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Citrus County chronicle ( May 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 12, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03119

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 12, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03119

Full Text




!-Jappy M9other


TODAY ..~.
& next
morning


Partly sunny,
40% chance of
showers.
PAGE A4


MAY 12, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


CITRU-S CO U N T Y





www.chronicleonlineNICL.co
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's


's C2l


Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 278


Cuts to juggle resources


Construction
Homebuilders across
the nation are having
trouble finding enough
qualified workers.
/Page D1

EXCURSIONS:


School budget plan has media specialists furious


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
A budget-cutting plan headed to the Cit-
rus County School Board this week is caus-
ing uproar among media specialists in the
county's elementary and middle schools.
That's because the proposal is to elim-
inate their positions and instead trans-
fer them to classrooms with teaching
vacancies.
In their place, the district would hire


aides to oversee media centers and pro-
grams in the elementary and middle
schools.
District officials have broached the
subject in the past and met with the
same resistance.
Media specialists say they do more
than just operate the school libraries.
Many teach reading, tutor students one-
on-one and instruct teachers in the use
See Page A8


BUDGET CUT PROPOSALS
* Move 15 media specialists in the elementary and
middle schools to classrooms, replacing them with
full-time aides. Potential savings: $500,000.
* Eliminate the "two-mile rule" for middle- and
highschool bus routes (but keep it in place for
elementary schools). Potential savings: $100,000.
* Combine bus routes. Potential savings: $200,000.
* New staffing formula in high schools to equalize
second semester class loads with first semester,
eliminating nine vacant teaching positions.
Potential savings: $500,000.


4Wa ing in her steps


Breathtaking
Travel expert Neil
Sawyer writes about
Africa's Victoria
Falls./Page A15


Placemats
From simple paper to
designer cutouts,
placemats prove
popular./HomeFront
JANE'S GARDEN:


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Kody Wood, left, and Kassidy Lundy, right, both say their lives are influenced significantly by the
loving guidance of their mom, Melissa Wood.



Living with breast cancer: A Mother's Day story


CHARLES LAWRENCE
Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County resident Pat
Panaccione is a fighter. Diag-
nosed with breast cancer in
September 2008, this wife,
mother of five and grand-
mother of 11 has been battling
the disease with the help of
family, strong will and faith.
Originally from the New
York City area, Panaccione and
her husband of 41 years owned
Big A Auto Parts in Crystal
River for 30 years and have
lived in Citrus County for 37
years. They lost the business


and their house due to mount-
ing health care costs.
"Citrus County is the best
place to raise my kids. They all
went to Citrus County schools,"
Panaccione said.
She keeps a log of her cancer
diagnosis because she said she
was devastated by the news.
"My daughter, Danielle,
saved my life," Panaccione
said. "Danielle was pregnant
and asked me to go with her to
see her sonogram. When the
doctor asked her if she had any
questions, Danielle mentioned
to her doctor that I had a lump
in my breast."


After her daughter's doctor
examined her, she was sent im-
mediately for a mammogram
and further tests to confirm
breast cancer.
"I got a surgeon who told me
I had lumps in both breasts.
Then, he told me I had to see a
plastic surgeon if I wanted to
have reconstructive surgery,"
Panaccione said.
"I remember waking up after
the surgery in recovery and my
whole family was around me.
They all had smiles on their
face. I kept saying, 'Is it bad?'
See Page A10


Inverness mom

sets example for

children to

follow
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
.- ^ INVERNESS
elissa Wood isn't
just raising two
fine children.
She's raising two fine citizens.
Just as her mother did when
she was growing up, Wood be-
lieves strongly in giving to her
community by
volunteering MOMMY
for numerous
projects and & ME
causes. Winners
Her chil- of the
dren, Kody Citrus
and Kassidy, County
followed in Chronicle's
her footsteps Mommy &
from the time Me online
they could contest
walk. And all are in. See
three say they Page A5
feel a bond of for results.
love and sup-
port that
builds each day
"She's the best mom any-
body could ever ask for," Kas-
sidy said. "She means more to
me than anything."
That was apparent during
the April 26 Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
awards, when Kassidy was
shocked to learn she had been
given the Outstanding Youth
Service Award named after
Shawn Harrison, a Citrus
County Young Marine who
died in 2010 at age 20.
See Page A10


Garden tips
Find the weekly column
by gardening expert
Jane Weber./Page A9


STATE NEWS:


Traveler
A young sea turtle
travels some 2,000
miles./Page All


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ............ D4
Crossword ...........A16
Editorial ............. C2
Entertainment ..........A4
Horoscope ................A4
Lottery Numbers ......B3
Lottery Payouts ........ B3
Movies ................. A16
O bituaries ................A6
Together..................A20


611 I8 112007 11 o


Donald Livingston,
left, Karen
McCleave, second
left, Craig
Anderson, second
right, and Cindy
Anderson, right,
enjoy their
afternoon at the
Citrus County Circle
of Friends Benefit
Weekend at Rock
Crusher Canyon.
They stood, danced
and sang as the
Outlaws Like Me
Tour dominated the
stage for listeners.
ERYN WORTHINGTON/
Chronicle


Country rocks Canyon


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Fans of live country music pulled out
their latest country attire for the biggest
concert of the year, braving evening
storms at an outdoor venue.
Circle of Friends Foundation hosted
the eighth annual Citrus County Circle of
Friends Benefit Weekend on Saturday at
Rock Crusher Canyon. Thousands of dol-
lars will be donated to fund student
scholarships and various nonprofit or-
ganizations in the community as a result
of the concert.


The 2013 Country Rocks the Canyon's
roster featured the "Outlaws Like Me"
tour starring Justin Moore, Josh Thomp-
son, Dustin Lynch and Michael Ray
Three local bands also took the stage -
TJ. Brown, Clemons Road and Jamie
Davis Band.
Attendees wearing cowboy hats and
boots danced their own country rhythm
from when the gates opened at 2 p.m.
throughout the night, with Justin Moore
ending the night with his own influence.
To get a sense of the music activities of
the night, see the Chronicle's Monday
edition.


Spacewalking

repair halts station

leak for now


MARCIA DUNN
AP aerospace writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
- Astronauts making a
rare, hastily planned
spacewalk replaced a
pump outside the Inter-
national Space Station
on Saturday in hopes of
plugging a serious am-
monia leak.
The prospects of suc-
cess grew as the min-
utes, then hours passed
and no frozen flecks of
ammonia appeared. Mis-
sion Control said it ap-
peared as though the
leak may have been
plugged, although addi-
tional monitoring over
the coming weeks will be
needed before declaring
a victory
"I will tell you that
we're happy We're very
happy," said Joel Mon-
talbano, NASAs deputy


space station program
manager. "We didn't see
any obvious signs of a
leak, but it's going to take
some time ... for us to
look at the system, eval-
uate the system and
make sure we did, in-
deed, stop the leak."
Montalbano expects it
will take "a good four
weeks, five weeks,
maybe even a few weeks
longer.
"Obviously, the longer
you go, the more confi-
dence you get," he told
reporters.
Christopher Cassidy
and Thomas Marshburn
installed the new pump
after removing the old
one suspected of spew-
ing flakes of frozen am-
monia coolant two days
earlier. They uncovered
"no smoking guns" re-
sponsible for the leak
See Page A8


HIGH
87
LOW
65


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A2 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012







Page A3- SUNDAY, MAY 12,2012



TATE&


CI-


LOCAL


[TRUS COUNTY CHRO


)NICLE


Around the

COUNTY

Tribute to honor
fallen officers
The National Association
of Retired Law Enforcement
Officers (NARLEO) will
have a special tribute to
fallen officers at 10 a.m.
Wednesday, May 15, at
Cooter Pond Park in
Inverness.
This year, the wreath-
laying ceremony on Na-
tional Peace Officers Me-
morial Day will honor four
officers who were killed on
duty long ago: state Cor-
rections Officer Rufus
Willams Walters, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
Deputy Aubrey Fred John-
son, Floral City Town Mar-
shal J.W. Newsom and
Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Deputy James McIn-
tosh McMullen.
The public is welcome to
join retired and active-duty
law enforcement personnel
to honor the four at this
ceremony during National
Police Week, May 12 to
18. For more information,
call NARLEO president
Andrew Tarpey at 352-
344-9313.
LWVCC
meets on Tuesday
The newly formed
League of Women Voters of
Citrus County is officially
recognized and is up and
running.
The next meeting will be
at 10:15 a.m. Tuesday,
May 14, at the Central
Ridge Library in Beverly
Hills.
At that time members will
review the Citizens Acad-
emy and try to narrow
down a request to focus on
"local issues." The group
will also discuss how to at-
tract working and younger
people.
Those interested n join-
ing are asked to attend and
bring a check in the amount
of $60 ($25 for students)
made out to LWVF.
All, including men, are
welcome and encouraged
to invite a friend, even if
they have not joined.
The league is a nonparti-
san education organization.
For information, call Linda
at 352-746-0655
Family Care Council
meets Monday
The Area 13 Family Care
Council will meet from
10 a.m. to noon Monday at
the Wildwood Agency for
Persons with Disabilities of-
fice, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic
Highway (State Road 44).
All persons interested in
issues concerning those
with developmental disabili-
ties and their families are
encouraged to attend. New
members are wanted. For
more information con-
tact Karen Huscher at 352-
726-1445 or
cbettykay@aol.com.
Area 13 covers Citrus,
Hernando, Lake, Marion
and Sumter counties.
HAM radio course
offered in Lecanto
Afree, beginning HAM
radio class course will be
offered at the Citrus County
Emergency Operations
Center, 3549 Saunders
Way, off County Road 491
in Lecanto.
The course consists of
three Saturday sessions: 9
to 10:30 a.m. (orientation)
June 8; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
June 15; and 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. June 22, with the
Federal Communication
Commission exam at
2 p.m.
Participants can learn the
necessary material to pass
the FCC Technician Class
amateur radio exam. There
is no fee for the class.
Training material/text cost
$21. Class is limited to 10


students.
Register for the class by
May 20. For more informa-
tion, call Joe Calzaretta at
352-382-0809 in Ho-
mosassa or email
K4LL@EarthLink.net.
-From staff reports


Sewer rate adjustment sought


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER -
The Crystal River City
Council will consider Mon-
day a resolution in final
reading dealing with ad-
justment to rates of sewer
customers who are not
connected to a public
water supply
According to the city,
residents of areas 112/113
and 114 or the county
area currently being con-
nected to city water and
sewer services receive
their water supply from
Ozello. However, Ozello is
unable to accommodate
its water customers with a
separate irrigation meter.


As a result, the residents
are being charged for
sewer service based on the
meter readings the city re-
ceives from Ozello, some of
which are for water not
being run into the sewer,
according to officials.
City code, say officials,
states customers who re-
ceive their sewer service
from the city and their
water supply from another
provider shall be charged
for sewer service on the
basis of 10,000 gallons.
Officials said they
checked with other munic-
ipalities and determined
that the prevailing prac-
tice is to charge on the
basis of the state average
residential water usage,


* WHAT: Crystal River
City Council meeting.
WHEN: 7 p.m.
Monday, May 13; 6:30
p.m. CRA meeting.
WHERE: City Hall on
U.S. 19.
CONTACT: www.
crystalriverfl.org

which is 6,000 gallons per
month.
The city bill for sewer
service would be based on
the base rate plus the
readings received from
Ozello, with a cap of 6,000
gallons.
Officials contend the
proposed adjustment
would reduce the monthly


They swam laps in the big pool, pedaled their bikes on winding
park paths and ran for the finish line at the Citrus County
Kids Triathlon on Saturday at Whispering Pines Park.
According to Deputy Michele Tewell, the community resource officer for
the city of Inverness, 175 kids participated in the first-ever event,
sponsored by the United Way and the Citrus County Sheriffs Office
gave away 117 bicycle helmets during registration. For complete coverage,
see Page B1. ABOVE: Dan Epstein, one of the many volunteers at
Saturday's triathlon, helps athlete No. 327 at the beginning of the
cycling part of the race. RIGHT: Alexis Santa Fe, lo0, finished second
in the Senior Division. She said of the three sports, she liked bicycling
the best. BELOW: As early as 8:30 a.m., kids in the Junior Division,
ages 5 to lo0, lined up at the edge of the pool at Whispering Pines Park
waiting their turn to get in the water and start their race.

V- 1-2 ^ -


I-


amount currently payable
under the 10,000-gallon
threshold by $23.96 for af-
fected customers.
Council members will
also tackle:
approval of reallocat-
ing budgeted funding
within Public Works from
salary and benefits to con-
tractual services in the
amount of $9,063.29;
consideration of con-
tract award to Tidwell
Brothers Paving, Inc. for
milling and resurfacing
per bid documents, for a
total cost of $177,425;
consideration of con-
tract award to Mittauer &
Associates, Inc. for con-
struction management of
Water Main Replacement


P 'r 1
It T*t

F14


u 329.





j--
\ -A


(CDBG Grant) for a total
cost of $36,000;
approval of applica-
tion for commercial use of
Hunter Springs Park Sub-
mitted by Gino's Frozen
Treats;
and a Three Sisters
Springs Quarterly Man-
agement Plan meeting
report.
In its capacity as the
Community Redevelop-
ment Agency (CRA), the
council will hear a presen-
tation about proposed
North Citrus Avenue im-
provements.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


WAR begins Withlacoochee Rescue Study


STEVE KESTERSON SR.
Special to the Chronicle

On April 24, Withla-
coochee Area Residents
Inc. (WAR) board members
hosted Dr. Robert Knight,
of the Florida Springs In-
stitute, for an afternoon
cruise on the lower With-
lacoochee River. Dr.
Knight has been hired by
the organization to do a
study of the riverine envi-
ronment, from the spillway
at Lake Rousseau out to
the estuary's mouth, and
identify measures that
would help restore the
river's biological balance.
The river appears to be
dying. Aquatic plant life is
nearly non-existent. The
presence of flourishing
beds of hydrilla and im-
portant sweeping areas of
eel grass reported by local


residents no longer exist.
Manatees that gathered in
substantial numbers in the
spring and fall until the
late 1990s are rarely seen.
With increasing frequency,
algal blooms transit down-
stream from the lake
above, the clouds reducing
water clarity to less than a
foot
During Knight's visit, his
water quality monitoring
equipment indicated the
presence of growing algae
by the high amount of dis-
solved oxygen present in
the river.
Herbicides have been
used on Florida surface
water bodies, by various
agencies, since the 1950s.
Since 1992, the Florida
Bureau of Invasive Plant
Management has been in
charge of applying herbi-
cides to aquatic vegetation


SO YOU KNOW
Withlacoochee Area
Residents will have its
second-quarter
meeting from 7 to 9 p.m.
Wednesday, May 15, at
the Yankeetown-Inglis
Woman's Club, 5 56th
St., Yankeetown. Topics
of the meeting will in-
clude updates on the
proposed Kings Road
Mine, Lower
Withlacoochee River

in Lake Rousseau. In 2007,
a massive kill of bivalves
said to be small Asian
clams and freshwater
mussels took place in the
river below the spillway
and was reported by the
local news media. The bu-
reau denied the possibil-
ity that herbicide


Research Project and
Springs Coast
minimum flows. There
will also be a panel
discussion on water and
issues that affect the
environment of the
Withlacoochee Area.
Coffee, tea and
desserts will be
provided. Questions
can be emailed to
warinc.directors@
gmail.com or call
352-447-5434.

applications upstream
had any part in causing
the shellfish die-off, de-
spite cautions noted in the
EPAs registration docu-
ments that there is a defi-
nite possibility of adverse
effects on shellfish and
aquatic animals during
applications.


The WAR Inc., a regis-
tered nonprofit organiza-
tion, recently received a
Felburn Foundation grant
to begin the study by
Knight. It is estimated that
the cost to complete the
study will be $22,000. Addi-
tional grant money will be
applied for but any finan-
cial help is welcomed by
the organization in its bat-
tle to save the Withla-
coochee. Further inform-
ation about the group's
goals and activities is
available at www.warinc
online.com.
Steve Kesterson Sr
serves on the board of With-
lacoochee Area Residents
Inc., an Inglis-based citizen
activist group concerned
with environmental issues.
WAR can be contacted on-
line at directors@war
inconline.com.


H. T.
SO'LY


t--


U
~






A4 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Today's Birthday People like you,
and chances are you have more
friends than you realize. In the year
ahead, good things could develop
through several pals whom you've
never fully appreciated.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you
spend time searching for ways to in-
crease your income, you will find nu-
merous ways to do so.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It is im-
portant to maintain as much control as
you can over an arrangement in which
you're presently involved. Don't hesi-
tate to assert yourself if need be.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You tend
to get hunches all the time, but the
ones you get today could be especially
strong, enabling you to forecast the
outcome of events with remarkable
accuracy.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -Although
your basic belief system might be
tested, after you've had time to ana-
lyze things the results will end up rein-
forcing what you've always thought to
be true.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Major ob-
jectives can be accomplished, so don't
waste your time on petty goals. Go
after something truly important that will
give you a real sense of achievement.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) There is
no reason to give up on traditional
methods that have proven successful
in the past. Lady Luck is inclined to fol-
low her same, familiar footsteps.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A signifi-
cant change could be in the offing for a
situation of vital importance. Don't fret
- the winds will shift in your direction.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) A
partnership is likely to be more effec-
tive than an independent endeavor.
Start forming alliances now.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
tend to be extremely successful when
you're prepared to work hard. Go
ahead and put the pedal to the metal.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A
group endeavor could be in need of re-
organization. Your ideas and advice
could prove especially helpful.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Be nice
to your neighbors, because something
fortuitous could develop through a
friendly acquaintance with one of them.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Don't
hesitate to think big, regardless of the
scope of the project at hand. You
shouldn't have any trouble taking
things as far as you want them to go.


ENTERTAINMENT


Brown's curbside art
irks LA neighbors
LOS ANGELES Grammy-
winning musician Chris
Brown's neighbors are unhappy
with the creepy art he's chosen
to have painted along the curb of
his Hollywood
Hills home.
A neighbor-
hood group
said the gri-
macing, sharp-
toothed,
red-eyed gob-
Chris lins painted
Brown along a retain-
ing wall have been scaring local
children, and is an eyesore to
boot, the Los Angeles Times
reported.
"There are lots of babies, lots
of children, and they're literally
frightened. It's like devils on the
wall big scary eyes and big
scary teeth, and just the whole
vibe is not what we're used to,"
Patti Negri, president of the Hol-
lywood Dell Civic Association,
told the newspaper.
L.A. city code officials re-
sponded to complaints about the
monster art and cited the "Run
It!" singer $376 for unpermitted
and excessive signage.
Under city ordinances, it's illegal
to create murals on most private
properties. Though that didn't stop
Madonna from painting her Holly-
wood Hills home in red and yellow
stripes in the 1990s.
Brown has been ordered to
remove the goblin paintings
within 30 days, but his attorney
Mark Geragos said the musician
is not backing down.
"They are trying to suspend the
First Amendment," Geragos said.
Geragos alleges neighbors
are harassing Brown, and have
also made parking complaints
about him and called animal
control.


Associated Press
Dallas Seavey, right, sits with his brother Tyrell Seavey at a
campsite in 2012 in Arrigetch Peaks, Alaska. Dallas Seavey,
who became the youngest Iditarod champion ever when he
won the race in 2012, is among eight mushers or outdoor ad-
venturers featured in the latest reality show set in Alaska.
"Ultimate Survival Alaska" premieres Sunday on NatGeoTV.


'Star Wars' movie to Singer's childhood
be shot in UK home to move


LONDON The next "Star
Wars" movie will be shot in a
galaxy far, far away from Holly-
wood Britain.
Lucasfilm President Kathleen
Kennedy said the company has
reached a deal with British Treasury
chief George Osborne to make
"Star Wars: Episode VII" in the U.K.
She said Friday the production
company was "revisiting the ori-
gins of 'Star Wars'" for the new
movie. Parts of all six previous
movies were made in Britain.
Osborne said the announce-
ment was "great news for fans
and our creative industries."
"Star Wars" maker Lucasfilm
was bought last year for $4.05
billion by The Walt Disney Co.,
which has announced plans for
a new trilogy of films.
The first new movie, directed
by sci-fi wunderkind J.J.
Abrams ("Star Trek"), is due for
release in 2015.


MACON, Ga. Officials in
Georgia have decided to move
the boyhood home of Little
Richard to spare it from a high-
way construction project.
Macon Mayor Robert Re-
ichert made the announcement
Friday. WMAZ-TV reported the
80-year-old singer is receiving
an honorary degree on Saturday
from Mercer University.
Born Richard Wayne Penni-
man, Little Richard grew up in
Macon's Pleasant Hill community.
The "Tutti Frutti" singer's boy-
hood home faced possible dem-
olition to make room for a
planned expansion of the inter-
change where 1-75 meets Inter-
state 16 to Savannah.
City officials said the home will
be relocated to a lot near the
Pleasant Hill community garden.
At its new location, the house
will be used as a neighborhood
resource center.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 12, the
132nd day of 2013. There are 233
days left in the year. This is
Mother's Day.
Today's Highlights:
On May 12, 1943, during World
War II, Axis forces in North Africa
surrendered. The two-week Trident
Conference, headed by President
Franklin D. Roosevelt and British
Prime Minister Winston Churchill,
opened in Washington.
On this date:
In 1780, during the Revolutionary
War, the besieged city of Charleston,
S.C., surrendered to British forces.
Ten years ago: Suicide bombers
attacked foreigners' housing com-
pounds in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia,
killing 25 victims.
Five years ago: A devastating
earthquake in China's Sichuan
province killed some 70,000 peo-
ple. Nearly 400 workers were ar-
rested in an immigration raid at a
kosher meatpacking plant in
Postville, Iowa.
One year ago: At least 100,000
Spaniards angered by grim eco-
nomic prospects and the political
handling of the international finan-
cial crisis turned out for street
demonstrations, marking the one-
year anniversary of a spontaneous
movement that inspired similar
protests elsewhere.
Today's Birthdays: Baseball Hall-
of-Famer Yogi Berra is 88. Actress
Vanessa A. Williams ("Melrose
Place") is 50. Actor Stephen Baldwin
is 47. Actress Samantha Mathis is
43. Actress Jamie Luner is 42. Actor
Christian Campbell is 41. Actress
Rhea Seehom is 41. Actor Mackenzie
Astin is 40. Actress Malin Akerman is
35. Actor Jason Biggs is 35. Actress
Emily VanCamp is 27. Actor Malcolm
David Kelley is 21. Actors Sawyer and
Sullivan Sweeten are 18.
Thought for Today: "A mother
becomes a true grandmother the day
she stops noticing the terrible things
her children do because she is so
enchanted with the wonderful things
her grandchildren do." Lois Wyse,
American advertising executive, au-
thor and columnist (1926-2007).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR [,- HI LO PR |HI LO PR
90 65 NA 189 67 0.10 kt J86 64 0.00


90 69 trace NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK exclusive daly
forecast by: .
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 87 Low: 65
Partly sunny; 40% chance of scat-
tered storms
I -MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 47
Partly cloudy to sunny; cooler and less humid

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 52
Cool start; Mostly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 87/66
Record 98/50
Normal 88/60
Mean temp. 77
Departure from mean +3
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.50 in.
Total for the year 5.80 in.
Normal for the year 13.21 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 12
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 70
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 57%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Grasses, Hickory
Today's count: 3.7/12
Monday's count: 4.8
Tuesday's count: 5.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/12 SUNDAY 7:58 1:46 8:22 2:10
5/13 MONDAY 8:51 2:39 9:15 3:03
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O ( SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:13P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:40 A.M.
SMOONRISE TODAY...........................8:37 A.M.
MAY 18 MAY 25 MAY 31 JUNE 8 MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:37 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:17 a/3:43 a 7:21 p/3:26 p
Crystal River** 6:38 a/1:05 a 5:42 p/12:48 p
Withlacoochee* 4:25 a/10:36 a 3:29 p/11:26 p
Homosassa*** 7:27 a/2:42 a 6:31 p/2:25 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
8:53 a/4:16 a 7:54 p/4:00 p
7:14a/1:38 a 6:15 p/1:22 p
5:01 a/11:10 a 4:02 p/---
8:03 a/3:15 a 7:04 p/2:59 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
87 67
87 74
89 70
85 59
88 72
83 58
85 76
88 67
88 69


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
ts
ts
ts
pc
ts
pc
ts
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK
West winds around 10 knots. Seas 1 Gulf water
foot or less. Bay and inland waters will tem perature
have a light chop. Chance of thunder-
storms today. 79 0


Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.88 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 36.98 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.64 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.68 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 69 57 .70 pc 63 36
Albuquerque 71 48 pc 77 55
Asheville 72 55 .38 pc 65 36
Atlanta 77 62 pc 73 46
Atlantic City 75 60 pc 71 40
Austin 82 63 pc 82 57
Baltimore 78 63 .45 pc 70 42
Billings 76 39 pc 85 58
Birmingham 78 64 .37 s 68 46
Boise 91 58 pc 89 55
Boston 72 59 .02 sh 72 45
Buffalo 57 46 .13 sh 50 35
Burlington, VT 72 59 .13 c 59 36
Charleston, SC 85 69 pc 81 56
Charleston, WV 68 60 .28 pc 60 37
Charlotte 81 65 pc 74 43
Chicago 60 45 pc 55 39
Cincinnati 60 52 .03 pc 58 38
Cleveland 56 45 pc 55 36
Columbia, SC 85 66 pc 80 51
Columbus, OH 62 49 .06 pc 57 37
Concord, N.H. 67 57 .39 sh 67 33
Dallas 81 60 s 79 54
Denver 70 43 pc 77 52
Des Moines 59 50 pc 64 42
Detroit 62 44 .02 pc 49 35
El Paso 76 51 s 78 58
Evansville, IN 69 54 .05 s 64 38
Harrisburg 73 63 .19 pc 64 39
Hartford 68 59 .35 pc 72 38
Houston 86 66 pc 84 61
Indianapolis 64 44 pc 58 38
Jackson 78 63 .03 s 73 46
Las Vegas 93 66 s 96 75
Little Rock 78 59 s 70 50
Los Angeles 73 61 s 77 62
Louisville 65 54 .03 pc 62 40
Memphis 75 60 s 67 45
Milwaukee 55 40 pc 50 36
Minneapolis 57 42 pc 58 38
Mobile 74 61 .32 pc 79 49
Montgomery 79 63 pc 74 48
Nashville 68 59 s 65 40
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 75 64 1.47 pc 78 57
New York City 70 61 1.10 pc 70 45
Norfolk 84 69 .13 pc 73 45
Oklahoma City 79 50 pc 73 53
Omaha 61 46 pc 65 46
Palm Springs 10472 s 106 77
Philadelphia 79 63 .16 pc 70 44
Phoenix 96 73 s 100 75
Pittsburgh 62 52 .03 pc 55 33
Portland, ME 64 51 .21 sh 68 40
Portland, Ore 85 57 sh 70 56
Providence, R.I. 71 55 .24 sh 72 42
Raleigh 81 66 .30 pc 72 48
Rapid City 63 32 pc 77 54
Reno 90 53 s 89 55
Rochester, NY 61 50 .03 sh 52 36
Sacramento 86 57 s 90 55
St. Louis 71 53 s 62 44
St. Ste. Marie 52 32 .22 rs 38 31
Salt Lake City 84 55 s 85 58
San Antonio 83 63 pc 82 60
San Diego 73 63 s 77 64
San Francisco 69 51 s 76 53
Savannah 87 67 pc 82 54
Seattle 81 54 sh 65 53
Spokane 86 58 pc 81 54
Syracuse 64 53 .16 pc 55 36
Topeka 68 48 pc 66 46
Washington 80 64 .02 pc 70 45
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 105 Thermal, Calif. LOW 22 Leadville,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/75/pc
Amsterdam 53/47/sh
Athens 77/59/pc
Beijing 86/52/pc
Berlin 64/43/sh
Bermuda 72/67/pc
Cairo 86/67/s
Calgary 86/52/pc
Havana 92/72/ts
Hong Kong 82/77/ts
Jerusalem 71/55/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


77/56/s
60/49/c
79/53/pc
78/55/ts
57/41/sh
81/56/s
63/53/c
78/63/s
68/59/s
72/59/pc
70/58/sh
46/37/sh
74/51/sh


LEGAL NOTICES





City of Crystal River............A18


Meeting Notices....................D5


Miscellaneous Notices...........D5



CCITITRUS COUNTY




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Report a news tip:
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Now Mom's

your 'friend'


LOCAL/NATION


Mommy &

Me winners


Associated Press


Josh Knoller, a young
professional in New York
City, spent years refusing
his mother's "Friend Re-
quest" on Facebook be-
fore, eventually, "caving
in."
Today they have an
agreement: she'll try not to
make embarrassing com-
ments, and he can delete
them if she does.
"We actually got into
some pretty big fights over
this," says Knoller, 29. "I
love my Mom to death but
she's a crazy, sweet Jewish
mother and I was a little
worried about what she
might post in front of my
closest friends."
As Mother's Day ap-
proaches, one in three
moms are connected with
their teens over Facebook,
according to the social net-
working giant's review of
how users self-identify.
With more than 1 billion
Facebook users, that's a lot
of mothers and kids keep-
ing in touch through social
media, says Fordham Uni-
versity communications
professor Paul Levinson,
author of "New New
Media." "Facebook has
been a boon to family rela-
tionships," said Levinson.
Kelly McBride, an assis-
tant professor of commu-
nications at LaSalle
University in Philadel-
phia, says her students
who "friend" their moth-
ers keep their Facebook
pages benign, using other
social media like Insta-
gram or Twitter for the
racy stuff.
"They may be willing to
'friend' their mother, but
when they do, they take
down the drinking or par-
tying or suggestive photo-
graphs," she says.
McBride says she'd like
to get her own mother, who
is 77, onto Facebook.
"I've offered repeatedly
to make her a Facebook
page so I could friend her,
but she just won't do it,"
she says.


Chronicle


For the past two weeks,
online readers have been
voting on their favorite
Mommy & Me photos.
The contest drew 35 con-
testants, each submitting
their favorite Mother's Day-
related photos. The photos
range from poignant to silly
and span six decades of
cherished memories.
BOTTOM LEFT: Ken
Stoops is the second-place
winner of the Mommy &
Me contest with 235 votes.
Ken submitted a picture of
his mother, Ellie Stoops,
and sister, Nancy Stoops-
Libengood, taken in 1956.
He will receive two months
of unlimited Jazzercise
classes from Citrus County
Jazzercise and 45-minute
massage from A Little Me
Time Massage and
Bodywork.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Betsy
Bennett is the third-place
winner of the Mommy &
Me contest with 194 votes.
Betsy, pictured with her
daughter Brooke, will re-
ceive a magnetic bangle
from Specialty Gems.


W(

wv1


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 A5


Anna Mosely,
mother of
seven
children, is
the winner of
the Mommy &
Me contest
with 538
votes. Anna,
pictured with
her family,
will receive
Sunday
brunch and
river cruise
for four
people from
Plantation on
Crystal River
and a $75 gift
certificate
from Whalen
Jewelers.
Special to the
Chronicle


Special to the Chronicle


e Welcome You TI V iia

ffotMer v -ies.eeraoe.





4 f To L1C I9River
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Richard
Anderson, 87
INVERNESS
Mr. Richard N. Ander-
son, 87, of Inverness, Fla.,
died Friday, May 10, 2013,
in Inverness, Fla.
He was
March 8,
1926, in
J a m e s-
town, N.Y,
son of Gus-
tav and
Bertha
(Ellis) An- Richard
derson. He Anderson
was an
Army veteran serving dur-
ing World War II with the
795th Military Police Bat-
talion. He worked as a pre-
cision grinder for MRC,
TRW and SKE He moved
to Inverness, Fla., from
Jamestown, N.Y, 20 years
ago. Mr. Anderson was a
member of First Presbyte-
rian Church, Inverness,
and former member of
Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church, Jamestown, N.Y
He was a lifetime member
of VFW and American Le-
gion; 25-year secretary/
treasurer for the MRC
Federal Credit Union and
a member of the Highland
Surveillance Unit, Inver-
ness. Mr. Anderson loved
to play golf, studying alter-
native medicines and
spending time his family
and friends.
Mr. Anderson was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents; a brother, Donald
Anderson; and a sister,
Harriet Carlson. Survivors
include wife of 53 years,
Elaine Miller Anderson,
Inverness; and a son,

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com
Coing timfo

4 buinessIday


Richard B. Anderson,
Sanford.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com. Arrangements
by the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Ellen
Aswegan, 82
ARBOR LAKES
Ellen Joan Aswegan, 82,
Arbor Lakes, Fla., died
May 6, 2013, under the lov-

Hospice of
Citrus
County
and dear a
friends.
Ellen
was born -
Jan. 8,7
1931, in Ellen
N e w Aswegan
Sharon,
Iowa, to the late Josiah
Earl and Lillian (Mulford)
Scott. She was employed
by Crosley Farm Store in
Eldora, Iowa, for many
years. She was a home-
maker who was also an ex-
cellent fisherwoman,
catching many different
species of fish throughout
the country
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her husband of 63
years, Leroy Aswegan;
nephew Charles (Phyllis)
Frazer, nieces Sherrill
Snider and Sandy (Phil)

0 Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
the next day.



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CRYSTAL RIVER
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Obituaries
Duncan, all of Texas, as
well as many other nieces
and nephews; brother-in-
law Floyd Aswegan, Grand-
view Home, Marshalltown,
Iowa; special friends Joe
and Ronnie Wilhelmy, Bev-
erly Hills, Fla., and their
children Tim (Kendra) Wil-
helmy, Fla., and Ann
(Roger) Stawski, Minn. She
was a special grandmother
to their grandchildren,
Jack, Taylor and Matthew.
She was preceded in death
by her sister Mildred
(Harold) Frazer and
brother Leonard "Bud"
(Glee) Scott
A memorial service will
be at 1:30 p.m. Friday, June
7, 2013, at First Congrega-
tional Church in Eldora,
Iowa, with the Rev. Cory
Larson officiating. A light
lunch will be served fol-
lowing the service in the
fellowship hall. Memorial
donations in Ellen's mem-
ory may be made to Hos-
pice of Citrus County,
Florida, the Alzheimer's
Association or the Ameri-
can Cancer Society in lieu
of flowers. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is in charge of local
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.





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Gregory
Gallagher, 29
INVERNESS
Gregory John Gallagher,
29, born Aug. 23, 1983,
passed May 2, 2013, due to
injuries sustained after
being struck by a car From
West Milford, N.J., he
resided in Inverness, Fla.,
since 2002.
Gregory was a line cook
and worked as a laborer in
landscaping and stucco
fields. Greg had a huge in-
terest in sports. His fa-
vorites were the N.Y
Yankees baseball and N.Y
Giants football. He was an
alumni of Phoenix Drum
& Bugle Corps (Lakewood,
N.J.) and The Magic Drum
& Bugle Corps (Orlando,
Fla.). He was a 2002 gradu-
ate of West Milford Town-
ship High School in West
Milford, N.J.
He is survived by his
mother, Charlene lannaci
(nee: Gallagher); and a sis-
ter, Dorothy lannaci of In-
verness, Fla.; maternal
grandfather, John Gal-
lagher, of West Milford,
N.J.; maternal aunts and
uncles John Gallagher of
West Milford, N.J., Greg
and Chris Gallagher of


Greenwood Lake, N.Y,
and Tony and Tracey Gal-
luzzo of Hamburg, N.J.; pa-
ternal uncle Patrick
McGraw of West Milford,
N.J.; cousins, Cassandra
and John Gallagher, Gar-
rett, Ryan and Shannon
Gallagher, Anthony and
Nicholas Galluzzo and
Philip Holman; a large
amount of distant cousins;
and a multitude of friends
and the love of everyone
who knew him. He was
predeceased by maternal
grandmother Dorothy Gal-
lagher (Smallwood).
Gregory gave a "Gift of
Life" with his donations of
organs and eyes. May
someone live on in his
gifts.
A memorial tribute and
Mass will be held at the
West Milford Presbyterian
Church in the near future.
Greg's mother, Charlene,
will make a formal an-
nouncement with those
details as soon as they are
solidified.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
See Page A7

Obituaries are at www.
chronicleonline.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Kathleen
Hendrickson,
61
HOMOSASSA
Kathleen G. Hendrick-
son, 61, of Homosassa,
died Wednesday, May 8,
2013.
A memorial service will
be at 2 p.m. Saturday, May
18,2013, at Wilder Funeral
Home. Family and friends
will be received from
1 p.m. until the hour of
service.
Charles
Huston, 83
HOMOSASSA
Charles Edward Huston,
83, of Homosassa, died Fri-
day, May 10, 2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto.




Thomas
Lukas, 70
INGLIS
Thomas Lukas, 70, of In-
glis, died Saturday, May 11,
2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto.
Burial will be in the
Long Island National
Cemetery
Burton
Whitely, 53
BUSHNELL
Burton Whitely, 53, of
Bushnell, died Friday, May
10, 2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto.


John Gray, 78
INVERNESS
John C. Gray, 78, Inver-
ness, died May 10, 2013, at
his residence.
John
was born
Jan. 9,
1935, in
Wray, Ga.,
to the late ,-
John and
Annie ,. .
(Purvis) -
Gray. He John
worked for Gray
Florida
Power Corp. for many
years as a boiler operator
and water assessment
technician. John served
our country in the U.S.
Army He was an avid and
accomplished deer hunter
Family members left to
cherish his memory are
his two sons, John E.
(Brenda) Gray, Vancleave,
Miss., and Gregory A.
(Suzanne) Gray, Brandon,
Fla.; brothers Kenneth
(Linda) Gray, Hortense,
Ga., Rodger (Myra) Gray,
Mystic, Ga.; and sisters
Jeanette Luna, Topeka,
Kan., Daphine Spratlin,
Ocilla, Ga., and Sarah Mc-
Call, Brunswick, Ga.;
seven grandchildren;
and seven great-
grandchildren. He was
preceded in death by his
wife, Carolyn E. Gray, on
Marchl3, 2012; his daugh-
ter Terri Ann Valois on
June 24, 2007; and siblings
Wilbur, Cecil, C.J. Gray and
Geneva Logerman.
A Funeral Service of Re-
membrance will be at 11
a.m. Tuesday, May 14,2013,
at Rutland Baptist Church.
Burial will follow at Oak
Ridge Cemetery in Inver-
ness. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 10 a.m. until the hour
of service. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is in charge of
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


Kathleen
Grizzle, 56
INVERNESS
Kathleen E. Grizzle, 56,
of Inverness, died Friday,
May 10, 2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County in Lecanto.
Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.
Death
ELSEWHERE


Geza
Vermes, 88
JESUS SCHOLAR
LONDON Geza Ver-
mes, a translator of the
Dead Sea Scrolls and
renowned for books ex-
ploring the Jewish back-
ground of Jesus, has died
at 88.
He died Wednesday,
David Ariel, president of
the Oxford Center for He-
brew and Jewish Studies,
said Saturday
Vermes had an early in-
terest in the Dead Sea


Scrolls, a cache of docu-
ments written between 200
B.C. and A.D. 200 which
were discovered in caves
at Qumran, near Jericho,
between 1947 and 1956.
Vermes published the first
English translation of the
scrolls in 1962.
The scrolls gave an in-
sight to Jewish practices
and thought at the time
Jesus was preaching, and
they informed a series of
books by Vermes on the
historical Jesus.
The first, "Jesus the
Jew," was published in
1973, followed by "The Au-
thentic Gospel of Jesus"
(2003), a commentary on
all of the sayings attrib-
uted to Jesus in the
gospels of Matthew, Mark
and Luke.
"Jesus expired on a
Roman cross and was
buried," Vermes wrote in
the latter volume. "But his
disciples saw him in re-
peated visions, which per-
suaded them that he had
been raised from the dead
before ascending to
heaven."


His last book, "Christian
Beginnings: From Naz-
areth to Nicaea, AD 30-
325," published last year,
was Vermes' account of the
development of Christian
doctrine up to the formu-
lation of the Nicene Creed.
In a review of the book,
Rowan Williams, the for-
mer archbishop of Canter-
bury, praised Vermes as
"the unchallenged doyen
of scholarship in the Eng-
lish-speaking world on the
Jewish literature of the
age of Jesus, especially the
Dead Sea Scrolls." How-
ever, Williams said the
book gave no answers on
why Jesus became an ob-
ject of worship, revered by
Christians as God.
Other books included
"The Dead Sea Scrolls:
Qumran in Perspective"
(1977); "Jesus and the
World of Judaism (1983);
"The Religion of Jesus the
Jew" (1993); and volumes
on key moments in Jesus
life including his birth,
trial and the resurrection.
Vermes gained his un-
derstanding of Christianity


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SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 A7

from the inside.
Born in Mako, Hungary
in 1924, he was 6 when his
parents converted to
Roman Catholicism -
which he described as a
pragmatic search for shel-
ter from the rising tide of
anti-Semitism.
In 1939, he found the
only way he could con-
tinue his education was to
enter a seminary Follow-
ing the war, he moved to
Belgium and a seminary
run by the Congregation of
Our Lady of Sion, founded
by two Jewish converts,
and gained a doctorate
from the Catholic Univer-
sity of Louvain, where his
dissertation was on the
Dead Sea Scrolls.
Vermes left the priest-
hood and the Catholic
Church in 1957, remarking
later that his studies of
Jesus had reconverted him
to Judaism.
His wife Pamela died in
1993. He is survived by his
second wife, Margaret Fu-
neral arrangements have
not been announced.
-From wire reports





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Teen arrested SCHOOLinud fr
Teen ar rested Continued from Page Al


AMANDA MIMS
Correspondent

A 19-year-old Hernando man was ar-
rested Friday after allegedly admitting to
a sexual relationship with a 13-year-old
Beverly Hills girl.
Michael Johns, of North Cannes Point,
faces charges of lewd and lascivious bat-
tery on a child 12 to 16 years of age and
transmitting harmful materials to a
minor, according to a Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office report.
On April 25, a sheriff's office investiga-
tor received information about inappro-
priate photographs exchanged between
two students at a local private school and


LEAK
Continued from Page Al

and consequently kept a
sharp lookout for any icy
flecks that might appear
from the massive frame
that holds the solar panels
on the left side.
"Let us know if you see
anything," Mission Control
urged as the fresh pump
was cranked up. Thirty
minutes later, all was still
well.
"We have our eyes on it
and haven't seen a thing,"
Marshburn said.
NASA said the leak,
while significant, never
jeopardized crew safety
But managers wanted to
deal with the trouble now,
while it's fresh and before
Marshburn returns to
Earth in just a few days.
The space agency never
before staged such a fast,
impromptu spacewalk for
a station crew. Even dur-
ing the shuttle program,
unplanned spacewalks
were uncommon.
The ammonia pump was
the chief suspect going
into Saturday's spacewalk.
So it was disheartening for
NASA, at first, as Cassidy
and Marshburn reported


interviewed Johns and the girl Wednesday
Initially, the teens admitted to sending
and receiving the photographs, but de-
nied having sex. On Thursday, the girl's
mother contacted the sheriff's office, say-
ing her daughter admitted to having sex
with Johns at a park in Inverness. The
sheriff's office arranged a child protec-
tive team interview and examination for
the girl at the Jessie's Place child advo-
cacy center in Beverly Hills.
An investigator questioned Johns on
Friday, and Johns admitted to having sex
with the girl, according to the report.
Johns was taken to the Citrus County
Detention Facility, where his bond was
set at $47,000.


Astronaut Christopher Cassidy, foreground, ho
wrench Saturday as he stows away a susp
pump on the International Space Station in
made from video. Thomas Marshburn is at le
astronauts made the spacewalk to replace
after flakes of frozen ammonia coolant wi
outside the station on Thursday.


nothing amiss on or
around the old pump.
'"All the pipes look shiny
clean, no crud," Cassidy
said as he used a long-
handled mirror to peer
into tight, deep openings.
"I can't give you any
good data other than nom-
inal, unfortunately No
smoking guns."
Engineers determined
there was nothing to lose
by installing a new pump,
despite the lack of visible


of technology, a necessary link as the
district eases toward state mandates of
replacing textbooks with iPads.
"Research proves that in schools with
certified media specialists, student
learning improves as well as their
achievement levels," one media spe-
cialist wrote in an email to the Chroni-
cle. "With the implementation of the
new Common Core Standards, media
specialists will be needed more than


ever."
Superintendent of Schools
Sandra "Sam" Himmel said she
and her staff are looking for
areas to cut $2 million from the
2013-14 budget. She said moving
media specialists into vacant
teaching positions, and replac-
ing them with aides, would save
the district $500,000.
She said none of the media
specialists would lose their jobs. st
And the plan doesn't include
high schools, which require
media specialists for accreditation.


