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Citrus County chronicle ( May 14, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 14, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03121

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 14, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03121

Full Text


Rolling: Heat notch easy win at Chicago /Bl


I TUESDAY-II


A'

Mostly sunny and
breezy, turning
cool at night.
PAGE A4


C I T R -S COUNTY 1
TO BUY FRO.

VILLAGE
TOYOTA
i RSEE PAGEBrE
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 118 ISSUE 280


Fla. college presidents' perks premium


Only eight institutions tie salary to performance goals


ON THE NET
* INSPECTOR GENERAL'S REPORT: tinyurl.com/cwpc9od


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A probe
ordered by Florida Gov. Rick
Scott has determined that the
pay and benefits of state college
presidents varies widely with
little explanation as to why
some presidents earn large six-


figure salaries.
This same review shows
many presidents have contracts
with provisions that appear to
violate law or in some in-
stances, the contracts automat-
ically renew each year without
approval by local college
boards.


Randy Hanna, chancellor of
the Florida College System,
said the critical review is
prompting college boards
across the state to alter and
amend the contracts now of-
fered to presidents.
Scott last year ordered his
chief inspector general to re-


view the salaries and benefits
offered to the 28 presidents in
the state college system after
trustees at a Jacksonville col-
lege agreed to a $1.2 million
severance package with the
outgoing president.
"We support our colleges with


taxpayer funds and we must en-
sure we get the best return on
that investment possible by
graduating students with the
skills and training they need to
get great jobs," Scott said in a
See Page A8


Fly flags
at half-staff
In observance of
Peace Officers Memorial
Day, Wednesday, May
15, the United States flag
is to be displayed at half-
staff for the entire day
tomorrow.
-From staff reports

I I IE.--] 11 1 1


Graduates
Meet the local Class of
2013./Inside
ASK THE EXPERTS:











Health & Life
Doctors Bennett,
Wilson, Grillo and
Vascimini share their
expertise./Page Cl


Classifieds ........ C8
Comics .......... C7
Crossword ....... .C6
Community ...... .C5
Editorial ..... .. .A10
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ....... .A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ...........C7
Obituaries ........ A6
TV Listings ....... C6


Two Citrus schools get solar power


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
John Colasanti, Citrus County School District maintenance coordinator, said a new set of solar panels at Citrus High School will provide
power to the school's cafeteria, which also serves as an emergency shelter, in the event of a power outage.

Systems come from Progress Energy grant; willprovide emergency backup


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Two more
Citrus County schools are put-
ting the sun to work.
A concept that dates back to
2006 has resulted in solar en-
ergy systems for Citrus High


School and Citrus Springs Mid-
dle School, which were selected
for 10-kilowatt solar installa-
tions with battery backup.
Each school has a building
designated as an Enhanced
Hurricane Protection Area
(EHPA) emergency shelter. The
schools were selected last year


as part of a program by the
Florida Solar Energy Center
and Progress Energy Florida.
The systems were designed
and installed by BlueChip En-
ergy of Lake Mary
According to Progress Energy
(now Duke Energy Florida),
which provided grants for sys-


teams, schools were selected
based on renewable energy ed-
ucation, location in the
Progress system and shelter ca-
pacity Once up and running,
ownership of the systems will
be turned over to the district
See Page A8


Ag Alliance wants to raise

extension service awareness

State evaluation coming in June


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
LECANTO -The Agricultural
Alliance of Citrus County is con-
tinuing efforts to boost public
awareness about the role of Cit-
rus County Extension Services.
The group reiterated its posi-
tion Monday in response to sev-
eral pending events.
In addition to the annual
threat of county budget cuts, the
extension service faces a rare
evaluation by a state team in
June and the imminent loss of


long-time 4-H
leader Amy At
Duncan.
The service is
a federal, state
and local part- f \
nership that re- L '
ceives funding -
from the state Amy
and the county Duncan
Maintaining the 4-H leader
service and sup- leaving.
porting 4-H have
been the agricultural alliance
See Page A8


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Linda Connors holds a doctor-
ate and has worked as an assis-
tant principal in three Citrus
County schools the past 16 years.
She applied for an upcoming
vacancy in the principal's slot at
Crystal River High School and a
committee scored her far above
the other applicants in areas


such as curriculum knowledge,
leadership, student discipline
and finance.
But her expected appointment
today by the Citrus County
School Board will be anything
but routine.
That's because Connors is Su-
perintendent of Schools Sandra
"Sam" Himmel's sister-in-law.
Connors is married to Doug
See Page A7


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NARLEO to honor forgotten heroes


Four killed in the line ofduty to


CHRIS TALAR
Special to the Chronicle
In 2010, NARLEO (the
National Association of
Retired Law Enforcement
Officers) honored Florida
Highway Patrol Trooper
Ronald Gordon Smith by
dedicating a monument at
the site where he was
killed. The nearby U.S. 19
bridge spanning the
Florida Barge Canal was
also named in his honor
the following year. The
members of NARLEO
Chapter 1 of Citrus County
are now embarking on an-
other assignment.
When NARLEO formed
a committee to investigate
how to properly honor
Trooper Smith, it was
widely believed that the
officer was murdered at
the site of the barge canal
bridge, on U.S. 19. Working
from the original crime re-
ports and photos taken
back in December 1973, it
was determined the actual
crime scene was more
than three miles south of
the bridge, at the intersec-
tion of U.S. 19 and Bass-
wood Avenue. (At the time


of the trooper's death,
Basswood Avenue was an
unnamed sandy trail lead-
ing to the Florida Power
hydro-electric dam.)
Permission was ob-
tained from the property
owners, and a small monu-
ment was dedicated on
Oct. 2, 2010. Trooper
Smith's family attended
the dedication, and for the
first time, family members
were introduced to five
local hunters who had wit-
nessed the attack on the
trooper and had captured
the two escaped prisoners
from Oklahoma, after a
short gunfight. On July 19,
2011, family members and
the hunters reunited for
the dedication of the new
"Trooper Ronald Gordon
Smith Memorial Bridge."
An honor guard of law en-
forcement and public
safety officers escorted
Smith family members in a
motorcade to formally
open the bridge to traffic.
Since 2011, it has come
to NARLEO's attention
there have been at least
three law enforcement of-
ficials killed in the line of
duty in Citrus County The


be remembered

officers' sacrifices had
been forgotten. One Citrus
deputy sheriff's death and
a Floral City marshal's
death were unknown to
local officials until a
Florida professor of his-
tory notified the sheriff.
The third officer was a
guard of a state convict
road gang who was killed
in an escape attempt. The
incident was brought to
NARLEO's attention by a
mention in the Chronicle's
"Back in Time" column.
a Corrections Officer
Rufus William Walters was
supervising a detail of
state convicts on July 22,
1938. At approximately
3 p.m., inmates Brusel Par-
rish and Arthur Sherman
located a shotgun Walters
had hidden earlier, and
murdered him. The two
convicts commandeered a
vehicle operated by two
state legislators en route to
a meeting, and took a .38
caliber revolver from one
of them. They fled to
Michigan, where Sherman
was killed and Parrish was
returned to Florida, where
he was killed during an-
other escape attempt.


Commission to honor


law enforcement officers


Board to issue

proclamations

Special to the Chronicle
County commissioners
will issue a proclamation
today honoring all Citrus
County law enforcement
officers and recognizing
May 12 to 18 as National
Law Enforcement Appre-
ciation Week.
The board will also
proclaim May 15 as Na-
tional Law Enforcement
Officers' Memorial Day,
to remember those offi-
cers who, through their
bravery and courageous
deeds, made the ultimate
sacrifice in service to
their community or be-
came disabled in the per-
formance of their duty. In
addition, the proclama-


It is a time for us to
remember, a time for us to
publicly say thank you.
Jeff Dawsy
Citrus County Sheriff.


tion recognizes and pays
respect to the survivors
and families of these
fallen or disabled
heroes.
The designations of May
15 and the calendar week
in which that date falls
have honored the law en-
forcement community
since October 1962, when
former President John E
Kennedy signed Public
Law 87-726. Former Presi-
dent Bill Clinton signed
Public Law 103-322 in Sep-
tember 1994, directing that
the flag of the United
States on all government


buildings be lowered to
half-staff on May 15 to com-
memorate all fallen and
disabled law enforcement
officers.
"This is an important
week for us," said Sheriff
Jeff Dawsy "It is a time for
us to remember, a time for
us to publicly say thank
you. Thank you for putting
yourselves in harm's way
for others, for being fear-
less and running toward
danger instead of away
from it, for putting your
lives on the line to protect
our homes, our children,
the people we love."


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TRIBUTE WEDNESDAY
* The National Association of Retired Law Enforcement Officers (NARLEO) will
have a special tribute to fallen officers at 10 a.m. Wednesday, May 15, at Cooter
Pond Park in Inverness.
* This year, the wreath-laying ceremony on National Peace Officers Memorial Day
will honor four officers who were killed on duty long ago: state Corrections
Officer Rufus Willams Walters, Citrus County Sheriff's Office Deputy Aubrey Fred
Johnson, Floral City Town Marshal J.W. Newsom and CCSO Deputy James
McIntosh McMullen.
* The public is invited to join retired and active-duty law enforcement personnel to
honor the four at this ceremony during National Police Week, May 12 to 18. For
more information, call NARLEO president Andrew Tarpey at 352-344-9313.


Deputy Sheriff James
McIntosh McMullen was
shot and killed on Dec. 26,
1899, when he answered
the door of his residence,
still in his uniform. Inves-
tigators believed the
shooter was a suspect the
deputy had encountered
previously, but despite a
large reward offered by
the state of Florida, the
shooter was never identi-
fied or captured. The case
remains unsolved.
Floral City Marshal
J.W Newsome was re-
sponding to a tip that a sus-
pect in a previous shooting
could be found in an illegal
bar known as "The Lobby"
inside the town limits. On
March 3, 1908, the day of
the marshal's death, Floral
City was one of the most


populated cities in the
state, after Cedar Key and
Key West. The phosphate
boom had added almost
10,000 to the 600 original
residents mostly young
miners and the unsavory
camp followers who tried
their best to separate the
hardworking laborers from
their hard-earned cash.
When Newsome and
Deputy Marshal L.B.
Thompson informed Steve
Harvey they had a warrant
for his arrest, Harvey
opened fire on the officers,
mortally wounding New-
some. Newsome shot Har-
vey in an exchange of
gunfire, and though also
mortally wounded, Harvey
fled from the bar with an
accomplice, Sam Patter-
son. Harvey and Patterson

State BRIEF =


Man scheduled to die
June 24 for killing women
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott on
Monday signed a death warrant for a man
convicted of killing two women and leaving a
third woman for dead.
Marshall Lee Gore, 49, is scheduled to die


were later located by an
angry mob of town citizens
who lynched Harvey and
shot and killed Patterson.
A coroner's jury later
ruled both deaths as justi-
fied. Marshal Newsome
was buried in the Hills of
Rest Cemetery in Floral
City
In addition to honoring
these officers on Police
Memorial Day the mem-
bers of NARLEO plan to
honor the forgotten offi-
cers with a permanent
monument honoring their
sacrifice.
Anyone who knows of a
family member of the offi-
cers or has any informa-
tion about them, can
contact Fallen Officers
Chairman Chris Talar at
352-586-2426.


by lethal injection at Florida State Prison near
Raiford at 6 p.m. on June 24.
Gore killed Susan Roark and Robyn Novick
and attempted to kill Tina Coralis in 1988.
Roark's nude body was found on a garbage
dump in Columbia County near Lake City.
Gore also stole the Tennessee woman's car.
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A2 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


LOCAI/STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C N oC.E
x nIIeI,;,







Page A3- TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013



TATE&


CI-


LOCAL


[TRUS COUNTY CHRO


)NICLE


Around the
COUNTY

Weekend fire
claims two sheds
Fire claimed two sheds in
Hernando on Sunday, ac-
cording to a report by Bat-
talion Chief Craig Stevens
of the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office Fire Rescue.
Firefighters responded to
a possible structure fire at
5:07 p.m. at 1070 E. Cho-
rus Court in Hernando after
getting reports there was a
shed fire with other struc-
tures in danger.
Crews from the Kensing-
ton Station were the first to
arrive and found two sheds
on fire.
Other units from the In-
verness, Connell Heights,
Hernando, Floral City and
Citrus Springs stations ar-
rived and quickly protected
the several other structures
that were in danger, accord-
ing to the report. The sheds
involved were knocked
down quickly to eliminate
further spread of the fire.
The fire was brought
under control at 5:15 p.m.
The homeowner was not at
home at the time of the fire.
The State Fire Marshal's
Office was notified and re-
sponded to the scene to in-
vestigate. Damage is
estimated at $8,000.
Vets committee
to meet Wednesday
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will meet
regarding Citrus County's
21 st annual Veterans Ap-
preciation Week at 1:30
p.m. Wednesday, May 15,
in the Conference Room of
the Citrus County Chronicle
building, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans' services or-
ganizations are encouraged
to send representatives to
participate in the planning
process. Individual veterans
are also welcome. Call Chris
Gregoriou at 352-795-7000.
SOWW panel
sets meeting
The Citrus 20/20 Inc. Save
Our Waters Week Commit-
tee will meet at 10 a.m. Mon-
day, May 20, in room 219,
Lecanto Government Center,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, off
County Road 491.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to plan and coordinate
activities for Citrus County's
18th annual Save Our Wa-
ters Week, Sept. 20 to 28.
All interested are welcome
to attend. Call Lace Blue-
McLean at 352-201-0149.
20/20 directors
to meet
The Citrus 20/20 Board
of Directors will meet at
4:30 p.m. Monday, May 20,
in room 117, Lecanto Gov-
ernment Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
All directors are asked to
attend. All interested per-
sons are welcome.
For more information
about Citrus 20/20 Inc., visit
www.citrus2020.org or call
352-201-0149.
From staff reports

Correction
The main photo on Page
C1 of Friday's Chronicle
misidentified actor Peter
Abrams in a caption. Abrams
plays George Fox in the Art
Center Theatre's production
of "Romance in D."
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Sheriff: Man 'hurt' little girl


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A Homosassa man is facing
charges he repeatedly molested
and sexually violated a 6-year-old.
Mark Delaine Borrego, 46, was
arrested May 1 and charged with
sexual battery on a person
younger than age 18, a capital of-
fense, and lewd and lascivious
molestation by a person 18 or
older on a person younger than


12. No bond was allowed. Borrego
was already in jail on unrelated
charges.
According to the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office report, a witness
said in May 2012 Borrego brought
up allegations he was abusing the
girl in a confrontation even before
the little girl made her first claim
that Borrego was hurting her
However, a few months later the
girl did bring up allegations Bor-
rego "hurt" her anatomy The wit-


ness took the girl to a doc- vestigators Borrego repeat-
tor at the time, but the edly fondled and violated
physician did not see any her over a period of time.
physical injuries, accord- When Borrego was in-
ing to the report. terviewed about the case,
In March 2013, the wit- he denied sexually abus-
ness said she noticed the ing the child, but could
girl was soiling her pants not answer why the girl
and the child said it was Mark would fabricate such
because Borrego "hurt" Borrego allegations.
her privates. Contact Chronicle re-
The girl reportedly told Depart- porterA.B. Sidibe at352-564-2925
ment of Children and Families in- or asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Lunch with a lawman


- -SI..


/ a


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
On Monday, Elisa Smith's fourth-grade class at Rock Crusher Elementary School was treated to a pizza and cupcake lunch with Sher-
iff Jeff Dawsy. Her class had the highest number of students on the west side of the county attend the sheriff's office's annual Summer
Safety and Youth Expo April 27. Shown with the sheriff, from left, are: Cailyn Burkhart, Brenden Conley and Hunter Frankel.


Resident seeks


removal of road


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
LECANTO -A citizens' panel
on land-use decisions will be ad-
vised on Thursday to deny a Ho-
mosassa man's request for the
county to vacate a roadway des-
ignation on property adjacent to
his residence.
Fred C. Lamond, who lives on
West Wayward Wind Loop, will
ask the Citrus County Planning
and Development Commission
(PDC) to remove an unnamed
and unconstructed roadway
lying adjacent to his property in
Grover Cleveland Estates from
planning maps. The un-built
road is a platted stubout that ap-
pears to have been designed to
provide access to the adjacent
un-platted land to the north, ac-
cording to a Planning and De-
velopment report
The un-platted land to the
north is a large tract that also
has frontage along two improved
county-maintained roadways -
West Country Club Drive and
West Pershing Drive and one
private improved roadway -
South Claridge Avenue.
The stub-out exists through
the county's Land Development
Code requirements that street
layouts in all new developments
shall be interconnected to the
street system of the surrounding
area. When adjacent lands are
un-platted, stubouts shall be
provided for future connection.
The request to vacate was pre-
sented to fire rescue and emer-
gency operations, which had no
objections. Likewise, utility
companies servicing the area
had no concerns. Lamond pro-


WHAT: Citrus County Plan-
ning and Development
Commission meeting.
WHEN: 9 a.m. Thursday.
WHERE: Room 166,
Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
CALL: 352-527-5239.
AGENDA: http://bocc.citrus
.fl.us/commissioners/
advboards/pdc/agenda/
agenda 5-16-13.pdf.

vided a petition signed by his
neighbors confirming they did
not object to the proposal either.
However, the county's Land
Development Division found
that vacating the roadway would
be inconsistent with the Com-
prehensive Plan. To vacate, any
access can be allowed only
when the principal or secondary
access to a parcel of land is not
diminished. According to policy,
subdivisions with fewer than 75
units shall have one road con-
nection, while subdivisions with
more than 75 units need two or
more connections. As this devel-
opment would exceed the
threshold, the PDC will be asked
to deny the request.
In another request, Richard
L. Jane will ask for a setback
variance to allow for construc-
tion of a carport, a screen room
addition with living space above
and the conversion of an exist-
ing balcony to living area at a
residence at 13580 W Brookview
Lane, Crystal River. Staff will
recommend approval with
conditions.


Newspaper carrier shoots attacker


Associated Press
WINTER HAVEN A man
delivering newspapers in cen-
tral Florida shot and wounded
a suspected attacker, Winter
Haven police reported.
Tiffany Simo and Douglas
Romeo were delivering copies


of the Ledger around 3 a.m.
Sunday when they noticed a
car following them. When the
carriers stopped their truck a
short time later, the car's
driver, 23-year-old Brian Scott
Dickey II, approached their
truck and fired four shots from
a handgun, police reported.


When Dickey began banging
on the window with his gun
and demanding they open
their door, Romeo pulled his
concealed firearm and fired
through the window.
Dickey was taken to a Lake-
land hospital, where he was
recovering.


Survey to ask county


residents about


budget cuts vs. taxes


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
The county's budget goal to rely
less on big taxpayers and ad val-
orem taxes has been raising con-
cern among residents, so Citrus
20/20, a county nonprofit group,
will offer residents a voice through
a survey
As the Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners (BOCC)
prepares to draw up next year's
county budget, its members have
been weighing spending cuts
against alternative revenue
sources because of a $16.5 million
budget shortfall for 2014.
The shortfall has three causes,
according to Commission Chair-
man Joe Meek.
"First and foremost, the contin-
ued reduction of valuation of real
estate in the community," Meek
explained in April to the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce.
"The second and third compo-
nents of that $16.5-million shortfall
come from Duke-Progress Energy
issues."
About $8 million in the shortage
arose from Duke's tax bill dispute.
The remainder would be the value
of losing the nuclear power plant,
which has yet to be quantified.
According to County Adminis-
trator Brad Thorpe in the 2012-13
budget statement: "We have taken
significant steps to hold the line or
reduce taxes, while keeping es-
sential services in place. Since
2007, ad valorem taxes have been
reduced by $19 million."
Also announced last year was
104 county jobs had been cut dur-
ing the previous four years, and
county staff did not get a pay in-
crease for a fourth year.
Last year, the BOCC hosted a
meeting at the county auditorium
for residents to tell them what to
cut and what to save. About 600
people turned out to plead for the
services they wanted to continue.
This year, Thorpe and Budget
Director Cathy Taylor have pre-
sented a seven-part budget analy-
sis to help residents understand
how the budget functions and


ON THE NET
Budget analysis presenta-
tions: www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/
managebudget/
management budget.htm.

which areas could be reduced for
savings.
Cuts can't realistically meet a
$16.5 million budget shortfall, so
the BOCC is about to put into ef-
fect municipal services benefits
units (MSBUs) and municipal
services taxing units (MSTUs) as
mechanisms to increase the num-
ber of payers into the system and
decrease reliance on property
taxes.
What are the opinions of tax-
payers about these moves?
Citrus 20/20 wants to find out As
a citizen-based organization dedi-
cated to fostering community-wide
participation in county develop-
ment, the group will offer the Cit-
rus County 2014 Budget Options
Survey to get taxpayer opinions to
the BOCC about how their money
should be spent before a proposed
millage rate is set in July
The survey was developed by a
roundtable of community organi-
zations spearheaded by Citrus
20/20 and joined by the Agricul-
tural Alliance, Board of Realtors,
Builders Association, Chamber of
Commerce, Economic Develop-
ment Council, Citrus County Coun-
cil, Tourist Development Council
and others.
The brief, anonymous survey
will ask county residents to rank
and prioritize the seven functions
of county government to help com-
missioners decide where to prior-
itize. The survey also will ask
taxpayers to point out their will-
ingness to pay more for priority
services, if needed.
Read Sunday's Chronicleto learn
the online link to the survey Final
survey results will be available
after June 10 on the Citrus 20/20
homepage at http://citrus2020.org/.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormerat 352-564-2916 or
cvanormer@chronicleonline. com.


= .






A4 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday There are strong indica-
tions that you will make constructive
changes in the year ahead that will
benefit you materially. You'll have to
work hard regardless.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don't
hesitate to push your plans forward if
you feel that your thinking is superior to
that of your colleagues. In all probabil-
ity, you're right.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Some-
thing you diligently worked on in the
past but temporarily put aside can be
revitalized. Your project has more
promise than ever.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Someone
quite inspirational could enter your life.
This charismatic person will turn out to
be a groundbreaking force in your life.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you and
your colleagues have put forth the nec-
essary effort, a project should come to a
satisfactory conclusion. Be sure to give
credit to each and every participant.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You'll
have a marvelous way of expressing
yourself that will capture the attention
of your listeners. Be sure to talk about
your latest ideas and interests.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Once you
set your mind on something, you're not
likely to be deterred. If you want to
bring another into the picture, be sure
he or she shares your motivations.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Two as-
sociates could become stronger allies
if you show them how they can fit in
with and how they would benefit from
your goals.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -A large
chunk of your time will be spent helping
a friend sort out his or her affairs.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Con-
ditions in general should be rather har-
monious. Your greatest benefits are
likely to be derived from one-on-one
social engagements.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you
can, you should try to spend time on
your favorite pet hobby. Having a little
fun will lift your spirits and do wonders
for your overall outlook.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Your en-
ergies are likely to be directed toward so-
cial pursuits rather than mundane or
worldly affairs. It won't be a waste of
time; you need this change of pace.
Aries (March 21-April 19) The time
is right to finalize material negotiations,
so if you've been haggling over money
with someone, this is the day to seal
the deal.


ENTERTAINMENT


Walters announces
her retirement
NEW YORK Barbara Wal-
ters said Monday that retirement
from her epochal television ca-
reer is near, but it's not happen-
ing right away.
Walters, who began in televi-
sion news as a "Today" girl in
1961, became the medium's
best-known in-
terviewer and
invented a
daytime talk
show at an
age many
people would
be going fish-
Barbara ing, said on
Walters "The View"
that she will step away from the
camera next summer.
Before that, her retirement
tour will include TV specials
looking back at her work.
The announcement brought
the 83-year-old Walters to tears.
While not necessarily a surprise
- reports about the plan leaked
out about a month ago and it
was confirmed by ABC on Sun-
day night the discussion was
alternately saucy and emotional.
"In the summer of 2014 I plan
to retire from appearing on tele-
vision at all," Walters said.
She preceded her announce-
ment with a taped piece outlining
career highlights, from her appear-
ance in a Playboy bunny outfit on
'Today" to her interview with Syr-
ian President Bashar Assad last
year. She mentioned her pride in
rising to "Today" co-host and be-
coming the first woman on a net-
work evening news program,
co-anchoring with Harry Rea-
soner on ABC. Her interviews be-
came her calling card, sitting
across from actors and presidents.
Her prime-time talk with Monica
Lewinsky set a ratings standard.


Associated Press
Aretha Franklin performs Saturday during McDonald's
Gospelfest 2013 at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J.
Franklin has canceled performances in Chicago on May 20
and Connecticut on May 26 under a doctor's recommendation
for treatment. It's unclear what she's being treated for.


Conroy memoir
coming in October
NEW YORK Pat Conroy
fans will finally get the real story
about his father, the man who in-
spired the novel "The Great
Santini."
Doubleday announced Mon-
day that the author has a mem-
oir coming out in October, "The
Death of Santini."
The publisher is calling the
book "a heart-wrenching ac-
count" of Conroy's father, the late
Donald Conroy, a Marine Corps
fighter pilot whom his son has
depicted as cruel and abusive.
The two Conroys eventually
became closer, and the memoir
will demonstrate how love can
"conquer even the meanest of
men," according to Doubleday.
Donald Conroy, whose fictional-
ized character was played by
Robert Duvall in the film adap-
tation, died in 1998.
"The Death of Santini" was
first announced in 2009 and has
long been anticipated.


Rare Sargent
painting up for auction
NEW YORK- A rare painting
by American artist John Singer
Sargent is coming to a New
York City auction.
"Marionettes," painted in
1903, could bring between $5
million and $7 million at
Sotheby's May 22 sale.
Sargent kept the work until his
death in 1925. It then passed
through his descendants to the
current owner.
The painting depicts a group
of men from an Italian American
community in Philadelphia per-
forming Sicilian puppet theater.
It's being sold as part of the
American Art auction. All the works
will be on view starting May 18.
The sale coincides with an ex-
hibition of Sargent's watercolors
at the Brooklyn Museum.
Sargent's "Group with Para-
sols" holds the auction record for
the artist, selling in 2004 for
$23.5 million.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, May 14, the
134th day of 2013. There are 231
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 14,1973, the United
States launched Skylab 1, its first
manned space station. (Skylab 1 re-
mained in orbit for six years before
burning up during re-entry in 1979.)
On this date:
In 1796, English physician Ed-
ward Jenner inoculated 8-year-old
James Phipps against smallpox by
using cowpox matter.
In 1900, the Olympic games
opened in Paris, held as part of the
1900 World's Fair.
In 1913, the Rockefeller Founda-
tion was founded in New York.
In 1948, according to the current-
era calendar, the independent state
of Israel was proclaimed in Tel Aviv.
In 1961, Freedom Riders were
attacked by violent mobs in Annis-
ton and Birmingham, Ala.
In 1973, the National Right to Life
Committee was incorporated.
Ten years ago: Death claimed
actress Dame Wendy Hiller at age
90; actor Robert Stack at age 84;
and Basketball Hall-of-Famer Dave
DeBusschere at age 62.
Five years ago: The Interior De-
partment declared the polar bear a
threatened species because of the
loss of Arctic sea ice.
One year ago: President Barack
Obama sought to tarnish Republi-
can Mitt Romney as a corporate
titan who got rich by cutting rather
than creating jobs; Romney's cam-
paign responded that the former
Massachusetts governor alone had
helped spur more public and private
jobs than Obama did for the nation.
Today's Birthdays: Rock singer-
musician Jack Bruce (Cream) is 70.
Movie producer George Lucas is
69. Rock singer David Byrne is 61.
Actress Cate Blanchett is 44.
Singer Danny Wood (New Kids on
the Block) is 44.
Thought for Today: "Sometimes
there is greater lack of communica-
tion in facile talking than in silence."
- Faith Baldwin, American ro-
mance novelist (1893-1978).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
LO PR HI LO PR I HI LO PIF
60NA I87 67 NA k J82 65 NA


86 68 NA 83 67 NAI

THREE DAY OUTLOOK zxclusve daily
9 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 53 *4
Mostly Sunny; Breezy; Turning cool
again at night.
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 58
Partly Cloudy; Warming trend starts.

THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
V. High: 87 Low: 61
Partly Cloudy and warm.

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 86/66
Record 99/48
Normal 89/61
Mean temp. 76
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.50 in.
Total for the year 5.80 in.
Normal for the year 13.34 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 30.13 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 50
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 33%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Hickory, Grasses
Today's count: 5.4/12
Wednesday's count: 5.1
Thursday's count: 4.9
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/14 TUESDAY 9:43 3:32 10:07 3:55
5/15 WEDNESDAY 10:35 4:23 10:57 4:46
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O ( SUNSET TONIGHT............................8:14P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:39A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY.........................10:18A.M.
MAY 18 MAY 25 MAY 31 JUNE 8 MOONSET TODAY .................................NONE

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Tuesday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:32 a/4:50 a 8:31 p/4:38 p
Crystal River** 7:53 a/2:12 a 6:52 p/2:00 p
Withlacoochee* 5:40 a/12:00 a 4:39 p/11:48 a
Homosassa*** 8:42 a/3:49 a 7:41 p/3:37 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
10:13 a/5:28 a 9:13 p/5:21 p
8:34 a/2:50 a 7:34 p/2:43 p
6:21 a/12:38 a 5:21 p/12:31 p
9:23 a/4:27 a 8:23 p/4:20 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
79 61
81 71
86 63
81 52
82 66
78 54
83 73
84 58
78 62


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
5
5
5
5
5
5


MARINE OUTLOOK
Northeast winds from 5 to 15 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will temperature
be choppy. Sunny skies today.


800
Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder n/a 27.86 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 36.92 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness n/a 37.57 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a 38.58 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION
Is. A %


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 49 41 s 63 37
Albuquerque 81 54 pc 85 59
Asheville 62 38 pc 71 50
Atlanta 71 45 s 77 59
Atlantic City 60 37 s 65 49
Austin 84 48 pc 85 68
Baltimore 60 38 s 66 48
Billings 93 64 pc 75 45
Birmingham 72 42 pc 82 60
Boise 94 58 s 74 47
Boston 60 46 s 60 44
Buffalo 44 34 pc 58 45
Burlington, VT 53 41 s 61 37
Charleston, SC 74 55 s 75 56
Charleston, WV 59 41 pc 72 56
Charlotte 68 42 pc 74 54
Chicago 60 36 pc 87 69
Cincinnati 62 36 pc 76 59
Cleveland 49 33 pc 57 53
Columbia, SC 73 54 s 76 54
Columbus, OH 57 38 pc 73 58
Concord, N.H. 55 41 s 64 30
Dallas 87 54 pc 88 65
Denver 84 56 ts 86 48
Des Moines 76 43 pc 95 62
Detroit 54 30 pc 62 56
El Paso 82 57 pc 85 65
Evansville, IN 68 38 pc 83 64
Harrisburg 55 41 pc 63 43
Hartford 57 44 s 65 36
Houston 81 55 pc 83 67
Indianapolis 63 37 pc 79 64
Jackson 78 46 s 85 59
Las Vegas 101 74 s 101 73
Little Rock 82 50 s 88 63
Los Angeles 84 66 s 78 61
Louisville 67 42 pc 82 65
Memphis 75 49 s 86 65
Milwaukee 51 33 pc 69 61
Minneapolis 71 41 .01 pc 92 57
Mobile 78 52 s 82 58
Montgomery 77 45 pc 83 59
Nashville 70 39 pc 83 59
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 78 61 pc 82 64
New York City 58 46 s 65 49
Norfolk 63 57 s 64 52
Oklahoma City 88 55 pc 88 65
Omaha 83 48 pc 95 59
Palm Springs 10874 s 107 67
Philadelphia 57 46 s 66 49
Phoenix 10375 s 102 78
Pittsburgh 52 34 pc 62 50
Portland, ME 57 41 s 61 37
Portland, Ore 68 57 pc 66 48
Providence, R.I. 60 41 s 64 41
Raleigh 64 44 pc 71 51
Rapid City 89 50 pc 77 48
Reno 86 54 s 83 52
Rochester, NY 49 36 pc 58 45
Sacramento 89 57 s 89 57
St. Louis 74 43 pc 89 66
St. Ste. Marie 47 31 pc 56 45
Salt Lake City 92 62 pc 84 54
San Antonio 84 55 ts 83 69
San Diego 85 65 s 76 61
San Francisco 64 51 s 70 51
Savannah 83 53 s 78 56
Seattle 64 55 .11 pc 64 48
Spokane 63 52 .16 pc 64 42
Syracuse 50 38 .01 pc 61 41
Topeka 80 46 pc 95 63
Washington 61 46 .01 s 67 49
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 108 Needles, Calif.
LOW 18 Silver Bay, Minn.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/78/s
Amsterdam 54/46/sh
Athens 79/61/sh
Beijing 84/62/pc
Berlin 65/48/c
Bermuda 70/62/r
Cairo 86/61/s
Calgary 59/45/pc
Havana 89/70/pc
Hong Kong 83/78/c
Jerusalem 71/56/s


Lisbon 69/54/pc
London 54/39/sh
Madrid 76/51/sh
Mexico City 75/55/ts
Montreal 59/41/s
Moscow 82/57/s
Paris 61/44/sh
Rio 82/69/s
Rome 69/59/s
Sydney 66/50/s
Tokyo 75/64/pc
Toronto 57/46/pc
Warsaw 67/49/pc


LEGAL NOTICES




City of Crystal River........................................C2
Meeting Notices............................................... 11
Miscellaneous Notices..................................C11
Foreclosure Sale/Action
N otices.................................................. ............ 11
Notice to Creditors/
Administration..............................................C11

y` C IT R U S O U N TY IN TY


CHRONICLE
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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
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Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

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Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonllne.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 6 3 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E editor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes........................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Louis
Smith, 88
CITRUS SPRINGS
Louis Robert Smith, 88,
of Citrus Springs, Fla.,
passed away in the early
morning hours of Monday,
May 13, 2013, under the
compass -
sionate
care of
Hospice of
Citrus
County
and his
family y.
Louis was
born in a Louis
log cabin Smith
Jan. 20,
1925, in Winfield, Ohio, to
Robert and Edith May
(Hoopengarner) Smith.
Louis had four sisters,
Ruby (E. "Red") Weick,
Marilyn (Russ) Stalder,
Roberta "Bert" (Ralph)
Klinger and Fanny (Gene)
Swad.
On June 13, 1946, Louis
married Leonia E. Zim-
merman in New Philadel-
phia, Ohio. Louis and
Leonia have five children,
Thomas L. (Linda), Louis
R. (Teresa), James M.
(Becky), LuAnn (Danny)
Hagey and Jeffrey L.
(Adele). They also have
nine grandchildren, Tra-
cie, Clint, Josh, Donovan,
Michael, Tisha, Nathan,
Casey and Heather; and 11
great-grandchildren.
In 1943, during World
War II, Louis entered the
U.S. Army, where he was
stationed in Okinawa,
Japan. He was assigned to
the Signal Corps, helping
to build roads and erect
bridges as well as working
as a mechanic. He re-
ceived an Honorable Dis-
charge Jan. 26, 1946, and
returned home to New
Philadelphia.
Following his release
from the army, Louis be-
came an independent
truck driver, hauling a va-
riety of freight across the
U.S. He and Leonia
resided in New Philadel-
phia, where they owned
and operated Farmer
Smith's Market on East
High Avenue. Louis con-
tinued with his independ-
ent trucking, hauling
produce for their produce
market. During this time
they lived part-time in
Naples, Fla., and part-time
in New Philadelphia,
Ohio. Louis loved camping
and fishing and spent
many hours of doing both
with Leonia, and very
often children and grand-
children were sharing the
fun with them. Louis also
loved to "tinker" with
things and could often be
found in his garage tearing
something apart.
Upon retirement, Louis
and Leonia traveled
across this beautiful coun-
try with their beloved dog
"Duke" and often with
grandchild in tow, in what
was lovingly referred to as
"the hippie van." Louis
and Leonia's later years
were spent in Inglis and
then Citrus Springs, where
he and Leonia built and
resided in a beautiful new
home. They spent many
wonderful years there, vis-
ited by family and friends.
They loved having a four-
legged companion sharing
their Citrus Springs home
as part of their family
These included "Rudy"
and "Andy," but no other
animal was ever as dear to
them as their "Duke."
Louis was a colorful story-
teller and enjoyed sharing
stories about his life with
family and friends. He was
an avid poker player, en-
joyed playing dominoes -
and you wouldn't want to
challenge him in a game of
Uno! He will be missed by
all those who loved him.
A visitation will be at
noon Wednesday, May 15,
2013, at the Strickland Fu-
neral Home Chapel in
Crystal River, where a fu-


dLs. E. Zave
Funeral Home With Crematory
JOHN GRAY
Service: Tues. 11:00 AM
Rutland Baptist Church
FRANK INNO
Private Arrangements
MATTHEW ROZALSKI
Mass: Sat. 11:00 AM
Our Lady of Fatima
NOAH B. CLEAVELAND
Private Arrangements
726-8323 00EUZA


neral service will be con-
ducted at 1 p.m. Graveside
military honors will be
conducted at2 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 16, 2013, at the
Florida National Ceme-
tery in Bushnell. In lieu of
flowers the family respect-
fully asks that you make
donations to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270 Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Margaret
'Peggy'
Cardinali, 65
LECANTO
Margaret "Peggy" Cardi-
nali, 65, of Lecanto, Fla.,
went to be with her Lord
and Savior Jesus Christ on
Sunday, May 12,2013, after
a two and a half year battle
with cancer. She died at
the Hospice of the Com-
forter in Altamonte
Springs. Peggy was born
Feb. 3,1948, in Greenwich,
Conn., the daughter of Hu-
bert and Hazel Oldham
Hanson. She was a teacher
at Seven Rivers Christian
School in Lecanto, the Cit-
rus County School System,
and the Little Acorn Pre-
school in Crystal River.
She moved to Lecanto in
1983 from Manahawkin,
N.J. She was a member of
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto, and
was a volunteer at the Sun-
coast Crisis Pregnancy
Center
Peggy is survived by her
husband of 44 years, Ray-
mond Cardinali of
Lecanto; three children,
Christina Cardinali Wert
of Oviedo, Jeffrey Cardi-
nali and wife Marie of Al-
tamonte Springs and
Victoria Voltzke and hus-
band Christian of Alta-
monte Springs; two sisters,
Carol Dinmore of Lecanto,
Susan Schmitz of Seattle,
Wash.; brother, George
Hanson of Boston, Mass.;
and five grandchildren,
Ryan Wert and Jason Wert
of Oviedo and Andrew
Cardinali, Aaron Cardinali
and Lucas Voltzke, all of
Altamonte Springs.
The family will receive
friends from 3 to 6 p.m.
Thursday, May 16, 2013, at
the Heinz Funeral Home.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Cardinali will be at 11 a.m.
Friday, May 17, 2013, at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church in Lecanto. The
Rev Ray Cortese will pre-
side. Donations in her
memory can be made to
Hospice of the Comforter,
605 Montgomery Road, Al-
tamonte Springs, FL
32714; or Seven Rivers
Christian School, 4221 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461. Heinz
Funeral Home & Crema-
tion, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Charlene
Hartt, 51
INVERNESS
Charlene Hartt, 51, of In-
verness, died Saturday,
May 11, 2013, at her home.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
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in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


To Place Your
"In Memory ad,
Candy Phillips


563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com




fo hoias


Angela
Ceparano, 83
BEVERLY HILLS
Angela Ceparano, 83, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., passed
away May 11, 2013, under
the loving care of her fam-
ily and Hospice of Citrus
County Angela was born
Dec. 14, 1924, in Norris-
town, Pa., the daughter of
Nunzio and Margaret
Taormina, the youngest of
seven children. She moved
to the area with her hus-
band from Lake
Ronkonkoma, N.Y, in
1986. Angela was a seam-
stress, crossing guard,
restaurateur and home-
maker. She was always in-
terested in spending
quality time with her fam-
ily and many friends. She
was a parishioner of Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church of Beverly Hills.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
John Ceparano, in 2007;
and six older siblings. Left
to cherish her memory are
her two sons, John Joseph
Ceparano and wife, Mary
Ann, Lecanto, Joseph
Ceparano and wife Susan,
Homosassa; three grand-
sons, Michael, Jimmy and
Gregory, all of Lecanto;
brother and sister-in-law,
Frank and Rosie
Ceparano, Deerfield
Beach; and 12 nieces and
nephews, including Marie
Leone and Dennis
Bluemke, who reside close
to her in Florida.
Funeral Mass will be at
11 a.m. Saturday, May 18,
2013, at Our Lake of Grace
Catholic Church in Bev-
erly Hills under the direc-
tion of Heinz Funeral
Home. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to
Hospice of Citrus County
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

John Heda, 58
LECANTO
John L. Heda, 58 of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Monday, May 13, 2013, in
the loving care of his fam-
ily and Hospice of Citrus
County He was born Sun-
day, Feb. 27, 1955, in
Chicago, Ill., to Leo and
Marie (Chapas) Heda.
John was a retired truck
driver and enjoyed travel-
ing and fixing toy trucks
for his grandson.
John was preceded in
death by his son, Kevin
Heda. Survivors include
his wife, Joann Siciliano
Heda of Lecanto; sons,
John Heda and wife Eliza-
beth of Plano, Ill., and
Michael Heda of Lecanto;
sisters, Pat and Marion;
brother-in-law, Sam Sicil-
iano and wife Carol of Bev-
erly Hills; and grandson
Jordan Lee Heda of Plano,
Ill.
Memorial service of re-
membrance is at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, May 15, 2013,
at Fero Funeral Home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Hospice of
Citrus County, P0. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464. Arrangements are
entrusted to Fero Funeral
Home, www.ferofuneral
home.com.




full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services. A
flag will denote
military service.


