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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03114


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MAY 7, 2013 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOL. 118 ISSUE 273 50 CITRUS COUNTY NBA playoffs: Heat open second-round series /B1 www.chronicleonline.com HIGH 80 LOW 52 Partly cloudy. Cool and breezy. PAGE A4 TODAY& next morning TUESDAY INDEX Classifieds . . . .C10 Comics . . . . .C9 Crossword . . . .C8 Community . . . .C7 Editorial . . . . .A8 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C9 Obituaries . . . .A6 TV Listings . . . .C8 000ETTU Prior allegations against mother unfounded M IKE W RIGHT Staff writerNo hint, not a single one. No scratches or bruises. Allegations of child abuse not supported. By all documented accounts, Aliyahs Branums motherhad cared for her child. Department of Children and Families officials said there was nothing to predict Chelsea Huggettmight kill her 2-yearold child in a rage April 26, as she is alleged to have done. DCF on Monday released Three Sisters access at least a year away A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerThe expected crush of visitors to a 57acre parcel on Kings Bay where manatees come in the dozens to nurture, especially in the winter, will have to wait another year or more for access. Three Sisters Springs, with its crystal-clear waters and consistent 72-degree water temperatures, is a favorite gathering spot for manatees and has recently been the subject of a National Geographic article. The property surrounding the springs, part of the Kings Bay manatee refuge, is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and owned by the City of Crystal River and the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Recently, theres been an increase in calls for the property to be made accessible to the public especially in light of the publicity the area has been getting and because it has a boardwalk where visitors can perch and watch the sea cows. While acknowledging the need for public access, officials are in favor of a more graduated process of opening up the property. Refuge Manager Michael Lusk of USFWS listed the following as prerequisites for public access: An entrance road from Cutler Spur Boulevard has to be constructed. Lusk said the Federal Department of Transportation recently approved a $700,000 grant for that project. The city of Crystal River is reworking Cutler Spur and expects to have that work done by the end of 2013 or early 2014. Southwest Florida Water Management District is set to begin work on a wetland area on the property. The wetland is expected to catch storm water runoff and cleanse it before it enters the bay. That work is expected to be done sometime in the middle of 2014. Lusk wants to construct a parking lot according to the specifications of the planned development of the property with a walking trail leading to the boardwalk. Ideally, we would like to see it open Project spans more than 2,400 pages, 788,000 words Associated PressPHILMONT, N.Y.I n the beginning, Phillip Patterson decided to write out every word in the Bible. On empty pages, he wrote of Adam, an ark, locusts, loaves, fishes and the resurrection. Four years of work begat more than 2,400 pages. Now, as he copies the last words of the last book, Patterson sees all that he has created. And it is good. Patterson, 63, is a retired interior designer who is neither monkish nor zealous. He goes to church but has never been particularly religious. Health issues including AIDS and anemia have sent him to the hospital and slowed the work. But he has always been curious. One day in 2007, his longtime partner, Mohammad, mentioned that Islam has a tradition of writing out the Quran. Patterson replied that the Bible was too long. Mohammad said, well then, Patterson should do it. The Bibles exact word count depends on who is doing the tallying, but multiple sources put the King James version at around 788,000 words. Every day as I write, I discover something new and it expands my mind more and more, Patterson said. Not so I can become more of a religious person, but so that I can become more of a whole person. Patterson will finish up the final lines of the Book of Revelation during a ceremony at his church, St. Peters Presbyterian, on May 11. Man handwrites King James Bible in four years Associated Press Phillip Patterson transcribes the King James Bible last month at this home in Philmont, N.Y. DCF: No sign of abuse Chelsea Huggett charged with first-degree murder. Phillip Patterson finishing project on May 11. MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Public access to the Three Sisters Springs property was tightly restricted for decades when it was privately owned. The area is still highly regulated after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took over managing the property. The USFWS now estimates the property could be open to the public in 2014. Road work needed before springs property can be opened to the public See SPRINGS / Page A2 County calls for investigation C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff WriterA first event at Citrus Countys Central Landfill a free disposal day on Saturday may be connected to a fire that broke out Sunday, according to county staff. Whether this is the case could be revealed in an investigation that has been requested. Free disposal was offered following a suggestion earlier this Fire may be connected to disposal day See FIRE / Page A2 See DEATH / Page A11

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year at a meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, said Lindsay Ubinas, public information officer for the county. The first-time event was popular with county residents, who ordinarily have to pay a $4 transaction fee per visit and other rates by weight depending on materials. They had over 1,200 customers in one day, Ubinas said. They also got rid of more than 20 boats. Assistant County Administrator Ken Frink, who also is the public works director, has asked Fire Chief Larry Morabito to conduct an investigation himself or facilitate an investigation by whoever Morabito would think is appropriate to investigate both Sundays fire and the fire from March 10 to determine if there has been any intentional wrongdoing, Ubinas said. In addition, Frink has asked if Morabito can provide any assistance from the state Fire Marshals Office to conduct an independent review. Although requested, it remains to be determined whether it will be granted. Frinks actions were not based in any particular suspicion, Ubinas said. He said it just appears to be a trash fire, Ubinas responded. Its in the area, apparently, of where all the trash was disposed of on Saturday on the free disposal day. Thats where this area was. Conceding that two fires in two months could appear suspicious, Ubinas said Frink knew people would raise questions, so he took the initiative to pursue an investigation. Saturdays first-time free disposal day at the landfill coincided with a free day for disposing of household hazardous waste materials, an event scheduled several times a year. Ubinas said investigators would be asked to consider whether some flammable materials such as oil or fuel, particularly as so many boats were deposited into the landfill cell had not been correctly consigned. The March 10 fire started below surface and burned part of the cell liner, repairs to which are expected to start soon. Sundays fire started on the surface of waste materials in the cell and was soon extinguished. Ubinas said county administrators had not drawn a connection between the two fires since they appeared dissimilar in origin, but have requested investigations of both to learn as much as can be known about how they occurred. Damage to the cell liner in the March 10 fire initially was estimated at $500,000. Sundays fire, however, caused no structural damage to the cell, according to Casey Stephens, director of the Division of Solid Waste Management. No personal injuries have been reported for either fire. Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer @chronicleonline.com. A2 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! TERMITE & PEST CONTROL (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS 406 N.E. 1ST ST., CRYSTAL RIVER SERVICE TO FIT ANY BUDGET: ONCE A YEAR QUARTERLY MONTHLY A complete inspection of the interior and the exterior of your property. Removal of kitchen and bathroom switch plates and place a barrier into wall voids to prevent insects from invading your property. Baits are placed in all cracks and crevices in the kitchen and bathroom area. Treatment around and under appliances such as dishwasher, refrigerator, washer and dryer. Treatment of attic or crawl spaces. QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE INTRODUCTORY 1ST SERVICE STARTING AT BUY 3, GET 1 GUARANTEED TO BEAT OUR COMPETITORS PRICES www.CitrusPest.com LICENSED & INSURED #8688 000ETMM A+ RA TING 2012 2012 2012 2012 HELP HAS ARRIVED! 000ESZ5 License #DN 17606 G e n e r a l & C o s m e t i c D e n t i s t r y H O N E S T P R O F E S S I O N A L C O M P A S S I O N A T E G e n e r a l & C o s m e t i c D e n t i s t r y General & Cosmetic Dentistry H O N E S T P R O F E S S I O N A L C O M P A S S I O N A T E HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Experience the Difference Whether youre looking for a smile makeover or a cleaning our friendly staff will make you feel comfortable without the sales tactics or the lecture. We Cater to Cowards! FREE SECOND OPINION Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 Ledgerdentistry.com 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000ES3O 000EU8T 000EVDM Are Moles and Gophers Killing Your Lawn? WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES GUARANTEED! Call today for a free lawn analysis. The Gopher & Mole Patrol 352-279-9444 000ETIZ GOT DEBT? Bankruptcy may help! Call us for a free consultation. Paul Militello P.A. (352) 637-2222 107 B. West Main St. Inverness, FL to the public by the winter season of 2014, but I cant guarantee it. Its a goal, Lusk added. We all want the public to be able to come use the boardwalk and access the property from land. Maybe that would reduce some of the congestion to the springs from the water, but we have to get some these things done first, he said. Crystal River City Manager Andy Houston said he too favors a graduated process for public access, but would like to see the property become accessible as soon as possible. Houston said he knows Lusk can only work with the resources he is given, but I hope the regional office folks understand that public access was an important part of the deal when they decided to manage the property. Both Lusk and Houston, however, agree that the property should not be open to the public without supervision, which some advocates of public access have suggested. Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352564-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com. SPRINGS Continued from Page A1 FIRE Continued from Page A1 ... Frink knew people would raise questions, so he took the iniative to pursue an investigation.

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Around the STATE Citrus County Church gets hefty donations As of Monday, thanks to generous people in Citrus County, Mount Carmel Methodist Church in Floral City received $4,300 toward the $10,000 being sought for much-needed repairs to the church. Donations included two $2,000 checks. Longtime church member Alida Langley said shes so excited she hasnt stopped screaming and thanking God and the people of Citrus County. However, Saturdays story on Page A2 of the Chronicle Community helping restore historic church, contained an incorrect phone number. For information or to offer help, call Greg Kell at 352-7267335 or Alida Langley at 352-726-1989. A trust has been set up at Brannen Bank. Make checks payable to Mount Carmel Methodist Church of Floral City Inc., Building Fund. Donations can be made at any Brannen Bank branch. Fire MSBU on agenda today The Citrus County Commission meet at 1 p.m. today at the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100, in Inverness to discuss a fire assessment program.The fire services municipal services benefit unit would be an alternative funding source for the 2014 budget. Government Services Group Inc. and Nabors, Giblin & Nickerson will present the fire assessment program to the board. This meeting is open to the public and citizens can make public comments and ask any questions after the presentation and commissioner discussion. GOP club to meet Saturday Anne Black from HPH Hospice will be the guest speaker at the Saturday, May 11, meeting of the Nature Coast Republican Club. The meeting begins at 9 a.m. at the American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River.Pensacola Two charged in mans deathA 22-year-old Florida girl has been charged with homicide after a mans body was found stuffed in the trunk of a car outside a motel near Pensacola. Escambia County Sheriffs deputies said family members discovered 43year-old Harvey Ray Smiths body Saturday after spotting his vehicle outside a motel. According to an arrest report, Debra Burge told investigators she asked Smith to her residence so Zachary Vance Greer could rob him. She said Greer killed Smith and placed his body in the trunk. From staff and wire reports S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerINVERNESS A 67-year-old Hernando man authorities said was caught with his pants down and charged with lewd and lascivious conduct involving a then6-year-old boy was sentenced to life in prison after a jury trial. Gerald Stefan Edwards, of East Wacker Street, was convicted last week on four counts sexual battery on someone younger than 12 years old, lewd and lascivious molestation and lewd and lascivious exhibition. Three of the charges carried maximum life sentences. Circuit Judge Ric Howard sentenced Edwards to 40 years in prison and 100 years of probation. He was also tagged a sexual predator. When Edwards was first arrested last July, a witness reported they found him in a room with the door closed, standing in front of the boy with his pants down to knee level. The witness told investigators Edwards was trying to pull up his pants. Edwards had said his pants were too big and would often fall down whenever he stands. According to Edwards arrest affidavit, the boy told investigators Edwards performed lewd acts in front of him. The boy reportedly told the witness Edwards also touched him inappropriately. Besides his explanation about the loose pants, Edwards reportedly told investigators he would often lie in bed with the boy to watch cartoons. He denied performing a lewd act in front of the boy, but admitted to scratching his private parts with his pants on. Edwards was unsure about whether the boy had ever seen him naked and couldnt recall if he ever touched the boys private parts. The boy reportedly told investigators that was the first time Edwards behaved inappropriately toward him. Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe can be reached at 352-5642925 or asidibe@chronicle online.com. Man sentenced in child-sex case Gerald Edwards sentenced to 40 years in prison. C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff writerPets are going public in Citrus County. Just about every weekend ahead, residents can expect to see dogs and cats at community events and shopping areas. Volunteers are behind the effort of getting the pets out of the Citrus County Animal Services shelter to reach out for new homes. So many people have no idea where the shelter is, what kind of animals we have here, that we have a shot clinic where they can bring their own pets for immunizations here, said Kelly Gill, volunteer outreach coordinator for the shelter. Its really been great to let them know what we have to offer. The bonus is that we can allow them to adopt animals on site at these events. On Saturday, Gill and other volunteers took several dogs and cats to Kmart in Inverness, where they could be seen and adopted by shoppers. Gill was hired late last year as part of the countys Strive for Life program to get more animals out of the shelter and into homes, with fewer having to be euthanized. Gill works to coordinate outreach activities throughout the county. Another part of the program is operating a mobile adoption unit to increase public awareness and raise adoption rates. Animal Services acquired a retired transit bus that is being modified for adoption unit use, and Gill will be its driver. Weve just finished the artwork on it and we hope to get it back in a week or so, Gill said. When the bus is ready, Gill said volunteers will be able to get more animals out to the public. Even without the use of the bus, the volunteers are getting close to 10 animals at a time to an event. Each event features an assortment of dogs and cats, puppies and kittens, different sizes and ages. Volunteers have been making the program work, but it can always use more help. While quite a few dog walkers have pitched in as volunteers right now to exercise and clean up after dogs, Gill said the shelter could use more volunteers to take care of the cats. Weve been having an orientation every month, Gill said. We always still need dog walkers. We definitely need volunteers to help with our cats to help socialize them and help cleaning their kennels as well. Brush them. Get them out of their crates and spend some time with them. If you want to volunteer, call 352-746-8400 or go to the website www.citruscritters.com.Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer@chronicle online.com. FUTURE ADOPTION EVENTS 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May 17, Beverly Hills Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 18, Walmart, Homosassa. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 25, Walmart, Homosassa. 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 25, Beverly Hills Flea Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 15, Kmart, Inverness. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, June 21, Beverly Hills Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 29, Walmart, Homosassa. Take home a new friend Adoption events help raise awareness about animals in need of homes STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the Chronicle Kelly Gill, volunteer outreach coordinator for Citrus County Animal Services, holds Hank, an American Staffordshire terrier Sat urday morning in Inverness. She and her crew from Animal Services brought several cats and dogs to Kmart in Inverness for adoption as well as to help make people aware of the various services the shelter offers. M IKE W RIGHT Staff writerTwo members of the Citrus County Hospital Board are in limbo after the state Senate adjourned Friday without confirming them. Michael Bays and Robert Priselac will continue to serve 45 days, unless Gov. Rick Scott appoints someone else to replace them. They would continue another year if Scott reappoints them. If Scott appoints no one, Bays and Priselac will leave the board. With Gene Davis recent resignation, that would reduce the board to only two members Debbie Ressler and Krista Joseph and mean the board would be unable to meet, because three members are required for a quorum. Neither Bays nor Priselac received notice from Sen. Charlie Deans office that their confirmation was in peril. Dean, R-Inverness, had said Davis would not be confirmed because he voted against the hospital board appealing a governance lawsuit with the hospital foundation to the Florida Supreme Court. Dean could not be reached for comment. Scott appointed Priselac in June; he appointed Bays, Davis and Joseph in September. If Scott reappoints Priselac and Bays, they would serve until the Senate confirmation hearings in 2014. Priselac said he believes Scott will reappoint him, though he said he hasnt had any communication with the governors office. I think God has a reason why things happen when they do, he said. Theres a reason to this. Both Bays and Priselac said they will continue working as if there will be no interruption. Were in the middle of a lot of important stuff, Bays said. Right now the boards still a board. The hospital board is seeking proposals to possibly sell or lease Citrus Memorial hospital. Priselac, who has led that effort on the boards behalf, said the confirmation mystery will not stop that process. I dont think we skip a beat, he said. You have to fulfill what you feel is a mission and take whatever comes across, deal with it, and move on. This is not even a setback. Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicleonline.com. BONDS GET DOWNGRADE Fitch Ratings has downgraded Citrus Memorial hospitals 2002 bonds from BBto B. Fitch cited the Citrus Memorial Health Foundations ongoing legal battles for control with the Citrus County Hospital Board and the lack of tax money provided to the hospital by the CCHB. The downgrade also reflects SunTrust Banks decision to give Citrus Memorial until April 2014 to repay $6 million in bonds. It is the third straight year Fitch dropped Citrus Memorials bond ratings. Bays, Priselac apparently off hospital board Senate doesnt confirm appointments

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Birthday In the year ahead, you are likely to get an opportunity to take over two endeavors that have been started by others. You could turn them both into winners. Taurus (April 20-May 20) You may be holding all the trump cards, but youre not likely to use this power unjustly. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because someone has helped you when you needed it in the past, your compassion is easily aroused. Admirably, youll be the first to respond to someone in need. Cancer (June 21-July 22) An issue of personal interest might also appeal to your friends. Although they may not know how to turn it into a group endeavor, you do. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Focusing on the virtues rather than the shortcomings of friends will not only boost their egos, but also make you very popular. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Youre basically a very imaginative person to begin with, but today that will be even more so. To your credit, youll put your ideas to work. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Because youll strive to treat others as fairly as possible, things will work out quite well. Friends and colleagues will respond in kind. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) An enterprising friend is likely to provide you with some helpful tips. Use them to extract even more juice from an already profitable situation. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Dont be surprised if you derive an unexpected bonus from help that you render to another. Youll set a wonderful example, and the right people will notice. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Even though your needs are important, they wont be more so than those of your loved ones. Youll figure out a way to help both your family and yourself. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Outward appearances might affect how your associates view things, but not you. Youll know how to dig deep beneath the surface and deal with root causes. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) One of your greatest assets is your ability to adjust quickly to changing conditions. Aries (March 21-April 19) You might be in a money-making mood, but try to profit for the benefit of others, not yourself. Youll get the most satisfaction from indulging your charitable inTodays HOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, May 7, the 127th day of 2013. There are 238 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 7, 1763, Pontiac, chief of the Ottawa Indians, attempted to lead a sneak attack on British-held Fort Detroit, but was foiled because the British had been tipped off in advance. (The Ottawa Indians and other tribes then launched an all-out war with the British that came to be known as Pontiacs War.) On this date: In 1915, nearly 1,200 people died when a German torpedo sank the British liner RMS Lusitania off the Irish coast. In 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims, France, ending its role in World War II. In 1954, the 55-day Battle of Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam ended with Vietnamese insurgents overrunning French forces. In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford formally declared an end to the Vietnam era. In Ho Chi Minh City formerly Saigon the Viet Cong celebrated its takeover. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush ordered the lifting of sanctions against Iraq, and called on members of the U.N. Security Council to do the same. Five years ago: Dmitry Medvedev was sworn in as Russias president. One year ago: Education Secretary Arne Duncan broke ranks with the White House, stating his unequivocal support for same-sex marriage one day after Vice President Joe Biden suggested on NBC that he supported gay marriage as well. Todays Birthdays: Rock musician Bill Kreutzmann (Grateful Dead) is 67. Rock musician Prairie Prince is 63. Actress Traci Lords is 45. Singer Eagle-Eye Cherry is 42. Thought for Today: We all live in suspense, from day to day, from hour to hour; in other words, we are the hero of our own story. Mary McCarthy, American author (19121989). Today in HISTORY C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE HI LO PR 71 60 NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 74 59 NA HI LO PR 74 60 NA HI LO PR 75 58 NA HI LO PR 71 54 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly Cloudy. Maybe a slight chance of a shower. Cool and breezy.THREE DAY OUTLOOK More sunshine. A little warmer. Sunshine continues. Warmth returns.High: 80 Low: 52 High: 83 Low: 54 High: 85 Low: 56 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 74/59 Record 97/50 Normal 87/59 Mean temp. 67 Departure from mean -6 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.50 in. Total for the year 5.80 in. Normal for the year 12.91 in.*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 11 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 51 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 49% POLLEN COUNT** Trees were moderate, grasses were light and weeds were absent. ** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:10 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:43 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................5:08 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................6:16 P.M. MAY 9MAY 18MAY 25MAY 31 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 79 59 pc Ft. Lauderdale 84 68 s Fort Myers 84 62 s Gainesville 78 54 pc Homestead 84 64 s Jacksonville 77 56 pc Key West 82 71 pc Lakeland 82 61 pc Melbourne 81 61 pc City H L Fcast Miami 83 67 s Ocala 79 56 pc Orlando 81 60 pc Pensacola 76 60 pc Sarasota 79 63 pc Tallahassee 78 53 pc Tampa 80 64 pc Vero Beach 81 60 s W. Palm Bch. 82 64 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESWest winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy skies today. Gulf water temperature77 LAKE LEVELS Location Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a 27.82 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 37.06 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a 37.73 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a 38.82 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 74 42 s 78 52 Albuquerque 69 55 pc 75 52 Asheville 63 52 .11 ts 62 47 Atlanta 67 44 .39 pc 70 54 Atlantic City 59 43 sh 67 54 Austin 75 45 pc 85 61 Baltimore 63 47 .02 sh 68 57 Billings 73 40 pc 76 47 Birmingham 61 47 .45 pc 73 52 Boise 79 50 ts 79 51 Boston 53 43 s 71 52 Buffalo 76 52 pc 77 52 Burlington, VT 79 51 s 79 55 Charleston, SC 74 56 ts 74 56 Charleston, WV 66 56 .34 sh 66 53 Charlotte 71 55 1.60 ts 68 51 Chicago 70 53 pc 66 49 Cincinnati 64 54 .28 ts 72 55 Cleveland 72 53 pc 69 54 Columbia, SC 72 57 ts 68 54 Columbus, OH 69 56 .01 ts 73 55 Concord, N.H. 73 30 s 79 45 Dallas 77 48 pc 84 59 Denver 66 35 ts 65 41 Des Moines 75 47 pc 76 54 Detroit 73 48 pc 72 51 El Paso 81 63 pc 84 64 Evansville, IN 67 52 .05 pc 73 54 Harrisburg 66 39 sh 70 56 Hartford 71 46 pc 78 51 Houston 79 49 pc 83 63 Indianapolis 66 53 .15 ts 73 56 Jackson 67 50 pc 76 55 Las Vegas 78 61 pc 75 56 Little Rock 73 53 pc 77 55 Los Angeles 68 59 .12 sh 66 57 Louisville 69 55 .04 ts 73 55 Memphis 64 54 .02 pc 74 56 Milwaukee 66 46 pc 61 49 Minneapolis 74 46 pc 73 53 Mobile 70 45 pc 78 56 Montgomery 64 45 pc 74 53 Nashville 64 50 .06 pc 72 52 New Orleans 74 50 pc 78 63 New York City 68 46 pc 71 58 Norfolk 72 55 ts 69 56 Oklahoma City 72 44 pc 78 57 Omaha 67 48 ts 72 52 Palm Springs 77 60 trace pc 76 62 Philadelphia 69 45 sh 73 57 Phoenix 86 69 pc 84 63 Pittsburgh 70 47 sh 71 55 Portland, ME 58 35 s 69 46 Portland, Ore 81 53 s 76 50 Providence, R.I. 68 45 s 72 52 Raleigh 67 55 1.41 ts 71 54 Rapid City 69 29 ts 71 47 Reno 61 50 ts 62 47 Rochester, NY 74 50 s 78 54 Sacramento 75 58 c 74 52 St. Louis 69 54 pc 75 56 St. Ste. Marie 74 37 s 75 46 Salt Lake City 75 60 ts 67 48 San Antonio 75 52 pc 83 63 San Diego 66 60 .20 sh 65 59 San Francisco 68 59 c 69 51 Savannah 76 51 .96 ts 74 55 Seattle 86 54 s 72 52 Spokane 81 50 s 83 51 Syracuse 77 44 s 79 52 Topeka 69 51 ts 74 55 Washington 64 52 sh 67 57YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 90 The Dalles, Ore. LOW 23 Stanley, Idaho TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 89/75/s Amsterdam 75/51/r Athens 85/63/s Beijing 84/65/pc Berlin 79/58/pc Bermuda 71/66/pc Cairo 95/66/pc Calgary 55/43/pc Havana 89/68/pc Hong Kong 81/76/c Jerusalem 80/64/s Lisbon 70/57/sh London 72/54/pc Madrid 76/59/c Mexico City 79/52/ts Montreal 79/59/s Moscow 63/45/s Paris 73/55/sh Rio 73/64/pc Rome 66/56/pc Sydney 70/57/c Tokyo 63/53/s Toronto 72/50/pc Warsaw 81/59/pc WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 5:03 a/12:39 a 4:47 p/12:38 p 5:48 a/1:22 a 5:18 p/1:15 p Crystal River** 3:24 a/10:00 a 3:08 p/10:44 p 4:09 a/10:37 a 3:39 p/11:22 p Withlacoochee* 1:11 a/7:48 a 12:55 p/8:32 p 1:56 a/8:25 a 1:26 p/9:10 p Homosassa*** 4:13 a/11:37 a 3:57 p/ 4:58 a/12:21 a 4:28 p/12:14 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 5/7 TUESDAY 4:00 10:12 4:23 10:35 5/8 WEDNESDAY 4:43 10:54 5:06 11:18 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 76 60 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. E NTERTAINMENT ABBA museum opens in Stockholm STOCKHOLM ABBA wants to be remembered for more than just catchy hits. A museum opens in Stockholm on Tuesday to show off band paraphernalia, including the helicopter featured on the cover of their Arrival album, a star-shaped guitar and dozens of glitzy costumes the Swedish band wore at the height of its 1970s fame. But some gear is definitely not on show. Band member Bjorn Ulveaus said certain items are forever lost, conceding only that they are embarrassing tight costumes he wore when he was slightly overweight. He declined to say more. Some 40 sets of the trademark shiny flares, platform boots and knitted hats are on display. Visitors can try on costumes, record music videos and sing such hits as Dancing Queen and Mamma Mia in a studio. Bill Clinton pitched Zeppelin reunion NEW YORK Its a diplomatic failure at the highest level: Bill Clinton couldnt get Led Zeppelin to reunite. The CBS Minutes Overtime webcast reported Monday that the former president was enlisted to ask the British rock gods to get back together last year for the superstorm Sandy benefit concert in New York City. He asked, they said no. David Saltzman of the Robin Hood Foundation said he and film executive Harvey Weinstein flew to Washington to ask Clinton to make the plea. Led Zeppelins surviving members Robert Plant John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page were in Washington just before the Sandy concert for the Kennedy Center Honors. Justin Bieber faces copyright lawsuit NORFOLK, Va. Two Virginia songwriters are suing Justin Bieber and Usher for $10 million for copyright infringement. Devin Copeland and Mareio Overton claim Biebers song Somebody to Love contains numerous lyrical and stylistic similarities to the song they wrote in 2008 by the same name. The duo filed a lawsuit Thursday in federal court in Norfolk, Va., claiming numerous producers conspired to copy their song. A message left Monday with a law firm representing Bieber was not immediately returned. The lawsuit said Copeland and Overton provided a copy of their song to musical promoters, who in turn provided it to representatives of Usher.Judge: Hagar did not defame woman IOWA CITY, Iowa A judge said rocker Sammy Hagar did not defame a Playboy bunny with whom he allegedly fathered a child when he accused her of extortion in his memoir. U.S. District Judge Linda Reade last week dismissed a lawsuit filed by the Iowa woman, identified as Jane Doe in court documents. The woman claimed she and Hagar had an affair in the 1980s and that she became pregnant with his child in 1988. The child died shortly after birth in 1989. In his 2011 memoir, Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock, Hagar denied fathering the child and accused the woman of extorting him for money. From wire reports Associated Press Shania Twain has announced 22 new show dates this fall to round out the first year of her two-year Las Vegas Strip residency. Twain told The Associated Press Monday the show at Caesars Palace is a dream performance scenario that allows her to balance her roles as a mother and as a country superstar. A4 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68* 1 year: $121.87* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946 Report a news tip:Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken .......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories .................................... Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Todays active pollen: Oak, Grasses, Hickory Todays count: 4.2/12 Wednesdays count: 5.2 Thursdays count: 5.1 000ER89 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . . . . C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . . . . . C12

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 A5 000EQG3 352-860-1100 352-628-9909 352-564-8000 2240 W. Hwy. 44 Inverness (Across from Outback) Crystal River Mall Crystal River (Next to JC Penney) 3944 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa (Across from Homosassa Wildlife State Park) 3 Convenient Locations Alzheimers Disease and Dementia ARE YOU AT RISK? According to a new study by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institute on Aging, men and women with hearing loss are much more likely to develop dementia and Alzheimers disease. People with severe hearing loss, the study reports, were 5 times more likely to develop dementia than those with normal hearing. Have you noticed a change in your ability to remember? The more hearing loss you have, the greater the likelihood of developing dementia or Alzheimers disease. Hearing aids could delay or prevent dementia by improving the patients hearing. 2011 Study by John Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institute on Aging FREE Hearing Tests Reveals if and when you need hearing assistance and is recommended for everyone over 50 years old. FREE Ear Canal Inspections* Sometimes its nothing more than excessive earwax. We use our state-of-the-art Video Otoscope to look inside your ear canal. You can watch on a video monitor as it happens. FREE HEARING AID REPAIRS! ANY MAKE OR MODEL (In-Store Repairs Only) OFFER GOOD MAY 7-10, 2013 NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. WOW! $ 695 CUSTOM FULL SHELL 100% Fixed Chip Digital FITS UP TO A 40 DB LOSS NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. AVAILABILITY LIMITED TO THE FIRST 20 PATIENTS MAY 7-10, 2013 TRY BEFORE YOU BUY 4 WEEK FACTORY TRIAL ABSOLUTELY FREE!

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Gloria Bruce, 89BEVERLY HILLSThe Service of Remembrance for Mrs. Gloria E. Bruce, age 89, of Beverly Hills, Florida, will be held 11:00 AM, Friday, May 10, 2013 at the St. Annes Episcopal Church, Crystal River, FL. Interment will follow at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida. The family will receive friends from 4:00 PM 6:00 PM, Thursday at the Beverly Hills Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes. The family requests expressions of sympathy take the form of memorial donations to HPH Hospice Foundation, Citrus Office, 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465-3503 or the Alzheimers Association, 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneral Home.com. Gloria was born on December 28, 1923 in Bangor, Maine, the daughter of E. Merle Bailey and Elizabeth Lambert Bailey. She died on Saturday, May 4, 2013 in the loving care of her husband, Bob, daughter, Elizabeth and HPH Hospice. She graduated from Bangor High School in 1942 and then from Farmington State Normal School, now the University of Maine at Farmington, in 1945. She taught the elementary grades for many years in Maine, Michigan and New York. In 1948 she married Robert W. Bruce while he was in the Navy. After his service they both attended Michigan State College. While in Michigan she had her first two children, son, Robert, Jr. and daughter, Elizabeth. She later had a son, Douglas on Long Island. In 1954 they moved to Levittown, Long Island and for many years she was a substitute teacher. A life time Episcopalian, she attended St. Johns Episcopal Church in Bangor, ME; singing in the junior choir with her to be husband, Robert. She was very active in the Episcopal Dioceses of Long Island while attending St. Francis of Assisi Church in Levittown. At St. Francis she was a choir member and formed and directed the junior choir. She was an active worker in the Altar Guild and Episcopal Church Women. Serving on the Vestry, she was chosen Senior Warden. She was also very active in the Diocese of Long Island serving on many boards, commissions and conventions electing Bishops. For eight years she was President of the Diocesan Altar Guild and Vice President of the Diocesan Episcopal Church Women resulting with her attending four National Episcopal Church conventions. She received many awards include the Bishops Distinguished Service Cross for Diocesan Service. After moving to Beverly Hills in 1990 she became active at St. Annes Episcopal Church, Crystal River, in the choir, Altar Guild, Episcopal Church Women, Diocesan conventions and a Deanery Director. In Beverly Hills she was active in the community, a member of the Beverly Hills Recreation Association, Civic Club, Share Club, New England Club, Rainbow Birthday Group and the Rainbow Rivers Club. Her activity in the Citrus County Genealogy Society led to her being a Mayflower descendant (Miles Standish and John Alden), and a member of the Fort Cooper Chapter of the D.A.R. She was also a member of the O.E.S. Chapter in Maine. Gloria is survived by her husband of 64 years, Robert W. Bruce of Beverly Hills, 2 sons, Robert and Wife, Pat of Vienna, VA and Douglas of East Meadow, Long Island, daughter, Elizabeth Ciuffetelli and husband, Stephen of Gainesville, 3 grandchildren, Lauren Bruce Bain and husband, Greg of Alexandria, VA and Amanda and Jennifer Ciuffetelli, both of Gainesville. Judith Bug Bean, 93 INVERNESS Judith Bug Warnock Gammell Bean, 93, Inverness, died May 5, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Judith was born Oct. 11, 1919, to the late Elby and Laura Warnock. She worked as a supervisor for Adams County, Ohio Welfare Department for more than 21 years. She was a member of the Sycamore Chapter of DAR in Adams County, Ohio. Judith attended the First Assembly of God Church for many years. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Frank Gammell in 1988; six brothers and a sister. She leaves her second husband of 21 years, Gordon Bean, Inverness; her son James and his wife Connie Gammell, Reynoldsburg, Ohio; and daughter, Charlene Gammell, Columbus, Ohio. She will be remembered as Aunt Bug by her many nieces and nephews. Her final message to all she leaves behind is Live a good life, be proud of your heritage, keep in touch with Jesus and I will be waiting for you. The family will receive friends in visitation at 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, 2013, at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Further services will be held at the WallaceThompson Funeral Home in Peebles, Ohio, with burial in the Tranquility Cemetery. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dewey Bidwell, 87 INVERNESS Dewey W. Bidwell 87, of Inverness, died May 3, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Health System. Private inurnment will be at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Frank Augustosky, 73CITRUS SPRINGS Frank J. Augustosky, 73, of Citrus Springs, died May 2, 2013. Elizabeth Craig, 90 INVERNESS Elizabeth L. Craig 90, Inverness, died May 4, 2013. Elizabeth was born Aug. 4, 1922, in Muskego, Wis., to the late Eugene and Catherine Sivenie Burns. She was a homemaker who loved to cook and read, liked playing games on her computer and was an avid collector of antique figurines. Left to cherish her memory are her children, Brian M. and his wife Ann Craig, Inverness, Dennis M. Craig, Tampa, Sean A. Craig and his partner Robert Parnell, Tampa and Linda M. and her husband Joseph Hasbrouck, Tampa; daughter-in-law, Lorie Craig. She was a treasured grandmother of 10 and great-grandmother of 20. She was preceded in death by her husband of 68 years, Ralph on July 2, 2010, and a son, Kevin in 2000. A celebration tribute of Elizabeths life will be 3 p.m. Thursday, May 9, 2013, at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Inurnment will take place at a later date at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Frederick Ted Gustina HOMOSASSA Our 85-year-old very special and one-of-akind, outstanding and precious husband of Marcille Gustina passed on into the arms of our Lord April 29, 2013. Ted was a U.S. Navy veteran in World War II during Japanese occupation and at Bikini Atoll for Operation Crossbow testing atomic weapons. He worked for NASA in California then returned to his birth home Syracuse, N.Y., to take over the family printing business for the next 40 years. Ted was a member of the Elks Lodge (55 years), the Lions Club (8 years), VFW and the American Legion. He was an avid golfer, a fisher, deer hunter, a good bowler, a penny-ante poker and a hand and foot card player. He was a lovable, kind-hearted, considerate people-person with a great sense of humor known for his timed jokes. He is survived by his wife, Marcille, of Homosassa; his sister, Peggy Sopcheck; brother, Jack Gustina of Syracuse, N.Y; his daughters, Jeanette Forsythe and her husband Lance of Homosassa, Carol Taylor of Syracuse, N.Y., Ardell Allen of Ithica, N,Y,, Linda McKeighen of Tampa, Patrice Spannagel of Flowery Branch, Ga., and Michelle Lilly of New Boston, Ill. He is a treasured grandfather to 16 and great-grandfather to 23. Memorial service will be at 2 p.m. May 13, 2013, at Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Lecanto, FL 34462. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Linda Aveni, 51OCALA Linda Aveni, 51, of Ocala, died May 2, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Barton Coppes, 60 HOMOSASSA Barton D. Coppes, 60, of Homosassa, died May 5, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Brooklyn, N.Y. Michael DeBerardinis, 55 OCALA Michael DeBerardinis, 55, of Ocala, died May 3, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. A6 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear the next day. Obituaries See DEATHS / Page A9 Gloria Bruce 000EHT7 Termite Specialists Since 1967 Homosassa 621-7700 Crystal River 795-8600 Inverness 860-1037 www.bushhomeservices.com PEST CONTROL TERMITES Elimination Pre-Construction Treatments Curative & Preventive Treatments Tent Fumigations PEST CONTROL Fleas Scorpions Spiders Bees Rodents Control Ants Roaches Free Inspections Investment Workshop May 9th, 2013 9:30 am Hosted By: Alex Malley This is your opportunity to hear directly from representatives of a broad spectrum of investment providers and sponsors:NorthStar | FS Investments | Jackson National AR Capital: BDCA & New York Recovery REIT Griffin-American Health Care REIT IIAttend your choice of 3 sessions (30 Minutes per session) Workshop is followed by a complimentary LunchCall Today To Reserve Your Seat 877.637.3230 2953 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy Inverness, FL 34453 000EQ7Y workshops and lunch hosted at: 505 E. Hartford St. | Hernando, FL 34442Investors should carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of: The Variable annuities offered by Jackson National Life, REIT (Real Estate investment Trust) offered by AR Capital, Griffin-American and NorthStar, Business Development Company (BDC) offered by FS Capital and AR Capital. This and other important information is contained in the prospectus which can be obtained by calling Alexander Malley at (877) 637-3230. Read prospectus carefully before investing. Alex S. Malley Registered Representative Securities offered through Cetera Advisors LLC, member FINRA/SIPC Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity 000EUZA Funeral Home With Crematory C h a s E D a v i s Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 REV. ROBERT BLACKBURN Service: Tuesday 11:00 AM Inverness Church of God EDITH JOYNER Viewing: Tuesday 5:00-7:00 PM Services: Thurs. 2:00 PM Sneads, FL ELIZABETH CRAIG Service: Thurs. 3:00 PM Chapel ESTHER HUGHART Arrangements Pending JUDITH BEAN Visitation: Wed. 3:00-4:00 PM 000EVLM Thurs., May 9, 2013 2 p.m. 6 p.m. College of Central Florida Citrus Campus Lecanto Screenings Information Giveaways Prizes Much more! Event Sponsored by: Everyone Invited!! Senior Health Expo. ASHLEY STRASS Forever Missed & Loved 6/23/06 5/7/11 2 Year Anniversary Its been two long years since the Lord called you home my Loving Ashley. Two years we have longed for your voice, laughter, and just to hold you one more time. Then we are comforted by knowing your THE BEST ANGLE THE LORD NEEDED AT HIS SIDE. Life has indeed never been the same without you. You wanted mom to have a baby brother... Am happy to tell you mom has been blessed with two baby boys, Nicholas and Marcus. We will always cherish the precious time spent together, most of all the gift of having you as a daughter. Love always, Mom & Dad, Brothers Steve, Nicholas & Marcus Family & Neighbors, All your Friends 000EV58 000EH62 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000EGHG Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 0 0 0 E T F G 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000ER7E Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 A7 000EVIB Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Truck Mount Extraction Spot Removal Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Wood Floor Cleaning www.smcflorida.com ServiceMaster of Citrus County Fire & Water DamageRestoration Specialists Recommended by Insurance Industry Residential & Commercial Smoke, Odor, Soot Removal Quick Response Time Water Removal Mold Remediation 24/7/365 Emergency Service 10% 0FF ANY CLEANING SERVICE OVER $100 C O U P O N C O U P O N C O U P O N C O U P O N 4 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY $ 99 95 *One room can not exceed 300 sq.ft. Expires 5/31/13 Carpet & Upholstery Specialists Expires 5/31/13 Restrictions Apply.

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A8 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000EV25

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James Finley, 70HOMOSASSA James A. Finley, 70, of Homosassa, died May 2, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Richard Dick Moody, 79CITRUS SPRINGS Richard W. Dick Moody of Citrus Springs, Fla., passed away Monday, May 6, 2013, in the loving care of his family at Hospice of Citrus County. He was born Friday, Jan. 26, 1934, in Danforth, Maine to Wendell and Marjorie (Bancroft) Moody. Dick was a Veteran of the United States Army and served during the Korean Conflict, where he spent two years in Korea. He worked at Pratt & Whitney in East Hartford, Conn., and 30 years as a Rural Mail Carrier in East Hampton, Conn. Dick enjoyed hunting and fishing at his camp in Weston, Maine. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 59 years, Jean (McKnight) Moody; son, Steven Moody and wife Jackie of Granby, Conn.; daughter, Linda Myers of Citrus Springs; son, James Moody and wife Heidi of Marlborough, Conn.; brother, Wayne Moody and wife Mary Ellen of Janesville, Wis; sister, Helen Warner and husband John of Salem, Ore.; and grandchildren, Brett and Kraig Moody of Enfield, Conn., Alexa and Allison Gattinella of New Britain, Conn., Amber and Abby Myers of Citrus Springs, and Matthew and Becky Moody of Marlborough, Conn. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Citrus County or the Marlborough Ambulance Association, Marlborough, CT 06447. Arrangements entrusted to Fero Funeral Home, www.ferofuneral home.com. Matthew Piach, 91 HOMOSASSA Matthew J. Piach, 91, of Homosassa, died May 4, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Ubly, Mich. William OCallaghan, 80 INVERNESS William J. OCallaghan, 80, of Inverness, Fla., passed away May 2, 2013. He was born the youngest of nine children in Mullingar, Ireland, May 25, 1933, to David and Margaret OCallaghan. William was a member of St. Scholastica Catholic Church as well as a member of the Knights of Columbus. He was an avid bowler and loved soccer and hockey. William is predeceased by his wife, Elizabeth OCallaghan and his eight siblings. He is survived by his children, Ken OCallag han, David OCallaghan, Kelly OCallaghan and Monica Smith; as well as 12 grandchildren. A memorial service will be at Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto with the family receiving friends from noon until service time at 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, 2013. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dorothea Purdy, 95TAVARESDorothea Purdy, 95, of Tavares, died May 5, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Colon, Mich. John Trapper Pope, 70 INGLIS John F. Pope (a.k.a. Trapper), 70, of Inglis, Fla., passed away April 30, 2013. He is survived by his daughter, Jennifer TuckerMogensen; granddaughter, Mary; grandson, Reece; mother-in-law, Mrs. Maida Baughman; sisters, Pat (Bob) Nelson, Mary Lee (Bud) Reeves, and Lynne (Carlos) Sanchez; as well as numerous nieces, nephews, brothers and sisters-in-law whom he loved. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary C. (Baughman) Pope; parents, Frank and Noreen; and brother, Jim Pope. He graduated in 1961 from Catholic Central High School in Grand Rapids, Mich., and received a bachelor of science degree from Michigan State University. After careers in wildlife biology and computer programming he retired to Florida where he resided for the past 10 years. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto.A memorial service will be conducted in Michigan in July for family and friends. John will be laid to rest next to his wife, Mary, in Resurrection Cemetery in Grand Rapids, Mich. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Rosalie Smagghe, 75 HOMOSASSA Ms. Rosalie V. Smagghe, 75, of Homosassa, Fla., died Tuesday, April 30, 2013, in Crystal River. She was born Feb. 24, 1938, in Detroit, Mich., daughter of the late Charles C. and Philomena L. (Raymaekers) Vinckevleugel. She worked as a secretary for Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich., and retired from Warren Consolidated schools in Michigan. She moved to Homosassa, Fla., from Warren, Mich., in 1993 and served as secretary for the Forest View Estates Homeowners Association. Her hobbies included reading, gardening flowers and traveling. Ms. Smagghe was a member of St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River. Ms. Smagghe was preceded in death by her parents and son-in-law, Harry Hawthorne. Survivors include son, Frank R. Smagghe of Homosassa; daughter, Linda Haw thorne of East Pointe, Mich.; former husband, Frank O. Smagghe of Roseville, Mich.; granddaughter, Shannon and her husband Mark Panetta; and greatgranddaughter, Rachel. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneral Home.com. Arrangements by the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Alma Spradley, 62INVERNESS Alma Mae Spradley, 62, of Inverness, died May 1, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. B USINESS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 A9 Money & MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,280 1,360 1,440 1,520 1,600 1,680 NDJFMA 1,560 1,600 1,640 S&P 500 Close: 1,617.50 Change: 3.08 (0.2%) 10 DAYS 12,000 12,800 13,600 14,400 15,200 NDJFMA 14,520 14,780 15,040 Dow Jones industrials Close: 14,968.89 Change: -5.07 (flat) 10 DAYSAdvanced1818 Declined1206 New Highs308 New Lows10 Vol. (in mil.)3,007 Pvs. Volume3,531 1,473 1,688 1463 984 183 14 NYSE NASD DOW14988.8714941.0914968.89-5.07-0.03%+14.23% DOW Trans.6314.006218.906297.98+79.08+1.27%+18.68% DOW Util.529.30521.91522.02-7.28-1.38%+15.21% NYSE Comp.9360.219330.199348.90+8.43+0.09%+10.72% NASDAQ3396.213381.443392.97+14.34+0.42%+12.37% S&P5001619.771614.211617.50+3.08+0.19%+13.41% S&P4001171.841165.071170.87+5.80+0.50%+14.74% Wilshire 500017092.8617029.9317072.33+42.40+0.25%+13.85% Russell 2000960.22954.87959.80+5.38+0.56%+13.00% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AK Steel Hold AKS2.762 7.27 3.43-.05 -1.4 tss-25.4-51.5dd... AT&T Inc T32.478 39.00 37.09-.25 -0.7 tts+10.0+18.2281.80 Ametek Inc AME29.869 43.46 40.85-.02 ... rtt+8.7+22.0210.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD64.999 101.86 95.80-.40 -0.4 ttt+9.6+32.02.21e Bank of America BAC6.720 12.94 12.88+.64 +5.2 sss+10.9+53.5300.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.350 12.64 12.12+.15 +1.3 stt+6.6+53.593... CenturyLink Inc CTL32.055 43.43 37.05-.09 -0.2 tss-5.3+2.9302.16m Citigroup C24.610 47.92 47.48+.51 +1.1 sss+20.0+44.7140.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.467 25.25 21.63+.59 +2.8 stt+36.6+18.8391.00 Disney DIS43.090 64.85 65.06+.26 +0.4 sss+30.7+49.6210.75f Duke Energy DUK59.639 75.46 72.90-1.57 -2.1 tts+14.3+20.7223.06 EPR Properties EPR40.049 61.00 58.09+.38 +0.7 sss+26.0+34.4243.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.139 93.67 90.58+.56 +0.6 sss+4.7+7.892.52f Ford Motor F8.820 14.30 14.09+.26 +1.9 sss+8.8+29.4100.40 Gen Electric GE18.028 23.90 22.58+.01 ... rtt+7.6+18.8170.76 Home Depot HD46.370 74.59 75.26+1.30 +1.8 sss+21.7+43.4251.56f Intel Corp INTC19.236 27.98 23.91-.05 -0.2 tss+16.0-13.0120.90 IBM IBM181.857 215.90 202.78-1.73 -0.8 ttt+5.9+0.3143.80f LKQ Corporation LKQ15.720 24.91 24.85+.07 +0.3 sss+17.8+43.528... Lowes Cos LOW24.760 39.98 40.81+1.22 +3.1 sss+14.9+27.1240.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.310 103.70 102.07-.85 -0.8 tss+15.7+9.1193.08 Microsoft Corp MSFT26.260 33.52 33.75+.26 +0.8 sss+26.4+8.2170.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.497 64.72 56.95-.34 -0.6 ttt+2.3+14.7181.04 NextEra Energy NEE63.509 82.65 80.60-1.15 -1.4 tss+16.5+32.4202.64f Penney JC Co Inc JCP13.552 34.99 16.92-.34 -2.0 tss-14.2-50.8dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.620 20.72 20.81+.22 +1.1 sss+15.3+22.1450.80 Regions Fncl RF5.460 8.65 8.71+.13 +1.5 sss+22.2+23.5100.12f Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.405 68.77 52.08+.63 +1.2 sss+25.9-4.4dd... Smucker, JM SJM73.200 105.18 102.55-1.01 -1.0 tss+18.9+36.5222.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.320 7.35 7.20+.05 +0.7 sss+27.0+188.3dd... Texas Instru TXN26.060 37.20 37.04+.03 +0.1 sss+19.9+20.7221.12 Time Warner TWX33.620 60.72 60.64+.21 +0.3 sss+26.8+66.3191.15 UniFirst Corp UNF55.860 93.00 91.29+.37 +0.4 sss+24.5+52.8170.15 Verizon Comm VZ39.859 54.31 52.05-.63 -1.2 tss+20.3+34.7cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.429 30.80 30.16-.18 -0.6 tss+19.7+13.51.53e WalMart Strs WMT58.270 79.50 78.83-.42 -0.5 tss+15.5+37.2161.88f Walgreen Co WAG28.539 50.35 47.84-.18 -0.4 tss+29.3+45.0211.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after s tock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative iss ue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A J.P. Morgan analyst upgraded the insurers stock rating, saying it should be able to grow its Medicare Advantage enrollment. Shares of the Medicaid and Medicare provider fell after reporting last week that its first-quarter net income fell 58 percent. The chemical companys net income rose 40 percent thanks to strong income from its olefins and vinyls units as well aslower costs. The meat company said that its second-quarter net income fell 42 percent. The company also cut its fullyear revenue forecast. The for-profit college operator said that its first-quarter net income dropped 29 percent as student enrollments continued to fall. Stocks mostly rose Monday in quiet trading, and a modest gain in the Standard & Poors 500 index sent it to a record high for a second straight day. Financial stocks had some of the markets biggest gains, helping to offset losses by utility stocks. 9 10 11 $12 FM MA Bridgepoint Edu. BPI Close: $10.83 -0.18 or -1.6% $8.11$22.19 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 471.7k (1.5x avg.) $586 m 52-week range PE: Yield: 4.7 ... 22 23 24 $25 FM MA Tyson FoodsTSN Close: $24.10 -0.83 or -3.3% $14.07$25.12 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 12.7m (2.9x avg.) $6.86 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 14.7 0.8% 70 80 90 $100 FM MA Westlake ChemicalWLK Close: $88.94 6.49 or 7.9% $48.13$98.27 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.7m (2.9x avg.) $5.98 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 15.5 0.8% 50 55 60 $65 FM MA WellCare HealthWCG Close: $56.38 -0.88 or -1.5% $44.75$68.65 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 965.3k (1.8x avg.) $2.45 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 13.4 ... 60 70 80 $90 FM MA Humana HUM Close: $75.49 1.56 or 2.1% $59.92$82.47 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 2.4m (0.8x avg.) $11.89 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 10.1 1.4% The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.76 percent Monday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans. NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.040.05-0.01.07 6-month T-bill.070.10-0.03.13 52-wk T-bill.100.10....17 2-year T-note.220.22....26 5-year T-note.740.72+0.02.79 10-year T-note1.761.74+0.021.88 30-year T-bond2.982.95+0.033.07 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.682.65+0.032.56 Bond Buyer Muni Idx4.054.02+0.034.50 Barclays USAggregate1.791.72+0.072.07 Barclays US High Yield5.055.09-0.046.96 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.773.64+0.133.95 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.031.00+0.031.03 Barclays US Corp2.652.58+0.073.28 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of crude oil rose on concerns that tensions between Syria and Israel could affect future supplies. The wholesale price of gasoline rose, and natural gas fell. Crude Oil (bbl)96.1695.61+0.58+4.7 Ethanol (gal)2.542.70+0.52+15.8 Heating Oil (gal)2.922.88+1.24-4.1 Natural Gas (mm btu)4.014.04-0.74+19.7 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.872.83+1.43+1.9 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1468.101464.30+0.26-12.3 Silver (oz)23.9223.98-0.24-20.7 Platinum (oz)1507.701501.20+0.43-2.0 Copper (lb)3.313.31-0.11-9.1 Palladium (oz)696.00692.20+0.55-1.0 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.211.22-0.43-6.6 Coffee (lb)1.411.40+0.75-1.7 Corn (bu)6.797.00-2.97-2.8 Cotton (lb)0.850.85+0.70+13.5 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)339.50338.60+0.27-9.2 Orange Juice (lb)1.431.47-2.38+23.6 Soybeans (bu)14.4514.55-0.72+1.8 Wheat (bu)6.937.11-2.57-10.9 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 22.38+.04 +10.2+17.2+13.0+6.4 CapIncBuAm 57.21-.15 +9.4+16.4+12.4+3.5 CpWldGrIAm 41.07-.08 +10.9+21.8+12.6+1.8 EurPacGrAm 44.09-.08 +7.0+16.9+9.6+0.4 FnInvAm 45.96+.11 +13.0+22.1+14.3+3.8 GrthAmAm 38.58+.09 +12.3+21.7+13.3+3.6 IncAmerAm 19.68-.02 +9.9+17.7+13.4+5.8 InvCoAmAm 34.22-.02 +13.9+21.3+13.2+4.3 NewPerspAm 34.55+.03 +10.5+20.2+13.4+4.0 WAMutInvAm 35.38+.03 +13.9+20.2+15.6+4.9 Dodge & Cox Income 13.93-.01 +1.3+5.0+5.9+6.9 IntlStk 37.70-.15 +8.8+23.5+10.3+0.2 Stock 140.15+.46 +15.5+29.2+14.7+3.4 Fidelity Contra 86.76+.19 +12.9+16.7+15.2+5.4 LowPriStk d 45.45+.10 +15.1+23.8+16.2+8.0 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 57.36+.11 +14.2+20.8+15.1+5.0 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.36-.01 +7.9+16.7+11.6+5.8 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.79+.03 +4.3+13.2+8.6+9.7 GlBondAdv 13.74+.03 +4.3+13.4+8.8+10.0 Harbor IntlInstl d 65.99+.02 +6.2+15.9+12.4-0.1 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.30-.01 +1.3+6.4+6.4+7.4 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 30.01+.05 +14.0+23.6+13.6+4.8 GrowStk 41.99+.07 +11.1+13.8+15.1+5.9 Vanguard 500Adml 149.26+.28 +14.2+20.8+15.2+5.0 500Inv 149.24+.28 +14.1+20.6+15.0+4.9 GNMAAdml 10.86-.01 +0.4+1.5+4.8+5.6 MuIntAdml 14.41-.02 +1.3+4.3+5.6+5.6 STGradeAd 10.82... +0.7+3.2+3.3+4.1 Tgtet2025 14.76+.01 +8.6+15.1+11.3+4.4 TotBdAdml 11.05... +0.6+3.0+5.1+5.7 TotIntl 15.99-.02 +7.0+18.0+9.5-1.4 TotStIAdm 40.57+.10 +14.3+21.2+15.3+5.6 TotStIdx 40.55+.10 +14.3+21.0+15.2+5.5 Welltn 37.00+.01 +10.0+16.6+12.1+6.3 WelltnAdm 63.91+.02 +10.0+16.6+12.2+6.4 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*Mutual Funds Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interest rates DEATHSContinued from Page A6 Richard Moody Rosalie Smagghe William OCallaghan Associated PressNEW YORK Bank of America led a rally in bigbank stocks in mostly quiet trading on Monday. Stock indexes ended little changed following a recordsetting run last week. News that Bank of America and MBIA, a bond-insurance company, had reached a settlement over a long-running dispute propelled both companies stocks up. BofA will pay $1.7 billion to MBIA and extend the troubled company a credit line. MBIA soared 45 percent, or $4.46, to $14.29. Bank of America gained 5 percent, or 64 cents, to $12.88, making it the leading company in the Dow Jones industrial average. The Dow slipped 5.07 points to close at 14,968.89. The Standard & Poors 500 index crept up 3.08 points to 1,617.50, a gain of 0.2 percent. Few changes in stocks 000EU0P Crystal River 305 S.E. US 19 352-795-7223

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O PINION Page A10 TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 Salute nurses Nurses Week 2013, designated from May 6 to May 12, is a week to showcase nursing. Nursing is a profession that is devoted to providing care and assistance to others using a wealth of knowledge that requires continuous enhancements. On behalf of the Citrus County Hospital Board (CCHB), send this salute to all nurses. The CCHB, by Chapter 2011256 of the Laws of Florida, needs to develop and implement a community health care plan. A community health care plan as a reality can only be achieved by the participation of many nurses being a subgroup ofthis huge group. May our community, Citrus County, realize that nurses appreciate the salute and a special focused week, but caring and helping others are an ingrained trait, which is a daily art and expression of goodwill. Debbie Ressler chairwoman, Citrus County Hospital Board Actions troubling Recent actions by County Administrator Brad Thorpe raise some red flags. The revelations regarding the landfill are of serious concern. Apparently, there were what appeared to be some errors in calculations by the company that processes the recycling operation. The miscalculations were estimated to have resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses to the county. A criminal investigation was started by the sheriffs office but stopped after the administrator decided there was no intentional wrongdoing and came to an agreement with the vendor for them to return what some believe is only a portion of what might have been owed. Any time a criminal investigation is started, the professional and ethical thing to do is let it run its course. By making an agreement with the company, the administrator has created a situation where many questions are not answered and gives the impression that a deal was cut. The fact that the administrator chose not do a public presentation to the commissioners and only poll them privately for their support for his actions only raises more concerns. Another disturbing issue was the apparent lack of a plan by the administrator to deal with the possible loss of revenue over the Progress Energy tax issue. His lack of a plan has put the county government in a difficult situation. The commission is busy looking for ways to cover the lost revenue at the expense of the taxpaying citizens. Regardless of what Commissioner Meek or the other commissioners say, an MSBU or MSTU is only a tax by another name. It is totally irresponsible for the administrator and the commission to pass the cost of their incompetence along to the taxpaying public. One can only hope that the commission will realize there are problems and move to address them. Roger B. Krieger Beverly Hills T heres the story of a woman with five kids who was asked if she had to do it all over again would she have five children? Yes, she said, just not these five. Thats the way I feel about the immigration reform bill introduced by the Senates bipartisan Gang of 8. Im all for an immigration bill, just not this immigration bill at least in its present form. One of the gang members, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, indicated the bill has problems that need fixing when he said in a recent interview: Lets try to fix it. Lets try to change it, but to just say lets defeat the whole thing; I dont think thats a productive approach either. I think this is a starting point that obviously we can and should improve. There is much to improve, maybe too much. The Daily Caller read through all 844 pages of the pending bill and found it contains roughly 400 exemptions, exceptions, waivers, determinations and grants of discretion. In fact, the Caller found, The document mentions discretion or discretionary 41 times ... judge or judges 73 times ... determines is used 84 times. This bill has more holes in it than a Texas border fence. Responding to a report by Ronald Mortensen, a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, which analyzed the Senate proposal, the centers executive director, Mark Krikorian, offered, Illegal aliens will be rewarded for breaking laws for which American citizens are routinely punished. He cites as one example the use of a fraudulent Social Security card, which, he said, would cause an American citizen to face up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, but, he said, ... under this bill the illegal alien would face a $1,000 penalty covering all his many offenses, a penalty which in many cases will be waived. According to Krikorian, the individual would then be issued a new Social Security number without any past bad credit or arrest records. Whats with all the preferential treatment? Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, a member of the Gang of 8, said in a statement to Breitbart News, The Gang of 8 made a promise that illegal immigrants will not be able to access public benefits. We already know that, once granted green cards and ultimately citizenship, illegal immigrants will be able to access all public benefit programs at a great cost to taxpayers. We have, however, identified a number of loopholes that would allow illegal immigrants to draw public benefits even sooner than advertised. Sen. Jeff Flake, RArkansas, disagrees. So lets close up the loopholes and debate it on the Senate floor. Additional public benefits for illegal immigrants should not be seen as far-fetched, given aBoston Herald report about the family of the accused Boston Marathon bombers, whose residency may have been legal, but whose behavior was not: The Tsarnaev family, including the suspected terrorists and their parents, benefited from more than $100,000 in taxpayerfunded assistance a bonanza ranging from cash and food stamps to Section 8 housing from 2002 to 2012. These were able-bodied people. Why did they receive benefits? What loophole did the Tsarnaev family slip through? Attorney General Eric Holder has taken the issue of breaking the law to new depths. In an April 24 speech to the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Holder said that creating a pathway to earned citizenship is a civil right. If thats so, why deny anyone from coming to America, even from nations that breed terrorists? As it stands, the bill is unlikely to pass. Thats why Sen. Rubio is right about the need to fix it. If he were to introduce an amendment to ban an illegal from voting for 10 years, we might see Democratic support for the measure quickly fade. The Democratic Party appears interested in importing new Democratic voters. Illegal immigrants know this, which leads many of them to believe that even if they break the law to get here, they have a right to become American citizens. I dont think so, do you? Readers may email Cal Thomas at tmseditors@ tribune.com. When your work speaks for itself, dont interrupt. Henry J. Kaiser, 1882-1967 Immigration, deformed CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisherMike Arnold .............................................. editor Charlie Brennan ........................ managing editor Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member Mac Harris ................................ citizen member Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief SPOILING FOR A FIGHT CCHB PR deal bad for public relations Y es, this is another editorial about the turmoil that is Citrus Memorial governance. But this time its about one of the most boneheaded moves weve seen them make recently. The governor-appointed Citrus County Hospital Board, which owns the facility, and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, which leases and operates it, have been generally in agreement on one thing: its not financially viable for Citrus Memorial to continue as an independent, public hospital in this economic climate. The health care environment of today is very different, and much more complex, than it was when Citrus Memorial was created 56 years ago. The CCHB commissioned a valuation for Citrus Memorial, which was completed recently, and is taking steps to review alternative futures for it. As part of this plan, the CCHB hired an experienced transition manager to assist in securing and assessing possible offers, and in looking out for the citizens of Citrus County if an ownership change occurs. That makes sense. What doesnt make sense is what theyre now considering adding to the transition consultants contract. The CCHB decided it needed outside public relations assistance because it anticipated opposition, particularly from within the hospital family. The hospital ownership/ governance issue is complex. Some clear, straightforward communicating would help the community you know, the people whose best interests are supposed to be paramount understand the issues and the process. From that standpoint, adding a communications professional to the mix is a good idea. There are plenty of highly qualified communications professionals in our community, many of them unaligned with any of the parties in the CMH governance mess, who understand well how to get the word out to locals. But the CCHB board instead asked its transition manager to hire an outside professional to run the PR effort a pricey, nonlocal option. More importantly, the purpose isnt to help the community understand whats happening its to wage a war of public opinion against any who dont agree with the CCHB. The transition manager told CCHB members, Youre about to get into a fight; frankly, youre already in a fight. You may think its bad, its going to get worse. This is exactly the wrong attitude. Instead of aggressive and combative posturing, we need to see some grown-up behavior from the members of both boards, their consultants and hospital management. Reminder: its not about them; its about the people of Citrus County. Everyone involved owes county residents a professional approach and a calm, reasoned, collegial process as we move toward resolution of Citrus Memorials future. THE ISSUE: Hospital board needs to communicate with county residents.OUR OPINION: Youre doing it wrong. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352563-5660. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor Worst driversIve been told by people who moved to Citrus County from all over the place, South Florida, all over the state and even Europe, that this county has the worst drivers in the world and I have to believe them now because every day I go out lately, I get cut off or something. What really cracks me up is in the 50 and 60 zone on (State Road) 44, you always have people going 30 and you cant get around because theyre in each lane and when you do get to go around one of them, I guess theyre the ones that call in and say people are speeding.Respect bicyclists Please respect bicyclists and pedestrians at the intersection of Southeast (U.S.) 19 and Fort Island Trail. I cross this intersection every day while biking to the Bicentennial pool for exercise. I am almost run down by speeding drivers who do not honor the Walk Pedestrian light. Traffic control for Crystal River, we need more safety concerning this dangerous matter. Will we wait for a terrible accident and lawsuit to address this issue? Please help us. I always respect pedestrians and walkers when Im driving.The laws the law To the person who wrote on April 27 that you should have one month to prove your innocence: I believe you are already innocent until proven guilty in the United States. DNA evidence has already shown they get that wrong sometimes, so then its too late.Take some prideTo the people who have (been) complaining about the litter on the side of the highway: Take a little pride in your neighborhood and pick it up. Ive been cleaning up Seven Rivers Road from Venable all the way around to Venable again. Do it once a month. It doesnt take much; just go out and pick it up instead of complaining. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and h ave less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Cal Thomas OTHER VOICES

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detailed reports from two child-protection investigations involving Huggett, the Hernando woman charged with first-degree murder and aggravated child abuse in the death of her daughter. According to an arrest report, Huggett is accused of shaking Aliyah, banging her head againsta wall and head-butting her because the child would not stop whining. Two days before her death, Aliyah was taken to Citrus Memorial hospital by ambulance with swollen hands. Doctors said the swelling was caused by an allergic reaction and sent her home the same day. Doctors reported no indications of abuse, Citrus County sheriffs detectives said. DCF reports also suggest Aliyahslife, while not ideal, was with an affectionate mother. There does not appear to be any conditions which would affect the childs safety or care and age is not a factor; the mother is 21 years old, however, appears to be very mature and bonded very well with the child, a DCF investigator wrote in a Jan. 10 report. The DCF investigated anonymous allegations against Huggett on two occasions. The first occurred in August, when the sheriffs office was still conducting child-protection investigations. By the second occasion, in January, that role was transferred to DCF. The August incident occurred following the Baker Act of Huggetts then-livein boyfriend,who cut himself with a razor blade. Huggett told child-protection investigators the boyfriend sliced himself while the two argued. She said Aliyah was asleep in another room and never saw anything. Investigators interviewed witnesses and Huggetts friends. One witness said Huggett tried to smother her crying child at a Veterans Administration clinic in The Villages. Huggett said she was only trying to comfort her daughter, not hurt her. Huggett agreed to receive social work help with parenting skills. She was reluctant to seek mental-health counseling for fear of being locked up under the states Baker Act, according to reports. The investigator urged her to follow a doctors recommendations. According to reports, Huggett told investigators that Aliyahs conception was the result of a rape while she was in military boot camp in California. Huggett and the live-in boyfriend, who is not the childs father, moved from California to Florida in summer 2011. While conducting the investigation, officials learned of another allegation that Huggett and the boyfriend were evicted from an apartment in April and had moved into a storage unit in Inverness. According to the allegation, the couple and Aliyah then moved into a friends house. Sheriffs deputies concluded their investigation on Oct. 5 three weeks before Aliyahs second birthday. In January, DCF investigators learned the three were living in a tent in Inverness. Their investigation showed that the tent was on property the boyfriend owned and that Huggett and her daughter stayed in a friends house at night. Reports stated the child showed no ill effects of living in the tent, which was spacious and included a toddlers air mattress, carpeting, necessary supplies and a cooler to keep food cold. The investigator said he met Huggett and Aliyah atthe boyfriends place of employment an Inverness fast-food restaurant and the child appeared happy. The report said both Huggett and the boyfriend interacted with Aliyah in a normal fashion. DCF investigators urged Huggett to seek counseling regarding the sexual assault she claimed led to Aliyahs conception, but she said she had already received counseling in California and did not want to repeat it. Huggett agreed to send Aliyah to daycare in Inverness. The daycare operator told DCF investigators Aliyah seemed well adjusted and showed no signs of being abused. The DCF concluded its investigation a month after it began. 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DEATHContinued from Page A1 For the RECORD Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A residential burglary was reported at 10:15 a.m. Friday, May 3, in the 10000 block of N. Ocean Drive, Dunnellon. A vehicle burglary was reported at 4:56 p.m. May 3 in the 600 block of N.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. A residential burglary was reported at 7:36 p.m. May 3 in the 100 block of W. Greenbriar Place, Dunnellon. A residential burglary was reported at 10:05 p.m. May 3 in the 9600 block of W. Moss Rose Lane, Crystal River. A residential burglary was reported at 4:50 p.m. Saturday, May 4, in the 11100 block of W. Halls River Road, Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 6:32 p.m. May 4 in the 2600 block of S. Pine Ridge Ave., Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 12:20 a.m. Sunday, May 5, in the 200 block of S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 11:04 a.m. Friday, May 3, in the 300 block of S. Park Ave., Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 1:47 p.m. May 3 in the 4000 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 6:30 p.m. May 3 in the 10000 block of E. Trails End Road, Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 7:20 p.m. May 3 in the 4000 block of N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. A petit theft was reported at 10:32 a.m. Saturday, May 4, in the 600 block of S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. A petit theft was reported at 3:13 p.m. May 4 in the 200 block of South Blvd., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 4:58 p.m. May 4 in the 70 block of N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.