Sa
Himi
uperini
of sch


She said elementary and middle
school principals have bought into the
plan.
"In the short term, they would make it
work by using an aide in the media cen-
ter rather than a media specialist,"
Himmel said.
However, asked if the move were only
temporary, Himmel said that would de-
pend on the district's funding situation
next year
Even though some principals late last
week sent the word out to their staffs,
veteran school board member Pat
Deutschman said she knew nothing
about the plan to eliminate media
specialists.
Associated Press She noted that district officials have
olds a power toyed with the idea in the past and
ect coolant board members decided each time the
this image move would have a negative impact on
eft. The two classroom teachers.
e the pump "They've been sitting on the bubble
ere spotted three years in a row. They're low-
hanging fruit," Deutschman said. "We
keep rejecting those proposals as


damage to the old one. The
entire team weary and
stressed by the frantic
pace of the past two days
- gained more and more
confidence as the 5 1/2-
hour spacewalk drew to a
close with no flecks of am-
monia popping up.
"Gloved fingers
crossed," space station
commander Chris Had-
field said in a tweet from
inside. "No leaks!" he
wrote a half-hour later.


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BREASTAUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


WHAT: Citrus County School Board
meeting
WHEN: Approximately 4 p.m.
Tuesday
WHERE: District administrative
offices, corner of S.R. 44 and
Montgomery Avenue, Inverness.
ONLINE: www.citrus.k12.fl.us.

budget cuts and they keep coming back."
Himmel said the issue isn't whether
media specialists are important.
"Everything we do is going to impact
our kids," she said. "We value media
specialists. We see real value in
having them in our schools. The
principals discussed it and said
they will make it work."
The district, she said, is facing
significant budget shortfalls,
including:
$750,000 due to Duke En-
ergy's decision to pay about 55
percent of its 2012 tax bill. Al-
meln though the issue is being liti-
gated, Duke says the county and
tendent school board should expect a
similar payment, or less, in 2013.
Voters' rejecting renewing
the quarter-mill property tax for schools
in 2012 cost the district about $2.2 mil-
lion. Since the referendum was not a tax
increase, it represents a loss in revenue.
The district must contribute an ad-
ditional $1.4 million to the Florida Re-
tirement System fund.
While the state increased funding to
the district by $4.2 million, $2.4 million
of that is earmarked for special teacher
raises. The funding for those raises -
$2,500 for "effective" teachers and
$3,500 for "highly effective" teachers -
actually is $850,000 less than what the
district needs, assistant superintendent
of schools Kenny Blocker said.
Deutschman said the board should
make a decision one way or another
about media specialists.
"It's an idea that keeps coming up
every year," she said. "We either have to
do it and find out if it works or not, or
take it off the table and say never bring
it back to us again."
Contact Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline.com.


A8 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Exotic Asian landscape plants can require more attention


W hen Helen
Springer and
Linda Meyer of
Pine Ridge visited my gar-
den, they described the
evergreen
viburnum
plants land-
scapers had in-
stalled in their
yards. What
kind of Vibur-
num were they?
There are
about 150
species, most
originally from Jane'
Asia and a few JAN
from other tem-
perate northern GA
continents.
North America has some
15 species, five of which
occur in Florida. Three
exotic Viburnum species
are readily available from
local growers. Only one
Florida native, Walter's
Viburnum, is tolerant of
local heat zone 10's torrid,
wet summers.
Growers concentrate on
easily rooted cuttings that
are fast-growing and can
be pruned to form a dense
shrub within a year in a 6-
inch container As soon as
roots fill the pot, plants are
bumped up to 10-inch pots
and pruned again to pro-
mote compactness and
density. Growers use deep
well water, daily overhead
irrigation, man-made pot-
ting media, root hormones,
growth retardants, fungi-
cides, pesticides, fertiliz-
ers and more to
manipulate commercial
plants. The business is
labor-intensive and re-
quires long work days from
dawn to dusk.
Sweet Viburnum, V
odoratissimum, is a fast-
growing Asian tree origi-
nally ranging from the
Himalayas to the Philip-
pines and Japan. It can
grow 20 feet tall with a
stout, low-branching trunk.
Thick, low-luster leaves
are 3 to 6 inches long,
arranged in opposite pairs
along the twigs. Sides of
the leaves are folded up
along a slightly curved
midrib. Dead leaves and


stems, as well as bumps in
the leaves, indicate pest or
disease problems often
caused by infected, dirty
pruning tools. Sweet
Viburnum is the
fastest to grow
and therefore
cheap for land-
scapers to buy
Four-inch di-
ameter flower-
heads of small,
star-shaped
white flowers
have a pleasant
Weber odor Since the
E'S plant is sheared
several times a
year, gardeners
rarely allow
flowers to form. Fruit is a
cluster of red berries that
ripen black. Remove
overly long shoots and nip
off every tip in January or
February to force the stem
to branch out at the leaf
nodes. Sweet Viburnum is
a popular screening and
hedging plant along prop-
erty lines. It provides nest
sites and cover for birds
and wildlife.
Mirror-leaf Viburnum, V
odoratissimum "Awabuki"
is a selected cultivar with
large, round, high-gloss
leaves. It is uncommon, so
it's not often used as a
hedge plant,. but it makes a
strikingly attractive speci-
men in a shrub border or
lawn tree ring. '"Awabuki"
grows to 12 feet tall and
over 6 inches in diameter if


, 3I I>II 6,,,, I> 3
S11 III0 1,,,, 1I I

L (352) 601-13".


not pruned. Fragrant white
flowers cluster in large ter-
minal panicles at the twig
ends. Bushes can be totally
covered in flowerheads.
Prune immediately after
the flowers fade, unless the
decorative fruit clusters
are wanted. Florida birds
rarely eat exotic fruits.
Sandankwa Viburnum,
V suspensum, grows
slowly, so it's mostly used
as a foundation plant at
least 4 to 5 feet from a
building. It can grow 10
feet tall, but is usually
pruned into a small, round
shrub. Leaves are tex-
tured, opposite and dark
green. The clusters of fra-
grant white flowers are
pink-tinted.
Compact Viburmun, V.

WATERING FINES
Citrus County issues
citations that carry
with them a fine of
$100 for first
offenders of local
watering rules.
Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


rDance Lessons
eP\eiY TI le, t:) i--i 11,m
Le:ilr si\ill-,< 1:1- h:1 & list','


I. /i


- BILL CIST\ER -


Sl I. ,i i 1 ..t ,1

l i~t I ', i I., I
r' I 'i l .l >. .l.li I ll


ii': ~ I



N9


tinus, "Spring Bouquet," is
an upright grower that can
reach 8 to 10 feet. Dense,
dark green leaves are nar-
row, opposite and closely
spaced along the
branches. Scented pink-
white blooms blossom in


spring. Slower-growing
tinus responds well to
pruning and can be made
into a column in time.
The ladies' hedge was
Sweet Viburnum. The
foundation plant was likely
Sandankwa and the pretty


lawn specimen Mirror-leaf.

Jane Weber is a
professional gardener
and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows
thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are
welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an
appointment, call
352-249-6899 or email
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 A9


V
I
\1





A10 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


LIVING
Continued from PageAl

but no one would answer
me. I had stage III invasive
ductal carcinoma and
lymph nodes were in-
volved, so it was pretty up
there. I'm in remission
right now," Panaccione
explained.
"I was numb. I was terri-
fied. I thought when you
have cancer, you die. I
didn't fit the pattern. I
didn't fit any criteria and it
wasn't in my family I got
my diagnosis a week be-
fore my 55th birthday Your
body is in such shock, you
don't know what to do."
Panaccione said.
Her youngest son was so
affected by his mother's
illness that his grades at
the College of Central
Florida took a dive and he
quit. According to Panac-
cione, her son didn't want
to see anything that had to
do with her being sick.
Her daughter Danielle
Smallridge said family
members went on a rotat-
ing schedule to take care
of their mother during her
illness.
"Us kids would be in and
out," Smallridge said. "She
needed 'round-the-clock
help. We were all on rota-
tions. Everyone jumped in
and helped. Nothing else
mattered.
"You don't want to be-
lieve it The first thing you
think of: your mom is going
to die. We all tried to stay
strong for her; be positive
for her to keep her spirits
up. We always stayed posi-
tive and kept on with the
laughing and jokes."
"I would like to say,"
Panaccione added, "early


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Pat Panaccione, center, is pictured with two of her five
children Friday: Deana Williamson, left, and Danielle
Smallridge. Panaccione is in remission from stage III
breast cancer and is receiving support from her children
and family during the process of recovery.


Her youngest
son was so
affected by his
mother's illness
that his grades
at the College
of Central
Florida took a
dive and he
quit.

detection is the key, be-
cause I waited too long. I
hadn't been sick. This
could happen to anybody I
worry for my girls because
they now have a first rela-
tive with breast cancer. I
don't want anyone to have
to go through this. It's not
an easy thing to go
through. I'm so happy to be
alive.
"If my daughter wouldn't
have said something, it


would have traveled. I'm
so happy she said some-
thing because I don't know
what I would've done.
"I feel blessed. I thank
God I have the support of
my family because I think
that helps in recovery I
have my faith, which is
what gets me through, and
my kids.
"I want to go to all my
grandkids' weddings."
This year for Mother's
Day, Panaccione's family is
going to have a pool party
at her mother-in-law's
house.
Panaccione is available
to speak to breast cancer
survivors. You can reach
her through the breast
cancer support group at
the Robert Boissoneault
Oncology Institute in
Lecanto, 352-527-0106.


STEPS
Continued from Page Al

The first thing Kassidy
did, after receiving the
plaque and posing for pic-
tures, was to thank her
mom, who sat proudly just
a few feet away
Kody, who attended the
same ceremony, says the
same thing.
The 2012 Citrus High
School graduate is about
to enter the Navy, fulfill-
ing a dream of serving his
country
Kody says that dream
was born in his youth, as
he helped his mother dur-
ing her volunteering in
the community
"She's helped me and
Kassidy so much," Kody
said. "I like doing any-
thing I can to help her"
Their mother also can't
help but heap praise on
both her children.
Of Kassidy, an eighth-
grader at Inverness Mid-
dle School, she said:
"She's a lot like me she
doesn't meet a stranger"
Kody hopes for a Navy
career in special forces.
"I'm very proud of
him," Mom said, then
added: "I wanted him to
choose something really
safe and lucrative. He
wanted more."
Native daughter
Wood was born and
raised in Inverness, the
youngest of seven chil-
dren. One sibling and her


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father have passed, and
the rest of the family still
live in and around down-
town Inverness.
"There were always a
lot of people at our
house," she said.
Wood received from her
mom the same volunteer-
ing spirit that has rubbed
off on Kody and Kassidy
"She raised me to give
me back to the commu-
nity," Wood said. "We
didn't grow up with
money but my mom said
we can give of our time."
Of Kassidy, Wood said:
"She's doing with me
some of the things I did
with my mom."
Kassidy, an eighth-
grader at Inverness Mid-
dle School, has taken on
the same anti-tobacco
campaign of her mother,
who oversees the tobacco
prevention program for
the Citrus County Health
Department.
When Kassidy ran for
student body president,
her platform was estab-
lishing a SWAT program
- Students Working
Against Tobacco.
"This past year, she has
grown so much," her mom
said. "She took a cause
and ran with it."
Kassidy, like her
brother, deflects praise
back to her mother


"She's the sweetest per-
son you'd ever hope to
meet," Kassidy said. "I'm
a much better person
than I would be without
her in my life."
'My best friends'
Wood is a single mother
- divorced from both of
her children's fathers.
"I probably haven't
been the PTA kind of
mom," she said. "I tell my
kids, be true to yourself.
Don't be what someone
wants you to be."
They're a tight family
They have conversation
and Mom wants her kids
to know she's available -
regardless of the subject.
"They're my best
friends," Wood said. "If
I'm honest with them,
they'll be honest with me.
Honesty is sadly lacking
in a lot of families these
days."
Kody said his mom is a
great role model.
"She's just awesome.
She has all the qualities
you would want in a
mom," he said.
His sister agreed.
"My mom," Kassidy
said, "she's just bullet-
proof."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. corn


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Flotilla slates
safety checks
Homosassa U.S. Coast
Guard Flotilla 15-4 will offer
free vessel safety checks be-
ginning at 8 a.m. Saturday,
May 18, at Homosassa Wal-
mart on U.S. 19 off Cardinal
Street.
Vessels passing safety
checks are awarded a U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary 2013
decal. The 2013 decal informs
other boating law enforce-
ment agencies that a boat
was in full compliance with all
federal and Florida state boat-
ing laws during a safety check
for that year.
For more information, call
William Schultz at 352-382-
7281 or 352-212-2570, or
email gwillkari@gmail.com.
Auxiliary 15-1 to
offer boating class
Do the kids want to borrow
the boat? Before they leave
the dock, have your son or
daughter take the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary's About Boat-
ing Safely to establish a good
foundation for a safe boating
experience.
The three-evening class
meets from 7 to 9 p.m. May
20, 22 and 24. After success-
ful completion of the course,
participants will earn the
Florida Safe Boater's Card
from the Fish & Wildlife Com-
mission. Parents who sign up
with children will get a $10
discount for themselves. Cost
is $30 and includes instruction
by certified U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary instructors, a book
and numerous handouts.
Anyone born after Jan. 1,
1988, must have a Florida
Safe Boater's Card to legally
operate a vessel with a 10 HP
motor or greater.
For information or to regis-
ter, call Linda Jones at 352-
503-6199.
EMS slates EMT,
paramedic classes
The next Nature Coast
EMS emergency medical
technician class begins
Thursday, May 23, at the Na-
ture Coast EMS Administra-
tion building, 3876 W. Country
Hill Drive in Lecanto.


The EMT program course
is 16 weeks long and is de-
signed to prepare students to
provide basic life support
measures as a member of an
ambulance crew, at the scene
of an accident, during trans-
port to a hospital or medical
facility and in the medical fa-
cility. It will prepare students
to sit for the Florida Bureau of
EMS EMT Certification Exam.
Those interested in regis-
tering should contact student
services and complete an ap-
plication. The office is open
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday; however, ap-
pointments can be scheduled
after business hours if
needed.
For more information and
admission requirements, call
lead instructor Lori Thompson
at 352-601-7330 or email
Lori.thompson@naturecoast
ems.org.
Vets case manager
available monthly
The Citrus County Veterans
Services Department has an-
nounced a case manager will
be available during the week
to assist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide informa-
tion for other veterans'
benefits.
First Wednesday
monthly Lakes Regional Li-
brary, 1511 Druid Road,
Inverness.
Second Wednesday
monthly Homosassa Li-
brary, 4100 S. Grandmarch
Ave., Homosassa.
Third Wednesday
monthly Coastal Regional
Library, 8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
To make an appointment, call
352-527-5915.

SO YOU KNOW
Submit news notes to
the Chronicle via email
to community@
chronicleonline.com.
Include the date of
the event in the
subject line.
Publication on
specific days or pages
cannot be guaranteed.


Sea turtle travels a long way


Associated Press
MARATHON -A tagged juvenile
loggerhead sea turtle that traveled
some 2,000 miles on ocean currents
was expected to make a full recov-
ery after being rescued off the
Florida Keys, hospital officials said
Saturday
Officials at the Keys-based Turtle
Hospital said the turtle named
"Charley" was eating squid and his
digestive system was active.
"That's a step back towards the
ocean," said hospital manager
Bette Zirkelback. "We'll wait for
blood chemistry to come back. He's
already not floating and on the bot-
tom of his tank. So the prognosis is
very good."
Charley had been nurtured from
a hatchling as part of a sea turtle
headstart program between Jorge
Tadeo Lozano University in Colom-
bia and Mundo Marino Aquarium
in Argentina. He was just over
seven inches long and about two
pounds when he was released June
8 off Santa Marta, Colombia.
Hospital officials said Charley


22 miles off the Middle Keys, with a
ball of Gooseneck barnacles trailing
from him. Plastic remnants were
found in his stool, which hospital
officials said was the likely cause
for his medical issues.


May 7, 22 miles off the Florida Keys.
likely traveled some 2,000 from his
original release point, riding vari-
ous ocean currents before ending
up in the Gulf Stream.
A fisherman found him floating
in Sargasso weed on Tuesday about


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For freed women, recovery begins now


Associated Press
Year after year, the clock
ticked by and the calendar
marched forward, carry-
ing the three women fur-
ther from the real world
and pulling them deeper
into an isolated nightmare.
Now, for the women
freed from captivity inside
a Cleveland house, the or-
deal is not
over. Next
comes re-
covery -
a from sex-
ual abuse
and their
sudden,
jarring re-
Amanda entry into
Berry a world
disappeared as much dif-
a teenager. f e r e n t
from the one they were
snatched from a decade
ago.
Therapists say with ex-
tensive treatment and sup-
port, healing is likely for
the women, who were 14,
16 and 21 when they were
abducted. But it is often a
long and difficult process.
"It's sort of like coming
out of a
c o m a "
says Dr
Barbara
Green-
berg, a
I psycholo-
gist who
special-
Gina izes in
DeJesus tr eating
kidnapped a b u s e d
in 2004. teenagers.
"It's a very isolating and
bewildering experience."
In the world the women
left behind, a gallon of gas
cost about $1.80. Barack
Obama was a state senator
Phones were barely taking
pictures. Things did not
"go viral." There was no
YouTube, no Facebook, no
iPhone.
Emerging into the future
is difficult enough. The
two younger Cleveland
women are doing it with-
out the benefit of crucial
formative years.
"By taking away their
adolescence, they weren't
able to develop emotional
and psychological and so-
cial skills," says Duane
Bowers, who counsels


Associated Press
A missing poster rests on a tree May 8 outside the home of Amanda Berry in Cleveland. For Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight, who were
freed from captivity inside a Cleveland house earlier this week, the ordeal is not over next comes recovery.


traumatized families
through the National Cen-
ter for Missing and Ex-
ploited Children.
"They're 10 years behind
in these skills. Those need
to be caught up before they
can work on reintegrating
into society," he says.
That society can be ter-
rifying. As freed captive
Georgina DeJesus arrived
home from the hospital,
watched by a media horde,
she hid herself beneath a
hooded sweatshirt. The
freed Amanda Berry
slipped into her home
without being seen.
"They weren't hiding
from the press, from the
cameras," Bowers says.
"They were hiding from
the freedom, from the
expansiveness."
In the house owned by
Ariel Castro, who is
charged with kidnapping
and raping the women,
claustrophobic control
ruled. Police say Castro
kept them chained in a
basement and locked in
upstairs rooms, that he fa-
thered a child with one of
them and he starved and
beat one captive into mul-
tiple miscarriages.
In all those years, they
only set foot outside of the


Councilman:
Kidnap victims
getting lawyers
CLEVELAND -A
Cleveland official said three
women who survived a
decade-long kidnapping or-
deal are beginning to get
lawyers to help with
compensation.
City Councilman Brian
Cummins said the lawyers
will become a primary point
of contact for the victims as
money pours into a charita-
ble fund.
Cummins said Saturday

house twice and then
only as far as the garage.
Jessica Donohue-Dioh,
who works with survivors
of human trafficking as a
social work instructor at
Xavier University in
Cincinnati, says the free-
dom to make decisions can
be one of the hardest parts
of recovery
'"How should I respond?
What do they really want
from me?"' Donohue-Dioh
says, describing a typical
reaction. "They may feel
they may not have a choice
in giving the right answer"
That has been a


that the lawye
keep focus on
needs and ens
tegrity of the d
process.
He said the
ney General's
taken the lead
nicating with t
over compens
issues.
The women
cued from a C
house Monday
pearing years
suspect is jail
and kidnappin


challenge
Dugard, who
vocate for tr
after survivi
captivity -'
to speak up
what I wan
finding out
body else wa
told ABC Ne
Like Berr;
impregnated
and is now r
children.


Another step toward
rs will help normalcy for the three
the victims' women will be accepting
sure the in- something that seems ob-
onation vious to the rest of the
world: They have no rea-
Ohio Attor- son to feel guilty.
Office has "First of all, I'd make
d in commu- sure these young women
the women know that nothing that
station happened to them is their
fault," Elizabeth Smart,
were res- who was kidnapped at age
leveland 14 and held in sexual cap-
y after disap- tivity for nine months, told
earlier. A People magazine.
ad on rape Donohue-Dioh says even
g charges. for people victimized by
Charges. monstrous criminals, guilt
From wire reports is a common reaction. The
Cleveland women told po-
for Jaycee lice they were snatched
is now an ad- after accepting rides from
*auma victims Castro.
ng 18 years in Family support will be
'learning how crucial, the therapists say
p, how to say But what does family
nt instead of mean when one member
what every- has spent a decade
ants," Dugard trapped with strangers?
*ws. "The family has to be
y, Dugard was ready to include a stranger
I by her captor into its sphere," Bowers
raising the two says. "Because if they try
to reintegrate the 14-year-


old girl who went missing,
that's not going to work.
That 14-year-old girl
doesn't exist anymore.
They have to accept this
stranger as someone they
don't know."
Natascha Kampusch,
who was kidnapped in
Austria at age 10 and spent
eight years in captivity, has
said that her 2006 reunion
with her family was both
euphoric and awkward.
"I had lived for too long
in a nightmare, the psy-
chological prison was still
there and stood between
me and my family," Kam-
pusch wrote in "3096
Days," her account of the
ordeal.
Kampusch, now 25, said
in a German television in-
terview that she was strug-
gling to form normal
relationships, partly be-
cause many people seem
to shy away from her.
"What a lot of these peo-
ple say is, 'What's more im-
portant than what
happened is how people
react,"' says Greenberg,
the psychologist.


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NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Suicide reflects despair of Mideast youth


Associated Press
SOUK AL-JUMMA,
Tunisia On the day he
chose to die, Adel Khedri
woke up at 6:30 a.m., took
his black backpack and
headed down to the busy
boulevard where he
worked as a cigarette
peddler.
It was the last in a series
of odd jobs that had de-
fined his hand-to-mouth
existence for almost nine
years. He couldn't afford to
pay bribes to get hired as a
driver or a guard. The
Tunisian army didn't need
him. There were few fac-
tory jobs. And the owner at
a fast food restaurant in
neighboring Libya had
cheated him out of wages
as a dishwasher.
So on March 12, three
weeks after his 27th birth-
day, Adel left the dirty room
he shared with his older
brother in a Tunis slum for
the tree-lined Avenue
Habib Bourguiba, once the
stage for the first of the
Arab Spring uprisings.
He stopped in front of
the art deco Municipal
Theater. He poured gaso-
line over his body Then he
set himself on fire.
Adel died 19 hours later.
One of his last words to a
doctor at the burn center
was "faddit" slang for
"fed up."
MEN
Adel is one of 178 people
in Tunisia who have set
themselves on fire since
the self-immolation two
years ago of another high
school dropout-turned-
street vendor launched the
Arab Spring.
These two book-ends of
a revolution that toppled
four Arab dictators show
how little has changed in
between for millions of
jobless, hopeless 20-
somethings across the Mid-
dle East and North Africa.
The difficulty of finding a
job, which helped spark the
unrest, is now a prescrip-
tion for continued turmoil.
Youth unemployment
worldwide is up to about
12.3 percent, in part be-


46Mjobs needed by 2020


Associated Press
Issam Khedri, 29, eldest brother of cigarette vendor Adel Khedri, shows photos of,
from left, his brother Adel, his mother, Latifa, and his father, Habib, April 14 in his room
in the Mellassine slum of the Tunisian capital, Tunis.


In the Middle East, youth
unemployment is expected to rise
from 27.7 percent in 2011 to
30 percent in 2018, the International
Labor Organization reported this
week. In North Africa, a slight
increase is expected, from
23.3 percent to 23.9 percent.


cause of the global finan-
cial crisis that began five
years ago. But some areas
of the Middle East and
North Africa suffer from
more than twice that rate,
because of stubborn labor
market problems com-
pounded by the turmoil of
the Arab Spring.
And the future looks
even worse. In the Middle
East, youth unemploy-
ment is expected to rise
from 27.7 percent in 2011
to 30 percent in 2018, the
International Labor Or-
ganization reported this
week. In North Africa, a
slight increase is ex-
pected, from 23.3 percent
to 23.9 percent.
Economists say fixing
the problem will require
broad and deep changes,
such as overhauling edu-
cation, slashing bloated
public sectors and encour-
aging entrepreneurship.
"There is no quick


immolations make up about
25 percent of admissions,
according to Dr Amen Allah
Messaadi, the center's
trauma chief. Some victims
suffer from mental prob-
lems, but most are just like
Adel unemployed high-
school dropouts in their 20s.


POPULATION
377 million in 2011,
up from 363 million in
2009
In Arab Spring coun-
tries, anywhere from 40
percent to 60 percent of
the population are esti-
mated to be younger than
25, with the biggest youth
bulge in Yemen and the
smallest in Tunisia.
Fertility rates, while
falling, drive the world's
second highest rate of
population growth, of 1.8
percent per year in 2011.
YOUTH
UNEMPLOYMENT
(2011, age 15-24)
Worldwide: 12.3
percent
Developed economies,
including European
Union: 17.6 percent


Middle East: 27.7
percent
North Africa: 23.3
percent
ECONOMY/JOBS
The region's Gross
Domestic Product is al-
most $2.7 billion, half of
that from six oil-
exporting countries with
just 12 percent of the re-
gion's population. Eco-
nomic growth averaged
4.9 percent a year in the
2000s.
It would have to reach
6 percent a year to cre-
ate 46 million jobs and
reduce unemployment
to the global norm of 6
percent by 2020, accord-
ing to Elena Ian-
chovichina, the World
Bank's lead economist
in the region.
From wire reports


solution that will address
all the aspirations of young
people looking for jobs
now," said Masood Ahmed,
head of the International
Monetary Fund for the Mid-
dle East and North Africa
(MENA).
In the meantime, the
numbers add up to a gen-
eration in trouble.
In Tunisia, 143 of the
people who lit themselves
aflame over the past two
years, many of them unem-
ployed, have died. Similar
self-immolations have been
reported in Algeria, Egypt,
Morocco, Jordan, Bahrain
and Lebanon, though in
smaller numbers.
A month after Adel's
death, five of the 20 beds at
the Ben Arous burn center
in Tunis held people who
had set themselves on fire,
including two young men
newly arrived from the poor
provincial towns of Kasser-
ine and Ben Guerdane. Self-


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NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Royal visit


Associated Press
Britain's Prince Harry ap-
plauds Saturday during
the opening ceremony for
the 2013 Warrior Games,
at the U.S. Olympic
Training Center, in
Colorado Springs, Colo.

Cops: Gunman
takes hostages
TRENTON, N.J. -A
standoff with an armed man
who police said took multi-
ple hostages was in its sec-
ond day Saturday as
authorities worked to nego-
tiate his surrender and his
captives' release.
The man, whose identity
has not been released, re-
mained holed-up in a two-
story red brick house in
South Trenton more than
25 hours after the standoff
began Friday afternoon, au-
thorities said.
Calif. triple killing
suspect sought
PETROLIA, Calif. -
SWAT teams from three
counties, federal law en-
forcement officials and local
police on the ground and
in the air have joined the
hunt for a Northern Califor-
nia man wanted in the
killing of his wife and two
young daughters.
The extra help which
includes two helicopters and
an armored vehicle -
comes as law enforcement
officials continued Saturday
to search through the
rugged terrain of California's
remote North Coast for
Shane Franklin Miller, 45.
Panel: Tear down
Sandy Hook
NEWTOWN, Conn. -
Newtown parents Steven
Uhde and Peter Barresi
didn't want the town to
abandon the elementary
school property where 20
first-graders and six educa-
tors were killed in Decem-
ber and build a new school
elsewhere, saying that
would be like letting the
gunman win.
So they were glad Friday
night when a task force of 28
local elected officials voted
unanimously for a plan call-
ing for tearing down Sandy
Hook Elementary School
and constructing a new build-
ing on the same property.
Nuke protesters
to stay in jail
KNOXVILLE, Tenn.--A
judge has ruled that a nun
and two other protesters
must remain in jail until they
are sentenced in Septem-
ber for breaking into a nu-
clear weapons plant in
Tennessee.
Sister Megan Rice and
protesters Michael Walli
and Greg Boertje-Obed
were convicted Wednesday
of sabotaging the plant and
damaging federal property
last year at the Y-12 Na-
tional Security Complex in
Oak Ridge.
US Arabs engage
in service day
DETROIT Roughly
2,000 Arab-Americans and
others in about a dozen
communities nationwide
volunteered their time Sat-
urday as part of the Na-
tional Arab American
Service Day.
They tackled a punch list
that included boarding up
and tearing down aban-
doned homes in Detroit and
cleaning up areas hard hit
by Superstorm Sandy in
New York.
-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


IRS knew tea party targeted


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sen-
ior Internal Revenue Serv-
ice officials knew agents
were targeting tea party
groups as early as 2011, ac-
cording to a draft of an in-
spector general's report
obtained by The Associated
Press that seemingly con-
tradicts public statements
by the IRS commissioner
The IRS apologized Fri-
day for what it acknowl-
edged was "inappropriate"
targeting of conservative
political groups during the
2012 election to see if they
were violating their tax-
exempt status. The agency
blamed low-level employ-
ees, saying no high-level of-
ficials were aware.
But on June 29, 2011,
Lois G. Lerner, who heads
the IRS division that over-
sees tax-exempt organiza-


On June 29, 2011, Lois G. Lerner, who
heads the IRS division that oversees
tax-exempt organizations, learned
at a meeting that groups were being
targeted, according to the
watchdog's report.


tions, learned at a meeting
that groups were being tar-
geted, according to the
watchdog's report. At the
meeting, she was told that
groups with "Tea Party,"
"Patriot" or "9/12 Project"
in their names were being
flagged for additional and
often burdensome scrutiny,
the report says.
The 9-12 Project is a
group started by conserva-
tive TV personality Glenn
Beck.
Lerner instructed agents


to change the criteria for
flagging groups "immedi-
ately," the report says.
The Treasury Depart-
ment's inspector general
for tax administration is
expected to release the re-
sults of a nearly yearlong
investigation in the com-
ing week. The AP obtained
part of the draft report,
which has been shared
with congressional aides.
Among the other revela-
tions, on Aug. 4, 2011,
staffers in the IRS' Rulings


and Agreements office
"held a meeting with chief
counsel so that everyone
would have the latest in-
formation on the issue."
On Jan, 25, 2012, the cri-
teria for flagging suspect
groups was changed to,
"political action type or-
ganizations involved in
limiting/expanding Gov-
ernment, educating on the
Constitution and Bill of
Rights, social economic re-
form/movement," the re-
port says.
While this was happen-
ing, several committees in
Congress were writing nu-
merous letters IRS Commis-
sioner Douglas Shulman to
express concern because
tea party groups were com-
plaining of IRS harassment
In Shulman's responses,
he did not acknowledge
targeting of tea party
groups.


Dozens die in blasts


Associated Press
Explosions killed dozens of people and injured many others Saturday in Reyhanli, near Turkey's border with
Syria.

Syria-linked group blamed in Turkey explosions


Associated Press

REYHANLI, Turkey In one
of the deadliest attacks in Turkey
in recent years, two car bombs ex-
ploded near the border with Syria
on Saturday, killing 43 and
wounding 140 others. Turkish of-
ficials blamed the attack on a
group linked to Syria, and a
deputy prime minister called the
neighboring country's intelli-
gence service and military "the
usual suspects."
The blasts, which were 15 min-
utes apart and hit the town of
Reyhanli's busiest street, raised
fears that Turkey could increas-
ingly be drawn into Syria's brutal
civil war.
Turkey already hosts Syria's
political opposition and rebel
commanders, has given shelter to
hundreds of thousands of Syrian
refugees and in the past retali-


ated against Syrian shells that
landed in Turkey
Deputy Prime Minister Besir
Atalay said the assailants were
from Turkey, but were linked to
Syria's intelligence service.
"We have to a great extent com-
pleted our work toward identify-
ing the assailants," he told
reporters. "We have established
that the organization and as-
sailants have links to the pro-
regime mukhabarat (intelligence)
organization."
He did not name the group, but
said the aim of the attack was to
pit Turks against Syrian refugees
in Reyhanli.
Earlier, another deputy prime
minister, Bulent Arinc said: "Our
thoughts are that their
mukhabarat and armed organiza-
tions are the usual suspects in
planning and the carrying out of
such devilish plans," he said.


Arinc said the attacks were still
being investigated, but that If it's
proven that Syrian was behind
the attack, Turkey would "do
whatever is necessary," without
specifying if that included mili-
tary action.
One of the car bombs ex-
ploded outside the city hall
while the other went off outside
the post office. Reyhanli, a main
hub for Syrian refugees and
rebels in Turkey's Hatay
province, is just across the bor-
der from Syria's Idlib province.
Private NTV television, citing
unnamed security sources, said
the explosions were remote-
controlled and that plastic ex-
plosives were used.
Images showed people franti-
cally carrying the wounded
through the rubble-strewn streets
to safety Black smoke billowed
from a tall building.


Chrysler recalls almost 470,000 Jeep SUVs


Associated Press

DETROIT Chrysler is
recalling 469,000 Jeep
SUVs worldwide because
they can shift into neutral
without warning on
startup.
The recall affects 2005
to 2010 Grand Cherokees
and 2006 to 2010
Commanders.
U.S. safety regulators
say cracks in a circuit
board can cause a faulty
signal as the SUVs are
being started. If the vehi-
cles shift into neutral, they
can roll away
Chrysler says the prob-
lem has caused 26 crashes
and two injuries.


Chrysler will notify own-
ers and dealers will up-
date software to take care
of the problem. Chrysler
found cracks in a circuit
board that turns the four-
wheel-drive system on and
off.
Repairs will be made at
no cost to owners.
The recall covers
295,000 vehicles in the
U.S., 28,500 in Canada, and
4,200 in Mexico. The re-
maining 141,000 are out-
side North America.
The company says in
documents filed with the
National Highway Traffic
Administration that it
began looking into the
problem after a customer


Associated Press
The 2006 Jeep Commander sits on display in 2005 at
Chelsea Proving Grounds in Chelsea, Mich. Chrysler is
recalling 469,000 Jeep SUVs worldwide because they
can shift into neutral without warning, the company
announced Saturday.
complained an SUV rolled after being started
away in January of 2012 remotely


World BRIEFS

On the mend


Associated Press
Reshma Begum receives
treatment Saturday at a
hospital in Savar, near
Dhaka, Bangladesh. The
seamstress who survived
17 days before being
rescued from a collapsed
garment factory building
was exhausted, panicked
and dehydrated as she re-
covered in a Bangladeshi
hospital Saturday, but
she was generally in good
condition, according to
her doctors.

Sharif declares
election victory
ISLAMABAD Former
Pakistani Prime Minister
Nawaz Sharif declared vic-
tory following a historic
election marred by violence
Saturday, as unofficial, par-
tial vote counts showed his
party with an overwhelming
lead.
If his victory is confirmed,
it would be a remarkable
comeback for the 63-year-
old Sharif, who has twice
served as the country's pre-
mier but was toppled in a
military coup in 1999.
6.5 earthquake
hits Tonga
DENVER -A 6.5-
magnitude earthquake has
hit the Pacific island nation
of Tonga, but no tsunami
warning has been issued.
The U.S. Geological Sur-
vey's National Earthquake
Information Center said the
quake hit shortly after 8:46
p.m. GMT Saturday.
The quake struck 218
miles northwest of the capi-
tal, Nuku'alofa.
Jihadist group
claims attacks
BAMAKO, Mali A radi-
cal jihadist group in north-
ern Mali that ruled the town
of Gao for nearly a year
said it was behind the latest
suicide attacks.
An official made the an-
nouncement Saturday.
Three suicide bombers
exploded themselves Fri-
day in Gossi, wounding two
soldiers. Another attacker in
Menaka was killed before
he could detonate his
explosives.
Rebels, gov't
fight over roads
BEIRUT Syrian rebels
on Saturday cut a newly
built bypass road linking
the capital Damascus with
the northern city of Aleppo,
an activist group said,
while state media reported
government troops have
secured a strategic high-
way between the capital
and the southern city of
Daraa.
The reported fighting
came as an activist group
said U.S. ambassador to
Syria Robert Ford, who left
the country last year, met
with a rebel commander at
a border crossing point with
Turkey.
Israelis protest
proposed budget
JERUSALEM Israeli
police said protesters
marched in Tel Aviv on Sat-
urday over proposed tax
hikes and benefit cuts.
Spokesman Micky
Rosenfeld said about two
thousand rallied Saturday
night.
Protesters are angry over
the proposed decrees by Is-
rael's new finance minister
Yair Lapid who started his
job several weeks ago.
Lapid ran in January's
election on a ticket vowing
to help the middle class.
-From wire reports









EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes can be
found on Page A18 of
today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


RlA FALLS




t thudiers..........






Our pilot announced,

"Passengers on the right

side can see smoke .

on the horizon..."

It was actually the mist

Rising from Victoria Falls

Zimbabwe, and we wer

about 50 miles aw.


~av
It'


Trip over Victoria Falls is

breathtaking experience


In prehistoric times, the
Zambezi River flowed
southward in the area of
what is now Victoria
Falls, but a nearby volcano's
eruption changed all of that
The river now flows eastward,
as it cascades around a pad of
lava laid down by the volcano,
cutting a chasm enjoyed by


thousands every year.
Being listed as one of the
Seven Natural Wonders of the
World garners plenty of
attention from travelers,
naturalists and geologists.
The pioneer explorer David
Livingston is credited with


Page A17


Trip to the British Isles
A group of 16 people from Citrus County recently took a cruise around the
British Isles. On a cold day in April, five residents visited the city of Inverness,
Scotland. From left are: Judy Ireton, Barbara Whittemore, Loretta Rogers, Joanie
Diffenderfer and Pat Edmunds. They are standing in front of the Inverness castle.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS

The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Neil Sawyer
SPONTANEOUS
TRAVELER

Sunset on the
Zambezi River.


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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C B ID/I F H 6:00 I 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 110:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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lHAD 59 68 59 45 54 Me" (2005) c Elisa Donovan. 'G' Drama) Sherry Stringfield, Adrian Paul. a G'
S 302 201 302 2 "Journey 2:The "Wrathof the Titans"(2012) Sam Game of Thrones (N) Veep (N) Family Tree Game of Thrones (In
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S**" 'The Chronicles of Real Time With Bill ** "Ice Age: Continental Drift" ** "Meet the Fockers"(2004) Robert De "American"
303 202 303 Riddick"m c Maher 'MA' (2012, Comedy) 'PG' c Niro. Future in-laws clash in Flodda.
(HGTB 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Who's Lived You Live in What? Extreme Homes'G' Hunters |Hunt Intl Hawaii Hawaii
i 51 25 51 32 42 Swamp People "Ride or Swamp People Ax Men "Hell or High Ax Men "The Final Swamp People Young Only in Amerca With
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E 24 38 24 31 Nightmare" (2012) 'NR' Docudrama) Aunjanue Ellis. c bonds with Caroline. attacked. (N) '14' Carlina White Story"
"Murder on the 13th Floor" (2012) Sean *** "Cries in the Dark" (2006) Eva La Rue, ** "Baby for Sale" (2004) Dana Delany A
50 119 Patrick Thomas. (In Stereo) N R' Adam Harrington. (In Stereo) 'NR' c couple helps bust a baby broker. c
S**** "Alien"(1979) Tom Skerritt. **** "Aliens" (1986) Sigourney Weaver. Space Maines *** "Alien 3"(1992, Science Fiction)
( J 320 221 320 3 3 (In Stereo) 'R' m battle an army of deadly monsters. 'R' c Sigourney Weaver. (In Stereo) R'
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(WNJ 103 62 103 Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (In Stereo) 'PG' Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass
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(STAf) 370 271 370 Smith. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' "The Tower" MA' (2012) Milla Jovovich. 'R' "The Tower" MA' Kumar"
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169 53 169 30 35 Turner, Hope Lange.'NR' c Drama) Rosalind Russel'NR' B Drama) Irene Dunne. 'NR' (DVS)
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(ii 350 261 350 Time" Misunderstanding"(2011) Jane Fonda. captures the experiences of black women. c (1997) Bill Bellamy'R'
S 48 33 48 31 34 "ara Croft: Tomb Raider" NBA Tip- NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) Inside the NBA (N) "Biker
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truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn Pawn Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow Tow_ Tow Tow
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CSI: Miami "No Good CSI: Miami "Rest in CSI: Miami "At Risk" (In CSIl: Miami "Law & CSI: Miami "Habeas CSI: Miami "Last Straw"
W 117 69 117 Deed" '14' Pieces" '14' Stereo) '14' Disorder"' 14' Corpse" '14' '14' c
(WGN3A 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30Rock |30Rock


Remember mom


on special day


D ear Readers:
Happy Mother's
Day. Please phone
your mother, grand-
mother, mother-in-law,
stepmother or foster
mother and wish them
the best. And our special
good wishes to all the
new mommies who are
celebrating their very
first Mother's Day Also,
please don't forget those
for whom this
day, for what-
ever reason,
is filled with
sadness. Give
them a call
and say you
are thinking
of them.
Dear
Annie: An-
o t h e r
Mother's Day .
is here, and I
dread it. I dis- ANN
like spending MAIL
any time with
my mother,
but I do it anyway be-
cause I feel it is the right
thing to do.
My father was an alco-
holic, and Mom was abu-
sive, both emotionally
and physically Many
times, my siblings and I
had to sit in the car out-
side the bars while my
parents were inside
drinking. She also beat us
with the wire end of a fly
swatter. One of her fa-
vorite things was to slap
me across the face. But
what hurt the most were
the cruel and cutting
things she said about how
I looked and dressed.


I
.E


Growing up, I had to
wait on her hand and
foot, getting her ciga-
rettes, beer, coffee or any-
thing else. I also was
expected to do a lot of the
housework and cooking.
Ironically, I don't resent
that as much because I
learned skills I might not
have otherwise devel-
oped. Her abuse also
taught me to be a better
parent, because
I knew how I
did not want
to raise my
children.
I know Mom
was unhappy,
and I am sure
she felt
trapped, but so
did my father.
She is now a
widow, cries a
lot and wants
E'S attention and
BOX sympathy.
When I was di-
agnosed with
cancer, it was all about
what she was going
through. She never once
asked me how I was
doing. After 63 years of
this, I am tired of her ex-
cuses for the way she
treated me. She has
never said she was sorry
It was always someone
else's fault. Am I a bad
daughter for not wanting
to be around her? Over
It
Dear Over: No. We
think you've put up with a
great deal over the years.
Whatever you give back
to your mother is a self-
less act of pure kindness.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"42" (PG-13) 3:15 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R)
11:45 a.m., 5:05 p.m., 7 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
3:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 11:45 p.m., 3:10 p.m.,
6:45 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
2:05 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 12:20 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R)
12:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:45 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"42" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R)


11:50 a.m., 5:20 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
4 p.m. No passes.
"The Great Gatsby" (PG-13)
In 3D. 12:45 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 2:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:20 p.m., 1:20 p.m.,
3:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7 p.m.,
8 p.m. No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R)
12:30 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:05 p.m.
"Tyler Perry Presents
Peeples" (PG-13) 12 p.m.,
2:25 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Wild fear
6 Get lost!
11 Play a guitar
16 River to the
Caspian Sea
20 Stage whisper
21 Native American group
22 Baggy
23 Called
25 Place
26 "Bolero" composer
27 Brown pigment
28 Flavoring plant
29 -tac-toe
30 Used a blue pencil
32 Of trees
34 Mil. rank
35 War god
37 Finished
38 Storehouse
39 Snappy comeback
41 Paramour
43 Stengel orAffleck
44 Kind of race
46 Scrapes
49 King of Judea
50 Autos
54 Blossom
55 Minty drink
56 Italy's shape
57 Leave
unmentioned
58 Bar bill
59 Reiner and Sagan
60 Liking
61 Cheese variety
62 Exude
64 Shows
displeasure
65 Drills
66 Hollywood's
Strip
67 Gamblers' haven
68 Sprints
69 Cooks
70 Owns
71 "Able was I I saw
Elba"
72 Use watercolors
74 Walked through water
75 Metal fasteners
77 CIA predecessor
80 Moist
81 Condescend
82 Roman moon goddess


Theater section (abbr.)
Clippers
Corn
Got along
Stop!
Cash-and- -
Kitchen appliance
Get spliced
Hotel
Mine entrance
Part of the foot
Tropical fruit
Groaned
Citation
Express out loud
Puts to use
Wireless set
Simpleton
Oregon's capital
Sock design
Crystal-filled rock
Salon item
Molt
Jerry Lewis
Surround
Gullet
Notable time
Hawaiian porch
Die down
Layers
Prize
Mimicking
Nut for pies
Golfer Palmer,
to friends
Prepared apples
Actor Rogen
Put forth effort
- palm
Hot drink


DOWN
1 Macaroni and spaghetti
2 Moving about
3 Female relative
4 Crete's Mount -
5 Yield
6 Endeavors
7 Lunar landscape fea-
ture
8 Stream
9 Under the covers
10 Brooks or Gibson
11 Drank noisily
12 Hoyden


13 Automaton
14 Employer
15 Sheer
16 Hard to follow
17 Go team!
18 Friend from Tijuana
19 Crowbar
24 Fender spoiler
31 White cliffs city
32 Famed fabulist
33 Singer Guthrie
36 Cabbage salad
38 - Salaam
40 Mogul
42 Poem
43 Small rooms
44 Cheers
45 Diminutive suffix
46 Happily ever -
47 Censure
48 Batman's sidekick
49 Injures
50 Exodus leader
51 Divert
52 Man on horseback
53 Declare
55 Pleasure trip
56 Exposed
59 Dracula
60 Coin of a kind
61 Strong wind
63 Summit
64 Snoops
65 Sheriff's star
66 Low-cal lunch
69 Fabric for pool tables
70 A sweetener
73 Lopsided
74 Use a scale
75 Donkey
76 Do a farm job
77 Movie award
78 Window covering
79 Feature of some type
81 Jig
82 Mammoth
84 Horned animal, for
short
85 New York's
Island
86 Cards held
88 Vessel
89 Polo
90 Highly decorated
93 Eastern queen
94 Stephen King's home


Beau -
Kind of toast
Unclose, poetically
Charity
North Carolina's capital
Paradise
Tumultuous
Maid (archaic)
Delicious drink
Bombing mission


- breve
Harvests
Spirit in a lamp
Jones or Kelly
Intone
Perceived
Went wrong
Pop
- Canaveral
Wild goat


Ripped
Diplomacy
Insect
Car for hire
Court


Puzzle answer is on Page A19.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A16 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans' Family Fun Day is May 25


Be there or be square! Sin- and egg races, potato sack races,
gles, parents, grandpar- Frisbee competition, baton re-
ents, children and lays and toss-the-tennis-ball-
grandchildren, if you're part of into-the-bucket contests are just
the veterans community, then the beginning. Hungry? Both
this one's for you. food and admission
From 10 a.m. to are free to all veterans
3 p.m. Saturday, May and their families. Do-
25, folks will have a nations will be ac-
chance to see and cepted, but are not
participate in the required.
kind of fun we "old- Clowns, face paint-
sters" grew up with. ing, hot dogs, ham-
The Citrus County burgers and cold
Veterans Coalition drinks will be accom-
cordially invites panied by live music
everyone to a party Barbara Corcoran to sing to, dance to or
on a portion of the VETERANS' just sit and enjoy.
5-acre landscape VIEWS Bring your own lawn
owned by the Christ chairs and "set a
Way Fellowship spell!"


