednesday, May
22. The public is welcome.
There will be various
health screenings, raffles,
40 vendors, food, music
and a muscle car and mo-
torcycle show, as well as
face painting for the kids.
Understand future health
care options and learn
more about Medicare.
For more information,
call 352-795-5044.
Dance, drum
classes offered
Community classes for
summertime African dance
and drum classes are
available.
For more information,
call 352-897-4173 or 352-
270-6148.
20/20 directors
meet in Lecanto
The Citrus 20/20 Board
of Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, May 20,
in room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All interested persons
are welcome.
For more information
about Citrus 20/20 Inc.,
visit www.citrus2020.org or
call 352-201-0149.
HAM radio course
on tap in May
Afree, beginning HAM
radio class course will be
offered at the Citrus County
Emergency Operations
Center, 3549 Saunders
Way, off County Road 491
in Lecanto.
The course consists of
three Saturday sessions:
June 8 from 9 to 10:30 a.m.
(orientation); June 15 from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and June
22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
with the FCC exam to be
given at 2 p.m.
Participants can learn
the necessary material to
pass the FCC Technician
Class amateur radio exam.
There is no fee for the
class. Training material/text
cost $21. Class is limited to
10 students; register by
May 20.
Call Joe Calzaretta at
352-382-0809 or email
K4LL@EarthLink.net.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Sean


Special to the Chronicle
Sean is a sweet,
adorable and friendly or-
ange tabby kitten. One
visit with Sean and you
will want to take him
home, and he is fixed and
ready to go. Adult cat
adoption fees are cur-
rently half price. Visitors
are welcome from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4
p.m. Monday through
Saturday at the Humani-
tarians' Manchester
House on the corner of
State Road 44 and Co-
nant Avenue, east of
Crystal River. Drop by
and enjoy the felines in
their cage-free, home-
style environment. Call
the Humanitarians at
352-613-1629 for adop-
tions, or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.pet
finder.com/shelters/fll8
6.html.


Nibble, sip, learn, float


Reserve now for wine and cheese cruise at wildlife park


Special to the Chronicle

The Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection's Ellie
Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park and the Friends of Ho-
mosassa Springs Wildlife Park will
offer "An Early Evening History
Cruise with Wine and Cheese" at
4:30 p.m. Saturday, May 25.
The cruise aboard pontoon boats
will depart promptly from the Park's
Visitor Center boat docks for an
evening cruise to the main spring
and Fish Bowl area. Participants


can learn about the area's history
while having a taste of wine, cheese,
crackers and an assorted fruit bowl.
Grape juice and water will also be
available.
Gary Ellis, director of GARI (Gulf
Archaeological Research Institute),
will speak about the early inhabi-
tants of the area. Park volunteer
Bert Henderson will do a presenta-
tion on the area's history since the
1800s. There will be door prizes.
Pontoon boats will return guests to
the Visitor Center on U.S. 19 at
sundown.


Tickets for the event, $25, may be
purchased at the park's administra-
tive office at the Visitor Center on
U.S. 19. Tickets are limited, so early
purchase is recommended. Partici-
pants should arrive by 4 p.m., as tick-
ets must be presented before
boarding boats.
The event is a fundraiser for the
Friends of Homosassa Springs
Wildlife Park.
For more information, call 352-
628-5343. In the event of bad
weather, a rain date of June 1 has
been set.


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Shrine Club has joined FDS Disposal to help fund transportation for children and their families to Shriners
Children's Hospitals. Recycle bins have been placed at 11 locations in Citrus County and FDS will contribute a
percentage of the proceeds from the bins to the transportation fund for the children and their families. This group of
Shriners and Nobles Ladies gathered recently to celebrate the beginning of the shared program.



FDS signs on to help Shriners


lion children with ortho-
pedic conditions, burns,
spinal cord injuries and
cleft lip and palate have
been cared for regardless
of their ability to pay
Members of the Egypt
Shrine Center in Tampa
have sponsored many chil-
dren through the decades
for treatment and pro-
vided transportation for
them and their families to
Shriners Hospitals. Close
to 300 patients have been
transported from Citrus
County to the hospitals for
at least one trip since 2008,
and most times additional
trips are needed. An emer-
gency air flight can cost as
much $24,000 for one trip.


The FDS recycle bins
can be found at the follow-
ing locations in Inverness:
Citrus Shriners Club, 68
Woodlake Ave.; BP Gas
Station, 1010 U.S. 41; and
the Masonic Lodge, 301
Hendrix Ave. They are
also at the United
Methodist Church, 8478 E.
Marvin St. in Floral City
and the Hernando Civic
Center, 3848 E. Parsons
Point.
They are also at the Ho-
mosassa RV Park, 10200 W
Fishbowl Drive, and in
Beverly Hills at the Texaco
Gas Station, 9542 Citrus
Springs Blvd. and Hooper
Funeral Chapel, 5054 N.
Lecanto Highway


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus Shrine Club
and FDS Disposal Inc.
have partnered in a
fundraiser for the
Shriners Childrens Hospi-
tal transportation fund.
FDS Disposal Inc. has
placed recycle bins at 11
locations in the county, all
displaying the picture of a
child and contact informa-
tion for the Shriners Chil-
drens Hospital. FDS
Disposal will be sharing a


Family
affair

A recent Founders Day
celebration of Delta Kappa
Gamma International
Society of Key Women
Educators took place at
Seven Rivers Golf and
Country Club in Crystal
River with 16 members
present. A real cause for
celebration took place
when retired educator
Jackie Best was inducted
into the local Mu Chapter
of DKG. Best is shown
with her mother, a retired
educator and DKG member
since 1972, Dorothy
Clifford. Clifford retired
from Inverness Primary
School and Best retired
from her teaching career in
Ohio. Delta Kappa Gamma
is an honor society for key
woman educators, both
working and retired.
Anyone interested in the
organization may call
Bonnie Ignico at 352-
726-4236.
Special to the Chronicle


portion of the proceeds
from these recycling bins
for the benefit of the young
patients and their
families.
The first Shriners Hos-
pital for Children was es-
tablished in 1922 in
response to the needs of
children coping with the
orthopedic after-effects of
the polio virus. Since then,
the health care system's
focus on orthopedics has
not wavered. In its 90-year
history, more than 1 mil-


YMCA plans Father's Day Essay Contest


Special to the Chronicle

The YMCA has always
taken pride in generating
opportunities to strengthen
and enhance communities;
doing so with the impor-
tance of family in mind.
The YMCA has many
things to be proud of, one of
which is being responsible
for the first Father's Day
celebration in Washington,
D.C., on June 19, 1910.


The Y is conducting the
Father's Day Essay Contest
for the second year to honor
fathers and encourage cre-
ativity for children. This
year's theme is "The Best
Dad Ever" Essays are being
accepted through June 12.
Prizes will be awarded in
three different categories
ranging from ages 5 to 7,8 to
10 and 11 to 12. Sponsors,
Hang'Em High Sports Fish-
ing, River Ventures, Ho-


mosassa Springs Wildlife
State Park and Capital City
Bank supplied the prizes
for the contest
First-, second- and third-
place prizes are awarded to
each age group. Prizes are:
Grand prize Charter
fishing trip for four (half-
day trip).
First place (three
prizes) Manatee snorkel
tour for winner and dad.
Second place (three


prizes) -$50 gift certificate
to a local restaurant
Third place (three
prizes) Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park
family pass (two children
and two adults).
Contest form and rules
are available at the YMCA
Administrative Office, 3909
N. Lecanto Highway, and
at www.ymcasuncoast.org.
For more information, call
the Y at 352-637-0132.


News NOTES

Separation group
to meet May 21
Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State (Nature Coast Chap-
ter) will meet at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, May 21, at the
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
The public is welcome to
attend discourse on Consti-
tutional issues pertaining to
separation of church and
state.
For information, call 352-
344-9211 or email nature
coastau@hotmail.com.
Memorial service
to honor USCG
Volunteers of the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary Divi-
sion 15 will host a memorial
service in honor of the U.S.
Coast Guard and all veter-
ans at 9 a.m. Monday, May
27, at the Douglas Munro
U.S. Coast Guard Monu-
ment in Crystal River.
The monument is behind
Crystal River City Hall (to
the right of City Hall in the
park area), 123 U.S. 19
Crystal River. There is
parking in the City Hall lot,
or turn at Northwest Sec-
ond Avenue, and park
along the street.
For more information,
call 352-503-6199.
Event to benefit
cancer group
A Welcome Summer din-
ner/dance social fundraiser
will be conducted from 5 to
9 p.m. Sunday, May 19, at
Mama's Kuntry Cafe, 1787
W. Main St., Inverness.
The event is sponsored
by Lisa and Dale White of
Mama's Kuntry Cafe and
Arnold and Mary-Ann
Virgilio of Virgilio Insurance
Services. Music will be pro-
vided by Saleem. All pro-
ceeds will be donated to
the Women's Breast Can-
cer Support Group of Citrus
County.
The menu will include
appetizers, barbecued
sliced chicken, beef and
pork as the entree, potato
salad, baked beans, dinner
roll and dessert. BYOB: Ice
and soda will be provided.
Tickets are $10 and are
limited. Dinners to go will
also be available.
RSVP via email to
aav@tampabay.rr.com, or
call Mary-Ann at Virgilio
Insurance Services, 352-
726-0040.
Artists to meet in
Weeki Wachee
Nature Coast Decorative
Artists Chapter of the Soci-
ety of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. the first
Saturday monthly at the
Weeki Wachee Senior
Center, 3357 Susan Drive
(off U.S. 19 and Toucan
Trail).
A brief meeting begins at
9 a.m., along with show
and tell. On Saturday,
June 1, the project is an
acrylic "Pink & Chocolate
Hibiscus," to be taught by
Jeannette Seese.
For more information,
visit www.naturecoast
decorativeartists.com, or
call Dottie at 352-527-2778.
Take chances on
car for B&GC
The Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County car give-
away will be May 25 at
1 p.m. at Love Chevrolet,
2209 State Road 44 W.,
Inverness.
Tickets are $25 and are
available from Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County
board members and at sev-
eral locations, at www.citrus
bgc.com, and by calling
352-621-9225.
The winner of the draw-
ing will have a choice of a
2013 Chevy Malibu or a
2013 Equinox SUV or the
cash value.


