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Citrus County chronicle ( April 14, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 14, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03091

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 14, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03091

Full Text


Field tight heading into final round of Masters /B1


Partly sunny;
40 percent chance
of thunderstorms.
PAGE A4


CITRUS CROC UNT Y R





www.chronicleonline.com


APRIL 14, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


101 C1ii


$ 1 I G*J


VOL. 118 ISSUE 250


On Oct. 8, 2012, Jazmine and Robert Lee were headed to the grocery
store when he lost control of the motorcycle they were on. Robert, 38,
died. His 12-year-old daughter survived, but suffered brain damage.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Thirteen-year-old Jazmine "Jazzy" Lee suffered a severe head injury following a motorcycle crash last year while riding with her
father. Injuries from the crash killed her father and the teen recovers at her Inverness home from the effects of the accident.
Above, she receives a kiss from her puppy Sergeant.



JAZMINE'S STORY


"When they told me my little girl was

going to die, I said, 'You don't know her."'


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS
Jazmine has something
to say
It comes out with a
laugh, or a giggle or a
knowing smirk.
"I love Sergeant," she
says, cuddling her Chihuahua.
Sometimes her voice is so
soft, almost a whisper
"My father died," she says.
"He's up in heaven."
Stringing a sentence to-
gether isn't within Jazmine's
reach just yet, but her family
knows they can just tell -
that she's ready to burst.
"How are you feeling?" a
friend asks.
Jazmine breaks into a broad
grin.
"Amazing!"
Jaz
it was Oct. 8. Jazmine and still
her father were riding her has
uncle's motorcycle to the gro-
cery store to pick up some
things for a school field trip.
They had left Publix and were likely
on their way to Winn-Dixie when the
bike hit a patch of wet pavement.
Spray from a sprinkler on Tompkins


75Ill


mine Lee's infectious smile lights up a room. W
I far from being fully recovered from the crash,
made remarkable progress in the past weeks

Street in Inverness splashed her fa-
ther's face and he lost control of the
motorcycle, flipping both he and his
daughter off. They had been traveling
less than 25 mph and both were wear-


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword ...... .A14
Excursions ...... .A14


ing helmets, Jazmine's mother
said.
Carrie Connolly divorced
Thomas Bruce Lee Jr. in 2008
after eight years of marriage,
but they remained friends. He
lived across the street on Dee
River Road just outside Inver-
ness. His brother and mother
also lived nearby It's a tight
family
Carrie and her ex-mother-
r in-law, Susan Lee, were at a
Leesburg hospital where Car-
rie's fiance was undergoing
surgery when they received a
call about the accident.
Thomas Lee had been flown
to Shands hospital in
Gainesville. His daughter was
taken by helicopter to Tampa
General Hospital.
Carrie rushed to Tampa.
Jazmine was unconscious
with severe brain damage. A
Mile chaplain was called in. Doc-
she tors tried to prepare Carrie
for the worst.
"When they told me my lit-
tle girl was going to die, I said,
'You don't know her,"' she said. "They
don't know us as a family They don't
know how hard we push."
See Page A2


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope . . . .A4 Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... .A14
Obituaries ....... .A6


Plane


forced to


land on


U.S. 41
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY -An apparent
engine malfunction led the pilot
of a small plane to make an emer-
gency landing on U.S. 41 in Floral
City, according to sheriff's office
officials.
The Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice received a phone call at 11:19
a.m. Saturday when witnesses re-
ported a Cessna aircraft in mid-
dle of the road.
See Page A8



County


pays man


to attend


his own


trial

Costly mistake
will be repaid in
vacation time,
garnishments
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
A Citrus County code compli-
ance officer received more than
five weeks of paid time off to tes-
tify in a South Florida civil rights
lawsuit in which he was a defen-
dant and lost a $7 million verdict.
County offi-
cials are now re-
quiring George
Pierson Jr. to
repay the nearly
$3,500 he re-
ceived in admin-
istrative salary
after a Chronicle
George reporter alerted
Pierson Jr. them to Pier-
requested paid son's role in the
time off at the lawsuit
suggestion of County officials
a superior, but acknowledge they
maintains the afforded Pierson
violation of the administra-
county policy
was a misun- tive pay, but said
derstanding. they wouldn't
have done that if
Pierson had been sincere about
the court details.
"He wasn't forthcoming when
in fact he should have," county
spokeswoman Lindsay Ubinas said.
Pierson retired from the Mira-
mar police force in 2008 and
moved to Inverness. The county
hired him in August 2008 first as a
See Page A8


TV Listings ...... A14
Together ... .A17, A18
Veterans Notes . .A15


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A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


JAZMINE
Continued from Page Al

J azmine wears a purple
shirt with the Batman
insignia across the front.
Purple is her favorite
color. It was her dad's fa-
vorite color, too.
She holds tight to a
stuffed eagle that her fa-
ther owned. He served in
the Marines, and Jazmine
knows exactly what that
means.
"United States Marine
Corps," she says. "Oorah!"
J azmine Lee's father
died on the day of the
accident. Meanwhile, she
clung to life at Tampa Gen-
eral. To relieve pressure
on her swelling brain, doc-
tors removed a portion of
her skull.
In early December,
while Jazmine was still in
a coma, her family brought
her home. Doctors had
seen her body react to a
"tickle test."
Jazmine slowly came out
the coma, at first nodding
her head to questions,
then mouthing words. And
then she spoke.
"The first thing she said
was, 'I want cereal,"' her
mother said.
The family took her to a
rehabilitation center in
Jacksonville, where doc-
tors continued to work on
her speech and motor
skills.
"That's part of the brain
healing," Carrie Connolly
said. "It's kind of like con-
nect the dots. She has to
connect all the neural
pathways to each other.
She has to relearn all of
that."
The brain damage in-
cludes blindness. Jazmine
likely can detect move-
ment from the side of her
right eye. Doctors aren't
sure how much of her sight
she will regain.
From Jacksonville,
Jazmine returned to
Tampa General, where
doctors reattached her
skull. While there, her
Uncle Jeff Thomas's
brother broke the sad
news that her father had
died.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office Animal Control Officer Terry Funderburk has some fun with Jazmine while visiting as
she recovers in her Inverness home. Funderburk found the girl's dog after it ran away.


"It was very traumatic,"
Carrie said. "Brain injury
or not, that was her
daddy"
Each day, the realization
of her father's death con-
tinues to make an impres-
sion on Jazmine.
"It's helped her in a way
that she wants to be strong


for Daddy and make
Daddy proud," Carrie said.
But it's a struggle.
"This is Daddy's girl,"
Carrie said. "Her daddy
was wrapped in her little
finger."
J azmine is happy for a
visit from Terry Fun-


derburk, an animal control
officer with the Citrus
County Sheriff's Office.
"Hi Terry!" Jazmine
says.
FRnderburk is responsi-
ble for reuniting Jazmine
with Sergeant, her 6-year-
old Chihuahua.
Shortly after Jazmine


came home on March 1,
Sergeant went missing.
Funderburk responded to
the call and, after hearing
Jazmine's story, made a
special effort to find the
dog.
"Our doggy was very
hard to find," Jazmine
says.


FRnderburk passed pho-
tos of Sergeant through the
neighborhood and learned
that new neighbors had
picked him up. Once he
explained the circum-
stances, the couple gladly
gave up the dog.
"Thanks for bringing
Sergeant home," Jazmine
says.
"It was kind of a per-
sonal mission to me," Fun-
derburk responds.
As FRnderburk prepares
to leave, he says to
Jazmine: "See you later,
alligator!"
To which she promptly
replies, "After while, croc-
odile!"
After a moment, she
adds softly: "My daddy
said 'See you later, alliga-
tor' all the time."
J azmine is a millennium
baby, born Jan. 1, 2000.
As a young teenager, she
continues to grow and
thrive in spite of the cir-
cumstances.
Teachers from Inver-
ness Middle School come
to the house each week to
tutor Jazmine. Her mother
is hoping Jazmine can re-
turn to Inverness Middle
School, where she is a
seventh-grader
"That's the goal we're
shooting for," Carrie said.
See .Page A5


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LOCAL







Page A3 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013



TATE&


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




AruTEd Officials mum on tractor store


Citrus County
Inverness cleanup
set for April 20
The city of Inverness is
holding the annual Spring
Cleanup Campaign on Sat-
urday, April 20.
In cooperation with Keep
Citrus County Beautiful, the
effort will coincide with and
support the celebration of
Earth Day, the Great Ameri-
can Cleanup and the Citrus
County Cleanup-Greenup
program.
KCCB and Waste Man-
agement will provide infor-
mation on the importance of
recycling and the advan-
tages to the community.
A kick-off celebration be-
gins at 8 a.m. at the Inver-
ness Government Center,
212 W. Main St.
Call 352-726-2611 to
sign up for a specific street
or area in the city limits.
Sen. Nelson to speak
to area Democrats
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson will
be the keynote speaker at
the yearly FDR/JFK
fundraising dinner hosted
by the Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday,
April 27.
The event will be in the
Hampton Room at the Cit-
rus Hills Country Club.
Meals include a choice of
London broil, bourbon
salmon or chicken marsala.
There will be a cash bar.
Entertainment is by Steve
Robinson.
Tickets are $40. Contact
352-726-3898 or palex3099
@aol.com for tickets.
Seniors sought for
graduation section
The Chronicle wants to
include graduating home-
schooled seniors from Cit-
rus County in the upcoming
graduation tab for 2013.
Also welcome are gradu-
ating seniors from out-of-
county schools who reside
in Citrus County.
Send the graduate's
name and a photo to the
Chronicle, attn: Cindy Con-
nolly, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429; or email cconnolly
@chronicleonline.com no
later than Friday, April 26,
with the photo as an
attachment.
Information and photos
can also be dropped off at
the Meadowcrest office in
Crystal River.

Riviera Beach
Five killed in crash
on 1-95 exit ramp
Five people have been
killed in a two-vehicle crash
on an interstate exit ramp in
South Florida.
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol reported a Mercedes
ran a red light as it exited
Interstate 95 in Riviera
Beach early Saturday and
struck a Lexus.
FHP Lt. Tim Frith said the
Lexus rolled over and hit
two trees. Several passen-
gers were ejected.
Four of the occupants of
the Lexus were pronounced
dead at the scene. Afifth died
at the hospital. All were be-
tween the ages of 14 and 22.
Frith said the driver of the
Mercedes was taken to St.
Mary's Medical Center and
was not cooperating with
investigators.

Tallahassee


based company operated
1,176 stores in 45 states.
Nearby stores can be found
in Dunnellon, Brooksville,
Ocala and Leesburg.
The store in Citrus
County has been rumored
for several months, and
last week it was mentioned
at both the Citrus County
Agricultural Alliance and
Economic Development
Council meetings. Two
company representatives
were on the alliance
agenda but did not appear,
and a company spokesman
would not confirm any


plans for a new store.
"What we can say at this
time is that, as a growth-
minded company, Tractor
Supply Company is always
looking for potential new
store locations that are a
good fit as far as the target
market is concerned," Rob
Hoskins, media relations,
said via email. "Concern-
ing a potential location in
Homosassa, this is espe-
cially true in that the area
is attractive due to the
part-time and hobby farm-
ers, and horse owners in
the area.


He said the Tractor
Supply product category
expertise includes lawn
and garden, and animal
care products that service
the needs of these cus-
tomers. Livestock and pet
are the largest product
categories.
According to Walmart
Realty, a sale is pending
for the 75,008-square-foot
building, which had been
listed at $3 million.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The Tractor Supply
Company website lists job
openings for a store in Ho-
mosassa Springs, and it is
no secret the national
chain store has been eye-
ing the former Walmart
location.
The cavernous retail


site in the Homosassa Re-
gional Shopping Center
has been vacant since Wal-
mart relocated last year.
The center is anchored by
Winn-Dixie.
Tractor Supply describes
itself on its website as "the
largest retail farm and
ranch store chain in the
United States." As of Dec.
29, 2012, the Tennessee-


Taste of Inverness
.


-A
ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Barbara Lamb, left, samples cookies and pastries by Anna Festa, right, from Gipetto's Cookie Jar and Bakery Saturday night at the Taste
of Inverness. The fundraiser, which benefits the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County, featured food, wine and entertainment.


LHS senior accepted to


Coast Guard Academy


JON-MICHAEL
SORACCHI
Sports editor

Chloe Benoist has spent
the last four years sailing
past fellow student-athletes
on the field and in the


classroom.
Now the Lecanto
High School senior
will devote at least
the next nine years
of her life continuing
to do so.
Benoist signed her
official letter of in-
tent to attend the
U.S. Coast Guard
Academy in New


certain if she wanted to com-
mit to that lifestyle, although
she didn't rule it out.
A second two-day visit,
where she shadowed an
academy cadet, was much
more enlightening and
showed Benoist the opportu-
nities that could be afforded


4 .



Chloe
Benoist


London, Conn., after receiv-
ing an appointment from the
military academy recently
As a student, Benoist plans
to major in operations re-
search analysis, a math and
computer science field.
"The academics are great,
I get to play all my sports and
I get to serve my country,"
Benoist said. "I think it's a
positive because you're guar-
anteed a job when you grad-
uate, and a lot of people are
struggling to find jobs."
Benoist said her first visit
was rough and left her un-


Two Flonda resident
Panther adjusting to Seven Mile Bridge Run


life in the wild
Wildlife officials said a rare
Florida panther seems to be
doing well in the wild after
being raised in captivity.
The male panther was
rescued as a kitten with its
sister in 2011 after their
mother was found dead.
The cats were raised with
limited human interaction at
a conservation center in
northeast Florida.
-From staff and wire reports


MARATHON Two Florida reside
won the overall men's and women's ti
an annual footrace over the Florida KE
seas Highway's longest bridge.
Jon Volpi of Boca Raton was the to
Saturday's Seven Mile Bridge Run wit
25 minutes and 51 seconds. Angela C
bourne Beach completed the course ii
It was the first time both runners en
race, first staged in 1982 to mark the c
of a project to build 37 new Keys bridge
Peter Frezza, of Tavernier, finished
the men's division, while Helena Burs:
Pine Key, was second in women's.
The event attracted about 1,500 en


her if she enrolled.
Athletically,
Benoist said she
would run both in-
door and outdoor
track and field,
which take place in
the winter and spring
seasons. She will
have to make a
choice in the fall,


however, whether to run
cross country or play soccer.
In soccer, Benoist is one of
three finalists for the Chron-
icle's Girls Soccer Player of
the Year award after scoring
10 goals, 10 assists and help-
ing lead Lecanto to a District
4A-4 title. She is also a final-
ist for Girls Cross Country
Runner of the Year; both of
those awards will be an-
nounced Thursday, May 30,
at College of Central Florida
in Lecanto.
Lecanto girls track and
field coach Rob Thompson


counts Benoist as one of his
brightest.
"As far as track, she's a
team leader," Thompson
said. "Without her, we would-
n't have made it to where we
are."
Panthers girls soccer
coach Roselle Lattin echoed
that sentiment.
"She's really a rare breed,"
Lattin said. "She works
hard on the field but also ex-
cels tremendously in the
classroom."
Benoist also carries 4.91
weighted and 4.0 unweighted
GPAs in Lecanto's Interna-
tional Baccalaureate pro-
gram, where coordinator
Darrick Buettner said his
pupil has laid the ground-
work for future success.
"Chloe's definitely going to
be on the path to succeed be-
cause she's so driven and
gets all her work done,"
Buettner said. "I've seen
enough kids go to academies
who don't have the skills
Chloe has. She's the whole
package."
Jon-Michael Soracchi is
the Chronicle sports editor.
Contact him atjmsoracchi@
chronicleonline. com or 352-
564-2928.


State BRIEFS
s win Air Force member charged
in Keys in boyfriend's murder
nts have ST. PETERSBURG -An active-duty U.S. Air
ties during Force member is being charged with second-
eys Over- degree murder in the death of her boyfriend.
The St. Petersburg Police Department reported
p finisher in 22-year-old Rashida Williams called 911 early
th a time of Saturday stating she had stabbed her boyfriend in
;obb of Mel- the chest.
n 43:36. Twenty-three-year-old Charles Marion Drum-
tered the mer was found dead inside his girlfriend's apart-
completion ment. Detectives said the knife used in the crime
ges. was found in the kitchen sink.
second in Investigators believe the couple was having an
a, of Big argument about money before the stabbing.
Williams is an airwoman at MacDill Air Force Base.
trants. -From wire reports


Program to help


World War II and

Korean War vets

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS Calling all World War II and
Korean War veterans: Representatives from
the Ocala Vet Center will be on hand at 1 p.m.
Monday, April 15, and every third Monday at
the Inverness Government Center, 212 W Main
St., to offer readjustment services.
They also offer services for any war zone vet-
eran at the Citrus County Resource Center in
Lecanto from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesdays and
from 1 to 3 p.m. on Thursdays.
Services are by appointment only Call 352-
260-7183.
"What we do is help veterans cope with and
navigate the aging process, the residuals from
their war zone experiences, family life, the VA


* WHAT: Ocala Vet
Center outreach.
* WHEN: 1 p.m.
Monday and every
third Monday.
* WHERE: Inverness
Government Center,
212 W. Main St.
* CONTACT: Services
are by appointment.
Call 352-260-7183.


and more," said
Richard Frank, a
Vet Center li-
censed mental
health counselor.
"We help veterans
and their
families."
Frank said they
decided to come to
Inverness because
of the large num-
ber of World War II
and Korean War
veterans in the


area who, for one reason or another, have dif-
ficulty traveling.
"We want to make it easier for them," he
said.
The Vet Centers program was started in 1979
as part of the U.S. Department of Veterans Af-
fairs because of the large number of Vietnam
veterans who were experiencing readjustment
problems.
Since then, the community-based centers
have extended their outreach to any war-zone
veteran and also family members, including
bereavement counseling for surviving parents,
spouses, children and siblings of service mem-
bers who die while on active duty.
"This is a great opportunity for every (war
zone) veteran," Frank said. "Sometimes, like
when you're looking for a job and you're mad
about it and you don't know why, you just need
a place to vent"
All services are free.
For an appointment, call 352-260-7183. For
more information, go online to www.vet
centerva.gov/About_US. asp


LOCAL


Website lists job openings

in Homosassa Springs


r C. nri,^ macir1^n.;:






A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Circumstances that have
caused you a great deal of stress and
frustration should begin to diminish in
the months ahead. Your luck is about
to change, letting you thrive in areas
where you had failed previously
Aries (March 21-April 19) It should
be a perfect time to formulate plans
lurking in the back of your mind. In fact,
you'll have no trouble thinking big.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) There's a
chance you'll hear about a new finan-
cial opportunity that you'll want to be a
part of. It's being engineered by some-
one whom you made a lot of money
with before.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Most
anything in which you involve yourself
has good chances for success.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -A
situation that you have lost control of is
likely to pay off in a big way. It just goes
to show you that Lady Luck likes you.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Something
exciting could develop that will elevate
your hopes and expectations. The first
sign of it will come about through one
or more of your friends.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Don't de-
spair if things haven't been too great
lately, especially where your work is
concerned. A constructive change is in
the making.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Even if
you think your social life is humming, it
could always be better. Some fascinat-
ing new friends are on the horizon.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -A condi-
tion you've wanted to change involving
a loved one is about to start moving in
a new direction. You'll see the first
signs of this today.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Per-
haps you've been of the opinion that
Cupid has lost interest in you. If that's
the case, you're likely to see him re-
double his efforts on your behalf to
make up for his neglect.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -You
are likely to experience a huge shift in
conditions that portend benefits for you
both career-wise and financially. This
wonderful change could be big.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
are likely to see the first signs of a
seismic shift in your popularity and
influence.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -An ob-
struction that has blocked your
progress on many things will begin to
vanish. Although it's a start, the
process will take time. Be patient.


If you film it,





will they come?


Branch

Rickey's

homeland

expecting

42'tourism

Associated Press

CINCINNATI
he southern
Ohio home
county of late
baseball executive
Branch Rickey ex-
pects increased in-
terest from his
depiction in the
movie "42" as the
baseball executive
who signed Jackie
Robinson to break
the color line.
The movie,
which opened na-
tionally this week-
end, tells the story
of how Robinson
became the first
black player in
modern Major
League Baseball.
Actor Harrison
Ford portrays
Rickey, who de-
cided Robinson was
the right player to
endure playing
amid the harsh
prejudice a black
man would face.
Rickey was born
in southern Ohio in
1881 and is buried
there. He is among
those featured on
Portsmouth's


Associated Press
Baseball player Jackie Robinson embraces Branch Rickey on July 20,
1962, in New York. Rickey was general manager of the Brooklyn
Dodgers when Robinson was hired. The home area of the late baseball
executive Rickey expects increased interest in his southern Ohio roots
from his depiction in the movie "42," in which Harrison Ford plays the
man who signed Jackie Robinson to challenge baseball's color line.


Floodwall Murals,
colorful artwork
stretching along a
20-foot-tall flood-
wall showing the
history and famous
figures of the Ohio
River city some 100
miles east of
Cincinnati.


"It should
heighten interest,
make people more
aware that he was
from this area,"
said Kim Bauer, ex-
ecutive director of
the Portsmouth-
Scioto County Visi-
tors Bureau.


Besides signing
Robinson, Rickey is
known as a highly
successful baseball
innovator who also
pioneered the farm
system approach to
developing players
in the minor
leagues.


ENTERTAINMENT


YESTERDAY'S
)oPRo .%-HI LO
000 YI/ on L N


WEATHER


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
', ,.1 "l I Bch
Ft LauderdalB
Fort Myers
Gainesvile
Homestead
.I.t k- *.' i
.1 ,' West
Lakelind
'1, lI-.3 I ir /


HI LO PR |HI LO PR
89 GB 0 an NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Elsive y
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 83 Low: 64 *
" 4 Pary sunny; 40% chance of
L "*J lhulderstoarns
--- -................. MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
.- High: 85 Low: 67
,- l f1",1 i\ 0" 'l' chance 0t a liiirii' -.,jj ii

....TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
| High: 87 Low: 65
S"iiill cloudy: 1 ii chance of a thunderstorm

ALMANAC
TEMPERATURE* DEW POINT
SII 89/66 Saturday at 3 pm 59
Record 90/39
Normal 8254 HUMIDITY
Mean ltemp 78 ir !,. at 3 pm 39%
Departure from mean 10 POLLEN COUNT**
PRECIPITATION* Today's active pollen:
1 i000 in
r. he month 0 30 in Oak, bayberry, hickory
Told for le yeai 3.70 in Today's count: 7.4/12
Normal ta r 1he year 11 44 in
S, r n aI~r e 1 I Monday's count: 7.1
UV INDEX: 10 Tuesday's count: 8.6
0-2 rinimal, 3-4 low 5-6 moderate, AIR QUALITY
7-9 hih_ 10+ veyiv ,
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Saturday was good with pollutants
Saturday at 3 pm 2994 in mainly parhculates
SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
,,-, r i:* r ,F T F-ru n n i -,.j
4/14 SUNDAY 9:24 312 9:48 3:36
4115 MONDAY 10:17 405 10:41 429


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT
SUNRISE TOMORROW
0 4 0 MOOlNRISE TOOAY
V12li 2 MA 2 A MMI MOONSET TODAY


S~$ FM


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is; HIGH. There is no burn ban.
F'i mafe intrmnaton call FIdD forestry at 1352 754-6777 For ore
I i'i. 11 * r weatt r/kbd
WATERING RULES
Lawn wateng lmtnl too days per week bere t0 a m or alter 4 prn. as fals
F.'Ef. i ,- ,, iII. water on ThI.,1 T r. irr1 Sunday
* F-' .-, -.. rn- ... -l. I ,- .,' mA1 r .:, n.-4..' r-l i ',
'- i .. .r.. rnozze or micro mgaonoI non-grass areas such as
vegelabte .- .i .... .i be dore on any day and a any time
i ,. ,'.,1 '[.,|r.. ,.,, ,,...I. L., F. FORE YOU INSTALL new
plan material 352-527-766 .,- 1,-.., 1, r, ,.: .. .j i.- for addioal

T, .: .:, ,r.-, ,-ease call Cty of Invemess @ 352-726-2321, Ctyo
Crystal Rir 4 3527954216ext.313.,unincopraledC -,, ',:,,rt. @352-
527-7669
TIDES


'From mouths of rivers "Al nd i . Bay
Sunday
ity High/Low High/Low
etv'awlr..1A" 0 ?8 B.4 37 i 8.20 p,421 i
.;ta! Rwar" 7 29 a;1 5S ?. B;A1 1t1 43 I
nlraricxhee" 5l'13s 068 :,. jp-
m Ksa'ss: 8 8 a;3.386 73Xp 3 0p


."Al Masons Cre-ek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
9'49 *t a B'55,4.55 p
8 10 2.35 a ? l l.2.7 p
5S.'22aa 503p/'20 5t
8359a.4 i2 8 05 B'3 54 p


F'cast
is
PC
is

ts

pc

ts


City
Miami
Li i,-i

Pensacola
Sarasota
Sill ll!, "
T ii
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch,


F'cast
pc
Is
ts
Is
ts
is
Is
ts
ts


MARINE OUTLOOK
Southeast winds around 15 knots. Gulf water
Seas 2 to 3 feet. -,., and inland temperature
waters will have a moderate chop
.i1-.. '-. riudy ..,in a chance of thun- 0
.r-,n,: today 7 6

TUken at Arlpeka
LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
W .tIi.1......' ir,- ai Holder 27.84 NA .
Tsala ,.,i, H~|,i ,IlJ 3716 NA:'
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 37.99 NA 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral 'i[, 18 NA 42.40

lTHEI NE-I Ai W ATION D >11 ecL ; .wn ,c ei


THE NATION


U.. l,. ...-'
*--

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t ^ w402


2* I
E '.
SOS' Sol801


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Ala 511 37 ;: 305

Aliirna 6t 4t] is 73 55
Alaliti; &!y 62 *l) ;>i; 60 *!Z

Bll0ng! 50 31 1 1 IS 42 ?4

Bi lon f1 23 02 y: 3 9









AE, I IN 8
Chtew o5 3t i>2 8 5
Ciiia l 60 36 ;i: W2 51
Cl~itn d 43 3 .03 DiC i5 4

Ci~i;bl) OH 54 42 K 68 50
Concoivrd *h 53 3. 02 sn 51 2?

Pes More's 54 32 0 ,' 66 42
Detrhn 43 37 )2 p 5,3 42

Htntrg 6 P 62 44
HASo 79 51 i 82 66
Scknon ^ 44 ts i4 63
1. 3 Vegas, SB 6' i 85 60
Lile Roc 71 l5 ;>c 77 6?
l isvtlr 53 37 pc 78 56
Men H 74 4 3
Ml mclina 3, ?t 01 i 41 29


KEY TO CONDMONS; c=cloudy; dr drizzia;
Ilir: ri-hary. pc=pdarly cloudy: r-rain.
s rain'now mit .Iruinny, he ishowefr, .
ans = now. is9-thundersornms. w= windy
@2013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, W.L


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L

58 .1 T
Oti:miCtv ;! 47 02 p 0O 55
a 53 61 38




5 1
Palr Sp s 91 tit s 83 60

Ils u 2 4 2 44
PHlii;n.J. O- 53 39 05 s 2 52 3S

YESTERDAY 4 NATIONAL LOW
Rgny 71 47 of 65 36


S I" .t, i :i ti 03 i: 40 L3










WORLD CITIES'
S;>ll 3ti''i;1 /i 61 47 c 49 55
San; Arit0lrai 78 i2 #[.: 86 66





YESTERDAY NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 96 I Con CaI LOW 5 LOW Lyc. N 0

WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY HILSKY
Acapulo 89.73|;
Amstrdam B'53C
Aliens ?654;s
8e'il 63A45i
BeI u ia : B60.'sh


,ldial m 74 54s


Mexico Cx',
Montreal
, C,
R3o
Rome
Sy4tnVy
Tokyo
Warsw


E~14~ p~
~O ~
8155 pc
4~i3/ Y~
AB 15t
~ IJL
/4 ~
66j4
l~1 64 pr
'U
4B5~ pr
~


S1LEGAL NOTICES




Judith Yancey, M.D.............A9

Fictitious Name Notices.....D6

Meeting Notices.................D6

Tax Deed Notices................D6


C I T R L r Li N T i


CHRONICLE

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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, April 14, the
104th day of 2013. There are 261
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
OnApril 14,1865, President
Abraham Lincoln was assassinated
by John Wilkes Booth during a per-
formance of "Our American Cousin"
at Ford's Theater in Washington.
On this date:
In 1775, the first American soci-
ety for the abolition of slavery was
formed in Philadelphia.
In 1912, the British liner RMS Ti-
tanic collided with an iceberg in the
North Atlantic at 11:40 p.m. ship's
time and began sinking. (The ship
went under two hours and 40 minutes
later with the loss of 1,514 lives.)
In 1949, the "Wilhelmstrasse Trial"
in Nuremberg ended with 19 former
Nazi Foreign Office officials sentenced
by an American tribunal to prison
terms ranging from four to 25 years.
In 1981, the first test flight of
America's first operational space
shuttle, the Columbia, ended suc-
cessfully with a landing at Edwards
Air Force Base in California.
Ten years ago: Assailants
armed with an AK-47 assault rifle
and a handgun opened fire at John
McDonogh High School in New Or-
leans, killing one youth and wound-
ing three others. (Six people later
received prison sentences in con-
nection with the shooting.)
Five years ago: Kidnapped
British journalist Richard Butler was
rescued by Iraqi troops from a house
in Basra after two months in captivity.
One year ago: Eleven Secret
Service agents were placed on
leave as a deepening scandal in-
volving prostitutes overshadowed
President Barack Obama's diplo-
matic mission to Latin America.
Today's birthdays: Country
singer Loretta Lynn is 81. Retired
MLB All-Star Pete Rose is 72. Retired
MLB All-Star Greg Maddux is 47.
Thought for Today: "Education
... has produced a vast population
able to read but unable to distin-
guish what is worth reading." -
George Macaulay Trevelyan, Eng-
lish historian (1876-1962).




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida leads nation in


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Changes
under Republican Gov Rick
Scott are making it more diffi-
cult for Florida's former felons
to get their voting rights re-
stored, which critics say has sup-
pressed the minority vote and
hurt Democratic candidates.
As one of his first actions after
taking office in 2011, Scott, as
chairman of the Florida Board
of Executive Clemency, undid
automatic restoration of voting
rights for nonviolent ex-offenders
that previous Gov Charlie Crist
helped adopt in 2007. Since
then, the number of former
felons who have had their voting
rights restored has slowed to a
trickle, even compared with the
year before Crist and the
clemency board helped make
the process easier
Civil liberties activists say
Florida's rights restoration rules
are the most restrictive in the
nation and have the effect, if not
the intent, of suppressing the mi-
nority vote. A disproportionate
number of black Floridians are


convicted felons 16.5 percent
of Floridians are black, yet black
inmates make up 31.5 percent of
the state's prison population -
meaning a higher percentage of
blacks don't have the right to vote
after completing their sentences.
And black voters tend to sup-
port Democrats. Exit polls show
only one in 10 supported Scott in
the 2010 election.
Desmond Meade is among the
former felons who cannot vote in
Florida because their civil rights
haven't been restored although
they've completed their sen-
tences, often many years ago.
"It weakens the political voice
in the African-American com-
munity," said Meade, who is
black. "Therefore, the plight of
African-Americans becomes ba-
sically a political non-factor."
That's exactly how it was
planned, say some critics who
believe the Republican effort to
make voting rights restoration
more difficult is politically
motivated.
"This is one of the few govern-
ment programs that has worked
precisely as it was designed,


3

la

c
v


nam
of as
poss
exec
of F
way
havE
In
righ
ber
com
in 2(
in o
in 2
the


denying ex-felons voting rights
The Sentencing Project, a
In 2011, 78 ex-felons had their right Washington, D.C-based criminal
to vote restored. That number rose to justice advocacy group, said that
nationally, 5.85 million ex-felons
342 last year. That compares with more have been disenfranchised by
various state rights restoration
than 14,000 in 2006, Gov. Jeb Bush's laws. The group puts Florida at
1.54 million, including 520,000
ast year in office, and more than 85,000 blacks. That's about one out of
in 2008, the first full year after the every five voting-age blacks.
In Florida, ex-felons must ob-
lemency board followed Crist's lead and tain approval from the governor
and at least two of the state's
voted to allow virtually automatic rights three elected Cabinet members
to have their civil rights re-
restoration for nonviolent former felons, stored, allowing them to vote,
serve on juries and hold public
[ely to try to suppress the vote Crist's lead and voted to allow office.
s many African-Americans as virtually automatic rights After Scott and three new
sible," said Howard Simon, restoration for nonviolent for- Cabinet members, all Republi-
cutive director of the ACLU mer felons, cans, were elected in 2010, one
lorida. "It was designed that In the midst of the post-Civil of the first things the new board
in 1868, and it continues to War Reconstruction Era, did was rescind Crist's rules and
e that effect in 2013." Florida adopted a new constitu- impose waiting periods of five to
12011, 78 ex-felons had their tion with a provision prohibiting seven years after release, de-
t to vote restored. That num- former felons from voting or pending on the severity of the
rose to 342 last year That holding public office unless crime, before ex-felons can
pares with more than 14,000 their civil rights were restored. apply for rights restoration. A
006, Gov Jeb Bush's last year There's disagreement about backlog of cases due to the new
office, and more than 85,000 exactly how many former felons rules and staff-depleting budget
008, the first full year after are affected, but Florida leads cuts can add several more years
clemency board followed the nation in all counts. to the wait.


JAZMINE
Continued from PageA2
"If not, we'll stay
homebound. Our goal is
to put her back in school
in August. Considering
how much progress
she's already made, I
can only imagine what
four more months will
bring."
J azmine misses her
school.
She misses her friends
and the teachers, but em-
phatically adds: "I do not
miss homework!"
Like any other child,
Jazmine dreams of her
future.
"I really badly want to
be a model," she says, then
adds with a confident
smile: "Models are
pretty!"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Evelyn
Fitzharris, 94
HERNANDO
Evelyn Fitzharris, 94, of
Hernando, Fla., passed
away April 1, 2013. Evelyn
was a native of Royalton,
Minn., and a graduate of
St. Elizabeth's School of
Nursing in Dayton, Ohio.
She is survived by her
children, Roger (Patricia)
of Springboro, Ohio, Mary
Kirsch of Hernando, Ann
Hemker (Michael) of Fort
Riley, Kan., Kevin (Cyn-
thia) of Fort Worth, Texas;
nine grandchildren; four
great-grandchildren; and
numerous nieces and
nephews. She was pre-
ceded in death by her hus-
band, Edward.
The family would like to
express its appreciation to
the Hospice of Citrus
County of the Nature Coast
for their compassion, sup-
port, and loving care. In
lieu of flowers, donations
may be made through
www.hospiceofcitrus.org.
Final resting place to be at
Catholic Calvary Cemetery
in Clearwater (www.
calvarycemetery.net).
Arrangements are under
the care of Hiers-Baxley
Funeral Services, Timber-


Ridge Chapel, Ocala. Con-
dolences may be ex-
pressed at www
hiers-baxley.com.
William 'Bill'
Welsch, 56
LECANTO
William "Bill" Welsch,
56, of Lecanto, Fla., died
April 11, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial hospital. Bill
was born Oct 8,1956, in Al-
bany, N.Y.
Survivors include his
children, Davina, Miles
and William F III; sister,
Beth Parker, Albany, N.Y;
grandchildren, David,
Kandence and Evelynn;
and his mother, Dot
Welsch.
A private memorial
service for immediate



"Your Trusted Family- Owned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"


family members and
friends of Bill Welsch is 11
a.m. Wednesday, April 17,
2013. Ms. Denise Lay of
First Presbyterian Church,
Inverness will officiate.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Phone 352-563-5660.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com

X41


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs! '-


.


000EDIC


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhme.com


Harold
Owens, 84
HERNANDO
Harold W Owens, 84, of
Hernando, Fla., died Fri-
day, April 12, 2013, at the
Hospice of Citrus County
House in Lecanto. Harold
was born Aug. 18, 1928, in
Shelby County, Ind., the
son of Earl and Minnie
Owens. He served in the
U.S. Air Force. Harold
worked as a warehouse

N
Sr Walter K.
Munkelwitz
Jan. 21, 1933-
March 27, 2013

Walter we miss
and love you!
Gail,
your children,
grandchildren &
great grandchildren


foreman for the U.S. Gov-
ernment at Fort Benjamin
Harrison in Indiana. He
moved to Hernando in
1996 from Bradenton.
Harold was a member of
the First Christian Church
in Inverness.
Survivors include his
wife of 63 years, Bonnie
Owens of Hernando; sons,
Jeffrey W Owens of Indi-
anapolis, Ind., Patrick A.
Owens of Solon, Ohio, and
Donald E. Owens of Smith-
field, Va.; brother, the Rev.
Herbert Owens of Ga.; five
grandchildren; three step-
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A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Glenn
Kilgus, 81
INVERNESS
Glenn Arthur Kilgus, 81,
of Inverness, went to be
with his Savior on Thurs-
day, April 11, 2013, at Hos-
pice of Citrus County in
Inverness.
Glenn was born on Oct.
12, 1931, in
Chicago,
Ill. He re-
tired to
C Florida in
1994. He
Swas a
graduate
of Jahn El-
Glenn ementary
Kilgus School,
Lane Tech and North Park
College. Glenn was em-
ployed by Cotter & Com-
pany (True Value national
corporate headquarters)
for 30 years, holding the
position of maintenance
supervisor. He served as a
board member for the
Friends of the Senior Cen-
ter, the American Heart
Association and the Citrus
Memorial Annual
Fundraising Ball Commit-
tee, for which he was an
annual patron donor. He
was a charter member of
the Mopar Car Club, Citrus
American and Italian Club
and the Highland Civic As-
sociation. For many years,
Glenn delivered Meals on
Wheels for Citrus County.
He was also a member of
the Moose Lodge and a
member of TOPS, achiev-
ing the status of Chapter
King in 2008. He enjoyed
bowling in leagues at
Sportsman Bowl.
Glenn was Christian by
faith and attended Our
Lady of Fatima Parish. His
lifelong hobby of making
clocks was a much enjoyed
pastime. If you were a
good friend of his, chances
are you are the owner of
one of his clocks. His
clocks always came with a
lifetime guarantee of re-
pairs. Glenn donated many
clocks for fundraisers; he
sold none of them, he just


enjoyed making them.
He was preceded in
death by his parents, Al-
fred Kilgus and Helen
(Flint) Kilgus; his brother
Alfred Kilgus; and son-in-
law Peter Paul Beinor He
is survived by his wife of
22 years, Rose, and her
children Anita Rose
Beinor of Inverness, David
Walter (Laura) Greenwell
of Bristol, Wis., and Don-
ald Greenwell of Chicago,
Ill. There are seven grand-
children and 13 great-
grandchildren. He is also
survived by his brothers-
in-law John (Marlene)
Veloria and Robert (Joni)
Veloria, who reside in
Chicago. Glenn has one
cousin, Ronald (Dena) Kil-
gus, Winnetka, Ill., and his
beloved cat "Snoopy" He
will be missed by a multi-
tude of close friends in
both Florida and Illinois;
he enjoyed vacationing in
Ormond and Daytona sev-
eral months each year. A
funeral tribute to Glenn
will be held on Monday,
April 15, 2013 at 2 p.m. at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory
The family will receive
friends in visitation from
noon until the hour of
service. The family re-
quests donations to Hos-
pice of Citrus County, PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464 in lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.
Rocelia
Gough, 72
INVERNESS
Rocelia N. Gough, 72, of
Inverness, died Wednes-
day, April 10, at Citrus
Memorial Hospital, Inver-
ness. Private arrange-
ments by Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness.

OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of deceased;
age; hometown/state;
date of death; place
of death; date, time
and place of visitation
and funeral services.


Russell
Matott, 57
INVERNESS
The Gathering of Re-
membrance for Mr. Rus-
sell Glenn Matott, age 57,
of Inverness, Florida, will
be held 10:00 AM, Sunday,
April 28, 2013 at the First
United Methodist Church
of Inverness. Cremation
will be under the direction
of Hooper Crematory, In-
verness. The family re-
quests expressions of
sympathy take the form of
memorial donations to
Tampa General Hospital
Foundation, PO. Box 1289,
Tampa, FL 33601-1289. On-
line condolences may be
sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mr Matott was born Au-
gust 5, 1955 in Gouverneur,
NY, son of Maurice and
Lenore (Elsey) Matott. He
died April 6, 2013 in Inver-
ness. He worked as a dry-
wall contractor. He was
also a musician and en-
joyed song writing and pol-
itics. Mr. Matott was a
member of First United
Methodist Church of
Inverness.
Mr. Matott was preceded
in death by his father,
Maurice Matott. Survivors
include his mother,
Lenore Bovay of Dekalb
Junction, NY, his wife,
Barbara Matott and step-
son, Anthony (Meghan
Price) Ortiz of Inverness,
brother, Jeffery Matott of
Dekalb Junction, NY and
several nieces and
nephews. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Inverness Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Homes &
Crematory

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits both free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
submitted by the
funeral home or
society in charge of
arrangements.
Email obits@chroni-
cle online.com or fax
352-563-3280.


NASA's Wallops Island

prepares for the spotlight


Associated Press
WALLOPS ISLAND, Va.
- On one of Virginia's
small barrier islands, a
NASA facility that oper-
ates in relative obscurity
outside scientific circles
is preparing to be thrust
into the spotlight.
On Wednesday, Orbital
Sciences Corp. plans to
conduct the first test
launch of its Antares rocket
under a NASA program in
which private companies
deliver supplies to the In-
ternational Space Station.
If all goes as planned, the


unmanned rocket's prac-
tice payload will be vaulted
into orbit from Wallops Is-
land before burning up in
the atmosphere on its re-
turn to Earth several
months later
The goal of the launch
isn't to connect with the
space station, but to make
sure the rocket works and
that a simulated version of
a cargo ship that will dock
with space station on fu-
ture launches separates
into orbit Orbital officials
say that should occur about
10 minutes after liftoff.
In that short period of


time, Wallops Island will
transition from a little-
known launch pad for
small research rockets to
a major player in the U.S.
space program.
The Wallops Flight Fa-
cility on Virginia's rural
Eastern Shore is small in
comparison to major
NASA centers like those
in Florida, California and
Texas. The site is near
Maryland and just south
of Chincoteague Island,
which attracts thousands
of tourists each summer
for an annual wild pony
swim.


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AS SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


PLANE
Continued from Page Al

Two passengers were re-
portedly on the private
plane en route to Valdosta,
Ga., when the plane began
to experience mechanical
problems and was forced
to land, said Cpt. Joe
Eckstein.
Neither occupant was
hurt.
The only damage evi-
dent was a couple of mail-



MISTAKE
Continued from Page Al

disaster relief outreach
worker for Nature Coast
Volunteer Center, and then
a month later promoted him
to code compliance officer
In 2009, Pierson learned
that a defendant in a case
he had worked in Broward
County was being released
from prison after serving
nearly 26 years of a life
sentence for rape and
murder.
Reports showed new
DNA evidence cleared An-
thony Caravella of the
crime. In 2010, Caravella
sued Pierson, three other
officers, the city of Mira-
mar and Broward County
Sheriff's Office for civil
rights violations.
Caravella said Pierson
and other officers coerced
him into confessing to the
crime. In 1984 at the time
of the murder, Caravella
was 15 years old and had
limited mental capacity,
according to court records.
After six weeks of testi-
mony, a federal jury on
March 25 ruled against
only Pierson and co-defen-
dant William Mantesta.
The verdict was split $4
million againstMantesta and
$3 million against Pierson.
Pierson, who said in an
interview last week he be-
lieved the verdict was un-
fair, returned to work in
Citrus County after the
trial's end.
Pierson said he never
requested paid adminis-
trative leave. He told his
supervisor, code compliance


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


boxes clipped by the air-
craft's wings. Once emer-
gency personnel arrived,
the pilot was able to navi-
gate the plane to the park


director Kim Corbin, about
the subpoena and requested
time off without pay
He showed her the sub-
poena, which cites Car-
avella as plaintiff and
"City of Miramar, et al" as
defendant.
Corbin told Pierson the
county allows for paid ad-
ministrative leave when an
employee is subpoenaed
as a witness in court and
suggested he request the
paid leave, Ubinas said.
Pierson, without telling
Corbin he was also a de-
fendant in the same case,
then formally requested 80
hours of administrative
leave. Pierson said he
didn't expect the trial to
last more than two weeks,
though it stretched to
nearly five weeks.
Pierson said in the in-
terview he couldn't recall
what he told Corbin or
anyone else about the case.
"I wasn't trying to keep it
hidden," he said.
Athis hourly rate of$15.67,
the county paid Pierson
$3,447 for 220 hours of ad-
ministrative time off.
The policy allows em-
ployees administrative leave
when they are required to
be in court. Two portions
of the policy state:
"An employee subpoe-
naed as a witness in a court
or an administrative hear-
ing, not involving his/her
own personal litigation or
service as a paid expert
witness, shall be granted
administrative leave with
pay....
In no case shall ad-
ministrative leave with
pay be granted for court at-
tendance when an employee


Problems
S_ with its en-
ImF H gine forced
this Cessna
aircraft out
of the air and
onto the
streets of
Floral City.
ERYN
WORTHINGTON
/Chronicle
in Floral City.
Eckstein said the inci-
dent was reported to the
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration (FAA).


is engaged in personal liti-
gation or service as a paid
expert witness; however, an
employee may be granted
annual leave in such cases
with the approval of the
department/office director"
The policy does not re-
quire the employee to say
whether he is a litigant,
nor does it require the su-
pervisor to ask.
County Attorney Richard
Wesch said employees
have the responsibility to
provide all pertinent infor-
mation to their supervisors.
"We would expect a full
disclosure of the circum-
stances," he said.
Wesch also said Pierson
should have known his role
in the lawsuit prevented him
from receiving paid time
off because he knew details
about his role that Corbin,
his supervisor, did not
Employees hired by the
county are required to
read an employee hand-
book and sign a statement
saying they understand
policies.
Pierson, whose person-
nel file includes acco-
lades for his leadership
from Corbin and Develop-
ment Services Director
Vince Cautero, will reim-
burse the county by for-
feiting 104 hours of
accumulated vacation
time and through deduc-
tions in the next 12 pay
periods, said Pierson's at-
torney Bill Grant.
He said Pierson didn't
try to mislead anyone.
"It wasn't an overt act,"
Grant said. "It was a mis-
understanding by George
and it was a misunder-
standing by the county."


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LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Students'

assignment:

Argue Jews

are evil
Associated Press
ALBANY, N.Y -A high
school English teacher
who had students pretend
to be Jew-hating Nazis in a
writing assignment has
been placed on leave.
The teacher at Albany
High School caused a storm
of criticism after having
students practice the art of
persuasive writing by pen-
ning a letter to a fictitious
Nazi government official
arguing that "Jews are evil."
District Superintendent
Marguerite Vanden Wyn-
gaard held a news confer-
ence Friday to apologize
for the assignment.
The Times Union news-
paper reported on Satur-
day that the teacher was
not in class on Friday and
had been placed on leave
by the school district.
The district has not
named the teacher, who
was described as a veteran.
The writing assignment
was done before a planned
class reading of the mem-
oir "Night," by Holocaust
survivor Elie Wiesel.
For the assignment, the
teacher asked students to
research Nazi propa-
ganda, then write a letter
trying to convince an offi-
cial of the Third Reich
"that Jews are evil and the
source of our problems."
"Review in your note-
books the definitions for
logos, ethos, and pathos,"
the teacher's assignment
said. "Choose which argu-
ment style will be most ef-
fective in making your point
Please remember, your life
(here in Nazi Germany in the
30's) may depend on it!"
Wyngaard said she
didn't think the assign-
ment was malicious but "it
displayed a level of insen-
sitivity that we absolutely
will not tolerate."
Many of the students
were dismayed by the as-
signment. Some refused to
write the essay


Associated Press
This citizen journalism image, provided by Aleppo Media Center AMC and authenticated
based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows buildings damaged Friday in a
government airstrike and shelling at Bostan Pasha district in Aleppo, northern Syria.


