<%BANNER%>

Citrus County chronicle ( April 7, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 7, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03084

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 7, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03084

Full Text


Final Four: NCAA championship game set /Bl


Sunny to partly
cloudy.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Y





www.chronicleonNICne.com
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VILLAGE
TOYOTA
SEE PAGE D7 FOR DETAILS


VOL. 118 ISSUE 243


The road comes last


Weather, equipment delay S.R 44 construction


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
Dan Groner drives State Road 44
somewhat regularly, so he was happy to
see road contractors working day in


night in November on the road resurfac-
ing project.
Then ... nothing.
Groner, who lives in Lecanto, became
weary of driving on uneven pavement at
intersections, sharp drop-offs in the


eastbound lanes near the Walmart Su-
percenter and long red-light waits at
traffic signals.
He came to one conclusion: The con-
tactor must have abandoned the project
"It is obvious that they feel that they
have completed the contract work,"
Groner said in a letter to the Chronicle,
referring to D.A.B. Constructors of Inglis.


Not so, state officials say
D.A.B. has been unable to perform
work since November because temper-
atures must be 65 degrees or higher to
install the top layer of asphalt. Because
the company pulled its heavy equipment
to other contract sites in Citrus and sur-
rounding counties, it could not continue
See Page A5


Home sweet museum


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Marguerite Carson explains some of the rare items in her small museum, which she has filled with many personal items
collected through the years.


Marguerite Carson lives life exactly as she chooses


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA
n what can only be
described as her
Kentucky manner,
Marguerite Carson
asks, "Honey, want
to see my museum?"
The owner of Longrider
Kentucky native Marguerite
Carson has succeeded in
business in many parts of
the country.


Clothing Co., Carson brings
her guest into the front
area of her home next to
the Western wear store.
"This is my personal mu-
seum," says the former an-
tiques dealer, historian,
artist, businesswoman,
handywoman, storyteller
and teacher
This woman was once in-
vited by the Smithsonian
Institute to present her re-
search on early American
graves to museum curators.
Her research is archived at


Appalachian State Univer-
sity in Boone, N.C.
Her own museum is
filled with her favorite
things -Americana arti-
facts, like a life-size horse
made from paper mach6
in the 1850s that was used
by harness-makers to dis-
play their products.
A small black horse sits
nearby the larger one.
"He's not old," she says.
"A friend gave it to me. I


Page A7


Impact fee gap narrows between counties


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Citrus County's competitive
position when it comes to im-
pact fees for new construction
is about to change in how it
compares to neighboring Her-
nando, as that county's morato-
rium runs out this summer.


This comparison has been
part of the argument for a sus-
pension of county impact fees
until a scheduled review in 2014.
Last month, county commis-
sioners heard a request from
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation to suspend impact
fees until the review. The
group cited the competitive ad-


vantage held by Hernando and
Marion counties, which cur-
rently have no impact fees.
As a result, the county board
agreed to add an impact fee re-
view to other funding options
prior to setting the 2013-14
property tax rate.
Ten years ago, when con-
struction was booming, Citrus


was running almost neck and
neck with Hernando County
when it came to impact fees for
new residential construction.
Citrus County's fees were
lower than Alachua's, higher
than Marion's and the same as
Lake County's.
See Page A9


Some


drop


out of


labor


force
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -After a full
year of fruitless job hunting,
Natasha Baebler just gave up.
She'd already abandoned
hope of getting work in her field,
counseling the disabled. But she
couldn't land anything else, ei-
ther not even a job interview
at a telephone call center
Until she feels confident
enough to send out r6sum6s
again, she'll get by on food
stamps and disability checks
from Social Security and live
with her parents in St. Louis.
"I'm not proud of it," said
Baebler, who is in her mid-30s
and is blind. "The only way I'm
able to sustain any semblance
of self-preservation is to rely on
government programs that I
have no desire to be on."
Baebler's frustrating experi-
ence has become all too com-
mon nearly four years after the
Great Recession ended: Many
Americans are still so discour-
aged that they've given up on
the job market.
Older Americans have re-
tired early. Younger ones have
enrolled in school. Others have
suspended their job hunt until
the employment landscape
brightens. Some, like Baebler,
are collecting disability checks.
'For all the
wrong reasons'
It isn't supposed to be this
way After a recession, an im-
proving economy is supposed to
bring people back into the job
market
Instead, the number ofAmer-
icans in the labor force those
who have a job or are looking
for one fell by nearly half a
million people from February
to March, the government said
Friday. And the percentage of
working-age adults in the labor
force what's called the par-
ticipation rate fell to 63.3 per-
cent last month. It's the lowest
See Page A10


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword .... .. .A16
o Excursions ...... .A16


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ....... .A4


Lottery Numbers . .B3


Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies ......... .A16
Obituaries ....... .A8


TV Listings ...... A16
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes . .A17


TODAY


& next
morning
HIGH
80
LOW
55


6 Ill5


J I r)"r '' rItr)r) 7. ,, -r" ,, r.


2012 DODGE RAM $17,999' 2012 CHEVY EQUINOX $20,999
2012 GMC SIERRA $18,999 2012 DODGE CHARGER $18,999
2012 JEEP LIBERTY $17,999' 2012 NISSAN XTERRA $22,999'
2012 HONDA CIVIC $14,999' 2012 DODGE JOURNEY $16,999'
2012 CHRYSLER TOWN&COUNIRY $21,999' 2012 JEEP PATRIOT $14,999'
PER M O N TH 2012 CHEVY MALIBU $15,999T 2012 CHEVY IMPALA $14,999*
2012 DODGE AVENGER $14,999' 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA $14,999'

. CRYSTAL 352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
A 1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S.Suncoast Blvd.
U AUTOM OTIVE Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL

SAPAYMENTS OF $88 PERMONTH UNTILJULY 4 2013. PAYMENTSUBVENTION BYCRYSTAL AUTOM01VE GROUP BASED ON 72 MONTH FINANCING WITH APPROVED CREDIT INVENTORY SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS *PRICE INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, EXCLUDESTAX,TAG, TITLE AND DEALER FEE $59950 WAC









Snag 'n' Bag helps keep county beautiful


Special to the Chronicle
Several years ago, one of
the directors of Keep Cit-
rus County Beautiful, who
is also a frequent fisher-
woman, had enough of
finding all kinds of litter in
area waterways and on the
shoreline. That was the
birth of the Snag 'n' Bag
program.
In cooperation with Cit-
rus County's Aquatics,
Solid Waste Management
and Grounds Maintenance
divisions and the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission, KCCB
designed, built and in-
stalled stations at boat
ramps and fishing piers all
around the county. Those
stations consist of an infor-
mational sign, a litter bag
dispenser filled with large,
bright yellow litter bags
and a collection tube for
used fishing line.
The idea is for boaters
and fishermen/women to
pick up a litter bag when-
ever they venture out on