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East about to be overrun by billions of cicadas Associated PressWASHINGTON Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and overrun the East Coast. The insects will arrive in such numbers that people from North Carolina to Connecticut will be outnumbered roughly 600-to-1. Maybe more. Scientists even have a horror-movie name for the infestation: Brood II. But as ominous as that sounds, the insects are harmless. They wont hurt you or other animals. At worst, they might damage a few saplings or young shrubs. Mostly they will blanket certain pockets of the region, though lots of people wont ever see them. Its not like these hordes of cicadas suck blood or zombify people, said May Berenbaum, a University of Illinois entomologist. Theyre looking for just one thing: sex. And theyve been waiting quite a long time. Since 1996, this group of 1-inch bugs, in wingless nymph form, has been a few feet underground, sucking on tree roots and biding their time. They will emerge only when the ground temperature reaches precisely 64 degrees. After a few weeks up in the trees, they will die and their offspring will go underground, not to return until 2030. Its just an amazing accomplishment, Berenbaum said. How can anyone not be impressed? And they will make a big racket, too. The noise all the male cicadas make when they sing for sex can drown out your own thoughts, and maybe even rival a rock concert. In 2004, Gene Kritsky, an entomologist at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, measured cicadas at 94 decibels, saying it was so loud you dont hear planes flying overhead. There are ordinary cicadas that come out every year around the world, but these are different. Theyre called magicicadas as in magic and are red-eyed. And these magicicadas are seen only in the eastern half of the United States, nowhere else in the world. There are 15 U.S. broods that emerge every 13 or 17 years, so that nearly every year, some place is overrun. Last year it was a small area, mostly around the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, West Virginia and Tennessee. Next year, two places get hit: Iowa into Illinois and Missouri; and Louisiana and Mississippi. And its possible to live in these locations and actually never see them. This years invasion, Brood II, is one of the bigger ones. Several experts said they really dont have a handle on how many cicadas are lurking underground but that 30 billion seems like a good estimate. At the Smithsonian Institution, researcher Gary Hevel thinks it may be more like 1 trillion. Even if its merely 30 billion, if they were lined up head to tail, theyd reach the moon and back. There will be some places where its wall-to-wall cicadas, said University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp. Associated PressQUETTA, Pakistan The graffiti on walls around this Pakistani provincial capital hold a dire warning ahead of this weekends national elections, Voting means death. Its a very real threat: During recent weeks at least six people have been killed and around 40 wounded in bombings and grenade attacks targeting candidates. Ethnic Baluch separatists who have waged a bloody insurgency trying to win independence for the vast, sparsely populated province of Baluchistan are seeking to derail the vote with a campaign of violence. In large part, their targets have been fellow Baluch, seen by the separatists as traitors for agreeing to participate in the vote. Our houses are not safe. Our workers are not safe. Our leaders are directly targeted every day, said Naimatullah Gichki, a senior member of a Baluch party, the National Party. We are fighting a war, not an election. Saturdays election has thrown into sharp relief a question that has divided the countrys Baluch ethnic minority: Can the community win their rights at the ballot box or is the only solution a violent campaign to break away from Pakistan? The Baluch have long been alienated by what they see as exploitation by the central government. Wedged between the borders with Afghanistan and Iran, Baluchistan is rich in oil, natural gas and valuable minerals. But it is Pakistans poorest province and remains extremely underdeveloped, with residents complaining that resource riches have mainly gone to fill the federal governments coffers. The area has also been plagued by horrific attacks by Islamic militants on minority Shiites. Literacy Associated Press Pre-schoolers listen to a reading Monday of the childrens book Duck on a Bike, after it was announced as this years annual One Book 4 Colorado, at an event launching Colorado Literacy Week, at the Denver Downtown Library. Defense: Soldier in killings had abnormalitiesJOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD, Wash. Defense lawyers are trying to introduce evidence that an Army sergeant charged with the premeditated killing of five fellow service members in Iraq may have had brain abnormalities. A military judge heard testimony Monday from an expert who said Sgt. John Russell had significant abnormalities in his brain structure and function. Dr. Ruben Gur said the abnormalities indicate Russell could have had difficulty regulating emotions. But experts called by the government suggested Russells brain is normal. Col. David Conn did not immediately rule whether the testing would be allowed in the court-martial. Russell has already pleaded guilty to the 2009 killings but does not agree they were premeditated. Prosecutors are trying to prove Russell plotted the shootings in advance. Minn. prepares to dispose of I-35W bridge partsMINNEAPOLIS Minnesota is preparing to give victims, historians and engineers a chance to claim some of the crumpled steel from the deadly 2007 collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge before the rest is sold for scrap. Aug. 1 will mark the sixyear anniversary of when the bridge buckled and fell into the Mississippi River during evening rush hour in Minneapolis, killing 13 people and injuring 145 others. The Minnesota Department of Transportation had to store the steel beams and plates until all the legal claims could be resolved. The Minnesota House is poised to vote Monday on a bill to give the department months to parcel out free pieces to victims families, collapse survivors, the state historical society and others. The bill also awaits Senate action. Secrecy shrouds pretrial hearing in WikiLeaks caseFORT MEADE, Md. Government secrecy reaches a new level this week in the court-martial of an Army private who gave reams of classified documents to WikiLeaks. The military judge has ordered what prosecutors said is an unprecedented closed hearing Wednesday to help her decide how much of Pfc. Bradley Mannings trial will be closed to protect national security. An unidentified prosecution witness will testify in a dry run to test alternatives to courtroom closures during presentation of classified evidence. The strategies could include redacted documents, unclassified summaries and even code words for classified information. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A12 TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Ceremony Associated Press Swiss guards attend a swearing-in ceremony Monday at the Vatican. The ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome. Alleged death camp guard is arrestedBERLIN A 93-year-old man who was deported from the U.S. for lying about his Nazi past was arrested by German authorities Monday on allegations he served as an Auschwitz death camp guard, Stuttgart prosecutors said. Hans Lipschis was taken into custody after authorities concluded there was compelling evidence he was involved in crimes at Auschwitz while there from 1941 to 1945, prosecutor Claudia Krauth said. Lipschis has acknowledged being assigned to an SS guard unit at Auschwitz but maintains he only served as a cook and was not involved in any war crimes. Lipschis was deported from the U.S. in 1983 for lying about his Nazi past when he immigrated to Chicago in the 1950s. Syrian rebels shoot down regime helicopter BEIRUT Syrian rebels shot down a military helicopter in the countrys east, killing eight government troops on board as President Bashar Assads troops battled opposition forces inside a sprawling military air base in the north for the second straight day. The downing of the helicopter was a welcome victory for rebels fighting to oust Assad as the two sides remain locked in stalemate in the 2-year-old conflict. In Geneva, a U.N. commission probing alleged war crimes and other abuses in Syria on Monday distanced itself from claims by one of its members that Syrian rebels have used the nerve agent sarin, but not the regime. The panel said it has no conclusive evidence about the alleged use of sarin as chemical weapons. In Washington, White House spokesman Jay Carney said its highly likely the Assad regime and not the Syrian opposition was behind any chemical weapons use in Syria. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated Press Any day now, cicadas with bulging red eyes will creep out of the ground after 17 years and overrun the East Coast with the awesome power of numbers. Big numbers. Billions. Maybe even a trillion. Associated Press Supporters of Pakistans minority Shiite Hazara community, frequently attacked by militants, rally Sunday for the upcoming elections in Quetta, Pakistan. Seeking to derail Pakistan vote Bomb at Pakistan Islamist party rally kills 16 PARACHINAR, Pakistan A bomb blast tore through a political rally held by an Islamist party in northwest Pakistan Monday, in an attack claimed by the Pakistani Taliban that killed 16 people and underscored an increase in violence ahead of the May 11 vote. The explosion, at a rally held in the village of Sewak in the northwest Kurram tribal area, was the latest attack on candidates, political offices and election-related events as the vote approaches. The bomb, which was apparently planted near the main stage of the rally, killed 16 and left 44 wounded, said Umar Khan, a doctor at the nearby Sada hospital where many of the wounded were initially taken. Two party leaders who were speaking at the event escaped unharmed. From wire reports Senate passes online sales tax bill Votes 69 to 27, sending to House Associated PressWASHINGTON The Senate aimed to help traditional retailers and financially strapped state and local governments Monday by passing a bill that would widely subject online shopping for many a largely tax-free frontier to state sales taxes. The Senate passed the bill by a vote of 69 to 27, getting support from Republicans and Democrats alike. But opposition from some conservatives who view it as a tax increase will make it a tougher sell in the House. President Barack Obama has conveyed his support for the measure. Under current law, states can only require retailers to collect sales taxes if the store has a physical presence in the state. That means big retailers with stores all over the country like Walmart, Best Buy and Target collect sales taxes when they sell goods over the Internet. But online retailers like eBay and Amazon dont have to collect sales taxes, except in states where they have offices or distribution centers. As a result, many online sales are tax-free, giving Internet retailers an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores. The bill would empower states to require businesses to collect taxes for products they sell on the Internet, in catalogs and through radio and TV ads. Under the legislation, the sales taxes would be sent to the state where the shopper lives. Supporters said the current tax disparity is turning some traditional stores into showrooms, where shoppers pick out items they like, then buy them on the Internet to avoid sales taxes. Its about the way commerce has changed in America, said Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill. Bookstores, stores that sell running shoes, bicycles and appliances are at a distinct disadvantage. Theyve become showrooms. Internet giant eBay is leading the fight against the bill, along with lawmakers from states with no sales tax and several prominent anti-tax groups. The bills opponents said it would put an expensive obligation on small businesses because they are not as equipped as national merchandisers to collect and remit sales taxes at the multitude of state rates. Businesses with less than $1 million in online sales would be exempt. eBay wants to exempt businesses with up to $10 million in sales or fewer than 50 employees. The issue is getting bigger for states as more people make purchases online. Last year, Internet sales in the U.S. totaled $226 billion, up nearly 16 percent from the previous year, according to government estimates. States lost a total of $23 billion last year because they couldnt collect taxes on out-of-state sales, according to a study done for the National Conference of State Legislatures, which has lobbied for the bill.

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Baseball/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Basketball/ B4 Hockey/ B4 Tennis/B4 Sports briefs/ B4 The demise of NBA titans Boston and LA Lakers. / B4 S PORTS Section B TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Rays blow seven-run lead, fall to Blue Jays Associated PressST. PETERSBURG J.P Arencibia hit a two-out, two-run homer in the ninth inning off Fernando Rodney and the Toronto Blue Jays completed their comeback from a seven-run deficit, beating the Tampa Bay Rays 8-7 on Monday night. The last time Toronto rallied from at least seven runs down to win was June 5, 2007, when it overcame an 8-1 margin to beat Tampa Bay 12-11, STATS said. Tampa Bay last lost a lead of at least seven runs May 25, 2009, when Cleveland came back from a 10-0 deficit to win 11-10. This time, Evan Longoria hit his third career grand slam as Tampa Bay built a 7-0 lead that Jeremy Hellickson and four Rays relievers failed to protect before a seasonlow crowd of 9,952 at Tropicana Field. Colby Rasmus and Mark DeRosa also hit two-run homers for Toronto. Toronto trailed 7-6 when Adam Lind drew a leadoff walk in the ninth from Rodney (1-1). Pinchrunner Emilio Bonifacio stole second and continued to third on catcher Jose Molinas throwing error with no outs. Rodney retired the next two batters before Arencibia lined a 2-2 pitch into the left-field seats. Arencibia, who pinch-hit in the sixth inning and stayed in the game to catch, hit his ninth home run. Darren Oliver (1-1) pitched one scoreless inning and Casey Janssen worked a perfect ninth for his eighth save. Longorias seventh homer of the season was the biggest blow in a seven-run third inning against Mark Buerhle. Rasmus hit a two-run homer off Hellickson in the fourth and DeRosa added a two-run, pinchhit shot off reliever Jake McGee in the sixth. Down 7-5, Toronto had the potential tying runs in scoring position in the seventh and eighth, but was only able to get one runner home on Jose Bautistas basesloaded sacrifice fly in the eighth off Rodney. Buehrle allowed seven runs and nine hits in six innings. He has now yielded eight home runs over his last three starts. Despite being staked to the seven-run lead, Hellickson only lasted five innings. The righthander yielded Rasmus homer and Melky Cabreras RBI single in the fourth. Associated Press Tampa Bays Sam Fuld slides in to score Monday ahead of a throw to Toronto catcher Henry Blanco in St. Petersburg. Couples, Montgomerie among 5 inducted to hall Associated PressST. AUGUSTINE About the only thing Fred Couples and Colin Montgomerie had in common was a golf swing good enough to trust for a lifetime. Couples became the first American to reach No. 1 in the world and won the Masters by a blade of grass that kept his ball from trickling into Raes Creek. Montgomerie found fame on the European Tour, where he won the Order of Merit a record seven times in a row, though he never won a major, a glaring hole in his credentials. Couples sauntered down the fairways, the essence of cool. Montgomerie walked with his head down, so intense he never looked like he was having much fun. They shared the stage Monday night when both were inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame, along with three others in the Class of 2013. The others were former U.S. Open champion and broadcaster Ken Venturi, former European Tour executive director Ken Schofield and two-time British Open champion and architect Willie Park Jr. That brings the Hall of Fame to 146 members. Couples talked about his childhood in Seattle, when his mother gave him $5 a day in the summer to play at Jefferson Park. He couldnt afford to buy a glove, and Couples still plays without one. He got choked up when he mentioned watching a PGA Tour player to put on a clinic in town when Couples was 14. I wasnt really the person who said, Thats what I want to do, Im going to be a PGA Tour player. But I knew I wanted to really, really get involved in golf, Couples said. And the gentlemans name was Lee Trevino, who has been a mentor and someone I love. Couples didnt look at his notes or used the teleprompter in the back of the room. He rambled at times, as he always does, talking about his journey from Seattle to the University of Houston, where he first met CBS announcer Jim Nantz, turned pro and won 15 times, including that 1992 Masters and the green jacket ceremony in Butler Cabin with Nantz. They had rehearsed that moment in college. He was overcome with emotion at the end of the night, reading two sentences from a piece of paper. Thanks for taking a kid from Seattle and putting him in the Hall of Fame, Couples said as his chin buckled. This is the coolest night of my life. He walked off the stage in tears, thrusting both arms in the air. The election of this years class was not without some debate. Couples was elected on the PGA Tour ballot ahead of Mark OMeara and Davis Love III, both of whom either won more tournaments or more majors. Couples received only 51 percent of the vote, a record low for the PGA Tour ballot. It takes 65 percent to get elected, though there is a loophole that if no one gets 65 percent, one player is elected provided he receives at least 50 percent. Montgomerie won 31 times on the European Tour, the most of any British player, and he was a stalwart in the Ryder Cup. The Scot played in eight of them and never lost in singles (6-0-2) while competing on six winning teams. He also was the winning captain in Wales in 2010. He never won on the biggest stage, however. Montgomerie lost the 1994 U.S. Open and the 1995 PGA Championship in a playoff. He was second to Ernie Els again in the 1997 U.S. Open at Congressional. And the most painful of all came in 2006 at Winged Foot, when he made double bogey from the middle of the 18th fairway and finished one shot behind Geoff Ogilvy. Thats the one that hurts, Montgomerie said of Winged Foot, noting another Hall of Fame member, Phil Mickelson, also Miamis Super Bowl chances dimmed Associated PressMIAMI As Dan Marino campaigned for Miami to be chosen the site of the 50th Super Bowl, he made no pretense about being objective on the subject. In my opinion, the former Dolphins quarterback said, every Super Bowl should be here. Instead, the NFL championship game might not return to Miami for a long time. Last week the Dolphins were denied public money for a stadium upgrade by the state Legislature, which removes South Florida from serious contention for the 50th Super Bowl and perhaps subsequent NFL and college title games as well. The defeat in Tallahassee also raises questions about the future of the Dolphins under multibillionaire owner Stephen Ross. He contends $350 million in stadium improvements are badly needed, but hes unwilling to foot the entire bill himself, and ruled out a less expensive, scaleddown renovation. The Dolphins say theyre already heavily in debt and one of the NFL s most leveraged teams, making upgrades impossible without taxpayer help. I dont think there is a clear alternative at this point, chief executive officer Mike Dee said. I dont think there is a road to a Plan B without legislative action in Tallahassee. Ross, 72, hasnt indicated any desire to bring aboard a coowner to help finance a stadium project. He hasnt threatened to move the Dolphins, and its unlikely the league would abandon South Florida, with several NFL franchises in smaller markets more logical candidates for relocation to Los Angeles or elsewhere. Undermanned Bulls take Game 1 against defending champions Associated PressMIAMI Nate Robinson scored 27 points, Jimmy Butler added 21 points and 14 rebounds while playing every second for the third straight game, and the Chicago Bulls stunned the Miami Heat 93-86 on Monday night to take Game 1 of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Trailing 86-83 with 2 minutes left, the Bulls scored the final 10 points of the game to beat the Heat once again. Joakim Noah added 13 points, Taj Gibson had 12 and Marco Belinelli added 10 for Chicago, which snapped a 27-game Miami winning streak during the regular season, and handed the Heat their first loss in their last 13 games in this one. LeBron James scored 24 points for Miami, which got 14 from Dwyane Wade. Game 2 is Wednesday night in Miami. The Bulls were without Derrick Rose, as theyve been all season. Kirk Hinrich was out again with a calf injury. Luol Deng isnt even expected to rejoin the team until Tuesday, after dealing with an illness apparently so severe that a spinal tap and other tests since were needed to rule out things like meningitis. And the group that was left gave the reigning NBA champions more than they could handle. A pair of three-point plays by James one of them coming when he just broke through a tackle attempt by Butler and muscled the ball to the rim anyway gave Miami a 76-69 lead midway through the fourth quarter, the biggest deficit Chicago faced all night. The Bulls, predictably, were undeterred. Coming off a Game 7 road win in Brooklyn two nights earlier just to get into a series with Miami, the Bulls just kept grinding. When Ray Allen made a 3-pointer to give Miami an 80-78 lead, Butler came back with one of his own to put the Bulls back on top. When the Heat went up by three after James made a free throw with 2:22 left, Belinelli connected for 3 on a second-effort Associated Press Chicago Bulls guard Nate Robinson drives to the basket Monday past Miami Heat guard Norris Cole during the second half of Game 1 of the NBA playoff series in the Eastern Conference semifinals in Miami. Robinson scored 27 points as the Bulls defeated the Heat 93-86. See MIAMI / Page B3 See HALL OF FAME / Page B3 See BULLS / Page B3

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B2 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE M AJOR L EAGUEB ASEBALL Associated PressCINCINNATI Andrelton Simmons homered twice and drove in a career-high four runs, leading the Atlanta Braves to a 7-4 victory that ended the Cincinnati Reds winning streak at three games. The Braves won at a place where theyve had little success lately. They were 0-4 at Great American Ball Park last season and 14-25 overall since it opened for the 2003 season. Paul Maholm (4-3) held down an offense thats been all-or-nothing. The left-hander allowed four hits and two runs in 5 2/3 innings. Craig Kimbrel gave up a pair of hits in the ninth while getting his 10th save in 12 opportunities. Atlanta scored in four of five innings against Bronson Arroyo (2-4), who gave up four runs in his shortest outing of the season. AMERICAN LEAGUE White Sox 2, Royals 1, 11 inn. KANSAS CITY, Mo. Jordan Danks atoned for a baserunning blunder in the ninth inning by hitting a solo home run in the 11th that lifted the Chicago White Sox over the Kansas City Royals 2-1. Danks connected with two outs off Kelvin Herrera (2-3) for his first homer of the season. The White Sox avoided a three-game sweep. Down 1-0, the White Sox loaded the bases with no outs in the ninth. After Paul Konerko grounded into a home-to-first double play, Danks entered as a pinch-runner at second base for Adam Dunn. Conor Gillaspie was intentionally walked to load the bases. Alexei Ramirez followed with an infield single up the middle that made it 1-all, but Danks was caught in a rundown between third and home and tagged out, ending the rally.Indians 7, Athletics 3 CLEVELAND Asdrubal Cabrera homered twice and Mark Reynolds hit one to the deepest reaches of Progressive Field, leading the Cleveland Indians to a 7-3 win over the Oakland Athletics. Jason Kipnis and Cabrera hit consecutive homers in the first inning off Jarrod Parker (1-5). In the fifth, Cabrera homered again and Reynolds launched a 460-foot shot his 10th this season that nearly cleared the left-field bleachers. The four homers backed Ubaldo Jimenez (2-2), who had his second straight solid outing. Jimenez struck out a season-high eight in 5 2/3 innings as Cleveland won for the seventh time in eight games. Jason Giambi hit a clutch, two-run single and Ryan Raburn doubled home a run in the seventh for the Indians, who had their six-game winning streak stopped Sunday.INTERLEAGUE Cubs 9, Rangers 2 CHICAGO Scott Feldman threw seven scoreless innings against his former team before leaving with a cramp in his pitching hand, and the Chicago Cubs came within three outs of their first shutout since August in a 9-2 win over the Texas Rangers. Feldman (3-3) allowed two hits, struck out three and walked one, and also hit an RBI single in the fifth for a 2-0 lead. AL Associated Press Atlantas Andrelton Simmons hits a two-run home run Monday in the eighth inning in Cincinnati. Atlanta defeated the Reds 7-4. Simmons powers Braves AMERICAN LEAGUE Mondays Games Chicago White Sox 2, Kansas City 1, 11 innings Cleveland 7, Oakland 3 Toronto 8, Tampa Bay 7 Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2 Minnesota at Boston, late Tuesdays Games Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 3-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Oakland (Milone 3-3) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 2-2) at Boston (Dempster 2-2), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Happ 2-2) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 1-4), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 3-0) at Houston (Lyles 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 8:40 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEMondays Games Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 4 Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late Miami at San Diego, late Philadelphia at San Francisco, late Tuesdays Games Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 1-4) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-3), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 5-0) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 2-2), 8:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 8:40 p.m. Arizona (McCarthy 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-4), 10:10 p.m. Miami (Sanabia 2-4) at San Diego (Stults 2-2), 10:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 3-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-1), 10:15 p.m. Blue Jays 8, Rays 7 TorontoTampa Bay abrhbiabrhbi Lawrie 3b4000Jnnngs cf4110 MeCarr lf5021KJhnsn lf5131 RDavis pr-lf0000RRorts 2b4110 Bautist rf3021Longori 3b5124 Encrnc 1b5010Loney 1b4110 Lind dh4110SRdrgz ss3000 Bonifac pr0100YEscor ss1000 Rasms cf4112Scott dh4122 MIzturs 2b5110JMolin c4000 HBlanc c2000Fuld rf3110 Arencii ph-c3222 Kawsk ss1110 DeRosa ph2112 Totals38812 8Totals377117 Toronto0003020128 Tampa Bay0070000007 EJ.Molina (3), Y.Escobar (3). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBToronto 11, Tampa Bay 6. 2BLoney (10). HRRasmus (5), Arencibia (9), DeRosa (3), Longoria (7), Scott (2). SBEncarnacion (2), Bonifacio (3). SFBautista. IPHRERBBSO Toronto Buehrle697725 E.Rogers110001 Oliver W,1-1110010 Janssen S,8-8100001 Tampa Bay Hellickson563343 McGee122201 Farnsworth H,11/320000 Jo.Peralta H,6111012 Rodney L,1-1 11/312221 J.Wright1/300001 WPHellickson, J.Wright. BalkOliver. UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt; First, Marty Foster; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Tim Welke. T:31. A,952 (34,078).White Sox 2, Royals 1, 11 inn. ChicagoKansas City abrhbiabrhbi De Aza lf5000AGordn lf5120 Kppngr 2b4010AEscor ss5000 Greene pr1000Butler dh5011 Rios rf5120Hosmer 1b4010 A.Dunn dh3010L.Cain cf4010 JrDnks dh1111Mostks 3b4000 Konerk 1b5000Francr rf4000 Gillaspi 3b3010S.Perez c4020 AlRmrz ss4011Getz 2b4000 Flowrs c3000 Wise cf3020 Totals372 92Totals39171 Chicago000000001012 Kansas City100000000001 EFrancoeur (1). DPChicago 1, Kansas City 2. LOBChicago 6, Kansas City 5. 2BButler (5), S.Perez (5). HRJor.Danks (1). CSRios (3). IPHRERBBSO Chicago Sale71/361105 Lindstrom2/300001 Thornton110000 Crain W,1-1100001 A.Reed S,11-12100001 Kansas City Shields820029 G.Holland BS,2-9141110 K.Herrera L,2-3231100 HBPby Shields (Flowers). WPShields. UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T:14. A,576 (37,903).Indians 7, Athletics 3 OaklandCleveland abrhbiabrhbi Jaso dh1100Brantly lf5020 Montz ph2000Kipnis 2b5111 S.Smith lf5010ACarer ss4322 Lowrie ss4000Swisher 1b4110 Cespds cf3112MrRynl 3b2111 Moss 1b4120CSantn c3100 Dnldsn 3b3011Giambi dh4022 Reddck rf4010Raburn rf3011 DNorrs c4010Stubbs cf4000 Sogard 2b2000 Rosales ph2010 Totals34383Totals347107 Oakland0001010103 Cleveland20002030x7 LOBOakland 8, Cleveland 9. 2BMoss (3), D.Norris (5), Rosales (3), Giambi (3), Raburn (5). HRCespedes (6), Kipnis (3), A.Cabrera 2 (4), Mar.Reynolds (10). SBBrantley (1). SFCespedes. IPHRERBBSO Oakland Parker L,1-5574427 Resop12/313333 Scribner11/320001 Cleveland U.Jimenez W,2-252/342238 Hagadone H,12/310001 Shaw H,212/321101 J.Smith110001 HBPby Parker (Mar.Reynolds). WPParker, Scribner. UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Doug Eddings; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Paul Nauert. T:05. A,514 (42,241). NL Braves 7, Reds 4 AtlantaCincinnati abrhbiabrhbi BUpton cf4000Choo cf3010 CJhnsn 3b4100Cozart ss5220 Kimrel p0000Votto 1b4211 J.Upton rf4120Phillips 2b4021 FFrmn 1b5021Bruce rf4001 Gattis lf4011Frazier 3b4011 Walden p0000Mesorc c4000 OFlhrt p0000DRonsn lf1010 R.Pena ph1000CIzturs ph1000 McCnn c4000Ondrsk p0000 Uggla 2b4220Hoover p0000 Smmns ss4234Paul ph1000 Mahlm p3000Arroyo p0000 Gearrin p0000Simon p0000 Avilan p0000Lutz ph-lf2010 JSchafr ph1111 Totals38711 7Totals33494 Atlanta1101100307 Cincinnati0002000204 EGattis (3), Mesoraco (3). DPCincinnati 1. LOBAtlanta 8, Cincinnati 8. 2BF.Freeman (4), Gattis (8), Cozart (4), Votto (7), Phillips (8). 3BUggla (2). HRSimmons 2 (4), J.Schafer (1). CSChoo (1). SArroyo 2. IPHRERBBSO Atlanta Maholm W,4-352/342226 Gearrin H,12/300001 Avilan H,42/300011 Walden032200 OFlaherty H,10100000 Kimbrel S,10-12120001 Cincinnati Arroyo L,2-4584427 Simon200006 Ondrusek133311 Hoover100011 Walden pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. HBPby Maholm (Choo). WPGearrin. UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Mike Winters. T:21. A,308 (42,319).INTERLEAGUE Cubs 9, Rangers 2 TexasChicago abrhbiabrhbi Kinsler 2b4000DeJess cf3210 D.Lowe p0000SCastro ss4322 Andrus ss4110Rizzo 1b4134 Beltre 3b4100ASorin lf4001 N.Cruz rf4010Sweeny lf0000 Morlnd 1b4000Schrhlt rf4001 Soto c4021Castillo c5010 DvMrp lf4010Valuen 3b4130 LMartn cf2000Barney 2b2100 Tepsch p1000Feldmn p4111 JeBakr ph1000Russell p0000 Kirkmn p0000Dolis p0000 J.Ortiz p0000 LGarci ph1000 Totals33251Totals349119 Texas0000000022 Chicago10050102x9 ESoto (2), Kinsler (5), Valbuena (4), Castillo (5). DPTexas 1. LOBTexas 5, Chicago 9. 2BAndrus (4), Rizzo (9), Valbuena (4). HR Rizzo (9). SBN.Cruz (2), DeJesus (2), A.Soriano (4). SFSchierholtz. IPHRERBBSO Texas Tepesch L,2-3466544 Kirkman11/321133 J.Ortiz12/310001 D.Lowe122201 Chicago Feldman W,3-3720013 Russell2/310000 Dolis11/322000 WPKirkman. UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Dale Scott; Second, Bill Miller; Third, CB Bucknor. T:08. A,618 (41,019). Rays schedule May 7 vs Toronto May 8 vs Toronto May 9 vs Toronto May 10 vs San Diego May 11 vs San Diego May 12 vs San Diego May 14 vs Boston May 15 vs Boston May 16 vs Boston May 17 at Baltimore May 18 at Baltimore May 19 at Baltimore May 20 at Toronto May 21 at Toronto May 22 at Toronto May 24 vs N.Y. Yankees May 25 vs N.Y. Yankees May 26 vs N.Y. Yankees May 27 vs Miami May 28 vs Miami May 29 at Miami May 30 at Miami May 31 at Cleveland June 1 at Cleveland June 2 at Cleveland June 4 at Detroit June 5 at Detroit June 6 at Detroit June 7 vs Baltimore June 8 vs Baltimore June 9 vs Baltimore June 10 vs Boston June 11 vs Boston June 12 vs Boston June 13 vs Kansas City June 14 vs Kansas City June 15 vs Kansas City June 16 vs Kansas City June 18 at Boston June 19 at Boston June 20 at N.Y. Yankees June 21 at N.Y. Yankees June 22 at N.Y. Yankees June 23 at N.Y. Yankees June 24 vs Toronto June 25 vs Toronto June 26 vs Toronto June 28 vs Detroit June 29 vs Detroit June 30 vs Detroit July 1 at Houston July 2 at Houston July 3 at Houston July 4 at Houston Baseball Leaders AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTINGMiCabrera, Detroit, .385; CSantana, Cleveland, .367; TorHunter, Detroit, .361; LCain, Kansas City, .337; AJones, Baltimore, .331; Altuve, Houston, .331; CDavis, Baltimore, .327. RUNSAJackson, Detroit, 31; MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; McLouth, Baltimore, 25; Crisp, Oakland, 24; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 24; AJones, Baltimore, 24; Machado, Baltimore, 23. RBIMiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Fielder, Detroit, 32; Napoli, Boston, 31; CDavis, Baltimore, 30; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 27; NCruz, Texas, 23; Donaldson, Oakland, 23. HITSMiCabrera, Detroit, 47; AJones, Baltimore, 44; Altuve, Houston, 43; TorHunter, Detroit, 43; Machado, Baltimore, 42; Kinsler, Texas, 41; Cano, New York, 40. HOME RUNSMarReynolds, Cleveland, 10; Arencibia, Toronto, 9; CDavis, Baltimore, 9; Encarnacion, Toronto, 9; Morse, Seattle, 9; Cano, New York, 8; Fielder, Detroit, 8; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 8. PITCHINGBuchholz, Boston, 6-0; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 5-0; Darvish, Texas, 5-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 5-1; 10 tied at 4. SAVESReed, Chicago, 11; Rivera, New York, 11; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 11; Nathan, Texas, 8; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 8; Janssen, Toronto, 8; Perkins, Minnesota, 7; GHolland, Kansas City, 7. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTINGCGomez, Milwaukee, .368; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .348; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, .337; Cuddyer, Colorado, .333; Segura, Milwaukee, .333; Sandoval, San Francisco, .331; Choo, Cincinnati, .331. RUNSCGonzalez, Colorado, 26; Choo, Cincinnati, 25; JUpton, Atlanta, 25; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 24; Holliday, St. Louis, 24; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 24; Pagan, San Francisco, 24; Votto, Cincinnati, 24. RBIBuck, New York, 29; Phillips, Cincinnati, 28; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 28; Craig, St. Louis, 25; Rizzo, Chicago, 25; Cuddyer, Colorado, 24; Frazier, Cincinnati, 24; Sandoval, San Francisco, 24. HITSChoo, Cincinnati, 40; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 40; Sandoval, San Francisco, 40; CGomez, Milwaukee, 39; Votto, Cincinnati, 39; SCastro, Chicago, 38; YMolina, St. Louis, 38. HOME RUNSJUpton, Atlanta, 12; Buck, New York, 10; Harper, Washington, 9; Rizzo, Chicago, 9; Beltran, St. Louis, 8; Fowler, Colorado, 8; 6 tied at 7. PITCHINGLynn, St. Louis, 5-0; Zimmermann, Washington, 5-1; Corbin, Arizona, 4-0; Harvey, New York, 4-0; Hudson, Atlanta, 4-1; JGarcia, St. Louis, 4-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 42; SMiller, St. Louis, 4-2; Maholm, Atlanta, 4-3. SAVESRomo, San Francisco, 12; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 12; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 10; RSoriano, Washington, 10; Mujica, St. Louis, 8; League, Los Angeles, 8; RBetancourt, Colorado, 8. West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Texas2012.6255-5L-111-49-8 Oakland1815.545215-5L-19-89-7 Seattle1518.455547-3L-19-86-10 Los Angeles1120.355873-7L-27-94-11 Houston824.25012111-9L-64-124-12 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Boston2011.6456-4L-311-59-6 New York1812.60017-3L-112-76-5 Baltimore1913.59416-4W-27-512-8 Tampa Bay1417.452644-6L-18-56-12 Toronto1221.364973-7W-27-125-9 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Atlanta1912.6134-6W-29-510-7 Washington1715.53126-4W-29-78-8 Philadelphia1418.438535-5L-28-106-8 New York1216.429533-7L-17-85-8 Miami1022.313975-5W-25-115-11 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway St. Louis2011.6457-3W-67-513-6 Pittsburgh1714.54835-5L-29-68-8 Cincinnati1815.54535-5L-112-56-10 Milwaukee1416.467523-7L-59-105-6 Chicago1220.375854-6W-16-106-10 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway San Fran.1912.6136-4W-611-48-8 Colorado1813.58114-6L-110-58-8 Arizona1615.516314-6L-18-88-7 Los Angeles1317.433534-6L-47-86-9 San Diego1318.419647-3W-17-86-10 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit1911.6339-1W-410-49-7 Kansas City1711.60717-3L-110-57-6 Cleveland1514.517327-3W-17-78-7 Minnesota1314.481434-6W-17-66-8 Chicago1317.433655-5W-17-76-10 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE Rodriguez on field for the first time since hip surgery Associated PressTAMPA Alex Rodriguez is back on the field for the first time since surgery on his left hip almost four months ago. He joined a group of injured New York Yankees starters Monday at the teams minor league complex. The 37-year-old third baseman ran, played catch and hit off a tee. Rodriguez said its like being 8 years old again when I first grabbed a bat. He added its pretty exciting and hes really looking forward to getting back. Rodriguez had surgery Jan. 16 and could return to the Yankees after the All-Star break. A surgeon repaired a torn labrum and impingement in the operation in New York. It feels good to be back out in uniform, Rodriguez said. Its been a rough stretch with the rehab, obviously. Its small bites at a time. Rodriguez is currently taking part in a 30-day rehab schedule setup by his doctors and team officials. Were taking it four weeks at a time, Rodriguez said. Today is one of 30. The upbeat A-Rod signed autographs and took photos with around 40 fans waiting for him outside the players parking lot. Fans driving by stopped their car near the complex driveway and jumped out to have photos taken. I have a lot of unfinished business, said Rodriguez, who struggled offensively late last season. Im really looking forward to getting back on the field close to 100 percent and being who I am. Outfielder Curtis Granderson (broken right forearm), first baseman Mark Teixeira (right wrist), corner infielder Kevin Youkilis (lumbar spine sprain), and catcher Francisco Cervelli (broken hand) are also rehabbing injuries in Florida. Its great seeing him, Teixeira said. Hes just happy to be back, doing some baseball activities. Hes got a big smile on his face right now, which is great. Shortstop Derek Jeter is also on the disabled list with a broken ankle, and is not expected back until after the All-Star break. We always talk about injuries are a part of the game, but this is crazy Rodriguez said. Ive never seen anything like it. But Ive got to tell you, the way those guys are playing up there, the job the front office has done putting these guys together at the last minute, hats off to everyone. A 14-time All-Star, Rodriguez had right hip surgery on March 9, 2009, and returned that May 8. He is due $114 million over the next five years as part of his $275 million, 10-year contract. A-Rod joins the walking wounded Associated Press New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez signs autographs for fans Monday after reporting to the teams minor league complex in Tampa. White Sox edge Royals 2-1 in extra innings

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S COREBOARD C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE made double bogey on the 18th. The four or five others, really, somebody happened to beat me. The 2006 Winged Foot, I beat myself. And thats where it hurts most. So that has taken the most to recover from. Montgomerie is the fourth player in the last four years to be inducted into the Hall of Fame without having won a major. The others were Jumbo Ozaki, Jock Hutchison and Christy OConnor Sr. A fifth would be Peter Alliss, who won 23 times on the European Tour, though he was recognized more for his work with the BBC. Ive enjoyed thoroughly my exploits in major championships, Montgomerie said. I just havent been fortunate, or whatever it takes. Ive never, ever stood up and made a winners speech and said I was unlucky. Never. I never will. Theres always a time where a bit of fortunate comes your way, whether it be for you or against your opponent at the time, and it just so happens that I just havent been so-called fortunate to walk through the door. The door has been ajar many a time. I just havent been able to walk through it. So at the same time, if youre talking about regrets of any part of my golfing career, I have none. Absolutely none, he said. Ive done exactly what Ive tried to do. Ive tried 100 percent on every shot, and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesnt. Montgomerie also received 51 percent of the vote on the International ballot. Venturi was a premier amateur out of San Francisco, leading the 1956 Masters until an 80 in the final round. Venturi captured the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional, in such stifling heat that he suffered from severe dehydration and nearly collapsed before he finished. When carpal tunnel syndrome ended his career, he moved to the broadcast booth and enjoyed 35 years of distinguished service to CBS Sports. Venturi later became Presidents Cup captain in 2000. He has been hospitalized in Palm Springs, Calif., for the last two months and could not attend the ceremony. Nantz accepted on his behalf, and then brought out Venturis two sons, Matt and Tim, saying, We need to put the crystal in the hands of the Venturi family. We need the fingerprints on the crystal. Schofield, also selected through Lifetime Achievement, was head of the European Tour from 1975 to 2004. He rode the presence of Europes Big Five Seve Ballesteros, Nick Faldo, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle and Ian Woosnam to get the tour onto a global stage. The tour went from 17 events when he started to 45 events when he retired. He also paved the way for the tour to go beyond continental Europe, and to include the continent in the Ryder Cup. Park joins his father in the Hall of Fame, and the son probably should have been enshrined already. He won the British Open in 1887 and 1889, and then broadened his influence on golf by building clubs, golf courses and writing. His book in 1896, The Game of Golf, was the first written by a golf professional. He later wrote The Art of Putting that was published in 1920. Among the golf courses he built were the Old Course at Sunningdale outside London, Maidstone on Long Island in New York and Olympia Fields outside Chicago. The Dolphins could try again next year for legislative approval, but they may have burned that bridge with their criticism of House Speaker Will Weatherford, who killed the plan by not putting it up for a vote. Hell still be the speaker of the House next year, Dee said, and I dont see him changing his opinion. The stadium owned by Ross opened in 1987, and the Dolphins have argued upgrades are essential to keep Miami competitive in Super Bowl bidding. The city has hosted the game 10 times, and Miami and San Francisco are finalists for the 50th Super Bowl in 2016. The House leadership has made our efforts to bring the Super Bowl back to Miami and South Florida much more difficult, said Rodney Barreto, chairman of the South Florida Super Bowl Host Committee. Without legislative approval, the Dolphins were unable to go forward with a planned May 14 referendum on the issue in Miami-Dade County. The team had sought up to $289 million from an increase in the county hotel tax, and up to $90 million in state sales tax rebates. The bill would have also allowed other professional sports teams in Florida to compete for a share of state tax dollars. The referendum outcome was uncertain, with opponents complaining the plan constituted corporate welfare. The Dolphins had already spent millions in campaign money, with such former players as Marino, Bob Griese and Jason Taylor lobbying on their behalf, arguing voter approval would significantly strengthen Miamis Super Bowl bid. Now San Franciscos the heavy favorite when NFL owners choose the host city May 21. The site of the 2017 Super Bowl will also be chosen, with owners selecting either the runner-up city for the 2016 game or Houston. MIAMI Continued from Page B1 HALL OF FAMEContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. (SUN) Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays 8 p.m. (WGN-A) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs 10 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Diego Padres NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS SECOND ROUND 7 p.m. (TNT) Indiana Pacers at New York Knicks, game 2 9:30 p.m. (TNT) Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder, game 2 IIHF HOCKEY 1 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 IIHF World Championships: Russia vs. United States NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND 7 p.m. (CNBC) Montreal Canadiens at Ottawa Senators, game 4 7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Pittsburgh Penguins at New York Islanders, game 4 9:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Minnesota Wild, game 4 10 p.m. (CNBC) Vancouver Canucks at San Jose Sharks, game 4 ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Manchester City FC vs West Bromwich Albion FC RADIO 6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame 7:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BASEBALL FHSAA regional semifinals 7 p.m. Citrus at Springstead 7 p.m. St. John Lutheran at Seven Rivers Christian NBA playoff glanceFIRST ROUND Wednesday, April 24 Oklahoma City 105, Houston 102 Indiana 113, Atlanta 98 San Antonio 102, L.A. Lakers 91 Thursday, April 25 Miami 104, Milwaukee 91 Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76 Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82 Friday, April 26 New York 90, Boston 76 San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89 Golden State 110, Denver 108 Saturday, April 27 Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134, 3OT Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83 Atlanta 90, Indiana 69 Oklahoma City 104, Houston 101 Sunday, April 28 Boston 97, New York 90 Miami 88, Milwaukee 77, Miami wins series 4-0 San Antonio 103, L.A. Lakers 82, San Antonio wins series 4-0 Golden State 115, Denver 101 Monday, April 29 Brooklyn 110, Chicago 91 Atlanta 102, Indiana 91 Houston 105, Oklahoma City 103 Tuesday, April 30 Denver 107, Golden State 100 Memphis 103, L.A. Clippers 93 Wednesday, May 1 Boston 92, New York 86 Indiana 106, Atlanta 83 Houston 107, Oklahoma City 100 Thursday, May 2 Brooklyn 95, Chicago 92 Golden State 92, Denver 88, Golden State wins series 4-2 Friday, May 3 New York 88, Boston 80, New York wins series 4-2 Indiana 81, Atlanta 73, Indiana wins series 42 Oklahoma City 103, Houston 94, Oklahoma City wins series 4-2 Memphis 118, L.A. Clippers 105, Memphis wins series 4-2 Saturday, May 4 Chicago 99, Brooklyn 93, Chicago wins series 4-3 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) Sunday, May 5 Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91, Oklahoma City leads series 1-0 Indiana 102, New York 95, Indiana leads series 1-0 Monday, May 6 Chicago 93, Miami 86, Chicago leads series 1-0 Golden State at San Antonio, late Today Indiana at New York, 7 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 8 Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m. Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Friday, May 10 Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11 Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m. New York at Indiana, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 12 San Antonio at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 13 Miami at Chicago, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 New York at Indiana, TBA x-Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 15 x-Chicago at Miami, TBA x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Thursday, May 16 x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m. x-San Antonio at Golden State, TBA Friday, May 17 x-Miami at Chicago, TBA x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA Saturday, May 18 x-New York at Indiana, TBA Sunday, May 19 x-Chicago at Miami, TBA x-Golden State at San Antonio, TBA x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Monday, May 20 x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.NHL playoff glance(x-if necessary) FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Tuesday, April 30 Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT Anaheim 3, Detroit 1 Wednesday, May 1 Boston 4, Toronto 1 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 0 San Jose 3, Vancouver 1 Thursday, May 2 Ottawa 4, Montreal 2 Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1 Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT Friday, May 3 Montreal 3, Ottawa 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3 Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT Saturday, May 4 Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0 Toronto 4, Boston 2 Anaheim 4, Detroit 0, Anaheim leads series 2-1 Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0, St. Louis leads series 2-1 Sunday, May 5 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT, Pittsburgh leads series 2-1 Ottawa 6, Montreal 1, Ottawa leads series 21 San Jose 5, Vancouver 2, San Jose leads series 3-0 Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT, Chicago leads series 2-1 Monday, May 6 Boston 5, Toronto 2, Boston leads series 2-1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3, Washington leads series 2-1 Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT, series tied 2-2 St. Louis at Los Angeles, late Today Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m. Wednesday, May 8 Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday, May 9 N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m. x-San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, TBA Friday, May 10 Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m. x-St. Louis at Los Angeles, TBA x-Anaheim at Detroit, TBA Saturday, May 11 Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, TBA x-Montreal at Ottawa, TBA x-Chicago at Minnesota, TBA x-Vancouver at San Jose, TBA Sunday, May 12 x-Detroit at Anaheim, TBA x-Minnesota at Chicago, TBA x-Boston at Toronto, TBA x-Ottawa at Montreal, TBA x-NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, TBA x-Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBA Monday, May 13 x-NY Rangers at Washington, TBA x-Toronto at Boston, TBA x-San Jose at Vancouver, TBA x-Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBA Major League Baseball National League FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Cincinnati-115Atlanta+105 St. Louis-130at Chicago+120 at San Diego-150Miami+140 at Los Angeles-140Arizona+130 at San Francisco-140Philadelphia+130 American League at Cleveland-115Oakland+105 at Baltimore-120Kansas City+110 at Boston-185Minnesota+175 at Tampa Bay-130Toronto+120 Los Angeles-190at Houston+180 Interleague at Pittsburgh-140Seattle+130 at Washington-125Detroit+115 at New York (NL)-170Chicago (AL)+160 Texas-110at Milwaukee+100 New York (AL)-110at Colorado+100 NBA Playoffs FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG at New York6(183) Indiana at Oklahoma City2(186) Memphis NHL Playoffs FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Ottawa-145Montreal+125 Pittsburgh-160at N.Y. Islanders+140 Chicago-175at Minnesota+155 at San Jose-170Vancouver+150 BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Assigned RHP Zach Clark to Bowie (EL). BOSTON RED SOX Placed RHP Andrew Bailey on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 29. Placed LHP Craig Breslow from the 15-day DL. CHICAGO WHITE SOXSent OF Dayan Viciedo on a rehab assignment to Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS Sent OF Michael Bourn to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment. Placed RHP Vinnie Pestano on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 1. Recalled LHP Nick Hagadone from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERSSent LHP Phil Coke on a rehab assignment to Toledo (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS Designated OFs Rick Ankiel and Fernando Martinez for assignment. Reinstated OF J.D. Martinez from the 15day DL. Selected the contract of OF Trevor Crowe from Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled INF/OF Jimmy Paredes from Oklahoma City. Optioned INF Brandon Laird to Oklahoma City. LOS ANGELES ANGELSOptioned RHP Ryan Brasier to Salt Lake City (PCL). Reinstated RHP Mark Lowe from the 15-Day D.L. NEW YORK YANKEES Assigned RHP Cody Eppley outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES Reinstated C Brian McCann from the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Tyler Pastornicky to Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS Designated RHP Kameron Loe for assignment. Optioned OF Dave Sappelt to Iowa (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Ryan Sweeney from Iowa. Recalled RHP Rafael Dolis from Iowa. LOS ANGELES DODGERSPlaced INF Mark Ellis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 27. Reinstated LHP Chris Capuano from the 15day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms with LHP Greg Smith on a minor league contract. Placed RHP Roy Halladay on the 15day DL. Recalled LHP Joe Savery from Lehigh Valley (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Optioned OF Jermaine Curtis to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES Placed LHP Clayton Richard on the 15-day DL. Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the 15-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSPlaced LHP Jose Mijares on restricted list. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Retained physical therapist Angela Gordon. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Chicago G Marco Belinelli $15,000 for making an obscene gesture during Saturdays game. FOOTBALL National Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed RB DeLeon Eskridge and DE J.D. Griggs. Waived LB Greg Jones and RB Richard Murphy. MINNESOTA VIKINGS Released P Chris Kluwe and WR Nicholas Edwards. Signed OT Brandon Keith and WR Adam Thielen. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Released RB Quentin Hines and LB Ian Sluss. PITTSBURGH STEELERS Announced the retirement of special assistant Joe Greene. Signed OT Guy Whimper and LB Terence Garvin. Released C Ivory Wade and DT Anthony Rashad White. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Named JoJo Wooden director of player personnel and Kevin Kelly director of college scouting. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Signed G Adam Snyder to a two-year contract. Named Ronald Curry assistant offensive coach. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Signed DT Andre Neblett, WRs Jheranie Boyd and Chris Denton, OT Jace Daniels and LB Kalial Glaud. Waived DT Richard Clebert, WR D.J. Monroe and RB Akeem Shavers. Terminated the contractws of G Roger Allen and DE George Selvie. HOCKEY National Hockey League EDMONTON OILERS Reassigned D Nathan Deck from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Stockton (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS Recalled G Martin Jones and G Jean-Francois Berube from Ontario (ECHL) MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Matt Dumba and F Carson McMillan from Houston (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Signed D Radko Gudas to a three-year contract. TENNIS WORLD TEAMTENNIS Announced Venus Williams and Andy Roddick are part owners of the league. COLLEGE ARKANSAS Announced QB Brandon Mitchell, DE Austin Flynn, S Defonta Lowe and RB Keante Minor will transfer. FLORIDA Announced mens basketball GF DeVon Walker will transfer. GEORGE MASON Named Tajama Abraham Ngongba womens assistant basketball coach. KANSAS Named Kale Pick graduate football assistant for offense. MILWAUKEE Announced the resignation of womens tennis coach Sean McInerney to take same position at Utah State. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: SUNDAY, MAY 5 Fantasy 5: 4 5 14 16 20 5-of-53 winners$62,148.49 4-of-5280$107 3-of-58,491$9.50 CASH 3 (early) 4 4 2 CASH 3 (late) 1 7 6 PLAY 4 (early) 9 1 6 7 PLAY 4 (late) 8 2 7 9 FANTASY 5 5 12 13 21 36 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 B3 possession to knot the game. Then when Robinson connected on a 20-footer with 1:18 left, the Bulls had the lead and plenty of swagger. With good reason, too. Wade missed a 3-pointer on the next possession, Robinson drove the lane and scored with 45.5 seconds left, and suddenly the Bulls were up 90-86 rendered virtually the entire building silent. James drove against Butler and tried a 12-footer that missed everything, the Bulls got the rebound, Robinson made a free throw to stretch the lead to five and the stunner was complete. Game 1 to the Bulls. And with it, home-court advantage as well. It was a night that started with a celebration and ended with Miamis arena in silence. James was honored before the game, with a brief on-court ceremony to commemorate his fourth NBA MVP award. Everybody here knows about the statistics, NBA Commissioner David Stern said. All I would like to add in presenting this trophy is that LeBron James exemplifies the values of our game. Teamwork, passion, a continued extraordinary desire to improve, and a state of excellence that is unmatched. So thank you LeBron James, for what you bring to our league. James picked up the trophy he was actually presented with it Sunday and made a slow circle with it aloft, as cheers rained down from the soldout stands. Its an unbelievable achievement, but I wouldnt be able to do it without these 14 guys here, our coaching staff and most of all you guys, James said, speaking to the crowd. This trophy is for you. So thank you so much, and lets get ready to go. And with that, the game started. Problem was, no one was ready to go. The Heat missed their first seven shots maybe rust from an eight-day layoff really was a factor and Chicago led 21-15 after an opening quarter where Nazr Mohammed, he of the 2.6-point-per-game scoring average in this regular season, had as many points (two) as any Miami starter did. A 10-0 Heat run in the second gave Miami a 25-23 lead, and the teams were tied at 37 at halftime. The story at that point was James, who wore twice as many pairs of sneakers in the first half (two) as he had field goals (one). He had two points at the break, the lowest of his 120-game postseason career, on just 1 for 6 shooting. James started the game in sneakers that were MVP editions, then returned to his more customary style late in the first half. He opened the second half with a 3pointer, so the shoes were a quick fix. But the Bulls were in for the long haul, and after James made the consecutive three-point plays to open a seven-point lead, Chicago answered with seven straight points, knotting the game at 76-all when Belinelli made a 3-pointer with just under 5 minutes left. Momentum belonged to Chicago, and soon, so did the game. BULLS Continued from Page B1 Associated Press Miami Heat forward LeBron James, right, talks with guard Dwyane Wade Monday during the first half of Game 1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Chicago Bulls in Miami. The Heat lost 93-86.

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B4 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S PORTS Bruins earn key Game 3 victory at Toronto Associated PressTORONTO The Boston Bruins spoiled the return of playoff hockey to Toronto, scoring two quick goals in the second period in a 5-2 victory over the Maple Leafs on Monday night. Adam McQuaid, Rich Peverley, Nathan Horton, Daniel Paille and David Krejci, with an empty-net goal with 1:17 remaining, scored for Boston The win came before 19,746 fans inside the Air Canada Centre. Outside, a blueand-white throng watched on a big screen in Maple Leaf Square as playoff hockey returned to Toronto for the first time since 2004. After being beaten 4-2 in Boston on Saturday night, the Bruins upped their game. The Leafs, meanwhile, made mistakes and were punished, although they tried to close the gap with a busy third period in which they outshot the visitors 18-6. The Leafs finished with a 47-38 edge in shots. Game 4 is Wednesday in Toronto, with Boston leading 2-1 in the best-of-seven series. The dominant line of Milan Lucic, Krejci and Horton finished with two goals and six assists. They have combined for 17 points through the first three postseason games, with five goals and 12 assists. Jake Gardiner and Phil Kessel replied for Toronto in a physical game. It was the Leafs first home playoff game since May 4, 2004, when Toronto lost 3-2 in overtime to Philadelphia to lose the conference semifinals 4-2. Fans were rewarded for their patience with free scarves Monday night but not with a win. The last home playoff win came in that same series, a 3-1 victory on April 30, 2004. Rangers 4, Capitals 3 NEW YORK Derek Stepan and Arron Asham both scored tiebreaking goals in the third period for the New York Rangers in a 4-3 victory over the Washington Capitals in Game 3. The Rangers finally found their offense and got back into their first-round playoff series. New York still trails 2-1 in the Eastern Conference series, with Game 4 here Wednesday night. Stepan gave the Rangers the lead for good with 6:25 remaining when he deftly tipped in a pass in front from Rick Nash. Asham had put New York in front 3-2 at 2:53, but Jay Beagle got the Capitals even again 4:26 later. Derick Brassard had a goal and two assists for the Rangers, who managed only one goal in the first two losses in Washington and hadnt scored since the first period of Game 1 a scoreless stretch of 124 minutes, 6 seconds. Late Sunday night Sharks 5, Canucks 2 SAN JOSE, Calif. Joe Pavelski and Logan Couture each scored twice to spoil Cory Schneiders return to the nets for Vancouver and the San Jose Sharks won their third straight game to open the playoffs, beating the Canucks 5-2. Pavelski scored the first two goals and Couture and Patrick Marleau added scores 9 seconds apart to break the game open early in the third period and give the Sharks a 3-0 series lead. Couture added a second power-play goal early in the third to end Schneiders night and give him a playoff-best four points for the game. Antti Niemi made 28 saves. San Jose will attempt to complete the first series sweep in franchise history at home tonight. Associated Press Toronto Maple Leafs forward James van Riemsdyk, left, collides Monday with Boston Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid as goalie Tuukka Rask looks on during the first period of Game 3 of their NHL Stanley Cup playoff series in Toronto. SPORTS BRIEFS Floridas Walker transferring after freshman yearGAINESVILLE Florida swingman DeVon Walker has decided to transfer after one season of limited playing time. Coach Billy Donovan made the announcement Monday, saying Walker has been granted his release and we hope for the best for him wherever he chooses to go. Walker played in 25 games last season, finishing with 20 points, 17 rebounds and four blocked shots. Hes the second underclassman to leave the Gators this month. Point guard Braxton Ogbueze announced his intention to transfer last week. Florida has one of the nations top recruiting classes headed to Gainesville. It includes guard Kasey Hill and forward Chris Walker, both McDonalds AllAmerica selections. Donovan also landed Rutgers transfer Eli Carter last week. Carter chose Florida over Maryland, looking for a fresh start after coach Mike Rice was fired. Glaud among college free agents signing with Bucs TAMPA Rutgers linebacker Kalial Glaud is among four college free agents joining the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The team also announced Monday the signings of North Carolina receiver Jheranie Boyd, Northern Michigan tackle Jace Daniels and Mount Union receiver Chris Denton. Defensive tackle Richard Clebert, receiver D.J. Monroe and running back Akeem Shavers were waived. The contracts of guard Roger Allen and defensive end George Selvie were terminated. Former MLB outfielder Otis Nixon arrestedCANTON, Ga. Former Major League outfielder Otis Nixon has been arrested on drug charges following a weekend traffic stop in suburban Atlanta. A report from the Cherokee County Sheriffs Office said Nixon was pulled over just after midnight Saturday after another driver called police to report a Dodge Ram truck weaving all over the road. The 54-year-old remained in jail Monday afternoon on $11,880 bond. The report said deputies found a pipe to smoke crack cocaine in Nixons pocket and another in the car. They also found several suspected crack rocks. The deputies conducted field sobriety tests and determined Nixon wasnt under the influence of crack cocaine or alcohol. Nixon collected more than 600 stolen bases in 17 seasons from 1983-99. He played for several teams including the Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians and Montreal Expos. From wire reports No Celtics, Lakers in second round for first time since 2007 Associated PressThe seconds ticked down on the Boston Celtics season as Game 6 against the New York Knicks slipped away, a ferocious fourthquarter comeback falling just short. Kevin Garnett trudged toward the bench to a standing ovation, and he stopped quickly to whisper in coach Doc Rivers ear. Rivers shook his head, muttering damn as a sixyear run of championship-level basketball in Boston flashed before his eyes. Three thousand miles away in Los Angeles, the stitches had recently been removed from Kobe Bryants left leg and the long, painful rehabilitation of a torn Achilles tendon was only beginning. The Celtics and Lakers are aching, aging and nowhere to be found now that the second round of the playoffs has started. The last time the second round began without at least one of the leagues two marquee franchises was the 2006-07 season, before Pau Gasol arrived in L.A. to help get the Shaq-less Lakers over the hump and before KG landed in Boston to help turn things around. Now both teams head into the offseason far sooner than theyre accustomed to, with big stars on the mend and a lingering question: Does either team deserve headliner status anymore? The Miami Heat are the clear kings these days, the defending NBA champions with the best player in the world. The San Antonio Spurs, who hammered the Lakers in the first round, and even the Knicks, who overcame their own immaturity to overwhelm the older Celtics, also sit higher on the totem pole at the moment. And there are younger stars entering their prime in Oklahoma City, Golden State and with that other team in Los Angeles, the Clippers. The hard decisions for the Lakers and Celtics are just around the corner. The Lakers were a mess all season, firing their coach five games in and limping through a humbling 45-37 year that including injuries to Gasol, Howard and Steve Nash. Then Bryant went down, and there was no chance. The new collective bargaining agreement is also set to unleash an avalanche of luxury tax penalties on the team with the largest payroll in the league next season as much as $85 million if they re-sign Howard and keep Gasol and his $19 million salary. When you lose, everything is in play, GM Mitch Kupchak said. This is the third year in a row that you could argue we didnt live up to or play up to expectations. Kupchaks biggest challenge may be persuading Howard to stay. Bryant may not be fully healthy until January, Nash will turn 40 next season and the rest of the roster is filled with journeymen and role players, taking some of the glitz out of what has been one of the most glamorous destinations in the league for decades. If you just look at the opportunity, which is to play for this franchise in this city, with what this franchise has meant to this city and its accomplishments, thats probably the most any team can offer a player, Kupchak said. The Celtics lost point guard Rajon Rondo to a torn ACL in January, almost a month before the trade deadline. But GM Danny Ainge declined to add another ball-handler, and it cost them dearly in the playoffs against the Knicks. The struggles of both teams to overcome key injuries stands in stark contrast to the Bulls, who have weathered the season-long absence of Derrick Rose and serious health concerns for Joakim Noah, Luol Deng and Kirk Hinrich to advance to the second round. The Spurs won 58 games despite missing Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili for long stretches. Now the Celtics enter yet another summer of deciding whether to bring back Pierce and Garnett, or start over around a rehabbing Rondo and Jeff Green, who played well with the increased minutes. Only this time the finality is much more palpable. Pierce could be traded, while Garnett is considering retirement. You know, we need more, Rivers said. But the key is, for us, you know, do you want to take away to get more? And that will be a decision that will be made later. The last time the second round of the playoffs didnt have at least one of these two teams, the Celtics failed to make it altogether and the Lakers were bounced by the Phoenix Suns in 2007. Ainge brought in Garnett and Ray Allen later that summer and Kupchak landed Gasol from Memphis in a trade, and the two were rekindling a decades-old rivalry in the NBA Finals, and ushering in a new era of popularity for the league, the following June. Those days seem so long ago and far away now. Associated Press Boston Celtics head coach Doc Rivers gives forward Kevin Garnett a pat on the back after taking him out of the game Friday in the final minute of Game 6 of their first-round NBA playoff series against the New York Knicks in Boston. The Knicks won 88-80, eliminating the Celtics from the playoffs. Sharapova advances at Madrid Open Associated PressMADRID Maria Sharapova rallied from a break down in the first set to beat Alexandra Dulgheru of Romania 7-5, 6-2 Monday and reach the second round of the Madrid Open. The second-seeded Russian said she was still adjusting to changing weather conditions in Madrid and the altitude as well after winning the title in Stuttgart last weekend. Madrid is 2,180 feet above sea level. It was a tough match, Sharapova said. I was really happy that I got that break back in the first set and was able to win in two sets. Victoria Azarenka of Belarus also advanced, outlasting Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia 7-6 (8), 7-6 (3). Azarenka, who finished runner-up in Madrid the past two years, is returning from an ankle injury and said it was good to get a tough test right away. I dont think I could have asked for a better match to start after a break, she said. Laura Robson of Britain pulled off the first upset of the tournament, beating fourth-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland 6-3, 6-1 in a second-round match. The 19-year-old Robson arrived in Spain coming off her sixth first-round loss of the year at the Portugal Open but was able to capitalize on her break points against last years Wimbledon finalist. In the mens event, 11th-seeded Nicolas Almagro of Spain advanced when Tobias Kamke of Germany retired injured after losing the first set 6-4. Milos Raonic of Canada, American John Isner and Japans Kei Nishikori were also first-round winners. The top-seeded players in the mens draw, including Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer, have a bye into the second round. Associated Press Maria Sharapova returns the ball Monday against Alexandra Dulgheru during the Madrid Open in Madrid.