Activists claim Syrian


airstrike kills 20 people


Associated Press
BEIRUT A Syrian
government airstrike on a
town in the country's
northwest killed at least
20 people Saturday, shat-
tering store fronts, setting
cars ablaze and sending a
giant plume of black and
gray smoke into the sky
President BasharAssad's
air force has been one of
his biggest assets in the
two-year-old civil war and
he has used warplanes and
helicopters to try to check
rebel advances, although
the regime also frequently
hits civilian areas.
A Human Rights Watch
report this week accused
the Syrian government of
committing war crimes by
using indiscriminate and
sometimes deliberate
airstrikes against civil-
ians, killing at least 4,300
people since the summer.
Saturday's air raid
struck the town of Saraqeb
in Idlib province, accord-
ing to the Britain-based
Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights activist
group. The Observatory


said three children were
among the 20 people
killed in the attack.
Amateur videos posted
online showed agiantplume
of black smoke, and peo-
ple in cars and on motor-
bikes racing to help the
wounded. A group of men
could be seen carrying a
wounded man covered in
gray dust. Another man in
the video rushes with a
bucket of water to help
extinguish cars in flames.
Rubble and twisted metal
litter the street.
The video appeared
genuine and corresponded
to other reporting by The
Associated Press.
Rebels have wrested
much of the countryside of
Idlib and other provinces
in northern Syria from
regime forces, although
government troops still
control many military
bases in the region from
which they launch attacks
- including airstrikes -
on opposition-held areas.
South of Saraqeb, Syr-
ian government troops
trying to relieve a be-
sieged military base am-


bushed a rebel checkpoint,
killing at least 21 opposi-
tion fighters.
The Observatory said
the government forces sur-
prised the rebel fighters
on the outskirts of the vil-
lage of Baboulein. The Ob-
servatory, which relies on
a network of local activists
on the ground, said many
opposition fighters were
also wounded in the attack
Observatory director
Rami Abdul-Rahman said
the assault was part of gov-
ernment efforts to resup-
ply the embattled military
base at Wadi Deif outside
of the town of Maaret al-
Numan, which is just
north of Baboulein on the
Damascus-Aleppo highway.
Rebels have been trying
for months to capture the
large base at Wadi Deif, from
which regime troops regu-
larly pound the now largely
abandoned town of Maaret
al-Numan with artillery
fire. The regime must push
convoys through rebel-held
territory to prevent the base
from running short of
troops and supplies.


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 A9


School board member

starts beard PAC


Associated Press
COLUMBIA, Mo. A
Columbia school board
member said his fellow
hirsute politicians need
more campaign cash.
The Columbia Missourian
reported Jonathan Ses-
sions and a friend have
created a political action
committee known as
Bearded Entrepreneurs
for the Advancement of a
Responsible Democracy


- BEARD, for short.
The 30-year-old infor-
mation technology spe-
cialist says he's worn a
beard continuously for
the past eight years.
Sessions is coy as to
whether the independent
expenditure committee is
an act of satire or a legiti-
mate super PAC created
to raise unlimited dona-
tions. The group recently
registered with the Federal
Elections Committee.


Women shot at Va.


community college

Victims stable; gunman charged


Associated Press
CHRISTIANSBURG,
Va. Two women who
were shot by a gunman at
a community college in a
mall in southwest Virginia,
causing students and
shoppers to flee in a panic,
were reported to be in
stable condition Saturday
Both women were being
treated at Carilion Roanoke
Memorial Hospital,
Christiansburg Police De-
partment spokeswoman
Becky Wilburn said.
Roanoke is about 35 miles
from Christiansburg.
Wilburn said the
women's names or addi-
tional information on
their injuries would not
be released, citing pri-
vacy concerns.


She gave the information
one day after the shoot-
ings at a satellite campus
of New River Community
College. She did not give
any other details about
the shooting or about sus-
pect Neil Allan MacInnis,
an 18-year-old student at
the college who has been
charged with two counts
each of malicious wound-
ing and using a firearm in
the commission of a
felony Investigators said
Friday that they don't
know what motivated the
shootings. Authorities
have not said what type of
weapon was used or how
it was obtained.
MacInnis minutes was
being held without bail
Saturday at Montgomery
County Jail.


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JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D.
All Patients of DOCTORS IMAGING GROUP, LLC ("DIG"), seen by
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., are notified that, effective March 15th, 2013,
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., formerly practicing with DIG at:
Diagnostic Imaging Center
6716 NW 11th Place
Gainesville, Florida 32605
became unavailable to patients at DIG. She will be relocating her practice
of Mammography and Ultrasound imaging to:
Tower Hill Office Park
7550 West University Ave, Suite A
Gainesville, Florida 32607
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D. will practice as MAMMOGRAPHY &
ULTRASOUND IMAGING CENTER, PLLC. The new practice's
phone number is (352) 727-4911. DR. YANCEY will be available to see
patients beginning June 3rd, 2013.
Patients may obtain a copy of their medical records currently at 6716
NW 11th Place, Gainesville, Florida, by coming to the office and signing a
Request Form. These forms can be obtained at the office of DIG. Patients
may also request in writing that their records: (i) be transferred to DR.
YANCEY, (ii) remain with DIG, or (iii) be transferred to another physician
of the Patient's choice. These requests can be made by either: (i) U.S. Mail
addressed to DIG's office address above, (ii) Telefax to (352) 331-9744 or
(iii) E-Mail to info@doctorsimaginggroup.com 000EoX





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Immigration reform
Fifteen years ago immi-
gration laws were re-
formed. The only change
was that citizenship was
given to all illegal aliens
presently in the country
except those with crimi-
nal records. It did nothing
to stop the steady flow of
illegal aliens into the
country President George
W Bush sent a bill to his
Republican Congress re-
quiring employers to cer-
tify that all employees
were citizens or had work
permits. Congress never
voted on the measure.
Employers of illegal
aliens, like the private
health industry and the
NRA, are able to influ-
ence Congress to vote
'no" on measures that the
vast majority of Ameri-
cans support.
The Mexican border is
2000 miles long and only a
third of it has a physical
barrier An 18-foot-high
steel wall with a concrete
base extending 10 feet
below grade is erected on
500 miles and there is
fencing on another 150
miles. Even if an effective
barrier could be installed
over the entire 2000
miles, 40 percent of ille-
gal aliens walk through a
border station with a tem-
porary pass and forget to
return to Mexico. Sen.
Rubio recently said that
greater effort must be
made to catch and extra-
dite these people. He did-
n't say how this would be
accomplished or how
much it would cost
Requiring employers to
certify all employees
would be nearly 100 per-
cent effective and the cost
would be miniscule com-
pared to a continuous bar-
rier on the border. It
would also permit people
applying for temporary
work permits to be admit-
ted legally If the so-called
reform bill presently in
Congress is enacted, all il-
legal aliens will become
citizens and the stream of
illegal aliens entering
the country will continue
unabated.
Stan Clewett
Homosassa


OK, II NED TOAI
"WAW S iNTO MY
IaT 0 ANt*W \NWArt4G


Stop bottled
water permits
On April 4 I1 went to a
meeting at Citrus Hills,
where Commissioner Joe
Meek presented an
overview of our future
here in Citrus County as
it relates to our taxes and
our future. It was very
informative.
Many questions were
asked, including what ef-
fects would result regard-
ing our water issues. I
had spent much of the
day doing research re-
garding the recent ac-
ceptance of a permit to
Heathwood Investment
Co. by SWFWMD (the
South West Florida Water
Management District) to
remove 76,700 gallons a
day from our aquifer to
become bottled water. By
the way, this adds up to 28
million gallons per year
out of our aquifer. Be-
cause they are proposing
that they will withdraw
no more than 76,700 gal-
lons per day, neither
SWFWMD nor the DEP
(Department of Environ-
mental Protection) re-
quire a meter on the
permitted well, as they do
not do so unless the per-
mit request is 100,000 gal-
lons per day or more.


C "0 D






We, as residents of Cit-
rus County, have been
subjected to water police
monitoring our water
consumption, have
worked hard to conserve
our water resources, have
been planting environ-
mentally friendly plants
in our yards, and in the
case of Sugarmill Woods
been fined by the state
for the bad construction
of their particular in-
stalled water system.
However, I learned that
we do have some control
over our water resources.
Our first step would be to
have the county commis-
sion to enact an ordi-
nance recommended by
the planning/zoning
board to require a meter
on any well that would re-
move water from the Cit-
rus County aquifer with
the intent of removing


said water to be bottled
and distributed outside
Citrus County.
We in Citrus County
have fragile limestone de-
posits under some of our
homes, for example in
Citrus Springs, with its
limestone resembling
Swiss cheese. If that area
of Citrus County becomes
vulnerable, it will be re-
flected in all Citrus
County homeowners' in-
surance, especially if we
become another desig-
nated sinkhole liability. It
is not uncommon for a
homeowner in Pasco
County, with all their
problems with sinkholes,
to have to carry a home-
owners' insurance policy
of $5,000 per year or
more.
It is different if water
is used in Citrus County
to water our yards, plants,


exactly where it belongs!
I have at least 18 feed-
ers, which guarantees lots
of birds and squirrels a
little extra food, more
like a treat I've never
experienced damage, but
have experienced pleas-
ure in watching these
comical, furry creatures
chomp down sunflower
seeds, peanuts and corn
S while the birds eat bread
pieces and birdseed. Up
and down and round the
will trees, squealing jeal-
ously, not wanting to
share, reminiscent of
small children! Proudly,
my property is a certi-
fied wildlife-safe area,
and all species are wel-
come.
My yard isn't profes-
sionally landscaped, but
it is the prettiest in the
area. I work diligently to
have 100 trees, numer-
ous palms, and colorful
flowers to draw bees and
birds. I have a screened
hospitals, grain or cattle, pool cage and two
because it returns to our screened porches which
aquifer We should not are frequent racetracks
permit water to be for those tiny grey feet
pumped and distributed and the big feet of
to the rest of the nation or herons, egrets, raccoons,
world because that water and other varmints. No
will never return to our damage in 15 years!
aquifer I have a few solutions
This can be done lo- for the squirrel situation.
cally to protect and pre- Simply buy more food
serve our water and enjoy your visitors;
resources in Citrus don't buy any food and
County. Please express remove your feeders
your opinions at the local completely; or, best of
level. all, move into a condo in
Suzan Franks a crowded city, where
Hernando your fourth-floor ve-
randa overlooks the
streets below. No squir-
Learn to love them rels, no problem. How-
ever, watch out for a
Squirrels in your roughneck pigeons land-
trees? Your yard? Your ing on your railing. Pi-
feeder? Wow! This is geons poop.
weird! Imagine an ani-
mal trying to survive the Joanie Welch
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A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


OPINION





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keep Citrus County beautiful by recycling


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Recycles
is a program of Keep Cit-
rus County Beautiful that
started as a single day
event and is expanding as
time goes on. America Re-
cycles Day focuses on edu-
cation for one day a year
(Nov. 15) on how to in-
crease recycling in com-
munities. This year Citrus
County Recycles included
two events showing what


to, where to and how to re-
cycle for homes and busi-
nesses in Citrus County.
A booth at the Ho-
mosassa Seafood Festival
had information for atten-
dees to learn more about
residential recycling
through the county's sin-
gle-stream recycling drop-
off bins and the
single-stream curbside
collection program pro-
vided by FDS Disposal to a
growing number of the


company's waste cus-
tomers. Single-stream re-
cycling allows participants
to put all of their recy-
clables into a single
container
There were also gifts
from booth sponsors:
KCCB, FDS, Citrus County
Solid Waste Management
Division, Citrus 20/20 and
Technology Conservation
Group. All of those items
were geared toward
spreading the message


about recycling or the sites. Participants
helped recipients observed several
reduce their -,. facets of recy-
waste stream, -- cling. Single
reduce lit- Stream
ter, reuse !KE Processors
items or COUNTY, ( S S P )
start recy- showed
cling. how single
On Amer- stream recy-
ica Recycles cling mate-
Day, KCCB rial from
partnered with residences is
three local recycling sorted for use in new
facilities to have tours of materials. The stop at


Technology Conservation
Group (TCG) showed how
computers and other elec-
tronics are recycled. The
Central Landfill visit
showed collection facili-
ties for household recy-
clables plus yard waste,
batteries, oil, antifreeze
fluorescent light bulbs and
hazardous waste.
For more information
about the KCCB Citrus
County Recycles program,
visit www.kccbinc.org.


Medicare increase


could ding some


in middle class


Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Retired
city worker Sheila Pugach
lives in a modest home on
a quiet street in Albu-
querque, N.M., and drives
an 18-year-old Subaru.
Pugach doesn't see her-
self as upper-income by
any stretch, but President
Barack Obama's budget
would raise her Medicare
premiums and those of
other comfortably retired
seniors, adding to a sur-
charge that already costs
some 2 million beneficiar-
ies hundreds of dollars a
year each.
Due to the creeping ef-
fects of inflation, 20 million
Medicare beneficiaries
also would end up paying
higher "income-related"
premiums for their outpa-
tient and prescription cov-
erage over time.
Obama administration
officials say Obama's pro-
posal will help improve
the financial stability of
Medicare by reducing tax-
payer subsidies for re-
tirees who can afford to
pay a bigger share of costs.
Congressional Republi-
cans agree with the presi-
dent on this one, making it
highly likely the idea will
become law if there's a
budget deal this year.
But the way Pugach sees
it, she's being penalized
for prudence, dinged for
saving diligently
It was the government, she
says, that pushed her into a
higher income bracketwhere
she'd have to pay additional
Medicare premiums.
IRS rules require peo-
ple age 70-and-a-half and
older to make regular min-
imum withdrawals from
tax-deferred retirement
nest eggs like 401(k)s. That
was enough to nudge her
over Medicare's line.
"We were good soldiers
when we were young,"
said Pugach, who worked


as a computer systems an-
alyst. "I was afraid of not
having money for retire-
ment and I put in as much
as I could. The consequence
is now I have to pay about
$500 a year more in
Medicare premiums."
Currently only about 1 in
20 Medicare beneficiaries
pays the higher income-
based premiums, which start
at incomes over $85,000 for
individuals and $170,000
for couples. As a reference
point, the median or mid-
point U.S. household in-
come is about $53,000.
Obama's budget would
change Medicare's upper-
income premiums in sev-
eral ways. First, it would
raise the monthly amounts
for those currently paying.
If the proposal already
were law, Pugach would be
paying about $168 a month
for outpatient coverage
under Medicare's Part B,
instead of $146.90.
Then, the plan would
create five new income
brackets to squeeze more
revenue from the top tiers
of retirees.
But its biggest impact
would come through
inflation.
The administration is
proposing to extend a
freeze on the income
brackets at which seniors
are liable for the higher
premiums until 1 in 4 re-
tirees has to pay It would-
n't be the top 5 percent
anymore, but the top 25
percent
"Over time, the higher
premiums will affect peo-
ple who by today's stan-
dards are considered
middle-income," ex-
plained Tricia Neuman,
vice president for
Medicare policy at the
nonpartisan Kaiser Family
Foundation. "At some
point, it raises questions
about whether (Medicare)
premiums will continue to
be affordable."


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SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 All











NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Ice block


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Obama budget limits



his bargaining power


World BRIEFS

Protest


Associated Press
The Great Republic leads
the American Integrity
into the Duluth Ship
Canal Saturday after ice
on Lake Superior blocked
access to the Duluth Su-
perior Harbor in Duluth,
Minn., causing nine ships
to wait at anchor in the
open lake until ice break-
ing operations could open
a lane for the traffic.


Meat recall grows
to 468K pounds
NEW ORLEANS -The
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture said a Louisiana-based
meat packing company has
expanded a recall of meat
products because of possible
bacterial contamination. No
illnesses have been reported
The Manda Packing
Company recall announced
this past week now includes
468,000 pounds of roast
beef, ham, turkey breast,
tasso pork, ham shanks,
hog headcheese, corned
beef and pastrami.
The agriculture depart-
ment said Friday the prod-
ucts were recalled because
of possible contamination
with Listeria monocytogenes.
The products were
shipped to retailers in Ala-
bama, Arkansas, Florida,
Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Mis-
souri, Oklahoma, South Car-
olina, Tennessee and Texas.
A statement on the com-
pany's website said the re-
called meats were produced
at Manda's Baker facility be-
tween Feb. 27 and April 9.
Guards, prisoners
clash at Gitmo
MIAMI -The U.S. mili-
tary said guards have
clashed with prisoners amid
a hunger strike at Guan-
tanamo Bay, leading offi-
cers to move detainees
from communal to single
cells at Camp 6.
The military accuses de-
tainees of covering surveil-
lance cameras, windows
and partitions, preventing
guards from observing
them during a hunger strike
that has dragged on for
more than two months.
Lawyers have alleged that
most of the 166 prisoners
are participating.
The U.S. military said in a
statement Saturday that de-
tainees used improvised
weapons to resist the transfer,
leading guards to fire four
less-than-lethal rounds. Offi-
cials said no guards or de-
tainees were seriously injured.
The military also said that
medical personnel have
evaluated each detainee.
Homeless man
charged in SUV fire
LONG BEACH, Calif. -
Police said a homeless
man set a 63-year-old Cali-
fornia man on fire outside a
7-Eleven store by throwing
a flammable substance in-
side the man's parked SUV.
Long Beach Sgt. Aaron
Eaton said the man suf-
fered severe burns in the
Friday evening attack.
Bystanders helped douse
the flames and 38-year-old
Raymond Sean Clark was
arrested a block away.
Eaton said the attacker and
victim apparently didn't
know each other and the
motive was murky.
Clark was jailed on suspi-
cion of attempted murder
and on some misdemeanor
warrants.
-From wire reports


Associated Press
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama's budget overtures to
Republicans may limit his bargain-
ing power if the GOP ever returns to
the negotiating table on a grand
deficit-reduction deal.
In essence, Obama's spending
blueprint is a final offer, a no-budge
budget whose central elements have
failed to persuade Republicans in
the past.
By voluntarily putting entitlement
cuts on the table, particularly a pro-
posal to slow the rise of Social Secu-
rity benefits, Obama has no other
gambit to win tax increases from
Republicans.
With many Democrats balking at
what he's already offering, it's not


politically feasible for him to offer
the GOP anything more.
Puzzled Democrats maintain
Obama not only has given away his
leverage, he also has threatened the
very identity of his party, which sees
the Social Security Act of 1935 as
one of its signature achievements.
"If he's trying to do it to show he is
forthcoming as a negotiator, then
why doesn't he wait until he gets to
the negotiating table?" said Rep.
Rush Holt, D-N.J. "There's a lot of
talk about the fact that politically
this is not a winner Our brand is the
party that brought you Social
Security."
What's irked Democrats the most
is Obama's decision to include a sig-
nificant shift in policy in his $3.8 tril-
lion budget that would alter the


government's calculation of infla-
tion, or the Consumer Price Index.
If adopted, this new "chained CPI"
would change the way the govern-
ment measures inflation and would
slow the rise in Social Security ben-
efits and other programs.
In exchange, Obama is insisting on
$580 billion in tax increases on
wealthier taxpayers. It's a demand
that Republicans flatly reject.
The president has offered the
benefit cut to Republicans before as
part of broad deficit reduction nego-
tiations, and only in exchange for tax
increases the GOP stringently op-
poses. The White House said the
same quid pro quo applies to
Obama's current offer, and chained
CPI can't take effect as a solo
measure.


All survive plane crash


Associated Press
All 108 passengers and crew survived after a new Lion Air jet crashed into the ocean and snapped in two
while attempting to land Saturday on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, injuring up to 45 people. Officials
initially said the plane overshot the runway before hitting the water, but a spokesman for Lion Air, a low-cost
carrier, said the plane crashed about 164 feet ahead of the runway. The weather was cloudy with rain at the
time of the incident.


Venezuelans bussed to La. polls


Voters to pick

Chavez successor

Associated Press
DORAL, Fla. Wearing the colors
of the Venezuelan flag and carrying
pillows, thousands of Venezuelans
began the journey from Miami to New
Orleans to vote in their homeland's
presidential election Sunday
More than two dozen buses with
an estimated 2,100 voters departed
from Doral on Saturday They
chanted the name of the opposition
candidate, Henrique Capriles, and
played Venezuelan music. Others
had coolers filled with food and
drinks for the 16-hour drive.
"I feel this is something I must
do," said Vivian Koenig, 21, before
getting on a bus.
With just six weeks of preparation,
Venezuelans in Florida have raised


money and arranged travel. Aside
from bus, many are traveling by car
and plane. Organizers said they ex-
pected a turnout similar or higher
than that of October, when 8,500
Venezuelans cast ballots in New
Orleans.
"It's been pretty amazing how peo-
ple have responded since the first
announcement that Chavez died,"
said Gilda Sollami of Voto Donde
Sea, a group of students and young
professionals that promotes voting
outside Venezuela. "They showed a
lot of interest."
President Hugo Chavez died in
March after a two-year battle with
cancer His chosen successor, in-
terim President Nicolas Maduro, is
favored to win, but opinion polls
show Capriles has narrowed
Maduro's advantage, rallying voters
frustrated with chronic food short-
ages, inflation, power outages and
surging crime that many blame on
Chavez's mismanagement.


Associated Press
Arleth Garay, front, and others cheer
Saturday before their bus leaves
South Florida for a 16-hour bus trip to
New Orleans to vote in the Venezue-
lan presidential elections on Sunday.


Looking for logic in NKorea's threats


Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea -
To the outside world, the
talk often appears to bor-
der on the lunatic, with the
poor, hungry and electric-
ity-starved nation threat-
ening to lay waste to
America's cities in an
atomic firestorm, or to
overrun South Korea in a
lightning attack.
Enemy capitals, North
Korea said, will be turned
"into a sea of fire." North
Korea's first strikes will be
"a signal flare marking the
start of a holy war" Py-
ongyang's nuclear arsenal
is "mounted on launch
pads, aimed at the wind-


pipe of our enemies."
And it's not all talk.
The profoundly isolated,
totalitarian nation has
launched two rockets
over the past year. A Feb-
ruary nuclear test re-
sulted in still more U.N.
sanctions. Another mis-
sile test may be in the
planning stages.
But there is also a logic
behind North Korea's be-
havior, a logic steeped in in-
ternal politics, one family's
fear of losing control and
the ways that a weak,
poverty-wracked nation can
extract concessions from
some of the world's most
fearsome military powers.
It's also steeped in an-


other important fact: It
works.
At various points over the
past two decades, North
Korea's cycles of threats
and belligerence have pres-
sured the international
community into providing
billions of dollars in aid
and, for a time, helped push
South Korea's government
into improving ties.
Most importantly to Py-
ongyang, it has helped
the Kim family remain in
power decades after the
fall of its patron, the So-
viet Union, and long
after North Korea had
become an international
pariah. Now the third
generation of Kims, the


baby-faced Kim Jong Un,
is warning the world that
it may soon face the
wrath of Pyongyang. If
the virulence of Kim
Jong Un's threats have
come as a surprise, he
appears largely to be fol-
lowing in his father's
diplomatic footsteps.
"You keep playing the
game as long as it works,"
said Christopher Voss, a
longtime FBI hostage ne-
gotiator and now the CEO
of the Black Swan Group, a
strategic advisory firm fo-
cusing on negotiation.
"From their perspective,
why should they evolve out
of this? If it ain't broke,
don't fix it."


Associated Press
A protester holds a
placard Saturday during a
party to mark former
British Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher's
death in central London's
Trafalgar square.
Thatcher's most strident
critics had long vowed to
hold a gathering on the
Saturday following her
passing. The festivities
were an indication of the
depth of the hatred which
some Britons still feel for
their former leader.


PSY hopes song
excites NKoreans
SEOUL, South Korea -
South Korean rapper PSY
said he hopes North Koreans
enjoy his new single even as
tensions remain high on the
Korean Peninsula.
The single, "Gentleman,"
was released in 119 coun-
tries Friday.
The "Gangnam Style"
star said Saturday he re-
gretted the current situation
between the two Koreas.
He said his job is to make
people, including North Ko-
reans, laugh.
North Korea has been in-
creasingly belligerent with
war rumblings recently,
leaving its neighbors wary
of a possible missile test.
PSY is set to unveil the
music video and choreogra-
phy for "Gentleman" at a
Seoul concert on Sunday.
PSY's "Gangnam Style"
video featuring his
much-mimicked horse-
riding dance made him
an international star almost
overnight. It's the most
watched video of all time on
YouTube, with more than
1.5 billion views.
Bus falls into
river, killing 27
LIMA, Peru Police in
Peru said a passenger bus
plunged off an Andean
highway into a river, killing
at least 27 people.
Officer Victor Paez of the
La Libertad highway police
said the cause of Satur-
day's crash is not immedi-
ately clear, though he said
there have been heavy
rains in the area some 600
miles north of the Lima, the
capital.
The victims of the crash
include three doctors, two
nurses and several rural
school teachers. Forty-
three passengers were
aboard the bus of the
Horna line when it left the
town of Huamanchuco
headed toward the regional
capital of Trujillo.
Volcano spews
ash over city
MEXICO CITY- The
Popocatepetl volcano has
spewed a dense cloud of
ash over the central Mexico
state of Puebla, with ash
falling to the ground in sev-
eral towns.
Mexico's National Disas-
ter Prevention Center said
ash was blown about 400
yards into the air above the
volcano, located east of
Mexico City. Prevailing
winds carried the material
northeast, away from Mex-
ico City.
The center said ash falls
had been confirmed in Hue-
jotzingo, near the city of
Puebla, which is capital of
the state of the same name.
The 17,886-foot volcano
periodically emits bursts of
ash, vapor and sometimes
glowing rock.
-From wire reports


m.











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A15
of today's Chronicle.
* For the Record: Recent marriages and
divorces in Citrus County can be found on
Page A17.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


InsonNs


Movie, tour offer glimpse at life of baseball great


BETH J. HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor


NEW YORK

"42" bringing
the Jackie
Robinson
story to a new
generation, fans young
and old may be inspired
to visit some of the
places in Brooklyn
connected to the
African-American
athlete who integrated
Major League Baseball
when he joined the
Brooklyn Dodgers in
1947.
In Coney Island, a statue portrays
Robinson and Pee Wee Reese, the
white Dodger who stood by him in
the face of racist taunts. At the ceme-
tery on the border of Brooklyn and
Queens where Robinson is buried,
admirers still leave baseballs and
other mementos. And for fans who
enjoy irony or who remain bitter
about the Dodgers' departure to Los
Angeles in 1957 -there's a "No Ball
Playing" sign at the housing complex
where the Dodgers' storied stadium,
Ebbets Field, once stood.
Joseph Dorinson, author of "'Jackie
Robinson: Race, Sports and the
American Dream," said it's no acci-
dent that the color barrier was bro-
ken by a Brooklyn team. "Jackie
made it in Brooklyn, and no other
place, because of the multicultural
and ethnic diversity here," he said.
That diversity still exists here today
Here's a guide to exploring Jackie
Robinson's Brooklyn.

STATUE
The life-size statue on Coney Is-
land shows Robinson and Reese arm
in arm. It's inscribed with the story of
how Reese, captain of the Dodgers,
"stood by Jackie Robinson against
prejudiced fans and fellow players ...
silencing the taunts of the crowd"
during a game in Cincinnati. The
statue is located outside MCU Park,
where the minor league Cyclones
team plays, at Surf Avenue and West
17th Street, near the last stop on the
D, F, N or Q train to Coney Island.

HOME AND CHURCH
Robinson lived in several places in
Brooklyn before moving to Queens
and later Connecticut with his wife
and children. On a tidy block in East
Flatbush, a two-story brick house at
5224 Tilden Ave. with a rusting fence
and peeling paint bears a plaque that
reads: "The first African-American
major league baseball player lived
here from 1947 to 1949." Local offi-
cials have started an effort to land-
mark the house.
Robinson and his wife, Rachel,
also lived for a time at 526 MacDo-
nough St. in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Al-
though much of the movie was filmed
in the South, some scenes were shot
on MacDonough because the film-
makers wanted to show the building's
distinctive front stoop, a common fea-
ture of Brooklyn homes. The produc-
tion company used the Nazarene
Congregational Church at 506
MacDonough St. for storage and
wardrobe while filming, according to
Nazarene's pastor, the Rev Conrad
Tillard.
When Robinson first arrived in
New York, he lived for a time with
Nazarene's then-assistant pastor, the
Rev Lacy Covington and his wife Flo-
rence. "Church and faith were cen-
tral to Jackie Robinson's success,"
said Tony Carnes, who publishes an
online magazine called A Journey
Through NYC Religions.
Nazarene was considered a "mink


Associated Press
This undated image provided by the Brooklyn Cyclones shows a statue of Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson at MCU
Park in the Coney Island section of the Brooklyn borough of New York, where the minor league Cyclones team plays. A
new film, "42," tells the inspiring story of how Robinson integrated Major League Baseball when he played for the
Brooklyn Dodgers. The pedestal of the statue states that Reese, captain of the Dodgers, "stood by Jackie Robinson
against prejudiced fans and fellow players" by walking over to Robinson, standing next to him and "silencing the taunts
of the crowd" during a game in Cincinnati.


A building on MacDonough Street in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn
where Jackie Robinson and his wife Rachel lived during his 1947 rookie season
with the Brooklyn Dodgers is seen April 7. A new movie, "42," tells Robinson's
inspiring story as the man who integrated Major League Baseball. Although much
of the movie was filmed in the South, some scenes were shot on MacDonough
because the filmmakers could not find a building elsewhere with the distinctive
front stoop commonly found in Brooklyn.


coat church" at the time, Tillard said,
with an educated, affluent African-
American congregation. Robinson
later came back to the church to
"make an impassioned speech about
the dangers of drugs," Tillard said.
Robinson's son, Jack, who'd served in
the Vietnam War, was a heroin addict.

GRAVESITE
Robinson died in 1972, just a year
after his son died in a car accident.
They are buried, along with the Cov-
ingtons and Robinson's mother-in-
law, in Cypress Hills Cemetery "A life
is not important except in the impact
it has on other lives," reads the in-
scription on Robinson's tombstone.
Mementos left by fans at the grave in-
clude a bat and baseballs, with one
ball bearing a handwritten note
thanking Robinson "for being an in-
spiration, strong and courageous."
On a recent day, Ronnie Carvey,
Taneisha Beckford and their 3-year-
old son were among those stopping at
the grave to pay respects, with


Carvey explaining to his child that
Robinson was a "famous baseball
player."
The cemetery entrance is 833 Ja-
maica Ave., Brooklyn, near the Cy-
press Hills stop on the J subway line,
also reachable via the Jackie
Robinson Parkway Robinson's plot is
in section 6 on the Queens side of the
graveyard, on Jackie Robinson Way
near Cypress Road, across from a
large stone mausoleum near a low
black fence, tall evergreen tree and
hedge row.

EBBETS FIELD &
WASHINGTON PARK
Robinson retired after the 1956
season. Dodgers owner Walter
O'Malley, still a much-hated name in
parts of New York City, moved the
team to Los Angeles after the 1957
season. The park was replaced by an
apartment complex at 1720 Bedford
Ave. in Crown Heights, where a
stone in a wall is inscribed with the
words: "This is the former


A plaque on a house in the Brooklyn
borough of New York where baseball
great Jackie Robinson once lived is
seen April 7. The sign reads: "The first
African-American major league baseball
player lived here from 1947 to 1949."
A new movie, "42," tells Robinson's in-
spiring story as the man who inte-
grated Major League Baseball. The
house at 5224 Tilden Ave. in East Flat-
bush is one of a number of places in
Brooklyn connected to Robinson.
site of Ebbets Field."
Ron Schweiger, Brooklyn's borough
historian, grew up going to Dodger
games at Ebbets Field and met
Robinson several times. As a Brook-
lyn public school teacher, he used
Robinson's story to teach his students
about civil rights, even hosting
Robinson's daughter Sharon as a
speaker at the school. Recalling a re-
cent visit to the Ebbets Field site,
Schweiger said "if you go up the
stairs and into the courtyard, you'd
be standing in right field. When you
walk closer to the entrance to the
building and look at the sign over to
the right of the doorway, there's a
sign: 'No radio playing. No bike rid-
ing. No ball playing."'
Long before Ebbets Field existed,
beginning in 1883, Brooklyn's base-
ball team played in Washington Park,
which is better known as a Revolu-
tionary War site for the Battle of
Brooklyn. George Washington's
troops were defeated here in 1776 by
the British, who used as their base an
old Dutch farmhouse now known as
the Old Stone House. After the ball-
park was built, the Old Stone House
served as a clubhouse for the Brook-
lyn Dodgers. Washington Park is at
Fifth Avenue and Third Street in
Park Slope (nearest subway stop, F to
Fourth Avenue).


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub-
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle.
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize.
the trip.


Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


DREAM
VACATIONS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Counseling can


often be answer


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Dear Annie: It
drives me crazy
that so many of
your answers include the
advice to see a counselor
When a wife is no
longer attracted to her
husband because he is
overweight or doesn't
bathe and isn't going to
change, she should leave
him and get back to en-
joying life. When one
spouse is set
in his ways, it
does no good
to see a coun-
selor. It's the
same in a re-
lationship
when a
cheater is
going to keep
cheating.
You are
wasting time
and money ANN I
seeing a coun- MAIL
selor when MI LI
your spouse is
not going to go with you
and keeps doing the
things that drive you
crazy Just tell these peo-
ple to get out of these re-
lationships. "Till death
do us part" will be the
death of the partner who
is miserable holding on to
something that will never
bring happiness. -Tired
of "Go See a Counselor"
Dear Tired: When we
tell people to seek coun-
seling, it isn't necessarily
to reconcile. When both
partners are willing to
work on their problems, it
can save the relationship.
But in instances where


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Evil Dead" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D.
1 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) 3:50
p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) In 3D.
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
7:05 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation"
(PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m. No
passes.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"42" (PG-13) 12:45 p.m.,
3:45 p.m., 7 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Scary Movie 5" (PG-13)


2 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"42" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 4:30 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Evil Dead" (R) 1:20 p.m.,
4 p.m., 8 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 5 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:45
p.m., 7:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 4:05 p.m., 7 p.m.
No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Power-
ful" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Power-
ful" (PG) In 3D. 4:10 p.m.
No passes.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1:40
p.m., 4:35 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Grain for grinding
6 School (abbr.)
10 Part of CPA (abbr.)
14 Hide
19 Inert gas
20 Sensational
22 Flower
24 Big blood vessel
25 Turn aside
26 Ordinary language
27 Commerce
28 "- a Hot Tin Roof"
29 Salty drop
30 Pronouncements
32 Construct
34 Lustrous fabric
35 Declared
but not proved
39 Kentucky -
41 Chosen ones
43 Jacket part
45 Controvert
47 Express strong disap-
proval
48 Cookbook abbr.
51 Apelike
53 Repeat
55 Overly
56 Once owned
59 Made
a hole-in-one
61 Unfriendly
62 Layer
64 Prayer beads
66 Pearly -
68 Metal fastener
70 Box
72 Bete -
73 Eastern
European
75 Divan
77 Country near India
79 Pallet
80 Two-dimensional
82 Fine violin,
for short
84 Hungry
86 War god
88 Consumed
90 Crazy
91 Of sound mind
95 Hard-rind fruit
97 Spoke
rhythmically
101 Rod
102 One
of the Osmonds


104 Change
106 Usual
108 Sheer
110 Four-wheel
carriage
112 Missing, as a GI
114 Artless
115 Traveled
aimlessly
117 Gigantic
118 Use a blue pencil
120 Ballet bend
121 Goof
122 Wager
124 Obi
126 Deli machine
128 Letter for plurals
129 Fit for a king
131 Itinerary
133 Alcove
135 Controlled
139 Ask urgently
141 Notion
145 School in England
146 Step
148 lazuli
150 Boast
151 Steers clear
153 Ford that flopped
155 Radar cousin
157 Seacoast
158 Ebb and neap
159 Summary
160 One of the Muses
161 Efface
162 Panic
163 Shows assent
164 Old pronoun
165 Doctrine


DOWN
1 Persona non -
2 "Bolero" composer
3 Paragon
4 Horse
of a certain color
5 Explosive stuff (abbr.)
6 Mountain
7 Milk portion
8 Plant
of the arum family
9 Make out
10 Bar mem.
11 Check
12 Santa-
13 Made neat
14 Pouch


15 Comfortably warm
16 Shaw
the bandleader
17 Pilfered
18 Aaron and
Williams
21 Raison -
23 Gun projectile
31 French cleric
33 Stage setting
36 Fuel
37 Monumental
38 Lamia
40 Desert plant
42 Sing
44 Pale purple
46 Prickle
48 Tied-on labels
49 Overcharge
for a ticket
50 Flower part
52 So long, amigo!
54 Horse opera
56 Japanese verse form
57 Molding edge
58 Colored
60 Hindu god
63 Yellow gem
65 Middling (hyph.)
67 Biblical mount
69 Old stringed
instrument
70 Manor house
in France
71 Of warships
74 Ricochet
76 Stuff
78 First head
of the USSR
81 Of the kidney
83 Valley
85 Synthetic fabric
87 Jessica Parker
89 bene
91 Machine part
92 Communion table
93 Abound
94 "Peanuts"
character
96 Stair post
98 Pitfall
99 French novelist
Zola
100 Bette or Jefferson
101 Unadulterated
103 Rice Burroughs
105 "Thinker" sculptor
107 Dregs


Mutineer
Famed fabulist
Legal
French painter
Part of MIT (abbr.)
Ragged piece
Ship part
Harbor town
Greek letter
Sprinter
Heavy


132 Pester in fun
134 Old card game
135 Sleeps
136 Set of morals
137 Cheese variety
138 '70s music
140 Shore
or Washington
142 Mournful sound
143 Equine
144 Chirp


Puzzle answer is on Page A17.


Peruse
Fill to the gills
Compass pt.
CD predecessors
Caviar
Harden


4-14 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


one partner is unwilling
to make the effort, the
other partner must de-
cide what is worth keep-
ing and what is not and
what the next step should
be. These decisions are
not simple, often involv-
ing young children or fi-
nancial concerns.
Counseling helps work
through the difficulties in
order to move forward -
in whatever di-
rection that
entails.
Dear Annie: I
hope it's not too
late to respond
to "Not Antiso-
cial or Addicted
to the Internet,"
who wants to
make friends.
He should con-
sider joining a
E'S fraternal organ-
BOX ization like the
3OX Elks, Moose,
Eagles, Masons
and Shriners, or a service
club such as Rotary, Ki-
wanis, Optimists, Cos-
mopolitans, etc. Each has
a unique philosophy and
format, some are co-ed,
most have benevolent or
charitable activities, and
the opportunities to form
new friendships are
huge. Happy 50-Year
Member


Mail questions for
Annie's Mailbox a t:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


A14 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


I
I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
The auxiliary will serve a
roast pork dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April
19, at the post home, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway. On the
menu for April 24 is shep-
herd's pie; public is welcome.
The meals are each $7.
All profits from the dinners
will go to support the many
programs of the American Le-
gion Auxiliary. For information,
call Unit President Sandy
White at 352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Chicken dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, April 19.


Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence


Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month, except
July and August, at the DAV
building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Membership
has been expanded to include
extended families. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-
341-5334.
The semi-annual yard sale
will be from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday, April 26, and Saturday,
April 27. Anyone with dona-
tions may bring them to the
DAV building from 3 to 5 p.m.
Thursday, April 25. If you wish
to donate but cannot deliver
items at that time, call one of
the persons/numbers below.
The auxiliary has projects
to help needy disabled veter-
ans and their families and
welcomes help with making
lap robes and ditty, monitor,
wheelchair and walker bags.
Good, clean material and yarn
are needed, as are bed
sheets and toiletry items.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at


Veterans NOTES
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast will be
Saturday, April 20. Everyone
is welcome. The all-you-can-
eat breakfast is served from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost is $5
for adults and $3 for children.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for Ma-
rine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at


the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
The Men's Auxiliary will
have a spaghetti and meatball
dinner from 3 to 5 p.m. Sun-
day, April 14, at the post. Cost
is $7; everyone is welcome.
Music at 5 p.m. will be by
Southern Silk.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Nominations for officers will
be taken at the meeting April
23 at 7 p.m. Post election is 1
to 6 p.m. May 28, followed by
the meeting and installation of
officers at 7 p.m.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little


Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. A fish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to enjoy the music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at
6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7.
All veterans in the
Homosassa/Homosassa
Springs area are invited to be
a part of American Legion
Post 166. This is open to all
veterans who love to ride and
would be interested in forming
an American Legion Riders
chapter. Riders members are
military men and women from
all branches of service, as
well as children of service
members. For more informa-
tion, call Clay Scott at 928-
848-8359 or email
eaglerider@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of

See VETERANS/Page A16


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CVCC yard sale season



ends, but still lot to do


Next month will be the last
chance to buy or sell at the
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition (CCVC) 2012-13 season's
yard sale. This selling season will
close, but don't worry, we'll be back
in September!
April's yard sale had a good
turnout, and we'd like to thank
everyone who participated in the
event.
May's CCVC yard sale will be the
second Saturday of the month, May
11, at Our Lady of Fa-
tima Church in Inver-
ness. It's a great chance
for those last-minute
Mother's Day shoppers.
Sellers can arrive Fri-
day afternoon to set up,
or arrive as early as 5
a.m. on the sale date.
Gates open at 7 a.m. for
buyers and the sales
runs until 1 p.m. Sellers Barbara C
should call Dan at 352- VETERW
400-8952 for the list of VIEW
guidelines and some
important changes next
season.
Speaking of fun things to do, make
sure to check out our CCVC Family
Fun Day, scheduled for Saturday,
May 25, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Our
theme is "A Peek into the Past,"
where veterans and their families
are welcome to enjoy free food and
refreshments and participate in a
variety of games that are definitely
"retro!"
Baton races, Hula Hoop
marathons, spoon-carrying-egg
races, Frisbee competitions, potato
sack races, and lots more will keep
everyone entertained. There's even


E


o
C
I


talk of live music to dance to, so
come on out and join the fun.
The purpose of this event is to let
the community know who we are,
what we do and especially to let the
young veterans in the area feel wel-
come to join our group and see what
we're all about. Membership appli-
cations ($10 for a full year) will be
available and donations will be
gladly accepted. Call Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537 for mem-
bership information, and Dan Cor-
coran at 352 400-8952 for
more information on the
event, or go to
www.ccvcfl.org, for an up-
to-date report on these fes-
tivities and more.
We would also like to
bring your attention to two
local businesses that are
veteran owned and veteran
friendly
Mrcoran Peppermint Patties, at
ANS' 859 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, is
is owned and operated by
Mark Fournier, an Army
veteran of Desert Storm,
and his wife, Wendy The restaurant,
named after Wendy's mother, serves
some of the best New England and
Southern seafood that this writer
has ever had. Clam chowder is made
fresh daily, and for we Florida
"Crackers," there are not just one
but three styles of fried green toma-
toes to choose from! The scallops
are fresh and juicy; the fried shrimp
are plump and delectable. Drinks
are refilled endlessly, and the home-
town friendliness of the staff is de-
lightful.
They offer specials and discounts
for veterans, not just on Veterans


Day but on Memorial Day and other
days they feel are often overlooked
by other businesses.
The Fourniers have been in busi-
ness for three years in Citrus County,
and the shop where it sits opened
last summer Many locals will recog-
nize the location as being the former
address of the Kracker Shack. Watch
our Coalition Crusader newsletter
for a full restaurant review of Pep-
permint Patties. They're open every
day except Monday and Tuesday
Call 352-419-4878 for details.
The next business we want to
spotlight is Fred's Barber Shop and
Hair Salon, 1244 State Road 44,
Crystal River Fred J. Sparkman Jr,
has owned the award-winning busi-
ness for more than 16 years, and is a
U.S. Navy veteran, serving as FTM2
(firecontrol technicians missiles sec-
ond class petty officer) from 1975 to
1979.
He and his co-stylists have both
male and female clients and the
shop sports a vast array of memora-
bilia mounted on the walls and ceil-
ings, ranging from a
barnacle-covered fishing pole to a
stuffed rattlesnake posed in a strik-
ing coil. Fred's is open from Monday
to Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
So, get a hair trim, have a deli-
cious meal and head on out for our
last yard sale of the season!

Barbara L. Corcoran is the public
information officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition Inc.
She may be contacted via
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org. More
information about this group may
be found at www.ccvcfl.org.


In SERVICE


Lauren R. Hansen
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren R. Hansen has gradu-
ated from the U.S. Navy's Nuclear Power School at Naval Nu-
clear Power Training Command in Goose Creek, S.C.
Nuclear Power School is a rigorous six-month course that
trains officer and enlisted students in the science and engi-
neering fundamental to the design, operation, and mainte-
nance of naval nuclear propulsion plants.
Graduates next undergo additional instruction at a prototype
training unit before serving as a Surface Warfare Officer
aboard a nuclear-powered surface ship or as an Electronics
Technician aboard a nuclear-powered submarine.
Hansen is the daughter of Martha Taylor of Crystal River
and Robert Taylor of Crystal River. She is a 2010 graduate of
Crystal River High School.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A15

January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets


at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II will meet at 11:30 a.m.
May 11 at Kally K's restaurant
in Spring Hill.
SERVICES & GROUPS
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year.
For information, call direc-
tor Gene Perrino at 352-302-
1037, or email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultra
rayl997@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez


Alexander J. Back
Air Force Airman Alexander J. Back graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman completed an intensive, eight-
week program that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness and basic warfare
S principles and skills.
^ He completed Technical Training in Muni-
1 tions Systems and will be stationed at Luke
AFB in Arizona. He is a member of the drill
team.
Alexander He is a 2011 graduate of Citrus High
J. Back School 2011. He is the son of Lisa Back and
U.S. Air Force. Robert Ramirez of Inverness.


Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 18, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. All are welcome.
Those who ordered a AFA
chapter jacket can pick it up
at this meeting. Call Mike
Emig at 352-854-8328 for
more information.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St.,
Crystal River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-


profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs
do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets. Free
classes to combat veterans
are offered by her at several
locations and times. Call her
at 352-382-7397.


Get jump




on happy




summer


Special to the Chronicle
YMCA campers enjoy gardening at one of last year's
summer sessions.


YMCA offering camps for

Citrus County youngsters


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County
YMCA is jumping into
high gear this summer
with a full throttle sum-
mer camp that will keep
kids entertained all day
long.
YMCA Program Direc-
tor Sara Bargiel has de-
veloped a 10-week
summer program for
youths and teens that
serves to continue to
stimulate children's
minds after school is out,
introduce them to new
experiences as well as
keep them physically
active.
This summer the Y is
excited to announce a
youth summer camp for
ages 5 to 11.
With themes such as
"Time Travelers", "Ship
Wrecked, "Welcome to
the Outback" and the "Y
Factor" kids are sure to
experience an exciting
adventure each week!
Camp activities include
bowling, swimming, putt-
putt golf, recreational ac-
tivities, field trips, sports,
crafts, guest speakers,
and lots and lots of fun!
This summer the
YMCA is introducing a
new camp for teens.
Camp EPIC, or Encour-
aging People to Impact
their Community, is a
camp designed for ages
12 to 14. At the Y, we rec-
ognize that one of the
most important assets in
a teen's development is
the opportunity to partic-
ipate in community
service.
Camp EPIC provides
teens the opportunity to
conduct local volunteer
service projects and de-
velop skills and talents
that can be utilized for
their future endeavors as
well as learn the impor-
tance of social
responsibility
We have expanded our
focus to provide both a
good connection to edu-
cation and incorporate
health and wellness ac-
tivities. Research shows
that children loose more
than academic knowl-
edge over the summer,
most children, particu-
larly children at a high
risk of obesity, gain
weight more rapidly
when they are out of
school during the sum-
mer break.
Data from the Florida
Department of Health
through its Community
Health Assessment Re-
sources indicates that
only 22.5 percent of Cit-
rus County's youth ages 5
to 14 get adequate daily
activity and that more


than 15 percent of teens
are already obese.
The summer program
will provide children ac-
tivities and tools that
they can use at the Y and
at home to improve their
health and wellness.
Using the principals of
the President's Fitness
Challenge materials, Y
camps will keep kids in-
volved in physical activ-
ity every day including
mostly aerobic, muscle
strengthening and bone
strengthening exercises.
High-quality YMCA sum-
mer programs keep stu-
dents engaged in
learning, teach them new
skills and encourage
them to develop unseen
talents.
They allow children to
form relationships, help
them stay fit and active,
as well as foster creativ-
ity and innovation.
To accommodate
higher anticipated en-
rollment this year, camps
are at Crystal River Mid-
dle School, Lecanto Mid-
dle School, and Pleasant
Grove Elementary
School.
The camp day runs
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
camp sites offer before
care, from 7 a.m. to 9
p.m., and after care, from
5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at no ad-
ditional charge. The cost
of camp is $89 per week.
The YMCA will also
offer the summer feeding
program through the Cit-
rus County School Board.
The Y offers financial
assistance for all pro-
grams, including summer
camp, for those who qual-
ify The YMCA is a proud
partner of the United
Way of Citrus County
which helps to provide fi-
nancial assistance for the
youth summer camp.
The Y has also been
awarded a grant from
The Black Diamond
Foundation to help pro-
vide financial assistance
for our teen camp E.PI.C.
this summer. With such
wonderful supporters
and partners, the Y will
be sure to give the com-
munity's youth and teens
a very memorable
summer
All YMCA camp staff
receives level 2 back-
ground screening, safety
training, child abuse pre-
vention training, concus-
sion training, and
CPR/FA and AED
certifications.
For questions, to regis-
ter, or more information
call 352-637-0132, visit
www.ymcasuncoast.org,
visit us at our Adminis-
trative office, or check
out our Facebook page.


