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Citrus County chronicle ( April 28, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 28, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03105

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 28, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03105

Full Text


New heights: Pollard places at state meet /B1


p..1.


Sunny to partly
cloudy, 10%
chance of rain.
PAGE A4


C wwwchronicleonlinecoT


www.chronicleonline.com


Florida's Best Community 1 Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 264


Concealed carry permits surge


First quarter ofyear nearing 2012 tota


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
LECANTO What used to be
sporadic or relatively steady
has turned into a torrent in the
wake of the school shooting in
Newtown, Conn., and the cur-
rent gun legislation debate.
Florida now leads the nation
with concealed-carry permit
holders at 1,052,718.
There has been a surge in re-


cent years in concealed-:- .Irr
applications and, in this
county, the Citrus Coint.\
Sheriff's Office's fingerpn nt-
ing service has become
a nexus of sorts to,
gauge the spate or
applications.
Deputy Andy
McEwen, CCSO vol-
unteer coordinator,
said for the entire
year of 2012, 1,197 .


d


GUN PERMIT OWNERSHIP COMPARISON


Permits Population Percentage
9,342 142,000 6.6


ndo 10,819


173,000 6.3


... ~County
~"~' Citrus
-1 .U Hernar


* Marion 19,308 331,000 5.8
* Broward 80,830 1,800,000 4.5
Source: Florida Department of Agriculture


fi nerprint
were obtained at the office.
PHowever, for the first three
months of 2013, 1,518 have al-
ready been done. In compari-


s,:,n, onl: 31100 fingerprints were
taken through March 2012, said
McEwen.
"It's a big spike and the ma-
jority is for the concealed


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Workers at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park examine one of four manatees rescued from southwest Florida
last month after being found suffering from the effects of red tide. The four animals were transported to the park to rehabilitate
before being returned to their home waters.

Effects of red tide's lethal toxins enter talks of manatee downlisting


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
S" he toxic algal bloom
- commonly known as
red tide has waxed and
wanedd since last Septem-
ber when state marine scientists first
spotted it in the southern waters of


Florida's west coast.
So has the number of manatee and
fish deaths from the toxins, but since
January the number of sea cow fatali-
ties has reached a record 268 as of
April 24.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Commis-
sion (FWC) spokesman Kevin Baxter
said the pace of manatee deaths has


slowed and the deadly algae are
dissipating.
"What we are seeing now is the tox-
ins are settling in the sea grasses, but
we only background concentrations of
the algae in most of the affected
areas," Baxter said.
See P Page A9


Hitler's food taster tells of poisoning fears


KIRSTEN GRIESHABER
Associated Press
BERLIN They were feasts
of sublime asparagus laced
with fear. And for more than
half a century, Margot Woelk
kept her secret hidden from the
world, even from her husband.
Then, a few months after her
95th birthday, she revealed the
truth about her wartime role:
Adolf Hitler's food taster
Woelk, then in her mid-
twenties, spent two and a half


years as one of 15 young
women who sampled Hitler's
food to make sure it wasn't poi-
soned before it was served to
the Nazi leader in his "Wolf's
Lair," the heavily guarded
command center in what is
now Poland, where he spent
much of his time in the final
years of World War II.
"He was a vegetarian. He
never ate any meat during the
entire time I was there," Woelk
said of the Nazi leader. "And
See Page A12


One of the
food testers
for Adolf
Hitler,
Margot
Woelk
speaks
Thursday
during an
interview
with The
Associated
Press in
Berlin.
Associated Press


weapons permit," he added.
After a cursory check of the
first week of April's numbers
See Page A10



Dispose


of trash


free on


Saturday

Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners and
Keep Citrus County Beautiful
will host a free disposal spring
cleanup day at the central land-
fill from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Satur-
day, May 4.
Businesses will be charged
business rates.
Citizens will need to provide
proof of residency by providing
a copy of tax bill or utility bill.
Handymen/lawn maintenance
companies should bring proof
that material is being trans-
ported for a Citrus County
homeowner by presenting a
copy of the client's tax/utility
bill or work order.
Tire loads over the maximum
10 per household limit will be
accepted only if the transporter
has a current tire transporter
permit.
Organizations and neighbor-
hoods performing cleanup and
transporting materials to the
landfill should be pre-approved
by Keep Citrus County Beautiful
(KCCB). Contact KCCB at 352-
746-9393 or email keepcitrus
countybeautiful@gmail.com for
approval.
Material restrictions:
Bulky waste area
Boat with motor and mo-
tors all fluids to be drained
prior to coming to landfill
No motor homes or
automobiles
Citizen service area
Anti-freeze 10-gallon
limit
Refrigerators, freezers
shall have food and doors
removed
Used oil 10-gallon limit
Waste tires 10 per
household
Household hazardous
waste drop-off center
No materials in containers
larger than a 5-gallon container
Gasoline 10-gallon limit
(for larger quantities call Solid
Waste Management in advance)
Scrap metal area (materi-
als containing 90 percent or
more metal)
See" Page A10


Classifieds ....... D3
Crossword ...... .A18
o Excursions ...... .A17


S


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope . . . .A4





LEI


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... .A18
Obituaries ....... .A6


TV Listings ...... A18
Together ........ A20
Veterans Notes . .A19


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Chamber recognizes community leaders


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer

CITRUS HILLS Joe
Silvestro embodied the
spirit of Friday night's Cit-
rus County Chamber of
Commerce Pillar Awards.
Silvestro, the founder of
Joe's Deli in Inverness
who died March 26, was
more than a successful
business owner
A baseball lover, Silve-
stro was instrumental in
building the Little League
program at Whispering
Pines Park in Inverness.
He was a Little League
umpire and one of the
original organizers of the
Little League program in
Inverness.
Friday night, his friend
Rocky Hensley presented
Silvestro's family with the
Charles B. Fitzpatrick
award, given annually to
an individual who has
made a significant impact
on the quality of life in Cit-
rus County.
"His legacy will live on
every time a child steps on
an Inverness baseball or
softball diamond," Hens-
ley said. "I truly believe
that if not for Joe Silvestro


Special to the Chronicle
Family members of the late Joe Silvestro were on hand to accept the Charles Fitzpatrick Award at Friday's chamber
of commerce dinner. Pictured are Rosemary DeMott, Joe Fallon, Barbara Fallon, Fitzpatrick's son Michael, presen-
ter Rocky Hensley and chamber president John Murphy.


we would not have Little
League as we know it
today at Whispering Pines
Park."
Silvestro's son-in-law,
Joe Fallen, said he knew
that the Charles B. Fitz-
patrick award, named for
the man who founded the
Fitzpatrick & Fitzpatrick


law firm, was the most
prestigious of the cham-
ber's annual recognition.
"Well done Dad," Fallen
said. "We could not be
more proud of him."
About 150 people at-
tended the chamber's
awards night at the Citrus
Hills Golf& Country Club.


Other award recipients:
Jean Grant Business
Women's Alliance Award:
Rebecca Martin.
Mandi Warren
Richards Rising Star
Award: Courtney Pollard.
Ambassador of the
Year: Nancy Hautop.
Rick Quinn Distin-


Detectives search for Ocala fugitive


Special to the Chronicle did not show up to a pro-
bation appointment Fri-
Citrus County Sheriff's day, April 19. Rogers made
Office detectives arrangements to
are looking for 27- turn himself in
year-old David April 25; however,
Preston Rogers of he never arrived to
5040 S.E. 30th St., be taken into
Apartment B, custody
Ocala. Rogers, who J Rogers is ap-
was arrested in proximately 5 feet,
July 2012 on fed- 8 inches tall and
eral drug traffick- David 160 pounds. He is
ing charges and Rogers facing up to a 20-
state drug charges, year prison sen-
violated his probation and tence for his previous


For the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic battery
arrest
Michael Carroll, 34, of
Citrus Springs, at 12:20 p.m.
April 23 on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
DUI arrest
Gary Defrank, 30, of
South Greengate Point, Ho-
mosassa, at 3:14 a.m. April 23
on misdemeanor charges of
driving under the influence and
driving while license sus-
pended or revoked According
to his arrest affidavit, he was
stopped in the area of West
Meadow Street and South
Calkins Point in Homosassa.
Tests of his breath showed his
blood alcohol concentration
was 0.257 percent and 0.261
percent. The legal limit is 0.08
percent. Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
Rachel Reider, 42, of
James Court, Homosassa, at
11:07 a.m. April 22 on a Citrus
County warrant for felony
charges of manufacturing, dis-
tributing, selling, giving or pos-
sessing with the intent to
manufacture, distribute, sell, or
give an imitation controlled
substance and conspiring to
commit an offense prohibited
by law. Bond $10,000.
Jamie Brunk, 36, of West
Peking Court, Dunnellon, at
4:42 p.m. April 22 for violation
of probation on an original
felony charge of dealing in
stolen property. No bond.
Kyle Bouchard, 21, of
North Elliot Way, Dunnellon, at
12:43 a.m. April 23 on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit
theft. Bond $250.
Megan Edwards, 23, of
North Elliot Way, Dunnellon, at
12:43 a.m. April 23 on a misde-
meanor charge of retail petit
theft. Bond $250.
Jason King, 36, of South
Millston Point, Homosassa, at
5:18 a.m. April 23 on felony
charges of selling, manufactur-
ing or delivering or possession
with intent to sell, manufacture
or deliver a controlled sub-
stance (methamphetamine)
and fleeing/eluding a law en-
forcement officer. According to
his arrest affidavit, a law en-
forcement officer saw the vehi-
cle he was driving at a known
drug house in the area of East
Street. He continued driving
when the officer attempted to
stop him after King pulled into
McDonald's in Inverness,
which was closed. He eventu-
ally stopped at a stop sign in
the same plaza and the officer
found a plastic bag containing
methamphetamine, which the
officer believed King threw out


at the McDonald's parking lot.
Bond $15,000.
Wilton Nova, 26, of North
Citrus Avenue, Crystal River, at
11:31 a.m. April 23 on felony
charges of giving false verifica-
tion of ownership to a pawn-
broker and grand theft.
According to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of stealing jew-
elry from a woman in Crystal
River. Bond $7,000.

SO YOU KNOW
For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.
Also under Public
Information on the
CCSO website, click
on Crime Mapping for
a view of where each
type of crime occurs
in Citrus County. Click
on Offense Reports to
see lists of burglary,
theft and vandalism.
For the Record reports
are also archived
online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office/Fire
Rescue Chief Larry
Morabito said the fire
service is seeking
volunteers to serve
alongside paid staff at
all stations. For
information, call John
Beebe, volunteer
coordinator, at 352-
527-5406.


federal drug trafficking
charges.
Call 888-ANY-TIPS, visit
crimestopperscitrus. com
or texting the word "CIT-


RUS" plus your tip to
274637. Tips are com-
pletely anonymous and
tipsters can be eligible for
up to a $1,000 reward.


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J.L. Hassell Award:
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Outstanding Commu-
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Citizen Award: Steve and
Jewel Lamb.
John T Barnes
Community Organization
Award: Key Training
Center.
Shawn Harrison Out-
standing Youth Service
Award: Kassidy Lundy
Dr. O.J. Humphries
Community Service
Award: Arnold Virgilio.
Charles B. Fitzpatrick
Award: Joe Silvestro
(posthumous).
Lifetime Ambassador
Recognition: Reyna Bell.
Chamber Champion
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A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


State


House


sticks to


its roots

Conservative

agenda

flourishes

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
While the GOP on the
national level discusses
whether it needs to
change its messaging to
appeal to a broader
base, Republicans in the
Florida House are
clearly sticking with a
conservative social
agenda.
They voted to send a
message to Congress and
President Barack
Obama to keep their
hands off citizens' guns
in the wake of the New-
town, Conn., elementary
school shootings. In ad-
dition, the House is con-
sidering a bill that would
allow guns in schools. It
already has sent the Sen-
ate three bills aimed at
protecting fetuses, along
with another that would
speed up the death
penalty.
Then there's the bill
the chamber passed to
ban Shariah, or Islamic
law, and other foreign
laws from being applied
in state courts, though
there's no evidence
judges have used foreign
law against Floridians.
"We don't need to
change our principles;
we do need to communi-
cate that there is com-
passionate reason for
some of the things that
we do and why we hold to
those principles," Rep.
Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala,
said. "Principles are the
foundation upon which
you build, and that's a
pragmatic choice to have
the right foundation in
place. That's what value
issues are all about"
Democrats said the
focus on conservative so-
cial issues in the House
distracts from more seri-
ous and immediate is-
sues facing the state,
such as the economy and
unemployment.
"The challenge back
to our Republican col-
leagues is to say, 'Look,
what does this do to ad-
vance the dialogue of
making Florida better?"'
said Rep. Alan Williams.
"I don't think it does a
whole lot. Right now we
should be focused on
how do we come out of
this recession as a
stronger, better Florida."
Williams, D-
Tallahassee, said the
conservative agenda
doesn't reflect the state's
moderate makeup or the
message voters sent by
backing Obama in the
past two elections.
House Democrats did
join Republicans on one
abortion bill sent to the
Senate. The measure
(HB 1129) would require
medical care for new-
borns surviving botched
abortions.
There was a partisan
split, though, on two other
bills involving the protec-
tion of the unborn. One
(HB 845) would ban abor-
tions based on the sex or
race of the fetus. The
other (HB 759) would
broadly expand the situa-
tions when a crime
against an expectant
mother leads to separate
charges for harming the
unborn child. The legisla-
tion would apply to fe-


tuses at any point in
gestational development
House Republicans
also have voted in favor
of what's called a memo-
rial that sends a message
to Obama and Congress
that they want gun rights
protected.


State workers to get pay raises


Increase first

in seven years

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's rank-and-file
state workers will be get-
ting their first across the
board pay raise in seven
years.
Legislators racing against
a looming deadline agreed
on Saturday to a package
that would offer a $1,400
raise to all those who cur-
rently earn less than
$40,000. State employees
who earn more than $40,000
will get a $1,000 raise.
The increases will go to
more than 160,000 people
who work at state agencies
and at 12 public universi-
ties. House and Senate


budget negotiators also
agreed to give a $600 per-
formance bonus to roughly
35 percent of all state
workers.
Sen. Joe Negron, R-
Stuart and Senate budget
chief, said it was time to
recognize hard-working
employees who have not
gotten a raise during a
time when the state's fi-
nances were strained dur-
ing the recession.
The raises will take ef-
fect on Oct. 1, if Gov Rick
Scott approves the budget
"This is something that
will benefit the majority of
workers who are at lower
income levels," said Doug
Martin with the American
Federation of State,
County and Municipal Em-
ployees. "This is a very
meaningful raise."
Those state employees,
however, who work as


This is something that
will benefit the majority of
workers who are at lower
income levels.
Doug Martin
with the American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employees.


highway patrol troopers
and in other law-
enforcement jobs will be
getting an additional 3 per-
cent on top of the across-
the-board raise. And those
in law-enforcement with
five years or more experi-
ence would get an addi-
tional 2 percent beyond
that.
Negron has been push-
ing to pay troopers more
because he said the state
trains them only to see


them jump over to local
law-enforcement agencies
that pay more.
Legislators have also
agreed to keep intact the
current premiums that
state employees pay for
health insurance. That
means Scott and thou-
sands of other high-paid
employees in state govern-
ment will continue to pay
only $8.34 a month for in-
dividual coverage and $30
for family coverage.


House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, said last week that
legislators may change that
amid the debate over
whether the state should
extend health insurance
coverage to the poor Scott
himself has recommended
for three straight years that
all state workers should
pay the same for coverage.
House and Senate
budget negotiators are
working through the week-
end to put the finishing
touches on a proposed $74
billion budget.
They must wrap up their
work by Tuesday in order
for the session to end on
May 3. That's because state
law requires the budget to
be on the desk of lawmak-
ers 72 hours before a final
vote is taken. The final
budget will cover spending
from July 2013 to June 2014.


Elvis entertains in Inverness


STEPHEN E. LASKO/Special to the Chronicle
Steven Gillis, right, from Orlando, won the Elvis look-alike contest Saturday afternoon at the Florida Elvis Festival in Inverness. Frank
A. Hahn, from Ocala, came in second. The contest was judged by Elvis' personal nurse (1975 to 1977), Marian J. Cocke. This was the
10th annual festival and also featured a two-hour play depicting the 1961 events leading up to and including the ninth Elvis movie,
"Follow That Dream," which was partially filmed in the Old Courthouse in Inverness. "What I would ask of Elvis fans is that you keep
his memory alive, do it with dignity and respect, do it with love and honor, do it from your heart," said Cocke. "He was a good and
loving man and he deserves the best."





Local man managed George Jones


Steve Prichard spent 15years building memories on the country music circuit


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Musician George Jones
left his legacy upon many
faithful country fans who
recognized him because of
dozens of hits about regrets
and good times. His 1980-
classic single "He Stopped
Loving Her Today" peaked
as one of the greatest coun-
try songs of all time.
Jones died Friday at the
age of 81 at Vanderbilt
University Medical Center
in Nashville after he was
hospitalized with irregular
blood pressure and a fever
Citrus County resident,
Steve Prichard was Jones'
agent for 15 years as he
traveled around the nation
singing to his fans.
He described Jones as a
man with a distinctive
voice and a good friend.
"George had one of
those baritone voices that
when you heard him on
the radio, you knew who
he was," Prichard said.


"Some of these new
singers there is no way to
tell who they are. He was a
real deal."
During his career with
Jones, Prichard acquired
many memorable stories
that he will never forget
"Merle Haggard and
George Jones did a concert
at the big amphitheater in
Nashville, Tenn., in 1982,"
Prichard said. "George
was scared to death. I was
hoping a couple of times
that evening he would
stage. Finally he showed
up right before he was
supposed to go on. We
were really sweating it. He
was about 30 minutes late
and I kept stretching the
opening acts."
Haggard and Jones per-
formed the sold out con-
cert and it was a success.
However, due to Jones
being so late for the concert,
Merle Haggard wrote a song
called "No Show Jones."
"That was a big hit,"
Prichard said. "They did a


Garth Brooks, left, and George Jones, center, perform
their duet "Beer Run" in 2001 at the Country Music
Association Awards show in Nashville, Tenn.


whole tour that year called
the 'No Show Jones Tour"'
On their first night of the
tour Haggard made a bet
with Prichard that Jones
would not show up.
"He bet me $1,000
against my $100," Prichard
said. "That was big money
for me back then."
Haggard's manager, Bob
Greene, hired two guys to
watch Jones to make sure
he didn't relapse with alco-


hol, left the hotel on time
and made it to the concert
"The Friday night date
was going to be the big
night," Prichard said. "All of
the people from the record
labels and press were flying
in to watch Merle Haggard
and George Jones do their
first show of the tour I
called the guys and they ac-
knowledged they were su-
pervising Jones."
When they got to Odessa,


Texas, for the concert,
Jones' bus had not arrived.
However, the band's bus
did.
"I went over and asked
where George was,"
Prichard said. "They said
'Well, here is what hap-
pened. This morning while
the guys were eating
breakfast he pulled up to
the restaurant. He gave
them a sign with one finger
and had a bottle of booze
in the other hand. The guy
driving the side car that
Jones was in took off down
the road.' He didn't make
the Friday night show."
Prichard lost the $100
bet.
Prichard reminisced
over the many memories
he shared with Jones and
said he was one of the
most respected musicians
of the time by other artists.
Jones announced in
2012 he would be retiring
in 2013. He was in the mid-
dle of the farewell tour
when he became sick.


Scientist: Rare Florida butterflies may be extinct


Associated Press
MIAMI Federal
wildlife officials are re-
viewing a South Florida
butterfly survey that con-
cluded five rare species
may be gone for good.


The U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service hired en-
tomologist Marc Minno to
perform the survey In re-
ports filed late last year,
Minno concluded the
Zestos skipper, the rock-
land Meske's skipper, the


Zarucco duskywing, the
nickerbean blue and the
Bahamian swallowtail had
disappeared from the pine
forests and seaside jungles
of the Florida Keys and
southern Miami-Dade
County, the only places


where some where known
to exist.
Minno said he spent six
years on a survey that was
only supposed to take two.
He said neither he nor
other butterfly experts
ever saw these species in


any stage of life, from lar-
vae to adult butterfly
"I thought I was going to
find some at some point so
I just took a lot more time,"
Minno told The Miami
Herald. "They're just not
there."






A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday There are strong indica-
tions you will form a powerful alliance
in the year ahead that could prove to
be helpful to your career. The value of
this partnership will depend on your
ability to keep it confidential.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) There's a
chance you could be domineering in a
one-on-one relationship, which would
be counterproductive. Use charm.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's nice
to be helpful, but don't take on so
many burdens it makes you ineffective.
When you're bogged down and can't
function, you won't do any good.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Stick to
the plan of a social engagement, in-
stead of trying to make a last-minute
change. Your alterations won't help.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) If you're not
careful, you could easily yield to peer
pressure and agree to do something
that does not serve your best interest.
Be firm and stand your ground.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Just be-
cause someone is a colorful talker
doesn't mean he or she is a knowl-
edgeable one. Don't be mesmerized
by the flash and overlook substance.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The need
for instant gratification could cause you
to spend your money foolishly. Wait
until you find the perfect buy.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If you
make an impulsive commitment or
promise, there's a good chance you'll
end up regretting it. Be very careful on
what or to whom you pledge your word.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If a
friend or associate is raring to go, you
might be a bit too retiring for him or
her. Get out and try to have fun.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You'll
be eager to hang out with people, yet
you might not enjoy be ig in a large
gathering full of new faces. Stick to
your familiar inner circle.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -There
is nothing wrong with being a little
competitive, provided it's for a reason-
able, constructive purpose. Today,
however, your urge to win might come
from a negative source.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -You'll
be susceptible to high-risk proposals
that promise something for nothing.
Beware all "too good to be true" deals.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -You'll
enjoy conversational exchanges as
long as they're not centered on per-
sonal or weighty subjects. Don't get
drawn into emotional repartee.


ENTERTAINMENT


Stolen 'Pulp Fiction'
car found: 19 years
VICTORVILLE, Calif. -Au-
thorities say the classic Chevro-
let convertible featured in the
film "Pulp Fiction" has been
found nearly two decades after it
was stolen.
The San Bernardino County
Sun reported movie director
Quentin Tarantino's 1964
Chevelle Malibu was recovered
in the San Francisco Bay area
earlier this week.
John Travolta's character
drove the cherry-red car in the
movie.
Sheriff's Sgt. Albert Anolin
said an investigation into an old
Malibu in the desert city of Vic-
torville on April 18 led detectives
to another Malibu in the Oakland
area. They then confirmed that
vehicle belonged to Tarantino
and was reported stolen in 1994.
Authorities said the car's cur-
rent owner is not believed to be
involved in its theft and is con-
sidered to be a victim of a fraud.
A message seeking Taran-
tino's comment was not immedi-
ately returned.

Reports: 'Derrick'
actor an SS member
BERLIN German media
say deceased actor Horst Tap-
pert, best known for playing
dapper TV sleuth Stefan Derrick,
served in a feared Nazi SS unit.
Reports said newly discov-
ered historical documents show
Tappert was in an elite SS ar-
mored infantry regiment which
also fought on the eastern front.
The SS is known to have
committed atrocities during
World War II but it is unclear
whether Tappert was involved.
"Derrick," produced between
1974 and 1998, was one of the
most widely syndicated German
TV shows, broadcast in more


Associated Press
Freddie Pate on guitar jams with Wayne Toups and the
ZyDeCajun band Friday at the Acura stage during the New
Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival in New Orleans.


than 100 countries including
China.
Tappert died in 2008. Ger-
many's ZDF television which
produced "Derrick" didn't imme-
diately respond to requests for
comment.

UNO to honor actor
John Larroquette
NEW ORLEANS -Actor
John Larroquette will receive
an honorary degree and conser-
vationist Marcus Eriksen will
serve as commencement
speaker at the University of New
Orleans's graduation ceremony
May 17.
Larroquette is a New Orleans
native who won four Emmy
Awards for his role on the televi-
sion comedy series "Night Court"
and has appeared on stage and
in films. He has a recurring role
on the NBC series "Deception."
He won a Tony Award in 2011
for his role in the revival of "How
to Succeed in Show Business
Without Really Trying."
Eriksen, a Metairie native, is
executive director and co-
founder of the 5 Gyres Institute,
which focuses on marine
conservation.


The graduation ceremonies
are scheduled for 7 p.m. at the
UNO Lakefront Arena.
Zach Braff raises
$2M on Kickstarter
NEW YORK Zach Braff
has met his goal on Kickstarter,
raising $2 million in three days to
fund his follow-up to "Garden
State."
The actor-director's crowd-
funding campaign follows Rob
Thomas' wildly successful use
of Kickstarter to finance a movie
of the defunct TV series '"Veron-
ica Mars." Thomas pulled in $2
million in less than a day, even-
tually gathering more than $5.7
million in 30 days.
But some observers have criti-
cized Hollywood stars for using
the Kickstarter website to dip
into the pockets of their loyal
fans.
Braff has said this is the only
way for him to direct his first film
since "Garden State" with final
cut and his desired casting.
After passing his goal Satur-
day, the "Scrubs" star said on
Twitter: "I will not let you down.
Let's go make a killer movie."
-From wire reports


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, April 28, the
118th day of 2013. There are 247
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On April 28, 1788, Maryland be-
came the seventh state to ratify the
Constitution of the United States.
On this date:
In 1789, rebelling crew members
of the British ship HMS Bounty led
by Fletcher Christian set Capt.
William Bligh and 18 sailors adrift in
a launch in the South Pacific. (Bligh
and most of the men with him man-
aged to reach Timor in 47 days.)
In 1952, war with Japan officially
ended as a treaty signed in San
Francisco the year before took effect.
In 1993, the first "Take Our
Daughters to Work Day," promoted
by the New York-based Ms. Foun-
dation, began in an attempt to
boost the self-esteem of girls by
having them visit a parent's place of
work. (The event was later ex-
panded to include sons.)
Ten years ago: The Soyuz
space capsule carrying a U.S.-
Russian space crew docked with
the international space station.
Five years ago: The first tax re-
bates were direct-deposited into
bank accounts from a $168 billion
stimulus package
One year ago: Syria derided
United Nations Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon as biased and called
his comments "outrageous" after he
blamed the regime for widespread
cease-fire violations
Today's Birthdays: Author
Harper Lee is 87. Actress-singer
Ann-Margret is 72. Actress Marcia
Strassman is 65. Actor Paul Guil-
foyle is 64. "Tonight Show" host Jay
Leno is 63. Actress Mary McDon-
nell is 60. Actress Simbi Khali is 42.
Actor Chris Young is 42. Actor
Jorge Garcia is 40. Actress Pene-
lope Cruz is 39. Actress Jessica
Alba is 32. Actor Harry Shum Jr. is
31. Actress Jenna Ushkowitz is 27.
Thought for Today: "The world
does not require so much to be in-
formed as reminded." Hannah
More, English religious writer
(1745-1833).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
NA NA NA 9062 0.00 K J87 62 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
79 66
82 72
88 66
83 60
84 68
80 65
84 75
88 64
82 70


F'cast
pc
s
s
pc
s
ts
pc
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southeast winds around 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Skies will be partly cloudy today.


90 66 0.00 87 64 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK exclusive dally
forecast by:
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING

Sunny to partly cloudy; 10% chance
of a PM shower
MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 86 Low: 62
Partly cloudy; 20% chance of a PM shower

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 85 Low: 63
Partly sunny; 30% chance of a PM
thunderstorm
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 89/63
Record 94/38
Normal 85/56
Mean temp. 76
Departure from mean +5
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.70 in.
Total for the year 5.10 in.
Normal for the year 12.37 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 11
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.16 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 58
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 38%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, hickory, grasses
Today's count: 5.2/12
Monday's count: 3.2
Tuesday's count: 2.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/28 SUNDAY 8:39 2:23 9:09 2:54
4/29 MONDAY 9:46 3:31 10:17 4:01
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O O SUNSET TONIGHT ............................8:04 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:51 A.M.
4 0 MAY MOONRISE TODAY .........................11:26 PM.
MAY 2 MAY 9 MAY 18 MAY 25 MOONSET TODAY............................ 9:16A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
informationon drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
8:51 a/4:08 a
7:12 a/1:30 a
4:59 a/11:11 a
8:01 a/3:07 a


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
7:53 p/4:01 p
6:14 p/1:23 p
4:01 p/--
7:03 p/3:00 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
9:43 a/4:56 a 8:39 p/4:46 p
8:04 a/2:18 a 7:00 p/2:08 p
5:51 a/12:06 a 4:47 p/11:56 a
8:53 a/3:55 a 7:49 p/3:45 p


F'cast
s
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
pc
s
s


Gulf water
temperature

79

Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.96 NA 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.18 NA 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 37.88 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 38.95 NA 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


Seattle


Saturday
City H LPcp.
Albany 63 33
Albuquerque 76 49
Asheville 55 51 .67
Atlanta 75 58
Atlantic City 64 37
Austin 81 69
Baltimore 69 39
Billings 76 49
Birmingham 79 61
Boise 77 47
Boston 56 42
Buffalo 69 39
Burlington, VT 62 32
Charleston, SC 75 54 .01
Charleston, WV 71 41
Charlotte 64 56 .14
Chicago 67 43
Cincinnati 63 38
Cleveland 68 39
Columbia, SC 68 58 .03
Columbus, OH 72 40
Concord, N.H. 65 29
Dallas 73 63
Denver 72 40
Des Moines 69 44
Detroit 67 38
El Paso 85 53
Evansville, IN 58 50 .02
Harrisburg 68 36
Hartford 66 38
Houston 82 66 .07
Indianapolis 62 43
Jackson 81 62
Las Vegas 90 63
Little Rock 72 55 1.00
Los Angeles 66 57
Louisville 59 53
Memphis 73 54 .11
Milwaukee 62 47
Minneapolis 74 43
Mobile 81 57
Montgomery 83 53
Nashville 61 51 2.10


THE NATION


Sunday
FcstH L
pc 74 46
s 79 52
r 58 51
ts 70 59
pc 61 48
pc 81 60
c 71 56
c 66 43
ts 72 58
pc 73 46
s 66 47
c 68 52
pc 72 49
r 72 63
r 67 55
r 64 56
pc 54 49
ts 67 55
ts 63 50
r 69 59
ts 64 55
s 71 42
pc 82 59
pc 76 51
pc 76 55
ts 56 50
pc 88 65
ts 67 53
c 70 50
pc 71 44
pc 81 63
ts 65 53
ts 75 58
s 94 70
pc 75 55
s 71 58
ts 67 54
ts 72 54
pc 59 47
ts 76 50
ts 76 61
ts 76 61
ts 73 55


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 83 68 ts 78 64
New York City 70 48 pc 66 51
Norfolk 66 49 c 71 53
Oklahoma City 65 52 pc 80 56
Omaha 68 44 pc 80 52
Palm Springs 10262 s 103 70
Philadelphia 69 47 pc 72 51
Phoenix 96 67 s 100 69
Pittsburgh 72 36 r 63 51
Portland, ME 57 34 s 56 42
Portland, Ore 72 45 c 67 47
Providence, R.I. 59 38 s 68 43
Raleigh 72 53 r 67 55
Rapid City 78 37 pc 65 42
Reno 84 49 s 84 51
Rochester, NY 67 36 pc 71 55
Sacramento 86 50 s 91 60
St. Louis 54 50 .16 pc 66 52
St. Ste. Marie 64 34 pc 63 45
Salt Lake City 74 45 pc 77 50
San Antonio 82 70 ts 80 62
San Diego 68 60 s 68 60
San Francisco 61 49 s 71 50
Savannah 78 52 r 76 63
Seattle 56 52 sh 59 43
Spokane 66 50 pc 63 44
Syracuse 64 32 pc 75 52
Topeka 58 48 .11 pc 78 55
Washington 73 49 c 71 54
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 103 Thermal, Calif. LOW 15 Leadville,
Colo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/73/pc
Amsterdam 52/41/pc
Athens 74/59/pc
Beijing 88/55/pc
Berlin 51/47/c
Bermuda 65/59/pc
Cairo 96/64/pc
Calgary 55/37/pc
Havana 87/69As
Hong Kong 79/75/pc
Jerusalem 87/68/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


62/47/s
57/37/sh
58/40/pc
76/54/ts
68/50/pc
49/32/sh
55/33/c
75/64/s
67/60/pc
79/61/s
67/58/pc
66/48/sh
53/42/sh


LEGAL NOTICES




Judith Yancey M.D.......................................A14
Bid Notices.....................................................D5
Meeting Notices................ ..........................D5
Lien Notices....................................................D5
Miscellaneous Notices...................................D5
Notice to
Creditors/Administration...........................D5
Tax Deed Notices...........................................D5

C- CITRUS COUNTY



CHRpNICILE
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G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
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Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions .................................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




























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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


La Mona
Gibson, 84
BEVERLY HILLS
La Mona Gibson, 84, of
Beverly Hills, Fla., died
Friday, April 26, 2013, in
the loving care of her hus-
band, John, and Hospice of
Citrus County. She was
born on Monday, Nov. 19,
1928, in Conneaut, Ohio, to
Leslie and Ruth (McNutt)
Jones.
Survivors include; her
loving husband of 65 years,
John Gibson of Beverly
Hills, Fla.; brother, John
McNutt of Ohio; and sis-
ters, Eunice Penning of
California and Jean Fritz
of Ohio.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home
www.ferofuneralhome.
com.

James
McCormick
It is with great sadness
that we share the passing
of our loving husband, fa-
ther and grandfather,
James McCormick. He
passed away Saturday
evening, April 20, 2013,
surrounded by his devoted
wife, Jeanette; and three
children Kathy, Terri and
Matt.
James touched many in
his life and we are grateful
for the multitude of friend-
ships that he developed
along the way. More than
any achievement, he was
most proud of his loving
family including his
children, Kathy and
Howard, Terri and Mark,
Matt and Eileen; and
grandchildren, Ashley,
Alex and Mallory, Eliza-
beth, Austin, Kate and Joe.
During 54 years of mar-
riage, James and Jeanette
led by example through
unconditional love, com-
passion and integrity- all
based on a foundation of
love and faith in Jesus
Christ. Beyond your
prayers, we ask that you
honor James today by
telling those closest to you
how much you love them.
There will be a memo-
rial service for James at
12:30 p.m. Thursday, May
9, 2013, at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church in
Lecanto. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests dona-
tions be made to a charity
of your choice. Two organ-
izations that were special
to James are, Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church, 4221
W Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461 and the
Wounded Warrior Project,
PO. Box 758517, Topeka,
Kansas 66675. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Lawrence
Trojanowski
Sr., 66
INVERNESS
Lawrence Trojanowski
Sr., 66, of Inverness, died
April 26, 2013, in
Brooksville, Fla.

OBITUARIES
Email obits@
chronicle online.com
or fax 352-563-3280.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.




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Terry
Palmer 58
INVERNESS
Terry K. Palmer, 58, of
Inverness, died Wednes-
day, April 24, 2013, at his
residence. There will be a
graveside service at 11 a.m.
Friday, May 3, 2013, at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, with mili-
tary honors provided by
VFW Post 4337. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness.

Patricia A.
Schirmer, 78
INVERNESS
Patricia A. Schirmer, 78,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away Wednesday, April 24,
2013, at Citrus Memorial
hospital in Inverness. She
was born on June 27, 1934,
in Detroit, Mich., to the
late Constantine and Joyce
(Pandoff) Roucoff.

was a sec-
retary in
the tool
S and die in-
dustry, and
arrived in
this area
25 years
Patricia ago, com-
Schirmer ing from
Oak Park, Mich. She at-
tended Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church in Inver-
ness and was a volunteer
and clown for Hospice of
Citrus County.
She is survived by her
loving companion, Nor-
man Alvey of Inverness.
Other survivors include
one son, Donald (Sandy)
Ritchie of Floral City, Fla.;
one daughter, Laura (Gary)
Armentrout of St. Louis,
Mo.; one stepson, Tracy
Ritchie of Detroit, Mich.;
one sister, Diane Dorcey;
two grandchildren, Brooke
Ritchie and Keaton Ar-
mentrout; and expecting
one great-grandchild. Pri-
vate arrangements are
under the care of Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home,
Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Howard T.
Romine, 86
CITRUS SPRINGS
Howard T Romine, 86,
died Wednesday, April 24,
2013, in Citrus Springs,
Fla.
Roberts of Dunnellon is
in charge of arrangements.






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Walter
Smith, 96
HERNANDO
The service of remem-
brance for Walter Edgar
Smith, 96, of Hernando,
Fla., will be at 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, at
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes.
He died Wednesday, April
24, 2013, in Inverness, Fla.
Cremation will be under
the direction of Hooper
Crematory, Inverness.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age; home-
town/state; date of
death; place of death;
date, time and place
of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military.
Additionally, all
obituaries will be
posted online at
www.chronicleonline.
com.
Paid obituaries are
printed as submitted
by funeral homes or
societies.
The national database
Legacy.com maintains
the Chronicle's
obituaries and guest
books. Per Legacy
policy, all guest book
comments are
screened by its staff
for appropriate
content before being
placed online.







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Associated Press
"Star Wars," starring Harrison Ford, left, as Han Solo,
Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia Organa and Mark Hamill
as Luke Skywalker, is being dubbed in the Navajo
language.


'Star Wars' being

dubbed in Navajo


Associated Press
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -
In the new translation of
"Star Wars," Darth Vader
is Luke's bizhe'e.
The classic 1977 film
that launched a science
fiction empire and re-
vealed the force within a
farm boy who battles evil
has been dubbed in
Japanese, French, Span-
ish and about a dozen
other languages. Add
Navajo to the list.
Manuelito Wheeler, the
director of the Navajo
Nation Museum who
reached out to Lucasfilm
Ltd. with the idea, has a
very good feeling about
this. He sees it as enter-
taining, educational and
a way to preserve the
Navajo language at a time
when fewer tribal mem-
bers are speaking it.
"That's the beauty of
what we're doing; we're
teaching Navajo language
to anybody who wants to
learn the Navajo lan-
guage," Wheeler said. "I


find that very rewarding
and somewhat ironic. We
went from a country that
wanted to limit our lan-
guage, to the Navajo lan-
guage saving our country
through Code Talkers, to
our language being part of
a major motion picture."
Native languages on the
big screen are a rarity In-
dependent films and docu-
mentaries at film festivals
have been in the tongue of
American Indian tribes.
Yet it's far less common to
see it done in mainstream
movies and shown in com-
mercial theaters. "Bambi"
was dubbed in the Ara-
paho language, and the
cartoon series "The
Berenstain Bears" was
translated into the Dakota
and Lakota languages.
"There's a little bit of
precedent but nothing
like 'Star Wars' in the
Navajo language," said
Michael Smith, director
of the American Indian
Film Institute and a
member of the Sioux
Tribe of Montana.


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9) FREE DISPOSAL DAY ,g0
Sponsored by the
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
AND KEEP CITRUS COUNTY BEAUTIFUL
As part of a countywide Spring Cleanup Day, free disposal will be provided to
Citrus County homeowners at the Central Landfill on
Saturday May 4, 2013 from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm
Businesses will be charged normal rates
Following are the acceptance / restrictions for disposal

Program acceptance requirements:
Citizens may be asked to provide proof of residency by providing a copy of driver's license, tax bill or utility bill
Handymen / lawn maintenance companies should bring proof that material is being transported for a Citrus County homeowner
by presenting a copy of the clients tax / utility bill or work order
Tire loads over the maximum 10 per household limit will be accepted only if the transporter has a current Tire Transporter Permit
Organizations / Neighborhood performing a cleanup and transporting materials to the landfill should be pre-approved by Keep
Citrus County Beautiful (KCCB). Contact KCCB at 746-9393 or e-mail keepcitruscountybeautiful@gmail.com for approval


Material Restrictions that will apply during the event:


1. Bulky Waste Area
a. Boat with motor and motors all fluids to be drained prior to coming to landfill
b. No motor homes or automobiles will be accepted *L lfl
2. Citizen Service Area
a. Anti-Freeze 10 gallon limit
b. Refrigerators / Freezers shall have food and doors removed
c. Used Oil- 10 gallon limit
d. Waste Tires 10 per household
3. Household Hazardous Waste Drop-off Center ___
a. No materials in containers larger than a 5 gallon container will be accepted
b. Gasoline 10 gallon limit for larger quantities call Solid Waste Management in advance for alternate disposal options
4. Scrap Metal Area Materials containing 90% or more metal
a. All material/equipment capable of containing fluids shall have fluids drained prior to coming to landfill
5. Yard Waste Area
a. Stumps in excess of 4 ft in diameter and logs in excess of 4 ft in diameter or in excess of 10 ft in length will not be accepted
The following program / areas will be closed or suspended during the event:
* Mulch Loading Flower pot recycling Single stream recycling (at landfill site only) Styrofoam recycling


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Some say immigration bill is bad deal for GOP


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Some
feisty Republicans are
challenging a claim widely
held among GOP leaders
that the party must support
more liberal immigration
laws if it's to be more com-
petitive in presidential
elections.
These doubters say the
Republican establishment
has the political calculation
backward. Immigration
"reform," they say, will
mean millions of new Dem-
ocratic-leaning voters by
granting citizenship to
large numbers of Hispanic
immigrants now living ille-
gally in the United States.
The argument is dividing
the party as it tries to repo-
sition itself after losing the
popular vote in five of the
past six presidential elec-
tions. It also could endan-
ger President Barack
Obama's bid for a legacy-
building rewrite of the na-
tion's problematic immi-
gration laws.
Many conservatives "are
scared to death" the Re-
publican Party "is commit-
ting suicide, that we're
going to end up legalizing 9
million automatic Democ-
rat voters," radio host Rush
Limbaugh recently told
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a
leader of the bipartisan
team pushing an immigra-
tion overhaul.
Strategists in both parties
say several factors, includ-
ing income levels, would
make many, and probably
most, newly enfranchised
immigrants pro-Democra-
tic, at least for a time.
Rubio says the risk is



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cluded, depends on the
ability to convince people
that do not agree with you
now to agree with you in
the future," he told Lim-
baugh.
Politically, Republicans
face two bad options.
They can try to improve
relations with existing
Latino voters by backing a
plan that seems likely to
add many Democratic-
leaning voters in the years
ahead. Or they can stick
with a status quo in which
their presidential nomi-
nees are losing badly
among the electorate's
fastest-growing segment
In 2012, Republican pres-
idential nominee Mitt
Romney, who suggested
that vanishing job opportu-
nities would prompt immi-
grants to "self deport,"
carried only 27 percent of
the Hispanic vote. A Re-
publican Party study of that
election concluded, among
other things, that the GOP
must appeal to more His-
panics, and to do so it must
"embrace and champion
comprehensive immigra-
tion reform."
Party leaders say the
harsh language that some
Republicans use when dis-
cussing illegal immigration
has angered many Ameri-
cans with Hispanic
heritages.
Rubio's bipartisan group
has proposed legislation to
strengthen border security,
allow tens of thousands of
new high- and low-skilled
workers into the country,
require all employers to


Associated Press
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks April 18 at a Capitol Hill news conference with the
Senate's "Gang of Eight," the bipartisan team pushing an immigration overhaul, to
outline their immigration reform legislation that would creates a path for 11 million
unauthorized immigrants to apply for U.S. citizenship. At right is Republican Sen. John
McCain of Arizona, and at Rubio's left is Democrat Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York.


check their workers' legal
status, and provide an
eventual path to citizenship
for some 11 million immi-
grants now in the country
illegally
Even if the bill survives
the Democratic-controlled
Senate, stiff resistance is
expected in the GOP-domi-
nated House. Many House
Republicans dislike the
idea of "amnesty" for those
who crossed the border il-
legally, and some say it's
foolish to enfranchise likely
Democratic voters.
Obama embraces the
Rubio plan, and it won cru-
cial praise from House
Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, and Rep. Paul Ryan,
R-Wis., last year's vice pres-


idential nominee.
Rubio and his allies chal-
lenge the notion that creat-
ing a way to citizenship for
millions of people here ille-
gally will dramatically in-
crease Democratic turnout
in future elections.
"Not all 11 million illegal
immigrants here today will
qualify to become citizens,
and not all of the 11 million
illegal immigrants are His-
panic," according to
Rubio's "Myth vs. Fact"
website. The site says many


immigrants will not choose
to become citizens, and
many new citizens, like
many current ones, will not
bother to vote.
Some Republican cam-
paign strategists, however,
say the political damage
would be worse than party
leaders acknowledge.
Republican consultant
and pollster Mike McKenna
said one of his surveys
shows that most Americans
favor "immigration reform"
and they believe it will ben-


efit Democrats more than
Republicans.
In an interview,
McKenna said Republican
leaders are embracing
Rubio's plan without suffi-
cient data on where it
might lead. "I think about
two months from now, the
folks in the establishment
are going to wish they
hadn't started this conver-
sation," McKenna said.
Party leaders erred, he
said, by couching the immi-
gration debate in political
rather than moral terms.
"The argument that it's
going to be politically ad-
vantageous is not going to
be sustainable over time,"
McKenna said.
Political activists have
swapped estimates of how
many people now living
here illegally might choose
to become citizens, register
to vote and turn out for
Democratic candidates if a
path to citizenship is
opened. Even the most con-
servative guesses assume
that Democrats would ben-
efit more than Republi-
cans, initially, at least
Rubio's allies play it
down.
"The status quo is not ac-
ceptable to Republican vot-
ers," said GOP consultant
Kevin Madden, who has
worked for Romney and
others. Republican leaders,
he said, must push for the
best rewrite of immigration
laws they can achieve.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


( ]" "got an email today," Mel
told me. "Chardonnay and
Jackson are splitting up.
They only got married four months
ago. It's so sad. I played guitar at
their wedding."
"And you think that's
why they're splitting
up?"
Mel gave me the stink- :
eye and told me what a
lousy, thoroughly despi-
cable man I am.
"It's OK," I said, "I've
learned to live with it."
Mel is in a band that
plays at lots of weddings
in the summer. One wed- MUL
ding he played was on a
big tourist boat that goes up and
down the river The entire ship had
been rented for the wedding and
the reception.
"How'd it go?" I asked Mel the
next time I saw him.
"Great," he said, "until the groom
and the father of the bride got into
a fistfight."
That's the trouble with floating
weddings: There's nowhere to run
when things go south. The guests
are stuck there like sprinkles on a
wedding cupcake until the ship
gets back to shore.
And what do you say as you're
leaving? "Congratulations"? "I'm so
happy for you"? "Where's the hon-
eymoon?" It's one thing when the
usher asks "Whose side are you
on?" at the church; it's quite an-
other when he asks you at a brawl.
Every time Sue and I come home
from a wedding now, we tell each
other it will be our last, because
you can smell the coming disaster
the way you can tell someone forgot
to empty the cat's litter box. It's a
mess from the first cringe-inducing,
self-written vow to the last
drunken, slurred "thanks for the
cappuccino machine." At the last
wedding we went to, the groom's
mother gave the bride a gift certifi-
cate for breast implants. Creepy
Sometimes wedding remorse
comes after the guests have left.
One bride didn't realize that getting
married meant she would have to
give up dating other people. You'd
think their wedding planner would
have mentioned that to her some-
where down the line. They seemed
to have gotten all the other details


right: They reserved the date with
the country club for the reception,
they picked the bridesmaids'
dresses, they got the perfect paper
for the invitations, they scheduled
all the wedding gown fit-
tings, they planned the
* menu with the caterer,
they picked songs to be
I played at every ritual
moment, they ordered
flowers for the church,
they rented a big, white
limo and they listened to
CDs from local wedding
bands. The only thing
they forgot to plan is
.LEN what their life would be
like after they got back
from the honeymoon at Disney
World.
It wasn't just the bride, in that
case. After a while, the groom
started to miss his old apartment;
he liked sitting around after work
in a living room that looked like a
dirty laundry basket had exploded.
Sure, he liked his new wife, but he
didn't want to be with her every
waking moment. You need some
downtime, he thought. Sometimes
he longed for the nights he would
just spend lying on the sofa flipping
through the channels, watching vi-
olent movies and sports.
His friends used to drop by unan-
nounced and bring their own beer,
but not now, now that his wife was
always there. It never bothered
them when she was just "the girl-
friend," but now that they were
married, his friends wanted to give
them some space. If there's one
thing the groom hates, it's space.
These days, all the groom's old
buddies go over to their friend
Bob's house instead, because Bob
is single. Again. His place is filthy;
the bathroom is a danger to public
health. Bob is happy to have his
friends over. He never asks them to
use a coaster. Sometimes the groom
wishes his new wife was more like
Bob.
"So what happened to Chardon-
nay and Jackson?" I asked Mel.
"It seems she fell for the guy who
installed their new hot tub."
"How very romantic."