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W e are all familiar with the excise tax when you buy a product, there is a certain tax that that you incur but up until Jan. 1, 2013, medical devices used during the care of a patient or that are implanted were not taxed. This is now a thing of the past as a result of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. I think we all agree that affordable health care for all of our citizens is an admirable goal, and working toward that is a good idea, but taxing the devices, which the government estimates will raise in excess of $20 billion by 2020, could be a slippery slope, and its impact on health care delivery could be affected. There are three classifications for medical devices. The first one is exempt, and the second one may be exempt depending on how it is marketed, and the third classification will be taxed on total sales rather than profits, which makes the reselling, or black market, not affected, and could interfere with the quality of goods that are utilized in health care delivery as we are all attuned to health care costs, and all trying to keep the costs down. Some specialties will be hit harder than others. For the specialty of Ear, Nose and Throat, devices used to do middle ear surgery and reconstruct middle ear bones and hearing will be affected, as well as hearing aid devices. Even the ear tubes that we put in children to help hearing and evacuate fluid will be affected by this excise tax. This tax will undoubtedly increase the cost of developing new Direct drugs Bashful? Buy the blue pill online L INDAA. J OHNSON AP business writer TRENTON, N.J. M en who are bashful about needing help in the bedroom no longer have to go to the drugstore to buy that little blue pill. In a first for the drug industry, Pfizer Inc. told The Associated Press the drugmaker will begin selling its popular erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to patients on its website. Men still will need a prescription to buy the blue, diamond-shaped pill on viagra.com, but they no longer have to face a pharmacist to get it filled. And for those who are bothered by Viagras steep $25a-pill price, Pfizer is offering three free pills with the first order and 30 percent off the second one. Pfizers bold move blows up the drug industrys distribution model. Drugmakers dont sell medicines directly to patients. Instead, they sell in bulk to wholesalers, who then distribute the drugs to pharmacies, hospitals and doctors offices. But the worlds secondlargest drugmaker is trying a new strategy to tackle a problem that plagues the industry. Unscrupulous online pharmacies increasingly offer patients counterfeit versions of Viagra and other brand-name drugs for up to 95 percent off with no prescription needed. Patients dont realize the drugs are fake or that legitimate pharmacies require a prescription. Other major drugmakers likely will watch Pfizers move closely. If it works, drugmakers could begin selling other medicines that are rampantly counterfeited and sold online, particularly treatments for nonurgent conditions seen as embarrassing. Think: diet drugs, medicines for baldness and birth control pills. If it works, everybody will hop on the train, says Les Funtleyder, a health care strategist at private equity fund Poliwogg who believes Pfizers site will attract fence-sitters who are nervous about buying online. The online Viagra sales are Pfizers latest effort to combat a problem that has grown with the popularity of the Internet. In recent years, Americans have become more comfortable with online shopping, with many even buying prescription drugs online. Thats particularly true for those who dont have insurance, are bargain hunters or want to keep their medicine purchases private. Few realize that the vast majority of online pharmacies dont follow the rules. The Internet is filled with illegitimate websites that lure customers with spam emails and professional-looking websites that run 24-hour call centers. A January study by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, which accredits online pharmacies, found only 257 of 10,275 online pharmacy sites it examined appeared legitimate. Experts say the fake drugs such websites sell can be dangerous. Thats because they dont include the right amount of the active ingredient, if any,H EALTH & L IFE I s it possible that the mighty little aspirin could help stop the growth of breast cancer? Well, if recent animal research is any indication, it may well become part of routine breast cancer treatment. Research done in test tubes and in mice which was recently presented at a conference in Boston suggests taking low doses of aspirin on a regular basis may stop breast cancer from growing and spreading. However, as I have warned all of my readers before, read these results with an air of caution, this is Low-dose aspirin may halt cancer See BENNETT / Page C6 Dr. Sunil Gandhi CANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Positive change C ancer is a very complex disease. There are many different kinds of cancer and it may start from many different parts of the body. At the same time, every cancer patient is unique and needs to be treated appropriately. We at my place of business have been managing many cancer patients every year since 1983, here in our own county. We realize our primary responsibility is taking care of our patients. We take it seriously. At the same time, there are many new advances in cancer and many new drugs are now available. These advances are remarkable Taxing medical devices G ood morning! Nature Coast EMS is preparing to celebrate National EMS week May 19 through 25 and we are asking for your letters and support. This years theme is One mission. One team. If you have a special story you wish to share, please send us a letter or email telling us how our team members helped you in your time of crisis. If you want to share your story but wish to remain anonymous, just make note of it in your letter. If you have a business in the area with a sign in front, we ask that you post a note of thanks to Nature Coast EMS celebrating National EMS Week and if you are able to offer a special discount on in your store during the week well get the word out. I want pictures, too, so if youre participating, let me know. Team members of Nature Coast EMS risk their lives every day saving lives; your family and friends, your neighbors, and your coworkers. Our EMTs and paramedics provide pre-hospital medicine in the field that begins the continuity of care right through the doors of the hospital. Nature Coast EMS has strong relations with the emergency departments at all area hospitals because it is important when providing the best possible health care with the latest protocols in place. Nature Coast EMS would like Requesting letters of support See LUCAS / Page C6 See GRILLO / Page C6 Dr. Denis Grillo EAR, NOSE & THROAT Section C TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE INSIDE Dr. Ed Dodge / Page C2 Dr. Frank Vascimini / Page C5 Dr. C. Joseph Bennett NAVIGATING CANCER So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. See GANDHI / Page C6 Katie Lucas NATURE COAST EMS Associated Press This photo provided by Pfizer shows Viagra pills. In a first for the drug industry, Pfizer Inc. on Monday told The Associated Press it will sell the erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to patients on its website. See DIRECT / Page C3 SO YOU KNOW Link to accredited pharmacies: www.nabp.net/programs/ accreditation/vipps/find-a-vipps-online-pharmacy Counterfeit Viagra pills, top and bottom left, are displayed March 2, 2012, alongside real ones, top and bottom right, in a lab at Pfizer in Groton, Conn. 000ERYG Little to no out of pocket expense for most Medicare Patients with secondary insurances. For Appointment Call Toll Free 1-855-Gulfcoast (1-855-485-3262) www.gulfcoastspine.net G e t B a c k I n t o T h e S w i n g O f L i f e G e t B a c k I n t o Get Back Into T h e S w i n g O f L i f e The Swing Of Life W i t h M i n i m a l l y I n v a s i v e S p i n e S u r g e r y W i t h With M i n i m a l l y Minimally I n v a s i v e Invasive S p i n e Spine S u r g e r y Surgery Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis Spinal Fractures due to Trauma or Osteoporosis Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to: Minimally Invasive Spine Surgeons James J. Ronzo, D.O. Frank S. Bono, D.O. Board Certified, Fellowship Trained

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HPH Hospice will host free 20-minute memory screenings for adults age 50 and older from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 11, and Wednesday, June 12. Participants will meet privately with Jerry Fisher, MSW, program specialist for the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter. While the screening is not considered a diagnostic tool and is not intended for those who have dementia or Alzheimers, it is helpful when it comes to determining if there is a serious memory problem, according to the Alzheimers Association. Screenings will take place at the HPH Hospice Team office at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza, inside the Memory Mobile. Appointments are required. Call HPH Hospice Team Office at 352-527-4600 for an appointment. CRYSTAL RIVER National Hospital Week is May 12 to 18, with the theme A Guiding Light for Changing Times recognizing the important role hospitals play in their communities. This week celebrates the history, technology and dedicated professionals that make our hospitals beacons of confidence and care. First and foremost, this week is a celebration of people, said Joyce Brancato, chief executive officer of Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center. Its about recognizing the people who work hard to provide superior health care 24/7. Were extremely proud of each member of our staff and we recognize the important role they play in making us a trusted health care partner in our community. Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, a 128-bed general, medical/surgical acute care facility serving Citrus, Levy and south Marion counties, opened its doors in 1978. Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com, Facebook.com/SRRMC or Twitter.com/SRRMC. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers : During May, donors will receive a moustache T-shirt. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, Big Lots, 146 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. 8:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, May 7, Citrus County School Bus Transportation, 710 N.E. Sixth Ave., Crystal River. 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, Arbor Trail Rehab & Skilled Nursing, 611 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday, May 8, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 1 to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 9, Camp E-Nini-Hassee, 7027 E. Stage Coach Trail, Floral City. 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, May 9, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, May 10, Lecanto High School, 3810 W. Educational Path, Lecanto. Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 11, American Legion Post No. 155, 6585 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, May 12, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, May 13, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway Inverness. Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 14, Walmart Supercenter, 3826 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 14, Citrus County School Bus Transportation, 2950 S. Panther Pride Drive, Lecanto. CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center offers the following health education programs presented by board-certified physicians and licensed medical professionals. Website: SevenRivers Regional.com. Call 352-7951234 to register for programs. Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp Having knee or hip replacement surgery? Attend Ortho Camp to learn preand postsurgery exercises, how to use a walker, knee and hip precautions and adaptive equipment that may be needed for activities of daily living at 1 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration required. WomensWorks: Girls Night Out This event is part of a nationwide initiative to educate women about health and wellness opportunities in their community. A rnold is a man who loves gardens. He has had great gardens in Zimbabwe through the years. They can be showplaces, but thats not why he grows them. He grows them for their wonderful nutritional value. He also grows them for their commercial value, and his produce is in much demand in Mutares grocery stores. Shoppers and shopkeepers alike know good produce when they see it. Unfortunately, the drought Zimbabwe suffered in the past decade has put a major crimp in Arnolds gardening efforts. The spring-fed stream that supplied water for his gardens dried up last year for the first time in the memory of village elders. It has not revived, even with the return of rain this rainy season. Chitakatira is a rural farming village scattered across a broad valley between the slopes of two mountain ranges, 10 or 12 miles south of Mutare. Some of the homes and small, two-hectare farms extend up the gentle slopes of one of those mountain ranges. Thats where Arnolds rural home and garden are situated. It is a beautiful area. Challenge of reviving the gardens Arnold has a deep well that could supply the water his gardens need, but it doesnt have a pump. The nearest electric source is a mile or two away. A solar pump would be his best solution, but the price of getting and installing a good solar pump is several thousand dollars beyond his means, so hes had to look for another solution. One of his neighbors has a water source from another small mountain stream. Arnold and Lancelot have become friends. He admired Arnolds gardens when they were thriving. Most of the small farmers in the area grow corn that is ground into mealie-meal (ground corn flour) after harvesting. That is their main crop. Arnold proposed a partnership with Lancelot that would benefit both of them. Arnold would help him develop gardens on his land and supply him with seeds or seedlings needed for these gardens. He would also transport their produce to area markets and manage any transactions involved. Finally, he would supply the hoses or pipes needed to bring water from a spring-fed reservoir to water the gardens. Both Arnold and Lancelot would supply the labor needed to work the gardens. Lancelot liked this plan, and they began putting it into effect a few months ago. Arnold invited me to visit their gardens in early April, and I was well impressed with how much they have already accomplished. The first crops of greens and veggies are nearly ready for harvest, and successive crops are coming along nicely. Theyll have a good supply of produce to use themselves and to market on a continuing basis. Promising potential for community Im focusing on Arnolds gardens for three reasons. The first is the nutritional potential in them is truly remarkable. Plants are the only living organisms that can convert the suns energy into food energy, and they provide the cleanest possible source of food energy. Gardening is also good exercise. If more people adopt the habit of growing good gardens, the advantages this provides will do wonders for their health. The second reason Im excited about Arnolds gardens is the community potential they offer. His neighbors are very interested in his gardens, and as they see the benefits connected with them, they want to try doing something similar. His gardens are models for the community, and he is very happy to help them get started. The third reason for optimism about his gardens is the commercial potential they offer. Arnold is already well known to managers of Mutares grocery stores and they like to stock his produce in their stores. As his community begins to follow his example, there is a nice potential for them to benefit economically, added to any health benefits they gain. Since poverty is a major contributing factor to health problems in developing countries, any economic upgrade will help families in many ways. As Arnold reaps more benefits from his gardening partnership, he plans to install a solar pump in his idle well and begin reviving the gardens on his property. His future goal is to register a trust named Kumakomo Agricultural Trust that will teach interested people of any community the key principles of sustainable gardening. The potential for his family and community is promising. The outlook for improving public health in the area is good! Ed Dodge, M.D., MPH, is a retired physician now living in Texas. Visit his website, www.the poweroflifestyle.com. C2 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE The story of Arnolds gardens in Zimbabwe Dr. Ed Dodge POWER OF LIFESTYLE Health NOTES See NOTES / Page C4 B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 000ESHJ New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Primary Medical Care Centers 000EV4R PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 16 DEADLINE: TUESDAY, MAY 7 0 0 0 E V 4 U EMERGENCY GUIDE 2013 This years emergency guide is once again being partnered with the Sheriffs Emergency Management Team to promote their May 18th expo as well as hurricane preparation plans for before, during and after the storm. It includes evacuation information, maps for tracking the storm, flood zone map and more. THE RATE INCLUDES AN AD IN TWO PUBLICATIONS As an advertiser, this section really delivers! Two ads for one price Distribution in the Chronicle and at the Expo Highly read content Readers will keep the section for future reference Call your advertising representative to reserve your space. 352-563-5592 Reserve Your Ad Today!

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or contain toxic substances such as heavy metals, lead paint and printer ink. Theyre generally made in filthy warehouses and garages in Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Online buyers are playing Russian roulette, says Matthew Bassiur, vice president of global security at New York-based Pfizer. The factories are deplorable. Ive seen photographs of these places, he says. You wouldnt even want to walk in them, let alone ingest anything made in them. Pfizer, which invented the term erectile dysfunction, has long been aggressive in fighting counterfeiters. It conducts undercover investigations and works with authorities around the globe, with good reason. Counterfeit versions of Viagra and dozens of other Pfizer medicines rob the company of billions in annual sales. Viagra is one of its top drugs, with $2 billion in worldwide revenue last year. And its the most counterfeited drug in the U.S., according to the company. A 2011 study, in which Pfizer bought Viagra from 22 popular Internet pharmacies and tested the pills, found 77 percent were counterfeit. Most had half or less of the promised level of the active ingredient. Viagra is appealing to counterfeiters because it carries a double whammy: Its expensive and it treats a condition with an embarrassment factor. Crooks running the illegal online pharmacies brazenly explain their ultra-low Viagra prices often $1 to $3 a pill by claiming they sell generic Viagra. Generics are copycat versions of brand-name prescription drugs. They can legally be made after a drugmakers patent, or exclusive right to sell a drug, ends. Generic drugmakers dont have to spend $1 billion or so on testing to get a new drug approved, so their copycat versions often cost up to 90 percent less than the original drug. But there is no such thing as generic Viagra. Pfizer has patents giving it the exclusive right to sell Viagra until 2020 in the U.S. and for many years in other countries. Many patients are unaware of that. Dr. David Dershewitz, an assistant urology professor at New Jersey Medical School who treats patients at Newarks University Hospital, says erectile dysfunction is common in men with enlarged prostates, diabetes and other conditions, but most men are too embarrassed to discuss it. He says well over half of his patients who do broach the issue complain about Viagras price. Some tell Dershewitz that they go online looking for bargains because they cant afford Viagra. The few that do admit to it have said that the results have been fairly dismal, but none has suf fered serious harm, he says. For Pfizer, thats a big problem. People who buy fake drugs online that dont work, or worse, harm them, may blame the companys product. Thats because its virtually impossible to distinguish fakes from real Viagra. The vast majority of patients do believe that theyre getting Viagra, said Vic Cavelli, head of marketing for primary care medicines at Pfizer, which plans to have drugstore chain CVS Caremark Corp. fill the orders placed on viagra.com. The sales lost to counterfeits threaten Pfizer at a time when Viagras share of the $5 billion-a-year global market for legitimate erectile dysfunction drugs has slipped, falling from 46 percent in 2007 to 39 percent last year, according to health data firm IMS Health. The reason? Competition from rival products, mainly Eli Lilly and Co.s Cialis the pill touted in those ubiquitous commercials featuring couples in his-and-hers bathtubs in bizarre places. Judson Clark, an Edward Jones analyst, forecasts that Viagra sales will decline even further, about 5 percent each year for the next five years, unusual for a drug in its prime. Clark says he thinks Pfizers strategy will prevent sales from declining, but hes unsure how well it will work. Its a very interesting and novel approach, he says. Whether it returns Viagra to growth is hard to say.Linda A. Johnson is at http://twitter.com/ LindaJ_onPharma. H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C3 Tips for safe use of eye cosmetics Q : How can I use eye cosmetics safely? A: Eye cosmetics are intended to make eyes more attractive, or in some cases to cleanse the eye area. One thing they shouldnt do is cause harm. Most are safe when used properly. However, there are some things to be careful about when using these products, such as the risk of infection, the risk of injury from the applicator, and the use of unapproved color additives. Eye cosmetics are usually safe when you buy them, but misusing them can allow dangerous bacteria or fungi to grow in them. Then, when applied to the eye area, the cosmetic can cause an infection. In rare cases, women have been temporarily or permanently blinded by an infection from an eye cosmetic. In view of these potential problems, the FDA has provided a checklist of tips for their safe usage. If any eye cosmetic causes irritation, stop using it immediately. If irritation persists, see a doctor. Avoid using eye cosmetics if you have an eye infection or the skin around the eye is inflamed. Wait until the area is healed. Discard any eye cosmetics you were using when you got the infection. Be aware that there are bacteria on your hands that, if placed in the eye, could cause infections. Wash your hands before applying eye cosmetics. Make sure that any instrument you place in the eye area is clean. Dont share your cosmetics. Another persons bacteria may be hazardous to you. Dont allow cosmetics to become covered with dust or contaminated with dirt or soil. Keep containers clean. Dont use old containers of eye cosmetics. Manufacturers usually recommend discarding mascara two to four months after purchase. Discard dried-up mascara. Dont add saliva or water to moisten it. The bacteria from your mouth may grow in the mascara and cause infection. Adding water may introduce bacteria and will dilute the preservative that is intended to protect against microbial growth. Dont store cosmetics at temperatures above 85 degrees F. Cosmetics held for long periods in hot cars, for example, are more susceptible to deterioration of the preservative. When applying or removing eye cosmetics, be careful not to scratch the eyeball or other sensitive area. Never apply or remove eye cosmetics in a moving vehicle. Dont use any cosmetics near your eyes unless they are intended specifically for that use. For instance, dont use a lip liner as an eye liner. You may be exposing your eyes to contamination from your mouth, or to color additives that are not approved for use in the area of the eye. Avoid color additives that are not approved for use in the area of the eye, such as permanent eyelash tints and kohl. Be especially careful to keep kohl away from children, since reports have linked it to lead poisoning. Richard P Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. DIRECT Continued from Page C1 Richard Hoffmann ASK THE PHARMACIST 0 0 0 E Q D F ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE A D V A N C E D H E A L T H Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA 9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 10A, Crystal River . . . . 352-563-2597 ASSISTED LIVING S U P E R I O R R E S I D E N C E S O F L E C A N T O M E M O R Y C A R E 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-5483 S U N F L O W E R S P R I N G S A S S I S T E D L I V I N G C O M M U N I T Y 8733 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8017 CARDIOLOGY C I T R U S C A R D I O L O G Y C O N S U L T A N T S P A Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC Delfin, Luis MD FACC Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC Kannam, Hari MD Miryala, Vinod MD FACC Nerello, Nishant MD Pasupuleti, Suman MD Rivero, Abel MD Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC Trigo, Gisela MD FACC Walker, Dennis J. MD 760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-4165 308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101, Leesburg . . . . . . 352-315-0627 910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages . . . . 352-751-3356 DENTAL C H R I S T I E D E N T A L O F M E A D O W C R E S T Beckton, Tedra DMD Tran, Hang DMD 6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River . . . . 877-290-2818 C I T R U S H I L L S D E N T A L A S S O C I A T E S Davila, Alexa DMD Davila, Jose DDS 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-527-1614 C O M P L E T E F A M I L Y D E N T I S T R Y Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA 1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1223 L E D G E R D E N T I S T R Y Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA 3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-3443 DERMATOLOGY B A Y D E R M A T O L O G Y & C O S M E T I C S U R G E R Y P A Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD Board Certified Esguerra, David DO FAOCD Board Certified Broughton, Brandi PA-C 7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-503-2002 FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE H E A L T H & W E L L C A R E S E R V I C E S O F F L O R I D A I N C DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD McCollough, Barney PA Tzivanis, James PA 5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-746-1818 H E R N A N D O M E D I C A L C E N T E R Patel, Shirish MD Mazur, Barbara ARNP 2669 N. Florida Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-637-2550 S U N C O A S T P R I M A R Y C A R E S P E C I A L I S T S Villacastin, Alex T. MD Co, Alistair W. MD Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC Stawkowski, Lawrence PA 10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs . . . 352-489-2486 ENDOCRINOLOGY C I T R U S D I A B E T E S T R E A T M E N T C E N T E R Christ Medical Center Tawfik, Eihab MD PA 7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-0444 HEALTH EDUCATION T O B A C C O P R E V E N T I O N F L O R I D A H E A L T H 120 N. Montgomery Ave. Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-1731 HEALTH PRODUCTS F U R N I T U R E P A L A C E & M A T T R E S S W A R E H O U S E 3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-2999 W H O L E S A L E S L E E P C E N T E R 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando . . . . . . . . . . 344-8882 HEARING A D V A N C E D F A M I L Y H E A R I N G A I D C E N T E R 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1775 A U D I B E L H E A R I N G A I D C E N T E R S 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8000 2036 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . . 352-586-7599 20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon . . . . . . . 52-789-1559 HEARING CONTINUED M I R A C L E E A R H E A R I N G A I D C E N T E R Lazio, Brian L-HAS 1801 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River Mall . . . 795-1484 HOME HEALTH SERVICES H O M E I N S T E A D S E N I O R C A R E 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-249-1257 S E N I O R H O M E C A R E 494 S Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-0150 HOSPICE H P H H O S P I C E 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-4600 HOSPITALS C I T R U S M E M O R I A L H O S P I T A L 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-1551 M U N R O E R E G I O N A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R 1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala . . . . . . . . . 352-351-7200 R E G I O N A L M E D I C A L C E N T E R B A Y O N E T P O I N T 14000 Fivay Road, Hudson . . . . . . . . 888-741-5119 INDEPENDENT LIVING I N V E R N E S S C L U B S E N I O R APARTMENTS 518 Ella Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-8477 INTERNAL MEDICINE G I R A S S H A H M D 203 S. Seminole Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-7800 NURSING HOMES C Y P R E S S C O V E C A R E C E N T E R 700 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-8832 D I A M O N D R I D G E H E A L T H & R E H A B I L I T A T I O N C E N T E R 2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-9500 L I F E C A R E C E N T E R O F C I T R U S C O U N T Y 3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-4434 ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY R O B E R T B O I S S O N E A U L T O N C O L O G Y I N S T I T U T E Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD Brant, Timothy A. MD Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility 522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-527-0106 OPHTHALMOLOGY S U N C O A S T E Y E C E N T E R Kaplan, George H. OD 221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-2526 ORTHOPEDIC/ SPORTS MEDICINE N A T U R E C O A S T O R T H O P A E D I C S & S P O R T S M E D I C I N E C L I N I C Choung, Walter I. MD Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO 2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-746-5707 520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-2663 2236 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . 352-344-2663 PHARMACIES B R A S H E A R S P H A R M A C Y 206 W. Dampier St., Inverness . . . . . . 352-637-2079 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-3420 G & R H E A L T H M A R T P H A R M A C Y 3791 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-3111 PLASTIC RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY F A R R I O R F A C I A L P L A S T I C A N D C O S M E T I C S U R G E R Y C E N T E R Farrior, Edward H. MD FACS 2908 W. Azeele St., Tampa . . . . . . . . . 813-875-3223 SURGERY P R E M I E R V E I N C E N T E R Sharma, Ravi MD 7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-0777 UROLOGY A D V A N C E D U R O L O G Y S P E C I A L I S T S Desai, Paresh G. MD FACS Desautel, Michael G. MD Kumar, Udaya MD FRCS Seneriz, Manuel A. MD Pulice, Frances A. PA 609 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-9707 3475 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-7671 PAID ADVERTISING

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Health experts reveal mostwanted facts about breast health, heart disease, incontinence and osteoporosis. Exhibitors from beauty and wellness centers provide product samples and service demonstrations. Healthy, gourmet refreshments provided by our award-winning caterer. 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration required. One-Day Childbirth Education Expectant couples learn about labor, delivery and relaxation techniques, exercising, newborn characteristics and breastfeeding from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 11, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Cost is $30; registration required. Breastfeeding/Infant Care Expectant or new mothers learn helpful techniques for successful breastfeeding as well as basic infant care at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 14, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Program is free; registration required. Balance Screenings Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center offers free balance screenings at 1675 S.E. U.S. 19 in the Crystal River Shopping Center (next to Sweetbay). Call 352-7950534 to schedule. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events. The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital.com. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco and Citrus County residents for $20 a year, which includes membership in the HCA national H2U program. May 7 Hearing screening and ear wax removal, 10 a.m. May 8 AARP driving classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 10 Mothers Day Tea, 10 a.m. The Citrus Alliance Against Adult Abuse (C4A) monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. For information, call Judy Stauffer at 352-303-2620. Your help is needed to protect our vulnerable against abuse, neglect and exploitation. Free Stress Buster Day for caregivers of those with Alzheimers, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, at The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road off U.S. 19, Spring Hill. Discussion topics include Alzheimers Disease Update, Stress Reduction and Keeping you Healthy Tai Chi. Reservations are required. Lunch will be provided, as well as chair massages, manicures and more. Call Alzheimers Family Organization at 727-848-8888 or 888-496-8004, or visit www.alzheimersfamily.org or Facebook.com/afo.fl. Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus Inc. will meet the second Thursday monthly in the basement of the Citrus County School Board office in Inverness, 1007 W. Main St. Use the elevator to go to the basement. 8 to 9 a.m. board meeting. 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee, doughnuts, networking. 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. membership meeting. For information, call the office at 352-389-0472 or email substancefree.citrus@yahoo. com. Free Mothers Day Tea from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa, to promote healing and peace for those who have lost their mothers. Share memories of your mother and/or find comfort in similar stories. Bring a photo/memory of your mother to share at the annual event. Tea and cookies will be served. For information or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500. SPRING HILL Access Health Care LLC offers lectures in May, at 5:15 p.m. at Access Health Cares main office at 5350 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill, conducted by Maria Scunziano-Singh, M.D. May 9 Joints are holding you together: Take care of them. May 23 Bioidentical hormones are here to say for women and men. Dr. Scunziano-Singhs practice focuses on combining traditional medicine with holistic treatments to maximize patients health care and nutrition. For information and to register, call 352-688-8116. The Nature Coast Lodge Assisted Living Facility in Lecanto offers activities, events and trips open to the public. Raffle tickets for a special Mothers Day basket are being sold for $1 at the facility from now until May 12. The money will go into a special activities fund. The winning ticket will be pulled at the Mothers Day luncheon, with a choice of fried shrimp or baked ham. The public is welcome to attend the luncheon. Reserve a set by May 10 for $6 per person. Tuesday, May 14 trip to Weeki Wachee, $10 per person. Call the lodge by Monday, May 13, to make a reservation. May 17 blood drive from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., offering a tour of the facility. NAMI Citrus offers a 12week Family to Family course to assist families to be better able to cope with mentally ill family members, beginning May 16 in Spring Hill. Call 352-277-1832. HPH Hospice, Healing Peoples Hearts in Citrus County, offers a two-day new volunteer orientation from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 22 and May 24 at its team offices, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH Hospice has been serving residents in Citrus County since 2005, and has provided services in Hernando and Pasco counties since 1984. Hospice volunteers often serve patients and families at the bedside, but they also assist in the office, help raise awareness, contribute to educational programs, provide fundraising support and more. Qualifications needed: Caring heart, positive attitude, extra love to share and a big smile that appears on demand. RSVP or receive information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600. Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Inverness Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Support GROUPS Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. Bereaved Parents of the USA (BP/USA) grief support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced the death of a child, 7 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call Bernadette Passalacqua at 352-746-4664 or visit www. bereavedparentsusa.org. Look Good ... Feel Better a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-3417741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. SPRING HILL Spinal Cord Injury support group, 5 p.m. second Thursday monthly in the gym at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital. Call Dee Hardee at 352592-7237. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. Womens Breast Cancer Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the second Friday monthly (except July and August), Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in the Allen Ridge Medical Center, County Road 491, Lecanto. Light lunch served. Call Judy Bonard at 352-5274389. Speaker will be Iris Rodgers of Rodman & Fields Dermatologists. Epilepsy support group at the Lakes Region Library, Inverness. Call Lili Jane at 352-344-8765. Mended Hearts of Citrus County for individuals who have or had cardiovascular disease, as well as caregivers and family members, 10 a.m. the second Friday monthly in the Gulf Room in the Historic Citrus High School; parking and transportation available from CMHS parking lot A2. Speaker: Penny Davis, clinical dietitian at Citrus Memorial, about nutrition needs for cardiac patients. Open to the public. Call Millie King, president, at 352637-5525; or CMHS Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. The Area 13 Family Care Council 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday monthly at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities office, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44). All persons interested in issues of those with developmental disabilities (autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, spina bifida and intellectual disabilities) are encouraged to attend. Call Karen Huscher at 352-7261445 or isabelfcc13@ yahoo.com. Area 13 covers Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties. There are 15 Family Care Councils with governor-appointed volunteer members, who are individuals with a developmental disability or are a family member. Seeking new members. Contact Huscher at 352-726-1445 or cbettykay @aol.com; facebook.com/ groups/331632140186772/. Website: www.FCCFlorida. org. NAMI-Citrus locally chartered group of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, meets the second Monday monthly at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, on County Road 486 in Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All those with an interest in mental health issues are welcome. Call 352-341-2273. SPRING HILL Healthy Hearts support group open to anyone looking for information on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30 p.m. the second Monday monthly in the cafeteria conference room at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville. Admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus, 352-597-6333 in Hernando or visit the website www.OakHill Hospital.com. HIV support group 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at Citrus County Health Department, 3700 Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Open to all affected by HIV. Persons attending remain confidential, testing will be anonymous. Reservation not required. Call 352-527-0068, ext. 281, if you have any questions. Nature Coast Multiple Myeloma Support Group 6 p.m. the third Wednesday monthly at the Oak Hill Hospital Partners Club (formerly Spring Hill Enrichment Center) at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50), Brooksville. Free dinner buffet will be served. Contact Herb and Dianne Terry at 352-621-0672 or hterry1@tampabay.rr.com, or Richard Blustein at 352-4284536 or Blustein22@aol.com. SPRING HILL Look Good Feel Better Support Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third Wednesday monthly at the Florida Cancer Specialists, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203, in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call 352-688-7744. Different Strokes for Different Folks stroke support group, 10:30 a.m. to noon the third Thursday monthly in the Inpatient Rehabilitation Multipurpose Room at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River. Call 352-795-1234 for details. Alzheimers caregiver and family support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first and third Thursdays monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-toLake Highway. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. FFRA (Families and Friends Reaching for the Abilities), third Friday monthly at the Key Training Center in Inverness at 130 Heights Ave. Social time and business meeting at 9 a.m. is followed by a speaker at 10 a.m. Lisa Noble from the Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center will talk about wound care, hyperbaric medicine, diabetes and treating wounds. Call Ron Phillips, president, at 352382-7819 or visit www. ffracitrus.org.Weekly meetings R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-563-5182. Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www. NARANONFL.org. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. C4 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE See GROUPS / Page C5 NOTES Continued from Page C2 SPEAKERS AVAILABLE Nature Coast EMS has speakers available for clubs or organizations regarding general ambulance service information, medical alerts program and more. To schedule a speaker, or for information, call Katie Lucas at 352-249-4730, or email at katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org. Seven Rivers Regional Speakers Bureau brings customized programs to clubs, churches and other community organizations. Contact Amy Kingery at 352-795-8344 or amy.kingery@hma.com. The Alzheimers Family Organization has speakers available for your organization or club. This presentation will include basic Alzheimers information and the services and programs the organization offers to the Central Florida community. Call 888-496-8004 or 727-848-8888. SPRING HILL Health Matters Home Care has a Registered Nurse available to do free speaking engagements for your group, club, church or organization. Call 352-686-4493 or 352-686-5593. The Citrus Team of HPH Hospice and its not-forprofit Homecare affiliate, HPH Homecare, provide free, ongoing education to Citrus County residents about their many programs, services and volunteer opportunities. There is no charge for a speaker; the solicitation of funds is never involved. Educational materials are provided at no charge. Call Anne Black, community liaison, at 352-527-4600. CEREC One-Visit Crowns Implants Lumineers and Veneers Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) AAID/ICOI Extractions In-House Specialty Care Root Canal Therapy Periodontal Gum Care Fillings Cleanings Sealants And much more! 352-795-1223 Dr. Richard C. Swanson 1815 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL www.rswansondental.com PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE 000ETQI New Patients Free Consults Emergency Care Exceptional Dentistry and Your Comfort is Our Number One Priority! Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000ETRD Post Surgery Care Stroke Rehab We Are A Five-Star Rated Facility 000EQCL Inpatient & Outpatient Skilled Care Cardiac Program I.V. Therapy Superior Woundcare Theres no need to leave Citrus County for the Best Rehabilitation (352) 795-8832 700 Southeast 8th Ave. Crystal River *Rating by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. www.cypresscovecare.com Citrus County All Hazards & Information Expo For more information contact the Citrus County Sheriffs Office (352) 249-2707 A r e Y o u P r e p a r e d ? Saturday May 18th 9am 1pm Special Guests: The National Weather Service Special Displays: Hurricane Re-entry Tag Distribution, and More N a t i o n a l G u a r d A r m o r y C r y s t a l R i v e r 1 8 5 1 W V e n a b l e S t www.chronicleonline.com 000E8KV

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For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-6210599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. AC Group 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous : Easy Does It, 8 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday; &:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday; The Recovery Room, 8169 S. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Floral City. It Works How and Why, noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Hospital Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery at Work Mens Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to 9 p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Parsons Point Road, Hernando. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352508-1604. Overeaters Anonymous : Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : support for any hurts, habits, hang-ups or addictions. 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in Oxford. Call 352-748-6124. 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand small-group time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-6282874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352688-4537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alz support.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz. org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2 p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program: 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352229-4202 or Sue at 352-5607918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-6420962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club; call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/ Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a not-forprofit charitable organization providing comprehensively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care available. Last Wednesday, 11:30 a.m., Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free respite care available. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Al-Anon meeting 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Lou Block, facilitator. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly, Jerry Fischer, facilitator. Diabetes Support Group 10 a.m. second Monday monthly, with Kim Palmer. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 5:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. ALS Support Group 2 p.m. the third Thursday monthly, with Katie Mitchell. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, with Lillian Rojas. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acutecare beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. More NOTES CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Centers relaunched website, SevenRivers Regional.com, features interactive health tools, a health library and enhanced event H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C5 To save bridge, redo root canal or get surgery Q : Thanks for writing your column weekly. I read it every week and enjoy the way you write. I am 58 years old and have a bridge on the bottom left side that is being held by two teeth. There are two fake teeth between those. My problem is with the back tooth that supports the bridge. My dentist had been telling me about this problem for a while, but since I was in no pain I ignored it. Now that I am in pain, she tells me the tooth is too far gone to be able to save. I am a bit confused, because this tooth had a root canal many years ago. I though once you had a root canal, you shouldnt have pain anymore. She tells me the pain is coming from an infection at the tip of the tooth. I want to save this tooth because, if lost, I lose three teeth the one with the problem and the two fake ones in front of it. Please help. A: I can tell you know what is going on. This is a very uncommon occurrence in dentistry. There are times that teeth with a root canal can have a recurrent abscess at the tip of the tooth in the jawbone. There are two ways to treat this. One is to redo the root canal by cleaning out the old root canal, cleansing the canal and refilling the canal with a new root canal filling. This can be very successful through the use of the new instrumentation available and the medications we now have to kill the bacteria and cleanse the canal system. The other method is to physically remove the infected tissue through a surgical procedure called an apicoectomy. The way of choosing which method is the best for any particular circumstance is multifaceted and too in depth for a column like this. However, it is important to know you can save a tooth like yours in many circumstances. This being said, it is important you are in the right hands. The use of a surgical microscope is imperative for a good result. Most general dentists do not have one of these, so you will likely need to see an endodontist someone whos in this sort of care. I happen to have one of these since I enjoy doing root canals, but even I would send you to an endodontist for this type of care. There are a few other things that might have caused your dentist to say the tooth must be pulled. There could have been a fracture in the tooth somewhere, or there could have been extensive decay that can make the tooth non-restorable even after the infection is treated. As usual, my suggestion is to have a nice heart-to-heart talk with your dentist to find out exactly what is going on and if there are any other options. I hope you find you can save this tooth. Best of luck! Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@MasterpieceDental Studio.com. Dr. Frank Vascimini SOUND BITES GROUPS Continued from Page C4 HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES Support group information will list monthly meetings first, as space is available, then weekly meetings. It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the Chronicle about changes to existing listings. To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-related events open to the public or support group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Information relating to professional training or seminars attended by those in the health care industries are considered business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest listings of Sundays Business section. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362-563-5660. Be prepared to leave a detailed message with your name, phone number and the address of the news event. Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions. Publication of submitted information or photos on specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed. See MORE / Page C6 000ETQP 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS

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in the past several years compared to what we had in the past. According to the National Cancer Institute, there are more than 12 million cancer survivors in the United States, and almost 2 million of them have survived for 20 years or longer. The reason cancer survival rates have dramatically increased in the past two decades can be traced directly to clinical research and trials. May is National Cancer Research Month, which provides an opportunity to examine the enormous benefits of clinical trial research. The cures for various types of cancer will all come from clinical research. The patients in oncologic clinical trials are given the best treatment available for their particular type of cancer. In addition to that standard treatment, the patient may be given either a new drug that is being tested or a placebo. No participant is ever given a placebo alone. This is very important to our practice. We have been doing clinical research trials in our office for many years. We have now joined Florida Cancer Specialist or FCS. It is the largest independent oncology/ hematology practice in the United States. It consists of more than 130 physicians, 90 nurse practitioners and it has more than 50 clinical sites. In association with Sarah Cannon Research Institute, one of the nations largest clinical research programs, FCS offers patients access to more national clinical trials than any private oncology practice in Florida. This will bring better cancer care to our patients in the county. I am very happy that this will help my patients. There are many other options for our patients in Citrus County. Overall, I feel that this change will improve cancer care substantially in our county. Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi @tampabay.rr.com or call 352-746-0707. devices, which could affect research and development as well as deployment of new, more advanced medical devices. This could impact the quality of medicine in the United States in light of the fact that there are other countries actively pursuing our citizens by luring and romancing them to come overseas for medical care as it is cheaper. Now there is a possibility that, if you have to have a medical device implanted, it might be better to leave the United States for that procedure. While the Affordable Care Act is an attempt to level the playing field and deliver health care equitably to everyone, this aspect may be a direct contradiction. I hope our politicians and powers-that-be that are controlling these decisions and issues will keep an open mind and reconsider taxes such as these as they will likely be detrimental to the health care of our citizens. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call 352795-0011 or visit Crystal CommunityENT.com. GRILLO Continued from Page C1 calendar, a monthly blog and email newsletter. Interactive health tools help users learn more about blood pressure, body weight and diabetes. The health library provides the definition, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of common conditions and diseases. The classes and programs Web page provides a detailed listing of current and future health seminars, screenings and community events. These events are educational and often free to attend. To read the monthly blog or receive the email newsletter, visit SevenRiversRegional.com, click on the About tab and the links to the blog and newsletter signup pages. Hospital news and happenings are posted on facebook. com/srrmc and twitter.com/ srrmc, or call HEALTHconnect at 352-795-1234 for information about services and events. Monthly diabetes selfmanagement education classes by Citrus Memorial Diabetes Center at Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center, Sugarmill Woods. These classes, taught by a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, offer an opportunity for those living with diabetes to learn about the importance of physical activity, meal planning and medication. Topics include blood glucose monitoring, problem solving, coping and reducing the risk for diabetes-related complications. To register for a class or to schedule a one-on-one appointment, call 352-341-6110. A physician referral is required. Hospice of Citrus County Inc. offers a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for individuals of all ages who are committed to the hospice philosophy and wish to make a positive impact on the lives of people. The Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift Shoppe is currently seeking those who have an interest in sorting, distributing or operating a cash register. Volunteers are also needed at Herrys Caf. Both are at 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite C., Homosassa. The goal of the Volunteer Department is to provide competent and confident volunteers. All volunteers are required to attend core Volunteer Training Orientation and ongoing in-service trainings throughout the year. Call Volunteer Director Cathi Thompson at 352-5272020. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Facebook or at www.hospiceofcitrus.org. Snyder Pharmacy, 102 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness, offers a drug Take-Back program to help patients safely dispose of medicines that may be dangerous to others and to the environment. Patients of any pharmacy may bring in unused or expired drugs in their original stock containers for free disposal. For information, call 352-3411212. More GROUPS National Osteoporosis Foundation Citrus County Support Group has suspended meetings for the summer. They will resume in September. The Citrus Memorial Diabetes Support Group, 10:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly on the campus of Citrus Memorial Health System in the auditorium. An RSVP is necessary, as refreshments will be served. Call 352-341-6110. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Suncoast Chapter Cancer Support Group (including Multiple Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no charge and light refreshments are provided. Contact: Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient services manager, at 813-963-6461 ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or visit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society website at www.lls.org. SPRING HILL Stroke Support Group noon the fourth Thursday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Pam McDonald at 352-346-6359. Celiac support meeting for all people who have celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, 10 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday monthly in the Community Room at the Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Ken Kral at 352-6844064 or email KenKral@ msn.com. SPRING HILL Amputee support group 7 p.m. the last Monday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Eva Baker at 352592-7232. Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Quarterly meetings offer information, support and encouragement. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilitator, at 352-6887744. MORE Continued from Page C5 C6 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE very early research in animals, and may not translate to the same success in humans. The research team, from the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Kansas City and the University of Kansas Medical Center, said tests on cancer cell lines in test tubes and tumors in mice show that aspirin not only significantly slows the growth of cancer cells and shrinks tumors, but also stops tumor cells from spreading to new sites. Their study investigated the effect of aspirin on two types of cancer, including the so-called aggressive triple-negative breast cancer, which does not respond as well to many treatments. Triple-negative breast cancers are so-called because they lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone and Her2/neu. Now, the potential for aspirin to be beneficial in cancer patients is not new. Aspirins effect on cancer was first suggested 20 years ago, and for more than 20 years, since a study in Australia first suggested aspirin may have anti-cancer properties, researchers have been finding the headache drug may prevent and also treat all sorts of cancer. For example, there are reports that colon cancer survival improves with aspirin use, and that aspirin and other commonly used painkillers may also help guard against skin cancer. It has also has been shown to reduce the risk of squamous cell esophageal cancer and prostate cancer. At first it was thought the effect only kicked in after ten years or so, but in 2012, three studies of people in middle age taking low-dose aspirin suggested that the anti-cancer benefits may start after only three years. However, despite all this evidence, the underlying mechanism through which aspirin confers its anticancer benefits have been somewhat difficult to establish. Now this latest study suggests that for breast cancer, it may be that aspirin interferes with the stem cells, immature cells in our body that are believed to fuel the growth and spread of tumors. For example, if chemotherapy does not destroy stem cells, they will eventually start to grow again. In this new study, researchers found that in the mouse model they used, cancer cells treated with aspirin formed no or only partial stem cells. In lab tests, aspirin blocked the growth of two different breast cancer lines. One of the cell lines the researchers used was of what is often called triple-negative breast cancer, which is a less common but much more difficult form of breast cancer to treat. The results were promising, but again, I urge all of you to be cautious. This is incredibly early stage research that, as of now, has not been proven in human studies. But it could be promising for the future. The researchers say aspirin may also improve the effectiveness of current treatments for hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers. In their study, they found aspirin boosted the effect of tamoxifen, which is one of the drugs used used to treat hormone-positive breast cancers. Many people take a daily low dose of aspirin to lower their risk of a further heart attack or stroke, or if they have a high risk of either. But taking aspirin is not without risks. For instance, daily aspirin use can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers. Researchers are continuing to investigate whether the advantages outweigh the potential disadvantages. So before you rush out and buy a bottle of 360 to begin taking every day, discuss this with your primary care physician or oncologist. Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. BENNETT Continued from Page C1 GANDHI Continued from Page C1 to recognize our team members and all emergency medical personnel at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Citrus Memorial Health System, Oak Hill Hospital, Bayflite, Aeromed, Regional Medical Center at Bayonet Point, a trauma II center, Shands at the University of Florida, our newest area trauma II center at Ocala Regional Medical Center and the many other wonderful facilities with which we serve. As part of National EMS week, Nature Coast EMS is hosting an intubation rodeo at Whispering Pines Park on May 20 starting at 9 a.m. Twenty five of the most complex timed scenarios will challenge each contestant to obtain the advanced airway. The top three contestants will be awarded trophies. Entry fee is $30 per person and teams of five or more are $25 each. We hope you will join us in celebrating the men and women in emergency medicine during National EMS Week. If you have any questions, email katie.lucas @naturecoastems.org or call 352-249-4730. Mail letters to: Nature Coast EMS, attn: Katie Lucas, 3876 W. Country Hill Drive, Lecanto, FL 34461. One last note to parents of graduating seniors; with all the pomp and circumstance surrounding high school graduation, accidents involving teenagers increase during the month of May so please remind them to be careful on the road, not just graduation night, but always. Be safe, take care and stay well! Congratulations, class of 2013! Katie Lucas is the public information officer at Nature Coast EMS. She can be reached at 352249-4730 or katie.lucas@ naturecoastems.org. Nature Coast EMS is an accredited, nonprofit established in 2000 to provide emergency medical services to Citrus County. Watch Every Minute Counts hosted by Mike Hall, CEO, Nature Coast EMS on WYKE TV at 8 p.m. Tuesdays and 10 a.m. Wednesdays. Nature Coast EMS does not call soliciting donations on behalf of paramedics and EMTs. The Citrus County Professional Paramedics and EMTs Local 365 is a union, and Nature Coast EMS team members do not benefit from any donation to this organization. LUCAS Continued from Page C1 Seven Days A Week Rain or Shine Call to see how you can receive 2 Weeks Free 352-563-5655 769452 The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County 000EMV2 000EOUT

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES Choir begins rehearsalsCitrus Community Concert Choir will begin rehearsing for its summer concert series on Tuesday, May 14. Rehearsals are 7 to 9 p.m. in the fellowship hall of Faith Lutheran Church, 935 S. Crystal Glen Drive, Lecanto. This years presentation will be music composed by Sir Andrew Lloyd Weber, including selections from Phantom of the Opera, Cats and more. Concert dates are Sunday, July 28; Friday, Aug. 2; and Sunday, Aug. 4. New singers are always welcome and should arrive at 6:30 p.m. for a brief voicing audition. For more information, call 352-212-1746 or 352628-6452. County Council to convene May 8 The Citrus County Council will meet at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 8, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle. Speakers for the meeting will be a representative from the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park and Citrus County Commissioner Rebecca Bays. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. and refreshments will be available. All are welcome. For more information, email freedomway1@ gmail.com. Computer users to get together Crystal River Users Group, a computer club, will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, at the Crystal Oaks Club House, off State Road 44, at 4948 W. Crystal Oaks Blvd., Lecanto. Presenter will be Brigitte Hagg on Learn how to Create GIFs. Haag will show how to make simple animated text, create or modify animated clipart or animate photos. Coffee and refreshments will be served at 6 p.m., with a short meeting at 6:30 p.m., followed by the presentation. CRUG meetings, the second Wednesday monthly, are open and free to everyone. For more information, visit www.CRUG.com. C OMMUNITY Page C7 TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Precious Paws ADOPTABLE Mistletoe Special to the Chronicle Mistletoe is a sweet, loving young adult longhaired feline. She is well socialized enjoys a tummy rub and regularly sleeps stretched out full length on her back. She will make a great family pet and wants to be a part of all family activities. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday (closed for Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26). Call 352-726-4700 for more information or visit www.preciouspaws florida.com. Learn to play bridge this month Beginner bridge lessons will begin May 9 to be offered from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays with the Nature Coast Bridge Club at Towne Square Mall, U.S. 19, Spring Hill. For more information, call Mary Ann Dufresne at 352-592-488 whimsey@ atlantic.net. Hospice to host special tea Wings Community Education at Hospice of Citrus County will present a Mothers Day Tea from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. Mothers Day Tea, a free public event, seeks to promote healing and peace for those who have lost their mothers.Share memories of your mother and/or find comfort in similar stories. All are welcome to bring a photo/memory of your mother to share at the annual event. Tea and cookies will be served. For more information, or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352-6211500. Reserve now for Friends lunch Senior Friends for Life will get together for lunch Monday, May 13, and its monthly meeting at Inverness Golf & Country Club, 3150 S. Country Club Blvd. Registration will begin at 11 a.m., lunch will follow at 11:45 a.m. Choice of entrees are Asian flank steak or chicken cordon bleu. A program will follow with Teddi Rusnak as speaker. Reservations must be made by May 8. Make reservations by calling Myrna Hocking at 352-860-0819, Teddie Holler at 352-746-6518 or Astrid Grant at 352341-0346. Blessing of the Fleet May 11 All boat owners and operators are invited to the second annual Blessing of the Fleet from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 11, on Kings Bay. Look for the 22-foot pontoon boat with a green bimini top and the Crystal River Sail & Power Squadron banner on the port side, anchored on Kings Bay north of Buzzards Island. Blessings will be performed by Father Gil Larsen from St. Annes Episcopal Church and Pastor David Bradford from St. Timothy Lutheran Church. For more information, call 352-794-3008. Nordic sons plan smorgasbordThe Sons of Norway, Sun Viking Lodge 607, will meet at 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 10, at Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 6193 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill. Come join us for our Syttende Mai celebration. There will be a smorgasbord with fiskeboller (fishballs), Kjttkaker (meatballs) and platters of shrimp, cold cuts and cheeses and Norwegian cakes. Cost is $15 for adults and $7 for children 12 to 16; children younger than 12 eat for free. For reservations, call Jan Link at 352-686-6538 or Nellie at 727-846-1584. For more information about the Sons of Norway, call Randi at 352-796-7016 or Elsie at 352-666-2220. A s May begins, many organizations prepare for a summer break, but have planned activities for this month. A May Spotlight of Events includes: The Citrus County Model Railroaders meet at 6:30 p.m. today at the Robinson Horticulture Building of the Citrus County Fairgrounds. Call Bob at 352-238-6879. The Circle of Friends Foundation will host the Country Rocks the Canyon Weekend May 10 and 11 at Rock Crusher Canyon, 275 S. Rock Crusher Road in Crystal River, to benefit youth programs. It features Justin Moore, Josh Thompson, Dustin Lynch and Michael Ray and local bands T.J. Brown, Clemons Road and the Jamie Davis Band. Gates open at 2 p.m. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.com. The Citrus County Veterans Coalition yard sale is from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at Our Lady of Fatima Church in Inverness. Sellers may call Dan at 352-400-8952. Yard sales will resume in September. The Citrus County Habitat For Humanity Womens Build is from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 11, at 8741 Discalfani Loop in Crystal River. To participate, call 352563-2744. The Broadway Lights and Vegas Nights Variety Show, sponsored by SnippetCitrus, is at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at the Dunnellon Train Depot featuring Paul and Jackie Stevio and Cote Deonath. Call Jackie at 352527-6902. The Citrus County Boys & Girls Clubs annual Steak and Steak dinner is at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at the College of Central Florida in Lecanto. For reservations, call 352621-9225. The Dunnellon Concert Singers will be in concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, May 12, at Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Admission is free. The Citrus County Retired Educators installation luncheon is at 1 p.m. Monday, May 13, at Mamas Kuntry Kitchen in Inverness. All retired educators and school personnel and guests are invited. For membership information, call membership chairman Ethel Winn at 352795-2533 or President Cindy Pifer at 352-746-2866. The Retired Educators will be in recess until October. The Citrus County 2013 Worlds Greatest Baby Shower is Monday, May 13, at the Citrus County Auditorium. The first session is from 3 to 5 p.m. and the second session is from 6 to 8 p.m. Call 352-228-9047. The public is invited to the May 14 luncheon of the Crystal River Christian Womens Club at noon at the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center. The Life Cycle of the Butterfly is the special feature by Bobby Vigliotti, and Jan Tombow will bring the inspirational message. For reservations, call Ginny at 352-746-7616. The club will be in recess until September. Our Lady of Grace Church and the Knights of Columbus 6168 will sponsor a blood drive from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 18, in the church parish hall with complimentary breakfast. Call 352-637-2475. The Spotlight of Events column for June information deadline is May 15, by calling me at 352-795-3006 or writing to me at P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423-0803. Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. May means concerts, shows, more Ruth Levins AROUND THE COMMUNITY Special to the ChronicleDo you have room in your heart and home and the ability to provide the daily care for a live in feline? If so, Precious Paws Rescue has the perfect feline partner for you. PPR has several adult and special needs cats that would love to be in a home. They miss living with a special person, curling up on a lap or just gazing out a window. They are up to date on all veterinary care, litterbox trained and socialized. In an effort to move these cats into a more personal home environment, preferably as the only pet in the household, PPR is looking for long-term foster families. Each cat will remain an official PPR foster. All necessary veterinary care, food and litter will be provided by PPR. The foster family will provide shelter and love. These cats are homeless for a variety of reasons the death of an owner, family relocation, or changes in the family structure. If you are a cat lover and unable to adopt or foster, you can help by sponsoring one of the rescued felines with an $18 monthly donation in the selected felines name to Precious Paws Rescue. PPR is an all-volunteer charity organization dedicated to decreasing the number of homeless pets through rescuing, fostering and adopting. PPR sponsors a low-cost spay/neuter program for cats and dogs to further help reduce the number of unwanted pets. For more information, call 352726-4700 and a volunteer will return your call. Stop by the Crystal River Mall Adoption Center from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, and view PPR pets with their individual stories by going online to preciouspawsflorida.com. Wanted: Cat people Precious Paws Rescue needs more fosters for homeless felines Special to the ChronicleAn opportunity to bring the world to Citrus County students is available this summer. 13to 18-year-old students will be coming for two weeks from France, Italy and Germany. Among the activities they will enjoy include snorkeling with manatees, tubing down Rainbow River, going to the beach and experiencing roller skating and bowling. English classes are conducted each morning, and every afternoon an actionpacked activity is planned. The Xplore staff provides transportation to and from each chaperoned excursion. American host siblings are encouraged to participate in all activities. This provides the international students with cultural immersion and offers the host siblings a meaningful and fun way to spend their summer. Volunteer host families are sought to participate in the sessions. They provide room, board, transportation to and from the meeting place and a loving environment for two weeks. The students are looking for a typical American family experience, which can be a mom and a dad, single parents or grandparents. There are two sessions to pick from, or participants can host both sessions. Program dates are July 6 to 14 and July 27 to Aug. 4. For more information, email Program Coordinator Cinda Moore at cinda.moore@xploreusa. org or call 352-302-8300. There will be an information session from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. DAWN PETERS /Special to the Chronicle The Crystal River Raid Civil War re-enactment organization had a successful re-enactment and was able to present a check for $1,500 to the Operation Welcome Home organization, which recognizes service members returning home from the Middle East. Presenting the check are John Porter, treasurer, and Dusty Porter, vice president, of Crystal River Raid. Accepting the check is Barbara Mills of Operation Welcome Home. Helping Operation Welcome Home Students need host families Visits will be in two sessions

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C8 T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E NTERTAINMENT P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. Robert Bresson, a French film director, said, Cinema, radio, television, magazines are a school of inattention: People look without seeing, listen without hearing. Some bridge players are guilty of listening without hearing to the auction. Every bid and most passes supply some information for the attentive player. In todays deal, look at only the West hand and the auction. What would you lead against four hearts? The auction followed a normal path. Norths jump to four hearts showed game-going values with three-card heart support. South was close to a slam-try (imagine Norths having ace-third of spades), but chose to pass. If you use two-over-one game-forcing, North would rebid three hearts. Then the auction might continue four clubs four diamonds (both control-bids) four hearts pass. Yes, here five diamonds makes, but do not make a habit of playing in five of a minor when four of a major is a favorite to succeed. (A defender having ace-fourth of hearts and being able to give his partner a heart ruff in five diamonds is much more likely than a 4-0 diamond break and a defender gaining two diamond ruffs in four hearts.) West should lead a diamond. Since diamonds have been bid and supported, it is highly likely that East is void of the suit. After East ruffs, he will probably shift to a club. South wins with his ace (West signaling with the queen to deny the king) and plays a trump, but West grabs the trick and gives his partner a second diamond ruff. Then East cashes the spade ace to defeat the contract. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 D ooms d ay P reppers Bugged Out Th e 80 s: Th e D eca d e That Made Us Th e 80 s: Th e D eca d e That Made Us P o l ygamy USA (N) PGT a b oo St range Behavior P o l ygamy USA PG (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.DrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Family SecretsFamily SecretsOprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now? (OXY) 44 123 Bad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubFind Me My Man Bad Girls ClubFind Me My Man (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 The Company Men (2010) Ben Affleck. R Thats What She Said (2012, Comedy) Anne Heche. R Mean Girls (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Tina Fey. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Big C: Hereafter MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass TimeGearz GGearz GDreamsDreamsTranslogicThe List PG Gearz GGearz G (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Urban Tarzan Worst Tenants (STARZ) 370 271 370 Ali (2001) Will Smith. R Click (2006, Comedy) Adam Sandler. (In Stereo) PG-13 Looper (2012, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Emily Blunt. (In Stereo) R Colombiana (2011) Zoe Saldana. (SUN) 36 31 36 The Game 365 Rays Live! (N) MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) (Live) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays Inside the Rays Inside the Rays (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Deep South Paranormal Deep South Paranormal Deep South Paranormal Weird or What? Monsters (N) Weird or What? Parallel Worlds (N) Weird or What? Monsters (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangLaughBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Brother Rat Little Men (1940, Drama) Kay Francis. NR The Asphalt Jungle (1950, Crime Drama) Sterling Hayden. NR (DVS) Crossfire (1947) Robert Young. NR Out of the Past (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch: On Deck (N) Deadliest Catch (N) (In Stereo) Backyard Oil PG Backyard Oil: Ken Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30MediumMediumGypsy Wedding19 Kids-Count19 Kids19 KidsCoupleCouple19 Kids19 Kids (TMC) 350 261 350 Road to Nowhere (2010) Shannyn Sossamon. (In Stereo) R Liberal Arts (2012) Josh Radnor. PG-13 King of California (2007) Michael Douglas. PG-13 House of D (2004) Anton Yelchin. (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle Anatomy of a Murder PG Castle XK (In Stereo) PG NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularJohnny TTeenLooneyAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodAirport Airport Airport Airport The LayoverNo Reservation (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops PGCops PGPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnRepoRepo (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Heartbreak City PG Charmed Reckless Abandon PG CSI: Miami Man Down CSI: Miami Broken Home CSI: Miami A Grizzly Murder CSI: Miami Triple Threat (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20ChrisChrisFunny Home VideosMLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs. (N) (Live)NewsVideos D ear Annie : My husband works at a private college. His male boss had an affair with one of the female directors under him. My husband and his assistant found out about it and, after much deliberation, brought it to the attention of the human resources department. The president of the college was informed, but he only put the two guilty parties on suspension for two weeks. My husband and his assistant still have to work for this man. He constantly undermines them, and it is obvious there is no future for my husband at this college. The affair is still going on, and my husband has told no one else. The spouses are in the dark, too. My husband has only worked for this college for a few years. Until this affair, he loved his job and did it well. Our daughter graduates high school next year, and we were hoping she could attend this school tuition-free. Instead, we may have to move, losing whatever benefits we may have accrued. Should my husband ask for compensation when he leaves, such as some kind of tuition benefit? The president is about to retire and has no interest in moving my husband to a different department. How do we handle this? In a Bind Dear Bind : How does your husband feel about the situation? If his daughter were guaranteed a tuition-free education at this college, would he be able to stick it out for another year or two until she is established? Is the president of the college the only one who can transfer your husband to another department? Would it do any good for him to go back to the human resources department? Please discuss his options, and then let him do whatever he feels is best. We know you have a vested interest in the outcome, but it is his job, and he should make the final decision. Dear Annie: My husband and I have eight grown children between us and an ever-increasing number of grandchildren. We make a good living, but when several of them come home for the weekends, the grocery bills get very high, especially when I have to buy for those with food allergies and unusual preferences. Now that some of our kids have good salaries, whats the best way to say it would be nice if everyone chipped in when we have weekends together? I find it difficult to ask, and some of them get a little annoyed that we would even think they should help. Theyve been known to send requests for the meals they want. Ive thought about sending out an email with the anticipated menus and asking them to let me know whether they would like to bring or prepare any of it. Is that fair? Too Good of a Cook Dear Cook: This is your family, and they are staying the weekend. They should be pitching in at every meal, and you should not be afraid to tell them so. Since they refuse to offer graciously, its fine to send a group email and assign a type of dish (starch, vegetable) to each child. Be upbeat and excited about their contribution to the weekend, and say you cant wait to taste their cooking. They can swap assignments or ask to prepare something else, but if they bring nothing, please do not compensate by cooking it yourself. Simply say youre sorry there will be less to eat. Dear Annie: I read the response from Frank about guests who track snow into the house. His suggestion is for the hostess to let people know in advance that they will have to take off their shoes. Nobody wants snow tracked into their home. If there is snow on the ground, why dont you already know that youll have to remove your shoes at the door? Glass Half Full Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) ICING IGLOO BEWARE SWITCH Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: He practiced the trumpet for weeks before his band tryout, but on the big day he BLEW IT Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. ADOVI SHACO TEBNIT GEEREM Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Print your answer here: TUESDAY EVENING MAY 7, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessThe Voice Contestants perform. (N) Grimm (N) NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Jesse James: American Experience PG CONSTITUTION USA With Peter Sagal TED Talks Education (N) PG Death of the Oceans? % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Jesse JamesCONSTITUTIONTED Talks EducationWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.The Voice The Live Playoffs, Part 2 Contestants perform. (N) (In Stereo Live) Grimm Kiss of the Muse (N) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Splash (Season Finale) (N) PG Dancing With the Stars (N) PG Body of Proof Dark City (N) PG Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Double Blind (N) (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles Parley (N) Golden Boy Beast of Burden (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Hells Kitchen Chefs Compete New Girl (N) Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Splash PG Dancing With StarsBody of Proof PGNewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningH.Babers Sr. Place for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Splash (Season Finale) (N) PG Dancing With the Stars (N) PG Body of Proof Dark City (N) PG NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office The Office F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse All In House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidPaidStudioHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Engagement Hart of Dixie On the Road Again PG Americas Next Top Model PG Two and Half Men Engagement Friends PG Friends O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Heartland Poker Tour PG Mobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangHells Kitchen New GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPorque el Am.Amores VerdaderosQu Bonito Amor (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars (N) American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers (AMC) 55 64 55 A Knights Tale (2001, Adventure) Heath Ledger, Mark Addy. PG-13 The Italian Job (2003) Mark Wahlberg. A thief and his crew plan to steal back their gold. PG-13 The Italian Job (2003) Mark Wahlberg. PG-13 (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedRiver Monsters: Unhooked PG Polar Bears: Edge of Existence A family of polar bears is documented. PG Wild Hawaii (In Stereo) PG Polar Bears: Edge of Existence PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown (N) PG Lets Stay Together Lets Stay Together The Game The Game The Game Lets Stay Together The Game Lets Stay Together (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/OCHousewives/OCMarried to MedicineTardyTardyThe Kandi FactoryHappensTardy (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowAmy Schumer Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) Amy Schumer Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) Jim Carrey. (In Stereo) PG-13 Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportTreasure DetectivesThe Car ChasersAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers Morgan LiveAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie Gravity Falls Y7 A.N.T. Farm G Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue (2010) G Jessie Jessie GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)E:60 (N)30 for 30Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49SportsNation (N)NFL Live (N) The Real Rocky30 for 3030 for 30E:60 (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48EphesusFaithfulDaily MassMother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopeThoughtWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Baby Daddy Paul Blart: Mall Cop (2009, Comedy) Kevin James, Jayma Mays. PG Shallow Hal (2001, Romance-Comedy) Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black. Premiere. PG-13 The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Once Around (1991) Richard Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter. (In Stereo) R The Prince & Me (2004) Julia Stiles. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. A Guy Thing (2003) Jason Lee. (In Stereo) PG-13 Dr. T & Womn (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX ReportThe OReilly FactorHannity (N)Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 ChoppedChopped Go for It!ChoppedChoppedChopped (N)Chopped (FSNFL) 35 39 35 GameCourtsideCollege LacrosseMarlinsMLB Baseball: Marlins at Padres (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Soul Surfer (2011, Drama) AnnaSophia Robb, Helen Hunt, Dennis Quaid. Premiere. PG Soul Surfer (2011, Drama) AnnaSophia Robb. PG (GOLF) 727 67 727 LearningPGA TourLive From THE PLAYERS (N) (Live)Live From THE PLAYERSPLAYERS (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Frasier G Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2Weight, Nation Weight, Nation Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) James Franco. PG-13 Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (2012) R CandelabraGame of Thrones The Climb MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Trust the Man (2005) David Duchovny, Julianne Moore. (In Stereo) R Crazy, Stupid, Love. (2011) Steve Carell. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA Veep MA Campaign (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HGTV Smart HomeHunt IntlHuntersFlip or Flip or Income Property GHuntersHunt IntlFlip or Flip or (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG RestorationRestorationRestorationRestoration (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms Tell All, Part 1 (N) Preachers Daughters Hallelujah Dance Moms Tell All, Part 1 (LMN) 50 119 Teenage Bank Heist (2012, Suspense) Maeve Quinlan, Rosa Blasi. (In Stereo) Walking the Halls (2012, Drama) Jamie Luner, Al Sapienza. (In Stereo) NR Shes Too Young (2004, Drama) Marcia Gay Harden. (In Stereo) (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Cowboys & Aliens (2011) Daniel Craig. NR Forrest Gump (1994) Tom Hanks. An innocent man enters history from the s to the s. A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (2011) R The Jump Off (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsAll In With Chris Rachel MaddowThe Last WordAll In With Chris WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C OMICSC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, M AY 7, 2013 C9 Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes. (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m. The Big Wedding (R) 11:45 a.m., 5:05 p.m., 8 p.m. The Croods (PG) In 3D. 2:45 p.m. No passes. Oblivion (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Pain and Gain (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 6:45 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m., 1:20 p.m., 1:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m., 8:30 p.m. No passes. (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m. The Big Wedding (R) 11:50 a.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m. The Croods (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m. Oblivion (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Pain and Gain (R) 12 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Scary Movie 5 (PG-13) 11:45 a.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix Local RADIO KTYMY SJ N IBMNW BPWSDNKSBX, S KTSXU, XBK KB NWWA BXYJYWE FSKT LBFYM NDNSXJK KTY LBFYMWYJJ. FMSKYM OTSXCN NOTYPY Previous Solution: I like the idea of often being alone in all aspects of my life. I like to feel lonely. Robert Plant (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-7