FOR THE RECORD
* Divorces and marriages filed in the state of
Florida are a matter of public record, available
from each county's Clerk of the Courts Office. For
Citrus County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or
visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


VETERANS & COMMUNITY





Cimus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger, pep-
peroni pizza, Italian super
salad with roll, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
warm slice apples, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Tuesday: Goldie's Grab N
Go (turkey), creamy macaroni
and cheese, corn dog minis,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh gar-
den salad, steamed green
beans, chilled strawberry
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
turkey super salad with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, sweet green peas,
chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken alfredo, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, mozzarella
maxstix, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled pears, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.Tuesday: Sausage
and egg biscuit, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, milk and juice


For the RECORD


Divorces 3/18/13
to 4/7/13
Charles R. Chadwick Jr. vs.
Julaine M. Chadwick
Karen E. Chappell vs.
Harold A. Chappell
Terri L. Simon vs. Tony
J. Headley
Scott Carson, Inverness vs.
Marcia Carson, Hernando
Eurshel L. Spires Jr. vs.
Mary Catherine Spires
Marriages 3/18/13 to 4/7/13
Jeffery Adam Bellcase,
Homosassa/Kelsey Raye
Winebrenner, Homosassa
Mark Wayne Bridges,
Homosassa/Sharon Sue
Taylor, Homosassa
Michael Lee Brown Jr.,
Crystal River/Angel Capri
Brooks, Crystal River
Robert Bruce Caldwell,
Inverness/Doris Roman,


Inverness
John Wayne Hooks,
Inverness/Patricia Sue
Weston, Inverness
Joshua Stephen
Hutchinson, Crystal
River/Amanda Fay Loiero,
Crystal River
John Fitzgerald Ingalls,
Beverly Hills/Carolina Lynn
Taylor, Beverly Hills
Rahaman Khan, Citrus
Springs/Shamshoon Nessia
Khan, Citrus Springs
Brandon James Parrish,
Inverness/Ciara Asa
Robertson, Gainesville
David Francis Plante,
Hernando/Gloria Ann
Langoski, Hernando
Patrick Frank Shipman,
Crystal River/Sharon Ann
King, Crystal River
Dale Jay Carlisle,


Dunnellon/Kristen Marie
Schneider, Dunnellon
Jason Louis Costa, Citrus
Springs/Kristen Michele
Smith, Citrus Springs
Richard Stephen Durrance,
Homosassa/Melissa May
Chitwood, Homosassa
Jeremy Matthew Onorato,
Homosassa/Jamie Nicole
Estes, Homosassa
Keith Wayne Russell,
Homosassa/Donna Marie
Russell, Homosassa
Ralph Coleman Ayers,
Homosassa/Margaret Joyce
Brooks, Homosassa
Samuel Terrell Byrd,
Gainesville, Ga./Rebecca
Jean Jurges, Gainesville, Ga.
Devin Wesley Ensor,
Crystal River/Melinda Desiree
Damron, Crystal River
Kirby Thomas Franklin,


Marion, Ohio/Brooke Ashley
Harrell, Marion, Ohio
Michael Lee Freudenburg,
Homosassa/Diane Maria
Lane, Homosassa
Percy John David
Kramberg Jr., Inverness/
Brandy Nichoal Morman,
Inverness
Robert Paul Riechel,
Beverly Hills/Elizabeth Anne
Hayes, Floral City
Francis Steven Villanueva
Sanchez, Inverness/Kansas
Marie Alexander, Inverness
Thomas Allen Shelby, Star
City, Ark./Mafalda Antopina
Withstandley, Citrus Springs
Benjamin Franklin Smith,
Inverness/Shumin Lin,
Inverness
Chad Aaron Whirle,
Dunnellon/Alexandra Jane
Cooley, Citrus Springs


variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
pulled pork barbecue on a
bun, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
chilled applesauce, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
steamed greens beans, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued chicken with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans,
baked sweet potatoes, chilled
peach cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
fajita chicken and rice with rip-
stick, Italian super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, Mexicali corn,
chilled flavored applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix,
Goldie's Grab N Go (turkey),
PB dippers, fresh garden
salad, sweet peas, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk vari-
ety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal variety
and toasts, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP


breakfast, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese on loco bread, ulti-
mate breakfast round, cereal
variety and toast, grits, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato tri-
angles, steamed broccoli,
applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Chicken nachos
with Spanish rice, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, Mexicali corn, po-
tato roasters, baby carrots,
celery, strawberry cups, baby
carrots, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, ham salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, chilled baked beans,
baked beans, potato triangles,
flavored Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, turkey super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
green beans, baby carrots,
potato roasters, strawberry
cups, cucumbers, celery,
juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
sandwich, pizza, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Italian
super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots,
cold corn salad, potato trian-
gles, peas, peach cup, juice,
milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Hot dog on bun
with mustard, baked beans
with tomato, carrot coins,


mixed fruit, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Vegetable soup,
turkey ham and cheese on
whole-grain bun, mayonnaise
and mustard, fresh orange,
oatmeal raisin cookie, low-fat
milk.
Wednesday: Birthday cele-
bration: Beef rotini pasta,
Neapolitan spinach, Italian
vegetable medley, slice birth-
day cake, dinner roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Baked chicken
thigh with coq au vin sauce,
rice pilaf, country vegetable
medley, applesauce, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Friday: Sausage and bean
casserole, buttered spinach,
yellow corn, citrus fruit, slice
whole-grain bread, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


Wedding

Hemrnandez/Glenn

Elizabeth Hernandez
and Christopher Glenn of
Inverness exchanged
nuptial vows in an after-
noon ceremony March 9,
2013, at the First Baptist
Church of Rutland. Pas-
tor James Jones offici-
ated at the ceremony
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Mr and Mrs. Luis
Hernandez Sr of Inver-
ness. Parents of the
groom are Bob and
Geneva Glenn of Gal-
latin, Tenn.
Lindsay Simpson of
Ocala served as the The bride's ring was
bride's honor attendant borne to the altar on a re-
and best man was Pete mote-control Jeep.
Callahan of Inverness. Following a honey-
The groom's nieces moon to Castillo Real in
Michelle and Michaela St. Augustine, the couple
were flower girls. is at home in Inverness.


Wedding


Gaffney/Kit


Joelyn Gaffney of Bev-
erly Hills and Theodore
Kit of Lecanto exchanged
wedding vows March 1 at
the Citrus Hills Country
Club. The Christian cere-
mony was performed by
Chaplain Donna Viglione
of The Wedding Chapel
in Inverness.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of John and Jaxque-
line Gaffney of Beverly
Hills. The groom's par-
ents are Siegfried Kit of
Brentwood, Calif., and
Iva and George Billick of
Sevierville, Tenn.
The maid of honor was
Dawn Bass and John
Lawrence Jr. was the best
man.
Bridesmaids were Lisa
Sutherland and Karen
Proulx. Henry Bass and


Zackery Gaffney served
as groomsmen. Flower
girls were Briauna
LaPointe and Kirstin
Lawrence and the ring-
bearers were Logan
Billick and Bradley
DeJesus.


News NOTE


Center offers free
quilting classes
Free quilting classes are
offered from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at the Tri County
Community Association
Center, 28444 Forbes St.,
Nobleton (the old Nobleton
Firehouse).
The classes are offered to
everyone experienced
and inexperienced. Instruc-
tors will help you get started
and show how it's done. If


you know what you are
doing and just wish to hang
out and sew with others who
love quilting, bring quilting
materials and join the group.
You will need to provide
your own materials for
sewing and a sewing
machine.
If you don't know what
you'll need, come to the
class and instructors will
help get you started.
For more information, call
Marge at 352-568-0216.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A14.

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For Ticket Information Tickets AreAvailablethrough
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New Knights


Special to the Chronicle
The Knights of Columbus St. Scholastica Council No. 14485 added three new members to its order: Lawrence
Wagner of Lecanto, Wayne Work of Hernando and Ron Lapierre of Inverness. The order is dedicated to the princi-
ples of charity, unity, fraternity and patriotism. A First Degree exemplification ceremony, by which a man joins the
order, explicates the virtue of charity. He is then said to be a First Degree Knight of Columbus; after participating
the subsequent degrees, each of which focuses on another virtue, he rises to that status. Upon reaching the Third
Degree, a Knight is considered a full member. To learn more about the Knights, call Ron at 352-563-5994.


April 15-19 MENUS


TOGETHER & COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 A17





A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


TOGETHER


65th ANNIVERSARY

The Shipps


Bill and Juanita Shipp
celebrated their 65th wed-
ding anniversary March
31, 2013, with family at Fort
Cooper Baptist Church in
Inverness, followed by a
celebratory dinner and egg
hunt in Floral City.
The couple exchanged
vows on Easter Sunday in
1948 when Pleasant Grove
Baptist Church in Oxford
substituted their Sunday
school services for the
union of Juanita Stokes
and William Shipp of
Floral City
Bill and Juanita both at-
tended school at Citrus
High School in Inverness.
Bill was drafted for the
war and served in the U.S.
Navy before returning
home to marry his young
bride. The pair went to St.
Petersburg, where Bill re-
tired from the city and
Juanita got her nursing de-
gree, later retiring from
the Citrus Memorial Hos-
pital operating room.
They would save money
all year to take their family


on vacations and their love
of travel carried over after
retirement.
Upon Juanita's retire-
ment, she became part of a
medical missionary team
and traveled the world
using her medical experi-
ence and testimony to
touch the lives of those she
came in contact with.
The members of Fort
Cooper Baptist, as well as
the students and families
at Inverness Christian
Academy, refer to the pair
as "Nanny and Papa."
The Shipps continue to
reside in their 1900s home
in Floral City, which is re-
ferred to as the Delany
Home on the national his-
torical registry
They have three chil-
dren: Donna Beebe of Flo-
ral City, Gary Shipp
(deceased) and Susan
Shipp (deceased); seven
grandchildren; 17 great-
grandchildren; and one
great-great-grandchild, all
but two of whom still re-
side in Citrus County.


Special to the Chronicle
Bill and Juanita Shipp celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary with their family in
Floral City. Shown are Mr. and Mrs. Shipp, front, with their grandchildren, from left:
Michael Bescher, Whitney Wright, Susan Shipp (all of Inverness), Melissa Brannen
of Hernando, Billy Beebe and James Beebe of Floral City. Not shown are Brandi Shipp
of Tampa and Dakota Shipp of Texas.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

News NOTE

Old cell phones
can help victims
Unwanted cellphones can
be donated to The Center for
Victim Rights by dropping
them off at Upscale Resale,
244 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal
River (phone 352-795-0743).
Wear To Go Consignment,
Times Square Plaza, 3802 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inver-
ness (phone 352-344-9327)
also accepts unwanted cell
phones, and the Inglis Police
Department assisted in this
effort for several years.
Drop phones off during
operating hours.
The phones are used as a
fundraiser and so that crime
victims who need them can
have a phone to call 911 if
necessary. The center helps
victims of crime apply for vic-
tim compensation and assists
with other resources for
victims.
This is a free and nation-
wide service. Contact the cen-
ter at 352-628-6481 or
crimevictimhelp@aol.com.
Visit the website at www.
advocate4victims.org.


Citrus County 's




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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
% 0U Auto racing/B3
0 Recreational sports/B4
College football/B4, B5
0 NBA, NHL/B5
0 Masters golf/B6


Miller signs with Methodist


Citrus senior set to

play girls soccer at

Division III school
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Deycasha
Miller has joined the elite status
in girls soccer
If there had been any lingering
doubt in that regard, it was put to
rest when Miller, a senior at Citrus
Citrus senior Deycasha Miller
scored 21 goals for the Hurricanes
in the 2012-13 season.
Chronicle file photo


High School, signed to play at
Methodist University in North
Carolina.
The official signing ceremony
was Thursday in the offices at Cit-
rus, capping a recruitment that
dated back to last year
"It was at a competitive (club)
soccer tournament in Miami,"
Miller said. "That's how it started.
Coach Bryan (Madej, Methodist's
head coach) saw me, and he said
he needs an aggressive attacker"
That is certainly something
Miller proved she can provide.
The speedy forward led all Citrus
County scorers with 21 goals; she
also had seven assists, despite
missing 10 matches after drawing
a red card against Belleview.
In attendance at the signing,


with Miller adorned in a
"Methodist U" T-shirt, were ad-
ministrators, family and friends,
and the two coaches who guided
her through her career at Citrus,
Ian Feldt this year and Steve Ekeli
the previous three.
"This is fantastic," Feldt said.
"I've been coaching here six or
seven years, and Deycasha is the
second player signed.
"She's obviously a very special
player I don't know what she'll do
at the next level, she can play in
the midfield as well. But we were
set in the midfield so we asked her
to play forward, and she did.
"She has all the raw skills
needed. She's fast, she can shoot,


Page B4


See


UNF freshman

Dewees sets record

for three-base hits
STEVE WATERS
Correspondent
Triples are a rarity in base-
ball. The three-base hit gave
way to the home run long ago,
with athletes focusing on the
brute force needed to hit the
long ball. The triple, however
infrequent, remains one of the
most exciting plays in the
sport, requiring the speed and
hitting prowess of a true talent.
But for Crystal River High
School graduate Donnie De-
wees, hitting triples has be-
come part of just another day
at the ballpark.
Dewees, an outfielder and
true freshman at the Univer-
sity of North Florida in Jack-
sonville, set a school record on
March 28 with three triples in
a single game, a 15-4 rout of
East Tennessee State. The
record led him to be selected
as the Atlantic Sun Conference
Player of the Week on April 1.
Not only did Dewees set the
single-game individual record
for the Ospreys (24-11, 6-3 ASC
as of April 11), he tied the team
record for triples in a game.
Dewees finished the game 4 for
6 at the plate with four runs
and seven RBIs. That night,
Dewees had four extra base
hits and 11 total bases. His
seven RBIs were one shy of
North Florida's school record.
"That night I was seeing the
ball really well," Dewees said.
"It was just one of those games
where everything was going
the way you wanted it to."
Dewees's three-triple game
capped a monster week for the
freshman. Dewees hit .550 that
week, with a 1.050 slugging per-
centage and .545 on-base per-
centage. He went 11 for 20 at
the plate with four doubles,
three triples, seven runs and a
team-best 11 RBIs.
This season (as of April 11),
Dewees is third on the team
with a .356 average, 10 doubles
and a team-leading 27 RBI.
North Florida coach Smoke
Laval, in his third season
See Page B3


" -
!


S - -
h. s-


TODD DREXLER/Courtesy of University of North Florida
University of North Florida outfielder Donnie Dewees, a 2012 graduate of Crystal River High School,
was recently named Atlantic Sun Player of the Week and set an Ospreys single-player and single-game
record with three triples in one game.


Snedeker,

Cabrera

tied for lead

at Masters

Woods nearly

disqualifiedfor

Friday error

Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. Tiger
Woods made two significant
moves Saturday at the Masters
- one to stay in the tourna-
ment, the other to stay in the
hunt
A day filled with high drama
before a shot was struck at Au-
gusta National,
ended with
B r a n d t
Snedeker and
Angel Cabrera
tied for the
lead, and
Woods only four
shots back. For
a few tense Angel
hours in the Cabrera
morning, it was
not clear if Woods was going to
get a chance to play
Masters officials discovered
late Friday evening that Woods
had taken a bad drop in the sec-
ond round and should have
added two shots to his score.
Under normal circumstances,
he would have been disquali-
fied for signing an incorrect
card. Officials took the blame
for not alerting Woods to a po-
tential problem they found
nothing wrong at first glance be-
fore he signed and kept him
in the tournament with two
shots added to his score. Woods
was covered under a 2-year-old
rule that prevents DQs when a
violation is reported by televi-
sion viewers.
"It certainly was a distraction
early," Woods said after three
birdies on his last seven holes
for a 70. "It happens and you
move on. I was ready to play
come game time."
So was Snedeker
He's been building toward a
moment like this for the last
year, and he seized his chance
on a glorious afternoon with a
bogey-free round of 3-under 69.


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B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


Boston
Baltimore
New York
Toronto
Tampa Bay




Atlanta
New York
Washington
Philadelphia
Miami


East Division
GB WC
0 E
5 Y2 --
) 1 1/2
5 112 1
) 2 112


East Division
GB WC
9 --
6 3 -
6 3 -
5 5 2
2 8 5


AL

Red Sox 2, Rays 1,
10 innings
Tampa Bay Boston
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Jnnngscf 5 1 1 0 Ellsurycf 5 1 1 0
SRdrgzlb 2 0 1 1 Victornrf 5 0 2 1
Fuld ph-rf 2 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 3 0 0 0
Longori3b 3 0 0 0 Napolilb 4 0 1 0
Zobrist rf-2b3 0 0 0 Mdlrks3b 4 0 1 0
Duncan dh 3 0 0 0 Nava If 4 0 1 0
Loney ph-dhl 0 0 0 JGomsdh 2 0 0 0
YEscorss 4 0 1 0 Drewss 4 0 0 0
RRorts2b-1b40 1 0 D.Rossc 3 1 1 1
JMolinc 4 0 2 0 Sltlmchph 1 0 0 0
KJhnsn pr 0 00 0
Loaton c 0 00 0
Joyce If 4 0 0 0
Totals 35 16 1 Totals 352 7 2
TampaBay001 000 000 0 1
Boston 000 010 000 1 2
One out when winning run scored.
E-Lobaton (1). DP-Boston 1. LOB-Tampa
Bay 7, Boston 8. 2B-S.Rodriguez (1),
J.Molina (1). HR-D.Ross (1). SB-S.Ro-
driguez (1), Ellsbury (5), Victorino (3).


Tampa Bay
Price
McGee
Jo.Peralta
Farnsworth
C.Ramos
B.Gomes L,0-1
Boston
Lester
A.Bailey
Hanrahan
Uehara
TazawaW,2-0


IP H RERBBSO


Str Home
W-1 2-2
W-1 1-2
L-1 2-3
W-2 2-4
L-1 3-3



Str Home
W-8 5-1
W-2 4-2
L-2 6-2
L-1 3-3
W-1 1-4


Detroit
Kansas City
Cleveland
Chicago
Minnesota


Central Division
Pct GB WC L
.545 5
.545 6
.500 12 12 5
.364 2 2 3
.364 2 2 4


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


Str Home
W-1 4-2
L-2 3-2
W-2 2-2
L-5 4-2
L-5 2-3


NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 7 4 .636 7-3 W-4 4-1 3-3
Cincinnati 5 6 .455 2 2 5-5 L-4 4-2 1-4
Pittsburgh 5 6 .455 2 2 5-5 W-2 3-2 2-4
Chicago 4 7 .364 3 3 3-7 L-1 2-3 2-4
Milwaukee 2 8 .200 4/2 4/2 2-8 L-3 1-5 1-3


W
Oakland 9
Texas 7
Seattle 5
Houston 4
Los Angeles 2


Arizona
San Fran.
Colorado
Los Angeles
San Diego


West Division
Pct GB WC I
.750 -
.636 11/2 -
.417 4 11/2 3
.400 4 112 4
.200 6 31/2


West Division
Pct GB WC


Str Home
L-1 3-3
L-1 4-2
W-1 2-3
W-3 1-5
L-5 0-4



Str Home
W-2 4-3
W-1 4-2
W-1 3-0
L-1 4-2
L-3 1-3


..~*.-.. --


Associated Press
Boston Red Sox outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury steals second base as Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Yunel Escobar
misses the throw in the 10th inning Saturday in Boston. The Red Sox won 2-1.



Red Sox nip Rays in 10 innings


Associated Press


Hanrahan pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
C.Ramos pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
WP-B.Gomes, Lester.
T-3:23. A-33,039 (37,071).
Orioles 5, Yankees 3
Baltimore NewYork
ab rhbi ab rhbi
McLoth If 5 1 3 0 Gardnr cf 5 0 1 0
Machd3b 4 0 1 0 Cano2b-ss 5 02 0
Markks rf 3 1 1 1 Youkils3b 5 0 0 0
A.Jones cf 4 1 2 1 Hafnerdh 4 1 1 1
C.Davislb 3 0 1 0 V.Wells If 4 1 2 1
Wieters c 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 3 0 1 0
Hardy ss 4 0 1 1 Cervelli c-2b 4 1 2 0
Flahrty2b 3 1 1 1 Overaylb 4 0 2 1
ACasill2b 0 0 0 0 J.Nixss 3 0 0 0
Reimld dh 4 1 1 1 Boesch ph 1 0 0 0
CStwrt c 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 5115 Totals 38311 3
Baltimore 112 100 000 5
NewYork 020 001 000 3
E-Hardy (1), Phelps (1). DP-Baltimore 1, New
York 1. LOB-Baltimore 6, New York 9. 2B-
McLouth 2 (3), C.Davis (4), Cano (4). HR-
Markakis (2), Flaherty (1), Reimold (1), Hafner
(3), V.Wells (3). S-Machado.


IP H R E
Baltimore
HammelW,2-1 6 8 3
Matusz H,1 1 1 0
O'DayH,3 1 2 0
Ji.Johnson S,5-5 1 0 0
New York
PHughes L,0-2 3 9 5
Phelps 4 1 0
Chamberlain 1 1 0
D.Robertson 1 0 0
PHughes pitched to 2 batters in the
HBP-by Phelps (Flaherty).
T-2:49. A-41,851 (50,291).
Indians 9,
White Sox,
Chicago Cleveland
ab r h bi


De Aza cf
Kppngr2b
Rios rf
A.Dunn lb
Konerk dh
Viciedo If
Gillaspi 3b
AIRmrz ss
Flowers c
Totals
Chicago
Cleveland


4 1 1 2 Bourncf
4 1 2 0 ACarerss
4 1 0 0 Raburn2b
4 0 0 0 Swisherdh
4 0 1 1 MrRynlib
4 0 0 0 Brantly If
4 0 1 0 Aviles3b
3 1 2 0 YGomsc
4 0 0 0 Stubbs rf
35 47 3 Totals
200 000 200
201 060 00x


E-Mar.Reynolds (2). LOB-Chicago 5, Cleve-
land 6. 2B-Keppinger (1), AI.Ramirez (4),
Raburn (2), Swisher (2). HR-De Aza (2),
Swisher (1), Mar.Reynolds (5), Y.Gomes (1).
SB-Mar.Reynolds (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Chicago
Sale L,1-1
Heath
Veal
A.Reed
Cleveland
McAllister W,1-1
Shaw
Hagadone
J.Smith


41-38 8
12-31 1
1 0 0
1 0 0

61-35 3
2-3 1 1
1 0 0
1 1 0


HBP-by Sale (Swisher, Brantley), by McAllister
(AI.Ramirez).
T-2:35. A-11,422 (42,241).
Tigers 7, Athletics 3


Detroit


Oakland


ab rh bi ab rh bi
AJcksn cf 5 0 1 1 Jasodh 4 0 0 0
TrHntr rf 5 1 1 1 CYoung cf 5 0 1 2
MiCarr3b 4 00 0 Reddckrf 5 00 0
Fielder 1b 3 1 2 1 Mosslb 5 0 0 0
VMrtnzdh 4 1 1 0 S.Smith If 2 1 2 0
Tuiassp If 2 1 1 0 Dnldsn 3b 3 0 2 0
Dirks ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Sogard 2b 3 1 0 0
JhPerltss 4 1 1 3 DNorrsc 3 1 2 1
Infante2b 4 1 1 0 Parrinoss 3 00 0
B.Penac 3 1 2 1 Lowrieph-ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 7107 Totals 34 3 7 3
Detroit 001 402 000 7
Oakland 010 000 200 3
DP-Oakland 1. LOB-Detroit 6, Oakland 10.
2B-A.Jackson (2), B.Pena (1), C.Young (3),
D.Norris (2). HR-Tor.Hunter (1), Fielder (4),
Jh.Peralta (1). S-B.Pena.
IP H RERBBSO


Detroit
VerlanderW,2-1
Alburquerque
Coke
Benoit
Oakland
Anderson L,1-2
Neshek
Scribner


6 3 1
2-3 2 2
2-3 1 0
12-31 0


BOSTON Shane Victorino
had a well-placed RBI single into
a five-man infield in the 10th in-
ning Saturday, lifting the Boston
Red Sox to a 2-1 win over the
Tampa Bay Rays.
David Ross had a solo homer for
Boston, which snapped a two-
game losing streak.
Junichi Tazawa (2-0) pitched
one inning for the win.
The Rays went 0 for 11 with run-
ners in scoring position.
Jacoby Ellsbury singled with one
out off Brandon Gomes (0-1), stole
second and advanced on catcher
Jose Lobaton's throwing error. Vic-
torino then hit a hard grounder
into a five-man infield that second
baseman Ben Zobrist made a div-
ing stop on to his right, but was un-
able to make a throw home.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Orioles 5, Yankees 3


R BB SO NEW YORK Nolan Reimold,

2 1 4 Ryan Flaherty and Nick Markakis hit
0 0 0 solo home runs, sending the Baltimore
0 0 1 Orioles over the Yankees 5-3 and
0 0 0 stopping New York's four-game win-

5 2 0 ning string.
0 0 6 Nate McLouth doubled twice, sin-
0 0 0 gled and made a nifty catch in left field
0 0 1 to back Jason Hammel (2-1).
e 4th. Orioles reliever Brian Matusz, Dar-
ren O'Day and Jim Johnson each
pitched a scoreless inning. Johnson
closed for his fifth save.
4 Travis Hafner and Vernon Wells hit
solo homers for the Yankees. Phil
ab r h bi Hughes (0-2) was booed off the
5 0 0 0 mound after giving up three long

4 01 n drives in three-plus innings.


Blue Jays 3, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -After finding
out Jose Reyes likely will be sidelined
until the All-Star break, R.A. Dickey won
his first game for the Toronto Blue Jays.
The NL Cy Young Award winner
allowed one run and five hits in 6 2/3
innings, and Jose Bautista backed
him with a two-run homer in the Blue
Jays' 3-2 win over the Kansas City
Royals.
James Shields (1-2) was a hard-luck
loser for the Royals, pitching a two-hit-
ter with six strikeouts and three walks.

Tigers 7, Athletics 3
OAKLAND, Calif. Prince Fielder
homered for the second straight game,
Torii Hunter hit his first clout since join-
ing Detroit to help back Justin Verlan-
der and the Tigers snapped the
Oakland Athletics' nine-game winning
streak with a 7-3 victory.
Jhonny Peralta followed Fielder's
leadoff shot in the fourth with a three-
run homer, and the Tigers didn't let the
A's back into this one a day after los-
ing 4-3 in 12 innings.
A's nemesis Verlander (2-1) out-
pitched Oakland lefty Brett Anderson
before a sellout crowd of 35,067.

Indians 9, White Sox 4
CLEVELAND Mark Reynolds hit a
grand slam in a big fifth inning and Zach
McAllister pitched into the seventh,
leading the Cleveland Indians to a 9-4
victory over the Chicago White Sox.
Reynolds had an RBI single to give
Cleveland a 3-2 lead in the third in-
ning. He connected off White Sox ace
Chris Sale in a six-run fifth and tied a
career high with five RBIs.
McAllister (1-1) allowed three runs
in 6 1-3 innings and retired 16 of 17 at
one point. He allowed five hits and
struck out six. Chicago scored two un-
earned runs in the first.


52-38 7 7 3 2
21-32 0 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 0 2


T-3:15. A-35,067 (35,067).


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
N.Y Yankees 5, Baltimore 2
Cleveland 1, Chicago White Sox 0
Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain
N.Y Mets 16, Minnesota 5
Toronto 8, Kansas City 4
Oakland 4, Detroit 3, 12 innings
Houston 5, L.A. Angels 0
Seattle 3, Texas 1
Saturday's Games
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1, 10 innings
Baltimore 5, N.Y.Yankees 3
Cleveland 9, Chicago White Sox 4
Detroit 7, Oakland 3
N.Y Mets 4, Minnesota 2
Toronto 3, Kansas City 2
Houston at L.A. Angels, late
Texas at Seattle, late
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 1-1) at Cleveland (Myers
0-1), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-0) at Boston (Buchholz 2-0), 1:35
p.m.
N.Y Mets (Gee 0-2) at Minnesota (Correia 0-1), 2:10
p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 0-1) at Kansas City (E.Santana 1-
1), 2:10 p.m.
Houston (Humber 0-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 0-0),
3:35 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 1-0) at Oakland (Parker 0-1),
4:05 p.m.
Texas (Tepesch 1-0) at Seattle (Maurer 0-2), 4:10
p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 0-1) at N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 1-
1), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston, 11:05 a.m.
Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, San Francisco 3
Atlanta 6, Washington 4, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 5
Philadelphia 3, Miami 1, 10 innings
N.Y Mets 16, Minnesota 5
St. Louis 2, Milwaukee 0
Arizona 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Colorado 7, San Diego 5
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 3, Washington 1
San Francisco 3, Chicago Cubs 2
N.Y Mets 4, Minnesota 2
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 0
Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 1
Miami 2, Philadelphia 1
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, late
Colorado at San Diego, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Halladay 0-2) at Miami (Slowey 0-2),
1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 2-0) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 1-
0), 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Irwin 0-0), 1:35
p.m.
N.Y Mets (Gee 0-2) at Minnesota (Correia 0-1), 2:10
p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 1-0) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0),
2:15 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 1-0) at Chicago Cubs
(E.Jackson 0-2), 2:20 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 0-1) at San Diego (Richard
0-1), 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-1) at Arizona (Cahill 0-2),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 3, Nationals 1
WASHINGTON -Tim Hudson
pitched seven innings of four-hit ball,
Evan Gattis homered, and the Atlanta
Braves beat Stephen Strasburg and
the Washington Nationals 3-1 for their
eighth straight victory.
Hudson (2-0) allowed one run,
walked none and struck out three in
improving his lifetime record against
Washington to 15-5. Not only did the
right-hander outpitch Strasburg, but he
also got two singles off Washington's
hard-throwing ace.
Strasburg (1-2) gave up two un-
earned runs and five hits in six in-
nings. He struck out seven, walked
one and hit a batter.

Marlins 2, Phillies 1
MIAMI Chris Coghlan hit a
game-ending single against a draw-in
infield with one out in the ninth inning,
giving the Miami Marlins a 2-1 victory
over the Philadelphia Phillies for just


their second win.
Marlins 20-year old phenom Jose
Fernandez pitched six scoreless in-
nings to outduel Cole Hamels.

Giants 3, Cubs 2
CHICAGO Madison Bumgarner
allowed two runs while pitching into
the seventh inning, Marco Scutaro
had three hits and the San Francisco
Giants held off the Chicago Cubs 3-2.
Pinch-hitter Dioner Navarro hit a
two-out, two-run homer off Bumgarner
in the seventh to pull the Cubs to 3-2.
It was Navarro's second career pinch
home run in two days, each hit from a
different side of the plate. His tying
homer in the ninth Friday was hit from
the left side.
The Cubs threatened in the eighth,
putting two on with no outs, before Al-
fonso Soriano grounded out and Wel-
ington Castillo hit into a double play
against Santiago Casilla, who earned
his first save. Giants closer Sergio
Romo was unavailable after throwing
four of the last five games.
Bumgarner (3-0) struck out six and
walked two, one intentional, in 6 2/3
innings.

Cardinals 8, Brewers 0
ST. LOUIS -Adam Wainwright
threw a four-hitter and drove in two runs
with three hits, two in a seven-run sixth
inning, and the St. Louis Cardinals shut
out the Milwaukee Brewers for the sec-
ond straight game with a 8-0 victory.
Milwaukee ace Yovani Gallardo
(0-1) endured yet another setback
against his nemesis, falling to 1-10
with a 6.83 ERA against St. Louis after
getting charged with five earned runs
in 5 1-3 innings. Gallardo, a 16-game
winner coming off his fourth consecu-
tive 200-strikeout season, was 0-2
with a 12.34 ERA in three starts
against St. Louis last season.
Cardinals pitchers have thrown
three straight shutouts overall and
worked 32 consecutive scoreless in-
nings, in a 4-1 homestand heading
into the finale Sunday.

Pirates 3, Reds 1
PITTSBURGH Jeff Locke won
for only the second time in three major
league seasons, and the Pittsburgh
Pirates beat the Reds 3-1 as Cincin-
nati starter Johnny Cueto left in the
fifth inning with a strained right triceps.
After striking out Pedro Alvarez
starting the fifth, Cueto threw a first-
pitch strike to Travis Snider then began
shaking his right arm. A Reds trainer
visited Cueto on the mound, briefly
massaged the pitcher's upper arm,
and both then walked to the dugout.
Cueto helped Cincinnati win the NL
Central last season, then left the divi-
sion series opener against San Fran-
cisco with an oblique strain that
knocked him out for the rest of the se-
ries, won by the Giants in five games.

INTERLEAGUE

Mets 4, Twins 2
MINNEAPOLIS Matt Harvey did-
n't allow a hit until Justin Morneau
homered off the right-field foul pole
with two outs in the seventh inning
and led the New York Mets over the
Minnesota Twins 4-2.
Harvey (3-0) pitched past the sev-
enth for the first time in 13 career
major league starts, allowing one run
and two hits in eight innings with six
strikeouts and two walks. His ERA
rose from 0.64 to 0.82.
Despite a 35-degree gametime
temperature, the 24-year-old right-
hander pitched with his sleeves rolled
up and reached 97 mph.


AMERICAN LEAGUE


Philadelphia Miami
ab r h bi
Revere cf 3 0 0 0 Pierre If
Rollins ss 2 0 0 0 Solano 2b
Utley 2b 4 0 0 0 Polanc 3b
Howard 1lb 4 0 1 0 Dobbslb
Mayrry pr-rf 0 0 0 0 Kearns rf
Brown If 4 1 1 0 Coghln cf
L.Nixrf 3 0 1 0 Brantlyc
Frndsn ph-1b1 0 0 0 Webb p
Galvis 3b 3 0 1 0 Cishek p
Kratz c 4 0 0 0 Hchvrr ss
Hamels p 2 00 0 Frnndz p
MYong ph 1 01 0 ARamsp
Lee pr 0 0 0 0 MDunn p
Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 Olivo c
MAdmsp 0 000
Carrerph 1 00 0
Aumontp 0 000
Totals 32 15 0 Totals


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 0 1 0
2 1 0 0

4 00 0
4 0 1 1
3 00 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
2 1 1 0
1 0 1 1
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0


282 5 2


Philadelphia 000 000 100 1
Miami 000 010 001 2
One out when winning run scored.
E-Solano (2), Hechavarria (1). DP-Philadel-
phia 1. LOB-Philadelphia 8, Miami 6.2B-
Howard (3). 3B-Hechavarria (1). SB-Solano
(1). S-Fernandez.
IP H RERBBSO
Philadelphia
Hamels 6 3 1 1 3 5
Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 1
Mi.Adams 1 0 0 0 0 2
AumontL,1-1 1-3 2 1 1 1 1
Miami
Fernandez 6 2 0 0 2 5
A.Ramos BS,1-1 2-3 2 1 1 1 1
M.Dunn 1 1 0 0 1 1
Webb 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
CishekW,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
T-2:51. A-20,037 (37,442).

Rays upcoming
schedule
April 15 at Boston
April 16 at Baltimore
April 17 at Baltimore
April 18 at Baltimore
April 19 vs Oakland
April 20 vs Oakland
April 21 vs Oakland
April 22 vs N.Y Yankees
April 23 vs N.Y Yankees
April 24 vs N.Y Yankees
April 25 at Chicago Sox
April 26 at Chicago Sox
April 27 at Chicago Sox
April 28 at Chicago Sox
April 30 at Kansas City
May 1 at Kansas City
May 2 at Kansas City
May 3 at Colorado
May 4 at Colorado


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NL

Braves 3, Nationals 1
Atlanta Washington
ab rh bi ab rh bi
BUpton cf 5 0 1 0 Span cf 4 0 1 0
Heywrd rf 4 00 1 Werth rf 4 0 1 0
J.Upton If 4 1 0 0 Harper If 3 0 0 0
Gattisc 3 1 1 2 Zmrmn3b 3 0 1 0
Uggla2b 4 0 1 0 LaRochIb 3 0 0 0
JFrncs 3b 4 00 0 Dsmnd ss 3 00 0
OFIhrt p 0 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 3 1 1 1
Kimrel p 0 00 0 WRamsc 3 00 0
CJhnsnlb 4 1 1 0 KSuzukc 0 0 0 0
R.Penass 3 0 2 0 Strasrgp 1 0 0 0
THudsn p 3 02 0 Berndn ph 1 0 0 0
Smmns ss 1 0 0 0 Duke p 0 00 0
HRdrgz p 0 00 0
Matthsp 0 0 0 0
Tracyph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 38 3 Totals 29 1 4 1
Atlanta 002 000 001 3
Washington 000 010 000 1
E-T.Hudson (1), Zimmerman (2). DP-Atlanta
2. LOB-Atlanta 9, Washington 1. HR-Gattis
(4), Espinosa (1). SB-J.Upton 2 (2).
IP H RERBBSO
Atlanta
T.HudsonW,2-0 7 4 1 1 0 3
O'Flaherty H,4 1 0 0 0 0 0
KimbrelS,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 1
Washington
StrasburgL,1-2 6 5 2 0 1 7
Duke 1 0 0 0 0 0
H.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 2 1
Mattheus 1 3 1 1 0 0
HBP-by Strasburg (Heyward).WP-Strasburg.
T-2:42. A-41,992 (41,418).
Giants 3, Cubs 2
San Francisco Chicago
ab rh bi ab rh bi
GBlanc cf-lf 5 0 2 1 Sappelt cf 4 0 1 0
Scutaro 2b 4 1 3 1 SCastro ss 4 0 1 0
Sandovl3b 4 0 1 1 Rizzolb 2 0 0 0
Posey c 2 00 0 ASorin If 4 0 3 0
Pence rf 4 0 1 0 Hairstn rf 2 0 0 0
Beltib 4 0 0 0 Schrhltph-rf 0 0 0 0
Torresl If 4 1 1 0 Castilloc 4 0 0 0
SCasill p 0 0 0 0 Lillirdg 3b 3 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 4 0 1 0 Valuen ph 1 0 0 0
Bmgrnp 1 1 0 0 AIGnzlz2b 2 1 1 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 DeJess ph 1 0 0 0
Pagan cf 1 00 0 Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0
Bowdenp 0 00 0
DNavrrph 1 1 1 2
Marmlp 0 0 0 0
Russellp 0 0 0 0
Clevngrph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 39 3 Totals 31 2 7 2
San Francisco 000 011 100 3
Chicago 000 000 200 2
E-Pence (1). DP-San Francisco 3, Chicago 1.
LOB-San Francisco 7, Chicago 7. 2B-Torres
(3). HR-D.Navarro (2). SB-A.Soriano (1), Hair-
ston (1). S-Bumgarner.
IP H RERBBSO
San Francisco
BumgarnerW,3-0 62-36 2 2 2 6
Affeldt H,4 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
S.CasillaS,1-1 2 0 0 0 1 2
Chicago
SamardzijaL,1-2 6 7 2 2 1 5
Bowden 1 2 1 1 0 0
Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 1
Russell 1 0 0 0 0 1
Affeldt pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP-by Bumgarner (Hairston), by Samardzija
(Posey). WP-Samardzija.
T-3:03. A-34,778 (41,019).
Cardinals 8,
Brewers 0
Milwaukee St. Louis
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Aoki rf 4 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 1 2 1
Fiers p 0 00 0 MCrpnt 2b 3 1 0 0
Segura ss 4 01 0 Hollidy f 3 1 1 2
Braun If 3 0 0 0 SRonsnl If 1 0 0 0
Axford p 0 0 0 0 Beltran rf 4 0 1 0
Princerf 1 00 0 Craigib 3 1 1 1
Weeks2b 4 0 1 0 Wggntnph-1bl 0 0 0
LSchfr cf 3 0 0 0 YMolin c 4 1 1 1
Maldnd c 3 00 0 Freese 3b 4 1 1 0
YBtncr3b 3 0 1 0 Descals ss 4 1 0 0
Lalli b 3 00 0 Wnwrgp 3 1 3 2
Gallardp 2 00 0
Badnhp p 0 000
McGnzl p 0 00 0
KDavis If 1 0 1 0
Totals 31 04 0 Totals 34810 7
Milwaukee 000 000 000 0
St. Louis 001 007 00x 8
E-Lalli (1). DP-Milwaukee 1. LOB-Milwau-
kee 4, St. Louis 3.2B-Weeks (2), Y.Betancourt
(1), Freese (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Milwaukee
Gallardo L,0-1 51-37 6 5 0 3
Badenhop 1-3 2 2 0 0 1
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 1
Fiers 1 0 0 0 0 0
St. Louis
WainwrightW,2-1 9 4 0 0 0 12
HBP-by Gallardo (M.Carpenter). WP-Gal-
lardo, Wainwright.
T-2:38. A-44,696 (43,975).
Marlins 2, Phillies 1


...... .......
_4 1 .......
es tilingla illi illin llir... 11- m ...........l.. M ir

.....- .... .....

wo-IL


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Pirates 3, Reds 1
Cincinnati Pittsburgh
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Choo cf 4 0 1 0 SMarte If 4 0 1 1
Cozartss 5 1 3 1 Walker2b 4 0 1 0
Vottolb 2 00 0 McCtchcf 3 1 0 0
Frazier3b 3 0 0 0 GJoneslb 4 0 2 1
Brucerf 4 01 0 Grillip 0 0 0 0
Heiseyl If 3 00 0 RMartnc 4 00 0
Paul ph-lf 1 0 0 0 PAIvrz 3b 2 1 0 0
Hoover p 0 00 0 Snider rf 3 1 1 0
Hanignc 3 00 0 Barmesss 3 01 0
Clzturs2b 3 01 0 Lockep 1 00 0
Cuetop 2 00 0 JHrrsnph 1 0 0 0
Simonp 1 01 0 JuWlsnp 0 0 0 0
DRonsn If 1 00 0 JHughsp 0 0 0 0
Tabata ph 1 0 1 1
Melncnp 0 0 0 0
GSnchzlb 0 00 0
Totals 32 17 1 Totals 303 7 3
Cincinnati 001 000 000 1
Pittsburgh 000 110 l10x 3
DP-Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB-Cincin-
nati 12, Pittsburgh 5.2B-Cozart (1), Bruce (5),
G.Jones (2), Tabata (1). HR-Cozart (3). CS-
Hanigan (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Cincinnati
Cueto 41-32 1 1 1 3
Simon L,0-1 2 3 2 2 1 2
Hoover 12-32 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
LockeW,1-1 5 4 1 1 4 0
Ju.Wilson H,1 12-33 0 0 2 2
J.HughesH,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
MelanconH,4 1 0 0 0 0 0
Grilli S,5-5 1 0 0 0 1 1
HBP-by Locke (Choo). Balk-Locke.
T-3:09. A-25,118 (38,362).

Blue Jays 3,

Royals 2
Toronto Kansas City
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bonifac rf 4 00 0 Gordon If 5 0 2 1
MeCarr If 4 0 0 0 AEscor ss 5 0 0 0
Bautist3b 3 1 1 2 Butler 1b 1 0 0
Encrncdh 4 00 0 S.Perezc 4 0 2 0
Lindlb 3 0 0 0 L.Cain dh 4 0 0 0
Rasms cf 3 00 0 Mostks 3b 4 00 0
MIzturs 2b 2 1 1 0 Francr rf 3 0 0 0
HBlanc c 3 0 0 0 Dyson cf 4 1 1 0
Kawskss 1 1 0 1 Getz2b 4 1 3 1
Totals 27 32 3 Totals 34 2 8 2
Toronto 001 002 000 3
Kansas City 000 000 101 2
DP-Toronto 1, Kansas City 1. LOB-Toronto
1, Kansas City 9.2B-M.lzturis (1), S.Perez (4),
Dyson (2), Getz (3). HR-Bautista (3). SB-
Dyson (2). SF-Kawasaki.
IP H RERBBSO
Toronto
DickeyW,1-2 61-35 1 1 2 4
Oliver H,3 2-3 1 0 0 0 1
S.SantosH,1 2-3 0 0 0 1 1
Cecil H,2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1
JanssenS,3-3 1 2 1 1 0 1
Kansas City
Shields L,1-2 9 2 3 3 3 6
HBP-by Dickey (Francoeur). WP-Shields.
PB-H.Blanco.
T-2:28. A-21,960 (37,903).

Mets 4, Twins 2


New York

Cowgill cf
Vldspn ph
Niwnhs cf
DnMrp 2b
DWrght 3b
Buck c
Duda If
Baxter If
Byrd rf
I.Davis lb
Turner dh
RTejad ss
Totals
New York
Minnesota


ab r h bi
4 11 1
1 0 0 0
0 00 0
4 0 2 1
4 0 1 1
4 00 0
2 00 0
1 0 0 0
4 11 1
4 0 1 0
4 1 3 0
4 1 1 0
36 4104
000
000


Minnesota

Hicks cf
Mauer dh
Wlngh If
Mornea lb
Doumit c
Plouffe 3b
Parmel rf
Dozier 2b
EEscor ss


ab r h bi
4 00 0
4 1 1 0
3 0 1 1
4 1 1 1
3 00 0
3 00 0
3 00 0
3 0 1 0
3 0 0 0


Totals 30 2 4 2
040 000 4
000 101 2


DP-NewYork 1. LOB-New York 6, Minnesota
3.2B-Turner (2), R.Tejada (4), Mauer (4), Will-
ingham (3). HR-Byrd (1), Morneau (1).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Harvey W,3-0 8 2 1 1 2 6
ParnelIS,1-1 1 2 1 1 0 2
Minnesota
Diamond L,0-1 41-38 4 4 0 1
Roenicke 12-31 0 0 1 1
Fien 2 0 0 0 0 2
Burton 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Diamond, Burton.
T-2:40. A-28,804 (39,021).

MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-Fielder, Detroit, .436; AJones,
Baltimore, .426; CDavis, Baltimore, .405;
Reyes, Toronto, .395; Berkman, Texas, .394;
TorHunter, Detroit, .388; Infante, Detroit, .382;
Pierzynski, Texas, .382.
RUNS-Crisp, Oakland, 14; AJackson, De-
troit, 14; AJones, Baltimore, 12; MiCabrera, De-
troit, 11; Lowrie, Oakland, 11; Gordon, Kansas
City, 10; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 9; Kinsler,
Texas, 9.
RBI-CDavis, Baltimore, 19; Fielder, Detroit,
18; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 13; Butler, Kansas
City, 11; MiCabrera, Detroit, 11; AJones, Balti-
more, 11; FGutierrez, Seattle, 10; Moss, Oak-
land, 10.
HITS-AJones, Baltimore, 20; TorHunter, De-
troit, 19; AJackson, Detroit, 18; Fielder, Detroit,
17; Gordon, Kansas City, 17; Lowrie, Oakland,
17; Altuve, Houston, 16; Crisp, Oakland, 16;
Rios, Chicago, 16.
DOUBLES-Lowrie, Oakland, 6; SSmith,
Oakland, 6; Berkman, Texas, 5; Bonifacio,
Toronto, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 5; Jennings, Tampa
Bay, 5; AJones, Baltimore, 5.
TRIPLES-Andrus, Texas, 2; Ellsbury,
Boston, 2; Gordon, Kansas City, 2; Maxwell,
Houston, 2; 19 tied at 1.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 6; Morse,
Seattle, 6; MarReynolds, Cleveland, 5; Crisp,
Oakland, 4; Fielder, Detroit, 4; FGutierrez, Seat-
tle, 4; Kinsler, Texas, 4; Middlebrooks, Boston, 4;
Rios, Chicago, 4.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 5;
Reyes, Toronto, 5; Crisp, Oakland, 4; AEscobar,
Kansas City, 3; Gentry Texas, 3; Jennings,
Tampa Bay, 3; Reddick, Oakland, 3; Rios,
Chicago, 3; MSaunders, Seattle, 3; Victorino,
Boston, 3.
PITCHING-Masterson, Cleveland, 3-0; 17
tied at 2.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 28; Master-
son, Cleveland, 20; Shields, Kansas City, 20;
Scherzer, Detroit, 18; Sabathia, New York, 18;
Lester, Boston, 18; Anderson, Oakland, 18.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 5; Wilhelm-
sen, Seattle, 4; Reed, Chicago, 3; Janssen,
Toronto, 3; Nathan, Texas, 3; Hanrahan,
Boston, 3; Rivera, New York, 2; GHolland,
Kansas City, 2; Perkins, Minnesota, 2; KHer-
rera, Kansas City, 2.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-CCrawford, Los Angeles, .412;
Segura, Milwaukee, .406; DanMurphy, New
York, .381; Harper, Washington, .372; Cuddyer,
Colorado, .371; MYoung, Philadelphia, .368;
Hundley, San Diego, .367.
RUNS-Carpenter, St. Louis, 12; Choo,
Cincinnati, 10; Fowler, Colorado, 10; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 10; CGonzalez, Colorado, 10;
Jay, St. Louis, 10; DanMurphy, New York, 10;
Phillips, Cincinnati, 10; Prado, Arizona, 10; JUp-
ton, Atlanta, 10.
RBI-Buck, New York, 19; DanMurphy, New
York, 11; Phillips, Cincinnati, 11; Frazier, Cincin-
nati, 10; Harper, Washington, 10; Sandoval, San
Francisco, 10; JUpton, Atlanta, 10; Utley,
Philadelphia, 10.
HITS-Harper, Washington, 16; DanMurphy,
New York, 16; Aoki, Milwaukee, 15; Choo,


SCOREBOARD


FFor the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:


POWERBALL
10 12 31 56 57
POWER BALL
33


CASH 3 (early)
3-3-7
CASH 3 (late)
4-1-9

PLAY 4 (early)
8-5-7-3
PLAY 4 (late)
i 55-9-9-1

FANTASY 5
7-8-9-17-28

LOTTERY
6-15-40-45-51-52
XTRA
2


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


FRIDAY, APRIL 22
Mega Money: 13 19 20 43


Mega Ball: 19
4-of-4 MB 0 winner
4-of-4 1
3-of-4 MB 47
3-of-4 901
2-of-4 MB 1,321
1-of-4 MB 10,907
2-of-4 27,206


$500,000
$7,084.50
$330.00
$51.00
$24.00
$2.50
$2.00


Fantasy 5:7 17 20 31 35
5-of-5 0 winners $0
4-of-5 288 $555.00
3-of-5 9,770 $23.00


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
No local events scheduled


Cincinnati, 15; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 15; Pagan,
San Francisco, 15; GParra, Arizona, 15; JUp-
ton, Atlanta, 15.
DOUBLES-Bruce, Cincinnati, 5; Carpenter,
St. Louis, 5; DeJesus, Chicago, 5; Hundley, San
Diego, 5; DanMurphy, New York, 5; GParra, Ari-
zona, 5; Rollins, Philadelphia, 5.
TRIPLES-Utley, Philadelphia, 2; 20 tied
at 1.
HOME RUNS-Buck, New York, 6; Fowler,
Colorado, 6; JUpton, Atlanta, 6; Harper, Wash-
ington, 5; Gattis, Atlanta, 4; Phillips, Cincinnati,
4; 10 tied at 3.
STOLEN BASES-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 4;
Revere, Philadelphia, 4; Aoki, Milwaukee, 3;
Rollins, Philadelphia, 3; Ruggiano, Miami, 3;
BUpton, Atlanta, 3; Utley, Philadelphia, 3;
DWright, New York, 3.
PITCHING-Bumgarner, San Francisco, 3-0;
Harvey NewYork, 3-0; 14 tied at 2.
STRIKEOUTS-ABurnett, Pittsburgh, 27;
Samardzija, Chicago, 27; Harvey New York, 25;
Kershaw, Los Angeles, 25; Wainwright, St.
Louis, 24; Cueto, Cincinnati, 18; Bumgarner,
San Francisco, 17.
SAVES-Romo, San Francisco, 6; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 6; RSoriano, Washington, 5; Grilli, Pitts-
burgh, 5; RBetancourt, Colorado, 4; League,
Los Angeles, 3; 5 tied at 2.