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CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots, ce-
real variety and toast, juice and
milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger, pepper-
oni pizza, Italian super salad with
roll, fresh baby carrots, tangy
baked beans, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Goldie's Grab N Go
(turkey), creamy macaroni and
cheese, corn dog minis, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh garden salad,
steamed green beans, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with
ripstick, oven-baked breaded
chicken with ripstick, turkey super
salad with roll, PB dipper plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet green
peas, chilled mixed fruit, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken alfredo, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, chilled flavored applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken sand-
wich, mozzarella maxstix, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, chilled peach cups, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, grits, milk
and juice variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety and toast, tater tots,
milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal
variety and toast, tater tots, juice


and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast round,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza, pulled
pork barbecue on bun, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, chilled applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
steamed green beans, flavored
Craisins, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger, bar-
becued chicken with roll, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots, tangy
baked beans, potato triangles,
chilled peaches, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds, fa-
jita chicken and rice with ripstick,
Italian super salad with roll, yo-
gurt parfait plate, fresh baby car-
rots, Mexicali corn, chilled
flavored applesauce, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with ripstick,
mozzarella maxstix, Goldie's
Grab N Go (turkey), PB dippers,
fresh garden salad, sweet peaas,
chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage
pizza, MVP breakfast, cereal vari-
ety, toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and
cheese biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toasts,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg
and cheese wrap, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese on loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal variety
and toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety, toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders with
rice, pizza, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, fajita chicken salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby


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carrots, fresh broccoli, potato tri-
angles, steamed broccoli, apple-
sauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nacho rounds with
Spanish rice, turkey and gravy
over noodles with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, Italian
super salad with roll, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold corn
salad, potato triangles, peas, cel-
ery, strawberry cup, baby carrots,
juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, ham super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots,
chilled baked beans, baked
beans, potato triangles, flavored
Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, maca-
roni and cheese with ripstick,
turkey super salad with roll,
maxstix, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, baby carrots, green
beans, potato roasters, straw-
berry cup, cucumbers, celery,
juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
sandwich, chicken alfredo with
ripstick, pizza, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, baby carrots, cold corn
salad, potato triangles, peas,
peaches, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Beef with rotini
pasta, parslied carrots, Italian
vegetable medley, applesauce,
dinner roll, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Three-bean and
beef chili, parslied rice, yellow
corn, raisins, wheat crackers with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday:, Egg salad, let-
tuce with carrots and tomato, mari-
nated broccoli salad, fresh orange,
whole-grain bread, low-fat milk.
Thursday:, Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, garlic mashed
potatoes, green peas, graham
crackers, slice rye bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Friday:, Barbecued chicken
thigh, brown rice, collard greens
with turkey ham, fresh orange,
slice cornbread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs, Inver-
ness and South Dunnellon. For
information, call Support Services
at 352-527-5975.


April29 to May 3 MENUS


da Vinci."
SURGICAL SYSTEM


A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


COMMUNITY


11
Ll





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Distressed manatees can be helped


Special to the Chronicle
Manatees continue to suffer
from the catastrophic effects of
red tide in southwest Florida
and also on the east coast in Bre-
vard County where a large num-
ber of manatees have died,
possibly from a different toxin.
Red tide acts as a neurotoxin
in manatees, giving them sei-


zures that can result in drown-
ing without human intervention.
Manatees may exhibit muscle
twitches, lack of coordination,
labored breathing and an inabil-
ity to maintain body orientation.
If rescued in time, most mana-
tees can recover, so report a sick
manatee immediately to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC)


Hotline at 888-404-3922, #FWC
or *FWC on your cellular phone,
or use VHF Channel 16 on your
marine radio.
Callers who report a sight-
ing should be prepared to an-
swer the following questions:
What is the exact location of
the animal?
Is the manatee alive or dead?
Look closely, as the manatee may


appear dead but still be alive.
How long have you been ob-
serving the manatee?
What is the approximate
size of the manatee?
Can you provide a contact
number where you can be
reached for more information?
To learn more about red tide,
visit Save the Manatee Club's
website at www.savethemanatee.


org. Also, visit the FWC website
at http://research.myfwc.com/
features/category_sub. asp?
id4434, for current red tide sta-
tus across the state.
Get tips from citizens who
have assisted in the rescue of a
red-tide-affected manatee on
the club's website at
www.savethemanatee.org/news_
pr_red_tide_4-13_2.html.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
A crane is used to gently lower a manatee into the water at Ellie Schiller Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park. Four of the large marine mammals were recently taken to
the park from the southwest Florida coast, where they were ailing due to the effects
of red tide. An unknown infection also killed an additional 100 manatees on the state's
east coast since last July, said Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission (FWC) spokesman
Kevin Baxter.


ALGAE
Continued from Page Al

He said the toxic con-
centrations found in the
sea grass should not be
lethal for manatees.
Baxter said it usually
takes between and two and
three months for the bod-
ies of water to rid them-
selves of the toxins. The
red tide toxins often attack
the sea cow's nervous sys-
tem, causing paralysis and
eventual death.
An unknown infection
also killed an additional
100 manatees on the
state's east coast since last
July, Baxter added.
In 2009, only 10 mana-
tees perished from red
tide. Twenty three died in
2011 and 33 died in 2012
from the toxins. In 2010,
Florida saw its worst man-
atee die-off from cold
stress 766 manatees
died a record. The state
is estimated to have a pop-
ulation of about 5,000 man-
atees which are
considered endangered.
But a change in that en-
dangered designation is








o [ I :v r I I-1
l .l~lA


We don't know yet if the
die-offs are going to affect the
decision to reclassify.
Chuck Underwood
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokesman


being considered. The U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service is
considering downlisting or
reclassifying the sea cows
to threatened based on a
conclusion the species has
made a healthy recovery
Pacific Legal Founda-
tion, a nonprofit watchdog
group, recently filed a pe-
tition on behalf of Save
Crystal River (SCR) seek-
ing to compel USFWS to
adhere to the results of its
own previous status study
suggesting reclassification.
Chuck Underwood,
USFWS spokesman, said
his agency continues to
study the issue of
reclassification.
"We don't know yet if the
die-offs are going to affect
the decision to reclassify,"
he said.
The Legal Foundation
was in the midst of moving
their Florida office this
week and did not return


the Chronicle's request for
comment, but Bob Mercer,
president of SCR said he is
pretty sure the founda-
tion's petition is driven by
science.
"I think if USFWS pres-
ents science to say the
manatee continue to be
threatened because of the
die-offs, I am sure Pacific
Legal will consider that,"
Mercer said.
However, Pat Rose of
Save the Manatee Club
said in light of the die-offs,
USFWS should strongly re-
consider reclassification.
"I think the service will
be grossly negligent to re-
classify at this time," Rose
said.
"We are talking about a
time when we are on pace
to surpass the worst year
in manatee deaths. I don't
think it's a good idea to be
talking about downlisting,"
he said.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


StateBRIEFS


Body of tourist
found in pond
ORLANDO The body of
a British businessman has
been found in a retention
pond at a Florida resort.
Orange County Sheriff's Of-
fice spokesman Jeff William-
son says 43-year-old Simon
Latham attended a conference
at an Orlando hotel with his
brother-in-law and about a
dozen other people.
Latham was last seen in
the Caribe Royale Resort
lobby early Thursday.
Williamson says the British
citizen's brother-in-law re-
ported him missing when he
failed to join the group Friday
morning for a 7 a.m. flight to
South Korea, where Latham
lived.
Latham's body was discov-
ered around 8 a.m. Saturday
in a retention pond on the re-
sort property. Williamson says
Latham's brother-in-law was
walking around the property
and called authorities when
he spotted the body.
An autopsy is pending. De-
tectives do not suspect foul
play.



PERMITS
Continued from Page Al

for fingerprinting, 132 peo-
ple came in and 83 of those
were for concealed-carry
permits.
Couples, single people,
young and old walk into
the lobby of the Emer-
gency Operations Center
and wait their turn to get
their prints scanned.
Volunteer Mary Beckett
patiently rolls fingerprints
into the scanner and the
computer and chitchats
about the integrity of their
prints.
Lt. Elena Vitt, the
deputy emergency man-
agement director, readily
answers concerns and
questions.
"One of the big things we
run into sometimes is
prints being rejected when
it gets to FDLE or the FBI
because as we age or de-
pending on the kind of
work you do, our finger-
prints wear off," Vitt said.
"Those people have to
come back and we would
try again, but we some-
times get the blame for the
rejection because of bad
prints," she added.
Vitt said as soon as fin-
gerprints are obtained,
they are immediately
transmitted to FDLE and
then the FBI to be
processed. And as soon as
the applicant pays for the
background check via
computer, the application
is processed immediately
Vitt said the fingerprint-
ing office recently ex-
panded its operating days
from three days a week to
five days.



TRASH
Continued from Page Al

All material/equip-
ment capable of contain-
ing fluids shall have fluids
drained prior to coming to
landfill
Yard waste area
No stumps or logs in
excess of 4-feet in diame-
ter; no logs in excess of 10


Humpback whale
carcass found
CANAVERAL NATIONAL
SEASHORE Researchers
are testing the remains of a
humpback whale that washed
ashore in central Florida for
contaminants.
A boater spotted the esti-
mated 40-foot-long humpback
whale carcass Wednesday in
Canaveral National Seashore.
Researchers from the
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research
Institute have been collecting
organs and bones spread
across the beach, including
18-inch-wide vertebrae. The
bulk of the whale's carcass
was left in a remote area to
wash back out to sea.
Research assistant Teresa
Mazza told Florida Today the
whale likely died about a
week ago.
Humpback whales are an
endangered species. Mazza
said the remains were too de-
composed to help researchers
determine what caused the
whale's death, but she also
said researchers haven't
found anything unusual.
-From wire reports

According to statistics
from the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture's Divi-
sion of Licensing, in 1988
- the first year after the
introduction of the con-
cealed-carry law only
32,814 Floridians had the
permit.
In 2008, that number
had jumped to 511,868. In
2013, the number eclipsed
the million mark. In Citrus
County, 6.6 percent (9,342)
of the population has a
permit as of March 31,
2013. In Marion County, 5.8
percent of the population
(19,308) are permit hold-
ers. In Hernando, 6.3 per-
cent of the population
(10,819) has a permit. In
Broward County, which
has 1.8 million people, 4.5
percent of the population
(80,8300) owns a permit.
John Long of Dan's Gun
Room, an Inverness
firearms supply store that
also offers classes for per-
mit, said the initial rush
for classes at the begin-
ning of the year is begin-
ning to wane.
"There was about a 50
percent increase from the
previous year, but it has
leveled off to normal now,"
Long said.
He said where there
used to be a 12-week wait-
ing time for the permits, it
is now down to eight
weeks.
Long, who teaches
classes at Dan's, said the
prevailing sentiment he
hears from permit seekers
is that they are worried the
government would restrict
their gun rights.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


feet in length
The following pro-
gram/areas will be closed
or suspended during the
event:
Mulch loading
Flower pot recycling
Single stream recy-
cling (at landfill site only)
Styrofoam recycling
For information, call
Solid Waste Management
(Citrus County Landfill) at
352-527-7670.


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Couple charged in drug bust


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Deputies
arrested a Dunnellon couple Mon-
day on drug charges stemming from
violation of probation, according to
Citrus County Sheriff's Office.
Benjamin Holliday, 34, and Jes-
sica Holliday, 34, both of West Jedi
Court, Dunnellon, were arrested
and charged with possession of
drug paraphernalia, possession of a
listed chemical with intent to man-
ufacture a controlled substance and
manufacturing with intent to sell a
controlled substance. Bonds were
$150,500 each.
According to the arrest report, a
probation officer alerted authorities
that both Hollidays had positive
tests for methamphetamines.
When deputies arrived at the res-
idence, both Hollidays answered
the door and invited officers inside.
The probation officer advised she
was doing a probation check and
questioned if the deputies could
search the residence.
With their permission, deputies
searched the residence and ob-


FOR THE RECORD
* For more information about
arrests made by the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org and click
on the Public Information link,
then on Arrest Reports.


Benjamin
Holliday
couple facing multip
relating to drug po
served several HCL
which is used for the
ing process. In a shed
casings, a water samp
pack, a one-pot metha
cook, another HCL gei
trainer of liquid fire, a
Mason jar, an empty li
package and salt.
Reportedly, when 1
were questioned, the
using methamphetar
ringes since their pr
but said they had been
and a half weeks.
They said the item


S shed because an arrangement had
Jessica been made with another person to
Holliday manufacture at the residence in the
shed in exchange for the leftover
ssesschges methamphetamine that was caught
in the coffee filters. Benjamin Hol-
generators, liday reportedly said that would
manufactur- amount to approximately one-
I were battery quarter to one-half gram. He told
le from a cold deputies of a glass container in a
amphetamine bathroom closet that was used to
nerator, a con- put the filters in to squeeze the
n empty glass methamphetamine out
thium battery All items were taken into
evidence.
the Hollidays Both Hollidays were arrested and
y admitted to transported to the Citrus County
mine with sy- Detention Facility.
devious arrest, Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn
i clean for two Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@chronicle
s were in the online.com.


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STATE & LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Central African Republic


town roiled by rebellion


Associated Press

NDELE, Central African
Republic The gunfire
starts here as soon as the
sun rises, echoing across
the town as women make
their way to the well and
the fortunate few children
who still attend school head
to class on rutted red paths
lined by banana trees.
One group of rebels is
nestled in the forest on the
outskirts of town; their
longtime enemies are po-
sitioned within walking
distance on the other.
Sometimes they shoot sim-
ply to announce their pres-
ence to the other.
Mostly, though, they ter-
rify townspeople who al-
ready have endured years
of upheaval and rebellion,
and who are now con-
fronting an increasingly
complex and toxic array of
armed fighters.
"Be brave! Be brave!"
children aged 8 and 9 shout
to reassure each other as
the gunfire crackles in this
town fatigued by the daily
threat of stray bullets.
The newest rebellion to
roil Central African Re-
public is estimated to have
forced some 173,000 peo-
ple from their homes since
December across the al-
ready deeply impover-
ished country in the heart
of Africa.
It also has put a country
that is bordered by some of
Africa's most troubled na-
tions firmly in the hands of
rebels who critics say are
more consumed with con-
trolling the country's natu-
ral resources than
bringing development and
prosperity.
Most residents of Ndele
fled into the surrounding
countryside when rebels
took the northern town of
13,000 in the far north in
their first power grab be-
fore making their way
south to Bangui, the capi-
tal, by March.
Each day brings the
threat of new uncertainty
in Ndele as young fighters
in camouflage and turbans
continue to arrive in town.
Each one has a Kalash-
nikov assault rifle.
The sweet scent of man-
goes ripening on the ground
mixes with the smoke from
freshly fired weapons.
"Each day there is more
gunfire and the govern-
ment has not addressed
the problem," said Jean-
Jacques Lundi, a father of
seven who repairs those
abandoned motorcycles
that haven't been comman-
deered by rebel groups.
"Until they disarm, life
cannot return to normal."
MEN
In announcing its forma-
tion in December, the
rebel alliance known as
Seleka said it wanted to
redress decades of neglect
by the federal government,
particularly by longtime
President Francois Bozize.
Yet four months after
the rebels seized Ndele,
most schools remain
closed and unemployment
has soared to around 70
percent. Public servants
have not been paid, and
light bulbs gather thick red
dust without electricity.
Residents like Jean-
Bosco N'Dackouzou say the
rebels, too, have profited at
the expense of civilians.
Over the course of several
days, they took the comput-
ers he was using to train un-
employed people in town,
plus two generators, solar
panels, even his kitchen
utensils. They shot 37 of his
goats for food, he said.
"We are being held
hostage and you steal from
us," he said of the rebels.
Rebels also have looted
non-governmental organi-
zations and even take bar-
rels of the fuels that the
United Nations uses to op-
erate humanitarian flights
to the town.
The town of Ndele sits in
an isolated corner of
northern Central African
Republic, not far from the
country's borders with its


troubled neighbors Chad
and Sudan. The capital,
Bangui takes is at least two
days away by road, and
cellphone reception is
sporadic at best.
Ndele has suffered
waves of armed rebellions
dating back to 2006. In the
latest spasm, bandits with


Associated Press
Seleka rebel soldiers adjust their weapons April 10 at their
base in the forest on the outskirts of Ndele, Central African
Republic. In announcing its formation in December 2012,
the rebel alliance known as Seleka said it wanted to
redress decades of neglect by the federal government,
particularly by longtime President Francois Bozize. Yet four
months after the rebels seized Ndele, most schools remain
closed, unemployment has soared to around 70 percent
and public servants have not been paid.


Kalashnikovs loot hospi-
tals and steal cars, and ex-
tort "taxes" from farmers
but deliver no electricity
or other public needs.
MEN
The Darfur region of
Sudan is nearby, and the
latest scare has been trig-
gered by the reported ar-
rival ofjanjaweed fighters,
notorious for their role in
putting down the Darfur
rebellion, alongside mem-
bers of Seleka.
Seleka denies their
presence, but armed Su-
danese men could be seen
on a recent afternoon rid-
ing in Seleka trucks. They
do not speak the national
languages of Central
African Republic and are
known to be from Darfur,
townspeople say
The town is also newly
awash in weapons with the
return of Seleka rebels
who took part in over-


throwing Bozize in March.
The Seleka fighters -
mostly derived from a
group active here since
2006 known as UFDR -
have set up shop in an old
forestry department build-
ing. On the other side of
town is a group known as
the CPJP, consisting of
fighters who did not join
the rebel alliance.
Tensions remain as evi-
dent by the sporadic
gunfire.
"UFDR, Seleka, CPJP-
all these different groups,
it's unexplainable," said
Assistant Mayor Youssou
Fezane, struggling to be
heard over the hail of cele-
bratory gunfire on a
Thursday afternoon from
rebels celebrating their re-
turn from the capital.
"It's the responsibility of
these groups to explain
their ideologies. I just want
for there to be peace."


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A12 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


HITLER
Continued from Page Al
Hitler was so paranoid that
the British would poison
him that's why he had 15
girls taste the food before
he ate it himself."
With many Germans
contending with food
shortages and a bland diet
as the war dragged on,
sampling Hitler's food had
its advantages.
"The food was delicious,
only the best vegetables, as-
paragus, bell peppers,
everything you can imag-
ine. And always with a side
of rice or pasta," she re-
called. "But this constant
fear we knew of all those
poisoning rumors and
could never enjoy the food.
Every day we feared it was
going to be our last meal."
The petite widow's story
is a tale of the horror, pain
and dislocation endured by
people of all sides who sur-
vived World War II.
Only now in the sunset of
her life has she been will-
ing to relate her experi-
ences, which she had
buried because of shame
and the fear of prosecution
for having worked with the
Nazis, although she insists
she was never a party mem-
ber. She told her story as
she flipped through a photo
album with pictures of her
as a young woman, in the
same Berlin apartment
where she was born in 1917.
Woelk first revealed her
secret to a local Berlin re-
porter a few months ago.
Since then, interest in her
life story has been over-
whelming. Schoolteachers
wrote and asked her for
photos and autographs to
bring history alive for their
students. Several re-
searchers from a museum
visited to ask for details
about her life as Hitler's
taster
Woelk said her associa-
tion with Hitler began after
she fled Berlin to escape
Allied air attacks. With her
husband gone and serving
in the German army, she
moved in with relatives
about 435 miles to the east
in Rastenburg, then part of
Germany; now it is Ketrzyn,
in what became Poland
after the war
There she was drafted
into civilian service and as-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Margot Woelk, one of the food testers of Adolf Hitler, shows an old photo album with
a picture of herself taken around 1939 or 1940, during an interview Thursday with The
Associated Press in Berlin.


signed for the next two and
a half years as a food taster
and kitchen bookkeeper at
the Wolf's Lair complex, lo-
cated a few miles outside
the town. Hitler was so se-
cretive, even in the relative
safety of his headquarters,
that she never saw him in
person only his German
shepherd Blondie and his
SS guards, who chatted
with the women.
Hitler's security fears
were not unfounded. On
July 20, 1944, a trusted
colonel detonated a bomb
in the Wolf's Lair in an at-
tempt to kill Hitler He sur-
vived, but nearly 5,000
people were executed fol-
lowing the assassination at-
tempt, including the
bomber
"We were sitting on
wooden benches when we
heard and felt an incredi-
ble big bang," she said of
the 1944 bombing. "We fell
off the benches, and I heard
someone shouting 'Hitler is
dead!' But he wasn't."
Following the blast, ten-
sion rose around the head-
quarters. Woelk said the
Nazis ordered her to leave
her relatives' home and
move into an abandoned
school closer to the
compound.
With the Soviet army on
the offensive and the war
going badly for Germany,
one of her SS friends ad-
vised her to leave the Wolf's
Lair
She said she returned by
train to Berlin and went
into hiding.


Woelk said the other
women on the food tasting
team decided to remain in
Rastenburg since their
families were all there and
it was their home.
"Later, I found out that
the Russians shot all of the
14 other girls," she said. It
was after Soviet troops
overran the headquarters
in January 1945.
When she returned to
Berlin, she found a city fac-
ing complete destruction.
Round-the-clock bombing
by U.S. and British planes
was grinding the city center
to rubble.
On April 20, 1945, Soviet
artillery began shelling the
outskirts of Berlin and
ground forces pushed
through toward the heart of
the capital against strong
resistance by die-hard SS
and Hitler Youth fighters.
After about two weeks of
heavy fighting, the city sur-
rendered on May 2 after
Hitler, who had aban-
doned the Wolf's Lair
about five months before,
had committed suicide.
His successor surrendered
a week later, ending the
war in Europe.
For many Berlin civilians
- their homes destroyed,
family members missing or
dead and food almost gone
- the horror did not end
with capitulation.
"The Russians then came
to Berlin and got me, too,"
Woelk said. "They took me
to a doctor's apartment and
raped me for 14 consecutive
days. That's why I could


never have children. They
destroyed everything."
Like millions of Ger-
mans and other Euro-
peans, Woelk began
rebuilding her life and try-
ing to forget as best she
could her bitter memories
and the shame of her asso-
ciation with a criminal
regime that had destroyed
much of Europe.
She worked in a variety
of jobs, mostly as a secre-


Woelk poses Thursday in her apartment after an interview
with The Associated Press in Berlin. She has not left her
apartment for the past eight years.


tary or administrative as-
sistant. Her husband re-
turned from the war but
died 23 years ago, she said.
With the frailty of ad-
vanced age and the lack of
an elevator in her building,
she has not left her apart-
ment for the past eight
years. Nurses visit several
times a day, and a niece


stops by frequently, she
said.
Now at the end of her
life, she feels the need to
purge the memories by
talking about her story
"For decades, I tried to
shake off those memories,"
she said. "But they always
came back to haunt me at
night."


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Associated Press
Jewish pilgrims gather for a procession Friday at the Ghriba synagogue, during the
annual Jewish pilgrimage in the resort of Djerba, Tunisia. They come to celebrate the
annual rites at EI-Ghriba, the oldest Jewish monument built in Africa more than 2,500
years ago. On April 11, 2002, a deadly attack on the synagogue killed 21 people,
including 14 German tourists.

Jews ease back into Tunisia

for famed pilgrimage


Associated Press

DJERBA, Tunisia Under a bright
Mediterranean sun Saturday, Jews whose
forebears once thronged Tunisia are
trekking to a celebrated synagogue under
the protection of police as organizers
try to inject new momentum to an annual
pilgrimage that's been depleted in recent
years by fears of anti-Semitism.
Jewish leaders hope the three-day pil-
grimage to the Ghriba synagogue, Africa's
oldest, on the island of Djerba is regain-
ing momentum after attendance plum-
meted in the wake of a 2002 al-Qaida
bombing and lingering safety concerns fol-
lowing Tunisia's revolution two years ago.
The pilgrimage evokes a larger issue
for Tunisia: How to convince Jews and
other foreigners that stability has re-
turned enough to merit a visit and help
revive a weakened economy The tourism
trade accounts for about 400,000 jobs and
7 percent of economic output in Tunisia,
an overwhelmingly Muslim country of
nearly 11 million.
Despite the setbacks in recent years,
Tunisia's Jews were sounding optimistic.
"This year will be better. The atmos-
phere is good, and the preparations have
been made carefully," said Perez Trabelsi,
the president of Ghriba's operating com-
mittee, and a Djerba native. 'Attendance
will go up from one year to the next, to re-
turn to its top level like before."
At its peak in 2000, about 8,000 Jews
came many from Israel, Italy and
France, where they or their forebears


had moved over the years. Such crowds
haven't returned since an al-Qaida-
linked militant detonated a truck bomb
at the synagogue in 2002, killing 21 peo-
ple, mostly German tourists and badly
jolting the now-tiny Jewish community.
The pilgrimage was called off in 2011
in the wake of Tunisia's revolution, when
major street protests ousted longtime
President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who
fled to Saudi Arabia, and some ultracon-
servative Muslims called Salafis chanted
anti-Semitic slogans at their rallies. Last
year, the pilgrimage resumed on a tiny
scale: Only 100 or so foreigners came.
This year, community leaders hope 300 to
500 will have come.
Rene Trabelsi, a Paris-based tour op-
erator, said the Tunisian government -
led by the moderate Islamic party En-
nahda has "gone beyond our hopes" in
providing security measures, police and
troops for the pilgrimage.
After Saturday's Sabbath, the three-
day pilgrimage was expected to culmi-
nate Sunday with the sale of necklaces,
scarves and other craftwork to raise
money for the synagogue. On Friday, as it
got underway, families lit candles and the
faithful marched through a white-washed
archway lined with bunting and Tunisia's
red crescent-and-star flag into the ornate,
blue-and-white synagogue.
Jews have been living in Djerba since
500 B.C. The Jewish population has
shrunk to 1,500, down from 100,000 in the
1960s. Most left following the 1967 war
between Israel and Arab countries.


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WORLD


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 A13








Aerial tools to aid in Caribbean drug fight


Devices first
Associated Press
ABOARD THE HIGH
SPEED VESSEL SWIFT -
Drug smugglers who race
across the Caribbean in
speedboats will typically
jettison their cargo when
spotted by surveillance air-
craft, hoping any chance of
prosecuting them will van-
ish with the drugs sinking
to the bottom of the sea.
That may be a less win-
ning tactic in the future.
The U.S. Navy on Friday
began testing two new aer-
ial tools, borrowed from the
battlefields of Afghanistan
and Iraq, that officials said
will make it easier to de-
tect, track and videotape
drug smugglers in action.
One of the devices on dis-
play aboard the High Speed
Vessel Swift is a large, white
balloon-like craft known as


used in Iraq
an aerostat, which is teth-
ered up to 2,000 feet above
the ship's stern. The other
tool on board for tests in the
Florida Straits is a type of
drone that can be launched
by hand from the deck
Together, they expand the
ability of Navy and Coast
Guard personnel to see
what's beyond their hori-
zon, according to officials
from both military branches
and the contractors hoping
to sell the devices to the
U.S. government
The devices should allow
authorities to detect and
monitor suspected drug
shipments from afar for
longer sustained periods,
giving them a better chance
of stopping the smugglers.
They also should allow
them to make continuous
videotapes that can be
used in prosecutions.


Associated Press
The U.S. Navy on Friday began testing a balloon-like craft
known as an aerostat, borrowed from the battlefields of
Afghanistan and Iraq, that officials say will make it
easier to detect, track and videotape drug smugglers in


action.
"Being able to see them
and watch what they are
doing even before we get
there is going to give us an
edge," said Chief Chris
Sinclair, assistant officer
in charge of a law enforce-
ment detachment on


board the Swift, a private
vessel leased to the Navy
that is about to begin a
monthlong deployment
to the southwestern
Caribbean, tracking the
busy smuggling routes off
Colombia and Honduras.


Crews practiced launch-
ing and operating both sys-
tems before a small
contingent of news media
on board the Swift, manag-
ing to bring back video of
vessels participating in a
mock surveillance mission
as well as radar and video
images of the fishing char-
ters and sailboats that dot
the choppy seas separat-
ing Cuba from the U.S.
mainland.
The drone, officially a
Puma All Environment un-
manned aircraft system
from Aerovironment Inc. of
Simi Valley, California,
splashed into the water on
one landing and had to be
retrieved. On the second
round, it clacked noisily but
intact on the shifting deck
of the 321-foot ship. Rear
Adm. Sinclair Harris, com-
mander of the Navy's 4th
Fleet, said the devices are
necessary at a time when
the service is making a ran-


sition to smaller, faster
ships amid budget cuts.
The aerostat, formally the
Aerostar TIF-25K and made
by a division of Raven In-
dustries Inc. of Sioux Falls,
S.D., is filled with helium.
It's an old technology, mod-
els of which have been used
for decades, but it's packed
with cameras and sensors
that expand the ship's radar
capability from about 5
miles to about 50 miles.
That can help teams in an
on-board control center to
identify larger ships, which
now would appear as just
dots on the horizon, from as
far as 15 miles away
The Puma, meanwhile,
can be sent out to inspect a
vessel flagged by the larger
aerostat and give a "God's
eye view," of what's hap-
pening on board, a job usu-
ally handled by a plane or
helicopter, said Craig Ben-
son, director of business de-
velopment for the company


State seeks abandoned lizards


Tegus found

in Panhandle

Associated Press
PANAMA CITY Al-
most three dozen exotic
lizards have been cap-
tured in a Florida Panhan-
dle neighborhood where
state wildlife officials said
a licensed seller aban-
doned them.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
staff captured 33 black-
and-white tegu lizards this
week in a Panama City
neighborhood.
The lizards appeared
after a previous resident
licensed to sell tegus left
town and abandoned
them, said Jerry Shores,
an investigator with the
wildlife commission.
Releasing exotic species
into the wild in Florida is il-
legal. A criminal investiga-
tion is pending, Shores said.


TOM FRIEDEL/Special to the Chronicle
Tegus are native to South America and can be purchased
as pets. However, they will compete with Florida's native
wildlife if they become established in the wild.


Most of the lizards were
found in a fenced-in yard,
though some residents
about a block away also
have reported seeing
tegus, Shores said. Most
measured up to 4 feet in
length and weighed up to
30 pounds.
Wildlife officials are
asking residents to report
tegu sightings but to leave
capturing them to profes-
sionals, who will continue


patroling the neighbor-
hood next week.
Anyone who spots a
tegu in the wild is encour-
aged to report it to
Florida's exotic species
hotline, www.IveGotl.org.
Pet owners who no longer
want to keep tegus or
other exotic animals can
turn them in for adoption
during one of the wildlife
commission's exotic pet
amnesty events.


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NOTICE OF NONAVAILABILITY AND
PRACTICE RELOCATION
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D.
All Patients of DOCTORS IMAGING GROUP, LLC ("DIG"), seen by
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., are notified that, effective March 15th, 2013,
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., formerly practicing with DIG at:
Diagnostic Imaging Center
6716 NW 11th Place
Gainesville, Florida 32605
became unavailable to patients at DIG. She will be relocating her practice
of Mammography and Ultrasound imaging to:
Tower Hill Office Park
7550 West University Ave, Suite A
Gainesville, Florida 32607
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D. will practice as MAMMOGRAPHY &
ULTRASOUND IMAGING CENTER, PLLC. The new practice's
phone number is (352) 727-4911. DR. YANCEY will be available to see
patients beginning June 3rd, 2013.
Patients may obtain a copy of their medical records currently at 6716
NW 11th Place, Gainesville, Florida, by coming to the office and signing a
Request Form. These forms can be obtained at the office of DIG. Patients
may also request in writing that their records: (i) be transferred to DR.
YANCEY, (ii) remain with DIG, or (iii) be transferred to another physician
of the Patient's choice. These requests can be made by either: (i) U.S. Mail
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A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


NATION/STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thousands still homeless after Sandy


Recovery slow six months after superstorm


Associated Press
MANTOLOKING, N.J. -
The 9-year-old girl who got
New Jersey's tough-guy
governor to shed a tear as
he comforted her after her
home was destroyed is
bummed because she now
lives far from her best
friend and has nowhere to
hang her One Direction
posters.
A New Jersey woman
whose home was overtaken
by mold still cries when she
drives through the area. A
New York City man whose
home burned can't wait to
build a new one.
Six months after super-
storm Sandy devastated
the Jersey shore and New
York City and pounded
coastal areas of New Eng-
land, the region is dealing
with a slow and frustrating,
yet often hopeful, recovery


Tens of thousands of peo-
ple remain homeless.
Housing, business, tourism
and coastal protection all
remain major issues with
the summer vacation -
and hurricane seasons
almost here again.
"Some families and
some lives have come back
together quickly and well,
and some people are up
and running almost as if
nothing ever happened,
and for them it's been
fine," New York Gov An-
drew Cuomo said at a news
conference Thursday
Lynda Fricchione's
flood-damaged home in
the Ortley Beach section of
Toms River, N.J., is gutted;
the roof was fixed just last
week. The family is still
largely living out of card-
board boxes in an apart-
ment. But waiting for a
final decision from federal


and state authorities over
new flood maps that gov-
ern the price of flood in-
surance is tormenting her
and many others.
But more than anything,
Fricchione is optimistic,
buoyed by a recent trip to
New Orleans with her
daughter during which
they met a resident of the
Lower Ninth Ward who
was one of the first to move
back in after Hurricane
Katrina inundated the
neighborhood that has be-
come a symbol of flood
damage and resilience.
By many measures, the
recovery from superstorm
Sandy, which struck Oct.
29, has been slow. From
Maryland to New Hamp-
shire, the National Hurri-
cane Center attributes 72
deaths directly to Sandy
and 87 others indirectly
from causes such as hy-


Associated Press
Flags decorate a fence on Thursday in Brick, N.J., around the burned remains of more
than 60 small bungalows which were destroyed last October during superstorm Sandy.


pothermia due to power
outages, carbon monoxide
poisoning and accidents
during cleanup efforts, for
a total of 159.


The roller coaster that
plunged off a pier in Sea-
side Heights, N.J., is still in
the ocean, although demo-
lition plans are finally


moving forward. Scores of
homes destroyed in
nearby Mantoloking still
look as they did the day
after the storm.


Woman, four children die in fire


Blaze began in
Associated Press
NEWNAN, Ga. A
woman and four young
children died early Satur-
day as a fire engulfed a
home in west Georgia, and
authorities said only an 11-
year-old girl who was
woken by her mother es-
caped. The woman died
trying to save the remain-
ing children.
Firefighters were alerted
at 1:17 a.m. Saturday to the
blaze at the single-story
home in Newnan, about 40
miles southwest of Atlanta.
Georgia state Insurance
Commissioner Ralph Hud-
gens ruled that the fire
was accidental and ap-
peared to have originated
in an electrical panel in
the home's den area, said
Glenn Allen, the commis-


electricalpanel
sioner's spokesman.
The fire killed Alonna T
McCrary, 27, as well as her
5-year-old daughter Eriel
McCrary and 2-year-old
daughter Nikia White, ac-
cording to Allen. Two other
children -Messiah White,
3, and McKenzie Florence,
2 also died. Allen said
the two were sleeping over
at the home.
A fifth child, 11-year-old
Nautica McCrary, escaped
the burning home and was
taken to a hospital to be
treated for smoke inhala-
tion. Allen said she has
since been released.
Newnan police Chief
Buster Meadows said the
older girl's mother was
able to get her safely out of
the burning house.
"The mother woke her
up and told her to run,"


Associated Press
Sisters Brandy McCrary, left, and Breona Montgomery,
who are cousins of the five fatal house fire victims, hug
neighbors Bonita Beasley, center, and Jennifer Moss,
right, Saturday in Newnan, Ga.
Meadows said. "There was gulfed in flames.
someone outside who she Neighbor Jemeka Bea-
ran to, and the mother dles said McCrary's run-
went back after the others. ning back into the home
Neither her nor the other was a testament to the
four children made it out." kind of mother she was.
By the time firefighters "She did what any
arrived, Meadows said, the woman would do in that
house was completely en- situation," Beadles said.


Citrus hills civic association's
Information Fiesta
May 2, 2013, Thursday, 6:30 PM to 8 PM
Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club's
hampton room
505 E. Hartford Street, Hernando, FL 34442
Invite your friends and family and join us at the "Information
Fiesta." This event gives people the opportunity to meet
and speak with representatives from Citrus County
government, nonprofit organizations, elected officials, and
other exhibitors. Learn how much Citrus County has to
offer. There is no cost to attend, and refreshments will be
served -- thanks to some of the exhibitors.
See you all there!
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: COLLEEN
WELCH @ 352-560-7502 OR EMAIL:
WELCHCG@AOL.COM


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NATION


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 A15


Sr -











NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Honoring


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Miss. man charged in



suspicious letters case


World BRIEFS

Protest


Associated Press
Michael Cain Brisboys, 2,
looks back at the line of
people as they create a
human cross in Hackleburg,
Ala. Saturday in memory
of those killed two years
ago when an EF5 tornado
devastated the town.
Michael lost his mother
Belinda Brisboys in the
storm and is being raised
by his grandparents.


Russia had wiretap
on bomb suspect
WASHINGTON U.S.
officials said Russian au-
thorities secretly recorded a
conversation in 2011 in
which one of the Boston
bombing suspects vaguely
discussed jihad with his
mother.
Officials said a second
call was recorded between
the suspects' mother and a
man under FBI investigation
living in southern Russia.
The officials spoke on
condition of anonymity be-
cause they were not author-
ized to speak publicly about
the ongoing case.
They say the Russians
shared this intelligence with
the U.S. in the past few
days.
The conversations are
significant because, had
they been revealed earlier,
there might have been
enough evidence for the
FBI to initiate a more thor-
ough investigation of the
Boston bombing suspects'
family.
Officials seek
human remains
NEW YORK- The med-
ical examiner's office plans
to search for Sept. 11
human remains in an alley
behind a mosque near the
World Trade Center where
airplane landing gear was
suddenly discovered.
The rusted landing gear
piece is believed to be from
one of two hijacked airliners
that decimated the twin tow-
ers in 2001, exploding with
fiery debris and killing thou-
sands of people.
On Saturday, yellow po-
lice tape blocked access to
a metal door that leads to
the hidden alley behind 51
Park Place.
The chief medical exam-
iner's spokeswoman, Ellen
Borakove, said the area first
will be tested as part of a
standard health and safety
evaluation for possible toxi-
city. She said sifting for
human remains is to begin
Tuesday morning.
Justice has
shoulder surgery
WASHINGTON -
Supreme Court Justice
Stephen Breyer is in a
Washington hospital after
shoulder replacement sur-
gery following a bicycle
accident.
Court spokeswoman
KathyArberg said the 74-
year-old Breyer is expected
to make a full recovery fol-
lowing the operation
Saturday.
Breyer injured his right
shoulder in a fall Friday
near the Korean War Veter-
ans Memorial.
The justice previously
broke his collarbone in an
accident in 2011 and sus-
tained broken ribs and a
punctured lung in a bicycle
mishap in 1993, before he
joined the court.
He was appointed to the
court in 1994 by President
Bill Clinton.
-From wire reports


Associated Press in charge in Mississippi,
made the announcement
BRANDON, Miss. A in news release Saturday
Mississippi man was following the arrest of 41-
charged Saturday year-old James
with making and Everett Dutschke.
possessing ricin FBI spokes-
for use as a woman Deborah
weapon as part of Madden said
the investigation Dutschke was ar-
into poison-laced rested about 12:50
letters sent to a.m. Saturday at
President Barack his house in Tu-
Obama and oth- James pelo.
ers, authorities Dutschke The letters,
said. charged with which tests
U.S. attorney Fe- making ricin. showed were
licia Adams and Daniel tainted with ricin, were
McMullen, the FBI agent sent April 8 to President


Barack Obama, Sen. Roger
Wicker of Mississippi and
80-year-old Mississippi
judge, Sadie Holland.
Dutschke is expected to
appear Monday in U.S.
District Court in Oxford.
He faces up to life in
prison, if convicted.
The news release said
Dutschke was charged
with "knowingly develop-
ing, producing, stockpil-
ing, transferring,
acquiring, retaining and
possessing a biological
agent, toxin and delivery
system, for use as a
weapon, to wit: ricin."


Dutschke's house, busi-
ness and vehicles were
searched earlier in the
week and he had been
under surveillance.
Dutschke's attorney,
Lori Nail Basham, said
Saturday in a text message
that "the authorities have
confirmed Mr Dutschke's
arrest. We have no com-
ment at this time."
Basham said earlier
this week that Dutschke
was "cooperating fully"
with investigators.
Dutschke has insisted he
had nothing to do with
the letters.


Associated Press
Rescue workers carry the body of a Bangladeshi garment worker Saturday after removing it from the rubble
of a building that collapsed Wednesday in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh.


Six arrested in connection with


Bangladesh building collapse


Death toll

nears 350

Associated Press

SAVAR, Bangladesh -
Police in Bangladesh
took six people into cus-
tody in connection with
the collapse of a shoddily-
constructed building
that killed at least 348
people, as rescue work-
ers admitted Saturday
that voices of survivors
are getting weaker after
four days of being
pinned under the in-
creasingly unstable
rubble.


Still, in a boost for the
rescuers, 29 survivors
were pulled out Satur-
day, said army
spokesman Shahinul
Islam.
Most of the victims
were crushed by mas-
sive blocks of concrete
and mortar falling on
them when the 8-story
structure came down on
Wednesday morning a
time many of the gar-
ment factories in the
building were packed
with workers. It was the
worst tragedy to hit
Bangladesh's massive
garment industry, and
focused attention on the
poor working conditions
of the employees who


toil for $38 a month to
produce clothing for top
international brands.
Among those arrested
Saturday were two own-
ers of a garment factory,
who a Dhaka court ruled
can be questioned by po-
lice for 12 days without
charges being filed. Also
detained are two govern-
ment engineers and the
wife of the building
owner, who is on the run,
in an attempt to force
him to surrender Late
Saturday, police ar-
rested another factory
owner Violent public
protests continued spo-
radically in Dhaka and
spread to the southeast-
ern city of Chittagong


where several vehicles
were set on fire.
Working round-the-
clock since Wednesday
through heat and a thun-
derstorm, rescuers on
Saturday finally reached
the ground floor from
the top of the mountain-
ous rubble through 25
narrow holes they have
drilled, said Brig. Gen.
Ali Ahmed Khan, the
head of the fire services.
"We are still getting re-
sponse from survivors
though they are becom-
ing weaker slowly," he
said, adding that rescue
workers were now able
to see cars that were
parked at the ground
level.


FAA suspends worker furloughs


FAA says air traffic system soon atf ll operation


Associated Press

NEW YORK-The Fed-
eral Aviation Administra-
tion said the U.S. air traffic
system will resume normal
operations by Sunday
evening after lawmakers
rushed a bill through Con-
gress allowing the agency
to withdraw furloughs of
air traffic controllers and
other workers.
The FAA said Saturday
that it has suspended all
employee furloughs and
that traffic facilities will
begin returning to regular
staffing levels over the next
24 hours. The furloughs
were fallout from the $85
billion in automatic-across-
the-board spending cuts
this spring.
The furloughs started to
hit air traffic controllers
this past week, causing
flight delays that left thou-


Associated Press
Congress easily approved legislation Friday ending
furloughs of air traffic controllers that have delayed
hundreds of flights daily, infuriating travelers and
causing political headaches for lawmakers.


sands of travelers frus-
trated and furious. Planes
were forced to take off and
land less frequently, so as
not to overload the re-
maining controllers on
duty
The FAA had no choice


but to cut $637 million as
its share of $85 billion in
automatic, government-
wide spending cuts that
must be achieved by the
end of the federal budget
year on Sept. 30.
Flight delays piled up


across the country Sunday
and Monday of this week as
the FAA kept planes on the
ground because there
weren't enough controllers
to monitor busy air corri-
dors. Cascading delays held
up flights at some of na-
tion's busiest airports, in-
cluding New York,
Baltimore and Washington.
Delta Air Lines canceled
about 90 flights Monday be-
cause of worries about de-
lays. Just about every
passenger was rebooked on
another Delta flight within
a couple of hours. Air travel
was smoother Tuesday
Things could have been
worse. A lot of people who
had planned to fly this week
changed their plans when
they heard that air travel
might be difficult, according
to longtime aviation con-
sultant Daniel Kasper of
Compass Lexicon.


Associated Press
An anti-abortion activist
yells through a poster
that reads in Spanish "I
was also an embryo. Let
him be born!" Saturday
during a protest in
Mexico City. Activists are
protesting Mexico City's
law that legalized
abortion in 2007.

100 join Gitmo
hunger strike
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
-A hunger strike among
prisoners at Guantanamo
Bay keeps growing.
Lt. Col. Samuel House
said Saturday that 100 of
166 prisoners at the U.S.
base in Cuba have now
joined the strike.
He said 19 are receiving
liquid nutrients through a
nasal tube to prevent dan-
gerous weight loss. House
said five of those are at a
hospital under observation
but that they do not have any
life-threatening conditions.
Lawyers for the de-
tainees said the military is
undercounting the number
of hunger strikers.
Prisoners began the
hunger strike in February to
protest conditions and in-
definite confinement.
Four killed
in bombings
KARACHI, Pakistan-
Police said four people
were killed and dozens
were injured in two sepa-
rate bombings of political
targets in the southern city
of Karachi.
The blasts come as Pak-
istan is preparing for country-
wide elections on May 11.
There was no immediate
claim of responsibility but
the Taliban have threatened
three political parties per-
ceived as being more lib-
eral and secular, including
two targeted Saturday
night.
Police officerAzam Baloch
said three people were killed
and 21 were injured when a
bomb planted on a motor-
bike exploded during a politi-
cal meeting. That blast
targeted supporters of the
Pakistan Peoples Party.
Police official Zahid Hus-
sain said the other bomb
targeted an office of the
Muttahida Quami Move-
ment. One person died and
21 were wounded in that
explosion.
Staff strike at
seven prisons
EDMONTON, Alberta -
Employees at seven pris-
ons Canada's Alberta
province are on strike to
protest the suspension of
one of their colleagues.
Alberta Justice Minister
Jonathan Denis called the
strike illegal. The province
is seeking a court injunction
to force the workers back to
their posts.
The dispute began at the
Edmonton Remand Centre
on Friday after a correc-
tional worker was sus-
pended for complaining
about safety issues.
Seventy workers who ar-
rived for the Friday afternoon
shift refused to go inside,
prompting officials to put the
facility into lockdown and re-
strict prisoners to their cells.
Guy Smith, the president
of the Alberta Union of Pub-
lic Employees, said employ-
ees at seven detention
centers have walked off the
job as of Saturday.
-From wire reports






Veterans Notes can be found on Page A19 of
day's Chronicle.


to(



EXCURSIONS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE







Dontjust wine...




free things to do in Napa Valley


a


MICHELLE LOCKE
Aimhint'd Press
NAPA, Calif.
Love the lush and
lovely Napa Valley
but hate how
expensive it can
be? You're not the
first.
In the late 19th century, writer
Robert Louis Stevenson moved his
honeymoon to the rustic but free set-
ting of an abandoned mining camp
when the $10-a-week going rate for
Calistoga hotels proved too much for
his slender purse.
You're not likely to find free lodg-
ing today, even if it is in a beat-up
cabin. But there are a number of
things you can enjoy in California's
premiere wine region at no charge.

SCENERY
There are two main ways to see the
Napa Valley by car.
Highway 29 is a straight shot from
the south end of the valley marked
by the famous Grape Crusher Statue
- through Napa, Yountville,
Oakville, Rutherford, St. Helena and
Calistoga. Along the way are dozens
of restaurants and wineries, includ-
ing the Robert Mondavi Winery and
Inglenook, the winery restored by di-
rector Francis Ford Coppola. Be
aware traffic gets heavy at rush hour
and slows to a crawl when there's a
big event going on, such as the an-
nual wine auction the first weekend
in June.
To reach the Grape Crusher Statue
from Highway 29 (heading north
from the San Fran-
r cisco Bay area),
turn left onto
Soscol Ferry
Road, continue
on Vista Point
Drive, then con-
tinue onto Napa
- Valley Corporate
Drive and then
right at the statue.
The other driv-
ing option is the Sil-
verado Trail, which is
most easily picked up by
taking the Trancas Street
exit from Highway 29 in
Napa and then turning left
when you see the sign for
the Silverado Trail. The
v trail more or less runs


Associated Press
Former Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman, right, embraces Pamela Des Barres, left, the subject in both photo-
graphs on the wall behind, April 13 during the opening of Wolman's photo exhibit "The Groupies" at Markham Vineyards
in St. Helena, Calif. More than 75 wineries have art on display all year long.


parallel to Highway 29 but is quieter,
winding through green vistas of vine-
yards and rolling hills.

ART
More than 75 wineries have art on
display all year long. Some of the
places to see free art anytime in-
clude The Hess Collection's contem-
porary art museum, featuring works
from the private collection of owner
Donald Hess (4411 Redwood Road,
Napa, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.), and The
Baron Wolman Gallery at Markham
Vineyards (2812 St. Helena Highway,
St. Helena, open daily 11 a.m. to
5 p.m.), with photographs by Wolman,
Rolling Stone's first chief
photographer.

WINERIES
The days when winery owners rou-
tinely poured their wares for free are
no more, although several wineries
offer two-for-one tasting coupons
(check online before you visit), and
others will waive tasting fees if you
buy a bottle to take home. But there
is still at least one winery offering
tariff-free tasting. That would be Sut-
ter Home Family Vineyards the
people who introduced America to


white zinfandel in the 1970s -
in St. Helena.
Stop by the charming tasting room
on Highway 29 in St Helena (277 St.
Helena Highway) and taste up to four
wines free from the eight-wine tast-
ing menu, which includes a zinfandel
port. And if you want to go cost- and
alcohol-free, ask for a tasting of Fre,
which is a line of wines that have had
the alcohol removed; www.
sutterhome.com, open 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. daily

MARKETS
The Napa Valley is famous for fine
dining and you can watch some of the
city's top chefs plying their trade at
the Napa Chef's Market, a free
weekly event on Thursday nights in
downtown Napa.
Traffic is rerouted so the market is
like a big street party with live music
and scores of stalls selling food,
drink, art and other items. There are
two cooking demonstrations, at 6:30
and 7:30 p.m., where you can watch
the food being made and then enjoy a
taste when it's done.
The valley may be best known for
its grapes, but there are other things
grown here, too. See the rest of the
region's bounty at the Napa Farmers


Market (500 First St., next to the
Oxbow Public Market) on Tuesday
and Saturday mornings, 8 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., May 1 through Oct. 30. The
pickings get better as the weather
grows warmer; hit the market in late
summer to see it at its best.

HIKES
The Land Trust of Napa County of-
fers free hikes most weeks between
April and November exploring the
wild side of the valley Go online to
see the hikes planned for this year.
Advance registration http://
community napalandtrust.org/page. as
px?pid300 is required and some of
the hikes are quite strenuous.
Also free is Robert Louis Steven-
son State Park, which includes a five-
mile hike one way to the top of
Mount St. Helena, offering
panoramic views of the valley and
beyond.
The park is about eight miles north
of Calistoga on Highway 29; limited
parking, no bathrooms.
The cabin where Stevenson and
his bride dodged those pricey rack
rates of 1880 is long gone, but a mon-
ument about a mile up the trail
marks the area where the couple
stayed.