BEVERLY HILLS
Dean Allen Hudnall, 31,
of Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Saturday, May 11, 2013, in
Bushnell, as a result of an
automobile accident. He
was born April 11, 1982, in
Inverness to John A. and
Kimberly K. Hudnall. He
was a lifelong resident of
Citrus County He was a
welder employed by Big
Span Structures LLC and
was of the Protestant faith.
He was preceded in
death by his mother, Kim-
berly Jansen, July 3, 2004.
Surviving are his father,
John Hudnall of South
Bend, Ind.; daughter, Kem-
ber Hudnall of Sarasota;
brother, Jered Hudnall of
South Bend, Ind.; and ma-
ternal grandparents, Car-
roll and Shirley Phipps of
Crystal River.
A memorial service will
be conducted at 11 a.m.
Saturday, May 18, 2013, at
the Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River, followed by a bal-
loon release at the Fort Is-
land Beach in Crystal
River. In lieu of flowers,
the family is requesting
memorial contributions be
made to Dean's grand-
mother, Sharon Phipps,
827 N. Lyle Ave., Crystal
River, FL 34429, to help
with funeral expenses.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Cheryl
Leech, 66
OZELLO
Cheryl S. Leech, 66, of
Ozello, Fla., passed away
Saturday, April 6, 2013, at
the Hospice House of Cit-
rus County in Lecanto. She
was born Jan. 23, 1947, in
Evansville, Ind., to Robert
H. and Mary Louise
(Davis) Miller. She came
here 35 years ago from
Lake Station, Ind. She was
a custodian for the Citrus
County School System, she
attended the Ozello Bap-
tist Church and was a
member of the EO.E. of
Homosassa.
She was preceded in
death by her daughter,
Kimberly S. Carroll, Dec.
27, 1997. She is survived by
her son, Dane M. Leech of
Ozello; a brother, Robert
D. Miller of Chicago, Ill.;
and a grandson, Devon
Roberts of Kentucky
A memorial service will
be at noon Saturday, May
18, 2013, at the Ozello
Causeway followed by a
reception at 2515 S.
Diecidue Drive, Ozello,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory Crystal
River assisted the family
with arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


SO YOU KNOW
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


Barbara
Salinas-
Norman, 70
CHICANA AUTHOR
SANTA FE, N.M.-A 70-
year-old woman whose
mummi-
fied body
was re-
cently
found in
her Santa
Fe apart-
ment was
identified
as a Chi- Barbara
cana ac- Salinas-
tivist, Norman
teacher and author.
Santa Fe police said the
decomposed remains of
Barbara Salinas-Norman
were discovered last week
and authorities say she
may have been dead for
more than a year
The Santa Fe New Mex-
ican reported Salinas-Nor-
man founded and ran a
publishing company
called Pinata Publications
in the office of her then-
husband, Sam Norman, an
Oakland lawyer She began
writing, illustrating and
publishing her own books
designed to help Mexican
American children iden-
tify with their culture. She
gave up teaching to write
full time in 1983.
She was the author of
"Los Tres Cerdos: Nacho,
Tito and Miguel" her
version of "The Three Lit-
tle Pigs." In the book, the
third pig, Miguel, builds a
home-made of adobe
bricks. The illustrations
depict New Mexico-style
furnishings, Indian pot-
tery, kiva fireplaces, vigas
and retablos.
She also was a bilingual
teacher in the Oakland,
Calif., public schools in the
1980s.
Salinas' body was dis-
covered by her brother-in-
law, Louis Ponce, who said
Friday that he had become
concerned about her be-
cause he hadn't heard
from her for a long time.
Stories from friends and
family suggested Salinas'
life had been unraveling
for some time. She often
slept in her car and
washed up in the bath-
room at a local library The
gas and electricity had
been turned off in her
condo because she wasn't
paying her bills. She ate at
soup kitchens. Her home
was in foreclosure.
Salinas earned a bache-
lor's degree in education
from California State Uni-
versity in Los Angeles and
a master's degree in pub-
lic health education from
the University of Califor-
nia, Berkeley She became
involved in the Chicano
movement during that
time and considered her-
self a founding mother of
MEChA, (Movimiento Es-
tudiantil Chicano de Azt-
lan), a student
organization promoting
higher education among
Chicanos.
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A6 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


L





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DUI arrests
Ralph Carey, Jr., South
Olbek Point, Homosassa, at
7:04 p.m. May 9 on a misde-
meanor charge of driving under
the influence. According to his
arrest affidavit, he was stopped
at the intersection of Grover
Cleveland Boulevard and
South Alabama Avenue in Ho-
mosassa for swerving and fail-
ure to maintain a single lane.
Tests of his breath showed his
blood alcohol concentration
was 0.20 and .0197 percent.
The legal limit is 0.08 percent.
Bond $1,000.
Keith Vanorden, 42, of
South Running Brook Drive,
Homosassa, at 3:16 a.m. May
10 on misdemeanor charges of
driving under the influence and
refusal to submit to testing. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit, he
was pulled over near a Crystal
River area restaurant after he
reportedly left the restaurant
without paying for his food. He
had difficulty performing sobri-
ety tasks and refused to submit
to a test of his breath. Bond
$1,000.
Other arrests
Andrew Luiz, 47, of East
Salmon Drive, Floral City, at
12:32 p.m. May 10 on felony
charges of grand theft and
planning/managing/supervis-
ing/trafficking in stolen property.
According to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of stealing alu-
minum doors from a restaurant
in Inverness. He reportedly at-
tempted to sell them at a recy-
cling facility in Lecanto and later
went to Leesburg to sell them
at a recycling facility there.
Bond $12,000.
Kokilaben Patel, 49, of
West Marquette Lane, Crystal
River, at 1:32 p.m. May 10 on a
misdemeanor charge of petit
theft. Bond $250.
Maddie Cryer, 26, of
South Kings Avenue, Ho-
mosassa, at 3:10 p.m. May 10


on a Citrus County warrant for
failure to appear in court on an
original felony charge of grand
theft. No bond.
Steven Stokes, 18, of
North Trapper Terrace, Her-
nando, at 2:57 p.m. May 10 on
a felony charge of burglary (be-
comes armed) and a misde-
meanor charge of assault.
According to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of burglarizing a
home on South School Avenue
in Lecanto and brandishing a
small folding knife. He told a
law enforcement officer he was
attempting to retrieve a cell
phone from the people inside.
Bond $15,250.
Jacob Hatten, 20, of
North Crause Point, Lecanto,
at 3:51 p.m. May 10 on a felony
charge of battery on a person
65 or older. According to his ar-
rest affidavit, he is accused of
throwing a man to the ground.
The alleged victim was at-
tempting to separate two
women who were arguing
when Hatten intervened. Bond
$2,000.
Michael Nase, 43, of Ho-
mosassa, at 9:29 p.m. May 10
on a Florida Parole Commis-
sion warrant for violation of pa-
role on an original felony
charge of failure to register as
a sex offender. No bond.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Burglaries
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:04 a.m. Friday,
May 10, in the 300 block of S.
School Ave., Lecanto.
A commercial burglary
was reported at 9:59 a.m. May
10 in the 2000 block of N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
A residential burglary was
reported at 3:57 p.m. May 10 in
the 1500 block of N. Branding
Iron Way, Inverness.
M A residential burglary was
reported at 8:27 p.m. May 10 in


the 9700 block of W. Sandra
St., Crystal River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 12:32 p.m. Satur-
day, May 11, in the 2600 block
of W. Scarano Court, Lecanto.
M A residential burglary was
reported at 1:41 a.m. Sunday,
May 12, in the 10 block of
Meadowdale St., Beverly Hills.
M A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 12:34 p.m. May 12 in
the 600 block of N.E. 2nd St.,
Crystal River.
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:48 p.m. May 12 in
the 800 block of S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 3:21 a.m. Friday, May 10, in
the 2300 block of N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River.
EA grand theft was reported
at 8:52 a.m. May 10 in the 3100
block of N. Carl G. Rose High-
way, Hemando.
SA grand theft was reported
at 9:20 a.m. May 10 in the 1500
block of Keats St., Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:57 p.m. May 10 in the
3700 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
EA grand theft was reported
at 3:24 p.m. May 10 in the 3700
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
EA grand theft was reported
at 8:26 a.m. Saturday, May 11,
in the 4100 block of E. Jessie


Lane, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 8:39 p.m. May 11 in the 2400
block of E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 8:52 a.m. Sunday, May 12,
in the 6300 block of S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:58 p.m. May 12 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
EA grand theft was reported
at 8:38 p.m. May 12 in the 4100
block of E. Lake Park Drive,
Hemando.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 5:38 a.m. Friday, May 10, in
the 6600 block of S. LimaAve.,
Homosassa.
A felony vandalism was
reported at 11:30 a.m. May 10
in the 4300 block of E. McCart-
ney Loop, Inverness.
A vandalism was reported
at 9:15 a.m. Saturday, May 11,
in the 7900 block of W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Crystal River.
A vandalism was reported
at 6:59 a.m. Sunday, May 12,
in the 800 block of S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
ON THE NET
For the Record reports
are archived online at
ww.chronicleonline.
corn.


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PRINCIPAL
Continued from Page Al

Connors, Himmel's
brother. Doug Connors is
an assistant principal at
Lecanto High School.
Himmel said she
stayed out of the selection
process, which was over-
seen by assistant superin-
tendent Mike Mullen.
"I didn't play any role
in it," Himmel said.
Most principal appoint-
ments come with a letter
of recommendation from
Mullen, the applicant's re-
sume and nothing more.
Mullen said he purposely
included in the board's
agenda packet the list of
other finalists, names of a
screening committee and
the applicant's scores.
"I am aware of the fact
that Dr. Connors is your
sister-in-law and that you
have made every effort
not to promote family
members while serving
as superintendent,"
Mullen's memo to Him-
mel reads. "However, it is
my belief that we should
always do what is in the


LOCAI/STATE


I


TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 A7

best interest of students
and staff, and in this case
I believe the best person
for Crystal River High
School is Dr. Connors."
Connors, who has a
doctorate in educational
leadership from the Uni-
versity of Central Florida,
is a Citrus High School
assistant principal. She's
held similar jobs at the
Renaissance Center and
Lecanto Middle School,
and also taught math at
Lecanto High School.
School board member
Pat Deutschman said
Connors is perfect for the
CRHS principal's job.
"Nobody comes close to
the depth of experience
she has," Deutschman
said.
Himmel said Connors
has earned the CRHS
position.
"She was assistant
principal before I be-
came superintendent,"
Himmel said. '"Am I sup-
posed to punish her be-
cause she's my
sister-in-law?"
The position is open
because of Mark McCoy's
decision to return to
classroom teaching.










Psychologist Joyce Brothers dead at 85


Associated Press

Joyce Brothers, the pop psy-
chologist who pioneered the tel-
evision advice show in the 1950s
and enjoyed a long and prolific
career as a syndicated colum-
nist, author, and television and
film personality, has died. She
was 85.
Brothers died Monday of res-
piratory failure in New York
City, according to her longtime
Los Angeles-based publicist,
Sanford Brokaw.
Brothers first gained fame on
a game show and went on to
publish 15 books and make
cameo appearances on popular
shows including "Happy Days"
and "The Simpsons." She visited
Johnny Carson on "The Tonight
Show" nearly 100 times.
The way Brothers liked to tell
it, her multimedia career came
about "because we were
hungry"
It was 1955. Her husband, Mil-
ton Brothers, was still in med-
ical school and Brothers had
just given up her teaching posi-
tions at Hunter College and Co-
lumbia University to be home
with her newborn, firmly believ-
ing a child's development de-
pended on it.
But the young family found it-
self struggling on her husband's
residency income. So Brothers
came up with the idea of enter-
ing a television quiz show as a
contestant.
"The $64,000 Question"
quizzed contestants in their cho-
sen area of expertise. She mem-
orized 20 volumes of a boxing
encyclopedia and, with that as
her subject, became the only
woman and the second person to
ever win the show's top prize.
Brothers tried her luck again
on the superseding "$64,000
Challenge," answering each
question correctly and earning
the dubious distinction as one of
the biggest winners in the his-


SOLAR
Continued from PageAl

The idea as explained
by 2007 Energy Center
documents is to provide
energy security during a
disaster. A ground-
mounted grid of solar pan-
els at each school will
provide electricity for
emergency power when
needed. The systems will
also help reduce each
school's electricity costs
throughout the year, while
providing scientific data
that can be analyzed by
students.
Installation at both
schools is nearly complete,



SERVICE
Continued from PageAl

priorities.
Duncan, who is leaving
for family reasons, has
been an extension agent
for 11 years and the public
face of 4-H in Citrus
County. The program has
18 separate clubs serving
hundred of members ages
5 to 18.
Her news triggered a
discussion on the number
of extension cuts from a
staff of 13 down to five -
and the possibility her po-
sition might not be filled or
not be filled in a timely
manner.
With summer 4-H camp
being planned, Duncan
said she hopes they can fill
the position soon.
"Extension is on the
line," said Chairman Dale
McClellan. "We should be
prepared not to be quiet."
Member Winn Webb sug-
gested the alliance write a
letter to the county ex-
pressing concern about
the vacancy and urging it
be filled as soon as possi-
ble. The idea was ex-
panded to include the
University of Florida and
other elected officials.
The evaluation team
will include representa-
tives from the University
of Florida and other ex-
tension services from
across the state. It is
scheduled to be in Citrus
County on June 12 and 13
and meet with individuals
and groups that utilize ex-
tension services.
The agricultural alliance
is moving to broaden its
participation with a variety
of membership options
and invites anyone inter-
ested in agriculture to at-
tend its meetings.


Associated Press
Psychologist Dr. Joyce Brothers, left, and Bruce Spizer, author of "The Beatles are Coming," are
interviewed at a news conference Jan. 16, 2004, in New York. Brothers died Monday in New York City,
according to publicist Sanford Brokaw. She was 85.


tory of television quiz shows.
She later denied any knowledge
of cheating, and during a 1959
hearing in the quiz show scan-
dal, a producer exonerated her
of involvement.
Her celebrity opened up
doors. In 1956, she became co-
host of "Sports Showcast" and
frequently appeared on talk
shows.
Two years later, NBC offered
her a trial on an afternoon tele-
vision program in which she ad-
vised on love, marriage, sex and
child-rearing. Its success led to a
nationally telecast program, and
subsequent late-night shows that
addressed such taboo subjects
as menopause, frigidity, impo-
tence and sexual enjoyment
She also dispensed advice on


according to district main-
tenance supervisor John
Colasanti. Construction on
the identical systems
started in December. At
Citrus High it sits just be-
hind the large brick cafe-
torium. The shelter
already has a backup gen-
erator but, he said, this is
redundancy if the genera-
tor fails to provide enough
power for lights.
He said it probably re-
ally will be used more as a
teaching tool. Once com-
plete, a TV monitor in the
school office will display
performance data from
system.
"Not only does solar pro-
vide clean electricity for
use by the schools during


REPORT
Continued from Page Al

statement about the
probe. "Every dollar we
invest in our colleges must
be geared toward this ulti-
mate goal."
The probe did not cover
the salaries and benefits
paid to presidents at the
state's 12 public universi-
ties which include
schools such as University
of Florida or Florida State
University.
The final report re-
leased Monday showed
that presidents in the
state college system are
receiving nearly $10 mil-
lion in salaries and bene-
fits during the current
fiscal year.
Some of the salaries
range from nearly
$144,000 for the president
of North Florida Commu-
nity College to more than
$630,000 to the president
at Miami-Dade College.
State law limits college
president salaries to
$225,000 if the money
comes directly from state
taxpayers. But colleges
are allowed to augment


several phone-in radio pro-
grams, sometimes going live.
She was criticized by some for
giving out advice without know-
ing her callers' histories. But
Brothers responded that she
was not practicing therapy on
the air and that she advised
callers to seek professional help
when needed.
Despite criticism of the for-
mat, the call-in show took off,
and by 1985, the Association of
Media Psychologists was created
to monitor for abuses.
Dr. Drew Pinsky, who has of-
fered his medical expertise in
radio and television formats first
pioneered by Brothers, was
among those sharing reaction to
her death Monday
"Knew nothing about her his-


the day and reduce the
need for expensive peak
power utility production,
but also teaches the next
generation about environ-
mental benefits of solar,"
said BlueChip Energy
spokesman Lawrence
Hefler, in a press release.
"It helps ensure that
Florida continues to grow
in solar adoption."
Colasanti explained as
the electricity is being gen-
erated, the batteries are
charged and any power
left over gets consumed on
site. With the school being
a big user, he does not an-
ticipate any power going
back to the grid. "It helps
us from a power stand-
point," he said, "because


tory on the $64,000 question, but
I did know Joyce Brothers," he
wrote on Twitter "She was a pi-
oneer and very knowledgable."
Other celebrities, including
Paris Hilton, rapper Common
and motivational guru Tony
Robbins, posted bits of Brothers'
advice on Twitter, such as: "The
best proof of love is trust."
For almost four decades,
Brothers was a columnist for
Good Housekeeping. She also
wrote a daily syndicated advice
column that appeared in more
than 350 newspapers. Briefly, in
1961, she was host of her own tel-
evision program.
Later, Brothers branched out
into film, playing herself in more
than a dozen movies, including
"Analyze That" (2002),


we don't get charged for
what is being produced."
"For the first five years
Progress Energy takes
care of it, after that it's
ours," he said. The system
will not require much
maintenance until 6 to 8
years out, when the batter-
ies will need to be
replaced.
The district already has
solar energy experience
with the system at Ho-
mosassa Elementary that
was completed in May
2007. It is a smaller system
without battery power
storage and has been
problem-free.
The solar arrays for the
two new systems have two
banks of 15 4-by-6-foot


the salary with money
from other sources.
Chief Inspector General
Melinda Miguel noted that
in some instances the total
amount of pay and bene-
fits offered to presidents
"was not readily transpar-
ent" or that some con-
tracts offered benefits for
life which means the total
owed by taxpayers is diffi-
cult to calculate.
Some college presi-
dents get thousands of dol-
lars each year in car
allowances, housing al-
lowances or medical in-
surance premiums.
One former president at
a college in Bradenton re-
ceived nearly $21,000 for
health insurance premi-
ums. Dennis Gallon, presi-
dent of Palm Beach State
College, receives a stipend
of nearly $96,000 instead of
a car and housing al-
lowance. E. Ann McGee,
president of Seminole
State College, is receiving
$1,000 a year to pay for


home Internet access.
Sandy Shugart, presi-
dent of Valencia College,
gets a golf club member-
ship and membership in
the group that hosts the
Florida Citrus Bowl as
part of his nearly $479,000
compensation package.
Auditors also found that
Shugart received a
$190,000 lump sum bonus
in 2012.
Miguel called on college
board trustees to establish
guidelines for compensa-
tion and to spell out how
much taxpayers will be
responsible for paying
even after the president is
no longer working for the
school. Eduardo Padron,
Miami-Dade president, is
guaranteed lifetime
health insurance after he
leaves the college.
"My belief is we will
able to work with the local
boards and colleges and
meet the recommenda-
tions," Hanna said.
Miguel's probe also


"Beethoven's 4th" (2001),
"Lover's Knot" (1996) and "Dear
God" (1996).
She was also an advocate for
women. In the 1970s, Brothers
called for changing textbooks to
remove sexist bias, noting that
nonsexist cultures tend to be
less warlike.
The quiz show scandal of 1958-
59 was one of the biggest scan-
dals in the history of television.
It erupted in 1958 when it was
revealed that quiz show produc-
ers had been rigging the out-
come of some shows, including
"The $64,000 Question," by giv-
ing favored contestants the an-
swers in advance.
Brothers was one of a number
of big winners who told an Asso-
ciated Press survey in Novem-
ber 1959 that they knew nothing
of any cheating.
At a House hearing that
month, associate producer
Mort Koplin also said Brothers
was among those not involved
in cheating. But he also de-
scribed how contestants, who
were carefully interviewed in
advance, could be affected un-
knowingly as producers tried
to manipulate the outcome of
shows by tailoring questions to
benefit favored ones and oust
less-favored ones.
According to the testimony,
Brothers applied to be a "64,000
Question" contestant as an ex-
pert in home economics and
psychology. The producers, look-
ing for an audience-pleasing
oddity, suggested the pretty
young woman try boxing as her
specialty She learned the sub-
ject so well, Koplin said, she
kept on winning even after the
producers "threw the book" at
her with tough questions aimed
at eliminating her.
Born Joyce Diane Bauer in
New York, Brothers earned her
bachelor's degree from Cornell
University and a Ph.D. in psy-
chology from Columbia.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A sign on the fence surrounding the solar panels explains
the process of deriving energy from the sun.


solar panels. They charge
a set of large batteries,
which feed the main
power system once they


noted that most colleges
had contracts that appear
to violate state laws de-
signed to restrict sever-
ance packages paid to
presidents who either re-
sign voluntarily or are
forced to leave their job.
State law was changed
in 2011 to limit payouts to
no more than 20 weeks but
many contracts included
provisions that would
allow a president to re-
ceive a payout above what
is allowed in law.
Hillsborough Commu-
nity College President
Ken Atwater was given a
contract after the law
changed that guarantees
him a year's worth of
salary even if he is fired.


reach capacity. According
to Duke Energy, 10 100-
watt light bulbs would use
one kilowatt of power.


Hanna noted that the
issue of severance pay-
ments has been an issue
for universities as well
after the law was changed.
State auditors in February
criticized Florida A&M
University for having a
contract that allowed for-
mer President James Am-
mons to receive a
one-year paid sabbatical
after he abruptly
resigned.
Additionally, 11 colleges
had so-called "rolling"
contracts that automati-
cally renewed each year
without requiring a vote
by college trustees. Only
eight colleges tied con-
tracts to performance
goals.


WHAT WAS

THE ORIGINAL

\7; INTENT OF OUR

CONSTITUTION?
WHY AND HOW HAS
ITS MEANING CHANGED?
Come join us in our search for the truth. Instructed by
Constitutional Scholars there are no costs, no tests, and
is learning friendly. We respect and value individual
opinions as we embark on this most important learning
experience. Open to everyone especially folks living in
Precinct 307, Sugarmill Woods.
Starts Wednesday, April 17
at 3:30-5:30pm
and continues each Wednesday to June 12
Homosassa Library Community Room
4100 S. Grandmarch Ave., Homosassa
Sponsored by the North Suncoast Republican Club


Contact Bruce Bryn, Director 503-7375
Educators presenting the course:
Shirley and Pat Miketinac 000EM4F


... presidents in the state college
system are receiving nearly $10
million in salaries and benefits ...


Brashear's
www.BrashearsPharmacy.com PHARMIVACY


471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto............... 746-3420
Hwy.491 Next To Suncoast Dermatology
206 W. Dampier Street, Inverness........637-2079
One Block Behind City Hall On Seminole Ave., Inverness


A8 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,640 S&P 500
S.C,:,,, Close: 1,633.77
Change: 0.07 (flat)
1,560 10 DAYS .........


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


. .. DAYS


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 15,091.68
Change: -26.81 (-0.2%)


1,680 15. .
1,60014,400
1,520 .
13,600.... .. ..............
1,440.
1,36012,800
1,280 N . F.A ;.. mD.. r iJr i


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
2,862
3,034
1189
1856
305
13


NASD
1,583
1,629
1127
1335
191
18


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15113.42
6375.22
512.34
9447.49
3447.10
1636.00
1190.36
17280.77
976.22


LOW
15053.46
6324.48
508.65
9397.96
3426.67
1626.74
1183.99
17189.19
971.24


CLOSE
15091.68
6344.00
510.41
9437.17
3438.79
1633.77
1187.85
17255.20
973.79


%CHG.
-0.18%
-0.49%
-0.64%
-0.06%
+0.06%
...%
-0.17%
-0.03%
-0.14%


YTD
+15.17%
+19.55%
+12.65%
+11.77%
+13.89%
+14.55%
+16.41%
+15.07%
+14.65%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 --- 7.18 3.45 -.11 -3.1 V A A -25.0 -48.8 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.71 --0 39.00 37.00 -.36 -1.0 V V A +9.8 +18.1 28 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 43.46 41.80 -.04 -0.1 V A V +11.3 +25.8 21 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 101.86 97.54 +.79 +0.8 A V V +11.6 +37.8 2.21e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 13.18 12.98 -.04 -0.3 V A A +11.8 +69.6 30 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 --0- 12.64 11.65 -.09 -0.8 V A V +2.5 +54.3 90
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 -0- 43.43 37.68 +.06 +0.2 A A A -3.7 +2.0 27 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 0 49.46 48.92 +.17 +0.3 A A A +23.7 +59.2 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 -0- 25.25 20.11 +.04 +0.2 A V V +27.0 +13.4 84 1.00
Disney DIS 43.51 0 67.43 67.32 +.12 +0.2 A A A +35.2 +50.1 20 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 75.46 71.77 -.41 -0.6 V V V +12.5 +15.1 21 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 --0- 61.00 57.78 +.34 +0.6 A A A +25.3 +36.4 24 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 90.10 -.04 ... A +4.1 +11.6 9 2.52f
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 14.01 -.10 -0.7 7 A A +8.2 +34.5 10 0.40
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 22.85 -.05 -0.2 V A V +8.9 +23.7 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 76.20 76.67 +.66 +0.9 A A A +24.0 +52.6 26 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0- 27.75 24.08 -.42 -1.7 V A A +16.8 -6.8 12 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 --0 215.90 202.47 -2.00 -1.0 V V V +5.7 +3.7 14 3.80f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 15.72 0 25.05 24.56 -.09 -0.4 V A A +16.4 +40.4 28
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 42.40 42.09 +.02 ... A A +18.5 +41.5 25 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 103.70 100.38 +.18 +0.2 A V A +13.8 +12.3 19 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 33.91 33.03 +.34 +1.0 A A A +23.7 +9.1 17 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 -0- 64.72 56.17 -.31 -0.5 V V V +0.9 +16.0 18 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 64.31 -- 82.65 79.62 -.38 -0.5 V A A +15.1 +26.7 20 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 13.55 --- 34.99 18.24 +.52 +2.9 A A A -7.5 -47.6 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.98 20.69 +.10 +0.5 A A A +14.6 +25.8 45 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.92 8.84 +.03 +0.3 A A A +24.0 +32.7 11 0.12f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0- 68.77 55.87 -.96 -1.7 V A A +35.1 +11.3 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 105.18 104.12 +.49 +0.5 A A A +20.7 +36.6 22 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.32 0 7.40 7.18 -.18 -2.4 V A A +26.6 +200.4 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 37.36 36.54 -.50 -1.3 V A A +18.3 +23.2 22 1.12
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 61.73 60.91 -.03 ... A A +27.3 +72.9 19 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 94.21 92.57 -.47 -0.5 V A A +26.3 +58.6 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 40.48 54.31 52.55 -.34 -0.6 V A A +21.4 +35.5 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 30.80 29.66 -.46 -1.5 V A A +17.7 +13.7 1.53e
WalMartStrs WMT 58.92 0 79.50 78.50 -.39 -0.5 V A +15.1 +36.2 16 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 50.35 49.07 +.35 +0.7 A A A +32.6 +46.2 22 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


MflU


The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 1.92
percent Monday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.



PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MO AGO 3.25 .13
1 YR AGO 3.25 .13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil fell for
a third straight
day and settled
at its lowest lev-
el since May 2,
hurt by a stron-
ger dollar. The
wholesale price
of gasoline and
gold also fell.




Irim


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .08
6-month T-bill .07 0.08 -0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .10 0.11 -0.01 .17
2-year T-note .25 0.24 +0.01 .26
5-year T-note .82 0.82 ... .75
10-year T-note 1.92 1.90 +0.02 1.84
30-year T-bond 3.13 3.10 +0.03 3.01


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.80 2.77 +0.03 2.49
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.08 4.07 +0.01 4.46
Barclays USAggregate 1.87 1.81 +0.06 2.06
Barclays US High Yield 5.03 4.95 +0.08 7.02
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.89 3.80 +0.09 3.89
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.10 1.08 +0.02 1.01
Barclays US Corp 2.71 2.65 +0.06 3.28


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 95.17
Ethanol (gal) 2.68
Heating Oil (gal) 2.89
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.93
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.82
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1434.50
Silver (oz) 23.67
Platinum (oz) 1484.50
Copper (Ib) 3.36
Palladium (oz) 717.95
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.21
Coffee (Ib) 1.45
Corn (bu) 7.18
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 332.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.48
Soybeans (bu) 15.21
Wheat (bu) 7.02


PVS.
96.04
2.61
2.91
3.91
2.86
PVS.
1436.80
23.63
1486.00
3.36
704.60
PVS.
1.20
1.44
6.88
0.86
335.00
1.48
14.88
6.97


%CHG %YTD
-0.91 +3.7
+0.34 +22.4
-0.52 -5.1
+0.38 +17.1
-1.37 +0.3
%CHG %YTD
-0.16 -14.4
+0.16 -21.6
-0.10 -3.5
+0.18 -7.7
+1.89 +2.2
%CHG %YTD
+0.10 -7.2
+0.52 +0.5
+4.40 +2.8
-0.51 +14.5
-0.75 -11.1
+2.56 +27.7
+2.20 +7.2
+0.68 -9.8


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.52 -.01 +10.9 +19.1 +12.8 +6.6
CaplncBuA m 57.36 -.09 +9.7 +17.3 +11.7 +3.6
CpWIdGrIA m 41.48 -.09 +12.0 +24.7 +11.7 +2.1
EurPacGrA m 44.47 -.19 +7.9 +20.4 +8.7 +0.8
FnlnvA m 46.51 ... +14.4 +24.9 +13.8 +4.0
GrthAmA m 39.23 +.05 +14.2 +25.0 +13.0 +4.0
IncAmerA m 19.75 -.02 +10.3 +18.7 +12.9 +6.1
InvCoAmA m 34.53 -.01 +14.9 +23.7 +12.7 +4.7
NewPerspA m 34.94 -.02 +11.8 +23.4 +12.8 +4.4
WAMutlnvA m 35.71 ... +15.0 +22.7 +15.1 +5.4
Dodge & Cox Income 13.89 -.01 +1.0 +4.8 +6.0 +6.9
IntlStk 38.34 -.04 +10.7 +28.6 +9.6 +0.8
Stock 141.92 -.09 +16.9 +32.1 +14.3 +4.1
Fidelity Contra 87.86 +.10 +14.3 +19.5 +14.5 +5.7
LowPriStk d 45.70 -.14 +15.7 +26.2 +15.2 +8.0
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 58.00 +.01 +15.4 +23.4 +14.6 +5.4
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.37 ... +8.4 +17.7 +11.2 +6.0
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.75 -.04 +4.0 +14.3 +7.3 +9.8
GIBondAdv 13.71 -.04 +4.1 +14.6 +7.6 +10.1
Harbor Intllnstl 66.82 -.17 +7.6 +20.1 +11.3 +0.3
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.26 -.01 +1.0 +6.1 +6.3 +7.4
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 30.29 -.02 +15.0 +25.9 +13.0 +5.2
GrowStk 42.82 +.07 +13.3 +17.8 +14.6 +6.2
Vanguard 500Adml 150.92 +.02 +15.4 +23.5 +14.6 +5.4
5001nv 150.90 +.02 +15.4 +23.3 +14.4 +5.3
GNMAAdml 10.80 +.01 -0.1 +1.2 +4.5 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.37 -.01 +1.0 +3.7 +5.6 +5.4
STGradeAd 10.81 ... +0.7 +3.1 +3.3 +4.0
Tgtet2025 14.84 -.01 +9.2 +16.8 +10.7 +4.6
TotBdAdml 10.99 -.01 +0.1 +2.4 +5.1 +5.6
Totlntl 16.05 -.04 +7.4 +21.4 +8.4 -1.1
TotStlAdm 41.03 -.01 +15.6 +23.7 +14.6 +6.0
TotStldx 41.02 ... +15.6 +23.6 +14.5 +5.9
Welltn 37.18 ... +10.5 +17.9 +11.8 +6.5
WelltnAdm 64.21 ... +10.5 +18.0 +11.9 +6.6
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stock indexes were little
changed Monday, and the Stan-
dard & Poor's 500 index took a
breather from its strong 2013
rally. Health care stocks had the
market's biggest gains, but they
were offset by drops for raw ma-
terials producers.


Post Holdings POST
Close: $44.45 V-2.67 or -5.7%
The maker of Grape-Nuts, Honey
Bunches of Oats and Raisin Bran
cereals said that its second-quarter
net income fell 59 percent.



F r r n
52-week range
$27.33 $47.80
Vol.: 367.Ok (1.5x avg.) PE:33.9
Mkt. Cap:$1.45 b Yield:...

Theragenics TGX
Close:$2.03A0.54 or 36.2%
Juniper Investment raised its buyout
bid for the medical device company
to $2.25 to $2.30 per share up from
$2.05 to $2.10 per share.
$21


1.0 F M A M
52-week range
$1.32 i $2.15
Vol.:1.2m (17.4x avg.) PE:29.0
Mkt. Cap:$63.03 m Yield:...

Jos. A Bank JOSB
Close:$42.90V-3.31 or-7.2%
The men's clothing company said its
fiscal first-quarter earnings will likely
come in below Wall Street's view on
lower sales.
-,-


r r 1 r n
52-week range
$37.31 $50.75
Vol.:1.4m (2.9x avg.) PE: 12.3
Mkt. Cap:$1.2 b Yield:...

Tesla Motors TSLA
Close:$87.80A11.04 or 14.4%
Shares of the electric car maker con-
tinued to soar on optimism about the
boost the company could get from its
Model S sedan.
$100


rl rl rl-- -

52-week range
$25.52 $88.00
Vol.:22.2m (5.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$10.13 b Yield:...

Overstock.com OSTK
Close:$26.28A0.78 or 3.1%
Shares of the online retailer hit a
52-week high a month after the com-
pany posted strong results during its
first quarter.
$30 |

Mkt. Cap:621.52 m Yield:

52-week range

Vol.:688.9k (2.5x avg.) PE:32.1
Mkt. Cap:$621.52 m Yield:...


Stock market rally




pauses Monday


Associated Press

NEW YORK A
record-breaking rally in
stocks paused Monday as
investors assessed
whether the rise in stock
valuations overstated the
recent improvement in the
economy
The latest positive data,
out Monday, showed that
Americans increased
spending at retailers last
month. That suggests con-
sumers may boost eco-
nomic growth in the
current quarter ending
June 30. Still, that wasn't
enough to lift shares.
"What we have seen is a
huge rally, and there aren't
any stones unturned at this
point," said Alec Young,
global equity strategist at
S&P Capital IQ. "You
reach a point where in-
vestors aren't willing to bid
things up any more."
Stocks have surged this
year, boosted by an im-
proving economy, Federal


Reserve stimulus and summer will continue to be
record corporate earnings, bolstered," said Cote.
Signs that the housing On Monday, stocks
market is reviving are also started lower before par-
supporting stocks. The ing some of those losses
Dow Jones industrial aver- throughout the day
age and the Standard and The Dow fell 26.81
Poor's 500 index both points, or 0.2 percent, to
closed at record highs 15,091.68. The S&P 500
Friday index was little changed at
Retail sales increased 1,633.77. The Dow is up
0.1 percent in April from 15.2 percent this year, and
March, the Commerce De- the S&P 500 is 14.6 percent
apartment said Monday. higher.
That's an improvement Telecommunications
from the 0.5 percent de- companies dropped the
cline in March, which was most of any industry group
the largest drop in nine in the S&P 500 index,
months. Economists had falling 0.83 percent.
forecast that sales de- Health care companies ad-
clined by 0.3 percent, vanced the most, rising 0.7
Consumer sentiment is percent.
improving as the housing Health care companies
market recovers, which is have risen 21.4 percent
giving people the confi- this year, the most of any of
dence to spend more, said the 10 industry groups in
Doug Cote, chief market the S&P 500. Investors
strategist at ING Invest- have been buying the
ment Management. stocks because they offer
"If housing continues its some growth prospects
upward trajectory, the ani- and also pay large
mal spirits of the con- dividends.


Business H1H

Dell board committee seeks
more info on Icahn plan
Dell board members said they need more
details from investor Carl Icahn if he wants
them to seriously consider his latest challenge
to Michael Dell's $24.4 billion plan to take the
computer maker private. Icahn and prominent
Dell shareholder Southeastern Asset Manage-
ment said last week they want to keep Dell
Inc. publicly traded and give shareholders $12
in cash or more shares.
But a Dell board special committee said in a
Monday letter that the proposal comes with
many unanswered questions. They want to
know whether Icahn and Southeastern want the
board to treat their offer as an acquisition pro-
posal it might endorse or if it is an alternative in
case shareholders reject Michael Dell's offer.
They also want more information on financ-
ing, who Icahn and Southeastern expect to be
on Dell's senior management team and what
strategy or operating plan that team would
implement.
An investment group led by company
founder Michael Dell offered earlier this year
to pay $13.65 per share to take the Round
Rock, Texas, company private. But that pro-
posal has drawn criticism from Icahn and
Southeastern, who together own about 13
percent of the company's outstanding shares.
Icahn and Southeastern say they would let
shareholders keep their stake in the slumping
PC maker so they could benefit from any Dell
rebound. Icahn and Southeastern plan to pay
for their offer with existing cash from the com-
pany and about $5.2 billion in debt.

Report: Bloomberg private
messages leaked online
NEW YORK -A published report said fi-
nancial data and news service Bloomberg ac-
cidently leaked online more than 10,000
private messages containing sensitive pricing
data exchanged by users of Bloomberg's fi-
nancial information service.
The Financial Times reported Monday the
messages between traders at dozens of large
banks from one day in 2009 and one in 2010
had been put online by a former Bloomberg


SHLIGHTS

employee. The newspaper said it's possible
he may have intended them to be uploaded to
a secure site.
Bloomberg told the newspaper that the post
was a "clear violation of our policies."
Bloomberg officials did not immediately re-
spond to requests for comment.
The report came the same day Bloomberg
News editor-in-chief Matthew Winkler apolo-
gized for allowing its journalists to access data
about the terminal usage of clients.

Drug manufacturer agrees
to $500 million penalty
WASHINGTON -A subsidiary of India's
largest pharmaceutical company has agreed
to pay a record $500 million in fines and
penalties for selling adulterated drugs and
lying to federal regulators in a case that is part
of an ongoing crackdown on the quality of
generic drugs flowing into the U.S.
Federal prosecutors said Monday the guilty
plea by Ranbaxy USA Inc. represents the
largest financial penalty against a generic drug
company for violations of the Federal Food,
Drug and Cosmetic Act, which prohibits the
sale of impure drugs.
It concludes a years-long federal investiga-
tion into Ranbaxy's manufacturing deficiencies.
The Food and Drug Administration had earlier
barred from Ranbaxy from importing more than
30 different drugs made at factories in India
and, in 2011, struck a deal that required the
company to ensure that data on its products is
accurate, undergo extra oversight from a third-
party and improve its drug making procedures.
The subsidiary of Ranbaxy Laboratories
Limited has agreed to plead guilty to criminal
charges and to resolve civil claims with all 50
states and the District of Columbia. The com-
pany had set aside $500 million to cover po-
tential criminal and civil liability.
It admitted as part of the deal that it sold im-
pure drugs developed at two manufacturing
sites in India. Prosecutors said the batches of
adulterated drugs included generic versions of
an antibiotic and other medications used to
treat a severe type of acne, epilepsy and
nerve pain.
From wire reports


I


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 A9







Page Al0 TUESDAY, MAY 14,2013



PINION


"The harder I work, the luckier I get."
Samuel Goldwyn, 1882-1974


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ........... publisher
M ike A rnold ........................ ................. editor
Charlie Brennan................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz ........................ citizen member
M N Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TARNISHED CODE




Sexual scourge



in the ranks



unacceptable


On May 12,1962, General penalties
Douglas MacArthur de- ticle 120
livered his inspira- ness/ass.
tional "Duty, Honor, Country" program
speech at the United States sexual a
Military Academy at West ual mis(
Point. tary's rai
In acknowledging the sa- an alarmr
cred duty of mili-
tary leaders as
the protectors of THE ISSUE:
our country and
the stewards of Sexual assault in
our country's sons the military.
and daughters en-
trusted to their OUR OPINION:
leadership, Gen- A failure of
eral MacArthur leadership.
asserted that the
three hallowed
words of "Duty," "Honor" and corrupt
"Country" perpetuate the tionalizi
code that "embraces the fronting
highest moral laws." commit
In recent years, however, duct the
the code has become tar- misguide
nished. Last week, the Penta- above tl
gon's disturbing report that they lead
an estimated 26,000 service The fa
members were sexually as- has proi
saulted last year and the sex- gress to
ual battery arrest of a tary just
lieutenant colonel in charge of the ch
of the Air Force's sexual as- to redoul
sault prevention programs While th
revealed the ugly truth that the surf;
too many military leaders the cor
have lost sight of the code that have
embodied by Duty, Honor, leaders.
Country. Instead
Sexual assault in military from the
ranks is not only a federal bottom (
crime, but also morally re- mand m
pugnant and ethically de- their leg
testable. Charged with charge s
upholding the military's be held
legal, moral and ethical stan- account;
dards, there can be no com- setting a
promise by the chain of the stand
command when investigating Just as
sexual assault and pursuing that there
justice under punitive Article military
120 of the Uniform Code of ago was
Military Justice (UCMJ). leaders
It demands zero tolerance enough,
- pure and simple! ers can (
Nevertheless, despite the sexual a
broad range of sexual assault living ti
offenses that carry harsh Honor, C


Toll road needed
How anyone could say that we
don't need a toll road
must never drive north
and south on (U.S.) 19. 0v
It's horrible and getting
worse. It has to come
sooner or later and the
longer you wait, the
more it's going to cost.
VCR repair 4
Does anybody know CAL
where I can get a VCR 63Q
machine fixed? I don't U0"
know anybody who does
it anymore.
Leave dogs at home
This is about people taking
dogs into restaurants and gro-
cery stores. Please leave your
dogs at home unless they are
service dogs that you need when
you are out. If you're out with
another human being and you
don't need your service dog,
please leave it at home. Other
people do not like to go to
restaurants and grocery stores
and have dogs in there with dog
hair flying around. I have a dog,
but I leave my dog at home.


Wa
I was re
a

UND

e


s under punitive Ar-
) and sexual aware-
ault prevention
.s, the incidents of
assault and other sex-
conduct in the mili-
nks have increased at
iing rate.
This intolera-
ble rise of crimi-
nal sexual assault
can only be attrib-
uted to a failure
of leadership. In-
stead of remain-
ing faithful to its
sacred duty, too
many military
leaders have suc-
cumbed to the
ve influences of ra-
ng rather than con-
sexual misconduct,
ing sexual miscon-
mselves and placing
ed personal loyalty
he welfare of those
d.
tilure of leadership
mpted some in Con-
call for taking mili-
rice out of the hands
rain of command and
ble education efforts.
is may sound good on
ace, it fails to attack
rruptive influences
e tainted our military

d, military leaders
very top to the very
of the chain of com-
ust once again take
al, moral and ethical
seriously to heart and
uncompromisingly
able for consistently
nd strictly enforcing
dards of conduct.
the scourge of drugs
atened to destroy our
more than 30 years
defeated by resolute
who said enough is
today's military lead-
defeat the scourge of
assault in the ranks by
he words of Duty,
country .


llet recovery
fading your article
bout the wallet not re-
urned in the grocery
store parking lot yester-
lay and I found a pock-
etbook and a wallet and
i purse in a carriage at
Vinn-Dixie and I turned
t in to the courtesy
lesk yesterday with
:redit cards and plenty
of cash. So honest peo-
)le are still out there.


uiO I o Foot soldiers
I see that Sheriff Dawsy
busted some dope houses
again. What about the men who
are behind him? They're the
ones that busted it, not Sheriff
Dawsy.
Bad manners
I love it when I go to a (store)
and the woman at the cash reg-
ister is talking on her cellphone
the whole time she's waiting on
customers. No, she didn't make
any errors with the change, but
it's still rude to do that. Doesn't
anyone know what the word "eti-
quette" means anymore?


GOP needs more than Hispanics


A after six months
of mulling over
November's
election results,
many Republicans .'1 ~
remain convinced
that the party's only
path to future victory
is to improve the Li
GOP's appeal to His-
panic voters. But how Byroi
many Hispanic vot- OTH
ers do Republicans VOI
need to attract before Vl
the party can again
win the White House?
A lot. Start with the 2012 exit
polls. The New York Times'
Nate Silver has created an in-
teractive tool in which one can
look at the presidential election
results and calculate what
would have happened if the
racial and ethnic mix of voters
had been different. The tool
also allows one to project future
results based on any number of
scenarios in which the coun-
try's demographic profile and
voting patterns change.
In 2012, President Obama fa-
mously won 71 percent of the
Hispanic vote to Mitt Romney's
27 percent. If all other factors
remained the same, how large a
percentage of the Hispanic vote
would Romney have had to win
to capture the White House?
What if Romney had won 44
percent of the Hispanic vote,
the high-water mark for Repub-
licans achieved by George W
Bush in 2004? As it turns out, if
Romney had hit that Bush
mark, he still would have lost,
with 240 electoral votes to 298
for Obama.
But what if Romney had been
able to make history and attract
50 percent of Hispanic voters?
What then? He still would have
been beaten, 283 electoral votes
to 255.
What if Romney had been
able to do something absolutely
astonishing for a Republican


a
H
(


and win 60 percent
of the Hispanic vote?
He would have lost
by the same margin,
283 electoral votes to
255.
But what if Rom-
"".... ney had been able to
Af reach a mind-blow-
ing 70 percent of the
York Hispanic vote?
|ER Surely that would
DCES have meant victory,
right? No, it would-
n't. Romney still
would have lost, although by the
narrowest of electoral margins,
270 to 268. (Under that scenario,
Romney would have won the
popular vote but lost in the
Electoral College; he could
have racked up huge numbers
of Hispanic votes in California,
New York and Texas, for exam-
ple, and not changed the results
in those states.)
According to the Times' cal-
culator, Romney would have
had to win 73 percent of the
Hispanic vote to prevail in 2012.
Which suggests that Romney,
and Republicans, had bigger
problems than Hispanic voters.
The most serious of those
problems was that Romney was
not able to connect with white
voters who were so turned off
by the campaign that they aban-
doned the GOP and in many
cases stayed away from the
polls altogether Recent reports
suggest as many as 5 million
white voters simply stayed
home on Election Day If they
had voted at the same rate they
did in 2004, even with the de-
mographic changes since then,
Romney would have won.
Likewise, the white vote is so
large that an improvement of 4
points going from 60 percent
to 64 percent of those whites
who did vote -would have won
the race for Romney
So which would have been a
more realistic goal for Romney


- matching the white turnout
from just a few years earlier, or
winning 73 percent of Hispanic
voters?
Everyone knows the Hispanic
vote will grow in the future. But
if 2012 voting patterns remain
the same whites voting in
lower numbers but about 60
percent for Republicans, blacks
and Asians turning out in large
numbers and voting 90-plus per-
cent and 70-plus percent, re-
spectively, for Democrats -
Republicans will have to win an
astonishingly high percentage
of the Hispanic vote to capture
the White House.
It is simply not reasonable to
believe there is something the
GOP can do pass immigra-
tion reform, juice up voter-out-
reach efforts that will create
that result.
That doesn't mean future Re-
publican presidential candi-
dates should not work to
increase their share of the His-
panic vote. They could, for ex-
ample, actually campaign in
areas with large numbers of
Hispanic voters.
But here is the real solution.
Romney lost because he did not
appeal to the millions of Amer-
icans who have seen their stan-
dard of living decline over the
past decades. They're nervous
about the future. When Romney
did not address their concerns,
they either voted for Obama or
didn't vote at all. If the next Re-
publican candidate can address
their concerns effectively, he
will win. And, amazingly
enough, he'll win a lot more
Hispanic votes in the process. A
lot from other groups, too.
It would do more than any
immigration bill or outreach
program ever could.

Byron York is chief political
correspondent for The
Washington Examiner


The- ENOH Zl TALKbOG POImTS...


VERS\Ot 1i

THE PRESIDENT IS
VIEWING W\Th GREAT
CONCERN REPORTS THAT
DEMOMTSTRATIOIS IRSPIRE
6B CAIRO PROTESTS EVOLJEP
INTO ATTACKS TkAT
IR OLVED TRE PARTICWPATIO
OF 1SLnA\G TERRORISTS
AAD EMREMISTS.


VERSI\O 2:


I TE PRESIDENT IS
VIt'AIWR W\TH GREAT
CONCERf REPORTS TMAT
DEORSTTRATIONS IHSPIREV
BY CNRO PROTESTS

INVOLVED THE PARTICPMAIOI
E, XTREWM5TS.


LETTERS )>


Citizens in charge
Somehow the county commis-
sioners have forgotten who they
work for and who pays their
salary and the county's bills.
The citizens are the owners
of this county and employ the
commissioners at their pleas-
ure. The commissioners are to
serve we, the people, not their
special interests. The commis-
sioners and county workers
are our employees.
We come before the county
employees, who are overpaid,
underworked and more nu-
merous than we need.
Time is now to reduce staff
and not add more fees or taxes
to the owners of this county
and stop putting up roadblocks
to new business and jobs.
Claude Strass
Homosassa

Great article
Kudos to Anthony Schembri
for his refreshing insight Sun-
day, April 28, titled "When
Tragedy Happens." It was like
inhaling a breath of fresh air
He has pinpointed the


NERSIOR 3"


TTRE PRESIDE IT IS


a

-.