NBA standings


y-New Yo
x-Brookly
x-Boston
Philadelp
Toronto


z-Miami
x-Atlanta
Washing
Orlando
Charlotte


y-Indiana
x-Chicag
x-Milwau
Detroit
Clevelan



y-San An
x-Memph
x-Housto
Dallas
New Orle


y-Oklaho
x-Denve
Utah
Portland
Minneso


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
ork 52 27 .658
yn 47 32 .595
41 39 .513
)hia 32 47 .405
31 48 .392
Southeast Division
W L Pct
63 16 .797
a 44 36 .550
Iton 29 51 .363
20 60 .250
e 19 61 .238
Central Division
W L Pct
a 49 30 .620
go 43 36 .544
ikee 37 43 .463
28 52 .350
d 24 55 .304
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
ntonio 58 21 .734
his 54 26 .675
in 44 35 .557
39 40 .494
means 27 53 .338
Northwest Division
W L Pct
omaCity 59 21 .738
r 54 25 .684
42 38 .525
33 46 .418
ta 30 50 .375


Pacific Division
W L Pct
y-L.A. Clippers 54 26 .675
x-Golden State 45 35 .563
L.A. Lakers 43 37 .538
Sacramento 28 51 .354
Phoenix 24 56 .300
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Toronto 97, Chicago 88
Brooklyn 117, Indiana 109
Philadelphia 97, Washington 86
New York 101, Cleveland 91
Atlanta 109, Milwaukee 104
Detroit 113, Charlotte 93
Miami 109, Boston 101
Memphis 82, Houston 78
L.A. Clippers 96, New Orleans 93
Dallas 108, Denver 105, OT
San Antonio 108, Sacramento 101
Utah 107, Minnesota 100
Oklahoma City 106, Portland 90
L.A. Lakers 118, Golden State 116
Saturday's Games
Charlotte 95, Milwaukee 85
Boston 120, Orlando 88
L.A. Clippers 91, Memphis 87
Minnesota 105, Phoenix 93
Today's Games
Chicago at Miami, 1 p.m.
Indiana at New York, 3:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 3:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Toronto, 3:30 p.m.
Portland at Denver, 5 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 6 p.m.
Sacramento at Houston, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Miami at Cleveland, 7p.m.
New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Washington at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8p.m.
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

NBA Leaders
Through April 12
Scoring
G FG FT PTS
Anthony NYK 66 660 420 1895
Durant, OKC 80 721 673 2251
Bryant, LAL 78 738 525 2133
James, MIA 75 758 394 2012
Harden, HOU 75 561 655 1948
Westbrook, OKC 80 663 457 1878
Curry, GOL 76 608 259 1736
Wade, MIA 67 553 297 1420
Aldridge, POR 73 626 276 1530
Lopez, Bro 72 556 289 1401
Ellis, MIL 79 575 284 1521
Lillard, POR 79 532 258 1499
Williams, Bro 76 482 310 1438
Pierce, BOS 75 467 330 1407
Lee, GOL 77 588 251 1427
Griffin, LAC 77 563 274 1405


G


1
25Y
3


Smith, NYK 79 520 237
Gay, TOR 72 496 233
Jr. Holiday, PHL 75 540 181
Jefferson, UTA 76 595 155
FG Percentage
FG
Jordan, LAC 297
Howard, LAL 455
McGee, DEN 293
Ibaka, OKC 434
Hickson, POR 407
Splitter, SAN 306
James, MIA 758
Johnson, TOR 325
Faried, DEN 380
Horford, ATL 576
Rebounds
G OFF DEF
Howard, LAL 74 242 668
Vucevic, ORL 74 261 617
Asik, HOU 79 268 657
Lee, GOL 77 216 649
Randolph, MEM 73 298 518
Evans, Bro 78 254 607
Hickson, POR 77 257 552
Horford, ATL 74 195 562
Cousins, SAC 72 214 496
Boozer, CHI 76 165 565
Assists
G
Rondo, BOS 38
Paul, LAC 67
Vasquez, NOR 77
Jr. Holiday, PHL 75
Williams, Bro 76
Parker, SAN 64
Westbrook, OKC 80
Rubio, MIN 54
Nelson, ORL 56
James, MIA 75


NHL standings


y-Pittsbu
N.Y. Islar
N.Y. Ran
New Jers
Philadelp


x-Montre
Boston
Toronto
Ottawa
Buffalo


Washing
Winnipeg
Tampa B
Carolina
Florida



y-Chicag
St. Louis
Detroit
Columbu
Nashville


Vancouv
Minnesot
Edmonto
Calgary
Colorado


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
rgh 42 3210 0 64141 102
nders 42 21 16 5 47119 122
gers 41 21 16 4 46100 96
sey 41 1516 10 40 96 113
phia 41 1721 3 37108 126
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
al 41 2610 5 57128 100
41 2611 4 56116 91
41 2313 5 51128 113
41 21 14 6 48101 89
42 1719 6 40108 127
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
ton 42 2317 2 48129 118
g 42 21 19 2 44109 123
3ay 41 1721 3 37132 128
41 1722 2 36107 131
41 1322 6 32 99 142
WESTERN CONFERENCE


)0






er
ta
on

0


x-Anaheim
Los Angeles
San Jose
Dallas
Phoenix


Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
40 31 5 4 66132
40 2315 2 48110
41 1915 7 45103
42 1916 7 45102
42 1519 8 38 98
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
41 2312 6 52112
41 2216 3 47105
40 1617 7 39102
40 1521 4 34106
42 1422 6 34100
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
41 27 9 5 59124
s 41 2314 4 50118
41 21 13 7 49102
41 21 17 3 45116
41 1816 7 43110


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Sportsman Series (Taped)
3 p.m. (NBC) Stadium Super Trucks (Taped)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia Phillies at Miami Marlins
1:30 p.m. (SUN, TBS) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox
2:10 p.m. (WGN-A) San Francisco Giants at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. (ESPN) Baltimore Orioles at New York Yankees
BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat
COLLEGE BOWLING
2 p.m. (ESPN) NCAA Women's Championship (Taped)
GOLF
2 p.m. (CBS) 2013 Masters Tournament final round
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Blackhawks at St. Louis Blues
5 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Buffalo Sabres
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Detroit Red Wings at Nashville Predators
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) AMA Supercross World Championship (Taped)
SOCCER
10:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: San Jose Earthquakes at
Portland Timbers

RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Tampa Bay Rays pre-game
1:35 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Boston
Red Sox

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 B3


Busch takes



weekend



sweep in Texas



Driver does Sprint Cup,


Nationwide double

Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas Kyle Busch took
advantage of a late caution to regain the lead
and held on for the final 16 laps after the last
restart Saturday night to win the Sprint Cup
race at Texas, completing a NASCAR week-
end sweep.
Busch followed Martin Truex Jr. for about
50 laps before a yellow flag for debris with 21
laps left. Busch took the lead off pit road dur-
ing the caution and charged forward in his
Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota with a strong restart.
It was the second time this season, and
eighth time in his career, that Busch won Cup
and Nationwide races in the same weekend.
He was the polesitter Saturday night, and won
the Nationwide race Friday night on the 11/2-
mile, high-banked track.
Busch, who also won both races at Fontana
last month, led 171 of 334 laps for his 26th ca-
reer Cup victory
Sprint Cup

NRA 500 Results
Saturday
At Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth, Texas
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 334 laps, 144.1 rating, 48 points.
2. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 334, 132.8, 43.
3. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 334, 95.6, 41.
4. (35) Greg Biffle, Ford, 334, 91.6, 40.
5. (18) Joey Logano, Ford, 334, 84.9, 40.
6. (7) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334, 109, 38.
7. (3) Aric Almirola, Ford, 334, 101.4, 37.
8. (15) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 334, 93.9, 0.
9. (16) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 334, 79.4, 35.
10. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 80.9, 35.
11. (14) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 334, 92.7, 33.
12. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 334, 105.6, 32.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 85.4, 31.
14. (23) Mark Martin, Toyota, 334, 75, 30.
15. (26) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 334, 84.9, 29.
16. (11) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 334, 88.9, 28.
17. (19) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 334, 72.2, 27.
18. (22) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 334, 68, 0.
19. (4) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 333, 83, 25.
20. (10) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 333, 70.6, 24.
21. (13) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 333, 62.9, 23.
22. (32) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 332, 55.3, 22.
23. (21) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 332, 65.4, 21.
24. (38) David Reutimann, Toyota, 332, 57.2, 20.
25. (28) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, 332, 57.1, 19.
26. (25) David Ragan, Ford, 331, 51.8, 19.
27. (33) David Stremme, Toyota, 331, 50.4, 17.
28. (42) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 331, 42.9, 16.
29. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 330, 91, 15.
30. (40) Josh Wise, Ford, 330, 43, 0.
31. (24) Casey Mears, Ford, 330, 41.7, 13.
32. (27) David Gilliland, Ford, 329, 49.1, 13.
33. (12) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 326, 45.3, 0.
34. (39) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 326, 37.2, 10.
35. (41) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 324, 28.9, 0.
36. (43) Timmy Hill, Ford, 322, 28.8, 8.
37. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 316, 88.7, 7.
38. (8) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, front suspension, 306, 98, 7.
39. (36)J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, rear axle, 293, 34.8, 5.
40. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 290, 45.7, 4.
41. (34) Mike Bliss, Toyota, brakes, 140, 29.6, 0.
42. (30) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, engine, 138, 28.7, 2.
43. (37) Michael McDowell, Ford, overheating, 44, 26.9, 1.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 144.751 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 27 minutes, 40 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.508 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 36 laps.
Lead Changes: 18 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-39; D.Ragan 40; Ky.Busch 41-42; M.Truex Jr. 43-
75; Ky.Busch 76-82; D.Gilliland 83; Ky.Busch 84-131; R.Newman 132-134;
Ky.Busch 135-187; J.Gordon 188-200; M.Truex Jr. 201-223; Ky.Busch 224;
M.Truex Jr. 225-279; J.Gordon 280-281; J.Logano 282; M.Truex Jr. 283-288;
Ky.Busch 289; M.Truex Jr. 290-314; Ky.Busch 315-334.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): Ky.Busch, 8 times for
171 laps; M.Truex Jr., 5 times for 142 laps; J.Gordon, 2 times for 15 laps;
R.Newman, 1 time for 3 laps; J.Logano, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Ragan, 1 time for
1 lap; D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 269; 2. Bra.Keselowski, 260; 3. Ky.Busch,
251; 4. G.Biffle, 239; 5. C.Edwards, 234; 6. D.Earnhardt Jr., 234; 7. K.Kahne,
232; 8. C.Bowyer, 208; 9. J.Logano, 207; 10. PMenard, 206; 11. M.Kenseth,
204; 12. K.Harvick, 192.
NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained in a race.
The formula combines the following categories: Wins, Finishes, Top-15
Finishes, Average Running Position While on Lead Lap, Average Speed
Under Green, Fastest Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.



TRIPLE
Continued from Page B1


leading the Ospreys, described Dewees as a
rare, young talent with tremendous upside.
"He's got a chance to do some great things,"
Laval said, praising Dewees's hitting ability
"You can't ask for anything more from a
freshman."
On Dewees's record-setting night, Laval
said he was so focused on the game that he
didn't realize Dewees set a school record with
his third triple, a bases-loaded hit late in
North Florida's romp.
"I'm just glad he contributed to the win,"
Laval said. "That's more important."
Upon being selected as the Atlantic Sun's
Player of the Week, Dewees said he was hon-
ored, and a little surprised at being recog-
nized so early in his college career.
"It feels really good, but at the same time,
it's kind of a weird feeling," Dewees said of
the award. "It hasn't really hit me yet"
With a career in baseball spanning more


than 30 years, including time as head coach
at LSU and scout for the Toronto Blue Jays
from, Laval said he's thrilled with Dewees's
early success, but also knows baseball is a
game where players need time to develop.
With a squad that includes 10 freshmen, Laval
said coaching players to pace themselves will
help them grow into leaders.
"You got to remember, next year they're
going to be sophomores and be expected to
lead," Laval said. "Their responsibilities will
grow. It's going to get tough on them."
But for now, Laval said he's using the same
old cliche: one game at a time. He's confident
his players will continue to excel, and he's
confident Dewees will play a major role.
"I'm just glad he's here," Laval said of De-
wees. "I'm glad he's a North Florida Osprey"


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
Chicago 3, Detroit 2, SO
Ottawa 2, New Jersey 0
Columbus 4, St. Louis 1
Dallas 5, Nashville 2
Calgary 3, Phoenix 2, OT
Saturday's Games
Columbus 3, Minnesota 2, SO
Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0
Colorado 4, Vancouver 3
Toronto 5, Montreal 1
N.Y. Rangers 1, N.Y. Islanders 0, OT
Washington 6, Tampa Bay 5, OT
Carolina 4, Boston 2
Pittsburgh 3, Florida 1
Dallas 2, San Jose 1
Calgary at Edmonton, late
B Anaheim at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
9 Chicago at St. Louis, 12:30 p.m.
1 Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 5 p.m.
Y2 Detroit at Nashville, 7:30 p.m.
0 Monday's Games
Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

NHL scoring leaders
Through April 12
GP G A PTS
Sidney Crosby, Pit 36 15 41 56
Steven Stamkos, TB 40 26 25 51
Martin St. Louis, TB 40 9 41 50
Chris Kunitz, Pit 41 21 26 47
Patrick Kane, Chi 40 20 26 46
Alex Ovechkin, Was 41 26 18 44
Eric Staal, Car 40 16 27 43
Ryan Getzlaf, Anh 38 13 30 43
N/ Backstrom, Was 41 6 37 43
JohnTavares, NYI 41 24 18 42
J.Toews, Chi 40 20 21 41
Taylor Hall, Edm 37 13 28 41
Nazem Kadri, Tor 40 17 23 40
Phil Kessel, Tor 40 14 26 40



BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Named Tim Wake-
field special assignment instructor/baseball
operations.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Placed INF
Erick Aybar and RHP Kevin Jepsen on the
15-day DL, Aybar retroactive to April 10. Re-
called OF J.B Shuck from Salt Lake (PCL).
Selected the contract of LHP Michael Roth
from Salt Lake. Designated OF Scott Cousins
for assignment.
MINNESOTATWINS-Optioned RHP Liam
Hendriks to Rochester (IL). Reinstated LHP
Scott Diamond from the 15-day DL.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Placed OFYoenis
Cespedes on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF
Michael Taylor from Sacramento (PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Placed SS Jose
G Reyes on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract
.7 of SS Munenori Kawasaki from Buffalo (IL).
.1 National League
.3 ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Activated
8 OF Cody Ross from the 15-day DL. Placed OF
0 Jason Kubel on the 15-day DL.
.5 CHICAGO CUBS Placed RHP Kyuji Fu-
.8 jikawa on the 15-day DL. Recalled RJP Rafael
.2 Dolis from Iowa (PCL).
.0 MIAMI MARLINS Sent 1B Joe Mahoney
.5 to Jupiter (FSL) on a rehab assignment.
.3 MILWAUKEE BREWERS Sent SS
.0 Jeff Bianchi to Huntsville (SL) on a rehab
.9 assignment.
.8 SAN DIEGO PADRES Sent 3B Chase
.5 Headley to Lake Elsinore (Cal) on a rehab as-
.2 signment.










Parks & Rec offers adult, youth programs


Special to the Chronicle

Another powerful night
of games for the Men's
Flag Football league
teams took place Thurs-
day All teams brought
their "'A" game and played
their hardest.
Teams face off again this
Thursday starting at 6:30
p.m. at Homosassa Area
Recreation Park for an-
other round of games.
Men's softball
Another season of Men's
softball is just around the cor-
ner. We encourage all to
come out and witness the tal-
ented Citrus County adult
leagues! Games are at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River


Hurricanes, 'Noles

conclude spring

period with game

Associated Press


and are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., and 8:30 p.m. on Mon-
days. This season is set to
start on April 15.
Co-ed kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed
kickball league is for adults
18 and up.
Games are at 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River, lasting an hour or nine
innings, whichever comes first.
The new season will be
starting on May 8 while regis-
tration for teams end April 26.
For more information, call
Maci at 352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
Our second beach volley-


was so sev
anguishe(
onto the f
around t
sprawled
forted him
ical tecl
treating tl
On Satu
that he v


MIAMI GARDENS There shine.
were two gimmick touchdowns in "He des
Miami's spring game, one of them "A horrific
coming when 1992 Heisman Tro- the fortiti
phy winner Gino Torretta con- the work
nected with Houston Texans' star that and
Andre Johnson for a score. there and
That one was a nod to the Hur- have to v
ricanes' past. ready foi
The other was a sign of hope for passed. H
the future. ball and (
Malcolm Lewis-who still is re- moving f
covering from a severe ankle in- speed byi
jury that ended his freshman Miami c
season last September caught a Florida A
75-yard touchdown pass, on a play The fir
where no one played any defense score wa
and did so with the blessing of ally the H
Hurricanes coach Al Golden. It Lewis ca
was the emotional highlight of the down the
day for Miami, a play that sent both score, a :
sides sprinting into the end zone to behind hi:
surround Lewis in celebration, terest in g
"We just wanted to show every- sive liner
body that he's working his butt off among the
every day," defensive lineman An- the end z(
thony Chickillo said. "And he'll be air as pla
ready for the season." rushed tc
Stephen Morris threw four mate, mai
touchdown passes in the game, ing helme
Miami's last official workout until "I appr
training camp this summer. Mor- me that op
ris' team prevailed 35-20. field and
When Lewis got hurt last year said. "I re
while trying to make a play Golden fc
against Georgia Tech, the injury the way"


MILLER
Continued from Page B1

needed. She's fast, she can
shoot, pass, dribble all
the skills you look for. I
think once (Methodist's)
coaches see what she can
do, they will be very
pleased."
There were several fac-
tors that made the Mon-
archs an appealing choice
for Miller, including the
possibility of playing right
away. Methodist, a Division
III school was 7-13 overall
last season and
5-6 in the USA South Ath-
letic Conference. The team
loses just two seniors, but
both were forwards.
Asked if she thought she


ball season is set to begin
May 14. Games are played at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River.
The team fees, days and
times are dependent on how
many teams we have sign up.
Registration for teams ends
May 3; for more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Kayaking camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation in partnership with
2 Sisters Kayak Tours will be
holding Kayaking Camps this
summer. Each camp will be
held at Hernando Beach Park
Monday through Thursday
and at Chassahowitzka River
on Friday.
Children ages 8 to 15 are


vere and his reaction so
d that Golden sprinted
field, wrapped his arms
he receiver who was
on the ground and com-
n until emergency med-
hnicans could begin
he dislocated joint
arday, Golden told Lewis
would get a moment to

serves it," Golden said.
c injury back in the fall,
ude, the perseverance,
ethic to come back from
the courage to go out
d do that. Now we don't
worry about when he's
r FAU. That's already
te's already caught that
done it here and we're
forward. He'll be full-
June."
opens the season against
tlantic on Aug. 30.
st try to get Lewis his
s botched, but eventu-
lurricanes got it right.
ught the ball and ran
left sideline for the
few defenders jogging
m with absolutely no in-
getting in his way Offen-
man Jon Feliciano was
e first to reach Lewis in
one, lifting him into the
ayers on both sidelines
surround their team-
ny jumping and thrust-
ets skyward.
reciated him for giving
opportunity, to get on the
do that again," Lewis
really appreciate Coach
ir that. ... I got it out of


would contribute right
away, Miller replied,
"Yeah, I think so.
"My speed, definitely (is
a major asset), and my
ability to take players on
one-on-one. And my ag-
gressiveness."
After initial talks during
her recruitment, a visit to
the campus in Fayet-
teville, N.C., convinced
Miller this was the right
place for her.
"I plan on going into the
medical field and I liked
the PA (physician's assis-
tant) program they have.
And I really liked the other
players on the team."
The scholarship Miller is
receiving is both academic
and athletic. She will grad-
uate from Citrus with a 3.3
grade-point average.


eligible and the cost is $80
per child. We will offer four dif-
ferent weeks to choose from
throughout June and July.
Each week will have two time
slots that will accommodate
ages 8 to 11 and ages 12 to
15 separately.
During this camp, children
will learn kayak instruction,
water and boater safety and
paddling techniques.
On Friday, children can put
their skills to the test with a
fun-filled Kayak Adventure
down the Chassahowitzka
River. Kayaks, life preservers,
dry boxes, whistles and a
camp T-shirt will be provided.
Registration is limited to 12
children weekly for each age
group, so sign up now!


Frosh QB Winston stars
at FSU spring game
TALLAHASSEE There's still a
quarterback scramble at Florida State
and freshman Jameis Winston put him-
self right in the middle of it Saturday.
Winston threw a long touchdown
pass on his first play at Florida State's
spring game, and the redshirt fresh-
man finished 12-for-15 for 205 yards
and two scores.
Clint Trickett, also competing to be
the starting quarterback, completed
22-of-32 for 259 yards and touchdown
while playing on both teams as the
Gold team, comprised mainly of re-
serves, defeated the Garnet 40-24.
Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher,
however, wasn't ready to make any
immediate changes on his depth chart
among the four players aspiring to re-
place EJ Manuel at the controls of the
Seminoles' offense.
"The quarterbacks all have their tal-
ents," Fisher said. "Let's be careful
and let him (Winston) play. He's going
to be a good player and hopefully he'll
be a great player."
Winston, who bolted from the locker
room to join his baseball teammates
for a Saturday doubleheader against
Duke, went right after the team's most
dependable cornerback, on a per-
fectly thrown 58-yard touchdown pass
to David Tyrrell that tied the score 7-7.
"He hit it right on the money," Fisher
said. "He stepped up and played very
nicely. He took advantage of the op-
portunities he had today."
Winston burned veteran defensive
back Lamarcus Joyner on the touch-
down bomb to Tyrrell.
"I was lollygagging," said Joyner, a


Certainly her ability to
find the back of the net is
something that will be both
welcomed at Methodist
and missed at Citrus next
season. One memory she'll
take with her is one that
will be remembered at Cit-
rus for a while.
"She scored the game-
winning goal against Eu-
stis in the district
semifinals, which was ar-
guably the biggest goal of
the season," Feldt said.
"Eustis has been the dom-
inant program in the dis-
trict for years and they had
beaten us twice (during
the regular season)."
It's that type of ability, to
come through in the
clutch, that Methodist
coaches hope she'll bring
to their campus.


For more information,
contact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540 or
visit www.citruscountyparks.
com
Archery camp
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation, in partnership with
McPherson's Archery & Out-
door Pro Shop, will be holding
an archery camp this summer.
The camp will be offered on
two different weeks and
participants will be separated
by age.
The camps are open to
boys and girls ages 6 to 15
with the groups consisting of
ages 6 to 8, 9 to 11, and 12 to
15. The camps will be held at
McPherson's Archery in


first-team all-conference pick last sea-
son in the ACC. "He knew it."
Winston, one of the nation's most
highly recruited prep quarterbacks a
years ago, hit 8 of 10 passes for 140
yards in the second quarter to stake
the Garnet to a 17-10 halftime lead.
"It was fun," Winston said. My offen-
sive line, they were like, 'let's go
Jameis, let's do it,'"
His older teammates see Winston
daily at practice, but were still im-
pressed with his debut before about
25,000 Seminole fans.
"It was exciting for everyone else on
the team to see that young guy go out
there and do what he did," said Rashad
Greene, who caught 11 passes for 120
yards and a touchdown.
Kenny Shaw caught 12 passes for
205 yards and a touchdown on an 18-
yard throw from Sean McGruie and
Roberto Aguayo kicked five field
goals, including one from 58 yards.
P.J. Williams 35-yard interception
return for a touchdown with 1:36 left
gave the Gold a 37-24 lead over the
Garnet team.
'You have to have a short memory,"
said Williams, who was beat by
Greene on a 20-yard touchdown
throw from Winston. 'You have to be
able to bounce back real fast."
Jacob Coker completed 15 of 26 for
186 yards and a 15-yard touchdown
pass to Will Burnham for the game's
first score, but also was intercepted
twice in the second half.
McGuire connected on 6 of 13
throws for 113 yards.
Trickett, penciled in as No. 1 going
into the spring, Winston, Coker and
McGuire will resume their battle for
the starting role when preseason drills
begin in August.


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus senior Deycasha Miller (yellow shirt) will attend
Methodist University, a Division III college in North Carolina.
Front row, from left: coach Anthony, Miller, Tricia Miller
and Sykora Miller. Back row, from left: coach Terri Hatch,
activities director Laura Aguilera, coach Steve Ekeli, coach
George Arryo, coach lan Feldt and Jenna Askew.


End of the season


Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club meets at 8:30 a.m.
each Wednesday. Men,
women and juniors age 10
and older can join.
There are all levels of
play; handicapped method.
Call Ron Fair 352-746-
3924, or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.


Lecanto. Each camp will run
Monday through Thursday
with two separate classes
each day. Participants will
learn about various archery
equipment, proper shooting
techniques and equipment
safety. At the end of each
camp the top shot of the
week will be awarded a
free bow.
Registration opens on April
29 and can be completed at
the Citrus County Parks &
Recreation office. Space will be
limited to 25 children per class.
For more information con-
tact Citrus County Parks &
Recreation at 352-527-7540,
visit www.citruscountyparks.
com or McPherson's Archery
at 352-341-2820.


Recreation
BRIEFS

Stumpknockers
to do run/walk
Get your running shoes,
your walking' shoes and
your dog for the inaugural
Stumpknockers Elvis Blue
Suede Shoes 5K Run/1
mile walk or 1 mile dog
walk on Saturday, April 27,
in downtown Inverness.
Registration is at 7 a.m. at
Stumpknockers Restau-
rant, 110 W Main St. The
event begins at 8 a.m.
This event is open to
anyone of any age and will
include music, food and
prizes. The best Elvis cos-
tume receives a $500 prize
for 5K runners.
Water and comfort stops
will be available along the
route. There will be a com-
fort station for dogs. Pre-
registration is $25 by April
24 and $30 the day of the
event. To register or for
information, go to www.
hospiceofcitrus.org or
www.elvis5krun.com.
Proceeds from this event
benefit Hospice of Citrus
County's Herry's Kids Pedi-
atric Services.
Clubs' summer
sessions open
May 24
Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County are preparing
for an exciting summer
camp opening May 24 and
running 10 weeks through
Aug. 2. Fun-filled weekly
themes are planned, includ-
ing "Ooey Gooey," "Splish
Splash," "Where the Wild
Things Are," "Myth Busters"
and "Super Heroes."
Since Camp Fusion will
not be held in summer 2013,
the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Citrus County are offering
special discounts to last
year's Camp Fusion
campers who want to attend
Boys & Girls Clubs summer
camp. Past Camp Fusion
parents should call 352-621-
9225 for more information.
The cost of the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus
County summer camp is
$70 per week from 7 a.m.
until 6 p.m. or $60 per
week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Parents should call their
neighborhood club or the
administration office at
352-621-9225 to register.
Call the Beverly Hills Club
at 352-270-8841, the
Inverness Club at 352-341-
2507, or the Homosassa
Club at 352-795-8624.
Citrus County
Kids Triathlon
coming
A Citrus County Kids
Triathlon feature swim/
bike/run for children ages 5
to 15 will take place May 11
in Inverness. Registration
fee is $25 through May 8.
There will be two divi-
sions for the children: jun-
iors, ages 5 to 10, and
senior, ages 11 to 15.
There will also be a Tri4Fun
division for all ages who
wish to try. For more infor-
mation, call DRC Sports at
352-637-2475 or visit
www.Citruskidstri.com.


Associated Press
Miami's Duke Johnson, left, fights off defensive backs Deon Bush and Tracy Howard during their spring football game Saturday in Miami Gardens.


B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lightning fizzle


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning center Dana Tyrell battles for the puck against Washington Capitals goalie Braden Holtby
during the second period Saturday in Washington.

Despite huge thirdperiod TB can't complete big comeback


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The Washing-
ton Capitals blew a four-goal lead
Saturday night before Mike Green
scored a power-play goal at 2:59 of
overtime, extending the team's win-
ning streak to seven games with a 6-
5 win over the Tampa Bay Lightning.
Alex Ovechkin scored his 27th
goal to move ahead in the NHEs
goal-scoring race, and the Capitals
moved four points clear atop the
Southeast Division, albeit after
cruising way too much once they had
a 5-1 lead early in the second period.
Green scored after Vincent
Lecavalier was whistled for slash-
ing Marcus Johansson, who was
skating in on the crease for a clear
look at a potential winning goal.
Ovechkin broke a tie with the
Lightning's Steven Stamkos to take
the solo spot atop the goal leader-
board for the first time this season.
Rangers 1, Islanders 0, OT
UNIONDALE, N.Y. Defenseman
Dan Girardi scored 3:11 into overtime to
give the New York Rangers a stirring 1-0
victory over the New York Islanders in a
game that felt every bit like a playoff
matchup between the area rivals.
Henrik Lundqvist and Islanders coun-
terpart Evgeni Nabokov staged a classic
goalie duel that seemed destined to go to
a shootout, but Girardi finished off a rush
by flipping a shot over Nabokov's shoul-
der for just his second goal of the season.
Lundqvist finished with 29 saves for
his first shutout of the season. Nabokov
stopped 19 shots.
Sabres 1, Flyers 0
BUFFALO, N.Y. Jhonas Enroth
stopped 29 shots to help the Buffalo
Sabres remain on the fringe of the play-
off race with a 1-0 victory over the
Philadelphia Flyers.
Christian Ehrhoff scored the lone
goal, 17 seconds into the third period,
when his fortunate carom off the end


boards sneaked in behind Steve Mason.
Buffalo (17-19-6) snapped a two-game
skid and climbed into a tie with New Jer-
sey for 10th in the Eastern Conference
standings.
Enroth stopped 11 shots in the final
period, including getting a piece of
Wayne Simmonds' shot from the slot
with 50 seconds remaining. For Enroth,
it was his third career shutout and first
since, Nov. 18, 2011.
Penguins 3, Panthers 1
SUNRISE Brenden Morrow scored
two goals to lift the Pittsburgh Penguins
to a 3-1 victory over the Florida Panthers.
Kris Letang also scored for Pittsburgh
and Marc-Andre Fleury made 25 saves.
Morrow also had an assist.
Scottie Upshall scored for Florida and
Jacob Markstrom stopped 19 shots.
Avalanche 4, Canucks 3
DENVER Jan Hejda scored with
7.6 seconds remaining and Jean-Se-
bastien Giguere stopped 24 shots, help-
ing the Colorado Avalanche rally for a
4-3 victory over the Vancouver
Canucks.
Hejda scored on a shot from just in-
side the blue line that beat a screened
Cory Schneider. It was Hejda's first goal
of the season.
Gabriel Landeskog, Cody McLeod
and P.A. Parenteau also scored to help
the Avalanche beat the Canucks for the
first time since Jan. 18, 2011.
Maxim Lapierre, Jannik Hansen and
Jason Garrison scored for the North-
west Division-leading Canucks.
Hurricanes 4, Bruins 2
RALEIGH, N.C. Jiri Tlusty scored
two goals and the Carolina Hurricanes
ended a seven-game losing streak with
a 4-2 victory over the Boston Bruins.
Joe Corvo's power-play goal at 9:36
of the third period broke a 2-2 tie.
Carolina goalie Justin Peters stopped
28 shots while Boston's Tuukka Rask
had 34 saves.


Tyler Seguin and Milan Lucic scored
for the Bruins.
Stars 2, Sharks 1
DALLAS Eric Nystrom and rookie
Alex Chiasson scored goals, Richard
Bachman made 31 saves and the Dal-
las Stars extended their winning streak
to five games with a 2-1 victory over the
San Jose Sharks.
Chiasson scored his sixth goal in just
his sixth career NHL contest since being
recalled from AHL Texas on April 2.
Bachman has been outstanding since
stepping in for the injured Kari Lehtonen
early in the Stars' 5-1 win over Los An-
geles on Tuesday, stopping 79 of 82
shots and winning all three contests.
Brent Burns scored for the Sharks,
who were coming off a 3-2 shootout win
in Detroit on Thursday and are 8-2-1 in
their last 11 contests.
Blue Jackets 3, Wild 2, SO
ST. PAUL, Minn. Mark Letestu and
Cam Atkinson scored in a shootout to lift
the Columbus Blue Jackets over the
Minnesota Wild 3-2.
The Wild dropped their third straight
and were left clinging to a two-point lead
over the Red Wings, Stars and Blue
Jackets with 47 points.
Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 39 shots
while Vinny Prospal and Fedor Tyutin
each scored for Columbus.
Pierre-Marc Bouchard and Jason
Pominville scored for Minnesota, and
Niklas Backstrom had 20 saves.
Maple Leafs 5,
Canadiens 1
TORONTO The Toronto Maple
Leafs scored four goals on their first five
shots, chased Montreal goalie Carey
Price midway through the first period
and beat the Canadiens 5-1.
Tyler Bozak, Leo Komarov, Jay Mc-
Clement, Dion Phaneuf and Phil Kessel
scored for Toronto, which has earned at
least one point in 12 of its last 13 games
(8-1-4). James Reimer stopped 36
shots for the Leafs.


Animal hazards of sports


Last week while running with
my dogs, I came across some
obstacles that pointed out the
uncontrolled injuries that may
occur while working out. Of the
many injuries that can occur in ex-
ercising, sports and working out,
few consider the animals that are
encountered in these pursuits.
To elaborate, while running with
my dogs, an unleashed, aggressive
dog came at us. Having
seen dozens of dog bites
in my hand surgery prac-
tice, I thought how ironic
this was going to be.
A dog doing a neigh-
borhood tour, without
their owner, occurs quite -
often in our area. The
dog can be harmless but
if it is unleashed, i.e. un-
controlled, it invariably Dr. Ron
goes after the runner or DOCT
walker with the leashed ORD
or controlled dogs. They
want to say hi or just
take a bite out of us.
Dog bites are the most common
animal bites in the United States.
The biggest injury to humans is as a
result of attempting to break up a
dog altercation.
Bites by any animal including hu-
mans involve two components. The
first is the crushing injury on tis-
sues including muscles, tendons
and nerves of the hand, arm or
wherever the bite occurs. The mere
crushing of the powerful jaws of
some dogs may immediately lacer-
ate tendons and nerves resulting in
immediate loss of function or feel-
ing of fingers or the hand.
Larger dog breeds can generate


r4
)I


over 450 pounds per square inch of
pressure. Therefore, the crush of
the bite alone can cause severe
damage. The heel cord of a walker
or runner can be easily severed
with an even less powerful bite.
The second is the subsequent in-
fection resulting from the bite after
inadequate or incorrect treatment.
The mouth of any animal, dog, cat,
snake or squirrels is filled with bac-
teria. Isolated from dog
and cat bite wounds are
over 130 disease-causing
bacteria.
Bites to the hand, re-
gardless of animal, are
dangerous because the
bones, tendons, and
joints in the hand are
quite superficial. Dog
and animal bite infec-
Joseph tions that develop may
OR'S lead to severe complica-
ERS tions, such as infection of
the bone, called os-
teomyelitis, or the joints,
called septic arthritis.
Dog bites become infected about
20 percent of the time and require
hospitalization 1 to 2 percent of the
time. Cat bites are reported to be in-
fected 80 percent because of
slightly different bacteria and in-
correct use of the proper antibiotics
and require hospitalization 8 to 10
percent of the time.
There are several basic rules the
treating physician will follow. The
first is never suture, repair or close
a puncture wound or even a larger
gash or laceration caused by an an-
imal bite. Once a wound is closed, it
prevents drainage resulting in a re-
duced blood flow, trapping dead tis-


sue that becomes a perfect growth
medium for bacteria.
Initial treatment of any bite
should include meticulous (a doc-
tor's word) cleaning and removal of
dead or crushed tissue. I have run
by aggressive squirrels, armadillo
and possums and had bats fly
through my Rod Stewart hair do.
Any wild animal bite has to be con-
sidered and observed for rabies. All
bites warrant update on tetnus im-
munization.
Prophylactic antibiotics -the use
of antibiotics before and in anticipa-
tion of an infection is not manda-
tory but would be commonly done. It
would also depend on the degree of
damage from the dog bite and risks
factors of the person bitten. In cat or
wild animal bites, the immediate
use of antibiotics is indicated.
Much less frequent are snake
bites, though while living and work-
ing in Arizona, I have been running
in the back country and hopped
over quite a few rattlesnakes lying
on the trails. The snakebites I have
treated were almost all pet snakes
and a few hands in the wrong place.
The worst was the quite intoxicated
guy who tried to kiss his pet rat-
tlesnake.
I have continued running with my
dogs and alone and try to avoid
areas where the same unleashed
dog is a bother. In the event of a
bite, wash it out thoroughly, watch
for signs of infection or see a physi-
cian and then call your lawyer.
Have a great weekend and enjoy
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and
shoulder orthopedic surgeon at
SeaSpine Orthopedic Institute, may
be reached at rbjhand@cox.net.


Celtics destroy


Magic 120-88


Kobe's season

done with

torn tendon

Associated Press

ORLANDO Courtney
Lee scored 20 points and
Jeff Green added 17 as the
Boston Celtics cruised to a
120-88 victory over the Or-
lando Magic on Saturday
night.
The win locked up the
seventh seed in the East-
ern Conference for Boston,
which never trailed in
winning its eighth straight
over Orlando.
All five Celtics starters
reached double figures,
with Kevin Garnett and
Paul Pierce scoring 14 and
12 points, respectively,
after resting Friday
against Miami.
Tobias Harris led the
Magic with 22 points, and
Nik Vucevic added 16
points and 12 rebounds.
Orlando hasn't won
back-to-back games since
December. The Magic play
their final home game of
season on Monday against
Chicago, and head to
Miami for the season fi-
nale on Wednesday
Bobcats 95,
Bucks 85
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Kemba Walker had 21 points,
Josh McRoberts nearly had a
triple-double and the Char-
lotte Bobcats handed the Mil-
waukee Bucks their ninth
straight road loss, 95-85.
The loss locks the Bucks
into eighth place in the East-
ern Conference, meaning
they'll draw the defending
champion Miami Heat in the
first round of the playoffs.
McRoberts had 18 points,
nine rebounds and a career-
high nine assists.
Mike Dunleavy had 19
points and Monta Ellis added
16 to lead the Bucks, who
have lost 11 of their last 14 with
two games left in the season.
Clippers 91,
Grizzlies 87
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Chris
Paul hit a free throw with 18.3
seconds left, and the Los An-
geles Clippers edged the
Memphis Grizzlies 91-87 in a
possible preview of a first-
round playoff series.


DeAndre Jordan led the
Clippers with 16 points. Paul
finished with 13, Blake Griffin
had 12 and Willie Green 10.
Marc Gasol had 18 points,
15 rebounds and seven as-
sists for Memphis. Zach Ran-
dolph finished with 16 points
and 12 rebounds. Tayshaun
Prince scored 13, and Mike
Conley added 12 points and
six assists.
Timberwolves 105,
Suns 93
MINNEAPOLIS Ricky
Rubio had a career-high 24
points, 10 assists and five
steals, and J.J. Barea scored
16 points to lead the Min-
nesota Timberwolves to a
105-93 victory over the
Phoenix Suns.
Derrick Williams added 15
points and six boards for the
Wolves, who gave coach Rick
Adelman victory No. 1,001. It's
also the first time the Wolves
(30-50) have won at least 30
games in a season without
Kevin Garnett on the roster.
Markieff Morris had 20
points and nine rebounds and
Jared Dudley scored 16 for
the Suns.
Kobe done with
torn Achilles tendon
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -
Kobe Bryant had surgery Sat-
urday on his torn Achilles ten-
don, ending his season with
two games left in the Los An-
geles Lakers' playoff chase.
Lakers trainer Gary Vitti
thinks Bryant will need six to
nine months for recovery from
the most serious injury of his
17-year NBA career. Given
Bryant's history of swift recov-
ery from countless minor in-
juries, Vitti and Lakers general
manager Mitch Kupchak both
believe the 34-year-old guard
could be back for their season
opener in the fall.
Bryant completely tore his
left Achilles tendon late in the
Lakers' 118-116 win over
Golden State on Friday night,
falling to the hardwood after
pushing off his planted foot in
an ordinary move toward the
hoop. Although he stayed in
the game to hit two tying free
throws with 3:08 to play,
Bryant's season was over.
Bryant's foot will be immobi-
lized for about a month to pre-
vent him from stretching out
the tendon, followed by a
lengthy rehabilitation process.
Nobody knows how the injury
will affect Bryant's play.


Associated Press
Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce drives around the
Orlando Magic's Maurice Harkless during the first half
Saturday in Orlando.

Spring FOOTBALL


Floyd tosses 2 TDs
in USF spring game
TAMPA- Matt Floyd threw
for 208 yards and two touch-
downs as the White team de-
feated the Green team 14-11
in the South Florida spring
game on Saturday.
Floyd and to Andre Davis
hooked up for an 85-yard
score on their first offensive
play. Davis caught his second
touchdown pass from Floyd
right before halftime. He fin-
ished with three catches for
90 yards.
The game was a big step
forward for Floyd, who is in
his third year with the pro-
gram and is battling senior
Bobby Eveld for the starting
position. Eveld was 14-of-24
for 143 yards and an intercep-
tion. He scored the Green


team's only touchdown with a
one-yard sneak as time
elapsed.
Coach Willie Taggart says
both quarterbacks had good
moments but still have much
to prove.
UCF QB impressive
in spring game
ORLANDO Central
Florida's offensive appears to
have made big strides this
spring, particularly at the
quarterback position.
Redshirt junior quarterback
Blake Bortles completed 18 of
24 passes for 276 yards and
two touchdowns Saturday
during the Knights' annual
spring game. The game
ended 45-6 as the coaching
staff substituted liberally be-
tween the first- and second-
team players.


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 B5





B6 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


SPORTS


Reprieve for Wooc


Tigerpenalize4d

but avoids

disqualification

Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. -Augusta Na-
tional kept Tiger Woods in the
Masters on Saturday, saying it
would be "grossly unfair" to dis-
qualify him for a rules violation
that club officials didn't immedi-
ately recognize.
In a bizarre twist to a complex
case, it was a television viewer's
phone call that ultimately
spared the world's No. 1 player.
The viewer questioned the
way Woods took a penalty drop
after his wedge into the par-5
15th hole struck the flag stick
and bounced back into the water
Woods dropped the ball two
yards behind where he had hit
his previous shot, a violation.
Fred Ridley, head of the Mas-
ters competition committees,
said officials reviewed the video
of Woods' drop and found nothing
wrong, so they didn't bother talk-
ing to Woods before he signed for
a 71 in the second round, leaving
him three shots behind.
It was only after Woods ex-
plained in interviews why he
took that drop to land short of
the pin that prompted another
call to the club and led to another
review. Woods ultimately was
given a two-shot penalty Satur-
day morning, turning the 71 into
a 73. But he was not disqualified
because of a revised rule (Rule
33-7) that allows players to stay in
the tournament if a dispute was
based on television evidence.
Woods took advantage of his re-
prieve to shoot a 2-under 70 Sat-
urday that left him four strokes
off the lead held by Brandt
Snedeker and Angel Cabrera.
Even though Woods was guilty
of not knowing the rules, Augusta
National took the blame for not
alerting him of a potential viola-
tion pointed out by a TV viewer
"Our committee had made a
decision and Tiger, although he
didn't know that decision, he was
entitled to have the benefit of
that decision when he signed his
scorecard," Ridley said. 'And to
me, it would have been grossly
unfair to Tiger to have disquali-
fied him after our committee
had made that decision."
Woods came to the course at 8
a.m. nearly six hours before
his tee time to review the
video with club officials.
In a statement posted on his
Twitter account, Woods said he
was unaware he had violated the
rule. Players can take a drop as
far back as they want on a line
from the hole to where it crossed
the hazard, unless they choose to
hit from the original spot. Then,
they are to drop as close as pos-
sible to the previous shot.


Tiger Woods was nearly disqualified after dropping the ball two feet behind the spot of his p
on the 15th hole Friday of the Masters. Woods was assessed a two-shot penalty for the rul
but the golfer is still alive at four shots off the lead heading into today's final round of the st


The possibility that Woods
might face disqualification
caused a bigger buzz than any
shot at this Masters, especially
one day after 14-year-old Guan
Tianlang was penalized one shot
for slow play, which nearly
caused him to miss the cut.
But this was Tiger Woods, No. 1
in the world, the biggest draw in
golf. He had won two straight tour-
naments coming into the Masters
and was the overwhelming fa-
vorite to win a green jacket for the
first time since 2005 and end his
five-year drought in the majors.
Ridley, a former U.S. Amateur
champion who served two years as
USGA president, said Woods was
candid about his drop and helped
the committee make the right de-
cision in docking him two shots.
"At that point, it was either no
penalty or a two-shot penalty,"
Ridley said. "But disqualifica-
tion (Saturday) morning was not
even on the table."
Rule 33-7 was revised two
years ago to account for TV view-


ers calling in violations that the
players might not know until
after they have signed their
cards. If no one had called in,
Augusta National would have
had no reason to review the
drop. But after Woods impli-
cated himself with his post-
round comments, and the club
had reviewed the drop and as-
sessed the two-shot penalty, he
would have been disqualified.
There is a distinction between
not being aware of a violation and
not knowing the rules. In this
case, Woods didn't know the rule.
The mistake was on the part of
Ridley, who didn't recognize the
violation and chose not to talk to
Woods before he signed his card.
The club said CBS Sports an-
nouncer Jim Nantz alerted Mas-
ters officials that Woods'
post-rounds comments were
causing some doubts, leading to
another review.
Woods had said after his round,
"I went back to where I played it
from, but went two yards further


back and I tried to tal
off the shot of what I f
that should land me
flag and not have it e
flag or skip over the
that was going to be t
cision to take off four
there. And I did. It
perfectly"
He hit that fifth sh
feet and made the pu
Photos and video r
his first divot clearly
where Woods took
drop. Ridley said on
didn't see a clear vi
first time was that Wo
never moved from t
spot. Ridley said t
gets a dozen or so cal
he didn't see a violat
"It was my decision
was a non-violation, ti
going to go down an
that we had consider
it wasn't a violation,"
"I didn't see at that p
that really was going
thing to where we we


N A


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Masters par scores


S Saturday
At Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta,
Ga.
Yardage: 7,435, Par: 72
Third Round
(a-amateur)
Brandt Snedeker 70-70-69 209 -7
Angel Cabrera 71-69-69 209 -7
Adam Scott 69-72-69 210 -6
Marc Leishman 66-73-72 211 -5
Jason Day 70-68-73 --211 -5
Matt Kuchar 68-75-69 212 -4
Tim Clark 70-76-67 -213 -3
TigerWoods 70-73-70 213 -3
Rickie Fowler 68-76-70 214 -2
Jim Furyk 69-71-74 214 -2
Bernhard Langer 71-71-72 -214 -2
Steve Stricker 73-70-71 214 -2
Lee Westwood 70-71-73 -214 -2
Bo Van Pelt 71-74-70 -215 -1
Fernandez-Castano 68-74-73-215 -1
Sergio Garcia 66-76-73 -215 -1
Nick Watney 78-69-68 215 -1
Fred Couples 68-71-77-216 E
Jason Dufner 726975-- 216 E
Zach Johnson 69-76-71 216 E
Thorbjorn Olesen 78-70-68 216 E
Justin Rose 70-71-75 -216 E
Bill Haas 71-72-74 217 +1
Freddie Jacobson 72-73-72 217 +1
Dustin Johnson 67-76-74- 217 +1
Charl Schwartzel 71-71- 75- 217 +1
John Senden 72-70-75 217 +1
K.J. Choi 70-71-77 -218 +2
Luke Donald 71-72-75 -218 +2
Ernie Els 71-74-73 -218 +2
JohnrHuh 70-77-71 218 +2
Bubba Watson 75-73-70 218 +2
StewartCink 75-71-73 -219 +3
Robert Garrigus 76-71-72 219 +3
Branden Grace 78-70-71 -219 +3
Henrik Stenson 75-71-73 219 +3
D.A. Points 72-75-72 219 +3
Brian Gay 72-74-74 220 +4
Kevin Na 70-76-74 220 +4
Jose Maria Olazabal 74-72-74P- 220 +4
Vijay Singh 72-74-74 220 +4
Richard Sterne 73-72-75 220 +4
David Toms 70-74-76 220 +4
Lucas Glover 74-74-73 221 +5
Trevor Immelman 68-75-78 221 +5
Martin Kaymer 72-75-74 -221 +5
Paul Lawrie 76-70-75 -221 +5
David Lynn 68-73-80 221 +5
Rory Mcllroy 72- 70-79 221 +5
Thomas Bjorn 73- 7376 222 +6
John Peterson 71-77-74 222 +6
Scott Piercy 75-69-78 222 +6
Peter Hanson 72-75-76 223 +7
Carl Pettersson 76-70-77 -223 +7
Michael Thompson 73-71-79 223 +7
Ryo Ishikawa 71- 77-76- 224 +8
Phil Mickelson 71-76-77 224 +8
Ryan Moore 71-72-81 224 +8
a-GuanTianlang 73-75-77 -225 +9
Sandy Lyle 73-72-81 226 +10
Associated Press Keegan Bradley 73-73-82- 228 +12
previous shot Masters tee times
es violation, At Augusta National Golf Club
oried major. Augusta, Ga.
All Times EDT
ke two yards a-amateur
elt I hit And Sunday
short of the 9:20 a.m.- Keegan Bradley
either hit the 9:30 a.m.- a-Guan Tianlang, Sandy Lyle
back. I felt 9:40 a.m. Phil Mickelson, Ryan Moore
9:50 a.m.- MichaelThompson, Ryo Ishikawa
he right de- 10:00 a.m.- Peter Hanson, Carl Pettersson
(yards) right 10:10 a.m. -Thomas Bjorn, Scott Piercy
worked out 10:20 a.m.- David Lynn, John Peterson
10:30 a.m. Trevor Immelman, Rory Mcllroy
10:40 a.m.- Martin Kaymer, Paul Lawrie
ot to about 4 10:50 a.m.- David Toms, Lucas Glover
tt for bogey 11:00 a.m. -Vijay Singh, Richard Sterne
plays show 11:20 a.m.- Kevin Na, Brian Gay
v in front of 11:30 a.m.- Henrik Stenson, Jose Maria


the second
e reason he
violation the
)ods' caddie
the original
he Masters
Is a day, and
ion.
n, because it
hat I was not
d tell Tiger
red this and
Ridley said.
point in time
to add any-
*re."