Church at the corner of Inde-
pendence Highway and Christy
Way in Inverness (one block west
of the CCVC/DAV headquarters
building). Parking will be guided
by volunteers.
Hula Hoop marathons, spoon


Hourly drawings will be called
for door prizes that won't re-
quire the winner be present.
Games and competitions will
have real awards for first, sec-
ond and third places. Souvenir
pin-back buttons of the event


will be on sale for $1 each, and
they'll be in limited supply, so
don't be late!
The goal we're setting is an in-
crease in our membership and
to remind the community that
we are here not only to show our
appreciation, but to offer help
year-round. The CCVC will have
a tent and table with informed
volunteers more than happy to
welcome new members for just
$10 a year. The group is one of
the most active in the veterans
community, and to share our ca-
maraderie, we've invited other
veteran-based groups to come on
out and let you know what they
are all about, too. Maybe you'll
find more than one group to join!
This event will be held rain or
shine, so don't give up on us if
you see a few clouds float by Fun
is the name of the game on this
day We love to bring veterans
and their families in the area to-
gether and give something back
for the service that goes along


with that duty, because without
our veterans and without their
families supporting that service,
there wouldn't be a reason to
recognize Memorial Day Fourth
of July, Veterans Day and the
freedom we have today. What
better way to show our thanks
than to give these fine people a
chance to have a fun day out "on
us."
And now, a little bit of history,
since Memorial Day is just
around the corner. While the
exact birthplace of this organ-
ized day of remembrance is still
being argued with more than
two dozen cities and towns lay-
ing claim to the title, plus several
women's groups in the South
claiming to have been decorat-
ing the graves of soldiers since
the Civil War, the one thing
agreed upon is that it is a day not
of division, but of coming to-
gether to recognize those
who have given their all for our
country


To me, this isn't to say we re-
member just those who died in
battle, but who died even in later
years due to injuries or illnesses
even remotely connected to
their duty to keep the United
States of America free. There is
nothing easy about being in the
military, even in peacetime.
Families must endure deploy-
ments and other assignments
that take their loved ones away
from their arms and shorten the
time and experiences they might
otherwise have shared.
Look for our flyers and an-
nouncements about the May 25
Family Fun Day, or contact us via
email. Visit www.ccvcfl.org for
more exciting details. See you
there!

Barbara L. Corcoran is public
information officer of the
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition Inc. Email her at
Barbiel @ccvcfl. org.


SMOKE
Continued from Page A15

putting Victoria Falls "on
the map."
The Zambezi River, with
headwaters in the neigh-
boring country of Zambia,
is one of Africa's major
rivers, 1,500 miles in
length. On its course to-
ward the Indian Ocean,
the river drops approxi-
mately 5,000 feet in alti-
tude and is one of Africa's
last remaining wild rivers,
drawing many whitewater
enthusiasts from around
the world. However, much
of the river is relatively
smooth and great for ca-
sual boaters to enjoy nu-
merous species of wildlife,
offering some of the most
spectacular sunsets ever
seen. There is very little
commercial boat traffic on
the Zambezi.
On a typical river "float"
in calm waters, wildlife -
particularly hippos,
elephants and the ever-
present crocodile can
be viewed up close. On a
couple of occasions we ob-
served elephants relaxing,
cooling off and playing in
the shallow of the river.
Once, we watched as a
group of elephants playing
in the water accepted a
lone elephant that had
been pacing back and
forth on the riverbank -
obviously wanting to join
them. It became clear that
there is a definite protocol
among elephants to join-
ing in a water game, prob-
ably much as we have in
our various games.
The Zambezi River
above Victoria Falls calms
and widens, giving the ap-
pearance of a large lake.
Across this "lake" is a
tremendous bilious cloud
of rising mist from the 354-
foot waterfalls cascading
into a very narrow canyon,
causing what locals call
the "smoke that thunders."
This is what we saw from
the airplane on our
approach.
Several walking paths
are discreetly placed as
near to the falls as possible
for the best views. The
roar of the falls is deafen-
ing, and at times the spray
from the falls seemed akin
to a monsoon, making a
poncho and camera pro-
tection necessary
A more spectacular view
of the falls is from a heli-
copter. There has been
nothing in my travels that
quite matches the excite-
ment of hovering over Vic-
toria Falls observing the
gaping chasm below being
hammered by 150,000 gal-
lons of water per second.
The bird's-eye view of the
falls, the intrusion of a
controversial railroad
bridge over the chasm and
the adjacent town of Victo-
ria Falls is a once-in-a-
lifetime event.
The "Devil's Cauldron,"
a natural hot tub on the lip
of the falls, is for brave
hearts only To see people
actually enjoying being
within inches, looking over


-'P.o


NEIL SAWYER/Special to the Chronicle
ABOVE: Two elephants, ready to play. BELOW: Bird's eye view of the falls.


--- --a--


ABOVE: Sundown on the Zambezi. BELOW: Upstream
from the falls on the Zambezi.



!*- 40 .
*r ^ '1.


WANT TO TRAVEL WITH THE WRITER?
* Neil Sawyer and his wife, Karyn, will travel to Israel in
January 2014.
The trip will be 15 days with an optional six days to
Jordan. There will be a maximum 16 persons in the
group; space is still open for six.
For more information, call Sawyer at 352-795-5804.


the edge of a 354-foot
freefall to the rocks below
- held back only by a thin
ribbon of limestone de-
posit is enough to drive
me to the poolside bar at
our hotel.
Stay around for a sunset
thrill of observing the
backlighted "smoke that
thunders." Ever-present
rainbows and changing
patterns of mist in the or-
ange light of the setting
sun are spectacular.
Avisit to Victoria Falls is
a destination for some
travelers, but it is more
likely visited by those who
are on a safari or other
outdoor attraction in this
beautiful part of South
Africa.
Please wave to the folks
in the Devil's Cauldron for
me if you're in the neigh-
borhood, if they're still
there. Happy travels.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer
have been residents of
Crystal River for 28 years.
They travel frequently,
havingbeen to 48 states,
66 countries and seven
continents. Neil
welcomes comments and
questions about travel.
Contact him via email to
gobuddy@
tampabayrrcom.


VACATIONING?
* Remember to take photos during the trip for the
Dream Vacation Photo Contest.
* Send a photo with a brief description of the trip.
Include the names of anyone pictured, and
include a contact name and phone number.
* Submit photos to the Chronicle at 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429.


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SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
Due to cancellations of a
few participants, two open
spots still remain for this
year's veterans' trip to
Hawaii. The annual trek, co-
ordinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for
Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Partici-
pants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai
(Marriott), Hawaii (stay in the
KMC inside the volcano) and
Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
McLean will have a per-
sonal meeting at his home
with any interested persons to
cover details and Information.
Also scheduled is a Sept. 10
luncheon meeting at the Rose
& Crown Room of Citrus Hills
Country Club for 2013 partici-
pants to meet and get up-to-
date information.
The 2014 trip will be Feb.
25 through March 14, and
McLean can provide informa-
tion about that trip.
Reservations should be
made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-
5131, or email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
The May 27, Memorial Day,
ceremony will be a noon.
Hamburgers and hot dogs
with all the fixings will be
served at 1 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and din-
ing hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren) and female vet-
erans who served during
wartime. Call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-249-
7663, or membership chair-
man Barbara Logan, 352-
795-4233.
Roast pork dinner will be
served from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Friday, May 17, at the post
home. All members and the
public are welcome. Donation
is$ 7.
All profits help support the
many programs of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary. For
more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
U H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members


and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for


tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Chicken dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, May 17.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Gerald A. Shook
Chapter No. 70 meets at
2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. The
next meeting will by May 14.
All members are asked to
come to the meeting.
We thank veterans for their
service and welcome any dis-
abled veteran to join us from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. any Tuesday
or Thursday at the chapter
hall. This is also the time that
we accept donated nonper-
ishable foods for our continu-
ing food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Visit the website at
http://davfl70.yktc.us.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-


tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.


Honor Guard


Special to the Chronicle
Who are these men and what do they do? This is the Honor Guard from the American Legion Post 155 in Crystal River.
These are the men who, upon request, honor our veterans at the National Cemetery in Bushnell. It is an honor to
pay tribute to the men and women who have served their country and now are going to their final resting place. Right
now, this Honor Guard is preparing to honor veterans who have been laid to rest at local cemeteries. Each year dur-
ing Memorial Day week, this group of men will visit the cemeteries and place an American flag on each veteran's
grave. They do so every year to insure each veteran has a new flag. They then take all the old flags and prepare them
for proper disposal according to government regulations. For more information about Legion Post 155's Honor Guard,
call Jim Gilchriese, public affairs officer, at 352-795-6526.


Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Sat-
urday, May 18. All-you-can-
eat breakfast served from
7:30 to 10:30 p.m.; donation
is $5 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren younger than 10. The
public is welcome.
The public is invited to the
Memorial Day Observance at
11 a.m. Monday, May 27.
Picnic will follow.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for Ma-
rine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Due to the fact there are no
contested positions, there will
be no ballot election on Tues-
day, May 28. Installation of
Legion, Sons of the Legion
and Legion Riders officers will
take place at 7 p.m. on this
date at our regular member-
ship meeting.


Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. Afish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7 p.m.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for


the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded


veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The

See VETERANS/Page A19


0512 CRN
INVITATION TO BID

City of Crystal River
STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
TO NORTH CITRUS AVENUE
Bid #13-B-03

The City of Crystal River will receive sealed bids for
STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS TO NORTH
CITRUS AVENUE. You are hereby invited to submit a
bid on the above referenced project. The Owner is the
City of Crystal River.

Bids will be received until 11:30 AM, on May 30, 2013
opened and read aloud at 11:35 AM in the Council
Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.

DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally
consists of 800 S.Y. of brick paver replacement,
installing landscaping, an irrigation system,
miscellaneous concrete work, new benches and trash
receptacles. There are alternate bids for adding a
curbed landscaped median, a 4" concrete underlayment
under the existing sidewalk, and removing a portion of
existing concrete sidewalk and replacing it with a brick
paver sidewalk.

ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of
work for which the BID is submitted. BIDS must be
enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:

"STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS TO NORTH
CITRUS AVENUE, BID #13-B-03", AND THE NAME
OF THE BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS

BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428

All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at
no charge, downloaded for free on the City website
(www.crvstalriverfl.ora), or picked up at City hall for a
charge of $25. Bidders who utilize the City website for
the bid documents are advised to check the website
regularly for updates and addendums. Bid packages
may be picked up at the Public Works Department at
City Hall, at the address above, between the hours of
8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The
contact person is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216,
extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension 305.

No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60)
days after closing time scheduled for receipt of BIDS.
Work shall be completed within forty five (45) calendar
days from receipt of the Notice to Proceed by the owner
for the base bid, with an additional fifteen (15) calendar
days allowed if the alternate bids are awarded for a
total of sixty (60) days.

The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all
BIDS for any reason whatsoever and waive all
informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID RESPONSE THAT IN
ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS
BUSINESS NEEDS. onEX .S


A18 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A18

Men's Auxiliary meets a
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
The post will host a benefit
event for Haily Eldon at
9 a.m. Saturday, May 18.
Haily is a 5-year-old diag-
nosed with neuroblastoma.
The fundraiser will feature a
drawing to begin at 3 p.m.,
Chinese auction, tricky tray,
pulled pork meal, raffles, live
auction, lawn sales (table
and space rentals available),
door prizes, children's games
and more. Items are still
sought for the auctions.
For more information, to
reserve tables, or for dona-
tion pickup, call 352-220-
8453, 352-949-7179 or
352-446-4271.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness.
Call Bob Huscher, secretary,
at 352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at
the post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at
Denny's in Crystal River at
2 p.m. the fourth Thursday
monthly. Call Jimmie at 352-
621-0617.


SERVICES & GROUPS
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will meet
regarding Citrus County's
21st annual Veterans Appre-
ciation Week at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 15, in the
Conference Room of the Cit-
rus County Chronicle build-
ing, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans' services or-
ganizations are encouraged
to send representatives to
participate in the planning
process. Individual veterans
are also welcome. For more
information, call Chris
Gregoriou at 352-795-7000.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For in-


formation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website
at www.rollingthunderfl7.com
for more information about
the group, as well as informa-
tion about past and future
events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President
Ray Thompson at 813-230-
9750 (cell), or email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard vet-
erans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans
to apply for benefits and pro-
vide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition provides food
to veterans in need. Food do-
nations and volunteers are
always welcomed and
needed. The Veterans Food
Bank is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday. The CCVC is on
the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul
and Independence, off U.S.
41 north. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-


400-8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inver-
ness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and
widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members
are welcome. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation; dona-
tions are tax deductible.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans' Me-
morial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs.Crimi-
nal background check and
membership are required.
Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a
partnering agency with the
Department of Veterans Af-
fairs (VA), provides tailored
care for veterans and their
families. The program is pro-
vided in private homes, as-
sisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice
care specific to illnesses and
conditions unique to each
military era or war.
It also provides caregiver
education and a recognition
program to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. Call
352-527-4600.


Potty, or spotty, training


My wife and I forgot
to have children.
We are so busy
going to movies, plays and
concerts, buying nice
things for the house, tak-
ing long vacations without
looking at a school calen-
dar, reading all
the latest best-
sellers and
going to ..
restaurants
with nice
white table-
cloths that it
simply slipped
our minds. You
know how it is:
You get busy, i
and suddenly MUL
think, "Boy, I
wish I had to
pay $50,000 a year to put
some 18-year-old who
thinks I'm an idiot
through college."
Of course, the downside
of not having children is
that I feel left out when
friends with children dis-
cuss time-outs, play dates,
family therapy and joint
custody I sit silent while
the discussion goes on
and on about the pros and
cons of one model of
breast pump over another
As much as I would like
to, I have nothing to con-
tribute. The group wants
to hear that my mother
had eight children with-
out the benefit of a breast
pump or Ritalin,
ADHD or peanut allergies
- like they want to hear
I've volunteered to spank
out-of-control kids in gro-
cery stores.
The underlying mes-
sage in all this seems to be
that raising a child is
hard, painful, demanding,
unending, exhausting
work. You'd think modem


I.
LL


parents would be looking
for tips to make life easier,
not harder. Which is why I
found the news of the lat-
est parenting trend, Elim-
ination Communication,
so stunning.
Elimination Communi-
cation, called
E.C. by parents
enamored of it,
is a growing
cult that wor-
ships diaper-
f r e e
potty-training.
They try to fig-
ure out from
baby's coos and
M ahs which ones
LEN mean "I love
you" and which
ones mean
"Look out below!" Be-
cause, obviously, as a new
parent, you don't have
enough to do. But you will
have enough doo-doo.
I heard about this from
Jackson, a new grandad.
"You mean they really
let the kid run around the
house buck-nekkid?"
"Not in my house," he
said, "but they do at their
house. When they think
the kid is ready to go, they
hold him over the toilet,
or over bowls they have
set up all over the house."
"Bowls? Remind me
not to have soup at their
house. Whose crazy idea
was this? The Octomom?"
"No, their doula tells
them kids go without dia-
pers in Third World coun-
tries all the time."
"Their what?"
"Their doula. It's a
woman who is there to
comfort the mother.
It's not really medical or a
midwife, but a
companion."
"I understand," I said.


"I think the English word
for that is 'friend' or 'fam-
ily' They don't know any-
thing about medicine,
they're just there to give
you crazy child-rearing
advice."
"My daughter-in-law
doesn't seem to have any
friends, and she doesn't
get along with her family
Ergo, the doula."
"You mean no one is
inviting her and her dia-
perless baby to the weekly
bridge game? That's hard
to believe. What other
Third World ideas are she
and her doula planning to
borrow?" I asked. "An
open sewer running down
the middle of her street?
Throwing garbage out of
the front window? Walk-
ing barefoot to the town
well to get contaminated
water for washing and
cooking? Collecting cow
chips for the cook stove?
Or is it just the no-diapers
thing?"
"The doula says it keeps
diapers out of landfills."
"Really? I've been to
the landfill, and what you
see are a lot of old com-
puters, printers and CD
players stacked up to the
sky And washing ma-
chines and refrigerators,
and a lot of construction
debris from people who
have remodeled their
houses to put in nurseries.
But I have never seen a
diaper there. Maybe be-
cause, unlike the comput-
ers, they decompose. Still,
there's a much easier way
to keep diapers out of
landfills: Forget to have
children."


Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


May 13 to 17MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
All breakfast and lunch menus for the
schools through May 23, the last day of
school, are manager's choice.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Hot dog on bun, mustard, baked
beans with tomato, carrot coins, mixed fruit,
low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Vegetable soup, turkey ham and
cheese on whole-grain bun, mayonnaise and
mustard, fresh orange, oatmeal raisin cookie,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday celebration -


Beef rotini pasta, Neapolitan spinach, Italian
vegetable medley, birthday cake, dinner roll
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Baked chicken thigh with coq
au vin sauce, rice pilaf, country vegetable
medley, applesauce, slice whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Sausage and bean casserole, but-
tered spinach, yellow corn, citrus fruit, slice
whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto, East
Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa Springs, In-
verness and South Dunnellon. For informa-
tion, call Support Services at 352-527-5975.


........ L.1, "


In SERVICE


Austin A. Barker

Army Pfc. Austin A. Barker
has graduated from One Sta-
tion Unit Training (OSUT) at
Fort Leonard Wood, Way-
nesville, Mo., which included
basic military training and ad-
vanced individual training
(AIT).
During basic military train-
ing, the trainee received in-
struction in drill and
ceremony, weapons qualifica-
tion, map reading, tactics, mil-
itary courtesy, military justice,
physical fitness, first aid and
Army doctrine, history, princi-
ples and traditions.
During AIT, the soldier com-
pleted the military police spe-
cialist course to acquire skills
to provide combat area sup-


port, conduct battlefield circu-
lation control, area security,
prisoner of war operations,
civilian internee operations,
and law and order operations.
The trainee performed as a
team member in support of
battlefield operations, installa-
tion law and order operations
and security of Army re-
sources and installations. Ad-
ditional training included
providing peacetime support
to the military community
through security of resources,
crime prevention programs,
and preservation of law and
order.
Barker is the son of Nancy
Catherine Weaver of Inver-
ness. The private first class is
a 2012 graduate of Citrus
High School.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

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TC EDI TED ARBOREAL GEN
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LANAI ABATE COATS AWARD
AP I NG PECAN ARN IE CORED
SETH EXERT BETEL TODDY
5-12 @ 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Laura Beth Dodd of
Homosassa, formerly of
Dyersburg, Tenn., and
Michael Dwayne Scales
Jr. of Homosassa will wed
at 1:30 p.m. May 26, 2013,
at the Church of Jesus
Christ, 815 S. Main St.,
Dyersburg.
The bride-elect is the
daughter of Michael and
Terri Dodd of Dyersburg.
She is the granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy
Johnson of Dyersburg,
Joe Dodd of Humboldt,
Tenn., and the late Ann
Dodd. She is a 2010 grad-
uate of Dyersburg High
School and is pursuing an
associate degree in busi-
ness management with
Hillsborough Community
College. She is currently
employed with Suncoast
Schools Federal Credit
Union in Crystal River.
The groom-elect is the
son of Michael and
Theresa Herrin of Ho-
mosassa and the late
Michael Dwayne Scales
Sr. He is the grandson of


Marriages
4/29/13 5/5/13
Carlos M. Jimenez,
Beverly Hills/Sandra Suyapa


Lopez, Beverly Hills
Gary Allen Moore,
Crystal River/Crystal Jean
Rollins, Inglis


Engagement

Fleming/Raymond


I -1Nm--
Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Powell of Scott, Ga., Mr.
and Mrs. Dale Strickland
of Homosassa and Mr.
and Mrs. Eddie Herrin of
Homosassa. He is a 2009
graduate of Lecanto High
School and Withla-
coochee Technical Insti-
tute. He is currently
employed with Centu-
ryLink as a field techni-
cian in Wildwood.
All family and friends
are invited.


Mr. and Mrs. Robert J.
Fleming Jr. of Clermont
announce the engagement
of their daughter, Ashley
Marie, to Gerald Allen
Raymond III, son of Tracy
and Johnny Branch of
Fuquay-Varina, N.C., and
Gerald Allen Raymond II
of Lecanto. .
The bride-elect is a ,
graduate of Withlacoochee
Technical Institute in In-
verness and is employed
as a hair stylist by Chez Co- [
lette in Spring Hill.
The prospective groom
is a graduate of Lecanto Services as
High School and is em- chanical su
played by American Me- The cou
chanical & Engineering 2015 weddi

Engagement =

Mills/Stitzel
Mr. and Mrs. Scott W.
Mills of Floral City an-
nounce the forthcoming
marriage of their daughter,
Marcy Mills, to J.T Stitzel,
son of Mr. and Mrs. John
Stitzel of Crystal River
The couple will ex-
change nuptial vows in a
ceremony on June 1, 2013,
at the Black Diamond
Ranch Golf & Country
Club.


s a nuclear me-
ipervisor.
ple plan a fall
ing.


Dakota Shipp was mar-
ried to Kelsey Lehmann
of Giddings, Texas, on
Saturday, April 13, 2013.
The couple chose the
date in honor of Dakota's
late father, Gary Shipp of
Hernando, who had mar-
ried Dakota's mother,
Kathy (now Foley of
Texas), on the same date
in 1973.
The wedding was at La
Bahia Hall in Burton,
Texas, a building built in
1845. The wedding cere-
mony was performed out-
side the hall, behind a log
wall with antique church
doors constructed by
Dakota's stepfather, Bill
Foley, formerly of Floral
City
The bride wore a white
gown with chiffon over-
lay, laced up the back.
The groom, his atten-
dants and the brides-
maids wore black with
white accents. White and
purple calla lilies were
carried by both the bride
and her maids.
The reception followed
inside the hall, which
had old barn windows
and attic fans for cooling,
wood floors and wood
beams across the cathe-
dral ceiling. Reception


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Engagement

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Wedding

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For the RECORD


A20 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


TOGETHER


tables draped in white
were adorned with black
liners and topped with
mason jars filled with
white baby's breath. Ele-
gant white lights were
fastened to the rafters.
The groom is a team
roper and tours with the
Professional Rodeo Cir-
cuit Association (PRCA).
His new bride works as
an account executive for
CVS Caremark.


allel











SPORTS


Close race
for NASCAR
at Darlington
on Saturday
night./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


~


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
0 Auto racing/B5
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 NFL, tennis/B6
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B6


Longoria's walk-off HR saves Rays


Slugger's blast gives

Tampa Bay 8-7

victory over SD

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Evan Lon-
goria hit a two-run homer with two
outs in the bottom of the ninth in-
ning off Padres closer Huston
Street, rallying the Tampa Bay
Rays over San Diego 8-7 on Satur-
day night.
Street (0-2) retired the first two


batters in the ninth before walking
Ben Zobrist on a full count. Longo-
ria followed with his ninth home
run, handing Street his first blown
save in nine tries this season.
The Rays won their fourth
straight, coming back after Jesus
Guzman's pinch-hit grand slam off
Jeremy Hellickson helped San
Diego overcome a 6-2 deficit in the
seventh.
Cesar Ramos (1-0) got the win.
The Rays moved up to .500 for the
first time since April 7.
James Loney hit a two-run homer
as the Rays roughed up San Diego's
Burch Smith in the second inning
of his major league debut. The


Tampa Bay Ray Evan Longoria is doused with water by teammate Ryan
/Roberts after hitting a two-run walk-off home run during the ninth inning
I /Saturday against the San Diego Padres in St. Petersburg.
Associated Press






PGA's soggy day


Woods, Garcia

differ at TPC

Associated Press
PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- Tiger Woods was sur-
rounded by four rows of fans
who stood shoulder-to-
shoulder, curious to see how
he was going to escape from
the trees on the second hole
at The Players Champi-
onship. Cheers erupted
when he pulled out a
5-wood, a risky shot off the
pine straw through a 15-foot
gap of pines.
Woods said he didn't hear
Sergio Garcia hit his shot
from the fairway. He didn't
see Garcia stare in his
direction.
But he heard Garcia on
television during a storm
delay
The Spaniard said the
burst of cheers disrupted his
swing, and he suggested that
Woods was the instigator by
thinking only of himself.
"Not real surprising that
he's complaining about
something," Woods said.
"That's fine," Garcia said
when told of Woods' com-
ments. "At least I'm true to
myself. I know what I'm
doing, and he can do what-
ever he wants."
A storm was brewing Sat-
urday at Sawgrass even be-
fore the real storms rolled in
and caused a two-hour delay,
keeping eight players from
finishing their round. And in
the midst of the latest chap-
ter in this Woods-Garcia rift,
Swedish rookie David Ling-
merth quietly went about his
business and wound up atop
the leaderboard.
Lingmerth finished a wild
day with an 8-foot eagle putt
on the par-5 16th and a
10-foot birdie on the island-
green 17th to reach 12-under
par when the third round
was suspended because of
darkness.
He was two shots ahead of
three players who have won
The Players Championship
- Woods, Garcia and Hen-
rik Stenson.


/

-~---m~-


Associated Press
David Lingmerth chips onto the 15th green Saturday during the third round of The Players
championship at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach.


"I'm aware of where
they're at," Lingmerth said.
"I try not to look at the
leaderboard when I'm out
there. I'm just trying to do
my thing. But having those
guys behind me, I know
they're going to try to hunt


me down, of course. But I'm
just going to try to forget
about all that and just try to
do my thing."
That starts just after sun-
rise. Eight players includ-
ing the top four had to
return Sunday morning to


complete the third round.
Woods and Garcia were on
the 15th hole.
The best action Saturday
was during the rain delay
when Garcia was asked
See Page B5


Rays box score and
more MLB games
For the San Diego-Tampa
Bay statistics, plus all of
Saturday's other MLB action,
see Page B2.

Rays scored six runs on five hits
and a couple of walks in the inning
and drove Smith out of the game.
Hellickson retired 16 straight
batters after giving up three hits,
including Chase Headley's two-run
homer, in the first.
Hellickson took a four-run lead
into the seventh, when he walked
Carlos Quentin to start the Padres'
rally After Guzman's slam, Quentin
walked again in the same inning,
See Page B3



Kids


Triathlon


big success

Turnout for

inaugural event

exceeds projections
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
INVERNESS Parents and
children were yelling joyously as
youngsters swam, biked and ran
while the parents snapped photos
on their phones and yelled encour-
agement at Whispering Pines Park.
The event was the inaugural Cit-
rus County Kids Triathlon. It was
sponsored by Citrus Oral & Maxillo-
facial Surgery, PA. and is the first
such event in the North Suncoast
Organizers of the event expected
a small turnout of 60 youngsters.
However, the event drew 175 plus
a waiting list and possible partici-
pants had to be turned away
The local United Way was the fi-
nancial beneficiary as Amy Meek,
local CEO of United Way said the
event raised $30,000 for the charity.
The competition was divided into
the Junior Division for ages 5 to 10.
Those young athletes swam 75 me-
ters (or three laps), then biked for 1
1/4 miles and ran a 1/2 mile.
The Senior Division was for
competitors ages 11 to 15. They
swam six laps, biked 3 miles and
ran 1 mile.
There was also a Tri4Fun Divi-
sion for all ages.
Meek knew the event was suc-
cessful because of her five-year-
old son's reaction.
"He loved it," she said. "We have
about 80 volunteers. We probably
have over 1,000 people here in-
cluding moms and dads, grandmas
and grandpas, brothers and sis-
ters. It is a great event. The day
could not be more gorgeous. Linda
Van Allen has single-handedly put
this thing together. She has really
gone above and beyond for the
United Way"
Chris Moling of DRC Sports was
the race director. DRC Sports puts
on the Crystal River Sprint
Triathlon over the summer and
people enjoyed the same profes-
sional efforts at the Kids Triathlon.
"The United Way approached us
about it," Moling said. "We have
See Page B3


r ----------------------- *4






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New York
Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
9 --
5 1 -
5 1 -
) 4Y2 3Y2
8 9Y2 8Y2


East Division
GB WC
3 4
6 1 /2
2 5Y2 5
I 5Y2 5
6 10 91/2


NL

Cardinals 3,
Rockies 0
Colorado St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EYong rf 4 00 0 MCrpnt 2b 4 1 2 0
Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 Jay cf 5 1 2 0
CGnzlz If 4 0 0 0 Hollidy If 5 1 2 0
Tlwtzkss 3 0 0 0 SRonsnlf 0 0 0 0
Heltonlb 2 0 0 0 Craig rf 3 0 3 1
Arenad3b 3 0 1 0 YMolinc 3 0 2 1
Brignc2b 3 0 0 0 MAdmsib 4 0 1 1
Torreal c 3 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 0 1 0
Chacin p 1 0 0 0 Kozma ss 4 0 0 0
Rutledg ph 1 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 4 0 0 0
Outmnp 0 000
WLopez p 0 0 0 0
Pachec ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 29 02 0 Totals 35313 3
Colorado 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 000 020 10x 3
DP-Colorado 1. LOB-Colorado 3, St. Louis
12. 3B-Craig (2). SF-Craig.
IP H RERBBSO
Colorado
Chacin L,3-2 5 8 2 2 3 5
Outman 12/33 1 1 0 3
W.Lopez 11/32 0 0 0 2
St. Louis
WainwrightW,5-2 9 2 0 0 1 7
T-2:40. A-43,050 (43,975).
Giants 10, Braves 1


Atlanta


San Francisco
ab rh bi ab rh bi


Smmns ss 5 00 0 Pagan cf 5 0 1 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Scutaro 2b 4 1 2 0
J.Uptonrf 3 01 0 Noonan2b 1 00 0
FFrmnib 3 0 1 0 Sandovl3b 3 2 1 1
Gattis If 4 12 0 Gaudin p 0 00 0
CJhnsn3b 3 0 0 0 Beltph-lb 1 01 2
Avilanp 0 0 0 0 Poseylb 3 2 1 1
Varvarp 0 0 0 0 Affeldtp 0 0 0 0
Walden p 0 00 0 Pencerf 4 22 0
DCrpntp 0 00 0 FPegur If 2 01 0
RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 GBancph-lf 2 1 2 4
BUpton cf 3 0 1 0 Quiroz c 3 1 1 1
G.Lairdc 4 0 1 0 BCrwfrss 4 0 2 1
Mahlmp 2 0 1 1 Bmgrn p 3 00 0
Gearrinp 0 00 0 Arias3b 0 1 0 0
R.Pena3b 2 00 0
Totals 34 17 1 Totals 35101410
Atlanta 000 010 000 1
San Francisco 100 140 04x 10
DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Atlanta 9, San Francisco
7. 2B--Gattis (9), Posey (10), Pence (9),
G.Blanco (4), Quiroz (2), B.Crawford (8). 3B-
Scutaro (2), G.Blanco (1). HR-Sandoval (5).
CS-G.Blanco (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
Maholm L,4-4 41/38 6 6 3 3
Gearrin 2-3 1 0 0 0 0
Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 10 1
Varvaro 1 3 3 3 0 0
Walden 2/3 1 1 1 1 2
D.Carpenter 1/3 1 0 0 1 0
San Francisco
BumgarnerW,4-1 7 4 1 1 2 11
Gaudin 1 1 0 0 1 1
Affeldt 1 2 0 0 0 0
Varvartopitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Maholm (Sandoval).WP-Bumgarner.
T-3:03. A-41,530(41,915).
Cubs 8, Nationals 2
Chicago Washington
ab rhbi ab rhbi
DeJesscf 4 1 1 2 Spancf 3 0 0 0
SCastross 5 01 0 EPerezcf 1 00 0
Rizzolb 5 0 3 2 Berndnrf 3 1 0 0
ASorin If 5 1 2 0 Zmrmn 3b 3 0 0 0
Schrhltrf 5 1 1 0 LaRochIlb 4 0 1 0
Valuen 3b 2 0 1 0 Dsmnd ss 4 1 3 2
Ransm3b 2 1 1 1 Espinos2b 4 0 1 0
Castilloc 3 2 0 0 TMoorel If 4 0 0 0
Barney2b 3 1 1 0 WRamsc 4 00 0
EJcksn p 2 1 1 2 Strasrgp 1 00 0
Camp p 0 00 0 Tracyph 1 00 0
Sweenyph 1 00 0 Dukep 0 00 0
HRndnp 0 00 0 Matthsp 0 00 0
Lmrdzzph 1 01 0
HRdrgzp 0 00 0
Totals 37 8127 Totals 332 6 2
Chicago 000 044 000 8
Washington 000 011 000 2
E-Zimmerman 2 (7). DP-Washington 1.
LOB-Chicago 6, Washington 6.2B-A.Soriano
2 (9), Valbuena (5), Ransom (4), Barney (6),
E.Jackson (1), Desmond (13). 3B-Lombardozzi
(1). HR-Desmond (6). CS-Rizzo (3). S-
E.Jackson.
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
E.Jackson W,1-5
Camp
H.Rondon
Washington
Strasburg L,1-5
Duke
Mattheus
H.Rodriguez


51/34 2 2 2 3
12/32 0 0 0 2
2 0 0 0 0 2


5 5 4
2/3 4 4
11/31 0
2 2 0


HBP-by Duke (Castillo).WP-Duke.
T-3:07.A-37,116 (41,418).
Reds 13, Brewers 7


Milwaukee
ab r h bi
Aoki rf 5 1 1 1
Segurass 5 34 1
Braun If 4 21 1
Hndrsn p 0 0 0 0
ArRmr3b 2 02 2
AIGnzlzclb 2 1 1 0
Lucroyc 4 00 0
CGomz cf 5 02 2
Weeks 2b 3 00 0
YBtncr 1b-3b4 0 0 0
Burgos p 2 0 0 0
Badnhp p 0 00 0
Maldndph 1 00 0
McGnzlp 0 00 0
Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0
LSchfr ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 38 7117
Milwaukee 202
Cincinnati 057


Cincinnati

Choo cf
Cozart ss
Votto 1 b
Phillips 2b
Bruce rf
Frazier 3b
Hoover p
Paul If
Ondrskp
Hannhn 3b
Mesorc c
Latos p
DRonsn ph-


ab r h bi
4 1 1 2
3002

5 00 0
5 23 2

0000
3 22 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0
4 2 2 2
3 22 2
IIf 1 0 0 0


Totals 38131413
021 000 7
001 00x 13


E-Braun (1), Votto (3). DP-Cincinnati 1.
LOB-Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 8. 2B-Segura
(5), Braun (7), Ar.Ramirez (5), C.Gomez (10),
Choo (10), Bruce 2 (12), Frazier (7), Mesoraco
(5). HR-Aoki (4), Segura (6), Bruce (3). SB-
Segura (9), Frazier (3). SF-Cozart 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
BurgosL,1-1 3 11 12 10 3 2
Badenhop 2 1 0 0 0 4
Mic.Gonzalez 2/3 2 1 1 2 1
Kintzler 11/30 0 0 0 2
Henderson 1 0 0 0 0 2
Cincinnati
Latos W,4-0 6 9 7 6 3 4
Ondrusek 2 2 0 0 1 1
Hoover 1 0 0 0 0 2
PB-Lucroy.
T-3:15. A-41,678 (42,319).


Str Home
W-4 12-7
L-1 9-6
L-1 13-9
W-4 12-6
W-1 7-12


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
14 .588 6
15 .559 1 1Y2 8
15 .545 1Y2 2 5
16 .515 2Y2 3 6
20 .412 6 6Y2 4


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
12 .657 9-1
16 .568 3 6-4
16 .556 32 1/2 5-5
19 .441 7Y2 4Y2 2-8
22 .389 9Y2 6Y2 4-6


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Str Home
L-1 11-5
W-1 10-7
L-2 10-7
W-1 8-7
L-2 7-9


Str Home
W-3 9-5
W-2 15-6
W-2 10-7
L-3 10-11
W-1 7-11


W
Texas 23
Oakland 18
Seattle 17
Los Angeles 14
Houston 10


San Fran.
Arizona
Colorado
San Diego
Los Angeles


West Division
L Pct GB WC
13 .639 --
19 .486 5Y2 4
19 .472 6 4Y2
22 .389 9 7Y2
27 .270 13Y2 12


West Division
GB WC
5 --
3 Y2 --
8 2Y2 1Y2
I 5Y2 4Y2
2 7Y2 6Y2


Str Home
W-3 11-4
L-5 9-8
W-2 10-8
W-3 7-9
L-3 6-15



Str Home
W-2 14-7
W-5 10-8
L-4 11-7
L-2 10-8
L-8 7-12


Associated Press
St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Adam Wainwright throw during the sixth inning Saturday against the
Colorado Rockies in St. Louis. Wainwright tossed a complete game, giving up two hits in the 3-0 victory.



Cards lock up Rockies 3-0


Wainwright


pitches St. Louis'


second straight gem

Associated Press

ST LOUIS -Adam Wainwright
carried a no-hitter into the eighth
inning and was one out from the
St. Louis Cardinals' second
straight one-hitter over the sud-
denly punchless Colorado Rock-
ies in a 3-0 victory Saturday
The Rockies had been hitless in
49 consecutive at-bats before
Nolan Arenado lined a clean hit to
center field with one out in the
eighth. Eric Young led off Friday
night's game with a broken-bat sin-
gle off rookie Shelby Miller then
failed to put a runner on until
Todd Helton walked with one out
in the fifth inning a day later.
The 49 at-bats is the longest hit-
less stretch since Sept 25-27, 1981,
when the Los Angeles Dodgers
went 50 at-bats without a knock.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Giants 10, Braves 1
SAN FRANCISCO Madison
Bumgarner struck out a season-high
11 over seven innings, Gregor Blanco
entered in the fifth as a pinch hitter
and drove in four runs, and the San
Francisco Giants routed the Atlanta
Braves 10-1.
The left-handed Bumgarner baf-
fled the Braves, getting them to
chase his fastball up in the zone and
bite on curveballs in the dirt. Bum-
garner (4-1) gave up just four hits
and walked two, snapping a string of
four starts without a victory.
Blanco had a double and triple in
setting a career high for RBIs.

Reds 13, Brewers 7
CINCINNATI Jay Bruce homered
and doubled twice as the Cincinnati
Reds delighted a sellout crowd by
moving five games over .500 for the
first time this season, battering the Mil-
waukee Brewers 13-7.
Six different Reds players drove in
two runs each, including starting
pitcher Mat Latos (4-0).
The bottom five hitters in Cincin-
nati's lineup were a combined 8 for 9
in the first three innings alone, scoring
10 runs and driving in six against
Hiram Burgos (1-1). The rookie al-
lowed 12 runs on 11 hits and three
walks in those three innings.

Pirates 11, Mets 2
NEW YORK Francisco Liriano
struck out nine and pitched into the
sixth inning to win his debut with Pitts-
burgh and help the Pirates beat the
New York Mets 11-1.
Jordy Mercer homered twice and
Jose Tabata had four hits, including a
two-run shot the Pirates, who teed off
on left-hander Jonathon Niese, finally
chasing him during a big fifth inning.
The Mets have struggled to score at
home, but Niese (2-4) would have put
any team in a hole. He tied a career
high by allowing eight runs, and walked
more batters than he struck out for the
fourth time in eight starts this season.

Cubs 8, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON Dominant early,
Stephen Strasburg fell apart after one
of Ryan Zimmerman's two errors and


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Toronto 3, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 8, San Diego 7
Cleveland 7, Detroit 6
Minnesota 8, Baltimore 5
L.A. Angels 3, Chicago White Sox 2
N.Y Yankees 3, Kansas City 2
Texas 8, Houston 7
Oakland at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Cleveland (McAllister 3-3) at Detroit (Porcello 1-2),
1:08 p.m.
Toronto (Jenkins 0-0) at Boston (Dempster 2-3), 1:35
p.m.
San Diego (Stults 3-2) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez
1-4), 1:40 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 2-3) at Minnesota (Diamond 3-2),
2:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-2) at Kansas City (E.Santana
3-1), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Tepesch 2-3) at Houston (Lyles 1-0), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 3-4) at Seattle (J.Saunders 2-4),
4:10 p.m.
LA. Angels (C.Wilson 3-1) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 3-2), 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 11, N.Y. Mets 2
St. Louis 3, Colorado 0
San Francisco 10, Atlanta 1
Chicago Cubs 8, Washington 2
Cincinnati 13, Milwaukee 7
Tampa Bay 8, San Diego 7
Philadelphia at Arizona, late
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Milwaukee (W.Peralta 3-2) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-4),
1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0),
1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Feldman 3-3) at Washington (G.Gon-
zalez 3-2), 1:35 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 3-2) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez
1-4), 1:40 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 3-3) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 4-
1), 2:15 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 1-4) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-
2), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (Koehler 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 0-2),
4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-1) at Arizona (McCarthy
0-3), 4:10 p.m.


wound up dropping his fifth consecu-
tive decision, an 8-2 loss to the
Chicago Cubs, whose starting pitcher,
Edwin Jackson, worked into the sixth
inning and hit a two-run double for
good measure.
Jackson (1-5) retired 12 of Wash-
ington's first 13 batters and allowed
two runs and four hits in 5 1-3 innings.
He earned his first win under a $52
million, four-year contract he signed
after leaving Washington as a free
agent, ended the Nationals' five-game
winning streak.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Blue Jays 3, Red Sox 2
BOSTON -Adam Lind hit a
tiebreaking homer off Boston closer
Junichi Tazawa leading off the ninth
inning to lift the Toronto Blue Jays to a
3-2 win over the Boston Red Sox.
It was just the fifth win in 16 games
for the struggling Blue Jays, who blew
a 2-0 lead in the eighth.
Toronto's Mark Buehrle had outdu-
eled Clay Buchholz and had the Blue
Jays in position to send him to his
first loss of the season before the
Red Sox rallied.
Lind belted a 2-2 pitch from Tazawa
(2-2) into the center field bleachers,
sending Boston to its seventh loss in
nine games.

Yankees 3, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Vernon
Wells hit a go-ahead two-run homer
and made a long running catch to pre-
serve a 3-2 victory for Andy Pettitte
and the New York Yankees over the
Kansas City Royals.
Pettitte (4-2) showed off his mastery
of the Royals once more, allowing a


run-scoring groundout by Lorenzo
Cain and a solo homer by Billy Butler
in seven stellar innings. The 40-year-
old left-hander gave up five hits, struck
out seven and improved to 15-3 in his
career against the Royals.
Kansas City hasn't beaten Pettitte
in 14 starts dating to Sept. 4, 2000.
James Shields (2-3) was hurt by a
throwing error on third baseman Mike
Moustakas in the second inning that
resulted in the Yankees' first run.

Angels 3, White Sox 2
CHICAGO Mike Trout hit a two-
run homer and Jerome Williams
pitched into the seventh inning to help
the Los Angeles Angels beat the
Chicago White Sox 3-2.
Williams (2-1) allowed two runs and
scattered seven hits in 6 2/3 innings.
He struck out three and walked one.
After eight appearances out of the
bullpen, Williams made his second
start after he replaced the struggling
Garrett Richards, who was filling in for
injured Los Angeles ace Jered Weaver.
Williams wore a pink glove in honor
of his mother Deborah, who died of
breast cancer 12 years ago. It was his
first win as a starter since June 1,
2012 against the Rangers.

