<%BANNER%>

Citrus County chronicle ( May 5, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 5, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03112

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 5, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03112

Full Text


Kentucky Derby: Rosario leads Orb to muddy victory /B1


TODAY CITRU-S COUNT Y


Sunny to partly
cloudy and
breezy.
PAGE A4


ONICLt
Swwv j.cliOricleorllie.COrjl
Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1 VOL. 118 ISSUE 271


Salt in the bay


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Kaleb Jemison, a 17-year-old senior at the Academy of Environmental Science in Crystal River, has been study-
ing the increasing amount of salt water invading King's Bay. The young man says areas like this canal system
not far from King's Bay are the perfect environment for barnacles to grow.

Barnacles, brackish water move inland in Crystal River


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
t is a salty proposition, but
the once-sparkling fresh wa-
ters of King's Bay are be-
coming brackish.
And despite some of the efforts
by officials to slow the encroach-
ment of the saline sea into area
waterways, the intrusion
continues.
A recent study by a Crystal
River prodigy and supported
by further studies commissioned
by the Southwest Florida Water
Management District
(SWFWMD) points in one di-
rection: salt water from the Gulf
of Mexico and barnacles have
settled in the coves, canals and
springheads of the bay and
rivers.
The line of demarcation for
salt/fresh water has shifted -
1 1/4 mile further into the bay in
43 years, according to 17-year-
old Kaleb Jemison, a senior at
the Academy of Environmental
Science in Crystal River Jemi-
son authored a comprehensive
study of saltwater intrusion in
King's Bay and has been making
his rounds presenting the results
to whoever will listen.
His warning: Barnacles are
everywhere in the bay


INFORMATION
To contact Southwest Florida
Water Management District,
call 800-423-1476 or visit
www.watermatters.org.
Kaleb Jemison can be
reached at 352-464-2367 or
he can be found at Under
Pressure on Facebook.
TOOFAR can be reached at
352-726-5004 or www.
toofarinc.com.

"Barnacles can only thrive in
water that is at least two parts
per thousand (ppt)," Jemison
said.
The bay's current salinity level
is anywhere between "two or
three" ppt, according to Chris
Anastasiou, the senior scientist
for Natural Systems and
Restoration at SWFWMD.
By comparison, pure saline
water in the gulf is 35 ppt, while
brackish water ranges from 0.5
ppt to 30 ppt
"The water in King's Bay is
getting less fresh," said
Anastasiou.
The study
He said that reality is borne
out by results of a study done by
Mote Marine Laboratory at the
behest of the water district that


was completed in 2010. The study
looked at barnacles and salinity
levels in the Crystal River, King's
Bay, the Homosassa and Withla-
coochee river systems.
That study reached some of
the following conclusions:
In the Homosassa River, the
barnacle community extended
upstream to a point bordered by
the main spring run into the
river. The fresh water flowing
from the shallow spring run is
adequate to keep barnacles from
penetrating further upstream,
but brackish water conditions
were observed in the deeper
parts of the river. In the upper
reaches of the river, the barnacle
communities do not occur in the
intertidal zone; rather, they are
restricted to the near-bottom
zone, which could be character-
ized as a salinity tide.
In the Withlacoochee River,
the upstream confinement of
barnacles to a near-bottom
higher salinity zone was more
pronounced. In the Withla-
coochee, the barnacles were lo-
cated so deep in the upriver
areas that they were not ob-
served during the reconnais-
sance survey when intertidal
and subtidal areas were in-
spected. As for the Homosassa
See Page A5


Lawmakers


protect


bunnies, not


uninsured

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida lawmakers could-
n't find a way to provide health care coverage for
the state's 1.1 million uninsured residents, but
they did pass a bill that would
make it illegal to dye bunnies
and chicks and another that
would prevent people from using
food stamps at strip bars.
The Legislature ended its an-
nual 60-day session Friday with
House Speaker Will Weather-
ford, Senate President Don
Gaetz and Gov Rick Scott all
claiming victories. Meanwhile,
lawmakers didn't take $50 billion
in federal money to expand Med-
icaid under President Barack will
Weatherford
Obama's health care overhaul
because Weatherford refused to Chapel, House
accept any federal money to help speaker.
the uninsured.
"There's a long way to go, w4
there's a lot of conversations to '
be had and I still think the health -
care debate is going to come back
and it's not going to go away,"
Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel,
said after the session ended.
The Republican leaders,
though, were praised by their
peers for accomplishing other
major goals, like a bill that ex-
pands early voting days and sites
two years after Republicans and Don
Scott cut early voting days, which Gaetz
was largely blamed for the long R-Niceville,
lines that made Florida the sub- Senate
ject of national ridicule in the president.
November presidential election.
Weatherford's priority of raising campaign con-
tribution limits also passed the Legislature and
was signed into law by Scott, whose spokeswoman
said three weeks earlier that Scott "can't imagine
signing a bill" that raised campaign contribution
limits. The $500 limit on all
races will increase to $1,000 for WINNERS,
legislative and local races and LOSERS
$3,000 for statewide races.
But Scott also couldn't imag- 0 See which
ine his priorities going down bills made
in defeat. He signed the cam- it into law
paign finance bill and an and which
ethics bill that was a priority failed./
for Gaetz, R-Niceville, as the Page All
Legislature finally agreed to
give him a partial victory on one of his two top
priorities a sales tax exemption for manufac-
turers who purchase new equipment.
See Page A9


Happy birthday, Reita: Inverness resident turns 107


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Al-
though her birthday isn't
until May 10, the friends
and family of Reita Car-
penter came to New Hori-
zon assisted living
residence in Inverness on
Friday to wish the feisty,
headstrong and outspoken
woman a happy 107th
birthday a week early
"We are here to cele-
brate the life of Reita Car-
penter while she is still
with us," announced the


Rev. Charles John- penter is a longtime
son, Hospice of Cit- member, said she
rus County has been the "con-
chaplain. summate church
He called her a woman," serving on
"one-person riot the altar guild, a
who says exactly Daughter of the
what she thinks and ri King, member of
doesn't care what Reita Episcopal Church
you think about Carpenter Women and a Sun-
what she thinks ... when she was day school teacher,
feisty to the end, younger. to name some of the
and we love her ministries she has
dearly" been involved in.
The Rev. Eugene 'Always giving of herself
Reuman, pastor of St Mar- to help others," Reuman
garet's Episcopal Church in said.
Inverness where Mrs. Car- See Page A7


Reita
Carpenter
turns 107 on
May 10. Her
friends and
family
surprised her
with a birthday
party a week
early on Friday
at New
Horizon
assisted living
residence in
Inverness
where she is a
resident.
NANCY
KENNEDY/Chronicle


S112811|11 I1 o


Classifieds ....... D4
Crossword ...... .A16
Excursions ...... .A15


Editorial ......
Entertainment ..
Horoscope . . .


. .C2
. .A4
. .A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... .A16
Obituaries ....... .A8


TV Listings ...... A16
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes . .A17


F-ISTEST GR IrG 7 .'E UP TO $4800 SUPER STOVV rGO
1 "II, DEL IN CLASS --' 1s8 18,
15,988/ I 59881i1898819j
1W 8 Va.,w


", -CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.3 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
S """ H O M O S A S S A INVERNESS B R 0 0 K S V I L L E
ca y ri r 1:n ,,:.,i. ItT ^,. r I IcII. I:I:r irJ,'LU 1l -: 1.. i-i;HTi: .1 rLi 'ir. Hlrn i El: rJiT I- E., :.i ii; i ,II.L n Ii-.I f .IF ii I f fH i EI ,'l E l'!: T 1.L. I l:li c I: Ll T-' I "' JHl: l: l.l I-. .:.. -Eli IqTH [I n, 'I l :, I T I IL 1 l I I i
1: .i n: : E I f l i i. lr, r f(,l 'irji1 :J i n iJI.U :,Lit 1.1. Elft. A1 : i : rllp:inr .E : I l Tl' .WIRII: '0I*.E Iu:'n'EL :ll l. ,,.. r linlil.E .:E I ,i.E : ,. i.i ..I L-: : .-i 'l 4i 1 I T ITI L .IU E -T .I.'.I IniP 1 : LULll.l.. T T 1 i TLE i. lI.
:.1 "' .l LE:':P : E '"H.. 1 n.ELI'.':1 LIT r -::,i: El l n1 ll. l :. l:.f.l i.:11. 1 T .:,.i El'.1 'h|:l..


& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
54


'-'F

&


mmmmmmmmmi


I MMMEMONJ


l aviiV^l I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


May 6to 10 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
hamburger sliders, Italian
super salad with roll, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, creamy macaroni
and cheese, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
steamed green beans, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with
ripstick, barbecued roasted
chicken with roll, turkey super


salad with roll, PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, sweet
green peas, flavored Craisins,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
Goldie's Grab N Go (PBJ),
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, sweet corn,
chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli, po-
tato smiles, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, milk and juice
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.


Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, corn dog
nuggets, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
peas, potato smiles, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breaded
chicken sandwich, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh gar-
den salad, tangy baked
beans, flavored Craisins, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
oven-baked breaded chicken
with ripstick, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, peach cups, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo
with ripstick, hot dog, Goldie's
Grab N Go (ham), PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, chilled


flavored applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal variety
and toasts, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese on loco bread, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, grits, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato tri-
angles, steamed broccoli,
applesauce, juice, milk.


Tuesday: Orange chicken
with maxstix, turkey and gravy
over noodles with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, cold corn salad,
potato triangles, peas, celery,
strawberry cup, baby carrots,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked
beans, baked beans, potato
roasters, flavored Craisins,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
macaroni and cheese with rip-
stick, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baby car-
rots, green beans, potato tri-
angles, peach cup,
cucumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, pizza,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, cold corn salad, po-
tato roasters, corn, strawberry
cup, juice, milk.


We Welcome You To Vl,. u Denta

Lfothe s Of/erve"we



f o

6824 fToL C River
352- .94-6139 ....


A9 Cleaning Special
$ O New Patients Only
FREE Exam & E-Rays
w/Cleaning
D0210 D0150 D1110
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 5/31/13


Porcelain
$ 7 0 Fused to
Metal Crowns
57 *(For first one)
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 5/31/13 D2751


Dentures $6900
starting at
Upper & Lower
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 5/31/13 D5510 D5120


: ,1
I


Second
Opinion
X-ray & Exam
| (New Patients Only)
( Pae D0210 D0150
If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required.
I Not valid with any other offers. Expires 5/31/13


---------------- ------------------------------------------------------ -----------------------
We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Italian meatball
hoagie, meatballs in marinara
sauce, cheesy mashed pota-
toes, Italian beans, mixed
fruit, hot dog bun, mustard,
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Blended juice,
baked chicken thigh, yellow
rice with tomato and pepper,
black beans, white bread,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Grilled
chicken breast patty in mari-
nara sauce, penne noodles
with garlic oil, Tuscan vegeta-
bles, peaches, slice rye bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Flame-broiled
beef patty, potatoes O'Brien,
yellow corn with diced tomato,
fresh orange, hamburger bun,
ketchup and mustard, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Tuna salad, pea-
cheese salad, marinated
broccoli salad, graham crack-
ers, two slices whole-grain
bread, mayonnaise, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at 352-527-
5975.



Call Modern Plumbing!


MODERN
PLUMBING, INC.
FOR COUPONS VISIT
www.modern-plumbing.com
LICENSE #CFC1426865



GOT



IPau l:Miielo .A




(352) 37-222


( DUKE



E ENERGY.


Progress Energy now has a new name: Duke Energy.


You'll see our new name and logo in your bills and other places soon. No other aspect of your
service or account is changing.


Although our name is changing, our commitment to you and the communities we serve remains
the same. So you can count on us for reliable electricity every time you flip the switch.


Learn more at duke-energy.com/newname.


@2013 Duke Energy Corporation


A2 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, MAY 5,2013 f



TATE2&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Canyon concert benefits charity, scholarships


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Country
arrives in town next weekend as
country singers Justin Moore,
Josh Thompson, Dustin Lynch
and Michael Ray add Citrus
County to their "Outlaws Like
Me" tour.
They are performing at Rock
Crusher Canyon for one reason -
charity and a scholarship
fundraiser.
Revenue collected from their
performance at the eighth annual
Citrus County Circle of Friends
Benefit Weekend May 10 and May
11 is donated to the Citrus County
Circle of Friends Foundation, a


Around the
COUNTY

Nayfield to address
Democrats
The Downtown Demo-
cratic Club meets at 6 p.m.
on the second Tuesday of
each month at the B&W
Rexall Drugs restaurant, 214
U.S. 41 South, Inverness.
It is a club for registered
Democrats to meet with
other Democrats and discuss
political topics of local, state
and national importance.
Dr. KC Nayfield will
speak to the club on land
and water conservation is-
sues at the May 14 meeting.
All Democrats are invited
to attend. For more infor-
mation, call 352-726-4676
or email downtown
democrats2013@gmail.com.
Contact Roger Sewell,
president, at rsewell@
tampabay.rr.com.
Senior Corps Week
begins
May 6 through May 10 is
Senior Corps Week, which
celebrates the service of
seniors to the community.
An open house and ice
cream social will take place
from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 9, at the Central
Ridge Community Center,
77 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills.
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation will be on hand
for tours of the building
while celebrating Senior
Corps with opportunity links.
Their goals are to bring
awareness to the building
while connecting people to
diverse volunteer services.
The open house is
hosted by the Nature Coast
Volunteer Center and RSVP.
For more information, call
352-249-1275.
Hospital recognizes
nurses
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center is honoring
the men and women who
have dedicated their lives to
healing others during Na-
tional Nurses Week, which
begins Monday, May 6 -
also known as National
Nurses Day-- and ends on
May 12, the birthday of Flo-
rence Nightingale, founder
of modern nursing.
The theme for this year's
National Nurses Week is
"Delivering Quality & Inno-
vation in Patient Care," which
was designated by the Amer-
ican Nurses Association.
"Nurses play an essential
role in enhancing patient
care, increasing access, co-
ordinating care and reduc-
ing health care costs," said
Cyndi Heitzman, chief nurs-
ing executive. "They are at
the forefront of innovation
every day, and they de-
serve special recognition.
We want them to know how
much we value their hard
work and commitment to
superior patient care -
honoring them is what this
week is all about."
"We thank our outstand-
ing nurses who work tire-
lessly to ensure the health
and welfare of our patients,"
said Joyce Brancato, Seven
Rivers chief executive officer.
"We admire their profes-
sionalism, their commitment
to the highest standards
and their undying dedica-
tion to those they serve."
-From staff reports


501(c) 3 nonprofit organi- Friends. Hampton's
zation. dream continued to im-
"Our concert is our pact county youths by
fundraiser," said coordi- funding nonprofit organi-
nator Stephanie Hamp- zations and providing
ton-Hill. "It is how we scholarships to college-
fund youth programs. bound students.
This concert is a benefit. "Over $1.6 million has
It is way bigger than just been donated to charita-
a fun weekend." Stephanie ble causes," Hampton-
Citrus County native Hampton-Hill Hill said. "From 2002 to
Mike Hampton, former coordinating present, $318,000 has
Major League Baseball Outlaws Like been awarded in scholar-
pitcher, had a dream of Me"concert ships to local students."
providing a vehicle to the county A total of 106 Citrus County stu-
to impact in the lives of youths in dents have been awarded schol-
need. arships to further their education
In 2010, Hampton's younger sis- at the collegiate level. Scholar-
ter Hampton-Hill, took over the ship recipients are chosen by the
leadership role of the Circle of foundation's board, of which


Hampton-Hill is a member.
She encourages everyone to
come out next weekend to not
only have fun but to support an
important cause.
Approximately 350 concert tick-
ets were donated to the Blanton-
Thompson American Legion in
Crystal River to raise funds to be
donated to Marine Lance Cpl.
Joshua Langston White, who was
injured in the line of duty in Au-
gust 2012.
Tickets are also available for
sale online at Ticketmaster.com
or by visiting local area busi-
nesses including Goldiggers &
Gunslingers, Citrus Sports & Ap-
parel and Hot Heads the Art of
Hair.


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle




Spring cleaning


It was a busy day for the Central Landfill on State Road 44 Saturday as the
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners and Keep Citrus County
Beautiful hosted a free disposal day, allowing people with proof
of residency to dispose of everything from household garbage to boats
at no cost. Below, a prison trustee helps empty trucks and trailers.


EDC feels pinch in marketing push


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer


CRYSTAL RIVER At-
tracting new industry
while retaining existing in-
dustry is the endgame of a
five-year plan proposed by
the Economic Develop-
ment Council.
The council wants to
fast-track the effort and be
marketing Citrus County by
the beginning of next year.
Speaking Wednesday,
Executive Director Don
Taylor said the strategic
plan is a response to the
nuclear plant closing and
the decline of the con-
struction industry


"It's a way to address di-
versifying the economy,"
he said.
The council has identi-
fied four key areas of plan
development: assessment
of existing site inventory,
identification of target in-
dustries, related work-
force availability and
marketing. It proposes
using one lead consultant
to work from start to finish,
along with outside experts
as needed.
It calls for defining and
involving the stakeholders,
so no groups will feel left out
once the plan is complete.
He acknowledged it will
not be an inexpensive en-


deavor and that private in-
vestors will be sought "Time
is of the essence," he said.
"I'd like to be ready to
market (Citrus County) by
the first of next year."
EDC President Joe
Meek concurred it is going
to be expensive. "We have
got to increase interest in
economic development,"
he said. "What's been lack-
ing is an action plan, im-
plementing it is going to
cost money"
The EDC is also expand-
ing its regional develop-
ment efforts. Taylor said
they will continue to be a
member of the Tampa Bay
Partnership, at a reduced


financial level, and will be
joining the North Florida
Economic Development
Partnership.
"We will be able to work
with our northern neigh-
bors," he said. "It kind of
sets us up as a bridge
county, there is some op-
portunity there."
"Citrus has tied itself to
the south and has not done
enough to the north,"
Meek said. "They're inter-
ested in us and are an-
other advocate for
Suncoast Parkway 2."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


Nature Coast EMS reaccredited


Special to the Chronicle
Nature Coast EMS has
received reaccreditation
from the Commission on
Accreditation of Ambu-
lances Services for its
compliance with nation
standards of excellence.
Nature Coast EMS was
originally accredited in
2009, becoming the fifth
ambulance service in the
state of Florida to suc-
cessfully complete the vol-
untary review process
which included comple-
tion of comprehensive ap-


plication and on-site re-
view by national experts
in the emergency medical
services.
Nature Coast EMS
CEO/President Mike Hall
said "the reaccreditation
process is actually stricter
and more detailed. We are
compared to national stan-
dards of the industry and
to the path of excellence we
created for ourselves dur-
ing the original process.
Our reaccreditation repre-
sents our firm commit-
ment to our patients and
community to provide the


highest level of care, and
for that we are proud.
"Our dedicated team
members are the key to
our successful completion
of the process. Everyone
plays a valuable role in
our ability to meet the
commission's high stan-
dards," Hall added.
Nature Coast EMS cele-
brated with the leadership
team preparing and serv-
ing a hot breakfast to all
team members over a
three-day period.
The commission is a
nonprofit organization es-


tablished to encourage
and promote quality pa-
tient care in America's
medical transportation
system. The primary focus
of the commission's stan-
dards is high-quality pa-
tient care. This is
accomplished by estab-
lishing national standards
that not only address the
delivery of patient care,
but also the ambulance
service's total operation
and its relations with
other agencies, the gen-
eral public and the med-
ical community.


WHAT: Country
Rocks the Canyon
Benefit Weekend.
WHEN: May 10
and May 11.
WHERE: Rock
Crusher Canyon,
275 S. Rock
Crusher Road,
Crystal River.
TICKETS:
Ticketmaster.com,
Goldiggers &
Gunslingers, Citrus
Sports & Apparel
and Hot Heads the
Art of Hair.




Police:

Help us

identify

homicide

victim

BOB REICHMAN
Sumter County Times
Authorities are hoping
the tattoo on a woman's
left shoulder, coupled
with a composite draw-
ing and pieces of the
woman's clothing will
help lead them to her
identity and eventually
to the person responsi-
ble for her death.
The tattoo of the word
"Jane" is on the woman's
arm. Authorities suspect
that it may have been
created
in a cor-
rectional
institu-
tion or
Sby an
amateur
While
authori-
ties have been following
up on clues about the
woman's identity, "we re-
ally need the public's
help to identify her,"
said Sumter County
Sheriff's Lt. Bobby
Caruthers.
The woman's badly de-
composed body was dis-
covered in woods near
State Road 44 and Inter-
state 75 on the morning
of April 22.
Because the area is
known to attract tran-
sients, local authorities
have already traveled to
Las Vegas and to Ala-
bama to interview peo-
ple who may have stayed
near the site where the
woman's body was found.
"It's just another stone
we've turned over to
eliminate suspects,"
Caruthers said.
Authorities still have
not revealed how the
woman was killed.
Here's the most recent
description of the woman:
She is white, 25 to 55
years of age, 5-foot-2 to 5-
foot-9, 160 to 170 pounds,
red or auburn hair with
a red scrunchy The vic-
tim had no teeth and may
have worn dentures.
She was wearing a
lightly colored shirt with
a floral design, size 3XL,
gray colored "Jersey"
sweatpants size 36-38,
pink and grey colored
glasses and white ladies
tennis shoes size 10W
Anyone with informa-
tion is urged to contact
the Sumter County Sher-
iff's Office Criminal In-
vestigations Division at
352-569-1680 or call the
Crimeline at 800-423-
8477. Callers can remain
anonymous and may be
eligible for a reward.


Special to the Chronicle
This tattoo adorned the
left shoulder of a homi-
cide victim found recently
near State Road 44 and
Interstate 75.


L


..ff LA- A


I






A4 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday There are two major areas
that will command your focus in the
year ahead. One pertains to a creative
endeavor, while the other involves ro-
mance. Success is indicated in each.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When
you put the needs of others before
your own, your probabilities for getting
what you want become excellent. Fate
will make sure things go your way.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You're
not likely to have much control over a
major change in your affairs. You might
interpret this happening negatively, but
it will prove to be a good thing.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -Although
you might have to take a little heat on
behalf of a friend, you're doing the right
thing and loyalty won't be forgotten.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) When you
apply yourself, you will find the oppor-
tunities you need to succeed. Once
you make up your mind, woe to those
who try to block your path.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't
hesitate to take a calculated risk if you
feel it's necessary. If you believe the
odds favor you, it's OK to gamble.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Any major
issues in which you and your mate are
in agreement will have far-reaching, fa-
vorable results. You'll quickly discover
a united front brings many benefits.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Rather
than criticize or dominate others, you'll
be inclined to set an example of lead-
ership. Doing so will make your meth-
ods constructive, not contentious.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) You
should give full rein to your enterprising
side, especially if you're in need of
some extra cabbage. Your moneymak-
ing instincts are unusually keen.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If you
feel that those in charge of a current
endeavor aren't effectively handling
things, don't hesitate to assert yourself
and show them how to do a better job.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -The
possibility of achieving two important
personal objectives is quite good.
When you're determined to be suc-
cessful, you will be.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Some-
times it's necessary to take a calcu-
lated risk to achieve something big. If
you honestly believe the odds favor
you, go ahead and take a chance.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you
wait for things to go your way, you're
not likely to get very far. You've got to
make things happen yourself.


ENTERTAINMENT


Gerbils strut their
stuff at pageant
BEDFORD, Mass. Ever
think your gerbil could do more
in life than its cage in your living
room will allow?
Dozens of gerbils are scurry-
ing to New England this week-
end in the hopes of squeaking
out a victory in an annual pag-
eant by the American Gerbil
Society.
The competition in Bedford,
Mass., features agility demon-
strations where gerbils must
overcome various obstacles and
race to the end of a course. The
small rodents vie for coveted rib-
bons based on body type and
agility.
The show draws gerbil enthu-
siasts from around the country.
Fourteen-year-old Sarah
Kaden from Bordentown, N.J.,
thinks gerbils have great
personalities.
She said, "Even though they
are so little, they are very differ-
ent from each other and they
smell a lot less than my brother's
hamsters."

Fans flock to
'The Office' fete
SCRANTON, Pa. The ac-
tors who play Pam, Jim, Dwight
and other beloved characters
from the popular NBC show
"The Office" are bidding farewell
to the northeastern Pennsylva-
nia city of Scranton that served
as the TV setting for their fic-
tional paper company for nine
seasons.
The NBC mockumentary
about cubicle-dwellers at the fic-
tional Dunder Mifflin wraps up
May 16. And thousands at-
tended a "Wrap Party" in Scran-
ton on Saturday.
Jenna Fischer, John Krasin-
ski and Rainn Wilson rode in
classic convertibles and posed


Associated Press
Katie Johnson, a gerbil breeder from Milford, Mass., holds a
gerbil prior to Saturday's American Gerbil Society's annual
New England pageant in Bedford, Mass. The small rodents are
judged on body type and color, and will go through agility
demonstrations where they must overcome various obstacles
and race to the end of the course.


for hundreds of photos as fans
thronged around them.
The stars later took the stage
in front of the Lackawanna
County courthouse and played a
concert as "The Scrantones."
Cast member Paul Lieber-
stein, who plays Toby, thanked
the crowd.
"Who gets a parade," he said.
"This doesn't happen in real life."
Atlanta funeral set
for rapper Kelly
ATLANTA- Funeral services
are planned next week in Atlanta
for former Kris Kross rapper
Chris Kelly, who was found
dead in his home from a possi-
ble drug overdose.
Murray Brothers Funeral
Home in Atlanta confirmed Sat-
urday it will conduct a public
viewing for Kelly throughout the
afternoon and evening
Wednesday.


A funeral service has been
scheduled for Thursday at Jack-
son Memorial
Baptist
Church.
Kelly, known
as "Mac
Daddy," and
Chris Smith,
known as
"Daddy Mac,"
made up the Chris Kelly
1990s child rapper died
rap duo Kris Wednesday at
Kross known age 34.
for wearing their clothes back-
ward as they rhymed.
Their song "Jump" became
one of the decade's most memo-
rable songs.
The 34-year-old Kelly died
Wednesday. His mother told Ful-
ton County police her son had
become sick after using cocaine
and heroin the night before.
-From wire reports


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, May 5, the
125th day of 2013. There are 240
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On May 5, 1813, Danish philoso-
pher Soren Kierkegaard, consid-
ered the father of existentialism,
was born in Copenhagen.
On this date:
In 1821, Napoleon Bonaparte,
51, died in exile on the island of St.
Helena.
In 1862, Mexican troops defeated
French occupying forces in the Bat-
tle of Puebla. (The Cinco de Mayo
holiday marks Mexico's victory.)
In 1942, wartime sugar rationing
began in the United States.
In 1961, astronaut Alan B. Shep-
ard Jr. became America's first space
traveler as he made a 15-minute
suborbital flight aboard Freedom 7,
a Mercury capsule launched from
Cape Canaveral, Fla.
Ten years ago: Searchers using
dogs and heavy equipment went in
after tornado-packed storms flat-
tened communities in four Midwest-
ern states.
Five years ago: Three men
were arrested and beaten by
Philadelphia police officers after a
vehicle chase in a scene video-
taped by a TV news helicopter.
One year ago: Thousands of
Japanese marched to celebrate the
switching off of the last of their na-
tion's 50 nuclear reactors.
Today's Birthdays: Actress Pat
Carroll is 86. Saxophonist Ace Can-
non is 79. Actor Michael Murphy is
75. Actor Lance Henriksen is 73.
Comedian-actor Michael Palin is
70. Actor John Rhys-Davies is 69.
Actor Roger Rees is 69. Actor
Richard E. Grant is 56. Actress Tina
Others is 40. Singer Craig David is
32. Actor Henry Cavill is 30. Soul
singer Adele is 25. Rock singer
Skye Sweetnam is 25.
Thought for Today: "It is quite
true what philosophers say: that
Life must be understood back-
wards. But that makes one forget
the other proposition: that it must be
lived forwards." Soren
Kierkegaard (1813-1855).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR -PR HI LO PR |HI LO PR
0.00 | 185 64 0.00 J 77 64 0.07
I." 85 64 0.00 J7,, 7


84 68 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK exclusive dally
forecast by: .
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING

Sunny to partly cloudy and breezy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 52
Variably cloudy; 20% chance of a passing
shower
. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 79 Low: 52
Partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 80/67
Record 94/50
Normal 87/58
Mean temp. 74
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday trace
Total for the month 0.50 in.
Total for the year 5.80 in.
Normal for the year 12.79 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.74 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 65
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 64%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, grasses, hickory
Today's count: 5.0/12
Monday's count: 5.3
Tuesday's count: 5.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/5 SUNDAY 2:40 8:51 3:03 9:14
5/6 MONDAY 3:20 9:31 3:43 9:54
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S, SUNSET TONIGHT. 8............ :09 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:45 A.M.
( 11 1 MOONRISE TODAY...........................3:56 A.M.
MAYS MAY 18 MAY 25 MAY 31 MOONSET TODAY............................ 4:25 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informati on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Sunday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:00 a/11:08 a 3:35 p/11:50 p
Crystal River** 1:21 a/8:30 a 1:56 p/9:12 p
Withlacoochee* 11:43 a/6:18 a ---/7:00 p
Homosassa*** 2:10 a/10:07 a 2:45 p/10:49 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
4:09 a/11:57 a 4:13 p/---
2:30 a/9:19 a 2:34 p/10:01 p
12:17 a/7:07 a 12:21 p/7:49 p
3:19 a/10:56 a 3:23 p/11:38 p


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
79 61
85 68
83 62
77 52
84 63
77 54
81 70
80 59
80 64


F'cast
s
s
s
pc
s
pc
pc
s
s


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
sh
s
pc
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK
Northwest winds around 20 knots. Gulf w ater
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters will be choppy. Mostly sunny
and breezy today. 7 9 0


Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.88 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.13 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.81 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.85 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


H""oda o n -- i
Horolul, ". -7 8 67

80s --
FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 77 44 s 77 44
Albuquerque 76 47 pc 78 52
Asheville 54 48 .01 ts 57 47
Atlanta 59 51 1.77 ts 64 49
Atlantic City 62 40 pc 57 45
Austin 85 37 pc 74 51
Baltimore 67 47 pc 63 45
Billings 58 44 s 66 42
Birmingham 60 43 1.65 ts 57 49
Boise 71 45 ts 78 46
Boston 52 44 s 58 45
Buffalo 76 53 s 78 50
Burlington, VT 77 46 s 78 49
Charleston, SC 69 55 .05 ts 75 59
Charleston, WV 73 50 c 69 52
Charlotte 64 50 sh 66 52
Chicago 71 48 .02 pc 65 49
Cincinnati 73 59 r 67 51
Cleveland 72 55 s 75 53
Columbia, SC 66 55 .05 ts 69 55
Columbus, OH 72 56 pc 73 50
Concord, N.H. 70 35 s 71 36
Dallas 74 39 pc 69 51
Denver 60 35 pc 61 36
Des Moines 50 35 .18 pc 61 46
Detroit 70 56 s 69 50
El Paso 85 44 pc 82 63
Evansville, IN 53 46 1.04 sh 61 54
Harrisburg 70 39 s 69 42
Hartford 72 43 s 70 39
Houston 81 42 s 74 53
Indianapolis 67 58 pc 67 52
Jackson 68 36 pc 61 50
Las Vegas 92 63 pc 85 61
Little Rock 53 38 .02 pc 64 47
Los Angeles 73 59 c 66 57
Louisville 64 53 .58 r 62 53
Memphis 58 36 .10 sh 60 52
Milwaukee 58 43 s 56 45
Minneapolis 49 34 .08 c 62 46
Mobile 70 43 pc 69 47
Montgomery 67 46 1.13 sh 61 46
Nashville 50 44 .94 ts 63 51
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 71 46 pc 70 52
New York City 69 48 s 62 46
Norfolk 61 51 .02 c 61 53
Oklahoma City 58 37 pc 65 46
Omaha 44 36 .09 pc 60 46
Palm Springs 97 63 pc 84 62
Philadelphia 71 47 s 66 46
Phoenix 96 68 pc 92 67
Pittsburgh 71 48 s 74 44
Portland, ME 56 38 s 61 39
Portland, Ore 83 47 s 83 53
Providence, R.I. 63 41 s 65 42
Raleigh 64 49 sh 65 55
Rapid City 58 25 pc 62 42
Reno 70 46 ts 76 48
Rochester, NY 75 53 s 77 50
Sacramento 90 61 pc 75 56
St. Louis 51 41 sh 59 50
St. Ste. Marie 74 51 pc 67 39
Salt Lake City 74 42 ts 76 52
San Antonio 80 42 pc 78 53
San Diego 66 60 c 65 61
San Francisco 84 55 pc 67 52
Savannah 72 58 .41 ts 75 55
Seattle 77 52 s 82 52
Spokane 71 46 s 78 47
Syracuse 75 45 s 77 47
Topeka 50 37 .09 pc 62 46
Washington 69 50 pc 63 47
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 98 Borrego Springs, Calif. LOW 11 Angel
Fire, N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/73/pc
Amsterdam 63/44/pc
Athens 82/63/pc
Beijing 78/58/pc
Berlin 70/48/pc
Bermuda 69/62/pc
Cairo 96/64/s
Calgary 75/46/s
Havana 83/66/pc
Hong Kong 82/75/c
Jerusalem 83/63/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


75/51/s
64/48/c
77/52/s
78/50/pc
79/57/s
66/45/r
69/46/pc
83/69/pc
68/58/sh
66/54/pc
69/54/s
73/46/s
70/46/pc


L LEGAL NOTICES





Fictitious Name Notices.................D6

Bid Notices......................................D6

Meeting Notices...............................D6

Miscellaneous Notices....................D6

Tax Deed Notices.............................D6

S C ITRUS C UNTY



CHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352 563 5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflnder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publish er, 5 6 3-32 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes........................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................ ......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www. chronicleonline. corn
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Ph.. Phone 352-563-6363
g 4 V POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SALT
Continued from Page Al

River, barnacles in the
upper reaches of the With-
lacoochee survey area
seem to be limited by the
vertical extent of the bot-
tom salinity tide.
In King's Bay, the dis-
tribution of barnacles
seems to be more complex,
but they are generally
found throughout the en-
tire bay and were found at
every sampling site with
the exception of KB-7,
where freshwater spring
flow was still significant.
B. subalbidus, a barna-
cle type, is known to be a
self-fertilizing hermaphro-
dite. This capability en-
hances the ability of this
barnacle to colonize new
areas where the presence
of adjacent individuals is
not necessary
Perhaps the most sur-
prising area where barna-
cles were found was the
large spring vent known as
Hammett 16, where barna-
cles were discovered in-


side the cave of this once-
flowing vent. At the time of
this inspection, the water
clarity of the area was very
low, with a strong green
color due to phytoplankton
and an abundance of fila-
mentous green algae that
covered most of the bottom
in this area.
However, Anastasiou
said, the water district has
been funding a series of
restorative projects to help
fight the creeping salinity.
The district recently an-
nounced it invested more
than $2.2 million in springs
protection and restoration
in 2011-12 and has an ap-
proved budget of $3.9 mil-
lion for 2012-13.
It also plans to begin
construction on three
major springs projects in
the next six months, in-
cluding the city of Crystal
River-to-Progress Energy
reclaimed water project,
Chassahowitzka Spring
sediment removal and
Three Sisters Springs wet-
land treatment project.
"Vallisneria americana,
commonly known as eel
grass, is one of the species


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Wooden dock pilings like this one provide evidence the
salt level in the Crystal River is high enough to allow
barnacles to grow.
we are targeting for our Hunters Cove (near
restoration project in Hunters Spring Park) and


other potential areas in the
bay This plant is a salt-tol-
erant freshwater sub-
merged aquatic vegetation
species that once was
prevalent throughout much
of the bay It is common in
estuaries throughout the
Eastern United States and
grows in areas where salin-
ity is as high as 10 ppt,"
Anastasiou said.
Larry Hartman, presi-
dent of TOO FAR, a citizen
group dedicated to conser-
vation of natural re-
sources, contends part of
the reason for the saltwa-
ter intrusion is excessive
withdrawal of ground
water from the aquifer sys-
tem that feeds the springs
and eventually empties
into the bay to act as a bar-
rier to the salt water
Hartman said the lake
systems that are the
recharge points for the
aquifer have been unnatu-
rally tampered with, caus-
ing them to be lower in
volume, with reduced abil-
ity to recharge the aquifer.
The prodigy
Jemison said he grew up


on the banks of the bay and
even during his young life
has seen the deterioration
of the bay
However, it was not until
his first year of high school,
at age 14, that he began his
quest to show the world
how salt water is wending
its way into the bay
Jemison said he took six
8-by6-inch slates and
placed them at various
points in King's Bay, in-
cluding the 1970 demarca-
tion line for brackish and
fresh water
He also studied the veg-
etation and marine life
and noticed some of the
fish and sea grass were not
doing very well, but there
seemed to be an increase
in barnacles.
Jemison concluded his
study recently and said the
increase in the barnacle
populations led him to be-
lieve the saltwater intru-
sion line had moved
further into the bay
Jemison plans to attend
Key West Community Col-
lege, where he expects to
continue his marine re-
search work.


CRYSTAL RIVER TUES., MAY 14TH, 8:30AM-3PM


Wokig -o roec
YorLfeti




Th Vilge -
633-701


Ultrasound can see things mammography 'Y w
cannot in dense breast. Call Today
Early detection is everything. 1-800-338-7499
* Painless, No Compression. (Space Limited -
* Fast Test Results & Confidential Pre-registration required)
* No Prescription Required Email: MHScan@aol.com
* Affordable- $139 HerScan.com


0% APR IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 36 MONTHS!*

A WHOLE LOT OF COMFORT...YOURS FOR ZERO.*

JUST PURCHASE YOUR QUALIFYING TRANE SYSTEM BETWEEN MARCH 15-MAY 31, 2013.



Energy prices have skyrocketed and so

has demand for systems that cut usage.

Trane's XLi high efficiency systems are

among the most cost-effective options

available today. Maximum comfort and

lower heating and cooling costs-that's

the Trane difference.

Federal tax credits available up to $300


CALL NOW FOR THE LOWEST PAYMENTS ON HIGH-

EFFICIENCY TRANE EQUIPMENT*.



352-746-0098 "'


H.E. Smith Co. Inc CIALI

-I', 1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461
www.trane.com


LICENSE # RA0035171


IT'S HARD TO STOP A TRANE. REALLY HARD.


*See your participating independent Trane Comfort SpecialistTM dealer or visit Trane.com for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Available through participating independent Trane
Comfort SpecialistTM dealers. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. Valid on qualifying systems only.


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


tSundcw



fan1t4


on










A man loves his
sweetheart the
most, his wife
the best, but
his mother
the longest.
-Irish Proverb

A man's work
is from sun to
sun, but a
mother's work
is never done.
-Author Unknown


mm s

No catrche...NroAI
*UD tO 31) games per Mom
$2 00 Per Came
Per Person For All Others
* Shoe Rental Extra $2.00/Pair
P MANATEE

HWY 44, CRYSTAL RIVER
795-4546
SORRY, NO OTHER COUPONS CAN BE
USED WITH THIS SPECIAL


I-
V workout




S. .. ..... i

,II- I JI-1,-,,-,

1.: h,,1 : 1H 1:1," I" i I '

jail f'iSe ,


JUST A CUPCAKE
sBal.,T & Ga ,,t
Cftwm- =EE 652-A N. CitrusAve.
601-1556 Crystal River, FL
Mon.-Sat. 10am 5pm ~ Market Day 8am 5pm


Gift Certificates Available



A Full Service Salon & Spa


s5OFF
Any Chemical Service or
Full Set ol Acrylic Nails
or Pedicure
Expires 531/13 Notvalid with any other offer


SEND FLOWERS THAT SAY

YOU LOVE HER LIKE NO OTHER.


Just like Mom, Flowers Can Make You Smile, Give You
Comfort or Make You Laugh. Every Mother Deserves a
Beautiful Bouquet on Mother's Day. Call FLOWER TIME
Direct or Order Mother's Day Flowers Online 24/7.
AMAZING MAY BOUQUET
Mother's Day Flowers
$75.00, $85.00, $95.00
Shown at $85.00


UNFORGETTABLE BEAUTY
Arrangement
$85.00, $95.00, $105.00
Shown at $95.00


FILLED WITH LOVE
Flower Arrangement
$70.00, $80.00, $90.00
Shown at $80.00


SWEETNESS OF LIFE
Arrangement
$55.00, $60.00, $65.00
Shown at $60.00


PURPLE PASSION
Flower Arrangement
$45.00, $50.00, $55.00
Shown at $50.00


STARTS IN THE HEART
Flower Arrangement
$90.00, $100.00, $110.00
Shown at $100.00





CHANTILLY PINK ROSES
Arrangement
$75.00, $85.00, $100.00
Shown at $85.00





DREAMS COME TRUE
Floral Arrangement
$55.00, $60.00, $65.00
Shown at $60.00






DELICATE EMOTIONS
Arrangement
$45.00, $50.00, $55.00
Shown at $45.00


LAVENDER LUXURY
Flower Arrangement
$70.00, $75.00, $80.00
Shown at$75.00


HOME SWEET HOME
Flower Basket
$55.00, $65.00, $75.00
Shown at $65.00


SWEETLY SPRING BASKET
Flower Arrangement
$40.00, $50.00, $60.00
Shown at $50.00






FILLED WITH GLADNESS
Gladiolus Bouquet
$40.00, $50.00, $60.00
Shown at $40.00


FLOWER TIME
Countywide Deliveries & Wireouts -
Shonna Tinsley Owner/Designer
Over 15 Years Experience C .
352-527-7111
www.flowertimeinc.com Teleflora 800flowers
000E.DG 2089 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto, FL


MOTHER'S DAY GIFT BASES!
Premade or Customize your own!
CANDLES CANDY LOTIONS & SOAPS
AMISH GOODS GOOSEBERRY COOKBOOKS
SAVANNAH CINNAMON SYRUPS & MORE!
FU ] UFRI It OPEN 7 DAYS:
Mon.-Fri. lOam-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm
Sun Noon-3pm
I119, 564-0311
...EU2N 639 N. Citrus Ave.


Don't Forget Mother's Day!


For more information go to: georgieoshairdesign.com
153 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River (Nextto Capital City Bank)
is o. a a.nan n


Because

she's
worth it!






Jim Green Jewelers I
Crystal River Shopping Center .
MonF 1665 SE Hwy. 19 Next to Sweetbay, Crystal River -
oan-5:oopm 352-563-0633
Sat. greejewele, CO
11am-S3pm www.limgreenjewelers~com


Ceterate om at



pLANTATION WG8



Mother's Day Brunch

Sunday, May 12
Cc.lc.l', Mrt c N htcir'h Lay ,_it
The Plr~tn- tlri \\"I.'I .2 Bar & Gni,
",_Lt'V II(I .-i 1 clIilt ll Inca Id ( ie cI tic l- t\Ini lv \ ill cInl \ e



$ I c' 4 lu I tllv prep re1 c hil d rII mIll .h r \\I I e
B- :". .,.i .llt-, \I c l l,. A ll. n1.1 \ . .i ill I.. I ..1 t-).1 .l .1.1
c 'r ,lri .nK .,r \ BI rIv M l.l rN \ i im ,.i i.i" l,. n ii\.l

Call for details and to make your reservation today
(352)795-4211


...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................


A6 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HAPPY
Continued from Page Al
Born in 1906, Mrs. Car-
penter grew up on a farm
in upstate New York and
married Harold Carpenter
at age 21. Together they
worked their poultry farm
for 42 years.
Her son Neil said it was
nothing for his mother to
hoist 100-pound bags of
chicken feed.
"She worked hard," he
said. "She used to 'draw'
chickens take the in-
sides out and split them
while my dad would be out
selling the eggs door to
door"
On her 100th birthday,
Mrs. Carpenter told the
Chronicle, 'Across from
our farm we bought a large
tract of land and turned it
into a housing develop-
ment. We called it Carpen-
ter's Acres and named
streets after ourselves. So
there's a Reita Street and
a Harold Street."
When the couple retired
in 1968, they took to the
road. They won $5,000 in
the lottery, bought a trailer


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
New Horizon activity director Elaine Polian holds the hand of Reita Carpenter moments
before her birthday party. Polian said she adores Reita.


and traveled across North
America. Mrs. Carpenter
had always wanted to go to
the Rose Parade in
Pasadena, Calif., so they
went. They saw the Rocky
Mountains, Mexico and
Canada.
Mrs. Carpenter was fas-
cinated by rocks, so they


mined them and made
jewelry
She and her husband
moved to Inverness in
1972; Harold died in 1985.
Shortly thereafter, at age
80, Mrs. Carpenter took


her first plane ride, which
she loved.
In 2009, granddaughter
Nancy O'Malley wrote
about her grandmother in
a paper for a U.S. women's
history class. In it, she


When she would talk to us
about school, she would always
say that getting an education is
the most important thing you
can do in your life.


Nancy O'Malley
granddaughter of Reita Carpenter.


wrote about her grand-
mother wanting to be a
nurse but fearing she
wouldn't be able to learn
"words that are big and
long."
She never finished
school, leaving after the
ninth grade to work on her
parents' farm in upstate
New York.
Because she only had
sisters, her parents would
take in orphaned teenage
boys to help out.
"We never knew that my
grandmother never gradu-
ated until she let it slip,"
O'Malley wrote. "Not finish-
ing school was her biggest
regret It's pretty amazing


that no one knew this about
her When she would talk to
us about school, she would
always say that getting an
education is the most im-
portant thing you can do in
your life."
Seven years ago on her
100th birthday, Mrs. Car-
penter said she has en-
joyed her life.
"I'm curious I always
want to know things," she
said. "I always wonder if
there will be peace. ... I
pray for several heads of
state, but I won't say who."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


"We Cater to Cowards!"
General & Cosmetic Dentistry
HONES T P JAL ^COMPASSIONATE
FREE SECOND OPINION.
Most Insurance Accepted lcense #DN

Ledger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.
Ledg erdentistry.com Se HablaEspanol
Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


Uj


SCREENING

Friday, May 17th

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments
Linda Azwell, OD
Please RSVP 352.795.3317
Crystal Eye Center
1124 N Suncoast Blvd
Crystal River, FL 34429
In association with:
A'IL, ^CATARACT &
,I],V( LASER INSTITUTE
CG ~ "Excellence...with love"
StLukesEye.com
7 .,,;''', ,..",.P T.,''' ,"" :;.d :,':" :4 : ". ,. ..:2 ,! "'''; . ,


HEALTH


New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart)


IilI


I L



I REPLACEMENT I
I HEARING AID
I REPAIRS I
1Must present coupon. Any make or model
In office only. One week only.

r--------*El
Ia r BATTERIES e

PREMIUM ZINCI|
BATTERIES ,




#Limit 1 Coupon Per Visit. Limit 2 Packs Per Visit.
Must present coupon. One week only.


g12 MONTHS

P SAME ASICASH g
WALK-INS WELCOMEpAansA




OVER 60 YEARS SERVING:O %
YOUR HEARING NEEDS I NI
FINANCING
I
THE MOST TRUSTED I ONE WEEK ONLY!' I
NAME IN HEARING! g-----------


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Associated Press
Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius testifies April 12 on Capitol Hill in Washing-
ton, D.C. State officials say thousands of people with
medical problems are in danger of losing coverage.



States fear


losing aid for

'uninsurables'


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Thousands of people with
serious medical problems
are in danger of losing
coverage under President
Barack Obama's health
care overhaul because of
cost overruns, state offi-
cials say
At risk is the Pre-Existing
Condition Insurance Plan,
a transition program
that's become a lifeline
for the so-called uninsur-
ables people with seri-
ous medical conditions
who can't get coverage
elsewhere. The program
helps bridge the gap for
those patients until next
year, when under the new
law insurance companies
will be required to accept
people regardless of their
medical problems.
In a letter this week to
Health and Human Serv-
ices Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius, state officials said
they were "blindsided"
and "very disappointed"
by a federal proposal they
contend would shift the
risk for cost overruns to
states in the waning days
of the program. About
100,000 people are cur-
rently covered.
"We are concerned
about what will become


of our high risk members'
access to this decent and
affordable coverage,"
wrote Michael Keough,
chairman of the National
Association of State Com-
prehensive Health Insur-
ance Plans.
"We fear... catastrophic
disruption of coverage for
these vulnerable individ-
uals," added Keough, who
runs North Carolina's
program.
The root of the problem
is that the federal health
care law capped spend-
ing on the program at $5
billion, and the money is
running out because the
beneficiaries turned out
to be costlier to care for
than expected. Advanced
heart disease and cancer
are common diagnoses
for the group.
Obama did not ask for
any additional funding for
the program in his latest
budget, and a Republican
bid to keep the program
going by tapping other
funds in the health care
law failed to win support
in the House last week.
The administration has
given the state-based
plans until next Wednes-
day to respond to pro-
posed contract terms for
the program's remaining
seven months.


Military school


pays tribute to


11 killed in duty


Associated Press
EGLIN AIR FORCE
BASE, Fla. The elite
school that trains bomb
technicians from all
branches of the military
held a somber ceremony
Saturday to mark the
deaths of 11 graduates
killed in the line of duty
last year
Families of the fallen
and military dignitaries
watched as the men's
names were added to a
memorial wall. The 11
deaths in 2012 bring the
number of military bomb
technicians killed in duty
to 298 since World War II.
The Naval Explosive
Ordnance Disposal
school is on a remote
swath of the sprawling
Eglin Air Force Base in
the Florida Panhandle.
Bomb disposal techni-
cians from all branches of

* Chronicle policy
permits free and
paid obituaries. Call
352-563-5660 for
information.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Candy Phillips
563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com

Cloi n gtimefor
plcn adI isI


the military must gradu-
ate from the school's in-
tense program, which has
a noncompletion rate of
more than 30 percent.
Each year, the school
memorializes graduates
killed in duty the previ-
ous year by listing their
names on the wall outside
school.
Those whose names
were added to the wall
Saturday are: Army Sgt.
Israel Nuanes, 38; Army
Sgt Eric Holman, 39; Army
Sgt. Jonathan Schmidt,
28; Marine Sgt. Joseph
D'Augustine, 29; Marine
Sgt. Joseph Fankhauser,
30; Marine Sgt. John Hul-
ing, 25; Marine Sgt. Sky
Mote, 27; Navy Petty Offi-
cer Taylor Gallant, 22; Navy
Lt. Christopher Mosko,
28; Navy SEAL and EOD
team leader Sean Carson,
32; and Air Force Airman
Bryan Bell, 23.


C. Stephen
Dixon, 50
HOMOSASSA
C. Stephen Dixon, 50, of
Homosassa, died Friday,
May 3,2013, at home under
the loving care of his fam-
ily and Hospice of Citrus
County. He was born Dec.
20, 1962, in Clearwater,
Fla., to Marjorie and
Charles
Dixon and
'^ came
here 42
years ago
from Olds-
mar. He
was the
field oper-
C. Stephen nations su-
Dixon pervisor
for the Citrus County
Board of County Commis-
sioners Department of En-
gineering, with 30 years of
service. He enjoyed boat-
ing, loved motorcycles and
spoiling his granddaugh-
ter
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 28 years, San-
dra Dixon; sons Dustin
Dixon (Carrie) of Ho-
mosassa and Darren
Dixon (Chelley) of Citrus
Springs; brothers Robert
Taggart of Homosassa and
Lawrence Taggart of Flo-
ral City; sisters Janet
Sparks (Clifford) of Spring
Hill and Dorothy Hennick
of Gainesville; and grand-
daughter Hailey Dixon.
A memorial service will
be at 3 p.m. Thursday, May
9, at Strickland Funeral
Home Chapel in Crystal
River. Friends are invited
to visitation with the fam-
ily from 2 p.m. until serv-
ice time. A procession to
Fountains Memorial Park
Cemetery for inurnment
services will follow.
Arrangements are under
the care of Strickland Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

John
Giammasi, 97
BEVERLY HILLS
John Giammasi, 97, Bev-
erly Hills, died May 3,
2013, at Woodland Terrace.
Mr. Giammasi was born
July 11, 1915, in Provi-
dence, R.I., to the late Gae-
tano and Stella (Olivo)
Giammasi and moved to
this area in 2001 from St.
Augustine, Fla.
He retired from the bev-
erage distributing busi-
ness and attended Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church in Beverly Hills,
where he was a member of
the Knights of Columbus.
He was predeceased by
his wife of 67 years,
Leonarda "Lee" Gi-
ammasi, in November
2005. Surviving are two
children, John Giammasi
and wife Elaine of Beverly
Hills, Fla., and Guy Gi-
ammasi and wife Patricia
of Centerville, Mass.;
seven grandchildren; and
eight great-grandchildren.
Graveside services will
be private in St. Francis
Cemetery, Pawtucket, R.I.
There will be a memorial
Mass announced at a later
date at St. Jude's Catholic
Church, Lincoln, R.I. The
Bellows-Falso Funeral
Home in Lincoln, R.I., is in
charge. Local arrange-
ments under the direction
of Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, Fla. In lieu of
flowers, memorials re-
quested to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. cornm.


New Patient Specials

Full Mouth X-Rays, S
Comprehensive Exam


We Meet All Your N
Dental Needs, in
Including Implants Fro
Fi

Family Friendly
Call today! 352-527-1614
Alexsa Davila,
DMD DN 15390
Walton Van Hoose,
DMD DN 18101
Citrus Hills Dental
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza


ot in conjunction with insurance
Offer expires in 30 days
house denture lab
e Denture Consults
nancing available
Most insurance
accepted.