Olazabal
11:40 a.m. -
11:50 a.m.-
12:00 p.m.
12:10 p.m.-
12:20 p.m.-
12:30 p.m. -
12:40 p.m.
12:50 p.m.-
1:10 p.m.-
1:20 p.m.-


- Stewart Cink, D.A. Points
- Branden Grace, Robert Garrigus
- Luke Donald, K.J. Choi
-John Huh, Ernie Els
Charl Schwartzel, Bubba Watson
- Dustin Johnson, John Senden
- Freddie Jacobson, Bill Haas
-Jason Dufner, Fred Couples
Zach Johnson, Justin Rose
- Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano,


Thorbjorn Olesen
1:30 p.m. BoVan Pelt, Sergio Garcia
1:40 p.m.-Jim Furyk, NickWatney
1:50 p.m.-Bernhard Langer, Lee Westwood
2:00 p.m. Rickie Fowler, Steve Stricker
2:10 p.m. -Tim Clark, Tiger Woods
2:20 p.m. Jason Day Matt Kuchar
2:30 p.m.- Adam Scott, Marc Leishman
2:40 p.m.- Brandt Snedeker, Angel Cabrera


Isner into Clay Court



Championship match


American to

face Almagro

in tennis final

Associated Press

HOUSTON John
Isner and Nicolas Alma-
gro, two of the biggest
servers in tennis, aced
their way into the final of
the U.S. Men's Clay Court
Championship.
Top-seeded Almagro of
Spain, the ATP Tour
leader with 261 aces,
needed only 58 minutes to
beat American wild-card
Rhyne Williams 6-2, 6-1.
Isner, second in tour
aces with 251, recovered
from a slow start to top de-
fending champion Juan
Monaco of Spain 1-6, 6-4,
6-4 in the other semifinal
to set up the booming
showdown Sunday
"Even though I got
creamed in that first set, I
felt like I was playing pretty
good," Isner said. "I felt it
was the best I'd played all
week My serve wasn't
working in the first set and
he was making a lot of re-
turns. It got away from me.
"After that first set, I
thought I served smart,"
Isner said. "I got myself
out of several jams the
rest of the match so it was
very encouraging."
The 6-foot-9 American
finished with nine aces
against Monaco and has
57 going into the finals,


Associated Press
John Isner returns a shot against Juan Monaco in their
semifinal tennis match at the U.S. Men's Clay Court
Championship on Saturday in Houston.


three short of tournament
record set by Pete Sam-
pras in 2002.
Isner used his power to
good advantage in the
final game of the match
with serves clocked at 142,
144 and a fault that hit 147
mph at match point.
Monaco returned Isner's
second serve but Isner
sealed the match with a
backhand volley
Almagro added seven
aces to his total against
Williams.


"I played better today
than I did the first two
days," Almagro said. "I feel
good today I think he was
a little bit tired. I'm happy
with my game. I tried to be
focused all the time and I
moved really good. That's
important for me."
Isner lost to Monaco 6-2,
3-6, 6-3 in last year's clay
court and he appeared
headed for another loss
after Monaco broke his
serve three times in the
opening set


MASTERS
Continued from Page B1

After opening with 12
pars, he birdied bothth the
par 5s and stuffed his tee
shot to 4 feet for birdie on
the par-3 16th to take the
lead. Cabrera joined him
at 7-under 209 with a 12-
foot birdie putt on the
final hole, capping off a
round in which he twice
made bogey on the par 5s.
They were two players
going in opposite direc-
tions this year. Snedeker
was seen as the hottest
player in golf when in three
straight weeks he was run-
ner-up to Woods, runner-
up to Phil Mickelson and
then won at Pebble Beach.
His momentum was slowed
by sore ribs that kept him
out of golf for a month,
though he appears to be
hitting his stride.
"I've spent 32 years of my
life getting ready for tomor-
row," Snedeker said. "I'm
going to be disappointed if
I don't win. Period. I'm not
here to get a good finish ...
I'm here to win."
Cabrera, whose two
major titles include a
Masters win in 2009, has
plunged to No. 269 in the
world.
"I've been working very
hard for this moment,"
Cabrera said through an
interpreter. "And I've got
to take the opportunity."
For Adam Scott, it's a
chance at redemption.
He was runner-up at the
Masters two years ago,
though the fresher
wounds are from last sum-
mer at Royal Lytham & St.
Annes, where the Aus-
tralian bogeyed his last
four holes and finished


Associated Press
Brandt Snedeker hits out of a bunker on the second hole
during the third round of the Masters golf tournament
Saturday in Augusta, Ga. Snedeker co-leads the event
heading into today's final round with Angel Cabrera.


one shot behind in the
British Open. Scott
rammed home a
25-foot birdie putt on the
17th hole for a 69 and was
one shot behind.
Two more Aussies, Marc
Leishman (72) and Jason
Day (73) were another shot
behind, giving the blokes
from Down Under as good
a chance as ever to give
their country some happy
memories from Augusta
National. It's the only major
an Australian has never
won, a point driven home
with every mention of Greg
Norman losing a six-shot
lead on the last day in 1996.
"Obviously, to win the
Masters would be incredi-
ble," Scott said. "It would
be great for Australia.
We've never looked better
odds-wise going into a Sun-
day, except that one year in
1996. It's going to be a hell
of a round tomorrow."
Day was in the lead for
most of the day, going 18
straight holes without a
bogey until he missed
short par putts on the last
two holes.
Matt Kuchar (69) was
three shots back, and


Woods was right behind.
Woods, the No. 1 player
in the world who already
has won three times this
year, was the heavy fa-
vorite going into the Mas-
ters to capture a green
jacket for the first time
since 2005 and end his
five-year drought in the
majors.
His big move came after
a bogey on the 11th hole,
leaving him six shots be-
hind as he made his way
through a back nine that
has not treated him kindly
of late. But he ran off
three birdies on the next
four holes, and made
clutch par saves on the
16th and 18th to stay in the
game.
"I'm right there in the
ball game, "Woods said.
"I'm four back with a great
shot to win this champi-
onship."
History is not on his
side. Woods has never won
a major from behind;
every Masters champion
has been no worse than a
tie for fourth going into
Sunday dating to Faldo's
comeback in 1989. But at
least he's still in the game.











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


"I used to own my father had a ranch. We used to hire
50 to 6o wetbacks to pick tomatoes. You know it takes
two people to pick the same tomatoes now. It's all done
by machine." -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus gestures March 18 while speaking at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.
The RNC has formally endorsed immigration reform and outlined plans for a $10 million outreach to minority groups gay voters among
them as part of a strategy to make the GOP more "welcoming and inclusive" for voters who overwhelmingly supported Democrats in 2012.





Mixed messages


As GOP strives for inclusion, members'gaffes turn into setbacks


BIL"LBARROW "Lord, I'm going to get in trouble
ATLANTA over this, but it is not natural for
National Republican two women or two men to be
leaders made waves
recently with a dim married. If it was natural, they
view of the party's fu- would have the equipment to have
ture if it fails to expand its core ,
support beyond white males and a sexual relationship.... There is
social conservatives. But weeks no way that this is about equality.
after GOP Chairman Reince
Priebus unveiled the "Growth To me, it's all about a free ride."


and Opportunity Project" report,
many party players maintain
that the problem often is more
about flawed messengers saying
the wrong things at the wrong
times than the policy positions at
issue.
The distinction between policy
flaws and communication prob-
lems is at the crux of the GOP's
soul-searching as the Republican
National Committee convenes
this week in Los Angeles for the
first time since the report's re-
lease. And it's a discussion that
won't end anytime soon as conser-
vatives, moderates and pragma-
tists struggle for control of the
GOP megaphone. The dynamic
has been highlighted in the weeks
since the chairman's call for out-
reach, with succession of conser-
vative party figures voicing
positions that may alienate the
very voters national party leaders
want to capture.


Alaska Rep. Don Young was forced to
apologize after referring to Hispanic mi-
grant workers as wetbackss." Media titan
Donald Trump, who flirted with a presi-
dential run in 2012, warned against com-
promising with President Barack Obama
on a citizenship path for anyone already
in the country illegally, saying they'll just
become Democratic voters.
Using social media, Republican Na-
tional Committee member Dave Agema
of Michigan redistributed controversial
writings that were harshly critical of gay
Americans. Agema dug in after many
Michigan Republicans called for his
resignation.
Days later, the head of the Georgia
state party, Sue Everhart, said that if
same-sex marriage were "natural," then
gay couples "would have the equipment
to have a sexual relationship." She pre-
dicted that if the Supreme Court allows
federal employee benefits for gay cou-
ples, then individuals who are "straight
as an arrow" will enter same-sex unions
just for financial perks.
Comments like those have some Re-
publicans reeling.
"It's extremely, extremely frustrating,"
said Gregory Steele, a University of
North Carolina senior who leads his


"It's extremely,


state's college Republican organization.
"We want the party to have a serious pol-
icy discussion about all of these issues
going forward, but it's hard to get to that
point with all of these mistakes."
Former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe of
Maine, who retired in January as one of
the GOP's last elected New England
moderates, deplored the "intolerance"
that she says has driven a "slow and
steady erosion of a strong political base."
"It's very exclusionary," Snowe said. "For
anyone who isn't already a Republican, how
are they going to be drawn in right now?"
At Log Cabin Republicans, a national
group of gay GOP loyalists, Gregory An-
gelo said the flaps reinforce the image of
an inflexible organization. But he also
noted Ohio Sen. Rob Portman's recent
embrace of same-sex marriage, and de-
scribed the party right now as going
through "growing pains."
"We are no longer walking in lock-step
on these (social) issues," he said.
White House losing streaks like the
one Republicans are in nationally -
aren't new. Democrats lost four out of five
presidential elections all by wide mar-
gins from 1972 to 1988, before then-
Arkansas Bill Clinton styled himself as a
"New Democrat" to win the presidency
in 1992 and 1996.
But current trends are foreboding for
Republicans. They've lost the popular
See Page C3


extremely frustrating."


Cut it


out and


get to


work
I don't have a high
opinion of the work
being done by the
U.S. Congress. With that
said, I really like our
own congressman, Rep.
Rich Nugent of
Brooksville.
Washington has
turned into a cesspool of
special interests, where
doing the business of the
people appears to be the
last thing on anyone's
mind. But that Rep. Nu-
gent is friendly, open to
your ideas and the fa-
ther of a bunch of kids
who are off fighting for
us in the Middle East.
How could you not
like him?
But Congress as a
group is another story
Some of that dysfunc-
tional congressional
performance is by de-
sign. The politicians
don't really have to ex-
plain themselves be-
cause they get to hide
behind the complexity
of the process and their
own political parties.
If we don't watch out,
the same dysfunctional
thing might happen in
Inverness with our
county commission.
It is inevitable our
local government will do
a lot of dumb things.
This is local, local stuff
and there are many
hundreds of employees
involved.
Combine that with the
fact that we have a high
concentration of resi-
dents who spend their
recreation time criticiz-
ing local government
and you get a recipe for
problems.
But the baby gets
thrown out with the
bathwater when the
politicians themselves
start behaving in a fool-
ish manner. For the past
five or so years, our
county government has
operated in pretty
smooth waters, even
though the problems
and issues have been
complex.
The key was that
members of the commis-
sion had personal re-
spect for each other -
even when they dis-
agreed about the issues.
Last November Scott
Adams got elected to the
commission and he is ef-
fectively playing the role
of the outside aggressor.
It's not so much his dis-
agreement with the
other four board mem-
bers on the issues; it is
how the entire process
of debate has come
down a few levels.
Just this week, one of
the commissioners, JJ
Kenney of Homosassa,
became so agitated that
he offered to take an
anonymous critic out to
the parking lot for a
pounding.
Kenney was agitated
because he and a family
member were accused
of being corrupt. The
commissioner has asked
the state attorney to re-
view the charges, and
they appear to have no
basis in fact. It is easy to
understand why Kenney
got angry
See Page C3






"Many people lose
Page C2 *SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


their tempers merely from seeing you keep yours."
Frank Moore Colby, "The Colby Essays," 1926


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
4 EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................publisher
Mike Arnold ................ .................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................managing editor
Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen m em ber
1. Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................ guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


KEEP CALM AND CARRY ON




Anonymous




complaint




roils Kenney


Most people justifiably
get mad when some-
one makes charges
that question their integrity
or that of their family mem-
bers. It is particularly galling
when allegations come in the
form of a publicly posted
anonymous letter
This is what happened to
CommissionerJohn'JJ" Kenney
earlier this month. A fre-
quent critic of county govern-


ment posted on
his blog an anony-
mous letter alleg-
ing Kenny's son
Mark was respon-
sible for Citrus
Recycling's un-
derpayment to
the county be-
tween 2009 and
2011, and the ac-
tion was a delib-
erate effort to
defraud the
county. This letter
had been sent to
the county in
March.
Sandy Messina,
the owner of Cit-
rus Recycling,
called the charges
"ridiculous." Ken-


son would simply claim he
had no money and not pay
Kenney then launched into
a dais-pounding defense of
his years of service, and sug-
gested if he were younger he
would settle the matter with
physical force, before asking
county attorney Richard
Wesch to request the state at-
torney investigate him re-
garding the allegations.
Kenney's frustration with


THE ISSUE:
Commissioner
JJ Kenney
fighting mad
about anonymous
allegations.

OUR OPINION:
Attacks scurrilous,
but an unfortunate
reality of politics.


To read Sandy
Messina's response
and see what
readers think,
see Page C3.


ney's immediate response was
to call the charges "crap" and
say he would ask for an in-
vestigation by the state attor-
ney if anyone attempts to link
his family to any wrongdoing
in the recycling program.
During last week's commis-
sion meeting, Messina read a
letter into the record stating
that not only was Kenney's
son not responsible for the er-
rors he was not even em-
ployed by Citrus Recycling
during part of the time they
occurred.
This should have ended the
issue. The allegations were
repudiated in public and for
the record. But commissioner
Kenney was mad, and when it
came time for him to bring is-
sues before the commission,
his anger was apparent.
After telling the anony-
mous person who wrote the
letter "you know where you
can go," he launched into an
impassioned personal de-
fense, noting he would sue
the person who posted the
letter, except that if the law-
suit were successful the per-


Keep digging, Scott
So Scott Adams is trying his
best to do the business of the
people, which he was elected
for, and now they want
to charge outrageous 0
amounts of money to
him for getting public
records that he needs
to have to investigate
what has gone on. W hy I
are the county adminis-
trators and others
afraid of being ques- CAL
tioned? What are they 5O
trying to hide and why 56 -(
do they want to make it
very difficult to get at records? Is
there something going on here?
Keep up the good work, Scott.


I

(


the allegations is
understandable.
There is some-
thing particularly
pernicious about
people who write
anonymous let-
ters, and Internet
postings allow
even the most
scurrilous accu-
sations to be
made publicly
available. It is
easy to sit behind
a computer
screen and spew
venom at public
officials.
While Kenney's
anger was justi-
fied, and he was
right to request


he be investigated to clear his
name, his outburst during the
commission meeting went too
far. Anonymous accusations
are enough to make anyone
mad enough to blow a gasket,
but as an elected public offi-
cial doing public business in
a public meeting Kenney has
an obligation to set a tone for
conduct. This should include
refraining from personal at-
tacks and suggestions that
physical violence is a solu-
tion to conflict.
Regardless of how clean a
public official may be, there
are always individuals who
will make accusations, often
unfounded and uninformed.
This is unfortunately part of
being in the political arena.
Kenney needs to recognize
that in the face of anony-
mous attacks, the best
course is to set the record
straight and then move on.
Challenging and venting
may make an offended per-
son feel better, but it ulti-
mately has no real impact
other than to please who-
ever made the allegation.


Gift of independence
Two months ago I started in-
tensive physical therapy, three
times a week for four weeks, at
ND TLC on (U.S.) 19. I cannot
JNDI believe the tremendous
lP results in my ability to
yrr walk and use of my arms.
M The four therapists there
are so kind and helpful.
Thank you, ladies.
Pinellas prices
*V My wife and I went to
r579 Treasure Island this
) 57 weekend and as we
came through St. Pete,
I saw that gas was $3.41 a gal-
lon. We are getting ripped off in
Citrus County by this government.


'Central Park Five,' graphically told


WASHINGTON
From Tom Paine's "Com-
mon Sense" to Harriet
Beecher Stowe's "Uncle
Tom's Cabin" to Martin Luther
King's "Letter from Birming-
ham Jail," American history is
replete with examples of
printed words accelerating so-
cial justice. Still,
from Mathew
Brady's 1862 photo
exhibit of "The
Dead of Antietam"
to the televised fire (
hoses and police
dogs in Birming- /
ham, Ala., in 1963 to '
the cameras that
brought Vietnam Georg
into American living 0TH
rooms, graphic jour-
nalism has exer- VOI
cised unique power
to open minds and hence shape
history. It may do so Tuesday
evening when PBS broadcasts
"The Central Park Five," a
meticulous narrative of a gross
miscarriage of justice.
There were abundant
dystopian aspects of New York
City in the 1980s when crime,
crack and AIDS produced a
perfect storm of anxiety about
the fraying social fabric. This
was the context a city on
edge when on April 19, 1989,
a 28-year-old white woman who
worked on Wall Street went for
a jog after dark in Central Park.
She became a victim of what
was immediately called "wild-
ing," a word probably unknown
by the four blacks and one His-
panic, ages 14 to 16, who were
arrested and charged with rap-
ing her and beating her nearly
to death.
After up to 30 hours of sepa-
rate interrogations by detectives
who are paid to be suspicious of
suspects, four of the five con-
fessed to a crime they did not
commit. Why? Watch this docu-


Hl
C


mentary by Ken Burns, David
McMahon and Sarah Burns. To
see the old videotapes of the in-
terrogations is to understand
the dynamic that sent the five
to prison in spite of the absence
of evidence to bolster a
rickety case that consisted en-
tirely of those contradictory
confessions.
One of the five re-
calls his interroga-
tion: "They pulled
my father aside.
Then my father
came back in the
room, it was like he
just changed. He
was like, 'Listen.' He
e Will was like, 'Tell these
people what they
IER want to hear so you
DES can go home.' If he
just, if he just
would've stood his ground, I
would've told the truth. I
would've stuck to the truth."
People determined to see
every American social problem
through the lens of race are
missing the fact of class: Would
the fates of five frightened, con-
fused, exhausted and skillfully
manipulated adolescents -
badly represented by counsels,
disastrously influenced by un-
sophisticated and bewildered
working-class parents, and all
swept up in a prosecutorial and
media storm have been dif-
ferent if their skin had been
white? Probably not. Remem-
ber, confident, affluent, edu-
cated, law-abiding Americans
can be reduced to bewilder-
ment by encounters with the
IRS or even the local DMV
What can be done to reduce
the chances of miscarriages of
justice like the one that robbed
the Central Park Five of their
youths? Society's safety de-
pends on determined detec-
tives and tough-minded
prosecutors who have the hard-


edged skills necessary for cop-
ing with nasty people. But soci-
ety's adversarial justice system
depends on a countervailing co-
hort of public defenders more
able than those on whom the
Central Park Five depended.
Remember, one reason Chief
Justice Earl Warren was a stick-
ler for defendants' rights was
that he had been a district at-
torney for 14 years and knew
what went on in the backrooms
of police stations.
One of the five now says: "I
lost that sense of, of being
youthful and missing the aver-
age things of going to school and
going to the prom and just, just
livin' like average 14-, 15-year-
old kid." Another says: "I'm al-
ways behind. Those years that it
took for me, I lost a lot. And
even now at the age of 36 where
I should be fully in a career,
have a house, a car, maybe mar-
ried, I don't have any of that
stuff. So I'm just here."
Journalism, like almost every
other profession relevant to this
case, did not earn any honors.
Until now. The only solace to be
derived from this sad story is
that it now is a story memorably
told. A society's justice system
can improve as a result of
lurches into officially adminis-
tered injustice. The dialectic of
injustice, then revulsion, then
reform often requires the pres-
entation of sympathetic victims
to a large audience, which "The
Central Park Five" does.
Finally, this recounting of a
multifaceted but, fortunately,
not fatal failure of the criminal
justice system buttresses the
conservative case against the
death penalty: Its finality leaves
no room for rectifying mistakes, but
it is a government program, so....

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


Thanks, Chronicle
We want to thank the Citrus
County Chronicle for taking an
active interest in helping improve
the image and appeal of areas
and properties in the county
needing some restoration.
The Chronicle, through some
very professional reporting,
has been instrumental in help-
ing to stimulate corrective ac-
tions in several areas of the
county most recently, with
the property in our neighbor-
hood needing some restoration.
Thank you for your interest in
helping to keep our county and
neighborhoods up to the stan-
dards the residents and business
community can be proud of.
The Pattersons
Hernando

Check trees now
Sunday, April 1, was a very
windy day I heard and saw
tree branches brushing against
my house. It brought back
memories of a severely windy
day two to three years ago,
when a tree came crashing
down on my roof. There was
several thousand dollars of
damage, and though I have
homeowners insurance, there
was a $1,000 deductible.
Hurricane season will be
here officially on June 1. It is a


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

good idea to look at the trees on
your property for large branches
or dying or dead trees and have
them removed, as in a heavy
wind there is a big chance they
will fall on a house.
Spending money on a tree
surgeon/removal service can
save you a lot of money in the
long run.
Robert E. Blum
Homosassa


ACOs a scheme
Re: "Doctors sayACO will
improve patient care"
As one of the 6,500 patients who
received the doctors' alleged
"explanation" of the Account-
able Care Organization, I was
glad to read the article by Mike
Wright which unfortunately
provided little more explanation
than the doctors' letter. The ar-
ticle enforced my initial reaction
that an ACO basically provides
a tacit approval by patients for
a group of physicians to share
medical histories and treatments.
It seems to me that an ACO is
an unneeded level of bureau-
cracy and is a sneaky way to get
patients' tacit approval for such
records sharing: Unless a patient
specifically opts out of the ACO's
records sharing, his or her records
are sharable by fiat Every pa-
tient now may and probably
should have all his or her spe-
cialists' treatments and histo-
ries sent to his or her primary
physician and any other spe-
cialists relevant to the treat-
ments. An ACO is not needed
to accomplish this.
I view an ACO as a thinly dis-
guised medical history sharing
scheme, and everyone in my
household has opted out.
Thomas Fallon
Lecanto


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Please don't ask me to give up my pedicure


A couple of weeks
ago, I saw a politi-
cal cartoon which
implied the continued ex-
istence of a Senate hair
and nail salon, even dur-
ing the midst of this cur-
rent period of
sequestration.
You might ask, "see-what?"
I'd been reading about
sequestration in the pa-
pers, but hadn't paid it a
lot of attention until I be-
came concerned about
those fellows and gals in
the Senate no longer being
allowed to pay a cut-rate
fare in their exclusive ton-
sorial parlor.
So, I looked it up on the
Internet ... sequestration,
not tonsorial.


Hang on tight, here goes:
Sequestration means "to
take possession of prop-
erty until a dispute over its
rightful ownership is re-
solved." Congress first
used the word in 1985 to
describe what happens
when the total money they
vote to spend exceeds the
total limit it previously
budgeted and they cannot
agree on where to cut
back. In a nutshell, the dif-
ference between the ex-
cess spending and the
spending limit is held cap-
tive by the U.S. Treasury
Have you got that?
My further research in-
dicated that within the
past few days, it has be-
come so hot in the kitchen


- or, rather, in the barber- we'd have to pay up. If we
shop this perk has been spent more this year than
waylaid. Senators will ap- we made, we'd have to
parently now have to do as spend less next year and it
we ordinary always meant
folks do and we had to
pay full bore to compromise.
have their hair Until some-
cut and their W one yelled "se-
nails trimmed. questration,"
Please don't the senators and
think I'm mini- House mem-
mizing this sit- bers all of
uation. Cheryl whom should
and I have al- Fred Brannen be smarter
ways had a A SLICE about such
budget. Some A SLICE things than my
of the time we OF LIFE wife and I are
lived within it apparently
and some of the time we couldn't grasp this concept
didn't. During those times What does this have to
we didn't, we always knew do with haircuts and nail
the day would come when trims?


Ironically, for 15 years or
more, backwhen I was young
and working long hours for
not much pay, Cheryl per-
sonally cut my hair. It
saved both money and
time and it gave us a mo-
ment together we wouldn't
have had otherwise.
Nowadays, we're able to
balance our budget with
both of us having other
folks do those grooming
routines we think we need
help with. I have one pro-
fessional cut my hair and
another one do my toes.
Yes, that's what I said. I
regularly have a pedicure,
and if you haven't tried it,
don't knock it.
I've given this more than
a little thought. If Cheryl


and I found ourselves fac-
ing our own personal se-
questration, I would
quickly give up my barber
appointment and ask her
very sweetly to trim the
few hairs I have left on my
head. But I'd look for other
places to cut before I gave
up my pedicure. Cheryl tried
once to cut my toenails -
just once and it hurt.
Sequestration?
You can feed me a
bologna sandwich instead
of a T-bone steak, but
please don't ask me to give
up my pedicure!


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


Letter to THE EDITOR


Setting record straight
on anonymous claims
This letter was read at the Cit-
rus County Board of County
Commissioners meeting on
April 9, 2013. I would like to
make this letter available to
anyone who wasn't able to at-
tend, or view the broadcast I
sincerely hope these facts clar-
ify any questions that were
raised in previous articles.
I am here today to address
two issues. The first is related
to the anonymous letter sent to
the Chronicle on March 4, 2013.
In this letter, Mark Kenney was
named as handling the weight
transactions between Citrus Re-
cycling and Citrus County from
2009 through 2011. This letter
states that he deliberately de-
frauded Citrus County At this
point I would like to refer to
Webster's Standard Dictionary
for the definition of defraud.
Defraud: "To take or withhold
by deceit; to swindle." Citrus
County was never defrauded or
swindled by myself, or any of
my employees.
I have been given permission
by Mark Kenney to provide you
with the following verifiable in-
formation. Marks's duties cov-
ered basically anything that
needed to be done at my facility.
The majority of time was spent
baling materials from the
county's recycling program. In
June of 2010 Mark had a work-
man's comp claim for injuries
sustained while baling. In the
same year he had back surgery
and was unemployed for ap-
proximately six months. In No-
vember of 2010 he was
employed by ED.S. Disposal
and Single Stream Processors,
Inc. This Information can be
verified by them and pay stubs
are also available. How can
someone be responsible for
something when they weren't
present?
The second issue to be ad-
dressed is the alleged $800,000
in revenue that was lost to the
landfill. At this point and time,
I would like to ask Mr Adams


MESSAGES
Continued from Page C1

vote in five out of the last six pres-
idential elections. In the last two,
Obama has won overwhelming ma-
jorities of non-white voters and
younger voters, while the anchors
of Republican support older
white voters -have become an in-
creasingly smaller share of the
electorate. Neither Clinton nor
Jimmy Carter ever drew popular
vote majorities. Obama has twice
cleared 51 percent.
Republicans also lost several
winnable Senate races in 2012
after conservative nominees made
controversial statements about
women and abortion.
Top Republicans both acknowl-
edge the damage such comments
have caused and remain careful to
defend the party's official positions
as they call for a wider tent.
Republican Governors Associa-
tion Chairman Bobby Jindal mem-
orably called for the GOP to "stop
being the stupid party," but the po-
tential 2016 presidential candidate
from Louisiana said in the same
January speech to the RNC, "We do
not need to change what we believe
... our principles are timeless."
Henry Barbour, a Mississippian
who helped write the post-election
analysis for Priebus, emphasizes
that the document shouldn't be
read as a call to change the Repub-
lican position on abortion, same-
sex marriage or immigration. "In
politics, you need to be what you're
for," he said.
Louisiana Republican Chairman
Roger Villere, a conservative who
is also national party vice chair-
man, said, "To be Democrat-light
will not win us elections."
Both Villere and Barbour said
fixing the party starts with soften-


where this figure was obtained.
For all intents and purposes, I
already know the answer to this
question. In March of 2010 the
county was approached by a
local company that was inter-
ested in obtaining the recycling
contract At this time they pro-
vided figures that reflected the
current market prices, and ton-
nage based on the previous
years' weight. These figures
raised questions as to the
amount the county was cur-
rently being paid for their
materials.
At this time I presented infor-
mation to clarify the pricing on
the recycling materials. Pricing
is based basically on quality,
volume and current market
prices. In my case, I had con-
tracts on certain materials that
didn't provide the highest price,
but always guaranteed me an
outlet for materials. At this time,
I was informed that there were
some discrepancies in weights.
Again, I will refer to Webster
Discrepancy: "A variance or in-
consistency" At that time, I re-
quested that payment of
processing fees be withheld. An
extensive audit, which I volun-
tarily consented to, was con-
ducted. There were
inaccuracies. Again, I refer to
Webster. Inaccuracy: '"An in-
stance of being incorrect or in-
exact." Weights were reviewed
and a figure determined for re-
payment of the inconsistencies.
I have resided in Citrus
County since 1976, and been in
business for the same amount of
time. A person's reputation is
their most valuable asset I in-
tend to preserve mine. If there
are any additional questions, I
am more than willing to address
them. If I am unable to do so, I
will direct them to my attorney
I would also like to add the
records and information are
available to anyone; they are a
matter of public record. Your
time is greatly appreciated.
Sandy Messina
Citrus Recycling
Lecanto


"You have to be
very, very careful,
because you
could say that to
a certain extent
the odds aren't
looking so great
for Republicans,
that you are on a
suicide mission.
You are just not
going to get those
votes.... You can
do whatever you
want to do, but
every one of those
11 million people
will be voting
Democratic. It is
just the way it
works."







ing the way Republicans talk about
hot-button issues and emphasizing
economic and fiscal policy
In Georgia, Everhart makes the
conundrum clear. She says the
party should emphasize the econ-
omy, but added: "I don't like to
refer to 'social issues' as much as I
say that they're just my beliefs, and
I'm going to talk about them," she
said. "If you change your views for


Resolution a problem Something amiss


The fact that John "JJ" Ken-
ney said in the paper that
someone making an anony-
mous letter, if he knew who it
was, that "a deputy would be
out there separating us in the
parking lot." I find it quite ap-
palling that a county commis-
sioner would verbally admit to
getting into a physical confronta-
tion with what is allowed.
Someone does not have to make
a public outcry as to who it is. And
the fact that our commissioner
said that he would confront the
guy physically is kind of why
the person made the anony-
mous letter, truth or untruth.

Quit spending money
So now we've got another
commissioner spending county
taxpayers' funds to do an in-
vestigation that's not even war-
ranted just because somebody
sent a letter or made a call.
Come on, guys. Quit spending
money. Quit spending money
uselessly. Gosh.


one group, you just lose another."
The one policy position where
many Republicans are eager to
give ground is immigration, where
Senate Republicans are negotiat-
ing with Democrats on a compre-
hensive overhaul. Yet they couch
these policy shifts on immigration
as more of a shift in message. Over
the weekend, Sen. Lindsey Gra-
ham of South Carolina went so far
as to call Romney's arch-conserva-
tive position on immigration "im-
practical" and "offensive." He was
referring specifically to Romney
urging immigrants in the country
illegally to "self-deport."
Perhaps the strongest call for
policy shifts as opposed to
tweaking the message comes
from New England Republicans.
Snowe said conservatives in
Congress, she said, have gone from
"original Republican principles
(of) fiscal responsibility and eco-
nomic opportunity" to "eviscerat-
ing government."
"That scares people," Snowe
said.
Steve Duprey, a Republican Na-
tional Committeeman from New
Hampshire, said any meaningful
shift on policy issues ultimately
must come from Republican presi-
dential candidates. Nominees al-
ways have that power, he said,
noting that Romney's march to the
right on immigration and other is-
sues helped define the party in
2012.
Snowe agreed, but noted that De-
mocrats' resurgence in 1992 came
only after Clinton had spent years
building a centrist anchor for the
party through his Democratic
Leadership Council.
Duprey offered one more ingre-
dient: "It usually takes a few elec-
tions of losing before you figure out
that singing to the choir isn't the
way to grow a party"


I've been reading in the
Chronicle about an anonymous
letter supposedly received by
the county commissioners. The
letter suggested Commissioner
Kenney's son Mark was in-
volved in an overcharge to the
county by Citrus Recycling.
Commissioner Kenney was
rightfully upset with his reputa-
tion on the line. At the Tuesday
night meeting, Citrus Recycling
owner Sandy Messina read a
statement to explain and refute
the amount of the overcharge.
She then said or asked Com-
missioner Scott Adams where
he got the figure of $800,000.
My question is, why would Ms.
Messina ask Scott Adams
where that figure came from if
the letter was anonymous and
why should Scott have to an-
swer that? We all know if Scott
Adams has something to say
or feels something is not right,
he brings it out in the open. He
doesn't write anonymous let-
ters. Something doesn't sound
right here.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

The recent pan/scraper
fiasco is another example
of how dialogue has
changed. County govern-
ment leaders did some-
thing really dumb, but all
of a sudden there were ac-
cusations of corruption,
criminality and out-of-
control spending.
Since his election,
Adams has made motions
to fire both the county ad-
ministrator and the county
attorney A new level of
fear exists throughout the
halls of the county court-
house about job security
and the future.
While it is great fun to
criticize any level of gov-
ernment, Citrus County is
not Washington, D.C.
In the past five years the
size of county government
has dropped each year. A
full 25 percent of the work-
force has been eliminated.
For the average taxpayer,
property taxes have gone
down each of the past five
years.
At the same time, services
have been maintained.
Regardless of what our
individual beliefs are on
the issues facing county
government, we can prob-
ably all agree that it is not
in the best interests of our
county for our leaders to
be perceived as a bunch of
buffoons.
New businesses won't
come here if they think we
are unprofessional or un-
friendly New jobs won't be


Nothing proven by letter
In reference to the recent in-
formation in the Chronicle about
an anonymous letter sent to
the county commission: All that
letter proves is that stupid peo-
ple can send in such unsigned
letters.
Why investigate JJ?
In Wednesday's paper (April 10),
Mr. "JJ" Kenney asked for an
investigation, I guess to clear his
name. County Attorney Richard
Wesch said he would comply
with their request to investigate.
Why investigate Mr. "JJ" Kenney
when it's his son Mark that's
accused of the wrongdoing? I
didn't get that.
Belongs in trash can
In reference to the anony-
mous letter that was sent to
the county commissioners: If
it's anonymous, any official
anywhere should put it in the
round file at the end of the
desk called a trash can. If it's
anonymous, it's not worth
anything.


created. New residents
will shy away
If our collective reputa-
tion sinks, we collectively
sink with it
The political plan here
is to create havoc for two
years and hope that voters
lose confidence in the
county commission. Scott
Adams and his chief ally
and business partner, Sen.
Charlie Dean of Inverness,
then hope that the incum-
bent commissioners will
get booted and new folks
will get elected who will
terminate the existing
county leadership.
That strategy sounds a
lot like what goes on in
Washington. Instead of
working to solve today's
problems, the tactical politi-
cian aims toward chaos with
hopes they will win during
the next election cycle.
Citrus County can't wait
for two years for our prob-
lems to be solved. Progress
Energy is closing the nuke
plant. J.C. Penney is shut-
ting its doors. We've got job
problems and tax prob-
lems and image problems.
Scott Adams is a smart
guy who has some good
ideas that can help move
this county forward. We
have elected all five of
these commissioners to
work for us now. We can't
afford to let our county
sink into buffoonery for
some future political goal.
Cut it out and get to work.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


1Hot Corner: ANONYMOUS ALLEGATIONS


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 C3










Fiberglass pool service
I'm trying to locate a pool
service in Citrus County that
does fiberglass pool refurbish-
ing. If you could put your
phone number in Sound Off,
I will get back with you
immediately.
Sorry for disappointment
Sorry to the Shrimpapalooza
customer. We packed up early
due to high winds that after-
noon which caused breakage
and artwork blowing all over the
place. Perhaps we'll have better
weather next year.
Good riddance
The seniors should be happy
those Internet places are clos-
ing. It was proven that the ma-
chines were rigged in the paper
last week. Also, only 3 percent
of all the money went to veter-
ans. That was supposed to go
to a nonprofit for all the veter-
ans and they kept all the
money. Get the facts.
Devaluing community
I agree with the man or who-
ever phoned in about the trash
between Dunnellon and Citrus
Springs. It is disgusting and it's
a shame that the law can't see
anybody throwing this out. They
must do it on off-duty time. The
other thing I want to say is: In
Citrus Springs, why do people
park their vehicles across the
sidewalks where you cannot
walk on the sidewalk you have
to take your life in your hands
and walk in the street? ... And
also, they put trash on there for
sale or free and people cannot
walk on the sidewalks. Please
check this out, somebody, be-
cause it sure is disgusting and
it runs down the value of other
people's homes and we would
sure like to see something done
about it.


COMMENTARY


Sound OFF


AIR SHIow

at







./S"vj'W ^








^^ -^fV ^

a-j


Ticketed for obeying law
I just received a ticket of
$158 from a red-light camera. I
was making a right turn on red.
The solution for me is as fol-
lows: Anytime the light is red, I
will not turn and the traffic can
pile up behind me and I will
wait 'til it turns green. Maybe
we'll get these people to fix this
silly nonsense. And by the way,
I don't think I've had a traffic
ticket in 30 or 40 years.
Turn in used cellphones
In reply to the person who
was looking to donate used
cellphones: St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, Crystal River,
will accept used cellphones to
be distributed to Cure the Call
Foundation. Please drop them
off at the office Monday
through Thursday, regular busi-
ness hours.


Lack of direction Cellphones for soldiers


How long is it going to take
Scott Adams to realize that he
has good intentions, but has no
idea how to accomplish his
goals?

Thanks for the aid
I'm calling to thank the cou-
ple who came to my aid on Fri-
day, March 29, in downtown
Inverness. I fell trying to get up
the curb and they were parking
at about the same time. They
immediately came over to help
me. Once safely on the side-
walk, they asked me if I knew a
good place to eat. It was nice
to be able to tell them informa-
tion on many good choices all
within walking distance. I hope
you enjoyed your meal and
thank you for your kindness
that night.


This is in response to the per-
son that wanted to know where
to send the used cellphones.
You can send them to
cellphonesforsoldiers.com.
They'll give you a free label
right there on the website.

Bigger score
We were just watching the
ballgame on Channel SUN and
we wonder why they don't put
the score information in the
upper left-hand corner a little
bit larger so we can see it. The
other stations, ESPN and all of
them, have a real nice big one
down the right-hand corner
where you can read it real well.
Maybe SUN will make it bigger
or the Rays will change to a sta-
tion where we can see the
scores.


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



Laboring over definition
In Saturday morning's paper
(April 6) on "Dim labor report," it
says the unemployment rate fell
because more people stopped
looking for work and were no
longer counted as unemployed.
So if you don't have a job and
you're not looking for work, if you're
not unemployed, what are you?
Gamblers stay out
It's kind of interesting the
person in Sound Off that said
they wanted to turn the mall
into a casino. What value is a
casino going to do? The people
that run it or own it are going to
be the ones making money.
How does that improve the
growth and the economic value
of Citrus County? I mean it's
such a dumb idea. We need to
get some activities in here that
will spur and generate the eco-
nomic growth of this county,
not a bunch of gamblers sitting
around gambling all their money
and then when they're broke,
they're going to be on welfare
because they can't afford to
keep up their houses or pay or
buy food for their families.
No tip for you
How do I justify a tip of 15 to
20 percent on a lousy meal? It
was Easter and a busy, busy day.
The steaks were not done as re-
quested and not tender. We sent
two back and waited and still they
were not good when returned.
They wanted to process as many
people as possible and I under-
stand that. But why do I have to
pay extra for a lousy meal?
Home-baked goodies
What I haven't seen advertised
lately are any home-baked cake
sales, fundraisers for churches,
organizations, etc. I always try
to stop by and pick some of
those home-baked goodies up.











B BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


ANDREW D. BROSIG/The Dally Sentinel
A flat panel television is on display Wednesday at Johnson Furniture in downtown Nacogdoches, Texas. Television ratings giant Nielsen
Company noted in its March quarterly viewing report a percentage of the population are eskewing traditional television viewing habits
in favor of online options, using computers, tablets and smart phones to get their entertainment fix.


NO


PROBLEM.


Fed up with cable, people turning to the Internet


RYAN NAKASHIMA
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES
Some people have had it with
TV They've had enough of the
100-plus channel universe.
They don't like timing their lives
around network schedules. They're
tired of $100-plus monthly bills.
A growing number of them have stopped paying
for cable and satellite TV service, and don't even
use an antenna to get free signals over the air.
These people are watching shows and movies on
the Internet, sometimes via cellphone connec-
tions. Last month, the Nielsen Co. started label-
ing people in this group "Zero TV" households,
because they fall outside the traditional definition
of a TV home. There are 5 million of these resi-
dences in the U.S., up from 2 million in 2007.
Winning back the Zero TV crowd will be one of
the many issues broadcasters discuss at their na-
tional meeting, called the NAB Show, taking place
this week in Las Vegas.
While show creators and networks make money
from this group's viewing habits through deals
with online video providers and from advertising
on their own websites and apps, broadcasters only
get paid when they relay such programming in
traditional ways. Unless broadcasters can adapt
to modern platforms, their revenue from Zero TV
viewers will be zero.
"Getting broadcast programming on all the giz-
mos and gadgets like tablets, the backseats of
cars, and laptops is hugely important," says
Dennis Wharton, a spokesman for the National
Association of Broadcasters.


The TV industry has a host of buzz words to
describe these non-traditionalist viewers.
There are "cord-cutters," who stop paying
for TV completely, and make do with online
video and sometimes an antenna. There are
"cord-shavers," who reduce the number of
channels they subscribe to, or the number of
rooms pay TV is in, to save money. Then there
are the "cord-nevers," young people who move
out on their own and never set up a landline phone
connection or a TV subscription. They usually
make do with a broadband Internet connection,
a computer, a cellphone and possibly a TV set
that is not hooked up the traditional way.


Although Wharton says more than
130 TV stations in the U.S. are broad-
casting live TV signals to mobile de-
vices, few people have the tools to
receive them. Most cellphones re-
quire an add-on device known as a
dongle, but these gadgets are just
starting to be sold.
Among this elusive group of con-
sumers is Jeremy Carsen Young, a
graphic designer, who is done with
traditional TV Young has a working
antenna sitting unplugged on his
back porch in Roanoke, Va., and he
refuses to put it on the roof.


"I don't think we'd use it enough to
justify having a big eyesore on the
house," the 30-year-old says.
Online video subscriptions from
Netflix Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. -
which cost less than $15 a month
combined have given him and his
partner plenty to watch. They take in
back episodes ofAMC's "The Walking
Dead" and The CW's "Supernatural,"
and they don't need more, he says.
He doesn't mind waiting as long as
a year for the current season's
See Page D4


Workforce takes job hunting on the road


It may seem impossible to
chart a steady course toward
reemployment if you've got
barriers to navigate around such
as lack of transportation or access
to the Internet. Well, we've got a
whale of a solution MOBY1.
"MOBY" is both a nickname for
our newest Mobile Resource Unit
as well as a nod to its substantial
size, as in Herman Melville's
Moby Dick the whale (it is not,
however, named in honor of
Richard Melville Hall, aka singer-
songwriter "Moby" Sorry).
At 40 feet stem to stern, the re-
furbished Winnebago tends to make
a big splash wherever its captain,
Jonathan Delicate, steers it. Size
aside, MOBY1 is hard to miss,
wrapped as it is in an eye-catching
- some might say, eye-popping -
green and "Workforce" blue.