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C10 T UESDAY,M AY 7,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000ER8E 000ER8S SOFABED blue gray color in good condition $100. call 352-257-3870 SOFATABLE quality attractive cream color lacquer measures 55LX 26TX 18 D. $60.00 352-746-1486 TABLEACCENT/END Beveled glass top/brass OVAL28L23W 22H VERYNICE $40. 352-621-0175 TABLE COFFEE/TV DISPLAYBrass with beveled glass top and shelf 47x 18x 26H $50.352-621-0175 TABLE END/ACCENT Brass with beveled glass top 27L23W 22H VERYNICE $40. 352-621-0175 TV STAND metal& glass corner unit $25. 352-422-2164 Two Seater PVC pipe glider, new cushions, leg rests, very good condition $60.00 352-795-0830 WRITING DESK peacon finsh letter desk glass top over inlaid wicker 2 drawers. Legs have pineapple design,purch. at Leaders. Sugarmill $100 740-705-9004 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 Craftsman Rear Tine Tiller, 5HP, $450 obo Murray, 22 4HP Push Mower $ 60 obo good cond (352) 860-0664 LAWN SPREADER SMALL$15 352-613-0529 Murray Rider Mower 40 cut very good condition $275. 352-637-4718 PREFORMED GARDEN POND 4LX3W X18D, ASKING 75.00 OBO INVERNESS 352-560-7857 Riding Lawn mower Murray 19.5 HP, with pull cart, includes extended warrenty $1,000 (352) 464-1128 4 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R $15 EACH 352-613-0529 MENS SUITS SIZE 34X30 & 36X30 $40 EACH 352-613-0529 !!!!! 205/55 R16 !!!!! Nice tread! Only asking $70 for the pair!! (352) 857-9232 *****225/70 R16***** Beautiful tread! Only asking $70 for the pair!! (352) 857-9232 ~~~~235\70 R16~~~~ Great tread! Only asking $70 for the pair!! (352) 857-9232 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BREAD MAKER Good condition, Otis, $10 (352)465-1616 CHILDRENS IRON HEADBOARD Brand New Metal Headboard, $15 (352)465-1616 COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $15 FOR BOTH 352-613-0529 CURIO CABINET29W X 60H X 12D. 4 SHELVES GOOD CONDITION $100 (352) 419-4394 CURIO CABINETW/4 SHELVES PECAN WOOD $65 352-419-4394 FILE CABINET 5-DRAWER beige metal upright heavy-duty fireproof in good shape. $50.00 352-746-1486 Firestone Wilderness TIRE, LE, P265-70R-16 for an SUV, $50 352-860-2828 GENERATOR B/S Engine,10 HP,5250 watts.Used once,like new.Paid $650 sell for $400 OBO 352-746-4160 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 GRAYFEMALE CAT,JACK RUSSLE DOG Cat uses a liter box.Dog is house broken,but waits to go outside 1-352-201-4430 INDUSTRIALSEWING MACHINE, Union Special, Style 63400A, Made in USA $130 OBO 352-489-0976 3 Cushion Couch Blue and White Check $200, chair and ottoman Blue Micro Fiber $100. 603-863-9750 3 PC SECTIONAL Gray suede, excellent Condition $300 352-527-8165 BOOKCASE/TV SHELF Dark oak finish 6 adj shelves NICE!! 6H 7L15W $100. 352-621-0175 COFFEE TABLE ORNATE carved med oak finish Good condition $45.00 Pine Ridge 352-270-3909 COUCH Double recliner couch. Light/Dark Brown. 2 years old. Excellent condition. $225.00 352-419-5556 Couch w/recliners at ea. end. blue tones, $325. Tan Recliner $100. good cond. for both 352-341-4902 Dining Rm. Set, table 6 chairs, hutch, buffet, $300. 3 pc. entertainment center/ bookcase/ desk, $100. Excellent condition! (352) 212-6918 (352) 249-8092 DINNING ROOM CHAIRS 4 chairs perfect condition brown tones $50 call 352-257-3870 Electric lift twin bed $50. 2 swivel Pine 24 inch bar stools $20 ea. 3 wood end tables $5. ea. Excel. condition! (352) 212-6918 (352) 249-8092 Entertainment Ctr Lt Wood; White chair $125/both; Twin box spring & mat. w/ rails $75.(352) 795-7254 FOR SALE!Fancy pub tables 30 top & 42 tall Wood mahogany color $75 Each Call 352-344-8840 FURNITURE BEDROOM SET $250.00,LANAI FURNITURE,GRILL,KITCHE N SET,SOFA, 1 ENDTABLE,coffee table best offer 352-201-0275 High End Used Furniture 2NDTIME AROUND RESALES 270-8803,2165 Hy 491 Lazy Boy Leather double reclining sofa $350. Matching reclining chair $350. (352) 382-0485 LOVE SEATAND CHAIR taupe with light colored floral print $50 for set. call 352-257-3870 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Full $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 MODEL HOME FURNITURE, ASHLEY, Liv. Rm. & Din. Rm. Sets (352) 302-5797 MULTIPURPOSE CABINETS 4 cabinets available $8 each (needs restoring). call 352-257-3870 OVER SIZES CHAIR W/TWIN BED light taupe perfect shape $50. 352-257-3870 PATIO DINING SET44 round table & 4 vinyl strap chairs. Easy care, great shape. $100.00 352-746-1486 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg. $75. 352-628-0808 Rocker Recliner Dk Brown Leather NEW $450 352-382-1570 Round dinette table, w/ 4 chairs on casters $150. Octigone glass top coffee table, $35., Excellent condition! (352) 212-6918 (352) 249-8092 SmlAntiqueRocker for nursing also Antique small Rocker, $135. for both, cash 352-795-0830 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 DRYER $100 in perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 Maytag Washer & Frididare Dryer Both Heavy Duty $175. for pair (352) 465-3384 WASHER$100 In perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call or text 352-364-6504 COMPUTER DESK W/HUTCH $100 Pull out keyboard. Text for Picture. SMW 586-904-3262 ABSOLUTEAUCTION May 18, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. for Rental Tool Company. Liquidation of rental equipment and inventory. For more information visit www.proteam auction.com. DUDLEYS AUCTION 6AUCTIONS5-9 EstateAdventure 3pm in, 6pm out 98Deville 1 owner 81k, golf cart, Antiques & Collectibles, Furniture, appliances, household, new items great fun @ hall 5-10 Real Estate 3 Inverness Investment Homes, 2 Lots ~ Sold Regardless of Price 10am 401 Ella Ave 125x135 w/home corner Ella &Dorian St RO/RP 11:30am 503 Lake Street 1940s home w/partial restoration dbl fence lot 2pm 203 Pine Street 110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block home, workshop, RO/RP 3pm. 1214 Stowe Street 2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120. 4pm 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot Commercial Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails. www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 BLACKAND DECKER AIRLESS SPRAYER $30 NEVER USED IN BOX INVERNESS 419-5981 BRAD PINCHER $15 TO FINISH BRAD NAILS WITHOUT HAMMER.EXTRA BRAD NAILS 419-5981 CRAFTSMANANGLE GRINDER $35 USED AS POLISHER, GRINDERAND CUTTER EXTRADISCS 419-5981 PAINTER SPRAYER Commercial, Sherman Williams 4900, Excel Condition $500. (352) 249-7212 POWERTOOLS 10 RigidTable Saw 300 13 Rigid Thickness Planer $200. 5500 Watt Generator $250. (352) 419-7364 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $100 HEAVY DUTYMADE OF METALOLDER STYLE INVERNESS 419-5981 TELEVISION color television in good condition $12 with remote 352-220-4158 YAMAHASPEAKERS SET OF 5 $90 352-613-0529 16GARAGE DOOR Wayne Dalton Insulated 8K Series Meets 120 MPH Wind Code $220 352-726-3730, 352-422-0201 Dell Computer Windows XP, Pentium 4 H/T, key board & mouse, $99 no monitor 352-621-0248 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 55 GALDIESEL/GAS DRUM With Portable Stand $40 352-726-3730 352-422-0201 15 Piece Patio Set Dark brown frame biege seats, $400 obo (352) 637-6647 Maintenance Associate Seeking a full time maintenance assoc. for a senior living community in Inverness, that is responsible and hardworking. Candidate must have previous experience in all phases of apartment maintenance and small appliance repair. Must have own tools. Benefits after 90 days. Please apply online at hr@dewarproperties. com or by faxing to 229-247-1353. NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehiclepreferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap -Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle SINGLE COPY ROUTES AVAILABLEThis is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. come to 1624 Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application SUMMER WORK GREAT PAY! Immediate FT/PT openings, customer sales/serv, will train, conditions apply, all ages 17+, Call ASAP! 352-600-5449 YARD/HOME MAINTENANCE Citrus Springs Ar ea P/T 2-3 days /week. Call 352-522-1109 between 6pm-9pm. Residence Serv CoordinatorP/T 24 hours week Resp include service delivery & referrals. Must have knowledge of available resources and transportation. Strong computer skills req. Qualified candidates send resume and cover letter to Joverstr eet@ chpc2.or g Equal Opportunity Employer www.community housing partners.or g Salon For SaleChair Rental $270 pr month 634-1397/637-3733 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Holland Financial Resources Hiring and Training InsuranceAgents 352-410-6927 PET CENTER Is Looking for an experienced Master Dog Groomer. Own Equip.. Req. Clean Shop, No drugs. Apply Personally on Thursdays Only 461 NE 1st Terr. Crystal River Upscale Country Club RestaurantNow accepting applications for Part time Breakfast and Lunch Cook. Please apply in person at 505 E Hartford St Tues-Sat between 2:00-4:30 pm. OPTICALSALESCitrus Vision Clinic is seeking sales help for our optical department. No industry experience required; sales experience a must. Incentive based pay.Apply in person. 2332 Hwy 44 W, Inverness, FL. SALES/SERVICE TECH Family owned and operated Pest Control Business Needed today Experience preferred will train the right person!clean driving record and valid drivers license a must Email to: jdsmithpest@ gmail.com or call (352) 726-3921 DRIVER OTR SD/LB/FLATBED 2Yrs Exp, ClassACDL (352) 799-5724 Exp. Dispatcher Experienced Service Techw/ Refrigeration Knowledge For AC Co. Must have knowledge of multi county area. Computer exp., be reliable & dependable. Experience only need apply Fax Resume to: 352-860-0757 or Email: aairinc @centurylink.net LANDSCAPE DESIGN CO.Seeking Exp. Help, with Pavers. Must have Dri. Lic. (352) 621-1944 MECHANIC/ BOAT RIGGERApply in Person at Homosassa Marine 3120 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, Fl. 34448 or Mail Resume PLUMBERS WANTEDMust have valid Drivers License Apply at: 4079 S. Ohio Ave, Homosassa Residential Plumbers/Helper Plumbers and Helpers needed for residential community (352) 341-4243 Contact JM Gibson Mechanical SEPTIC SERVICE TECH Experienced, clean CDL, current medical card, call for interview 352-628-0085 CASHIER/COOK Looking for people for food concession help, for local events and also people who want to travel.Adriver license is a plus but not mandatory.Call Perry cell 610-909-3678 or office 407-957-0433 NEEDANEW CAREER? Career Preparation Courses Five W eek Pr ogram Medical Assistant $1,420 T wo W eek Pr ogram: Nursing Assist. $475 Rehab Tech $475 Phlebotomy $475. T A YLORCOLLEGE .EDU (352) 245-4119 WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for P/Temployment.Child care work exp required Apply M-F, 12pm-2pm, No Phone Calls. Live in House Keeper/Personal AssistantCitrus Springs Area. Resp. include housekeeping, cooking finances & shopping. Salary of $10,000 per year plus living expenses. Owner Travels 6 mo /year. Must like animals. Sent resume with reach number to: tmg2@bellsouth.net. Replacing 19 Yr emp. due to health. I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CHIRO.ASST.P/Texp. M-W-F 8:30am-6pm T-Th 10am-4pm apply in person 6166 W Hwy 44, CR DENTAL ASSISTANTMust have exp. EFDA Certified. Immediate Openings in our Crystal River Office. We offer a great benefit pkg. please fax re 352-794-6140 or email at VDCSH @hotmail.com Directorof Resident Services Senior Solutions DirectorCNAs every other weeknd Dishwasher APPLY AT: Superior Residences of Lecanto Memory Care 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy (352)746-5483 drug free workplace dselsavage@ superioralf.com mbates@ superioralf.com LPN or MEDICAL ASSISTANT/ PHLEBOTOMISTWanted for office based medical practice in Inverness. Experience required. Fax Resume (352) 726-5818 NEEDED Experienced, Caring & Dependable CNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE (352) 860-0885 RPSG TECHPT/FTNight Position 13Yrs. Exp, in sleep med. must be reg.by BRPT, current CPR card is req. EOE Call for appt. 386-538-1060 SURGICAL ASSISTANTOur high quality oral surgery practice is seeking a fulltime surgical assistant. Must have dental or medical exp, a caring attitude and be computer savy Benefits incl. health insurance & pension Mail resume to: 6129 W. Corporate Oaks Dr. Crystal River, FL. 34429 Quickie Melody Power Chair, 2008 model, needs work 352-637-2153 Misty Meadows U-Pick Blueberries OpenThur-Sun 7am-7pm 352-726-7907 www.mistymeadowsblueberryfarm.com Gold Rafael Angel Ring, looks like a coin very sentimental lost in Homosassa pls call 352-628-4404 Hernando ShhTzu Male, light brown, 1yr old, lost in the area of Bonnie pt (citrus hills area) 352-601-7876 Lost Calico Cat Spayed Female brown color w/orange/cream markings with white chest belly & paws, Beverly Hills, Gleason Place Heartbroken Lost on A pril 6, REWARD 352-527-0302 LOST DARK GRAY MALE CAT Gray w/ White Muzzle White paws, pink nose w/ green eyes. Missing from Humanitarians Parking Lot 4/2/13 on 44 in Crystal River. PLEASE CALL If you have seen him REWARD (352) 382-9303 OR 352-201-0576 LOST-Mens Brown Leather Wallet in Homosassa vicinity of WinnDixie and Walgreens. If found Call (352) 621-7586 NEEDANEW CAREER? Career Preparation Courses Five W eek Pr ogram Medical Assistant $1,420 T wo W eek Pr ogram: Nursing Assist. $475 Rehab Tech $475 Phlebotomy $475. T A YLORCOLLEGE .EDU (352) 245-4119 Salon For SaleChair Rental $270 pr month 352-634-1397 TRAIN FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAREER IN HEALTH CARE! Enrolling Now for ALL PROGRAMS: PRACTICAL NURSING PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PROFESSIONAL NURSING PROFESIONAL NURSING Paramedic Opt. LPN TO ADN NURSING BRIDGE T A YLORCOLLEGE .EDU (352) 245-4119 Todays New Ads 4 BF Goodrich Tires & Rims like new, P245s-70-16 $400. 352-613-2333 GOLF CART, Ez go gas, no spark,older work hrs, top, $375, & cart extras $24 315-466-2268 INVERNESS 2 bedroom. 2 bath. Over 1200 sf, garage. 1st,last & sec. Community pool.352-464-0919 LOSTCHIHUAHUAPEPPY. WHITE W/ BROWN HAIR ON HIS EARS & HEAD. BIG BLACK SPOTS ON HIS BODY&TAIL. DISAPPEARED ON 5/5 CRYSTAL/BORDER AVENUE. WE LOVE HIM & MISS HIM! CALL JENNIFERAT 352-697-3055 WITH ANYINFORMATION. $100 REWARD FOR RETURN. Mercury 97 Grand Marquis very good cond. cold ac, newer tires, ask. $2200. 352-563-1600 Southern Bell Gown 5 layers, strapless, color gold iridescent lots of sparkle, size 16, worn 1 time, $300 (Orig. $500) 352-746-0513 SUZUKI 1981 GS1100E, Mint Condition, adult owned, super fast, garage kept, new tires, new seat, Italian fairing, smoke windshield with sissy bar, only 15k orig. mi. many extras serious inquires only $2600. Call 352-489-5932 SYLVAN2001, 820 Elite Fisher, 20ft Pontoon Boat, w/trailer & Yamaha 50HP engine $3700. 352-447-2053 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or UnwantedCars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Riding Mowers, & MORE 352-270-4087 FREE Cats Free to good loving adult only homes. Rescued older adult cats, all fixed 2 Declawed, (352) 422-6310 FREE FIRE WOOD Mostly Oak, You Haul Away (352) 419-7862 Free to Loving Home Female Jack Russell Spayed Call after 1pm (352) 419-8686 FREE VW Engine (in parts), 2 benches for VW Bus, dash board & muffler. 352-746-2226 ADiabetic needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, call Mike 386-266-7748 Wanted Single 60-66yr old good looking guy, with pick up truck. Wanting to meet 65 yr. old, Citrus Co. Single Woman Send Response to Blind Box 1829P c/o Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Wanted.The lady with a bright smile, awesome blue eyes, and short sassy hair. Kids are ok but no more than 2. Can also have grand kids and Ill even allow a puppy. I desire someone who is loving and caring to everyone she meets. Needs to be beautiful all the way thru and have a great outlook on life. Someone with wisdom & intelligence. Someone looking a very long term relationship with a guy that will love and adore her and do his best to fulfill her dreams. If you are the one God appointed to me then please get ahold of me... and bring ice cream. Todays New Ads 2003 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS $4,100. 157K miles. Runs great. Cold air. jonkern@ptd.net or 352-613-1738 Bayliner 1984 Trophy Cuddy cabin, clean, with trailer, Volvo pente i/o. $2850. READY TO GO! cash only, call Doug 352-564-0855 DODGE 1993 Stealth ES: black exterior paint, gray leather seats, sunroof, cruise,AC, power windows and locks, 5 speed manual transmission, 3.0LDOHC V6, 120,500 miles. $3,800. 352-344-0625 FURNITURE BEDROOM SET $250.00,LANAI FURNITURE,GRILL,KITCHE N SET,SOFA, 1 ENDTABLE,coffee table best offer 352-201-0275 Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source!

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T UESDAY,M AY 7,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248 Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call 1-352-200-2508 Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENT Locally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $ 39 Flat Rate No Hidden Costs 000E5AE Exp. 5/31/13 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior Pressure Washing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000EI6K 000EKOX WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465 Bonded & Insured www.windowgenie.com/springhill 0 0 0 E S I Z HANDYMAN Rons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 000ESX4 ROOFING AAA ROOFING Call the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411 Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $ 100 OFF Any Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!! Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827 For a FREE In-Home Estimate! BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELING BATHFITTER000ETFE 0 0 0 E S 3 V TREE SERVICE 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696 Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grinding C o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured352-400-3188 YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND P A VERS Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC000ETRN Copes Pool & Pavers 000EVK9 LANDSCAPE & SOD 7700 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River NOW OPEN Sod Sales/Installed Landscaping Nursery Mulch 257-5410 257-5412 NOW OPEN Sod Sales/Installed Landscaping Nursery Mulch 000EN86 METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer Satisfaction Lic.#CCC1325497 000EH0P When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile CleanerShowers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Cleaning & Sealing Grout Painting Residential & Commercial 586-1816 746-9868 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Adult Family Care HomeAlzheimer Dementia Incontinency (SL6906450) 503-7052 Support & Assistance with/ Shopping, Appts. Errands & Light Housekeeping. Lic. w/Ref. (352) 613-0078 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services ESTATE SALES Pricing to Final Check W e Ease S tress! 352344-0333 or 422-2316 ROCKYS FENCING FREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 #1 HANDYMAN All Types of Repairs Free EST., SR. DISC. Lic#38893, 201-1483 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 Primary Cleaning **Free Estimates** call Kala 352-212-6817 CLEANING BYPENNY Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. 352-503-7800, 352-476-3820 NA TURE COAST CLEANING Res. Rate-$20 hr. No Time Wasted! 352-564-3947 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 Weekly or just an occasional clean. CallTabitha @ 352-601-2175. All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 SOD SOD SOD & DECORATIVE ROCK *Installation Specialist* John (352) 464-2876 #1 Professional Leaf vac system why rake? FULLLawn Service* Free Est. 352-344-9273 AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Cuts Starting $15 Res./Comm., Lic/Ins. 563-9824, 228-7320 AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Quality Cuts Lawn Care Budget Plans, Lic/Ins 352-794-4118 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Helpin Hand Grass Man Cut Clean Mulch Edge FREE ESTIMATES! Russell 352-637-1363 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup,hauling. treework 352-726-9570 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 ATYOUR HOMEMower and Small Engine-It s T une Up T ime! 352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Jeffery Upchurch Painting. Res Painting, interior/ext. Free est. Lic/ins (352) 220-0273 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. SOD SOD SOD & DECORATIVE ROCK *Installation Specialist* John (352) 464-2876 ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE J Tree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 DOUBLE J Tree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 10% off-Mention Ad Lic/ins. 352-344-2696 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 (352) 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Car Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! 640984A 000ER8K Lecanto Hills 55+ Park Lot rent $240, 2/1, Clean, Fully furn., shed & carport $7,500 61 S Atkins Ter. Call ofc: 352-746-4648 2 Mobile Home Steps for sale48wooden, brand new $250 for both 352-503-7709 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITY LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 INVERNESS to share house, older woman pref. Reference $300 mtly + util. 352-344-4578 1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA 12 x 40 enclosed front, with vinyl window, utiltiy & outdoor shed all appls and some furniture included, lot rent includes water garbage and sewer sm. pets okay, $16,000 863-519-8233 Ext. 11243 Crystal river 2 bedroom. 2 bath. Beautiful home on the lake. Furnished and includes all appliances.A55 plus community. Close to shops. asking $24,900 352-794-4128 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $11,000 or Lease to Own from $199/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Your world first.Every Day v automotive Classifieds HOME-ON-LAND Only $59,900, 3/2 like new on acre. Tape-n-texture walls, new carpet & appliances,AC & heat! Warranty, $2,350 dwon, $319.22/mo P&I, W.A.C. Owner can finance. Call 352-621-9182 HOMOSASSA Dbl.Wide 3/2 95% remodeled inside, 1.25 acres half-fenced, recent roofing & siding, 16x16 workshop,must-see! $65,900(352) 621-0192 INVERNESS 4BR/2BA, on Acre on paved road, fenced yard. $3000. down, $417.53 WAC. Call 386-546-5833 Leave Message www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle Follow the HOMOSASSA 2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19 352-634-1311 INVERNESS 14 x 60 with addition 2/1 1.25 Acres, near wal-mart $475 Mthly 706-473-2184 HOMOSASSA2/1FencedAcre,Addition Huge Deck, Shed $500.mo 352-628-5244 43,900. 3/2,Dblewide. Delivered & set up, New Jacobsen. The only home with a 5 yr. warr., only $500 down and $293.40/ mo. P&I W.A.C. Must See 352-621-3807 BIG USED HOMES 32x80 H.O.M. $50,900 28x76 H.O.M. $43,500 28x70 ScotBilt $42,500 40x42 Palm Har. $65k 28X70 Live oak $52,500 We Sell Homes for Hnder $10,000 Call & View (352) 621-9183 NEW 3/2 JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John L yons @ 800 622 2832 ext 210 for det ails. http://www .p almharbor .c om/model center /plantcity/ INVERNESS 55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 352-476-4964 for details HERNANDO 16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 acres, must see inside, nice & Clean $49,900 (will consider reasonable cash offers) 352-465-1500 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com BEAGLE PUPPIES$125 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 Shih-Tzu & Shih-Poo Pups, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors, Beverly Hills, FL (352)270-8827 Horse Quality HAY(352) 795-1906100 Bales Pick-Up $4.50 200 Bales Pick Up $4.00 This Is Shamrock Hay Horse Quality HAY(352) 795-1906100 Bales Pick-Up $4.50 200 Bales Pick Up $4.00 This Is Shamrock Hay I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 1 Bedroom, 1 bath @$350 inc. H20 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 352-476-4964 For Details! My name is Ginger, and I have a lot of colors. I was a stay now I am a loving kitten looking for my forever home, is it you. See me @ www.savingangels petrescue. 419-0223 / 726-1006 My name is LuLU. I am about 18 months old and full of energy.Yes I am a Chi. Everything is done, except me being in my forever home. See me@ www.savingangels petrescue.com or call 726-1006 / 419-0223 PAPILLONS: AKC, DOB: 10/27/12, UTD on shots with health certs & guaranteed. Parents on site, Ch. lines, 2 females 3 1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male. All tri color. Other Paps avail 8 mo & up. (386) 496-0876 Shepherd Mix, Her name is Daisy Color is Blond, 3 yrs old, spayed, UTD on Shots Micro Chipped, lovable, house trained, FenceYard Needed moving cant keep needs loving home (863) 661-6220 Shih Poo Puppies, 4 males, 1 female ready 6/9 Yorkshire Puppies 3 males 1 female Ready 5/9 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips Mother pin 14k diamond cut 5 gemstones in 14k $100.00 352-628-4210 WEDDING BAND 14K Ladies size 6-1/2 $100.00 352-628-4210 FISHTANK WITH STAND 35 gallon black stand $25. call 352-257-3870 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ADiabetic Needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, C all Mike 386-266-7748 I BUY AMMO, Also Reloading Supplies & Equip. PAYING $$ Top Prices $$ 352-302-0962 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 LOSTCHIHUAHUAPEPPY. WHITE W/ BROWN HAIR ON HIS EARS & HEAD. BIG BLACK SPOTS ON HIS BODY&TAIL. DISAPPEARED ON 5/5 CRYSTAL/BORDER AVENUE. WE LOVE HIM & MISS HIM! CALL JENNIFERAT 352-697-3055 WITH ANYINFORMATION. $100 REWARD FOR RETURN. Technics KN-750 music keyboard $45. 352-419-4464 AREARUG 7X10 Nice design, no worn spots, Clean $30. Text for picture. SMW 586-904-3262 BICYCLE BOYS SPIDERMAN 12 WITH TRAINING WHEELS $30 352-613-0529 CLUB CAR GOLF CART $, 1,500. Excel. batteries, garage kept, Delivery Avail 352-527-3125 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 EZ Go Golf Cart 1997, runs good, $1,150 Club car Golf Cart $450 352-564-2756 GOLF CART, Ez go gas, no spark,older work hrs, top, $375, & cart extras $24 315-466-2268 GUN & KNIFE SHOW BROOKSVILLE HSC CLUB Sat. May 11th 9a-5p Sun. May 12th 9a-4p HERNANDO COUNTYFAIRGROUNDS Admission $6.00 (352) 799-3605 KAYAK CARRIER kayak roof rack $80.00 phone 352-726-6084 MENS BICYCLE 26 balloon tires. RIPCurl Magna. $65.00/ 352-637-5969 TAPERFLEX WATER SKI $25.00 call 352-257-3870 Tennis Racket, stringing machine, electronic Alpha ultra edge, w/6 pt hold excel. cond. $400. obo Recumbent Bike BikeE, 21spd. aluminum 29lbs, excel cond. $400 obo (352) 489-0105 2013 ENCLOSED TRAILERS, 6x12 with ramp, $1975. ** call 352-527-0555 ** BOYS BABYCLOTHES good condition sizes 3 months-3 toddler $ .25 -$2.00 call 352-257-3870 TODDLER CAR SEAT blue good condition $25.00 call 352-257-3870 KitW ood Cabinets 36 sink cab w/ 24 matching side $30; 8 ft center top + dsink, base cab + 4 top wall cab.$60 352-465-1892 MOTORBIKE HELMET Hardly used, good condition, green/ black/ white color, $30 (352)465-1616 OCEANIC VEO 180 AIR/NITROX WRIST DIVE COMPUTER Battery replacement, $100 (352)465-1616 ROCKING HORSE Rocks by rubber, ok condition, $50 (352)465-1616 Southern Bell Gown 5 layers, strapless, color gold iridescent lots of sparkle, size 16, worn 1 time, $300 (Orig. $500) 352-746-0513 STEPLADDER (Wagner) HD 8like new.Used inside only.Cost $119,sell for $80. 352-746-4160 STORAGE SHED 12X20, g/ cond. $1200 U Move (352) 249-7212 TRAVELBAGTravel bag perfect for school or travel $9-352-220-4158 TUB SAFETY HANDRAIL Medline Deluxe $30.00 352-628-4210 Twin Electric Beds in good condition $1200. 352-628-2777 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR FULL DREDNAUGHT W/EXTAS NICE! ONLY $55 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR Martin D 16 h built 1992, spruce top mahogany back and sides, solid woods nice condition, Martin hard case $ 975 352 527 1245 Estey Discovery II Organ in good condition $10. 352-419-4464 Fender Frontman 15G guitar amp $25. 352-419-4464 Galveston acoustic guitar in good condition $50. 352-419-4464 M-audio key studio keyboard controller $20. 352-419-4464 PIANO Currier console piano Excellent cond. $400., (352) 503-7219 Need a JOB? #1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds

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C12 T UESDAY,M AY 7,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 590-0507 TUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE N O T I C E The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a workshop on Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 6:00pm in the Lecanto Government Building 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida to discuss the CR-491 Corridor Planning Project. This notice informs and notifies the public that members of the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will be in attendance at this workshop. The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will not vote or conduct business but will actively participate in the discussion. The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustee(s) will be active participant(s) in the discussion of the CR -491 Corridor Planning Project as it is related to Citrus County Hospital Board business. This notice informs the public that members of the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees shall participate in the discussion and this matter will come to the Citrus County Hospital Board for further discussion and action at a later date and time. Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness, Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250. May 7, 2013 589-0603 TUCRM Medical Practice Closing PUBLIC NOTICE Kings Bay Family Care/Dr. Michael B. Mueller It is with deep regret that I must announce that I am closing my medical practice. Please know that I have been honored to serve each and every patient and that you will be missed. If you would like copies of your medical records, or you have any other concerns, please contact me in writing at: Kings Bay Family Care, po box 2444, Crystal River, Florida 34423. Published five (5) times in The Citrus County Chronice, May 7, 14, 21, 28, & June 3, 2013. 590-0514 TUCRN Jones, David E. 2012-CP-000732 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. :2012-CP-000732 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF DAVID E. JONES, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DAVID E. JONES, deceased, whose date of death was February 13, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012-CP-732; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 7, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Courtney Jones 10080 South DevonTerrace, Homosassa, FL 34448 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq., Florida Bar No. 0857750V anNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 1352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa.com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle May 6 & 13, 2013 000ER8Q NISSAN 1994, extra cab, 5 spd cold ac, tonneau cover high miles, runs strong $1700. 352-344-0484 TOYOTA2011 TUNDRA CREWMAX 32K MILES, 4WD, LEATHER, S/R $30995. 352-628-5100 WE FINANCE ALL RENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 FORD 1997, Explorer XLT $3,495 352-341-0018 FORD 1998, Explorer Sport $4,995. 352-341-0018 FORD 98, Explorer, XLT, good clean cond. new tires $2,700 obo (352) 637-4676 GMC 2009YUKON SLE 32K MILES $24995. 352-628-5100 HONDA 2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 HYUNDAI 2004 Santa Fe, new timing belt & seals, high mileage, runs great, $3200. 352-344-0484 LEXUS 2010 RX350 LOADED, NAV, PREMIUM RED $29995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2001 4RUNNER SR5 4WD, V6 ONLY73K MILES $9995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA2002 RAV 4 4WD 74,000 MILES, 4CYL $8995 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2005 RAV4 92K MILES, 29 MPG $9995. 352-628-5100 2013 DODGE Grand Caravan Wheelchair van with 10lowered floor, ramp and tie downs for more info call Tom 352-325-1306 CHEVY 2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLERTown & Country 2005 7-Pass Non-Smoking Mini-Van, Stown Go Seats, 3.8ltr V6, 21mpg Leather, 2nd Owner, Impeccably Maint., Records, All Options. Clean Reliable Family Van. $6,999. obo 352-422-3217 06 Suzuki Burgman 650 w/tryke kit, wh/bl under 5k mi, loaded with extra.$7995 OBO352-621-0248 CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES 352-942-3492 Harley Davidson 2005,1200C Blk, xtra chrome, hard bags, 12,900 mi., sissy bar, forw ctrls & wshield. $5600 (352) 726-9325 SUZUKI 1981 GS1100E, Mint Condition, adult owned, super fast, garage kept, new tires, new seat, Italian fairing, smoke windshield with sissy bar, only 15k orig. mi. many extras serious inquires only $2600. Call 352-489-5932 CHEVY 2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 FORD 2000, Ranger XLT Lesabre, $3,995. 352-341-0018 FORD 2002 MUSTANG GT 69K MILES, LEATHER $8995. 352-628-5100 FORD 2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD 2005,Focus, Sedan, SES, 25,000 miles. $7,500. 352-341-0018 FORD Mustang, V6, 5spd manual, gar. kept, GT wheel,s silver, great cond. $3,500 obo (352) 476-7408 HONDA 2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 KIA OPTIMAHYBRID EX ONLY3K MILES, LOADED $21995. 352-628-5100 LINCOLN 2002, Towncar Executive, Good cond. $5,500 obo 352-628-5451 or 352 601-2214 Mazda 2012 3i, 5-door Touring, graphite 7300 mi, ext. warranty exc. cond. $16,388. 727-857-6583 Mercury 97 Grand Marquis very good cond. cold ac, newer tires, ask. $2200. 352-563-1600 WE FINANCE ALL RENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Oldsmobile 1992,Toronado White Diamond, leather int. 124Kmi, FWD 3800 tuned port injection, V6, Meticulously,maintained$3500. (352) 527-3291 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE 2004 DAKOTA4WD CLUB CAB, SPORT $8495. 352-628-5100 DODGE 2006 Dakota Quad CAB ST4.7 Liter Magnum R V8A.R.E. Cap, Hitch, 43,000 $9,700.00 352.746.2621 352.746.2621 FORD RANGER 1997, Stick shift, bed cap, engine & clutch replaced 2009, brake drums/rotors replaced 2011, cold air, runs great, few small dings. $1700. 352-447-2053. 1997 Lincoln Twn Car Light Green, Low mi. new carriage roof, new head line, good tires, cold a/c $3000 352-503-7256 2003 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS $4,100. 157K miles. Runs great. Cold air. jonkern@ptd.net or 352-613-1738 2011 Chrysler200 Convert, cherry/tan 22k mi, beautiful car, automatic, $21,950 Firm 352-897-4520 BUICK 2005 Century, 4dr 96k mi, power window, lock, cruise control, am/fm/cd asking $4900. 352-302-9217 BUICK 2006 Lacrosse CX 92K MILES, LIKE NEW $8995. 352-628-5100 CADILLAC 1999 STS $1,500, minor work needed 352-364-2268 CHEVROLET 2003 Corvette 50th anniversary model, miilinium yellow, 28,500 miles, immaculate, loaded,call for details. $24,900 Sugarmill 740-705-9004 CHEVROLET 2008, Cobalt LT $6,995. 352-341-0018 DODGE 1993 Stealth ES: black exterior paint, gray leather seats, sunroof, cruise,AC, power windows and locks, 5 speed manual transmission, 3.0LDOHC V6, 120,500 miles. $3,800. 352-344-0625 DUDLEYS AUCTION 6AUCTIONS59 EstateAdventure 3pm in, 6pm out 98Deville 1 owner 81k, golf cart, Antiques & Collectibles, Furniture, appliances, household, new items great fun @ hall 510 Real Estate 3 Inverness Investment Homes, 2 Lots ~ Sold Regardless of Price 10am 401 Ella Ave 125x135 w/home corner Ella &Dorian St RO/RP 11:30am 503 Lake Street 1940s home w/partial restoration dbl fence lot 2pm 203 Pine Street 110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block home, workshop, RO/RP 3pm. 1214 Stowe Street 2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120. 4pm 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot Commercial Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails. www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 FORD 1999 Crown Victoria 60,800 miles,silver in color,power windows,locks,seat,cruise,tilt wheel,cassette player,newer tires very clean. $3900 o.b.o. 352-257-2590 1989 Merc. 35 HP, NoTilt Good compression good spark, nice shape $695. Newer motor guide, 40lb thrust, foot control., like new $450. (352) 860-0513 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 15 FT BOWRIDER w/55 Johnson, w/tilt, bimini, foot trolling mtr., fish finder, trailer, runs and looks good, $1,200firm 860-0513 1988, 15 FTFiberglass, center console, w/40HP, Johnson, w/tilt, new bimini, trailer, ready to fish, $2,000 860-0513 1994 GRADYWHITE 208ADVENTURE w/cabin,outbd power tilt/trim 150 Yamaha, fish finder, many extras. Very clean, motor needs work, must see. $5,495. 352-503-7928 1998 Sting Ray22 Ft, extra Clean 175 Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab, great for fish/pleasure $7500 352-422-4658 Bayliner 1984 Trophy Cuddy cabin, clean, with trailer, Volvo pente i/o. $2850. READY TO GO! cash only, call Doug 352-564-0855 Carolina Skiff24 ft. new motor-41 Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP, trailer. Lots of extras $14,500(352)287-3308 PONTOON 2005 18ft Party Pontoon w/ galvanized Trailer. 40hp Yamaha $6995 (352) 650-9059 Seabreeze w/trailer, 15tri hull must sell, best offer 352-746-0589 SPEED BOAT1975, w/trailer newly painted, new red custom canvas cover. $2,000. 813-650-4662 SYLVAN2001, 820 Elite Fisher, 20ft Pontoon Boat, w/trailer & Yamaha 50HP engine $3700. 352-447-2053 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com YACHTMAN1988 22 Pontoon Pontoon 22ft-40hp ELTO-Trailer-New Deck 2006-some new seats fully equipped-under cover 4,300.00 352.746.2621 KEYSTONE RV COMPANY2008 Cougar 5th wheel 33Double slides, wood floors, ducted A/C, large shower, all the extras, like new condition, $21,500. 352-726-6261 2001 Aliner Expedition 18, sleeps 4, Gd Cond w/ A/C, Refrig $4500 (352) 249-6098 2011 ROCKWOOD 20Trailer, like new,1 db bed, slide w/convertable sofa, all appliances,full bath, many extras $13,400 352 860-2701 ROCKWOOD TT 31Signature Series. Aluminum frame. Rear queen, 12LR slide. All factory extras + more. Completely equipped (linens, kitchen, tools, spare parts). Ready to go. Immaculate condition, No smoking, no pets. $14,000. 352-637-6262 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. POP-UPCAMPER Coleman Elite, 16 ft opens to 25ft, H/A, 2 K beds, Refig $3600 (352) 344-9589 TRAVELTRAILER 26 2005 Springdale by Keystone with slide, queen bed, sleeps 8, ductedA/C, tub with shower, good condition. $6700 352-464-1622 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 Yellow Stone32tag along $1500 OBO 352-220-6048 4 BF Goodrich Tires & Rims like new, P245s-70-16 $400. 352-613-2333 Tonneau Cover Rugged, 6 feet, folds into 3 sections Asking $250 727-251-7568 VW 2 transmissions, 1 is for a VW bus 746-2226/ 212-1538 $$ TOP DOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Room To Roam3/2 ON 2 ACRES Quite Country Setting front porch, Large rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, w/ water & electric, and Steel Carport, Completely Fenced Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area, only 20 Min. to Ocala $132,000 352-302-6784 SANDI HARTRealtor Listing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it! 352-476-9649 sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 SPECIAL New Home in Quiet Neighborhood, 3/2/2 2932 sq. ft. corner lot, on 1 acre, $279,900 Call Barney (352) 563-0116 TONY Pauelsen Realtor 352-303-0619 tpauelsen@ hotmail.com Buy or Sell now is the time TOP PERFORMANCE Real estate Consultant FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com 516 S. TUCK POINT 2/1/1Block Home, Remodeled, New Everything, Canal to Withlacoochee River Priced to Sell Immediately! $64,900 (352) 503-6703 HAVE IT ALL Spring Water, Fish from Dock, Watch the Manatees from porch, walk to festivals, enjoy living in dwntn Crystal River, gated community, 2/2 Condo w/gar. $249,900, owner,lic. RE Broker 352-257-9496 YOUR High-Tech Water Front Realtor ROD KENNER 352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties HERNANDO Lot for sale (Arbor Lakes 55+) $15,000 OBO 781-864-1906 INVERNESS RENT TO OWN!! No Credit Check! 3/2/2, 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM Im Gorgeous Inside!!! Big & Beautiful, 3/2/2 N ear 7 Rivers Golf Course 305 N Venturi Ave $149,900 Call Nancy Wilson For Appt. to see 352-422-4137 Waybright Real Estates, Inc. 3-4BR/ 2BA/ 2-4Car New Roof, Cathedral Ceilings, Fruit Trees, 2 Lots, $145,000. 352-563-9857 3/2/2 POOL HOME New Paint and carpet, Updated Kitchen, REDUCED $133,900 352-302-4057 3BR/2BA Pool, New Cage Recently Remodeled, 4/13 New kit & bath, cabinet. w/ granite, New AC Lots of Extras $155,900 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5 11A-3P, 352-601-0241 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. HOMOSASSA 211 Pine St 4BD/3BA. 3000 SF, heated pool, Granite, SSAppliances, Wood, Tile and Carpet. 2 Car Gar, fireplace $235,000 Call 850-585-4026 SMW 3/3/2, court yard pool home, FSBO $233K call for appt. no realtors 352-503-2978 Phyllis Strickland Realtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 GAIL STEARNS your Gale ForceRealtor TROPIC SHORES Realty 352-422-4298 Email: Gail@ gailsellscitrus.com W eb: www. gail sellscitrus.com Low overhead means savings for you! Waterfront, Foreclosures &Owner financing available. I NEED LISTINGS! I SOLD ALMOST 2-HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor (352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican Realty Phone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSE Realtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath. Office Bldg for sale perfect for Accountants, Chiropractor or insurance office. Corner Lot, fences, great location Approx. 1400 sq ft.Listed to sell by owner 352-746-5079 TERRAVISTAGOLF COURSE LOT on Red Sox Path. Great vistas. 85 ft. frontage on golf course $56,400. Call 352-638-0905 2355 S. Ripple Path Crystal River, 34429 Great Marine Mech, Boat storage and launch site for nearby scallops plus fishing & kayaks, Lgr bldg w/ 3/18rollups office tlr & boat ramp, $169k, finance poss. call 352-634-3862 FOR SALE BY AUCTION 2,240 SF Bldg. on .55 Acres, Split into 2 Suites, Zoned CH High Intensity Comm, Large Sign, Great Location Auction held on site 1919 NW US Hwy 19 Crystal River Fl. Thurs. May 16th, 12PM Preview From 11am Sale Day CALL 352-519-3130 Visit American Heritage Auctioneers.com PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 2/1/1 Treated with tender loving care. Freshly painted int/ext Near shoping $43,999 209 S Washington ST Cl Bill 301-538-4840 Nicest 2/1 in Beverly Hills MUST SEE!! You wont find a nicer home in this price range looks and feels brand new with over $25K in upgrades. Large new 12x 24 shed in rear with office and work shop. Completely renovated insulated windows, new oak kitchen cabinets,new bathroom tile, berber carpet, 3D shingles.Large Florida room (can be 3rd bedroom) $54,900 with easy terms. This house shows as new it wont last long! More info here http://www.sharphome.c om/131313 call Troy 352-364-6316 REMODELED 2/1.5/1 NEW: Roof, kitchen, appls, bath, flooring, paint, much more. 1240sf, under AC. $59,900. (352)527-1239 Recently Foreclosed Special Financing Available Any Credit, Any Income 2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft. 6515 S. Tropicana Ave., Lecanto $39,900. Visit: www.roseland co.com\AQF Drive by then Call (800) 282-1550 Homosassa Springs Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn St. Nice Neighborhood. Asking $12,500. (904) 757-1012 PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOU AVIEW TO LOVE www. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. (352) 563-5966 www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Washer Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! 640983A ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE INVERNESS 1/1 $400-$465 Near Hospital 352-422-2393 HOMOSASSA 600 sq ft,On US 19, Across from Wildlife Park352-634-1311 INVERNESS 2 bedroom. 2 bath. Over 1200 sf, garage. 1st,last & sec. Community pool.352-464-0919 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 MEADOWCREST Fairmont Villa 3/2/2, beautifully furnished Maintenance free, fireplace in living rm. $900/mo + utilities 352 746-4116 AVAILABLE NOWCITRUS SPRINGS 3/2/2, New Carpet, Near School $725. mo.HOMOSSASA 2/1 Duplex $495. RIVER LINKS REALTY 352-628-1616 Homosassa Spg2/2 on canal, new paint,flooring throughout, w/d pets ok $1000 mthly, 619-301-5442 INVERNESS RENT TO OWN!! No Credit Check! 3/2/2, 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESS Moorings Condo 2/2/1 water front, part.furn., all appl. low HOA, lawn care and more, screen glass lania, patio w/awning, clear hurricane shutters, $86K or rent opt. 352-344-8493 or 734-529-2146 DUDLEYS AUCTION 6AUCTIONS5-9 EstateAdventure 3pm in, 6pm out 98Deville 1 owner 81k, golf cart, Antiques & Collectibles, Furniture, appliances, household, new items great fun @ hall 510 Real Estate 3 Inverness Investment Homes, 2 Lots ~ Sold Regardless of Price 10am 401 Ella Ave 125x135 w/home corner Ella &Dorian St RO/RP 11:30am 503 Lake Street 1940s home w/partial restoration dbl fence lot 2pm 203 Pine Street 110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block home, workshop, RO/RP 3pm. 1214 Stowe Street 2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120. 4pm 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot Commercial Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails. www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384

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G8 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH 000ERY7 Profiles Health in Medical Nutrition WellnessCitrus Countys Advertising SupplementMay 7, 2013

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, May 7, 2013 G7 P ROFILESINH EALTH G2 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Paid Advertisement Hearing problems? Youll want to hear this... 1-800-277-1182 7 Locations in Tampa Bay 000ES1Q New In Citrus Gardner Audiology recently moved its R&D and assembly facilities from the Tampa area to their Crystal River location to offer the residents of Citrus County an unprecedented opportunity to experience the newest technologies in hearing advancements, all in one location. Clients can be tested, fitted and walk out with their choice of the finest hearing appliance in just one visit. After gathering information and personal preferences through their field research studies with over 3,000 patients in the greater Tampa area for the past three years, Gardner Audiology has decided to focus on Central Florida. Through the main facility in Crystal River, they are offering the residents in the counties around Citrus the convenience and combined technology not even offered in any large cities. This facility now contains their plastics lab to mold acrylic inner ear devices and electronics lab to allow for efficient assembly in-house. The skilled professionals can also offer repair of all major brands of hearing aids. Dan Gardner, M.S., knows firsthand about hearing loss. His Oceanography studies were abruptly halted in the 1960s when he sustained a head injury with ear damage while serving in the U.S. Navy. Since that time, Dan has been passionate about helping people improve their hearing. After his discharge from the military, Dan returned to the University of South Florida to earn his graduate degree in Audiology, the Science of Hearing. Innie or Outie? Dan addressed his hearing problem early in life when he began wearing hearing aids. He chooses to wear a virtually imperceptible outer ear device that allows him to effortlessly hear conversation. To address the desire of clients who want an in the ear appliance that is invisible to others, Gardner Audiology is excited to introduce their recent development of a unique customized design that fits entirely inside the ear canal, yet holds all of the technology of the larger outer ear devices. This advanced new hearing aid looks like an inner ear space capsule. Dan Calls his invention the Innie. Consumer preference for a type of hearing aid is a lifestyle choice do you prefer an Innie or an Outie? Who Can Help You? It helps to talk with an educated professional who understands your problem such as an audiologist. Audiologists have earned an advanced university degree. They are not to be confused with a Hearing Ai d Specialist who need only a high school education or GED. As Dan says, Consult with an audiologist because who you see is much more important than the products you buy. Call Gardner The primary mission of Gardner Audiology is still the same after 37 years in Citrus County. Help people solve thei r hearing problems. Enjoy the wealth o f information and free hearing guides, along with the field trial testimonials at: www.gardneraudiology.com Master Audiologist Daniel Gardner, M.S. presently wears a hearing aid that hides outside his ear canal. He used the microscopes in his new Crystal River laboratory to design this miniscule hearing aid that will hide inside the ear canal. Hearing Loss Hurts Are you allowing hearing loss to seriously impact your personal and professional life? It can cause symptoms of irritability, anger, fatigue, stress, memory loss, and depression that slowly leads to isolation and withdrawal. Hearing aids are the best and sometimes only solution for most people suffering from hearing loss. Your quality of life can be improved with better hearing. PAID ADVERTISEMENT THE EARS ARE BACK! Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is located on Donovan Avenue in Crystal River, just off Route 486 near Route 44. A few years ago their sign was vandalized and someone stole their trademark: a huge set of ears. Business continued as usual, but people really missed the big ears. Now that the ears have been replaced, it is easy to find Advanced Family Hearing, and there are many reasons to stop in to meet the talented women who have run this business for over 15 years. Owner, Jerillyn Clark, is Board Certified and Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who has personally served Citrus County for 28 years. She opened her business with a strong commitment to this area and continues to give back to the county. The office has been managed by Jackie Ziegler, who not only keeps the center running smoothly, but is able to make every customer feel like a treasured part of the family. Mercedes Boatwright is a Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who really knows her business and her community. Mercedes is a fourth generation Citrus County native married to a native commercial fisherman. You will find Advanced Family Hearing heavily involved in all aspects of community service. Jerillyn Clark also has a strong compassion for the people who serve in our armed forces. Her daughter, Major Abbi Johnson, is on her third deployment overseas. Major Johnsons goal is to change the face of veterans by reminding people that our vets are not only the honored elderly veterans of previous military battles, but also the young men and women who have sacrificed and served to keep America free. ATTENTION VETS: Advanced Family Hearing continues to honor our veterans by offering them many free services. Veterans have to travel to Gainesville to receive their hearing devices, and then are required to go back and forth to get them adjusted and fitted, or repaired. Advanced Family Hearing will take care of all of those services with a convenient stop in Crystal River. The skilled staff will fit and adjust your new hearing aids, and also make any in office repairs needed for as long as you have them all at no cost. Communication is critical in life. Our jobs, relationships and social interactions are all more stressful when our hearing becomes compromised. Even the action of living independently can be impossible when the ability to hear properly is lost. Nearly 1 in 5 American adults struggle with hearing loss a figure that climbs to 1 in 3 for people over 65. With the tremendous advancements in hearing aid technology, there is no reason to settle for a diminished quality of life because of hearing loss. Hearing aids come in many common styles, though not every one is right for every individual. Factors such as the wearers level of hearing loss, size of ear canal, and even dexterity issues impact which style of hearing aid is best for you. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center offers a variety of hearing aids in every style and from most major manufacturers. The specialists will fit and service any hearing aid even if it was not purchased from them. Some of the products include: Behind-the-Ear Hearing Aids In-the-Ear Hearing Aids Receiver-in-Canal Hearing Aids In-the-Canal Hearing Aids Completely-in-Canal Hearing Aids Invisible Hearing Aids In addition to hearing aids, they offer a wide assortment of Hearing Protection & Personal Listening Devices. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is open Monday Friday 9:00am 4:00pm *Available outside standard business hours by appointment.** Come in for a free screening. Call 352/795-1775 000ELYZ

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, May 7, 2013 G3 P ROFILESINH EALTH G6 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH In home care for longer, healthier, and more purposeful life Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes in-home care to a new level. Since the business opened in 2004, their mission has been to transform day-to-day caregiving into opportunities for meaningful conversation and activities that engage and enrich the lives of seniors physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that the practice of Interactive Caregiving TM contributes to longer, healthier, more purposeful lives for seniors. Comfort Keepers caregivers are well trained, professional caregivers who are set apart by their natural gift of caring for others. To work with Comfort Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent screening and interviewing processes and must show a strong devotion to others. Only a few special people who pass this process go on to complete the training necessary to deliver this special brand of care and become Comfort Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass extensive background checks that exceed both state and franchise requirements and also must complete continuing education. In-home care is a growing need for seniors who desire to stay in their own homes with familiar surroundings, but can no longer take care of the necessary requirements of the home. Sometimes, all that is needed is a little assistance to enable a senior to stay in their own home and function safely for many more years. Whether it is only a few hours a week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at Comfort Keepers make it possible for seniors to continue to live in their own home and enjoy a quality of life that they thought was going to change forever. This care reinforces seniors self value by allowing them to continue their daily activities with as much independence as possible. The focus is providing solutions for the normal transition of aging. In order to achieve the most favorable outcome for each client, Comfort Keepers carefully matches caregivers and clients by personalities, interests, skills and needs. This extra consideration forms the basis of strong, healthful relationships. Comfort Keepers Care Coordinators work as partners with our clients family to provide their loved one a complete inhomecare solution to promote independent living. Comfort Keepers provides companionship and assistance through: Meal Preparation Laundry & Linen Washing Light Housekeeping Grooming & Dressing Support Errand Services Bathing & Hygiene Care Grocery Shopping Respite Care Transportation Alzheimers/Dementia Care All Comfort Keepers caregivers are employees of the company and not independent contractors. All of our caregivers are bonded and covered with Workers Compensation and Liability Insurance. Comforts Keepers is locally-owned and family operated by Deborah and Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively involved in the community and participates and sponsors local organizations like, Chamber of Commerce, Womens Business Alliance, Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters and various health expos. For in-depth information about Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com or stop by the local office at 2244 Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida. Phone: 352-726-4547 Paid Advertisement 2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL (352) 726-4547 www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888 Companionship Escort for Shopping and Meal Preparation Doctors Appointments Laundry Bathing and Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care Medication Reminders Alzheimers/Dementia Care In-Home Care Services that help people maintain full and independent lives We Are Comfort Keepers 000ERY6 Our family is here to give comfort to your family. Gailen, Jennifer & Lindsey discussing quality care. Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager, Gailen Spinka, General Manager and Lindsey Haller, Administrator Deborah & Bart will help you when you call. Deborah Spinka, Office Manager and Bart Haller Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner, Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison, Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Suite B, Crystal River, Florida 795-1775 000ELYT Complete FullT ime Hearing Aid Care We Provide FREE: Second Opinions Hearing Exams In-Office Demonstrations 30-Day Trial Loss & Damage Insurance Lifetime Service and Cleanings Unlimited Computer Adjustments Nationwide Coverage 0% FINANCING 12 Months Same As Cash Most Insurances Accepted FREE Video Otoscope Exam! It Could Only Be Ear Wax Price Match Guarantee Serving Citrus County for Over 28 Years F r e e Consultation Free With People You Can Trust Confused About Todays Digital Technology? Let Us Answer All Of Your Questions.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, May 7, 2013 G5 P ROFILESINH EALTH G4 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH 000EH06 PAID ADVERTISEMENT Vision changes as you age Changes in your vision can affect the quality of life as you grow older. These changes could be could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called pres byopia. CATARACTS are a normal part of the aging process, but can also be from an injury or from long-term use of steroid medications. Diabetes, smoking and long-term exposure to sunlight can also cause cataracts. A cataract is when the natural lens of the eye becomes cloudy, when things begin to look yellowish or even foggy. Seeing through a cloudy lens is like looking through a fogged-up window. The lens in the eye works similar to a camera lens; the crystalline lens focuses the light that enters the eye as it travels to the retina. Vision becomes blurry or dark and colors become dull. Cataracts usually a ffect people over the age of 60, and are the leading cause of treatable vision loss in adults. The good news is cataract surgery is one of the safest, easiest and most commonly per formed surgical pro cedure with over 15 million each year. Innovative technology has provided patients with a choice to choose a lens implant that meets their specific vision needs and can possibly reduce or eliminate the need for glasses. At the Suncoast Eye Center, cata racts are treated with the most advanced surgical procedure available: small incision, no-stitch surgery. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman remove the clouded natural lens of the eye and replace it with an advanced, premium artificial lens implant of your choice. Surgery is often timed so that one eye has adequate vision while the sur gical eye heals. STANDARD LENS this lens gives you sharp distance vision, but glasses are needed for closer objects. TORIC LENS this lens is best for patients with a high degree of astigmatism, it provides excellent dis tant vision but will often require the need for glasses for near and mid range distance activities. BLENDED VISION this will give you a greater range of vision without the need for glasses. This is also known as MONO VISION ; your dominant eye is for distance and the non-dominant eye is for near vision. MULTIFOCAL LENSES this unique lens is proven to provide excellent vision at near, intermediate and far distances without the use of glasses; under all lighting conditions day or night. The multifocal lens procedure is performed worldwide and is rec ognized for its safety and predictabil ity. The beauty of using this type of lens is that it relies on the eyes work ing together, as they are designed to do. By having both eyes processing all visual information in the same way, the multifocal lens gives people natural vision at all distances, much like they had in their youth. Medicare and most insurance plans pay for the standard cataract procedure, but there is an out-of-pocket expense to cover the cost of the premium lenses and customization involved. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman will explain the advantages and dis advantages of all lens implant options avail able, and the particular procedure which is most suitable for your needs. PRESBYOPIA is a common age-related condition. Usually beginning around the age of 40, the natural lens hardens and becomes less flexible so it beco mes difficult to see objects in the distance and up close without glasses. Tests to determine presbyopia may include the examination of the retina, a muscle integrity test, refraction test, slit-lamp test, or visual acuity. According to the U.S National Library of Medicine, there is no cure for presbyopia, but it can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Adding bifocals to an existing lens, or changing an already existing bifocal prescription can correct this problem in many cases; new surgical pro cedures can also provide solutions in others. IF CATARACTS or PRESBYOPIA are affecting your quality of life, now is the time to talk to your eye doctor, at SUNCOAST EYE CENTER and find out your best option. Call today to schedule your evaluation. 1-800-2826341. Are you experiencing blurry vision or just cant see as well as you used to? Changes in your vision could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called presbyopia. Both conditions usually affect the quality of life as you grow older. Theres a Lens for Every Lifestyle SIGNS OF CATARACTS: Blurry vision Difficulty driving or seeing at night Difficulty viewing a computer screen Colors appear dim and faded Frequent change in glasses prescription Glare or halos around lights Difficulty reading, especially i n low light SIGNS OF PRESBYOPIA: Loss of ability to read up close Difficulty viewing a computer screen Need reading glasses or bifocals Holding objects further away to read Decreased focusing ability for near objects Eyestrain Headache A Lens For Every Lifestyle 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com 000EH03 When Experience Counts Most Advanced Cataract Surgery with Multifocal IOL Premium Lens Implants Droopy Eyelid Surgery Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecare Specialists Eye Exams At Suncoast Eye Center Our Most Important Patient Is You! LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D Board Certified Ophthalmologist ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Board Certified Ophthalmologist

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, May 7, 2013 G5 P ROFILESINH EALTH G4 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH 000EH06 PAID ADVERTISEMENT Vision changes as you age Changes in your vision can affect the quality of life as you grow older. These changes could be could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called pres byopia. CATARACTS are a normal part of the aging process, but can also be from an injury or from long-term use of steroid medications. Diabetes, smoking and long-term exposure to sunlight can also cause cataracts. A cataract is when the natural lens of the eye becomes cloudy, when things begin to look yellowish or even foggy. Seeing through a cloudy lens is like looking through a fogged-up window. The lens in the eye works similar to a camera lens; the crystalline lens focuses the light that enters the eye as it travels to the retina. Vision becomes blurry or dark and colors become dull. Cataracts usually a ffect people over the age of 60, and are the leading cause of treatable vision loss in adults. The good news is cataract surgery is one of the safest, easiest and most commonly per formed surgical pro cedure with over 15 million each year. Innovative technology has provided patients with a choice to choose a lens implant that meets their specific vision needs and can possibly reduce or eliminate the need for glasses. At the Suncoast Eye Center, cata racts are treated with the most advanced surgical procedure available: small incision, no-stitch surgery. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman remove the clouded natural lens of the eye and replace it with an advanced, premium artificial lens implant of your choice. Surgery is often timed so that one eye has adequate vision while the sur gical eye heals. STANDARD LENS this lens gives you sharp distance vision, but glasses are needed for closer objects. TORIC LENS this lens is best for patients with a high degree of astigmatism, it provides excellent dis tant vision but will often require the need for glasses for near and mid range distance activities. BLENDED VISION this will give you a greater range of vision without the need for glasses. This is also known as MONO VISION ; your dominant eye is for distance and the non-dominant eye is for near vision. MULTIFOCAL LENSES this unique lens is proven to provide excellent vision at near, intermediate and far distances without the use of glasses; under all lighting conditions day or night. The multifocal lens procedure is performed worldwide and is rec ognized for its safety and predictabil ity. The beauty of using this type of lens is that it relies on the eyes work ing together, as they are designed to do. By having both eyes processing all visual information in the same way, the multifocal lens gives people natural vision at all distances, much like they had in their youth. Medicare and most insurance plans pay for the standard cataract procedure, but there is an out-of-pocket expense to cover the cost of the premium lenses and customization involved. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman will explain the advantages and dis advantages of all lens implant options avail able, and the particular procedure which is most suitable for your needs. PRESBYOPIA is a common age-related condition. Usually beginning around the age of 40, the natural lens hardens and becomes less flexible so it beco mes difficult to see objects in the distance and up close without glasses. Tests to determine presbyopia may include the examination of the retina, a muscle integrity test, refraction test, slit-lamp test, or visual acuity. According to the U.S National Library of Medicine, there is no cure for presbyopia, but it can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Adding bifocals to an existing lens, or changing an already existing bifocal prescription can correct this problem in many cases; new surgical pro cedures can also provide solutions in others. IF CATARACTS or PRESBYOPIA are affecting your quality of life, now is the time to talk to your eye doctor, at SUNCOAST EYE CENTER and find out your best option. Call today to schedule your evaluation. 1-800-2826341. Are you experiencing blurry vision or just cant see as well as you used to? Changes in your vision could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called presbyopia. Both conditions usually affect the quality of life as you grow older. Theres a Lens for Every Lifestyle SIGNS OF CATARACTS: Blurry vision Difficulty driving or seeing at night Difficulty viewing a computer screen Colors appear dim and faded Frequent change in glasses prescription Glare or halos around lights Difficulty reading, especially i n low light SIGNS OF PRESBYOPIA: Loss of ability to read up close Difficulty viewing a computer screen Need reading glasses or bifocals Holding objects further away to read Decreased focusing ability for near objects Eyestrain Headache A Lens For Every Lifestyle 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com 000EH03 When Experience Counts Most Advanced Cataract Surgery with Multifocal IOL Premium Lens Implants Droopy Eyelid Surgery Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecare Specialists Eye Exams At Suncoast Eye Center Our Most Important Patient Is You! LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D Board Certified Ophthalmologist ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Board Certified Ophthalmologist

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, May 7, 2013 G3 P ROFILESINH EALTH G6 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH In home care for longer, healthier, and more purposeful life Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes in-home care to a new level. Since the business opened in 2004, their mission has been to transform day-to-day caregiving into opportunities for meaningful conversation and activities that engage and enrich the lives of seniors physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that the practice of Interactive Caregiving TM contributes to longer, healthier, more purposeful lives for seniors. Comfort Keepers caregivers are well trained, professional caregivers who are set apart by their natural gift of caring for others. To work with Comfort Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent screening and interviewing processes and must show a strong devotion to others. Only a few special people who pass this process go on to complete the training necessary to deliver this special brand of care and become Comfort Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass extensive background checks that exceed both state and franchise requirements and also must complete continuing education. In-home care is a growing need for seniors who desire to stay in their own homes with familiar surroundings, but can no longer take care of the necessary requirements of the home. Sometimes, all that is needed is a little assistance to enable a senior to stay in their own home and function safely for many more years. Whether it is only a few hours a week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at Comfort Keepers make it possible for seniors to continue to live in their own home and enjoy a quality of life that they thought was going to change forever. This care reinforces seniors self value by allowing them to continue their daily activities with as much independence as possible. The focus is providing solutions for the normal transition of aging. In order to achieve the most favorable outcome for each client, Comfort Keepers carefully matches caregivers and clients by personalities, interests, skills and needs. This extra consideration forms the basis of strong, healthful relationships. Comfort Keepers Care Coordinators work as partners with our clients family to provide their loved one a complete inhomecare solution to promote independent living. Comfort Keepers provides companionship and assistance through: Meal Preparation Laundry & Linen Washing Light Housekeeping Grooming & Dressing Support Errand Services Bathing & Hygiene Care Grocery Shopping Respite Care Transportation Alzheimers/Dementia Care All Comfort Keepers caregivers are employees of the company and not independent contractors. All of our caregivers are bonded and covered with Workers Compensation and Liability Insurance. Comforts Keepers is locally-owned and family operated by Deborah and Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively involved in the community and participates and sponsors local organizations like, Chamber of Commerce, Womens Business Alliance, Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters and various health expos. For in-depth information about Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com or stop by the local office at 2244 Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida. Phone: 352-726-4547 Paid Advertisement 2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL (352) 726-4547 www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888 Companionship Escort for Shopping and Meal Preparation Doctors Appointments Laundry Bathing and Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care Medication Reminders Alzheimers/Dementia Care In-Home Care Services that help people maintain full and independent lives We Are Comfort Keepers 000ERY6 Our family is here to give comfort to your family. Gailen, Jennifer & Lindsey discussing quality care. Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager, Gailen Spinka, General Manager and Lindsey Haller, Administrator Deborah & Bart will help you when you call. Deborah Spinka, Office Manager and Bart Haller Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner, Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison, Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Suite B, Crystal River, Florida 795-1775 000ELYT Complete FullT ime Hearing Aid Care We Provide FREE: Second Opinions Hearing Exams In-Office Demonstrations 30-Day Trial Loss & Damage Insurance Lifetime Service and Cleanings Unlimited Computer Adjustments Nationwide Coverage 0% FINANCING 12 Months Same As Cash Most Insurances Accepted FREE Video Otoscope Exam! It Could Only Be Ear Wax Price Match Guarantee Serving Citrus County for Over 28 Years F r e e Consultation Free With People You Can Trust Confused About Todays Digital Technology? Let Us Answer All Of Your Questions.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE Tuesday, May 7, 2013 G7 P ROFILESINH EALTH G2 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH Paid Advertisement Hearing problems? Youll want to hear this... 1-800-277-1182 7 Locations in Tampa Bay 000ES1Q New In Citrus Gardner Audiology recently moved its R&D and assembly facilities from the Tampa area to their Crystal River location to offer the residents of Citrus County an unprecedented opportunity to experience the newest technologies in hearing advancements, all in one location. Clients can be tested, fitted and walk out with their choice of the finest hearing appliance in just one visit. After gathering information and personal preferences through their field research studies with over 3,000 patients in the greater Tampa area for the past three years, Gardner Audiology has decided to focus on Central Florida. Through the main facility in Crystal River, they are offering the residents in the counties around Citrus the convenience and combined technology not even offered in any large cities. This facility now contains their plastics lab to mold acrylic inner ear devices and electronics lab to allow for efficient assembly in-house. The skilled professionals can also offer repair of all major brands of hearing aids. Dan Gardner, M.S., knows firsthand about hearing loss. His Oceanography studies were abruptly halted in the 1960s when he sustained a head injury with ear damage while serving in the U.S. Navy. Since that time, Dan has been passionate about helping people improve their hearing. After his discharge from the military, Dan returned to the University of South Florida to earn his graduate degree in Audiology, the Science of Hearing. Innie or Outie? Dan addressed his hearing problem early in life when he began wearing hearing aids. He chooses to wear a virtually imperceptible outer ear device that allows him to effortlessly hear conversation. To address the desire of clients who want an in the ear appliance that is invisible to others, Gardner Audiology is excited to introduce their recent development of a unique customized design that fits entirely inside the ear canal, yet holds all of the technology of the larger outer ear devices. This advanced new hearing aid looks like an inner ear space capsule. Dan Calls his invention the Innie. Consumer preference for a type of hearing aid is a lifestyle choice do you prefer an Innie or an Outie? Who Can Help You? It helps to talk with an educated professional who understands your problem such as an audiologist. Audiologists have earned an advanced university degree. They are not to be confused with a Hearing Ai d Specialist who need only a high school education or GED. As Dan says, Consult with an audiologist because who you see is much more important than the products you buy. Call Gardner The primary mission of Gardner Audiology is still the same after 37 years in Citrus County. Help people solve thei r hearing problems. Enjoy the wealth o f information and free hearing guides, along with the field trial testimonials at: www.gardneraudiology.com Master Audiologist Daniel Gardner, M.S. presently wears a hearing aid that hides outside his ear canal. He used the microscopes in his new Crystal River laboratory to design this miniscule hearing aid that will hide inside the ear canal. Hearing Loss Hurts Are you allowing hearing loss to seriously impact your personal and professional life? It can cause symptoms of irritability, anger, fatigue, stress, memory loss, and depression that slowly leads to isolation and withdrawal. Hearing aids are the best and sometimes only solution for most people suffering from hearing loss. Your quality of life can be improved with better hearing. PAID ADVERTISEMENT THE EARS ARE BACK! Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is located on Donovan Avenue in Crystal River, just off Route 486 near Route 44. A few years ago their sign was vandalized and someone stole their trademark: a huge set of ears. Business continued as usual, but people really missed the big ears. Now that the ears have been replaced, it is easy to find Advanced Family Hearing, and there are many reasons to stop in to meet the talented women who have run this business for over 15 years. Owner, Jerillyn Clark, is Board Certified and Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who has personally served Citrus County for 28 years. She opened her business with a strong commitment to this area and continues to give back to the county. The office has been managed by Jackie Ziegler, who not only keeps the center running smoothly, but is able to make every customer feel like a treasured part of the family. Mercedes Boatwright is a Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who really knows her business and her community. Mercedes is a fourth generation Citrus County native married to a native commercial fisherman. You will find Advanced Family Hearing heavily involved in all aspects of community service. Jerillyn Clark also has a strong compassion for the people who serve in our armed forces. Her daughter, Major Abbi Johnson, is on her third deployment overseas. Major Johnsons goal is to change the face of veterans by reminding people that our vets are not only the honored elderly veterans of previous military battles, but also the young men and women who have sacrificed and served to keep America free. ATTENTION VETS: Advanced Family Hearing continues to honor our veterans by offering them many free services. Veterans have to travel to Gainesville to receive their hearing devices, and then are required to go back and forth to get them adjusted and fitted, or repaired. Advanced Family Hearing will take care of all of those services with a convenient stop in Crystal River. The skilled staff will fit and adjust your new hearing aids, and also make any in office repairs needed for as long as you have them all at no cost. Communication is critical in life. Our jobs, relationships and social interactions are all more stressful when our hearing becomes compromised. Even the action of living independently can be impossible when the ability to hear properly is lost. Nearly 1 in 5 American adults struggle with hearing loss a figure that climbs to 1 in 3 for people over 65. With the tremendous advancements in hearing aid technology, there is no reason to settle for a diminished quality of life because of hearing loss. Hearing aids come in many common styles, though not every one is right for every individual. Factors such as the wearers level of hearing loss, size of ear canal, and even dexterity issues impact which style of hearing aid is best for you. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center offers a variety of hearing aids in every style and from most major manufacturers. The specialists will fit and service any hearing aid even if it was not purchased from them. Some of the products include: Behind-the-Ear Hearing Aids In-the-Ear Hearing Aids Receiver-in-Canal Hearing Aids In-the-Canal Hearing Aids Completely-in-Canal Hearing Aids Invisible Hearing Aids In addition to hearing aids, they offer a wide assortment of Hearing Protection & Personal Listening Devices. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is open Monday Friday 9:00am 4:00pm *Available outside standard business hours by appointment.** Come in for a free screening. Call 352/795-1775 000ELYZ

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G8 Tuesday, May 7, 2013C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE P ROFILESINH EALTH 000ERY7 Profiles Health in Medical Nutrition WellnessCitrus Countys Advertising SupplementMay 7, 2013



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MAY 7, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 118 ISSUE 273 50 CITRUS COUNTYNBA playoffs: Heat open second-round series /B1 www.chronicleonline.com HIGH80LOW52Partly cloudy. Cool and breezy.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY INDEX Classifieds . . . .C10 Comics . . . . .C9 Crossword . . . .C8 Community . . . .C7 Editorial . . . . .A8 Entertainment . . .A4 Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3 Lottery Payouts . .B3 Movies . . . . . .C9 Obituaries . . . .A6 TV Listings . . . .C8 000ETTU Prior allegations against mother unfoundedMIKEWRIGHT Staff writerNo hint, not a single one. No scratches or bruises. Allegations of child abuse not supported. By all documented accounts, Aliyahs Branums motherhad cared for her child. Department of Children and Families officials said there was nothing to predict Chelsea Huggettmight kill her 2-yearold child in a rage April 26, as she is alleged to have done. DCF on Monday released Three Sisters access at least a year away A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerThe expected crush of visitors to a 57acre parcel on Kings Bay where manatees come in the dozens to nurture, especially in the winter, will have to wait another year or more for access. Three Sisters Springs, with its crystal-clear waters and consistent 72-degree water temperatures, is a favorite gathering spot for manatees and has recently been the subject of a National Geographic article. The property surrounding the springs, part of the Kings Bay manatee refuge, is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and owned by the City of Crystal River and the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Recently, theres been an increase in calls for the property to be made accessible to the public especially in light of the publicity the area has been getting and because it has a boardwalk where visitors can perch and watch the sea cows. While acknowledging the need for public access, officials are in favor of a more graduated process of opening up the property. Refuge Manager Michael Lusk of USFWS listed the following as prerequisites for public access: An entrance road from Cutler Spur Boulevard has to be constructed. Lusk said the Federal Department of Transportation recently approved a $700,000 grant for that project. The city of Crystal River is reworking Cutler Spur and expects to have that work done by the end of 2013 or early 2014. Southwest Florida Water Management District is set to begin work on a wetland area on the property. The wetland is expected to catch storm water runoff and cleanse it before it enters the bay. That work is expected to be done sometime in the middle of 2014. Lusk wants to construct a parking lot according to the specifications of the planned development of the property with a walking trail leading to the boardwalk. Ideally, we would like to see it open Project spans more than 2,400 pages, 788,000 words Associated PressPHILMONT, N.Y.In the beginning, Phillip Patterson decided to write out every word in the Bible. On empty pages, he wrote of Adam, an ark, locusts, loaves, fishes and the resurrection. Four years of work begat more than 2,400 pages. Now, as he copies the last words of the last book, Patterson sees all that he has created. And it is good. Patterson, 63, is a retired interior designer who is neither monkish nor zealous. He goes to church but has never been particularly religious. Health issues including AIDS and anemia have sent him to the hospital and slowed the work. But he has always been curious. One day in 2007, his longtime partner, Mohammad, mentioned that Islam has a tradition of writing out the Quran. Patterson replied that the Bible was too long. Mohammad said, well then, Patterson should do it. The Bibles exact word count depends on who is doing the tallying, but multiple sources put the King James version at around 788,000 words. Every day as I write, I discover something new and it expands my mind more and more, Patterson said. Not so I can become more of a religious person, but so that I can become more of a whole person. Patterson will finish up the final lines of the Book of Revelation during a ceremony at his church, St. Peters Presbyterian, on May 11. Man handwrites King James Bible in four years Associated PressPhillip Patterson transcribes the King James Bible last month at this home in Philmont, N.Y. DCF: No sign of abuse Chelsea Huggettcharged with first-degree murder. Phillip Pattersonfinishing project on May 11. MATTHEW BECK/ChroniclePublic access to the Three Sisters Springs property was tightly restricted for decades when it was privately owned. The area is still highly regulated after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took over managing the property. The USFWS now estimates the property could be open to the public in 2014. Road work needed before springs property can be opened to the public See SPRINGS/ Page A2 County calls for investigationCHRISVANORMER Staff WriterA first event at Citrus Countys Central Landfill a free disposal day on Saturday may be connected to a fire that broke out Sunday, according to county staff. Whether this is the case could be revealed in an investigation that has been requested. Free disposal was offered following a suggestion earlier this Fire may be connected to disposal day See FIRE/ Page A2 See DEATH/ Page A11

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year at a meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, said Lindsay Ubinas, public information officer for the county. The first-time event was popular with county residents, who ordinarily have to pay a $4 transaction fee per visit and other rates by weight depending on materials. They had over 1,200 customers in one day, Ubinas said. They also got rid of more than 20 boats. Assistant County Administrator Ken Frink, who also is the public works director, has asked Fire Chief Larry Morabito to conduct an investigation himself or facilitate an investigation by whoever Morabito would think is appropriate to investigate both Sundays fire and the fire from March 10 to determine if there has been any intentional wrongdoing, Ubinas said. In addition, Frink has asked if Morabito can provide any assistance from the state Fire Marshals Office to conduct an independent review. Although requested, it remains to be determined whether it will be granted. Frinks actions were not based in any particular suspicion, Ubinas said. He said it just appears to be a trash fire, Ubinas responded. Its in the area, apparently, of where all the trash was disposed of on Saturday on the free disposal day. Thats where this area was. Conceding that two fires in two months could appear suspicious, Ubinas said Frink knew people would raise questions, so he took the initiative to pursue an investigation. Saturdays first-time free disposal day at the landfill coincided with a free day for disposing of household hazardous waste materials, an event scheduled several times a year. Ubinas said investigators would be asked to consider whether some flammable materials such as oil or fuel, particularly as so many boats were deposited into the landfill cell had not been correctly consigned. The March 10 fire started below surface and burned part of the cell liner, repairs to which are expected to start soon. Sundays fire started on the surface of waste materials in the cell and was soon extinguished. Ubinas said county administrators had not drawn a connection between the two fires since they appeared dissimilar in origin, but have requested investigations of both to learn as much as can be known about how they occurred. Damage to the cell liner in the March 10 fire initially was estimated at $500,000. Sundays fire, however, caused no structural damage to the cell, according to Casey Stephens, director of the Division of Solid Waste Management. No personal injuries have been reported for either fire. Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer @chronicleonline.com.A2TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE For solutions to all your pest problems, call today! TERMITE & PEST CONTROL (352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS 406 N.E. 1ST ST., CRYSTAL RIVER SERVICE TO FIT ANY BUDGET: ONCE A YEAR QUARTERLY MONTHLY A complete inspection of the interior and the exterior of your property. Removal of kitchen and bathroom switch plates and place a barrier into wall voids to prevent insects from invading your property. Baits are placed in all cracks and crevices in the kitchen and bathroom area. Treatment around and under appliances such as dishwasher, refrigerator, washer and dryer. Treatment of attic or crawl spaces. QUARTERLY PEST CONTROL SERVICE INTRODUCTORY 1ST SERVICE STARTING AT BUY 3, GET 1 GUARANTEED TO BEAT OUR COMPETITORS PRICES www.CitrusPest.com LICENSED & INSURED #8688 000ETMM A+ RA TING 2012 2012 2012 2012 HELP HAS ARRIVED! 000ESZ5 License #DN 17606 General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE General & Cosmetic Dentistry General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Experience the Difference Whether youre looking for a smile makeover or a cleaning our friendly staff will make you feel comfortable without the sales tactics or the lecture. We Cater to Cowards! FREE SECOND OPINION Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 Ledgerdentistry.com 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000ES3O 000EU8T 000EVDM Are Moles and Gophers Killing Your Lawn? WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES GUARANTEED! Call today for a free lawn analysis. The Gopher & Mole Patrol 352-279-9444 000ETIZ GOT DEBT? Bankruptcy may help! Call us for a free consultation. Paul Militello P.A. (352) 637-2222 107 B. West Main St. Inverness, FL to the public by the winter season of 2014, but I cant guarantee it. Its a goal, Lusk added. We all want the public to be able to come use the boardwalk and access the property from land. Maybe that would reduce some of the congestion to the springs from the water, but we have to get some these things done first, he said. Crystal River City Manager Andy Houston said he too favors a graduated process for public access, but would like to see the property become accessible as soon as possible. Houston said he knows Lusk can only work with the resources he is given, but I hope the regional office folks understand that public access was an important part of the deal when they decided to manage the property. Both Lusk and Houston, however, agree that the property should not be open to the public without supervision, which some advocates of public access have suggested.Contact Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe at 352564-2925 or asidibe@ chronicleonline.com. SPRINGSContinued from Page A1 FIREContinued from Page A1 ... Frink knew people would raise questions, so he took the iniative to pursue an investigation.