At'^


to the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

malaise of this country Misdi-
rected fear has led to mass hys-
teria and propelled us into a
state of stupidity. Bereft of
common sense, we plod along


continuously making the wrong
choices. Until we quit putting
God's wisdom, grace and power
on the back burner, we are
doomed to flounder like lost,
confused, frightened sheep and
let paranoia overtake us. Lord
Jesus, have mercy on us all.
Thanks, Mr Schembri, for a
thought-provoking, powerful
article. It certainly helped me
put things in proper perspec-
tive, and without Whoopi's
help either Way to go man!
Vicky Ross
Inverness

Check the dictionary
I have a dictionary at home,
printed in 1968. It says mar-
riage is between a man and a
woman.
I would like anyone that
takes the pro-gay marriage po-
sition to point out a word in
the dictionary that has a dra-
matically different definition
today than it had 40 or 50 years
ago. I have a feeling that may
take awhile.
Brad L. Block
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LETTERS to the Editor


It's up to all of us
If you've been out on
the bay either boating or
kayaking and you've seen
a piece of paper, plastic or
other items floating in the
water and just kept going,
you could be part of the
problem. Everyone must
step up to the plate. I go
out weekly to kayak and
take pictures of the beau-
tiful nature we have
around us, but nothing
spoils a great shot like
trash in the scene. I come
back with so much trash
on my kayak, folks wonder
how I can even paddle.
It's the right thing to do.
I've said it before and I'll
say it again. We are land
mammals and many that
occupy our bay are the
aquatic mammals along
with other wildlife. They
were here way before we
were. They deserve a
clean atmosphere to live
in. After all, if it's clean
for them, then it's clean
for us.
I commend Art Jones
and his volunteers for the
hot and hard work in
Hunters Spring. It shows
that people are trying to
make good on the messes
that humans have caused.
I also commend Pat
Rose for his lifetime of
dedication to an endan-
gered species, the docile
manatees who were here
way before any humans
and have just one preda-
tor humans. I've had
enough of the insults and
disparaging remarks
about Pat Rose, director
of Save the Manatee Club.
These rumors and down-
right false statements
only show how unin-
formed those people are
about the truth. The fact
is that Pat did not stop the
One Rake At a Time har-
vester from removing lyn-
gbya. He, with others,
stopped it from dredging.
Many other people were
opposed to the harvester
being used as a dredge to
bulldoze the bottom of the
bay To remove lyngbya
the correct way by me-


chanical means is one
thing, to dredge the bot-
tom with the harvester is
quite another
Rose, an aquatic biolo-
gist, and other biologists
have expressed their con-
cerns about what digging
deep into the mucky bot-
tom of our bay might
cause worse conditions
than what we already are
facing and maybe a cata-
strophic event right here
in our own back yards. So
dredging into the bottoms
is unacceptable. Please
ask yourself why people
are bashing Mr Rose for
standing up for our bay, a
bay he has loved and
cared about for more than
40 years, visiting and
fighting for its protection.
Let's get some beautiful
hyacinths (if they can tol-
erate the saltiness we now
have from the lack of rain
and our diminishing
spring flows) or other
aquatic plants back here
in the water to filter all
the yuck out. Let's all get
moving, to do our part in
this clean up not just in
Hunters Spring. Don't just
depend on the harvesters
to do it all; each and every
person who lives here or
comes to enjoy the bay
needs to step up to the
plate and do their part,
small or large -just do it!
Capt. Stacy Dunn
Keeping Wildlife Wild

Help our hospital
Dear Governor Scott:
Please allow me to ex-
press my disgust, anger
and fear at what is going
on in my county of Citrus
that I have lived in for
more than 40 years, with
the taxpayers' hospital,
Citrus Memorial.
In the local paper this
morning, the headline
reads, "CCHB about to
pay for PR." The story
goes on to explain how
much the expenditure
will be and the reason for
the expenditure.
Sir, this whole thing is
terribly wrong. The peo-


ple who support this hos-
pital are not included in
what may happen or is
about to happen to "their
hospital." I remember Cit-
rus Memorial when it was
just a shoebox. I was a po-
lice officer for the city of
Inverness. I watched this
hospital grow and flour-
ish under the leadership
and guidance of the Cit-
rus Memorial Foundation.
I know those who led this
hospital to a respectful po-
sition within the medical
communities. No names
are necessary; suffice to
say that they were for the
successful operation of Cit-
rus Memorial and they
were for those people in
need of hospital care.
Sir, please involve your-
self in this situation. Help
the people of Citrus
County be heard. Exert
your power as governor of
this great state to rein in
those with attitudes of
power, be they politicians
or those in places of
power within this hospi-
tal. Please help us help
our hospital and those
loyal and excellent peo-
ple who are the doctors,
nurses and all those sup-
port staff who made this
hospital great.
Michael E. Pitts
Inverness

Not for the people
Poll question: What will
be the impact of the Leg-
islature's move to have
the state enforce water
pollution rules without
federal intervention?
The state has turned
down millions of dollars
for rapid transit and Medi-
caid, so we know where
the average citizen stands
with our present govern-
ment We wouldn't have
any pollution controls
without federal controls, as
this state is run by business
and our present represen-
tatives and senate only
represent their donors.
Verna Brunswick
Beverly Hills


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NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Bill passes


Associated Press
Sen. Scott Dibble, an
openly gay lawmaker who
sponsored the Senate's
gay marriage bill, throws
a kiss toward the gallery
Monday in St. Paul, Minn.
The Minnesota Senate
voted to legalize gay
marriage. Monday's vote
sends the bill to Gov.
Mark Dayton, who has
promised to sign.

Police ID suspect
in New Orleans
mass shooting
NEW ORLEANS Po-
lice are identifying a sus-
pect in the shooting of 19
people during a Mother's
Day parade in New
Orleans.
Police Superintendent
Ronal Serpas said Monday
night that they were looking
for 19-year-old Akein Scott.
He said multiple people
identified Scott as the
shooter.
He said it was too early
to say whether Scott was
the only shooter.
Three gunshot victims
remained in critical condi-
tion Monday, though their
wounds didn't appear to be
life-threatening. Most of the
injured have been released
from the hospital.
Video released earlier in
the day shows a crowd
gathered for a boisterous
second-line parade Sunday
suddenly scattering in all di-
rections, with some falling
to the ground.
Abortion doc
guilty in three
babies' deaths
PHILADELPHIA-A
Philadelphia doctor accused
of performing illegal, late-
term abortions in a filthy
clinic has been found guilty
of first-degree murder in the
deaths of three babies born
alive but acquitted in the
death of a fourth baby.
Dr. Kermit Gosnell was
also found guilty of involun-
tary manslaughter in the
overdose death of a patient.
Prosecutors said the
72-year-old Gosnell deliv-
ered babies alive and had
their spines severed with
scissors to kill them.
The defense had argued
there were no live births at
the clinic.
The grisly details of the
case came out more than
two years ago when authori-
ties described finding bags
and bottles of fetuses at the
foul-smelling clinic and un-
sterile instruments that were
reused.
Prosecutors seek the
death penalty.


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obama slams IRS


Defends Libya

efforts

Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama on
Monday called reports that
the Internal Revenue Serv-
ice targeted conservative
groups "outrageous" and
said anyone responsible
should be held accountable.
He pushed back strongly
against fresh Republican
criticism of the administra-
tion's handling of last year's
deadly Benghazi attacks,
calling it a political
"sideshow."
The president was
dogged by the persisting po-
litical controversies as he
tended to diplomatic duties
during a visit with British
Prime Minister David
Cameron.
Obama acknowledged
people are properly con-
cerned about acknowledge-
ments from the IRS that
conservative political
groups were targeted dur-


As
President Barack Obama gestures Monday dui
news conference with British Prime Minis
Cameron in the East Room of the White
Washington. The president said during 1
conference that the Internal Revenue Service's
of conservative groups is "outrageous" an
involved needs to be "held fully accountable."


ing the 2012 campaign to
see if they were violating
their tax-exempt status. But
he angrily dismissed con-
tinued questions over Sep-
tember's insurgent attack in
Libya that killed Ambassa-
dor Chris Stevens and three
other Americans.
"There's no there there,"
Obama said. "The fact that
this keeps on getting


churned up, frar
whole lot to do w
cal motivations."
The Internal
Service, an ind
agency in the Tre
apartment, apolo;
day for v
acknowledged w
propriate" target
servative politic.
The agency bla


targeting
level employees, saying no
high-level officials were
aware.
"If in fact IRS persons en-
gaged in the kind of prac-
tices that have been
reported on and were in-
tentionally targeting con-
servative groups, then that's
outrageous and there's no
place for it," Obama said.
Obama's response on
Benghazi comes after dis-
closure last week of emails
that the administration had
associated Press turned over to congres-
ring a joint sional investigators. They
ter David show that political consid-
House in rations influenced the
the news talkingpointsthatU.N.Am-
targeting bassador Susan Rice used
id anyone five days after the Sept 11
assault, with State Depart-
ikly, has a ment and other senior ad-
vith politi- ministration officials asking
that references to terror
Revenue groups and prior warnings
dependent be deleted.
asury De- Obama said the focus
gized Fri- should be on making sure
that it that diplomats serving
vas "inap- around the world are ade-
ing of con- quately protected, which he
al groups. acknowledged those in
med low- Benghazi were not


Search over


Western retailers

embrace plan to

improve factories

Associated Press

SAVAR, Bangladesh Several
of the biggest Western retailers
embraced a plan that would re-
quire them to help pay for factory
improvements in Bangladesh as
the nearly three-week search for
victims of the worst garment-in-
dustry disaster in history ended
Monday with the death toll at a
staggering 1,127.
Bangladesh's government also
agreed to allow garment workers
to form unions without permis-
sion from factory owners. That
decision came a day after it an-
nounced a plan to raise the mini-
mum wage in the industry
The collapse of the eight-story
Rana Plaza factory building April
24 focused worldwide attention
on hazardous conditions in
Bangladesh's garment industry,
where workers sew low-cost
clothing that ends up on store
shelves around the globe, includ-
ing the U.S. and Western Europe.
The tragedy came months after
a fire at another garment factory
in Bangladesh killed 112 workers.
Swedish retailing giant H&M,
the largest purchaser of garments
from Bangladesh; British compa-
nies Primark and Tesco; C&A;
and Inditex, owner of the Zara
chain, said they would sign a con-
tract that requires them to con-
duct independent safety
inspections, make reports on fac-
tory conditions public and cover
the costs of repairs.
It also requires them to stop


Associated Press
A Bangladeshi soldier stands Monday at the site where a Bangladesh
garment-factory building collapsed on April 24 in Savar, near Dhaka,
Bangladesh. Nearly three weeks after the building collapsed, the search
for the dead ended Monday at the site of the worst disaster in the
history of the global garment industry. The death toll: 1,127.


doing business with any factory
that refuses to make necessary
safety improvements.
Two other companies agreed to
sign last year: PVH, which makes
clothes under the Calvin Klein,
Tommy Hilfiger and Izod labels,
and German retailer Tchibo.
Among the big holdouts so far
are Walmart Stores, which is the
second-largest producer of cloth-
ing in Bangladesh behind H&M,
and the Gap.
Labor groups are setting
Wednesday as the deadline for
companies to commit to the plan.
Based on the seven companies
that plan to participate in the
pact, somewhere between 500
and 1,000 of the 5,000 factories op-
erating in Bangladesh will be cov-


ered, according to Scott Nova, ex-
ecutive director of the Worker
Rights Consortium, one of the or-
ganizations pushing for the
agreement.
"This agreement is exactly
what is needed to finally bring an
end to the epidemic of fire and
building disasters that have taken
so many lives in the garment in-
dustry in Bangladesh," Nova said.
The Rana Plaza owner and
eight other people, including gar-
ment factory owners, have been
detained in the investigation. Au-
thorities say the building owner
added floors to the structure ille-
gally and allowed the factories to
install heavy equipment that the
building was not designed to
support.


Nile virus hit Detroit is broke; bankruptcy ahead?
record last year


NEWYORK
health officials s
was the worst e
Nile virus death
The final tally
Monday was 28
or two more tha
set in 2002.
But there we
nesses overall,
rious cases tha
years.
The Centers
Control and Pre
predicted it wou
year because o
conditions that
breeding of the
that spread the
people.
West Nile vir
agnosed in Ug;
but no cases w
in the U.S. until
York. It gradually
the West Coast


-U.S.
said last evar


Associated Press


....... J DETROIT The first
ever for West report by Detroit's emer-
is. agency manager declares
y reported that the city is broke and
86 deaths at risk of running com-
in the record pletely out of money a
financial meltdown that
re far fewer ill- could mean employees
and fewer se- don't receive paychecks,
n in previous retirees lose their pen-
sions and residents en-
for Disease dure even deeper cuts in
ni ha municipal services.
evention had If Detroit cannot avert
uld be a bad disaster, the only remain-
f weather ing option appears to be
promote bankruptcy, a threat that
mosquitoes looms large over Kevyn
virus to Orr's urgent efforts to
make deals with creditors
us was first di- and debt holders. Experts
anda in 1937, say he will have to seek
rprted concessions from those
ere reported groups to keep the Motor
1999 in New City afloat.
ly spread to "On a cash-flow basis,
t. we don't have it. We're
-From wire reports broke," Orr said Monday at


a news conference. He
said the city can make pay-
roll through the rest of the
year, but that some other
bills and obligations are
not being paid or are being
deferred.
"We can't continue to do
what we've been doing,"
he said. "It's probably a lit-
tle worse than I expected.
It's severe. I mean it's
dire."
In March 2012, Detroit
borrowed $80 million from
Bank of America to avoid
running out of money But
the outlook has not im-
proved in the last year
"No question his first at-
tention has got to be
turned to making sure he
has enough money to pay
the bills he has coming in,"
said James McTevia, pres-
ident of McTevia and Asso-
ciates, a Detroit-area
turnaround firm. "If I'm a
creditor getting paid for
my current goods and


services, I'm going to be
more apt to work out on
something I'm owed."
Orr, a Washington-based
turnaround expert and
bankruptcy attorney, was
selected by Gov Rick Sny-
der to oversee Detroit's fi-
nances. In his report, Orr
described the city's opera-
tions as "dysfunctional
and wasteful after years of
budgetary restrictions,
mismanagement, crippling
operational practices and,
in some cases, indiffer-
ence or corruption."
"Outdated policies,
work practices, proce-
dures and systems must be
improved consistent with
best practices of 21st cen-
tury government," Orr
wrote. 'A well-run city will
promote cost savings and
better customer service
and will encourage pri-
vate investment and a re-
turn of residents."
Detroit's net cash posi-


tion the amount of
money in the bank after
bills are paid was a neg-
ative $162 million as of
April 26. The budget
deficit that a few months
ago was believed to be
about $327 million could
reach $386 million before
July 1.
The city also owes more
than $400 million, includ-
ing $124 million for public
improvement projects. Its
long-term debt tops
$14 billion.
Orr avoids using "bank-
ruptcy" in the 41-page re-
port to the state treasurer,
but the inference is clear,
McTevia said.
The bulk of the city's
revenue comes from prop-
erty and business taxes.
But Detroit's population
dropped by 250,000 be-
tween 2000 and 2010. And
outside of downtown and a
few other areas, business
growth virtually is nil.


World BRIEFS

Kite flying
_-


Associated Press
Afghan boys play with
their kite Monday on a
hill overlooking Kabul,
Afghanistan. Banned
during the Taliban
regime, kite flying is once
again the main
recreational escape for
Afghan boys and some
men.

Two arrested in
Malcolm X
grandson's death
MEXICO CITY- Mexico
City prosecutors said they
have arrested two men in
connection with the death of
Malcolm Shabazz, the
grandson of political activist
Malcolm X.
An official of the dty's
prosecutor's office, who was
not authorized to be quoted
by name, said the two sus-
pects are employees of the
bar where Shabazz report-
edly got in a violent dispute
last week.
The 28-year-old Shabazz
died of blunt-force trauma in-
juries. A companion said the
dispute involved a $1,200
bar tab.
The official was unable to
provide further details
Monday.
Much like his grandfather,
Shabazz spent his youth in
and out of trouble. He was
taken to a hospital in Mexico
City where he died Thursday.
Deadly bomb
strikes civilian
area in east Libya
TRIPOLI, Libya--A
deadly car bomb exploded
Monday near a hospital in a
busy area packed with civil-
ians in the eastern Libyan
city of Benghazi, destroying
part of the facility, officials
said.
Officials gave conflicting
casualty figures, with death
tolls ranging from three to
10 in the chaotic aftermath
of the attack.
Benghazi, which was the
birthplace of the revolution
that led to the ouster of dic-
tator Moammar Gadhafi,
has suffered a series of as-
sassinations and other at-
tacks, including the Sept. 11
assaults on the U.S. diplo-
matic mission that killed
Ambassador Chris Stevens
and three other Americans.
The oil-rich North African
nation is still largely domi-
nated by militias, many in-
cluding fighters who battled
Gadhafi's forces during the
2011 civil war, and many at-
tacks are blamed on them
as infighting is rampant in
the battle for control.
But witnesses and ana-
lysts said Monday's explo-
sion stood out because it
struck during the day in a
crowded area, putting civil-
ians at risk.
Builders bulldoze
Mayan pyramid
in Belize
BELIZE CITY-A con-
struction company has es-
sentially destroyed one of
Belize's largest Mayan pyr-
amids with backhoes and
bulldozers to extract
crushed rock for a road-
building project, authorities
announced Monday.
The ceremonial center
dates back at least 2,300
years and is the most im-
portant site in northern Be-
lize, near the border with
Mexico.
Belizean police said they
are conducting an investi-
gation and criminal
charges are possible.
-From wire reports











SPORTS


* Yankees
and Indians
split double-
header.
/B2


0 Baseball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Football/B4
0 Hockey/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 Tennis/B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Chicago no match for defending champs


Chicago team.
Never before had the Bulls
scored fewer than 69 in a playoff T
game nor 10 or less in a quarter
during the postseason, but both
those marks fell on a night when
they were dominated on both
ends of the floor
Miami led by 11 at the half and
put this one away in the third
quarter, outscoring Chicago 17-9
in the period.
Now the Heat will try to wrap
up the series at home on Wednes-
day night taking what they hope
will be the next step toward a sec-
ond straight championship.
It'f s hard to believe the Bulls
won the series opener the way
the past three games have gone.
Miami pounded Chicago in Associated Press
Game 2, coming away with its Miami's LeBron James, left, and Norris Cole react Monday during
the second half of Game 4 of an NBA Eastern Conference
See Page B3 semifinal against the Chicago Bulls in Chicago.


T pecting to go in. The pace was perfect t. *
Tiger WinS layerS 3 feet away, and he made his par
Mission accomplished.
Championship by not Garcia, who two-putted
for birdie on the 16th, was
throwing it way standing on the 17th tee
row g it away watching Woods make his
par
Associated Press The Spaniard won The Players
Championship in 2008 in a
PONTE VEDRA BEACH playoff on the 17th hole. P.iil
laus have never had a con- and in the water, Garcia
versation longer than a found the green.
couple of minutes, and rarely This wasn't a
about golf. Maybe it's be- playoff.
cause they already think along the Garcia, ho, wex e:.
same lines when it comes to winning went at the flj.- d .nd
tournaments. posed over the shot until
The Players Championship was an- he saw the *pllrih
other example of how Woods rarely 'As the bIll J 1 in the
beats himself, air I was thinkil-,.
Nicklaus was under the oak tree at 'Please be riht. be- .
Augusta National last month after hit- cause itwis strjilht
ting his ceremonial tee shot when he at it," Gar:l si l l(
talked about one that got away, the first "It was probli bl 3
time he had a share of the lead going feet left ,it the
into the final round of a major and did- hole. When it
n't win. It was the 1971 Masters, and he splashed, \"i\i
found the water trying to reach the 15th think, 'Well. .
green with a 3-wood. hopefully I
"I don't like to waste a tournament on hit a go.,d
one shot," Nicklaus said. "If I was today shot after
thinking about strategy of what I this and
wanted to do on that, I probably would- make 4 & -
n't have done it. I put myself out of the and still
tournament. One shot shouldn't be a have a -
shot that puts you out of the chance
tournament." on the
The island green on the TPC Saw- nex t.'
grass is nothing like the 15th at Augusta I t s
National, but it's hard not to think about p r e t t y
Nicklaus when reviewing the hole that much as
settled a weekend duel between Woods simple as
and Sergio Garcia. that."
Woods was standing on the 17th tee Only it wasn't
Sunday when he looked over and saw that simple. His
Garcia approaching the par-5 16th next shotbounced
green with a putter in hand, realizing off the mound fram-
he was there in two and at worst would ing a bunker and car-
make birdie to tie Woods for the lead. omed back into the
The pin was in its traditional Sunday water He wound up
location, the back right corner behind with a quadruple-
the bunker. Finding land is always the bogey 7. Adding to his
priority. From there, it's a bonus to misery, Garcia put his
catch the ridge that feeds the golf ball tee shot into the
down a gentle slope toward the hole. water on the 18th for
"The thing is, you can get baited into a double bogey
hitting it over there, and that's the hard To say such mis-
part," Woods said. "I thought that the takes never happen
prudent play for me was hit it in the to Woods would be
center of the green, even left-center, to ignore the final
and try and hit kind of a pull-cut It I hit hole at Dubai in
a pull-cut, it's going to have a little bit of 2001, when he went
distance to it, and it might have the for the green on the
shape where it might land up on top 18th hole and
and feed down. But when I hit it, a little found water for a
bit of gust came up and it stalled out." double bogey to
The ball stayed on the front of the lose by two shots.
green, leaving a difficult putt from 45 He has lost tourna-
feet. Woods hit a lot of good putts that ments down the
didn't go in Sunday This might have
been the best putt that he wasn't ex- See Page B3




Orb impresses with workout


Associated Press


NEW YORK Orb is ready
The Kentucky Derby winner put in his final
workout before the Preakness, breezing four fur-
longs in 47.18 seconds, galloping out five furlongs
in 59.54 and delighting trainer Shug McGaughey
"I thought it was breathtaking," McGaughey
said Monday morning.
With exercise rider Jennifer Patterson aboard,
Orb seemed to move effortlessly around the track
on a clear, sunny day In fact, McGaughey called it
more impressive than the colt's workout before
he won the Derby by 2 1/2 lengths on May 4.
"For him to go off nice and relaxed in 24 and
change and come home on his own the way he
did, and gallop out the way he did, and drop his


Heat take 3-1

series lead with

easy 88-65 win

Associated Press
CHICAGO LeBron James
scored 27 points and the Miami
Heat nearly matched a franchise
record for points allowed in a
playoff game, pounding the list-
less and short-handed Chicago
Bulls 88-65 on Monday night to
take a 3-1 lead in the Eastern
Conference semifinals.
The 65 points allowed were
only two more than the all-time
postseason low for a Miami oppo-
nent, and it was easily the worst
offensive performance by a


head and walk home, it sent cold chills up my
back," the Hall of Fame trainer said.
After cooling down and receiving a sponge bath,
Orb was loaded onto a van headed to Pimlico a -
Race Course in Baltimore. A win in the 13/16-mile
Preakness on Saturday would set up a Triple
Crown try in the Belmont Stakes on June 8. The
last Triple Crown winner was Affirmed in 1978.
McGaughey wasn't concerned with the fast frac- .
tions, which come nine days after running 1 1/4
miles in the Derby
"I think it's a tribute to the way he came out of
the Derby, and to come back and be able to have
a work like that and do it the way he did it I Associated Press
couldn't be more thrilled," he said. "Right now I'm Kentucky Derby winner Orb, with exercise rider Jennifer Patterson
aboard, gallops Monday at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y. during his
See Page B3 final workout before the Preakness on Saturday.


James, Allen headline
NBA All-Defensive Team
LeBron James and Memphis guard
Tony Allen headline the NBAAII-
Defensive First Team.
The league announced Monday
that Allen received 53 points in the
voting, while the Miami Heat star had
52.
The pair were joined on the first
team by Clippers guard Chris Paul,
Thunder forward Serge Ibaka, Knicks
center Tyson Chandler and Bulls cen-
ter Joakim Noah.
Marc Gasol, who was the NBA's
defensive player of the year, made
the second team. He was joined on
that squad by Celtics guard Avery
Bradley, Grizzlies guard Mike Conley,
Spurs forward Tim Duncan and Pac-
ers forward Paul George.




JGR


roars



back on



track
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. When
Joe Gibbs publicly addressed
the illegal part found in Matt
Kenseth's engine, the team
owner was respectful of
NASCAR's inspection process
but adamant about the impor-
tance of not sullying Joe Gibbs
Racing's reputation over an in-
fraction he insisted was not
intentional.
When an appeals board last
week reduced most of the
penalties NASCAR levied
against JGR, Gibbs did not cele-
brate winning his case. His re-
action was reserved, almost
subdued, and nothing close to
the celebration one might have
expected over an issue that was
so important to him.
Perhaps it's because JGR
chose to do its celebrating on
the race track.
JGR came roaring back from
two rocky weeks fighting
NASCAR by blowing the doors
off the competi-
tion at Darling-
ton Raceway,
where it swept
last weekend's
races. Kenseth ,
won the Sprint 7
Cup race on
Saturday night,
Kyle Busch won Matt
the Nationwide Kenseth
Series race on
Friday night and nobody came
close to challenging the
organization.
Busch routed the field in the
Nationwide race and led JGR
drivers Elliott Sadler and Brian
Vickers across the finish line.
Kenseth wound up fifth to give
JGR first, second, third and fifth
in the first race of the weekend.
In the Cup race, it looked like
it was going to be Busch again as
he led a race-high 265 laps. But
a flat tire in the homestretch
caused Busch to fade to a sixth-
place finish. Sailing past him
was Kenseth for his series-lead-
ing third win of the season and
teammate Denny Hamlin, who
made it a 1-2 JGR finish in Ham-
lin's first full race since suffer-
ing a compression fracture of a
vertebra in his lower back.
See Page B3


.x






B2 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


AMERICAN LEAGUE


New York
Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
2 --
5 1 -
) 2 -
4 4Y2 2Y2
5 9Y2 7Y2



East Division
GB WC
8 4
1 1 /2
2 4 3Y2
) 6 5Y2
) 1012 10


NL

Brewers 5, Pirates 1
Milwaukee Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aoki rf 5 2 3 3 SMarte If 4 0 0 0
Segura ss 5 0 3 1 Snider rf 4 0 1 0
CGomz cf 4 0 1 1 Watson p 0 00 0
ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 0 McCtch cf 4 0 0 0
Bianchi3b 0 0 0 0 GSnchzlb 3 1 1 0
YBtncr2b 4 0 0 0 Walker2b 4 0 0 0
Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 PAIvrz 3b 3 0 0 1
Lallilb 3 0 0 0 McKnrc 3 0 0 0
AIGnzlz ph 1 1 1 0 Barmesss 3 0 2 0
LSchfr If 3 2 1 0 AJBrntp 1 0 0 0
Estrad p 1 0 0 0 Contrrs p 0 0 0 0
KintzIlrp 0 00 0 Tabata ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Weeksph 1 000
Hndrsn p 0 00 0
Totals 35 595 Totals 30 1 4 1
Milwaukee 100 020 101 5
Pittsburgh 000 000 100 1
E-A.J.Burnett 2 (2), G.Sanchez (1). LOB-Mil-
waukee 6, Pittsburgh 4. 2B-Aoki 2 (8),
L.Schafer (1), G.Sanchez (5). SB-Aoki 2 (6),
Segura 3 (13), C.Gomez (8). S-L.Schafer,
Estrada 2, A.J.Burnett.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
EstradaW,3-2 7 3 1 1 1 5
KintzlerH,5 1 1 0 0 0 0
Henderson 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
A.J.Burnett L,3-4 7 7 4 3 0 6
Contreras 1 0 0 0 0 0
Watson 1 2 1 1 0 1
Cardinals 6, Mets 3
New York St. Louis
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Baxter rf 4 1 0 0 MCrpnt2b-3b4 2 2 2
DnMrp 2b 4 1 3 2 Beltran rf 3 0 0 0
DWrght 3b 4 0 1 1 Hollidy If 4 2 2 2
I.Davisib 3 0 0 0 Craigib 4 0 2 1
Dudalf 2 0 0 0 YMolinc 3 0 1 0
Buck c 3 0 0 0 Jay cf 2 0 0 1
Ankielcf 3 1 0 0 Freese3b 4 1 1 0
RTejad ss 4 00 0 Kozma ss 0 00 0
Hefnerp 1 0 0 0 Descals ss-2b4 0 2 0
Turner ph 1 0 0 0 Lynn p 1 0 0 0
Rice p 0 0 0 0 Wggntn ph 1 1 1 0
Atchisn p 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Burkep 0 0 0 0 Rosnthlp 0 0 0 0
Vldspnph 1 0 0 0 MAdmsph 1 0 0 0
Mujicap 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 34 3 Totals 31 611 6
NewYork 030 000 000 3
St. Louis 210 000 30x 6
DP-NewYork 2. LOB-NewYork 7, St. Louis 7.
2B-Dan.Murphy (10), Craig (11), YMolina (11),
Wigginton (1). HR-Holliday (6). SB-Descalso
(3). S-Hefner, Lynn. SF-Jay.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Hefner 6 5 3 3 4 2
RiceL,1-3 2/3 2 2 2 0 1
Atchison 0 3 1 1 0 0
Burke 11/31 0 0 0 1
St. Louis
LynnW,6-1 7 4 3 3 5 7
Choate H,5 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
Rosenthal H,10 2/3 0 0 0 0 2
MujicaS,10-10 1 0 0 0 0 1
Cubs 9, Rockies 1
Colorado Chicago
ab rhbi ab rhbi
EYong cf 4 0 0 0 DeJess cf 4 2 2 2
Rutledg2b 3 1 1 1 SCastross 3 1 2 2
CGnzlzlf 4 0 0 0 Rizzolb 5 1 1 0
Tlwtzkss 4 0 0 0 ASorinlf 4 1 2 2
WRosr c 2 00 0 Fujikw p 0 00 0
Heltonib 2 0 1 0 Marmlp 0 0 0 0
Arenad3b 3 0 0 0 Schrhltrf 4 0 2 2
Blckmnrf 3 00 0 Ransm3b 4 00 0
Nicasio p 2 0 1 0 Castillo c 4 2 2 0
Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 1 1 0
Brigncph 1 0 0 0 TrWoodp 3 1 2 1
WLopezp 0 0 0 0 Borbon f 1 00 0
Totals 28 1 3 1 Totals 36914 9
Colorado 000 000 001 1
Chicago 230 000 22x 9
DP-Colorado 1, Chicago 2. LOB-Colorado 3,
Chicago 6. 2B-DeJesus (11), S.Castro (9),
A.Soriano (10), Castillo 2 (8), Tr.Wood (1). 3B-
Schierholtz (1). HR-Rutledge (5), A.Soriano (4).
CS-Schierholtz (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Nicasio L,3-1 6 8 5 5 1 2
Ottavino 1 3 2 2 0 1
W.Lopez 1 3 2 2 1 0
Chicago
Tr.WoodW,4-2 7 2 0 0 3 2
Fujikawa 1 0 0 0 0 2
Marmol 1 1 1 1 0 3


Baseball Top 10
AMERICAN LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
LoneyTB 37 109 16 41 .376
MiCabrera Det 36 149 27 55 .369
MauerMin 34 137 24 47 .343
AltuveHou 38 153 17 51 .333
TorHunter Det 33 147 23 49 .333
LongoriaTB 37 141 28 47 .333
Machado Bal 38 163 28 54 .331
Pedroia Bos 38 148 23 49 .331
JhPeralta Det 34 132 19 43 .326
KinslerTex 35 146 21 47 .322
Home Runs
CDavis, Baltimore, 11; Encarnacion, Toronto,
11; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 11; Cano, New
York, 10; 9 tied at 9.
Runs Batted In
MiCabrera, Detroit, 40; CDavis, Baltimore, 37;
Fielder, Detroit, 33; Napoli, Boston, 33; Mar-
Reynolds, Cleveland, 32; AGordon, Kansas City,
28; Morneau, Minnesota, 28.
Pitching
Buchholz, Boston, 6-0; MMoore, Tampa Bay,
6-0; Darvish, Texas, 6-1; Masterson, Cleveland,
6-2; Guthrie, Kansas City 5-0; Scherzer, Detroit,
5-0; Lester, Boston, 5-0.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
SeguraMil 35 136 20 50 .368
CGomezMil 35 128 22 47 .367
AdGonzalez LAD 33 116 10 40 .345
YMolinaStL 36 137 12 47 .343
SMarte Pit 37 150 29 48 .320
SandovalSF 37 147 21 47 .320
CuddyerCol 31 119 18 38 .319
GParraAri 37 149 24 47 .315
CCrawfordLAD 34 127 24 40 .315
Tulowitzki Col 34 106 18 33 .311
Home Runs
JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Buck, NewYork, 10; Harper,
Washington, 10; Beltran, St. Louis, 9; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 9; Rizzo, Chicago, 9; 5 tied at 8.
Runs Batted In
Phillips, Cincinnati, 31; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 31;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 30; Buck, New York, 29;
Craig, St. Louis, 28; Rizzo, Chicago, 28; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 26; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 26; San-
doval, San Francisco, 26.
Pitching
Zimmermann, Washington, 6-1; Lynn, St. Louis,
6-1; Corbin, Arizona, 5-0; SMiller, St. Louis, 52;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 5-2; Parnell, New York, 4-0;


Harvey, NewYork, 4-0.


Str Home
W-1 12-7
W-1 9-6
L-2 13-10
W-5 13-6
W-2 7-12


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
15 .583 6
16 .568 Y2 Y2 7
16 .529 2 2 4
17 .514 2Y2 2Y2 6
21 .417 6 6 4


Str Home
W-1 12-6
L-1 11-8
L-3 10-8
W-1 9-8
L-1 8-9


W
Texas 24
Oakland 19
Seattle 18
Los Angeles 14
Houston 10


West Division
L Pct GB WC
13 .649 -
20 .487 6 3Y2
20 .474 6Y2 4
23 .378 10 7Y2
29 .256 15 12Y2


NATIONAL LEAGUE


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
13 .649 8-2
16 .579 212 7-3
17 .553 312 5-5
20 .444 712 4 2-8
22 .421 812 5 5-5


Str Home
W-1 10-6
W-3 16-6
L-1 10-8
W-1 10-11
W-3 8-11


San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
GB WC
5 --
3 2 --
6 3 1
2 6Y2 4Y2
7 7 5


Str Home
W-4 11-4
L-1 9-8
W-1 11-9
L-1 7-9
L-5 6-16




Str Home
W-3 15-7
L-2 10-10
L-1 11-7
L-3 10-8
W-2 9-12


NewYork

Gardnr cf
ISuzuki If
Cano 2b
Hafner dh
Boesch rf
Nelson 3b
V.Wells ph
Joseph 1lb
CStwrt c


AIGnzlz ss 2 0 0 0
Overay ph 0 000
J.Nixpr-ss 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 04 0 Totals 271 5 1
NewYork 000 000 000 0
Cleveland 100 000 00x 1
DP-New York 1, Cleveland 1. LOB-New York
6, Cleveland 7. 2B-A.Cabrera (11), Stubbs (8).
HR-Kipnis (5). CS-Bourn (1).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
D.Phelps L,1-2 62/34 1 1 5 7
Logan 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Claiborne 1 1 0 0 0 1
Cleveland
MastersonW,6-2 9 4 0 0 3 9
WP-Logan, Masterson.
Umpires-Home, Mark Carlson; First, Jerry
Meals; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Dan las-
sogna.
T-2:26. A-0 (42,241).

Second Game
Yankees 7, Indians 0


Associated Press
New York Yankee Jayson Nix throws to first Monday to finish off a double play after getting Cleveland's Nick
Swisher at second base in the eighth inning in the first game of a doubleheader in Cleveland.




Yankees split with Indians


Dirks hits grand


slam in Tigers win

Associated Press

CLEVELAND Vidal Nuno
pitched five innings of three-hit
ball to win his first major league
start, Vernon Wells and Lyle Over-
bay had two RBIs apiece and the
New York Yankees beat the Cleve-
land Indians 7-0 Monday for a dou-
bleheader split
Cleveland's Justin Masterson
pitched a four-hitter for his third
career shutout as the Indians won
the opener 1-0 and stopped the
Yankees' five-game winning streak
Pitching in just his second game
for the Yankees, Nuno walked
three walks and struck out three.
The former Cleveland draft pick
became the only left-hander other
than CC Sabathia or Andy Pettitte
to start for New York since 2008.
Rookie Adam Warren finished
the five-hitter for his first big
league save.
New York chased Trevor Bauer
(1-2) during a six-run seventh.
In the opener, Masterson (6-2)
gave up four singles only one
reached the outfield for his sec-
ond shutout this season. The right-
hander overpowered the AL East
leaders for his third career shutout
and second this year.
Jason Kipnis homered in the
first inning off David Phelps (1-2)
for the Indians.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tigers 7, Astros 2
DETROIT -Andy Dirks hit his first
career grand slam, part of a six-run
fourth inning for the Detroit Tigers in their
7-2 victory over the Houston Astros.
Victor Martinez also homered for the
Tigers, who swept four straight from the
Astros in Houston earlier this month and
opened this three-game series at Com-
erica Park with another convincing
victory.
Anibal Sanchez (4-3) allowed two
runs and six hits in seven innings for the
Tigers. He struck out eight with one
walk.
Bud Norris (4-4) allowed seven runs
and nine hits in five innings before leav-
ing with lower back spasms. Houston
has lost five straight and 15 of 18 and
the Astros also lost standout second
baseman Jose Altuve in the second in-
ning with a jaw injury.

Twins 10, White Sox 3
MINNEAPOLIS Rookie Aaron
Hicks hit two home runs and made a
leaping catch in center field to take a
home run away from Adam Dunn in the


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Cleveland 1, N.Y.Yankees 0,1st game
N.Y Yankees 7, Cleveland 0, 2nd game
Detroit 7, Houston 2
Minnesota 10, Chicago White Sox 3
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, late
Texas at Oakland, late
Today
Cleveland (Kazmir 2-1) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 2-0),
7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 2-2) at Baltimore (Tillman 3-1), 7:05
p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 5-2) at N.Y Yankees (Sabathia
4-3), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 3-1) at Toronto (Dickey 2-5), 7:07
p.m.
Houston (Harrell 3-3) at Detroit (Fister 4-1), 7:08 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 1-3) atTampa Bay (M.Moore 6-0), 7:10
p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-1) at Minnesota (Correia
4-2), 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 5-0) at L.A. Angels (Vargas 1-3),
10:05 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 3-2) at Oakland (Colon 3-2), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
San Diego at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Detroit, 1:08 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday's Games
Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 6, N.Y Mets 3
Chicago Cubs 9, Colorado 1
Atlanta at Arizona, late
Washington at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today
Cleveland (Kazmir 2-1) at Philadelphia (Pettibone 2-0),
7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 1-4) at Pittsburgh (Locke 3-1), 7:05
p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 2-2) at Baltimore (Tillman 3-1),
7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 3-1) at Toronto (Dickey 2-5), 7:07
p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-3) at Miami (Nolasco 2-4), 7:10
p.m.
Colorado (Francis 1-3) at Chicago Cubs (Villanueva
1-2), 8:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Gee 2-4) at St. Louis (Gast 0-0), 8:15 p.m.
Atlanta (Teheran 2-0) atArizona (Corbin 5-0), 9:40 p.m.
Washington (Haren 4-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw
3-2), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
San Diego at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Arizona, 3:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Cincinnati at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

Minnesota Twins' 10-3 win over the
Chicago White Sox.
Justin Momeau extended his hitting
streak to nine games with three hits and
four RBIs, including a bases-clearing
double that capped the scoring in the
eighth.
Twins starter Pedro Hernandez (2-0)
allowed three runs on six hits in 5 1/3 in-
nings. The left-hander retired 14 of the
next 15 batters he faced after giving up
two runs in the first inning.
Alex Rios had two RBIs for the White


Sox, who are last in the American
League in batting average and runs
scored.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Brewers 5, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH Marco Estrada al-
lowed three hits over seven innings and
the Milwaukee Brewers beat the sloppy
Pittsburgh Pirates 5-1 to snap a four-
game losing streak.
Norichika Aoki went 3 for 5 with three
RBIs and two stolen bases for the
Brewers. Jean Segura added three hits
and three stolen bases as Milwaukee
ran wild against Pittsburgh backup
catcher Mike McKenry. The Brewers
stole six bases in all and took advan-
tage of three Pittsburgh errors to win for
just the second time this month.
Estrada (3-2) bounced back from a
rough start against St. Louis by striking
out five and issuing just one walk to re-
main unbeaten against the Pirates.
Burnett (3-4) allowed four runs in
seven innings and pushed his National
League-leading strikeout total to 72, but
Pittsburgh couldn't extend its winning
streak to a season-high four games.

Cardinals 6, Mets 3
ST. LOUIS Lance Lynn overcame
early control woes and St. Louis used a
three-run seventh inning to beat the
New York Mets 6-3.
Lynn (6-1) allowed three runs on
three hits and four walks the first two in-
nings. He only gave up one hit and one
walk in his last five innings. He is 4-0 at
home this season.
RickAnkiel, signed by the Mets ear-
lier in the day after clearing waivers and
playing against the team that revived his
career as a position player, just missed
a diving catch on Ty Wigginton's pinch-
hit bloop double to shallow center off
Scott Rice (1-3) to open the seventh.
Matt Carpenter followed Wigginton's
hit with a sharp grounder off Rice's leg
and the ball rolled into foul territory down
the first-base line. Wigginton never
stopped running and his head-first slide
barely beat the tag to snap a 3-3 tie.

Cubs 9, Rockies 1
CHICAGO Travis Wood pitched
seven scoreless innings and the
Chicago Cubs came within two outs of
their first shutout since last August in a
9-1 win over the Colorado Rockies.
Alfonso Soriano homered for
Chicago, which has won three straight
for the second time this season.
Josh Rutledge hit a home run off
Carlos Marmol with one out in the
ninth, ruining the Cubs' bid for their
first shutout win since they beat Col-
orado on Aug. 26, 2012.
Wood (4-2) allowed two hits while
striking out two for his major league-
leading eighth quality start.


NewYork


ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gardnr cf 4 1 0 0 Stubbs cf 3 0 1 0
J.Nix3b 4 2 2 1 Brantlylf 4 0 1 0
Canodh 5 0 1 0 ACarerss 4 00 0
V.Wells If 4 1 2 2 Swisherdh 3 0 1 0
Overaylb 5 1 1 2 CSantnib 4 00 0
BFrncs rf 4 0 1 0 MrRynl3b 3 00 0
Joseph 2b 4 1 1 0 Raburn rf 4 0 1 0
AIGnzlz ss 4 0 2 0 Aviles 2b 4 0 0 0
AuRmn c 4 1 1 1 YGomsc 3 01 0
Totals 38 711 6 Totals 32 0 5 0
NewYork 100 000 600 7
Cleveland 000 000 000 0
E-Mar.Reynolds (3), C.Santana (2). DP-
Cleveland 1. LOB-New York 7, Cleveland 8.
2B-Overbay (8), Joseph (1), Au.Romine (1),
Swisher (9).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
NunoW,1-0 5 3 0 0 3 3
Warren S,1-1 4 2 0 0 0 4
Cleveland
BauerL,1-2 61/36 3 2 2 4
Hagadone 1/3 3 4 3 1 1
Albers 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
Huff 12/31 0 0 0 2
WP-Albers.
Umpires-Home, Gerry Davis; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Dan lassogna; Third, Jerry
Meals.
T-2:56. A-23,300(42,241).

Tigers 7, Astros 2


Houston
ab
Grssmn cf 4
Pareds rf 3
Altuve 2b 1
RCeden ss 2
JCastro c 4
Carter 1b 4
C.Pena dh 4
JMrtnz If 4
Dmngz 3b 4
MGnzlz ss 3
Totals 33
Houston
Detroit


Detroit
r h bi ab rh bi
1 2 1 Dirks If 4 23 4
0 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 1
0 0 0 MiCarr 3b 4 0 0 0
0 0 1 Fielder b 4 1 1 0
00 0 VMrtnz dh 4 1 1 2
00 0 Avilac 4 0 0 0
0 1 0 JhPerlt ss 2 1 2 0
0 2 0 D.Kellycf 3 1 1 0
0 0 0 Infante2b 2 1 0 0

272 Totals 31 7 9 7
002 000 000 2
100 600 00x 7


DP-Houston 2, Detroit 1. LOB-Houston 6, De-
troit 2. 2B-J.Martinez (5), Dirks (2), Tor.Hunter
(11), Fielder (9). HR-Dirks (4), V.Martinez (2).
SB-Paredes (1), Ma.Gonzalez (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
B.NorrisL,4-4 5 9 7 7 1 2
Clemens 3 0 0 0 1 3
Detroit
Ani.SanchezW,4-3 7 6 2 2 1 8
Ortega 2 1 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Ortega (R.Cedeno).
Umpires-Home, Jim Joyce; First, Cory Blaser;
Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Ed Hickox.
T-2:50. A-31,161 (41,255).