Twins 8, Orioles 5
MINNEAPOLIS Ryan Doumit
homered, Joe Mauer and Justin
Morneau each had three hits, and the
Minnesota Twins beat the Baltimore
Orioles 8-5.
Vance Worley (1-4) struggled
through 5 1-3 innings, but a strong
performance by Minnesota's bullpen
enabled him to earn his first win in 13
starts dating to Aug. 1, 2012.
Matt Wieters connected for the Ori-
oles, who lost for just the second time
in seven games.
Up 6-5 in the sixth, Doumit hit his
third homer of the season, a two-run
shot into the second deck in left field
to give Minnesota a little breathing
room at 8-5.

Indians 7, Tigers 6
DETROIT Ubaldo Jimenez out-
pitched Justin Verlander, and Cleve-
land's Chris Perez got Miguel Cabrera
to hit a game-ending groundout with
two on to preserve the Indians' 7-6 win
over the Detroit Tigers.
Verlander (4-3) was erratic early, al-
lowing three runs in the first two in-
nings. He settled a bit after that, but the
Indians took a 6-1 lead before Detroit
closed the gap with a four-run seventh.
It was 7-5 when Perez allowed an
unearned run in the ninth, but with
men on first and second, Cabrera hit a
weak grounder to third to end it.
It was Perez's sixth save.
Jimenez (3-2) allowed a run and
three hits in six innings, striking out
eight with one walk.

Rangers 8, Astros 7
HOUSTON -Adrian Beltre, Nel-
son Cruz and Lance Berkman all
homered to back up another solid out-
ing by Yu Darvish, and the Texas
Rangers held on for an 8-7 win over
the Houston Astros.
Darvish (6-1) yielded three hits and
three runs in seven innings. In his pre-
vious outing against the Astros, he
came within one out of pitching a per-
fect game at Houston on April 2.
Houston led 3-1 before it was done
in by its bullpen during a six-run sixth
inning by the Rangers.


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


NewYork

Gardnr cf
Cano 2b
V.Wells If
Hafner dh
ISuzuki rf
J.Nix ss
Overay lb
Nelson 3b
CStwrt c


Totals 32
NewYork


Kansas City


r h bi
00 0 AEscorss
0 0 0 L.Cain cf
1 1 2 AGordn If
0 1 0 Butler dh
0 0 0 Hosmerlb
0 2 0 S.Perezc
01 0 Dysonpr
1 1 0 Mostks3b
1 0 0 Francr rf
EJhnsn 2b
36 2 Totals
001 020 000


ab rh bi
4 0 1 0

4 00 0
4 1 1 1
4 0 1 0
4 02 0
0000
4000
3 00 0
3 1 1 0
332 6 2
3


Kansas City 001 100 000 2
E-Moustakas (6). DP-Kansas City 1. LOB-
New York 5, Kansas City 5. 2B-J.Nix (3), Nel-
son (2), S.Perez (6). HR-V.Wells (8), Butler (4).
SB-E.Johnson (3). CS-Gardner (3).
IP H RERBBBSO
NewYork
PettitteW,4-2 7 5 2 2 1 7
D.Robertson H,7 1 0 0 0 0 3
RiveraS,14-14 1 1 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
ShieldsL,2-3 8 6 3 2 2 5
K.Herrera 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Shields (C.Stewart).
T-2:30. A-30,910 (37,903).
Twins 8, Orioles 5
Baltimore Minnesota


ab r h bi


ab rh bi


McLothlf 5 0 0 0 Dozier2b 5 1 1 2
Machd 3b 5 1 3 1 Mauer c 4 33 1
Markksrf 5 1 2 1 Doumit dh 3 1 1 2
A.Jones cf 5 1 1 0 Mornealb 4 0 3 3
C.Davislb 4 0 1 1 Plouffe3b 4 0 0 0
Wietersc 2 1 2 2 Parmel rf 3 1 1 0
Hardy ss 4 0 1 0 Arcia If 4 0 0 0
Flahrty2b 2 1 1 0 WRmrzcf 4 00 0
ACasill ph-2b1 0 0 0 EEscor ss 2 2 1 0
Reimld dh 4 0 1 0
Totals 37 5125 Totals 33810 8
Baltimore 300 101 000 5
Minnesota 002 402 00x 8
E-Plouffe (4). DP-Baltimore 1, Minnesota 2.
LOB-Baltimore 8, Minnesota 6.2B-Machado
(13), A.Jones (14), Dozier (2), Mauer (14), E.Es-
cobar (2). HR-Wieters (5), Doumit (3). SF-Wi-
eters.
IP H RERBBSO


Baltimore
S.Johnson L,0-1
Patton
Matusz
Strop
Minnesota
Worley W,1-4
Duensing H,7
Fien H,3
Burton S,1-2


4 7 6 6 4 3
2 3 2 2 1 0
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


51/311 5
2 1 0
2/3 0 0
1 0 0


HBP-by Worley (Flaherty).WP-S.Johnson.
T-2:45. A-32,221 (39,021).
Angels 3,
White Sox 2


Los Angeles Chicago
ab r h bi
Callasp 3b 3 1 1 0 DeAza cf
Trout cf 4 1 2 2 AIRmrz ss
Pujolsdh 4 1 1 0 Rios rf
Trumolf-lb 4 0 1 0 Konerkdh
Hamltn rf 4 0 1 0 A.Dunn lb
HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0 Viciedo If
BHarrs ss 4 0 0 0 Wise pr
lannett c 2 0 1 0 Kppngr 3b
LJimnzlb 3 0 0 0 Flowrsc
Shuck If 0 0 0 0 Greene 2b
Totals 32 37 2 Totals


ab rh bi
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
4010
4 0 1 0


4000
3 1 3 0
0 0 0 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0
3 0 1 1
342 8 2


Los Angeles 201 000 000 3
Chicago 020 000 000 2
E-A.Dunn (2), De Aza (4), Greene (2). DP-
Chicago 2. LOB-Los Angeles 4, Chicago 6.
2B-Hamilton (5). HR-Trout (6). CS-Trout (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Los Angeles
Williams W,2-1
S.Downs H,7
Richards H,1
Frieri S,7-8
Chicago
Quintana L,2-1
Thornton
Crain
PB-Flowers.


62/37 2
1/3 0 0
1 0 0
1 1 0


6 5 3 2 1 5
1 1 0 0 0 0
2 1 0 0 1 3


T-2:58. A-28,774 (40,615).


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




AL

Rays 8, Padres 7
San Diego Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
EvCarr ss 5 1 0 0 Joyce rf 5 02 1
Venale rf 4 1 1 0 KJhnsn If 4 0 1 1
Headly 3b 3 1 1 2 Zobrist 2b 3 1 0 0
Quentin If 2 1 0 1 Longori 3b 4 2 1 2
Blanks If 0 0 0 0 Loneylb 4 1 1 2
Alonso b 4 0 1 0 Scottdh 2 1 0 0
Kotsaydh 3 1 1 0 Fuldcf 4 1 1 0
Denorfi dh 1 0 0 0 Loaton c 4 1 2 0
Gyorko2b 4 0 0 0 YEscorss 4 1 2 2
Amarstcf 4 1 1 0
JoBakrc 2 0 0 0
Guzmnph 1 1 1 4
Hundly c 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 76 7 Totals 34810 8
San Diego 200 000 500 7
Tampa Bay 060 000 002 8
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Amarista (2), Zobrist (3). DP-San Diego 1.
LOB-San Diego 4, Tampa Bay 6. 2B-Joyce
2 (3). HR-Headley (4), Guzman (1), Longoria
(9), Loney (2). SB-Ev.Cabrera (11). SF-
K.Johnson.
IP H RERBBSO
San Diego
B.Smith 1 5 6 6 2 2
TRoss 4 3 0 0 1 3
Brach 11/31 0 0 0 0
Thatcher H,3 1 0 0 0 0 0
Gregerson H,9 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
StreetL,0-2 2/3 1 2 2 1 0
Tampa Bay
Hellickson 62/36 6 6 1 8
J.Wright 0 0 1 0 2 0
C.RamosW,1-0 21/30 0 0 0 3
J.Wright pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
B.Smith pitched to 7 batters in the 2nd.
HBP-by TRoss (Zobrist), by J.Wright (Venable).
T-3:23. A-18,587 (34,078).
Blue Jays 3,
Red Sox 2
Toronto Boston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
MeCarr If 4 0 1 1 Ellsury cf 5 1 1 1
Bautist rf 3 0 2 0 Victorn rf 4 0 1 0
Encrnc dh 3 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 0
Arenciic 4 0 0 0 D.Ortizdh 4 0 1 0
Lindlb 4 2 3 1 Napolilb 3 00 0
Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0 JGoms If 4 00 0
Rasms cf 3 1 1 1 Mdlrks 3b 4 0 2 0
Bonifac2b 4 0 0 0 Drewss 3 0 0 0
Kawskss 3 0 0 0 D.Rossc 2 1 0 0
Nava ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 38 3 Totals 342 7 1
Toronto 001 100 001 3
Boston 000 000 020 2
E-Kawasaki (3). DP-Boston 3. LOB-Toronto
5, Boston 8. 2B-Middlebrooks 2 (9). 3B-Ells-
bury (4). HR-Lind (2). SB-Pedroia (8). CS-
Lawrie (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
Buehrle 7 5 1 1 2 5
OliverW,2-1 1 1 1 0 1 3
JanssenS,10-10 1 1 0 0 0 0
Boston
Buchholz 8 6 2 2 3 4
TazawaL,2-2 1 2 1 1 0 2
Buehrle pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
T-2:42. A-36,543 (37,071).
Yankees 3, Royals 2






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




PGA Tour
The Players
Championship
Saturday
AtTPC Sawgrass, PonteVedra Beach
Purse: $9.5 million
Yardage: 7,215, Par: 72
Partial Third Round
Note: Play was suspended due to
darkness
Jeff Maggert 70-71 -66 207 -9
David Lynn 72-68-68 208 -8
Greg Chalmers 68-73-68 209 -7
Marc Leishman 72-66-71 209 -7
Sean O'Hair 70-71-69-210 -6
Jeff Overton 71-70-69 210 -6
Kevin Streelman 69-70-71 -210 -6
Steve Stricker 67-71-72 -210 -6
Jason Dufner 71-67-72-- 210 -6
Louis Oosthuizen 69-75-67-211 -5
Branden Grace 73-71-67 -211 -5
Kyle Stanley 75-68-68 211 -5
Chris Stroud 73-69-69 211 -5
Brendon de Jonge 72-69-70 -211 -5
Brandt Snedeker 71-69-71 -211 -5
Martin Laird 71-67-73 211 -5
Rory Mcllroy 66-72-73 211 -5
Daniel Summerhays 69-74-69 212 -4
Davis Love III 70-72-70 -212 -4
Andres Romero 69-72-71 --212 -4
Roberto Castro 63-78-71 212 -4
Matt Every 70-71-71 212 -4
Peter Hanson 70-70-72 212 -4
Ben Crane 69-71-72-212 -4
Jerry Kelly 71-68-73-212 -4
Webb Simpson 67-71 74 212 -4
Adam Scott 69-68-75 212 -4
Angel Cabrera 74-70-69-213 -3
Bubba Watson 73-70-70-- 213 -3
James Driscoll 75-68-70 -213 -3
Zach Johnson 66-71-76-- 213 -3
William McGirt 70-74-70-214 -2
JohnSenden 73-70-71 -214 -2
David Hearn 72-71-71 -214 -2
Freddie Jacobson 72-71-71 214 -2
Harris English 70-71-73-214 -2
Luke Donald 72-69-73 214 -2
Tim Herron 71-69-74- 214 -2
Sang-Moon Bae 68-71-75-- 214 -2
Chris Kirk 70-69-75-- 214 -2
Jason Day 69-75-71 -215 -1
Charley Hoffman 70-74-71 --215 -1
Jimmy Walker 72-71-72-215 -1
Boo Weekley 71-71-73 -215 -1
John Huh 70-72-73-215 -1
Graham DeLaet 71-70-74 -215 -1
Charles Howell III 71-67-77- 215 -1
Michael Thompson 69-75-72-216 E
Ricky Barnes 71-71-74 -216 E
K.J. Choi 69-73-74 216 E
James Hahn 70-74-73 217 +1
Seung-Yul Noh 70-74-73 217 +1
Chad Campbell 71-72-74 -217 +1
Jason Bohn 68-74-75-217 +1
Carl Pettersson 70-72-75 217 +1
Justin Leonard 70-74-74 218 +2
Charl Schwartzel 72-71-75 218 +2
Martin Kaymer 73-69-76 218 +2
Brian Davis 78-66-75-219 +3
Padraig Harrington 68-76-75-- 219 +3
Charlie Wi 74-70-75-- 219 +3
Rory Sabbatini 75-68-76 219 +3
D.A. Points 72-70-77- 219 +3
JoshTeater 72-72-76-- 220 +4
Jonas Blixt 69-75-77-221 +5
Ben Curtis 69-72-80 221 +5
Bo Van Pelt 69-74-79 222 +6
Leaderboard at time of suspended play
SCORE
THRU
1. David Lingmerth -11 16
2. Henrik Stenson -10 15
2.Tiger Woods -10 14
2. Sergio Garcia -10 14
5. Jeff Maggert -9 F
5. Hunter Mahan -9 16
7. David Lynn -8 F
7. Ryan Palmer -8 15
7. Casey Wittenberg -8 16
10. Greg Chalmers -7 F
10. Marc Leishman -7 F
12. Sean O'Hair -6 F
12. Jeff Overton -6 F
12. Kevin Streelman -6 F
12. Steve Stricker -6 F
12. Jason Dufner -6 F
12. Lee Westwood -6 15



Pirates 11, Mets 2


Pittsburgh New York
ab r h bi
SMarte If-cf 5 1 2 0 RTejad ss
Mercer 2b 5 2 2 2 DnMrp 2b
McCtch cf 2 2 1 1 Hwkns p
Snider ph-rf 2 0 0 0 Vldspn2b
GSnchzlb 4 2 1 0 DWrght3b
Tabata rf-lf 5 3 4 3 Carson p
Inge3b 4 0 2 0 Buckc
McKnrc 4 1 2 3 Turner lb
Barmes ss 4 0 2 2 Byrd rf
Liriano p 3 0 0 0 ABrwn If
Morris p 1 0 0 0 Lagars cf
JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 Niese p
JMcDnI ph 1 0 0 0 Atchisn p
Watson p 0 00 0 Duda ph
I.Davis lb
Totals 40111611 Totals
Pittsburgh 013 050 110
NewYork 000 001 001


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0
3 00 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
00 0


DP-NewYork2. LOB-Pittsburgh 7, New York
8.2B-Tabata (3), R.Tejada (9). HR-Mercer 2
(3), Tabata (2), A.Brown (1). S-Inge, Niese.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
LirianoW,1-0 51/36 1 1 2 9
Morris 12/30 0 0 0 3
Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 2
Watson 1 1 1 1 0 2
New York
Niese L,2-4 41/38 8 8 3 1
Atchison 2/3 2 1 1 0 0
Hawkins 2 4 1 1 0 1
Carson 2 2 1 1 1 3
HBP-by Morris (Valdespin).
T-3:03 (Rain delay: 0:47). A-31,160 (41,922).

Rangers 8, Astros 7
Texas Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Kinsler 2b 5 0 1 0 Grssmn cf 3 1 1 0
Andrus ss 5 0 1 1 Pareds rf 4 0 0 0
Brkmndh 4 2 2 1 Carterph 1 0 0 0
Beltre 3b 5 1 1 1 Altuve 2b 3 0 0 1
N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 2 JCastrodh 4 0 0 0
Morlndlb 4 1 2 0 Corprnc 4 1 1 0
JeBakrIf 1 0 1 0 C.Penalb 2 2 1 0
DvMrp ph-lf 2 1 1 1 Crowe If 4 1 1 1
Soto c 3 1 0 0 Dmngz 3b 4 2 2 3
Gentry cf 1 0 0 0 MGnzlz ss 3 0 1 1
LMartn ph-cf2 1 1 2
Totals 36 8118 Totals 327 7 6
Texas 010 006 100 8
Houston 001 020 013 7
E-Kinsler 2 (7). DP-Houston 1. LOB-Texas
5, Houston 4. 2B-Kinsler (11), Moreland (9),
Dav.Murphy (6), Grossman (4), C.Pena (6).
3B-Moreland (1), L.Martin (2). HR-Berkman
(3), Beltre (7), N.Cruz (9), Dominguez 2 (2).
SB-Crowe (1). CS-Andrus (1), Grossman (3).
SF-Altuve, Ma.Gonzalez.
IP H RERBBSO
Texas
Darvish W,6-1 8 4 4 4 3 9
Kirkman 0 2 2 2 0 0
NathanS,11-11 1 1 1 1 1 0
Houston
Bedard 5 4 2 2 1 7
HumberL,0-8 2/3 5 5 5 1 1
Cisnero 31/32 1 1 1 2
Bedard pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Kirkman pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Bedard (Je.Baker).WP-Nathan.
T-3:22. A-27,188 (42,060).


4000 I
3 0 1 0
4 1 1 1 Indians 7
4 0 1 0 Cleveland I
0 0 0 0 ab rh bi
0 0 0 0 Bourn cf 6 2 2 0
1 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4 2 1 0
2 0 0 0 ACarer ss 5 1 3 2
332 7 2 Swisher rf 3 1 1 1
11 CSantnc 4 0 1 0
2 iambimhdh 3 0 0 29


MrRynI lb
Stubbs rf
Brantly If
Chsnhll 3b
Aviles 3b


, Tigers 6


Detroit

AJcksn cf
TrHntr rf
MiCarr 3b
Fielder 1lb
VMrtnz dh
D Kellv dh


3 1 1 1 Dirks If
0 0 0 0 Tuiassp If
5 0 2 0 JhPerlt ss
3 0 0 0 Avila c
2 0 1 1 B.Penac
Infante 2b


Totals 38 7127 Totals
Cleveland 210 011 110
Detroit 001 000 401


ab r h bi
5 0 0 1
5 0 1 1
5 0 1 0
3 0 1 0
3 1 1 0
0 00
2 1100
1 1 0 0
2 2 1 1
2 00 0
1 1 0 1
4 1 2 2
336 7 6
7
6


E-Swisher (1), Mi.Cabrera (2). DP-Cleveland
1. LOB-Cleveland 13, Detroit 6. 2B-A.Cabr-
era (9), Swisher (8), Brantley (6), Fielder (8),
V.Martinez (7). 3B-Infante (2). HR-Jh.Peralta
(3). SB-Bourn (2), Jh.Peralta (2). SF-Giambi,
B.Pena.
IP H RERBBSO


Cleveland
U.Jimenez W,3-2
Hagadone
Allen H,1
J.Smith H,4
C.Perez S,6-7
Detroit
Verlander L,4-3
Smyly
Alburquerque
D. Downs


5 6 4
12/33 2
1 3 1
11/30 0


Hagadone pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
HBP-by J.Smith (Fielder). WP-U.Jimenez.
T-3:33. A-41,438 (41,255).
MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .376; Loney,
Tampa Bay, .371; CSantana, Cleveland, .350; Al-
tuve, Houston, .336; TorHunter, Detroit, .333; Lon-
goria, Tampa Bay, .333; Mauer, Minnesota, .333.
RUNS-AJackson, Detroit, 33; AJones, Bal-
timore, 28; Machado, Baltimore, 28; McLouth,
Baltimore, 28; MiCabrera, Detroit, 27; Jennings,
Tampa Bay, 27; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 26.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 40; CDavis, Balti-
more, 34; Fielder, Detroit, 33; Napoli, Boston,
32; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 31; NCruz, Texas,
27; AGordon, Kansas City, 27.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 53; Machado, Bal-
timore, 51; Altuve, Houston, 50; AJones, Balti-
more, 50; Kinsler, Texas, 47; Pedroia, Boston, 47;
TorHunter, Detroit, 46; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46.
HOME RUNS-MarReynolds, Cleveland, 11;
CDavis, Baltimore, 10; Encarnacion, Toronto,
10; Arencibia, Toronto, 9; Cano, New York, 9;
NCruz, Texas, 9; Fielder, Detroit, 9; Longoria,
Tampa Bay, 9; Morse, Seattle, 9; Trumbo, Los
Angeles, 9.


PITCHING-MMoore, Tampa Bay, 6-0; Buch-
holz, Boston, 6-0; Darvish, Texas, 6-1; Lester,
Boston, 5-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 5-0; Guthrie,
Kansas City, 5-0; Hammel, Baltimore, 5-1; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 5-2; Masterson, Cleveland, 5-2.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 80; Scherzer,
Detroit, 61; Buchholz, Boston, 60; AniSanchez,
Detroit, 58; Verlander, Detroit, 57; FHernandez,
Seattle, 56; Dempster, Boston, 55.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-CGomez, Milwaukee, .374; Se-
gura, Milwaukee, .352; YMolina, St. Louis, .351;
AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, .339; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, .336; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .327; Cud-
dyer, Colorado, .319.
RUNS-Choo, Cincinnati, 29; SMarte, Pitts-
burgh, 28; JUpton, Atlanta, 28; MCarpenter, St.
Louis, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 27; Holliday,
St. Louis, 26; Pagan, San Francisco, 25; Votto,
Cincinnati, 25.
RBI-Phillips, Cincinnati, 31; Goldschmidt,
Arizona, 30; Buck, New York, 29; Rizzo,
Chicago, 28; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 28; Craig, St.
Louis, 27; Braun, Milwaukee, 26; AdGonzalez,
Los Angeles, 26.
HITS-SMarte, Pittsburgh, 48; CGomez, Mil-
waukee, 46; YMolina, St. Louis, 46; Sandoval,
San Francisco, 45; Segura, Milwaukee, 45;
Choo, Cincinnati, 43; Pence, San Francisco, 43;
Votto, Cincinnati, 43.
HOME RUNS-JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Buck,
New York, 10; Harper, Washington, 10; Beltran,
St. Louis, 9; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 9; Rizzo,
Chicago, 9; YBetancourt, Milwaukee, 8; Braun,
Milwaukee, 8; Fowler, Colorado, 8.
PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington, 6-1;
Corbin, Arizona, 5-0; Lynn, St. Louis, 5-1 ;Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 5-2; SMiller, St. Louis, 5-2; 11
tied at 4.
STRIKEOUTS-AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 66;
Harvey, New York, 58; Samardzija, Chicago, 57;
Kershaw, Los Angeles, 56; Wainwright, St. Louis,
55; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 54; SMiller, St.
Louis, 51; Strasburg, Washington, 51.



NBA playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Sunday, May 5
Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91
Indiana 102, New York 95
Monday, May 6
Chicago 93, Miami 86
San Antonio 129, Golden State 127, 20T
Tuesday, May 7
NewYork 105, Indiana 79
Memphis 99, Oklahoma City 93
Wednesday, May 8
Miami 115, Chicago 78
Golden State 100, San Antonio 91


SCOREBOARD


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
^O,, 8-5-0
. CASH 3 (late)
0, 1-6-5

PLAY 4 (early)
3-4-9-0
PLAY 4 (late)
Tm 3l -3-8-8-0

FANTASY 5
13 19 28 29 33

POWERBALL LOTTERY
6-13-19-23-43 20-23-26-32-41-46
POWER BALL XTRA
16 2


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


Mega Money: 5 20 23 39
Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 2
3-of-4 MB 56
3-of-4 1,065
2-of-4 MB 1,552
1-of-4 MB 14,119
2-of-4 36,897


$10,363.50
$809.00
$127.00
$61.00
$7.00
$4.00


Fantasy 5:10 15 20 33 34
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 285 $555.00
3-of-5 9,618 $22.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


Friday, May 10
Miami 104, Chicago 94, Miami leads series
2-1
San Antonio 102, Golden State 92, San An-
tonio leads series 2-1
Saturday, May 11
Memphis 87, Oklahoma City 81, Memphis
leads series 2-1
Indiana 82, New York 71, Indiana leads se-
ries 2-1
Today, May 12
San Antonio at Golden State, 3:30 p.m.
Monday, May 13
Miami at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 14
NewYork at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 15
Chicago at Miami, 7p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 16
Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.
x-San Antonio at Golden State, TBA
Friday, May 17
x-Miami at Chicago, TBA
x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA
Saturday, May 18
x-New York at Indiana, TBA
Sunday, May 19
x-Chicago at Miami, TBA
x-Golden State at San Antonio, TBA
x-Memphis at Oklahoma City TBA
Monday, May 20
x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.



NHL playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Saturday, May 4
Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Toronto 4, Boston 2
Anaheim 4, Detroit 0
Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0
Sunday, May 5
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT
Ottawa 6, Montreal 1
San Jose 5, Vancouver 2
Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT
Monday, May 6
Boston 5, Toronto 2
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT
Los Angeles 4, St. Louis 3
Tuesday, May 7
Ottawa 3, Montreal 2, OT
N.Y. Islanders 6, Pittsburgh 4
Chicago 3, Minnesota 0
San Jose 4, Vancouver 3, San Jose wins se-
ries 4-0
Wednesday, May 8
Boston 4, Toronto 3, OT
N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3
Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 2, OT
Thursday, May 9
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 0
Ottawa 6, Montreal 1, Ottawa wins series 4-
1
Chicago 5, Minnesota 1, Chicago wins series
4-1
Friday, May 10
Toronto 2, Boston 1, Boston leads series 3-2
Washington 2, NY Rangers 1, OT Washing-
ton leads series 3-2
Detroit 4, Anaheim 3, OT series tied 3-3
Los Angeles 2, St. Louis 1, Los Angeles wins
series 4-2
Saturday, May 11
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, OT, Pittsburgh
wins series 4-2
Today, May 12
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Monday, May 13
x-NY Rangers at Washington, TBA
x-Toronto at Boston, TBA



Sprint Cup
Bojangles'Southern 500 Results
Saturday
At Darlington Raceway
Darlington, S.C.
Lap length: 1.366 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (7) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 367 laps, 125.6 rat-
ing, 47 points.
2. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 367, 105, 42.
3. (8) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 367, 112.6, 42.
4. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 367, 121.7, 40.
5. (10) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 367, 106.6, 39.
6. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 367, 137.7, 40.
7. (17) Carl Edwards, Ford, 367, 89.6, 37.
8. (12) J. Pablo Montoya, CheWvy, 367, 90.2, 36.
9. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 367, 99.3, 35.
10. (21) Ryan Newman, Chevy, 367, 81.4, 34.
11. (13) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 367, 96.5, 33.
12. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 367, 91.9, 32.
13. (9) Greg Biffle, Ford, 367, 83.6, 31.
14. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 367, 102.7, 31.
15. (20) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 367, 86.8, 29.
16. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevy, 367, 72.7, 28.
17. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 367,105.5, 27.
18. (14) R. Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 366, 69.7, 26.
19. (15) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 366, 76, 25.
20. (18) Aric Almirola, Ford, 366, 64.3, 24.
21. (11) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 365, 73.6, 23.
22. (30) Joey Logano, Ford, 365, 70.1, 22.
23. (28) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 364, 63.9, 21.
24. (27) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 363, 62.7, 0.
25. (22) Mark Martin, Toyota, 363, 55.2, 19.
26. (23) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 363, 47.6, 18.
27. (37) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 362, 52.4, 17.
28. (40) Danica Patrick, Chevy, 362, 43.4, 16.
29. (29) David Gilliland, Ford, 362, 45.6, 15.
30. (32) Landon Cassill, Chevy, 360, 40.7, 14.
31. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 359, 36.5, 0.
32. (26) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 358, 69.6, 12.
33. (41) Timmy Hill, Ford, 358, 34.1, 11.
34. (24) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 358, 43, 10.
35. (42) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 354, 31.4, 9.
36. (33) David Reutimann, Toyota, accident,
327, 51.1, 8.
37. (19) Casey Mears, Ford, accident, 327,
53.2, 7.
38. (34) Josh Wise, Ford, accident, 326, 40, 0.
39. (31) David Ragan, Ford, engine, 318, 39.2, 5.
40. (39) D. Stremme, Toyota, engine, 230, 46.6, 4.
41. (36) Scott Speed, Ford, brakes, 77, 29.9,3.
42. (35) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 58,
27.2, 2.
43. (38) Mike Bliss, Toyota, overheating, 18,
24.8, 0.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 141.383 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 32 minutes, 45 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 3.155 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 25 laps.
Lead Changes: 9 among 4 drivers.
Lap Leaders: Ku.Busch 1-51; KyBusch 52-53;


M.Kenseth 54-55; Ku.Busch 56-73; Ky.Busch
74-105; M.Kenseth 106-107; Ky.Busch 108-185;
J.Gordon 186-201; Ky.Busch 202-354;
M.Kenseth 355-367.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): Ky.Busch, 4 times for 265 laps; Ku.Busch,
2 times for 69 laps; M.Kenseth, 3 times for 17
laps; J.Gordon, 1 time for 16 laps.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 423; 2. C.Ed-
wards, 379; 3. M.Kenseth, 364; 4. D.Earnhardt
Jr., 359; 5. C.Bowyer, 349; 6. K.Kahne, 326; 7.
Bra.Keselowski, 326; 8. Ky.Busch, 325; 9.
A.Almirola, 317; 10. K.Harvick, 315; 11.
PMenard, 315; 12. J.Gordon, 311.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 B3


RAYS
Continued from Page BI


this time with the bases loaded against Jamey
Wright to force in the lead run that made it 7-
6.
Smith, a 23-year-old righty called up from
Double-A San Antonio, got three quick outs,
including a couple of strikeouts in the first in-
ning.
But he walked Longoria to lead off the sec-
ond and Loney followed with his second
homer of the season. Smith threw 26 pitches
in the inning without getting an out. Tyson
Ross finished the inning for the Padres and
pitched four shutout innings of relief.
Hellickson pitched 6 2-3 innings, giving up
six earned runs on six hits while striking out
eight.
Tampa Bay Rays schedule
May 12 vs San Diego
May 14 vs Boston
May 15 vs Boston
May 16 vs Boston
May 17 at Baltimore
May 18 at Baltimore
May 19 at Baltimore
May 20 at Toronto
May 21 at Toronto
May 22 at Toronto
May 24 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 25 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 26 vs N.Y. Yankees
May 27 vs Miami
May 28 vs Miami
May 29 at Miami
May 30 at Miami
May 31 at Cleveland
June 1 at Cleveland
June 2 at Cleveland
June 4 at Detroit
June 5 at Detroit
June 6 at Detroit
June 7 vs Baltimore
June 8 vs Baltimore



KIDS
Continued from Page B1


done kids tris all over the state. We have the
formula. We were hoping for 60 to 100 kids
and we have 175. We are excited. Basically, it's
a sellout. We are happy to be at Whispering
Pines Park. It's a perfect venue."
Van Allen, who did much of the heavy lift-
ing for this event, was just as happy as a
competitor.
"My son does triathlons," she said. "I said
Citrus County needs a kids triathlon and it's
time. The response is unbelievable. We are
beside ourselves. United Way is thrilled that
we have such a great response. The last 10
days, it just exploded at registration. Next
year, we will probably have 250. Everybody is
having a great time. It's about the kids getting
outside and physical and feeling good about
themselves."
Kayla Duncan, 7, who attends Inverness
Primary School, had a positive reaction to the
event.
"(I'm) happy," she said. "I liked the biking. I
want to do it again next year"
Bob Brockett, who was one of the founders
of what became the Crystal River Sprint
Triathlon and is the principal sponsor, was
very happy with the way the event turned out.
"This is far beyond what anybody ex-
pected," he said. "We were hoping for 60 to 80.
We had to turn some away This is huge for the
county. This is huge for the kids. Everyone is
just beaming.
His daughter, Callie, volunteered as a life-
guard in the pool and later handled announc-
ing duties. She recalled her first triathlon at
St Anthony's in Pinellas County when she was
seven years old. She is now a senior at the
University of Florida, majoring in history
"It is very inspiring and it's really fun to
watch," she said.
Citrus Springs resident Alex Acker, 12, said
she felt "good."
We did three different things and I like to
do all of them," Acker said. "I am best at
running."
Citrus County Kids Triathlon
Age Group Winners
Junior Division
Female Age 6
Francesca Mastroianni, Ocoee 30:57.7
Female Age 7
Abrielle Spiddle, Hernando 18:54
Female Age 8
Gamma Navickas, Hernando 19:55
Female Age 9
Lauren Wood, Inverness 14:39.7
Female Age 10
Ava Rice, Lecanto 13:03.8
Male Age 6
Joe Meek, Beverly Hills 21:33.7
Male Age 7
Luke Wheeler, Inverness 19:53.5
Male Age 8
Luke Sadecki, Inverness 17:42
Male Age 9
Canyon Anderson, Dunnellon 16:29
Male Age 10
Caleb Holloway, Inverness 13:03.6
Senior Division
Female Age 11
Sophia Macaisa, Inverness 26:08.9


Female Age 12
Whitnee Anderson, Land 0' Lakes 27:23
Female Age 13
Zoe Conti, Spring Hill 28:30.5
Female Age 14
Grace Tyler, Inverness 27:21.9
Female Age 15
Maureen Gillespie, Hernando 28:41.7
Male Age 11
Connor Bishop, Inverness 27:46.7
Male Age 12
Taylor Martin, Crystal River 28:46.3
Male Age 13
Trent Stukes, Crystal River 27:17.5
Male Age 14
Gregory Buettner, Hernando 22:10
Male Age 15
Jeff Amodie, Spring Hill 21:53.8


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Grand Prix of Spain
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Stadium Super Truck Series (Taped)
4 p.m. (ESPN2) American Le Mans Series: Monterey (Taped)
BASEBALL
1:30 p.m. (SUN) San Diego Padres at Tampa Bay Rays
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Toronto Blue Jays at Boston Red Sox
1:30 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Washington Nationals
4 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Los Angeles Dodgers
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Chicago
White Sox
BASKETBALL
NBA PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
3:30 p.m. (ABC) San Antonio Spurs at Golden State
Warriors Game 4
BICYCLING
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of California, Stage 1
GOLF
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: The Players Championship -
Final Round
HOCKEY
10:30 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 IIHF World Championships:
United States vs. Germany (Same-day Tape)
NHL PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND
4:30 p.m. (CNBC) Washington Capitals at New York
Rangers Game 6
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston Bruins at Toronto Maple Leafs
Game 6
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Detroit Red Wings at Anaheim Ducks -
Game 6
COLLEGE LACROSSE
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament-- Cornell at Maryland
BULL RIDING
4 p.m. (CBS) PBR Last Cowboy Standing (Taped)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
10 a.m. (SUN) Florida at Florida State (Taped)

RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game
1:40 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) San Diego Padres at Tampa
Bay Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kayaking, Archery youth


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, in partnership with 2 Sis-
ters Kayak Tours, is holding
Kayaking Camps this summer.
Each camp will be held at Her-
nando Beach Park from Monday
to Thursday and at Chassahow-
itzka River on Friday
Children ages 8 to 15 are eligi-
ble and the cost is $80 per child.
We will offer four different
weeks to choose from through-
out June and July. Each week
will have two time slots that will
accommodate ages 8 to 11 and
ages 12 to 15 separately
During this camp, children
will learn kayak instruction,
water and boater safety and pad-
dling techniques. On Friday,
children can put their skills to


the test with a fun filled Kayak
Adventure down the Chassa-
howitzka River.
Kayaks, life preservers, dry
boxes, whistles and a camp T-
shirt will be provided. Registra-
tion is limited to 12 children
weekly for each age group so
sign up now!
For more information, contact
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
Archery Camp
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, in partnership with McPher-
son's Archery & Outdoor Pro Shop,
is holding an Archery Camp this
summer. The camp will be offered
on two different weeks and partici-
pants will be separated by age.
The camps are open to boys and


girls ages 6 to 15 with the
consisting of ages 6 to 8,
and 12 to 15. The camps
held at McPherson's Arch
Lecanto. Each camp will
day through Thursday wit
separate classes each da
pants will learn about var
archery equipment, proper
ing techniques and equip
safety. At the end of each
top shot of the week will b
awarded a free bow.
Registration is now opei
be completed at the Citrus
Parks & Recreation office.
be limited to 25 children pe
For more information co
rus County Parks & Recre
352-527-7540, visit www.c
typarks.com or McPhersoi
Archery at 352-341-2820.


camps
groups Youth g
9 to 11,
will be Citrus Count
hery in ation, in partner
run Mon- Golf Course, w
th two golf lessons. TI
y. Partic held at Pine Ri
y. Partici- Wednesday m
ous hoot- 11:30 a.m. or T
er shoot- from 5:30 to 7:
ment Wednesday, Ju
i camp the June 13, and ru
be Children age
and the cost is
n and can off for addition
County will be given by
Space will bins and severe
er class. During these le
)ntact Cit- will learn putting
nation at on-course play,
citruscoun- quette. Golf clu
n's but if your child
encourage there


upcoming soon
lolf lessons For more information, contact
ty Parks & Recre- Crysta Henry, recreation program
ship with Pine Ridge specialist for youth programs at 352-
ill hold summer youth 527-7543, www.citruscountyparks.
he lessons will be com, or Randy Robbins at
he lessons will be 352-746-6177.
dge Golf Course on 352-746-6177.
mornings from 9:30 to Movie in the Park
hursday evenings It's time again for another of Citrus
30 p.m. They begin County Parks & Recreations Movie in
ne 12 and Thursday,
un for five weeks. the Park Events. Zoo Keeper (PG)

s 6 to 15 are eligible will be shown on the two-story tall air
$80 per child with $15 screen Saturday, June 1. The movie
al siblings. Instruction will begin at dark (around 8 p.m.).
golf pro Randy Rob- The event will be held at Lecanto
al of his volunteers. Community Park. Bring the whole
ssons, participants family out for this fun and free event
g, driving, chipping, under the stars.
and on-course eti- For more information, please con-
bs will be provided, tact Citrus County Parks & Recre-
has their own set, we ation at 352-527-7540 or visit
m to bring them along. www.citruscountyparks.com.


LMS student excels at meet


Special to the Chronicle
Lecanto Middle School student Harrison Mancke placed 3rd in the discus with a toss of 91 feet, 6 inches and
5th in the girls shot put with a throw of 34 feet, 7 inches at the Florida middle school track meet Saturday at
Clearwater Calvary Christian School.



Tryouts, signups and events


Special to the Chronicle

The Nature Coast Soccer Club, an
official Florida Youth Soccer Asso-
ciation Region "C" League, will be
having competitive travel league
registration and tryouts for both
boys teams (Under 9-10 through
Under 19) and girls teams (Under 9-
10 through Under 15) on the follow-
ing dates:
Tuesday, May 28, 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 pm (boys only).
Wednesday, May 29, 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. (girls only).
Thursday, May 30, 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. (boys only).
Friday, May 31, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. (girls only).
Saturday, June 1, 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. (all boys, and girls teams except
U-13).
Monday, June 3,5:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. (girls only).
Tuesday, June 4 5:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. (boys only).
Wednesday, June 5, 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. (girls only).
Thursday, June 6, 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. (boys only).
Tryouts will be held at the NCSC
Fields at the Central Ridge District
Park in Holder All prospective play-
ers must wear proper soccer attire,
including shin guards, and will need
to bring their own supply of water.
For more information or a list of
coaches and teams, call: Mike Penn
at 352-489-0160 or Mike Deem at 352-
302-0793 or visit the website at
www.naturecoastsoccer.com.
Citrus United
soccer tryouts
Citrus United Soccer Club will be hold-
ing competitive tryouts for the upcoming
2013-14 season beginning May 30. All
age groups from U-9 through U-18, both
boys and girls, are welcome to try out.
Please visit our website at www.
citrusunited.com to view times and loca-
tions of tryouts, or contact John With-
kowski at 352-228-2523.
Men's softball
On Monday night, Advanced Fitness
downed AMS Oil 15-3 in the evening's
opening game.
Reflections Church earned a forfeit
victory over Sons of Pitches in the mid-
dle contest.
R.C. Lawn Care" and The Machines
combined for 32 runs in the final game,
but R.C. Lawn Care emerged victorious
by a score of 22-10.
Teams play again this Monday at 6:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River.
Men's flag football
On Thursday night, three more flag
football games kicked off with all
matchups decided by a combined seven
points.
The first game was a battle between
Red and Purple teams. Both teams ex-


changed scores, but Red pulled through
with a 27-25 win over Purple.
The second game, between Gold and
Orange, was also closely contested. In
the end, Gold nipped Orange 24-20.
In the evening's final matchup, Pink
face off against Green. Both teams had
powerful plays throughout the night, but
it was Pink prevailing 33-32 over Green.
Teams play this Thursday starting at
6:30 p.m. at Homosassa Area Recre-
ation Park for another round of games.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to start up
again on June 28. Games are played at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River on
Thursday starting at 6:30 p.m.
Registration for teams is from May 20
through June 21. For more information,
call 352-527-7540.
Adult co-ed kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kickball league
is for adults 18 and up. Games are at
6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal River, lasting
an hour or nine innings, whichever
comes first.
The new season tentatively starts July
10. Registration for teams begins June 6
and ends July 5. For more information,
call 352-527-7540.
Beach volleyball
Registration for our second season of
beach volleyball begins for teams on
May 20 and runs through June 14.
Games are played starting at 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River.
The fee is $15 per player, with a maxi-
mum of seven players per team. For
more information, call 352-527-7540.
Aqua Zumba at
Bicentennial Park Pool
Love the water and want to get active?
Come and join Aqua Zumba at Bicenten-
nial Pool.
Classes are at 10 a.m. on Saturdays.
The cost is $4 per class. For more infor-
mation, contact Bicentennial Pool at
352-795-1478.
Swimming lessons
at Bicentennial Pool
Are you interested in having your chil-
dren learn how to swim or in learning to
swim yourself? Bicentennial Pool offers
swimming lessons for all ages, including
adult swim lessons.
Lessons are twice a week and run for a
two-week session. For more information,
call Bicentennial Pool at 352-795-1478.
CRHS annual
cheerleading camp
The Crystal River High School cheer-
leaders' annual Camp Rah Rah and Cheer
Camp will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to
noon Tuesday through Friday, May 28 to
31, at the Crystal River High School gym.
Come learn cheers, dances and have


fun. Camp is for ages 5 through eighth
grade (no experience necessary). Cost
of $45 includes daily snack and a T-shirt.
Register and pay by May 20 and save
$5. For a registration form or more infor-
mation, write: CRHS Cheerleaders -
Attn: Julie Taylor, 3195 Crystal High
Drive, Crystal River, FL 34428.
CHS cheer camp
coming in June
The CHS kids cheer camp will be from
June 3 to 6, with each day going from 9
a.m. to 12 p.m for children between the
ages of 3 to 12.
A single child costs $45, which in-
cludes a T-shirt, snack and drink or two
children from the same
family for $75.
Campers should wear shorts, a T-shirt
and tennis shoes each day.
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Mon-
day, June 3 in the Citrus High School
gym lobby.
For more information,
contact Jillian Godwin at godwinj@
citrus.kl2.fl.us or 352-726-2241, ext.
4550.
Sisson Benefit Golf
Tournament in June
The Kyle Sisson Benefit Golf Tourna-
ment will take place Saturday, June 15,
at Inverness Golf & Country Club, 3150
S. Country Club Drive. The price of $75
per person includes cart, range balls and
lunch.
The game is a four-person team
scramble with an 8:30 a.m. tee time.
Prizes will be awarded for closest pin on
par 3's, longest drive and chance draw-
ing raffles.
Hole sponsorships are: Silver, $100;
Bronze, $250; Gold, $500; and Platinum
$1,000.
Mail all entries/sponsorships to:
Michele Snellings, 5260 W. Angus Drive,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465. Players should
make checks payable to Team Hope,
ACS. For hole sponsorships, make
checks payable to Sun Trust Bank, note
left corner: Kyle Sisson Benefit Account.
For more information, call Nick Mal-
tese at 352-464-7511 or Michele
Snellings at 352-697-2220.
LifeSouth plans
golf tournament
Support LifeSouth Community Blood
Centers' Five Points of Life Foundation
by competing in the second annual Five
Points of Life Golf Tournament on Friday,
May 17. Play the famed Golden Ocala
course, while supporting a great cause.
For more information and to register a
team, visit www.fivepointsoflife.com
/2011/12/08/five-points-of-life-golf-
tournament.
Those interested in sponsoring or do-
nating to the auction may call Elli Alba at
352-224-1611 or email emalba@
lifesouth.org.