Real snow


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with
a brief description of the
trip.
If it's selected as a
winner, it will be pub-
lished in the Sunday
Chronicle. At the end of
the year, a panel of
judges will select the
best photo during the


Nicholas, Alexis and
Anthony Ucci of Citrus
Springs had a dream
come true when they
were finally able to see
snow on March 27
at their great-grand-
mother's house in
Melrose, Mass. Al-
though there was not a
lot, it was just enough
to have a snowball
fight. Mom Robin Ucci
realized too late that
they had not changed
out of their Crocs in all
the excitement.
Fortunately,
Great-Grandma Winam
and Aunt Ellen had
extra socks for
everyone.
Special to the Chronicle



year and that photo-
graph will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


Overnight at Disney


Parks to be open 24 hours on May 24


Associated Press

ORLANDO Disney will
celebrate the start of the


Disneyland Park and Disney
Adventure Park in California,
will stay open from 6 a.m.
Friday, May 24, to
6 a.m. May 25.
Disney did
something similar
in 2012 to






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Husband's habits


detrimental to all


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Dear Annie: I am
currently in school
and working four
different jobs. I am also
the mother of three chil-
dren. My husband is very
selfish. He doesn't think
twice about sending our
children to a sitter so he
can go out to do whatever
he wants. When
I'm at school or
working, I con-
stantly worry
about the kids. I
feel it is his re-
sponsibility to
take care of
them when I
cannot, and vice
versa.
My husband
also has a
drinking prob-
lem and won't ANI
admit it My MAII
heart breaks
when he stays
out most of the night with
"friends" and passes out
when he gets home early
in the morning. I fear that
one day he will drive home
so drunk that he will kill
himself or someone else.
We are in our 30s, and at
this point in life, I think he
should be a responsible
parent. He is a terrible
role model for our chil-
dren. Sad and ETus-
irated Wife
Dear Wife: You are also
a role model, and that
means you should not put
up with behavior that is
detrimental to your mar-
riage and to your family's
well-being. We give your
husband credit for leaving
the children with a sitter
and not simply walking out
on them, but it is not


enough. No husband and
father should be drinking
all night, driving impaired
and leaving the kids with a
sitter at a moment's notice.
You cannot force him to
get help, but you can get
some counseling, with or
without him, in order to
plan your future. Also con-
tact Al-Anon
(al-anon.ala
teen.org). If
e there is the po-
tential for your
4 husband to put
the children in
harm's way, he
may need to
leave the home
for their safety.
Dear Annie:
"Tired" asked
how to get her
HE'S kids to pick up
BOX their clothes.
My husband, a
volunteer fire-
man, pointed out that
clothes on the floor create
a terrible fire hazard.
We found a great way to
get the kids to pick up their
clothes. Tell them a couple
of days in advance that if
the clothes and toys aren't
picked up by a certain
time, they will be confis-
cated for three days. Then,
if they don't comply, put
everything in a large
garbage bag and lock it up
somewhere. (We used the
trunk of our car) We didn't
have to do it more than
twice. Laura


Write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St, Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"42" (PG-13) 12:40 p.m.,
3:50 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:15 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
No passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4:10 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D.
1 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 12:50
p.m., 4 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Pain and Gain" (R)
12:30 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"42" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Big Wedding" (R)
2 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:25 p.m.,


7:55 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 4:35 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:05 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. No
passes.
"Oblivion" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 1:25 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Pain and Gain" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Scary Movie 5" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Graduation group
6 Ocean liner
10 Decorate
14 Streetcar
18 Headgear
for a horse
20 Scarlett's home
21 Park attraction
22 Type style
24 Shrewd
25 War god
26 Concept
27 Newspaper
employee
29 Penn or Connery
30 "Animal -"
32 Greek letter
34 Plant part
36 Hindu goddess
37 Go wrong
38 Narrow opening
39 Dirt
41 Uppity one
43 Strike violently
44 Combustible
material
45 Tread on
47 Blackthorn fruit
49 Creature
of Egyptian myth
52 Soil
53 Grasp
55 Something behind the
times
(2 wds.)
59 Chimp's cousin
60 Lawn or table
62 Landing place
64 Roman goddess
65 Means of restraint
66 Intense
67 Mineral
69 Have a late meal
71 Love god
72 Time of year (abbr.)
73 Crazed
74 Oklahoma city
75 Malevolent spirit
77 Insect egg
78 Decorative mat
80 Dish
82 Calm
84 Talk on and on
85 Wickedness
87 Go after game
88 Lovers' meeting
89 Calorie counter
90 Football players
92 Roof parts


93 In medias -
94 Gone up
96 Country in Eur.
97 Tart
99 Curved bone
102 Formerly, of old
104 Catchall abbr.
105 Kind of monster
106 Divide in two
107 Concern
108 Bitter
110 On the summit
112 Room to move
114 Prima-
115 Send off
the tracks
117 Spinnaker
119 Weathercock
120 Timberland
121 Ring out
123 Dishonest
behavior
125 Dud
126 Stomach muscles, for
short
129 Regrets
131 Correct, as a text
132 Cure
133 Chronicle (abbr.)
136 Palo-
138 Manner of walking
140 Animal friend
141 Yearn
142 Days long past
143 Water pipe
145 Venus de -
147 E pluribus -
149 Kitchen gadget
151 Carried
152 Margarine
153 Poker stake
154 Become aware of
155 Nation
156 Sign gas
157 Lascivious look
158 Pub measures


DOWN
1 Try to get
2 Light-beam device
3 Communion table
4 Astonish
5 Harden
6 Commence
7 Damage
8 Wrath
9 Deli meat
10 Great victory
11 Disencumber


12 of March
13 Supermarket sign
14 Vocal vibrato
15 Pole
16 In the company of
17 Alma-
19 Knee-jerk reaction
23 Scotia
28 Edge
31 Trouble
33 Prepare to fire
35 Print measures
38 Chinese dynasty
39 Magnificent
40 Run off to wed
42 Daring
44 Helsinki native
45 Gin and -
46 Wallach
or Whitney
48 Adams or Falco
49 Swamp bird
50 Make ready,
for short
51 Stylist
52 Son of Jacob
and Leah
54 The Gobi, e.g.
56 Track event
(2 wds.)
57 Consecrate
with oil
58 Liking
60 Small
61 Kind of cracker
63 Hard liquor
66 Bertinelli or Harper
68 To some extent
70 Mail charge
73 Bishop's
headdress
74 Assert
75 Lair
76 Brazen
79 Cereal grass
80 Bowling item
81 Cask
83 Bread variety
84 Stab
85 Puts into office
86 Coq au -
89 Great fear
91 Food and drink
92 A deadly sin
95 Depot (abbr.)
97 Light brown
98 Winglike parts
100 Showy flower
101 Edible root
103 Catch


Backbone
Perceived
Complain
Coffin stand
Hard wood
Ultimate
King's entertainer
Chortled
Satire
Container for wine
Grassland


Flying formation
Swamp
Ooh and -
Shapeless mass
Ottoman
One
of the Chipmunks
Mr. Simpson
Feudal Japanese sol-
dier
Build


Largest asteroid
Gumbo ingredient
Floor covering
Old instrument
The Abominable Snow-
man
-Arbor
Lion constellation
Dir. letters
Daddy


Puzzle answer is on Page A20.


4-28


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


N
L


A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during wartime (also
stepchildren), as well as fe-
male veterans who served
during wartime. Call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or


Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,


or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility-
challenged veterans who wish
to schedule an appointment
for transportation to the VA
medical center in Gainesville
may call the Citrus County
Transit office for wheelchair
transportation; call 352-527-
7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Outdoor flea market and
pancake breakfast will be Sat-
urday, May 18. All-you-can-
eat breakfast served from
7:30 to 10:30 p.m.; donation
is $5 for adults and $3 for chil-
dren younger than 10. The
public is welcome.
The public is invited to the
Memorial Day Observance at
11 a.m. Monday, May 27.
Picnic will follow.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine or
FMF Corpsman is eligible to
join the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit


the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and
Saturday, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-


795-5012 for information.
VFW membership is open to
male and female veterans
who have participated in an
overseas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Post election of officers is
1 to 6 p.m. May 28, followed
by the meeting and installa-
tion of officers at 7 p.m.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians


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A Stg-atre .f Eci ce
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welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. Afish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email
eaglerider@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within
24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets


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at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and
its activities.
The post will have a family
Fun Day from noon to 6 p.m.
Sunday, April 28. All families
and children are welcome to
enjoy games such as corn
hole and horseshoes, a dunk
tank, bounce house, face
painting and more.
There will be live entertain-
ment and food including ham-
burgers, hot dogs and pulled
pork.
Call Rick DePue at 352-
404-3574 for information.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 352-860-1629 for
information and directions.


If you want

to advertise

here in the

Great E

Getaways

call 563-5592


Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
May 11 at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill.

SERVICES & GROUPS
Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Community Education
and the Hospice Foundation
of America will present "Im-
proving Care for Veterans
Facing Illness and Death"
from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Tues-
day, April 30, at the Seventh-
day Adventist Church, 1880
N. Trucks Ave., Hernando.
Lunch will be provided by the
Seventh-day Adventists
Church at 12:30 p.m., with the
program commencing at
1:30 p.m.
Experience gained on the
battlefield and in the military
helps shape a veteran's life.
As veterans age, this experi-
ence may influence how they
approach serious illness and
confront their own deaths.
The program will enhance the
sensitivity and understanding
of all those who care for vet-
erans. It examines cases from
across the country discussed
by a panel of national leaders
in the field of hospice care.
The audience will have the
opportunity to share their own
experiences.
"Improving Care for Veter-
ans Facing Illness and Death"
is offered at no cost and is
open to the public. The infor-
mation will be useful to veter-
ans, clinicians, administrators,
chaplains, social workers,
nurses, case managers,
counselors, physicians, addic-
tion professionals and other
staff working in hospice and
palliative care, hospitals, long-
term care and assisted-living
facilities. Three continuing ed-
ucation credits for profession-
als are available from the
Hospice Foundation of Amer-
ica. To make a reservation,
call Lynn Miller at 352-621-
1500, ext. 1728.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as

See VETERANS/Page A20


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SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 A19





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Jessica Brown and Jeff
Read of Clearwater ex-
changed nuptial vows
March 24, 2013, in St. Au-
gustine. Mary Ann Kelly
officiated the ceremony
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Steven and Noreen
Brown of Crystal River.
The groom is the son of
Ron and Lynne Read.
Kaeley Read, the
groom's daughter, was the
bride's attendant and
Bryson Read, his son,
stood by the groom.
Following a honey-
moon trip to Ireland, the
couple is at home in
Clearwater.
The bride is a 2004
graduate of Crystal River


Divorces 4/15/13 4/21/13
Dawn Marie Casas,
Hernando vs. Edward J.
Casas Jr., Inverness
Jenda Cosgrove vs.
Chadwick Cosgrove
Tymothy William Gennaro,
Inverness vs. Brandi Ann
Gennaro, Inverness
Carly R. Hooker, Inver-
ness vs. Richard A. Hooker
Jr., Inverness
Elisha Hooker, Inverness
vs. William Hooker,
Inverness
Channing Huff, Floral City
vs. Karen Elaine Huff,
Inverness
Jeanne M. Pattillo, Beverly
Hills vs. Charles John
Pattillo, Beverly Hills
Hollynn Hicks Pospiech,
Inverness vs. Richard Lester


High School and a 2010
graduate of the Univer-
sity of South Florida. She
is a seventh- and eight-
grade reading teacher.
The groom graduated
from Florida State Uni-
versity in 1994 and is an
eighth-grade language
arts teacher.


Pospiech, Inverness
Sarina Ashley Venuto,
Hernando vs. Robert
Eugene Venuto, Port Richey
Stefanie L. Wright, Crystal
River vs. Richard W. Wright,
Ocala
Marriages 4/15/13-
4/21/13
Edward Velez Jr., Crystal
River/Tamila Delian Brown,
Crystal River
Eddie Theo Williams,
Inverness/Charlene Sue
Amelotte, Inverness
Michael Charles
Worthington, Homosassa/
Stacey Marie Justice,
Homosassa
William Frank Wortman
Jr., Lecanto/Karren Marie
Beane, Inverness


A Humane Society OF CENTRAL FL


Barney
Barney is a beautiful black
6-year-old male, pedigreed
Scottish terrier of 20
pounds. He has just lost
his dad and is quite con-
fused, but loves everyone.
He's OK with other dogs,
unless they growl at him,
but no cats or kids. He has
been the only pet in an
adult home. Barney and
his little friends will be at
Saturday's pet adoption
with A Humane Society of
Central FL from 10 a.m. to


VETERANS
Continued from Page A19

well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause.
Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultra
rayl997@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41).
All Coastie veterans are
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to


noon at Pet Supermarket,
Inverness. If you have a lit-
tle dog that needs a home,
call 352-527-9050. Visit
www.AHumaneSociety
PetRescue.com.

veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are
welcome.
The CCVC is a nonprofit
corporation; donations are tax
deductible. Members can
renew with Gary Williamson
at 352-527-4537, or at the
meeting. Visit www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Open spots still remain
for those couples and individ-
uals interested in taking a trip
to Hawaii with a group of vet-
erans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, coor-
dinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for
Sept. 17 to Oct. 4.
Participants will visit the is-
lands of Oahu (Hale Koa
Hotel), Kauai (Marriott),
Hawaii (stay in the KMC in-
side the volcano) and Maui
(Royal Lahina Resort).
Reservations should be
made as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-
5131, or email dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-


90th BIRTHDAY

Giuseppe Cammarata


Giuseppe Cammarata,
seated right, celebrated
his 90th birthday Saturday,
April 20, 2013, at home in
Pine Ridge, surrounded by
family and friends from
New Jersey, New York and
Florida. Seated next to


him is his wife, Mary
Standing, left to right, are
his sons, Sal and Tony
Cammarata from Staten
Island, N.Y, Frank
Cammarata of Inverness
and his daughter, Vinnie
Breniak of Pine Ridge.


New ARRIVAL


Zayden Tyler


Deveney Danzeisen and
Aaron Sphon of Crystal
River announce the birth
of a son, Zayden Tyler
Sphon, at 7:41 p.m. March
19, 2013, at Citrus Memo-
rial hospital.
The baby weighed
8 pounds, 5 ounces, and
was 20 3/4 inches long.
Maternal grandmother


Sphon


is Pamela Danzeisen of
Crystal River
Paternal grandparents
are Kevin and Yvonne
Sphon of Crystal River.
Great-grandparents are
Vivian Lott, Colquitt and
Vicki Cain, Louis and
Barbara Sphon, and
Danny and Mary
Rumbaugh.


News NOTE=


Model railroaders
to meet May 7
The Citrus Model Railroad
Club will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7, at the
Robinson Horticulture Build-
ing of the Citrus County Fair-
grounds.
Wes Brockway of Sugarmill
Woods will present a slide-

527-3722, ext. 102, or e-mail
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-
rial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092,
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices.
HPH Hospice care and pro-
grams do not affect veterans'
benefits. Call the Citrus Team
Office at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets.
Free classes to combat vet-
erans are offered by her at
several locations and times.
Call her at 352-382-7397.

FOR THE RECORD
Divorces and
marriages filed in the
state of Florida are a
matter of public
record, available from
each county's Clerk of
the Courts Office.
For Citrus County, call
the clerk at 352-
341-6400 or visit
the website at
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


show and talk about his
grandfather as a steam loco-
motive engineer during the
reign of Pancho Villa and the
Mexican Revolution in the
early 1900s.
For more information, visit
www.citrusmodelrrclub.org or
call Bob Penrod at 352-238-
6879.


201



Tell the special graduate

in your life how much

you care. Print an

inspiring message in our

annual keepsake tab.

Include photos of your

graduate at no extra /

charge. fi


65th ANNIVERSARY

The Neeses


r .
* ** ,


Archie and Colleen
Neese of Inverness will
celebrate their 65th wed-
ding anniversary April
30, 2013.
The couple were mar-
ried April 30, 1948, in
Cloverdale. Ind.


They are both retired
from the General Motors
Allision Division and
have lived in Citrus
County for 25 years.
The Neeses have one
son, Greg Neese, of
Clermont.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A18.

CLASS SIH 1PETRIM TRAM=
HALTER TIARIAER IDE ROMAN
A S T UJTEE ARES IDEA E D I TOR
S EA N IF A RM T AU STJEM D E V I
E RR S L I T G R I ME SINJOB RA M

S P H I NX LO-A M- H-O-- E --LDH A T
ORANG TEN NI S P EIRi DIANA
R E IN V1V ID ORE UIP EROCS
APR MA I AD A E DEMON N I T
DO L I PLATTER S-ERENE
P R-A T E E V I L -HUINT T -RYST
DIETER LINI EMEN AVES
REIS RIS EN G ER T ANG Y RI B
E RST ETC SEAi HAL iE ARE
A C E R BBATOPBLEE EWAIY I F A C I E
D E R A I L S IA L V A N E IF FOREST
P E AL KNA V ER Y IF LOP 0
A B S R N- ES D LH E L- RE C
ALTO T 0 T PET LONG YORE
H OOKAHIMI LO NUM o PENER
BORNE LEO ANTE OT I COE
L AINID NE N LEER PINT S
4-28 C 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


a.


2x5"


$89.00



2x3"

$69.00



2x2"

$49.00


Call the Chronicle
or your advertising
representative to
reserve your space

563-5592

CHIONCLjE


Wedding

Brown/Read


For the RECORD


Graduation


2X5


2X3





2X2


A20 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY











SPORTS


A neck
and neck
night for
NASCAR at
Richmond.
/B3

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Horse racing/B2
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 NBA, NHL, golf/B4
0 MLB/B5
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B6
0 NFL draft/B6


Three Pirates medal at Class 2A meet


Dunnellon's Jackson wins state 800 [


LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
Manuel Henriquez, Corey
Pollard and Hayley Clark all
took fifth places Saturday at the
Class 2A State Track and Field
Meet at the University of North
Florida in Jacksonville.
Henriquez, a senior, did his
best ever and had a 147-9 heave
in the discus.
"He did exceptional," Crystal
River High head boys coach
Tim Byrne said. "Manuel had


the best day He was the only
one who improved."
Pollard was fifth in the high
jump with a 6-foot leap.
Byrne said the conditions at
the high jump were very poor
Pollard has completed a 6 foot,
7 inch jump previously
"All of the kids did poorly, not
just Corey," Byrne said. "He did
tie for fifth place. In the high
jump, he cleared 6 foot. There
was a flooding issue. There was
See Page B3


Crystal River junior Corey Pollard clears the bar Saturday in the
high jump competition at the Class 2A State Track & Field Cham-
pionships at Hodges Stadium at the University of North Florida.
Pollard cleared 6 feet and finished in a five-way tie for fifth place,
earning a state medal for his top-eight finish.
JEFF BRYAN/Riverland News


Off the board


W' 1
Associated Press
Southern California quarterback Matt Barkley was chosen with the 98th overall pick in the fourth round of the NFL draft
Saturday by the Philadelphia Eagles.


Eagles end Barkley's slide by taking QB in fourth


Associated Press
NEW YORK This was
one rush quarterbacks
embraced.
Starting with Matt
Barkley, the fourth round of
the NFL draft was the land-
ing spot for quarterbacks
who carried hopes of going
much higher Philadelphia
traded up with Jacksonville
to get the Southern Califor-
nia QB with the opening
pick Saturday
"I try not to get stressed
about things I can't control,"
Barkley said when asked
about his drop in the draft
from likely first-rounder in
2012 to No. 98 overall. "I'm
just glad I know where my
home is and I can't wait to


hit the playbook"
Yes, it was three rounds


later than
Barkley hoped
for Same thing
for Ryan Nassib
of Syracuse,
Landry Jones of
Oklahoma and
Tyler Wilson of
Arkansas, the
other quarter-
backs chosen in
Round 4.
"We're going
to take the best


More
draft cov
* To see al
rounds o
draft and
who the
Bay Bucs
welcomir
the fold,
Page B6


value on the board," coach
Chip Kelly said, adding the
Eagles rated Barkley in the
top 50. "There's a prime ex-
ample. The best value on
the board by far was Matt.
He's an extremely mature


young man, intelligent, ar-
ticulate. He has that 'it'
factor"
NFL Perhaps. But
he seemed to
average have a lot more
I seven of it last year, but
f the Barkley opted to
also return to school.
Tampa He and the Tro-
s will be jans slumped,
ng into Barkley injured
see his shoulder,
and his stock
plummeted.
He will join
quarterbacks Michael Vick
and Nick Foles.
The New York Giants,
hardly in need of a quar-
terback with Eli Manning
in his prime, still dealt with
Arizona to move up for


round Saturday
Nassib.
Nassib, from the Philadel-
phia suburbs, took a call
from Giants coach Tom
Coughlin, but wasn't sure
what Coughlin told him.
"To be honest with you, I
blacked out. I didn't get
everything," Nassib said.
"What I did get from him
was that first off I had to cut
my ties with the Philadel-
phia Eagles and switch,
which won't be a problem."
Oakland, which acquired
Matt Flynn from Seattle in
the offseason to be its
starter, followed two picks
later at No. 112 overall with
Wilson. Three spots after
that, Pittsburgh grabbed


Page B3


Moore,


Rays down


White Sox
Associated Press
CHICAGO Matt Moore became
the first Tampa Bay pitcher to win
five games in April as the Rays
snapped a two-game losing streak
with a 10-4 victory over the Chicago
White Sox on Saturday night
The left-hander joined Boston's
Clay Buchholz as the only five-game
winners this month. He allowed just
three hits, one earned run and
matched a season high nine strike-
outs in six innings of work.
Moore's 1.13 ERA is second-low-
est in the majors behind St. Louis
right handerJake Westbrook (0.98).
Tampa Bay, now 3-9 on the road,
pounded out 19 hits the most
since June 26, 2011.
Kelly Johnson matched a career-
high with four hits while driving
home two runs. Evan Longoria
also matched a career-best for hits,
going 4-for-6 with two runs scored.
The 19 hits and 10 runs allowed
were season-high against the
White Sox, who saw a three-game
winning streak.
For the second straight night the
Rays jumped out to an early lead.
Rays shortstop Ben Zobrist broke
out of a 0-for-9 series slump with a
two-run first inning home run.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Rays starting pitcher
Matt Moore pitches to the Chicago
White Sox during the first inning
Saturday in Chicago.


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Another round of adult recreational sports


Archery Camp

available for kids

this summer

Special to the Chronicle

The new men's softball season
began Monday night with three
games. The results were:
Advanced Fitness 23, Reflec-


tions Church 1.
R.C. Lawn Care 26, Sons of
Pitches 6.
01' Guys with Help 18, AMS
Oil 6.
Teams play again this Monday
at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30
p.m. at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River
Men's flag football
Another round of men's flag foot-
ball contests took place Thursday
night. The results were:


Purple 46, Green 39.
Blue 31, Orange 7.
Gold 31, Red 12.
Teams face off this Thursday
starting at 6:30 p.m. at Homosassa
Area Recreation Area.
Archery Camp
on tap for summer
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, in partnership with McPher-
son's Archery & Outdoor Pro Shop,
will have an Archery Camp this sum-


mer. The camp will be offered on
two different weeks and participants
will be separated by age.
The camps are open to boys and
girls ages 6 to 15 with the groups
consisting of ages 6 to 8, 9 to 11 and
12 to 15. The camps will be at
McPherson's Archery in Lecanto.
Each camp will run Monday through
Thursday with two separate classes
each day. Participants will learn
about various archery equipment,
proper shooting techniques and


equipment safety. At the end of each
camp, the top shot of the week will
be awarded a free bow.
Registration will open April 29 and
can be completed at the Citrus
County Parks & Recreation office.
Space will be limited to 25 children
per class.
For more information, call Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, visit www.
citruscountyparks.com, or call
McPherson's Archery at 352-341-2820.


Things to know


Associated Press
Kentucky Derby hopefuls Palace Malice, right, under jockey Mike Smith, gallops ahead of stablemate Overanalyze
with exercise rider Obed Perez in the saddle during a morning workout Saturday at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky.

Many stories to follow leading up to 139th Kentucky Derby


Associated Press

Here are 10 things to
know about the 139th Ken-
tucky Derby to be run on
May 4 at Churchill Downs
in Louisville. A full field of
20 3-year-old colts is ex-
pected for the 1 1/4-mile
race, including one co-
owned by Louisville bas-
ketball coach Rick Pitino
and five possibly a
record six trained by
Todd Pletcher Most of the
horses will be running the
distance for the first time.
The race draws upward
of 150,000 people, many of
whom never actually see a
horse run live because they
are focused on the party at-
mosphere, especially in the
infield. The Derby's signa-
ture drink is the mint julep
served over crushed ice in
a souvenir glass. The race
is likely America's best-
dressed sporting event,
with many people topping
off their fancy outfits with
elegant/outsized/outra-
geous hats.
1. PLETCHER TAKES
AIM: Trainer Todd
Pletcher has five probable
starters and possibly a
record sixth for the race.
His horses are Verrazano,
Overanalyze, Revolution-
ary, Palace Malice and
Charming Kitten. He might
also enter Winning Cause.
Pletcher had five starters
in 2007, when his highest
finish was sixth. He won in
2010 with Super Saver The
only trainer to start five
horses in a single year and
win was D. Wayne Lukas
with Grindstone in 1996.
2. DRAW DAY: The field


of 20 horses is announced
on Wednesday. That's
when the draw is held to
determine spots in the
starting gate. Some train-
ers want to avoid the No. 1
post because their horse
starts next to the rail and
could get pinched going
into the first turn. Others
don't like the No. 20 post
because their horse is on
the far outside and has to
quickly make its way over
toward the rail to save
ground going into the first
turn. The most winners -
12 each have come from
the No. 1 and No. 5 spots.
Last year's winner, I'll
Have Another, broke from
the No. 19 spot. The odds
are set on draw day, too.
3. KRIGGER GOES FOR
HISTORY: Kevin Krigger,
a 29-year-old jockey from
the U.S. Virgin Islands,
will be aboard Golden-
cents. The horse is co-
owned by Louisville
basketball coach Rick
Pitino and trained by Doug
O'Neill, who won last
year's Derby Krigger will
be the second black rider
in the Derby since 1921.
He could be the first black
jockey to win since Jimmy
Winkfield won for the sec-
ond time in 1902. Black
jockeys dominated the
Derby in its early years,
winning 15 of the first 28
races between 1875 and
1902. Krigger rode his first
horse at age 5 in St Croix.
4. UNBEATEN VER-
RAZANO: The colt trained
by Todd Pletcher is unde-
feated, including a win in
the Wood Memorial. Ver-
razano didn't race as a 2-


year-old, setting him up for
a chance to break one of the
Derby's oldest jinxes: no
horse since Apollo in 1882
has won the Derby without
racing at 2. Verrazano could
be the likely Derby favorite.
His jockey, John Velazquez,
hopes to be recovered from
race injuries in time to ride
in the Derby
5. IT'S ALL ABOUT
THE POINTS: For the first
time in Derby history, the
field of 20 starters is being
determined by points.
Churchill Downs insti-
tuted a tiered system that
awards a sliding scale of
points to the top four fin-
ishers in 36 designated
races. The top 20 point
earners at the end of the
series will earn a spot in
the Derby starting gate if
more than 20 horses enter
If two or more horses have
the same number of
points, earnings in non-re-
stricted stakes races will
be the tiebreaker. From
1986-2012, earnings in
graded stakes were used to
decide which 20 horses
ran in the Derby
6. OLDEST TRAINER:
D. Wayne Lukas, who has
the second-most Derby
wins with four, has two con-
tenders this year in Will
Take Charge and Oxbow. At
77, he could become the
oldest trainer to win, break-
ing the record of Charlie
Whittingham, who was 76
when he won in 1989 with
Sunday Silence. Lukas will
extend his record for most
Derby starters to 46 if both
horses get in.
7. CRACKLIN' ROSIE:
Rosie Napravnik is set to


ride in the Derby for the
second time. She finished
ninth the best result by
a woman jockey aboard
Pants On Fire in 2011. No
woman has won the Derby
and only Julie Krone has
won a Triple Crown race,
taking the 1993 Belmont
with Colonial Affair.
Napravnik will ride My-
lute, runner-up in the
Louisiana Derby
8. THE WINNER'S
SPOILS: The winning
horse is draped with a gar-
land of red roses and the
winning owner receives a
gold trophy
9. TIGHTER SECU-
RITY: In the aftermath of
the Boston Marathon
bombings, Churchill
Downs is tightening secu-
rity and expanding screen-
ing of fans, employees and
vendors who enter the
track for the Derby Cool-
ers are banned again from
the infield; they were al-
lowed back in 2009. They
were prohibited after the
9/11 terrorist attack in
2001. Cans, fireworks,
laser lights and pointers,
noisemakers and air horns
are also banned. Purses
must be 12 inches or less.
10. TRIPLE CROWN
STARTS HERE: Only 11
horses have swept the
Triple Crown and none
since Affirmed in 1978.
The feat begins with a vic-
tory in the Derby, followed
by wins in the Preakness
and Belmont stakes during
a five-week span. A horse
has just one chance to win
the Triple Crown series
because it's restricted to
3-year-olds.


CHS cheer camp
coming in June
The CHS kids cheer camp
will be from June 3 to 6, with
each day going from 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m for children be-
tween the ages of 3 to 12.
A single child costs $45,
which includes a T-shirt,
snack and drink or two
children from the same
family for $75.
Campers should wear
shorts, a T-shirt and tennis
shoes each day.
Registration begins at
8:30 a.m. Monday, June 3 in
the Citrus High School gym
lobby.
For more information,
contact Jillian Godwin at
godwinj@citrus.kl 2.fl.us or
352-726-2241, ext. 4550.
CR hoops camp
tips off in June
The Crystal River 2013
hoops camp has three ses-
sions: June 3-6, 10-13 and
17-20. Each day goes from
9 a.m. to 12 p.m..
One session is $49, two
sessions are $79 and all
three are $99. The camp will
be led by Crystal River High
School boys basketball
coach Steve Feldman.
All pre-registered campers
will receive a camp T-shirt
and the first 24 campers who
register for all three weeks will
receive an Adidas basketball.
For more information,
contact Steve Feldman at
feldmans@citrus.kl2.fl.us
or 352-601-0870.
Jr. Hurricane
Youth Basketball
Camp, League
Registration for the Jr.
Hurricane Youth Basketball
League will be Saturday,
May 4 and Saturday, May
18, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in
the Citrus High School
gym lobby.
The Junior Hurricane
Youth Basketball Camp will
be held June 10-13, from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Citrus
High School gym. The camp
is open to boys and girls
ages 7-14. Registration fee
of $65 includes camp T-
shirt, insurance, basketball
instruction and games.
League games will start
on June 22 and will be
played at Citrus High
School. The $45 fee in-
cludes uniform, insurance
and trophies. There is a dis-
count for multiple siblings.
The league is also open to
boys and girls ages 7-14.
For more information,
contact Tom Densmore at
726-8045.
CRHS annual
cheerleading camp
The Crystal River High
School cheerleaders' annual
Camp Rah Rah and Cheer
Camp will be offered from


8:30 a.m. to noon Tuesday
through Friday, May 28 to
31, at the Crystal River High
School gym.
Come learn cheers,
dances and have fun. Camp
is for ages 5 through eighth
grade (no experience neces-
sary). Cost of $45 includes
daily snack and a T-shirt.
Register and pay by May
20 and save $5. For a regis-
tration form or more informa-
tion, write: CRHS
Cheerleaders -Attn: Julie
Taylor, 3195 Crystal High
Drive, Crystal River, FL
34428.
Clubs' summer
sessions open
May 24
Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County are preparing for
an exciting summer camp
opening May 24 and running
10 weeks through Aug. 2.
Fun-filled weekly themes are
planned, including "Ooey
Gooey," "Splish Splash,"
"Where the Wild Things
Are," "Myth Busters" and
"Super Heroes."
Since Camp Fusion will
not be held in summer 2013,
the Boys & Girls Clubs of Cit-
rus County are offering spe-
cial discounts to last year's
Camp Fusion campers who
want to attend Boys & Girls
Clubs summer camp.
The cost of the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County
summer camp is $70 per
week from 7 a.m. until 6 p.m.
or $60 per week from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Parents should call
their neighborhood club or
the administration office at
352-621-9225 to register.
Get a jump on
summer with the Y
The Citrus County YMCA
is jumping into high gear this
summer with a full throttle
summer camp that will keep
kids entertained all day long.
This summer the Y is ex-
cited to announce a youth
summer camp for ages 5
to 11.
This summer, the YMCA is
introducing a new camp for
teens. Camp EPIC, or En-
couraging People to Impact
their Community, is a camp
designed for ages 12 to 14.
To accommodate higher
anticipated enrollment this
year, camps are at Crystal
River Middle School,
Lecanto Middle School and
Pleasant Grove Elementary
School. The camp day runs
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
camp sites offer before care,
from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., and
after care, from 5 p.m. to 6
p.m. at no additional charge.
The cost of camp is $89 per
week. The YMCAwill also
offer the summer feeding
program through the Citrus
County School Board.
For questions, to register,
or more information call 352-
637-0132, or visit www.
ymcasuncoast.org.


Sisson Benefit Golf 697-2220.


Tournament in June
The Kyle Sisson Benefit
Golf Tournament will take
place Saturday, June 15, at
Inverness Golf & Country
Club, 3150 S. Country Club
Drive. The price of $75 per
person includes cart, range
balls and lunch.
The game is a four-person
team scramble with an 8:30
a.m. tee time. Prizes will be
awarded for closest pin on par
3's, longest drive and chance
drawing raffles.
Hole sponsorships are: Sil-
ver, $100; Bronze, $250; Gold,
$500; and Platinum $1,000.
Mail all entries/sponsorships
to: Michele Snellings, 5260 W.
Angus Drive, Beverly Hills, FL
34465. Players should make
checks payable to Team Hope,
ACS. For hole sponsorships,
make checks payable to Sun
Trust Bank, note left corner:
Kyle Sisson Benefit Account.
For more information, call
Nick Maltese at 352-464-7511
or Michele Snellings at 352-


Sports clinic skills
challenge on May 4
Quest 4 Health Sports
Therapy Clinic will offer a
Family, Fun & Fitness Sports
Skills Challenge from noon to
4 p.m. Saturday, May 4, at Cit-
rus High School, Inverness.
Free and open to youths
and novice adults, the chal-
lenge wants to make Citrus
County youth athletics rele-
vant, afford aspiring athletes
every opportunity to advance
and get the eyes that matter to
see local sports stars of tomor-
row. Quest 4 Health's Sports
Skills Challenge offers an af-
ternoon of skill and agility
courses designed for youths
and novice-level adults looking
to showcase their talents and
take on a more difficult task.
Participants will be put to the
test, facing a variety of rigorous
physical challenges such as:
Beat the Pitcher
Longest Hit
Fastest 40
Highest Vertical Jump


Quest 4 Health also seeks
sponsors for both athletes and
individual events. Advertise
your organization while sup-
porting local athletes.
More information about the
various sponsorship pack-
ages, as well as the event, is
available by calling Quest 4
Health at 352-364-4134.
LifeSouth plans
golf tournament
Support LifeSouth Commu-
nity Blood Centers' Five
Points of Life Foundation by
competing in the second an-
nual Five Points of Life Golf
Tournament on Friday, May
17. Play the famed Golden
Ocala course, while support-
ing a great cause.
For more information and
to register a team, visit
www.fivepointsoflife.com/2011
/12/08/five-points-of-life-golf-
tournament.
Those interested in spon-
soring or donating to the auc-
tion may call Elli Alba at
352-224-1611 or email
emalba@lifesouth.org.


Citrus County Kids
Triathlon coming
A Citrus County Kids
Triathlon feature
swim/bike/run for children
ages 5 to 15 will take place
May 11 in Inverness. Registra-
tion fee is $25 through May 8.
There will be two divisions
for the children: juniors, ages
5 to 10, and senior, ages 11 to
15. There will also be a
Tri4Fun division for all ages
who wish to try.
For more information, call
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475
or visit www.Citruskidstri.com.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park of-
fers tennis lessons with Lind-
say Rodriquez.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for reg-
istration and information.
Whispering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons.


The Original


Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club 746-4425 $23.00*
Eagle Ridge Country Club 352-307-1668 $24.00*
Inverness Golf and Country Club 637-2526 $23.00
Juliette Falls Golf and Country Club 522-0309 $32.00*
Ocala National Golf Club 352-629-7980 $24.00*
Plantation on Crystal River 795-7211 $22.00*
Skyview at Terra Vista 746-3664 $32.00*
Stone Crest Country Club 800-249-0565 $24.00*
*Plus tax.
Purchase Your Card At One Of These Fine Courses
Or Call For Further Details.
Plnao o Card Valid May 1 October 31, 2013


Camp BRIEFS


Event BRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Pirates 5,
Cardinals 3
Pittsburgh St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
SMartelf 4 1 1 0 MCrpnt3b 4 1 1 0
Tabata rf 4 0 1 0 Curtis ph 1 0 0 0
McCtchcf 4 0 0 1 Beltranrf 5 0 2 1
GJoneslb 4 0 1 1 Hollidylf 5 0 0 0
JMcDnl2b 0 0 0 0 Craiglb 4 0 1 0
Inge2b 4 0 1 0 YMolinc 4 0 1 0
Melncnp 0 00 0 Jaycf 2 1 1 0
WRdrg ph 1 0 1 0 Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0
Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0
PAIvrz3b 5 1 2 0 Salasp 0 0 0 0
RMartn c 4 22 2 Wggntn ph 1 0 0 0
Barmes ss 3 1 2 0 Boggs p 0 00 0
AJBrntp 2 0 0 0 Kozma ss 3 0 1 1
JMcDnIlph 1 0 0 0 Descals 2b 2 0 0 0
Watson p 0 00 0 Westrk p 2 00 0
GSnchzlb 0 0 0 1 J.Kellyp 0 0 0 0
SRonsncf 1 1 1 0
Totals 36 5115 Totals 34 3 8 2
Pittsburgh 000 000 410 5
St. Louis 100 001 001 3
DP-Pittsburgh 1, St. Louis 1. LOB-Pittsburgh
10, St. Louis 9. 2B-R.Martin (5), Beltran (2),
Craig (8), Y.Molina (6), Jay (3). HR-R.Martin
(3). SB-Jay (1), Kozma (1). SF-G.Sanchez.
IP H RERBBSO
Pittsburgh
A.J.BurnettW,2-2 6 5 2 2 3 6
WatsonH,6 1 0 0 0 1 2
MelanconH,9 1 1 0 0 0 1
Grilli S10-10 1 2 1 1 0 1
St. Louis
Westbrook 6 6 0 0 0 6
J.KellyL,0-1 BS,1-1 1/3 3 4 4 1 1
Rosenthal 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
Rzepczynski 1/3 1 1 1 1 0
Salas 2/3 0 0 0 0 1
Boggs 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBP-by A.J.Burnett (Jay), by Rosenthal
(Tabata). WP-Rosenthal, Salas.
Umpires-Home, Mike Winters; First, Mark
Wegner; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Tim Tim-
mons.
T-3:42. A-40,909 (43,975).

Royals 3, Indians 2
Cleveland Kansas City


ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Brantly If 5 0 2 2 Gordon If 4 1 2 0
Kipnis 2b 5 02 0 AEscor ss 3 01 0
ACarerss 4 01 0 Butlerdh 2 0 1 0
Swisherrf 3 0 1 0 Hosmerlb 3 0 0 1
Giambidh 4 0 0 0 L.Cain cf 4 0 0 0
CSantn c 4 0 1 0 Francr rf 3 1 0 0
MrRynllb 4 1 1 0 S.Perezc 4 1 1 2
Chsnhll 3b 4 1 0 0 MTejad 3b 3 0 1 0
Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 1 0 0 0
EJhnsn 2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 37 29 2 Totals 30 3 6 3
Cleveland 000 000 002 2
Kansas City 020 000 10x 3
E-A.Cabrera (3), M.Tejada (1), Hosmer (1).
DP-Cleveland 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-Cleve-
land 9, Kansas City 8. 2B-Brantley (3), A.Es-
cobar (6). 3B-Brantley (1). HR-S.Perez (1).
SB-Gordon (1), A.Escobar (5).
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
KazmirL,0-1 5 5 2 2 2 4
Allen 11/30 0 0 0 2
Hagadone 1/3 1 1 1 0 1
Shaw 0 0 0 0 2 0
R.Hill 0 0 0 0 1 0
J.Smith 1/3 0 0 0 0 0
Albers 1 0 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
E.SantanaW,3-1 7 6 0 0 0 5
K.HerreraH,4 1 1 0 0 1 2
G.Holland S,6-7 1 2 2 0 0 2
Shaw pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
R.Hill pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP-Kazmir, Shaw, K.Herrera.
Umpires-Home, Clint Fagan; First, Bruce
Dreckman; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Paul
Emmel.
T-3:02. A-19,224 (37,903).

Red Sox 8, Astros 4


Houston
ab r h bi
Altuve2b 5 1 1 1
Barnesrf 2 1 1 0
Ankiel ph-rf 1 0 0 0
B.Laird lb 2 0 0 0
FMrtnz ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Carter lf-1b 4 0 0 1
RCeden dh 2 0 0 1
C.Penadh 1 1 0 0
Corprn c 2 00 0
Dmngz3b 4 01 1
MGnzlz ss 4 1 2 0
Grssmn cf 4 00 0
Totals 32 45 4
Houston 200
Boston 040


Boston

Ellsury cf
Nava rf
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli 1lb
Carp If
JGoms ph-lf
Sltlmch c
Mdlrks 3b
Drew ss


ab r h bi


3 0 2 1
3 02 3
4 0 1 0
3 00 0
2 00 0
4 2 1 0
3 22 0
2 2 1 1


Totals 34812 8
000 110 4
10030x 8


E-Grossman (1), Drew (1). DP-Houston 1.
LOB-Houston 10, Boston 11. 2B-Ma.Gonza-
lez (4), Nava (3), D.Ortiz (4), Saltalamacchia
(5), Middlebrooks (4). SB-Ma.Gonzalez (3),
Pedroia (6). SF-R.Cedeno, D.Ortiz.
IP H RERBBSO
Houston
Peacock L,1-3 31/36 5 5 5 3
Blackley 12/32 0 0 0 2
W.Wright 1 0 0 0 2 1
Ambriz 1 4 3 3 1 1
Veras 1 0 0 0 0 1
Boston
Doubront W,3-0 62/34 3 3 4 8
TazawaH,8 1-3 0 0 0 1 1
Bard 0 0 1 1 2 0
A.Wilson 1 1 0 0 0 1
A.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 2
Bard pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Doubront (Barnes). WP-Doubront.
PB-Saltalamacchia. Balk-Tazawa.
Umpires-Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Jordan
Baker; Second, Tim McClelland; Third, Jerry
Meals.
T-3:40. A-34,726 (37,499).

This Date in Base-
ball
April 28
1901 Cleveland pitcher Bock Baker gave
up a record 23 singles as the Chicago White
Sox beat the Indians 13-1.
1930 --The first night game in organized
baseball was played in Independence, Kan. In a
Western Association game, Muskogee defeated
Independence 13-3.
1934 Detroit's Goose Goslin hit into four
double plays, but the Tigers still beat Cleveland
4-1.
1945 -Chicago's Hank Wyse pitched a one-
hitter over Pittsburgh for a 6-0 win. The only Pi-
rate hit was by Bill Salkeld in the eighth inning.
1956 Cincinnati rookie Frank Robinson hit
the first home run of his 586 lifetime homers in
a 9-1 win over Chicago. Robinson homer came
off Paul Minner in Crosley Field.
1961 Warren Spahn, at the age of 40, no-
hit the San Francisco Giants 1-0 at Milwaukee.
1966 Cleveland's Sonny Siebert defeated
the Angels 2-1 as the Indians tie the modern
major league record with its 10th straight win
since opening day.
1971 Hank Aaron connected off Gaylord
Perry for his 600th career home run in the At-
lanta Braves' 10-inning, 6-5 loss to the San
Francisco Giants.
1982-Philadelphia's Pete Rose went 5-for-
5 to tie Max Carey for the NL record with nine
career 5-hit games. The Phillies scored six runs
in the top of the ninth to beat Los Angeles 9-3.
1988 -The winless Baltimore Orioles set an
American League record by losing their 21st
straight, falling to the Minnesota Twins 4-2.
1989 Rickey Henderson of the New York
Yankees set a major league record when he led
off a game with a home run for the 36th time in
his career, breaking a tie with Bobby Bonds.
1989 Toronto's Nelson Liriano broke up a


SCOREBOARD


FOT ithee ,coTd


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
3 23 48 54 55
POWER BALL
5


CASH 3 (early)
7-7-8
CASH 3 (late)
0-5-1

PLAY 4 (early)
S 7-2-8-5
PLAY 4 (late)
M 4-6-5-0

FANTASY 5
18 19 22 25 36

LOTTERY
10-12-17 -28-38-44
XTRA
5


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


FRIDAY, APRIL 22
Mega Money: 8 11 20 41
Mega Ball: 18
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $904.00
3-of-4 MB 44 $405.00
3-of-4 1,107 $48.00
2-of-4 MB 1,509 $24.50
1-of-4 MB 12,834 $2.50
2-of-4 33,018 $3.00


Fantasy 5:9 10 22 26 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 297 $555.00
3-of-5 9,623 $21.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Sportsman Series (Taped)
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Stadium Super Truck Series (Taped)
2 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA O'Reilly Auto Parts SpringNationals
MLB
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Chicago Cubs at Miami Marlins
1 p.m. (TBS) Toronto Blue Jays at New York Yankees
2 p.m. (SUN) (WGN-A) Tampa Bay Rays at Chicago
White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN) Atlanta Braves at Detroit Tigers
COLLEGE BASEBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN) South Carolina at LSU
BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Boston Celtics
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at Milwaukee Bucks
7 p.m. (TNT) San Antonio Spurs at Los Angeles Lakers
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Denver Nuggets at Golden State Warriors
EQUESTRIAN
2:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Polo U.S. Open Championship (Taped)
4 p.m. (NBC) Equestrian Rolex Championships
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATour: Ballantine's Championship,
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
1 p.m. (CBS) Champions Tour: Liberty Mutual Legends of
Golf, Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour: Zurich Classic of New Orleans,
Final Round
3 p.m. (CBS) PGA Tour: Zurich Classic of New Orleans,
Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: North Texas Shootout, Final
Round
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Ottawa Senators at Boston Bruins
COLLEGE LACROSSE
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Women's ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA

RADIO
MLB
1:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game
2:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Chicago
White Sox

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


no-hitter in the ninth inning for the second time
in six days ending Kirk McCaskill's bid with a
pinch-hit double. McCaskill settled for a one-hit-
ter as California won 9-0.
1999 Colorado's Larry Walker hit three
home runs and drove in eight runs to lead the
Rockies to a 9-7 win over the St. Louis Cardi-
nals.
2002 -The Angels defeat the Blue Jays 8-5
as SS David Eckstein hits a grand slam forthe
second day in a row a 14th inning blast off
Pedro Borbon. He also homered in yesterday's
11 -4 win over Toronto. Eckstein hit eight home
runs for the year.
2011 Ben Zobrist set a Tampa Bay record
with eight RBIs, hitting a home run and two dou-
bles as the Rays routed the Minnesota Twins
15-3 in the first game of a day-night double-
header.
Today's birthday: Dillon Gee 27; David Freese
30.