Twins 10,
White Sox 3


Chicago

De Aza cf
AIRmrz ss
Rios rf
Viciedo dh
A.Dunn lb
Kppngr3b
Gillaspi ph
C.Wells If
Flowers c


Greene2b 4 000
Totals 35 3103 Totals 35101210
Chicago 200 001 000 3
Minnesota 004 101 04x 10
E-AI.Ramirez (6). DP-Chicago 1, Minnesota
1. LOB-Chicago 7, Minnesota 7. 2B-
AI.Ramirez (8), Rios (8), Morneau 2 (10), Plouffe
(7), Arcia (5), Florimon (4). HR-Hicks 2 (3).
SB-Dozier (3). SF-Viciedo, Doumit.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
H.Santiago L,1-2 52/38 6 3 1 6
Lindstrom 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Omogrosso 1 1 0 0 1 1
Heath 1 3 4 4 3 0
Minnesota
PHernandezW,2-0 51/36 3 3 0 4
Roenicke H,5 12/31 0 0 0 3
BurtonH,8 1 2 0 0 1 1
Fien 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Roenicke.
Umpires-Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Jordan
Baker; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Wally Bell.
T-2:51. A-25,605 (39,021).


Rays schedule
May 14 vs Boston
May 15 vs Boston
May 16 vs Boston
May 17 at Baltimore
May 18 at Baltimore
May 19 at Baltimore
May 20 at Toronto
May 21 at Toronto
May 22 at Toronto
May 24 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 25 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 26 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 27vs Miami
May 28 vs Miami
May 29 at Miami
May 30 at Miami
May 31 at Cleveland
June 1 at Cleveland
June 2 at Cleveland
June 4 at Detroit
June 5 at Detroit
June 6 at Detroit
June 7 vs Baltimore
June 8 vs Baltimore
June 9 vs Baltimore
June 10 vs Boston
June 11 vs Boston
June 12 vs Boston
June 13 vs Kansas City
June 14vs Kansas City
June 15 vs Kansas City
June 16 vs Kansas City


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

First Game
Indians 1, Yankees 0


Cleveland
r h bi
0 1 0 Bourncf
0 0 0 Kipnis2b
0 0 0 ACarerss
0 0 0 Swisherlb
0 1 0 Giambidh
0 1 0 CSantnc
0 0 0 MrRynl3b
0 0 0 Brantly If
0 1 0 Stubbs rf


ab rh bi
2 00 0
4 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
4010
4 0 1 0
24 000
1 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 1 0


Cleveland


Minnesota
r h bi
2 3 0 Dozier2b
1 3 0 Mauerc
0 1 2 Wlngh lf
0 0 1 Mornealb
0 0 0 Doumitdh
0 0 0 Plouffe 3b
0 0 0 Arcia rf
0 1 0 Hicks cf
0 2 0 Flormn ss


ab rh bi
5 110


5 134
43322 1 1

4 0 1 0
3 3 2 2
4 2 2 0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
Sunday, May 5
Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91
Indiana 102, New York 95
Monday, May 6
Chicago 93, Miami 86
San Antonio 129, Golden State 127, 20T
Tuesday, May 7
New York 105, Indiana 79
Memphis 99, Oklahoma City 93
Wednesday, May 8
Miami 115, Chicago 78
Golden State 100, San Antonio 91
Friday, May 10
Miami 104, Chicago 94
San Antonio 102, Golden State 92
Saturday, May 11
Memphis 87, Oklahoma City 81, Memphis
leads series 2-1
Indiana 82, New York 71, Indiana leads se-
ries 2-1
Sunday, May 12
Golden State 97, San Antonio 87, OT, series
tied 2-2
Monday, May 13
Miami 88, Chicago 65, Miami leads series 3-1
Oklahoma City at Memphis, late
Today
New York at Indiana, 7p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 15
Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 16
Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, May 17
x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, 7 or 8 p.m.
x-Miami at Chicago, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 18
x-New York at Indiana, TBA
Sunday, May 19
x-Chicago at Miami, TBA
x-Golden State at San Antonio, TBA
x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA
Monday, May 20
x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.



NHL Playoffs
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, April 30
Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 1
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 4, Toronto 1
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Islanders 0
San Jose 3, Vancouver 1
Thursday, May 2
Ottawa 4, Montreal 2
Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1
Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT
Friday, May 3
Montreal 3, Ottawa 1
N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago 5, Minnesota 2
San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT
Saturday, May 4
Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Toronto 4, Boston 2
Anaheim 4, Detroit 0
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0
Sunday, May 5
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Islanders 4, OT
Ottawa 6, Montreal 1
San Jose 5, Vancouver 2
Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT
Monday, May 6
Boston 5, Toronto 2
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 3
Tuesday, May 7
Ottawa 3, Montreal 2, OT
N.Y. Islanders 6, Pittsburgh 4
Chicago 3, Minnesota 0
San Jose 4, Vancouver 3, San Jose wins se-
ries 4-0
Wednesday, May 8
Boston 4, Toronto 3, OT
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 2, OT
Thursday, May 9
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y Islanders 0
Ottawa 6, Montreal 1, Ottawa wins series 4-1
Chicago 5, Minnesota 1, Chicago wins series
4-1
Friday, May 10
Toronto 2, Boston 1
Washington 2, NY Rangers 1, OT
Detroit 4, Anaheim 3, OT
Los Angeles 2, St. Louis 1, Los Angeles wins
series 4-2
Saturday, May 11
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y Islanders 3, OT Pittsburgh
wins series 4-2
Sunday, May 12
N.Y Rangers 1, Washington 0
Toronto 2, Boston 1
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, Detroit wins series 4-3
Monday, May 13
Boston 5, Toronto 4, OT, Boston wins series
4-3
N.Y Rangers 5, Washington 0, N.Y Rangers
wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7)
Today
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Wednesday, May 15
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.

Playoff OT goals
First Round
April 30 Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT,
Bryan Bickell, 16:35.
April 30 St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT,
Alexander Steen, 13:26.
May 2 Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT, Gustav
Nyquist, 1:21.
May 3 -San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT, Raffi
May 4 -Washington 1, N.Y Rangers 0, OT,
Mike Green, 8:00.
May 5 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Islanders 4, OT,
Chris Kunitz, 8:44.
May 5 Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT, Jason
Zucker, 2:15.
May 6 Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT, Damien
Brunner, 15:10.
May 7- Ottawa 3, Montreal 2, OT, Kyle Tur-
ris, 2:32.
May 7 San Jose 4, Vancouver 3, OT,
Patrick Marleau, 13:18.
May 8 Boston 4, Toronto 3, OT David Kre-
jci, 13:06.
May 8 Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 2, OT,
Slava Voynov, 8:00.


May 8 Anaheim 3, Detroit 2, OT, Nick
Bonino, 1:54.
May 10 -Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT,
Mike Ribeiro, 9:24.
May 10 Detroit 4, Anaheim 3, OT, Henrik
Zetterberg, 1:04.
May 11 Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT,
Brooks Orpik, 7:49.
May 13 Boston 5, Toronto 4, OT, Patrice
Bergeron, 6:05.



NASCAR Sprint Cup
Leaders
Through May 12
Points
1, Jimmie Johnson, 423.2, Carl Edwards, 379.
3, Matt Kenseth, 364.4, Dale Earnhardt Jr, 359.
5, Clint Bowyer, 349. 6, Kasey Kahne, 326. 7,
Brad Keselowski, 326. 8, Kyle Busch, 325. 9,
Aric Almirola, 317. 10, Kevin Harvick, 315. 11,
Paul Menard, 315. 12, Jeff Gordon, 311. 13,
Greg Biffle, 311. 14, Martin Truex Jr., 301. 15,


SCOREBOARD


For the r'co-rd


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
J1 8-0-9
CASH 3 (late)
04-8-9
4
PLAY 4 (early)

PLAY 4 (late)
TM 77-1-5-5


FANTASY 5
13 16 27 33 35


Sunday's winning numbers and payouts:


Fantasy 5:11 12 -
5-of-5 4 winners
4-of-5 240
3-of-5 8,076


13- 18- 36
$44,451.83
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Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASEBALL
10 a.m. (SUN) Oklahoma vs. Oklahoma State (Taped)
MLB BASEBALL
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Cincinnati Reds at Miami Marlins
7 p.m. (SUN) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND
7 p.m. (TNT) New York Knicks at Indiana Pacers, game 4
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Golden State Warriors at San Antonio Spurs,
game 5
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of California, stage 3
IIHF HOCKEY
5 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 IIHF World Championships: Slovakia
vs. United States
NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS, SECOND ROUND
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Ottawa Senators at Pittsburgh
Penguins, game 1
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) San Jose Sharks at Los Angeles Kings,
game 1

RADIO
6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
7:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay
Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Jamie McMurray, 295.16, Ricky Stenhouse Jr.,
282. 17, Ryan Newman, 276. 18, Kurt Busch,
262.19, Joey Logano, 259.20, Jeff Burton, 258.
Money
1, Jimmie Johnson, $3,328,830. 2, Matt
Kenseth, $2,573,506. 3, Kyle Busch,
$2,506,735.4, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $2,394,829.
5, Brad Keselowski, $2,341,985. 6, Carl Ed-
wards, $2,175,639. 7, Kevin Harvick,
$2,087,958. 8, Martin Truex Jr., $1,897,309. 9,
Clint Bowyer, $1,879,451. 10, Ryan Newman,
$1,854,831. 11, Jeff Gordon, $1,838,889. 12,
Kasey Kahne, $1,792,473. 13, Joey Logano,
$1,776,357. 14, Aric Almirola, $1,770,417. 15,
Tony Stewart, $1,750,314. 16, Greg Biffle,
$1,746,294. 17, Ricky Stenhouse Jr.,
$1,744,069. 18, Mark Martin, $1,669,252. 19,
Paul Menard, $1,618,019.20, Juan Pablo Mon-
toya, $1,597,608.


Major League Baseball
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Milwaukee -110 at Pittsburgh +100
Cincinnati -145 at Miami +135
at Chicago -115 Colorado +105
at St. Louis -155 NewYork +145
at Arizona -135 Atlanta +125
at Los Angeles-175 Washington +165
American League
at Detroit -280 Houston +240
at New York -120 Seattle +110
at Tampa Bay-150 Boston +140
Chicago -115 at Minnesota +105
at Los Angeles-125 Kansas City +115
Texas -110 at Oakland +100
Interleague
at Philadelphia-120 Cleveland +110
at Baltimore -130 San Diego +120
at Toronto -145 San Francisco +135
NBA Playoffs
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
at Indiana 5 (17912) New York
at San Antonio 7 (195) Golden State
NHL Playoffs
Tonight
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Pittsburgh -200 Ottawa +170
at Los Angeles-160 San Jose +140
Tomorrow
at Chicago -200 Detroit +170
Odds to Win Series
Pittsburgh -360 Ottawa +280
Los Angeles -165 San Jose +145
Chicago -340 Detroit +270


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Optioned LHP
Mike Belfiore to Norfolk (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Optioned 3B Lon-
nie Chisenhall to Columbus (IL). Selected the
contract of LHP David Huff from Columbus. Re-
called RHP Trevor Bauer from Columbus.
DETROITTIGERS-Placed OF Austin Jack-
son on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sunday.
Recalled OF Avisail from Toledo (IL).
HOUSTON ASTROS-Announced the resig-
nation of president and CEO George Postolos.
NEWYORKYANKEES-Recalled RHP Brett
Marshall from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Op-
tioned OF Brennan Boesch to Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Agreed to terms with 1 B
Anthony Rizzo on a seven-year contract.
CINCINNATI REDS-Assigned C Corky
Miller outright to Louisville (IL).
MIAMI MARLINS-Optioned C Kyle Skip-
worth to New Orleans (PCL). Placed OF Austin
Kearns on the restricted list.
NEW YORK METS-Agreed to terms with
OF Rick Ankiel on a one-year contract. Op-
tioned OF Andrew Brown to Las Vegas (PCL).
Transferred RHP Jenrry Mejia to the 60-day DL.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES-Reinstated INF
Neil Walker from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF
Jordy Mercer to Indianapolis (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Placed RHP Jake
Westbrook on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May
9.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES-Announced assis-
tant coach Barry Hecker has left the team.
NBA DEVELOPMENT LEAGUE
LOS ANGELES D-FENDERS-Named Mark
Madsen coach.


FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS-Promoted Dru
Grigson to director of college scouting, Quentin
Harris to director of pro scouting, and Josh
Scobey to pro scout. Named Terry McDonough
eastern regional scout, John Mancini area
scout-midwest, Debbie Pollom college scouting
coordinator and Glen Fox and Darius Vinnett
scouting assistants.
ATLANTA FALCONS-Signed CB Saeed
Lee and K Jeremy Shelley.
BUFFALO BILLS-Announced Buddy Nix is
stepping down as executive vice president/gen-
eral manager and will remain with the club as
special assistant.
CAROLINA PANTHERS-Signed WR Bren-
ton Bersin, TE Logan Brock, C Brian Folkerts,
DT Linden Gaydosh, WR Taulib Ikharo, LB Ben
Jacobs, DE Louis Nzegwu and WR R.J.Webb.
Waived WR Trey Diller, LB Damario Jeffery DE
Thomas Keiser and OL Zack Williams.
CHICAGO BEARS-Signed WR Demetrius
Fields, DT Corvey I rvin and DT Christian Tupou.
Agreed to terms with CB Maurice Jones. Re-
leased LB Dom DeCicco and CB LeQuan
Lewis.
CINCINNATI BENGALS-Signed LB Sean
Porter, HB Rex Burkhead and DT Terrence
Stephens. Waived DT Travis Chappelear.
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Signed DB Akeem
Auguste, DB Abdul Kanneh, P T.J. Conley, DL
Nicolas Jean-Baptiste and LB Ausar Walcott.
Waived DB Kevin Barnes, DB Ricky Tunstall,
WR Mike Edwards, DL Paipai Falemalu and P
Jake Schum.
DALLAS COWBOYS-Signed RB Joseph
Randle, OL Edawn Coughman, OL D.J. Hall
and WR Anthony Jones. Released OL Charlie
Bryant and Aderious Simmons and WR Greg
Herd.
DETROIT LIONS-Signed C Darren Keyton.
Released C Skyler Allen.
GREEN BAY PACKERS-Signed FB
Jonathan Amosa, LB Donte Savage, CB Bran-
don Smith, WR Tyrone Walker and LB Jarvis
Wilson. Released LB Micah Johnson and FB
Ryan Roberson.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-Signed RB Knile
Davis, DL Risean Broussard, S Greg Castillo,
DE Miguel Chavis, S Justin Glenn, RB Jordan
Roberts and DB James Rogers. Released FB
Ryan D'lmperio, RB Nate Eachus and DB Jose
Gumbs.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS-Signed OLTy-
ronne Green and OL R.J. Mattes. Released DL
Brandon Deaderick and WR Andre Holmes.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS-Signed DE
Baraka Atkins, WR Brent Leonard, DB Korey
Lindsey PK Jose Maltos, RB Khiry Robinson
and G Jeremiah Warren. Waived RB Shawne
Alston, CB Ryan Lacy and C Ryan Lee.
OAKLAND RAIDERS-Signed CB Chance
Casey-Thomas, LB Eric Harper, WR Greg
Jenkins, TE Jeron Mastrud, DE Ryan Robinson,
C Andrew Robiskie and CB Mitchell White.
Claimed WR Andre Holmes off waivers from
New England.Waived CB Adrian Bushell, C De-
veric Gallington, DB Akwasi Owusu-Ansah, TE
Mickey Shuler and LS Adam Steiner.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS-Released LB
Ramon Buchanon. Signed TE Victor Marshall
and DE Benson Mayowa.
TENNESSEE TITANS-Signed DT Antonio
Johnson to a one-year contract.Waived LB Tom
Wort.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Signed DE
Steven Means and RB Mike James.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS-Signed LB
Brandon Jenkins and S Bacarri Rambo. Waived
WR Jason Thompson.
MOTORSPORTS
INDYCAR-Named Derrick Walker head of
competition.
COLLEGE
ECAC-Named Dr. Kevin T McGinniss com-
missioner.
CHATTANOOGA-Named Will Wade men's
basketball coach.
ELON-Named Jonathan Small director of
football operations.
GEORGE MASON-Accepted an invitation
to join the Eastern Wrestling League.
MANHATTAN-Named Alyssa Shale assis-
tant athletic director for compliance.
MICHIGAN-Announced S Marvin Robinson
and LB Mike Jones and LB Kaleb Ringer have
left the football team.
VIRGINIA-Announced the resignation of
softball coach Eileen Schmidt.


TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 B3


HEAT
Continued from Page B1

most lopsided playoff victory while
handing the Bulls their worst ever post-
season loss, and the Heat continued to
roll from there.
James had his usual complete game
with eight assists and seven rebounds
Monday
Chris Bosh finished with 14 points
after scoring 20 and grabbing 19 re-
bounds in Game 3, and the Heat won
again despite another quiet night from
Dwyane Wade, who finished with six
points. Norris Cole also struggled with
seven points after back-to-back 18-point
performances, but the Heat had more
than enough in this one.
They shot about 49 percent while the
Bulls set a franchise playoff low at 25.7
percent. They were particularly bad
from the outside, going 2 for 17 from 3-
point range.
The Bulls again were missing ailing
Luol Deng and injured Kirk Hinrich
(calf), and a team that kept finding ways
to win despite being short-handed all
season simply appeared to run out of




TIGER
Continued from Page B1

stretch. More often than not, the other
guy beats him.
Back to Nicklaus, talking about Au-
gusta National, though it can apply to
other golf courses and situations.
"If you've got a 50-50 chance of
doing it, I wouldn't be doing it," Nick-
laus said about high-risk shots. "If
you've got a 90-10 chance, think real
hard about it, and try to make sure
you eliminate the 10."
(Nicklaus said he has never talked
to Phil Mickelson about this.)
Woods made a mistake on Sunday
when he hit a pop-hook into the water
on the 14th, leading to double bogey
that gave hope to about a half-dozen
players, at least for a short time. That
was because of a bad swing, which is
bound to happen over 18 holes of a
final round. It's his head that kept
him in the game.
"I stayed really patient," Woods
said. "I kept telling myself, 'That was
your only bad swing you made all day
You can still win this tournament."'
He figured if he could play the last
four holes in 1-under, he would at
least get into a playoff. He played the




ORB
Continued from Page B1

on cloud nine. The way he was strid-
ing today, the way he held his leads
through the lane, I thought it was
spectacular."
Orb, owned by the Phipps Stable
and Stuart Janney III, takes a five-
race winning streak in the Preakness,
where he will face what look to be
nine challengers. Among them are
Derby runners Mylute (fifth), Oxbow
(sixth), Will Take Charge (eighth),




JGR
Continued from Page B1

When asked to explain JGR's per-
formance at Darlington, team Presi-
dent J.D. Gibbs downplayed any magic
formula.
"I just think our whole team -
we've just got a great team from top to
bottom, drivers, crew chiefs, guys that
travel, guys back at the shop," Gibbs
said. "I think that really pays off on the
weekend. It pays off in Nationwide.
That's kind of our training ground for
our guys to move up to Cup. Then it
pays off in Cup. We have guys that
work hard, long hours. They enjoy it.
They enjoy winning races, too."
The weekend sweep came on the
heels of a trying two weeks for the
Gibbs organization.
One of the connecting rods in
Kenseth's race-winning engine from
Kansas did not meet the minimum
weight requirements and NASCAR
punished the organization with one of
the toughest penalties in recent his-
tory Joe Gibbs didn't dispute the part
was illegal, and manufacturer Toyota
accepted full blame.
What was important to Gibbs was
proving that there was no intent to de-
ceive on the part ofJGR or Toyota, and
that the part did not provide any com-
petitive advantage. So the team went
through the appeals process for the
first time in its history, and won a rare
victory at the first level in getting most
of the penalties reduced.
Kenseth still had to go to Darlington
without crew chief Jason Ratcliff, who


had his suspension reduced from six
races to one.
It made no difference, though, as
Kenseth was steady all weekend be-
hind fill-in crew chief Wally Brown
and found himself in position to
pounce as Busch began to fade for the
first Southern 500 win of Kenseth's
career.
In some regards, it's the addition of
Kenseth that has pushed JGR to what
seems to be a higher level this year.
The 2003 champion is the consum-
mate professional on and off the track.
He rides out the highs and lows with
an even keel, and brings a steadiness
the organization hasn't had since
Bobby Labonte departed at the end of


steam.
Carlos Boozer had 14 points and 12
rebounds for his fifth double-double in
the postseason but was just 3 of 14 from
the field. Jimmy Butler scored 12 and
Joakim Noah grabbed nine rebounds,
but it was a miserable night for Chicago
- particularly Nate Robinson, who
missed all 12 shots and did not score.
James scored 15 points and Bosh
added 12 in the first half to help the
Heat take a 44-33 lead at the break, but
that doesn't even come close to telling
the complete story
Consider this.
Miami shot just under 53 percent,
with the Bulls at about 27 percent.
Chicago was also 1 of 11 on 3-pointers,
and the only conversion from long
range came from Richard Hamilton.
The veteran guard entered to loud
cheers with the Bulls trailing 30-17 after
back-to-back 3-pointers by Shane Bat-
tier and Ray Allen, and the crowd was
roaring after Hamilton nailed a wide
open 3 from up top and Taj Gibson con-
verted a three-point play
The Bulls couldn't sustain any mo-
mentum. The Heat suffocated them on
both ends, squeezing a little harder
every time Chicago made a push.


last four in 1 under and won The
Players Championship. Of the four
players tied for the lead, two went
into the water on the 17th Garcia
and Jeff Maggert- while David Ling-
merth made a gallant try He missed
an 8-foot birdie chance on the 17th
and had to make a 70-foot putt down
two ridges on the 18th to tie. He three-
putted for bogey
Woods now is 52-4 when he has at
least a share of the lead going into the
final round on the PGA Tour, which
does not count his playoff win over
Tom Lehman in La Costa. They were
tied for the lead when rain washed
out the last round. Woods won in a
playoff when Lehman hit into the
water, and Woods hit his tee shot to a
foot.
His four wins this year speak to why
Woods is such a good closer. He has
yet to break 70 in the final round in
those four wins. He didn't need to.
Of the 52 times that Woods won with
at least a share of the lead after 54
holes, his average score in the final
round is 70.5. The 22 times he has won
when trailing after 54 holes, his aver-
age score in the final round is 66.6.
It's all about doing whatever it
takes to win. And when you don't,
make sure it's because someone else
beats you.


Itsmyluckyday (15th) and Goldencents
(17th). Also set for the race is Depart-
ing, winner of the Illinois Derby
"I think it's formidable," Mc-
Gaughey said. "I know that Oxbow
made a good run in the Derby I never
really kind of sat down and watched it
and pinned it down. The other horse
(Will Take Charge) got in some trou-
ble. You've got to respect Departing
coming in there off his race in the Illi-
nois Derby and being relatively fresh.
My main concern is just trying to get
Orb over there the best way we possi-
bly can and if he runs his race I think
they'll know he's in there."


2005.
JGR still had a veteran after
Labonte left in Tony Stewart, but the
temperamental driver was never the
role model Hamlin needed. Busch
only spent one season with Stewart at
JGR, and when Stewart left in 2009,
Hamlin became the most senior driver
in the shop a quiet leader with
proven on-track credentials that de-
mand respect from Busch and Hamlin.
"I think Denny and Kyle really like
having him, hearing what he has to
say," J.D. Gibbs said. "On the race
track, he just has a gift So I think it's
really been a blessing for Joe Gibbs
Racing to have him join our team. We
look forward to a great future."
Behind the scenes, JGR has also
worked extremely hard to overcome
shortcomings.
The move this year by NASCAR to
the new Gen-6 race car was a clean
slate for everyone, and JGR seized the
opportunity to get out front in devel-
opment. Employees at the shop stud-
ied the new specifications and built
new cars around the new weight rules,
while the crews worked hard to un-
derstand the new rear camber rules
and how it affected the rear tires.
It's been clear all season that JGR
did its homework: The team has won
five of 11 Cup races between Kenseth
and Busch, who both rank inside the
top-eight in the Sprint Cup standings.
Hamlin missed four races with his in-
jury but still ranks 27th, one spot be-
hind Talladega winner David Ragan,
and ahead of Danica Patrick and
Labonte.
In the Nationwide Series, Busch has


won five of the eight races he's en-
tered and Sadler and Vickers are both
inside the top-five in points.
It's been seven years since Stewart
gave JGR its last Cup title, and the
team has gone down swinging several
times since with both Busch and
Hamlin.
It's too early to tell if this year will
be the season JGR puts together a full
season, but the performance is high
right now.
"I think we have been strong in the
past, but I think what we've learned
over all these years is you have to be
consistent," J.D. Gibbs said. "You can't
start off too strong. To me, it's just that
consistency I think our guys really get
that at the shop."









Bruins score improbable Game 7 victory


Rangers advance

with 5-0 win at

Washington

Associated Press

BOSTON Patrice Berg-
eron tied it with 51 seconds left
in regulation then scored the
game-winner 6:05 into over-
time on Monday night to give
Boston a 5-4 victory over the
Maple Leafs in Game 7 as the
Bruins turned back Toronto's
comeback with a rally of their
own.
Tuukka Rask stopped 24
shots for Boston, which led the
best-of-seven series 3-1 before
the Maple Leafs won two in a
row to force a seventh game.
Toronto opened a 4-1 lead in
the third period of the decisive
game, but Boston cut the deficit
to two midway through the
third period and then scored
twice in the final 82 seconds to
force overtime.
James Reimer made 30 saves


for the Maple Leafs. Cody Fran-
son scored twice, and former
Bruin Phil Kessel had a goal
and an assist for Toronto.
Rangers 5, Capitals 0
WASHINGTON Led by Henrik
Lundqvist's 35 saves in a second
consecutive shutout, and goals
from some unlikely sources, the
New York Rangers beat the Wash-
ington Capitals 5-0 in Game 7 to
reach the Eastern Conference
semifinals.
New York contained Alex
Ovechkin again and completed its
comeback after trailing in the series
2-0 and 3-2 the latest in Wash-
ington's long history of playoff
collapses.
Sixth-seeded New York faces
No. 4 Boston in the second round.
It is the first time New York won a
Game 7 on the road in its history.
Arron Asham put New York
ahead in the first period, before
Taylor Pyatt and Michael Del Zotto
made it 3-0 early in the second on
goals 2:10 apart.
Ryan Callahan added a goal 13
seconds into the third period, and
when Mats Zuccarello scored with


about 13 1/2 minutes remaining,
thousands of red-clad fans
streamed to the exits.
Late Sunday night
Red Wings 3, Ducks 2
ANAHEIM, Calif. Henrik Zetter-
berg and Valtteri Filppula each had a
goal and an assist, and the Detroit
Red Wings finished off the Anaheim
Ducks with a 3-2 victory in Game 7.
Justin Abdelkader scored a short-
handed goal and Jimmy Howard
made 31 saves as the seventh-
seeded Red Wings won three of the
first-round series' final four games to
oust the Ducks, who had the NHL's
third-best record in the regular
season.
Detroit faces top-seeded Chicago
in the second round.
Emerson Etem and Francois
Beauchemin scored and Jonas
Hiller stopped 29 shots for the
Ducks, who failed to win their first
playoff series since 2009 despite
home-ice advantage.
After the clubs played four over-
times in the series' first six games,
the Red Wings largely dominated
the anti-climactic clincher.


Associated Press
Boston Bruins center Patrice Bergeron is embraced Monday by
teammate Zdeno Chara (33) after scoring the game-winning goal in
overtime in Game 7 of their NHL Stanley Cup playoff series in Boston.


POOr ju dgment ,
U d Bulls, Seminoles
will play football
___in 2015, 2016
Jags'Blackmon TAMPA- South Florida
'n and Florida State have
bames problems agreed to a home-and-
home football series, with


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Justin Black-
mon pinned his problems on his
decisions.
Blackmon, suspended the first four
games of the 2013 season for violating
the NFEs substance-abuse policy, ac-
knowledged Monday that he's at a
crossroads in his career and his per-
sonal life. But the Jacksonville
Jaguars receiver insisted he doesn't
have an alcohol or substance-abuse
problem.
"Out of this whole thing one of the
main things I would say that I had a
problem with was just making a poor
decision, making a selfish decision at
that and not thinking about the long
term of it and just thinking about at
the time," Blackmon said following
the team's first organized team activ-
ity "If you want to ask if I have a prob-
lem? I have a problem with making a
poor decision."
Blackmon has a credibility prob-
lem, too.
It was just 11 months ago that that
Blackmon apologized for getting ar-
rested on a DUI charge in Stillwater,
Okla. tests showed his blood-alco-
hol content to be three times the legal
limit and vowed that this is "not
who I'm going to be."
Blackmon eventually pleaded
guilty to aggravated DUI, which put
him in the league's substance-abuse
program. Although he declined Mon-
day to reveal what triggered his sus-
pension, it's likely he failed a random
test
The former Oklahoma State star
and fifth overall pick in the 2012 draft
also was arrested on a misdemeanor
DUI charge in Texas in 2010 after of-
ficers caught him speeding on a sub-
urban Dallas highway The charge
was later reduced to an underage al-
cohol possession charge.
Although it sure seems like this is a
pattern of behavior, Blackmon said
he's "confident" his latest mistake will
be his last
"I don't think anybody wants to be
in the position that I'm in right now,
and I don't think anybody wants to be
in a position that can be any worse,"
Blackmon said. "I'm not going to go
into it and say I want to be in this po-
sition because that's not where I want
to be. All I can do is come out here and
work every day and get better each
day Coach Gus (Bradley) says every
day, 'Today is the most important day'
and that's all I can do is come out here
every day and try to improve and take
care of everything else as it comes."
Blackmon declined comment when
asked whether he plans to enroll in a
rehabilitation program.
Blackmon, who caught 64 passes for
865 yards and five touchdowns as a
rookie, will miss games against
Kansas City, Oakland, Seattle and In-
dianapolis to open the season. He will
be eligible to return to practice Mon-
day, Sept 30. He will be allowed to at-
tend meetings and be inside the


Associated Press
Jacksonville Jaguar receiver Justin Blackmon runs Monday after a pass
reception during NFL organized team activities in Jacksonville.


facility during the suspension, but
can't practice or play
Blackmon apologized to teammates
shortly after the suspension was an-
nounced April 30.
"He came across well," veteran cen-
ter Brad Meester said. "He just apol-
ogized for what he did. He knew he
was wrong and said it wouldn't hap-
pen again. We all accepted that ... We
can't control what people do what
they leave here. We can't change what
happened in the past We have to be
there for him and help him through
this and make sure this doesn't hap-
pen again."
Running Maurice Jones-Drew,
though, said reaction to Blackmon's
suspension has been "out of control."
"The media just blows it out of pro-
portion," Jones-Drew said. '"A lot of
people make several mistakes. If
you're that age and you have that
amount of money, how would you act?
If you answer that question truthfully,
you can go from there."
Plenty of first-round draft picks,
however, go their entire careers with-
out landing in the substance-abuse
policy or on the suspended list.
"You have to do the right thing no


matter where you are," Meester said.
"We're blessed with this opportunity.
You'd hate to lose that opportunity
because of something dumb you did
outside of here. You don't want that to
be the reason you can't play this
game."
If Blackmon gets another suspen-
sion while in the program, it would be
for a full season.
"We're going to see what kind of
character he has," Jones-Drew said.
Blackmon's four-game hiatus will
cost him about $220,000. It also trig-
gered language in his contract that
voids future guarantees, meaning the
Jaguars could cut him without having
to pay about $10 million that remains
on a four-year, $18.5 million contract.
Blackmon made it clear he wants to
move on from the suspension, but the
23-year-old receiver stopped short of
saying he plans to change his lifestyle.
"I've just got to make better deci-
sions," he said. "Like I said, my prob-
lem was I made a selfish decision and
I apologize for that I apologized to my
teammates and I apologized to my
family for it That's something that I
did and I take full responsibility for
it"


games scheduled between
the Bulls and Seminoles in
2015 and 2016.
USF athletic director
Doug Woolard announced
the agreement Monday.
The teams will play in Tal-
lahassee on Sept. 26,
2015 and in Tampa on
Sept. 24, 2016.
The Bulls and Semi-
noles have met twice in
football. USF won 17-7 in
Tallahassee in 2009, and
Florida State came out on
top 30-17 in Tampa last
season.
Swingman Walker
changes mind,
stays at Florida
GAINESVILLE -
Florida coach Billy Dono-
van is sympathetic to
changes of heart.
So it's no surprise that
Donovan, who once re-
turned to Gainesville after
taking the Orlando Magic's
coaching job, welcomed
back freshman swingman
DeVon Walker on Monday.
Florida granted Walker
his release from scholar-
ship last week so he could
transfer elsewhere. But
Walker changed his mind
over the weekend, saying
he "just realized this is
where I want to be."
Like he did with forward
Alex Tyus a few years
ago, Donovan applauded
Walker's decision to stay.
Donovan said, "We always
encourage guys to do
what they feel is best for
their future and we're glad
that DeVon will be continu-
ing with us here at
Florida."
Walker played in 25
games as a freshman, fin-
ishing with 20 points and
17 rebounds.
Ex-Gators QB
Leak returns as
QC coach
GAINESVILLE Former
Florida quarterback Chris
Leak is returning to the foot-
ball program.
Leak is joining the team
as a quality control assis-
tant. Coach Will Muschamp
said Leak will work with the
defensive staff in breaking
down film and other office
tasks. Muschamp added
Leak is interested in pursu-
ing a coaching career.
Leak led the Gators to
the 2006 national champi-
onship and finished his ca-


reer as the team's all-time
leader in passing yards
(11,213), completions (895)
and attempts (1,458).
Since leaving
Gainesville, Leak has
played in the Canadian
Football League, Arena
Football League and served
as co-host of a national
radio show.
Muschamp also said
freshman safety Marcell
Harris junior college trans-
fer Trenton Brown, an offen-
sive lineman, have enrolled
in school. They started
classes Monday.
Buccaneers sign
draft picks
Means, James
TAMPA The Tampa
Bay Buccaneers have
signed defensive end
Steven Means and running
back Mike James, two of
their selections in last
month's NFL draft.
Means is a fifth-round
pick out of Buffalo. James
was taken in the sixth round
after rushing for 1,386
yards and 17 touchdowns
during his career at Miami.
Means started every
game of his last two sea-
sons in college, finishing
with 18 1/2 career sacks.
The Bucs announced the
signing Monday. Terms
were not disclosed.
Ex-Jacksonville
WR Smith serving
prison term
JACKSON, Miss. -
Former Jacksonville
Jaguars receiver Jimmy
Smith has been sentenced
to six years in prison in
Mississippi for drug pos-
session and weapons
charges.
The Mississippi Depart-
ment of Corrections' web-
site said the 44-year-old
Smith entered the prison
system in late March and
was recently moved to a
facility in Yazoo City. On-
line records show he was
sentenced by a Madison
County court to two years
for possession of a firearm
by a convicted felon and
four years for possession
of cocaine.
WJXX-TV in Jack-
sonville, first reported
Smith's sentence. His ten-
tative release date is listed
as Nov. 8, 2018.
Smith, a standout at
Jackson State drafted by
the Dallas Cowboys in
1992, played 13 seasons
in the NFL, including 11 for
the Jaguars. He became
the franchise's all-time
leading receiver before his
retirement in 2005.
-From wire reports


Venus Williams exits in 1st round at Italian Open


Associated Press

ROME Venus Williams lost
to Laura Robson 6-3, 6-2 in the
wind at the Italian Open on
Monday, ending prospects for a
sister showdown in the second
round.
Serena Williams, who won the
Madrid Open on Sunday,


watched the match from the
stands.
Robson had eight double-
faults and Williams six, the gusts
complicating play at Foro Ital-
ico. Williams' errors came at
more inopportune times, with
two double-faults in the final
game.
The 19-year-old Robson, who


won the Wimbledon junior title
at 14, is ranked No. 39- 15 spots
below Venus Williams. Next up
for Robson is the No. 1 player
The top eight seeds have first-
round byes. This is the last
major warmup for the French
Open, which starts May 26.
In other matches, ninth-
seeded Samantha Stosur


cruised past Su-Wei Hsieh of
Taiwan 6-2, 6-3; Sabine Lisicki of
Germany eliminated American
qualifier Mallory Burdette 6-1,
6-2; and Italian wild card Nas-
tassja Burnett defeated 2008 fi-
nalistAlize Cornet of France 6-2,
6-2.
Among the men, 11th-seeded
Marin Cilic beat Andrey Golubev


of Kazakhstan 6-4, 6-2 and Ital-
ian wild card Potito Starace ral-
lied past Radek Stepanek of the
Czech Republic 4-6, 6-4, 6-3 to set
up a match against second-
seeded Roger Federer.
Tenth-seeded Janko Tipsare-
vic withdrew because of bron-
chitis, with Lukas Rosol taking
his place in the draw.


on his decisions 7


B4 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5 BRIEFS ]


3







Section C TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013



H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Haircuts for hugs


Barber, 82,

offers services in

Connecticut park
JESSICA HILL
Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn.
Each Wednesday, bar-
ber Anthony Cymerys
sets up his chair in the
shade of an oak tree in
Hartford's Bushnell Park. For
longtime clients, the homeless
or those just down on their
luck, the fee is always the
same: a hug for a haircut.
The 82-year-old Cymerys,
who is known as Joe the Bar-
ber, began offering his services
25 years ago after retiring from
a career in business. He had
cut hair for his family, but de-
cided to put his clippers to
work for the less fortunate after
being inspired by a church ser-
mon about the homeless.
He wanted the homeless not
to look homeless.
His clients line up on park
benches, some of them also
turning out for free meals pro-
vided Wednesdays by a local
church. One by one, they take
a seat in a folding lawn chair
above a car battery Cymerys
uses to power his clippers.
As he finished a trim on one
customer recently, a loud
squeal came from the battery
He gathered the mobile shop,
connected the clippers to his
car and picked up where he
left off.
"It really is love. I love these
guys," Cymerys said. He
paused and turned to his
client in the chair, "You know
I love you, right?"
"That's what it's all about,"
Cymerys said.


'Choosing Wisely'


In past articles, I had dis-
cussed the importance of pa-
tients empowering them-
selves and working with their
doctors to improve their health
care.


There is now a cam-
paign called Choosing
Wisely, which started
in spring of 2012. It is
gaining momentum
and support from the
nation's doctors and
specialty groups.
It was started by the
American Board of In-
ternal Medicine and it
was started to stimu-
late conversations be-
tween doctors and


Dr. Deni
EAR, I
& THI


patients regarding the delivery of
health care. The goal is to have
patients and doctors discuss tests
and procedures to make sure
that the choices are appropriate
and provide safe and effective
health care.
Along with the American
Board of Internal Medicine doc-
tors, nine other specialty soci-
eties released their guidelines.
In February 2013, my specialty
society, The American Academy
of Otolaryngology Head and


Neck Surgery (ear, nose and
throat society) released the five
things they feel will improve pa-
tient care.
This concept of working to-
gether is very impor-
tant in this day and
age, where we have an
aging population more
likely to be ill and lim-
ited resources of
/n health care delivery
The idea is doctors
and patients working
together can make
s Grillo smarter decisions, and
sGrlloit also adds to the
NOSE safety of the health
ROAT care system in the
United States. As the
delivery of health care
in this country becomes more of
a challenge, it is important that
we maintain our goals of high
quality care being delivered
safely
Some research in Washington
suggests up to 30 percent of
health care dollars goes toward
unnecessary testing procedures,
and hospital stays that do not re-
ally affect the patient's health
quality and in some instances
See Page C4


Understanding addiction


Addiction is a persistent,
compulsive dependence
on a behavior or sub-
stance. An addiction can be a de-
pendence on a habit-forming
substance such as
nicotine, alcohol, pre-
scription pain killers,
or caffeine, or an ad-
diction to a behavior
such as eating, shop-
ping, gambling, exer-
cising, playing video
games, watching
pornography or even
work.
An addiction can de- Dr. Carle
velop suddenly in re- WELL
sponse to a stressful COF
change in your life, or
it can creep up on you
gradually It is important to rec-
ognize the signs that you or some-
one you love is suffering from an
addiction. Symptoms of physical
dependence on alcohol or drugs
include:
Increasing tolerance you
need more and more alcohol or
drugs to achieve the same effect.
Withdrawal symptoms as
the effects of the alcohol or drug
wear off, you experience anxiety,
shakiness or trembling, sweating,
nausea and vomiting, insomnia,


I


depression, irritability, fatigue,
loss of appetite, or headaches.
You have to take a drink or more
drugs to relieve your discomfort.
When any behavior negatively
affects your quality of
life, it is a sign that you
are addicted. You may
find yourself doing
something, not be-
cause you want to, but
because you feel you
have to.
You may lose interest
in the things you used
to enjoy, spend less
ne Wilson time with close friends
NESS and family members,
NER and experience diffi-
culty in your relation-
ships. You may isolate
yourself from social situations in
order to mask your addiction.
Your addiction may affect your
performance at school or work,
and you may find yourself in fi-
nancial difficulties because of
uncontrolled spending or legal
difficulties because of aggressive
or irresponsible behavior
Addiction is often associated
with depression, dependent be-
havior, and difficulty in formulat-
ing long-term personal goals
See Page C3


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
NAVIGATING
CANCER


Race and

income
Over the years, I
have often dis-
cussed the impor-
tance of screening, early
detection and early
treatment of cancer
This simple motto
means all of the differ-
ence in the world when
looking at the chance of
successful treatment.
But when this does not
occur, the chance of a
cure and good outcome
is greatly diminished.
New research con-
firms this fact, showing
women who delay treat-
ment for breast cancer
are less likely to survive,
and this is especially ob-
served in blacks, His-
panics and those of low
income.
The finding came from
a new study conducted
by researchers from the
University of California,


.Page C4


Dr. Frank
Vascimini
SOUND BITES


Finding

a new

dentist
Q My dentist and
hygienist of 30
years recently
retired simultaneously.
They were thorough and
knowledgeable and at
every visit treated me as
if I were a new patient. I
am having difficulty
finding a dentist to as-
sume my care that meets
the standards of my
prior one.
I had one visit with a
dentist whose primary
concern was my only two
fillings, which he wanted
to replace at a cost of al-
most $2,000, even though
he said he saw no signs
of problems or decay be-
neath them. He did not
perform the oral exam
or check my bite. He did
See Page C4


* So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic
reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician.


IZ2iHPH Hospice...

( because they provide safe, secure, compassionate
care to the people of Citrus County 4)
John Siefert, Executive Director, Citrus Economic Development Council

"Before companies come to Citrus County to locate, to hire and to expand here, they
want to know there are excellent medical options and hospice care is an important part of
that. Having such compassionate, caring professionals providing care at the end of life is
attractive to businesses and individuals who are considering coming here."
Dignity. Respect. Compassionate Care.
It's no wonder people trust HPH Hospice as life nears an end. Call to learn more or v


naSrpIft hbsp i ced 98
anot-for-profito a ni initially licensed 3,1984 I A A


I ^ INlSl llBIDE I


* Dr. Richard
Hoffmann
/Page C3


Associated Press
Anthony Cymerys, also known as Joe the Barber, right, checks the connection of his hair clippers
to the battery May I as Colby Snow, 4, left, watches and waits for his haircut in Bushnell Park in
Hartford, Conn. Cymerys uses a car battery and power inverter to run the electric clippers he uses
to give haircuts each Wednesday, for the fee of a hug.


Cymerys smiles as he works with clients in the park.