^ f WHERE r.t.-L LIVE
A I;e /1


Special to the Chronicle
The Kids' Fishing Clinic at Fort Island Trail Park near Crystal River in February offered
participants a chance to learn about the Snag 'n' Bag program, along with providing
other fun and informative opportunities.


the water, contain all of Filled litter bags can be
their own litter and pick left in the trash recepta-
up litter left by others. cles at boat ramps or re-


turned home. Any unus-
able fishing line can be left
in the tube at the station


This is the fourth
installment in a six-part
series about Keep Citrus
County Beautiful.

and it will be recycled into
new tackle boxes.
Trash in waterways is
ugly and offensive to Na-
ture Coast visitors. Mini-
mizing such trash helps to
entice return visits to the
county which, in turn, ben-
efits the economy
Opportunities to live,
work and play on rivers,
lakes, estuaries and the
gulf help to make Citrus
County a special place.
Keeping those resources
free from bottles, cans,


LIE]
These Snag 'n' Bag
dispensers can be found at
county boat ramps.
tangled fishing line, food
wrappers, broken lures
and other trash improves
the environment.
Sponsors are always
needed, Keep Citrus
County Beautiful officials
said.


Senator: NASA to lasso


asteroid, bring it closer


SETH BORENSTEIN
AP science writer
WASHINGTON -
NASA is planning for a ro-
botic spaceship to lasso a
small asteroid and park it
near the moon for astro-
nauts to explore, a top sen-
ator said Friday
The ship would
capture the 500-
ton, 25-foot aster-
oid in 2019. Then
using an Orion
space capsule, a
crew of about four
astronauts would
nuzzle up next to
the rock in 2021 for Sen
spacewalking ex- Nel
ploration, accord- D-
ing to a
government docu-
ment obtained by The As-
sociated Press.
Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.,
said the plan would speed
up by four years the exist-
ing mission to land astro-
nauts on an asteroid by
bringing the space rock
closer to Earth.
Nelson, who is chairman
of the Senate science and
space subcommittee, said
Friday that President
Barack Obama is putting
$100 million in planning
money for the accelerated
asteroid mission in the
2014 budget that comes out
next week. The money
would be used to find the
right small asteroid.
"It really is a clever con-
cept," Nelson said in a
press conference in Or-
lando. "Go find your ideal
candidate for an asteroid.
Go get it robotically and
bring it back."
This would be the first
time ever humanity has
manipulated a space ob-
ject on such a grand scale,
like what it does on Earth,
said Robert Braun, a Geor-
gia Institute of Technology
aerospace engineering
professor who used to be
NASA's chief technology
officer
"It's a great combination
of our robotic and human
capabilities to do the kind
of thing that NASA should
be doing in this century,"
Braun said.
Last year, the Keck Insti-
tute for Space Studies pro-
posed a similar mission for
NASA with a price tag of
$2.6 billion. There is no
cost estimate for the space
agency's version. NASAs
plans were first reported
by Aviation Week.
While there are thou-
sands of asteroids around
25 feet, finding the right
one that comes by Earth at
just the right time to be
captured will not be easy,
said Donald Yeomans, who
heads NASAs Near Earth
Object program that moni-
tors close-by asteroids. He
said once a suitable rock is
found, it would be cap-
tured with the space
equivalent of "a baggie
with a drawstring. You bag
it. You attach the solar
propulsion module to de-
spin it and bring it back to
where you want it."
Yeomans said a 25-foot
asteroid is no threat to
Earth because it would


IF
F


ON THE NET
* NASA: www.nasa.gov
* The Keck Institute plan: www.kiss.caltech.edu/
study/asteroid/asteroid final report.pdf
* B612Foundation: http://b612foundation.org


burn up should it inadver-
tently enter Earth's atmos-
phere. These types
of asteroids are
closer to Earth -
not in the main as-
teroid belt between
Jupiter and Mars.
They're less than
10 million miles
away, Braun said.
Bill "It's probably
son the right size aster-
la. oid to be practicing
on," he said.
A 25-foot asteroid is
smaller than the size rock
that caused a giant fireball
that streaked through the
sky in Russia in February,
said Apollo 9 astronaut
Rusty Schweickart, head
of the B612 Foundation, a
nonprofit concerned about
dangerous space rocks.
The robotic ship would
require a high-tech solar


engine to haul the rock
through space, something
that is both cutting-edge
and doable, Braun said.
Then NASA would use a
new large rocket and the
Orion capsule both
under development to
send teams to the asteroid.
There would be no grav-
ity on the asteroid, so the
astronauts would have to
hover over it in an ex-
tended spacewalk.
Exploring the asteroid
"would be great fun,"
Schweickart said. "You'd
have some interesting
challenges in terms of op-
erating in an environment
like that."
Nelson said the mission
would help NASA develop
the capability to nudge
away a dangerous asteroid
if one headed to Earth in
the future.


Withlacoochee Area Residents Inc.

gets grant from Felburn Foundation


Special to the Chronicle
The Felburn Foundation has madE
initial grant of $4,000 toward a pro
sional study to collect all available (
and recommend corrective actions
remediation to the plant and biolog
life of the Withlacoochee River
Withlacoochee Area Residents In
local nonprofit dedicated to pu
awareness, environmental educat
and advocacy for positive stewards
of regional water resources, will proxy
an additional $2,000 towards the cos
the first part of the study
Members of WAR have been moni
ing the lower Withlacoochee R:
(below the Lake Rousseau spillway)
many years and have been well aware
the lack of aquatic plant life and
species that depend on it for survive
In 2001, there were large number
wintering manatees in the lower e

CLICK & SAVE
* Check out local deals
offered at www.
chronicleonline.com.
* Each deal will be
available for purchase
online for 48 hours,
but a minimum
number of customers Non-
must participate for Surgi
the deal to be available. Smal


rj%1









SYour L *estyle

Citrsj FIRST AMERICAN H ll -li-R iB
867-8515^^^^^^^^^^
Os^Pcala ^^^^^^^^^^^^g^^
671-5374H^^^^~^
KSS~~mT~i^^^ 1313B^^^^^B


We Welcome You To


Value Dental Care

6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.
.62Crystal River
352-794 -6139


miles of the Withlacoochee.
Today, there are few manatee sight-
e an ings, the aquatic plant growth is nearly
)fes- non-existent, and east of Yankeetown,
data game and rough fish presence is mini-
s for mal, at best. Even the opportunistic,
,ical fishing cormorant has nearly aban-
doned the lower river
c., a University of Florida's Dr Robert
blic Knight and his company Wetland Solu-
ion, tions will begin Stage 1 of the study
ship WAR director, John Fuchs, who ap-
vide plied for this grant, anticipates that the
st of total cost for completion of the river
study and resultant baseline status and
tor- restoration guidelines will require an
iver additional $16,000. Fuchs hopes for and
, for welcomes outside financial participa-
re of tion from any party or concern with mu-
the tual interest in saving/preserving this
al. designated Florida Scenic River
rs of To contact John Fuchs, email
ight warincdirectors@gmail.com.