If you participated in the Jonathan Delicate served six
Spring Fling Job Fair last month years in the United States Air
at the College of Central Florida Force and has six years of expe-
in Lecanto, you had an opportu- rience in management, an associ-
nity to climb aboard ate's degree in office
and check out administration and is
MOBY1's features. currently working on
The climate-con- his bachelor's degree.
trolled mobile re- Moreover, he knows
source unit is loaded what he's talking
with 10 computer about when it comes
workstations and In- to helping job seekers.
ternet access, plus all "I was unemployed
the equipment for eight months, so I
needed to conduct a Laura Byrnes can relate right off the
job search, hiring bat; I understand the
event or training, in- WORKFORCE struggles of obtaining
cluding copier, printer CONNECTION employment," he told
and fax machine, me. He also has first-
But enough, for now, about the hand knowledge of Workforce
mobile resource unit; equally im- Connection's services, which he said
portant, if not more so, is the mobile helped "put more tools in my tool
customer service coordinator belt" that led to his reemployment


And now Jonathan is here to re-
turn the favor.
For job seekers who live on the
west side of Citrus County, and
who may not be able to visit our
One-Stop Career Center in Inver-
ness, MOBY1 is the next best
thing. It can make the self-service
and staff-assisted resources of the
one-stop more accessible, as it
did last week during a visit to the
Homosassa Library MOBY1 will
also be available at the Crystal
River Mall on April 24 from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m., and will return on
May 6 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to the
Homosassa Library where it will
then be available bi-monthly
Job seekers interested in going
the DIY route can use MOBY1
to access the Employ Florida
See Page D2


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Putting

mortgage

balance

on credit

card not a

bad idea
DEAR BRUCE: I
have a second
mortgage in the
amount of $22,000. I am
paying 9 percent inter-
est, which is $181 a
month. I would to like to
pay down this loan as
soon as possible to get
my home equity back. I
am thinking of transfer-
ring the balance to a
credit card with 0 per-
cent interest for a year
to save on interest.
Should I do this? I.N.,
via email
DEAR I.N.: I have no
quarrel with you trans-
ferring your second
mortgage over to a 0 per-
cent interest card for a
year, if that is possible.
Paying down the loan is
certainly a great idea.
But people who offer
you 0 percent interest
are gambling that when
the year is up, you will
be sloppy, and all of a
sudden you will be fac-
ing 25 percent interest or
more, which is a killer
You didn't indicate
what your income is or
what other expenses you
have, but $22,000 is not
an insignificant amount
of money Rather than
focusing on the gross
amount, what you should
do is sit down and figure
out how much money you
can comfortably afford
every month and how
long it will take to re-
duce the $22,000 down to
nothing. In addition, if you
can squeeze in an extra
payment from time to
time, do so.
If you can't find a 0
percent interest credit
card, at least look and
see if you can find one
with a lower interest rate.
If your credit is good and
you make your payments
on time, you should be
able to find something in
the 6 percent to 7 per-
cent range. That's not a
huge saving, but every
nickel counts.
DEAR BRUCE: What
are the procedures for
getting a spouse's name
added to a home title?
The home was pur-
chased four years ago
and has only one name
listed. The other spouse
had bad credit.
In the event of the
husband's death, will
this affect the wife? She
would have no home,
correct? Is there a cost
for this procedure? -
B.E., via e-mail
DEAR B.E.: There are
simple procedures for
addressing this problem.
You can inquire with the
lender and ask to have
the wife's name put on the
title. Maybe the lender will
agree and maybe not.
In the event of the
husband's death, having
only his name on the
title would certainly af-
fect the wife, unless he
has a will drawn leaving
the home to her If there
is a mortgage, it may
well be that once the
lender learns the hus-
band is no longer in the
picture, the loan may be
called, and that is an-
other matter altogether.
See Page D2





D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


BYRNES
Continued from PageAl
Marketplace, the state's
premier online job bank,
as well as narrated webi-
nars and eLearning
courses, career and wage
information, skill and in-
terest assessments, re-
sume builder programs,
and job shop resource
guides.
Staff-assisted services
include one-on-one con-
sultation with Jonathan,
job-search assistance and
referral, resume prepara-
tion, employability work-
shops, recruiting events



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

If the wife's name can't
be added to the title or if
you want to cover yourself
immediately, have the hus-
band execute a properly
drawn will with an attor-
ney, leaving the entire
home to her, subject to the
mortgage.
DEAR BRUCE: My dad
is getting divorced. He and
this wife were married
only five years. They have
no children together and
own no property together.
The property they lived on
is in her name. He re-
ceives a monthly Social
Security disability check.
Will his ex-wife be entitled
to any of that money? -
Concerned in New York
DEAR CONCERNED:
The only income that your
father has is his monthly
Social Security disability I
can't imagine how his wife
can be entitled to any of
that money The fact that
they had a relatively short
marriage is a contributing
factor The important thing
is they have no children
and don't own any prop-
erty together
The property was in her
name and continues to be,
and he will very likely
have no claim on that, ei-
ther. If you are concerned
about her going after the
disability check, I think
you can put those concerns
aside.
DEAR BRUCE: I hired a
company back in 2009 to
take care of my taxes. They
were recommended by a
company I used to work
for. Recently I found out
that they never filed my
taxes, and I have 30 days to
file three years of taxes.
What can I do? RW., via
email
DEAR RW: You say the
company never filed any of
your taxes? Why in the
world would that be? If
this is a reputable com-
pany, then this is an over-
sight, but it sounds like the
company simply took
your money and failed to
file on your behalf. If that
is the case, fraud has been
committed.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


and job fairs, proficiency
assessments, skills trans-
ferability and support
service referral.
MOBY1 is also avail-
able for employers' use
for exclusive onsite hir-
ing events/job fairs; on-
site employee
orientations, workshops
and training; recruitment
support, such as job can-
didate testing and inter-
views; and outplacement
services.
There is no charge to
either job seekers or em-
ployers for any of these
services.
Jonathan said that so
far he believes MOBY1

The first thing you ought
to do is explain to the IRS
what is happening and
that you are considering
filing a complaint against
this company for what it
neglected to do. Your next
move is to discuss with the
IRS what you can do to
have this thing straight-
ened out. If fraud has been
committed, by all means go
after the company
DEAR BRUCE: My sis-
ter and her husband had a
joint checking account. My
sister signed a "paid on
death" form and put my
name as the receiver. The
bank did not say anything
about him signing.
Naturally, to make the
situation more confusing,
she died before he did, and
now the bank says the "paid
on death" form is no longer
admissible since their money
became his money. Is this
correct? MJ., via email
DEAR M.J.: I am not
sure what it is you signed.
A "paid on death" form
with your name on it as a
receiver? I frankly do not
know what that means.
And why the bank had an
obligation to say anything
to him about signing is also
something I am having a
problem understanding.
However, given the fact
that she is dead, when the
bank says the "paid on
death" form no longer ap-
plies since their money
has become his money, it is
probably the case. If there
is substantial money in-
volved, you may wish to
consult an attorney I am
not certain what has hap-
pened up until now, but I
suspect that when she died
the money became his, and
that's the end of the story
DEAR BRUCE: I have
one son, two grandchil-
dren, one daughter-in-law
and a step-grandson (all
one family). I have worked
extremely hard to amass
the monies I have right
now, and I am hoping
there is a way I can pre-
vent the daughter-in-law
and step-grandson from
ever getting any of it.
If I leave money to my
son, would it automatically
go to his wife? If his wife
gets any, she will give it to
her son (the step-grandson,


and its outreach in Citrus
County has been a huge
success. He said the word
is spreading quickly and
that he appreciates the
help he's received from
the community.
The next time you see
our big, green whale-of-a-
resource unit in your
neighborhood, stop by
and meet Jonathan to
find out what he and
Workforce Connection can
do for you. Or give him a
call to learn more at 800-
434-JOBS, ext. 1933.
"My goal is to assist
each and every customer
that steps foot on the
unit," Jonathan said.

age 22), and I don't want
him to get any
Do I have to make out a
trust for the grandchildren
to get my money after I die
(I'm 68) and leave my son
out completely, that way
avoiding her getting any of
it? Should I specify an age
for my grandchildren to
get it?
I know it sounds confus-
ing, but it's my money and
I think I should be able to
do what I want with it. Any
suggestions? C.H., via
email
DEAR C.H.: You can do
with your money pretty
much what you choose.
You can't cut out a spouse,
but that's not a problem
here.
If you don't want your
daughter-in-law and step-
grandson to ever get their
hands on your money, then
don't leave it to your son.
Just leave the money to
your grandchildren. You
can do this by way of a
trust, which pays at a cer-
tain age or upon your death
or on any other condition
that you wish to impose.
It's your money and it's
your call, but by all means
do it properly, either in a
will or in a trust. Even if
you do have a trust, you
still want to remember
your grandchildren in the
will for other things that
you might own, but re-
member, it's your call.
Also, in your will, you
should make it very clear
that you didn't overlook
your son, his wife or the
step-grandchild and that
you specifically wanted
the money to go to your
two grandchildren. You
should also explain to your
grandchildren what you
are doing and why Make it
clear that you don't want
them to give any of the
money to the mentioned
folks after your demise.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com
or to Smart Money,
PO. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


"Each person comes with
their own unique needs
and concerns. There is
nothing more special
than knowing you are
helping those in need."

Laura Byrnes, APR
is a Certified Workforce
Professional and commu-


nications manager at
Workforce Connection.
Please contact her at (352)
291-9559 or (800) 434-5627,
ext. 1234 orlbyrnes@
workforceconnectionfl
.com. Information about
Workforce Connection is
also available at www.
WorkforceConnection
FL.com.


SUBMISSION
DEADLINES
Follow these guidelines
to help ensure timely
publication of submitted
material.
* Business Digest: 4
p.m. Wednesday for
publication Sunday.


For more information
on advertising call

Anne Farrior at
352-564-2931 or

Candy Phillips at
1 352-563-3206 1


For information on
how your business can
advertise on the
Chronicle Website call
563-5592


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D3


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801




Leadership Citrus contributes to local restoration efforts


The 2013 Leadership Citrus class of the
Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is
busy today, Sunday April 14 from 10 am to
4 pm, in Floral City at the Duval House. The
house, built in 1866 by John Paul Formy-
Duval in 1866, is the oldest residential
structure in Citrus County. The 2013 Lead-
ership Citrus class is helping to restore it to
its original condition. H.D. Bassett and
Frank Peters of the Duval House Trust
began restoration efforts that will include
removing two additions that had been
added and restoring the structure as accu-
rately as possible to its original condition.
Each Leadership Citrus class votes on a
community project and this year, after an
overwhelming vote, the class chose to give
time and energy to these restoration efforts.


"The Floral City Heritage Council
should be commended for their vision to
retain and enhance Floral City's roots by
restoring the Duval House," said Katie
Mehl, public relations coordinator at Cit-
rus Memorial Health System. "The 2013
Leadership Citrus class chose this project
to lend a hand in preserving an important


part of Citrus County's history so future
generations can enjoy a look back into the
days when Floral City was a boomtown
with a population larger than Miami's."
Sgt. Ryan Glaze from the Citrus County
Sheriffs Office said what he looks forward
to most on the workday is the opportunity
to help out and give back to the community.
"I am thankful for the chance to lead by
example in order to help motivate others
within the community to step up and be a
genuine stakeholder within our commu-
nity," he said.
Those interested in more information
about the Duval House may call the Floral
City Heritage Council at 352-726-7740.
Donations to assist with the restoration
effort may be sent to the Duval House


Trust at 7188 S. Duval Island Drive, Floral
City, FL 34436.
Founded in 1991, Leadership Citrus is a
highly successful community leadership
program of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce that brings together individu-
als with diverse backgrounds and experi-
ences from both the public and private
sectors. The Leadership Citrus program is
designed for those who have demon-
strated the talent, interest and desire re-
quired for involvement in community
leadership roles. Through discussion and
interaction with established community
leaders, as well as various experts, partic-
ipants have a unique opportunity to ex-
amine the social, political and economic
factors affecting community life.


Chamber honors keystones of the

county at Annual Awards Dinner


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Keith Rigoulot
Excel Printing,
Crystal River
... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
April 18- 4:30 p.m.
Ribbon Cutting -
Christ Medical Center
April 24- 4:30 p.m.
Ribbon Cutting -
Cruise Planner at the
C.R. Chamber office.
April 25 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Business
After Hours -
Suncoast Schools
Federal Credit Union
April 26 6 to 10
p.m. Awards Dinner
- Chamber Pillar
Awards at Citrus Hills
May 3 11 a.m. Rib-
bon Cutting Florida
Cancer Specialist
May 10 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. May Lunch
@ Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
May 23 5 to 7 p.m.
Business After Hours
- Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Facility
Check our complete
Chamber and
Community calendar
at www.citruscounty
chamber.com or
follow the QR code to
see the website on
your smart phone!







R .4r.r


very spring,
the Citrus
County
Chamber
honors those citizens
and businesses that
donate their time, en-
ergy and expertise to
the county.
"This year, we are
pleased to announce
that the awards ban-
quet has claimed its
name, please applaud
the Pillar Awards,"
says Cindi Fein, Public
Relations Coordinator
at the Chamber.
"Movies have the Os-
cars, music has the
CMAs and the Gram-
mys, and it makes per-
fect sense that the
cornerstones of our
community now will
be honored with Pillar
awards."
"To celebrate the
awards theme, we're
doing our own Oscar-
like event," says Jeff
Inglehart, Special
Events Coordinator
for the Citrus County
Chamber of Com-
merce, "complete with
the red carpet and in-
terviews by our
very own Chamber
Chat host, Melissa
Benefield."
While there is no
formal dress code, at-
tendees will probably
feel most comfortable
in cocktail attire.
The annual banquet
is brought to the com-
munity this year by
Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen at Izaak Wal-
ton Lodge and Neon


" 40, ,fI4'
iiiiiiiiii


Leon's Zydeco Steak
House, along with
supporting sponsors
Insurance Resources
and Risk Management
and Mike Bays State
Farm Insurance
Agent.
Awards will be pre-
sented in 16 cate-
gories, including
outstanding youth
service, distinguished
citizen, outstanding
community organiza-
tion and the Charles B.
Fitzpatrick Heritage
Award honoring an in-
dividual who has "left
their mark" on Citrus
County. Chamber
Champions, ambassa-
dors and directors are
also acknowledged.
Josh Wooten, Presi-
dent and CEO of the
Chamber, is more ex-
cited than ever for the
awards this year.
"There have been


some speed bumps
lately here in Citrus
County," he says, "and
it is refreshing to see
the nominations we
received praising
those who have pro-
vided service above
and beyond. There are
so many good people
and organizations
right here in our
county, we even added
an award category this
year for Outstanding
Community Business
/Corporate Citizen
Award. It's fantastic to
see the positive energy
in our county and to
be able to focus on
that."
In addition to inter-
views and photos on
the red carpet, the
evening features a
cocktail hour with
cash bar, a multitude
of silent auction items
and door prizes, the


popular 50-50 and a
live auction with our
very own Southeast-
ern Farmer of the
year, Dale McClellan,
as auctioneer.
Tickets are $35 per
person and table
sponsorships are
available for $300. If
you are interested in
donating an auction
item or door prize,
contact Keith@citr-
uscountychamber.co
m. A few sponsorship
opportunities are still
available. Reserva-
tions are necessary
and will be accepted
up through 4 p.m. this
coming Friday, April
19. You may call 352-
795-3149 or visit
www.citruscounty
chamber.com to re-
serve your seat. This
event is open to all,
and we look forward
to seeing everyone.


Take a 'class in glass' or buy unique piece


i ,
Join us in welcoming our new member, Glasswerx, to the Chamber of Commerce. Owned and operated by
Debra Hawthorne, Glasswerx is a full service Glass Art Studio offering classes in Stained Glass, fusing and
mosaics. They offer repairs and retail of materials and supplies for glass artists. The gallery is filled with
beautiful handmade artwork for sale and local glass artists are encouraged to consign their work. Stop in
and enjoy the beauty Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., with extended hours on Tuesday and
Thursday until 8 p.m. Current Saturday hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Glasswerx is at 4318 N. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River. You can reach Debra at 561-512-6945. Mother Nature knows how glass loves sunshine and
she gave us a wonderfully sunny morning to cut the ribbon for our new member Glasswerx. Joining scissor-
wielding owner Debra Hawthorne, center front, are, from left, front row: Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brent-
wood; Jim Ferarra, Insight Credit Union; Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers; Jennie Douglas, Debra Hawthorne,
Kelley Paul, WollinkaWikle Title Ins.; and Jenee Vickers, Kiddie Kampus Learning Center. From left, middle
row: Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank; Jeanne Green, Inside Citrus; Lisa Nash,
FDS Disposal. From left, back row: Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County; Bill Hudson, Land Title
of Citrus County; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Sharon Maim; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control;
and Dan Pushee, associate member.


10 tips to
save water
for Water
Conservation
Month

While the Southwest
Florida Water Management
District encourages water
conservation year-round,
there is extra emphasis each
April for Water Conservation
Month. April is traditionally
one of the driest months of
the year and typically marks
the peak demand season for
public water suppliers.
Lower your monthlywater
bill and do your part to save
hundreds of gallons of water:
INDOOR
Run your washing ma-
chine and dishwasher only
when they are full.
Use the shortest clothes
washing cycle for lightly
soiled loads; normal and
permanent press wash cycles
use more water.
Thaw frozen food in the
refrigerator or microwave,
not under running water.
Scrape, don't rinse, your
dishes before loading in the
dishwasher.
Install high-efficiency
showerheads, faucets and
toilets.
OUTDOOR
Check your home's irri-
gation system for leaks to
save up to 6,300 gallons of
water per month.
Turn off your home's ir-
rigation system and only
water as needed; save up to
2,000 gallons each time a
watering day is skipped.
Don't leave sprinklers
unattended. Use a timer to
remind yourself to turn
sprinklers off.
Use a hose with a shutoff
nozzle when washing the car
to save around 40 gallons per
wash.
Consider installing a
rain barrel with a drip irriga-
tion system for watering your
landscaping. Rainwater is
free and better for your
plants because it doesn't con-
tain hard minerals.
CHECK FOR LEAKS
Use your water meter to
check for leaks. Turn off all
faucets and water-using ap-
pliances and make sure no
one uses water during the
testing period. Remember to
wait for the hot water heater
and ice cube makers to refill
and for regeneration of water
softeners. Go to your water
meter and record the current
reading. Wait 30 minutes.
(Remember: no water
should be used during this
period.) Read the meter
again. If the reading has
changed, you have a leak.
To learn more, log on to
WaterMatters.org.


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.









NC Supreme Court overturns big rate hike sought by Duke Energy
Associated Press The North Carolina lion households and busi- The rate package Duke Attorney General Roy nation's largest electricity
Supreme Court ruled Fri- nesses by 7.2 percent. The proposed included a 10.5 Cooper's office argued in provider following its
RALEIGH, N.C.-- North day that the state Utilities commission voted in Janu- percent profit for the com- court last year that the 2012 takeover of rival
Carolina's highest court has Commission did not ade- ary 2012 to allow the rate pany's subsidiary operat- commission failed to bal- Progress Energy. The
overturned a substantial quately consider the nega- increase, which would ing in the western half of ance the interests of both court agreed, sending the
rate hike sought by Duke tive impact on consumers generate an extra $309 the state, pushing the typi- customers and investors case back to the utilities
Energy and approved by by allowing Duke to raise million in annual revenue cal residential bill up by in overseeing the Char- commission for further
state utilities regulators. electricity rates for 1.8 mil- for Duke. $84 a year to almost $1,236. lotte company, now the consideration.


Financial seminar
in April
Nature Coast Financial will host
an annual Shred Party from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 23, in the
parking lot of the Century 21 building
next to Brannen Bank on U.S. 19.
Bring any paper you want to have
shredded.
CF Foundation
board to meet
The CF Foundation Board of Di-
rectors will meet at 4:30 p.m. April
17 at the CF Founders Hall Board-
room, Ocala, 3001 S.W. College
Road, Ocala, to discuss general
business.
Both meetings are open to the
public. A copy of the agenda will be
available at each meeting. For fur-
ther information, contact the CF
Foundation office.
Property owners
association expo slated
Villages Services Cooperative Inc.
will hold its fourth annual Vendor
Expo on April 17. The expo is open
to any officer of a homeowners,
property owners or condo owners
association. As in the past, selected
vendors will be present to describe
their services and provide contact
points for future subcontracts from
the various associations. Currently
20 suppliers have registered with
VSC, all of whom have been
screened for credentials and refer-
ences. Landscapers, painters, sprin-
kler services, etc., will round out this
year's expo.
Any association officer desiring an
invitation to this important event may
do so by calling 352-746-6770 and
asking for Amber or Sharon, who will
verify your credentials and supply
additional information.
Villages Services Cooperative Inc.
is a community management com-
pany serving 26 communities in Cit-
rus County.
Monster, Workforce
Connection team up
Monster and Workforce Connec-
tion have again teamed up to help
job seekers power up their job-
search efforts with a free Power
Seekers workshop on Wednesday,
April 17.
The high-energy workshop takes
place from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at
the College of Central Florida's
Webber Conference Center, 3001
S.W. College Road, in Ocala. There
is no charge to attend, but registra-
tion is required. Seating is limited to
175 participants.
Monster Worldwide, which pio-
neered digital recruiting in 1994, is
the parent company of Monster.com,
the premier global online employ-
ment solution. Workforce Connec-
tion provides fee-free services to job
seekers and employers in Citrus,
Levy and Marion counties.
SaRatta Reeves, national re-
cruiter and trainer for Monster, will
provide recommendations and tech-
niques to help job seekers stand out
from the crowd. Participants will



TV
Continued from Page Dl

episodes to appear on streaming
services, even if his friends acci-
dently blurt out spoilers in the
meantime. With regular televi-
sion, he might have missed the
latest developments, anyway
"By the time it gets to me to
watch, I've kind of forgotten
about that," he says.
For the first time, TV ratings
giant Nielsen took a close look at
this category of viewer in its
quarterly video report released
in March. It plans to measure
their viewing of new TV shows
starting this fall, with an eye to-
ward incorporating the results
in the formula used to calculate
ad rates.
"Our commitment is to being
able to measure the content
wherever it is," says Dounia Tur-
rill, Nielsen's senior vice presi-
dent of insights.
The Zero TV segment is in-
creasingly important, because
the number of people signing up
for traditional TV service has
slowed to a standstill in the U.S.
Last year, the cable, satellite
and telecoms providers added
just 46,000 video customers col-
lectively, according to research
firm SNL Kagan. That is tiny when
compared to the 974,000 new
households created last year.


While it's still 100.4 million homes,
or 84.7 percent of all households,
it's down from the peak of 87.3
percent in early 2010.


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events.
Duke names Fremstad
to business development
Duke Energy has named John
Fremstad business development
manager for the company's Busi-
ness Development and Economic
Development team.
He will be located in Orlando and
responsible for recruiting companies
in the data center sector in Duke En-
ergy's six-state service territory in
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Florida, Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana.
Duke Energy partners with local,
regional and state economic devel-
opment organizations, and also has
a specialized enterprise-wide busi-
ness development team that identi-
fies and proactively recruits large
national and international companies
to its entire service footprint.
Fremstad spent the past decade
as the vice president of KBR Build-
ing Group-Florida and vice president
of the Metro Orlando Economic De-
velopment Commission. Notable
Central Florida projects he led in-
clude the recruitment and/or con-
struction of the Sanford Burnham
Institute for Medical Research, Uni-
versity of Florida Research and Aca-
demic Center, JetBlue University,
Electronic Arts and the schools of
medicine and interactive entertain-
ment at the University of Central
Florida.
He also founded bioOrlando, a
company dedicated to accelerating
growth in the bio/life sciences industry.
Dilts-Benson named
chief quality officer
Access Health Care LLC an-
nounces the appointment of Lynda
Dilts-Benson, R.N., CCM, LHRM
(certified case manager, licensed
health care risk manager) as chief
quality officer.
Benson will direct
'. the companies'
newly formed
1 Quality Depart-
ment, which is re-
sponsible for,
among many other
Lynda things:
Ditts-Benson 0 Ensuring ap-
propriate care and treatment is ac-
cessible to members and provided
in a timely manner.
Ensuring the care and treat-
ment provided members is based on
accepted evidenced-based medical
principles, standards, and practices.
Improving and maintaining ben-
eficiary physical and emotional status.


Nielsen's study suggests that
this new group may have left tra-
ditional TV for good. While
three-quarters actually have a
physical TV set, only 18 percent
are interested in hooking it up
through a traditional pay TV
subscription.
Zero TVers tend to be younger,
single and without children.
Nielsen's senior vice president of
insights, Dounia Turrill, says part
of the new monitoring regime is
meant to help determine whether
they'll change their behavior over
time. "As these homes change life
stage, what will happen to them?"
Cynthia Phelps, a 43-year-old
maker of mental health apps in
San Antonio, Texas, says there's
nothing that will bring her back
to traditional TV She's watched
TV in the past, of course, but for
most of the last 10 years she's
done without it.
She finds a lot of programs on-
line to watch on her laptop for
free- like the TED talks educa-
tional series and every few
months she gets together with
friends to watch older TV shows
on DVD, usually "something to-
tally geeky," like NBC's "Chuck."
The 24-hour news channels
make her anxious or depressed,
and buzz about the latest hot TV
shows like "Mad Men" doesn't
make her feel like she's missing
out. She didn't know who the
Kardashian family was until she
looked them up a few years ago.


"I feel absolutely no social
pressure to keep up with the
Joneses in that respect," she
says.


Business DIGEST =
Improving and maintaining ben-
eficiary engagement in the health
care process.
Promoting health and early in-
tervention and empowering mem-
bers to develop and maintain
healthy lifestyles.
Involving members in treatment
and care management decision-
making.
Utilizing technology and other
resources efficiently and effectively
for member welfare.
Ensuring appropriate care and
treatment is accessible to members
and provided in a timely manner.
Being accountable and respon-
sive to member concerns and out-
comes.
Benson was promoted from her
previous position as chief compli-
ance officer.
Englund appointed
to SR medical staff
On Feb. 15, Craig W. Englund,
M.D., was appointed to the medical
staff at Seven Rivers Regional Med-
ical Center. Dr. Englund specializes
in hematology and oncology.
Dr. Englund is a graduate of
Cetec University School of Medicine
in Santo Domingo, Dominican Re-
public. He com-
pleted his internal
medicine intern-
,. ship and residency
at Ravenswood
S" Hospital Medical
Center in Chicago,
I -Ill., and his med-
Craig ical oncology and
Englund hematology fellow-
ships at University of Miami School
of Medicine in Miami, Fla. Dr. En-
glund is board-certified in medical
oncology and hematology.
"We welcome Dr. Englund to the
Seven Rivers Regional family," said
William V. Harrer III, M.D., chief of
staff.
For more information about the
hospital and its medical staff, visit
SevenRiversRegional.com.
Customer assistance
days under way
The Florida Department of Busi-
ness and Professional Regulation
(DBPR) reminds Floridians the sec-
ond annual CustomerAssist program
is currently under way. Throughout
the remainder of the Legislative Ses-
sion, DBPR will feature a help desk
at the Florida Capitol in order for de-
partment staff to assist current and
potential licensees as well as con-
sumers who have questions regard-
ing the services offered by the
department.
The CustomerAssist initiative was
developed to provide customers
who may need assistance with li-
cense applications with a direct and
personal point of access to the de-
partment. Staff for specific busi-
nesses and professions will be
available on specific days, and the
Department encourages customers,
license holders and applicants to
visit the CustomerAssist table at the
Florida Capitol to receive specialized
assistance.


The following businesses and pro-
fessions will be represented from 9
a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. on the
Plaza level of the Florida Capitol on
the following dates:
April 17: Hotels and Restau-
rants
N April 18: Real Estate
April 24: Condominiums and
cooperatives/regulation
April 25: Construction
May 1: Cosmetology
May 2: Hotels and restau-
rants/construction
The Central Intake Unit, which
processes applications for the De-
partment's licenses, will also be
available April 18, April 25 and May
1 to answer questions about license
application processes. Direct inter-
net access to the department will
also be available so customers can
check the status of their license ap-
plications online, file complaints and
access additional department infor-
mation.
For information, visit
www.MyFloridaLicense.com.
Board members named
at Chamber of Commerce
The Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce unanimously voted in
two new board members at its Feb-
ruary meeting. Please welcome to
the board of directors John F.
Hodgkins II, assistant vice president
at Regions Bank, and Rob Wolf,
dean of Instructional Services at the
College of Central Florida's Citrus
campus.
John began his career with Re-
gions in 2007 as a financial service
specialist and became licensed with
its investment services divisions in
2009. John is a proud native and
graduate of Crystal River High
School with a bachelor's degree in
business marketing from University
of South Florida. In his current posi-
tion as assistant vice president of
the Crystal River market, he special-
izes in providing financial solutions
and lending to small-business own-
ers. This involvement with finance
and small business increases the
strengths he brings to the board of
directors. John is also on the board
of directors of the Boys and Girls
Club of Citrus County. He and his
wife Lindsey reside in Lecanto with
their young son.
Rob relocated to Citrus County
more than 25 years ago and prior to
his current position has worked at the
Citrus County Chronicle as a sports
editor as well as working in market-
ing and public relations, corporate
training and continuing education as
director of the University Center at
the college. He is also an adjunct
business professor at Saint Leo Uni-
versity. A graduate of Lecanto High
School, Rob earned a B.A. in busi-
ness management and a master's of
business administration from Saint
Leo University. He is currently in the
dissertation phase of a Ph.D. in or-
ganization and management from
Capella University, which adds to his
expertise level to advise the Cham-
ber. He and his wife Lori live in Cit-
rus Springs with their daughter.


Associated Press
A list of television programing, with an option to watch via television
or iPad, is visible Wednesday on the screen of a tablet computer in
the lobby of the SuddenLink office in Nacogdoches, Texas.


For Phelps, it's less about sav-
ing money than choice. She says
she'd rather spend her time pro-
ductively and not get "sucked
into" shows she'll regret later.
"I don't want someone else
dictating the media I get every
day," she says. "I want to be in
charge of it. When I have a TV,
I'm less in control of that."
The TV industry has a host of
buzz words to describe these
non-traditionalist viewers.
There are "cord-cutters," who
stop paying for TV completely,
and make do with online video
and sometimes an antenna.
There are "cord-shavers," who
reduce the number of channels
they subscribe to, or the number
of rooms pay TV is in, to save
money


Then there are the "cord-nev-
ers," young people who move
out on their own and never set
up a landline phone connection
or a TV subscription. They usu-
ally make do with a broadband
Internet connection, a computer,
a cellphone and possibly a TV
set that is not hooked up the tra-
ditional way
That's the label given to the
group by Richard Schneider, the
president and founder of the on-
line retailer Antennas Direct.
The site is doing great business
selling antennas capable of ac-
cepting free digital signals since
the nation's transition to digital
over-the-air broadcasts in 2009, and
is on pace to sell nearly 600,000
units this year, up from a few
dozen when it started in 2003.


Oak Hill Hospital sets
Associates of Month
Oak Hill Hospital has announced
its star associates for the Month of
March. Each month hospital associ-
ates are chosen in a process that
involves nominations and voting by
their peers, patients, patient fami-
lies and physicians.
This month's Oak Hill Hospital
stars are:
Jessica Kekovich, LPN, joined
Oak Hill Hospital in September
2004 and works in the progressive
care unit as a licensed practical

her job as not only
caring for patients
but helping make
them smile and
making their stay
at Oak Hill better.
Jessica lives with
Jessica her son George
Kekovich and her fiance
John Singleton in Spring Hill. The
family also includes Milo and Boots,
their two cats, and Max, their dog.
Jessica's nomination came from
a patient who praised her for her
compassion and attention. "I was
suffering from a severe allergic re-
action to a medication and Jessica
would not leave my side until she
resolved the issue with my doctor,"
the patient said.
The patient praised Jessica's nat-
ural inclination to go above and be-
yond what is required as a nurse.
For her part, Jessica said "I enjoy
working with my staff members be-
cause they've always treated me
like family."
Judith Radke, RN, works as a
registered nurse in the intensive
care and cardiovascular intensive
care units, caring for open-heart
surgical patients. She also teaches
Zumba at a local fitness studio. She
lives in Spring Hill and her family
consists of a son, Nicholas, and two
daughters, Anna
and Julie. Her
seventh grand-
child is due in
May.
Judi's nomina-
tion came from a
patient and his
Judith family, who
Radke praised her for
being "superior, gracious, and the
most efficient nurse ever." She was
praised for being caring and com-
municating with not only the patient
but the family. She enjoys a reputa-
tion as someone who is willing to
make both patient and family com-
fortable and doing whatever is nec-
essary to make that happen. Of
Oak Hill Hospital, Judith said she
enjoys "the many friends I have
made."
In making the announcement,
Oak Hill Hospital's Chief Operating
Officer Sonia Gonzalez said, "Dr.
Thomas Frist Sr., our founder, al-
ways believed that 'Good people
beget good people.' People like
Jessica and Judith prove that Oak
Hill Hospital will continue the
legacy."


While the "cord-nevers" are a
target market for him, the cate-
gory is also troubling. More peo-
ple are raised with the power of
the Internet in their pocket, and
don't know or care that you can
pull TV signals from the air for
free.
"They're more aware of Netflix
than they're aware over-the-air
is even available," Schneider says.
That brings us to truck driver
James Weitze. The 31-year-old
satisfies his video fix with an
iPhone. He often sleeps in his
truck, and has no apartment. To
be sure, he's an extreme case
who doesn't fit into Nielsen's
definition of a household in the
first place. But he's watching
Netflix enough to keep up with
shows like "Weeds," "30 Rock,"
"Arrested Development,"
"Breaking Bad," "It's Always
Sunny in Philadelphia" and
"Sons of Anarchy"
He's not opposed to TV per se,
and misses some ESPN sports
programs like the "X Games."
But he's so divorced from the
traditional TV ecosystem it
could be hard to go back. It's be-
come easier for him to navigate
his smartphone than to figure
out how to use a TV set-top box
and the button-laden remote
control.
"I'm pretty tech savvy, but the
TV industry with the cable and
the television and the boxes, you
don't know how to use their


equipment," he says. "I try to go
over to my grandma's place and
teach her how to do it. I can't
even figure it out myself."


D4 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


y







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECLASSIFIED SUNDAYAPRJL 14, 2013 D5


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748




BEAGLE PUPPIES
Beautiful
10 weeks old
$125. ea.
(352) 447-3022
FREE SAFE BOATING
CLASS April 18, 25th
& May 2, 6P- 8:30P
Meets State
Requirements for
Boaters Certification
Contact Jim Kelly
(352) 795-4412
Homosassa Springs
Lot. o 150 x 220 on Inn
St. Nice Neighbor-
hood. Asking $12,500.
(904) 757-1012
INVERNESS
3/2/2 furnished,
very nice, in town

WE BUY GUNS
Buy, Sell, Trade
Repair & Restore
CALL (352) 445-1573




$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
UnwantedCars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
Dining Room Table,
glass top, 4 uphol-
stered chairs
w/ arm rest
(352) 527-2029
Free
50ft, Roan TV Tower
You take down
(352)-341-5992
Free Chihuahua

home no small kids.
Good with older kids,
gets along & cats.

FREE COMPUTER
MONITOR, works
CTX
(352) 341-2271

Buckskin Mare
14 Hands, to a good
home call
352-503-2246


-I
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




Boston
Bulldog/Terrier 4/10/13
Male, bl & wh, black col-
lier, missing from cardi-
nal St, behind new
wal-mart Reward
352-220-0240
Calico Cat, female,
spayed, white on
bellywhite flea color
Lost between
1400-1600 Cardinal St.
Reward call Eleanor
352-621-0862
Lost Calico Cat
Chocolate color white
chest & paws, orange
marking, Beverly Hills,
Gleason Place
Heartbroken last seen
April 6, REWARD
352-527-0302
Lost Calico Kitten
female, 8 mo. old
7 toes on front paw,
near Byrd St Inverness
(352) 637-3339
Lost Dachshund/
Chihuahua Mix
Turkey Oak & Citrus
brown/ white nose,
white chest,
REWARD
(352) 543-5100
Lost male Chihuahua,
8 yrs old,6 bs lost in
Cinnimon Ridge on
4/6. (352) 527-8028
Lost Miniature Golden
Retriever, Female
Name Taylor
W. Hadenotter Lane
Homosassa
SMALL REWARD
(423) 366-6041
LOST
Pitbull BIk and Wh, fe-
male, 4-5 yrs old,
non-spayed, lost in the
area's of Bev. Hill, or
Apachy shores/
Hernando. Family pet
pis call 352-476-5266
Missing Black & White
Male Cat, inverness

Call with Any Info
(352) 201-9130




Found
Free Beautiful Gray
Long Hair Cat Female,
spayed.
Needs A Good Home
Well manored &
loving. Loves
petting will make a
good companion.
Call (269) 254-3191




FREE SAFE BOATING
CLASS April 18, 25th
& May 2, 6P- 8:30P

Requirments for
Boaters Certification
Contact Jim Kelly
(352) 795-4412


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds

In Print

and

Online

All

The Tim e


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




18 Yr. Exp. LPTA
New to area, looking for
full time position Call
Laura 352-228-4535
EMPTY TRUCK
Returning to
Milwaukee, Chicago,
Mid West
Can move 1 item or
whole household
(414) 520-1612
Brian

Cemetery

4 burial lots. Valued
$2495 each. Asking
$1800ea. Beverly Hills
Memorial Gardens
321-269-7247




ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Fast paced environ-
ment. Ability to multitask
with good communica-
tion skills,Excellent Mi
crosoft Office skill is re-
quired. DFWP/EOE
resumewci@aol.com

SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-13

Performs routine
office tasks in Veter-
ans Services. Ability
to type and com-
pose routine letters
and memorandum.
Minimum of one
year's experience
performing
secretarial/clerical
duties. Working
knowledge of the
Microsoft Office
Suite of Products.
Starting pay
$9.99 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
LecantoFL 34461

to apply online by
Friday, April 19, 2013
EOE/ADA





Homemaker/
Caregiver

for older female in
her Citrus Hills Fl.
Home, no exp.
PT 1p-5p, Fri. Sat. &
Sun w/potential for
addl Hrs. Resume to:
caregiver 531
@gmail.com
or Mail: Resume
836 Sunnyside Ave.
Akron, OH, 44303




Busy Specialty office
Looking For
P/T Medical Asst.

Average hours per
week 25-30. Must
have experience in
taking vitals manu-
ally, assist in minor
office procedures,
and administer
SubQ injections
Medical terminol-
ogy and protocol.
Computer skills
are required.
Please Forward
Resume with Cover
Letter and starting
salary history to
medasstjob
@embarqmail.com

CNA/HHA
HOME VISITS
8/12 HR. SHIFTS

FAX RESUME
(352) 637 1176 or
CALL (352) 637-3111

*SLVENRilVER
... . . . ..R..
Join Our Team

RN-ICU
FT-Nights

APPLY at Our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.com
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River Fl.
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug /Tobacco
Free Workplace


DENTAL/
FRONT DESK

Value Dental Care
has a F/T, front desk
position Must Have
dental/front desk
exp. We offer, great
benefit package
35-37 hrs. week
Fax Resume to
352-794-6140
or Email VDCSH
@hotmail.com
No phone calls
please

RN
P/TorF/T3-11shift

CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8th Ave.
Crystal River
(352) 795-8832



LISTINGS
RN,LPN,CNA'S
Ciarra Medical person-
nel is hiring!
New nurses
welcome.Now accepting
applications for
RNs,LPNs and CNA.
Local positions all shifts.
Must have
cerficaion,CPRphysical,PPD,
pass level two
background check and
drug testing.
Apply at
www.ciarrastaffing.com
RN's, PT & OUT'S
LPN's, Psych.
Nurse, & ST.

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097




AIRLINE CAREERS -
Train for hands on Avi-
ation Maintenance
Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if quali-
fied Housing availa-
ble CALL Aviation
Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-314-3769
Experienced
Machinist

Part time Position
352-344-1441
Paralegal/
Legal Assistant

Estate Planning and
Civil Litigation
Experienced required
VanNess& VanNess
Fax Re sume to
352-795-0961or mail to
1205 N Meeting Tree
Blvd, Crystal River, FL
34429




FOOD RUNNER

Day time, country club
setting, reliable and de-
pendable, must be able
to lift food trays, drug
free work place. Apply
between 10am-2pm
Tue.-Fri. at Sugarmill
Wood County Club
contact Robin




AC SALES

Will train right person,
easy six figure income
Must have val. fl. DL,
Dave (352) 794-6129

r-- M -- -
do you possess...
.A DYNAMIC
PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
....SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS

Seekin an
INSIDE
SALES REP
to help service
existing accounts
and prospect for
new. Full Time with
Comprehensive
Benefits Package
Base Salary plus
Commission

APPLY TODAY:
dikamlot@chronicl
eonline.com



I Drug Screen I
Required for Final
SApplicant EOE




CABLE
TECHNICIAN

DECCA CABLE
currently has
openings for cable
technlclans. We are
hiring experienced
technlclans, as well
as trainees. Install,
troubleshoot, and re-
pair hlgh speed
Internet, cable &
phone service to
client customers.
Must have a valld FL
drivers Llc. wlth a
clean record.
Anyone Interested
call 352-854-6557 x 3
or apply In person at
Oak Run on SR 200
W& 110th Street,
Ocala.
EEO/DFWP
CDL CLASS A

WITH TANKER
REQUIRED
Looking to hire
someone to work in
septic industry
352-563-2621


NOW HIRING
DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
120 bed Skilled
Nursing facility'

APPLY IN PERSON
Woodland Terrace
124 Norvell Bryant
Hwy. Hernando
352-249-3100


CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH

APPLY IN PERSON AT:
920 E. Ray Street
Hernando

Experienced AC
Installer

ALPHA AIR
(352) 726-2202

Illustrator/
Photo Shop
Help Needed
Part time. Full time
In-house or take
home work, avail.

Also SEAMSTRESS
w/ Surger Exp.

(352) 464-1416

MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163





*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. Call
Michelle
352-436-4460





ADVERTISING
SALES ASSISTANT
Full Time

Strong Administra-
tive and computer
skills a must.
Customer Service
Skills Neccessary
Support Sales Reps
and Customers on
a daily Basis

Send Resume to
djkamlot@
chronicleonline.com



EOE and Drug
Screen required for
final candidate

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

CASE MANAGER
Apprentice

Live in position
room & board plus
hourly. For Men's
Homeless shelter
Fax Resume to:
352-489-8505

CDL CLASS A
DRIVER

Truss exp. helpful.
Bruce Component
Systems.
352-628-0522

NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone?

TELEMARKETERS
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500


CH*pNibE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.







Embroiderer
Needed

Experienced Only
Need Apply $10 hr.


Maintenance
Help
Part Time,
experience helpful,
apply in person







TURN KEY
Price Negotiable
352-634-1397





"LAUNDROMAT"
FOR SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER,
Lrg., Clean, Well Est.
352-795-2399


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25 x30x9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
SA local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com

LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
*for in 352-299-4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




Antique China
US made Franciscan
China, Desert Rose &
Ivy patterns, several
hard to find pieces, 25%
off price, Too many to
price separately! call
for info 352-270-8366

Oak pie safe hutch
$300, Large oak display
case $100
both exec. cond.
352-586-9498

Antique Oak Side
Board $950 OBO
352-527-3982




GE 25 Cub ft side by
side Refig $250, Ken-
more Ele. Range $150
Amana Dishwasher
$175, kenmore washer
$140, Panasonic Built in
Micro $50, all look and
workgreat 897-4108
GE STOVE,
deluxe glass top,
self cleaning
2 yrs. new $275.
(352) 746-5666
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
Super Juicer
as seen on TV,
used 1 time
$60 with all the extra's
352-628-4437
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free
Delivery. 352 263-7398




3 FILING CABINETS 4
drawer, 1 has key, and
2 desks $10 ea. or $40
all. Ipurdin@live.com or
352-586-0082




6 Drawer Snap on
Tool Box,
with tools
$195.
315-466-2268
10" Table Saw,
w/ 2 extentions $225
12" Brand Saw
w/ stand
$225 Both Craftsman
(352) 637-9694
AIRLESS SPRAYER
BLACK AND DECKER
$30 NEW IN BOX FOR
PAINT/STAIN ETC IN-
VERNESS 419-5981

Aluminum Ladder
Indust. Extends 30'
$100
352-860-2828

$10 4 MULTI LENGTH
INDOOR EXTENSION
CORDS $5 INVER-
NESS 419-5981
CRAFTSMAN 10"
BANDSAW $100
Ipurdin@live.com or
352-586-0082

Craftsman
3 Tier Tool Box
Good Condition
$250. obo
(352) 341-5247
CRAFTSMAN ANGLE
GRINDER 7 INCH $35
USED AS
POLIS HER/GRINDER/C
UTTER 419-5981

CRAFTSMAN COM-
PRESSOR 8-10 gal
tank. Needs repair.
$50.00 o.b.o.
352-344-5311


WITH CASE $25 USED
VERY LITTLE INVER-
NESS 419-5981
SHOP SMITH
$900.
4 ft TABLE SAW
$500.
(352) 503-2323



AM/FM RECEIVER
Bookshelf set
w/turntable,cassette,
30W speakers $35.
352-465-8495
Sony Betamax
recorder/player.
Works good. $50
(352) 746-6813
TV'S FOR SALE
Sat-Sat 8am-4pm
$25 Each Inq. Ft. Desk
614 NW Hwy 19, Cry.
River, Best Western.
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET 5 $90
352-613-0529



LANDSCAPE STONES
135 sand/tan geo
stones, 15 cap stones
delivery an option
$250.00 352-746-0401
LUMBER Nice Selection
Cherry Cedar, Some
walnut $1. -$3 a Bd. Ft.
The more you buy
the better the price.
(352) 228-0658



COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 15" $20
352-613-0529
Computer w/windows 7,
monitor, printer, key-
board, mouse, speak-
ers. $250.00
352-5134127
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP F4400 PRINTER
Printer/Scanner. Works
with Windows 2000,XP,
Vista. Asking 25.00
352-650-0180



6 Metal Patio Chairs
Metal with full cushions,
good cond, $95
352-382-0124
PATIO SET table and
3 Highback chairs-$20.
2 Ig plants $5
Ipurdin@live.com or
352-586-0082



(2) LOVE SEATS
Taupe color
$75 ea
(352) 746-5666
48" PLEXIGLASS TA-
BLE TOP Top is round
and in great condition.
Asking 25.00
352-650-0180
7' Tufted Sofa
Cream/salmon floral de-
sign, good cond. $100
352-503-9306
DRESSER, MIRROR,
NITE STAND, 2 TW.
BEDS W/MATTRESS
$100 Ipurdin@live.com
or 352-586-0082
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
Plenty of Storage
$75.
(352) 746-5666
Full Bed, 2 night
stands, dresser/mirror,
box spring & mattress
$400.
L Shaped Computer
Desk, black wood
$100 (352) 586-7437
Glass Top Table,
w/ 4 chairs $75.
1 Entertainment
Center Black,
1 Entertainment Light
Oak $125 for both
(352) 795-7254
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Light Tan Recliner
Rocker, w/ stand light
& magazine rack $100
White Leather Chair,
stand w/light. $100
(352) 795-7254
MASTER BEDROOM
SET-QUEEN SIZE
White Oak vernier,
Headboard,2-night
stands with built in
lights,Dresser with
mirror,Chifrobe,6 month
old King Coil mattress
with box spring and
frame.
$600.00 352-795-9405
MATTRESS Full size
mattress only great con-
dition.$60.00 726-2572
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
*k 352-621-4500 *
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Quality Mattress Sets
Qn./Full.$199 both Pcs
Twin Matts. $89.95 All
New, Nice 621-4500
RECLINER-Black
leather,exc cond.
custom extra large
51' wide $295.
(352) 419-5077
ROLL TOP DESK
Oak desk, full size,
good condition. $300
(352) 621-6892
after 6pm
SOLID MAPLE HUTCH
AND DRESSER $100
Ipurdin@live.com or
352-586-0082
TWIN BUNK BEDS
With Dresser and mir-
ror, chest of drawers
$250, 1920's Kerosene
Lamp $75 Call
352-746-7815


2 Hedge Trimmers
1-electric, 1-gas $20
ea; 2 Weed wacker
1-gas; 1 -electric $20
ea (352) 465-5998
Craftsman Rider
Mower42" cut Excel-
lentCondition $450
352-637-4718
Custom Made Garden
4x4x12H, $50 all PT
Other sizes avail
Includes delivery
(352) 527-4910
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Lawn Tractor
Trailer 30" x 40"
excel, condition
$150.
(352) 382-0479
Linamar
self propelled push
cordless mower, 2
spare batty. Orig. cost
$500, asking $200
352-382-2324
Power Mate Tiller

Rear Tine 18 exec.
cond. $350
352-344-4721




Citrus Springs
Sat, Sun 8a to 4p
Variety of items!
11124 N Tulsa Ter

HOMOSASSA
9771 W Halls River Rd
Moving Sale 9am-4pm
Sat 4/13-Sun 4/14
Furniture:Living, Dining
Patio,Bedroom,desks,
chairs,file cab.Home
decor,paintings,outdoor
storage units,gas grill
42"w paneled door
LECANTO
Leisure Acres
5529 s. Gray Oak Ter
Sat & Sun 9-4
DON'T MISS IT
Yard Sale Leftover
Exc. Bike $55, Ladies
Golf Club $45, Student
Desk $25, Basket Ball
Goal $15, pool blnk reel
$35 352-212-1827



3 Men's Suits
2 are custom tailored
31 waist 34 length char-
coal color $33 each
352-205-7973
4 MEN'S SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
$15 EACH
352-613-0529
MEANS SUITS SIZE
34X30 & 36X30 $40
EACH 352-613-0529
PGH STEELER SKI
JACKET Mens med
NFL VG Cond $25.
Dunnellon 465.8495



!!!!! 245/60 R20 !!!!!
Nice tread! Only $70 for
the pair!! (352)
857-9232
*****215/50 R17*****
Like new! Only $70 for
the pair!! (352)
857-9232
----~~~~265\75 R16 ~~~~
Beautiful tread! Only
$100 for the pair!!
(352) 857-9232
2 Large Nautical
Oil Paintings
$45. ea.
1 Gun Cabinet, holds 8
guns Wood $99.
352-341-3526
1989, 40H Mercury,
Long shaft, no controls,
$185.
Golf Cart Tire,
& hug caps, $15.
315-466-2268
ANTIQUE BABY CRA-
DLE Wooden cradle
from Vt.No room.$30.00
352-341-5247
Bamboo Coffee Table
exec. cond, glass top
$55 613-2797
BICYCLE BOYS 12"
SPIDERMAN WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
Carrier A/C, used, 2V2
ton pkg unit w/trane
10kw heat. Gd cond
$575. Sears Craftman
front tine tiller 825
series, 24". Like New
$250 (352) 447-4368
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $5
EACH 352-613-0529
COLEMAN POWER
MATE 1500 GENERA-
TOR, Carburetor needs
work. $60, (352)
465-1813 (Dunnellon)
DECORATIVE
KITCHEN CANNISTER
SET $10 HAS 4
CONTAINERS WITH
TOPS 419-5981

EXP. PAINTER

Drivers Lic. Required

GARRARD AUDIO
CASSETTE PLAYER
AND RECORDER $10
GOOD CONDITION
419-5981
GE SMART WATER for
HOT/COLD WATER
dispenser $60.00
352-527-1399
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
Haywood Power Flow
LX, %/4 HP PUMP with
filter basket and star-
clear filter & 2C900
filters & hoses $500
obo 352-489-2823
Magnum Tex Finish,
Interior/Exterior
Commercial
Paint Sprayer
$150.
(352) 428-7679
Pressure Washer

5 HP 2600 PSI $150
352-746-6090


l i............... *,

Fa:(5)5356 Tl re 88 5-2301Eal lsi- -crncenie~o est:ww~hoiloln~o


Buy, Sell, Trade
Repair & Restore
CALL (352) 445-1573



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
Scall 352-527-0555



Deluxe Baby Carriage
$25 Exec. Cond.
352-249-7804



ALL AUTOS WANTED
with or without title. Any
cond. make or model.
We pay up to $10,000
and offer free towing.
(813) 505-6939


SANDER $100 MADE
OF METAL HEAVY
DUTY OLDER STYLE
INVERNESS 419-5981
ROLF LEATHER
HANDBAG $20 NEW
NEVER USED BLACK
MANY COMPART-
MENTS 419-5981
Ryobi Router Table
$60.
Digital Thermos Stat
$50.
(352) 249-7033
SEWING MACHINE
GEMSY G0818
Sewing machine with
table $350 Firm
(352) 527-8738
Submersible Pump
3 wire $75.
Guaranteed
will demonstrate
352-726-7485



Lazy Boy Lift Chair,
excel. cond.
$450
Large Bedside
comode Like new,
$35. (352) 586-9882
WALKER 4 WHEEL
W/SEAT,&HAND
BRAKES, LIKE NEW.
$75.00 352-746-4160
Wheelchair Lift Easily
load folding chair(not
scooter) to vehicle hitch
$100 Dunnellon.
352.465.8495



Grinnell Bros. Spinet
Piano made in Detroit
Mich VGCond. $400
(352) 447- 4368













Wanted
Old Guitars,amps,
pedals, accessories
Private Collector pay-
ing CASH!!!
Call M.J. 257-3261




3 MINI MUFFIN TINS/4
BREAD PANS $7
GOOD CONDITION
44E INVERNESS


SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE
w/gold trim.
$150. OBO
(352) 746-3327
HOUSEHOLD over
stove microwave good
cond, 50.00 clean
moving boxes 25.00
Inverness. 352 419888



TREADMILL, manual,
easy to use, folds, ex-
tras, very good condi-
tion, $60 (Dunnellon)
(352) 465-1813
Weights Olympic,
easy curl, +70 lbs. $40.
2 Dumbbells 160 Ibs,
$40. Bar/Dumbbells +
110 l bs+, $40.
(352) 637-6000



20' CANOE
Fit 3 people, yellow
$100
352-860-0939
BICYCLE RACK Allen
Brand fits on your car or
van trunk, holds up to 4
bicycles, new in box.
$50 746-7232
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel. cond.
w/ Charger, Delivery
Avail .352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DOGGY LIFE VEST
MTI brand, m (8-201b),
orange w/black straps.
Handle on top. New $25
746-7232
EZ Go Golf Cart
$1,500 Excel. cond.
w/ Charger,
Delivery Available
352-527-3125
GOLF CART
2005, Club Car
fast. good cond.
rain cover, ball wash
$2,000. (352) 746-1243
GUN RACK or Dry Bag
w/mask,snorkel, flippers
& flag-$20ea.
lpurdin@live.com or
352-586-0082

HUGE
AMMO SALE


Hard to Find
22 Ammo, 38, 40, 45,
223, 9mm, & Many
Others Available
AMERICAN
TRADING POST
787 NE 5th Street

352-564-0012

SCUBA TANK 80cu.ft.,
Aluminum, silver US Di-
vers Brand,w/J valve &
harness.Good
Cond.$50 746-7232
WATER COOLER
5gal.w/spout.Orange
w/Gatorade logo.Cup
holder on side.Great

WE BUY GUNS


Dixie Girl
Dixie Girl, 5 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
loves people, dogs
& kids. Intelligent,
affectionate,
friendly, gentle, aims
to please. Medium
size. Walks well on
leash, rides well in
car. Beautiful girl.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363

DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






A(352) 634-5039 *









LILLY
Lilly, a 3-y.o. Hound
mix, very sweet, af-
fectionate, bonds
w/human friends.
Fawn & white color.
A bit timid in new sit-
uations, walks well
on leash, sits for
treats, weight 50 Ibs.
Good companion
for family who can
spend time w/her.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808.