NBA playoffs
AlITimes EDT
(x-if necessary)
FIRST ROUND
(Best-of-7)
Saturday, April 20
New York 85, Boston 78
Denver 97, Golden State 95
Brooklyn 106, Chicago 89
L.A. Clippers 112, Memphia 91
Sunday, April 21
Indiana 107, Atlanta 90
San Antonio 91, L.A. Lakers 79
Miami 110, Milwaukee 87
Oklahoma City 120, Houston 91
Monday, April 22
Chicago 90, Brooklyn 82
L.A. Clippers 93, Memphis 91
Tuesday, April 23
Miami 98, Milwaukee 86
New York 87, Boston 71
Golden State 131, Denver 117
Wednesday, April 24
Oklahoma City 105, Houston 102, Oklahoma
City leads series 2-0
Indiana 113, Atlanta 98
San Antonio 102, L.A. Lakers 91
Thursday, April 25
Miami 104, Milwaukee 91, Miami leads se-
ries 3-0
Chicago 79, Brooklyn 76
Memphis 94, L.A. Clippers 82
Friday, April 26
New York 90, Boston 76, New York leads se-
ries 3-0
San Antonio 120, L.A. Lakers 89, San Anto-
nio leads series 3-0
Golden State 110, Denver 108, Golden State
leads series 2-1
Saturday, April 27
Chicago 142, Brooklyn 134, 30T, Chicago
leads series 3-1


Memphis 104, L.A. Clippers 83, series tied 2-
2
Atlanta 90, Indiana 69, Indiana leads series
2-1
Oklahoma City at Houston, late
Today, April 28
New York at Boston, 1 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 7 p.m.
Denver at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.
Monday, April 29
Chicago at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 30
x-Milwaukee at Miami, 7 or 8 p.m.
x-L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 8 or 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 1
x-Boston at New York, TBA
Atlanta at Indiana, TBA
x-Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 or 9:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 2
x-Miami at Milwaukee, TBA
x-Brooklyn at Chicago, TBA
x-San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, TBA
x-Denver at Golden State, TBA
Friday, May 3
x-New York at Boston, TBA
x-Indiana at Atlanta, TBA
x-Oklahoma City at Houston, TBA
L.A. Clippers at Memphis, TBA
Saturday, May 4
x-Milwaukee at Miami, TBA
x-Chicago at Brooklyn, TBA
x-L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, TBA
x-Golden State at Denver, TBA
Sunday, May 5
x-Boston at New York, TBA
x-Atlanta at Indiana, TBA
x-Houston at Oklahoma City, TBA
x-Memphis at L.A. Clippers, TBA



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-Pittsburgh 48 3612 0 72165 119
x-N.Y.Rangers 48 2618 4 56130 112
x-N.Y. Islanders 48 2417 7 55139 139
Philadelphia 48 2322 3 49133 141
New Jersey 48 1919 10 48112 129
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Montreal 48 29 14 5 63149 126
x-Boston 47 2813 6 62129 105
x-Toronto 48 26 17 5 57145 133
x-Ottawa 47 2417 6 54112 102
Buffalo 48 21 21 6 48125 143
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
y-Washington 48 2718 3 57149 130


Winnipeg 48 2421 3 51128 144
Carolina 48 1925 4 42128 160
Tampa Bay 48 1826 4 40148 150
Florida 48 1527 6 36112 171
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
z-Chicago 48 36 7 5 77155 102
x-St. Louis 48 2917 2 60129 115
x-Detroit 48 2416 8 56124 115
Columbus 48 2417 7 55120 119
Nashville 48 1623 9 41111 139
Northwest Division


GP W L OT
y-Vancouver 47 2614 7
x-Minnesota 48 2619 3
Edmonton 47 1822 7
Calgary 48 1925 4
Colorado 48 1625 7
Pacific Division
GP W L OT
y-Anaheim 47 3011 6
x-Los Angeles 47 2616 5
x-San Jose 47 2515 7
Phoenix 47 2018 9
Dallas 48 2222 4


Pts GF GA
59125 114
55122 127
43118 132
42128 160
39116 152

Pts GF GA
66137 113
57130 116
57122 113
49120 128
48130 142


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Buffalo 2, N.Y. Islanders 1, SO
Colorado 5, Phoenix 4, SO
Edmonton 6, Minnesota 1
Chicago 3, Calgary 1
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 4, New Jersey 0
Detroit 3, Dallas 0
Columbus 3, Nashville 1
Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3
Washington 3, Boston 2, OT
Philadelphia 2, Ottawa 1
Montreal 4, Toronto 1
Minnesota 3, Colorado 1
Pittsburgh 8, Carolina 3
St. Louis 3, Chicago 1
Phoenix at Anaheim, late
Vancouver at Edmonton, late
San Jose at Los Angeles, late
Sunday's Games
Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
END REGULAR SEASON



Sprint Cup
Toyota Owners 400 Results
Saturday
At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond, Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (17) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 406 laps,
111.2 rating, 47 points.
2. (5) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 406, 127.1, 43.
3. (7) Joey Logano, Ford, 406, 97, 41.
4. (6) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 406,
118.9, 41.
5. (16) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 406, 93.1, 40.
6. (28) Carl Edwards, Ford, 406, 96.3, 38.
7. (1) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 406, 132.4, 39.
8. (34) Aric Almirola, Ford, 406, 73.3, 36.
9. (14) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 406, 112.6, 36.
10. (19) D. Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 406, 81.7, 34.
11. (3) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 406, 80.9, 33.
12. (26) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, 406, 99.7, 32.
13. (29) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 406, 72.8, 31.
14. (24) A J Allmendinger, Chevy, 406, 73, 30.
15. (15) Ryan Newman, Chevy, 406, 75.9, 29.
16. (12) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 406, 66, 28.
17. (9) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 406, 94.3, 27.
18. (21)Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 406, 74.5, 26.
19. (32) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 406, 64.7, 25.
20. (20) David Ragan, Ford, 406, 60.1, 24.
21. (4) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 406, 78.5, 23.
22. (22) D. Reutimann, Toyota, 406, 54.2, 22.
23. (18) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 406, 58.6, 21.
24. (8) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 406, 98.9, 21.
25. (31) Landon Cassill, Chevy, 406, 52.7, 19.
26. (13) Jamie McMurray Chevy, 406, 79.3, 18.
27. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 405, 49.1, 17.
28. (27) Josh Wise, Ford, 404, 44.7, 0.
29. (30) Danica Patrick, Chevy, 402, 42.6, 15.
30. (40) Casey Mears, Ford, 402, 42.4, 14.
31. (25) David Stremme, Toyota, 402, 40.5, 13.
32. (39) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 401, 40.6, 12.
33. (23) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 398, 73.3, 11.
34. (42) Timmy Hill, Ford, 397, 29.9, 10.
35. (2) B.Vickers, Toyota, accident, 392, 67.6, 0.
36. (33) Greg Biffle, Ford, 391, 49.7, 8.
37. (36) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 368, 29.9, 7.
38. (10) Mark Martin, Toyota, 349, 86, 6.
39. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, vibration, 245,
32.2, 0.
40. (43) Brian Keselowski, Toyota, brakes, 186,
26.8, 4.
41. (35) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 121,
33.6, 3.
42. (11) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, engine, 109,
63.8, 2.
43. (38) Mike Bliss, Toyota, brakes, 17, 25.5, 0.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 92.141 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 18 minutes, 17 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.343 seconds.
Caution Flags: 11 for 75 laps.
Lead Changes: 10 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: M.Kenseth 1-36; C.Bowyer 37-42;
M.Kenseth 43-111; C.Bowyer 112-218;
M.Kenseth 219-253; Ky.Busch 254-293;
Ku.Busch 294-329; J.Montoya 330-396; K.Har-
vick 397; J.Burton 398-404; K.Harvick405-406.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): M.Kenseth, 3 times for 140 laps;
C.Bowyer, 2 times for 113 laps; J.Montoya, 1
time for 67 laps; Ky.Busch, 1 time for 40 laps;
Ku.Busch, 1 time for 36 laps; J.Burton, 1 time
for 7 laps; K.Harvick, 2 times for 3 laps.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 343; 2. C.Ed-
wards, 300; 3. K.Kahne, 297; 4. D.EarnhardtJr.,
297; 5. C.Bowyer, 290; 6. Bra.Keselowski, 284;
7. Ky.Busch, 278; 8. G.Biffle, 272; 9. K.Harvick,
271; 10. PMenard, 271; 11.A.Almirola, 258; 12.
J.McMurray 245.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a
race.
The formula combines the following categories:
Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Average Run-
ning Position While on Lead Lap, Average
Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most
Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.



BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL- Suspended
Pittsburgh LHP Jonathan Sanchez six games and
fined him an undisclosed amount for hitting St.
Louis 1 B Allen Craig during Friday's game.
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX Sent LHP Leyson
Septimo to Charlotte (I L) for a rehab assignment.
NEWYORKYANKEES -Placed C Francisco
Cervelli and RHP Ivan Nova on the 15-day DL.
Recalled C Austin Romine from Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Vidal
Nuno from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Trans-
ferred SS Derek Jeter from the 15-day to the 60-
day DL.
SEATTiLE MARINERS Sent OF Michael
Saunders to Tacoma (PCL) for a rehab assign-
ment.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated LHP
Aaron Laffey for assignment. Selected the con-
tract of RHPJustin Germano from Buffalo (IL).
National League
CINCINNATI REDS Placed LHP Manny
Parra on the 15-day DL, retroactWve to April24. Re-
instated LHP Sean Marshall from the 15-day DL
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Placed RHP
Stephen Fife on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April
22. Recalled RHP Matt Magill from Albuquerque
(PCL).
NEW YORK METS Optioned LHP Josh
Edgin to Binghamton (EL). Reinstated RHP Shaun
Marcum from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Sent CWilson
Ramos to Harrisburg (EL) for a rehab assignment.


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 B3


Harvick




wins at




Richmond


Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. Kevin Harvick won Sat-
urday night's race at Richmond International
Raceway by plowing through traffic on a two-
lap sprint to the finish.
Juan Pablo Montoya was trying to hold off
Harvick for his first win since 2010 when the
caution came out with four laps remaining. It
sent the race into two laps of overtime, and
most of the field gave up track position to pit
for tires.
Montoya came off pit road in sixth and
Harvick was seventh for the restart. But Har-
vick rocketed through the field to snatch
away the win.
Clint Bowyer was second, Joey Logano
third, and Montoya settled for fourth.
Tony Stewart restarted in fifth, but was
bumped out of the way by Kurt Busch and
wound up 18th.
Rain washes out NHRA qualifying
BAYTOWN, Texas Rain forced NHRA officials
to cancel the majority qualifying Saturday for the
NHRA SpringNationals at Royal Purple Raceway.
One round of Pro Stock Motorcycle qualifying was
completed, and 12 Pro Stock cars made attempts
before the rain became steady in the afternoon.



STATE
Continued from Page BI


a lot of debris. There were a lot of complaints.
They took their time about cleaning it."
Clark was tied for fifth place in the girls
pole vault with a 10-foot vault.
Gabby Charles ended up ninth place overall
but was tied for fourth place with a 13-foot
vault. Byrne said that Charles place came
down to faults.
"Gabby Charles did well," the coach said.
"Manuel did well. Last weekend (at regionals)
was better for most of them.
The Crystal River High boys finished 38th
with 5.66 team points. Because of the ties,
Byrne said the athletes don't get full points in
the final points.
The Crystal River girls were 47th with two
points.
John McAteer was 13th in the boys pole
vault with a 12-foot effort.
Pollard was 14th in the boys 800 with a
2:08.52. Dunnellon's Chris Jackson won the
state title in the same race with a time of
1:55.42
The boys 4x800 finished ninth with a time
of 8:13.2. McAteer, Pollard, John Bester and
Brandon Harris all ran on the team.
The Crystal River boys 4x400 team finished
15th with a time of 3:30.12. Jared Miller, McA-
teer, Bester and Pollard ran on the relay




BOARD
Continued from Page BI


Jones, probably hoping to groom him behind
Ben Roethlisberger.
"I just think it was time to start grooming a
new player, freshen up the room if you will,"
quarterbacks coach Randy Fichtner said.
"I get to learn from one of the best quarter-
backs to play the game," Jones added.
Before Saturday's surge, quarterbacks were
rare only one was chosen in each of the first
three rounds: Florida State's EJ Manuel by
Buffalo in the first round; West Virginia's
Geno Smith by the Jets in the second; and
North Carolina State's Mike Glennon by
Tampa Bay in the third.
In all, 11 QBs were selected, the same num-
ber as last year. But four went in the first
round in 2012.
A former quarterback, Denard Robinson of
Michigan, is headed to Jacksonville, which
had one of the league's worst offenses the last
two years. Robinson will be switched to run-
ning back or receiver by the Jaguars; he set
the NCAA record for career yards rushing
(4,495) by a quarterback
'A lot of people have put me at different po-
sitions," he said. "Now it's time to go to work."
South Carolina running back Marcus Latti-
more, who would have been a high pick if
healthy but is coming off a second severe knee
injury, went to the 49ers 131st overall. San
Francisco can afford to "redshirt" Lattimore
because it has a strong stable of runners, in-
cluding Frank Gore, Kendall Hunter and
LaMichael James.
"We really haven't even talked about that,
so I don't have any clue," Lattimore said about
possibly sitting out 2013 to heal completely
"My main goal right now is to go in there and
work hard, go in there and learn the offense,
and if I'm ready to play, I'm going to play, and
if I'm not, I'm not."
Lattimore, who dislocated his left knee and
tore three ligaments last season, said he spoke
with Gore during his rehab.
"And now I'm with the 49ers, and it's just a


great, great situation for me," Lattimore said.
Special teamers finally got the call when
three kickers went in the fifth round: punters
Jeff Locke of UCLA to Minnesota and Sam
Martin of Appalachian State to Seattle, and
placekicker Caleb Sturgis of Florida to Miami.
National champion Alabama, which had
four players chosen previously three in the
first round had five more go on the final
day: linebacker Nico Johnson to Kansas City
with the pick after Barkley was taken; guard
Barrett Jones, who can play all offensive line
positions, to the Rams; DTs Jesse Williams to
Seattle and Quinton Dial to San Francisco;
and tight end Michael Williams.
Mr. Irrelevant, the 254th and final pick, was
tight end Justice Cunningham of South Car-
olina by Indianapolis.






B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


SPORTS


Creating separation


Creating separation


Glover increases

leadatPGA's

Zurich to 2 strokes

Associated Press

AVONDALE, La. Lucas Glover
increased his lead to two strokes in
the Zurich Classic to remain in po-
sition for his first victory in two
years.
The 2009 U.S. Open winner shot
a 2-under 70 on Saturday to reach
14 under at TPC Louisiana.
Kyle Stanley, Jimmy Walker, Billy
Horschel and D.A. Points were tied
for second. Stanley had a 65,
Walker and Horschel shot 66, and
Points had a 70.
Guan Tianlang, the 14-year-old
Chinese amateur, shot a 77 to drop
to 2 over last among the 71 play-
ers who made the cut. He tied for
58th two weeks ago in the Masters
after becoming the youngest player
to make the cut at Augusta Na-
tional, and will play in a U.S. Open
qualifier in two weeks in Dallas.
Kevin Stadler was 11 under after
a 65 matching Stanley for the
best round of the day Boo Weekley,
a stroke behind Glover entering
the round, salvaged a 73 with a two-
putt birdie on the 18th to finish at
10 under.
North Texas
LPGA Shootout
IRVING, Texas Carlota Ciganda
shot a 5-under 66 to take a two-stroke
lead over the world's No. 1 player and
an LPGA Tour rookie into the final
round of the inaugural North Texas
LPGA Shootout.
Ciganda had only one bogey in the
third round. Even after driving right
into a concrete drainage ditch on No.
12, the Spaniard hit the half-sub-
merged ball out of the water to about
10 feet and made the birdie putt. She
was at 11-under 202 after her second
66 of the week.
Top-ranked Inbee Park finished her
67 with consecutive birdies. Caroline
Masson, the leader after each of the
first two rounds, recovered from an
opening double bogey for a 69.
Na Yeon Choi, the No. 3 player, was
8 under after a bogey-free 66.
Legends of Golf
SAVANNAH, Ga. Roger Chap-


Associated Press
Lucas Glover hits off the 10th fairway during the third round of the PGA
Zurich Classic golf tournament Saturday at TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La.


man and Jay Don Blake teamed to
shoot an 11-under 61 to take a one-
stroke lead in the Champions Tour's
Legends of Golf better-ball tournament.
Chapman and Blake were 17 under.
The teams of Bernhard Langer-Tom
Lehman, Brad Faxon-Jeff Sluman,
Scott Hoch-Jim Gallagher Jr., Craig
Stadler-Kirk Triplett and Brad Faxon-
Jeff Sluman were tied for second.


Ballantine's Championship
SEOUL, South Korea Swede's
Alex Noren took a one-stroke lead in the
Ballantine's Championship, competing a
5-under 67 in the rain-delayed second
round and shooting a 69 in the third.
Noren had a 9-under 207 total on
the Blackstone course. The tourna-
ment is sanctioned by the European
and Asian tours.


Zurich Classic
Saturday
AtTPC Louisiana, Avondale, La.
Purse: $6.6 million
Yardage: 7,425, Par: 72
Third Round
a-amateur
Lucas Glover 65-67-70 202 -14
Kyle Stanley 72-67-65-204 -12
Jimmy Walker 67-71-66-204 -12
Billy Horschel 67-71-66-204 -12
D.A. Points 66-68-70 204 -12
Kevin Stadler 68-72-65-205 -11
Henrik Norlander 71-70-65-206 -1C
Ricky Barnes 64-76-66-206 -1C
Ken Looper 73-66-67-206 -1C
Boo Weekley 65-68-73-206 -1C
Ken Duke 70-69-68-207 -9
Harris English 68-70-69-207 -9
Nick Watney 69-69-69 207 -9
Luke Guthrie 67-71-69 207 -9
Bobby Gates 67-70-70 207 -9
Justin Rose 68-69-70 207 -9
Rod Pampling 71-70-67-208 -8
Jason Dufner 70-71-67-208 -8
D.H. Lee 70-70-68 208 -8
Peter Tomasulo 73-67-68 -208 -8
David Hearn 71-69-68 -208 -
Richard H. Lee 70-69-69 -208 -8
Stephen Ames 67-72-69-208 -8
Chris Kirk 67-72-69 -208 -8
John Peterson 71-67-70 -208 -8
Nicolas Colsaerts 70-68-70-208 -8
Jerry Kelly 70-67-71-208 -8
Ernie Els 67-69-72-208 -8
Morgan Hoffmann 66-69-73 -208 -8
Luke List 71-70-68-209 -7
Retief Goosen 71-70-68 -209 -7
Fabian Gomez 71-70-68 -209 -7
Roberto Castro 71-70-68 209 -7
Andrew Svoboda 70-70-69 209 -7
Brandt Jobe 70-70-69 209 -7
Ryan Palmer 70-70-69 209 -7
Jeff Overton 73-68-69-210 -6
Aaron Watkins 71-69-70 210 -6
Sean O'Hair 70-70-70 -210 -6
Derek Ernst 73-67-70 -210 -6
Bubba Watson 73-65-72-210 -6
Steve LeBrun 70-68-72 -210 -6
Doug LaBelle II 70-67-73-210 -6
Jeff Maggert 70-67-73-210 -6
Brian Davis 68-69-73-210 -6
George McNeill 74-67-70 -211 -5
Hunter Haas 72-69-70 -211 -5
Brendan Steele 70-71-70-211 -5
Steven Bowditch 73-67-71 -211 -5
Stuart Appleby 70-70-71 211 -5
Matt Every 68-72-71 -211 -5
Rickie Fowler 67-73-71-211 -5
Joey Snyder III 72-67-72 -211 -5
Chad Campbell 68-71-72-211 -5
Gary Woodland 68-70-73 -211 -5
Matt Jones 67-71-73-211 -5
Greg Chalmers 70-71-71-212 -4
Trevor Immelman 68-73-71 -212 -4
J.J. Henry 68-72-72-212 -4
Scott Brown 69-71-72 -212 -4
Michael Letzig 72-68-72-212 -4
Jason Kokrak 68-71-73-212 -4
Tommy Gainey 68-71-73 -212 -4
Jason Bohn 68-71-73-212 -4
David Toms 72-68-73-213 -3
Graham DeLaet 68-71-74-213 -3
Chris DiMarco 68-70-75-213 -3
Lee Williams 70-71-73-214 -2
Jonas Blixt 71-69-74-214 -2
Colt Knost 72-68-74 -214 -2
a-Guan Tianlang 72-69-77-218 +2
North Texas
Shootout
Saturday
At Las Colinas Country Club, Irving,
Texas
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,410, Par: 71
Third Round
Carlota Ciganda 66-70-66 202 -11
Inbee Park 67-70-67-204 -9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Caroline Masson 64-71-69-204 -9
Na Yeon Choi 70-69-66 205 -8
Karine Icher 71-69-67-207 -6
Christina Kim 68-72-67-207 -6
Jee Young Lee 72-68-67-207 -6
SoYeon Ryu 71-68-68 -207 -6
I.K. Kim 70-71-67-208 -5
Suzann Pettersen 70-70-68 208 -5
Shanshan Feng 71-67-70 208 -5
Brittany Lincicome 70-68-71 209 -4
YaniTseng 69-69-71-209 -4
Moriya Jutanugarn 71-66-72-209 -4
Dewi Claire Schreefel75-70-65 210 -3
Cristie Kerr 70-73-67-210 -3
LexiThompson 71-71-68-210 -3
Haeji Kang 69-72-69-210 -3
MindyKim 72-69-69-210 -3
Chella Choi 71-69-70-210 -3
Moira Dunn 69-71-70-210 -3
MiJungHur 67-73-70-210 -3
Jennifer Johnson 71-69-70 210 -3
Jessica Korda 69-69-72 210 -3
Kathleen Ekey 70-67-73 -210 -3
Paula Creamer 73-69-69 211 -2
Stacy Lewis 72-70-69-211 -2
Mo Martin 67-74-70-211 -2
Julieta Granada 70-70-71 211 -2
Kristy McPherson 67-73-71 -211 -2
Angela Stanford 69-70-72 -211 -2
Hee Young Park 68-70-73-211 -2
Anna Nordqvist 73-70-69-212 -1
Alison Walshe 74-69-69 -212 -1
Hee Kyung Seo 70-69-73 -212 -1
Eun-HeeJi 72-73-68-213 E
Sandra Gal 75-69-69-213 E
RyannO'Toole 71-73-69-213 E
Christel Boeljon 71-71-71 -213 E
Vicky Hurst 70-72-71-213 E
Lindsey Wright 73-69-71 -213 E
Jodi Ewart Shadoff 72-69-72 -213 E
Lizette Salas 71-70-72 213 E
Giulia Sergas 73-68-72 213 E
Rebecca Lee-Bentham72-68-73 213 E
Becky Morgan 73-67-73 213 E
Azahara Munoz 69-75-70-214 +1
Reilley Rankin 77-67-70 --214 +1
Momoko Ueda 73-70-71 214 +1
Jane Park 72-69-73 -214 +1
Jiyai Shin 70-71-73-214 +1
Liberty Mutual
Legends of Golf
Saturday
At The Club at Savannah Harbor,
Savannah, Ga.
Purse: $2.7 million
Yardage: 7,087, Par: 72
Second Round
Blake/Chapman 66-61-127 -17
Hoch/Gallagher Jr. 67-61 -128 -16
Stadler/Triplett 64-64-128 -16
North/Watson 64-64 -128 -16
Faxon/Sluman 62-66-128 -16
Langer/Lehman 63-65-128 -16
Eger/McNulty 66-63-129 -15
O'Meara/Toledo 66-63-129 -15
Allen/Frost 67-62-129 -15
Calcavecchia/Senior 65-64 -129 -15
Couples/Haas 66-64-130 -14
Jacobsen/Weibring 66-64-130 -14
Pernice Jr./Tway 67-63 -130 -14
Elkington/Mediate 65-65 -130 -14
Mize/Sutton 65-65-130 -14
Glasson/Pate 65-65-130 -14
Funk/Goodes 66-65-131 -13
Bryant/Purtzer 66-65-131 -13
Kite/Morgan 64-67-131 -13
Sauers/Perry 66-66-132 -12
Hatalsky/Pooley 68-64-132 -12
Nelson/Levi 67-66-133 -11
Gilder/B.Wadkins 66-67-133 -11
Forsman/Simpson 70-63-133 -11
Lyle/Woosnam 65-69-134 -10
Cook/Pavin 69-65-134 -10
Hallberg/Rutledge 66-69 -135 -9
Jacobs/Zoeller 69-66-135 -9
Daley/Jones 68-68 -136 -8
Roberts/Wiebe 69-67-136 -8
DoyleNaughan 68-69-137 -7
Bean/Lu 69-68 -137 -7
Brooks/Wood 70-69-139 -5


TB falls to Florida


Panthers nip

Lightning 5-3

Associated Press

TAMPA NHL points
leader Martin St. Louis
had a goal and an assist in
the Tampa Bay Lightning's
5-3 loss to the Florida Pan-
thers in the season finale
for two non-playoff teams
on Saturday night.
The 37-year old St Louis
finished the year with 60
points.
Tampa Bay also got a
goal from Ryan Malone.
Rangers 4, Devils 0
NEW YORK Henrik
Lundqvist made 20 saves in
coasting to his second shutout
of the season, and Rick Nash
scored twice for the playoff-
bound New York Rangers in a
4-0 victory over the New Jer-
sey Devils in the regular-sea-
son finale for both teams.
The Rangers still had to
wait to find out who they will
face in the first round of the
playoffs, but they know it
won't be the top-seeded Pitts-
burgh Penguins.
Red Wings 3,
Stars 0
DALLAS The Detroit
Red Wings are headed to the
playoffs for the 22nd straight
season after Henrik Zetter-
berg had two goals and an
assist in a 3-0 victory over the
Dallas Stars.
Jimmy Howard made 17
saves to post his fifth shutout
of the season as Detroit se-
cured the seventh spot in the
Western Conference.
Jonathan Ericsson also
scored and Pavel Datsyuk
had three assists for the Red
Wings.
Capitals 3,
Bruins 2, OT
WASHINGTON Eric
Fehr scored on a power play
3:23 into overtime, and the
Washington Capitals, with


Associated Press
Florida Panthers defenseman T.J. Brennan battles with Tampa Bay Lightning center
Tom Pyatt for the puck during the second period Saturday in Tampa.


nothing at stake, came back
for a 3-2 victory over the
Boston Bruins, who are trying
to win the Northeast Division.
The Bruins entered the day
tied with the Montreal Canadi-
ens, whose finale against the
Toronto Maple Leafs was still
in progress when Boston's
loss ended.
Flyers 2,
Senators 1
OTTAWA- Jakub Voracek
scored the winner, Steve
Mason made 43 saves and
the Philadelphia Flyers closed
out the season with a 2-1 win
over the Ottawa Senators.
Jason Akeson also scored
for the Flyers, who failed to
advance to the postseason for
just the ninth time in franchise
history.
Blue Jackets 3,
Predators 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio- Jack
Johnson scored the go-ahead
goal with 4:48 left and the
Columbus Blue Jackets
capped a remarkable turn-
around with a 3-1 victory over
the Nashville Predators.
Coming into the night, the
Blue Jackets were tied for


eighth in the West with Min-
nesota, each with 53 points.
The Wild, coming off a 6-1
loss at home to Edmonton on
Friday, were in action at Col-
orado. The Wild would clinch
a playoff spot with a win.
Wild 3, Avalanche 1
DENVER Devin Se-
toguchi broke a second-pe-
riod tie and Niklas Backstrom
stopped 29 shots, helping the
Minnesota Wild secure their
first playoff spot in five years
with a 3-1 win over the Col-
orado Avalanche.
Zach Parise scored and
Pierre-Marc Bouchard added
a late empty-net goal for the
Wild, who earned the No. 8
seed and will face top-seeded
Chicago in the first round of
the postseason.
Canadiens 4,
Maple Leafs 1
TORONTO Lars Eller
had a goal and two assists
and the Montreal Canadiens
sent Toronto a pre-playoff
message, defeating the slug-
gish Maple Leafs 4-1.
The Canadiens did it without
No. 1 goalie Carey Price, who
was given the night off in favor
of Peter Budaj. Rubbing salt


into the wound, Montreal
chased Toronto starter James
Reimer early in the third period.
Penguins 8,
Hurricanes 3
PITTSBURGH James
Neal scored three goals in his
first game back from a con-
cussion and the Pittsburgh
Penguins snapped a two-
game skid with an 8-3 victory
over Jordan Staal and the
Carolina Hurricanes.
Evgeni Malkin had a goal
and two assists for the
Penguins.
Blues 3,
Blackhawks 1
ST. LOUIS Brian Elliott
made 22 saves and Jaden
Schwartz had his first two-
goal game as the St. Louis
Blues earned home-ice ad-
vantage for the first-round of
the playoffs by defeating the
Chicago Blackhawks 3-1.
The Blues won 12 of their
last 15 games to capture
fourth place in the Western
Conference.
Elliott and the Blues were
helped by facing a Chicago
lineup that was devoid of al-
most every regular.


Bulls take down



Nets in 3 OTs


Associated Press

CHICAGO Nate
Robinson scored 34
points, and the Chicago
Bulls wiped out a 14-point
deficit late in regulation
and beat the Brooklyn
Nets 142-134 in triple
overtime Saturday to take
a 3-1 lead in the first-
round playoff series.
The Bulls were trailing
109-95 with less than 4
minutes to go in the
fourth quarter when
Robinson put the Bulls on
his back and carried
them to the wild victory
He scored all but five of
his points after the third
quarter, including the
first 12 in a 14-0 run that
wiped out the deficit.
Then, with 2 seconds left
in the first overtime, he
banked in a go-ahead
jumper over Deron
Williams.
Joe Johnson answered
with one of his own to
send it into a second over-
time, tied at 121. The
Bulls had a chance to win
in the closing seconds of
the next extra session, but
Joakim Noah was
blocked, and the game
went to a third overtime.


Grizzlies 104,
Clippers 83
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Marc
Gasol had 24 points and 13
rebounds, and Memphis beat
Los Angeles to even the first-
round playoff series at 2-all.
Zach Randolph finished
with 24 points and nine re-
bounds as the Grizzlies won
their second straight to en-
sure another stop in Mem-
phis for Game 6.
Chris Paul and Blake Grif-
fin had 19 points apiece for
the Clippers.
Hawks 90,
Pacers 69
ATLANTA-Al Horford
had 26 points and 16 re-
bounds as the Atlanta Hawks
turned things around dramat-
ically in their playoff series
against Indiana, blowing out
the Pacers 90-69 in Game 3.
Playing with much more
urgency than they did in two
double-digit losses at Indi-
anapolis, the Hawks raced to
a 54-30 halftime lead and
narrowed the best-of-seven
series to 2-1. Game 4 is
Monday night in Atlanta,
where the Hawks have won
12 straight over the Pacers
dating to 2006.


Associated Press
Chicago Bulls Taj Gibson and Nate Robinson cele-
brate a basket against the Brooklyn Nets during the
second overtime in Game 4 of their first-round NBA
basketball playoff series Saturday in Chicago. The
Bulls won 142-134 in three overtimes.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto


Atlanta
Washington
New York
Philadelphia
Miami


East Division
GB WC
8 --
5 2 -
) 2Y2 -
8 6 31/2
) 8Y2 6


East Division
GB WC
2 -1
2 2Y2 Y2
5 4Y2 2Y2
) 5 3
8 1012 812


NL

Nationals 6, Reds 3
Cincinnati Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo cf 3 1 1 1 Span cf 5 0 2 1
Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 Espinos 2b 4 1 0 0
Vottolb 4 1 1 0 Harper If 3 2 2 2
Phillips 2b 4 0 3 1 Werth rf 3 1 2 0
Brucerf 411 0 LaRochlb 4 0 0 0
Heisey If 1 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 1 1 1
Paul If 2 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 0
Hannhn3b 3 0 1 0 KSuzukc 4 0 1 0
Hoover p 0 00 0 Haren p 3 0 1 1
Marshall p 0 00 0 Duke p 0 0 0 0
Clztursph 1 0 0 0 Clipprdp 0 0 0 0
Mesorc c 4 00 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Leake p 1 00 0 Lmrdzz ph 1 0 0 0
Simon p 1 00 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0
Frazier ph-3b2 0 1 1
Totals 34 39 3 Totals 33610 5
Cincinnati 000 101 100 3
Washington 022 200 00x 6
E-Hannahan (1), Espinosa (1). DP-Washing-
ton 3. LOB-Cincinnati 6, Washington 8. 2B-
Votto (2). HR-Choo (4), Harper (9).


CS-Harper (2).

Cincinnati
Leake L,1-1
Simon
Hoover
Marshall
Washington
HarenW,2-3
Duke
Clippard H,4
Storen H,4
R.Soriano S,7-8


IP H RERBBSO


2 2 0 5
1 0 1 1
0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2


Phillies 9, Mets 4
Philadelphia NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Rollins ss 4 2 2 0 Baxter rf 3 0 1 0
Utley2b 5 1 1 1 Ricep 0 0 0 0
MYong 3b 4 23 0 RTejadss 3 1 1 0
Howard 1b 4 1 1 2 DnMrp2b 4 0 0 0
Brown If 5 1 2 3 DWrght3b 4 1 2 1
Mayrry cf 4 1 1 1 Duda If 3 0 1 0
L.Nixrf 4 0 1 1 Hwknsp 0 0 0 0
Quinter c 4 0 0 0 Lagars cf 1 0 0 0
Pettionp 2 1 1 0 Buck c 3 1 1 1
Frndsnph 1 0 0 0 I.Davislb 3 1 1 1
Valdes p 0 0 0 0 VIdspn cf-lf-rf 4 0 1 1
Galvis ph 1 00 0 Marcm p 1 0 0 0
Durbin p 0 0 0 0 Turner ph 1 0 0 0
Horst p 0 000 0 Carsonp 0 00 0
Cowgill cf-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 38 9128 Totals 324 8 4
Philadelphia 003 050 100 9
NewYork 010 110 001 4
E-Baxter (1). DP-Philadelphia 2. LOB-
Philadelphia 7, New York 5. 2B-Rollins (9),
Utley (4), R.Tejada (5), D.Wright (4), I.Davis (1),
Valdespin (2). HR-Brown (3), Mayberry (2),
Buck (8). CS-Mayberry (2). SF-Howard,
I.Davis.
IP H RERBBSO


Philadelphia
Pettibone W,1-0
Valdes
Durbin
Horst
New York
Marcum L,0-1
Carson
Hawkins
Rice


3 3 2 4
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 1
1 1 0 0

3 3 2 3

1 0 0 1
0 0 1 2


HBP-by Pettibone (Baxter). WP-Marcum.
Cubs 3, Marlins 2


Chicago Miami
ab r h bi
DeJess cf 4 1 2 1 DSolan 2b
SCastross 4 0 1 0 Polanc 3b
Rizzo lb 2 0 0 0 Stanton rf
ASorin If 4 0 0 0 Kearns If
Schrhlt rf 3 1 1 0 Ruggin cf
Castillo c 4 1 2 0 Mahny lb
Valuen3b 4 02 1 Olivoc
Barney 2b 4 00 0 Valaika ss
TrWood p 2 00 0 Sanaiap
Borbon ph 0 00 0 MDunn p
Loe p 0 00 0 Webb p
Russell p 0 0 0 0 Pierre ph
Marmlp 0 0 0 0 Qualls p
Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0
Gregg p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 38 2 Totals
Chicago 110 000 100
Miami 110 000 000


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 0 10

4 00 0
3 00 0
4 0 1 0

3 0000
1 0 0 0
0 00 0
0 00 0
1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0


31 2 5 2
3
2


E-Stanton (5). DP-Chicago 1, Miami 2. LOB-
Chicago 6, Miami 5. 2B-DeJesus (8), Schier-
holtz (9), Valbuena (3). HR-Stanton (1), Olivo
(2). CS-Schierholtz (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Tr.WoodW,2-1 6 3 2 2 1 5
LoeH,1 1 1 0 0 1 0
Russell H,5 2/3 1 0 0 0 0
MarmolH,2 1/3 0 0 0 1 0
GreggS,3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1
Miami
Sanabia L,2-3 62/36 3 3 2 4
M.Dunn 2/3 1 0 0 1 0
Webb 2/3 0 0 0 1 0
Quails 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Marmol, Sanabia.
Interleague

Tigers 7, Braves 4
Atlanta Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Smmnsss 4 1 1 0 AJcksncf 2 1 2 0
Uggla2b 3 0 0 1 TrHntrrf 4 01 0
J.Upton If 4 1 1 2 MiCarr3b 5 0 2 2
FFrmn b 4 0 2 1 Fielder dh 5 0 1 0
CJhnsn3b 4 00 0 VMrtnzlb 4 1 1 0
Gattis c 4 0 0 0 JhPerltss 4 1 1 2
BUptoncf 4 01 0 Tuiasspl If 3 01 0
JFrncsdh 3 1 1 0 D.Kellylf 1 1 1 0
JSchafr rf 3 1 1 0 Avila c 3 1 0 0


Infante 2b
Totals 33 47 4 Totals
Atlanta 003 000 010
Detroit 021 200 02x


4 23 3
35713 7
4
7


LOB-Atlanta 4, Detroit 9.2B-D.Kelly (1), In-
fante (2). HR-J.Upton (12), Jh.Peralta (2), In-
fante (1). SB-Infante (1). CS-B.Upton (2).
S-A.Jackson.
IP H RERBBSO


Atlanta
Medlen L,1-3
Walden
Avilan
Gearrin
Detroit
Porcello W,1-2
Smyly H,3
BenoitH,4
Valverde S,2-2


51/310 5
12/30 0
1/3 2 2
2/3 1 0

61/35 3
2/3 0 0
1 2 1
1 0 0


HBP-by Medlen (Tor.Hunter).


Str Home
W-4 10-5
W-3 7-5
W-3 8-4
W-1 8-4
L-3 5-8



Str Home
L-3 6-2
W-3 9-6
L-3 7-7
W-2 6-8
L-3 2-10


Kansas City
Detroit
Minnesota
Chicago
Cleveland


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L
8 .600 6
10 .545 1 1Y2 5
10 .500 2 2Y2 6
13 .435 3Y2 4 5
12 .400 4 4Y2 3


Str Home
W-2 5-2
W-2 7-3
W-1 6-6
L-1 7-6
L-2 2-6


W
Texas 16
Oakland 13
Los Angeles 9
Seattle 9
Houston 7


West Division
L Pct GB WC
8 .667 -
12 .520 3Y2 2
13 .409 6 4Y2
16 .360 7Y2 6
17 .292 9 7Y2


NATIONAL LEAGUE


St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Chicago


Central Division
L Pct GB WC L10
9 .609 6-4
10 .583 Y2 7-3
10 .524 2 1 8-2
12 .520 2 1 5-5
14 .391 5 4 5-5


Str Home
L-1 5-3
W-1 8-4
L-2 7-5
L-3 12-4
W-3 3-5


Colorado
Arizona
San Fran.
Los Angeles
San Diego


L Pct
8 .652
10 .565
10 .565
11 .500
15 .318


West Division


GB WC

2 -
2 -
3Y2 1Y2
7Y2 5Y2


Str Home
W-1 9-3
L-1 6-5
L-3 8-4
W-2 5-5
W-2 3-7


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves relief pitcher Jordan Walden throws during the sixth inning Saturday against the Detroit Tigers
in Detroit. The Tigers pulled out a 7-4 victory over visiting Atlanta.



Tigers overpower Braves


Associated Press

DETROIT Omar Infante and
Jhonny Peralta both hit two-run
homers, and Rick Porcello
bounced back from a nightmarish
start last weekend to pitch into the
seventh inning, helping the De-
troit Tigers to a 7-4 win Saturday
over the Atlanta Braves.
Infante's homer off Kris Medlen
(1-3) broke a 3-all tie in the fourth.
Porcello (1-2) allowed three runs
in 6 1/3 innings. He didn't make it
through the first last Saturday at
Los Angeles, when he gave up
nine runs to the Angels.
Atlanta's Justin Upton hit his
major league-leading 12th homer
in the eighth, but Infante doubled
home a run in the bottom half and
scored to make it 7-4.
Jose Valverde pitched a perfect
ninth for his second save since re-
turning to the Tigers earlier in the
week.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 5, Blue Jays 4
NEW YORK Travis Hafner hit a
three-run homer, then lumbered
around the bases for a go-ahead triple
in the seventh inning that sent CC
Sabathia and the New York Yankees
over the Toronto Blue Jays 5-4.
Vernon Wells delivered another key
hit against his former team as the Yan-
kees beat Toronto for the third straight
day. With Mariano Rivera getting a
day off to rest, Joba Chamberlain
worked around a pair of one-out sin-
gles in the ninth for his first save since
2010.
Jose Bautista and Brett Lawrie
homered for the Blue Jays, who
dropped to 1-5 on their seven-game
road trip.
Hafner wiped out a 3-0 deficit with
his sixth home run, a long drive to
center field in the fourth off J.A. Happ.
Afew innings later, the slugging desig-
nated hitter broke a 4-all tie.

Orioles 7, Athletics 3
OAKLAND, Calif. Nick Markakis
and Adam Jones hit back-to-back
home runs in the fourth inning, Chris
Tillman pitched six innings for his first
win of the season and the Baltimore
Orioles beat the Oakland Athletics 7-3.
Nate McLouth also homered for Bal-
timore, which is 3-0 on its 11-game
road trip and in position for its first four-
game sweep in Oakland since 1987.
Tillman scattered seven hits with
seven strikeouts and two walks. He
also had to bat in the seventh inning
after an injury to catcher Taylor Tea-
garden forced the Orioles to abandon
their DH.
Josh Donaldson matched his career
high with four hits and two RBIs. The
A's have lost four straight and eight of
nine.

Twins 7, Rangers 2
MINNEAPOLIS Pedro Hernan-
dez pitched five shutout innings for his
first major league win, Josh Willing-
ham homered and the Minnesota
Twins beat the Texas Rangers 7-2 to
end a three-game slide.
Anthony Swarzak, Brian Duensing
and Jared Burton each work a score-
less inning before Glen Perkins strug-
gled in the ninth, giving up a two-run
double to Mitch Moreland.
Derek Holland (1-2) pitched seven
innings of five-hit ball for Texas, which
lost for just the second time in nine
games.
With so many weather postpone-
ments reducing the need for a fifth
starter, Hernandez (1-0) was making
his first start since April 7, although he


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Detroit 7, Atlanta 4
Baltimore 7, Oakland 3
N.Y.Yankees 5, Toronto 4
Minnesota 7, Texas 2
Kansas City 3, Cleveland 2
Boston 8, Houston 4
Tampa Bay 10, Chicago White Sox 4
L.A. Angels at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
Today's Games
Toronto (Dickey 2-3) at N.Y.Yankees (PHughes 0-2),
1:05 p.m.
Houston (B.Norris 3-2) at Boston (Lackey 0-1), 1:35
p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 4-1) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-
0), 2:10 p.m., 1st game
Tampa Bay (Price 0-2) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod
0-1), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 2-1) at Minnesota (Correia 2-1), 2:10
p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 2-1) at Oakland (Colon 3-
0), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 0-2) at Seattle (Iwakuma 2-1),
4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 3-1) at Detroit (Fister 3-0), 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 1 -0) at Kansas City (W.Smith 0-0),
8:10 p.m., 2nd game
Monday's Games
Houston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Detroit 7, Atlanta 4
Washington 6, Cincinnati 3
Philadelphia 9, N.Y. Mets 4
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3
Chicago Cubs 3, Miami 2
Colorado at Arizona, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 1-0) at Miami (Nolasco 1-
2), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 0-3) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 2-1),
1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cingrani 1-0) at Washington (Detwiler 1-
1), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 2-1) at St. Louis (S.Miller 3-1), 2:15
p.m.
Colorado (Garland 2-1) at Arizona (Corbin 2-0), 4:10
p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 2-
2), 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 1-1) at San Diego (Mar-
quis 1-2), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 3-1) at Detroit (Fister 3-0), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


had two relief outings. In five innings,
he allowed just five hits and struck out
three.

Royals 3, Indians 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Ervin San-
tana pitched seven scoreless innings,
Salvador Perez hit a two-run homer
and the Kansas City Royals held on to
beat the Cleveland Indians 3-2.
Santana (3-1), who was acquired in
an Oct. 31 trade with Anaheim for
minor-league pitcher Brandon Sisk, al-
lowed six singles, struck out five and
walked none.
Greg Holland, who logged his sixth
save in seven opportunities, gave up
two unearned runs in the ninth on a
Michael Brantley two-out triple, which
scored Mark Reynolds, who had an
infield single, and Lonnie Chisenhall,
who reached on Eric Hosmer's error.
Holland struck out Jason Kipnis to end
the game.

Red Sox 8, Astros 4
BOSTON David Ortiz had two
hits and three RBIs to extend his torrid
start after a long layoff, and Felix
Doubront overcame a wild first inning
to pitch into the seventh as the Boston
Red Sox beat the struggling Houston
Astros 8-4.
It was 14th win in 19 games for the
surging Red Sox (17-7). Boston can tie
a club record for the most wins in April
by completing a four-game sweep
over Houston (7-17) on Sunday.


Boston matched its best start since
2002 with its fourth straight win.
Ortiz is hitting .519 (14 of 27) with
two homers and nine RBIs since get-
ting back into the lineup last Saturday.
He missed the 71 of the final 72
games last season and all of spring
training with a heel injury.
The Red Sox went 18-8 in April
1998 and 2003.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cubs 3, Marlins 2
MIAMI David DeJesus hit a
tiebreaking single in the seventh inning
to help lift the Chicago Cubs to a 3-2
win over the struggling Miami Marlins.
Travis Wood (2-1) pitched six innings
allowing two runs and struck out five for
Chicago, which has won four of five.
Three relievers held the lead to get
to Kevin Gregg, who pitched a perfect
ninth for his third save.
Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton
hit his first home run of the season, an
estimated 472-foot drive over the left-
field scoreboard. Miguel Olivo also
homered for Miami, which dropped to
5-19, the worst record in baseball.

Nationals 6, Reds 3
WASHINGTON Bryce Harper
homered and singled, Dan Haren had
his best start of the young season and
the Washington Nationals beat the
Cincinnati Reds 6-3.
Denard Span and Jayson Werth
each had two hits for Washington,
which has won the first three games of
the four-game set.
Haren (2-3) didn't quite match Jor-
dan Zimmermann's one-hitter and Gio
Gonzalez's impressive eight innings of
one-hit ball the previous two games,
but he was sharp enough. Haren al-
lowed two runs and six hits over six in-
nings, lowering his ERA from 7.36 to
6.29.
Rafael Soriano pitched a scoreless
ninth for his seventh save.
Brandon Phillips had three singles
and Shin-Soo Choo homered for
Cincinnati, which has lost four of five.

Phillies 9, Mets 4
NEW YORK-- Domonic Brown and
John Mayberry Jr. hit consecutive
home runs to break open a close game
and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the
New York Mets 9-4, sending Jonathan
Pettibone to his first major league win.
Ryan Howard knocked in two runs,
Jimmy Rollins scored twice and
Michael Young had three hits two
that never left the infield for the
second straight day. Pettibone (1-0)
pitched his way out of an important
jam to help Philadelphia improve to
4-1 against the Mets after losing the
season series last year.
Shaun Marcum (0-1) went four in-
nings in his Mets debut after begin-
ning the season on the disabled list
with a neck injury and right biceps ten-
dinitis. John Buck hit his eighth homer
in the ninth, way too late to prevent
New York from dropping to 3-5 on a
nine-game homestand with its third
straight defeat.

Pirates 5, Cardinals 3
ST. LOUIS Russell Martin hit a
two-run home run to highlight a four-
run seventh inning and the Pittsburgh
Pirates rallied to beat the St. Louis
Cardinals 5-3.
The comeback gave A.J. Burnett (2-
2) his second victory over St. Louis in
10 days. He gave up two runs and five
hits in six innings. His six strikeouts
expanded his team record for month
of April to a league-leading 48. Burnett
threw seven shutout innings in a 5-0
win over St. Louis on April 17.


AL

Rays 10,
White Sox 4
Tampa Bay Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Jnnngs cf 6 1 1 De Aza If 4 0 1 0
Joyce rf 5 2 1 0 Greene 2b 4 1 1 0
Zobrist ss 5 2 2 2 Rios rf 5 0 1 0
Longori3b 6 2 4 1 A.Dunndh 4 2 1 1
Loneylb 5 1 3 2 Konerklb 5 1 1 0
Duncan dh 6 0 1 0 AIRmrz ss 4 0 2 1
KJhnsn2b 5 1 4 2 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 2 1
JMolin c 1 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 0 0 0
Loaton pr-c 3 1 1 1 JrDnks cf 2 0 0 1
Fuld If 4 0 2 0
Totals 4610199 Totals 364 9 4
Tampa Bay 201 011 212 10
Chicago 000 100 030 4
E-J.Molina (1), AI.Ramirez (3). LOB-Tampa
Bay 14, Chicago 10. 2B-Zobrist (6), Longoria
(3). 3B-K.Johnson (1). HR-Jennings (3), Zo-
brist (2), A.Dunn (5). SB-K.Johnson (4), Fuld
(1), De Aza (3).
IP H RERBBSO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore W,5-0 6 3 1 1 1 9
McGee 1 2 0 0 1 3
Farnsworth 1/3 3 3 3 2 0
Jo.Peralta H,4 2/3 0 0 0 1 2
C.Ramos 1 1 0 0 0 0
Chicago
FloydL,0-4 22/32 2 2 2 1
H.Santiago 32/310 4 4 0 4
Veal 12/34 2 1 1 0
Lindstrom 1 3 2 2 1 2
HBP-by H.Santiago (J.Molina). WP-Veal.
Balk-Farnsworth.
Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Tom
Hallion; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Lance Barrett.
T-3:39. A-25,270 (40,615).

Yankees 5,
Blue Jays 4


Toronto
ab
RDavis cf 5
MeCarr If 5
Bautist rf 4
Encrnc lb 4
Arencii c 4
Lawrie 3b 4
DeRosadh 3
Rasms ph 1
MIzturs ss 4


NewYork
r h bi
0 1 1 Gardnrcf
01 0 J.Nix3b
1 1 1 Cano 2b
1 1 0 V.Wells If
0 0 0 Youkils lb
1 1 1 Hafnerdh
0 1 0 ISuzuki rf
00 0 Nunez ss
1 3 0 CStwrtc


ab r h bi
5010
5 0 1 0
4 0 1 0





4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0


Kawskpr 0 000
Bonifac 2b 4 0 2 0
Totals 38 4113 Totals 35511 5
Toronto 001 201 000 4
NewYork 000 300 20x 5
E-C.Stewart (1). LOB-Toronto 7, New York 8.
2B-Bonifacio (7), Cano (8). 3B-Hafner (1).
HR-Bautista (7), Lawrie (2), Hafner (6). SB-
V.Wells (2).
IP H RERBBSO


Toronto
Happ 6 8 3 3 2
E.Rogers L,1-2 2/3 2 2 2 0
Cecil 11/31 0 0 0
New York
SabathiaW,4-2 8 9 4 3 0
Chamberlain S,1-1 1 2 0 0 0
PB-C.Stewart.