Solutions

for Hip Pain


Surgical
cal
ler Incision


* No Blood Transfusion
* Shorter Hospital Stay
* Faster Recovery Time


S SEMINAR

Homosassa 11:00 am
Friday, April 12, 2013
West Citrus Elks Lodge 7890 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.

Laigo Medical Center RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION:
Teaching Hospital 1-888-685-1594 (toll free)
FLORIDA KNEE &ORTHOPEDIC PAVILION www.LargoMedical.com


Dr. Michael Welch, LUMUL & Associates


Dr. Philip sherman, UMU ur. Jay skipper, UMU


I-AL L OUPROUCT AREAMERIAN ADE!Wedo otshi*t*Chna


5 o0o Cleaning Special;
| l y New Patients Only |
Wji| FREE Exam & E-Rays w/
W Cleaning
D0210D 0150 D1110
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 4/30/13 i


Dentures $f 00
starting at
Upper & Lower
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 4/30/13 D5510 -D5120


FREE


Second
Opinion
X-ray & Exam
(New Patients Only)
D0210 D0150


If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 4/30/13


5 9o ~Porcelain
Fused to
Metal Crowns
(For first one)
Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 4/30/13 D2751
. . . . . . . . .


We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance.


A-


AL


AL


A2 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


LOCAL\STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3- SUNDAY, APRIL 7,2013



TATE&


. LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Seniors sought
for grad section
The Chronicle wants to
include graduating home-
schooled seniors from Cit-
rus County in the upcoming
graduation section for 2013.
Also welcome are gradu-
ating seniors from out-of-
county schools who reside
in Citrus County.
Send the graduate's
name and a photo to the
Chronicle, attn: Cindy Con-
nolly, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429; or email cconnolly@
chronicleonline.com no
later than Friday, April 26,
with the photo as an
attachment.
Information and photos
can also be dropped off at
the Meadowcrest office in
Crystal River.
Democrats plan
FDR/JFK dinner
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson will
be the keynote speaker at
the yearly FDR/JFK
fundraising dinner hosted
by the Citrus County Demo-
cratic Executive Committee
from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday,
April 27.
Sen. Bill Nelson will be
keynote speaker. The event
will be in the Hampton
Room at the Citrus Hills
Country Club. Meals in-
clude a choice of London
broil, bourbon salmon, or
chicken Marsala. There will
be a cash bar. Entertain-
ment is by Steve Robinson.
Tickets are $40. Please
contact 726-3898 or
palex3099@aol.com for
tickets or information about
the event.
Parkway topic
of discussion
The Citrus County Coun-
cil will meet at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, April 10, at 72
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills.
Guest speakers will in-
clude Randy Fox of the
Florida Department of
Transportation and Citrus
County Commissioner John
"JJ" Kenney. Fox will pro-
vide updates on the
progress of the Suncoast 2
Parkway toll road.
Doors open at 8:30 a.m.
and coffee and doughnuts
are available. The public is
welcome.
For more information,
email freedomwayl @
gmail.com, or call 352-746-
5984.
LWV slates
Tuesday meeting
The newly formed non-
partisan League of Women
Voters of Citrus County will
meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
April 9, at the Central Ridge
Library in Beverly Hills. Vol-
unteer officers will be intro-
duced and a process begun
to select the most pressing
local issue. The League will
meet the second Tuesday
monthly. All men and
women are welcome.
The mission of the
League is to promote in-
formed citizen participation
in government. For informa-
tion, call Linda at 352-746-
0655.

Tampa

Airman killed
in Afghanistan
The Defense Department
has released the name of a
Florida airman killed in
Afghanistan.
The Pentagon says 29-
year-old Capt. James
Michael Steel of Tampa
died in a crash of an F-16
near Bagram Airfield on
Wednesday.
The Air Force Academy
said he was the chief of
mobility for the 77th Fighter


Squadron, Shaw Air Force
Base, in South Carolina.
Steel graduated from the
Air Force Academy in Col-
orado in 2006 and arrived
at Shaw Air Force Base in
2010.
-From wire reports


Speak now on toll road!

CHRIS VAN ORMER Master Plan and its prior- reports are available for a safe route in case of hur-
Staff writer ity projects. Citrus resi- those wish to get further ricane evacuation?"


A road-visioning group
is asking for opinions
about a road long planned
to be built through Citrus
County.
The county's represen-
tative is urging people to
speak out.
Long in the planning
stage, the Suncoast Park-
way 2, an extension
through Citrus County of
the toll road that starts at
Veterans Expressway in
Tampa, is part of the mas-
ter plan biennial update of
the Tampa Bay Area Re-
gional Transportation Au-
thority (TBARTA).
TBARTA will host five
telephone town hall meet-
ings to discuss the region's
transportation future, the
Regional Transportation


dents will join Hernando
County folk in a telephone
forum from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
on Monday, April 8.
"The Suncoast toll road
extension has been a po-
larizing issue among Cit-
rus County residents for a
decade," said Theodora
"Teddi" Rusnak of Her-
nando, who represents Cit-
rus County residents on
the TBARTA Citizens Ad-
visory Committee.
Speaking to the Chroni-
cle recently, Rusnak urged
residents to view informa-
tion online at
www.tbarta.com to become
acquainted with the toll
road project. Click on the
Master Plan link, then
read the plan from its up-
date vision to executive
summary. More detailed


into it. Additional infor-
mation will be posted
shortly before the Monday
session.
"Points of special inter-
est that our residents may
want to consider when
viewing these web pages
are: FDOT Secretary
(Ananth) Prasad's recent
contention that the pro-
posed Suncoast toll road
could adequately serve its
purpose as an economic
development stimulator if
it is built as only a two-
lane (one lane in each di-
rection) toll road," Rusnak
said. "Is that the best use
of public tax dollars? Will
that really generate the
stimulus hoped for? How
many people will really
want to pay a toll to drive
on a one-lane road? Is that


These are questions res-
idents will be able to ask.
"Since trucks seek the
fastest through-routes pos-
sible toll booths slow
them down as do stop-
lights what advantage
could the extension of the
Suncoast toll road effect in
diverting the possible on-
slaught of gravel trucks
driving through Crystal
River and Homosassa on
U.S. 19 from the Tarmac
mine in Levy County, es-
pecially since gravel
trucks have historically
avoided toll roads due to
their cost per axel?" Rus-
nak continued.
Residents can ask
TBARTA how aware it is
of the county's traffic
conditions.
"Is there alternate assis-


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Gale Moore of Williston flew his 1942 Super Stearman aircraft that weighs in at 35 pounds and has a
96-inch wingspan, which is powered by a DAI engine, at the 13th annual Big Bird Fly-In in Dunnellon.