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Around theSTATE Citrus CountyChurch gets hefty donationsAs of Monday, thanks to generous people in Citrus County, Mount Carmel Methodist Church in Floral City received $4,300 toward the $10,000 being sought for much-needed repairs to the church. Donations included two $2,000 checks. Longtime church member Alida Langley said shes so excited she hasnt stopped screaming and thanking God and the people of Citrus County. However, Saturdays story on Page A2 of the Chronicle Community helping restore historic church, contained an incorrect phone number. For information or to offer help, call Greg Kell at 352-7267335 or Alida Langley at 352-726-1989. A trust has been set up at Brannen Bank. Make checks payable to Mount Carmel Methodist Church of Floral City Inc., Building Fund. Donations can be made at any Brannen Bank branch. Fire MSBU on agenda todayThe Citrus County Commission meet at 1 p.m. today at the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100, in Inverness to discuss a fire assessment program.The fire services municipal services benefit unit would be an alternative funding source for the 2014 budget. Government Services Group Inc. and Nabors, Giblin & Nickerson will present the fire assessment program to the board. This meeting is open to the public and citizens can make public comments and ask any questions after the presentation and commissioner discussion.GOP club to meet SaturdayAnne Black from HPH Hospice will be the guest speaker at the Saturday, May 11, meeting of the Nature Coast Republican Club. The meeting begins at 9 a.m. at the American Legion Post 155 on State Road 44 in Crystal River.PensacolaTwo charged in mans deathA 22-year-old Florida girl has been charged with homicide after a mans body was found stuffed in the trunk of a car outside a motel near Pensacola. Escambia County Sheriffs deputies said family members discovered 43year-old Harvey Ray Smiths body Saturday after spotting his vehicle outside a motel. According to an arrest report, Debra Burge told investigators she asked Smith to her residence so Zachary Vance Greer could rob him. She said Greer killed Smith and placed his body in the trunk. From staff and wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerINVERNESS A 67-year-old Hernando man authorities said was caught with his pants down and charged with lewd and lascivious conduct involving a then6-year-old boy was sentenced to life in prison after a jury trial. Gerald Stefan Edwards, of East Wacker Street, was convicted last week on four counts sexual battery on someone younger than 12 years old, lewd and lascivious molestation and lewd and lascivious exhibition. Three of the charges carried maximum life sentences. Circuit Judge Ric Howard sentenced Edwards to 40 years in prison and 100 years of probation. He was also tagged a sexual predator. When Edwards was first arrested last July, a witness reported they found him in a room with the door closed, standing in front of the boy with his pants down to knee level. The witness told investigators Edwards was trying to pull up his pants. Edwards had said his pants were too big and would often fall down whenever he stands. According to Edwards arrest affidavit, the boy told investigators Edwards performed lewd acts in front of him. The boy reportedly told the witness Edwards also touched him inappropriately. Besides his explanation about the loose pants, Edwards reportedly told investigators he would often lie in bed with the boy to watch cartoons. He denied performing a lewd act in front of the boy, but admitted to scratching his private parts with his pants on. Edwards was unsure about whether the boy had ever seen him naked and couldnt recall if he ever touched the boys private parts. The boy reportedly told investigators that was the first time Edwards behaved inappropriately toward him. Chronicle reporter A.B. Sidibe can be reached at 352-5642925 or asidibe@chronicle online.com. Man sentenced in child-sex case Gerald Edwardssentenced to 40 years in prison. CHRISVANORMER Staff writerPets are going public in Citrus County. Just about every weekend ahead, residents can expect to see dogs and cats at community events and shopping areas. Volunteers are behind the effort of getting the pets out of the Citrus County Animal Services shelter to reach out for new homes. So many people have no idea where the shelter is, what kind of animals we have here, that we have a shot clinic where they can bring their own pets for immunizations here, said Kelly Gill, volunteer outreach coordinator for the shelter. Its really been great to let them know what we have to offer. The bonus is that we can allow them to adopt animals on site at these events. On Saturday, Gill and other volunteers took several dogs and cats to Kmart in Inverness, where they could be seen and adopted by shoppers. Gill was hired late last year as part of the countys Strive for Life program to get more animals out of the shelter and into homes, with fewer having to be euthanized. Gill works to coordinate outreach activities throughout the county. Another part of the program is operating a mobile adoption unit to increase public awareness and raise adoption rates. Animal Services acquired a retired transit bus that is being modified for adoption unit use, and Gill will be its driver. Weve just finished the artwork on it and we hope to get it back in a week or so, Gill said. When the bus is ready, Gill said volunteers will be able to get more animals out to the public. Even without the use of the bus, the volunteers are getting close to 10 animals at a time to an event. Each event features an assortment of dogs and cats, puppies and kittens, different sizes and ages. Volunteers have been making the program work, but it can always use more help. While quite a few dog walkers have pitched in as volunteers right now to exercise and clean up after dogs, Gill said the shelter could use more volunteers to take care of the cats. Weve been having an orientation every month, Gill said. We always still need dog walkers. We definitely need volunteers to help with our cats to help socialize them and help cleaning their kennels as well. Brush them. Get them out of their crates and spend some time with them. If you want to volunteer, call 352-746-8400 or go to the website www.citruscritters.com.Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvanormer@chronicle online.com. FUTURE ADOPTION EVENTS 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May 17, Beverly Hills Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 18, Walmart, Homosassa. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 25, Walmart, Homosassa. 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 25, Beverly Hills Flea Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 15, Kmart, Inverness. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, June 21, Beverly Hills Farmers Market. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 29, Walmart, Homosassa. Take home a new friend Adoption events help raise awareness about animals in need of homes STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleKelly Gill, volunteer outreach coordinator for Citrus County Animal Services, holds Hank, an American Staffordshire terrier Sat urday morning in Inverness. She and her crew from Animal Services brought several cats and dogs to Kmart in Inverness for adoption as well as to help make people aware of the various services the shelter offers. MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerTwo members of the Citrus County Hospital Board are in limbo after the state Senate adjourned Friday without confirming them. Michael Bays and Robert Priselac will continue to serve 45 days, unless Gov. Rick Scott appoints someone else to replace them. They would continue another year if Scott reappoints them. If Scott appoints no one, Bays and Priselac will leave the board. With Gene Davis recent resignation, that would reduce the board to only two members Debbie Ressler and Krista Joseph and mean the board would be unable to meet, because three members are required for a quorum. Neither Bays nor Priselac received notice from Sen. Charlie Deans office that their confirmation was in peril. Dean, R-Inverness, had said Davis would not be confirmed because he voted against the hospital board appealing a governance lawsuit with the hospital foundation to the Florida Supreme Court. Dean could not be reached for comment. Scott appointed Priselac in June; he appointed Bays, Davis and Joseph in September. If Scott reappoints Priselac and Bays, they would serve until the Senate confirmation hearings in 2014. Priselac said he believes Scott will reappoint him, though he said he hasnt had any communication with the governors office. I think God has a reason why things happen when they do, he said. Theres a reason to this. Both Bays and Priselac said they will continue working as if there will be no interruption. Were in the middle of a lot of important stuff, Bays said. Right now the boards still a board. The hospital board is seeking proposals to possibly sell or lease Citrus Memorial hospital. Priselac, who has led that effort on the boards behalf, said the confirmation mystery will not stop that process. I dont think we skip a beat, he said. You have to fulfill what you feel is a mission and take whatever comes across, deal with it, and move on. This is not even a setback. Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352-563-3228 or mwright@chronicleonline.com. BONDS GET DOWNGRADE Fitch Ratings has downgraded Citrus Memorial hospitals 2002 bonds from BBto B. Fitch cited the Citrus Memorial Health Foundations ongoing legal battles for control with the Citrus County Hospital Board and the lack of tax money provided to the hospital by the CCHB. The downgrade also reflects SunTrust Banks decision to give Citrus Memorial until April 2014 to repay $6 million in bonds. It is the third straight year Fitch dropped Citrus Memorials bond ratings. Bays, Priselac apparently off hospital board Senate doesnt confirm appointments

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Birthday In the year ahead, you are likely to get an opportunity to take over two endeavors that have been started by others. You could turn them both into winners. Taurus (April 20-May 20) You may be holding all the trump cards, but youre not likely to use this power unjustly. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Because someone has helped you when you needed it in the past, your compassion is easily aroused. Admirably, youll be the first to respond to someone in need. Cancer (June 21-July 22) An issue of personal interest might also appeal to your friends. Although they may not know how to turn it into a group endeavor, you do. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Focusing on the virtues rather than the shortcomings of friends will not only boost their egos, but also make you very popular. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Youre basically a very imaginative person to begin with, but today that will be even more so. To your credit, youll put your ideas to work. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Because youll strive to treat others as fairly as possible, things will work out quite well. Friends and colleagues will respond in kind. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) An enterprising friend is likely to provide you with some helpful tips. Use them to extract even more juice from an already profitable situation. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Dont be surprised if you derive an unexpected bonus from help that you render to another. Youll set a wonderful example, and the right people will notice. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Even though your needs are important, they wont be more so than those of your loved ones. Youll figure out a way to help both your family and yourself. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Outward appearances might affect how your associates view things, but not you. Youll know how to dig deep beneath the surface and deal with root causes. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) One of your greatest assets is your ability to adjust quickly to changing conditions. Aries (March 21-April 19) You might be in a money-making mood, but try to profit for the benefit of others, not yourself. Youll get the most satisfaction from indulging your charitable in-TodaysHOROSCOPES Today is Tuesday, May 7, the 127th day of 2013. There are 238 days left in the year. Todays Highlight in History: On May 7, 1763, Pontiac, chief of the Ottawa Indians, attempted to lead a sneak attack on British-held Fort Detroit, but was foiled because the British had been tipped off in advance. (The Ottawa Indians and other tribes then launched an all-out war with the British that came to be known as Pontiacs War.) On this date: In 1915, nearly 1,200 people died when a German torpedo sank the British liner RMS Lusitania off the Irish coast. In 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims, France, ending its role in World War II. In 1954, the 55-day Battle of Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam ended with Vietnamese insurgents overrunning French forces. In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford formally declared an end to the Vietnam era. In Ho Chi Minh City formerly Saigon the Viet Cong celebrated its takeover. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush ordered the lifting of sanctions against Iraq, and called on members of the U.N. Security Council to do the same. Five years ago: Dmitry Medvedev was sworn in as Russias president. One year ago: Education Secretary Arne Duncan broke ranks with the White House, stating his unequivocal support for same-sex marriage one day after Vice President Joe Biden suggested on NBC that he supported gay marriage as well. Todays Birthdays: Rock musician Bill Kreutzmann (Grateful Dead) is 67. Rock musician Prairie Prince is 63. Actress Traci Lords is 45. Singer Eagle-Eye Cherry is 42. Thought for Today: We all live in suspense, from day to day, from hour to hour; in other words, we are the hero of our own story. Mary McCarthy, American author (19121989).Today inHISTORY CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 71 60 NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 74 59 NA HI LO PR 74 60 NA HI LO PR 75 58 NA HI LO PR 71 54 NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Partly Cloudy. Maybe a slight chance of a shower. Cool and breezy.THREE DAY OUTLOOK More sunshine. A little warmer. Sunshine continues. Warmth returns.High: 80 Low: 52 High: 83 Low: 54 High: 85 Low: 56TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 74/59 Record 97/50 Normal 87/59 Mean temp. 67 Departure from mean -6 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.50 in. Total for the year 5.80 in. Normal for the year 12.91 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 11 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.01 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 51 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 49% POLLEN COUNT** Trees were moderate, grasses were light and weeds were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:10 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:43 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................5:08 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................6:16 P.M. MAY 9MAY 18MAY 25MAY 31 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 79 59 pc Ft. Lauderdale 84 68 s Fort Myers 84 62 s Gainesville 78 54 pc Homestead 84 64 s Jacksonville 77 56 pc Key West 82 71 pc Lakeland 82 61 pc Melbourne 81 61 pc City H L Fcast Miami 83 67 s Ocala 79 56 pc Orlando 81 60 pc Pensacola 76 60 pc Sarasota 79 63 pc Tallahassee 78 53 pc Tampa 80 64 pc Vero Beach 81 60 s W. Palm Bch. 82 64 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESWest winds from 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a moderate chop. Partly cloudy skies today. Gulf water temperature77 LAKE LEVELSLocation Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a 27.82 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 37.06 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a 37.73 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a 38.82 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 74 42 s 78 52 Albuquerque 69 55 pc 75 52 Asheville 63 52 .11 ts 62 47 Atlanta 67 44 .39 pc 70 54 Atlantic City 59 43 sh 67 54 Austin 75 45 pc 85 61 Baltimore 63 47 .02 sh 68 57 Billings 73 40 pc 76 47 Birmingham 61 47 .45 pc 73 52 Boise 79 50 ts 79 51 Boston 53 43 s 71 52 Buffalo 76 52 pc 77 52 Burlington, VT 79 51 s 79 55 Charleston, SC 74 56 ts 74 56 Charleston, WV 66 56 .34 sh 66 53 Charlotte 71 55 1.60 ts 68 51 Chicago 70 53 pc 66 49 Cincinnati 64 54 .28 ts 72 55 Cleveland 72 53 pc 69 54 Columbia, SC 72 57 ts 68 54 Columbus, OH 69 56 .01 ts 73 55 Concord, N.H. 73 30 s 79 45 Dallas 77 48 pc 84 59 Denver 66 35 ts 65 41 Des Moines 75 47 pc 76 54 Detroit 73 48 pc 72 51 El Paso 81 63 pc 84 64 Evansville, IN 67 52 .05 pc 73 54 Harrisburg 66 39 sh 70 56 Hartford 71 46 pc 78 51 Houston 79 49 pc 83 63 Indianapolis 66 53 .15 ts 73 56 Jackson 67 50 pc 76 55 Las Vegas 78 61 pc 75 56 Little Rock 73 53 pc 77 55 Los Angeles 68 59 .12 sh 66 57 Louisville 69 55 .04 ts 73 55 Memphis 64 54 .02 pc 74 56 Milwaukee 66 46 pc 61 49 Minneapolis 74 46 pc 73 53 Mobile 70 45 pc 78 56 Montgomery 64 45 pc 74 53 Nashville 64 50 .06 pc 72 52 New Orleans 74 50 pc 78 63 New York City 68 46 pc 71 58 Norfolk 72 55 ts 69 56 Oklahoma City 72 44 pc 78 57 Omaha 67 48 ts 72 52 Palm Springs 77 60 trace pc 76 62 Philadelphia 69 45 sh 73 57 Phoenix 86 69 pc 84 63 Pittsburgh 70 47 sh 71 55 Portland, ME 58 35 s 69 46 Portland, Ore 81 53 s 76 50 Providence, R.I. 68 45 s 72 52 Raleigh 67 55 1.41 ts 71 54 Rapid City 69 29 ts 71 47 Reno 61 50 ts 62 47 Rochester, NY 74 50 s 78 54 Sacramento 75 58 c 74 52 St. Louis 69 54 pc 75 56 St. Ste. Marie 74 37 s 75 46 Salt Lake City 75 60 ts 67 48 San Antonio 75 52 pc 83 63 San Diego 66 60 .20 sh 65 59 San Francisco 68 59 c 69 51 Savannah 76 51 .96 ts 74 55 Seattle 86 54 s 72 52 Spokane 81 50 s 83 51 Syracuse 77 44 s 79 52 Topeka 69 51 ts 74 55 Washington 64 52 sh 67 57YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 90 The Dalles, Ore. LOW 23 Stanley, Idaho TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 89/75/s Amsterdam 75/51/r Athens 85/63/s Beijing 84/65/pc Berlin 79/58/pc Bermuda 71/66/pc Cairo 95/66/pc Calgary 55/43/pc Havana 89/68/pc Hong Kong 81/76/c Jerusalem 80/64/s Lisbon 70/57/sh London 72/54/pc Madrid 76/59/c Mexico City 79/52/ts Montreal 79/59/s Moscow 63/45/s Paris 73/55/sh Rio 73/64/pc Rome 66/56/pc Sydney 70/57/c Tokyo 63/53/s Toronto 72/50/pc Warsaw 81/59/pc WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 5:03 a/12:39 a 4:47 p/12:38 p 5:48 a/1:22 a 5:18 p/1:15 p Crystal River** 3:24 a/10:00 a 3:08 p/10:44 p 4:09 a/10:37 a 3:39 p/11:22 p Withlacoochee* 1:11 a/7:48 a 12:55 p/8:32 p 1:56 a/8:25 a 1:26 p/9:10 p Homosassa*** 4:13 a/11:37 a 3:57 p/ 4:58 a/12:21 a 4:28 p/12:14 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 5/7 TUESDAY 4:00 10:12 4:23 10:35 5/8 WEDNESDAY 4:43 10:54 5:06 11:18 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR 76 60 NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. ENTERTAINMENT ABBA museum opens in StockholmSTOCKHOLM ABBA wants to be remembered for more than just catchy hits. A museum opens in Stockholm on Tuesday to show off band paraphernalia, including the helicopter featured on the cover of their Arrival album, a star-shaped guitar and dozens of glitzy costumes the Swedish band wore at the height of its 1970s fame. But some gear is definitely not on show. Band member Bjorn Ulveaus said certain items are forever lost, conceding only that they are embarrassing tight costumes he wore when he was slightly overweight. He declined to say more. Some 40 sets of the trademark shiny flares, platform boots and knitted hats are on display. Visitors can try on costumes, record music videos and sing such hits as Dancing Queen and Mamma Mia in a studio.Bill Clinton pitched Zeppelin reunionNEW YORK Its a diplomatic failure at the highest level: Bill Clinton couldnt get Led Zeppelin to reunite. The CBS Minutes Overtime webcast reported Monday that the former president was enlisted to ask the British rock gods to get back together last year for the superstorm Sandy benefit concert in New York City. He asked, they said no. David Saltzman of the Robin Hood Foundation said he and film executive Harvey Weinstein flew to Washington to ask Clinton to make the plea. Led Zeppelins surviving members Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page were in Washington just before the Sandy concert for the Kennedy Center Honors.Justin Bieber faces copyright lawsuitNORFOLK, Va. Two Virginia songwriters are suing Justin Bieber and Usher for $10 million for copyright infringement. Devin Copeland and Mareio Overton claim Biebers song Somebody to Love contains numerous lyrical and stylistic similarities to the song they wrote in 2008 by the same name. The duo filed a lawsuit Thursday in federal court in Norfolk, Va., claiming numerous producers conspired to copy their song. A message left Monday with a law firm representing Bieber was not immediately returned. The lawsuit said Copeland and Overton provided a copy of their song to musical promoters, who in turn provided it to representatives of Usher.Judge: Hagar did not defame womanIOWA CITY, Iowa A judge said rocker Sammy Hagar did not defame a Playboy bunny with whom he allegedly fathered a child when he accused her of extortion in his memoir. U.S. District Judge Linda Reade last week dismissed a lawsuit filed by the Iowa woman, identified as Jane Doe in court documents. The woman claimed she and Hagar had an affair in the 1980s and that she became pregnant with his child in 1988. The child died shortly after birth in 1989. In his 2011 memoir, Red: My Uncensored Life in Rock, Hagar denied fathering the child and accused the woman of extorting him for money. From wire reports Associated PressShania Twain has announced 22 new show dates this fall to round out the first year of her two-year Las Vegas Strip residency. Twain told The Associated Press Monday the show at Caesars Palace is a dream performance scenario that allows her to balance her roles as a mother and as a country superstar. A4TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68* 1 year: $121.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories ....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Todays active pollen: Oak, Grasses, Hickory Todays count: 4.2/12 Wednesdays count: 5.2 Thursdays count: 5.1 000ER89 in Todays Citrus County Chronicle LEGAL NOTICES Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C12 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . . . . C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . . . . . C12

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 A5 000EQG3 352-860-1100 352-628-9909 352-564-8000 2240 W. Hwy. 44 Inverness (Across from Outback) Crystal River Mall Crystal River (Next to JC Penney) 3944 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa (Across from Homosassa Wildlife State Park) 3 Convenient Locations Alzheimers Disease and Dementia ARE YOU AT RISK? According to a new study by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institute on Aging, men and women with hearing loss are much more likely to develop dementia and Alzheimers disease. People with severe hearing loss, the study reports, were 5 times more likely to develop dementia than those with normal hearing. Have you noticed a change in your ability to remember? The more hearing loss you have, the greater the likelihood of developing dementia or Alzheimers disease. Hearing aids could delay or prevent dementia by improving the patients hearing. 2011 Study by John Hopkins University School of Medicine and the National Institute on Aging FREE Hearing Tests Reveals if and when you need hearing assistance and is recommended for everyone over 50 years old. FREE Ear Canal Inspections* Sometimes its nothing more than excessive earwax. We use our state-of-the-art Video Otoscope to look inside your ear canal. You can watch on a video monitor as it happens. FREE HEARING AID REPAIRS! ANY MAKE OR MODEL (In-Store Repairs Only) OFFER GOOD MAY 7-10, 2013 NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. WOW! $ 695 CUSTOM FULL SHELL 100% Fixed Chip Digital FITS UP TO A 40 DB LOSS NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. AVAILABILITY LIMITED TO THE FIRST 20 PATIENTS MAY 7-10, 2013 TRY BEFORE YOU BUY 4 WEEK FACTORY TRIAL ABSOLUTELY FREE!

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Gloria Bruce, 89BEVERLY HILLSThe Service of Remembrance for Mrs. Gloria E. Bruce, age 89, of Beverly Hills, Florida, will be held 11:00 AM, Friday, May 10, 2013 at the St. Annes Episcopal Church, Crystal River, FL. Interment will follow at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida. The family will receive friends from 4:00 PM 6:00 PM, Thursday at the Beverly Hills Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes. The family requests expressions of sympathy take the form of memorial donations to HPH Hospice Foundation, Citrus Office, 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills, FL 34465-3503 or the Alzheimers Association, 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneral Home.com. Gloria was born on December 28, 1923 in Bangor, Maine, the daughter of E. Merle Bailey and Elizabeth Lambert Bailey. She died on Saturday, May 4, 2013 in the loving care of her husband, Bob, daughter, Elizabeth and HPH Hospice. She graduated from Bangor High School in 1942 and then from Farmington State Normal School, now the University of Maine at Farmington, in 1945. She taught the elementary grades for many years in Maine, Michigan and New York. In 1948 she married Robert W. Bruce while he was in the Navy. After his service they both attended Michigan State College. While in Michigan she had her first two children, son, Robert, Jr. and daughter, Elizabeth. She later had a son, Douglas on Long Island. In 1954 they moved to Levittown, Long Island and for many years she was a substitute teacher. A life time Episcopalian, she attended St. Johns Episcopal Church in Bangor, ME; singing in the junior choir with her to be husband, Robert. She was very active in the Episcopal Dioceses of Long Island while attending St. Francis of Assisi Church in Levittown. At St. Francis she was a choir member and formed and directed the junior choir. She was an active worker in the Altar Guild and Episcopal Church Women. Serving on the Vestry, she was chosen Senior Warden. She was also very active in the Diocese of Long Island serving on many boards, commissions and conventions electing Bishops. For eight years she was President of the Diocesan Altar Guild and Vice President of the Diocesan Episcopal Church Women resulting with her attending four National Episcopal Church conventions. She received many awards include the Bishops Distinguished Service Cross for Diocesan Service. After moving to Beverly Hills in 1990 she became active at St. Annes Episcopal Church, Crystal River, in the choir, Altar Guild, Episcopal Church Women, Diocesan conventions and a Deanery Director. In Beverly Hills she was active in the community, a member of the Beverly Hills Recreation Association, Civic Club, Share Club, New England Club, Rainbow Birthday Group and the Rainbow Rivers Club. Her activity in the Citrus County Genealogy Society led to her being a Mayflower descendant (Miles Standish and John Alden), and a member of the Fort Cooper Chapter of the D.A.R. She was also a member of the O.E.S. Chapter in Maine. Gloria is survived by her husband of 64 years, Robert W. Bruce of Beverly Hills, 2 sons, Robert and Wife, Pat of Vienna, VA and Douglas of East Meadow, Long Island, daughter, Elizabeth Ciuffetelli and husband, Stephen of Gainesville, 3 grandchildren, Lauren Bruce Bain and husband, Greg of Alexandria, VA and Amanda and Jennifer Ciuffetelli, both of Gainesville. Judith Bug Bean, 93INVERNESSJudith Bug Warnock Gammell Bean, 93, Inverness, died May 5, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Judith was born Oct. 11, 1919, to the late Elby and Laura Warnock. She worked as a supervisor for Adams County, Ohio Welfare Department for more than 21 years. She was a member of the Sycamore Chapter of DAR in Adams County, Ohio. Judith attended the First Assembly of God Church for many years. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Frank Gammell in 1988; six brothers and a sister. She leaves her second husband of 21 years, Gordon Bean, Inverness; her son James and his wife Connie Gammell, Reynoldsburg, Ohio; and daughter, Charlene Gammell, Columbus, Ohio. She will be remembered as Aunt Bug by her many nieces and nephews. Her final message to all she leaves behind is Live a good life, be proud of your heritage, keep in touch with Jesus and I will be waiting for you. The family will receive friends in visitation at 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, 2013, at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Further services will be held at the WallaceThompson Funeral Home in Peebles, Ohio, with burial in the Tranquility Cemetery. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dewey Bidwell, 87INVERNESSDewey W. Bidwell, 87, of Inverness, died May 3, 2013, at Citrus Memorial Health System. Private inurnment will be at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Frank Augustosky, 73CITRUS SPRINGSFrank J. Augustosky, 73, of Citrus Springs, died May 2, 2013. Elizabeth Craig, 90INVERNESSElizabeth L. Craig, 90, Inverness, died May 4, 2013. Elizabeth was born Aug. 4, 1922, in Muskego, Wis., to the late Eugene and Catherine Sivenie Burns. She was a homemaker who loved to cook and read, liked playing games on her computer and was an avid collector of antique figurines. Left to cherish her memory are her children, Brian M. and his wife Ann Craig, Inverness, Dennis M. Craig, Tampa, Sean A. Craig and his partner Robert Parnell, Tampa and Linda M. and her husband Joseph Hasbrouck, Tampa; daughter-in-law, Lorie Craig. She was a treasured grandmother of 10 and great-grandmother of 20. She was preceded in death by her husband of 68 years, Ralph on July 2, 2010, and a son, Kevin in 2000. A celebration tribute of Elizabeths life will be 3 p.m. Thursday, May 9, 2013, at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory. Inurnment will take place at a later date at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Frederick Ted GustinaHOMOSASSAOur 85-year-old very special and one-of-akind, outstanding and precious husband of Marcille Gustina passed on into the arms of our Lord April 29, 2013. Ted was a U.S. Navy veteran in World War II during Japanese occupation and at Bikini Atoll for Operation Crossbow testing atomic weapons. He worked for NASA in California then returned to his birth home Syracuse, N.Y., to take over the family printing business for the next 40 years. Ted was a member of the Elks Lodge (55 years), the Lions Club (8 years), VFW and the American Legion. He was an avid golfer, a fisher, deer hunter, a good bowler, a penny-ante poker and a hand and foot card player. He was a lovable, kind-hearted, considerate people-person with a great sense of humor known for his timed jokes. He is survived by his wife, Marcille, of Homosassa; his sister, Peggy Sopcheck; brother, Jack Gustina of Syracuse, N.Y; his daughters, Jeanette Forsythe and her husband Lance of Homosassa, Carol Taylor of Syracuse, N.Y., Ardell Allen of Ithica, N,Y,, Linda McKeighen of Tampa, Patrice Spannagel of Flowery Branch, Ga., and Michelle Lilly of New Boston, Ill. He is a treasured grandfather to 16 and great-grandfather to 23. Memorial service will be at 2 p.m. May 13, 2013, at Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church, 2540 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Lecanto, FL 34462.Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Linda Aveni, 51OCALALinda Aveni, 51, of Ocala, died May 2, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Barton Coppes, 60HOMOSASSABarton D. Coppes, 60, of Homosassa, died May 5, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Brooklyn, N.Y. Michael DeBerardinis, 55OCALAMichael DeBerardinis, 55, of Ocala, died May 3, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. A6TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear the next day. Obituaries See DEATHS/ Page A9 Gloria Bruce 000EHT7 Termite Specialists Since 1967 Homosassa 621-7700 Crystal River 795-8600 Inverness 860-1037 www.bushhomeservices.com PEST CONTROL TERMITES Elimination Pre-Construction Treatments Curative & Preventive Treatments Tent Fumigations PEST CONTROL Fleas Scorpions Spiders Bees Rodents Control Ants Roaches Free Inspections Investment WorkshopMay 9th, 2013 9:30 amHosted By: Alex MalleyThis is your opportunity to hear directly from representatives of a broad spectrum of investment providers and sponsors:NorthStar | FS Investments | Jackson National AR Capital: BDCA & New York Recovery REIT Griffin-American Health Care REIT IIAttend your choice of 3 sessions (30 Minutes per session) Workshop is followed by a complimentary LunchCall Today To Reserve Your Seat877.637.3230 2953 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy Inverness, FL 34453 000EQ7Yworkshops and lunch hosted at:505 E. Hartford St. | Hernando, FL 34442Investors should carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of: The Variable annuities offered by Jackson National Life, REIT (Real Estate investment Trust) offered by AR Capital, Griffin-American and NorthStar, Business Development Company (BDC) offered by FS Capital and AR Capital. This and other important information is contained in the prospectus which can be obtained by calling Alexander Malley at (877) 637-3230. Read prospectus carefully before investing. Alex S. MalleyRegistered Representative Securities offered through Cetera Advisors LLC, member FINRA/SIPC Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity 000EUZA Funeral Home With Crematory Chas. E. Davis Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 REV. ROBERT BLACKBURN Service: Tuesday 11:00 AM Inverness Church of God EDITH JOYNER Viewing: Tuesday 5:00-7:00 PM Services: Thurs. 2:00 PM Sneads, FL ELIZABETH CRAIG Service: Thurs. 3:00 PM Chapel ESTHER HUGHART Arrangements Pending JUDITH BEAN Visitation: Wed. 3:00-4:00 PM 000EVLM Thurs., May 9, 2013 2 p.m. 6 p.m. College of Central Florida Citrus Campus Lecanto Screenings Information Giveaways Prizes Much more! Event Sponsored by: Everyone Invited!! Senior Health Expo. ASHLEY STRASS Forever Missed & Loved 6/23/06 5/7/11 2 Year Anniversary Its been two long years since the Lord called you home my Loving Ashley. Two years we have longed for your voice, laughter, and just to hold you one more time. Then we are comforted by knowing your THE BEST ANGLE THE LORD NEEDED AT HIS SIDE. Life has indeed never been the same without you. You wanted mom to have a baby brother... Am happy to tell you mom has been blessed with two baby boys, Nicholas and Marcus. We will always cherish the precious time spent together, most of all the gift of having you as a daughter. Love always, Mom & Dad, Brothers Steve, Nicholas & Marcus Family & Neighbors, All your Friends 000EV58 000EH62 Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 000EGHG Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place Your In Memory ad, Candy Phillips 563-3206 cphillips@chronicleonline.com 000ETFG 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for over 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000ER7E Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 A7 000EVIBCarpet & Upholstery Cleaning Carpet Protector Tile Floor Cleaning Truck Mount Extraction Spot Removal Pet Odor Removal Oriental Rugs Wood Floor Cleaning www.smcflorida.com ServiceMaster of Citrus CountyFire & Water DamageRestoration Specialists Recommended by Insurance Industry Residential & Commercial Smoke, Odor, Soot Removal Quick Response Time Water Removal Mold Remediation 24/7/365 Emergency Service10% 0FFANY CLEANING SERVICE OVER $100 C O U P O N C O U P O N C O U P O N C O U P O N4 ROOMS & 1 HALLWAY$9995**One room can not exceed 300 sq.ft. Expires 5/31/13 Carpet & Upholstery Specialists Expires 5/31/13 Restrictions Apply.

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A8TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000EV25

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James Finley, 70HOMOSASSAJames A. Finley, 70, of Homosassa, died May 2, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Richard Dick Moody, 79CITRUS SPRINGSRichard W. Dick Moody of Citrus Springs, Fla., passed away Monday, May 6, 2013, in the loving care of his family at Hospice of Citrus County. He was born Friday, Jan. 26, 1934, in Danforth, Maine to Wendell and Marjorie (Bancroft) Moody. Dick was a Veteran of the United States Army and served during the Korean Conflict, where he spent two years in Korea. He worked at Pratt & Whitney in East Hartford, Conn., and 30 years as a Rural Mail Carrier in East Hampton, Conn. Dick enjoyed hunting and fishing at his camp in Weston, Maine. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 59 years, Jean (McKnight) Moody; son, Steven Moody and wife Jackie of Granby, Conn.; daughter, Linda Myers of Citrus Springs; son, James Moody and wife Heidi of Marlborough, Conn.; brother, Wayne Moody and wife Mary Ellen of Janesville, Wis; sister, Helen Warner and husband John of Salem, Ore.; and grandchildren, Brett and Kraig Moody of Enfield, Conn., Alexa and Allison Gattinella of New Britain, Conn., Amber and Abby Myers of Citrus Springs, and Matthew and Becky Moody of Marlborough, Conn. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Citrus County or the Marlborough Ambulance Association, Marlborough, CT 06447. Arrangements entrusted to Fero Funeral Home, www.ferofuneral home.com. Matthew Piach, 91HOMOSASSAMatthew J. Piach, 91, of Homosassa, died May 4, 2013. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Ubly, Mich. William OCallaghan, 80INVERNESSWilliam J. OCallaghan, 80, of Inverness, Fla., passed away May 2, 2013. He was born the youngest of nine children in Mullingar, Ireland, May 25, 1933, to David and Margaret OCallaghan. William was a member of St. Scholastica Catholic Church as well as a member of the Knights of Columbus. He was an avid bowler and loved soccer and hockey. William is predeceased by his wife, Elizabeth OCallaghan and his eight siblings. He is survived by his children, Ken OCallag han, David OCallaghan, Kelly OCallaghan and Monica Smith; as well as 12 grandchildren. A memorial service will be at Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto with the family receiving friends from noon until service time at 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, 2013. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Dorothea Purdy, 95TAVARESDorothea Purdy, 95, of Tavares, died May 5, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Colon, Mich. John Trapper Pope, 70INGLISJohn F. Pope (a.k.a. Trapper), 70, of Inglis, Fla., passed away April 30, 2013. He is survived by his daughter, Jennifer TuckerMogensen; granddaughter, Mary; grandson, Reece; mother-in-law, Mrs. Maida Baughman; sisters, Pat (Bob) Nelson, Mary Lee (Bud) Reeves, and Lynne (Carlos) Sanchez; as well as numerous nieces, nephews, brothers and sisters-in-law whom he loved. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary C. (Baughman) Pope; parents, Frank and Noreen; and brother, Jim Pope. He graduated in 1961 from Catholic Central High School in Grand Rapids, Mich., and received a bachelor of science degree from Michigan State University. After careers in wildlife biology and computer programming he retired to Florida where he resided for the past 10 years. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto.A memorial service will be conducted in Michigan in July for family and friends. John will be laid to rest next to his wife, Mary, in Resurrection Cemetery in Grand Rapids, Mich. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Rosalie Smagghe, 75HOMOSASSAMs. Rosalie V. Smagghe, 75, of Homosassa, Fla., died Tuesday, April 30, 2013, in Crystal River. She was born Feb. 24, 1938, in Detroit, Mich., daughter of the late Charles C. and Philomena L. (Raymaekers) Vinckevleugel. She worked as a secretary for Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich., and retired from Warren Consolidated schools in Michigan. She moved to Homosassa, Fla., from Warren, Mich., in 1993 and served as secretary for the Forest View Estates Homeowners Association. Her hobbies included reading, gardening flowers and traveling. Ms. Smagghe was a member of St. Benedict Catholic Church, Crystal River. Ms. Smagghe was preceded in death by her parents and son-in-law, Harry Hawthorne. Survivors include son, Frank R. Smagghe of Homosassa; daughter, Linda Haw thorne of East Pointe, Mich.; former husband, Frank O. Smagghe of Roseville, Mich.; granddaughter, Shannon and her husband Mark Panetta; and greatgranddaughter, Rachel. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneral Home.com. Arrangements by the Homosassa Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Alma Spradley, 62INVERNESSAlma Mae Spradley, 62, of Inverness, died May 1, 2013. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 A9 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,280 1,360 1,440 1,520 1,600 1,680 NDJFMA 1,560 1,600 1,640 S&P 500Close: 1,617.50 Change: 3.08 (0.2%) 10 DAYS 12,000 12,800 13,600 14,400 15,200 NDJFMA 14,520 14,780 15,040 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 14,968.89 Change: -5.07 (flat) 10 DAYSAdvanced1818 Declined1206 New Highs308 New Lows10 Vol. (in mil.)3,007 Pvs. Volume3,531 1,473 1,688 1463 984 183 14 NYSE NASD DOW 14988.8714941.0914968.89-5.07-0.03%+14.23% DOW Trans.6314.006218.906297.98+79.08+1.27%+18.68% DOW Util.529.30521.91522.02-7.28-1.38%+15.21% NYSE Comp.9360.219330.199348.90+8.43+0.09%+10.72% NASDAQ3396.213381.443392.97+14.34+0.42%+12.37% S&P5001619.771614.211617.50+3.08+0.19%+13.41% S&P4001171.841165.071170.87+5.80+0.50%+14.74% Wilshire 500017092.8617029.9317072.33+42.40+0.25%+13.85% Russell 2000960.22954.87959.80+5.38+0.56%+13.00% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS2.7627.27 3.43-.05 -1.4tss-25.4-51.5dd... AT&T Inc T32.47839.00 37.09-.25 -0.7tts+10.0+18.2281.80 Ametek Inc AME29.86943.46 40.85-.02 ...rtt+8.7+22.0210.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD64.999101.86 95.80-.40 -0.4ttt+9.6+32.02.21e Bank of America BAC6.72012.94 12.88+.64 +5.2sss+10.9+53.5300.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.35012.64 12.12+.15 +1.3stt+6.6+53.593... CenturyLink Inc CTL32.05543.43 37.05-.09 -0.2tss-5.3+2.9302.16m Citigroup C24.61047.92 47.48+.51 +1.1sss+20.0+44.7140.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46725.25 21.63+.59 +2.8stt+36.6+18.8391.00 Disney DIS43.09064.85 65.06+.26 +0.4sss+30.7+49.6210.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63975.46 72.90-1.57 -2.1tts+14.3+20.7223.06 EPR Properties EPR40.04961.00 58.09+.38 +0.7sss+26.0+34.4243.16 Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.13993.67 90.58+.56 +0.6sss+4.7+7.892.52f Ford Motor F8.82014.30 14.09+.26 +1.9sss+8.8+29.4100.40 Gen Electric GE18.02823.90 22.58+.01 ...rtt+7.6+18.8170.76 Home Depot HD46.37074.59 75.26+1.30 +1.8sss+21.7+43.4251.56f Intel Corp INTC19.23627.98 23.91-.05 -0.2tss+16.0-13.0120.90 IBM IBM181.857215.90 202.78-1.73 -0.8ttt+5.9+0.3143.80f LKQ Corporation LKQ15.72024.91 24.85+.07 +0.3sss+17.8+43.528... Lowes Cos LOW24.76039.98 40.81+1.22 +3.1sss+14.9+27.1240.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.310103.70 102.07-.85 -0.8tss+15.7+9.1193.08 Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26033.52 33.75+.26 +0.8sss+26.4+8.2170.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.49764.72 56.95-.34 -0.6ttt+2.3+14.7181.04 NextEra Energy NEE63.50982.65 80.60-1.15 -1.4tss+16.5+32.4202.64f Penney JC Co Inc JCP13.55234.99 16.92-.34 -2.0tss-14.2-50.8dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62020.72 20.81+.22 +1.1sss+15.3+22.1450.80 Regions Fncl RF5.4608.65 8.71+.13 +1.5sss+22.2+23.5100.12f Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40568.77 52.08+.63 +1.2sss+25.9-4.4dd... Smucker, JM SJM73.200105.18 102.55-1.01 -1.0tss+18.9+36.5222.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.3207.35 7.20+.05 +0.7sss+27.0+188.3dd... Texas Instru TXN26.06037.20 37.04+.03 +0.1sss+19.9+20.7221.12 Time Warner TWX33.62060.72 60.64+.21 +0.3sss+26.8+66.3191.15 UniFirst Corp UNF55.86093.00 91.29+.37 +0.4sss+24.5+52.8170.15 Verizon Comm VZ39.85954.31 52.05-.63 -1.2tss+20.3+34.7cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.42930.80 30.16-.18 -0.6tss+19.7+13.51.53e WalMart Strs WMT58.27079.50 78.83-.42 -0.5tss+15.5+37.2161.88f Walgreen Co WAG28.53950.35 47.84-.18 -0.4tss+29.3+45.0211.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A J.P. Morgan analyst upgraded the insurers stock rating, saying it should be able to grow its Medicare Advantage enrollment. Shares of the Medicaid and Medicare provider fell after reporting last week that its first-quarter net income fell 58 percent. The chemical companys net income rose 40 percent thanks to strong income from its olefins and vinyls units as well aslower costs. The meat company said that its second-quarter net income fell 42 percent. The company also cut its fullyear revenue forecast. The for-profit college operator said that its first-quarter net income dropped 29 percent as student enrollments continued to fall. Stocks mostly rose Monday in quiet trading, and a modest gain in the Standard & Poors 500 index sent it to a record high for a second straight day. Financial stocks had some of the markets biggest gains, helping to offset losses by utility stocks. 9 10 11 $12 FM MA Bridgepoint Edu.BPI Close: $10.83 -0.18 or -1.6% $8.11$22.19 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 471.7k (1.5x avg.) $586 m 52-week range PE: Yield: 4.7 ... 22 23 24 $25 FM MA Tyson FoodsTSN Close: $24.10 -0.83 or -3.3% $14.07 $25.12 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 12.7m (2.9x avg.) $6.86 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 14.7 0.8% 70 80 90 $100 FM MA Westlake ChemicalWLK Close: $88.94 6.49 or 7.9% $48.13 $98.27 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.7m (2.9x avg.) $5.98 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 15.5 0.8% 50 55 60 $65 FM MA WellCare HealthWCG Close: $56.38 -0.88 or -1.5% $44.75 $68.65 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 965.3k (1.8x avg.) $2.45 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 13.4 ... 60 70 80 $90 FM MA HumanaHUM Close: $75.49 1.56 or 2.1% $59.92 $82.47 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 2.4m (0.8x avg.) $11.89 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 10.1 1.4% The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.76 percent Monday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.040.05-0.01.07 6-month T-bill.070.10-0.03.13 52-wk T-bill.100.10....17 2-year T-note.220.22....26 5-year T-note.740.72+0.02.79 10-year T-note1.761.74+0.021.88 30-year T-bond2.982.95+0.033.07 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.682.65+0.032.56 Bond Buyer Muni Idx4.054.02+0.034.50 Barclays USAggregate1.791.72+0.072.07 Barclays US High Yield5.055.09-0.046.96 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.773.64+0.133.95 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.031.00+0.031.03 Barclays US Corp2.652.58+0.073.28 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of crude oil rose on concerns that tensions between Syria and Israel could affect future supplies. The wholesale price of gasoline rose, and natural gas fell.Crude Oil (bbl)96.1695.61+0.58+4.7 Ethanol (gal)2.542.70+0.52+15.8 Heating Oil (gal)2.922.88+1.24-4.1 Natural Gas (mm btu)4.014.04-0.74+19.7 Unleaded Gas (gal)2.872.83+1.43+1.9 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1468.101464.30+0.26-12.3 Silver (oz)23.9223.98-0.24-20.7 Platinum (oz)1507.701501.20+0.43-2.0 Copper (lb)3.313.31-0.11-9.1 Palladium (oz)696.00692.20+0.55-1.0 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.211.22-0.43-6.6 Coffee (lb)1.411.40+0.75-1.7 Corn (bu)6.797.00-2.97-2.8 Cotton (lb)0.850.85+0.70+13.5 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)339.50338.60+0.27-9.2 Orange Juice (lb)1.431.47-2.38+23.6 Soybeans (bu)14.4514.55-0.72+1.8 Wheat (bu)6.937.11-2.57-10.9 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 22.38+.04 +10.2+17.2+13.0+6.4 CapIncBuAm 57.21-.15 +9.4+16.4+12.4+3.5 CpWldGrIAm 41.07-.08 +10.9+21.8+12.6+1.8 EurPacGrAm 44.09-.08 +7.0+16.9+9.6+0.4 FnInvAm 45.96+.11 +13.0+22.1+14.3+3.8 GrthAmAm 38.58+.09 +12.3+21.7+13.3+3.6 IncAmerAm 19.68-.02 +9.9+17.7+13.4+5.8 InvCoAmAm 34.22-.02 +13.9+21.3+13.2+4.3 NewPerspAm 34.55+.03 +10.5+20.2+13.4+4.0 WAMutInvAm 35.38+.03 +13.9+20.2+15.6+4.9 Dodge & Cox Income 13.93-.01 +1.3+5.0+5.9+6.9 IntlStk 37.70-.15 +8.8+23.5+10.3+0.2 Stock 140.15+.46 +15.5+29.2+14.7+3.4 Fidelity Contra 86.76+.19 +12.9+16.7+15.2+5.4 LowPriStk d 45.45+.10 +15.1+23.8+16.2+8.0 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 57.36+.11 +14.2+20.8+15.1+5.0 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.36-.01 +7.9+16.7+11.6+5.8 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.79+.03 +4.3+13.2+8.6+9.7 GlBondAdv 13.74+.03 +4.3+13.4+8.8+10.0 Harbor IntlInstl d 65.99+.02 +6.2+15.9+12.4-0.1 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.30-.01 +1.3+6.4+6.4+7.4 T Rowe Price EqtyInc 30.01+.05 +14.0+23.6+13.6+4.8 GrowStk 41.99+.07 +11.1+13.8+15.1+5.9 Vanguard 500Adml 149.26+.28 +14.2+20.8+15.2+5.0 500Inv 149.24+.28 +14.1+20.6+15.0+4.9 GNMAAdml 10.86-.01 +0.4+1.5+4.8+5.6 MuIntAdml 14.41-.02 +1.3+4.3+5.6+5.6 STGradeAd 10.82... +0.7+3.2+3.3+4.1 Tgtet2025 14.76+.01 +8.6+15.1+11.3+4.4 TotBdAdml 11.05... +0.6+3.0+5.1+5.7 TotIntl 15.99-.02 +7.0+18.0+9.5-1.4 TotStIAdm 40.57+.10 +14.3+21.2+15.3+5.6 TotStIdx 40.55+.10 +14.3+21.0+15.2+5.5 Welltn 37.00+.01 +10.0+16.6+12.1+6.3 WelltnAdm 63.91+.02 +10.0+16.6+12.2+6.4 TOTALRETURN FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates DEATHSContinued from Page A6 Richard Moody Rosalie Smagghe William OCallaghan Associated PressNEW YORK Bank of America led a rally in bigbank stocks in mostly quiet trading on Monday. Stock indexes ended little changed following a recordsetting run last week. News that Bank of America and MBIA, a bond-insurance company, had reached a settlement over a long-running dispute propelled both companies stocks up. BofA will pay $1.7 billion to MBIA and extend the troubled company a credit line. MBIA soared 45 percent, or $4.46, to $14.29. Bank of America gained 5 percent, or 64 cents, to $12.88, making it the leading company in the Dow Jones industrial average. The Dow slipped 5.07 points to close at 14,968.89. The Standard & Poors 500 index crept up 3.08 points to 1,617.50, a gain of 0.2 percent. Few changes in stocks 000EU0P Crystal River 305 S.E. US 19 352-795-7223

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OPINION Page A10TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 Salute nursesNurses Week 2013, designated from May 6 to May 12, is a week to showcase nursing. Nursing is a profession that is devoted to providing care and assistance to others using a wealth of knowledge that requires continuous enhancements. On behalf of the Citrus County Hospital Board (CCHB), send this salute to all nurses. The CCHB, by Chapter 2011256 of the Laws of Florida, needs to develop and implement a community health care plan. A community health care plan as a reality can only be achieved by the participation of many nurses being a subgroup ofthis huge group. May our community, Citrus County, realize that nurses appreciate the salute and a special focused week, but caring and helping others are an ingrained trait, which is a daily art and expression of goodwill.Debbie Ressler chairwoman, Citrus County Hospital BoardActions troublingRecent actions by County Administrator Brad Thorpe raise some red flags. The revelations regarding the landfill are of serious concern. Apparently, there were what appeared to be some errors in calculations by the company that processes the recycling operation. The miscalculations were estimated to have resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses to the county. A criminal investigation was started by the sheriffs office but stopped after the administrator decided there was no intentional wrongdoing and came to an agreement with the vendor for them to return what some believe is only a portion of what might have been owed. Any time a criminal investigation is started, the professional and ethical thing to do is let it run its course. By making an agreement with the company, the administrator has created a situation where many questions are not answered and gives the impression that a deal was cut. The fact that the administrator chose not do a public presentation to the commissioners and only poll them privately for their support for his actions only raises more concerns. Another disturbing issue was the apparent lack of a plan by the administrator to deal with the possible loss of revenue over the Progress Energy tax issue. His lack of a plan has put the county government in a difficult situation. The commission is busy looking for ways to cover the lost revenue at the expense of the taxpaying citizens. Regardless of what Commissioner Meek or the other commissioners say, an MSBU or MSTU is only a tax by another name. It is totally irresponsible for the administrator and the commission to pass the cost of their incompetence along to the taxpaying public. One can only hope that the commission will realize there are problems and move to address them.Roger B. Krieger Beverly Hills Theres the story of a woman with five kids who was asked if she had to do it all over again would she have five children? Yes, she said, just not these five. Thats the way I feel about the immigration reform bill introduced by the Senates bipartisan Gang of 8. Im all for an immigration bill, just not this immigration bill at least in its present form. One of the gang members, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, indicated the bill has problems that need fixing when he said in a recent interview: Lets try to fix it. Lets try to change it, but to just say lets defeat the whole thing; I dont think thats a productive approach either. I think this is a starting point that obviously we can and should improve. There is much to improve, maybe too much. The Daily Caller read through all 844 pages of the pending bill and found it contains roughly 400 exemptions, exceptions, waivers, determinations and grants of discretion. In fact, the Caller found, The document mentions discretion or discretionary 41 times ... judge or judges 73 times ... determines is used 84 times. This bill has more holes in it than a Texas border fence. Responding to a report by Ronald Mortensen, a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies, which analyzed the Senate proposal, the centers executive director, Mark Krikorian, offered, Illegal aliens will be rewarded for breaking laws for which American citizens are routinely punished. He cites as one example the use of a fraudulent Social Security card, which, he said, would cause an American citizen to face up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, but, he said, ... under this bill the illegal alien would face a $1,000 penalty covering all his many offenses, a penalty which in many cases will be waived. According to Krikorian, the individual would then be issued a new Social Security number without any past bad credit or arrest records. Whats with all the preferential treatment? Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, a member of the Gang of 8, said in a statement to Breitbart News, The Gang of 8 made a promise that illegal immigrants will not be able to access public benefits. We already know that, once granted green cards and ultimately citizenship, illegal immigrants will be able to access all public benefit programs at a great cost to taxpayers. We have, however, identified a number of loopholes that would allow illegal immigrants to draw public benefits even sooner than advertised. Sen. Jeff Flake, RArkansas, disagrees. So lets close up the loopholes and debate it on the Senate floor. Additional public benefits for illegal immigrants should not be seen as far-fetched, given aBoston Heraldreport about the family of the accused Boston Marathon bombers, whose residency may have been legal, but whose behavior was not: The Tsarnaev family, including the suspected terrorists and their parents, benefited from more than $100,000 in taxpayerfunded assistance a bonanza ranging from cash and food stamps to Section 8 housing from 2002 to 2012. These were able-bodied people. Why did they receive benefits? What loophole did the Tsarnaev family slip through? Attorney General Eric Holder has taken the issue of breaking the law to new depths. In an April 24 speech to the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Holder said that creating a pathway to earned citizenship is a civil right. If thats so, why deny anyone from coming to America, even from nations that breed terrorists? As it stands, the bill is unlikely to pass. Thats why Sen. Rubio is right about the need to fix it. If he were to introduce an amendment to ban an illegal from voting for 10 years, we might see Democratic support for the measure quickly fade. The Democratic Party appears interested in importing new Democratic voters. Illegal immigrants know this, which leads many of them to believe that even if they break the law to get here, they have a right to become American citizens. I dont think so, do you?Readers may email Cal Thomas at tmseditors@ tribune.com. When your work speaks for itself, dont interrupt.Henry J. Kaiser, 1882-1967 Immigration, deformed CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief SPOILING FOR A FIGHT CCHB PR deal bad for public relations Yes, this is another editorial about the turmoil that is Citrus Memorial governance. But this time its about one of the most boneheaded moves weve seen them make recently. The governor-appointed Citrus County Hospital Board, which owns the facility, and the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, which leases and operates it, have been generally in agreement on one thing: its not financially viable for Citrus Memorial to continue as an independent, public hospital in this economic climate. The health care environment of today is very different, and much more complex, than it was when Citrus Memorial was created 56 years ago. The CCHB commissioned a valuation for Citrus Memorial, which was completed recently, and is taking steps to review alternative futures for it. As part of this plan, the CCHB hired an experienced transition manager to assist in securing and assessing possible offers, and in looking out for the citizens of Citrus County if an ownership change occurs. That makes sense. What doesnt make sense is what theyre now considering adding to the transition consultants contract. The CCHB decided it needed outside public relations assistance because it anticipated opposition, particularly from within the hospital family. The hospital ownership/ governance issue is complex. Some clear, straightforward communicating would help the community you know, the people whose best interests are supposed to be paramount understand the issues and the process. From that standpoint, adding a communications professional to the mix is a good idea. There are plenty of highly qualified communications professionals in our community, many of them unaligned with any of the parties in the CMH governance mess, who understand well how to get the word out to locals. But the CCHB board instead asked its transition manager to hire an outside professional to run the PR effort a pricey, nonlocal option. More importantly, the purpose isnt to help the community understand whats happening its to wage a war of public opinion against any who dont agree with the CCHB. The transition manager told CCHB members, Youre about to get into a fight; frankly, youre already in a fight. You may think its bad, its going to get worse. This is exactly the wrong attitude. Instead of aggressive and combative posturing, we need to see some grown-up behavior from the members of both boards, their consultants and hospital management. Reminder: its not about them; its about the people of Citrus County. Everyone involved owes county residents a professional approach and a calm, reasoned, collegial process as we move toward resolution of Citrus Memorials future. THE ISSUE:Hospital board needs to communicate with county residents.OUR OPINION:Youre doing it wrong. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Charlie Brennan at 352-563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor Worst driversIve been told by people who moved to Citrus County from all over the place, South Florida, all over the state and even Europe, that this county has the worst drivers in the world and I have to believe them now because every day I go out lately, I get cut off or something. What really cracks me up is in the 50 and 60 zone on (State Road) 44, you always have people going 30 and you cant get around because theyre in each lane and when you do get to go around one of them, I guess theyre the ones that call in and say people are speeding.Respect bicyclistsPlease respect bicyclists and pedestrians at the intersection of Southeast (U.S.) 19 and Fort Island Trail. I cross this intersection every day while biking to the Bicentennial pool for exercise. I am almost run down by speeding drivers who do not honor the Walk Pedestrian light. Traffic control for Crystal River, we need more safety concerning this dangerous matter. Will we wait for a terrible accident and lawsuit to address this issue? Please help us. I always respect pedestrians and walkers when Im driving.The laws the lawTo the person who wrote on April 27 that you should have one month to prove your innocence: I believe you are already innocent until proven guilty in the United States. DNA evidence has already shown they get that wrong sometimes, so then its too late.Take some prideTo the people who have (been) complaining about the litter on the side of the highway: Take a little pride in your neighborhood and pick it up. Ive been cleaning up Seven Rivers Road from Venable all the way around to Venable again. Do it once a month. It doesnt take much; just go out and pick it up instead of complaining. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Cal ThomasOTHER VOICES

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detailed reports from two child-protection investigations involving Huggett, the Hernando woman charged with first-degree murder and aggravated child abuse in the death of her daughter. According to an arrest report, Huggett is accused of shaking Aliyah, banging her head againsta wall and head-butting her because the child would not stop whining. Two days before her death, Aliyah was taken to Citrus Memorial hospital by ambulance with swollen hands. Doctors said the swelling was caused by an allergic reaction and sent her home the same day. Doctors reported no indications of abuse, Citrus County sheriffs detectives said. DCF reports also suggest Aliyahslife, while not ideal, was with an affectionate mother. There does not appear to be any conditions which would affect the childs safety or care and age is not a factor; the mother is 21 years old, however, appears to be very mature and bonded very well with the child, a DCF investigator wrote in a Jan. 10 report. The DCF investigated anonymous allegations against Huggett on two occasions. The first occurred in August, when the sheriffs office was still conducting child-protection investigations. By the second occasion, in January, that role was transferred to DCF. The August incident occurred following the Baker Act of Huggetts then-livein boyfriend,who cut himself with a razor blade. Huggett told child-protection investigators the boyfriend sliced himself while the two argued. She said Aliyah was asleep in another room and never saw anything. Investigators interviewed witnesses and Huggetts friends. One witness said Huggett tried to smother her crying child at a Veterans Administration clinic in The Villages. Huggett said she was only trying to comfort her daughter, not hurt her. Huggett agreed to receive social work help with parenting skills. She was reluctant to seek mental-health counseling for fear of being locked up under the states Baker Act, according to reports. The investigator urged her to follow a doctors recommendations. According to reports, Huggett told investigators that Aliyahs conception was the result of a rape while she was in military boot camp in California. Huggett and the live-in boyfriend, who is not the childs father, moved from California to Florida in summer 2011. While conducting the investigation, officials learned of another allegation that Huggett and the boyfriend were evicted from an apartment in April and had moved into a storage unit in Inverness. According to the allegation, the couple and Aliyah then moved into a friends house. Sheriffs deputies concluded their investigation on Oct. 5 three weeks before Aliyahs second birthday. In January, DCF investigators learned the three were living in a tent in Inverness. Their investigation showed that the tent was on property the boyfriend owned and that Huggett and her daughter stayed in a friends house at night. Reports stated the child showed no ill effects of living in the tent, which was spacious and included a toddlers air mattress, carpeting, necessary supplies and a cooler to keep food cold. The investigator said he met Huggett and Aliyah atthe boyfriends place of employment an Inverness fast-food restaurant and the child appeared happy. The report said both Huggett and the boyfriend interacted with Aliyah in a normal fashion. DCF investigators urged Huggett to seek counseling regarding the sexual assault she claimed led to Aliyahs conception, but she said she had already received counseling in California and did not want to repeat it. Huggett agreed to send Aliyah to daycare in Inverness. The daycare operator told DCF investigators Aliyah seemed well adjusted and showed no signs of being abused. The DCF concluded its investigation a month after it began. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 A11 000ER0R Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol 000EHI5 000EUII 000ERJB Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons Ward Eye Center 8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa (352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123 MODERN MODERN DIABETIC DIABETIC SPECIALIST SPECIALIST 000EOYP Policies set by local retailer, See store for details. Excludes delivery and set up fees. Other charges may apply. Offer does not apply to Serta Motion Perfect Adjustable Foundations, iComfort Pillows and other iComfort accessories. Void in the state of Tennessee. DEATHContinued from Page A1 For the RECORD Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A residential burglary was reported at 10:15 a.m. Friday, May 3, in the 10000 block of N. Ocean Drive, Dunnellon. A vehicle burglary was reported at 4:56 p.m. May 3 in the 600 block of N.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. A residential burglary was reported at 7:36 p.m. May 3 in the 100 block of W. Greenbriar Place, Dunnellon. A residential burglary was reported at 10:05 p.m. May 3 in the 9600 block of W. Moss Rose Lane, Crystal River. A residential burglary was reported at 4:50 p.m. Saturday, May 4, in the 11100 block of W. Halls River Road, Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 6:32 p.m. May 4 in the 2600 block of S. Pine Ridge Ave., Homosassa. A residential burglary was reported at 12:20 a.m. Sunday, May 5, in the 200 block of S. Scarboro Ave., Lecanto.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 11:04 a.m. Friday, May 3, in the 300 block of S. Park Ave., Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 1:47 p.m. May 3 in the 4000 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 6:30 p.m. May 3 in the 10000 block of E. Trails End Road, Floral City. A petit theft was reported at 7:20 p.m. May 3 in the 4000 block of N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. A petit theft was reported at 10:32 a.m. Saturday, May 4, in the 600 block of S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. A petit theft was reported at 3:13 p.m. May 4 in the 200 block of South Blvd., Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 4:58 p.m. May 4 in the 70 block of N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.

