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Citrus County chronicle ( May 4, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 4, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03111

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: May 4, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03111

Full Text



State champion: Giardino wins adaptive shot put title /B1


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
83 Partly sunny.
LOW Thirty percent
5Q chance of rain.
5 PAGE A4


CITRU-S COUNTY






Hwww.chronicleNIConline.com
www.chronicleonline.com __


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 500


VOL. 118 ISSUE 270


DCF had visited mom twice


Investigators said

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
A Hernando woman charged
with murder in the death of her
2-year-old daughter received two
prior visits from Department of
Children and Families investiga-
tors, who saw no evidence the
child was being abused.
DCF investigators met with


Sno signs ofabuse prior to child's death


Chelsea Maree Huggett in August
2012 and again last January
based on anonymous calls to the
child abuse hotline, DCF spokes-
woman Carrie Hoeppner said
Friday
Reports from those visits show
no signs of abuse on Aliyah Marie
Branum, Huggett's daughter.
In each case, Hoeppner said,
Huggett was cooperative with


investigators. Following the Jan-
uary visit, Huggett placed Aliyah
in daycare, which Hoeppner said
would have given more people
access to the child to ensure she
was not being abused.
Huggett, 21, had her first ap-
pearance before a judge Friday
via closed-circuit TV from the
Citrus County Detention Facility
She is being held without bond


on charges of first-degree murder
and aggravated child abuse.
An arrest report said Huggett
shook her child, slammed her
head against the wall and head-
butted her because "she would
See Page A2
Chelsea Huggett, charged with
murder in the death of her
daughter, has the child's name
and date of birth tattooed on her
chest.
Special to the Chronicle


Music to
benefit food
bank
Enjoy free music,
and buy barbecue
and lobster begin-
ning at noon and
continuing until
4 p.m. today at Lib-
erty Park in
Inverness.
Music & Munchies
in May with Music in
the Park benefits the
Community Food
Bank of Citrus
County and the Cit-
rus High School
music department.
Picnic tables are
available, but bring
lawn chairs and
blankets.
Fla. Senate
passes 74.5B
budget
TALLAHASSEE -
The Florida Senate
has passed a $74.5
billion state budget.
The unanimous
vote sends the
budget to the Florida
House. The House
was expected to ap-
prove it late Friday.
Flush with cash
for the first time in
seven years, the
budget includes
more than $1 billion
for public schools.
It also includes a
state worker and
teacher pay raises.
Legislators included
a 3 percent tuition hike
for college and univer-
sity students. Scott
has remained stead-
fasly opposed to tu-
ition hikes.
The budget does
not include any fed-
eral aid to cover ad-
ditional people under
Medicaid.
-From staff and wirereports




To see a selection
of the past week's
photos, visit
www.chronicleonline.
com and click on the
"This Week in Pho-
tos" slideshow.


Cyclists honor their fallen colleagues


A group participating in the Brotherhood
Ride cycles through Inverness Friday en
route to Tennessee. The cyclists will cover
700 miles in nine days to honor firefighters and
police officers killed in the line of duty during 2012.

Photos by Matthew Beck

Following a short break in Inverness, the
Brotherhood Riders stopped at the 9/11
memorial at Liberty Park in Inverness. See
more photos on Page A3.


Awards honor students who go beyond special


Central Florida.
A partnership of the Cit-
rus County School District
and Citrus County Cham-
ber's Business Leaders of
Tomorrow, the Golden
Scholars night offered spe-
cial recognition to stu-
dents whose achievements
go far beyond special.
Awards presenter Cir-

Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... C7


cuit Court Judge Patricia
Thomas was over-
whelmed as she read
lengthy lists of accolades
with each nominee and
winner.
"Pretty amazing, aren't
they?" Thomas said to
about 150 students,


Page A5


Obituaries ..
TV Listings .


. . . .A6
. . . .C6


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO It's not
that these students are
smart, though they obvi-
ously are.
And it's not their aca-


Classifieds . .
Comics . . .
5 Crossword . .


. . .C8
. . .C7
. ... C6


demic success, though it is
deep.
And it's not their in-
volvement in clubs and
sports, though it is vast.
And it's not their com-
munity leadership,
though it is impressive.

Community ...... .C5
Editorial ........ .A8
Entertainment . . .A4


It's the combination of
all those and so much
more, that brought recog-
nition to the best and
brightest graduating sen-
iors at the Golden Scholar
Awards program Thurs-
day night at the College of



Horoscope . . . .A4


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


Crystal Automotive Group
Homosassa, FL
Everyone wants a new vehicle, especially if
someone is offering to make those pay-
ments until next year for you.
This is exactly what local car dealer, Crys-
tal Automotive Group has agreed to do.
Making the payments for the customer
until 2014.
During the promotion, if a customer pur-
chases a new or used vehicle prior to Mon-
day, May 6th, Crystal Automotive Group
will make their car payments for until
2014.
0TI7


LOCAL DEALER DECIDES TO

PAY CUSTOMER CAR PAYMENTS


"We just want to show customers how easy
it is to purchase a new vehicle today and we
could not think of a better way than to
agree to make their car payments for
them," said Justin Lamb, Director of Op-
erations for the company.
To qualify for the promotion, customers
must simply purchase a vehicle from one of
the five Crystal Dealerships. They offer
convenient locations: Chevrolet in Ho-
mosassa, Nissan in Homosassa and
Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in Inverness,
Brooksville and Homosassa. Crystal has


set up a hotline so customers can call and
have any and all questions answered. That
number is 1-800-584-8755 ext. 2014.
Skeptical shoppers may think the deal
seems too good to be true. When asked
"What's the catch?", Crystal's Finance Di-
rector, Ted Nipper replied, "The customer
must be able to finance the vehicle for 6
years with an interest rate not exceeding
2.99%. To take advantage of Crystal Au-
tomotive Group making your car payment
for you, you must purchase a vehicle at one
of our five locations by May 6th. Also re-


member, offers may not be combined." Ac-
cording to Nipper, "There are very few ve-
hicles that do not qualify for the
promotion. However, almost everyone will
qualify for a loan during the promotion."
With an event this large, Crystal is expect-
ing a large customer turnout. When asked
further about the event, Justin Lamb
stated, "It's exciting to offer such a unique
benefit. We're pulling out all the stops to
make this easy for our customers. We've
decided to bring in additional vehicles for
this event to give them the best selection."


Zuhair Sami honored for perfect SATscore


-11-









Community helping restore historic church


Group 'halfwi

there'with

fundraising

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

FLORAL CITY The n
bers of Mt. Carmel Methc
Church in Floral City believE
scripture that says, "Ask anc
shall receive."
Though few in numbers, ye
in faith, they've been asking
to help them raise enough m(
to fix their leaky roof and dos
other badly needed repairs.
Last fall, people from the
rounding community, sp
headed by Cornerstone Ba
Church in Inverness, v
moved to help the little, yet
toric, church in Floral City.
A plea went out to
community-at-large back
September.
'"As a result, we rece
$5,000," said longtime chi
member Alida Langley "We
about $7,000 ourselves, so
we have $12,000 in hand v
halfway there. We want the
ple who gave to us who migI
wondering what's happenii
know we appreciate their gi
However, said the Rev .
Kell, Cornerstone pastor,
church needs about $25




Host families
needed
Inverness area volunteer
host families are being sought
to provide room, board, trans-
portation and a safe, support-
ive environment for 13- to
18-year olds from France,
Italy and Germany who will be



MURDER
Continued from Page Al

not stop 'whining.'"
The child died Friday,
April 26. Huggett at first
blamed a boyfriend for her
daughter's death, saying
he poisoned her with bug
spray
Huggett was arrested
Thursday after admitting
to a detective that she
caused the injuries that
killed Aliyah, sheriff's offi-
cials said.
Developments Friday
included:
Prosecutors have about
30 days to decide whether
to present Huggett's case to
the grand jury In Florida,
the only way someone can
be tried on a first-degree
murder charge is by grand
jury indictment
Assistant State Attorney
Pete Magrino said he must
still review evidence and
reports to determine how
to proceed. He said it's
"way too premature" to
say whether prosecutors
would recommend the
death penalty for a first-
degree murder conviction.
DCF investigators re-
moved two children from
the Huggett home after
Aliyah's death, Hoeppner
said. The children, age 6
and 8, lived with their par-
ents, who are roommates
of Huggett's but not related
to Huggett nor Aliyah.
Hoeppner said the chil-
dren were removed as a


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Mt. Carmel Methodist Church in Floral City was founded in 1903. The current church building was built
in 1969 and is badly in need of repair. The small congregation is working to raise $10,000 so they can
begin repairing the roof within the next 45 days.


in repairs.
"I hope we can start working
within the next 45 days, which
means we need to raise another
$10,000 as quickly as possible,"
Kell said. "We can't afford to
start and not be able to finish."
He added that this is not a
Cornerstone project per se -
although Cornerstone members
are involved but a


visiting Citrus County for two
weeks this summer as part of
the Xplore program.
There are two sessions for
host families to pick from, or
they can chose both
sessions.
Program dates are July 6 to
July 14 and July 27 to Aug. 4.
For more information, con-


The anonymous child
abuse hotline number:
800-96-ABUSE (800-
962-2873)

precaution and are staying
with relatives while DCF
officials decide when they
can return to their par-
ents. She said there is no
restriction against the par-
ents visiting the children.
The children's father,
Brian Alan Jones, was ar-
rested the day of Aliyah's
death on an unrelated
warrant for violation of
probation, according to the
sheriff's office website.
Sheriff's spokeswoman
Heather Yates said the ar-
rest is not connected in
any way to the investiga-
tion into Aliyah's death.
Huggett is eight
months pregnant. Hoepp-
ner said DCF will work
with Huggett and her fam-
ily to decide the best place
for the child once he or
she is born.
Huggett and Aliyah
have had at least three
homes in the past year.
Hoeppner said the August
DCF visit and January visit
were in different homes, as
was the home Aliyah was
living when she died.
The sheriff's office still
held the contract for child-
protection investigations
when someone called the
child abuse hotline for a
possible domestic violence
case in August
Hoeppner said Huggett
was cooperative with in-


Our Goal Is A


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Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals



Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


community project.
The plan is to replace the en-
tire roof, including the trusses -
which are from the original
structure and about 100 years
old and bring the air condi-
tioning and heating system up to
date and the electrical wiring up
to code.
Langley's grandparents, A.W
and Alida Williams, founded the



County BRIEFS =


tact program coordinator
Cinda Moore at cinda.moore
@xploreusa.org or 352-302-
8300.
There will be an information
session hosted at the Central
Ridge Library, 425 W. Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills,
from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m.Thurs-
day, May 9.


vestigators and worked
with social workers until
December
In January, someone
called the abuse hotline,
concerned about Aliyah's
living conditions and that
Aliyah had a mark on her
back.
By then, child-
protection investigations
had reverted from the
sheriff's office to the De-
partment of Children and
Families. DCF investiga-
tors found no mark on
Aliyah's back nor signs of
abuse, or any reason to re-
move her from the home,
Hoeppner said.
Again, Huggett was co-
operative but declined
assistance. She agreed to
enroll Aliyah in daycare,
which investigators took
as a positive sign be-
cause it would allow
more people access to
Aliyah to watch for possi-
ble signs of abuse.
DCF's involvement
ended there, until Aliyah's
death.
Hoeppner said both in-
vestigative visits are now
under review, which is
routine in a child's death.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Add an arlislic ioucih to your existing yard
or pool or plhi
something
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SPOOL AND PAVER LLC
Isred 352-400-3188


church in 1903. Her daughter,
Florence Langley, serves as
church pastor
"I want people to know that
the money they gave is still
there, but we can't get started
yet," Langley said. "When we
first built this church (in 1969),
we never asked anybody, but
people just knew the need was
there. I still remember my mom


Aviation board
members sought
The Board of County Com-
missioners is currently ac-
cepting applications for two
vacancies on the Aviation Ad-
visory Board (AAB). This is for
a regular-member for District
5 and a member-at-large. The


regular-member position for
District 5 must reside in Dis-
trict 5. The term will expire
Jan. 31, 2014. The term for
the member-at-large position
will expire Jan. 31.
For more information, go
to www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Ap-
plications for vacancies may
be obtained at the Board of


FUNDRAISER
Mt. Carmel Methodist
Church on U.S. 41, just
south of the intersection at
County Road 48 in Floral
City, will be selling barbecue
from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. -
or until sold out Satur-
day, May 4. Proceeds will
be put toward epairs and
renovations.

ning home with a cigar box
ed with $1,700 from people in
area exactly what we
eded to put the walls up.
Je prayed and God sent peo-
," she said.
;ell said they're still praying
d hoping local businesses will
p up and help the small but
:hful congregation have a safe
1 comfortable place to
ship.
Our hope is to get the com-
nity involved," Kell said.
For more information or to
er help, call Alida Langley at
-726-1989 or Greg Kell at 352-
-7335. A trust has been set up
Brannen Bank. Make checks
able to Mt Carmel Methodist
irch of Floral City Inc., Build-
Fund. Donations can be
de at any Brannen Bank
nch.
contact Chronicle reporter
ncy Kennedy at 352-564-2927
nkennedy@chronicleonline.
n.




County Commissioners of-
fices in the Citrus County
Courthouse at 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness; or,
by calling 352-341-6560. Ap-
plications are also available
online on the Board of
County Commissioners
website.
-From staff reports


Legislature sets sales tax holiday


The News Service
of Florida

TALLAHASSEE The
back-to-school sales tax
holiday will likely be back
this summer and will in-
clude personal computers.
The Legislature passed
on Friday the last day of
the legislative session a
wide-ranging economic de-
velopment bill (SB 406) that
includes a three day pe-
riod, Aug. 2 through Aug. 4,


during which a number of
items won't be subject to
the 6 percent sales tax.
The bill now goes to
Gov Rick Scott.
Clothes, shoes, wallets,
bags and backpacks cost-
ing $75 or less and school
supplies costing $15 or
less would be covered by
the tax holiday
Personal computers and
related accessories costing
$750 or less, as long as
they're not used for com-
mercial purposes, are also


covered, as are digital
readers, tablets and items
like keyboards or monitors
- as long as they don't in-
clude a TV tuner
State economists have
estimated the impact of the
proposed three-day holi-
day at $28.3 million to the
state and $6.4 million to
local governments -
though some economic
studies have shown that
people are induced to buy
more uncovered items dur-
ing the sales tax holiday


Juttin Moore, Michael Ray, Durtin [,nch, Joth Thompon,
JaMie Davit, (leMoni Road and TJ. Brown
For Ticket Information Tickets Are Available through
352-302-8177 ticketmaster

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352-503-6856


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State-of-the-Art Equipment.


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Crystal River (next to Kia dealer)
352-794-6161
We have Zumba Classes!


2668 W. Woodview Ln,
Lecanto, FL
352-270-8868


A2 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


LOCAI/STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







'N


Page A3 -SATURDAY, MAY 4,2013
EVER FORGET


CI-


TRUS COUNTY CHRO


NICLE


The Brotherhood Ride is a
team of firefighters, law
enforcement officers and
emergency medical
personnel who ride to honor
those who have died in the
line of duty. Their mission is
to ride on or near the
anniversary of the deaths of
the men and women they
honor, to show the families,
friends, coworkers and the
community that they will not
be forgotten. The nonprofit
public charity is organized
entirely by volunteers who
themselves are emergency
responders. For information
about the charity, go to
www.brotherhoodride.com.
LEFT: The Brotherhood Riders
briskly make their way along State
Road 44 headed to Crystal River.
Only short stops along the way
interrupt their progress northward.

Photographs by
Matthew Beck


Riders peddling closely together make their way to the 911 Memorial at Liberty Park in Inverness.


ABOVE: One rider's helmet closely resembles a firefighter's helmet. BELOW: The riders,
ultimately making their way to Tennessee, are either active or retired emergency responders.


Each rider sports a jersey with the names of fallen comrades in the law
enforcement/ fire services fields who lost their lives in 2012. Six of the eight
are from Florida.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today 's
HOROSCOPES
Today's Birthday- You'll find that
learning will be easier for you in the
year ahead if you study things that
have an immediate application.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You don't
have to resort to extravagance to let a
loved one know how much you care. In
fact, sometimes small but thoughtful
gestures are the best.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) When
working in concert with another, don't
attempt to hog the glory for a job well
done, even if you think you did all the
work. Rewards should be split equally
for any joint endeavor.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Make
important decisions based only on the
existing facts. Optimistic reasoning
could impair your judgment.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Avoid incli-
nations to make small difficulties into
big ones. Instead, use that wonderful
imagination of yours in positive ways.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't re-
quest a business or financial favor
from people whom you know purely on
a social basis. If you want to keep
them as friends, seek elsewhere.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It's iffy as
to whether you'll hit your stride and be
productive. To succeed, you must first
make sure you have a clear aim and a
strong focus.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Discus-
sions with friends are likely to prove
enlightening, but steer clear of commit-
ting to any proposed joint endeavors.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Al-
though you will likely get a strong start,
you could quickly tire and lose steam
as the day wears on. There's a chance
you won't finish what you start.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Occa-
sionally, we all do a little harmless exag-
gerating. If you do so today, however,
many harmful complications could result.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You'll
handle small financial dealings compe-
tently, but that won't be so when it
comes to situations with larger stakes.
Avoid taking any risks.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Be
careful not to behave in a superior or
condescending manner when dealing
with others. You're on shakier ground
than you know, and you could use
some friends.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Rewards
you've been expecting will come your
way, but only in direct proportion to
your efforts. Don't expect any big re-
turns for subpar work.


ENTERTAINMENT


Lindsay Lohan
enters rehab really


LOS ANGELES Lind-
say Lohan has checked into
rehab and will not face a
probation violation for leav-
ing another treatment facil-
ity after a
few minutes,
a prosecutor
said Friday
49 Santa
Monica
Chief Deputy
City Attorney
STerry White
Lindsay said he has
Lohan received
confirmation that Lohan has
checked in to a rehab facility
and he is satisfied with her
location. A source close to
the actress who was not au-
thorized to speak publicly
said Lohan has checked in to
the Betty Ford Center in
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Lohan is required to
spend 90 days in rehab as
part of a plea deal in a mis-
demeanor case filed after a
June car accident.
Attorney Mark Jay Heller
told a judge during a hear-
ing Thursday that Lohan
had checked in to a different
rehab facility, but the starlet
left it after a few minutes.

Aerosmith, others to
play charity concert
BOSTON -Aerosmith,
James Taylor and Jimmy
Buffett are among the
scheduled performers for a
Boston Marathon benefit
concert May 30.
The show, at the TD Gar-
den, will benefit One Fund
-the collection of donations
that will be distributed to the
survivors of the April 15
bombings and the families of
those killed in the attack.
Other confirmed acts in-


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR 81H LO 67PR ce HI LO68 NA
81 66 1.30 |^ 81 67 tiace L j78 68 NA


84 70 0.10 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK foe daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 59
-,,.: Partly sunny; 30% chance of show-
ers
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 78 Low: 52
Partly cloudy and breezy; 10% chance of a
shower
...... MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 76 Low: 54
Variably cloudy and breezy; 20% chance of a
shower
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 78/68
Record 96/50
Normal 87/58
Mean temp. 73
Departure from mean +1
PRECIPITATION*
Friday trace
Total for the month 0.50 in.
Total for the year 5.80 in.
Normal for the year 12.73 in.
'As of 7 p.m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 3
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.77 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 7
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 72%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Hickory, Grasses
Today's count: 4.8/12
Sunday's count: 5.6
Monday's count: 5.6
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
5/4 SATURDAY 1:58 8:10 2:21 8:33
5/5 SUNDAY 2:40 8:51 3:03 9:14
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SU N (Q SUNSETTONIGHT........................... 8:08P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW..................... 6:46 A.M.
0A) AY MOONRISE TODAY..........................3:19 A.M.
MAY 9 MAY18 MAY 25 MAY31 MOONSET TODAY.................. 3.28 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 1:34 a/10:08 a 2:50 p/10:48 p
Crystal River* 1:11 p!7:30 a /8:10 p
With acoochee' 10:58 a/5:18 a 11:08 p/5:58 p
Homosassa*** 12:44 a/9:07 a 2:00 p/9:47 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
3:00 a/11:08 a 3:35 p/11:50 p
1:21 a/8:30 a 1:56 p/9:12 p
11:43 a/6:18 a -- /7:00p
2:10 a/10:07 a 2:45 p/10:49 p


I --


Associated Press/Florida Keys News Bureau
Stephen Bogart, left, son of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren
Bacall, chats with movie critic Leonard Maltin on Friday while
riding the 100-year-old African Queen in Key Largo. The two
men are participating in the inaugural Humphrey Bogart Film
Festival that continues through Sunday.


elude Jason Aldean, Boston,
Extreme, Godsmack, The J.
Geils Band, Carole King and
New Kids on the Block
Donnie Wahlberg of New
Kids on the Block said that
like other native Bostoni-
ans, he and his bandmates
are honored to do their part.

Witherspoon pleads
no contest, pays fine
ATLANTA Reese With-
erspoon pleaded no contest
and paid a $100 fine after
berating a state trooper in
Atlanta
while her
husband
Jim Toth
was given a
sobriety
test, an em-
barrassing
exchange
Reese caught on a
Witherspoon dashboard
camera after the usually
squeaky-clean Hollywood
star had what she called
"one too many" glasses of
wine.


The video, which was first
obtained by TMZ and pub-
licly released by authorities
Friday, shows Witherspoon
asking the trooper, "Do you
know my name?" and then
adding, "You're about to
find out who I am."
Witherspoon's exchange
with the officer had already
been outlined in a police re-
port, but the video offered a
rare glimpse at the actress
unfiltered. Witherspoon,
who has built a wholesome
professional image, apolo-
gized shortly after her ar-
rest, saying she was "deeply
embarrassed."
Municipal Court of At-
lanta Deputy Solicitor
Ronda Graham said in a
statement that Witherspoon
entered the plea and paid
the fine, resolving the case.
During an interview with
"Good Morning America" on
Thursday, Witherspoon said
she panicked and said "all
kinds of crazy things," includ-
ing falsely claiming that she
was pregnant at one point
-From wire reports


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
79 66
85 69
84 66
76 59
86 68
74 63
85 74
84 64
82 69


F'cast
ts
pc
PC
ts
pc
ts
PC
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tilljir :e
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
sh
pc
ts
ts
ts
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK
Northwest winds around 15 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland temperature
waters will have a moderate chop.
Partly cloudy with a chance of thun- 0a r
derstorms today.

Taken at Aripeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.93 27.88 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a 37.13 39.25
Tsala Apopka-Inverness 37.82 37.81 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.87 38,85 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precont chance of being equaled or exceeded ii any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida WVater Management District and is subject to revision, in no event
will the District or the united States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
tlls data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydiological Data Section at 352 796-7211

THE NATION


je


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'-- 44.
-- -

SOS *
D0 ,, = n, Criy e


L)a
A I in


20s 30

- is- '


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston SC
Charleston. WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisvlle
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


;0s
El ..


' PFW
0erSoi
.*; 60s
H~u~n ^^


4-8,
80's


Friday Saturday
H LPcp. FcstH L
72 51 s 74 43
66 37 s 72 47
59 53 c 59 48
70 60 trace r 61 48
57 44 s 58 47
70 44 s 78 47
65 44 s 67 46
65 48 pc 58 39
74 61 06 r 65 42
76 43 ts 72 43
53 44 s 58 42
79 58 s 69 47
72 49 s 76 48
71 60 .03 pc 72 60
76 50 pc 73 50
68 55 pc 66 51
47 39 .05 sh 61 48
77 54 pc 68 50
77 58 pc 69 53
71 59 pc 70 55
78 58 pc 71 50
67 32 s 70 36
67 39 pc 68 48
61 28 pc 55 36
35 34 .46 sh 55 44
76 58 pc 67 49
68 40 s 83 58
76 63 r 56 49
69 47 s 70 43
69 46 s 72 38
69 47 s 76 50
73 61 02 pc 64 51
66 46 123 c 62 44
87 59 s 90 66
52 41 03 sh 56 42
90 61 s 73 58
78 64 .02 r 59 50
65 43 3.00 sh 56 43
43 37 .01 sh 56 45
38 32 .18 sh 46 42
73 55 pc 71 45
77 66 r 61 44
75 62 r 56 46


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 70 56 pc 71 54
New York City 66 51 s 68 46
Norfolk 61 52 s 65 48
Oklahoma City 63 34 pc 56 43
Omaha 46 32 sh 50 43
Pam Springs 97 68 s 96 64
Philadelphia 65 48 s 68 45
Phoenix 92 69 s 95 69
Pittsburgh 75 50 s 71 46
Portland, ME 58 38 s 61 37
Portland, Ore 79 50 s 81 53
Providence, R.I. 61 44 s 63 40
Raleigh 69 48 pc 67 49
Rapid City 61 25 pc 59 34
Reno 81 44 s 75 48
Rochester, NY 77 51 s 71 49
Sacramento 93 52 s 88 53
St. Louis 45 41 1.80 r 52 47
St. Ste Marie 69 39 pc 69 43
Salt Lake City 71 40 pc 70 47
San Antonio 70 45 s 79 50
San Diego 82 60 s 70 59
San Francisco 85 56 s 75 52
Savannah 76 62 trace c 73 62
Seattle 71 49 s 77 51
Spokane 70 51 s 73 44
Syracuse 75 50 s 78 45
Topeka 51 37 sh 50 43
Washington 68 51 s 67 51
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 99 Borrego Springs, Calif. LOW 12
Alamosa, Colo
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/72/pc
Amsterdam 53/40/c
Athens 80/64/s
Beijing 77/57/s
Berlin 68/41/c
Bermuda 67/62/sh


Lisbon 77/55/s
London 64!42/sh
Madrid 74/49/pc
Mexico City 79/50/pc
Montreal 73/54/s
Moscow 52/49/r
Pars 63/43/c
Rio 84/69/s
Rome 66/58/pc
Sydney 75/54/c
Tokyo 63/55/sh
Toronto 70/48/s
Warsaw 68!50/pc


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, May 4, the
124th day of 2013. There are 241
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On May 4, 1776, Rhode Island
declared its freedom from England,
two months before the Declaration
of Independence was adopted.
On this date:
In 1626, Dutch explorer Peter Mi-
nuit landed on present-day Manhat-
tan Island.
Ten years ago: Tornadoes swept
across the Central Plains and Mid-
west, resulting in 38 deaths and
causing a wide swath of destruction.
Five years ago: A river boat
sank in a remote Amazon region in
northern Brazil, killing at least 48
people.
One year ago: Adam Yauch, 47,
the gravelly-voiced rapper who
helped make The Beastie Boys one
of the seminal groups in hip-hop,
died in New York.
Today's Birthdays: The former
president of Egypt, Hosni Mubarak,
is 85. Opera singer Roberta Peters
is 83. Katherine Jackson, matriarch
of the Jackson musical family, is 83.
Jazz musician Ron Carter is 76.
Rock musician Dick Dale is 76. Pop
singer Peggy Santiglia (The Angels)
is 69. Actor Richard Jenkins is 66.
Country singer Stella Parton is 64.
Actor-turned-clergyman Hilly Hicks
is 63. Irish musician Darryl Hunt
(The Pogues) is 63. Singer Jackie
Jackson (The Jacksons) is 62.
Singer-actress Pia Zadora is 61.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Oleta
Adams is 60. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Sharon Jones is 57. Country
singer Randy Travis is 54. Actress
Mary McDonough is 52. Comedian
Ana Gasteyer is 46. Actor Will Arnett
is 43. Rock musician Mike Dirnt
(Green Day) is 41. Contemporary
Christian singer Chris Tomlin is 41.
TV personality and fashion designer
Kimora Lee Simmons is 38. Rock
musician Jose Castellanos is 36.
Singer Lance Bass ('N Sync) is 34.
Thought for Today: "When your
work speaks for itself, don't inter-
rupt." Henry J. Kaiser, American
industrialist (1882-1967).



LEGAL NOTICES


Notice to

Creditors/Administration........Cll


- C ITRUS C U N ZTY .



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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; Cairo 96/65/s
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; Calgary 66/45/s
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; Havana 84/68/pc
sn-snow; ts=thunderstorms; w-windy. Hong Kong 80/75/ts
@2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi. Jerusalem 86/66/pc


A4 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For the RECORD


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Chronicle Publisher Gerry Mulligan presents the Hall of Fame Award to Zuhair Sami
Superintendent of Schools Sandra "Sam" Himmel looks on.


SCHOLAR
Continued from PageAl

parents, educators and
business leaders who at-
tended the ceremony
Later, when Superinten-
dent of Schools Sandra
"Sam" Himmel dismissed
a half-dozen Citrus High
School students to attend a
choir event, Thomas
quipped, "I don't know
when these kids sleep!"
Chronicle Publisher
Gerry Mulligan told the
young scholars he hopes
they achieve further suc-
cess in college, and then
return to Citrus County for
their careers.
"There is no place better
in the world to return and
raise a family than here in
Citrus County," he said.
"So keep us on your GPS."
Hall of Fame recipient
Zuhair Sami, of Lecanto
High School, was honored
for a perfect score on his
SATs. He also is one of
2,600 U.S. Presidential
Scholars out of 3 million
students nationwide.
"He's an amazing stu-
dent among amazing stu-
dents," Mulligan said. "He
is truly unique."
Zuhair, who plans to
major in microbiology and


GOLDEN SCHOLAR AWARDS
* HALL OF FAME: Zuhair Sami, Lecanto High School.
* GOLDEN SPIRIT: Mary Jane Onsager, Citrus High
School.
* BUSINESS-BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY: Ashley
Nichols, Citrus High School.
* ENGLISH LITERATURE: Chloe Lane, Crystal River
High School.
* FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS: Brian Imparato,
Lecanto High.
* MATH-ENGINEERING-COMPUTER SCIENCE:
Nicholas Fernandez, Citrus High School.
* SCIENCE: Lily Parrish, Lecanto High School.
* SOCIAL STUDIES: Michael Teti, Lecanto High
School.
* NEW MEDIA-JOURNALISM: Madison Farrior,
Crystal River High School.
* WORLD LANGUAGES: Michael Hetland, Citrus High
School.
* VOCATIONAL-CAREER TECHNICAL: Mollie Griffith,
Lecanto High School.
* LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE: Zachary Brostrom,
Lecanto High School.


cell science at the Univer-
sity of Florida, said after-
ward he constantly strives
to learn more.
"It's knowing that
there's always something
higher than where you
are," he said. "I want to see
all the things I can."
School board member
Pat Deutschman said the


school district encourages
students to excel.
"This is a great place for
kids to find multiple op-
portunities," she said.
"This is a very supportive
community."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


Duke has $600 million for CR3


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
Angela Peifer, 44, of
Homosassa, at 12:48 p.m.
Tuesday on misdemeanor
charges of domestic battery
and resisting an officer without
violence. No bond.
Other arrests
Arthur Nesbitt, 21, of
West Monticello Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 9:02 a.m. Tues-
day on a felony charge of
using a credit card with intent
to defraud. According to his ar-
rest affidavit, he is accused of
using a business credit card
without permission multiple
times. Bond $2,000.
Gary Defrank Jr., 30, of
West Finch Court, Lecanto, at
5:37 p.m. Tuesday on a Citrus
County warrant for violation of
probation on seven original
felony charges of dealing in
stolen property. No bond.
Mark Sanders, 55, of
Zephyr Street, Inverness, at
1:01 p.m. Wednesday on a
felony charge of selling, man-
ufacturing or delivering or pos-
session with intent to sell,
manufacture or deliver a con-
trolled substance (marijuana).
Bond $5,000.
Leonora Boysza, 44, of


West Sugarmaple Lane, Bev-
erly Hills, at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesday on a felony
charge retail theft ($300 or
more). According to her arrest
affidavit, she is accused of
stealing more than $400 worth
of jewelry from Bealls in Inver-
ness in January. Bond $2,000.
Laura Arends, 25, of
Northeast 10th Street, Crystal
River, at 6:42 p.m. Wednes-
day on a misdemeanor charge
of retail petit theft. Bond $500.
Burt Conrady, 55, of
West Starburst Lane, Ho-
mosassa, at 6:39 p.m.
Wednesday on a felony
charge of abuse of an elderly
person or disabled adult. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of hitting a de-
velopmentally disabled person
with frozen meat and twisting
the person's ear. Bond
$10,000.
James Keyte, 44, of
Poppy Lane, Inverness, at
7:43 p.m. Wednesday on
felony charges of grand theft
and burglary. According to his
arrest affidavit, he is accused
of stealing a swimming-pool
pump from a gated property
on North Munich Terrace in
Lecanto. Bond $7,000.
Christopher Boone, 28,
of South Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa, at 12:16 a.m.


Thursday on a misdemeanor
charge of disorderly intoxica-
tion. Bond $150.
Dennis Crowe Jr., 28, of
Homosassa, at 1:12 a.m.
Thursday on misdemeanor
charges of criminal mischief,
disorderly intoxication and re-
sisting an officer without vio-
lence. Bond $1,150.
Burglaries
A vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 8:04 a.m. Thursday,
May 2, in the 7400 block of W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River.
A residential burglary was
reported at 1 p.m. May 2 in the
4800 block of S. Momingside
Terrace, Homosassa.
Thefts
A grand theft was re-
ported at 4:54 p.m. Thursday,
May 2, in the 8000 block of W.
Grove St., Homosassa.
M A petit theft was reported
at 5:43 p.m. May 2 in the 6100
block of W. Minuteman St.,
Homosassa.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 6:37 p.m. May 2 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
Vandalism
SA vandalism was reported
at 1:05 a.m. Thursday, May 2,
in the 3400 block of S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa.


State BRIEFS


Governor signs
death warrant
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott has signed a death
warrant for a man convicted in
the death of a prison guard.
The governor's office an-
nounced Friday that 58-year-
old William Van Poyck is
scheduled to die by lethal injec-
tion at Florida State Prison near
Raiford at 6 p.m., June 12.
Van Poyck and Frank Valdes
tried to free John O'Brien from a
prison van in West Palm Beach
in June 1987. One of the
guards, Fred Griffis, was killed
during the escape attempt. Van
Poyck and Valdes were unable
to free O'Brien and were ar-
rested when Valdes lost control
of their car and struck a tree.
Van Poyck and Valdes
both received death sen-
tences. Valdes was report-
edly stomped to death by
guards at Florida State
Prison in 1999, but no one


was convicted in two trials.
Tornado touches
down near FAU
BOCA RATON The Na-
tional Weather Service said a
tornado cut a half-mile path
of damage near the Florida
Atlantic University campus.
Meteorologists said the
tornado touched down Thurs-
day afternoon in Boca Raton.
The weather service says
the tornado packed 70-mph
winds.
The Miami Herald reported
the twister took down fences,
trees, a store sign, power
lines and parts of a roof.
Heavy rains, strong winds
and flooding were reported
throughout South Florida on
Thursday.
Keys crocodile
relocated
ISLAMORADA- The relo-
cation of a crocodile that laid its
eggs in a Florida Keys front


yard reflects shift in policy re-
garding the threatened reptiles.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
officials say the crocodile
was moved from a Lower
Matecumbe Key neighbor-
hood last week to undevel-
oped bayside waters about 4
miles away. The agency is
watching over the eggs.
State wildlife officials previ-
ously avoided relocating croco-
diles because the animals are
territorial and tend to return to
their usual stomping grounds.
The commission's crocodile re-
sponse coordinator told The
Key West Citizen the agency's
policy has evolved since a dog
was snatched by a crocodile in
Key Largo last summer.
Now wildlife officers will re-
locate large crocodiles from
high-use recreation areas
and private properties when
people are concerned about
their presence.
-From wire reports


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

Duke Energy leaders be-
lieve the $600 million the
company has set aside will
be enough to cover the cost
of decommissioning the
Crystal River nuclear plant
"We believe our funding is
adequate," Duke executive
vice president Lynn Good
said. "We have 40 to 50 years
to move through the decom-
missioning of this plant"
Good and Jim Rogers,
Duke Energy chairman,
president and CEO, ad-
dressed the decommission-
ing process Friday, during
the company's first-quarter
earnings report.
Rogers said they will fol-
low a process to produce a
cost estimate that will be
included in the decommis-
sioning report due to the
Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission in November
He said after the report is
approved they will be able
to give out more details. He
said decommissioning costs
are entirely based on dis-
mantling all the equipment
at the plant and dealing
with the spent fuel.
Rogers said with the sys-
tem already drained, they
are a good bit ahead except
for the spent fuel, a big cost,
since they do not currently
have dry fuel storage.
Rogers said over the next
few months, full-time
staffing at the plant will be
significantly reduced from
the 600 workers previously
on site. More layoffs were
announced this week.
While Duke disclosed

County BRIEF

Republicans to
host administrator
Brad Thorpe, Citrus County
administrator, will speak at
1 p.m. today Saturday, May 4,
to the Ronald Reagan Repub-
lican Assembly Inc. at 938 N.
Suncoast Blvd., in the South
Square Plaza. Refreshments
will be provided. For informa-
tion, call 352-257-5381. CASA
donations accepted.
-From staff reports


Thursday it was suspend-
ing plans for two proposed
nuclear units at existing
plants in North Carolina,
Rogers said it is continuing
to pursue the combined op-
erating and construction li-
cense for the nuclear plant
in Levy County.
Overall, the earnings re-
port was positive and
Rogers said it was consis-
tent with their internal
plan.
"We're 10 months into
the merger with Progress
Energy and we are
pleased with the pace of
our integration efforts," he
said. "We are clearly on
track to achieve our
merger commitments, pro-
viding benefits for both
customers and investors."
Rogers will resign as


CEO later this year. He
said the search for his re-
placement is ongoing,
looking at both internal
and external candidates.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline.com.