Skies come alive


Big Bird Fly-In

attracts hundreds
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

DUNNELLON
For Gale Moore of Williston,
flying radio-controlled
airplanes is not only his
pastime but his passion.
"I have been flying for 35 years
now," Moore said. "It is some-
thing that I enjoy doing. I enjoy
building as well as flying."
Moore joined 25 registered pi-
lots and 200 spectators at the
13th annual Big Bird Fly-In at
Rainbow R/C Park in Dunnellon.
Aircraft at the event are re-
quired to have a minimum
wingspan of 80 inches, making
them a big plane, also known as
"big bird."


The majority of the planes are
scale models and replicas of
planes flown during World War I
or World War II.
"These are all scale and semi-
scale airplanes," said event co-
ordinator George Derewenko.
"They are copied after real
airplanes."
Moore brought his 1942
Super Stearman that weighs in
at 35 pounds, has a 96-inch
wingspan, and is powered by a
DA1 engine.
Moore said he was unsure of
what to expect at Saturday's
flight, as he recently moved to
Florida from Kentucky.
"I am pleased with the nice,
open field that they have here,"
Moore said. "I flew once today,
but we have an elevator prob-
lem. So we are going to be down
the rest of the day I'm just en-
joying the rest of the day watch-
ing the show."


Pilots from all over the state
traveled to Dunnellon to fly their
airplanes together to rekindle
their childhood obsession.
"We have people from Ocala,
Hernando County, Fort Pierce
and all over," Derewenko said.
"Once a year they come here.
I'm 75 years old and I have been
doing it since I was 12 years old.
I just enjoy doing it."
"Anyone is welcome to come
out here and be a spectator,"
Derewenko continued. "We fly 365
days a year with weather per-
mitting. We usually start flying at
8:30 in the morning. If anyone is
interested in flying, we have an
introductory program where we
can teach them how to flyforfree."
For more information, call
Derewenko at 352-270-3307.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


views

tance that TBARTA can
render our western-most
communities in light of the
truck traffic the Tarmac
mine will generate?" Rus-
nak asked. "TBARTA does
indicate a future freight
traffic pattern (blue hash
line) at the northern end of
the county"
On Monday night, resi-
dents will be called and
asked to join the phone
call forum. Anyone who
doesn't want to wait to be
called can call 855-244-
1359 to listen in and ask a
question. Facebook and
Twitter interactions also
will be established. Com-
ments can be posted
through the TBARTA web-
site also.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.



Council


to vote on


bad bills
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
City officials are poised to
forgive more than $1,500 in
delinquent utility bills
during their meeting on
Monday
The city council will
vote on whether to dismiss
as a bad debt $1,520.34 in
unpaid balances through
fiscal year 2010.
Prior utility accounts
were turned over to an
outside collection agency
in July of 2012, but met
with no success.
Even if the city were
able to collect the balances,
the fees being paid by the
city for the collection agency
brings into question the
validity of that course of
action, officials contend.
Normal city practice is
to terminate utility service
if the account is two months
in arrears. If there is a de-
posit on file, it is applied
against the unpaid balance.
Other matters the city
council will tackle include:
Renewing a one-year
contract for lawn care
services for the city's
cemeteries and bicycle
trail. The contract is with
Nature Cost Lawn Service
for $13,000 a year
Consideration of ex-
tending the city's contract
with Williams, McCranie,
Wardlow & Cash, PA., for
audit services.
Considering authori-
zation to proceed to fore-
close on a recorded lien
for property of Renee
Lewis Simmons.
The city council in its ca-
pacity as the Community
Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) will not meet this
week, according to City
Manager Andy Houston.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925.


Doctors say ACO will improve patient care


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer


CRYSTAL RIVER A
physicians' group is the
first in Citrus County to
be designated by
Medicare as an Account-
able Care Organization,
or ACO.
The Nature Coast ACO
sent letters to about 6,500
patients of 10 primary
care physicians who
comprise West Florida
Medical Associates. The
letters explain that the
ACO will, over time, im-
prove the health care
they receive from physi-
cians with no additional
cost.
An ACO is not a man-
aged-care plan. Patients
may still see any doctor
they wish, whether that
doctor is part of the ACO
or not.


The ACO allows
Medicare to share pa-
tient information with its
physicians in the ACO,
who in turn may use that
information to better
treat patients.
Medicare has so far ap-
proved 250 ACOs nation-
wide, including 26 in
Florida.
The three-year agree-
ment could benefit physi-
cians who achieve
medical-care bench-
marks in a variety of cat-
egories, mainly dealing
with preventing serious
health ailments. Doctors
say they do not know
what the incentive will
be until after the three-
year pilot time
concludes.
A patient's medical
history, including tests
performed, medications
prescribed and proce-


dures that have taken
place, will be shared
with the physicians in
the ACO.
Medicare can then let
doctors know about
trends among their pa-
tient group. Doctors say
the information can be
used to, for example, en-
courage more mammo-
grams or cholesterol
treatments.
"Patients like it be-
cause they can get high-
quality care under this
program," Dr. Venu-
gopala Reddy said.
Patients should see no
changes in Medicare
benefits or costs. The
doctors said medical in-
formation will be strictly
protected.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.


ALL ABOUT ACOs
* It's not an HMO, managed care or insurance company.
* Medicare coverage continues with no change.
* Patients may still see any doctor they wish, whether
the doctor is part of the ACO or not.
* Medicare will share patient information with the
patient's doctor in the ACO, including medical
conditions, prescriptions and visits to other
physicians. Patients may opt out by telling
Medicare to not share that information.
* Because patient information is shared with their
primary doctors within the ACO, patients may not
have to fill out as many forms that ask for the same
information.
* Patients will not need to have the same medical
tests done over and over.
* Medicare won't share information about anyone
who has received treatment for alcohol or
substance abuse without written permission.
* By sharing information, the ACO will lead to better
medical care for patients.
Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Also visit
www.cms.gov/aco or www.Medicare.gov/aco.