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East about to be overrun by billions of cicadas Associated PressWASHINGTON Any day now, billions of cicadas with bulging red eyes will crawl out of the earth after 17 years underground and overrun the East Coast. The insects will arrive in such numbers that people from North Carolina to Connecticut will be outnumbered roughly 600-to-1. Maybe more. Scientists even have a horror-movie name for the infestation: Brood II. But as ominous as that sounds, the insects are harmless. They wont hurt you or other animals. At worst, they might damage a few saplings or young shrubs. Mostly they will blanket certain pockets of the region, though lots of people wont ever see them. Its not like these hordes of cicadas suck blood or zombify people, said May Berenbaum, a University of Illinois entomologist. Theyre looking for just one thing: sex. And theyve been waiting quite a long time. Since 1996, this group of 1-inch bugs, in wingless nymph form, has been a few feet underground, sucking on tree roots and biding their time. They will emerge only when the ground temperature reaches precisely 64 degrees. After a few weeks up in the trees, they will die and their offspring will go underground, not to return until 2030. Its just an amazing accomplishment, Berenbaum said. How can anyone not be impressed? And they will make a big racket, too. The noise all the male cicadas make when they sing for sex can drown out your own thoughts, and maybe even rival a rock concert. In 2004, Gene Kritsky, an entomologist at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, measured cicadas at 94 decibels, saying it was so loud you dont hear planes flying overhead. There are ordinary cicadas that come out every year around the world, but these are different. Theyre called magicicadas as in magic and are red-eyed. And these magicicadas are seen only in the eastern half of the United States, nowhere else in the world. There are 15 U.S. broods that emerge every 13 or 17 years, so that nearly every year, some place is overrun. Last year it was a small area, mostly around the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, West Virginia and Tennessee. Next year, two places get hit: Iowa into Illinois and Missouri; and Louisiana and Mississippi. And its possible to live in these locations and actually never see them. This years invasion, Brood II, is one of the bigger ones. Several experts said they really dont have a handle on how many cicadas are lurking underground but that 30 billion seems like a good estimate. At the Smithsonian Institution, researcher Gary Hevel thinks it may be more like 1 trillion. Even if its merely 30 billion, if they were lined up head to tail, theyd reach the moon and back. There will be some places where its wall-to-wall cicadas, said University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp. Associated PressQUETTA, Pakistan The graffiti on walls around this Pakistani provincial capital hold a dire warning ahead of this weekends national elections, Voting means death. Its a very real threat: During recent weeks at least six people have been killed and around 40 wounded in bombings and grenade attacks targeting candidates. Ethnic Baluch separatists who have waged a bloody insurgency trying to win independence for the vast, sparsely populated province of Baluchistan are seeking to derail the vote with a campaign of violence. In large part, their targets have been fellow Baluch, seen by the separatists as traitors for agreeing to participate in the vote. Our houses are not safe. Our workers are not safe. Our leaders are directly targeted every day, said Naimatullah Gichki, a senior member of a Baluch party, the National Party. We are fighting a war, not an election. Saturdays election has thrown into sharp relief a question that has divided the countrys Baluch ethnic minority: Can the community win their rights at the ballot box or is the only solution a violent campaign to break away from Pakistan? The Baluch have long been alienated by what they see as exploitation by the central government. Wedged between the borders with Afghanistan and Iran, Baluchistan is rich in oil, natural gas and valuable minerals. But it is Pakistans poorest province and remains extremely underdeveloped, with residents complaining that resource riches have mainly gone to fill the federal governments coffers. The area has also been plagued by horrific attacks by Islamic militants on minority Shiites. Literacy Associated PressPre-schoolers listen to a reading Monday of the childrens book Duck on a Bike, after it was announced as this years annual One Book 4 Colorado, at an event launching Colorado Literacy Week, at the Denver Downtown Library. Defense: Soldier in killings had abnormalitiesJOINT BASE LEWISMCCHORD, Wash. Defense lawyers are trying to introduce evidence that an Army sergeant charged with the premeditated killing of five fellow service members in Iraq may have had brain abnormalities. A military judge heard testimony Monday from an expert who said Sgt. John Russell had significant abnormalities in his brain structure and function. Dr. Ruben Gur said the abnormalities indicate Russell could have had difficulty regulating emotions. But experts called by the government suggested Russells brain is normal. Col. David Conn did not immediately rule whether the testing would be allowed in the court-martial. Russell has already pleaded guilty to the 2009 killings but does not agree they were premeditated. Prosecutors are trying to prove Russell plotted the shootings in advance.Minn. prepares to dispose of I-35W bridge partsMINNEAPOLIS Minnesota is preparing to give victims, historians and engineers a chance to claim some of the crumpled steel from the deadly 2007 collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge before the rest is sold for scrap. Aug. 1 will mark the sixyear anniversary of when the bridge buckled and fell into the Mississippi River during evening rush hour in Minneapolis, killing 13 people and injuring 145 others. The Minnesota Department of Transportation had to store the steel beams and plates until all the legal claims could be resolved. The Minnesota House is poised to vote Monday on a bill to give the department months to parcel out free pieces to victims families, collapse survivors, the state historical society and others. The bill also awaits Senate action.Secrecy shrouds pretrial hearing in WikiLeaks caseFORT MEADE, Md. Government secrecy reaches a new level this week in the court-martial of an Army private who gave reams of classified documents to WikiLeaks. The military judge has ordered what prosecutors said is an unprecedented closed hearing Wednesday to help her decide how much of Pfc. Bradley Mannings trial will be closed to protect national security. An unidentified prosecution witness will testify in a dry run to test alternatives to courtroom closures during presentation of classified evidence. The strategies could include redacted documents, unclassified summaries and even code words for classified information. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Ceremony Associated PressSwiss guards attend a swearing-in ceremony Monday at the Vatican. The ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome. Alleged death camp guard is arrestedBERLIN A 93-year-old man who was deported from the U.S. for lying about his Nazi past was arrested by German authorities Monday on allegations he served as an Auschwitz death camp guard, Stuttgart prosecutors said. Hans Lipschis was taken into custody after authorities concluded there was compelling evidence he was involved in crimes at Auschwitz while there from 1941 to 1945, prosecutor Claudia Krauth said. Lipschis has acknowledged being assigned to an SS guard unit at Auschwitz but maintains he only served as a cook and was not involved in any war crimes. Lipschis was deported from the U.S. in 1983 for lying about his Nazi past when he immigrated to Chicago in the 1950s.Syrian rebels shoot down regime helicopter BEIRUT Syrian rebels shot down a military helicopter in the countrys east, killing eight government troops on board as President Bashar Assads troops battled opposition forces inside a sprawling military air base in the north for the second straight day. The downing of the helicopter was a welcome victory for rebels fighting to oust Assad as the two sides remain locked in stalemate in the 2-year-old conflict. In Geneva, a U.N. commission probing alleged war crimes and other abuses in Syria on Monday distanced itself from claims by one of its members that Syrian rebels have used the nerve agent sarin, but not the regime. The panel said it has no conclusive evidence about the alleged use of sarin as chemical weapons. In Washington, White House spokesman Jay Carney said its highly likely the Assad regime and not the Syrian opposition was behind any chemical weapons use in Syria. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressAny day now, cicadas with bulging red eyes will creep out of the ground after 17 years and overrun the East Coast with the awesome power of numbers. Big numbers. Billions. Maybe even a trillion. Associated PressSupporters of Pakistans minority Shiite Hazara community, frequently attacked by militants, rally Sunday for the upcoming elections in Quetta, Pakistan. Seeking to derail Pakistan vote Bomb at Pakistan Islamist party rally kills 16PARACHINAR, Pakistan A bomb blast tore through a political rally held by an Islamist party in northwest Pakistan Monday, in an attack claimed by the Pakistani Taliban that killed 16 people and underscored an increase in violence ahead of the May 11 vote. The explosion, at a rally held in the village of Sewak in the northwest Kurram tribal area, was the latest attack on candidates, political offices and election-related events as the vote approaches. The bomb, which was apparently planted near the main stage of the rally, killed 16 and left 44 wounded, said Umar Khan, a doctor at the nearby Sada hospital where many of the wounded were initially taken. Two party leaders who were speaking at the event escaped unharmed.From wire reports Senate passes online sales tax bill Votes 69 to 27, sending to House Associated PressWASHINGTON The Senate aimed to help traditional retailers and financially strapped state and local governments Monday by passing a bill that would widely subject online shopping for many a largely tax-free frontier to state sales taxes. The Senate passed the bill by a vote of 69 to 27, getting support from Republicans and Democrats alike. But opposition from some conservatives who view it as a tax increase will make it a tougher sell in the House. President Barack Obama has conveyed his support for the measure. Under current law, states can only require retailers to collect sales taxes if the store has a physical presence in the state. That means big retailers with stores all over the country like Walmart, Best Buy and Target collect sales taxes when they sell goods over the Internet. But online retailers like eBay and Amazon dont have to collect sales taxes, except in states where they have offices or distribution centers. As a result, many online sales are tax-free, giving Internet retailers an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores. The bill would empower states to require businesses to collect taxes for products they sell on the Internet, in catalogs and through radio and TV ads. Under the legislation, the sales taxes would be sent to the state where the shopper lives. Supporters said the current tax disparity is turning some traditional stores into showrooms, where shoppers pick out items they like, then buy them on the Internet to avoid sales taxes. Its about the way commerce has changed in America, said Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill. Bookstores, stores that sell running shoes, bicycles and appliances are at a distinct disadvantage. Theyve become showrooms. Internet giant eBay is leading the fight against the bill, along with lawmakers from states with no sales tax and several prominent anti-tax groups. The bills opponents said it would put an expensive obligation on small businesses because they are not as equipped as national merchandisers to collect and remit sales taxes at the multitude of state rates. Businesses with less than $1 million in online sales would be exempt. eBay wants to exempt businesses with up to $10 million in sales or fewer than 50 employees. The issue is getting bigger for states as more people make purchases online. Last year, Internet sales in the U.S. totaled $226 billion, up nearly 16 percent from the previous year, according to government estimates. States lost a total of $23 billion last year because they couldnt collect taxes on out-of-state sales, according to a study done for the National Conference of State Legislatures, which has lobbied for the bill.

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Baseball/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 Basketball/B4 Hockey/B4 Tennis/B4 Sports briefs/ B4 The demise of NBA titans Boston and LA Lakers. / B4 SPORTSSection BTUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Rays blow seven-run lead, fall to Blue Jays Associated PressST. PETERSBURG J.P. Arencibia hit a two-out, two-run homer in the ninth inning off Fernando Rodney and the Toronto Blue Jays completed their comeback from a seven-run deficit, beating the Tampa Bay Rays 8-7 on Monday night. The last time Toronto rallied from at least seven runs down to win was June 5, 2007, when it overcame an 8-1 margin to beat Tampa Bay 12-11, STATS said. Tampa Bay last lost a lead of at least seven runs May 25, 2009, when Cleveland came back from a 10-0 deficit to win 11-10. This time, Evan Longoria hit his third career grand slam as Tampa Bay built a 7-0 lead that Jeremy Hellickson and four Rays relievers failed to protect before a seasonlow crowd of 9,952 at Tropicana Field. Colby Rasmus and Mark DeRosa also hit two-run homers for Toronto. Toronto trailed 7-6 when Adam Lind drew a leadoff walk in the ninth from Rodney (1-1). Pinchrunner Emilio Bonifacio stole second and continued to third on catcher Jose Molinas throwing error with no outs. Rodney retired the next two batters before Arencibia lined a 2-2 pitch into the left-field seats. Arencibia, who pinch-hit in the sixth inning and stayed in the game to catch, hit his ninth home run. Darren Oliver (1-1) pitched one scoreless inning and Casey Janssen worked a perfect ninth for his eighth save. Longorias seventh homer of the season was the biggest blow in a seven-run third inning against Mark Buerhle. Rasmus hit a two-run homer off Hellickson in the fourth and DeRosa added a two-run, pinchhit shot off reliever Jake McGee in the sixth. Down 7-5, Toronto had the potential tying runs in scoring position in the seventh and eighth, but was only able to get one runner home on Jose Bautistas basesloaded sacrifice fly in the eighth off Rodney. Buehrle allowed seven runs and nine hits in six innings. He has now yielded eight home runs over his last three starts. Despite being staked to the seven-run lead, Hellickson only lasted five innings. The righthander yielded Rasmus homer and Melky Cabreras RBI single in the fourth. Associated PressTampa Bays Sam Fuld slides in to score Monday ahead of a throw to Toronto catcher Henry Blanco in St. Petersburg. Couples, Montgomerie among 5 inducted to hall Associated PressST. AUGUSTINE About the only thing Fred Couples and Colin Montgomerie had in common was a golf swing good enough to trust for a lifetime. Couples became the first American to reach No. 1 in the world and won the Masters by a blade of grass that kept his ball from trickling into Raes Creek. Montgomerie found fame on the European Tour, where he won the Order of Merit a record seven times in a row, though he never won a major, a glaring hole in his credentials. Couples sauntered down the fairways, the essence of cool. Montgomerie walked with his head down, so intense he never looked like he was having much fun. They shared the stage Monday night when both were inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame, along with three others in the Class of 2013. The others were former U.S. Open champion and broadcaster Ken Venturi, former European Tour executive director Ken Schofield and two-time British Open champion and architect Willie Park Jr. That brings the Hall of Fame to 146 members. Couples talked about his childhood in Seattle, when his mother gave him $5 a day in the summer to play at Jefferson Park. He couldnt afford to buy a glove, and Couples still plays without one. He got choked up when he mentioned watching a PGA Tour player to put on a clinic in town when Couples was 14. I wasnt really the person who said, Thats what I want to do, Im going to be a PGA Tour player. But I knew I wanted to really, really get involved in golf, Couples said. And the gentlemans name was Lee Trevino, who has been a mentor and someone I love. Couples didnt look at his notes or used the teleprompter in the back of the room. He rambled at times, as he always does, talking about his journey from Seattle to the University of Houston, where he first met CBS announcer Jim Nantz, turned pro and won 15 times, including that 1992 Masters and the green jacket ceremony in Butler Cabin with Nantz. They had rehearsed that moment in college. He was overcome with emotion at the end of the night, reading two sentences from a piece of paper. Thanks for taking a kid from Seattle and putting him in the Hall of Fame, Couples said as his chin buckled. This is the coolest night of my life. He walked off the stage in tears, thrusting both arms in the air. The election of this years class was not without some debate. Couples was elected on the PGA Tour ballot ahead of Mark OMeara and Davis Love III, both of whom either won more tournaments or more majors. Couples received only 51 percent of the vote, a record low for the PGA Tour ballot. It takes 65 percent to get elected, though there is a loophole that if no one gets 65 percent, one player is elected provided he receives at least 50 percent. Montgomerie won 31 times on the European Tour, the most of any British player, and he was a stalwart in the Ryder Cup. The Scot played in eight of them and never lost in singles (6-0-2) while competing on six winning teams. He also was the winning captain in Wales in 2010. He never won on the biggest stage, however. Montgomerie lost the 1994 U.S. Open and the 1995 PGA Championship in a playoff. He was second to Ernie Els again in the 1997 U.S. Open at Congressional. And the most painful of all came in 2006 at Winged Foot, when he made double bogey from the middle of the 18th fairway and finished one shot behind Geoff Ogilvy. Thats the one that hurts, Montgomerie said of Winged Foot, noting another Hall of Fame member, Phil Mickelson, also Miamis Super Bowl chances dimmed Associated PressMIAMI As Dan Marino campaigned for Miami to be chosen the site of the 50th Super Bowl, he made no pretense about being objective on the subject. In my opinion, the former Dolphins quarterback said, every Super Bowl should be here. Instead, the NFL championship game might not return to Miami for a long time. Last week the Dolphins were denied public money for a stadium upgrade by the state Legislature, which removes South Florida from serious contention for the 50th Super Bowl and perhaps subsequent NFL and college title games as well. The defeat in Tallahassee also raises questions about the future of the Dolphins under multibillionaire owner Stephen Ross. He contends $350 million in stadium improvements are badly needed, but hes unwilling to foot the entire bill himself, and ruled out a less expensive, scaleddown renovation. The Dolphins say theyre already heavily in debt and one of the NFLs most leveraged teams, making upgrades impossible without taxpayer help. I dont think there is a clear alternative at this point, chief executive officer Mike Dee said. I dont think there is a road to a Plan B without legislative action in Tallahassee. Ross, 72, hasnt indicated any desire to bring aboard a coowner to help finance a stadium project. He hasnt threatened to move the Dolphins, and its unlikely the league would abandon South Florida, with several NFL franchises in smaller markets more logical candidates for relocation to Los Angeles or elsewhere. Undermanned Bulls take Game 1 against defending champions Associated PressMIAMI Nate Robinson scored 27 points, Jimmy Butler added 21 points and 14 rebounds while playing every second for the third straight game, and the Chicago Bulls stunned the Miami Heat 93-86 on Monday night to take Game 1 of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Trailing 86-83 with 2 minutes left, the Bulls scored the final 10 points of the game to beat the Heat once again. Joakim Noah added 13 points, Taj Gibson had 12 and Marco Belinelli added 10 for Chicago, which snapped a 27-game Miami winning streak during the regular season, and handed the Heat their first loss in their last 13 games in this one. LeBron James scored 24 points for Miami, which got 14 from Dwyane Wade. Game 2 is Wednesday night in Miami. The Bulls were without Derrick Rose, as theyve been all season. Kirk Hinrich was out again with a calf injury. Luol Deng isnt even expected to rejoin the team until Tuesday, after dealing with an illness apparently so severe that a spinal tap and other tests since were needed to rule out things like meningitis. And the group that was left gave the reigning NBA champions more than they could handle. A pair of three-point plays by James one of them coming when he just broke through a tackle attempt by Butler and muscled the ball to the rim anyway gave Miami a 76-69 lead midway through the fourth quarter, the biggest deficit Chicago faced all night. The Bulls, predictably, were undeterred. Coming off a Game 7 road win in Brooklyn two nights earlier just to get into a series with Miami, the Bulls just kept grinding. When Ray Allen made a 3-pointer to give Miami an 80-78 lead, Butler came back with one of his own to put the Bulls back on top. When the Heat went up by three after James made a free throw with 2:22 left, Belinelli connected for 3 on a second-effort Associated PressChicago Bulls guard Nate Robinson drives to the basket Monday past Miami Heat guard Norris Cole during the second half of Game 1 of the NBA playoff series in the Eastern Conference semifinals in Miami. Robinson scored 27 points as the Bulls defeated the Heat 93-86. See MIAMI/ Page B3 See HALL OF FAME/ Page B3 See BULLS/ Page B3

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B2TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEMAJORLEAGUEBASEBALL Associated PressCINCINNATI Andrelton Simmons homered twice and drove in a career-high four runs, leading the Atlanta Braves to a 7-4 victory that ended the Cincinnati Reds winning streak at three games. The Braves won at a place where theyve had little success lately. They were 0-4 at Great American Ball Park last season and 14-25 overall since it opened for the 2003 season. Paul Maholm (4-3) held down an offense thats been all-or-nothing. The left-hander allowed four hits and two runs in 5 2/3 innings. Craig Kimbrel gave up a pair of hits in the ninth while getting his 10th save in 12 opportunities. Atlanta scored in four of five innings against Bronson Arroyo (2-4), who gave up four runs in his shortest outing of the season.AMERICAN LEAGUE White Sox 2, Royals 1, 11 inn.KANSAS CITY, Mo. Jordan Danks atoned for a baserunning blunder in the ninth inning by hitting a solo home run in the 11th that lifted the Chicago White Sox over the Kansas City Royals 2-1. Danks connected with two outs off Kelvin Herrera (2-3) for his first homer of the season. The White Sox avoided a three-game sweep. Down 1-0, the White Sox loaded the bases with no outs in the ninth. After Paul Konerko grounded into a home-to-first double play, Danks entered as a pinch-runner at second base for Adam Dunn. Conor Gillaspie was intentionally walked to load the bases. Alexei Ramirez followed with an infield single up the middle that made it 1-all, but Danks was caught in a rundown between third and home and tagged out, ending the rally.Indians 7, Athletics 3CLEVELAND Asdrubal Cabrera homered twice and Mark Reynolds hit one to the deepest reaches of Progressive Field, leading the Cleveland Indians to a 7-3 win over the Oakland Athletics. Jason Kipnis and Cabrera hit consecutive homers in the first inning off Jarrod Parker (1-5). In the fifth, Cabrera homered again and Reynolds launched a 460-foot shot his 10th this season that nearly cleared the left-field bleachers. The four homers backed Ubaldo Jimenez (2-2), who had his second straight solid outing. Jimenez struck out a season-high eight in 5 2/3 innings as Cleveland won for the seventh time in eight games. Jason Giambi hit a clutch, two-run single and Ryan Raburn doubled home a run in the seventh for the Indians, who had their six-game winning streak stopped Sunday.INTERLEAGUE Cubs 9, Rangers 2CHICAGO Scott Feldman threw seven scoreless innings against his former team before leaving with a cramp in his pitching hand, and the Chicago Cubs came within three outs of their first shutout since August in a 9-2 win over the Texas Rangers. Feldman (3-3) allowed two hits, struck out three and walked one, and also hit an RBI single in the fifth for a 2-0 lead. AL Associated PressAtlantas Andrelton Simmons hits a two-run home run Monday in the eighth inning in Cincinnati. Atlanta defeated the Reds 7-4. Simmons powers Braves AMERICAN LEAGUEMondays Games Chicago White Sox 2, Kansas City 1, 11 innings Cleveland 7, Oakland 3 Toronto 8, Tampa Bay 7 Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2 Minnesota at Boston, late Tuesdays Games Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 7:05 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 3-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Oakland (Milone 3-3) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 2-2) at Boston (Dempster 2-2), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Happ 2-2) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 1-4), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 3-0) at Houston (Lyles 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 8:40 p.m.NATIONAL LEAGUEMondays Games Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 4 Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2 Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late Miami at San Diego, late Philadelphia at San Francisco, late Tuesdays Games Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 1-4) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-3), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 7:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 5-0) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 2-2), 8:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 8:40 p.m. Arizona (McCarthy 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-4), 10:10 p.m. Miami (Sanabia 2-4) at San Diego (Stults 2-2), 10:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 3-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-1), 10:15 p.m. Blue Jays 8, Rays 7Toronto Tampa Bay abrhbi abrhbi Lawrie 3b4000Jnnngs cf4110 MeCarr lf5021KJhnsn lf5131 RDavis pr-lf0000RRorts 2b4110 Bautist rf3021Longori 3b5124 Encrnc 1b5010Loney 1b4110 Lind dh4110SRdrgz ss3000 Bonifac pr0100YEscor ss1000 Rasms cf4112Scott dh4122 MIzturs 2b5110JMolin c4000 HBlanc c2000Fuld rf3110 Arencii ph-c3222 Kawsk ss1110 DeRosa ph2112 Totals38812 8Totals377117 Toronto0003020128 Tampa Bay0070000007 EJ.Molina (3), Y.Escobar (3). DPTampa Bay 1. LOBToronto 11, Tampa Bay 6. 2BLoney (10). HRRasmus (5), Arencibia (9), DeRosa (3), Longoria (7), Scott (2). SBEncarnacion (2), Bonifacio (3). SFBautista. IPHRERBBSO Toronto Buehrle 697725 E.Rogers 110001 Oliver W,1-1110010 Janssen S,8-8100001 Tampa Bay Hellickson 563343 McGee 122201 Farnsworth H,11/320000 Jo.Peralta H,6111012 Rodney L,1-1 11/312221 J.Wright 1/300001 WPHellickson, J.Wright. BalkOliver. UmpiresHome, Mike Everitt; First, Marty Foster; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Tim Welke. T:31. A,952 (34,078).White Sox 2, Royals 1, 11 inn.Chicago Kansas City abrhbi abrhbi De Aza lf5000AGordn lf5120 Kppngr 2b4010AEscor ss5000 Greene pr1000Butler dh5011 Rios rf5120Hosmer 1b4010 A.Dunn dh3010L.Cain cf4010 JrDnks dh1111Mostks 3b4000 Konerk 1b5000Francr rf4000 Gillaspi 3b3010S.Perez c4020 AlRmrz ss4011Getz 2b4000 Flowrs c3000 Wise cf3020 Totals372 92Totals39171 Chicago000000001012 Kansas City100000000001 EFrancoeur (1). DPChicago 1, Kansas City 2. LOBChicago 6, Kansas City 5. 2BButler (5), S.Perez (5). HRJor.Danks (1). CSRios (3). IPHRERBBSO Chicago Sale 71/361105 Lindstrom 2/300001 Thornton 110000 Crain W,1-1100001 A.Reed S,11-12100001 Kansas City Shields 820029 G.Holland BS,2-9141110 K.Herrera L,2-3231100 HBPby Shields (Flowers). WPShields. UmpiresHome, Vic Carapazza; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T:14. A,576 (37,903).Indians 7, Athletics 3Oakland Cleveland abrhbi abrhbi Jaso dh1100Brantly lf5020 Montz ph2000Kipnis 2b5111 S.Smith lf5010ACarer ss4322 Lowrie ss4000Swisher 1b4110 Cespds cf3112MrRynl 3b2111 Moss 1b4120CSantn c3100 Dnldsn 3b3011Giambi dh4022 Reddck rf4010Raburn rf3011 DNorrs c4010Stubbs cf4000 Sogard 2b2000 Rosales ph2010 Totals34383Totals347107 Oakland0001010103 Cleveland20002030x7 LOBOakland 8, Cleveland 9. 2BMoss (3), D.Norris (5), Rosales (3), Giambi (3), Raburn (5). HRCespedes (6), Kipnis (3), A.Cabrera 2 (4), Mar.Reynolds (10). SBBrantley (1). SFCespedes. IPHRERBBSO Oakland Parker L,1-5574427 Resop 12/313333 Scribner 11/320001 Cleveland U.Jimenez W,2-252/342238 Hagadone H,12/310001 Shaw H,2 12/321101 J.Smith 110001 HBPby Parker (Mar.Reynolds). WPParker, Scribner. UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez; First, Doug Eddings; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Paul Nauert. T:05. A,514 (42,241). NL Braves 7, Reds 4Atlanta Cincinnati abrhbi abrhbi BUpton cf4000Choo cf3010 CJhnsn 3b4100Cozart ss5220 Kimrel p0000Votto 1b4211 J.Upton rf4120Phillips 2b4021 FFrmn 1b5021Bruce rf4001 Gattis lf4011Frazier 3b4011 Walden p0000Mesorc c4000 OFlhrt p0000DRonsn lf1010 R.Pena ph1000CIzturs ph1000 McCnn c4000Ondrsk p0000 Uggla 2b4220Hoover p0000 Smmns ss4234Paul ph1000 Mahlm p3000Arroyo p0000 Gearrin p0000Simon p0000 Avilan p0000Lutz ph-lf2010 JSchafr ph1111 Totals38711 7Totals33494 Atlanta1101100307 Cincinnati0002000204 EGattis (3), Mesoraco (3). DPCincinnati 1. LOBAtlanta 8, Cincinnati 8. 2BF.Freeman (4), Gattis (8), Cozart (4), Votto (7), Phillips (8). 3BUggla (2). HRSimmons 2 (4), J.Schafer (1). CSChoo (1). SArroyo 2. IPHRERBBSO Atlanta Maholm W,4-352/342226 Gearrin H,12/300001 Avilan H,4 2/300011 Walden 032200 OFlaherty H,10100000 Kimbrel S,10-12120001 Cincinnati Arroyo L,2-4584427 Simon 200006 Ondrusek 133311 Hoover 100011 Walden pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. HBPby Maholm (Choo). WPGearrin. UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Mike Winters. T:21. A,308 (42,319).INTERLEAGUE Cubs 9, Rangers 2Texas Chicago abrhbi abrhbi Kinsler 2b4000DeJess cf3210 D.Lowe p0000SCastro ss4322 Andrus ss4110Rizzo 1b4134 Beltre 3b4100ASorin lf4001 N.Cruz rf4010Sweeny lf0000 Morlnd 1b4000Schrhlt rf4001 Soto c4021Castillo c5010 DvMrp lf4010Valuen 3b4130 LMartn cf2000Barney 2b2100 Tepsch p1000Feldmn p4111 JeBakr ph1000Russell p0000 Kirkmn p0000Dolis p0000 J.Ortiz p0000 LGarci ph1000 Totals33251Totals349119 Texas 0000000022 Chicago10050102x9 ESoto (2), Kinsler (5), Valbuena (4), Castillo (5). DPTexas 1. LOBTexas 5, Chicago 9. 2BAndrus (4), Rizzo (9), Valbuena (4). HR Rizzo (9). SBN.Cruz (2), DeJesus (2), A.Soriano (4). SFSchierholtz. IPHRERBBSO Texas Tepesch L,2-3466544 Kirkman 11/321133 J.Ortiz 12/310001 D.Lowe 122201 Chicago Feldman W,3-3720013 Russell 2/310000 Dolis 11/322000 WPKirkman. UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Dale Scott; Second, Bill Miller; Third, CB Bucknor. T:08. A,618 (41,019). Rays scheduleMay 7 vs Toronto May 8 vs Toronto May 9 vs Toronto May 10 vs San Diego May 11 vs San Diego May 12 vs San Diego May 14 vs Boston May 15 vs Boston May 16 vs Boston May 17 at Baltimore May 18 at Baltimore May 19 at Baltimore May 20 at Toronto May 21 at Toronto May 22 at Toronto May 24 vs N.Y. Yankees May 25 vs N.Y. Yankees May 26 vs N.Y. Yankees May 27 vs Miami May 28 vs Miami May 29 at Miami May 30 at Miami May 31 at Cleveland June 1 at Cleveland June 2 at Cleveland June 4 at Detroit June 5 at Detroit June 6 at Detroit June 7 vs Baltimore June 8 vs Baltimore June 9 vs Baltimore June 10 vs Boston June 11 vs Boston June 12 vs Boston June 13 vs Kansas City June 14 vs Kansas City June 15 vs Kansas City June 16 vs Kansas City June 18 at Boston June 19 at Boston June 20 at N.Y. Yankees June 21 at N.Y. Yankees June 22 at N.Y. Yankees June 23 at N.Y. Yankees June 24 vs Toronto June 25 vs Toronto June 26 vs Toronto June 28 vs Detroit June 29 vs Detroit June 30 vs Detroit July 1 at Houston July 2 at Houston July 3 at Houston July 4 at Houston Baseball LeadersAMERICAN LEAGUE BATTINGMiCabrera, Detroit, .385; CSantana, Cleveland, .367; TorHunter, Detroit, .361; LCain, Kansas City, .337; AJones, Baltimore, .331; Altuve, Houston, .331; CDavis, Baltimore, .327. RUNSAJackson, Detroit, 31; MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; McLouth, Baltimore, 25; Crisp, Oakland, 24; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 24; AJones, Baltimore, 24; Machado, Baltimore, 23. RBIMiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Fielder, Detroit, 32; Napoli, Boston, 31; CDavis, Baltimore, 30; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 27; NCruz, Texas, 23; Donaldson, Oakland, 23. HITSMiCabrera, Detroit, 47; AJones, Baltimore, 44; Altuve, Houston, 43; TorHunter, Detroit, 43; Machado, Baltimore, 42; Kinsler, Texas, 41; Cano, New York, 40. HOME RUNSMarReynolds, Cleveland, 10; Arencibia, Toronto, 9; CDavis, Baltimore, 9; Encarnacion, Toronto, 9; Morse, Seattle, 9; Cano, New York, 8; Fielder, Detroit, 8; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 8. PITCHINGBuchholz, Boston, 6-0; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 5-0; Darvish, Texas, 5-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 5-1; 10 tied at 4. SAVESReed, Chicago, 11; Rivera, New York, 11; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 11; Nathan, Texas, 8; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 8; Janssen, Toronto, 8; Perkins, Minnesota, 7; GHolland, Kansas City, 7. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTINGCGomez, Milwaukee, .368; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .348; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, .337; Cuddyer, Colorado, .333; Segura, Milwaukee, .333; Sandoval, San Francisco, .331; Choo, Cincinnati, .331. RUNSCGonzalez, Colorado, 26; Choo, Cincinnati, 25; JUpton, Atlanta, 25; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 24; Holliday, St. Louis, 24; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 24; Pagan, San Francisco, 24; Votto, Cincinnati, 24. RBIBuck, New York, 29; Phillips, Cincinnati, 28; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 28; Craig, St. Louis, 25; Rizzo, Chicago, 25; Cuddyer, Colorado, 24; Frazier, Cincinnati, 24; Sandoval, San Francisco, 24. HITSChoo, Cincinnati, 40; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 40; Sandoval, San Francisco, 40; CGomez, Milwaukee, 39; Votto, Cincinnati, 39; SCastro, Chicago, 38; YMolina, St. Louis, 38. HOME RUNSJUpton, Atlanta, 12; Buck, New York, 10; Harper, Washington, 9; Rizzo, Chicago, 9; Beltran, St. Louis, 8; Fowler, Colorado, 8; 6 tied at 7. PITCHINGLynn, St. Louis, 5-0; Zimmermann, Washington, 5-1; Corbin, Arizona, 4-0; Harvey, New York, 4-0; Hudson, Atlanta, 4-1; JGarcia, St. Louis, 4-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 42; SMiller, St. Louis, 4-2; Maholm, Atlanta, 4-3. SAVESRomo, San Francisco, 12; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 12; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 10; RSoriano, Washington, 10; Mujica, St. Louis, 8; League, Los Angeles, 8; RBetancourt, Colorado, 8. West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Texas2012.6255-5L-111-49-8 Oakland1815.545215-5L-19-89-7 Seattle1518.455547-3L-19-86-10 Los Angeles1120.355873-7L-27-94-11 Houston824.25012111-9L-64-124-12 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Boston2011.6456-4L-311-59-6 New York1812.60017-3L-112-76-5 Baltimore1913.59416-4W-27-512-8 Tampa Bay1417.452644-6L-18-56-12 Toronto1221.364973-7W-27-125-9 East Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Atlanta1912.6134-6W-29-510-7 Washington1715.53126-4W-29-78-8 Philadelphia1418.438535-5L-28-106-8 New York1216.429533-7L-17-85-8 Miami1022.313975-5W-25-115-11 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway St. Louis2011.6457-3W-67-513-6 Pittsburgh1714.54835-5L-29-68-8 Cincinnati1815.54535-5L-112-56-10 Milwaukee1416.467523-7L-59-105-6 Chicago1220.375854-6W-16-106-10 West Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway San Fran.1912.6136-4W-611-48-8 Colorado1813.58114-6L-110-58-8 Arizona1615.516314-6L-18-88-7 Los Angeles1317.433534-6L-47-86-9 San Diego1318.419647-3W-17-86-10 Central Division WLPctGBWCL10StrHomeAway Detroit1911.6339-1W-410-49-7 Kansas City1711.60717-3L-110-57-6 Cleveland1514.517327-3W-17-78-7 Minnesota1314.481434-6W-17-66-8 Chicago1317.433655-5W-17-76-10 AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE Rodriguez on field for the first time since hip surgery Associated PressTAMPA Alex Rodriguez is back on the field for the first time since surgery on his left hip almost four months ago. He joined a group of injured New York Yankees starters Monday at the teams minor league complex. The 37-year-old third baseman ran, played catch and hit off a tee. Rodriguez said its like being 8 years old again when I first grabbed a bat. He added its pretty exciting and hes really looking forward to getting back. Rodriguez had surgery Jan. 16 and could return to the Yankees after the All-Star break. A surgeon repaired a torn labrum and impingement in the operation in New York. It feels good to be back out in uniform, Rodriguez said. Its been a rough stretch with the rehab, obviously. Its small bites at a time. Rodriguez is currently taking part in a 30-day rehab schedule setup by his doctors and team officials. Were taking it four weeks at a time, Rodriguez said. Today is one of 30. The upbeat A-Rod signed autographs and took photos with around 40 fans waiting for him outside the players parking lot. Fans driving by stopped their car near the complex driveway and jumped out to have photos taken. I have a lot of unfinished business, said Rodriguez, who struggled offensively late last season. Im really looking forward to getting back on the field close to 100 percent and being who I am. Outfielder Curtis Granderson (broken right forearm), first baseman Mark Teixeira (right wrist), corner infielder Kevin Youkilis (lumbar spine sprain), and catcher Francisco Cervelli (broken hand) are also rehabbing injuries in Florida. Its great seeing him, Teixeira said. Hes just happy to be back, doing some baseball activities. Hes got a big smile on his face right now, which is great. Shortstop Derek Jeter is also on the disabled list with a broken ankle, and is not expected back until after the All-Star break. We always talk about injuries are a part of the game, but this is crazy Rodriguez said. Ive never seen anything like it. But Ive got to tell you, the way those guys are playing up there, the job the front office has done putting these guys together at the last minute, hats off to everyone. A 14-time All-Star, Rodriguez had right hip surgery on March 9, 2009, and returned that May 8. He is due $114 million over the next five years as part of his $275 million, 10-year contract. A-Rod joins the walking wounded Associated PressNew York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez signs autographs for fans Monday after reporting to the teams minor league complex in Tampa. White Sox edge Royals 2-1 in extra innings

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE made double bogey on the 18th. The four or five others, really, somebody happened to beat me. The 2006 Winged Foot, I beat myself. And thats where it hurts most. So that has taken the most to recover from. Montgomerie is the fourth player in the last four years to be inducted into the Hall of Fame without having won a major. The others were Jumbo Ozaki, Jock Hutchison and Christy OConnor Sr. A fifth would be Peter Alliss, who won 23 times on the European Tour, though he was recognized more for his work with the BBC. Ive enjoyed thoroughly my exploits in major championships, Montgomerie said. I just havent been fortunate, or whatever it takes. Ive never, ever stood up and made a winners speech and said I was unlucky. Never. I never will. Theres always a time where a bit of fortunate comes your way, whether it be for you or against your opponent at the time, and it just so happens that I just havent been so-called fortunate to walk through the door. The door has been ajar many a time. I just havent been able to walk through it. So at the same time, if youre talking about regrets of any part of my golfing career, I have none. Absolutely none, he said. Ive done exactly what Ive tried to do. Ive tried 100 percent on every shot, and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesnt. Montgomerie also received 51 percent of the vote on the International ballot. Venturi was a premier amateur out of San Francisco, leading the 1956 Masters until an 80 in the final round. Venturi captured the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional, in such stifling heat that he suffered from severe dehydration and nearly collapsed before he finished. When carpal tunnel syndrome ended his career, he moved to the broadcast booth and enjoyed 35 years of distinguished service to CBS Sports. Venturi later became Presidents Cup captain in 2000. He has been hospitalized in Palm Springs, Calif., for the last two months and could not attend the ceremony. Nantz accepted on his behalf, and then brought out Venturis two sons, Matt and Tim, saying, We need to put the crystal in the hands of the Venturi family. We need the fingerprints on the crystal. Schofield, also selected through Lifetime Achievement, was head of the European Tour from 1975 to 2004. He rode the presence of Europes Big Five Seve Ballesteros, Nick Faldo, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle and Ian Woosnam to get the tour onto a global stage. The tour went from 17 events when he started to 45 events when he retired. He also paved the way for the tour to go beyond continental Europe, and to include the continent in the Ryder Cup. Park joins his father in the Hall of Fame, and the son probably should have been enshrined already. He won the British Open in 1887 and 1889, and then broadened his influence on golf by building clubs, golf courses and writing. His book in 1896, The Game of Golf, was the first written by a golf professional. He later wrote The Art of Putting that was published in 1920. Among the golf courses he built were the Old Course at Sunningdale outside London, Maidstone on Long Island in New York and Olympia Fields outside Chicago. The Dolphins could try again next year for legislative approval, but they may have burned that bridge with their criticism of House Speaker Will Weatherford, who killed the plan by not putting it up for a vote. Hell still be the speaker of the House next year, Dee said, and I dont see him changing his opinion. The stadium owned by Ross opened in 1987, and the Dolphins have argued upgrades are essential to keep Miami competitive in Super Bowl bidding. The city has hosted the game 10 times, and Miami and San Francisco are finalists for the 50th Super Bowl in 2016. The House leadership has made our efforts to bring the Super Bowl back to Miami and South Florida much more difficult, said Rodney Barreto, chairman of the South Florida Super Bowl Host Committee. Without legislative approval, the Dolphins were unable to go forward with a planned May 14 referendum on the issue in Miami-Dade County. The team had sought up to $289 million from an increase in the county hotel tax, and up to $90 million in state sales tax rebates. The bill would have also allowed other professional sports teams in Florida to compete for a share of state tax dollars. The referendum outcome was uncertain, with opponents complaining the plan constituted corporate welfare. The Dolphins had already spent millions in campaign money, with such former players as Marino, Bob Griese and Jason Taylor lobbying on their behalf, arguing voter approval would significantly strengthen Miamis Super Bowl bid. Now San Franciscos the heavy favorite when NFL owners choose the host city May 21. The site of the 2017 Super Bowl will also be chosen, with owners selecting either the runner-up city for the 2016 game or Houston. MIAMIContinued from Page B1 HALL OF FAMEContinued from Page B1 On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS MLB BASEBALL 7 p.m. (SUN) Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays 8 p.m. (WGN-A) St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs 10 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at San Diego Padres NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS SECOND ROUND 7 p.m. (TNT) Indiana Pacers at New York Knicks, game 2 9:30 p.m. (TNT) Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder, game 2 IIHF HOCKEY 1 p.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 IIHF World Championships: Russia vs. United States NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND 7 p.m. (CNBC) Montreal Canadiens at Ottawa Senators, game 4 7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Pittsburgh Penguins at New York Islanders, game 4 9:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Chicago Blackhawks at Minnesota Wild, game 4 10 p.m. (CNBC) Vancouver Canucks at San Jose Sharks, game 4 ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Manchester City FC vs West Bromwich Albion FC RADIO 6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame 7:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BASEBALL FHSAA regional semifinals 7 p.m. Citrus at Springstead 7 p.m. St. John Lutheran at Seven Rivers Christian NBA playoff glanceFIRST ROUND Wednesday, April 24 Oklahoma City 105, Houston 102 Indiana 113, Atlanta 98 San Antonio 102, L.A. Lakers 91 Thursday, April 25 Miami 104, Milwaukee 91 Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76 Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82 Friday, April 26 New York 90, Boston 76 San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89 Golden State 110, Denver 108 Saturday, April 27 Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134, 3OT Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83 Atlanta 90, Indiana 69 Oklahoma City 104, Houston 101 Sunday, April 28 Boston 97, New York 90 Miami 88, Milwaukee 77, Miami wins series 4-0 San Antonio 103, L.A. Lakers 82, San Antonio wins series 4-0 Golden State 115, Denver 101 Monday, April 29 Brooklyn 110, Chicago 91 Atlanta 102, Indiana 91 Houston 105, Oklahoma City 103 Tuesday, April 30 Denver 107, Golden State 100 Memphis 103, L.A. Clippers 93 Wednesday, May 1 Boston 92, New York 86 Indiana 106, Atlanta 83 Houston 107, Oklahoma City 100 Thursday, May 2 Brooklyn 95, Chicago 92 Golden State 92, Denver 88, Golden State wins series 4-2 Friday, May 3 New York 88, Boston 80, New York wins series 4-2 Indiana 81, Atlanta 73, Indiana wins series 42 Oklahoma City 103, Houston 94, Oklahoma City wins series 4-2 Memphis 118, L.A. Clippers 105, Memphis wins series 4-2 Saturday, May 4 Chicago 99, Brooklyn 93, Chicago wins series 4-3 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) Sunday, May 5 Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91, Oklahoma City leads series 1-0 Indiana 102, New York 95, Indiana leads series 1-0 Monday, May 6 Chicago 93, Miami 86, Chicago leads series 1-0 Golden State at San Antonio, late Today Indiana at New York, 7 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 8 Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m. Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Friday, May 10 Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11 Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m. New York at Indiana, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 12 San Antonio at Golden State, 3:30 p.m. Monday, May 13 Miami at Chicago, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 14 New York at Indiana, TBA x-Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 15 x-Chicago at Miami, TBA x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Thursday, May 16 x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m. x-San Antonio at Golden State, TBA Friday, May 17 x-Miami at Chicago, TBA x-Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA Saturday, May 18 x-New York at Indiana, TBA Sunday, May 19 x-Chicago at Miami, TBA x-Golden State at San Antonio, TBA x-Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Monday, May 20 x-Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.NHL playoff glance(x-if necessary) FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) Tuesday, April 30 Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT Anaheim 3, Detroit 1 Wednesday, May 1 Boston 4, Toronto 1 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 0 San Jose 3, Vancouver 1 Thursday, May 2 Ottawa 4, Montreal 2 Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1 Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT Friday, May 3 Montreal 3, Ottawa 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3 Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT Saturday, May 4 Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0 Toronto 4, Boston 2 Anaheim 4, Detroit 0, Anaheim leads series 2-1 Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0, St. Louis leads series 2-1 Sunday, May 5 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT, Pittsburgh leads series 2-1 Ottawa 6, Montreal 1, Ottawa leads series 21 San Jose 5, Vancouver 2, San Jose leads series 3-0 Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT, Chicago leads series 2-1 Monday, May 6 Boston 5, Toronto 2, Boston leads series 2-1 N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3, Washington leads series 2-1 Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT, series tied 2-2 St. Louis at Los Angeles, late Today Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m. Wednesday, May 8 Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at St. Louis, 9 p.m. Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursday, May 9 N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m. x-San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, TBA Friday, May 10 Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m. x-St. Louis at Los Angeles, TBA x-Anaheim at Detroit, TBA Saturday, May 11 Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m. x-Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, TBA x-Montreal at Ottawa, TBA x-Chicago at Minnesota, TBA x-Vancouver at San Jose, TBA Sunday, May 12 x-Detroit at Anaheim, TBA x-Minnesota at Chicago, TBA x-Boston at Toronto, TBA x-Ottawa at Montreal, TBA x-NY Islanders at Pittsburgh, TBA x-Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBA Monday, May 13 x-NY Rangers at Washington, TBA x-Toronto at Boston, TBA x-San Jose at Vancouver, TBA x-Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBA Major League Baseball National League FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Cincinnati-115Atlanta+105 St. Louis-130at Chicago+120 at San Diego-150Miami+140 at Los Angeles-140Arizona+130 at San Francisco-140Philadelphia+130 American League at Cleveland-115Oakland+105 at Baltimore-120Kansas City+110 at Boston-185Minnesota+175 at Tampa Bay-130Toronto+120 Los Angeles-190at Houston+180 Interleague at Pittsburgh-140Seattle+130 at Washington-125Detroit+115 at New York (NL)-170Chicago (AL)+160 Texas-110at Milwaukee+100 New York (AL)-110at Colorado+100 NBA Playoffs FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG at New York6(183) Indiana at Oklahoma City2(186) Memphis NHL Playoffs FAVORITELINEUNDERDOGLINE at Ottawa-145Montreal+125 Pittsburgh-160at N.Y. Islanders+140 Chicago-175at Minnesota+155 at San Jose-170Vancouver+150 BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES Assigned RHP Zach Clark to Bowie (EL). BOSTON RED SOX Placed RHP Andrew Bailey on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 29. Placed LHP Craig Breslow from the 15-day DL. CHICAGO WHITE SOXSent OF Dayan Viciedo on a rehab assignment to Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS Sent OF Michael Bourn to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment. Placed RHP Vinnie Pestano on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 1. Recalled LHP Nick Hagadone from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERSSent LHP Phil Coke on a rehab assignment to Toledo (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS Designated OFs Rick Ankiel and Fernando Martinez for assignment. Reinstated OF J.D. Martinez from the 15day DL. Selected the contract of OF Trevor Crowe from Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled INF/OF Jimmy Paredes from Oklahoma City. Optioned INF Brandon Laird to Oklahoma City. LOS ANGELES ANGELSOptioned RHP Ryan Brasier to Salt Lake City (PCL). Reinstated RHP Mark Lowe from the 15-Day D.L. NEW YORK YANKEES Assigned RHP Cody Eppley outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES Reinstated C Brian McCann from the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Tyler Pastornicky to Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS Designated RHP Kameron Loe for assignment. Optioned OF Dave Sappelt to Iowa (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Ryan Sweeney from Iowa. Recalled RHP Rafael Dolis from Iowa. LOS ANGELES DODGERSPlaced INF Mark Ellis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 27. Reinstated LHP Chris Capuano from the 15day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to terms with LHP Greg Smith on a minor league contract. Placed RHP Roy Halladay on the 15day DL. Recalled LHP Joe Savery from Lehigh Valley (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Optioned OF Jermaine Curtis to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES Placed LHP Clayton Richard on the 15-day DL. Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the 15-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTSPlaced LHP Jose Mijares on restricted list. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Retained physical therapist Angela Gordon. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA Fined Chicago G Marco Belinelli $15,000 for making an obscene gesture during Saturdays game. FOOTBALL National Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed RB DeLeon Eskridge and DE J.D. Griggs. Waived LB Greg Jones and RB Richard Murphy. MINNESOTA VIKINGS Released P Chris Kluwe and WR Nicholas Edwards. Signed OT Brandon Keith and WR Adam Thielen. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Released RB Quentin Hines and LB Ian Sluss. PITTSBURGH STEELERS Announced the retirement of special assistant Joe Greene. Signed OT Guy Whimper and LB Terence Garvin. Released C Ivory Wade and DT Anthony Rashad White. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Named JoJo Wooden director of player personnel and Kevin Kelly director of college scouting. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Signed G Adam Snyder to a two-year contract. Named Ronald Curry assistant offensive coach. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Signed DT Andre Neblett, WRs Jheranie Boyd and Chris Denton, OT Jace Daniels and LB Kalial Glaud. Waived DT Richard Clebert, WR D.J. Monroe and RB Akeem Shavers. Terminated the contractws of G Roger Allen and DE George Selvie. HOCKEY National Hockey League EDMONTON OILERS Reassigned D Nathan Deck from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Stockton (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS Recalled G Martin Jones and G Jean-Francois Berube from Ontario (ECHL) MINNESOTA WILD Recalled D Matt Dumba and F Carson McMillan from Houston (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Signed D Radko Gudas to a three-year contract. TENNIS WORLD TEAMTENNIS Announced Venus Williams and Andy Roddick are part owners of the league. COLLEGE ARKANSAS Announced QB Brandon Mitchell, DE Austin Flynn, S Defonta Lowe and RB Keante Minor will transfer. FLORIDA Announced mens basketball GF DeVon Walker will transfer. GEORGE MASON Named Tajama Abraham Ngongba womens assistant basketball coach. KANSAS Named Kale Pick graduate football assistant for offense. MILWAUKEE Announced the resignation of womens tennis coach Sean McInerney to take same position at Utah State. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Monday in the Florida Lottery: Players should verify winning numbers by calling 850-487-7777 or at www.flalottery.com.Sundays winning numbers and payouts: SUNDAY, MAY 5 Fantasy 5: 4 5 14 16 20 5-of-53 winners$62,148.49 4-of-5280$107 3-of-58,491$9.50 CASH 3 (early) 4 4 2 CASH 3 (late) 1 7 6 PLAY 4 (early) 9 1 6 7 PLAY 4 (late) 8 2 7 9 FANTASY 5 5 12 13 21 36TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 B3 possession to knot the game. Then when Robinson connected on a 20-footer with 1:18 left, the Bulls had the lead and plenty of swagger. With good reason, too. Wade missed a 3-pointer on the next possession, Robinson drove the lane and scored with 45.5 seconds left, and suddenly the Bulls were up 90-86 rendered virtually the entire building silent. James drove against Butler and tried a 12-footer that missed everything, the Bulls got the rebound, Robinson made a free throw to stretch the lead to five and the stunner was complete. Game 1 to the Bulls. And with it, home-court advantage as well. It was a night that started with a celebration and ended with Miamis arena in silence. James was honored before the game, with a brief on-court ceremony to commemorate his fourth NBA MVP award. Everybody here knows about the statistics, NBA Commissioner David Stern said. All I would like to add in presenting this trophy is that LeBron James exemplifies the values of our game. Teamwork, passion, a continued extraordinary desire to improve, and a state of excellence that is unmatched. So thank you LeBron James, for what you bring to our league. James picked up the trophy he was actually presented with it Sunday and made a slow circle with it aloft, as cheers rained down from the soldout stands. Its an unbelievable achievement, but I wouldnt be able to do it without these 14 guys here, our coaching staff and most of all you guys, James said, speaking to the crowd. This trophy is for you. So thank you so much, and lets get ready to go. And with that, the game started. Problem was, no one was ready to go. The Heat missed their first seven shots maybe rust from an eight-day layoff really was a factor and Chicago led 21-15 after an opening quarter where Nazr Mohammed, he of the 2.6-point-per-game scoring average in this regular season, had as many points (two) as any Miami starter did. A 10-0 Heat run in the second gave Miami a 25-23 lead, and the teams were tied at 37 at halftime. The story at that point was James, who wore twice as many pairs of sneakers in the first half (two) as he had field goals (one). He had two points at the break, the lowest of his 120-game postseason career, on just 1 for 6 shooting. James started the game in sneakers that were MVP editions, then returned to his more customary style late in the first half. He opened the second half with a 3pointer, so the shoes were a quick fix. But the Bulls were in for the long haul, and after James made the consecutive three-point plays to open a seven-point lead, Chicago answered with seven straight points, knotting the game at 76-all when Belinelli made a 3-pointer with just under 5 minutes left. Momentum belonged to Chicago, and soon, so did the game. BULLSContinued from Page B1 Associated PressMiami Heat forward LeBron James, right, talks with guard Dwyane Wade Monday during the first half of Game 1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Chicago Bulls in Miami. The Heat lost 93-86.

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B4TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS Bruins earn key Game 3 victory at Toronto Associated PressTORONTO The Boston Bruins spoiled the return of playoff hockey to Toronto, scoring two quick goals in the second period in a 5-2 victory over the Maple Leafs on Monday night. Adam McQuaid, Rich Peverley, Nathan Horton, Daniel Paille and David Krejci, with an empty-net goal with 1:17 remaining, scored for Boston The win came before 19,746 fans inside the Air Canada Centre. Outside, a blueand-white throng watched on a big screen in Maple Leaf Square as playoff hockey returned to Toronto for the first time since 2004. After being beaten 4-2 in Boston on Saturday night, the Bruins upped their game. The Leafs, meanwhile, made mistakes and were punished, although they tried to close the gap with a busy third period in which they outshot the visitors 18-6. The Leafs finished with a 47-38 edge in shots. Game 4 is Wednesday in Toronto, with Boston leading 2-1 in the best-of-seven series. The dominant line of Milan Lucic, Krejci and Horton finished with two goals and six assists. They have combined for 17 points through the first three postseason games, with five goals and 12 assists. Jake Gardiner and Phil Kessel replied for Toronto in a physical game. It was the Leafs first home playoff game since May 4, 2004, when Toronto lost 3-2 in overtime to Philadelphia to lose the conference semifinals 4-2. Fans were rewarded for their patience with free scarves Monday night but not with a win. The last home playoff win came in that same series, a 3-1 victory on April 30, 2004.Rangers 4, Capitals 3NEW YORK Derek Stepan and Arron Asham both scored tiebreaking goals in the third period for the New York Rangers in a 4-3 victory over the Washington Capitals in Game 3. The Rangers finally found their offense and got back into their first-round playoff series. New York still trails 2-1 in the Eastern Conference series, with Game 4 here Wednesday night. Stepan gave the Rangers the lead for good with 6:25 remaining when he deftly tipped in a pass in front from Rick Nash. Asham had put New York in front 3-2 at 2:53, but Jay Beagle got the Capitals even again 4:26 later. Derick Brassard had a goal and two assists for the Rangers, who managed only one goal in the first two losses in Washington and hadnt scored since the first period of Game 1 a scoreless stretch of 124 minutes, 6 seconds.Late Sunday night Sharks 5, Canucks 2SAN JOSE, Calif. Joe Pavelski and Logan Couture each scored twice to spoil Cory Schneiders return to the nets for Vancouver and the San Jose Sharks won their third straight game to open the playoffs, beating the Canucks 5-2. Pavelski scored the first two goals and Couture and Patrick Marleau added scores 9 seconds apart to break the game open early in the third period and give the Sharks a 3-0 series lead. Couture added a second power-play goal early in the third to end Schneiders night and give him a playoff-best four points for the game. Antti Niemi made 28 saves. San Jose will attempt to complete the first series sweep in franchise history at home tonight. Associated PressToronto Maple Leafs forward James van Riemsdyk, left, collides Monday with Boston Bruins defenseman Adam McQuaid as goalie Tuukka Rask looks on during the first period of Game 3 of their NHL Stanley Cup playoff series in Toronto. SPORTS BRIEFSFloridas Walker transferring after freshman yearGAINESVILLE Florida swingman DeVon Walker has decided to transfer after one season of limited playing time. Coach Billy Donovan made the announcement Monday, saying Walker has been granted his release and we hope for the best for him wherever he chooses to go. Walker played in 25 games last season, finishing with 20 points, 17 rebounds and four blocked shots. Hes the second underclassman to leave the Gators this month. Point guard Braxton Ogbueze announced his intention to transfer last week. Florida has one of the nations top recruiting classes headed to Gainesville. It includes guard Kasey Hill and forward Chris Walker, both McDonalds AllAmerica selections. Donovan also landed Rutgers transfer Eli Carter last week. Carter chose Florida over Maryland, looking for a fresh start after coach Mike Rice was fired.Glaud among college free agents signing with BucsTAMPA Rutgers linebacker Kalial Glaud is among four college free agents joining the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The team also announced Monday the signings of North Carolina receiver Jheranie Boyd, Northern Michigan tackle Jace Daniels and Mount Union receiver Chris Denton. Defensive tackle Richard Clebert, receiver D.J. Monroe and running back Akeem Shavers were waived. The contracts of guard Roger Allen and defensive end George Selvie were terminated.Former MLB outfielder Otis Nixon arrestedCANTON, Ga. Former Major League outfielder Otis Nixon has been arrested on drug charges following a weekend traffic stop in suburban Atlanta. A report from the Cherokee County Sheriffs Office said Nixon was pulled over just after midnight Saturday after another driver called police to report a Dodge Ram truck weaving all over the road. The 54-year-old remained in jail Monday afternoon on $11,880 bond. The report said deputies found a pipe to smoke crack cocaine in Nixons pocket and another in the car. They also found several suspected crack rocks. The deputies conducted field sobriety tests and determined Nixon wasnt under the influence of crack cocaine or alcohol. Nixon collected more than 600 stolen bases in 17 seasons from 1983-99. He played for several teams including the Atlanta Braves, Cleveland Indians and Montreal Expos.From wire reports No Celtics, Lakers in second round for first time since 2007 Associated PressThe seconds ticked down on the Boston Celtics season as Game 6 against the New York Knicks slipped away, a ferocious fourthquarter comeback falling just short. Kevin Garnett trudged toward the bench to a standing ovation, and he stopped quickly to whisper in coach Doc Rivers ear. Rivers shook his head, muttering damn as a sixyear run of championship-level basketball in Boston flashed before his eyes. Three thousand miles away in Los Angeles, the stitches had recently been removed from Kobe Bryants left leg and the long, painful rehabilitation of a torn Achilles tendon was only beginning. The Celtics and Lakers are aching, aging and nowhere to be found now that the second round of the playoffs has started. The last time the second round began without at least one of the leagues two marquee franchises was the 2006-07 season, before Pau Gasol arrived in L.A. to help get the Shaq-less Lakers over the hump and before KG landed in Boston to help turn things around. Now both teams head into the offseason far sooner than theyre accustomed to, with big stars on the mend and a lingering question: Does either team deserve headliner status anymore? The Miami Heat are the clear kings these days, the defending NBA champions with the best player in the world. The San Antonio Spurs, who hammered the Lakers in the first round, and even the Knicks, who overcame their own immaturity to overwhelm the older Celtics, also sit higher on the totem pole at the moment. And there are younger stars entering their prime in Oklahoma City, Golden State and with that other team in Los Angeles, the Clippers. The hard decisions for the Lakers and Celtics are just around the corner. The Lakers were a mess all season, firing their coach five games in and limping through a humbling 45-37 year that including injuries to Gasol, Howard and Steve Nash. Then Bryant went down, and there was no chance. The new collective bargaining agreement is also set to unleash an avalanche of luxury tax penalties on the team with the largest payroll in the league next season as much as $85 million if they re-sign Howard and keep Gasol and his $19 million salary. When you lose, everything is in play, GM Mitch Kupchak said. This is the third year in a row that you could argue we didnt live up to or play up to expectations. Kupchaks biggest challenge may be persuading Howard to stay. Bryant may not be fully healthy until January, Nash will turn 40 next season and the rest of the roster is filled with journeymen and role players, taking some of the glitz out of what has been one of the most glamorous destinations in the league for decades. If you just look at the opportunity, which is to play for this franchise in this city, with what this franchise has meant to this city and its accomplishments, thats probably the most any team can offer a player, Kupchak said. The Celtics lost point guard Rajon Rondo to a torn ACL in January, almost a month before the trade deadline. But GM Danny Ainge declined to add another ball-handler, and it cost them dearly in the playoffs against the Knicks. The struggles of both teams to overcome key injuries stands in stark contrast to the Bulls, who have weathered the season-long absence of Derrick Rose and serious health concerns for Joakim Noah, Luol Deng and Kirk Hinrich to advance to the second round. The Spurs won 58 games despite missing Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili for long stretches. Now the Celtics enter yet another summer of deciding whether to bring back Pierce and Garnett, or start over around a rehabbing Rondo and Jeff Green, who played well with the increased minutes. Only this time the finality is much more palpable. Pierce could be traded, while Garnett is considering retirement. You know, we need more, Rivers said. But the key is, for us, you know, do you want to take away to get more? And that will be a decision that will be made later. The last time the second round of the playoffs didnt have at least one of these two teams, the Celtics failed to make it altogether and the Lakers were bounced by the Phoenix Suns in 2007. Ainge brought in Garnett and Ray Allen later that summer and Kupchak landed Gasol from Memphis in a trade, and the two were rekindling a decades-old rivalry in the NBA Finals, and ushering in a new era of popularity for the league, the following June. Those days seem so long ago and far away now. Associated PressBoston Celtics head coach Doc Rivers gives forward Kevin Garnett a pat on the back after taking him out of the game Friday in the final minute of Game 6 of their first-round NBA playoff series against the New York Knicks in Boston. The Knicks won 88-80, eliminating the Celtics from the playoffs. Sharapova advances at Madrid Open Associated PressMADRID Maria Sharapova rallied from a break down in the first set to beat Alexandra Dulgheru of Romania 7-5, 6-2 Monday and reach the second round of the Madrid Open. The second-seeded Russian said she was still adjusting to changing weather conditions in Madrid and the altitude as well after winning the title in Stuttgart last weekend. Madrid is 2,180 feet above sea level. It was a tough match, Sharapova said. I was really happy that I got that break back in the first set and was able to win in two sets. Victoria Azarenka of Belarus also advanced, outlasting Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia 7-6 (8), 7-6 (3). Azarenka, who finished runner-up in Madrid the past two years, is returning from an ankle injury and said it was good to get a tough test right away. I dont think I could have asked for a better match to start after a break, she said. Laura Robson of Britain pulled off the first upset of the tournament, beating fourth-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland 6-3, 6-1 in a second-round match. The 19-year-old Robson arrived in Spain coming off her sixth first-round loss of the year at the Portugal Open but was able to capitalize on her break points against last years Wimbledon finalist. In the mens event, 11th-seeded Nicolas Almagro of Spain advanced when Tobias Kamke of Germany retired injured after losing the first set 6-4. Milos Raonic of Canada, American John Isner and Japans Kei Nishikori were also first-round winners. The top-seeded players in the mens draw, including Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer, have a bye into the second round. Associated PressMaria Sharapova returns the ball Monday against Alexandra Dulgheru during the Madrid Open in Madrid.

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We are all familiar with the excise tax when you buy a product, there is a certain tax that that you incur but up until Jan. 1, 2013, medical devices used during the care of a patient or that are implanted were not taxed. This is now a thing of the past as a result of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. I think we all agree that affordable health care for all of our citizens is an admirable goal, and working toward that is a good idea, but taxing the devices, which the government estimates will raise in excess of $20 billion by 2020, could be a slippery slope, and its impact on health care delivery could be affected. There are three classifications for medical devices. The first one is exempt, and the second one may be exempt depending on how it is marketed, and the third classification will be taxed on total sales rather than profits, which makes the reselling, or black market, not affected, and could interfere with the quality of goods that are utilized in health care delivery as we are all attuned to health care costs, and all trying to keep the costs down. Some specialties will be hit harder than others. For the specialty of Ear, Nose and Throat, devices used to do middle ear surgery and reconstruct middle ear bones and hearing will be affected, as well as hearing aid devices. Even the ear tubes that we put in children to help hearing and evacuate fluid will be affected by this excise tax. This tax will undoubtedly increase the cost of developing new Direct drugs Bashful? Buy the blue pill onlineLINDAA. JOHNSON AP business writerTRENTON, N.J. Men who are bashful about needing help in the bedroom no longer have to go to the drugstore to buy that little blue pill. In a first for the drug industry, Pfizer Inc. told The Associated Press the drugmaker will begin selling its popular erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to patients on its website. Men still will need a prescription to buy the blue, diamond-shaped pill on viagra.com, but they no longer have to face a pharmacist to get it filled. And for those who are bothered by Viagras steep $25a-pill price, Pfizer is offering three free pills with the first order and 30 percent off the second one. Pfizers bold move blows up the drug industrys distribution model. Drugmakers dont sell medicines directly to patients. Instead, they sell in bulk to wholesalers, who then distribute the drugs to pharmacies, hospitals and doctors offices. But the worlds secondlargest drugmaker is trying a new strategy to tackle a problem that plagues the industry. Unscrupulous online pharmacies increasingly offer patients counterfeit versions of Viagra and other brand-name drugs for up to 95 percent off with no prescription needed. Patients dont realize the drugs are fake or that legitimate pharmacies require a prescription. Other major drugmakers likely will watch Pfizers move closely. If it works, drugmakers could begin selling other medicines that are rampantly counterfeited and sold online, particularly treatments for nonurgent conditions seen as embarrassing. Think: diet drugs, medicines for baldness and birth control pills. If it works, everybody will hop on the train, says Les Funtleyder, a health care strategist at private equity fund Poliwogg who believes Pfizers site will attract fence-sitters who are nervous about buying online. The online Viagra sales are Pfizers latest effort to combat a problem that has grown with the popularity of the Internet. In recent years, Americans have become more comfortable with online shopping, with many even buying prescription drugs online. Thats particularly true for those who dont have insurance, are bargain hunters or want to keep their medicine purchases private. Few realize that the vast majority of online pharmacies dont follow the rules. The Internet is filled with illegitimate websites that lure customers with spam emails and professional-looking websites that run 24-hour call centers. A January study by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, which accredits online pharmacies, found only 257 of 10,275 online pharmacy sites it examined appeared legitimate. Experts say the fake drugs such websites sell can be dangerous. Thats because they dont include the right amount of the active ingredient, if any,HEALTH& LIFE Is it possible that the mighty little aspirin could help stop the growth of breast cancer? Well, if recent animal research is any indication, it may well become part of routine breast cancer treatment. Research done in test tubes and in mice which was recently presented at a conference in Boston suggests taking low doses of aspirin on a regular basis may stop breast cancer from growing and spreading. However, as I have warned all of my readers before, read these results with an air of caution, this is Low-dose aspirin may halt cancer See BENNETT/ Page C6 Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE Positive change Cancer is a very complex disease. There are many different kinds of cancer and it may start from many different parts of the body. At the same time, every cancer patient is unique and needs to be treated appropriately. We at my place of business have been managing many cancer patients every year since 1983, here in our own county. We realize our primary responsibility is taking care of our patients. We take it seriously. At the same time, there are many new advances in cancer and many new drugs are now available. These advances are remarkable Taxing medical devices Good morning! Nature Coast EMS is preparing to celebrate National EMS week May 19 through 25 and we are asking for your letters and support. This years theme is One mission. One team. If you have a special story you wish to share, please send us a letter or email telling us how our team members helped you in your time of crisis. If you want to share your story but wish to remain anonymous, just make note of it in your letter. If you have a business in the area with a sign in front, we ask that you post a note of thanks to Nature Coast EMS celebrating National EMS Week and if you are able to offer a special discount on in your store during the week well get the word out. I want pictures, too, so if youre participating, let me know. Team members of Nature Coast EMS risk their lives every day saving lives; your family and friends, your neighbors, and your coworkers. Our EMTs and paramedics provide pre-hospital medicine in the field that begins the continuity of care right through the doors of the hospital. Nature Coast EMS has strong relations with the emergency departments at all area hospitals because it is important when providing the best possible health care with the latest protocols in place. Nature Coast EMS would like Requesting letters of support See LUCAS/ Page C6 See GRILLO/ Page C6 Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT Section CTUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE INSIDE Dr. Ed Dodge /Page C2Dr. Frank Vascimini /Page C5 Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER So you know: T he information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician. See GANDHI/ Page C6 Katie LucasNATURE COAST EMS Associated PressThis photo provided by Pfizer shows Viagra pills. In a first for the drug industry, Pfizer Inc. on Monday told The Associated Press it will sell the erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to patients on its website. See DIRECT/ Page C3 SO YOU KNOW Link to accredited pharmacies: www .nabp.net/programs/ accreditation/vipps/find-a-vipps-online-pharmacy Counterfeit Viagra pills, top and bottom left, are displayed March 2, 2012, alongside real ones, top and bottom right, in a lab at Pfizer in Groton, Conn. 000ERYG Little to no out of pocket expense for most Medicare Patients with secondary insurances. For Appointment Call Toll Free 1-855-Gulfcoast (1-855-485-3262) www.gulfcoastspine.net Get Back Into The Swing Of Life Get Back Into Get Back Into The Swing Of Life The Swing Of Life With Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery With With Minimally Minimally Invasive Invasive Spine Spine Surgery Surgery Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis Spinal Fractures due to Trauma or Osteoporosis Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to: Minimally Invasive Spine Surgeons James J. Ronzo, D.O. Frank S. Bono, D.O. Board Certified, Fellowship Trained

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HPH Hospice will host free 20-minute memory screenings for adults age 50 and older from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 11, and Wednesday, June 12. Participants will meet privately with Jerry Fisher, MSW, program specialist for the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter. While the screening is not considered a diagnostic tool and is not intended for those who have dementia or Alzheimers, it is helpful when it comes to determining if there is a serious memory problem, according to the Alzheimers Association. Screenings will take place at the HPH Hospice Team office at 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza, inside the Memory Mobile. Appointments are required. Call HPH Hospice Team Office at 352-527-4600 for an appointment. CRYSTAL RIVER National Hospital Week is May 12 to 18, with the theme A Guiding Light for Changing Times recognizing the important role hospitals play in their communities. This week celebrates the history, technology and dedicated professionals that make our hospitals beacons of confidence and care. First and foremost, this week is a celebration of people, said Joyce Brancato, chief executive officer of Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center. Its about recognizing the people who work hard to provide superior health care 24/7. Were extremely proud of each member of our staff and we recognize the important role they play in making us a trusted health care partner in our community. Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, a 128-bed general, medical/surgical acute care facility serving Citrus, Levy and south Marion counties, opened its doors in 1978. Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com, Facebook.com/SRRMC or Twitter.com/SRRMC. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers: During May, donors will receive a moustache T-shirt. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, Big Lots, 146 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River. 8:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, May 7, Citrus County School Bus Transportation, 710 N.E. Sixth Ave., Crystal River. 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, Arbor Trail Rehab & Skilled Nursing, 611 Turner Camp Road, Inverness. 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday, May 8, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 1 to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 9, Camp E-Nini-Hassee, 7027 E. Stage Coach Trail, Floral City. 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, May 9, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, May 10, Lecanto High School, 3810 W. Educational Path, Lecanto. Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 11, American Legion Post No. 155, 6585 W. Gulfto-Lake Highway, Crystal River. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, May 12, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, May 13, Walmart Supercenter, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway Inverness. Noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 14, Walmart Supercenter, 3826 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 14, Citrus County School Bus Transportation, 2950 S. Panther Pride Drive, Lecanto. CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center offers the following health education programs presented by board-certified physicians and licensed medical professionals. Website: SevenRivers Regional.com. Call 352-7951234 to register for programs. Pre-Surgery Ortho Camp Having knee or hip replacement surgery? Attend Ortho Camp to learn preand postsurgery exercises, how to use a walker, knee and hip precautions and adaptive equipment that may be needed for activities of daily living at 1 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration required. WomensWorks: Girls Night Out This event is part of a nationwide initiative to educate women about health and wellness opportunities in their community. Arnold is a man who loves gardens. He has had great gardens in Zimbabwe through the years. They can be showplaces, but thats not why he grows them. He grows them for their wonderful nutritional value. He also grows them for their commercial value, and his produce is in much demand in Mutares grocery stores. Shoppers and shopkeepers alike know good produce when they see it. Unfortunately, the drought Zimbabwe suffered in the past decade has put a major crimp in Arnolds gardening efforts. The spring-fed stream that supplied water for his gardens dried up last year for the first time in the memory of village elders. It has not revived, even with the return of rain this rainy season. Chitakatira is a rural farming village scattered across a broad valley between the slopes of two mountain ranges, 10 or 12 miles south of Mutare. Some of the homes and small, two-hectare farms extend up the gentle slopes of one of those mountain ranges. Thats where Arnolds rural home and garden are situated. It is a beautiful area. Challenge of reviving the gardens Arnold has a deep well that could supply the water his gardens need, but it doesnt have a pump. The nearest electric source is a mile or two away. A solar pump would be his best solution, but the price of getting and installing a good solar pump is several thousand dollars beyond his means, so hes had to look for another solution. One of his neighbors has a water source from another small mountain stream. Arnold and Lancelot have become friends. He admired Arnolds gardens when they were thriving. Most of the small farmers in the area grow corn that is ground into mealie-meal (ground corn flour) after harvesting. That is their main crop. Arnold proposed a partnership with Lancelot that would benefit both of them. Arnold would help him develop gardens on his land and supply him with seeds or seedlings needed for these gardens. He would also transport their produce to area markets and manage any transactions involved. Finally, he would supply the hoses or pipes needed to bring water from a spring-fed reservoir to water the gardens. Both Arnold and Lancelot would supply the labor needed to work the gardens. Lancelot liked this plan, and they began putting it into effect a few months ago. Arnold invited me to visit their gardens in early April, and I was well impressed with how much they have already accomplished. The first crops of greens and veggies are nearly ready for harvest, and successive crops are coming along nicely. Theyll have a good supply of produce to use themselves and to market on a continuing basis. Promising potential for community Im focusing on Arnolds gardens for three reasons. The first is the nutritional potential in them is truly remarkable. Plants are the only living organisms that can convert the suns energy into food energy, and they provide the cleanest possible source of food energy. Gardening is also good exercise. If more people adopt the habit of growing good gardens, the advantages this provides will do wonders for their health. The second reason Im excited about Arnolds gardens is the community potential they offer. His neighbors are very interested in his gardens, and as they see the benefits connected with them, they want to try doing something similar. His gardens are models for the community, and he is very happy to help them get started. The third reason for optimism about his gardens is the commercial potential they offer. Arnold is already well known to managers of Mutares grocery stores and they like to stock his produce in their stores. As his community begins to follow his example, there is a nice potential for them to benefit economically, added to any health benefits they gain. Since poverty is a major contributing factor to health problems in developing countries, any economic upgrade will help families in many ways. As Arnold reaps more benefits from his gardening partnership, he plans to install a solar pump in his idle well and begin reviving the gardens on his property. His future goal is to register a trust named Kumakomo Agricultural Trust that will teach interested people of any community the key principles of sustainable gardening. The potential for his family and community is promising. The outlook for improving public health in the area is good! Ed Dodge, M.D., MPH, is a retired physician now living in Texas. Visit his website, www.the poweroflifestyle.com.C2TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE The story of Arnolds gardens in Zimbabwe Dr. Ed DodgePOWER OF LIFESTYLE HealthNOTES See NOTES/ Page C4 B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Medicine Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 213 S Pine Ave. Inverness (352) 560-3000 000ESHJ New Patients & Walk-ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers Primary Medical Care Centers 000EV4R PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 16 DEADLINE: TUESDAY, MAY 7 000EV4U EMERGENCY GUIDE 2013 This years emergency guide is once again being partnered with the Sheriffs Emergency Management Team to promote their May 18th expo as well as hurricane preparation plans for before, during and after the storm. It includes evacuation information, maps for tracking the storm, flood zone map and more. THE RATE INCLUDES AN AD IN TWO PUBLICATIONS As an advertiser, this section really delivers! Two ads for one price Distribution in the Chronicle and at the Expo Highly read content Readers will keep the section for future reference Call your advertising representative to reserve your space. 352-563-5592 Reserve Your Ad Today!