It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mm FeeADAcode D0210, D0150A


Frederick 'Ted'
Gustina, 85
HOMOSASSA
Our 85-year-old "very
special" and "one-of-a-
kind," "outstanding and
precious" husband Mar-
cille Gustina passed on
into the arms of our Lord
April 29, 2013.
Ted was a U.S. Navy vet-
eran in World War II dur-
ing Japanese occupation
and at Bikini Atoll for Op-
eration Crossbow testing
atomic weapons. He
worked for NASA in Cali-
fornia then returned to his
birth home of Syracuse,
N.Y, to take over the fam-
ily printing business for
the next 40 years.
Ted was a member of
The Elks Lodge (55 years),
The Lions Club (8 years),
VFW and The American
Legion. He was an avid
golfer, a fisher, deer
hunter, a good bowler, a
penny-ante poker player
and a hand and foot card
player. He was a lovable,
kindhearted, considerate
people person with a great
sense of humor known for
his timed jokes.
He is survived by his
wife Marcille of Ho-
mosassa; his sister Peggy
Sopcheck; brother Jack
Gustina of Syracuse, N.Y;
his daughters Jeanette
Forsythe and her husband
Lance of Homosassa,
Carol Taylor of Syracuse,
N.Y, Ardell Allen of Ithica,
N.Y, Linda McKeighen of
Tampa, Patrice Spannagel
of Flowery Branch, Ga.,
and Michelle Lilly of New
Boston, Ill. He is a treas-
ured grandfather to 16 and
great-grandfather to 23.
Memorial service will be
2 p.m. May 13, 2013, at
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church, 2540 W
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486),
Lecanto, FL 34462.


OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.
www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com


Than Just
Lorrie Verticals
\-BEST ''
,,ESiT 2" Faux Wood
" -Woven Woods
Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
*Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments
* Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to SugarmillFamily Rest.)
Sei
I


Eleanor
Norton, 74
HOMOSASSA
Eleanor C. Norton, 74, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away Thursday, April 18,
2013, at Seven Rivers hos-
pital, Crystal River, Fla.
She was born Jan. 27, 1939,
in Hartford, Conn., to the
late Russell and Marion
(Bigley) Chapman. Eleanor
was a credit analyst for
Chesebrough-Pond's, and
arrived in this area in
2004, coming from Clinton,
Conn. She attended Calvary
Baptist Church in Crystal
River. Her memberships
include Orange Blossom
Pomona and Marion
Grange No. 207 in Belle-
view; Order of the Eastern
Star Olive Branch Lodge
No. 87, Madison, Conn.;
Key Training Center; the
animal shelter and pro-
adoption group.
She was preceded in
death by one great-great-
grandchild, Kenneth
Carde. Survivors include
her loving husband of 41
years, the Rev Dr. Alan
(TOM) Norton. Other sur-
vivors include three sons,
Craig Norton of Ho-
mosassa, Gary Norton
(Jean) of Nova Scotia and
Kenny Norton of Canada;
two daughters, Kimberly
Langille of Nova Scotia
and Kimberly Norton of
Toronto, Ontario, Canada;
three grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
A Celebration of Life
Memorial Service is
scheduled for 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, May 11, 2013, at the
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory, In-
verness, with Pastor
Charles Robertson of Cal-
vary Baptist Church in
Crystal River officiating.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made in
Eleanor's name to either
the Key Training Center,
or Citrus County Founda-
tion for Animal Protection.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.


"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


&.i.. ai
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation Veter a l
rMemorial Carev

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!--


IBrow


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. .
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


S., S S -



PI DII I*r~ I,' t I *[ I 'If~~

Come join the National Cremation Society for a
FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
When the time comes wouldn't you
prefer your loved ones celebrate
your legacy rather than stress about
making arrangements? Give them
the relief they'll need during a
tough time.
We'll discuss:
* Affordable options and savings
* Veterans benefits
* Worldwide Away-From-Home
Protection
* And much more...
RESERVATION REQUIRED
Limited seating available.
CALL NOW!
1-352-319-6816
FirI lilli alhlnt6ld i inly please.
*Free cremation does notinclude Travel Protection Plan


Lend



Your



Ear TM


.- W2


Hearing in Noise
Comparison
Study
Participants
Sought
Gardner Audiology,
a leader in hearing
satisfaction research, is
seeking participants to
evaluate and compare
a new advanced noise
suppression technology
in hearing aids that hide
inside your ear canal
verses behind the ear
models.
In exchange for
completing a pre and
post-fitting questionnaire
Gardner will loan you the
hearing aid model of your
choice for a free 30 day
field study. Audiologists
with advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.
At the end of 30 days
you will return the loaner
aids or purchase them
with a generous discount.
It is your choice.


Call 1.800.277.1182
to schedule a free
candidate screening

3000 Central Florida
residents have participated
in Gardner Audiology
research studies










Crystal River
and Inverness
Offices
www.gardneraudiology.com


A8 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


OOOET3V


m





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LAWMAKERS
Continued from PageAl

The Republican governor wanted
the 6 percent tax eliminated perma-
nently, and lawmakers approved a
bill that would eliminate the tax for
three years. Lawmakers also pro-
vided money for teacher raises,
though it will be doled out based on
teacher performance rather than
across the board like Scott wanted.
The ethics bill will allow the
Florida Commission on Ethics to gar-
nish wages if officials don't pay fines
- in the past, many just ignored
them. The commission will also be
able to take complaints from the gov-
ernor, Florida Department of Law
Enforcement and state and U.S. at-
torneys and will have to post officials'
financial disclosure forms online.
Lawmakers won't be able to lobby any
state agency for two years after leav-
ing office and won't be able to take
new government jobs while in office.
And lawmakers accomplished all
that and more while wrapping up
business exactly one hour before
sunset on the final day a far cry
from recent session endings that
lasted deep into the night.
"I've been in this town 12, 13 years.
I've never seen a House and a Senate


managed better I've never seen a ses-
sion managed better," said Florida
Chief Financial Officer Jeff Atwater,
who is a former Senate president
Still, the Legislature did nothing
to expand Medicaid, as Scott and the
Senate wanted. That, though, wasn't
really mentioned by the leaders as
they claimed success.
Democratic Senate Leader Chris
Smith did give Gaetz credit for trying.
"The Medicaid plan his chamber
crafted is testament to his commit-
ment to bipartisan cooperation. My
biggest disappointment is the re-
fusal by House Republicans to ac-
cept the Senate proposal. It was an
opportunity lost for the people of
Florida," Smith said in a statement
issued after the session ended.
The Legislature did send Scott a
bill that would make it illegal to dye
bunnies, chicks and ducklings. That
comes a year after the Legislature
and Scott rescinded a 45-year-old
ban on dyeing animals.
Lawmakers also shut down Inter-
net cafes that offered slot machine-
like games and passed a bong ban
that makes the sale of marijuana
pipes illegal, as well as a bill that
would limit law enforcement agen-
cies use of remotely controlled air-
craft known as drones.
Other bills would make it illegal to
send text messages while driving and


to hold protests at funerals. Another
measure would close a loophole to
guard against gun purchases by peo-
ple with mental illness. People who
voluntarily admit themselves for
treatment, then quickly check out
would be put into databases to pre-
vent them from buying guns.
Two bills were aimed at helping
foster children. One would allow
them to remain in foster care until
they are 21 and the other Scott
signed will give foster parents more
freedom to make decisions for the
children they take care of, such as
joining sports teams and going on
school field trips. Foster parents will
also be able to teach teenagers in
their care how to drive.
Another measure bans the use of
welfare recipients' electronic cash
cards at "adult entertainment estab-
lishments" such as strip clubs and
casinos.
Lawmakers also sent Scott a bill
that would require medical care for
newborns who survive botched
abortions. Another bill that would
have banned abortions based on the
race or gender of the fetus failed.
Democrats were pleased with
other bills that failed, including a
measure that would have allowed
parents to vote on one of several
turnaround options for bad schools
through a petition drive.


Associated Press
Florida Gov. Rick Scott gets a kiss Friday from Victoria
Quertermous Gaetz, wife of Senate President Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville (not pictured), after the end of the legislative
session in the Capitol in Tallahassee.


-52597883


I -wwNe Stu0y


If you have trouble hearing on the phone, an amplified 9i
phone may help. FTRI offers free amplified telephones 14
to Florida residents with hearing loss. Cordless phones,
captioned phones and phones that amplify your speech are a few of the
options available at locations statewide.


BRFASTAUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


STATE


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 A9





A10 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013

County BRIEFS

Update driving
skills with AARP
Florida is a mandated state
and any insurance company
doing business in Florida
must give a discount to those
completing an AARP Safe
Driving Course, open to all
age 50 and older. Update to
earn a discount and learn
about newly enacted motor
vehicle and traffic laws.
Course fee is $12 for AARP
members; $14 for all others.
Call the listed instructor to
register:
Crystal River, Homosassa
May 9 and 10, 8:30 a.m.,
First Christian Church of Ho-
mosassa, 7030 Grover Cleve-
land Blvd., Homosassa
Springs.
Call Carol Thomas at 352-
746-2416.
May 14 and 15, 12:30
p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Seven
Rivers Hospital Annex.
Call Hedda Smith at 352-
527-8144.
May 21 and 22, 1 to 4
p.m., Coastal Region Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Call Lou Harmin at 352-
564-0933
May 16 and 17, 8:30
a.m., First Christian Church of
Homosassa, 7030 Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa
Springs.
Call Carol Thomas at 352-
746-2416.
May 21 and 22, 9 a.m. to
noon, St. Benedict Church
Parish Hall, 455 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River.
Call Pat Hubbell at 352-
586-2731.
May 23 and 24, 8:30
a.m., First Christian Church of
Homosassa, 7030 Grover
Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa
Springs.
Call Carol Thomas at 352-
746-2416.
Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs
May 13 and 15, 8:15 to
11:15 am., Citrus County Re-
source Center, 2804 W. Mark
Knighton Court, Lecanto, (off
County Road 491; same
building as VA clinic).
Call Theresa Williams at
352-746-9497.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TV or not TV? Technology can outpace our lives


Remember when TV used to
sign off for the night? No
infomercials, no reruns,
no experimental public-
access foolishness --
nothing at all but snow.
Or, if you were lucky, a
test pattern. Try ex-
plaining a test pattern
to someone who's ,
never seen one. It's like
getting "tube tester" as
your word in charades.
"Two words, sounds
like oh, I give up." J
Here's a little exper-
iment: Tell your grand- MUL
children that, after
midnight, every night, all three
channels used to play "The Star-
Spangled Banner" and then go
off the air for six or seven hours.
See if they believe you or if they
think you're pulling their leg.
"Three channels? You're just
funning me. You mean three hun-
dred, right? You're talking about
back in the Olden Days when you
guys only had three hundred
channels to pick from. It must
have been miserable."
Will they believe you if you tell


EOE


II


them there was a time when, if
you wanted to change the chan-
nel, you actually had to get out of
your chair, walk to the TV set and
turn the channel knob?
You didn't watch three
seconds of one show
and then click around
the dial to see what
else was on. You'd
watch the same station
for a half-hour. Why
the channel dial had 12
numbers on it was al-
M ways a mystery Would
there ever be 12 chan-
LEN nels? Who could ever
watch so much televi-
sion? You'd have to be glued to
the sofa. When would you have
time to go bowling or go to the
movies? You'd have no time to
play; you'd never see your friends.
You'd have to do nothing but sit in
front of the TV all day long. You'd
be isolated and unhappy
Will youngsters believe you
when you tell them that you had to
wait for the set to warm up? That
you had to get up from the sofa
once again to adjust your horizon-
tal and vertical settings to keep


that thick black bar from scrolling
up and down the screen? Adjust-
ing the antenna might help but
by the time you got it just right, the
show would be half over
Will they believe you when you
tell them about television repair
shops? Repair a TV? Why? You
just throw it out and get a new
one. And why wait for it to break?
Let's just get a newer, bigger, bet-
ter one right now.
Will they believe you when you
tell them the idea of having two
TV sets in one house would never
have occurred to most people?
Having one was a huge luxury;
who in the world could afford two
of them? It'd be like having more
than one phone. What on Earth
for? We're all going to watch the
same show, anyway The sofa ma-
jority rules. If four people wanted
to watch Ed Sullivan and two
wanted to watch "Wagon Train,"
you'd watch Ed Sullivan. Maybe
every couple of weeks you'd let
the losers watch what they
wanted on the giant 15-inch TV
The TV screen itself wasn't
giant, mind you, but the console it
came in sure was. It was 12 feet


00m'jOItt.
g uppot /t.
Find out what these values can
mean for your career.
HPH Hospice is a not-for-profit community-
based healthcare organization providing
innovative, skilled medical care to patients with
life-limiting illness and compassionate support
to their family members. We are currently
searching for qualified candidates with a Florida
Licensed RNs with acute care and nursing
management experience. Hospice experience
highly preferred.
Hospice CenAter Admlnistfrator
HPH Hospice is currently seeking a nursing
manager for our Citrus County Hospice House
and then our Care Center, when completed.
To learn more about becoming a part of our
team and to view other nursing opportunities,
please visit our website at www.hph-hospice.org
(under Careers) or contact our recruiter.
727-868-7971
18107 Ma.jestic Blvd.
Hudson, FL 34667


H DkhospIce


long and weighed a couple of tons.
It'd take the delivery men three
hours to get it into the house. It
had a radio, a record player
(we're back to charades again), a
storage bin for records, a bar and
a TV and it matched our colonial
furniture so it wouldn't shock the
Founding Fathers if they ever
showed up to watch "The Beverly
Hillbillies."
It was great until something
went wrong. Then the whole
thing would have to go to the shop
and the delivery men were
nowhere to be found. It'd take the
whole family to stuff the monster
into a borrowed station wagon
and lug it down to the shop,
where they would keep it for a
week. A week without television?
Suddenly, that second TV didn't
seem like such a bad idea. And
the shop was full of new and bet-
ter ones. There was talk of color
TV We can always put the old one
down in the rec room when it
comes back.

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


The Savings
Are Yours
Because
The Factory
Is Ours!



i _- - :1 :


5 BLIND FACTORY

1657 W GULF TO LAKE HWY* LECANTO 52 0012
www.72-hourblinds.com "P2 --M M


y FLORIDA CANCER



& Research Institute


World Class Medicine.


Hometown Care.


S


V. Upender Rao, MD


Sunil Gandhi, MD


Gustavo Fonseca, MD


Marion T. Chirayath, MD


521 N. Lecanto Hwy


* Lecanto, FL 34461


* (352) 746.0707


___________________L __________LOCALLY.


Patrick Acevedo, MD
Jorge Ayub, MD
Sawsan G. Bishay, MD
Marion T. Chirayath, MD
Mamta T. Choksi, MD
Jennifer L. Cultrera, MD
Gustavo Fonseca, MD, FACP
Sunil Gandhi, MD, FACP
Larry Gandle, MD
Vivian Griffin, MD
Mary M. Li, MD, PhD
Vikas Malhotra, MD
Arthur Joseph Matzkowitz, MD
V. Upender Rao, MD, FACP
Joseph M. Sennabaum, MD
Gerald H. Sokol, MD, MSc, FCP
Thomas H. Tang, MD
David Wenk, MD
Gail Wright, MD, FACP, FCCP


TALL IASS E


8 Convenient Nature Coast Locations


BROOKSVILLE
7154 Medical Center Dr.
Spring Hill, FL 34608
(352) 596.1926

HUDSON
7651 Medical Dr.
Hudson, FL
(727) 868.9208

INVERNESS
2231 Highway 44 W #203
Inverness, FL 34453
(352) 860.7400

LAND 0' LAKES
19409 Shumard Oak Dr.
Suite 101
Land 0' Lakes, FL 34638
(727) 842.8411


LECANTO
521 N. Lecanto Hwy
Lecanto, FL 34461
(352) 746.0707


NEW PORT RICHEY
8763 River Crossing Blvd.
New Port Richey, FL 34655
(727) 842.8411

SPRING HILL
11063 County Line Road
Spring Hill, FL 34609
(352) 688.7744

ZEPHYRHILLS
38010 Medical Center Ave.
Zephyrhills, FL 33540
(813) 783.1676


Gainsvil e


TAMPA






* Nature Coast
FCS Locations


Additional
FCS Locations


17 FL^ancencom 71


N


')RLANDO


Sebring


m-1


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bills that passed in state Legislature


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE Leg-
islation that passed during
the 2013 regular session of
the Florida Legislature,
which ended Friday:
BUSINESSES
Would exempt manu-
facturers from paying the 6
percent state sales tax on
new equipment purchases
from April 30, 2014, to
April 30, 2017.
Would forbid local
governments from requir-
ing businesses to offer
paid or unpaid family and
medical leave.
Would revise the
amount of reimbursement
for certain prescription
drugs used by injured
workers in an attempt to
lower workers' compensa-
tion insurance costs.
EDUCATION
Will roll back gradua-
tion standards adopted
just three years ago; let the
University of Florida take
the lead in online educa-
tion and offer bachelor de-
grees completely online.
Would expand the au-
thority of Florida's public
schools to discipline stu-
dents for cyberbullying
done through use of a
school computer, at the
site of a school-sponsored
activity or on a school bus.
CRIME
Will limit law enforce-
ment agencies' use of the
remotely controlled air-
craft known as drones.
Would make it illegal
to possess without permis-
sion other people's per-
sonal information such as
Social Security numbers,
driver's licenses, medical
records, passports, bank
account numbers, credit
cards and Medicaid or
food assistance account
numbers unless they have
authorization.
Banned Internet cafes
where patrons played slot
machine-like games for
cash prizes.
Would make it illegal
to send text messages
while driving.
Would make it illegal
to dye bunnies, chicks and
ducklings and sell or give
away as a promotion
chickens or ducks under
four weeks of age or bun-
nies under two months of
age to be used as pets.
Would make it illegal
for shops to "knowingly and
willfully" sell pipes used to
consume illegal drugs.
Adds 27 new designer
drugs to the state's con-
trolled substances list.
Prohibits protesting or
picketing within 500 feet of
any funeral or burial from
one hour before to one
hour after the ceremony
Would prohibit a con-
victed rapist from having
any custody rights if the
rape results in a child.
Would raise from 11 to
16 the age at which out-of-
court statements child vic-
tims make to investigators
can be used at the trials of
the people accused of sex-
ually abusing them.
Would require offi-


BILLS THAT FAILED IN STATE LEGISLATURE


Measures that failed during the 2013 regular ses-
sion of the Florida Legislature, which ended Friday,
would have:
ABORTION
* Banned abortions that are based on the race or
gender of a fetus.
BUSINESS & ECONOMY
* Helped the Miami Dolphins by kicking in money
toward the $400 million needed for Sun Life Sta-
dium renovations.
* Set uniform state standards for workers to seek
compensation from employers when they say they
haven't been paid their full wages.
* Allowed Florida's craft breweries to sell 64-ounce
containers of beer for customers to take home.
COURTS
* Prohibited judges from applying foreign law -
including Shariah, or Islamic law in Florida cases.
* Eliminated mandatory life sentences for juveniles
convicted of first-degree murder and allowed judges
to consider factors like an offender's age and
maturity at the time of the crime, but required a
50-year minimum sentence.
* Allowed grandparents to petition for visitation rights
to their minor grandchildren.
* Required a jury in a murder trial to recommend the
death penalty unanimously instead of by a majority.
CRIME & PUNISHMENT
* Criminalized "revenge porn," the posting and
identifying of nude photos, which is usually intended
to humiliate an ex-lover.
* Made it illegal to allow an "open party" if a minor
possessed or was consuming alcohol, or taking
drugs.
* Allowed someone licensed to carry a concealed
weapon to do so at a concert, sporting game, or
other event.
* Required an alleged attacker to commit an "overt
act" before using self-defense under the state's
"Stand Your Ground" law.


cials to determine whether
suspects in custody are
registered sexual offend-
ers and, if so, not release
them before their first
court appearance.
Would close a loop-
hole to guard against gun
purchases by people with
mental illness. People who
voluntarily admit them-
selves for treatment, then
quickly check out would
be put into databases to
prevent them from buying
guns.
ETHICS, ELECTIONS
Will limit campaign
contribution limits, now at
$500 per contributor per
election for all offices, to
$1,000 for legislative and
local races and $3,000 for
statewide races.
Will allow the Florida
Commission on Ethics to
garnish wages if officials
don't pay fines; allow the
commission to take com-
plaints from the governor,
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement and
state and U.S. attorneys;
require officials' financial
disclosure forms be posted
online; ban lawmakers
from lobbying any state
agency for two years after
leaving office; will pro-
hibit lawmakers from tak-
ing new government jobs
while in office; prohibit
lawmakers from voting on
any bills that could di-
rectly affect their personal
finances; require lawmak-
ers to take ethics training.
Would allow elections
supervisors to email sam-
ple ballots to voters who
provide their email ad-
dresses on registration


EDUCATION
* Allowed Florida teachers and other school
employees to carry firearms to fight back in the
event of a schoolhouse attack.
* Let parents at failing public schools help to "trigger"
turnaround plans, including handing them over to
private educational management companies, by
allowing them to vote on an option.
* Permitted U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants to
pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities.
GOVERNMENT
* Closed the state pension plan to new state and
county employees and teachers and made them sign
up for retirement accounts similar to 401(k) plans.
HEALTH CARE
* Took $50 billion in federal money over the next
decade to expand health care coverage for needy
Floridians as allowed under the Affordable Care Act,
in lieu of a Medicaid expansion.
* Required doctors and pharmacists to check the
state's prescription drug tracking system, a
database that monitors who is getting prescriptions
in Florida.
* Created a needle-exchange pilot program in Miami-
Dade County.
INSURANCE
* Eliminated the state's no-fault Personal Injury
Protection auto insurance.
MOTOR VEHICLES
* Rolled back sharp increases in auto fees that the
state adopted three years ago to close a large
budget gap and paid for them by eliminating a
payroll tax credit to insurance companies.
PASSED BUT VETOED
* Another bill passed by the Legislature but vetoed by
Gov. Rick Scott would have ended permanent
alimony in Florida, limited how much alimony an
ex-spouse could receive and required judges to give
divorced parents equal custody of their children
absent extraordinary circumstances.


forms rather than mailing ical care for newborns who 0 Would require health
paper copies. survive botched abortions. insurers to provide the


ENVIRONMENT
Would keep intact an
existing tax on farmers in
the northern Everglades
until 2036. The money will
be used to help pay for
water quality restoration
projects that are part of an
$880 million Everglades
restoration plan that was
negotiated between Scott
and the federal govern-
ment. The legislation also
calls for spending $32 mil-
lion a year for the next 10
years.
Would ensure state
taxes won't be charged on
natural gas used as vehicle
fuel for five years, and sets
aside $6 million for a nat-
ural gas-fueled vehicle re-
bate program.
SOCIAL SERVICES
Would allow youths to
remain in foster care until
age 21.
Will give foster par-
ents more freedom to
make decisions for the
children they take care of,
such as joining sports
teams and going on school
field trips. Foster parents
will also be able to teach
teenagers in their care
how to drive.
Would ban the use of
welfare recipients' elec-
tronic cash cards at "adult
entertainment establish-
ments" like strip clubs and
casinos.
HEALTH
Will expand the drug-
prescribing powers of
optometrists.
Would require med-


same level of coverage for
cancer treatments given
orally as those drugs ad-
ministered intravenously.
CONSUMERS
Would make it easier
to evict tenants if they only
pay partial rent or if they
break rules like parking in
the wrong spot or having
an unauthorized pet twice
in a year.
Would legalize wine
barrels that hold just more
than five gallons.
Would create a new
"clearinghouse" designed
to steer homeowners to ac-
cept private insurers in-
stead of having them
obtain coverage through
Citizens Property Insur-
ance. It would also phases
in over three years a
$700,000 cap on the value
of homes that can be in-
sured by Citizens.
MISCELLANEOUS
Would allow the state
to seek restitution for
property and money Ger-
many's Nazi government
took from Holocaust vic-
tims during World War II.
Would create a public
records exemption for the
names of spouses and chil-
dren of law enforcement
officers.
Would make sure
Floridians have the right
to be heard at local gov-
ernment and state agency
meetings.
Would shield charities
from having to return
money they took in good
faith from people later re-
vealed to be scam artists.


Experience the Difference


Whether you're
looking for a smile
makeover or a
cleaning our
friendly staff will
make you feel
comfortable without
the sales tactics or
the lecture.


FREE SECOND OPINION

"We Cater

to Cowards!"


Ledger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.
Next to ACE
in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443
Ledgerdentistry.com


Has it been too long
since your last

Girls Night Out?


HEALTHconnect has the specialists and information you need.
Join us for Girls Night Out. We'll have physicians and clinical professionals available for
one-on-one discussions about important women's health concerns such as breast health,
incontinence, heart disease and osteoporosis. This Women'sWorks program will give you
the tools you need to be a healthier you. Women of all ages are welcome.


Women'sWorks: Tools for a Healthier You
Thursday, May 9, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, Main Lobby
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
Program is free and includes:
Mini-makeovers and beauty advice
Service demonstrations and product samples
Gourmet refreshments and door prizes

Let HEALTHconnect link good living with good health.


First 50 guests
wearing orange or
purple will receive
a Women'sWorks
bracelet charm.


, SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
SevenRiversRegional.com
Your Life. Our Story.


s1


Registration required.
352.795.1234


STATE


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 All


01 1


MFRCR





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


All about immigration: Green cards? Citizenship?


Associated Press

WASHINGTON This
may be the year Congress
decides what to do about
the millions of immigrants
living illegally in the U.S.
After years of gridlock,
there are ideas whizzing
all around Washington.
For now, all eyes are on
an 844-page Senate pro-
posal with the you-said-a-
mouthful title of the
"Border Security, Eco-
nomic Opportunity and
Immigration Moderniza-
tion Act of 2013."
Look for the Senate Ju-
diciary Committee to take
its first votes on the legis-
lation on Thursday
What's in that bill? Is
there a Plan B? And who
are all these immigrants,
once you get past the big
round numbers?
A big dose of facts, fig-
ures and other informa-
tion to help understand
the current debate:
WHY NOW? Major
problems with U.S. immi-
gration have been around
for decades.
President George W
Bush tried to change the
system and failed. Presi-
dent Barack Obama prom-
ised to overhaul it in his
first term but never did.
In Obama's second term,
he's making immigration a
priority, and Republicans
also appear ready to deal.
Why the commitment?
Obama won 71 percent
of Hispanic votes in his
2012 re-election campaign,
and he owes them. Last
year's election also sent a
loud message to Republi-
cans that they can't ignore
this pivotal voting bloc.
It's been the kind of
breathtaking turnaround
you rarely see in politics.
Plus, there's growing pres-
sure from business lead-
ers, who want to make it
easier for the U.S. to at-
tract highly educated im-
migrants and to legally
bring in more lower-
skilled workers such as
farm laborers.
WHAT'S THE PROB-
LEM? Talk about "com-
prehensive immigration
reform" generally centers
on four main questions:
What to do about the
11 million-plus immigrants
who live in the U.S. with-
out legal permission.
How to tighten border
security
How to keep busi-
nesses from employing
people who are in the U.S.
illegally
How to improve the
legal immigration system,
now so convoluted that the
adjective "Byzantine"
pops up all too frequently
WHAT'S THE GANG OF
EIGHT? A group of four
Democrats and four Re-
publicans in the Senate
that crafted a bill to ad-
dress all four questions. In
a nutshell, this proposal
would tighten border con-
trols, allow more high- and
low-skilled workers to
legally immigrate, require
employers to verify their
workers have legal status,
and create an opportunity
for those who are in the
U.S. illegally to eventually
become citizens.
IS THERE A PLAN B?
And C and D.
Obama has his own
backup plan in case con-
gressional talks fail, but


he's given his support to
the Senate bill as a worthy
compromise.
In the House, Republi-
can Rep. Bob Goodlatte,
the head of the House Ju-
diciary Committee, said
his committee will tackle
the main immigration is-
sues one by one, instead of
starting with a single
sweeping bill.
Separately, there's a bi-
partisan House group
working on legislation.
Obama said he will keep
an open mind about the
various proposals, but the
final deal has to address
all the big issues.
COMING TO AMERICA.
A record 40.4 million immi-
grants live in the U.S., rep-
resenting 13 percent of the
population. More than 18
million are naturalized cit-
izens, 11 million are legal
permanent or temporary
residents, and more than
11 million are in the coun-
try without legal permis-
sion, according to the Pew
Hispanic Center, a private
research organization.
Those in the U.S. ille-
gally made up about 3.7
percent of the U.S. popula-
tion in 2010. While overall
immigration has steadily
grown, the number of im-
migrants in the U.S. ille-
gally peaked at 12 million
in 2007.
WHERE FROM?
Twenty-nine percent of the
foreign-born in the U.S., or
about 11.7 million people,
came from Mexico. About
25 percent came from
South and East Asia, 9 per-
cent from the Caribbean, 8
percent from Central
America, 7 percent South
America, 4 percent the
Middle East and the rest
from elsewhere.
The figures are more
lopsided for immigrants
living here illegally: An es-
timated 58 percent are
from Mexico. The next
closest figure is 6 percent
from El Salvador, says the
government.
WHERE TO? California
has the largest share of the
U.S. immigrant popula-
tion, 27 percent, followed
by New York, New Jersey,
Florida, Nevada, Hawaii
and Texas, according to
the Migration Policy Insti-
tute, a private group fo-
cused on global
immigration issues.
California has the
largest share of immi-
grants in the U.S. illegally,
at 25 percent, followed by


Texas with 16 percent.
Florida and New York
each have 6 percent, and
Georgia has 5 percent, ac-
cording to the Department
of Homeland Security
GETTING IN: Here's one
way to think about the ways
immigrants arrive in the
U.S: Some come in the front
door, others the side door
and still others the back
door, as laid out in a report
from the private Population
Reference Bureau.
Arriving through the
front door: people legally
sponsored by their fami-
lies or employers. Also
refugees and asylum-seek-
ers, and immigrants who
win visas in an annual "di-
versity" lottery
Side door: legal tempo-
rary arrivals, including
those who get visas to visit,
work or study There are
dozens of types ofnonimmi-
grantvisas, available to peo-
ple ranging from business
visitors to foreign athletes
and entertainers. Visitors
from dozens of countries
don't even need visas.
Back door: Somewhat
more than half of those in
the U.S. illegally have
come in the back door,
evading border controls,
Pew estimates. The rest
legally entered, but didn't
leave when they were sup-
posed to or otherwise vio-
lated terms of their visas.
IS IT A CRIME? Simply
being in the United States
in violation of immigration
laws isn't, by itself, a
crime; it's a civil violation.
Entering the country
without permission is a
misdemeanor criminal of-
fense. Re-entering the
country without authoriza-
tion after being formally
removed can be felony
Pew estimates that a lit-
tle less than half of immi-
grants who lack legal
permission to live in the
U.S. didn't enter the coun-
try illegally. They over-
stayed their visas, worked
without authorization,
dropped out of school or
otherwise violated the
conditions of their visas.
WHAT'S IN A NAME?
There are varying and
strong opinions about how
best to refer to the 11 mil-
lion-plus people who are
in the U.S. without legal
permission.
Illegal immigrants? Un-
documented workers?
Unauthorized population?
Illegal aliens?
The last has generally


Cetr le vTflom at

PLANTATION
JL on Crystal River

Mother's Day Brunch
Sunday, May 12
Celebrate Mother's Day at
The Plantation's West 820 Bar & Grill,
featuring a delightful meal the entire family will enjoy!
Our especially prepared I..m rii. will be
served from 11:30am-3pm.
Reservations are required. .11 I. .. .1,,,.' in the lounge.
$34.95 adults, $15.95 children. All mothers will be offered a
complimentary Bloody Mary or Mimosa upon arrival.
Call for details and to make your reservation today
(352)795-4211


fallen out of favor. Some
immigrant advocates are
pressing a "Drop the I-
Word" campaign, arguing
that it is dehumanizing to
refer to people as "illegal."
"Undocumented work-
er" often isn't accurate be-
cause many aren't
workers, and some have
documents from other
countries. Homeland Se-
curity reports refer to
"unauthorized immi-
grants," but the agency
also reports statistics on
"aliens apprehended."
DEFINITIONS OF
TERMS, PLEASE:
Legal permanent resi-
dents (LPRs): people who
have permission to live in
the U.S. permanently but
aren't citizens. They're
also known as "green
card" holders. Most of
them can apply for citizen-
ship within five years of
getting green cards. In
2011, 1.06 million people
got the cards.
Refugees and asylees:
people who come to the
U.S. to avoid persecution
in their home countries.
What's the difference be-
tween the two terms?
Refugees are people who
apply for protective status
before they get to the U.S.
Asylees are people who
apply upon arrival in the
U.S. or later.
Naturalization: The
process by which immi-
grants become U.S. citizens.
GOING GREEN: Is
there an actual green
card? Indeed there is.
It's the Permanent Resi-
dent Card issued to people
who are authorized to live
and work in the U.S. on a
permanent basis. In 2010,
the government re-
designed them to add new
security features and
make them green again.
The cards had been a va-
riety of colors over the
years. New green cards
are good for 10 years for
lawful permanent resi-
dents and two years for
conditional residents.
PATH TO CITIZEN-
SHIP: There's a lot of talk
about creating a "path to
citizenship" for immi-
grants who are in the U.S.


without legal status.
But there's vigorous de-
bate over what conditions
these immigrants should
have to satisfy to get citi-
zenship among them
are paying taxes, fines and
fees, and passing back-
ground checks.
Some legislators want to
set additional conditions,
such as improvements in
border security and in
tracking whether legal im-
migrants leave the country
when required. Others
want to limit immigrants
who are in the U.S. ille-
gally to some sort of legal
status that stops short of
citizenship.
But more than 60 per-
cent of Americans think
those who are here ille-
gally should have a way to
become citizens, according
to an Associated Press-GfK
poll conducted in April.
The Senate bill would
allow those in the country
illegally to obtain "regis-
tered provisional immi-
grant" status six months
after the bill was enacted if
they met certain conditions.
Additional border secu-
rity improvements would
have to go into place be-
fore anyone obtained
green cards or citizenship.
It would take immi-
grants living here illegally
at least 13 years to get all
the way to citizenship.
They'd have to pay taxes,
fees and $2,000 in fines. No
one who entered the coun-
try after Dec. 31, 2011, or
had a felony conviction or
more than three misde-
meanors would be eligible.
THE A-WORD: Nothing
stirs up a hornet's nest like
talk of amnesty for immi-
grants who are in the


country illegally, although
there's a lot of disagree-
ment over how to define
the term.
A 2007 effort to overhaul
the immigration system,
led by Bush, failed in part
because Republicans were
dismayed that it included
a process to give otherwise
law-abiding immigrants
who were in the country il-
legally a chance to become
citizens. Critics com-
plained that would be of-
fering amnesty
All sides know it's not
practical to talk about send-
ing 11 million-plus people
back to their countries of
origin. So one big challenge
this time is finding an ac-
ceptable way to resolve the
status of those who are in
the country illegally
Backers of the Senate
bill stress that those who
are in the country illegally
would have a longer and
more difficult path to citi-
zenship under their plan
than would immigrants
who followed all the rules.
A VIEW FROM THE
SOUTH: Is life actually
better in the U.S.? A little
more than half of Mexican
adults think so, according
to a 2012 Pew Global Atti-
tudes poll. Thirty-eight
percent said they'd move
to the U.S. if they had the
chance. Nineteen percent
said they'd come even
without authorization.
MEN
Sources: Pew Hispanic
Center, Migration Policy
Institute, Department of
Homeland Security Cen-
sus Bureau, Government
Accountability Office,
Population Reference Bu-
reau, Encyclopedia of
Immigration.


Mant Sbteet Reta iani
aad "Mitce fomqge" g
4105 N. Lecanto Hwy.. Beverly Hills 746-1770 o


Enjoy 5 0off



All the Frills Bouquet


L


Feminine and full of color, this bouquet is perfect
to wow any Mom in your life!
I Site Price: $39"


Meridien Research is seeking healthy volunteers

for a high potassium research study
Meridien Research is seeking healthy volunteers with mildly elevated potassium levels to participate in a research study. J


You may have high potassium if you:
* Are Diabetic
* Take common blood pressure medications that increases potassium in the blood
* Have been told by your physician you have reduced kidney function

Only a blood test will see if you qualify.
Call today to set up an appointment for a complimentary screening.

During this 21 day study, qualified participants will receive at no cost study-related:
* Evaluations, physical exams, routine lab work
* Investigational medication

Not sure if you have high potassium?
Call Meridien Research for a complimentary screening appointment.*
*certain eligibility requirements must be met for the complimentary screening



Meridien3


eeach 352-597-8839


Compensation
of up to $825
for time and travel
may be available.
No medical insurance
is necessary to
participate.


16176 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville, FL 34601


890518-01


"Highest in Customer Satisfaction with Online Flower Retailers."
By J.D. Power And Associates, 2012
'Take 50% off "All the Frills" and 20% off minimum product purchase of $29. Discounts: (i) apply to the regular price of the
products, (ii) will appear upon checkout and cannot be combined with other offers or discounts, unless specified, and (iii) do
not apply to gift cards or certificates, international delivery, shipping & handling, taxes, or third-party hosted products (e.g.
wine). Discounts not valid on bulk or corporate purchases of 10 units or more. Images in this advertisement may include
upgraded, premium containers which are available for an additional charge. Prices valid while supplies last. Offer expires
5/8/2013. ProFlowers received the highest numerical score in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Online Flower
Retailer Satisfaction ReportsM. Study based on 2,154 responses measuring 8 online flower retailers and measures the opinions
of consumers who made an online purchase in the past 12 months. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and
perceptions of consumers surveyed October-November 2012. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com
000ELOT


A12 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


NATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


dXFdNSi 7 .,
ITS. *
iNeFFiciNT;,
ITLIRTSO^ P' '
INMNATOWAr-
STANPiN '
AN'D i NDS ,, ,
70^ Be1
CLOSD. ,^


Selling water barrels
I would like to know, if possible, if
anybody knows where I could buy a
water barrel. If they could please put it
in the Chronicle with Sound Off so peo-
ple like me could be able to find one.
Keeping score
A friend moved here from Tampa. Her


coworkers in Tampa kept teas-
ing her about Citrus County
being a laughingstock because
they made it difficult for new
industry to come into the
county. What's the commission-
ers' scores on jobs lost and
gained in this county?


I T / .
"AR 'WWSUI) ItO ielfeAUTGVANTA NAMo"'


Letters toTHE EDITOR


Thinking outside the box
Now would be a good time to talk
about and do something with the Crystal
River Mall property. Lately there has
been a lot of focus on how to turn the
town of Crystal River into something it
just cannot be because there is not
enough property to work with. My per-
sonal opinion is that the property is too
close to U.S. 19 traffic and parking
would not be available, but at least it
shows some vision, as does the Baywalk
project By the way, whatever happened
to the Baywalk project?
Now, it could be said that Crystal
River suffers from a lack of a "home-
town" feeling, unlike Inverness or even
The Villages. So why not show some real
vision and build the Baywalk to meet up
with a walking bridge over U.S. 19 at
Northwest Sixth Avenue, to be used by
horse-drawn carriages and rickshaws or
bicycles, etc., and after leveling the mall
itself, design a town center very much
like the one in Spanish Spring in the old
part of The Villages to take its place. If
you look on a map, you will see that
Northwest Sixth Avenue goes directly to
the mall but also connects with North-
west Crystal Street and to Northwest
10th Street. Both connect to North Cit-
rus Avenue to bring commerce back
through what we think about today as
downtown Crystal River and connect
the loop back to Baywalk.
I am sure that although this type of
out-of-the-box thinking would take a lot
of planning and cooperation between
the city, county and the private sector, it
would be well worth the effort for pres-
ent and future residents to feel proud of
this accomplishment. This concept
should have been considered at the Wal-
mart property at County Roads 491 and
486 to give that hometown feeling to
Beverly Hills, Citrus Hills, Black Dia-
mond, etc. Just one citizen's opinion. Let
Sound Off know what you think.
Marco Wilson
Inverness
Editor's note: The Baywalk project is
still on the front burner for city staff and
council. They are currently waiting for a
consultant to finish a study that looks at
tying together a larger conceptual plan
for the downtown area. The consultant
should be finished in about three
months' time.

Keep-right laws
Re: Sound Off, Tuesday, April 23,
"No such law:"
A Sound Off caller stated that the
keep-right driving law was "defeated"
five or six years ago. Not for two-lane
roads, I hope. Four-lane roads, maybe?
The state of Florida and whoever is re-
sponsible on the federal level seem to
be unaware of such a "defeat." The
keep-right signs are still on (U.S.) 19 in
Citrus County, on the toll road to Tampa,
and on the interstate highways of
Florida plus in many, if not all, other
states. The Florida Driver's Handbook
of 2013, on page 43, still shows a "slower
traffic keep right" sign and says that
left-lane drivers must move to the right
lane when approached from the rear,
even if the left-lane driver is traveling at
the posted speed limit, and to stay gen-
erally in the right lane. A strange thing
for a defeated law!
The Sound Off caller would do all of us
uninformed drivers a favor by delineating
the law of rescission, telling the state


and federal entities to remove the
"slower traffic keep right" signs that
proliferate our highways, and for
Florida to revise its driver's handbook
to comply with current law.
Personally, even if no "law" existed
concerning a keep-right provision, my
common sense tells me that to keep
right on four-lane roads (with excep-
tions) is the intelligent way to drive.
Is there any response from the Sound
Off caller or likeminded individuals
who believe left-lane (passing-lane)
driving on four-lane roads such as (U.S.)
19, (State Road) 44, or (U.S.) 41 among
others is the wiser way to drive? Please
enlighten us right-lane drivers who pass
in the left lane (the passing lane) and
then return to the right lane, what is in-
appropriate or illegal about our driving
patterns. Do we impede traffic? Do we
cause faster traffic to weave around us?
Do we create road rage situations?
What is our problem?
Sam Williams
Homosassa

Successful poker run
On March 30, the Legion Riders of
Blanton-Thompson American Legion
Post 155 conducted our seventh annual
Mystery Poker Run benefiting Veterans
receiving Hospice care.
With the support of our community,
Post 155 families, great weather and a
lot of dedicated workers, we had a suc-
cessful day
For their parts, we want to thank
Sleepy Hollow, Bently's Restaurant, Lou
Cerra of WRGO 102.7 Radio, Dan's Clam
Stand, Connie's Kickstand, Iron Horse
Parts, Sonny's Bar-B-Que, Wholesale
Leathers Crystal River, McPherson's
Archery & Outdoor Pro Shop, Crystal
Nissan, Winn-Dixie, Crystal River
Harley Davidson, Trikes by Design,
Leather Me Up, Tropical Window, Pep-
permint Pattie's Restaurant, Coach's
Pub, Manatee Lanes, Burkes of Ireland,
Boat House, Beef'O' Brady's, Havana
House, Nick Nickolas Ford, Taste of
Philly, Mama Sally's Restaurant, A
Salon Beyond, Torrillis Pizza, Inverness
Elks Lodge No. 2522, Chef Anthony's
Pizza Cafr, Ace Hardware Hernando,
Chicken King Restaurant, Renab Ranch,
Country and Feed Supply, Natalia's
Pizza & Pasta, Citrus Pet Centre, Bob's
Kitchen, Tire Kingdom of Crystal River,
Sweet Bay Crystal River, AJ's Caf6, Mr
B's Car Wash, DynaBody, Crystal River
Cycle, Crock's Pub, Chili's Restaurant,
Barney's of Brooksville, Curves Beverly
Hills, Advance Chiropractic, Brooksville
Optical, Red Mule Pub in Brooksville,
and Scared Horse Ranch.
Thank you to the biker community not
only locally but also from Tampa, Fort
Myers, Bell and Daytona Beach. Individ-
ual supporters Cassandra Greene, Jodi
Moore, DeWayne Little, Helga Squires,
John Cain, Carol Poole and Post 155's own
Jim Woodman and his kitchen support.
Thanks to American Legion Post 155,
Commander Mike Klyap Jr, Legion
Rider's Director George Gasparini, La
Societe de Femme-Caban No. 1219,
American Legion Auxiliary, and Sons of
the Legion.
A special thank you to Linda Baker and
Joe Foster of Hospice of Citrus County.
We cannot do enough.
Tom Poole
poker run chairman
Post 155 Crystal River


CO!


1FA


Tips must be earned AL
I'm calling in about all the CAYL.
talk about tips and wait staff. 563-
Nine times out of 10, you do
not get great service. I do not
feel that I should be required to leave a
15, 20 percent tip on the table from my
check when all wait staff has done is come,
ask me my drink, take my order, brought
my drink and left and I have not seen them
again until it was time to deliver the
check. They're lucky if I leave 5 cents.
Offended by Hiaasen
As a responsible citizen, taxpayer and
legal gun owner, I object to the Miami
Herald's liberal columnist Carl Hiaasen's
characterizing me as a gun nut. He
would better serve the public by read-
ing, by spending less time calling and
less listing of the facts.


(


Backward thinking
I just wanted to say way to go, Crys-
tal River, putting the squeeze on the
mall for their water bill. I've lived in this
town since 1955. I was born and raised
here in '57 and I've watched this town
slowly and painfully decline into noth-
ing but a wasteland of clothes stores
and now you're going to close the mall.
You're taking a good cue from
JND the way your county runs
Things; squeezing businesses
to death, not letting new busi-
nesses come in. You're back-
ward thinking, not forward

Personal vendetta
io This is in regards to Scott
Adams. I would like to see in
)579 the newspaper a headline:
"Scott Adams voters to vote
again." It has become obvious
to the citizens of Citrus County that we
elected a county commissioner with a
personal vendetta. Remove anyone he
doesn't like. Well, I made the mistake
of voting for him. I feel that there are a
lot of voters who believe Scott Adams
has let them down. No more investiga-
tions, no more landfill, no more
vendetta.
Try an outlet mall
Why not turn the Crystal River Mall
into an outlet mall? That would fit the
area and we'd get a lot of people and
we'd be a destination and it would give
us something that we don't have.


/ Vascdlarrtoracic Surgeon
A


When Dr. Royalty says he considers it a privilege to take care ofpatients,
he means beyond their physical health, giving hope for a better life. Using
technology available at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, he can treat
patients who have blocked arteries, aneurysms and lung or chest issues with
minimally invasive surgical options, so patients have faster, easier recoveries.
Dr. Royalty compares what he does to someone conducting an orchestra,
making sure the right resources, the right players, the right notes and the
right sounds come together, all for the benefit of his patients. That's the
positively pitch-perfect care you deserve.

Learn more at SevenRiversRegional.com.


Positively


---SEVEN RIVERS
---REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER


Independent member of the medid staff


Blackshears !

I I IBEST/
MAluminumw
RESCREEN SEAMLESS GUTTERS GARAGE SCREENS
NEW SCREEN ROOM GLASS ROOM CONVERSIONS
HWY. 44 75 7 Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER I7 i RR 0042388
"35 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"


Do you have the right insurance coverage?
(all Your Local Team Of Experts for A Free Analysis And Estimate!
Iome U Auto U Business
Financial Services
L CENTRAL RIDGE
INSURERS, LLC
T 2535 N. Reston Terr., Hernando, FL
(Next to Village Services on 486)
352-527-0110


MANAGER'S SPECIALS


One owner, stil smells new. N I8/M 51, 6N1 IA
$19,968 $19,968 L

ALv


IC] Hwy. 44 W. Inverness- CR,486
x]]I0Y.4,Inverness
I c(352) 726-1231,
SS Onicknicholasford.com 8I Nickicholas
oooEs44 SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 I_


OPINION


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 A13


DOEUSM











NATION


CI


&
TRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


CHRONICLE


ion FS


NSeven U.S. soldiers killed in blast, attack
Cubs' debut
Deaths comes amid acknowledgement of CIA payments to Afghan government


Associated Press
Baby polar bears Suka
and Sakari splash in the
water recently at The
Toledo Zoo in Toledo,
Ohio. The male and female
cubs, born in November,
are on display at the zoo
for the first time and were
named after a naming
contest that drew hun-
dreds of votes.

Thousands sign
petition for teen
BARTOW, Fla. Nearly
30,000 people have signed
an online petition asking the
Bartow Police Department
and the Polk County State
Attorney to drop charges
against a 16-year-old ac-
cused of detonating a bottle
of explosive materials on
school property.
The incident happened
April 23. The girl has been
charged as a juvenile with
making, possessing or dis-
charging a destructive de-
vice and with possessing or
discharging weapons on
school property. Prosecutors
haven't decided whether to
continue with the case.
Lakeland lawyer Larry
Hardaway, who's represent-
ing the teen, said she was
conducting an experiment
for a science class. The
girl's science teacher wasn't
aware of the experiment.
The Lakeland Ledger re-
ported the teen has been
suspended from school for
10 days. A school investiga-
tion is also under way.
Calm, moist air aids
fight against fire
CAMARILLO, Calif. -
A big cool-down in weather
calmed a huge wildfire
burning in Southern Califor-
nia coastal mountains Sat-
urday, and firefighters
worked to cut miles of con-
tainment lines while condi-
tions were favorable.
High winds and withering
hot, dry air were replaced
by the normal flow of damp
air off the Pacific, signifi-
cantly reducing fire activity.
The 43-square-mile blaze
at the western end of the
Santa Monica Mountains
was 30 percent surrounded.
Despite the favorable
conditions, evacuation or-
ders remained in place for
residences in several areas.
Nearly 1,900 firefighters
using engines, bulldozers
and aircraft worked to corral


the blaze.
Solar
lands in
PHOENIX -
single-seat coc
above the Ame
west, pilot Bert
could hear onl
gear box and t
whine of four e
tors. No noisy
He's flying S
considered the
advanced sun-p
Piccard pilot
for 20 hours, fi
along the Calif
after taking off
Field in Mount;
San Francisco
dawn Friday. H
over Edwards
Base and touc
early Saturday
Phoenix Sky H
He landed h
only three-qua
plane's battery
From Phoen
craft will travel
Fort Worth airp
Lambert-St. Lo
Dulles airport i
ington area an
John F. Kenne


Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan -
Seven U.S. soldiers and a
member of the NATO-led
coalition were killed on
Saturday in one of the dead-
liest days for Americans
and other foreign troops in
Afghanistan in recent
months, as the Taliban
continued attacks as part
of their spring offensive.
The renewed violence
came as Afghan President
Hamid Karzai acknowledged
at a news conference that
regular payments his gov-
ernment has received
from the CIA for more than
a decade would continue.
Karzai also said that talks
on a U.S.-Afghan bilateral
security agreement to gov-
ern future American mili-
tary presence in the


country had been delayed
because of conditions the
Afghans were placing on
the deal.
The U.S.-led coalition
reported that five interna-
tional troops were killed
by a roadside bomb in
southern Afghanistan, and
coalition spokesman Capt.
Luca Carniel confirmed
all five were American.
The coalition did not
disclose the location of the
roadside bombing. How-
ever, Javeed Faisal, a
spokesman for the gover-
nor of Kandahar province,
said the coalition patrol
hit the bomb in the Mai-
wand district of the
province, the spiritual
birthplace of the Taliban.
Later, the coalition re-
ported that a soldier with
the Afghan National Army


turned his weapon on
coalition troops in the
west, killing two in the
most recent of so-called in-
sider attacks. Such attacks
by members of the Afghan
security forces against
their fellow colleagues or
international troops have
eroded confidence in the
Afghan forces as they work
to take over from foreign
forces.
Both killed were Ameri-
can, according to two U.S.
officials who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity to dis-
close the nationalities
ahead of an official
announcement.
At the news conference,
Karzai said he had met
earlier in the day with the
Kabul station chief of the
CIA and was reassured
that the agency's payments


to the Afghan government
would continue. The New
York Times had reported
that, for more than a
decade, the CIA had given
the Afghan National Secu-
rity Council tens of mil-
lions of dollars in monthly
payments delivered in
suitcases, backpacks and
plastic shopping bags.
Karzai said he told the
station chief: "'Because of
all these rumors in the
media, please do not cut
all this money because we
really need it. We want to
continue this sort of assis-
tance.' And he promised
that they are not going to
cut this money"
Karzai described the
payments as a form of "gov-
ernment-to-government"
assistance, and while he
wouldn't say how much the


Associated Press



Awin for women

M awada Chaballout, a 27-year-old American member of a Saudi female soccer team
practices May 21, 2012, at a secret location in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia's
official press agency said Saturday that the country's Education Ministry issued
directives ordering private female schools to provide appropriate places and equipment for
women's sports and that female Saudi teachers should be given priority in supervising these
activities. The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's
rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at
the Olympics. "It's about time," said Aziza Youssef, a professor at King Saud University.
"Everything is being held back in Saudi Arabia as far as women's rights." -Associated Press





Experts: Feds pressure


widow, pals in bomb case


Associated Press


BOSTON- Every time the widow
plane of suspected Boston Marathon
bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev leaves
Arizona her parents' house, federal agents
- Alone in the watching the residence follow her in
ckpit and high unmarked vehicles.
erican South- Federal authorities are placing in-
trand Piccard tense pressure on what they know to
y his plane's be the inner circle of the two bomb-
he quiet ing suspects, arresting three college
electric mo- buddies of surviving brother
jet engines. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, and keeping
olar engines. Tamerlan's 24-year-old widow,
wolar Impulse, Katherine Russell, in the public eye
world's most with their open surveillance and
powered plane. leaks to media about investigators'
:ed the craft focus on her.
rst cruising Legal experts say it's part of their
ornia coast quest not just to determine whether
from Moffett Russell and the friends are culpable
ain View near but also to push for as much infor-
just after mation as possible regarding
de passed whether the bombing suspects had
Air Force ties to a terrorism network or ac-
hed down complices working domestically
morning at or abroad. A primary goal is to push
harbor Airport. the widow and friends to give their
having used full cooperation, according to the
rters of the experts.
power. David Zlotnick, a professor of law
iix, the air- at Roger Williams University and
to Dallas- former federal prosecutor in the
ort in Texas District of Columbia, said authori-
e i a, ties may be tracking Russell closely
uis airport, because they feel she's not being
n the Wash- completely honest about all she
d New York's knows.
dy airport. "It seems to me they don't believe
-From wire reports her yet," he said.


Dzhokhar is in a
prison hospital,
facing a potential
death sentence if
convicted of the ter-
rorism plot that au-
thorities allege the
19-year-old and his
Katherine late 26-year-old
Russell brother carried out
April 15. Twin pressure cooker
bombs detonated near the race's
finish line, leaving three people
dead and injuring more than 260
others. Tamerlan died in a gunfight
with authorities April 19, a day after
authorities released photos of the
suspects.
Tamerlan's widow has been en-
sconced at her parents' North
Kingstown, R.I., home since then.
Much about her remains a mystery,
including what she knew or wit-


The home of
Katherine
I Russell's
parents is
c u a pictured
North
SKingstown,
R.I. Below,
Russell's
Smugshot from
a June 26,
2007, arrest
do son shoplifting
charges.