For more information,
call 352-621-9225.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Recycle fundraiser efforts

benefit transportation fund






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING MAY 18, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI.: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
aO WEH NBC 19 19 Preak News Entertainment'Night Grimm'14' [ To Be Announced Saturday Night Live News SNL
Britain's Roal The Lawrence Welk Are You Keeping As Time AsTime Waiting for Yes New Tricks (In Stereo)
10 WEl) UPBS 3 3 14 6 Weddings 'PG' Show'G' Served? Up Goes By Goes By God Minister'PG' PG'
0 CWiFT) PBS 5 5 5 41 Lawrence Welk Griffith Just Seen Movie Austin City Limits Front Row Center 'G'
138th Nightly Paid Paid Grimm (In Stereo) To Be Announced Saturday Night Live (In News Saturday
SWF NBC 8 8 8 8 8 Preak. News Program Program 14' Stereo) 14' Night Live
News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Bet on Your Baby (N) 20/20 "Rock 'n' Royalty: Billboard's All-Stars" (N) News Hot Topics
0 WFT ABC20 20 20 News 'G'a Fortune (In Stereo) 'PG' m (In Stereo) Na
WTP, CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! Elementary (In Stereo) Criminal Minds'14' 48 Hours (N) (In 10 News, Inside
(WT))CBS 10 10 10 10 10 (N) News Fortune *G'a a (DVS) Stereo) a 11pm (N) Edition
MLB Baseball Regional FOX13 6:00 News (N) Cops 'PG' Cops 'PG' Cops 'PG' Cops 'PG' FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Hell's
B CWTT FOX 13 13 13 13 Coverage. (N) (In Stereo) a a a a a (In Stereo) a Kitchen
ED WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News |ABC Entertainment 'Night Bet on Your Baby (N) 20/20 (N) (In Stereo) a News Crook
c RI ND 2 2 2 22 22) Turning Point With Jack Van Prophecy In Touch With Dr. Leslie Hale a 7th Street All Over CTN Pure
(WCF) IND 2 2 2 22 22 David eremiah'PG' Impe News Charles Stanley'G' Theater theWorld Special Passion
News World Paid Let's Ask Bet on Your Baby (N) 20/20 "Rock 'n' Royalty: Billboard's All-Stars" (N) News Private
S WFTS) ABC 11 11 11 News Program America (In Stereo) 'PG'a (In Stereo) a Practice
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Leverage "The Ice Man Leverage A crew of Movie
*B(WMiO) IND 12 12 16 PG' PG' Theory Theory Job"14' thieves. 'PG' a
D (WTT MNT 6 6 6 9 9 House Paid Paid Paid Bloopers Bloopers Futurama Futurama Ring of Honor Wrest. Bones'14'm
( 1WAC)" TBN 21 21 My Pillow Gener Jim Raley Life Center Church Rabbi Messer Paid Sonic |B. Hinn Chosen [Kingdom
King of Two and Two and Engagement The First The First Mr. Box Mr. Box Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
S WTOG CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Family Family Office Office "Roadkill"'14' "Amplification"'14'
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S WYE FAM 16 16 16 15 Lane Zone Stereo)'14' Eye
ED WOG FOX 13 7 7 MLB Baseball Fox 35 News at 5 Cops'PG' Cops'PG' CopsPG' Cops PG FOX 35 News at 10 Hell's Kitchen'14'
C (WVE UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Futbol Mexicano Primera Divisi6n (N) (SS) Sabado Gigante (N)'PG (SS) Comed. |Noticiero
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54 48 54 25 27 '14' View" 14' '14' HisDog" 14 "Underwater"'14'
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55 64 55 Ledger, Mark Addy. PG-13' Spartan warriors battle the Persian army 'R' Butler. R'a
To Be Announced Too Cute! "Curious My Cat From Hell (N) My Cat From Hell (In America's Cutest (N) My Cat From Hell (In
(ID 52 35 52 19 21 Kittens"'G'a (In Stereo) PG Stereo) PG' (In Stereo)'PG' Stereo) 'PG'
*** "Gridiron Gang" (2006, Drama) The "In the Hive"(2011, Drama) Michael Clarke Duncan, Loretta Devine. A *** "Cadillac
[BET 96 19 96 Rock, Xzibit, Jade Yorker. 'PG-13' black teen enters an unorthodox alternative school. 'R' Records" (2008) R'
BRAV) 254 51 254 Medicine |Marriedto Medicine |Married to Medicine |Married to Medicine |Married to Medicine |Medicine Newlyweds
1 ** "Ace Ventura: ** "The House Bunny" (2008, Comedy)Anna *** "Hot Tub Time Machine" (2010, Comedy) ** "Tommy Boy"
(WC) 27 61 27 33 When Nature Calls" Faris, Colin Hanks. 'PG-13 a John Cusack. 'R' (1995) Chris Farley.
Cops Cops Dog and Beth: On the Them Idiots Whirled Tour Bill Engvall, Jeff *** "Hot Shots! Part Deux" (1993, Comedy)
(CiD 98 45 98 28 37 Reloaded Reloaded Hunt'14' Foxworthy and Larry the Cable Guy. 14' Charlie Sheen. Premiere.PG-13'
) 43 42 43 Paid Paid The Car Chasers Treasure Detectives Suze Orman Show The Car Chasers American Greed
(ii) 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room CNN Newsroom (N) Anderson Cooper Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Anderson Cooper
Austin & Jessie Good- Jessie ** "Leend of the Guardians: Jessie Good- Austin & Dog With a Jessie
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(ESPji) 33 27 33 21 17 College Softball SportCtr X Games Barcelona. From Barcelona, Spain. (N Same-day Tape) SportsCenter (N)
ESPN 34 28 34 43 49 NHRA Drag Racing Update College Softball Baseball Tonight (N) E:60
[EWITN 95 70 95 48 Living |Wisdom |Mother Angelica Live ConcilioVaticano II: Second Council Living Right Campus |The Faith
S** "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" *** "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1" (2010, Fantasy) Daniel *** "Batman
29 52 29 20 28 (2010) Nicolas Cage. Radcliffe. Harry sets out to destroy the secrets to Voldemorts power. PG-13' Begins" (2005) 'PG-13'
** "Against the Ropes" (2004, Drama) Meg **Y' "Legally Blonde 2: Red, ** "100 Girls" (2000) Jonathan ***y, "Heavenly
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(TliU) 44 37 44 32 America's News HQ FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Justice With Jeanine Geraldo at Large Red Eye (N)
(DiH) 26 56 26 Iron Chef America Diners IDiners Diners |Diners Diners IDiners Diner and Dive Iron Chef America
(I5lF) 35 39 35 Game 365 |Marlins MLB Baseball Arizona Diamondbacks at Miami Marlins. (N) (Live) Marlins Boxing World Poker Tour
** "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (2009) Shia LaBeouf. Sam UFC: Belfort vs. Rockhold Belfort vs. Rockhold. *** "Live Free or Die
30 60 30 51 Witwicky holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. From Santa Catarina, Brazil. (N) (Live) Hard"(2007)
I[OLF 727 67 727 LPGA Tour Golf Central |PGA Tour Golf HP Byron Nelson Championship, Third Round. From Irving, Texas.
ll)*** 59 68 59 45 54 "The Wish List" "I Married Who?" (2012, Romance-Comedy) "Meddling Mom" (2013, Comedy) Sonia "Uncorked" (2010)
59 68 59 45 54 (2010) NKellie Martin, Ethan Erickson. NBraga, Tony Plana, Mercedes Renard. Julie Benz.
i**22 "in Time" (2011) ***y, "Moonrise Kingdom" (2012, Drama) 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Inductees include
302 201 302 2 2 'PG-13' Bruce Willis. PG-13' Heart and Rush. (N) (In Stereo) 14' N
***"Crazy, Stupid, Love."(2011) Steve VICE 'MA' Veep 'MA' The Newsroom (In Boardwalk Empire True Blood (In Stereo)
2) 303 202 303 Carell. (In StereofPG-13'a a Stereo) MA' 'MA' 'MA'
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Most Extreme Airports Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
l 51 25 51 32 42 PG a PG PG PG PG PG PG PG PG PG PG'
*** "Accused at 17" (2009, Suspense) Movie "Girl Fight" (2011, Docudrama) Anne Heche,
(HFE) 24 38 24 31 Cynthia Gibb, Linden Ashby. NR' James -upper, Jodelle Ferland. NR' [
"The Perfect Child" (2007, Drama) Rebecca *** "Lying to Be Perfect" (2010, Drama) "Unanswered Prayers" (2010, Drama) Eric
50 119 Budig. (In Stereo) NR Poppy on gomery. (In Stereo) a Close, Samantha this. (In Stereo) a
S 320 221 320 3 3 "Silence- ** "For a GoodTime, Call..." ** "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" (2005, Action) Brad ** "Battleship" (2012) Taylor Kitsch, Rihanna.
320 221 320 3 3 Lambs" (2012) Arn Graynor. R' Pitt. (In Stereo)'PG-13' Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG-13'N
ISNBC 42 41 42 Documentary |Documentary Documentary |Documentary Documentary IDocumentary
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109 65 109 44 53 '14' 14' 14' Up (N) IAlaska 'PG' Up
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Jim Rome on Showtime *** "The School of Rock" (2003, Comedy) Boxing Lamont Peterson vs. Lucas Martin Matthysse. (N) All Access
W 340 241 340 4 MA, L Jack Black. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' (Live) PG, L
__ 112 NASCAR RaceDay (N) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: All-Star Race. From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. NASCAR Victory Lane
SPEED) 732 112 732 (Live) (N) (Live) (N) (Live)
*** "Indiana Jones and the Temple of ***y "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989) Harrison Ford. Indy's hunt for I**)
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169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Deborah Kerr. 'MR' (1935) Boris Karloff. NR VIII" (1933) NR' Death" (1976) PG
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(Ll) 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) a Stereo) N Stereo) N Stereo) N Stereo) Stereo)
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.iii) 350 261"Son of Morning" ** "Blues Brothers 2000" (1998) Dan *** "Friht Night" (2011, Horror) Anton *Y "The Breed" (2006)
350 261 350 (2011) Joseph Cross. Aykroyd. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'm Yelchin, Colin Farrell. (In Stereo) R' 'R'I
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48 33 48 31 34 Gibson, Madeleine Stowe. HR recruit completes rigorous training. R' '.'.'m Mel Gibson.'R'm
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(1TR9) 9 54 9 44 Tricked Out Trailers Mega RV Countdown Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
riiiV) 25 55 25 98 55 Wipeout PG' Wipeout"Rats!"'PG' Caught Caughth t Caut Caught Bait Car Bait Car Bait Car Bait Car
[TV1 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne |Roseanne Gold Girls IGold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King
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S 47 32 47 17 18 Stereo)'PG'm '14' IFly"'PG'a B (DVS) (DVS) Virgin" R'
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North 05-18-13
SAK 4
Q 7 6 3
AQJ
48 5 2
West East
*10 97 Q 8 5 2
SK J 4 V A 10 9 8 2
K873 *962
A Q 4 4 J
South
J 6 3
V 5
10 5 4
K 10 9 7 6 3
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 NT Pass


Opening lead: 10


SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

We have been looking at Stayman, but exactly
how it operates is influenced by your other no-
trump responses.
In today's deal, look at the South hand. Your
partner opens one no-trump, showing 15-17
points. After East passes, what would you re-
spond?
The first question is: Does your partnership
use transfers into the minors? If you do, you
should go via that route, perhaps responding
two spades. (And then two clubs followed by
three clubs would show a four-card major, long
clubs and at least enough points for game.)
If, however, you do not transfer into the mi-
nors, traditionally responder bids two clubs, ini-
tially treated as Stayman, then rebids three
clubs, which is a drop-dead sequence. The re-
sponder has a long club suit in a weak hand, and
opener is expected to pass. More logical is to
play an immediate jump to three of a minor as a
sign-off. Then two clubs followed by three clubs
shows a long minor (with or without a four-card
major), at least enough points for game and ei-
ther worry that three no-trump might fail and
five of a minor make, or interest in a slam.
In this deal, let's assume you jump to three
clubs as a sign-off. West leads the spade 10. What
would you do?
Note that one no-trump by North should be
defeated by a heart lead.
Here, you want to restrict your losers to one
spade, one heart and two clubs. You should plan
to take two diamond finesses and to start the
club suit from the dummy (lead up to honors). If
your first trump play is from hand, you will have
to lead the king to squash East's jack but why
guess?
To THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Yeah. It's me, not you. And,
one letter to each square, 8 well, I was thinking that we
to form four ordinary words. should see other people.
GHEED -- -

1" T..l....I I. Services, Inc

DAANP .
S|- '-


COUL -
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: DIGIT STRUM CASING POUNCE
I Answer: The owner of the rug store had -
CAR PETS


ACROSS
1 Campus area
5 Island off Italy
9 Mdse.
12 Loosen
13 James
Brown's
genre
14 Record
15 Mouse target?
16 Boxer
18 Shade
20 Feelings
21 Sneak a look
22 Spider alert
23 Pine
26 "Aeneid" or
"Beowulf"
30 Desk item
33 Malamute's
load
34 Earl -
Biggers
35 Baseball
family name
37 "Bootnose" of
hockey


39 Air pump
meas.
40 Sketch
41 Speed gun
43 Run smoothly
45 Capone foe
48 Not our
51 Travel pros
53 Cookie
sheet liner
(2 wds.)
56 In of
57 401(k) cousin
58 Wash
59 Actress Falco
60 Speaker
pro -
61 Mets' former
ballpark
62 Bumper
mishap