Citrus Hills
Junior Golf Camp
The 17th annual Citrus
Hills Junior Golf Camp starts
Wednesday, June 5.
Ages range from 4 to 17.
Our PGA professionals (with
67 years of experience) are
dedicated to giving the jun-
iors the best instruction on
golf fundamentals and hav-
ing fun in the process.
Included in our golf camp is
a free summer membership.
You have a choice of five con-
secutive Wednesdays from 9
to 11 a.m. or five consecutive
Thursday from 5:30 to 8
p.m.. In addition to teaching
them golf, we feed them pizza
and soda every lesson.
The cost of the camp is
$100. We also carry junior
merchandise and equipment
in our pro shop.
Classes fill up quickly, so
please call Citrus Hills Golf
Shop at 352-746-4425 for
more information or to regis-
ter your junior.
Camp Patriot
upcoming for
young hoopsters
Coach Tim Ryan, the Na-
tional NJCAA Men's Basket-
ball Coach of the Year from
the College of Central
Florida, is hosting Camp Pa-
triot Basketball Camp for the
10th straight year. The camp
is for boys and girls ages 8
to 18 and located at the
Ocala campus of the College
of Central Florida.
Four sessions are offered,
the dates are: June 17-20,
June 24-27, July 8-11 and
July 22-25. Each day runs
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The cost is $150 per ses-
sion. For more information,
please visit www.camppatriot
basketball.com or call Tim
Ryan at 352-427-7435.
CRHS Volleyball
Camp set for June
The Crystal River Volley-
ball Camp will be held from
June 3 to 7 from 5 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. at Citrus Springs
Middle School. The camp is
open to girls ages 11 to 16
from any county or surround-
ing schools and it is open to
girls of all skill levels.
Training will be offered on
basic and improving volley-
ball skills of setting, hitting,
serving, passing, defensive
and team play. T-shirts will
be available to all campers.


Crystal River High School
players and coaches will be
the camp coaches.
The cost of the camp is
$55 and camp registration
forms are available at Crys-
tal River High School, Crys-
tal River Middle School,
Citrus Springs Middle
School, or contact Mike Rid-
ley at 352-566-7789 or email
at ridleym@citrus.kl2.fl.us.
Panthers plan
volleyball camp
Summer volleyball camp
will be offered by the Lecanto
Panthers this summer.
Open to fourth-graders
through entering ninth-
graders, cost is $65. Parents
can pick up a registration
form at Lecanto High School
or email Alice Christian at
christiana@citrus.kl2.fl.us for
more information and times.
CR hoops camp
tips off in June
The Crystal River 2013
hoops camp has three ses-
sions: June 3-6, 10-13 and
17-20. Each day goes from
9a.m. to 12 p.m..
One session is $49, two
sessions are $79 and all
three are $99. The camp will
be led by Crystal River High
School boys basketball
coach Steve Feldman.
All pre-registered campers
will receive a camp T-shirt
and the first 24 campers who
register for all three weeks will
receive an Adidas basketball.
For more information,
contact Steve Feldman at
feldmans@citrus.kl2.fl.us
or 352-601-0870.
Register now for
Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center
in Crystal River will be in June
and July at Soquili Stables.
Eight weeklong sessions
will be offered from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day. Campers can learn to
ride and care for a horse.
There will be equine activi-
ties, in the saddle and on the
ground, as well as crafts,
swimming and more.
For more information and
to sign up, visit the website
at www.faithhavencrc.org
/camp_soquili.php, call 352-
206-2990, or email
soquili.stables@gmail.com.
Like Camp Soquili on Face-
book: www.facebook.com/
CampSoquili.


Kidd stays in the picture


Special to the Chronicle
Crystal River High School sophomore Kyle Kidd, cen-
ter, finished in a four-way tie for second place in the
FSGA Florida Junior Tour's 16 to 18-year-old boys tour-
nament at Via Mizner Golf & Country Club in Boca
Raton on May 4 and 5. Kidd fired rounds of 66 and 71
to finish with a 137 for the two-day, 36-hole event.


--- Camp BRIEFS


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


RECREATIONAL SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Orpik's OT goal sends Penguins to 2nd round


Associated Press

UNIONDALE, N.Y Brooks
Orpik scored 7:49 into overtime,
and the Pittsburgh Penguins
overcame three one-goal
deficits in Game 6 to eliminate
the New York Islanders with a 4-
3 victory on Saturday night.
Orpik, a defenseman, took a
shot from the left point that
might have clipped Islanders
forward Brad Boyes on its way
past goalie Evgeni Nabokov
The Penguins advanced to
face the Ottawa Senators in the
second round of the playoffs de-
spite being outshot 38-21 in the


decisive win.
The Islanders were just 5:16
away from sending the series
back to Pittsburgh for one more
game when another defense-
man, Paul Martin, got the Pen-
guins even for the third time.
Evgeni Malkin assisted on the
tying and winning goals. On
Martin's goal, Malkin curled be-
hind the New York net with the
puck and sent a hard pass high
in the zone to Martin, who
ripped a drive through traffic in
front.
Michael Grabner had given
the Islanders a 3-2 edge 2:21 into
the third.


He scored his second career
NHL postseason goal off a feed
from Keith Aucoin to give the Is-
landers their third lead on
their 30th shot against the
top-seeded Penguins. The goal
left Pittsburgh netminder
Tomas Vokoun sprawled out on
his stomach.
New York Islanders center John
Tavares and goalie Evgeni
Nabokov put the squeeze on Pitts-
burgh Penguins center Evgeni
Malkin on Saturday in the third
period of Game 6 of their first-
round NHL Stanley Cup playoff
hockey series in Uniondale, N.Y.
Associated Press


Comic


Kenseth claims

Southern 500

at Darlington

Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C. -
Matt Kenseth passed his
Joe Gibbs Racing team-
mate Kyle Busch with 13
laps to go to win his first
Southern 500 on Saturday
night.
Busch had the strongest
car for much of the race
and led for 265 of the 367
laps at Darlington Race-
way But his machine ap-
peared to fall away at the
worst possible time and
he faded to sixth.
Denny Hamlin com-
pleted his first full race
since suffering a compres-
sion fracture in a vertebra
in his lower back on
March 24.
Jeff Gordon would up
third in his 700th straight
career start.
Points leader Jimmie
Johnson was fourth and
Kevin Harvick fifth.
Kenseth's victory came
without crew chief Jason
Ratcliff, who was sus-
pended for the No. 20 Toy-
ota having an illegal part
in a win at Kansas.
Carl Edwards finished
seventh, followed by
Juan Pablo Montoya and
Dale Earnhardt Jr. Ryan
Newman rounded out the
top 10.
"This is a dream come
true," Kenseth shouted on
his radio. "Thank you guys
very much."
Kenseth had won three
times here in the Nation-
wide Series, but had
never come closer than
third in Sprint Cup. Once
he cleared Busch,
Kenseth had smooth sail-
ing to the finish to win for
the third time in his debut
JGR season. It was
Kenseth's 27th career
Sprint Cup victory
No one matched Busch
for most of the race. He
had powered to victory in
the Nationwide event
here Friday night and was
running strong again after
taking the lead from older
brother and pole-sitter
Kurt Busch 74 laps in.
Kyle Busch stayed on


PGA
Continued from Page B1

about the par-5 second hole.
"Well, obviously Tiger
was on the left and it was
my shot to hit," Garcia
said. "He moved all of the
crowd that he needed to
move. I waited for that. I
wouldn't say that he didn't
see that I was ready, but
you do have a feel when
the other guy is going to hit
and right as I was in the
top of the backswing, I
think he must have pulled
like a 5-wood or a 3-wood
and obviously everybody
started screaming. So that
didn't help very much."
Woods said Garcia didn't
have his facts straight.
"The marshals, they told
me he already hit, so I
pulled a club and was get-
ting ready to play my shot,"
Woods said.
Asked if they talked it
over when play resumed,
Woods replied, "We didn't
do a lot of talking."
Garcia wound up mak-


Associated Press
Matt Kenseth holds up the trophy Saturday in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR
Sprint Cup's Southern 500 race at Darlington Raceway in Darlington, S.C.


top through several
stretches of green-flag
racing and through the
first four restarts. But his
machine couldn't keep up
after Kenseth went by
Crew chief Dave Rogers
said Busch had a cut tire
and only 12 pounds of
pressure left when he
went into the garage.
"Honestly, I have only
dreamed about winning
the Southern 500,"
Kenseth said. "This to me
feels bigger than probably
any win in my career"
The win came with Wally
Brown calling the shots as
crew chief. Ratcliff is ex-
pected back for the next
race after JGR had penal-


ing a bogey on the second
hole to lose the one-shot
lead he had at the start of
the round. Woods pulled
off his shot, and then
blasted out of the bunker
to about 10 feet and made
birdie to take the lead.
When storm clouds
moved in, Garcia already
hit a tough shot onto the
green at No. 7, and Woods
had to mark his ball in the
fairway when the siren
sounded to stop play.
When they resumed, Wood
hit onto the seventh green,
and Garcia putted before
Woods got there.
They were on the 15th
hole when play was
stopped because of dark-
ness. Woods gave a brief TV
interview, and Garcia came
over to shake his hand.
"It happens to me when
I'm in Spain," he said of
the large crowds. "Obvi-
ously, it happens to him
everywhere he goes. He
gets a lot of people fol-
lowing, and I think you
have to be very careful
because there's another
guy playing."


ties imposed by NASCAR
reduced on appeal.
The best chance to de-
feat Busch appeared to
come from Kasey Kahne,
who pressured his JGR
rival on the restart after
the fourth caution pe-
riod. Kahne looked like
he had cleared Busch but
the car got loose and the
back end slammed the
wall.
Kahne was not happy
with Busch's maneuver.
"Three times this year
me and Kyle had contact
and I had a chance, capa-
ble-winning cars, it's dis-
appointing on the points
side and not winning some
of these races," Kahne


said. "Whether he hit me
or just blew the air off,
whatever it was, he blew
his entry I'm not sure what
he was thinking on that"
Kurt Busch had hoped
to go from an upside-down
finish when his car went
airborne late and crash-
landed on Ryan Newman
at Talladega last week to
his first Sprint Cup victory
in two years at Darlington.
He set a qualifying record
to win the pole Friday and
led 69 of the first 73 laps
before getting passed by
brother Kyle.
Kurt Busch struggled to
stay close during the un-
expected long stretches of
green-flag racing.


Advertorial
FREE MEDICATION DOSE

Tampa Doctors Treat

Erectile OwDysfunction


BY STEVE MUELLER
Men's Health Consultant
TAMPA Local physicians at a new
medical clinic in Tampa are so sure
their medication will help men with
erectile dysfunction, they are offering
the first 37 callers a free in-office me-
ication dose.
Erectile dysfunction and premature
ejaculation have long been a problem
for millions of men, in spite of the
popularity of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra.
Many men aren't helped by these pills
or cannot take them due to adverse
side effects.
Florida Men's Medical Clinic cus-
tom blends over 180 combinations of
medications for each patient. 'That's
why our success rate is so high," says
Dr. Kevin Homsby, M.D. and author
of the book "A Doctor's Guide
to Erectile Dysfunction." 'We
help men as old as ninety-four, with
diabetes, prostate surgery and heart
conditions. Regardless of their age or
medical history our results everyday
are amazing.'
All medications are FDA approved,
and no surgery is involved. "We


adjust the prescription for a man's
performance to 45-minutes, an hour,
0-minutes or longer,' according to Dr.
Homsby,' and patients see results right
in our office. After climax the patient
stays erect the entire period of time.
This allows them to achieve a sec-
ond climax and adequately satisfy their
partner. No other medication can do
is. We offer a simple guarantee: If
you don't respond to the medication
on the first visit the office visit is free."
With that guarantee, local patients have
nothing to lose.
Openings are filling quickly for the
free in-office medication dose, after
that the normal fees will be charged.
Patients see a licensed Florida physi-
cian and are assured of utmost privacy
and professionalism with private waiting
rooms and an all male staff. Further
information is available by calling
(352) 593-0900.
Florida Men's Medical Clinic, 2203
N. Lois Ave., Suite 705, Tampa, FL
Just off 1-275 by International Mall. For
patients more than 60 miles away the
doctor will pay your gas.
www.FloridaMensClinic.com


OO0EWzv Board Certified Urologist endorsed


Grizzlies hold


off Thunder


through


13. Durant went 3 of 11
from the floor in the sec-
ond half, and his team-
mates went a combined 23
of 69 for the game.
Pacers 82,
Knicks 71
INDIANAPOLIS Roy Hi-
bbert had 24 points and 12
rebounds and Paul George
had 14 points, eight rebounds
and eight assist to lead the
Pacers past New York 82-71
in Game of the Eastern
Conference semifinals.
The Pacers are up 2-1, with
Game 4 of the best-of-seven
series Tuesday in Indy.
Carmelo Anthony scored
21 points to lead the Knicks,
who led only once in the
game for a total of 76 sec-
onds. New York spent the
final 45 minutes trying to play
catch-up but never did.
Amare Stoudemire looked
rusty after returning from a
two-month absence, going 3
of 8 from the field and finish-
ing with seven points. J.R.
Smith scored nine points after
missing the morning
shootaround because of a
102-degree fever.
Indiana took control with a
14-3 run that gave it a 58-44
third-quarter lead, and the
Knicks never got closer than
eight
The big questions heading
into the game were whether
Smith would play, whether
Stoudemire would be effective
and whether Indiana could get
back to its brand of basketball.


Associated Press
Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol drives against Okla-
homa City Thunder center Kendrick Perkins during the
second half of Game 3 in a Western Conference semifinal
NBA basketball playoff series Saturday in Memphis, Tenn.


The Original
SUMMERTIME I
On Sale Now!



.6 .... .... .:.









Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
Eagle Ridge Country Club
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Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club
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Skyview at Terra Vista
Stone Crest Country Club

Purchase Your Card At One Of
Or Call For Further
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These Fine Courses
Details.
er 31, 2013


Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
Marc Gasol scored 20
points and hit two free
throws with 1:03 left to put
Memphis ahead to stay,
and the Grizzlies held off
the Oklahoma City Thun-
der 87-81 Saturday to take
a 2-1 lead in this Western
Conference semifinal.
Gasol scored 16 in the
second half as Memphis
remained unbeaten at
home in the postseason.
The Grizzlies pulled out
the win in an ugly per-
formance for both teams
following a three-day lay-
off since Game 2. After
struggling at the free
throw line in Oklahoma
City, the Grizzlies hit all six
at the line in the final 1:03
to clinch it.
Kevin Durant scored 25
points, but only two in the
fourth quarter. A 91 per-
cent free throw shooter in
the regular season, Durant
missed two with 39.3 sec-
onds left.
Tony Allen had his best
game in this series, scoring
14 points for Memphis.
Jerryd Bayless added 11.
Zach Randolph scored
only eight points but had
10 rebounds.
The Thunder had their
worst scoring and shooting
performance this postsea-
son. Reggie Jackson had 16
points for Oklahoma city,
and Kevin Martin and
Serge Ibaka each added


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 B5










Nadal, Serena each in Madrid finals


Associated Press

MADRID Rafael
Nadal reached his seventh
consecutive final since re-
turning from a knee injury,
brushing aside wild-card
entry Pablo Andujar 6-0, 6-4
at the Madrid Open on
Saturday.
Nadal had little trouble
extending his winning
streak in clay-court semifi-
nals to 46 matches, quickly
finishing his overmatched
countryman after winning
the first six games.
Nadal can win his fifth
title since coming back from
seven-month layoff healing
his left knee.
"I couldn't have asked for
a better run of results," said
Nadal, a two-time cham-
pion in the Spanish capital.
"Five months ago I wouldn't
have dreamed of this re-


turn. I want to thank all
those who supported me
through that time."
The Spaniard will play
Stanislas Wawrinka after
the 15th-ranked Swiss re-
covered late to defeat
Tomas Berdych 6-3, 4-6, 6-4.
Serena Williams and
Maria Sharapova will meet
for the No. 1 ranking and the
women's title after winning
semifinals in straight sets.
Nadal dominated the out-
classed Andujar
The clay-court expert's
groundstrokes usually were
enough to force Andujar to
make errors and if not,
Nadal knew when to go for
a winner or approach the
net to finish off the point
The worst moment for the
113th-ranked Andujar came
when he ceded his third
straight service game with a
double fault.


Associated Press
Serena Williams returns the ball to Sara Errani during the
Madrid Open semifinals Saturday in Madrid.


But in the second set An-
dujar shook off his jitters
and had three break points
for a 4-2 lead, only for Nadal
to hold his serve.
"I played a very, very good
first set, playing aggres-
sively," Nadal said. "Pablo
played more aggressively in


the second set and had a
chance at a break, but luck-
ily it got away from him."
Andujar continued to
prove feisty, but Nadal hit a
winner to set up a break
point for 5-4 that he con-
verted when Andujar's
drop shot fell short


The top-ranked Williams
will have a chance to win
her 50th title after beating
Sara Errani of Italy 7-5,
6-2. No. 2 Sharapova got
her 500th win at all levels
after defeating Ana
Ivanovic 6-4, 6-3.
Sharapova has won all 10
sets she has played on
Madrid's outdoor red clay
court Williams, however,
boasts a 12-2 record against
the Russian.
After a skittish start,
Williams dominated Errani
and broke her final service
game in both sets.
"I feel I played solid,"
Williams said. "In the sec-
ond set more than in the
first, I made a few less er-
rors, which is something I
needed to do."
The defending champion
improved to 5-0 against the
seventh-ranked Errani and


to 30-2 this year
Williams said Shara-
pova will pose a difficult
challenge.
"I feel this whole tourna-
ment I have only played
clay-court opponents," said
Williams. "All have been
smaller than me. Tomorrow
will be a different game,
more power"
Williams struggled with
her shot-making early, un-
characteristically misfiring
on three smashes in the first
set, which she still managed
to pull out after falling be-
hind 3-1.
The 15-time Grand Slam
winner then started click-
ing with her serve and held
two games to love, but she
needed four set points be-
fore finally breaking Errani
with a forehand winner
placed just inside the line to
grab the lead.


Past behind him Packers rookieRB
S_ mmduo ready to duel


Associated Press
Oakland Raiders cornerback D.J. Hayden runs drills Saturday during NFL football rookie minicamp at the team's
training facility in Alameda, Calif.


Raiders rookie

CB overcame life-

threatening ailment

Associated Press

ALAMEDA, Calif. Since being
selected with the 12th overall pick
in the draft, Raiders cornerback
D.J. Hayden has become a bit of a
national celebrity due to the story of
his near-fatal injury six months ago.
As much as he would prefer oth-
erwise, the rookie gets questioned
about it just about everywhere he
goes.
Hayden understands why, of
course. It's just that his focus is
elsewhere these days.
"The only time I think about it is
when somebody asks me," Hayden
said Saturday "But when I'm on the
field I don't think about that. I think
about the play and I think about the
coverage that I'm in. I put (the in-
jury) past me."
At least now Hayden can find


some relief on the field.
For the first time since tearing a
blood vessel off of his heart follow-
ing an on-field collision with a col-
lege teammate, Hayden is back in
helmet and pads while participat-
ing in Oakland's three-day rookie
mini-camp.
The former Houston standout has
had his moments, too. Hayden
whiffed attempting to jam a wide re-
ceiver near the line of scrimmage
but recovered quickly and broke the
pass up just as it was nearing the re-
ceiver's hands.
Plays like that are reminiscent of
the ones Hayden made in college
where he was widely regarded as
one of the top cornerbacks in college
before getting hurt.
The Raiders certainly think he
can get back to that level. They
traded down from the third spot in
the first round to acquire an addi-
tional pick in the draft, then
pounced on Hayden when their
turn came up.
So far he's done nothing to disap-
point- though Hayden is still nurs-
ing a sore hamstring that he hurt
during pre-draft workouts.


"He's still not quite 100 percent
but he's been out there working
through it," Raiders coach Dennis
Allen said. "I'm pleased with where
D.J.'s at. It's going to be a learning
process. It's putting one foot in front
of the other When it comes time to
play games this September, I think
he'll be ready to roll."
Few people expected that Some,
including Hayden himself, won-
dered if he would simply walk again
after what happened last November
Hayden had to be rushed to the
hospital with a life-threatening in-
jury after colliding with a Houston
teammate during practice. He suf-
fered a torn blood vessel off the
back of his heart an injury that
has a significantly high fatality rate
- and underwent major surgery as
a result
Thoughts of football seemed
miles away at the time, which is
why Hayden flashed a huge grin
when asked what it felt like to get
back to practice.
"Oh man it felt so great just to get
back out there, put the helmet back
on and just actually be on the field
and in practice," Hayden said.


Associated Press

GREEN BAY, Wis. -
Eddie Lacy and Johnathan
Franklin say they're al-
ready friends. The two
Green Bay Packers rookie
running backs are also
roommates, teammates
and competitors.
With the team taking Al-
abama's Lacy in the sec-
ond round of last month's
NFL draft, then trading up
to take UCLAs Franklin in
the fourth round, both
players understand their
connection.
And when they arrived
in Green Bay for the
team's rookie orientation
camp, they learned they'd
be bunking in together at a
hotel near the airport,
where the rookies are
being housed until train-
ing camp kicks off in July
or they find more perma-
nent living arrangements.
"We're roommates in the
hotel, we talk. But we're
going to have to compete,"
Lacy said. "It's just like
when you're in college -
you get there, you meet the
other running backs,
you're all friends but you
have to compete. It's no
different here."
Added Franklin: "On the
field, we're competing def-
initely. But off the field


we're definitely buddies.
But we're here to help
each other grow and push
each other to get better."
And the Packers clearly
need to get better in the
run game. Whether that
improvement comes from
Lacy, Franklin or one of the
team's veteran holdovers
- DuJuan Harris, Alex
Green and James Starks -
doesn't matter. After
watching the offense face a
steady diet of defenses
geared to slow down quar-
terback Aaron Rodgers
and his receivers, coach
Mike McCarthy wants a
more balanced attack
"We've made some
scheme adjustments. We
have already started that
process," McCarthy said.
"Lacy, frankly will fit into
some of these changes
we've made. We'll see how
it goes through the offsea-
son and training camp. I'm
excited about it"
The Packers haven't had
a 100-yard rusher in the
last 43 regular-season
games, the longest active
streak in the NFL. Over
the past three seasons, the
Packers' running backs
have combined for 12 rush-
ing touchdowns and are
averaging only 3.8 yards
per carry fewest in the
NFL in both categories.


NFL BRIEFS

Former Jets WR Hall of Famer
Sauer dies at 69 Butler dies at 85


WESTERVILLE, Ohio-
George Sauer, a wide receiver
on the New York Jets' only
Super Bowl championship
team, has died. He was 69.
The Moreland Funeral
Home in Westerville said he
died Tuesday after a long strug-
gle with Alzheimer's disease.
Sauer played a key role in
the Jets' 16-7 win over the
Baltimore Colts in the 1969
Super Bowl. He caught eight
passes from Joe Namath that
day in one of the greatest up-
sets in pro football history.
He played for the Jets in the
AFL and then the NFL from
1965-70. He was chosen to
four all-star teams and was a
two-time All-Pro. In 84 games,
he caught 309 passes for 4,965
yards and 28 touchdowns.


PITTSBURGH Pitts-
burgh Steelers Hall of Fame
defensive back Jack Butler
died Saturday morning follow-
ing a lengthy battle with a
staph infection. He was 85.
Butler's son John said his fa-
ther's heart stopped suddenly.
Butler had been hospitalized
for several months while deal-
ing with a staph infection that
had plagued him off and on
since he retired in 1959.
A Pittsburgh native, Butler
made the Steelers as an un-
drafted rookie free agent out
of St. Bonaventure in 1951.
He developed into one of the
top defensive backs of his
era. He played nine seasons
with the Steelers, collecting
52 interceptions.


Many mothers are also good sports


In the event one of you arose
this morning and did not ap-
propriately confirm today is
Mother's Day, then consider this
your wake-up call and
opportunity to make ,
amends. Also, over
the years my wife has
made it abundantly
clear that Mother's
Day always precedes
Father's Day So bet- -
ter watch out.
It is amazing what
our wives and moth-
ers have accom- Dr. Ron
polished, not only in DOC1
raising children and ORE
husbands and simul-
taneously gaining
ground in all forms of sports
from ice hockey, boxing,
paragliding and mountain climb-
ing to ultra-marathons. Sports
once considered much too tough
and arduous for women.
Currently, we may take women
in sports for granted but in the
athletic world of the past,


T
1
I


women were relegated to a sec-
ondary position. Of the many
supposed reasons, the primary
reasons were cultural and finan-
cial. In parts of the
world, cultural and
religious taboos are
still prevalent in not
allowing women to
enjoy let alone
* compete in sports.
These religions still
consider women com-
peting in sport to be
against God's law.
Joseph In the Olympic or-
OR'S ganization, the origi-
ERS nal founder and
father of the modern
Olympics, Baron de
Coubertin, considered 'women's
sports against the law of nature."
After the 1928 Olympics, the
women's 800 meter run was
dropped from the Olympics as
too strenuous. Why? Of the
eleven women starting the race,
five collapsed during the race,
five collapsed at the finish line


and the remaining female com-
petitor collapsed in the dressing
room. Of course, lack of prepara-
tion and training had nothing to
do with the results!
By comparison, approxi-
mately 45 percent of the athletes
competing in the 2008 Olympics
in Beijing were female.
My mother, being a national
team hurdler for the Germans,
was a relative oddity in her day
My wife, at age 13 running her
first marathon, the Fiesta Bowl
in Scottsdale, Ariz., was one of
only seven women in the race.
Before being allowed to run, she
had to undergo an electrocar-
diogram, but when she won the
state mile championship a few
years later it had become a given
that women could not only com-
pete in sports but excel in en-
durance events as well as men.
In many sports, women's body
habitus are much more suitable.
Women's physical abilities in
sports have seen the same ad-
vances as men in world records


and sport-specific achieve-
ments. All of this hyperbole
aside, women in sport present a
completely different set of phys-
ical and mental ailments due to
anatomical and physiological
differences between men and
women. Injuries and other or-
thopedic conditions present dif-
ferently in women than in men.
Biologic and gender-specific is-
sues result in certain orthopedic
injuries and conditions in
women being more frequent.
Some women are prone to
the triad of abnormal men-
strual periods, eating disorders
and osteoporosis.
Menstrual periods are some-
times a problem with timing,
weight gain, cramping and loss
of red blood cells.
Eating disorders usually de-
velop in gymnastics, ballet, fig-
ure skating, wrestling or any
weight-sensitive sport. Due to
overrunning and taking in insuf-
ficient calories, cross country
runners see their share of


anorexia nervosa. The illness of
anorexia can sneak up on an
athlete before adequate inter-
vention can be achieved.
Osteoporosis, or bone loss, af-
fects significantly more women
than men and is the major cause
of disability in older women.
Women who have been physi-
cally active or were athletes
when younger were shown in
numerous studies to have better
muscle strength and denser
bones as they age.
Whether a great female ath-
lete or just jogging or walking
the neighborhood, women, your
wife and mother, have learned to
workout, play sports and just as
their male counter parts run
businesses and raise families.
So happy Mother's Day and
remember: it is one month to Fa-
ther's Day
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at
SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute,
can be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net.


B6 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


-7







MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
The outlook for manatees is still tenuous, according to Dr. Katie Tripp, director of science and conservation for Save the Manatee Club.


in dan er


Manatees' burgeoning prosperity no reason for rush to reclassify


KATIE TRIPP
Special to the Chronicle
In 2012, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service (FWS) announced plans
to move forward with a "reclassi-
fication" of manatees, intended to
categorize them as "threatened"
under the federal Endangered Species
Act (ESA). However, with unprecedented
manatee mortalities in 2013 (more than
582 through the end of April, many due
to red tide in Southwest Florida and oth-
ers dying mysteriously in Brevard
County), FWS announced its downlisting
plans were on hold.
The ESA dictates that FWS base any
reclassification decision on five factors.
If the answer to any of the questions
posed by the five-factor test is "yes,"
FWS cannot downlist or delist. Our re-
view of the five factors comes up with
several "yes" answers that tell us down-
listing is premature.
1. Is there a present or threatened de-
struction, modification or curtailment of
species' habitat or range?
Yes.
Fifty percent of Florida's manatees
depend on artificial sources of water that
could fail or disappear Loss of even one
site could result in catastrophic mortality.
More than 17 percent of manatees use
springs habitat Spring flows are threat-
ened by over-pumping of the aquifer for
consumptive use and degraded water
quality
We are witnessing the legacy of nutri-
ent pollution in the Indian River Lagoon


To learn more about
red tide, visit Save the
Manatee Club's website
at http://tinyurl.com/
ctwctfu
system, where a natural event has likely
been exacerbated by nutrients from
years' worth of runoff churned up to feed
algal blooms that wiped out seagrass.
Waterfront development continues, fa-
cilitating more boat traffic that directly
threatens manatees and secondarily im-
pacts the species' habitat.
2. Is the species subject to overutiliza-
tion for commercial, recreational, scien-
tific or educational purposes?
No.
3. Is disease or predation a factor?
Not currently
Manatees have not suffered from wide-
spread disease in the past, but their winter
congregations do leave them susceptible
to widespread disease transmission.
4. Are there inadequate regulatory
mechanisms in place outside the ESA?
Yes.
The ESA and federal Marine Mammal
Protection Act are important safeguards.
Florida does have some state-level pro-
tection for manatees, including the Man-
atee Sanctuary Act. However, manatees
are affected by many of the environmen-
tal decisions made in our state, and Tal-
lahassee's strong antienvironmental


sentiment in recent years has eroded
growth management, weakened state en-
vironmental and regulatory agencies and
stood in the way of meaningful protec-
tions for our waters, including springs.
5. Are other natural or manmade fac-
tors affecting its continued existence?
Yes.
Watercraft, water control structures,
marine debris, red tide, climate change,
seagrass loss and cold stress deaths all
fall under this category Climate change
stands to cause massive negative
changes to the manatee's world, from in-
creased storm events, wide temperature
swings (think cold stress), possible shifts
in food availability and even reduced
spring flows.
Some people (including perhaps FWS)
argue that we now have more manatees
than we used to, so it's time for a status
change. However, none of the ESAs five
factors simply consider a population
snapshot. Decisions under the ESA are
to be made in full consideration of what
the future holds for a species. For
Florida's manatees, unfortunately, both
the immediate and long-term scenarios
indicate ongoing perils that make recov-
ery tenuous.

Dr Katie Tripp has been Save the
Manatee Club's director ofscience
and conservation since May of2008.
She received her Ph.D. in veterinary
medical sciences from the University
ofFlorida, where she conducted
research on manatee physiology


'End of Power' a glimpse at the future


MICHAEL FRANCIS
For the Chronicle
Moises Naim,
"The End of Power"
(New York, Basic Books,
2013, 306 pages), $31.
he author of this
book, Moises Naim,
has impressive
credentials: Venezuelan
minister of Industry and
Trade, executive director of
the World Bank and editor
of Foreign Policy magazine.
He periodically appears
on television analyzing
global developments.


Book REVIEW


In this latest book he
argues "power is shifting
from brawn to brains,
from north to south and
from east to west." The
book has chapters on mil-
itary power, global eco-
nomic competition,
domestic politics, religion
and other international
trends. In particular, he
points out that the global
balance of power in eco-
nomic affairs, military ca-
pability, politics and
information are changing


rapidly in directions that
are difficult to under-
stand and predict. He ar-
gues that whether or not
this is a healthy trend re-
mains to be seen, but that
these developments alter
the way we have come to
understand international
politics, economics andn d.--- .
culture.
At the most basic level,
changes are taking place Jupiterimages
in the global balance of Former dominant industries such as cars, research and
energy face new global competitors, including high-
See Page C3 speed trains from Europe and Japan.


Worries


mount


with the


years
s you get older,
more things be-
come of concern.
Here are things that
concern me:
I am concerned
Florida legislators are
patting themselves on the
back for passing a law
that outlaws texting while
you drive. Do we really
need a law? Does anyone
out there think it's a good
idea to text with your
hands while you're
driving a car? Really?
H I am concerned that
my baseball team the
New York Mets is al-
ready out of contention
for the playoffs, and it's
only May
I am concerned that
we are measuring more
salt in the water in King's
Bay The bay is supposed
to be fresh water, but
with the water flow out
of the springs slowing
down, the salt water is
making its way into the
bay and changing our
world-famous ecosystem.
On a related subject, I
am concerned that my
wife recently saw a shark
in King's Bay They usu-
ally don't like coming into
freshwater locations -
could make swimming
lessons at the shallows a
bit more interesting.
I am concerned
about the future of the
Crystal River Mall. This
important retail location
is struggling, and that
means fewer jobs and
fewer businesses in our
community.
I am concerned that
my once-perfect deci-
sion making is not recog-
nized by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office. I
was late for a meeting
the other night and traf-
fic was backed up at the
State Road 44 and U.S.
19 intersection. I de-
cided to take a shortcut
past the Jim LeGrone
Park and save time. In-
stead of saving time, I
got pulled over by a very
alert sheriff's deputy be-
cause I was driving too
fast. I was 15 minutes
late for my meeting and
could only blame myself.
I am concerned the
Florida House of Repre-
sentatives does not want
to participate in the new
federal Medicaid pro-
gram and instead wants
to turn $50 billion back to
the federal government
and leave low-income
residents scurrying to find
health insurance cover-
age. I am concerned the
legislators have notvisited
the emergency rooms
of our local hospitals to
see where low-income
See Page C3


Our world-class schools deserve world-class support


At the Golden Citrus Schol-
ars, where the community
celebrates and honors high-
achieving students, one presenter
implored students to return home
after completing college to work and
make our community a better place.
Realistic? I am not so sure. These
students, and many more like them,
are truly world-class. Ourgrads attend
some of the most prestigious uni-
versities in America MIT, Har-
vard, Stanford, Georgia Tech, NYU
and the Armed Forces academies.


Even more significant will be
their contributions to the better-
ment of the world. These are the
type of students who one day may
win a Nobel Prize, serve on the
Supreme Court, develop the next
software sensation or become
president. They will drift off to all
parts of the globe in search of in-
credible opportunities, which Cit-
rus County does not offer as a
career opportunity
As a mother of two boys who left
the nest for the West Coast to find


better hunting grounds, I applaud
their courage and sense of adven-
ture, and marvel at their experi-
ences. We have been preparing
our homegrown students to com-
pete in the world so let's en-
courage them to do just that.
Our public schools have been
criticized for falling short when
compared to test scores of students
from other countries. The truth is
that many students in the United
States outperform those from Fin-
land, Singapore and Shanghai,


while at the same time many other
students fall short. When factoring
in the poverty, immigration and
sample sizes (the United States has
far more students in its education
system, and all of them are tested),
one can conclude the comparisons
lack credibility and relevance.
What is more significant is that
American universities are recog-
nized as the best in the world. We
prepare our students, beginning at


.Page C3


Still


Pat Deutschman
GUEST
COLUMN






"Noth
Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013



PINION


bing will ever be attempted, if all possible objections must be first overcome."
Samuel Johnson, "Rasselas," 1759


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz ......................citizen member
M Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


POOR PERFORMANCE



Lawmakers fail



at session's



No. 1 priority


At some time during your
work life, you've had a
conversation with a su-
pervisor about priorities. Let's
say that you have maybe 10 tasks
on the to-do list, but your boss
tells you one item is critically
important. This is the one you
really need to address because
so much depends on it.
You agree, then get to work.
Two months later,
meeting with your THE I
supervisor for a
progress update, State legi
here's what you re- to act c
port: You didn't get care
that top priority
item done, but you
handled a bunch of OUR O1
other stuff, includ- Govern'
ing a number of to call
things that weren't session
even on the top-10 dc
list.
How do you think
that would fly with the boss?
This scenario is exactly what
we just witnessed with our state
legislators. By the end of the
two-month regular legislative
session, they had passed bills
making it illegal to dye bunnies
or chicks and prohibiting the
use of food stamps at strip clubs,
but they couldn't figure out how
to say "yes" to providing health
care coverage to more than one
million uninsured Floridians -
which was the No. 1 priority.
The House, which refused to
agree to a plan supported by
Gov Rick Scott and passed by
the Senate, threw up a number
of reasons not to take the $50 bil-


Manual transmission
Thank you to the gentleman
who found our auto manual.
Thank goodness we had a card
in the book showing that we
used Cliff's East Cove Auto on
(State Road) 44. He took the
time to drop off the manual to
Cliff. Thank you so much.
Flight of the Snowbird
The new garbage system is
great and had to be done
sooner or later. My question is:
Why did they choose to do it in
May when 40 percent
of the population is up
North for the summer? l
Now many of these
garbage cans will just
sit out there on the
curb for the next five
months because no
one's home, unless a
friend or neighbor has a
key to their house and CAL
can take them into their
garages or move them 563-
someplace where
they're off the curb.
Doesn't anybody know what the
word "planning" means any-
more? Because this is sure poor
planning.
Road rage
I would like to know who is the
genius who decided to rip up
the blacktop on North Apopka
Avenue while the construction
was being done on both sides of
the roads. So every day, twice a
day, sometimes four or five
times a day, you have to go
through a construction zone
with big ruts and sewer manhole
covers and trenches. I think that
they could have left the blacktop
in place until the construction
alongside the road was done
and then ripped up the blacktop.


s




P
o
a
3r
-I


I


lion in federal funding to extend
Medicaid health care coverage
or institute a similar coverage
plan. As a result, the most vul-
nerable Floridians continue to
live precariously, hoping to
avoid illness or any type of med-
ical issues because they can't af-
ford to get care.
We need to hold state lawmak-
ers accountable. Although spe-
cial legislative
sessions are not in-
ISUE: expensive, Gov.
slators fail Rick Scott should
n health call them back to
priority. address healthcare
coverage. It's a crit-
ically important
:INION: issue: one of every
r needs four Floridians is
special uninsured. As the
to get it former president of
ne. the Florida Public
Health Association
has observed, those
without financial coverage or
access to care present serious
infection risks and financial
burdens to the insured. We pay
a very high price for the unin-
sured to get their care through
emergency departments and
when preventable conditions
have developed into more seri-
ous threats, the most costly and
least effective options.
Right now we should remind
these state legislators that their
job is to implement what our
federal lawmakers already cre-
ated and for which the federal
government will pay And later,
at the ballot box, we can deliver
a performance evaluation.


Speeding by children
We need help from the Citrus
County Sheriff's department to
curb the speeders in front of the
Homosassa wildlife park on
Fishbowl Drive. There are hun-
dreds of children going to the
park this time of year on field
trips. Cars by the dozens are not
heeding the speed limit and some
are exceeding 40 to 45 mph and
a few (are) even running the red
light at the pedestrian crossing
at the park. This is a very, very
dangerous situation, as some-
body is liable to be hurt
badly or even killed.
JND Great mistake
It's cute. I'm just, I
don't mean to pick on
the Chronicle or the
proofreader. I just no-
ticed up in the weather
report on the front page
of the Chronicle of May
)579 1 it says, "Mostly
clousy with a chance of
showers." I was just cu-
rious if they meant to
take the "c" off and make it
"lousy" or if it was supposed to
be "cloudy." Anyway, it just
made me laugh. I just wanted to
say thanks. We're all human.
Great mistake. Have a great day.
Thanks, stranger
I would just like to say thanks
to the people who found my
husband's phone and brought it
to us and dropped it off on the
front porch. I really appreciate
it. I was not home to thank the
person, so hopefully they'll see
this in the paper and know that I
give them a very big thank-you
and thank you for being so hon-
est and returning it. You do not
know how much it is appreci-
ated. Have a good day.


Torture now part of legacy


Many Americans, includ-
ing some of Barack
Obama's critics, take
his word that his administration
opposes torture. With fanfare,
two days after occupying the
Oval Office, he issued Execu-
tive Order 13491, commanding
the CIA to close its secret pris-
ons while also de-
claring that no
detainee in U.S. cus-
tody could be sub-
ject to any form of
interrogation not
found in the Army
Field Manual,
thereby excluding
torture.
Noting this, the Nat H
nonpartisan Consti- OTH
tution Project's 577-
page April 16 report, VOI
"Detainee Treat-
ment," scrupulously documents
the range and depth of this na-
tion's torture policies, and has a
separate substantial chapter
covering our current president.
"The Obama Administration"
exposes the factual torture
record of our re-elected leader
For example, George W Bush
approved "renditions," which
the CIA vigorously implemented.
This occurred when terrorism
suspects were kidnapped by the
CIA often from the streets of
their nations and sent to
countries known for torturing
their prisoners.
But the Constitution Project's
report reminds us that rendi-
tions have continued under
Obama in utter secrecy, of
course. We don't know who gets
snatched and why and for how
long. Neither do their families.
Of course, the receiving coun-
tries must first assure Obama
officials that these suspects
won't be tortured. That's exactly
what Bush's ultra-loyal Secre-
tary of State Condoleezza Rice
used to tell Americans and the
rest of the world without ever
following up on the renditions'
ghost prisoners.
As for those CIA secret pris-
ons, the Constitution Project
cites a 2011 Nation magazine
article in its report:
'Jeremy Scahill wrote that
the CIA was interrogating Al
Qaeda-affiliated prisoners in 'a
secret prison buried in the
basement of Somalia's National
Security Agency (NSA) head-
quarters, where prisoners sus-
pected of being Shabab
members or of having links to
the group are held. Some of the
prisoners have been snatched
off the streets of Kenya and ren-
dered by plane to Mogadishu.
While the underground prison
is officially run by the Somali
NSA, U.S. intelligence person-


HI
Ic


nel (the CIA) pay the salaries of
intelligence agents and also di-
rectly interrogate prisoners."'
How? By torturing them?
Well, if President Obama ever
has to testify before an inde-
pendent American commission
on torture, he might refer to this
portion of Scahill's story in the
Constitution Pro-
ject's report: "For-
mer detainees (in
the Somali prison)
did not allege that
they were beaten or
. physically tortured,
but did describe
being held for ex-
tended periods
entoff without counsel, in
IER squalid conditions.
"Somali intelli-
DES gence officials and
former detainees told
Scahill thatAmericans conducted
interrogations at the prison."
Were these interrogations
conducted under the CIA's ver-
sion of American rule of law,
Mr. President?
"Even more troubling," re-
ports the Constitution Project,
"is the evidence that Afghan de-
tainees have been tortured
after U.S. forces turned them
over to the Afghan National Di-
rectorate of Security (NDS)."
The Constitution Project cites
a 2011 report from the U.N. As-
sistance Mission in Afghanistan
(UNAMA). According to the report:
"Torture was especially per-
vasive in Department 124, the
NDS's facility for 'high-value
detainees' in Kabul. Of 28 former
detainees at Department 124,
26 told UNAMA they had been
tortured by methods such as
'beating, suspension, and twist-
ing and wrenching of genitals.'
Seventeen of those 26 had been
captured by coalition forces.
Five of the 26 were children."
Hear that, President Obama?
And dig this, sir: 'According to
The Washington Post, Depart-
ment 124 is across the street
from the United States' military
headquarters in Kabul and was
built with U.S. funds."
Torture sites paid for by your
and my taxes.
Finally, in July 2011, the U.S.
did ban prisoner transfers to the
NDS in Kandahar But, according
to the Constitution Project, "there
was evidence that the military's
restrictions on transfers were
not being applied to transfers
by the CIA," which has a privi-
leged place in Obama's soul.
Here's what one person
transferred by the CIA told the
Afghanistan Independent
Human Rights Commission, as
related by the Constitution
Project: "I was severely beaten
by cable in the head and neck. I


FIMA AVUT I4LLATh
'\ILL FPFiAAW(
TAKE FlACM .OV
C 'NAS BwrW
L THIS &SII


was shackled and they con-
nected the shackles to an elec-
trical current and shocked me
until I was unconscious. They
also beat me on the back and
waist very hard. ... Even my
tongue is severely damaged
from the electric shock."
This may help you under-
stand why the "liberating"
United States is so detested in
Afghanistan.
Propelled by the Constitution
Project's "Detainee Treatment"
task force, the website
ThinkProgress.org recently re-
ported that "pressure is mount-
ing on the Obama
administration to allow access
to documents pertaining to the
CIA's post 9/11 terror suspect
detention program and to order
a full accounting of the Bush-
era torture program" ("Na-
tional Security Brief: Pressure
Mounts On Obama To Investi-
gate Torture,"
thinkprogress.org, April 17).
But access to Bush-era docu-
ments isn't enough. The admin-
istration's continuing torture
program, as reported by the
Constitution Project, must be
included.
'As long as the debate contin-
ues," the Constitution Project
stresses, "so too does the possi-
bility that the United States
could again engage in torture."
And not only by this adminis-
tration.
But this debate must center
on actual, due process account-
ability for the torturers not
only named CIA torturers, but
also those in our military and,
of course, those in the executive
branch from whom the ultimate
directive came.
Accountability must also come
to those members of the Bush
and Obama administrations who
abetted torture through legal
means, argues ThinkProgress.org,
citing Thomas Pickering's recent
op-ed in The Washington Post
"The Obama administration should
declassify all relevant documents
as soon as possible and work with
Congress to 'close the loopholes
that allowed torture to occur
under a pretense of legality."'
If we don't have this debate,
what are we saying to our fu-
ture generations and to our
future administrations, what-
ever they may decide to do
without telling us?