Associated Press
nessed in the weeks, months and
years before the bombings, and what
she saw and did in the days after.
It's unclear when Russell last
communicated with her husband,
but her lawyer, Amato DeLuca, told
The Associated Press in an inter-
view last month that the last time
she saw him was before she went to
work April 18. DeLuca said Tuesday
that Russell had met with law en-
forcement "for many hours over the
past week," and would continue to
do so in the coming days.
Zlotnick said the fact that charges
have been brought against the
younger brother's three friends from
the University of Massachusetts
Dartmouth over allegations they
covered up for Dzhokhar indicates
authorities are willing to go after the
widow for similar actions. That puts
pressure on Russell to cooperate.


CIA gave to the National
Directorate of Security,
which is the Afghan intel-
ligence service, he said the
financial help was very
useful. He claimed that
much of the money was
used to care for wounded
employees of the NDS,
Afghanistan's intelligence
service, and operational
expenses.
"We have spent it in dif-
ferent areas (and) solved
lots of our problems,"
Karzai said.
He said the CIA pay-
ments were made in cash
and that "all the money
which we have spent, re-
ceipts have been sent back
to the intelligence service
of the United States
monthly"
The CIA declined to
comment on Saturday


World BRIEFS

Big bubble


Associated Press
Children play with giant
soap bubbles Saturday
in Warsaw, Poland, one
of many forms of enter-
tainment offered during a
long weekend of national
holidays.

Israel enforces 'red
line' with airstrike
BEIRUT With a second
airstrike against Syria in four
months, Israel enforced its
own red line of not allowing
game-changing weapons to
reach Lebanon's Hezbollah,
an ally of President Bashar
Assad's regime, Israeli offi-
cials said Saturday.
But the strike, which one
official said targeted a ship-
ment of advanced surface-
to-surface missiles, also
raised new concerns that
the region's most powerful
military could be dragged
into Syria's civil war and
spark a wider conflagration.
Train with chemicals
derails in Belgium
BRUSSELS Belgian
media said hundreds of
people were evacuated
after a train carrying chemi-
cals derailed and caught
fire in northern Belgium.
Amateur video showed
the train ablaze in the early
hours of Saturday; in day-
light, the train cars could be
seen forming a zig-zag over
the track.
Media, citing a statement
from the East Flanders gov-
ernment, said authorities
were investigating if a death
of someone in the area of
the derailment was linked to
the accident. The statement
said 17 people were injured.
The fire was extinguished
Saturday evening, the re-
ports said. Houses within
500 meters of the train
were evacuated.
Police: 39 killed in
Nigerian ethnic clash
YOLA, Nigeria Police
said at least 39 people were
killed in ethnic violence in a
rural town in Nigeria.
The attack happened Fri-
day in Wukari, a town in
Nigeria's Taraba state.
State health official and
residents said Saturday
others were also injured in
the violence that sparked
during a funeral service that
pitted the Jukun people
against the Hausa Fulani.
Taraba state police
spokesman Joseph Kwaji
later said at least 39 people
were killed.
-From wire reports







ER5,X



EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


APT AF FOOD










EXHIBITION GOES TO LONDON



You've eaten at the restaurant

or probably you haven't.

Now, visit the exhibition.


JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press
LONDON
panish chef Ferran Adria, the
man behind the late, lamented
elBulli restaurant, is bringing
an exhibition dedicated to the
art and science of his distinc-
tive brand of molecular gastronomy
to London.
Diners lucky enough to get reserva-
tions at elBulli before it closed two
years ago feasted on 50-course tast-
ing menus featuring frozen cocktails,
ham tapioca, lobster and lamb's
brain salad and many other
challenging creations.
Visitors to "elBulli: Ferran Adria
and the Art of Food" will see
sketches, menus, film, photographs
and even plasticine models of food,
showing how those memorable
menus were created. Just don't
expect to eat.
"If you go to the Barcelona football
team museum, you don't play foot-
ball," Adria said unapologetically
Thursday as he announced the Lon-
don show. "If you go to an airplane
museum, you don't fly a plane."
The hunger-inducing nature of the
exhibition didn't prevent 650,000


people visiting it over the course of a
year at Barcelona's Palau Robert.
In London, it will be on display
from July 5 to Sept. 29 at Somerset
House, a palatial 18th-century edi-
fice beside the River Thames that
has been transformed during the past
decade from dusty tax office to busy
arts and cultural center.
The exhibition is the latest stage in
the expanding afterlife of elBulli,
which closed its doors in July 2011
after a final meal that included
"Clam Meringue," "Olive Spheres"
and "Hot Cold Gin Fizz."
Adria, who started at elBulli in
1984 and became head chef three
years later, used the restaurant to ex-
plore his fascination with the
essence of food and the experience
of eating.
In the restaurant's kitchen and a
scientific lab in Barcelona, he and


his team deconstructed ingredients
to what he calls the molecular level,
then reconstructed dishes using un-
expected re-combinations of the orig-
inal components, presenting the
results in mouthful-sized portions.
"For every 100 dishes we created,
one was brilliant," said Adria, a com-
pact, energetic 50-year-old in gray
jeans, black jacket and sneakers, who
proves incapable of remaining
seated as he discusses his work with
journalists.
The restaurant, tucked in a cove on
the rocky coast of northeast Spain,
maintained a three-star Michelin rat-
ing for more than a decade and was
ranked the world's best place to eat
five years running by Restaurant
magazine.
It also made Adria part celebrity
chef, part twinkling mad scientist -
one of the food world's most famous
figures. He voiced a character in the
Spanish version of Pixar's animated
film "Ratatouille," and made an ap-
pearance in "The Simpsons."
Molecular gastronomy has inspired
chefs from Britain's Heston Blumen-
thal to Chicago's Grant Achatz and
Denmark's Rene Redzepi. Some of
its signature touches foams,
jellies, liquid nitrogen have almost
become culinary cliches.
"Everybody agrees that
there is a before and an after
in gastronomy, thanks to Fer-
ran," said Ignasi Genoves,
general director of
Palau Robert.
Adria, however, said
elBulli's legacy isn't a style of
food, but an ethos of authen-
ticity, experimentation and
S risk.
"People believe the legacy
of elBulli is a type of cooking, but it's
not," he said through a Spanish inter-
preter "The important thing is the
philosophy we are transmitting to all
the people who worked with us."
Hundreds of people have passed
through elBulli's kitchens, then
marched out into the food world.
Adria noted with pride that the four
top chefs on Restaurant magazine's
influential top 50 ranking this year
are elBulli alumni.
The restaurant may be closed,
but Adria said elBulli's work is just
beginning.
In 2011 he and business partner
Juli Soler announced plans to trans-
form the site into a gastronomic
think-tank and research institute
called elBulliFoundation.
Due to open in 2015, it's an ever-
evolving concept. Adria's attempt to
explain it Thursday involved much


Associated Press
Spanish chef Ferran Adria gestures March 30, 2011, during an interview with
The Associated Press at his restaurant elBulli in Roses, Spain. Adria, the man
behind the late, lamented elBulli restaurant, is bringing an exhibition dedicated
to the art and science of his ex-
perimental brand of cooking to ,
London. The show, which was
visited by 650,000 people dur- .1
ing a year-long run in Barcelona, .
will be on display from July 5 to
Sept. 29 at London's Somerset .
House. P


arm-waving and diagram-
scrawling, as he described a
multipronged structure that
will encompass a history of L
cuisine ranging "from the Big
Bang to the Neolithic period"
and beyond, taking in the origins of
human life.
"If there's no homo sapiens, there's
no cooking," he said.
More prosaically, Adria and elBulli
have been the subject of a documen-
tary, and a feature film about the


restaurant is in the works.
The chef, who ranges the world
collaborating with artists and scien-
tists, clearly enjoys the freedom of
not having to run a kitchen and
worry about his Michelin ranking.
"The restaurant is closed -
not elBulli," he said.


Van Gogh Museum reopens with display on his craft


Collection almost

doubles in size
TOBY STERLING
Associated Press
AMSTERDAM- The Van
Gogh Museum in Amsterdam
has reopened after a seven-
month renovation, kicking off
with "Van Gogh At Work," an
exhibition that shows the fa-
mously tortured artist's work-
ing methods right down to his
paints, brushes and other tools.
Appropriately, the final
painting curators hung Wednes-
day was a self-portrait in which
Vincent Van Gogh painted him-
self behind a canvas, brushes


Associated Press
Visitors look at paintings by Van Gogh, "Sunflowers" and "La Berceuse (Woman Rocking a Cradle); Au-
gustine Roulin" at Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Wednesday, May 1. The Van Gogh
Museum has reopened its doors to the public after a seven-month renovation.
and palette in hand. Nearby, on collections, said they were pre- Although Van Gogh received
loan from the Musee d'Orsay in served by Dr. Paul-Ferdinand little acclaim during his life
Paris, are an actual palette and Gachet, the physician who and sold few paintings, Gachet
paints that Van Gogh used. treated the artist in the final decided to hold on to some of
Marije Vellekoop, head of months before his 1890 suicide. his patient's tools.


"Van Gogh's star was starting
to rise, and there had been an
exhibition of his work,"
Vellekoop said. "Dr. Gachet saw
his quality, or perhaps he had
some vision of the future."
In all, 145 paintings and
sketches are on display, almost
double the museum's usual
collection.
A highlight is the display of
two versions of Van Gogh's
famed yellow "Sunflowers,"
hung on either side of a green-
dominated portrait he painted
known as "La Berceuse."
In a surviving letter, Van
Gogh indicated that he in-
tended the paintings, which
usually hang in three different
museums, to be displayed that
way.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub- Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize. fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
the trip. Accent Travel Office.


* Veterans
Notes can be
found on
Page A17 of
today's
Chronicle.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Was it rude to


read her paper?


SUNDAY EVENING MAY 5, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D11:Comcast~Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 16:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
SWESHI NBC 19 19 News News The Voice Contestants perform. 'PG' N All-Star Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG News Access
The Life of Mammals Call the Midwife (N) (In Call the Midwife (N) (In Masterpiece Classic The Bletchley Circle As Time As Time
ED PBS 3 3 14 6 (In Stereo) 'G' Stereo) '14' a Stereo) 14' m (N)'PG'B (N)'14' Goes By Goes By
o UWUF) PBS 5 5 5 41 Health-Joel Doc Martin 'PG' Call the Midwife '14' Masterpiece Classic The Bletchley Circle Doc Martin 'PG'
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly The Voice "The Knockouts, Part 1" Contestants All-Star Celebrity Arentice The celebrities News Paid
S FANBC 8 8 8 8 8 News perform. (In Stereo) 'PG' c must plan a party. (N) (In Stereo) 'PG' c Program
News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Jack makes a Red Widow "The Hit" News Sports
S [WFTV) ABC120 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG PG' [c discovery. (N) 14' '14 [ Night
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (Season Finale) The win- The Mentalist "Red 10 News Paid
DB CEW)ICBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) c ning team is determined. (N) 'PG' cc John's Rules" 14' 11pm (N Program
FOX13 6:00 News (N) The Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
SWTT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) cc Simpsons Show Simpsons Burgers '14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) c Notice 'PG'
B [ WtJ) ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge (N) '14' Red Widow '14' News Inside Ed.
IND 2 2 2 22 22 ,Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for Believers Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
WC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Anointing Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
ABC 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Jack makes a Red Widow "The Hit" News Castle 'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'B discovery. (N)'14' '14'c
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Burden" Law & Order "Bad Girl" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
ED CWi IND 12 12 16 14' 14' Theory Theory 'PG'B 'PG'B '14'm 'PG'
E D WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9 ** "The Education of Charlie Banks" R' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris |Chris Tampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM) [WAX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Dayna Brody
WT 4 4 4 12 12 King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Golden CSI: Miami "Wet Foot/ Cold Case "Factory "Ready to Wear (Pret-
IMJ CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Parachute" '14' Dry Foot" '14' Girls" 'PG' B a-Porter)"R'
Casita Big Rotary Spy Inverness Your Citrus County Court I SpyY' Eye for an Fam Team
M YKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Games Spotlight Eye
ED i iCW ) FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Simpsons Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers |Fam. Guy |American FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG' c
S[WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero Aquiy Ahora (SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina'PG'(SS) Arranque de Pasion Corned. Noticiero
I WXPX ION 17 Monk 'PG' c Monk 'PG' c Monk'PG' Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
American American Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck
54 48 54 25 27 Hoggers Hoggers DyDynast yynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
n ** "Man on Fire" (2004) Denzel *** "Drumline" (2002) Nick Cannon. Rivalry between two Mad Men "For Mad Men "For
(___ 55 64 55 Washington. 'R' drummers threatens a college band. 'PG-13' Immediate Release" (N) Immediate Release" c
T52 35 52 19 21 o Be Announced Ice Cold Gold (In River Monsters (In River Monsters (N) (In Ice Cold Gold River Monsters (In
M[i) 52 35 52 19 21 Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) 'PG' "Fractured" (N) 'PG' Stereo) 'PG'
S 96 19 9** "yler Perry's Why Did I Get Married The Sheards (N) The Sheards 'PG' The Game Let's Stay The Sheards 'PG' m
96 19 96 Too?"(2010)TylerPerry.'PG-13'c 'PG'B c14' Together
(RiAVDJ 254 51 254 Married to Medicine Housewives/Atl. What Happens Married to Medicine The Kandi Factory Happens |Fashion
217 61 217 *** "I Love You, Man"(2009, Comedy) Paul *** "Role Models" (2008, Comedy) Seann *** "Role Models"(2008, Comedy) Seann
B 27 61 27 33 Rudd, Jason Segel. R' William Scott. Premiere. R' William Scott, Paul Rudd. 'R'
*** 98 45 98 28 37 c "AnyGiven Sunday" (1999, Drama) Al Dog and Beth: On the Guntucky Guntucky Dog and Beth: On the Guntucky Guntucky
98 45 98 28 37 Pacino, Dennis Quaid. (In Stereo) R'c Hunt (N)'14' (N)'14' (N) 14' Hunt'14'B cc14' 14'
WNl 43 42 43 Paid Paid Millions |On The Facebook Supermarkets American Greed American Greed
WNNJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Anthony Bourd. Anthony Bourd. Anderson Cooper Anthony Bourd.
Austin & Jessie c Good- Good- Dog With a Austin & Shake It Jessie c Dog With a Shake It Gravity Gravity
(ISNJ 46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Charlie Charlie Blog (N) AllyG' Up!G' Blog G' Up! G' Falls Y7' Falls Y7'
(ESPN 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco Giants. (N) SportsCenter (N)
(EPN 34 28 34 43 49 World/Poker NHRA Drag Racing NHRA Drag Racing Summit Racing Equipment Southern Nationals. MLS Soccer
[EWTN 95 70 95 48 Devotions Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime |G.K. |Rosary Fran. God |Bookmark
*** "Twister" (1996, Action) Helen Hunt, Bill *** "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do America's Funniest
S 29 52 29 20 28 Paxton, Cary Elwes. 'PG-13' white couple adopts a homeless black teen. 'PG-13' Home Videos 'PG'
i ** "Mallrats"(1995, Comedy) ** "Die Another Day" (2002) Pierce Brosnan. **+ "Judge Dredd"(1995) Sylvester Stallone.
(R J 118 170 "Greedy" Shannen Doherty R' Premiere. (In Stereo) PG-13' Premiere. In Stereo) '1' B
fTNi 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
(TOD) 26 56 26 Chopped Chopped Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped Iron Chef America Restaurant: Im.
(SELJ 35 39 35 UFC Unleashed World Poker Tour World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
F1 *** "Iron Man" (2008, Action) Robert Downey **+ "Iron Man 2" (2010, Action) Robert Downey Jr, ** Ion Vlan 2 12010) Robert
(E1 ) 30 60 30 51 Jr., Terrence Howard. PG-13' Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle. PG-13' -I,.. '
(GOL) 727 67 727 Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf |PGA Tour Golf
(AD "Be My Valentine" ** "Ice Dreams" 2010, Drama) Jessica "Mr. Hockey: The Gordie Howe Story" (2013) Frasier Frasier 'PG'
59 68 59 45 54 (2013) c Cauffiel, Brady Smith, Jerry Stiller. c Michael Shanks.'PG' 'G'B
**' "The DayAfter *+ "Abraham Lincoln: Vam ire Hunter" Game of Thrones "The Veep (N) VICE 'MA' Game of Thrones "The
302 201 302 2 2 Tomorrow" (2012) Benjamin Walker. (In tereo) R' Climb" (N) 'MA' MA c Climb" 'MA'
Rea Ta.3 Real Time With Bill *** "Mary and Martha" (2013) Candelabra *** "Beginners" (2010, Drama) Ewan
(i0i 303 202 303 ,. i Maher'MA' Hilary Swank. c McGregor (In Stereo) R'
(HGV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Extreme Homes'G' You Live in What? Hunters |Hunt Intl Hawaii Hawaii
Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Ax Men "Slippery Ax Men "Hell or High Swamp People Restoration Restoration
S 51 25 51 32 42 PG 'PG 'PG 'PG Slope"'14' Water" (N) '14' "Devoured" 'PG'
"Pastor Brown" ** "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" (2009, Army Wives"Blood and The Client List (N) ** "Tyler Perry's
E 24 38 24 31 (2009) 'PG-13' c Comedy) Tyler Perry. 'PG-13' cc Treasure" 'PG' 14' c Madea Goes to Jail"
"Past Lies" (2008, Suspense) Nicole Eggert, "Iris Johansen's The Killing Game" (2011) "Lost in the Dark" (2007, Suspense) Mae
50 119 David Orth. (In Stereo) N R' Laura Prepon. (In Stereo)'NR' NWhitman. (In Stereo)N R 'B
1 0 "American Reunion" (2012) ** "Savages" (2012) Taylor Kitsch. Three pot growers go **+ "For a Good Time, Call..." The Jump
320221 320 3 3 JasonBiggs. R' ccto war against a Mexican drug cartel. 'R' (2012) AriGraynor.'R' Off
[iSNBCJ 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera predator Raw To Catch a Predator | Lockup Tampa
S 1109 65, 1109 I 44 53 inside Combat Rescue Drain the Great Lakes Wicked Tuna: Hooked Wicked Tuna "Money Locked Up Abroad Wicked Tuna "Money
f14' G' Up on the Line" "The RearArgo' 14' on the Line"
WitRJ 28 36 28 35 25 ** "Cats & Dogs" Sponge. |Sponge. See Dad |Wendell ** "Cats & Dogs"(2001) Jeff Goldblum. Friends 14' c
WWN) 103 62 103 Master Class Master Class Oprah's Lifeclass Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Lifeclass (N) Oprah's Lifeclass
44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG'
S"Woman The Big C: Hereafter The Borgias "Siblings" Nurse Nurse Nurse The Borgias (N) (In The Borgias (In Stereo)
340 241 340 4 Black" "Quality of Life" 'MA' 'MA' c Jackie Jackie (N) Jackie Stereo) MA'N 'MA'
Lucas Oil Off Road SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR Faster Faster My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
732 112 732 Racing Firebird. (N) (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Than Than Car TV PG'
S Bar Rescue "On the Bar Rescue "Hogtied Bar Rescue Bar Rescue "Beach Bar Rescue "Broke Bar Rescue "Webers of
E 37 43 37 27 36 Rocks" '14' Ham's" 'PG' "Bottomless Pit" 'PG' Bummer" PG' Black Sheep" 'PG' Lies" 'PG'
71 *** "Looper"(2012, Science Fiction) Bruce ,ii 1..... I .-,,.... .. Cl;h"i" Comedy) Adam Sandier. (In Da Vinci's Demons
(STARZ] 370 271 370 Willis, Emiy Blunt. (In Stereo) 'R' cI i..- i .,..I 11- i :i .-..-.. I :. "The Magician" 'MA'
MLB Baseball: Rays at Rays Live! Ship Sprtsman Reel Time Fishing the Addictive Professional Tarpon Reel Florida
36 31 36 Rockies (N) Shape TV Adv. Flats Fishing Tournament Senes Animals G'
*31 59 3n 1 26 29 *+ "Red Planet" (2000) Val Kilmer. Astronauts try to colo- *** "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines" (2003, Science *** "Sin
31 59 31 26 29 Contact" nize Mars to save mankind. PG-13' c Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger. 'R'N City"
(1SS 49 23 49 16 19 *** "Hitch" (2005) Will Smith.'PG-13' ** "Valentine's Day"(2010) Jessica Alba. 'PG-13' |** "Valentine's Day" (2010)
S*0 "Hello, Dolly!" (1969, Musical Comedy) *** "Rose ofWashington **** "Funny Girl" (1968) Barbra Streisand. Ziegfeld
) 169 53 169 30 35 Barbra Streisand. G' Square" (1939) Tyrone Power. Follies' Fanny Brice loves gambler Nicky Arnstein.
S 53 Backyard Baard drd The Big Brain Theory: MythBusters (In Stereo) MythBusters (In Stereo) Argo: The Real Story MythBusters (In Stereo)
S53 34 53 24 26 Oil PG Oi PG Pure Genius 'PG'B c'PG' c (N (In Stereo) c 'PG'c
C) 50 46 50 29 30 Gypsy Wedding Gypsy Wedding Gypsy Wedding Gypsy Wedding Welcome to Myrtle Gypsy Wedding
"Swedish Auto" **+ "Shadows and Lies"(2010, Drama) *+ "About Cherry" (2012, Drama) Ashley *** "Fright Night"
(iTM) 350 261 350 (2006) Lukas Haas. James Franco. (In Stereo) 'R' B Hinshaw. Premiere. (In Stereo) R' (2011) 'R'
(5I *48 33 48 31 34 ** "Men in Black If" (2002) NBA Tip- NBA Basketball First Round: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) c Inside the NBA (N) "Final"
48 33 48 31 34 Tommy Lee Jones.'PG-13' Off(N) (Live) cc
TOON 38 58 38 33 ** "Planet 51" 2009, Comedy) 'PG' Teen Looney Squidbill. |King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Mexico Beaches 'G' Caribbean Escapes Trip Flip New Extreme Factories Burger Burger Manliest Restaurants
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Jokers Jokers World's Dumbest... Word's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest...
[TjVL 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girs Gold Girs Gold Girls Gold Girls Raymond |Raymond Raymond |Raymond Raymond |King
** "The Dilemma" (2011) Vince Vaughn. A man sees his ** "Couples Retreat" (2009) Vince Vaughn. Four couples ** "The Dilemma"
lS) 47 32 47 17 18 best friend's wife out with another guy PG-13' endure therapy sessions at a tropical resort. (2011) Vince Vaughn.
:I h .... Few ,. :I I h,,,, Long CSI: Miami "Crowned" CSI: Miami "Friendly CSI: Miami "Terminal CSI: Miami "Sinner
W E 117 69 117 1 i.,-,,i -,, i ....- i '14' Fire"'14' Velocity"'PG' Takes All"'14' c
[WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! IBloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30 Rock 30Rock


Dear Annie: Re-
cently, my wife
and I stayed for
four days at the home of
one of her school chums.
The gals yakked until late
at night, so I was the first
one up every morning.
I'm an early riser, anyway
I like reading the news-
paper with my breakfast,
so when I'd get up, I'd go
outside and pick up the
paper and
bring it in. My
wife says it
was wrong to
get the paper
before our -
hostess. Any-
way, after a
couple of
days, the
school friend
seemed in a
snit about
something, ANN
and my wife MAI
says that was
the reason,
even though she never
said so when I asked
whether something was
bothering her
Recently, we were in-
vited to stay with differ-
ent friends for a
weekend, and I am get-
ting no end of hassle from
my wife to make sure I
wait for our hosts to fin-
ish with the paper. I fig-
ure I'll just go out for
coffee somewhere and
buy a paper. My wife says
it would be rude to take
off at breakfast.
Is this idiotic or what?
- California
Dear California: It
would be rude to read the
paper in such a way that
your hosts must wait for


you to finish, or that you
drag sections of it all over
the house and fill in all
the clues to the cross-
word puzzle. But there is
nothing wrong with read-
ing the paper early, put-
ting it back together
nicely and having it avail-
able to your hosts when
they awaken.
You can resolve this
simply enough. When you
arrive, inform
your hosts that
you are an early
riser, and ask
whether they
would mind if
you fetch their
paper and read
it with your cof-
fee, promising
to keep it in
pristine condi-
tion for when
E'S they are ready
1BOX to read it. You
also could offer
to go to the
local coffee shop and
bring back coffee and
muffins (and a newspa-
per) for everyone else.


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers
column. Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox
and read features by
other Creators Syndicate
writers, visit the website
a t www creators. com.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:20 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"42" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R)
11:45 a.m., 5:05 p.m., 8 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
2:45 p.m. No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13)
12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m., 6:45
p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 2:20 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.


No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D.
12:20 p.m., 1:20 p.m.,
1:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m.,
8:30 p.m. No passes.
"42" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R)
11:50 a.m., 5:20 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 1:50 p.m.,
4:10 p.m.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 12 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m. No
passes.
"Scary Movie 5" (PG-13)
11:45 a.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Jeer
6 Old footwear
accessories
11 Flight unit
16 Ticket remnants
21 Reef material
22 Of the bishop of Rome
23 Laconic
24 Canvas stand
25 Egg-shaped
26 "Goodnight -"
27 Fjord
28 Island near
Bonaire
29 Pigsty
30 Taj Mahal site
32 Seaweed
34 Bay window
36 Decompose
37 Cogito sum
39 Rends
41 Retained
43 Sea eagle
44 Blatant promotion
45 Suffocate
48 Strike
50 Brink
52 City in Russia
55 Wild disturbance
57 Annexes
59 City on the
Rio Grande
63 "- Frome"
64 Newspaper
headline
66 Acted together
68 Sonny's ex
69 Sage
70 Actress
Farrow
72 Ray flower
73 Owned
74 So-so grade
75 Cabbage variety
76 Period
78 In medias -
79 Gong
80 Make plans for
82 Big success
83 Avid
85 Two score
86 "- Fledermaus"
87 Bounder
88 Unopened flower
89 That man's
90 Anti-slip device
93 Well-known
95 Shadowy
96 Event at Carnegie Hall
100 Damage


101 Demand payment from
102 Thesaurus name
104 Crucifix
105 Roman god
106 School subj.
107 Because
109 Kind of dancer
110 Frame of mind
111 Plant bristle
112 City near Phoenix
115 Lightning bolt
117 Called
118 Leash
119 River in Egypt
121 Grasped
122 Lampoon
123 Musical work
125 Charity
127 Girl in Oz
129 Wound mark
132 --de deux
134 Aid and -
136 Unclothed
137 Hoarfrost
141 Pale
142 Burned
144 Private sch.
146 Tidings
148 "Mad -"
149 Bert's pal
151 Military
group
153 Some horses
155 Efface
157 Happening
158 Ohio natives
159 Monsters
160 Strictness
161 Schoolroom events
162 Attempt again
163 Aquarium fish
164 007, e.g.


DOWN
1 Extent
2 Lid
3 Simian creature, for
short
4 Lard
5 Jumping insect
6 Apparition
7 Restate, in a way
8 Mimic
9 Cistern
10 Smooth and shiny
11 Mark with dots
12 Take-
13 Guthrie the folk singer
14 French


river
Hit the hay
Close
Man at sea
Shylock's
specialty
Jazz type
Blackboard
Develop
Bandleader
Brown
Eternal
Movie award
Hanging fishnet
Soft mineral
Wife of Zeus
Calendar abbr.
Howard or
Perlman
Trudge
City in Indiana
Holy city
Different
Utter
Entice
Flew very high
Old anesthetic
Distributed cards
Strangely
Liver secretion
- de Janeiro
Wharf
Conduct
High card
Grow together
Sea duck
Custom
Variety of pear
Name
in a palindrome
Showy actor
Something sticky
Discovery
Music hall dance
Cowl
Thorax
Surgical knife
Rye fungus
Supply of money
Speck
Profundity
Kitchen VIP
Tropical resin
Appraiser
Exchange
Throw into
confusion
Laughing
or natural
Wile E. Coyote's
nemesis


(2 wds.)
Pace
Essays of -
Hard rind fruit
Woodland deity
God of thunder
Raines
or Fitzgerald
Scarlet
Slangy denial
Diplomats'


building
Ragout
Dish
Dry, said of wine
Black Sea city
Saccharine
Cut with care
Queen lace
Sleeper's sound
Mystical card
Semblance


- -Dixon Line
Put forth effort
Hardens
Sandy material
Old Italian
magistrate
Antitoxins
Loan charge (abbr.)
- capital
Skill
Fix fraudulently


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


5-5


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.E


A16 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
The nominations and elec-
tion of officers will be at 5:30
p.m. Thursday, May 9. Finger
foods will be provided.
The May 27, Memorial Day,
ceremony will be a noon.
Hamburgers and hot dogs
with all the fixings will be
served at 1 p.m.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Baked ham dinner from 5
to 6:30 p.m. Friday, May 10.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.


Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or


Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Cmdr. Richard
Floyd 727-492-0290, Ken
Stewart at 352-419-0207, or
352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Sat-
urday, May 18. All-you-can-
eat breakfast served from
7:30 to 10:30 p.m.; donation
is $5 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren younger than 10. The
public is welcome.
The public is invited to the
Memorial Day Observance at
11 a.m. Monday, May 27. Pic-
nic will follow.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and


FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for Ma-
rine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as


well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and
Saturday, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Due to the fact there are no
contested positions, there will
be no ballot election on Tues-
day, May 28. Installation of
Legion, Sons of the Legion
and Legion Riders officers will
take place at 7 p.m. on this
date at our regular member-
ship meeting.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first


Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7 p.m.
The next meeting will be
Monday, May 6, at 7 p.m.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose


1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
TALLY-HO Hidden 352-860-2805
So www.tallyhovacations.com
dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
ADIMVION OF EDUCATION TOURS FL Seller of Travel 10131


Lyou.^^ Qe fInvitecd

"SINGLES"
Luncheon & Presentation
Meet & Greet Tuesday, May 14, 2013 11:00am
$15.00 pp prepaid
Quality Inn "Tuscany on the Meadows"
350 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
M By Reservation Only 352-527-8002
THE TRAVEL CLUB
5- Full Service Travel Agency
?t uler 527-8002 476-4242
46-77 #ST36390 gerrystravelclub@aol.com GerryvJonesEc



If you want to

advertise here in the


Great Getaways

call 563-5592


and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
The post will host a benefit
event for Haily Eldon at 9 a.m.
Saturday, May 18. Haily is a
5-year-old diagnosed with
neuroblastoma. The
fundraiser will feature a draw-
ing to begin at 3 p.m., Chi-
nese auction, tricky tray,
pulled pork meal, raffles, live
auction, lawn sales (table and


space rentals available), door
prizes, children's games and
more. Items are still sought for
the auctions.
For more information, to re-
serve tables, or for donation
pickup, call 352-220-8453,
352-949-7179 or 352-
446-4271.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
May 11 at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill.

SERVICES & GROUPS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for

See VETERANS/Page A18


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

udr 352.795.5797
Everything Outdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS






-JANUARY 18, 2014
5-Night Cruise from Tampa to Grand Cayman & Cozumel
MWNBRILLIANCE of the SEAS
Interior $589.80 per person
Oceanview $S659.80 per person
Balcony S759.30 per person
Rates include port/government taxes and fuel surcharges. ..
Based on double occupancy Space is limited Motor coach included in
price from Our Lady of Fatima Motorcoach based on minimum 30 people




ST35415 -- --
Becky's Travel Store
r Linse Christmas Lights &
Brilliance of the Sea/Canada & New England St. Augustine Harbor Cruise
Sailing Sept. 15, 2013 Dec. 18, 2013
$75.00 ship board credit per cabin '
Visiting Portland, Bar Harbor, St John, NB&Halfax Cost $68.00
Oceanview $890.00
(saving. of $270.00 p p....on) Trip includes round trip
Balcony $1470.00 motorcoach from Beverly Hills
(savings. of $184.00 per person) Time for lunch on your own. Late afternoon Harbor
Cruise only Includes cruise port & govt taxes of $105 08 Cruise. Private Tolley de to see the holiday I ght
Prices are per person double occupancy ue rvate e e t see te holiday lights.
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (352) 5278855
Located Next to Winn Dixie (552) a /
www beckystrave. service, com 00]=E 9


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Family, friends and staff
celebrated the 100th
birthday of Retha Beat-
rice Walker April 30,2013,
at Woodland Terrace of
Citrus County
A resident of Beverly
Hills since 1971, she was
born in Wayne County,
Tenn. She also lived in
Mississippi, where she
met and married Henry
Clinton "Clint" Walker in
1930. They later migrated
to Michigan, where they
lived until 1971 before
coming here.
While in Michigan,
Retha worked during
World War II at the
"Bomber Plant" in Ypsi-
lanti. After the war, she
worked as a saleslady for
Sarah Coventry Jewelry
and sold Avon. She has
been an accomplished
cook and avid gardener.


After moving to Florida,
she and Clint were active
in their church, and she
enjoyed jewelry making,
sewing and other arts and
crafts.
She has four children,
14 grandchildren, 35
great-grandchildren, 42
great-great-grand-
children and two great-
great-great-grandchildren


GetTOGETHER

Hospice to host Enjoy time with
special 'tea' the girls May 10


Wings Community Educa-
tion at Hospice of Citrus
County will present a
"Mother's Day Tea" from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Thursday, May 9,
at the Hospice of Citrus
County Wings Education
Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
"Mother's Day Tea," a free
public event, seeks to pro-
mote healing and peace for
those who have lost their
mothers.
It provides a time for re-
flection upon their lives to
provide further hope and
meaning for our own lives.
Share memories of your
mother and/or find comfort in
similar stories.
All are welcome to bring a
photo/memory of your
mother to share at the an-
nual event. Tea and cookies
will be served.
For more information
about the tea, or to make a
reservation, call Lynn Miller
at 352-621-1500.



VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome, call Charlie
Jensen at 352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has a case manager avail-
able during the week to as-
sist veterans to apply for
benefits and provide informa-
tion about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday-
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition provides food
to veterans in need. Food do-
nations and volunteers are
always welcomed and
needed. The Veterans Food
Bank is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday. The CCVC is on
the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul
and Independence, off U.S.
41 north. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inver-
ness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and
widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members
are welcome. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation; dona-
tions are tax deductible.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical


Hospice of Citrus County's
Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift
Shoppe will present Girls'
Nite Out from 5 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day, May 10, at the Thrift &
Gift Shoppe, 8471 W. Peri-
winkle Lane, Homosassa. A
donation of $10 will benefit
patients and families served
by Hospice of Citrus County.
The event will offer food,
fun and fashion, and feature
wine and cheese, handbags,
door prizes, goodie bags,
jewelry and more. Featured
vendors will include: Cup-
cakes by Hayley, Sew Spe-
cial, Jackie's Gothic Victorian
Hats, FM Designs, Walk
Don't Run Travel, Lia
Sophia, Stretchies by Judith,
Scentsy, Avon, Chocolates
by Vanessa, Park Lane,
Heavenly Colors, Handbags
R Us, R.G Holland Massage,
Rodan & Fields Dermatology
and the Pampered Chef.
For a reservation or more
information, call Caroline at
352-621-1550.


assistance or more blankets
is asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone
number to the veteran.
Open spots still remain
for those couples and individ-
uals interested in taking a
trip to Hawaii with a group of
veterans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, co-
ordinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy vet-
eran, is scheduled this year
for Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Partici-
pants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel),
Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii (stay
in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal
Lahina Resort). Reservations
should be made as soon as
possible. Call McLean at
352-637-5131, or email
dmclean8@tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans' Me-
morial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law-
enforcement programs.
Criminal background check
and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a
partnering agency with the
Department of Veterans Af-
fairs (VA), provides tailored
care for veterans and their
families. The program is pro-
vided in private homes, as-
sisted living facilities and
nursing homes, and staff is
trained to provide Hospice
care specific to illnesses and
conditions unique to each
military era or war. It also pro-
vides caregiver education


100th BIRTHDAY


Six generations of the Walker family, clockwise from
back left, include: Virginia Sawyer, Cheryl Bailey,
Deanna Bondie, Felicia Trese, Retha Sawyer and
Landon Kincer.


Wedding-

Graves/Fellows


Linda Patrice Graves
and Eugene Edgar Fel-
lows of Hudson ex-
changed nuptial vows in
an afternoon ceremony
April 1, 2013, overlooking
the water by Three Sis-
ters Springs in Crystal
River.
The Christian cere-
mony was performed by
Chaplain Donna Viglione
from The Wedding
Chapel in Inverness.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400
or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.
FORMS AVAILABLE
* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements and more. Call
352-563-5660 for copies, or fill out an online
form at www.chronicleonline.com.


and a recognition program to
honor veterans' services and
sacrifices. HPH Hospice care
and programs do not affect
veterans' benefits. Call the
Citrus Team Office at 352-
5274600.


Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. She offers
free classes to combat
veterans. Call her at 352-
382-7397.


Betsey Goodrich Krusen
and David Joseph Ferreira
of Beverly Hills exchanged
wedding vows March 30,
2013, at Fort Island Gulf
Beach in Crystal River.
The Christian ceremony
was performed by Chap-
lain Donna Viglione from
The Wedding Chapel in
Inverness.
Parents of the bride are
George C. Krusen II of
Boxborough, Mass., and
the late Betsey Krusen.
The groom is the son of
Robert and Madelyn
Ferreira of Crystal River.
Deborah White at-
tended as the maid of
honor. Best man was Ben
Ferreira and Josh Ferreira
served as groomsman.
A reception followed at
Citrus Hills Country Club,
and the couple took a hon-
eymoon cruise to the
Bahamas.
The groom is self-
employed DF Handy-


Marriages 4/22/13
to 4/28/13
Duane Dustin Acha, Citrus
Springs/Barbara Lynn Abbott,
Citrus Springs
Roger Allie Albritton,
Inverness/Connie Leone
Roberts, Beverly Hills


man in Beverly Hills
and the bride is associated
with Arthrex Medical Sup-
ply Co. of Naples.


Charles Donald Dykes,
Gulf Hammock/Jennie
Paulette Miller, Chiefland
Ralph Richard Redwinski,
Citrus Springs/Margaret
Boyer, Beverly Hills
Russell Thomas Yeazel,
Inverness/Michelle Whitler
Harvin, Inverness


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


SCOFF SPATS STA IR S T U B S
C O R A L P A L T E R S E E A S E L
O V A T E IRENE INLET A R U B A
PEN AGRA K ELP T ER I EIL ROT
ER GO RIPS K EPT ERN H Y PE
SMOTHER SLAP EDGE
MOSCO W R I OOT ELL-S LAREDO
E T H AN BAN NER COOPERATED
CHER WI SE MIIA DA ISY HAD
CEE KALE EPOCH RES BEL L
ARRANGE HIT EAGER FORTY
Di IE CAD BUD HIS S
CLEAT FAMED DTM CONCERT
HARM DUN ROGET ROOD LAR
ENG S I INC 2 STiAP MiO nD SaElTkAf
S C 0GT S A E ooiA AMS E TD
SCOTTS ALEmSiTREAKmNAMED
T ET H E R INI L E HEL D SAT I R E
OJPJUS AILMIS DORO0TH Y
S C A'R PA S A"B E T IN U-D-E R I M E
WAN STUNG pACAD NElWlS MAX
E R IN I E CORPSmRO NS S E A SE
E V EIN TmE R I ES s O G R E S R I GOR
T E STSmRETR Y TETR A GENT
5-5 C 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


" it, .:h.: ni lc.nline rom


Retha Beatrice Walker


Wedding

Krusen/Ferreira


For the RECORD


A18 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


TOGETHER











SPORTS


The Chicago
Bulls pulled out
a tense Game 7
over the Brooklyn
Nets./B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


" Baseball/B2
" Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
" NBA, NHL, golf/B4
" Recreational sports/B5
" Auto racing/B6
" NFL/B6


Smith wins Nationwide Series wreck-fest


Associated Press
TALLADEGA, Ala. Regan Smith
thought he'd won at Talladega before, only
to have a NASCAR ruling go against him.
So there was no rush to celebrate Sat-
urday night as Smith waited for
NASCAR to review videotape and scor-
ing loops to determine the winner of the
crash-filled Nationwide Series race. He
thought he was out front when the final
caution flew after all, it was dark
enough that he could clearly see the
glaring yellow lights but experience
taught Smith to stay calm.
After a few anxious minutes the word
came down: Smith was going to Victory
Lane.
"I was having flashbacks sitting on pit
road, I'm not going to lie, when they
were making the decision," said Smith,
who crossed the finish line first of the
2008 Sprint Cup race but wasn't


Sprint Cup qualifying
Saturday's qualifying was rained
out, leaving Carl Edwards in pole
position for today's race: Page B6.

awarded the win because NASCAR said
he went below the yellow line to pass
Tony Stewart.
"I was thinking 'Man, I hope we got it.
I'm pretty sure we got it when the flag
came out and I saw the lights come on.'
I knew we were ahead. I don't know if
it's vindication, but I definitely wanted
to win and it certainly wipes that bad
memory away."
The race was delayed three hours by
rain and slowed by seven cautions, and
as darkness closed in on Talladega Su-
perspeedway, NASCAR cut the race dis-
tance by 10 laps. Then Joey Coulter
brought out a caution one lap shy of the


new scheduled finish and NASCAR de-
cided it would make one attempt at a
green-white-checkered finish.
At least 10 cars were jockeying for po-
sition in packs of two on the final lap
when Brian Vickers was spun hard into
the outside wall. Smith, Joey Logano
and Kasey Kahne raced three-wide all
the way to the finish line and Kahne ac-
tually crossed it first.
'"As soon as they started wrecking, I
saw the caution, I still raced to the line. I
had a good enough run to get there and
be first there, and I was kind of surprised


Page B3


Driver Regan Smith celebrates in
Victory Lane after winning the
Nationwide Series auto race Saturday at
the Talladega Superspeedway in
Talladega, Ala.
Associated Press


Power


I


Orb


~*~*'

WY
-Y i r ~
4 _ '~4W I;.

~3i ingIE~


"-.- -
....


Associated Press
Jockey Joel Rosario rode Orb, right, to win the 139th Kentucky Derby on Saturday at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky.

JockeyJoel Rosario rides Orb to win 139th running of the Kentucky Derby


Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Way
back in the pack heading into
the final turn, Orb was calm
even if his jockey wasn't.
Churning through a sloppy
track that resembled creamy
peanut butter, the bay colt
picked up speed and, one by
one, blew past rivals.
By that time, jockey Joel
Rosario knew he was aboard
the Kentucky Derby winner.
Orb powered to a 2 1/2-
length victory Saturday at
Churchill Downs, giving
trainer Shug McGaughey and
Rosario their first Derby wins.
"I was so far behind,"
Rosario said. "He was very re-
laxed. It's exactly what I
wanted."
Rosario had Orb in the clear
on the outside and they forged
to the lead in deep stretch,
with enough momentum to
hold off 34-1 shot Golden Soul.


139th Kentucky Derby


1. Orb
2. Golden Soul
3. Revolutionary
4. Normandy Invasion
5. Mylute
6. Oxbow
7. Lines of Battle
8. Will Take Charge
9. Charming Kitten
10. Giant Finish
It was a popular victory be-
fore a crowd of 151,616, which
poured enough late money on
Orb to make him the 5-1 fa-
vorite, a position Revolution-
ary had owned most of the day
McGaughey, a 62-year-old
native of Lexington, finally got
the Derby win he had long
sought. Orb was just his sec-
ond starter since 1989, when
he settled for second after
Sunday Silence beat Easy
Goer on a muddy track.
"It means everything to me,"
the Hall of Famer said. "I've


11. Overanalyze
12. Palace Malice
13. Java's War
14. Verrazano
15. Itsmyluckyday
16. Frac Daddy
17. Goldencents
18.Vyjack
19. Falling Sky

always dreamed of this day
and it finally came."
The race was dominated by
closer. Golden Soul rallied
from 15th to second, while Rev-
olutionary was 18th at one point
and finished third for trainer
Todd Pletcher Normandy Inva-
sion finished fourth.
Orb paid $12.80, $7.40 and
$5.40. Golden Soul returned
$38.60 and $19.40, while Revo-
lutionary paid $5.40 to show.
Mylute was fifth, followed by
Oxbow, Lines of Battle, Will
Take Charge and Charming


Kitten. Giant Finish was 10th,
then came Overanalyze,
Palace Malice, Java's War, Ver-
razano, Itsmyluckyday, Frac
Daddy, Goldencents, Vyjack
and Falling Sky.
The second leg of thorough-
bred racing's Triple Crown will
be May 18 when the Preakness
Stakes is held at Pimlico.
The rain that pelted the
track earlier in the day had
stopped by the time 19 horses
paraded to the post for the
139th Derby While it created a
gloppy surface, it didn't seem
to bother Orb, who had never
previously run on a wet track.
"I said, 'A day like today
might have cost me one Ken-
tucky Derby, maybe it'll turn
around and help us today," Mc-
Gaughey said.
His triumph was a victory
for the old school of racing,
where a private trainer like
See Page B3


Brockett


wins


Ozello

Adventure Race

raises money for

county students
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
Bob Brockett became the
Michael Jordan of the Ozello
Adventure Race on Saturday in
Ozello.
The 58-year-old athlete fin-
ished second in the kayak and
took a commanding lead on the
bicycle race to win the overall
event in a record time of 45:34.
It was his fourth triumph in the
seven-year history of the Ozello
Adventure Race.
Michel Bermudez, 42, of Ho-
mosassa was second.
The Wizards of Oz set a team
record with a 41:03. Corbin
Clarke, Steve Cournoyer and
John Kelly finished first.
Cheryl Paradis, 52, a
Brooksville teacher won the fe-
male race with a clocking of
55:44. Holly Alexander of Citrus
Springs was second with a time
of 56:52.
There were 52 registered
contestants. The event raised
$3,700 and most of it will go to
college scholarships for Citrus
County students. The event is
sponsored by the Crystal River
Rotary Club.
Brockett, a 6-foot-1, 198-
pound athlete, was one of those
who founded what became the
Crystal River Sprint Triathlon
series years ago. The Adventure
Race is less demanding since
participants have a 1 1/2-mile
kayak race, a seven-mile bike
and a two-mile run. In a regular
triathlon, athletes have a swim
followed by a 15-mile bike and
a three-mile run.
It helped that there was prac-
tically no wind, the sky was
overcast and conditions ideal.
"There are people that can
kayak that can't bike," Brockett
said. "The guy who beat me (in
the kayak, Jack Rademacher) is
80. He knows the way It is very
laidback. A 58-year-old can win
See Page B3


r ----------------------- *4






Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check Tire Pressure on AII 4 Tires
S* 27-Point Inspection
2l* Battery Test E
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED!
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere!

2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453
S352.341.0018
lovechevysales.com
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt.; 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt.; 8AM-Noon Sat.


Im i"'" ". FREE
SAVE 13% Alignment
lmlam. sandr wnudl, Z=
I & wel ii i ,.i li dI lw Valid atLove Chey or Love Honda. Prices mayvary by model.
Valid at Love Hondaor Lov Chy.Pleasepresent coupon dunn write | plus taxesandfeeswhereappliale.Pleasepresent coupon during wdte
up.6 ottobecombineditlhanyotherdiscouns. EB ir s5-31-13. up. Nottobecombinedwithanyotherdiscounts. Expires 5-31-13.
h------------------------ i h-----------------------------i


M II : 1 I = I I1'.,1


*lI J11I i:I iJ MI=ll'i]m


FiR Oil Change
F-E & Tire Rotation
S4-Wheel Alignment $i3I
SWit ThM PurchMase of 4 TMs I t$34 w
Plu to '' K h licablu Up u. I Palte i lmrencoup ndurngpibup. h bio da yolu adiosinth.Hria1n t.
L Natteo o po b mbedw m d 3 .. .. .. nw mmpm m .anduns. E d is

S2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
L 352.628.4600
- -lovehlonda.com
H O O LnidaL HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt; 9AM-6PM Sat.; 11AM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-FrL; 8AM-2PM Sat.


. -l A lj I I I A I I I I I I"


OOOETP1


I i'l O S-V=I .' C UHPllili l O SiVJ IE:4 :'HP- ON i. ll il]


7L






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Boston
New York
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


East Division
GB WC
7 -- --
1 2 --
1 2Y2 Y2
8 612 41/2
3 1012 812


East Division
GB WC
6 --
6 2 1Y2
2 4 3Y2
4 4 3/2
) 9 8/2


NL

Reds 6, Cubs 4
Cincinnati Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo cf 4 2 1 1 Sappelt cf 2 0 0 0
Cozartss 3 1 1 1 DeJessph-cf 1 0 0 0
Votto b 4 1 2 0 Ransm3b 3 0 0 0
Phillips2b 4 1 0 0 Valuenph-3b 1 00 0
Brucerf 5 1 1 1 Rizzolb 3 2 1 0
Frazier3b 3b 0 0 1 ASorin If 3 2 2 4
Paul If 2 01 0 SCastross 4 00 0
CMillerc 2 0 0 0 Castillo c 3 0 0 0
Hannhn ph 0 0 0 1 Hairstn rf 3 0 0 0
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0
Chpmnp 0 00 0 HRndnp 0 00 0
Cingrn p 2 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 0 0 0
Lutz ph 1 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0
Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0
Mesorcph-cO 0 0 1 Borbonrf 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 66 6 Totals 29 4 3 4
Cincinnati 101 000 040 6
Chicago 202 000 000 4
E-Samardzija (1). DP-Cincinnati 1, Chicago
1. LOB-Cincinnati 8, Chicago 2. 2B-Votto (4),
Paul (3), Rizzo (8). HR-Choo (5), A.Soriano 2
(3). SF-Frazier, Mesoraco.
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Cingrani 6 3 4 4 1 5
OndrusekW,2-0 1 0 0 0 0 0
BroxtonH,4 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chapman S,7-7 1 0 0 0 1 0
Chicago
Samardzija 6 4 2 1 3 5
Russell H,7 1 0 0 0 1 1
MarmolL,2-2 0 0 3 3 2 0
H.RondonBS,1-1 2 2 1 1 2 0
Marmol pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Nationals 5,
Pirates 4
Washington Pittsburgh
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Espinos 2b 4 0 1 0 SMarte If 3 1 1 2
Dsmndss 4 0 01 Sniderrf 4 0 0 0
Harper If 5 1 1 0 McCtchcf 3 01 0
Zmrmn3b 2 3 1 0 GJoneslb 4 0 1 0
LaRochib 1 01 1 Mazzarp 0 0 0 0
TMoorerf 3 0 0 1 RMartnc 3 01 0
WRamsc 5 0 1 2 PAIvrz 3b 4 0 0 0
Berndncf 3 1 0 0 Mercer 2b 4 1 1 0
Strasrg p 3 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 2 2 2
Lmrdzz ph 1 0 1 0 Locke p 1 0 0 0
Clipprdp 0 00 0 JuWIsnp 0 00 0
RSorinp 0 00 0 Morrisp 0 00 0
GSnchzph 1 00 0
Watson p 0 00 0
Inge lb 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 56 5 Totals 304 7 4
Washington 001 102 001 5
Pittsburgh 002 020 000 4
E-W.Ramos (3), Barmes (3), PAIvarez (6).
DP-Washington 2, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Wash-
ington 11, Pittsburgh 3.2B-Espinosa (8). 3B-
Zimmerman (2). HR-S.Marte (4), Barmes (1).
SB-Zimmerman (1), LaRoche (1), S.Marte
(10). S-Locke. SF-Desmond, LaRoche,
T.Moore.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Strasburg 7 5 4 4 1 8
ClippardW,2-1 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Soriano S,10-11 1 1 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
Locke 5 3 4 3 3 3
Ju.Wilson BS,1-1 12/31 0 0 3 3
Morris 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Watson L,1-1 12/32 1 1 0 1
Mazzaro 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Locke pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Marlins 2, Phillies 0


Miami


Philadelphia


ab rhbi ab rhbi
Valaika 2b 4 1 1 1 1 Rollins ss 3 0 0 0 0
Polanc 3b 3 0 1 0 Galvis 3b 3 0 1 0
Ruggin cf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0
Diazlf 4 0 0 0 Howard 1b 3 0 0 0
Ozunarf 3 1 1 1 DYongrf 3 00 0
Dobbslb 4 0 0 0 DBrwnl If 3 0 0 0
Olivo c 3 0 1 0 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0
Hchvrr ss 3 0 1 0 Revere cf 2 0 0 0
Frnndzp 2 01 0 Mayrryph-cf 1 00 0
Pierreph 1 00 0 Hamelsp 2 00 0
MDunnp 0 00 0 Aumontp 0 00 0
Cishekp 0 0 0 0 Horstp 0 0 0 0
L.Nixph 1 00 0
Totals 31 26 2 Totals 280 1 0
Miami 011 000 000 2
Philadelphia 000 000 000 0
LOB-Miami 4, Philadelphia 3. HR-Valaika (1),
Ozuna (1). SB-Polanco (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Miami
Fernandez W,1-2
M.Dunn H,5
Cishek S,4-5
Philadelphia


Hamels L
Aumont
Horst


St. Louis


71 0 0 19

1 0 0 0 1 2


L,1-4 8 6 2 2 0 6
2/3 0 0 0 1 1
1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Cardinals 7,
Brewers 6


Milwaukee


ab rhbi ab rhbi
MCrpnt 2b 5 0 0 Aoki rf 2 1 2 1
Beltranrf 5 0 0 0 Segurass 5 1 2 2
Hollidyl If 4 0 0 0 Braun If 5 01 0
Manessp 0 0 0 0 YBtncr3b 5 0 1 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0
Craig 1 b 4 2 2 1 CGomzcf 4 1 2 1
YMolinc 4 01 0 Maldndc 4 1 2 0
Freese3b 3 1 2 0 AIGnzlzlb 4 1 2 0
J.Kellyp 0 0 0 0 Bianchi3b 0 1 0 0
Salas p 0 0 0 0 Gallard p 2 0 0 0
Choatep 0 00 0 Lucroyph 1 01 2
SRonsnl If 1 1 1 0 Grzlnyp 0 00 0
Jay cf 3 1 2 4 Badnhp p 0 0 0 0
Kozmass 4 1 1 0 LSchfrph 1 0 1 0
Wnwrg p 2 00 0 Hndrsn p 0 00 0
Descals2b 1 1 1 2
Totals 36 7107 Totals 37614 6
St. Louis 030 001 201 7
Milwaukee 200 003 010 6
E-C.Gomez (1). DP-St. Louis 4. LOB-St.
Louis 4, Milwaukee 8. 2B-Y.Molina (9),
Ale.Gonzalez (2). HR-Craig (1), Jay (3),
Descalso (1), Segura (4), C.Gomez (6). SB-
S.Robinson (2). S-Aoki.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
Wainwright 51/311 5 5 0 5
J.Kelly 11/31 0 0 1 0
Salas H,2 2/3 2 1 1 0 0
Choate BS,1-1 0 0 0 0 0 0
ManessW,1-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 0
MujicaS,8-8 1 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
Gallardo 6 6 4 4 0 4
Gorzelanny BS,1-1 1 2 2 2 1 0
Badenhop 1 0 0 0 0 3
Henderson L,2-1 1 2 1 1 1 2
Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.