Orioles 7, A's 3


Baltimore


Oakland


5
0
1

4
1


ab rh bi ab rh bi
McLothl If 5 13 2 Crispcf 4 00 0
Machd 3b 4 22 0 Jasoc 5 03 0
Markksrf 4 1 2 2 S.Smithdh 5 1 1 0
A.Jonescf 4 11 1 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0
C.Davislb 2 1 0 1 Mosslb 3 21 0
Wieters dh-c4 00 0 Dnldsn 3b 4 0 4 2
Hardy ss 4 0 1 1 Reddckrf 2 0 0 1
Flahrty 2b 4 1 1 0 CYoung If 4 0 1 0
Tegrdn c 2 00 0 Sogard 2b 2 00 0
Tillman p 1 0 0 0 Rosales ph-2b1 0 0 0
Matusz p 0 00 0
O'Day p 0 000
Reimld ph 1 0 0 0
Strop p 0 000
JiJhnsn p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 7107 Totals 34310 3
Baltimore 000 400 021 7
Oakland 011 000 010 3
DP-Baltimore 1, Oakland 1. LOB-Baltimore 4,
Oakland 10. 2B-Machado (8), Flaherty (2),
Donaldson 2 (9), C.Young (5). HR-McLouth (1),
Markakis (3), A.Jones (4). CS-Donaldson (1).
SF-C.Davis, Reddick.
IP H RERBBSO
Baltimore
TillmanW,1-1 6 7 2 2 2 7
Matusz H,4 11/31 1 1 1 1
O'Day 2/31 0 0 0 1
Strop 0 0 0 0 1 0
Ji.JohnsonS,10-10 1 1 0 0 0 0
Oakland
GriffinL,2-2 7 5 4 4 2 7
Blevins 1 3 2 2 0 0
Resop 1 2 1 1 0 0
Strop pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
HBP-by Strop (Rosales). WP-Tillman, Strop,
Resop.

Twins 7, Rangers 2


Texas Minnesota
ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 4 0 2 0 Dozier 2b
Gentry cf 3 0 1 0 Mauerlb
LMartn ph-cfl 0 0 0 Wlngh If
Beltre dh 4 0 0 0 Doumit c
N.Cruz rf 3 1 1 0 WRmrz rf
Przyns c 3 1 1 0 Arciadh
JeBakr3b 3 0 1 0 Hicks cf
DvMrp If 4 00 EEscor3b
Morlndlb 4 0 1 2 Flormnss
LGarci ss 4 0 1 0
Totals 33 28 2 Totals
Texas 000 000 002


ab r h bi
3 1 1 1
4 00 0
4222
4 0 1 0
4 1 1 1
3 2 1 0
4 1 1 2

3 0 0 1

337 9 7
2


Minnesota 001 002 13x 7
E-Moreland (2). LOB-Texas 7, Minnesota 4.
2B-Kinsler 2 (5), Moreland (6), Doumit (7),
Hicks (1). HR-Willingham (4). SB-Kinsler (3),
Willingham (1). CS-Gentry (1). SF-Dozier.
IP H RERBBSO


Texas
D.Holland L,1-2
Kirkman
Minnesota
PHernandezW,1-0
Swarzak H,2
Duensing H,4
Burton
Perkins
WP-D.Holland 2.


7 5 4 3 1


5 5 0 0 1
14330


11/31 0 0 0
2/3 0 0 0 0
1 1 0 0 0
1 1 2 2 2


Tampa Bay
Rays schedule
April 28 at Chicago Sox
April 30 at Kansas City
May 1 at Kansas City
May 2 at Kansas City
May 3 at Colorado
May 4 at Colorado
May 5 at Colorado
May 6 vs Toronto
May 7 vs Toronto
May 8 vs Toronto
May 9 vs Toronto
May 10 vs San Diego
May 11 vs San Diego
May 12 vs San Diego
May 14 vs Boston
May 15 vs Boston
May 16 vs Boston
May 17 at Baltimore
May 18 at Baltimore
May 19 at Baltimore
May 20 at Toronto
May 21 at Toronto
May 22 at Toronto
May 24 vs N.Y.Yankees
May 25 vs N.Y.Yankees


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 B5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Getting defensive


Associated Press
Tampa Bay quarterback Josh Freeman threw for 27 touchdowns and became the first Buccaneer to throw for
4,000 yards but the team was often done in by a pass defense that ranked as the worst in the NFL.


Bucs use draft to bolster NFL's worst defense; also trade Blount


Associated Press


TAMPA Darrelle Revis will
have plenty of help in trying to
transform the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers into a playoff team.
Intent on overhauling the NFEs
worst pass defense, general manager
Mark Dominik and coach Greg Schi-
ano used five of their first six picks in
the draft to patch a leaky secondary,
bolster a defensive line weakened by
free agency and heighten expecta-
tions for the upcoming season.
Schiano noted Saturday that it's
only April, so it's difficult to gauge
how much better the Bucs are than
they were at the end of last season.
The second-year coach is confi-
dent, though, that the building
process is headed in the right
direction.
"We're building it our way, we're
building it with our kind of people.
I'm excited," Schiano said. "I be-
lieve we made ourselves better. I
know we made ourselves better."
An aggressive plan to remake the
defense was launched with the
signing of All-Pro safety Dashon
Goldson in free agency The effort
really took off with the pre-draft
trade that landed Revis, a three-
time All-Pro cornerback looking for
a big payday, from the New York
Jets in exchange for Tampa Bay's
first-round pick, No. 13 overall.
The Bucs selected Mississippi
State cornerback Johnthan Banks in
the second round, then turned their


attention to the defensive line with
a pair of fourth-round picks spent
on Illinois tackle Akeem Spence
and Michigan State end William
Gholston, cousin of former Jets first-
round pick Vernon Gholston.
The linemen were Tampa Bay's
first two picks Saturday Buffalo
pass rusher Steven Means was
added in the fifth round, and Miami
running back Mike James -joining
third-round quarterback Mike
Glennon as the only offensive play-
ers selected by the Bucs was the
team's final pick in Round Six, No.
189 overall.
Meanwhile, the Bucs traded re-
serve running back LeGarrette
Blount to the New England Patriots
for a seventh-round pick and the
rights to Olympic sprinter Jeff
Demps, who was undrafted last
year after telling teams he wanted
to focus on his track career.
Dominik used the pick received
the Patriots to move up seven spots in
the sixth round to select James, who
rushed for 1,386 yards and 17 touch-
downs during his college career
The GM said Demps, who signed
with New England as a free agent
last summer, was not the motivation
for the deal.
The former Florida running back
was a silver medalist as part of the
4x100 relay team that finished sec-
ond to Jamaica at the 2012 London
Games. He has not played in a reg-
ular season NFL game, and the Pa-
triots were unable to get a


commitment from him to give up
track and devote himself full-time
to football.
"We're just taking the rights to
see what happens," Dominik said.
Blount, who entering the final year
of his contract, was a 1,000-yard as a
rookie with the Bucs after going un-
drafted in 2010. He led Tampa Bay in
rushing again with 781 yards the fol-
lowing year, but lost his starting job
after Doug Martin joined the team as
a first-round draft pick in 2012.
"We felt like as an organization,
this is in the best interest of the
team," Dominik said of moving
Blount, who didn't figure to play
much with Martin coming off a Pro
Bowl rookie season.
The Bucs moved up 12 spots Sat-
urday to make Spence the 100th
overall selection. In addition to
swapping positions with Oakland in
the fourth round, Tampa Bay sent
one of its two sixth-round picks to
the Raiders in exchange for the op-
portunity to grab the 6-foot-1, 307-
pound tackle.
Adding Spence addressed a need
created by the loss of Roy Miller to
free agency Gholston will compete
for an opportunity to fill to con-
tribute at a position weakened by the
departure of Michael Bennett, who
led the team in sacks last season.
"I heard Coach Schiano's voice
on the phone and I about had a
heart attack," an elated Spence said
by telephone from his family's
home in Fort Walton Beach.


Pace is not



just for sports


Having run a multi-
tude of marathons
and road races, I
make the repeated mis-
take of going out at the
start too fast
and reap the
benefit of sig- -
nificant suffer-
ing at the end of
the 26.2 miles. I
usually try to
find the person ("
with the sign
who is the pace- L I
setter for the
time I think I Dr. Ron
am capable of DOCT
running. Some- ORD
how I seem to
always get an
adrenaline rush and go
past the pace-setter.
A few years ago, while
running the Chicago
Marathon, the streets of my
hometown were lined with
rows of people yelling
"Ron, Ron, Ron." In my ex-
haustion I could not figure
out how they all knew my
name. Later, my wife
pointed out to me they were
yelling "run, run, run."
Recently watching the
events at the Boston
Marathon, two thoughts
came to mind at once.
One, were the runners
who were caught in the
devastation of the terrorist
bomber on pace or did they
start out too fast and fall
back to this time and place?
Secondly, as a doctor
who started out his career
as a trauma surgeon put-
ting on amputated limbs, I
have never seen such wan-
ton (i.e. deliberate and un-
provoked) devastation.
It is strange how on that
day, the runners' pace was
life-saving or life-devastat-
ing. Pace is the consistent
and continuous rate of
speed walking or running
or as applied to life, the con-
tinuous and consistent rate
at which something hap-
pens, develops or changes.
The concept of pace is
often lost on athletes in not
just running sports but
other eye-hand coordina-
tion and balance endeav-
ors. Pace is a difficult
concept to teach kids in
athletics as well as life. Es-
pecially in this age of mul-
timedia and instant
communication, kids that
partake in sports want it
all now, want to be perfect
right away and expect
their effort to be rapidly
rewarded. Learning pace
allows kids to make the


a
rn
M1


consistent and continuous
effort to gain or achieve
their athletic, academic or
personal social goals.
Being a champion or
good at what
you do requires
pace. Pace is
persisting, en-
during the
stresses and
dealing with the
sacrifices asso-
1' ciated with
work and effort
over a long pe-
Joseph riod of time to
OR'S achieve goals.
ERS Watching my
wife's ability as a
track coach -
being challenged by ele-
mentary school kids and
teenagers as they start out a
400-meter or mile-long run
at a 50-meter dash pace -
is a study in patience and
re-direction. It never fails
after starting much too fast
that they dwindle to a walk
or crawl. She teaches these
kids and adults who start
too fast and who do not rap-
idly meet with success the
concept of pace.
There is a lesson to be
learned about pace be-
cause there is a great sim-
ilarity of the need for pace
in sports as in life.
For those who were in-
jured in the Boston
Marathon massacre, the
recovery, retraining on ar-
tificial limbs and regaining
a semblance of their health
and lives is going to be an
ultimate personal attempt
at learning pace. They will
need to be consistent, con-
tinuous and maintain a
pace to endure and return
to society and their lives.
We do not live in coun-
tries such as Israel, Ire-
land, near the subways of
England or Spain or the
resorts of Bali or the U.S.
Marine barracks in
Lebanon where bombs
have wreaked havoc on in-
nocent populations. We
live in the United States,
where we have the un-
sanctioned ability to pray
for our friends and neigh-
bors who have been in-
jured, maimed and killed
by these terrorists.
Run, walk, kayak or
swim that extra bit for
those who can't because of
this mindlessness.
Ron Joseph, M.D. a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine Or-
thopedic Institute, may be
reached at rbjhand@
cox.net.


2013 NFL Draft SELECTIONS


At New York
(x-compensatory selection)
First Round
1. Kansas City, Eric Fisher, ot, Central Michigan.
2. Jacksonville, Luke Joeckel, ot, Texas A&M.
3. Miami (from Oakland), Dion Jordan, de, Oregon.
4. Philadelphia, Lane Johnson, ot, Oklahoma.
5. Detroit, Ziggy Ansah, de, BYU.
6. Cleveland, Barkevious Mingo, de, LSU.
7. Arizona, Jonathan Cooper, g, North Carolina.
8. St. Louis (from Buffalo), Tavon Austin, wr, WestVir-
ginia.
9. New York Jets, Dee Milliner, db, Alabama.
10.Tennessee, Chance Warmack, g, Alabama.
11. San Diego, D.J. Fluker, ot, Alabama.
12. Oakland (from Miami), D.J. Hayden, db, Houston.
13. New York Jets (from Tampa Bay), Sheldon
Richardson, dt, Missouri.
14. Carolina, Star Lotulelei, dt, Utah.
15. New Orleans, Kenny Vaccaro, db, Texas.
16. Buffalo (from St. Louis), EJ Manuel, qb, Florida
State.
17. Pittsburgh, Jarvis Jones, Ib, Georgia.
18. San Francisco (from Dallas), Eric Reid, db, LSU.
19. NewYork Giants, Justin Pugh, ot, Syracuse.
20. Chicago, Tyler Long, g, Oregon.
21. Cincinnati, Tyler Eifert, te, Notre Dame.
22. Atlanta (from Washington through St. Louis),
Desmond Trufant, db, Washington.
23. Minnesota, Sharrif Floyd, dt, Florida.
24. Indianapolis, Bjoern Werner, de, Floida State.
25. Minnesota (from Seattle), Xavier Rhodes, db,
Florida State.
26. Green Bay, Datone Jones, de, UCLA.
27. Houston, DeAndre Hopkins, wr, Clemson.
28. Denver, Sylvester Williams, dt, North Carolina.
29. Minnesota (from New England), Cordarrelle Pat-
terson, wr, Tennessee.
30. St. Louis (from Atlanta), Alec Ogletree, Ib, Geor-
gia.
31. Dallas (from San Francisco), Travis Frederick, c,
Wisconsin.
32. Baltimore, Matt Elam, db, Florida.
Second Round
33. Jacksonville, Johnathan Cyprien, db, FlU.
34.Tennessee (from Kansas City through San Fran-
cisco), Justin Hunter, wr, Tennessee.
35. Philadelphia, Zach Ertz, te, Stanford.
36. Detroit, Darius Slay, db, Mississippi State.
37. Cincinnati (from Oakland), Gio Bernard, rb, North
Carolina.
38. San Diego (from Arizona), Mantei Te'o, Ib, Notre
Dame.
Cleveland Exercised in Supplemental Draft.
39. New York Jets, Geno Smith, qb, West Virginia.
40. San Francisco (from Tennessee), Cornellius Car-
radine, de, Florida State.
41. Buffalo, Robert Woods, wr, Southern Cal.
42. Oakland (from Miami), MenelikWatson, ot, Florida
State.
43. Tampa Bay Johnthan Banks, db, Mississippi
State.
44. Carolina, Kawann Short, dt, Purdue.
New Orleans Forfeited.
45. Arizona (from San Diego), Kevin Minter, Ib, LSU.
46. Buffalo (from St. Louis), Kiko Alonso, Ib, Oregon.
47. Dallas, Gavin Escobar, te, San Diego State.
48. Pittsburgh, LeVeon Bell, rb, Michigna State.
49. New York Giants, Johnathan Hankins, dt, Ohio
State.
50. Chicago, Jon Bostic, Ib, Florida.


51. Washington, David Amerson, db, N.C. State.
52. New England (from Minnesota), Jamie Collins, lb,
Southern Miss.
53. Cincinnati, Margus Hunt, de, SMU.
54. Miami (from Indianapolis), JamarTaylor, db, Boise
State.
55. San Francisco (from Green Bay), Vance McDon-
ald, te, Rice.
56. Baltimore (from Seattle), Arthur Brown, Ib, Kansas
State.
57. Houston, D.J. Swearinger, db, South Carolina.
58. Denver, Montee Ball, rb, Wisconsin.
59. New England, Aaron Dobson, wr, Marshall.
60. Atlanta, Robert Alford, db, SE Louisiana.
61. Green Bay (from San Francisco), Eddie Lacy, rb,
Alabama.
62. Seattle (from Baltimore), Christine Michael, rb,
Texas A&M.
Third Round
63. Kansas City, Travis Kelce, te, Cincinnati.
64. Jacksonville, Dwayne Gratz, db, UConn.
65. Detroit, Larry Warford, g, Kentucky.
66. Oakland, Sio Moore, Ib, UConn.
67. Philadelphia, Bennie Logan, dt, LSU.
68. Cleveland, Leon McFadden, db, San Diego State.
69. Arizona, Tyrann Mathieu, db, LSU.
70. Tennessee, BlidiWreh-Wilson, db, UConn.
71. St. Louis (from Buffalo), TJ. McDonald, Southern
Cal.
72. New York Jets, Brian Winters, ot, Kent State.
73. Tampa Bay, Mike Glennon, qb, N.C. State.
74. Dallas (from Carolina through San Francisco), Ter-
rance Williams, wr, Baylor.
75. New Orleans, Terron Armstead, ot, Arkansas-Pine
Bluff.
76. San Diego, Keenan Allen, wr, California.
77. Miami, Dallas Thomas, ot, Tennessee.
78. Buffalo (from St. Louis), Marquise Goodwin, wr,
Texas.
79. Pittsburgh, Markus Wheaton, wr, Oregon State.
80. Dallas, J.J. Wilcox, db, Georgia Southern.
81. New York Giants, Damontre Moore, de, Texas
A&M.
82. New Orleans (from Chicago through Miami), John
Jenkins, nt, Georgia.
83. New England (from Minnesota), Logan Ryan, db,
Rutgers.
84. Cincinnati, Shawn Williams, db, Georgia.
85. Washington, Jordan Reed, te, Florida.
86. Indianapolis, Hugh Thornton, g, Illinois.
87. Seattle, Jordan Hill, dt, Penn State.
88. San Francisco (from Green Bay), Corey Lemonier,
de, Auburn.
89. Houston, Brennan Williams, ot, North Carolina.
90. Denver, Kayvon Webster, db, South Florida.
91. New England, Duron Harmon, db, Rutgers.
92. St. Louis (from Atlanta), Stedman Bailey wr, West
Virginia.
93. Miami (from San Francisco through Green Bay),
Will Davis, db, Utah State.
94. Baltimore, Brandon Williams, dt, Missouri South-
ern.
95. x-Houston, Sam Montgomery, de, LSU.
96. x-Kansas City, Knile Davis, rb, Arkansas.
97. x-Tennessee, Zaviar Gooden, Ib, Missouri.
Fourth Round
98. Philadelphia (from Jacksonville), Matt Barkley, qb,
Southern Cal.
99. Kansas City, Nico Johnson, Ib, Alabama.
100. Tampa Bay (from Oakland), Akeem Spence, dt,
Illinois.
101. Jacksonville (from Philadelphia), Ace Sanders,


wr, South Carolina.
102. New England (from Detroit through Minnesota),
Josh Boyce, wr, TCU.
103. Arizona, Alex Okafor, Ib, Texas.
104. Miami (from Cleveland), Jelani Jenkins, Ib,
Florida.
105. Buffalo, Duke Williams, db, Nevada.
106. Miami (from New York Jets through New Or-
leans), Dion Sims, te, Michigan State.
107. Tennessee, Brian Schwenke, c, California.
108. Carolina, Edmund Kugbila, g, Valdosta State.
109. Green Bay (from New Orleans through Miami),
David Bakhtiari, ot, Colorado.
110. New York Giants (from San Diego through Ari-
zona), Ryan Nassib, qb, Syracuse.
111. Pittsburgh (from Miami through Cleveland),
Shamarko Thomas, db, Syracuse.
112. Oakland (from Tampa Bay), Tyler Wilson, qb,
Arkansas.
113. St. Louis, Barrett Jones, c, Alabama.
114. Dallas, B.W. Webb, db, William & Mary.
115. Pittsburgh, Landry Jones, qb, Oklahoma.
116. Arizona (from NewYork Giants), Earl Watford, g,
James Madison.
117. Chicago, Khaseem Greene, Ib, Rutgers.
118. Cincinnati, Sean Porter, Ib, Texas A&M.
119. Washington, Phillip Thomas, db, Fresno State.
120. Minnesota, Gerald Hodges, Ib, Penn State.
121. Indianapolis, Khaled Holmes, c, Southern Cal.
122. Green Bay J.C.Tretter, ot, Cornell.
123. Seattle, Chris Harper, wr, Kansas State.
124. Houston, Trevardo Williams, Ib, UConn.
125. Green Bay (from Denver), Johnathan Franklin,
rb, UCLA.
126. Tampa Bay (from New England), William Ghol-
ston, de, Michigan State.
127. Atlanta, Malliciah Goodwin, de, Clemson.
128. San Francisco, Quinton Patton, wr, Louisiana
Tech.
129. Baltimore, John Simon, Ib, Ohio State.
130. x-Baltimore, Kyle Juszczyk, rb, Harvard.
131. x-San Francisco, Marcus Lattimore, rb, South
Carolina.
132. x-Detroit, Devin Taylor, de, South Carolina.
133. x-Atlanta, Levine Toilolo, te, Stanford.
Fifth Round
134. Kansas City Sanders Commings, db, Georgia.
135. Jacksonville, Denard Robinson, rb, Michigan.
136. Philadelphia, Earl Wolff, db, N.C. State.
137. Seattle (from Detroit), Jesse Williams, dt, Ala-
bama.
138. Seattle (from Oakland), Tharold Simon, db, LSU.
139. Indianapolis (from Cleveland), Montori Hughes,
dt, UT-Martin.
140. Arizona, Stepfan Taylor, rb, Stanford.
141. New York Jets, Oday Aboushi, ot, Virginia.
142. Tennessee, Lavar Edwards, de, LSU.
143. Buffalo, Jonathan Meeks, db, Clemson.
144. New Orleans, Kenny Stills, wr, Oklahoma.
145. San Diego, Steve Williams, db, California.
146. Denver (from Miami through Green Bay), Quan-
teras Smith, de, Western Kentucky.
147. Tampa Bay Steven Means, de, Buffalo.
148. Carolina, A.J. Klein, Ib, Iowa State.
149. St. Louis, Brandon McGee, db, Miami.
150. Pittsburgh, Terry Hawthorne, db, Illinois.
151. Dallas, Joseph Randle, rb, Oklahoma State.
152. New York Giants, CooperTaylor, db, Richmond.
153. Atlanta (from Chicago), Stansly Maponga, de,
TCU.
154. Washington, Chris Thompson, rb, Florida State.
155. Minnesota, Jeff Locke, p, UCLA.


156. Cincinnati, Tanner Hawkinson, g, Kansas.
157. San Francisco (from Indianapolis), Quinton Dial,
dt, Alabama.
158. Seattle, Luke Willson, te, Rice.
159. Green Bay, Micah Hyde, db, Iowa.
160. St. Louis (from Houston), Zac Stacy, rb, Vander-
bilt.
161. Denver, Tavarres King, wr, Georgia.
162.Washington (from New England), Brandon Jenk-
ins, Ib, Florida State.
163. Chicago (from Atlanta), Jordan Mills, ot,
Louisiana Tech.
164. Miami (from San Francisco through Cleveland),
Mike Gillislee, rb, Florida.
165. Detroit (from Baltimore through Seattle), Sam
Martin, p, Appalachian State.
166. x-Miami, Caleb Sturgis, k, Florida.
167. x-Green Bay, Josh Boyd, de, Mississippi State.
168. x-Baltimore, Ricky Wagner, g, Wisconsin.
Sixth Round
169. Jacksonville, Josh Evans, db, Florida.
170. Kansas City, Eric Kush, c, California (Pa.)
171. Detroit, Corey Fuller, wr, Virginia Tech.
172. Oakland, Nick Kasa, te, Colorado.
173. Denver (from Philadelphia through Cleveland,
San Francisco and Green Bay), Vinston Painter, ot, Vir-
ginia Tech.
174. Arizona, Ryan Swope, wr, Texas A&M.
175. Cleveland, Jamoris Slaughter, db, Notre Dame.
176. Houston (from Tennessee through Minnesota,
Arizona and Oakland), David Quessenberry, ot, San
Jose State.
177. Buffalo, Dustin Hopkins, k, Florida State.
178. New York Jets, William Campbell, g, Michigan.
179. San Diego, Tourek Williams, Ib, FlU.
180. San Francisco (from Miami), Nick Moody Ib,
Florida State.
181. Oakland (fromTampa Bay), Latavius Murray, rb,
UCF
182. Carolina, Kenjon Barner, rb, Oregon.
183. New Orleans, Rufus Johnson, Ib, Tarleton State.
184. Oakland (from St. Louis through Houston), My-
chal Rivera, te, Tennessee.
185. Dallas, DeVonte Holloman, Ib, South Carolina.
186. Pittsburgh, Justin Brown, wr, Oklahoma.
187. Arizona (from New York Giants), Andre Elling-
ton, rb, Clemson.
188. Chicago, Cornelius Washington, de, Georgia.
189. Tampa Bay (from Minnesota), Mike James, rb,
Miami.
190. Cincinnati, Rex Burkhead, rb, Nebraska.
191. Washington, Bacarri Rambo, db, Georgia.
192. Indianapolis, John Boyett, db, Oregon.
193. Green Bay, Nate Palmer, Ib, Illinois State.
194. Seattle, Spencer Ware, rb, LSU.
195. Houston, Alan Bonner, wr, Jacksonville State.
196. Minnesota (from Denver through Philadelphia
and Tampa Bay), Jeff Baca, g, UCLA.
197. Cincinnati (from New England), Cobi Hamilton,
wr, Arkansas.
198. Houston (from Atlanta through St. Louis), Chris
Jones, db, Bowling Green.
199. Detroit (from San Francisco through Baltimore
and Seattle), Theo Riddick, rb, Notre Dame.
200. Baltimore, Kapron Lewis-Moore, de, Notre
Dame.
201. x-Houston, Ryan Griffin, te, UConn.
202. x-Tennessee, Khalid Wooten, db, Nevada.
203. x-Baltimore, Ryan Jensen, c, Colorado State-
Pueblo.
204. x-Kansas City, Braden Wilson, rb, Kansas State.
205. x-Oakland, Stacy McGee, dt, Oklahoma.


206. x-Pittsburgh, Vince Williams, Ib, Florida State.
Seventh Round
207. Kansas City Mike Catapano, Ib, Princeton.
208. Jacksonville, Jeremy Harris, db, New Mexico
State.
209. Oakland, Brice Butler, wr, San Diego State.
210. Jacksonville (from Philadelphia), Demetrius Mc-
Cray, db, Appalachian State.
211. Detroit, Michael Williams, te, Alabama.
212. Philadelphia (from Cleveland), Joe Kruger, de,
Utah.
213. Minnesota (from Arizona), Michael Mauti, Ib,
Penn State.
214. Minnesota (from Buffalo through Seattle), Tarvis
Bond, g, North Carolina.
215. New York Jets, Tommy Bohanon, rb, Wake For-
est.
216. Green Bay (from Tennessee through San Fran-
cisco), C.J. Johnson, wr, Grand Valley State.
217. Cleveland (from Miami), Armonty Bryant, de,
East Central.
218. Philadelphia (from Tampa Bay), Jordan Poyer,
db, Oregon State.
219. Arizona (from Carolina through Oakland), D.C.
Jefferson, te, Rutgers.
220. Seattle (from New Orleans), Ryan Seymour, g,
Vanderbilt.
221. San Diego, Brad Sorenson, qb, Utah State.
222. Buffalo (from St. Louis), Chris Gragg, te,
Arkansas.
223. Pittsburgh, Nick Williams, db, Samford.
224. Green Bay (from Dallas through Miami), Kevin
Dorsey wr, Maryland.
225. NewYork Giants, Eric Herman, g, Ohio.
226. New England (from Chicago through Tampa
Bay), Michael Buchanan, de, Illinois.
227. Cleveland (from Cincinnati through San Fran-
cisco), Garrett Gilkey, ot, Charon State.
228. Washington, Jawan Jamison, rb, Rutgers.
229. Minnesota (from Minnesota through New Eng-
land and Tampa Bay), Everrett Dawkins, dt, Florida
State.
230. Indianapolis, Kerwynn Williams, rb, Utah State.
231. Seattle, Ty Powell, Ib, Harding.
232. Green Bay, Sam Barrington, Ib, South Florida.
233. Oakland (from Houston), David Bass, dt, Mis-
souri Western.
234. Denver, Zac Dysert, qb, Miami (Ohio).
235. New England, Steve Beauharnais, Ib, Rutgers.
236. Chicago (from Atlanta), Marquess Wilson, wr,
Washington State.
237. San Francisco, B.J. Daniels, qb, South Florida.
238. Baltimore, Aaron Mellette, wr, Elon.
239. x-Philadelphia, David King, db, Oklahoma.
240. x-Cincinnati, Reid Fragel, ot, Ohio State.
241. x-Seattle, Jared Smith, g, New Hampshire.
242. x-Seattle, Michael Bowie, ot, Northeastern State
(Okla.).
243. x-Atlanta, Kemel Ishmael, db, UCF
244. x-Atlanta, Zeke Motta, db, Notre Dame.
245. x-Detroit, Brandon Hepburn, Ib, Florida A&M.
246. x-San Francisco, Carter Bykowski, ot, Iowa
State.
247. x-Baltimore, Marc Anthony, db, California.
248. x-Tennessee, Daimion Stafford, db, Nebraska.
249. x-Atlanta, Sean Renfree, qb, Duke.
250. x-Miami, Don Jones, db, Arkansas State.
251. x-Cincinnati, T.J. Johnson, c, South Carolina.
252. x-San Francisco, Marcus Cooper, db, Rutgers.
253. x-New York Giants, Michael Cox, rb, UMass.
254. x-Indianapolis, Justice Cunningham, te, South
Carolina.


B6 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


SPORTS












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Carlos Arredondo, a peace activist whose son was killed during the Iraq war, was handing out flags nearby at the time of the
explosions and assisted victims after a pair of bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.



When tragedy happens


predict what happens next:
Hollywood celebrities and
politicians turn out to score
points. You get the feeling that
the tragedy happened solely to bring
them to you. The pundits and the experts
hound the media for exposure on how
and why the tragedy occurred. The air-
waves are filled with what we must do
and suggestions. Out comes a dazzling
display of rhetoric. The water coolers in
the workplace are abuzz. Sunday morn-
ing talk shows have a new issue to ex-
plore. The reporters have become the ..
experts. A reporter interviews another -- -


L

I


Anthony Schembri
GUEST
COLUMN


reporter and
quotes what a
third reporter
said. Then come
the remotes from
the scenes and the
street interviews
with the perpetra-
tor's landlord, his
barber, his neigh-
bor, his elemen-
tary school
teacher and the
man who sold him
his Sunday news-
papers. The


media's appetite is insatiable.
The urge to make new laws overcomes
legislators. Their quick actions will pro-
duce ideas in government that will affect
us for years and move the problem fur-
ther away from resolution. In Germany,
it's called a schlimmbesserung (an im-
provement that makes things worse). It's
emotional. If success happens, they all
dash for the credit. It reminds me of sex-
crime legislation after a child is killed.
We enacted Megan's Law in New Jer-
sey, Jenna's Law in New York,
Stephanie's Law in Kansas, Amber's Law
in Texas and Jessica's Law in Florida.
Not one of them prevented another child
murder. Have we lost our footing? Are we
feeling too much and thinking too little?
Emotions should not be the currency of
our criminal-justice system. This type of
emotional, quick-fix response plays well
for the public and advocates of the deter-
rence theory, but it misdirects crime pol-
icy and distorts explanations of crime
causation. In other words, if the criminal
justice system were improved, the
tragedy would not have happened. Now
what happens? The news will sell more
papers, the police will be blamed, politi-
cians will make more speeches and more
laws will be passed. If more police were
on the streets, if more offenders were
sentenced to longer terms, if more pris-
ons were built and more offenders served
their sentences, if immigration laws
worked, then dangerous criminals would


A jetliner flies over flags flying at half-staff April 16 at the Washington Monument in
Washington after President Obama ordered flags to be lowered on federal buildings
to honor the loss of life from the explosions at the Boston Marathon.


We soon will long for the
days when we only had to
take off our shoes before
we boarded a plane.
Because of our response,
they are winning an
inch at a time. Enough
handwringing. Who is
taking the long view?
Who will flex the
analytical muscle?

be removed from society, potential crim-
inals would be deterred, crime would be
reduced and citizens would feel safe.
Therefore, the answer to this tragedy is
more, more, more. We will hire more po-
lice, more prosecutors, buy more cam-
eras, build more jails, search more
people, mostly minorities, and pay more
taxes. The circle around our freedoms
will get smaller. The Patriot Act will be
tightened. Perhaps it will require a DNA
sample on a license renewal.
We soon will long for the days when we
only had to take off our shoes before we
boarded a plane. Because of our re-
sponse, they are winning an inch at a
time. Enough handwringing. Who is tak-
ing the long view? Who will flex the ana-
lytical muscle? It's a hot topic, so
someone named Whoopi will tell us.
What agenda is this good for liberal,
conservative, Republican or Democrat?


Ideology becomes an impasse. The
skepticism about our government in-
creases. The radio personalities capital-
ize on this and offer simple solutions to
complex problems. They whisper into
microphones that somehow America has
lost its greatness. They are pissed off. I
hate people who are pissed off. I hate
people who pretend to be pissed off with
a faux outrage. They fake caring. Now
comes the other side, they who love the
people who hate us. The career sign-
carriers. The explainers, the under-
standers and the tolerators -those who
argue that you should be able to marry
your Pekingese or that Typhoid Mary
should be able to work as a cook. Ideol-
ogy becomes an impasse. The things we
do to make things better actually makes
them worse. We are doing the wrong
things with greater conviction. To whom
shall we turn for answers? Dr. Phil, Katie
Couric and Oprah? We search for answers;
they search for ratings. We like that.
They make us think that solving this
tragedy is easy, so why isn't our govern-
ment doing it? They create more cyni-
cism, the currency for reform. We will
search for another Lincoln. Is there an-
other among us? Is our storehouse of
brainpower so impoverished that we are
out of Lincolns, or do we make the wrong
choice? Now the tragedy is over, now
what? Men with acoustic guitars will
write songs about the victims. This
tragedy will become a script for a Sun-
dance-approved flick about likeable per-
petrators. Celebrities and politicians will
create a fund to help the victims. About
six months after they collect millions of


Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Move over

and let

the work

take place
I was in a room re-
cently where Art
Jones, the leader of
the One Rake at a Time
project in Crystal River,
was meeting with all
sorts of state and federal
government agency
bosses, lobbyists for in-
terest groups and city
and county officials.
Art, who happens to
be the Chronicle's Citi-
zen of the Year for 2012,
was trying to move for-
ward with his actual
plan to clean up King's
Bay As you might recall,
it was Art who, out of
frustration, created a
plan through the local
Rotary Club to go out
and gather volunteers to
rake up the disgusting
lyngbya in the bay
The interesting thing
about Art Jones was that
he was the only person
in the room who was not
a paid employee of some
level of government or a
special interest group.
Coincidentally, he was
the one who actually get-
ting something done.
This is not meant to
insult those in govern-
ment or even the paid
lobbyists of the world,
but it sometimes takes
people coming from the
outside to get actually
things done.
In Citrus County, Art
Jones isn't the only vol-
unteer who is standing
up and getting amazing
things done.
Debbie Lattin of In-
verness realized that
some children were
going home from our
public schools and not
having any meals over
the weekend. During the
academic year the
schools provided kids
with breakfast and
lunch, but on the week-
ends they were on their
own. Debbie started the
Blessings in a Backpack
program to send kids
home with a backpack
filled with food. Simple
and effective, and thou-
sands of kids have bene-
fited from her
leadership. Debbie is a
volunteer
Diane Toto is a legend
in Homosassa for creat-
ing the We Care Food
Pantry and providing
free food to needy
people in southwest Cit-
rus County. Diane is a
volunteer
Ginger West and her
late husband started the
Family Resource Center
in Hernando and for
decades have provided
food, clothing, housing,
transportation and job
assistance to all sorts
of people. Ginger is a
volunteer
See Page C3


For Pierson, a pension; for his victim, uncertainty


While George Pier-
son was attending
and losing a
civil trial for framing a
mentally challenged teen,
the former Miramar police
detective was drawing a
full paycheck from his cur-
rent government employer,
Citrus County.
Pierson, 63, a code en-
forcement officer in cen-
tral Florida, was granted
paid administrative leave


after he showed his super-
visor a witness subpoena
in the Anthony Caravella
civil trial. Pierson missed
more than five weeks of
work, but took home his
usual pay, which amounted
to $3,447 for the trial's
duration.
Fill in your own adjec-
tive here: outrageous,
galling ... or perhaps a fit-
ting way to cap off a
supreme injustice.


A federal jury found
Pierson liable for $3 mil-
lion in damages last month
after Caravella spent
nearly 26 years in prison
for a 1983 rape and murder
he didn't commit. Another
Miramar officer, William
Mantesta, was found liable
for $4 million in damages.
"George Pierson never
requested administrative
leave," Pierson's attorney,
Bill Grant, said in a voice-


mail message. "Adminis-
trative leave was suggested
to him."
When Citrus County
Chronicle reporter Mike
Wright started asking ques-
tions about Pierson's paid
leave and whether it vio-
lated county policy, county
officials met with Pierson
and Grant. The result:
Pierson offered to repay
the $3,447, by forfeiting va-
cation time and future pay


So in a bit of a twist,
Pierson will have some of
his upcoming paychecks
garnished, but the money
won't be going to Caravella.
It'll be going to Citrus
County.
Grant called the matter
"a misunderstanding" and
said Pierson apologized
and offered to repay "out of
an abundance of caution."

See Page C3


Michael Mayo
GUEST
COLUMN







Page C2 -SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHI


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
NMac Harris ........................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................ guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .........................copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


ANTI-GOVERNMENT FERVOR




Commissioner



attacks with



half the story


P people like to believe Afte:
the worst about those in tween
government, vendo:
We elect people to public agreed
office, and within 90 days we $227,8,
are ranting that there is all (the co
sorts of corruption and invest:
malfeasance going on. wrong
Newly elected county com- Citr
missioner Scott Adams is rebid f
feeding the anti-government and ai
fervor, and he is winning sup- used.
port from those who love to Shei
hate those in elected office. nied A
Each week he comes up with county
another conspir-
acy as to why THE ISSUE:
those in office are
out of control. Believing
Adams' claims the worst.
often have a ker-
nel of truth, thus OUR OPINION
feeding the larger
conspiracy theory Assaults from
that everyone is a withn creating
crook. hostile climate.
His latest attack
again involves the county some
landfill and yes, Adams Of cou
says it is just a coincidence have
he is developing a private scenai
landfill in Sumter County with it hap
his mentor Sen. Charlie Dean. making
Commissioner Adams left b(
claimed millions of dollars would
were bilked from the landfill torted
through a recycling contract, the sc
and that the county stopped a who a
criminal investigation of county
those involved. But
What really happened was news t
that in 2011, the county asked that re
the Citrus County Sheriff's and re
Office to investigate some al- vestige
legations that a vendor was Scott.
not reimbursing the county the coi
at the appropriate rate and The
see whether fraud might be about
involved. ings a
Remember, the county work
asked for the investigation. ployee
Detectives began to investi- the fo
gate the fraud allegation and ers. At
found evidence that the ing,
weight scales used by the intern
county were different than mission
those used by the private dle oft
company The county was It mi
being short-changed by Cit- a laug]
rus Recycling. govern


Gulls blight beach M0
A couple of weeks ago, I was I was
out at the Fort Island park at the I think
beach there, and there was pick up
thousands of little seagulls the rigl
spoiling the sand. I suggest they house,
put some cameras up and get by and
some young fellow, dep-
utize him and give him OUJND
a hat and a badge and
he should have a border FF
collie and that would
take care of those birds
real quick. The conces-
sion stand was closed,
locked up. )
Stop, then turn CAL
While stopped for a 5630579
red light on (County 5 -0
Road) 486 and (U.S.)
41 in Hernando Tuesday (April in front
16) at 5 p.m., four cars turned clean u
right on red in a row without hood. I
stopping, not even a rolling have sc
stop. Guess what? None were body p
senior citizens. They all had in front
Florida plates, so they should that thE
have known the law. It seems it goes
like these people don't know, or shoots
figure the rules don't bother and it's
them. thing.


r some negotiations be-
the county and the
r, Citrus Recycling
d to pay the county
49. Because the victim
'unty) was satisfied, the
igation into criminal
doing was terminated.
us Recycling did not
for the county contract,
other vendor is now

riff's investigators de-
.dams' charges that the
y urged them to drop


I:


the case. The
county was the
victim, investiga-
tors said, and it
originally re-
quested the in-
vestigation. When
they settled the
claim, the case
was over.
Does the
county deserve


criticism in the case?
irse it does. It should
explained the whole
rio to the public when
opened in 2011. By not
g it public, the county
behind a situation that
be twisted and dis-
by Scott Adams and
ore of regular critics
ttend each and every
meeting.
remember the good
here: It was the county
recognized the problem
*quested an outside in-
ation, all long before
Adams was elected to
unty commission.
weekly complaints
corruption and misdo-
are creating a hostile
environment for em-
es, administrators and
ur other commission-
this last week's meet-
Adams began to
gate the other com-
Dners right in the mid-
the meeting.
.ght have been good for
h, but it wasn't good for
iment in Citrus County.


owing over litter
s just calling to say that
it's kind of crazy that I
p across the street on
ht-of-way from my
but these tractors come
they mow the rights-of-
way on these side
streets and there's no-
body picking up no
trash in front of them
and they just run over
everything and basi-
cally it looks worse
when they get done
than it did when they
started. Now I clean
up across the street
from my place, but I'm
not going to walk up
and down these roads
t of those tractors and
ip the whole neighbor-
think that they should
)me inmates or some-
icking this garbage up
t of them tractors so
ey don't just mow it and
everywhere and it
on the streets and stuff
s just a nasty-looking


Writer misses point
of letter
This is in response to Al Gi-
annone's letter, which itself
was a response to Phyllis
Crowe's letter regarding Pine
Ridge. Mr. Giannone appears
to have missed the point of Ms.
Crowe's epistle. By promoting
Pine Ridge to the outside
world, and highlighting the nu-
merous amenities enjoyed by
our residents such as the sta-
ble, the riding trails, a 27-hole
golf course, tennis courts and a
flying club, we can attract po-
tential new homeowners (it has
nothing to do with developers).
As more people desire to buy
or build in Pine Ridge, the law
of supply and demand dictates
that property values will rise.
This will benefit all the indi-
vidual home and lot owners.
Secondly, Mr. Giannone is
correct that the $2.5 million
listed on the financial state-
ment represents various assets
in the Pine Ridge community,
but included in that number is


"Who offends writes on sand, who is offended on marble."
Italian proverb


Evidence of grown-ups


WASHINGTON
Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-
Texas, chairman of the
Financial Services
Committee, has told Richard
Cordray not to bother. This is
part of the recent evidence that
government is getting some
adult supervision.
Barack Obama used a recess
appointment to make Cordray
director of the Consumer Fi-
nancial Protection Bureau. But
a federal circuit
court has declared
unconstitutional
three other recess
appointments made
the same day be- {. <-.
cause the Senate
was not in recess. So /
Hensarling has told
Cordray not to tes-
tify before his com- Georgi
mittee: "Absent OTH
contrary guidance
from the United VOlN
States Supreme
Court, you do not meet the
statutory requirements of a
validly serving director of the
CFPB, and cannot be recog-
nized as such."
Last week the Federal Avia-
tion Administration promoted
chaos in travel by furloughing
air traffic controllers, suppos-
edly because the sequester cuts
-4 percent of its budget- can-
not be otherwise implemented.
Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla.,
notes that the FAA says its
15,000 air traffic controllers
must be furloughed in the same
proportion as its 32,000 other
employees, who include librar-
ians, historians, speechwriters,
PR people, congressional and
White House liaisons and many
others perhaps less essential to
the FAA's primary mission than
are people in O'Hare's control
tower.
Even were the FAA's claim
true, the chance of which is
vanishingly small, Congress
could explicitly give Obama the
discretion he pretends not to
have to make sequester cuts
compatible with rational prior-
ities. He and congressional De-
mocrats oppose this because


b 12015


ri(T*tBA \E"


they want government to be-
come so irrationally painful
that the suffering public will
demand more government.
Obama may think his powers
of persuasion can convince the
public that as chief executive
he is a mere bystander in the
executive branch. About those
powers:
In 2009, he flew to Copen-
hagen to give a speech about
himself (he referred to himself
26 times in 48 sen-
tences), expecting
this to enchant
I: the International
Olympic Committee
into awarding
Chicago the 2016
games. Unen-
thralled, the com-
mittee made
e Will Chicago the first city
IER eliminated from the
competition.
CES Since then,
Obama has cam-
paigned for Obamacare without
making it popular and against
Republican candidates without
success in 2010. Still, his faith in
the potent ointment of his
words is probably unshaken by
even the failure of his barn-
storming in support of gun leg-
islation almost weirdly
unrelated to the event New-
town to which it was suppos-
edly a response.
Last week, Sen. Max Baucus,
D-Mont., chairman of the Fi-
nance Committee, announced
he will not seek a seventh term
next year Rep. Dave Camp, R-
Mich., Baucus' tax-writing
counterpart, is term-limited by
Republican rules as chairman
of the Ways and Means Commit-
tee. So the two most important
people in the most urgent leg-
islative project tax reform to
ignite economic growth- have
parallel incentives to work
quickly. And if Democrats still
control the Senate in 2015, Fi-
nance, the Senate's most im-
portant committee, probably
will be chaired by Oregon's Ron
Wyden, who has the intellectual
power and political independ-
ence of such previous Demo-


cratic luminaries on Finance
as Louisiana's Russell Long,
Texas' Lloyd Bentsen and
New York's Daniel Patrick
Moynihan.
In a burst of the bipartisan-
ship we are told to revere, a
coalition of Republican and
Democratic senators rose
above party differences last
week to affirm class solidarity.
They moved toward a tax in-
crease of at least $22 billion to
benefit the political class at the
state and local levels. Because
Baucus opposes the legislation
to enrich state and local gov-
ernments by subjecting Inter-
net commerce to state and local
sales taxes, Majority Leader
Harry Reid brought it directly
to the floor, bypassing the Fi-
nance Committee. One reason
the Republican-controlled
House should reject this tax in-
crease is that much of the
revenue will be passed on to
public employees and, through
their unions, to Democrats'
campaigns.
Finally, last week, Earth Day
passed with less notice than
was given to the approaching
death of another planet-saver,
Fisker Automotive Inc. The
electric car maker's slide to-
ward Solyndra-style bank-
ruptcy has been greased with
$192 million in government
loans. Fisker is a redundant
demonstration of the govern-
ment's incompetence as a ven-
ture capitalist, and of the decay
of environmentalism into
cranky gestures. Although elec-
tric cars are 40 percent pow-
ered by coal, that being the
percentage of U.S. electricity
generated by coal, Fisker was
supposed to combat global
warming, of which there has
been essentially none for 15
years. As adult supervision re-
turns, Washington may take se-
riously the bad news about its
harebrained green investments
and the good news that refutes
the argument for more of them.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


AADTmT&


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

$1.3 million in cash which is
sitting idle. Advertising ex-
pense for the year ending Dec.
31, 2011, (the most recent avail-
able) was zero.


14T.7ZOflbx $
5SIJED TO
p~tpA.
ODP/m,


Thirdly, nowhere in Ms.
Crowe's letter was there any
mention of giving $250,000 a
year to the golf course.
I believe the purpose of Ms.
Crowe's letter was to say "hey,
we have a beautiful commu-
nity here in Pine Ridge. It is an
equestrian and golfing commu-
nity, a great place to live or re-
tire to. Come see us," and as a
result we will all profit from it.
What is not addressed is the
board's position that because
Pine Ridge golf course is pri-
vately owned, it cannot be con-
sidered an amenity.
The board represents all of
Pine Ridge and should be pro-
moting Pine Ridge in its entirety
The Pine Ridge golf course is
as much of a draw for prospec-
tive homeowners as the stable
and riding trails, and needs to
be included in any presentation
of Pine Ridge estates, including
the website. To do otherwise is
a disservice to the residents of
Pine Ridge the board represents.
Charles Baumstark
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


a

i


I
C





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Warning! Do not read before you fish your breakfast


I could have never
imagined a column
wherein my thoughts
would include both my
good brother William and
Truman Capote, but that's
precisely what this one
does.
Capote? His novella
"Breakfast at Tiffany's"
was the basis for the
screenplay of the movie by
the same name, and his
character, Holly Golightly,
brought him to mind.
My brother? He entered
my thoughts because of a
conversation we recently
had. I remember well
when William and I made
fun of old people for talk-
ing about their maladies
and comparing the proce-
dures they'd had or were
going to have done. He and
I are now old people and
we talk with each other
about our maladies and our
past, present or pending


procedures. Most recently
we had an in-depth discus-
sion of a particular event
that we'd both recently en-
dured. Though he reads
everything I write, rarely
does he offer a suggestion
- but this is something he
said inquiring minds
would want to know.
Warning! I know most of
us now eat pizza and watch
crime-scene investigation
TV at the same time, but if
you are at all squeamish
and are still eating your
breakfast, whether at
Tiffany's or in your
kitchen, you might want to
wait until you've finished
eating before you read any
further
C- o-l- o-n- o-s-c- o-p-y.
You've been warned and
you've been given a hint,
so here goes:
Capote's Holly Golightly
is a country girl turned
New York caf6-society


ingenue who gets by with a prepare for a colonoscopy
little help from her wealthy I'll come back to the
male friends. She's not a preparation procedure,
prostitute, but she isn't but first, a word about the
what the casual observer colonoscopy itself: Once
thinks she is, either, you hang your clothes and
GoLytely is something your pride in the dressing
else altogether. room and don a
What appears hospital gown,
to be an inno- .. it's not so bad.
cent mixture of After vital sta-
powder inside tistic checks,
a gallon jug you're put to
isn't. It is much sleep. They
more. Add a then slip a
gallon of water tube-like appa-
to the jug and ratus with a
it is a poly- Fred Brannen light and snip-
ethylene glycol A SLICE pers into your
electrolyte so- innards. If
lution. What's OF LIFE nothing is
it used for? I amiss, that's it,
could tell you in six very but if you have a polyp, the
descriptive words, but snipper snips 'em and
Cheryl would never let me they're biopsied. Most
print those six words, so times, things are still OK
here it is in a more deli- because the usual result is
cate manner: It is used to benign. Got all that?
clean you out in order to Now, back to the prepa-


ration process. Just like
Ms. Golightly, medicinal
GoLytely isn't what one
might think it is. It looks so
innocent in its jug. How
could it possibly be a big
deal? Let me tell you how.
First you fill the jug with
its powder inside up with
water, put in a packet of
flavoring, put it into the re-
frigerator, then at the ap-
pointed time, over several
hours, you drink it. Still
doesn't sound so bad, does
it? But you haven't yet
tasted it and you haven't
calculated that at the rec-
ommended 8 ounces every
15 minutes, it will take
four hours to consume it
all. A gallon has 128
ounces, divided by 8
equals 16 glasses. It tastes
awful, but that's the easy
part. After about the
eighth glass, as GoLytely
goes in, GoLytely comes
out. It's not pretty and it


isn't tame. Trot actually
means to trot, and to do so
quickly
How do I put this so that
it remains printable?
When it's all over, the
properly prepared patient
or the victim, whichever
your prefer, sort of looks
and feels like slung chit-
terlings. I'll give no further
explanation of what slung
chitterlings are, but if you
really care, look it up on
Google there's a blow-
by-blow description con-
cerning cleaning pig
intestines before frying
'em.
One final note: I person-
ally believe the manufac-
turer should call this
concoction Golntensely in-
stead of GoLytely!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


Warren unfairly blamed
I think that Janice Warren is unduly
blamed for her role in the little problem
with the mail-outs. First of all, she didn't
make the mistake and couldn't have known
about it beforehand. Just the same, she is
not placing blame or pointing fingers be-
cause she is who she is. Mrs. Warren has
done a wonderful job at bringing true pro-
fessionalism to our local government, so cut
her a little slack. We are very fortunate to
have her serving the people.
Hummingbird attraction
If hummingbirds stop coming to your
feeder, the sugar water could either be too
sweet or not sweet
ND enough. I use two cups
0UND of water and one-half
cup of sugar. I put one
cup of water in a pan
with the sugar and I
heat it 'til it's almost
boiling and I stir it to
AA make sure the sugar is
dissolved and then you
CAL pour in the other cup of
563 0579 water. Let it cool and
5 3U05" 9 put it in your feeder.
Now my feeder, that
much will last me two months and there will
be a little left, but I put a new batch out
after two months. And especially, keep it
out of the direct sunlight. Partial shade or
full shade is the best. Good luck. Do not use
red dye it's not good for the birds.
Disgraceful place
I agree with the person who wrote in
about Citrus County's filth. Citrus County is
a disgrace. Litter all over the roads ... and
Cardinal Street is the filthiest place to go
that I know of. I don't like it and I don't like
it. And you people who move here, you want
to move in a nice place? They ought to make
you all clean it up.
Park it on power lines
I'm calling about the Suncoast Parkway
extension. Why don't they run the Suncoast
Parkway up the power lines and they would
have to use a lot less land from people that
live there. It would save a lot of money.
Turtle rescuer
Today is April 19. I'm a local resident
here, a transplant from up North, but I was
delighted to meet Sally Mackler from Ho-
mosassa at our Crystal River CVS parking
lot. She rescued a 30-pound snapping turtle.
Macho men walked by, didn't offer a hand,
but there was Sally walking this huge turtle
and risked herself all along the parking lot
way in the back. And she has a bad back
(and was) waiting for her pharmacy meds.
She got (the turtle) to the point where it
hopped into the back creek river and she
saved the turtle's life. A true hero in uniform.
Sally Mackler of Homosassa, I salute you. And
she tells me she's from Illinois, too, originally.
But she works with the wildlife people and I
tell you, she's a true hero in uniform. I salute
you, Sally. God bless for a rescue I witnessed.