Stone* Stucco* Columns
Decorative Foam Banding
Painting & Pressure Washing


352-746-5951
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LOCAI/STATE


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* r, L7 W' 1
! & wesl
s Wide
Perdido River DeForest
Finch, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. DeForest
|- Leon Finch, age 86, of Bev-
erly Hills,

will be
held 10:00
AM, Tues-
day, May 7,
2013 at the
Beverly -
Hills
Chapel of DeForest
Hooper Finch
Funeral
Homes with Pastor Wayne
Wilkinson officiating. In-
terment will follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, Florida.
The family will receive
friends from 6:00 PM until
Associated Press 8:00 PM, Monday at the
e legislative Beverly Hills Chapel. The
family requests expres-
sions of sympathy take the
Id s form of memorial dona-
tions to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 or
HPH Hospice Foundation,
Scott said Citrus Office, 3545 N.
Lecanto Hwy., Beverly
roved a bill Hills, FL 34465. Online
manufacturers condolences may be sent to
recent state the family at www.
pment from HooperFuneralHome.com.
30, 2017. He He was born February 4,
y eliminate 1927 in Oneonta, NY, son
so included of Mark and Leila (Knapp)
budget for Finch. He died May 2, 2013
anted raises in Lecanto, FL. Mr Finch
Legislature was a Navy veteran serv-
on teacher ing during World War II.
He worked as a service
or gets two representative for NY
n a lift going State Electric and Gas and
ito the elec- moved to Beverly Hills,
e President Florida from Mohawk, NY
"And I'm for in 1991. Mr Finch was a
so I'm glad member of the Brother-
hood of Electrical Workers
speaker Will and was a volunteer driver
e work done for Skill Bank, Beverly
passage of Hills. Mr Finch was pre-
, the health ceded in death by his par-
exception. ents, his wife of 65 years,
session, we Audrey A. Finch, 2 broth-
iorities, and ers, Stanton Finch, Martin
House pri- Finch, and sister, Florabell
ties, we said Brooks.
tive priori- Survivors include
d, R-Wesley daughter, Gloria (John)
for five and Clark of Beverly Hills, FL,
)od." sister, Natalie Horth of
n the Legis- Oneonta, NY, 3 sisters-in-
isiness until law, Alice Taylor, Anita
before, when Baird and Arlene Bunting
at 1:55 a.m., and numerous nieces and
the annual nephews.
die" hanky
our before Franklin
McCaig, 79
HOMOSASSA
Franklin D. McCaig, 79,
of Homosassa, died Thurs-
no reported day May 2, 2013, at Citrus
a Florida court Memorial hospital in In-
aw. That led verness. A funeral service
t as a solu- will be at 1 p.m. Monday,
m menace." May 6, 2013, at the Strick-
eatment land Funeral Home
SSCm n Chapel in Crystal River,
o Scott with Pastor Thomas
E Florida Reaves officiating. The
passed leg- family will receive friends
Id require one hour prior to service
o provide the time. Interment will follow
average for at the Magnolia Cemetery
ts given in Lecanto.
rugs admin- Frederick
usly.
(HB 1159) Moulder, 93
'otes in the INVERNESS
ite shortly Frederick C. Moulder, 93,
.y session of Royal Oaks, Inverness,
The legisla- died Thursday May 2,2013,
Gov. Rick at Citrus Memorial Health
sideration. System. Services will be in
average pro- Cheboygan, Mich. Heinz
pioned by Funeral Home & Crema-
nacquisto, a tion, Inverness.
iblican
led of cancer. John
Benacquisto Terrell Jr., 75
several of her CRYSTAL RIVER


Signs are moved into place Friday in preparation for the sine die ceremony to mark the close of th
session on the fourth floor of the Capitol in Tallahassee.



Legislative session en


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Lawmakers
ended their 60-day session Friday,
waiting until the final hour to pass a
$74.5 million budget and then leav-
ing town without passing a bill to
extend health care coverage to 1.1
million Floridians.
The Legislature did send Gov.
Rick Scott an elections bill that at-
tempts to fix problems with long
lines and vote-counting delays that
made Florida a joke across the na-
tion last November. Among other
things, the bill allows elections su-
pervisors to hold up to 14 days of
early voting instead of the eight
days now in law, a reversal for the
GOP-led legislature from two years
ago. It also allows more early voting
sites.
The $74.5 billion budget was ap-
proved just before session ended,
but the House and Senate never
bridged a wide gap on a health care
plan.
The Senate wanted to use $50 bil-
lion in federal money over the next
decade to expand health care cov-
erage as allowed under the federal
health care law, while the House
doesn't want to accept any federal
money for Medicaid expansion.
The Senate began Friday by send-
ing Scott a bill that would speed up
the residential mortgage foreclo-
sure process.
Among bills that died on the final
day were a measure that would
have helped the Miami Dolphins
with $400 million in stadium reno-


2013 SESSION

vations, prohibited judges from ap-
plying foreign law in Florida cases,
banned abortions based on the race
or gender of a fetus and created a
needle-exchange pilot program,
among others.
Still, Scott already has signed
many major bills into law, including
a ban on Internet cafes offering slot
machine-like games, a wide-ranging
ethics bill, an increase in campaign
contribution limits and more. Scott
vetoed a bill that would have ended
permanent alimony.
Scott said he will sign the elec-
tions bill.
The Republican governor was
also able to claim victories on his
top two priorities: a sales-tax ex-
emption for manufacturers and
teacher raises.
"When you go across the state
and listen to Florida families, they
all want a job and they want the ed-
ucation system improved. That's ex-
actly what they want and that's


exactly what they got,'
after the session ended.
The Legislature appr
that will exempt mai
from paying the 6 pe
sales tax on new equil
April 30, 2014, to April:
wanted to permanently;
the tax. Lawmakers als
$480 million in the
teacher raises. Scott wa
for all teachers, but the
is basing the increases
performance.
"I think the govern
wins. I think it gives him
into the summer and in
tion cycle," said Senate
Don Gaetz, R-Niceville.
Rick Scott for governor,
he got the wins."
Gaetz and House Sp
Weatherford praised the
in the session and the
most of the major bills
care plan being the big
"When we set out on
talked about having pri
we didn't say they'd be
orities or Senate priority
they would be legisla
ties," said Weatherfor
Chapel. "We went four
that's pretty doggone go
Unlike last year, whe:
lature didn't finish its bu
midnight, or the year be
the budget was passed
lawmakers wrapped up
session with the "sine
drop ceremony an h
sunset.


Legislative BRIEFS


Senate confirms
Edgar to PSC
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Senate has confirmed
Lisa Edgar to a third four-
year term on the Florida Pub-
lic Service Commission.
Senators voted 26-13 for
her confirmation on Friday -
the last day of the 2013 leg-
islative session.
Sen. Jack Latvala took the
unusual move of separating
her from a list of other execu-
tive appointments.
The Clearwater Republi-
can said he was concerned
about Edgar siding too often
on the side of electric compa-
nies on rate increases. Other
Democrats and Republicans
also expressed concerns.
Edgar was originally ap-
pointed by Gov. Jeb Bush
and then reappointed by Gov.
Charlie Crist before being
reappointed by Gov. Rick
Scott. She is the longest
serving member of the panel.
The five-member commis-
sion regulates the state's in-
vestor-owned utilities.
Foreclosures bill
headed to Scott
TALLAHASSEE Florida
lawmakers have sent Gov.
Rick Scott a bill meant to
speed up the residential
mortgage foreclosure
process.
The bill (HB 87) cleared
the Senate on a 26-13 vote
Friday.
The bill aims to relieve a
backlog of foreclosure cases
in a state swamped by a ris-
ing number of homes taken
back by banks during the
housing crisis.
Republican Sen. Jack Lat-
vala said Florida's real estate
market won't return to normal
until the backlog of foreclo-
sure cases is reduced.
Latvala said the measure


Associated Press
Capitol reporter Bill Cotterell, who has been covering the
Florida legislature since 1969, takes a photo Friday on
the floor of the House of Representatives in Tallahassee.


is tilted more in favor of con-
sumers than banks.
Democratic Sen. Darren
Soto said the bill doesn't pro-
tect people who lose their
homes due to fraud.
The bill reduces the
amount of time for banks to
go after foreclosed home-
owners on deficiency
judgments.
Anti-'Shariah' bill
dead for session
TALLAHASSEE -A bill
that would ban Islamic law
and other foreign laws from
being applied in state courts
has died on the last day of


Florida's legislative session.
Senate President Don
Gaetz on Friday declared the
bill (HB 351) "resolved" after
its sponsor decided not to
ask for the unanimous vote
required to move the bill
forward.
It had failed a previous pro-
cedural vote Thursday. The
House approved the legisla-
tion on a 79-39 vote last
month.
Sen. Alan Hays sponsored
the bill. The Umatilla Republi-
can said he wanted to protect
Floridians from foreign law
being used against them in
state courts.


But there are i
cases in which a
applied foreign la
critics to deride i
tion to a "phanto
Cancer tre
bill goes t
TALLAHASSE
lawmakers have
isolation that would
health insurers to
same level of co
cancer treatment
orally as those d
istered intraveno
The measure
cleared its final v
House and Sena
before the 60-da
Friday evening.T
tion now goes to
Scott for his cons
The cancer cc
posal was cham
Sen. Lizbeth Bei
Fort Myers Repu
whose mother di
An emotional
was hugged by
colleagues after
passed the bill o


vote.
The cancer tr
visions were tuc
larger bill dealing
health-care issu
Cancer media
form are often n
expensive than
given intravenous


Obituaries


the Senate
n a 37-2


John Lostin Terrell Jr,


75, of Crystal River, died
eatment pro- Saturday, April 27, 2013, at
*ked into a his home in Crystal River.
g with several A celebration of life will
Swith several take place from 2 to 4 p.m.
es. Sunday, May 19, 2013, at
nations in pill 12465 Citation Road,
nuch more Spring Hill, FL 34610.
those drugs Strickland Funeral
usly. Home with Crematory as-
sisted the family with
-From wire reports arrangements.


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs!





jj] 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
SLicensed Funera Director
iI 352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.ffrr.com / www.brownfunerahome.co


Monica
McCormack,
81
HOMOSASSA
Monica E. McCormack,
81, of Homosassa, passed
away peacefully Thursday,
May 2,
2013, at .
HPH Hos- -
p i c e f '
House, |
Lecanto. 4
Monica -
graduated
f r o m
Bishop Monica
M c D o n McCormack
nell Me-
morial High School in
Brooklyn, N.Y, and was a
bookkeeper for many
years in the manufactur-
ing industry She retired to
Homosassa in 1994 from
Commack, L.I., N.Y., and
was a member and lector
of St. Thomas The Apostle
Catholic Church, Ho-
mosassa. Mrs. McCormack
enjoyed her work here as
a volunteer with Meals on
Wheels and with AARP as
a tax preparer. She loved
travelling, cruising, family
vacations and golfing.
She will be lovingly re-
membered by her family
and friends, including her
four daughters, Kathy
(Ted) LaMott, Deerfield
Beach, Peggy (Tom) Sulli-
van, W Redding, Conn., Pat
(Bob) Smith, Bolton Land-
ing, N.Y, Jeanne (Carl)
Faber, Centereach, N.Y;
her brother, the Rev Fran-
cis McMullen, Accokeek,
Md.; sisters, Sister Marie
Lalande (Mae), St.
Joseph's, Brentwood, N.Y,
Kathleen Schafer, Brod-
headsville, Pa.; and eight
grandchildren. Monica
was preceded in death by
her husband, Peter, in
1995.
Friends will be received
from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.
Sunday, May 5, 2013, at
Brueggemann Funeral
Home, E. Northport, N.Y
Mass of the Resurrection
will be celebrated at 11
a.m. Monday, May 6, 2013,
at Christ The King Church,
Commack, N.Y., with bur-
ial following at Northport
Rural Cemetery, North-
port, N.Y In lieu of flow-
ers, donations are
suggested to HPH Hospice
(Hernando-Pasco-Citrus),
12107 Majestic Blvd., Hud-
son, FL 34667. Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa.
www.wilderfuneral.com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.



Funeral Home With Crematory
JAMES J. MacDONALD, Jr.
Private Arrangements
CAROLYN ROADS
Service:
Saturday 1:00 PM (today)
ELEANOR NORTON
Service:
Saturday (5/11) 11:00 AM
726-8323 000EHW3


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Candy Phillips


563-3206
cphillips@chronicleonline.com


II


Coin imfr9
plcigdis
4 buines ay
pr Iiotorndae


A6 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,640 ................................. S& P 500
0 0 0 Close: 1,614.42
Change: 16.83 (1.1%)
1,520 10 DAYS .........
1 ,6 8 0 ........................ ................................... ..............

1,600
1 ,4 4 0 ............:............. ............. ............ .. .


1,360 ............ .. ............ .-

1,28 0 ...... .... ...... ........... .. .......M .... .......


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,531
3,340
2223
835
487
10


NASD
1,688
1,707
1825
639
280
21


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
15009.59
6268.69
533.74
9369.23
3388.12
1618.46
1170.17
17073.62
959.55


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
15,040 D J.................... Dow Jones industrials
S -,, Close: 14,973.96
1 '"f Change: 142.38 (1.0%)
-4 4n':' 10 DAYS
15 ,2 0 0 ........... ........... .... ......... ....... ... ......... ............ ....

14,400 -. . -. ...... ..... ..............

13 ,6 0 0 ....... . ..... ................

12 ,800 .. .. .... .. . .............


SII .


LOW
14831.58
6094.02
528.22
9246.78
3370.30
1597.60
1150.43
16847.23
946.94


F i


CLOSE
14973.96
6218.90
529.30
9340.47
3378.63
1614.42
1165.07
17029.93
954.42


CHG.
+142.38
+124.88
-1.65
+93.74
+38.01
+16.83
+14.64
+182.70
+14.57


%CHG.
+0.96%
+2.05%
-0.31%
+1.01%
+1.14%
+1.05%
+1.27%
+1.08%
+1.55%


YTD
+14.27%
+17.19%
+16.82%
+10.62%
+11.89%
+13.20%
+14.17%
+13.57%
+12.37%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE *CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.76 -- 7.70 3.48 +.19 +5.8 A A A -24.3 -55.3 dd
AT&T Inc T 32.47 39.00 37.34 -.22 -0.6 A V A +10.8 +19.1 28 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 43.46 40.87 +.79 +2.0 A V V +8.8 +18.3 21 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 101.86 96.20 +.95 +1.0 A V V +10.1 +33.2 2.21 e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 12.94 12.24 +.05 +0.4 V A A +5.4 +49.9 28 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.64 11.97 -.09 -0.7 V V V +5.3 +48.0 92
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 -0- 43.43 37.14 +.10 +0.3 A A -5.1 +2.4 30 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 0 47.92 46.97 +.43 +0.9 A A A +18.7 +42.5 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 --0 25.25 21.04 -.73 -3.4 V V V +32.8 +23.2 38 1.00
Disney DIS 42.84 0 63.93 64.80 +.92 +1.4 A A A +30.1 +48.4 21 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0 75.46 74.47 -.31 -0.4 V A A +16.7 +20.8 21 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 --0- 61.00 57.71 +.99 +1.7 A A A +25.2 +29.9 24 3.16
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 90.02 +1.39 +1.6 A A V +4.0 +5.5 9 2.52f
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.83 +.42 +3.1 A A A +6.8 +23.5 10 0.40
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 22.57 +.25 +1.1 A V V +7.5 +16.5 17 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 74.59 73.96 +.63 +0.9 A A A +19.6 +41.5 25 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -+- 29.27 23.96 +.08 +0.3 A A A +16.2 -14.3 12 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 --0 215.90 204.51 +2.12 +1.0 A V V +6.8 -1.1 14 3.80f
LKQ Corporation LKQ 15.72 0 24.51 24.78 +.55 +2.3 A A A +17.4 +41.6 28
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.98 39.59 +.72 +1.9 A A A +11.5 +23.1 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 103.70 102.92 +.86 +0.8 A A A +16.7 +7.7 19 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 0 33.17 33.49 +.33 +1.0 A A A +25.4 +7.0 17 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 --0 64.72 57.29 +.40 +0.7 A V V +2.9 +12.8 18 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 62.62 0 82.65 81.75 +.02 ... A A A +18.2 +32.0 20 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 13.55 -- 36.75 17.26 +.46 +2.7 A A A -12.4 -52.4 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.67 20.59 -.02 -0.1 A A A +14.1 +21.2 37 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.55 8.58 +.12 +1.4 A A A +20.3 +24.8 10 0.12f
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0- 68.77 51.45 +.30 +0.6 A A A +24.4 -11.3 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 105.18 103.56 +.67 +0.7 A A A +20.1 +32.8 22 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.32 0 7.35 7.15 +.05 +0.7 A A A +26.1 +176.3 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 36.90 37.01 +.31 +0.8 A A A +19.8 +17.1 22 1.12
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 60.72 60.43 +.68 +1.1 A A A +26.3 +63.1 19 1.15
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 93.00 90.92 +1.35 +1.5 A A +24.0 +48.6 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 39.85 54.31 52.68 +.15 +0.3 V A A +21.7 +34.4 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 30.80 30.34 +.28 +0.9 V A A +20.4 +12.5 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 58.27 0 79.50 79.25 +.79 +1.0 A A A +16.2 +35.8 16 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 50.35 48.02 -.86 -1.8 V A A +29.7 +46.2 22 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b -Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e -Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates


WflU



The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 1.74
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil jumped
to its highest
level in a month
on expectations
for stronger de-
mand after the
unemployment
rate fell to its
lowest level
since 2008.





112

EM^SB


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .05 0.05 ... .07
6-month T-bill .10 0.10 ... .13
52-wk T-bill .10 0.10 ... .17
2-year T-note .22 0.20 +0.02 .27
5-year T-note .72 0.65 +0.07 .82
10-year T-note 1.74 1.63 +0.11 1.93
30-year T-bond 2.95 2.82 +0.13 3.12


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.65 2.54 +0.11 2.61
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.02 3.99 +0.03 4.52
Barclays USAggregate 1.72 1.72 ... 2.09
Barclays US High Yield 5.09 5.17 -0.08 7.00
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.64 3.65 -0.01 3.95
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.00 0.94 +0.06 1.05
Barclays US Corp 2.58 2.59 -0.01 3.29


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 95.61
Ethanol (gal) 2.70
Heating Oil (gal) 2.88
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.04
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.83
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1464.30
Silver (oz) 23.98
Platinum (oz) 1501.20
Copper (Ib) 3.31
Palladium (oz) 692.20
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.22
Coffee (Ib) 1.40
Corn (bu) 7.00
Cotton (Ib) 0.85
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 338.60
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.47
Soybeans (bu) 14.55
Wheat (bu) 7.11


PVS.
93.99
2.71
2.86
4.03
2.78
PVS.
1467.70
23.79
1500.20
3.10
692.20
PVS.
1.24
1.39
6.98
0.84
337.20
1.45
14.41
7.19


%CHG %YTD
+1.72 +4.1
... +23.4
+1.01 -5.3
+0.40 +20.6
+1.61 +0.5
%CHG %YTD
-0.23 -12.6
+0.78 -20.5
+0.07 -2.4
+6.73 -9.0
-1.5
%CHG %YTD
-1.48 -6.2
+0.97 -2.4
+0.29 +0.2
+1.06 +12.8
+0.42 -9.4
+1.31 +26.6
+0.97 +2.6
-1.04 -8.6


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 22.34 +.15 +10.0 +15.7 +11.6 +6.3
CaplncBuA m 57.36 +.24 +9.7 +15.8 +10.6 +3.6
CpWIdGrIA m 41.15 +.40 +11.1 +20.4 +9.6 +1.9
EurPacGrA m 44.17 +.39 +7.2 +15.3 +6.7 +0.6
FnlnvA m 45.85 +.54 +12.8 +19.7 +11.7 +4.0
GrthAmA m 38.49 +.47 +12.1 +19.1 +10.9 +3.8
IncAmerA m 19.70 +.11 +10.0 +16.9 +11.7 +5.8
InvCoAmA m 34.24 +.36 +14.0 +19.3 +10.8 +4.4
NewPerspA m 34.52 +.39 +10.4 +18.2 +10.7 +4.1
WAMutlnvA m 35.35 +.33 +13.9 +18.4 +13.4 +4.9
Dodge & Cox Income 13.94 -.03 +1.3 +5.2 +6.0 +6.9
IntlStk 37.85 +.35 +9.1 +21.9 +7.0 +0.4
Stock 139.69 +1.57 +15.1 +26.4 +11.7 +3.4
Fidelity Contra 86.57 +.92 +12.6 +14.4 +12.8 +5.6
LowPriStk d 45.35 +.45 +14.8 +21.3 +13.6 +8.1
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 57.25 +.60 +13.9 +18.6 +12.7 +5.0
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m 2.37 +.02 +8.4 +16.7 +10.4 +5.8
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.76 +.08 +4.1 +12.3 +6.9 +9.8
GIBondAdv 13.71 +.07 +4.1 +12.6 +7.2 +10.0
Harbor Intllnstl d 65.97 +.62 +6.2 +13.9 +8.7 0.0
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.31 -.04 +1.4 +6.6 +6.5 +7.4
T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 29.96 +.30 +13.8 +21.7 +11.0 +4.8
GrowStk 41.92 +.49 +11.0 +11.5 +12.4 +6.0
Vanguard 500Adml 148.98 +1.57 +13.9 +18.6 +12.7 +5.0
5001nv 148.96 +1.57 +13.9 +18.5 +12.6 +4.9
GNMAAdml 10.87 -.03 +0.5 +1.6 +5.1 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.43 -.01 +1.4 +4.5 +5.7 +5.6
STGradeAd 10.82 -.01 +0.7 +3.3 +3.3 +4.1
Tgtet2025 14.75 +.09 +8.5 +13.7 +9.4 +4.4
TotBdAdml 11.05 -.05 +0.6 +3.2 +5.4 +5.7
Totlntl 16.01 +.15 +7.1 +16.3 +6.3 -1.2
TotStlAdm 40.47 +.43 +14.0 +18.9 +12.7 +5.7
TotStldx 40.45 +.43 +14.0 +18.8 +12.6 +5.6
Welltn 36.99 +.16 +10.0 +15.4 +10.7 +6.3
WelltnAdm 63.89 +.29 +10.0 +15.5 +10.8 +6.4
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks jumped Friday after a
stronger-than-expected jobs re-
port raised confidence in the
economy, and the Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose above
the 1,600 level for the first time.
Employers added 165,000 jobs
last month, more than econo-
mists expected.

Linkedin LNKD
Close: $175.59V-26.08 or -12.9%
The online professional networking
firm said that it expects its earnings
growth to slow later this year as it
hires more workers.




F M A
52-week range
$88.00 $202.91
Vol.:11.6m (4.5x avg.) PE: 924.2
Mkt. Cap: $16.05 b Yield:...

Weight Watchers WTW
Close:$42.84A0.53 or 1.3%
The weight-management company
reported results for the fiscal first
quarter that beat Wall Street ana-
lysts' expectations.



F rl|
52-week range
$40.00 $63.26
Vol.:3.0m (3.9x avg.) PE: 10.1
Mkt. Cap: $2.39 b Yield: 1.6%

Furniture Brands FBN
Close: $0.95V-0.14 or -12.8%
The furniture company reported a
loss during its first quarter as sales
declined at its Thomasville compa-
ny-owned stores.


52-week range
$0.88 -- $1.82
Vol.:2.3m (4.0x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$53.5 m Yield:...

Teradata TDC
Close:$50.65 V-2.41 or -4.5%
The data management company
said that its first-quarter profit
dropped 35 percent as it got off to a
slow start to the year.



F r l
52-week range
$48.81 $80.97
Vol.:10.1m (3.9x avg.) PE:20.8
Mkt. Cap:$8.36 b Yield:...

Madison Sq. Garden MSG
Close:$60.71 A0.21 or 0.3%
The owner of the New York Knicks
and the New York Rangers reported
a 24 percent jump in net income dur-
ing the third quarter.





52-week range
$34.36 $63.44
Vol.:1.2m (3.0x avg.) PE:37.3
Mkt. Cap:$3.82 b Yield:...


Stocks surge


Hiring climbs

Associated Press

NEW YORK Stocks surged to all-
time highs Friday when a surprisingly
good jobs report finally gave investors a
clear sign of U.S. economic strength after
weeks of conflicting signals.
The market jumped from the opening,
traders donned party hats, and a wave of
buying helped the Standard and Poor's
500 index close above 1,600 for the first
time. The Dow Jones industrial average
briefly rose above 15,000, a milestone.
"There's euphoria today," said Stephen
Carl, the head equity trader at The
Williams Capital Group. "That's what
you'd have to call it."
On the floor of the New York Stock Ex-
change, brokers sported baseball caps
emblazoned with "Dow 15,000."
Investors are hoping it's more than just
a one-day celebration. Jobs are key to
keeping stocks climbing. Big U.S. compa-
nies are making record profits, but much
of that lately has come from cutting costs,
not boosting sales. More jobs, and more


consumer spending, would help.
The April jobs report was a good start.
U.S. employers added 165,000 new work-
ers last month and many more in Febru-
ary and March than previously
estimated. The unemployment rate fell to
the lowest level in four years, 7.5 percent.
The Dow rose 142.38 points to close at
14,973.96, up 1 percent. The S&P 500
index surged 16.83 points, or 1 percent, to
1,614.42.
The surge in U.S. hiring comes after
weeks of mixed signals about the strength
of the global economy
The gains were broad. Eight of the 10
industry groups in the S&P 500 index
rose. Nearly three stocks rose for every
one that fell on the NYSE.
Companies that stand to benefit most
from an upturn in the economy led the
stock market up.
Those that make basic materials and
produce oil and gas rose the most in the
S&P 500 index. U.S. Steel, General Elec-
tric and Dow Chemical were among the
winners.
Utilities, consumer-staple companies
and other safe-play stocks trailed the
market as investors took on more risk.


___Sweet 1,600
_ The Standard & Poor s 500 index closed above the 1,600 point-level
for the first time in history Friday.
If it feels like the index crossed its last milestone just a short time
ago, that s because it did. The S&P 500 crested 1,500 for the first time
since the recession on Jan. 25. The broad market index leaped
between 100-point milestones in just 67 trading days. That is its fastest such rise since the earliest days of the
bull market. In 2009, the index surged from 900 to 1,000 in just 63 days.
Since then, temporary stumbles have slowed the market. Worries about Europe s debt problems and a tepid
U.S. economic recovery meant it took more than 200 days for the index to reach each of its last three 100-point
milestones.
This year, though, has gotten off to a hot start. The S&P 500 is up 13.2 percent, better than the index s
annual performance in 11 of the last 20 years.

The ride to 1,600 The Standard & Poors 500 index is up 139 percent since hitting a low in March 2009.


Aug. 3 Nov. 16
1.000 1.100
r ,* 1 .: 4 -,


March


Feb. 1 1.4
il : i-, i l 4 ,:,,li 14 1.300 1.- 1
800 900 1.200 .3, _
- -., ,: I,_I. .1,,: _ __.2 0 -- .


h15 Jan 25
00 1.500


1.600
.- d,,


March 9 "Marh in
676.53 Mrh 1
500-- Market bottom --- 00 --
during the recession i .3,,


2007 2008 2009 2010


~i1


2011


Source. FactSet


2012 2013


Stan Choe, Jenni Sohn AP


Business BRIEFS


NYC brokerage
rewards tattoos
NEW YORK- Getting tat-
tooed with the company logo
is all the rage at one New
York City brokerage firm.
The reward? A 15 percent
pay raise.
The CEO of Rapid Realty
NYC said about 40 employ-
ees have gotten inked with
the logo in the past two years.
Anthony Lolli said workers
are "passionate about the
brand."
They also may be passion-
ate about the extra 15 percent
in commission they get for
sporting a tattoo.
Lolli started the policy a
year and a half ago after one
emnlonee nnt the tattoo to


Associated Press
Mayra Segarra, an employee of Rapid Realty NYC, shows
off her tattoo April 1 after being inked in the Brooklyn
borough of New York.


prove his company loyalty. Conglomerate's
The franchise has offices earnings jump
throughout New York City. OMAHA, Neb. Berkshire
Lolli said the company may Hathaway's first-quarter profit
soon be featured in a reality jumped 51 percent as its in-
show that would depict surance companies per-
New Yorkers apartment formed well and the value of
hunting. its investments soared.

US Cellular Warren Buffett's firm said
embraces iPhone Friday it earned $4.89 billion,
NEWYORK-- U.S. Cellu-
lar, the only major U.S. wire- gG fE t aV2
less carrier to resist the
iPhone, says it's going to start
selling it this year.
CEO Mary Dillon an-
nounced the reversal Friday I
on a call with investors and
analysts. She didn't specify -
exactly when the company
would start selling Apple's
phone, or what models it
would carry.
A year and a half ago, Dil-
Ion said U.S. Cellular Corp.
had the opportunity to carry
the phone but rejected it be-
cause it was too expensive.
The iPhone is more expen-
sive than most smartphones,
and phone companies absorb
this cost to sell it for $199 or
less.
Apart from the wholesale gl
cost of the individual phone,
carriers face another obsta- $ 1
cle: Apple requires them to
commit to purchasing a mini-
mum amount. N
In the case of U.S. Cellular,
it has promised to buy $1.2
billion worth of iPhones over Crystal River
three years, according to a
regulatory filing. O05 S.. US 1 9
That's roughly 2 million
phones. A 1 -7


or $2,977 per Class A share.
That's up from last year's
$3.25 billion net income,
or $1,966 per Class A
share.
The Omaha-based con-
glomerate said its revenue
grew 15 percent to $43.87 bil-
lion from $38.15 billion last
year.
-From wire reports


-T ME T-
LKids, 9fFree
N& .7

ids 10 8r under from Kids i Men ]
Limit 2 Kids per adult centre


I


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, MAY 4,2013



PINION


"The victim to too severe a law is considered
as a martyr rather than a criminal."
Charles Caleb Colton, Lacon, 1825


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ........... publisher
M ike A rnold ........................ ................. editor
Charlie Brennan................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz ........................ citizen member
M 00 Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
W illiamson Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


MISSED CHANCE




Mobile home


park residents


deserved better


State Sen. Charlie Dean,
R-Inverness, deserves
credit for following
through on a promise he
made to his constituents at a
town hall meeting in October
regarding regulation on man-
ufactured home lot rents.


Unfortunately,
the bill stalled in
committee level
and as of late
Friday appeared
it would fail
passage.
Had the bill
passed in the Sen-
ate, it still had a
tough road to pas-
sage since there
was no compan-
ion House bill.


Smith's choice of bills
seems almost comical since
his constituency does not in-
clude strip clubs, but does in-
clude many seniors on fixed
incomes striving to make pay-
ments on arbitrarily hiked lot
rents. If Smith didn't want to


THE ISSUE:
Mobile home
park bill likely
to fail.

OUR OPINION:
Rep. Jimmie T.
Smith ignores
constituency.


State Rep. Jimmie T Smith,
R-Inverness, attended the
same town hall meeting and
was presented the same
1,000-signature petition as
Dean, yet he did not see fit to
sponsor a companion piece of
legislation. Smith had com-
mitted to writing a compan-
ion bill, but said his slots
were taken. Perhaps this is
because Smith wasted one of
his bills on legislation to pre-
vent Medicaid recipients
from using their EBT cards
on certain purchases, such as
at strip clubs.


Pay to play
We are visitors from upstate
New York, visiting family as we
have for the last few years. We
enjoy your paper so much, and
buy it every day. You have many
good articles and your price is
half of what we pay for our
paper at home. One question we
have is: Why do students in your
county (Citrus) have to pay to
play sports ... even T-ball? Is it
that way in all counties in
Florida? We do have high school
taxes in New York, we know, but
all kids can play sports without
paying extra.
Editor's note: Students do not
have to pay to play sports in Citrus
County; however, there may be ad-
ditional costs for uniforms, equip-
ment, etc. that students would be
asked to pay for or to help
raise money. Children
who play club sports with
private organizations
have to pay to play in
those leagues.
Thanks for lunch ',
This message is for A
two very kind gentle-
men who bought my CALI
lunch on Tuesday (April 563-
23) at a local Beverly
Hills restaurant. I was
having a very stressful day and
your act of kindness just bright-
ened up my day. You'll never
know how much. I want to say if
I run into you again, I am going
to purchase two pieces of
cheesecake for the both of you.
Again, thank you so much. And
believe me, I will pay it forward.
No toll road needed
Janet Masaoy had studied the
Suncoast Parkway for the
longest time. She was a wonder-
ful lady. She did everything she
could to stop the toll road and
she did. Why don't you people
leave us alone? We don't want
the toll road. The toll road's


I


(


support the bill,
he should have
said so straight-
away, rather than
use the "slot-is-
filled" excuse.
To be fair, Smith
might argue the
Medicaid EBT bill
he sponsored had
broader reach, but
the latest statistics
show one out of 12
Florida residences


is a manufactured home. With
more than 760,000 mobile
homes in the state we call
that a lot of reach.
More than likely, Smith's
choice to sponsor the EBT
bill had to do with returning
a favor, which is fine if it al-
lows Smith to be a more ef-
fective representative for his
district. We hope this is the
case and Smith either admits
next year he has no interest
in the bill or follows through
with sponsoring a bill.
Anything less is a disserv-
ice to his constituents.


going to go in front of my prop-
erty in Homosassa here. Now
I'm getting letters from lawyers
saying it's already a done deal.
Thanks, Scott Adams
We, as Citrus County citizens
and taxpayers, owe a debt of
gratitude to our county commis-
sioner, Scott Adams. Scott is
truly for the people. How can
they truly believe that full resti-
tution was paid back to the
county when staff forgave
$57,000 for Citrus Recycling of
the taxpayers' money? In my
high school math, that does not
add up to full restitution at all.
Who in the world are you
kidding?
Wallet not returned
It was nice to read about peo-
ple being honest re-
JND turning wallets and so
forth. But unfortu-
FF nately, that didn't hap-
pen to me. The other
S day I was at Publix, had
my lottery tickets in my
plastic case, accidently
left it in the shopping
Yfl@ cart and it was never
returned to Publix.
)579 Thank God they're los-
ing tickets. The tickets
were all losing tickets
last night.
Look out aquifer
Good morning. It's a beauti-
ful day and now that I've had
my coffee, I'm going to go out-
side and put all of my sprin-
klers on my lawn and let them
have as much water as they
like and I'm going to wash my
car and take a long, hot
shower. Being as all the water
I've been saving over the years
is being given away free to a
bottling company, I've decided
to start using it myself. So look
out, aquifer, here I come. It's
my water and I'm going to use
it now.


Try detainees for what?


DOUGLAS COHN
ELEANOR CLIFT
WASHINGTON
Among the litany of frus-
trations President
Obama is experiencing
in his dealings with Congress is
what to do about Guantanamo,
and the160 men detained in the
prison's deteriorating facilities.
It held 240 men when Obama
took office in 2009, and as pres-
ident he has not sent anyone to
Guantanamo. But, like the Syr-
ian poison gas situation, Guan-
tanamo does not lend itself to
simple solutions.
Obama tried early in his ad-
ministration to make the case
that Guantanamo is not needed,
that America's prison system
with "super-max" prisons al-
ready housing the worst of the
worst could easily absorb the
men from Guantanamo. But Re-
publicans objected, and Obama
backed down, and then the
American people forgot about
it.
The problem is twofold. First,
the detainees must be defined.
Are they enemy combatants,
enemy soldiers, war criminals,
terrorists, common criminals,
or simply innocents? In the un-
likely event they are declared
soldiers, they must be given bel-
ligerent status, which is cov-
ered by the Geneva
Conventions. If not, the second
problem applies. They must be
charged with crimes. But what


Other VOICES


crimes and against what
nation?
Obama has declared the al-
ternative of non-judicial incar-
ceration is unacceptable: "The
notion that we're going to con-
tinue to keep over 100 individ-
uals in a no-man's land in
perpetuity even at a time
when we've wound down the
war in Iraq, we're winding
down the war in Afghanistan,
we're having success defeating
al Qaeda, we've kept the pres-
sure up on all these transna-
tional terrorist networks, when
we've transferred detention au-
thority in Afghanistan the
idea that we would still main-
tain, forever, a group of individ-
uals who have not been tried,
that's contrary to who we are,
it's contrary to our interests,
and it needs to stop."
A hunger strike staged by 100
of Guantanamo's remaining
prisoners has forced the issue
back onto the president's
agenda, and into the media.
"I don't want these individu-
als to die," Obama said, defend-
ing the Pentagon's practice of
putting the men into solitary
confinement and force-feeding
them through a tube inserted in
the nose to sustain them.
But prisoners who Americans
associate with terrorism don't
generate much sympathy How-
ever, of the 100 men participat-


ing in the hunger strike, 86
were cleared for release years
ago. They were considered low-
level detainees, swept up on the
battlefield and likely to pose lit-
tle risk if returned to their
home countries, but they've
been caught up in a vortex that
leaves them trapped in a legal
limbo. Further, after years of
confinement, the "little risk"
designation is undoubtedly no
longer applicable.
Of the 86 cleared for release,
56 are from Yemen, and when
Richard Reid, the shoe bomber,
tried to detonate a bomb on a
U.S. airliner over Detroit on
Christmas Day, 2009, a plot
planned in Yemen, the door
was slammed shut on the men
who thought they were on their
way to freedom.
At his press conference, the
president made the case that
America's prison system can
handle those men who pose a
risk, and that the American
people shouldn't be afraid to
put the Constitution to a test
and give the remaining de-
tainees a trial. But that's the
rub. A trial for what?

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor
Clift author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column,
founded in 1932 by Drew
Pearson.