Str Home
L-3 8-5
W-1 9-7
L-1 8-9
W-2 7-8
W-1 5-11


Detroit
Kansas City
Cleveland
Minnesota
Chicago


St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
11 .621 8
10 .615 Y2 7
13 .519 3 2Y2 7
14 .462 4Y2 4 3
16 .429 5/2 5 5


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
11 .633 7-3
13 .567 2 6-4
14 .548 2Y2 Y2 5-5
15 .483 4Y2 2Y2 3-7
19 .367 8 6 5-5


Str Home
W-3 10-4
W-3 9-4
W-6 6-6
L-2 7-6
L-1 7-7


Str Home
W-5 7-5
L-1 9-5
W-2 12-4
L-4 9-9
L-3 5-9


W
Texas 19
Oakland 17
Seattle 15
Los Angeles 11
Houston 8


Colorado
San Fran.
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Diego


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
11 .633 6
14 .548 2Y2 1Y2 ,
17 .469 5 4
19 .367 8 7 3
23 .258 11Y2 10Y2


West Division
L Pct GB WC
12 .600 --
12 .586 Y2 --
14 .517 2Y2 1Y2
15 .464 4 3
17 .414 5Y2 4Y2


Str Home
W-2 10-4
L-1 9-8
W-3 9-8
L-1 7-8
L-5 4-11



Str Home
W-1 10-4
W-4 9-4
L-4 8-8
L-2 7-8
W-2 6-7


Associated Press
New York Yankees outfielder Brett Gardner hits an RBI single off Oakland Athletics relief pitcher Chris Resop
in the seventh inning Saturday at Yankee Stadium in New York. The Yankees won 4-2.


Yankees double


Rays fall to Rockies


by 9-3 score

Associated Press

NEW YORK Phil Hughes
pitched eight shutout innings of
four-hit ball for his first win of the
season, and the New York Yan-
kees beat the Oakland Athletics
4-2.
Chris Stewart and Lyle Overbay
homered against Bartolo Colon,
sending the As to their only loss in
the right-hander's six starts this
year. Hughes (1-2) struck out nine
and outpitched his former New
York teammate for his first victory
since Sept. 20 against Toronto.
Travis Hafner and Brett Gard-
ner each had an RBI single for the
Yankees.
INTERLEAGUE
Rockies 9, Rays 3
DENVER Carlos Gonzalez hit a
go-ahead homer in the fifth and rookie
Nolan Arenado added a grand slam,
lifting the Colorado Rockies to a 9-3
win over the Tampa Bay Rays in
David Price's first start since his run-in
with umpire Tom Hallion.
Jon Garland (3-2) threw five solid
innings and surrendered three runs to
help the Rockies snap an 11-game
home skid in interleague play.
Arenado broke open a tight game
when he lined a curveball from Price
(1-3) into the left field seats in the sev-
enth. It was his first career grand slam.
Price didn't have his best stuff as he
surrendered nine runs four earned
- in 6 2/3 innings.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Rangers 5, Red Sox 1
ARLINGTON, Texas- Craig Gentry
had an infield hit that produced two
runs and later hit a two-run homer as
the Texas Rangers beat the Boston
Red Sox 5-1.
The Rangers broke a 1-1 tie and
went ahead to stay on the speedy
Gentry's infield hit in the fourth. He
added his first homer in the eighth.
Alexi Ogando (3-2) pitched into the
seventh inning for his first victory in
five starts.
Ian Kinsler hit the first pitch thrown
by John Lackey (1-2) into the left-field
seats for his sixth homer this season,
and 28th career leadoff shot.

Indians 7, Twins 3
CLEVELAND Scott Kazmir
earned his first victory in three sea-
sons, Nick Swisher homered in his
first at-bat since missing three games
with a sore shoulder and the Cleve-
land Indians beat Minnesota 7-3 for
their sixth straight victory.
Kazmir (1-1), a two-time AL All-Star
who pitched in an independent league
last season, allowed two runs in six in-
nings. It was his first win since beating
Tampa Bay on Sept. 19, 2010, while
with the Angels.
The left-hander, who allowed eight
earned runs in 8 1/3 innings in his first
two starts, struck out seven.

Mariners 8, Blue Jays 1
TORONTO Dustin Ackley hit his
first career grand slam, Michael Saun-
ders homered twice and the Seattle
Mariners roughed up Cy Young knuck-
leballer R.A. Dickey, beating the strug-
gling Toronto Blue Jays 8-1.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 6, 10 innings
Oakland 2, N.Y.Yankees 0
Seattle 4, Toronto 0
Texas 7, Boston 0
Detroit 4, Houston 3
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, ppd., rain
Tampa Bay 7, Colorado 4, 10 innings
L.A. Angels 4, Baltimore 0
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 3
N.Y Yankees 4, Oakland 2
Seattle 8, Toronto 1
Baltimore 5, L.A. Angels 4, 10 innings
Kansas City 2, Chicago White Sox 0
Detroit 17, Houston 2
Texas 5, Boston 1
Colorado 9, Tampa Bay 3
Today's Games
Minnesota (Pelfrey 2-3) at Cleveland (Kluber 2-0),
1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Straily 1-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 3-2),
1:05 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 2-3) at Toronto (Morrow 0-2),
1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Quintana 2-0) at Kansas City
(W.Davis 2-2), 2:10 p.m.
Boston (Lester 4-0) at Texas (Darvish 5-1), 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Hammel 4-1) at L.A. Angels (Williams 1-0),
3:35 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 3-2) at Houston (Humber 0-6), 4:10
p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 3-2) at Colorado (Chacin 3-0), 4:10
p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 5
Philadelphia 4, Miami 1
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 1
N.Y Mets 7, Atlanta 5, 10 innings
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 1
Tampa Bay 7, Colorado 4, 10 innings
San Diego 7, Arizona 6
San Francisco 2, L.A. Dodgers 1
Saturday's Games
Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 4
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee 6
Washington 5, Pittsburgh 4
Miami 2, Philadelphia 0
N.Y Mets at Atlanta, ppd., rain
Colorado 9, Tampa Bay 3
Arizona at San Diego, late
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
N.Y Mets (Niese 2-2) at Atlanta (Hudson 3-1), 1:35
p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 2-2) at Pittsburgh (W.Ro-
driguez 2-1), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-1) at Milwaukee (Estrada 2-1),
2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-
4), 2:20 p.m.
Miami (Slowey 0-2) at Philadelphia (Halladay 2-3),
2:35 p.m.
Arizona (Kennedy 1-2) at San Diego (Volquez 2-3),
4:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 3-2) at Colorado (Chacin 3-0), 4:10
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 3-1) at San Francisco (M.Cain 0-
2), 8:05 p.m.


Seattle's offensive outburst was
welcomed by right-hander Hisashi
Iwakuma, who'd received just one run
of support in his previous three out-
ings. He pitched seven sharp innings
to win for the first time in four starts.
Iwakuma (3-1) allowed one run and
five hits. He walked three and struck
out five, lowering his ERA to 1.61.

Royals 2, White Sox 0
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Jeremy
Guthrie ran his unbeaten streak to a
club record 17 consecutive starts with a
four-hitter in the Kansas City Royals' 2-
0 victory over the Chicago White Sox.
Guthrie is 9-0 in the 17 starts, which
started Aug. 8, 2012, against the
White Sox. Left-hander Paul Splittorff
held the Royals' record with 16
straight undefeated starts in 1977-78.
It was first shutout and fourth com-
plete game for Guthrie (4-0), who
threw 11 or fewer pitches in every in-
ning except when he threw 21 in the
fourth and the eighth.

Orioles 5, Angels 4,
10 innings
ANAHEIM, Calif. Steve Pearce's


ip A's 4-2

RBI single with two outs in the 10th in-
ning lifted the Baltimore Orioles to a 5-
4 victory over the Los Angeles Angels.
Baltimore also got homers from
Manny Machado, J.J. Hardy and
Nolan Reimold.
Tommy Hunter (1-1) pitched one in-
ning to get the win.
Freddy Garcia allowed two runs
and three hits over 6 2/3 innings in his
Orioles debut after getting staked to a
4-0 lead.

Tigers 17, Astros 2

HOUSTON Miguel Cabrera hit
two home runs and tied a career with
six RBIs to lead the Detroit Tigers' 17-
2 mauling of the Houston Astros.
Max Scherzer (4-0) won his fourth
straight to begin the season, allowing
one run on three hits and striking out
eight in eight innings. Detroit has won
its first three games against Houston
and has won eight of its last nine.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Reds 6, Cubs 4
CHICAGO Todd Frazier and
Devin Mesoraco each had a sacrifice
fly in Cincinnati's four-run eighth in-
ning, and the Reds rallied for a 6-4
victory over the Chicago Cubs.
Cincinnati had just one hit in the de-
cisive rally, but took advantage of an-
other woeful outing by reliever Carlos
Marmol to secure its first winning road
series of the season. The Reds held on
for a 6-5 victory in the opener on Friday
when Darwin Barney struck out with
the bases loaded to end the game.
Alfonso Soriano hit a pair of two-run
homers for the Cubs, who have lost
four of five. It was Soriano's 31st ca-
reer multihomer game.

Marlins 2, Phillies 0
PHILADELPHIA- Jose Fernandez
pitched one-hit ball and struck out
nine in seven dominant innings, lead-
ing the Miami Marlins over the
Philadelphia Phillies 2-0 for his first
win in the majors.
Marcell Ozuna hit his first career
homer and Chris Valaika connected
for the first time in three years to stop
Cole Hamels (1-4).
The 20-year-old Fernandez (1-2) al-
lowed just a single by Freddy Galvis
up the middle in the first. He then re-
tired the next 17 batters.

Nationals 5, Pirates 4
PITTSBURGH Stephen Stras-
burg struck out eight in seven innings
and the Washington Nationals won a
game he started for the first time since
opening day by beating the Pittsburgh
Pirates 5-4.
Tyler Moore hit a go-ahead sacrifice
fly in the top of the ninth inning off
Tony Watson (1-1) Wilson Ramos' RBI
single in the sixth tied the game at 4
after Pittsburgh built a two-run lead.
Starling Marte and Clint Barmes
each hit two-run homers for the Pirates.

Cardinals 7, Brewers 6
MILWAUKEE Jon Jay homered
and drove in the go-ahead run in the
ninth and Allen Craig and Daniel
Descalso each hit home runs to lead
the St. Louis Cardinals to a 7-6 win
over the Milwaukee Brewers.
Shane Robinson singled to center
and then took second on center fielder
Carlos Gomez's fielding error off Jim
Henderson (2-1) who started the ninth
for Milwaukee with the game tied at 6.
Robinson stole third and then scored
when Jay singled up the middle.


AL


Yankees 4, A's 2


Oakland New York
ab r h bi
Jaso c 3 0 1 0 Gardnrcf
Lowrie dh 4 0 0 0 Cano 2b
Cespds cf 4 1 2 0 V.Wells If
Mossib 3 0 1 0 Hafnerdh
Dnldsn 3b 4 1 0 0 ISuzuki rf
S.Smith If 4 0 2 1 Nelson 3b
Reddckrf 3 0 0 1 Overaylb
Rosales ss 4 0 0 0 Nunezss
Sogard 2b 3 0 0 0 CStwrt c
Totals 32 26 2 Totals
Oakland 000 000 002
NewYork 001 011 10x


ab rh bi
4 0 1 1
4 1 1 0
4010
4 0 1 0

4 00 0
4 0 0 0
3 1 2 1
3 1 1 0
3 1 1 1
334 8 4
2
4


E-Donaldson (4). DP-New York 1. LOB-Oak-
land 6, New York 5.2B-S.Smith (8), Cano (10),
Overbay (5). 3B-Nunez (1). HR-Overbay (5),
C.Stewart (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Colon L,3-1 51/36 3 3 0 3
Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 2
Resop 2/3 2 1 1 0 0
Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 1
NewYork
PHughesW,1-2 8 4 0 0 2 9
Kelley 0 1 1 1 0 0
Rivera 1 1 1 1 1 0
Kelley pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Orioles 5, Angels 4,
10 innings
Baltimore Los Angeles
ab rh bi ab rh bi
McLoth If 5 0 0 0 Aybarss 5 1 1 1
Machd 3b 5 2 2 1 Trout cf 4 0 1 1
Markksrf 5 0 1 0 Pujolslb 4 0 0 0
A.Jones cf 4 0 2 0 Trumo rf 2 1 1 2
Reimld dh 4 2 1 2 Callasp 3b 4 0 1 0
Hardy ss 5 1 2 1 HKndrc2b 4 0 1 0
Pearcelb 4 0 3 1 Richrdsp 0 0 0 0
Flahrty2b 3 0 1 0 Conger dh-c 4 1 1 0
Snyder c 3 0 0 0 lannett c 2 0 0 0
Wieters ph-cl 0 0 0 Cousins ph 0 1 0 0
Frieri p 0 0 0 0
BHarrs 2b 0 0 0 0
Hamltnph 1 0 0 0
Shuck If 3 0 0 0
Totals 39 5125 Totals 33 4 6 4
Baltimore 110 010 100 1 5
LA 000 000 220 0 4
DP-Baltimore 1, Los Angeles 2. LOB-Balti-
more 10, Los Angeles 3.2B-Pearce (2). HR-
Machado (4), Reimold (4), Hardy (4), Trumbo (8).
SB-Machado (3), A.Jones 2 (3), H.Kendrick (3).
CS-Trumbo (1). S-Shuck. SF-Reimold.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
FGarcia 62/33 2 2 1 2
O'Day BS,2-2 11/32 2 2 1 2
Tom.HunterW,1-1 1 1 0 0 1 0
Ji.JohnsonS,11-11 1 0 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
Hanson 5 7 3 3 2 3
Kohn 1 1 0 0 1 1
D.DeLaRosa 2 2 1 1 0 2
Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 3
RichardsL,1-3 1 2 1 1 1 0
HBP-by Hanson (Pearce). WP-Hanson.
Mariners 8,
Blue Jays 1


Seattle

MSndrs cf
Seager3b
KMorls lb
Morse rf
Ibanez dh
Shppch c
Ackley 2b
EnChvz If
Andino ss


Totals 35
Seattle
Toronto


Toronto
r h bi
2 3 3 Lawrie3b
0 0 0 MeCarrdh
1 1 0 Bautistrf
0 0 0 Encrnclb
21 0 Rasmscf
1 1 1 RDavisIf
1 1 4 Mlzturs2b
0 0 0 DeRosa ph
1 1 0 HBlancc
Kawsk ss
Arencii ph
88 8 Totals
100 411 001
000 000 100


ab rh bi
3000
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 02 0
3000

2 00 0
1 0 0 0
4 0 1 0


31 1 6 1
8
1


DP-Seattle 1. LOB-Seattle 3, Toronto 8.2B-
M.Saunders (2), Shoppach (5), H.Blanco (1).
3B-lbanez (1). HR-M.Saunders 2 (4), Ackley
(1). SF-Kawasaki.
IP H RERBBSO


Seattle
Iwakuma W
Medina
O.Perez
Toronto
Dickey L,2-
Lincoln
Cecil


Boston

Ellsury cf
Victorn rf
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli lb
Nava If
Sltlmch c
Mdlrks 3b
Drew ss
Totals
Boston
Texas


,3-1


7 5 1 1 3 5
1 0 0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0 1 0


5 6 6 7 7
2 0 0 0
1 2 1 1
Rangers 5,
Red Sox 1


Texas
r h bi
0 2 0 Kinsler2b
0 0 0 Andrusss
0 0 0 Brkmn dh
1 1 0 Beltre3b
0 1 0 Przynsc
01 1 N.Cruzrf
0 1 0 Morlndlb
0 1 0 Gentry cf
0 0 0 LMartn If
17 1 Totals
010 000 000
100 200 02x


2 5
1 2
0 0




ab r h bi

4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
3 1 1 0
4 1 1 0
4000
3 1 2 0
4 1 2 3
3 0 1 0
34510 4
1
5


E-Middlebrooks 2 (4). DP-Texas 1. LOB-
Boston 9, Texas 8. 2B-D.Ortiz (8), Saltalamac-
chia (6). HR-Kinsler (6), Gentry (1).
SB-Ellsbury (12), Andrus (6). CS-L.Martin (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Lackey L,1-2 5 6 3 3 3 4
A.Miller 1 1 0 0 0 0
Tazawa 1 1 0 0 0 3
Uehara 1 2 2 2 0 2
Texas
OgandoW,3-2 6 6 1 1 2 4
R.RossH,5 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
ScheppersH,6 11/30 0 0 0 0
Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 2
Ogando pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP-by Ogando (Nava), by Scheppers
(Napoli). WP-Ogando.
Rockies 9, Rays 3


Tampa Bay Colorado
ab r h bi
Jnnngscf 4 0 2 0 EYong cf
Scott ph 0 0 0 0 Rutledg 2b
Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 CGnzlz If
Zobrist 2b 4 1 0 0 Tlwtzkss
Longori3b 4 1 2 0 WLopezp
Loneylb 4 1 3 1 Cuddyrrf
KJhnsnIf 4 0 1 2 WRosrc
YEscorss 0 0 0 0 Arenad3b
RRorts2b 3 0 0 0 Pacheclb
JMolin c 4 0 0 0 Garlnd p
Price p 3 0 0 0 Escaln p
BGomsp 0 0 0 0 JHerrrss
CRams p 0 000
Fuld ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 35 39 3 Totals


ab rh bi
5230
5 0 1 0



3100
4 3 2 1
3 1 3 3




0 00
1 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


35911 8


Tampa Bay 003 000 000 3
Colorado 102 010 50x 9
E-Zobrist (2), Longoria (2). DP-Tampa Bay 1,
Colorado 1. LOB-Tampa Bay 9, Colorado 6.
2B-Jennings (8), Loney (9), Tulowitzki (7),
Pacheco (4). HR-C.Gonzalez (6), Arenado (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
Price L,1-3 62/310 9 4 3 5
B.Gomes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
C.Ramos 1 1 0 0 0 0
Colorado
GarlandW,3-2 5 7 3 3 1 2
EscalonaH,3 2 0 0 0 1 2
W.Lopez 2 2 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Price (Tulowitzki), by Garland (YEs-
cobar). Balk-Escalona.
Umpires-Home, Clint Fagan; First, Bruce Dreck-
man; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Paul Emmel.
T-3:04. A-29,099 (50,398).


AMERICAN LEAGUE


NATIONAL LEAGUE


B2 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tigers 17, Astros 2 FOr the re cord


Detroit Houston
ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksn cf 5 2 2 0 Grssmn cf 3 0 1 0
D.Kellycf 1 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0
TrHntrrf 5 34 2 JCastro dh 4 01 1
MiCarr3b 4 3 4 6 C.Penalb 2 0 0 0
RSantg3b 1 0 0 0 B.Lairdlb 2 0 0 0
Fielder b 5 0 1 1 Corprnc 4 1 2 1
Tuiassplb 1 1 1 0 Carter If 2 0 0 0
VMrtnz dh 6 2 2 4 FMrtnzlIf 2 0 0 0
Dirks If 5 2 1 0 RCedenss 3 0 0 0
JhPerlt ss 6 1 2 2 Ankiel rf 2 0 0 0
Avila c 5 2 2 1 Dmngz 3b 3 0 1 0
Infante 2b 4 1 2 1
Totals 48172117 Totals 31 2 6 2
Detroit 420 111 332 17
Houston 000 000 101 2
E-R.Cedeno (4). DP-Detroit 1, Houston 1.
LOB-Detroit 9, Houston 4.2B-Tor.Hunter (9),
VMartinez (6), Jh.Peralta (6), Avila (1), Altuve
(8). 3B-Dirks (1). HR-Mi.Cabrera 2 (6),
V.Martinez (1), Corporan (2). SB-Tor.Hunter
(1). CS-Grossman (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Detroit
ScherzerW,4-0 8 3 1 1 2 8
Alburquerque 1 3 1 1 0 2
Houston
HarrellL,3-3 41/310 8 8 4 3
Cisnero 22/38 6 6 1 0
Clemens 2 3 3 2 0 1
Cisnero pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP-Scherzer, Alburquerque.

Royals 2,
White Sox 0
Chicago Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
De Aza If 4 0 1 0 AGordn If 4 0 0 0
Kppngr2b 4 0 0 0 AEscorss 4 0 1 0
Riosrf 4 0 0 0 Butlerdh 3 1 0 0
A.DunnIb 3 0 0 0 Hosmerib 4 1 3 0
Konerkdh 4 0 2 0 L.Caincf 4 0 1 2
Gillaspi 3b 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0
AIRmrz ss 3 0 0 0 Francr rf 3 0 0 0
Flowrsc 3 0 1 0 S.Perezc 4 0 2 0
Wisecf 3 0 0 0 Getz2b 4 0 1 0
Totals 31 04 0 Totals 332 8 2
Chicago 000 000 000 0
Kansas City 200 000 00x 2
E-Axelrod (1), AI.Ramirez (4). DP-Chicago
1. LOB-Chicago 5, Kansas City 10.2B-Kon-
erko (5). 3B-Hosmer (1), L.Cain (2). SB-
A.Escobar (7).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Axelrod L,0-2 72/38 2 2 1 0
Thornton 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
GuthrieW,4-0 9 4 0 0 1 3
HBP-by Axelrod (Butler, Moustakas).

Indians 7, Twins 3


Minnesota Cleveland
ab r h bi


Dozier 2b 4 000 Brantly If
Mauerdh 4 1 1 0 Kipnis2b
Wlngh If 4 0 1 0 ACarer ss
Mornea lb 4 0 0 0 Swisher dh
Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 0 MrRynl lb
Doumitc 4 01 1 CSantn c
Parmel rf 3 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b
Hicks cf 3 1 1 1 Stubbscf
Flormn ss 2 0 1 1 Carrer rf
Arciaph 1 0 1 0
EEscor ss 1 0 00
Totals 34 37 3 Totals
Minnesota 010 010 010
Cleveland 220 000 21x


ab r h bi


34712 7
3
7


E-Kipnis (2). DP-Minnesota 1, Cleveland 1.
LOB-Minnesota 9, Cleveland 6.2B--Willing-
ham (6), Plouffe (4), A.Cabrera (6), Stubbs (7).
3B-Kipnis (2). HR-Hicks (1), Kipnis (2),
Swisher (3). SB-Kipnis (6).
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
CorreiaL,3-2 5 6 4 4 2 4
Swarzak 2 4 2 2 0 1
Pressly 1 2 1 1 0 0
Cleveland
KazmirW,1-1 6 5 2 2 1 7
ShawH,1 1 1 0 0 1 1
J.Smith 1 1 1 1 2 0
C.Perez 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Correia (Chisenhall).WP-Shaw.
Late Friday night
Rays 7, Rockies 4,
10 innings
Tampa Bay Colorado
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jnnngscf 4 1 1 2 Fowler cf 1 0 1 0
RRorts 2b 4 1 1 1 EYong cf 3 0 0 0
JoPerltp 0 0 0 0 Pacheclb 5 1 0 0
McGeep 0 00 0 CGnzlz If 5 0 1 0
BGomsp 0 0 0 0 Cuddyrrf 4 1 1 2
Scott ph 1 0O0 0 WRosr c 5 1 1 0
Frnswrp 0 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 5 0 3 1
Rodney p 0 00 0 Rutledg 2b 5 1 2 1
Zobristrf 4 1 2 1 JHerrrss 4 01 0
Longori3b 4 1 1 1 Francis p 1 0 0 0
SRdrgzlb 3 0 0 0 Ottavinp 1 0 0 0
Joyce rf 2 0 1 0 WLopez p 0 0 0 0
KJhnsn If 4 1 1 2 Tlwtzk ph 0 0 0 0
Fuld If 0 00 0 Chatwd pr 0 0 0 0
YEscor ss 5 0 1 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0
Loaton c 5 2 3 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0
MMoorp 2 0 0 0 Brigncph 1 0 1 0
JWrghtp 0 000
Loneylb 3 0 00
Totals 41 7117 Totals 40411 4
Tampa Bay 002 020 000 3 7
Colorado 210 010 000 0 4
LOB-Tampa Bay 8, Colorado 12. 2B-
R.Roberts (3), Zobrist 2 (8), Lobaton (2),
W.Rosario (4), Arenado 2 (2). HR-Jennings
(4), K.Johnson (4), Cuddyer (6), Rutledge (4).
S-Fowler.
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore 5 7 4 4 4 3
J.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1
Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 2
McGee 2/3 2 0 0 1 2
B.Gomes 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
FarnsworthW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1
RodneyS,4-5 1 2 0 0 0 2
Colorado
Francis 5 5 4 4 1 3
Ottavino 2 1 0 0 0 2
W.Lopez 1 1 0 0 1 0
Brothers 1 0 0 0 1 1
Belisle L,1-2 1 4 3 3 0 0
HBP-by Francis (K.Johnson).
Umpires-Home, Paul Emmel; First, Clint Fagan;
Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Gary Darling.
T-3:35. A-30,255 (50,398).



NBA playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Saturday, April 20
New York 85, Boston 78
Denver 97, Golden State 95
Brooklyn 106, Chicago 89
L.A. Clippers 112, Memphia 91
Sunday, April 21
Indiana 107, Atlanta 90
San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 79
Miami 110, Milwaukee 87
Oklahoma City 120, Houston 91
Monday, April 22
Chicago 90, Brooklyn 82
L.A. Clippers 93, Memphis 91
Tuesday, April 23
Miami 98, Milwaukee 86
New York 87, Boston 71
Golden State 131, Denver 117


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
7 12 26 36 40
POWER BALL
17


CASH 3 (early)
9-3-5
CASH 3 (late)
8-1-1

PLAY 4 (early)
9-4-3-1
PLAY 4 (late)
a 6-7-1-5

FANTASY 5
9-10-16-17-29

LOTTERY
5-17-18-24-29-33
XTRA
3


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


FRIDAY, APRIL 22
Mega Money: 13 17 31 41
Mega Ball: 6
4-of-4 MB No winner


4-of-4 4
3-of-4 MB 64
3-of-4 1,325
2-of-4 MB 1,708
1-of-4 MB 13,927
2-of-4 36,768


$3,074.50
$420.00
$60.50
$33.00
$4.00
$2.50


Fantasy 5:2 4 12 14 28
5-of-5 2 winners $121,580.14
4-of-5 397 $98.50
3-of-5 11,739 $9.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Sao Paulo Indy 300 race
12 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Aaron's 499 race
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Sportsman Series (Taped)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Summit Racing Equipment
Southern Nationals (Same-day Tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
9 a.m. (SUN) South Florida at Florida (Taped)
MLB
1:30 p.m. (TBS) New York Mets at Atlanta Braves
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) Cincinnati Reds at Chicago Cubs
2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies
4 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Colorado Rockies
8 p.m. (ESPN) Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco
Giants
BASKETBALL
NBA PLAYOFFS CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
1 p.m. (ABC) Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder
Game 1
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Indiana Pacers at New York Knicks -
Game 1
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Volvo China Open,
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Wells Fargo Championship, Final
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGATour: Wells Fargo Championship, Final
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kingsmill Championship, Final
Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Insperity Championship,
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
NHL PLAYOFF FIRST ROUND
12 p.m. (NBC) Pittsburgh Penguins at New York Islanders
3 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Blackhawks at Minnesota Wild -
Game 3
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Montreal Canadiens at Ottawa Senators
Game 3
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) Vancouver Canucks at San Jose
Sharks Game 3
1 a.m. (NBCSPT) 2013 IIHF World Championships: Latvia
vs. United States (Same-day Tape)
SOCCER
11 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: Houston Dynamo at Los Angeles
Galaxy
SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Texas at Oklahoma State
3 p.m. (ESPN) LSU at Georgia

RADIO
MLB
3:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game
4:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Colorado
Rockies

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Wednesday, April 24
Oklahoma City 105, Houston 102
Indiana 113, Atlanta 98
San Antonio 102, L.A. Lakers 91
Thursday, April 25
Miami 104, Milwaukee 91
Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76
Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82
Friday, April 26
New York 90, Boston 76
San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89
Golden State 110, Denver 108
Saturday, April 27
Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134, 30T
Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83
Atlanta 90, Indiana 69
Oklahoma City 104, Houston 101
Sunday, April 28
Boston 97, NewYork 90
Miami 88, Milwaukee 77, Miami wins series
4-0
San Antonio 103, L.A. Lakers 82, San Anto-
nio wins series 4-0
Golden State 115, Denver 101
Monday, April 29
Brooklyn 110, Chicago 91
Atlanta 102, Indiana 91
Houston 105, Oklahoma City 103
Tuesday, April 30
Denver 107, Golden State 100
Memphis 103, L.A. Clippers 93
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 92, NewYork 86
Indiana 106, Atlanta 83
Houston 107, Oklahoma City 100
Thursday, May 2
Brooklyn 95, Chicago 92
Golden State 92, Denver 88, Golden State
wins series 4-2
Friday, May 3
New York 88, Boston 80, New York wins se-
ries 4-2
Indiana 81, Atlanta 73, Indiana wins series 4-
2
Oklahoma City 103, Houston 94, Oklahoma
City wins series 4-2
Memphis 118, L.A. Clippers 105, Memphis
wins series 4-2


Saturday, May 4
Chicago 99, Brooklyn 93, Chicago wins se-
ries 4-3
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Sunday, May 5
Memphis at Oklahoma City 1 p.m.
Indiana at New York, 3:30 p.m.
Monday, May 6
Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7
Indiana at New York, 7p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8
Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Friday, May 10
Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 11
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m.
NewYork at Indiana, 8 p.m.



NHL playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, April 30
Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 1
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 4, Toronto 1
Pittsburgh 5, N.Y Islanders 0
San Jose 3, Vancouver 1
Thursday, May 2
Ottawa 4, Montreal 2
Washington 3, N.Y Rangers 1
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, St. Louis leads
series 2-0
Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT
Friday, May 3
Montreal 3, Ottawa 1, series tied 1-1
N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3, series tied 1-1


Chicago 5, Minnesota 2, Chicago leads se-
ries 2-0
San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT, San Jose leads
series 2-0
Saturday, May 4
Washington 1, N.Y Rangers 0, Washington
leads series 2-0
Toronto 4, Boston 2, series tied 1-1
Anaheim 4, Detroit 0, Anaheim leads series
2-1
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 5
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders Noon
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 3 p.m.
Monday, May 6
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y Islanders, 7p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8
Boston at Toronto, 7p.m.
Washington at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
x-Los Angeles at St. Louis, TBD
Thursday, May 9
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
x-San Jose at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
x-Minnesota at Chicago, TBD
Friday, May 10
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
x-NY Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
x-St. Louis at Los Angeles, TBD
x-Anaheim at Detroit, TBD



Sprint Cup
Aaron's 499 Lineup
Saturday qualifying ccd., rain; race Sunday
At Talladega Superspeedway
Talladega, Ala.
Lap length: 2.66 miles
Lineup based on practice times
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford.
2. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota.
3. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford.
4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford.
5. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
6. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota.
7. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota.
8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
9. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
10. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet.
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford.
12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.
13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota.
14. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota.
15. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.
17. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford.
19. (34) David Ragan, Ford.
20. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota.
21. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford.
22. (13) Casey Mears, Ford.
23. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet.
24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
25. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet.
26. (35) Josh Wise, Ford.
27. (30) David Stremme, Toyota.
28. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.
29. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet.
30. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet.
31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford.
32. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota.
33. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet.
34. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
35. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota.
36. (95) Scott Speed, Ford.
37. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford.
38. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford.
39. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota.
40. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota.
42. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
43. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet.
Failed to Qualify
44. (81) Elliott Sadler, Toyota.



Kentucky Derby
Winners
Note: Partial list
2013- Orb
2012- I'll Have Another
2011 -Animal Kingdom
2010 -Super Saver
2009-Mine That Bird
2008 Big Brown
2007 -Street Sense
2006 Barbaro
2005 Giacomo
2004-Smarty Jones
2003 Funny Cide
2002-War Emblem
2001 Monarchos
2000 Fusaichi Pegasus
1999 Charismatic
1998 Real Quiet
1997- Silver Charm
1996 -Grindstone
1995 -Thunder Gulch
1994 Go for Gin
1993 Sea Hero
1992 -LilE.Tee
1991 -Strike the Gold
1990 -Unbridled
1989 -Sunday Silence
1988-Winning Colors
1987- Alysheba
1986 -Ferdinand
1985- Spend A Buck
1984 -Swale
1983- Sunny's Halo
1982 -Gato Del Sol
1981 Pleasant Colony
1980 -Genuine Risk
1979- Spectacular Bid
1978- Affirmed
1977- Seattle Slew
1976 -Bold Forbes
1975 -Foolish Pleasure
1974 -Cannonade
1973 -Secretariat
1972 -Riva Ridge
1971 -Canonero ll
1970 -Dust Commander
1969 -Majestic Prince
1968 -Forward Pass
1967- Proud Clarion
1966 -Kauai King
1965 -Lucky Debonair
1964 -Northern Dancer
1963 -Chateaugay
1962-Decidedly
1961 -Carry Back
1960- Venetian Way
1959 -Tomy Lee
1958 -Tim Tam


1957- Iron Liege
1956 Needles
1955 Swaps
1954 -Determine
1953-Dark Star
1952 Hill Gail
1951 Count Turf
1950 Middleground
1949 -Ponder
1948 -Citation
1947- Jet Pilot
1946 -Assault
1945 -Hoop, Jr.
1944- Pensive
1943 Count Fleet
1942 Shut Out
1941 -Whirlaway
1940 Gallahadion
1939 Johnstown
1938 Lawrin
1937-War Admiral
1936 Bold Venture


NATIONWIDE
Continued from Page B1


the caution came out," Kahne said. "I knew I
was third when the caution came out and I
knew I was first at the line. I actually thought
maybe Joey had won."
NASCAR needed several minutes to re-
view video to see who won the race. The win
went to Smith over Logano under caution
with Kahne in third.
"I was really surprised they threw that cau-
tion, so many times they wouldn't in that situ-
ation," Kahne said. "NASCAR always switches
it up, you never know what's going to happen."
The win moved Smith into the points lead
for the first time in his career, and for the
first time for JR Motorsports.



KENTUCKY
Continued from Page B1


McGaughey works exclusively for wealthy
owners in this case Stuart Janney and
Ogden Mills "Dinny" Phipps.
"The Phippses and Janneys has been my
whole life for 20 some years now, and have
really kind of given me everything I've got,"
said McGaughey, who never lost his thick
Southern drawl despite years of working in
New York.
"I'm extremely proud to be able to work
with people such as this. To bring a day like
today into their lives is just a huge, huge
thrill for me. All I can do is just say thanks for
the opportunity," he said.
First cousins Janney and 72-year-old Dinny
Phipps, who are among the sport's blue
bloods that include the old-money Whitney
and Vanderbilt families, also got their first
gold Derby trophy
"I just couldn't be more delighted that
we're doing this together," the 64-year-old
Janney said.
Phipps' late father, Ogden, owned Easy
Goer and undefeated Personal Ensign. Jan-
ney's parents owned star filly Ruffian.
"This horse's bloodline goes back to our
grandmother," Janney said. "Dinny's father
was very instrumental in getting me to take
over my parents' horses 20 some years ago."
When the horses burst from the gates,
Palace Malice and Mike Smith set a sizzling
pace that couldn't be sustained.
On the far turn, the pack closed in on the
leader, with Oxbow attacking from the inside
and Normandy Invasion moving up on the
outside to take the lead.
Rosario positioned Orb in the clear on the
outside and they reeled in Normandy Inva-
sion in mid-stretch before surging clear.
History was denied on several fronts:
Pletcher's Derby record fell to 1 for 36
after sending out a record-tying five horses
for the second time in his career. Besides
Revolutionary, Charming Kitten was ninth;
Overanalyze was 11th; early pacesetter
Palace Malice was 12th; and previously un-
beaten Verrazano was 14th.
Rosie Napravnik's bid to become the
first woman jockey to win ended with a fifth-
place finish aboard Mylute. It was still the
highest finish by a woman rider, bettering her
ninth-place showing two years ago.
Kevin Krigger failed in his attempt to be
the first black jockey to win since 1902. He
rode Goldencents to a 17th-place finish for
trainer Doug O'Neill, who won last year with
I'll Have Another Rick Pitino owns 5 percent
of the colt, who couldn't deliver a
horses/hoops double for the coach of the na-
tional champion Louisville basketball team.
E D. Wayne Lukas missed out on becoming
the oldest trainer to win at 77. He saddled
two horses: Oxbow was sixth with 50-year-old
Gary Stevens making a Derby comeback
after seven years in retirement, and Will
Take Charge was eighth.



OZELLO
Continued from Page B1


this. It is so much fun to do. I smoked these
guys on the bike. I knew someone was going
to catch me. This is like a mini sprint. I did
pretty good on the kayak."
The second place finisher is hooked on this
race.
"This is my first time doing it," Bermudez
said. "I love it. It's very fun. I have done reg-
ular triathlons. I like the kayak. It's very dif-
ficult but it's fun."
Paradis was in her fourth race when she
took the victory
"I was worried about (Alexander)," she
said. "She was running fast My best event is
kayak. I kayak on the river at Weeki Wachee.
I took off in the water. I had a good bike. I
used my husband's bike. I still have a lot of
energy"
"This is fun," Alexander said. "I haven't
done much kayaking. It was flat Spectacular.
No sun, no wind. The water was perfect
today No waves."
Homosassa resident Sam Nall took part in
the bike portion of the race. His wife, Marie,
handled the kayak and Kevin Scholl did the
running. They combined to make up the Sug-
armill Trifecta team.
Nall is 70 and currently ranked No. 1 in the
nation as a triathlete in his age class. How-
ever, he had knee surgery a year ago and to-
gether with hip replacement, he may only
walk in future races.


Nall still enjoyed the Ozello race.
"It's lots of fun," Nall said. "It's just plain
fun. As the body falls apart, it's still nice to be
a part of it. I need a knee replacement. It's
pretty painful to run. I hope to stay in the top
five. The pain came later. I am going to hang
in as long as I can."
The average age for a participant in the
race was 48 years old.
Race director Barry Schwartz knew the
race went about as well as possible.
"Perfect conditions," Schwartz said. "The
clouds kept it where the athletes can per-
form. Bob has a new record. No wind and a
cloud cover really helped. It makes for per-
fect conditions. It was a good crowd. We
raised almost $4,000. It will go right back to
scholarships."


SCOREBOARD


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 B3











Capitals upend Rangers Bulls drub Nets in


Overtime goal

gives team 1-0

win over N. Y.

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Hen-
rik Lundqvist and Braden
Holtby kicked, swiped,
caught and otherwise
kept getting in the way of
the puck, matching each
other save-for-save for a
second shy of 68 minutes,
until Mike Green scored
the power-play goal in
overtime that gave the
Washington Capitals a
sweep at home to open
their playoff series
against the New York
Rangers.
Green nailed a one-
timer from high in the slot
on a feed from Mike
Ribeiro precisely at the
eight-minute mark of the
extra period, Holtby made
24 saves for his first career
playoff shutout, and the
Capitals beat the Rangers
1-0 Saturday to take a 2-0
series lead in the Eastern
Conference playoffs.
With Rangers defense-
man Ryan McDonagh in
the penalty box for delay
of game, having lifted the
puck over the glass in
New York's defensive
zone, the Capitals took ad-
vantage of their first
power play since the first
period. Ribeiro faked a
slap shot, and then
pushed the puck to Green,
who beat Lundqvist to the
glove side.
Game 3 is Monday in
New York.
Henrik Lundqvist made
37 saves for the Rangers.
Holtby has saved 59 of 60
shots in the series, includ-
ing 35 of 36 in Thursday's
3-1 victory in Game 1.
Maple Leafs 4,
Bruins 2
BOSTON Joffrey Lupul
scored two goals and the
Toronto Maple Leafs got a


Associated Press
New York Rangers defenseman Anton Stralman, left, and New York Rangers goalie
Henrik Lundqvist defend Washington Capitals left wing Martin Erat during the second
period of Game 2 of a Stanley Cup NHL playoff series Saturday in Washington.


4-2 win over the Boston Bru-
ins that evened their first-
round series at one game.
The Maple Leafs played
aggressively from the start
after a weak performance in
a 4-1 loss in which the Bruins
were much more physical.
But that changed early in
Game 2 as Toronto delivered
22 hits in the first period to
just 10 for Boston.
Nathan Horton gave the
Bruins a 1-0 lead at 1:56 of
the second period, but Lupul
scored at 5:18 on a power
play and at 11:56 with the
teams at even strength.
Phil Kessel made it 3-1 on
a breakaway 53 seconds into
the third period. Johnny Boy-
chuk cut the lead at 10:35
before James van Riemsdyk
scored for Toronto at 16:53.
Game 3 of the best-of-
seven playoff series is sched-
uled for Monday night in
Toronto.
Ducks 4,
Red Wings 0
DETROIT Nick Bonino
scored for Anaheim on a sec-
ond-period power play 18
seconds after Detroit's Justin
Abdelkader was ejected for a
violent hit on Toni Lydman -
and the Ducks went on to a


4-0 victory to take a 2-1 se-
ries lead over the Red Wings
in the Western Conference
playoffs.
Abdelkader appeared to
catch Lydman square in the
side of the head with his left
shoulder, and he was given a
major penalty for charging
and a game misconduct with
4:49 remaining in the second.
The Ducks immediately
took advantage when Bonino
backhanded a shot past
goalie Jimmy Howard from
point-blank range.
Ryan Getzlaf, Emerson
Etem and Matt Beleskey
scored in the third period for
the Ducks. Jonas Hiller made
23 saves for Anaheim.
Late Friday night
Blackhawks 5,
Wild 2
CHICAGO Patrick
Sharp and Michael Frolik had
two goals apiece, and the
Blackhawks took a 2-0 series
lead over the Wild.
Patrick Kane added two
assists as Chicago put to-
gether a strong start and im-
pressive finish. Bryan Bickell
added an empty-net score to
his winning goal in the Black-
hawks' 2-1 overtime victory in
the postseason opener Tues-


day night.
Game 3 is today in
Minnesota.
Devin Setoguchi and
Marco Scandella scored for
the Wild, who are making
their first postseason appear-
ance in five years.
Sharks 3,
Canucks 2, OT
VANCOUVER, British Co-
lumbia Raffi Torres scored
at 5:31 of overtime to give
the San Jose Sharks a 2-0
lead over the Vancouver
Canucks.
The series shifts to San
Jose for games today and
Tuesday. San Jose was 17-
2-5 at home this season.
Joe Thornton and Patrick
Marleau, whose goal in the
final minute of the third period
forced overtime, also scored
for San Jose.
The Canucks took their
sixth consecutive loss in a
home playoff game. Now,
they might not get another
one after winning their fifth
consecutive Northwest Divi-
sion title.
Ryan Kesler scored two
third-period goals for Vancou-
ver, helping the Canucks
overcome a 1-0 deficit that
stood since the first period.


Associated Press

NEW YORK Joakim
Noah had 24 points and 14
rebounds, Marco Belinelli
also scored 24 points and
the Chicago Bulls beat the
Brooklyn Nets 99-93 on
Saturday night in Game 7
of their first-round series.
Carlos Boozer added 17
points as the Bulls shook
off injuries to two starters
and every run the Nets
tried to make in the second
half to win a Game 7 on the
road for the first time in
franchise history They ad-
vanced to a second-round
series against defending
champion Miami that
starts Monday night
The Bulls opened a 17-
point halftime lead with a
rare offensive outburst,
and found a way to get big
baskets every time the
Nets pulled close to win
the NBAs only do-or-die
game of the first round.
Deron Williams had 24
points, seven assists and six
rebounds for the Nets. They
were trying to become the
ninth NBA team to win a
series after trailing 3-1.
Late Friday night
Thunder 104,
Rockets 93
HOUSTON Kevin Durant


scored 27 points and Kevin
Martin added 25 to lead the
Oklahoma City Thunder to a
103-94 victory over the Houston
Rockets, sending them to the
second round of the playoffs for
the third straight season.
The Rockets were looking
to become just the fourth
team in NBA history to force a
Game 7 after trailing 3-0.
But the Thunder opened
the fourth quarter with a big
run to take the lead and
cruised to the victory.
Grizzlies 118,
Clippers 105
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Mike
Conley and Zach Randolph
scored 23 points each, and
the Memphis Grizzlies beat
the Los Angeles Clippers 118-
105 to take the first-round se-
ries 4-2 and advance to their
second Western Conference
semifinals in three seasons.
The Grizzlies had never
won four straight postseason
games before this series, and
they became only the 10th
team in NBA history to win four
straight after trailing 0-2. They
will open the second round at
Oklahoma City today.
Memphis finished with
seven players in double fig-
ures. Tony Allen had a post-
season-best 19 points, and
Jerryd Bayless had 16.


Associated Press
Chicago Bulls guard Nate Robinson reacts after hitting a
three-pointer Saturday against the Brooklyn Nets during
the first half in Game 7 of their first-round NBA basketball
playoff series in New York.


Saturday's GolfLEADERBOARD


Associated Press
Phil Mickelson watches his tee shot Saturday on the fifth hole during the third round
of the Wells Fargo Championship at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, N.C.



Two tied for Wells Fargo



Championship lead


Mickelson, Watney

atop PGA Tour event

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. Phil Mickelson
and Nick Watney wound up tied for the
lead Saturday in the Wells Fargo Cham-
pionship, minus the separation from the
rest of the field.
Mickelson hit a shot out-of-bounds on
the 15th hole and hit another shot that
struck a spectator in the head, costing
him three shots over the last four holes
at Quail Hollow in his round of 1-over
73. Watney hit a semi-shank with a 6-iron
on the par-3 17th, took double bogey and
had to settle for a 71.
It felt like a small consolation that they
were tied at 8-under 208, one shot ahead
of George McNeill, who had his share of
trouble down the stretch for a 72.
Instead of pulling away from the pack,
their mistakes in a wild final hour al-
lowed a dozen players to get within
three shots of the lead.
One of them was Rory McIlroy, who
shot 73 and missed seven putts from the
5-foot range or closer, which was no way
to celebrate his 24th birthday. McIlroy
ranked 82nd out of the 83 players who
made the 36-hole cut in the key putting
statistic, yet he still goes into the final
round with a good chance for his first
win of the year.
Kingsmill Championship
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. Two-time
champion Cristie Kerr shot a 5-under 66 to


take a two-stroke lead over second-ranked
Stacy Lewis and Suzann Pettersen after
the third round of the LPGA Tour's
Kingsmill Championship.
Kerr, the only two-time winner at the River
Course, made six birdies to reach 10-under
203. She took command on a day when
seven players shared the lead at one point or
another.
Lewis shot a 69, and Pettersen, the
2007 champion, had a 68. Angela Stanford
was three strokes back after a 70, and llhee
Lee was fifth at 6 under after an all-over-the-
place 69.
Ariya Jutanugarn, the 17-year-old Thai
player who led after each of the first two
rounds, had three bogeys and a birdie on
her first four holes and fought a balky putter
for a 73 that left her five shots back, where
she was tied with Lizette Salas, whose
bogey-free 65 was the best round of the
day.
Insperity Championship
THE WOODLANDS, Texas Gene
Sauers chipped in for birdie on the par-4 17th
a day after making a double bogey on the
hole, and finished with a 6-under 66 to take a
two-stroke lead in the Champions Tour's In-
sperity Championship.
Sauers hit into the water on the 17th hole
Friday, but atoned for the mistake Saturday
with a 25-yard chip.
The 50-year-old Sauers, a three-time winner
on the PGA Tour who is making his 10th
career start on the 50-and-over tour, had an
8-under 136 total at The Woodlands Country
Club.
First-round leader Mike Goodes was sec-
ond after his second straight 69.