C2 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013

Our Lady of Grace
Church and Knights of
Columbus Council 6168
Blood Ministries blood drive,
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
May 18, in the Parish Life
Center of Our Lady of Grace
at 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly
Hills, with complimentary pan-
cake breakfast.
Giving blood is a painless
procedure and comes with a
mini physical. New and first-
time donors are welcome. To
donate, you must be at least
17 years old and at least 110
pounds. Bring photo identifi-
cation. Call LifeSouth at 352-
537-3061.
Knowledge is Power
Health Fair, 1 to 4 p.m.
Wednesday, May 22, at Crys-
tal River Health & Rehab, 136
N.E. 12th Ave., free.
There will be various health
screenings, drawings, 40 ven-
dors, food, music and a mus-
cle car and motorcycle show,
as well as face painting for
the kids. Understand what
your future health care op-
tions are and learn more
about Medicare. Call 352-
795-5044.
"Improving Care for
Veterans Facing Illness and
Death," 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Wednesday, May 22, at
the Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Ho-
mosassa. Free.
Registration will be at 8:30
a.m. with coffee and dough-
nuts, with the program from 9
a.m. to noon, followed by a
half-hour discussion.
Three continuing education
credits for professionals are
available from the Hospice
Foundation of America.
To make a reservation, call
Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500,
ext. 1728.
Free heart health semi-
nar, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
May 22, at Plantation Inn in
Crystal River, hosted by Cit-
rus Memorial Health System
Heart and Vascular Center
with a presentation from car-
diologist Dr. Nishant Nerella
and cardiovascular and tho-
racic surgeon Dr. Peter Yung
Kim. Seating is limited, so an
RSVP is required to attend.
Register online at www.citrus
mh.com/events or call 352-
344-6732.
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem is a 198-bed, not-for-profit
community hospital that pro-
vides health care services to
residents of Citrus County and
surrounding communities.
CRYSTAL RIVER -Dur-
ing National Emergency
Medical Services Week,
May 19-25, local communities
and medical personnel come
together to publicize safety
and honor the dedication of
those who provide the day-to-
day lifesaving services of
medicine's front line.
This year's theme, "EMS:
One Mission. One Team,"
highlights the team approach
that EMS professionals take
in fulfilling their mission: car-
ing for those in need.
"Emergency responders re-
main calm and focused in life-
threatening situations and use
their medical expertise to as-
sure the health and welfare of
those they serve," said Joyce
Brancato, chief executive offi-
cer at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center. "They work
quickly and efficiently to de-
liver patients safely to our hos-
pital, where clinicians can
perform diagnosis and treat-
ment. These are highly skilled,
dedicated individuals who pro-
vide outstanding service to
Citrus County and we thank
them for everything they do."
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center, a 128-bed
general, medical/surgical
acute care facility serving Cit-
rus, Levy and south Marion
counties, opened its doors in
1978. Learn more at Seven
RiversRegional.com,
Facebook.com/SRRMC or
Twitter.com/SRRMC.
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers: During May,
donors will receive a mous-


tache T-shirt. To find a donor
center or a blood drive near
you, call 352-527-3061.
Donors must be at least 17, or
16 with parental permission,
weigh a minimum of 110
pounds and be in good health
to be eligible to donate. A
photo ID is required.
The Lecanto branch office
is at 1241 S. Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491), open
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays (7 p.m. Wednes-
days), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at


301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
days, (6:30 p.m. Wednes-
days), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Saturday and closed Sun-
days. Visit www.lifesouth.org.
Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday,
May 14, Walmart Super-
center, 3826 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa.
0 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Tues-
day, May 14, Citrus County
School Bus Transportation,
2950 S. Panther Pride Drive,
Lecanto.
0 4 to 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 15, First Baptist
Church of Crystal River, 700
Citrus Ave.
Noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
day, May 15, Walmart Super-
center, 1936 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 16, Seven Rivers
Regional Medical Center,
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crys-
tal River.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday,
May 17, Nature Coast Lodge,
279 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun-
day, May 19, St. Scholastica
Catholic Church, 4301 W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto.
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, May
19, Walmart Supercenter,
1936 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
8:30 a.m. to noon Mon-
day, May 20, Anytime Fitness,
5723 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.
0 1 to 4 p.m. Monday, May
20, Dairy Queen, 727 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
Noon to 6 p.m. Tuesday,
May 21, AAA Roofing, 1000
N.E. Fifth St., Crystal River.
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center offers the fol-
lowing health education pro-
grams presented by
board-certified physicians and
licensed medical profession-
als. Website: SevenRivers
Regional.com.
Call 352-795-1234 to regis-
ter for the programs.
Breastfeeding/Infant
Care Expectant or new
mothers learn helpful tech-
niques for successful breast-
feeding as well as basic infant
care at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May
14, in the Medical Offices
Building Community Room.
Program is free; registration
required.
Balance Screenings -
Seven Rivers Rehab &
Wound Center offers free bal-
ance screenings at 1675 S.E.
U.S. 19 in the Crystal River
Shopping Center (next to
Sweetbay). Call 352-795-
0534 to schedule.
SPRING HILL-Oak
Hill Hospital H2U Partner's
Club events. The hospital is
at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring
Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19
on State Road 50. Visit
OakHillHospital.com.
H2U Partner's Club events
and activities are open to
members only. Membership is
open to Hernando, Pasco and
Citrus County residents for
$20 a year, which includes
membership in the HCA na-
tional H2U program.
May 21 90's+ Club,
10:30 a.m.
May 22 Meet & Eat at
China 1,12:30 p.m.
May 22 Suncoast traf-
fic school. 6 to 10 p.m.
SPRING HILL-Access
Health Care LLC offers lec-
tures in May, at 5:15 p.m. at
Access Health Care's main of-
fice at 5350 Spring Hill Drive,


Health NOTES


Spring Hill, conducted by
Maria Scunziano-Singh, M.D.
May 23 Bioidentical
hormones are here to say for
women and men.
For information and to reg-
ister, call 352-688-8116.
The Nature Coast
Lodge Assisted Living Fa-
cility in Lecanto offers activi-
ties, events and trips open to
the public.
Tuesday, May 14 trip
to Weeki Wachee, $10 per
person. Call the lodge by
Monday, May 13, to make a
reservation.
May 17 blood drive
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., offer-
ing a tour of the facility.
NAMI Citrus offers a 12-
week "Family to Family"
course to assist families to be
better able to cope with men-
tally ill family members, begin-
ning May 16 in Spring Hill.
Call 352-277-1832.
HPH Hospice, "Healing
People's Hearts in Citrus
County," offers a two-day new
volunteer orientation from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. May 22 and
May 24 at its team offices,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Winn-Dixie shopping
plaza in Beverly Hills.
HPH Hospice has been
serving residents in Citrus
County since 2005, and has
provided services in Her-
nando and Pasco counties
since 1984. Hospice volun-
teers often serve patients and
families at the bedside, but
they also assist in the office,
help raise awareness, con-
tribute to educational pro-
grams, provide fundraising
support and more.
Qualifications needed: Car-
ing heart, positive attitude,
extra love to share and a big
smile that appears on de-
mand. RSVP or receive infor-
mation by calling Debi
Shields, volunteer coordina-
tor, at 352-527-4600.
Support
GROUPS

Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 1100
Turner Camp Road, Inver-
ness, hosts a volunteer meet-
ing at 10:30 a.m. the second
Tuesday monthly, September
to May. Call 352-344-8111.
HIV support group, 3 to
4 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at Citrus County
Health Department, 3700
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Open to all affected by HIV.
Persons attending remain
confidential, testing will be
anonymous. Reservation not
required. Call 352-527-0068,
ext. 281, if you have any
questions.
Nature Coast Multiple
Myeloma Support Group,
6 p.m. the third Wednesday
monthly at the Oak Hill Hospi-
tal Partner's Club (formerly
Spring Hill Enrichment Cen-
ter) at Oak Hill Hospital,
11375 Cortez Blvd. (State
Road 50), Brooksville. Free
dinner buffet will be served.
Contact Herb and Dianne
Terry at 352-621-0672 or
hterryl@tampabay.rr.com, or
Richard Blustein at 352-428-
4536 or Blustein22@aol.com.
SPRING HILL Look
Good Feel Better Support
Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Specialists,
10441 Quality Drive, Suite
203, in the Medical Arts Build-
ing next to Spring Hill Hospi-
tal. Call 352-688-7744.


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

B.K. Patel, M.D. H. Khan, M.D.
Internal Medicine Board Certified Family Medicine

Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals



Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746.0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503.2011


"Different Strokes for
Different Folks" stroke sup-
port group, 10:30 a.m. to
noon the third Thursday
monthly in the Inpatient Reha-
bilitation Multipurpose Room
at Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center in Crystal
River. Call 352-795-1234.
Alzheimer's caregiver
and family support group
by Alzheimer's Family Organi-
zation, 2:30 p.m. the first and
third Thursday monthly at Su-
perior Residences of Lecanto,
4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way. Call Debbie Selsavage
at 352-746-5483.
FFRA (Families and
Friends Reaching for the Abili-
ties), third Friday monthly at
the Key Training Center in In-
verness at 130 Heights Ave.
Social time and business
meeting at 9 a.m. is followed


by a speaker at 10 a.m. Call
Ron Phillips, president, at
352-382-7819 or visit
www.ffracitrus.org.
National Osteoporosis
Foundation Citrus County
Support Group has sus-
pended meetings for the sum-
mer. They will resume in
September.

Weekly meetings
R.I. Discovery (Recov-
ery International) Abraham
Low self-help systems for
mental health depression,
obsession, stress, fears,
anger. Meetings are 2 to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Call Jackie, 352-563-5182.
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group,
6:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,


HEALTH & LIFE


. Page C3


0514 TUCRN

City of Crystal River, Florida

Request for Bids -

Tree Evaluation & Trimming Services

Bid No. 13-B-12

Synopsis: The City of Crystal River is seeking bids from qualified firms for tree evaluation and
trimming services associated with the need to perform specialized trimming and pruning of trees
that comprise an historic oak tree canopy. Vendors must provide all necessary labor, tools,
equipment, supplies and supervision for the work described herein. Sealed Bids must be received
by the City Clerk no later than 2 PM, June 10, 2013.

Important instructions and specifications regarding responses to this bid are listed below. Failure to
follow these instructions could result in bid disqualification.

Questions regarding this bid should be in writing and should reference the above bid number.
Submit all questions via email to City Manager Andy Houston (ahouston 5crystalriverfl.org) or via
fax at 352-795-6351.
Paper copies can be obtained at City Hall. Any addendums will be posted at www.crystalriverfl.ora.

A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held on Friday May 24, 2013 at 10:00 am at the Job Site -
Depot Parking Lot NE 2nd Avenue and Crystal St., Crystal River, Fl.

Submission Requirements: Bids must be enclosed in a sealed envelope clearly marked as follows:

Attention: City Clerk
Re: Response to Request for Bids/Tree Evaluation & Trimming Services
Bid# 13-B-12
City of Crystal River
123 NW HWY 19
Crystal River, FL 34428

Bids received after the deadline will not be opened or considered.

Background: A canopy of twenty three (23) oak trees exists along Crystal Street within Crystal
River, extending from approximately NE 1st Avenue (Citrus Avenue) to NE 3rd Avenue. The trees
that comprise part of this canopy (fourteen of the oaks on the West side of Crystal St.) were
planted in the early 1900's and the canopy has historical significance to the Crystal River
community.

The trees that comprise this canopy were evaluated by a licensed arborist in 2009 and a written
report was generated summarizing the results of that evaluation. That report is available at:
www.crystalriverfl.org or at City Hall and can be used for informational purposes, however the
trees may have different requirements at this time (please note that tree #11 has been removed).

The City is interested in receiving bids for the following services:
* pruning & trimming of deadwood, dying, damaged, crossing and/or circling of branches as
required to protect the long-term health and appearance of the trees.
pruning or removing low hanging branches that are weak or could prove hazardous.
pruning some leaders from trees with multi-dominate leaders from the same central area on the
main trunk as in Tree #4 #8 and # 20 to protect long term health. Remove 1 large leader in #13
(see arborist report).
removing vegetation such as suckers and mistletoe and cutting Vines (can be cut at ground
level and be allowed to die) growing on the trunks and/or within the limbs of all trees that are
affected. Vines or other vegetation are not to be pulled out of the tree causing harm to the bark.
Not necessary to remove Epiphytes that do not harm the Oaks.
cleaning the crotch of trees as needed to prevent rot.
after pruning as listed above, removing 30% of the remaining moss by hand on 360 degrees of
trees. Absolutely no spraying for moss removal is allowed.
removing nearby trees that have canopies growing into the Oaks as marked with X in red spray
paint.
Note: 226 Crystal remove about 20% from sides of Cedar growing into Canopy of Oak-
Tree 14, remove dead branch crossing sidewalk 256 Crystal Ave- remove 2 Camphor trees -
remove 2 trees from the empty lot south of Waybright Realty.
disposing of all waste and debris associated with the performance of this work to an approved
landfill or disposal site.

Bid Requirements: Firms wishing to be considered for this project must submit a sealed bid
packet by the time and date set forth above which contains the following elements:
* Information on the firm, to include qualifications of the staff who would be conducting this work
on behalf of the City and the experience of both the designated staff and the firm overall in
providing services of this nature.
A list of equipment to be used and designated operators.
A projected timeline to complete the work addressed within the bid. Daily work time should be
scheduled so as not to interfere with school traffic.
Explanation of the management of traffic (MOT) plan that will be utilized inasmuch as Crystal
Street is a main thoroughfare and handles considerable school-related traffic. The bidder shall
adhere to the requirements of the Florida Department of Transportation's (FDOT) manual on
Traffic control.
Proof of Commercial General Liability Insurance and Comprehensive Automobile Liability
Insurance, in an amount of not less than a $300,000 combined single limit, and Workers
Compensation coverage which includes tree trimming work. The City of Crystal River must be
named as an additional insured upon the award of a contract. An original certificate of insurance
must be received before work begins.
An original signature of an authorized representative. Bid must be in black non-erasable ink and
any corrections made by the bidder must be initialed by the person who signs the bid.
By submitting a bid, the bidder attests that they are fully compliant with all applicable
immigration laws.
By submitting a bid, the bidder attests that they implement a drug free workplace policy.

Specifications:
Work shall be done in accordance with recognized and approved principles of modern
arboriculture methods with emphasis on tree health. In accordance with the National Arborist
Association (NAA), cuts shall be done by trained employees who are skilled in this class of work.

Evaluation of Bids: Bids meeting the requirements set forth above will be evaluated by City
representatives, and those firms determined to be most qualified will be interviewed. The City
reserves the right to select the bid that, in its sole discretion, best meets its needs with respect to
the services being sought. The City further reserves the right to reject any and all bids if it is
deemed to be in the best interest of the City to do so.

The city may terminate this bid at any time, in whole or in part either for the City's convenience or
because of the Bidder's material default of its Bid obligations, by delivering written notice of
termination to the Bidder.

BID RESPONSE SHEET BID #13-B-12 (TREE TRIMMING SERVICES)


Bid Total Cost to complete the work as described above:


$


Name of Company:
Address of Company:

Company Representative:


Signature:
Phone Number:
Date:


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Room 204 in office building,
use right-side entrance across
from the Memorial Garden;
Nar-Anon is for family and
friends of addicts. Find a free
local support group: call 888-
947-8885 or go to
www.NARANONFL.org.
Food Addicts in Re-
covery Anonymous (FA) is a
free 12-step recovery pro-
gram for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeat-
ing, undereating or bulimia.
For details or a list of meet-
ings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit www.foodaddicts.org.
0 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Depression and anxiety
peer support group meets at
10 a.m. Thursday at Central
Ridge Library.


OOFY2XI





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FDA monitors over-the-counter medications


Qr What can
you tell me
about the
rug Facts label on _
over-the-counter
(OTC) medications?
A: Reading the
Drug Facts label on
your OTC products
can help answer
many questions about Richard
your nonprescription ASK
medications. The PHARl
FDA recently (2013)
provided the follow-
ing information about OTC drug
products and their approved la-
beling to ensure that they are
used safely
All OTC drug products have to
meet FDA quality, effectiveness


Hoffmann
STHE
RACIST


and safety standards.
While easier to obtain
and use than pre-
scription drugs, it is
important to under-
stand that these prod-
ucts are medicines
and not without risks.
Before using any
medicine you should
think through the
benefits and the risks
to make the best
choice for you. Re-
view the product and


ask yourself:
What is the purpose of this
drug?
Should I use the product?
Is there the possibility of in-
teractions with other drugs or


with foods?
What are the possible side
effects?
When should I stop taking
the medicine and contact a
doctor?
How much of the medicine
should I take?
How do I take it, how often,
and how long?
An OTC product sometimes
begins as an approved prescrip-
tion drug. After there is enough
post-marketing information
about the safety of the medicine,
a drug company may submit an
application to switch the pre-
scription product to over-the-
counter.
A few drugs get direct over-
the-counter approval. These


products have often been ap-
proved in foreign markets so
post-marketing safety data is
available for FDA to examine.
Most OTC products are mar-
keted through the OTC drug
monograph system. An OTC
drug monograph states such
things as what kind of ingredi-
ents may be used to treat certain
symptoms or conditions without
a prescription, and the appro-
priate dose and instructions for
use. OTC products that meet a
monograph's requirements may
be marketed without FDA
review.
Regardless of the pathway
that supports the marketing of
an OTC drug, it must meet the
same effectiveness standards


that prescription drugs meet.
The safety standards for an OTC
drug can be even higher than
those that may support the mar-
keting of a prescription drug.
To further ensure the safe use
of OTC products, FDA conducts
studies to learn if potential OTC
consumers understand the Drug
Facts label, can properly choose
the medicine for their needs,
and use it according to the
directions.


Richard P Hoffmann,
Pharm.D., has been a
pharmacist for more than 40
years. Send questions to him at
2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442.


WILSON
Continued from Page C1

because you are concen-
trating so much attention
on short-term goals related
to your addiction.
The causes of addiction
are complex. Researchers
have not been able to de-
fine one particular type of
"addictive personality" that
is prone to addiction, but
several factors have been
associated with addiction.
Many addicts were physi-
cally abused as children.
Children who experience
emotional abuse, such as
constant inconsistent praise
and criticism from their
parents, develop feelings of
anger that are difficult to
express and may result in



GROUPS
Continued from Page C2

Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the back hall, St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19 south of
Cardinal Street. Group is
composed of men and
women who are experiencing
grief and are convinced "Life
can be good again." Open to
all. Come or call Anne at 352-
212-0632.
Al-Anon groups meet
regularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S.
41.
Crystal River AFG:
8 p.m. Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
Last ResortAFG:
11:30 a.m. Wednesday, First
United Methodist Church,
3896 S. Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness.
Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG:
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
YANA Club, 147 Seventh St.,
Crystal River.
Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday,
St. Margaret Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
Beginners Al-Anon:
10 a.m. Saturday at Yana
Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Cit-
rus Avenue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics Anony-


some form of addiction
later in life. Other factors
linked to addiction are low
self-esteem, exposure to
traumatic experiences, and
difficulty in family or other
relationships.
Recent studies have
shown that the causes of
addiction are at least 50
percent genetic. It is im-
portant to be aware of your
family history If your par-
ents or grandparents suf-
fered from some kind of
addiction, your chances of
becoming addicted are
much greater.
Genes are related to ad-
diction in several ways.
Some genes affect the way
in which the body metabo-
lizes alcohol, and others
affect the way the brain
processes pleasure and
stimulation. Some genetic


mous: If you drink, and want
to stop, call Alcoholics Anony-
mous Nature Coast Inter-
group at 352-621-0599. Visit
www.ncintergroup.com.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living
Waters Ministries, 12 N. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 352-527-2443. Free
and open to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon, 20831
Powell Road. Call the church
at 352-489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
Easy Does It, 8 to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday and Mon-
day; &:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday; The Recovery
Room, 8169 S. Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), Floral City.
It Works How and Why,
noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday;
7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Saturday, YANA
Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St.,
Crystal River.
More Will Be Revealed,
8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Memorial Hospital Historic
School House: 135 S. Citrus
Ave., Inverness.
Recovery at Work Men's
Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Lecanto Church of
Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Lecanto.
Recovery on the River, 7
to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to 9 p.m.
Friday and Sunday; Lecanto
Church of Christ, 797 S.
Rowe Terrace, Lecanto.


concerts
S at The Old


ourthousC
Proudly Present


Doug Spears

Thursday, May 16
Limited seating.
Reservations Necessary.
Call: 352-341-6427


Tickets $10 e, ..
Including Refreshments
at the 1912 Citrus County
Courthouse, Inverness
Doors open at 6:15
Music starts promptly at 7 p.m.


ClI 1 )\II(I
Edward Jones
Financial Services
Smith Optical Services, David Rom
State Farm Insurance, Dave and
Thelma Noble, Rebecca Pujals-
Jones, Highlander Cafe of Crystal
River, Charles Davis Funeral Home
and Crematory, Joyce' s Courtside
Pub, Deco Cafe, Elegant Catering,
3Js Pizza, Ice Cream Doctor, Winn
Dixie Supermarkets, Sweetbay
Supermarkets, Suncoast
Chiropractic and Anonymous
TO BENEFIT THE CITRUS
COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY


markers are associated
with mood, anxiety and
personality disorders,
which are often present in
people who seek comfort
or stimulation from alco-
hol or drugs. Inherited
personality traits can also
create a family environ-
ment that makes children
susceptible to addiction.
Genetic tendencies
alone do not lead to addic-
tion. Physical vulnerabil-
ity, complex emotional and
psychological issues, and
social environment all
contribute to an addiction.
Successful treatment for
addiction takes all of these
influences into account.
The 12-step program, orig-
inally developed by Alco-
holics Anonymous and
now applied to many types
of addictions, guides ad-


Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m.
Thursday, Citrus County Fam-
ily Resource Center's out-
reach center: 3848 E. Parsons
Point Road, Hernando.
Narcotics Anonymous is
not affiliated with any of the
meeting facilities listed. Call
the 24-hour Helpline: 352-
508-1604.
Overeaters Anonymous:
Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the
Senior Center (V.A. building)
on County Road 491,
Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-
746-5019.
The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.
Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777.
The New Beginning, 7
p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at


dicts to recovery by help-
ing them to understand
themselves, take responsi-
bility for their lives and
live by a new set of values.
Left untreated, addic-
tion to alcohol or drugs
can have fatal conse-
quences including liver
disease, drug overdoses,
and accidents caused by
impaired judgment. Any
form of addiction is detri-
mental to your health and
can launch you into a
downward spiral of loss,
despair, and deteriorating
relationships with family
members and friends.
If you think you or some-
one close to you is ad-
dicted, talk to your family
physician about it. Most
addictions cannot be over-
come by willpower alone.
Your doctor may prescribe


352-341-0777.
The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar disorder and
more. Weekly meeting. Call
352-637-3196.
Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at 352-422-3234.
Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 1100
Turner Camp Road, Inver-
ness, offers two free weekly
women's domestic abuse
support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday and 10:30 a.m. to
noon Wednesdays. Child care
available. Call CASA at 352-
344-8111.
Celebrate Recovery:
support for any hurts, habits,


Accepting New Patients



"= .. ,r .:
D. Pbl.Fguro



....



SevigCitrusg CountyPrnces1on"
eiae* Atn


UnitdHathcare 1}PT SSO


medication to help you
overcome your depend-
ence, and refer you to
counseling, therapy, or
even residential treatment.
There are also support
groups and self-help pro-
grams for all types of ad-
dictions, including Alco-
holics Anonymous (www.
aa.org), Moderation Man-
agement (for problem
drinkers, www.modera-
tion. org), Gamblers Anon-
ymous (www.gamblers
anonymous.org), and On-
line Gamers Anonymous
(www.olganon.org).
Further reading:
Drug dependence.
Medline Plus. The Na-
tional Institutes of Health.
(www. nlm.nih.gov/
medlineplus/ency/article
/001522.htm).
Addictions Help


hang-ups or addictions.
6:30 p.m. Monday at
Oxford Assembly of God
Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in
Oxford. Call 352-748-6124.
7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Re-
covery Fellowship Church,
2242 W. State Road 44. Call
352-726-2800.
7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Dinner available be-
fore the meeting from 6 to
7 p.m. for $4 donation and a
coffee house after. Call 352-
746-6200.
Gulf to Lake Church Min-


Guide. HELPGUIDE.org
(www.helpguide.org/topics
/addiction.htm).
NCADD Self-Test:
What are the Signs ofAlco-
holism? National Council
on Alcoholism and Drug
Dependence (wwwncadd.
org/index.php/learn-about-
alcohol/alcohol-abuse-self-
test).
The genetics of addic-
tion. Claudia Wallis. CNN
Money Oct 16,2009 (http://
moneycnn.com/2009/10/16/
news/genes_addiction.
fortune/index.htm).


Dr Carlene Wilson is a
board-certified internist
and pediatrician in pri-
vate practice in Crystal
River Call her at 352-563-
5070 or visit wwwIMP
WellnessCentercom.


istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal
River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fri-
days, followed by large- and
small-group time and a Coffee
Cafe at 9. Call 352-586-4709.
Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless
and hurting of Citrus County.
We offer referrals to Celebrate
Recovery, call 352-563-1860.
Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or other
out-of-control habits, 8 p.m.
Monday at the Sanctuary,
7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Call Paul at 352-628-2874.
See GROUPSY/Page C8


R U ...



A'
m 16 .


lew Patients* Free ionsults* Emergenc eCare
* CEREC One-Visit Crowns U Extractions 0 Fillings
* Implants : In-House Specialty Care 0 Cleanings
* Lumineers and Veneers 0 Root Canal Therapy 0 Sealants
* Dentures, Partials & Bridges 0 Periodontal Gum Care 0 And much more!
* Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) 0 AAID/ICOI

352-795-1223
.npmr 1815 S.E. Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL
www.rswansondental.com Dr, Richard C Swanson




There's no need

to leave Citrus County

for the Best Rehabilitation

Inpatient &
Outpatient
Skilled Care

Post Surgery
Core
Stroke Rehab
Cardiac Program
Superior
Woundcare

I.V. Therapy

A~ T~7T Five-Star Rated [iitv


Cypress Cove

www.cypresscovecare.com


700 Southeast 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832
*Rating by Centers for Medicare
& Medicaid Services.


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 C3





C4 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

Irvine, who found that pa-
tients who experience a
longer treatment delay
time (TDT) have signifi-
cantly reduced survival
time compared to those
with a shorter TDT The
results were recently pub-
lished in JAMA Surgery
In this study, re-
searchers conducted a ret-
rospective study using
data from the California
Cancer Registry database.
The investigation included
8,860 breast cancer cases
diagnosed from 1997 to
2006.
Treatment delay time
was considered the num-
ber of weeks between the
date a person received a
breast cancer diagnosis
and the date of definitive
treatment
The data from this study
provides a unique per-
spective that can be used
to improve the outcome of
breast cancer in adult
women.
Their findings demon-
strate women with a delay
in surgical treatment of
more than six weeks have
shorter survival compared
with those who had sur-
gery closer to their
diagnosis.
Treatment delay time
of longer than six weeks
after diagnosis was no-
tably different between
racial and ethnic groups,
as well.
In Hispanic women, 15.3
percent experienced a
TDT, compared to 15.3 per-
cent in black women, and
only 8.1 percent in non-
Hispanic white women.
Women shown to have
TDT longer than six weeks
were also more likely to be
those with Medicaid or no
insurance at all (17.8 per-
cent) compared to those
with private insurance (9.5
percent).
Treatment delay time of
more than six weeks after
diagnosis was also more
likely to be experienced by
females with low socioeco-
nomic status (17.5 percent)
compared to those with
high socioeconomic status
(7.7 percent).
And this delay makes a
huge difference in the sur-
vival of a woman diag-
nosed with breast cancer.
Results from this study
showed that the five-year
survival in patients who
received surgery and had
TDT longer than six weeks



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

may even harm the pa-
tient. This is why open dis-
cussion about health care
between the patient and
the doctor needs to be car-
ried out
The entity Consumers
Reports is also getting in-
volved to translate these
lists and guidelines into
plain English so the pa-
tient can understand the
information. They also
provide educational mate-
rials to help the patient's
understand decision-
making processes with
their doctor.
My specialty society has
initially selected several
items that should be
openly discussed with doc-
tors if proposed, and this
includes the use of scan-
ning such as CT or MRI for
things like sudden hearing
loss, dizziness and
hoarseness.
Other items that have
been highlighted as impor-
tant problems include the
overuse of antibiotics for
middle and external ear
infections. The use of X-
rays and scans for evaluat-
ing uncomplicated sinus
infections also is discour-
aged.


This campaign is likely
to get more participants.
A third phase of spe-
cialty societies will likely
release their guidelines
later this year.
Efforts such as these will
continue and only
strengthen the excellent
health are delivery system
we have in this country

Denis Grillo, D.O.,
FOCOO, is an ear, nose
and throat specialist in
Crystal River Call him at
352-795-0011 or visit
CrystalCommunityENT
comn.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


was 80 percent, as opposed
to 90 percent among those
with TDT fewer than two
weeks.
As you can see, it is cru-
cial to prevent further
treatment-related delays
before and after the diag-
nosis of breast cancer so
that we can maximize the
survival of these women.
This data supports con-
tinued evidence of dispar-
ities in health care that
lead to decreased survival,
whether the disparity is a
function of race, income or
delays in receiving
treatment
We should all work on
eliminating these dispari-
ties in an effort to improve
the health of our nation.


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist and a member
of the Citrus County Unit
of the American Cancer
Society Watch
"Navigating Cancer" on
WYKE TVat 7:30p.m.
Tuesday and at 10 a.m.
Thursday. If you have
any suggestions for topics,
or have any questions,
contact him at 522 N
Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461, or
email
cjbennett@rboi. com.


VASCIMINI
Continued from Page C1

tell me I had "beautiful
teeth and a healthy
mouth."
His hygienist com-
plained throughout the
entire visit that my teeth
were difficult to work on
as they were "small" and
my jaw was too "tight."
After she cleaned my
teeth, I could feel on the
sides of my molars where
she had scored the plaque
but did not remove it. I
saw a chair-side assistant
come out of a room where
they were working on a
patient with a handful of
dirty instruments which
she rinsed under the
faucet and threw directly
into the sterilizer.
Of course, I do not in-
tend to return to this den-
tist, but wonder how I
could better choose a den-
tist for my care. (I chose
this one on the recom-
mendation of two friends).
Any pointers you could
give would be appreciated
and I think it would be a
good topic for your col-
umn which I read every
week. Retired RN.
A: Thanks for this ques-
tion. You are right, I think


a lot of people will benefit
from this. It is hard to
move to a new area or
have your dentist retire
finding yourself in the sit-
uation of finding a new
dental care provider.
Many people do just as
you did and get a referral
from one of their friends.
This can certainly work
out OK but, in many cases,
your criteria for a new
dentist or hygienist may
not match your friend's. It
is apparent that this is the
case for you.
There are a few screen-
ing tools you can use right
from the start. The Acad-
emy of General Dentistry
(www.agd.org) is a very
well-respected organiza-
tion that has multiple lev-
els of involvement.
A dentist can choose to
be a member or make the
necessary efforts to attain
either fellowship or mas-
tership. The latter two
designations are awarded
to someone who has
passed an examination
and taken many hours of
continuing education in
both lecture and hands on
format (fellowship), while
mastership is awarded to
the person who goes
above and beyond the fel-
low in the amount of
hours taken in education.


Unfortunately, I do not
feel that either of the
above awards alone
means you have found
your dentist I do think it is
a great start because you
know the person you are
going to has an interest in
continuing education.
The next thing I usually
recommend is to call the
offices you are consider-
ing and ask to speak with
the office manager. You
can ask this person the
questions that are impor-
tant to you. You should get
an idea of the office based
on this conversation and
the answers you hear.
Next, you might con-
sider asking for a tour of
the office before you make
an appointment. This will
let you see how things are
done (such as steriliza-
tion) and may help you
avoid the disappointing
appointment you had. It
would be great if you were
able to at least meet the
dentist and hygienist
briefly, though this may be
hard depending on what
is going on in the office
while you are there. Once
you have had the opportu-
nity to go through the
above steps, I feel like you
will have a very good idea
of which office is for you.
The only thing left from


here is to make an appoint-
ment for a new patient
exam. If you are scheduled
with the hygienist first, I
would be cautious. I feel it
is best to meet with the doc-
tor first so he or she can re-
view your medical and
dental history, do an exam-
ination of your mouth and
surrounding structures,
and take the appropriate
X-rays. Only after this can
he or she make the proper
diagnosis.
I hope this has helped
you in your search for the
right dentist and hygienist


Dr Frank Vascimini is a
dentist practicing in
Homosassa. Write to 4805
S. SuncoastBlvd.,
Homosassa, FL 34446 or
email info@Masterpiece
Den talStudio. com.


@MASTERPIECE
DE NTAL-STUDIO
The art of optimum-quality dentistry.

I Always
elcomiiig
wPatients
FRANK J. 111. ,,l_
4805 S. SuncoBasIN Bl
_ Homosassa, FL 3444 "P"
*I.-- m-~ a


OEQDF PAID ADVERTISING -





HBTigigTWC~


ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

ADVANCED HEALTH
Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA
9030 W. Fort Island Trail,
Ste. 10A,
Crystal River........352-563-2597

ASSISTED LIVING

SUPERIOR RESIDENCES
OF LECANTO
MEMORY CARE
4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Lecanto.............. 352-746-5483

SUNFLOWER SPRINGS
ASSISTED LIVING
COMMUNITY
8733 W. Yulee Drive,
Homosassa.........352-621-8017

CARDIOLOGY

CITRUS CARDIOLOGY
CONSULTANTS PA
Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
Delfin, Luis MD FACC
Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC
Kannam, Hari MD
Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
Nerello, Nishant MD
Pasupuleti, Suman MD
Rivero, Abel MD
Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC
FACOI
Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
Walker, Dennis J. MD

760 S.E. 5th Terrace,
Crystal River........352-795-4165

308 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness........... 352-726-8353

211 S. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness........... 352-726-8353

601 E. Dixie Ave.,
Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg............352-315-0627

910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210,
Lake Sumter Professional Plaza,
The Villages.........352-751-3356

DENTAL

CHRISTIE DENTAL OF
MEADOWCREST
Beckton, Tedra DMD
Tran, Hang DMD
6015 W. Nordling Loop,
Crystal River........877-290-2818

CITRUS HILLS DENTAL
ASSOCIATES
Davila, Alexa DMD
Davila, Jose DDS
2460 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernando...........352-527-1614

COMPLETE FAMILY
DENTISTRY
Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA
1815 S.E. U.S. 19,
Crystal River........352-795-1223

LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
3640 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.........352-628-3443


DERMATOLOGY

BAY DERMATOLOGY &
COSMETIC SURGERY PA
Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD
Board Certified
Esguerra, David DO FAOCD
Board Certified
Broughton, Brandi PA-C
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.........352-503-2002

FAMILY/GENERAL
PRACTICE

HEALTH & WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD
McCollough, Barney PA
Tzivanis, James PA
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River........352-746-1818

HERNANDO MEDICAL CENTER

Patel, Shirish MD
Mazur, Barbara ARNP
2669 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando...........352-637-2550

SUNCOAST PRIMARY
CARE SPECIALISTS
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
Co, Alistair W. MD
Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD
Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD
Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC
Stawkowski, Lawrence PA

10489 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs......352-489-2486

ENDOCRINOLOGY

CITRUS DIABETES
TREATMENT CENTER
Christ Medical Center
Tawfik, Eihab MD PA
7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River........352-564-0444

HEALTH EDUCATION

TOBACCO PREVENTION
FLORIDA HEALTH
120 N. Montgomery Ave.
Inverness........... 352-726-1731

HEALTH PRODUCTS

FURNITURE PALACE
& MATTRESS WAREHOUSE
3106 S. Florida Ave.,
Inverness.................. 726-2999

WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTER
1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.,
Hernando.................. 344-8882

HEARING

ADVANCED FAMILY
HEARING AID CENTER
2027 N. Donovan Ave.,
Crystal River........352-795-1775

AUDIBEL HEARING AID
CENTERS
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.........352-621-8000

2036 State Road 44 West,
Inverness........... 352-586-7599

20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dunnellon............ 52-789-1559


HEARING CONTINUED

MIRACLE EAR
HEARING AID CENTER
Lazio, Brian L-HAS
1801 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River Mall.......795-1484

HOME HEALTH
SERVICES

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR
CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Lecanto.............. 352-249-1257

SENIOR HOME CARE
494 S Pleasant Grove Rd.,
Inverness........... 352-344-0150

HOSPICE

HPH HOSPICE
3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills.........352-527-4600

HOSPITALS

CITRUS MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
502 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness.................. 726-1551

MUNROE REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
1500 S.W. 1st Ave.,
Ocala................. 352-351-7200

REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER BAYONET POINT
14000 Fivay Road,
Hudson.............. 888-741-5119

INDEPENDENT LIVING

INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR
APARTMENTS
518 Ella Ave.,
Inverness........... 352-344-8477

INTERNAL MEDICINE

GIRAS. SHAH, MD
203 S. Seminole Ave.,
Inverness.................. 726-7800

NURSING HOMES

CYPRESS COVE CARE
CENTER
700 S.E. 8th Ave.,
Crystal River........352-795-8832

DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH
& REHABILITATION
CENTER
2730 W. Marc Knighton Court,
Lecanto.............. 352-746-9500

LIFE CARE CENTER OF
CITRUS COUNTY
3325 W. Jerwayne Lane,
Lecanto.............. 352-746-4434

ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY

ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD
Brant, Timothy A. MD
Prostate Cancer Treatment
Facility
522 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Lecanto.............. 352-527-0106


OPHTHALMOLOGY


SUNCOAST EYE CENTER
Kaplan, George H. OD
221 N.E. U.S., 19,
Crystal River........352-795-2526

ORTHOPEDIC/
SPORTS MEDICINE

NATURE COAST
ORTHOPAEDICS & SPORTS
MEDICINE CLINIC
Choung, Walter I. MD
Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO
2155 W. Mustang Blvd.,
Beverly Hills.........352-746-5707

520 S.E. 8th Ave.,
Crystal River........352-564-2663

2236 State Road 44 West,
Inverness .........352-344-2663

PHARMACIES

BRASHEAR'S PHARMACY
206 W. Dampier St.,
Inverness........... 352-637-2079

471 N. Dacie Point,
Lecanto.............. 352-746-3420

G & R HEALTHMART
PHARMACY
3791 N. Lecanto Hwy.,
Beverly Hills.........352-527-3111

PLASTIC -
RECONSTRUCTIVE
SURGERY

FARRIOR FACIAL PLASTIC
AND COSMETIC SURGERY
CENTER
Farrior, Edward H. MD FACS
2908 W. Azeele St.,
Tampa................ 813-875-3223

SURGERY

PREMIER VEIN CENTER
Sharma, Ravi MD
7767 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.........352-621-0777

UROLOGY

ADVANCED UROLOGY
SPECIALISTS
Desai, Paresh G. MD FACS
Desautel, Michael G. MD
Kumar, Udaya MD FRCS
Seneriz, Manuel A. MD
Pulice, Frances A. PA
609 W. Highland Blvd.,
Inverness........... 352-726-9707

3475 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa.........352-628-7671


HEALTH & LIFE







Page C5 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Auxiliary 15-1 to
do boating class
Do the kids want to bor-
row the boat? Before they
leave the dock, have your
son or daughter take the
U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary's About Boating Safely
to establish a good founda-
tion for a safe boating
experience.
The three-evening class
meets from 7 to 9 p.m. May
20, 22 and 24. After suc-
cessful completion of the
course, participants will
earn the Florida Safe
Boater's Card from the Fish
& Wildlife Commission.
Parents who sign up with
children will get a $10 dis-
count for themselves. Cost
is $30 and includes instruc-
tion by certified U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary instructors,
a book and numerous
handouts.
Anyone born after Jan.
1, 1988, must have a
Florida Safe Boater's Card
to legally operate a vessel
with a 10 HP motor or
greater.
For more information or
to register, call Linda Jones
at 352-503-6199.
PFLAG meets
today at Unity
PFLAG Lecanto (Par-
ents, Family and Friends of
Lesbians and Gays) will
meet from 7 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 14, at the
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
PFLAG's mission is to
promote the health and
well-being of LGBT per-
sons, their families and
friends. Meetings are open
to the public.
The first half of this
month's meeting will be fo-
cused on a roundtable dis-
cussion of any issues/
concerns attendees may
have. In addition, the group
will address an HIV/AIDS
fundraising project and
marriage equality.
For more information,
call Linda at 352-419-2738
or email pflag.lecanto
@gmail.com.
Eagles welcome
everyone to jam
The Citrus Eagles 3992
welcomes the public to
come to jam sessions from
6 to 9 p.m. Sunday with
B.J. Bear and Co.
The Eagles lodge is at
8733 Gulf-to-Lake Highway
in Inverness.

Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE

Elsie


Special to the Chronicle
Elsie is a young adult fe-
line ready for a special
home. She has been
dumped in a shelter
twice in her short life and
yet she is quiet loving.
She likes to sit on your
lap, be brushed and will
purr the whole time. She
tolerates other animals
and likes to watch all the
goings-on around her. Kit-
tens and cats are avail-
able for adoption at the
Pet Supermarket on
State Road 44 in Inver-
ness during regular store
hours. The Crystal River
Mall adoption center is
open noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday
(closed May 23 through
26). Call 352-726-4700
for more information or
visit www.preciouspaws
florida.com.


'Dig into Reading'


Summerprogram to kick offMay 31 at Citrus County libraries


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Library Sys-
tem's summer reading program will
be getting under way May 31 and
running for eight weeks through the
end of July
This year's theme ..*
explores the world
of archaeology, so -
kids will be able to
"Dig into Reading" _-
while tweens and
teens can go
"Beneath the
Surface."
Dig into Reading
is for children ages
kindergarten
through fifth grade /
and there are lots
of classes available. '.
Dress as a fairy,
learn about Florida's
ancient people, enjo0
presentations by the
Ellie Schiller Ho- ,
mosassa Springs '-
Wildlife State Park, as
well as the Floral City Heritage Mu-
seum, and "rock out" as Florida li-
censed geologist Michael
Czerwinkski discusses how rocks
are formed.
Tweens and teens will be able to
express themselves through subway
art, learn about ancient Egypt and


party like a Hobbit.
After the weekly classes, everyone
is encouraged to borrow books ex-
ploring the subjects introduced dur-
ing the classes more in depth.
Reading during the summer keeps


kids' brains active and make it eas-
ier to get back into the swing of
school activities in the fall.
Homosassa Walmart continues its
partnership with the Citrus County
Library System, encouraging weekly
library visits and summer reading
by providing a donation allowing


five children from each part of the
county a chance to win a bicycle of
their choice (up to a maximum value
of $80).
Look for the Reading Log book-
mark entry forms at the libraries.
Starting May 25, every library card-
holder in kindergarten
'H through 12th grade is eligi-
ble to enter weekly for a
chance to win during the
drawing that will take
place at the end of July
To conclude the summer
reading program, there
will be a grand finale Aug.
2 at the Citrus County Au-
. .. ditorium in Inverness,
where children will be en-
tertained with a blend of art
m nd science by Orlando-based
performer Jiggleman.
Traditional library story
times for babies, toddlers and
preschoolers will continue to be
offered throughout the summer
The Library's Summer Reading
Classes are part of the Florida Li-
brary Youth Program (FLYP) ses-
sions, providing children with
ways to explore a wide variety of
subjects. Funding is provided by the
Florida Arts License Plate Program.
The classes are free and open to the
public.
For more information, visit
www.citruslibraries.org.


Early Learning Coalition at
safety, youth expo


Sue Littnan, Child Passenger Safety instructor,
answered questions on the correct use of child
safety seats. Many families were surprised to
learn that their child should be riding in a
booster seat until he or she is 4 feet, 9 inches
tall. Until a child is that heighth, a booster
raises the child to make the vehicle seatbelt fit
correctly. Mary Ascough, 9, is shown getting
measured to see if she should ride in a booster
seat. Her mom, Dayna, and brother Owyn, 3,
saw that Mary had some growing to do before
she would be ready to start riding in a car using
just a seatbelt. For more information about the
Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast,
call 352-563-9939.


Special to the Chronicle
The Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast
participated in the Summer Safety and Youth Expo as a resource for
families in the community. Ingrid Ellis, program manager, shared
information about coalition services such as child care assistance
and the voluntary pre-kindergarten program.


Doing inspirational lunch with PEO


he PEO annual "Let's Do
Lunch" was held at the Sug-
armill Woods Golf and Coun-
try Club with Jeff and Patti Warner
speaking and entertaining.
PEO (Philanthropic Education Or-
ganization) Chapter HL is a philan-
thropic education
organization comprising
multiple chapters
throughout the United
States and Canada, as
well as overseas.
Through its six projects,
PEO offers scholarships
to high school seniors
and women whose lives
have been interrupted by
life's circumstances and Ruth L
grants supporting out- AROUIN
standing graduate stu- C
dents, as well as coM
international students
who, upon returning to their home
countries, plan to improve condi-
tions for their fellow countrymen.
PEO loans aid women of all ages
who might otherwise be unable to
attend college.
In addition, PEO owns a college in
Nevada, Mo. Cottey College is an all-
women's school that offers a two-
year degree with plans for a
four-year degree in the future.
Marlene Kaltenbach served as
chairwoman for the event and
Shirley Shrader gave the invocation.
Sally Moore serves as president.
Jovial Jeff and Patti Warner min-
gled throughout the crowd of PEO


N
I


supporters, fully engaged in sharing
interesting entertaining
experiences.
From Cocoa Beach, the couple
have been entertaining together in
song and inspirational speaking for
more than 26 years. A real estate
professional and part-
time bodyguard for vari-
ous celebrities and events,
Jeff teaches Sunday
school at First Baptist in
Cocoa where he serves as
deacon/chairman. He
sings for Stonecroft Min-
istries luncheons and
community events, includ-
ing military banquets and
aevins reunions. An avid golfer,
ID THE he is Brevard County's
2012 Golf Champion.
UNITY Patti speaks regularly at
retreats, prayer break-
fasts, women's teas and statewide
Stonecroft ministries. She gave the
opening prayer for the Florida Sen-
ate and the House of Representa-
tives invocation.
Sen. Bill Posey awarded her the
"Living Treasure Award." She holds
a practical theology diploma from
the International Seminary in
Apopka and is a licensed minister
with the International Ministerial
Association.
We were delighted with their mu-
sical artistry, beginning with "Fly Me
to the Moon," made famous by Frank
Sinatra in 1954, and "My Way," writ-
ten by Paul Anka for Sinatra.


Playfully, Patti remarked of Jeff,
"The Lord is my shepherd and I
knew what I wanted."
Passionately, Patti spoke of PEO's
mission to celebrate, educate and
motivate and the many changes that
have taken place for women, includ-
ing the right to vote in 1920. In 1950,
job opportunities began to open up
in former male-dominated fields.
In the 1970s, professional business
careers, including the first female
military (U.S. Army) general,
emerged. In 1981, Sandra Day
O'Connor became the first female
Supreme Court justice.
She outlined the 10 reasons to
pursue a college degree, including
the opportunity to be an agent of
change and a strong sense of self-
pride.
Positive quotes we took away from
her remarks were: "Set no limits,
anything is possible if you set your
mind to it," and "We may not reach
the stars, but, at least our feet have
left the ground."
The songs kept coming and often
we were invited to sing along with
songs of the era that brought us all-
time favorite romantic, sentimental
memories of the '50s through '70s.


Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community Let her know about
your group's upcoming activities
by writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


News NOTES

Tribute to honor
officers
The National Association
of Retired Law Enforcement
Officers (NARLEO) will
have a special tribute to
fallen officers at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, May 15, at
Cooter Pond Park in
Inverness.
The wreath-laying cere-
mony on National Peace
Officers Memorial Day will
honor four officers who
were killed on duty long
ago: state Corrections Offi-
cer Rufus Willams Walters,
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Deputy Aubrey Fred
Johnson, Floral City Town
Marshal J.W. Newsom and
CCSO Deputy James McIn-
tosh McMullen.
The public is welcome to
join retired and active-duty
law enforcement personnel
to honor the four at this cer-
emony during National Po-
lice Week, May 12 to 18.
For more information, call
NARLEO president Andrew
Tarpey at 352-344-9313.
Genealogical
Society to meet
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will meet
at 10 a.m. Tuesday, May
14, at the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints,
3474 W. Southern St.,
Lecanto.
The speaker will be Mary
Ann Machonkin, president
of the genealogy society.
She will speak about "Un-
derused Features of Family
Search.org." This free web-
site has many valuable doc-
uments that are not indexed
and can only be accessed
by "browsing." She will also
talk about the newly added
"family trees" and the Re-
search Wiki. Guests are
welcome.
For more information, call
Mary Ann Machonkin at
352-382-5515 or visit
www.citrusgenealogy.com.
Auxiliary to serve
roast pork dinner
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 155, Crystal River, will
serve a roast pork dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday,
May 17, at the post, 6585
W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway.
All members and the
public are welcome. Dona-
tion is $ 7.
All profits help support
the programs of the Auxil-
iary. For more information,
call 352-249-7663.

Humane Society
CITRUS CO.


Lira


Special to the Chronicle
Lira was found on the
streets with a large
amount of her hair and
skin missing from half her
back. The veterinarian
said she had been burned
(either chemical or fire).
Her previous owners
could not be found. She
does not act like she has
been abused, so it is hard
to guess what might
have happened. She has
healed and is now in
need of a loving home.
She is a 6-year-old,
medium-sized terrier mix
that loves people and
gets along great with
other dogs. To access
the adoption application
or to view other adopt-
able pets, visit www.
roomforonemore.net. For
more information, call
Karron at 352-560-0051.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TUESDAY EVENING MAY 14, 2013 C: Comcast,Citrus B: Bright House D/1 DComcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
O WES) NBC 19 19 News News Ent Access The Voice (N) a The Voice (N) 'PG' Grimm (N) '14' News Jay Leno
World Nightly PBS NewsHour (N) (In Annie Oakley: American CONSTITUTION USA Frontline "Never Forget Death of the Oceans?
O CWEl PBS 3 3 14 6 News Business Stereo) Na Experience PC' With Peter Sagal (N) to Lie"'PG'
o0 (WIF PBS 5 5 5 41 Capitol Business PBS NewsHour (N) Annie Oakley CONSTITUTION Frontline'PG' a World T Smiley
F L NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Voice (N) (In The Voice "Live Grimm "The Waking News Jay Leno
O F NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News 8 Ton. Stereo) a Eliminations" (N)'PG' Dead" (N)'14'
I CWm ABC 20 20 20 News World Jeopardy! Wheel of Wipeout (N) (In Stereo) Dancing With the Stars Body of Proof Eyewit. Jimmy
News (N) G' Fortune 'PG'N (N)'PGC' "Breakout" (N)'14' News Kimmel
_ WTSP CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News, Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! NCIS"Damned If You NCIS: Los Angeles Golden Boy"Next 10 News Letterman
( 2 CBS 10 10 10 10 10 6pm (N) News Fortune (N)'G' Do"'14' "Descent"'14' Question"'14'c 11pm (N
FOX13 6:00 News (N) TMZ (N) omg! So You Think You Can New Girl Mindy FOX13 10:00 News (N) News Access
( CWTV FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) a 'PG' Insider (N) Dance'14' '14' Project (In Stereo) a Hollyw'd
ED WCJB ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Ent Inside Ed. Wipeout (N)'PG' Dancing With Stars Body of Proof'14' News J. Kimmel
Christian Today Kenneth Great Awakening H.Babers Place for A. Perry Life Today Purpose Great
S WCF) IND 2 2 2 22 22 Fitness Hagin Sr Miracles Wommack Stone for Life Awaken
) WF ABC 11 11 11 News World The List Let's Ask Wipeout (N) (In Stereo) Dancing With the Stars Body of Proof News Jimmy
News (N)'PG' America 'PG' (N)'PG "Breakout" (N)'14' Kimmel
ND 12 12 16 Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order: Criminal How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
ED MRw IND 12 12 16 14' '14' Theory Theory Intent '14' cN Intent'14' N '14'c '14',
] (WTT) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 Raymond Seinfeld FamFeud FamFeud House'PG'm House"Forever"'14' Seinfeld Scrubs Baggage Excused
1D 1WAC" TBN 21 21 Studio The 700 Club (N) 'G' Babers Amazing |Manna Voice IPaid Paid Studio Healing Paid
King of King of Two and i i......-i.. "Leap Year" (2010, Romance-Comedy) Amy Two and Engagement Friends Friends
M WT CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Queens Half Men Adams. (In Stereo) 'PG' Half Men 'PG' '14',
Animal Citrus County Cancer Every B. Cosby Crook & Chase (In Heartland Poker Tour Mobil 1 S.
SEWYEJFAM 16 16 16 15 Court Today Court Minute Stereo)'G' 'PG' The Grid Rasmussen
S(WjG FOX 13 7 7 Simpsons Simpsons BigBang Big Bang SoYouThink NewGir |Mindy FOXB35 NewsNat10 TMZ'PG' Access
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Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage American American American American
S 54 48 54 25 27 Wars PG' WarsPG' Wars'PG' Wars PG' WarsgPG' Wars Wars'PG' WarsN) Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers
i**5/ "Man on Fire" (2004, Crime Drama) ** "The Transporter" (2002, Action) Jason *** "The Devil's Own" (1997, Suspense)
55 64 55 Denzel Washington. 'R' Statham, Shu Qi.'PG-13' ma Harrison Ford, Brad Pitt. 'R'
52 35 52 19 21 To Be Announced River Monsters (In Wild Deep Wild Deep Wild Deep Wild Deep Wild Deep Wild Deep Wild Deep Wild Deep
52 35 52 19 21 Stereo) 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG' 'PG'
106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live "Top 10 Let's Stay Let's Stay The Game The Game The Game Let's Stay The Game Let's Stay
96 19 96 Countdown"(N)'PG'm Together Together '14' 14' '14' Together '14' Together
BRAVO 254 51 254 Newlyweds Tardy Tardy Tardy Tardy Housewives/OC Tardy Tardy Happens Tardy
South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Daily Show Amy Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) Amy Daily Show Colbert
27 61 27 33 'MA' '14' Report Schumer '14' '14' '14' '14' Schumer Report
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i[CBC1 43 42 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report CNBC Reports Crowd Rules The Car Chasers Mad Money
CiNJ) 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Live Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
Good- Jessie Shake It Austin & Jessie Dog With a Shake It Good- Jessie Dog With a Good- Jessie
(l 46 40 46 6 5 Charlie 'G' a Up!'G' Ally a 'G' Blog'G' Up!'G' Charlie 'G' a Blog'G' Charlie 'G' I
(ELPN1 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) E:60(N) 30 for 30 Baseball Toight (N) (Live) a SportsCenter (N)
ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 Around Pardon NFL Live (N) a 30 for 30 30 for 30 E:60 (N)
(EWTN) 95 70 95 48 Faith Faithful Daily Mass Mother Angelica Live Religious |Rosary Threshold of Hope Thought |Women
America's Funniest *** "Matilda" (1996, Comedy) MaraWilson, r *n "Beetlejuice"(1988, Comedy) Michael The 700 Club (In
29 52 29 20 28 Home Videos 'PG' Danny DeVito, Rhea Perlman. PG' Keaton, Alec Baldwin.'PG' Stereo) 'PG' m
i**1 1 "The Distinguished Gentleman" (1992) -* "Mallrats"(1995)Shannen ** "Career Opportunities" ** "Greedy" (1994)
(Ril) 118 170 Eddie Murphy. (In Stereo)'R' a Doherty (In Stereo) 'R' (1991) Frank Whaley 'PG-13' 'PG-13' cc
FNi1 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
F l 26 56 26 -Chopped Chopped Chopped'G' Chopped Chopped(N) Chopped
[FSNFLJ 35 39 35 oGame Marlins MLB Baseball Cincinnati Reds at Miami Marlins. (N) (Live) Marlins UFC World Poker Tour
30 60 30 51 Howl Met Howl Met Two and Two and *** "Star Trek" (2009) Chris Pine. Chronicles the early *** "Star Trek" (2009, Science
30 60 30 51 Half Men Half Men days of the starship Enterprise and her crew. Fiction) Chris Pine.'PG-13'
[GOLF) 727 67 727 Central PGA Tour Big Break Lessons Golf's Greatest Rounds (N) Central Learning
Brady Brady Brady Brady Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG' Frasier'PG'
IIALL) 59 68 59 45 54 Bunch Bunch Bunch Bunch
**01 "The Day After Tomorrow" (2004) Dennis **)Y "Snow White and the Huntsman"(2012) Fast & Family Tree Game of Thrones (In
302 201 302 2 2 Quaid. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' ma Kristen Stewart.'PG-13' ma Furious 6 'MA' Stereo) 'MA' cc
*** "Contagion" (2011) Marion **' "We Boughta Zoo" (2011) Matt Damon. A man and Real Time With Bill Veep'MA' FamilyTree
303 202 303 Cotillard.'PG-13' a his family work to renovate and reopen a zoo. Maher 'MA' c 'MA'
(HiITV) 23 57 23 42 52 Million Dollar Rooms Hunt Intl Hunters Flip or Flip or Income Property'G' Hunters Hunt Intl Flip or Flip or
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STJ 51 25 51 32 42 "Wood"'PG' 'PG' 'PG' Cars'PG' Cars PG' Cars'PG' Cars PG
24 38 24 31 Dance Moms 'PG' B Dance Moms'PG' a Dance Moms "Tell All, Dance Moms "Tell All, Preachers' Daughters Dance Moms "Tell All,
24 38 24 31 Part 1"'PG' Part 2" (N) N (N) N Part 2" N
.* "Obsessed"(2002, Docudrama)Jenna "Lying Eyes" (1996, Suspense) Cassidy Rae, ** "Caught in the Act" (2004, Drama) Lauren
50 119 Elfman, Kate Burton. (In Stereo) a (DVS) Vincent Irizarry. (In Stereo) Holly, Max Martini. (In Stereo) cN
(*i"I 320 221 320 3 3 Robot"(2004) Will Smith. *** "Mr. Holland's Opus" (1995) Richard Dreyfuss. Life *** "The Five-Year Engagement" (2012)
320 221 320 3 3 (In Stereo)'PG-13' m steers a musician toward teaching. 'PG' c Jason Segel. (In Stereo) TRH-
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109 65 109 44 53 Behavior"'14 That Made Us '..'...i.-, i (N) relationships.
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(WB 103 62 103 Lost and Found 'PG' Lost and Found 'PG' Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now? Oprah: Where Now?
fXY) 44 123 Bad Girls Club Bad Girls Club Bad Girls Club Find Me My Man'14' Bad Girls Club Find Me My Man'14'
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732 112 732 (N) PG'
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*** "Return to Me" **i "We Own the Niqht" (2007) Joaquin *** "Hope Springs" (2012) Meryl *** "The Patriot" (2000) Mel
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9 Fact or Faked: Fact or Faked: Fact or Faked: Weird or What? "Freaks Weird or What? (N) (In Weird or What? "Freaks
31 59 31 26 29 Paranormal Files Paranormal Files Paranormal Files of Nature" Stereo) a of Nature"
fTR1 49 23 49 16 19 King |Seinfeld Seinfeld |Seinfeld Big Bang IBig Bang Big Bang |Big Bang Laugh |Big Bang Conan (N)
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(TL] J 50 46 50 29 30 Medium |Medium Gypsy Wedding Couple |Couple 19 Kids |19 Kids Couple Couple 19 Kids 19 Kids
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ETi) 350 261 350 (2006) Lukas Haas. Tom Hanks. (In Stereo) 'PG' and sorrow during World War I. 'PG-13' a Dahlia"
Castle "Pretty Dead" (In Castle "Knockout" (In NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) NBA Basketball Conference
48 33 48 31 34 Stereo) 'PG' Stereo)'PG' ) (Live) N Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) N1
3ILJ 38 58 38 33 Regular |Regular JohnnyT Teen Looney Adven King/Hill King/Hill American American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
Ti) 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Food Food Airport Airport Airport Airport Extreme Factories Extreme Factories
iiI 25 55 25 98 55 Cops'14' Cops'14' Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Repo Repo
) 32 49 32 34 24 Nanny Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special CSI: Crime Scene
US 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Investigation '14'
Charmed "Astral Charmed "Apocalypse CSI: Miami "Rush" (In CSI: Miami "Just CSI: Miami "Burned" (In CSI: Miami Possible
S 117 69 117 Monkey"'PG' Not"'PG' Stereo) '14' c Murdered"'14' c Stereo) '14' c drug-smuggling.'14'
WO 18 18 18 18 20 Chris IChris Funny Home Videos Y2n "Four Weddings anda Funeral" WGN News at Nine Funny HomeVideos


West
4 10 9 5 3
VJ 6
+ K Q 10 9
& 7 4





Deal
Vuln
South W4
1 NT P
2 V P
3 NT P


North 05-14-13
K 7 6 4
V 10 3
* 63
* A J 9 8 2
East
4 J 8
V K Q 7 5 2
5 8 7 4
K 6 3
South
A Q 2
VA 9 8 4
+ A J 2
4 Q 10 5


er: South
erable: Both
Vest North
ass 2 4
ass 24/2NT
ass Pass


East
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: + K

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

This week we are looking at the Stayman con-
vention, whose primary job is to try to find a 4-4
major-suit fit after opener immediately shows a
balanced hand.
When the opening bid is one no-trump and re-
sponder bids two clubs, it asks opener to show a
four-card major If opener has two of them, he
rebids two hearts. Then, what does the respon-
der do when he has four spades and fewer than
four hearts?
If he has game-invitational strength, it de-
pends upon system. If one no-trump two no-
trump is natural, showing about nine points and
inviting game, then responder continues with
two no-trump. Since he used Stayman, he must
have a four-card major, and since he has not
raised hearts, he must hold four spades. But if
one no-trump two no-trump is not natural, per-
haps a transfer to diamonds, responder rebids
two spades.
Opener is expected to place the final contract
Here, with an absolute maximum, he signs off in
three no-trump.
After West leads the diamond king, what
should South do?
Declarer has six top tricks and at least three
more can come from the clubs. However, if East
has the club king, there is a risk the opponents
will collect four diamond tricks to defeat you.
The answer? Duck the first trick. If West leads
another diamond, it gives you two diamond
tricks. If West shifts, you win in hand and run the
club 10 (or queen).
Ducking with the A-J-x is called the Bath
Coup because this play was first recognized in
that English city when whist was popular

T J S T THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, I
one letter to each square, M
to form four ordinary words.
SHUBY

~ .i-T..l....i- Services, Inc 76





RANWOR

LI L I THE MUSICAL
KILLER WHALES
FORMFD ---
NASCAV
/ A1 v- -l Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer AN "-"
here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BOUND GLAZE INCOME POSTAL
Answer: The speedy barber always went -
AT A GOOD CLIP


ACROSS
Spring shape
-, amas, amat
Beat
decisively
Bear in the sky
Pinch
Counting
rhyme start
Exception
Rattle
Cook's vessel
Action star
Chuck
Leavening
agent
Soggy
Wiedersehen
Unfaltering
Shawl or stole
Hwys.
Diminishes
Angry
Nosh
Selected a
card
Tarzan's
moniker


- matter
of fact
Place for
posies
Hatfield foe
Imitation
Actress Ruby
Night light
Not skillful
Ida. neighbor
Hair styling
goo
Canyon reply
Iowa college
town
Look at
Chimney dust

DOWN
- -de-sac
Spanish gold
Equal, in
combos
Reindeer
herders
Erelong
Wire gauge
Unfenced


Answer to Previous Puzzle


8 Helped with
expenses
9 Provide new
weapons
10 Loosen, in a
way
11 Parting words


Head covers
Peculiar
Swings off
course
Kind of
currency
Remote
Genealogy
chart
Party tray
cheese
"The Thin
Man" dog
Serfs
Bric-a- -
"Eso -"
(Paul Anka hit)
Move in the
breeze
Favorite
Santa Fe loc.
Engine sound
In unison
(2 wds.)
Fleshy
mushrooms
Austen novel
Changes
direction
Edit out
Bridal notice
word
Author
Umberto
Greek letter
Youngster


5-14 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


D earAnnie: My husband
and I have been hap-
pily married for 15
years and recently decided to
try an open-marriage lifestyle.
We are doing this with full
honesty and respect for each
other
The main prob-
lem is that the dat-
ing success is not
equal. I found it
easier to get a date.
Whereas, my hus-
band is having a
tremendous degree
of difficulty He has
online dating pro-
files, but no luck. I
am seeing someone
who is a wonderful
person, but I want ANI
my husband to ex- MAIL
perience new
things along with
me. Open marriage is still con-
sidered taboo, and it is ex-
tremely important to my
husband and me that we are
honest about our marital sta-
tus with any prospective date.
Even though he is happy for
me, I feel compelled to help
him. But I'm not sure how to
do it without overstepping un-
spoken boundaries. Open
but Lost
Dear Open: Are you sure
your husband wants this as
much as you do? He may have
agreed to the arrangement
only to please you. We think
you need to have this discus-
sion again and let your com-
mitment to honesty lead the
way. Ask your husband
whether he is truly happy with
the idea of an open marriage
and, if so, what you can do to
make things easier for him.
Marriage, "open" or other-
wise, requires the ability to
communicate.


L


Dear Annie: Would you
please address the distinction
between "dinner" and "sup-
per"? I've heard many people
refer to the evening meal as
dinner, but the definition of an
evening meal is supper I even
heard a prominent
newscaster refer to
the president as sit-
S ting down with a
guest at the White
House for "dinner"
tonight, but if they
are sitting down at
.1 night, it is clearly
4. supper. Stickler
in the South
Dear Stickler: In
most parts of the
U.S. and Canada,
IE'S these words are
.BOX used interchange-
ably However,
there are regional
distinctions, which might ex-
plain why this bothers you so
much.
According to most defini-
tions, "dinner" refers to the
main meal of the day Back in
the Middle Ages, people often
ate the main meal at
lunchtime. Now we tend to eat
it much later, but it is still
called "dinner" regardless of
the time. "Supper" refers to a
lighter meal taken later in the
evening and is often used in-
terchangeably with "tea." The
word "dinner" also is used
when referring to a formal
meal or banquet (hence the
president's dinners), and
"supper" is always a less for-
mal affair. We hope that an-
swers your question. Thanks
for the change of pace.
Dear Annie: In response to
"Wife of the Plumber," I have
only one thing to say: Get out
while the getting' is good!
Her husband is a total nar-


cissist, and nothing is going to
change him. Narcissists are
superb at conning people, es-
pecially those who love them.
We are the ones they treat the
worst, because we have that
unrealistic hope that given
time things will improve.
After almost half a century,
I can attest to the fact that no
matter how many chances you
give, no matter how many
promises they make and no
matter how much you love
them or how hard you work, it
will never change. They see
nothing wrong with them-
selves. It is always the other
person's fault. They will not
seek help. I urge her not to
throw her life away on some-
one who will never be there
for her I hoped too much and
loved too strongly, and al-
though still legally married, I
have finally reached the point
of emotionally withdrawing
from my self-made prison. If
leaving is not feasible, she
needs to protect herself and
her children from the extreme
damage that is done by living
with this type of person. And
get counseling. Been There,
Done That and Escaped


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Email
your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 Third
St., Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www. creators. com.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books


OPALD CMUSE
WALE I L T L I B
LITTLETOEITO
ROUES DR R N
PAJSS CO0AX
SP L E
OARMVI LLAGER
R Lv L0
VZ WIEBAC K ESE
RIL -E VEEPS
PORKESICAN
D E N SER A NG E L
ENT RETREATED
ATA SEAL GAIN
RAP K OS ELSA


C6 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


THAT'S THE SADDEST
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POST CARD I'VE EVER READ!
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Garfield

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COMICS


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


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Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
MR. B., CAPTAIN? WE DON'T
WHO'S THE HAVE A
CAPTAIN CAPTAIN,
OF VOUR ELMO
CARPOOL?



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THEN WHO SETS TO DECIDE WHEN
STOP FOR "
DONUTS ON
14E WAY TO
WORK?




'AND WH'E TO


L'A CAPTAIN?! WHY DO WE
NEED A CAPTAIN FOR
OUR CARPOOL?
-_-__ ._ L_____



-V


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


"Wow, this brings back some memories....
My first car, a '57 convertible -- that was
a mistake."


"It's a good thing moms don't
give report cards."


Doonesbury -
501 OITOLP MY PARENWT5
RI6HT AFTER 6RAPUA-
TON ANA MOVEP IN WITH
EPUARO. W'E' E EEN
TOC6THER EER SINCE.







Big Nate


WHAT? IT TOOK ME
YEAR9 TO 6ET IT
ALL SORTEP OUT! FECTF
I HATE YOU! YOUR
UF5 OUNPA PER-



-a-
v:j,


THEY' RE AFRAID HE'S
BECOME UTTERLY
INTOXICATED BY M'Y
FLIRTATIOUS, I
BUBSLY PERSONALITY. '
--- 7F--


I HAVE
THAT
EFFECT MUST..
ON NOT...
PEOPLE. STAY..
AN'Y(TH IN6


Arlo and Janis


Betty


Frank & Ernest


To dy's MOVIES
Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"42" (PG-13) 3:15 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R) 11:45 a.m., 5:05 p.m.,
7 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) 3:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
No passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) In 3D. 11:45 p.m.,
3:10 p.m., 6:45 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 12 p.m., 2:05 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:30 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 12:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:45 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:01
a.m. Wednesday (midnight showing). No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"42" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R) 11:50 a.m., 5:20 p.m.,


7:40 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) 4 p.m. No passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:45 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 2:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m.,
1:20 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m.
No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 12:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) 12:01 a.m.
Wednesday (midnight showing). No passes.
"Star Trek: Into Darkness" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:01
a.m. Wednesday (midnight showing). No passes.
"Tyler Perry Presents Peeples" (PG-13) 12
p.m., 2:25 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 7 slenba y

"KWYIY FD GS PSM DS EIYZK ZD


IYOSIKFGE KWZK


HSLY KS KSBG."


Z ESST OAZM WZD


- TIZLZ HIFKFH


UISSXD ZKXFGDSG


Previous Solution: "Miss Renata Tebaldi was always sweet and very firm ... she
had dimples of iron." Rudolf Bing, Manager, Metropolitan Opera
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-14


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


Dilbert


TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 C7


9YOU AREN'T FOOLING
ANY BOP
(if~ -s '>? -"'

4^






C8 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013



GROUPS
Continued from PageC3

Dunnellon Life Recov-
ery group for adults where
addiction, compulsion and
codependency issues are
dealt with, at 7 p.m. Monday
at Rainbow Springs Village
Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd
St. Road, Dunnellon. Call
Char at 352-465-1644 or
Nancy at 352-794-0017.
SPRING HILL- Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital
of Spring Hill. Call Charissa
Haffner at 352-346-8864.

Organizations

Alzheimer's Associa-
tion-Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter affiliated support groups
are for family members, care-
givers and others interested in
learning more about
Alzheimer's disease. Meet-
ings are open to everyone
and free of charge. To
arrange free respite care so
you can attend a group, call
the Hernando office at 352-
688-4537 or 800-772-8672.
Website: www.alz
support.com Live chat
every Wednesday at noon.
Message boards open at all
times to post questions and
leave replies. Join the
Alzheimer's Association on-
line community at www.alz.
org/livingwith_alzheimers_
message_boards_lwa.asp.
Crystal River Health &
Rehabilitation Center, 136
N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River;
2 p.m. third Saturday monthly.


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Call Christina DiPiazza at
352-795-5044.
Brooksville: Lykes Me-
morial County Library, 238
Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first
Friday monthly. Call Jerry
Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill
Hospital Senior Partners,
11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m.
first Thursday monthly. Call
Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Spring Hill: The Resi-
dence at Timber Pines, 3140
Forest Road; 2 p.m. third
Monday monthly. Call Diane
Koenig at 352-683-9009 or
The Residence at 352-683-
9009. Free respite care pro-
vided, call to reserve.
First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that
run on a monthly basis. All
groups are open to the public
and free of charge, and meet
at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the
Administration Building:
First Monday: diabetic
support group.
Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia care-
givers support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke
survivors support group.
Memory Lane Respite of-
fered weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia. Any-
one bringing a loved one for
the first time is encouraged to
come early to fill out informa-
tion forms. Call 352-628-4083
for meeting dates.
Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services
to residents of Citrus County
and surrounding communi-
ties. Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administra-


tion Building unless indicated.
ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program: 11:30 a.m. the
second Wednesday monthly.
Meetings are in the confer-
ence room at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute at
522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Call 352-527-0106.
AHEC Quit Smoking:
3 p.m. Tuesday at Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Insti-
tute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000,
ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support:
11:30 a.m. the second Friday,
Robert Boissoneault Cancer
Institute. Call Judy Bonard at
352-527-4389.
Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at 352-726-1551, ext.
6596 or ext. 3329.
Cancer Support: at Can-
cer Treatment Center. Call
Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for
date and time.
Diabetes Support: Call
Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-
341-6110 for details.
Head and Neck Cancer
Support: Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Contact
Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106.
Heart-Healthy Eating
Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. sec-
ond Wednesday every other
month, CMHS Medical Office
Building. Call 352-560-6266
or 352-344-6538 to register.
Look Good Feel Better:
monthly at Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute,
Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522
N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto,
sponsored by the American


Cancer Society, the Cosme-
tology Association and the
Personal Care Products
Council. A licensed cosmetol-
ogist is present to advise
women about many issues.
For dates, times, more infor-
mation or to register, call the
American Cancer Society at
800-395-5665.
Mended Hearts Support:
10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf
Room at CMHS Historic
Building. Call Cardiovascular
Services at 352-344-6416.
Ostomy Support Group:
2 p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus
Room, at the CMHS Historic
Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave.,
Inverness. Call Steve at 352-
229-4202 or Sue at 352-560-
7918.
Stroke Support Group of
Citrus County: 3 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, CMHS
Annex Building conference
room, State Road 44 across
from Walgreens. Call 352-
344-6596 or 352-344-1646.
Hospice of Citrus
County support groups and
workshops. Call 866-642-
0962 or 352-527-2348.
Grief workshops:
1 p.m. Thursday Hos-
pice of Citrus County Clinical
Office, 326. S. Line Ave.,
Inverness.
2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednes-
day Newly Bereaved Grief
Workshop, Wings Education
Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa.
Grief support groups:
11 a.m. Tuesday Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
0 9 a.m. Wednesday -
Grief's Journey ... A Walking
Group, Whispering Pines


Park (Parking Area E).
10 a.m. Thursday-
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
2 p.m. second Thursday
- Hospice of the Nature
Coast Levy Office, 24-B
County Road 40 E., Inglis.
10:30 a.m. Saturday-
First United Methodist
Church, 831 Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.
Evening support groups
(for working people):
0 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
newly bereaved Hospice of
Citrus County Clinical Office,
326 Line Ave., Inverness.
Social support:
10 a.m. Tuesday-
Frank's Family Restaurant,
2780 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando.
0 1 p.m. first Thursday -
Mulligan's Grill (formerly
Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell
Bryant Highway (C.R. 486),
Hernando.
11:30 a.m. third Tuesday
- LIFT luncheon
(widows/widowers), Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club; call
352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for
reservations.
Wings education series:
"4th Tuesdays @ 2" -
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
Teen Encounter and
Camp Good Hope Camps
for grieving children/teens of-
fered in April and October.
0 Suicide Survivors Sup-
port Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Monday at the Hospice of
Citrus County Hospice
House, 3350 W. Audubon
Park Path, Lecanto. The


group is free and open to the
public. Participants need not
be hospice families. For infor-
mation, call Lynn Miller at
352-527-2020.
HPH Hospice, in part-
nership with the Alzheimer's
Association Florida Gulf
Coast Chapter, offers Care-
givers Support Groups for
caregivers of dementia or
Alzheimer's patients to pro-
vide information, education
and emotional support in a
safe, comforting and confi-
dential environment.
There is no charge, and
everyone is welcome to join.
Call Sue Piatek at 352-527-
4600 with questions.
First Tuesday, 11 a.m.,
Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S.
U.S. 41, Inverness.
0 Second Monday, 1 p.m.,
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Free
respite care available.
0 Last Wednesday, 11:30
a.m., Our Lady of Grace
Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt
Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free
respite care available.
Hospice of Citrus
County/Hospice of the Nature
Coast was licensed 1985.
Weekly ongoing Be-
reavement Group from HPH
Hospice and St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
available to anyone who has
experienced the loss of a
loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Thursday at St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.
19), Crystal River. There is no
cost to attend. Call Paul Win-
stead at 352-527-4600.
HPH Hospice is a nonprofit
agency licensed in 1984.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


6a: 66)56-565 1Tol re:(88)82-34 16ai: *asfi0schoic 0olne 0o Iw .ste 0wchonc 0olie 0o


Disabled SWM 45,
Searching for a Female
Travel Companion to
join me on a 2 3 Month
cross country journey
around the U.S. I will
provide Transportation,
fuel, Lodging, the Occa-
sional meal and some
entertainment. You will
need to pay your way
on the rest, I will provide
character references,
you must do the same.
View more details
http://ocala.craigslist.org/r
id/3799757407.html





2009 Cub Cadet,
Riding Mower
0 Turn, 50" New Belts
Battery & Blades
$1,000 obo
352-563-1600


Craftmatic,
Automatic Electric
Single Bed
$200.
(352) 344-8067
Crystal River
Ig sunny room,
furnished, Lg yard,
wifi, c/h/a, $300. &
% util. 352-564-0795
Dining Rm 4 brass
frame char/blue velour
chairs, 43" beveled
glass top $150 obo,
2 Barrel chairs
& ottoman cust made
white cover $75 obo,
352-746-0817
Excellent Full Set,
Wilson, Fire Stick
Golf Clubs, with Bag,
and Pull cart Pd $1,400
Asking $325
(352) 382-1751
HYUNDAI
2004 Santa Fe,
new timing belt &
brakes, 227K mi., runs
and drives like new
$2,950. 352-344-0484


John Deere
L100, 5 speed, 17 HP,
Mint Condition
$700.
(352) 344-1310
Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072
Road Bike for Sale:
Specialized Men's
Bike Model, Sequoia,
silver, Aluminum, 54.5
cm, Carbon fork, 24
spd. 27" rims, com-
puter, tool kit, 2 air
pumps Like New All for
$$610. 352-586-4630



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389


000ERAS
Sudoku ** *a 4puz.com

2 6 5 4


4 9 8 5


65 771

3 2 7 9


6_


6 5 9 8

94 38


5 2_ 9 4


1 9 8 2_
Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andl
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


,1 n n structures
withstand
Installations byBrian eI 1253853 1i
Sieaeoiawa t -i >352-628-7519


'F fl E E ;'ES-T A
Permit And rr i
I Engineering Fees I
| Up to $200 value I

*Siding Soffit Fascia Skirting *Roofovers *Carports *Screen Rooms *Decks Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
Large Gas/BBQ Grills
& MORE 352-270-4087



5 KITTENS
cute and adorable
419-8563
Beautiful black/white
Tuxedo Cat, 2% yrs. old
gentle, preferred family
w/no children, or pets
pls call 352-746-5427
Blue Tick Hound
Male, 6-8 mths old,
needs good home.
352-257-3304
Burgundy Recliner
Fair Condition, very
comfortable
(352) 419-6383
FREE 2 mirrors
46"x68" 24"x36"
352-795-1878
Free Kitten
1 male, 2 females,
5 wks old,
352-364-1812
FREE MANURE.
No shavings,
Already bagged,
Ready for pick-up at
our pasture gate
(352) 249-7127
Mini Pin, male, 2yrs old,
tri color, great with kids
& sm dogs.
Kitten Siamese mix,
male 8 wks old, gray &
white
352-400-6004



LOST 5 COCKATIELS
Blackish/Gray with
orange cheeks
N. Highland Estates
(352) 254-1677
LOST Cockatiel
Gray bird, yellow
face, orange cheeks
REWARD
(352) 746-7263



BLONDE/WHITE MALE
TERRIER/PIT MIX
FOUND CRYSTAL
RIVER. CALL JUDY
352-503-3363
BROWN/BLACK BRIN-
DLE SPAYED FEMALE
POSSIBLE PIT MIX
FOUND OLDFIELD-
GLENBROOK CALL
JUDY@352-503-3363
FOUND:
Taken to Citrus County
Animal Services; female
Catahoula, found Citrus
Springs Blvd also young
male Catahoula Leop-
ard; also female boxer
mix, brown and white,
found Gulf to Lake;
also one male and one
female German Shep-
herd mix. call Judy
352-503-3363


found JACK RUSSELL
FEMALE in HER-
NANDO, ALSO NEU-
TERED JACK RUS-
SELL MALE FOUND
RTE 44. CALL JUDY
352-503-3363

FOUND:
Taken to
Citrus County Animal
Shelter:short haired
male blk/whi/brn
Chihuahua, found
CR484.,Female, possi-
bly bull dog mix
white/brown Found
Haggerty Point, reddish
brown male;young male
hound mix, tan/black
found NE 12th St. Call
Judy 352-503-3363




NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses
Five Week Proaram
*Medical Assistant
$1,420
Two Week Proaram:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.
TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-'24-4119


W~#4 E SO(4/


That special little
dog
might be at the
A60OPTION
EVENT
of
A Humane Society
OF
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Pet Rescue, Inc's

PET
SUPERMARKET
INVERNESS
SATURDAY'S
10-12PM
Small Dogs
For Adoption

Medium to Small
Dog Crates Needed

Wanted like new
stuffed toys
Need to re-home
a small dog?
www.AHumaneSoci
eftvetRescuercom
35 527 9E050

FOSTER PARENTS
NEEDED


Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397

TRAIN FOR A
SUCCESSFUL
CAREER IN
HEALTH CARE!
Enrolling Now for
ALL PROGRAMS:
PRACTICAL NURSING
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
ASSISTANT
PROFESSIONAL
NURSING
PROFESSIONAL
NURSING
Paramedic Opt.
LPN TO ADN
NURSING BRIDGE
TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352) 245-4119




NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses
Five Week Proaram
*Medical Assistant
$1,420
Two Week Proaram:
*Nursing Assist. $475
* Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.
TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-'24-4119




EXP'D. BARBER
For Busy shop.
(352) 419-2427








I I I I I I I I

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


DENTAL LAB
TECHNICIAN
No experience required.
Excellent vision, manual
dexterity, attention for
detail a must.$ 8.00 to
start, P-T possible F-T
dentaltechjob@aol.com
Exp. ALS
LPN'S, CNA'S
& Bookkeeper/
Office Manager
pay based on
experience, please
send resume to:
Nature Coast Lodge
279 N Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
or email to: admin
ncl@tampabay.rr.com
EXPERIENCED
RN'S
Full time & Part time
Positions Available
RN's needed for
outpatient surgery
center. MUST have
experience in
PRE/ POST outpa-
tient surgery center
or hospital experi-
ence in ICU or ER.
Excellent pay, bene-
fits, excellent hours,
no weekends,
nights, or call. Best
place to work in
Citrus County.
Submit Resume to
Fax 527-1827
or in person:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida.
F/T RECEPTIONIST
Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
w/experience on
Medical Weight Loss
& Gynecology.
DFWP. Send resume:
Email: suncoastobi
@earthlink.net
Fax: 352-584-8201
NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885



Y0ouI \01 I first.

i, Diaj



Cf ."1 IdE


82 16753491
479321865
653894271
135287496
798463152
264519783
947152638
582736914
316948527


P/T Chiropractic
ASSISTANT
Busy office, 30-35hrs
week, Must be out-
going able to multi
task. Have com-
puter skills. Able to
work Sat. Mornings
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3885




Eckerd
Floral City
Cook Needed

Please visit our
website:
www.eckerd.ora
to apply.

Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927




Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
Part time
Breakfast and
Lunch Cook.
Please apply
in person at
505 E Hartford St
Tues-Sat between
2:00-4:30 pm.



AUTOMOTIVE
BODY TECH /
PAINTER
5 yrs exp, light body
work, base coat clear
coat painting. Valid dl,
must own tools. Call
795-1420 or Email
autosportracing@
hotmail.com
DRIVER
OTR SD/LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724


Plaster's/Laborers
Raymond Seijas Plas-
tering Inc. is looking for
F/T help, experience a
must, own transporta-
tion required, work is in
The Villages.
David Nava 208-4942
Danny Seijas 601-6832

Septic Tank Co
Taking applications.
Exp and CDL helpful.
Call 352-302-4977


WATER/FIRE
CLEANING
TECHNICIAN
Seeking a Full-Time
responsible, motivated
Water Technician that
could lead to a future
management position.
Individual must have
construction, demo
and cleaning experi-
ence and reliable
transportation. Our
company performs
24/7 Emergency Ser-
vices; therefore, indi-
vidual must be willing
to be on call 24/7 and
perform dry-outs from
start to finish. Prefer
someone who is
IICRC Certified but
willing to train some-
one who is a team
player and the right fit
for our growing busi-
ness. Please send
resume to Attn:
Amber EMAIL to:
info@naturecoas-
trestoration.com or
FAX
(352) 465-7616.





Exp. ALS
LPN'S, CNA'S
& Bookkeeper/
Office Manager

pay based on
experience, please
send resume to:
Nature Coast Lodge
279 N Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
or e-mail to: admin
ncl@tampabay.rr.com


HEALTH & LIFE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
12 Hr. Shifts, Day &
Night Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Exp.class A CDL
Driver-

Local. Full, Part-time.
Apply in person
NO CALLS-Atlas Van
Lines 5050 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy, Crystal
River. Drug Screen
and Background
Check Required.





































CHiONILE




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHiOMCLE


SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449


Residence Serv
Coordinator

P/T 24 hours week
Resp include service
delivery & referrals.
Must have knowl-
edge of available
resources and trans-
portation. Strong
computer skills req.
Qualified candi-
dates send resume
and cover letter to
Joverstreet@
chpc2.orq
Equal Opportunity
Employer
www.communitv
housing partners.ora




Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
634-1397/637-3733




DUDLEY'S






Three Auctions
5-16 Estate Adven-
ture 4Dm Furniture, 96
Regency Presidential
1 owner car, Snapp on
Tools boxes,
collectibles, antiques
5-17 Estate Firearms
6Dm Court ordered.
50+ firearms & parts,
fishing &sporting
goods. Browning,
Winchester, Reming-
ton, Ithaca, transfers
w/ FFL dealer.
5-18 Live & On Line
Stamps 11am
binders, unsorted
stamps, first day
issues,1940's-2000's
patriotic, political &
military, vintage to
contemp.. 1,000's &
1,000's
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

A


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


Ex. Lg. Hess Truck
Collection
Excellent Shape
$500. obo
352-746-2210




ADMIRAL matching set
washer & Dryer good
condition. $100 for each
one 352-563-2288

APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030

EUREKA CLEANER
Upright Vacuum
Cleaner Excellent
Condition $10.00
352-746-5421

VACUUM CLEANER
Kenmore Upright Vac-
uum Cleaner Excellent
Condition $25.00
352-746-5421

WASHER OR DRYER
$145 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Lkie New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398

WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504




DESK oak with two file
drawers, 4 reg. drawers.
29"h x 29"d x 59"w text
for photos $95
352-503-2525

Office and Computer
desk, chair, & other
office supplies
$315 for all
Call (352) 746-0500





DUDLEY'S






Three Auctions
5-16 Estate Adven-
ture 4Dm Furniture, 96
Regency Presidential
1 owner car, Snapp on
Tools boxes,
collectibles, antiques
5-17 Estate Firearms
Q6m Court ordered.
50+ firearms & parts,
fishing &sporting
goods. Browning,
Winchester, Reming-
ton, Ithaca, transfers
w/ FFL dealer.
5-18 Live & On Line
Stamps 11am
binders, unsorted
stamps, first day
issues,1940's-2000's
patriotic, political &
military, vintage to
contemp.. 1,000's &
1,000's
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


m
AIRLESS
SPRAYER/BLACK @
DECKER $30 IN BOX
NEVER USED INVER-
NESS 419-5981
BRAD PINCHER $15
FINISH BRAD NAILS
WITHOUT HAMMER
EXTRA BRAD NAIL IN-
CLUDED 419-5981
Misc tools, some power,
drills, saws, ect
704 898 1109
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 MADE
OF METAL HEAVY
DUTY OLDER MODEL
INVERNESS 419-5981



18-20 Commercial
Office Speakers
intercom-music, set of
6.5 HP Ceiling Speaker
w/hardware $350
352-419-2286
1-27" JVC COLOR TV
works great with remote
call Ron $25.00
352-746-0401



Scaffolding 4-5', 3-4'
pieces, w/some braces
$150.352464-0825



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP PHOTO/SLIDE
SCANNER Scanjet
G4050. W/ software.
$99.00 obo
352 621 0248



6 ft. Finish Mower
Good Condition
$750.
(352) 746-4703



PATIO TABLE SET 42
inch round teal glass top
table and 4 chairs.
$100.00 352-527-8663
Wicker couch,
2 chairs 3 tables
$125.
2 seat glider & chair
$75.
(352) 503-7748



2 Cherry Drop Leaf end
Tables $25ea, Black
coffee table $10, 6ft
Christmas tree $10.
call after 6pm 302-2713


CLASSIFIED



2 wicker vinyl chairs,
moss gr w/ tan cushions
$25 ea, Patio fiber glass
table white w/4 chairs
cushions & casters
stripped patt. w/ multi
colors $150 341-6917
1- SIDE CHAIR white
wash wood, green pad-
ded seat can text pic,
Ron $30.00
352-746-0401
1-SIDE CHAIR Black,
wood, with green pad-
ded seat can text pic
Ron $45.00
352-746-0401
1-TV STAND 36"wide,
26"tall with drawer like
new $40.00 Call Ron
352-746-0401
1-WHITE DRESSER
39" wide, 19"deep,
46"high $100.00 call
Ron 352-746-0401
Bedroom Set
2 night stands, ar-
moire, headboard,
footboard, Kg. size
mattress, $600
(352) 426-2526
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$125, Exercise
Stepper $75
352-795-7254
CHROMECRAFT
KITCHEN TABLE AND
CHAIRS $1200 new.Off
white-4 chairs-table w/1
leaf & oak trim. Looks
new! $400
352-382-4836
Couch & Love Seat
$250.
2 Recliner Chairs
$110 ea.
(352) 503-7748
Craftmatic,
Automatic Electric
Single Bed
$200.
(352) 344-8067
CURIO CABINET oak
with 3 glass shelves and
light, curved glass front.
text for pictures $100.
352-503-2525
Dining Room.
china cab., buffet, ta-
ble & 6 chairs, maple
color $750 for all
will sell separate
(352) 628-2085


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840

FURNITURE
BEDROOM SET
$250.00,LANAI
FURNITURE,GRILL,KITCHE
N SET,SOFA,1
END TABLE,coffee
table best offer
352-201-0275


TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 C9


GLASS ROUND
TABLETOP 48" round
glass only. beveled
edge. text for photo. $60
352-503-2525
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 k
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Patio Furniture
white PVC, table &
6 chairs $600.
(352) 628-2085
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN SIZE MAT-
TRESS AND BOX SPR-
ING in excellent condi-
tion $100 Contact Wal-
ter @ 352-364-2583
Sleeper Love Seat
Black Leather, good
cond. $100 or best of-
fer(352) 795-7513
Smi AntiqueRocker
for nursing also Antique
small Rocker, $135.
for both, cash
352-795-0830
Sofa
8ft like new,
beige $400. obo
(352) 220-2542
Two Seater PVC pipe
glider, new cushions,
leg rests, very good
condition $60.00
352-795-0830



2009 Cub Cadet,
LTX 1045 Riding Mower
Hydrostatic, 46" New
Belts Battery & Blades
$900 obo
352-563-1600
2009 Cub Cadet,
Riding Mower
0 Turn, 50" New Belts
Battery & Blades
$1,000 obo
352-563-1600
AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Canopy for Sears Gar-
den Tractor, good cond.
$45.00
560-0307
Craftsman
Riding Mower,
42"deck,
18V2HP Engine $350.
352-746-7357
Grass Catcher for
Weed Eater Lawn
Mower 38" cut, may fit
other mowers $125.
Grass Catcher for
Snapper Lawn Mower
28 & 33" cut, $125.
352-795-5682
John Deer Mower
42" Deck 22 horse, 105
hrs, new blades $1100
OBO, Echo Gas Hedge
trimmer 24" blade $150
OBO 352-489-7114
John Deere
LI00, 5 speed, 17 HP,
Mint Condition
$700.
(352) 344-1310


5 14 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UChick for UFS, 2013

"He says the average surface temperature
on his planet is about 600 degrees."