DOWN
1 pro quo
2 Open
3 Cherish
4 Burro


Answer to Previous Puzzle


5 "30 for 30"
channel
6 "The Iron
Horse" Gehrig
7 Annoy
8 Vibrant


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


9 Smug
10 Rx amount
11 Bane of pvts.
17 Was fond of
19 Just
scrapes by
22 Finished
24 Frighten
25 Ms. McEntire
27 Kind of rally
28 1040 org.
29 Dernier -
30 Friend
31 Bulldogs
backer
32 de guerre
36 Square
38 "Auld -
Syne"
42 Staggered
44 Europe-Asia
divider
46 Sarcastic
47 Beer mug
48 Tease
49 Fox's prey
50 Midterm or
final
51 Length x
width
52 Animal fat
54 Exclamation
of disgust
55 Festive night


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I've been
married to "Ned" for
25 years, and each year
it seems to get worse. When
we married, he told me I could
do whatever I wanted with the
house, but he never said I'd be
the one paying. The
house was barely
furnished, the bed-
ding had holes in it,
the carpet was a
mess, and the cur-
tains were stained.
I replaced all of
that, but Ned
wouldn't contribute
a dime. Aside from
being cheap, he
never mowed the
lawn, raked the
leaves or cleaned ANN
the garage. He only MAIL
wanted to fish. I did
the maintenance as
long as I could, and now we
pay someone else to do it.
Here's the current problem:
Ned has dementia and doesn't
realize that his kids have con-
trol of his money His kids
have told him he can drive to
get his mail. Of course, he then
drives all over town. He's been
in three accidents already I
saw a lawyer to get my name
removed from the car title in
case Ned injures someone. I
don't want to be financially or
criminally responsible.
I don't know how much
more I can take. I spend all my
money on the upkeep of the
house. What can I do? Sec-
ond Wife
Dear Wife: Please notify
your police department or the
Department of Motor Vehicles
that Ned has dementia and
should not have a driver's li-
cense. Ned's doctor can help.
When Ned is in an accident,
do not repair the car unless


m

L


you need it yourself. Let his
kids fix it, or allow the car to
become too damaged to run.
Talk to your lawyer about
Ned's will. Does he have a
health care power of attorney?
Who owns the house? Can you
stay there if Ned
dies? You need to
sort this out and see
what your options
are.
Dear Annie: My
mom is in an excel-
lent skilled nursing
1I facility. The staff is
H great, but they
sometimes say
things that are not
helpful.
Last month, a
IE'S staff person said, in
.BOX front of residents
and visitors, "Your
mom really wants
to go to church. She cries
about it." I was embarrassed
and said, "Fine." By Sunday,
however, Mom said she didn't
want to go. This is how it is
with her for every occasion.
When I do convince her to go,
she procrastinates and we ar-
rive late. She then falls asleep
and later complains that she
didn't have a good time. Part of
this is dementia, but it's also
her personality She has al-
ways been a manipulator.
What Mom really wants is
for me to be with her 24/7. She
has even suggested that I sleep
on the tiled floor next to her
bed. The staff members don't
see this. So, please do not hu-
miliate the adult children.
This public berating, no mat-
ter how sweetly delivered,
leaves my mother unhappier
than before. If you need to
consult with us, please do so in
private. Her Daughter
Dear Daughter: All such


suggestions should be done
privately Please cut this out of
your newspaper (or print it
from the website) and bring it
to the nursing home where the
staff can see it. They mean
well, but this is not appropri-
ate.
DearAnnie: I read the letter
from "Uneasy About Switch-
ing," who wants to change
hairstylists. I am a hairstylist,
and I have realized over the
years that we can't possibly
please everyone.
I have had clients I treas-
ured and thought were "for-
ever clients," but when I
couldn't accommodate them
due to scheduling, surgery,
etc., they went to someone
else. It hurt my feelings until I
realized we don't "own" any-
one. In fact, I, too, have
switched who does my hair
over the years. But I would ap-
preciate being told why A
Hairstylist Who Understands


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www. creators. com.


5-18


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C6 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


WOOLLF



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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles


Sally Forth


Dilbert


YOUR SWEETIE

15 BACK!








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To dy's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Big Wedding" (R) 12:45 a.m., 4:15 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) 11:45 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:15 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 4 p.m., 7:45 p.m.,
10:40 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D. 11:50 p.m.,
3:15 p.m., 6:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 3:05 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:35 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 6:50 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Big Wedding" (R) 12:35 p.m., 3:55 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) 3:20 p.m., 10 p.m.


"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:10 p.m.,
6:50 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
6:45 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:35 p.m., 10:35 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 12:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:40 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) 4:10 p.m.,
6:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m., 10:50 p.m. No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:20 p.m., 12:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 7:30
p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Tyler Perry Presents Peeples" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


"This is time well spent."


*MR. WILSON CAN'T WIG&LE HIS EARS,
BUT HE SURE CAN RAISE HIS EY'EROWS."


Betty


Frank & Ernest


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public LocalRADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: >t slenb yV


"IKRV GNOHCXL CSE GVCHCGRLH,


CPLHKGCS MNZEKLHM GNSRKSOL RN


TOR RVLPMLZJLM NS RVL ZKSL RN


ELDLSE NOH DHLLENP."


ECS ZKTKSMAK

Previous Solution: "I don't like going where I've already been ... I don't want to
waste time with what I already know." Jeanne Moreau
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-18


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle


COMICS


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 C7






C8 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013



NOTES
Continued from Page C4


dessert, coffee and tea. Tick-
ets are $10 for adults, $5 for
children and can be pur-
chased at the door. Takeouts
available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the comer
of U.S. 41 and State Road 40
East in Dunnellon, hosts its
fish fry from 4 to 6 p.m. the first
Friday monthly in the church
pavilion. Cost is $7 for adults
and $3.50 for children. The fish
fry is open to the public.

Worship

First Presbyterian
Church Of Crystal River will
celebrate Pentecost Sunday
at 10:30 a.m. Pastor JackAl-
wood's sermon is titled "Come
Holy Spirit." A Christian edu-
cation study on "How to Read
the Bible" will precede wor-
ship at 9 a.m. in Westminster
Hall. The church office is
closed Monday, May 27, in
honor of Memorial Day. Call
the office at 352-795-2259 or
visit fpcofcrystalriver.org.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lecanto will celebrate the Day
of Pentecost with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m.
today and 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. A nursery is provided
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
There is a healing service at
10 a.m. Wednesday. SOS
summer hours are 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Evening Bible study
is at 7 p.m. Thursday.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites the
public to attend Great Ves-
pers at 5 p.m. today and Di-
vine Liturgy at 10 a.m.
Sunday. The Holy Myrrhbear-
ers ask attendees to bring a
box or can of food for distribu-
tion at Family Resource Cen-
ter in Hernando. The church
is at 1277 N. Paul Drive, In-
verness, off U.S. 41 North,
across from Dollar General.
Call 352-726-4777.
Worship services at St.
Timothy Lutheran Church
include a "come-as-you-are"
worship service with Com-
munion at 5 p.m. Saturday;
early service with Communion
at 8 a.m. Sunday with Sun-
day school classes for all
ages at 9:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship hour at 9 a.m., and
traditional service with Com-


union at 10:30 a.m. Special
services are announced. A
nursery is provided. The
church is at 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
Faith Lutheran Church
in Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto invites
the public to services at 6 p.m.
Saturday and 9:30 a.m. Sun-
days. This week Pastor Lane's
sermon is "Living in Shinar"
from Genesis 11:1-9. As one
of the traditions at the church,
the people wear red in cele-
bration of Pentecost. Following
the Sunday service is a time of
fellowship. Adult Bible study
and Sunday school classes for
children begin at 11 a.m. The
church is wheelchair accessi-
ble, hearing assistance is
available and large-print bul-
letins are available from the
ushers. Call 352-527-3325.
Floral City United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to Sunday morning
worship services at 8 in the
historic 1884 church and 10:30
in the main sanctuary. For Pen-
tecost Sunday, Pastor Mary
Gestrich will preach on "God's
Intention to Reach and Re-


claim the World." The sermon
emphasis is on God's promise
not to judge the world now but
to reach out and reclaim his
creation. Red is the honored
color of the Sunday service.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate
Pentecost Sunday with Holy
Eucharist Rite 1 at 8 a.m. and
Holy Eucharist Rite 2 at
10:30 a.m. Adult Sunday
school begins at 9:30 a.m. A
lunch for the youth is pre-
pared at noon with Youth Sun-
day school following at
12:30 p.m. Feed My Sheep, a
feeding program for people in
need, is at 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday followed by a
Holy Eucharist and healing
service at 12:30 p.m. com-
memorating the First Book of
Common Prayer. The vestry
will meet at 2 p.m. Food
pantry hours are 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) will cele-
brate the Day of Pentecost at
the 8 and 10:15 a.m. services
tomorrow. St. Anne's will host
Our Father's Table from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
today. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 a.m. Monday and


Friday in the parish library.
The "Widows Network" meets
the fourth Monday monthly at
various locations. All widows
are welcome. Call the church
of time and place. The young
adults meet for a light meal
and Bible study the first Fri-
day monthly at one of the
group member's homes. For
details, call Dave or Kathy
Jackson at 352-344-1167. All
are welcome to join St. Anne's
at 6 p.m. Sunday, May 26, for
a Bluegrass Gospel sing-
along. Annie and Tim's United
Bluegrass Band will perform
and lead the singing.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, conducts worship at
8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. with
Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.
Adult Bible class continues
with the in-depth study on
Revelations. Bible Information
Class is at noon Monday. Visi-
tors are always welcome. Call
352-489-3027.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-


ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-K
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in the 8:30 a.m. contemporary
worship service or the 11 a.m.
traditional service every Sun-
day. Coffee and doughnuts
are served in the fellowship
hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Sun-
day school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m.
Wednesday evenings begin
with a supper served from 5
to 6. Awana and OTEG (Ordi-
nary Teens Extraordinary
God) begins at 6:30 p.m. with
adult Bible study. Visit www.
fbcfloralcity. org or call 352-
726-4296.


To place an ad, call 563-5966
A a --a


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I Fx(32563-665 0l Fee .88)85-24 1E ai:6lssf 0crnilenin-0m I es0e


70yr WM 6'1" 200lbs
seeking open minded
woman from Crystal
River Area for friendship
& fun times
(352) 949-1657

1.Q.kc
Disabled SWM 45,
Searching for a Female
Travel Companion to
join me on a 2 3 Month
cross country journey
around the U.S. I will
provide Transportation,
fuel, Lodging, the Occa-
sional meal and some
entertainment. You will
need to pay your way
on the rest, I will provide
character references,
you must do the same.
View more details
http://ocala.craigslist.org/r
id/3799757407.html
Seeking Estimates to
update 2 Bathrooms
Lic. & Ins. Call
Gene 352-726-1500
Single Man in 30's look-
ing for Single Woman,
no kids, for friendship,
possible relationship
ages 25 -35. cell
352-422-0440


24" ELECTRIC RANGE
24" TAPPAN Electric
range with power cord.
four burner, like brand
new condition. $195.00
phone 352-726-6518
BUICK
97 LE SABRE, loaded
125k mi., very nice
cond. asking $1875.
352-637-2588 or
845-588-0759
Cadillac Rims & Tires
Four for Sale
225/55R16-99V
very good tread
$225
352-489-7114
CRYSTAL RIVER
lbr,1.5ba, $465.
Fridge-Stove,water-
trash, Fenc'd-yrd,
pets-ok, 352-587-2555
CRYSTAL RIVER
SUPER YARD SALE!
SATURDAY ONLY
8am to ?
6046 W Woodside Cir.
Diamond Engagement
Ring, Gold, paid $1200
willing to sell for $400
OBO call anytime
(352) 422-7696
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes
Estates
2/2/2, + FL room
fenc'd yd $650/mo.
1st,last. sec
(352) 489-7094
HOMOSASSA
MOVING SALE
Sat. 18th, 9a-1p
new stuff!
1355 S. Colonial Ave
HOMOSASSA SMW
Saturday, 18th 8a-3p
ESTATE SALE *
14 E. Sycamore Court