@I201


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Medicaid should pay
more on rape victim
Some men rape women physically
and some men rape women emotion-
ally through their rage and cruel
words. Neither is normal and both are
destructive.
I read in today's newspaper (April
18, Tampa Bay Times) about a young
woman called Queena. She was re-
turning a book to the Bloomingdale
Library in Tampa when she was
raped, beaten and left for dead. This
is a very bright young woman who was
about to graduate from high school
and ready to attend the University of
Florida on a full scholarship. Instead
she was left unable to walk, talk, see
or eat on her own. She lives at home
with her mother who is her caregiver.
Kendrick Morris, 21, is the man who
attacked her. He is now serving 65
years in the state prison.
It costs her family $70,000 a year for
her therapies and medical supplies.
Medicaid covers only $1,500 a year.
The family must rely on donations to
a fund for Queena through the Bank
of Tampa and SunTrust
With all that this young woman has
gone through, shouldn't Medicaid be
covering more of her expenses? I
would think so.


Ruth J. Anderson
Homosassa


Letters to THE EDITOR

Questioning taxes
Why does the BOCC cry about Duke
Energy underpaying its property
taxes? They are begging the turnpike
to take $7,539,000 in 2013, $5,120,000
in 2014, $5,120,000 in 2015, $5,120,000
in 2016, $5,120,000 in 2017 and
$5,120,000 in 2018 off the tax rolls.
Add it up and it comes to a property
tax loss of $28,019,000, which is more
than Duke is skinning us for; and it's
for a toll road scheduled to begin con-
struction in 2024. I don't understand the
benefit to our county, especially when
BOCC cries how we need more revenue.
BOCC tells us they will get around
the property tax cap with MSBUs. If
MSBUs apply to everyone in the
county, what is the difference be-
tween them and ad valorem tax? Just
a way to get more with no tax cap.
This helps us citizens how?
Kathy Chetoka
Homosassa
Surprised by letter
I was pleasantly surprised by the
publication of the letter by Mr. Donald
Holcomb on April 18. I always had the
impression that any letter that even
remotely questioned the normality of
the gay lifestyle ended up in the trash
bin. Keep the free speech coming.
Brad L. Block
Homosassa


SRMC thanks volunteers
Delivering exceptional care with
kindness and compassion is about per-
sonal connection. It's about taking the
time to talk to patients and their loved
ones about support, assistance and
making them feel more comfortable.
Volunteers play a key role in pro-
viding that personal touch. They make
a difference by offering a smile or kind
words, assisting someone in need or
lending a helping hand to make a patient
or family member more comfortable.
The dedicated volunteers at Seven
Rivers Regional Medical Center gen-
erously give their time to improve the
health care experience for our pa-
tient and visitors. Our volunteers are
key members of our team, and their
contributions are felt throughout the
hospital.
We publicly thank and honor our
volunteers during National Volunteer
Week (April 21 to 27), but our appreci-
ation for what they do is ongoing.
On behalf of the entire health care
team at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center, I thank our extraordinary
volunteers and all those who serve
at organizations throughout our com-
munity You have chosen to spend
your time serving others, and your ef-
forts make a difference to so many
Joyce Brancato, CEO
Seven River Medical Center


SCHEMBRI
Continued from Page C1

dollars for the victims,
here come the scandals.
The victims never got any
money. Now comes the
finger-pointing, now
come the political investi-
gations, now comes the
turf protection. Newtown
will be forgotten. Boston
will take its place. A new
tragedy will soon come to



MAYO
Continued from Page C1

In an April 12 memo to
Pierson, Citrus County
Human Resources Direc-
tor Sherry Anderson
wrote: "Although you did
receive the subpoena to
appear (as a witness), you
were also named as a de-
fendant in the same case.
As such, to avoid any ap-
pearance of impropriety,
you have volunteered to
reimburse the county for
the administrative leave."


take the spotlight off
Boston. I called the State
Department yesterday
and asked for the "Peace
Department." I was told
there is none. Sometimes
I feel like Charlton Hes-
ton when he looked up
and saw the monkeys rid-
ing the ponies. I wish stu-
pidity caused pain. I am
not a social commentator.
I guess I am writing this
because I want us to
think. I am a criminolo-
gist who teaches and


Anderson and Grant
told me Pierson's super-
visor was aware that Pier-
son was a defendant in
the case, and that he did-
n't mislead anyone. Grant
said Pierson faces no
other disciplinary action,
and will continue in his
$32,593-a-year job.
According to the memo,
Pierson, who makes $15.67
an hour, will give up 103
hours of vacation time
and will have 117 hours
($1,833) docked from his
next 12 paychecks.
I think he'll be able to
take the financial hit.


writes about policing,
crime and government. I
saw television go from in-
nocence (Andy Griffith) to
relevance (Archie
Bunker). I was taught a
prayer which in part
read: "Thy Kingdom
come, Thy will be done,
on earth as it is in
Heaven." We were to
make on Earth like it is in
Heaven peace. Aahh,
peace!
Sometimes I remember
the poignant words of that


Pierson gets an annual
pension of at least
$113,374 from Miramar.
He took a disability re-
tirement in 2008 after 34
years with the force. He
moved to Inverness, and
was hired by Citrus
County in August 2008.
Anderson said a dis-
ability pension from a law
enforcement position
doesn't preclude some-
one from civilian govern-
ment work. "He passed a
pre-employment physi-
cal, and was cleared to
perform the functions for
what we hired him for,"


great western philoso-
pher Rodney King when
he said: "Can't we all just
get along?"
"Peace on Earth?"
Looks like that's only on
the Christmas cards.


Anthony Schembri is the
former county adminis-
trator for Citrus County
and a criminologist. He
teaches policing, crime
and government at the
University of Florida.


Anderson said.
While Pierson is work-
ing toward his second
government pension, Car-
avella, released in 2009,
has been working an $11-
an-hour construction job.
After appeals and other
legal hurdles play out,
it's anyone's guess when
Caravella might see his
$7 million.

Michael Mayo is a
columnist for the South
Florida Sun Sentinel.
Email him atmmayo@
sun-sentinel., com.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Jewel Lamb of Crystal
River is driven to help
people in need. While she
has a full-time job that
keeps her pretty busy, she
led the effort to create the


Feed Citrus
Food Bank in
Homosassa as a
branch of the
Feeding Amer-
ica program.
Now dozens of
nonprofits in
Citrus County
can get their


low-cost food supplies
through the countywide food
bank. Jewel is a volunteer.
There is an extra level of
credibility that comes when
people dedicate a portion
of their lives to actually
solving problems. There is
also clarity of purpose.
Art Jones just wants to
clean up the mess in the
bay Debbie Lattin doesn't
want kids to be hungry on
the weekend. Diane Toto
hates to see hungry peo-
ple. Ginger West hates to


see people living in the
woods. Jewel Lamb wants
to make it easy for others
to help people.
To get real things done,
it sometimes takes people
with a single focus to just
plow ahead and do it. And
let me tell you: I have made
the mistake on occasion of
getting in front of most of


these folks when
they were work-
ing on their
passion, and
they each took
turns knocking
me over with
their elbows.
Getting things
done is not a


job for the faint of heart.
These are just five of the
many people who make
good things happen in Cit-
rus County. Let's celebrate
what makes them special
and give them all the assis-
tance we can, because they
are the ones who are actu-
ally solving problems.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


Getting
things done
is not a job
for the faint
of heart.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 C3


/7 .


lor









Honest stranger
I just wanted to say that we
lost our phone, our cellphone in
Walmart on Monday (April 15)
and somebody found it. We just
wanted to say thank you since
there was an honest person.
Usually you don't get them
back when you lose them and
whoever did it, I just wanted to
say thank you.
Casino a pipe dream
How could anyone believe a
casino in place of the failing
mall could ever be allowed? Our
commissioners let the legisla-
tors and governor take away
our small Internet caf6s that
provided so many jobs, filled
empty stores, paid rent, elec-
tric, water and bought drinks
and food from our local mer-
chants, besides providing enter-
tainment and fellowship for
everyone. Do you think that our
commissioners are for the peo-
ple or just special interests?
Not true volunteers
In the Saturday, April 20, edi-
tion of the Chronicle on page 3,
the article about "National Vol-
unteer Week honors service."
That was a very nice article and
really highlights the volunteers
of our county. There was one
thing that brought to attention
the use of volunteers by some
organizations or groups within
the county. The statement is:
"However, volunteers do not re-
ceive a dime and like it that
way. Volunteering has exposed
us to the amount of people in
Citrus County that volunteer."
My comment is, please don't
refer to the part-time fire de-
partment employees as volun-
teers, since they do receive pay
for their actual time on the job.
Don't refer to them as volun-
teers. They're not true volun-
teers in the sense of the word.


COMMENTARY


Sound OFF


Faulty overlay plan
Old Homosassa has an over-
lay plan in which oak trees are
to be protected and buildings
constructed in certain man-
ners. Why is our county consid-
ering the proposed construction
of a two-story retail business
and the removal of our beauti-
ful old oak trees on the corner
of West Yulee Drive and New
York Avenue in Old Homosassa?
Why do we have an overlay plan
if our county is not going to ad-
here to it?
See it his way
I just want to say hang in
there, Scott Adams. I'll be glad
to help you elect some other
people on that county commis-
sion that see it your way.


Oh, those dirty looks
I agree with the person that
wrote in about drivers at inter-
sections with the oncoming
traffic. You are supposed to be
able to see oncoming traffic in
order to get out of the intersec-
tion. I am from the old school
and I learned the correct way.
But people give you dirty looks
when you do what they want
you to do.
Read traffic laws
Yes, there are ignorant drivers
in Crystal River. I had crossed
over (U.S.) 19 one day and
pulled way over to the right and
I had somebody sit on (U.S.) 19
because they would not go
around me. Why don't they
read the rule books?


Faulty perception
Just reading the article in
this morning's paper, Sunday,
April 21, about the individual
saying that folks in the South
are not necessarily more polite
because she continues to run
into terrible rude people in the
aisles of stores. I wonder just how
someone can be that brilliant to
know a Southerner from a North-
erner just by passing them in
the aisle of a store. She could
be running into more rude
Northern people in the stores,
not rude Southern people.
Yeah, Southern people can be
rude. Maybe I am being rude
this morning. But that's not an
accurate measure of rudeness.
What you see in the aisles of
stores can be anyone.


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


q,(1" .
P5. V 11.


I

3~d



~41~ t
-U---


OCuEFMQ
First Annual
"Too Far" Water and Natural Resoure." Citrus County' s

dS 2013 World's

Mudflah Greatest

Mania Baby Shower
May 13, 2013
at the Citrus County Auditorium
charity Flahing Teurnament
Wihn-SATURDAY MAY 4T 2013 FROM 7AM TO3PPM Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby
Where- HERNANDO PARK AND BOAT RAMP Shower! Learn about taking care of
ntrty fee-ONLY *15.oo yourself and your baby. Parents of
PrIe Mo-ne.y--45OO.O-LARGIEST TOTAL WEIGHT infants under 6 months old are also
-*300.00-BIGGEiST SINGLE FISH invited. There will be exhibits, games,
JOIN US FOR OUR FIRST"TOO FAR WATER AND NATURAL door prizes, a scavenger hunt and gifts
RESOURCE" MUD FISHING TOURNAMENT. PROCEEDS FROM THIS for moms, dads and babies!
CHARITY EVENT WILL QO TO FUND SCHOLARSHIPS FOR STUDENTS
IN CITkUS COUNTY WHO EXCEL IN THE WATER AND NATURAL Sessions: 3-5pm or 6-8pm
RESOURCES AREAS OF STUDY. THIS TOURNAMENT WILL DECREASE
THE POPULATION OF TRASH FISH THAT COMPETE WITrH SPORT AND
FOOD FISH IN OUR LAKE. FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE CallIE28-9047 -e
SO C'MON DOWN AND HELP US TAKE OUT THE TRASH. .
IT'S FOR 2 GOOD CAUSES! o forEnformation.
TAKE HWY 41 NORTH FROM 44 TO JUST PAST CR 486 *
(NORVELL BRYANT) INTERSECTION, STAY RIGHT AND *
90-' FOLLOWTHIE BOAT RAMP SIGNS.
LORA L WILSON, PL GOOD LUCKSN P \\0 i ..1(..
Ier-e, FL 34450 4116
m THE I Visit the Chronicle booth at this
..BALLROOMC .. sj m ce event to learn about our Cutest Ba.y Contest!


Citrus County All Hazar








/4 -..
.--- -- -


Are You ]
Saturday
9am
Special Guests: The Natic
Special Displays: Hurrican
Distribution, and More

National Guard A
Crystal River
1851 W. Venable

r -SHERIFFR -
JEFFREYJ. DAWSY


Pi

M
-V

one
e


Ar

-S


& Information Expo '



ED Q yzello
SBRAINS Adventure Race

OR Saturday, May 4th @ 9am
SPirates Cove Boat Ramp
F.Mr 8am check-in
FI A VE 1Ozello Trail (County Rd. 494)
10 miles west of US 19 between Homosassa & Crystal River
prepared? Kayaking 1.5 miles
lay 18th .
lay 1pm Bicycling 7 miles

al Weather Service Running 2 miles
Re-entry Tag
Re-entry Tag More information and application form or
", register online at OzelloAdventureRace.com
Barry Schwartz Race Director (352) 586-6366
rmory YOU ARE INVITED TO COMPETE IF YOU
ARE 14 Years OR OLDER & PHYSICALLY FIT
>t. CONIE Awards: Overall best times in team category &
For more information for individuals in age/gender classes.
contact the Citrus Crystal River T1
County Sheriff s Office C ry sa
(352) 249-2707 Rotary wi[ wh!i oion crn


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Bring under control
I'd like to add this to the "Road
rage theory" Sound Off in the
paper. That stretch of road,
people are driving it recklessly
(at) high rates of speed. They're
not doing the speed limit. They're
not paying attention to the speed
limit and that whole stretch of
road is like that and it's getting
worse, a lot worse. OK, either
change the speed limit to 60 mph
or start bringing it under control.
Gambled away
This is for the call in Sunday's
Sound Off (April 21), "People
out of work." They talk about
how these Internet (caf6s) fed
and paid light bills for their em-
ployees. But what about the
children who went without food,
without lights and without
water for the parents who
ended up spending all their
money in the Internet caf6s be-
cause they were hooked on
gambling? Stop and think about
that before you start putting
our governors and politicians
down for doing the right thing.
Try farther South
This is in reference to the ER
wait times at Seven Rivers. I left
from Homosassa and I went to
Oak Hill Hospital and I was
treated and released within four
hours and that was on a busy
day, according to them. So it
was worth going the other way
for treatment.
What money can't buy
To the person that thinks
when you go to the emergency
room, if you have money, you
should be taken right away, if
you don't have money, you
should spend at least a mini-
mum of 12 hours waiting: One
thing your money will never buy
you is called compassion and
respect. Good luck to you.


ds













CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Thinkstock
Getting back into the workforce can be daunting for older jobseekers who feel unprepared to re-enter the market. To help address those fears,
Workforce Connection has a series of workshops scheduled throughout the month of May.




For older jobseekers,





opportunities abound


To say the caller was frustrated would
be an understatement.
"Virtual Recruiter? What on Earth
is that?"
"Login to my dashboard? The only dash-
board I've heard of is on a car!"
At 67, Carol not her real name found
she needed to get back in the workforce,
and good grief have things changed since
the last time she looked for a job as a nurse's
assistant.
For one thing, everything is done on a
computer, and in Carol's words, she wasn't
exactly "computer-savvy."
The reality is that regardless of age,
today's jobseekers have to start with skills
that just a few years ago might have been
considered advanced.
Today, 40 percent of those age 55 and
older are actually still working, up from 29
percent in 1993. For those like Carol inter-
ested in finding employment, the good news
is that in Florida those 55 and older have
the lowest unemployment rate, at 7.1 per-
cent, among all labor force age groups (16- to
19-year-olds have the highest unemploy-
ment rate at 23.5 percent, followed by those
20 to 24 at 14.3 percent, and 25 to 54 at
7.5 percent).
But unsurprisingly, as with general job-
seekers, the length of time away from the
workplace can be an issue. Even as the un-
employment rate continues to drop in the
state and our region, the average length of
unemployment in Florida, at 49 weeks, is
still incredibly high and possibly higher
still for older jobseekers, according to Deb-
orah Chalfie, AARP's senior legislative rep-
resentative for financial security and
consumer affairs.
"Once they become unemployed, it takes
older workers far longer than younger work-
ers to find a new job," Chalfie said in an
AARP Foundation article promoting job-
search classes for older jobseekers.
Chalfie said that a policy of not hiring the
long-term unemployed has an "age-dis-
criminatory effect," especially if prospective
employers have misinformed biases against
hiring older people, such as thinking they
will be more expensive or won't fit in with


their younger colleagues or, significantly,
will lack the technological skills required to
succeed in today's workplace.
Which brings us full circle back to Carol's
conundrum: Clearly, keeping skills current
is critical to finding employment- and yes,
that can seem pretty daunting if your skills
aren't exactly "current."
Workforce Connection has a variety of op-
tions that can help jobseekers of any age,
but may be particularly useful to older job-
seekers.
First and foremost,
if you haven't done so
yet, please visit our
One-Stop Career
Center in Inverness.
This truly is the one
place to go for em-
ployment resources
and staff assistance,
Laura Byrnes including access to,
WORKFORCE and help with, com-
WORKFORCE puters. Also, our new
CONNECTION mobile resource unit,
mentioned here ear-
lier this month and also equipped with 10
computers and Internet access, will be back
at the Homosassa Public Library on May 6
and May 20 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Workforce Connection also offers a wide
array of employability workshops designed to
help any jobseeker get back in the game.
Navigating the New World of Work takes a
deep dive into strategies to help job seekers
more effectively market their skills and
qualifications.
The workshop is offered in two half-day
formats on May 10 and 11 and May 24 and 25
at the one-stop center, as well as two-hour
sessions on May 6 at the Homosassa Public
Library and May 16 at the Central Ridge
Public Library
Nail That Interview on May 14 and May
28 is ideal for anyone committed to improv-
ing their interview skills. In the first half of
the workshop, participants review inter-
view basics including preparation, appro-
priate attire and how to address prompts
such as "Tell me about yourself." During the
second part, participants will be paired


with a Workforce Connection employment
specialist and go through a practice
interview.
Targeted Resume is intended for job
seekers who have a basic resume that they'd
like to tailor for a specific job. The workshop
is held on May 17 and May 31 in Inverness.
If you don't see a workshop that interests
you or a date that works, you are welcome to
attend workshops in Levy and Marion coun-
ties. You will find the calendar of events,
searchable by location and event types,
along with much more on our new website,
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com.
If you have been considering updating
your skills to get back in the workforce, for
whatever reason and regardless of age, your
timing could not be more perfect. On the
heels of the successful Spring Fling Job Fair
held in Citrus County in March, Workforce
Connection is holding a regional job fair on
May 8 at the College of Central Florida's
Klein Conference Center in Ocala.
Veterans will receive early admission at 8
a.m. followed by general job seekers at 8:30
a.m. Businesses with open jobs in health
care, manufacturing, distribution, Informa-
tion Technology and financial services sec-
tors will be on hand. To date, the following
businesses plan to attend: R & L Truckload
Services, ResCare Home Care/Southern
Home Care, Arcadia Health Care, Sitel,
Pike Electric, Caregiver Services, Family
Life Care, HealthSouth, Express Employ-
ment Professionals, Spherion, Digital Re-
ception Services, Cutrale Citrus Juices USA,
Quantum Mechanix, Frito-Lay, Childhood
Development Services and Kids Central.
For more information about the Citrus
County One-Stop Career Center, workshops
and other jobseeker services, please call
352-637-2223 or visit us at 1103 E. Inverness
Blvd., in Inverness or at www.Workforce
ConnectionFL.com.

Laura Byrnes, APR is a Certified Workforce
Professional and communications manager
at Workforce Connection. Please contact her
at 352-291-9559 or 800-434-5627, ext. 1234 or
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl. com.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Ignoring

debt won't

fix credit
DEAR BRUCE:
Back in 2006, I
had a slip-and-
fall accident at work. I
went to a clinic to have it
checked out the next day
and after the diagnosis
of a sprained ankle, I
was given pain meds
and a set of crutches and
sent on my way I re-
turned to work the next
day and gave the secre-
tary the bills from the
clinic. She told me that
everything would be
covered by the company,
as it was work-related.
In ignorant bliss, I
simply assumed that all
would be taken care of,
as the secretary indicated.
Every time I received a
new request for payment
from the clinic, I simply
forwarded it to my work-
place. Recently, I procured
a credit report and I saw
that there was a judg-
ment against me for the
total of $2,000, granted to
the clinic a few months
after my visit I contacted
the clinic, asked if there
was anything I could do
and was told the debt
was owned by a collec-
tions company and gave
me the information.
I have been told by
more than one person
that to contact the col-
lection agency this long
after the fact would ac-
tually harm my credit as
there would be an up-
dated "event" regarding
this situation. If I leave it
alone, after so many years
go by, the issue will drop
from my credit history
Bruce, could you please
give me the real scoop?
I do not know what to
believe. S.S., via email
DEAR S.S.: Ignoring it
will not make it go away
The clinic has sold the
bill to another agency, and
it is now the company
you have to deal with.
Tell the agency that the
money should have been
paid by workers' comp
as this is a comp-covered
action, and that you no-
tified your company in a
timely fashion, so you ex-
pect them to make a claim
against workers' comp.
If that doesn't get you
anywhere, you might wish
to go to the workers' comp
company and explain the
problem. Make it clearthat
under no circumstances
are you going to pay for
this because this was a
work-related injury that
should have been paid for
by workers' compensation.

Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams. com.


Angela Acevedo taking
over medical practice
Because of the passing of Arnelle
V. Eslava-Fernandez, M. D., Angela
Acevedo, M. D. is taking over the
medical practice located at 204 S.
Apopka Avenue, Inverness.
Dr. Acevedo is board-certified in
internal medicine. She completed
her residency in internal medicine
and pediatrics at New York Medical
College in 2002. Since then she has
practiced in Florida. She has been in
Citrus County since 2007. She has
an office in Crystal River at 6202 W.
Corporate Oaks Drive.
As of June 15, the Inverness office
will be moving to 112 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness, which is just around
the corner from the current location.
The phone number for the Inver-
ness office remains 352-341-1159.
The phone number for the Crystal
River office is 352-795-9697.


Customer assistance
days under way
The Florida Department of Busi-
ness and Professional Regulation
(DBPR) reminds Floridians the sec-
ond annual CustomerAssist program
is currently under way. Throughout
the remainder of the Legislative Ses-
sion, DBPR will feature a help desk
at the Florida Capitol in order for de-
partment staff to assist current and
potential licensees as well as con-
sumers who have questions regard-
ing the services offered by the
department.
The CustomerAssist initiative was
developed to provide customers
who may need assistance with li-
cense applications with a direct and
personal point of access to the de-
partment. Staff for specific busi-
nesses and professions will be
available on specific days, and the
Department encourages customers,


Business DIGEST
license holders and applicants to
visit the CustomerAssist table at the
Florida Capitol to receive specialized
assistance.
The following businesses and pro-
fessions will be represented from 9
a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. on the
Plaza level of the Florida Capitol on
the following dates:
May 1: Cosmetology
May 2: Hotels and restau-
rants/construction
The Central Intake Unit, which
processes applications for the De-
partment's licenses, will also be
available May 1 to answer questions
about license application processes.
Direct internet access to the depart-
ment will also be available so cus-
tomers can check the status of their
license applications online, file com-
plaints and access additional depart-
ment information.
For information, visit
www.MyFloridaLicense.com.


Van Houten II receives
Control certification
Schlabach Security and Sound
Inc. has taken home automation
and control to the "next level" with
the recent certi-
fication of Ken
Van Houten II to
the Control4
level of Tech II.
Van Houten is
Schlabach's pri-
mary home the-
ater technician
Ken Van and is fondly
Houten m i noted by our
satisfied clients as the home au-
tomation pro at SSS!
Control offers the latest in
home control automation includ-
ing control of lighting, thermostat,
cameras, intercom, motorized
blinds, home theater and whole-
house music. Clients find the


Control system reliable and af-
fordable, Schlabach Security
finds it flexible.
"Our clients just want a simple
way to keep up with their videos,
music and lighting," according to
Van Houten. "Control4 makes it
easy while keeping the system
dependable."
The Control4 system allows a
family to start off with a basic sys-
tem that can be upgraded over
time with solutions that fit the
homeowner's needs and budget.
For more information, the
Control website, www.control4
.com, is informational and enter-
taining. Schlabach Security and
Sound has been in Citrus County
since 1995. Their showroom is
available by appointment and is
at 2181 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way in Lecanto. Visit www.
sssonline.biz for photos and
details.










D2


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Citrus

Springs

group stays

active with

YMCA
It is easy to make sure loved
ones stay healthy, happy and
active, but it is not always easy to
do the same for yourself that
is where the Y comes in. The Y
offers group exercise for all lev-
els. Classes are available in both
mornings and afternoons. With
classes ranging from yoga stretch
to cardio pump, group exercise is
another way to keep moving
without having to join a gym.
"Group exercise is really fun.
The class gets your body moving;
it is very motivating," voiced par-
ticipant June Towner. "Our
group exercise instructor is
good," said participant Carolyn
Alter. "A good instructor makes
a good workout and that is what
we have," added Mary Harken-
rider.
"I have tried many gym classes
and always dropped out. This
one I like," voiced Muriel Bryan
when asked why she has chooses
to stay active with the YMCA.
The Y also offers SilverSneak-
ers, the nation's leading exercise
program, designed exclusively for
older adults. The SilverSneakers
program is available at little or
no cost as a benefit through
Medicare health plans, Medicare
supplement carriers and some
group retiree plans.
"Group exercise is a fun way to
get healthy, meet new friends
and motivate each other. Classes
give participants a sense of fam-
ily, allowing everyone to have an
enjoyable workout in an uplifting
and friendly environment," com-
mented instructor Angie Cata-
lano. "SilverSneakers programs
are a gentle way for older adults
to exercise. Classes like yoga
stretch help enhance flexibility
and strength. The Y does a great
job at being accessible to all lev-
els of experience for those who
are interested in staying active."
The Y has classes to meet all
standards, so do not be intimi-
dated get active with the
YMCA and try out your first class
at any of our locations for free.
The Y offers convenient locations
for their programs in Ho-
mosassa, Citrus Springs and In-
verness, making group exercise a
hassle-free and enjoyable way to
take a step in keeping yourself
healthy and happy. For ques-
tions or to register, call the Y's of-
fice at 352-637-0132 or stop in
and visit us at the Y's Beverly
Hills office.


A sampling of some of the silent auction items donated for the annual Pillar Awards.


Oscars? CMAs? Even better:


the annual Pillar Awards


About 200 guests joined the Citrus
County Chamber of Commerce on
April 26 to honor community mem-
bers and organizations that truly
make Citrus County a gem of a place in which
to live, work and play. This year the annual
awards claimed their own name, The Pillar
Awards quite appropriate, as the recipients
represent the support and backbone that hold
the community together. The event, held at the
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club, was pre-
sented by Neon Leon's and Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen, along with supporting sponsors In-
surance Resources and Risk Management and
Mike Bays, State Farm Insurance Agent.
In an Oscar-like presentation, attendees
were photographed on the red carpet and in-
terviewed by Chamber Chat Host Melissa Bene-
field. The evening's festivities began with live
music by Craig Jaworski, a buffet dinner and
silent auction. After the award announce-
ments, our very own Southeast Farmer of the
Year Dale McClellan took the stage as auction-
eer for an exciting live auction. Guests bid on a
selection of items that included one-of-a-kind
jewelry, a Citrus County flyover for two, advertis-
ing packages and, of course, the much-sought-
after golf putters one each from the Florida
State Seminoles and University of Florida
Gators. And now, the winners of the 2012 an-
nual Chamber Pillar awards:


THE ENVELOPE,
PLEASE:
Jean Grant Business Women's
Alliance Award: Rebecca Martin
Mandi Warren Richards Rising
Star Award: Courtney Pollard
Ambassador of the Year: Nancy
Hautop
Rick Quinn Distinguished Citizen
Award: Paul Cash
Outstanding Leadership Citrus
Graduate Award: Art Jones
J.L. Hassell Award: Sibex
Walt Connors Small Business Award:
Plantation Inn on Crystal River
Outstanding Community Business/
Corporate Citizen Award: Steve
and Jewel Lamb
John T. Barnes Community Organi-
zation Award: Key Training Center
Shawn Harrison Outstanding Youth
Service Award: Kassidy Lundy
Dr. O.J. Humphries Community
Service Award: Arnold A. Virgilio
Charles B. Fitzpatrick Award:
Joe Silvestro
Lifetime Ambassador Recognition:
Reyna Bell
Chamber Champion Award:
Leon McClellan
Bill Hudson
Mary Ann Virgilio
Sandy Anderson
Jill Demers
Mike Buchanan
Insight Credit Union
FDS
Lifetime Director Awards:
Kevin Cunningham
Jack Reynolds
Pete Burrell
Mike Fitzpatrick


Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
May 4- 11 a.m. ribbon-
cutting Florida Cancer
Specialists
May 9 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Business After Hours -
Old Florida National Bank,
Crystal River
May 10-- 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. May lunch -
Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
May 17 -4:30 p.m.
ribbon-cutting Saltface
Charter at MacRae's
May 23 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. Business After
Hours Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Facility
Check our complete
Chamber and Community
calendar at www.citrus
countychamber.com or
follow the QR code to see
the website on your
smartphone!


Special

Hazardous

Waste

Drop-Off

Day May 4
Keep Citrus County Beautiful and
Citrus County Solid Waste Manage-
ment will be hosting a free disposal
spring cleanup day at the central
landfill on Saturday, May 4, from 7
a.m. until 4 p.m. Businesses will be
charged business rates.
Program acceptance require-
ments:
Citizens will need to provide
proof of residency by providing a
copy of tax bill or utility bill
Handymen/lawn maintenance
companies should bring proof that
material is being transported for a
Citrus County homeowner by pre-
senting a copy of the client's tax/util-
ity bill or work order.
Tire loads over the maximum
lo-per-household limit will be ac-
cepted only if the transporter has a
current Tire Transporter Permit.
Organizations/neighborhoods
performing a cleanup and trans-
porting materials to the landfill
should be pre-approved by Keep
Citrus County Beautiful (KCCB).
Contact KCCB at 352-746-9393 or
email keepcitruscountybeautiful@
gmail.com for approval.
Material restrictions will apply
during the event. Get complete in-
formation at http://www.bocc.
citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm/
solid waste.htm or call Solid Waste
Management (Citrus County Land-
fill) at 352-527-7670.


Christ Medical Center joins

Chamber of Commerce


Please welcome new Chamber
member Christ Medical Center.
Located at 7562 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River, this multispe-
cialty group offers trusted medical
care where physicians and practition-
ers work together to speed recovery
and keep costs down for the patient.
Appropriate, comprehensive and
timelytreatment for our patients all in
one place is the sole purpose of Christ
Medical Center.
We believe if you choose Christ
Medical Center for your health care
needs, you'll agree it is simply the best
comprehensive care you will find any-
where in the area. Your Health. Your
Life. Our Passion. Call us at 352-564-
0444 or visit our website at
www.christmedicalcenter.com.


The staff of Christ Medical Center
hosted a wonderful opening event at its
ribbon-cuttingApril 18. Joining the staff
were many businesspeople including:
Commissioner ScottAdams; John Mur-
phy, chairman of the Chamber Board of
Directors; Anna Neptune; Leon McClel-
lan; Gailen Spinka; and Josh Wooten,
president/CEO of the Chamber of Com-
merce. Ambassadors included: Bonnie
Pushee, associate member; NancyHau-
top, Top Time Travel; Jeanne Green, In-
side Citrus; JeneeVickers, Kiddie Kampus
Learning Center; Jim Ferarra; George
Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Tom
Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus
County; Dan Pushee, associate member;
Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics;
Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank;
and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


PUT CITRUS COUNTY IN YOUR HANDS
Every Chamber member goes with you!
S.nlod WIn the NOW:
rhfh SEE .r : DINE
VIEVI L.-c 1 E .n* STAY
f I.. .. SHOPI


CITRUS COUNTY


N l nature Coastff ]'
"rr~Sng m cth Ffcellrnrr and (ompas.ion"
Help us celebrate
National EMS Week!

*EMS
ONE IhSSION. ONE TEAM.
Sunday through Friday May 19-25
Thank our team on your business sign
or offer a special discount for the week!
Help us celebrate on your business sign...
National EMS Week
Thank you Nature Coast EMSI
If you offer a special discount for the team 'll let them know to stop byl
Thank you for your consideration!
Our guys and gals risk their lives every day saving lives.
This is the week to say thank you!
Email t e Lucsat kaie snatu, aems.org or call 352-249-4730
If you can help us celebrate this very important week!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, APRIL 28,2013 D3


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa: 32)53-65 ol.re:(88.82230 1 m il*lasfid rnilo*ie Iwbst: w crnilonie0o


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748




Chevrolet
1970 Impala,
convertible, older
restoration, needs tic,
$15k, 352-628-2777
Chrysler
1941 4 dr. sedan
good solid body, runs
great,needs starter,
$3500. 352-628-2777






Doublewides
Available
in 55+ park in
Lecanto, Exc.
Condition & Pricing
352-563-0500

GLASS TOP TABLES,
1 sofa tbl, 1 coffee tbl, 2
end tbls. $95 obo
352-860-0444

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

Billing Clerk
Receptionist
Medical Asst.
Scanning Asst.

Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429

PONTOON
2005 18ft Party Pon-
toon w/ galvanized
Trailer. 40hp Yamaha
$6995 (352) 650-9059
Residential
Cleaner Needed
Experienced Only
Mon-Fri Team Player
with Ref. Must past drug
test and Bk Grnd check
apply at
springcleancitrus.com
Twin Electric Beds
in good condition
$1200.
352-628-2777
YAMAHA
1999 v star 1100, cust.
pipes, wshleld & bags,
Adult ridden, gar. kept
$2900 (352) 650-9059




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
UnwantedCars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




11/2 yr old Bullmastiff
named Opie. Up to
date on shots & tags.
Needs loving home
(352) 419-8580
firewood small or large
oak or pine trees you
cut down and haul
away. great for bonfires
or fireplace
352-628-9624
FREE FIRE WOOD
mostly Oak
(352) 419-7862
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
(352) 613-3205
Yorkie Poo
1 yr old, male, 9 lbs
black, upt on shots, not
neut, lives with cat, gets
long with other dogs,
need family to play with
794-3989/212-3855




Misty Meadows
U-Pick Blueberries
Open Thur-Sun
7am-7pm
352-726-7907
www.mistymeadows-
blueberryfarm.com


MaleCat
called Mini Menace
4" white stripe down
back, lost on Crown
Drive, Inverness
pls call 352400-8860
Little Boys Back Pack
Blue with sharks
Crystal River
(352) 293-8256
Lost Calico Cat
Dark brown color
white chest & paws,
orange marking,
Beverly Hills, Gleason
Place Heartbroken
Lost on April 6, RE-
WARD 352-527-0302
LOST DARK GRAY
MALE CAT Gray w/
White Muzzle White
paws, pink nose w/
green eyes. Missing
from Humanitarian's
Parking Lot 4/2/13 on
44 in Crystal River.
PLEASE CALL
If you have seen him
REWARD
(352) 382-9303 OR
352-201-0576

( and read
Lost Gold w/silver
hoop hearing in the
area of Bealls Inver-
ness. Reward call
344-9663
Lost White Bichon
12 yrs., Name Snowie
Inverness Area
East of the trail
(352) 637-9685
Yorkie Mix, Tan & BIk,
named Remy. Lost on
4/23 near NE 1st st
and 12th in Cry. River.
Friendly. Call
(586) 206-4465




Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397




EMPTY TRUCK
Returning to
Milwaukee, Chicago,
Mid West
Can move 1 item or
whole household
(414) 520-1612
Brian
Live in Care Giver
for your loved ones,
Excellent References
Call Joyce Ann (local
res.) 850-661-1312
Looking For Rent/
Option Home in Citrus
County 352-419-0223
or 352-726-1006




HairStylist/Nail
Tech Needed

Shear Delight
352-601-8059




Homemaker/
Caregiver

for older female in
her Citrus Hills Fl.
Home, no exp.
PT 1 p-5p, Fri. Sat. &
Sun w/potential for
addl Hrs. Resume to:
caregiver 531
@gmail.com
or Mail: Resume
836 Sunnyside Ave.
Akron, OH, 44303

HOUSEKEEPING
PERSON

Opening on house
keeping staff at Citrus
Hills. Responsible for
cleaning hospitality
villas, including laun-
dry, as well as offices
and models as
needed. Flexible
part-time schedule
to include weekends.
Apply at Terra Vista
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"1with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On"y $28.50
includes a photo


Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


3-11 RN
SUPERVISOR

Seeking a dynamic
experienced RN
Leader to join a
progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will
have a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and man-
agement abilities,
great organizational
skills and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Apply in person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness, FL
Send resume to:
atdon@
SouthernLTC.com
An EEO/AA Em-
ployer M/F/V/D


Avante
At Inverness
Open Position

DIETARY AID
Full time, Hours and
days will vary.
Please apply online
At
Avantecenters.com


CNA

Citrus Health and
Rehab Center, a five
star skilled nursing
facility, we have two
positions available
on our 3-11 and 11-7
shifts. We offer a
good salary and
work environment
including
medical/dental/vision
insurance. A liberal
paid time off plan
Please apply in
person for an
immediate interview.
701 Medical Court E
Inverness
EOE/DFW
Not for profit


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST &
SURGICAL ASSIST

Part time or Full time
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@



SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team

RN-ICU
FT-Nights

APPLY at Our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River Fl.
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


LPN or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT/
PHLEBOTOMIST

Wanted for office
based medical
practice in
Inverness. Experience
required. Fax Resume
(352) 726-5818


Medical
Assist./X-Ray
Tech

Large Orthopedic
practice seeks F/T
MA Assist. Must
have X-Ray Tech
Experience and
Florida Licence.
Ortho experience a
plus for starting
salary increase.
Email your
Resume to:
julie@citrusortho.net
or Fax 352-746-4130


Medical Careers
begin here

Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Computer and
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com


RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.

APPLY IN PERSON
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, FI 34461
EOE/SF/DF


NEEDED
Experienced,
Caring & Dependable
CNA's/HHA's
Hourly & Live-in,
flex schedule offered
LOVING CARE
(352) 860-0885





CHAMPS
SOFTWARE
Crystal River based
Enterprise Software
Company has follow-
ing job opportunities:
Software Applica-
tions Specialists
to develop, implement
and support plant soft-
ware solutions such as
CMMS,MRO Inven-
tory, WF Management
and LOTO. At least 3
years' experience
working in plant
environment required.
Software Sales
Executive
to develop large
enterprise accounts.
Must have 3+ years of
experience selling
software solutions to
enterprise accounts
both to plant
management & IT
departments.
These positions
require extensive
travel. Please submit
resume to: jobs@
champsinc.com

Family Services
Director

Non-profit Christian
organization in Cit-
rus County is seeking
Family Services
Director responsible
for ensuring ade-
quate number of
qualified participat-
ing families to meet
organization's goals
and objectives. Ac-
tively monitor, serv-
ice and manage
the mortgage port-
folio. Candidates
will possess excep-
tional communica-
tion and presenta-
tion skills, be a com-
passionate advo-
cate of the organi-
zation and its mis-
sion, experienced
with mortgage
lending, processing,
servicing and knowl-
edge of real estate
transactions, docu-
mentation and
compliance.
Bachelor's degree
or equivalent work
experience pre-
ferred; high school
diploma or equiva-
lent required.
Full time position
Monday thru Friday,
some evenings and
weekend events.
Application Dead-
line May 7, 2013

Send Resume and
Cover letter to:
1108 E. Inverness
Blvd., Box 127
Inverness, Fl. 34452

Holland
Financial
Resources

Hiring and Training
Insurance Agents
352-410-6927

MEDICAL
OPPORTUNITIES

* Billing Clerk
* Receptionist
* Medical Asst.
* Scanning Asst.

Blind Box 1792P
c/o Citrus
County
Chronicle, 1624
N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal
River, FL 34429





Port Hotel & Marina
Housekeepers
& Maintenance
Ale House
Servers
Apply at Port Hotel & Marina
1610 SE Paradise Circle
Crystal River* 795-3113

Country Club
Restaurant
FT Cook
Needed

Tue, Wed, Thur, Sat,
& Sun 9am-3pm

Dishwasher
Wed, Fri, Sat
4pm-8pm & Sun
8am-3pm

Call 352-854-6557 X3
or email resume to
jobs@deccahomes.
corn
EEOC/DFWP





Acct Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460
to Schedule an
Interview


B
DIRECT TECHS
4 spots open. Must pass
background, drug and
DMV check. Must have
Truck, SUV or VAN.
Piece work $1 k to
$2k/week. 80 miles ra-
dius. Call 352-201-7219
or 407-738-9463

Driver -

One Cent Raise af-
ter 6 and 12 months.
$0.03 Enhanced
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or Weekly Pay,
Home time Choices.
CDL-A, 3 months
OTR exp.
800-414-9569
www.
drivekni.ht.com

DRIVER

OTR SD/LB/FLATBED
2 Yrs Exp,
Class A CDL
(352) 799-5724

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

EXP. PIPE UTIL-
ITY FOREMAN
Croft Contracting Inc.
Experienced, working
pipe crew foreman.
Valid drivers license
req'd. To work in Cit-
rus & surrounding
counties. Weekend
work may be req'd.
Salary based on ex-
perience. Please ap-
ply at: 2271 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando,
Citrus Co., 34442
email resume to:
croftcontracting
inc(5?earthlink.net
EEO/Drug Free
Workplace

INSTALLERS AND
SERVICE TECHS

Byers Discount
Air Conditioning
Call (352) 746-9484

MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163

Metal Polisher

Wanted experience
Metal Polisher, for
plating shop,
knowledgeable trim, buff
& polishing wheels, Bkgr
check req. Experience
only need apply for in-
terview call 564-0001

Now Taking Appl.

Septic Tank industry.
Exp and/or CDL help-
ful. Call 352-302-4977

The City of
Crystal River
is accepting
applications
for the following
two positions:
Equipment
Operator
w/pay range
$23,858-$33,794 and
Maintenance
Worker II
w/pay range
$20,609 -$29,192.
Job descriptions &
application forms
are available online
@ crystalriverfl.org.
Applications should
be sent to Public
Works Director,
123 NW Hwy 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428 and must
be received
by May 3, 2013.


WASTEWATER
OPERATOR
Requires: HS Diploma,
valid driver lic & safe
driving record, FL
class C Wastewater
certification, apply
online
http://tinyurl.com/vwna3
0871




CDL CLASS A
DRIVER

Truss exp. helpful.
Bruce Component
Systems.
352-628-0522

CUSTODIAN

PART-TIME 24 hrs
to transition to
FULL TIME 40hrs
Needed for an
Expanding Venture
We are looking for
a motivated and
energetic person to
join our team;
someone who is hard
working, reliable, has
a great work ethic and
good character. Job
duties include general
office cleaning, floor
maintenance, window
cleaning and related
custodial tasks.
Position requires
experience in
custodial work, ability
to follow written and/or
verbal assignments.
We are an equal
opportunity employer
offering a competitive
salary and benefits
package. The
successful candidate
must have a minimum
of one year of related
experience and/or
training, and great
references. Only
qualified applicants
please send resume
to: CC Chronicle
Blind Box 1827P
1624 N Meadowcrest
Blvd, Crystal River,
FL 34429

Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits, Clean work
enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129

FUEL TRUCK
DRIVER

CDL with Hazmat
required.
Call (352) 795-3469


B
Maintenance
Associate

Seeking a full time
maintenance assoc.
for a senior living
community in Inver-
ness, that is respon-
sible and hardworking.
Candidate must have
previous experience
in all phases of apart-
ment maintenance
and small appliance
repair. Must have own
tools. Benefits after
90 days.
Please apply
online at
hr@dewarproperties.
com or by taxing to
229-247-1353.






PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP

Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
*Avail. weekdays
& weekends?

Join the Citrus
County Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Send Resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com

CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
FL 34429

EOE, drug screening
for final applicant


Part-Time Gate
Security
Coordinators

Neat, energetic and
outgoing persons with
good people and
telephone
skills for part-time
work at the main
entrance of Citrus
Hills. You will greet,
identify and log all
visitors. Preferred
experience: customer
service, military
service or law
enforcement. Good vi-
sion, able to stand for
prolonged
periods of time.
Starting pay is $7.79
per hour. Must be
available for any
of the three (3) shifts
of 24/7 operation or
extra daytime
coverage as needed.
Apply in person @
Welcome Center,
2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd, Hernando, FL



CHIkONICLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CEiuoNlM E


B
SUMMER WORK

GREAT PAY!
Immediate FT/PT
openings, customer
sales/serv, will train,
condltlons apply, all
ages 17+, Call ASAP!
352-600-5449




Boys & Girls
Club

P/T ProgramAssis-
tant and summer camp
staff at all locations.
Sub. Teachers encour-
age to Apply website:
citrusbac.com
Fax to 3526214679.