Thank You For 15 Years, o notes"

I I4UTiFut RESuTSrf


WWILLAfl
STRUC TION COKP
INNFra E, Q9BB


C.e. 352-6242829i


Yard Equipment
Chain saw, bnd
blower/mulcher, hedge
trimmer, edger, all for
$100 352-746-0817




Dinning Room Set
Solid Oak Butterfly Leaf
table w/6 chairs $100,
Butcher block table
white w/4 chairs $50
call after 6pm 302-2713




!!!!!LT 275/65 R20!!!!!
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $80 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
*****295/40 R20**
Nice tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair! (352)
352-857-9232
1 ROLLING CART
great for TV $15.00 call
Ron 352-746-0401
1 WHITE TOILET
Round bowl with bolts
wax ring and seat
$35.00 352-746-0401


4 WHEEL WALKER
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 628-0033
1-5X7 RUG
Good condition Multi
color can text pic call
Lori $20.00
352-302-2004
1-WHITE FRAMED
MIRROR 27" x 39"
$25.00 call Ron
352-746-0401
6' SHELVING UNIT
3' wide x 6' tall
Plastic $15.00
352-382-4911
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BILZ RED PAT-
TERNED MOTORCY-
CLE HELMET SZ L
Extra visor included
Minor scuffs $30
220-3944
BOOKS The Element
Encyclopedia of Witch-
craft and The Element
Encyclopedia of 5000
Spells by Judika Illes.
Selling together for
$40.00. 352-419-5656


BREAD MAKER Otis,
hardly used. Good
condition, $20
(352)465-1616
CD PLAYER JVC XL-M
415 TM Compact Disc
Player. Automatic
Changer $50.00
352-746-5421
COMODE
$10.00
352-746-5421
DOG HOUSE Suncast
Dog House 36 1/2
Length by 25 Width.
Heavy duty plastic used
indoors. Like new.
$50.00 352-419-5656
Emerg. Generator
B & S Eng. 5250 watt,
new carborator $300
OBO 352-746-0817
Furniture, Rugs, silk
trees, Patio, BBQ Grill
Lots MISC. Must Sell
(352) 249-7521

Furniture, Rugs, silk
trees, Patio, BBQ Grill
Lots MISC. Must Sell
(352) 249-7521
Honeywell Thermostat
new,open box,$25.
firm. Homosassa
407-766-2335


aea Dirwasor'y


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052



JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



Your World










CHRONICLE



.... "hh.,'ll, e,., Alrv '"''TI


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777


Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **-
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *"
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE-*Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *"
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
*352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641



"Full Lawn Service*
Hedgetrim, Mulching
Hauling Available !!
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Enaine. 4551 W.
Cardinal 352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.





Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lie. & ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
ULic #CCC1325497

MJOHNSON
MAC ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

S866-376-4943





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
2 Pools & Pavers
C leaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
Residential &
T. -Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
I IN A or pool or plan
m somielhi.g
- --.: :- "(ompl elelnew!
"Often imtated,
ii..- nevel duplkauted"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST
COPIES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
icene 352-400-3188


Stretching Cleaning
Removal Repair
Fre In Home Estimates
Lifetime Warranty on Stretchina

Upholstery Cleaning
Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfaces
L6 & Ih







BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!

Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-3S2-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


WINDOW
GENIE.
We Cleon Windows ond o Whole Lot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www windowgenie.com/springhill





AAA ROOFING
Call the akf ustes"
Free Written Estimate

S$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof:
S Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000ESX4


I D V CINI


GENERAL .J5
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377







Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
S Repairs
Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
AIl or dale & Dependable
Experience lifelong
352-344-0905
Sell: 400-1722
sured Lic.#37761


-m-m-9


PAINTING











W ORDY AU D Y0 000ER8Q
WORDY GIRDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE
arv answer isarhvmina


1. Ballerina's hair knot completed (1) .. ..
__ -|_-___ -- 'pair of words (like
and DOUBLE TR4
2. Michelle Obama's hairstyle twinges (1) they will fit in the l
Squares. The nmiml
definition tells you
3. Lawmaker's assistant's pigtails (1) syllables in each w
I12013UFS,Dist. byUn
4. Corporation's long-lasting dos (1)


5. Tears Rasta locks into thin strips (1)


6. The South's hairdos like Hathaway's (2)


7. Iroquoians' hairdos like Beckham's (2)


SIMVHXfII1 SIAWHOW 'L SHIXId SaIXI '9 SUV3 HQl SaHHS '
SWH3d SwIa *'t SIMVlHSMIV SONVd SDNVa'g 3NO( NflH 'I
SAIMSNV


La-Bra & Mirror
covers for 08 Mercedes
CLK 350 $99
561-718-5707
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Good condition,
green/white color, me-
dium sized, hardly used,
$30 (352)465-1616
MOVIE PROJECTOR 8
MM Keystone Movie
Projector K1l10.
Excellent Condition.
$100.00 352-746-5421
MOVING BOXES 125
Sm. 10 for $3.
Med. 10 for $5
6 Lg. $.75 each
352-344-0183
POOL COVER
ROLLER FOR SALE
adjustable size to fit
pool. $100.00
352-382-4727
RECORDS 3 Boxes 78
RPM records $25.00
ea. Box 352-746-5421
REESE Single
(one)folding aluminum
ramp $25
352-513-4614
ROCKING HORSE Very
good condition, strong,
will last for long time, will
email photo, $50
(352)465-1616
ROUTER Black &
Decker 1 1/2 HP
Router, Never Used
Still in Box $45.00
352-746-5421
Southern Bell Gown
5 layers, strapless, color
gold iridescent lots of
sparkle, size 16, worn 1
time, $300 (Orig. $500)
352-746-0513
TROY-BILT POWER
WASH- 2200PSI, 4.5
HP Briggs & Stratton
Engine, 3 tips, runs
great, $100, 628-0033
TWIN SIZED HEAD-
BOARD Toddler head-
board, metal, grey,
never used, $10
(352)465-1616



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 by Pride $395
1 by Berkline $295
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS &
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



BATHTUB/NEW 5
feet,very nice60.00
OBO LINDA 341-2271
DECORATIVE
KITCHEN CANISTER
SET $10 CERAMIC 4
CONTAINERS WITH
LIDS 419-5981
KIRBY G6 VACUUM
Like new-all tools-12 mi-
cro bags-carpet clean-
ing kit(never used)2 bot-
tles solution $300
352-382-4836



Complete Gym Set
Indcl, weights, pully sys,
exercise bike, and More
$500 OBO
352-746-0589
Exercise Bike
Schwin, airdine pro, new
$800 now $175 OBO
Mountain Bike
Mongouse 10 speed,
like new $75.00 OBO
352-746-0817
TREADMILL Space
Saver Life styler Ex-
panse 850 w/Cell Joint
Prot Sys.$75 cash &
carry. 897-4645 Iv msg



Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DOME TENT
Only $65
352-341-4008
Dunnellon Pawn
Fire Arms****Ammo
Mags****Since 1987
352-489-4870
Excellent Full Set,
Wilson, Fire Stick
Golf Clubs, with Bag,
and Pull cart Pd $1,400
Asking $325
(352) 382-1751
Ez Go Gas
not running,older work
horse, $375, & extra's
$24 315-466-2268
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Ammo-concealed clas-
ses 352-447-5595
James Anglin Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in Box
with 2 mags $189.00
352-419-4800


kayak blue w/storage
Greatt paddle $150 obo
352-746-0817
KAYAK RACK -
car top-$80-
352-726-6084
Road Bike for Sale:
Specialized Men's
Bike Model, Sequoia,
silver, Aluminum, 54.5
cm, Carbon fork, 24
spd. 27" rims, com-
puter, tool kit, 2 air
pumps Like New All for
$$610.352-586-4630



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1975.
call 352-527-0555**



BABY CRIB in good
condition with mattress
$25 Contact Walter @
352-364-2583


Sell r Swa


A*




Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII






I BUY AMMO,
Also Reloading
Supplies & Equip.
PAYING
$$ Top Prices $$
352-302-0962
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
FRENCH BULLDOG
Pups,11weeks,2Males,house
broken,shots,$800each
adriansmith17@aim.com
352-795-5310





Bi"i


LILLY
Lilly, a 4-y.o.
Shepherd mix, weight
about 45 Ibs, is
housebroken,
heartworm-negative,
beautiful & friendly.
She sits on command,
shakes hands, &
gives paw when
asked. Takes treats
gently. Walks well on
leash, gets along
w/other dogs. Friendly
& affectionate. Call
Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.







SALLIE
Sallie, 1-y.o. female
terrier/dalmation
mix, weight 35 Ibs.
Heartworm-
negative, gets
along w/other dogs,
sits for treats, ap-
pears housebroken.
Friendly & affec-
tionate, shy at first.
Slim & trim in build.
Sweet & joyful girl,
came to shelter be-
cause owners could
not afford her.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.


PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tri color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876

Shepherd Mix,
Her name is Daisy
Color is Blond, 3 yrs old,
spayed, UTD on Shots
Micro Chipped, lovable,
house trained,
Fence Yard Needed
moving can't keep
needs loving home
(863) 661-6220


TOBY
Toby, a 6-y.o. black/
white terrier mix,
neutered, Heart-
worm -negative,
housebrkn, micro-
chipped, weight 45
lbs. In great physical
shape, good w/
dogs & cats. Very
calm, gentle,
friendly & affection-
ate. Walks very well
on a leash, a quiet
dog & would be
an excellent com-
panion for an older
person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
352-697-2682


Shih Poo Puppies,
4 males, 1 female
ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
3 males 1 female
Ready 5/9
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827


TUCKER
Tucker, 2-y.o. Shep-
herd mix, neutered,
UTD shots, Heart-
worm negative, micro-
chipped, housebrkn,
weight 54 Ibs. A bit
fearful of men, bonds
well w/women. Great
physical shape. Gets
along w/most dogs.
Walks well on leash,
affectionate, friendly,
although shy @ first.
OK w/older children,
fenced yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
352-697-2682




GOATS FOR SALE
Mother & 2 Babies
$160 for All
(352) 628-4750
Nigerian Dwarf
Goat
male, 1 year old
$50
(352) 527-4990


Tell that special
person
,Happy Bia rthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Ony $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


C10 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FAT CAT
OUBLE), and
letter
ber after the
i how many
word.

iv iUclckforUFS


CLASSIFIED




2/1, 2.5 Acr. wkly or
monthly (352)564-1242
HOMOSASSA
1 bedroom. 1 bath.
furnished, pool, 400
deposit, 450/month
(352)628-4441
INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951
INVERNESS
SWMH w/add 2/1 1.25
Acres, near wal-mart
$500 Mthly nonsmoking
706-473-2184






*'THIS OUT!
2007 Double Wide MH
28 x 60 3/2 1.10 Acres
(Brooksville) $65k
Ready To Move In
575 Credit Score & 10%
down Qualifies
(352) 795-1272





2009 DW MH
Ready to Move In
Crystal River 1,568 Sq
Ft. 3/2/ on 3.2 Acres
$89,900 10% down 575
Credit Score Qualifies
352-795-2377
ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181
DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807



Inverness
2008 Manufactured
Home, on 1/2 acre
$59,900 Must See
Ready to Move In
352-795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
Check us out at
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/
$8500 off any Palm
Harbor Home pur-
chased
John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210


For lSale-.l
Skyline 28 x 64
on 1.2 acres, 3 bd, 2ba,
Owner Financing
& low Credit Scores
Qualify $59,900
352-795-1272
STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


Town Of Hernando
3/2 DW MH, 1.5 Acres,
30 min. from Ocala,
$45,900 Financing
Available
352-795-2377




We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details




HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182


HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192



1989,24 x40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vinyl window,
utility & outdoor shed
all appls and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243
Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A 55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-794-4128
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully furn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S AtkinsTer. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648



FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Desertrose
Apartments
RENTAL SPECIAL
1 MONTH FREE
2 bed/2 bath
Call now for details!!
Enslng Properties LLC
352-795-1795
www.ensing
propertles.com.

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393






CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Commercial Storefront
clean 1000 SF, exc.loc
$795/mo 352-634-2528




Meadowcrest
Condo for Rent
Will Call back after writ-
ing out info
352-220-6754
30 days




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




AVAILABLE NOW
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
Near School
$725. mo.
HOMOSSASA
2/1 Duplex $495.
RIVER LINKS
REALTY
352-628-1616
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 New W/D. No
pets/smkg $750 mo.
1st/last 678- 953-0581
FLORAL CITY
2/1, Det. Gar. CHA,
Hist. Dist., No pets/
smoking $675mo.
lst/Ist/sec. 422-6263
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paint,flooring, w/d pets
ok $800 mthly, 8928 W.
White Dogwood Dr.
619-301-5442




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
Moorings Villa
2/2/1 waterfront,
part.furn., all appl. low
HOA, lawn care and
more, screen glass
lania, patio w/awning,
clear hurricane shutters,
$85,900 or rent opt.
352-344-8493 or
734-529-2146


-"-
Crystal River
Ig sunny room,
furnished, Lg yard,
wifi, c/h/a, $300. &
% util. 352-564-0795




Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
(904) 757-1012

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. "Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


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',t.' ,.
S d. .,4


.* H. / ., *

.. . ., -.
.g. J -. ,.:
/I- .- i
_/11 '




1. .. *C.




CH OI o :_.


.4/,


must sell!
Lecanto FI 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079




2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/ 3/18' rollups
office tir & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862







2,240 SF
Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. May 16th,
12PM
Preview From 1 lam
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctloneers.com












PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 o w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164





For Sale I,1
Nicest 2/1 in Beverly
Hills MUST SEE!! You
won't find a nicer
home in this price
range looks and feels
brand new with over
$25K in upgrades.
Large new 12'x 24'
shed in rear with of-
fice and work shop.
Completely renovated
insulated windows,
new oak kitchen
cabinets,new bath-
room tile, berber car-
pet, 3D shingles.Large
Florida room (can be
3rd bedroom)
"$54,900 with easy
terms". This house
shows as new
it won't last long!
More info here
http://www.sharphome.c
om/131313
call Troy 352-364-6316


5-14-13


How Do







































Chronicle


Classifieds /


In Print /


& Online







CH ONICL5E &






(352) 563-5966


I et


- Z, Ss?,


r;


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.







TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013 Cll


2//1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840

For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, on appox. % acre
with enclosed large pool
new roof, new Hot
water heater $125,000,
746-5421

REMODELED 2/1.5/1
NEW: Roof, kitchen,
appl's, bath, flooring,
paint, much more.,
1240sf, under AC.
$59,900. (352)527-1239




LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity with amenities
$120K posss rent
opt)352-804-9729







I'm Gorgeous Inside!!!
Big & Beautiful, 3/2/2
Near 7 Rivers Golf
Course 305 N Pompeo
Ave $149,900.
Call Nancy Wilson
For Appt. to see
352-422-4137
Waybright
Real Estates, Inc.




2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan, carpet,
tile, bright, cheerful,
clean. Realtor/Owner
(352) 697-0295


For SaleB ,,u
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
Wood Floors, Tile and
Carpet. 2 Car GarSS
Appl. fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026

SMW
3/3/2, court yard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978


Phyllis Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855

SPECIAL *
New Home in
Quiet neighborhd.
3/2/2, on I acre
2932 sf. corner lot,
$269,900.
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116
Spruce Creek Pr.
55+, gated,
3/2/2, 2370 Liv. area,
on GC $159,000.
Call Lindsay Paolillo,
Foxfire Realty
352-509-1063












TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





For Sale
Lake Panasoffkee
5BR/2BA 2,200 SF CB
Home w/3 lots, C/H/A,
fenced yd, 2 car gar,
close to lake. $140,000
Call 352/569-4026



Inverness, Regency Pk
2/2, fireplace, Ist floor
community pool
$48,900 352-637-6993




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com




Your World









CHRONICLE



.. ', ir, "I., l -,lr. ," T,


516 S. TUCK POINT
2/1/1 Block Home,
Remodeled, New
Everything, Canal to
Withlacoochee River
Priced to Sell
Immediately! $64,900
(352) 503-6703



HAVE IT

ALL
Spring Water, Fish from
Dock, Watch the
Manatees from porch,
walk to festivals, enjoy
living in dwntn Crystal
River, gated community,
2/2 Condo w/gar.
$249,900, ownerlic. RE
Broker 352-257-9496

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906




2001 Mercury Motor
125 runs great, $1675
Leave Message
561-313-5308
352-270-3859
Outboard Mercury
Motor 20HP,
Execllent Condition.
$800.
(352) 726-0321




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-

1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
1998 Sting Ray
22 Ft, extra Clean 175
Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab,
great for fish/pleasure
$7500 352-422-4658
2001 Century
WAC, yam 150 OX66FI
mtr, Windless, wash
down, fish finder,
w/trailer exec, Cond.
$12,900 352-563-5628












19' REGAL, $650 &
17' CACCI CRAFT
$500
REGAL HAS GOOD
ENGINE & DRIVE.SS
PROP. NEEDS FLOOR
& SIDES RECOVERED
$600 CACCI GOOD
ENGINE & LOWER
UNIT, NEEDS CARBS
CLEANED, FLOOR RE-
COVERED $500. BOTH
HAVE TITLE AND
TRAILER352-256-8488
Carolina Skiff
24 ft., new motor-41
Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP,
trailer. Lots of extras
$14,500 (352)287-3308
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




06 Winnebago
29' site seerer, class A,
loaded 19k mi, 2 slides,
new tires, exec cond.
$46,500 270-8475

Motor Home
06 28' Class C, Chateu
Sport, 21k miles, exc.
cond. used twice per yr.
$28,000 352-445-0072




KEYSTONE
2001 Litehouse 23 ft.
Sleeps 6. Nice condi-
tion. Generator, TV,
DVD, AC, awning &
more. UVW 2960 lbs.
$5995 or BO.
352-489-3931
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
TRAVEL TRAILER 26'
2005 Springdale by
Keystone with slide,
queen bed, sleeps 8,
ducted A/C, tub with
shower, good condition.
$6700 352-464-1622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945


4 BF Goodrich
Tires & Rims
like new, P245's-70-16
$400. 352-613-2333
Tonneau Cover
Leer 700, Fiberglass,
Red, off Chevy, 62'
Like New, $425. obo
352-527-4271 B.H.




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT CR
461-4518& 795-4440




03 MITSU SPYDER
Red cony, a real looker!
Auto V6 25mpg. Great
mech'l cond. Price Re-
duced call for pics.
$4990 464-2966
2002 Saturn
L100 4 door, Gold, all
elec. $1500 OBO
352-746-0817
2011 Chrysler
200 Convert, cherry/tan
22k mi, beautiful car,
automatic, $21,950 Firm
352-897-4520
BUICK
2005 Century, 4dr
96k ml, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-302-9217
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100

must sell!
CADILLAC
1999 STS $1,500, minor
work needed
352-364-2268
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th
anniversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles, immaculate,
loaded,call for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004

CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt LT
$6,995.
352-341-0018
DODGE
1993 Stealth ES: black
exterior paint, gray
leather seats, sunroof,
cruise, AC, power win-
dows and locks, 5
speed manual transmis-
sion, 3.0L DOHC V6,
120,500 miles. $3,800.
352-344-0625

DUDLEY'S







Three Auctions
5-16 Estate Adven-
ture 4Dm Furniture, 96
Regency Presidential
1 owner car, Snapp on
Tools boxes,
collectibles, antiques
5-17 Estate Firearms
6Dm Court ordered.
50+ firearms & parts,
fishing &sporting
goods. Browning,
Winchester, Reming-
ton, Ithaca, transfers
w/ FFL dealer.
5-18 Live & On Line
Stamps 11am
binders, unsorted
stamps, first day
issues,1940's-2000's
patriotic, political &
military, vintage to
contemp.. 1,000's &
1,000's
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
2000, Ranger XLT
Lesabre, $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Focus, Sedan,
SES, 25,000 miles.
$7,500. 352-341-0018
FORD
'96, Mustang, V6, 5spd
manual, gar. kept, GT
wheels silver, great
cond. $3,500 obo
(352) 476-7408
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5,500 obo
352-628-5451 or
352 601-2214
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
Mercury
2001 Sable, 4dr, auto,
very good condition
$5500. 352-228-1111

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
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Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
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1998 MADZA
B2500 pick-up truck
New A/C, swaybar,
shocks, radio. $3500 cl
7a-7p(352) 465-2823
2012 Toyota
Tacoma, pre-runner,
TRD Sport, access Cab,
Char/gray, Loaded 10K
mi, $25K
746-0177 / 697-1101
2012 Toyota
Tacoma, pre-runner,
TRD Sport, access Cab,
Char/gray, Loaded 10K
mi, $25K
746-0177 / 697-1101
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100
WE FINANCE ALL
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CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
1997, Explorer XLT
$3,495
352-341-0018


1998, Explorer Sport
$4,995.
352-341-0018
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
HYUNDAI
2004 Santa Fe,
new timing belt &
brakes, 227K mi., runs
and drives like new
$2,950. 352-344-0484
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100




JEEP
'98 Grand Cherokee,
6 cyl. 4 wheel drive
$3,000 (352) 628-6702
Cell 364-3122




2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10" lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
Town & Country 2005
7-Pass Non- Smoking
Mini-Van, Stow'n Go
Seats, 3.81tr V6, 21 mpg
Leather, 2nd Owner,
Impeccably Maint.,
Records, All Options.
Clean Reliable Family
Van. $6,999. obo
352-422-3217




06 Honda
Shadow Spirit V TW 750
Exec. Cond, Must See
Burnt Orange Color
ask $3500 527-7199
06 Suzuki
Burgman 650 w/tryke
kit, wh/bl under 5k mi,
loaded with extra.$7995
OBO 352-621-0248
BUDDY SCOOTER
2009,50cc, 1,500 mi-
les Red, great shape.
Asking $1,700
(352) 438-8026
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk, xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12,900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
HONDA
2004 Gold Wing TRIKE
EASY STEER, DE-
FLECTOR WINGS,
INTERCOM, BRAKE
LIGHT MODULATOR,
LIGHTED SPOILER,
TRAILER TO MATCH
CB, ADJUSTABLE
PASSENGER FOOT
RESTS
CHAMPION KIT AND
MANY EXTRAS
49,900 MILES $24,500
352-382-5149

SUZUKI
1981 GS1100E, Mint
Condition, adult
owned, super fast,
garage kept, new ti-
res, new seat, Italian
fairing, smoke wind-
shield with sissy bar,
only 15k orig. mi.
many extra's serious
inquires only $2600.
Call 352-489-5932

SUZUKI
1987, GS450L. Adult
driven & well maint.
Very low miles, Looks
and runs well. $1,200
obo (352) 249-7127


590-0514 TUCRN
Jones, David E. 2012-CP-000732 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE CASE NO. :2012-CP-000732
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF DAVID E. JONES,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of DAVID E. JONES, deceased, whose date of
death was February 13, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012-CP-732; the address of which is 110 North
Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other credtars of the decedent and other persons having ddms or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is May 7, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Courtney Jones
10080 South DevonTerrace, Homosassa, FL 34448
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq., Florida Bar No. 0857750 VanNess &
VanNess, P.A., 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
1-352-795-1444,tmv@vannessoa.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle May 6 & 13, 2013


591-0521 TCRN
vs. Hartman, Floyd T Case No,: 2012-CC-426 Notice of Action
Public Notice
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CC-426
PINE RIDGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a
Florida not-for-profit corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FLOYD T. HARTMAN, TRUSTEE, OR HIS SUCCESSORS IN TRUST, UNDER THE HARTMAN LIV-
ING TRUST, DATED DECEMBER 14, 2001, if alive and if dead, his unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors and all parties claiming by, through, under or against
him, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against him, and all un-
known natural persons, if alive and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their
several and respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other par-
ties claiming by, through, or under those unknown natural persons; the several and
respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or other persons claiming
by, through, under or against the Defendant(s) and all claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of
the above named or described Defendant(s), or parties claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to the lands hereinafter described,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FLOYD T. HARTMAN, TRUSTEE OR HIS SUCCESSORS IN TRUST,
UNDER THE
HARTMAN LIVING TRUST, DATED DECEMBER 14, 2001
705 N. JEFFERSON STREET, ARLINGTON, VA 22205-1127
Defendant.
if dead, his unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other par-
ties claiming by, through, under or against him and all other claimants, and all other
parties claiming by, through, under or against him, all unknown natural persons, if


I, ,st Ce~tr/


alive and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective un-
known heirs, devisees, grantees and creditors, or other parties claiming by, through,
or under those unknown natural persons, their several and respective unknown as-
signs, successors in interest, trustees or other persons claiming by, through, under or
against the Defendant(s) and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate,
or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under the above-named
Defendant(s), or parties claiming to have any right, title or interest in and to the
lands hereinafter described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint (to Foreclose a Clam of Uen for Mainte-
nance and Upkeep Service Fees) on the following described real property described
in Citrus County, Florida:

LOT 16, BLOCK 136, PINE RIDGE UNIT ONE, according to the plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 8, Pages 25 through 36, inclusive, of the Public Records of Citrus County,
Florida.
Physical Address of: 5485 W. Pine Ridge Blvd., Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Property Appraiser's Parcel ID#: 18E17S320010 1360 0160 (Alt. Key # 2058153)
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your witten de-
fenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff's attorney, KAREN 0. GAFFNEY, ESQUIRE, of KAREN 0.
GAFFNEY, P.A., 205 W. Dampier Street, Inverness, FL 34450, on or before the 30th day
following the first publication date of this Notice which is May 27,2013, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
Witness my hand and seal of said Court on this 18th day of April, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, Clerk of Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
May 16 & 23, 2013



593-0521 TUCRN
STEWART, JOHN R. 2013-CP-246 NTC (SummaryAdministration)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013-CP-246
IN RE: ESTATE of JOHN RICHARD STEWART, JR.
a/kla JOHN R. STEWART
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has
been
entered in the ESTATE of JOHN RICHARD STEWART, JR. a/k/a JOHN R. STEWART,
deceased, File Number 2013-CP-246, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450; that the decedent's date of death was February 3,2013; that the total
value of the estate is $NONE and that the names and address of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order are:
Michael Stewart Gregory R Stewart
14 Adams Street 8500 East Keating Park Street
East Islip, NY 11730 Floral City, FL 33634
Joanne DeScatto Richard M. Stewart
70 Featherbed Lane 118 Main Avenue
Oakdale, NY 11769 Mastic, NY 11950
Emil J. Stewart John R. Stewart III
89 Nassau Street 835 North Conant Avenue
Islip Terrace, NY 11752 Crystal River, FL 34429
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for
full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WITH BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 14, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Joanne DeScetto
70 Featherbed Lane, Oakdale, NY 11769
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, 209 Courrthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar Number: 157310, Telephone: (352) 726-1211
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County ChronicleMay 14 & 21, 2013


594-0521 MCRN
Estate of Harvey, Laura 2013-CP-151 NTC
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013-CP-119
IN RE: ESTATE OF LAURA M. HARVEY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LAURA M. HARVEY, deceased, whose date of death
was JANUARY 23, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives' at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is May 14th, 2013
Personal Representative:
/s/ EVELON LITTLETON
2459 Johnstown Road, Dover, OH 44622
Attorney for Personal Representative:
DONALD F. PERRIN, P.A.
By:/s/ Donald F. Perrin
Post Office Box 250,Inverness, FL 34451-0250
dfplawa)tampabav.rr.com (352) 726- 6767
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle, May 14 & 21, 2013


934-0518 MIXCRN
Diguglielmo, Samuel Case No. 2012-CA-000933A, NOS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FORCITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.2012-CA-000933 A
U.S., NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SPECIALTY
UNDERWRITING AND RESIDENTIAL FINANCE TRUST,
MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-AB3
Plaintiffss,
vs.
SAMUEL DIGUGLIELMO, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuantto an Order dated April 23, 2013, and entered in
Case No. 2012-CA-000933 A, of the Circuit Court of the 5TH Judicial Circuit in and for
CITRUS County, Florida, wherein U.S., NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SPECIALTY UNDERWRITING AND RESIDENTIAL
FINANCE TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2006-AB3 is the Plaintiff and SAMUEL J. DIGUGLIELMO; and ALICE JEAN
DIGUGLIELMO; and BANK OF AMERICAN NA and REGIONS are the Defendants, the
clerk shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on www.citrus.realforeclose.com, at
10:00 a.m. on the 23rd day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in
said Order of Final Judgment, to wit:
BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST SIDE OF CITRUS AVENUE AND
THE SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE SHORE DRIVE FORMERLY KNOWN AS LAKE STREET,
RUN THENCE EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH OF LASKE SHORE DRIVE 145 FEET,
THENCE RUN SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE EAST LINE OF CITRUS AVENUE 100
FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE NORTH LINE OF ZEPHYR STREET FORMERLY
KNOWN AS RAILROAD STREET, THENCE WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
ZEPHYR STREET 145 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE EAST SIDE OF CITRUS AVENUE,
THENCE NORTH ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF CITRUS AVENUE TO THE POINT OF THE
BEGINNING, IN SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH RANGE 20 EASTACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 36 PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IF YOU AREA PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE
SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE
ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF
RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS.
DATED this13th day of May, 2013.
By:/s/ Kalei McElroy Blair, Esq./Florida Bar #44613
GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff(s)
2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110, Tampa, Florida 33607
Telephone: (813) 443-5087,Fax: (813) 443-5089
emailservice@gilbertgrouplaw.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle May 14 & 18, 2013
801594.003028st/np


589-0603 TUCRM
Medical Practice Closing
PUBLIC NOTICE
King's Bay Family Care/Dr. Michael B. Mueller
It is with deep regret that I must announce that I am closing my medical practice.
Please know that I have been honored to serve each and every patient and that
you will be missed. If you would like copies of your medical records, or you have any
other concerns, please contact me in writing at: Kings Bay Family Care, po box 2444,
Crystal River, Florida 34423.
Published five (5) times in The Citrus County Chronice, May 7, 14, 21, 28, & June 3,
2013.


592-0521 TUCRN
05/21 Meeting-Affordable Housing Adv. Comm.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the AFFORDABLE HOUSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE will
meet at 5:00 PM on the 21st of May, 2013, at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact Citrus
County Housing Services, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto, FL 34461 (352)
527-7520.
Any person who requires a special accommodation (ADA) must provide us at least
72 hours notice.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute)
Published one (1) time on May 14, 2013.


Nodces to Credito
Administrationi


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


Motices to Creditor
Administration I


Foreclosure Salle/
s
Action Notice I


Foreclosure Sal
Action Notice


Foreclosure Sal]e/
Action Notices


I Misc. No


I Misc.Not


Misc. notice


Metn


Metn


Metn




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4 MORE REASONS...
LjCD^^^^ %Afr^^~H


2009 CADILLAC SRX


19K miles. Stk# 10340031


19,888


2010 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER
23K miles. Stk#13040021
$27,995


2008 NISSAN 350Z
Convertible, 24K miles. Stk#13040214A
$22,888


2010 TOYOTA PRIUS
31K miles. Stk#13030405
S$19,995


www.villagetoyota.com 352-628-5100


ToyotaCare
ll I', I 1.1. .l I I.s ", "
2 year / 25,000 mile
Complimentary Maintenance
Program
wvver, you purch.ase or lease rievw 212 cr 2:1: To\yt.a vehicle
'. d % .,. -,1 ,ld :,,,.I..m!.,- dh ..IH .1.-," 13 ":, :,,,.-,, % ,I H H


C12 TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2013











Congratulations Class of 2013


10. I just don't like the taste of glass.
9. I don't have a license to fly, yet!
8. I can see the road fine from inside
my car.
7. It takes less time to buckle than
text message.
6. Road rash isn't attractive.


--SHERIFF-
1I I REYJ.DAWSY


5. My head won't fit in the CD player.
4. It's not cool to be stone cold dead.
3. My friends won't look good without me.
2. Wrinkled clothes are better than
blood stains!
1. Would a casket be more comfortable?
(From getyourbuckleon.com)


352-726-4488

www.sheriffcitrus.org


G2 Tuesday, May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A reminder from the Citrus County SherifPs Office*






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Setting the stage for your future


Dear 2013 Graduates,
Congratulations for achieving one of
the most important goals of your lifetime.
Your high school graduation reflects a
tremendous accomplish-
ment and sets the stage
for your future life and
career choices.
As you prepare to fur- j
their your education .
and/or pursue your cho-
sen career, please re-
member the contributions
to your success that were
made by your family,
school staff members and
the local community. It is
important to express
gratitude to each of those Sandra "
individuals who chal-
lenged, inspired, empow-
ered and guided you along the way. I
especially encourage you to keep your
family and friends close in your hearts
and minds as you move into the next
stage of your life.
The high moral standards and values
they helped to instill in your life will pro-


San


vide you with personal direction and a
foundation of support in the years ahead.
Congratulations, again, to each of you
on all of your accomplishments. Best
wishes for achieving
your future education
and career goals. What-
ever you choose to pur-
sue, I invite you to return
to your roots and become
a productive member of
this wonderful commu-
nity. (If education is your
career choice, make sure
7 ^ you make an appoint-
ment with me when you
finish your degree!)
May you accomplish
1" Himmel much and have wonder-
ful memories along the
way!





Sandra "Sam"Himmel
Superintendent of Schools


AREA GRADUATIONS
CREST, 2 p.m. EBD, 7 p.m. InD, Thursday, May 16
West Coast Christian School, 2 p.m., Saturday, May 18, Victory Hall
WTI GED, 6 p.m., Monday, May 20
Crystal River High School, 7 p.m., Tuesday, May 21
Citrus High School, 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 22
Lecanto High School, 7 p.m., Thursday, May 23
Inverness Christian Academy, 7 p.m., Thursday, May 23
Seven Rivers Christian School, 7 p.m., Friday, May 24
Dunnellon High School, 7 p.m., Friday, June 7
West Port High School, 6 p.m., Thursday, June 7


Golden Scholars are recognized


Created a couple of years ago as a way
to give special recognition to the many
outstanding students in Citrus County
schools for their special accomplishments,
both academically and personally, the
Golden Citrus Scholarship awards were
presented Thursday, May 2, at a ceremony
at the College of Central Florida Citrus
Campus.
A project of the Citrus County Chamber
of Commerce, the Business Leaders of To-
morrow and the Citrus County ( ........ /l
the selection process includes nominations
from public and private schools and uses a


set of stringent guidelines and objectives
to select the winners.
As this year's winners were announced
family, community leaders, school admin-
istrators, teachers and business representa-
tives applauded each student's impressive
achievements.
As the best of the best were honored, it
was clear from their impressive records
that they were already using those skills
and abilities to enrich their schools and the
community in their roles as leaders.
The winners and nominees are on Pages
23-30.


What's Inside

Citrus High School ............................ 4-15
Crystal River High School ................16-32
Golden Citrus Scholars ....................23-30
Dunnellon High School ....................32-39
Lecanto High School........................39-49
C R ES T ........................................ ......... 49
Inverness Christian Academy...............49
West Coast ChristianSchool.................49
West Port High School ......................... 49
Seven Rivers Christian School .............50
Hom e School ....................................... 50
Early Graduate ... ......................... ....50
Butte High School................................. 50
Withlacoochee Technical Institute ..........51


4'1 i
Photos and names for public and private schoolchildren
were submitted by the individual schools. Photos and
names for homeschooled children, early graduates and
Butte High School in Montana were supplied by their
parents or guardians.


Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429

352-563-6363

Gerry Mulligan
Publisher

Ken Melton
Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs Graphic Artist

Sarah Gatling
Community Editor

Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager


Tuesday, May 14, 2013 G3


GRADUATION










G4 Tuesday May 14, 20t13s High Schoo COass of C2RONICLE


Cody Agen


Bryan Albert


Jena Askew


unaaanrcK
Amburgey


ivMegan ALi1nson


Kayla Axtell


Christopher Baker


Rebekkah Balint


Kelly Barberee


Brianna Barfield


Brianne Barten


Caitlin Beagan Tyler Beagan


Becky Bearden


Dylan Bender


Jacob Bensinger


Justin Best


Dylan Bevilacqua


Brianna Blackmon


Brooke Boling


Dustin Bradburn


Alex Bradshaw


Elizabeth Brannock


Alec Branson Amanda Brewer


Vi


Brandon Brooks


camuna
Brooke-Meer


Robert Briggs Natalie Brissette












Rachel Brown Stephen Bruke


Alexis Bean


/ 7


Darian Boyer


G4 Tuesday, May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Isiah Brown





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


O LINCOLN


NICK NICHOLAS 7 H L&
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River 7957371
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com 795m7371
Sales: Mon-Fri 8:30 AM to 7 PM; Sat 8:30 AM to 5 PM Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM


GENUINE PARTS.
GENUINE SERVICE.
GENUINE PEOPLE.
GENUINE PEACE OF MIND.


Hwy. 44 W.
Inverness
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726-1231
SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5


Tuesday, May 14, 2013 G5


GRADUATION










G6 ~~ ~ itu Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO I ONY(L HOIL


Dorothy Buckley


Heather Campbell


Austin Burns


Savanah Cantwell Anthony Caponigro


Samantha Cairo


Justin Carnevales


Kaitlin Carroll-Cruz


Joseph Cembrola Corey Chandler


Dn1Uer a LIuweII


Brandon Chapel


Darius Chapes


Jake Chason


Corrine Clark


Toni Clemente


Monica Coates


Elizabeth Cochran


Scott Colby


Dylan Coleman


John Collier Kevin Colucci


Ashley Colvin


Lindsay Connors


Sara Dalton Sarah Davis


Wade Cooper


Cayla Corley


Jerry Corne


Autumn Creel


G6 Tuesday, May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Trevor Cypret


Nayomi Dejesus


Aislynn Dean


Amanaa .uan:


mranaon turry


-mery .yr


4






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IirsHg Scho Cls of 201


Garrett Denney Nicholas
Deresinski


Shauna Dumaw Cody Duncan


Michael Dicamillo Alexander
Dickinson


Justin Dunham David Edwards


Melissa D'Oria James Douglas


Thomas Edwards


Marissa Dubois


Nathan Eichron Victoria Ekeli


Congratulations
Graduates
.------------------------------------.
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senior picture or yearbook to receive

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Andrew Denn


Jessica Duke


Tuesday, May 14, 2013 G7


GRADUATION









G8 ~~ ~ itu Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO I ONY(L HOIL


Daniel Elias Colton Ellis


Kaitlin Englund Kyle Everett
Kaitlin Englund Kyle Everett


Ariel Fannon


Michael Farmer


Angela Fasulo


Joseph Feliciano


Meghan Felton Nicholas Ferguson


Nicholas Meghan Flahrety
Fernandez


Morgan Flanagan Christian Fogarty


Terence Garrity


Jackson Goodman


K.


Alicia Greenwood Natalia Guilen


Cody Hall


Chad Hanstein


Harley-Jane Kendyll Hatcher
Harvey


Jessica Hernandez


Christian
Hemenway


Taylor Hoffmann


Dominique Hollis Samantha
Holloway


Bryan Fay


Donad Frazer


Jessica Ford


James Green


Paige Gramer


Dustin Haugh


G8 Tuesday, May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Michael Hetland


Destiny Hedge


Jordan Helms





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CtuHihScho Clas of 20


Dalton Homan


Christine Hughes


Logan Hotaling


Dennis Howard


Dominic Gavin
Humphries Iddings-Wiseman


Austin Hughes


Jill Isenberg


GRADUATION


4

0
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oe's
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Miciaha Ivey


Colby Johnson


Vanessa Jacobson


Danielle Johnson


sranaon Jaques


Daria Jolobova


Joshua
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Kayla Jocelyn


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Tuesday, May 14, 2013 G9
W N1P


Abraham Juste


Tamaiya Jones


Andrew Judd










GIO~~itu Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO Iu ONY(L HOIL


Austin Kelly


Eugene Kelly


Jadouu rmp ip


arski Samantha Kennedy


Korren King James Klitzka


Daniel Knight Robbin Kuzyk


Julie LaFlamme


Dillion LaFond Michael
Lajeunesse


Garret Lake Terance Lampkins


Brianna Lebron


Angela Leclerc


Clara Leopassi


Jessica Liptrap


Nathan Elizabeth Lynch
Lovestrand


Randy Lynn Amanda
Maldonado


Kaylee
Mammarella


Taylor Mampe


Kelby Martin Kristen Martin


Hunter McDaniel


Elissa Kane


Austin Killeen


G10 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


jonn iviarunez


iviarvin vvilliam


Itaelen iviassengil


anawn ivicuilananan


uaniei ivicuonaia


ueorge ivicuonala






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ICtuHihScho Clas of 2013


Roger Mcintire


Tyler Mcinstosh


Aaron Mcintyre Killian McLean


Sarah McNerney Rocky Meadows


Scott Michaud Deanna Mielke


Timothy Milazzo Bridgett Miller


Deycasha Miller


Ocean Moberg


Alexis Moeller Martin Moff


Dennis Monroe Christopher
Mosher


Lindsey Muller Alexandra
Mundreanu


Taylor Nail


Ashley Nichols Ryans Nobles


It's Your moment
Congratulations Class of 2013


Are You Ready To Vote?
CO [i G R-, TU L-,-T 1r [i S C ]assof2013!
.ft ":.u .. l q.:..riq ,;.' n/ i'..,c'.it e ':.." ..L JTri riq t I i 1. M Ari.z
Cr 1"-:.-]l 4C-'] r" .".' nc ." L ..U E" r..,IE n)' I 'l \i "\ "l'".t,
Register & Vote!
Go online at www.votecitrus.com
or call the election office.

EVERY/..'
EVRYc COUNTS


Next Primarn Election Susan Gill
August 12. 2014 Supervisor of Elections
Citrus County
Next General Election
November 4.2014 352-341-6740


I4 SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES
of Lecanto 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
MEMORY(SR44) Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746-LIVE (5483)


Jacob Nolen


Arianna Null


Tuesday May 14, 2013 Gil


GRADUATION









G12~~itu Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO Iu ONY(L HOIL


Dillon Ogle


Onsanger


Rousely Paul Brittnay Payne


Kayla Pearson


Andrew Perkins Caroline
Petelalat


Saige Peyton Karma Pfeiffer


Victoria Pfeiffer


7i


Quang Pham


Kaitlynn Ramsay


Taylor Ramsey


Racheal Reed Steven Reese


Joel Potts


Kyle Presnick


Riley Reid Andrew Rhoads


Joshua Proffer


Roberta Ribecca


.V ...


Joshua Robinson


Mark Pagan


Jordyn Pelno


Louis Perez


Christa Rice


G12 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jacob Rife


Scott Robinson


Xavier Rogers


jasmine Mogers


Auam iogstaa


uynan iogstaa


jonn ioqgstaa





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IirsHg Scho Cls of 201


Meghan Rogstad Colby Romine


Katlynn Rowland


Nicholas Ryan


Ronald Sadler


Fatima Salazar


Maria Sanchez


Jessie Santero Khalil Sara


Greigh Savage


Nicholas Schaffer Sydney Schantz


Stephen Schock


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PARTNERS


L4 F,10 US
Oi Facebuook

In


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I I


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Congratulations

Class of 2013!

Whether you're saving your
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Tyler Schulz


Zachary Scott


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G13


GRADUATION


000ESWH










G14~ ~ ~ ~~itu Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013N Iu OUTF) HOIL


II.


Cory Scroggins Marc Seay


Daniel Shoemake


Jackie Short


Cassie Self


Breanne Sidwell


unristopner
Sessions


Jean-Marie
Siewert


Branaon znatner


Nicole bKelton


Travis Sharrone


Merissa Slank


Lauren zneppara


Ashley Sledge


Kacie Sherouse


James bioan


Steven Smith Steven Smith


Alexsandra Chrissy Snow
Smolko


Austin Sobol Faith Solony


uevomne opencer


Lissette Toledo


Kristina Trujillo


Brianna Smith


Rihana Smith


Nicholas Tate


Larra Taylor


Christian
Thompson


G14 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kyle Tobin


John Travis


tennis niton


ualton Insely


Mason ioles








CITU CitrTs High CSRONICL ClassTIO ofea Ma2102133


Samantha Turner Amber Upchurch


Bradley Robert Verdin
Vanbenschoten


Daniel Vielleux Raymond Vielleux


Amanda Walker


Emily Walker


Meghan Walker


Caitlin Warnock


AI'Lamar White


Nicholas Whitely Lea Whitley


Kailey Whitton


Harley Wilber


Joel Wilbur


Tiffany Wilks


Shelby Williams


Austin Wilson


Jeremy Winder


Antnony wnrgnt


Alyssa Yancey


Kattileen Zeigler


Katherine Zerbo


William Ziegler


Crystal Vieux


Katie Wagner


Class of 2013
SChristina

Aguilera
Congratulations
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Tuesday May 14, 2013 G15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Viitu



[onhlin at','


wwwV~l chrol eonlineco










G16~~Cysa Rivera Mayh 14oo 2013s ofDO 2013s 1ONY(L HOIL


Melissa Avery Zachary Ayala


Dallas Baldner


Brandi Baldwin


Minnah Barajas


Samantha Barbour


Jessica Barnett


Kade Bevington


Nicole Biggs


Kelsie Bogert


NICcKOlas sorra


Anthony Bostic


Candace Bowers


John Thomas
Bowling


Robert Brooker


L.d2uiily DIWII


Adam Burns


Delaney Caleau


Bailey Carpenter


Jeffrey Carte


Brittany Clark


Chance Clark


Travis Coleman


Clarissa Consol


Kohlton
Bendowski


Abigail Brown


Coty Brown


iris Laranalno


Cang Cuesta


G16 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Corey Collins


John Crank


Joshua Crist


Shawn Deem


Megan Creech


ly ueweese





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Crsa -ivrHg Scho Clas of 2013


Andrew Dill Ashley Dillinger David Dipietro Alyssa Doel


Courtney Dorman Morrow Dumas


Kristen Dunlap


Hunter Earnheart Jake Endsley Miranda Englehart


Corey Evans Natalie Ezzell


Madison Farrior


Katelin Flanders


Krystine Foshay


Brandon Frampton


Deandre Franklin


Dewayne Franklin


Briksam Gad


Cody Galloway Alyssa Ganci


Tatelyn Gavigan
Tatelyn Gavigan


Congratulations

'idaer Caldwell


I


On Your Graduation!
We are very proud of you
and your accomplishments.


IJ


Congratulations,

Class of 2013!