Wells Fargo
Championship
Saturday
At Quail Hollow Club, Charlotte, N.C.
Purse: $6.7 million
Yardage: 7,492, Par: 72
Third Round
Nick Watney 67-70-71 -208 -8
Phil Mickelson 68-67-73 -208 -8
George McNeill 69-68-72-209 -7
JohnSenden 70-73-67-210 -6
Ryan Moore 67-75-68 -210 -6
Robert Karlsson 69-72-69 -210 -6
David Lynn 71-68-71 -210 -6
Derek Ernst 67-71-72-210 -6
Lee Westwood 70-68-72-210 -6
Brian Harman 70-70-71-211 -5
D.A. Points 71-69-71 -211 -5
Kevin Streelman 68-72-71 -211 -5
Jason Kokrak 68-70-73 211 -5
Rory Mcllroy 67-71-73-211 -5
Bo Van Pelt 74-70-68 212 -4
D.H. Lee 72-71-69 -212 -4
Sergio Garcia 72-68-72-212 -4
Lucas Glover 68-71-73 212 -4
Rod Pampling 69-69-74-212 -4
John Merrick 74-71-68 -213 -3
Henrik Norlander 74-70-69-213 -3
Charles Howell III 72-72-69-213 -3
VaughnTaylor 70-72-71-213 -3
Russell Henley 69-71-73-213 -3
Scott Gardiner 70-67-76 -213 -3
Shawn Stefani 69-73-72 -214 -2
Ross Fisher 70-71-73-214 -2
Robert Garrigus 67-72-75 -214 -2
Brian Davis 72-74-69 -215 -1
Webb Simpson 70-74-71 --215 -1
Lee Williams 73-71-71-215 -1
Richard H. Lee 73-70-72 215 -1
Chris Kirk 72-71-72- 215 -1
John Rollins 69-74-72-215 -1
James Driscoll 70-72-73-215 -1
Kyle Stanley 74-68-73 -215 -1
Jordan Spieth 69-71-75 215 -1
D.Summerhays 67-73-75-215 -1
JoshTeater 72-73-71 -216 E
PeterTomasulo 71-73-72-216 E
Martin Flores 73-71-72 -216 E
Bud Cauley 70-73-73-216 E
Steve Marino 71-72-73 -216 E
Jimmy Walker 71-72-73-216 E
David Hearn 69-72-75 -216 E
Ted Potter, Jr. 71-70-75 216 E
Ryo Ishikawa 73-73-71 -217 +1
Robert Allenby 76-70-71-217 +1
Luke List 71-75-71 -217 +1
Geoff Ogilvy 74-72-71-217 +1
Pat Perez 76-69-72-217 +1
Brendon de Jonge 74-71-72-217 +1
Patrick Reed 70-74-73-217 +1
Gary Woodland 70-73-74-217 +1
Stuart Appleby 71-71-75 -217 +1
Angel Cabrera 73-69-75-217 +1
Dicky Pride 71-71-75 217 +1
ZachJohnson 68-72-77- 217 +1
James Hahn 72-74-72 -218 +2
Steven Bowditch 69-76-73-218 +2
Casey Wittenberg 73-71-74 -218 +2
Roberto Castro 71-73-74-218 +2
Luke Guthrie 74-69-75-218 +2
Nate Smith 67-74-77-218 +2
Will Claxton 73-73-73-219 +3
Tommy Gainey 74-72-73-219 +3
Hunter Haas 75-71-73-219 +3
Matteo Manassero 71-75-73 -219 +3
Scott Brown 74-71-75-220 +4
Brad Fritsch 71-72-77-220 +4
Boo Weekley 68-75-77 -220 +4
Trevor Immelman 70-72-78-220 +4
Made cut, did not finish
Kevin Sutherland 73-73-75-221 +5
Matt Jones 73-73-75 -221 +5
Doug LaBelle II 74-72-75-221 +5
Hunter Mahan 73-72-76 -221 +5
Mike Weir 72-73-76 -221 +5
Rickie Fowler 72-72-77 221 +5
Kevin Stadler 73-71-77-221 +5
Chris Stroud 71-75-76 -222 +6
Jonathan Byrd 72-73-77-222 +6


Kevin Chappell 73-71-78-222 +6
Justin Hicks 74-72-78-224 +8
Kingsmill
Championship
Saturday
At Kingsmill (River Course),
Williamsburg,Va.
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,340, Par: 71


Cristie Kerr
Suzann Pettersen
Stacy Lewis
Angela Stanford
Ilhee Lee
Lizette Salas
Ariya Jutanugarn
Inbee Park
Katie Burnett
Mo Martin
Sandra Gal
Chella Choi
Jenny Shin
Caroline Hedwall
Karrie Webb
Irene Cho
Jane Park
Shanshan Feng
So Yeon Ryu
Laura Diaz
Na Yeon Choi
Anna Nordqvist
Giulia Sergas
Azahara Munoz
Yani Tseng
Amy Yang
Sun Young Yoo
Moriya Jutanugarn
Lexi Thompson
Paula Creamer
Alison Walshe
Juli Inkster
Julia Boland
Daniela lacobelli
Gerina Piller
Eun-Hee Ji
Lisa McCloskey
T. Suwannapura
Ai Miyazato
J. Shadoff
Brittany Lincicome
Catriona Matthew
KrisTamulis
S. Prammanasudh
Christel Boeljon
Karen Stupples
Beatriz Recari
Sarah Kemp
Jee Young Lee
Hee Kyung Seo
I.K. Kim
Hee Young Park
D. Claire Schreefel
Chie Arimura
Sarah Jane Smith
Jiyai Shin
Lindsey Wright
Natalie Gulbis
Nicole Jeray
Brittany Lang
Meena Lee
Mindy Kim
Vicky Hurst
Paige Mackenzie
Mina Harigae
Maria Hjorth
Nicole Castrale
Veronica Felibert
Reilley Rankin
Danah Bordner
Kristy McPherson
Pernilla Lindberg
Momoko Ueda
Candle Kung
Sandra Changkija
Lorie Kane
R. Lee-Bentham
M. Francella


66-71-66-
68-69-68-
68-68-69 -
68-68-70 -
69-69-69-
72-71-65-
64-71-73-
68-72-69-
68-70-71 -
68-72-70 -
68-69-73-
70-73-68 -
71-72-68-
68-73-70-
70-71-70-
70-69-72-
68-71-72-
69-69-73-
67-71-73-
70-75-67-
69-73-70-
70-72-70 -
74-68-70 -
68-73-71 -
69-72-71 -
69-72-71 -
71-73-69-
73-70-70-
71-71-71 -
69-70-74-
69-70-74-
69-69-75-
73-71-70-
70-73-71 -
72-71-71 -
70-72-72-
69-73-72-
69-73-72-
68-70-76-
71-73-71 -
75-69-71 -
72-71-72-
71-71-73-
69-72-74-
69-70-76-
68-71-76-
72-72-72-
69-74-73-
68-74-74-
71-71-74-
72-73-72 -
68-77-72-
67-78-72-
74-70-73-
73-71-73-
70-72-75-
69-73-75 -
72-73-73-
73-72-73-
70-75-73-
69-76-73-
69-75-74-
70-73-75-
71-72-75-
69-75-75-
71-72-76-
73-72-75 -
75-70-75-
70-75-75-
73-71-76-
73-71-76-
70-75-76 -
73-72-76 -
71-73-77-
73-72-77-
69-76-77-
70-72-81 -
75-70-79-


Insperity
Championship
Saturday
At The Woodlands CC, The Woodlands,
Texas
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 7,002, Par 72
Second Round
Gene Sauers 70-66 136 -8
MikeGoodes 69-69-138 -6
Loren Roberts 72-69-141 -3
Peter Senior 73-70-143 -1
Esteban Toledo 72-71 -143 -1
Barry Lane 77-67 -144 E
Mark Calcavecchia 75-69-144 E
Mark O'Meara 73-71-144 E
Steve Jones 72-72-144 E
Brian Henninger 71-73-144 E
David Eger 75-70 -145 +1
John Cook 73-72-145 +1
Blaine McCallister 73-72-145 +1
Hal Sutton 71-74- 145 +1
Michael Allen 71-74- 145 +1
Tom Kite 76-70 -146 +2
Jay Don Blake 75-71 -146 +2
Chien Soon Lu 75-71 -146 +2
DanForsman 76-71 -147 +3
Andrew Magee 76-71 -147 +3
Bob Gilder 74-73-147 +3
Bob Tway 73-74 -147 +3
Steve Elkington 73-74-147 +3
Tom Pernice Jr. 76-72-148 +4
Tom Purtzer 76-72 -148 +4
Jim Rutledge 73-75-148 +4
Jay Haas 73-75- 148 +4
Mark Mouland 72-76-148 +4
Jeff Sluman 72-76-148 +4
Mark Brooks 71-77-148 +4
David Frost 80-69 -149 +5
Bernhard Langer 77-72-149 +5
Rod Spittle 75-74-149 +5
Bart Bryant 75-74 -149 +5
Kenny Perry 74-75 -149 +5
Hale Irwin 73-76-149 +5
Steve Lowery 72-77- 149 +5
Mark Bucek 71-78-149 +5
Larry Nelson 81-69-150 +6
Wayne Levi 78-72-150 +6
Curtis Strange 76-74-150 +6
KirkTriplett 76-74-150 +6
Peter Jacobsen 76-74-150 +6
D.A.Weibring 74-76-150 +6
Russ Cochran 79-72-151 +7
Dick Mast 78-73-151 +7
Mark McNulty 77-74-151 +7
Craig Stadler 77-74-151 +7
Sandy Lyle 76-75-151 +7
Willie Wood 76-75-151 +7
Fred Funk 75-76-151 +7
Gary Hallberg 72-79-151 +7
Brad Bryant 72-79 -151 +7
Corey Pavin 79-73-152 +8
Gene Jones 78-74 -152 +8
Robin Byrd 78-74- 152 +8
Roger Chapman 78-74-152 +8
Steve Pate 82-71 -153 +9
Bill Glasson 79-74-153 +9
Gil Morgan 77-76-153 +9
John Harris 77-76-153 +9
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 74-79-153 +9
Tom Jenkins 75-79-154 +10
Ben Crenshaw 74-80-154 +10
Duffy Waldorf 84-71 -155 +11
Brad Faxon 81-74 -155 +11
Bobby Wadkins 79-76-155 +11
Dana Quigley 77-78-155 +11
Scott Simpson 75-80 155 +11
MarkWiebe 76-80-156 +12
Joe Daley 81-76-157 +13
John Jacobs 81-76 -157 +13
Scott Hoch 80-77 -157 +13
Andy Bean 79-78 -157 +13
Fuzzy Zoeller 78-79-157 +13
Tommy Armour III 74-84-158 +14
JimThorpe 78-82-160 +16
Anders Forsbrand 80-81-161 +17
Chie-Hsiang Lin 85-77-162 +18
Morris Hatalsky 89-80-169 +25


ciecisive iame i


B4 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Men's softball teams put up big run totals


Special to the Chronicle

Another week of Monday night
men's softball saw three games
with offensive outbursts. In the
evening's first game, both teams
had strong hits but Reflections
Church went on to beat R.C.
Lawn Care 12-10.
In the second game, Advanced
Fitness defeated The Machines
21-2 while, in the last game 01'
Guys with Help downed Sons of
Pitches 24-12.
Teams play this Monday at
6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m.
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River.
Men's flag football
On a rainy Thursday night, the
points piled up. In the first game,
Pink pulled through with a 94-0 win
over Orange. In the middle game,
Blue and Purple team played a close
battle, but Blue prevailed 31-26. The
final game pitted Gold against


Green. Both teams had powerful
plays throughout the night, but
Green went on to beat Gold 39-20.
Teams face off again Thursday
starting at 6:30 p.m. at Homosassa
Area Recreation Park.
Aqua Zumba at
Bicentennial Park Pool
Love the water and want to get
active? Come and join Aqua Zumba
at Bicentennial Pool in Crystal River.
Classes are on Saturdays and they
begin at 10 a.m.
The cost is $4 per class. For more
information, contact Bicentennial
Pool at 352-795-1478.
Throw shoes
in Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe Club
meets at 8:30 a.m. each Wednes-
day. Men, women and juniors age
10 and older can join.
There are all levels of play;
handicapped method. Call Ron Fair


352-746-3924, or email
rfair3@tampabay.rr.com.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus County,
2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto,
is host site for a community Divine
Yoga class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of charge and is
open to all ages and physical abili-
ties. Some of the benefits of yoga
are improved balance, coordina-
tion, strength and flexibility. Yoga is
also helpful in counteracting stress
and anxiety.
For more information, call Sheila
Abrahams at 352-270-8019 or email
divineyogas@gmail.com.
YMCA offers group
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA offers
group exercise in Citrus Springs at
the Hope Evangelical Lutheran
Church, 9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.


The location offers classes in Pi-
lates and cardio circuit on a regular
basis beginning.
The Y currently has three other
areas in the county where group ex-
ercise classes are offered, including
Homosassa, Inverness and Crystal
River. Financial assistance is avail-
able to all those who qualify.
For more information, call the
YMCA office in Beverly Hills at
352-637-0132, or visit online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Shuffleboard Club
invites public
Floral City Shuffleboard Club
plays at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Fri-
days and at 1 p.m. Wednesday at
Floral Park in Floral City.
It is a great opportunity to meet
people in the community, and get
some light exercise. We welcome all
newcomers. Yearly dues are $3 per
person, and there is no need to pur-
chase any equipment.


Call the vice president of the
Floral City Shuffleboard Club, Dana
Bause, at 352-726-0670.
YMCA is
SilverSneakers location
Citrus County YMCA is an official
SilverSneakers location for their group
exercise program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the nation's
leading exercise program designed
exclusively for older adults and is
available at little or no additional cost
through Medicare health plans,
Medicare Supplement carriers and
group retiree plans.
Group exercise classes meet at
the First United Methodist Church in
Homosassa on Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays. Classes include
cardio interval, Pilates, and stability
and strength.
To find out if you are eligible for
SilverSneakers, call your health plan
provider. For more information, call
the YMCA office at 352-637-0132.


winners of CCBA tourney


Special to the Chronicle
The players from the Citrus County Builders Association's 18th annual Family Fishing Tournament pose with their checks after winning prize money April 27.


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Builders
Association recently announced
the 2013 winners of the CCBA
18th annual Family Fishing
Tournament presented by
Exclusive Platinum Sponsor
FDS Disposal Inc. and the
winners of the Aaron Monier
Memorial Youth Tournament,
presented by Coastal


Conservation Association-
Citrus Chapter.
The 2013 Winners of the CCBA
18th Annual Family Fishing
Tournament are:
REDFISH MOST SPOTS
1st Mike Moore 4.72 lbs. 22 1/2" 24 Spots
2nd Richard Hunt3.80 lbs. 21 3/4" 9 Spots
COBIA
1st John Dickey 32.10 lbs. 40 5/8"
2nd E.J. Gerrits 19 lbs 36 1/4"


CATFISH
1st J.R. Atherton
2nd Rhett Ghering
TROUT
1 st Cary Lewis
2nd Hunter McPherson
3rd Mark Brady
REDFISI
1 st Brandon Colbert
2nd Robert Rowthorn
3rd J.T. Amoringas


H HOMOSASSA SLAM
4 44 bs. 237/8" (Trout Aggregate)
Kelly Kofmehl 14.741bs
AARON MONIER
4.98 lbs. 25" MEMORIAL YOUTH
4.92 lbs. 25"
4.38 lbs. 233/4" TOURNAMENT
H 1st Trace Kofmehl Drum 24.56 lbs
2nd Chase Burlew Cobia 18.48 lbE
7.56 lbs. 263/4" 3rd SeanThatauakorn Shark 13.16 lbs
7.50 Ibs. 263/4" 4th Taylor Green Redfish 5.98 lbs.
7.48 lbs. 26 1/2" 5th Nathan Berquon Jack 4.3 lbs.


6th Matteo Lasorsa Spanish Mack 2.94 lbs.
The Citrus County Builders
Association sincerely thanks all
of this year's sponsors, partici-
pants, volunteers, donors and
committee members that made
this event possible. For more in-
formation on this event and the
important businesses that made
it happen, visit the fishing tour-
nament page of www.Citrus
Builders.com


Recreational BRIEFS


Youth golf lessons
available soon
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with Pine Ridge Golf Course,
will hold summer youth golf
lessons. The lessons will be
at Pine Ridge Golf Course on
Wednesday mornings from
9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. or
Thursday evenings from 5:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
The classes will begin on
Wednesday, June 12 and
Thursday June 13, and run for
five weeks. Children ages 6 to
15 are eligible and the cost is
$80 per child with $15 off for
additional siblings.
Instruction will be given by
golf pro Randy Robbins and
several of his volunteers. Dur-
ing these lessons, participants
will learn putting, driving, chip-
ping, on-course play and on-
course etiquette. Golf clubs
will be provided, but if your
child has their own set, we en-
courage them to bring them.
For more information, con-
tact Crysta Henry, recreation
program specialist for youth
programs at 352-527-7543,
www.citruscountyparks.com,
or Randy Robbins at 352-
746-6177.
Citrus United
soccer tryouts
Citrus United Soccer Club
will be holding competitive try-
outs for the upcoming 2013-
14 season beginning May 30.
All age groups from U-9
through U-18, both boys and
girls, are welcome to try out.
Please visit our website at
www.citrusunited.com to view
times and locations of tryouts,
or contact John Withkowski at
352-228-2523.
CRHS Volleyball
Camp set for June
The Crystal River Volleyball
Camp will be held from June 3
to 7 from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at
Citrus Springs Middle School.
The camp is open to girls ages


11 to 16 from any county or
surrounding schools and it is
open to girls of all skill levels.
Training will be offered on
basic and improving volleyball
skills of setting, hitting, serv-
ing, passing, defensive and
team play. T-shirts will be
available to all campers. Crys-
tal River High School players
and coaches will be the camp
coaches.
The cost of the camp is $55
and camp registration forms
are available at Crystal River
High School, Crystal River
Middle School, Citrus Springs
Middle School, or contact
Mike Ridley at 352-566-7789
or email at ridleym@citrus.
k12.fl.us.
CRHS annual
cheerleading camp
The Crystal River High
School cheerleaders' annual
Camp Rah Rah and Cheer
Camp will be offered from 8:30
a.m. to noon Tuesday through
Friday, May 28 to 31, at the
Crystal River High School gym.
Come learn cheers, dances
and have fun. Camp is for
ages 5 through eighth grade
(no experience necessary).
Cost of $45 includes daily
snack and a T-shirt.
Register and pay by May
20 and save $5. For a regis-
tration form or more informa-
tion, write: CRHS
Cheerleaders -Attn: Julie
Taylor, 3195 Crystal High
Drive, Crystal River, FL 34428.
Panthers plan
volleyball camp
Summer volleyball camp
will be offered by the Lecanto
Panthers this summer.
Open to fourth-graders
through entering ninth-
graders, cost is $65. Parents
can pick up a registration form
at Lecanto High School or
email Alice Christian at chris-
tiana@citrus.kl2.fl.us for
more information and times.
Archery Camp on
tap for summer
Citrus County Parks &


Recreation, in partnership
with McPherson's Archery &
Outdoor Pro Shop, will have
an Archery Camp this sum-
mer. The camp will be offered
on two different weeks and
participants will be separated
by age.
The camps are open to
boys and girls ages 6 to 15
with the groups consisting of
ages 6 to 8,9 to 11 and 12to
15. The camps will be at
McPherson's Archery in
Lecanto. Each camp will run
Monday through Thursday
with two separate classes
each day. Participants will
learn about various archery
equipment, proper shooting
techniques and equipment
safety. At the end of each
camp, the top shot of the week
will be awarded a free bow.
Registration will open April
29 and can be completed at
the Citrus County Parks &
Recreation office. Space will
be limited to 25 children per
class.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com,
or call McPherson's Archery
at 352-341-2820.
Citrus County Kids
Triathlon coming
A Citrus County Kids
Triathlon feature swim/bike/
run for children ages 5 to 15
will take place May 11 in In-
verness. Registration fee is
$25 through May 8.
There will be two divisions
for the children: juniors, ages
5 to 10, and senior, ages 11 to
15. There will also be a
Tri4Fun division for all ages
who wish to try. For more in-
formation, call DRC Sports at
352-637-2475 or visit
www.Citruskidstri.com.
Kayaking Camps
set for kids
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership
with 2 Sisters Kayak Tours,


will have Kayaking Camps
this summer. Each camp will
be at Hernando Beach Park
Monday through Thursday
and at Chassahowitzka River
on Friday. Children ages 8 to
15 are eligible and the cost is
$80 per child.
There will be four different
weeks to choose from
throughout June and July.
Each week will have two time
slots that will accommodate
ages 8 to 11 and ages 12 to
15 separately. During camp,
children will learn kayak in-
struction, water and boater
safety and paddling tech-
niques. On Friday, children
can put their skills to the test
with a fun-filled kayak adven-
ture down the Chassahow-
itzka River.
Kayaks, life preservers, dry
boxes, whistles and a camp
T-shirt will be provided. Regis-
tration is limited to 12 children
weekly for each age group.
For more information, call
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com.
Register now for
Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center
in Crystal River will be in June
and July at Soquili Stables.
Eight weeklong sessions
will be offered from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Campers can learn to ride and
care for a horse. There will be
equine activities, in the saddle
and on the ground, as well as
crafts, swimming and more.
For more information and
to sign up, visit the website at
www.faithhavencrc.org/camp_
soquili.php, call 352-206-
2990, or email soquili.sta-
bles@gmail.com. Like Camp
Soquili on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/
CampSoquili.
CHS cheer camp
coming in June
The CHS kids cheer camp
will be from June 3 to 6, with
each day going from 9 a.m. to


12 p.m for children between
the ages of 3 to 12.
A single child costs $45,
which includes a T-shirt,
snack and drink or two
children from the same
family for $75.
Campers should wear
shorts, a T-shirt and tennis
shoes each day.
Registration begins at 8:30
a.m. Monday, June 3 in the
Citrus High School gym lobby.
For more information,
contact Jillian Godwin at
godwinj@citrus.kl2.fl.us or
352-726-2241, ext. 4550.
CR hoops camp
tips off in June
The Crystal River 2013
hoops camp has three ses-
sions: June 3-6, 10-13 and
17-20. Each day goes from
9 a.m. to 12 p.m..
One session is $49, two
sessions are $79 and all three
are $99. The camp will be led
by Crystal River High School
boys basketball coach Steve
Feldman.
All pre-registered campers
will receive a camp T-shirt and
the first 24 campers who regis-
ter for all three weeks will re-
ceive an Adidas basketball.
For more information,
contact Steve Feldman at
feldmans@citrus.kl2.fl.us
or 352-601-0870.
Sisson Benefit Golf
Tournament in June
The Kyle Sisson Benefit
Golf Tournament will take
place Saturday, June 15, at
Inverness Golf & Country
Club, 3150 S. Country Club
Drive. The price of $75 per
person includes cart, range
balls and lunch.
The game is a four-person
team scramble with an 8:30
a.m. tee time. Prizes will be
awarded for closest pin on par
3's, longest drive and chance
drawing raffles.
Hole sponsorships are: Sil-
ver, $100; Bronze, $250; Gold,
$500; and Platinum $1,000.
Mail all entries/sponsorships


to: Michele Snellings, 5260 W.
Angus Drive, Beverly Hills, FL
34465. Players should make
checks payable to Team Hope,
ACS. For hole sponsorships,
make checks payable to Sun
Trust Bank, note left corner:
Kyle Sisson Benefit Account.
For more information, call
Nick Maltese at 352-464-7511
or Michele Snellings at 352-
697-2220.
LifeSouth plans
golf tournament
Support LifeSouth Commu-
nity Blood Centers' Five
Points of Life Foundation by
competing in the second an-
nual Five Points of Life Golf
Tournament on Friday, May
17. Play the famed Golden
Ocala course, while support-
ing a great cause.
For more information and
to register a team, visit
www.fivepointsoflife.com/2011
/12/08/five-points-of-life-golf-
tournament.
Those interested in spon-
soring or donating to the auc-
tion may call Elli Alba at
352-224-1611 or email
emalba@lifesouth.org.
Second annual
blessing of the fleet
All boat owners/operators
are invited to this annual
event, which will be held on
May 11 from 10 a.m. to 12
p.m.
This is your opportunity to
get your boat blessed and
perhaps keep you safer at
sea.
The Blessing of the Fleet
will be held on King's Bay on
the north side of Buzzard's Is-
land. Look for the 22-foot pon-
toon boat with a green bimini
and the Crystal River Sail and
Power Squadron banner on
the port side.
Blessings will be performed
by Fr. Gil Larsen from St.
Anne's Episcopal Church and
Pastor David Bradford from
St. Timothy's Lutheran
Church.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 B5


S.
)S.










Edwards on pole after rain cancels qualifying


Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. -
Steady rain Saturday
washed out qualifying at
Talladega Superspeedway,
where the field was set by
practice speeds.
It put Carl Edwards on
the pole for Sunday's race,
followed by Martin Truex
Jr. and Marcos Ambrose.
They ran a spirited Fri-
day first practice session
because everyone had
seen the weather radar
and knew the laps might
count if qualifying was
canceled.
"It was like a heat race
out there," said Edwards.
"Everybody was trying to
get their fastest lap, and
we got ours with like a
minute to go. It was pretty


exciting."
Ambrose concurred.
"We were all driving like
idiots in that first practice
knowing it was probably
going to rain," he said.
Joey Logano will start
fourth, followed by Ryan
Newman and Matt Kenseth.
Denny Hamlin will be
seventh in his first race
since missing four with a
compression fracture in a
vertebra in his lower back.
Hendrick Motorsports driv-
ers Jimmie Johnson, Jeff
Gordon and Kasey Kahne
round out the top 10 in
Sunday's starting lineup.
Hamlin is planning to
start the race but get out of
his car at some point and let
Brian Vickers take over for
him. The two practiced the
driver exchange on Friday,


Associated Press
After the Sprint Cup's Aaron's 499 qualifying was rained
out Saturday, Carl Edwards got the pole position for hav-
ing the fastest practice time.


with Hamlin getting out of
the car through a roof hatch
and Vickers coming in
through a window.
They had the exchange


down to just over a minute,
which they determined
would keep the car on the
lead lap if the exchange
was made under a caution.


T


"It took us right at one
minute every time that we
rehearsed it, so we're
going to be plenty fine
there," Hamlin said.
"Everything is pretty
seamless."
Hamlin could get assis-
tance during the race from
good friend Michael Wal-
trip, who will be making
just his second start of the
season. It's likely that
Hamlin will drop to the
back of the field at the
start of the race to try
avoid an early accident,
but he could also risk
falling out of the draft.
So it wouldn't be a sur-
prise to see Waltrip, a fel-
low Toyota driver, partner
with Hamlin to help him
stay in the draft until he
gets out of the car.


Cleats to fill Expanded role
expected of Romo


Jacksonville Jaguars first round draft pick Luke Joeckel (76) blocks Abry Jones during NFL rookie
Friday at EverBank Field in Jacksonville.

Rookie Joeckel is Jags' most highly regarded tackle since


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -Jacksonville
Jaguars offensive tackle Luke
Joeckel is going through an awk-
ward stage.
His hand placement, foot stagger
and set balance seem strange all
part of his transition from left to
right tackle.
He might feel a bit off, but he
looks just fine.
Joeckel has been downright domi-
nant through two days of rookie mini-
camp, showing exactly why the
Jaguars selected him with the second
overall pick in last week's NFL draft
He hasn't allowed a sack or even
a pressure in team drills. It should-
n't be much of a surprise because
he's going against undrafted rook-
ies and tryout players. But it's
surely a good start for a former
Texas A&M standout, playing a
somewhat different position for the
first time in years.
"It's feeling a lot better than I
thought it would," Joeckel said fol-
lowing another rain-soaked practice
Saturday "My set felt a lot cleaner
today and my first step felt a little bit
faster today It's going to be a process,
but it's moving along pretty well."
The Jaguars already have Joeckel
locked into a starting role this fall,
with hopes that he will help solid-
ify an offensive line that allowed 50
sacks last season.
Coaches and front office person-
nel believe an improved line will
allow them to more accurately eval-
uate quarterback Blaine Gabbert,


It's feeling a lot
better than I thought
it would.
Luke Joeckel
Jaguars rookie offensive tackle on the
move from the left side to the right.

whose first two years were filled
with team turmoil and key injuries.
Adding Joeckel to a line that's
getting starting guards Uche
Nwaneri and Will Rackley back
from injuries should make the
Jaguars more functional than
they've been the last two seasons.
Joeckel allowed just two sacks
over his final two seasons with the
Aggies, and for months after the
season, was widely projected as the
top draft pick. Kansas City, though,
opted to take Central Michigan's
Eric Fisher with the No. 1 choice.
Joeckel was admittedly disap-
pointed, but he quickly put those
feelings aside after going second to
Jacksonville.
He also embraced the move to
right tackle.
"I want to get on the field," he
said. "I want to help my team win
football games, whatever position it
might be. If they wanted me to go
play guard, I'd go play guard. I def-
initely would love to be a left tackle
in the future, but whatever gets me
on the field is what I'd do."
So far, the results have been
positive.
"He has excellent movement skills,


great balance, he's a very
offensive line coach Ge
said. "He's working hard
to get better fast He's
Love what I've seen so fa
"He's so smooth, a f
He has great, natural b,
lower body has a lot of
He has a low center of
has all those things you
tackle, especially I'm re
to get to work with him.
The real test will
Joeckel lines up agaii
starter Jason Babin a
Mincey during organize
tivities later this moi
even more telling will
days in full pads, when c
teammates will get a be
his physicality and tough
"He's right on track,"
Gus Bradley said. "Now h
to get more and more rep
ably take him a little bit o
right side, but he will ge
he's such a professional
handling it that he will g
Equally challenging
has been dealing with h:
stardom. After the dr
turned to College Stal
and was mobbed for
and pictures around tom
"It was pretty crazy,"
offensive lineman fina
face on TV and now yo
recognized. It's not a b
was very cool. I was gett:
before because I was s
now I'm getting stared at
face was on TV It's a little


Cowboys QB

will have bigger

commitment

Associated Press

IRVING, Texas Jerry
Jones says Tony Romo has
committed to spending
"Peyton Manning-type
time" trying to turn the
Dallas Cowboys into Super
Bowl contenders again.
Reaction to the words
from the Dallas owner and
general manager came fast:
Does that mean Romo has-
n't done enough to make
team headquarters his sec-
ond home in six full seasons
as the starting quarterback?
"No. It's a bonus," Jones
says. '"Anybody will tell you
that Peyton Manning's in-
volvement in what they do
is a bonus as opposed to
what the general commit-
ment is of top quarter-
backs in the NFL. We've
committed and he's com-
lo H mitted to that type of in-
season and offseason
Associated Press approach for these years
ie minicamp under his contract as
part of the $100 million."
Jones winks and smiles
.Bosel"i as he throws out the ball-
park figure of the six-year,
$108 million extension he
y smart kid," gave Romo in March a
eorge Yarno deal with more guaran-
d. He's going teed money than Super
competitive. Bowl winner Joe Flacco of
.r Baltimore.
luid mover While Jones sees Romo
balance. His as something of a budding
power in it. business partner, a skepti-
* gravity He cal fan base sees a full-
look for in a time golfer and part-time
ally excited quarterback who used to
1" date celebrity girlfriends
come when before settling down with
nst Jaguars his wife and first child.
and Jeremy Critics are looking
ed team ac- through the lenses of one
nth. Maybe playoff win and a 1-6
be his first record in elimination
coaches and games since Romo took
tter feel for over in the middle of the
:hness. 2006 season. And the last
head coach thing they saw was a huge
he just needs interception that ended a


ps. It'll prob-
f time on the
t it You see
already with
et there."
for Joeckel
is newfound
raft, he re-
tion, Texas,
autographs
wn.
he said. "An
ally gets his
)u're getting
)ad thing. It
ing stared at
o large. But
because my
e different"


chance to beat Washington
and sent Romo to his third
loss in five seasons in play-
off-or-bust finales against
an NFC East rival.
Jones' glasses call
them rose-colored if you'd
like see that playoff win
as the only time a quarter-
back not named Troy Aik-
man won in the postseason
since the Cowboys stopped
winning Super Bowls
nearly two decades ago.
Plus, the owner wonders
where the Cowboys would
be without Romo, consid-
ering they were second-to-
last in rushing a season
ago with a struggling of-
fensive line and an unreli-
able defense. Romo is the
franchise leader in touch-
down passes and probably
two seasons away from
catching Aikman in yards
and completions.
That's where Jones was
coming from when he
started hinting in the state-
ment announcing Romo's
contract extension that his
33-year-old quarterback
would be something of a
player-CEO when it comes
to the Dallas offense.
Jones showed he wasn't
kidding by seeking Romo's
input before Dallas drafted
Wisconsin center/guard
Travis Frederick late in the
first round and grabbed a
complement to tight end
Jason Witten in Gavin Es-
cobar of San Diego State in
the second round. Neither
player was projected as
high as he was picked.
"The more Tony can be
involved in what we're
doing offensively, the more
the product we have out
there (that) complements
his skills, the more we're
going to do it," Jones said.
The draft talk is more
symbolic Jones says a
few minutes of input can't
outweigh a year's worth of
scouting work but it was
noteworthy that Romo
called Frederick "the best
player in this draft at his
position" the day after he
was taken.


Associated Press
Dallas owner Jerry Jones expects an expanded role for
Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo after signing his
quarterback to a $108 million extension with more
guaranteed money than Super Bowl winner Joe Flacco.


Steelers rookie LB Jarvis Jones settling in


Associated Press


PITTSBURGH -Jarvis
Jones is not James Harri-
son. For one thing, there's
the hair.
The rookie Pittsburgh
Steelers outside line-
backer has long dread-
locks that appear under
his helmet and skitter
across his name when he
sprints into the backfield.
There's the body, too.
The 6-foot-2, 245-pound
Jones is taller, leaner and
wispier than the 2008 NFL
Defensive Player of the


Year who was cut by the
Steelers in a salary cap
move in March.
Then there's the de-
meanor Where Harrison
was all snarl, the 23-year-old
Jones is Southern charm.
Yet Jones understands
he is the heir apparent.
The Steelers tend not to
take risks with first-round
draft picks. The compar-
isons are inevitable after
they chose the speedy
Georgia kid, who led the
NCAA in sacks last fall,
with the 17th selection. The
draft came just six weeks


after releasing the produc-
tive but aging Harrison.
"I don't compare myself
in no way to James Harri-
son," Jones said. "He's a
great player. Respect him.
Never met him. But I love
his game. I wouldn't mind
being an impact player
like James Harrison."
Neither would the
Steelers.
Pittsburgh led the NFL
in fewest yards allowed in
2012 but failed to produce
the kind of splash plays -
namely sacks and turnovers
- that have helped make


the franchise perennial
Super Bowl contenders. In-
juries to Harrison, outside
linebacker LaMarr Wood-
ley and safety Troy Pola-
malu forced the Steelers to
play solid but safe. Pitts-
burgh finished tied for 15th
with 37 sacks and 24th in
takeaways with 20.
Jones could bring back
some of the menace. He set
a Georgia record with 14.5
sacks in 2012, his ability to
wreak havoc in opposing
backfields from the edge
had him projected as a
potential Top 5 pick.


Associated Press
Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Jarvis Jones participates in
the NFL rookie mini camp Saturday in Pittsburgh.


Waltrip seemed to fore-
shadow that Saturday when
discussing his race plan.
"Quite honestly, for the
first 100 miles or so, I won't
be aggressive at all be-
cause it's just a matter of
getting in the flow and get-
ting back to what you know
you know how to do so
well," Waltrip said.
Waltrip had an opportu-
nity to win Talladega last
October until leader Tony
Stewart triggered a multi-
car accident trying to hold
off the field. It collected
Waltrip, who turned 50 this
week and only runs restric-
tor-plate races anymore.
His last win was at Tal-
ladega in 2003, but he led
four laps in the season-
opening Daytona 500 and
finished 22nd.


B6 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Shift toward living united bearing fruit


early one year ago, I began
my role as the newly
named CEO of the United
Way of Citrus County. This past
year has been a journey of study-
ing the social issues we face and
charting pathways to galvanize our
community to address them with
impactful solutions. I want to
share with you why I feel we must
live united. I will do that by shar-
ing a few stories and highlighting
where we've been and where we
are going.


Our original value proposition
in 1986 was to identify the social is-
sues our community faced and
pool together all the right individ-
uals and all the right resources
needed to solve them. That has not
changed. We are still committed to
that same value proposition.
After taking a holistic view of
our community, I found that nearly
17,000 adults in Citrus County over
the age of 25 do not have a GED; of
those, 4,500 have less than a ninth-
grade education, and only 15 per-


cent of our population has a bach-
elor's degree or higher. We also
know that 16,000 households lack
a savings account. Our poverty rate
is at 14 percent. But the poverty
rate for single mothers with chil-
dren under age 5 jumps dramati-
cally, to 53 percent. We do know
that there are 600 open jobs in our
community, but a vast majority of
those require certified workers to
fill them. Even if we could fill all
of those 600 jobs today with a
skilled laborer, we would still have


5,400 people looking for work. With
statistics like these, we know that
more must be done to bring real,
lasting change to these individuals,
their families and our community.
Last summer, our board decided
just financially supporting agencies
is not enough. The complexities of
the problems we face are too big for
any single agency or group to solve.
So we charged forward with a bold
plan for true community impact.
See Page C3


Special to the Chronicle
With help from Dr. Bob Knight, King's Bay Adaptive Management conducted an experiment to determine whether water hyacinth can
be effective in starving the lyngbya algae suffocating King's Bay.


lowe


HELEN SPIVEY "h
Special to the Chronicle


eor


Worldwide, there is
-__!* 1 -- -- __ __.& .- -VI1


I ts past is well known: evidence m ait small,
Used, abused and suffering fouled ponds and lakes
all the calamities that have
befallen many of Florida's can be cleared in no time
waters, King's Bay was once using water lettuce or
beautiful enough to be called
one of the first Outstanding water hyacinths. ... KBAM
Florida Waters. But here we are. decided to see if they
King's Bay is fed by more than 30 springs, many w
of which were first-magnitude springs; most are would work in King's Bay.
not anymore. Their flow is down, and worse, the n s


flow is getting salty. We are allowing so much
fresh water to be pumped for agriculture, cities,
subdivisions, lawns, toilets, washers and dish-
washers and on and on. And we are finding out
one thing fresh water is not it is not infinite.
Our two organizations of volunteers, KBAM
(King's Bay Adaptive Management) and KBSA
(King's Bay Springs Alliance) are trying to crack
the "restore code" for King's Bay and its springs
flow. KBAM spent a year getting a scientific base-
line for the waters of King's Bay, so improve-
ments brought about from what they are trying to
accomplish solving the problem of helping
King's Bay rid itself of the villain, lyngbya algae
- can be proven.


Lyngbya, as you must already
know, is a filamentous, stringy,
hairlike algae that grows in tangled
mats on the bottom of the bay, pro-
cessing the nutrients from pollu-
tion and producing gasses that
make it float up to the surface, par-
ticularly when it is warm.
Worldwide, there is evidence
that small, fouled ponds and lakes
can be cleared in no time using
water lettuce or water hyacinths.
These aquatic plants quickly grow,
eating up the nutrients fouling the


waters and shading the algae so it
can't grow. They are even used for
cleaning up the ponds associated
with sewage treatment plants.
KBAM decided to see if they would
work in King's Bay
KBAM first started out with a
corral of PVC pipe floating in an
assigned area in the lagoon by
Parker Island. Scientific measure-
ments of the waters around were
taken at regular intervals, and with
See Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Fed up

with the

world?

Go back

to school
Some folks who pay
too much attention
to the Internet or
the cable television
channels run by the po-
litical parties tend to be-
lieve this nation's best
days are behind us.
The recent bombings
in Boston lend credence
to the belief that the lu-
natic fringe is taking over
I contend that all you
have to do is spend an
evening at a recognition
banquet for local high
school students and you
will understand the op-
posite is true.
The majority of our
young people are smarter
and more involved than
previous generations.
While the failures show
up regularly in the arrest
reports of the Chronicle,
they are no representa-
tion of what is really
going on in our schools.
I had the opportunity
the other evening to sit
through a student awards
program put on by the
Chamber of Commerce
and the county school
system. These Golden
Scholar award winners
will get you enthused
about what our young
people are doing. They
are smart, multitalented
and leaders. They are
involved in their churches,
communities and volun-
teer with nonprofits all
over the spectrum.
Did I mention they are
smart?
Chloe Lane is a
Crystal River High grad-
uate with a perfect 4.0
average and will attend
the honors program at
Florida State University.
She is a soccer player, and
was named to the FSU
cross-country team. She
was ranked No. 1 in her
graduating class.
See Page C3


My little
(Mike's note to readers: I've
never done this- written a let-
ter to my daughter in the news-
paper But Erin doesn't turn 18
every day.)
Dear Erin,
Every day I come to
work and your photos
are plastered all over my wall:
The photo of me holding you as
a newborn. Another framed
photo of you all dressed up,
maybe less than a year old. The
picture of your first birthday,
cake smeared on your mouth,
nose and just below the left eye.
Other photos provide instant
memories: You holding a base-


girl i
ball on the bleachers
in Lakeland at our
first spring training
game. We got in free
and then someone
who was leaving
gave us his seats be-
hind the dugout. A
woman who liked
your smile handed
you the baseball she
caught during bat-
ting practice (and I
had to stop you from


s entering adulthood


Mike Wright
WRIGHT
ON TARGET


tossing the ball on
the field because you thought
the players needed it). Then, as
we were leaving, a stadium em-
ployee gave us a free pizza.


"This was fun,
Daddy! I want to
come back," you
said with a giggle.
"Erin, it's not al-
ways like this," I
replied.
Others: Swim-
ming photos,
baby photos, a
First Communion
photo, another one
as young teenager.
My computer


screen background
is of us at a softball game/
picnic, me munching a hotdog
and your head resting on my
left shoulder


As recently as three weeks
ago, we shared many photos to-
gether at the Maroon 5 concert. 4
My favorite is the lead singer,
Adam Someone (that's a joke,
Erin!) singing on that platform
just a few feet away In the fore-.
ground is the silhouette of the -
back of your head. You were
that close to your rock 'n' roll
hero. Later you said it was the -
best night of your life. It was -,d 1
mine, too- because of that.
You've always been my little
girl. And on Tuesday my little
girl becomes a little lady. An MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
adult. You can register to vote. Erin loved this plastic truck, given
to her by one of my co-workers.
See Page C3 I still have that truck.


Amy Meek
GUEST
COLUMN


F






g "When the man you
Page C2 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 four years ago, he is
to change his mind
don't like does it, hI

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


like switches from what he said a year ago, or
a broadminded person who has courage enough
with changing conditions. When a man you
? is a liar who has broken his promises."
Franklin P. Adams, "Nods and Becks," 1944


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
.MN Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CONFIRMATION CHICANERY




Political ploy



derails Senate



confirmation


he four-year gover- for re
nance battle between thought
the Citrus County Hos- pulled
pital Board (CCHB) and the Sen. Ja
Citrus Memorial Health has D(
Foundation (CMHF), like the given
infamous Hatfield-and-McCoy the dih
feud, appears to have no end. boards
Each time there
is a ray of hope THE ISSUE:
that the public in-
terest and com- Citrus County
mon sense will Hospital Board.
finally prevail, it
is dashed by the OUR OPINION
twists and turns of Gov. Scott shou
the governance Gov. Scott should
the governance stand firm on
battle. stand firm on
The most recent appointments.
twist involves the
political subterfuge sur- Gov.
rounding the Senate confir- allow
mation of two county carry
residents appointed to the firmly
CCHB by Gov. Scott last Sep- Gene I
tember Gene Davis of In- point
verness and Mike Bays of tive
Lecanto. Pushil
Davis' commitment to fos- confir:
tering reconciliation between would
the feuding boards and end- that th
ing the diversion of taxpayer- precede
funded health care dollars to machi:
attorneys apparently ruffled Suct
the feathers of Citrus move I
County's Sen. Charles Dean. larly i
Learning that Dean op- CCHB
posed his nomination princi- ality, a
pally because of his lone vote confid
to settle the governance dis- board
pute, Davis declined an invi- critical
station to appear before the sale, l,
Senate Ethics and Elections rus M(
Committee and submitted his Citiz
immediate resignation from CCHB
the CCHB. must b
Following on the heels of bestju
Davis' resignation, Mike Bays of the
learned his name was pulled not be
from the Ethics and Elections dividu
Committee's confirmation list politic


Where's the unfairness? Ke
To the woman who called in I'm c
about how unfair it is to her sex cates a
to have to provide more mar- it's all r
riage and divorce papers than ments.
her male counterparts: I don't birth ce
get it. Unless she's married an- your co
other woman or an armadillo, our were bc
men don't marry and divorce as mean ii
much as women. Where is the ers, it's
unfairness? This is just another know w
example of how self-
centered people have OUND
become, in my opinion.
Make it here
Just recently I looked
at a new vehicle I'm in f
the market for and I
went to a car dealer,
looked at the specs and CA
I was shocked to find
that the engine of that 563-0579
particular brand was
made in Spain, transmission Be
made in Mexico, the body made
in Canada, assembled in the Atten
U.S.A. I could not believe it. I've bee
That's crazy. Aren't we capable from yc
of manufacturing those things they ar
right here in this country? RS. I they're
didn't buy that car. I went to immed
look at another dealership where don't d
everything is made in the U.S.A. there a
Now being the patriot that I am immed
- I love my country- I'm not grandsc
going to buy garbage from do you
Spain or Mexico. Mr. Obama, do money?
something about this. U.S. gov- Do not
ernment, do something about one tha
this. This is crazy. ... We want to phone
buy U.S.A., period, are you


masons unknown. Al-
h Bays' name was
by committee chair
ack Latvala, it no doubt
mean's thumbprint on it
his past meddling in
spute between the two
S.


N:
d


To treat dedi-
cated citizens
who selflessly vol-
unteer their time,
talent and experi-
ence for the bet-
terment of our
community in
such a shabby
manner is repre-
hensible, to say
the least.


Scott is urged not to
political subterfuge to
the day by standing
behind Mike Bays and
Davis with their reap-
nent after the legisla-
session concludes.
ng back against this
mation chicanery
send a strong message
e public interest takes
dence over political
nations.
h a bold leadership
by Gov. Scott is particu-
needed to restore the
's stability and ration-
is well as the public's
ence, as the hospital
navigates through the
1 process of a possible
ease or merger of Cit-
emorial hospital.
;ens appointed to the
, or any state board,
be free to exercise their
dgment in the interests
public they serve and
held hostage to the in-
al agendas of meddling
ians.


aep your papers
ailing about the certifi-
nd the people that think
right to have no docu-
OK, so you lost your
certificate. You can call
county of origin where you
orn and get a duplicate. I
in these times of comput-
just a matter of do you
'here you were born? How
can you exist in this
world today without some
kind of identification? I
want to know who's vot-
ing. I want to know
who's driving. Just be-
cause you think you
don't need it, you feel
you don't need it, does-
n't mean that it's right.
I think people should
have identification and
be asked to show it.
Dware this fraud
ition, all grandparents:
in getting telephone calls
young men telling me that
e my grandson and
in jail and need money
lately. I may be old, but I
o things like that. But
re people out there that
lately would say, "Oh, my
on, my grandson, where
want me to send the
'" Please, this is fraud.
send any money to any-
it calls you on the tele-
and tells you that they
r grandchildren.


Why judicial activism matters


"The legislative department
is everywhere extending the
sphere of its activity, and draw-
ingallpowerinto its impetuous
vortex."
-James Madison,
"Federalist No. 48"


WASHINGTON
But under today's regula-
tory state, which Madi-
son could hardly have
imagined, the legislature, al-
though still a source
of much mischief, is -
not the principal
threat to liberty.
Suppose a federal ,
executive depart- ., .
ment flagrantly /.
abused its regula-
tory powers for the
unmistakable pur-
pose of suppressing Georg
truthful speech that OTH
annoys the govern-
ment. If you assume VOI
the Supreme Court
would rectify this assault on the
First Amendment's core protec-
tion, you would be mistaken.
The government has done
this and the court has declined
to do its duty to enforce consti-
tutional limits. Herewith an il-
lustration of why conservatives
must abandon their imprecise
opposition to "judicial ac-
tivism" and advocate for more
vigorous judicial engagement
in protecting liberty from the
vortex of the regulatory state.
Spirit, Allegiant and South-
west are low-cost carriers that
have thrived since deregulation
of the airline industry began in
1978. The government retains a
narrow authority to prevent de-
ceptive advertising practices.
But as the airlines argued in pe-
titioning the Supreme Court to
hear their case, the government
is micromanaging their speech
merely to prevent the public
from understanding the govern-
ment's tax burdens.
The government's Total Price
Rule forbids the airlines from
calling attention to the tax com-
ponent of the price of a ticket by
listing the price the airline
charges and then the tax com-
ponent with equal prominence.


HI



The rule mandates that any list-
ing of the tax portion of a
ticket's price "not be displayed
prominently and be presented
in significantly smaller type
than the listing of the total
price." The government is try-
ing to prevent people from
clearly seeing the burdens of
government.
These three low-cost carriers
compete for the most price-
conscious travelers, and want to
tell those travelers
which portion of a
ticket's cost the air-
lines control. The
government, far
from regulating to
prevent customer
confusion, is trying
to prevent cus-
tomers from under-
e Will standing the taxes
IER | and fees that com-
prise approximately
DES 20 percent of the av-
erage airline ticket.
Timothy Sandefur of the pub-
lic-interest, limited-government
Pacific Legal Foundation noted
that decades ago the Supreme
Court, without justification in
the Constitution's text, struc-
ture or history, created a binary
First Amendment. So today the
Amendment gives different de-
grees of protection to two kinds
of speech strong protection
to political speech, minimal
protection to commercial
speech.
The court has never clearly
defined the latter but has sug-
gested that commercial speech
proposes a commercial trans-
action between the speaker and
the audience. And the court has
held that freedom of commer-
cial speech cannot be abridged
if the speech is neither false nor
deceptive nor related to an ille-
gal activity.
Note two things: The air-
lines' speech the government is
regulating with the Total Price
Rule would be protected even
if it were just commercial
speech. And it actually is polit-
ical speech: It calls its audi-
ence's attention to, and invites
disapproval of, government
policy


SLETTERS to the Editor


Rubio voted
correctly on gun bill
With a great deal of effort, I
was able to finish reading the
report by Carl Hiaasen, chas-
tising with a great deal of ran-
cor our magnificent Sen.
Marco Rubio. It is very obvious
that the very liberal mind of
Carl Hiaasen cannot accept a
great majority of voters elected
a very conservative senator
like Rubio.
Hiaasen blamed Rubio in
particular for the defeat of the
Senate bill that would create
expanded federal background
checks of gun buyers. However,
since this Senate bill was de-
feated by a majority of votes
against it, then even if Rubio
would have voted in favor, the
bill would have failed.
Rubio voted against the ex-
panded background checks be-
cause it would have created a
gun registration whereby Pres-
ident Obama and his pals would
be able to track and trace
every firearm in America,
which would also effectively
gut the Second Amendment.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

Then Hiaasen goes out on a
limb, assuming Rubio voted the
way he did because he expects
to get the GOP nomination for
president in 2016. Well, I cer-
tainly hope Mr Hiaasen's fears
become a reality, because if
Rubio becomes our next presi-
dent, with control of the House


and the Senate, we will not
only be able to retain our Sec-
ond Amendment rights, but we
will also be able to get rid of
the ominous Obamacare!
Adolph A. (Al) Puig
Hernando

Thanks for making
event a success
The Crystal River Sail and
Power Squadron hosted a Mili-
tary Card Party on April 17
with a light luncheon, raffle
baskets and door prizes to
raise funds to continue our
goal of boating safety and edu-
cation in Citrus County.
The Chronicle was generous in
its sponsorship of this fundraiser
The advertising was instru-
mental in increasing the atten-
dance at our function. Thank
you, Citrus County Chronicle!
We also want to thank the
participants. If we didn't have
you, there would not be any
fundraising.
Pete Ward and Jennie O'Connor
Co-chairwomen
Crystal River Power Squadron


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


In permitting the govern-
ment's regulation of this
speech, the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the District of Colum-
bia held, 2-1, that the Total
Price Rule "does not prohibit
airlines from saying anything; it
just requires them to disclose
the total, final price and to
make it the most prominent fig-
ure in their advertisements."
But this ignores the govern-
ment's obvious purpose of pre-
venting the airlines from
drawing attention to the gov-
ernment's exactions.
In their brief asking the
Supreme Court to reverse the
D.C. Circuit's decision, the air-
lines noted that the government
is forbidding them to do what
virtually every American indus-
try does advertise the pre-tax
price of their products. Shirts
and shoes and salamis are sold
with the pre-tax sum on the
price tag.
D.C. CircuitJudgeA. Raymond
Randolph, dissenting from the
court's permission of this unau-
thorized and indefensible regu-
lation, asked: How can the
government's supposed interest
in consumers having "accurate"
information be served by re-
quiring "significantly smaller"
typefaces for taxes and fees that
make up a larger share of the
prices of the low-cost airlines
than of the older airlines? Ran-
dolph said the government's
purpose is "to control and to
muffle speakers who are criti-
cal of the government."
Government is violating one
of the natural rights that the
Founders said government is
"instituted" (the Declaration's
word) to protect. This episode
confirms conservatism's prem-
ise that today's government is
guilty of shabby behavior until
proven innocent. And conserva-
tives enable such behavior
when their unreflective denun-
ciations of judicial "activism"
encourage excessive judicial
deference toward the modern
executive's impetuous vortex.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Differences? Yes, but folks i


I don't always read all
of the nationally syn-
dicated columnists
printed by the Chronicle,
but I make it a point to
consistently read the lo-
cals. Most recently, while
reading Mary Alice Till-
man, a number of thoughts
zoomed through my head,
including:
She's smarter than I am.
Her column only appears
once a month and I'm still
trying to string words to-
gether every week.
Mary Alice and I met for
the first time several years
ago when I was a young state
bank examiner and she was
working at a bank I was ex-
amining in Brooksville. We
visited briefly and I
learned she and my lovely


wife had been classmates
at Hernando High School.
Cheryl was a northern
transplant, MaryAlice was
a native.
In her recent column, she
noted truisms regarding
being Southern, including
the use of sayings such as
"I was just fixin' to do that"
I'll come back to this later.
Mary Alice also quoted
my favorite writer, the
gone but not forgotten
Lewis Grizzard. She told
about his opinion concern-
ing cornbread, specifically
about adding sugar to
cornbread. She indicated
that Lewis once wrote, "If
you want something sweet,
you should eat some
pound cake. If you eat
sugar in your cornbread,


you might as well be a hea- sweetened cornbread.
then who doesn't know the Pound cake? I love it, too,
Lord, not to mention but a little sugar in corn-
Southeastern Conference bread makes it taste good
football." whether you
I have no have pinto
idea about beans or col-
Mary Alice's lard greens to
pedigree, nor I go with it or
Lewis'. I can not. Then the
document my biggie: I know
own family his- I'm not a hea-
tory back to an- then. I'm sure I
tebellum days know the Lord.
with a great- Fred Brannen And, while
great-grandfa- A SLICE they've pretty
their born in much been on
Georgia in 1809 OF LIFE top the past
and who moved few years, in
to Florida prior to the 1850 my opinion, Southeastern
census. I'm pretty sure my Conference football is not
Southern heritage is solid, the be-all and end-all. My
I don't agree with the take on this is that St.
great Grizzard about Bobby is the most genuine


can gel

talk-the-talk and walk-the-
walk football coach of all
time, and he didn't coach
in the SEC.
Now, I'm fixin' to get
back to fixin' to.
Daughter Becky is an
educated lady who, among
other things, currently
serves as the national mar-
keting director for a
prominent collegiate
sorority Even so, she
adamantly avows that "I
was just fixin' to fix sup-
per" is proper syntax -
she's Southern to the very
marrow of her bones. I still
use "fixin' to" for specific
emphasis, but our other
two children, Bethy-Pooh
and Fred 3, both of whom
are also Southern-born,
rarely do. All of 'em, in-


. along

eluding Becky, generally
speak with an interesting
mixture of both Northern
and Southern brogue. This
is no doubt due to their
mother's Northern roots
and my Southern ones.
The point? I always
enjoy the humor Mary
Alice offers; and I know for
a fact that regardless of
places of birth, phrases
spoken or foods eaten,
Northern folks and South-
ern folks can get along -
they can even love each
other.
Cheryl and I are living
proof.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


WRIGHT
Continued from Page C1

Make decisions on your own, if you want.
I'm a pretty emotional guy I know that
bugs you occasionally- and it's pretty difficult
writing this right now. But I can't let this time
pass without telling you what you mean to me.
When your mom was pregnant, my only
prayer was that our child wouldn't grow up to
be a jerk. You are just the oppo-
site of that You are warm, loving, I knoi
pleasant, polite and the kind of
friend anyone would love to crazy
have. You do your best in school, much
most of the time. You have ambi-
tion. You want to attend college passes
and earn a career. You're show-
ing responsibility by working you at I
hard now.
It hasn't been easy for you, I'm th
Erin. Your mom and I divorced you fe
when you were 10 and I couldn't
have been a good dad with all same
that drinking. I know that. But


when I sobered up and made my amends, you
accepted them without question. Having you in
my sober life is nothing less than a blessing, a
gift from God, and I thank Him for it every day
We did that every-other-weekend visitation
thing for a while, and then a strange thing hap-
pened when you entered high school. Sud-
denly, incredibly, visiting Inverness every two
weeks wasn't high on your social calendar. So
we eased into a semi-organized routine where
we see each other when we can, or need to. I know
I go crazy if too much time passes without you
at my side. I'm thankful you feel the same way
Although it's been eight years since you
moved away from Inverness, not a week goes
by when someone doesn't ask me about you.
Happened just the other day. You need to


come up here for a tour. My friends would
love to see what a beautiful young woman
you've become. So, try to pencil Inverness in
sometime soon, OK?
Finally, I want to pass on a few suggestions
to you. That's my right as a father. You can
look it up in the Dad Rulebook.
Open your heart to God. Establish your
own relationship with Him. Trust Him with
your thoughts, your ideas, your anger and
your happiness. My constant prayer is that
you feel His presence, guidance and love.
Be good to yourself. Make
V I go decisions that benefit Erin. Don't
be so concerned with what other
if too people think. You're beautiful
time just as you are.
Take risks. Have fun. Jump
without in the car and drive someplace
you've never been (tell your
ny side. mom or me first; your fun can't
iankful come at our expense). Experi-
iankful ence life. We've done a lot of
el the that. Remember driving back
from Michigan eight years ago
way. through the Blue Ridge Moun-
tains? We didn't plan any of that
Always, always know that your mom and
dad love you very much. That never, ever
changes. You can always talk to us about any-
thing and we won't judge. As I told you re-
cently, I won't agree with all your decisions
but I'll always support you.
That's it. If I said more I'd be rambling and
I know how you feel about that.
You're an incredible daughter, friend and
confidant. I look forward to this next stage in
your life. You are an awesome human being.
I love you Daughter.
Daddy


Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at
352-563-3228 ormwright@chronicleonline.com.


MIKE WRIGHT/Chronicle
Erin and I show off our Maroon 5 concert T-shirts after an awesome Orlando
weekend in late March.