Honda
06 Shadow Spirit V TW
750 Awesome! Must
See Exec. Cond, burnt
orange $3250 527-7199
INVERNESS
Highlands
close to downtown
3/2/2, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723
Inverness
Sat & Sun May 18 & 19
8am to 2pm
PS2 w/ games, outdoor
& household items
1312 Poe Street






INVERNESS
Saturday Only 8a to 3p
Coach purses & shoes
brand new items
Dooney & Burke and
lots of designer clothes
varied sizes,
accessories, loftbed
Buy One Get One Free
Of Same Value
2920 S. Eagle Terrace
Mag Tag Freezer
white 30 cubic feet, free
standing up right
freezer, exec. cond.
$250 352-382-1959
OAK FIRE WOOD
cut to 20" length.
Make an offer
(352) 341-4902
OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods
May 18 & 19th
Sat & Sun 12- 4PM
211 Pine Street
(352) 503-5233


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

6 __


7 2




829 7


1 4


7 698


7 39


__2 6


____8 __1
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andl
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

All of our
structures
withstand
Installations by Brian C1253853l =i h

U-* a w4352-628-7519

'F RE E '- !i
Permit And
I Engineering Fees I
I Up to $200 value I --

*Siding Soffit *Fascia Skirting *Roofovers *Carports *Screen Rooms *Decks Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
Raleigh Grand Prix
Road Bike, made in
England, $300.
GIANT OCR2 Road
Bike, under 1 yr. old
$500. 352-464-4955
SATURDAY 18TH
MAY 2013
ESTATE SALE
121 Linder Drive
Homosassa, Fl. 34446
10.00 a.m. -4 p.m.
Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Tupperware
Call Fran Smith May
is Birthday month lots
of great specials
352-746-3652



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
Large Gas/BBQ Grills
& MORE 352-270-4087



Fancy Tail
Guppies
(352) 560-3019



LOST KEYS
at How yards Flea Mkt or
Hwy 19 heading to
Crystal River. Rubber
ducky key chain that
lights up please call
352-400-2971
MAN'S RING
Mr Mitchelll Mason's
ring Lost in Inverness
or Dunnellon area.
Please call
352-746-1915


flip & slide, blk/silver in
a camouflage
clip-on case, lost near
China First Inverness
(352) 527-8336
YELLOW CANE
Lost in Homosassa.
REWARD
(352) 503-2323



Chihuahua, male
brown w/ white chest,
no tail, Around Owl
Point Crystal River
(970) 391-5854
Found presently at Cit-
rus County Animal Shel-
ter:Female Mountain
Cur mix, tan;hound mix,
white/brown male.
also small white neu-
tered male, found at
Arlington in Homosassa.
Judy 352-503-3363



Friends of Citrus County
Animal Services
(FOCCAS)
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit
100% volunteer organi-
zation formed in 2010 to
assist in re-homing,
rescuing and providing
for the medical needs
of homeless pets
in Citrus County.
For more info on events,
projects and special
needs dogs visit
www.friendsofccas.org


SATURDAY
Charity Adoption
Event
MANATEE LANES
BOWING ALLEY
CRYSTAL RIVER
Vendors/Contest/
Games /Prizes
2PM-5PM
Homeless
Small Dogs/
Dobermans/Cats
Need to re-home
a small dog?
www.AHumaneSoci
QfletRcueomrn
7 9050
FOSTER PARENTS
NEEDED


Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397

B;?PPY


LORDY LORDY LOOK
WHO'S 40
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
CHRIS
WE LOVE YOU
Mom, Dad,
Janet, Steve
Shellie, and Emily




P/T STYLIST

352-795-6050










Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




Exp. ALS
LPN'S, CNA'S
& Bookkeeper/
Office Manager

pay based on
experience, please
send resume to:
Nature Coast Lodge
279 N Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
or email to: admin
ncl@tampabay.rr.com

EXPERIENCED
RUN'S
Full time & Part time
Positions Available
RN's needed for
outpatient surgery
center. MUST have
experience in
PRE/ POST outpa-
tient surgery center
or hospital experi-
ence in ICU or ER.
Excellent pay, bene-
fits, excellent hours,
no weekends,
nights, or call. Best
place to work in
Citrus County.
Submit Resume to
Fax 527-1827
or in person:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida.


HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto
Dietary Aide
Part-time and PRN
positions available.
Two years of dietary
and/or food ser-
vices experience in
a healthcare setting
preferred. Must be
willing to submit to
background check
and drug screening
and be able to lift
30 Ibs floor-to-waist.
We offer
competitive pay in
a team-oriented
environment.
Lisa Shields
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lisa Shields@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
40312

U4 A
CWrM



MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
w/experience on
Medical Weight Loss
& Gynecology.
DFWP. Send resume:
Email: suncoastobi
@earthlink.net
Fax: 352-584-8201

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T Chiropractic
ASSISTANT
Busy office, 30-35hrs
week, Must be
outgoing able to multi
task. Have computer
skills. Able to work
Saturday Mornings
Fax Resume to :
352-726-3885

RN or LPN
FIT 3-11shift
Come Join our Team
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352)795-8832




Eckerd
Floral City
Cook Needed

Please visit our
website:
www.eckerd.ora
to apply.


111U i |i .1 [list.

L DIC

CUkmcLE


632547189|



829465713
316879542
457123698
178396254
593214876
264 7 58931


Holland
Financial
Resources
Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927


Volunteers
Needed
Cert. Experienced
Dental Asst's
to Assist Dentists
at FreeDental Clinic
Soon to Open -
call 352-422-4376:
Food Bank, Intake,
Thrift Store, Bingo
call 352-216-0012





EXPERIENCED
LINE COOK
lots of Italian cuisine
full time pm.
live within a 10 mile
radius of Inglis
smoke free, dfwp
352-212-1607 or
352-447-2406
for interview


Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
Part time
Breakfast and
Lunch Cook.
Please apply
in person at
505 E Hartford St
Tues-Sat between
2:00-4:30 pm.





Accounts
Payable Clerk

Deal Processing
Clerk
Two F/T Acounting
positions
for local auto
dealership group.
NO PHONE CALLS
Apply in Person
or by mail/fax to:
Human Resource
Dept., Crystal Nissan
937 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34448
fax (352) 417-0810


R&R Person/
Auto Mechanic

Experienced ONLY
must be able to R&R
transmissions. Clean
license and own tools
call btwn 7am to 6pm
352-489-5580


DRIVER
OTR DD/LB FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,$45k-60k yr.
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724
Septic Tank Co
Taking applications.
Exp and CDL helpful.
Call 352-302-4977

The City of
Crystal River

Executive
Administrative
Assistant
Position provides
administrative assis-
tance within the
Office of the City
Manager. Duties
include preparing
correspondence,
answering phones,
providing informa-
tion to the public,
coordinating
agenda packet
preparation, con-
ducting internet
research projects,
and updating the
City's website. Also
serves as Deputy
City Clerk, which
periodically involves
attending evening
meetings and
preparing formal
meeting minutes.
Must have a strong
working knowledge
of Microsoft Office
software; not less
than a high school
education, with
some college pre-
ferred; and at least
five (5) years of ap-
plicable experience
in office administra-
tion. Salary range is
$14.25/hr. -$15.75/hr.
Resumes and letters
of interest should be
sent to: Office of the
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL,
34428.
In order to be
considered,
resumes must be
received by
no later than 2 PM
on June 4, 2013.
WASTEWATER
OPERATOR
Requires: HS Diploma,
valid driver lic & safe
driving record, FL class
C Wastewater certifica-
tion, apply online
http://tinvurl.com/
vwna30871



CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
12 Hr. Shifts, Day &
Night Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto


Sheriffs Ranches
Enterprises

Customer Service
Representative I

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR
GED REQUIRED


$7.79 per hour
Part-Time 18 hrs/wk


Apply in person.
Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 US HWY 19
Crystal River FL 34428
(352) 795-8886
EOE/DFWP
--Apo


RELIGION







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DELIVERY DRIVER

P/T, w/ FT potential
must be able to lift
751bs., clean driving
record, reliable
transportation
necessary. Must 21
yrs. or older.Cabinet
experience a plus.

Apply in person at
Deem Cabinets
3835 S. Pittsburgh Av
Homosassa Fl. 34448

Exp. ALS
LPN'S, CNA'S
& Bookkeeper/
Office Manager

pay based on
experience, please
send resume to:
Nature Coast Lodge
279 N Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
or email to: admin
ncl@tampabay.rr.com

Exp. appt. set-
ters

Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits, Clean Work
Environment.
Dave (352) 794-6129







































CHPoNlcLE





SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHIkoNiLCLE


SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAPI
352-600-5449




RECEPTIONIST

Part time receptionist

office. Computer skills
needed. Approx 20hrs
per week Fax resume
to: 352-795-7063




Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
634-1397/637-3733


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179


KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year, $39
hair color special & $39
Facial, Hair cut $10 with
ad. call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518


DISNEY CLOCK large
Disney alarm clock,
great condition,($10)
352-212-1596

DUDLEY'S







Three Auctions
5-16 Estate Adven-
ture 4Dm Furniture, 96
Regency Presidential
1 owner car, Snapp on
Tools boxes,
collectibles, antiques
5-17 Estate Firearms
6im Court ordered.
50+ firearms & parts,
fishing &sporting
goods. Browning,
Winchester, Reming-
ton, Ithaca, transfers
w/ FFL dealer.
5-18 Live & On Line
Stamps 11am
binders, unsorted
stamps, first day
issues,1940's-2000's
patriotic, political &
military, vintage to
contemp.. 1,000's &
1,000's
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

Ex. Lg. Hess Truck
Collection
Excellent Shape
$500. obo
352-746-2210

A


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




HAYWARD POWER
FLO LX POOL PUMP 1
HORSEPOWER USED
ONLY ABOUT A YEAR.
$150.00 352-726-0686




24" ELECTRIC RANGE
24" TAPPAN Electric
range with power cord.
four burner, like brand
new condition. $195.00
phone 352-726-6518
ADMIRAL dryer good
condition. $100.
352-563-2288
ADMIRAL Washer &
dryer good condition.
$100 each.
352-563-2288
ADMIRAL washer good
condition. $100.
352-563-2288
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
CHEST FREEZER
Woods brand, 7 cubic
feet works great! $100
3524194513
DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
FROST FREE CHEST
FREEZER white with
lock and key. 90 day
warranty. $100 call/text
352-364-6504
GE Profile
side by Side 26.6 Cubic
ft, stainless steel, refrig,
water, cubed and
crushed ice on door,
exec. cond. $625 OBO
(352) 527-2729
HAIER 5000 BTU
WINDOW AIR CONDI-
TIONER NEVER USED.
$85.00 OBO
352-726-0686


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


Kenmore Washer
& Electric Dryer,
16 months old
$475. for Set
(352) 344-0544
KITCHEN AID DISH/W
White Ex Cond. Energy
Star. Heavy Duty.
Moving Must Sell. $100
OBO 465-1319
Mag Tag Freezer
white 30 cubic feet, free
standing up right
freezer, exec. cond.
$250 352-382-1959
REFRIGERATOR
G.E.14 cubic feet,
works good ($40)
352-212-1596
SUNBEAM WATER
COOLER Hot/Cold Re-
frig & 5 Gal Water. Ex
Cond. Moving Must Sell.
$35 OBO 465-1319
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Lkie New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL ELEC
RANGE White Self
Cleaning. VG Condition.
Moving Must Sell
$100 OBO 465-1319
WHIRLPOOL REFRIG-
ERATOR White 18 CF
&Auto Ice Maker. Very
Cold. Moving Must Sell
$100 OBO 465-1319