Nat Hen toff is a nationally
renowned authority on the
First Amendment and the Bill
of Rights. He is a member of
the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the
Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow



m ii


FOm TLE PRODUCERS WO BRWOT YOU t"WldT


SLETTER to the Editor


Guantanamo
can be closed
A few weeks ago President
Obama lamented in a speech
that he wanted to close Guan-
tanamo prison. Although he
ran on closing Guantanamo
and tried to follow through on
his promise, he said Congress
prevented him from doing so.
He continues to blame Con-
gress primarily the Republi-
can House. The Republicans
have made it difficult, but not
impossible, according to Eric
Posner, professor at the Uni-
versity of Chicago Law.
In the speech, Obama said
"... it hurts us in terms of our


international standing." Yes, it
does. Western countries are
frowning on our treatment of
Muslim prisoners at the facility.
Force feeding is ugly treatment
for men who have never been
tried or convicted of any of-
fense. In fact, our treatment of
the prisoners has made it al-
most impossible to either put
them on trial or free them.
I watched a TV interview of
Republican congressmen
screaming that they don't want
Obama to send these prisoners
to a facility in Illinois. Hypo-
critically, this is the party that
says we need to stop spending
and start saving money Yet the


cost of keeping Guantanamo
open far exceeds sending them
to a prison in the United
States. Presently we are going
to spend more than $20 million
to upgrade Guantanamo. The
National Defense Authorization
Act of 2012 set rules about "enemy
combatants." They ruled Obama
could release detainees. The
only issue is al-Qaida. As of this
writing, there isn't much left of
this terrorist group. All the
president needs to declare is
that our war against al-Qaida is
over then political prisoners
could be freed.

L.M. Eastman
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to
leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political
attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


SEND LETTERS TO 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429,
FAXto 352-563-3280 or EMAIL letters@chronicleonline.com. Letters must
be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four per month.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Remembering the meeting of the mothers


oday is Mother's Day
While thinking
about it and consid-
ering what I might write
for this special day, my
mind ran to the mothers
who have been an integral
part of my world: my pa-
ternal grandmother, Lydia;
my maternal grandmother,
Sally; my mother, Hazel;
and the mother of my chil-
dren, Cheryl.
There are all sorts of
tales I could tell about
each of these ladies, but
today I've chosen to tell
the story about the first
time my mother met the
girl who was to become the
mother of my children.
I've shared events from
this chapter of my life be-
fore, so I won't dwell on


the circumstances any
more than is necessary to
set the stage.
In early 1966, I had been
a patient in Martin Army
Hospital at Fort Benning
for 11 days battling spinal
meningitis. I was winning
the fight for my life, and a
few days before a good
Samaritan had written a
couple of letters for me:
one to my mother in which
I detailed my illness to the
best of my ability, and a
short love note to Cheryl
explaining I was in the
hospital and had been un-
able to write to her, but not
elaborating on my medical
condition.
When my mother got my
letter, she found a way to
contact me by telephone.


As any mother would be,
she was livid that I'd nearly
died and no one had con-
tacted her until I was able
to do so myself.
I calmed her
the best I could
by assuring her
that the worst H
was over. She
still said she
was coming to
where I was,
but I talked her
down. Fred B
It was a long, A SL
difficult, un-
necessary and OF I
expensive trip
she didn't need to make.
After she seemed to be
convinced I was going to
be all right and agreed not
to take a midnight ride to


Georgia, I bared my 20-
year-old heart to her.
"Mama, I need for you to
do something for me. I
need for you to
call Cheryl, ex-
S plain to her
what I've been
through and
make her un-
derstand that
I'm going to be
OK. And
Mama, I also
rannen need for you to
LICE understand that
even though
LIFE she and I have
only dated for a
few weeks, I don't just like
this girl, I love her If she'll
have me, and I believe she
will, I'm going to marry
her."


My mother did what I
asked, but she went a step
further. She called my
sweetheart, explained
how sick I'd been and told
her everything was going
to be all right, but in addi-
tion, she made a date with
her my mother took
Cheryl out to dinner
This wasn't in accordance
with the script I was writ-
ing in my head as to how
my bride-to-be would meet
my mother, but it worked.
I wasn't totally naive. I
knew my mother wanted to
do whatever she could to
help me, but I also knew
she wanted to meet and
evaluate her prospective
future daughter-in-law,
and that's precisely what
she did! Cheryl aced the


audition and a bond
formed between the two of
them which lasted until
my mother died 26 years
later.
Mama has been gone for
more than 20 years, but
while putting this column
together my thoughts of
her included homemade
birthday cakes, hand-sewn
Halloween costumes and,
most importantly, the very
kind, impromptu dinner
date she had with the 17-
year-old girl who would be
the mother of my children.
Pleasant memories; very
pleasant memories, indeed.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


SoundOFF

Look in mirror
To the waiter who was complaining that
he woke up and fed his family breakfast
and then went to work to a grouchy boss
and to a disrespectful manager and
then didn't get left a tip, in the April 26
Opinion column of Sound Off: Maybe if
everybody is against him, maybe it's
him. Maybe it's not everybody else and
he should look for another line of work.
Streetlight needed
I think we need a streetlight going east
on (State Road) 44 out of town on the
bridge there just before the VFW. Between
town and the VFW, it's very dark there
at night. You can't even ride your bike
home at 8 o'clock at night. Could use a
streetlight on the bridge. It'd be nice.
Money for lake chain
I would like to know why King's Bay
always gets millions to clean up that bay
and us folks over here on the Floral, In-
verness and Hernando chain of lakes beg
to have them come in and clean up what
we used to have as a bay and now is
growth. And they tell us there's not
enough money in the budget to be able
to come over there and clean up our
bay but King's Bay has millions in the
budget, millions that they're allotted.
Now please give us some help over here
in the chain of lakes, us lowly people
that used to look at a bay and now we
look at nothing but growth and a little
trail that runs through the bay.



POWER
Continued from Page C1

power. During most of the 21st century,
the United States dominated and -par-
ticularly after the implosion of the So-
viet Union was clearly the strongest
by almost any measurement The United
States accounted for (and still does) half
of the world's yearly defense spending.
But now other contenders are rising
such as (most obviously) China, but also
the "new" Russia, Brazil and India, while
the British and the French continue to
support expensive defense establish-
ments, as do many other countries.
Among international analysts there is
the belief that America is in decline -
more due to the rise of China, India and
others than any actual decline.
On economic matters, Naim spends a
good deal of the book pointing out that
the older, dominant industries (cars, re-
search, energy, even entertainment) are
facing important global competitors. Our
domination of international banking has
slipped away as new techniques and
markets are created across the globe. We
see the Big Three American automakers
facing an important set of competitors.
In the area of transportation, develop-
ments such as high-speed trains are
coming from Europe and Japan. In vir-
tually every place our firms dominated
world trade and production, they are
now facing challenges from new com-
petitors that are high-tech and sensitive
to the bottom line. The lists of the richest
companies, formerly dominated by oil
and car producers, now are often busi-
nesses unheard of a decade ago. The
yearly lists of the world's richest men or
women show important new names, and
some of the old names have disappeared.
As for labor unions, there still are im-
portant unions in the United States and
abroad, but generally unions are declin-


ing in terms of membership and politi-
cal clout. The decline in unions has
been, unsurprisingly, good for many in-
dividual companies, but this is reflected
in developments such as the shift in
America to more concentration of
wealth in the upper 1 percent and de-
clining incomes for workers.
The book has an interesting chapter
on the fierce and unsettling competition
among religious groups. Traditional
Christian churches have lost member-
ship across the globe to evangelical and
charismatic religions which have done
much to promote their causes in Africa,
Asia and Latin America. Part of their
rise is the effective use of communica-
tions systems such as television. Over re-
cent decades worldwide Roman
Catholic membership has waned con-
siderably In Africa, the competition be-
tween more fundamentalist churches
has led to violence from traditional Is-
lamic congregations ignored by the
American media.
Another issue the book is concerned
with is the decline of effective demo-
cratic governance. With the collapse of
the Soviet Union and the chaotic demo-
cratic movements in the Middle East
and other places, it seems to be more
difficult for democracies to satisfy their


Letter to THE EDITOR


Three Sisters opening
set for Summer 2014
Editor's note: This letter, delivered to
Citrus County Commissioner Rebecca
Bays, is being reprinted at her request.
Dear Ms. Bays:
Thank you for your letter of Feb. 13,
2013, inquiring about a timeline for
opening the Three Sisters Springs
property at Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and the status of
developing a visitor center on U.S. 19.
If funding can be secured, U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service (FWS) plans to
open the property to the public on a
limited basis with minimal facilities by
the summer of 2014. These basic im-
provements will allow public access to
the property until additional facilities
can be constructed in the future.
While there is no set timeframe in
the management plan for the con-
struction of a visitor center, FWS is
implementing a cost effective phased
approach of development and con-
struction of several projects over the
next few years. Development of the
site will include a boardwalk, parking
facilities, entrance and interpretive
signs, nature trails, wildlife viewing
platforms, education center with a
fishing pier, discovery center, and
bike access. These projects will en-
hance the visitor experience and pro-
vide opportunities for environmental
education.


We are pleased to be a partner with
the city of Crystal River, the South-
west Florida Water Management Dis-
trict (SWFWMD) and Florida
Communities Trust (FCT) in managing
this truly unique property Given that
more than 200,000 people travel to
Crystal River every year to enjoy an
encounter with a manatee in the wild,
we agree that Three Sisters Springs
can serve as a gateway to that experi-
ence. By properly developing the
Three Sisters Springs site, not only
can the NWR accomplish its primary
mission of protecting the endangered
Florida manatee, it can also help at-
tract more tourists to the area, bol-
stering the local economy and
educating hundreds of thousands of
people every year on the unique
beauty of the Nature Coast.
FWS is proud of all the accomplish-
ments since it was entrusted with the
Three Sisters Springs property in July
2010, under the lease agreement and
management plan with Crystal River,
SWFWMD and FCT Since that time,
FWS has completed a 1,300-foot board-
walk encompassing the springs to pro-
tect its edges and allow the public
greater visibility into the springs. Addi-
tionally, the existing service road has
been resurfaced, several parking lots
have been created for more visitors,
and over 80 native trees and shrubs
have been planted by refuge staff and
volunteers. The NWR also has held 12


open house events welcoming approxi-
mately 11,000 visitors. FWS has met the
deadlines in the management plan thus
far, and will strive to meet the remain-
ing deadlines recognizing that some de-
lays may occur.
Despite limited resources, FWS con-
tinues to push forward with the proj-
ects outlined in the management plan.
In 2011, FWS contracted with Liollio
Architecture to create a master devel-
opment plan for the Three Sisters
Springs based on the management plan
and public input. More than a year's
worth of intense planning and public
meetings went into the development of
a plan outlining two options and re-
leased in September 2012. Option "A"
fulfills the requirements of the man-
agement plan and places all develop-
ment, including a visitor center, on the
Three Sisters spring site. Option "B"
also fulfills the requirements of the
management plan, and includes a visi-
tor center on U.S. 19. Although FWS
supports either option for develop-
ment, the scope and cost of both proj-
ects pose some challenges.
FWS is committed to continuing to
work closely with its partners to open
Three Sisters Springs to the public as
soon as possible. If you have further
questions, please contact Michael Lusk
at 352-563-2088, ext. 202.

Cynthia K. Dohner
regional director, FWS



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

residents go for health care services
when they do not have insurance.
I am concerned that William
Bunch at Oyster's Restaurant in Crys-
tal River might one day stop serving his
famous Shrimp Supreme sandwich.
That would be a shame, because it is
the best sandwich ever constructed. I
am also concerned that my cardiologist
does not agree with my assessment or
concern.
I am concerned that the drivers of
Citrus County are so focused on their
routines that they do not notice the new
traffic light on S.R. 44 at Meadowcrest
Boulevard. (Yes, this is the home of the
Chronicle.) The traffic light went up this
week and motorists are confused. A mo-
torcyclist was severely injured Thurs-
day People just don't see what wasn't
there a few weeks ago.
I am concerned that the Chronicle
reported a story this week that an In-
verness man was arrested for the second
time this year for allegedly committing
lewd and lascivious molestation of a
nursing-home resident How can he be
out of jail?
I am concerned that our 11-year-old
Yorkie, Wilson, injured himself while
chasing a raccoon the other evening. He
can no longer walk up and down the
stairs to do his dog business outside. In-
stead, Wilson now walks over to me,
barks once, turns around, and waits for
me to pick him up and carry him down
the stairs. My real concern is that I ac-
tually do it
It's hard not to be concerned.


Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


citizens. Of course, Washington -
stricken by the unfortunate polarization
of the two lavishly-funded major politi-
cal parties appears as a textbook ex-
ample of gridlock. But similar gridlock
has appeared in other democratic coun-
tries. Naim predicts we will work
through this bottleneck and that we are
"on the verge of a revolutionary wave of
positive political and institutional inno-
vations." Personally, I am less sanguine
about Washington's ability to improve
the effectiveness of our system, but
hopefully good sense will prevail.
I recommend plowing your way
through the entire volume. This is a rich
and provocative argument about the
state of the globe and its future.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill Woods
resident who taught international
politics and US. foreign policy at the
University ofNotre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring. He served as a
chairman of the Department of
Government and International Studies
for six years, was director ofNotre
Dame's 20 different foreign studies
programs for five years, and held
various other teaching and administra-
tion positions at the university.


SCHOOLS
Continued from Page C1

pre-K level, for a world-class ed-
ucation. If we are interested in
simply preparing students for
the local job market, why would
we care how our students meas-
ure up to the rest of the state,
country or world? Our mission is
to open the world of opportuni-
ties to our hard-working kids, al-
lowing them to go far beyond
previous generations in discov-
ering the rest of the world.
Our teachers are committed to
preparing students to meet greater
and greater challenges. In a
world-class school system, student
success is measured not only by
test scores, but by postsecondary
success. Completion of college


and postgraduate work are re-
flective of their K-12 experiences.
We have had incredible aca-
demic performances by some
students straight-A students,
students with perfect SAT scores,
Advanced Placement (AP) stu-
dents, Merit Scholars, Interna-
tional Science Fair competitors,
top scores in AP and Interna-
tional Baccalaureate (IB) exams.
Additionally, we develop accom-
plished musicians, singers, per-
formers and leaders.
Unfortunately, teachers are gen-
erally not given credit for help-
ing develop these skills in these
students.
Our public-school teachers
continue to be measured by a
simplistic methodology of deter-
mining "effectiveness" a one-
time standardized test that
doesn't capture the more signif-


icant outcomes: What was that
teacher's direct impact on that
student's learning in all areas,
motivation, achievement and ef-
fort beyond the FCAT?
For example, this weekend I
met with a group of teachers
who were giving up their entire
Saturday, with no pay, to learn
about a program from the Smith-
sonian Institute coming to Citrus
County, so they could incorpo-
rate it into their lesson plans.
How about drafting teacher
Howard Lindsey, whose stu-
dents scored top marks on their
certification exams, and who
has the second highest number
of students in the United States
to have earned their industry
certifications? The IB program
headed by Derrick Buettner, has
a very high pass rate exceeding
national averages. We have


plenty of teachers like Vicky
Joseph who stay after school tu-
toring on their own time or make
home visits to students because
they care deeply about their
learning. At the Academy of En-
vironmental Science, students
spend the day doing scientific
research. Classes filled to ca-
pacity with eager learners at the
Health Academy use state-of-
the-art nursing and dental assis-
tant labs. Interestingly, many
former students who graduate
from college do come back
home, often to become teachers
- the greatest testimonial to the
quality of our schools.
Congratulations to English
teacher Nancy Smith of Citrus
High School, who was just named
a finalist for the Teacher of the
Year from Florida! Our teachers
give their all, every day, with no


excuses, because they are moti-
vated by their students' success
and they are true professionals.
And yet our state Legislature
can't bring itself to give teachers
the same raise they are giving to
all other state employees with-
out attaching some sort of meas-
urement of effectiveness. Merit
pay is not only shameful, it is just
plain wrong.
When I sit at graduations and
awards ceremonies, I know we
have created a world-class school
system and we have world-class
teachers who influence and in-
spire world-class students. Con-
gratulations and best wishes to
all our graduating seniors wher-
ever your dreams take you!


Pat Deutschman is a member of
the Citrus County School Board.


Another issue the book is concerned with is the

decline of effective democratic governance....

Of course, Washington appears as a textbook

example of gridlock. But similar gridlock has

appeared in other democratic countries. Naim

predicts we will work through this bottleneck and

that we are "on the verge of a revolutionary wave

of positive political and institutional innovations."


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 C3


1
3





CImRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letter to THE EDITOR


Mall embarks
on new venture
When Sears closed its
mall store a year ago, mall
management faced a fore-
boding challenge that
being to find a big-box ten-
ant to fill the 92,000 square
feet of retail space that
Sears vacated. To put this
in perspective, we point
out that Sears had occu-
pied just over 21 percent
of the total mall retail
space. Even in the best of
times, this would be a dif-
ficult task. Of course, these
are not the best of times;
they are, in fact, the most
difficult times since the
mall opened more than
20 years ago.
So it comes as no sur-
prise that despite consid-
erable effort, we have not
been able to attract a ten-
ant for the Sears space.
Over the past 14 years,
when Sears was alive and
kicking, the Crystal River
Mall owners and tenants
paid in excess of
$5,800,000 in property
taxes, thousands more in
sales tax revenue and em-
ployment wages. Sears'
contribution to that amount
was approximately 21 per-
cent. That contribution to
Citrus County revenue will
be missed.
There has been and con-
tinues to be a lot of specu-
lation about the Crystal
River Mall. The mall is not
dead; to the contrary, in
the past year 10 new busi-
nesses have moved into
the mall community.
Crystal River has many
mall dissenters. But, hap-
pily, we have a few sup-


porters, and one of those is
Vincent De Rosa. Many of
you may know Vinnie; he
grew up here in Citrus
County and he recently re-
turned to the county after
a 30-year absence.
He approached the mall
management with many
ideas to improve tenancy
One of the ideas was the
mixed use of the Sears
space. Vinnie was instru-
mental in the introduction
to Citrus County SCORE
and, as a result, a partner-
ship is now developing be-
tween SCORE and the
mall. Those interested
in space may visit the
SCORE website at www.
citruscounty.score.org for
more information.
Vincent De Rosa, Inc. is
leasing approximately
10,000 square feet of the
new multi-use space for
mini-golf, shuffleboard,
and other family enter-
tainment. Design is cur-
rently underway for
CuzinVinnie.com Mini-
Putt-Golf. The design, con-
struction, signage, and
carpeting will all be com-
pleted by local vendors.
A late June opening is
anticipated.
The Crystal River Mall
is continuing its effort to
make the city of Crystal
River and Citrus County
an active business commu-
nity Don't count us out. We
have not lost faith in you.
We invite other "Vinnies"
to come forward with their
ideas.
Millie Bresnahan
Crystal River Mall Manager
www. Melinda.crystal
rivermall@gmail.com


41


ioN'T kIlT
THE PRONE,
/


DEAR GRAP ATE 5- WELCOME TO THE FUTURE...


Please expand 581
How much longer do we, the
people in Citrus County, have to
put up with the terrible condi-
tions on County Road 581? This
road is used by people going to
three major churches on this road
several days of the week, and an
elementary school with school
buses several times during the
day and parents driving children
to school. A lot of people use
(C.R.) 581 to go south to Her-
nando County, to go to
Brooksville for work and different
shopping and restaurants we
don't have here in Inverness.
From the intersection of State
Road 44 back to the fire tower,
it's absolutely terrible. At the in-
tersection of (S.R.) 44 and (C.R.)
581 needs widened for north and
southbound (S.R.) 44 traffic, es-
pecially the southbound lane
needs to be widened and longer.


C FOUND Too far
to drive
FFP I was reading
somebody wrote
in about sup-
porting the
mall in Crystal
River. Does she
CAI. realize people
p i in Inverness,
563-0579 that costs
quite a bit of
gas to go to the mall all the time?
Too far for me. I can't afford it.
Making a living
Today is Tuesday, April 30, and
I'm reading in the Chronicle about
the not renewing Cookin' Good's
permits for the beach concession.
Well, isn't that just nice? A man
trying to make a living. It's ridicu-
lous. I haven't heard of complaints.
He controls the beaches good. Some-
one has to. The county stopped.


Right to raise rent
I was reading in the Chronicle
about these mobile home parks.
This has been going on for years
and years and years. They knew
when they moved into the park, they
have to pay for that land they sit
on and it doesn't belong to them.
They know the whole situation and
they still are complaining about it,
which I don't understand. The man
has the right to raise the rent when
he wants, the way I look at it.
Better signage needed
I visited Meadowcrest Tuesday,
April 30, to renew my vehicle reg-
istration. After riding around the
complex, I stopped at the Chroni-
cle for directions. Please tell
Motor Vehicles to add some no-
ticeable signage. Take a clue from
the Chronicle's prominent sign.
And also, a thank you to the lovely
receptionist at the Chronicle.


Come celebrate the achievements of
Citrus County's Athletes of the Year!

College of Central Florida
Citrus Campus

May 30, 2013


Award Ceremony begins at 6:30 pm.
Tickets available at the Citrus County Chronicle
Meadowcrest office in Crystal River for $10 each.
Cash or check only please.
COLLEGE of
Z CENTRAL
EBUIClK M-- l FLORIDA

Citrus County All Hazards & Information Expo


-~ --


WINDS,


RAINS

OR

FLAMES


Are You Prepared?
Saturday May 18th
9am 1 pm
Special Guests: The National Weather Service
Special Displays: Hurricane Re-entry Tag
Distribution, and More .*,.--.

National Guard Armory M .-07
Crystal River
1851 W. Venable St.


-- SHERIFF -
JEFFREY J. DAWSY


For more information
contact the Citrus
County Sheriff s Office
(352) 249-2707


'.....


IM E


Citrus County's

2013 World's

Greatest

Baby Shower

May 13, 2013
at the Citrus County Auditorium
Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby
Shower! Learn about taking care of
yourself and your baby. Parents of
infants under 6 months old are also
invited. There will be exhibits, games,
door prizes, a scavenger hunt and gifts
for moms, dads and babies!
Sessions: 3-5pm or 6-8pm -

S CallEf28-9047
forEnformation. "




Visit the Chronicle booth at this
event to learn about our Cutest Baby Contest!


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday urday
1 2 3 4


5 6 7 8 9 10 11


12 13 14 15 17 18


19 20 21 22 23 24 25


26 27 28 29 30
:** ....a B *FT ~- ui --1-------- 'f


JUII O O ,.JU \I, HOMOSASSA, FL
Platinum Sponsors r .C..
C. ... RCIT Homosassa Marine

Fish out of MacRae s Bait & Tackleon the Homosassa
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. : ..... .......$ 0




For tournament information or entry formscall
hM acRae s- 628-2602
Or Barramundi Corp.$- 628-0200


C4 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


COMMENTARY


VA"







1 ,I!


4











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Big shoes unfilled



Homebuilders having trouble finding enough qualified workers


ALEX VEIGA
AP Real Estate Writer
U S builders and the subcon-
tractors they depend on
U SJ are struggling to hire fast
enough to meet rising demand for new
homes.
Builders would be starting work on
more homes and contributing more to
the economy if they could fill more job
openings.
In the meantime, workers in the right
locations with the right skills are com-
manding higher pay
Consider Richard Vap, who owns a
drywall installation company The resur-
gent housing market has sent builders
calling again. Vap would love to help -
if he could hire enough qualified people.
"There is a shortage of manpower,"
said Vap, owner of South Valley Drywall
in Littleton, Colo. "We're probably only
hiring about 75 or 80 percent of what we
actually need."
The shortage of labor ranges across oc-
cupations from construction superin-
tendents and purchasing agents to painters,
cabinet makers and drywall installers.
The NationalAssociation of Home Builders
said its members have complained of too
few framers, roofers, plumbers and car-
penters. The shortage is most acute in
areas where demand for new homes has
recovered fastest, notably in Arizona,
California, Texas, Colorado and Florida.
The problem results largely from an
exodus of workers from the industry
after the housing bubble burst. Experi-
enced construction workers lost jobs.
And many found new work in com-
mercial building or in booming and
sometimes higher-paying industries like
mining and natural gas drilling.
Hispanic immigrants, largely from
Mexico, who had filled jobs during the
boom were among those who left the in-
dustry and, in some
cases. the United
States a


Dave Erickson, president of Greyhawk
Homes in Columbus, Ga., lost an employee
who took a job this year in Texas. The for-
mer employee is now installing fiber-
optic cable and earning 30 percent more
than he did as a construction supervisor
A shortage of labor in a well-paying in-
dustry might seem incongruous in an
economy stuck with a still-high 7.5 per-
cent unemployment rate. But it reflects
just how many former skilled construction
workers have moved on to other fields.
In 2006, 3.4 million people worked in
homebuilding. By 2011, the figure had
bottomed at about 2 million. As of last
month, about 2.1 million people were
employed in residential construction.
Jobs in the industry did rise 4.1 percent
in April from a year earlier, faster than
overall U.S. job growth. But they'd have
to surge 24 percent more to reach 2.6 mil-
lion, their 2002 level "the last time the
market was normal," said David Crowe,
chief economist for the National Associ-
ation of Home Builders.
For now, the industry is building faster
than it's hiring. In February, builders
began work on single-family homes at the
fastest pace in five years. And in March,
new home construction broke the 1 million
mark for the first time since June 2008.
In the 12 months that ended in March,
housing starts surged 47 percent. Yet
over the same period, the industry's em-
ployment grew just 3.7 percent.
Normally, a rebound in home con-
struction helps propel an economy after
a recession. But even with the steady
gains in housing starts, sales and prices
since last year, the industry remains
below levels considered healthy
The National Association of Home
Builders said nearly half its members
who responded to a survey in March said
a scarcity of labor has led to delays in
completing work.





























a /


Jr


I.
A.


"I can't find qualified people to fill the
positions that I have open," said Vishaal
Gupta, president of Park Square Homes
in Orlando, Fla. If not for the labor short-
age, "I would be able to build more
homes this year and meet more demand
than I can handle today"
Gupta's company is facing a side effect
of the labor shortage: Demand for higher
pay from qualified workers. On some oc-
casions, he said he's been outbid by ri-
vals that need contractors for their own
projects. Gupta's preferred paint con-
tractor left for a rival that paid more. His
new cabinet contractor is about 10 per-
cent more expensive than his old one.
The higher pay they're handing out helps
explain why builders have been gradu-
ally raising prices on new homes. The
median price was $247,000 in March, up
about 12 percent from the same month in
2011, the Commerce Department said.
Vap, owner of South Valley Drywall,
rode out the downturn after the housing
crash in part by relying on commercial
construction projects. He cut his resi-
dential construction staff from 244 in
2006 to 80 in 2009.
This year, Vap has hired 15 field em-
ployees for residential construction and
said he needs to hire 35 more to do the
work he foresees in 2013.
During the 2005-2006 housing boom
years, Gupta had to bring in workers
from Texas because there weren't
enough employees in Florida to keep up
with construction.
'A lot of people who are from other states
or from Mexico are not willing to come back
here as fast as they did last time because
of what they experienced," Gupta said.
In part, that's why Crowe thinks em-
ployment in single-family home building
won't return to its 2002 total until 2016.
And he isn't unhappy about that.
"In a perverse sort of way, the mild
housing recovery is probably a good
thing," Crowe said. "We
need to rebuild the
thile iidistr.


r~ -.

1.'
iit ./ 'A


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Act of


God?


Out of


luck

DEAR BRUCE:
One of our
friends came to
my house for a visit. A
major storm blew
through the area and
there was quite a bit of
damage, including to his
car from falling debris
from our "healthy"
trees.
I contacted my insur-
ance company to see
about helping with the
damage, but they said
since it was "an act of
God," there was no cov-
erage. I don't under-
stand how this could be.
- RPT., South Carolina
DEAR R.T.: In the
event that your friend's
car was damaged by de-
bris from your "healthy"
trees, it's entirely possi-
ble that it would be
called "an act of God"
and it would not be cov-
ered by your home-
owner's insurance. If the
tree was diseased in
some way, that would be
another matter If your
friend has comprehen-
sive insurance on his
car, it will easily take
care of the problem.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
heard you say that when
buying term insurance,
it should be "renewable
and convertible." Can
you explain? Reader,
via email
DEAR READER: The
answer is simple. If you
purchase term insur-
ance, it should be re-
newable without
evidence of insurability.
In other words, if it's a
10-year term, after the
10 years, the policy
should be renewable in
spite of any medical his-
tory the person may
have. Convertible sim-
ply means it could be
converted to whole life if
you chose to do so.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
recently inherited
$50,000. I would like to
leave it to my children
and grandchildren. I
will not need this money,
and it came from my
side of the family. My
husband won't need it if
I should die before him.
How can I do this? -
J.S., via email
DEAR J.S.: You can
leave the money in your
will. However, you may
not cut your husband out
See Page D3


Don't let hiring test your patience test the candidates


Think about the time
and effort you dedi-
cate to hiring even
one new employee. You
aren't just filling a posi-
tion, you are investing in a
key corporate asset: the
person with the right
skills, attitude and com-
mitment to help your busi-
ness grow, regardless of
what job they do for you.
So what happens when
things don't quite work
out?
According to the Har-
vard Business Review, 80
percent of employee
turnover is caused by bad
hiring decisions.
Estimates vary, but as


any hiring manager knows,
this kind of turnover is in-
deed costly The U.S. De-
partment of Labor tells us
you'll pay about one-third
of a new hire's annual
salary to replace him or
her, and that's just for
starters. A study by the So-
ciety for Human Resource
Management (SHRM) esti-
mated it can cost up to five
times the employee's an-
nual salary, with replace-
ment costs rising
exponentially based on
salary and tenure. Other
studies say it will cost two
to two and a half times the
annual salary
Bottom line: Dealing


with a bad hiring can hurt quantify costs Yager says
your bottom line. can be lethal to your busi-
So why is itso costly? Fred ness, such as lower em-
Yager, editor of ployee morale,
eFinancial customer dis-
Careers, notes satisfaction,
that expenses lost customers,
associated with lost sales, re-
hiring include duced quality
training and of products and
orientation, ter- low production,
mination costs not to mention
such as the increased
COBRA, unem- workload on
ployment and Laura Byrnes other employ-
potential litiga- WORKFORCE ees, which can
tion, and if you CONNECTION spiral off addi-
hire from out of tional ex-
area, possibly travel, hotel penses.
and meals as well. Most importantly, Yager
There are also hard-to- notes, "you need to repeat


the entire hiring process to
replace the wrong hire,
which includes time and
expenses."
Despite steady improve-
ments to the economy,
today's work environment
is still highly competitive
and challenging. Suffice to
say that employers need to
be strategic in their hiring
strategy yet a recent sur-
vey indicates that might
not be the case.
More than one-third (36
percent) of the 1,400 chief
financial officers (CFOs)
interviewed for a 2011
Robert Half Finance & Ac-
counting survey said the
top factor leading to a


failed hire, aside from per-
formance issues, is a poor
skills match. Another 14
percent cited "failure to fit
into the corporate cul-
ture."
Clearly, determining a
job applicant's skills fit is
a skill in itself and one
that, as the research sug-
gests, can test the patience
and fortitude of any hiring
manager
Happily, Workforce Con-
nection can help. We offer
an array of assessment
tools, available at no
charge, to assist you in se-
lecting the best candidate.


Page D3










D2


SU CITRUS COUNTY
.%' CChamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


YOU CAUGHT MY EYE...
Tish Tramontana /_/
Duds N Suds Laundromat, -.
Crystal River
Terry Dernbach
Walmart, Inverness

... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Upcoming Chamber of Commerce events
SMay 15 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Business Leaders of Tomorrow members meeting
L J 1 May 16 10 a.m. groundbreaking for Wollinka-Wikle Title
M E May 17 4:30 p.m. ribbon-cutting for Saltface Charters at MacRae's
May 22 -8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Business Women's general membership meeting
May 23 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Business After Hours at Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Facility
-Check our complete Chamber and Community calendar at www.citruscounty-
| J chamber.com or follow the QR code to see the website on your smartphone!
W ~ Wherever you go, whatever you do, take Citrus County along with you!


Joining Melissa McCallum, center with scissors, are her parents Jolene and Pete McCallum, daughter Maranda Nelson, granddaughter Cheznie Nelson and special clients and friends
Michele Swanson and Lynda and Frank Wormwood. Also celebrating the new membership are Cira Schnettler from the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce; Sarah Fitts, First International
Title; Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Anne Marie Saxer; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Peter Retzko, Citrus County Chronicle; Dan Pushee;
Nicholle Fernandez, Villages of Citrus Hills; Lisa Nash, F.D.S. Disposal; Bonnie Hardiman-Pushee; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank; and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.



Go cruising with a new Chamber member

Cruise Planners American Express is a full-service, award-winning travel company. Top producers with virtually
every cruise line. We not only specialize in cruises, but also offer great land and tour vacations, affiliation with
American Express offers special Mariners Club sailing and redemption of American Express Pay with Points.
Independently owned and operated by Melissa McCallum, a Citrus County resident for more than 27 years. Melissa prides
herself on knowledge of the industry and customer service, fulfilling all of your vacation needs. We do it all! Individual
and group travel, destination weddings, special occasion travel, fundraising and event travel. Plan your next vacation with
Cruise Planners and experience thoughtful, knowledgeable, one-on-one consideration of all your vacation expectations.


One day only: Pay no
preregistration fee for
YMCA summer camp
On May 17, the Y will host a "Super Sum-
mer Sign-up Day" at its administrative
office at 3909 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills.
For one day only, all pre-registrations can be
made without any fees due up front, and those
who come in and register will receive a free T-
shirt and may enjoy refreshments.
This summer the Y is excited to announce
not only the Youth Summer Camp for ages 5
to 11, but for the Y's first time, Camp E.P.I.C.
- A Camp for Teens. Camp E.P.I.C., or En-
couraging People to
Impact their Com-
munity, is a camp
designed for ages 12
to 14. Teens will
have the opportu-
nity to participate
in community serv-
ice projects and de-
velop skills and
talents that can be utilized for their endeavors
as well learn the importance of social
responsibility.
The Y's program director, Sara Bargiel,
has developed 10 weeks of summer camp
that will interest, educate and keep kids ac-
tive. From "Time Travelers" to "Y Factor,"
all 10 themed weeks ooze fun field trips,
sports, creativity and have underlying edu-
cational lessons for both the youth and
teens. Using principals of the President's
Fitness Challenge, the Y's camps will keep
kids physically active for no less than 60
minutes a day.
Camps are located at Crystal River Middle
School, Lecanto Middle School and Pleasant
Grove Elementary School. The camp day runs
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and camp sites offer be-
forecare from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and aftercare
from 5 p.m. 6 p.m. for no additional charge.
The Y offers financial assistance for all pro-
grams, including summer camp, for those who
qualify.
YMCA is a proud partner of the United Way
of Citrus County. Special thanks to the Black
Diamond Foundation for awarding the Y a
grant to help provide financial assistance for
the teen summer camp. With such wonderful
supporters and partners, the Y will be sure to
give the community's youth and teens a mem-
orable summer so don't wait, register your
children today either online, at the Y office, or
take advantage of no money down on "Super
Summer Sign-up Day!"
Registration forms for the Y's summer
camp are available online and at the Beverly
Hills Y office. For questions or more information
call 352-637-0132, visit www.ymcasuncoast
.org or check out our Facebook page.


Chamber and community welcome Florida Cancer Specialists


Florida Cancer Specialists held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house for the newly remodeled Inverness Cancer Center at
2231 State Road 44 West. Mayor Bob Plaisted and other community leaders joined FCS physicians, leaders, staff, patients and
their families for the festivities. Several business members, as well as Commissioner Dennis Domato and Chamber President/
CEO Josh Wooten, joined Chamber Ambassadors Nancy Hautop, Top Time Travel; Lisa Nash, F.D.S. Disposal; Crystal Ashe, Health Care
Center at Brentwood; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; and Dan Pushee at the festivities. You can visit them at www.flcancer.com.


Before the storm: Prepare now

for upcoming hurricane season


Just because we sit 10 miles
in from the Gulf doesn't
mean Citrus County can't be af-
fected by severe weather.
Whether it be a"no name" storm
as in 1993 or tornados, now is
the time to make preparations
for your home, family and pets.
Complete emergency informa-
tion can be found at www.
sheriffcitrus.org/EM/.
Discuss the types of haz-
ards that could affect your
family, then create
and rehearse an
emergency plan for
either sheltering at home
or evacuating.
Know your home's vul-
nerability to storm surge, flood-
ing and wind. Front doors and
garage doors are the most sus-
ceptible to wind.
Locate a safe room or the
safest areas in your home for
each hurricane hazard. Con-
sider an emergency shelter if
you do not have an appropriate
place in your home.
Determine escape routes and
a place to meet.
Post emergency telephone
numbers by your phones.
Mobile homes can only with-
stand minimal hurricane
winds. Plan to evacuate.
Check your insurance policy.


Make sure you have enough
coverage for your home and
personal property.
Meet with your family to pre-
pare for disaster. Explain the
dangers of fire, severe weather
and earthquakes to children.
Discuss the types of disasters
that are most likely to happen.
Explain what to do in each case.
Pick two places to meet:
Have one be right out-
side your home in case of a
sudden emergency,
like a fire.
The second
should be outside your
neighborhood in case you
can't return home.
Ask an out-of-state friend to
be your "family contact."
Showeachfamilymemberhow
to turn off the water, gas and
electricity at the main switches.
Teach each family member
how to use the fire extinguisher
and show them where it's kept.
Install smoke detectors on
each level of your home, espe-
cially near bedrooms.
Conduct a home hazard hunt.
Stock emergency supplies and
assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit.
Take a Red Cross first aid
and CPR class.
Create your plan at www.
floridadisaster.org/family.


Basic disaster
supplies kit
A basic emergency supply
kit should include the follow-
ing recommended items:
* Water: One gallon of
water per person per day for
at least three days, for
drinking and sanitation
* Food: At least a three-
day supply of non-perishable
food
* Battery-powered or hand-
cranked radio and a NOAA
weather radio with tone alert
and extra batteries for both
* Flashlight and extra
batteries
* First-aid kit
* Whistle to signal for help
* Dust mask to help filter
contaminated air and plas-
tic sheeting and duct tape to
shelter in place
* Wet wipes, garbage bags
and plastic ties for personal
sanitation
* Wrench or pliers to turn
off utilities
* Manual can opener for food
* Local maps
* Cellphone with chargers,
inverter or solar charger


Happy

Mother's

Day!
he following Chamber
member restaurants are
open for Mother's Day:
Beef'O' Brady's, 6738 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River,
564-0544.
Clawdaddy's Raw Bar &
Grill, 16001 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River, 564-2529.
Cody's Original Roadhouse,
305 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River,
795-7223.
Havana House Grill, 6875 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River, 563-0080.
Ike's Old Florida Kitchen,
6301 W. Riverside Drive, Yankee-
town, 447-4899.
Joe's Family Restaurant, 911
W. Main St., Inverness, 726-
1688.
Neon Leon's Zydeco Steak-
house, 10350 W. Yulee Drive,
Homosassa, 621-3663.
Plantation, 9301 W. Fort Island
Trail, Crystal River, 795-4211.
Seagrass Waterfront, 10386
W. Halls River Road, Homosassa,
503-6808.
Taverna Manos, 5705 W. Gulf-
to-Lake Highway, Crystal River,
564-0078.


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.















* To place an ad, call 563-5966


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 D3


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


. .. 0 -- ... ol re: 88) 52240 1 mal:c*ssf eds -,ileoli- 0m I w bs0 0 -, clon inec0


Wanted Single
60-66yr old good
looking guy, with pick
up truck. Wanting to
meet 65 yr. old, Citrus
Co. Single Woman
Send Response to
Blind Box 1829P c/o
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429




03 MITSU SPYDER
Red conv, a real looker!
Auto V6 25mpg. Great
mech'lI cond. Price Re-
duced call for pics.
$4990 464-2966
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lidlns
352-794-4118
Dining Rm 4 brass
frame char/blue velour
chairs, 43" beveled
glass top $150 obo,
2 Barrel chairs
& ottoman cust made
white cover $75 obo,
352-746-0817
HAPPY 21st


You re a big girl now!
Congratulations to your
parents on surviving 21
years of raising you.
You are a success! We
are so proud of all of us.
ha!
Love and hugs on your
Big 21.
Mothhair, Daddy, Zoey
and Penny
HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
Wood Floors, Tile and
Carpet. 2 Car Gar,SS
Appl. fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026
Outboard Mercury
Motor 20HP,
Execllent Condition.
$800.
(352) 726-0321




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
& MORE 352-270-4087




5 KITTENS
cute and adorable
419-8563


Tuxedo Cat, 2% yrs. old
gentle, preferred family
w/no children, or pets
pls call 352-746-5427
Blue Tick Hound
Male, 6-8 mths old,
needs good home.
352-257-3304
Burgundy Recliner
Fair Condition, very
comfortable
(352) 419-6383
fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great as mulch or
for gardens U load and
haul away
352-628-9624
FREE KITTENS
very friendly, playful
pls call 352-249-7473
FREE MANURE.
No shavings,
Already bagged,
Ready for pick-up at
our pasture gate
(352) 249-7127
KITTENS
2 male 7 weeks old,
1st shots & assistance
w/nuet. a forever
home needed
(941) 661-0261
Mini Pin, male, 2yrs old,
tn color, great with kids
& sm dogs.
Kitten Siamese mix,
male 8 wks old, gray &
white
352-400-6004
Red Nose Pit
Friendly, 3yr old,
neutered, house bro-
ken, have to move and
can't take himus, call
352-400-8639


-g
Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberrines
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistymeadows-
blueberryfarm.com



Attention Beverly Hills
Residents: At Country
Lakes Villas on Sat,
May 4. Our precious
12 yr old Pomeranian,
Abbey Joyhas gone
missing while staying
overnight with
Grandma & Grampa.
She was wearing a
pink collar and is 67/2
lbs. buff color
Please call
352-794-0490, we are
devastated!
Large Anatolian
Shepherd
Male, tan, dark ears and
nose, micro chipped
100lbs lost on4/26/13 in
Floral City near S.Turner
Ave & StageCoach rd.
$300 REWARD
(352) 220-2540
LOST 5 COCKATIELS
Blackish/Gray with
orange cheeks
N. Highland Estates
(352) 254-1677
Lost Calico Cat
Dark brown color
w/cream/orange
markings: with white
chest belly & paws,
Beverly Hills, Gleason
Place Heartbroken,
Missing on
April 6, REWARD
352-527-0302
LOST Cockatiel
Gray bird, yellow
face, orange cheeks
REWARD
(352) 746-7263
LOST
Honda Gold wing
battery cover, tan lost
between Lowes and
Lecanto. Reward please
call 352-464-0387


Please help find her.
She's 11 yr old- part
rott/part terrier. Grand-
daughter distraught. Us
too! Last see on Cher-
rywood st, off
Rockcrusher near Fire-
house. Reward offered.
call 352-212-9759 or
352-476-3508.
LOST: Ring of Keys.
Fell off truck onto high-
way somewhere be-
tween Hwy. 44 Crystal
River near Christ Medi-
cal Center and Hwy.
486 Hernando/Citrus
Hills. Call 352-422-3261.




BLONDE/WHITE MALE
TERRIER/PIT MIX
FOUND CRYSTAL
RIVER. CALL JUDY
352-503-3363
BROWN/BLACK BRIN-
DLE SPAYED FEMALE
POSSIBLE PIT MIX
FOUND OLDFIELD-
GLENBROOK CALL
JUDY@352-503-3363
FOUND FEMALE CUR
MIX, TAN, BLACK MUZ-
ZLE ALSO FOUND
BROWN DACHSHUND
MIX FEMALE;
ALSO YOUNG
BLONDE MALE
FLOPPY EARS,
FOUND HERNANDO
ALSO BLACK/TAN
SHIBA INU FEMALE
PUREBRED;
CALL JUDY
352-503-3363.
found JACK RUSSELL
FEMALE in HER-
NANDO, ALSO NEU-
TERED JACK RUS-
SELL MALE FOUND
RTE 44. CALL JUDY
352-503-3363
Set of Car Keys
found in the parking
lot of AJ's Cafe
approx. 10 days ago
Please No Calls
Stop by AJ's for details


That special little
dog
might be at the
ADOPTION
EVENT
of
A Humane Society
OF
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Pet Rescue, Inc's

PET
SUPERMARKET
INVERNESS
SATURDAY'S
10-12PM

Small Dogs
For Adoption

Medium to Small
Dog Crates Needed

Wanted like new
stuffed toys

Need to re-home
a small dog?
www.AHumaneSoci
etvPetRescue.com
52 527 9050


FOSTER PARENTS
NEEDED


NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses

Five Week Program
*Medical Assistant
$1,420

Two Week Program:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-T4-4119



Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397



TRAIN FOR A
SUCCESSFUL
CAREER IN
HEALTH CARE!

Enrolling Now for
ALL PROGRAMS:

PRACTICAL NURSING

PHYSICAL THERAPIST
ASSISTANT

PROFESSIONAL
NURSING

PROFESSIONAL
NURSING
Paramedic Opt.

LPN TO ADN
NURSING BRIDGE

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352) 245-4119







HAPPY 21st
CHAYA!