UNITED
Continued from Page C1

In December, we provided 56 indi-
viduals with one-on-one budget coaching
A month later, we checked back to find
our participants will collectively save
$42,000 this year alone. This is impact.
We kicked off a new program in Jan-
uary providing 25 students earning
their GEDs with supplemental assis-
tance in the form of gas cards, bus fare,
money for car insurance and child
care. This program was funded by the
Black Diamond Foundation. The suc-
cess of this program is amazing, as ev-
idenced by the following story:
One student is a 28-year-old home-
less man. His life has taken a few
wrong turns, and he was really ready
for a new beginning. When we met
him, he was walking eight miles each
way to get to the Withlacoochee Tech-
nical Institute and never missed a day
of school. So we bought him a bike. We
provided him with dental care. We
provided him a new tent when his old
one was destroyed. A week later, he
landed a job at a local fast-food restau-
rant He is still working on his studies
at WTI and will earn his GED very soon.
After that, we have a plan in place for
him to get HVAC certified to begin new
career. This is just one of many suc-
cess stories within this new program.
A few months ago, we partnered
with the College of Central Florida,
the Economic Development Council,



BAY
Continued from Page Al

the proper permits in hand, volun-
teers dumped water hyacinths into the
confined corral.
The manatees, Crystal River's win-
ter attraction, were not excluded at
first because they are a part of the
Bay's environment. But no matter the
reason, the manatees ate our experi-
ment. A few hefty storms also blew the
aquatic plants up on the shore, where
they died.
So we tried again. Dr. Bob Knight, of
the Howard T Odum Florida Springs
Institute, our resident hero, con-
structed some cages with watertight
caps on the PVC pipe, allowing the
cages to float, and a heavy screen to
discourage the manatees, most of
which are out vacationing in other
areas.
Last week we filled a few cages with
water hyacinths an exotic only
those with a permit can handle and
water lettuce and tied them up in the


Workforce Connection, SCORE and the
Small Business Development Center
to host "Land That Job." We recruited
19 local senior-level executives from a
variety of industries to provide mock
interviews with folks who are inter-
ested in those fields. We paired each
attendee up with an executive from
their industry of choice to provide real
feedback on how to improve their in-
terviewing techniques. We also had a
wide variety of classes hosted by
Marie Straight and John Siefert, and
two instructors from Workforce Con-
nection. It was not a job fair; it was a
launching pad to move folks in a new
and positive direction. We had 75 at-
tendees, and four people were hired
that day by their mock interviewers.
So I go back to my opening comments,
that we must live united. Live united is
not just a great tagline or brilliant mar-
keting message; it is a way of operating,
it's a way of seeing the world, it's a way
of seeing our role in this community.
So now I invite you I challenge you
- to not just live united, but be inten-
tional about it Some of you have been
loyally giving and living united for many
years. Your dedication plays a huge role
in our success. You are inspiring others
to join our movement I ask all of you to
be a part of Driving Change Together,
because all ofus together truly will make
our dream of a better Citrus County, a
reality Thank you and God bless you.

Amy Meek is CEO of
United Way of Citrus County.

corral. Now we will wait to see if they
can grow in waters that are saltier
than usual.
Some of the volunteer members of
KBAM are also on the board of KBSA
and are working on a program to edu-
cate anyone interested in ways to pro-
tect the King's Bay spring shed and
springs. We are working toward a
"Come One, Come All on Springs" this
summer, and will have plenty of infor-
mation for you. Not the kind you take
home and put in a drawer, but infor-
mation you can talk to folks about -
friends, neighbors, county commis-
sioners, city council members, mayors,
legislators, editors, your kids, your
parents anyone who will listen -
and post your thoughts on social
media. It really will feel good to help.
And thanks!

Helen Spiveyis a volunteer with
King's Bay Adaptive Management
and King's Bay Springs Alliance. She
previously served on the Crystal
River City Council and in the Florida
House ofRepresentatives.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Brian Imparato is graduating from
Lecanto High School as a member of the
National Art Honor Society. He will at-
tend the College of Central Florida and
then move on to the Savannah College of
Art and Design. He has been a leader in
the 4-H clubs for nine years, raises horses
and has won all sorts of awards at the
county fair.
Mollie Griffith is another Lecanto
High graduate who is a National Honor
Society student and a leader in the culi-
nary arts program. As
a student she over- Our school
sees the operations of families a
the Panther Caf6 and
Bakery at the school, amazing sti
She is a straight-A
student and has equipped t<
logged 700 hours of
volunteer time with the leaders
various nonprofits in nation. I
the community
Ashley Nichols, watching
from Citrus High
School, is graduating cable tele
with honors and has
been a leader of the season ar
Future Business depressed, I
Leaders of America p
for the past four you attend
years. At the same
time she has earned high school
12 varsity letters in
sports and is a regu- or awards (
lar volunteer at Cit- over the nex
rus Memorial
hospital in Inverness. see the r
Nicholas Fernan-
dez, of Citrus High, has a perfect 4.0 GPA
and is No. 1 in his graduating class. He
was captain of the football team and was
involved in both wrestling and weightlift-
ing. At the same time he became a certi-
fied mechanical drafter. He will attend
MIT the nation's top school for me-
chanical or biological engineering and
continue to play football at the college
level.
U Lily Parrish, of Lecanto High,
achieved a 4.9 GPA, one of the highest
ever recorded in the county She is an all-
county softball player and is already plan-
ning to attend the Duke University
summer program called "the Institute of
Human Genetics."
U Michael Teti, of Lecanto High, re-
ceived top academic honors, volunteers
time with all sorts of community organi-
zations and finds time to work as a sports
reporter with Bright House Sports
Network.
U Madison Farrior, of Crystal River
High, has been yearbook editor wizard,
the senior class president and the prom
queen. She qualified for state in


weightlifting and found time to devote
more than 100 hours as a volunteer to
Camp Rah Rah summer camp.
Zackary Brostrom, of Lecanto High,
is the ROTC leader for more than 120 stu-
dents and an outstanding academic
achiever.
Michael Hetland, of Citrus High, is a
top language student, tennis player, ROTC
member, volunteer and mentor to stu-
dents who need help.
Liam Cash, a graduate at Seven
Rivers Christian School, has been the
movie critic for the Chronicle for years
while graduating with top academic hon-
ors. He started the school's Interact Club,
and has participated on mission trips to
Belize, Mexico, Vi-
Is and enna and Alabama.
producing He is an actor, writer
re producing and real personality
udents well U Zuhair Sami, of
Lecanto High, won
D take over the Hall of Fame
honor at the Golden
nhip of this Scholars event for
f ou are his academic
Syou are achievement and
too much leadership. He had a
perfect score on the
vision this SAT and a GPA of
.n 4.65. Among his many
id getting honors: He was rec-
recommend ognized as a Presi-
dential Scholar
one of our Candidate one of
only 2,600 seniors in
graduations America (out of 3
million graduates) to
ceremoniess win the recognition.
t month and U Mary Jane On-
sager won the Golden
eal news. Spirit Award for her
extraordinary deter-
mination in facing down challenges and
still achieving great success. Mary Jane
had to undergo heart surgery, but less
than two weeks later still managed to per-
form her duties as a student representa-
tive at the district performance
competition. In the past two years, she
has also coordinated fundraising efforts
and raised more than $53,000 for arts re-
lated health efforts. At the same time, she
has maintained a perfect 4.0 grade point
average.
Our schools and families are pro-
ducing amazing students well equipped to
take over the leadership of this nation. If
you are watching too much cable televi-
sion this season and getting depressed, I
recommend you attend one of our high
school graduations or awards ceremonies
over the next month and see the real
news.
Our kids are terrific.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicleonline.com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 C3


V




I
n

it


0

X
Is








n





c
(]





C4 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


Better days ahead?
The United States is facing
persistent high unemployment,
minimal economic growth, stag-
gering unfunded liabilities, and
unsustainable federal spend-
ing. True national unemploy-
ment is 14.3 percent, not the
contrived 7.7 percent; 12.9 million
unemployed means there are
2.9 million fewer people work-
ing than in 2007. The country is
also divided left versus right;
any proposal about anything
will be criticized by many Some
have suggested we at least keep
the discourse civil and present
coherent factual arguments;
let's hope it happens.
A recent Wall Street Journal
editorial described a potential
ray of hope for compromise.
The Senate endorsed "dynamic
scoring" of changes in tax law.
Forecasters in the Congres-
sional Budget Office have al-
ways relied on "static scoring,"
believing reducing marginal
rates and capital gains rates by
even as much as 50 percent
would have no effect on how
consumers and businesses
spend and invest or how the
competitiveness of the U.S.
economy changes. The article
cites 2003 CBO predictions
after the Bush tax cut on capi-
tal gains was enacted, CBO pre-
dicted a 5 percent decrease in
revenue; the actual result was
an increase of 66 percent.
Think back over the past 90
years. The same growth in rev-
enue occurred not only under
President Bush but also under
presidents Coolidge, Kennedy,
Clinton and Reagan. In de-
creasing both marginal rates
and capital gains rates, Repub-
licans and Democrats passed
legislation which was truly for
the common good. Unemploy-


COMMENTARY


Letters to THE EDITOR


MakI CONCSS lWces FasteR To 2cT 11e wNTTOWL eJuQA
%Ep I3aZTO F$ 0 C 9aeske m us.,


a C>@JP


I


K


ment dropped and the economy
grew measurably
What does this mean going
forward? We have additional
proof positive that lower tax
rates don't decrease revenue;
they dramatically increase rev-
enue. Unfortunately, some
among us continue to charac-
terize lower tax rates as "tax
breaks;" the wealthy are the
enemy because they have a lot
of money and don't need any
more. There are also calls for
increased taxes on large corpo-
rations. But this hurts all con-
sumers when the additional
cost of doing business is
passed on as higher-priced
products, decreased earnings
on investment or job elimina-
tion. Excessive corporate taxa-


tion frequently drives busi-
nesses overseas or even to
bankruptcy
I would hope we can all see
decreasing the tax rate on all
income earners is not a bad
thing; it's a good thing.
Keeping more of your own
money is not cheating the rest
of us out of revenue, but actu-
ally putting more money into
government coffers. Another
bright spot on the horizon is the
increasing awareness of how
the federal government wastes
billions on ineffective and un-
necessary things. Low taxes
and less government spending.
What a novel idea!


Joseph P Ryan
Homosassa


I am responding to Cheryl
Seronick's "I see a country" let-
ter (April 22), as the bemoaner
and U.S. Navy veteran who
proudly served my country
Sadly, many are not open to
accurate criticism, which could
be constructive if considered.
"90 percent of the country is in
favor of" a bill, apparently fili-
bustered by the touting-the-
Constitution party, makes me
wonder how this percentage
was obtained.
My eyes and views are wide
open and I see a president who
"inherited" debt he has tripled.
I see major cities, like Detroit,
vacant and bankrupt. I talk with
homeless, often ill, veterans


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



who live in parks and forests
because our leadership has
failed them.
According to the Department
of Defense Office of Actuary,
Obama's proposal to cap annual
military cost-of-living increases
at 1 percent will tremendously
hurt seniors and disabled vets.
Suicide is at a devastating high
(349 active-duty in 2012) and troop
deaths in Afghanistan are a daily
occurrence in this war About
44 percent of troops deployed
for war have serious problems
integrating and reconnecting
(National Academy of Sciences).
Major military budget cuts mean
less equipment and fewer soldiers.
I did not complain about my
beloved country; rather, the di-
rection our leader has taken. A
leader is something that guides
a fish into a trap. Many people are
like salmon, swimming upstream
with no chance of survival.
Others are lured by words and
smiles. Still, others are caught
in the net of no future, no es-
cape. America is trapped.
I will stand up to keep my
freedoms, appreciate my privi-
leges, and pray we are able to
withstand these next few years
of poor leadership.
Joanie Welch
Inverness

Thanks for your help
A special "thank you" is sent
to the gentleman concerned
enough to stop and check on two
ladies with car trouble on (State
Road) 44, and east of Croft
A tree limb had come off an-
other vehicle and became at-
tached under our van.
We really appreciate your
thoughtfulness.
Peggy Gibb
Delilah Rose
Inverness


Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday urday
1 2 3 4


5 61 7 8 9 10 1


12 13 14 15 17 18


19 20 22 23 24 Is


26 27 28 29 30


A -zncra* ir


Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby
Shower! Learn about taking care of
yourself and your baby. Parents of
infants under 6 months old are also
invited. There will be exhibits, games,
door prizes, a scavenger hunt and gifts
for moms, dads and babies!
Sessions: 3-5pm or 6-8pmn .

CallE^28-9047
forEnformation. "





Vi-sa i-e Cliionicle ,.: C:.ll. a IllI s
even i :, leai an :,,,I *:'.i C ieal BaI v C-:[ nieDlVI


-~ --


FLAMES


Are You Prepared?
Saturday May 18th
9am 1 pm
Special Guests: The National Weather Service
Special Displays: Hurricane Re-entry Tag
Distribution, and More .*,.--.


National Guard Armory M .-07
Crystal River
1851 W. Venable St.


- SHERIFF --
JEFFREY J. DAWSY


For more information
contact the Citrus
County Sheriff s Office
(352) 249-2707


juieoIo0t b ,
Platinum Sponsors
CHiSpNidE


RU.DLMPOMI.


I CRYSTAL
IT i N Homosassa Marine


Fish out of MacRae s Bait & Tackleon the Homosassa
River or Twin RiversMarina on theCrystal River












For tournament information or entry formscall
** e ........ ... $ ,00





M acRae s- 628-2602.


or Barramundi Corp. 628-0200
4 t f r z ....... ....... ....2 $ 0 0

Or arg froaundeCr42pd. -$28-020












BUSINESS
^CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


aS:iS


Associated Press
The home page for Ultimate Poker by the company Ultimate Gaming is seen on a computer screen April 29 at the company's headquarters
in Las Vegas. The social gaming company launched the first legal, real-money poker site in the U.S. on Tuesday morning. The Ultimate
Gaming site will be available only to in players in Nevada, but likely represents the shape of things to come across the country.


n 0


The Internet is the future ofgambling and casinos aren't waiting for states


WAYNE PARRY
Associated Press

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.
With legal gam-
bling now
moving be-
yond the casinos and
onto the Internet, the
industry is bracing for
the most far-reaching
changes in its history.
A Las Vegas firm, Ultimate
Gaming, on Tuesday became
the first in the U.S. to offer on-
line poker, restricting it, for
now, to players in Nevada.
New Jersey and Delaware also
have legalized gambling over
the Internet and expect to
begin offering such bets by the
end of this year.
And many inside and out-
side the industry say the re-
cent position taken by the
federal government that states
are free to offer Internet gam-
bling as long as it doesn't in-
volve sports betting will
lead many cash-hungry state
governments to turn to the
Web as a new source of tax
revenue.
Ten other states have con-
sidered some form of Internet
gambling so far this year, but
none has legalized it yet. Ef-
forts to pass a national law le-
galizing online poker have
sputtered, leaving states free
to pass laws as they see fit.
"It's no longer a question of


if Internet gaming is coming;
it's a question of when," said
Frank Fahrenkopf, president
of the American Gaming Asso-
ciation, the trade organization
for the nation's commercial
brick-and-mortar casinos.
"Unless there is a federal bill
passed, we are going to have
the greatest expansion of le-
galized gambling in the United
States. I don't think that's what
anyone intended, but it is what
we're seeing."
The brave new world for
gambling brings with it a host
of questions and concerns.
Will letting people bet online
result in fewer visits to casi-
nos, and therefore fewer deal-
ers, beverage servers and
hotel and restaurant workers
at the casinos? Will Internet
bets create a new revenue
stream from new players, or
will it simply redirect money
from gamblers who otherwise
would have visited a casino,
and might have eaten dinner
and seen a show, as well? And
will it create even more prob-
lem gamblers?
Michael Frawley is chief op-
erating officer of The Atlantic
Club Casino Hotel, perhaps
the most endangered of At-
lantic City's 12 casinos. A deal
for it to be sold to the parent
company of PokerStars, the
world's largest online poker
website, is up in the air. The
Atlantic Club's owners said
Wednesday the deal was dead,
but PokerStars said the next
day it still wants to salvage the


purchase. It was not immedi-
ately clear whether the deal
will ultimately get done.
Frawley said the Internet's
vast reach could help double
business at his casino, pro-
vided the right balance is
struck between the online and
physical gambling experi-
ences for customers.
"If you go to the movies, you
can watch one at home, or you
can watch one in the theater,"
he said. "Both of them can be a
great experience."
Regardless of whether Pok-
erStars buys The Atlantic
Club, Internet gambling is ex-
pected to take off in New Jer-
sey before long. The Borgata
Hotel Casino & Spa has said it
is preparing to offer online
gambling later this year, and
Gary Loveman, CEO of Cae-
sars Entertainment, has also
said he expects his company's
four Atlantic City casinos to
grab a large share of New Jer-
sey's online market
Geoffrey Stewart is general
manager of Caesars Online
Poker. Parent company Cae-
sars Entertainment's World
Series of Poker brands, as well
as its 37 casinos across the
U.S., make it an early favorite
to be a leader in online gam-
bling. He said brick-and-
mortar casinos such as
Caesars Palace can use Inter-
net play to complement their
physical casinos.
"Someone comes to play
with us online, we will be able
to offer them seats to the real


World Series of Poker, or offer
them hotel rooms at Caesars
Palace," he said. "Like any
other business, you're always
looking for what is the next
distribution channel."
Not everyone in the industry
is all-in, however
The American Gaming Asso-
ciation conducted a study a
few years ago on whether
poker-only Internet gambling
- which it supports would
cannibalize the existing brick-
and-mortar casinos. The study
determined that it would not.
But when Internet gambling
allows for casino games, such as
in the bill recently adopted by
New Jersey, traditional casinos
could suffer, Fahrenkopf said.
The most popular form of In-
ternet gambling is online poker
When the Justice Depart-
ment charged executives of
three online poker sites in
April 2011 with conducting il-
legal transactions, it was a $6
billion a year industry After
the crackdown, it was largely
on hiatus, because at the time,
taking online bets from U.S.
customers was illegal. But not
long afterward, the U.S. Jus-
tice Department revised its
stance, allowing states to take
online bets so long as they
didn't involve sporting events.
Eric Baldwin is a profes-
sional poker player who's
eager to get back online again
now that poker is once again
available over the Net.


Page B3


SCORE partners with Crystal River Mall


Crystal River Mall is the
largest shopping location
in Citrus County, with great
parking availability and an in-
door capacity for a large numbers
of shoppers/visitors. When the
Sears store recently
vacated an 82,000-
square-foot unit,
SCORE leadership, in
a conversation with
the mall ownership
and management, dis-
cussed a plan to fill
the empty space. The .;
goal was to enhance
the shopping experi- Dr Fr
ence, create small-
business opportunities He
and add some fun EXPEF
family activities. MAT
The joint SCORE/
mall venture initially will be known
as the SCORE Small Business Op-
portunity & Entertainment Center
The partners envision a multi-
purpose venue which would include
enhanced shopping, small-business
opportunities and family recre-
ation and entertainment options.


Marketing a mix
of venues
Leisure and entertainment
programs, along with other con-
sumer interests, can boost shop-


ederick
rzog
tIENCE
TERS


ping and develop
small-business oppor-
tunities. The concept,
encompassing differ-
ent attractions, is not
new. Community-type
centers such as the
SCORE/mall partner-
ship are located in
many parts of the
country The partners
believe creative mar-
keting and packaging
of attractive pastimes
can bring visitors to
the mall. Everybody


benefits!
Visitors will be able to shop,
have a meal in the food court,
play miniature golf with the kids
and friends on an 18-hole indoor,
air-conditioned setting, watch
product and service demonstra-
tions, see a live performance on


stage with great audience seating
capacity ... and more.
Small-business opportunities
for the venturesome entrepre-
neur will be available for the will-
ing. Boutique retail spaces at the
mall can have a presence 7/24/365
at low cost. Shared expenses will
allow new businesses to manage
startup costs effectively and allow
existing businesses to add mar-
keting and sales power to their
bottom line.
Meeting space,
offices and more
Office space, conference rooms
and additional meeting places
will be an additional accommo-
dation. Businesses, social groups
and nonprofit organizations will
have a location that can provide
business services to make meet-
ings more efficient
The potential uses
are unlimited
Go to a meeting and have your
agenda and materials produced
onsite, eat in the food court be-


fore or after your business, see a
movie, attend a new product
demonstration, listen to a lecture,
sell your product or services to a
shopper, have a year-round
booth/display for your business,
play a game of miniature golf,
hear a new band play or re-
hearse, plan a family gathering,
etc. The potential for uses are
unlimited.
SCORE ... for the life of
your business
The SCORE office is located on
the Citrus County Campus of the
College of Central Florida. Office
hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday
Our phone number is 352-249-
1236. If you call during non-busi-
ness hours, please leave a
number so we can call you back.

Dr Frederick J. Herzog, Ph.D., is
the immediate past president and
chairman of Citrus County SCORE.
He can be reached via e-mail at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


P


There's no

way with

this will
DEAR BRUCE:
My wife's 90-
year-old father is
currently living with us.
When he and his wife
were married, they had
two wills made out that
were identical. Both
stated that the surviving
spouse is left everything.
Since she has passed
away, does he need to
make out a new will?
And will the old one
have to be probated? -
Reader in Arizona
DEAR READER: The
first question is, since
his wife is no longer in
the picture, who would
be left as heir to your fa-
ther-in-law's estate? In
the event that there are
no alternate heirs
named, he will have to
have a new will made.
For example, my will
states that in the event of
my wife's passing before
me, my daughter,
Maryann, receives my
entire estate. That
should be sufficient
The newest will would
have to be probated in
order for the money to
be distributed. If I were
you, I would be more
comfortable spending a
couple of hundred dol-
lars to have a new will
drawn.
DEAR BRUCE: About
10 years ago, my daugh-
ter took a loan out on a
house for $32,000. Since
this time she has fallen
ill and I have been help-
ing her with her fi-
nances. I was shocked to
see that her balance is
still $32,000. I'm assum-
ing that this is some
kind of revolving ac-
count, but I am unclear
as to how it will ever be
paid off. What do you
suggest? Reader, via
email
DEAR READER: If
you are interested in
getting the whole thing
resolved, the first thing
you should do is get her
authorization in writing
so you can make in-
quiries regarding the
account. Find out ex-
actly what type of ac-
count it is. Perhaps it's
an interest-only ac-
count, but until this in-
formation is available, I
can't make an intelli-
gent comment. That's
the first move.
DEAR BRUCE: When
my son was a teenager,
we opened a joint ac-
count under his name
and mine. He is now in
his late 20s, married, but
his marriage is on shaky
ground. If they should
not resolve their issues,
will she be able to take
any or part of the money
that has been sitting in
this account? Reader,
via email
DEAR READER:
Without a little more in-
formation, I can't com-
ment definitively, but by
and large, since you
opened the account
when he was a young-
ster and now he has
reached maturity, the
money is his. If they
have to split up their as-
sets, this would be con-
sidered an asset


Send questions to bruce
@brucewilliams. cornm.
Questions of general
interest will be answered
in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Workshop links
wellness, wealth
Free "Wellness & Wealth Work-
shop" in many ways, financial
health is like physical health. Both
require knowledgeable advice, a
long-term view and proactive partici-
pation. World-renowned investment
strategist Jeff Saut will share the
stage with one of the foremost heart
catheterization specialists in the
world, Dr. Robert L. Feldman.
The workshop will be from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 1, at Col-
lege of Central Florida Conference
Center, 3800 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto.
Seating is limited and reservations
are required: Call 800-443-4368
or email amy.barbieri@
raymondjames.com.
The event is open to the public,
free to attend and will include light
refreshments.
Access Health Care's
Triana attends workshop
SPRING HILL-Access Health
Care LLC announces that Juan Tri-
ana, Chief Compliance Officer, re-
cently attended the HIPAA workshop
entitled "Being Prepared for Compli-
ance Enforcement"
on April 4 and 5 at
the University of
Central Florida
Executive Devel-
opment Center in
Orlando.
The workshop
Juan was presented by
Triana "The Privacy & Se-
curity Compliance Dream Team"
featuring Michael R. Lowe, Esq.,
and Kelly McLendon, RHIA, CHPS.
Lowe is board-certified in health
care law by the Florida Bar. He re-
ceived his bachelor's degree in his-
tory from the U.S. Naval Academy


and his master's degree in National
Security Studies from the highly
prestigious Georgetown University.
Lowe regularly represents clients in
medical records and HIPAA privacy
regulation issues, Medicare/Medic-
aid fraud and abuse prevention and
defense and reimbursement issues.
While attending the workshop on
HIPAA compliance and enforce-
ment, Triana attended two days of
classes covering such issues as
HIPAA Omnibus Rule Changes, Un-
derstanding Breach Determination &
Notification, Meaningful Use Secu-
rity Criteria, Compliance Plans and a
variety of other presentations.
Triana attended this workshop in
partial completion of requirements
for upcoming certifications in Health-
care Compliance and Healthcare
Compliance Privacy.
Oak Hill Hospital receives
Fit-Friendly award
SPRING HILL- Oak Hill Hospital
has again received the American
Heart Association's Start! Fit-
Friendly Company Gold Award.
Oak Hill Hospital continues to be a
multiple-year winner 2011, 2012
and 2013.
Start! Fit-Friendly Companies
recognition program award is given
by the American Heart Association's
Start! Movement. It is intended to be
a catalyst for positive change in the
workplace across America. It recog-
nizes companies that demonstrate
progressive leadership by making
the health and wellness of their em-
ployees a priority.
Oak Hill Hospital has been recog-
nized at the Gold Level, which
means:
It offers employees physical ac-
tivity support at the worksite.
It increased the number of
healthy eating options available to
employees.


Business DIGEST

It promotes a wellness culture
at the worksite.
It embraces at least nine criteria
as outlined by the American Heart
Association in the areas of physical
activity, nutrition and culture
Oak Hill Hospital has been serv-
ing the Nature Coast since 1984. It
is the largest medical facility in Her-
nando and Citrus County (262
acute-care beds), is one of the
area's largest private employers,
and offers Hernando County's only
comprehensive cardiovascular pro-
gram, including open-heart surgery.
Some 300 physicians, 950 associ-
ates and more than 350 volunteers
comprise Oak Hill Hospital's health
care delivery team.
It is at 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring
Hill, 1.9 miles east of U.S. 19 on
State Road 50. Visit OakHillHospital
.com, or like us on Facebook.
Karaoke, drumming
on tap at mall in May
Crystal River Mall events in
May:
Saturday, May 11: Welcome
back the sax-playing Santa from
2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday, May 18: Bring your
drum and join the Citrus County
Drummers at 2 p.m.
Saturday, May 25: Try your
hand at karaoke at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, May 29: The
Workforce Bus will be in front of
Kmart from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and
Belk will be celebrating its 125th an-
niversary with activities throughout
the day.
For information, 352-795-2585 or
www.thecrystalrivermall.com or like
the mall on Facebook at The Crystal
River Mall.
Job fair to feature
local employers
OCALA-- Representatives from


local businesses with jobs to fill plan
to participate in Workforce Connec-
tion's Job Fair from 8:30 a.m. to
noon Wednesday, May 8, at the Col-
lege of Central Florida's Klein Con-
ference Center in Ocala.
The job fair is open to anyone
looking for work in Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties. Veterans will be
admitted at 8 a.m. While there is no
charge to attend, job seekers are
asked to register online by visiting
the Calendar of Events at
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com.
Professional dress is required.
"For jobseekers, this job fair is a
great way to meet with employers
who are hiring and have the oppor-
tunity to apply for jobs before walk-
ing out the door," said Brenda
Chrisman, Workforce Connection's
chief business development officer.
"For businesses, the venue offers an
accelerated, efficient and cost-
effective way to recruit."
To date, the following businesses
have registered for the event:
Caregiver Services, Cutrale Citrus
Juices USA, Florida Department of
Corrections, Express Employment
Professionals, Family Life Care,
HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital
of Ocala, Kangaroo Express, Pike
Electric, Quantum Mechanix, R & L
Carriers, ResCare Home Care,
SITEL and Spherion.
Workforce Connection staff will be
available to help people apply for
jobs and register with Employ
Florida, the state's premier online
job bank.
Employers interested in participat-
ing should call 352-873-7939, ext.
1141. Space is limited with priority
given to health care, manufacturing,
distribution, Information Technology
and financial services industries.
Those who plan to attend are en-
couraged to show up early, bring
printed copies of their resume, and


be prepared with a one-to-two
minute introduction or "elevator
speech" highlighting work experi-
ence, training and abilities. Job Fair
preparation tips can be found in the
Job Seekers Resource Center sec-
tion of Workforce Connection's web-
site at www.WorkforceConnection
FL.com.
For information, call 352-873-
7939, ext. 1141 or 800-434-JOBS
(5627), ext. 1141.
Seven Rivers awards
nursing scholarships
Seven Rivers Regional Medical
Center associates Patricia Dourm
and Heidi Kippenberger are the hos-
pital's most recent
nursing scholar-
ship recipients.
Dourm, director
of clinical educa-
tion, earned a full
scholarship to ob-
tain a bachelor's
Patricia degree in nursing.
Dourm Kippenberger,
R.N., received a
full scholarship to
earn a master's
degree in nursing.
Both will earn their
L W degrees through
curricula offered by
Western Gover-
Heidi nor's University.
Kippenberger "Our scholarship
programs make it easier for associ-
ates to further their education by re-
moving the financial burden," said
Joann Mramor, director of human
resources. "We are proud of Trish
and Heidi. Their enthusiasm to take
their education to the next level is
commendable."
To learn more about career oppor-
tunities and the many benefits asso-
ciated with employment at Seven
Rivers Regional, visit Careers at
SevenRiversRegional.com.


GAMBLING
Continued from Page Dl

"The money's good
when things are good," he
said. On the other hand, he
acknowledges, "Most peo-
ple don't go to work for 12
hours, do their best and
come home down a couple
thousand dollars."
He plans to at least try
legalized Internet poker to
see if the player pools are
big enough to make it
worthwhile.
Every week, it seems, a
study comes out touting the


promise of Internet gam-
bling for cash-strapped
casinos and even more cash-
strapped state governments.
Gambling Compliance,
which tracks the online
gambling industry, predicts
Internet gambling in New
Jersey will bring in nearly
$262 million in its first year
and nearly $463 million
after four years. The group
said that figure could go as
high as $575 million after
four years if online gambling
takes off in New Jersey
H2 Gambling Capital, a
U.K. consultancy for the
Internet gambling indus-
try, predicts 17 states will


have approved Internet
gambling by2017, led by New
York, California, Florida,
Illinois and New Jersey
And Morgan Stanley
predicts that by 2020, on-
line gambling in the U.S. will
produce the same amount
of revenue as Las Vegas
and Atlantic City combined
bring in today: $9.3 billion.
States across the coun-
try are also turning to the
Internet to boost sales of
their lottery tickets. Twelve
states have either ap-
proved or are considering
selling lottery tickets on-
line, and Georgia and Illi-
nois are already doing it.


Voting ends May loth


Winners announced May 12th


Juftin Moore, Michael Ray, Dudin lynch, Josh Thompton,
Jamie Davit, (lemon, Road and TJ. Brown
For Ticket Information Tickets Are Available through
352-302-8177 ticketmaster

60LDI66ERS &a n tc
.GUNSLINGERS ^ ^S^ V~^ Lf 3


This year's emergency guide is once again being partnered
with the Sheriff's Emergency Management Team to promote their
May 18th expo as well as hurricane preparation plans for before,
during and after the storm. It includes evacuation information,
maps for tracking the storm, flood zone map and more.
As an advertiser, this section really delivers!
Two ads for one price
Distribution in the Chronicle and at the Expo
Highly read content
Readers will keep the section for future reference

PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 16

DEADLINE: TUESDAY, MAY 7

THE RATE INCLUDES AN AD IN TWO PUBLICATIONS

Call your advertising representative
CIRTRM... to reserve your space.

OOOEV4U www.chronicleonline.com , -- ,


D2 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


BUSINESS










33


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connection
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Welcome

new April

Chamber

members
These businesses chose to
invest in Citrus County
with a membership in the
Chamber, and we thank
them. We hope that you will
support these new members
and visit their facilities/
consider using their serv-
ices. The Chamber of Com-
merce and Economic
Development Council en-
courage you to Shop Citrus
First! All phone numbers
listed are 352 area code un-
less otherwise noted.
AJ's Cafe
216 N.E. U.S. 19
Crystal River
794-3899
ATM Antiques
& Auctions
811 S.E. U.S. 19
Crystal River
795-2061
Community Alliance
of Citrus County
110 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness
341-7075
HealthSouth
Rehabilitation
Hospital of Spring Hill
12440 Cortez Blvd.
Brooksville
592-4281
Marine Corps
League No. 1139
726-0834
Modern Plumbing Inc.
4169 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness
726-5601
Mullet Hole Tavern
631 N. Citrus Ave.
Crystal River
564-0902
Pine 2 Palm
6 Gerbera Court
Homosassa
220-0529
Thunder Bay
Builders
3755 Commercial Way
Spring Hill
877-214-8882
Top Time Travel
586-8617
Village Cadillac
Toyota
2431 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa
628-5100


Youth Leadership program unveiled

through YMCA/Chamber partnership


T he YMCA is pleased to introduce
the youth version of Leadership
Citrus. The highly esteemed Leader-
ship Citrus, a program of the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce, has
been offered in our community for
more than 20 years. This youth ver-
sion is a great opportunity for future
leaders entering their junior year of
high school to learn more about cur-
rent issues in our community and


meet key decision makers in Citrus
County. A range of topics including
human needs, education, growth
strategies, historical and natural re-
sources, local government and crimi-
nal justice will expose participants to
the decisions facing our community
today.
The YMCA and Leadership Citrus
would like to thank sponsors of this
program: The Citrus County Educa-


tion Foundation, Citrus 20/20, Col-
lege of Central Florida.
There is a limited number of
students who will be selected for
this program. Applications and more
information are available at www.
ymcasuncoast.org or www.
leadershipcitrus.com. Deadline to
apply is May 31. For more informa-
tion, call the Citrus County YMCA at
352-637-0132.


Left to right: Josh Wooten, Chamber president/CEO; first-place winner Kristen Carney, Lecanto High School;
second-place winner Sydney Schantz, Citrus High School; third-place winner Lea Whitley, CHS; first-place
winner in art Meghan Flaherty; and Hamilton Rice, TCG president/CEO. Carney won $1,500, with an additional
$250 each to the school's science and English departments. Flahrety won $400, with an additional $500
going to her school's art department. Schantz won $1,000 and Whitley $750.

Celebrating Earth Week with TCG

electronic recyclables to celebrate Earth Week. Additionally, winners from 2012 visited the Crystal River
Chamber, where they were photographed and given scholarship dollars. TCG, founded in 1996, is an elec-
tronics recycling, asset management and electronic component distribution company providing a full com-
plement of end-of-life electronics management services. They are located at 705 S. Easy St., Lecanto, FL 34461 and
may be reached by phone at 352-527-2534 or email at employeerelations@tcgrecycling.com.


New Image winner for April: Seagrass Resort

S eagrass owner Basil Green ac-
cepted and completed his own
"mission impossible" when he built
the new Seagrass Waterfront.
Spending months and many dol-
lars, Basil kept open the popular
tiki bar with food selections with
assistance from Rudy's BBQ. Long
gone are the sad bathrooms of the
original Seagrass, now replaced by
clean facilities hooked up to sewer
and with other amenities. It truly
was a recreation, and the ambassa-
dors of the Chamber are pleased to
honor Seagrass with the April New
Image Award.
If you haven't been to the new
restaurant, which still offers some
good favorite dishes, stop on by at Seagrass Waterfront owner Basil Green, second from left, accepts the
10386 W. Halls River Road, Ho- New Image Award for April from County Commissioner Rebecca Bays
mosassa. The phone number is (far left); John Murphy, Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce Board of
352-503-2007. Directors; and Josh Wooten, Chamber president/CEO.


9 F "like"us on
I fa rhook


Check out all the 2013 Pillar
VAward winners and red carpet
attendees on our Facebook page
at facebook.com/CitrusChamber!




Abitare Salon & Day Spa wins in

Earth Month competition fundraiser

A bitare Paris Salon &
Day Spa recently won
first place in an Aveda
Earth Month Fundraising
Event inHyde Park Village,
alongside Tampa Bay area's
top Aveda Salons.
The fundraiser was an
Earth Elements-themed .
Fashion Show with pro-
ceeds to benefit the Gulf L
Restoration Network.
Abitare won first place
for their "Earth Element"
model Alison Colson, .
shown here in the recycled
newspaper gown created by,
Blair Salter, a senior at Seven M
Rivers Christian School.
Abitare also won fourth place
for their "Air Element"
model Gabriella DiSanza, ment themes was creative Nelson andAbitareMakeup
shown inside the seven-foot Hair and Makeup Designs Artists Holli Cole & Angela
human size bubble. by Abitare Stylists Jack Oliverio, collaborated with
Coordinated to both Ele- Reynolds & Erica Gatto- their entireAbitare Team.


On this week's Chamber Chat...
Ryan Bishara, director of marketing at
Suncoast Plumbing & Electric Inc., co-hosts
Chamber Chat this week and shares why this
Citrus County company, founded in 1979, is still
going strong today.
Bill Foster joins us to talk about the second
annual Blessing of the Fleet held on King's Bay
May 11 from 10 a.m. to noon.
Grammy Award-winning artist Pat Benatar is
coming to Citrus County to perform at WalkerFest,
and Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill is going to
tell you how to get tickets to this exciting event
coming up on June 21!
Debra Hawthorne from Glasswerx in Crystal
River is bringing some of her favorite stained-glass
pieces to share with Chamber Chat viewers! Be
sure to take the opportunity to stop by her full-
service glass art studio in Crystal River and visit
her at debsglasswerx.com.
You have three chances to watch Chamber Chat:
6 p.m. Monday; 8 a.m. Thursday; and 1 p.m. Friday.
If you would like your business or local event featured
on Chamber Chat at no cost to you email
Melissa Benefield at spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"Like" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show.


Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
May 9 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Business
After Hours -
Old Florida National
Bank, Crystal River
May 10-- 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Chamber
Member's Lunch at
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club.
May 17-4:30 p.m.
ribbon-cutting -
Saltface Charter
at MacRae's.
Check our complete
Chamber and Com-
munity calendar at
www.citruscounty
chamber.com or snap
the QR code on your
smartphone!


Golden


Citrus


Scholars


named
For the third year in a row,
the Business Leaders of
Tomorrow hosted the Golden
Citrus Scholar Awards.
"We are thrilled to provide
the opportunity to showcase
some of Citrus County's finest
scholars," said chairman
Courtney Pollard. "These stu-
dents are the best and bright-
est in their respective areas of
study and were nominated by
their teachers and counselors
for these awards."
The event was held on May
2 at Central Florida College in
Lecanto. For more informa-
tion on the Business Leaders
of Tomorrow, a committee of
the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce, contact Keith
Pullias at 352-795-3149.
Business/Business
Technology
A'Laura Ledford, LHS
Ashley Nichols, CHS
ZakeryVanKampen, CRHS
English Literature
Amanda Pitre, LHS
Sydney Schantz, CHS
Chloe Lane, CRHS
Fine & Performing Arts
Brian Imparato, LHS
Mary Jane Onsager, CHS
Zane McNiece, CRHS
Jared Bogart, SR


Math Engineering -
Computer Science
Harrison King, LHS
Nicholas Fernandez, CHS
Clarissa Consol, CRHS
Science
Lily Parrish, LHS
Edmund Brooke-Meer, CHS
Leisa Miller, CRHS
Thomas Beno, AES
Social Studies
Michael Teti, LHS
Rebekkah Balint, CHS
Jake Endsley, CRHS
New Media Journalism
Edgar Filipinas, LHS
Kaitlynn Ramsay, CHS
Madison Farrior, CRHS
Liam Cash, SR
World Languages
Zuhair Sami, LHS
Michael Hetland, CHS
Hannah Cox, CRHS
Vocational -
Career Technical
Mollie Griffith, LHS
Joshua Juergensmeyer, CHS


^B^^^^^^^^^^RiiWATCHi^^^^^^^^^^l^
C^^HAMBER CHATy
Every M ondKiiiay Nt^Bight at 6 p-mll^B
wfi^l^HIOn WYKE i^Bi
^BrgtBHnus CH 1 r Dig'ital 47^B


-- :


momem-


Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.










D4 SUNDAY, 1VLkY 5,2013 DECLASSIFIED CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563=5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fax:(35) 53-565 Tol Fee:(88) 82-230 1Emal: lasifids~hroiclon~ne~cm Iwebite ww~chonileolin~co


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748

Wanted Single
60-66yr old good
looking guy, with pick
up truck. Wanting to
meet 65 yr. old, Citrus
Co. Single Woman
Send Response to
Blind Box 1829P c/o
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

Wanted. The lady with
a bright smile, awesome
blue eyes, and short
sassy hair. Kids are ok
but no more than 2.
Can also have grand
kids and I'll even allow a
puppy. I desire some-
one who is loving and
caring to everyone she
meets. Needs to be
beautiful all the way thru
and have a great out-
look on life. Someone
with wisdom & intelli-
gence. Someone look-
ing a very long term re-
lationship with a guy that
will love and adore her
and do his best to fulfill
her dreams. If you are
the one God appointed
to me then please get
ahold of me... and bring
ice cream.





2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10" lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306





$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
UnwantedCars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
& MORE 352-270-4087


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111






















How

To Make

Your

Car

Disappear...


Simply advertise

in the Classifieds

and get results

quickly!


(352) 563-5966


CliII )NI('.E

www.chronicleonline.com


DISHWASHER
WORKS GOOD
U pk up
(352) 794-6355

FREE Cats
Free to good loving
adult only homes.
Rescued older adult
cats, all fixed
2 Declawed,
(352) 422-6310

Free to Loving Home
Female Jack Russell
Spayed
Call after 1 pm
(352) 419-8686

FREE
VW Engine
(in parts), 2 benches for
VW Bus, dash board &
muffler. 352-746-2226

Moving Boxes
Lg. picture boxes
U-Pick Up
1-850-221-9162

PUPPY 8 month old
Boxer/Lab mix female.
Rescued last Christmas,
now 9 months old. All
shots and Spayed up to
date. Needs more ac-
tion owners than we can
supply Free to loving
home. 352-637-0095




Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistymeadows-
blueberryfarm.com


BLUEBERRIES
(352)643-0717




Gold Rafael Angel
Ring, looks like a coin
very sentimental
lost in Homosassa
pls call 352-628-4404

Hernando
Shh Tzu Male, light
brown, lyr old, lost in
the area of Bonnie pt
(citrus hills area)
352-601-7876

Large Anatolian
Sheppard
Male, tan, dark ears
and nose, micro chip-
ped IlOObs lost on
4/26 in Floral City near
S.Turner Ave &
StageCoach rd.
(352) 220-2540

Lost Calico Cat
Spayed Female brown
color w/orange/cream
markings with white
chest belly & paws, Bev-
erly Hills, Gleason Place
Heartbroken Lost on
April 6, REWARD
352-527-0302

LOST DARK GRAY
MALE CAT Grayw/
White Muzzle White
paws, pink nose w/
green eyes. Missing
from Humanitarian's
Parking Lot 4/2/13 on
44 in Crystal River.
PLEASE CALL
If you have seen him
REWARD
(352) 382-9303 OR
352-201-0576

LOST Mens Brown
Leather Wallet in
Homosassa vicinity of
WinnDixie
and Walgreens. If found
Call (352) 621-7586




Wallet Found in
Homosassa Walmart
Pkg Lot on 4/15. ID
indicates Tampa Res.
(352) 422-7874





NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses

Five Week Program
*Medical Assistant
$1,420

Two Week Proaram:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-235-4119

TRAIN FOR A
SUCCESSFUL
CAREER IN
HEALTH CARE!

Enrolling Now for
ALL PROGRAMS:

PRACTICAL NURSING

PHYSICAL THERAPIST
ASSISTANT
PROFESSIONAL
NURSING
PROFESIo NAL
NURSING
Paramedic Opt.

LPN TO ADN
NURSING BRIDGE

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352) 245-4119


Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397






NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses

Five Week Program
*Medical Assistant
$1,420

Two Week Program:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)273-4119






WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER

Is now accepting
applications for
P/T employment.Child
care work exp required
Apply M-F, 12pm-2pm,
No Phone Calls.






Live in House
Keeper/Personal
Assistant
Citrus Springs Area.
Resp. include house-
keeping, cooking ,
finances & shopping.
Salary of $10,000 per
year plus living
expenses. Owner
Travels 6 mo /year.
Must like animals.
Sent resume with
reach number to:
tma2ilbellsouth.net.
Replacing 19 Yr emp.
due to health.









Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Onfy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966







ACTIVITY
MANAGER

Join an exciting
team at Arbor Trail
Rehab & Skilled
Nursing Center.
We are seeking a
career oriented pro-
fessional to develop
and maintain activ-
ity programs. Excel-
lent communication
skills and high en-
ergy level required.
Qualified profes-
sional must have 2
years experience or
be certified as an
Activities Director,
also must have valid
C.N.A. license and
CPR certification.
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D

Send resume by fax:
352-637-1921
or e-mail: athrc@
southernLTC.com
Or apply in person
at: 611 Turner Camp
Rd, Inverness


CNA/HHA
Needed
Seeking a CNA/HHA
to work with a devel-
opmentally disabled
male adult overnights.
Must be able to pass
a level 2 background
screening and drug
screening. Must have
clear driving record.
$10.00 hr. no benefits.
Fax (352) 629-6806


Dental Assistant

30 hours per week
Certified and
Experienced,
Coleman Area
1-800-469-4467


DENTAL
ASSISTANT

Experience a Must,
Team oriented
office, Call for
Appointment.
(352) 746-3525
Beverly Hills


CHIRO. ASST.
P/T exp.
M-W-F 8:30am-6pm
T-Th 10am-4pm
apply in person
6166 W Hwy 44, CR

DENTAL
ASSISTANT

Must have exp.
EFDA Certified. Im-
mediate Openings
in our Crystal River
Office. We offer a
great benefit pkg.
please fax re
352-794-6140 or
email at VDCSH
@hotmail.com

*Director
of Resident Services

*Senior Solutions
Director

*CNA's
every other weekend

*Dishwasher

APPLY AT:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
drug free workplace
dselsavage@
superioralf.com
mbates@
superioralf.com

LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office
based medical
practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

Medical Biller

Full Time
Hematology/Oncology
Experience
Fax Resume to
352-795-2017

Medical Careers
begin here

Train ONLINE forAllied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.

APPLY IN PERSON
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF

RPSG TECH

PT/FT Night Position
1-3 Yrs. Exp, in sleep
med. must be reg.by
BRPT, current CPR
card is req. EOE
Call for appt.
386-538-1060


a-I

AIRLINE CAREERS -
Train for hands on Avi-
ation Maintenance
Career FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing availa-
ble CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769


COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLORIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-

College of
Central Florida

Records
Technician
Criminal Justice
Institute Close date
is 5/14/13.

Admissions and
Records Technician
Reposted. Review
date is 5/08/13.
Open until filled.

Faculty Associate
Degree Nursing
Master's in Nursing
and FL Nursing
License required.
Open until filled.

Faculty Computer
Information
Technology
Master's degree with
18 graduate hours in
Computer Science
Management
required.
Open until filled.

Adjunct opportuni-
ties available
college-wide.

Commitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for diverse student
populations.
Please submit a
copy of transcripts
indicating the de-
gree conferred with
the electronic ap-
plication. Education
must be from a re-
gionally accredited
institution.

How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment at
CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or
fax to 352-873-5885.

3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer


CHAMPS
SOFTWARE
Crystal River based
Enterprise Software
Company has follow-
ing job opportunities:
Software Applica-
tions Specialists
to develop, implement
and support plant soft-
ware solutions such as
CMMS,MRO Inven-
tory, WF Management
and LOTO. At least 3
years' experience
working in plant
environment required.
Software Sales
Executive
to develop large
enterprise accounts.
Must have 3+ years of
experience selling
software solutions to
enterprise accounts
both to plant
management & IT
departments.
These positions
require extensive
travel. Please submit
resume to: jobs@
champsinc.com


EXECUTIVE
ASSISTANT

The Centers
is seeking an
Executive Assistant
to help support our
Citrus County ser-
vices. Experience
required providing
administrative sup-
port at a high level
of proficiency with
MS Office (ie: Word,
Excel, Outlook,
Powerpoint) and
other applications.
Seeking professional
with strong organi-
zation & communi-
cation skills, includ-
ing follow-up, atten-
tion to detail, ability
to work independ-
ently & multi-task.
Associates degree
or HS diploma & min
5 yrs related exp.
Full benefits pkg

DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

Family Services
Director

Non-profit Christian
organization in Cit-
rus County is seeking
Family Services
Director responsible
for ensuring ade-
quate number of
qualified participat-
ing families to meet
organization's goals
and objectives. Ac-
tively monitor, serv-
ice and manage
the mortgage port-
folio. Candidates
will possess excep-
tional communica-
tion and presenta-
tion skills, be a com-
passionate advo-
cate of the organi-
zation and its mis-
sion, experienced
with mortgage
lending, processing,
servicing and knowl-
edge of real estate
transactions, docu-
mentation and
compliance.
Bachelor's degree
or equivalent work
experience pre-
ferred; high school
diploma or equiva-
lent required.
Full time position
Monday thru Friday,
some evenings and
weekend events.
Application Dead-
line May 7, 2013

Send Resume and
Cover letter to:
1108 E. Inverness
Blvd., Box 127
Inverness, Fl. 34452

Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927

PET CENTER

Is Looking for an
experienced Master
Dog Groomer. Own
Equip.. Req. Clean
Shop, No drugs.
Apply Personally
on Thursday Only
461 NE /st Terr.
Crystal River




BARTENDER
/SERVER
Part time. Inverness
Elks Lodge in Her-
nando. Call between
2pm 6pm. 726-2027.


COOKS w/
Breakfast Exp.

Full time or Part time,
Benefits or Vac. Holi-
day & Bonus Pay.

Now Taking
Applications Apply
2p-3p, Mon. Fri.
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for

Part time
Breakfast and
Lunch Cook.

Please apply
in person at
505 E Hartford St
Tues-Sat between
2:00-4:30 pm.




Lic. Realtor Asst.

F/T salary/commission
email resume to:
ajconsulting 99@
yahoo.com
OPTICAL SALES
Citrus Vision Clinic is
seeking sales help for
our optical department.
No industry experience
required; sales experi-
ence a must. Incentive
based pay. Apply in
person. 2332 Hwy 44
W, Inverness, FL.

SALES HELP
Must have Exp.

Apply In Person
APOPKA MARINE
3260 E. Gulf to Lake
Hw. (352) 726-7773

SALES/SERVICE
TECH
Family owned and
operated Pest Control
Business
Needed today!
Experience pre-
ferred, will train the
right person!clean
driving record and
valid drivers license
a must Email to:
jdsmithpest@
gmail.com or call
(352) 726-3921





Driver Two raises in
first year Qualify for
any portion of
$.03/mile quarterly
bonus: $.01 Safety,
$.01 Production,
$.01 MPG.
3 months OTR
experience.
800-414-9569
www.drive
knight.com

Exp. Dispatcher

Experienced
Service Tech
w/ Refrigeration
Knowledge

For AC Co. Must
have knowledge of
multi county area.
Computer exp., be
reliable & dependa-
ble. Experience
only need apply
Fax Resume to:
352-860-0757
or Email: aairinc
@centurylink.net

MECHANIC/
BOAT RIGGER


Apply in Person
at
Homosassa
Marine
3120S.
Suncoast
Blvd
Homosassa, FR.
34448
or Mail
Resume


DRIVER

OTR SD/LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at:
4079 S. Ohio Ave,
Homosassa

Residential
Plumbers/Helper

Plumbers and Help-
ers needed for resi-
dential community
(352) 341-4243
Contact JM Gibson
Mechanical
SEPTIC SERVICE
TECH
Experienced, clean
CDL, current medical
card, call for interview
352-628-0085



CASHIER/COOK
Looking for people for
food concession help,
for local events and also
people who want to
travel. A driver license is
a plus but not
mandatory.Call Perry
cell 610-909-3678 or
office 407-957-0433
Maintenance
Associate

Seeking a full time
maintenance assoc.
for a senior living
community in Inver-
ness, that is respon-
sible and hardworking.
Candidate must have
previous experience
in all phases of apart-
ment maintenance
and small appliance
repair. Must have own
tools. Benefits after
90 days.
Please apply
online at
hr@dewarproperties.
com or by faxing to
229-247-1353.








































Sheriffs Ranches
Enterprises

Field


HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
OR GCED REQUIRED
$10.15 per hour
Full-Time 40 hrs/wk

Christen Mason
Thrift Store in Crystal River
200 US Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL34428
er(352)795e8886
a EOE/DFWP-L
employees5of8t6
CiruEountyW


B
CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
conditions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449

YARD/HOME
MAINTENANCE

Citrus Sprinas Area
P/T 2-3 days/week.
Call 352-522-1109
between 6pm-9pm.





Library Aide
(2 positions
available)
Announcement
#13-20

P/T working 20 hours
weekly on a flexible
schedule providing
assistance in the
Citrus County Library
system. Must be
available to work
some evenings and
Saturday at various
branch locations.
Must be able to lift
20 pounds on occa-
sion. Graduation
from H.S or G.E.D.
$8.45 hourly to start.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, May 10, 2013
EOE/ADA

PART TIME
HELP

Local smoke-free Ten-
nis Club looking for
part-time help with
computer skills (Word,
Excel) and great cus-
tomer
service skills.
Shifts open Sunday,
Wed., Thurs. & Fri.
Email resume: tennis
@citrushills.com

Residence Serv
Coordinator

P/T 24 hours week
Resp include service
delivery & referrals.
Must have knowl-
edge of available
resources and trans-
portation. Strong
computer skills req.
Qualified candi-
dates send resume
and cover letter to
Joverstreet@
chpc2.ora
Equal Opportunity
Employer
www.communitv
housing partners.ora


Building Maintenance Tradesworker
THE CITRUS COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR A BUILDING MAINTENANCE TRADESWORKER.

S.. ... ... .....



Perfornmselectncalrepairsof.---,i 1 .. .t1 .-- Pr-.f i.. t 1 I t p .t
intenor buildings Repairs .. I I
Performs routine paperwork, including filling out work orders and writing up work summanes Operates
power tools such as sanders, circulars saws and power drills

S .. .. . ..... ... . rr ... ...