2 Small Computer
Desks Formica Top
36"x24" with 2 Drawer
File Cabinet Attached
$25 each 727463-4411
4 DRAWER FILE
CABINET PreOwned
Commercial Metal $75
727-4634411
COMMERCIAL DESK
CHAIRS (2) PreOwned
Fabric Covered
Adjustable $45 each
727-4634411
COMMERCIAL METAL
FILE CABINET 5
Drawers $85
727-4634411
Computer Desk
Beautiful Kidney
shaped, 60" x 27" x 30",
brown pecan color, pd
($679) selling for $175
352-503-7298
DESK CHAIRS (4) Gray
Tweed Fabric Commer-
cial PreOwned $15
each 727-4634411
Executive Desk w/ /4"
glass top, 6 ftx3ftx25
in, 7 drawers, walnut
color $175;
Cherry color credenza
40inx16in, 2 top draw-
ers, w/2 low doors $75
(352) 795-9146
FILE CABINET 2
Drawer Lateral Com-
mercial Metal Graphite
Color 30"x28"x18" $45
727-4634411
LATERAL FILE CABI-
NET 3 Drawer Commer-
cial Metal PreOwned
40"x36"x18" $65
727-4634411




DUDLEY'S







Three Auctions
5-16 Estate Adven-
ture 4Dm Furniture, 96
Regency Presidential
1 owner car, Snapp on
Tools boxes,
collectibles, antiques
5-17 Estate Firearms
pmn Court ordered.
50+ firearms & parts,
fishing &sporting
goods. Browning,
Winchester, Reming-
ton, Ithaca, transfers
w/ FFL dealer.
5-18 Live & On Line
Stamps 11am
binders, unsorted
stamps, first day
issues,1940's-2000's
patriotic, political &
military, vintage to
contemp.. 1,000's &
1,000's
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777


AIRLESS
SPRAYER/BLACK @
DECKER $30 IN BOX
NEVER USED INVER-
NESS 419-5981
BRAD PINCHER $15
FINISH BRAD NAILS
WITHOUT HAMMER
EXTRA BRAD NAIL IN-
CLUDED 419-5981
Milling Machine
Bridgeport clone, w/vice,
rotary table, $1800.
Lathe, metal, Brand
New 14"x40", $2500.
352-795-5285
Misc tools, some power,
drills, saws, ect
704 898 1109
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 MADE
OF METAL HEAVY
DUTY OLDER MODEL
INVERNESS 419-5981



18-20 Commercial
Office Speakers
intercom-music, set of
6.5 HP Ceiling Speaker
w/hardware $350
352-419-2286
1-27" JVC COLOR TV
works great with remote
call Ron $25.00
352-746-0401
COLOR TELEVISION
color television with re-
mote in excellent condi-
tion $10- 352-2204158
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529



Scaffolding 4-5', 3-4'
pieces, w/some braces
$150.352-464-0825



COMPUTER DESK
small student computer
desk. like new,($20)
352-212-1596
COPIER /FAX Machine
Brother, fax, scan, blk
& color printer w/ tele.
Exc Cond. $60
(352) 746-6397
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP PHOTO/SLIDE
SCANNER Scanjet
G4050. WI software.
$99.00 obo
352 621 0248



Patio umbrella base
stand, white cast iron
criss cross leaf pattern
$30 3524194513
SMALL PATIO SET
white aluminum 42"
round table 2 chairs w/
cushions & umbrella.
$100 3524194513
Wicker couch,
2 chairs 3 tables
$125.
2 seat glider & chair
$75.
(352) 503-7748



2 wicker vinyl chairs,
moss gr w/ tan cushions
$25 ea, Patio fiber glass
table white w/4 chairs
cushions & casters
stripped patt. w/ multi
colors $150 341-6917
1- SIDE CHAIR white
wash wood, green pad-
ded seat can text pic,
Ron $30.00
352-746-0401
1-SIDE CHAIR Black,
wood, with green pad-
ded seat can text pic
Ron $45.00
352-746-0401
1-TV STAND 36"wide,
26"tall with drawer like
new $40.00 Call Ron
352-746-0401
1-WHITE DRESSER
39" wide, 19"deep,
46"high $100.00 call
Ron 352-746-0401


Your World

C au ae 4a4.e

qH _NICE-


#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyvman
V FASTF 100%Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *A
Affordable Handyman
s FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
"352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


CLASSIFIED



36" ROUND TABLES
(2) Rugged Formica
Top Sturdy Steel
Pedestal $35 each
7274634411
Antique Table
Solid oak with 4 padded
chairs, painted white
$200 OBO
352-422-0463
Bedroom Set
2 night stands, ar-
moire, headboard,
footboard, Kg. size
mattress, $600
(352) 426-2526
BIG MAN'S RECLINER
dark blue fabric,
works perfectly, rocks
too. No stains. $100
3524194513
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$125, Exercise
Stepper $75
352-795-7254
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$150, Exercise
Stepper $50
352-795-7254
CHEST mid-century
modern walnut with
custom glass top.
Quality piece. $70
(352)795-7813
CHROMECRAFT
KITCHEN TABLE AND
CHAIRS $1200 new.Off
white-4 chairs-table w/1
leaf & oak trim. Looks
new! $400
352-3824836
COMPUTER HUTCH /
DESK Oak Finish. New
Condition. Moving Must
Sell. $65 OBO
465-1319
Couch & Love Seat
$250.
2 Recliner Chairs
$110 ea.
(352) 503-7748
Craftmatic,
Automatic Electric
Single Bed
$200.
(352) 344-8067
Dining Rm 4 brass
frame char/blue velour
chairs, 43" beveled
glass top $150 obo,
2 Barrel chairs
& ottoman cust made
white cover $75 obo,
352-746-0817
Dining Room.
china cab., buffet, ta-
ble & 6 chairs, maple
color $750 for all
will sell separate
(352) 628-2085
DRESSER walnut
mid-century modern
triple.Custom glass
top.Quality piece.$95
(352)795-7813


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840
Large double bookcase
solid wood, 6' wide x 41"
tall x 11" deep. $100
3524194513
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Patio Furniture
white PVC, table &
6 chairs $600.
(352) 628-2085
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS AND BOX SPR-
ING in excellent condi-
tion $100 Contact Wal-
ter @ 352-364-2583
Skillfully Designed
Table
32"x 38" A beauty $155
OBO 352-726-7421
Sleeper Love Seat
Black Leather, good
cond. $100 or best of-
fer(352) 795-7513


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641




"Full Lawn Service*
Hedgetrim, Mulching
Hauling Available!!
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Sofa
8ft, like new,
beige $400. obo
(352) 220-2542
SOLID MAPLE
DRESSER 6 Drawers &
Lgr Mirror. Great Condi-
tion Moving Must Sell
$95 OBO 465-1319
SOLID OAK ARMOIRE
VG Cond. 22w 68h 13d
Moving Must Sell.
$65 OBO 465-1319
SQUARE 36" TABLE
Rugged Gray Formica
Top Sturdy Steel Frame
$30 727463-4411
TV CABINET Oak
Finish & Glass Doors
48"x70" VG Cond.
Moving Must Sell
$75 OBO 465-1319
TWIN BED, Brass
looking headboard,
boxspring &matress,like
new, xtra-clean,($40)
352-212-1596
WOODGRAIN BAN-
QUET TABLES (2) 6
Foot Long PreOwned
$35 each 727463-4411




2009 Cub Cadet,
LTX 1045 Riding Mower
Hydrostatic, 46" New
Belts Battery & Blades
$900 obo
352-563-1600
2009 Cub Cadet,
Riding Mower
0 Turn, 50" New Belts
Battery & Blades
$1,000 obo
352-563-1600
38" JD Hydro $450
42" Yardman $325
Very good cond.
Can be delivered
732-597-3910
42" Craftsman, $450
54" Craftsman, Hyrdo
$550
Very good cond.
Can be dilvered
732-597-3910
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Craftsman Kohler
Lawn Mower
17 HP, 42 "cut, only
use 3 seasons, exec.
cond. $450
(352) 527-3442
Craftsman
Riding Mower,
42"deck,
18/2HP Engine $350.
352-746-7357
Grass Catcher for
Weed Eater Lawn
Mower 38" cut, may fit
other mowers $125.
Grass Catcher for
Snapper Lawn Mower
28 & 33" cut, $125.
352-795-5682
John Deer Mower
42" Deck 22 horse, 105
hrs, new blades $1100
OBO, Echo Gas Hedge
trimmer 24" blade $150
OBO 352-489-7114
John Deere LT 133
Kohler 13 hsp, 5 spd
geer drive, 38" deck
excellent cond. $675.
352-726-0230
LAWN SPREADER
SCOTTS SMALL $15
352-613-0529
PREFORMED
GARDEN POND
4'LX3'WX18"D INVER-
NESS ASKING 65.00
OBO 352-560-7857
Snapper Riding Mower
14%/ Briggs & Stratton
Engine, 38" deck,
Good Cond. $300
352-746-7357
Stihl Electric Trimmer
$150.
Fertilize Spreader
$35.
(352) 527-7223
TODD GAS
CADDY
28 Gal. Portable Fuel
Tank, like new $175
352-270-8902
Yard Equipment
Chain saw, bnd
blower/mulcher, hedge
trimmer, edger, all for
$100 352-746-0817




BEVERLY HILLS
(Pine Ridge)
Sat. 9am-2pm
Oak Hm Off. Furn,
sleeper sofa, table, lawn
tractor, organ, tools, too
much to list
2940 W. Lantana Dr


AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine, 4551 W.
Cardinal 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lie. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 C9

.1


5-18 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2013


"I thought you said you

wanted it 'to go'!"





Thank eYou For 15 Years ofjtes!


BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, Sat. 8am
GREAT ITEMS BOTH
DAYS!
yard & home tools,
hshld items, some
furniture, NEW
plates machine
3125 N. Juniperus
Way


BEVERLY HILLS
Moving Sale
Furniture, Rugs, silk
trees, Patio, BBQ
Grill Lots MISC.
613-0539, 249-7521


Citrus Hills
Sat, May 18, 8:30a-?
805 E Dakota Ct.
Meadows


CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-2p
Thomasville Furniture,
wallpaper & borders,
collectibles, gold &
silver jewelry, fenton
& fostona glass.
MUCH MORE
Behind Olive Tree
Restaurant, US 19,
UNITS 80, 81, 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 9am-4pm Furn,
household items
too much to list
8752 N. Briar Patch Ave

CRYSTAL RIVER
Saturday 5/18
8 AM to 1 PM. Furniture,
yard tools, antiques,
kayak rack, and Knick
knacks of all kinds!
9353 W Hugh Barco Ct

CRYSTAL RIVER
SUPER YARD SALE!
SATURDAY ONLY
8am to ?
6046 W Woodside Cir.







DUNNEL-

LON
Moving Sale &
Sat.18th 8am-3pm
Riverbend Rd


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state license number in
all advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an
unlicensed business.
The Citrus County
Chronicle wants to
ensure that our ads meet
the requirements of the
law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


HOMOSASSA
2 Family Yard Sale
Sat-Sun 8:30am-5pm
3269 S. Edgeworth Terr

Homosassa
Fri, Sat, Sun
9am to 4pm
table saw, lawn
mower, clothes,
motor bike, etc...
5402 W State St.

HOMOSASSA
HUGE CHARITY
YARD SALE
Sat, May 18, 9a to 2p
behind Mike's Pub
cnrofUS19&
Oaknridge Drive
352-628-6896
absolutely no early
birds, rain date
Sun, May 19th

HOMOSASSA
MOVING SALE
Sat. 18th, 9a-1p
new stuff!
1355 S. Colonial Ave

Homosassa
Sat, Sun 5/18 & 5/19
9am to 3pm
tools, garden, golfcart
& much much more
3720 S Alabama Ave

HOMOSASSA SMW
Saturday, 18th 8a-3p
ESTATE SALE *
14 E. Sycamore Court

INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat., 8a Noon
Yamaha Keyboard,
Autoharp, books, etc.
REAL Garage Sale
prices
5781 S. Eaton Terr.

Inverness
Sat & Sun May 18 & 19
8am to 2pm
PS2 w/ games, outdoor
& household items
1312 Poe Street




^, "



INVERNESS
Saturday Only 8a to 3p
Coach purses & shoes
brand new items
Dooney & Burke and
lots of designer clothes
varied sizes,
accessories, loftbed
Buy One Get One Free
Of Same Value
2920 S. Eagle Terrace


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932





YouLI \\ orid first


Need a .ob

iir a

qualified

employee?