My name is Dusty
I am 9 mths old. Every
thing is done, now all I
need is my home. Call &
come and get me
419-0223/726-1006 visit
me on www.savingangels
petrescue.com


My name is

Max
I am a mini scz, fixed,
utd, and chipped looking
for my forever home.
Call SAVING ANGELS
RESCUE
419-0223/726-1006
Visit our web site
www.savingangelspetres-
cue.com









OZZIE
Ozzie, 2-3 y.o. Black-
mouth cur mix,
beautiful, weight 50
lbs, friendly, slightly
shy, likes other dogs
& people, strong,
active, needs strong
handler, no young
children, fenced
yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288. "

Parrot's Whole Sale
Prices hand fed,baby
nandays, Pr bl front
amazons, prof indian
Ring necks, pr cocka-
tiels & sgl, parkeets
637-6967

Shih-Tzu & Shih-Poo
Pups, Available
Registered
Lots of Colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
Shih-Tzu PUPS
1 MALE, 1 FEMALE
AKC, 3 mos. old,
Home raised, shots up
to date, very loving
(352) 621-0450
Shorkie for Sale
Female, health cert, 1st
shots, 8 wks April 12th
$300 Call Judy
352-344-9803









TUCKER
Tucker, 3 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
beautiful, active,
Hearworrrm-negative,
playful&friendly,
weight 50 lbs. Experi-
enced handler, no
young children in
family, fenced yard
preferred. Loves
exercise & play.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Yorkshire Terriers
Males, 8 wks on 4/4,
$450 cash. See the
parents in Lecanto
(727) 242-0732


unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
Call Mike 386-266-7748
BEAGLE PUPPIES
Beautiful
10 weeks old
$125. ea.
(352) 447-3022
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



Dachshund Puppy
Female, Mini, small
Champion blood line.
Health Cert. $375.
(352) 795-0200
(352) 220-4792 Cell


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY,APRIL 14,2013 D5







D6 SUNDAY,APRIL 14, 2013


4 HP Evinrude
Outboard, with
remote tank,
Runs Good $350.
(352) 628-7818
1985 FORCE
85 HP, Outboard Eng,
w/power lift. low hrs
fresh water only $1200
352-507-1490
BASS TRACKER
'92, Complete outfit,
fish or pleasure, great
cond. $2,500 obo
513-260-6410 Crs. Riv.
JET SKI
Flotation Ramp/Dock
$500
Mercury Outboard
Motor 10HP, $300.
(305) 333-0542



BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-
22 Ft Pontoon Boat
2004 Odyssey, 115 HP,
4 cyc, '05 Yam. motor
gar. kept, $10,500 obo
(352)422-2113
1994 GRADY WHITE
208 ADVENTURE
w/cabin,outbd power
tilt/trim 150 Yamaha,
fish finder, many extras.
Very clean, motor needs
work, must see. $5,495.
352-503-7928
ALUMA CRAFT
Magic Tilt, 16ft, alumi-
num John Boat with mo-
tor & trailer
dept. find. & anchors,
excel. cond. low hrs on
mtr., $2,700 cash firm
Floral City
(352) 341-1714



Bayliner 1984
Trophy Cuddy
cabin, clean, with
trailer, Volvo pente
i/o.does not fire,
needs work,$2000.
cash only, call
Doug 564-0855





--
C DORY
1999 16ft, Angler, with
trailer, Honda 4 stroke,
40HP, $7,800 Floral City
(717) 994-2362 Cell





l '- L: S ,


Dinghy
Good Condition and Ele.
Trolling Motor $300 for
both 352-422-2516
FREE SAFE BOATING
CLASS April 18, 25th
& May 2, 6P- 8:30P
Meets State Re-
quirments for Boat-
ers Certification
Contact Jim Kelly
(352) 795-4412
SEADOO
'09, JET SKI
$1,800 & Flotation
Dock Ram $500.
(305) 333-0542
SEARS
12 ft. Aluminum V
Bottom, galv. trlr.
excel. cond., 4HP
Johnson outbrd,
$500 cash, firm excel.
cond. Floral City
(352) 341-1714
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



'06 ROCKWOOD
TT
31' Signature Series.
Aluminum frame. Rear
queen, 12' LR slide. All
factory extras + more.
Completely equipped
(linens, kitchen, tools,
spare parts). Ready to
go. Immaculate condi-
tion, No smoking, no
pets. $14,000.
352-637-6262
5th WHEEL HITCH
(Hirch) 4-way tilt &
15K load range
$250 OBO
(352) 422-2113
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, On. bed., +
rear bunk beds,
slide out, ducted AC
Very clean. Reduced!
$9,000 (352) 621-0848
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



$$ TOP DOLLAR $$
For Wrecked, Junk or
UnwantedCars/Trucks
$$ (352) 201-1052 $$
"BEST PRICE;*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**


-m
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




03 MITSU SPYDER
Red cony, a real looker!
Auto V6 25mpg. Great
mech'I cond. Can email
pics. $5600 464-2966
2004 FORD
Crown Victoria, 133K
mi, exec. cond. garg.
kept, smk free, new ti-
res, $6,490
352-422-1916
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybod Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3 -1902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
2005 Lesabre
$8,995.
352-341-0018
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th an-
niversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles,
immaculate,loaded,call
for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2004, Impala
$4,995.
352-341-0018


FORD
1999 Crown Victoria
60,800 miles,silver in
color,power
windows,locks,seatcruise,tlt
wheelcassette
player,newer tires
very clean. $3900
o.b.o. 352-257-2590


2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
1991 Crown Victoria
$1,500 352-795-7474
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
GMC
'04, Sierra, V6, auto,
1 owner, non smoker
64K mi., $8,200
(352) 344-8553
HONDA
'07, Civic Hybrid,
128k mi., org. owner,
leather, very clean,
asking $9,750
(352) 503-7312
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
LINCOLN
2000, Town car,
loaded I owner
$5,495.
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PONTIAC
2001, Grand am
$2,995
352-341-0018
SUBARU
2002, Forester AWD
$3,995
352-341-0018








I I I I I I I I
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On% i$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


CLASSIFIED




Shortbed, 350 Bortec,
700 Pw Tran,CustColor,
Silv BI,show truck $9500
OBO 813-469-8024



1967 CHEVY
Shortbed, 350 Bortec,
700 Pw Tran,CustColor,
Silv BI,show truck $9500
OBO 813-469-8024
DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
quad cab 270,000 miles
needs transmission, en-
gine, AC work good
body, tires $1000 OBO
360ci 352-464-4764
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
FORD
2011 Ranger XLT,
$17,500. KBB, OBO
AutoTrans, Power
Windows, Doors Locks
AM/FM/CD/XM/CB,
Cruise, Bed Cover,Alloy
Wheels, More Pictures
w/email: djameson5
@tampabay.rr.com
cell 410-703-9495
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100



FORD
'98, Explorer, XLT,
$2,700 obo
(352) 637-4676
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
JEEP
1999 Cherokee Sport
4X4, 6 cyc, 4WD, 148k
mi, Good cond $3500
(352) 447-4368
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100





L (i) Da)


G'- ci


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



05 TOYOTA
Sienna LE, local car
serviced only at Toyota,
Color tan 103K Mi,
$10,800, 352-795-2975
1995 Dodge
Caravan, 6 cyc, 7 pass,
runs, great, looks good
$1, 475 352-637-2588
845-588-0759
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs for more info
call Tom 352-325-1306



370-0505 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
APPLICATION: 2012-320
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
ARQUE TAX RECEIVABLE
FUND L P US BANK CUST
FOR ATRF FLORIDA &
CAPONE
The holder of the follow-
ing certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate
number and year of issu-
ance, the description of
the property, and the
names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2953
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010
DESCRIPTION OF
PROPERTY:
TOWN OF DUNNELLON LOT
644
NAME IN WHICH
ASSESSED:
INGRID C REYES,
ROY D REYES
Said property being in the
County of Citrus, State of
Florida.Unless such certifi-
cate shall be redeemed
according to law, the
property described in
such certificate shall be
sold to the highest bidder
on line, on May 15, 2013
at 9:30 A.M. at
www.citrus.realtaxdeed.
com.
Dated March 28, 2013
ANGELA VICK
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Citrus County, Florida
By: Theresa Steelfox,
Deputy Clerk
Advertised 4 times:
April 14, 2013
April 21, 2013
April 28, 2013
May 5,2013


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

GOLDWING
1986 Trike, Tri-wing
conversion, always
garage kept, excel.
cond. 33k mi. $9,000
(352) 746-7290

HARLEY
'99, FXDWG 7k mi, stg
3 cam, big blc, 42" drag
pipes $7000 obo, or
trade 727-408-0602

Heavy Leather
Motor Cycle Jacket size
40,designed for Harley
Davidson, good cond.
$60 OBO 352-503-6734



366-0414 SUCRN
04/25 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE:
S.M. Duggan Towing
L.L.C. gives Notice of Fore-


KAWASAKI
'09, Eliminator,
low miles, good cond.
$1,500
(352) 637-2306, Bill

YAMAHA
2005, Majesty, YP 400
step thru motorcycle
scooter, exc. shape,
only 2200 miles, $3000
352-419-4419



365-0414 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865.08, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS




closure of Lien and intent
to sell these vehicles) on
04/25/2013, 10:00 a.m. at
1635 NE 32ndAve, Ocala,
FL 34470 pursuant to Flor-
ida Statutes. S.M. Duggan
Towing L.L.C. reserves the


HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business
under
the fictitious name of
KINGS BAY LODGE
located at 506 NW 1st
Crystal River, Florida
34428, in the County of
Citrus, intends to register
the said name with the
Division of Corporations
of the Florida
Department
of State, Tallahassee,
Florida. Dated at
St. Petersburg, Florida
this
5th day of April, 2013.
/s/B. Norris Rickey,
Director, Crystal Tenn Inc.
Published one (1) time in
Citrus County Chronicle
April 14, 2013




right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1991 CHEV Caprice
VIN #
1G1BN53E6MR105134
April 14, 2013


369-0414 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
A Steering Committee meeting of the Strategic Planning Committee of the Citrus
County Hospital Board will be held on Thursday, April 25, 2013 beginning at 12:00pm
in the Board Room, located on the second floor of the Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem Administration Building, 502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness, Florida, to discuss:
I Approval of Minutes.
I Update of the Community Needs Assessment.
I Other
Copies of the Agenda are available by calling the Citrus County Hospital Board of-
fice at 352-341-2250. Any person wishing to appeal any decision made by this
Board, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting, must ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record must include the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons who require special accommodations under the American with Disabilities
should contact the Citrus County Hospital Board Office, 123 S. Pine Ave., Inverness,
Florida, 34452 (352) 341-2250.
April 14, 013

367-0414 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY CONSTRUCTION
LICENSING AND APPEALS BOARD AGENDA
WEDNESDAY April 24, 2013 2:00 P.M.
Lecanto Government Complex
3600 W. Sovereign Path
Lecanto, Florida 34461
DAVID HUTCHINS, CHAIRMAN JAMES WHITE WILLIAM L. WINKEL
GERRY GAUDETTE ROBERT CABLE
(1) CALL TO ORDER
(2) PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE
(3) PROOF OF PUBLICATION
(4) APPROVAL OF MINUTES
(5) CITATIONS:

a) Benjamin Hill Citation #0064- Commence or perform work forwhich
a building permit is required without such permit being in effect.
b) Lester Patton Citation #0088 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor, or advertise one's self or business or act in
the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or
certified in Citrus County.
c) Virgil Fuston Citation #0096 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or certified in
Citrus County.
d) Matthew Logue Citation #0042 Engage in the business or act in the
capacity of a contractor, or advertise one's self or business or act in
the capacity of a contractor without being duly registered or
certified in Citrus County.
(6) OTHER DISCUSSION:


4na1k Dnf
10 6,cm.. ^^^k^A^^. -^ 4m. .


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052



SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316



ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352 422-7279 **
**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call H&H
Services today!
li#37658 352-476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *r
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V'RELIABLE-*Free Est
* 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
e FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748


A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. Good Rates, Res,
Free Est., Lic#39324
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609*
Primary Cleaning
** Free Estimates-
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service-
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
AFFORDABLE
RELIABLE
Quality Cuts Lawn Care
Budget Plans, Lic/Ins
352-794-4118
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes,
beds, cleanup,hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine- It's Tune Up
Time! 352-220-4244


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We GetOff The
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up& Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@vahoo.com


DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876
SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352)419-2065



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065



Your World

66 4444t


CHONidCE


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AAA ROOFING
Call the "eak6usten"
Free Written Estimate

:$100 OFF:
Any Re-Roof:,
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000EHZ








GENERAL

Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

35 -2 1 4*


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneT!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-3S2-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM




Add an arlidittouch to your exiting yard
'R or pool or pln
s' something

Snomplelelynew!
"Oftenimitated,
V.i ll dupikated"


YOURINTEIRLOCKINGBRICK0 R SPECIALIST
COIP E.S
I POOL AND PAVER LLC
I Insurd 352-400-3188


I DN INI


PRESSURE
WASHING AND
SEALING
OF
CONCRETE/PAVERS
AROUND YOUR POOL.
3 CHOICES OF SEALANT
Free Estimates
352-ss515-3131
Local business
i Weeki Wachee local.
18 yrs. exp.


Ozello Gardens Y DON'T LET YOUR
oI' has: i DRYER START
has:.A FIRE!

P-nut Shell Mulch Fia,,RaIReNo,...$

P-nut Shell Compost Call

P-nut Shell Topsoil

795-7517- Delivery -
46-11070 Price
Locll.O ne 1+ rs


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S ALL Home
Repairs
: SmaLL Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
A Alord.ihe & Dependable
Experience lifelong
S52-.344-0905
cell: 400-1722
.. sured Lic.#37761


Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Metal Roofing
We Install Seamless Gutters
A_ Lic #CCC1325497


MAC JOHNSON
iTM ROOFING, INC



TOLL FREE

866-376-4943




When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
.'/* Cleaning & Sealing
SH'" "Grout Painting
IE 1?' Residential &
(I '7 Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


I PAI N


MOTTSTTNG _


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Chapter 18, Building Ordinance update
ANY PERSON WHO DECIDES TO APPEAL A DECISION MADE BY THE CONSTRUC-
TION LICENSING & APPEALS BOARD WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSID-
ERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING WILL NEED TO INSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, WHICH RECORD SHALL INCLUDE THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. (SECTION
286.0101, FL. STATUTES.)
ANY PERSON REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AT THIS MEETING
BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY OR PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENT SHOULD CONTACT THE
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE, 110 NORTH APOPKA, INVERNESS, FL 34450,
(352) 341-6560 AT LEAST TWO DAYS BEFORE THE MEETING. IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR SPEECH IMPAIRED, USE THE TTY TELEPHONE (352-341-6580 OR
LECANTO GOVERNMENT BUILDING (352-527-5350).
April 14, 2013

368-0414 SUCRN
Citrus County Code Compliance
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, April 17, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi- purpose Room 166, 3600 WestSovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance
Special Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have
questions, contact Code Compliance at (352) 527-5350.
Baylon, Isaac S. *REPEAT VIOLATION"
63 S J Kellner Blvd, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep,
dump, store, place or depositabandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked,
disabled, wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property,
street, or highway; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: The trailer, a boat, and the grey four door Jeep
parked on the property.
Breault, Ann C T "REPEAT VIOLATION"
2411 E North St, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances.To Wit: Wood, metal, plastic, aluminum, pallets, and
other miscellaenous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Breault, Ann C T "REPEAT VIOLATION"
2411 E North St, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The RV and three vans parked on the property.
Campbell, Michelle L & Campbell Sr. EST, Roy F.
6272 W Tangerine Ln, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of household garbage and
other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Corey, Brian K.; Frankie C.; Tina M.
5751 S Ashlawn Way, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings;
except for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set
out fr nomore thn 48 hoursfofar pck up and removal; exceptforrecyclebb mate-
rial stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in
a lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: 75 to 100 bags of trash all around the yard,
luggage, basketball hoop, boat seats, gas can, some construction debris, kids toys,
tarps, nets, and miscellaneous junk and debris around the yard.
Corey, Brian K.; Frankie C.; Tina M.
5751 S Ashlawn Way, Homosassa, FI 34448
It shall be unlawful for anyone owning, leasing, occupying or having control of any
property subject to the provisions of this article to maintain weeds, grass and under-
growth in excess of 18" in height, or an accumulation of vegetative matter pursuant
to Article VI Section 20-61 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
Crosby III, Ann Britt & James W.
6397 S Tex Pt, Homosassa, FI 34448
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter18- 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set
or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Fail-
ure to obtain building permits for installing opening in dividingwall between two
units.
Curcio, John J.; Rudolph and Carole E.
3658 S Cedar Ter, Homosassa, FI 34448


CLASSIFIED


Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 8- 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit:
Failure to obtain building permits for two sheds, two carports, a three car garage,
and a new metal roof on the mobile home.
Dimick, Brian & Tendler, Ivy
4615 N Elm Dr, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or
sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Large amounts of household garbage, broken
household furniture, car tires, mattresses, broken TVs, overflowing garbage dumpster,
and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Doganis, Michael
12350 N Goldie Pt, Dunnellon, FI 34433
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 8- 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set
or place a mobile/manufactured home ar floating residential unit within the teri-
tory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit:
Expired permit #201107691, expired permit #201107692, and After the Fact permit
for an 8x10 open front porch w/ roof over.
Hale, Anthony *FINE APPEAL**
6749 W Cardinal St, Homosassa, Fl 34446
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Special requirement for
all accessory uses. Accessory structures shall not be occupied as a residence, with
the exception of guest cottages or garage apartments. To Wit:
An RV is being occupied in the backyard behind the fence.
"APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT 12/19/12 HEARING**
Hauter, Randall *REPEAT VIOLATION"
19 W Lemon St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, buckets, metals, plastics, household
furniture, garbage, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed
area.
Herman, George
7830 W Heck Ct, Crystal River, FI 34428
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 8- 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any
building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or
place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory
covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit:
Failure to obtain building permits for installing metal roof and vinyl siding to a mobile
home.
James M. Heck Revocable Inter Vivos Trust *FINE APPEAL**
3118 N Whitewater Ter, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Carpet remnants, mattresses, broken furniture,
and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
"APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT 9/19/12 HEARING**
Jimmy Carnes Enterprises LLC
3999 S Highlands Ave, Inverness, FI 34452
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20- 31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Furniture and a large amount of household
garbage.
Kiamesha Trust
8515 W Candleglow St, Crystal River, FI 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Car fires, broken kids toys, exercise equipment,
old mattresses wooden and metal debris and other miscellaneous trash and


SUNDAY,APRIL 14,2013 D7


debris.
Lashley, Generay A.
1858 N Bud Ter, Inverness, Fl 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, totes, buckets, plastics, tvs, metals, alumi-
num, household garbage, household appliances, and other miscellaneous materals
being stored in an unenclosed area.
Madrac BH4 LLC
15 N Fillmore St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage,broken furniture, metal
and plastic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Navarro, Carmelita A.
235 S Barbour St, Beverly Hills, Fl 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The boat on the trailer parked on the property.

Roundtree, James V.
6279 N Khyber Ave, Dunnellon, FI 34433
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep,
dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20-41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Large motorhome that appears to be inoperable and does not have a visi-
ble
tag or decal.
Schneider, Julie
2962 W Beamwood Dr, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapteri 8-62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building
or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: 8x8 shed
Single Stream Processors Inc.
698 S Easy St, Lecanto, FI 34461
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapteri 8-62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall
erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building
or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: Failure to
com-
ply with the conditions of your Development Order. Remove all the
materials being stored in this area or obtain permits to use the area for storage.
Yanke, Marlana T.
1606 N little Carmen Ter, Inverness, FI 34453
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except
for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out
for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site
or sanitary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultur-
al
lands on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20-31(a) of the Citrus
County Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Tires, wood, and other miscellaneous materi-
als
being stored in an unenclosed area.
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office,
Citrus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
phone: (352) 341- 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hear-
ing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
MICHELE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 14, 2013


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2013 Corolla............... 49 per mo. $2,548due 2013 Rav4................... 59 per mo. $2,887 due

2013 Camry................. 99 per mo. $2,598due 2013 Highlander Gas.. 279 per mo. $2,678due

2013 Camry Hybrid.....*249 per mo. $2,648due 2013 Tacoma................ *239 per mo. $2,638due

2013 Prius C............... 99 per mo. $2,598due 2013 Venza.................. 79 per mo. $2,678due

2013 Prius.................... 229 per mo. $2,628due 2013 Sienna.................269 per mo. $2,668due

2013 Prius V................ 279 per mo. $2,678due 2013 Tacoma................*239 per mo. $2,638due

2013 Avalon................ 99 per mo. $2,698due 2013 Tundra................ 99 per mo. $2,698due


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW 2013 KIA
SOUL
STK#KD0366


NEW 2013 KIA
RIO .LX
STK#KD0325 A


NEW 2013 KIA
OPTIMA
STK#KD0335 -


mr
100,000 MILE
WARRANTY


NEW 2014 KIA
SORENTO
STK#KE501


On
FOR
60 MONTHS"
MSRP $2_69
..M^, ^ V AX -T


OR $115 /MONTH LEASE* OR $164 /MONTH LEASE*
W1TH A/PRA CaEDE LEASE PAYMENT IS ON 36 MONTHS LSUL 39 MONTHS! WITH 12K PE YEAR. TOTAL F S4 995 DLE A SIN SMART PAY S A DE TIME LESE PAYMENT FOR 36 MONTHS (O'LIL 39 MONTHS WITH $7T956 SOUL S7.38 RIO LX
SB 6/6 -I & 10,440 SORRIO IX )U A1 SIGNING Sf-h D[A- RH O- FAI! S OFFHS I-XCI SiVIV- A :ACIOR REHA ES & SINCE NW S 10 Il-A4 '-H


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
MALIBU 1LS


STK#D0026


NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO
2WD EXT CAB I


STK#D8012


MSRP $3?4S5


OR $135 /MONTH
NEW 2013 CHEVROLET
EOUINOX.LS...


LEASE*


STK#D5195
lb -


UK 185 MONTHH LEASE*
NEW2013 CHEVROLET
CRUZETK#D

STK#D0114 !:


MSRP $1


OR $185 /MONTH LEASE*


OR $159 /MONTH LEASE*


1 1 10 1 J III !'
LEA6E P6514 6 S O, 39 MTH[llS WHII 10K PER yEAR, TOX OF C56439 3I6 A' S{lIG SMAlT [55 B A ONE [1ME LAfIS ^AW'ENT fOR 39 ..,TS IL Wi $6,7(fi 51 17,773 S1vIW4AX) $7,738 EOU.OX & $5.2B7 1 i4-
A[ AT SI4NI F3 2013 SI.FFA 7V) x AR W OJSSIFR 14,3S B ,^N5 AMl) IRA A 99 C NK VWR C3ld i TRINL LIC<13I-. IA IF EC3 I SI W 7 C NiOY- IJA T 1 MIMU $
WAN. ML.T BEPl jREU' LE/lY NG A F@M fliOE W OOMPiITTM: V/, IOM MWT Q16,PiT 8FC, TINLL.L MAJNTENCE ,N SI/ED, U-VT [1T 1 PlCX-/3. Cet -L)OR [CT/S, *$ 3.39 P S1 ',)CO 55) CE EIF5I SE1-C 3 1,ELS


D8 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


(6 )


MSRP $2)9O


Fk\~


orA





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I /M O. 36 MONTH LEASE $2,199 due at signing after all offers Includes security deposit Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
,.,,InJ.I I .l..a. ,.f $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles MRSP $35,795.36.







wI Base Preferred Equipment Group

-H b Lease For Qualified



/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,989 due at signing (after all offers Intcldes ..r d l.-.,,r Tx. ride license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
.l.ii.' ,jhx x, ,1 $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $39,800.







w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage


Lease For Qualified
Lessees /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
.3 '3O. .e Aior I,.nGa ITer il rs). Includes security deposit. Tax, title license, dealer fees and op ional equipment extro.
.' HleO ,0 .,e 0 $,, ,?3 le ,.Or 30F000 miles MRSP $43,405






w/wBw/ Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mimeage

Lease For Qualified
Lessees


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$4,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileoge charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles, MRSP $44,945.


CERTIFIED PR E-OWN ED CERTIFIED PR E-OWN ED

2008 CADILLAC 2008 CADILLAOC 2009 CADILLAC 2004 CADILLAC 2010 CADILLAC 2011 CADILLAC
SRX DTS DTS XLR DTS SRX

3RD SEAT eC2S241B AWAREN SS PKG BC2C176EA 40,175 MILES. #C382230A EXTRA CLEAN, #C2T20O A HEATED ANS CO LED SEATS, #C3X331A HEATED SEATS, #C3S3270
Leases ,aaass ,asse *aBfsi eedae V*119 /e


2004 CHEVROLET 2008 BUICK 1999 FORD F350 2008 VW 2010 FORD 2009 HONDA
IMPALA SS LUCERNE CREW DRW XLT BEETLE EDGE CRV
CXL SE LV GREEN SE CONVERTIBLE 2W LIMITED EX-L
BLACK. 40000 MiLES. SUPECHARGED, BRANDY, LEATHER SUNROOF LOCAL TRAD, 7 3 POWERSTROKE DIESEL XLT TRIM BLACK, 52000 MILES, LEATHER. GRAY, LEATHER, SURODOF SILVER, 32,000 MILES. LEATHER ,
LEATHER, SUNROOF ONE OWNER #200536 3SK MILES #CZT217A EXTRA CLEANR ONE OWNER. aC3S293A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, C3S235TA SUNROOF, ONE OWNER, #C3S28G

2010 HONDA 2010 BUICK 2011 BUICK 2012 CHEVROLET 2011 TOYOTA 2009 MERCEDES
ACCORD LACROSSE LACROSSE CXS AVALANCHE LiZ SEQUOIA SL E63
/6 LE-L CSX W H" LUE DIAMOND DRPLATIUM SLIrR AUO
WHITE DIAMOND.ONLY 13000 M ILES OCHA32,000 MILES. SUNROOA LEATHER BLACK, LOW70 MILES CHROMLEATHE BELSLUE 16 000 MILES. LEATHER, SUNOO.NAV 2213 M SUNROO F LOCAL TRADE EXTRA CLEA STEEL GAN. SUNROOF, .000 MILEATHER, HELOCAL TRADE N,SEATS.
L 3 CTH E, S284AENE B A SUNROOF, ONE OWNER LOCAL 3MOSOTRADEC227C3M33A LOCAL ONE OWNER TE,3301A LEA DE, C2T19 A
*01,s5Ees *s-,1o O,0ee 2s9,98 0 sR,9SQ 10, ees

2005 CADILLA20 0004 LINCOLN 2005 HOND200003 CADILLAC 2002 CADILLAC 2005 CADILLAC
SDEVILLE TOWNCAR CIVIC CTS ESCA.LADE AWD TS
VW IT' 2R EX "SEANS WHITE DIAMOOS LUXURY II
SILVER, 122D000 MILES. NEEDS W ,RK LOCAL TRA3 E, EXTRA ENTRA CLEAN BLACK. 70,1O 0 MILES. LEATHER, BLUE, 48,000 MILES. LEATHER, SUSN ROOF. SUNROOF LOCAL TRADE. EXTRA CLEAN TAN. SUNROOF, LEATHER, HEATED SEATS,
LC38396 R W#C3KO46B SUNROOF. ONE OWNER LOCAL TRADE. #C2S272O # C3M303A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, C3X299A


-0CAILC 20L SIN...2 LL VHOA N 200A3CAlILLAC CAIC 2M#I
300EKO m X"O m~rDAON UUYI


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 D9




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ALL CERTIFIED, .
AmAMENi0a&


* Vehicle meets Kia's High Quality Standards
* 10 Year1100,000 Mile Limited Powertrain Warranty*
* 10 years / Unlimited Miles $50 Sign & Drive
Roadside Assistance Plan*
* Rental car reimbursement u
adr ep5 3$o tp for up to


* Vehicle History Report* STAY FOR
* 150-Point Quality Assurance Inspection
* Travel breakdown $75 per day up to F EE
$375 for food and lodging per covered FO O D
merhanircal hrakdnwn* F O O


10 days for a covered mechanical failure Up to $75 for towing charges per covered Sf
* Eligible for Extended Service Contract Protection mechanical breakdown / FR&
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0N^ $14,979
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'* \


S I
, = g=,iv
"w ini-n
i- *BM


Citrus


I......


1850 S.E. HWY. 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 352-564-8668
uSho|p from H-lome @ www-cvrcitruski-a.com


4v


D10 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013







INSIDE


OME


RONT


Sikorski's
Attic
PAGE E4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


'N


<-I
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The Kenmore Elite'
Dishwasher 12793
with 360 Degree
Powerwash Plus,
available in stores
by late May.
Kenmore/
Associated Press -A


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E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


7-a?282
h t a a'i 379t~~


* 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


OPEN HOUSE 12-3PM
1752 W. SHANELLE PATH





GOLF COURSE VILLA IN BRENTWOOD
* 2BR with OFFICE Huge Lanai/Screen Porch
* Large Lot/Great View Maintenance-Free
* Motivated Seller
* Social Membership Includes Terra Vista
DIRECTIONS.: Brentwood Cir. to R on W. Nicole Dr., to
L at end of Rd., to R on Shanelle Path
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellslorida.com










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
S1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


I 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


5982 N. OAKMONT DR., PINE RIDGE
* Quality Custom Built 4/2/2 Cherry Cabinets, Stainless Appl
* Beautiful Hardwood Floors Outside Newly Painted
* Efficient 2-Zone Heat & Air Pristine Condiion
* Lg Lanai w/Summer Kitchen Lush Landscaping w/Gazebo
GEILA 'gala' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


I island I rail and near boat ramps. UNLIV i,UUI
WATERFRONT
BACK ON THE MARKET AND READY TO SELL in Indian Waters, deep canal with direct Gu
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and envision your horse ranch on this very pretty offers. L356428
5 92 acres Partially cleared for a home and PINE RIDGE:
driveway and sitting on the corner of Bonanza and 2.75 acres in equestrian area- $40,755
Bravo in the Equestrian area of PINE RIDGE 1 acre $17,000
...w.....m..... .......


Beautifully updated 3/2 mobile home. New root, new *3BR/2BA/2-Car Garage *7 1/2 Fenced Acres (mol) Hardwood & Tile Floors New Deck Hardwood Floors Throughout Home
HVAC system, new flooring, new septic new i Formal LR/DR i Wood-Burning Fireplace New Kitchen *3 Bedrooms / 2 Baths Large Master Suites r Split Floor Plan
appliances, new carport, new screened lanai, fenced Kitchen & Breakfast Dinette New Dual Pane Windows Granite .96 Acre Lot Large Sutes ptloo an
yard and shed Hwy. 19 South to left on Fresh Paint IN/OUT New Air Conditioner : Security System Fully Enclosed Screen
fel to hton Hul Te to Newer Carpets Added 2Car Carport Updated Baths Covered Boat Dock SS Room for Pool and More
Longfellow St., to right on S. Hull Ter. BeauitfulLandscaping Outbuildings Just Like New losetoSchools MustSee
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663 gl SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500s s usee!!!
wwwronmcevoy.remax.com LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 Email: sherylpolltts@ol.co.m US OU CHERYL LAMBERT 352-637-6200
Certified Distressed Property Expert Em ail:Iounolley@tmpabay.rr.com 000d148: www.CrysualRiverLiing.coln > Email: cheryllamberl@remax.net

*-I ** I1I
I. I I II H 1 1II I i


r






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Investments is proud to an-
nounce the latest production
levels achieved by its agents
for 2013.
Dawn Theroux has sur-
passed the $1 million mark in
closed sales volume in 2013.
Dawn can be reached at
the Inverness office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-726-5855 or by e-mail at
dawntherouxera@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Jeanne Gaskill has also
surpassed the $1 million mark
in closed sales volume in 2013.
Jeanne can be reached at
the Beverly Hills office of ERA
American Realty by calling
352-746-3600.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievement of these fine real
estate professionals.
RE/MAX agents
get kudos for sales
The associates and staff of
RE/MAX Realty One are
pleased to recognize three of
their agents this week for
passing the $1 million mark in


Alan
Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Barbara
Mills
RE/MAX
Realty One.


sales volume.
Alan Ivory,
Wayne Hem-
merich and r
Barbara Mills
have all sailed
past this pro-
duction mile- Wayne
stone recently. Hemmerich
Alan and RE/MAX
Wayne are Realty One.
agents in the
Crystal River office of RE/MAX
located on U.S. 19. Barbara
works out of the Inverness of-
fice located on U.S. 41.
All three agents have a
long history of success in the
Citrus County marketplace.
Canchola honored
by EXIT Realty
Congratulations to Yolanda
Canchola
with EXIT Re-
alty Leaders
in Crystal
River. Yolanda
has won the
top listing
agent award Yolanda
for March Canchola
2013. EXIT Realty
Call Leaders.
Yolanda at
352-794-0888.


I Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
S Realtor_, A HOUSE Realtor@
746-67S so e'W 2879022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


18 S. Jackson, 2/1/1 C/H/A..........................$44,900
312 S. Washington, 2/2/1 C/H/A..................$54,900
3826 N. Briarberry Pt., 2/1.5/1 Villa 55+.....$44,900


Removing detergent residue


Dear Sara: I have lots
of used clothing I
want to give to a
close friend, but she is
chemically sensitive and un-
able to wear them, even
though I've washed them
several times in fragrance-
free detergents and used
fragrance-free softeners. Do
you know any way to rid
clothes of the smell of per-
fumes and detergents? -


KD.M., email
Dear KD.M.: I enjoy using
Charlie's Soap. Please read
the FAQ section of their site
in regard to sensitive skin
(charliesoap.com/faq.html).
This soap gets rid of build-
up and residue from other
detergents, so it should work
well for you. Here's some
feedback from my commu-
nity members on the prod-
uct: frugalvillage.com/


forums/laundry/127595-
charlies-soap.html. I'd rec-
ommend using vinegar as
your fabric softener, too.
Dear Sara: Do you have a
foolproof recipe and tips for
cleaning windows so that
there are no streaks? -
Marian, email
Dear Marian: Straight
vinegar will work fine to

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty 4 ^
BROKERASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


bI /b car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. U I KUS SrNINS BLVU.
| 700929 $259,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2/2. 701884 $129,900 3/2/1 700428 $69,500




ELBOURNE 18 TRUMAN 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR. 5269 S. BAYLINER
2 700838 $45,000 2/2/1 701074 $54,750 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 3/2/2. 701882 $68,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 E3






E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"



HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Preventing peanut



allergies in children

Peanut butter is a common part of allergies. According to the Centers for
most children's diets; however, it Disease Control and Prevention (2012),
can cause serious health problems common symptoms of peanut allergy are:
for those who have peanut al- An itchy mouth.
lergies. To keep children with U Swelling of the lips and
peanut allergies safe, it is im- tongue.
portant to understand peanut U Stomach cramps.
allergies and know how to U Diarrhea.
identify foods that contain U Vomiting.
peanuts and reduce accidental Trouble breathing.
contact with peanuts. H Dizziness.
A food allergy happens when U Rash.
the immune system responds 0 A drop in blood pressure.
to a harmless food as if it were In a severe reaction, the
a threat. The first time a per- Monica Payne throat swells and the airway
son with a food allergy is ex- CONSUMER tightens, making it difficult to
posed to the food, no symptoms SCIENCE breathe. This is known as an
occur. But the body has now anaphylactic reaction. If this
been primed, and when the condition is not corrected
person eats the food again, an allergic re- quickly, it can lead to death.
sponse occurs. Many children with peanut allergy
The most common foods that may cause carry a medication, called epinephrine or
allergies are peanuts, eggs, milk, soy, EpiPen, to stop this reaction before it
shellfish, wheat, and tree nuts (such as causes serious harm. Children may
walnuts). In the United States, 4 to 8 per- outgrow some food allergies, but they are
cent of children have food allergies. Of
these children, 1.4 percent have peanut See PEANUTS/Page E7


Inside...


Kitchen
maintenance
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE Ell
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Objects appear to be desk wax seals; bisque porcelain


Dear John: What are seals and made of ivory, the
these? I think they are potential dollar value is $250
made of to $500 each, per-
ivory with metal haps more if finely
bases. The bases done.
are flat and Dear John: You
smooth on the bot- helped me once a
tom. They be- long time ago. I am
longed to my hoping you can
parents. R.C., again with these
Internet items. The pic-
Dear R.C.: Al- tures are of stat-
though they could ues my husband
have been parasol John Sikorski brought back from
handles originally; SIKORSKI'S Europe. They ap-
at least from your ATTIC pear to be of Ro-
photographs, it ap- mans and the
pears you have two material is bisque.
desk wax seals. I think they My husband was in World
were made in the 19th century War II stationed in South
in Europe, possibly France. France and Sardinia.
The two give the impression The statues do not have
they are made of ivory Wax any markings that I can find.
seals are a specific category of I am hoping to identify them
collecting. If they are wax and their worth. They are 10


3/4 inches high.
The other item is a wicker
carriage that is between 85 to
90 years old. The carriage
has the original cover and
the wheels still work. I am
trying to find out the value of
these things. All items are in
excellent condition. -A.C.,
Beverly Hills
Dear A.C.: The two fig-
urines appear to be bisque
porcelain, as you mention.
They were likely made in Eu-
rope, perhaps France, in the
late 19th century. I cannot
make out the quality or the
condition due to the poor
photographs.
Bisque (unglazed porce-
lain) figures made during the
Victorian era have been a
category of collecting for a
long time. Based on the pho-
tographs, potential dollar


value is likely in the $100 to
$200 range for each. If you
want to send some good pho-
tos, including front, side,
back, and bottom, I would be
glad to give you a better
opinion.
The wicker doll buggy
would sell in the $25 to $75
range.
Dear John: I am a regular
column reader. I am attach-
ing photos of a chest secre-
tary that belonged in my
See ATTIC/Page E9
Though they might have
been parasol handles at one
time, these appear to be
desk wax seals, probably
from 19th-century Europe. If
they're made of ivory, they
could be worth $250 to
$500 each.
Special to the Chronicle







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3


clean your interior windows or eye-
glasses, but for excellent results, mix
1 cup vinegar and 1 teaspoon liquid
dishwashing soap (such as Dawn) in
a spray bottle and fill the rest of the
bottle with water. Add essential oil if
you'd like it scented. Newspaper
works well to avoid streaks.
Here are two recipes for exterior
window washing:
Mix 2 cups rubbing alcohol (70
percent isopropyl), 1/2 cup ammonia
and 1 teaspoon dishwashing liquid
(such as Dawn). Top off with water
until you have 1 gallon of window
cleaner. Mix and pour into your
bottles.
If your windows have thermal panes
or have any type of insulated film,


too much ammonia might discolor
the windows and weather stripping.
You might notice a lavender haze or
cloudiness on the windows. I'm sure
this isn't the case for all thermal win-
dows, but I would call the manufac-
turer for their suggestion. It happens
with thermal window inserts and
tinted films, too (basically anything
with an anti-reflective coating or
rubber type sealing/stripping).
If you have thermal windows,
avoid the ammonia.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
Street, Kansas City MO, 64106, or
email sara@frugalvillage.com.


Property owners firm



slates vendor expo


Special to the Chronicle

Villages Services Coopera-
tive Inc. will hold its fourth
annual vendor expo on
Wednesday, April 17. The
expo is available to any offi-
cer of a homeowners, prop-
erty owners or condo owners
association.
As in the past, selected
vendors will be present to
describe their services and
provide contact points for fu-
ture subcontracts from the


various associations.
Currently 20 suppliers
have registered with VSC, all
of whom have been screened
for credentials and refer-
ences. Landscapers,
painters, sprinkler services,
etc., will round out this year's
expo.
Any association officer
seeking an invitation to this
event may request one by
calling 352-746-6770. Ask for
Amber or Sharon; be ready
to verify your credentials


and supply additional
information.
Villages Services Coopera-
tive Inc. is a community man-
agement company serving 26
communities in Citrus
County VSC boasts 11 fully li-
censed community associa-
tion managers (LCAMs) who
are fully qualified to manage
all types of associations, as
well as a full, on site ac-
counting company to handle
all aspects of association
finances.


REALTY GROUP

SINGLE FAMILY HOME DETACHED VILLA
4 BED, 4 BATH, 3 CAR, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR,
TERRA VISTA HILLSIDE VILLAS
Usual. Enjoy '. foyer and be
S... nd evening ptivated by the
e panoramic I' nd tasteful
S.. maintained, ...me. Beautiful 2
:,,,ket Mo, e. i :ilus den, 2 bath,
home located in the community of Terra Vista. Chefs kitchen, breakfast 2 car garage, Hillside villa. Many desirable upgrades such as huge
nook and great room. Grand dining room and sitting area complete with a mirror in Formal dining room, Eat-in kitchen, butler pantry, ceramic
wet bar 2 first floor master suites, Large guest bedrooms. 4 Baths. 2nd tile and carpet throughout and so much more. This home has
floor game room and office/bedroom. 3 car garage, zoned HVAC. Sec arguably one of the best views in Terra Vista overlooking prestigious
system. Oversized screened pool enclosure All of this and located on Skyview golf course. Come and sit on the extended lanai and watch
Legendary Ted Williams Ct. MLS 700149.............. $849,000 all the golf action unfold before you. MLS 702190....... $249,000
DETACHED VILLA
3 BED, 2.5 BATH,
2 CAR,
SSKYVIEW VILLAS
In igious gated
mmi.irn of Terra Vista.
Il ..., .'v ,- 3/2.5/2 w/den.
iF,, ,r,- brick paved
.....r 1 home with
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH I.. ..i-law/guest suite
Large roomy open split floor plan home featuring 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, with full bath. Designer decorated and painted, gourmet kitchen,
office/den, living room, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai Formal dining incorporated with an open floor plan is great for
and a 2 car attached garage. Dining area overlooking private backyard, entertaining. Lots of tile, and wet bar. Large master suite has
Upgrades include Conan countertops, ceramic tile, plantation shuttered hardwood floor, TWO custom walk-in closets. You'll be proud to return
windows, lots of cabinets in the kitchen. Corner lot with huge trees and to this elegant home w/lush landscaping & on a large corner lot. This
situated close to all amenities. MLS700761 .............$249,900 is a beautiful homewith lots of upgrades. MLS 700214. .$364,900









DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
Maintenance Free Vlla 3 bedroom, bat2 bath, 2 cga garage. Featuring an DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS
extended view of the 5th hole of the championship Skyview Golf Course. The Great rental! Unfurnished Madeira model. Spacious kitchen with SS
villa has a therapeutic step in tub in the guest bathroom, the latest in secure appliances and breakfast bar. Great room with dining area
bathing. The covered lanai faces south for cool evening breezes. The best of overlooks the lanai. Close to the Bella Vita Fitness Center & Spa.
all worlds including all the amenities that come with membership. Social Club Membership included.
9632 ......... ........ .............. .....$ 1,400 #1255 ................................................. $ 1,200


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777

DETACHED VILLA SINGLE FAMILY HOME
4 BED.4 BATH. 2 CAR 3 BED, 4 BATH, 2 CAR,
PLUS GOLF CART GARAGE WATERFORD PLACE
SKYVIEW 'VILLAS .. ...T .1 Home on an
h ,,,,,,I i i o prestigious
S .. ..............I ... Nestled am ong
... ,,,, . I ......., .... .1 find a beautiful
J ., 2 car garage
...''" ... ...... ih cart garage).
surround the gas heated pool and spa. Home features a detached guestin-law suite., ,,. i .... include a Koi
Bright & spacious, this home has neutral tile throughout with carpet in the pond, woodfloors in living room & dining room, a 20x40 (largest in Terra
bedrooms. Very energy efficient with extra insulation. Master suite features a huge Vista). Solar heated pool with spa and outdoor kitchen great for
walk-in closets, double sink, jetted garden tub and walk in shower. Large lanai in a entertaining or family gatherings. A large master suite and private guest
secluded backyard. Hurricane shutters, lots of outdoor living space, huge walk in retreat completes this Oasis. Loaded with features & upgrades you
pantry, plantation shutters. The list goes on and on. MLS 700517... $535,000 would expect in this caliber home. MLS 700601 ......... $549,000
TOWN HOME 2BED 7 BRENTWOOD
2.5 BATH, ICAR, TOWN HOME
BRENTWOOD 3 BED
TOWNHOMES '" 2 BATH, 1 CAR
ca dsh i maintenance
-, cated ISd g g lb
n 1 I1 Mb:dm, Ity of I. s 3 bedroom
.... .... .. ..... .. H ills .
IP: .. r ., q,,- room 11sc c" arg
A.d i a ,,1 ,1 ,,, ,,, o m b o. .r .. ... . is lo c a t e d in
half bath, kitchen w/wood cabinets and Coran countertops. 111 us
Breakfast nook. Large screen lanai. Upstairs has master bedroom w/ H -at room with
walk-in closet, dual vanity in master bath w/spacious shower, office/ I h ,, ",1 dining combo,
den area, Guest bedroom has plenty of closet space, laundry room eat-in kitchen. Spacious bedrooms upstairs, master suite with walk-in
and full bath. This townhome is tastefully decorated and is sure to closet, nice open floor plan, screened lanai, professionally decorated,
make you feel right at home. MLS 700082............. $115,000 furniture negotiable MLS 359587 ...................... $129,900










BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR BRENTWOOD TOWN HOME 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR BRENTWOOD
Nice 2/Bd with 2 1/2 baths and 1 car garage. The bedrooms are on Nice unfurnished Brentwood Townhome for rent. Two bedrooms,
the second floor and there is a half bath on the firstfloor. Screened two and half baths. Screened in lanai. Citrus Hills Social Club
Porch Comes with the Citrus Hills Social Club Membership. Membership Included.
#3267............. .......... ................... $ 1,100 #1277............... ....................... $900


I
I


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 E5







E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013



PEANUTS
Continued from Page E4

unlikely to outgrow peanut
allergies.
Knowing the different
names for peanuts can
help you to determine
which foods contain
peanuts. Peanuts can be
called beer nuts, goobers,
ground nuts, mixed nuts,
nut pieces, nut meat, man-
delonas, and monkey nuts
(The Food Allergy and
Anaphylaxis Network,
2011).