P/T DOCKHAND

Cleaning boats and
grounds. Explaining
boats and river to cus-
tomers. Must work in
heat and rain. Knowl-
edge of tools, equip.
boating & lifting req.
Must have drivers lic.
Apply in person:
River Safari,
10823 W. Yulee Dr.
Homosassa

Residential
Cleaner Needed
Experienced Only
Mon-Fri Team Player
with Ref. Must past drug
test and Bk Grnd check
apply at
springcleancitrus.com




MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP.
HSDiploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294




Salon For Sale
Chair Rental
$270 pr month
352-634-1397




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structureslic.com


LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352-299-4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




BAVARIA CHINA ALL
SERVING pieces
SERVES 12 missing 2
sm plates $30.00
603-493-2193
CHINA CABINET, deco
era ,glass door with
shelves and cabinet
below.$100.00
352-513-4473



DIE CAST Moose
Lodge themed 36
Dodge Pickup bank.
Mint $20.00
352-270-0630
Large Elvis Presley
Collection complete
bubble gum set, his
personal scarf, and
personal pictures from
1977, $5. gold piece.
lots of papers &
books, Asking $750
(352) 586-2935



a


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
GE DISHWASHER,
WHITE good cond.
works good!Ready to be
connected. $65.00 352
513 4473
KENMORE Glass Top
Electric Range
white, exc. cond.
$125. 352-465-5991
Kenmore Range, $125.
Amana Dish Washer
$145
Kenmore Washer $125.
Panasonic above range
Micro. $40 All work good
352- 897-4108
REFRIGERATOR
16 cu ft w/ice
maker,Kenmore,white,
in exc. cond.$200 obo
352-746-4160


Your World






CHR~NMC"LE


CLASSIFIED







D4 SUNDAY,APRIL 28, 2013


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
UPRIGHT FREEZER
Upright Kelvinator
Freezer, works great.
asking $250.00
352-422-7873
WASHER OR DRYER
$135 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free De-
livery 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call
or text 352-364-6504
White like New, GE
Electric self cleaning
range, Dish Washer, &
space saver micro-
wave $600 for All
(856) 229-1136



AIRLESS SPRAYER BY
BLACK @ DECKER
$30 NEW IN BOX,
NEVER USED
419-6981
Electric Power
Metal Saw
good cond. labor saver
cash, firm $25.
(352) 341-1714
POWER TOOLS, Wood
working & automotive
Large & Small Many
Items (352) 563-2997
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HEAVY
DUTY, MADE OF
METAL. OLDER STYLE
INVERNESS 419-5981
ROUTER Black and
Decker 1 1/2 HP
Router. Brand New in
Box $45.00
352-746-5421
RYOB1I10" Compound
Miter Saw. Nice. 30 Ib
Scotts W&F Near new
Reese's hitch with ball.
All $45. 527-6709



DIRECT Official TV
Deal America's top
satellite provider!
DIRECTV Plans start-
ing at $29.99/mo for 12
months after instant
rebate. Get the best in
entertainment.
800-253-0519
STEREO AM-FM Stereo
with CD Player like new
$35- 352-220-4158
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529



CANON PIXMA-MX420
ALL IN ONE Wireless
Printer, Scanner &
Fax $75.00 OBO
352-527-1399
DELL COMPUTER
MONITOR 15" $20
352-613-0529
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


2 Barrel chairs
& ottoman cust made
white cover $100 obo,
Curio brass dome 6' x
33" w/four glass shelves
$200 obo 746-0817
2 Display Cases
48"W x 38" H,
$75 each
(352) 341-2836
Leave message
3 pc. Oak
Entertainment
Center, good cond.
$265. obo
352-489-0976
4 Rattan BarStools
Padded, swivel, light
wood color, $175
352-249-3259
7' Couch sage Green,
$250, 2 out doors
tables 1 wood
1 glass top $35 each
304-661-9811
BASSETT SOFA sage
green perfect condition
$100. call 352-257-3870
BEAUTIFUL CHINA
CABINET with lighted
shelves and storage
drawers.$100.00
352-726-9758
Beautiful Pulaski
6pc hand decorated
bdrm set, solid pine,
pd over $3k, asking.
$975 352-566-7324



Beautiful,

High End
Drexal Heritage
Furniture from model
home in Terra Vista
Call for your private
showing and furniture
details 352-804-6114

BRASS TABLE GLASS
TOP 2 shelves 47"L
18"W26"H Very nice
beveled edges $ 50.
352-621-0175
BRASS TABLE GLASS
TOP 27"L 23"W 22"H
Nice beveled edges
Good Condition $40.
352-621-0175
BRASS TABLE GLASS
TOP oval 28"L 23"W
22"H Good condition
$40. 352-621-0175
CURIO CABINETS
8 various sizes
fm. $50 to $375. obo
352-344-9999
DARK WOOD CHINA
CABINET lighted glass
shelves, storage draw-
ers.$100.00 cash.
352-726-9758
Dining Rm 4 brass
frame char/blue velour
chairs, 43" beveled
glass top $200 obo, din-
ning set,like new 4 light
brn wicker chairs red,
grn gold thick cushions
4' glass top $850 new
now $600 obo 746-0817
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT Cherry colorfits
27" TV,glass door for
DVD player etc. Excel-
lent.$50 746-7232


i-
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LOVE SEAT AND
CHAIR pretty good
condition $50. call
352-257-3870
Maple Wood Table
Solid wood, w/4
chairs, clean $40.00,
black truck tool box
$40.00
628-4766
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Full $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
Oriental Style Round
Table w/mother of
pearl figures and 4
chairs, Sacrifice @
$675. 352-566-7324
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
RATTAN TABLE AND
CHAIRS 42 inch peacon
finish rattan glass top
tbl & 2 chairs purchased
at Leaders a year ago.
Additional chairs to
match can be pur-
chased. $325. Sugarmill
740-705-9004
RECLINER Lazy Boy
recliner, light blue,
perfect condition $100
352-746-9691
Rocker Recliner
Dk Brown Leather
NEW $450
352-382-1510
SECTIONAL SOFA with
3 recliners, heat, mes-
sage, phone. Like new.
$700.
dvanhorn@tampabay.rr.com,
for pix.
352-637-3156
SHELVING UNIT 6 ad-
justable shelves dark
wood open back 6'H 7'L
15" W very nice $100.
352-621-0175
SIDEBOARD BUFFET
Vintage, dark wood,
good condition $300
pictures on request
(352) 503-7930
SOFA BED good
condition $100 call
352-257-3870
STEP 2 TWIN BED Like
new, has large storage
underneath.$100.00
cash 352-726-9758
TV STAND
W/COMPONENT
SHELVES and extra
storage. $25.00
603-493-2193
TWIN BEDS 2 Com-
plete beds, mat, box
spr, rails, Headboard,
3 drawer dresser, sm
bk case, $225 (352)
270-8939 aft 5 PM
WRITING DESK
peacon finsh letter desk
glass top over inlaid
wicker two drawers.
Legs have pineapple
design,pusrchased at
Leaders. Sugarmill $100
740-705-9004


i--
WOOD DRESSER 6
large drawers need
restoring $25. call
352-257-3870



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019
Bolens 2 cycle Tiller
new $125. cash, firm
Scotch Fertilizer
Spreader, good cond.
cash firm $17.50
352-341-1714
Craftsman
Riding Mower,
42"deck,
Briggs & Stratton
Engine 18% Hsp $400.
352-746-7357
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL $15
352-613-0529
MULCHING MOWER
Black & Decker 18"
electric mulching mower
$100.Excellent condition
352-527-2422
UPRIGHT LEAF
MULCHER THROW IN
LEAVES IT CHOPS
THEM&FILLS THE BAG
100.00, 464-0316
Yard Equipment
Chain saw, bnd
blower/mulcher, hedge
trimmer, edger, all for
$200 352-746-0817




HOMOSASSA
Fri. Sat & Sun
9am to 4pm
BENEFIT Yard Sale
to help pay for
chemo treatment.
1685 S. Palm Ave.
INVERNESS
865 N Leisure Point
Huge multi family sale,
fishing, household, An-
tiques too many items to
list. Sat & Sun 9-?
No Early Birds!



4 MENS SPORTS
COATS SIZE 40R $20
EACH 352-613-0529
BOYS SUMMER
CLOTHING SIZE 5
SHIRTS, SHORTS &
PAJAMAS $35
352-613-0529



!!!!!! 235/60 R18 !!!!!!
Nice tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
*****225/70 R15*.****
Good tread! Only asking
$60 for the pair! (352)
857-9232
----~~~~265\70 R16 ~~~~
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $100 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
3 Double 17"
Ceiling Light Fixture
with bulbs, excel.
cond. $20 ea or 3 for
$50. (352) 513-5342


CLASSIFIED



4 TIRES
195-70-R15
like new $60
352-201-7125
15 hsp, Evanrude $195
Mikita 14.4v Sawzall
$65, 1930 antique out-
board $80, Craftsman
tool box & 100 tools $40
12' Jon boat $120
315-466-2268
34 FIESTA HLC
DISHES- 8 plates,
bowls & cups, 7 salads,
3 serving bowls, multi
color, $65. 628-0033

V THIS OUT!
55 Gallon
Aquarium
(Long) w/wooden stand,
accessories, Lg. fresh
water shark, 2 Lg
Plecostamus fish &
other small fish $300.
352-628-3393 or
352-302-8098
215 65R/16 KELLY
NAVIGATOR GOLD
GOOD TREAD LEFT A
PAIR ONLY 65.00
464-0316
2- 17" White Blinds,
like new, 2 for $10 or
$8 ea. Hanging Ceil-
ing Light, tan, wicker,
globe, $20. 513-5342
30LB DANSFORTH
ANCHOR- 37" shaft,
22" Flutes, 25" cross-
bar, $40. 352-628-0033
ALUMINUM RUNNING
BOARDS FOR CHEWVY
TAHOE GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
APPLIANCES, like new
washers/dryers, stoves,
fridges 30 day warranty
trade-ins, 352-302-3030
BICYCLE BOYS SPI-
DERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
BIRD CAGE Black Wire
with plastic base, 2
perches,2 feed dispens-
ers. 20H*17W*13D
$25 746-7232
BRA FOR CHEVY
TAHOE BLACK 4
HEADLIGHT GREAT
SHAPE 464-0316
BRAD PINCHER $15
SET BRAD NAILS
WITH SQUEEZE OF
HAND NO HAMMER
419-5981
BREADMAN BREAD
MACHINE Makes up to
2 lb. loaf, includes hard
bound recipe book. VG
Cond. $30 746-7232
CAST IRON KETTLE
Vintage hanging cast
iron camp fire kettle with
lid. Good Condition.
$40 746-7232
COMMODE Commode
$10.00 352-746-5421
DOGGY LIFE VEST
MTI brand M(8-201b)
orange w/black straps
Handle on top.New
$25 746-7232
DONVIER ICE CREAM
MAKER Chillfast
system-no electricity, no
ice or salt needed. Ex-
cellent. $25 746-7232


Emerg. Generator
B & S Eng. 5250 watt,
new carborator $500
OBO 352-746-0817
GAS GRILL 40" wide,
working condition, in-
cludes gas tank and
new cover. $75
746-7232
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
GUINEA PIG/RABBIT
CAGE Plastic base with
wire top.40"L*18"W*20"
Plus bowl,bottle,hutch.
$50 746-7232
HARLEY SLIDE ON
ORIGINAL MUFFLE RS
NEW 1350/1450 ONLY
90.00, 464-0316
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Wood Cradle and
High Chair $100
(352) 795-7254
JADE AND PEARLY
DOT CACTUS Jade
plant $13.00 and Pearly
Dot cactus $3.00
352-212-2051
Kennmore
Dehumitifyer use one
time like new
$75.00
795-6348
Metal Folding Chairs
Approx 170 Chairs,
good cond., $5.00 ea.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
(352) 746-7161
PARAFFIN BATH
HoMedics Para spa
Plus Paraffin Bath Heat
Therapy System.VG
cond. $40 746-7232
Pressure Washer
gasoline powered, like
new, $125 cash, firm
Conference Table 94"
long, exc. cond. $35
cash firm 352-341-1714
QUILTING FRAME
Quilting frame, light
weight and easily disas-
sembled for storage.
$50. 527-2422
Reverse Osmosis
Aqua Pure, like new
$400. obo
352-726-3878
SLOW COOKER Red
w/ removable crock, lid
latches in place for safe
transport.5Qt. Excellent
cond. $25 746-7232
STEP 2 LARGE PLAY-
HOUSE. used
indoors.Good condi-
tion.$100.00 cash.
352-726-9758
Welded Galvanized
Wire Fence
48" high, by 100' long
never used, $98. cash
firm (352) 341-1714



Sharp Copier
Prints Bk & Color, Table
Top $75.00, Large Of-
fice display Mirror $25
352-634-4329



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY 70.00
464-0316


Bedside Camode
$15
10 packages of protec-
tive underware size
small $5. ea.
(352) 419-4146
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS 20.00
EACH 464-0316
Electric Wheel Chair
in good condition
$1000.00
(352) 341-6217
Harmar Universal
Power Chair Lift
w/swing arm
$700.
(352) 419-4578
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS GREAT SHAPE
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
NEW 4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT
MUCH EASIER TO
GET UP ONLY 20.00
464-0316
SAFETY BATHTUB
TUB GRAB BAR IT
CLAMPS TO THE SIDE
OF THE TUB ONLY
25.00, 464-0316
Twin Electric Beds
in good condition
$1200.
352-628-2777



BUYING US COINS
Top $$$$ Paid. We
Also Buy Gold Jewelry
Beating ALL Written
Offers. (352) 228-7676



"ALMOST NEW"
BLACK STRAT COPY
$95 W/AMP,GIGBAG
STRAP,TUNER,CORD,+
MORE! 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
$95 FULL SIZE WITH
GIGBAG, TUNER,
STRAP,+MORE!
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PACKAGE WITH
GIGBAG, STRAP,
TUNER,+MORE $75
352-601-6625
EPIPHONE THUNDER-
BIRD PRO 4 BASS
VINTAGE BURST,
ACTIVE ELECTRICS
W/TWEED BAG $200
352-601-6625
IBANEZ ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC FISHMAN
PREAMP BUILT IN
TUNER BLACK FINISH
$50 352-601-6625
IBANEZ TALMAN
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMP,GIGBAG,
TUJNER,STRAPCORD&
MORE "NEW' $185
352-601-6625
Music Lovers,
large assortment of
Piano music
reasonably priced
$100. obo
(352) 257-9723
SPINET PIANO
Krakauer Bros, looks
and sounds good $400
pictures on request
(352) 503-7930


Air Max
1 cubic ft. re
and sulfer, $
352-341
BAVARIAN
SERVICE F
DINNER
w/gold
$95 O
(352) 74'
COFFEE M
ELECTRIC I
FOR B
352-613
FIESTA DIS
ice for 12, 4
setting, mu
$15.00 ea
setting
352-726
LAMPS 2
Lamps with
$15.00 352-
QUEEN COi
1 valance
bedskirt be
ground green
print $255
SINGERS
Pro-finish
14CG754. N
$150 firm 35:
SUITCASE F
FOR HAl
CLOTHES ex
pockets L
$10.00 603-
UPRIGHT C
Upright W
Cleaner Eur
Condition
352-746
VACUUM C
Kenmore Up
uum Cleane
Condition
352-746



ELEC.TRE
NORDIC T
OPTIONS
POWER INC
1495.NO
464-0
El I IPTICAI


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Filter, Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
,moves iron DAN'S GUN ROOM
$400 BO (352) 726-5238
N CHINA DOME TENT
FOR 12+ sleeps 5, only $75.
WARE 352-341-4008
trim. EXERCISER Lifestyler
'BO Exerciser Bike. Duel
6-3327 Action Electronic
lAKER & Ergometer $35.00
MIXER $15 352-746-5421
-052TH GRAND
-05290 OPENING
HES Serv- Specials*
piece place RAY'S GUN SHOP
ilti colors. Stokes Flea Market,
ch place Bldg "A" Rt. 44, 4 mi.
.Call E. of Hwy. 19, CR
3-9009 ffl#159017015016163
- 3 way
h Shades *- Ruger SR22 $339
-746-5421 e Ruger KSR45 $469
VMFORTER W Ruger SR9 $439
2 shams Bushmaster
ige back AR15 $1049
en tropical Your Headquarters
513-4614 for Guns, Ammo and
Reloading Supplies
SURGER Hours: 8am to 2pm
h Model Tuesday-Saturday
lew in box. 352-527-1660
2-637-3156 352-586-7516
OLDOVER
NGING Leaf mulcher, electric
extra storage $35. Electric Boat
Like new Wrench $40.
-493-2193 Automatic Fish scale
CLEANER $15. 352-860-0939
'acuum LEFTY DRIVERS
*eka Good Cobra, Callaway, Nike
$10.00 Like New were$300.00
3-5421 Sell $75.00ea. Sugarmill
CLEANER 352.503.7740
right Vac- SCUBA TANK 80CUFT.
r Excellent Aluminum, silver US Di-
$25.00 vers brand w/J valve &
i-5421 harness.Good cond.
$50 746-7232
WATER COOLER
5GAL w/spout.Orange
Sw/Gatorade logo.Cup
ADMILL holder on side.Great
RACALL Cond. $20 746-7232
, PLUS -
LINE NEW Wet Suit
W 400. Large w/flippers great
)316 buy $100 OBO
RY NOR- 352-746-0817


DIC TRAC ALL ELEC-
TRONICS PLUS
POWER INCLINE
GREAT SHAPE A
STEAL AT 400.00 464
0316



BICYCLE RACK ALLEN
brand fits on your car or
van trunk, holds up to 4
bicycles, new in box.
$50 746-7232
BIKE Wildwood Huffy
Bike $15.00
352-746-5421
Boat box/Locker
72" x 23" x 24" like new
$400 obo, kayak excur-
sion blue w/storage Grt
paddle $200 obo
352-746-0817
CABELAS Drift
Sock/Anchor Easy to
rig, vented 4 easy re-
trieval. reinforced nylon
w/pouch.$25 746-7232
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel.
batteries, garage
kept, Delivery Avail
352-527-3125


2009 LDL
Enclosed Custome
Motor Cycle Trailer
5 x 8, Red, diamond
plate V Nose, 50" full
rear spring drop ramp
Low profile, used once
garaged for 3 yrs. like
new, beautiful cond.
pd $2,500 Sell $1,600
(352) 422-1026
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1975.
call 352-527-0555
Dual Axle Trailer
12ft, good cond.
$1500. or best offer
352-322-0086



CHILDREN'S CLOTH-
ING sizes 3 months to 3
toddlers $.25-$1.00 like
new. call 352-257-3870
GIRL INFANT CLOTH-
ING 3-6 mos. 14 pieces,
6 mos. 12 pieces 26
pieces total $20.00
352-400-5650


^StB^


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Palios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AFFORDABLE
Top Soil, Mulch, Stone
Hauling & Tractor Work
(352) 341-2019

.l lus"" t
<'ui '. l I I Irst.
L l y Day


Classifieds


Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
' iE, :aa or pool or plan
J -^ something
-^ -.- "completely new!
^i "Often imitated,
IS SIj, dupik ateui"


YOUR INTEl ROCKING RICK AVER SPECIALIST

CO PES
I POOL AND PAVER LLC
Lined 352-400-3188


#1 TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property main & all
repairs, call H&H
Services today!
li#37658 352-476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
PeRELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
P RELIABLE. Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


GENERAC A
Stand Alone .1I
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

0 2*


AAA ROOFING
Call the ".akwhuste"
Free Written Estimate


$100 OFF:
|Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000EHZ


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Primary Cleanina
** Free Estimates-
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service*
Free Est.352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START

.A FIRE!
iFld 1Rale-

Hidden Co ,
II I


Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine- It's Tune Up
Time! 352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
WeGet OffThe
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lie. (352) 584-5374





for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Jeffery Upchurch
Painting. Res Painting,
interior/ext. Free est.
Lic/ins (352) 220-0273



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention
Consumers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up& Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




YNouC\\orid first

Need a j.lh
air ;i
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!

CHmONIE
Classifieds
auij.ij.m.ij. MMiHif


WIND

We aeon Windows nd o Whole tol Morel

Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill






Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
-%:Lic#0CCC1325497

MA JOHNSON

M A ROOFING, INC




TOLL FREE

866-376-4943


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Completeetree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimmings.Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S ALL Home
'_ -' Repairs
Small Carpentry

Screening

Mr. Tile CleanDryer
V Gents
S Alloa le & Dependable
Expe ence lifelong
525861816 744-986805
cell: 400-1722
. sured Lic.#37761





When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers sFloors sLanais
Pools & Pavers
C i leaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
ResidentialR
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 k*k
**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


Oft







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Girls 12-18 mos.5 pcs.,
18mos.8pcs.
18-24mos.3 pcs.
16 pcs. total $15.
352-400-5650
TODDLER BED with
mattress,made of
wood.$50.00 cash.
352-726-9758



LARGE FISH TANK
WITH STAND black
stand $25.
352-257-3870









,


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




A Diabetic Needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
Call Mike 386-266-7748
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492



I BUY AMMO,
Also Reloading
Supplies & Equip.
PAYING
$$ Top Prices $$
352-302-0962
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369






2005 JAYCO
TOYHAULER F36Z 5th
wheel camper, 5000
watt Onan generator,
25 gal fuel station,pull
down Queen bed and
screen wall in garage
area. $11K OBO
701-371-8589


KAT BUNN
Formally from Crystal
River Mall, NOW at
Kountry Girl Salon,
styling for 15+ year,
specializing in Color
and High Fasion Color
(pinks,blues,purples,ect)
30day speical Color
and Hair Cut $57.00
and Hair cut $10 with
ad. call for an appoint-
ment 352-339-4902
or stop in and visit me
at 19240 East Pennsyl-
vania Ave. Dunnellon, Fl
www.hairbykatbunn.
weebly.com


DIXIE GIRL
Dixie Girl, 5-y.o.
pretty Shepherd
mix, loves people,
other dogs, kids. In-
telligent, affection-
ate, friendly, gentle,
sweet disposition.
Weight 42 lbs. Aims
to please. Walks well
on leash, rides well
in car. Perfect
companion, wants
to be by your side.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *

[ 1 I


LILLITH
Lilith, a spayed
4-y.o. Hound/Lab
mix, housebrkn,
crate-trained,
UTD on shots, low
energy, great on
leash, weight 45 lbs.
Beige/white in color.
She is a great com-
panion dog, won-
derful house man-
ners. Loves people
& bonds strongly to
her human friend.
Needs someone to
spend time w/her.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.








PAPILLONS:
AKC, DOB: 10/27/12,
UTD on shots with
health certs & guaran-
teed. Parents on site,
Ch. lines, 2 females 3
1/2 lb.& 1 sm. male.
All tri color. Other
Paps avail 8 mo &
up.(386) 496-0876


-m-
BEAGLE PUPPIES
$125
Crystal River Area
386-344-4218
386-344-4219




T a l






SALLIE
Sallie, a very sweet
& joyous terrier
/Dalmation mix,
1-y.o., housebrkn,
HW negative, slim &
trim, is a bit shy,
warms up quickly.
Weight 35 lbs. Pretty
& affectionate,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/other
dogs, sits for treats.
Family could not af-
ford to keep her.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Shih Poo Puppies,
4 males, 1 female
ready 6/9
Yorkshire Puppies
3 males 1 female
Ready 5/9
(352) 795-5896
628-6188 evenings
Shih-Tzu & Shih-Poo
Pups, Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827











SPARKY
Sparky is full of
personality! He is
bright, alert, and
attentive. Sparky is
good with kids,
housebroken, crate
trained, and is a
good watch dog.
Sparky bonds
strongly and is ea-
ger to please. He is
a Pointer mix, less
than 2 years old,
and weighs 54
pounds. Adoption
interview and
fenced yard is re-
quired. He is vac-
cinated, neutered,
microchipped, and
HW negative.
Sparky's adoption
fee is only $30
through CCAS.
Email his
foster family at
rwmoak@att.net or
call 352-573-7821.
See more of Sparky
at TheRedDog
Farm.com.











TOBY
a 6-y.o. black/white
terrier mix, neutered,
HW-negative, house-
brkn, weight 45 lbs. In
good shape, good
with other dogs &
also cats. Found as
a stray. Very calm,
gentle, affectionate,
and walks very well on
a leash. Quiet dog,
good companion for
an older person.

Call Joanne @
352-795-1288











TUCKER
2-y.o. shepherd mix,
weight 54 Ibs. HW
negative, neutered &
housebrkn. Microchip-
ped. UTD on shots.
In good physical
shape. Gets along
with most dogs.
Walks well on leash.
Affectionate, friendly,
understands some
commands. OK with
older children, fenced
yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.
Yorkshire Terriers
Males, 8 wks on 4/4,
$450 cash. See the
parents in Lecanto
(727) 242-0732



Galvanized Chain Link
Dog Fence
10' sq. x 6' high
w/access door $275.
cash only, firm
352-341-1714


M ^^^


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928


BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
7 352-563-5510
1998 Sting Ray
22 Ft, extra Clean 175
Hrs. 4.3 V6, Cutty Cab,
great for fish/pleasure
$7500 352-422-4658
Aluminum
Jon Boat
16' Galvanized Trailer,
no rust or corrosion
15 hsp outboard
$2700. cash firm.
352-341-1714



Bayliner 1984
Trophy Cuddy
cabin, clean, with
trailer, Volvo pente
/o.does not fire,
needs work,$2000.
cash only, call
Doug 564-0855
or cell 212-8385
Palm Beach 161
2002, 16'c.c. 50hp,2
stroke,Bimini Livewell in
Exc. Con. Inc. Trailer
$5800. 352-563-5628
PONTOON
2005 18ft Party Pon-
toon w/ galvanized
Trailer. 40hp Yamaha
$6995 (352) 650-9059
Vee Bottom
Aluminum 12Ft boat
motor, & trailer good
cond. $375.cash firm
352-341-1714
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




ONE OWNER
KEYSTONE RV
COMPANY
2008 Cougar 5th wheel
33' Double slides, wood
floors, ducted A/C, large
shower, all the extras,
like new condition,
$21,500. 352-726-6261



2001 Aliner Expedition
18', sleeps 4, Gd Cond
w/ A/C, Refrig $4500
(352) 249-6098
2005 Trail Light
30' Travel Trailer w/
slide, rear Qu bed,
ducked a/c exec. cond.
$7200 352-344-2712
'06 ROCKWOOD
TT
31' Signature Series.
Aluminum frame. Rear
queen, 12' LR slide. All
factory extras + more.
Completely equipped
(linens, kitchen, tools,
spare parts). Ready to
go. Immaculate condi-
tion, No smoking, no
pets. $14,000.
352-637-6262
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
Unwanted Cars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
"BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191

Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3-1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
Buick
2001 Century, 6 cyl,
82k mi, auto, cold a/c,
power, clean, $3990.
obo 352-302-4225
BUICK
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-302-9217
BUICK
2005 Lesabre
$8,995.
352-341-0018
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th an-
niversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles,
immaculate,loaded,call


for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2004, Impala
$4,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
07 Taurus SE
79k mi, pwr windw, lock,
cruise control, am/fm/cd
owner, exc. cond.
$5,500. 352-302-9217
FORD
'09, Mustang GT,
loaded, 2,600 miles,
automatic, uses regu-
lar gas $26,500.
(352) 489-1747


FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
60,800 miles,silver in
color,power
wndows,bcks,seat,cruise,lt
wheel,cassete
player,newer tires
very clean. $3900
o.b.o. 352-257-2590
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
'07, Civic Hybrid,
128k mi., leather,
Extra clean $8,750
(352)503-7312
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
LINCOLN
2000, Town car,
loaded I owner
$5,495.
352-341-0018
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5,500 obo
352-628-5451 or
352 601-2214
Lincoln Town Car
'94 Cartier, wht w/blk
carriage top, gar kept
exc cond, low miles
$5000 (352) 794-3980
Mazda
2012 3i, 5-door
Touring, graphite
7300 mi, ext. warranty
exc. cond. $16,388.
727-857-6583
PONTIAC
2001, Grand am
$2,995
352-341-0018
SUBARU
2002, Forester AWD
$3,995
352-341-0018
VW Engine
(in parts), and 2 trans-
missions, 2 benches for
VW Bus, dash board &
muffler. 352-746-2226

WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




Chevrolet
1970 Impala,
convertible, older
restoration, needs tic,
$15k, 352-628-2777
Oldsmobile
1992, Toronado
White Diamond, leather
int. 124Kmi, FWD 3800
tuned port injection, V6,
Meticulously,main-
tained$3500. (352)
527-3291






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


I ar


SUNDAY, APRIL 28,2013 D5


CLASSIFIED



Chrysler
1941 4 dr. sedan
good solid body, runs
great, needs starter,
$3500. 352-628-2777



DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
DODGE
99' Dakota, A/C, 148k
miles, new paint, 22/
mpg exc runng. cond.
$2,995 (352) 527-8143
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100
WE FINANCE ALL
RENT BUY- SELL
CARS TRUCKS RVs
CONSIGNMENT USA
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
CHRYSLER

2004Town & Country
Limited ,Navigation,
DVD, 3rd row seating,
leather,every option
avail.new tires, $6,950
257-3894 /794-6069
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs for more info
call Tom 352-325-1306



2009 LDL
Enclosed Custome
Motor Cycle Trailer
5 x 8, Red, diamond
plate V Nose, 50" full
rear spring drop ramp
Low profile, used once
garaged for 3 yrs. like
new, beautiful cond.
pd $2,500 Sell $1,600
(352) 422-1026
HONDA
2004 Gold Wing
GL1800 +EASY STEER
+DEFLECTOR WINGS
+INTERCOM
+ROTOR COVERS
+WHEEL OF FIRE
+BRAKE LIGHT
MODULATOR
+EXTRA LED BRAKE
LIGHTS
+RUNNING BOARDS
+ARM RESTS
+LIGHTED SPOILER
+TRAILER TO MATCH
+CB
+KURYAKYN TRUNK
RACK
+WINGBLING DASH
+SEAT COVERS
+ADJUSTABLE PAS-
SENGER FOOT
RESTS
+PASSENGER PUSH
TO TALK BUTTON
$24,500 KEN AND
JACKIE SMITH
HOMOSASSA
352-382-5149


374-0428 SUCRN
Leo M. Paquette Case No: 2013CP48 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.:2013CP48
IN RE: ESTATE OF: LEO M. PAQUETTE.,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the Estate of LEO M. PAQUETTE, deceased, whose date of
death was December 1,2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness,
Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the Personal Representatives and the
Personal Representatives' Attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's Estate on whom a copy of this Notice has been served must
file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's Estate must file their claims with this Court. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED
Personal Representative
/s/ YOLANDE M. PAQUETTE
1313 Lakeview Drive, Inverness, FL 34450
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ KAREN 0. GAFFNEY, Esquire Florida Bar No.: 500682
Karen 0. Gaffney, P.A.
205 West Dampier Street, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone: (352) 726-9222
April 21 & 28, 2013


379-0407 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote Arnow, Peter and Stephens, Lisa
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Peter Arnow Lisa R. Stephens
7805 W Miss Maggie Dr, Apt 2 4369 S. Blue Water Pt
Homosassa, FL 3 Homosassa, FL
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of
ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide
voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of
Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 28, 2013


371-0428 SUCRN
05/09/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central Florida,
Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director
April 28, 2013


JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Harley Davidson
2005,1200C BIk xtra
chrome, hard bags,
12,900 mi., sissy bar,
forw ctrls & wshield.
$5600 (352) 726-9325
HONDA
'07, Rebel, 250,
less than 10,000 miles
$1,400
(352) 489-7741
Kawasaki
2006 KLR650, one
owner 5400 miles new
Michelins $3500 obo
352-302-5596
YAMAHA
1999 v star 1100, cust.
pipes, wshleld & bags,
Adult ridden, gar. kept
$2900 (352) 650-9059


I ill' '
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370-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-320
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
ARQUE TAX RECEIVABLE
FUND L P US BANK CUST
FOR ATRF FLORIDA &
CAPONE
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2953
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
TOWN OF DUNNELLON LOT
644
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
INGRID C REYES,
ROY D REYES
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.Unless such certifi-
cate shall be redeemed
according to law, the
property described in
such certificate shall be
sold to the highest bidder
on line, on May 15, 2013
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.
com.
Dated March 28, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
April 14, 2013
April 21, 2013
April 28, 2013
May 5, 2013




382-0428 SUCRN
MAY SALES
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicles will
be sold by PUBLIC
AUCTION on the property
of SCALLY'S LUBE & GO
TOWING AND RECOVERY,
1185 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, FL 34453;
352-860-0550;
in accordance with
Florida Statute 713.78.
Auctions are as Follows:
Sales will begin at 8:00
AM, All Vehicles may be
viewed 30 minutes before
sale. For more details, call
352-860-0550.
1)1994 FORD RANGER
COLOR: BLUE VIN#
1FTCR10A8RTA92164
Auction Date: 05/10/2013
2) 2002 HONDA ACCORD
COLOR: GOLD VIN#
1HGCG16552A069489
Auction Date: 05/13/13
3) 2002 CHEVY CAVALIER
COLOR: WHITE VIN#
2G1WP14X8R912750
Auction Date: 05/16/13

Scally's Lube and Go
reserves the right to bid
on all vehicles in Auction.
All sales final at 9:00 AM
April 28, 2013.


377-0428 SUCRN
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
PERFORMANCE STAGE at Kings Bay Park
Bid #13-B-09
The City of Crystal River wll receive seed bids for a new performance stage at
Kings Bay Park, located on NW 3rd Street, Crystal River. You are hereby invited to
submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is the City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on May 21, 2013, opened and read aloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Ths is a design/build specification to meet the specifica-
tions listed in this document. Design and construction must meet all federal, state
and local relevant codes and standards. The successful bidder will be 100% responsi-
ble for determining and meeting codes and standards required. The work consists of
constructing a three sided performance stage within the park grounds. Structure to
be constructed of: painted steel tubular frame with painted steel exterior roof and
wall panels. Interior to be constructed with: 2 by 6 tongue & grove wood on three
walls and ceiling. Basic dimensional size: 40 foot approximate width, eave height 8
feet, depth approximately 20 feet building height of 14 to 15 feet from top of slab.
The elevation of the slab will be approximately 2 feet above existing site grade, with
handicap access. The 150 amp electrical sub-service will be fed via the existing park
restrooms for single phase lighting and power.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work for which the BID is
submitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"PERFORMANCE STAGE at Kings Bay Park", BID #13-B-09, AND THE NAME OFTHE
BIDDER AND THEIR ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge,
downloaded for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora), or picked up at
City hall for no charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents
are advised check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid pack-
ages may be picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address
above, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The
contact person is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314.
April 28, 2013


378-0428 FCRN
Meeting Notice- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating
Board will hold a regular meeting at 10:30 A.M. on the 16TH day of May. 2013 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information
regarding this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County
Transit, 1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone:
(352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 28, 2013


380-0428 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance enti-
tIed:
AN ORDINANCE CREATING THE STORMWATER MUNICIPAL SERVICE TAXING UNIT FOR
THE ENTIRE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; DESCRIBING THE
BOUNDARIES OF THE STORMWATER MSTU; AUTHORIZING THE STORMWATER MSTU TO
ANNUALLY LEVY AD VALOREM TAXES TO PROVIDE STORMWATER SERVICES, FACILITIES
AND PROGRAMS; AUTHORIZING A PLEDGE OF THE STORMWATER MSTU AD VALOREM
TAX REVENUES TO THE RETIREMENT OF DEBT WHEN APPROVED BY THE ELECTORS OF THE
STORMWATER MSTU AS PROVIDED BY GENERAL LAW; AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF
DEBT UPON REFERENDUM APPROVAL; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 14th day of May, 2013, at 3:30
PM, at which time and place any and all persons interested may present any matter
for or against the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Commission.
Copies of the proposed ordinance may be reviewed in the Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he or she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
/s/ JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time, April 28, 2013.


383-0428 SU/MCRN
BOCC Meeting May 7, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will
conduct a Special Meeting on Tuesday, May 7, 2013, beginning at 1:00 pm in the
Commission Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida, to discuss and possibly take action upon the Fire Services Munici-
pal Service Benefit Unit report.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, prior to the meeting.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceed-
ings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes)
BY:/s/ JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time, Sunday, April 28, 2013..


381-0428 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF HEARING ON ORDINANCE
The public is hereby notified that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, intends to conduct a public hearing to consider an ordinance enti-
tfled:
AN ORDINANCE CREATING THE LAW ENFORCEMENT MUNICIPAL SERVICE TAXING UNIT
FOR THE ENTIRE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; DESCRIBING
THE BOUNDARIES OF THE LAW ENFORCEMENT MSTU; AUTHORIZING THE LAW ENFORCE-
MENT MSTU TO ANNUALLY LEVY AD VALOREM TAXES TO PROVIDE LAW ENFORCEMENT
SERVICES, FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS; AUTHORIZING A PLEDGE OF THE LAW ENFORCE-
MENT MSTU AD VALOREM TAX REVENUES TO THE RETIREMENT OF DEBT WHEN APPROVED
BY THE ELECTORS OF THE LAW ENFORCEMENT MSTU AS PROVIDED BY GENERAL LAW;
AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF DEBT UPON REFERENDUM APPROVAL; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
in the Board of County Commissioners' Meeting Room, Citrus County Courthouse,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida on the 14th day of May, 2013, at 4:00
PM, at which time and place any and all persons interested may present any matter
for or against the proposed ordinance for consideration of the County Commission.
Copies of the proposed ordinance may be reviewed in the Lecanto Government
Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL or the Citrus County Courthouse, 110
North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of County Com-
missioners with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he or she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two
days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
/s/ JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
Published one (1) time, April 28, 2013.


384-0428 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 032-13
Contract Mowing of Zones 2 & 3
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide routine finish mowing, trimming, mulching, weeding, edging and litter
pickup at various locations throughout Citrus County.
Minimum Requirements For Submittina A Bid
To submit a Bid, Bidders must have been in the mowing business for at least one (1)
year.
1. Work Zone Safety, Intermediate Level or possess a Maintenance of Traffic
(MOT) Certification. A copy of the certification is to be submitted with the
Bid.
In order to be awarded a contract, Bidders must have at least one individual certi-
fied in Work Zone Safety at the intermediate level or higher or Maintenance of Traffic
(MOT) Certificate.
2. Bidders must attend the Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting and bus tour of locations.
This will take approximately two to three hours please adjust your schedules
accordingly as you must complete the tour to bid. Please limit your company's
attendance to only two individuals.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before May 10, 2013 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for May 10, 2013 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Dennis Damato, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 28, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CIVIC 4DR LX
H7903
$12,500


2010 HONDA
ACCORD
H7797
$14,926


2010 HONDA 2011 HONDA
ACCORD EXL CR-V
H7895 H7747
$19,000 $20,042


ZU1U HUNUA
FIT
PH7907
$12,500


2009 HONDA
RIDGELINE RT
H7775
$17,254


2010 HONDA
CIVIC LX
H7668
$12,666


2011 HONDA
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H7803
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LOVEHONDA.COM
1.36 month closed end lease with approved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2995 cash or trade
equity plus taxes, tag & fees. First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost Not a lease
*' 36 month closed end lease with approved credit 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter S2500 cash or trade equity. Payment is plus ta, with no
capitalized cost reduction. First payment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Options at additional cost. '"' 44 City/Hwy combined Based on 2012 EPA
mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008 Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain
your vehicle. t Covers internal lubricant parts See dealer for details. All preowned vehicles include $2000 cash down or trade equity Offers valid thru date of publication


I


I


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 D7


'19?Alb




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW 2013 KIA
SOUL
STKRKD0366


NEW 2013 KIA
OPTIMA
STK#KD0335 .0


NEW 2014 KIA
SORENTO
LX K ,
STK#KE5012 'S.


4.'
"~ ~


FOR
60 MONTHS^


OR $115 /MONTH LEASE* OR $164 /MONTH LEASE*
WITH APPROVED CREDIT LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS) WITH 12K PER YEAR, TOTAL OF $4,495 DUE AT SIGNING, SMART PAY IS A ONE TIME LEASE PAYMENT FOR 36 MONTHS (SOUL 39 MONTHS) WITH $7,956 SOUL, $7,308 RIO LX,
$8,676 OPTIMA & $10,440 SORRENTO LX DU AT SIGNING. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS EXCLUSIVE, ALL FACTORY REBATES & INCENTIVES TO DEALER,


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
MALIBU 1


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
2WD EXT CAB
STK#D8012


STK#D0026


OR $135 /MONTH LEASE*


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX


STK#D5195


OR $185 /MONTH LEASE'
NEW2013 CHEVROLET
CRUZE
LS
STK#D0114


OR $185 /MONTH LEASE*


OR $159 /MONTH LEASE*


LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 39 MONTHS WITH 10K PER YEAR, TOTAL OF $500 DUE AT SIGNING. SMART PAY IS A ONE ME LEASE PAYMENT FOR 39 MONTHS WTH $6,705 MALIBU, $7,729 SILVERADO, $7,738 EQUINOX & $5,287 CRUZE-
DUE AT SIGNING FOR 2013 SILVERADO 2WD EXT CAB CUSTOMER MUST OWN AND TRADE A 99 OR NEWER GM TRUCK, INCLUDES ALL REBATES CUSTOMER MUST QUALIFY FOR GM EMPLOYEE PROGRAM, MUST PUT MINIMUM $500
DOWN, MUST BE CURRENTLY LEASING A GM VEHICLE OR COMPETITE MAKE CUSTOMER MUST QUALIFY VTH CREDIT WORTHINESS MAINTENANCE ON SILVERADO LIGHT DUTY PICK-UP SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS** "$13.39 PER $10CO FINANCED ON SELECT MODELS.


101
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY'


D8 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


ml:-.yila


oi 0





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FT7 DEghsa & Mh915Mb M EQ7XLEi7
MA!.U ..a....taifG rauii j
c iprTT .V-Tj Tr

-FB


$2,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.







w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


IeMO.36 MONTH LEASE

$2,989 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $39,800.


w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group



Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,979 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $43,405.


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


w/ Preferred Equipment Group


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE


$4,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995.


-t) CERTIFIED PRE-OWN ED
2008 CADILLAC 2009 CADILLAC 2010 CADILLAC 2010 CADILLAC 2012 CADILLAC 2012 CADILLAC
DTS DTS CTS DTS SRX CTS
LUXURY COLLECTION LUXURY COLLECTION PREMIUM COLLECTION 3.6 PERFORMANCE
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, DRIVER BLUE, ONLY 24,000 MILES, CRYSTAL RED, 32,000 MILES, LEATHER, BLACK, 33,000 MILES, NAV, SUNROOF, BLACK TRICOAT, ONLY 8,800 MILES, BLACK TRICOAT, 3.6LV6, LEATHER,
AWARENESS PKG, #C3X176A ONE OWNER LOCAL TRADE IN, # C3X331A ONE OWNER #C383340 HEATED AND COOLED SEATS, #C3X331A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S350A PERFORMANCE COLLECTION, #C383300
sps, B0s ss22,90 s23,4088 s2S,988 s0 s29, 9 s3,508



2008 VW 2012 CHRYSLER 2010 FORD 2009 HONDA 2010 HONDA 2008 DODGE
BEETLE 200 EDGE CRV ACCORD QUAD CAB
SE CONVERTIBLE LIMITED 2WD LIMITED EX-L V6 EX-L 4X4 SLT
BLACK, 52,000 MILES, LEATHER, LIGHT BLUE, ONLY 12,000 MILES, GRAY, LEATHER, SUNROOF, SILVER, 32,000 MILES, LEATHER, WHITE DIAMOND, ONLY 13,000 MILES, GRAY, ONLY 31,000 MILES, 5 7L V8, LEATHER,
EXTRA CLEAN, ONE OWNER, #C3S293A ONE OWNER LOCAL TRADE IN, #C3X168A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S235A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3S289G LEATHER, SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3S289A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3A348A
S if5,988 S ,9G.88 1 s1 8,88 s 19,488 S-19,9a88 s2s,88
2010 BUICK 2011 BUICK 2011 ACURA 2012 CHEVROLET 2011 TOYOTA 2009 MERCEDES
LACROSSE LACROSSE CXS MIDX AVALANCHE LTZ SEQUOIA SL E63
CSX TECH PACKAGE WHITE DIAMOND PLATINUM SILVER AMG
MOCHA, 32,000 MILES, SUNROOF, LEATHER, BLACK, LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS, WHITE DIAMOND, 32,000 MILES, NAV, 16000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV DVD 22,813 MILES, SUNROOF, NAV, DVDS, LOADED STEEL GRAY, 26,000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE IN,
NAV, ONE OWNER, #C3S305A SUNROOF, LOADED, #C2S269G SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3X343A #C3MO50A ONE OWNER TRADE, C3S301A EXTRA CLEAN, #C2T192A
s23,998 s-SIE,| s34,88| s43,9833 s4*7,988 G88,988


2000 CADILLAC 2004 LINCOLN 2005 MERCURY 2004 CADILLAC 2002 CADILLAC 2005 HONDA
STS TOWNCAR GR MARQUIS CTS ESCALADE AWD CIVIC
WHITE DIAMOND WHITE LS WHITE DIAMOND 2DR EX "SE"
71,000 MILES, ONE OWNER, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, EXTRA EXTRA CLEAN TAN, 76,000 MILES, LEATHER, SILKING GREEN, 70,000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, EXTRA CLEAN BLACK, 70,100 MILES, LEATHER,
#C3X270A #C3XO46B LOCAL TRADE IN, #C3X042B ONE OWNER TRADE IN, #C3S272A #C3M303A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER
ts,900 as, 889 I 08 8 0S,,9S0 p9, 088 9s0,988

9WWW. S--=--- -- U LL..L- IVAN CAD-3 I LLAC. C 0M-1

4040 1Wf COLLEGE FROAD OCALA, F=L 35o-732-4700


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I1


W G3T139
2013 ESCAPE SE
$27,135 MSRP
-1,200 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-500 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash

*23,935


%$


w or w
Down

Available


1 W G3T120
2013 EDGE SE
$29,700 MSRP
-846 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Retail Customer Cash
-1,000 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash
-500 Retail Bonus Cash

2*5,854


Li


G3T111


2013 FIESTA (
$17,115 MSRP
-$720 Retail Customer Cash
-500 Challenge Retail Bonus Cash


I86


Go Further


ford.com


2013 F-1
$34,745
-1,500
-2,300
-1,000
-1,000
-500
-2,500

*2


TRUCKS ON SA
I -PEN.... -. 1 h-1 1[%.. Ur w


1994 GMC SONOMA
New tires, only 97,000 miles
$5,950


TA SXT I


50 SUPER CAB S
MSRP
STX Discount
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Ford Credit Customer Cash
STX 5.0L Customer Cash
5.0L Special Cash
Retail Customer Cash

5.941

LE _


TX


Im

2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT 2000 FORD RANGER XLT
V6, 4x4, running boards Power Windows, cruise, tilt
$8 950 $9,950


GETSLQALYP


2001 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX
$4,950


W0 FUKU KUWRN VICIUKIA LA 6UUO RKU UU 5 EL
Leather
$6,950 $9,950


2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS 2011 HYNDAI SONATA
Clean, Cloth interior
$11,950 $15,950
mol


2011 NISSAN ROUGE
31,000 Miles, cloth interior
$16,950


2012 FORD E150
$21,950


2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL
Leather, 3rd seat
$29,950


2008 LINCOLNMKX2012 FORD FUSION SE 2009 HONDA ACCENT 2012 FORD MUSTANG COUPE 2011KIA SORENTO 2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT
One owner, AWD, Loaded Leather 4 cyl., moonroof 6 cyl., 5 speed Cloth, 32,000 miles, Like New! 20,000 miles Cloth Interior
$18,950 $19,950 $19,950 $19,950 $ 19,950 $20,950

1j-

2011 FORD FUSION SEL 2010 LINCOLN MKZ 2010 LINCOLN MKZ 2011 LINCOLN HYBRID 201 1 FORD EDGE 2013 MUSTANG CONV
11,000 miles One owner leather Moonroof Like new, one owner Leather rear camera
,950, $ 21,950 $22,950 $26,950 $26,950 $26,950

I p


2013 FORD EXPLORER XLT
Leather, 22,000 miles
$31,950


2013 FORD FLEX LIMITED
$32,950


2008 FORD F250 CREW 2011 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ 2010 CADILLAC SRX
Lariat, 4x4, Diesel 4x4, Loaded 4,000 miles, one owner, all the toys!
34,950 $39,950 $34,950


2013 LINCOLN MKX
13,000 miles, Loaded!
$35,950


Nick Nicholas

Call Toll Free Crystal River is
877-795-7371 Hw1. 19 N. 795-7371Fr


1 Based on 2011 CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 4/30/13.


LINCOLN


'1


or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordlincoln.com


D10 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


t Riverai


L --i


~. .......




H Section E SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013

OMECITRUS COUNTY CHRFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULL


Sikorski's
7& Attic
PAGE E4


CO OR FO1 TIE ARBDE8I, E

PASSIONFLOWER, PT. 2, E5

SwE COMPLETE UISTINS








E2 SUNDA~~ APRIL 28, 2013 Cimus Cou2wrY (FL) CHRONICLE


K~ A.


5278 W. YUMA LANE
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG 2,782 SF Living
* 36'x18' Lanai Gourmet Kitchen
* Luxurious Goldcrest Home Built in 2005
PETER & MARVIA KOROL i
352) 527-7842
352 422-3875


BEST WATERFRONT BUY
IN RIVERHAVEN!
Price slashed to $144,900 on 2/2/2 waterfront villa
with new roof in 2012. Call it home or it has great
rental history. Big deck/dock, deep canal. Bonus room
& Fla Room. Close to tennis & pool.
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusreiy.om


HISTORIC TWO STORY
LOG HOME
Over 1,800 sq. ft. living space on 1/2 acre lot.
2 bedroom, 2 bath, Old Homosassa Springs, stone
fireplace, modern country-style kitchen. Just one mile
from the public boat ramp.
PAM ZADORZANY (941) 726-3491
Email: piparvi@yahoo.com


WATERFRONT"





3801 N. SEMINOLE PT., CRYSTAL RIVER
Come witness nature's beautyll This large 5 bedroom, 2 bath
corner lot home boasts 310' of waterfront Located across
from a State Preserve for added peace and quiet All big ticket
items recently replaced AC, roof and windows Interior
features indude split plan, Florida room, enormous living room
with fireplace, separate formal dining, large kitchen and
g I 1 . I. ,1 1. 1 1

DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460 1Vj
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


MOVE-IN CONDITION
GREAT LOCATION, CLOSE TO
SHOPPING, SCHOOLS AND HOSPITAL.
3BR/2BA HOME WITH FLORIDA ROOM,
AND GARAGE. FENCED BACKYARD,
OUT-BUILDING AND MUCH MORE.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I I
Email: barboajiills@earthlink.net


*New Roof 2009 *3BD/3BA/2-Car Garage
Air Conditioner 2004 Split Plan
* Gorgeous Landscaping Summer Kitchen
*Pool Heater 2012 *Sparkling Pool
*New Appliances
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylponts@aol.comn 1
www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


2421 N. Leana Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


GOLF COURSE VILLA IN BRENTWOOD
* 2BR with OFFICE Huge Lanai/Screen Porch
* Large Lot/Great View Maintenance-Free
* Motivated Seller
* Social Membership Includes Terra Vista
DIRECTIONS.: Brentwood Cir. to R on W. Nicole Dr., to
L at end of Rd., to R on Shanelle Path
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


RWM
REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


THIS IS RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER!
Maintenance-free WATERFRONT! A MINUTE TO Big Lake
Henderson! 2/2.5 unit on the water DESPERATE OWNER
reduced his price down to $45,000 and HAS TO SELL
ASAP!!! Jet ski off your backyard. Boat launch just around the
corner CALL FOR A CHANCE FOR A GOOD
WATERFRONT DEAL!
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.nel
www.CilrusCounlyHomes.com


ROOM TO SPREAD OUT!
*3/3/2-Car Garage New Roof
* Attached 2-Car Carport Newer Air
* .75 Acre Lot Newer Appliances
* Partially-Fenced New Tile
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [
Email: sherylpolls@ aol.com
www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


V7 4,r






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Powell shines
bright at ERA
ERAAmer- ,
ican Realty & ^
Investments
is proud to an- *
nounce the -
latest produc-
tion level
achieved by Betty
one of its Powell
agents year to ERA
date. American
Betty Pow- Realty.
ell, Inverness
office, has surpassed the $1
million mark in closed sales
volume in 2013.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievements of this fine real
estate professional. Betty
Powell can be reached at the
Inverness office of ERAAmer-
ican Realty by calling 352-
726-5855.
RE/MAX agents
reach for the stars
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One would
like to congratulate Lucy
Barnes, Cheryl Nadal and
Tony Viggiano for having
passed the $1 million mark in
sales volume recently. These
agents join a select group of
agents who have accom-
plished this in 2013.
Lucy and Cheryl both work
out of the Crystal River office
of RE/MAX and have more
than 30 years of experience in
the business. Tony is an agent
in the Homosassa RE/MAX
office and is a consistent


Sby the end of
Sthe year, Kim
has been a
Realtor for 15
years and is
consistently a
top producer.
Lucy Cheryl Reach her at Kim
Barnes Nadal 352-422-2285 Kulch
RE/MAX RE/MAX or at the Plan- Plantation
Realty One. Realty One. station Realty Realty.
Office, open
\//, : seven days a week, at 352-
795-0784.