This area's
#1

employment

source!



1 _


INVERNESS
Sat-Sun 8am-?
H.D. 1974 Sportster,
many misc parts, Ele.
hand tools, glass ware,
fieftya, Dressdon, R.D.
figurine, + more,
4165 E. Stage Coach
Trail
Inverness
Three Family Sale
Sat, Sun, May 18 & 19
8am to ? Lots of Stuff
3160 E Dove Ct,
INVERNESS
Thurs Fri, Sat,
Turner Camp to
OakHaven

LECANTO
GIGANTIC
MOVING SALE
Fri, Sat 8am to 3pm
furniture, fishing
gear, tools & misc.
1629 N Crooked
Branch Dr.

Moving Sale
Citrus Springs
Thurs thru Sun
8:30am to 2pm
entire household
1495 W Cntry Club Blvd
PINE RIDGE
Saturday 18th 8a-2p
4335 N. Saddletree Dr.
SATURDAY 18TH
MAY 2013
ESTATE SALE
121 Linder Drive
Homosassa, Fl. 34446
10.00 a.m. -4 p.m.




DUNNELLON
Fri, Sat, Sun
May 17, 18 & 19
9am to 5pm
Hshld furn, tools,
washer & dryer, 2
bdrm, living & dining
set & other items
4176 SW Dahlia Ct.
Rainbow Lakes Est.

Sugarmill Wds
OakVillage off Hy 98
May 18th thru 19th
9am to 5pm
29 Hollyhock Ct.
call 352-799-0307




4 MEANS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MEANS SUITS SIZE
34X30 & 36X30 $40
EACH 352-613-0529


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Needa EJB
#1 Employment source is

.hirOAn IA"cleonassine.com
www.chrnonicleonline.com|







CIO SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


U 000ER8Q
WORDY G UN BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Struck actor Brad (1) Every answer is a rhyming
I --_-______ ~ pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Kindle alternative thief (1) they will fit in the letter
2.Kindlealtenatieh squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Arrive at a sandy shore (1) syllables in each word.


2013 UFS,Dit byUniv Uclck forUFS


4. South Korean city's soup holders (1)


5. Booze chooser (2)


6. More jolly Scottie or Airedale (3)


7. Triple Crown race lack of strength (2)


SStNItVM MSStNXWit d L tIIitMI llRllI J'9 1I3M3Id 1IOfl)]I '
SIAMO H S T1 038 HDV H ODVa H 0003 XOON 'e LId IIH'I
5 81 1 ,


Wedding Dress, size 8,
never worn, simple line,
V back with rhinestone
closures long train $150
352-422-0463



!!!!!LT 275/65 R20!!!!!
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
*295/40 R20***
Nice tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair! (352)
352-857-9232
1 ROLLING CART
great for TV $15.00 call
Ron 352-746-0401
1 WHITE TOILET
Round bowl with bolts
wax ring and seat
$35.00 352-746-0401
4 WHEEL WALKER
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
6 Stacking Chairs
White plasitc with seat
pads $30.00
352-637-0407
19" Zenith Color TV
w/ VHS player
& stand $150
Hoover Hepper Filter
Sweeper $75
(352) 527-7223
1-5X7 RUG
Good condition Multi
color can text pic call
Lori $20.00
352-302-2004
1-WHITE FRAMED
MIRROR 27" x 39"
$25.00 call Ron
352-746-0401
Above Ground Pool
48' x 18' w/sand filter &
pump $250 you remove
Murry 26" ladies bike
$25 352-637-0407
AIR HOCKEY TABLE
doubles as ping pong
table w/ all accessories
$50 3524194513
ALUMINUM RUNNING
BOARDS FOR CHEVY
TAHOE GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00 464-0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BOYS BICYCLE SPI-
DERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
BREAD MAKER Otis,
hardly used. Good
condition, $20
(352)465-1616
Emerg. Generator
B & S Eng. 5250 watt,
new carborator $300
OBO 352-746-0817
Garmin GPS,
$75.
RCA VHS
Video Camera
$100
(352) 527-7223
GERBIL CAGE
PETVILLE
ROLLACOASTER $20
352-613-0529
HARLEY SLIDE ON
ORIGINAL MUFFLE RS
NEW 1350/1450 ONLY
$90.00, 464-0316
Honeywell Thermostat
new,open box,$25.
firm. Homosassa
407-766-2335
Kenwood Stereo
System AM/FM, 5 CD
player, & cassette in
cabinet w/ 2 large
speakers $150.
Compact Refrigerator
2.7 cu ft., like New $50.
(352) 586-1694
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Good condition,
green/white color, me-
dium sized, hardly used,
$30 (352)465-1616
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY FORD,DODGE
IN BOX $60.00
352-464 0316
OAK FIRE WOOD
cut to 20" length.
Make an offer
(352) 341-4902
OUTDOOR SHED
10'X12', completely
wired, 1 yr old, exc.
cond. pd $1800. will
sell for $1200.
352-302-8797
Play Ground
Swing Set
4 Swings, rings,climbing
rope, slide, look out
tower with canopy, con-
struction is western
cedar $800
352-726-3035
REESE Single
(one)folding aluminum
ramp $25
352-513-4614
ROCKING HORSE Very
good condition, strong,
will last for long time, will
email photo, $50
(352)465-1616
SEWING MACHINE
American made in Kan-
sas by WHITE manu-
facturing, good condi-
tion.($30) 352-212-1596
Teak shower bench,
paid $150, never used,
does not fit shower.
$90 firm 3524194513


TROY-BILT POWER
WASH- 2200PSI, 4.5
HP Briggs & Stratton
Engine, 3 tips, runs
great, $100, 628-0033
TRUCK WINDOW
rear-solid GMC
factory tint
$50.00
352-628-4210
TUB HANDRAIL
Medline Deluxe
safety handrail
$30.00
352-628-4210
TWIN SIZED HEAD-
BOARD Toddler head-
board, metal, grey,
never used, $10
(352)465-1616
USED GOODYEAR
TIRE (REGATTA)
P225/60R 16 $40.00
GOOD TREAD
352-464-0316
USED TIRES 3 Fire-
stone Forenza-215/55R-
tires-$15 each firm-good
cond. 352-564-1771
WALKER WHEELS
hand brake
basket&seat
good condition
$50.00 352-628-4210



TOSHIBA 2060 COP-
IER & Cab. VG Cond.
Needs Service. Dark
Copy? Moving Must Sell
$100 OBO 465-1319



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 by Pride $395
1 by Berkline $295
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $70.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
100.00 464 0316
NEW 4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT
MUCH EASIER TO
GET UP ONLY 20.00
464-0316
SAFETY BATHTUB
TUB GRAB BAR IT
CLAMPS TO THE SIDE
OF THE TUB ONLY
$25.00, 464-0316



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS &
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" IBANEZ
TALMAN ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC "TELE"
STYLE,GIGBAGON-BOARD
TUNER,+MORE!
$145 352-601-6625
"NEW" LES PAUL
COPY JT 220DTR
TRANS CHERRY RED
W/BLOCK INLAYS
$100 352-601-6625
Collection of Piano
Music Books
Large collection
Variety of Music books
and Sheets, $75 OBO
352-527-9723



2 DOOR COMMERCIAL
METAL STORAGE
CABINET 50"x36"x18"
PreOwned $75
727-463-4411
BATHTUB/NEW
5 feet,very nice 30.00
OBO LINDA 341-2271
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $6
EACH 352-613-0529
DECORATIVE
KITCHEN CANISTER
SET $10 CERAMIC 4
CONTAINERS WITH
LIDS 419-5981
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place setting, 2
light green,1 yellow, 1
pink. $15.00 each place
setting 352-726-9009
FIESTA DISHES 4
piece place settings, 2
Dk Blue, 1 lime green, 1
dk green, $15.00 each
setting 352-726-9009
QUEEN BEDSPREAD
Queen sizebread, excel-
lent condition $15-
352-220-4158
Skillfully Designed
Table
32"x 38" A beauty $155
OBO 352-726-7421
TOASTER OVEN
MAGIC CHEF $20
352-613-0529


ELECTRIC TREADMILL
DOESN'T FOLD
UP,BUT WILL GIVE U
A WORKOUT ONLY
100.00 464 0316
EXERCISE BICYCLE
UPRIGHT TYPE
WORKS GREAT 85.00
464 0316
Exercise Bike
Schwin, airdine pro, new
$800 now $175 OBO
Mountain Bike
Mongouse 10 speed,
like new $75.00 OBO
352-746-0817
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE IT'S GONNA
BE TOO HOT TO GET
OUT & EXERCISE
ONLY 100.00 464-0316
TREADMILL Space
Saver Life styler Ex-
panse 850 w/Cell Joint
Prot Sys.$75 cash &
carry. 897-4645 Iv msg

Il

2 Ladies Leisure Bikes.
Blue and Pink. Rode
once and just don't use!
$50 each Inverness
(850) 933-9526.
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DAY PACK in excellent
condition,,$10-
352-220-4158
DOME TENT
Only $65
352-341-4008
Dunnellon Pawn
Fire Arms****Ammo
Mags****Since 1987
352-489-4870
Excellent Full Set,
Wilson, Fire Stick
Golf Clubs, with Bag,
and Pull cart Pd $1,400
Asking $325
(352) 382-1751
Ez Go Gas
not running,older work
horse, $375, & extra's
$24 315-466-2268


Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Ammo-concealed clas-
ses 352-447-5595
kayak blue w/storage
Greatt paddle $150 obo
352-746-0817
Raleigh Grand Prix
Road Bike, made in
England, $300.
GIANT OCR2 Road
Bike, under 1 yr. old
$500. 352-464-4955
Road Bike for Sale:
Specialized Men's
Bike Model, Sequoia,
silver, Aluminum, 54.5
cm, Carbon fork, 24
spd. 27" rims, com-
puter, tool kit, 2 air
pumps Like New All for
$$610. 352-586-4630
Walk Behind
Lawn Mower
good condition
$60. 352-341-1714



NEW ENCLOSED
8.5' x 20'
CAR HAULER
$3990. 352-564-1299



BABY CRIB in good
condition with mattress
$25 Contact Walter @
352-364-2583



Diamond Engagement
Ring, Gold, paid $1200
willing to sell for $400
OBO call anytime
(352) 422-7696


Sel orSw


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966







I BUY AMMO,
Also Reloading
Supplies & Equip.
PAYING
$$ Top Prices $$
352-302-0962
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




Bird for Sale
Baby Nandays hand
fed $250ea, fisher
lovebird$40,cockatiels
$35 each, pr para-
keets w/cage $20, pr.
breeder indian ring
necks $250 637-6967


CLASSIFIED



BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
FRENCH BULLDOG
Pups,11weeks,2Males,house
broken,shots,$800each
adriansmithl7@aim.com
352-795-5310


[WNW


LILLY
Lilly, a 4-y.o.
Shepherd mix, weight
about 45 Ibs, is
housebroken,
heartworm-negative,
beautiful & friendly.
She sits on command,
shakes hands, &
gives paw when
asked. Takes treats
gently. Walks well on
leash, gets along
w/other dogs. Friendly
& affectionate. Call
Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.








PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tri color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876








SALLIE
Sallie, 1-y.o. female
terrier/dalmation
mix, weight 35 lbs.
Heartworm-
negative, gets
along w/other dogs,
sits for treats, ap-
pears housebroken.
Friendly & affec-
tionate, shy at first.
Slim & trim in build.
Sweet & joyful girl,
came to shelter be-
cause owners could
not afford her.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.










SKY
Sky, a spayed
female black lab
mix, 2 y.o., heart-
worm negative,
microchipped,
housebroken.
Weight 52 lbs. Beau-
tiful, friendly dog,
would be best as
the only dog in the
family. Walks well on
a leash. Looking for
her fur-ever home.
Fenced yard is
preferred.
Call Susie @
352-621-3207 OR
352-422-2787.