Get harvesters
rolling again
This letter is long overdue.
Today's front-page story
about the Save The Manatee
Club challenging the King's
Bay cleanup permit has
pushed me over the edge.
The cleanup needs to take
place and mechanical har-
vesters are the quickest and
most efficient way to get that
done. In the end the cleanup
benefits everyone including
the manatees.
The Save The Manatee Club
from its very inception has
been strident and inflexible
when it has come to things they
don't particularly like.
Sure, manatees contribute
to the overall economy of the
county and I don't know
many people who don't like
them. The cleanup will con-
tribute to their overall qual-
ity of life and ensure that
they remain with us for many
years.
So my message to the Save
The Manatee Club is simple:
Get out of the way
Barry Bowman
Floral City

Shepherding
immoral values
The liberals and progres-
sives truly believe they are
right in their support of sexu-
ally immoral behavior, when in
fact they are simply using (tak-
ing advantage of) other liberal-
thinking people to help them
destroy traditional moral
values.
Who are the causalities of


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

this lifestyle? Marriage. The
lower middle class and poor,
who believe this liberal
thinking, become the collat-
eral damage. They experi-
ence sexually transmitted
disease and unwanted preg-
nancies. These two factors
limit their future choices and
are the building blocks of
poverty, crime, drug use and
drug distribution.
Sexual immorality used to
be an antisocial behavior. Then
the liberals started condoning
the behavior, then rewarding


this behavior with additional
welfare and food stamp pay-
ments for additional children.
Thus the government became
a facilitator of sexually im-
moral behavior
Then came the gay move-
ment and the liberals walked it
through the same progression
of tolerance and then govern-
ment support through discrim-
ination laws and now
marriage.
All of this pain and anguish
is heaped on those who engage
in these behaviors so the liber-
als can destroy traditional sex-
ual purity until marriage,
which then allows immorality
to flourish. This reinforces the
liberals' motto of "the ends jus-
tify the means."
Meanwhile, the protectors
of traditional moral values
remained silent and now im-
morality rules our culture.
The gay marriage movement
is a direct attack on God's
first provision for man and
woman, which was to marry,
raise children and populate
the earth.
By changing the definition of
marriage, the government has
violated the Free Exercise
Clause of the Constitution by
imposing laws on religious
people and churches that are
in direct violation of biblical
scripture.
Surely we do not raise our
children to engage in these
destructive behaviors, yet
the liberals promote and le-
galize such activities that im-
pact the poor and gays so
severely.
Donald Holcomb
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Logic fails to
hold up
Re: "Resist Urge to
Rush Decision on CMHS
Future."
I'm writing this letter
not to comment on the
pros and cons of the posi-
tions stated in this edito-
rial, but to illustrate how
sloppy reasoning can ruin
a good argument or justify
a bad one.
You cite an example of
"holy books" such as the
Bible and Koran. They
should be called religious
texts, as they are certainly
not holy to everyone, but
the example serves. These
books are open to various
interpretations because
they contain contradictions
within themselves, not be-
cause different people can
read the same text and
come to different conclu-
sions. For example, the
commandment "Thou shalt
not kill" is found in Exo-
dus. It's hard to interpret
that as anything but what it
is. Thou shalt not kill can't
mean killing is alright or
language goes right out the
window. But in the very
same Old Testament, in the
Book of Isaiah, God said,
"Anyone who is captured
will be run through with a
sword. Their little chil-
dren will be dashed to
death right before their
eyes. Their homes will be
sacked and their wives
raped by the attacking
hordes. For I will stir up
the Medes against Baby-
lon, and no amount of sil-
ver or gold will buy them
off. The attacking armies
will shoot down the young
people with arrows. They
will have no mercy on
helpless babies and will
show no compassion for
the children." It's the
same "holy book," just a
different section.
I know it wasn't the edi-
tor's intention to make his
case by using religious
texts, but in citing them he
lends to the opinion an air
of authority that isn't there.
If this is the opinion of the
Chronicle, fair enough, but
don't try to substantiate it
by using specious logic that
doesn't hold up to scrutiny


Mai


ria Weiser
Hernando


Thanks
Leadership Citrus
The Duval Preservation
Trust wishes to publicly
thank the members of the
Citrus Leadership Class
of 2013 for all the hard
work and dedication they
brought to their work day
at the historic Duval
House in Floral City.
This house is the oldest
residential structure in
Citrus County, built in
1865 and 1866, during the
pioneer days of Florida. It
is owned by the Duval
Preservation Trust, a
501C-3 non-profit estab-
lished to preserve and re-
store the house and the
2-acre property where it
resides. The south end of
the property, at some fu-
ture date, can be utilized
as a historic village, con-
taining other historic
structures in Citrus
County saved from the
wrecking ball.
The trust is grateful to
the young business pro-
fessionals of the Citrus
Leadership Class of 2013
for choosing the Duval
House as their class
project of giving back to
their community. Much
was accomplished in the
six hours the group was
on site. In the beginning
stages of restoration on
a historic structure such
as the Duval House, a
"reveal" is an important
first step. It involves re-
moving modern materi-
als, such as interior
drywall, floor coverings,
paneling and exterior
aluminum siding in
order to reveal the origi-
nal "bones" of the
house. As the Citrus
Leadership group
worked on this process,
the original interior
board paneling was ex-
posed, as well as the
original interior floors
and ceilings. The exte-
rior work, removing the
modern aluminum sid-
ing, revealed the origi-
nal lap cypress siding.
This enables the trust to
refine its overall
restoration plan to in-
clude repair of damage
that was hidden by the
modern materials.
The removal was a


dirty, dusty job that was
done with enthusiasm,
teamwork and cama-
raderie by the Citrus
Leadership group. They
paused for a lunch break
and then went right back
to the task, completely
filling a dumpster with all
the debris removed from
the house. They are self-
motivated, requiring little
supervision, and an ab-
solute pleasure to work
with. Laughter echoed
throughout the historic
rooms all during the day
as the work progressed.
The work performed by
Citrus Leadership on this
project is invaluable to
the Duval Preservation
Trust, but even more im-
portant, they have moved
forward the historic
preservation of a unique
structure that will benefit
all of Citrus County and
the generations of its citi-
zens who will follow in
their footsteps.
The citizens of Citrus
County can be proud and
grateful to have such a
wonderful program that is
part of the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce, to
provide a means for these
future leaders of our
county to learn more
about their community
and how it operates. The
Citrus Leadership Class
of 2013 certainly shows us
that our future is destined
to be in good hands.
Members of the Citrus
Leadership class who par-
ticipated in the historic
Duval House project are:
Catherine Edmisten,
Cindi Fein, Courtney Pol-
lard, Isaac Baylon, John
Steelfox, Katie Mehl,
Laura Grady, Lindsay
Ubinas, Meghan Shay,
Melissa Benefield,
Melissa Wood, Michael
Dufca Sunshinp Arnold


Raymond Th
Ryan Glaze,
and Teri Hari
The o
Duval Prese




fi

secretary an


Sound

Outside labor force
I called one of the home-building sup-
ply companies and I found out they're
using a company in the Philippines to
handle their warranty work. I was just
wondering if anybody else knows of a
big store that's using outside-of-the-
country services. It bugs me when we
have people here who need jobs, but yet
they're contracting them overseas to
save money. I think it should be taxed
extra if they use outside work. We have
workers who need to be (working) here.
ER room for emergency care
Today, Wednesday, April 24, in Sound
Off, somebody was complaining again
about the waits at the Citrus Memorial
emergency room and stating they have
learned to go to an urgent care facility in-
stead of going to the ER. What part of
"emergency" don't the people in this
county understand? And don't they under-
stand that an emergency room triages the
patients and those who are indeed an
emergency are the ones who get first care
and the rest have to sit and wait, which
makes sense. The emergency room is only
for an emergency, not for medical care that
can be gotten elsewhere.
Waitresses have a say
Regarding "Pay for service": As a former
waitress, I would not bring a meal out if it
was not prepared correctly. A waitress


/OFF
does have a say in how it is cooked. If a
customer asks for it prepared their way,
the cook best read what the customer
wants. This is how you are tipped and you
bring the customers back.
In support of Adams
I have to totally agree with Commis-
sioner Adams. I think you're doing a great
job in holding everyone accountable for
what goes on. This is totally ridiculous. We
have people voted in to be our commis-
sioners to do what is best for the county
and then you have to hire outside firms to
tell you a financial plan at a cost of
$31,680? This is totally, totally uncalled
for. What do we elect you people for?
Cloudy sight
I've been watching the manatees and
the Lecanto harvesters operate in Crys-
tal River for many years coexisting
peacefully. I don't know what the Save
the Manatee Club has been seeing or
observing, but evidently they have not
been seeing what I've been seeing.
No rocket science
Here we go again. Let's stand on the
shore and boo hoo and jump up and
down and cry our little eyes out. They
make a little turbidity. So what? It set-
tles right back down. Rake it down and
you wind up with a cleaner bay than be-
fore. It's that simple. It's not that hard
and it's definitely not rocket science.


lompson,
SherriParker HAPPY M THEIR'S DAY

officers of the
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This year's emergency guide is once again being partnered
with the Sheriff's Emergency Management Team to promote their
May 18th expo as well as hurricane preparation plans for before,
during and after the storm. It includes evacuation information,
maps for tracking the storm, flood zone map and more.
As an advertiser, this section really delivers!
Two ads for one price
Distribution in the Chronicle and at the Expo
Highly read content
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PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 16

DEADLINE: TUESDAY, MAY 7

THE RATE INCLUDES AN AD IN TWO PUBLICATIONS

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.I T R O UN.T Y. to re s e rv e y o u r s p a c e .
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OPINION


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 A9












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS


Associated Press
A spectator receives a
mint julep Friday before
the running of the 139th
Kentucky Oaks at
Churchill Downs in
Louisville, Ky.


Iowa woman says
husband bit dog
to stop attack
MADRID, Iowa-An
Iowa woman whose nose
was severely injured by an
attacking dog said her hus-
band bit the animal to make
it stop assaulting her.
Caren and Laine Henry
told The Des Moines Regis-
ter on Thursday that a 50-
pound Labrador mix ran out
of a yard in rural Madrid on
Sunday and attacked the
couple while they were
walking their pet beagle.
Caren Henry said the
dog bit her abdomen and
right thigh, scratched at her
eyes, then clamped onto
her nose, tearing it off. She
said her husband was bit
on an arm when he tried to
help her.
Caren Henry said her
husband "finally had to bite
the dog in its nose, and it let
loose."
Teacher accused
of taping
student's mouths
AURORA, Colo. -A
Denver area second-grade
teacher is accused of taping
her students' mouths shut
when they wouldn't be
quiet.
The incident happened
Thursday at Fulton Acad-
emy in the suburb of Au-
rora. Police are
investigating and the
unidentified teacher is on
paid administrative leave.
According to KUSA-TV,
one parent said all 28 kids
in the class may have been
affected.
The teacher did not re-
turn a phone call seeking
comment.
The school is under the
jurisdiction of Aurora Public
Schools with limited respon-
sibility for making its own
decisions.
The school district issued
a statement saying it's tak-
ing the matter seriously and
will conduct its own
investigation.
Solar plane
leaves Calif. on
cross-country trip
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.
- A solar-powered airplane
left Northern California and
is on the first leg of a
planned journey to several
U.S. cities.
The Solar Impulse left
Moffett Field in Mountain
View just after dawn on
Friday.
It plans to stop at Sky
Harbor airport in Phoenix,
Dallas-Fort Worth airport in
Texas, Lambert-St. Louis
airport, Dulles airport in the
Washington area and New
York's John F. Kennedy air-
port. Each flight leg will take
20 to 25 hours, with 10-day
stops in each city.
The plane is powered by
about 12,000 photovoltaic
cells that cover massive
wings and charge its batter-
ies, allowing it to fly day and
night without jet fuel.
Its creators say solar
planes will never replace
fuel-powered commercial
flights. The goal is to show-
case the potential of solar
power.
-From wire reports


Solid jol
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
U.S. economy showed in
April that it's healthier than
many had feared, adding a
solid 165,000 jobs and driv-
ing the unemployment rate
down a notch to a four-year
low of 7.5 percent.
Not only that, but many
more people were hired in
February and March than
previously thought, the
Labor Department said Fri-
day The job gains came de-
spite a global slowdown,
Social Security tax in-
creases and federal spend-
ing cuts, which some
thought would drag on the
economy
Coming after a poor
March jobs report and some


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gains in April e
cent data showing eco- ofjob gains in February and
)mic weakness, the fig- March by a combined
es helped ease fears that 114,000. It now says employ-
S. hiring might be slump- ers added 332,000 jobs in
g for a fourth straight year February and 138,000 in
4e job market is benefit- March.
g from a resurgent hous- The economy has created
g market, rising consumer an average of 208,000 jobs a
nfidence and the Federal month from November
serve's stimulus actions, through April well above
which have helped lower the monthly average of
rrowing costs and lift the 138,000 for the previous six
)ck market months.
"All things considered, The unemployment rate
5,000 isn't the biggest edged down from 7.6 per-
onthly gain in payrolls cent in March and has
u'll ever see, but it's fallen 0.4 percentage point
lough to assuage concerns since the start of the year,
at the economy had though it remains high. The
called again," said Paul Fed has said it plans to keep
shworth, an economist at short-term interest rates at
ipital Economics. record lows at least until
The Labor Department unemployment falls to
vised upward its estimate 6.5 percent


Associated Press
Double amputee Jason Koger of Owensboro, Ky.,
demonstrates his i-limb ultra revolution hands,
decorated with images of his children, Thursday in
Philadelphia. Koger, a husband and father of three
who lost his limbs in an accident, can now activate
with an iPhone app 24 different grip patterns for his
new hands.


App lets amputees program

their own bionic hands


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Double-
amputee Jason Koger used to fly
hundreds of miles to visit a clini-
cian when he wanted to adjust the
grips on his bionic hands.
Now, he's got an app.
Koger came to Philadelphia this
week to demonstrate the i-limb
ultra revolution, a prosthetic de-
veloped by the British firm Touch
Bionics. Using a stylus and an
iPhone, Koger can choose any of 24
grip patterns that best suit his
needs.
It's the latest evolution in equip-
ment for Koger, a 34-year-old mar-
ried father of three from
Owensboro, Ky, who lost his hands
in an all-terrain vehicle accident in
2008.
"Five years ago, I couldn't pull
my pants up by myself," said Koger
"Today, I go hunting and do some of
the things that I probably never
imagined I could have done five
years ago."
The technology indicates how
rapidly the field of prosthetics is
changing, benefiting patients from


injured military members to vic-
tims of the Boston Marathon bomb-
ing. Practitioners say increased
government research in the wake
of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
is driving some of the advances.
In Koger's case, he was shocked
by a downed power line. He went
into a coma and had no idea until
he woke up three days later that
doctors had amputated both his
limbs at mid-forearm.
His wife spent those three days
researching prosthetics, Koger
said.
Since then, he's used a variety of
prostheses, which he considers like
tools different extensions for dif-
ferent tasks. Electric hooks have al-
lowed him to pursue his passion for
hunting. Myoelectric hands, which
react to electrical impulses gener-
ated by his remaining arm muscles,
offer more precise movements.
The previous version of Koger's
myoelectric device required pro-
gramming by a prosthetist, mean-
ing Koger had to fly to Advanced
Arm Dynamics in Dallas. The pros-
thetist would work with Koger to
pick a few grip patterns such as


ase fears

U.S. job market
The unemployment rate fell
in April to a four-year low of
7.5 percent.
UNEMPLOYMENT RATE
8.50 percent
8.50 percent ..................................
8.2500 ...... ....... ..............5... 0. 5


7.50
7.25 r......... r r r r -
AM JJ ASONDJ FMA
2012 2013
JOB CREATION April
350 thousand jobs. 165,000*
300 .... ................. ...
250

1ll150 .....
100
50
AMJJ ASONDJ F MA
2012 2013
*Preliminary data
SOURCE: Labor Dept. AP


pinching, pointing or shaking
hands to program into the i-limb.
Yet sometimes Koger would get
home and realize they weren't the
ones he needed. Now, the latest
i-limb comes with iPhone or iPad
app that allows Koger to reprogram
his hand with the touch of a stylus.
On Thursday, he demonstrated by
gripping an orange, a baseball and
a can of soda.
The i-limb allows fingers and
thumbs move independently to
conform around certain objects,
said Ryan Spill, a prosthetist for
Advanced Arm Dynamics' new of-
fice in Philadelphia, who is work-
ing with Koger. The thumb is also
motorized, not passive, as in previ-
ous prostheses.
The Boston Marathon bombings,
which wounded more than 260
people including many with seri-
ous leg injuries, have shined a light
on the advances in prostheses. But
experts note that technology for
upper extremity bionics, which in-
volve fine motor skills, is much dif-
ferent from what's needed for
lower extremities, which focuses
on weight distribution and gait


Killings reported in Syrian village


Associated Press


BEIRUT The bodies of
the Syrian boys and young
men in jeans and casual
shirts were strewn along a
blood-stained pavement,
dying apparently where
they fell. Weeping women
moved among the dead,
and one of them screamed,
"Where are you, people of
the village?"
In the Syrian civil war's
latest alleged mass killing,
activists said Friday that
regime troops and gunmen
from nearby Alawite areas


beat, stabbed and shot at
least 50 people in the Sunni
Muslim village of Bayda.
The slaying highlighted
in the starkest terms the
sectarian overtones of a
conflict that has already
killed more than 70,000
people. Details of the
killings came to light as the
Obama administration said
it was again weighing
whether to arm the rebels.
Syria's 2-year-old crisis
has largely broken along
sectarian lines: the Sunni
majority forms the back-
bone of the rebellion, while


President Bashar Assad's
minority Alawite sect, an
offshoot of Shiite Islam, an-
chors the regime's security
services and military offi-
cer corps. Other minorities,
such as Christians, largely
support Assad or stand on
the sidelines, worried that
the regime's fall would
bring about a more Islamist
rule.
Activists said fighting
broke out in Bayda early
Thursday and at least six
government troops were
killed. Syrian forces backed
by Alawite gunmen known


as shabiha from the sur-
rounding area returned in
the afternoon and stormed
the village, according to the
Britain-based Syrian Ob-
servatory for Human
Rights.
The gunmen torched
homes and used knives,
guns and blunt objects to
kill people in the streets,
the group said. It added
that it has documented the
names of at least 50 dead in
Bayda, but that dozens of
villagers are still missing
and the death toll could
rise to as high as 100.


World BRIEFS

Shaved


A strong grip


Associated Press
A boy feels his head
Friday after it was shaven
during a ceremony before
Buddha's birthday on May
17 at the Jogye temple in
Seoul, South Korea. Ten
children entered the
temple to experience life
with monks for 16 days
leading up to Buddha's
birthday.

US military plane
crashes in
Kyrgyzstan
CHALDOVAR, Kyrgyzstan
-An American military refu-
eling plane carrying three
crew members crashed Fri-
day in the rugged mountains
of Kyrgyzstan, the Central
Asian nation where the U.S.
operates an air base key to
the war in Afghanistan.
There was no word on the
fate of the KC-135 crew as
darkness fell and the search
for them was suspended for
the night. Cargo planes do
not have ejector seats. Offi-
cials at the U.S. base said
they had no information yet
on the cause of the crash.
The plane crashed at 2:55
p.m. near Chaldovar, a vil-
lage 100 miles west of the
U.S. Transit Center at Manas
base outside the Kyrgyz cap-
ital, Bishkek. Pieces of the
plane, including its tail, were
scattered across in a grassy
field bordered by mountains;
the air was infused with the
heavy stench of fuel.
Lead prosecutor
in Bhutto case
is killed
ISLAMABAD Gunmen
on Friday killed the lead
Pakistani prosecutor in two
high-profile cases the as-
sassination of former Prime
Minister Benazir Bhutto, and
the brutal assault on civil-
ians in Mumbai shocking
a country reeling from Tal-
iban attacks as it prepares
for nationwide elections.
Chaudhry ZulfikarAli was
gunned down in a hail of
bullets as he drove to court
in the normally quiet capital,
where a concentration of
diplomats, government and
military officials and aid
workers live. Nobody
claimed responsibility for the
killing, but as Ali's work put
him in direct conflict with
militant groups, suspicion
immediately fell on them.
German WWII
bomber to be
salvaged
LONDON -Afamous
German WWII bomber has
spent decades submerged
in the English Channel -
but that's about to change.
British officials on Friday
announced a complex sal-
vage operation to rescue
the only known surviving
example of the German
Dornier Do 17 bomber, an
aircraft nicknamed "the fly-
ing pencil" because of its
narrow fuselage.
The wreck is located just
off the Kent coast in south-
east England in about 60
feet of water. The plane had
been shot down during the
1940 Battle of Britain.
Experts said the bomber,
discovered by divers five
years ago, is remarkably
undamaged despite the
passage of time.
Officials at the RAF Mu-
seum in London said the
challenging salvage will be
the biggest recovery of its
kind and they hope to one
day display the bomber at
the museum.
-From wire reports


4.









S POR MAY4,201TS
PORT


* Hawks,
Celtics
bounced
from
NBA
playoffs.
/B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Auto racing/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Basketball/B4
0 Golf, hockey/B4
0 Baseball/B5
0 Horse racing/B6
0 Football/B6


Journey around county ends in regional win


SRCS baseball

blasts OCP 17-0
JON-MICHAEL SORACCHI
Staff writer
HOLDER In a game that
spanned a long lightning delay
and two different ballparks, the
Seven Rivers Christian baseball
team didn't need very long once
on the field to finish the job.
The Warriors, boosted by 12
first-inning runs and the stellar
pitching of Cory Weiand, easily
dispatched visiting Orlando
Christian Prep 17-0 in five in-
nings Friday afternoon during a
FHSAA Class 2A regional quar-
terfinal contest.
"Good things happen when
you have hitters like we do mak-
ing great contact," Seven Rivers
coach Jim Ervin said. "That's
the difference in this team from
earlier in the season."


Seven Rivers (17-2 overall)
moves onto the regional semifi-
nals Tuesday against either
Faith Christian or St. John
Lutheran, who've been post-
poned twice and are scheduled
to play today in Orlando.
The winner of that contest de-
termines if the Warriors get an-
other home playoff game: Seven
Rivers would host St. John, but
would have to travel to Faith
Christian.
With a 1 p.m. start time at
Dazzy Vance Field in Ho-
mosassa, a thunderstorm de-
layed the action with the
Warriors up 4-0 in the bottom of
the first inning.
Wanting to get the contest in,
the decision was made to finish
at Central Ridge Park in Holder
Between the initial delay and
travel time, the two teams
restarted about 90 minutes later
at 3 p.m.
Ervin went out of his way to
praise the quick work on the


field at Central Ridge by Citrus
County grounds maintenance
unit supervisor Steve Sykes and
his crew.
"We thank Parks and Recre-
ation for giving us the chance to
get the game in (Friday)," Ervin
said. "They did a great job."
Seven Rivers was never seri-
ously challenged by OCP (4-14-1
overall). The top five batters in
the Warriors' lineup did the ma-
jority of the damage and the
team was aggressive at the plate
from the get-go.
Senior second baseman John
Iwaniec went 2 for 4 with a triple
and three runs while junior
third baseman Adam Gage bat-
ted 3 for 4 with two doubles, four
runs and two RBIs.
"We're a little better than last
year," Gage said, "(and) just to
get another regional win is a big
deal to us."
Seventh-grader Parker Pills-
bury had the game's only home
See ARR PageB3


IVIMTI I IVV t. nreonomle
Seven Rivers Christian School base runner Adam Gage beats a throw
to first base from Orlando Christian Prep shortstop Matt Tolentino
Friday afternoon at Dazzy Vance Field in Homosassa. Minutes later
the game was suspended and moved to another location due to rain.
Gage scored later in the inning.


Sweet repeat

Lecanto's Giardino

defends shotput title,

ties for team crown
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent


On a day punctuated by intermittent
rain showers, troublesome enough to al-
most delay the tournament, the FHSAA
Class 3A state track and field meet con-
cluded Friday evening
at the University of
North Florida in Jack-
sonville with two
Lecanto High School
qualifiers finishing
strong.
Junior Matthew Gia-
rdino reclaimed his
state title in the adapted Josh
shot put for the second Riemer
year in a row. With a finished 8th in
throw of 23 feet, 2 Class 3A shot
inches, Giardino easily put at state.
defeated second place
finisher Hakeem Mustafa of Bayside (16
feet, 5 inches) and Vanguard's Joey Gibbs
in third place (10 feet, 8 3/4 inches).
Giardino (3:11.35) finished second in
the adapted 800 meters to Gibbs (2:53.30)
after clipping the guard rail around the
curve with his tire and losing ground in
the final lap.
The finish of the adapted 200 meters
was so close Giardino and Gibbs that it
took several tense minutes after the fin-
ish of the race to determine that Gibbs
had edged out Giardino at the line by
four one-thousandths of a second (38.304
to 38.308).
"I pulled up too quickly at the finish
line," Giardino said. "It's kind of unfor-
tunate but things happen. Today was a
long day with the weather and it was
kind of rough in that aspect.
"I've really got to give it to Joey, he had
a good race," Giardino said of his com-
petitor "He surprised me in that 200
meter race. I honestly didn't expect him
to be with me at the finish. But I have to
give him a lot of credit he's a good
racer"
In the adapted overall team title,
Lecanto (Giardino) and Vanguard
(Gibbs) tied for a share of the state title
with 26 points apiece.
Lecanto senior Josh Riemer qualified
for state in the shot put after placing
third in Region 3A-2 and winning a Dis-


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Lecanto junior Matt Giardino, seen here Tuesday at Lecanto High School, won the
adaptive shot put at the FHSAA Class 3A State Track and Field Championships on
Friday at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. Giardino also tied for the
team title for the Panthers after winning the adaptive team championship outright
last season.


trict 3A-6 title in the event.
Riemer threw the shot 48 feet, 3 inches
in the state finals for an eighth-place fin-
ish to medal.
Austin Droogsma of Gulf Breeze won
the state title with a 57 foot, 2 1/2-inch
throw.


Riemer earned Lecanto its lone point
in the overall team title competition for
a share of 59th place.
Giardino will dedicate his team state
medal to Lecanto sophomore Kyle Sis-
son, who was paralyzed in a BMX bike
accident on Feb. 16.


Source:


LeBron


isMVP


4th time
Associated Press
LeBron James is getting his
fourth Most Valuable Player
award and
the only mystery
left is whether
the vote was
unanimous.
The Miami
Heat star will be
introduced Sun-
day as the
award winner, LeBron
according to a Jamrones
person familiar
with the results reportedly will
and who spoke named NBA
to The Associ- MVP oSunday.
ated Press on Sunday.
condition of
anonymity because the league
has not publicly announced this
year's recipient. James will be-
come the fifth player with at least
four MVP awards, joining Ka-
reem Abdul-Jabbar, Michael Jor-
dan, Bill Russell and Wilt
Chamberlain.
No one has ever swept every
first-place vote in the NBAs MVP
balloting.
"I don't know who else you'd
vote for," Heat forward Chris
Bosh said Friday "No offense to
everybody else, but that's just
how good he has played this
year"
James averaged 26.8 points, 8.0
rebounds and 7.3 assists this sea-
son, shooting a career-best 56
percent
Only Russell had won four
MVPs in five years, and only
Abdul-Jabbar had gone back-to-
back on the award twice. Abdul-
Jabbar has six MVPs in all,
Jordan and Russell have five
apiece and Chamberlain won
four
James won the award in 2009
and 2010, only got four first-place
votes in 2011 his first season
with the Heat- then reclaimed
the award last season.
Shaquille O'Neal got 120 of the
121 top votes cast after the 1999-
2000 season, with Allen Iverson
getting the lone other one that
year


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B2 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


AUTo RACING


DAARA series comes to Citrus County


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

The Citrus County Speedway
gets a taste of history tonight as it
welcomes the Daytona Antique
Auto Racing Association's
(DAARA) Southern Vintage Se-
ries, while also featuring the re-
turn of the Open Wheel Modified,
Sportsman, Pure Stock and Mini
Stock classes.
The DAARA series features
several divisions of historic race-
car models, including Flathead
and Overhead Midgets, Non-
caged and Caged Sprints, Super
Modifieds (also known as Speed-
sters), V8 and Modified Stocks,
and Inline Cylinder and Flathead
Stocks. The Midget classes race
together, while sprints which
sport an elongated, missile-
shaped body and stock groups
periodically run with the other
sprint or stock classes.
Steve Parrish (No. 38 car) nar-


rowly leads J.T Dunn (No. 11) by
six points in the Inline and Flat-
head division, which typically
boasts the most crowded field of
the series. Dave Cash (No. 98),
Jim Miltner (No. 44) and Josh
Rynd (No. 15) share a lead in the
Caged Sprints, which are also
among the deeper DAARA fields.
There's a lot of championship
history at the top of the Open
Wheel Modified standings, with
Hernando's Richie Smith (No.
289), a former Open Wheel
champ who also holds multiple ti-
tles in various stock classes, and
Inverness' Herb Neumann Jr.,
who carries a long and distin-
guished record in Late Models,
occupying the top two places, re-
spectively Smith has two feature
wins, a heat win and a second-
place finish this season, while
Wesley Chapel's Troy Robinson
(No. 0) dominant in the divi-
sion's most recent feature on
April 13 and Neumann (No. 01)


also have feature victories.
Like Smith, Sportsman leader
Mike Bell (No. 17) comes in with a
heat victory and two feature wins
- including one on April 13 amid
a number of early exits and ex-
tensive car damage for its drivers.
But the Brooksville driver leads
by just one point over Sarasota's
Mark Peterson (No. 73, 411
points), who won the heat on April
13 and also has a feature victory
Meanwhile, a consistent Jay Wit-
foth (No. 4), of Beverly Hills, lurks
nearby with 406 points.
The Pure Stock class has four
different drivers with feature
wins this season, but it's Floral
City's 16-year-old Karlin Ray (No.
72) who's solidly in front with
three feature and two heat wins
this year. Winter Garden's Carl
Peters (No. 39) secured the top
spot on the fourth lap of last Sat-
urday's feature to win his first of


the season in two
track this year.


tries at the


The Mini Stock class continues
to spit out new winners, with only
Dade City's Kevin Stone (No. 98,
two feature wins, one heat win)
prevailing in more than one fea-
ture this season in a field with 10
different combined winners this
season. Mark Patterson (No. 22), of
Webster, is the most recent feature
- and heat winner, as he stayed
clean through a pair of yellow flags
to hold his advantage for the final
15 laps on April 13. Stone main-
tains a formidable edge in the
standings, however, as he leads a
second-place Jerry Daniels (No.
11), of Weirsdale, by 33 points.
Heat races begin at 5:30 p.m.
The grandstand gate opens at 4
p.m. and admission prices are $13
for adults, $9 for seniors and stu-
dents, and $5 for children age 11
and younger (children under 42
inches are free). Family passes
are also available, as well as
passes for the pits (gate opens at
2 p.m.) and skyboxes.


Gentleman behind the wheel


..'.,flC~I
-' ~ ~


^^^ ^y-.. .^-f~
-,< .> ^ : ... . . .
-
B C H CRAWFORD/Special to tCri


BUTCH CRAWFORD/Special to the Chronicle
Bushnell resident Chris Allen is leading the Mod Mini Stocks division by 24 points. The division will get back on the track May 11.


Allen balances racing hard and clean during races at Citrus County Speedway


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

Chris Allen has an ethical code
on the racetrack that he places
above winning.
"I'm a firm believer in racing
people how you want to be
raced," the 40-year-old Bushnell
driver said after his latest feature
win last Saturday "That's proba-
bly what cost me a championship
against (Dunnellon's Clint) Foley
(two years ago). I got into him a
couple times and crossed him up
and let him save it when I could
have passed him."
While Allen practices good
sportsmanship, he's still a formi-
dable competitor. With two fea-
ture wins and three heat victories
this year, he's ahead in the stand-
ings by 24 points over his friend
and supporter Michael Lawhorn.
"I couldn't be happier," Allen
said of leading the season while
also having Lawhorn around.
"We've raced together just about
everywhere. We do whatever we
can to try to make our two cars


run as well as we can."
Having fun while doing what he
can afford is a guiding motivation
for Allen, who is quick to empha-
size the crucial role played by his
father Mike Allen, who began rac-
ing more than four decades ago.
"My dad has been the biggest
influence on my racing career
and has given me every opportu-
nity in the world to do whatever I
want," Allen said. "We don't have
a lot of money, but we damn sure
have fun doing what we're doing.
I always tell everybody that as
long as I can afford to race, I will."
Allen, who considers the Citrus
County Speedway "the most fun in
the state," won a championship at
the track in his first year in 1992 in
what was then called the Bomber
division (now Pure Stock), possibly
helping to prompt a rule change.
"We raced Dodges back then,
and we were the only ones here
that were running a big-block (en-
gine) Dodge," Allen said. "About
three or four years after we dom-
inated with it my first year, they
banned big blocks."


Allen builds his own race cars
and performs the maintenance
on them, with special help from
Bob Pilkington of Slingshot Chas-
sis. He likes the combination of
affordability and power the Mod
Mini Stocks offer.
"They're basically a mini Late
Model," he said. "We don't run
Late Models because they're so
dadgum expensive. The Mod
Minis have a four-cylinder motor
- versus the big V8s and
they're a lot less expensive to
maintain and run. They limit us
on what we can do chassis-wise
and motor-wise, and it keeps
some of the costs down and
makes it more competitive.
"When you look at lap times
from the last big Late Model race
here, we could've out-qualified
half the Late Model field," Allen
continued. "We turn the motors
over 8,000 RPM, which is right up
there where the Late Models are
turning, so we zing 'em pretty
good. They're pretty reliable cars
and they handle really well."
Allen extends his courteous-


ness toward his competition off
the track, providing carburetors
or other supplies, which he said
is part of the effort needed to sup-
port the division.
"There've been times, three or
four years ago, when they sent us
home without enough cars in the
race," Allen said. "The whole
thing is, if you don't help guys out,
the class will suffer That's why we
have such a good car count; we all
get along pretty damn good. We've
got a lot of money invested in the
cars. They're not yard art"
Allen is looking forward to an
upgrade to his current No. 33 ma-
chine, which could make him an
even happier driver, while improv-
ing his already healthy prospects
for a championship season.
"Bob (Pilkington's) actually
helping me with a brand new car
I hope to have out by the end of
the season that's a lot better than
this one," he said.
Allen's Mod Mini Stock class
returns to action next Saturday,
May 11, for its sixth race of the
season.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Citrus County
Speedway points
Super Late Models
Car No. Name Points
110 Steve Dorer 323
98 Herb Neumann Jr. 310
23 Tood Brown 302
1 Dale Sanders 299
88 Joe Winchell 289
Open Wheel Modifieds
Car No. Name Points
289 Richie Smith 414
01 Herb Neumann Jr. 402
0 Troy Robinson 401
2 Steven Hise 388
18 Shane Butler 353
Mod Mini Stocks
Car No. Name Points
33 Chris Allen 526
44 Michael Lawhorn 502
24 Phil Edwards 501
99 Leroy Moore 477
71 Wayne Heater 468
Sportsman
Car No. Name Points
17 Mike Bell 412
73 Mark Peterson 411
4 Jay Witfoth 406
114 John Buzinec 380
66 Andy Nicholls 368
Street Stocks
Car No. Name Points
3 Curtis Flanagan 641
48 Dora Throne 602
16 J.D. Goff 497
26 Bradley Lyon 371
61 John Chance 308
Pure Stocks
Car No. Name Points
72 Karlin Ray 636
32 Mike Autenrieth 584
45 James Johnston 580
44 Glen Colyer 539
3 Jason Waller 514
Mini Stocks
Car No. Name Points
98 Kevin Stone 724
11 Jerry Daniels 691
73 Jason Terry 680
20 Shannon Kennedy 613
50 Jesse Mallory 577
Pro Figure 8s
Car No. Name Points
6 Joey Catarelli 100
85 Thomas Peet 98
32 Eric Sharrone 96
13 Neil Herne 94
94 Charlie Meyer 92
Figure 8s
Car No. Name Points
82 Jimmy Kruse 196
6 Ronnie Schrefiels 192
85 Pnut Higginbotham 190
33 Travis Nichols 186
32 Mike Autenrieth 186
Upcoming
Speedway schedule
Racing key
SLM: Super Late Models (50 Lap Features)
OWM: Open Wheel Modifieds
SP: Sportsman
MMS: Mod Mini Stocks
SS: Street Stocks
MS: Mini Stocks
PS: Pure Stocks
HD: Hornet Division
PF8: Pro Figure-8s
F8: Street Stock/Pure Stock Figure-8s
FUPS: Florida United Promoters Series
(Super Late Models, 100 Lap Features)
TBARA: TampaBayAreaRacingAssociation
(Sprints)
DAARA: Daytona Antique Auto Racing Asso-
ciation
S.E.C.K.S.: South East Champ Kart Series
MIDGETS: FI 3/4 Midgets
Dates
May 4 OWM, SP, PS, MS, Pro-Challenge,
DAARA
May 11 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs
May 18-TRUCKs (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
OWM (50 Laps), PF8, S.E.C.K.S.
May 25 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, F8
June 1 SS (50 Laps), MS, HD, OWM, SP,
Pro-Challenge
June 8 FUPS (Powell Memorial), MMS,
PS, MS, DWARFs
June 15-- OWM, SP SS, MS, PF8
June 22 -TBARA, MMS, SS, PS, HD, F8,
MIDGETS
June 29 DAARA (Rest to be announced)
July 6 -CLOSED
July 13 SLM, MMS (50 Laps), SS, PS,
DWARFs, HD
July 20 CLOSED
July 27 SLM, MMS, SS, MS, PS, HD, F8
Aug. 3 OWM, SP SS, PS, Pro-Challenge
Aug.10 FUP MMS, SS, MS, DWARFs, HD
Aug. 17 OWM (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
SS, PS, PF8
Aug. 24 CLOSED
Aug. 31 CLOSED
Sept. 7-TRUCKs (50 Laps), SP (50 Laps),
OWM (50 Laps), MS, PS
Sept. 14 -FUPS, MMS, SS, PS, F8, DWARFs
Sept. 21 OWM, SP SS, PS (50 Laps), MS,
PF8
Sept. 28 FLAG POLE, BOAT & TRAILER,
SUIT CASE RACE, F8, MS, PS
Oct. 5 -OWM (50 Laps), TRUCKs (50 Laps),
SP (50 Laps), Pro-Challenge, DWARFs
Oct.12-SLM, SS, MMS, MS, HD
Oct. 19 -TBARA, (Frank Stromquist) SS (57
Laps), PS, F8, MIDGETS
Oct. 26 OWM, SP SS, PS, MS, PF8
Nov 2-FUPS, MMS, SS, MS, HD
Nov 9-OWM, SP MS, PS, DWARFs, Robert
Aaron F8 Special 50 Laps no-points


Hamlin runs
16 laps at Talladega
TALLADEGA, Ala. -
Denny Hamlin ran 16 laps at
full speed Friday, turned his
car over to Brian
Vickers and then did-
n't exactly rule him-
self out of running a
full race this week-
end as he recovers
from a back injury.
Hamlin insisted he'll k" :+
again give Vickers the
car at some point De
Sunday at Talladega Han
Superspeedway. trying to
But with a sly from ba.
smile, Hamlin left the
door open to run a full race in
his return from a compressed
fracture of a vertebra in his
lower back. After missing four
races, he was cleared Thurs-
day to get back in the car this
weekend and said doctors
gave him permission to run
the entire race.
He said his intention was to
"take a knee" after the start by
getting out of the car during a


I

o
c


caution and allowing Vickers
to finish the race. That slightly
contradicted crew chief Darian
Grubb, who said earlier Friday
they'd play race-day by ear
and see how the race flows.
When asked
about that after his
practice stint, Hamlin
stammered about
his true plans.
"Ummm, yeah. I'd
say there's going to
be a caution at some
point and I'd like to
nny get out and just en-
mnlin sure myself of one
) return more week of heal-
;k injury. ing," Hamlin said.
So bet on Hamlin
getting out of the car?
"Is there that bet in Vegas?"
Hamlin asked.
He doesn't particularly like
Talladega, or restrictor-plate
racing, for that matter. But he
found himself tossing and
turning Thursday night, un-
able to sleep because he was
so anxious to get back in his
firesuit, back into his race car
and back onto the track.


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Auto racing BRIEF






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MLB box scores
Cardinals 6,
Brewers I


St. Louis


Milwaukee


ab rh bi ab rh bi
MCrpnt 2b 4 1 1 0 Aoki rf 4 0 2 0
Beltran rf 5 1 1 1 Segura ss 4 0 0 0
Hollidy If 4 3 3 2 Braun If 4 1 2 0
Craigib 5 0 3 0 ArRmr3b 3 0 2 0
YMolinc 5 1 2 0 AIGnzlzpr-lb1 0 0 0
Freese 3b 5 0 2 0 Weeks 2b 3 0 0 0
Jay cf 3 0 2 2 Lucroy c 3 0 0 1
Kozmass 4 0 1 0 CGomzcf 4 0 1 0
SMillerp 3 0 0 0 YBtncr1b-3b 3 0 1 0
CMrtnzp 0 00 0 Lohsep 1 0 0
Wggntn ph 1 0 0 0 Lalli ph 1 0 0 0
Manessp 0 0 0 0 Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0
Salas p 0 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 1 0 0 0
McGnzl p 0 00 0
Axfordp 0 0 0
Totals 39 6155 Totals 32 1 8 1
St. Louis 002 020 200 6
Milwaukee 000 001 000 1
E-Y.Betancourt (3). DP-St. Louis 2, Milwau-
kee 1. LOB-St. Louis 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B-
M.Carpenter (11), Y.Molina (8), Freese (3), Jay
(4). HR-Beltran (8), Holliday (4). SB-
C.Gomez (7). SF-Lucroy.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
S.MillerW,4-2 6 7 1 1 1 5
Ca.Martinez 1 1 0 0 0 0
Maness 1 0 0 0 0 0
Salas 1 0 0 0 0 0
Milwaukee
LohseL,1-3 5 11 4 4 1 3
Kintzler 2 3 2 2 2 1
Mic.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 0 1
Axford 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Axford. PB-Lucroy.

MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-CSantana, Cleveland, .383; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, .373; TorHunter, Detroit, .355;
Kinsler, Texas, .342; Lowrie, Oakland, .339;
CDavis, Baltimore, .337; McLouth, Baltimore,
.333.
RUNS-AJackson, Detroit, 28; Crisp, Oak-
land, 24; AJones, Baltimore, 23; McLouth, Bal-
timore, 23; MiCabrera, Detroit, 22; Jennings,
Tampa Bay, 21; 7 tied at 19.
RBI-Napoli, Boston, 31; MiCabrera, Detroit,
30; CDavis, Baltimore, 29; Fielder, Detroit, 27;
MarReynolds, Cleveland, 24; NCruz, Texas, 21;
Donaldson, Oakland, 21; AJones, Baltimore,
21.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 41; AJones, Balti-
more, 40; Altuve, Houston, 39; TorHunter, De-
troit, 39; Kinsler, Texas, 39; Machado, Baltimore,
39; Cano, New York, 37; Lowrie, Oakland, 37.
DOUBLES-Napoli, Boston, 15; Machado,
Baltimore, 12; Donaldson, Oakland, 11; AJones,
Baltimore, 11; Lowrie, Oakland, 11; JCastro,
Houston, 10; Crisp, Oakland, 10; Seager, Seat-
tle, 10.
TRIPLES-Ellsbury Boston, 3; Trout, Los An-
geles, 3; 10 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 9; Encar-
nacion, Toronto, 9; Morse, Seattle, 9; Mar-
Reynolds, Cleveland, 9; Arencibia, Toronto, 8;
Cano, NewYork, 8; Bautista, Toronto, 7; Fielder,
Detroit, 7.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 11;
Crisp, Oakland, 8; McLouth, Baltimore, 8;
RDavis, Toronto, 6; AEscobar, Kansas City, 6;
Pedroia, Boston, 6; Rios, Chicago, 6.
PITCHING-Buchholz, Boston, 6-0; MMoore,
Tampa Bay 5-0; Darvish, Texas, 5-1; Fister, De-
troit, 4-0; Lester, Boston, 4-0; Kuroda, New York,
4-1; Hammel, Baltimore, 4-1; Masterson, Cleve-
land, 4-2; FHernandez, Seattle, 4-2; Sabathia,
New York, 4-3.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 58; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 51; AniSanchez, Detroit, 50;
Dempster, Boston, 47; Buchholz, Boston, 47;
Scherzer, Detroit, 46; Masterson, Cleveland, 44.
SAVES-Rivera, New York, 11; Reed,
Chicago, 10; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 10; Nathan,
Texas, 8; Wilhelmsen, Seattle, 8; GHolland,
Kansas City, 7; Janssen, Toronto, 7.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-CGomez, Milwaukee, .372;
CJohnson, Atlanta, .352; Segura, Milwaukee,
.347; Choo, Cincinnati, .330; AdGonzalez, Los
Angeles, .330; WRosario, Colorado, .329;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, .328.
RUNS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 23; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 23; Pagan, San Francisco, 23;
Choo, Cincinnati, 22; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 22;
JUpton, Atlanta, 22; Fowler, Colorado, 21.
RBI-Buck, NewYork, 29; Phillips, Cincinnati,
26; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 24; Braun, Milwaukee,
23; Sandoval, San Francisco, 23; YBetancourt,
Milwaukee, 22; Utley Philadelphia, 21; DWright,
New York, 21.
HITS-SMarte, Pittsburgh, 38; Choo, Cincin-
nati, 36; Sandoval, San Francisco, 36; SCastro,
Chicago, 35; CGomez, Milwaukee, 35;
Desmond, Washington, 34; YMolina, St. Louis,
34; Segura, Milwaukee, 34.
DOUBLES-Desmond, Washington, 11;
Schierholtz, Chicago, 11; MCarpenter, St. Louis,
10; 8 tied at 9.
TRIPLES-Segura, Milwaukee, 3; DWright,
New York, 3; EYoung, Colorado, 3; 9 tied at 2.
HOME RUNS-JUpton, Atlanta, 12; Buck,
New York, 10; Harper, Washington, 9; Fowler,
Colorado, 8; Rizzo, Chicago, 8; Beltran, St.
Louis, 7;YBetancourt, Milwaukee, 7; Braun, Mil-
waukee, 7; Gattis, Atlanta, 7; WRosario, Col-
orado, 7.
STOLEN BASES-Pierre, Miami, 10;
SMarte, Pittsburgh, 9; ECabrera, San Diego, 8;
Segura, Milwaukee, 8; CGomez, Milwaukee, 6;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 6; Revere, Philadelphia,
6; DWright, New York, 6.
PITCHING-Lynn, St. Louis, 5-0; Zimmer-
mann, Washington, 5-1; Harvey, New York, 4-0;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 4-2; 18 tied at 3.
STRIKEOUTS-ABurnett, Pittsburgh, 57;
Samardzija, Chicago, 47; Kershaw, Los Ange-
les, 47; Harvey, New York, 46; Ryu, Los Ange-
les, 46; Wainwright, St. Louis, 43; Lynn, St.
Louis, 39.
SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 12; Romo, San
Francisco, 11; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 9; RSoriano,
Washington, 9; RBetancourt, Colorado, 8;
League, Los Angeles, 8; Mujica, St. Louis, 7.



NBA playoff glance
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, April 30
Denver 107, Golden State 100
Memphis 103, L.A. Clippers 93, Memphis
leads series 3-2
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 92, New York 86
Indiana 106, Atlanta 83
Houston 107, Oklahoma City 100, Oklahoma
City leads series 3-2
Thursday, May 2
Brooklyn 95, Chicago 92, series tied 3-3
Golden State 92, Denver 88, Golden State
wins series 4-2
Friday, May 3
New York 88, Boston 80, New York wins se-
ries 4-2
Indiana 81, Atlanta 73, Indiana wins series 4-
2
Oklahoma City at Houston, late
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, late
Saturday, May 4


Chicago at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 5
x-Houston at Oklahoma City, 1 or 3:30 p.m.
x-Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 3:30, 8 or 9:30
p.m.
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Sunday, May 5
Indiana at New York, 1,3:30 or 8 p.m.
Monday, May 6
Brooklyn or Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8
Brooklyn or Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 9:30 p.m.


FOr the r'co-rd


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
9-5-9
CASH 3 (late)
0 4-6-3
PLAY 4 (early)
0-9-1-8
PLAY 4 (late)

T FANTASY 5
. 2 4 12 14 28
MEGA MONEY

MEGA BALL
6


Thursday's winning numbers and payouts:


THURSDAY, MAY 2
Fantasy 5:6 12 17 34 35
5-of-5 1 winner $211,020.41
4-of-5 275 $123.50
3-of-5 8,194 $11.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
3 p.m. (ESPN) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Aaron's
312
6 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing Summit Racing Equip-
ment Southern Nationals, Qualifying (same-day tape)
1 a.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Racing Sao Paulo Indy 300, Quali-
fying (same-day tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) Vanderbilt at South Carolina
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Florida at LSU
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Maryland at Clemson
3:15 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi at Auburn
MLB BASEBALL
4 p.m. (FOX) Baltimore Orioles at Los Angeles Angels or
Washington Nationals at Pittsburgh Pirates
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago White Sox at Kansas City Royals
8 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays at Colorado Rockies
NBA BASKETBALL PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND
8 p.m. (TNT) Chicago Bulls at Brooklyn Nets, game 7
HORSE RACING
4 p.m. (NBC) 139th Kentucky Derby
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour Volvo China Open, Third
Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Wells Fargo Championship, Third
Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour Wells Fargo Championship, Third
Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Kingsmill Championship, Third
Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Insperity Champi-
onship, Second Round (same-day tape)
IIHF HOCKEY
5 a.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey 2013 World Championships: United
States vs. Austria
NHL HOCKEY PLAYOFFS FIRST ROUND
12:30 p.m. (NBC) New York Rangers at Washington Capitals,
game 2
7 p.m. (CNBC) Toronto Maple Leafs at Boston Bruins, game 2
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Anaheim Ducks at Detroit Red Wings,
game 3
10 p.m. (NBCSPT) St. Louis Blues at Los Angeles Kings,
game 3
COLLEGE LACROSSE
4 p.m. (FSNFL) ECAC Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Tottenham Hot-
spur FC vs Southampton FC
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: New York Red Bulls at Columbus
Crew
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) Tennessee at Missouri

RADIO
7:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
8:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Colorado
Rockies

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
No local events scheduled.


NHL playoff glance
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Tuesday, April 30
Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT, Chicago leads
series 1-0
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
Anaheim 3, Detroit 1
Wednesday, May 1
Boston 4, Toronto 1, Boston leads series 1 -0
Pittsburgh 5, NY Islanders 0
San Jose 3, Vancouver 1, San Jose leads se-
ries 1-0
Thursday, May 2
Ottawa 4, Montreal 2
Washington 3, NY Rangers 1, Washington
leads series 1-0
St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, St. Louis leads
series 2-0
Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT, series tied 1-1
Friday, May 3
Montreal 3, Ottawa 1, series tied 1-1
NY Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3, series tied 1-1
Minnesota at Chicago, late
San Jose at Vancouver, late
Saturday, May 4
NY Rangers at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 5
Pittsburgh at NY Islanders Noon
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 3 p.m.
Monday, May 6
Washington at NY Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 8p.m.
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7
Montreal at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at NY Islanders, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10 p.m.


PGA Tour
Wells Fargo Championship
Friday
At Quail Hollow Club, Charlotte, N.C.
Purse: $6.7 million
Yardage: 7,492, Par 72
Second Round
Phil Mickelson 68-67- 135
Scott Gardiner 70-67-137
Nick Watney 67-70-137
George McNeill 69-68-137
Rory Mcllroy 67-71 -138
Lee Westwood 70-68 -138
Rod Pampling 69-69-138
Jason Kokrak 68-70-138
Derek Ernst 67-71 -138
Lucas Glover 68-71 -139
David Lynn 71-68 -139
Robert Garrigus 67-72 -139
D.A. Points 71-69-140
Kevin Streelman 68-72 -140
Russell Henley 69-71 -140
ZachJohnson 68-72-140
Brian Harman 70-70 -140
Daniel Summerhays 67-73 140
Sergio Garcia 72-68-140
Jordan Spieth 69-71-140
Ted Potter, Jr. 71-70 -141
Ross Fisher 70-71 -141
Nate Smith 67-74-141
David Hearn 69-72-141
Robert Karlsson 69-72 -141
Dicky Pride 71-71 -142
Angel Cabrera 73-69 -142
Kyle Stanley 74-68-142
Stuart Appleby 71-71 -142
Vaughn Taylor 70-72 -142
Shawn Stefani 69-73-142
Ryan Moore 67-75-142
Trevor Immelman 70-72 -142
James Driscoll 70-72 -142
Jimmy Walker 71-72 -143
John Rollins 69-74-143
Luke Guthrie 74-69 -143
D.H. Lee 72-71 -143
John Senden 70-73- 143
Boo Weekley 68-75 -143
RichardH. Lee 73-70 -143


Chris Kirk
GaryWoodlar
Steve Marino
Bud Cauley
Brad Fritsch
Bo Van Pelt
Kevin Stadler
Roberto Casti
Martin Flores
Charles Howe
Kevin Chappe
Casey Wittent
Lee Williams
Henrik Norlan
Webb Simpso
Rickie Fowler
Patrick Reed
Peter Tomasu
Brendon de Ji
John Merrick
Steven Bowdi
Pat Perez
Scott Brown
Hunter Mahar
Mike Weir
Jonathan Byrd
Josh Teater
Brian Davis
Geoff Ogilvy
Robert Allenb
Luke List
Doug LaBelle
Matteo Manas
Matt Jones
James Hahn
Chris Stroud
Ryo Ishikawa
Tommy Gaine
Hunter Haas
Kevin Sutherla
Will Claxton
Justin Hicks

Nicolas Colsa
Scott Langley
Jesper Parnev
Martin Laird
Sean O'Hair
Rory Sabbatin
John Huh
Tag Ridings
Colt Knost
David Lingme
Chez Reavie
Brandt Jobe
Michael Letzig
Bobby Gates
Troy Matteson
Neal Lancaste
Bubba Watson
Jason Bohn
Joey Snyder I
Jack Fields
Andres Gonza
Martin Kayme
Andrew Svobo
Donald Const
Jeff Gove
Jim Herman
Fabian Gome
Chad Campbe
Brendan Stee
Jeff Maggert
Tom Gillis
Andres Rome
CamiloVillega
Cameron Per
Charles Frost
Morgan Hoffm
Joe Ogilvie
Seung-Yul No
Bill Haas
Johnson Wag
J.J. Henry
Wes Short, Jr.
Robert Streb
Darron Stiles
Joey McLister
Kelly Mitchum
John Petersor
Ben Curtis
Ken Duke
Aaron Watkins
Jerry Kelly
Scott Stallings
Michael Bradl
Ricky Barnes
Scott Verplank
David Mathis
Henrik Stenso
Ben Kohles
Cameron Trin
Alistair Presne
Erik Compton
Jonas Blixt
Steve LeBrun
Justin Bolli
Eric Meierdier
Brian Stuard
Nicholas Thor
Charlie Beljan
Jin Park
Stephen Ame
Paul Haley II
Padraig Harrir
Greg Owen


72-71 -
nd 70-73-
71-72-
70-73 -
71-72-
74-70-
73-71 -
ro 71-73 -
73-71 -
ill III 72-72 -
al1 73-71 -
berg 73-71 -
73-71 -
der 74-70-
dn 70-74 -
72-72 -
70-74 -
10o 71-73 -
Inge 74-71 -
74-71 -
tch 69-76-
76-69-
74-71 -
73-72 -
72-73 -
72-73 -
72-73 -
72-74-
74-72 -
y 76-70-
71-75-
II 74-72-
ssero 71-75-
73-73 -
72-74 -
71-75 -
73-73 -
ay 74-72 -
75-71 -
and 73-73 -
73-73 -
74-72 -
Failed to Qualify
erts 70-77-
73-74-
ik 72-75 -
72-75 -
72-75 -
ni 70-77 -
74-73 -
75-72 -
74-73-
rth 74-73-
73-74 -
75-72 -
s 74-73 -
71-76-
S72-76-
er 75-73-
n 72-76 -
71-77 -
II 76-72 -
73-75 -
ales 77-71 -
ar 72-76 -
oda 70-78 -
able 73-75 -
72-76-
72-76 -
z 73-76 -
,ell 75-74 -
le 75-74-
73-76-
76-73 -
ro 74-75-
as 74-75 -
sy 76-73 -
74-75 -
nann 78-71 -
72-77-
h 74-75 -
79-70 -
ner 75-74-
73-76-
74-75-
75-74 -
77-72 -
77-72-
73-76-
S73-76-
74-76-
74-76-
3 76-74-
73-77-
S77-73-
ey 77-73-
74-77-
S76-75-
78-73-
in 76-76-
78-74-
gale 73-79-
ell 76-76-
76-76-
76-76-
77-75-
77-75-
*ks 76-76-
78-75-
npson 75-78-
S78-75-
76-77-
s 77-76-
79-75-
ngton 80-75-
77-78-


Champions Tour
Friday, At The Woodlands CC
The Woodlands, Texas
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 7,002, Par 72 (36-36)
First Round (partial):
Mike Goodes 35-34 -69
Gene Sauers 32-38 -70
Brian Henninger 37-34 -71
Mark Brooks 35-36 -71
Hal Sutton 38-33 -71
Michael Allen 35-36 -71
Mark Bucek 36-35 -71
Brad Bryant 35-37 -72
Steve Jones 35-37 -72
Steve Lowery 35-37 -72
Rocco Mediate 36-36 -72
Gary Hallberg 38-34 -72
Jeff Sluman 37-35 -72
Loren Roberts 37-35 -72
Esteban Toledo 38-34-72
Mark Mouland 36-36 -72
Blaine McCallister 37-36 -73
Peter Senior 36-37 -73
Bob Tway 37-36 -73
Steve Elkington 39-34 -73
Hale Irwin 36-37-73
MarkO'Meara 38-35-73
Jay Haas 37-36 -73
John Cook 39-34 -73
Jim Rutledge 41-32-73
Jim Gallagher, Jr. 40-34 -74
Tommy Armour III 37-37-74
Ben Crenshaw 37-37-74
D.A. Weibring 37-37-74
Kenny Perry 38-36 -74
Bob Gilder 37-37-74
Chien Soon Lu 35-40 -75
Tom Jenkins 39-36 -75
Scott Simpson 37-38 -75
Bart Bryant 37-38 -75
Jay Don Blake 37-38 -75
Mark Calcavecchia 37-38-75
Fred Funk 38-37-75
David Eger 37-38 -75
Rod Spittle 36-39 -75
Tom Purtzer 39-37 -76
Peter Jacobsen 36-40 -76
Andrew Magee 37-39 -76
Tom Pernice Jr. 39-37-76
Willie Wood 40-36 -76
Sandy Lyle 40-36 76
KirkTriplett 39-37-76
Mark Wiebe 36-40 -76
Tom Kite 38-38 -76
Curtis Strange 39-37-76
Dan Forsman 35-41 -76
Craig Stadler 42-35 -77
John Harris 36-41 -77
Dana Quigley 39-38 -77
Bernhard Langer 40-37 -77
Gil Morgan 36-41 -77
Mark McNulty 41-36 -77
Barry Lane 44-33 -77
Jim Thorpe 39-39 -78
Dick Mast 41-37-78
Fuzzy Zoeller 41-37 -78
Wayne Levi 42-36 -78
Roger Chapman 40-38 78
Gene Jones 38-40 -78
Robin Byrd 40-38 -78
Bobby Wadkins 39-40-79
Bill Glasson 40-39 -79
Andy Bean 40-39 -79
Corey Pavin 41-38-79
Russ Cochran 38-41 -79
Scott Hoch 41-39 -80
David Frost 41-39 -80
Anders Forsbrand 40-40 80
John Jacobs 42-39 81
Larry Nelson 39-42 81


Bryant battles


mom over auction

Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. Kobe Bryant is in a court
battle to try to keep his mother from auctioning
off mementoes from his high school days in
Pennsylvania and his early years with the Los
Angeles Lakers.
A New Jersey auction house filed a lawsuit in
U.S. District Court in Camden on Thursday for
the right to sell the stuff after the NBA star's
lawyers wrote the firm telling it to cancel a
planned June auction.
The disagreement is a high-value, high-pro-
file version of a question many families face:
Can Mom get rid of the stuff a grown child left
at home?
In this case, the 900 mementoes happen to be
worth upward of $1.5 million.
Among the first 100 or so items Pamela
Bryant intends to sell: the NBA star's jerseys,
practice gear and sweatsuits from Lower
Merion High School; varsity letters; a trophy for
being the outstanding player at the 1995 Adidas
ABCD basketball camp; and a signed basketball
from the 2000 NBA championship game.
And then there are rings, for the 1996 Penn-
sylvania high school championship, a pair that
the Lakers made for Bryant's parents for the
2000 NBA championship and one from the 1998
NBA All-Star game.
According to court filings, Pamela Bryant
struck a deal in January with Goldin Auctions
in Berlin, N.J., which earlier this year sold a
rare Honus Wagner baseball card for a record
$2.1 million.





Price looking to put dispute
with umpire in past
DENVER Tampa Bay Rays pitcher David
Price is looking forward to taking the mound again
and no longer talking about his verbal spat with
umpire Tom Hallion.
Price will make his first start today against Col-
orado since his run-in with Hallion. Price says he
has no grudge with umpires and hopes the crew
working the game feels the same way.
The AL Cy Young Award winner accused Hal-
lion of directing a profanity toward him during the
Rays' win over the Chicago White Sox last Sun-
day. Price thought Hallion missed a pitch and ex-
changed words with the plate umpire while
heading to the dugout after the seventh inning.
Asked if the quarrel might be held against him,
Price said, "I don't think umpires hold grudges."
Price still hopes Hallion apologizes to him.

ATP chairman, former player,
Brad Drewett dies at 54
LONDON Brad Drewett, a former tour player
who led the ATP as executive chairman and
helped increase prize money at Grand Slam tour-
naments, died Friday. He was 54.
He had Lou Gehrig's disease, and the govern-
ing body of men's tennis said in a statement he
died at his home in Sydney.
Drewett was a top-40 singles and top-20 dou-
bles player before he retired in 1990. He was
hired in 2006 to lead operations in the Middle
East, Asia and the Pacific regions. He led the ATP
since January 2012.
WTA chairman Stacey Allaster said the prize
money increases were "perfect examples of
Brad's brilliant strategic management, and an-
other example of how much he cared about our
athletes and the sport's long-term growth."
As a player, he won 181 singles matches and
two titles as well as seven doubles titles. In 1975,
he captured the Australian Open boys' singles title
and a year later made it to the Australian Open
singles quarterfinals in his Grand Slam debut. He
reached two Australian Open doubles semifinals
and the Wimbledon doubles quarterfinals.

Rain washes out NHRA
Southern Nationals qualifying
COMMERCE, Ga. Rain forced NHRA offi-
cials to postpone qualifying Friday for the NHRA
Southern Nationals at Atlanta Dragway.
Only eight Pro Stock cars were able to make
runs before consistent showers returned to the
track northeast of Atlanta. Rickie Jones topped the
drivers who finished with a pass of 6.596 seconds
at 210.11 mph.
-From wire reports




WARRIORS
Continued from Page B1


run, a two-run shot to left center field in the
fourth inning, en route to a 3-for-4 performance
which also included a double, two runs and
three RBIs. Teammate Lance Mosher was a
perfect 3 for 3 with two doubles, a walk, three
runs and three RBIs.
Weiand struck out 10 of the 15 batters he
faced and only allowed one ball Jay
Vasquez's double to lead off the fourth inning
- to leave the infield. Vasquez also walked in
the first inning, representing two of the three
times OCP reached base.
Giving up the lone hit and two walks in front
of error-free defense, Weiand needed just 57
pitches before giving way to Gage for the fifth
and final inning.


Weiand spotted his three primary pitches, a
fastball, curveball and changeup, well and even
froze a batter for a strikeout on a knuckleball.
The sophomore left-hander is now 7-0 with 84
strikeouts in 44 innings and a sub-0.50 ERA.
Offensively, the Warrior contributed as well
with two hits, two runs and two RBIs.
"(Cory) did a nice job," Ervin said. "Our pitch-
ing has been strong throughout the season, so
that really didn't surprise me. (Our pitchers are)
confident in what they do."
Gage tossed the final frame, striking out all
three batters he faced looking. According to
Ervin, Gage will start Tuesday's contest but be-
cause of Weiand's low-pitch total Friday, both of
the staff's top two pitchers are available.
Garret Griggs added a double, a run and two
RBIs for the Warriors.


SCOREBOARD


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 B3









Pacers finish off Hawks with 81-73 victory


Celtics also eliminated

by Knicks 88-80

Associated Press
ATLANTA George Hill and David
West each scored 21 points and the Indi-
ana Pacers withstood a furious Atlanta
comeback in the fourth quarter, beating
the Hawks 81-73 on Friday night to close
out the opening-round playoff series four
games to two.
The home team had won every game
until the Hawks returned to Philips
Arena and set a franchise record with
just nine points in the second quarter on
1-of-15 shooting. The defense broke down
in the third, allowing Hill and West to
combine for 22 points, and the Pacers
built a 65-50 lead going to the fourth.
The Hawks showed some heart, slicing
it to 76-73 on Al Horford's dunk with 2:13
remaining.
But the comeback fizzled there, and
the Pacers advanced to face New York.
The Hawks went through an absolutely
brutal stretch from early in the second
quarter to nearly midway through the
third, in which they did not actually put
the ball in the hoop.
In the equivalent of more than a quar-
ter 15:43 to be exact -Atlanta went 1
of 21 from the field, the only basket
awarded to Devin Harris on a goaltend-
ing call against Roy Hibbert.
At a time when the Hawks needed one
of their best performances of the season,
they produced one of their worst.
Horford led with 15 points, while Josh
Smith and Harris finished with 14.
Indiana bullied the Hawks much of the
night, overcoming their own poor shoot-
ing (32 of 76) by beating Atlanta in the
lane. The Pacers finished with a stagger-
ing 53-35 lead on the boards.
Hibbert added 17 points and 11
rebounds.
Knicks 88, Celtics 80
BOSTON Carmelo Anthony scored 21
points and the New York Knicks held on after


Associated Press
Atlanta Hawks small forward Josh Smith tries to get to the basket Friday against
Indiana Pacers small forward Paul George in the first half of an NBA first-round playoff
game in Atlanta. The Hawks were eliminated in an 81-73 Game 6 loss.
blowing most of a 26-point lead to beat the Iman Shumpert scored 15 of his 17 points
Boston Celtics 88-80 in Game 6 and advance in the second half, when the Celtics cut a


in the postseason for the first time since
2000.


75-49 deficit to four points. But Anthony
made a jumper to give New York an 81-75


lead and then sank a 3-pointer, before J.R.
Smith converted a three-point play to restore
the double-digit lead the Knicks had nursed
most of the game.
Jeff Green scored 21 points for the Celtics,
who had rallied from a 3-0 deficit in the series
and had a chance, at home, to force a deci-
sive seventh game.
No NBA team has advanced in the playoffs
after losing the first three games.
Late Thursday night
Warriors 92, Nuggets 88
OAKLAND, Calif. Stephen Curry scored 22
points to go with eight assists, Andrew Bogut
broke out with the best performance of his injury-
saddled season and the Golden State Warriors
eliminated the Denver Nuggets with a 92-88 vic-
tory in Game 6.
Bogut had season-bests and career-playoff
highs of 14 points and 21 rebounds, and rookie
Draymond Green added a career-high 16 points
and 10 rebounds to power Golden State into the
second round for the first time in six years.
The Warriors went ahead by 18 points early in
the fourth before holding off one final Nuggets
flurry.
Andre Iguodala scored 24 points and Ty Law-
son had 17 in another disappointed early exit for
Denver, which has lost in the first round nine of
the past 10 seasons.
The Nuggets won 23 of their final 26 regular
season games to earn the Western Confer-
ence's third seed, then lost four of six to the hot-
shooting Warriors.
Nets 95, Bulls 92
CHICAGO Deron Williams, Brook Lopez
and Joe Johnson each scored 17 points, and
the Brooklyn Nets again avoided elimination,
beating the short-handed Chicago Bulls 95-92
to tie their first-round series at 3.
The series goes back to Brooklyn for Game
7 today. The winner gets Miami in the second
round.
The Bulls hung in until the end even though
they were missing Luol Deng and Kirk Hinrich.
Only eight NBAteams have come back from
a 3-1 deficit to win a best-of-7 series, but the
Nets are in position to do just that.


'Lefty'


Mickelson

holds 36-hole

lead at WFC

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Phil Mickelson has figured
out the secret to the greens
at Quail Hollow. Or maybe
he's just had a lot of good
bounces for two days.
Mickelson opened with a
pair of 15-foot birdie putts,
dropped in a 40-foot putt at
the turn and made back-to-
back birdies late in his
round Friday. He finished
with a 5-under 67 for a two-
shot lead going into the
weekend at the Wells Fargo
Championship.
Quail Hollow, renowned
for pristine conditions, had
everything go wrong with
spring and wound up with
putting surfaces that are
mostly choppy with brown
patches where the grass has
died. Two greens were en-
tirely replaced by sod last
week.
Despite that, Mickelson
has taken only 50 putts in
two rounds. And the most
staggering statistic of all?
He hasn't missed from in-
side 10 feet
"I think that the greens
are putting very, very good,
obviously, because I've
putted them well," Mickel-
son said. "But with them
being slower, we're able to
putt them aggressively
We're able to take some of
the break out without fear
of racing it way by And I've
made a concerted effort to
leave uphill putts, which
has allowed me to putt even
more aggressive and play
even less break And that's
made a big difference in my
putting."
For a tournament that al-
ready has had six major
champions win in the 10-
year history, Mickelson is
missing from the list. And
it's a title he dearly wants.
He was at 9-under 135
heading into the weekend,
though there is plenty of
star power around him.
Nick Watney played with
Mickelson the opening two
rounds and looks efficient,
going bogey-free on the
back nine. He had a 70 and
was at 7-under 137, along
with George McNeill (68)
and Scott Gardiner, the 37-
year-old tour rookie who
had missed eight straight
cuts coming into the Quail
Hollow. Gardiner, the first
Aboriginal Australian to be-


on top


Associated Press
Phil Mickelson reacts Friday as he nearly makes a shot from a sand trap on the fourth
hole during the second round of the Wells Fargo Championship at Quail Hollow Club in
Charlotte, N.C. Mickelson leads the tournament by two strokes entering the weekend.


come a pro golfer, ran off
four straight birdies at the
turn and had a 67.
Rory Mcllroy struggled
with the speed of the greens
- he felt they were much
faster than Thursday but
rallied on the front nine
with three birdies for a 71.
Lee Westwood twice hit into
the water on the par-5 sev-
enth and still escaped with
a bogey by making a 25-foot
putt. He had a 68. They
were in a group at 6-under
138 that included Rod Pam-
pling, the ninth alternate
and last man in the field.
Mike Goodes takes
Champions lead
THE WOODLANDS, Texas
- Mike Goodes shot a 3-under
69 in wind that gusted to 30
mph to take a one-stroke lead
after the first round of the
Champions Tour's Insperity
Championship.


Only seven players in the
81-man field broke par on an
unseasonably cold and blus-
tery day. A gust blew down one
scoreboard at The Woodlands
Country Club.
Brian Henninger, Mark
Brooks, Hal Sutton, Michael
Allen and Mark Bucek were
two strokes back at 71.
12-year-old misses
cut at China Open
TIANJIN, China The
youngest player to compete
on the European Tour missed
the cut, while Mikko Ilonen of
Finland tied the course record
with a 9-under 63 for a three-
shot lead at the China Open.
The 12-year-old amateur
Ye Wocheng missed the cut
at 14 over after a pair of 79s.
But China's Dou Zecheng
became the youngest at 16 to
make the tournament cut with
a 70-72 for a 2-under total.


17-year-old leads
by 1 at Kinsgmill
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -
Ariya Jutanugarn weathered
the wind and kept her lead in
the LPGA Tour's Kingsmill
Championship.
The 17-year-old Thai
player bounced back from
three early bogeys with three
birdies in an even-par 71 that
left her at 7 under, a shot
ahead of second-ranked
Stacy Lewis and Angela
Stanford on the windswept
River Course.
Lewis and Stanford both
had their second consecutive
68s, the best rounds of the
day. They played in the
morning and experienced
wind gusts that reached 22
mph, hardening the greens
and creating swirling condi-
tions that drove scores
higher.


Islanders rally


past Penguins


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Kyle
Okposo's first career
playoff goal with 7:37 re-
maining lifted the New
York Islanders to a 4-3
victory over the Pitts-
burgh Penguins on Friday
night, evening their play-
offs series at one game
each.
Matt Moulson, Colin
McDonald and Matt Mar-
tin also scored for the Is-
landers, who spoiled
Sidney Crosby's come-
back from a broken jaw
by rallying from an early
two-goal deficit.
Crosby scored twice in
the game's first eight min-
utes as the Penguins
raced to a quick 3-1 lead.
But they couldn't hold it
as the Islanders bounced
back from a lifeless per-
formance in Game 1.
Evgeni Nabokov over-
came a sluggish start to
stop 30 shots as the Is-
landers won their first
playoff game in more
than six years.
Marc-Andre Fleury
made 38 saves for Pitts-
burgh, which allowed the
speedy Islanders to effec-
tively counterpunch all
night
Game 3 is Sunday in
New York.
Canadiens 3,
Senators 1
MONTREAL Ryan
White started a three-goal
second period and goalie
Carey Price was back in top
form with 29 saves and the
Montreal Canadiens downed
the Ottawa Senators 3-1 to
even their playoff series.
The best-of-seven Eastern
Conference quarterfinal is
tied 1-1 heading into Game
3 on Sunday in Ottawa.
Brendan Gallagher and
Michael Ryder also scored
for Montreal. Milan Michalek
scored for Ottawa, which
was let down by a power
play that went 0-for-4.
There was anticipation of
rough play after Eric Gryba's
hit that saw Montreal's Lars
Eller carried off the Bell Cen-
tre ice on a stretcher with a
concussion and some miss-
ing teeth in Ottawa's 4-2 win
in the series opener on
Thursday night.
Late Thursday
Red Wings 5,
Ducks 4, OT
ANAHEIM, Calif. Gus-
tav Nyquist's power-play
goal at 1:21 of overtime after


NHL suspends
Ottawa's Gryba
MONTREAL-- Ottawa
Senators defenseman
Eric Gryba was sus-
pended for two games by
the NHL on Friday for his
crushing hit to the head
on Montreal Canadiens
center Lars Eller in Game
1 of their first-round play-
off series.
Gryba caught Eller with
his head down at the
Montreal blue line Thurs-
day night in the second
period of the Senators'
4-2 victory. Eller crashed
face-first to the ice, and
was bleeding heavily as
he was taken from the
Bell Centre ice on a
stretcher. He sustained a
concussion and facial and
dental injuries.
Elller was released
from the hospital Friday
and was resting at home.
-From wire reports

the Red Wings blew a three-
goal lead in the third period
gave Detroit a 5-4 victory
over the Anaheim Ducks to
even their playoff series.
Johan Franzen scored two
goals and Damien Brunner
had his first Stanley Cup
playoff goal and two assists
for the Red Wings, who sur-
vived a third-period collapse
with a timely goal from
Nyquist.
Bobby Ryan scored the
tying goal with 2:22 left in
regulation for the Ducks.
Blues 2, Kings 1
ST. LOUIS Defenseman
Barret Jackman scored his
first career playoff goal with
50.4 seconds remaining, lift-
ing the St. Louis Blues to a
2-1 win over the defending
Stanley Cup champion Los
Angeles Kings for the second
straight time.
Jackman, a stay-at-home
type who totaled three goals
and 12 points in the regular
season, joined a rush and
scored in transition against
Jonathan Quick, last year's
playoff MVP. He beat Quick
from just inside the blue line
for a 2-0 series lead heading
to Los Angeles.
Patrik Berglund's deflection
tied it early in the third period
for St. Louis, which was
swept by the Kings in the
second round last season
while getting outscored 15-6.
Dustin Brown scored for
the Kings, who'll try to re-
bound in Game 3 tonight.


B4 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston
New York
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami


W L
20 9
17 11
17 12
12 15
10 20



W L
17 12
15 15
14 16
12 15
8 22


East Division
GB WC
0 --
' 2Y2 --
6 3 -
4 7 4
3 1012 712


East Division
GB WC

0 2Y2 2
' 3Y2 3
4 4 3/2
' 9/2 9


NL

Reds 6, Cubs 5
Cincinnati Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo cf 4 2 2 1 DeJess cf 4 0 1 0
Cozartss 5 0 1 1 Sappeltph 1 1 1 0
Vottolb 3 2 2 0 SCastross 4 1 1 0
Frazier3b 4 0 1 1 Rizzolb 5 1 3 0
Bruce rf 5 1 1 2 ASorin If 5 1 2 1
Paul If 3 1 1 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 2 1
DRonsn If 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 0 0 0 1
Mesorc c 5 0 1 1 Castillo c 4 0 1 2
Clzturs 2b 2 0 0 0 TrWood pr 0 0 0 0
Leake p 3 0 0 0 Valuen 3b 4 0 3 0
LeCure p 0 00 0 Ransm ph 0 00 0
Marshll p 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 5 0 0 0
Hannhnph 1 0 0 0 Villanvp 2 0 0 0
Broxtn p 0 0 0 0 Bowden p 0 0 0 0
Chpmn p 0 00 0 Borbon ph 1 00 0
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 Loep 0 0 0 0
Gregg p 0 00 0
DNavrrph 1 1 1 0
Totals 35 69 6 Totals 40515 5
Cincinnati 110 002 110 6
Chicago 000 002 003 5
E-Castillo (4). DP-Cincinnati 2, Chicago 1.
LOB-Cincinnati 10, Chicago 12.2B-Choo (9),
Frazier (6), Bruce (8), Paul (2), Mesoraco (4),
Rizzo (7), A.Soriano (6). SB-Schierholtz (4).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Leake W,2-1 52/39 2 2 0 3
LeCure H,2 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
Marshall H,3 2/3 1 0 0 0 1
Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 0
Chapman 2/3 4 3 3 2 1
Hoover S,1-1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Villanueva L,1-2 52/37 4 4 2 4
Bowden 11/30 1 1 3 0
Loe 1 2 1 1 1 0
Gregg 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Broxton (Castillo), by Bowden (Votto).
Phillies 4, Marlins 1
Miami Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Pierre If 3 0 1 0 Rollinsss 4 0 1 0
Diazph-lf 1 0 0 0 Utley2b 4 1 1 1
DSolan 2b 4 1 2 1 MYong 3b 4 0 0 0
Polanc3b 4 0 1 0 Howard 1b 3 1 2 1
Dobbslb 3 0 0 0 DYong rf 3 0 1 0
Ruggin cf 4 00 0 MAdmsp 0 00 0
Ozunarf 4 0 2 0 L.Nixph 1 0 0 0
Brantly c 3 0 0 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0
Hchvrrss 3 0 0 0 DBrwn If 3 1 1 1
Nolasco p 2 0 0 0 Ruiz c 3 1 1 0
Kearns ph 1 0 0 0 Revere cf 3 0 1 1
Webb p 0 0 0 0 Pettion p 1 0 0 0
Coghln ph 1 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
Mayrry ph-rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 304 8 4
Miami 000 100 000 1
Philadelphia 021 100 00x 4
E-D.Solano (6). DP-Miami 2. LOB-Miami 8,
Philadelphia 4. 2B-Ozuna (2), Howard (9),
D.Young (1). HR-D.Solano (1), Utley (6), Howard
(5), D.Brown (5). SB-Pierre (10), Ruiz (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Nolasco L,2-3 6 8 4 4 1 4
Webb 2 0 0 0 1 2
Philadelphia
Pettibone W,2-0 61/35 1 1 0 3
BastardoH,4 2/3 0 0 0 2 2
Mi.AdamsH,3 1 1 0 0 1 1
Papelbon S,5-5 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pirates 3, Nationals 1
Washington Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 4 0 0 0 SMarte If 4 1 2 0
Matthsp 0 0 0 0 Mercer2b 4 1 1 2
Dsmndss 4 0 1 0 McCtchcf 4 1 3 1
Harper If 4 0 1 0 GSnchzlb 4 0 2 0
Zmrmn 3b 4 00 0 RMartn c 2 00 0
LaRochib 3 1 2 0 Ingerf 2 0 0 0
TMoorerf 4 0 1 0 Sniderph-rf 2 0 1 0
Espinos 2b 4 0 1 1 PAIvrz 3b 4 0 0 0
KSuzukc 3 0 1 0 Barmesss 3 0 0 0
Detwilrp 2 00 0 GJonesph 1 00 0
Stmmnp 0 00 0 Grillip 0 00 0
Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 AJBrnt p 3 0 0 0
Berndn pr-cf0 0 0 0 Melncnp 0 0 0 0
JMcDnlss 0 00 0
Totals 33 17 1 Totals 333 9 3
Washington 000 100 000 1
Pittsburgh 100 020 00x 3
E-PRAIvarez (5). LOB-Washington 6, Pitts-
burgh 8. 2B-G.Sanchez (4). HR-Mercer (1),
McCutchen (4). SB-S.Marte 2 (9).
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
DetwilerL,1-3 5 6 3 3 2 5
Stammen 2 1 0 0 0 2
Mattheus 1 2 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,3-2 7 5 1 1 1 9
MelanconH,11 1 1 0 0 0 2
GrilliS,12-12 1 1 0 0 0 3
Detwiler pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Balk-Stammen.
Mets 7, Braves 5,
10 innings
NewYork Atlanta
ab rhbi ab rhbi
RTejad ss 5 1 2 1 JSchafr rf 1 0 0 0
DnMrp2b 5 0 1 1 Smmnsss 4 0 1 2
Familip 0 0 0 0 J.Upton If 4 0 0 1
DWrght3b 5 1 1 1 FFrmnib 5 01 0
Buckc 4 1 1 2 Gattisc 5 1 1 1
Turnerib 3 0 0 0 Uggla2b 5 0 2 0
I.Davisph 1 0 0 0 BUptoncf 4 1 2 0
Dudalf 4 1 1 1 JFrncs 3b 1 0 1 1
Byrdcf 4 1 1 1 R.Pena3b 2 2 2 0
ABrwnrf 3 0 0 0 Minor p 1 1 0 0
VIdspn ph 0 1 0 0 Pstrnck ph 0 0 0 0
Marcmp 2 00 0OFIhrtp 0 00 0
Hwknsp 0 00 0 Kimrelp 0 00 0
Atchisnp 0 00 0 RJhnsnph 0 00 0
Lagarsph 1 00 0 Waldenp 0 00 0
Ricep 0 00 0 Avilanp 0 00 0
Lyonp 0 00 0 Gearrinp 0 00 0
Parnellp 0 000
Baxterph-rf 0 1 0 0
Totals 37 777 Totals 32510 5
NewYork 210 000 011 2 7
Atlanta 001 020 110 0 5
DP-New York 3. LOB-New York 2, Atlanta 7.
2B-R.Tejada (8), B.Upton (4), R.Pena (3). HR-
D.Wright (4), Buck (10), Duda (6), Byrd (2), Gat-
tis (7). SB-Valdespin (4). CS-J.Francisco (1).
S-Minor, Pastornicky, R.Johnson.SF-J.Upton.
IP H RERBBSO
NewYork
Marcum 4136 3 3 3 4
Hawkins 12/31 0 0 0 2
Atchison 1 0 1 1 2 0
Rice 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Lyon 1 3 1 1 0 0
ParnellW,2-0 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
FamiliaS, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Atlanta
Minor 7 3 3 3 0 4
OFlahertyBS,1-1 1 1 1 1 0 1
KimbrelBS,2-11 1 1 1 1 0 3
WaldenL, 1-1 2/3 1 2 2 1 0
Avilan 0 1 0 0 0 0
Gearrin 1/3 0 0 0 0 0


Avilan pitched to 1 batter in the 10th.
HBP-by Walden (Baxter). WP-Atchison.