A4 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Small things will have a
way of adding up during coming
months. You will make great strides in
gradual increments, and it will help to
be patient.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Unless
you're extremely careful, you could
spill the beans about something that
you promised to keep secret. Don't
open your mouth without thinking.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) There is
someone who is anxious to talk to you
about a matter that you've been
equally as anxious to discuss. Be
ready, because the perfect moment to
do so might present itself.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Gener-
ally, the race belongs to the smart and
not necessarily to the strong or swift. If
you want to outdistance a competitor,
you'd better be able to outthink him or
her.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Every-
thing will work out well if you treat
events philosophically, especially any-
thing that tends to produce adverse
conditions.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Keep in
mind that even a small profit is better
than none at all. Don't expect more
than you deserve, and you won't be
disappointed with what you earn.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Forgo
making an important decision if you
feel you haven't had adequate time to
properly study the alternatives.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Tech-
niques used in your job or daily life can
be improved upon. Start giving some
thought about ways to do things better.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You'll be
a fun person to hang out with, because
you're not apt to take yourself or life
too seriously.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If
there is a business matter you'd like to
close, let your instincts govern the tim-
ing. Proceed to wrap things up only
after you see that everyone's happy.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Don't
discount any bright ideas that come
out of the blue, but don't be too quick
to act on them either.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You
might be able to save more money on
a purchase than what you'll get from
something you sell. Don't be too picky.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) In situ-
ations where you have the right to ask
for cooperation from others, people will
be more responsive if you make re-
quests instead of demands.


ENTERTAINMENT


Country time


Garth

Brooks

excited to

join George

Strait on

ACMs

Associated Press

NASHVILLE,
Tenn. Garth
Brooks says he's
never seen anything
like the reaction he's
gotten since it was
announced he will
share the stage with
George Strait for the
first time Sunday
during the Academy
of Country Music
Awards.
Brooks and his
early musical hero
will be singing to-
gether for the first
time and paying trib-
ute to the show's late
executive producer
Dick Clark.
"Everywhere I go,
restaurants, stores,
whatever 'Hey,
you're gonna be
singing with George.
Hey, we can't wait to
see you with
George,"' Brooks
said in a phone inter-
view. "It's so cool. It's
like getting to sing
with someone that's
attained a level that
you only get if you
die. They love him
and worship him and
I'm in line with
everybody else."
The show airs live


Associated Press
Musician Garth Brooks, left, presents George Strait with the Artist of
the Decade award April 6, 2009, at the ACM Artist of the Decade All
Star Concert in Las Vegas. Brooks and Strait will perform together for
a tribute to the late Dick Clark at the 48th annual Academy of Coun-


try Music Awards on Sunday in Las Vegas.


ACADEMY OF COUNTRY MUSIC
The 48th annual Academy of Country
Music Awards will air on CBS stations
from 8 to 11 p.m. Sunday.


at 8 p.m. Sunday
from the MGM Grand
in Las Vegas with
Blake Shelton and
Luke Bryan hosting.
The show also will
include appearances
by top nominees Eric
Church and Hunter
Hayes, who's per-
forming with Stevie
Wonder, Jason
Aldean, Carrie Un-
derwood, Kenny
Chesney and Mi-
randa Lambert.
Brooks has often
said he wanted to be
just like Strait when
he first picked up a
guitar and a cowboy
hat and started play-


ing for tips while in
college in Oklahoma.
He demurred when
asked what the two
will perform, but said
he believed it will be
remembered as a
special moment for a
special man.
Clark began pro-
ducing the ACMs in
1979 and was in-
volved until his
death last April. The
show continues to be
run by dick clark pro-
ductions and Clark's
son, Rac, serves as
executive producer.
Brooks said he ad-
mired Clark for his
down to Earth and


personal approach
when it came to
artists.
When Clark had an
idea or wanted to
talk over an appear-
ance, he would pick
up the phone and
call a performer di-
rectly He wouldn't
use a middle man.
He thinks renam-
ing the academy's
artist of the decade
award in Clark's
honor was appropri-
ate and in line with
the legendary status
of previous winners,
who include Brooks,
Strait, Loretta Lynn,
Alabama and Marty
Robbins.
"Those are all the
cream of the crop
and that's what Dick
Clark meant," Brooks
said.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Sunday, April 7, the 97th
day of 2013. There are 268 days
left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On April 7,1953, the U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly ratified Dag Ham-
marskjold of Sweden as the new
secretary-general, succeeding
Trygve Lie of Norway.
On this date:
In 1862, Union forces led by
Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated the
Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh
in Tennessee.
In 1927, the image and voice of
Commerce Secretary Herbert
Hoover were transmitted live from
Washington to New York in the first
successful long-distance demon-
stration of television.
In 1949, the Rodgers and Ham-
merstein musical "South Pacific"
opened on Broadway.
In 1983, space shuttle astronauts
Story Musgrave and Don Peterson
went on the first U.S. spacewalk in
almost a decade as they worked in
the open cargo bay of Challenger
for nearly four hours.
Ten years ago: The Supreme
Court voted 6-3 to uphold a 50-
year-old Virginia law making it a
crime to burn a cross as an act of
intimidation.
Five years ago: Kansas won the
NCAA championship, defeating
Memphis 75-68.
One year ago: CBS newsman
Mike Wallace, 93, died in New
Canann, Conn.
Today's Birthdays: Actor James
Garner is 85. Country singer Cal
Smith is 81. Actor Wayne Rogers is
80. Country singer Bobby Bare is
78. Rhythm-and-blues singer Char-
lie Thomas (The Drifters) is 76.
Movie director Francis Ford Cop-
pola is 74. TV personality David
Frost is 74. Singer Patricia Bennett
(The Chiffons) is 66. Singer John
Oates is 64. Actor Jackie Chan is
59. Actor Russell Crowe is 49. Actor
Bill Bellamy is 48. Actress Heather
Burns is 38.
Thought for Today: "Tomorrow
is often the busiest day of the
week." Spanish proverb.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR HI LO PR
NA NA NA I181 47 0.00 J76 49 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 10 knots. Seas
around 2 feet. Bay and inland waters
will have a light chop. Partly cloudy
today.