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Tuesday May 14, 2013 G17


GRADUATION










GIS~~Cysa Rivera Mayh 14oo 2013s ofDO 2013s 1ONY(L HOIL


Joshua Gebeault


Lee Gensheimer


Emily Gentile


Shelby Gerber Marina Gergis


Jacqueline Gordon Tyler Graber


Jessica Groom


Janice Groom


Anthony Guinan


Robert Gulledge Clifford Guyett


Jonathan Hager


Cassidy Hansarick


Glenn Hartwell


Darien Hauter


Darren Hawes


Weston Hawkins


Shiann Henderson


Manuel Henriquez


Victoria Hiers


Kyle Higgins


Steffany Hileman


Kayla Hitchcock


Trea Holland


Lauren Holmes


Victoria Huntley


Kassandra
Jackson


Clifton Griffith


Johnathan
Gregory


Jermia Holt


G18 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Quillen Howard


John Ibon


Rida Jabbar


Jareth Jackson


Kaley Jacobs


Jamie Jaster










CITU CrystTl River CHROICL School Classa May 1400133


Samantha Jenkins


Alexander Johnson


Sydney Justice


Sydney Kelley


Michael Kidd


Ryan Kidwell


Dakota King


Brent Kirk


Kory Kleinhanzi


Jonathan Kocher


Victoria Kofmehl


Riley Kopp


Chloe Lane


Ashley Kovanda


Emilie Lawson


Josepn La-ieur


Tara Lawson


Whittney Leathead


Sylvia Lockard


Bilial Jenkins


Benjamen
Johnson


Austin Jones


Emily Laga


David Lemon


inevin Lamar


Leena Levins


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G19


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Jose Lopez


Gregory Lynn


Misty Lyons


Rouriney Liyncn


rayla iviarun


Alexis Makin










G20^^^^^^ ^Cytal Tivdr May 14, 2013 of 2013 O (FL) C1RONICLE


John McAteer Justin McCaig


Jared Miller Leisa Miller


Matthew McCoy


Rebecca Miller


Maegan McMichen


Shyanna Miller


Zane McNiece Ashley Meiman


John Mislan Wyatt Moore


Aubrie Menster Meagan Miles


Jamie Mortimer Jessica Moudis


Nikki Moynihan


Naomi Mulligan


Reba Murray


Steven Mussoni


Ann Marie Myers


Orianna Myers


Sebastian Myers


Cornelius Natteal


Krista Neuburger


Nicholas Neuhart


Sharidyn Nevels


Casidy Newcomer


Brittnie Pattison Marissa Penn


Cy Navejar


Cody Neill


Daniel Ogen


G20 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Elani Patides


Michael Olson


Carl Parker


Samantha Osborn


Noel Palmer


Micnael -aplneau









CITU CrystTl River CHROICL School Classa May 1400133


August Petska Matthew
Pisowicz-Atherton


Neil Presswood Jessica Pritchard


Corey Pollard


Jessica Pollard


Jestine Pudlo Katie Purpura


Alexandria Porro


Alycia Porro Austin Porta


Nicholas Ricca Lamechia
Richburgh


Thomas Rigalo


Angelina Posa


Joshua Roberts


Rhiannon Roberts


Emily Rodgers


Alexander Katelyn Rodriguez
Rodriguez


Rachel Roe


Dalton Rogers


f& FA!K_


Desire Rosselli


Arianna Rudge


Jasmine Salman


Kotcha Schillings Kelsey Schroder


Sara Roman


Ian Ross


Shatana Rose


John Ross


Tyrish Ruiz


Keith Runnels


Mia Russo


Patrick Ryan


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G21


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Michael Sentz


Anthony Sampson


Sabrina Scott


Domonique Shafer




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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G22 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1rr
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Tuesday May 14, 2013 G23


GRADUATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- ;HALL ~~ OF FAM U~AWARD


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


ZUHAIR SAMI Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards:
U.S. Presidential Scholar candidate, Commissioner's Academic Challenge (second
place 2011, fifth place 2010), National Merit Finalist, Sunshine State Scholar Nomi-
nee, AP Scholar with Distinction, Florida Bandmasters Association Excellent rating for
Concert Band, First place Citrus County Math Field Day, National Honor Society
Extracurricular Activities:
Academic Team (Varsity Captain, Quran Recitation in Arabic, Minority Report (start-up
band; original and unoriginal music; percussion), Concert Band (first chair oboist), In-
tramural Sports Club (Cricket instructor), Tennis, Spanish Club, National Honor
Society
Community Service:
Peer tutoring 105 hours, Citrus County Library System 45 hours, Hospice of Citrus
County 35 hours, MedShare 15 hours, Relay For Life 10 hours, Page of Hope 5 hours
Future Goals:
After graduating high school, I plan to major in microbiology and cell science at the
University of Florida, before pursuing graduate studies in medicine. I'm currently look-
ing specialize in neuropsychology with a focus on behavioral science and/or neurolin-
guistics. In addition to my career pursuits, I hope to continue hobbies and other
activities I enjoy, such as playing music (oboe, piano, percussion, etc.), bicycling and
tennis. I would also like to continue developing my skills in Spanish and perhaps learn
Arabic or another language.


MARY JANE ONSAGER Citrus High School
Honors/Awards:
Honor Roll, Thespian President's List, Elks Student of the Month, Second Place in the
Medicine and Health Category of the Citrus Regional Science Fair, National Honor Society,
Most Improved in Chorus, Letter in Chorus, Superiors in: Solo and Ensemble Competition
at State and District Level, Outstanding Freshman in Drama, International Thespian Soci-
ety, District 12 Assistant Student Representative,District 12 Student Representative, Excel-
lent and Superior One-Act at the Florida State Thespian Festival, Most Dedicated Drama
Student, International Honor Thespian Status, Letter in Drama
Extracurricular Activities:
Citrus High School Drama Club (stage manager, hair and makeup artist, actress), District
12 Thespians/Florida State Thespians (District 12 Student Representative), Breez', So Di-
vine, National Honor Society, Bible Study at Journey Church, Journey Church Praise Team
Community Service:
Festival Coordinator/BC/EFA Fundraiser for District 12 Thespians 108 hours, Festival
Venue Supervisor/BC/EFA Fundraiser for Florida Sate Thespians 90 hours, Clinician at the
Barbershop Youth in Harmony Workshops 21 hours
Future Goals:
After I graduate from Citrus High School, I will attend the University of Central Florida as a
event management major, a career I chose after being inspired by my work with Florida
State Thespians. After I obtain my Bachelor of Science in event management, I would like
to work in a few different firms and eventually own my own event management Firm.


"Zuhair is one of the most
pleasant young men with
whom I have ever had the
honor and the pleasure to
work. Zuhair shows him-
self- through words and
actions to be a quiet, at-
tentive, cooperative, hard-
working, dedicated and
ever-respectful young
gentleman. It is without
doubt that, upon comple-
tion of his education,
Zuhair will be an excep-
tionally positive force in
both his family and com-
munity."
Brian Sullivan


"Mary Jane is the type of
person who you want 'in
your corner'no matter the
situation; she personifies
the definition of the word
leader.' Mary Jane inspires
other students and me to
become better at what we
do by watching her set the
example. Her ability to inter-
act with adults and students
alike is stimulating; many
students would quake at
the thought of being in
charge of some of the
daunting tasks that Mary
Jane has willingly and en-
thusiastically taken on.
Mary Jane doesn't take any
job lightly."
Kristen Neander


i


G24 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


GOLDEN SPIRIT AWARD






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


Bu* ES BUSI sTCNLG


2013 WINNER

Ashley Nichols
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards:
Varsity Letter Cross Country 2009-2012, Varsity Letter Weightlifting
2010-2013, Varsity Letter Track 2010-2013, Who's Who in FBLA
(Future Business Leaders of America) 2012, Weightlifting Captain
2012-2013, Region 2 State Vice President FBLA 2011-2012
Community Service:
Citrus Memorial Health System 80+ hours, IPS Runners Club 10+
hours, IMS Track and Field 5 hours, CASA/CUB 5 hours, Salvation
Army 8 hours
Future Goals:
Plan to attend Nova South Eastern University in Fort Lauderdale
and pursue a degree in general sonography or athletic training.
After graduation from college I plan on finding a job in the medical
field, but still pursue my passion for photography.
"It has been my pleasure to be Ashley's advisor and teacher over
the last four years. She has provided me with assistance in the co-
ordination of FBLA activities and been an exemplary student. She
has been an asset to the organizations she served."
Thresa Cook


2013 NOMINEES


A'Laura Ledford
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards: Academic
Honor Roll 7+ years
Future Goals: After high
school I plan to attend the
College of Central Florida;
the reason being is that they
have an excellent nursing
program that will help me
achieve my goal of becoming
a registered pediatric nurse.


Zakery Vankampen
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards: Honor Roll
award winner, NHS of the
SARS Good Citizenship
Award, Bright House Net-
works Volunteer Youth Serv-
ice Award, Upward Bound,
Microsoft Industry Certified
Future Goals: I plan to attend
Keiser University in an effort
to achieve a degree in busi-
ness management.


I ENGISH LIEATUR


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER


Chloe Lane
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards:
Advanced Placement Scholar Award 2012, Elks Club Student of the
Month for March 2013, Maintained on un-weighted GPAof 4.0 (4.6
weighted) 2009-2013, Invited to the University Honors Program at
Florida State University 2013, Part of All-County and All-Chronicle
Girls' Cross-Country Team 2012
Community Service:
Tutoring children at CRPS 2009-2011, Volunteered at the Key Train-
ing Center bowling Saturdays 2011-2012, Cleaned and set-up
CRHS morning show set 44 hours, Processed clothing at the
Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch 76 hours, Volunteering through the Na-
tional Honor Society 2012-present
Future Goals:
I have been accepted by both the University of Florida and Florida
State University, but have not decided between the two, and am
uncertain in regard to my major.
"Chloe Lane is the ideal high school student. Dedicated to her educa-
tion, her school, and her community, she bestows her very best on all."
Cheryl Morris


Amanda Pitre
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards: Principal's
Honor Roll, National Honor
Society, Pre-IB Program, IB
Program, AP Scholar award,
Soccer Management award
Future Goals: I have been
admitted to the Florida State
University Honors Program
and will major in exercise sci-
ence on a pre-med track.


Sydney Schantz
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: National
Honor Society, Tri-M Music
Honors Society, Chorus Con-
sistency and Excellency
Award, Stetson Honor Choir,
Swim Team Doug Patton
Coach's Award, AP Scholar,
National Merit Semi-finalist,
Girl Scout Bronze and Silver
Awards


2013 NOMINEES


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G25


GRADUATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


Mary Jane
Onsager
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: Honor
Roll, Thespian Presi-
dent's List, Elks Student
of the Month, Letter in
Chorus, Most Dedicated
Drama Student
Future Goals: I will at-
tend the University of
Central Florida as an
event management
major, a career.


I FIN & PEFRMN ARTS


2013 WINNER

Brian Imparato
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards:
Crystal River Middle School Bearcat Award 2006-
2009, LHS Student of the Month, County Fair Rib-
bons 4 Blue 2008, 2 Blue and 1 Top of Division
2009, 1 Best of Show 2010, 1 Best of Show and 1
Blue 2012, 1 Top of Division, 1 Blue and 1 Red 2013
Community Service:
Volunteer at the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
Future Goals:
I will likely be attending the College of Central
Florida to get my AA degree, and then I hope to at-
tend the Savannah College of Art & Design. I plan to
work toward a major in animation.
"Brian loves learning and enthusiastically embraces
research and experimentation. He is continuously
upbeat and because he is so inquisitive, his eager-
ness for discovery makes teaching fun and exciting."
Connie Phillips


Zane McNiece
Crystal River
High School
Honors/Awards: Supe-
rior, Florida Vocal Associ-
ation Solo/Ensemble
Future Goals: I plan on
attending the College of
Central Florida (or
Catawba College in North
Carolina) for two years
and then transfer to a
university.


Jared Bogart
Seven Rivers
High School
Honors/Awards: A-B
Honor Roll, Swordsman
Award, Christian Char-
acter Award, Academic
Excellence Award
Future Goals: I plan to
attend a university in
Florida and major in
dance, with a
possible minor in
communications.


I ATH ENIERN COPTR*CEC


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER
Nicholas Fernandez
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards:
Valedictorian, National Merit Commendation, Certified Mechanical
Drafter, Rotary Student of the Month, Elected Mr. CHS by staff, Boys
State Delegate, AP Scholar with Distinction
Community Service:
Citizens Academy 21 hours, Jacksonville Mission Trip 8 hours,
Cornerstone Baptist Youth Group 15 hours, Relay For Life 9 hours,
Citrus Freshman Orientation/Rush Camp 32 hours
Future Goals:
I will be attending Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the fall of
2013, and I hope to earn a degree in mechanical and/or biomedical
engineering. I hope to find and create practical applications for future
technologies in the field of engineering. While aspiring to become an
engineer, I also find medicine fascinating; a medical education may
be in my future. In addition to attending MIT for academics, I will play
division three football.
"Nick is determined, self-reliant and calm under pressure. If he does
not achieve at the level he desires, he will work harder until he meets
the goal he has set for himself."
Mary Kalbaugh


Harrison King
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards: Sunshine
State Scholar, AP Scholar
with Honor, Environ First
Place County, Elks Student of
the Month, LHS English, Biol-
ogy and History Award
Future Goals: I plan to go to
either the University of
Florida, University of Miami
or Harvard University.


Clarissa Consol
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards: AP Scholar
with Honors, NHS Scholar,
West Citrus Elks Student of
the Month, All-Chronicle Girls'
Cross-Country Team
Future Goals: I will be run-
ning cross-country for Stetson
University and pursuing my
undergraduate work majoring
in mathematics. Then attend
Stetson Law School.


2013 NOMINEES


2013 NOMINEES


A n___________


G26 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER
Lily Parrish
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards:
National Honor Society 2011-2013, Girls State Dele-
gate 2012, Duke Talent Identification Program 2012,
All-County softball team 2011, Principal's Honor Roll
2009-2013, Principal's Award 2010-2012
Community Service:
Relay For Life Fundraiser 40 hours, IB tutor 50 hours,
Volunteer Coach LHS volleyball camp 20 hours,
Color for CASA 15 hours, Member of MedShare club
Future Goals:
I will further my education in the honors program at a
post-secondary institution. I have not decided which
college or university I will attend in the fall, I hope to
attain a bachelor's degree in biochemistry.
"As a teacher, I have seen many students over my
career that have excelled in and out of the classroom
but I would consider Lily to be far above them in set-
ting expectations, reaching goals and working ex-
tremely hard for her future."
David Soluri


Edmund
Brooke-Meer
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: AP
Scholar with Distinction,
Qualified for Regional
Science Fair, TookAP
Biology, AP Chemistry
and AP Calculus AB
senior year, taken 12 AP
exams by graduation
Future Goals: UCF
chemistry-biochemistry
track.


Leisa Miller
Crystal River
High School
Honors/Awards: Straight
superiors at the Florida Fed-
eration of Music Festival,
Elks Student of the Month,
AP Scholar with Honor
Future Goals: I plan to at-
tend the University of
Florida and double major in
computer engineering and
violin performance.


Thomas Beno
Academy of
Environmental Science
Honors/Awards: Intel
Science and Engineering
Fair, Recognition Award
State Science Fair, State
Qualifier Merit and Navy
Award, Academy Scholar,
National Honor Society
Future Goals: University
of Florida School of
Engineering (medical /
robotics).

IIIIIIIIIr -7


SOCAL SUIE


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER


Michael Teti
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards:
National Honor Society, Honor Roll, Talented Twenty, Quill and
Scroll Honor Society, English Award (AP English Language and
Composition), Bright Futures Scholarship, AP Scholar
Community Service:
Link Crew Student Leadership/Mentor Program for Underclassman,
Link Crew, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Lecanto Life Care Center,
National Honor Society Tutoring
Future Goals:
I plan on attending Sante Fe College for two years to earn an Asso-
ciate of Arts degree in pharmacy then transfer to the University of
Florida to attend pharmacy school while have a job off campus as a
pharmacy technician.
"In addition to Michael's exceptional academic record, it is Michael's
character that separates him from the crowd. I have personally wit-
nessed Michael go out of his way to be especially kind or helpful to
his fellow students. He has a quiet empathy and compassion for oth-
ers that is unique to his age group."
Michelle Ducios


Rebekkah Balint
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: Honor Roll
2009-2013, Letter for Varsity
Swim Team and Drama
Future Goals: I plan to at-
tend Flagler College to major
in fine arts, and dual minor in
honorable entrepreneurship
and creative writing. Also join
the Peace Corps for a two-
year tour.


Jake Endsley
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards: National
Honor Society, Calculus Club,
Chemistry Club
Future Goals: I have been
accepted at the University of
Central Florida in the Summer
B term. I plan to major in
chemical engineering. I also
have interests in electrical and
mechanical engineering.


2013 NOMINEES


2013 NOMINEES


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G27


GRADUATION


SCIENCE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


Edgar Filipinas
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards: Honor
Roll, Principal's Honor
Roll, National Honor So-
ciety, Quill & Scroll Na-
tional Honor Society,
Panther Pride Award
Future Goals: I have
been accepted to
Stanford, Berkeley,
UCLA, UP and others to
pursue a degree in
biomedical sciences


I EWMEI JORALS


2013 WINNER

Madison Farrior
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards:
Elk's Student of the Month 2012, National Honor
Society 2012-2013, Quill & Scroll National Honor
Society 2012-2013, Prom Queen, Yearbook
Editor-in-Chief
Community Service:
Camp Rah Rah 100 hours, Vacation Bible School
summer camp 80 hours, Various activities with GTL
Youth Group 20 hours, Various activities with NHS
30 hours, CRHS Recycling Program 10 hours
Future Goals:
Attend the University of Florida to pursue a career in
the medical field, criminal justice/criminal
psychology or English/journalism.

"I have never seen a staff member who picked up
how to design pages and write journalistically as
quickly as Madison did."
Cynthia Livesay


Kaitlynn Ramsay
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: Varsity
Letters in Girls Weightlifting
2010-2013 and Swimming
2011-2012, National Honor
Society 2011-2013
Future Goals: I plan to
attend the University of
North Florida and work at
the UNF Aquatics Facility as
a lifeguard and water safety
Instructor.


Liam Cash
Seven Rivers
Christian School
Honors/Awards:
Swordsman Award,
Warrior Award, National
Honor Society, Christian
Character
Future Goals: I plan to
attend Florida State Uni-
versity to major in film
production. I will apply to
the FSU Film School for
my sophomore year.


I WOL LANGAGE


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER

Michael Hetland
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards:
Varsity Soccer Letter Award 2009-2013, Varsity Tennis Letter Award
2010-2013, National Honor Society Member
Community Service:
Youth Sock Drive Volunteer, Tornado Cleanup Volunteer, First
United Methodist Church Fall Harvest Volunteer 2009-2010; Citrus
County School Board Volunteer, FUMC Fall Harvest Volunteer
2010-2011; Salvation Army Volunteer, Relay For Life Volunteer, Her-
nando Family Resource Center Volunteer 2011-2012; Salvation
Army, Relay For Life, Hernando Family Resource Center 2012-2013
Future Goals:
I plan to attend the University of West Florida on an Air Force
ROTC scholarship. I would like to pursue a pilot career in the
United States Air Force or become a rescue combat officer.
"There is a quiet, soft-spoken, humble manner about him, but yet it is
easy to see that the other students like, respect and admire him. He
knows how to work hard and also delegate with authority and compe-
tence. He is a true leader."
Lidia Thompson


Zuhair Sami
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards: U.S.
Presidential Scholar candidate,
Commissioner's Academic
Challenge, National Merit
Finalist, AP Scholar with
Distinction
Future Goals: Major in micro-
biology and cell science at the
University of Florida before
graduate studies in medicine.


Hannah Cox
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards: National
Honor Society, FFA President,
FFA Highest GPAAward, First
Place Score and First Female
on the Ag. Mechanics Team,
Star Greenhand Award
Future Goals: I plan to attend
CF or Santa Fe to receive my
associate's in agriculture, then
UF to receive my bachelor's in
animal science.


2013 NOMINEES


2013 NOMINEES


A n___________


G28 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VOCATIONAL CAEREIAL


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER


Mollie Griffith
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards:
National Honor Society 2011-2013, A/B Honor Roll 2009-2013,
Principal's Social Studies Award 2010, Principal's English Award
2010, Principal's Culinary Arts Award 2011
Community Service:
St. Scholastica Church 500 hours, Lakewood Retreat 200 hours,
SALSA Camp (Art Camp) 39 hours, Lion's Club 4 hours, Salvation
Army 4 hours, American Irish Club 12 hours
Future Goals:
I plan on working in the food industry after earning my bachelor's
degree in culinary arts. I have not decided which area of the indus-
try I want to begin my career with, but I am interested in working in
a hotel or a restaurant with a catering business on the side.

"It has been more than a pleasure having this student in my program.
She is a Gold Seal program complete for the vocational scholarship
that is through the State of Florida. I will miss her very much and wish
any school she applies for the best because she is the best!"
Suzanne S. Sheffield


Joshua
Juergensmeyer
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: U.S. Army
Excellence Award, 82nd Air-
borne Award, Daedalian
Award, Top Performer Award
Future Goals: I will be at-
tending the University of
Central Florida to pursue de-
grees in electrical engineer-
ing and music.


Taylor Wade
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards: Dance
Scholarships, Dynamite base,
Life saver back spot, Cheer-
leading Captain
Future Goals: I plan to at-
tend college and earn a bach-
elor's degree in either early
childhood education or ele-
mentary education. I would
also like to include dance and
biblical background.


I LEAERSHP & SRVIC


SCHOLAR
2013 AWARD


2013 WINNER

Zachary Brostrom
Lecanto High School
Honors/Awards:
National Honor Society 2011-2013, Honor Roll 2009-2013, Princi-
pal's Award in Chemistry I Honors 2010-2011, Principal's Award in
AJROTC 2011-2012, Varsity Academic letter 2009-2010, Nomi-
nated for the National Young Leaders Conference 2010-2011, Aca-
demic Achievement Medal 2011-2012
Community Service:
Various JROTC events and functions 2009-2013, Volunteer work
for the Chamber of Commerce 15 hours
Future Goals:
After high school, I will leave for the Army as a medic. I plan to work
on earning my associate degree so I can attend Officer Candidate
School (OCS). From there, I plan to attend medical school to be-
come a full-fledged physician.
"Zachary Brostrom is an unselfish young man who puts the welfare of
our younger cadets and the welfare of our program above his per-
sonal desires and aspirations. He teaches and leads by example in
his demeanor, conduct, and work ethic."
David K. Brown


Meghan Flaherty
Citrus High School
Honors/Awards: Honor Roll,
S4TL Delegate, Girls State
Alternate, Rotary Student of
the Month, President's Volun-
teer Service Award, CHS Hall
of Fame, All-Star Soccer
Future Goals: I plan to at-
tend a four-year university to
receive a bachelor's degree
in elementary education.


Emilie Lawson
Crystal River High School
Honors/Awards: Cross
Country Team Spirit Award,
Certified Nursing Assistant,
State Qualifier HOSA
Future Goals: I plan to be-
come a pediatric or neonatal
nurse practitioner in the
United States Military. I de-
sire to receive my master's in
nursing.


2013 NOMINEES


2013 NOMINEES


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G29


GRADUATION




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCITRUS- COUNTY
CHkRONicLE
www.chronicleonline.com

Congratulations

Citrus County Graduates!
Stay Connected while at college on facebook and twitter.

While you are away at school you don't have to be disconnected from
your community. Like us on facebook and follow us on twitter.
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Get breaking news updates. See and comment on pictures from
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Socialize, Laugh and Have Fun!


G30 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Crsa -ivrHg Scho Clas of 201 1


Nikisha Shaffer


Katelynn Shopland Kylie Sisk


Jessica Slack


Andrew Small


MN


ine


Hadley Skidmore


m


Jacob Smith


Emily Spencer


Travis Swanson


Amber Szymanski Carl Taylor


Darrin Taylor


Matthew laylor lyler lerrell


Kyle Smith


Aaron Snell


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G31


GRADUATION


Zachary Theile








G32^^^^Cytal River May 14o 2013 of 2013 O (FL) C1RONICLE


Matthew Thomas


Kevin Veltman


Kira White


Valerie Thoroyan


Taylor Wade


Brooke Tilton


Matthew Turek


Robert Walters Jamie Waters


Bryana Winters


traay vvorKman


Omam Valdivia


Giovanna
Valladares


Christina Vancise


Zakery Vankampen


Dunlo High Scho Clas of 201 1


Samantha Alarcon

P *1.


Jessica Baker


uanny Alejanaro


Jade Allen


Jana Alley


Steven Anderson


-iias Anaraae


Tyler Armstead


Meranda Bettis


Storm Bazarsky Giovanni Bencini Joseph Berardi


Congratulations


to the Class of




2013



May all your

dreams come true!


Jamie Yox


Hari Acosta


G32 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Victoria Atkinson


Amanda Barber


Blaise Bergeron










I -unlo Hig Scho Clas of 2013


*1*- -~


Danielle Blake Jordon Boley


Jessie Brown


Ariel Buchko


Austin Burke


Jackson Cannon


Megan Caranci


Anna Carmona


Brandon Carmona


Nicholas Carothers


Victoria Carter


Bryan Castaneda


Abigail Chester


Joseph Chi Abigail
Chicas-Aguilar


Victor
Chicas-Aguilar


uurtis UnocK


Micnaei L;nung


Kerri Ciaramella


Ellaina Crooks


Dylan Buzbee


Jesse Bye


Jared Byrd


Jess Carter


Chest-Moore


Melissa Clark


violet uoion


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G33


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Cody Crosby


Marissa Daly


Austin Cooke


James Cruz








G34~~unelo Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO I ONY(L HOIL


p 1
U
U


Danielle Darling


Angela Degennaro


Irma Echevarria


Ashley Edmonds


Jonathan Evans


John Feliciano


Kyle Fennell


Joseph Fernandez


Tatiara Fernandez


Stephen Fontanez


Christopher
Fortune


John Franquiz


Andrea Gallant


'I~-7
Ak


tric uoicocnea


Staci Golding Alexander
Gonzalez


Geresha Gordan


Lauren Hamilton


r~1


Zoe Ferrall


Tania
Garcia Millan


Jade Gardner


Celina
Garcia Millan


Jeremy Gatch


Eric Glynn


G34 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Belen Gutierrez


Cody Hankins


Jaycee Gunter


Codi Hart


I vEr |~L'J,











I -unlo Hig Scho Clas of 2013


Kyla Hernandez


snaKera HiIDert


Vinny Hillman


Lawrence
Hines-Cornell


iKevin Mitt


Stanley Hodge Jonathon Hogan


Jeremiah Honan


Gavin Honeysette


Tyrell Horn


Rachel Horne


Harley Hoste


Danielle Hurley


Jacilyn Indellicati


Andre Jackson Christopher
Jackson


Tanika Jackson Catherine Jager


Latricia Janichi Randi Jarrell


Marcus Jennings


Shawna Jeroski


Caitlin Jungwirth


unrlstopner
Kessener


Justin Kiger


jenry
Knibbs-Mitchell


Courtney Kusmerz


Joseph Lobsiger


uereK HMolt


Cody Ingalls


iee joiner


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G35


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Jaime Lopez


Tia Love


Jordon Loyola


Leslie Maddox


Zachary Main


Shatara Marrero


Kichard Litterine









G36~ ~ ~ ~ Dnelo Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013N Iu OUTF) HOIL


Casundra Martin


Zachary Matthews


'Tv^~


Jonathan Melendez


John Mendez


Christopher Miller


Dustin Molina


Ryan Molloy Daisy Morris


Heather Mumm


D'Andre Munford


Jonathan Nedrick


Alex ronnemacner


i 7P


Amanda Oram


Devon Orona


Zahyrimar
Otero Diaz


Larlos otero


Kayla Owens


Jonathan Padilla


uaniel Pastore


Danielle Prinz


Johnathan
Melendez


umar Nrovoa


Hali Oberbeck


Lianna O'Bry


James uimo


iviarK upaiz


G36 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dakota Pryor


Nikolai Pierro


Hannah Pomeroy


Brent Proto


Max Pudlo


Marykay Quick


7n .m-_2-

7, J .,


Danielle Piercy










I -unlo Hig Scho Clas of 2013


WA ~E


Juan Quinones Rajendra Ram


Kristoff Rampersad


Micheal Record


Denver Reich


Natalie Reid


Chase Reilly


Traci Rice


Kerry Ritzie Carmen Rivera


Christopher Rivera Julian Rivera


Michael Roberson David Roberto


Kelli Robinson Bridgette
Rodriguez


Danny Rodriguez


-B 7 JA


Nicholas
Rodriguez


Austin Roosen


Robert Rupprecht


Jf
/ k 4


Rayven Russell


Gabriel Saathoff Megan Sain


David Saint Louis Mirland
Sain Louis


Sara Mia
Sanchez Perez


Ashley Segarra Roberto Segarra Morgan Shalna


Jose Sanchez


Joseph Satiro


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G37


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Lakiya Scott


Kayla Sears


Mark Shoults Ngqabutho Sigogo


Annie Scharet











G38 Tue^^day May 1fn4l 201 GRADATT High Shool (lL) CoRONICLE


Jeremy Sizemore


Meagin Smeriglio


Christopher Smith


Quenton Smith


Tiana Smith


U-.--,


'yr


A


James Sponagle Tyler Sponagle


Roland Stamm


Alexander Stetz


Robert Stoots


Shawn Sullivan


J'von Swoll


Devin Taylor


Geempsy Telfort


Edward Terrero


Kelsie Tomaine


Germarie
Torres Leon


Chandra Torres


Courtney Trapp Dominique Triplett


Chad Turner


Emmily Valeo Christine Valme Jovon Vargas Trent Vaughn


Glory Vazquez Jazmine Velez


Marquinsia
Walker


Tiara Thomas


Michaela
Thompson


victor iraao


Jonn iorres


Jose Torres


G38 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Priscilla Velez


Dana Washington


Teresa Vereen


Connor Wentz Stevie White







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Duni -slo

H igh Schoo

ClaSsf 2013


I LeatoHg Scho Clas of 2013


Jonn fauams


Matthew Alt


1roor-riose
Alyounes


Rebecca Wilkerson


Barret Willingham


Mary Amstead Valerie Anderson


Vanessa Steven Andrade
Anderson


Avery Arduser


Elizabeth Worner


Kalhemir Tyler Arthur
Arroyo-Rodriguez


Amber Atkinson


Nicolaus Avera


Savannah Bagwell


Aimee Wright


ciizaetn vvrignt


Shayla Wright Erica Wygant


Holly Baker


Angelina Banks


Larissa Barnes


Kayla Baroni Elizabeth Barreto


Sarah Young Theresa Barreto


Lauryn Beatty


Jamie Yaklin


Marissa Aretz


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G39


GRADUATION


inevin IeCK


IVilsty necKTora


OKyler mennett











G40~~Lcat Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO I ONY(L HOIL


Dalton Bertine


Trenton Bilby


uraaley Hoatrignt


Austin soleware


imymani nOStICK


iralilln Dreeaen


llzaDetn
Britt-Busler


Zachary Brostrom


ivienissa urown


Amy Burnett


Richard Carlton


Emily Burns Matt Burns


irrisen I.arney


riyan uarollo


Allen Chan


I nomas ueno


Chloe Benoist


Karli Bonilla


Tara Bucko


josepn uaiy


Kelly Busbee


/-JiV y DUbII


cric ,asn


G40 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rialey uaron


Lindsey Cleveland


Jordan Castillo


lleah Clements


Patrick Colletti


Amy unen


Nathan Ghesmore


candice nChristian










CITU COUNTYo High CSRONICL ClassTO ofea Ma2102133


Marissa Colson


Joshua Cook


Drew Cooke


Katelyn Corbin


Terrence Council Joseph Couture


Nichole Cramer


Elizabeth Crowe


Tyler Cumbie


Jessica Curl


Daniella Darling


Chanele Davis


Christopher Davis


Morgan Dawson


Joseph
DeAndrade


ioaey
Desaulniers


uomlnlK uetzei


Jessica uiDella


Casey
DiGiantomasso


snea uotson


Austin
Drake-Gregory


2'h


Patrick Dumon


Dale Eastmond


Justin Dunham


Stefanie Englerth Brittany Eno Jordan Farmer


Connor Dupler


Edgar Philip Michael Fillman Caitlin Foley
Filipinas


Eileen Colon


Genie Cross


William Davis


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G41


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Edwin Elliott










G42~~Lcat Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013AIO I ONY(L HOIL


Marissa Folsom


Adrian Fonseca


Reis Foster


Joshua Franklin Trisha Frase


Eric Fruge Yetzy Gallardo


Amber Gamble


Samantha Garcia


Miranda Geller


Sem Gerestant Desiree Gerlach


Tyler Gillespie Aaron Gonzalez


Angelica Gonzalez


Jose Gonzalez


Weyman Gordon


Rebecca Harrison


Duncan Hart


Katelyn Hatcher


James Heinzman


Matthew Henry


Amanda Houghton Abigail Howard


Star Ganzalez


F4eAL


Tyler Hand


David Hardin


John Hill


G42 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Levi Hitson Kyle Hobbs


Dakota Holt Andrew Hooper


Ashley Hoffman


Sierra Hogan










CITU COUNTYo High CSRONICL ClassTO ofea Ma2102133


Katelyn Howard William Howard


Hannah
Huntington


Madison Jemison Grace Jordan


Brian Imparato Francisco Ippolito


Kyle Justice Lloyd Justo


Alexander Taylor Isaacson
Irizarry-Ortiz


Kristen Kearney Emily Kelley


Samantha
Kempton


Christian Kraay


Kelena Klippel


Gwendolyn Lim


Joshua Linn


Callie Long Glen Long


Rossangel Jonathon
Lopez Loughridge


Samantha Luciana Alexis Lueck


Steven James


Harrison King


Brianna
Kirkpatrick


ittmani Lamb


Alexis Larson


Melissa Lane


Jeremiah Lee


Dustin
Lemanowicz


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G43


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


Jessica Lundy


Michael Makros


I^^ N Vw


Mary Lumapas










G44 ~ ~ ~ ~ Lcat Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013N Iu OUTF) HOIL


Irunrer ivianmreao


Darrell
Marsh-Thornton


Brigette Martinez


ruly iviarinez


uaniei iviauiain


Cory McCoy Kevin McDonald


Wade McDonald


Angela McHugh


Luke McKinney


Hallie McManama


Bryce McWhorter Jordan Mejia


Kimberly Menietti Thomas Michael


Matthew Michelet


Alena Miller


Anthony Miller


Kendall Moore


Wineshka Morales Ryan Morrill


Dakota Mosher


Thi Nguyen Carter Nichols Moses Nunez Jr.


Tori Mayes


Cody McCary


Jared McClain


David McNall


Alaina Moody


Justin Miniter


David Murphy


Austin Myers


G44 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Courtney O'Brien


Justin Nash Tyler Neihoff


John Obday







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I Leat Hig Scho Clas of 2013


Kayla Palmer Lily


Grace Payne Michael Pearson


Shane Pellegrine


Marissa Peragine


Jonathan Perry


Jessica Poppen


Malik Pottinger


Jessica Poulin


Nicole Priselac


George Puopolo


Brittany Putney


Matthew Quigley


Keenan Ring


diaey


Courtney
Patterson


Justice Peters


Korey Polk


L y Pous
Lainey Poulis


James Prem


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G45


GRADUATION


anivani raiei


Kelli Richards


Joshua Riemer










G46 ~ ~ ~ ~ Lcat Highda Mayoo 14as 201 2013N Iu OUTF) HOIL


Daniel Roberts


I infllida roUerFL


Trevor Roberts


mronala KOCK


riatelyn rouericK


Joshua Roman


Shawn Rosselet


Ashley Saunders


Yasmin
Saunders-Salazar


Geoffrey Ruiz Tyler Rumpf
Geoffrey Ruiz Tyler Rumpf


Roger Schmiedel


Hope
Schortemeyer


Allison Ryan Sean Ryan


Katelyn Schulze


Brian Sciorra


Courtney Rymer


Hayley Seawell


Alexander Sharp


Robert Sheffield


Jaclyn-Marie
Shier


Lory Shires


Guy Shoemaker


Joseph Spell Scott Stearns


Justin Seffern


Peter
Sencenbaugh


Cameron
Shackelford


G46 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lauren Siller


George Steele


Mercedes Smith







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-eat High Scho Clas of 2013









Law,- -.-I


Daniel Stevenson


Tiffany Swain


Parker Stillions Megan Straight Chad Strickland Michael Summa













Joshua Swander Victoria Tad-v Dakota Talbot Michael Tanascu


iristina Summers Katelyn Sunday


Matthew Tanner


Michael Teti


Brianna Thue


Cortney Toomey


Jacob Tourbin


Tawnie Tricomi


Stephanie Tucker


Elliot Valente Tiffany Valenti


Paola Vega


Colton Viccaro


Au'Sharaj Vickers


Jazmine Vickers


Brooke Videon April Ann Viloria


Anthony Watson


Ashley Tiseth


Maria Valdivia


Benjamin
Washington


Sheneula
Washington


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G47


GRADUATION


Charles Wayne


Matthew Webb


Savannah Weller





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORKFORCE CONNECTION


WORKFORCE

CITRUS LEVY MARION


No Charge for Services! Contact or Visit Us to Get Started:


ONE-STOP CAREER CENTER
352-637-2223 or 800-434-JOBS (5627)
1103 E. Inverness Blvd., Inverness
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com


PATRIOT JOB CONNECTION
352-840-5762 or 800-434-JOBS, ext. 1683
College of Central Florida Lecanto and Ocala campuses
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com


Member o E Fr D nD D D Du oDtD eD a upon request, l p n D b -D D I eq vi
Flrd Relay Sevc at 711 Fo aco mdtos call 80-3-67 ext. 787 or Lemi co mcainLwrfreoncinlcn ct les the busnes day in -* I 9 U n -


G48 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


I)EPOM


-41


411ioo""









CITU COUNTYo High CSRONICL ClassTO ofea Ma2102133


Christian Wesch Rita West


Summer West


Destanie Widener


Katharine Widener


Andrew Wilkinson


Casey Williams


Nicholaus Worster Shawntavia Wright


Michael Wyka


Brittany Young


Darrel Zickuhr


Gabrielle Zuniga


Edward Zwolski


I~ CRS Cls f21


JUbtpJI IVIdLLIIuw o,uuy IniliuLiiy
Feldman Gordon


David-John
Randel Hale


Antonio Jamarcus Kirsten Ann Khristopher
Hosley LaVoy Thomas Lovar


jubsiud LIUyu
Hill


Michael Johns


Dylan Paul
Patton


Alyssa Michelle
Schnarrs


Jonathan
Michael Ricci


Michael Andrew
Stephens


Jason Witfoth


Nikole Wilson


Invernss ChrstianAcdm

Cls of 201


Chris Mousel


Lacey Watson


Matthew
Sirochmana


Christina
Aguilera


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G49


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION


eK st Coast

Christian

[ SchIool[]

Class of 2013M


West Port

High School

Class of 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


See Rier Chita Scoo Cls of 201 1


Hom Schoo


Jared Andrew McKenna Lynn
Bogart Britton


Jasmine Alexus Allison Autumn
Fisher Green


Liam Patrick Eliane Heri
Cash Choung


John Hayden
Harvey Hobbs


Emily Rose
Huegel


Taylor Louise Kaitlen Marlie
Desmond Fenton


John David Joshua Scott
Iwaniec Jackson


SI Hannah Jo
Dixon










Jordan
Taliercio


CirsHg Schoo


Milena Ruby
Kacer


Sofia Micaela Melissa Elaine
Leon Manning


Christopher Mark Laurence James
Powell Powell


Kimberly Nicole Montana DeLade
Strong Wallace


Tiana Elizabeth Lance Jack
Miele Mosher


Ryan Dwight Blair Rachel
Primer Salter


Emily Joyce
Whitchurch


Jacob Patrick
Norman


Daniette Sharee Cindy Lou
St. Martin Steve


Andrea Lauren
Zachar


Aubrey
E l z b t h
Mitcheltree



But Hig Schoo

FomrCytlRvrHg Scho

Cls of 201


SHeather
Marie
Blauer


G50 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


Rebecca Kay
Wright









CI usCUT W itaL)he CHRONICLE InstiuA teO Tueda Mayute 14, 201G5


Philip Abrams
Christopher Argerenon
Codie Arnold
Kevin Atkinson
Wesley Bainter
Lane Barber
Jemini Barnes
Matracia Barrow
Israel Beard
Christopher Beckett
Kim Bernard
Brittney Blair
Kyle Blomquist
Bethany Born
Penny Bouchard
Justin Bowman
Brian Brannon
Jesica Brihn
Augustina Brockman
Angela Brown
Jonathan Brundon
Benjamin Brzoska
Robert Campbell
Courtney Clark
Justin Codraro
Elizabeth Cole
Shay Colon
Cassyann Cornaz


Dovina Counsil
Julie Croisetu
Kimberly Dandridge
James Darmiento
Amber Dehn
Justin Demarco
Jessica Direnno
Nicholas Dloughy
Jacob Dodge
Carly Ellis
Veronica Ender
Robert Eppig
Angel Evans
Charles Ewing
Adam Ezzel-Din
Lauren Farnham
Jessica Felsentreger
Tabatha Fitzgerald-Walker
Elaini Freeman
Catherine Frie
Taylor Frisbie
Seth Fullington
Lucas Garrett
Emily Gentile
Callie Gerhardt
Janet Gilchrist-Nichols
Sara Gingerich
Melissa Gorman


Matthew Graziano
James Grizzle
Jenna Hackett
Tommy Hall
Kristina Hatfield
Katherine Hathaway-Miller
Alicia Hayes
Thomas Hayes
Desiree Helmick
Eric Hickey
Marianna Hiers
Justin Hilton
Ashley Hinson
Jeremiah Hollon
Brittlee Howerton
Eric Hughey
Daniel Hunter
Sade Jenkins
Jeffrey Johnson
Berta Juarez
Kaitlyn Kane
Tyler Keenan
Dustin Kelley
Kip Kellogg
Erica Khong
Casey Kinser
Cassandra Kippenberger
Jordan Koehler


Christopher Korman
Marah Kosto
Cynthia Kunesky
Sabrina Lambert
Melissa Lancaster
Ashley Land
John Lane
Melissa Lanier
Sandra Laverty
Angelique Lebron
Jason Levine
Shyenne Lewis
Katie Long
Blake Mahatcek
Sean Mann
James Marino
Michael McClure
Brittany McCool
Melanie McDonald
Nathan McKee
Jessica Mobley
Christopher Moody
Luz Moreno
Jessica Morris
Jessica Moudis
John Mulroomey
Kevin Murphy
Justin Murray


Allyssa Myers
Allyson Nash
Deanna Niemeyer
Virginia Nugent
Kaitlin O'Connell
Autumn O'Niel
Amanda O'Toole
Joshua Ouellette
Tobie Parham
Brandi Parkhurst
Jessika Patrick
Diana Patterson
Ben Patty
Brittany Powlowski
Dustin Payne-Cupeto
Tam Pham
Thomas Phillips
Michael Picone
Ashley Pierce
Franklin Pilgrim
Janelle Pineo
Kelly Pinnell
Amber Rebaudo
Aaron Renney
Kimberly Richards
Corina Rimiller
Felina Rimiller
Haley Rimiller


Aurelio Rivera
Margaret Roach
Chayanne Rodriguez
Samantha Roesch
Anna Rogers
Casandra Rouse
Breanne Rubright
Preston Sapp
Tonna Scouten
Krystal Sharp
Matthew Sherwood
Trevor Shine
Cody Shriver
Amanda Smith
Brian Smith
Charles Smith
Kayla Smithers
Adam Soboleski
Taylor Stafford
Danielle Steele
Nicole Steele
Christiana Stevens
Rhianna Stevens
Jennifer Strong
Donald Sunseri
Alyssa Thomas
Jessica Thomas
Kelly Thomas


Toby Thompson
Jennifer Thunell
Grace Tolbert
Meredith Tomey
Ashley Toto
Paul Trippett
Victoria Turner
Michael Wagner
Travis Washburn
Jessica Welcher
Jameel Wells
Kasandra White
Ashleigh Whitlock
Ashley Williams
Brittany Williams
Linda Williams
Barry Wiseman
Samantha Wohlfahrt
Michael Wolff Rash
Sarah Wolford
Richard Wright
Travis Wright
Sabrina Yates
Jessica Young
Stephen Young
Angela Zacharias


WHEN





YOU



NEED



CITRL '


Now Go Out

0o Dnili


Tuesday May 14, 2013 G51


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRADUATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA


-an equal opportunity college- Apply

. ..S... .. Ji


Apply by Monday, Aug. 5, for fall 2013 classes.
Bachelor's Degrees
Associate Degrees
College Credit Certificates
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Programs


online at www.CF.edu.


- -


College of Central Florida offers equal access and opportunity in employment, admissions and educational activities. The college will not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, marital status, national origin, genetic information or disability status in its employment practices or in the
admission and treatment of students. Recognizing that sexual harassment constitutes discrimination on the basis of gender and violates this policy statement,
the college will not tolerate such conduct. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies:
Carol W Smith J.D., Equity Officer, Ocala Campus, Ewers Century Center, Room 201C, 352-854-2322, ext. 1437 or smithc@cf.edu..


G52 Tuesday May 14, 2013


GRADUATION


i ..4 'IN


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