Kansas City
Detroit
Cleveland
Minnesota
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
10 .600 7
11 .593 7
13 .500 2Y2 2Y2 7
13 .480 3 3 4
15 .444 4 4 5


Str Home
W-2 8-4
W-1 10-4
W-5 5-6
L-1 7-6
W-2 7-7


W
Texas 18
Oakland 17
Seattle 14
Los Angeles 10
Houston 8


West Division
L Pct GB WC I
11 .621 -
13 .567 112 12 !
17 .452 5 4
18 .357 7/2 61/2
21 .276 10 9


West Division
L Pct GB WC
11 .607 -
12 .571 1 --
13 .536 2 1
14 .481 3Y2 2Y2
17 .393 6 5


Str Home
W-1 9-4
W-1 9-8
W-2 9-8
L-1 6-7
L-3 4-9



Str Home
W-1 9-3
W-3 8-4
L-3 8-8
L-1 7-8
W-1 5-7


Str Home
L-3 8-5
L-1 9-7
W-2 8-8
W-2 7-8
L-3 5-11


St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
11 .621 7-3
12 .586 1 7-3
14 .533 212 1 4-6
14 .500 312 2 4-6
18 .379 7 512 5-5


Str Home
W-4 7-5
W-2 9-4
W-1 12-4
L-3 9-8
L-2 5-8


Colorado
San Fran.
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Diego


Associated Press
Philadelphia Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz celebrates after Miami Marlins batter Chris Coghlan struck out to
end the ninth inning Friday in Philadelphia. The Phillies won 4-1.



Marlins flounder in 4-1 loss


Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Jonathan
Pettibone pitched neatly into the
seventh, Ryan Howard, Chase
Utley and Domonic Brown hit solo
homers and the Philadelphia
Phillies beat the Miami Marlins 4-
1 on Friday night.
Pettibone (2-0) allowed one run
and five hits in 6 1-3 innings in his
third start filling in for injured
lefty John Lannan.
Donovan Solano hit a solo
homer for the Marlins, who've lost
three in a row after winning three
straight.
Ricky Nolasco (2-3) gave up four
runs and eight hits in six innings.
The Phillies are 9-2 combined
against the Marlins (8-22) and
New York Mets (11-15), but 5-14
against other teams. They're 9-3
when Pettibone, Lannan or Kyle
Kendrick start and 5-13 when aces
Cole Hamels, Roy Halladay and
Cliff Lee take the mound.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mets 7, Braves 5,
10 innings
ATLANTA- David Wright hit the
tying home run in the ninth inning off
closer Craig Kimbrel and the New York
Mets scored twice in the 10th to rally for
a 7-5 victory over the Atlanta Braves.
The Mets, who have won two in a
row after dropping six straight, scored
four of their first five runs on homers
before taking a two-run lead off Jor-
dan Walden (1-1) in the 10th.
Pinch-hitter Jordany Valdespin drew
a two-out walk from Walden and stole
second base when closer Bobby Par-
nell (2-0) squared around to bunt while
taking a strike on the first pitch he saw.
New York manager Terry Collins
brought in pinch-hitter Mike Baxter,
whom Walden hit with a pitch, and Te-
jada followed with an RBI single that
scored Valdespin from second to
make it 6-5. Baxter scored on Daniel
Murphy's RBI single.

Reds 6, Cubs 5
CHICAGO Jay Bruce had two
RBIs and scored a run, Shin-Soo
Choo drove in a run and scored twice,
and the Cincinnati Reds held off the
Chicago Cubs 6-5.
The Cubs scored three runs in the
ninth against Reds closer Aroldis
Chapman before reliever J.J. Hoover
came on and struck out Darwin Bar-
ney with the bases loaded to pick up
his first save.
Nate Schierholtz drew a two-out
bases-loaded walk and Welington
Castillo followed with a two-run single
to pull the Cubs within one. After
pinch-hitter Cody Ransom drew a
walk to load the bases again, Hoover
replaced Chapman.
Mike Leake (2-1) gave up two runs
and nine hits in 5 2/3 innings, earned
his fourth straight decision over the
Cubs with help from five relievers.
Devin Mesoraco, Todd Frazier and
Zack Cozart also had run-scoring hits
to help the Reds hand Carlos Vil-
lanueva (1-2) the loss.

Pirates 3, Nationals 1
PITTSBURGH A.J. Burnett al-
lowed one run and struck out nine in
seven shutout innings, and call-up
Jordy Mercer hit a tiebreaker home run
to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 3-1
victory over the Washington Nationals.
Burnett (3-2) gave up five hits and
one walk in winning his third straight


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, ppd., rain
Boston 3, Toronto 1
Chicago White Sox 3, Texas 1
Detroit 7, Houston 3, 14 innings
Baltimore 5, L.A. Angels 1
Friday's Games
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 6, 10 innings
Oakland 2, N.Y Yankees 0
Seattle 4, Toronto 0
Texas 7, Boston 0
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, ppd., rain
Detroit at Houston, late
Tampa Bay at Colorado, late
Baltimore at L.A. Angels, late
Today's Games
Minnesota (Correia 3-1) at Cleveland (Kazmir 0-1),
1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Colon 3-0) at N.Y. Yankees (PHughes 0-2),
1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 2-1) at Toronto (Dickey 2-4), 1:07
p.m.
Baltimore (FGarcia 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 2-1),
4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 3-0), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 3-0) at Houston (Harrell 3-2), 7:10
p.m.
Boston (Lackey 1-1) at Texas (Ogando 2-2), 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 1-2) at Colorado (Garland 2-2),
8:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
Baltimore at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Detroit at Houston, 4:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Thursday's Games
San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 2
Philadelphia 7, Miami 2
Washington 3, Atlanta 1
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 5
Friday's Games
Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 5
Philadelphia 4, Miami 1
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 1
N.Y. Mets 7, Atlanta 5, 10 innings
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 1
Tampa Bay at Colorado, late
Arizona at San Diego, late
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, late
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Cingrani 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Samardz-
ija 1-4), 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 4-2) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 3-
1), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 1-4) at Pittsburgh (Locke 3-
1), 4:05 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 0-2) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-3),
7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-2) at Atlanta (Teheran 1-0), 7:10
p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 1-2) at Colorado (Garland 2-2),
8:10 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 3-0) at San Diego (Richard 0-3), 8:40
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Magill 0-0) at San Francisco (Vogel-
song 1-2), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 2:35 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.


after going 0-2 in his first three starts.
He also raised his NL-leading strike-
out total to 57.
Mercer's two-run home run off Ross
Detwiler (1-3) in the fifth inning put the
Pirates ahead for good 3-1. Mercer
was recalled from Triple-A Indianapolis
before the game when second base-
man Neil Walker was placed on the
disabled list with a right hand injury.
Andrew McCutchen had three hits,
including a home run, for Pittsburgh.
Leadoff hitter Starling Marte and Gaby
Sanchez added two hits.

Cardinals 6, Brewers 1
MILWAUKEE Matt Holliday and
Carlos Beltran homered and Shelby
Miller pitched six strong innings to
help the St. Louis Cardinals beat the
Milwaukee Brewers 6-1.
Miller (4-2) gave up seven hits and a
walk in six innings while striking out five.


He was scoreless through the first
five innings before allowing a sacrifice
fly by Jonathan Lucroy. Carlos Martinez,
Seth Maness and Femando Salas held
the Brewers without a run over the final
three innings. Martinez and Maness
made their major league debuts.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Athletics 2, Yankees 0
NEW YORK -A.J. Griffin pitched
six-hit ball into the eighth inning and
Adam Rosales homered on CC
Sabathia's first pitch, leading the Oak-
land Athletics to a 2-0 victory over the
New York Yankees.
Derek Norris hit an RBI single in the
sixth inning to help Oakland open its
10-game road trip with its fourth win in
five games.
Griffin (3-2) serenaded his team-
mates in the visiting clubhouse with
guitar and song in English, Spanish
and French before preparing for his
sixth start of the season. Coming off
two losses in which he allowed 11
earned runs and 13 hits in 11 innings,
Griffin was smooth on the mound, too.
The Yankees had two runners on
base only once, in the third inning, and
Griffin needed only nine pitches in the
each of the fourth through sixth innings.
He struck out four, walked one and was
removed for Sean Doolittle after Gard-
ner's bunt single to start the eighth.
Grant Balfour got the final out for
his fourth save this season and 22nd
in a row since blowing one on April 29,
2012, securing Oakland's first nine-in-
ning shutout of the year.

Mariners 4, Blue Jays 0
TORONTO Felix Hernandez
pitched eight shutout innings to win
his third straight start, Kyle Seager
and Jason Bay homered and the
Seattle Mariners blanked the Toronto
Blue Jays 4-0.
Seager had three hits as the
Mariners won for the sixth time in
eight games.
Hernandez (4-2) allowed five hits,
walked none and struck out seven,
improving to 3-0 with a 0.60 ERA in
his past four starts. He's 95-24 in his
career when he receives two or more
runs of support.
Tom Wilhelmsen pitched the ninth
for the Mariners, who had lost seven
of their previous eight road games.
The struggling Blue Jays lost for the
seventh time in eight games.
Making his first start of the season,
Blue Jays left-hander Ricky Romero
(0-1) allowed three runs and three hits
in four innings. He walked three and
struck out four.

Indians 7, Twins 6,
10 innings
CLEVELAND Drew Stubbs' RBI
double with one out in the 10th inning
lifted the Cleveland Indians to their
fifth straight victory, 7-6 over the Min-
nesota Twins.
Stubbs, who had four hits, drove a
1-0 pitch from Casey Fien off the wall
in left-center to give Cleveland its first
five-game winning streak since win-
ning seven in a row from April 26-May
3,2011.
Mike Aviles started the rally with a
leadoff single off Fien (1-2). Pinch-
hitter Ezequiel Carrera, claimed off
waivers from Philadelphia on Thurs-
day, moved Aviles to second with a
sacrifice. Stubbs, who had two singles
and two doubles, then drove in the
game-winner.


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Oakland
ab
Rosales ss 5
S.Smith If 5
Lowrie 2b 5
Cespds cf 3
Dnldsn 3b 4
DNorrs c 3
Reddck rf 3
Freimn lb 3
Moss ph-1b 1
Montz dh 3
Jaso ph-dh 1
Totals 36
Oakland
New York


NewYork
r h bi
1 2 1 Gardnrcf
0 0 0 Cano 2b
0 3 0 V.Wells If
1 0 0 Hafner dh
0 1 0 ISuzuki rf
0 1 1 Nunez ss
00 0 Overay lb
0 3 0 J.Nix3b
00 0 CStwrt c
0 0 0 Boesch ph
00 0 AuRmnc
2102 Totals
100 001 000
000 000 000


ab r h bi
4 0 2 0
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
4 00 0
3 00 0
3 02 0
0 00 0
1 0 0 0
0000
31 0 6 0
2
0


DP-Oakland 1. LOB-Oakland 11, New York 6.
2B-Cano (9), J.Nix (1). HR-Rosales (1). S-
C.Stewart.
IP H RERBBSO
Oakland
Griffin W,3-2 7 6 0 0 1 4
Doolittle H,4 12/30 0 0 0 1
BalfourS,4-4 1/3 0 0 0 0 1
New York
SabathiaL,4-3 6 8 2 2 2 6
Warren 3 2 0 0 2 4
Griffin pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP-Sabathia.

Mariners 4,
Blue Jays 0
Seattle Toronto
ab rh bi ab rh bi
MSndrs cf 3 1 0 0 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0
Seager3b 4 1 3 2 MeCarrIf 4 0 1 0
KMorls dh 3 1 0 0 Bautist rf 3 0 1 0
Morse rf 4 01 0 Encrnclb 4 00 0
Bay If 3 1 1 1 Arencii c 3 0 0 0
Smoaklb 3 0 1 0 Linddh 3 0 1 0
Ackley 2b 4 02 1 Rasms cf 3 0 1 0
JMontr c 4 0 0 0 MIzturs 2b 3 0 0 0
Ryan ss 4 00 0 Kawskss 3 0 1 0
Totals 32 484 Totals 300 5 0
Seattle 000 301 000 4
Toronto 000 000 000 0
E-Ryan (3). DP-Seattle 3, Toronto 2. LOB-
Seattle 5, Toronto 4. 2B-Lind (4). HR-Seager
(4), Bay (3). SB-Kawasaki (3). CS-Seager (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Seattle
FHernandezW,4-2 8 5 0 0 0 7
Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 1 1
Toronto
Romero L,0-1 4 3 3 3 3 4
Loup 2 4 1 1 0 2
E.Rogers 1 0 0 0 0 1
Oliver 1 1 0 0 0 0
Janssen 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Romero (K.Morales). WP-Romero.

Indians 7, Twins 6,
10 innings
Minnesota Cleveland
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Dozier2b 4 1 3 0 Brantly If 4 1 1 0
Mauerc 5 0 1 0 Kipnis2b 5 0 2 4
Mornealb 3 1 1 1 ACarerss 4 0 0 0
Doumitdh 5 1 1 1 MrRynldh-1b4 1 1 2
Parmelrf 4 2 1 2 CSantn1b-c 5 0 1 0
Plouffe 3b 5 1 2 1 Raburn rf 5 0 0 0
EEscor ss 0 0 0 0 Aviles 3b 4 2 3 0
Arcia If 5 0 2 1 YGomsc 2 2 1 0
Hicks cf 3 0 0 0 Giambi ph 1 0 0 0
Wlngh ph 0 00 0 Allen p 0 0 0 0
Carroll3b 0 0 0 0 R.Hillp 0 0 0 0
Flormn ss 4 00 0 C.Perez p 0 0 0 0
WRmrzcf 1 0 0 0 Carrerph 0 0 0 0
Stubbscf 5 1 4 1
Totals 39 6116 Totals 39713 7
Minnesota 110 001 300 0 6
Cleveland 002 021 010 1 7
One out when winning run scored.
DP-Cleveland 1. LOB-Minnesota 9, Cleve-
land 10.2B--Arcia (2), Aviles (2), Stubbs 3 (6).
3B-Kipnis (1). HR-Parmelee (3), Plouffe (3),
Mar.Reynolds (9). SB-Dozier (2). CS-Aviles
(1). S-Dozier, Carrera. SF-Morneau.
IP H RERBBSO


Minnesota
PRHernandez
Duensing
Roenicke H,3
Burton BS,1-1
Fien L,1-2
Cleveland
Masterson
Allen BS, -1
R.Hill


62/38 5 5 2 5
11/32 1 1 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 2


C.PerezW,1-0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Allen pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP-by Masterson (Parmelee). WP-Master-
son. PB-YGomes. Balk-P.Hernandez.

Rangers 7,
Red Sox 0
Boston Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Ellsurycf 4 0 2 0 Kinsler2b 5 1 3 1
Victorn rf 4 0 1 0 Andrus ss 5 1 2 1
Pedroia 2b 4 00 0Brkmn dh 4 1 0 0
D.Ortizdh 4 01 0 Beltre3b 5 1 4 3
Napolilb 4 00 0 N.Cruz rf 4 0 2 1
JGoms If 2 0 1 0 Przyns c 5 0 1 0
Mdlrks 3b 3 00 0 JeBakr f 2 1 1 0
Sltlmchc 3 00 0 DvMrpph-lf 3 0 0 0
Ciriacoss 3 0 1 0 Morlndlb 4 2 3 0
Gentry cf 2 0 1 1
LMartn ph-cf 1 0 1 0
Totals 31 06 0 Totals 40718 7
Boston 000 000 000 0
Texas 010 510 OOx 7
E-Ciriaco (2), Middlebrooks (2). DP-Boston 2,
Texas 2. LOB-Boston 5, Texas 12.2B-Kinsler
(8), Beltre (6), Je.Baker (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Doubront L,3-1 32/312 6 6 1 2
A.Wilson 22/35 1 1 1 1
Mortensen 12/31 0 0 1 1
Texas
D.Holland W,2-2 8 6 0 0 1 9
D.Lowe 1 0 0 0 0 0


Tampa Bay Rays
schedule
May 4 at Colorado
May 5 at Colorado
May 6 vs Toronto
May 7 vs Toronto
May 8 vs Toronto
May 9 vs Toronto
May 10 vs San Diego
May 11 vs San Diego
May 12 vs San Diego
May 14 vs Boston
May 15 vs Boston
May 16 vs Boston
May 17 at Baltimore
May 18 at Baltimore
May 19 at Baltimore
May 20 at Toronto
May 21 at Toronto
May 22 at Toronto
May 24 vs N.Y.Yankees
May 25 vs N.Y.Yankees
May 26 vs N.Y.Yankees
May 27 vs Miami
May 28 vs Miami
May 29 at Miami
May 30 at Miami
May 31 at Cleveland
June 1 at Cleveland
June 2 at Cleveland
June 4 at Detroit
June 5 at Detroit
June 6 at Detroit
June 7 vs Baltimore
June 8 vs Baltimore
June 9 vs Baltimore


NATIONAL LEAGUE


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 B5



AL

A's 2, Yankees 0










Wide-open 139th Kentucky Derby expected


Associated Press


LOUISVILLE, Ky. A
trainer flooding the field
with five horses. A black
jockey trying to make his-
tory, and a woman rider, too.
Louisville coach Rick Pitino
seeking a double champi-
ons in racing and basketball.
He's sure in the right place.
The 19-horse field for
today's Kentucky Derby is
balanced, with no definitive
favorite.
Orb is the pre-race
choice, just barely Nearly
overshadowed is his trainer,
Shug McGaughey, who re-
ally, really wants this race.
Doug O'Neill is trying to win
back-to-back. And then
there's the threat of rain,
which has done in some of
the best-laid plans on race
day
It sure looks like a topsy-
turvy Derby
"I don't think we've got
Secretariat in this bunch,
even Seattle Slew," four-
time Derby-winning trainer
D. Wayne Lukas said, "so I
think it's going to boil down
to the trip and the pace and
a lot of other things."
Todd Pletcher will saddle
a record-tying five horses -
undefeated and early sec-
ond choice Verrazano, Rev-
olutionary, Overanalyze,
Palace Malice and Charm-
ing Kitten.
"We laid out a plan to get
here with them, and it's all
come down pretty much like
we hoped," said Pletcher,
who has one Derby win with
31 previous starters.
Verrazano is 4-0 in his
young career, not having run
as a 2-year-old. He'll be try-
ing to disprove an old Derby
jinx: no horse since Apollo
in 1882 has won without rac-
ing as a juvenile.
Relative unknown Kevin
Krigger will be aboard
Goldencents, trying to be-
come the first black jockey
to win since Jimmy Wink-
field in 1902.
"I'm going to ride us the
race that should get us to the
Kentucky Derby winner's
circle," Krigger said.
The colt is partly owned


by Pitino, whose Cardinals
won the NCAA champi-
onship last month. The
coach recently got elected to
basketball's Hall of Fame, so
a Derby win would com-
plete the ultimate trifecta.
Rosie Napravnik wants to
grab history for herself, too.
No female jockey has
ever won the Derby, al-
though she came closest,
with a ninth-place finish in
2011. Napravnik will ride
15-1 long shot Mylute.
"He feels great, he's act-
ing great and I'm very confi-
dent heading into the
Derby," she said.
Orb was the narrow 7-2
early favorite for the 139th
Derby He comes in on a
four-race winning streak for
McGaughey, the 62-year-old
trainer whose Hall of Fame
resume lacks a Derby vic-
tory He's making his second
appearance since 1989,
when he finished second
with Easy Goer
"I hope the track is fast
and safe for everybody and
nobody has any excuses,
and let the best horse win,"
McGaughey said.
Goldencents will be try-
ing to deliver for more than
Krigger and Pitino. He's
trained by O'Neill, who put
unknown Mario Gutierrez
aboard I'll Have Another
last year and won. The
trainer is following the same
script this time, giving Krig-
ger a big break while trying
to become the first trainer to
win back-to-back Derbies
since Bob Baffert in 1997-98.
"We think it is our time,"
O'Neill said. "We think it is
us."
The forecast calls for an
80 percent chance of rain
and a high of 59 degrees.
The last Derby run on a
sloppy track was in 2010.
"It'll make the Derby that
much more wide open,"
said trainer Ken McPeek,
who has two starters, Rrac
Daddy and Java's War
Lukas has two horses -
Oxbow and Will Take
Charge ready for his 27th
Derby
At 77, Lukas would be the
oldest trainer to win.


139TH RUNNING OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY


First jewel in the crown
Orb is the early favorite over undefeated Verrazano, one of
a record-tying five horses for trainer Todd Pletcher. Trained
by Shug McGaughey, Orb draws the No. 16 post in a full
field of 19 horses. Black Onyx, who had the No. 1 post,
was scratched.


Churchill Downs
Louisville, Ky.
Winner's t
Circle's
Tu-rf.


How the favorites have fared
Since 1875


29 10
2nd 3rd


46
Out of
the money: ,


Winning post positions
Since 1900


12 12
11
98 8


10 10


4 4 4
3 3 2 3 2
1 1
0m
PP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

SOURCES: Churchill Downs; Kinetic.theTechnologyAgency


THE FIELD
Post positions, horses, jockeys and odds:


Oxbow

[f, Revolutionary
Golden Soul
t Normandy Invasion
Mylute
Giant Finish
Goldencents
i Overanalyze
Palace Malice
Lines of Battle
Itsmyluckyday
Falling Sky
Verrazano
p Charming Kitten
Orb
Will Take Charge
Frac Daddy
/f Java's War
g Vyjack


Stevens
Borel
Albarado
Castellano
Napravnik
Espinoza
Krigger
Bejarano
Smith
Moore
Trujillo
Saez
Velazquez
Prado
Rosario
Court
Lebron
Leparoux
Gomez


Kentucky Derby winners through the years


- I'll Have Another
-Animal Kingdom
- Super Saver
-Mine That Bird
- Big Brown
- Street Sense
- Barbaro
-Giacomo
- Smarty Jones
- Funny Cide
-War Emblem
- Monarchos
- Fusaichi Pegasus
- Charismatic
-Real Quiet
-Silver Charm
- Grindstone
-Thunder Gulch
-Go for Gin
-Sea Hero
-Lil E.Tee
-Strike the Gold
-Unbridled
-Sunday Silence
-Winning Colors
- Alysheba
- Ferdinand
-Spend A Buck


- Swale
- Sunny's Halo
- Gato Del Sol
- Pleasant Colony
- Genuine Risk
- Spectacular Bid
-Affirmed
- Seattle Slew
- Bold Forbes
- Foolish Pleasure
- Cannonade
- Secretariat
- Riva Ridge
Canonero II
-Dust Commander
- Majestic Prince
- Forward Pass
- Proud Clarion
- Kauai King
- Lucky Debonair
- Northern Dancer
- Chateaugay
- Decidedly
- Carry Back
-Venetian Way
-Tomy Lee
-Tim Tam
- Iron Liege


- Needles
- Swaps
- Determine
- Dark Star
- Hill Gail
- Count Turf
- Middleground
- Ponder
- Citation
-Jet Pilot
-Assault
- Hoop, Jr.
- Pensive
-Count Fleet
- Shut Out
-Whirlaway
-Gallahadion
- Johnstown
- Lawrin
-War Admiral
- Bold Venture
-Omaha
- Cavalcade
- Brokers Tip
- Burgoo King
-Twenty Grand
- Gallant Fox
-Clyde Van Dusen


- Reigh Count
-Whiskery
- Bubbling Over
- Flying Ebony
-Black Gold
- Zev
- Morvich
- Behave Yourself
- Paul Jones
- Sir Barton
- Exterminator
- Omar Khayyam
- George Smith
- Regret
- Old Rosebud
- Donerail
-Worth
- Meridan
- Donau
-Wintergreen
- Stone Street
- Pink Star
- Sir Huon
- Agile
- Elwood
-Judge Himes
- Alan-a-Dale


-His Eminence
- Lieut. Gibson
- Manuel
- Plaudit
-Typhoon II
- Ben Brush
- Halma
- Chant
- Lookout
-Azra
-Kingman
- Riley
- Spokane
-MacBeth ll
- Montrose
- Ben Ali
-Joe Cotton
-Buchanan
- Leonatus
-Apollo
- Hindoo
-Fonso
- Lord Murphy
- Day Star
- Baden Baden
-Vagrant
-Aristides


Rookies report


QB Glennon

excited about

opportunity

with Bucs

Associated Press

TAMPA Third-round
draft pick Mike Glennon
is eager to establish him-
self with the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers.
The former North Car-
olina State quarterback is
getting a jump on learn-
ing the team's offensive
system during a mini-
camp for rookies that
began Friday and is look-
ing forward to competing
for a role as a backup to
starter Josh Freeman,
who's entering the final
year of his contract.
Glennon was the third
quarterback selected in
the draft behind Florida
State's E.J. Manuel and
West Virginia's Geno
Smith. He has the size
and arm strength the
Bucs like in a quarter-
back and is not a stranger
to being No. 2 on a depth
chart, having served as a
backup to Russell Wilson
for three years in college.
"As a competitor you
want to be out on the field
... but learning from Rus-
sell was a great experi-
ence," said Glennon, who
started his final 26 games
with the Wolfpack after
Wilson transferred to Wis-
consin. Glennon finished
his college career with
7,411 passing yards, 63
touchdowns and 31
interceptions.
"He does all the right
things off the field," Glen-
non said of Wilson. "He's
an extremely sharp guy.
He works hard and pre-
pares. It doesn't come as a
surprise that he's doing so
well."
Wilson was a third-
round pick a year ago,
won Seattle's starting job
during training camp and
led the Seahawks to the
playoffs as a rookie.


The Bucs hope Glennon
catches on quickly, too;
however they aren't
counting on him to play
right away.
Freeman is heading
into the final season of
the contract he signed as
the 17th overall pick of
the 2009 draft. He's com-
ing off a year in which he
became the franchise's
first 4,000-yard passer and
also set a record for 27 TD
passes, but his career also
has been marked with in-
consistency and he's yet
to lead Tampa Bay to the
playoffs.
General manager Mark
Dominik and coach Greg
Schiano have made it
clear that Freeman's the
unquestioned starter.
Glennon will compete
with veteran Dan
Orlovsky for No. 2.
Before traveling to
Florida for minicamp, the
6-foot-7, 220-pound Glen-
non reached out to Wilson
"to pick his mind and
hear how he handled
things," Glennon said.
"He's a man on a mis-
sion, and you can hear it
in the way he talks. He
just kind of told me to
take it one day at a time
and try to get better each
and every day Don't
worry about the long
run," the native of Centre-
ville, Virginia added. "If
you just get better each
and every day, eventually
good things will happen. I
think that was great
advice."
Like the Bucs, Glennon
feels he's a good fit for a
system that thrived last
season on a solid running
game, play-action and
throwing the ball down
the field.
The third-round pick is
not fazed by the percep-
tion this year's draft was
thin at quarterback.
Manuel was a first-round
pick, while Smith went in
Round Two.
"I'm confident in what I
can do," Glennon said.
"Obviously you want to go
as high as you can in the
draft, but it's not all about
that. It's about the
longevity of your career,


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon lis-
tens as a coach calls a play Friday during NFL rookie mini-
camp in Tampa. Glennon, out of North Carolina State, was
the Buccaneers' third-round pick in the 2013 draft.

Jaguars' Denard Robinson shines
during rookie minicamp
JACKSONVILLE Denard Robinson is going back to
college with a little NFL experience.
The former Michigan star made his debut with Jack-
sonville on Friday, showing off his speed and versatility as
the Jaguars opened a three-day rookie minicamp.
The only negative was that the Jaguars won't get to see
more for a while. Robinson headed back to Ann Arbor fol-
lowing practice for his college graduation. He will miss the
final two days of camp.
Robinson, a fifth-round pick making the transition from
quarterback to running back, took the majority of repetitions
with the first-team offense and even upstaged first-rounder
Luke Joeckel.
With maize-and-blue clad fans cheering his moves,
Robinson broke several long runs and caught all but one
pass thrown his way. He lined up at running back, fullback
and receiver.


and I think coming to
Tampa Bay is a good situ-
ation for that."
The 22-year-old plans to
immerse himself in the
playbook and learn the of-
fense as quickly as possi-
ble, while also beginning
to build relationships
with his new teammates.
He sent text messages
to the other quarterbacks
on the roster after being


selected No. 73 overall,
and received a call back
from Freeman.
"It was good to hear
from him. He just said
he's excited to have me
here, that the quarter-
backs are a tight group
and he looks forward to
me kind of joining the
family," the rookie said.
"It was really encourag-
ing talking to him."


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's oldest profes-
sional sports franchise
- the Miami Dolphins -
was dealt a crushing
blow Friday after the
Florida Legislature
ended its session with-
out passing any funding
plan that would assist
the team's quest to refur-
bish its stadium.
The refusal of the
GOP-controlled Legisla-
ture to aid the team was-
n't just a defeat for the
Dolphins it could also
sack South Florida's ef-
forts to lure another
Super Bowl to the region
in the next few years.
Others who lost out in-
clude the city of Orlando,
which was hoping for
help to lure a Major
League Soccer team, as
well as the Jacksonville
Jaguars and Daytona In-
ternational Speedway.
The professional
sports teams were all
backing a Florida Senate
proposal that would
have allowed each of
them to compete for a
share of state tax dollars.
But the House led
by Speaker Will Weath-
erford refused to
bring up the legislation.
"I think part of the
complication was the
fact that it wasn't just the
Dolphins," Weatherford
said. "You had five or six
different franchises that
were looking for a tax re-
bate, and that's serious
public policy. You're
talking about hundreds
of millions of dollars and
I think the House just
never got comfortable
there when the session
ended."
But the defeat was es-
pecially stinging for the
Dolphins since the team
had already agreed to


pay for a Miami-Dade
County referendum on
whether to raise local
bed taxes to assist the
team. The initial Senate
bill authorized the use of
the taxes. The failure of
legislators to act makes
the May 14 ballot ques-
tion meaningless, even
though early and absen-
tee balloting had already
begun.
Dolphins owner
Stephen Ross blasted
Weatherford, saying in a
statement that the Wes-
ley Chapel Republican
had promised to at least
let the legislation come
up for a vote on the
House floor.
"He put politics before
the people and the 4,000
jobs this project would
have created for Miami
Dade, and that is just
wrong," Ross said.
Weatherford, in a
tweet, later contended
that it wasn't true that he
had promised an up or
down vote.
The Dolphins wanted
both state and local help
to pay for $400 million
worth of renovations to
Sun Life Stadium. The
Dolphins wanted $3 mil-
lion a year for the next
30 years from the state.
In order to convince
skeptical politicians the
team agreed to a series
of concessions includ-
ing that it would pay part
of the money after 30
years.
But the push by the
Dolphins coincided with
an effort by other cities
and professional sports
organizations to also ob-
tain state tax dollars.
The Florida Senate
passed legislation that
would have created a
process where pro teams
would compete for $13
million a year in state
incentives.


30-1
10-1
50-1
12-1
15-1
50-1
5-1
15-1
20-1
30-1
15-1
50-1
4-1
20-1
7-2
20-1
50-1
15-1
15-1


Legislature



refuses to aid



Dolphins


B6 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE












RELIGION


791 01


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Faith, and a cup of coffee


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


STEVEN EIGHINGER
Quincy (Ill.) Herald-Whig

HANNIBAL, Mo.
Steve Youngblood said he
has been told the North
Street Station Ministry
Center and coffee shop has the
feel of a Christian version of
"Cheers."
"Because, like the old
'Cheers' song said, 'Sometimes
you just wanna go where
everybody knows your name,"'
Youngblood said. "Only this is
a coffee shop, instead of a bar"
The Quincy (Ill.) Herald-
Whigreported that 54-year-old
Youngblood, who for most of
his life has been a northeast
Missouri resident, has been in-
volved in ministry for 30 years.
Last year he helped establish
the North Street site as a
"marketplace ministry"
Located next to the Tom and
Huck statue at the base of the
lighthouse, there's a wide
range of activities and Chris-
tian-related themes provided.
Along with a simple coffee
house atmosphere in part of
the site, the center also fea-
tures a bookstore, provides
outreach ministries, and hosts
small-group meetings, Bible
studies, worship, music, semi-
nars, prayer support and gen-
eral conversation.
"Something like this had al-
ways been in the back of my


Special events
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala will sponsor a Shab-
baton on May 10 to 11. The
program is made possible
through a grant by the Jewish
Council of North Central
Florida. All activities will take
place at the Collins Center,
Building 300, 9401 State
Road 200 in Ocala. The event
will be a Reconstructionist ap-
proach to Judaism and the
various ways of experiencing
Judaism though the Recon-
structionist lens.
Rabbinical intern Hannah
Spiro, a student at the Recon-
structionist Rabbinical Col-
lege, will lead the program.
Her specialty is incorporating
music with Jewish liturgy
through the medium of alter-
native folk rock. The weekend
will lead off with a Shabbat
evening service at 8 with a
musical service led by Han-
nah with interpretation on the
liturgy, continued on Saturday
morning at 10 with a "Lunch
'n' Learn" and service on the
theme of "Different Voices of
Reconstructionist Judaism,"
followed by a catered lunch.
The evening's program will
feature Spiro in concert in a
coffeehouse-like setting.
Her repertoire will consist of
Israeli, American folk stan-
dards and original composi-


mind, and I felt this (site) was
the perfect place," said Young-
blood, who has a ministerial
background in Hannibal and
for more than a decade has
worked as a church consultant
and church planter for Church
Foundations in Kirksville.
Youngblood, who also pas-
tors a church in Burlington,
Iowa, feels the marketplace
ministry concept is on the cut-
ting edge of modern worship.
The rise of non-denomina-
tional ministry has been seen
at both the national and local
levels, from the emergence of
the megachurches to smaller
outreaches such as North
Street Station.
"The church as we know it is
in radical transformation,"
Youngblood feels. "The church
has been seriously weakened
by pride, religion, politics and
a loss of vision and leadership
... We are serving a generation
who will not conform to past
norms simply because of man-
made traditions.
"Every aspect of Christianity
is being examined and evalu-
ated by a new generation of
bright, fresh and excited new
thinkers.
"We're not here offering reli-
gion," Youngblood says. "That's
the last thing we need more
religion. We don't want a
bunch of man-made rules. Any-
thing that tries to motivate you


tions. The concert will begin at
7:30 p.m. All services are free
and open to the public.
Combo ticket for lunch and
concert is $15. Cost for lunch
or concert separately is $10
each. For reservations, call
Estelle at 352 861-2542 or
Mary at 353-861-2056 by
Monday.
The second annual
Blessing of the Fleet will
take place from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday, May 11, on
King's Bay. Look for the
22-foot pontoon boat with a
green bimini and the Crystal
River Sail and Power
Squadron banner on the port
side anchored on King's Bay
north of Buzzard's Island.
Blessings will be performed
by Father Gil Larsen from St.
Anne's Episcopal Church and
Pastor David Bradford from
St. Timothy Lutheran Church.
Temple Beth David will
celebrate Shavuot on Tues-
day, May 14, beginning with a
dairy dinner at 6 p.m., dedica-
tion of the Mosaic Wall at
7 p.m., followed at 7:30 p.m.
with the showing of "Catskills
on Broadway." Dinner cost is
$7 for member adults and
$3.50 for children 12 and
younger; or $10 for non-mem-
ber adults and $5 for children
12 and younger. The movie is
included for members. If you
are just coming for the movie,


with fear or shame is religion.
That's not God."
The ministry center opened
last fall following about six
months of renovation at the site.
The coffee shop opened earlier
this month. Bills are paid pri-
marily through donations.
Carol Tatman of Hannibal is
a frequent visitor and, like oth-
ers, also helps out as a
volunteer
"It feels so homey here," she
said. "The atmosphere is special."
Tatman said there are infor-
mal men's groups who meet
for coffee and Youngblood said
local pastors sometimes gather
there. The site is also popular
for musicians and interested
parties who hear about North
Street Station by word of
mouth.
"We've had people from
Burlington, Iowa, to Columbia,
Mo., come here," said Elena
Kroeger, who serves as North
Street Station's ministry
director
Kroeger, who teaches a
Wednesday morning "People
Builders" class, understands
why some who have heard
about North Street Station but
have not visited might ques-
tion its purpose or validity.
"Until you see it, you don't
get it," she said.
Even the coffee served at
North Street Station is differ-
ent from the norm. It is pre-


Religion NOTES
a donation is appreciated. For
more information contact
administrator@tbdfl.org. The
temple is at 13158 Antelope
St., Spring Hill.
The Altar & Rosary Soci-
ety of St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church will have its
semiannual flea market from
8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
May 18, in Father Stegeman
Hall on the corner of U.S. 41
and State Road 40 East in
Dunnellon. Doors will open at
8 a.m. The famous jewelry
boutique table will again be
featured. Light refreshments
will be served for a nominal
fee. The public is welcome to
attend.
First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills is launching the
Helping Hands Food Pantry
from 9 to 11 a.m. the third
Saturday monthly beginning
May 18 at 4950 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. The
pantry will serve Beverly Hills,
Lecanto and Citrus Springs
Proof of residency is required.
Call 352-746-2970.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church in Dunnellon
will host a Women's Em-
maus Retreat Friday through
Sunday, May 24 to 26. All
women seeking spiritual re-
newal are invited to attend.
Call the office at 352-489-
3166 or email mail@stjohncc.
com for more information.