Shih Poo Puppies,
5 males, 2 female
Ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
2 males, 1 female
Ready
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827












TUCKER
Tucker, 2-y.o. Shep-
herd mix, neutered,
UTD shots, Heart-
worm negative, micro-
chipped, housebrkn,
weight 54 lbs. A bit
fearful of men, bonds
well w/women. Great
physical shape. Gets
along w/most dogs.
Walks well on leash,
affectionate, friendly,
although shy @ first.
OK w/older children,
fenced yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
352-697-2682










WILLY
Willy, a 1-y.o. Chesa-
peake Bay Retriever
mix, wt. 50 lbs,
Heartworm nega-
tive. Walks very well
on a leash, stays by
your side. Gets
along well w/other
dogs, does not care
about cats. Walks
well on leash. Sweet
nature, needs work
w/house skills.
Should be crated
when alone.
Call Susie @
352-621-3207 or
352-422-2787.

Yorkshire Terriers
Male Puppies, 8 wks
$650. Shots, Health
cert., parents on site
Lecanto 727-242-0732

^^^^^-11


I et


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Mother & 2 Babies
$160 for All
(352) 628-4750



BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
CR MINI FARMS
2/1, 2.5 Acr. wkly or
monthly (352)564-1242
CRYSTAL RIVER
lbr,1.5ba, $465.
Fridge-Stove,water-
trash, Fenc'd-yard,
pets-ok, 352-587-2555
HERNANDO
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
$400 $500 Mo. Call
Larry 352-201-2428
HERNANDO
3/2, Country Setting
5025 N Tanglewood
Ave. $575. mo.
352-362-5019
HOMOSASSA
1 bedroom. 1 bath.
furnished, pool, 400
deposit, 450/month
(352)628-4441
INVERNESS
I BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951
INVERNESS
SWMH w/add 2/1 1.25
Acres, near wal-mart
$500 Mthly nonsmoking
706-473-2184






*' THIS OUT!
2007 Double Wide MH
28x60 3/2 1.10 Acres
(Brooksville) $65k
Ready To Move In
575 Credit Score & 10%
down Qualifies
(352) 795-1272





2009 DW MH
Ready to Move In
Crystal River 1,568 Sq
Ft. 3/2/ on 3.2 Acres
$89,900 10% down 575
Credit Score Qualifies
352.79e.9377


HowDo





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Chronicle *-


Classifieds / /.


In Print "


& Online JL '..
BB-




C...C I T R U.S C o U N a CIT U- CO T ,U


CHRONICLE Cft4 o1


.ff S



/4


(352) 563-5966


ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807

Palm Harbor
4/2 $499/Month
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/olantcitv/
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210



For Sale II
Skyline 28 x 64
on 1.2 acres, 3 bd, 2ba,
Owner Financing
& low Credit Scores
Qualify $59,900
352-795-1272

STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183






Town Of Hernando
3/2 DW MH, 1.5 Acres,
30 min. from Ocala,
$45,900 Financing
Available
352-795-2377





We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details





HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I L-.;-


HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
HOMOSASSA
Owner Financing, 3/2
2000 Sq Ft, comp. re-
modeled, open fl plan,
fenced yard $5k down
$525 monthly 302-9217

-I-I

1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vinyl window,
utility & outdoor shed
all appl's and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243
Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A 55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-794-4128
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S AtkinsTer. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648
WESTWIND VILLAGE
55+ Rent or Bu y
$8,000 & Up
Mon-Fri. 8:30-11 am
Call for Appointment
(352) 628-2090





ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
5641 W. Irving Ct.......... .............$750
2/2/1 Nice home off Rock Crusher
5339 S. Elm St. ........................... $900
2/1 Furnished with utls included
CRYSTAL RIVER
9351 W. Wisonsin Ct............... $825
3/2/1 Beutiful kitchen
1266 N. Seagull PI.................. S $1100
#143 Condo3mo. min.
CITRUS SPRINGS/BEVERLY HILLS/LEANTO
81 S. Adams(BH) ......................... $625
2/1.5/1 Cute with sun porch
1829 W.Androedaie (CS)...... $875
3/2/2 Lovely area
1791 W. C(arline Path ().......1000
Beautiful home
INVERNESS
5525 S. Kine Terr. ......................$1200
2/2/1 Furnor Unfurnbeautiful home





At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio
Apt. $650. All Util.
Inc'd (352)382-7892

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025







SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 Cll


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Desertrose
Apartments
RENTAL SPECIAL
1 MONTH FREE
2 bed/2 bath
Call now for details!!
EnsIng Properties LLC
352-795-1795
www.ensing
propertles.com
INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1water incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238





CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Commercial Storefront
clean 1000 SF, exc.loc
$795/mo 352-634-2528



Meadowcrest
Condo for Rent
Will Call back after writ-
ing out info
352-220-6754
30 days



INVERNESS Duplex
Sr's Welcome 2BR/1IBA
More... No Pets/smoke
$595. mo Avail 6/1/13
(352) 746-2932




At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio
Apt. $650. All Util.
Inc. (352) 422-1933
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116



AVAILABLE NOW
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
Near School
$725. mo.
HOMOSSASA
2/1 Duplex $495.
RIVER LINKS
REALTY
352-628-1616
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Lakes
Estates
2/2/2, + FL room
fence' yd yd $650/mo.
1st,last. sec
(352) 489-7094
FLORAL CITY
2/1, Det. Gar. Chad,
Hist. Dist., No pets/
non smoking $675mo.
lst/Ist/sec. 422-6263
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paint,flooring, w/d pets
ok $800 mthly, 8928 W.
White Dogwood Dr.
619-301-5442
INVERNESS
Highlands
close to downtown
3/2/2, Immaculate
(352) 400-5723
LECANTO 3/2
Builders Model, FP,
Granite Kit. & Baths
$1,000 352-422-1933




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Crystal River
Ig sunny room,
furnished, Lg yard,
wifi, c/h/a, $300. &
util. 352-564-0795


HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
*(352)4642514**
1305 Hwy 486



Executive Suite
Available, King Bed,
high speed internet
Direct tv, whole house
access, w/d, carport
parking, secluded,
Christian gentleman
$125. wkly call Bruce
352-445-7501 or Ray
828-497-2610




Wanting to Rent on
Lease 3/2, with Pool
or waterfront, in
Crystal River or
Homosassa
6 mos in advance,
(352) 422-6939





must sell!
Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty .com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Nature Coast Landings:
Sale/Trade: Biigrig RV
Site plus storage lot.
$49,500/offer for both.
352-843-5441. See at
detailsbyowner.com




OPEN HOUSE
Suaarmill Woods
May 18 & 19th
Sat & Sun 12- 4PM
211 Pine Street
(352) 503-5233




2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/ 3/18' rollups
office tlr & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840
For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, on appox. / acre
with enclosed large pool
new roof, new Hot
water heater $125,000,
746-5421




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity with amenities
$120K posss rent
opt)352-804-9729

Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 292-1550





L.oo lc
I'm Gorgeous InsideM!
Big & Beautiful, 3/2/2
Near 7 Rivers Golf
Course 305 N Pompeo
Ave $149,900.
Call Nancy Wilson
For Appt. to see








Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees, 2 Lots,
$145,000.
352-228-7328



4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home $65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan carpet,
tile bright, cheerful.
clean. Realtor/Owner
(352) 697-0295

For Salek %
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241


3/2/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
REDUCED $129,500
352-302-4057










Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
Wood Floors, Tile and
Carpet. 2 Car GarSS
Appl. fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026
SMW
3/3/2, court yard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978


BETTY J.

POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email :debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855

SPECIAL *
New Home in
Quiet neighborhd.
3/2/2, on I acre
2932 sf. corner lot,
$269,900.
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116
Spruce Creek Pr.
55+, gated,
3/2/2, 2370 Liv. area,
on GC $159,000.
Call Lindsay Paolillo,
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063





El





TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





For Salek ,,
Lake Panasoffkee
5BR/2BA 2,200 SF CB
Home w/3 lots, C/H/A,
fenced yd, 2 car gar,
close to lake. $140,000
Call 352/569-4026



Inverness, Regency Pk
2/2, fireplace, 1st floor
community pool
$48,900 352-637-6993


CLASSIFIED


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www. plantation
realtylistings.com




HAVE IT

ALL
Spring Water, Fish from
Dock, Watch the
Manatees from porch,
walk to festivals, enjoy
living in dwntn Crystal
River, gated community,
2/2 Condo w/gar.
$249,900, ownerlic. RE
Broker 352-257-9496

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906
Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150lx220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
hmrm 1999@att.net
(904) 757-1012

' THIS OUT!
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $53,900. Call
352-638-0905




2001 Mercury Motor
125 runs great, $1675
Leave Message
561-313-5308
352-270-3859
Cadillac Rims & Tires
Four for Sale
225/55R16-99V
very good tread
$225
352-489-7114
New Boat Trailers
16' thru 45' Alum.
EZ Pull Trailers
352-564-1299
Yamaha, 8HP,
2 stroke, new water
pump, $695.
Motor Guide
401b.- New $125.
(352) 422-6956


im-
Beautiful Sedona, AZ
Time share for sale
2 weeks annually use,
very low price, 5 Star
Sedona Summit
352-419-4629


** BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510"
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
2001 Century
WAC, yam 150 0X66FI
mtr, Windless, wash
down, fish finder,
w/trailer exec, Cond.
$12,900 352-563-5628



6-76






19' REGAL, $650 &
17' CACCI CRAFT
$500
REGAL HAS GOOD
ENGINE & DRIVE.SS
PROP. NEEDS FLOOR
& SIDES RECOVERED
$600 CACCI GOOD
ENGINE & LOWER
UNIT, NEEDS CARBS
CLEANED, FLOOR RE-
COVERED $500. BOTH
HAVE TITLE AND
TRAILER352-256-8488
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
"(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



06 Winnebago
29' site seerer, class A,
loaded 19k mi, 2 slides,
new tires, exec cond.
$46,500 270-8475
Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21 k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072



MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK
2006, 26ft., lite alumi-
num frame, like new
tires, poss. financing
$275 mo., $7,500. or
discount for cash
(352) 726-9369
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



03 MITSU SPYDER
Red cony, a real looker!
Auto V6 25mpg. Great
mech'l cond. Price Re-
duced call for pics.
$4990 464-2966
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th
anniversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles, immaculate,
loaded,call for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt LT
$6,995.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
'04, PT Cruiser,
like new, new tires,
battery & much more
only 43K mi. $6,250
(352) 527-8960
DODGE
1993 Stealth ES: black
exterior paint, gray
leather seats, sunroof,
cruise, AC, power win-
dows and locks, 5
speed manual transmis-
sion, 3.0L DOHC V6,
120,500 miles. $3,800.
352-344-0625
DUDLEY'S






Three Auctions
5-16 Estate Adven-
ture 4m Furniture, 96
Regency Presidential
1 owner car, Snapp on
Tools boxes,
collectibles, antiques
5-17 Estate Firearms
6Dm Court ordered.
50+ firearms & parts,
fishing &sporting
goods. Browning,
Winchester, Reming-
ton, Ithaca, transfers
w/ FFL dealer.
5-18 Live & On Line
Stamps 11am
binders, unsorted
stamps, first day
issues,1940's-2000's
patriotic, political &
military, vintage to
contemp.. 1,000's &
1,000's
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
FORD
04 Crown Victoria
LX, Exec. cond., new
tires, 133K mi. $4,200.
obo 352-422-1916
FORD
2000, Ranger XLT
Lesabre, $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Focus, Sedan,
SES, 25,000 miles.
$7,500. 352-341-0018
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




CHEVROLET
1956 Chevrolet Bel Air
grille, $100.00 Front &
rear Bumpers $100.00
each Tail Light $50.00
Bumper Guard $50.00
(352)628-1734







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966




2012 Toyota
Tacoma, pre-runner,
TRD Sport, access Cab,
Char/gray, Loaded 10K
mi, $25K
746-0177 / 697-1101


PKlj7GE' 10 1 11 -
K j -, -, %l-L I JE

AUTO SALES
2302 Hwy 44 West,
Inverness

1352-423 -0498


Z002 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT QUAD CAB, 20 inch wheels, nice
matched tires, clean, straight body, safety checked, just
serviced, cold a/c, pwr windows, pwr seat, stereo, tilt, cruise,
reduced for this ad only $4500.00. Call Charley.