608 Refngerant Certification must be completed within four(4) months of hire
Human Resource Division
Citrus County Sheriff's Office
1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave
Inverness FL 34450
(352) 341-7429
On-line employment applications are available at
www.sheriffcitrus.org
Equal Opportunity Employer MF/DN


D4 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
634-13971637-3733




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13,995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com


Coletb


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





Your World






CI I4p)NICLE


Large Elvis Presley
Collection complete
bubble gum set, his
personal scarf, and
personal pictures from
1977, $5. gold piece.
lots of papers &
books, Asking $750
(352) 586-2935






APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fndges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504


KENMORE Glass Top
Electric Range
white, exc. cond.
$125. 352465-5991


Maytag Washer &
Frididare Dryer,
Both Heavy Duty
$175. for pair
(352) 465-3384


WASHER OR DRYER
$135 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398


WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504






COMPUTER DESK
W/HUTCH $100
Pull out keyboard. Text
for Picture. SMW
586-904-3262






Bankruptcy Auction
Online & Onsite
Tuesday, May 14
@ 10am
Preview: Day of Sale
9-10am
3609 N 29th Ave,
Hollywood, Fl 33020
'06 Lexus LX 470
Sport Utility, '04
Toyota Tundra Lim-
ited Double Cab,
High-end quality
home furniture &
decor, artwork &
paintings,
salon equipment,
electronics, office
furniture, computers
& more!
Visit www.moecker
auctions.com for
Details, Photos and
Catalog
Moecker Auctions
(800) 840-BIDS
10% -13%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin


DUDLEY'S






TWO AUCTIONS
5-2 Walk About
Auction 3pm Full line
up of Estate Merchan-
dise & 50 roll around
computer desk &
chairs- outdoor sale.
Great value
5-5 Antique &
Collectible Auction
1pm Christie's
Quality 1800's
Furniture, Oriental,
Coins,Sterling Pitcher
&flatware +, Lalique,
knives & estate fire-
arms, estate jewelry,
Bronze, art, carpets,
only 100 of 500 lots
sold on line.
Incredible
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667





Electric Power
Metal Saw
good cond. labor saver
cash, firm $25.
(352) 341-1714

PAINTER SPRAYER
Commercial, Sherman
Williams 4900, Excel
Condition $500.
(352) 249-7212

POWER TOOLS 10"
Rigid Table Saw 300
13" Rigid Thickness
Planer $200.
5500 Watt Generator
$250. (352) 419-7364





DIRECT Official TV
Deal America's top
satellite provider!
DIRECTV Plans start-
ing at $29.99/mo for 12
months after instant
rebate. Get the best in
entertainment.
800-253-0519

TELEVISION color tele-
vision in good condition
$12 with remote
352-220-4158

YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529





16' GARAGE DOOR
Wayne Dalton Insulated
8K Series Meets 120
MPH Wind Code $220
352-726-3730,
352-422-0201





Dell Computer
Windows XP, Pentium 4
H/T, key board &
mouse, $99 no monitor
352-621-0248


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



55 GAL DIESEL/GAS
DRUM With Portable
Stand $40
352-726-3730
352-422-0201




15 Piece Patio Set
Dark brown frame
biege seats,
$400 obo
(352) 637-6647
TABLE & 4 CHAIRS
Round 40", 4 high back
chairs with arms. Beige
plastic. Table top weath-
ered. $25 746-7232



2 Barrel chairs
& ottoman cust made
white cover $100 obo,
Curio brass dome 6' x
33" w/four glass shelves
$200 obo 746-0817
2 Display Cases
48"W x 38" H,
$75 each
(352) 341-2836
Leave message
2 LAZY BOY ROCKER
RECLINERS Clean,
Good Cond. $90 Both
352-726-3730
352-422-0201
3 Cushion Couch
Blue and White Check
$200, chair and ottoman
Blue Micro Fiber $100.
603-863-9750
3 PC SECTIONAL
Gray suede,
excellent Condition
$300
352-527-8165
BEAUTIFUL CHINA
CABINET with lighted
shelves and storage
drawers.$100.00
352-726-9758
BOOKCASE/TV SHELF
Dark oak finish 6 adj
shelves NICE!! 6' H
7'L 15"W$100.
352-621-0175
COFFEE TABLE OR-
NATE carved med oak
finish Good condition
$45.00 Pine Ridge
352-270-3909
COUCH Double recliner
couch. Light/Dark
Brown. 2 years old.
Excellent condition.
$225.00 352-419-5556
Couch w/recliners at
ea. end. blue tones,
$325. Tan Recliner
$100. good cond. for
both 352-341-4902
Dining Rm 4 brass
frame char/blue velour
chairs, 43" beveled
glass top $200 obo, din-
ning set,like new 4 light
brn wicker chairs red,
grn gold thick cushions
4' glass top $850 new
now $600 obo 746-0817
Dining Rm. Set, table
6 chairs, hutch, buffet,
$300. 3 pc. entertain-
ment center/ book-
case/desk, $100.
Excellent condition!
(352) 212-6918
(352) 249-8092


CLASSIFIED



DINNING ROOM
CHAIRS 4 chairs per-
fect condition brown
tones $50 call
352-257-3870
Electric lift twin bed
$50. 2 swivel Pine 24"
inch bar stools $20 ea.
3 wood end tables $5.
ea. Excel. condition!
(352) 212-6918
(352) 249-8092
Entertainment Ctr
Lt Wood; White chair
$125/both; Twin box
spring & mat. w/ rails
$75.(352) 795-7254
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT Cherry colorfits
27" TV,glass door for
DVD player etc. Excel-
lent.$50 746-7232


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Lazy Boy Leather
double reclining sofa
$350.
Matching reclining
chair $350.
(352) 382-0485
LOVE SEAT AND
CHAIR taupe with light
colored floral print
$50 for set. call
352-257-3870
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
J MODEL HOME
FURNITURE, ASHLEY,
Liv. Rm. & Din. Rm.
Sets (352) 302-5797
MULTIPURPOSE
CABINETS 4 cabinets
available $8 each
(needs restoring). call
352-257-3870
OVER SIZES CHAIR
W/TWIN BED light
taupe perfect shape
$50. 352-257-3870
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Rocker Recliner
Dk Brown Leather
NEW $450
352-382-1570
Round dinette table,
w/ 4 chairs on casters
$150. Octigone glass
top coffee table, $35.,
Excellent condition!
(352) 212-6918
(352) 249-8092


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 D5


D AD BUFFET KenstingtonEst
Vintage, dark wood, KenstingtonEst
good condition $300 Sunda 5/48a-2p
pictures on request G s clothing,
(352) 503-7930 Assorted HH items
(352) 5037930 650 N Heathrow Dr
SOFA BED blue gray
color in good condition
$100. call 352-257-3870
STEP 2 TWIN BED Like
new, has large storage
underneath.$100.00
cash 352-726- 9758 m m
TABLE ACCENT/END PINE RIDGE
Beveled glass top/brass 5/3, 5/4, 5/5 8am-2pm
OVAL 28L 23W 22H Moving Sale! Like New
VERY NICE $40. Contempary Furn &
352-621-0175 HH items. Must See!
TABLE COFFEE/TV 4373 W Mustang Blvd
DISPLAY Brass with
beveled glass top and
shelf 47x 18x 26H
$50.352-621-0175
TABLE END/ACCENT 4 MJENS SPORTS
Brass with beveled JACKETS SIZE 40R
glass top 27L 23W 22H $15 EACH
VERY NICE $40. 352-613-0529
352-621-0175 MENS SUITS SIZE
WRITING DESK 34X30 & 36X30 $40
peacon fish letter desk EACH 352-613-0529
glass top over inlaid
wicker 2 drawers. Legs
have pineapple
design,purch. at Lead- 205/55 R16
ers. Sugarmll $100/
Sl740-705-900 Nice tread! Only asking
775- for the n ri!


AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Bolens 2 cycle Tiller
new $125. cash, firm
Scotch Fertilizer
Spreader, good cond.
cash firm $17.50
352-341-1714
Craftsman
Rear Tine Tiller,
5HP, $450 obo
Murray, 22" 4HP Push
Mower $60 obo good
cond (352) 860-0664
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Murray Rider
Mower 40" cut very
good condition $275.
352-637- 4718
Riding
Lawn mower
Murray 19.5 HP, with
pull cart, includes
extended warrenty
$1,000 (352)464-1128
Yard Equipment
Chain saw, bnd








CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat-Sun 8am-12pm
Furn, Hsdhold, & more
2793 W. Fairway Loop
Craftsman Riding
Mower
42" hydrostatic Drive,
24HP, with
60 hrs. $1100.
(352) 513-5436
HOMOSASSA
ESTATE SALE*
Fri., Sat., Sun. 8a-4p
6731 W. Country Clb Dr
INVERNESS
Life Choice Pregnancy
Apr 10th-11th 8am-?
Furn, toys, and more
1300 Hwy41 N. Suite B
352-341-5176


(352) 857-9232
*****225/70 R16*****
Beautiful tread! Only
asking $70 for the pair!!
(352) 857-9232
----235\70 R16 ----
Great tread! Only asking
$70 for the pair!! (352)
857-9232
15 hsp, Evanrude $195
Mikita 14.4v Sawzall
$65, 1930 antique out-
board $80, Craftsman
tool box & 100 tools $40
12' Jon boat $120
315-466-2268
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BIRD CAGE Black Wire
with plastic base, 2
perches,2 feed dispens-
ers. 20H*17W*13D
$25 746-7232
BREADMAN BREAD
MACHINE Makes up to
2 lb. loaf, includes hard
bound recipe book. VG
Cond. $30 746-7232
CAST IRON KETTLE
Vintage hanging cast
iron camp fire kettle with
lid. Good Condition.
$40 746-7232
Cemetary Plots
Fountains Memorial Pk,
Homosassa, 2 adj. lots,
valued at $4k, asking
$2200. 352-302-9624
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $15
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529
DOGGY LIFE VEST
MTI brand M(8-201b)
orange w/black straps
Handle on top.New
$25 746-7232
DONVIER ICE CREAM
MAKER Chillfast
system-no electricity, no
ice or salt needed. Ex-
cellent. $25 746-7232
Emerg. Generator
B & S Eng. 5250 watt,
new carborator $500
OBO 352-746-0817
GAS GRILL 40" wide,
working condition, in-
cludes gas tank and
new cover. $75
746-7232


GENERATOR B/S
Engine,10 HP,5250
watts.Used once,like
new.Paid $650 sell for
$400 OBO
352-746-4160
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
GUINEA PIG/RABBIT
CAGE Plastic base with
wire top.40"L*18"W*20"
Plus bowl,bottle,hutch.
$50 746-7232
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Wood Cradle and
High Chair $100
(352) 795-7254
HOOVER STEAMVAC
Clean Surge with stair
and upholstery attach-
ments.$85
352-586-0082
INDUSTRIAL SEWING
MACHINE, Union
Special, Style 63400A,
Made in USA
$130 OBO
352-489-0976
Kit Wood Cabinets
36" sink cab w/ 24
matching side $30;
8 ft center top + dsink,
base cab + 4 top wall
cab.$60 352-465-1892
Metal Folding Chairs
Approx 170 Chairs,
good cond., $5.00 ea.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
MICROWAVE OVEN
GE Profile Fits Over
Stove $100.00 Phone:
352-382-0009
PARAFFIN BATH
HoMedics Para spa
Plus Paraffin Bath Heat
Therapy System.VG
cond. $40 746-7232
Pressure Washer
gasoline powered, like
new, $125 cash, firm
Conference Table 94"
long, exc. cond. $35
cash firm 352-341-1714
QUILTING FRAME
Quilting frame, light
weight and easily disas-
sembled for storage.
$50. 527-2422
Reverse Osmosis
Aqua Pure, like new
$400. obo
352-726-3878
ROYBI 10" compound
miter saw, nice. 30 Ib
Scotts W&F. Near new
Reese's hitch with ball.
All $45 527-6709
SLOW COOKER Red
w/ removable crock, lid
latches in place for safe
transport.5Qt. Excellent
cond. $25 746-7232
SQUARE DANCE
DRESSES 9 dresses
@$10 ea. Various Col-
ors. Small call Ruth
352-382-1000
STEP 2 LARGE PLAY-
HOUSE. used
indoors.Good condi-
tion.$100.00 cash.
352-726-9758
STORAGE SHED
12X20, g/cond. $1200
U Move (352) 249-7212
TRAVEL BAG Travel
bag perfect for school or
travel $9- 352-220-4158
Welded Galvanized
Wire Fence
48" high, by 100' long
never used, $98. cash
firm (352) 341-1714


Electric Wheel Chair
in good condition
$1000.00
(352) 341-6217
Harmar Universal
Power Chair Lift
w/ swing arm
$700.
(352) 419-4578
Twin Electric Beds
in good condition
$1200.
352-628-2777



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS &
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL
DREDNAUGHT
W/EXTAS NICE! ONLY
$55 352-601-6625
"NEW" BLACK STRAT
COPYW/GIGBAG,
TUNER&MORE,MAPLE
FRET BOARD $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" FULL SIZE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG,TUNER,
STRAP&MORE $75
352-601-6625
"NEW"FULL SIZE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG
TUNER,STRAP&MORE
$75 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
Martin D 16 h built 1992,
spruce top mahogany
back and sides, solid
woods nice condition,
Martin hard case $ 975
352 527 1245
BLACK IBANEZ
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
WITH ONBOARD
TUNER &SOME EX-
TRAS $50
352-601-6625
Galveston acoustic
guitar in good condition
$50. 352-419-4464
IBANEZ TALMAN
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMP,GIGBAG,
TUNER,STRAP,CORD&
MORE "NEW' $185
352-601-6625
PIANO
Currier console piano
Excellent cond.
$400.,
(352) 503-7219
SPINET PIANO
Krakauer Bros, looks
and sounds good $400
pictures on request
(352) 503-7930



AREA RUG 7X10 Nice
design, no worn spots,
Clean $30.
Text for picture. SMW
586-904-3262



ELEC.TREADMILL
NORDIC TRAC ALL
OPTIONS, PLUS
POWER INCLINE NEW
1495.Reduced $335
352-464-0316


0wr -



irkes51


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179





Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374





Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469





BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483

Affordable Handyman
VIFAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
SRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
se FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *

HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


I DYRVN CENN


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
vRepairs
S.* Small Carpentry
UM Fencing
Screening
S(lean Dryer
Vents
A ,llij.t'rle & Dependable
SEq, ,iince lifelong
352-344-0905
0 cell 400-1722
S sured L- Lc#37761


NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
Primary Cleaning
t **Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Weekly or just an
occasional clean.
Call Tabitha @
352-601-2175.



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


WINDOWS
GENIE.
We deon Windows m d a Whoie Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting

Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service*
Free Est.352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790


GENERAC
Stand Alone ,
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST. (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570




All chases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


AAA ROOFING
Cal the "eak6usters"
Free Written Estimate

$10O0 OFF;
Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
[ic./Ins. CCC057537 OOESX4


Id ZI M


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAIN.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.








Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


TjrEe SEry ice




ESTIMATES'-

Tree trimming/removal
Stump grinding


Licensed & Insured


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852


Add an arislkc touch to your existing yard
or pool or plan

completely new!
T r-- A -,,Often imitatd,
nevel dupikatu"


YOU INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVE SPECIAULIST
COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC

Sinsued 352-400-3188


DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825

TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696





344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!





THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
Lc #00CCC01325497


MAC JOHNSON
iMAC ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
Cf leaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
S Residential &
58 6-C1.6 Commercial

586-1816 746-9868









D6 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


ELLIPTICAL BY NOR-
DIC TRAC All Electron-
ics+ Power INCLINE A
STEAL AT REDUCED
335.00352-464-0316



BICYCLE BOYS
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
BICYCLE RACK ALLEN
brand fits on your car or
van trunk, holds up to 4
bicycles, new in box.
$50 746-7232
CABELAS Drift
Sock/Anchor Easy to
rig, vented 4 easy re-
trieval. reinforced nylon
w/pouch.$25 746-7232
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel.
batteries, garage
kept, Delivery Avail
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ Go Golf Cart
1997, runs good,
$1,150
Club car Golf Cart
$450
352-564-2756

GUN & KNIFE
SHOW
BROOKSVILLE
HSC CLUB
Sat. May 11th 9a-5p
Sun. May 12th 9a-4p
HERNANDO
COUNTY FAIR-
GROUNDS
Admission $6.00
(352) 799-3605
KAYAK CARRIER
kayak roof rack
$80.00 phone
352-726-6084
Leaf mulcher, electric
$35. Electric Boat
Wrench $40.
Automatic Fish scaler
$15. 352-860-0939
SCUBA TANK 80CUFT.
Aluminum, silver US Di-
vers brand w/J valve &
harness.Good cond.
$50 746-7232
TAPERFLEX WATER
SKI $25.00 call
352-257-3870
Tennis Racket,
stringing machine,
electronic Alpha ultra
edge, w/6 pt hold ex-
cel. cond. $400. obo
Recumbent Bike
BikeE, 21spd.
aluminum 291bs,
excel cond. $400 obo
(352) 489-0105
WATER COOLER
5GAL w/spout.Orange
w/Gatorade logo.Cup
holder on side.Great
Cond. $20 746-7232



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1975.
** call 352-527-0555 **



BOYS BABY CLOTHES
good condition sizes 3
months 3 toddler $ .25
$2.00 call
352-257-3870
TODDLER BED with
mattress,made of
wood.$50.00 cash.
352-726-9758
TODDLER CAR SEAT
blue good condition
$25.00 call
352-257-3870



FISH TANK WITH
STAND 35 gallon black
stand $25. call
352-257-3870
.e-


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




1989 Merc. 35 HP,
No Tilt Good com-
pression good spark,
nice shape $695.
Newer motor guide,
trolling motor,
401b thrust, foot con-
trol., like new $450.
(352) 860-0513


m
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *







My name is Ginger, and
I have a lot of colors. I
was a stay now I am a
loving kitten looking for
my forever home, is it
you. See me @
www.savingangels
petrescue.
419-0223/726-1006














My name is LuLU. I am
about 18 months old
and full of energy. Yes I
am a Chi. Everything is
done, except me being
in my forever home.
See me@
www.savingangels
petrescue.com or call
726-1006 / 419-0223








PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tn color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876
Shih Poo Puppies,
4 males, 1 female
ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
3 males 1 female
Ready 5/9
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu & Shih-Poo
Pups, Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827



Galvanized Chain Link
Dog Fence
10' sq. x 6' high
w/access door $275.
cash only, firm
352-341-1714

Horse Quality
HAY
(352) 795-1906
100 Bales Pick-Up
$4.50
200 Bales Pick Up
$4.00
This Is Shamrock Hay




Horse Quality
HAY
(352) 795-1906
100 Bales Pick-Up
$4.50
200 Bales Pick Up
$4.00
This Is Shamrock Hay


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



A Diabetic Needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
Call Mike 386-266-7748



I BUY AMMO,
Also Reloading
Supplies & Equip.
PAYING
$$ Top Prices $$
352-302-0962
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219 20131

M -Yamaha F


LILLITH
Lilith, a spayed
4-y.o. Hound/Lab
mix, housebrkn,
crate-trained,
UTD on shots, low
energy, great on
leash, weight 45 lbs.
Beige/white in color.
She is a great com-
panion dog, won-
derful house man-
ners. Loves people
& bonds strongly to
her human friend.
Needs someone to
spend time w/her.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*"352-563-5510"
15 FT BOWRIDER
w/55 Johnson, w/tilt,
bimini, foot trolling
mtr., fish finder, trailer,
runs and looks good,
$1,650 (352) 860-0513
1988, 15 FT
Fiberglass, center con-
sole, w/40OHP Johnson,
w/tilt, new bimini,
trailer, ready to fish,
$2,295 (352) 860-0513
1989, 17 FT
Aluminum Tracker,
w/ high sides, great for
salt/fish water, 60HP
evinrude/tilt, dual Batt.
built in gas tank, foot
control, trolling mtr.
bimini top, new Ken-
wood stereo, w/ CD,
fish finder, batewell,
trailer, great shape,
$3,200. (352) 860-0513
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/tnm 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
1998 Sting Ray
22 Ft, extra Clean 175
Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab,
great for fish/pleasure
$7500 352-422-4658
20ft PONTOON
w/48HP, Johnson, w/
tilt, fish or cruise, seats
6, troll. mtr.-batewell-
fish finder, all in good
shape, $2,450. No
trailer (352) 860-0513



Bayliner 1984
Trophy Cuddy
cabin, clean, with
trailer, Volvo pente
i/o.does not fire,
needs work,$2000.
cash only, call
Doug 564-0855
or cell 212-8385
Carolina Skiff
24 ft., new motor-41
Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP,
trailer. Lots of extras
$14,500 (352)287-3308
PONTOON
2005 18ft Party Pon-
toon w/ galvanized
Trailer 40hp Yamaha
$6995 (352) 650-9059
Pontoon Hse Boat
32 ft diesel engine
driving paddle wheel.
$5000. Dunnellon
260-494-5563
Seabreeze
w/trailer, 15' tn hull
must sell, best offer
352-746-0589
SPEED BOAT
1975, w/trailer newly
painted, new red cus-
tom canvas cover.
$2,000. 813-650-4662
Vee Bottom
Aluminum 12Ft boat
motor, & trailer good
cond. $375.cash firm
352-341-1714
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555tt
boatsupercenter.com
YACHTMAN
1988 22 Pontoon Pon-
toon 22ft-40hp
ELTO-Trailer-New Deck
2006-some new seats
fully equipped-under
cover 4,300.00
352.746.2621






KEYSTONE RV
COMPANY
2008 Cougar 5th wheel
33' Double slides, wood
floors, ducted A/C, large
shower, all the extras,
like new condition,
$21,500. 352-726-6261



2001 Aliner Expedition
18', sleeps 4, Gd Cond
w/ A/C, Refrig $4500
(352) 249-6098
2005 Trail Light
30' Travel Trailer w/
slide, rear Qu bed,
ducked a/c exec. cond.
$7200 352-344-2712
2011 ROCKWOOD
20' Trailer, like new,1 db
bed, slide w/convertable
sofa, all appliances,full
bath, many extra's
$13,400 352 860-2701
'06 ROCKWOOD
TT
31 Signature Series.
Aluminum frame. Rear
queen, 12 LR slide. All
factory extras + more.
Completely equipped
(linens, kitchen, tools,
spare parts). Ready to
go. Immaculate condl-
tion, No smoking, no
pets. $14,000.
352-637-6262
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


'03 Coleman Elite, 16 ft
opens to 25ft, H/A,
2 K beds, Refig $3600
(352) 344-9589
TRAVEL TRAILER 26'
2005 Sprinngdale by
Keystone with slide,
queen bed, sleeps 8,
ducted A/C, tub with
shower, good condition.
$6700 352-464-1622
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
Yellow Stone
32' tag along
$1500 OBO
352-220-6048



Tonneau Cover
Rugged, 6%2 feet,
folds into 3 sections
Asking $250
727-251-7568
VW
2 transmissions,
1 is for a VW bus
746-2226/212-1538



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




1997 Lincoln
Twn Car Light Green,
Low mi. new carriage
roof, new head line,
good tires, cold a/c
$3000 352-503-7256
2011 Chrysler
200 Convert, cherry/tan
22k mi, beautiful car,
automatic, $21,950 Firm
352-897-4520
BUICK
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-302-9217
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100

must sell!
CADILLAC
1999 STS $1,500, minor
work needed
352-364-2268
CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt LT
$6,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment


FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
60,800 miles,silver in
color,power
wndows,bcks,seatcruise,tti
wheel,cassette
player,newer tires
very clean. $3900
o.b.o. 352-257-2590
FORD
2000, Ranger XLT
Lesabre, $3,995.
352-341-0018




370-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-320
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
ARQUE TAX RECEIVABLE
FUND L P US BANK CUST
FOR ATRF FLORIDA &
CAPONE
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-


CLASSIFIED



FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Focus, Sedan,
SES, 25,000 miles.
$7,500. 352-341-0018
FORD
'96, Mustang, V6, 5spd
manual, gar. kept, GT
wheels silver, great
cond. $3,500 obo
(352) 476-7408
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5,500 obo
352-628-5451 or
352601-2214
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAY 5. '13
1-800-438-8559

Oldsmobile
1992, Toronado
White Diamond, leather
Int. 124Kmi, FWD 3800
tuned port injection, V6,
Meticulously,main-
tained$3500. (352)
527-3291







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII






DODGE
2006 Dakota Quad CAB
ST 4.7 Liter Magnum R
V8 A.R.E. Cap,
Hitch, 43,000 $9,700.00
352.746.2621
352.746.2621
FORD
2011 Ranger XLT,
$15,500. OBO
AutoTrans, only 4.900
mi Pow Windows &
Locks, AM/FM/CD/
XM/CB, Cruise, Bed
CoverAlloy Wheels,
More Pictures w/email:
djameson5
@tampabay.rr.com
cell 410-703-9495




sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2953
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
TOWN OF DUNNELLON
L 0 T
644
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
INGRID C REYES,
ROY D REYES
Said property being in
the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.Unless such certifi-
cate shall be redeemed
according to law, the


DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
NISSAN
1994, extra cab, 5 spd
cold ac, tonneau cover
high miles, runs strong
$1700. 352-344-0484
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
1997, Explorer XLT
$3,495
352-341-0018
FORD
1998, Explorer Sport
$4,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Explorer, XLT,
good clean cond. new
tires $2,700 obo
(352) 637-4676
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
HYUNDAI
2004 Santa Fe, new
timing belt & seals, high
mileage, runs great,
$3200. 352-344-0484
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



2013 DODGE
Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with
10" lowered floor,
ramp and tie downs
for more info call
Tom 352-325-1306
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
Town & Country 2005
7-Pass Non- Smoking
Mini-Van, Stow'n Go
Seats 3.81tr V6, 21mpg
Leather, 2nd Owner,
Impeccably Maint.,
Records, All Options.
Clean Reliable Family
Van. $6,999. obo
352-422-3217



06 Suzuki
Burgman 650 w/tryke
kit, wh/bl under 5k mi,
loaded with extra.$7995
OBO 352-621-0248
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk, xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12,900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
YAMAHA
1999 v star 1100, cust.
pipes, wshield & bags,
Adult ridden, gar. kept
$2900 (352) 650-9059




property described in
such certificate shall be
sold to the highest bidder
on line, on May 15, 2013
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.
com.
Dated March 28,2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
April 14, 2013
April 21, 2013
April 28, 2013
May 5, 2013


388-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID
OWNER: CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
123 NORTH WEST HIGHWAY 19
CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA 34428
Separate sealed BIDS for the construction of:NE 6th Street Sewer Realignment
BID NO. 13-B-10
BIDS will be received until 11:00 AM ,Thursday, May30, 2013 opened and read aloud
at 11:05 AM at the Crystal River City Hall, 123 North West Highway 19, Crystal River
Florida 34428.
WORK shall consist of the following items:
Perform all work and furnish all necessary labor, equipment, material and
transportation for the construction of the NE 6th Street Sewer Realignment. Project is
located from the intersection of NE 6th St. and NE 6th Ave to just past the
intersection of NE 6th St. & NE 7th Ave. and consist of the installation of 684 feet of 8
inch sewer main, 4 manholes, repair of associated City streets and miscellaneous
restoration.
The work includes, but is not limited to, clearing and grubbing, excavation;
pavement and driveway restoration; installation of sod; protection of existing
structures, landscaping, trees and utilities; erosion control; and maintenance of traf-
fic. All Work is to be performed per the current edition of the Florida Department of
Transportation Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction,
supplements thereto, when not specifically stated in the Special Provisions section of
this bid package, or shown on the plans.
ALL BIDDERS must be qualified for the type of work for which the BID is submitted.
BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"BID FOR NE 6th St. Sewer Realignment", BID NO. 13-B-10 AND THE NAME OF THE
BIDDER AND HIS ADDRESS.
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: CITY CLERK'S OFFICE, CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, 123
NORTH WEST HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA 34428
The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, consisting of ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS, INFORMATION
FOR BIDDERS, BID, AGREEMENT, GENERAL CONDITIONS, SUPPLEMENTAL GENERAL CON-
DITIONS (if applicable), NOTICE OF AWARD, NOTICE TO PROCEED, CHANGE ORDER,
PROJECT PLANS, SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND ADDENDA, MAY BE EXAMINED AT THE
FOLLOWING LOCATIONS AT NO CHARGE:
CRYSTAL RIVER CITY HALL, PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT,
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA 34428
THERESA KRIM 352-796-4216, EXT. 314 OR LOU KNEIP EXT. 305
Hard copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be purchased at the office of:
BURRELL ENGINEERING, INC., 12005 N. FLORIDA AVENUE, DUNNELLON, FL 34434
Payment for hard copy plans & specifications is a non-refundable fee of $50.00
EMAIL REQUEST TO:troyburrell@bellsouth.net, Or Call:Troy Burrell, P.E., 352-489-4144
Plans and specifications may also be viewed or downloaded at no charge on the
City website; www.crystalriverfl.org Bidders using the website are advised to check it
regularly and prior to submitting bids for any addendums or updates that may be
issued.

No BIDS may be withdrawn for a period of SIXTY (60) days after closing time
scheduled for receipt of BIDS.


A Bid Bond will be required for this Project. The bid bond shall be in the amount of
5% of the bid amount.
The OWNER reserves the right to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatsoever
and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE BID
RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
Published 1 time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 5, 2013


392-0505 SUCRN
CCAAB 5/9/13 MEETING
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD will
meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto Government
Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Engi-
neering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352)
527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sover-
eign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days be-
fore the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 5, 2013


389-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 031-13
Meter Installation Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide Meter Installation Services to include the Repair-Replacement of
approximately six hundred (600) Water Meters that are beyond their useful life and
have incurred problems with the Meter Register, Wiring from the meter to the
Reading Touchpad,Touchpad Problems and/or complete Meter Failure. Additional
Water Meter Replacement Programs may be established for groups of meters as
necessary.
Minimum Requirements For Submittina A Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, one of the following requirements to be
determined a responsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Florida State Certified Plumber,
2. Florida State Certified General Contractor, or
3. Florida State Certified Underground Contractor.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before June 5, 2013 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is schle d for June 5, 2013 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 5, 2013


390-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PROPOSAL FOR CITRUS COUNTY
SPORTS ATHLETIC COMPLEX FEASIBILITY STUDY
RFP # 025-13
Recognizing Citrus County's potential attraction as a competitive sports and/or
eco-tourism destination, the Citrus County Tourist Development Council is seeking
proposals from qualified firms or individuals interested in conducting a feasibility study
for a Sports Athletic Complex.
The goal of this proposal is to select a single consulting firm that is supported by
highly qualified professionals that will evaluate information and conditions; and de-
termine whether a sports athletic complex is viable. The purpose of the feasibility
study if warranted will be to assess a potential site for redevelopment as a complex,
perform a marker feasibility analysis to determine a competitive sports play, develop
a program and master project budget for a complex and create a finance plan to
fund the complex.
Minimum Reauirements For Submittina A Proposal
Proposer shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirement to be determined a
responsive and responsible at the time of Proposal Submittal:
O Proposer must have a minimum of five (5) years experience in the design and
planning of similar scope as requested in the solicitation.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before May 17, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for May 17, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
"BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 5, 2013


391-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 030-13
Resurfacing of:
Citrus County Road (CR) 491 from W. Noble St. to W. Cardinal St.
and
W. Fort Island Trail from W. Dixie Shores Dr. to W. Pine Bark Ln.

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide roadway resurfacing services for Citrus County Roads 491 from W. No-
ble St. to W. Cardinal St. and W. Fort Island Trail from W. Dixie Shores Dr. to W. Pine
Bark Ln. located in Citrus County Florida. The work includes, but is not limited to, fur-
nishing all equipment, labor and material for asphalt leveling and/or milling portions
of the existing asphalt pavement and the placement of Super Pave 12.5 Fine As-
phalfic Concrete (Traffic Level C) with polymer PG 67-22 (AC-30)(<15% RAP) for level-
ing and resurfacing as specified under current Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT) Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction and its supple-
ments including, but not limited to, milling, exposing, and cleaning edge of existing
pavement, temporary and permanent striping, redressing, filling and sodding areas
adjacent to the pavement, striping and other items as specified in the Contract
Documents for approximately three (3) miles of roadways in Citrus County, Florida.
Minimum Reauirements For Submittina A Bid
Bidder must presently have, or will procure at time of award of a contract, person-
nel, materials and equipment necessary to perform the services outlined in this Invi-
tation to Bid.
1) Bidder must have an individual on site during all phases of work associated with
this project including but not limited to roadway preparation, asphalt milling, paving,
striping, and sod placement who is certified in work zone safety (Maintenance of
Traffic (MOT) Intermediate Level) in accordance with the Florida Department of
Transportation requirements.
2) Bidders must be pre-qualified by the Florida Department of Transportation and
submit a copy of such at the time of Bid Submittal.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before May 21, 2013 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for May 21, 2013 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a disabil-
ity or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at
(352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle May 5, 2013


386-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in
business under the
fictitious name of:
SNAZZY SELECTIONS
located:
6033 E Noble Lane,
Inverness, FL, 34452,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register the
said name with the
Division of Corporations of


the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Beverly Hills, FL,
this 1st day of May 2013.
/s/Stan Godlewski, Owner
All Inclusive Computer
Services, LLC
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, May 5,2013.
387-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in


business under the
fictitious name of:
THE APPLIANCE STORE
AND MORE
located:
3882 N Lecanto HWY,
Beverly Hills, FL, 34465,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register the
said name with the
Division of Corporations of
the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Beverly Hills, FL,
this 2nd day of May 2013.
/s/ Galen Lohmeyer,
Owner
Published in Citrus County
Chronicle, May 5, 2013.


INCLUDES
TRAILER

WUTIC STAR 22' BAY
) Four Stroke -Trailer with Brakes

$295"o
bper month


S $34,900


URSION X21FC REAR FISH PONTOON
a F115 EFI Four Stroke and Trailer
10o .DOWN

per month


INCLUDES
TRAILER


KCURSION K25E TRITOON
-25' X 8'6" Yamaha -Double Bimini Tops
00
$530W~
per month


CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River

.ES. 795-2597


I Misc. ot


I Misc. ol


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ImicN


Meing
I Not[ices


MBing
I Notices I


IB=3


I Bi


I Bi


I Bi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


rDown


2013 ESCAPE SE Available
$27,135 MSRP
-1,200 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-500 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash

,95a s25


lqW 1 G3T120
2013 EDGE SE
$29,700 MSRP
-846 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-1,000 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash
-500 Retail Bonus Cash

2i5.854


20
$17,115
-$720
-500

*'1


13 FIESTA 4
MSRP
Retail Customer Cash
Challenge Retail Bonus Cash


I


I86


Go Fu


ford.


2013 F-150 SUPER CAB S
$34,745 MSRP
-1,500 STX Discount
-2,300 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,000 Ford Credit Customer Cash
-1,000 STX 5.0L Customer Cash
e- -500 5.0L Special Cash
rther -2,500 Retail Customer Cash
corn $25941

ON SALE
--,i,^O tt .. 1 - ".
rfi-a^-"- *J -^Mam-^:^


2004 JEEP UNLIMITED 2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT
.6 cyl., auto, cruise Cloth
$10,950 $19,950


2013 FORD F1 50 XL 2010 DODGE RAM 1500 HEMI
One owner, 6 cyl., 7,000 miles $ Laramie, 4x4
$20,950 $29,968


p 9q l


2001 FORD CROWN VICTORIALX 2003 BUICK CENTURY
Runs great, cold air
$4 950 $6.950


2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2006 FORD 500 SEL 2007 MERCURY GRANDMARQUIS LS 2011 HYNDAI SONATA 2011 NISSAN ROUGE
Like New Leather Nice, leather Clean, Cloth interior 31,000 Miles, cloth interior
$6,950 $9,950 $1 1,950 $15,950 $16,950

KS B^--" K .


2009 CADILLAC DTS 2012 FORD FOCUS SE 2012 FORD FUSION SEL
Memory Seats, all the toys Cloth, new tires Leather
$18,950 $17,950 $19,950

L wHECi^^~


2009 HONDA ACCENT 2012 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 2011KIA SORENTOI
4 cyl., moonroof 6 cyl., 5 speed Cloth, 32,000 miles, Like New!
$19,950 $19,950 $19,950


2012 FORD E150 2011 FORD FUSION SEL 2010 LINCOLN MKZ 2010 LINCOLN MKZ 2011 LINCOLN HYBRID
Great work van 11,000 miles One owner, leather Moonroof Like new, one owner
$21,950 $21,950 $21,950 $22,950 $26,950



2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL 2013 FORD EXPLORER XLT 2013 FORD FLEX LIMITED 2008 FORD F250 CREW 2013 FORD ESCAPE SEL
Leather 3rd seat Leather, 22,000 miles Loaded, leather Lariat, 4x4, Diesel 18.000 miles, leather
$29,950 $31,950 $32,950 $34,950 $26,950


Leather rear camera
$26,950



2010 CADILLAC SRX
4,000 miles, one owner, all the toys!
$34,950


2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT
20,000 miles, Cloth Interior
$20,950


One Owner, moon roof
$22,950


2013 LINCOLN MKX
13,000 miles, Loaded!
$35,950


Nick Nicholas lo-o

Call Toll Free crystal River
Nicholas


Hs 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 211CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 5/12/13.


LINCOLN


TX


TRUCKS
i ,.. k. -Z Z Z -. .,


of f I MI IPf I
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


I er-s niver iiI


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 D7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE $2,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.








.w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
n Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Oualified
Lessees


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,989 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $39,800.







wI Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group



Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Gualied
Lessees /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,979 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $43,405.







-wI Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Oualifed
Lessees


/MO.36 MONTH LEASE

$4,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995.


3 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED

2008 CADILLAC 2010 CADILLAC 2012 CADILLAC 2011 CADILLAC 2012 CADILLAC 2011 CADILLAC
DTS DTS SRX SRX CTS DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION PREMIUM COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION .6 PERFORMANCE PREMIUM COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, DRIVER BLACK, 33,000 MILES, NAV, SUNROOF, BLACK TRICOAT, ONLY 8,800 MILES, MOCHA, 22,067 MILES, SUNROOF, BLACK TRICOAT, 3.6L V6, LEATHER, DIAMOND WHITE, NAV, SUNROOF, HEATED AND
AWARENESS PKG, #C3X176A HEATED AND COOLED SEATS, #C3X331A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S350A HEATED SEATS, EXTRA CLEAN PERFORMANCE COLLECTION, #C383300 COOLED SEATS, #C383370
$15,9a sea, 9gBB 9S, 9aBB s31 ,a9a s363,5BB 38,9BeB



2007 CADILLAC 2012 CHRYSLER 2010 DODGE 2010 FORD 2009 HONDA 2008 DODGE
DTS 200 CHARGER EDGE CRV QUAD CAB
LUXURY II LIMITED RALLYE 2WD UNITED EX-L 4X4 SLT
SILKING GREEN, 54,000 MILES, HEATED AND MEMORY LIGHT BLUE, ONLY 12,000 MILES, CRYSTAL RED, SPOILER, LOCAL TRADE, GRAY, LEATHER, SUNROOF, SILVER, 32,000 MILES, LEATHER, GRAY, ONLY 31,000 MILES, 5.7LV8, LEATHER,
SEATS, ONE OWNER, EXTRA CLEAN, #C383360 ONE OWNER LOCAL TRADE IN, #C3X168A EXTRA CLEAN #C383160 LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S235A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3S289G SUNROOF, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3A348A
41S,988 1Gs,988 *16,988 s 18,988 see ,4a88 s,9a88

2012 TOYOTA 2010 BUICK 2011 BUICK 2012 CHEVROLET 2011 TOYOTA 2009 MERCEDES
CAMRY LACROSSE LACROSSE CXS AVALANCHE LTZ SEQUOIA SL E63
XLE CSX WHITE DIAMOND PLATINUM SILVER AMO
SILVER, 5,600 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, MOCHA, 32,000 MILES, SUNROOF, LEATHER, BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS, 16000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV DVD 22,813 MILES, SUNROOF, NAV, DVDS, LOADED STEEL GRAY, 26,000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE IN,
NAV, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3X078A NAV, ONE OWNER, #C3S305A SUNROOF, LOADED, #C2S269G #C3MO50A ONE OWNER TRADE, C3S301A EXTRA CLEAN, #C2T192A
see,9 a sas3,988 SGa | s*43,988 4 7,988 a5Gg,9 5


2000 CADILLAC 2006 VW 2005 MERCURY 2004 LINCOLN 2004 CADILLAC 2005 HONDA
STS GOLF GR MARQUIS TOWNCAR CTS CIVIC
WHITE DIAMOND HATCHBACK LS WHITE 2DR EX *SE'
71,000 MILES, ONE OWNER, SUNROOF, SILVER, LOCAL TRADE, GREAT CONDITION, TAN, 76,000 MILES, LEATHER, LOCAL TRADE, EXTRA EXTRA CLEAN SILKING GREEN, 70,000 MILES, LEATHER, BLACK, 70,100 MILES, LEATHER,
#C3X270A COLD A/C, #C33S293B LOCAL TRADE IN, #C3X042B #C3X046B ONE OWNER TRADE IN, #C3S272A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER
$5,955 $5,955 $5rs,955 $5,955 $9 s,99ee 5see

WWW. SIU L--..1A..IA 111= CADI =1 _'-.AC -=.-1- V
4040 WA COLLEGE ROAD OCALA. FL 352-732-4700


D8 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013





INSIDE
BI Sikorski's
S1Attic PAGE E6


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULID


A living succulent picture by
FormLA Landscaping created
for the courtyard of the 2012
Pasadena Showcase House of
Design. Living pictures, cut-
tings of assorted succulents
woven together in everything
from picture frames to pallet
boxes, are hot among garden
designers and landscapers this
spring as an easy. modern way
to add color and texture to an
outdoor space.
- i, [' 1 F .,; "


\


SI J,1
O/jTJl Jj


JrJ


MLb


S 'N


I rjijfi 1/ '7t


~i~jli ~


-i l i ,I .


-V4
,' Jjli2


- 7.4~u


I


)


//IiiLm


I .


Ij Ij
-j -i


000'n







E2 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PiNt nilDUl:
* 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


With over 2,100 square feet of living area, this lovely 3 or 4
bedroom home has lots of room for your family. Huge Florida Room,
Great room with fireplace, modern kitchen, huge master suite
and 2 full baths. Located in beautifully maintained Meadowcrest with
many amenities included. A must see.
STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net


.=. .... ,_ 'I"1

516 S. TUCK PT., INVERNESS
Affordable 2/1/1 waterfront home!! Just a stones throw away
to some of the best bass fishing in the world on the beautiful
Withlacoochee River! This recent remodel house only needs
you to make it a home. Interior features complete kitchen
remodel, new carpet, fixtures, appliances and paint. Exterior
boast mature landscaping, large backyard and huge patio.

DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


60 S I KELLNER BLVD.
* 2BD/1.5BA/2CG Warm & Comfortable
* Beautifully Maintained Living RM & Fla RM
* Enclosed lanai Larger lot

PETER & MARVIA KOROL I
(352) 527-7842 Liii
(352) 422-3875


6~~~~~~.t- ^ *..J18Nhll~.,'


BEAUTIFUL 3/2/3 HOME ON 10 ACs W/4 PADDOCKS & PLENTY
OF STORAGE SPACE This farm home is just minutes from all
conveniences in Dunnellon Home extra features are 3-car del garage as
well as a 4,800 sq ft RV metal barn with roll-up doors and a car lhift Great
for car collector, or RV storage Home interior features Travatine floors,
stainless steel appliances, and much more Seller motivated, look todayll
DIR From Hwy 41 N in Dunnelblon (about 7 miles out of cily) to Hwy 328
R, to NW 165th Court Rd (on left), home on L see sign
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email: dawnwright@remax.net i


QUAIL RUN BEAUTY WITH OVERSIZED GARAGE
* 3BR, 2 BATH Split Plan 2-Car with Workshop Area
* Nearly 1/2 Acre Wooded Lot Family Room
* Updated Roof & HVAC Large Kitchen
*1,864 Living Area Enclosed, Florida Rm.

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536 S j
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828

+
2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

S 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish








TIMELESS FLOOR PLAN
* New Roof 2009 ..-.1 a 1i a, *, a -
* New HVAC 2004 Great Curb Appeal
*New Pool Heater 2012 French Doors to Pool Area

SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotis@ aol.comn ii *
Websilte: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com I.*


VUUH PHIVAII: aANil1UAyH
IN PELICAN COVE
This gorgeous, fully furnished, 2/2/2 free-standing end
unit boasts 1,579 sq ft of waterfront living Recently
remodeled and updated w/Conan counters & new
carpet Includes all appliances Enjoy the enclosed patio
or shaded back deck, each allowing a serene view of the
Crystal River Preserve Boat slip w/16,000 lb lift Call
for your private showing now
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


OVER

$40 MILLION

SOLD THIS YEAR
Contact RE/MAX to sell
your home!


Ci S Cin
J Citrus County


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


,oifkilili I
WATERFRONT CONDO WITH BOAT
This 2 BR, 2 BA...waterfront condo overlooks the
Indian River and has a private dock with 16 ft. pontoon
boat included. Enjoy the enclosed patio, the community
pool and the convenient location. Terrific waterfront
buy in Pelican Cove. Call to see.

WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com


I A' D-B NIII; REATORI_.


LARGE YARD,
GREAT LOCATION
.63 ACRE COMES WITH THIS 2BR/2BA HOME.
PERGO FLOORING, FENCED BACKYARD,
GARAGE AND 2-CAR DETACHED CARPORT.
CLOSE TO SHOPPING.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 i
Email: barbaralimi l s@arthlink.net 1






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How to clean a



stainless steel sink


Dear Sara: I have
tried cleaning my
stainless steel
sink with vinegar and
with baking soda, but nei-
ther worked. Do you have
any other suggestions? -
Jim T, email
Dear Jim T.: Try salt
and lemon. I use regular
liquid dishwashing deter-
gent with baking soda,
washing soda or Borax
and a bristled dish brush


bara IN oel
FRUGAL
LIVING


to scrub. For shine, use furniture
polish, baby oil or lemon oil, or wipe
down with Windex. You might like
the results from using Bon Ami or
Bar Keepers Friend, too.
Dear Sara: Could you please
share the recipe for homemade
laundry soap? I saw one once on the
Frugal Village forums it made a
very large batch and used Gain De-
tergent for added scent. Shawn
R., email
Dear Shawn: My website has a lot
of laundry soap recipes. Here's one
that includes Gain detergent, shared
by Cricket in Texas:
1 large plastic cat litter tub.
2 boxes Borax.
2 boxes washing soda.

WONDERING IF YOU
SHOULD SELL YOUR HOME!
WONDER NO LONGER
Call DEBBIE RECTOR'S TEAM
Licensed Real Estate Consultants (Realtors)
For a FREE Market Analysis and Marketing Plan
$6 million closed and under contract.
Call Debbie Rector's Team
or visit www.buyfloridahomesnow.com
Tb Learn More e
S(352) 746-9924 J


ERAK5 3Rat


8 pounds baking soda.
6 bars Fels-Naptha
soap, fine ground in food
processor, or use a grater
1 bottle Purex scent
crystals (I used lavender),
32-load size. (You can use
Downy Unstopables, too.)
1 small box Gain
powder. (I just added this
for the smell. It's op-
tional. Mine was really
cheap due to coupons.)
I would stir in some of


each and continue in layers as it fills
the tub and gets hard to mix. I ended
up using my hands. I put some into the
Purex bottle and use the little cap to
measure out about 2 tablespoons. It
should last the year I use it in my HE
Whirlpool and am very happy with it.
It costs about $35, 10 cents a load.
Dear Sara: I have two completely
unrelated questions: 1. How do I
keep those little black bugs from in-
vading my white flour? 2. Is there a
way to reheat french fries? -Agnes
D., Pennsylvania
See FRUGAL/Page E5


Real Estate DIGEST


RE/MAX
agents
set new
records
The associ-
ates and staff of
RE/MAX Re- Ron
alty One are McEcoy
pleased to an- RE/MAX
nounce that Realty One.
Ron McEvoy
has qualified for the 2013 multi-
million dollar club.
Ron recently passed the $2
million mark in sales volume,
which qualifies him for this elite
club. Only a handful of local Re-
altors have reached this level of
success this year.
Ron is a Realtor in the Crystal
River RE/MAX office located on
U.S. 19.
Geila English and Kelly God-
dard are the latest RE/MAX Re-
alty One agents to hit the $1
million mark in sales volume this
year.
Both Geila and Kelly work out
of the Central Ridge office lo-
cated on County Road 491 in
Lecanto. They join a unique


Geila
English
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Kelly
Goddard
RE/MAX
Realty One.


group of Realtors who have
qualified for the million dollar
club this year.
ERA
agents hit
new highs
ERAAmeri-
can Realty and
Investments is
pleased to an- Pamela
nounce that Lloyd
Pamela Lloyd ERAAmerican
has recently Realty.
joined the team.
Pamela will work in the com-
pany's Inverness office specializ-
ing in residential sales.
Pamela has lived in Citrus
County since 2005. She is the


proud parent of two children and
proud grandmother of five grand-
children. Call her at 352-726-5855.
EXIT Realty
taps top agents
Congratulations to The Real
Team with EXIT Realty Leaders
in Beverly
Hills. The
Real Team
has won
the top list-
ing agent
award for
April 2013.
Call the
real team a The Real
call at 352- Team
527-1112. EXIT Realty
EXIT Leaders.
Realty has
placed in every category in the
monthly broker report for EXIT
Realty Florida in March, includ-
ing: No. 5 in top 25 offices in new
listings taken, No. 4 in total list-
ings, No. 8 in sales volume, No.
11 in sales volume per agent,
No. 6 in closed sides, No. 4 in
closed sides per agent, and No.
8 in gross closed commissions.


I Wayne Cormier Realtor'
352-422-0751


8015 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL 34446
352-382-1700

waynecormier.com
Million Dollar Producer
Real Estate Needs?
352-422-0751
7:00 am to 10:00 pm
7 days a week!


wayecrmerearh9. kne


RELAXING WATERFRONT
LIVING
This 4 bedroom, 3bath home with a 2 car
garage. Has over 2,200 sq. ft. living area,
boat dock seawall, & amazing water
views from the screened porch. Across
from 3 Sisters Springs.
$425,000 MLS #702545
For More Information Or To IP r
Preview This Home Contact : -i l
Rick Snell NEXT GENERATION
352-794-6100 REALTY


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 E3











Hercules club an attractor for butterflies


any homeowners
like to grow citrus
fruit trees in their
gardens. Modem large ed-
ible citrus fruit has been
developed by selection
and crossbreeding over
millennia from
ancient Asian
origins.
There are
several genera
in this plant A
family Locally
in Zone 8a and
9b, always plant
grafted citrus
on the south
side of a build- Jane
ing and shel- JAIN
tered from cold GAR
winter winds.
Microclimates
near lakes, rivers and
towns where dark water,
roads and buildings ab-
sorb heat by day and radi-
ate heat at night make
better sites for tender cit-
rus fruit trees. Some vari-
eties are more
cold-tolerant than others.
Tender, desirable vari-
eties are grafted on
hardier rootstock. Leaves
are tender and can defoli-
ate after a frost. Hard
freezes may kill the twigs,
branches and even the
trunk. Suckers that sprout
below a graft will be of the


root stock usually a
thorny sour orange.
One problem for back-
yard citrus is the butterfly
caterpillar nicknamed cit-
rus dog. It is the larval
stage of the giant swallow-
tail, Florida's
largest butter-
fly, with a
wingspan 4.5 to
5.5 inches.
There are nine
swallowtail
species resi-
dent in Florida.
Schaus' swal-
lowtail is en-
WVeber dangered and
E'S breeds only
DEN north of Key
Largo and on
tropical hard-
wood hammock islands in
Biscayne National Park,
where there is no spraying
for mosquitos and its lar-
val host plants, wild lime,
Zanthoxylum fagra, and
torchwood, Amyrus, still
exist.
Giant Swallowtail cater-
pillars evolved to eat na-
tive plants in the Rutaceae
family, which has five gen-
era, including rue and cit-
rus. Further south,
frost-tender wild lime can
be grown in Zone 9a with

See JANE/Page E5


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Giant Swallowtail butterfly caterpillars are nicknamed citrus dogs. Though they ravage citrus trees, the caterpillars
can be transplanted to Hercules club, which they prefer.


S IKEY "Always There For You"
"HEJL" GAIL COOPER
1 -I i"ulliln",illin f 1 DLollar IRealior
f Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3, mindspring.com
If f -^ e


PERFECT FORA LARGE FAMILY!
* 5/3/3 heated pool home
* Custom built in 2004 .36 acre corner lot
* Zodiac kitchen French door refrigerator
* Corian baths throughout
* Central vacuum 2 AC/heat units
* Sunsetter awning for poolside comfort
#701153 $325,000


Il -1
STUNNING UNOBSTRUCTED GOLF VIEWS!
* 3/2/2 detached villa 2051 sq ft living
* Overlooks #1 green on the Oak course
* New roof/skylights in 2006
* NewAC/heat in 2012
* Florida room with heat and air
* Yard maintained by association
#701503 $149,900


CAROLE LISTER
AfI Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
EIM Cell: 422-4620 KE
flffira m- i. 7nn


1 n13 n1na 1II A1 LL:
-4/3/3 -Pool w/waterfall
*Family Room -2-sided Fireplace
*Gourmet kitchen 'Bonus room
#349779 $270,000



CUSTOM BEAUTY
:3/2/2/2 Heated pool
Family Room Library
Lots of built-ins Rec room
*700779 $284f l50


SPACIOUS ROOMS
*3/3/3 -Heated Pool
*Freshly painted New Windows
*Island Kitchen -Fam room & Den
#701382 $265,000



MANY EXTRAS
:3/2/3 -Heated pool
Fam. rm fireplace Eat-in kitchen
*Pavered drive -Wood/tile/carpet
9 9 249.900O


4010 W. UUNANLA UK. ULr.VL.KLT rilILLS
Don't wait too long to see this 5.7 acre GENTLEMEN'S TURN KEY HORSE FARM.
- Tree lined circular driveway divided by two 4/5 board paddocks. Lovely expanded
ranch pool home set up as mother/daughter 3500 sq. ft. 6 bdrms. 5 baths 2/1 car
garages. solar heated pool overlooking barn, paddocks and horses. Barn has 4 large
stalls w/separate tack & feed rooms w/wash area. Property has 4 huge paddocks w/
improved pasture. 1 ac. Underground electric dog containment so much for the horse
person. Must see to appreciate $379,000. Call Fran Perez 352-586-8885.
ALSO: ALMOST 3 ACRE WOODED LOT IN PINE RIDGE FOR $52,000
S :J M01 : I" :1^ = : D"


____AaRqqq_4k2_",


I


See .JVirtual .IIIrs@..i re.UIJ leJ.II..Is IB.I.om


E4 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



\
Il






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

protective microclimates
or by being covered or
brought indoors during
frosty periods.
The most widespread
native species in Florida is
Zanthoxylum clava-
herculis. Common names
include prickly ash,
toothache tree and Her-
cules' club. Rainbow
Springs State Park has a
tall old Hercules' club tree
near the butterfly garden.
The towering tree has
large corky lumps like
worn teeth on the trunk.
The national champion
tree in Little Rock, Ark.,
has a 7.5-foot-diameter
trunk.
Leaves are deciduous,
compound pinnate and al-
ternate along the twigs
with prickles between
leaves. Leaf length is 4
inches to 12 inches with
seven to 19 leaflets. The
trunk, twigs, leaf and
leaflet midribs have sharp
prickles. Leaflets are lop-
sided and unequal on ei-
ther side of the center
vein, bright dark green
above and with hairs and
a prickle below. Leaf
edges are crenate or
slightly toothed. Panicles
of greenish-white tiny
flowers attract pollinators
in early spring. Birds eat
the twin-capsuled seeds.