First Baptist Church of
Crystal River and Rock
Crusher Road First Church of
God are planning a joint mis-
sion trip to Yo Creek Village,
Belize, to work with an area
church. The dates of the mis-
sion are Feb. 11 to 17, 2014.
The cost of the trip is $1,750.
They will be involved in con-
struction projects, children and
youth ministry, and community
outreach. They will also have
the opportunity to work with a
local school. Application dead-
line is Sunday. Completed ap-
plications and a $150 deposit
are due at this time. Informa-
tion packets and applications
are available by calling Jo Ann
Lapp at Rock Crusher Road
First Church of God at 352-
795-5553.
Summer fun
Children ages 3 through
sixth grade are invited to "Tell
It On The Mountain" VBS
from 9 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, June 10 to 14,
at Faith Lutheran Church, 935
S. Crystal Glen Drive (in Crys-
tal Glen Subdivision),
Lecanto. Register at faithle-
canto.com or at the church of-
fice, or by calling 352-527-
3325 or email office-fatihle-
canto@ tampabay. rr.com.
This is a Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans sponsored event.
First United Methodist


mium coffee from around the
world, supplied by efforts that
support Baptist and Assembly
of God missionaries. Proceeds
help support causes from edu-
cation in the Middle East to
combatting human trafficking
in India.
"Life-changing coffee is sold
there," Tatman said.
One of the weekly highlights
is usually Saturday's "Word
and Worship." Some weeks, it
could be entirely music, pro-
vided by singers and musi-
cians who volunteer their
efforts. At times, the music -
and the verbal sharing of the
message may spill out into
the street.
Kroeger said part of the rea-
son for the location of North
Street Station in the city's
historic district is to have a
presence among the tens of
thousands of tourists who fre-
quent Hannibal during the
year
"We are here to serve visi-
tors to Hannibal and to help
anyone who comes through
our doors," Youngblood said.
Kroeger said there is little
that is conventional about how
worship is approached at
North Street Station.
"You may not see a cross
hanging anywhere, but you
will know Jesus is here,"
Kroeger said.
Along with a good cup of coffee.


Church of Dunnellon will offer
its 3rd annual "SPARK Sum-
mer Camp," from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. June 10 through
Aug. 2. This program also ac-
cepts children with special
needs. There are different
themes, crafts and games for
each week. The church is at
21501 W. State Road 40,
Dunnellon.
Bible Olympics is taking
Rock Crusher Road Church
of God on a mission. As part
of its summer children's pro-
gram, the church is going on
a mission that's possible be-
cause God is their leader.
They are celebrating the 10th
anniversary of the Bible
Olympics program and are
inviting the public to be part of
the team to help make this the
best year of Bible Olympics
ever. The challenge runs
through Sunday, Aug. 25, with
a closing program. Children
ages 2 years through eighth
grade will meet from 10 to
11:15 a.m. Sunday and
6:15 to 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
days with the Bible Olympics
competition weekend being
July 26 and 27. Participants
will have lessons about Bible
characters that were given im-
possible missions (in their
eyes) but with God's help the
missions became possible.


Page C2


Get


happy

A few weeks back I
wrote about
"what's making me
happy," which got a great
response from people.
Some sent emails or
stopped me in the mar-
ket to tell me what's
making them happy.
Seems everyone was rid-
ing the happiness train.
But then someone
pointed out that God
never promised us hap-
piness and that those
who pursue it never ob-
tain it.
There's always a buzz
kill in every crowd.
Still, the person had a
good point and one
worth exploring.
One of my favorite
comic strip characters is
Calvin of "Calvin and
Hobbes." Calvin, a boy
who's maybe 7 (Hobbes
is a stuffed tiger and
Calvin's best friend), be-
lieves the world revolves
around him. His highest
goal in life is to wear
rocket ship underpants
and experience
euphoria.
When presented with
a choice in life, Calvin
weighs his options care-
fully then goes with
whichever option suits
See Page C2


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Down


on the


(Jewish)


farm
ewish lawyer, Jew-
ish scholar, Jewish
doctor even Jewish
senator but Jewish
farmer? Somehow this
just doesn't have the
right ring to it. The truth
is, since Biblical times,
Jews have been farmers
following the laws in the
Torah about harvesting
and providing for the
poor It wasn't until the
late 1880s that Jewish
farming took a foothold
in America.
Basically, the history
of Jewish farming can be
divided into three peri-
ods: 1882-1900; 1900-
1960; 1970-present. As
conditions in Eastern
Europe grew increas-
ingly hard for Jews,
many decided to cast
their fortunes and be-
come farmers in Amer-
ica. They had had had
experience with cattle
dealing, raising domes-
tic livestock such as
chickens and goats and
although they were not
allowed to own land in
Russia, they were will-
ing to take a chance on
America, where they
could be free.
Many immigrant Jew-
ish families arrived
See Page C2


PHIL CARLSON/The Quincy Herald-Whig
Michael Owens reacts to the music during a praise singing session in the North Street Ministry Center and coffee shop in Hannibal, Mo.
The shop offers a "Word and Worship" program every Saturday afternoon.

Missouri group mixes worship with cozy feel of a classic coffee shop





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

his fancy at the moment,
whichever one he thinks will
make him happy at the
moment
However, he quickly learns
that happiness is illusive. He
says, "What good is wearing
rocketship underpants if no
one asks to see them?"
Indeed.
He also says, "Here's the
difference between me and
the rest of the world. Happi-
ness isn't good enough for me.
I demand euphoria!"
But is even euphoria
enough?
I have a friend who says
happiness is a byproduct. It
happens when you're doing
something else and rarely
when you're pursuing it. Be-
cause when you're pursuing
it, it stays out of reach. Or if
you reach it, it slips through
your fingers or it crumbles
like dust and the wind blows
it away
I could give so many exam-
ples of my fruitless pursuit of
happiness, and over the years
of writing this column I have.
Fruitless pursuit is my go-to
mode of operation. But this
morning I was remembering
my groovy white go-go boots.
When I was a kid I wore or-
thopedic saddle shoes that my
mom bought me at the Stride
Rite shoe store. Today, wearing
them might be considered
ironic and, therefore, hip, but
back then, coupled with an
overbite and a weight problem,
well, I wasn't a groovy chick.
And then came the year I fi-
nally outgrew the need for
those clunky black and white
clodhoppers, which serendip-
itously was also the same year
Stride Rite displayed the
grooviest pair of white go-go
boots in the store window -
just like the ones worn by the
dancers on "Hullabaloo." (If
you're too young to remember
"Hullabaloo," Google it.)
Also, that was the same year


my mom had a full "Buy 12
pairs of shoes at the regular
price, get one pair free"
Stride Rite card.
Serendipity-do-dah!
Visions of me in my psyche-
delic mini-dresses, fishnet
stockings and white Hulla-
baloo go-go boots exploded
my brain. (This was the '60s.)
I just knew that God could-
n't wouldn't pass up the
opportunity for me to be the
swingingest, grooviest chick at
Nevada Avenue Elementary
School in Canoga Park, Calif. I
knew with all my heart, soul,
mind and entire being that
everlasting bliss would be
mine if only I had those boots.
Since they were free, Mom
let me get them.
I wore them once, and not
even to school. I don't even
know why I didn't wear them.
I guess I just didn't like them
on me as I did on the Hulla-
baloo dancers.
That same letdown hap-
pens every time I chase after
something that I think will
make me happy beyond
imagination.
If I do manage to grasp it,
the happiness, even if it's eu-
phoria, never lasts.
Maybe it's part of the curse
from the Garden of Eden that
we don't get what we think we
want. However, if that's so, I'm
not so sure that's necessarily
a punishment from God.
Maybe it's a gift from God, be-
cause if I have everything I
want, I would have no need of
him.
That said, God does give mo-
ments of happiness, often when
we're not expecting them, often
when we need them most, be-
cause he loves us.

Nancy Kennedy is the author
of "Move Over, Victoria -I
Know the Real Secret, "Girl
on a Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace." She
can be reached at 352-564-
2927, Monday through Thurs-
day, or via email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online, com.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

during the late 1880s with
the sponsorship of Baron de
Hirsh or the Hebrew Immi-
grant Aid Society. The char-
itable groups bought up
large tracts of land outside
of major cities and settled
these immigrants on the
land. Unfortunately, with a
few exceptions such as
Woodbine in New Jersey
and Colchester and Elling-
ton, Connecticut-the farm-
ers only lasted about five
seasons. Disease, harsh
weather conditions and in-
experience were among the
many reasons these at-
tempts failed.
In the early 1900s, philan-
thropist Baron De Hirsh
founded the Jewish Agricul-
tural and Industrial Assis-
tance Society (JAIAS). Instead
of trying to settle large groups
on Jews on parcels on land,
JAIAS, settled individual fam-
ilies and sent out workers
who helped the newcomers
with farming needs.
The organization provided
loans and published a maga-
zine for 50 years entitled
"Jewish Farmer" These
farms were also located on
abandoned farms not far
form metropolitan areas.
Successful farming commu-
nities included southern
New Jersey (poultry, eggs),
Connecticut (dairy, vegeta-
bles, cattle, eggs, poultry),
Florida (citrus, tomatoes),
and Ohio and Michigan (fruit
and vegetables). The Jewish
communities of farmers
were able to have their own
synagogues, burial societies
and ritual slaughterers, signs
of a cohesive communal life.
On a personal note, my
husband's aunt, Rochel,
lived on such a farm in
Ellington, Connecticut. My
husband liked to tell me sto-
ries of how his aunt did not
trust indoor plumbing and
had an outhouse for years.


Though I never knew his
aunt, what my husband was
describing was probably his
remembrances during the
1950s. I must admit, I was in-
trigued by the story, probably
because I thought farm life
sounded different from the
suburbia where I was raised.
During the Depression,
many of the farms went out
of business, but during the
Second World War when the
demand for eggs and other
farm products was high,
those farms that made it
through the hard times of
the 1930s were able to pros-
per At its peak after the War,
there were 100,000 Jewish
farms and 25,000 Jewish
farm families. From 1950 to
1970, many of these farms
went out of business, when
farming methods became
more concentrated, but a
few loners held out, hoping
for better times and applying
modernization techniques.
With the advent of the
1970s, many Jews from the
cities and suburbia tried
their hands at organic farm-
ing; a quick look down the
produce and dairy aisles of
your local supermarket and
you will see the fruit (no pun
intended!) of their labors:
Gary Hirshberg (Stonyfield
Yogurt), Sam Kahn (Cascade
Farms), Ben and Jerry (ice
cream mavens of Vermont),
and Drew and Myra Good-
man (Earthbound Farm).
With a few exceptions,
most farms owned by Jews
are small, part-time ven-
tures. With many Jews want-
ing to leave the big cities to
"get down on the farm,"
there are bound to be more
farmers in the future. Old
McDonald is not the only one
with a farm; Mr Cohen has
one too!

Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish educa-
tor She lives in Ocala with
her husband, Phil. She can
be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

They even have the Bible characters coming
each Sunday morning to talk about their mis-
sion. The deadline to sign up to be a part of the
competitive team is Sunday, May 26. The
church is at 419 N. Rock Crusher Road, Crys-
tal River. Call the church office at 352-795-
5553 or visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
As part of its annual Summer Missions
Project, Rock Crusher Road First Church of God
has set a "God-size" goal of contributing 500
hours of their time in community service. Mem-
bers can serve as volunteers anywhere in the
community. The reason behind the goal is to get
the church outside of the building and into the
community where they can help make a differ-
ence. The church is at 419 N. Rock Crusher
Road, Crystal River. Call the church office at 352-
795-5553 or visit www.rockcrusherchurch.com.
Music & more
The Marion Civic Chorale, conducted
by Matthew Bumbach, will perform a concert
titled "Give My Regards to Broadway," at
3 p.m. Sunday at First United Methodist
Church, 1126 E. Silver Springs Blvd. (State
Road 40), Ocala. The program will include "A
Sentimental Journey Thru the 40's" and med-
leys from "Les Miserables," "My Fair Lady,"
and "The Phantom of the Opera." Admission is
free. A free-will offering will be collected to
benefit the church's Tuesday Morning Out-
reach Ministry to help the homeless, jobless
and others in need. Call 352-537-0207.
The Dunnellon Concert Singers will per-
form "Favorites From The Great American
Songbook" at 4 p.m. Sunday at Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church, 439 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway, Hernando. Free admission. No tick-
ets necessary. Donations accepted. This event
is a fundraiser for Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church's Music Ministry. The church is at the
intersection of Norvell Bryant Highway (County
Road 486) and Citrus Hills Boulevard. Call
Mary Mahoney at 352-270-3352.
The House of Power Church will host the
New Taylor Singers at 11 a.m. Mother's Day
Sunday, May 12, with dinner on the grounds
to follow the worship service. The New Taylor
Singers is a Gospel singing group from Black-
shear, Ga. The church is at 7330 N. Dawson
Drive, Hernando, on the corner of N. Dawson
Drive and N. Lecanto Highway (County Road
491). Call 352-344-9454.

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and F


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


THE 7]
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUSCOUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


( Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided


ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west ofPlantation nn
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.
I r-' i .- .i1i .r ,t
.] .l. 11r I .t I 1. Yi i
-IZB






"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
cmwith a
Heart
for the
community"


Attend


the worship

service ofi


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i lib Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.0






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


S Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon





HEKE,YOU'LL FIND
A CKIJNC FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKYMTXL
RIVfg y -
VJNITCD
N-ECTHODIST
CH U KCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
-. A Stephen Ministry Provider ,


SB Crystal
E River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager


(r 1Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

CASUAL
Sunday Worship
8:00, 9:30, &
11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 & 10:45 am
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors
A Stephen
Ministry
Church
Office Hours
8:30 am
To
4:30 pm
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org


C2 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Annie and Tim's United
Blue Grass Band will be in
concert at 7 p.m. Friday, May
17, at First Presbyterian
Church in Crystal River, 1501
S.E. U.S. 19. This is a
fundraiser for the combined in-
tergenerational Vacation Bible
School on June 17 to 21 at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church.
This VBS brings together kids
and adults from St. Anne's, St.
Timothy, First Presbyterian
and Crystal River United
Methodist churches and other
nondenominational people in
the area. Food, fun, fellowship
and root-beer floats will be en-
joyed at this event. A love of-
fering will be collected at the
performance to support the
VBS. Call 352-795-2259.
The Amazzing Steel
Drum Band Ensemble will
be in concert from 5 to 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 25, at St.
Anne's Episcopal Church.
Enjoy a dinner featuring ro-
maine salad, ziti casserole
and dessert while listening to
the toe-tapping, body-swaying
strains of steel drums music.


This concert is a fundraiser for
the July 20 to 27 Friends in
Service Mission trip to Hope
Village in Minot, N.D., by the
combined team of St. Anne's
and Shepherd of the Hills
churches. Tickets ($10) are
on sale at both churches. Call
352-795-2176 for home
delivery.
Food & fellowship
First Baptist Church of
Floral City will have a church-
wide picnic and fundraiser
from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today at Floral City Park. This
time of fellowship includes the
FBC youths' annual "Cake
Auction." This auction is the
biggest fundraiser for the
youth during the year. It helps
send youth to church camp.
The public is welcome to
come out and join in fellow-
ship, fun and supporting our
young people.
The Homosassa First
United Methodist Church
pancake breakfast will take
place from 8 to 10 a.m. Satur-
day, May 11, at the church's
fellowship hall, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Ado-
nation of $4 for all you can
eat. Come and enjoy.
The third Saturday night


supper will take place at
4:30 p.m. May 18 in the De-
wain Farris Fellowship Hall at
Community Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N. Cit-
rus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Menu includes
spaghetti with sausage, garlic
knots, salad, dessert, coffee
and tea. Tickets are $10 for
adults, $5 for children and can
be purchased at the door.
Takeouts available. Call the
church at 352-489-1260.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers
have resumed from 4 to
6 p.m. the third Friday
monthly through May 17 in
the Jack Steele Hall at 86
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A
donation of $8 per person or
two tickets for $15 includes
all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce,
Italian bread, dessert and cof-
fee or tea. Come and enjoy a
delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the cor-
ner of U.S. 41 and State Road
40 East in Dunnellon, hosts
its fish fry from 4 to 6 p.m.
the first Friday monthly in the
church pavilion. Cost is $7 for
adults and $3.50 for children.


The fish fry is open to the
public.
Worship
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River will
celebrate a Communion wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Pastor Jack Alwood's
sermon title is "Do You Want
to Be Made Well?" A Christian
Education study on "How to
Read the Bible" will precede
worship at 9 a.m. in Westmin-
ster Hall. Call the office at
352-795-2259 or visit fpc
ofcrystalriver.org for more
information.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
sixth Sunday of Easter with
Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday. A nursery
is provided during the 10:30
a.m. service. Christian Forma-
tion is at 9:15 a.m. There is a
healing service at 10 a.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study. SOS summer hours are
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday
at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Evening Bible study
is at 7 p.m. Thursday.
Worship services at St.
Timothy Lutheran Church


include a "come-as-you-are"
worship service with Com-
munion at 5 p.m. Saturday;
early service with Communion
at 8 a.m. Sunday with Sun-
day school classes for all
ages at 9:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship hour at 9 a.m., and
traditional service with Com-
munion at 10:30 a.m. Special
services are announced. A
nursery is provided. The
church is at 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River.
Call 352-795-5325 or visit
www.sttimothylutheran
crystalriver.com.
Faith Lutheran Church,
in Crystal Glen Subdivision at
County Road 490 and State
Road 44, invites everyone to
the Saturday service at 6 p.m.
and Sunday at 9:30 a.m. This
week Pastor Stephen Lane
will have as his sermon,
"Heaven Help Us," from Rev.
21:9. The church is handi-
capped accessible, offers
hearing assistance, and large-
print bulletins are available.
Following the Sunday service
is a time of fellowship and
children's Sunday school and
adult Bible classes begin at
11 a.m. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
St. Raphael Orthodox


CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


Sherpherd
of the Hills
Episcopal
Church
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Wednesday
Healing Service
10:00 am
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
www.SOTHEC.org
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church





-/ern, i

Vomo

.. .... ..ry forChildren and Families"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(1/2 miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
Individual Hearing Devices
Ministries and Activities for all Ages.


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.

Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm

(352) 746-9422


U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.comrn


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
Place to Belong

2101 N, Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


GOSPEL
< II II'II*,T I \' 2
Hernando Church of Christ
7187 North Lecanto Hwy.
(State Road 491), Hernando, FL
WITH GUEST ?SPEAKER
ALLEtN BAILEY
Everyone is invited to attend
5/8/13 through 5/12/13
Time of Service
Wednesday through Friday
@ 7:00pm
Saturday @ 5:00pm
Sunday @ 10:00am
and second service after lunch.
For more information or
directions call
David Smith (352) 400-5222
Jason Yarborogh (352) 249-7785
Jimmy Smith (352) 400-3419


SHomosassa Springs
X SEVWINMY ADVENISrCHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com




Grace Bible
Church






Sunday
9:30 AM.....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM ..................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM .....................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM ....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1/ mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


', Rev. Stephen Lane

3Faith
Lutheran

Church (L.M.
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325

COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com





The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando, FL |
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.com

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


RELIGION


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA










Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3276 6.


Places of worship that



offer love, peace



and harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL


1,AIMMl%-,j
Hemondo, FL 34-442
352-726-673
Visit us Gn the Web 7t "A
L


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 C3

Church in America invites
the public to attend the Noc-
turn and Matins of Great and
Holy Pascha at 7 p.m. today
and the Divine Liturgy of
Great and Holy Pascha at
10 a.m. Sunday immediately
followed by an Agape Meal
and then Great Vespers of
Holy Pascha. The church is at
1277 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, off U.S. 41 North across
from Dollar General. The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees
to bring a box or can of food
for distribution at Family Re-
source Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort
Island Trail West. The church
will celebrate the sixth Sun-
day of Easter at the 8 and
10:15 a.m. services tomorrow.
St. Anne's will host Our Fa-
ther's Table from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. today. Alcoholics
Anonymous meets at 8 p.m.
Monday and Friday in the
parish library. The young
adults meet for a light meal
and Bible study the first Fri-
day monthly at one of the
group member's homes.

See NOTES/Page C4

First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Contemporary Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Home Bible Study
(Call for location)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the comer ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813





C4 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

For details, call Dave or Kathy
Jackson at 352-344-1167. All
are welcome to join St. Anne's
at 6 p.m. Sunday, May 26, for
a Bluegrass Gospel sing-
along. Annie and Tim's United
Bluegrass Band will perform
and lead the singing.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, conducts worship at 8
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. with Sun-
day school at 9:15 a.m. Adult
Bible class continues with the
in-depth study on Revelations.
Bible Information Class is at
noon Monday. Anew Bible In-
formation Class is beginning
Tuesday at 7 p.m. Visitors are
always welcome. Confirmation
Sunday is May 12 at the late
service. Call 352-489-3027.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday


F1 47 Years of
SST Bringing Christ
FIRST to Inverness
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am
Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 A.M.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
S www.1lstlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship ... .............10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway




Todd
Langdon




First Unite

Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion
9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & WorshipE


RELIGION


monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-K
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in the 8:30 a.m. contemporary
worship service or the 11 a.m.
traditional service every Sun-
day. Coffee and doughnuts
are served in the fellowship
hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Sun-
day school classes for all ages
begin at 9:45 a.m. Wednes-
day evenings begin with a
supper served from 5 to 6.
Awana and OTEG (Ordinary
Teens Extraordinary God) be-
gins at 6:30 p.m. with adult
Bible study. For more informa-
tion, www.fbcfloralcity.org or
call 352-726-4296.


'I "First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS H
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr.Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca cornn



J7 First

Assembly

of God
n n
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

,Pl Pastor,
irold


Rushing

















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The
Dunnellon Concert Singers
will present "Favorites From
the Great American Song-
book" at 4 p.m. Sunday. Free
admission. A love offering will
be collected. The church is on
County Road 486 opposite
Citrus Hills Boulevard in Her-
nando. Call 352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to its various activi-
ties. Adult Bible study with the
Rev. Bob Martin is at
8:45 a.m. Sunday followed by
the 10 a.m. worship service
with the Rev. "Jerry" Carris.
Children's church, a nursery,
and hearing devices for the
hearing impaired are pro-
vided. The Korean worship
service with the Rev. Yoon is
at 2 p.m. Mark Bodenheim
chairs the Men's Connection
at 7 p.m. Monday. Holidaze
Crafters invites all to come


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM
& 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study,
Gospel Singing, Pitch-in
Dinners, singing the old
hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.


Firsf Ba ist

of Lake, fou"rea.m
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: p ,i..r. . I I,,. ,,,l .. -.
Check us out on Facebook









oad

tist

ch
5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
SMiles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


and enjoy crafts and fellow-
ship at 9 a.m. Tuesday. The
HUMW choir meets for prac-
tice at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Darryl
Frenier. On Wednesdays,
Bible study with Pastor Jerry
Carris is at 1 p.m., Korean
Bible study with the Rev. Yoon
is at 4 p.m., and Bible study
with the Rev. Bob Martin is at
7 p.m. Cub Scouts Pack 452
meets at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The United Methodist Women
meet at 9:45 a.m. the second
Thursday monthly. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
and meeting takes place the
fourth Saturday monthly.
Share Praise and Fellowship
meets at 6 p.m. the second
and fourth Sunday monthly.
The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. Casual
praise and worship is at
9:30 a.m. Sunday and tradi-
tional Sunday morning wor-
ship is at 11 a.m. A nursery is
provided at both services.
Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m.
Call 352-637-0770.
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church invites the


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Cultode Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les 'Eperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711






First Baptist Church
Of Beverly Hills
4950 N. Lecanto Hwy
Pastor
Marple Lewis III
Sunday
Bible Study 9:15 am
Worship 11:00 am
Wednesday
Prayer 6 pm
Youth 6-8 pm
(352) 746-2970 www.fbcbh.com











VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 PM.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.* to 3:15 P.* Sat.
orByAppointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
:. .catholicweb.com .:


public to Sunday services at
9:30 a.m. with celebration of
Holy Communion. The third
Sunday monthly is a casual
service. Coffee hour follows
the service and all are invited.
Large-print service folders are
available. Wednesday Bible
study is at 10:30 a.m. Jacob's
Journey is at 1 p.m. Monday.
YMCA offers exercise classes
Tuesday and Thursday. Call
352-489-5511 for more infor-
mation. The church is at 9425
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to Sun-
day worship services at
10 a.m. Tomorrow we will
share in Communion and col-
lect nonperishables for the
local SOS food pantry. We
are a nondenominational
church where you will find a
warm and friendly atmos-
phere; a place for growing
friendships, family and faith.
The church is at the Realtors
Association of Citrus County,
714 S. Scarboro Ave. in
Lecanto, on State Road 44.
Wednesday at 7 p.m. the
church is beginning a home
Bible study through the sum-
mer months. The church is
currently studying the book of
James. Call for location and


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor


Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 A
Sunday School.................9:30 M
Contemporary Service.. .10:30 M
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes.................. 7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade... .7:00 P
Teens ............................... 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726 4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 4:00 PM
352-726-4033


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


Hwy. 44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness
* Sunday Services *
* Traditional
11:00 AM
* Casual Service *
* 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service .
* Tapes & CD' s Available U
0 Sunday School for all ages
* 9:30 AM
S Nursery Provided
SFellowship & Youth Group
0 5 to 7 PM 0
" Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
* Podcast: FPC inv.com 0

Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

directions. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
New Covenant Grace
Fellowship of Citrus County
meets at 10 a.m. Sunday at
the Inverness Community
Center, 1082 Paul Drive, In-
verness (U.S. 41 and Inde-
pendence). This new church is
"low on religion, high on grace
a church where you feel
better about yourself when
you leave than when you ar-
rived." Everyone is welcome.
Visit www.ncgrace.com.
If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church for
you. Abundant Life is a grow-
ing church where you can find
a church home, as well as a
caring church family. The Sun-
day morning service is at
10:30 and the midweek serv-
ice is at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
Both services have uncompro-
mised and encouraging Bible-
based teachings that will build
your faith. Abundant Life is a
full-Gospel, nondenomina-
tional church that believes in
the power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Abundant
Life of Crystal River is at 4515
N. Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundantlife
citrus.org or call 352-795-LIFE.

Come To
ST.
MARGARET'V
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Our Lady of
Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30- 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


Sunid.i, Evening 6:00 PM


Wednesday


7:00 PM


Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A placeto io,.,, I,.,, 1 t..1 /,..,n,


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all,


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


(0







Page C5 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Academy alumni
to convene May 7
The Sheriff's Office Citi-
zens' Academy Alumni As-
sociation will meet at
5:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 7,
at the Cornerstone Baptist
Church in Inverness at
5:30 p.m. All are welcome.
The association was
formed by graduates of the
Citizens'Academy. They
support the Sheriff's Of-
fice's charities such as
Jesse's Place, Shop-With-
A-Cop, the Carruth Youth
Camp and the Employee
Appreciation Dinner.
Capt. Doug Dodd, who
helped form the Alumni
Association, will be the
principal speaker.
There will also be a
silent auction at the meet-
ing, to raise funds for the
organizations supported by
CAAA. The doors will open
at 5:30 p.m. so that mem-
bers can bid on the many
items and gift certificates.
Funds raised at the two
yearly CAAA meetings are
the primary source of the
contributions made
throughout the year.
For more information,
call Jonna Wing at 352-
726-7721 or email jwing74
@tampabay.rr.com.
Beginner bridge
lessons offered
Beginner bridge lessons
will begin May 9, to be
offered from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. Thursday with
the Nature Coast Bridge
Club at Towne Square Mall,
U.S. 19, Spring Hill.
Call Mary Ann Dufresne
at 352-592-4882 or email
whimsey@atlantic.net.
Computer users
group to meet
Crystal River Users
Group, a computer club,
will meet at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8, at the
Crystal Oaks Club House,
off State Road 44, at 4948
W. Crystal Oaks Blvd.,
Lecanto.
Presenter will be Brigitte
Hagg on "Learn how to
Create GIFs." Haag will
show how to make simple
animated text, create or
modify animated clipart or
animate photos.
Coffee and refreshments
will be served at 6 p.m.,
with a short meeting at
6:30 p.m., followed by the
presentation. CRUG meet-
ings are open and free to
everyone. Visit www.
CRUG.com for information.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Dunkin D.


Special to the Chronicle
This cozy-looking orange
tabby kitten is Dunkin D.
He is gentle and sweet
and will warm your heart.
He is also fixed and ready
for adoption. However, if
you are looking for a
more mature feline, all
our adult cat adoption
fees are presently half
price. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.
Monday through Satur-
day at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House
on the corner of State
Road 44 and Conant Av-
enue, east of Crystal
River. Call the Humani-
tarians at 352-613-1629
for adoptions, or view
most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Beautiful blankets for babies


CINDY CONNOLLY/Chronicle
Several members of the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Quilting Group show some of the many quilts the group has
made to donate for the annual World's Greatest Baby Shower. From left are: Gloria Peterson, Peg Huber, Barbara
Dwyer, June Dreger-Parsons, Barbara Driest, Judy Teague, Carol Herbst and Gerry Kauth.

Citrus County's World's Greatest Baby Shower will take place Monday, May 13,
at the Citrus County Auditorium in Inverness. The first session will be from
3 to 5p.m. and a second session will be from 6 to 8p.m. At the event, parents
who are expecting and parents ofinfants younger than 6 months learn about
taking care of themselves and their babies. There are exhibits, games, a
scavenger hunt and gifs for moms, dads, babies and lots ofdoor prizes.
For information, call Blaire Peterson at 352-228-9047.


Herry's Kids
supports shower

Hospice of Citrus County/Hospice of
the Nature Coast Herry's Kids
Pediatric Services is a proud
supporter of the 2013 World's
Greatest Baby Shower. Herry's Kids
Pediatric Services provides
specialized services to children and
teens with life-threatening illnesses
and offers grief support and
therapeutic camps to young people
who have experienced a loss.
Pictured at the Baby Block at Citrus
Memorial Health System are, from
left: World's Greatest Baby Shower/
Citrus Memorial Health System
volunteer Janet Bienvenu, World's
Greatest Baby Shower assistant
chairwoman/Citrus Memorial Health
System Director of Women's &
Children's Services Margie Leturno
and Hospice of Citrus County Public
Relations Manager Joe Foster.


Toastmasters plan open house May 8


Special to the Chronicle

Radiant Ridge Toast-
masters will have an open
house at 5:30 p.m. Wednes-


day, May 8, at First Baptist
Church, 700 N Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River
All who dread public
speaking or have trouble


communicating can bene-
fit from Toastmasters.
Toastmasters show you
how to overcome fears, be-
come more confident and


learn leadership skills.
For more information,
call Vicky lozzia at 352-563-
2651 or Renate Wilms at
352-746-4598.


Steak & Steak celebrates Citrus children


Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County have nurtured and en-
hanced the lives of children
for 21 successful years. On Saturday,
May 11, we will celebrate our chil-
dren once again with the 12th an-
nual Steak & Steak Dinner at the
College of Central Florida Citrus
Campus, Building L4.
The evening will be
about Citrus County kids
and the good things they
have accomplished.
Youths of the Year
from each club will be in-
troduced. You will hear
from each nominee and
one will be named Youth
of the Year for the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus
County Lane
Nominees include BOY
Austin Cobb, Youth of the GIRLS
Year from the Central
Ridge Club. He is a
leader in his club and
quick to lend a helping hand to oth-
ers. He is an honor roll student at
Citrus Springs Middle School, a
member of the school golf team, in
the school band and participates in
the Torch Club, Street Smarts pro-
gram and 52 Day Challenge at the
Central Ridge Club.


C


Ten-year-old Melissa Scott is
Youth of the Year for the Evelyn Wa-
ters Boys & Girls Club in Inverness.
She attends Pleasant Grove Ele-
mentary School, where she is in the
fifth grade. Melissa has a strong,
positive attitude and is always will-
ing to help staff and other members.
She is a positive role model and
maintains good grades in
school. She appeared on
WYKE in January repre-
senting the Evelyn Waters
Club.
The Homosassa Robert
Halleen Club's Boys &
pr Girls Club Youth of the
Year is Kyle Robinson.
Kyle is 12 years old and is
currently in the sixth
Vick grade at Crystal River
S & Middle School. Kyle has
'LUBS been a member of the
Boys & Girls Club without
interruption since he was
in kindergarten. He is a
diligent student and has recently
been accepted into the Junior
Honor Society He is a leader in his
club and is cognizant of the needs of
younger members. He is always will-
ing to help. He participates in
Sharks football and is an all-around
good athlete. Kyle enjoys club pro-


grams and uses his influence for the
good of the club and its members.
The board's task of choosing one
child to represent the clubs is a dif-
ficult one.
Please join the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County as we rejoice in the
happy promise of our children. Tick-
ets are $50 in advance and $60 at the
door VIP tables may be purchased
for $500. The reception will be at
5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:30
p.m. Dress is business casual. The
steak menu is catered and donated
by Kiwanis of Inverness.
There will be a live auction and a
silent auction during the evening's
events.
Tickets for the clubs' car giveaway
of a 2013 Chevy Malibu or a 2013
Equinox SUV will also be on sale for
$25. Call the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County at 352-621-9225 for
more information.
The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus
County are partially funded by the
United Way of Citrus County, Kids
Central Inc. and the Florida Depart-
ment of Education.

Lane Vickis grant coordinator of
the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County.


News NOTES

Blessing of the
Fleet May 11
All boat owners and op-
erators are invited to the
second annual Blessing of
the Fleet from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday, May 11, on
King's Bay.
Look for the 22-foot pon-
toon boat with a green bi-
mini top and the Crystal
River Sail & Power
Squadron banner on the
port side, anchored on
King's Bay north of
Buzzard's Island.
Blessings will be per-
formed by Father Gil
Larsen from St. Anne's
Episcopal Church and Pas-
tor David Bradford from St.
Timothy Lutheran Church.
The Crystal River Sail &
Power Squadron is a non-
profit organization dedi-
cated to boating safety and
education.
For more information,
call 352-794-3008 or visit
www.usps.org/crystalriver.
Novel society
gathers May 4
The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Society
meets on the first Saturday
of each month in the Com-
munity Room at the Central
Ridge Library, 425 W. Roo-
sevelt Boulevard, Beverly
Hills. Business meetings
begin at 1 p.m. and pro-
grams begin at 1:30 p.m.
The May 4 meeting will
be devoted to preparing for
the fifth annual North Amer-
ican Conference of the His-
torical Novel Society to be
at the historic Renaissance
Vinoy Resort in St. Peters-
burg, June 22 and 23.
Everyone interested in
reading, writing and the his-
torical novel genre is wel-
come to attend meetings of
FCHNS.
For more information,
call Marian Fox at 352-726-
0162 or visit ww.fchns.org.
'Fiesta' time with
community band
The Nature Coast Com-
munity Band, under the di-
rection of Cindy Hazzard,
will present two concerts -
"Fiesta" at 2:30 p.m.
today, May 4, at First
United Methodist Church,
8831 W. Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa, and at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, May 5, at
Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland
Ave., Inverness.
"Fiesta" is a concert
commemorating Cinco De
Mayo, which celebrates
democracy and freedom.
All NCCB concerts are
free; donations to support
the NCCB are appreciated.
Those who plan to attend
are advised to arrive early.
For more information and
to contact the conductor/
music director, visit nature
coastcommunityband.com.
Model A club to
gather May 7
The Citrus A's Model A
group will meet at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7, at the
Floral City Lion's Club. All
are welcome.
For more information,
call Patti Tompkins at
352-688-3931 or visit
www.citrusas.com.
Railroaders
to meet May 7
The Citrus Model Rail-
road Club will meet at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, May 7, at the
Robinson Horticulture
Building of the Citrus
County Fairgrounds.
Wes Brockway of Sug-
armill Woods will present a
slide show and talk about
his grandfather as a steam
locomotive engineer during
the reign of Pancho Villa
and the Mexican Revolution
in the early 1900s.
For more information,
visit www.citrusmodelrr


club.org or call Bob Penrod
at 352-238-6879.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING MAY 4, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI.: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 16:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
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ED WFTS) ABC 11 11 11 News Program America dance challenge.'PG' Practice
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Leverage Tainted food. Leverage A school-bus *** "Glory Road"(2006) Josh Lucas. A coach
E (WMO IND 12 12 16 '14' '14' Theory Theory 'PG' a driver. 'PG leads the first all-black NCAA team.
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27 61 27 33 Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy. 'R' Rudd, Jason Segel.'R' N Seth Rogen, Traci Lords. 'R'
.i* 98 45 98 28 37 "Days of Thunder" (1990, Action) Tom *** "Any Given Sunday" -1 "' Drama AlPacino Cameron Diaz. A ** "Ace Ventura: Pet
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North
0 A 8 5
V A Q J
SK5 2
A 3
West
4 6
V 8 5 3
+ Q J 10 9 8
* 7 6 4 2


South
1 4
1 &-


05-04-13
4
S6


East
# J 9 7 3
V K 10 9 2
7 6 4 3
. 5


South
& K Q 10 2
V 74


East
Pass


Opening lead: Q

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Christian Nestell Bovee, an epigrammatic
writer who died in 1904, said, "Music is the
fourth great material want first food, then
clothes, then shelter, then music."
If alive today, he would surely relegate music
to fifth behind food, clothes, shelter and bridge.
In bridge, the fourth bid in an uncontested
auction is game-forcing when it is in the fourth
suit. Usually, responder is hunting for the best
game, but sometimes he wants to suggest a slam.
Look at this deal. When North hears his part-
ner rebid one spade, he knows game in spades
should be easy and that a slam might be possi-
ble. Jumping immediately to four spades does
not do justice to his hand. Instead, he first forces
to game with two diamonds. Then, after opener
continues with three clubs, North jumps to four
spades, which logically is a slam-try Now South,
with such a great hand, can take control with
(Roman Key-Card) Blackwood before bidding
seven spades or seven no-trump.
After West leads the diamond queen to the
bare ace, how should South plan the play?
If declarer can play spades safely, he will have
13 tricks: four spades, one heart, two diamonds
and six clubs.
The right play is to cash the spade king, plan-
ning to cross to dummy's ace. That works great
here, uncovering the 4-1 break. However, East
might throw South off the scent by playing his
spade nine under declarer's king. If South
thinks that is a singleton, he will next cash his
spade queen and go down one.
Watch out for this falsecard.