Sand Viper N
1100cc, 4 cyl. liquid cold 4 speed .
w/reverse, new tires, 2 seater, '
75+ MPH. Have Fun! *
Today Only! $3,800 w/ad.


futo Repair G Performance
1621 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
352-419-6549


2013 NAUTICSTAR
__ 2000XS OFFSHORE
Yamaja F15OTXR Four Stroke Walk-in Console
.. ..Hydraulic Steerin w/Tilt Wheel
Tandem Torsion Axle Aluminum Trailer w/Brakes

$37,900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-25971


transmission, over 4K in Ini, i
leather, loaded, safety check
S6995.00. Call Charley.


__ 2013 Xcursion X23F
4 POINT FISH PONTOON

31 Gallon Centerline Fuel Tank- Lifetime Chassis Wrranty

$27F500
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE $
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597|


CREST 22' FAMILY
FISH PONTOON
--1 Johnson J50PLEE Garmin 441
I .i _= GPS Garmin 140 Fishfinder
New Upholstery Rod Holders


THREE RIVERS MARINE $8,05
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


$29,900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


HURRICANE 226FF

DECK BOAT
5 -h Cl15TLRV 2 Stroke -Bimini Top

2003 MagicTilt Galvanized Trailer

THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
1997, Explorer XLT
$3,495
352-341-0018
FORD
1998, Explorer Sport
$4,995.
352-341-0018
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
HYUNDAI
2004 Santa Fe,
new timing belt &
brakes, 227K mi., runs
and drives like new
$2,950. 352-344-0484
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



JEEP
'98 Grand Cherokee,
6 cyl. 4 wheel drive
$3,000 (352) 628-6702
Cell 364-3122



2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10" lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306
BUICK
97 LE SABRE, loaded
125k mi., very nice
cond. asking $1875.
352-637-2588 or
845-588-0759
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment



CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2004 883 Sportster, w/
screaming eagle pkg,
Low Mi, Ex cond $4900
325-563-5552, 464-7005
Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk, xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12,900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
Honda
06 Shadow Spirit V TW
750 Awesome! Must
See Exec. Cond, burnt
orange $3250 527-7199
HONDA 2003
Reflex motor scooter/
250cc/automatic
yellow /70mpg/ 70mph/
windshield/ like new
condition/ pictures
available/asking
$2500/call
352-382-0468
SUZUKI
1981 GS1100E, Mint
Condition, adult
owned, super fast,
garage kept, new ti-
res, new seat, Italian
fairing, smoke wind-
shield with sissy bar,
only 15k orig. mi.
many extra's serious
inquires only $2600.
Call 352-489-5932
SUZUKI
1987, GS450L. Adult
driven & well maint.
Very low miles, Looks
and runs well. $1,200
obo (352) 249-7127


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


L" v
k4 --


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


I


ra New 2013 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD
Model RM3H3CEW
See Why The CR-V Is The Best
ng Compact Suv In America!
Save While They Last!


For a New 2013 Honda
)SSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Mode[TF3H3DJW
Best Selling Compact SUV
In America!
Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW
Come See Why The Odyssey Is The Best!


X60
O9%90 MONTHS
on select new Honda models
on approved credit.

OVER 90 USED
& Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles!


, -- '-
*1a-


...for a New 2012 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2CEW, 4WD With
The Trunk In The Bed, Power Pkg,
Cruise Control, V-6 Power
And A Ride Like No Other.

"Check anywhere in the
world first, but CHECK
WITH CHAD LAST!" f




ifs *


All Pre-Owned Vehicles include:
6 Mo./ 6,000 Mile
Limited Powertrain Warranty'


Plus a 5-DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


Out Our REALLY BIG Selection
of Pre-Loved Vehicles!


.A As


2007 HYUNDAI
ACCENT
$6,377


7 CHEVY
BU MAXX
T,639


2003 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS
$6,921


2006 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER
$8,490


2007 PONTIAC
G5 5-SPD
$6,973


2009 CHEVY
IMPALA
$8,786


* -.. -.w.
~


2009 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY
$11,564


2012 TOYOTA
COROLLA
$15,022


UsedCars
UsedCars


2008 HONDA
CIVIC LX
$9,900


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of HONDA CERTIFIED Vehicles!


2010 HONDA
CIVIC 4DR LX
$11,500


2010 HONDA
FIT
$15,500


2010 HONDA
CIVIC LX
$12,900


gffg; F


2010 HONDA
ODYSSEY EX-L
$21,500


2010 HONDA
ACCORD LX
$14,900


2009 HONDA
RIDGELINE RT
$17,500


2011 HONDA
CR-V
$20,300


Lo


2010 HONDA
ACCORD EXL
$19,000


2011 HONDA
CR-V
$19,000


2011 HONDA
CR-V EXL
$20,500


2011 HONDA
ODYSSEY EX-L
$24,900


LOVE Can Do For You!

.52.628.4600

INDA.COM


les per year 15 cents per mile thereafter.
1t, tag and lease and state tees due at signing.
se. 2.36 month closed end one-pay lease of $9,976 with approved credit, 12,000 miles
ily. Payment is plus lax, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Options at additional cost.
owned vehicles include $2000 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.


3 Honda


nsmission!


i


C12 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


PA.


PM




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All-New 2014
Chevy Impala 1 LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy Cmze LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy Traverse LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy Malibu LS
36 month lease A


New 2013 Chevy Camamro LS
DRIVE TODAY FOR... WITH...


New 2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13205, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: $25,015


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SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 C13


7!1


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0A
Jenkins Acur^a
1^^^^^--..^ 1^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^11111^^^^^^'''''^


Affordable


'1 ri. tJ ID.


NEW'13 Mo
Acura ILX 17."
Luxtury Starts Here! -ir -LE
Includax Damn Payment
oth No Security Deposit,




ZERO. APR
AVAILABLE FINANCING FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS ON NEW Acuras*
On Select Models. See Dealer For Details, Good Thru 05/31/13


MO37 NEW'13
-Acura RDX
urbtoan36Achtit me er
No S uty Deposit,
~5,TT_


ZERO


* DOWN PAYMENT
* PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
a SECURITY DEPOSIT


Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
SA ai l c a PER with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands!t PER
NEW'13 M Mo o NEW 13
Acura TL ---'--.*- 'r47 9 Acura MDX


.................
Thank you for reading this A prices are plus tax, tag ttle Veices subject to prior sale Limit 1 trade-in per purchase Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers See dealer for complete details Programs subject to change without notice Star ratings are part of the U S Department of Transportaton's Safercar ov program (www safercargov) Models tested with
$38,694 29 ,, i i. .. ... ..P
3215 A-tal net capita zOed ct $32,479 5 Total ontly payment 3,4 Option to phas at eas end 2129 Csed e for 2013 LX 5 Speed Atomat Ml #DE1F3DJW) MSRP $26,795 Acl net ptalized cost $23,261 17 Total monthly payments 7,524 Option t purchase at lease and S16077 Cloed-end lease for 2013 TSX Sport Wagon
5Speed (Mode #CW2H5DJW) MSRP$32,755 Actualnet capitalizedcost $30,272 34 Totalmonthy payments $1,124 Optonto purchaseat lease end $19,980 555 Ciosed-end lease Ifor 2013 TSX 5 Speed Automatic (Model #CU2F4DJW) MSRP $33,905 Acitual net capdazed cost $29,206 50 Total monthly payments $9,684 Option to phase at lease end $20,343
Additionalesetrms for t e hiSquaidlesses .. .. 1, .. .. .R s .. .nude ,destostination., tao, se, btle fees, optiors and itsanceetraScourtydeptr aed Lnssenesponsihe for maintenance, excess-atearamd
151 oer,100,(0 ilesyearxfor-ehindes wth,.,,.' ,,, ,' ", .. ,., A oailable n )TL, RL, RDX, ZDXawnthappr.oedcredt


AVAILABLE ON SELECT CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED MODELS*
On Select Models. See Dealer For Details. Good Thru 05/31/13


7 Yr / 100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty*
12 Month / 12,00OMile Comprehensive Warranty
150 Point Inspection
24 Hour Emergency Roadside Assistance Trip Interruption
Expense Reimbursement
-* Rental Vehicle M
Reimursement & More
*Powertrain warranty begins from
date of new car sale and zero mileage


2011 VW
GTI
NICE & SPORTY!

$21,995


2012 ACURA
MDX
A MUST SEE!

$39,995


HUGE



OFPRE- 0WNED


2011 HONDA
PILOT
NICE!

27,995



01NIERTIBIES

SUVS RUOKS


2012 A ^t 2010 ACU RAW2012 DODG D CHEmmOLET 2011 ACURA
--X WA 1 L-.H. RAM 1-1 -A SS 11 .1


S...228,28995 ...... s28,995 -... s28,995 .J..29,995 ..3...$ 35,995


Thank you for reading this. All prices are plus tax, tag & title. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Limit 1 trade-in per purchase. Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers. See dealer for
complete details.Programs subject to change without notice. *With a purchase of a used vehicle. Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details.


First Year
Maintenance
Included With All
Pre-Owned
Vehicles
Pre-Ownedll
Vehicles
Come With


201II 00TOOA207CDILC209HUNA I 00IOOT 09 CR 21IOLSAE


C14 SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013


Ivlyipuiii~i iTiriii





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUITfl
TOU' GH


NEW 2012 F-150 XL
4X4 CREW CAB


NEW 2012 F-250 4X4 NEW 2012 F-350 4X4
CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL CREW CAB LAAT DIESEL


M SRP.......................................................... $38,335 M SRP ......................................................... $57,345 M SRP ......................................................... $62,525
Nick Nicholas Discount................................-1,900 Nick Nicholas Discount...............................-4,100 Nick Nicholas Discount...............................-4,900
Retail Customer Cash...............................-3,500 Retail Customer Cash..............................-3,000 Retail Customer Cash..............................-3,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash.....-1,500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash....-1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash....-1,000

$31,435 $49,245 $53,625


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XLT SUPER CAB


M SRP .............................................................................ui Gr Dis............$36,655
301A Equipment Group Discount............................................................ -500
XLT Chrome Package Discount................................................................ -750
Nick Nicholas Discount .......................................................................-1,906
5.0L Special Retail Customer Cash..........................................................-500
Retail Custom er Cash ..........................................................................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash............................................-1,000
F1 50 XLT Bonus Customer Cash..............................................................-500
F1 50 Special Retail Customer Cash.....................................................-1,000


$27,999


NEW 2013 F-150 4X4
LARIAT SUPER CREW CAB


M SRP.........................................................$51,465
502A Equipment Group Discount...................750
Nick Nicholas Discount.............................-2,600
Retail Customer Cash................................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash....-1,000


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XL SUPER CREW CAB


M SRP.........................................................$35,430
101 A Equipment Gorup Discount................. -750
Nick Nicholas Discount.............................-1,400
5.0L Special Retail Customer Cash..................500
Retail Customer Cash................................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash....-1,000


SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 C15




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2010 IA SEDONA LX 2012 F RD FIESTA SEL 2010 IAOPTIMA LX
Stk# 7580561A Q1 999 Stk# P219988 Stk# P5124946
Black, 46,812 Miles 4 000 Blue, 10,443 Miles 000 Gray, 54,266 Miles 0 9 99
I -. i- 1- S I tI


2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS
Stk# G163952A 999
Red, 21,586 Miles
St A G2677-A


S11 KIA


2006 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
Stk 8758074A l
Gray, 77,731 Mile0,999


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2007 KIA SPECTRA EX
Stk# P453498 4 99
Black, 46,731 Miles 99



2009 IABORREGOLK
St# G4519527.A 1 533


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CAR DEALS, WE OPEN RELATIONSHIPS"
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