NA NA NA NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive dally
forecast by:
-- TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 80 Low: 55 *i
Sunny to partly cloudy

I MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING

Sunny to partly cloudy

. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
I L ] High: 85 Low: 63
Partly cloudy and warm

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 80/50
Record 92/34
Normal 81/53
Mean temp. 65
Departure from mean -2
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.30 in.
Total for the year 3.70 in.
Normal for the year 10.83 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.08 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 52
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 42%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Bayberry, Pellitory
Today's count: 8.6/12
Monday's count: 9.9
Tuesday's count: 10.3
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/7 SUNDAY 3:46 9:58 4:10 10:22
4/8 MONDAY 4:28 10:40 4:52 11:03
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
@* O ) O ( SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:52 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:12A.M.
A 1 Y 2 MOONRISE TODAY........................... 5:18 A.M.
APRIL 10 APRIL18 APRIL25 MAY 2 MOONSET TODAY............................ 5:33 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
4:19 a/12:07 a
2:40 a/10:00 a
12:27 a/7:48 a
3:29 a/11:37 a


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
5:00 p/12:38 p
3:21 p/10:19 p
1:08 p/8:07 p
4:10 p/11:56 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:12 a/12:57 a 5:30 p/1:16 p
3:33 a/10:38 a 3:51 p/11:02 p
1:20 a/8:26 a 1:38 p/8:50 p
4:22 a/12:15 p 4:40 p/--


Gulf water
temperature


690
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.91 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.27 n/a 39.25
TsalaApopka-lInverness 38.12 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.34 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


"-- 90s hi f 1"u- ,lh
H .o ~ F rnI.
Honolu, -- a .

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.

SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
Albany 47 28 sh 59 41
Albuquerque 76 48 pc 74 47
Asheville 66 32 pc 67 46
Atlanta 65 44 trace pc 72 55
Atlantic City 50 34 pc 59 48
Austin 82 50 c 80 64
Baltimore 54 37 pc 67 51
Billings 67 40 c 60 33
Birmingham 76 40 pc 75 56
Boise 54 46 .03 sh 58 35
Boston 47 33 c 58 45
Buffalo 51 23 sh 55 39
Burlington, VT 40 24 sh 55 36
Charleston, SC 73 42 pc 72 55
Charleston, WV 70 33 sh 69 52
Charlotte 69 36 pc 70 51
Chicago 70 36 pc 56 43
Cincinnati 68 32 sh 66 51
Cleveland 56 29 sh 64 44
Columbia, SC 74 37 pc 75 55
Columbus, OH 62 32 sh 66 51
Concord, N.H. 43 26 sh 58 36
Dallas 75 56 pc 76 63
Denver 63 35 pc 66 38
Des Moines 71 54 c 66 52
Detroit 51 32 pc 60 41
El Paso 83 60 s 86 62
Evansville, IN 74 42 sh 70 57
Harrisburg 54 36 pc 65 49
Hartford 50 33 c 62 44
Houston 75 47 pc 78 65
Indianapolis 71 39 sh 68 53
Jackson 76 41 pc 75 58
Las Vegas 84 60 pc 85 60
Little Rock 75 44 pc 73 58
Los Angeles 67 56 pc 67 55
Louisville 74 44 sh 69 55
Memphis 74 45 pc 74 60
Milwaukee 54 35 .02 pc 45 38
Minneapolis 55 37 .09 pc 50 42
Mobile 74 40 pc 74 60
Montgomery 78 40 pc 76 55
Nashville 74 40 pc 73 56
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp.Fcst H L
New Orleans 72 48 pc 75 63
New York City 52 35 pc 65 49
Norfolk 51 43 s 71 52
Oklahoma City 74 54 c 73 61
Omaha 72 52 ts 69 50
Palm Springs 88 59 s 92 62
Philadelphia 53 37 pc 66 51
Phoenix 89 63 s 89 64
Pittsburgh 57 24 sh 61 49
Portland, ME 42 27 c 51 37
Portland, Ore 57 50 .20 r 53 40
Providence, R.I. 49 35 c 57 44
Raleigh 64 39 pc 72 50
Rapid City 68 39 .01 sh 61 41
Reno 63 45 sh 62 33
Rochester, NY 48 23 sh 60 38
Sacramento 68 53 pc 72 46
St. Louis 76 54 ts 73 60
St. Ste. Marie 33 18 .34 pc 39 26
Salt Lake City 62 45 sh 60 42
San Antonio 80 51 pc 82 65
San Diego 67 59 pc 65 59
San Francisco 63 54 .01 c 61 47
Savannah 62 43 .01 pc 73 56
Seattle 54 46 .35 r 51 40
Spokane 55 45 .08 sh 49 33
Syracuse 45 25 sh 60 37
Topeka 78 58 ts 71 55
Washington 59 40 pc 67 53
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 91 Borrego Springs, Calif.
LOW 15 Frenchville, Maine
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/75/s
Amsterdam 49/29/s
Athens 69/54/s
Beijing 61/35/pc
Berlin 47/31/pc
Bermuda 63/57/pc
Cairo 96/62/s
Calgary 34/16/sf
Havana 86/66/pc
Hong Kong 81/67/c
Jerusalem 85/67/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


60/47/sh
49/33/pc
56/44/pc
77/52/ts
49/41/sh
35/29/c
53/32/pc
79/67/pc
63/44/s
76/59/s
66/44/ts
58/37/sh
42/30/c


1 LEGAL NOTICES




Judith Yancey, M.D.....A10


Meeting Notices............D7


Miscellaneous

Notices........................D7


C I T 1.1COU N T Y



CHRkNICLE
Florida's Best Communit Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscnption price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax, Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Who's in charge:
Gerry M ulligan .......................................................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike Arnold ................................... ......... .......................... Editor, 564-2930
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John Murphy .................... Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes ............................................. Online Manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................... ..... Classified Manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken....................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Community content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ..........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
So und O ff ................................................................. ........................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to.
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


i-ncoiao' *j jn,,j
ye "





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ROAD
Continued from Page Al

the S.R. 44 work even
when the weather was
warm enough, according
to project records.
The company had
scheduled to begin work
again tonight, but delayed
it until next Sunday be-
cause of rain in the county
earlier last week.
Project administrator
Frank Proch of AIM Engi-
neering and Surveying
Inc., the project's consult-
ant, said he realizes the
public may not understand
why a day or two of rain
stops the contractor from
continuing work.
"It sounds ridiculous,"
he said. "Hopefully this
will be the last delay"
Proch, who has 45 years
in the road consulting
business, said the weather
delay is not unusual.
"It happens all the
time," he said.
The road
comes last
D.A.B. has a $9.4 million
contract with the Depart-
ment of Transportation to
resurface 11 miles of S.R.
44 between North Lopp
Terrace near Stokes Flea
Market and Forest Drive
near Whispering Pines
Park in Inverness.
The project started in
February 2012 and is
scheduled for completion
in July Proch said the proj-
ect is ahead of schedule.
The DOT initially in-
cluded construction of
sidewalks on both sides of
the road the entire length
of the project. Last Janu-
ary, at the county's request,
the state eliminated side-
walks on the south side of
the road along the Withla-
coochee State Forest.
While that elimination
saved four months of work,
D.A.B. needed about that
much time to repair ero-
sion to sidewalks and
drainage areas caused