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or contain toxic substances such as heavy metals, lead paint and printer ink. Theyre generally made in filthy warehouses and garages in Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Online buyers are playing Russian roulette, says Matthew Bassiur, vice president of global security at New York-based Pfizer. The factories are deplorable. Ive seen photographs of these places, he says. You wouldnt even want to walk in them, let alone ingest anything made in them. Pfizer, which invented the term erectile dysfunction, has long been aggressive in fighting counterfeiters. It conducts undercover investigations and works with authorities around the globe, with good reason. Counterfeit versions of Viagra and dozens of other Pfizer medicines rob the company of billions in annual sales. Viagra is one of its top drugs, with $2 billion in worldwide revenue last year. And its the most counterfeited drug in the U.S., according to the company. A 2011 study, in which Pfizer bought Viagra from 22 popular Internet pharmacies and tested the pills, found 77 percent were counterfeit. Most had half or less of the promised level of the active ingredient. Viagra is appealing to counterfeiters because it carries a double whammy: Its expensive and it treats a condition with an embarrassment factor. Crooks running the illegal online pharmacies brazenly explain their ultra-low Viagra prices often $1 to $3 a pill by claiming they sell generic Viagra. Generics are copycat versions of brand-name prescription drugs. They can legally be made after a drugmakers patent, or exclusive right to sell a drug, ends. Generic drugmakers dont have to spend $1 billion or so on testing to get a new drug approved, so their copycat versions often cost up to 90 percent less than the original drug. But there is no such thing as generic Viagra. Pfizer has patents giving it the exclusive right to sell Viagra until 2020 in the U.S. and for many years in other countries. Many patients are unaware of that. Dr. David Dershewitz, an assistant urology professor at New Jersey Medical School who treats patients at Newarks University Hospital, says erectile dysfunction is common in men with enlarged prostates, diabetes and other conditions, but most men are too embarrassed to discuss it. He says well over half of his patients who do broach the issue complain about Viagras price. Some tell Dershewitz that they go online looking for bargains because they cant afford Viagra. The few that do admit to it have said that the results have been fairly dismal, but none has suf fered serious harm, he says. For Pfizer, thats a big problem. People who buy fake drugs online that dont work, or worse, harm them, may blame the companys product. Thats because its virtually impossible to distinguish fakes from real Viagra. The vast majority of patients do believe that theyre getting Viagra, said Vic Cavelli, head of marketing for primary care medicines at Pfizer, which plans to have drugstore chain CVS Caremark Corp. fill the orders placed on viagra.com. The sales lost to counterfeits threaten Pfizer at a time when Viagras share of the $5 billion-a-year global market for legitimate erectile dysfunction drugs has slipped, falling from 46 percent in 2007 to 39 percent last year, according to health data firm IMS Health. The reason? Competition from rival products, mainly Eli Lilly and Co.s Cialis the pill touted in those ubiquitous commercials featuring couples in his-and-hers bathtubs in bizarre places. Judson Clark, an Edward Jones analyst, forecasts that Viagra sales will decline even further, about 5 percent each year for the next five years, unusual for a drug in its prime. Clark says he thinks Pfizers strategy will prevent sales from declining, but hes unsure how well it will work. Its a very interesting and novel approach, he says. Whether it returns Viagra to growth is hard to say.Linda A. Johnson is at http://twitter.com/ LindaJ_onPharma.HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 C3 Tips for safe use of eye cosmetics Q:How can I use eye cosmetics safely? A: Eye cosmetics are intended to make eyes more attractive, or in some cases to cleanse the eye area. One thing they shouldnt do is cause harm. Most are safe when used properly. However, there are some things to be careful about when using these products, such as the risk of infection, the risk of injury from the applicator, and the use of unapproved color additives. Eye cosmetics are usually safe when you buy them, but misusing them can allow dangerous bacteria or fungi to grow in them. Then, when applied to the eye area, the cosmetic can cause an infection. In rare cases, women have been temporarily or permanently blinded by an infection from an eye cosmetic. In view of these potential problems, the FDA has provided a checklist of tips for their safe usage. If any eye cosmetic causes irritation, stop using it immediately. If irritation persists, see a doctor. Avoid using eye cosmetics if you have an eye infection or the skin around the eye is inflamed. Wait until the area is healed. Discard any eye cosmetics you were using when you got the infection. Be aware that there are bacteria on your hands that, if placed in the eye, could cause infections. Wash your hands before applying eye cosmetics. Make sure that any instrument you place in the eye area is clean. Dont share your cosmetics. Another persons bacteria may be hazardous to you. Dont allow cosmetics to become covered with dust or contaminated with dirt or soil. Keep containers clean. Dont use old containers of eye cosmetics. Manufacturers usually recommend discarding mascara two to four months after purchase. Discard dried-up mascara. Dont add saliva or water to moisten it. The bacteria from your mouth may grow in the mascara and cause infection. Adding water may introduce bacteria and will dilute the preservative that is intended to protect against microbial growth. Dont store cosmetics at temperatures above 85 degrees F. Cosmetics held for long periods in hot cars, for example, are more susceptible to deterioration of the preservative. When applying or removing eye cosmetics, be careful not to scratch the eyeball or other sensitive area. Never apply or remove eye cosmetics in a moving vehicle. Dont use any cosmetics near your eyes unless they are intended specifically for that use. For instance, dont use a lip liner as an eye liner. You may be exposing your eyes to contamination from your mouth, or to color additives that are not approved for use in the area of the eye. Avoid color additives that are not approved for use in the area of the eye, such as permanent eyelash tints and kohl. Be especially careful to keep kohl away from children, since reports have linked it to lead poisoning. Richard P. Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. DIRECTContinued from Page C1 Richard HoffmannASK THE PHARMACIST 000EQDF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE ADVANCED HEALTH Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA 9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 10A, Crystal River . . . . 352-563-2597 ASSISTED LIVING SUPERIOR RESIDENCES OF LECANTO MEMORY CARE 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-5483 SUNFLOWER SPRINGS ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY 8733 W. Yulee Drive, Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8017 CARDIOLOGY CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC Delfin, Luis MD FACC Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC Kannam, Hari MD Miryala, Vinod MD FACC Nerello, Nishant MD Pasupuleti, Suman MD Rivero, Abel MD Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC Trigo, Gisela MD FACC Walker, Dennis J. MD 760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-4165 308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-8353 601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101, Leesburg . . . . . . 352-315-0627 910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages . . . . 352-751-3356 DENTAL CHRISTIE DENTAL OF MEADOWCREST Beckton, Tedra DMD Tran, Hang DMD 6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River . . . . 877-290-2818 CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES Davila, Alexa DMD Davila, Jose DDS 2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-527-1614 COMPLETE FAMILY DENTISTRY Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA 1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1223 LEDGER DENTISTRY Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA 3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-3443 DERMATOLOGY BAY DERMATOLOGY & COSMETIC SURGERY PA Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD Board Certified Esguerra, David DO FAOCD Board Certified Broughton, Brandi PA-C 7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-503-2002 FAMILY/GENERAL PRACTICE HEALTH & WELLCARE SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD McCollough, Barney PA Tzivanis, James PA 5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-746-1818 HERNANDO MEDICAL CENTER Patel, Shirish MD Mazur, Barbara ARNP 2669 N. Florida Ave., Hernando . . . . . . 352-637-2550 SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS Villacastin, Alex T. MD Co, Alistair W. MD Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC Stawkowski, Lawrence PA 10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs . . . 352-489-2486 ENDOCRINOLOGY CITRUS DIABETES TREATMENT CENTER Christ Medical Center Tawfik, Eihab MD PA 7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-0444 HEALTH EDUCATION TOBACCO PREVENTION FLORIDA HEALTH 120 N. Montgomery Ave. Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-1731 HEALTH PRODUCTS FURNITURE PALACE & MATTRESS WAREHOUSE 3106 S. Florida Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-2999 WHOLESALE SLEEP CENTER 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando . . . . . . . . . . 344-8882 HEARING ADVANCED FAMILY HEARING AID CENTER 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-1775 AUDIBEL HEARING AID CENTERS 5699 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-8000 2036 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . . 352-586-7599 20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon . . . . . . . 52-789-1559 HEARING CONTINUED MIRACLE EAR HEARING AID CENTER Lazio, Brian L-HAS 1801 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River Mall . . . 795-1484 HOME HEALTH SERVICES HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE 4224 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-249-1257 SENIOR HOME CARE 494 S Pleasant Grove Rd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-0150 HOSPICE HPH HOSPICE 3545 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-4600 HOSPITALS CITRUS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-1551 MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala . . . . . . . . . 352-351-7200 REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER BAYONET POINT 14000 Fivay Road, Hudson . . . . . . . . 888-741-5119 INDEPENDENT LIVING INVERNESS CLUB SENIOR APARTMENTS 518 Ella Ave., Inverness . . . . . . 352-344-8477 INTERNAL MEDICINE GIRA S. SHAH, MD 203 S. Seminole Ave., Inverness . . . . . . . . . . 726-7800 NURSING HOMES CYPRESS COVE CARE CENTER 700 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-795-8832 DIAMOND RIDGE HEALTH & REHABILITATION CENTER 2730 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-9500 LIFE CARE CENTER OF CITRUS COUNTY 3325 W. Jerwayne Lane, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-4434 ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY ROBERT BOISSONEAULT ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD Brant, Timothy A. MD Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility 522 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-527-0106 OPHTHALMOLOGY SUNCOAST EYE CENTER Kaplan, George H. OD 221 N.E. U.S., 19, Crystal River . . . . 352-795-2526 ORTHOPEDIC/ SPORTS MEDICINE NATURE COAST ORTHOPAEDICS & SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC Choung, Walter I. MD Hubbard, Jeremiah A. DO 2155 W. Mustang Blvd., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-746-5707 520 S.E. 8th Ave., Crystal River . . . . 352-564-2663 2236 State Road 44 West, Inverness . . . . . 352-344-2663 PHARMACIES BRASHEARS PHARMACY 206 W. Dampier St., Inverness . . . . . . 352-637-2079 471 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto . . . . . . . . 352-746-3420 G & R H EALTHMART PHARMACY 3791 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills . . . . 352-527-3111 PLASTIC RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY FARRIOR FACIAL PLASTIC AND COSMETIC SURGERY CENTER Farrior, Edward H. MD FACS 2908 W. Azeele St., Tampa . . . . . . . . . 813-875-3223 SURGERY PREMIER VEIN CENTER Sharma, Ravi MD 7767 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-621-0777 UROLOGY ADVANCED UROLOGY SPECIALISTS Desai, Paresh G. MD FACS Desautel, Michael G. MD Kumar, Udaya MD FRCS Seneriz, Manuel A. MD Pulice, Frances A. PA 609 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness . . . . . . 352-726-9707 3475 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa . . . . 352-628-7671 PAID ADVERTISING

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Health experts reveal mostwanted facts about breast health, heart disease, incontinence and osteoporosis. Exhibitors from beauty and wellness centers provide product samples and service demonstrations. Healthy, gourmet refreshments provided by our award-winning caterer. 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at Seven Rivers Regional. Program is free; registration required. One-Day Childbirth Education Expectant couples learn about labor, delivery and relaxation techniques, exercising, newborn characteristics and breastfeeding from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 11, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Cost is $30; registration required. Breastfeeding/Infant Care Expectant or new mothers learn helpful techniques for successful breastfeeding as well as basic infant care at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 14, in the Medical Offices Building Community Room. Program is free; registration required. Balance Screenings Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center offers free balance screenings at 1675 S.E. U.S. 19 in the Crystal River Shopping Center (next to Sweetbay). Call 352-7950534 to schedule. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club events. The hospital is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on State Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital.com. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco and Citrus County residents for $20 a year, which includes membership in the HCA national H2U program. May 7 Hearing screening and ear wax removal, 10 a.m. May 8 AARP driving classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 10 Mothers Day Tea, 10 a.m. The Citrus Alliance Against Adult Abuse (C4A) monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. For information, call Judy Stauffer at 352-303-2620. Your help is needed to protect our vulnerable against abuse, neglect and exploitation. Free Stress Buster Day for caregivers of those with Alzheimers, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, at The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road off U.S. 19, Spring Hill. Discussion topics include Alzheimers Disease Update, Stress Reduction and Keeping you Healthy Tai Chi. Reservations are required. Lunch will be provided, as well as chair massages, manicures and more. Call Alzheimers Family Organization at 727-848-8888 or 888-496-8004, or visit www.alzheimersfamily.org or Facebook.com/afo.fl. Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus Inc. will meet the second Thursday monthly in the basement of the Citrus County School Board office in Inverness, 1007 W. Main St. Use the elevator to go to the basement. 8 to 9 a.m. board meeting. 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee, doughnuts, networking. 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. membership meeting. For information, call the office at 352-389-0472 or email substancefree.citrus@yahoo. com. Free Mothers Day Tea from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa, to promote healing and peace for those who have lost their mothers. Share memories of your mother and/or find comfort in similar stories. Bring a photo/memory of your mother to share at the annual event. Tea and cookies will be served. For information or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352-621-1500. SPRING HILL Access Health Care LLC offers lectures in May, at 5:15 p.m. at Access Health Cares main office at 5350 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill, conducted by Maria Scunziano-Singh, M.D. May 9 Joints are holding you together: Take care of them. May 23 Bioidentical hormones are here to say for women and men. Dr. Scunziano-Singhs practice focuses on combining traditional medicine with holistic treatments to maximize patients health care and nutrition. For information and to register, call 352-688-8116. The Nature Coast Lodge Assisted Living Facility in Lecanto offers activities, events and trips open to the public. Raffle tickets for a special Mothers Day basket are being sold for $1 at the facility from now until May 12. The money will go into a special activities fund. The winning ticket will be pulled at the Mothers Day luncheon, with a choice of fried shrimp or baked ham. The public is welcome to attend the luncheon. Reserve a set by May 10 for $6 per person.Tuesday, May 14 trip to Weeki Wachee, $10 per person. Call the lodge by Monday, May 13, to make a reservation.May 17 blood drive from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., offering a tour of the facility. NAMI Citrus offers a 12week Family to Family course to assist families to be better able to cope with mentally ill family members, beginning May 16 in Spring Hill. Call 352-277-1832. HPH Hospice, Healing Peoples Hearts in Citrus County, offers a two-day new volunteer orientation from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 22 and May 24 at its team offices, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the Winn-Dixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH Hospice has been serving residents in Citrus County since 2005, and has provided services in Hernando and Pasco counties since 1984. Hospice volunteers often serve patients and families at the bedside, but they also assist in the office, help raise awareness, contribute to educational programs, provide fundraising support and more. Qualifications needed: Caring heart, positive attitude, extra love to share and a big smile that appears on demand. RSVP or receive information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600. Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Inverness Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.Support GROUPS Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support groups are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers disease. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers. Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. Bereaved Parents of the USA (BP/USA) grief support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced the death of a child, 7 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call Bernadette Passalacqua at 352-746-4664 or visit www. bereavedparentsusa.org. Look Good ... Feel Better, a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-3417741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. SPRING HILL Spinal Cord Injury support group, 5 p.m. second Thursday monthly in the gym at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital. Call Dee Hardee at 352592-7237. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. Womens Breast Cancer Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the second Friday monthly (except July and August), Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in the Allen Ridge Medical Center, County Road 491, Lecanto. Light lunch served. Call Judy Bonard at 352-5274389. Speaker will be Iris Rodgers of Rodman & Fields Dermatologists. Epilepsy support group at the Lakes Region Library, Inverness. Call Lili Jane at 352-344-8765. Mended Hearts of Citrus County, for individuals who have or had cardiovascular disease, as well as caregivers and family members, 10 a.m. the second Friday monthly in the Gulf Room in the Historic Citrus High School; parking and transportation available from CMHS parking lot A2. Speaker: Penny Davis, clinical dietitian at Citrus Memorial, about nutrition needs for cardiac patients. Open to the public. Call Millie King, president, at 352637-5525; or CMHS Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. The Area 13 Family Care Council, 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday monthly at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities office, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44). All persons interested in issues of those with developmental disabilities (autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, spina bifida and intellectual disabilities) are encouraged to attend. Call Karen Huscher at 352-7261445 or isabelfcc13@ yahoo.com. Area 13 covers Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties. There are 15 Family Care Councils with governor-appointed volunteer members, who are individuals with a developmental disability or are a family member. Seeking new members. Contact Huscher at 352-726-1445 or cbettykay @aol.com; facebook.com/ groups/331632140186772/. Website: www.FCCFlorida. org. NAMI-Citrus, locally chartered group of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, meets the second Monday monthly at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, on County Road 486 in Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All those with an interest in mental health issues are welcome. Call 352-341-2273. SPRING HILL Healthy Hearts support group open to anyone looking for information on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30 p.m. the second Monday monthly in the cafeteria conference room at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville. Admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus, 352-597-6333 in Hernando or visit the website www.OakHill Hospital.com. HIV support group 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at Citrus County Health Department, 3700 Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Open to all affected by HIV. Persons attending remain confidential, testing will be anonymous. Reservation not required. Call 352-527-0068, ext. 281, if you have any questions. Nature Coast Multiple Myeloma Support Group 6 p.m. the third Wednesday monthly at the Oak Hill Hospital Partners Club (formerly Spring Hill Enrichment Center) at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50), Brooksville. Free dinner buffet will be served. Contact Herb and Dianne Terry at 352-621-0672 or hterry1@tampabay.rr.com, or Richard Blustein at 352-4284536 or Blustein22@aol.com. SPRING HILL Look Good Feel Better Support Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third Wednesday monthly at the Florida Cancer Specialists, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203, in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call 352-688-7744. Different Strokes for Different Folks stroke support group, 10:30 a.m. to noon the third Thursday monthly in the Inpatient Rehabilitation Multipurpose Room at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River. Call 352-795-1234 for details. Alzheimers caregiver and family support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first and third Thursdays monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-toLake Highway. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. FFRA (Families and Friends Reaching for the Abilities), third Friday monthly at the Key Training Center in Inverness at 130 Heights Ave. Social time and business meeting at 9 a.m. is followed by a speaker at 10 a.m. Lisa Noble from the Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center will talk about wound care, hyperbaric medicine, diabetes and treating wounds. Call Ron Phillips, president, at 352382-7819 or visit www. ffracitrus.org.Weekly meetings R.I. Discovery (Recovery International) Abraham Low self-help systems for mental health depression, obsession, stress, fears, anger. Meetings are 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesdays at Crystal River United Methodist Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave. Call Jackie, 352-563-5182. Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www. NARANONFL.org. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. C4TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE See GROUPS / Page C5 NOTESContinued from Page C2 SPEAKERS AVAILABLE Nature Coast EMS has speakers available for clubs or organizations regarding general ambulance service information, medical alerts program and more. To schedule a speaker, or for information, call Katie Lucas at 352-249-4730, or email at katie.lucas@naturecoastems.org. Seven Rivers Regional Speakers Bureau brings customized programs to clubs, churches and other community organizations. Contact Amy Kingery at 352-795-8344 or amy.kingery@hma.com. The Alzheimers Family Organization has speakers available for your organization or club. This presentation will include basic Alzheimers information and the services and programs the organization offers to the Central Florida community. Call 888-496-8004 or 727-848-8888. SPRING HILL Health Matters Home Care has a Registered Nurse available to do free speaking engagements for your group, club, church or organization. Call 352-686-4493 or 352-686-5593. The Citrus Team of HPH Hospice and its not-forprofit Homecare affiliate, HPH Homecare, provide free, ongoing education to Citrus County residents about their many programs, services and volunteer opportunities. There is no charge for a speaker; the solicitation of funds is never involved. Educational materials are provided at no charge. Call Anne Black, community liaison, at 352-527-4600. CEREC One-Visit Crowns Implants Lumineers and Veneers Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) AAID/ICOI Extractions In-House Specialty Care Root Canal Therapy Periodontal Gum Care Fillings Cleanings Sealants And much more! 352-795-1223 Dr. Richard C. Swanson 1815 S.E. Hwy. 19 Crystal River, FL www.rswansondental.com PROFESSIONAL CONVENIENT PAIN FREE 000ETQI New Patients Free Consults Emergency Care Exceptional Dentistry and Your Comfort is Our Number One Priority! Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances 000ETRD Post Surgery Care Stroke Rehab We Are A Five-Star Rated Facility 000EQCL Inpatient & Outpatient Skilled Care Cardiac Program I.V. Therapy Superior Woundcare Theres no need to leave Citrus County for the Best Rehabilitation (352) 795-8832 700 Southeast 8th Ave. Crystal River *Rating by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. www.cypresscovecare.com Citrus County All Hazards & Information Expo For more information contact the Citrus County Sheriffs Office (352) 249-2707 Are You Prepared? Saturday May 18th 9am 1pm Special Guests: The National Weather Service Special Displays: Hurricane Re-entry Tag Distribution, and More National Guard Armory Crystal River 1851 W. Venable St. www.chronicleonline.com 000E8KV

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For details or a list of meetings, call 352-270-8534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous: If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352-6210599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. AC Group, 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352-489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: Easy Does It, 8 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday; &:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday; The Recovery Room, 8169 S. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Floral City. It Works How and Why, noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. More Will Be Revealed, 8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus Memorial Hospital Historic School House: 135 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Recovery at Work Mens Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Lecanto Church of Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Recovery on the River, 7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to 9 p.m. Friday and Sunday; Lecanto Church of Christ, 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Citrus County Family Resource Centers outreach center: 3848 E. Parsons Point Road, Hernando. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Call the 24-hour Helpline: 352508-1604. Overeaters Anonymous : Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : support for any hurts, habits, hang-ups or addictions. 6:30 p.m. Mondays at Oxford Assembly of God Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in Oxford. Call 352-748-6124. 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352-726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to 7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand small-group time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-6282874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association -Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352688-4537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alz support.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz. org/living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Crystal River Health & Rehabilitation Center, 136 N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River; 2 p.m. third Saturday monthly. Call Christina DiPiazza at 352-795-5044. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-6839009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program: 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support Group: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cyprus Room, at the CMHS Historic Building, 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352229-4202 or Sue at 352-5607918. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352344-6596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-6420962 or 352-527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club; call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/ Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a not-forprofit charitable organization providing comprehensively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care available. Last Wednesday, 11:30 a.m., Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Free respite care available. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Al-Anon meeting 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Lou Block, facilitator. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly, Jerry Fischer, facilitator. Diabetes Support Group 10 a.m. second Monday monthly, with Kim Palmer. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 5:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. ALS Support Group 2 p.m. the third Thursday monthly, with Katie Mitchell. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, with Lillian Rojas. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acutecare beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. More NOTES CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Centers relaunched website, SevenRivers Regional.com, features interactive health tools, a health library and enhanced eventHEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 C5 To save bridge, redo root canal or get surgery Q:Thanks for writing your column weekly. I read it every week and enjoy the way you write. I am 58 years old and have a bridge on the bottom left side that is being held by two teeth. There are two fake teeth between those. My problem is with the back tooth that supports the bridge. My dentist had been telling me about this problem for a while, but since I was in no pain I ignored it. Now that I am in pain, she tells me the tooth is too far gone to be able to save. I am a bit confused, because this tooth had a root canal many years ago. I though once you had a root canal, you shouldnt have pain anymore. She tells me the pain is coming from an infection at the tip of the tooth. I want to save this tooth because, if lost, I lose three teeth the one with the problem and the two fake ones in front of it. Please help. A: I can tell you know what is going on. This is a very uncommon occurrence in dentistry. There are times that teeth with a root canal can have a recurrent abscess at the tip of the tooth in the jawbone. There are two ways to treat this. One is to redo the root canal by cleaning out the old root canal, cleansing the canal and refilling the canal with a new root canal filling. This can be very successful through the use of the new instrumentation available and the medications we now have to kill the bacteria and cleanse the canal system. The other method is to physically remove the infected tissue through a surgical procedure called an apicoectomy. The way of choosing which method is the best for any particular circumstance is multifaceted and too in depth for a column like this. However, it is important to know you can save a tooth like yours in many circumstances. This being said, it is important you are in the right hands. The use of a surgical microscope is imperative for a good result. Most general dentists do not have one of these, so you will likely need to see an endodontist someone whos in this sort of care. I happen to have one of these since I enjoy doing root canals, but even I would send you to an endodontist for this type of care. There are a few other things that might have caused your dentist to say the tooth must be pulled. There could have been a fracture in the tooth somewhere, or there could have been extensive decay that can make the tooth non-restorable even after the infection is treated. As usual, my suggestion is to have a nice heart-to-heart talk with your dentist to find out exactly what is going on and if there are any other options. I hope you find you can save this tooth. Best of luck! Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email them to him at info@MasterpieceDental Studio.com. Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES GROUPSContinued from Page C4 HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES Support group information will list monthly meetings first, as space is available, then weekly meetings. It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the Chronicle about changes to existing listings. To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-related events open to the public or support group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Information relating to professional training or seminars attended by those in the health care industries are considered business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest listings of Sundays Business section. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362-563-5660. Be prepared to leave a detailed message with your name, phone number and the address of the news event. Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions. Publication of submitted information or photos on specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed. See MORE / Page C6 000ETQP 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS

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in the past several years compared to what we had in the past. According to the National Cancer Institute, there are more than 12 million cancer survivors in the United States, and almost 2 million of them have survived for 20 years or longer. The reason cancer survival rates have dramatically increased in the past two decades can be traced directly to clinical research and trials. May is National Cancer Research Month, which provides an opportunity to examine the enormous benefits of clinical trial research. The cures for various types of cancer will all come from clinical research. The patients in oncologic clinical trials are given the best treatment available for their particular type of cancer. In addition to that standard treatment, the patient may be given either a new drug that is being tested or a placebo. No participant is ever given a placebo alone. This is very important to our practice. We have been doing clinical research trials in our office for many years. We have now joined Florida Cancer Specialist or FCS. It is the largest independent oncology/ hematology practice in the United States. It consists of more than 130 physicians, 90 nurse practitioners and it has more than 50 clinical sites. In association with Sarah Cannon Research Institute, one of the nations largest clinical research programs, FCS offers patients access to more national clinical trials than any private oncology practice in Florida. This will bring better cancer care to our patients in the county. I am very happy that this will help my patients. There are many other options for our patients in Citrus County. Overall, I feel that this change will improve cancer care substantially in our county.Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is the volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi @tampabay.rr.com or call 352-746-0707. devices, which could affect research and development as well as deployment of new, more advanced medical devices. This could impact the quality of medicine in the United States in light of the fact that there are other countries actively pursuing our citizens by luring and romancing them to come overseas for medical care as it is cheaper. Now there is a possibility that, if you have to have a medical device implanted, it might be better to leave the United States for that procedure. While the Affordable Care Act is an attempt to level the playing field and deliver health care equitably to everyone, this aspect may be a direct contradiction. I hope our politicians and powers-that-be that are controlling these decisions and issues will keep an open mind and reconsider taxes such as these as they will likely be detrimental to the health care of our citizens. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call 352795-0011 or visit Crystal CommunityENT.com. GRILLOContinued from Page C1 calendar, a monthly blog and email newsletter. Interactive health tools help users learn more about blood pressure, body weight and diabetes. The health library provides the definition, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of common conditions and diseases. The classes and programs Web page provides a detailed listing of current and future health seminars, screenings and community events. These events are educational and often free to attend. To read the monthly blog or receive the email newsletter, visit SevenRiversRegional.com, click on the About tab and the links to the blog and newsletter signup pages. Hospital news and happenings are posted on facebook. com/srrmc and twitter.com/ srrmc, or call HEALTHconnect at 352-795-1234 for information about services and events. Monthly diabetes selfmanagement education classes by Citrus Memorial Diabetes Center at Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center, Sugarmill Woods. These classes, taught by a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, offer an opportunity for those living with diabetes to learn about the importance of physical activity, meal planning and medication. Topics include blood glucose monitoring, problem solving, coping and reducing the risk for diabetes-related complications. To register for a class or to schedule a one-on-one appointment, call 352-341-6110. A physician referral is required. Hospice of Citrus County Inc. offers a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for individuals of all ages who are committed to the hospice philosophy and wish to make a positive impact on the lives of people. The Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift Shoppe is currently seeking those who have an interest in sorting, distributing or operating a cash register. Volunteers are also needed at Herrys Caf. Both are at 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite C., Homosassa. The goal of the Volunteer Department is to provide competent and confident volunteers. All volunteers are required to attend core Volunteer Training Orientation and ongoing in-service trainings throughout the year. Call Volunteer Director Cathi Thompson at 352-5272020. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Facebook or at www.hospiceofcitrus.org. Snyder Pharmacy, 102 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness, offers a drug Take-Back program to help patients safely dispose of medicines that may be dangerous to others and to the environment. Patients of any pharmacy may bring in unused or expired drugs in their original stock containers for free disposal. For information, call 352-3411212. More GROUPS National Osteoporosis Foundation Citrus County Support Group has suspended meetings for the summer. They will resume in September. The Citrus Memorial Diabetes Support Group, 10:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly on the campus of Citrus Memorial Health System in the auditorium. An RSVP is necessary, as refreshments will be served. Call 352-341-6110. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Suncoast Chapter, Cancer Support Group (including Multiple Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no charge and light refreshments are provided. Contact: Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient services manager, at 813-963-6461 ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or visit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society website at www.lls.org. SPRING HILL Stroke Support Group noon the fourth Thursday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Pam McDonald at 352-346-6359. Celiac support meeting for all people who have celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, 10 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday monthly in the Community Room at the Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Ken Kral at 352-6844064 or email KenKral@ msn.com. SPRING HILL Amputee support group 7 p.m. the last Monday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Eva Baker at 352592-7232. Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Quarterly meetings offer information, support and encouragement. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352-527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer InstituteNew Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilitator, at 352-6887744. MOREContinued from Page C5 C6TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE very early research in animals, and may not translate to the same success in humans. The research team, from the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Kansas City and the University of Kansas Medical Center, said tests on cancer cell lines in test tubes and tumors in mice show that aspirin not only significantly slows the growth of cancer cells and shrinks tumors, but also stops tumor cells from spreading to new sites. Their study investigated the effect of aspirin on two types of cancer, including the so-called aggressive triple-negative breast cancer, which does not respond as well to many treatments. Triple-negative breast cancers are so-called because they lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone and Her2/neu. Now, the potential for aspirin to be beneficial in cancer patients is not new. Aspirins effect on cancer was first suggested 20 years ago, and for more than 20 years, since a study in Australia first suggested aspirin may have anti-cancer properties, researchers have been finding the headache drug may prevent and also treat all sorts of cancer. For example, there are reports that colon cancer survival improves with aspirin use, and that aspirin and other commonly used painkillers may also help guard against skin cancer. It has also has been shown to reduce the risk of squamous cell esophageal cancer and prostate cancer. At first it was thought the effect only kicked in after ten years or so, but in 2012, three studies of people in middle age taking low-dose aspirin suggested that the anti-cancer benefits may start after only three years. However, despite all this evidence, the underlying mechanism through which aspirin confers its anticancer benefits have been somewhat difficult to establish. Now this latest study suggests that for breast cancer, it may be that aspirin interferes with the stem cells, immature cells in our body that are believed to fuel the growth and spread of tumors. For example, if chemotherapy does not destroy stem cells, they will eventually start to grow again. In this new study, researchers found that in the mouse model they used, cancer cells treated with aspirin formed no or only partial stem cells. In lab tests, aspirin blocked the growth of two different breast cancer lines. One of the cell lines the researchers used was of what is often called triple-negative breast cancer, which is a less common but much more difficult form of breast cancer to treat. The results were promising, but again, I urge all of you to be cautious. This is incredibly early stage research that, as of now, has not been proven in human studies. But it could be promising for the future. The researchers say aspirin may also improve the effectiveness of current treatments for hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers. In their study, they found aspirin boosted the effect of tamoxifen, which is one of the drugs used used to treat hormone-positive breast cancers. Many people take a daily low dose of aspirin to lower their risk of a further heart attack or stroke, or if they have a high risk of either. But taking aspirin is not without risks. For instance, daily aspirin use can increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and stomach ulcers. Researchers are continuing to investigate whether the advantages outweigh the potential disadvantages. So before you rush out and buy a bottle of 360 to begin taking every day, discuss this with your primary care physician or oncologist.Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a board-certified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@rboi.com. BENNETTContinued from Page C1 GANDHIContinued from Page C1 to recognize our team members and all emergency medical personnel at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Citrus Memorial Health System, Oak Hill Hospital, Bayflite, Aeromed, Regional Medical Center at Bayonet Point, a trauma II center, Shands at the University of Florida, our newest area trauma II center at Ocala Regional Medical Center and the many other wonderful facilities with which we serve. As part of National EMS week, Nature Coast EMS is hosting an intubation rodeo at Whispering Pines Park on May 20 starting at 9 a.m. Twenty five of the most complex timed scenarios will challenge each contestant to obtain the advanced airway. The top three contestants will be awarded trophies. Entry fee is $30 per person and teams of five or more are $25 each. We hope you will join us in celebrating the men and women in emergency medicine during National EMS Week. If you have any questions, email katie.lucas @naturecoastems.org or call 352-249-4730. Mail letters to: Nature Coast EMS, attn: Katie Lucas, 3876 W. Country Hill Drive, Lecanto, FL 34461. One last note to parents of graduating seniors; with all the pomp and circumstance surrounding high school graduation, accidents involving teenagers increase during the month of May so please remind them to be careful on the road, not just graduation night, but always. Be safe, take care and stay well! Congratulations, class of 2013!Katie Lucas is the public information officer at Nature Coast EMS. She can be reached at 352249-4730 or katie.lucas@ naturecoastems.org. Nature Coast EMS is an accredited, nonprofit established in 2000 to provide emergency medical services to Citrus County. Watch Every Minute Counts hosted by Mike Hall, CEO, Nature Coast EMS on WYKE TV at 8 p.m. Tuesdays and 10 a.m. Wednesdays. Nature Coast EMS does not call soliciting donations on behalf of paramedics and EMTs. The Citrus County Professional Paramedics and EMTs Local 365 is a union, and Nature Coast EMS team members do not benefit from any donation to this organization. LUCASContinued from Page C1 Seven Days A Week Rain or Shine Call to see how you can receive 2 Weeks Free 352-563-5655 769452 The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County 000EMV2 000EOUT

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES Choir begins rehearsalsCitrus Community Concert Choir will begin rehearsing for its summer concert series on Tuesday, May 14. Rehearsals are 7 to 9 p.m. in the fellowship hall of Faith Lutheran Church, 935 S. Crystal Glen Drive, Lecanto. This years presentation will be music composed by Sir Andrew Lloyd Weber, including selections from Phantom of the Opera, Cats and more. Concert dates are Sunday, July 28; Friday, Aug. 2; and Sunday, Aug. 4. New singers are always welcome and should arrive at 6:30 p.m. for a brief voicing audition. For more information, call 352-212-1746 or 352628-6452.County Council to convene May 8The Citrus County Council will meet at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 8, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club, 72 Civic Circle. Speakers for the meeting will be a representative from the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park and Citrus County Commissioner Rebecca Bays. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. and refreshments will be available. All are welcome. For more information, email freedomway1@ gmail.com.Computer users to get togetherCrystal River Users Group, a computer club, will meet at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, at the Crystal Oaks Club House, off State Road 44, at 4948 W. Crystal Oaks Blvd., Lecanto. Presenter will be Brigitte Hagg on Learn how to Create GIFs. Haag will show how to make simple animated text, create or modify animated clipart or animate photos. Coffee and refreshments will be served at 6 p.m., with a short meeting at 6:30 p.m., followed by the presentation. CRUG meetings, the second Wednesday monthly, are open and free to everyone. For more information, visit www.CRUG.com. COMMUNITYPage C7TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Precious PawsADOPTABLE Mistletoe Special to the ChronicleMistletoe is a sweet, loving young adult longhaired feline. She is well socialized enjoys a tummy rub and regularly sleeps stretched out full length on her back. She will make a great family pet and wants to be a part of all family activities. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday (closed for Memorial Day weekend, May 23 to 26). Call 352-726-4700 for more information or visit www.preciouspaws florida.com. Learn to play bridge this monthBeginner bridge lessons will begin May 9 to be offered from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays with the Nature Coast Bridge Club at Towne Square Mall, U.S. 19, Spring Hill. For more information, call Mary Ann Dufresne at 352-592-488 whimsey@ atlantic.net.Hospice to host special teaWings Community Education at Hospice of Citrus County will present a Mothers Day Tea from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at the Hospice of Citrus County Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite A, Homosassa. Mothers Day Tea, a free public event, seeks to promote healing and peace for those who have lost their mothers.Share memories of your mother and/or find comfort in similar stories. All are welcome to bring a photo/memory of your mother to share at the annual event. Tea and cookies will be served. For more information, or to make a reservation, call Lynn Miller at 352-6211500.Reserve now for Friends lunchSenior Friends for Life will get together for lunch Monday, May 13, and its monthly meeting at Inverness Golf & Country Club, 3150 S. Country Club Blvd. Registration will begin at 11 a.m., lunch will follow at 11:45 a.m. Choice of entrees are Asian flank steak or chicken cordon bleu. A program will follow with Teddi Rusnak as speaker. Reservations must be made by May 8. Make reservations by calling Myrna Hocking at 352-860-0819, Teddie Holler at 352-746-6518 or Astrid Grant at 352341-0346.Blessing of the Fleet May 11All boat owners and operators are invited to the second annual Blessing of the Fleet from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 11, on Kings Bay. Look for the 22-foot pontoon boat with a green bimini top and the Crystal River Sail & Power Squadron banner on the port side, anchored on Kings Bay north of Buzzards Island. Blessings will be performed by Father Gil Larsen from St. Annes Episcopal Church and Pastor David Bradford from St. Timothy Lutheran Church. For more information, call 352-794-3008. Nordic sons plan smorgasbordThe Sons of Norway, Sun Viking Lodge 607, will meet at 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 10, at Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 6193 Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill. Come join us for our Syttende Mai celebration. There will be a smorgasbord with fiskeboller (fishballs), Kjttkaker (meatballs) and platters of shrimp, cold cuts and cheeses and Norwegian cakes. Cost is $15 for adults and $7 for children 12 to 16; children younger than 12 eat for free. For reservations, call Jan Link at 352-686-6538 or Nellie at 727-846-1584. For more information about the Sons of Norway, call Randi at 352-796-7016 or Elsie at 352-666-2220. As May begins, many organizations prepare for a summer break, but have planned activities for this month. A May Spotlight of Events includes: The Citrus County Model Railroaders meet at 6:30 p.m. today at the Robinson Horticulture Building of the Citrus County Fairgrounds. Call Bob at 352-238-6879. The Circle of Friends Foundation will host the Country Rocks the Canyon Weekend May 10 and 11 at Rock Crusher Canyon, 275 S. Rock Crusher Road in Crystal River, to benefit youth programs. It features Justin Moore, Josh Thompson, Dustin Lynch and Michael Ray and local bands T.J. Brown, Clemons Road and the Jamie Davis Band. Gates open at 2 p.m. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.com. The Citrus County Veterans Coalition yard sale is from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at Our Lady of Fatima Church in Inverness. Sellers may call Dan at 352-400-8952. Yard sales will resume in September. The Citrus County Habitat For Humanity Womens Build is from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 11, at 8741 Discalfani Loop in Crystal River. To participate, call 352563-2744. The Broadway Lights and Vegas Nights Variety Show, sponsored by SnippetCitrus, is at 6 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at the Dunnellon Train Depot featuring Paul and Jackie Stevio and Cote Deonath. Call Jackie at 352527-6902. The Citrus County Boys & Girls Clubs annual Steak and Steak dinner is at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at the College of Central Florida in Lecanto. For reservations, call 352621-9225. The Dunnellon Concert Singers will be in concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, May 12, at Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Admission is free. The Citrus County Retired Educators installation luncheon is at 1 p.m. Monday, May 13, at Mamas Kuntry Kitchen in Inverness. All retired educators and school personnel and guests are invited. For membership information, call membership chairman Ethel Winn at 352795-2533 or President Cindy Pifer at 352-746-2866. The Retired Educators will be in recess until October. The Citrus County 2013 Worlds Greatest Baby Shower is Monday, May 13, at the Citrus County Auditorium. The first session is from 3 to 5 p.m. and the second session is from 6 to 8 p.m. Call 352-228-9047. The public is invited to the May 14 luncheon of the Crystal River Christian Womens Club at noon at the Chet Cole Life Enrichment Center. The Life Cycle of the Butterfly is the special feature by Bobby Vigliotti, and Jan Tombow will bring the inspirational message. For reservations, call Ginny at 352-746-7616. The club will be in recess until September. Our Lady of Grace Church and the Knights of Columbus 6168 will sponsor a blood drive from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 18, in the church parish hall with complimentary breakfast. Call 352-637-2475. The Spotlight of Events column for June information deadline is May 15, by calling me at 352-795-3006 or writing to me at P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423-0803.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. May means concerts, shows, more Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY Special to the ChronicleDo you have room in your heart and home and the ability to provide the daily care for a live in feline? If so, Precious Paws Rescue has the perfect feline partner for you. PPR has several adult and special needs cats that would love to be in a home. They miss living with a special person, curling up on a lap or just gazing out a window. They are up to date on all veterinary care, litterbox trained and socialized. In an effort to move these cats into a more personal home environment, preferably as the only pet in the household, PPR is looking for long-term foster families. Each cat will remain an official PPR foster. All necessary veterinary care, food and litter will be provided by PPR. The foster family will provide shelter and love. These cats are homeless for a variety of reasons the death of an owner, family relocation, or changes in the family structure. If you are a cat lover and unable to adopt or foster, you can help by sponsoring one of the rescued felines with an $18 monthly donation in the selected felines name to Precious Paws Rescue. PPR is an all-volunteer charity organization dedicated to decreasing the number of homeless pets through rescuing, fostering and adopting. PPR sponsors a low-cost spay/neuter program for cats and dogs to further help reduce the number of unwanted pets. For more information, call 352726-4700 and a volunteer will return your call. Stop by the Crystal River Mall Adoption Center from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, and view PPR pets with their individual stories by going online to preciouspawsflorida.com. Wanted: Cat people Precious Paws Rescue needs more fosters for homeless felines Special to the ChronicleAn opportunity to bring the world to Citrus County students is available this summer. 13to 18-year-old students will be coming for two weeks from France, Italy and Germany. Among the activities they will enjoy include snorkeling with manatees, tubing down Rainbow River, going to the beach and experiencing roller skating and bowling. English classes are conducted each morning, and every afternoon an actionpacked activity is planned. The Xplore staff provides transportation to and from each chaperoned excursion. American host siblings are encouraged to participate in all activities. This provides the international students with cultural immersion and offers the host siblings a meaningful and fun way to spend their summer. Volunteer host families are sought to participate in the sessions. They provide room, board, transportation to and from the meeting place and a loving environment for two weeks. The students are looking for a typical American family experience, which can be a mom and a dad, single parents or grandparents. There are two sessions to pick from, or participants can host both sessions. Program dates are July 6 to 14 and July 27 to Aug. 4. For more information, email Program Coordinator Cinda Moore at cinda.moore@xploreusa. org or call 352-302-8300. There will be an information session from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at Central Ridge Library, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. DAWN PETERS/Special to the ChronicleThe Crystal River Raid Civil War re-enactment organization had a successful re-enactment and was able to present a check for $1,500 to the Operation Welcome Home organization, which recognizes service members returning home from the Middle East. Presenting the check are John Porter, treasurer, and Dusty Porter, vice president, of Crystal River Raid. Accepting the check is Barbara Mills of Operation Welcome Home. Helping Operation Welcome Home Students need host families Visits will be in two sessions

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C8TUESDAY, MAY7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.Robert Bresson, a French film director, said, Cinema, radio, television, magazines are a school of inattention: People look without seeing, listen without hearing. Some bridge players are guilty of listening without hearing to the auction. Every bid and most passes supply some information for the attentive player. In todays deal, look at only the West hand and the auction. What would you lead against four hearts? The auction followed a normal path. Norths jump to four hearts showed game-going values with three-card heart support. South was close to a slam-try (imagine Norths having ace-third of spades), but chose to pass. If you use two-over-one game-forcing, North would rebid three hearts. Then the auction might continue four clubs four diamonds (both control-bids) four hearts pass. Yes, here five diamonds makes, but do not make a habit of playing in five of a minor when four of a major is a favorite to succeed. (A defender having ace-fourth of hearts and being able to give his partner a heart ruff in five diamonds is much more likely than a 4-0 diamond break and a defender gaining two diamond ruffs in four hearts.) West should lead a diamond. Since diamonds have been bid and supported, it is highly likely that East is void of the suit. After East ruffs, he will probably shift to a club. South wins with his ace (West signaling with the queen to deny the king) and plays a trump, but West grabs the trick and gives his partner a second diamond ruff. Then East cashes the spade ace to defeat the contract. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 D ooms d ay P reppers Bugged Out Th e 80 s: Th e D eca d e That Made Us Th e 80 s: Th e D eca d e That Made Us P o l ygamy USA (N) PGT a b oo St range Behavior P o l ygamy USA PG (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.DrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Family SecretsFamily SecretsOprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now?Oprah: Where Now? (OXY) 44 123 Bad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubBad Girls ClubFind Me My Man Bad Girls ClubFind Me My Man (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 The Company Men (2010) Ben Affleck. R Thats What She Said (2012, Comedy) Anne Heche. R Mean Girls (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Tina Fey. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Big C: Hereafter MA (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass TimeGearz GGearz GDreamsDreamsTranslogicThe List PG Gearz GGearz G (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Urban Tarzan Worst Tenants (STARZ) 370 271 370 Ali (2001) Will Smith. R Click (2006, Comedy) Adam Sandler. (In Stereo) PG-13 Looper (2012, Science Fiction) Bruce Willis, Emily Blunt. (In Stereo) R Colombiana (2011) Zoe Saldana. (SUN) 36 31 36 The Game 365 Rays Live! (N) MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays. From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. (N) (Live) Rays Live! (N) Inside the Rays Inside the Rays Inside the Rays (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Deep South Paranormal Deep South Paranormal Deep South Paranormal Weird or What? Monsters (N) Weird or What? Parallel Worlds (N) Weird or What? Monsters (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangLaughBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35Brother Rat Little Men (1940, Drama) Kay Francis. NR The Asphalt Jungle (1950, Crime Drama) Sterling Hayden. NR (DVS) Crossfire (1947) Robert Young. NR Out of the Past (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) Deadliest Catch: On Deck (N) Deadliest Catch (N) (In Stereo) Backyard Oil PG Backyard Oil: Ken Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30MediumMediumGypsy Wedding19 Kids-Count19 Kids19 KidsCoupleCouple19 Kids19 Kids (TMC) 350 261 350 Road to Nowhere (2010) Shannyn Sossamon. (In Stereo) R Liberal Arts (2012) Josh Radnor. PG-13 King of California (2007) Michael Douglas. PG-13 House of D (2004) Anton Yelchin. (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Castle Anatomy of a Murder PG Castle XK (In Stereo) PG NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (TOON) 38 58 38 33 RegularRegularJohnny TTeenLooneyAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodAirport Airport Airport Airport The Layover No Reservation (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops PGCops PGPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnRepoRepo (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24Gold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsGold GirlsRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Heartbreak City PG Charmed Reckless Abandon PG CSI: Miami Man Down CSI: Miami Broken Home CSI: Miami A Grizzly Murder CSI: Miami Triple Threat (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20ChrisChrisFunny Home VideosMLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs. (N) (Live) NewsVideos Dear Annie: My husband works at a private college. His male boss had an affair with one of the female directors under him. My husband and his assistant found out about it and, after much deliberation, brought it to the attention of the human resources department. The president of the college was informed, but he only put the two guilty parties on suspension for two weeks. My husband and his assistant still have to work for this man. He constantly undermines them, and it is obvious there is no future for my husband at this college. The affair is still going on, and my husband has told no one else. The spouses are in the dark, too. My husband has only worked for this college for a few years. Until this affair, he loved his job and did it well. Our daughter graduates high school next year, and we were hoping she could attend this school tuition-free. Instead, we may have to move, losing whatever benefits we may have accrued. Should my husband ask for compensation when he leaves, such as some kind of tuition benefit? The president is about to retire and has no interest in moving my husband to a different department. How do we handle this? In a Bind Dear Bind: How does your husband feel about the situation? If his daughter were guaranteed a tuition-free education at this college, would he be able to stick it out for another year or two until she is established? Is the president of the college the only one who can transfer your husband to another department? Would it do any good for him to go back to the human resources department? Please discuss his options, and then let him do whatever he feels is best. We know you have a vested interest in the outcome, but it is his job, and he should make the final decision. Dear Annie: My husband and I have eight grown children between us and an ever-increasing number of grandchildren. We make a good living, but when several of them come home for the weekends, the grocery bills get very high, especially when I have to buy for those with food allergies and unusual preferences. Now that some of our kids have good salaries, whats the best way to say it would be nice if everyone chipped in when we have weekends together? I find it difficult to ask, and some of them get a little annoyed that we would even think they should help. Theyve been known to send requests for the meals they want. Ive thought about sending out an email with the anticipated menus and asking them to let me know whether they would like to bring or prepare any of it. Is that fair? Too Good of a Cook Dear Cook: This is your family, and they are staying the weekend. They should be pitching in at every meal, and you should not be afraid to tell them so. Since they refuse to offer graciously, its fine to send a group email and assign a type of dish (starch, vegetable) to each child. Be upbeat and excited about their contribution to the weekend, and say you cant wait to taste their cooking. They can swap assignments or ask to prepare something else, but if they bring nothing, please do not compensate by cooking it yourself. Simply say youre sorry there will be less to eat. Dear Annie: I read the response from Frank about guests who track snow into the house. His suggestion is for the hostess to let people know in advance that they will have to take off their shoes. Nobody wants snow tracked into their home. If there is snow on the ground, why dont you already know that youll have to remove your shoes at the door? Glass Half Full Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) ICING IGLOO BEWARE SWITCH Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: He practiced the trumpet for weeks before his band tryout, but on the big day he BLEW IT Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. ADOVI SHACO TEBNIT GEEREM Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Print your answer here: TUESDAY EVENING MAY 7, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessThe Voice Contestants perform. (N) Grimm (N) NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Jesse James: American Experience PG CONSTITUTION USA With Peter Sagal TED Talks Education (N) PG Death of the Oceans? % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Jesse James CONSTITUTIONTED Talks EducationWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.The Voice The Live Playoffs, Part 2 Contestants perform. (N) (In Stereo Live) Grimm Kiss of the Muse (N) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Splash (Season Finale) (N) PG Dancing With the Stars (N) PG Body of Proof Dark City (N) PG Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Double Blind (N) (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles Parley (N) Golden Boy Beast of Burden (N) 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) Hells Kitchen Chefs Compete New Girl (N) Mindy Project FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Splash PG Dancing With StarsBody of Proof PGNewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningH.Babers Sr. Place for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Splash (Season Finale) (N) PG Dancing With the Stars (N) PG Body of Proof Dark City (N) PG NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office The Office F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse All In House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidPaidStudioHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half MenEngagementHart of Dixie On the Road Again PG Americas Next Top Model PG Two and Half MenEngagementFriends PG Friends O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Animal Court Citrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Heartland Poker Tour PG Mobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangHells Kitchen New GirlMindyFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPorque el Am.Amores VerdaderosQu Bonito Amor (N)NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars Storage Wars PG Storage Wars (N) American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers American Hoggers (AMC) 55 64 55 A Knights Tale (2001, Adventure) Heath Ledger, Mark Addy. PG-13 The Italian Job (2003) Mark Wahlberg. A thief and his crew plan to steal back their gold. PG-13 The Italian Job (2003) Mark Wahlberg. PG-13 (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedRiver Monsters: Unhooked PG Polar Bears: Edge of Existence A family of polar bears is documented. PG Wild Hawaii (In Stereo) PG Polar Bears: Edge of Existence PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown (N) PG Lets Stay Together Lets Stay Together The Game The Game The Game Lets Stay Together The Game Lets Stay Together (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/OCHousewives/OCMarried to MedicineTardyTardyThe Kandi FactoryHappensTardy (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowAmy Schumer Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (N) Amy Schumer Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) Jim Carrey. (In Stereo) PG-13 Dog and Beth: On the Hunt Cops Reloaded Cops Reloaded (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportTreasure DetectivesThe Car ChasersAmerican GreedMad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers Morgan LiveAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie Gravity Falls Y7 A.N.T. Farm G Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue (2010) G Jessie Jessie GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)E:60 (N) 30 for 30 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49SportsNation (N)NFL Live (N) The Real Rocky30 for 30 30 for 30 E:60 (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48EphesusFaithfulDaily Mass Mother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryThreshold of HopeThoughtWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28Baby Daddy Paul Blart: Mall Cop (2009, Comedy) Kevin James, Jayma Mays. PG Shallow Hal (2001, Romance-Comedy) Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black. Premiere. PG-13 The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Once Around (1991) Richard Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter. (In Stereo) R The Prince & Me (2004) Julia Stiles. A collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. A Guy Thing (2003) Jason Lee. (In Stereo) PG-13 Dr. T & Womn (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 Chopped Chopped Go for It!Chopped Chopped Chopped (N) Chopped (FSNFL) 35 39 35 GameCourtsideCollege Lacrosse MarlinsMLB Baseball: Marlins at Padres (FX) 30 60 30 51How I MetHow I MetTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Soul Surfer (2011, Drama) AnnaSophia Robb, Helen Hunt, Dennis Quaid. Premiere. PG Soul Surfer (2011, Drama) AnnaSophia Robb. PG (GOLF) 727 67 727 LearningPGA TourLive From THE PLAYERS (N) (Live) Live From THE PLAYERS PLAYERS (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Frasier G Frasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2Weight, Nation Weight, Nation Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) James Franco. PG-13 Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (2012) R CandelabraGame of Thrones The Climb MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Trust the Man (2005) David Duchovny, Julianne Moore. (In Stereo) R Crazy, Stupid, Love. (2011) Steve Carell. (In Stereo) PG-13 Real Time With Bill Maher MA Veep MA Campaign (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52HGTV Smart HomeHunt IntlHuntersFlip or Flip or Income Property GHuntersHunt IntlFlip or Flip or (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG Counting Cars PG RestorationRestorationRestorationRestoration (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms Tell All, Part 1 (N) Preachers Daughters Hallelujah Dance Moms Tell All, Part 1 (LMN) 50 119 Teenage Bank Heist (2012, Suspense) Maeve Quinlan, Rosa Blasi. (In Stereo) Walking the Halls (2012, Drama) Jamie Luner, Al Sapienza. (In Stereo) NR Shes Too Young (2004, Drama) Marcia Gay Harden. (In Stereo) (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Cowboys & Aliens (2011) Daniel Craig. NR Forrest Gump (1994) Tom Hanks. An innocent man enters history from the s to the s. A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (2011) R The Jump Off (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsAll In With Chris Rachel MaddowThe Last WordAll In With Chris WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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COMICSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, MAY7, 2013 C9 Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes. (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m. The Big Wedding (R) 11:45 a.m., 5:05 p.m., 8 p.m. The Croods (PG) In 3D. 2:45 p.m. No passes. Oblivion (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Pain and Gain (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 6:45 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Iron Man 3 (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m., 1:20 p.m., 1:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 5:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m., 8:30 p.m. No passes. (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m. The Big Wedding (R) 11:50 a.m., 5:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m. The Croods (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m. Oblivion (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Pain and Gain (R) 12 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Scary Movie 5 (PG-13) 11:45 a.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix LocalRADIO KTYMY SJ N IBMNW BPWSDNKSBX, S KTSXU, XBK KB NWWA BXYJYWE FSKT LBFYM NDNSXJK KTY LBFYMWYJJ. FMSKYM OTSXCN NOTYPYPrevious Solution: I like the idea of often being alone in all aspects of my life. I like to feel lonely. Robert Plant (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-7