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It is important to realize
that even foods that do not
have the word "peanut" or
"nut" in the ingredient list
can have peanuts in them.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration (FDA) re-
quires that foods with even
a trace amount of peanuts
be labeled. They can ei-
ther be labeled with the
name of the allergen listed
somewhere near the in-
gredients list, or the ingre-
dients list must state the
source of the allergen,
such as "oil (peanut)."
Always read the food
label to find out if the food


It is also important to prevent cross-contamination
when preparing foods. Don't use the same utensils
when preparing food for people with food allergies, if
used with the allergen. Wash utensils and surfaces
with hot, soapy water and dry with a paper towel or
clean dish towel.


has peanuts. Remember
that some foods are ex-
cluded from the FDA la-
beling law: fresh fruits and
vegetables, foods regu-
lated by the USDA, like
meats, poultry, or certain


egg products, restaurant
foods, and supplements.
Non-food items such as
medications, mouthwash,
toothpaste, shampoo and
shaving cream are also ex-
cluded.


INE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744



For ~ a ~ Vita o ro utpeP oo,


NEW LISTING


"b. 3428 N Bravo Dr
1/ MLS 702158 S399,000
IDEAL horse property with beautiful
3/2/3 home.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


922 W S.Iei Meadeo Loop
MLS 700994 $225,000
Maintenance free villa featuring
2bd/2ba, office/den and heated pool.
Steve Dobbyn 352-634-0499


NEW LISTING





O-y 4389 S LeWoodsDr
.. MLS 702204 $199,000
Spacious, updated 3/2/2 ranch
home located just a short walk from
the Homosassa River.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


I*Deg 3267 W Blossom Dr
S MLS 359551 $219,000
4/3/3 pool home on the golf course.
You really should see this!
Jov Holland 352-464-4952


Ls-


"ID6l9 4964W Pine Ridge Blvd
MLS 359650 $329,900
3/3/3, pool. Many fine features,
in-law suite. Must see!
Brian Murray 352-212-5913


7/,LU" 1 4837 W Mohawk Dr
SMLS 701122 $189,000
Meticulously maintained inside &
out, on a beautiful 1 acre corner lot.
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213
_ .


i 1671 N Dimaggio Path
MLS 700934 $239,000
3/2/2 in a great location on the 2nd
fairway of Skyview Golf Course.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


CSr MLS 359132 $124,000
2/2/2 home on an acre;
all you need at a greatvalue!
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


Some common foods
that frequently contain
peanuts are listed below:
Asian food (for exam-
ple, shrimp stir-fry and
sweet-and-sour chicken are
often prepared with peanut
sauce or peanut oil).
Mexican food (such as
enchiladas and beef
sauces).
: Cookies, cakes.
Pastries.
Chocolate bars.
Candies.
Energy bars.
Ice cream, frozen yo-
gurt.
Cereal and granola.
Breads topped with
seeds and nuts.
Salad dressings.
Artificial and natural
flavorings.
Chili.
Egg rolls.
Marzipan.
It is also important to
prevent cross-contamina-
tion when preparing foods.
Don't use the same uten-
sils when preparing food
for people with food aller-
gies, if used with the aller-
gen. Wash utensils and
surfaces with hot, soapy
water and dry with a paper


towel or clean dish towel.
Peanut-free foods are
good choices to use in
lunches at school. Some
examples include fresh
foods such as produce,
milk, fish, and un-
processed whole grains,
such as brown rice or pop-
corn.
For additional informa-
tion on packing peanut-
free lunches for school, go
to http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/fyl345 to view Univer-
sity of Florida/IFAS fact
sheet FCS80019, entitled
"Raising Healthy Chil-
dren: Packing a Peanut-
Free Lunch."
Call Monica Payne at the
Citrus County Extension
office at 352-527-5713.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS' knowledge, re-
search, and resources to
address youth, family,
community, and agricul-
tural needs. All programs
and related activities
sponsored for, or assisted
by, the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences
are open to all persons
with non-discrimination
with respect to race, creed,
color, religion, age, disabil-
ity, sex, sexual orientation,
marital status, national
origin, political opinions,
or affiliations.


Monica Payne is the
Family and Consumer
Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.


SO YOU KNOW
* News notes tend to run one week prior to the
date of an event.
* During the busy season, expect notes to run no
more than twice.
* Submit information at least two weeks before
the event.
* Early submission of timely material is appreci-
ated, but multiple publications cannot be
guaranteed.
* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness
or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or by e-
mail to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com.


od _- _

5141 S Slelson Poini Dr .l ( 2392 N Loma PI
3378 W Naegelia PI MLS 358532 $80,000 71 E Hartiord SI 30u5a 1- MLS 358186 $51,000
MLS 359406 $94,900 3/2/2 with a majestic stone wood- MLS 357326 $59,500 Updated 2/2 Doublewide in
Lovely 3/2/2 home, immaculate & burning fireplace. A bit of TLC will Move-in-ready upper unit. Lots of 55+ community. Near lakes
ready for YOU! make it fabulous! "news" in this home-come see! and amenities.
Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478 Mike McHale 352-302-3203 Mark Casper 352-364-1947 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
S2011 Prudential Rnancial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Let nature's critters help maintain garden


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Looking for some help in
the garden? Many of na-
ture's most useful critters
lie literally at our feet, un-
derappreciated and ig-
nored despite their ability
to eliminate insects, condi-
tion soils and pollinate
plants.
Turtles, moths, moles,
dragonflies, snakes, toads
and spiders are among the
many wild things that can
help maintain a land-
scape. The payback is min-
imal- food, water, shelter,
and easing off on harsh
lawn and garden
chemicals.
"I believe in teamwork,
using all the creatures that
live in your garden," said
Sharon Lovejoy, author of
"Trowel and Error" (Work-


man Publishing, 2003).
"Start from the ground up
with night crawlers as part
of your workforce."
Add to the earthworms
already in your plant beds
with commercially avail-
able red worms.
"Build a worm bin or a
place where they can't get
out," Lovejoy said. "Use all
of your leftovers your
kitchen compost. Worms
can process up to 6 pounds
of garbage in a week."
"Grow an assortment of
native plants, which will
draw a great many bird
species," Lovejoy said.
'"Add plant hosts as food
for butterfly and moth
larvae."
That list would include
milkweed (monarch but-
terflies), borage (green


See GARDEN/Rage E10


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A toad in a residential garden in New Market, Va. Toads, turtles, moths, moles, dragonflies, snakes and spiders are
among the many wild things that can help maintain a landscape, yet most go unappreciated or ignored despite their
ability to kill insects, condition soil and pollinate plants. Harmful insects make up more than 60 percent of a toad's
daily diet.


L Mi Ile it AMERICAN
:Lou M1919e Realtor UM REALITY INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@ 4511 N. LecantOH5
cell: (352) 697.1685 Oe352-746-3600


SheriC]air er.
Sherriu C. Parke


.- **- PINE RIDGE PRIVACY in the Premier
SPECTACULAR is the Word for this Equestrian community of Pine Ridge. This
Pine Ridge home nestled into 5.5 acres 4 BR, 3.5 bath home w 3 car garage on
surrounded by horse trails. Luxurious 5.5 acres has been lovingly decorated for
extras abound. Gourmet cooks will delight comfort and convenience. The stunning
in the luxurious kitchen surrounded by kitchen with upgraded appliances will
views of the pool and fireplace, The amaze you. Enjoy relaxing views from
amazing 4 car garage and workshop will every window. Located steps from the
delight the car collector Seller says bring equestrian center and on the horse trails.
an offer $379,900. MLS 359411 $369,000 MLS 358707





Have you always wanted to watch
your horse graze while you relax in the Don't want to mow the grass? Bring
pool? This home on 6+ acres makes it your horse and enjoy the view here! This
possible with the pastures and barn immaculate home on 1.2 acres is perfect
located right behind your home. Located for the person who wants an equestrian
on the horse trails of Pine Ridge, this lifestyle. Wheelchair accessible with an
home is fresh as a daisy with its two sided open floor plan, breakfast bar, gas
fireplace and lovely surroundings. Call for fireplace and fencing surrounding the
a personal tour. MLS 701497 Priced right property. New Listing. Only $175,000.
at $299,000 MLS 702183


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Keep your kitchen in ship-shape


Regular maintenance the key

to long life for appliances


AMY LORENTZEN
Associated Press

Your dishwasher, sink
drain and garbage dis-
posal do the major dirty
work in your kitchen, and
you can keep them
smelling fresh and run-
ning efficiently with a few
easy steps.
If there are spots or
stuck-on grime on the
dishes when they come
out of the washer, or if the
sink has an unpleasant
odor even after you clean
it and run the disposal, it
means these hard-work-
ing appliances may need
extra attention.
"Dishwashers and
drains battle kitchen
waste and activity daily,
which can take a toll on
the appearance and per-
formance if not cleaned
correctly," said Chris
Salatino with Kenmore
Major Appliances.
Dishwashers
Electric dishwashers
have a filtration system
that requires regular
cleaning, especially if you
don't scrape or pre-rinse
dishes.
"The maintenance on a
dishwasher depends on
how you treat it," says
John DeSilvia, host of
DIY Network's "Rescue
My Renovation."
If you're not a pre-
rinser, he recommends
cleaning the filter once a
month. Just look at the
bottom of your dish-
washer, find and remove
your filter, then scrub
away debris with a soft
brush. Rinse and rein-
stall.
"Don't be scared, it's re-
ally easy," says DeSilvia.


If in doubt, check .\ 01 ir
owner's manual on hIv to
find and remove the filter
Can't find the instr it -
tions? Log on to your
manufacturer's website
Or online tutorials it sites
such as DIYNetwork i:1ii,
and YouTube.com i: n
help you through the
process.
The interior of yiir
dishwasher may also )p-
pear filmy at times To -Let
rid of that buildup.
Salatino advises wjitiln
until the washer h.1s in-
ished a cycle and c oled
Then make a paste w lth
powdered detergent or
use liquid detergent on j
damp sponge to wipe
away mineral deposits
Follow up by runn i ni i
normal cycle.
If you're in a hard-
water area and wiping
with detergent doesn't re-
move all the film, riun .
normal cycle with 2 i: 1ps
of white vinegar in .nil 1-
right glass on the l ,wer
rack. Salatino advises
turning off the "he.ited
dry" option during the
cycle.
There also are co,,e iier-
cial cleaners marketed es-
pecially for miners I
buildup in dishwashers
Consumer Reports rec -
ommends replacing
worn or rusted dish
racks, and using ca re
when loading dishes
and silverware so
you don't damage
See .
Page EO

A Whirlpool
Gold Series
dishwasher.
Whirlpool Corporation/
Associated Press


E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

mother-in-law's family They were from
Brookline, N.H., and Townsend, Mass.
It is a large piece, 70 inches tall, 18 inches
deep and 39 inches wide. The slanted piece in
front unfolds to about 17 inches. It is covered
with green baize or felt and held up by two
wooden pieces that slide out from the front of
the chest to hold the desk firmly
All five drawers are tongue-and-groove con-
struction and have keyholes, as does the cab-
inet with the key showing. The metal seems to
be brass, but is badly darkened with age.
The cabinet has three shelves inside; the
second one has vertical uprights that create
three smaller sections. As I remember it, the
cabinet part can be separated from the bottom
drawers to create two pieces of furniture.
Obviously, it is pretty old. It is in good con-
dition with a few dings and marks of age, but
nothing serious. I am not ready to sell just yet,
but would appreciate any insight you might
give me as to probable worth, so I can plan for
its future. E.S., Crystal River
Dear E.S.: From what I can see in your
photograph, the secretary was made in
America, likely during the last quarter of the
19th century The photos you sent are out of
focus, making it difficult to say much more.
Take a photo of the side, the front with doors
open, and a bottom drawer. Make sure the
photos are good and clear, then I will finish
the story.


These two figurines appear to be
bisque porcelain, likely made in
Europe in the late 19th century.
Bisque (unglazed porcelain) figures
made during the Victorian era have
been a category of collecting for a
long time. Potential dollar value is
likely in the $100 to $200 range
for each.
Special to the Chronicle

PHOTO REQUESTS
Chronicle photographers will
consider requests to take pho-
tos of community events. Call
352-563-5660 for details.


DearJohn: I want to thank you for your giving
me the information for my plumbing code book-
let I have since come across a booklet by Ed-
ward Brooks, PhD., on "New Mental Arithmetic
Printers" by Christopher Sower Company,
Philadelphia, Pa, 1908. It is not in very good
condition due to its age. But I am hoping it has
some value due to its age. -R.R., Homosassa
Dear RR: Regardless of age or rarity, condi-
tion will always be a factor in price. I was not able
to find any interest in the author Edward Brooks.
Potential dollar value is catch-as-catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a professional in the
antiques business for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m. Send
questions to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala, FL 34478 or asksikorski@aol.com.


CABANA/COURTYARD HOME
IN PREMIERE LOCATION IN SUGARMILL WOODS
Situated on estate sized lot on the golf
course with views of the 8th green. Stained
glass double door entrance way. Designed
for comfort and entertaining. Additional
screen lanai offers beautiful view of the
course and greenbelt. Some features
include private pool with spa that
waterfalls, ironwood hardwood flooring in
bedrooms, European sinks with waterfall
faucets, jetted master bath tub.
MLS #358047
For More Information Or To
Preview This Home Contact
Becky Norman riENnoAm
352-212-7217 Nm.


--.NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
Villages of Citrus Hills, well known for an
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO active Florida lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on 1
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S acre, open floor plan, wood burning
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET fireplace, a sparkling pool and spacious
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2.5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River covered lanai will make you feel at home
bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront eight away. A l recent facelift included new
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Withlacoochee River paint and flooring, and A/C, range and the
windows; great income potential, too! $199,900 garage door were replaced in 2012.
MLS 359564 $220,000 willbuy you this peace of heaven! MLS 700472 $142,500


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acrelot in quiet neighborhood
estate w/pool and separate apartment lifestyle Open and airy with the on Ambridge Pt. next to the Withlacoochee
estateplantation shutters diffusing the StateForest and the trails but also very close to
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives you State Forest and thetrailsbutalso vey closet
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sqft. this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space.
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129.000


* *DWOLL
BANIKOR


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 E9







E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013


KITCHEN
Continued from Page E8

spray arms. Inspect the
arms to make sure they
aren't clogged with debris,
which could affect water
pressure. Use pipe clean-
ers to dislodge blockages.
For cleaning the outside
of your dishwasher,
Salatino says all you need
is a soft, damp cloth or
sponge and mild deter-
gent. If you've got a stain-
less steel cover, you'll
need a special cleanser.
Super suds
Phosphates, which help
control water hardness,
were eliminated from
dishwater detergents a
few years ago over pollu-
tion concerns. Since then,
some consumers have
complained that dishes
don't seem as clean.
Lucinda Ottusch, with
Whirlpool's Institute of


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kitchen Science, says one
mistake people make is buy-
ing cheap detergent She
says the all-in-one packets
by name-brand companies
really do help your dish-
washer perform best
She also recommends a
rinse aid, which promotes
drying by allowing the
water to sheet off dishes.
Loading your dish-
washer properly also can
aid cleaning. Find tips at
http://www.instituteof
kitchenscience. com/
kitchen-101/dishwashers
And, you don't have to
wait until the dishwasher
is full to run a cycle. Ot-
tusch says many newer
models sense the size of a
load and how dirty the
dishes are, and work ac-
cordingly
"Running the dish-
washer takes very little
water and energy, and
waiting until it is packed
full of dishes can compro-
mise cleaning perform-
ance," she says.


UNBELIEVABLE WATERFRONT UNDER s '
$100K! That's right, new carpet, paint, tile, .' C
MOVE IN READY. Bring your flats boat,
kayak, canoes, and have a Florida's
picture perfect ride to the Halls River and d
the Homosassa River. Located at the end
of the canal with great privacy.
MOTIVATED SELLER! .4


ao& "Always There For You"
R. *GAIL COOPER
. rii ..]i lli.r D .:.llr R e all,'.r
Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3 -mindspring.com


II


L __ .- ... 7
NEWLY PAINTED INTERIOR!
* Driftwood plan with 3/2/3
* Heated pool with large lanai
* Screened front entry
*New 18" tile
AC/heat new in 2010
* Home warranty for the buyers
#700421 $180,000


DO NOT MISS THIS CHANCE!
* 2/2 villa in private location
* Grove of trees and west side easement
* Newer tile and carpeting
* Indoor laundry area
Lanai looks out to private greenbelt
* Screened front entry
#701957 $69,900


S-e VirM 'T ou, .II, .I I.II I .c I -


Dirty draining
If you've got a smelly
drain, there's probably
bacteria growing in it.
To eliminate the prob-
lem, start by mixing a cup
of baking soda and a cup
of vinegar. Pour the mix-
ture down the drain, let it
sit for 15 minutes or more,
then run the disposal and
rinse with hot water.
To clean disposal blades,
freeze white vinegar in ice
cube trays and let the dis-
posal grind away at them.
The ice will help dislodge
stuck-on debris, and the
vinegar freshens the unit
If there's still an odor, try
pouring in half a cup of
bleach, but not if you have a
septic system. You may
need to go buy a live enzyme
product that eats away bac-
teria, or a corrosive cleaner
meant to unclog drains.
If your sink's drain plug
has moldy buildup, soak it
in a vinegar or bleach so-
lution, then wipe away any
remaining grime. If mold
builds up again quickly,
replace the plug. Home
improvement stores
should offer styles that fit
your sink, and some even
stock scented versions.
If unpleasant odors con-
tinue, consider whether you
might have a backed-up dis-
posal or clogged plumbing
The grind
The crunching and
gnashing of your disposal
may make you leery of


touching it, but there are
ways you can keep it run-
ning well without calling a
professional.
DeSilvia says to always
run cold water before,
during and after using the
disposal.
"Never use hot water
with your garbage dis-
posal," he says. "It breaks
down food, causing it to
liquify and accumulate
around your pipes."
It's best to scrape large
pieces of food into the
trash can, then let the dis-
posal take care of smaller
scraps. Don't put potato
peels, shellfish, coffee
grounds or other fibrous
foods into the disposal.
They're clog-makers.
DeSilvia reminds home-
owners never to put their
hand in the disposal. If it
won't grind, use the reset
button, usually a black or
red button on the bottom
of the unit Make sure the
outlet the disposal is
plugged into is working.
If the disposal seems
jammed, use the Allen
wrench or similar hand-
crank tool that comes with
the unit to give it a push
start. If you can't find
yours, many hardware
stores carry them.
"Most service calls can
be avoided by simply reset-
ting your disposal," DeSil-
via says. "Press the button
and you are good to go. Just
saved yourself $300 bucks
for a service call."


Sandi Hart, Realtor
352-476-9649
ERA American Realty
& 117 S. Hwy. 41, Inverness, FL 34450


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A spider's web in a residential garden in New Market, Va.
Spiders may land on the creepy, crawly list for many peo-
ple but they account for as much as 80 percent of all the
predator control in home gardens. The payback is minimal
- food, water, shelter and easing off on harmful lawn and
garden chemicals.


GARDEN
Continued from Page E7

lacewings), sunflowers (la-
dybugs) and yarrow (hov-
erflies). Many insects in
the larval stage are vora-
cious predators. Green
lacewings as juveniles are
aptly named "aphid lions"
because of their appetite
for the sap-sucking pests.
"I would certainly place
spiders near the top of un-
derappreciated life in the
garden," said Whitney
Cranshaw, an extension en-
tomologist with Colorado
State University 'Although
sometimes I think it is less
that they are not appreci-
ated but rather people don't
want to think of them."
Spiders are credited for
as much as 80 percent of
all predator control in the
garden. Jumping spiders,
wolf spiders, lynx spiders
and crab spiders are the
standouts, Cranshaw said.
Also great garden
helpers are:
Toads. "Harmful in-
sects make up 62 percent
of a toad's daily food sup-
ply," said Lovejoy, who
stacks rocks and wood in
secluded spots to shelter
toads, frogs, turtles, sala-
manders and lizards.
Dragonflies that can
capture over 400 mosqui-
toes a day
Moles. "They eat their
body weight in insects,


slugs and grubs while aer-
ating the soil," Lovejoy said.
Sphinx wasps that can
pollinate 200 flowers in
less than seven minutes,
Lovejoy said.
Snakes. "Most snakes
- about 99 percent of
those found in gardens -
are harmless helpers, and
eat rodents and insect
pests," Lovejoy said.
Garter and gopher snakes
top her "beneficial" list.
Box turtles that feast on
slugs, snails, insects, larvae
and grubs. "They're slow
but sure," Lovejoy said.
Bats. These nocturnal
aerialists pollinate flow-
ers, spread seeds and de-
vour upwards of 600
mosquitoes an hour.
Most predatory insects
aren't selective, though,
feeding on anything that
comes within reach.
"Praying mantises are gen-
eralists," said James Dill, a
pest management special-
ist with University of
Maine Extension. "So are
many spiders. They're
very efficient but don't dis-
criminate in what they eat.
They'd just as soon grab a
honeybee if it happens by"
Maintain a healthy gar-
den with ample spacing if
you hope to attract benefi-
cial insects, Dill said.
"Spacing allows you to
observe things better if
you're walking around,
looking for trouble," he
said. "It also reduces the
odds for (plant) disease."


.d-.A-A






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bringing butterflies into the garden


he first step in prac- subtropic
tical butterfly gar- Florida a
dening is to identify eaten by s
which adults
live and breed
in your area.
Fewer than 200
butterfly-
species breed
in Florida. A
few are tropical
strays; five to
seven migrate
south for the
winter, includ- Jane Weber
ing the JANE'S
monarch, Gulf GARDEN
fritillary, long- G R E
tailed skipper,
common buckeye, and from the
cloudless sulphur, little Key West
sulphur and barred Bahamiar


sulphur
Florida is a long state -
subtropical in the south,
temperate in the penin-
sula and cooler with frosty
winters further north.
"Florida Butterfly Cater-
pillars and their Host
Plants," an accurate, use-
ful reference by Mark
Minno, Jerry Butler and
Daniel Hall, has maps and
photos of 167 species.
Adult female butterflies
lay eggs on specific plants
- sometimes on only one
particular plant. Plants re-
stricted in their range to


al coastal South
nd the Keys are
specificc butterfly
caterpillars.
Some plants
are threatened
by habitat loss
and human dis-
turbance. Con-
sequently,
butterflies de-
pending on
them become
threatened and
endangered.
For example,
torchwood
grows on tropi-
cal hammocks
Miami area to
and is host to the
1 swallowtail and


the federally listed, endan-
gered Schaus' swallowtail.
They cannot breed any-
where else in Florida. The
Bahamian swallowtail has
not been seen for years
and probably no longer ex-
ists in Florida.
Luckily, about 100 but-
terfly species are wide-
ranging in Florida. In most
counties, 65 to 70 species
commonly breed and visit
gardens. Because host
plants need certain
ecosystems such as salt

See JANE/Page E15


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
The zebra longwing is the state butterfly of Florida. About
100 butterfly species are wide-ranging in Florida. In most
counties, 65 to 70 species commonly breed and visit gar-
dens. Any garden can attract 35 to 50 kinds of butter-
flies depending on the diversity of nearby habitats.
R a slG y www.parsleyrealestate.com

eal Estate, Inc. 352726-2628
I-Ia&,


BEST7
REAL ESTATE, INC.
[ OB---- 5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
| fS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OtCE: (352) 795-6633 Rltor
WWW.ALEXRE.COM E-MAIL: SALES@ALEXRE.COM
AT'- *N I IS lAVt A j W EE


TOP NOTCH furnished doublewide. Immaculately upgraded: eat
in kitchen, baths, A/C, and osmosis system. You will be pleasantly
surprised when you walk into this light and bright, spacious home.
Master bedroom's measurements include a dressing room. Launch
your boat just one block away into the Hernando Lake. Owner will
consider owner financing. $39,900.00


JOANN MARTIN
Preferred
REAL ESTA TE


S'.S
OEN HOUEns
SUNAY 1004:OP


NATURE'S PARADISE-FLORAL CITY, FL BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL
Waterfront 2-story home on private 2.27 acres. Corner 2.17 acre tract. Paved road & central
Gorgeous setting. $149,900 MLS#358757 water. $17,500 MLS#700351


248 E. Joplin Ct. 795 E. Everett Ln.
Hernando
Elegant 3/3/3 with den/office. Located on 6th Hernando
fairway of the Oaks Golf Course. Stainless steel Newer roof 2005, Hvac 2008.
appliances, summer kitchen. Come see it today. Whole house water filter. Furniture
$279,900 Dir: From 486, South on negotiable. Asking $142,900.
Essex to left on E Joplin Ct.


BANK OWNED-DUNNELLON, FL
3BR/2BA DW off Hwy 200.1 acre. Fenced
$29,000


BANAI UWNtU--tLUKAL LIlT, tL
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. 45.000 MLS#701 383


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352 302-6714


oi overl ni acre, iencea & ciossienceU, fl'u3,33',A lY c,
covered front patio, 2 sheds, vinyl floors mobile home Kitchen & bath renovated ir
Exterior painted 2011, roof cool sealed 2011 004 10 x 13 shed in rear yard, newel
Furniture negotiable price list in mobile i i **
#353265 $39,900 1, i I , ''i i .''"


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 Ell








E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013






Real Estate


Classifieds

RL A--


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



To place an ad, call 563-5966


-: Classifieds


In Print





. Online


X All

The Time


F : 15 5W-556 Ii TolU-l *b 85-2340 Emal:Iecl.Iw


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!

V


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HOMOSASSA 2/1
Fenced acre, Addition
Huge Deck, Shed
$500.mo 352-628-5244




43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807






3/2 on 1.5
Acres
FHA Approved
$2600 Down
(Town of Hernando)
352-795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908



Easter Sale
Family Home Center
Three Lot Model
Clearance
NO HIDDEN FEES
$72,900 30x76 4/2
$69,900 30 x 60 3/2
$82,900 32 x 76 4/2
Price Incls: Delv, Set,
A/C Skirting, Steps,
upgraded appliances &
Furniture Remember
The Reason for The
Season 352-795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181




Own Your
Own Land?
Financing Available to
purchase your next
New or used
Manufactured Home
352-795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
Check us out at
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/
New mobiles
$39K off list
John Lyons @
800-622-2832 ext 210



ENSY SELL

REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377


-I.-




We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272




INVERNESS
55+ park
on water. Furnished
2bd, 1.5 bath, $595.
Rent inc. grass cutt-
ing and your water.
Call 352-476-4964
for details





For S.e'%ulf
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 114 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $89,900.
716-807-8847




Credit Scores
above 575 Qualify for
several land/home
packages in the
Tri-County area
352-795-2377

FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498


I i
HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on / acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
HOMOSASSA
3/2, 1,800 Sq Ft,
Fenced Yard,new floor-
ing $5000 down
$525 (352) 302-9217
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on V4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message
Mobile Homes
with land.
Ready to move in.
Owner financing with
approved credit.
3Br 2Ba. No renters.
850-308-6473.
LandHomes
Express.com



INVERNESS
Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
Florida Room, Carport
$10,000 0 BO (352)
419-5114 or 601-4929
Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 352-726-2553
OCALA
2br iba furn. 55+
Comm.16x16 add-on,
sliding drto private
deck, 28ft encls porch,
& 28 ft storage, $6200
(352) 470-1727




DUNNELLON
3/2/2 located off 488
$750mo, 1st, Last Sec
Req. fence yard, no
pets 352-208-9462
352-598-9212


RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA/CHASSAHOWITZKA
8140 Miss Maggie Dr.l (H) $.....550
2/1 Waterfrontduplex
60xhorn C. E (H) .............. $1,350
3/2/2 Pool home in SMW
HERNANDO
5164 l Dewey Wy (Her) ...REDUCED $725
3/2 D new mobile on 1/2ACR
6315N. SIewo Dr.(Her).....$625
2/1FHonda room
CRYSTAL RIVER
10905W. Gem St................ $625
2/2/1 Duplex, close to hospital
11280 Bayshore Dr........... $1,000
2/2, Fumished on canal
BEVERLY HILLS/LECANTO
3299 N. Maidename Dr. (H).... $685
2/1.5/1 Close to park, 2 screen lanais
1933 W. SIamelle Path (L) ... $1,200
3/2/2 Beauiful Brentwood home

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST-INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?


3/2/1 CORNER LOT,
EXTRA LARGEYARD,
LAWN CARE INCLUDED $775
2/3/2 EXTRA ROOMY ..........$850
2/1/1 PARTIAL FENCED YARD.....$600
3/2 FREESTANDING
GARAGE, ACREAGE............... $900

2/2 CARPORT................... $650
2/2/1 ...................................$650

3/2/2 LAWNCARE & POOL
CAREINCLUDED.... .$1,050
Jennifer Fudge,
j Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Prtad Your PreamO Homwe

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com

7m57








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nature Coast Landings.
Large RV Site.
Reduced to $39,500.
www.detailsbyowner
or call 352-843-5441




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Studio Apt.
Furnished, All Util. W/D
Rm., Boat dock, cable
TV, $650 mo $250 sec.
352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Inverness
1/1 $400. & 2/2 $600.
Near Hospital
352-422-2393




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Avail. Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
2/1water incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238

LECANTO
1 BD apartment $500
352-216-0012/613-6000




INGLIS
2/1, Near Power Plant,
Clean, Quiet, $495./
mo. (352) 447-6016








Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528


LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801
Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906




BLACK DIAMOND
Villa 3/2/2 Furnished
with Social Membership
$1375 Neg.
502-727-2491
CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242
THE GLEN
Maint. Free Villa, 2/2/1
vyn. scrn. por., 1,320 sf,
garg. & cable furn.
redecorated, 55+
comm. $725. mo
(352) 634-7674



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2 $1,100/mo Bob
Hedick Coldwell Banker
Next Generation
352-634-4286
Buy 1-3bd Homes
From $1000/mo!
PreForeclosured and
Rent20WN Homes!
Bad Credit OK! Only
500 Credit Score Min!
To learn more and
access local listings call
1-866-955-0621




INVERNESS
2/2/2 remodeled, on
golf course $895mo +
Sec. 352-895-0744




BEVELRY HILLS
1/1, Carport $450.,
1st last, sec. For more
Info. (352) 637-2838
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878
CITRUS SPRINGS
2 Story 3BR + Loft,
Near schools, $895.
mo. 352-812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS,
2 BR, 1 BA, 2CG; $595.
1896 W. Rutland Drive.
352- 382-1373.
Crystal River North
2/1 + Den, Country
Setting $550/ mo.,
+dep (352)795-0161


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
Near School
$775. mo.
RIVER LINKS
REALTY
352-628-1616

INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Opt 3rd
HUGE YARD
$650/mo Ist/last/sec
(352) 422-6978

INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




Gospel Island
clean 2/1,no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




INVERNESS
3/2/2 furnished,
very nice, in town
352-527-9268




Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.








TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $56,400. Call
352-638-0905
UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


Bankruptcy Auction
Onsite & Online
Precision Steel Works
Corp.Thurs, April
18th at 11am.
Preview: Day of Sale
9-11am
3709 NW 81 Street,
Miami, FI 33147
Welding Equipment
& Machinery, Vehi-
cles, Forklift, Power
& Hand Tools, Ware-
house Items, Steel
Beams and more!
Visit www.moecker
auctions.com for
Details, Photos and
Catalog
Moecker Auctions
(800) 840-BIDS
10% -13%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
Case
No.: 12-39848-BKC-AJC
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin



Online Only Real
Estate Auction-
Oceanfront Lot in
Holden Beach &
17+/- Acre Water
Front Tract in Hert-
ford, NC. Direct ICW
Access, Selling
Regardless of Price
in Excess of $399,000
on the Day of the
Auction, 4/29 at
8am to 5/9 at 3pm,
Iron Horse Auction
Co., Inc
800-997-2248.
NCAL3936.
www.iron
horseauction.com






Sun April 14th, 1-4 pm
1204 N Timucuan Trail
Move In Ready"
Fully Furnished 3/2
Pool Home. 2002 built
home in community
of Lakeside Golf &
Country Club.
From HWY 41 to
Lakeside Golf & CC
entrance. Left on
Sabal Palm, Left on
Timucuan Trail.
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC






PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 % w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.comr
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
**cash only **
352-503-3245
Town Home
2/2/1 w/glass lanai,
1123 Sq Ft, Maint. free
exterior, new paint &
flooring. exec. unit ready
to move in. The Glen,
55+ comm $52,900
585-797-7907



Use Your Tax Money
for a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
6515 S. Tropicana
Ave., Lecanto
$49,900.
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then Call
(800) 282-1550




INVERNESS
RENT TO OWN!!
No Credit Check!
3/2/2, 888-257-9136
JADEMISSION.COM




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3-4BR/ 2BA/ 2-4Car
New Roof,
Cathedral Ceilings,
Fruit Trees,
2 Lots, $145,000.
352-563-9857
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


DEN BEDROOMS. 3
bath. THIS HUGE
AND BEAUTIFUL
TWO STORY HOME
WITH 3 CAR GAR-
AGE IS OVER 3500
SQ. FT. HOME
BACKS UP TO A NA-
TURE PRESERVE.
HOME IS A FORE-
CLOSURE SHORT
SALE AND THE
BANK IS WORKING
WITH THE SELLERS.
THIS HOME WAS
BUILT IN 2005.
dennis neff@yahoo.com
Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Hme


4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell



3/2/2 POOL HOME
New Paint and carpet,
Updated Kitchen,
REDUCED $134 900
352-302-4057

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351

HOMOSASSA
211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. 3000 SF,
heated pool, Granite,
SS Appliances, Wood,
Tile and Carpet. 2 Car
Gar, fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


You've Got It!





Somebody






Wants






It!


























CHI NICE



(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline .com


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 E13


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www. bettyh u nts
homes.com.








E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013



PRICED TO SELL
Condo/Patio home
2/2/2 on golf course L
new appliances,A/C, IS
tile & carpet, updated 2-HC
kitchen & baths.
352-503-2175 Let
rec
,


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

WANTED
I need listings!!
I SOLD all of
mine and I can
sell yours too.
Market is good!
Call me, lets talk.
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


Room To Roam
3/2 ON 2 ACRES
Quite Country Setting
front porch, Large
rear screened porch,
Patio, 24x30 Steel
Building, w/ water &
electric, and Steel
Carport, Completely
Fenced Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area,
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$132,000
352-302-6784


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I NEED
ISTINGS!
OLD ALMOST
)MES A MONTH
IN 2012
's BREAK that
cord together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515



Real Estate
Auction


Chassahowitzka Bay
Homosassa, FL
8015 W
Chassahowitzka St.
4BR 2BA 2,356+/- sf
Mobile Home
with 6'x 8' shed.
Open Public
Inspection:
1-4p Sun Apr 14 &
2 hrs before auction
Nominal Opening
Bid: $10,000
Auctions: 12:30p
Thur. Apr. 25
or bid live from
anywhere at
auctionnetwork.
corn
williamsauction.com
800.982.0425
Daniel S. Nelson
Re Lic BK3223097
Thomas L Williams
Auc Lic AU 1112
5% Buyer's Premium


m







SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855

SPECIAL *
New Home in Quiet
Neighborhood, 3/2/2
2932 sq. ft. corner lot,
on 1 acre, $279,900
Call Barney
(352) 563-0116


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant


CITRUS HILLS
Completely Furnished
Condo, in prime loca-
tion 3bd/3ba w/ car
port asking $114,900.
352-419-5268
Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266
INVERNESS VILLA
For Sale, Near
Whispering Pines
Park. Close to stores
/restaurants. Near
Medical Facilities/
Hospital. Light,
Updated End Unit.
2 BR. 2BA., Garage
Eat in Kit., Liv. Rm.
/Din. Rm., Front/back
porch, garage, attic
w/ storage, newer AC
w/ guarantee. ALL
Appl's. UPDATED,
Near Condo Pool
Call (352) 637-3746
(352) 697-2475




SPECIAL *
2BD 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance req. Com-
pletely remodeled, Price
Reduced $169,000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area,10K boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/586-4987


Get Results
In The Homefront
Classifieds!


3/2.5/2 Residence in Inverness, FL
Will Sell Regardless of Price!
Airport Across the Street 30' x 40' Shop
ALSO:
Beach Lots in St. Augustine & Fernandina
Waterfront COMM in Jacksonville
AUCTION DATE:
April 17, 11AM ET 2] ri]
See Website for More Details!
Tranron Dngger Walter L Drigge lit
L, RE Broker, R Ulf AU707 & A83145 14
10% BuetPrs ium


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

YOWULL THIS!
Floral City's BEST Lake
House Value! 2 Boat
Docks, 2/2/Den/FP &
more! 1YR Warranty
$159K Realty Connect
212-1446
www.RealtyConnect.me


m
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor










ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty







SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureC oast
Proerties.om
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


N H 30 LOTS FOR SALE
INVERNESS, To Settle
Estate, Sell All or Part







9748 W. Halls River Rd
SF Building Lot
approx. 94 x 265
Access via Halls River
Road, or Blue River
Cove Terrace. Public
water & Sewer $11,000
(352) 628-7332





MAGNIFICENT HISTORIC HOME a.Am
Sold at or above $150,000
940 NE 4th Avenue, Crystal River, Florida 34428
3 bedmoms/2 bathrooms on a.52 acre parcel
2-story Gothic Victorian, Renovated 2006/7, 10' ceilings,
gorgeous pool, 5 fireplaces, garden room
idealfor a bed and breakfast!

ETelephone Bidding Available
fisherauction.com
800.331.6620


" 3% Broker Commission
EIRs T' FISHER
LamrRsrAU3:061 Su t is ofa
LarnarRsherAUQ3:AB1OOI|Subjcttoafliformasoaie


kut Your trmw How,.
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chronicleh 1- finder.corn






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LAND



'. LARGEST SELECTION OF


FORECLOSURES IN CITRUS COUNTY


JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
This sleepy orange butterfly is sitting on a Stokes' aster.


JANE
Continued from Page Ell

marshes, some butterflies are re-
stricted to those habitats. Any garden
can attract 35 to 50 kinds of butterflies
depending on the diversity of nearby
habitats. Just provide the right host
plants for different caterpillars to eat;
roof eaves and dense shrubbery offer
hiding places where caterpillars can
pupate safe from predators. Those
cute slotted butterfly houses do not
work in Florida. Save the money for
another host plant instead. Provide
adult food like flower nectar, pollen,
rotting fruit, damp, rich soil and/or
decomposing dung.
Cultivated home gardens have
many flowers that provide nectar
food for adult butterflies. Butterflies
and their caterpillars are cold-
blooded insects. Adults need miner-
als not found in flower nectar. Males
in particular often congregate
around muddy puddles and moist
ground to sip dissolved salts and
minerals needed to reproduce. A
shallow tray with moist, mineral-
rich soil on the bottom works well.
Of most importance to a sustain-
able butterfly garden is providing
appropriate caterpillar host plants.
The last third of Minno's 2005 book
has 185 plant descriptions, two color
photos per page, with habitat, range,
notes and a list of caterpillars that
host on each plant. For example,
page 287 shows the drought-resis-
tant, native, deciduous turkey oak
tree, which inhabits dry uplands,
pinelands and sandhills in north
and central Florida.
Turkey oak is host to four butter-


fly caterpillar species banded gone.#700941 1861 Edlerberry Lane his. $199,900, #702143,3101 S.Graymor'Path Tonya Koch 352-613-6427
hairstreak; sleepy duskywing, Juve-
nal's duskywing and Horace's dusky- COMMERCIAL RENTALS
wing caterpillars. Laurel oak grows
throughout Florida in uplands, wet- v.. Adjacent to the courthouse.
lands and dry or wet hammocks. It is: Your cho ice of several office suits
prevalent locally along river plains from 475- o 0
and in home gardens, but is host t 340f on 41 N, Inverness, includes Don't need public access? ESTATE SALE! Priced to Get R Done, this 3/2/2 home i
only Horace's duskywing and white 4,000 sq. ft. warehouse; So many uses! $349,000. beautiful. Oak shaded acre yard in sight of the Bike Trai
M hairstreak. #357257. Debbie Tannery 352-613-3983 Small one room suite for only Bonus room for hobby or office. $147,500 #359476
Minno's concise book has a thor- $350 per month
ough 20-page cross-referenced 808 S Hwy 41, Inverness
index of plants and caterpillars by Approx 1500 sq ft $800 per month
common and scientific name. A Mini warehouse space
checklist of Florida breeding but- 10 x 10 to 12 x 40 Starting at $50
terflies by subfamily is included. -1
terflies iby subfamily is included. CALL FOR A LIST OF WAITING FOR THAT GREAT BUY? Maybe this wil
The book is in county libraries, do- ENJOY THE GOOD LIFE. Beautiful golf course catch your eye! BANK-OWNED 3/2 on .61 acres MOL, 138(
nated by the Citrus Chapter of the community. 3/2/2 with open floor plan viewing your private AVAILABLE RENTALS! livingfor NLY $37,900! MLSt 2195.2847 Rnne
Florida Native Plant Society. pool. $127,900. Movein ready. #354369 Call Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752.
Jaret Daniels' field guide "Butter-
flies of Florida" (2003) and "Your -- -
Florida Guide to Butterfly Garden-
ing" (2000) are good resources. Dr. -
Daniels is associate curator of lepi-
doptera at University of Florida Mu- TOOT TOOT... This movemn ready hom.... .. " .. ... -
tr aa Uv er s M horn its so cute 1981 2/2/1 home boasting NEW Roof, BAM! ITS BARGAIN TIME! BANK-OWNED 2/1/ NO BIG TWINKIE... A little work can turn this bank-
seum of Natural History's Butterfly NEW Flooring & NEW Paint! Breakfast bar & appliances with ceramic tile, living & family rm, screen porch, int laundry owned 2001 3/2/2, 1526 living, into a doll house
Rainforest in Gainesville (352-846- Take a peek & make an offers #702104. $64,900. with shower &more! #702187 103 Tyler. $47,900. Double lot, screen porch.3336 Paula Ln Inv.
2000). It houses 60 to 80 free-flying 9585 Berry Ln. Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. $74,900! #701190- Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752
native and exotic butterflies in out-
door screened enclosures. Ho-
mosassa Butterfly farm on Cardinal 1 2I
Street east of U.S. 19 (352-628-6362)
has a good collection of local butter-
flies M garden has host and nectar PRESTO (HANGO back to a duplex d HANG IN YOUR HAMMOCK.. or jump in your boat! EASY TO PLEASY! EASY on the eyes, EASY on your wall
flies. My garden has host and nectar 2/2 home packed with potential. Home formerly a duplex Bankwned WATERFRONT 3/2 for $69,900! Screen porch, & EASY to move in! Bankwne 2/2/2, 1390 living
plants for more than 70 species of that can be changed back with a few tools! #702021. FL room & living room, eat-in kitchen, boat dock, updated boasting fresh interior paint, new flooring & appliances
native Florida butterflies. 2156 CR 412B Lake Pansoffkee. $25,000. I interior, rear deck! #359100.7416 Gospel Island Rd. screen porch&family room .#700822.6715 Red Robin.
STomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586 6598. Tomika Sires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Tomika S ires-Hanssen 352-586-6598.

Jane Weber is a professional
gardener and consultant.
Semi-retired, she grows thousands .
ofnative plants. Visitors are
welcome to her Dunnellon, Marion | ..." YOU NEVER GET A 2ND FIRST IMPRESSION...
we~co] t h r ]io .11- "-L 11 i UlI LI, luhui u luuh I
County, garden. For an appoint- OH MYLANTA.. This 1996 Fairview Estates home is ONLY $64/Sq Ft! 3/2/2, 2801 living, boasting new paint & 2006 2-Story 4/3.5/2, 2276 living for $159,900
ment, call 352-249-6899 or contact flacing, formalliving anddining, family room with wet bar and fireplace split iand ope pls. 4320 landinheud. Gourmet kitchen. New appliances, paint, ooring.#701655.
JWeberl2385 gmail.com. #358696.ONLY $179,900! Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-212-5752. 9429 Nest P. Kimberly Fuller 352-212-5752.


SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013 E15








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


I I .1111 ", f Mh l l II..... IIh,





Pt Df, ,352 212 7280


* Inveiness Coll 8 CC
* I_ .i l.- I., 1 : I .I | a, 1


Mi_ = /111 ""II $169,500
Jeanne 0a Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
I'iv'I'. CillusCountISold. comr


RUTLAND











Mit =/1 ii alI $35,000
Call Jim Mio 1ton at 4222 173
to see this piopelI'











1001 LOUNDS


Mi =/ IIiiiIIII $69,000
Call Stelan StuatIl ,'3522120211
o Isaac Bay lon ,35269 2493


TWO COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OVER 6.400 SF!
211 NE 4TH STREET. CHIEFLAND. FLORIDA 34626


1 iii ,, I .i ...

OFFERED AT ONLY S199,000
V 1 i' h , f Ili, V ... ,.'


CUTE AND CLEAN


l.-:,a li : .ilh .I ,i i hfii i i'i. il .

PRICED TO SELL $39,999
Call Ouade Feeset 352302 7699


M I_ = /11"Il. $155,000
Call Tim Donovan o0 Isaac Baylon
lot a personal lour










* Ni.: 1':., MH h ,i.:


* VVIJFI, HIJPl
M_:, = i11177 $49,500
Willaid Pickiel 2019871
It'It,'I. CitiusCountIrSold. corn


II


CITRUS SPRINGS!

l ih . i 1 66.1, i ii 1, .l ii



Mt i,= 7111l.1 $89,900
loItaine 0 Regan 586 0075









OPEN WATERFRONT
ON HERNANDO LAKE


., . ... Id h .. I 1hIrI ,, I i, I',,,
I hI h I" I I I 'h ... .

ri. =i'-i:-ii"'. $159.000
C171 1 C N-e it 4766549


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY
I. .. ... i N . I I _i ,
1 I I I' 11 I1 I .1 i- d


$95,000
Call Jim iloton at 3524222/173 lo
I out personal tout ol Emetald Hills


MUST SEE TO BE APPRECIATED



ilhb ili:l jllilll Hin ,l hl ,11 '
Mit = :' . ASKING PRICE S224,900
Call Nilda Cano 352 270 0202 to see
this and make an roller!


* LAKE SIDE COUNTRY CLUB

* e-i,:,,,iii I.. POOL I...I,
* .i n.h,, I m .ll . :.r l _" I1I1:: i. II I.A
* il. l il I..
Mi:, =: `X.:._"X $150,000
Jeanne Pichkel 212 3410
itti'iE'. CiliusCountl Sold. corn


COMMERCIAL BUILDING

.... H l.lnni. iV b 1 Ti,. nl. .l.1 l l' 1heli .,:i


Mi :, = _.', Al .. $105.900
Call Jim Motion at 4222173 lot a lout


I.:ih v ,h f _' il ,,li I...i h ...I l,,,l : fi,
p ,:ii W ilh V ,i ;qJIIl II dI liviil
hl.,, i l_ h d ,,, l, : 11 l,,,,hhl ., : ni ,,h ,j 01
hl. i llli is M .:.%ii: i ,, A ll. ii:i:l
Mi_ =i 71:11I1 ASKING $165,000
Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072


WELCOME TO YOUR COUNTRY HOME


. .. i..I. . ) 1..... I i. .II i ..I i. ...


rhiii "1. ASKING $228.900
Pit Dt, ,,35212 7280
['teil /ladep it it it p 2/gj1d3j u i;jui


11 I ..na III ..... II]..,1


C411 DORIS 1lINER I. ,l.j
352 726 6668 jt Cal 422 4627


WORK OR LIVE IN UNIQUE, VICTORIAN
ERA HOME-ZONED COMMERCIAL




11i ASKING S138.,900
h. elli 1 s . ..1 , ,hll ,s,, ..h ,


* 1... I ...: I, ..1

* l_ l, ii,. 1,, l.ia ,,lr I

Mi / = 711-'." $125,000
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
Iel'il'I. C/it usCountl'Sold. corn


CLOSE TO TOWN
Tl I ll: li i ,i bli6 ill 111 I J1l hb .i l .lili
M 1. i l. l l ti, l l..l. :iii l.lii ,l il l. | lil;l ,,,.i l
Lllllnlln in. ] 1&: lh ....I ;
PRICED TO SELL!! $84,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


WATERFRONT
CUSTOM BUILT. ONE OWNER HOME
f.. ii. I..ii .j- I
Fi i H.).d 01. . ... ... ..]H i i .. i I l
Hi. .I.:. . I .,, ,, i, I mI,

i I = ....ASKING $158.900
Pit D,s 352'212 7280


P


E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 2013