The company
had scheduled


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
After a delay of four months, officials believe work on resurfacing State Road 44 will continue in a week.


early last summer with
heavy rain from Tropical
Storms Beryl and Debby
Each week, those in-
volved with the project sit
down for progress meet-
ings at AIM's temporary of-
fice in Lecanto.
Participants include those
from AIM, D.A.B., the
county and telecommuni-
cations companies that
may have underground
cable in the area.
Minutes from these
meetings show that
whether D.A.B. did road-
work was contingent on


several factors, including:
Weather Placing the
first layer of asphalt re-
quires temperatures at a
minimum of 45 degrees.
D.A.B. was able to do that
with much of the project
length, though it hasn't yet
touched the eastern three-
fifths of a mile in Inverness.
The top layer, called the
friction course, requires
temperatures at a mini-
mum 65 degrees.
D.A.B. determined the
final section in Inverness
requires only one layer of
asphalt because the 45


mph speed limit is lower
than other parts of S.R. 44.
However, the company de-
cided to delay work on that
section until it had com-
pleted all the Inverness
resurfacing.
Equipment D.A.B.
has three work crews,
Proch said, and they are
spread out on projects in
Citrus, Hernando, Lake
and Pasco counties. Once
heavy equipment is moved
to one project area, it stays
until sections of work are
completed.
So, even though there


were many days during the
winter that temperatures
topped 65 degrees, the
company's equipment was
tied up at other projects.
Night work The
contract requires D.A.B. to
pave at night within 600
feet of a signalized inter-
section. Much of the major
paving that is still to occur
is near signalized intersec-
tions in Inverness.
Proch said when D.A.B.
continues the work, much


to begin work
again tonight,
but delayed it
until next
Sunday
because of rain
in the county
earlier last
week.
of it will happen at night.
The road comes last -
D.A.B. workers spent the
warmest months working
not on the road, but side-
walks, drainage areas and
slopes. Proch said contrac-
tors save the road work for
the end of the contract be-
cause they're required to
make repairs if the new as-
phalt is damaged before
the project is completed.
Once completed, the work
has a three-year warranty.
Groner, the Lecanto res-
ident, wasn't satisfied to
hear weather is the reason
for the delay since
November.
'"A lot of that equipment
sat there without being
moved," he said. "They can
say what they want, but
everybody has an excuse."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228.


MANAGER'S SPECIALSi


2003 FORD CROWN
VICTORIA LX
N2C294B
NZLZABs


200 3 JEEP
WRANGLER 4X4
NP5777D
I I STE


2008 FORD EDGE
AWD SE
N2C259A
1 I STE


2009 KIA
SEDONA EX
N2T224B
t1 0 7TE


2009 MAZDA MX-5 2008 FORD EDGE 2008 FORD F150 2010 FORD
MIATA CONVERT LIMITED SUPER CREW MUSTANG GT
N2T244D N3TO99A N2T307B NP5748
$17,975 $20,975 $20,975 $23,975

Hwy. 44 W. Inverness CR486

(352) 726-1231
f nicknicholasford.com 490 Nickicholas
000EKi7 SALE HOURS: Mon Fri: 8-7 Sat: 8:30 5 ______


Blackshears 11



RESCREEN SEAMLESS GUTTERS GARAGE SCREENS
NEW SCREEN ROOM GLASS ROOM CONVERSIONS
HWY. 44 7 Licensed & Insured
CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9722 RR 0042388
"36 Years As Your Hometown Dealer"
FreeEstmates w 6.blacksheas.c


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Week in state gov't: Internet caf6s unplugged


JIM SAUNDERS
The News Service of
Florida

TALLAHASSEE A
month ago, Internet cafes
were like countless other
issues floating around the
Capitol. They were impor-
tant to some people, but
hardly a top priority.
Then came raids on In-
ternet cafes across the
state, charges of racketeer-
ing and illegal gambling
and most jarring the
resignation of Lt. Gov Jen-
nifer Carroll because of
her past ties to the indus-
try
Suddenly, ridding the
state of Internet cafes be-
came a big issue. And
Thursday, little more than
three weeks after the in-
vestigation became public,
the Senate gave final ap-
proval to a bill that likely
will shutter hundreds of
what critics call "store-
front casinos."
"There is nothing in this
bill that is going to close le-
gitimate businesses," said
Senate Rules Chairman
John Thrasher, R-St. Au-
gustine, who has helped
spearhead the issue. "This
is about closing down un-
scrupulous operators who
have found loopholes in
the statutes."
The Senate voted 36-4 to
pass the measure (HB 155),
which came after the
House earlier voted 108-7
to approve it. Gov. Rick
Scott's office has already
said he will sign the bill.
Internet cafes have
opened in strip malls
across the state in recent
years, raking in money and
trying to fend off criticism
that they offer computer-
ized versions of slot ma-
chines. But until now,
lawmakers could not agree
on how to deal with the in-
dustry, with some seeking
to ban the businesses and
others pushing for
regulation.
The move this year to
shut down the cafes hap-
pened at relative warp
speed at least in the leg-
islative world. And that
played a part in criticism
from some lawmakers,
who argued the bill was
too broad and would affect
arcades that are popular
with seniors.
All four senators who
voted against the bill -
Joe Abruzzo, D-Royal
Palm Beach, Maria Sachs,
D-Delray Beach, Jeff
Clemens, D-Lake Worth,
and Jeremy Ring, D-Mar-
gate represent Palm
Beach and Broward coun-
ties, where many seniors
congregate and play games
at such arcades.
"The seniors, as long as
they believe they (arcades)
could get shut down and
they're worried about it, I
can't support it," Ring said
of the bill.