You're a big girl now!
Congratulations to your
parents on surviving 21
years of raising you.
You are a success! We
are so proud of all of us.
ha!
Love and hugs on your
Big 21.
Mothhair, Daddy, Zoey
and Penny







NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses

Five Week Proaram
*Medical Assistant
$1,420

Two Week Program:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-24-4119


EXP'D. BARBER

For Busy shop.
(352) 419-2427











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR

Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a
progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and man-
agement abilities,
great organizational
skills and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
atdon@
SouthernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D
Assistant
Director of
Dining Services

Formal training in food
service management is
preferred. Previous ex-
penence in long term
care or acute care food
preparation and supervi-
sory experience is pre-
ferred. Must have basis
computer skills, a basic
understand of dietary
management, quality
food production, and
therapeutic nutrition is a
plus. We offer competi-
tive wage/benefit with a
liberal paid time off pol-
icy. Please apply in per-
son or send resume to
Citrus Health & Rehab
Ctr. 701 Medical Ct. E,
Inverness, Fl 34452
EOE/DFW/Not for Profit.
Busy Specialty office
Looking For

F/T Med Asst.
Includes Benefits.
Looking for organ-
ized, energetic
individual that has
computer experi-
ence. Please
forward resume
with work history to
medasstjob@embarq-
mail.com orfax
352-795-9481.
DENTAL LAB
TECHNICIAN

No experience required.
Excellent vision, manual
dexterity, attention for
detail a must.$ 8.00 to
start, P-T possible F-T
dentaltechjob@aol.com
Director of Clinical
Services

A growing home health
agency in Citrus County
needs FT Director of
Clinical Services.
Candidate must have at
least 2 years manage-
ment experience in
home health agency.
Please call
352-563-0663 or fax to
352-563-0992 or
email resume to
elle-scarfone@acehomecare-
flonda.com HHA
License #212040961
Exp. ALS
LPN'S, CNA'S
& Bookkeeper/
Office Manager

pay based on
experience, please
send resume to:
Nature Coast Lodge
279 N Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
or e-mail to: admin
ncl@tampabay.rr.com

EXPERIENCED
RN'S
Full time & Part time
Positions Available
RN's needed for
outpatient surgery
center. MUST have
experience in
PRE/ POST outpa-
tient surgery center
or hospital experi-
ence in ICU or ER.
Excellent pay, bene-
fits, excellent hours,
no weekends,
nights, or call. Best
place to work in
Citrus County.
Submit Resume to
Fax 527-1827
or in person:
110 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Lecanto, Florida.


CHIRO. ASST.
P/T exp.
M-W-F 8:30am-6pm
T-Th 10am-4pm
apply in person
6166 W Hwy 44, CR

F/T RECEPTIONIST

Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

HEALTHCARE
OPPORTUNITIES
Life Care Center of
Citrus County in
Lecanto

Dietary Aide
Part-time and PRN
positions available.
Two years of dietary
and/or food ser-
vices experience in
a healthcare setting
preferred. Must be
willing to submit to
background check
and drug screening
and be able to lift
30 lbs floor-to-waist.

We offer
competitive pay in
a team-oriented
environment.

Lisa Shields
352-746-4434
352-746-6081 Fax
3325 W. Jerwayne Ln
Lecanto, FL 34461
Lisa_Shields@
LCCA.com
Visit us: LCCA.COM
EOE/M/F/V/D -
40312



Cen
L _ja


LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office
based medical
practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

w/experience on
Medical Weight Loss
& Gynecology.
DFWP. Send resume:
Email: suncoastobl
@earthlink.net
Fax: 352-584-8201

Medical Careers
begin here

Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

P/T Chiropractic
ASSISTANT

Busy office, 30-35hrs
week, Must be out-
going able to multi
task. Have com-
puter skills. Able to
work Sat. Mornings
Fax Resume to:
352-726-3885

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.

APPLY IN PERSON
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, FI 34461
EOE/SF/DF

SURGICAL
ASSISTANT

Our high quality oral
surgery practice is
seeking a fulltime
surgical assistant.
Must have dental or
medical exp, a
caring attitude and
be computer savyw
Benefits incl. health
insurance & pension
Mail resume to:
6129 W. Corporate
Oaks Dr. Crystal
River, FL. 34429




AIRLINE CAREERS -
Train for hands on Avi-
ation Maintenance
Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing availa-
ble CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769


Eckerd
Floral City
Cook Needed

Please visit our
website:
www.eckerd.ora
to apply.

Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927

Library
Circulation
Supervisor
Announcement
#13-22

Advanced library
work managing
the circulation
functions, schedul-
ing, staff and daily
operations at the
Central Ridge
Library. Must be
able to work some
evenings and Satur-
days. Requires over
one year of library
or equivalent man-
agement or supervi-
sory experience.
Beginning rate of
pay $1,107.03 B/W.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 24, 2013
EOE/ADA

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

Billing Clerk
Receptionist
Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.

Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429




Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for
Part time
Breakfast and
Lunch Cook.
Please apply
in person at
505 E Hartford St
Tues-Sat between
2:00-4:30 pm.




AUTOMOTIVE
BODY TECH /
PAINTER
5 yrs exp, light body
work, base coat clear
coat painting. Valid dl,
must own tools. Call
795-1420 or Email
autosportracing@
hotmail.com
BOAT BUILDERS
WANTED
All Positions

Century Boats is now
excepting application
& resumes for:

Assembly/Rigging, Mold
Maintenance, Finishing,
Lamination, Cut/Grind
Experience Preferred

40047 County Rd. 54 E
Zephyrhills, FL 33540
813-236-8879 (fax) or
email to contact@
centuryboats.com
www.centuryboats.com

Driver -

One Cent Raise af-
ter 6 and 12 months.
$0.03 Enhanced
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or Weekly Pay,
Hometime Options.
CDL-A, 3 months
OTR exp.
800-414-9569
Www.
drivekniaht.com

DRIVER

OTR SD/LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Wemrner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Wemrner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
Plaster's/Laborers

Raymond Seijas Plas-
tering Inc. is looking for
F/T help, experience a
must, own transporta-
tion required, work is in
The Villages.
David Nava 208-4942
Danny Seijas 601-6832


Septic Tank Co

Taking applications.
Exp and CDL helpful.
Call 352-302-4977

WATER/FIRE
CLEANING
TECHNICIAN

Seeking a Full-Time
responsible, motivated
Water Technician that
could lead to a future
management position.
Individual must have
construction, demo
and cleaning experi-
ence and reliable
transportation. Our
company performs
24/7 Emergency Ser-
vices; therefore, indi-
vidual must be willing
to be on call 24/7 and
perform dry-outs from
start to finish. Prefer
someone who is
IICRC Certified but
willing to train some-
one who is a team
player and the right fit
for our growing busi-
ness. Please send
resume to Attn:
Amber EMAIL to:
info@naturecoas-
trestoration.com or
FAX
(352) 465-7616.





*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. Call
Michelle
352-436-4460

Exp. ALS
LPN'S, CNA'S
& Bookkeeper/
Office Manager

pay based on
experience, please
send resume to:
Nature Coast Lodge
279 N Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
or email to: admin
ncl@tampabay.rr.com

Exp.class A CDL
Driver-

Local. Full, Part-time.
Apply in person
NO CALLS-Atlas Van
Lines 5050 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy, Crystal
River. Drug Screen
and Background
Check Required.


GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
2 positions available
Announcement
#13-21

Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Heavy lifting,
pushing, bending,
climbing and reach-
ing required. Ability
to work outdoors in
hot/cold tempera-
tures under noisy
conditions. Current
valid Florida Driver
License required.
FULL TIME POSITION
WORKING
Sunday-Thursday,
7:00AM-3:30PM.
$7.79 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 17, 2013
EOE/ADA






































CEWPNICPE
morin dl~ ivery of

theiitr-usCounty
Choi;cl tte aqndther

newsaper fo


hom delivery Pa~a'
custo mers.)[:


Lawn Service Help

PIT EXP. ONLY, Must
have Clean Drivers Lic.
(352) 302-6034


CmROMCLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449




Part Time
Possible 2 days
week

Moving Experience
Heavy Lifting,
Neat appearance
(352)522-0945

Residence Serv
Coordinator

P/T 24 hours week
Resp include service
delivery & referrals.
Must have knowl-
edge of available
resources and trans-
portation. Strong
computer skills req.
Qualified candi-
dates send resume
and cover letter to
Joverstreet@
chec2.org
Equal Opportunity
Employer
www.communitv
housing partners.ora

Residential
Cleaner

Inv. Cleaning Co.
Looking for speed, ac-
curacy, customer serv.
orientated,experienced
only team player with
references (day work
only)352-302-6418




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP.
HSDiploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294




Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
634-1397/637-3733




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS




F I.



130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
* A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
* All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



ANTIQUE FAN
McGraw Electric Co.
Model1265R $25.00
call 352-257-3870


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









D4 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013


AUTHENTIC SHIPS
PORT HOLE Heavy
brass window that
opens and closes.
$100.00 firm. 513-4473
Ex. Lg. Hess Truck
Collection
Excellent Shape
$1500. obo
352-746-2210

Ai

I


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
VINTAGE BRASS
CHANDELIER with
crystal drops.works
good, 8 lamps.$100.00
513-4473




ADMIRAL matching set
washer & Dryer good
condition. $100 for each
one 352-563-2288
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
EUREKAATLANTIS
CARPET
STEAMER/SHAMPOOER
retails $280.00 sell
$50.00 call
352-257-3870
EUREKA CLEANER
Upright Vacuum
Cleaner Excellent
Condition $10.00
352-746-5421
Maytag Washer &
Frididare Dryer,
Both Heavy Duty
$175. for pair
(352) 465-3384
VACUUM CLEANER
Kenmore Upright Vac-
uum Cleaner Excellent
Condition $25.00
352-746-5421
WASHER OR DRYER
$145 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Lkie New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179





Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052






SHADYVIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374





Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078


WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504




DESK oak with two file
drawers, 4 reg. drawers.
29"h x 29"d x 59"w text
for photos $95
352-503-2525
Office and Computer
desk, chair, & other
office supplies
$315 for all
Call (352) 746-0500




ABSOLUTE AUCTION
May 18, 2013 at 9:00
a.m. for Rental Tool
Company. Liquidation
of rental equipment
and inventory. For
more information visit
www.proteam
auction.com.
ProTeam Auction
Company, Jeff Bowlin,
Auctioneer, AU3911

Bankruptcy Auction
Online & Onsite
Tuesday, May 14
@ 10am
Preview: Day of Sale
9-10am
3609 N 29th Ave,
Hollywood, Fl 33020
'06 Lexus LX 470
Sport Utility, '04
Toyota Tundra Lim-
ited Double Cab,
High-end quality
home furniture &
decor, artwork &
paintings,
salon equipment,
electronics, office
furniture, computers
& more!
Visit www.moecker
auctions.com for
Details, Photos and
Catalog
Moecker Auctions
(800) 840-BIDS
10% -13%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




Wood working
machines, full set up
all newer quality
machines. By appt.
(352) 341-1569




27 INCH EMERSON
COLOR TV Excellent
condition, cable ready.
$50. (352) 382-0683
Leave message
18-20 Commercial
Office Speakers
intercom-music, set of
6.5 HP Ceiling Speaker
w/hardware $350
352-419-2286


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554






AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755






COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838






#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777


YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529



Scaffolding 4-5', 3-4'
pieces, w/some braces
$150. 352464-0825




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




15 Piece Patio Set
Dark brown frame
biege seats,
$400 obo
(352) 637-6647
PATIO TABLE SET 42
inch round teal glass top
table and 4 chairs.
$100.00 352-527-8663
Wicker couch,
2 chairs 3 tables
$125.
2 seat glider & chair
$75.
(352) 503-7748



2 Cherry Drop Leaf end
Tables $25ea, Black
coffee table $10, 6ft
Christmas tree $10.
call after 6pm 302-2713
2 wicker vinyl chairs,
moss gr w/ tan cushions
$25 ea, Patio fiber glass
table white w/4 chairs
cushions & casters
stripped patt. w/ multi
colors $150 341-6917
Bedroom Set
2 night stands, ar-
moire, headboard,
footboard Kg. size
mattress, $600
(352) 426-2526
Black Entertainment
center w/tan recliner
$125, Exercise
Stepper $75
352-795-7254
Bucket Swivel Rocker
Green Velour, good
cond. arm cover $45
352-341-6917
CHROMECRAFT
KITCHEN TABLE AND
CHAIRS $1200 new.Off
white-4 chairs-table w/1
leaf& oak trim. Looks
new! $400
352-382-4836
Couch & Love Seat
$250.
2 Recliner Chairs
$110 ea.
(352) 503-7748
COUCH Double recliner
couch. Light/Dark
Brown. 2 years old.
Excellent condition.
$225.00 352-419-5556
CURIO CABINET oak
with 3 glass shelves and
light, curved glass front.
text for pictures $100.
352-503-2525


DUN-RITE ELE TRI
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
P FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V* RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Dining Room.
china cab., buffet, ta-
ble & 6 chairs, maple
color $750 for all
will sell separate
(352) 628-2085
Entertainment Ctr
Lt Wood; White chair
$125/both; Twin box
spring & mat. w/ rails
$75.(352) 795-7254


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840
FURNITURE
BEDROOM SET
$250.00,LANAI
FURNITURE,GRILL,KITCHE
N SETSOFA, 1
END TABLE,coffee
table best offer
352-201-0275
GLASS ROUND
TABLETOP 48" round
glass only. beveled
edge. text for photo. $60
352-503-2525
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Love Seat
Blue, Excellent Cond.
$40
352-503-2605
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Patio Furniture
white PVC, table &
6 chairs $600.
(352) 628-2085
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Sleeper Love Seat
Black Leather, good
cond. $100 or best of-
fer(352) 795-7513
Sml AntiqueRocker
for nursing also Antique
small Rocker, $135.
for both, cash
352-795-0830
Sofa
8ft, like new,
beige $400. obo
(352) 220-2542
SOFA BED light blue
gray great condition
$100.00 call
353-257-3870


Affordable Handyman
Vt FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820


CLEANING BY
TABITHA Monthly
Occasional, Residential
352-601-2175**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Liclns 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


CLASSIFIED



TRADTIINAL LE
SEAT AND CHAIR
good condition $50.00
call 352-257-3870
TRADITIONAL SOFA
perfect shape $100.00
call 352-257-3870
Two Seater PVC pipe
glider, new cushions,
leg rests, very good
condition $60.00
352-795-0830



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Canopy for Sears Gar-
den Tractor, good cond.
$45.00
560-0307
Craftsman
Rear Tine Tiller,
5HP, $450 obo
Murray, 22" 4HP Push
Mower $60 obo good
cond (352) 860-0664
Craftsman
Riding Mower,
42"deck,
181/2HP Engine $350.
352-746-7357
Grass Catcher for
Weed Eater Lawn
Mower 38" cut, may fit
other mowers $125.
Grass Catcher for
Snapper Lawn Mower
28 & 33" cut, $125.
352-795-5682
John Deer Mower
42" Deck 22 horse, 105
hrs, new blades $1100
OBO, Echo Gas Hedge
trimmer 24" blade $150
OBO 352-489-7114
Yard Equipment
Chain saw, bnd
blower/mulcher, hedge
trimmer, edger, all for
$100 352-746-0817




Dinning Room Set
Solid Oak Butterfly Leaf
table w/6 chairs $100,
Butcher block table
white w/4 chairs $50
call after 6pm 302-2713
LECANTO
MOVING SALE
lots of tools &
furniture
352-746-2210
MOVING SALE
Too Much to List!
pls call 352-249-7521



4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
GOLF SKIRTS
Lilly Pullitzer, sz's 8 & 10
Gorgeous Prints,
29 skirts, ong. $75.
sell for $15. ea.
352-527-3112
MEN'S SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30 $40
EACH 352-613-0529


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876



#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service*
Free Est.352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine. 4551 W.
Cardinal 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-m-
****215 60R/65R 16****
KELLY NAVIGATOR
GOLD GOOD TREAD.A
PAIR FOR $65.00
352-464-0316
****215 60R/65R 16****
KELLY NAVIGATOR
GOLD GOOD TREAD.A
PAIR FOR $65.00
352-464-0316
****215 60R/65R 16****
KELLY NAVIGATOR
GOLD GOOD TREAD.A
PAIR FOR $65.00
352-464-0316
6' SHELVING UNIT
3' wide x 6' tall
Plastic -$15.00
352-382-4911
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BILZ RED PAT-
TERNED MOTORCY-
CLE HELMET SZ L
Extra visor included
Minor scuffs $30
220-3944
BOOKS The Element
Encyclopedia of Witch-
craft and The Element
Encyclopedia of 5000
Spells by Judika Illes.
Selling together for
$40.00. 352-419-5656
CD PLAYER JVC XL-M
415 TM Compact Disc
Player. Automatic
Changer $50.00
352-746-5421
COMODE
$10.00
352-746-5421
DOG HOUSE Suncast
Dog House 36 1/2
Length by 25 Width.
Heavy duty plastic used
indoors. Like new.
$50.00 352-419-5656
DRAGON EGG
MegaBloks Havocfire
Metal Ages
Armor Dragon $25.00
352-628-4210
Emerg. Generator
B & S Eng. 5250 watt,
new carborator $300
OBO 352-746-0817
GERBIL CAGE
PETVILLE
ROLLACOASTER $25
352-613-0529
HARLEY SLIDE ON
ORIGINAL MUFFLE RS
NEW 1350/1450 ONLY
$90.00, 464-0316
HARLEY SLIDE ON
ORIGINAL MUFFLE RS
NEW 1350/1450 ONLY
$90.00, 464-0316
Huffy Bike
Man's 10 speed, newer
tires, red $50
352-341-6917
INDUSTRIAL SEWING
MACHINE, Union
Special, Style 63400A,
Made in USA
$130 OBO
352-489-0976
Kit Wood Cabinets
36" sink cab w/ 24 "
matching side $30;
8 ft center top + dsink,
base cab + 4 top wall
cab.$60 352-465-1892


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273
Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& dnrive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


kindle keyboard 3g wifi
6" screen $50
352 447 4380
after 12pm
La-Bra & Mirror
covers for 08 Mercedes
CLK 350 $99
561-718-5707
MOVIE PROJECTOR 8
MM Keystone Movie
Projector K110.
Excellent Condition.
$100.00 352-746-5421
MOVING BOXES 125
Sm. 10 for $3.
Med. 10 for $5
6 Lg. $.75 each
352-344-0183
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX $60.00
352-464 0316
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX $60.00
352-464 0316
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX $60.00
352-464 0316
POOL COVER
ROLLER FOR SALE
adjustable size to fit
pool. $100.00
352-382-4727
RECORDS 3 Boxes 78
RPM records $25.00
ea. Box 352-746-5421
ROUTER Black &
Decker 1 1/2 HP
Router, Never Used
Still in Box $45.00
352-746-5421
Southern Bell Gown
5 layers, strapless, color
gold iridescent lots of
sparkle, size 16, worn 1
time, $300 (Ong. $500)
352-746-0513
TRUCK WINDOW
rear solid GMC
factory tint
$50.00
352-628-4210
USED GOODYEAR
TIRE (REGATTA)
P225/60R 16 $40.00
GOOD TREAD
352-464-0316



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 by Pnride $395
1 by Berkline $295
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $70.00
464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $70.00
464-0316
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $70.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
100.00 464 0316
NEW 4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT
MUCH EASIER TO
GET UP ONLY 20.00
464-0316
SAFETY BATHTUB
TUB GRAB BAR IT
CLAMPS TO THE SIDE
OF THE TUB ONLY
$25.00, 464-0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK VERY LONG SO
YOU CAN SLIDE INTO
THE SHOWER 40.00
352-464 0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK VERY LONG SO
YOU CAN SLIDE INTO
THE SHOWER 40.00
352-464 0316
WALKER WHEELS
hand brake
basket&seat
good condition
$50.00 352-628-4210



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS&
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"BUILD YOUR OWN
LAP STEEL" FULL KIT
WITH MANY EXTRAS
FOR CUSTOMIZING
$75 352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PAK, EVERY-
THING YOU NEED TO
START+LESSONS
DVD $75 352-601-6625
"NEW"BASS EFFECTS,
ZOOM BI AND
ELECTRO-HARMONIX
NANO"THE MOLE" $50
352-601-6625



BATHTUB/NEW 5
feet,very nice60.00
OBO LINDA 341-2271
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $7
EACH 352-613-0529
FREE 2 mirrors
46"x68" 24"x36"
352-795-1878
KIRBY G6 VACUUM
Like new-all tools-12 mi-
cro bags-carpet clean-
ing kit(never used)2 bot-
tles solution $300
352-382-4836


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Tnmming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825


MA EF
TOASTER OVEN $25
352-613-0529



Complete Gym Set
IncI, weights, pully sys,
exercise bike, and More
$500 OBO
352-746-0589
Exercise Bike
Schwin, airdine pro, new
$800 now $175 OBO
Mountain Bike
Mongouse 10 speed,
like new $75.00 OBO
352-746-0817



BICYCLE BOYS SPI-
DER MAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel.
batteries, garage
kept, Delivery Avail
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
Dunnellon Pawn
Fire Arms****Ammo
Mags****Since 1987
352-489-4870
Ez Go Gas
not running,older work
horse, $375, & extra's
$24 315466-2268
Fear No-Evil Guns
Glocks-S&W-Beretta
Ammo-concealed clas-
ses 352-447-5595
GOLF CLUBS full set, 9
irons,3 woods with bag
$ 75.00 352-637-5389

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. May 11th 9a-5p
Sun. May 12th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY FAIR-
GROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
James Anglin Gunsmith
9 Millimeter new in Box
with 2 mags $189.00
3524194800
kayak blue w/storage
Greatt paddle $150 obo
352-746-0817
KAYAK RACK -
car top-$80-
352-726-6084



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1975.
** call 352-527-0555 "



BLUE BABY CAR SEAT
clean like new $25.00
call 352-257-3870


StumpGrinding cheap
avg cost $25-18"stump
volume disc. over 5
call Rich 352-586-7178
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




Painting & Wallpaper
Removal, Husband &
Wife Team. Excel Ref.
Free Est. 352-726-4135




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Stretching Cleaning

Freei In Home- Estimate
Lifetime Warranty on Stretching
& Repairs
Upholstery Cleaning
Now Cleaning Tile & Hard Surfac-e
I,, Ii
0-


I.uremI


GENERAL 7 -
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377








BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


WIND
GENIE.
We lean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
or pool or plan
Something
., completely new!

4U"O ften imitated,
Q 12 vdupikated"


YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICKPAVERSPECIALIST

CO PES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
SInsured 352-400-3188


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
"- All Home
V -" Repairs
A -.., Small Carpentry
M el'* Fencing
Screening
WerIns t Clean Dryer
Vents
'r All J. d..'e & Dependable

w 352.344-oo0905
c ell 400-1722
sured Lic.#37761







Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
LicC#0001325497

MA JOHNSON

ACl ROOFING, INC




TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


AAA ROOFING
Call the "1,eak6ustes"
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF;
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
L[ic./Ins. CCCO57537 ~ OOESX4










When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
,r Cleaning & Sealing
S" Grout Painting
I 7 ^ Residential &
S Commercial

586-1816 746-9868









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RV/TRUCK TIRE
Goodyear Tire
245/70R/19.5 Brand
new off Ford
$100.00 352-860-1510
.


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII







I BUY AMMO,
Also Reloading
Supplies & Equip.
PAYING
$$ Top Prices $$
352-302-0962
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com



Ui8i~


LILLY
Lilly, a 4-y.o.
Shepherd mix,
weight about 45 lbs,
is housebroken,
hearwormrn-negative,
beautiful &
friendly. She sits on
command, shakes
hands, & gives paw
when asked. Takes
treats gently. Walks
well on leash, gets
along w/other dogs.
Friendly & affection-
ate. Call Joanne @
352-795-1288 or
352-697-2682.








PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tn color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876
Shepherd Mix,
Her name is Daisy
Color is Blond, 3 yrs old,
spayed, UTD on Shots
Micro Chipped, lovable,
house trained,
Fence Yard Needed
moving can't keep
needs loving home
(863) 661-6220
Shih Poo Puppies,
4 males, 1 female
ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
3 males 1 female
Ready 5/9
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827


TOBY
Toby, a 6-y.o. black/
white terrier mix,
neutered, Heart-
worm -negative,
housebrkn, micro-
chipped, weight 45
lbs. In great physical
shape, good w/
dogs & cats. Very
calm, gentle,
friendly & affection-
ate. Walks very well
on a leash, a quiet
dog & would be
an excellent com-
panion for an older
person.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
352-697-2682


TUCKER
Tucker, 2-y.o. Shep-
herd mix, neutered,
UTD shots, Heart-
worm negative, micro-
chipped, housebrkn,
weight 54 Ibs. A bit
fearful of men, bonds
well w/women. Great
physical shape. Gets
along w/most dogs.
Walks well on leash,
affectionate, friendly,
although shy @ first.
OK w/older children,
fenced yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
352-697-2682


Castrated Male Goat
1 1/2 yr old, gentle,
good with kids, $35
de-horned 422-5622

Goats for Sale
1 male 1 female 18
mths old $200 for both
568-1353 /I603-9152

GOATS FOR SALE
Mother & 2 Babies
$160 for All
(352) 628-4750
Nigerian Dwarf
Goat
male, 1 year old
$50
(352) 527-4990


v*





Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




2001 Mercury Motor
125 runs great, $1675
Leave Message
561-313-5308
352-270-3859
Outboard Mercury
Motor 20HP,
Execllent Condition.
$800.
(352) 726-0321




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510"

98 Alium Boat
18' w/50 hp, fish finder,
nav. sys, exec. cond.
$2300 352-249-6235
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
1998 Sting Ray
22 Ft, extra Clean 175
Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab,
great for fish/pleasure
$7500 352-422-4658
2001 Century
WAC, yam 150 OX66FI
mtr, Windless, wash
down, fish finder,
w/trailer exec, Cond.
$12,900 352-563-5628
Carolina Skiff
24 ft., new motor-41
Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP,
trailer Lots of extras
$14,500 (352)287-3308
JOHN BOAT
12ft., 9.9 Johnson,
trailer, swivel seat,
very nice. $950.
(352) 341-1569
SPEED BOAT
1975, w/trailer newly
painted, new red cus-
tom canvas cover.
$2,000. 813-650-4662
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555"*
boatsupercenter.com




06 Winnebago
29' site seerer, class A,
loaded 19k mi, 2 slides,
new tires, exec cond.
$46,500 270-8475




KEYSTONE
2001 Litehouse 23 ft.
Sleeps 6. Nice condi-
tion. Generator, TV,
DVD, AC, awning &
more. UVW 2960 Ibs.
$5995 or BO.
352-489-3931
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
TRAVEL TRAILER 26'
2005 Spnngdale by
Keystone with slide,
queen bed, sleeps 8,
ducted A/C, tub with
shower, good condition.
$6700 352-464-1622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




4 BF Goodrich
Tires & Rims
like new, P245's-70-16
$400. 352-613-2333
Tonneau Cover
Leer 700, Fiberglass,
Red, off Chevy, 672'
Like New, $425. obo
352-527-4271 B.H.
Tonneau Cover
Rugged, 6%/ feet,
folds into 3 sections
Asking $250
727-251-7568




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted
Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


m
03 MITSU SPYDER
Red cony, a real looker!
Auto V6 25mpg. Great
mech'lI cond. Price Re-
duced call for pics.
$4990 464-2966
2002 Saturn
L100 4 door, Gold, all
elec. $1500 OBO
352-746-0817
2003 MERCURY
GRAND MARQUIS
LS $4,100. 157K miles.
Runs great. Cold air.
jonkern@ptd.net or
352-613-1738
2011 Chrysler
200 Convert, cherry/tan
22k mi, beautiful car,
automatic, $21,950 Firm
352-897-4520
BUICK
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-302-9217
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100

must sell!
CADILLAC
1999 STS $1,500, minor
work needed
352-364-2268
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th
anniversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles, immaculate,
loaded,call for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt LT
$6,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
DODGE
1993 Stealth ES: black
exterior paint, gray
leather seats, sunroof,
cruise, AC, power win-
dows and locks, 5
speed manual transmis-
sion, 3.0L DOHC V6,
120,500 miles. $3,800.
352-344-0625
FORD
2000, Ranger XLT
Lesabre, $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Focus, Sedan,
SES, 25,000 miles.
$7,500. 352-341-0018
FORD
'96, Mustang, V6, 5spd
manual, gar. kept, GT
wheels silver, great
cond. $3,500 obo
(352) 476-7408
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5,500 obo
352-628-5451 or
352 601-2214
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
Mercury
2001 Sable, 4dr, auto,
43k mi. v good cond.
$5500. 352-228-1111
Mercury
97 Grand Marquis
very good cond. cold
ac, newer tires, ask.
$2200. 352-563-1600
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440











FORD
Shay1929 Model-A

Must See! $13500.
obo 352-746-2210






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





1998 MADZA
B2500 pick-up truck
New A/C, swaybar,
shocks, radio. $3500 cl
7a-7p(352) 465-2823
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD


CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
1997, Explorer XLT
$3,495
352-341-0018


FORD
1998, Explorer Sport
$4,995.
352-341-0018
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100




JEEP
'98 Grand Cherokee,
6 cyl. 4 wheel drive
$3,000 (352) 628-6702
Cell 364-3122


CLASSIFIED




2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10 lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
Town & Country 2005
7-Pass Non- Smoking
Mini-Van, Stow'n Go
Seats, 3.81tr V6, 21 mpg
Leather, 2nd Owner,
Impeccably Maint.,
Records, All Options.
Clean Reliable Family
Van. $6,999. obo
352-422-3217




06 Honda
Shadow Spirit V TW 750
Exec. Cond, Must See
Burnt Orange Color
ask $3500 527-7199
06 Suzuki
Burgman 650 w/tryke
kit, wh/bl under 5k mi,
loaded with extra.$7995
OBO 352-621-0248
BUDDY SCOOTER
2009,50cc, 1,500 mi-
les Red, great shape.
Asking $1,700
(352) 438-8026


Misc. Notice


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 D5


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk, xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12,900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
HONDA
2004 Gold Wing TRIKE
EASY STEER, DE-
FLECTOR WINGS,
INTERCOM, BRAKE
LIGHT MODULATOR,
LIGHTED SPOILER,
TRAILER TO MATCH
CB, ADJUSTABLE
PASSENGER FOOT
RESTS
CHAMPION KIT AND
MANY EXTRAS
49,900 MILES $24,500
352-382-5149

SUZUKI
1981 GS1100E, Mint
Condition, adult
owned, super fast,
garage kept, new ti-
res, new seat, Italian
fainng, smoke wind-
shield with sissy bar,
only 15k ong. mi.
many extra's serious
inquires only $2600.
Call 352-489-5932

SUZUKI
1987, GS450L. Adult
driven & well maint.
Very low miles, Looks
and runs well. $1,200
obo (352) 249-7127


394-0512 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote Sexton, Cynthia L,
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Cynthia L. Sexton
20 W. Murray St.
Beverly Hills, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 12, 2013


396-0512 SUCRN
05/16 Meeting
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Executive Committee of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc., a Fla. not
for profit corporation will hold a special meeting on Thursday, May16, 2013, at 5:30
PM, in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health
System Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Boulevard, Inverness, Florida, for the
purpose of peer review and risk management, pursuant to 395.0193 and 395.0197
Florida Statutes. THIS AGENDA ITEM WILL NOT BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, F.S. 395.0193(7)
AND F.S. 395.0197(14).
May 12, 2013


393-0512 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, May 15, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Ballagas, Gloria A. & Juan J.
6760 S Sorrell Ave, Homosassa, FI 34446
Failed driveway apron inspection: in accordance with Citrus County Land Develop-
ment Code; Section 7900.
Baylon, Isaac S. *REPEAT VIOLATION" "KOVACH, JR."*
63 S J Kellner Blvd, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit The trailer, a boat, and the grey four door Jeep parked on the
property.
Baylon, Roger S. & Idaisa *REPEAT VIOLATION"
25 Beverly Hills Blvd, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Hot water heater, bath tub, papers, garbage,
metals, plastics, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed
area.
Burinski, Nickolay
2529 E Earth St, Inverness, FI 34453
Failed driveway apron inspection: in accordance with Citrus County Land
Development Code; Section 7900.
Clontz, Trenton W.
7666 W Chassahowitzka St, Homosassa, Fl 34448
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Esker, James H. & Valerie M.
400 S Jefferson St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B), Accessory Uses:
Accessory structures (RV) shall not be occupied as a residence, with the exception
of guest cottages/garage apartments as outline herein.
Gilmer, Laura J.
5636 S Sandalwood Way, Floral City, FI 34436
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapterl8 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Failure to
obtain a building permit for installing a shed.
Green, Leland L. & Eleanor L. & Roberta T.
56 N West Ave, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Unused rabbit kennels, wood, fires, garbage,
pile of brush, metal, plastics, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an
unenclosed area.
Hale, Anthony *FINE APPEAL**
6749 W Cardinal St, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Special requirement for
all accessory uses. Accessory structures shall not be occupied as a residence, with
the exception of guest cottages or garage apartments. To Wit: An RV is being
occupied in the backyard behind the fence. **APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT
12/19/12 HEARING**
Hans, Paul Dean
4920 W Pleasant Acres PI, Lecanto, FI 34461
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and
undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter
pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Harness, Brenda R.
8151 E Tierra Ct, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and
undergrowth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter
pursuant to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Harness, Brenda R.
8151 E Tierra Ct, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Buckets, aluminum, wood, plastics, boxes, fires,
tree debris, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.

Haver EST, Ralph W. ATTN: David Haver
4384 S Alita Ter, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk,debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture, spa tub, tires, lumber, tvs, household
garbage, and miscellaneous junk.
Holloway, Heather
2069 N Shimmer Ter, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except


for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, cartires, broken bicycle
parts, household furniture, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash
and debris.
Larry Burk Investments LLC *REPEAT VIOLATION"
4245 N Pine Dr, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal siteor
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Garbage, paper, plastics, furniture, and other
miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Lin, Jing & Jie
1170 N Van Nortwick Rd, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20 61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Martello, James M. & Anne S.
2 Taft St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: A recliner, pile of tree debris, wood, plastics,
cardboard, tv, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed
area.

McGlone, John E. & Martin, Gary D.
6705 W Park Dr, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Failed driveway apron inspection: in accordance with Citrus County Land Develop-
ment Code Section 7900
Nelson, Andrew C. & Romine, Gwen L.
3141 N Hooty Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Appliances, household items, metal, tires, plas-
tics, paper, metal, aluminum, totes, and other miscellaneous materials being stored
in an unenclosed area.
Nelson, Andrew C. & Romine, Gwen L.
3141 N Hooty Pt, Inverness, Fl 34453
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B), Accessory Uses:
Accessory structures (RV) shall not be occupied as a residence, with the exception
of guest cottages/garage apartments as outlined herein.
Parente EST, Raymond ATTN: Donald R. Peyton
3615 W Whippoorwill St, Lecanto, Fl 34461
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: 2 pits in backyard with bags of trash, lumber,
buckets, propane tank, and miscellaneous junk and debris around the property.
Peace, Suzie
6915 W Arlington PI, Homosassa, Fl 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18-62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit:
Permit 01104932 for water damage repair was issued on July 12, 2011 and expired on
January 8, 2012 and has not been repurchased.
Perry II, Anthony D.
4923 S Old Floral City Rd, Inverness, Fl 34450
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3730(4); Any barn, stable, pen, sty,
or other similarly utilized building or structure shall be located not less than 50 feet
from any property line.

Perry II, Anthony D.
4923 S Old Floral City Rd, Inverness, Fl 34450
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building
or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Failure to ob-
tain building permit for a chicken coop.
Perry II, Anthony D.
4923 S Old Floral City Rd, Inverness, Fl 34450
Violation of Land Development Code Section 3730(A); The raising of those animals
described herein shall be permitted in Coastal and Lakes Residential on parcels of
land containing not less than two acres and developed with a single family resi-
dence. To Wit: Remove the pigs and all but 4 chickens from the property.
Purvis, Barbara & Cleo
5250 S Suffolk Ter, Homosassa, Fl 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out
for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Bags of trash and lumber in front of the
garage, debris under the carport, and miscellaneous junk and debris around the
yard.
Schonbrun, Trustee, Harvey
2875 N Bucknell Ter, Hernando, Fl 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or
highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of
Ordinances. To Wit: The trailer with the flat tire that has a boat on it and the black
Dodge truck that has no tag on it that is parked on the property.
Single Stream Processors Inc. *KOVACH, JR."
698 S Easy St, Lecanto, Fl 34461
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Failure to
comply with the conditions of your Development Order. Remove all the materials
being stored in this area or obtain permits to use the area for storage.

Willard, Ryan Lee
8470 N Windbreak Ter, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, car tires, broken car
parts, broken ATV parts, wood, metal and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous
trash and debris.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL
MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in The Citrus County Chronicle, May 12, 2013.

395-0512 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH HOME & TWO SHEDS
CASE NUMBER: 136789
Description of property: AK: 2993162 and legally described as KAUFMAN & RENES
UNREC SUB IN SW1/4 OF SEC 23-20-20: LOT 22 TOG WITH UND 1/27TH INT TO PARK
AREA: BEG AT SW COR OF SEC 23-20-20, TN N 89D 57M 15S E 474.90 FT, TN N OD 24M
15S E 33 FT TO POB, TN N OD 24M 15S E 150 FT, TN N 89D 57M 15S E 75 FT, TN S OD 24M
15S W 150 FT, TN S 89D 57M 15S W 75 FT TO POB. SUBJ TO EASM OF REC FUR DESC IN


OR BK 1270 PG 1292- AND- LOT 23-TOG WITH UND 1/27TH INTO PARK AREA:
BEG AT SW COR OF SEC 23-20-20, TN N 89D 57M 15S E 400.04 FT, TN N OD 46M 05S E 33
FT TO POB, TN N OD 46M 05S E 150 FT, TN N 89D 57M 15S E 73.91 FT TN S OD 24M 15S W
150 FT, TN S 89D 57M 15S W 74.86 FT TO POB. SUBJ TO EASM OF REC FUR DESC IN OR
BK 1270 PG 1288
MICHAEL D ROSE EST
8979 E. FLORAL PARK DR.
FLORAL CITY, FL
On February 21,2013, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building
Official to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 8979 E. Floral Park
Dr.; Floral City, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code
Compliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code
Compliance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County
Commissioners, Dept. of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division,
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 12, 2013


m
Meeting^
I Notices I


B
Meeting^
I Notices


MBBin
No ices^


Meeting
I Notices I


Meeting
I Notices I


MBeting
I Notices




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


fT7I/


/I


*iWAIII '1


0


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
DIAMOND WHITE, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL
ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3X353A
*18,488
2012 CADILLAC
SRX
BLACK TRICOAT, ONLY 8,800 MILES,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S350A
$29,988


2007 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLUE, 56,000 MILES, LUXURY II COLLECTION,
LOCAL TRADE, #C3S331C
16,9as88


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, DRIVER
AWARENESS PKG, #C3X176A
$18,988
2007 CADILLAC
STS
PREMIUM
WHITE, 27,000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV,
EXTRA NICE
$30,488


2006 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM
BLACK, 55,000 MILES, CHROME WHEELS, ONE
OWNER, LOADED WITH LUXURY, #C3X172A
s16,988


CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2010 CADILLAC
CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
BLACK CHERRY, 37,138 MILES, LEATHER,
BRAND NEW, 383440
923,6988
2011 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
MOCHA, 22,067 MILES, SUNROOF,
HEATED SEATS, EXTRCLEAN
p31,988
2006 INFINITI
M35
SPORT
SILVER, NAV SUNROOF, BACK UP CAM, HEATED &
COOLED SEATS, ONE OWNER, #C3S298A
816,988


2011 CADILLAC
CTS
SILVER, ONLY 18,000 MILES, LEATHER, LOCAL
TRADE, #C383430
$24,988
2012 CADILLAC
CTS
3.6 PERFORMANCE
BLACK TRICOAT, 3.6LV6, LEATHER,
PERFORMANCE COLLECTION, #383300
$36,5SB

2007 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY II
SILING GREEN, 54,000 MILES, HEATED AND MEMORY
SEATS, ONE OWNEEXTFRA CLEAN, #03360
f16,988


2010 CADILLAC
CTS
VANILLA LATTE, 30,500 MILES, LEATHER, EXTRA
CLEAN, LOCAL TRACE, #C383320
24,1988
2012 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
SILVER, 26,000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
LOCALTRADE, #C383460


2012 CHRYSLER
200
UNITED
LIGHT BLUE, ONLY 12,000 MILES,
ONE OWNER LOCALTRADE IN, #C3X168A
$16,988


2010 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM
CRYSTAL RED, ONLY 19,000 MILES, NAY, SUN-
ROOF, HEATED AND COOLED SEATS, #C353470
*E7, 988
2011 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
DIAMOND WHE, NAV, SUNROOF, HEATED AND
COOLED SEATS, #C383370
356,988
2010 DODGE
CHARGER
RALLY
CRYSTAL RED, SPOILER, LOCAL TRADE,
EXTRA CLEAN#C383160
$18,988


2010 FORD 2009 HONDA 2010 NISSAN 2011 CHRYSLER 2008 DODGE 2012 TOYOTA
EDGE CRV ALTIMA 200 QUAD CAB CAMRY
2W1D UNITED EX-L 2.5 SL UNITED CONV 4X4 SLT XLE
GRAY, LEATHER, SUNROOF, SILVER, 32,000 MILES, LEATHER, WHITE, 30,000 MILES, SUNROOF, TAN LEATHER, SILVER, POWER RETRACTBLE HARDTOP, NAV, GRAY, ONLY 31,000 MILES, 5.7L V, LEATHER, SILVER, 5,600 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S235A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3S289G SPOTLESS, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C383390 LEATHER, LOADED, IC3S297A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3A348A NAV, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3X078A
M18,988 a19,488a 19,988 1 8 ,988 p22,988 p22,988


2010 BUICK
LACROSSE
CSX
MOCHA, 32,000 MILES, SUNROOF, LEATHER,
NAY, ONE OWNER, #C3S305A
$23,1988


1996 CHEVY
SUBURBAN
LT
WHITE, LEATHER, DUAL AC, RUNS GOOD
#C3S315B
$3,988


2010 LINCOLN
MKX


CRYSTAL RED, 30,000 MILES, SUNROOF, NAV
ONE OWNER #C3M320A
$25,988


1999 OLDS
INTRIGUE
GLS
RED, RUNS GOOD, COLD NC
#C3S289B
*3,988


2011 BUICK
LACROSSE CXS
BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
SUNROOF, LOADED, #C2S269G
E26,9889


2000 JAGUAR
X-LTE


BLACK, LOCALTRADE, LEATHER, SUNROOF,
#C383400A
$4,988


2012 CHEVROLET
AVALANCHE LTZ
WHITE DIAMOND
16000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVY DVD
#C3M050A
$43,98


2000 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
RED, ONLY 66,000 MILES, LEATHER,
EXTRA CLEAN, #C3X354A
$SB,9BB


2011 TOYOTA
SEQUOIA
PLATINUM SILVER
22,813 MILES, SUNROOF, NAY, DVDS, LOADED
ONE OWNER TRADE, C3S301A
$47,988


2005 MERCURY
GR MARQUIS
LS
TAN, 76,000 MILES, LEATHER,
LOCAL TRADE IN, #C3X042B
$8,9B88


2009 MERCEDES
SL E63
AMG
STEEL GRAY, 26,000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE IN,
EXTRA CLEAN, #C2T192A
$65,988


2005 HONDA
CIVIC
2DR EX"SE"
BLACK, 70,100 MILES, LEATHER,
SUNROOF, ONE OWNER
*9,988


SI~WAN


I I


..._A..A....-S....".."I ..%......I. .- "
00.ETJX SM LL IVA N =A ILLA 3-= M-
4040 1ASF COLLEGE lOAD OCA3L_&A. F=L oM-77MM-4700


I SUPER SAVERS o SUPER SAVERS # SUPER SAVERS ]


D6 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012


el


Aj


^


4F-^




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW 2013 KIA
SOUL
STK#KD0383


101
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY"


NEW 2013 KIA
RIO LX
STK#KD0325


NEW 2014 KIA
SORENTOO
LXTKKE014
STK#KE5014 y-flr^


-* * IW I /IIVIlImU I lE OE * * * Ur wIO / IlVl IU r I- o * I --
LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS) WITH 12K PER YEAR, TOTAL OF $4,495 DUE AT SIGNING. SMARTPAY IS AONE TIME LEASE PAYMENT FOR 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS)
WITH $7 QR RO II t$7 ,nR RIO IY XtR R76 OPTIMA RA &10 44n N RORFTINTO I Y IU IF AT RIGNNlll R.F rlAI ER FOR rflTAII OFFER FYI I IlIVE Al I FACTORY RERATFS R INCENTIVFR. TO -lAI FR


Q!