%'Ir j T THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Ma'am I assure you
one letter to each square, m this will never let
to form four ordinary words. Doesit you down. It works
w ?rkrain or shine.
O NLEV E .....
"- ' -0 "
~". 'T....I ri I. Services inc ,

YEDCA -._
II -" I-,


RALNEY



LUTOWA E
, T r-~---r-^


THE ABACU5 WAS A
5UCE55 BECAUSE IT
COULD ALWAYS EE ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer "T 1W
here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: OBESE OUNCE DRIVER AFFECT
Answer: Her golf score would be horrible after so
many of her shots went OFF-COURSE


ACROSS
1 Lively dances
5 Corn unit
8 Leave out
12 Racetrack
13 Ms. Thurman
14 Walk through
water
15 Story
16 Wooed
18 Loses control
20 Joule fraction
21 911 responder
22 Barge pusher
25 Air rifle ammo
28 Peruse
29 Constantly
33 Claim
35 Harry Potter's
rival
36 Pioneer
Daniel
37 Against
38 Popular
columnist
39 Familiar auth.
41 Total
42 Difficult


45 Squeak
stopper
48 Web address
49 Finish line
markers
53 Charmingly
56 Forum
farewell
57 Roman robes
58 Nourished
59 Stanley
Gardner
60 Winter fall
61 NFL scores
62 Campus
bigwig

DOWN
1 Little bits
2 John, in
Russia
3 Fundraiser,
often
4 Got some rest
5 Lux. locale
6 It multiplies
by dividing
7 Strict boss


Answer to Previous Puzzle


8 Have
9 Medieval
weapon
10 Footnote word
11 Williams and
Koppel


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Noted Khan
19 Power glitch
23 "Golly!"
24 Gull kin
25 Rum-laced
cake
26 Amorphous
mass
27 Unkempt one
30 Dye vessels
31 Brownish tint
32 Wander
34 New Age
singer
35 Coffee
go-with
37 Pigeon talk
39 Aimless
40 Canceled
43 Furrow
44 Rescued
45 Chooses
46 De-crease
47 Toy building
block
50 Rid of rind
51 Fitzgerald or
Raines
52 Perceived
54 Fancy shooter
55 Fabric meas.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I am a 57-
year-old man with no
siblings, and my
mother is deceased. My 82-
year-old father is physically
healthy, but he's in the early
stages of dementia. He has a
few hobbies to keep
him busy, but for
some reason, he has
become obsessed I
with me.
Dad has become
rather "needy."
Sometimes he calls
me three or four
times a day, even
when I am at work.
He insists that I go
to his house every
day, even if there is
no particular rea- ANN
son. MAIL
I know Dad is
probably lonely, but
still. He doesn't have a lot of
friends due to his attitude and
sharp tongue. He has become
demanding, insisting I do
things immediately rather
than when I have time. He
also has grown very mean-
mouthed and pouts if he does-
n't get his way
This is getting to me and
putting a strain on my family
What do you suggest? Crazy
in Kansas
Dear Kansas: We think Dad
is frightened. He knows he is
slipping and finds reassur-
ance in your constant pres-
ence. Dementia also can affect
his personality Call and visit
him when you can. When you
don't have time to run errands,
calmly and repeatedly say that
you will get to them on the
weekend (or whenever), and
follow through. Ignore the
rants. We also suggest you go
with him to his next doctor's
appointment and discuss your


I

L.


concerns. And please contact
the Alzheimer's Association
(alz.org) for information on re-
sources and assistance, be-
cause this is likely to get more
difficult for you over the next
several years.
Dear Annie: I am
married to a won-
derful woman who
is generous and
helpful. We are
both retired, in
good health and
live comfortably We
are currently
babysitting two of
our grandchildren
five days a week,
nine months out of
the year. We love
IE'S our grandchildren,
BOX but I feel this is too
much.
The problem is,
when I talk to my wife about
doing less so we could take the
winter off and spend it in a
warmer climate, she refuses. I
want to enjoy my retirement.
Winters here are depressing
and limit our physical activi-
ties. I don't feel it would be
right for me to travel by myself
or spend time in a warmer and
more enjoyable place while
she stays home and babysits.
How can I get her to realize
that the years slip by, and that
if we don't enjoy ourselves
now, it may be too late when
the grandkids no longer need
us to babysit? Richard in
New England
Dear Richard: It's possible
your idea of a wonderful re-
tirement is not the same as
your wife's. She may enjoy
being around her grandchil-
dren and want to be close to
them (and of assistance to
your children) as long as she is
capable of doing so. Since you


have three months "off," begin
by planning some special trips
during that time. When winter
comes, use your weekends or
school vacations to get away
You might even take the
grandchildren on longer trips
if they are old enough and you
can afford it. If you approach
this in the spirit of compro-
mise, perhaps your wife will
listen and even offer some
suggestions of her own.
Dear Annie: This is in reply
to the widow in Florida who
complained that she is unable
to make new friends.
I suggest she find a local an-
imal shelter where she can
volunteer her time. Most shel-
ters welcome volunteers, es-
pecially during the week.
Whether or not she makes
new human friends, the ani-
mals she works with will ap-
preciate the time she spends
with them and will display a
love and loyalty she will treas-
ure forever. Steve


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 737
3rd Street, Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www creators. com.


K Q J 10 9 8
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither


West North
Pass 1 V
Pass ??


TIOIN OGLE FU N|
OHIIONDEAL ANIN E
WANT DROUGHT S
L ABLE DODOS
R O Y MEA
KE YA SADD EINU
OP E SjG T S SC A B
NIB TS ACT iH BOI
C|R|ABBY ROOST|
BAR TET
R IDIDE SIESTI VE
SNOIRK EL AS I A
V I NE ERATT WALJ
|PTIS DE|N|Y A Y|E


C6 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts

WELL,THE RAIN MAY
HAVE WASHED AWAYMY
PITCHER' MOUND, BUT NObW
IT'S BACK IN SHAPE


NM UP HERE LIKE I U5ED
TO BE! LUP HERE ON THE
OL'MOUND-THROWING MY
OL' FAST BALL, ANP..


Pickles


WHA-THE RECKARE
YOU tI0NO, OVAL''
YDUR tSLIAY
EYEBROA)S )ERE
OLToF CONT(?OL.


"- ,
-^^:, -'
-j:2L,- '


WHAT O)E NEED
AROUND HERE I1 A
LITTLE MORE RAIN.





-
5 4 ____,_^e ./-g


Sally Forth -

WHAT
ARE YOU CATALOG
REDN, CATALOG.
REA ING
TED?2









Dilbert


Beetle Bailey

I WONDER IF THINK HE
OTTO OBJECTS TO LIKES IT
5ARGE MAKING HIM
WEAR CLOTHES


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


1'/\ AFRM-ROLLO CRARE? |
S~MWS RE'S GORRAW BE.WAT \AE
l"-- ,-- TO A PULP! A


(OU C'T LNEU \I FIARk,5ON7m I'LL BE.T kR'5 NEMEi-R. E-T
F,tR. SkC> WE R'NOTRIGTO R OLLO CSRAGREDt!
-. .__FERBUTFIT-E.LF! I,--I---


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT YOUR
CLOTHES AND OUR CLOSET
'- PACE' YOU-
PROMISED TO..-)


I' T


IT'S TWO OUT IN THE NINTH,
YOU MEAN ATHAT''T/ ON THE
YOU MAN TAT' WO ON THE
C r THAN D AN BASES
WHAT IARE LOADED
NAVEOl. -
---'' S*,- t, -,",I.- -



N. ., ,
Iif


( WELL, DOIN'T THAT
COME ACROSS?

I_ - --


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury -



1 I.. .. i...









Big Nate

...AND SOLDIERS OFTEN
RETURNED TO THE
BATTLEFIELD TO LOOK
FOR SOUVENIRS AND
MOMENTS.
MR_.S. GODFRE.Y?







Arlo and Janis


"So you didn't study for the algebra final,
either, eh?"


ELU, ARENTAU.LL
PRF-1XNTIL4L
LIBRARIE PRET-
TY EASY TO MAKE
I FUN IOF.


TRUE,
BUT
ROLANP
MAKA55
IT SO
MUCH E


OPTION TWIIO. CORRECT!
CONTINUE FOR FULL
REAPIN6 TEXT OF
THE 60AT GOAT BOOK
BOOK! CUCK HERE.











.-..UT THAT'S
o WEVER- WHAT'S
YoV WANt KNOWN
ITo SAY AS A
T IS FINE HAiP-Y
WITH rME. EYEBALL.
0 -0


'~OLF IT OK, BUT GOLF CARTS
ARE 5LIPER COOl-!"

Betty


"Am I part of the younger
generation yet?"


Frank & Ernest


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 7:30 p.m.,
9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m., 2 p.m.,
3:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"42" (PG-13) 12:15 p.m., 3:50 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R) 11:45 a.m., 5:05 p.m.,
8 p.m., 10:30 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 2:45 p.m. No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
6:45 p.m. No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) 12:50 p.m., 2:20 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:50 p.m.,
10:50 p.m. No passes.


"Iron Man 3" (PG-13) In 3D. 12:20 p.m.,
1:20 p.m., 1:50 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
5:10 p.m., 7 p.m., 8 p.m., 8:30 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
No passes.
"42" (PG-13) 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R) 11:50 a.m., 5:20 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 1:50 p.m., 4:10 p.m.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R) 12 p.m., 3:50 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m. No passes.
"Scary Movie 5" (PG-13) 11:45 a.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 slenba o


"X SKRXKHK ZFBZ KBOF NY MJ FBJ


UNE-UXHKA ZBRKAZJ


GXZFXA MJ


GBXZXAU ZN SK SWNMUFZ ZN


YWMXZXNA."


- LBWT PBT BJF


Previous Solution: "One thing is clear to me: We, as human beings, must be
willing to accept people who are different from ourselves." Barbara Jordan
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 5-4


Garfield


For Better or For Worse


ARE YOU HEY, IT'S NOT
SERIOUS? BAD' I CAN SEE MY
FOLKS REALLY LIKING
SOME OF
THE STUFF
IN HERE.

t- Jhi


WOMEN ALWAYS GO FOR
UY5 IN UNIFORM .,


P ,C./''-^- ;',

....... . < . -. -., ......
GGUY IN UNIFORM


r^-~~?

THAT'S A COMMON
MISTAKE. THE WORD
IS ACTUALLY MEMENTO,
NOT MOMENT.
1-


Today' MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


COMICS


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 C7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Habitat for Humanity Month


Outstanding volunteer


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed April 2013 as "Habitat for Humanity of Citrus County
Month." April marks the 20th year for Habitat for Humanity in Citrus County, which will dedicate its 100th home in
2013. Through volunteer labor and donations of money and materials, Habitat for Humanity builds and rehabilitates
houses with the help of the homeowner families. Habitat houses are sold to partner families at no profit, financed
with affordable no-interest loans, and the homeowners' monthly mortgage payments are used to build more Habitat
houses. From left are: John "JJ" Kenney, commissioner; Rebecca Bays, commissioner; Dennis Damato,
commissioner; George Rusaw, Habitat for Humanity; Scott Adams, commissioner; and Joe Meek, commissioner.


Special to the Chronicle
Hospice of Citrus County Volunteer Services Manager
Karen Rizzo, right, presents volunteer David Crank with
the Hospice of Citrus County 2012 Outstanding Patient
Support Volunteer Service Award at the 2013 "Follow
That Dream" Volunteer Recognition Banquet April 11
at Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club in Hernando. Crank
was recognized for his exceptional efforts in making a
difference in the lives of patients served by Hospice of
Citrus County.


BOCC proclaims National Volunteer Week


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners proclaimed April 21 through 27 as "National Volunteer Week" in Citrus County. The proclamation urges all citizens to help
recognize and renew the volunteer spirit of Citrus County by committing to address the needs of our community through service.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


6 66 05) ...65 1 ol re: 88)8* -34 *6mi: l*sfid0croice0lnec0 w b .t: w0choice0lnec0


#1 Employment source is




www.chronicieonline.com


structures
withstand
Installationsby Brian cc 8 120 rnh

've @ 4 352-628-7519
1 - -- 1- -



Permit And .
Engineering Fees I
S ip to $200 value -

*Siding *Soffit *Fascia Skirting *Roofovers *Carports *Screen Rooms *Decks *Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
Wanted Single
60-66yr old good
looking guy, with pick
up truck. Wanting to
meet 65 yr. old, Citrus
Co. Single Woman
Send Response to
Blind Box 1829P c/o
Citrus County Chroni-
cle, 1624 N. Mead-
owcrest Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429
Wanted. The lady with
a bright smile, awesome
blue eyes, and short
sassy hair. Kids are ok
but no more than 2.
Can also have grand
kids and I'll even allow a
puppy. I desire some-
one who is loving and
caring to everyone she
meets. Needs to be
beautiful all the way thru
and have a great out-
look on life. Someone
with wisdom & intelli-
gence. Someone look-
ing a very long term re-
lationship with a guy that
will love and adore her
and do his best to fulfill
her dreams. If you are
the one God appointed
to me then please get
ahold of me... and bring
ice cream.



15 Piece Patio Set
Dark brown frame
biege seats,
$400 obo
(352) 637-6647
2011 Chrysler
200 Convert, cherry/tan
22k mi, beautiful car,
automatic, $21,950 Firm
352-897-4520
Carolina Skiff
24 ft., new motor-41
Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP,
trailer. Lots of extras
$14,500 (352)287-3308

I ,, 1 1


c s I 1>1 liCSt.

___ Cl-sified,


Leek
CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat-Sun 8am-12pm
Furn, Hsdhold, & more
2793 W. Fairway Loop
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel.
batteries, garage
kept, Delivery Avail
352-527-3125
COUCH Double recliner
couch. Light/Dark
Brown. 2 years old.
Excellent condition.
$225.00 352-419-5556
Craftsman
Rear Tine Tiller,
5HP, $450 obo
Murray, 22" 4HP Push
Mower $60 obo good
cond (352) 860-0664
Crystal River
Going out of
Business Sale
Fri, Sat 7:30a to 3p
tools, equip, misc.
two much to list, great
prices! Retiring
ALL MUST GO!
4100 Citrus Av. Hy 495
FORD
'98, Explorer, XLT,
good clean cond. new
tires $2,700 obo
(352) 637-4676


HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
HYUNDAI
2006 Santa Fe, new
timing belt & seals, high
mileage, runs great,
$3200. 352-344-0484
INDUSTRIAL SEWING
MACHINE, Union
Special, Style 63400A,
Made in USA
$130 OBO
352-489-0976
INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495./ mo.
(352) 447-6016


CRYSTAL RIVER
Multi-Family Sale
Saturday 4, 8a-2pm
9410 W. Milwaukee Ct
INVERNESS
to share house, old
women perf. Reference
$300 mtly + util.
352-344-4578
Kenstington Est
Sunday 5/4 8a-2p
Girls clothing,
Assorted HH items
650 N Heathrow Dr
Maytag Washer &
Frididare Dryer,
Both Heavy Duty
$175. for pair
(352) 465-3384
NISSAN
1994, extra cab, 5 spd
cold ac, tonneau cover
high miles, runs strong
$1700. 352-344-0484
PINE RIDGE
Sat & Sun 7am
6052 N Orchis Ter
Seabreeze
w/trailer, 15'tri hull
must sell, best offer
352-746-0589



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
UnwantedCars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers,
& MORE 352-270-4087



Beautiful Black
Female Kitty
approx 4 yrs. old,
declawed frontpaws
& spayed. Annual vet
visits for tests and
vaccinations, receipts
available. All accesso-
ries & supplies FREE.
Owner Moving, unable
to Follow.
352-527-9930 BH


DISHWASHER
WORKS GOOD
U pk up
(352) 794-6355
FREE
34" Hitachi, not
working, Pixma,
Dell computer monitor
(352) 621-9810
FREE Cats
Free to good loving
adult only homes.
Rescued older adult
cats, all fixed
2 Declawed,
(352) 422-6310
Free Shepherd Mix,
short not tall,
Name Daisy
lovable, house
trained, Screen in
yard needed
Moving cant keep
(863) 661-6220
Free
Storage Shed
8x 10, U haul,
(352) 465-0339
Free to Loving Home
Female Jack Russell
Spayed
Call after 1pm
(352) 419-8686
FREE
VW Engine
(in parts), 2 benches for
VW Bus, dash board &
muffler. 352-746-2226
Moving Boxes
Lg. picture boxes
U-Pick Up
1-850-221-9162
PUPPY 8 month old
Boxer/Lab mix female.
Rescued last Christmas,
now 9 months old. All
shots and Spayed up to
date. Needs more ac-
tion owners than we can
supply Free to loving
home. 352-637-0095




Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistymeadows-
blueberryfarm.com

PICK
BLUEBERRIES
(352) 643-0717


426789 13 5|
389451762
751623849

237894651
918562473

645137298
163245987

892376514
574 918 326


Calico Cat, female,
spayed, white on
belly,white flea color
Lost between
1400-1600 Cardinal St.
Reward call Eleanor
352-621-0862
Gold Rafael Angel
Ring, looks like a coin
very sentimental
lost in Homosassa
pls call 352-628-4404
Hernando
Shh Tzu Male, light
brown, lyr old, lost in
the area of Bonnie pt
(citrus hills area)
352-601-7876
Large Anatolian
Sheppard
Male, tan, dark ears
and nose, micro chip-
ped 100lbs lost on
4/26 in Floral City near
S.Turner Ave &
StageCoach rd.
(352) 220-2540
Lost Calico Cat
Spayed Female brown
color w/orange/cream
markings with white
chest belly & paws, Bev-
erly Hills, Gleason Place
Heartbroken Lost on
April 6, REWARD
352-527-0302
Lost Cat
Tabby, white chest
bushy tail
Citrus Hills Area
Olympia & Nashville
(352) 746-4633
LOST Cockatiel
In Terra Vista
Gray bird, yellow
face, orange cheeks
(352) 746-7263


White Muzzle White
paws, pink nose w/
green eyes. Missing
from Humanitarian's
Parking Lot 4/2/13 on
44 in Crystal River.
PLEASE CALL
If you have seen him
REWARD
(352) 382-9303 OR
352-201-0576
LOST Mens Brown
Leather Wallet in
Homosassssa vicinity of
WinnDixie
and Walgreens. If found
Call (352) 621-7586




Wallet Found in
Homosassa Walmart
Pkg Lot on 4/15. ID
indicates Tampa Res.
(352) 422-7874




NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses

Five Week Proaram
*Medical Assistant
$1,420

Two Week Proaram:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.
TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-245'4119


C8 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


COMMUNITY







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397

TRAIN FOR A
SUCCESSFUL
CAREER IN
HEALTH CARE!

Enrolling Now for
ALL PROGRAMS:

PRACTICAL NURSING

PHYSICAL THERAPIST
ASSISTANT

PROFESSIONAL
NURSING

PROFESSIONAL
NURSING
Paramedic Opt.

LPN TO ADN
NURSING BRIDGE

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352) 245-4119




NEED A NEW
CAREER?
Career Preparation
Courses

Five Week Proaram
*Medical Assistant
$1,420

Two Week Proaram:
*Nursing Assist. $475
*Rehab Tech $475
*Phlebotomy $475.

TAYLORCOLLEGE
.EDU
(352)-'22-4119




WEE CARE DAY
CARE CENTER

Is now accepting
applications for
P/T employment.Child
care work exp required
Apply M-F, 12pm-2pm,
No Phone Calls.




Live in House
Keeper/Personal
Assistant

Citrus Springs Area.
Resp. include house-
keeping, cooking ,
finances & shopping.
Salary of $10,000 per
year plus living
expenses. Owner
Travels 6 mo /year.
Must like animals.
Sent resume with
reach number to:
tma2dabellsouth.net.
Replacing 19 Yr emp.
due to health.







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




CHIRO. ASST.
P/T exp.
M-W-F 8:30am-6pm
T-Th 10am-4pm
apply in person
6166 W Hwy 44, CR



Your World







C-lNWILE


CNA/HHA
Needed
Seeking a CNA/HHA
to work with a devel-
opmentally disabled
male adult overnights.
Must be able to pass
a level 2 background
screening and drug
screening. Must have
clear driving record.
$10.00 hr. no benefits.
Fax (352) 629-6806

DENTAL
ASSISTANT

Experience a Must,
Team oriented
office, Call for
Appointment.
(352) 746-3525
Beverly Hills

DENTAL
ASSISTANT

Must have exp.
EFDA Certified. Im-
mediate Openings
in our Crystal River
Office. We offer a
great benefit pkg.
please fax re
352-794-6140 or
email at VDCSH
@hotmail.com

*Director
of Resident Services

*Senior Solutions
Director

*CNA's
every other weekend

*Dishwasher

APPLY AT:
Superior Residences
of Lecanto
Memory Care
4865 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy (352)746-5483
drug free workplace
dselsavage@
superioralf.com
mbates@
superioralf.com

LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office
based medical
practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818

Medical Biller

Full Time
Hematology/Oncology
Experience
Fax Resume to
352-795-2017

NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885

RPSG TECH

PT/FT Night Position
1-3 Yrs. Exp, in sleep
med. must be reg.by
BRPT, current CPR
card is req. EOE
Call for appt.
386-538-1060




CHAMPS
SOFTWARE
Crystal River based
Enterprise Software
Company has follow-
ing job opportun ties:
Software Applica-
tions Specialists
to develop, implement
and support plant soft-
ware solutions such as
CMMS,MRO Inven-
tory, WF Management
and LOTO. At least 3
years' experience
working in plant
environment required.
Software Sales
Executive
to develop large
enterprise accounts.
Must have 3+ years of
experience selling
software solutions to
enterprise accounts
both to plant
management & IT
departments.
These positions
require extensive
travel. Please submit
resume to: jobs@
champsinc.com


Family Services
Director

Non-profit Christian
organization in Cit-
rus County is seeking
Family Services
Director responsible
for ensuring ade-
quate number of
qualified participat-
ing families to meet
organization's goals
and objectives. Ac-
tively monitor, serv-
ice and manage
the mortgage port-
folio. Candidates
will possess excep-
tional communica-
tion and presenta-
tion skills, be a com-
passionate advo-
cate of the organi-
zation and its mis-
sion, experienced
with mortgage
lending, processing,
servicing and knowl-
edge of real estate
transactions, docu-
mentation and
compliance.
Bachelor's degree
or equivalent work
experience pre-
ferred; high school
diploma or equiva-
lent required.
Full time position
Monday thru Friday,
some evenings and
weekend events.
Application Dead-
line May 7, 2013

Send Resume and
Cover letter to:
1108 E. Inverness
Blvd., Box 127
Inverness, Fl. 34452

Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927

PET CENTER
Is Looking for an
experienced Master
Dog Groomer. Own
Equip.. Req. Clean
Shop, No drugs.
Apply Personally
on Thursday Only
461 NE lst Terr.
Crystal River

Physical
Education
Teacher/Athletic
Director PT

Pope John Paul II
2013-2014 School Yr.
PT, Tues, Wed., Thurs
Minimum of a
Bachelor's degree in
PE and Florida certi-
fication or the ability
to obtain profes-
sional certification
within 3 years.
www.p p2.org
352-746-2020




COOKS w/
Breakfast Exp.

Full time or Part time,
Benefits or Vac. Holi-
day & Bonus Pay.

Now Taking
Applications Apply
2p-3p, Mon. Frl.
A.J.'s CAFE
216 NE. Hwy 19
Crystal River

Upscale Country
Club Restaurant
Now accepting
applications for

Part time
Breakfast and
Lunch Cook.

Please apply
in person at
505 E Hartford St
Tues-Sat between
2:00-4:30 pm.


BARTENDER
/SERVER
Part time. Inverness
Elks Lodge in Her-
nando. Call between
2pm 6pm. 726-2027.




Lic. Realtor Asst.

F/T salary/commission
email resume to:
ajconsulting 99@
yahoo.com
OPTICAL SALES
Citrus Vision Clinic is
seeking sales help for
our optical department.
No industry experience
required; sales experi-
ence a must. Incentive
based pay. Apply in
person. 2332 Hwy 44
W, Inverness, FL.

SALES HELP
Must have Exp.

Apply In Person
APOPKA MARINE
3260 E. Gulf to Lake
Hw. (352) 726-7773




DRIVER

OTR SD/LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

Exp. Dispatcher

Experienced
Service Tech
w/ Refrigeration
Knowledge

For AC Co. Must
have knowledge of
multi county area.
Computer exp., be
reliable & dependa-
ble. Experience
only need apply
Fax Resume to:
352-860-0757
or Email: aairinc
@centurylink.net

EXP. PIPE UTIL-
ITY FOREMAN
Croft Contracting Inc.
Experienced, working
pipe crew foreman.
Valid drivers license
req'd. To work in Cit-
rus & surrounding
counties. Weekend
work may be req'd.
Salary based on ex-
perience. Please ap-
ply at: 2271 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando,
Citrus Co., 34442
email resume to:
croftcontractina
inc(@earthlink.net
EEO/Drug Free
Workplace

MECHANIC/
BOAT RIGGER


Apply in Person
at
Homosassa
Marine
3120S.
Suncoast
Blvd
Homosassa, Fl.
34448
or Mail
Resume

PLUMBERS
WANTED

Must have valid
Driver's License
Apply at:
4079 S. Ohio Ave,
Homosassa

Residential
Plumbers/Helper

Plumbers and Help-
ers needed for resi-
dential community
(352) 341-4243
Contact JM Gibson
Mechanical

SEPTIC SERVICE
TECH
Experienced, clean
CDL, current medical
card, call for interview
352-628-0085


CLASSIFIED




CASHIER/COOK
Looking for people for
food concession help,
for local events and also
people who want to
travel. A driver license is
a plus but not
mandatory.Call Perry
cell 610-909-3678 or
office 407-957-0433

Maintenance
Associate

Seeking a full time
maintenance assoc.
for a senior living
community in Inver-
ness, that is respon-
sible and hardworking.
Candidate must have
previous experience
in all phases of apart-
ment maintenance
and small appliance
repair. Must have own
tools. Benefits after
90 days.
Please apply
online at
hr@dewarproperties.
com or by faxing to
229-247-1353.









































Sheriffs Ranches
Enterprises

Field
Representative 1

















HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
OR GED REQUIRED
$10.15per hour
Full-Time 40 hirs/w
CONTACT:
Christen Mason
Thrift Store in Crystal River
a200 US HL. 19
B Crystal River, FL 34428











opportunity to own


to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come tor
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
condSheriftions apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449

YARD/HOME
MAINTENANCE
Citrus p Srinses A
THIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAays week.
























Call 352-522-1109
between 6pm-9pm.
between 6pm-9pm.


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 CO


-BfJ
PART TIME
HELP

Local smoke-free Ten-
nis Club looking for
part-time help with
computer skills (Word,
Excel) and great cus-
tomer
service skills.
Shifts open Sunday,
Wed., Thurs. & Fn.
Email resume: tennis
@citrushills.com


Residence Serv
Coordinator

P/T 24 hours week
Resp include service
delivery & referrals.
Must have knowl-
edge of available
resources and trans-
portation. Strong
computer skills req.
Qualified candi-
dates send resume
and cover letter to
Joverstreet@
chpc2.orq
Equal Opportunity
Employer
www.communitv
housing partners.ora





Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
634-1397/637-3733





DUDLEY'S






TWO AUCTIONS
5-2 Walk About
Auction 3pmFull line
up of Estate Merchan-
dise & 50 roll around
computer desk &
chairs- outdoor sale.
Great value
5- Antique &
Collectible Auction
1im Christie's
Quality 1800's
Furniture,Oriental,
Coins, Sterling
Pitcher & flatware +,
Lalique, knives &
estate firearms, estate
jewelry, Bronze, art,
carpets, only 100 of
500 lots sold on line.
Incredible
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667





Large Elvis Presley
Collection complete
bubble gum set, his
personal scarf, and
personal pictures from
1977, $5. gold piece.
lots of papers &
books, Asking $750
(352) 586-2935


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030


-'0n


5-4 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UClick for UFS, 2013

"Pull over to this house and leave
the engine running."




Thank You For 15 Years, of Votes!

SI ': BEAUIIFL RESULT TS



CONSTRUCTION CORP
Est 1988


DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
KENMORE Glass Top
Electric Range
white, exc. cond.
$125. 352-465-5991
Maytag Washer &
Frididare Dryer,
Both Heavy Duty
$175. for pair
(352) 465-3384
WASHER OR DRYER
$135 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
White like New, GE
Electric self cleaning
range, Dish Washer, &
space saver micro-
wave $600 for All
(856) 229-1136




COMPUTER DESK
W/HUTCH $100
Pull out keyboard. Text
for Picture. SMW
586-904-3262




DUDLEY'S






TWO AUCTIONS
5-2 Walk About
Auction 3pm Full line
up of Estate Merchan-
dise & 50 roll around
computer desk &
chairs- outdoor sale.
Great value
5-5 Antique &
Collectible Auction
1m Christie's
Quality 1800's
Furniture, Oriental,
Coins,Sterling Pitcher
&flatware +, Lalique,
knives & estate fire-
arms, estate jewelry,
Bronze, art, carpets,
only 100 of 500 lots
sold on line.
Incredible
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667


CRAFTSMAN ANGLE
GRINDER $35 USED
AS POLISHER,
SANDER, GRINDER
AND CUTTER
419-5981
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL
ARM SAW 2.5hp good
shape $100.00
352-503-2350
Electric Power
Metal Saw
good cond. labor saver
cash, firm $25.
(352) 341-1714
PAINTER SPRAYER
Commercial, Sherman
Williams 4900, Excel
Condition $500.
(352) 249-7212
POWER TOOLS 10"
Rigid Table Saw 300
13" Rigid Thickness
Planer $200.
5500 Watt Generator
$250. (352) 419-7364



EMERSON 19" LDC
HDTV+DVD Remote 2
HDMI inputs,PC input
via VGA $75.00 call
352-726-9009
FISHER STEREO $75
TUNER/AMP/TAPE
DECK/TURNTABLE/SPE
AKERS/GLASS
CABINET 419-5981
GARRARD DOUBLE
TAPE DECK $10
PLAYS AND REC-
ORDS INVERNESS
419-5981
TELEVISION color tele-
vision in good condition
$12 with remote
352-220-4158
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529



16' GARAGE DOOR
Wayne Dalton Insulated
8K Series Meets 120
MPH Wind Code $220
352-726-3730,
352-422-0201



Dell Computer
Windows XP, Pentium 4
H/T, key board &
mouse, $99 no monitor
352-621-0248
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


55 GAL DIESEL/GAS
DRUM With Portable
Stand $40
352-726-3730
352-422-0201




15 Piece Patio Set
Dark brown frame
biege seats,
$400 obo
(352) 637-6647
TABLE & 4 CHAIRS
Round 40", 4 high back
chairs with arms. Beige
plastic. Table top weath-
ered. $25 746-7232



2 Display Cases
48"W x 38" H,
$75 each
(352) 341-2836
Leave message
2 LAZY BOY ROCKER
RECLINERS Clean,
Good Cond. $90 Both
352-726-3730
352-422-0201
3 Cushion Couch
Blue and White Check
$200, chair and ottoman
Blue Micro Fiber $100.
603-863-9750
3 PC SECTIONAL
Gray suede,
excellent Condition
$300
352-527-8165
BEAUTIFUL CHINA
CABINET with lighted
shelves and storage
drawers.$100.00
352-726-9758



Beautiful,

High End
Drexal Heritage
Furniture from model
home in Terra Vista
Call for your private
showing and furniture
details 352-804-6114
BED FRAME HD for
Queen or King,Goldtone
foot&head rails,looks
like Brass bed.$100
352-746-4160
BOOKCASE/TV SHELF
Dark oak finish 6 adj
shelves NICE!! 6' H
7'L 15"W $100.
352-621-0175
COFFEE TABLE OR-
NATE carved med oak
finish Good condition
$45.00 Pine Ridge
352-270-3909


doeaDi e


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Your World










CHkONJCLE


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lie EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483

1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call H&H
Services today!
li#37658 352-476-2285


ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *k
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
Primary Cleaning
** Free Estimates-
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557


Weekly or just an
occasional clean.
Call Tabitha @
352-601-2175.


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

Land1scapie

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876



#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service*
Free Est.352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


#1 Employment source is

.chrniclenline.c
www.chronicleonline.com


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


'"


YO \ rid lfi'i

Need a jeh)

oir a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1

employment
source!



Q--J


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557







C 10 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


WORDY GURDYBY TRICKY RICKY KANE0ER
1. Snooping actress O'Donnell (2) Every answer is a rhyming
n pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Window material course of study (1) they will fit in the letter
_- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Very last LP record material (2) syllables in each word.
2013 UFS,Dist.byUnivUclickforLUFS
4. Weirder bobbing-head bidder (2)


5. Actor Vince's minor chess pieces (1)


6. Irritate Hansel's fairy tale sister (2)


7. Belgian capital's marinara mollusks (2)


Sa1SfSIN siaSSfIi a *L a1313O alI3N 9 SNAVd SNHOflVA T
HIa ON aaao3000 ANIA TVIVNI SSVTL) SSVTID HISOH SON'
siaaSKv


COUCH Double recliner
couch. Light/Dark
Brown. 2 years old.
Excellent condition.
$225.00 352-419-5556
Couch w/recliners at
ea. end. blue tones,
$325. Tan Recliner
$100. good cond. for
both 352-341-4902
Dining Rm. Set, table
6 chairs, hutch, buffet,
$300. 3 pc. entertain-
ment center/ book-
case/desk, $100.
Excellent condition!
(352) 212-6918
(352) 249-8092
Electric lift twin bed
$50. 2 swivel Pine 24"
inch bar stools $20 ea.
3 wood end tables $5.
ea. Excel. condition!
(352) 212-6918
(352) 249-8092
Entertainment Ctr
Lt Wood; White chair
$125/both; Twin box
spring & mat. w/ rails
$75.(352) 795-7254
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT Cherry colorfits
27" TV,glass door for
DVD player etc. Excel-
lent.$50 746-7232


FOR SALE!
Fancy pub tables
30" top & 42" tall
Wood mahogany
color $75 Each
Call 352-344-8840

FUTON FRAME ONLY
NO MATTRESS asking
$25. 352-513-4519
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Lazy Boy Leather
double reclining sofa
$350.
Matching reclining
chair $350.
(352) 382-0485
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 -k
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500

MODEL HOME
FURNITURE, ASHLEY,
Liv. Rm. & Din. Rm.
Sets (352) 302-5797

Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808


RATTAN TABLE AND
CHAIRS 42 inch peacon
finish rattan glass top
tbl & 2 chairs purchased
at Leaders a year ago.
Additional chairs to
match can be pur-
chased. $325. Sugarmill
740-705-9004
Rocker Recliner
Dk Brown Leather
NEW $450
352-382-1570
Round dinette table,
w/ 4 chairs on casters
$150. Octigone glass
top coffee table, $35.,
Excellent condition!
(352) 212-6918
(352) 249-8092
SIDEBOARD BUFFET
Vintage, dark wood,
good condition $300
pictures on request
(352) 503-7930
STEP 2 TWIN BED Like
new, has large storage
underneath.$100.00
cash 352-726-9758
TABLE ACCENT/END
Beveled glass top/brass
OVAL 28L 23W 22H
VERY NICE $40.
352-621-0175
TABLE COFFEE/TV
DISPLAY Brass with
beveled glass top and
shelf 47x 18x 26H
$50.352-621-0175
TABLE END/ACCENT
Brass with beveled
glass top 27L 23W 22H
VERY NICE $40.
352-621-0175
TODDLER'S IRON
HEADBOARD Brand
New Metal Headboard,
boys and girls, $10
(352)465-1616
WRITING DESK
peacon finsh letter desk
glass top over inlaid
wicker two drawers.
Legs have pineapple
design,pusrchased at
Leaders. Sugarmill $100
740-705-9004



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Bolens 2 cycle Tiller
new $125. cash, firm
Scotch Fertilizer
Spreader, good cond.
cash firm $17.50
352-341-1714
Craftsman
Rear Tine Tiller,
5HP, $450 obo
Murray, 22" 4HP Push
Mower $60 obo good
cond (352) 860-0664
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Murray Rider
Mower 40" cut very
good condition $275.
352-637- 4718
Riding
Lawn mower
Murray 19.5 HP, with
pull cart, includes
extended warrenty
$1,000 (352) 464-1128


CITRUS SPRINGS
Sat-Sun 8am-12pm
Furn, Hsdhold, & more
2793 W. Fairway Loop
Craftsman Riding
Mower
42" hydrostatic Drive,
24HP, with
60 hrs. $1100.
(352) 513-5436



CRYSTAL RIVER
3146 N Appaloosa
Point, May 4 & 5th,
8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Tools,
clothes,housewares,
etc.

YARD SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER -
DUNNELLON
7854 W Dunnellon Rd
Saturday May 4, 8 to 3
Household Items,Books
and more. Side Yard of
First Baptist Church
of Lake Roussea
Crystal River
Going out of
Business Sale
Fri, Sat 7:30a to 3p
tools, equip, misc.
two much to list, great
prices! Retiring
ALL MUST GO!
4100 Citrus Av. Hy495
CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE SALE
Building behind Joe's
Carpet Fri. Sat. & Sun.
8:30 ? Rain or Shine
Everything must Go!
6633 Gulf to Lake Hwy
CRYSTAL RIVER
Multi-Family Sale
Saturday 4, 8a-2pm
9410W. Milwaukee Ct
CRYSTAL RIVER
Multi-Family Yard Sale
Sat. 4th, 8am-4pm
Riding lawn mower,
Harley Motor cycle
parts, yard equip.,
boating, sports gear,
household Items
1625 SE 2nd Court
Crystal River
Sat, Sun 8am to noon
Lg Two Family Sale
adult & children cloth-
ing, furn, exercise equip.
Lots of good stuff!
5673 W Pine Circle
CRYSTAL RIVER
Street Sale! Everything
Must Go! 9-5pmn
Fri 5/3 Sat 5/4 Sun 5/5
corner of Pinwheel &
504 SE Paradise Pt Rd.
Crystal River
Thur Fri Sat 8am-?
2 Fam.MOVING SALE
Tools, Furn, Zero Turn
Lawn mower
7889 & 7947 N. Neige
Pt(Citrus Ave to Pine
Bluff, Right on N. Neige)
HERNANDO
Fri. 3 & Sat.4, 9a-3p,
DOWNSIZING
Tools to Toothpics
4074 N. Indian River Dr
Citrus Hills, Fairview Est


5-4-13


I i l l l i l l i I I I I I I I.


HOMOSASSA
NEIGHBORHOOD SALE
Something
For Everyone
Fri. Sat. & Sun., 8:30-2p
7508 W VINEYARD DR
INVERNESS
ESTATE SALE *
Thurs., Fri. & Sat.
7419 E. Applewood Dr

Kenstington Est
Sunday 5/4 8a-2p
Girls clothing,
Assorted HH items
650 N Heathrow Dr
LECANTO
Estate Sale
Sat-Sun 9am4pm
Shop tools, and more.
99 S. Salisbury Terr
PINE RIDGE
Fri. & Sat. 8am-3pm
4547 N. Butternut Ave.