Hercules' club ranges
from Palm Beach, Fla.,
north to Virginia and west
to Texas and Oklahoma. It
is prevalent along fence
lines, vacant fields,
wooded lots, coastal plains
and shell mounds in dry
sandhills, wetter woods
and isolated hammocks. I
dig dormant rootstock with
one to three stems in Feb-
ruary to send to butterfly
farms further north where
freezes kill Hercules' club
during harsh prolonged
winters.
Giant swallowtail cater-
pillars prefer this native
plant to the tough, thick-
leaved citrus trees. If eggs
are too numerous on my
young citrus trees, I move
some of the voracious
caterpillars after they
hatch to the better host
plants kept at the back of
the garden away from visi-
tors, who may get pricked
by thorns on youmg
shrubs. Once the Hercules'
club trees grow taller,
there will be less hazard
for curious butterfly
lovers.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding
and engagement announcements, anniversaries,
birth announcements and first birthdays.



R Jackie Caffney Jason Gaffney
Realtore, A HOUSE Realtor@
02479 SOLD0Name 287-9022
In fla ri WEEKtS DERIYV E BEIlEBIV ulill Bif I


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

Dear Agnes: The black bugs in
flour are often weevils. Moths are
also common pantry pests. You can
prevent an infestation by placing
your flour in the freezer. If storing
your flour in the pantry, many peo-
ple have had luck by placing bay
leaves or spearmint in their pantry
Clean your kitchen from top to bot-
tom with bleach and water or
vinegar.
As for reheating french fries, you


can heat a skillet on the stovetop
and pan-fry to reheat them, or stick
them in a toaster oven or regular
oven at 450 degrees. As I'm sure you
know, microwaving produces soggy
fries.
Dear Sara: I got several 1-pound
packages of fresh asparagus with
about 20 spears in each of them for
only $1.69 per package. I plan on
getting several more bundles. I plan
to freeze several packages, but
should I blanch the asparagus first?
- Jas, Florida
Dear Jas: Blanch them for two to
four minutes, depending on the size
of the spear. After blanching,


plunge the spears into ice water Let
the asparagus cool, then drain and
place it in freezer storage bags.
MEN
Baby clothes collect a lot of food
stains. Remove them by using a bar
of Fels-Naptha or applying dish-
washing liquid and one tablespoon
ammonia. Rub gently and rinse,
then place the garments outside in
the sun. It works as a natural
bleach. You can use an applique or
patch to cover up stains, too.
The first reader has another sug-
gestion for stain removal:

See FRUGAL/Page E12


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Li Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty '
BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
d e S


. .... '1 _L' 'I
*- 0


N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 6262 W.SETTLER 3948 N. BUCKWHEAT
75 Seats 702233 $217,300 5/4/3 700993 $339,000 3/2/2 700825 $179,900





39 D375 W. CRESTONT 346 W. CRESTONT CT
4/3/3 702561 $299 900 2/2/2 700617 $124,900 3/3/2 701184 $189,900



_;,* eo


m


m


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 E5


I CITRUS S






E6 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"
Ci

HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Simple steps for an



irrigation makeover


Water! It is essential for life au-
tomatic underground irrigation
systems were devised to quietly
manage the task of applying
water throughout the land-
scapes. This landscape tool is
a great asset to homeowners,
particularly during dry times,
but like anything else, they do
require maintenance to oper- -,
ate efficiently
Now is great time to test your
system to make sure it's work-
ing correctly The results could Joan Br
be substantial water savings FLOF
for you and your community FRIEI
Step 1: Examine the con-
dition and type of irrigation LIV
heads. Make regular checks
for damaged or missing spray heads and
leaking lines. Are there heads that spray
a hard surface or that leave part of the
landscape without water? Are any nozzles
clogged? Are irrigation heads buried by
surrounding grass or other plant growth?
Twist to raise, or if necessary, dig out and
reposition heads on flexible risers (swing


pipe), or add a threaded riser to raise
heads on inflexible risers to grade level.
Step 2: Check your controller to be
sure you are in compliance
with current water restrictions.
If you are not watering in ac-
cordance with local restric-
tions, it can cost you a hefty
fine. For those residents with
house numbers ending in an
even number, irrigation can
occur only on Thursday and/or
Sunday Residents with odd
adshaw house numbers are permitted
IIDA- to irrigate on Wednesday
NDLY and/or Saturday Irrigation is
permitted after 4 p.m. or before
ING 10 a.m. For more information
on current water restrictions,
refer to www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/waterres
/utilities/watering_restrictions.html.
Step 3: Evaluate your lawn and land-
scape for dry spots. Dry spots may be
caused by poor coverage if irrigation
heads have been installed too far apart,
See STEPS/Page E10


I
I
I


Inside...


Living pictures
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Look, kids! It's the incredible 'Super Automatic Washer'


Dear John: I think
your readers will
find this interest-
ing. It belongs to my sister-
in-law and
came down
through her
family The cop-
per boiler that
holds the "auto-
matic washer"
is quite beauti-
ful and the in-
struction
booklet is even
more interest- John S
ing. The inside SIKOF
part comes AT
apart and fits
into a case. I
would love to see what you
could find out about it.
The sales flyer starts off
with "Cuts Wash Day In
Half," and then, "in the


city or wherever electric-
ity is available, the elec-
tric washer has been the
greatest convenience and
labor saver for
housewives
today And
wherever there
S is electricity,
I the only reason
many house-
wives have not
purchased elec-
tric washers is
because of the
ikorski high prices.
SKI'S Now with the
TIC Super Auto-
matic Washer,
you can have all
the conveniences, all the
time and labor-saving ad-
vantages of the finest high
priced electric washer at
less than one-tenth the


price and without the
need of electricity or any
other power whatsoever.
The Super Automatic
Washer is a revelation in
the washing machine in-
dustry It is what inventors
and washing machine
manufacturers have been
striving to accomplish for
years. It accomplishes
every up-to-date washing
principle yet it is the
simplest and most inex-
pensive washer made."
The instruction card,
with "Read Carefully" in
See ATTIC/Page E11
This old "automatic
washer" was designed to
be used on the stove in
houses that didn't have
electricity.
Special to the Chronicle


I


1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 E7


SUBMISSION DEADLINES
Follow these guidelines to help ensure timely publication of submit-
ted material. The earlier Chronicle editors receive submissions, the
better chance of notes running more than once. W. Main St., Inerness
311 W. Main St., Inverness
Community notes: At least one week in advance of the event. 352-726-5263
Veterans Notes: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday. www.landmarkinvernesscom b E T
Together page: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday. -ww,.m
Business Digest: 4 p.m. Wednesday for publication Sunday.
Chalk Talk: 4 p.m. Monday for publication Wednesday. LARGEST SELECTION OF FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY
Health Notes: 4 p.m. Friday for publication Tuesday.
Religious events : 4 p.m. Tuesday for publication Saturday.
Real Estate Digest: 4 p.m. Thursday for publication Sunday.
Photos and stories are published as space is available. The Chronicle WHEN ONLY THE CHEAPEST WILL DO, we found IFYUCKYMAKESYOUFEELLUCKY...then hisoneisfor THIS BANK OWNED BOMSHELL IS ROCKINI 200!
cannot guarantee placement on color pages. this beauty for youl Well...the beauty is in the price, 3/2 you! 1974 3/2/1 home, 1572 living on nice corner lot for 4/3.5/2 home, 2,936 living nestled on 1 AC, Wildwooc
home in Bushnell. $24,900. 268 CR 552N. #702559. $34,900! Inground pool, screened porc, family & living rooms. Country Estates! Alot of ank for $273,000 #702025
SSubmit material at Chroncle offices in Inverness or Crystal RivTomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. #701412. 806 Shelly. Tomika Spires Hanssen 352-586-6598. 2601 R 243 B, Wildwood. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.
fax at 352-563-3280; or by e-mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.



a GITTA BARTH
REALTOR ABOVE AVEkrAGE BELOW MARKET VALUE' -..... .1.
Investors Realty YA GOTTA SEE IT TO BELIEVE ITn' iI 1..,,, ,,, ,,,,, JI..,
of Citrus County, Inc Cell: (3 2 ) 2 2 0 -0 4 6 6 COME WITH A LOADED TOOL BELT! ....,1, .. 199900,, ,, ,,,,, ,, i,
Visit my website at: www.mloda-house.com gbarth myflorida-house.com 2/2/1 for $49,900. #701351. 303 Adams St. gourmet kitchen, family rm w/fireplace... MUST see ome kihe and tucked on a corner lot fr ONLY $74,900.1 urenshire
Visit mywebste at: www.mylorida-house.ommy ousecom Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. 4418 Amserdam. #702656. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752. MLS#702644. Call omik Spire Hanssen 352-586-6598.





A BOATER'S DREAM
MOVE RIGHT IN- COME TRUE! HONEY FOR THE MONEY! .ll l,,,,
NATURE LOVERS BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240 REMBRANDT COULDN'T PAINT A PRETTIER PICTURE THAN THIS! BANK OWNED 4/3 3 pool home built in Home boasts NEW appl., NEW paint, replace, sp
2 Ranch on 60 acr.. ft. of seawall; stationary & float- 2006 w/3,338 square feet of living on 1.92 AC (MOL) ONLY $299,900. Gourmet kitchen, den/o ice, formal dining rm., & open floor plans, eatin kitchen. #702953. $129,900
/2/2 Ranchon 60 acres, very ing dock; spacious modern 3/2.5 int. laundry, 2 master suites, lanai, split & open floor plan. #702665.1519 Bismark. Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752. 13835 SW 110th PI. Kim Fuller 352-212-5752.
secluded and private setting of privacy! Very well maintained, new home sits high and dry (never
perfect retreat! Rolling pasture roof 05/09 Just bring your suitcase and flooded) on 2 lots. Please visit".
and mature oaks. Take the tour at move right in! Community features www.mywaterfronthomeforsale.com .
golf, tennis, clubhouse R m rfronthomef ..sacrn
-V $400,000 MLS#358397 $169,00 to find out more about this home!
MLS #358336! $499,000




wi nd o w I,;u w I ,, Ug eat ilnuc o p ot, .,,e n,.i aibd. M O N E Y W E LL S P E N T I I.h ., I..... ....... . ... I ...- j,,,k. ., ... ..... I... ,11 . ...., .. ,l u d .
..... .... .. ..... ..r ..r.. .i ...... .... /4 & so much more. 10455 E. Buck Lane, Floral City. list Seeing is believing. 1007 Telephone P. Rd., Invernes
.., ..nI,.... J O)h900 ..n. ..i1 . #701914. KICKING PRICE OF $58,900. #355889.OWNER ASKING $330,000.
GET YOUR
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO GOLF CART READY! %,
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S Thts enttcmg 3,647 sq ft Mttch Undenvood
3/3/4 & den, saltwater pool home m the center
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET of the back nmie of the Pme Rtdge Golf
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River Course might be your well-deserved haven
bridges to the Crystal River Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront Dream kitchen w/granite counters, SS
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River ..... . r...i .... smart
windows; great income potential, tool $199,900 ....... .... "
MLS359564 $189,000 willbuyyouthispeaceofheaven! I 41 $292,000
PRIDE OF OW NERSHIP ,l,,,,,,,, ... . ,I,.. LIGHT BRIGHT & AIRY d. ,,h ,k G .......... .
I ...l" . nj. I I 1 i n, i .11 ..1 ., II i. il d i.... 21 NEAT AS A PIN! I
make it a must see; 7501 N. Galena, $119,900. Edgewaler Dr., Inverness. $134,900, #701620. Tonya featuring HUGE basement.'$129,500.3171 E Possum C
#702555. Debbie Tannery 352-6133983. Koch 352-613-6421. #357508. Tonya Koch 3526136427.




CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRYESTATE WITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 54 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acre lot in quiet neighborhood -
estate w/pool and separate apartment A plantationifestyle OPshuttersd airY fusWith the onAmbridgePt nexttothe Withlacoochee .. -..- 3 2 POOL HOME ON ACREAGE. I.h,. WHAT S YOUR PLEASURE? 1..
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight 190 ft of seawall gives you StateForestandthetrailsbutalsoverycloseto 5115, 500 CAN BUY YOU SO MUCH I Ji ,,i,, Ill. ,,,,1d1. 1Ar. .."I ........ 1.I ,,,.i 1
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sqft th s 3/3/2 pool home to the bike trail. Fenced yard, wood cabinets, solid surface downtown. Close to the Trail or the State Park. $219,500. 3/2/2 pool home ready to move right in. $127,500. 88!
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space counters, beautifully shaded. 7606 E. Broyhill. #702495. 8120 Watermark. #359408. Fox Run Ter. #354369.
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129,000






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


p C uRes


Unique style allows walls to come alive


SARAH WOLFE
Associated Press
L cooking for a fresh way to liven
up your garden walls? Think
plants, not paintings.
Living pictures cut-
< tings of assorted succulents
woven together in everything from
picture frames to pallet boxes -
have caught on among garden de-
signers and landscapers this spring
as an easy, modern way to add color
and texture to an outdoor space.
"Living pictures composed of
succulents have a gorgeous sculp-
tural quality that work surprisingly
well in a number of different aes-
thetics contemporary, bohemian,
Southwestern and more," says
Irene Edwards, executive editor of
Lonny home design magazine.
"They're great for urban dwellers
with limited space."
Living pictures are also nearly


maintenance-free (i.e. hard to kill).
So even beginners or those with the
blackest of thumbs can look like the
master gardener of the neighbor-
hood.
Here's how you can create your
own living succulent picture:
Pick your style
There are a few ways you can go.
For a larger living picture, you
can use a wooden pallet, framing
out the back like a shadow box.
Large, do-it-yourself living wall
panels are also for sale online
through garden shops like San
Francisco's Flora Grubb Gardens
and DIG Gardens based in Santa
Cruz, Calif.
But going big right away can be
daunting, and bigger also means
heavier, so many newbies like Cali-
fornia gardening blogger Sarah


FLORA GRUBB GARDENS/Associated Press
A large living succulent picture hanging outside a bedroom. A close-up of a
living succulent picture in San Francisco.


See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


. A


LIVING
Continued from Page E8

Cornwall stick with smaller
picture or poster frames.
Go vintage with an an-
tique frame or finish, or
build your own out of local
barn wood. Chunky, stream-
lined frames like the ones
Cornwall bought from Ikea
give a more modern feel.
You'll also need a shadow
box cut to fit the back of the
frame, and wire mesh or
"chicken wire" to fit over
the front if you're going to
make your own.
First, nail or screw the
shadow box to the back of
the frame. A depth of 2 to 3
inches is ideal. Set the wire
mesh inside the frame and
secure it with a staple gun,
then nail a plywood backing
to the back of the shadow
box.
Take cuttings
Almost any succulent can
be used for living pictures,
though it's usually best to
stick with varieties that stay
small, like echeverias and
sempervivums, says DIG Gar-
dens co-owner Cara Meyers.
"It's fun to use varieties
of aeoniums and sedums
for their fun colors and tex-
tures, but they may need a
little more maintenance, as
they may start to grow out
of the picture more," she
says.


) "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods" @

NANCY Direct:
PONTICOS 352634 4225
Multi-Million $$$ Producer KEY 1 REALTY INC.
8015S SuncoastBlvd,Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com







& SUMMER KITCHEN SOLAR HEATED POOL HOME IS
GOLF COURSE VIEW! UPDATED & FANTASTIC BUY!
SCAR + Upstairs Storage 3 Split Bedrooms for Privacy NICE!
itchen w/ots of Cabinets 2006 Roof Shingles & 2009 Heat Pump
2 Vanities + 2 Walk-Ins Large Dining Room & Open Great Room
0 MLS#700774 $158,900 MLS#702477


I


.A JOANN MARTIN
Sreferred I
?REAL ESTATE
r '- L f*"


Broker Associate


2848 E Chartwell Cir., Hernando
Beautiful 3 Bedroom 2 bath home with heated
caged in-ground pool, 3 car garage wood
flooring, double pane, double hung windows on
private .47 acre in Canterbury Lakes Estates.
Priced at169,900.00 MLS #701542
Directions: From 486 turn into Canterbury Lake
Estates entrance. Stay on Canterbury Lake Drive
to left on Chartwell to #2848.


352-270-3255


m"


4394 N. Indianhead Rd, Hernando
2001 Sweetwater Custom Built Home.
2465 sq. ft. of living 3/2/2.5 ton Energy
Efficient HVAC System installed 7/09.
Home nestled on private 1.10 acre.
$188,900. MLS#357441
Directions: Rt. 486 to north on Annapolis
to end of road, right on Indianhead to
#4394 on left.


Cut off small buds of the
succulents for cuttings,
leaving a stem of at least
1/4-inch long.
No succulents to snip?
You can always buy some at
a nursery or trade with
other gardeners in your
neighborhood.
"They grow so easily,
don't feel embarrassed
knocking on a door to ask
for a few cuttings," Corn-
wall says.
Make sure any old bottom
leaves are removed, then
leave the cuttings on a tray
in a cool, shaded area for a
few days to form a "scab"
on the ends before planting.
Add soil
Set the frame mesh-side
up on a table and fill with
soil, using your hands to
push it through the wire
mesh openings.
Be sure to use cactus soil,
which is coarser than pot-
ting soil for better drainage.
Some vertical gardeners
place a layer of sphagnum
moss under and over the
soil to hold moisture in
when watering.
Fill in with plants
Now comes the fun and
creative part.
Lay out the succulent cut-
tings in the design you want
on a flat surface, and poke
them into the wire mesh
holes in your frame.
You can start either in
See Page E10


Ay


r


HAVE AWESOME
*3 Bed +Office/3 Bath/ 3
* Gourmet Corian Island K
* Tub + Separate Shower,
$299,90(


Take my vitl toa C *


I. I I. I 'l .1 1 1 ''1 I; 1
.f l Robert& Holly Jones AMERICAN
* f l 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com WS 4
IERAII f\.4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 11E3


C 1g11 ~!!1 rI1 J 41 S-1I1!71 ri ~ II! tiSI'] m1-~~-


I.

Ki ONE ACRE ON
k THE GOLF COURSE
Pool "Court Yard" spa,
fountain, water fall &
more. 4 bedrooms
plus a den, 3 baths,
master has a jetted tub
- .S .,- & separate shower.
_- 2789 Living 4192
Under Roof. Offers Welcomed. $317,000. The architectural -
design & deco are a must see. MLS 702574
Directions: US 19 to Sugarmill Woods Main Entrance,
continue on Cypress Blvd. past the Country Club to
z 40 Seagrape St., Homosassa, FL 34446. oETJW
I. I I. I I. I I". I


^


HERNANDO OPE HOUSES^\^LHT^^~*'' 1-Jn^


7 G


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 E9







E10 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


STEPS
Continued from Page E6

or not in a recommended
square or triangle pattern.
Other causes can be low
system water pressure, a
plugged nozzle, or a south,
west or windy exposure.
Step 4: Evaluate your
landscape and lawn for
wet spots. Wet areas may
be due to normal system
drainage, but they could
also be caused by a leaky
valve causing constant
seepage out to the heads,
like a dripping indoor
faucet Open the valve box
and either replace worn
diaphragms in the sole-
noid valves, or with sealed
units, replace the entire
valve.
Step 5: Is the land-
scape exposed to full sun,
shade, southwest slope, or
other conditions which
would affect water usage?


LIVING
Continued from Page E9

one corner or by placing
the "focal point" cuttings
in first and filling in
around them. Waves or
rivers of color are popular
living-picture designs, al-
though Cape Cod-based
landscaper Jason
Lambton has gone bolder
with spirals of green and
purple.
"We painted the pallet
different color stripes to go
with the color theme of the
back of the house," said
Lambton, host of HGTV's
"Going Yard." "It looked
like a cool piece of living,
reclaimed art"
Using just one type of
succulent is also a simple
yet elegant option, said
Kirk Aoyagi, co-founder
and vice president of
FormLA Landscaping.
"Collages with some


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Adjust run times on the
controller accordingly. A
shady or northern expo-
sure will likely require
half the water of a level,
sunny landscape. A south-
or west-facing slope may
require two times the
water of a level landscape
area in full sun.
Step 6: What type of
plants are in your land-
scape? Group plants with
similar water require-
ments together and water
appropriately An estab-
lished border of medium
to low water-using shrubs
requires less irrigation
than turf or a vegetable
garden.
Step 7: If you have an
overhead irrigation sys-
tem, the goal is to apply a
half-inch of water to your
plants per application. If
you are unsure how long to
run your irrigation system,
you can perform the catch-
can test.
First, place four identi-

draping and some upright
plants can create a more
dramatic look and feel," he
said.
Care and
maintenance tips
Keep the living picture
flat and out of direct sun-
light for one to two weeks
to allow roots to form
along the stems, then
begin watering.
"If you hang it up right
away or it rains a lot, that
dirt will just pour right out
... I made that mistake
once," Lambton said.
Mount your living art
once the succulents are se-
curely rooted, which can
take four to eight weeks
depending on climate.
After that, water every
seven to 10 days by remov-
ing from the wall and lay-
ing it flat. Be sure to let
the water drain before
hanging your living pic-
ture back up, to avoid
rotting.


Irrigation Rate
(Amount of water
applied per hour)

Minutes to run
each zone

cal, straight-sided cans be-
tween irrigation heads in
one zone. Operate the zone
for 15 minutes. Use a rule
and measure, in inches, the
depth of water collected in
can four. Add all the con-
tainer measurements to-
gether and divide by four to
obtain the average con-
tainer depth in that zone.


1/2
inch


60


1 inch



30


Next, multiply the zone's
average water depth by
four to obtain hourly ap-
plication rate in inches
per hours. Refer to the ac-
companying table to deter-
mine the irrigation run
time to apply half-inches
of water per hour.
In preparation for the
upcoming growing season,


1 1/2
inch


20


in


there really is n
time to give your i
system a makeov
sure it's working
The results coulc
stantial water sa'
you and your coi
For more info
contact County E
at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County E


links the public with the
2 University of Florida/
ches IFAS's knowledge, re-
search, and resources to
address youth, family,
15 community, and agricul-
tural needs. Programs and
activities offered by the
o better Extension Service are
irrigation available to all persons
er to en- without regard to race,
correctly, color, handicap, sex, reli-
b gion, or national origin.


vings for
immunity.
rmation,
extension

extensionn


Dr Joan Bradshaw is Di-
rector of University of
Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


PINE RIDGE Pr u de trial CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. ' 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744



For ~ a ~ Vita oro utpePoo,


tL 1i132 N Hambletonian Dr
MLS 702354 $229,000
Flawless & impeccable
3bd/2ba home.
Directions: 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd, L on Liberty, L on Hambletonian.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
NEW LISTING

,,ISLA


1390 W Double Eagle Ct fHiELl3 400 E Dakola CI
MLS 702524 $695,000 MLS 702580 $249,900
Stunning 3bd/3ba home 2bd/3ba pool home w/den on
on golf course, golf course.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


`,., a 1048 W Lake Valley CI


2359 W Pine Ridge Blvd
MLS 702560 $169,900
Centrally located and just
right 3/2/2.
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


155 W Toucan Lp


je/- ll 3831 W NorlhcresI Cl lr'a MLS 700045 $365,000 MLS 357980 $137,500 MLS 344859 $99,000
-I i .li h' SI 155.000 Beautiful 3/2/2 home on a 2/2/2 + workshop surrounded by Immaculate maint. free villa.
3bd/2ba pool home plus den/office. cul-de-sac in Terra Vista. Twisted Oaks Golf Course. 2 car gar, 3 solar tubes.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Sandra Olear 352-212-4058 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926 Helen Forte 352-220-4764






120 E Gilchrisl CI 25 3a FFO-- 303 E Hartford St 4-3a -i(
.Jid(S 130 W Casurina PI MLS 355589 $63,900 MLS 342911 $59,900 3826 N Parkside Village Ter
r.h_ L: ~I.. J'F. $66.900 Furnished 2/2 ground floor unit Lower level condo overlooking MLS 701797 $38,500
Pristine 2/2, well maintained home. close to community pool the community pool Cozy 1/1 villa in 55+ community.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Lori Nickerson 352-220-8434
S 2013 BRER Affiliates LLC. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates LLC. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
S Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in manylurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

bold letters, reads as fol-
lows. "Put the boiler on the
stove. Fill the boiler half
full of water. Light the fire.
Cut a half bar of soap in
very thin slices; or if soap
powder or soap flakes is
used, put half of a 10 cent
box in the water.
"Be sure the soap is fully
dissolved. Place the Super-
Automatic Washer in the
boiler. Put the clothes in
the boiler, the more
clothes the better, as the
washer works best when
the boiler is filled with
clothes to the tops of the
tubes of the washer.


"Very Special Note. The
Super-Automatic Washer
does not begin to work
until the water in the base
is at a boiling point. It
takes about 20 minutes for
the water to boil in the
base, then the Super-Auto-
matic begins to work.
When the streams begin to
pour out of the openings in
the Towers of the washer,
it has begun to wash the
clothes." H.G.,
Inverness
Dear H.G.: I am so glad
you sent along the photo-
copies of the instructions
and the photo; I had never
seen this device before. It
certainly reminds us of
how much easier life's
simple task of washing
clothes is today


This invention was con-
sidered a good thing, mak-
ing life easier for the
housewife. We often use
the term "remember the


good, old days" it is not
so romantic when one
looks back at everyday life
in the early 20th century
I suspect some of our


readers can remember
when electricity was not
readily available, espe-
cially if one lived in a rural
circumstance. The history


This invention was considered a good thing, making

life easier for the housewife. We often use the term

"remember the good old days" it is not so

romantic when one looks back at everyday life in

the early 20th century. I suspect some of our

readers can remember when electricity was not

readily available, especially if one lived in a rural

circumstance. The history of washing clothes and

the mechanical inventions that were created to

make chores easier could fill a book.


REALTY GROUP t
RELT GROUPo Rsae


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Ril I nFCKFR 32.4-4.0647 SUISAN Mill I FN -.499.9-13 VICTORIA FRANKI IN .35-427-777


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 4 BEDROOM, 4 BATH,
)E SOUTH FOXFIRE AS GOOD AS IT GETS! One-of-a-kind immaculate 4 bedroom. BRENTWOOD 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME
aths, great 4 bath, 2 car garage plus golf cart garage. Custom pool/spa home with Contemporary, 2/2.5/1 Townhouse in gated community of Brentwood.
situated on guest suite, situated on the best home site in Foxfire on Skyview Golf A spacious dining room/great room combination. All bedrooms
lanai with Course. Professionally decorated, to many upgrades to mention, enjoy upstairs. Half bath downstairs. Inside Laundry, tile & carpet. Glass
a Vista. exclusive living in this premier courtyard home. A must see in Terra Vista. doors open to screen lanai off of living room.
13 4 ,9 0 0 M LS 355511 ................................................................................ $ 5 8 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 359134 .............................................................................. $ 8 9 ,9 0 0


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR BRENTWOOD VILLAS
SPACIOUS & OPEN 3/2/2 Golf Course home in the gated "Brentwood"
Community of Citrus Hills comfortable open floor plan with a nice view
from the lanai. Sliding glass door to a screened porch. The 3rd bedroom
is currently being used as a den. Home is filled with natural sunlight.
Come see this beautiful home and make it your own!
M LS 359190 ................................... ...... ......................... $ 16 9 ,0 0 0


DETACHED
VILLA
2 BEDROOM,
2 BATH, 2 CAR
N WOODVIEW VILLA
P,- ,utiful maintenance
home, 2 bedrooms,
,,:-,n floor plan design
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS 'illl a great use of
Enjoy maintenance free living in this 2/2/2 w/office in Terra Vista'. space, sunroom with plantation shutters, superior condition, lots of
Dual pane sliding glass pocket doors lead out to a beautiful
screened private inground pool and lanai. It's the perfect place to added closet space and upgrades in every room! Ready to move into
enjoyyour morning coffee in the fresh Florida air on a corner lot in premiere community of Terra Vista.
M LS 358772 ................................. .............................. $ 2 2 9 ,9 0 0 M LS 355853 ............................................................................... $ 19 9 ,0 0 0


DETACHED VILLA
3 BED, 2 BATH,
'. 2 CAR
HILLSIDE VILLAS
-1 ..-......nal Windward
ii -,...1.- lla. 3/2/2 with
i.. t floor plan,
dining room.
,, desirable
upgrades including exquisite wood flooring, Conan countertops, surround
sound, plantation shutters, self cleaning heated pool. The panoramic view is
spectacular of the 5th green on the Skyview Golf Course in the premier
country club gated community of Terra Vista.
M LS 359361 ............................... ........................ .... $ 2 8 3 ,0 0 0


Terms 6 Months or More
T^^erra Visa & Brentwood Rentals! SociaMmesi icue ih l etl


SINGLE
FAMILY HOME
3 BED, 2.5 BATH,
2 CAR WOODSIDE
t,. r courtyard home
,IIl course with
1: ..-ooms 2.5 baths,
f. den/office, dining room, family room with double sided fireplace,
BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR gourmet kitchen with upgraded appliances. Wood cabinets and
Nice 2/Bd with 2 1/2 baths and 1 car garage. The bedrooms are on granite counters. Surround sound, security system, 3 zone heating
the second floor and there is a half bath on the first floor. Screened system. Spacious master suite w/sitting area, Split floor plan.
porch. Comes with the Citrus Hills Social Club Membership. Spectacular views. Social Membership included.
# 3267 ........................................................................................... $ 1 1 0 0 # 479 1 ................................................ ..................................... $ 2 ,1 0 0


SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR TERRA VISTA
Exceptional and Fabulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den),
3 bath, 2 car, 5375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive upscale gated
community of Terra Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen great
space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended
screened Lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs.
# 5 3 7 5 ................................... ...... ........ ... ....................................... $ 2 ,3 0 0


I


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 Ell

of washing clothes and the
mechanical inventions that
were created to make
chores easier could fill a
book The Super Automatic
Washer you have is one of
numerous variations on the
basic theme. You are fortu-
nate to own one. I imagine
most of our readers have
never seen one.
-
John Sikorski has been
a professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


DETACHED VILLA
3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR
BRENTWOOD VILLAS


G I ... n..... i ... .. I ...

Upgraded kItchen includes Conan countertops and maple cabinets. Tiled
entry, kitchen and dining areas overlook this wonderful open floor plan. Wood
blinds add an attractive decorator touch. Very open & airy with high ceilings,
Nice Brentwood location with private backyard.
M LS 702670 ....................................................... ..... ........................... $ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0







E12 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

Stain remover: Put dish-
washer powder such as
Cascade in a pan and dis-
solve it in warm water,
then let the garment soak
in it overnight. Wash the
garment with a cup of the
powder and regular soap
just like any other piece of
laundry. Check it before
you put in the dryer, as it
may need a little extra
help. -Bea, e-mail
Note from Sara: Com-
bine Clorox II with the
Cascade for additional
help with stain removal.
Label removal: I collect
Del Monte jars and every
so often have a problem
with label removal. The la-
bels are made with a heavy
paper that becomes "plas-
ticized" by the ink used.
This toughens the paper
and gives it strength, mak-
ing it quite impervious to
water, as we have learned
the hard way I found that
if I carefully peel off about
1/2 to 3/4 of an inch from a
corner with a rounded
paring knife, the label can


be pulled off intact if it's
done slowly and with even
pressure. I also found that
the label resisted tearing if
I run the knife along the
edge to help ease the
label's release. For glue
removal, I use Goof Off.
This method works for re-
moving the cap label as
well. I put a few drops of
Goof Off on the lid and
scrape away Richard,
Washington
Dissolve super glue:
Peanut butter will dissolve
super glue. My mom tried
it when she got two fingers
stuck together and was
free in minutes. D.M.,
Virginia
Use for leftover pickle
juice: I boil potatoes, cut
them into pieces and then
mash with a fork. Then I
use pickle juice as a sub-
stitute for butter. G.D.,
email
Painless cures for the
naked salad: I like my sal-
ads dressed, thank you very
much, but have you ever
stopped to read the ingre-
dients in a store-bought
bottle of salad dressing? It
reads like something out of
a science fiction novel, and
they want me to pay for the


Put dishwasher powder such as Cascade in a pan
and dissolve it in warm water, then let the garment
soak in it overnight. Wash the garment with a cup of
the powder and regular soap just like any other
piece of laundry. Check it before you put in the
dryer, as it may need a little extra help.


honor of putting that in my
body? I think not! Not
when I can grab a few in-
gredients from the shelf
and/or refrigerator and
very inexpensively whip
up a very tasty version at
home!
Some of my favorites:

HONEY-MUSTARD
DRESSING
1/2 cup mayonnaise.
2 tablespoons pre-
pared mustard.
2 tablespoons honey.
1 tablespoon lemon juice.
Whisk ingredients together
and store in refrigerator


RANCH DRESSING
1 cup mayonnaise.
1 teaspoon onion salt.
1/4 teaspoon dried
chives.
1/4 teaspoon dried
parsley.
1/4 teaspoon garlic
powder.
1/4 teaspoon salt.
1/4 teaspoon white
pepper.
1 cup buttermilk (can sub-
stitute 1 tablespoon vine-
gar or lemon juice and
enough milk to make 1
cup).
Mix the mayonnaise and
spices together, then gradu-
ally add buttermilk. Mix


until smooth. Best if stored
in refrigerator overnight be-
fore using (stir before using).

ITALIAN DRESSING
6 tablespoons olive oil.
2 tablespoons white
wine vinegar.
2 tablespoons chopped
fresh parsley.
1 tablespoon fresh
lemon juice.


O1OOEUG5


2 garlic doves, chopped.
1 teaspoon dried basil,
crumbled.
1/4 teaspoon dried
crushed red pepper.
A pinch of dried
oregano.
Whisk together and sea-
son with salt and pepper to
taste. L.B., Oregon
-
Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (wwwfru-
galvillage.com), a website
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Street, Kansas City MO,
64106, or email sara@
frugalvillage. com.


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM


GN i I


www.dudleysauction.com
7 ~3 INVERNESS
INVESTMENT HOMES & 2 LOTS
Friday, May 10th .


Auction 10 AM 401 Ella Ave
125x135 corner of Ella & Dorian St across from Little Lake
Henderson. Property zoned RO
Auction 11;30 AM
503 Lake Street
1940's home, remodeled floors,
double fenced lot, close to
historic Inverness & lake.
Auction 2 PM
203 Pine Street
110x162 lot, 2/1 cottage block
home, workshop, RO/RP
Auction 3 PM -1214 Stowe Street
2 lots (Lots 63 & 64) just off Old Floral City Road. 80x120.
Auction 4 PM 8075 S Florida Ave Floral City Lot
Commercial property Hwy 41S & Rails to Trails.


I.


I woman special S/W M/H, outside A/C unit & newly remodeled, on 2 lots (0 97 acre).
water heater remove by previous owners, cathedral ceilings, inside laundry, secluded &
floors & roof seem sound no leaks Price set as private Large living room, dining room.
value of land, well, septic & impact fees kitchen Easy access to Gulf of Mexico
Inside ce sty #702549 S32.000 #702563 S80.000


1 bath, I. mt and rear screened porches been removed, 3 r 11 I .I i
Newer in 2010, newer appliances drive RV m; 18 :i 11
approximately 2 years old Fully fenced backyard dryer hookups, half of upstairs looks like it was
with shed #700919 $22,500 planned on being living area #359722 $85,000


I bath 84 ft on deep water canal covered
boathouse (21 x 30), dock, seawall Tile BEVERLY HILLS 2 bedroom, 1 bath.
floors, new carpet in bedrooms, new roof 1 car garage home in nice neighborhood
double paned windows, updated kitchen & Fenced rear yard, needs refrigerator
baths #701806 $217,000 #359547 $44,400


DUNNELLON 1998 nobility D/W MH w/ 3 HERNANDO 1974 2 bdrm, 1 5 bath M/H
bedrooms, 2 baths, on 2 5 acres Master bath one blk from Tsala Apopka lake for greal
garden tub w/dbl vanity & shower country fishing, nearby to Dunnellon, Ocala &
kitchen, vaulted ceilings, 16 x 20 work shop w/ Inverness, estate sale; large eat-in kitchen
electric, inside laundry #356595 $65,000 #700282 $26,900


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


e.EST

eator


1 DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
(1/2 mieS. oftheFairgrounds) MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE
"> Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up.to-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Abl667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


au 6
abl667
_A








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 E13


To place an ad, call 5635966



.- Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


.The Time


I Fax (352 56-56 1. Tol Free (888 85-24 1 Emil clsiid4hoilo~n~o I wesie wwShoilol


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


FLORAL CITY
2/2 & carport. SW
w/ addition, Shed.
$500+util., call Tom
305-896-9782

HOMOSASSA
1/1 Carport & Fl. Rm.
AC, new appl's on 1
AC, lawncare inc'd in
rent, $500mo 1st & last
nice neighborhood
(352) 628-5178

HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311

INVEREESS
14 x 60 with addition
2/1 1.25 Acres, near
wal-mart $475 Mthly
706-473-2184


HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced Acre, Addition
Huge Deck, Shed
$500.mo 352-628-5244



43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


Home Finder]
www.chroniclehomefinder.comrn


Fkztd Yowr Dtrwm* HOMW-
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.comrn


BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
homes. $8500 off of
any home, 2/2 & 3/2
from $39,900
Call John Lyons d)
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details.
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
LPlantcitv/




INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!
2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details




FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182


HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new floor-
ing $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217



HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192

INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on 14 Acre
on paved road,
fenced yard. $3000.
down, $417.53 WAC.
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message





1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vynal window,
utiltiy & outdoor shed
all appl's and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243

Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A 55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-794-4128

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully furn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648


2 Mobile Home
Steps for sale
48" wooden, brand new
$250 for both
352-503-7709










ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT]
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
5641 W. Irving C .................. $150
2/2/1 Nice home, great location
6 Oxhorn t. E....................... $1,350
3/2/2 Pool home in SMW
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5164k eweay (HeL)... REDUCED $685
3/2 DW, new mobile on 1/2ACREI
5525 S. Kine Terr. (Inv.) .........$1,200
2/2/1 beautiful home, furn. or unfurn.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N. Senea Pt................. $1200
2/2 Furnished Waterfrontl)DW
9351 W. Wisconsin Ct ............... $825
3/2/1 Nice home, beautiful kitchen
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
1829 W. Anoednae ((S) .......... 825
3/2/2 Lovely area, nice porch
2295 N. Aindrea Pt. () ............ $995
3/2/1 Villain Brento d








In


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

NEED A
GOOD TENANT?
Bring us your vacant
home and watch us
work for you!

2/1 Waterfront $650
2/2/1 a ............ $700
3/2 Doublewide $800
2/1 Apartment $525

3/2 Dublewide......... $750

2//Carport ......... 3BR $650
2/2/1 . . $650
Jennifer FudgeTown 563-9857
Property Manager
FCherylOScruggs,
0 Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
to share house, older
women perf. Reference
$300 mtly + until.
352-344-4578




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393


RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Now Accepting
Applications
Income
Based Rent
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal River,
FL (352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
OFFICE HOURS
Monday thru Friday
8:00am 3:00 pm
Closed for Lunch
Noon to 1:00pm
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer"




SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom
cabinets, central air&
heat, stove,
refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD




OPPORTUNITY


INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495.1 mo.
(352) 447-6016



HOMOSASSA
600 sqft, On US 19,
Across from Wildlife
Park 352-634-1311



BRENTWOOD
2 bd 2 ba new Twn/hse,
unfurn, has wash/dryer
plus access to pool and
SmGym $850mth
1st last, sec req.
352-503-7709
Whispering Pines
Villa Furnished
3/2/1 Liv, Din, Kit, Lanai,
end unit ots of privacy
$850 mthly, last, sec.
413-478-6396



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Buy 1-3bd Homes
From $1000/mo!
PreForeclosured and
Rent2OWN Homes!
Bad Credit OK! Only
500 Credit Score Min!
To learn more and
access local listings call
1-866-955-0621




LECANTO
3/2, Mostly furn. Call
for info 352-746-2351
MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116








E14 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AVAILABLE NOW
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
Near School
$725. mo.
HOMOSSASA
2/1 Duplex $495.
RIVER LINKS
REALTY
352-628-1616
BEVERLY HILLS
Updated 2/1+carport
$500. month
352-422-4012
CITRUS SPRINGS
312/2, $850+ deposit
352-341-4178
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paint,flooring through-
out, w/d pets ok $1000
mthly, 619-301-5442
Inverness 3/3
liv & fam rm,rec. rm,
w/pool table, LG caged
pool & deck on 1 acre
$1150.mo. + $1500 sec.
352-634-3897
INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
SUGARMILL
WOODS
2/2.5/2 1st, last sec.
$875 monthly
352-628-0800




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
(904) 757-1012

must sell!
Lecanto FI 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079




TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $56,400. Call
352-638-0905


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination." Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EoUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage, Farms
Ranches &









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
cross land realty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






Auctions, Sealed Bid
& Online w/ Bid
Centers, Restaurant,
Commercial Tracts,
Luxury Homes and
Land Lots, Lake
Front Home, Town
Homes, Duplex Lots
& Residential Lots in
NCA SC & VA, Auc-
tions ending May
1st, 15th, 16th, 21st,
22nd, 23rd, 25th &
30th, See Website
for Sealed Bid & Bid
Center Locations,
NCAL3936,
SCAL1684, VAAL580,
www.ironhorse
auction.com







For Sake

3BR/2BA, Pod,

New

Cage Recently
Re-

modeled, 4/13

New
kit & bah,

cabinet.

w/ granite,
New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241






2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/ 3/18' rollups
office tIr & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862


2,240 SF

Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. May 16th,
12PM
Preview From 1 am
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com












2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840

For WSale %*
Nicest 2/1 in Beverly
Hills MUST SEE!! You
won't find a nicer
home in this price
range looks and feels
brand new with over
$25K in upgrades.
Large new 12' x 24'
shed in rear with of-
fice and work shop.
Completely renovated
insulated windows,
new oak kitchen
cabinets,new bath-
room tile, berber car-
pet, 3D shingles.Large
Florida room (can be
3rd bedroom)
"$54,900 with easy
terms". This house
shows as new
it won't last long!
More info here
http://www.sharphome.c
om/131313
call Troy 352-364-6316
REMODELED 2/1.5/1
NEW: Roof, kitchen,
appl's, bath, flooring,
paint, much more.,
1240sf, under AC.
$59,900. (352)527-1239





Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 282-1550


INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




FLORAL CITY
Withlapoka Island
3/2/2 w/fire place, Ig
yard, dock on main ca-
nal, completely furn.
$1000 mth,lst, last,
$500 Sec. Bk gr/credit
ck Req. 321-303-2875




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-282828
and enter the
house number

WMI
REALTY ONE


Lee k
I'm Gorgeous Inside!!!
Big & Beautiful, 3/2/2
Near 7 Rivers Golf
Course 305 N Venturi
Ave $149,900.
Call Nancy Wilson
For Appt. to see
352-422-4137
Waybright
Real Estates, Inc.




3-4BR/ 2BA/ 2-4Car
New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees,
2 Lots, $145,000.
352-563-9857

AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3/2/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
REDUCED $133,900
352-302-4057

For Sale% A
3BR/2BA Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
SS Appliances, Wood,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar, fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


I .Sw I'v I
B-770


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
SMW
3/3/2, court yard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

WANTED
I need listings!!
I SOLD all of
mine and I can
sell yours too.
Market is good!

Call me, lets talk.
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515





Room To Roam
3/2 ON 2 ACRES
Quite Country Setting
front porch, Large
rear screened porch,
Patio, 24x30 Steel
Building, w/ water &
electric, and Steel
Carport, Completely
Fenced Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area,
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$132,000
352-302-6784


* SPECIAL *
New Home in Quiet
Neighborhood, 3/2/2
2932 sq. ft. corner lot,
on 1 acre, $279,900
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855













TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant






INVERNESS VILLA
For Sale, Near
Whispering Pines
Park. Close to stores
/restaurants. Near
Medical Facilities/
Hospital. Light,
Updated End Unit.
2 BR. 2BA., Garage
Eat in Kit., Liv. Rm.
/Din. Rm., Front/back
porch, garage, attic
w/ storage, newer AC
w/ guarantee. ALL
Appl's. UPDATED,
Near Condo Pool
Call (352) 637-3746
(352) 697-2475







516 S. TUCK POINT
2/1/1 Block Home,
Remodeled, New
Everything, Canal to
Withlacoochee River
Priced to Sell
Immediately! $64,900
(352) 503-6703


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com





HAVE IT ALL
Spring Water, Fish from
Dock, Watch the
Manatees from porch,
walk to festivals, enjoy
living in dwntn Crystal
River, gated community,
2/2 Condo w/gar.
$249,900, owner lic. RE
Broker 352-257-9496


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"



Lots Fr Sal


HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Erba stella is a plantain, not a weed


LEE REICH
Associated Press

My friend Bob would
shudder if he knew that I
planted plantain today.
Like many homeowners,
he loves his lawn. And
plantain the weed is
one of the banes of a lawn,
along with grubs and their
attendant skunks.
But I wasn't planting just
any old plantain. I'm grow-
ing the salad-green kind
(Plantago coronopus). This
plantain is a different
species than the ones that
invade Bob's lawn, which
is mostly P major.
What's in a name?
Like its weedy relatives,
plantain the salad green
comes from Europe.
Records there indicate
that humans have enjoyed
munching on it since the
16th century
If it is to become popu-
lar here, however, it will
undoubtedly need a new
name, something that
sounds more pleasant and
distinguishes it from plan-
tain the weed, as well as
from plantain the tropical
fruit, a close relative of the
banana. After all, how pop-
ular were avocados when
they were known as alliga-
tor pears?
Salad plantain's Euro-
pean names include
corne-de-cerf, or star-of-
the-earth. Here, it often
goes by its Italian name,


LEE REICH/Associated Press
This undated photo shows Erba stella sharing a bed with lettuce in a garden in New Paltz, New York. Erba stella is
very pleasant eating, with texture overshadowing the relatively mild flavor. The leaves grow in a low whorl just like
those of plantain-the-weed, but are narrow and refreshingly crunchy; even the flower spikes retain that pleasant
crunchiness.


erba stella, which has a
nice ring to it and is my
name of choice.
As might be expected of
a close relative of plantain
the weed, erba stella is
very easy to grow. It toler-
ates cold weather, as well
as warm, a trait shared by
kale, collards and Swiss
chard but few other
greens. Hence, erba stella
can be sown in early


spring, summer or even
late summer
Crunchy goodness
I plant the tiny seeds in
long furrows and then har-
vest by slicing the tops off
plants in a different part of
the row each time with a
knife; new leaves sprout
quickly Even when erba
stella gets old, though, it
retains its good flavor


and texture.
So what does erba stella
taste like?
It makes for good eating,
with texture overshadow-
ing the relatively mild fla-
vor The leaves grow in a
low whorl like those of
plantain the weed, but are
narrow and refreshingly
crunchy Even the flower
spikes retain that pleasant
crunchiness.


Bite into the raw leaves
of plantain the weed, in
contrast, and you'll end up
with a mouthful of strings
from the tough veins lining
each leaf. Plantain the


weed has been eaten, but
as a boiled potherb.
No worries
Bob and some of you
readers may still worry
about deliberately plant-
ing a near-weed. Erba
stella is, admittedly, not far
removed from the wild.
The larger size and in-
creased succulence of cul-
tivated plants come not
from breeding but from
their being planted in rich,
moist garden soil.
Still, fear not. First of all,
erba stella is an annual.
Plantain the weed has
much more opportunity to
establish itself and spread
because it is a hardy
perennial.
Second, despite repeat-
edly finding its way across
the Atlantic as an acciden-
tal tourist in ships' holds,
erba stella has never ven-
tured out into the wild here.
As for Bob, I'll give him
a taste of plantain the
salad green whoops, I
mean erba stella before
I tell him what it is. Then
he'll understand why I
planted it. He may even be
inspired to boil up and eat
some of the weedy plan-
tains he removes from his
lawn.


| a sley www.parsleyrealestate.com
Real Estate352-726-2628


LOVELY, WELL KEPT HOME in Inverness. This 3 bedroom 2 bath
home has been lovingly maintained and offers vaulted ceilings, wood
burning fireplace, great room and a lanai. Built in 2001, it still has that
new look! Come see!! $119,900.


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL I
3BR/2BA DW off Hwy 200. 1 acre. Fenced
$29,000


uBANI UWNLVU-LUKAL U1 T, 1L
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. S45000 MLS#701383


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352 302-6714 11M


SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 E15









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


uULE 5UUUKI|E 5UIilIUII I"

1" 1 i q. .11" m d,, , i h',,,,I I, i


m lh. ,l . 6i ll.. 6ll
r = ii.: ASKING $144.900
Pt Ds ,352' 212 7280
I'l-. lifi? iill 21la llid i-]


1nu11 U armNua mIU i Y!

I n l Ih i n a 111 Ia I I I IT!
* 1.1i 11 h l hl i i ii 1 1 iiiiii
Mi 3 = hil":.'i ASKING S138,500
Call Nancy Jenks
352 400 8072 0o 352 726 6668


Mti i3 i-.:I:. $45,000
Willaid Pickiel 352 201 9871


BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED
i Il',i , i,, ,. H, II,




11.: = -il $135,000
CllI Jm Al.ll.i. tl 4222173
to ) wo iIIs "/.liiulousil hept inoin











PRIME COMMERCIAL BUILDING
HWY. 19
* I 'I'II' h. I : R .1,, 1. .... ...
* l .. .... 6 jI .. I.. .. I I.
* H .. Ih d. .. . I...I . I 1.
r 1.: -= -. I,- OFFERED AT S320,000
C11 E[, G. /6 ikl it J352 4002635


SOME OF THE BEST RIVERFRONT
MONEY CAN BUY!

* VV 1. '' I v. i .I ... I. .1. 1...I
* mI_ d ill;, ... l .i I lll i
PRICED TO SELL $149,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699











BRING HAMMER AND ELBOW GREASE!

11I.... 1I I h.. II ..1 I 6 ... I. I.


rii =-1 $59.900
4 l Il, Ahw.' n BOOt. 637 4904


WINDERMERE
: .:.. : I.. ... ... I ...) .:. I I l.




rii: =. 1 ASKING $94,000
Pt Di,-s ,352212 7280
I' c'n a /lsltPps c22padjtris ciOl


LAND SALE


S h ,, I i.... .......... I, I .
.. I ... .. ..... I ii I


t", 181.1I8.1,6 m.1 e c :!- -2l 668


CUTE AND CLEAN
:1 b .. I b.ih ... ....e. I ,i,.. e .ihul3lj

PRICED TO SELL $39,999
....,ld bQu lad hi. |.al I1:0
,Cll iJ If.i 6 .
Call quade 352.302.7699


II


* V.i 1. 1 .1I1,.i. IIW

. ( ),,,1 (, Ii I,,, I I .,vi
Mtl = 71111ii, $55,000
Willaid Pickiel 352 201 9871


h ll :.. .l h :. : lh l VVI I lhl. .B..l h ;l I. II : .


$49,900
Call Ruth fieodrick 1-352-563-6866


h',thI, '1... II, .... .. ... I... 'T
....... ... '"" .iI ...1,1



S318,900 r.I at ,,
I .. "ifa yir., *, an,3' at ,.n .'


* V.i n., I. .in MH

* 11" 1 ." I" i, in, II
* .VV I, i .:. i :) If .
MiG_ =!I "11 $49,500
Willaid Pickiel 352 201 9871


IN INVERNESS CITY LIMITS

I..., l F .i ,.il H ...l l. .l I...l .. ll ... .ll 11,.1 l.
Mi_ = i II ii'i $69,000
Call Stelan Stuai '352 212 0211
0o Isaac Baylon ,'352 697 2493


THE VIEW FROM THIS MOBILE IS EXQUISITE!

." i ",,i,, ,, ,l ,:,,Ir,,l ,,i . ..
I.. II.I... :....lhhi. I... I .I II.. .:.... M ... l. _I


.. ... .... .. ,.:.... $24 900
C11 Dov- A/l,. F),} ippi 352 422 462?
IH i i H ,:1 rji i rj r iii:i Hi:ir i irj i i i


..
CITRUS SPRINGS!
VVi, a II' l. v l l I II :I j. I li .:.:ll



Ml = 1i111111 JUST $55,000
lottaine 0 Regan 586 0075


HAMPSHIRE HILLS 2.5 ACRES
. 'R _' b.ill -' ,I,, l I |,,I.' h
* l.I I I I .I I h b l ,I ,

MI, =Ill', ONLY $249,500
Call Chatles Kell/ 352 422 2387


WIDE OPEN WATERFRONT
: , '. ', ,, ,1
1 1 II' I l l lld l l h l l ll l l I,, I .. h



rhi: = '".4-"1 ASKING $189.000
Pit Dil ,s 352' 212 7280


P


E16 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013