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
2WD EXT CAB


STK#D8012


* * *OR $135 /MONTH
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
EOUINO
LS
STK#D5195

No-


LEASE** * *


-/


* * OR $185 /MONTH LEASE** * *
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
CRUZE
LS
STK#DO1 14


* * *OR $185 /MONTH LEASE** * *


* * *O $159 /IMO
BIW t am


TH LEASE* ** *
;:fN 6 0: 0-11 m:4lo


LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 39 MONTHS WITH 10K PER YEAR, TOTAL OF $500 DUE AT SIGNING, SMARTPAY IS A ONE TIME LEASE PAYMENT FOR 39 MONTHS WITH $6,705 MALIBU, $7,729 SILVERADO, $7,738 EQUINOX & $5,287
CRUZE DUE AT SIGNING. UP TO $12,000 DISCOUNT OFF MSRP ON SELECT MODELS. FOR 2013 SILVERADO 2WD EXT CAB CUSTOMER MUST OWN AND TRADE A 99 OR NEWER GM TRUCK. INCLUDES ALL REBATES. CUSTOMER
MUST QUALIFY FOR GM EMPLOYEE PROGRAM, MUST PUT MINIMUM $500 DOWN, MUST BE CURRENTLY LEASING A GM VEHICLE OR COMPETITIVE MAKE CUSTOMER MUST QUALIFY WITH CREDIT WORTHINESS. MAINTENANCE
M I II \/RAnn IGHT fl ITV PPICK-I IPD QF S A FR FN RDE TAII S **0l3 PR t9 inn IIAMrPI nMiD N I G PrT NAnnlI


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012 D7


Q!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BUITfl
TOU' GH


NEW 2012 F-150 XL
4X4 CREW CAB


NEW 2012 F-250 4X4 NEW 2012 F-350 4X4
CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL CREW CAB LAAT DIESEL


MSRP....................................................... $38,335 MSRP......................................................... $57,345 MSRP.................................................$62,525
Nick Nicholas Discount................................-1,900 Nick Nicholas Discount...............................-4,100 Nick Nicholas Discount...............................-4,900
Retail Customer Cash...............................-3,500 Retail Customer Cash..............................-3,000 Retail Customer Cash..............................-3,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash.....-1,500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash....-1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash ....-1,000

$31,435 $49,245 $53,625


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XLT SUPER CAB


MSRP.................................................................................. ...........$36,655
301A Equipment Group Discount ............................................................-500
XLT Chrome Package Discount................................... ........................ -750
Nick Nicholas Discount .......................................................................-1 906
5.0L Special Retail Customer Cash.........................................................-500
Retail Customer Cash.................... ....................................... ..........-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash ............................... -1,000
F1 50 XLT Bonus Customer Cash.............. ................................... -500
F1 50 Special Retail Customer Cash .....................................................-1,000


NEW 2013 F-150 4X4
LARIAT SUPER CREW CAB


M SRP...................................................... $51,465
502A Equipment Group Discount...............-....750
Nick Nicholas Discount...........................-2,600
Retail Customer Cash..............................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash....-1,000

$44,615


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XL SUPER CREW CAB


M SRP.........................................................$35,430
101 A Equipment Gorup Discount................... -....750
Nick Nicholas Discount...........................-1,400
5.0L Special Retail Customer Cash..............-....500
Retail Customer Cash..............................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash ....-1,000

$29,280


D8 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2012






Section E SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013



OME


RONT


INSIDE
BI Sikorski's
S1Attic PAGE E4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUII


~&
I -


Sandy Chilewich's finely
embossed ornamental
design is created with a
one-of-a-kind mold and is
spot printed with metallic
foil to suggest the
weathered look of a
delicate old textile.
although the mat itself
is durable vinyl.
(www.chilewich.com)


-0V


' .: .
,. I,.'.. I..'


m^fff 00'. ffiFRl
elf //J 'I~ffll qi7iTL,'


3I


7.. .






E2 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2421 N. Waw Hw. Beel il 2-82wwRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


6145 W. RIO GRANDE DR.
PINE RIDGE


5 BR, 3.5 BATH ON 10 ACRES!!!
.2004 Goldcrest Homes *3-Car Garage


, New Construction Now Ready Mother-in-Law Suite *15 x 30 Heated, Salt, Pool 3BD/2BA/2.5CG 2007 Pool Home
Living RM + Fam. RM 2,464 SF Living Area Kiichen wCorian Couners *2 HVAC nits 2,309 Living Sq. Ft. Gourmet Kitchen
Choose Your Own Appliances, Fans & Fixtures Kitchen w/Corian Counters 2HVACUnts Split Floor Plan Maple Cabinets
Call Listing Agentfor Details Over 4,500 Sq. Ft. Living Horses Welcome Expanded Lanai Stainless Appliances
PETER & MARVIA KOROL GEILA 'gaul' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
(352) 527-7842 KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 Email: g.english@remax.net
(352) 422-3875 Email: kellygoddardsellsflorido.com www.sellingitruscountyhomes.com






29 S. OSCEOLA ST., BEVERLY HILLS MILLION $$$ VIEW
*2BD/2BA/1CG *OnCornerofRose REA LTY ONE
Florida Room Private Backyard Plus a nice place to call home
Nicely Maintained All Appliances 24/7 INFO LINE with 3 bedrooms & 2 baths.
T(352) 527-7842 LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
(352) 422-3875 637-2 8 YEmail: lucybarnes@remax.ne
(352) 422-3875 Visual Tours: www.crysialriveril.com
HERE'S HOW:
RENTALS 1 Buyer calls exclusive
TALS 24/7 Info Line -
AVAILABLE 637-2828
Visit +
Is 2 Buyer enters house
W RiiiusnbIt number when AFFORDABLE!!!!!!!!!
prompted This 3/2/2 with carport, screened room,

3 Buyer listens to 200 ft. off the river. Nice & clean.
Ir property
presentation in LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucyblrnes@remax.net
English or Spanish Visual Tours: www.crystalriverfl.com






LAKESIDE GOLF COURSE SWEETWATER BEAUTY MEADOWCREST VILLA
ON THE 9TH FAIRWAY IS THIS 3BR/2BA HOME t ST V I
ON THE 9TH FAIRWAY IS THIS 3BR/2BA HOME New Paint New Kitchen IN PINEHURST VILLAGE
WITH 2,086 SQ. FT. OF LIVING AREA. FAMILY
ROOM WITH STONE FIREPLACE, LOTS OF New Carpet Updated Baths 2/2/2 WITH ENCLOSED LANAI
STORAGE. SPLIT PLAN, LARGE SCREEN ROOM. 2,290 Living Sq. Ft. Cul-De-Sac LOW PRICE
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 Email: sherylpotlls@aol.com Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Email: barbarajmills@eorthlink.net 000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com Visual Tours: www.cryslalriverl.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


ERA agents rack
up new highs
ERAAmerican Realty &
Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
levels achieved by its agents.
Lou Miele, of the Beverly
Hills office, has surpassed the
$1 million mark in closed
sales volume in 2013.
Lou can be reached at the
Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-746-3600.


Dawn
Theroux
has sur-
passed the
$2 million
mark in
closed
sales vol-
ume in
2013.
Dawn
can be
reached at


Lou
Miele
ERAAmerican
Realty.


the Inverness office of ERA
American Realty by calling


352-726-
5855, or by
email at
dawn
therouxera
@tampa
bay.rr.com.
ERA
Dawn American
Theroux Realty is
ERAAmerican proud to
Realty. recognize
the achieve-
ment of these fine real estate
professionals.


11 T"Ir:


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour
BROKER/ASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR


EXIT Realty opens
new office


,mancy
Little Lewis
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


1 11 h ~'


Art PatyrI 746-9000


.Su^> Sarra rstnuy .i.


I DEER
4/3/3 702561 $299,900


7170 N. GRACKLE
3/2/2 700780 $109,500


.. ..... ..... '.._., ,. ...' --" -" ... ,a
9142 N. AKOLA WAY 2435 W. ERIC 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR. 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
3/2/2 702470 $125,000 2/1/1 701256 $49,900 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 | 3/2/1 700428 $69,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


difficult real estate market for
all, we are committed to grow-
ing to meet the needs of our
agents and clients.
EXIT is opening a new loca-
tion in the heart of Yankee-
town, in Levy County. The
office is located north of Ike's


Old Florida Kitchen Restaurant
at 5 63rd St., Yankeetown.
Nancy Little Lewis will be
acting as the managing broker
associate in the new location.
Call them at 352-447-2595.

See DIGEST/Page E6


30EX3W yf

REAL ESTATE, INC.
rn ...5569W .GULF TO LAKE Hw Y .
CRYSTAL RIVER,FL 34429
oFF.E: (352) 795-6633
WW W ALEX~RE COM EMALSALESi@ ALEXRE COM


BE':.T


Ir r Ir r


I CITRUS SPRINGS


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 E3


EXIT Re-
alty Lead-
ers is proud
to be a
growing
part of the
Citrus
County real
estate com-
munity.
Even
through a






E4 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information............352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

Cl foN ICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Results from the 4-H


Tropicana speech contest

If you have ever felt nervous or anx- Tropicana and administered through the
ious about speaking in front of a 4-H Youth Development Program, Citrus
group, you are not alone. Most people County Extension and the University of
are not "naturals" at speaking in public. Florida/IFAS.
Some studies even suggest that Participants start by writing
most people are less afraid of and delivering a two to three
death than they are of public ( minute speech on a topic of
speaking! pi their choice in their classroom.
With this in mind, it's easy to Classroom winners progress to
see that building public speak- g the school contest, and the
ing skills can give you a big first- and second-place school
competitive advantage in life. | winners are invited to the
Learning communication county contest. The talent
skills helps young people nav- shown by these young orators
igate their world and prepare at the county level was impres-
for workforce, civic and family sive as usual.
roles they will assume as Amy Duncan The elementary school coun-
young adults. YOUNG tywide winner was Abriana
Recently, more than 3,400 Dutton of Lecanto Primary
youths in fourth, fifth and sixth IDEAS School. Her speech was enti-
grades participated in the 4-H tled, "If I Was Little Red Riding
Tropicana Public Speaking Program. In Hood." She gave a creative and enter-
the process, youths learned skills includ- training fictional account of how she
ing goal-setting, organization and deci- would have dealt with the Big Bad Wolf.
sion making. The middle school winner, Jacob Hens-
Public speaking fosters self-confidence, ley of Lecanto Middle School, was a re-
empowering a young person to learn, peat Tropicana Contest winner. His
serve and lead in many arenas for years
to come. This program is sponsored by See SPEECH/Page E7


Inside...


Perfect placemats
PAGE E8
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Cute cement figures catch eye of browser at yard sale


D earJohn: I love your show ture I would like to sell. I am try-
and read your column. ing to find the true value of what
Could you I have and was hoping
please give me some you could help and
information and value maybe point me in the
of my yard-sale find? direction of someone
They are solid cement. who maybe wants to
I understand you can buy The main item I
tell the age of these by have is a flour sift cab-
if the hat comes off or i met with all original
not; mine does not parts and in good
come off. They are 21 shape. I also have a
inches high, plus their wooden school desk
legs. Is the girl rare? John Sikorski with an inkwell that is
M.M., Internet SIKORSKI'S in great shape, and
Dear M.M.: I am not ATTIC also an old baby scale
familiar with the ATTIC with a wicker basket. I
rumor about the hat have included some


relative to indicating any specific
age. Both figures are of no specific
collectible interest. They appear
to be mass-produced, commercial-
grade quality. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: I have some furni-


pictures. -A., Internet
Dear A.I.: The Hoosier-type
kitchen cabinet you have is likely
100 years old, or at least close to
it. The name Hoosier is a general
term used to refer to kitchen cab-
inets that were a brand new idea


for the housewife in America. It
combined several kitchen tasks
into one cabinet.
They were all the rage in their
day During the late 20th century,
they became a hot decorative
item in the antiques market. In-
terest slumped during the first
decade of the 21st century If you
get more than $200 for yours, it
will be a lucky day
School desks have dropped off
the decorator's list of must-have
items and are slow to sell, except
at the bargain price level.
The baby scale with a wicker
basket would likely sell in the $25
to $75 range.

See ATTIC/Page E9
These concrete statues of a pair
of children were found at a yard
sale recently.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


S KEi "Always There For You"
LPE. ELr GAlL COOPER

11 Ilui ll",illioni, Dollar Realior
Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3,.1mindsnrmna.com


LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! PERFECT FAMILY HOME!
* 3/2.5/2 custom pool home 4/3/2 pool home 3049 sq ft of living
* Prime location on sought after street Hardwood flooring in living areas
* Dual paned windows and sliders Large island kitchen with 18" tile
* Wood burning fireplace in family room Walk-in pantry is 5'9x4'5
* 12'x34' lanai for outdoor entertaining Front loading washer/dryer convey
* Home warranty for the buyers All furnishings available separately
#359082 $229,000 #358257 $225,000
See.JVirtua .IIIou ,..i.UJwIJr IIJI.I..Ie IIB.I..m


HOME JUST LISTED
*3/2/2 -Family room
*Fireplace -Florida room
*Vaulted ceilings -Side-entry garage
#702610 $134,000


HAMMOCKS VILLA
* 3/2/2 -Lg eat-in kitchen
*Florida room 10' ceilings
*Area pool Lawn maint. inc.
#701855 $149,900


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
SPACIOUS & OPEN 3/2/2 Golf Course Home In The Gated
"Brentwood" Community of Citrus Hills comfortable Open Floor Plan
with a nice view from the lanai. Sliding glass door to a screened
porch. The 3rd bedroom is currently being used as a den. Home is
filled with natural sunlight. Come see this beautiful home and make it
your own!
M LS 359190 ............................................................................ $ 1 6 9 ,0 0 0

BRENTWOOD
TOWN HOME,
3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1-CAR
This is maintenance-free, r
Forida living at its BEST!
This 3 bedroom 2.5 bath 1-
car garage townhome is
located in Brentwood of
with living and dining
combo, eat-in kitchen.
Spacious bedrooms
upstairs, master suite with
walk-in closet Nice open floor plan, screened lanai, professionally
decorated, furniture negotiable.
M LS 359587 .. ....................... ................................. $ 1 2 9 ,9 0 0









SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODSIDE
Custom courtyard home is located on Skyview Golf Course with
3 Bedrooms, 2.5 baths, Den/Office, Dining Room, Family Room with
double-sided Fireplace, Gourmet kitchen with upgraded appliances.
Wood cabinets and granite counters. Surround sound, security
system, 3-zone heating system. Spacious master suite w/sitting area,
Splitfloor plan. Spectacular views. Social Membership included.
#4791 .................................................... ........................... ... .. $ 2 ,1 0 0


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
Enjoy maintenance-free living in this 2/2/2 w/office in Terra Vista's
Dual pane sliding glass pocket doors lead outto a beautiful screened
private inground pool and lanai. It's the perfect place to enjoy your
morning coffee in the fresh Florida air.
M LS 358772 ............................................................................ $ 2 2 9 ,9 0 0





SINGLE FAMILY, 5 BED, 5.5 BATHS, 2-CAR, TERRA VISTA
Remarkably unique Mediterranean Mansion, 2-story home at the peak
of Terra Vista with an amazing view of the Skyview Golf Course. This
home features a study, studio, exercise room, formal living and dining
with a double fireplace, gourmet kitchen w/breakfast nook and a huge
family room with wet bar perfect for entertaining. Maid's quarters,
2 staircases, 5 bedrooms, and 5.5 baths. Magnificent Courtyard and
Veranda 25x17 heated pool, hottub and cabana house w/full bath.
M LS 700092 ...........................................................................$ 7 9 9 ,0 0 0











DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Fully Furnished 2/2/2 Detached Villa in Terra Vista. Beautifully
decorated. Enjoy maintenance-free living so you can relax. Open
Great room, makes for a sunny atmosphere. Neutral colors
throughout.
#2938 ........... ............. .................. $1,500


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center

BILL DECKER 352-464-0647* SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777






DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, WOODVIEW VILLA Exceptional Windward model Villa. 3/2/2 with den, split floor plan,
Beautiful maintenance-free home, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2 car garage, separate dining room. Many desirable upgrades including exquisite
open floor plan design with a great use of space, Sunroom with wood flooring, Coran countertops, surround sound, plantation
plantation shutters, Superior condition, lots of added closet space shutters, self-cleaning heated pool. The panoramic view is
and upgrades in every room! Ready to move into on a corner lot in spectacular of the 5th green on the Skyview Golf Course in the
premiere community of Terra Vista. premier country club gated community of Terra Vista.
M LS 355853 ............................................................................ $ 1 9 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 359361 .......................................................................... $ 2 8 3 ,0 0 0

SINGLE FAMILY HOME,
4 BED, 4 BATH, 3-CAR,
TERRA VISTA


,, h n ,,--i. ,, I I.
.I I I. . ... 1. 1 . .. ,
condition Beautiful custom home located in the community of Terra Vista.
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BA, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS Chefs Kitchen, breakfast nook and great room. Grand dining room and sitting
Luxurious Lantana Model. This open floor plan has a beautifully area complete with a wet bar. 2 first floor master suites, Large guest
mirrored formal dining room with butler pantry. Large eat-in kitchen, bedrooms. 4 Baths. 2nd floor game room and office/bedroom. 3-car garage,
Spacious great room overlooks the private screened Lanai. Zoned HVAC. Sec system. Oversized screened pool enclosure All of this and
2 Bedrooms plus a den/office complete this lovely home. located on Legendary Ted Williams Ct.
M LS 352909......... .... .................... .......................... $ 194 ,900 M LS 700149 ... ............................... ................ $ 849 ,000






Townhome, 2 bec, i
1-car gar.

DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2-CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS the wet areas. .
Maintenance-Free Villa, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage. Featuring center with p.. 1
an extended view of the 5th hole of the championship Skyview Golf sauna, hot tub, :...... ...
Course. The villa has a therapeutic step-in tub in the guest bathroom, course all in n .-
the latest in secure bathing. The covered lanai faces south for cool community. Don'
evening breezes. The best of all worlds including all the amenities one. Beautiful view of the pond and fountain from your lanai. No
that come with membership. neighbors behind you.
# 9632 ......................................... ................................................... $ 1 ,4 0 0 # 22 7 1 ................................................. ..................................... $ 1 ,1 0 0


i Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN
* f l 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
I mm AlaysTheeForYou
A hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com s
SA 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465


ONE ACRE ON THE GOLF COURSE
Pool "Court Yard" spa, fountain, water fall & more. 4 bedrooms |
plus a den, 3 baths, master has a jetted tub & separate shower.
2789 Living 4192 Under Roof. Offers Welcomed. $289,900. The .
architectural design & deco are a must see. MLS 702574 ...EXM
*1~ij~~m ii~ij~~i ~jiijum -m -


CAROLE LISTER
A^R Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
ER cell: 422-4620 K
_______Office: 382-1700 ......

HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY



,:_ l p_..--


^Speclizing fintu CTerraist


&1 BrjentwodResle


ITemi


I ww ~ istr isigco


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 E5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DIGEST
Continued from Page E3

RE/MAX agents
take the cake
The brokers and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
pleased to announce that Len
Palmer and Alan Ivory have
passed the multimillion dollar
mark in sales volume this
year. Both Len and Alan quali-
fied for this distinguished club


Len
Palmer
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Alan
Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


in just the first four months of
2013.
Len works out of the Central
Ridge RE/MAX office located


Sally
Cure
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Sherry
Potts
RE/MAX
Realty One.


on County Road 491 in
Lecanto. Alan works in the
Crystal River office located on
U.S. 19. They are both in the
top 5 percent of Realtors in the
Citrus County marketplace.


Realtors Sally Cure and
Sherry Potts have qualified
for the 2013 million dollar
club. The associates and staff
of RE/MAX Realty One are
thrilled to recognize these
two on this significant
accomplishment.
Both Sally and Sherry have
been Realtors in the Citrus
County marketplace for many
years and are well known for
their success in the real es-
tate profession.
Sally can be reached in the
Homosassa RE/MAX office
and Sherry works out of the
Crystal River office.


L'Esperance
takes top spot
Mary L'Es-
perance was
named the top
sales agent
for Citrus
Hills for April
2013.
The wel- r
come center Mary
for the Vil- L'Esperance
Citrus
ages of Citrus Hills.
Hills is located
at 2400 N. Terra Vista Blvd. in
Citrus Hills. Visit them online
at www.CitrusHills.com.


* Nonprofit organiza-
tions are invited to
submit news re-
leases about up-
coming community
events. Write the
name of the event,
who sponsors it,
when and where it
will take place and
other details.
* Include a contact
name and phone
number.
* Call 352-563-5660
for details.


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL
.72 acre commercial property on Hwy 41. Corner 2.17 acre tract. Paved road & central
S22.000 MIS#37109 ... C17 cnn 4cAInnCnnC I


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.alcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352302-6714 i I

I -E AMERICAN
Lou M iele e RA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@ 4511 N. LentoHw
Cell: (352) 697-1685 Offi 352e4 6-o


PINE RIDGE Pr udeunti al CITRUS HILLS
1481 W Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744






NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING





6 oJe- Ti 5747 N Pecan Way 936 W Sun Vista Ct
1896 N Ravenwod Pt ML702757 $299,900 1835 W Nicole Dr MLS 702019 S399,900
MLS 702755 $339,900 3/3/3, + office, pool home MLS 702767 $119,900 Spectacular, light & airy 3/2/2 home
3bd/2ba home on quiet cul-de-sac. w/huge detached garage. 2bd/2ba maintenance free villa. on cul-de-sac.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976 Brian Murray 352-212-5913 Carl Manucci 352-302-9787 Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553







0i0fj 3422 N Buckhorn Dr 1820 E Gate Dancer Cir '7 ji 172 W Doerr Path L Sl/ 1613 E Wesigale Ln
MLS 355561 $299,000 MLS 356176 $283,600 MLS 701971 $249,900 MLS356655 $213,000
Beautifully designed 3/3/2 on 2.75 acres. Quality 3/2.5/3 home with many features 3bd/2ba villa, customized and 3bd/2ba with spacious rooms-perfect
Bring your horses! & great views sensational. Must see! for Florida family lifestyle.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Phil Phillips 352-302-3146 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523






%'-? 1 I Milbark Cl 5l, 314 S Fillmore St / 2343 N Pulnam Pl 1' i E "Hartiord SI 2. I b
.11 l I 169.500 MLS358326 $99,500 MLS 357348 $84,900 MLS 356657 $59,000
Beautiful, spotlessly clean, well Beautifully renovated 3/2/2 pool home. Neat, clean 2 bedroom 2 bath villa in Maintenance free townhome
maintained 4bd/2ba home. Don't miss this one. prime location. 2bd/2.5 ba
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
S Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.


E6 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SPEECH
Continued from Page E4

speech this year was titled "Trying
One More Time." This was an in-
spiring speech about how, after first
failing many, many times, people
like Abraham Lincoln, Michael Jor-
dan and Colonel Sanders each tried
one more time and finally
succeeded!
Each of these youths took home a
first-place plaque and a full scholar-
ship to attend a week at 4-H summer
camp in July But more than that,
they are able to walk away with a
sense of accomplishment
Appreciation and thanks are de-
served by the people who assisted
in providing this high-impact pro-
gram to the youths of our commu-
nity. These folks include the judges


at the school and county level con-
tests; Cheryl King, the program spe-
cialist for elementary language arts
and social studies; Citrus County
school curriculum specialists;
teachers; and the participants'
parents.
Programs and activities offered by
the Extension Service are available
to all persons without regard to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation, marital sta-
tus, national origin, political opin-
ions, or affiliations.
For persons with disabilities re-
quiring special accommodations,
please contact our office at least five
working days prior to the program so
that proper consideration may be
given to the request. Please call 352-
527-5700.
For the hearing impaired, contact
the Florida Relay Center Service at
800-955-8771.


I LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


Ir Mma..t


-\. Si -:.;IHK^ A BOATER'S DREAM
MOVE RIGHT IN COME TRUE!
NATURE LOVERS BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
2 Ranch on 60 es, very ... ft. of seawall; stationary & float-
3/22 Ranch on 60 acres, very ing dock; spacious modern 3/2.5
secluded and private setting of privacy! Very well maintained, new home sits high and dry (never
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture roof 05/09 Just bring your suitcase and flooded) on 2 lots. Please visit
and mature oaks. Take the tour at move right in! Community features www.mywaterfronthomeforsale.com
www m yflorida-rarnch m golf, tennis, clubhouse to find out more about this home!
MLS #353046 $400,000 MLS #358397 $169,000 MLS #358336! $499,000






GET YOUR
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO GOLF CART READY!
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S This enticing 3,647 sq ft Mitch Underwnood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home min the center
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET of the back nine of the Pine Ridge Golf
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River Course might be your well-deserved haven
bridges to the Crystal RiverI Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River 1.... ,. .,.,i .... smart
windows; great income potential, tool $199,900 ... ......
MLS 359564 $189,000 willbuy you this peace ofheaven! ii I $292,000






CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfrontthe right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acre lot in quiet neighborhood
definestate wool and separattinctive 5/4 wapartmeont A lifestyle Open and airy with the onAmbndgePt nexttotheWithlacoochee
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantation shutters diffusing the on
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you State Forest and the trails but also very close to
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sqft this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129,000


- --. :U
I 1 '." ;- :".- ''". .a-. 1.05+/-AC(5
PINE RIDGE GOLF COURSE HOME. 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths, plus a guest house/hobby room/workshop. Over 2 bdrms, 1.5 bth
5300 square feet of space under roof includes the guest area, attached 2-car garage, oversized golf-cart garage, plus elec. Poss owner fin
so much more room. Ready for immediate move in. #702827 $299,900 1 Jea


COLD^^e"
BANK11T


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SLACEMA[4


PANACHE


KIM COOK
Associated Press
S he placemat is a favorite at
many dinner tables: The
often-whimsical plastic ver-
sion catches the slip of spaghetti
from a youngster's fork, while a
nice cotton placemat elevates the
dining experience just a little with-
out having to set down a whole
tablecloth.
There's something civilized
about setting an individual dining
place with a frame of sorts. An heir-
loom set of fine linen placemats
are a quick and elegant way to
dress the table. For something un-
usual, mats made of faux or real
tropical leaves, lashed bamboo
sticks, glitter, pebbles or squares of
birch bark create a textural plat-
form for plate and meal.
Placemats are a relatively inex-
pensive addition to dining-room
decor, and can also be used on
portable trays or big coffee tables if
meals are served unconventionally
Here are a few new spring op-
tions from retailers and designers:
New York designer Sandy
Chilewich continues to experiment
with her woven vinyl material, pro-
ducing an array of textured mats in
neutrals, metallics and colors.
There's a hand-silkscreened,
brushed-dot pattern, a delicate fili-
greed foil mat, faux printed cowhide,
and a hip mod croc pattern in red,
black and tan. (www.chilewich.com
for retail locations.)
There are more woven mats at
CB2: a selection of vinyl, basket-
weave squares in on-trend hues
like carbon, chartreuse, orange and
white. Textile designer Liora
Manne's signature felting tech-
nique of layering and interlocking
acrylic fibers is used in two very
different placemats. A sophisti-
cated plaid mat in layered grays
and lime yellow pops when set with
white china. And her laser-cut, geo-
metric Corte mats in peacock and
fire engine red pack a playful
punch. (www.cb2.com)
Eco-friendly dyes are used to
make two pretty, mid-century, pat-
terned placemats at Crate & Bar-
rel. Dax features a digital linear
See Page E9


Artist Lian Ng makes
paper placemats with
clever and charming
cutout designs like trees,
safari animals, hearts and
butterflies that are
inspired by children's pop-
up books. He will do cus-
tom designs, as well. Mats
are sold in packs of ten.
Visit www.publique
shop.com.
Associated Press


L 4


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013


4







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

Dear John: I inherited some
things a couple of years ago that I
want to get appraised and sell. I
need honest experts in the following
areas to give me a fair market value
for the items and advise the best way
to sell them.
Some old and very old quilts, old
camera equipment, and very old
record albums. I am under no illu-
sion that this stuff is worth big
money, but I want the best value I
can get. R.P, Internet
Dear RE: I am sure the quilt spe-
cialists at Suwannee shops can help
you. The shop is in Trenton and is
well worth anyone's time for a visit;
it is quite impressive. The website is
www.suwanneeshops.com.
Before you talk to someone about
the camera equipment, make a com-
plete list of what you have. Then con-
tact www.collectiblecameras. com.
You have not mentioned what
kind of records you own. I suggest
you check the website
www.78rpm.com.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 E9


PANACHE
Continued from Page E8

print in teals and greens,
while Gus has a starburst
pattern in muted sunset
hues. For a more feminine
look, there's Oona, an or-
gandy and sateen cotton eye-
let-patterned placemat, and
the delicate Capiz shell mat,
a luminous circle. (www
crateandbarrel.com)
San Francisco-based Lian
Ng's PopMat paper place-
mats are inspired by chil-
dren's popup books. Made of
recycled paper, Ng's mats
come in packs of 10 and have
a spot to write a guest's
name. There are many de-
signs that would work well
for themed affairs or just for
fun butterflies, balloons,
cakes, trees, even a troupe of
safari animals. (www
publiqueshop.com)
At West Elm, find a dra-
matic graphic placemat in-
spired by Japanese ink
brush art. Also, there's
British designer Sarah
Campbell's floral-print table
linens. A stone trellis design
in stone or citron takes the
table in a tailored direction,


and a denim-y mini stripe
heads into farm table terri-
tory (www.westelm.com)
Elizabeth Liberty elevates
lowly burlap to simple chic
with hand-painted place-
mats stamped with cows,
roosters and flowers.
(www.etsy.com/shop/Liberty-
ByDesign)
Zazzle.com has a range of
placemat designs, from vin-
tage flora and fauna to edgy
street art.
You can contribute your
own design if you're cre-
ative; most custom mats sell
for around $20 each.
(www.zazzle.com)
Or make your own place-
mats using some of the ideas
at wwwhomemadesimple.
com. You can cover a favorite
fabric with iron-on vinyl
using fusible webbing, or de-
coupage favorite print im-
ages on dollar store mats.
For a party, use scrapbook
paper as placemats; you can
toss them in the recycle bin
afterwards.
Search the web for other
clever, placemat-making
ideas involving crocheting
plastic bags, lashing together
little twigs, weaving T-shirt
scraps and decoupaging
greeting cards.


Associated Press
Sandy Chilewich's new large scale abstract Brush Dot silkscreened
design in black on her signature woven vinyl placemat
(www.chilewich.com).


RELAXING WATERFRONT
LIVING
This 4 bedroom, 3 bath home with a 2 car
garage. Has over 2,200 sq. ft. living area,
boat dock seawall, & amazing water
views from the screened porch. Across
from 3 Sisters Springs.
$425,000 MLS #702545
For More Information Or To
Preview This Home Contact
Rick Snell NEXT GENERATION
352-794-6100 REALTY


721. EVELYN CURRENCY
835 NE US19, Cil: O3 cO6 41061
Crystal River, FL Cell: 352-6 m
352-795-0021 evelyn.surrency@century21.com


"HORSE LOVERS"
PERFECT SET UP for your horses or livestock.
3 BR, 2BA 2005 Homes of Merit DW and a 50x23
metal garage/workshop with 2 garage doors on
concrete slab. Home features cathedral ceiling,
split floor plan with great room. Screened back
porch and a nice front porch. Most furniture
included and most contents in workshop. All on
1.42 acre fenced and crossed-fenced of nice
pasture. Across from Withlacoochee State
-orest with miles of riding trails. MLS #700192


1- 911111111








E10 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013







Real Estate


Classifieds









^^^Emll
^^^Jrtft.?4A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966



-a -S ^tS:E ClassifledsI


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
*1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
CR MINI FARMS
2/1, 2.5Acr. wkly or
monthly (352)564-1242
HERNANDO
3/2, Country Setting
5025 N Englewood
Ave. $575. mo.
352-362-5019
HOMOSASSA
1 bedroom. 1 bath.
furnished, pool, 400
deposit, 450/month
(352)628-4441
HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311
INVERNESS
Close In, 1 & 2 BR MH
Clean, Quiet & Com-
fortable 352-212-6182


INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951
LECANTO
2BR DW $550. mo.
(352) 628-2312






V THIS OUT!
2007 Double Wide MH
28 x 60 3/2 1.10 Acres
(Brooksville) $65k
Ready To Move In
575 Credit Score & 10%
down Qualifies
(352) 795-1272





2009 DW MH
Ready to Move In
Crystal River 1,568 Sq
Ft. 3/2/ on 3.2 Acres
$89,900 10% down 575
Credit Score Qualifies
352-795-2377

ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

DREAM HOME
$43,900, 3/2 Dblewide.
Delivered & Set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807



Inverness
2008 Manufactured
Home, on 1/2 acre
$59,900 Must See
Ready to Move In
352-795-1272


Palm Harbor Homes
Check us out at
http://www.oalmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/
$8500 off any Palm
Harbor Home pur-
chased
John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210



For Sale%*
Skyline 28 x 64
on 1.2 acres, 3 bd, 2ba,
Owner Financing
& low Credit Scores
Qualify $59,900
352-795-1272
STRETCH YOUR LEGS
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Under $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183





Town Of Hernando
3/2 DW MH, 1.5 Acres,
30 min. from Ocala,
$45,900 Financing
Available
352-795-2377




We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details


HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-N-LAND
Bring The Dogs
Only $69,900, 3/2
"like new" on r acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,850
down, $349.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C.
Owner can finance.
Call 352-621-9182



HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192




1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vinyl window,
utility & outdoor shed
all appl's and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243

Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A 55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-794-4128

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977


Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648




2 Mobile Home
Steps for sale
48" wooden, brand new
$250 for both
352-503-7709




J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

NEED A
GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant home
and watch us work for you!

2/1 DUPLEX ...........................$525
2/1 WATERFRONT ...................$650
2/1 PARTS AVAIL JUNE $500

3/2/2 POOL...
POOLCAREINCL ..........$1000
3/2/2 .......................................... $90 0

2/2/Carport ........................$650
2/2/11 ............................ $650
Jennifer Fudge,
SProperty Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


-ACION-

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounltyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
POOL HOMES IN
SUGARMILL WOODS
7 Bumelia ................................ $1,000
S0.lnCi 'iEGE s$5IB
3/2/2 Pool and lawn care included
145 Pine St. ......................... $1,800
3/3/3 New modern appliances
CRYSTAL RIVER
10939 W. Gem St ..................... $550
2/1 Duplex, close to hospital
CITRUS SPRINGS/BEVERLY HILLS
34S. Jefft St. H) ............... $750
2/2 Nice ary rooms
7815N.IU al Dr. (CS) .............$1100
3/2/2 Gorgeous home
45 W. Kentwood P CS $.........1300
3/2/2 Pool home, nice kitchen
9047Travis Dr. (CS) ..................$625
2/2 newer duplex




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

Desertrose
Apartments
RENTAL SPECIAL
1 MONTH FREE
2 bed/2 bath
Call now for details!!
Ensing Properties LLC
352-795-1795
www.ensing
properties.com


INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1 water incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238
RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Now Accepting
Applications
Income
Based Rent
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal River,
FL (352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
OFFICE HOURS
Monday thru Friday
8:00am 3:00 pm
Closed for Lunch
Noon to 1:00pm
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer."


Get


Results


In The


Homefront


Classifieds!


SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom
cabinets, central air &
heat, stove,
refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD













CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Commercial Storefront
clean 1000 SF, exc.loc
$795/mo 352-634-2528




HOMOSASSA
600 sq ft, On US 19,
Across from Wildlife
Park 352-634-1311




INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Over 1200 sf, garage.
1st,last & sec. Commu-
nity pool.352-464-0919




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116




AVAILABLE NOW
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
Near School
$725. mo.
HOMOSSASA
2/1 Duplex $495.
RIVER LINKS
REALTY
352-628-1616

BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2 New W/D. No
pets/smkg $750 mo.
1st/last 678- 953-0581

FLORAL CITY
2/1, Det. Gar. CHA,
Hist. Dist., No pets/
smoking $675mo.
1 st/Ist/sec. 422-6263

Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paint,flooring, w/d pets
ok $800 mthly, 8928 W.
White Dogwood Dr.
619-301-5442

INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




For Sale By Owner
3/2/2, on appox. 1/
acre with enclosed
large pool new roof,
new Hot water heater
$125,000, 746-5421

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
Moorings Villa
2/2/1 waterfront,
part.furn., all appl. low
HOA, lawn care and
more, screen glass
lania, patio w/awning,
clear hurricane shutters,
$85,900 or rent opt.
352-344-8493 or
734-529-2146



Crystal River
Ig sunny room,
furnished, Lg yard,
wifi, c/h/a, $300. &
/2 util. 352-564-0795




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
(904) 757-1012

must sell!
Lecanto FI 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079
Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $56,400. Call
352-638-0905


Your World





CRNICLE


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination." Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
'Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


LAND AUCTION -
Greenbrier County,
WV. 1,894+/- acres
pasture and timber
land offered in 24
tracts. Barns & out
buildings for cattle
operations. One
tract has a beautiful
8 bedroom house
with indoor pool.
Open and wooded
land with magnifi-
cent views. Auction
Thursday, May 30 in
Lewisburg, WV.
Woltz & Associates,
Inc., Roanoke, VA,
Real Estate Brokers
& Auctioneers
(Wv#1000). Goto
www.woltz.com or
call 800-551-3588 for
property and auc-
tion details.




2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/ 3/18' rollups
office tlr & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862







2,240 SF

on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. May 16th,
12PM
Preview From 11am
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com












PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 h w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840

For Salenoe
Nicest 2/1 in Beverly
Hills MUST SEE!! You
won't find a nicer
home in this price
range looks and feels
brand new with over
$25K in upgrades.
Large new 12' x 24'
shed in rear with of-
fice and work shop.
Completely renovated
insulated windows,
new oak kitchen
cabinets,new bath-
room tile, berber car-
pet, 3D shingles.Large
Florida room (can be
3rd bedroom)
"$54,900 with easy
terms". This house
shows as new
it won't last long!
More info here
http://www.sharphome.c
om/131313
call Troy 352-364-6316
REMODELED 2/1.5/1
NEW: Roof, kitchen,
appl's, bath, flooring,
paint, much more.,
1240sf, under AC.
$59,900. (352)527-1239



LECANTO
(Black Diamond)
3/2/2 Gated Golf Com-
munity with amenities
$120K posss rent
opt)352-804-9729
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 282-1550




INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM



FLORAL CITY
Withlapoka Island
3/2/2 w/fire place, Ig
yard, dock on main ca-
nal, completely furn.
$1000 mth,1st, last,
$500 Sec. Bk gr/credit
ck Req. 321-303-2875


Get

Results in

the

homefront

classifiedsI


H
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

WmNr
REALTY ONE


L.QQk
I'm Gorgeous Inside!!!
Big & Beautiful, 3/2/2
Near 7 Rivers Golf
Course 305 N Pompeo
Ave $149,900.
Call Nancy Wilson
For Appt. to see
352-422-4137
Waybright
Real Estates, Inc.




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RFIK
REALTY ONE




2/2/2, Part time or
year round, $82,000
Open plan, carpet,
tile, bright, cheerful,
clean. Realtor/Owner
(352) 697-0295

For Sale v~r
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241


K^U


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
Wood Floors, Tile and
Carpet. 2 Car GarSS
Appl. fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


SMW
3/3/2, courtyard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978
^Mj^^^f


BETTY J.
POWELL
Realtor

"Your Success is my
goal.. Making
Friends along the
way is my reward !"

BUYING OR
SELLING

CALL ME
352-422-6417
bipowell@
netscape.com
ERA American
Realty & Investments


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus .com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!







DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real EstateL...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


SPECIAL *
New Home in
Quiet neighborhd.
3/2/2, on I acre
2932 sf. corner lot,
$269,900.
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant






For Sale %4
Lake Panasoffkee
5BR/2BA 2,200 SF CB
Home w/3 lots, C/H/A,
fenced yd, 2 car gar,
close to lake. $140,000
Call 352/5694026





Inverness, Regency Pk
2/2, fireplace, 1st floor
community pool
$48,900 352-637-6993






"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


516 S. TUCK POINT
2/1/1 Block Home,
Remodeled, New
Everything, Canal to
Withlacoochee River
Priced to Sell
Immediately! $64,900
(352) 503-6703



HAVE IT ALL
Spring Water, Fish from
Dock, Watch the
Manatees from porch,
walk to festivals, enjoy
living in dwntn Crystal
River, gated community,
2/2 Condo w/gar.
$249,900, ownerlic. RE
Broker 352-257-9496
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNature-Coast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906




VouI\\orld tirit

Need a job
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

C O.N. IlE
Classifieds
,, IIIIIIo l l i onI


SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013 Ell









E12 SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2013


CANAL TO LAKE PANASOFFKEE..
L,.)...i ,..... I I ilh h,,.....n. I..lh i I.. ,.. ,, i..

. p, .1.l i |. i.il' l i. ,V f L... -...


M1l .il ihi ASKING $110,000
Call lildlaid Pickiel at 201 9871 to I.,eiI


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DMuEErUL num =ima lum wU
" ,\IIH fII ~: ~ I I_ l Ii iI (I I.H 1-: 1: E
fl ,ll.i KInIn 1 l-lfrll ;T lh ;.ll., h, s,'.
. h I..Ijul i'd iI ,.. II .Vi I(I IIH


ASKING $214,900
Pit D, ,352' 212 7280


WATEHFOUNT




..II i l I \l. H ,',, ,,' 3. II., 1, ll 1),. ..,i ,,.,
i,,,,, ill ,,, $130,000
Ruth fiedeinck / 352 563 6866


ON DOUBLE LOT






ASKING $63,800
Pi h i 2 ,,, 212 7280
P[? D4ti ,13511 212 i280
rI ls I,#ng II II II c21/p 1d#,, ,;.>


* t., ,.....n. t ilh I. II Il, i,.,
* rj.. ,, Mi. i ,,. i,,., I.
$115,000 = '- ii
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
hilltop: i''i citluscountsold. coin


$99,900 TURN KEY HOME!
i ','..... a \.lli. h. I 2 hi I L3.-jhri
l.1 ,'h , ] .i i n: l I" ,, i. '. I, i lli -' ..I i ll



i...i ,' Pal 3 = ; tl63 1
Mar' Parsons t3521 634 1273


CELINA HILLS





N1 ll. ,( ifi. $160,000
Call Jim Mi ton 422 2173
to see this lovely home







PRICE REDUCTION
TiAo Chielland Commetcial Buildings'
II l[jE rt, 1..-.1 i r.. lI,... l,. i ").. 1, I
..l..... e III I f
* u I., ...J -.. l I I


. II. I Ini I IlI I -i l r, I I lli, II I

1i. '=. I i1llw- il ONLY 5193,000
Call [lias G Kniallah at 3524002635


JUST REDUCED



..i $71,500
Call Maitha Snydei 352 476 8727
and ask lot file =701408


WATERFRONT LIKE NEW

i_-il i l, f_- ,OR IS3r. 4. I. m I.. 4 ..


C all D iS I l352 4i I.2 4 .6

CAll DORIS lillNER 352 422 4627


NEWLY PRICED: GORGEOUS WATER!





i L.) i ') ,..l, 1,,II .. H, i ,L., M l. ;ln l l. l'

NOW $119,900
Ask loir #.ldi / Booth 637 4904


LEASE OPTION

" l .. I. .. h
* I I..1.11 I...I nI- i. i,.) \,,,\I h. ..I ,


= .1ii $159,900
Je.inne Pickrel 212 3410
hutp III n ciltuscounnusold corn











SUPER LOCATION
rM1 [Tor ,iF E FHE 1.1E ; ,,.F 1i,, -1 i2 .....
V I, I.. .... .1 ,' Il l,,, il h I...i.i..... i

,, ,) ...., il ASKING $59,900
Pit Di, ,352' 212 7280


INVERNESS TRIPLEX



MI= ': u $240,000
Call Jim Motion to see this
investment popeitl' at 422 2173








WATERFRONT, POOL L
HOME WITH DOCK I, f 11: 1 i:J I:.

., I .. .l I I I
.I .... I ,, I 1. ,1 I ,
I, I :1:1 I I; I I II. I ,, 1 : I INf i .
1ii 1 = ASKING $159,900
Pit Di ,,352 212 7280
I ..1 h: nii iiL ii /L2f!L dt1 Li!m


CAREFREE LIVING AT IT'S BEST
r. h ll. ll. 1.1- i .H 1,,1,,,, L, il 1 -.. I..


hi, L" "I" m I fI 1 m Ihq'
.l: = ii Ii. ASKING $67,900
C.ill N.ncl Jenks
352 400 8072 cell 352 726 6668 police


I , -h jI-

* i.i) ........ .I

= ;ii $169,500
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
httllp: '' 'r. citiuscounltsold. coming


OPEN WATERFRONT
ON HERNANDO LAKE ,,,, ......,,,,



.11 1 , ,,,, I I lh
rii = :I. $159,000
C11n Ce fiteqe it 4766549


PRICE REDUCED!
1 .,j L,.ii ., i. .... ,, r ;I: HF', i.,, i..,I


, i i i,,, ........ $123,500
CJ.1 Ou.ide feesei 352 302 7699


GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB

..- i l i ..i ... ..I .
Il. = 'lit.. h,,. i,, 11 $134,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


HIGHLANDS HOME



$59,900
Tei} R BI/.ico 4/9 9252


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