II I .:
Tony Jody
Viggiano Broom
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
multi-million dollar producer.
Realtor Jody Broom re-
cently joined a very small
group of agents who have al-
ready closed more than $2
million in sales volume this
year. The associates of
RE/MAX Realty One are
pleased to recognize her as
their first multi-million dollar
producer in 2013.
A veteran agent with more
than 30 years experience in
Citrus County real estate,
Jody is consistently one of the
top producers in this area.
Plantation Realty
taps superstars
Plantation Realty would
like to congratulate Kim
Kulch for being a multi-million
dollar producer for 2012.
Looking for higher numbers


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor*,, A HOUSE Realtor@
746,167 SOLD nle 287-9022

The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
HOMES UNDIER $ ,1000 IN BEVERLYHILL
18 S. Jackson, 2/1/1 C/H/A..........................$44,900
312 S. Washington, 2/2/1 C/H/A..................$54,900
521 S. Jackson, 2/1.5/1 C/H/A, Fenced.......$59,900


Plantation
is also proud
to announce
that John
Shields also
reached the
multi-million
John dollar mark for
Shields 2012.
Plantation Reach him
Realty. at 352-422-
5287 or at the
Plantation Realty at 352-
795-0784.


BROKER/ASSOC.'REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
& r *


9576 N CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD. 6262W SETTLER
75 Seats 702233 $217,300 5/4/3 700993 $339,900


PIN RI GE IN R-G

.TI


QUAI RUN.


* Nearly a dozen medical professionals contribute
their expertise to columns in Health & Life./
Tuesday
* Read up on all things school-related in the
Chronicle's Education section./Wednesdays
* Plan menus for the week from the tempting
recipes in the Flair for Food section./Thursdays
* Get a jump on weekend entertainment with the
stories in Scene./Fridays
* See what local houses of worship plan to do for
the week in the Religion section./Saturdays
* Read about area businesses in the Business
section./Sundays


m


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 E3






E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHRONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nesting rituals of



the Carolina Wren


One surefire sign of spring is the
nesting ritual of the Carolina wren.
Be on the lookout for a small, perky
songbird, tail held upward, with rusty un-
derparts and a white eye stripe.
Carolina wrens (Thryothorus ludovi-
cianus) may appear
small, but they em-
ploy one of the
loudest songs per
volume of birds.
Males are espe-
cially outgoing and
are the only ones to
produce songs:
teakettle, tea-kettle,
tea-kettle and twee- Joan Bradshaw
dle, tweedle, twee- FLORIDA-
dle are familiar
tunes across the FRIENDLY
Southeast. LIVING
For most Floridi-
ans, the Carolina Wren is the common
house wren that nests in and around
houses and garages, and is more likely to
nest in a hanging plant than in a bird-
house. Carolina wrens are usually found


Special to the Chronicle
The Carolina wren has one of the loudest
songs per volume among bird species.
in pairs, and each pair stays in its home
territory all year long.
These birds are monogamous, and
breeding pairs may stay together for
years. They work together to construct
nests, which can be found almost any-
where. Wrens will nest in standard blue-
bird boxes, but they have been known to
nest in a variety of unusual places around
See WREN/Page E12


Inside...


Scandinavian style
PAGE E9
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Eyeing an ewer; lucky $5 purchase yields handsome find


Dear John: Attached is a
picture of an ewer and
the base. Both ewers are
identical; each has
the mark "73" im-
pressed into the
base, which would
indicate a pattern or
mold. In one of them
there is a note, very
unclear, but we make
out "... copies Jan (il-
legible) signed 1568-
1594 I.E." C,
Internet John S
Dear C.: I am glad SIKOE
you sent good, clear AT
photographs. You
have a German salt
glaze stoneware ewer. The time
of production is likely early
20th century They were made
in large quantities and are usu-
ally quite ornately decorated.
They are bought and sold in the


k

R
1


antiques marketplace on a reg-
ular basis, but have never de-
veloped into a specific category
of collecting. Ewers
of this general type
typically sell in the
$50 to $150 range.
Dear John: Here is
V a photograph of a
large platter we pur-
chased at an estate
sale a few years ago
in Montana. We have
lived here in Beverly
korski Hills for a few
SKI'S months and read
tiC your articles in the
Chronicle. My hus-
band and I found the
estate sale late in the day and
most of the stuff had been sold,
leaving the home almost empty.
We bought the platter for $5;
there was no price on it and
when we asked the salesperson


what the price was, she had no
idea. My husband said, "how
about $5?" and she took it. We
like the deep blue colors. On
the back of the platter, there
seems to be some sort of symbol
with letters, but the deep blue
colors obscure them. Can you
tell us anything about it and the
value? Thank you in advance
for any help. TD., Internet
Dear T.D.: That was your
lucky day; generally speaking,
the good things in an estate sale
are grabbed up first and the
rest of the stuff lingers on. The
platter was one of those good
things that was missed. You
have a Flow Blue platter Flow
Blue was produced in England
and Europe from 1830 to 1900.
Dishes, etc., were printed with
various patterns using cobalt
blue coloring that was made to
smear or flow outside the pat-


tern. It has been a category of
collecting for decades. If you
were to sell it currently, poten-
tial dollar value is $100 to $200.
Not bad for a $5 purchase.
Dear John: We have a
marble-top table. Enclosed is a
photo. It is 23 inches wide by 17
inches deep and 28 inches high.
What might be the price I could
sell it for?
Can you also give me some
information on the enclosed
picture of an aluminum can,
which my parents told me was
See ATTIC/Page Ell
This is a German salt glaze
stoneware ewer. Although
ewers are bought and sold
regularly in the antiques
marketplace, they have never
developed a devoted following
of collectors.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Passionflower vines and toxic exotic invaders


A popular pas-
sionflower in
Florida gar-
dens is "Incense," a
hybrid with 4-inch di-
ameter, rich purple
flowers. It has five-
lobed leaves. One par-
ent, native P
incarnata, Maypop,
always has three-
lobed leaves. The
other parent, P
cincinnata, originated
in tropical South


P2
Jane
JAN
GAR


America. The hybrid was devel-
oped to survive cool, temperate
climates and provide large,
vividly colored, profuse flowers.
In early spring, young "In-


S cense" plant leaves
often have three
lobes. Mature stems
sprout five-lobed
leaves. "Incense" is a
stronger, more reli-
able climber than
Maypop. Neither
harms its host tree or
prop. Passionvines
Weber cling by curly tendrils
growing from the leaf
E'S axils where leaves
DEN join the stem.
Tropical red pas-
sionvines from South and Cen-
tral America are sometimes sold
locally They contain toxins that
poison Florida butterfly cater-
pillars as they feed. The toxins


would protect butterfly caterpil-
lars in the plants' native lands,
but Florida caterpillars sicken
and die. I have never seen a
local caterpillar on the bright,
red-flowered alien Brazilian
passionvine.
If gardeners want a red pa-
sionvine, there is a safe hybrid
propagated and sold at the UF
Museum of Natural History's
Butterfly Rainforest in
Gainesville. It has deep, bur-
gundy-red flowers and is a ram-
pant grower. This perennial
emerges in spring after winter
dormancy Check www.uflmnh.
ufl.edu/butterflies/plantlist for
availability
Zebra Longwing caterpillars


can only eat leaves, buds and
flowers of passoinvines. Zebras
are white with black spines.
Adults prefer shady habitats.
Variegated Fritillary caterpil-
lars, orange and white striped,
eat passionvines, as well as vio-
lets. Resident throughout
Florida, Variegated Fritillary
has multiple generations a year
and prefers open, sunny sites.
If the voracious caterpillar de-
vouring passionvines is orange
with black spines, it is the larva
of the more abundant Gulf Frit-
illary The adult has orange
wings with black markings and
three white dots ringed in black
on each forewing. Underneath,
on the hindwing, there are many


silvery patches, making identifi-
cation easy
Florida's state butterfly, Zebra
Longwing, is aptly named for its
long black wings with pale yel-
low stripes. Adults have a slow
flight, so they are easy to photo-
graph. Besides nectar, they
gather pollen to later digest at
communal night roost sites.
Zebra Longwings cannot sur-
vive long freezes north of Marion
County. Because of the rich
pollen protein diet, they live for
several months, so they stray
into North and West Florida in
summer and fall. This special
butterfly prefers to flutter in the

See JANE/Page E12


Sia i i s..


U


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(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


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SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 E5






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


An introduction to window box gardening


Raised-bed gardening on a small scale I m


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Sometimes the best view isn't what
you see through a window, but what
catches your eye underneath it.
Window boxes deliver color, edibles
and fragrance. They're practical, too,
as raised-bed gardens that elevate
their contents to within easy reach.
"Window boxes are convenient con-
tainers," said David Trinklein, a hor-
ticulturist with University of Missouri
Extension. "Plant them with herbs, for
example, and you won't have to go
outside to bring in the harvest"
If you have room for a window


box, you have room for a garden.
Window boxes are ideal for small,
shallow-rooted plants like radishes,
lettuce, marigolds, impatiens, pan-
sies, begonias, parsley, basil, sage
and thyme.
"Mix and match flowers with veg-
etables," said Rhonda Ferree, an ex-
tension educator with the University
of Illinois. "They need the same soil
types and have the same water pref-
erences. Plant flowers toward the
front for curb appeal; position veg-
etables toward the back for easier
access."
See WINDOWS/Page Ell


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.corn


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
Tall and small flowers complement one another in this
springtime window box assortment in Belgium. This
homeowner in the Belgian countryside refreshes her plant
selection with the change in seasons. Window boxes are
convenient containers that provide color, deliver edibles
and supply fragrances.


COLD eLL
HAVIeRO


E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Yes, you can freeze or refrigerate yeast


Dear Sara:
Is it okay
to put
dry yeast pack-
ets in the refrig-
erator? My
house gets hot
inside in the
summer, so I'm
thinking it
would keep bet-
ter in there. -
S.S., California
Dear S.S.:


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


using it within a
year Some peo-
ple report that
the yeast goes
dead, but I
haven't had any
problems with
it; I suspect that
some packets
are probably al-
ready dead
when you buy
them.
Dear Sara:


Yes, you can refrigerate I'm getting really tired of
dry instant yeast (such as the rubber coming off of
SAF dry yeast). You can my bathroom rugs. There
freeze it, too. Make sure must be some way of fixing
it's tightly sealed. I suggest this! It seems a shame to

.EErp: ,T

REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
J MLS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633 eto|
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM
AG T] /ENT Iell k4,' :ONv DUT SEE DAY eY.lAv WEEK!


have to just toss them. I
hang them on a line in my
garage, since I live in a
condo with no outside
clotheslines, and I won't
put the rugs in a dryer Any
suggestions? M. Swan-
son, email
DearM. Swanson: These
types of rugs are prone to
problems with the rubber
backing breaking down.
Some washing machines
(especially when using hot


or warm water) will cause
this, and bleach and dry-
ers will certainly cause the
backing to crumble.
Consider trying this fab-
ric coating spray by Per-
formix: plastidip.com/
home_solutions/Super_
Grip. According to the
product information:
"Super Grip is an air dry
non-skid fabric coating.
The tackified synthetic
rubber coating bonds to


most fabrics to stop skid-
ding and shifting. This
durable rubber coating
formula is machine wash-
able and remains flexible.
Super Grip will not trans-
fer or yellow surfaces and
will not pick up dirt or lint"
You can find this product
at Lowe's, Home Depot, Ace
Hardware and Walmart
Dear Sara: Any tips for
caring for long hair on young
girls? My daughter's hair is


a rat's nest every morning. -
Rebecca H., Florida
Dear Rebecca: I would
brush and braid the hair
after your child's bath or
shower and before bed-
time, which makes it eas-
ier to brush for school the
following morning. I use
detangler on my girls. You
can make it at home by
combining a couple of

See FRUGAL/Page Ell


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Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744


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JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


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MLS 702034 $350,000
Spacious &well maintained.
Expansive views of #9 on
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NEW LISTING


,-Z\:A 1667 N Shadowview Path
MLS 702383 $349,900
Maintenance free 3bd/2.5ba villa.
Maria Fleming 352-422-1976







l 460 W Doerr Path
MLS 356086 $325,000
Very nice 3/2.5/2 villa on
Skyview Golf Course
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


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3bd/2ba home with beautiful pool.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


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MLS 700636 $324,900
Fully furnished home overlooking the
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Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


IVILO UztOI 4-,tl
Greenbriar 2bd/2ba lower
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7/Wt MLS 359357 $199,000
New Roof! Great Value!
All weather Florida room.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


S 3690 WTreyburn Path 2493 N Brentwood Cir o(j/j' 1246 E Cleveland SI P OO 3709 N Buckwheat Pt
MLS 358373 $129,000 MLS 700534 $123,000 1.11i :.i:: S112.500 / MLS 356804 $89,900
Awesome Value! 3/2/2 open plan The perfect Florida 2/2/2 home is nimbly located on a Nice pool home with privacy on
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Tami Mayer 352-476-1507 Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Joy Holland 352-464-4952
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Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 E7












WHEEL IN THE COL R


Use artist's tool

to bring color to

your garden

JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press
Long a companion for artists. the
color wheel can also be a ha nd.\
tool for gardeners.
Gardening author Sydne Eddri-
son created a wheel that has 252
colors instead of the usual 12
That's because nature doesn't
work with a limited palette,
she says.
"In nature you have al-
ready been dealt this hand.
You only have to learn how
to play it," she says.
Even all of the tints,
shades and tones in Ed- .
dison's "The Gardener's Landscape architect Jeni Webber's
Color Wheel" don't cap- creation of a floral wreath resembles a
ture the diversity of color wheel. Long used by artists.
what's really growing out a color wheel helps gardeners see the
there. But she says it's a relationships colors have to one another.
good way to start seeing ,and plant accordingly. ,
colors in the garden and
how they relate to each
other
"The color wheel trains yo .r
eye to look, to really look," P. t
says Eddison, author of six
books including "The Gar-
dener's Palette" (Contempo-
rary Books, 2003). "You begin to ...
understand why certain things ,
work, or why you like a Christ-
mas wreath that's red and green
and why you're happy to seeI pii .-.
ple and yellow crocuses
together"
In both examples, the two olor-,I -
are complementary -opposite *
each other on the color wheel -
and in color theory, opposites A
attract.
In garden planning, colors .1 re
used to create either contrast --r
harmony, says Eddison, who l.is"
tended 2 1/2 acres in Newto n.
Conn., for half a century
"Contrast calls attention t- itself .
It gives a jolt," says Eddison. 81
See Page EO10


E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SCANDINAVIAN


SPRINGTIME

Chilly regions yield hot styles in decor


KIM COOK
Associated Press

Perhaps to alleviate the dreari-
ness of long northern winters,
Scandinavian style tends toward
folk-art florals, crisp checks, plaids
and stripes, and wood furniture left
natural or painted in colors that
evoke the region's natural
beauty.
The look is ca-
sual and easy, with
playful touches and .
a simple yet refined
vibe.
If all that sounds
appealing as
you shake off
winter's
gloom, you'll This photo provided
find many by FinnStyle.com
pretty, Scandi- shows Oiva Toikka's
navian- charming little glass
inspired bird, Orange Kuulas,
decor options manufactured by
for spring. iittala, the famed
Scandina- Finnish glass house.
vian style is Associated Press
typically anchored by whites and
creams, which provide a light-filled
canvas on which berry red, sky
blue, forest green and ochre offer
pops of cheerful color. Black some-
times provides a dramatic canvas,


especially on a rug. But there are
also soothing faded pinks, soft
stone grays and dusky purples in
the palette.
This spring, Ikea honors its Scan-
dinavian roots with an extensive
collection including designer Eva
Lundgreen's Akerkulla floral motif
curtains and rug. The Hemnes fur-
niture collection really nails the
Swedish look with a linen cabinet
--. in a deep red, a bed frame in
:ri..\ dn(I a shelving unit
in blue.
An airy,
pared-down
version of neo-
Si: Isical design was
i the li hInark of 18th
W century Gustavian design,
which has become popular outside
of Sweden in the last 20 years.
Ikea's Isala side table is a great ex-
ample, in clean white or forget-me-
not blue. In textiles, you'll find a
kicky pink gingham check in the
Emmie Ruta duvet cover, and a
country floral in the Eivor Leva
duvet cover. (www.ikea.com.)
At The Company Store, there's
the cottage charm of the Carrie
comforter cover in an orange
crewelwork floral motif on earthy
See Page E12


GENTLEMAN'S FARM
7400 W. GLENDALE CT., DUNNELLON, FL
35 Acre farm offers privacy, amongst huge
oaks, huge workshop & barn with stalls,
RV parking. Home features beautiful stone
fireplace, jetted tub, Security system,
gourmet kitchen, and relaxing front porch.
Priced Reduced to $639,000.00. MLS #351844.
Directions: Hwy 19 N to right on N. Citrus
Avenue. Continue North approximately 8 miles to
intersection of Citrus Ave. & Hwy 488. Continue
through intersection, turn right on W. Glendale Ct.
Home at the end of road.
For More Information Or To
Preview This Home Contact
S Rick Snell NEXTGENERATION
352-794-6100 REALTY


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 E9






E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


COLOR
Continued from Page E8

"Whereas harmony is a
sigh of relief."
Colors adjacent on the
color wheel, such as the
warm shades of red and
orange or the cool tones of
blue and green, create har-
mony together.
Take a color wheel into
the yard to parse out par-
ticular colors. Take it to
the garden center to help
pick out plants for the
summer.
Then play in the soil.
Eddison recommends
experimenting with color
in pots on the terrace.
"Don't force a color
theme on the garden," she
warns. "It has different
colors at different times of
the year."
Color also changes
throughout the day, de-
pending on the light.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Eddison changes her
patio pots every year, and
paints her garden furni-
ture to coordinate.
"Sometimes my color
schemes are a little wild. I
had a Crayola color
scheme one year," she says.
"People were blinded by it,
but I loved it"
"The year that I did yel-
low, white and yellow-
green, that was terrific,"
Eddison says. "And I
painted the furniture yel-
low."
Look to fabrics or fa-
mous artwork (Monet's
paintings, for example) for
color inspiration, she sug-
gests.
Or simply trust nature,
which turns out comple-
mentary color combina-
tions all its own, says
Betina Fink, an oil painter
who teaches color theory
in Tucson, Ariz.
"There are these beauti-
ful, naturally occurring
complementary colors,"


When planning a garden,
remember that cool colors, such
as blues and violets, recede, says
Fink. Warm colors reds,
oranges and yellows want to
take center stage. Green -
nature's most abundant color in
many places is "the great
peacemaker," says gardening
author Sydney Eddison.


she says. During spring in
the Southwest, for exam-
ple, prickly pear cacti
sport buds and blooms
ranging from yellows to
purples.
Jeni Webber, a Berkeley,
Calif., landscape architect
and Eddison's niece, also
suggests taking nature's
lead. Purple, yellow, white


and soft pink constitute
nature's palette in Califor-
nia fields, she says, and
they look great together.
"Nature doesn't worry
about things matching,"
says Webber. "But usually
it does."
When planning a gar-
den, remember that cool
colors, such as blues and


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violets, recede, says Fink.
Warm colors reds, or-
anges and yellows want
to take center stage. Green
- nature's most abundant
color in many places is
"the great peacemaker,"
says Eddison.
"Green doesn't call at-
tention to itself or vanish,"
Eddison says. "It helps
harmonize all of the color
schemes."
An incompatible color
scheme can be softened by
incorporating more sooth-
ing green foliage. In par-
ticular, gray and
gray-green foliage helps
blend colors.
Meanwhile, a little
white goes a long way in
the garden, warns
Eddison.
"It is the lightest and
brightest and most eye-
catching color in the gar-
den," she says. "It requires
special handling."
White works well with
individual colors or com-
bined with pastels. Low-
growing white flowers,
such as the tickseed plant
"Star Cluster" Coreopsis,
when spread throughout a
garden can help the eye
scan its surroundings.


Flowers come and go,
but foliage often remains
year-round, so plan it care-
fully, says Webber. She
likes orange foliage, a rel-
ative newcomer, and men-
tions the perennial
Heuchera Marmalade, a
variety of coral bells.
Instead of hard and fast
rules, Webber trusts her
eyes to know when two
plant colors clash: A bad
combination hurts. "If I'm
cheating and putting col-
ors together that don't go
well together, I'll see how
my eyes are feeling," she
says.
Over decades of experi-
menting with color, Eddi-
son also has found that
rules can only get a gar-
dener so far
'"As much as following
the rules works, ditch
them to follow your heart
and soul," she says.
Eddison's color wheel
and instructional booklet
may be purchased from
the publisher, The Color
Wheel Co. in Philomath,
Ore., online for $15. The
booklet's cover depicts a
floral wreath created by
Webber that emulates a
color wheel.


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./2 acre commercial property on Hwy 41. Corner
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CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.co www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 302-6714






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WINDOWS
Continued from Page E6

The location of the window
box usually dictates what you
can grow, Trinklein said. "Win-
dow boxes that get a blistering
afternoon sun require one thing.
Window boxes in shade require
another"
Fern Richardson, author of
"Small Space Container Gar-
dens" (Timber Press, 2012) de-
scribes herself as "a big believer
in creative window boxing."


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 Ell


"There's nothing stopping
window box gardeners from
adding garden ornaments to
their boxes," Richardson said.
"Small gazing balls tucked be-
tween the plants can add a little
sparkle to a shady area. Garden-
ers can even use short shep-
herd's hooks to plant a
hummingbird feeder in a win-
dow box."
Window boxes work especially
well:
U As theme gardens. Find
flowers that display your school
colors, patriotic mixtures that
show the flag or plants that com-


plement the paint on your
house.
At delivering fragrances.
Fill window boxes outside bed-
rooms with evening primrose,
four o'clock (Mirabilis) and
moonflowers for perfume-like
scents on still summer nights.
For four-season gardening.
Grow daffodils, grape hyacinth
and tulips in spring; ornamental
edibles like peppers, strawber-
ries and chives in summer; flow-
ering kale and pansies for color
through fall and winter
To showcase houseplants.
Display your favorite potted


plants in empty window boxes
during the summer growing sea-
son. That will free up some shelf
space indoors while enhancing
things outdoors.
"If there is no room in the
budget for a high-style window
box, thrifty gardeners can use
spray paint and even stencils to
upgrade inexpensive plastic
window boxes into something
that is one-of-a-kind," Richard-
son said. "Current fashion
trends are always a great place
to look for color and pattern in-
spiration."
Be careful, though, when wa-


tering window-box gardens,
Trinklein said.
"Most plants die from overwa-
tering in containers, but window
boxes can dry out quickly from
exposure to wind and hot
weather," he said. "Add a soilless
medium like vermiculite or peat
moss to the mix that drains well
yet retains moisture and light-
ens their weight.
"Window boxes will need
tending maybe three times a
week, but that's a small price to
pay for what they add in the way
of attractiveness to the home,"
Trinklein said.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

teaspoons of conditioner with water in
a spray bottle. I like to use a wide-tooth
comb versus a hairbrush, too. I work
small sections, starting at the bottom.
Dear Sara: Can you freeze cartons of
juice? It's on sale, but I can only keep
so many in my fridge. Do you think they
would freeze okay? -PS., email
Dear ES.: It's perfectly fine to freeze
juice. You'll want to remove some
juice from the carton to leave room for
expansion. When you're ready to
drink it, simply thaw it in the fridge.
Dear Sara: Can I chop up a large
piece of chocolate candy and make
hot chocolate out of it? I've used
candy this way in cookies, but never



ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

used to go to the local pub and bring
home some beer? It is 7 1/2 inches
from the bottom to the lid and 5
inches across the bottom. Is it worth
anything? It is stamped pure alu-
minum. Thank you for any informa-
tion that you can provide. H.K,
Beverly Hills
Dear IL.K.: The white marble-top
lamp table was made in America,
perhaps in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
Grand Rapids was a furniture man-
ufacturing mecca during the Victo-
rian era. Occasionally, the underside
of the marble or frame has a maker's
mark. The style is Renaissance Re-
vival, a popular style during the last
quarter of the 19th century, when
your table was produced. The one
corner of the marble appears to


in a beverage. -Laurie, Florida
Dear Laurie: I prefer bittersweet
or semi-sweet chocolate for home-
made hot chocolate, but nothing
should stop you from making it from
leftover milk chocolate. Chop the
chocolate and add it to a saucepan
with milk. Slowly heat on medium-
low, stirring constantly until the
chocolate melts. You can add a
splash of vanilla, too.
MEm
Easy homemade creamer: I make
my own creamer with half sweet-
ened condensed milk and half regu-
lar milk. I add vanilla or cinnamon,
too. -Sherry Minnesota
Add vegetables: I add finely
chopped fresh yellow squash to just
about anything, such as rice,
spaghetti and chili. It stretches the
dish, making it more filling and nu-

have been broken and repaired,
which will affect the sellability if it
is too much of an eye ore. Potential
dollar value, as is, is $100 more
perhaps on a lucky day
The aluminum can is called a
growler, a term used since the 18th
century for a container used to fetch
a measure of beer. It used to be not
long ago, adults would ask a young-
ster to fetch a growler of beer from
the local neighborhood pub or beer
garden, a chore not likely to exist
anymore. I wonder if any of our
readers remember those days.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1
p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


tritious. R.N, Florida money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Village (wwwfrugalvillage.com), a Street, Kansas City MO, 64106, or
website that offers practical, email sara@frugalvillage.com.







E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


SPRING
Continued from Page E9

chambray cotton. The tailored yet elegant
Hampton table comes in gentle shades of tar-
ragon, ash and tan.
(www.thecompanystore.com)
Anthropologie's got the Amora bedding set
with a colorful graphic on snowy white. While
South American in origin, the folk pattern is
similar enough to those of northern design
that it reads Scandinavian.
The same is true of the retailer's Fesi throw
pillow from the Philadelphia-based design
house Mushmina. It's a Moroccan-embroidered
pattern, yet looks like a snowflake or ski haus
motif.
The light and airy Speckled Blooms cotton
curtain features a hyacinth repeat in rosy pink
and green on white. Pair it with a few painted
furniture pieces and a striped rag rug in sim-
ilar hues, and you're off to a great Scandi-style
start. (www.anthropologie.com)


WREN
Continued from Page E4

the home. Don't be surprised if
you find these resourceful
birds nesting in your prized
hanging baskets, using a
clothespin pouch hanging on
the clothes line, or nesting in a
Christmas wreath that didn't
get taken down quickly
enough.
The Carolina wren uses a va-
riety of materials to construct
its dome-shaped nest. Nests
may be constructed from the


Burke D6cor has a charming teapot sprin-
kled with playful tulips and blossoms, de-
signed by Swedish ceramicist Camilla
Engdahl. (www.burkedecor.com)
And at www.finnstyle.com, find Oiva
Toikka's plump little glass birds, made by the
Finnish glass house litala. Erja Hirvi's Keis-
arinna fabric for Marimekko, with white mag-
nolia blossoms and branches scattered on
dove grey, is also available here.
The Dala horse has long been a symbol of
Swedish culture. Originating in the country's
furniture- and clock-making towns, toy horses
were made from scraps of leftover wood, and
the icon often appears on decorative items.
Annika Schmidt, an artist in Portland, Maine,
creates pillow covers and ceramic tiles
printed with her own version of the horse en-
twined in flowers, rendered in berry reds or
turquoise.
"I spent idyllic and carefree summers at my
grandmother's house in Sweden; I'd spend
hours playing in her small orchard, sur-
rounded by roses," Schmidt says.
(www.etsy.com/shop/LilleputtStudio)


skin of snakes, hair, feathers,
pet fur and many other materi-
als found around the yard. The
male wren builds many
"decoy" nests in different
places in the pair's territory
They are known to build multi-
ple nests to confuse predators.
The female selects one nest,
spruces it up to her liking and
then lays four to seven brown
speckled eggs.
She incubates them for 12 to
16 days. When the chicks hatch,
they have no feathers, and are
blind and helpless. Both par-
ents feed their chicks for an ad-
ditional two weeks before they


gain independence. A mating
pair of Carolina wrens may
have several broods each year.
Carolina wrens are versatile
birds that feed on insects, lar-
vae and spiders, but also eat
berries and fruit. They forage
on or near the ground and hop
along far more often than they
fly They use their bills to poke
about and search for hidden
meals and try to remain close
to brush in which they can
hide.
This spring, enjoy the pres-
ence of these intriguing little
birds. For more information,
please contact Citrus County


JANE
Continued from Page E5

shade, but also nectars on flowers
in full sun. Flat rocks placed in the
sun warm up early and may attract
adult butterflies in the mornings.
In my garden, I dig below ground
stem and root cuttings shortly after
emergence from winter dormancy in
March. Three to five cuttings are
stuck together in a 6-inch diameter by
6-inch deep round pot full of humus-
rich soil made of half sand from the
yard and half decayed fine organic
vegetable mulch. Pots are put in the
shade under irrigation for about six
weeks. When roots creep out the bot-
tom drainage holes, the new plants
are ready for adoption. Fast growing
"Incense" passionvines quickly climb
up nearby props, trellises, fences or
trees to feed butterfly caterpillars.


Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS's
knowledge, research and re-
sources to address youth, fam-
ily, community, and
agricultural needs." Programs
and activities offered by the
Extension Service are avail-
able to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap,
sex, religion or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshawis the direc-
tor of the University of Florida
/IFAS Citrus County Extension.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"Incense" passionvine hybrid
blooms in abundance from May to
September. It is a safe host plant for
three Florida butterfly caterpillar
species. Some gardeners buy cater-
pillars to put on host plants in their
gardens. Homosassa Butterfly on
Cardinal Street raises 25 to 30 native
butterflies in season. There you can
see eggs, caterpillars and chrysalises
in separate protective rooms. Adults
fly in the outdoor screened enclo-
sures. Homosassa Butterfly is an ex-
cellent place to photograph native
butterflies on native plants.


Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands
of native plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon, Marion
County, garden. For an appoint-
ment, call 352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are in-
vited to submit news releases
about upcoming community
events.
* Write the name of the event,
who sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and
other details.
* Include a contact name and
phone number to be printed in
the paper.
* News releases are subject to
editing.
* Call 352-563-5660 for details.


@ JOANN MARTIN
I referred
REAL ESTA TE

Broker Associate 352-270-3255


3771 N. Blazingstar way
Beverly Hills
1298 sf of living, 2 bedroom
2 bath. Large kitchen.
Needs TLC. Close to shopping
& library. mls#702244
Priced at $59,900


mg
^hi-


2045 N. Annapolis Ave
Hernando
Home offers 2691 sf of living.
Open floor plan, fireplace.
Skylights, roof 2003.
Peaceful setting. mls#702526
Offered for $149,900


CAROLE LISTER
M, Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
.A Cell: 422-4620 K...1
Office: 382-1700




OAKLEAF VILLA OAKLEAF VILLA
*3/2/2 Hardwood floors :2/2/2 Skylights
*Custom cabinets Corian Cathedral ceiling *NewA/C
*Cathedral ceilings -Skylights *New garage door -New roof
#702308 $142,900 #702226 $115,000



HAMMOCKS VILLA VILLA NEAR COUNTRY CLUB
3/2/2 -Family room -2/2/2 Family room
* Lg eat-in kitchen Florida room -Huge master bath Updated kitchen
SWalk-around shower Furniture nego. Garage screen$1 1No onthlyfee
#701855 $155,000 #701368 $119,900


[, KEY "Always There For You"
E.1 EJjL GAIL COOPER
m- li'uIilljin miioni, Dollar Realuor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
F.... m hnm u in drn.... ..........


FRESHLY PAINTED INSIDE AND OUT! GOLF COURSE COTTAGE!
* Nicely updated 2/2 home 3/2/2 custom design home
* Newer appliances and countertops Over 1900 sq ft of living
* New 16" tile in main living areas Family room has gas fireplace
* Ceiling fans throughout Expanded lanai with golf course views
* Well for irrigation 18" tile in all main living areas
* Private wooded yard & greenbelt Yard maintained by association
#702312 $95,900 #359297 $194,900
See. Vi u @ -I Iwr.IIIm ,.. i. .J leho B.I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
--'-

FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
CRYSTAL RIVER
1br 1.5ba $475 Incl:
Wter/Trsh, Frdge/Stve,
Wshr/Dry, FL-Rm,
Newer-AC, Fencd Yrd
352-587-2555
HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced Acre, Addition
Huge Deck, Shed
$500.mo 352-628-5244



43,900.3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807





3/2 on 1.5
Acres
FHA Approved
$2600 Down
(Town of Hernando)
352-795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183




Easter Sale
Family Home Center
Three Lot Model
Clearance
NO HIDDEN FEES
$72,900 30 x 76 4/2
$69,900 30 x 60 3/2
$82,900 32 x 76 4/2
Price Incls: Delv, Set,
A/C Skirting, Steps,
upgraded appliances &
Furniture Remember
The Reason for The
Season 352-795-1272




Own Your
Own Land?
Financing Available to
purchase your next
New or used
Manufactured Home
352-795-1272

Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/
$39k off select 2012
models (3)
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210




MUST SELL

REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377


We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272




INVERNESS
55+ park
on water. Furnished
2bd, 1.5 bath, $595.
Rent inc. grass cutt-
ing and your water.
Call 352-476-4964
for details




Credit Scores
above 575 Qualify for
several land/home
packages in the
Tri-County area
352-795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on 12 acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new floor-
ing $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217


INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on 14 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message




1989, 24 x 40, 2BD/2BA
12 x 40 enclosed front,
with vynal window,
utititiy & outdoor shed
all appl's and some
furniture included, lot
rent includes water
garbage and sewer
sm. pets okay, $16,000
863-519-8233
Ext. 11243
Crystal river 2 bedroom.
2 bath. Beautiful home
on the lake. Furnished
and includes all appli-
ances. A 55 plus com-
munity. Close to shops.
asking $24,900
352-7944128





Doublewides
Available
in 55+ park in
Lecanto, Exc.
Condition & Pricing
352-563-0500

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$11,000 or Lease to
Own from $199/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

INVERNESS
Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
Florida Room, Carport
$10,000 OBO (352)
419-5114 or 601-4929
Lecanto Hills 55+ Park
Lot rent $240, 2/1,
Clean, Fully turn.,
shed & carport $7,500
61 S Atkins Ter. Call
ofc: 352-746-4648


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?


3/2 Mobile $800
3/2 Bonus Room $900
2/1/1 ............... $600
3/2/1 Lawncre Included... $775

2/2/2 ............ $850
3/2/2 Pool, Lawncare Included
$1,050

3/2 Doublewide On Acrege $750

3/2/2 Pool, Pool Cae Included
. . $950
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010


ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
wwwCitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
5641 W. Irving Ct ............... $750
2/2/1 Nice home, great localon
60xhornCt E ................. $1,350
3/2/2 Pool hone in SMW
HERNANDO
illt Dew Way- E......... DRED t685
3/2 DWnew mobile on1/2ACR
95E.Glassbro(t ................$1,500
3/3/3 on golf course
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 Cleveland ..................... $675
2/2 Roory hone close to 7 Niers Hospirl
11280 Bayshore Dr ............ $1,000
2/2 Furnished withb anengnes
CITRUS SPRINGS/BEVERLY HILLS
34 S. Jefferson St. (lH) ............ $750
2/2 Nice rooms with loan
8160 N. Dual Dr ( )........ $1,300
3/2/2 Pool hore, fully fumished



#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


Home Finder

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Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 E13







E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio Apt.
$650. All Util. Included
(352) 382-7892
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Homosassa
sm 1bd w/utilities $375.
1st, last, $500 sec.
352-563-1033 or
352-601-0819



ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
INVERNESS
1/1 $400. & 2/2 $600.
Near Hospital
352-422-2393
INVERNESS
2/1water inc. 1st fl,
livkit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238
LECANTO
1 BD apartment $500
352-216-0012/613-6000
SEABREEZE
MANOR
Senior Citizens,
Disabled or Handi-
capped. Rent based
on income.
Applications now
accepted for 1 & 2
bedrm units with
carpeting, custom
cabinets, central air &
heat, stove,
refrigerator &
additional outside
storage with patio.
37 Seabreeze Dr.,
Inglis. Call
(352) 447-0277-TDD







Get
Results in
the
home font
classifies!
onI inom.
Aplctos now


RIVER REACH
APARTMENTS

Now Accepting
Applications
Income
Based Rent
2151 N. River Reach
Circle Crystal River,
FL (352) 795-8024
TDD Hearing
impaired number:
1-800-955-8771
OFFICE HOURS
Monday thru Friday
8:00am 3:00 pm
Closed for Lunch
Noon to 1:00pm
"62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children."




"This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and
Employer "





LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801



INVERNESS
2 bedroom. 2 bath.
Whis Pines,Gar.$695
1st,last & references.
352-464-0919
Whispering Pines
Villa Furnished
3/2/1 Liv, Din, Kit, Lanai,
end unitl ots of privacy
$850 mthly, last, sec.
413-478-6396



At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio Apt.
$650. All Util. Included
(352) 382-7892
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



CRYSTAL RIVER
Roommate 3/2/2,
Must love Dogs $700.
(352) 422-5735




BEVERLY HILLS
Updated 2/1+carport
$500. month
352-422-4012


CITRUS SPRINGS
2 Story 3BR + Loft,
Near schools, $895.
mo. 352-812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352-341-4178
Homosassa Spg
2/2 on canal, new
paint,flooring through-
out, w/d pets ok $1000
mthly, 619-301-5442
INVERNESS
2/2/2 Remodeled, on
Golf course $895mo +
Sec. 352-895-0744
INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM
Sugarmill Woods
4br/2ba $1000 avail
6/1 (201)-680-3285
(347) 351-9623



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



INVERNESS
All Utility incl'd.,
$325 mo. 352-726-0652
INVERNESS
Furn Rm, priv full bath,
incls cable/wifi, access
kit & W/D. $360 mo. or
$90 wk.(352) 613-1123




35 Beech Street 2 bed.
2 bath. Large 1st floor
refurbished condo on
golf course. Excel. bldg.,
low maint. fee, quiet
owners, pet friendly.
Great value. Priced fur-
nished or unfurnished.
607-287-0774
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE
Homosassa Springs
Lot. 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
(904) 757-1012


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $56,400. Call
352-638-0905


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



Your World








CHRONICLE


... I'i, rI, iri,


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.



AUCTION: 5/23/2013
10AM @ Osceloa
CO.Courthouse,
K ssimmee, FL.
3Br/2Ba
W/attached
Garage 1,351 Sq.Ft.
Call Sharon:
954-740-2421.
Email:
Sharon.w.sullivan
@irs.gov
Visit:
www.irsauctions.
GOV for info



Beverly Hills 41 Truman
SUN, 12-3 Remodeled
2/1.5/1 New Roof, Kit.,
bath, appl.'s, flooring,
paint, MORE $59,900.
352-527-1239



2355 S. Ripple Path
Crystal River, 34429
Great Marine Mech,
Boat storage and launch
site for nearby scallops
plus fishing & kayaks,
Lgr bldg w/ 3/18' rollups
office tIr & boat ramp,
$169k, finance poss.
call 352-634-3862





YIoi \\irld first

Need a jib)
ir ai
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


Cm(Nd


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





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(352) 563-5966



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_________________________________________________6409t 80B







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2,240 SF
Bldg.
on .55 Acres,
Split into 2 Suites,
Zoned CH High
Intensity Comm,
Large Sign,
Great Location
Auction held on site
1919 NW US Hwy 19
Crystal River Fl.
Thurs. May 16th,
12PM
Preview From I1 am
Sale Day
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.comrn









PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 % w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164



2/1/1 Treated with
tender loving care.
Freshly painted int/ext
Near shopping $43,999
209 S Washington ST
Cl Bill 301-538-4840
REMODELED 2/1.5/1
NEW: Roof, kitchen,
appl's, bath, flooring,
paint, much more.,
1240sf, under AC.
$59,900. (352)527-1239

Invernes -I


FOR SALE 2/2
5372 S Stoneridge Dr
Stone Ridge Landing
OPEN HOUSE
All Weekend 11a-4p
INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM


H
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE



3-4BR/ 2BA/ 2-4Car
New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees,
2 Lots, $145,000.
352-563-9857
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number


REALTY ONE



3/2/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
REDUCED $133 900
352-302-4057


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR
ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.comrn
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351
HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
SS Appliances, Wood,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar, fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
WANTED
I need listings!!
I SOLD all of
mine and I can
sell yours too.
Market is good!
Call me, lets talk.
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.




I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.comrn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515
Room To Roam
3/2 ON 2 ACRES
Quite Country Setting
front porch, Large
rear screened porch,
Patio, 24x30 Steel
Building, w/ water &
electric, and Steel
Carport, Completely
Fenced Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area,
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$132,000
352-302-6784







SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855
SPECIAL *
New Home in Quiet
Neighborhood, 3/2/2
2932 sq. ft. corner lot,
on 1 acre, $279,900
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116






# Employment
source is...




www chronicleonine corn


Hme


Office Open
7 Days a Week
LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




INVERNESS VILLA
For Sale, Near
Whispering Pines
Park. Close to stores
/restaurants. Near
Medical Facilities/
Hospital. Light,
Updated End Unit.
2 BR. 2BA., Garage
Eat in Kit., Liv. Rm.
/Din. Rm., Front/back
porch, garage, attic
w/storage, newer AC
w/ guarantee. ALL
Appl's. UPDATED,
Near Condo Pool
Call (352) 637-3746
(352) 697-2475



47 LOTS in Rarity Bay
on Tellico Lake, East
Tennessee. FORE-
CLOSURE AUCTION.
May 11, 10:30 AM.
Furrow Auction Co.
1-800-4FURROW.
www.furrow.com
Lic.TN#62




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


516 S. TUCK POINT
2/1/1 Block Home,
Remodeled, New
Everything, Canal to
Withlacoochee River
Priced to Sell
Immediately! $64,900
(352) 503-6703


HAVE IT ALL
Spring Water, Fish from
Dock, Watch the
Manatees from porch,
walk to festivals, enjoy
living in dwntn Crystal
River, gated community,
2/2 Condo w/gar.
$249,900, ownerlic. RE
Broker 352-257-9496


Get

Results

In The

Homefront

Classifieds!


How **

Vowi Do
rouI
"1 0 IfW

Wo


M AWEII1,d0


Inpul; "


Chronicle
Classifieds
In Print


tjy *..- .




.
-. /


I "
& Online 4 o

C0 II3ONICLE -5 CH6N6iaiOT



(352) 503m5966 /h/


SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013 E15


Waefrn


LmsF


How
To Make
Your
Dining
Room
Set
Disappear...
Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!



(352) 563-5966

C llle )i( .,E








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SKYVIEW GOLF COURSE
..II, ... i,, l .ivli, ll IH ............I, I I I ..
V I .. 1 ..] I. 1 1II...... d l ...I.


r1 = 11 41 ASKING S208,900
Pit Di 352 212 7280


* liii.ii I.m il I. 111_ I .
* "2 2 PIh'I t .lfi..
* I _,:^hl p.:..:.l l. ....i.l ''.

* H i.1I, lli : i:d...i i h .il ..li. :
Mit = 7111 7 $229,000
Jeanne io Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
CiiiusCoun L'Sold. corn


JUST REDUCED TO $24.900
FOR FAST SALE!

I. I. II I "l F I. Iv lj Il ... a I ..
1.1.I.I IU.. H .] H.... I -- I" ... '


C352 D766668 i. 22 4 62
352 726 6668 o} 422 4627


THREE BEDROOM, TWO BATH
HOME IN CITRUS SPRINGS


MI _:, i = .: .' $109,900
Call Isaac Baylon lot a personal lout
Cell: 13521697 2493











SUPER LOCATION
MAINTENANCE FREE LIFESTYLE
I. .. .... i.. .. ; l. ...I I .) il .. l

ASKING $59.900
Pit Di,. 43521 212 7280
I..i i''i tnii a1 c21idia.can


* IVI I'.arc ijrrrr.
* 31Z ; I,,ll, villi1

* MIAll 'al'l II..: livin
Mr' = 3' ,7] "$90,000
Jeanne ot WHllad Pickiel 212 3410
I''I. ciltuscounti-sold. coin


OVER 2 ACRES QUALITY!



-..IIh,,, h ,,. ..,, ,, I .. h ..


ri.: =ir. S157.900
G ill, Pli's-}li 's /S l _


II


WATERFRONT COTTAGE ON 2.4 ACRES
s. ) h ... .... .. -.. 1 1.I., I. ..hh l .d I lh l




rII Pi ".I ASKING S119,900
Pit D, 4352'1212 7280


INVERNESS 3/2/2 CLOSE TO TOWN
N IIl .llil n., 1.m il I _111|4


PRICED TO SELL!! $84,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699










31 BEAUTIFUL ACRES ,,ii.


ll:l ll4 1 ..I.. l ..J h .ill .. II. l., f l ...

Mt = 3. 3: $850,000
Call Jim Motion at 352 4222173
to lout this slice ol paradise


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!

hI h-.i ll VVI b'I iJ f .1-" I ..I j I 'I J. .i : id lji
...Ijl.j ha W I. bl il' l. rl.l
ONLY ASKING $189,900
Call Quade Feeset 352 302 7699


FLORIDA LAKEFRONT PARADISE

1 ... h ,,l 1 .-.. . . h

f , h. ,, h ....- ,,, ,, .,, ,, 1, "
NMl; = -.1-.i ASKING $235,000
Call Jim iloion 422 2113 to see this
be.iutiul icre.ige


BEST PRICE IN CELINA HILLS!
S8.1111. _" bill, pf...I hf.'.. ,lhl .v.



.1 p qm ..,I n ] n l.n.j li .l h 6l ,
Mi 1f = Il.:. ASKING $109,900
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072
at 352 726 6668


* I.I ,l r I, [.,:llh hii 'll-
* VV.-II ..r,.a.lr.ar .J
* I ALIITII II_ l. li(.-1 .I
* e Al_.l llll Il..i ..l l..:. I'.

Mt = i11I. "' $125,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 2123410
I'i'ir'. cilluscount sold. corn


'II NE Ill SIu I Cliin llainl Floiilad 3115.'

iII- .. :.. .. i .. ,,,- .. i i. I 1 .6..
,1 .1.. h 6 .1 1 ....1 .
OFFERED AT ONLY S199.OOO
i ,11 ll, 1, I,,,, .i .r i, h,, J, i,.- i l


* a.ll.ly I..f.',1 IU I l. .,I1.

* I "_' A i: A l.l iil i: l I:..I | l ,ll
* VVhii ls II i 11. '. 'IIII'.
Mi = ,:i,:l $140,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
Iwii. CitiusCountilSold. corn


' ,, ,,, ,,


Mi'.- =/i'iii ASKING S175,000
Call Tim Donovan at 220 0328
to see this lovell home


um inc wVinLfLuu.un.EE nivcn

S li.:. 11 ... .i l.; il. i n,..l ,: I MI" .il, l .
,:] l lll Ilia l d. l hI lllli.

Mit 3' .h'l13 ASKING $189,900
Call Maltha Sny'dei at 476-8727 to
see this stunning piopett'y


STONERIDGE LANDINGS
VW I..il .1I'1 I.,q IIl i .il l 1' ., .Ill..

,:l.f1 liB ; j.a u, II.' ll,
i.IMII hnl ilin all li-iiy l

$19,900
Call Ruth iedeick 1 352 563 6866


WAVE A WAND!

vlll Il ill li l i ll: A 1. h dil lll I, i ill i II

Mi 3 = 71111 I:1I $28,000
Ask lot Mailyin Booth 637 4904


DUIU I irUL numc IrIUB ar UU I
r II. H IVl- I IfIl I IIIuH I u iHuIl
I... 1" I F 1 a T 1 II.. 1. 1- ...-..

ASKING $214.900
Pit Di, ,,352' 212 7280


P


E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 2013


r 1 ___._