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C10TUESDAY,MAY7,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000ER8E 000ER8S SOFABED blue gray color in good condition $100. call 352-257-3870 SOFATABLE quality attractive cream color lacquer measures 55LX 26TX 18 D. $60.00 352-746-1486 TABLEACCENT/END Beveled glass top/brass OVAL28L23W 22H VERYNICE $40. 352-621-0175 TABLE COFFEE/TV DISPLAYBrass with beveled glass top and shelf 47x 18x 26H $50.352-621-0175 TABLE END/ACCENT Brass with beveled glass top 27L23W 22H VERYNICE $40. 352-621-0175 TV STAND metal& glass corner unit $25. 352-422-2164 Two Seater PVC pipe glider, new cushions, leg rests, very good condition $60.00 352-795-0830 WRITING DESK peacon finsh letter desk glass top over inlaid wicker 2 drawers. Legs have pineapple design,purch. at Leaders. Sugarmill $100 740-705-9004 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 Craftsman Rear Tine Tiller, 5HP, $450 obo Murray, 22 4HP Push Mower $60 obo good cond (352) 860-0664 LAWN SPREADER SMALL$15 352-613-0529 Murray Rider Mower40 cut very good condition $275. 352-637-4718 PREFORMED GARDEN POND 4LX3W X18D, ASKING 75.00 OBO INVERNESS 352-560-7857 Riding Lawn mower Murray 19.5 HP, with pull cart, includes extended warrenty $1,000 (352) 464-1128 4 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R $15 EACH 352-613-0529 MENS SUITS SIZE 34X30 & 36X30 $40 EACH 352-613-0529 !!!!! 205/55 R16 !!!!! Nice tread! Only asking $70 for the pair!! (352) 857-9232 *****225/70 R16***** Beautiful tread! Only asking $70 for the pair!! (352) 857-9232 ~~~~235\70 R16~~~~ Great tread! Only asking $70 for the pair!! (352) 857-9232 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 BREAD MAKER Good condition, Otis, $10 (352)465-1616 CHILDRENS IRON HEADBOARD Brand New Metal Headboard, $15 (352)465-1616 COFFEE MAKER & ELECTRIC MIXER $15 FOR BOTH 352-613-0529 CURIO CABINET29W X 60H X 12D. 4 SHELVES GOOD CONDITION $100 (352) 419-4394 CURIO CABINETW/4 SHELVES PECAN WOOD $65 352-419-4394 FILE CABINET 5-DRAWER beige metal upright heavy-duty fireproof in good shape. $50.00 352-746-1486 Firestone Wilderness TIRE, LE, P265-70R-16 for an SUV, $50 352-860-2828 GENERATOR B/S Engine,10 HP,5250 watts.Used once,like new.Paid $650 sell for $400 OBO 352-746-4160 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 GRAYFEMALE CAT,JACK RUSSLE DOG Cat uses a liter box.Dog is house broken,but waits to go outside 1-352-201-4430 INDUSTRIALSEWING MACHINE, Union Special, Style 63400A, Made in USA $130 OBO 352-489-0976 3 Cushion Couch Blue and White Check $200, chair and ottoman Blue Micro Fiber $100. 603-863-9750 3 PC SECTIONAL Gray suede, excellent Condition $300 352-527-8165 BOOKCASE/TV SHELF Dark oak finish 6 adj shelves NICE!! 6H 7L15W $100. 352-621-0175 COFFEE TABLE ORNATE carved med oak finish Good condition $45.00 Pine Ridge 352-270-3909 COUCH Double recliner couch. Light/Dark Brown. 2 years old. Excellent condition. $225.00 352-419-5556 Couch w/recliners at ea. end. blue tones, $325. Tan Recliner $100. good cond. for both 352-341-4902 Dining Rm. Set, table 6 chairs, hutch, buffet, $300. 3 pc. entertainment center/ bookcase/ desk, $100. Excellent condition! (352) 212-6918 (352) 249-8092 DINNING ROOM CHAIRS 4 chairs perfect condition brown tones $50 call 352-257-3870 Electric lift twin bed $50. 2 swivel Pine 24 inch bar stools $20 ea. 3 wood end tables $5. ea. Excel. condition! (352) 212-6918 (352) 249-8092 Entertainment Ctr Lt Wood; White chair $125/both; Twin box spring & mat. w/ rails $75.(352) 795-7254 FOR SALE!Fancy pub tables 30 top & 42 tall Wood mahogany color $75 Each Call 352-344-8840 FURNITURE BEDROOM SET $250.00,LANAI FURNITURE,GRILL,KITCHE N SET,SOFA, 1 ENDTABLE,coffee table best offer 352-201-0275 High End Used Furniture 2NDTIME AROUND RESALES 270-8803,2165 Hy 491 Lazy Boy Leather double reclining sofa $350. Matching reclining chair $350. (352) 382-0485 LOVE SEATAND CHAIR taupe with light colored floral print $50 for set. call 352-257-3870 Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Full $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 MODEL HOME FURNITURE, ASHLEY, Liv. Rm. & Din. Rm. Sets (352) 302-5797 MULTIPURPOSE CABINETS 4 cabinets available $8 each (needs restoring). call 352-257-3870 OVER SIZES CHAIR W/TWIN BED light taupe perfect shape $50. 352-257-3870 PATIO DINING SET44 round table & 4 vinyl strap chairs. Easy care, great shape. $100.00 352-746-1486 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg. $75. 352-628-0808 Rocker ReclinerDk Brown Leather NEW $450 352-382-1570 Round dinette table, w/ 4 chairs on casters $150. Octigone glass top coffee table, $35., Excellent condition! (352) 212-6918 (352) 249-8092 SmlAntiqueRocker for nursing also Antique small Rocker, $135. for both, cash 352-795-0830 APPLIANCES like new washers/dryers, stoves, fridges 30 day warranty trade-ins, 352-302-3030 DRYER $100 in perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call/text 352-364-6504 Maytag Washer & Frididare Dryer Both Heavy Duty $175. for pair (352) 465-3384 WASHER$100 In perfect working condition. 30 day warranty call or text 352-364-6504 COMPUTER DESK W/HUTCH $100 Pull out keyboard. Text for Picture. SMW 586-904-3262 ABSOLUTEAUCTION May 18, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. for Rental Tool Company. Liquidation of rental equipment and inventory. For more information visit www.proteam auction.com. DUDLEYS AUCTION 6AUCTIONS5-9 EstateAdventure 3pm in, 6pm out 98Deville 1 owner 81k, golf cart, Antiques & Collectibles, Furniture, appliances, household, new items great fun @ hall 5-10 Real Estate 3 Inverness Investment Homes, 2 Lots ~ Sold Regardless of Price 10am 401 Ella Ave 125x135 w/home corner Ella &Dorian St RO/RP 11:30am 503 Lake Street 1940s home w/partial restoration dbl fence lot 2pm 203 Pine Street 110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block home, workshop, RO/RP 3pm. 1214 Stowe Street 2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120. 4pm 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot Commercial Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails. www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 BLACKAND DECKER AIRLESS SPRAYER $30 NEVER USED IN BOX INVERNESS 419-5981 BRAD PINCHER $15 TO FINISH BRAD NAILS WITHOUT HAMMER.EXTRA BRAD NAILS 419-5981 CRAFTSMANANGLE GRINDER $35 USED AS POLISHER, GRINDERAND CUTTER EXTRADISCS 419-5981 PAINTER SPRAYER Commercial, Sherman Williams 4900, Excel Condition $500. (352) 249-7212 POWERTOOLS 10 RigidTable Saw 300 13 Rigid Thickness Planer $200. 5500 Watt Generator $250. (352) 419-7364 ROCKWELLBELT SANDER $100 HEAVY DUTYMADE OF METALOLDER STYLE INVERNESS 419-5981 TELEVISION color television in good condition $12 with remote 352-220-4158 YAMAHASPEAKERS SET OF 5 $90 352-613-0529 16GARAGE DOOR Wayne Dalton Insulated 8K Series Meets 120 MPH Wind Code $220 352-726-3730, 352-422-0201 Dell Computer Windows XP, Pentium 4 H/T, key board & mouse, $99 no monitor 352-621-0248 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 55 GALDIESEL/GAS DRUM With Portable Stand $40 352-726-3730 352-422-0201 15 Piece Patio SetDark brown frame biege seats, $400 obo (352) 637-6647 Maintenance AssociateSeeking a full time maintenance assoc. for a senior living community in Inverness, that is responsible and hardworking. Candidate must have previous experience in all phases of apartment maintenance and small appliance repair. Must have own tools. Benefits after 90 days. Please apply online at hr@dewarproperties.com or by faxing to 229-247-1353. NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehiclepreferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap -Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle SINGLE COPY ROUTES AVAILABLEThis is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. come to 1624 Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application. SUMMER WORKGREAT PAY! Immediate FT/PT openings, customer sales/serv, will train, conditions apply, all ages 17+, Call ASAP! 352-600-5449 YARD/HOME MAINTENANCECitrus Springs Ar ea P/T 2-3 days /week. Call 352-522-1109 between 6pm-9pm. Residence Serv CoordinatorP/T 24 hours weekResp include service delivery & referrals. Must have knowledge of available resources and transportation. Strong computer skills req. Qualified candidates send resume and cover letter to Joverstr eet@ chpc2.or g Equal Opportunity Employer www.community housing partners.or g Salon For SaleChair Rental $270 pr month 634-1397/637-3733 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Holland Financial ResourcesHiring and Training InsuranceAgents 352-410-6927 PET CENTERIs Looking for an experienced Master Dog Groomer. Own Equip.. Req. Clean Shop, No drugs. Apply Personally on Thursdays Only 461 NE 1st Terr. Crystal River Upscale Country Club RestaurantNow accepting applications forPart time Breakfast and Lunch Cook.Please apply in person at 505 E Hartford St Tues-Sat between 2:00-4:30 pm. OPTICALSALESCitrus Vision Clinic is seeking sales help for our optical department. No industry experience required; sales experience a must. Incentive based pay.Apply in person. 2332 Hwy 44 W, Inverness, FL. SALES/SERVICE TECHFamily owned and operated Pest Control Business Needed today! Experience preferred will train the right person!clean driving record and valid drivers license a must Email to: jdsmithpest@ gmail.com or call (352) 726-3921 DRIVEROTR SD/LB/FLATBED 2Yrs Exp, ClassACDL (352) 799-5724 Exp. Dispatcher Experienced Service Techw/ Refrigeration Knowledge For AC Co. Must have knowledge of multi county area. Computer exp., be reliable & dependable. Experience only need apply Fax Resume to: 352-860-0757 or Email: aairinc @centurylink.net LANDSCAPE DESIGN CO.Seeking Exp. Help, with Pavers. Must have Dri. Lic. (352) 621-1944 MECHANIC/ BOAT RIGGERApply in Person at Homosassa Marine 3120 S. Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, Fl. 34448 or Mail Resume PLUMBERS WANTEDMust have valid Drivers License Apply at: 4079 S. Ohio Ave, Homosassa Residential Plumbers/HelperPlumbers and Helpers needed for residential community (352) 341-4243 Contact JM Gibson Mechanical SEPTIC SERVICE TECHExperienced, clean CDL, current medical card, call for interview 352-628-0085 CASHIER/COOKLooking for people for food concession help, for local events and also people who want to travel.Adriver license is a plus but not mandatory.Call Perry cell 610-909-3678 or office 407-957-0433 NEEDANEW CAREER?Career Preparation Courses Five W eek Pr ogram Medical Assistant $1,420 T wo W eek Pr ogram: Nursing Assist. $475 Rehab Tech $475 Phlebotomy $475.T A YLORCOLLEGE .EDU (352) 245-4119 WEE CARE DAY CARE CENTERIs now accepting applications for P/Temployment.Child care work exp required Apply M-F, 12pm-2pm, No Phone Calls. Live in House Keeper/Personal AssistantCitrus Springs Area.Resp. include housekeeping, cooking finances & shopping. Salary of $10,000 per year plus living expenses. Owner Travels 6 mo /year. Must like animals. Sent resume with reach number to:tmg2@bellsouth.net. Replacing 19 Yr emp. due to health. I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I CHIRO.ASST.P/Texp. M-W-F 8:30am-6pm T-Th 10am-4pm apply in person 6166 W Hwy 44, CR DENTAL ASSISTANTMust have exp. EFDA Certified. Immediate Openings in our Crystal River Office. We offer a great benefit pkg. please fax re 352-794-6140 or email at VDCSH @hotmail.com Directorof Resident ServicesSenior Solutions DirectorCNAsevery other weekndDishwasherAPPLY AT: Superior Residences of Lecanto Memory Care 4865 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy (352)746-5483 drug free workplace dselsavage@ superioralf.com mbates@ superioralf.com LPN or MEDICAL ASSISTANT/ PHLEBOTOMISTWanted for office based medical practice in Inverness. Experience required. Fax Resume (352) 726-5818 NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 RPSG TECHPT/FTNight Position 13Yrs. Exp, in sleep med. must be reg.by BRPT, current CPR card is req. EOE Call for appt. 386-538-1060 SURGICAL ASSISTANTOur high quality oral surgery practice is seeking a fulltime surgical assistant. Must have dental or medical exp, a caring attitude and be computer savy Benefits incl. health insurance & pension Mail resume to: 6129 W. Corporate Oaks Dr. Crystal River, FL. 34429 Quickie Melody Power Chair, 2008 model, needs work 352-637-2153 Misty MeadowsU-Pick Blueberries OpenThur-Sun 7am-7pm 352-726-7907 www.mistymeadowsblueberryfarm.com Gold Rafael Angel Ring, looks like a coin very sentimental lost in Homosassa pls call 352-628-4404 Hernando ShhTzu Male, light brown, 1yr old, lost in the area of Bonnie pt (citrus hills area) 352-601-7876 Lost Calico Cat Spayed Female brown color w/orange/cream markings with white chest belly & paws, Beverly Hills, Gleason Place Heartbroken Lost on April 6, REWARD 352-527-0302 LOST DARK GRAY MALE CAT Gray w/ White Muzzle White paws, pink nose w/ green eyes. Missing from Humanitarians Parking Lot 4/2/13 on 44 in Crystal River. PLEASE CALL If you have seen him REWARD (352) 382-9303 OR 352-201-0576 LOST-Mens Brown Leather Wallet in Homosassa vicinity of WinnDixie and Walgreens. If found Call (352) 621-7586 NEEDANEW CAREER?Career Preparation Courses Five W eek Pr ogram Medical Assistant $1,420 T wo W eek Pr ogram: Nursing Assist. $475 Rehab Tech $475 Phlebotomy $475.T A YLORCOLLEGE .EDU (352) 245-4119 Salon For SaleChair Rental $270 pr month 352-634-1397 TRAIN FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAREER IN HEALTH CARE!Enrolling Now for ALL PROGRAMS:PRACTICAL NURSING PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PROFESSIONAL NURSING PROFESIONAL NURSING Paramedic Opt. LPN TO ADN NURSING BRIDGET A YLORCOLLEGE .EDU (352) 245-4119 Todays New Ads 4 BF Goodrich Tires & Rims like new, P245s-70-16 $400. 352-613-2333 GOLF CART, Ez go gas, no spark,older work hrs, top, $375, & cart extras $24 315-466-2268 INVERNESS2 bedroom. 2 bath. Over 1200 sf, garage. 1st,last & sec. Community pool.352-464-0919 LOSTCHIHUAHUAPEPPY. WHITE W/ BROWN HAIR ON HIS EARS & HEAD. BIG BLACK SPOTS ON HIS BODY&TAIL. DISAPPEARED ON 5/5 CRYSTAL/BORDER AVENUE. WE LOVE HIM & MISS HIM! CALL JENNIFERAT 352-697-3055 WITH ANYINFORMATION. $100 REWARD FOR RETURN. Mercury97 Grand Marquis very good cond. cold ac, newer tires, ask. $2200. 352-563-1600 Southern Bell Gown 5 layers, strapless, color gold iridescent lots of sparkle, size 16, worn 1 time, $300 (Orig. $500) 352-746-0513 SUZUKI1981 GS1100E, Mint Condition, adult owned, super fast, garage kept, new tires, new seat, Italian fairing, smoke windshield with sissy bar, only 15k orig. mi. many extras serious inquires only $2600. Call 352-489-5932 SYLVAN2001, 820 Elite Fisher, 20ft Pontoon Boat, w/trailer & Yamaha 50HP engine $3700. 352-447-2053 $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or UnwantedCars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Riding Mowers, & MORE 352-270-4087 FREE Cats Free to good loving adult only homes. Rescued older adult cats, all fixed 2 Declawed, (352) 422-6310 FREE FIRE WOODMostly Oak, You Haul Away (352) 419-7862 Free to Loving Home Female Jack Russell Spayed Call after 1pm (352) 419-8686 FREE VW Engine (in parts), 2 benches for VW Bus, dash board & muffler. 352-746-2226 ADiabetic needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, call Mike 386-266-7748 Wanted Single 60-66yr old good looking guy, with pick up truck. Wanting to meet 65 yr. old, Citrus Co. Single Woman Send Response to Blind Box 1829P c/o Citrus County Chronicle, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Wanted.The lady with a bright smile, awesome blue eyes, and short sassy hair. Kids are ok but no more than 2. Can also have grand kids and Ill even allow a puppy. I desire someone who is loving and caring to everyone she meets. Needs to be beautiful all the way thru and have a great outlook on life. Someone with wisdom & intelligence. Someone looking a very long term relationship with a guy that will love and adore her and do his best to fulfill her dreams. If you are the one God appointed to me then please get ahold of me... and bring ice cream. Todays New Ads 2003 MERCURY GRAND MARQUISLS $4,100. 157K miles. Runs great. Cold air. jonkern@ptd.net or 352-613-1738 Bayliner 1984Trophy Cuddy cabin, clean, with trailer, Volvo pente i/o. $2850. READY TO GO! cash only, call Doug 352-564-0855 DODGE1993 Stealth ES: black exterior paint, gray leather seats, sunroof, cruise,AC, power windows and locks, 5 speed manual transmission, 3.0LDOHC V6, 120,500 miles. $3,800. 352-344-0625 FURNITURE BEDROOM SET $250.00,LANAI FURNITURE,GRILL,KITCHE N SET,SOFA, 1 ENDTABLE,coffee table best offer 352-201-0275 Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source!

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TUESDAY,MAY7,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator DONT LET YOUR DRYER START A FIRE! DRYER VENT CLEANING Call1-352-200-2508Dr. Vent1-855-4DR-VENTLocally Owned 15+ Yrs. Lic./ins., Bonded $39Flat Rate No Hidden Costs000E5AE Exp. 5/31/13 PAINTING 352-465-6631 Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior Pressure Washing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000EI6K 000EKOX WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter CleaningFREE ESTIMATES352-503-8465Bonded & Insuredwww.windowgenie.com/springhill 0 0 0 E S I Z HANDYMANRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer VentsAffordable & Dependable Experience lifelong352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 000ESX4 ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed One Day Bath Remodeling In Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate!BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000ETFE 0 0 0 E S 3 V TREE SERVICE 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 3 5 2 3 4 4 2 6 9 6 352-344-2696Licensed & Insured Tree trimming/removal Stump grindingC o m p l e t e T r e e S e r v i c e C o m p l e t e Complete T r e e S e r v i c e Tree ServiceFREE ESTIMATES Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000ETRN Copes Pool & Pavers 000EVK9 LANDSCAPE & SOD7700 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River NOW OPEN Sod Sales/Installed Landscaping Nursery Mulch 257-5410 257-5412 NOW OPEN Sod Sales/Installed Landscaping Nursery Mulch 000EN86 METAL ROOFING Metal RoofingWe Install Seamless GuttersTOLL FREE 866-376-4943 Over 25 Years Experience & Customer SatisfactionLic.#CCC1325497 000EH0P When mopping isnt enough call... TILE CLEANING Mr. Tile CleanerShowers Floors Lanais Pools & Pavers Cleaning & Sealing Grout Painting Residential & Commercial586-1816 746-9868 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also W anted Dead or Alive W ashers & Dryers. FREE PICK UP! 352-564-8179 Adult Family Care HomeAlzheimer Dementia Incontinency (SL6906450) 503-7052 Support & Assistance with/ Shopping, Appts. Errands & Light Housekeeping. Lic. w/Ref. (352) 613-0078 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 AFFORDABLE Top Soil, Mulch, Stone Hauling & Tractor Work (352) 341-2019 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Estates/Auction Services ESTATE SALES Pricing to Final Check W e Ease S tress! 352344-0333 or 422-2316 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 #1 HANDYMAN All Types of Repairs Free EST., SR. DISC. Lic#38893, 201-1483 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 Primary Cleaning **Free Estimates** call Kala 352-212-6817 CLEANING BYPENNY Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. 352-503-7800, 352-476-3820 NA TURE COAST CLEANING Res. Rate-$20 hr. No Time Wasted! 352-564-3947 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 Weekly or just an occasional clean. CallTabitha @ 352-601-2175. All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 SOD SOD SOD & DECORATIVE ROCK *Installation Specialist* John (352) 464-2876 #1 Professional Leaf vac system why rake? FULLLawn Service* Free Est. 352-344-9273 AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE Cuts Starting $15 Res./Comm., Lic/Ins. 563-9824, 228-7320 AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Quality Cuts Lawn Care Budget Plans, Lic/Ins 352-794-4118 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Helpin Hand Grass Man Cut Clean Mulch Edge FREE ESTIMATES! Russell 352-637-1363 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup,hauling. treework 352-726-9570 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 ATYOUR HOMEMower and Small Engine-It s T une Up T ime! 352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 CHRIS SATCHELL PAINTINGASAP 30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref. Insured 352-464-1397 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 Jeffery Upchurch Painting. Res Painting, interior/ext. Free est. Lic/ins (352) 220-0273 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. SOD SOD SOD & DECORATIVE ROCK *Installation Specialist* John (352) 464-2876 ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 D & R TREE SERVICE Lawn & Landscape Specialist. Lic. & Ins. Free Est. 352-302-5641 Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 TREE REMOVAL & STUMP GRINDING Trim/Tree Removal, 55ft. Bucket Truck 10% off-Mention Ad Lic/ins. 352-344-2696 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 (352) 563-5966www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Car Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! 640984A 000ER8K Lecanto Hills 55+ Park Lot rent $240, 2/1, Clean, Fully furn., shed & carport $7,500 61 S Atkins Ter. Call ofc: 352-746-4648 2 Mobile Home Steps for sale48wooden, brand new $250 for both 352-503-7709 CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 FLORAL CITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 INVERNESSto share house, older woman pref. Reference $300 mtly + util. 352-344-4578 1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA 12 x 40 enclosed front, with vinyl window, utiltiy & outdoor shed all appls and some furniture included, lot rent includes water garbage and sewer sm. pets okay, $16,000 863-519-8233 Ext. 11243 Crystal river 2 bedroom. 2 bath. Beautiful home on the lake. Furnished and includes all appliances.A55 plus community. Close to shops. asking $24,900 352-794-4128 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $11,000 or Lease to Own from $199/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 Your world first.Every Dayvautomotive Classifieds HOME-ON-LANDOnly $59,900, 3/2 like new on acre. Tape-n-texture walls, new carpet & appliances,AC & heat! Warranty, $2,350 dwon, $319.22/mo P&I, W.A.C. Owner can finance. Call 352-621-9182 HOMOSASSADbl.Wide 3/2 95% remodeled inside, 1.25 acres half-fenced, recent roofing & siding, 16x16 workshop,must-see! $65,900(352) 621-0192 INVERNESS 4BR/2BA, on Acre on paved road, fenced yard. $3000. down, $417.53 WAC. Call 386-546-5833 Leave Message www.twitter.com/ citruschronicleFollow the HOMOSASSA2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19 352-634-1311 INVERNESS14 x 60 with addition 2/1 1.25 Acres, near wal-mart $475 Mthly 706-473-2184 HOMOSASSA2/1FencedAcre,Addition Huge Deck, Shed $500.mo 352-628-5244 43,900. 3/2,Dblewide. Delivered & set up, New Jacobsen. The only home with a 5 yr. warr., only $500 down and $293.40/ mo. P&I W.A.C. Must See 352-621-3807 BIGUSED HOMES 32x80 H.O.M. $50,900 28x76 H.O.M. $43,500 28x70 ScotBilt $42,500 40x42 Palm Har. $65k 28X70 Live oak $52,500 We Sell Homes for Hnder $10,000 Call & View (352) 621-9183 NEW 3/2JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John L yons @ 800 622 2832 ext 210 for det ails. http://www .p almharbor .c om/model center /plantcity/ INVERNESS55+ park Enjoy the view! 2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent, car port, water, grass cutting included. Call 352-476-4964 for details HERNANDO16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 acres, must see inside, nice & Clean $49,900 (will consider reasonable cash offers) 352-465-1500 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com BEAGLE PUPPIES$125 Crystal River Area 386-344-4218 386-344-4219 Shih-Tzu & Shih-Poo Pups, AvailableRegistered Lots of Colors, Beverly Hills, FL (352)270-8827 Horse QualityHAY(352) 795-1906100 Bales Pick-Up $4.50 200 Bales Pick Up $4.00 This Is Shamrock Hay Horse QualityHAY(352) 795-1906100 Bales Pick-Up $4.50 200 Bales Pick Up $4.00 This Is Shamrock Hay I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 1 Bedroom, 1 bath @$350 inc. H20 Pets considered and section 8 is accepted. Call 352-476-4964 For Details! My name is Ginger, and I have a lot of colors. I was a stay now I am a loving kitten looking for my forever home, is it you. See me @ www.savingangels petrescue. 419-0223 / 726-1006 My name is LuLU. I am about 18 months old and full of energy.Yes I am a Chi. Everything is done, except me being in my forever home. See me@ www.savingangels petrescue.com or call 726-1006 / 419-0223 PAPILLONS: AKC, DOB: 10/27/12, UTD on shots with health certs & guaranteed. Parents on site, Ch. lines, 2 females 3 1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male. All tri color. Other Paps avail 8 mo & up. (386) 496-0876 Shepherd Mix, Her name is Daisy Color is Blond, 3 yrs old, spayed, UTD on Shots Micro Chipped, lovable, house trained, FenceYard Needed moving cant keep needs loving home (863) 661-6220 Shih Poo Puppies, 4 males, 1 female ready 6/9 Yorkshire Puppies 3 males 1 female Ready 5/9 (352) 795-5896 628-6188 evenings Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips Mother pin 14k diamond cut 5 gemstones in 14k $100.00 352-628-4210 WEDDING BAND 14K Ladies size 6-1/2 $100.00 352-628-4210 FISHTANK WITH STAND 35 gallon black stand $25. call 352-257-3870 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ADiabetic Needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, Call Mike 386-266-7748 I BUY AMMO, Also Reloading Supplies & Equip. PAYING $$ Top Prices $$ 352-302-0962 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 LOSTCHIHUAHUAPEPPY. WHITE W/ BROWN HAIR ON HIS EARS & HEAD. BIG BLACK SPOTS ON HIS BODY&TAIL. DISAPPEARED ON 5/5 CRYSTAL/BORDER AVENUE. WE LOVE HIM & MISS HIM! CALL JENNIFERAT 352-697-3055 WITH ANYINFORMATION. $100 REWARD FOR RETURN. Technics KN-750 music keyboard $45. 352-419-4464 AREARUG 7X10 Nice design, no worn spots, Clean $30. Text for picture. SMW 586-904-3262 BICYCLE BOYS SPIDERMAN 12 WITH TRAINING WHEELS $30 352-613-0529 CLUB CAR GOLF CART$, 1,500. Excel. batteries, garage kept, Delivery Avail 352-527-3125 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 EZ Go Golf Cart 1997, runs good, $1,150 Club car Golf Cart $450 352-564-2756 GOLF CART, Ez go gas, no spark,older work hrs, top, $375, & cart extras $24 315-466-2268 GUN & KNIFE SHOWBROOKSVILLE HSC CLUBSat. May 11th 9a-5p Sun. May 12th 9a-4p HERNANDO COUNTYFAIRGROUNDS Admission $6.00 (352) 799-3605 KAYAK CARRIER kayak roof rack $80.00 phone 352-726-6084 MENS BICYCLE 26 balloon tires. RIPCurl Magna. $65.00/ 352-637-5969 TAPERFLEX WATER SKI $25.00 call 352-257-3870 Tennis Racket, stringing machine, electronic Alpha ultra edge, w/6 pt hold excel. cond. $400. obo Recumbent Bike BikeE, 21spd. aluminum 29lbs, excel cond. $400 obo (352) 489-0105 2013 ENCLOSED TRAILERS, 6x12 with ramp, $1975. ** call 352-527-0555 ** BOYS BABYCLOTHES good condition sizes 3 months-3 toddler $ .25 -$2.00 call 352-257-3870 TODDLER CAR SEAT blue good condition $25.00 call 352-257-3870 KitW ood Cabinets 36 sink cab w/ 24 matching side $30; 8 ft center top + dsink, base cab + 4 top wall cab.$60 352-465-1892 MOTORBIKE HELMET Hardly used, good condition, green/ black/ white color, $30 (352)465-1616 OCEANIC VEO 180 AIR/NITROX WRIST DIVE COMPUTER Battery replacement, $100 (352)465-1616 ROCKING HORSE Rocks by rubber, ok condition, $50 (352)465-1616 Southern Bell Gown 5 layers, strapless, color gold iridescent lots of sparkle, size 16, worn 1 time, $300 (Orig. $500) 352-746-0513 STEPLADDER (Wagner) HD 8like new.Used inside only.Cost $119,sell for $80. 352-746-4160 STORAGE SHED 12X20, g/ cond. $1200 U Move (352) 249-7212 TRAVELBAGTravel bag perfect for school or travel $9-352-220-4158 TUB SAFETY HANDRAIL Medline Deluxe $30.00 352-628-4210 Twin Electric Beds in good condition $1200. 352-628-2777 BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. We Also Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 WE BUY US COINS & CURRENCY (352) 628-0477 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR FULL DREDNAUGHT W/EXTAS NICE! ONLY $55 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR Martin D 16 h built 1992, spruce top mahogany back and sides, solid woods nice condition, Martin hard case $ 975 352 527 1245 Estey Discovery II Organ in good condition $10. 352-419-4464 Fender Frontman 15G guitar amp $25. 352-419-4464 Galveston acoustic guitar in good condition $50. 352-419-4464 M-audio key studio keyboard controller $20. 352-419-4464 PIANO Currier console piano Excellent cond. $400., (352) 503-7219 Need a JOB?#1 Employment source is www.chronicleonline.com Classifieds

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C12TUESDAY,MAY7,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 590-0507 TUCRN PUBLIC NOTICE N O T I C E The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will conduct a workshop on Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 6:00pm in the Lecanto Government Building 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida to discuss the CR-491 Corridor Planning Project. This notice informs and notifies the public that members of the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will be in attendance at this workshop. The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees will not vote or conduct business but will actively participate in the discussion. The Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustee(s) will be active participant(s) in the discussion of the CR -491 Corridor Planning Project as it is related to Citrus County Hospital Board business. This notice informs the public that members of the Citrus County Hospital Board of Trustees shall participate in the discussion and this matter will come to the Citrus County Hospital Board for further discussion and action at a later date and time. Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness, Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250. May 7, 2013 589-0603 TUCRM Medical Practice Closing PUBLIC NOTICE Kings Bay Family Care/Dr. Michael B. Mueller It is with deep regret that I must announce that I am closing my medical practice. Please know that I have been honored to serve each and every patient and that you will be missed. If you would like copies of your medical records, or you have any other concerns, please contact me in writing at: Kings Bay Family Care, po box 2444, Crystal River, Florida 34423. Published five (5) times in The Citrus County Chronice, May 7, 14, 21, 28, & June 3, 2013. 590-0514 TUCRN Jones, David E. 2012-CP-000732 NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE CASE NO. :2012-CP-000732 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF DAVID E. JONES, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DAVID E. JONES, deceased, whose date of death was February 13, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012-CP-732; the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 7, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Courtney Jones 10080 South DevonTerrace, Homosassa, FL 34448 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Thomas M. VanNess, Jr., Esq., Florida Bar No. 0857750V anNess & VanNess, P.A., 1205 North Meeting Tree Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 1352-795-1444, tmv@vannesspa.com Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle May 6 & 13, 2013 000ER8Q NISSAN1994, extra cab, 5 spd cold ac, tonneau cover high miles, runs strong $1700. 352-344-0484 TOYOTA2011 TUNDRA CREWMAX 32K MILES, 4WD, LEATHER, S/R $30995. 352-628-5100 WE FINANCE ALLRENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 FORD1997, Explorer XLT $3,495 352-341-0018 FORD1998, Explorer Sport $4,995. 352-341-0018 FORD98, Explorer, XLT, good clean cond. new tires $2,700 obo (352) 637-4676 GMC2009YUKON SLE 32K MILES $24995. 352-628-5100 HONDA2007, Element, Hard to find, cold A/C, runs great, Must See, Call (352) 628-4600 HYUNDAI2004 Santa Fe, new timing belt & seals, high mileage, runs great, $3200. 352-344-0484 LEXUS2010 RX350 LOADED, NAV, PREMIUM RED $29995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2001 4RUNNER SR5 4WD, V6 ONLY73K MILES $9995. 352-628-5100 TOYOTA2002 RAV 4 4WD 74,000 MILES, 4CYL $8995 352-628-5100 TOYOTA 2005 RAV4 92K MILES, 29 MPG $9995. 352-628-5100 2013 DODGEGrand Caravan Wheelchair van with 10lowered floor, ramp and tie downs for more info call Tom 352-325-1306 CHEVY2003 Venture Van, 7 pass. and priced to sell. Call 352-628-4600 For appointment CHRYSLERTown & Country 2005 7-Pass Non-Smoking Mini-Van, Stown Go Seats, 3.8ltr V6, 21mpg Leather, 2nd Owner, Impeccably Maint., Records, All Options. Clean Reliable Family Van. $6,999. obo 352-422-3217 06 SuzukiBurgman 650 w/tryke kit, wh/bl under 5k mi, loaded with extra.$7995 OBO352-621-0248 CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES352-942-3492 Harley Davidson2005,1200C Blk, xtra chrome, hard bags, 12,900 mi., sissy bar, forw ctrls & wshield. $5600 (352) 726-9325 SUZUKI1981 GS1100E, Mint Condition, adult owned, super fast, garage kept, new tires, new seat, Italian fairing, smoke windshield with sissy bar, only 15k orig. mi. many extras serious inquires only $2600. Call 352-489-5932 CHEVY2008, Cobalt, 2 DR, automatic, power windows, power locks, cold A/C, Call for Appointment 352-628-4600 FORD2000, Ranger XLT Lesabre, $3,995. 352-341-0018 FORD2002 MUSTANG GT 69K MILES, LEATHER $8995. 352-628-5100 FORD2004, Mustang, Looking for a sports car? Here it is, 6 cyl. automatic, appointment Only Call 352-628-4600 FORD2005,Focus, Sedan, SES, 25,000 miles. $7,500. 352-341-0018 FORD, Mustang, V6, 5spd manual, gar. kept, GT wheel,s silver, great cond. $3,500 obo (352) 476-7408 HONDA2013 Civic LX, Priced to sell, Serious callers only 352-628-9444 KIAOPTIMAHYBRID EX ONLY3K MILES, LOADED $21995. 352-628-5100 LINCOLN2002, Towncar Executive, Good cond. $5,500 obo 352-628-5451 or 352 601-2214 Mazda2012 3i, 5-door Touring, graphite 7300 mi, ext. warranty exc. cond. $16,388. 727-857-6583 Mercury97 Grand Marquis very good cond. cold ac, newer tires, ask. $2200. 352-563-1600 WE FINANCE ALLRENT-BUY-SELL CARS-TRUCKS-RVs CONSIGNMENT USA US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Oldsmobile1992,Toronado White Diamond, leather int. 124Kmi, FWD 3800 tuned port injection, V6, Meticulously,maintained$3500. (352) 527-3291 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE 2004 DAKOTA4WD CLUB CAB, SPORT $8495. 352-628-5100 DODGE2006 Dakota Quad CAB ST4.7 Liter Magnum R V8A.R.E. Cap, Hitch, 43,000 $9,700.00 352.746.2621 352.746.2621 FORD RANGER1997, Stick shift, bed cap, engine & clutch replaced 2009, brake drums/rotors replaced 2011, cold air, runs great, few small dings. $1700. 352-447-2053. 1997 LincolnTwn Car Light Green, Low mi. new carriage roof, new head line, good tires, cold a/c $3000 352-503-7256 2003 MERCURY GRAND MARQUISLS $4,100. 157K miles. Runs great. Cold air. jonkern@ptd.net or 352-613-1738 2011 Chrysler200 Convert, cherry/tan 22k mi, beautiful car, automatic, $21,950 Firm 352-897-4520 BUICK2005 Century, 4dr 96k mi, power window, lock, cruise control, am/fm/cd asking $4900. 352-302-9217 BUICK 2006 Lacrosse CX 92K MILES, LIKE NEW $8995. 352-628-5100 CADILLAC1999 STS $1,500, minor work needed 352-364-2268 CHEVROLET2003 Corvette 50th anniversary model, miilinium yellow, 28,500 miles, immaculate, loaded,call for details. $24,900 Sugarmill 740-705-9004 CHEVROLET2008, Cobalt LT $6,995. 352-341-0018 DODGE1993 Stealth ES: black exterior paint, gray leather seats, sunroof, cruise,AC, power windows and locks, 5 speed manual transmission, 3.0LDOHC V6, 120,500 miles. $3,800. 352-344-0625 DUDLEYS AUCTION 6AUCTIONS59 EstateAdventure 3pm in, 6pm out 98Deville 1 owner 81k, golf cart, Antiques & Collectibles, Furniture, appliances, household, new items great fun @ hall 510 Real Estate 3 Inverness Investment Homes, 2 Lots ~ Sold Regardless of Price 10am 401 Ella Ave 125x135 w/home corner Ella &Dorian St RO/RP 11:30am 503 Lake Street 1940s home w/partial restoration dbl fence lot 2pm 203 Pine Street 110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block home, workshop, RO/RP 3pm. 1214 Stowe Street 2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120. 4pm 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot Commercial Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails. www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 FORD1999 Crown Victoria 60,800 miles,silver in color,power windows,locks,seat,cruise,tilt wheel,cassette player,newer tires very clean. $3900 o.b.o. 352-257-2590 1989 Merc. 35 HP, NoTilt Good compression good spark, nice shape $695. Newer motor guide, 40lb thrust, foot control., like new $450. (352) 860-0513 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 15 FT BOWRIDERw/55 Johnson, w/tilt, bimini, foot trolling mtr., fish finder, trailer, runs and looks good, $1,200firm 860-0513 1988, 15 FTFiberglass, center console, w/40HP, Johnson, w/tilt, new bimini, trailer, ready to fish, $2,000 860-0513 1994 GRADYWHITE 208ADVENTURE w/cabin,outbd power tilt/trim 150 Yamaha, fish finder, many extras. Very clean, motor needs work, must see. $5,495. 352-503-7928 1998 Sting Ray22 Ft, extra Clean 175 Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab, great for fish/pleasure $7500 352-422-4658 Bayliner 1984Trophy Cuddy cabin, clean, with trailer, Volvo pente i/o. $2850. READY TO GO! cash only, call Doug 352-564-0855 Carolina Skiff24 ft., new motor-41 Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP, trailer. Lots of extras $14,500(352)287-3308 PONTOON2005 18ft Party Pontoon w/ galvanized Trailer. 40hp Yamaha $6995 (352) 650-9059 Seabreezew/trailer, 15tri hull must sell, best offer 352-746-0589 SPEED BOAT1975, w/trailer newly painted, new red custom canvas cover. $2,000. 813-650-4662 SYLVAN2001, 820 Elite Fisher, 20ft Pontoon Boat, w/trailer & Yamaha 50HP engine $3700. 352-447-2053 WE HA VE BOA TS GULF TO LK MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats **(352)527-0555** boatsupercenter.com YACHTMAN1988 22 Pontoon Pontoon 22ft-40hp ELTO-Trailer-New Deck 2006-some new seats fully equipped-under cover 4,300.00 352.746.2621 KEYSTONE RV COMPANY2008 Cougar 5th wheel 33Double slides, wood floors, ducted A/C, large shower, all the extras, like new condition, $21,500. 352-726-6261 2001 Aliner Expedition 18, sleeps 4, Gd Cond w/ A/C, Refrig $4500 (352) 249-6098 2011 ROCKWOOD 20Trailer, like new,1 db bed, slide w/convertable sofa, all appliances,full bath, many extras $13,400 352 860-2701 ROCKWOOD TT31Signature Series. Aluminum frame. Rear queen, 12LR slide. All factory extras + more. Completely equipped (linens, kitchen, tools, spare parts). Ready to go. Immaculate condition, No smoking, no pets. $14,000. 352-637-6262 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. POP-UPCAMPER Coleman Elite, 16 ft opens to 25ft, H/A, 2 K beds, Refig $3600 (352) 344-9589 TRAVELTRAILER 26 2005 Springdale by Keystone with slide, queen bed, sleeps 8, ductedA/C, tub with shower, good condition. $6700 352-464-1622 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 Yellow Stone32tag along $1500 OBO 352-220-6048 4 BF Goodrich Tires & Rims like new, P245s-70-16 $400. 352-613-2333 Tonneau Cover Rugged, 6 feet, folds into 3 sections Asking $250 727-251-7568 VW 2 transmissions, 1 is for a VW bus 746-2226/ 212-1538 $$ TOP DOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot, Hwy 19 LarrysAuto Sales 352-564-8333 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 Room To Roam3/2 ON 2 ACRES Quite Country Setting front porch, Large rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, w/ water & electric, and Steel Carport, Completely Fenced Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area, only 20 Min. to Ocala $132,000352-302-6784 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 SPECIAL New Home in Quiet Neighborhood, 3/2/2 2932 sq. ft. corner lot, on 1 acre, $279,900 Call Barney (352) 563-0116 TONY PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619 tpauelsen@ hotmail.comBuy or Sell now is the time TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com 516 S. TUCK POINT 2/1/1Block Home, Remodeled, New Everything, Canal to Withlacoochee River Priced to Sell Immediately! $64,900 (352) 503-6703 HAVE IT ALLSpring Water, Fish from Dock, Watch the Manatees from porch, walk to festivals, enjoy living in dwntn Crystal River, gated community, 2/2 Condo w/gar. $249,900, owner,lic. RE Broker 352-257-9496 YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties HERNANDOLot for sale (Arbor Lakes 55+) $15,000 OBO 781-864-1906 INVERNESSRENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3/2/2, 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM Im Gorgeous Inside!!! Big & Beautiful, 3/2/2 Near 7 Rivers Golf Course 305 N Venturi Ave $149,900 Call Nancy Wilson For Appt. to see 352-422-4137 Waybright Real Estates, Inc. 3-4BR/ 2BA/ 2-4Car New Roof, Cathedral Ceilings, Fruit Trees, 2 Lots, $145,000. 352-563-9857 3/2/2 POOL HOME New Paint and carpet, Updated Kitchen, REDUCED $133,900352-302-4057 3BR/2BA, Pool, New Cage Recently Remodeled, 4/13 New kit & bath, cabinet. w/ granite, New AC Lots of Extras $155,900 OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5 11A-3P, 352-601-0241 Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. HOMOSASSA 211 Pine St 4BD/3BA. 3000 SF, heated pool, Granite, SSAppliances, Wood, Tile and Carpet. 2 Car Gar, fireplace $235,000 Call 850-585-4026 SMW3/3/2, court yard pool home, FSBO $233K call for appt. no realtors 352-503-2978 Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 GAIL STEARNSyour Gale ForceRealtorTROPIC SHORES Realty 352-422-4298Email: Gail@ gailsellscitrus.com W eb: www. gail sellscitrus.com Low overhead means savings for you! Waterfront, Foreclosures &Owner financing available. I NEEDLISTINGS!I SOLD ALMOST 2-HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath. Office Bldg for sale perfect for Accountants, Chiropractor or insurance office. Corner Lot, fences, great location Approx. 1400 sq ft.Listed to sell by owner 352-746-5079 TERRAVISTAGOLF COURSE LOT on Red Sox Path. Great vistas. 85 ft. frontage on golf course $56,400. Call 352-638-0905 2355 S. Ripple Path Crystal River, 34429 Great Marine Mech, Boat storage and launch site for nearby scallops plus fishing & kayaks, Lgr bldg w/ 3/18rollups office tlr & boat ramp, $169k, finance poss. call 352-634-3862 FOR SALE BYAUCTION2,240 SF Bldg.on .55 Acres, Split into 2 Suites, Zoned CH High Intensity Comm, Large Sign, Great Location Auction held on site 1919 NW US Hwy 19 Crystal River Fl.Thurs. May 16th, 12PMPreview From 11am Sale Day CALL 352-519-3130 Visit American Heritage Auctioneers.com PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 2/1/1 Treated with tender loving care. Freshly painted int/ext Near shoping $43,999 209 S Washington ST Cl Bill 301-538-4840 Nicest 2/1 in Beverly Hills MUST SEE!! You wont find a nicer home in this price range looks and feels brand new with over $25K in upgrades. Large new 12x 24 shed in rear with office and work shop. Completely renovated insulated windows, new oak kitchen cabinets,new bathroom tile, berber carpet, 3D shingles.Large Florida room (can be 3rd bedroom) $54,900 with easy terms. This house shows as new it wont last long! More info here http://www.sharphome.c om/131313 call Troy 352-364-6316 REMODELED 2/1.5/1 NEW: Roof, kitchen, appls, bath, flooring, paint, much more. 1240sf, under AC. $59,900. (352)527-1239 Recently Foreclosed Special Financing Available Any Credit, Any Income 2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft. 6515 S. Tropicana Ave., Lecanto $39,900. Visit: www.roseland co.com\AQF Drive by then Call(800) 282-1550 Homosassa Springs Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn St. Nice Neighborhood. Asking $12,500. (904) 757-1012 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage,Farms Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 212-3559 RCOUCH.com UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. (352) 563-5966www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Washer Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! 640983A ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE INVERNESS1/1 $400-$465 Near Hospital 352-422-2393 HOMOSASSA600 sq ft,On US 19, Across from Wildlife Park352-634-1311 INVERNESS2 bedroom. 2 bath. Over 1200 sf, garage. 1st,last & sec. Community pool.352-464-0919 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 MEADOWCRESTFairmont Villa 3/2/2, beautifully furnished Maintenance free, fireplace in living rm. $900/mo + utilities 352 -746-4116 AVAILABLE NOWCITRUS SPRINGS3/2/2, New Carpet, Near School $725. mo.HOMOSSASA2/1 Duplex $495. RIVER LINKS REALTY 352-628-1616 Homosassa Spg2/2 on canal, new paint,flooring throughout, w/d pets ok $1000 mthly, 619-301-5442 INVERNESSRENT TO OWN!!No Credit Check! 3/2/2, 888-257-9136 JADEMISSION.COM HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 INVERNESSMoorings Condo 2/2/1 water front, part.furn., all appl. low HOA, lawn care and more, screen glass lania, patio w/awning, clear hurricane shutters, $86K or rent opt. 352-344-8493 or 734-529-2146 DUDLEYS AUCTION 6AUCTIONS5-9 EstateAdventure 3pm in, 6pm out 98Deville 1 owner 81k, golf cart, Antiques & Collectibles, Furniture, appliances, household, new items great fun @ hall 510 Real Estate 3 Inverness Investment Homes, 2 Lots ~ Sold Regardless of Price 10am 401 Ella Ave 125x135 w/home corner Ella &Dorian St RO/RP 11:30am 503 Lake Street 1940s home w/partial restoration dbl fence lot 2pm 203 Pine Street 110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block home, workshop, RO/RP 3pm. 1214 Stowe Street 2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120. 4pm 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot Commercial Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails. www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384

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G8Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH 000ERY7 Profiles Health inMedical Nutrition WellnessCitrus CountysAdvertising SupplementMay 7, 2013

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETuesday, May 7, 2013 G7 PROFILESINHEALTH G2Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH Paid Advertisement Hearing problems? Youll want to hear this... 1-800-277-1182 7 Locations in Tampa Bay 000ES1Q New In Citrus Gardner Audiology recently moved its R&D and assembly facilities from the Tampa area to their Crystal River location to offer the residents of Citrus County an unprecedented opportunity to experience the newest technologies in hearing advancements, all in one location. Clients can be tested, fitted and walk out with their choice of the finest hearing appliance in just one visit. After gathering information and personal preferences through their field research studies with over 3,000 patients in the greater Tampa area for the past three years, Gardner Audiology has decided to focus on Central Florida. Through the main facility in Crystal River, they are offering the residents in the counties around Citrus the convenience and combined technology not even offered in any large cities. This facility now contains their plastics lab to mold acrylic inner ear devices and electronics lab to allow for efficient assembly in-house. The skilled professionals can also offer repair of all major brands of hearing aids. Dan Gardner, M.S., knows firsthand about hearing loss. His Oceanography studies were abruptly halted in the 1960s when he sustained a head injury with ear damage while serving in the U.S. Navy. Since that time, Dan has been passionate about helping people improve their hearing. After his discharge from the military, Dan returned to the University of South Florida to earn his graduate degree in Audiology, the Science of Hearing. Innie or Outie? Dan addressed his hearing problem early in life when he began wearing hearing aids. He chooses to wear a virtually imperceptible outer ear device that allows him to effortlessly hear conversation. To address the desire of clients who want an in the ear appliance that is invisible to others, Gardner Audiology is excited to introduce their recent development of a unique customized design that fits entirely inside the ear canal, yet holds all of the technology of the larger outer ear devices. This advanced new hearing aid looks like an inner ear space capsule. Dan Calls his invention the Innie. Consumer preference for a type of hearing aid is a lifestyle choice do you prefer an Innie or an Outie? Who Can Help You? It helps to talk with an educated professional who understands your problem such as an audiologist. Audiologists have earned an advanced university degree. They are not to be confused with a Hearing Ai d Specialist who need only a high school education or GED. As Dan says, Consult with an audiologist because who you see is much more important than the products you buy. Call Gardner The primary mission of Gardner Audiology is still the same after 37 years in Citrus County. Help people solve thei r hearing problems. Enjoy the wealth o f information and free hearing guides, along with the field trial testimonials at: www.gardneraudiology.com Master Audiologist Daniel Gardner, M.S. presently wears a hearing aid that hides outside his ear canal. He used the microscopes in his new Crystal River laboratory to design this miniscule hearing aid that will hide inside the ear canal. Hearing Loss Hurts Are you allowing hearing loss to seriously impact your personal and professional life? It can cause symptoms of irritability, anger, fatigue, stress, memory loss, and depression that slowly leads to isolation and withdrawal. Hearing aids are the best and sometimes only solution for most people suffering from hearing loss. Your quality of life can be improved with better hearing. PAID ADVERTISEMENT THE EARS ARE BACK! Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is located on Donovan A venue in Crystal River just of f Route 486 near Route 44. A few years ago their sign was vandalized and someone stole their trademark: a huge set of ears. Business continued as usual, but people really missed the big ears. Now that the ears have been replaced, it is easy to find Advanced Family Hearing, and there are many reasons to stop in to meet the talented women who have run this business for over 15 years. Owner Jerillyn Clark, is Board Certified and Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who has personally served Citrus County for 28 years. She opened her business with a strong commitment to this area and continues to give back to the county The of fice has been managed by Jackie Ziegler who not only keeps the center running smoothly but is able to make every customer feel like a treasured part of the family Mercedes Boatwright is a Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who really knows her business and her community Mercedes is a fourth generation Citrus County native married to a native commercial fisherman. Y ou will find Advanced Family Hearing heavily involved in all aspects of community service. Jerillyn Clark also has a strong compassion for the people who serve in our armed forces. Her daughter Major Abbi Johnson, is on her third deployment overseas. Major Johnsons goal is to change the face of veterans by reminding people that our vets are not only the honored elderly veterans of previous military battles, but also the young men and women who have sacrificed and served to keep America free. ATTENTION VETS: Advanced Family Hearing continues to honor our veterans by of fering them many free services. V eterans have to travel to Gainesville to receive their hearing devices, and then are required to go back and forth to get them adjusted and fitted, or repaired. Advanced Family Hearing will take care of all of those services with a convenient stop in Crystal River The skilled staf f will fit and adjust your new hearing aids, and also make any in of fice repairs needed for as long as you have them all at no cost. Communication is critical in life. Our jobs, relationships and social interactions are all more stressful when our hearing becomes compromised. Even the action of living independently can be impossible when the ability to hear properly is lost. Nearly 1 in 5 American adults struggle with hearing loss a figure that climbs to 1 in 3 for people over 65. W ith the tremendous advancements in hearing aid technology there is no reason to settle for a diminished quality of life because of hearing loss. Hearing aids come in many common styles, though not every one is right for every individual. Factors such as the wearers level of hearing loss, size of ear canal, and even dexterity issues impact which style of hearing aid is best for you. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center of fers a variety of hearing aids in every style and from most major manufacturers. The specialists will fit and service any hearing aid even if it was not purchased from them. Some of the products include: Behind-the-Ear Hearing Aids In-the-Ear Hearing Aids Receiver-in-Canal Hearing Aids In-the-Canal Hearing Aids Completely-in-Canal Hearing Aids Invisible Hearing Aids In addition to hearing aids, they of fer a wide assortment of Hearing Protection & Personal Listening Devices. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is open Monday Friday 9:00am 4:00pm *A vailable outside standard business hours by appointment.** Come in for a free screening. Call 352/795-1775 000EL Y Z

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETuesday, May 7, 2013 G3 PROFILESINHEALTH G6Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH In home care for longer, healthier, and more purposeful life Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes in-home care to a new level. Since the business opened in 2004, their mission has been to transform day-to-day caregiving into opportunities for meaningful conversation and activities that engage and enrich the lives of seniors physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that the practice of Interactive Caregiving TM contributes to longer, healthier, more purposeful lives for seniors. Comfort Keepers caregivers are well trained, professional caregivers who are set apart by their natural gift of caring for others. To work with Comfort Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent screening and interviewing processes and must show a strong devotion to others. Only a few special people who pass this process go on to complete the training necessary to deliver this special brand of care and become Comfort Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass extensive background checks that exceed both state and franchise requirements and also must complete continuing education. In-home care is a growing need for seniors who desire to stay in their own homes with familiar surroundings, but can no longer take care of the necessary requirements of the home. Sometimes, all that is needed is a little assistance to enable a senior to stay in their own home and function safely for many more years. Whether it is only a few hours a week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at Comfort Keepers make it possible for seniors to continue to live in their own home and enjoy a quality of life that they thought was going to change forever. This care reinforces seniors self value by allowing them to continue their daily activities with as much independence as possible. The focus is providing solutions for the normal transition of aging. In order to achieve the most favorable outcome for each client, Comfort Keepers carefully matches caregivers and clients by personalities, interests, skills and needs. This extra consideration forms the basis of strong, healthful relationships. Comfort Keepers Care Coordinators work as partners with our clients family to provide their loved one a complete inhomecare solution to promote independent living. Comfort Keepers provides companionship and assistance through: Meal Preparation Laundry & Linen Washing Light Housekeeping Grooming & Dressing Support Errand Services Bathing & Hygiene Care Grocery Shopping Respite Care Transportation Alzheimers/Dementia Care All Comfort Keepers caregivers are employees of the company and not independent contractors. All of our caregivers are bonded and covered with Workers Compensation and Liability Insurance. Comforts Keepers is locally-owned and family operated by Deborah and Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively involved in the community and participates and sponsors local organizations like, Chamber of Commerce, Womens Business Alliance, Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters and various health expos. For in-depth information about Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com or stop by the local office at 2244 Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida. Phone: 352-726-4547 Paid Advertisement 2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL (352) 726-4547 www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888 Companionship Escort for Shopping and Meal Preparation Doctors Appointments Laundry Bathing and Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care Medication Reminders Alzheimers/Dementia Care In-Home Care Services that help people maintain full and independent lives We Are Comfort Keepers 000ERY6 Our family is here to give comfort to your family. Gailen, Jennifer & Lindsey discussing quality care. Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager, Gailen Spinka, General Manager and Lindsey Haller, Administrator Deborah & Bart will help you when you call. Deborah Spinka, Office Manager and Bart Haller Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner, Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison, Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Suite B, Crystal River, Florida 795-1775 000ELYT Complete FullT ime Hearing Aid Care We Provide FREE: Second Opinions Hearing Exams In-Office Demonstrations 30-Day Trial Loss & Damage Insurance Lifetime Service and Cleanings Unlimited Computer Adjustments Nationwide Coverage 0% FINANCING 12 Months Same As Cash Most Insurances Accepted FREE Video Otoscope Exam! It Could Only Be Ear Wax Price Match Guarantee Serving Citrus County for Over 28 Years Free Consultation Free With People You Can Trust Confused About Todays Digital Technology? Let Us Answer All Of Your Questions.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETuesday, May 7, 2013 G5 PROFILESINHEALTH G4Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH 000EH06 PAID ADVERTISEMENT Vision changes as you age Changes in your vision can affect the quality of life as you grow older. These changes could be could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called pres byopia. CATARACTS are a normal part of the aging process, but can also be from an injury or from long-term use of steroid medications. Diabetes, smoking and long-term exposure to sunlight can also cause cataracts. A cataract is when the natural lens of the eye becomes cloudy, when things begin to look yellowish or even foggy. Seeing through a cloudy lens is like looking through a fogged-up window. The lens in the eye works similar to a camera lens; the crystalline lens focuses the light that enters the eye as it travels to the retina. Vision becomes blurry or dark and colors become dull. Cataracts usually a ffect people over the age of 60, and are the leading cause of treatable vision loss in adults. The good news is cataract surgery is one of the safest, easiest and most commonly per formed surgical pro cedure with over 15 million each year. Innovative technology has provided patients with a choice to choose a lens implant that meets their specific vision needs and can possibly reduce or eliminate the need for glasses. At the Suncoast Eye Center, cata racts are treated with the most advanced surgical procedure available: small incision, no-stitch surgery. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman remove the clouded natural lens of the eye and replace it with an advanced, premium artificial lens implant of your choice. Surgery is often timed so that one eye has adequate vision while the sur gical eye heals. STANDARD LENS this lens gives you sharp distance vision, but glasses are needed for closer objects. TORIC LENS this lens is best for patients with a high degree of astigmatism, it provides excellent dis tant vision but will often require the need for glasses for near and mid range distance activities. BLENDED VISION this will give you a greater range of vision without the need for glasses. This is also known as MONO VISION ; your dominant eye is for distance and the non-dominant eye is for near vision. MULTIFOCAL LENSES this unique lens is proven to provide excellent vision at near, intermediate and far distances without the use of glasses; under all lighting conditions day or night. The multifocal lens procedure is performed worldwide and is rec ognized for its safety and predictabil ity. The beauty of using this type of lens is that it relies on the eyes work ing together, as they are designed to do. By having both eyes processing all visual information in the same way, the multifocal lens gives people natural vision at all distances, much like they had in their youth. Medicare and most insurance plans pay for the standard cataract procedure, but there is an out-of-pocket expense to cover the cost of the premium lenses and customization involved. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman will explain the advantages and dis advantages of all lens implant options avail able, and the particular procedure which is most suitable for your needs. PRESBYOPIA is a common age-related condition. Usually beginning around the age of 40, the natural lens hardens and becomes less flexible so it beco mes difficult to see objects in the distance and up close without glasses. Tests to determine presbyopia may include the examination of the retina, a muscle integrity test, refraction test, slit-lamp test, or visual acuity. According to the U.S National Library of Medicine, there is no cure for presbyopia, but it can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Adding bifocals to an existing lens, or changing an already existing bifocal prescription can correct this problem in many cases; new surgical pro cedures can also provide solutions in others. IF CATARACTS or PRESBYOPIA are affecting your quality of life, now is the time to talk to your eye doctor, at SUNCOAST EYE CENTER and find out your best option. Call today to schedule your evaluation. 1-800-2826341. Are you experiencing blurry vision or just cant see as well as you used to? Changes in your vision could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called presbyopia. Both conditions usually affect the quality of life as you grow older. Theres a Lens for Every Lifestyle SIGNS OF CATARACTS: Blurry vision Difficulty driving or seeing at night Difficulty viewing a computer screen Colors appear dim and faded Frequent change in glasses prescription Glare or halos around lights Difficulty reading, especially i n low light SIGNS OF PRESBYOPIA: Loss of ability to read up close Difficulty viewing a computer screen Need reading glasses or bifocals Holding objects further away to read Decreased focusing ability for near objects Eyestrain Headache A L ens F or E v er y Lifest yle 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com 000EH03 When Experience Counts Most Advanced Cataract Surgery with Multifocal IOL Premium Lens Implants Droopy Eyelid Surgery Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecare Specialists Eye Exams At Suncoast Eye Center Our Most Important Patient Is You! LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D Board Certified Ophthalmologist ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Board Certified Ophthalmologist

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETuesday, May 7, 2013 G5 PROFILESINHEALTH G4Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH 000EH06 PAID ADVERTISEMENT Vision changes as you age Changes in your vision can affect the quality of life as you grow older. These changes could be could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called pres byopia. CATARACTS are a normal part of the aging process, but can also be from an injury or from long-term use of steroid medications. Diabetes, smoking and long-term exposure to sunlight can also cause cataracts. A cataract is when the natural lens of the eye becomes cloudy, when things begin to look yellowish or even foggy. Seeing through a cloudy lens is like looking through a fogged-up window. The lens in the eye works similar to a camera lens; the crystalline lens focuses the light that enters the eye as it travels to the retina. Vision becomes blurry or dark and colors become dull. Cataracts usually a ffect people over the age of 60, and are the leading cause of treatable vision loss in adults. The good news is cataract surgery is one of the safest, easiest and most commonly per formed surgical pro cedure with over 15 million each year. Innovative technology has provided patients with a choice to choose a lens implant that meets their specific vision needs and can possibly reduce or eliminate the need for glasses. At the Suncoast Eye Center, cata racts are treated with the most advanced surgical procedure available: small incision, no-stitch surgery. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman remove the clouded natural lens of the eye and replace it with an advanced, premium artificial lens implant of your choice. Surgery is often timed so that one eye has adequate vision while the sur gical eye heals. STANDARD LENS this lens gives you sharp distance vision, but glasses are needed for closer objects. TORIC LENS this lens is best for patients with a high degree of astigmatism, it provides excellent dis tant vision but will often require the need for glasses for near and mid range distance activities. BLENDED VISION this will give you a greater range of vision without the need for glasses. This is also known as MONO VISION ; your dominant eye is for distance and the non-dominant eye is for near vision. MULTIFOCAL LENSES this unique lens is proven to provide excellent vision at near, intermediate and far distances without the use of glasses; under all lighting conditions day or night. The multifocal lens procedure is performed worldwide and is rec ognized for its safety and predictabil ity. The beauty of using this type of lens is that it relies on the eyes work ing together, as they are designed to do. By having both eyes processing all visual information in the same way, the multifocal lens gives people natural vision at all distances, much like they had in their youth. Medicare and most insurance plans pay for the standard cataract procedure, but there is an out-of-pocket expense to cover the cost of the premium lenses and customization involved. Both Dr. Seigel and Dr. Freedman will explain the advantages and dis advantages of all lens implant options avail able, and the particular procedure which is most suitable for your needs. PRESBYOPIA is a common age-related condition. Usually beginning around the age of 40, the natural lens hardens and becomes less flexible so it beco mes difficult to see objects in the distance and up close without glasses. Tests to determine presbyopia may include the examination of the retina, a muscle integrity test, refraction test, slit-lamp test, or visual acuity. According to the U.S National Library of Medicine, there is no cure for presbyopia, but it can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Adding bifocals to an existing lens, or changing an already existing bifocal prescription can correct this problem in many cases; new surgical pro cedures can also provide solutions in others. IF CATARACTS or PRESBYOPIA are affecting your quality of life, now is the time to talk to your eye doctor, at SUNCOAST EYE CENTER and find out your best option. Call today to schedule your evaluation. 1-800-2826341. Are you experiencing blurry vision or just cant see as well as you used to? Changes in your vision could be caused by a cataract or an eye condition called presbyopia. Both conditions usually affect the quality of life as you grow older. Theres a Lens for Every Lifestyle SIGNS OF CATARACTS: Blurry vision Difficulty driving or seeing at night Difficulty viewing a computer screen Colors appear dim and faded Frequent change in glasses prescription Glare or halos around lights Difficulty reading, especially i n low light SIGNS OF PRESBYOPIA: Loss of ability to read up close Difficulty viewing a computer screen Need reading glasses or bifocals Holding objects further away to read Decreased focusing ability for near objects Eyestrain Headache A L ens F or E v er y Lifest yle 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL (352) 795-2526 Toll Free: (800) 282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com 000EH03 When Experience Counts Most Advanced Cataract Surgery with Multifocal IOL Premium Lens Implants Droopy Eyelid Surgery Glaucoma & Diabetic Eyecare Specialists Eye Exams At Suncoast Eye Center Our Most Important Patient Is You! LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D Board Certified Ophthalmologist ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Board Certified Ophthalmologist

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETuesday, May 7, 2013 G3 PROFILESINHEALTH G6Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH In home care for longer, healthier, and more purposeful life Comfort Keepers of Inverness takes in-home care to a new level. Since the business opened in 2004, their mission has been to transform day-to-day caregiving into opportunities for meaningful conversation and activities that engage and enrich the lives of seniors physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. Comfort Keepers feels that the practice of Interactive Caregiving TM contributes to longer, healthier, more purposeful lives for seniors. Comfort Keepers caregivers are well trained, professional caregivers who are set apart by their natural gift of caring for others. To work with Comfort Keepers, caregivers must pass stringent screening and interviewing processes and must show a strong devotion to others. Only a few special people who pass this process go on to complete the training necessary to deliver this special brand of care and become Comfort Keepers. All Comfort Keepers pass extensive background checks that exceed both state and franchise requirements and also must complete continuing education. In-home care is a growing need for seniors who desire to stay in their own homes with familiar surroundings, but can no longer take care of the necessary requirements of the home. Sometimes, all that is needed is a little assistance to enable a senior to stay in their own home and function safely for many more years. Whether it is only a few hours a week, or 24 hours a day, the caregivers at Comfort Keepers make it possible for seniors to continue to live in their own home and enjoy a quality of life that they thought was going to change forever. This care reinforces seniors self value by allowing them to continue their daily activities with as much independence as possible. The focus is providing solutions for the normal transition of aging. In order to achieve the most favorable outcome for each client, Comfort Keepers carefully matches caregivers and clients by personalities, interests, skills and needs. This extra consideration forms the basis of strong, healthful relationships. Comfort Keepers Care Coordinators work as partners with our clients family to provide their loved one a complete inhomecare solution to promote independent living. Comfort Keepers provides companionship and assistance through: Meal Preparation Laundry & Linen Washing Light Housekeeping Grooming & Dressing Support Errand Services Bathing & Hygiene Care Grocery Shopping Respite Care Transportation Alzheimers/Dementia Care All Comfort Keepers caregivers are employees of the company and not independent contractors. All of our caregivers are bonded and covered with Workers Compensation and Liability Insurance. Comforts Keepers is locally-owned and family operated by Deborah and Gailen Spinka and daughter, Lindsey Haller. Comfort Keepers is actively involved in the community and participates and sponsors local organizations like, Chamber of Commerce, Womens Business Alliance, Leadership Citrus, Suncoast Business Masters and various health expos. For in-depth information about Comfort Keepers, visit the websites at www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com or stop by the local office at 2244 Highway 44 West in Inverness, Florida. Phone: 352-726-4547 Paid Advertisement 2244 Hwy. 44 West, Inverness, FL (352) 726-4547 www.seniorservicesinvernessflorida.com Independently owned and operated office. HH299992888 Companionship Escort for Shopping and Meal Preparation Doctors Appointments Laundry Bathing and Light Housekeeping Incontinence Care Medication Reminders Alzheimers/Dementia Care In-Home Care Services that help people maintain full and independent lives We Are Comfort Keepers 000ERY6 Our family is here to give comfort to your family. Gailen, Jennifer & Lindsey discussing quality care. Owners: Deborah Spinka, Office Manager, Gailen Spinka, General Manager and Lindsey Haller, Administrator Deborah & Bart will help you when you call. Deborah Spinka, Office Manager and Bart Haller Gailen Spinka, General Manager-Owner, Jennifer Duca, Community Liaison, Lindsey Haller, Administrator-Owner A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER A DVANCED F AMILY H EARING A ID C ENTER 2027 N. Donovan Ave., Suite B, Crystal River, Florida 795-1775 000ELYT Complete FullT ime Hearing Aid Care We Provide FREE: Second Opinions Hearing Exams In-Office Demonstrations 30-Day Trial Loss & Damage Insurance Lifetime Service and Cleanings Unlimited Computer Adjustments Nationwide Coverage 0% FINANCING 12 Months Same As Cash Most Insurances Accepted FREE Video Otoscope Exam! It Could Only Be Ear Wax Price Match Guarantee Serving Citrus County for Over 28 Years Free Consultation Free With People You Can Trust Confused About Todays Digital Technology? Let Us Answer All Of Your Questions.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETuesday, May 7, 2013 G7 PROFILESINHEALTH G2Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH Paid Advertisement Hearing problems? Youll want to hear this... 1-800-277-1182 7 Locations in Tampa Bay 000ES1Q New In Citrus Gardner Audiology recently moved its R&D and assembly facilities from the Tampa area to their Crystal River location to offer the residents of Citrus County an unprecedented opportunity to experience the newest technologies in hearing advancements, all in one location. Clients can be tested, fitted and walk out with their choice of the finest hearing appliance in just one visit. After gathering information and personal preferences through their field research studies with over 3,000 patients in the greater Tampa area for the past three years, Gardner Audiology has decided to focus on Central Florida. Through the main facility in Crystal River, they are offering the residents in the counties around Citrus the convenience and combined technology not even offered in any large cities. This facility now contains their plastics lab to mold acrylic inner ear devices and electronics lab to allow for efficient assembly in-house. The skilled professionals can also offer repair of all major brands of hearing aids. Dan Gardner, M.S., knows firsthand about hearing loss. His Oceanography studies were abruptly halted in the 1960s when he sustained a head injury with ear damage while serving in the U.S. Navy. Since that time, Dan has been passionate about helping people improve their hearing. After his discharge from the military, Dan returned to the University of South Florida to earn his graduate degree in Audiology, the Science of Hearing. Innie or Outie? Dan addressed his hearing problem early in life when he began wearing hearing aids. He chooses to wear a virtually imperceptible outer ear device that allows him to effortlessly hear conversation. To address the desire of clients who want an in the ear appliance that is invisible to others, Gardner Audiology is excited to introduce their recent development of a unique customized design that fits entirely inside the ear canal, yet holds all of the technology of the larger outer ear devices. This advanced new hearing aid looks like an inner ear space capsule. Dan Calls his invention the Innie. Consumer preference for a type of hearing aid is a lifestyle choice do you prefer an Innie or an Outie? Who Can Help You? It helps to talk with an educated professional who understands your problem such as an audiologist. Audiologists have earned an advanced university degree. They are not to be confused with a Hearing Ai d Specialist who need only a high school education or GED. As Dan says, Consult with an audiologist because who you see is much more important than the products you buy. Call Gardner The primary mission of Gardner Audiology is still the same after 37 years in Citrus County. Help people solve thei r hearing problems. Enjoy the wealth o f information and free hearing guides, along with the field trial testimonials at: www.gardneraudiology.com Master Audiologist Daniel Gardner, M.S. presently wears a hearing aid that hides outside his ear canal. He used the microscopes in his new Crystal River laboratory to design this miniscule hearing aid that will hide inside the ear canal. Hearing Loss Hurts Are you allowing hearing loss to seriously impact your personal and professional life? It can cause symptoms of irritability, anger, fatigue, stress, memory loss, and depression that slowly leads to isolation and withdrawal. Hearing aids are the best and sometimes only solution for most people suffering from hearing loss. Your quality of life can be improved with better hearing. PAID ADVERTISEMENT THE EARS ARE BACK! Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is located on Donovan A venue in Crystal River just of f Route 486 near Route 44. A few years ago their sign was vandalized and someone stole their trademark: a huge set of ears. Business continued as usual, but people really missed the big ears. Now that the ears have been replaced, it is easy to find Advanced Family Hearing, and there are many reasons to stop in to meet the talented women who have run this business for over 15 years. Owner Jerillyn Clark, is Board Certified and Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who has personally served Citrus County for 28 years. She opened her business with a strong commitment to this area and continues to give back to the county The of fice has been managed by Jackie Ziegler who not only keeps the center running smoothly but is able to make every customer feel like a treasured part of the family Mercedes Boatwright is a Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist who really knows her business and her community Mercedes is a fourth generation Citrus County native married to a native commercial fisherman. Y ou will find Advanced Family Hearing heavily involved in all aspects of community service. Jerillyn Clark also has a strong compassion for the people who serve in our armed forces. Her daughter Major Abbi Johnson, is on her third deployment overseas. Major Johnsons goal is to change the face of veterans by reminding people that our vets are not only the honored elderly veterans of previous military battles, but also the young men and women who have sacrificed and served to keep America free. ATTENTION VETS: Advanced Family Hearing continues to honor our veterans by of fering them many free services. V eterans have to travel to Gainesville to receive their hearing devices, and then are required to go back and forth to get them adjusted and fitted, or repaired. Advanced Family Hearing will take care of all of those services with a convenient stop in Crystal River The skilled staf f will fit and adjust your new hearing aids, and also make any in of fice repairs needed for as long as you have them all at no cost. Communication is critical in life. Our jobs, relationships and social interactions are all more stressful when our hearing becomes compromised. Even the action of living independently can be impossible when the ability to hear properly is lost. Nearly 1 in 5 American adults struggle with hearing loss a figure that climbs to 1 in 3 for people over 65. W ith the tremendous advancements in hearing aid technology there is no reason to settle for a diminished quality of life because of hearing loss. Hearing aids come in many common styles, though not every one is right for every individual. Factors such as the wearers level of hearing loss, size of ear canal, and even dexterity issues impact which style of hearing aid is best for you. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center of fers a variety of hearing aids in every style and from most major manufacturers. The specialists will fit and service any hearing aid even if it was not purchased from them. Some of the products include: Behind-the-Ear Hearing Aids In-the-Ear Hearing Aids Receiver-in-Canal Hearing Aids In-the-Canal Hearing Aids Completely-in-Canal Hearing Aids Invisible Hearing Aids In addition to hearing aids, they of fer a wide assortment of Hearing Protection & Personal Listening Devices. Advanced Family Hearing Aid Center is open Monday Friday 9:00am 4:00pm *A vailable outside standard business hours by appointment.** Come in for a free screening. Call 352/795-1775 000EL Y Z

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G8Tuesday, May 7, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE PROFILESINHEALTH 000ERY7 Profiles Health inMedical Nutrition WellnessCitrus CountysAdvertising SupplementMay 7, 2013