PINE RIDGE
Sat & Sun 7am
6052 N Orchis Ter






PINE RIDGE
5/3, 5/4, 5/5 8am-2pm
Moving Sale! Like New
Contempary Furn &
HH items. Must See!
4373 W Mustang Blvd



4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MENS SUITS SIZE
34X30 & 36X30 $40
EACH 352-613-0529



!!!!! 205/55 R16 !!!!!
Nice tread! Only asking
$70 for the pair!!
(352) 857-9232
*****225/70 R16*****
Beautiful tread! Only
asking $70 for the pair!!
(352) 857-9232
****215 60R/65R 16****
KELLY NAVIGATOR
GOLD GOOD TREAD.A
PAIR FOR $65.00
352-464-0316
----235\70 R16----
Great tread! Only asking
$70 for the pair!! (352)
857-9232
2 Solid Maple END ta-
bles & A COFFEE TA-
BLE $90 352-586-0082
or Ipurdin@live.com
3 DOUBLE ROLLS
VINYL PREPASTED
WALL COVERING $30
FLORAL ENGLAND
165 SQ FT 419-5981
15 hsp, Evanrude $195
Mikita 14.4v Sawzall
$65, 1930 antique out-
board $80, Craftsman
tool box & 100 tools $40
12' Jon boat $120
315-466-2268
10" CRAFTSMAN
BAND SAW WITH
STAND $90
352-586-0082 or
lpurdin@live.com
24" CRAFTSMAN
SCROLL SAW $90.
352-586-0082 or
Ipurdin@live.com
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
ART, Robert Butler
PRINT: signed
1987 Courthouse
352-564-9311 $25.00
BIRD CAGE Black Wire
with plastic base, 2
perches,2 feed dispens-
ers. 20H*17W*13D
$25 746-7232
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Otis, $20
(352)465-1616
BREADMAN BREAD
MACHINE Makes up to
2 lb. loaf, includes hard
bound recipe book. VG
Cond. $30 746-7232
CAST IRON KETTLE
Vintage hanging cast
iron camp fire kettle with
lid. Good Condition.
$40 746-7232
Cemetary Plots
Fountains Memorial Pk,
Homosassa, 2 adj. lots,
valued at $4k, asking
$2200. 352-302-9624
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $15
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529


CLASSIFIED




MTI brand M(8-201b)
orange w/black straps
Handle on top.New
$25 746-7232
DONVIER ICE CREAM
MAKER Chillfast
system-no electricity, no
ice or salt needed. Ex-
cellent. $25 746-7232
GAS GRILL 40" wide,
working condition, in-
cludes gas tank and
new cover. $75
746-7232
GENERATOR B/S
Engine,10 HP,5250
watts.Used once,like
new.Paid $650 sell for
$400 OBO
352-746-4160
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
GUINEA PIG/RABBIT
CAGE Plastic base with
wire top.40"L*18"W 20"
Plus bowl,bottle,hutch.
$50 746-7232
HARLEY SLIDE ON
ORIGINAL MUFFLE RS
NEW 1350/1450 ONLY
$90.00, 464-0316
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Wood Cradle and
High Chair $100
(352) 795-7254
HOOVER STEAMVAC
Clean Surge with stair
and upholstery attach-
ments.$85
352-586-0082
INDUSTRIAL SEWING
MACHINE, Union
Special, Style 63400A,
Made in USA
$130 OBO
352-489-0976
Kit Wood Cabinets
36" sink cab w/24"
matching side $30;
8 ft center top + dsink,
base cab + 4 top wall
cab.$60 352-465-1892
Metal Folding Chairs
Approx 170 Chairs,
good cond., $5.00 ea.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
MICROWAVE OVEN
GE Profile Fits Over
Stove $100.00 Phone:
352-382-0009
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good con-
dition, green/ black/
white color, $30
(352)465-1616
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX $60.00
352-464 0316
PARAFFIN BATH
HoMedics Para spa
Plus Paraffin Bath Heat
Therapy System.VG
cond. $40 746-7232
Pressure Washer
gasoline powered, like
new, $125 cash, firm
Conference Table 94"
long, exc. cond. $35
cash firm 352-341-1714
QUILTING FRAME
Quilting frame, light
weight and easily disas-
sembled for storage.
$50. 527-2422
Reverse Osmosis
Aqua Pure, like new
$400. obo
352-726-3878
ROYB1I10" compound
miter saw, nice. 30 Ib
Scotts W&F. Near new
Reese's hitch with ball.
All $45 527-6709
SLOW COOKER Red
w/ removable crock, lid
latches in place for safe
transport.5Qt. Excellent
cond. $25 746-7232
SOLID MAPLE
DRESSER & HUTCH
$85 352-586-0082 or
Ipurdin@live.com
SQUARE DANCE
DRESSES 9 dresses
@$10 ea. Various Col-
ors. Small call Ruth
352-382-1000
STEP 2 LARGE PLAY-
HOUSE. used
indoors.Good condi-
tion.$100.00 cash.
352-726-9758
STORAGE SHED
12X20, g/ cond. $1200
U Move (352) 249-7212
TRAVEL BAG Travel
bag perfect for school or
travel $9- 352-220-4158
USED GOODYEAR
TIRE (REGATTA)
P225/60R 16 $40.00
GOOD TREAD
352-464-0316
WEDDING GOWN Oleg
Cassini gown, white.
Worn once. Size 8 $100
352-201-2665
Welded Galvanized
Wire Fence
48" high, by 100' long
never used, $98. cash
firm (352) 341-1714



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY $70.00
464-0316


BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316
Electric Wheel Chair
in good condition
$1000.00
(352) 341-6217
Harmar Universal
Power Chair Lift
w/swing arm
$700.
(352) 419-4578
NEW 4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT
MUCH EASIER TO
GET UP ONLY 20.00
464-0316
SAFETY BATHTUB
TUB GRAB BAR IT
CLAMPS TO THE SIDE
OF THE TUB ONLY
$25.00, 464-0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK VERY LONG SO
YOU CAN SLIDE INTO
THE SHOWER 40.00
352-464 0316
Twin Electric Beds
in good condition
$1200.
352-628-2777



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676
WE BUY
US COINS&
CURRENCY
(352) 628-0477



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL
DREDNAUGHT
W/EXTAS NICE! ONLY
$55 352-601-6625
"NEW" BLACK STRAT
COPY W/GIGBAG,
TIJNER&MORE,MAPLE
FRET BOARD $75
352-601-6625
"NEW" FULL SIZE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAGTUNER,
STRAP&MORE $75
352-601-6625
"NEW'FULL SIZE
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG
TUNER,STRAP&MORE
$75 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
Martin D 16 h built 1992,
spruce top mahogany
back and sides, solid
woods nice condition,
Martin hard case $ 975
352 527 1245
BLACK IBANEZ
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
WITH ONBOARD
TUNER &SOME EX-
TRAS $50
352-601-6625
Galveston acoustic
guitar in good condition
$50. 3524194464
Guitar strap $2.
352419-4464
IBANEZ TALMAN
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMP,GIGBAG,
TUNERSTRAPCORD&
MORE "NEW'$185
352-601-6625
M-Audio key studio 4
octave keyboard
controller $25.
352419-4464
Music Lovers,
large assortment of
Piano music
reasonably priced
$100. obo
(352) 257-9723
PIANO
Currier console piano
Excellent cond.
$400.,
(352) 503-7219
Several boxes of sheet
music $15.
352419-4464
SPINET PIANO
Krakauer Bros, looks
and sounds good $400
pictures on request
(352) 503-7930
Technics KN-750 music
keyboard $50.
352419-4464



AREA RUG 7X10 Nice
design, no worn spots,
Clean $30.
Text for picture. SMW
586-904-3262
DECORATIVE
KITCHEN CANNISTER
SET $10 E-MAIL
PHOTO 4 CONTAIN-
ERS WITH LIDS
419-5981
FIESTA DISHES 8 4
piece place setting.
multi colors, $15.00
each place setting Call
352-726-9009
TWO DOOR SMALL
UPPER OAK CABINET
fits over fridge. $30.
352-513-4519


USED EXTERIOR
METAL DOOR FROM
recent renovation
36x80. $65.00
352-5134519



ELEC.TREADMILL
NORDIC TRAC ALL
OPTIONS, PLUS
POWER INCLINE NEW
1495.Reduced $335
352-464-0316
ELLIPTICAL BY NOR-
DIC TRAC All Electron-
ics+ Power INCLINE A
STEAL AT REDUCED
335.00 352-464-0316



BICYCLE BOYS
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
BICYCLE RACK ALLEN
brand fits on your car or
van trunk, holds up to 4
bicycles, new in box.
$50 746-7232
CABELA'S Drift
Sock/Anchor Easy to
rig, vented 4 easy re-
trieval. reinforced nylon
w/pouch.$25 746-7232
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel.
batteries, garage
kept, Delivery Avail
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ Go Golf Cart
1997, runs good,
$1,150
Club car Golf Cart
$450
352-564-2756
KAYAK CARRIER
kayak roof rack
$80.00 phone
352-726-6084
Leaf mulcher, electric
$35. Electric Boat
Wrench $40.
Automatic Fish sealer
$15. 352-860-0939
SCUBA TANK 80CUFT.
Aluminum, silver US Di-
vers brand w/J valve &
harness.Good cond.
$50 746-7232
Tennis Racket,
stringing machine,
electronic Alpha ultra
edge, w/6 pt hold ex-
cel. cond. $400. obo
Recumbent Bike
BikeE, 21spd.
aluminum 291bs,
excel cond. $400 obo
(352) 489-0105
WATER COOLER
5GAL w/spout.Orange
w/Gatorade logo.Cup
holder on side.Great
Cond. $20 746-7232



2009 LDL
Enclosed Custome
Motor Cycle Trailer
5 x 8, Red, diamond
plate V Nose, 50" full
rear spring drop ramp
Low profile, used once
garaged for 3 yrs. like
new, beautiful cond.
pd $2,500 Sell $1,600
(352) 422-1026
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1975.
call 352-527-0555



ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, ok condition,
$50 (352)465-1616
TODDLER BED with
mattress,made of
wood.$50.00 cash.
352-726-9758


Sell r Swa


DIXIE GIRL
Dixie Girl, 5-y.o.
pretty Shepherd
mix, loves people,
other dogs, kids. In-
telligent, affection-
ate, friendly, gentle,
sweet disposition.
Weight 42 lbs. Aims
to please. Walks well
on leash, rides well
in car. Perfect
companion, wants
to be by your side.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.


LILLITH
Lilith, a spayed
4-y.o. Hound/Lab
mix, housebrkn,
crate-trained,
UTD on shots, low
energy, great on
leash, weight 45 Ibs.
Beige/white in color.
She is a great com-
panion dog, won-
derful house man-
ners. Loves people
& bonds strongly to
her human friend.
Needs someone to
spend time w/her.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


My name is Ginger, and
I have a lot of colors. I
was a stay now I am a
loving kitten looking for
my forever home, is it
you. See me @
www.savingangels
petrescue.
419-0223 / 726-1006




-Z









My name is LuLU. I am
about 18 months old
and full of energy. Yes I
am a Chi. Everything is
done, except me being
in my forever home.
See me@
www.savingangels
petrescue.com or call
726-1006 / 419-0223








PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tri color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876


A Diabetic Needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
Call Mike 386-266-7748




I BUY AMMO,
Also Reloading
Supplies & Equip.
PAYING
$$ Top Prices $$
352-302-0962

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Ony $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
*1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


2012 CAROLINA

SKIFF16Ji0
. Mercury 60 ELPT Four Stroke, BiminiTop,
-Swim Platform, Galvanized EZ Loader Trailer
With Oil Bath Hubs ti 6 F5
1 5"" aS16500

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE '
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597T


CALL FOR DETAILS
--- 563-3206



... A._- _
-



As Low As $18 per ad



NEW 2013 EXCURSION X21FC
BREAR FISH PONTOON BOAT
Yamaha F115 EFI Four Stroke
T 5 Year Bumper to Bumper
LOTS OF
SEXTRAS $25,300
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597|


2002 KIA SPORTAGE ............. $3,750

2005 CHEVY EQUINOX s...$4,950

2000 TOYOTA RAV4 L 4X4 ...$6,450

All vehicles safety inspected
and serviced Ready to Go!




1998 CHEVY BLAZER 44 ........$1,875

2000 BUICK CENTURY ......$2,950

2002 FORD EXPLORER SPORT $3,450

2005 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING $3,450
All vehicles safety inspected
and serviced Ready to Go!


AUOSLE




232Hy 4Wst:


Ineres




35242304:


BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219
GOAT 2yr old
gentle, neutered male
dehorned, healthy,
natural grass mower,
w/ run line & food $75
352422-5622












SALLIE
Sallie, a very sweet
& joyous terrier
/Dalmation mix,
1-y.o., housebrkn,
HW negative, slim &
trim, is a bit shy,
warms up quickly.
Weight 35 lbs. Pretty
& affectionate,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/other
dogs, sits for treats.
Family could not af-
ford to keep her.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Shih Poo Puppies,
4 males, 1 female
ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
3 males 1 female
Ready 5/9
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu & Shih-Poo
Pups, Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827



Galvanized Chain Link
Dog Fence
10' sq. x 6' high
w/access door $275.
cash only, firm
352-341-1714

Horse Quality
HAY
(352) 795-1906
100 Bales Pick-Up
$4.50
200 Bales Pick Up
$4.00
This Is Shamrock Hay




Horse Quality
HAY
(352) 795-1906
100 Bales Pick-Up
$4.50
200 Bales Pick Up
$4.00
This Is Shamrock Hay

^^^^^^:i


CALL FOR DETAILS

.-- --563-3206


-- rad


As low As 1O per ad ...


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FLORAL CITY
2/2 & carport. SW
w/ addition, Shed.
$500+util., call Tom
305-896-9782

HOMOSASSA
2/1, & 1/1, Near US 19
352-634-1311

INVEREESS
14 x 60 with addition
2/1 1.25 Acres, near
wal-mart $475 Mthly
706-473-2184

HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced Acre, Addition
Huge Deck, Shed
$500.mo 352-628-5244




43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
Vlew 352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
homes. $8500 off of
any home, 2/2 & 3/2
from $39,900
Call John Lyons .l
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details.
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/





INVERNESS
55+ park
Enjoy the view!

2 bd, 1 bath Lot rent,
car port, water, grass
cutting included.
Call 352-476-4964
for details





FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

HERNANDO
16x70 MH 2/2 Split Plan
Nice Porch, on 1 1/4 ac-
res, must see inside,
nice & Clean $49,900
(will consider
reasonable cash offers)
352-465-1500

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new floor-
ing $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217



HOMOSASSA
Dbl.Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192

INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on 14 Acre
on paved road,
fenced yard. $3000.
down, $417.53 WAC.
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message





1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vynal window,
utiltiy & outdoor shed
all appl's and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243
Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-794-4128

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240,2/1,
Clean, Fully furn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648


2 Mobile Home
Steps for sale
48" wooden, brand new
$250 for both
352-503-7709





-ACTION

RENTAL MANAGEMENT 1
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.conm
HOMOSASSA
5641 W. Irving Ct....................... $750
2/2/1 Nice home, great location
6 xhorn Ct. E ......................... $1,350
3/2/2 Pool home in SMW
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
5164 N Dewey Way (Her.)....REDUED $685
3/2 DW,new mobile on 1/2 ACRE!
5525 S. Kine Terr. (Inv.).......... $1,200
2/2/1 beautiful home,furn. or unfum.
CRYSTAL RIVER
2561 N. Senea Pit.................. $1200
2/2 Furnished Waterfront DW
9351 W.Wisonsin Ct............... $825
3/2/1 Nce home, beautiful kitchen
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
1829 W.Andro edae (CS) ........... $825
3/2/2 Lovely area, nice porch
2295 N.AndreaPI. ()............... $995
3/2/1 Villa in Brentwood




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
INVERNESS
to share house, older
women perf. Reference
$300 mtly + until.
352-344-4578




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

INVERNESS
1/1 $400-$465
Near Hospital
352-422-2393




INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant
and hospital, Clean,
Quiet, $495./ mo.
(352) 447-6016




HOMOSASSA
600 sq ft, On US 19,
Across from Wildlife
Park 352-634-1311


LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




BRENTWOOD
2 bd 2 ba new Twn/hse,
unfurn, has wash/dryer
plus access to pool and
SmGym $850mth
1st last, sec req.
352-503-7709
Whispering Pines
Villa Furnished
3/2/1 Liv, Din, Kit, Lanai,
end unit ots of privacy
$850 mthly, last, sec.
413-478-6396




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




LECANTO
3/2, Mostly furn. Call
for info 352-746-2351
MEADOWCREST
Fairmont Villa 3/2/2,
beautifully furnished
Maintenance free,
fireplace in living rm.
$900/mo + utilities
352-746-4116




BEVERLY HILLS
Updated 2/1+carport
$500. month
352-422-4012
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352-341-4178
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paintflooring through-
out, w/d pets ok $1000
mthly, 619-301-5442
Inverness 3/3
liv & fam rm,rec. rm,
w/pool table, LG caged
pool & deck on 1 acre
$1150.mo. + $1500 sec.
352-634-3897
INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
SUGARMILL
WOODS
2/2.5/2 1st, last sec.
$875 monthly
352-628-0800


-I-


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CAIRO, GA
1 Tenant to share 2 Bd
Rm House, Reasona-
ble (229) 377-3974




Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
(904) 757-1012


must sell!
Lecanto Fl 1-1/2 bath.
Office Bldg for sale -
perfect for Accountants,
Chiropractor or insur-
ance office. Corner Lot,
fences, great location -
Approx. 1400 sq
ft.Listed to sell by owner
352-746-5079

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com




TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $56,400. Call
352-638-0905

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






For Sale10w

3BR/2BA, Pool,

New

Cage

Recently Re-

modeed

4/13 New

kit&bath,

cabinet.

w/ granite,

New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241


Alan .wAMERICAN Jea""n
DeMichael ER REALTY & INVESTMENTS Gaskill
Realtor "Always There For You" Realtor
352.613-5752 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy. 352.476.5582
Beverly Hills, FL 352-7 34465
352-746-3600 Office

OE HI IS 1 1 AM I "


INE. IUUDh.E.EQU SI IAN iHUOME.I





r ,,il. $339,900
5600 W. YEARLING DR.
Dir: 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd., Left on Pony,to Left on Bonanza,to Right on Yearling. Home on Right.


Experience Florida
Living At It's Best!
Open House
Sun, May 5th 1-5 PM,
2/2/1 Condo
247 NW Baypath Dr,
Crystal River, Fl 34428
"Springs on the Kings
Bay" MLS 354317
Rose Strawn Realtor
Cell 352-427-6006
Waybright Real Estate,
Inc 352-795-1600
110 NE Crystal St,
Crystal River, FI




2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/ 3/18' rollups
office tIr & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862


1wL




2,240 SF

Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. May 16th,
12PM
Preview From Ilam
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctloneers.com


PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 2 w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840


Per Sa&leI
Nicest 2/1 in Beverly
Hills MUST SEE!! You
won't find a nicer
home in this price
range looks and feels
brand new with over
$25K in upgrades.
Large new 12'x 24'
shed in rear with of-
fice and work shop.
Completely renovated
insulated windows,
new oak kitchen
cabinets,new bath-
room tile, berber car-
pet, 3D shingles.Large
Florida room (can be
3rd bedroom)
"$54,900 with easy
terms". This house
shows as new
it won't last long!
More info here
http://www.sharphome.c
om/131313
call Troy 352-364-6316

REMODELED 2/1.5/1
NEW: Roof, kitchen,
appl's, bath, flooring,
paint, much more.,
1240sf, under AC.
$59,900. (352)527-1239





Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$39,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive b then Call
(800) 82-1550





OPEN HOUSE
New Home
399 E. Keller Court
Citrus Hills
Saturday & Sunday
2:00 4:00 pm





INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




FLORAL CITY
Withlapoka Island
3/2/2 w/fire place, Ig
yard, dock on main ca-
nal, completely furn.
$1000 mth,1st, last,
$500 Sec. Bk gr/credit
ck Req. 321-303-2875




3-4BR/2BA/2-4Car
New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees,
2 Lots, $145,000.
352-563-9857




3/2/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
REDUCED $133,900
352-302-4057


CLASSIFIED





Por Saleov4
3BR/2BA, Pool, New
Cage Recently Re-
modeled, 4/13 New
kit & bath, cabinet.
w/ granite, New AC
Lots of Extra's $155,900
OPEN HOUSE SUN. 5/5
11A-3P, 352-601-0241


Sis


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
SS Appliances, Wood,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar, fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026
SMW
3/3/2, court yard pool
home, FSBO $233K
call for appt. no realtors
352-503-2978













Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

WANTED
I need listings!!

I SOLD all of
mine and I can
sell yours too.
Market is good!

Call me, lets talk.
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comr


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'lI work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 Cll


Room To Roam
3/2 ON 2 ACRES
Quite Country Setting
front porch, Large
rear screened porch,
Patio, 24x30 Steel
Building, w/water &
electric, and Steel
Carport, Completely
Fenced Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area,
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$132,000
352-302-6784

SPECIAL *

New Home in Quiet
Neighborhood, 3/2/2
2932 sq. ft. corner lot,
on 1 acre, $279,900

Call Barney
(352) 563-0116













TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant






INVERNESS VILLA
For Sale, Near
Whispering Pines
Park. Close to stores
/restaurants. Near
Medical Facilities/
Hospital. Light,
Updated End Unit.
2 BR. 2BA., Garage
Eat in Kit., Liv. Rm.
/Din. Rm., Front/back
porch, garage, attic
w/ storage, newer AC
w/ guarantee. ALL
Appl's. UPDATED,
Near Condo Pool
Call (352) 637-3746
(352) 697-2475






"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www. plantation
realtylistings.com

516 S. TUCK POINT
2/1/I Block Home,
Remodeled, New
Everything, Canal to
Withlacoochee River
Priced to Sell
Immediately! $64,900
(352) 503-6703




HAVE IT

ALL
Spring Water, Fish from
Dock, Watch the
Manatees from porch,
walk to festivals, enjoy
living in dwntn Crystal
River, gated community,
2/2 Condo w/gar.
$249,900, ownerlic. RE
Broker 352-257-9496


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNau-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"






HERNANDO
Lot for sale
(Arbor Lakes 55+)
$15,000 OBO
781-864-1906





1989 Merc. 35 HP,
No Tilt Good com-
pression good spark,
nice shape $695.
Newer motor guide,
trolling motor,
401b thrust, foot con-
trol., like new $450.
(352) 860-0513


** BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510R
15 FT BOWRIDER
w/55 Johnson, w/tilt,
bimini, foot trolling
mtr.fish finder, trailer,
runs and looks good,
$1,650 (352) 860-0513
1988, 15 FT
Fiberglass, center con-
sole, w/40HP, Johnson,
w/tilt, new bimini,
trailer, ready to fish,
$2,295 (352) 860-0513
1989, 17 FT
Aluminum Tracker,
w/ high sides, great for
salt/fish water, 60HP
evinrude/tilt, dual Batt.
built in gas tank, foot
control, trolling mtr.
bimini top, new Ken-
wood stereo, w/ CD,
fish finder, batewell,
trailer, great shape,
$3,200. (352) 860-0513
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
1998 Sting Ray
22 Ft, extra Clean 175
Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab,
great for fish/pleasure
$7500 352-422-4658
20ft PONTOON
w/48HP, Johnson, w/
tilt, fish or cruise, seats
6, troll. mtr.-batewell-
fish finder, all in good
shape, $2,450. No
trailer (352) 860-0513



Bayliner 1984
Trophy Cuddy
cabin, clean, with
trailer, Volvo pente
i/o.does not fire,
needs work,$2000.
cash only, call
Doug 564-0855
or cell 212-8385
Carolina Skiff
24 ft., new motor-41
Hrs., 4 stroke, 150HP,
trailer. Lots of extras
$14,500 (352)287-3308
PONTOON
2005 18ft Party Pon-
toon w/ galvanized
Trailer. 40hp Yamaha
$6995 (352) 650-9059
Pontoon Hse Boat
32 ft diesel engine
driving paddle wheel.
$5000. Dunnellon
260-494-5563
Seabreeze
w/trailer, 15' tri hull
must sell, best offer
352-746-0589
SPEED BOAT
1975, w/trailer newly
painted, new red cus-
tom canvas cover.
$2,000. 813-650-4662
Vee Bottom
Aluminum 12Ft boat
motor, & trailer good
cond. $375.cash firm
352-341-1714
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555"*
boatsupercenter.com
YACHTMAN
1988 22 Pontoon Pon-
toon 22ft-40hp
ELTO-Trailer-New Deck
2006-some new seats
fully equipped-under
cover 4,300.00
352.746.2621




ONE OWNER
KEYSTONE RV
COMPANY
2008 Cougar 5th wheel
33' Double slides, wood
floors, ducted A/C, large
shower, all the extras,
like new condition,
$21,500. 352-726-6261



2001 Aliner Expedition
18', sleeps 4, Gd Cond
w/ A/C, Refrig $4500
(352) 249-6098
2005 Trail Light
30' Travel Trailer w/
slide, rear Qu bed,
ducked a/c exec. cond.
$7200 352-344-2712
2011 ROCKWOOD
20' Trailer, like new,1 db
bed, slide w/convertable
sofa, all appliances,full
bath, many extra's
$13,400 352 860-2701
'06 ROCKWOOD
TT
31' Signature Series.
Aluminum frame. Rear
queen, 12' LR slide. All
factory extras + more.
Completely equipped
(linens, kitchen, tools,
spare parts). Ready to
go. Immaculate condi-
tion, No smoking, no
pets. $14,000.
352-637-6262
POP-UP CAMPER
03 Coleman Elite, 16 ft
opens to 25ft, H/A,
2 K beds, Refig $3600
(352) 344-9589
TRAVEL TRAILER 26'
2005 Springdale by
Keystone with slide,
queen bed, sleeps 8,
ducted A/C, tub with
shower, good condition.
$6700 352-464-1622


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945
Yellow Stone
32' tag along
$1500 OBO
352-220-6048



Tonneau Cover
Rugged, 6% feet,
folds into 3 sections
Asking $250
727-251-7568
VW
2 transmissions,
1 is for a VW bus
746-2226/1212-1538



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




1997 Lincoln
Twn Car Light Green,
Low mi. new carriage
roof, new head line,
good tires, cold a/c
$3000 352-503-7256
2011 Chrysler
200 Convert, cherry/tan
22k mi, beautiful car,
automatic, $21,950 Firm
352-897-4520
BUICK
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-302-9217

must sell!
CADILLAC
1999 STS $1,500, minor
work needed
352-364-2268
CHEVROLET
2008, Cobalt LT
$6,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600


FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
60,800 miles,silver in
color,power
windows,locks,seat,cruise,tilt
wheel,cassette
player,newer tires
very clean. $3900
o.b.o. 352-257-2590
FORD
2000, Ranger XLT
Lesabre, $3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
FORD
2005,Focus, Sedan,
SES, 25,000 miles.
$7,500. 352-341-0018
FORD
'96, Mustang, V6, 5spd
manual, gar. kept, GT
wheels silver, great
cond. $3,500 obo
(352) 476-7408
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5,500 obo
352-628-5451 or
352 601-2214
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAY 5. -13
1-800-438-8559


Chevrolet
1970 Impala,
convertible, older
restoration, needs tic,
$15k, 352-628-2777
Chrysler
1941 4 dr. sedan
good solid body, runs
great,needs starter,
$3500. 352-628-2777
Oldsmobile
1992, Toronado
White Diamond, leather
int. 124Kmi, FWD 3800
tuned port injection, V6,
Meticulously,main-
tained$3500. (352)
527-3291







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966






IOW M1

DODGE
2006 Dakota Quad CAB
ST 4.7 Liter Magnum R
V8 A.R.E. Cap,
Hitch, 43,000 $9,700.00
352.746.2621
352.746.2621
FORD
2011 Ranger XLT,
$15,500. OBO
AutoTrans, only 4.900
mi Pow Windows &
Locks, AM/FM/CD/
XM/CB, Cruise, Bed
Cover,Alloy Wheels,
More Pictures w/email:
djameson5
@tampabay.rr.com
cell 410-703-9495
NISSAN
1994, extra cab, 5 spd
cold ac, tonneau cover
high miles, runs strong
$1700. 352-344-0484

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
1997, Explorer XLT
$3,495
352-341-0018
FORD
1998, Explorer Sport
$4,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
'98, Explorer, XLT,
good clean cond. new
tires $2,700 obo
(352) 637-4676
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
HYUNDAI
2004 Santa Fe, new
timing belt & seals, high
mileage, runs great,
$3200. 352-344-0484




CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER
Town & Country 2005
7-Pass Non- Smoking
Mini-Van, Stow'n Go
Seats, 3.81trV6 21 mpg
Leather, 2nd Owner,
Impeccably Maint.,
Records, All Options.
Clean Reliable Family
Van. $6,999. obo
352-422-3217




06 Suzuki
Burgman 650 w/tryke
kit, wh/bl under 5k mi,
loaded with extra.$7995
OBO 352-621-0248
2009 LDL
Enclosed Custome
Motor Cycle Trailer
5 x 8, Red, diamond
plate V Nose, 50" full
rear spring drop ramp
Low profile, used once
garaged for 3 yrs. like
new, beautiful cond.
pd $2,500 Sell $1,600
(352) 422-1026
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk, xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12,900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
YAMAHA
1999 v star 1100, cust.
pipes, wshleld & bags,
Adult ridden, gar. kept
$2900 (352) 650-9059


931-0504 MIXCRN
Hill, Antoinette File No: 2013 CP 199 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013 CP 199
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANTOINETTE HILL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANTOINETTE HILL, deceased, whose date of
death was February 9, 2013, file number 2013 CP 199, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is 110 N Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450. The names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creators of the decedent and other persons having cldms or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April 29, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/James E. Hill
10 Cyclamen Court West, Homosassa, FL 34446
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/John S. Clardy III, Florida Bar No. 123129,
Clardy Law Firm PA
PO Box 2410, Crystal River, FL 34423-2410
Telephone: (352) 795-2946
April 29 and May 4, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Chevy Spark 1 LS
5-Speed


New 2013 Chew Cruze LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chew Traverse LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chew Malibu LS
36 month lease A


New 2013 Chew Camaro LS
DRIVE TODAY FOR... WITH...
A i n, & -m m m n M m mM


New 2013 Chew Equinox LS
Stk. #C13135, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: $25,030


III


C12 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


7!l




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


...for a New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
Automatic Transmission!


...for a New 2013 I
HONDA FIT
Model GE8H3CEXW, Equipped Not
Stripped With Automatic, A/C And Cruise!


New 2013 Honda
OR-V LX 2WD
Model RM3H3CEW
e Why The Cr-V Is The Best
Compact Suv In America!
we While They Last!


or a New 2013 Honda
SSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
ModelTF3H3DJW
Best Selling Compact SUV
SII In America!
|i Save While They Last!


...for a New 2013 Honda ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW
Come See Why The Odyssey Is The Best!

0P9%R
X60
% APRMONTHS
on select new Honda models


...for a New 2012 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1F2CEW, 4WD With
The Trunk In The Bed, Power Pkg,
Cruise Control, V-6 Power
And A Ride Like No Other.

"Check anywhere in the
world first, but CHECKj
WITH CHAD LAST!" F


on approved credit. l, /

OVER 90 USED
& Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles! .
All Pre-Owned Vehicles include: .
6 Mo./6,000 Mile .
Limited Powertrain Warranty* ",/F I

Plus a 5-DAY EXCHANGE PROGRAM!
See dealer for complete details.


Our REALLY BIG Selection
Ire-Loved Vehicles!


2005 PONTIAC
MONTANA
H7810
$4,580


2007 HYUNDAI
ACCENT
H7896
$6,377


EVT ZUUO IUTUIA
IAXX HIGHLANDER
H7887
$8,490
,i^9.


2007 PONTIAC
G5 5-SPD
H7902
$6,973


zuuy 2riEVT
IMPALA
H7872
$8,786


H7833 H7771
15,010 $16,042


LtedCars


2008 HONDA
CMC LX
H7773
$10,659


2010 HONDA
ACCORD LX
PH7873
$14,100


Central Florida's Finest Selection
of HONDA CERTIFIED Vehicles!


2010 HONDA
CIVIC 4DR LX
H7903
$12,500


2010 HONDA
FIT
PH7907
$12,500


2010 HONDA
CMC LX
H7668
$12,666


2010 HONDA 2009 HONDA 2011 HONDA
ACCORD RIDGELINE RT CR-V
H7797 H7775 H7803
$14,926 $17,254 $18,728


2010 HONDA 2011 HONDA 2011 HONDA 2011 HONDA
ACCORD EXL CR-V CR-V EXL ODYSSEY EX-L
H7895 H7747 H7843 H7899
$19,000 $20,042 $20,358 $25,000


I


per mile thereafter.
state fees due at signing.
ad end one-pay lease of $9,976 with approved credit, 12,000 miles
lix, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Options at additional cost.
.i $2000 cash down or trade equity. Offers valid thru date of publication.
..........


slon!


,OVE Can Do For You!

ll.628.4600

NB A.COM


I


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 C13


DOFTOX


"59


J4 *





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


:Jenkins ^Acura


Safety L








JWM


APR
FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS
AVAILUULE ON HEW Aarma'


Luxury Performance Engineering Service


Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands!t


"Five Stars"*


"Top Safety Picks"


I i 1 A cura RDX N E W '13 A cuaff 3I


Luxury Starts Here!
Lease $O20 per
for 209mo.




$209 mo x 36 months $2499 Due At Sikn hdudes Down Pament
wth No Security Deposit Excludes Tax& Tao WMh Appmred oCedit


Aggressive Yet Elegant!
Lease $349 per
for n mo.


WMAAF2DJW
$349 m x 36 months $2699 Due At Sining dudes Seariy Depost
Down Payment Bdudes Tax &Tag Wth Appoed Credit


Urban Achiever!
Lease $37 per
for 379 o.




$379 mo x 36 mor $1,999 Due At rgl Indudes Down Pyment with
No Security Deposit Exudes Ta & Tag Wrth Apprm Crededit


State of The Art Togetherness!!
Lease $439per
for 43 mo.


#YD2H2DJNW
$439 mo x 36 moth. $2,499 Due At SrgnM hdudes Seat Depost
Down Payent E:dudes Tax & Tag Wth App d Credit


Thank you for reading t. All pr1es arem pos t. tag & tae. Vehicles subot to pnor sale. Lmnd I trade-in per purchase. Cannot be c ,ombunnd w1t any other adverbsed offers. See dealer for complete dotilPrograms subject to change whfout note. *Wit a prchase of a used vehicle. Some restrdtons rnmay apply. See dealer for details. Star ratings are part of the U.S. Departmit of Transportation's Saferar.gov program (w.saferca.god). Mode tested vi
standard side-impact airbags (SAB) t Based on ALG's 209 2013 Residual Vlue Awards for a Luxury Brand SuOed to limited availability Through May 05,2013, to approved lessees by Acura Finandal Serce DA ofAmedrican Honda Finance Corp.
led-edri leave for 2013 MDX 6 Speed Automatic (Model YD2H2DJNRI MaRP $44,175. Actual net capitalize coet $38,273.49. Total monehlyppayments $16,8d. 4 Opse to purchase ateae end $24,738. oead.end ease tofl 2013 TL 0 peed Automarec (Model hUAF2DJW). MSRP $36,800.Acta neted pilalhed M coa $32,330.52.$Ti0e monthlyppaymensb $12,564., pon to perchare atleaeend $21,712. cleed-ed. Iolf or 2013 RDX 5 Speed AtrXade (Model
#TB3H3DJNW. MSRP $35,215.AaIl net aephtalzed o St $32,482.95. Total mothlypaymentn.0pt tothlyatyleeasntsen3,64.Option,,eeendt2AS1IS. Ce ndlose for 2013 ILX 50eSpeedAudaorueaor2(Model#DEIF3pDJ MSRP $26,795.,Adtad net cep.zed os3t $235,787.88.0 TomonthlypayMents$7,524. OptinWto purchase at leseend $16,12.90. eaedend leawe for 2013 TSX Sprt Wagon Speed (Model # C 2H5D ). MSRP $32,755. Actual net
capftlalzed cet $30,272.34. Total monthly paynents$11,124. Oplon to purchase at laseend $19,980.5. Cidend leae for 2013 TSX 5 Speed Auonatlc(ModelWU2F4DJW). MSRPS31405.ActK A netMcapltoled et $2,46349. Tod monthlypayent $10,404. Opaon to purchase at leas end $19,643. Addisinal Iea-ateormeaforwelqualled lease, NotallIseaaeA 11qualfy. HIgherleael atewsho epplyfor Imea1lovercrdltratings or In diferenttregions,
Dealer partUcpaton may affect actual payment MSRPs Include dednaton; tae, license, te eas, options and Insurance exwra. Security depot mined. Les.ee responslible for manlnteae, ee lve e e aear and 15ml. over 10,000 mlleyear for vehldean with MSRP is Ian $30,000, but for vehlles wih1 MSRP of $30,000 or more, ndmileage cost Is 20ml. oer 10,000 mllesyear. See dealer for complete detais. AvalobleI on 2010D T., RL, RDX, ZDX wAn approved
redit


PRE-OWNED


VEHICLES


'~~


/'


-1HOD


First Year Maintenance Included
With All Pro-Owned Vehicles

l-r ^.f IfirTlI11111, i r i


$16,995





'20,995





$27,995





$34,995


Thank you for reading this. All prices are plus tax, tag & title. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Limit
1 trade-in per purchase. Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers. See dealer for
complete details.Programs subject to change without notice. *With a purchase of a used vehicle.
Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details.


$25,995





$28,995




Kl16
$39,995

Vehicle
Gainimh


* ZERO DOWN AVAILABLE
* ZERO PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
* ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT


1. -on Ien xb.am1 dsra


C14 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


2012INFNIT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I 3 lii I
BI~LTM


NEW 2012 F-150 XL
4X4 CREW CAB


NEW 2012 F-250 4X4 NEW 2012 F-350 4X4
CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL CREW CAB LAT DIESEL


MSRP...........................................$38,335 MSRP.................................................. $57,345 MSRP.................................................. $62,525
Nick Nicholas Discount............................-1,900 Nick Nicholas Discount........................... 4,100 Nick Nicholas Discount........................... 4,900
Retail Customer Cash..........................-3,500 Retail Customer Cash.............................-3,000 Retail Customer Cash.............................-3,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash..-1,500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000

$31,435 $49,245 $53,625


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XLT SUPER CAB


NEW 2013 F-150 4X4
LARIAT SUPER CREW CAB


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XL SUPER CREW CAB


..936.65


301A Equipment Group Discount....................................................-500
XLT Chrome Package Discount....................................................-750
Nick Nicholas Discount........................................................................-1,906
5.0L Special RetailCustomer Customer Cash.................................................500
Retail Customer Cash.................................................................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash...... ....................... 1,000
F 150 XLT Bonus Customer Cash.....................................................-500
F150 Special Retail Customer Cash.........................................-1,000

$27,999


MSRP..................................................$51,465
502A Equipment Group Discount................750
Nick Nicholas Discount...........................2,600
Retail Customer Cash...........................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000


MSRP..................................................$35,430
101 A Equipment Gorup Discount................750
Nick Nicholas Discount............................1,400
5.0L Special Retail Customer Cash...........-..500
Retail Customer Cash...........................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000


SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013 C15


ftjiP..




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Citr


miles. #P219988

999


2011 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS
Red, 21,586 miles. #G163952A

17,500


2001 KIA SPECT RAi
Ice Blue, 75042 miles. #5729082A

8P599


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Citrusr


2008 VOLKSWAGEN
NEW BEETLE COUPE S
$121700
Red, 20,642 miles.
#G411228B


D98


2003 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS
White, 47,948 miles. #G444621 B
S6.209


2001 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LIMITED
Blue, 21,779 miles. #G441908B
$7.999


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2012 FORD FIESTA SEL


Blue, 10,443


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C16 SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013


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