But supporters of the
measure said it is de-
signed to stop illegal gam-
bling and that shutting
down Internet cafrs will
be good for the state.
"For far too long, strip
mall casinos have deterio-
rated Florida's quality of
life," David Hart, execu-
tive vice president of the
Florida Chamber of Com-
merce, said in a statement
emailed to reporters after
the Senate vote.
BACK TO SCHOOL:
While lawmakers rushed
to get rid of Internet cafrs,
most major legislation is a
harder slog. And Thursday,
the House approved an ed-
ucation bill (HB 867) that
has created deep divisions.
The proposal, which has
become known as the
"parent trigger" bill,
would give parents more
power to determine what
happens with failing pub-
lic schools. It has drawn
fierce opposition from De-
mocrats and groups such
as the Florida Education
Association, which con-
tend it is designed to help
for-profit operators of
charter schools.
But the more immedi-
ately important question,
at least politically, is how
Republican lawmakers
view the issue. A similar
bill died last year in the
Senate, amid opposition
from some Republicans.
And though the House
voted 68-51 to approve this
year's version, seven mem-
bers of the GOP majority
crossed party lines to op-
pose it.
The Senate version (SB
862) cleared its first com-
mittee Monday and is ex-
pected to go to two more
committees before head-
ing to the floor. President
Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, in-
dicated changes in the
makeup of the Senate and
changes in the bill could
lead to its passage.
"So the fact that we have
15 new senators and the
fact that the bill is not the
same means that I think
last year's vote is not nec-
essarily a telltale of how
the vote will come out this
year," Gaetz said.
But senators can expect
fierce pressure from
groups such the Florida
Education Association,
which released a state-
ment after the House vote
saying "every credible par-
ent group in Florida has
been outraged by this bill."
"This doesn't empower
parents, it doesn't provide
better education for stu-
dents, but will line the
pockets of the charter op-
erators," Andy Ford, presi-
dent of the statewide
teachers union, said in the
statement.
But the proposal has in-
fluential support from
groups such as the Foun-
dation for Florida's Fu-


Weekly ROUNDUP


ture, which is chaired by
former Gov. Jeb Bush.
They say it would em-
power parents.
Under the proposal, par-
ents would be allowed to
petition school districts to
consider specific turn-
around options for schools
that receive "F" grades for
two consecutive years. If
districts reject parents'
plans in favor of other
ideas, the state Board of
Education would choose
the plans that would be
implemented.
"Let's recognize that
while failing schools aban-
don children, parents
never do. ... And so, if
schools are unwilling to
change, we have a moral
obligation to force that
change," said Rep. Matt
Gaetz, a Fort Walton Beach
Republican and son of the


Senate president
HAPPY DAYS ARE
HERE AGAIN (WELL,
SORT OF): While lawmak-
ers will have to resolve
tough policy issues during
the coming weeks, a
brightening economic pic-
ture should make every-
body a little happier.
Sure, the House and
Senate have to resolve
myriad budget details for
the upcoming 2013-14 fis-
cal year. But a better econ-
omy means more tax
dollars. And that makes it
easier to pump money into
popular programs such as
education and avoid
painful spending cuts.
"The bottom line is,
there's nothing like having
some money," Thrasher
said.
House and Senate ap-
propriations committees


Wednesday approved $74
billion budget proposals
that will go to the full
chambers next week. The
Senate committee unani-
mously approved its
spending plan, while the
House panel split along
party lines because of a
disagreement about ex-
panding Medicaid under
the federal Affordable
Care Act.
The Medicaid expan-
sion is sort of a budget
issue accepting federal
money to expand Medi-
caid would show up in the
budget. But the legislative
debate about Medicaid ex-
pansion isn't really about
next year's budget. It's
about Democrats wanting
expansion, and Republi-
cans blocking it.
"My main concern is not
so much about what's in the
budget, it's about what's not
in the budget," House Mi-
nority Leader Perry


Thurston, D-Fort Laud-
erdale, said during the ap-
propriations committee.
House Republicans crit-
icized Democrats for vot-
ing against a budget that,
thanks to the better times,
is addressing needs such
as more money for
education.
"We're here to pass a
budget and this, members,
is a good budget," said
Rep. Matt Hudson, a
Naples Republican who is
chairman of the House
Health Care Appropria-
tions Subcommittee.
STORY OF THE
WEEK: The Florida Sen-
ate gave final approval to a
bill aimed at permanently
turning out the lights at In-
ternet cafrs.
QUOTE OF THE
WEEK: "There's nothing a
little prosperity won't
help." Rep. Dennis Bax-
ley, R-Ocala, about the
budget.


A 859 US Hwy 41, S., Inverness, FL 419-4878
Wed. Sun 11 AM 7 PM or until last customer leaves f|
he accp i all maJ|rI crdil cud, Closed Mon. & Tues.






CRYSTAL ISLES RV RESORT
An Encore SuperPark in Crystal River, Fl




Spa Kiddie Pool
S,,: Court Volleyball
S,,ball Horseshoes
Boat Rentals
Golf Net


12 MONTHS i
SAME AS CASH




0%

FINANCING

ONE WEEK ONLY!
--- ----

rr. CL OAIN


Owner, Rickey Richardson
Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist


A6 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MUSEUM
Continued from Page Al

said, 'I'll name him Jimmy
and keep him here on the
floor"'
She points out an an-
tique tilt table, a centuries-
old bonnet, a black funeral
dress worn by her grand-
mother at her grandfa-
ther's funeral 127 years
ago.
In her mid-70s, Carson is
a staunch conservative
and a patriot. She loves
her family, God and coun-
try She keeps a shotgun by
the front door and a pistol
by her bed. She says she's
not scared of much and not
intimidated by anything.
She's never been afraid of
hard work or a challenge.
"My state, Kentucky, we
were a divided state," she
says. "My family, we were
Abraham Lincoln people."
M E N
She grew up in London,
Ky., her father's favorite
child. He was in state poli-
tics and at age 9 she
helped him by writing his
campaign speeches.
"Life was marvelous,"
she says. "We didn't have a
lot. We didn't have televi-
sion, but we had radio. I
was raised in a log cabin,
and we'd make our own
fun."
As "Miss Marguerite"
continues her impromptu
tour, she picks up a pair of
tooth pullers.
"Honey, let me show you
this," she says.
Her people were cob-
blers. The first one to emi-
grate to the U.S. was
Francisco Esteppe in the
1600s.
"He was a cobbler and a
blacksmith they always
went together," she says.
"Back in those days, you
had apprenticeships from
one generation to the next
"My great-great-great
grandfather Moses made
these tooth-pullers, and I
used them on my baby's
baby teeth. Honey, they
would latch right on and
you wouldn't need a string
on a door."
The family name, Es-
teppe, was changed some-
where down the line and
became Estep. Carson
uses that as her profes-
sional name, Marguerite
Estep Carson.
"My great-grandfather


/"
- : r,


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
From her Homosassa home, Marguerite Carson looks over an enlargement of an old photograph from her home town
in Kentucky.


Samson fought with the
Union troops in the Civil
War," she says. "He mar-
ried seven times. He was a
flutist. He and the flag
bearer and the drummer
set the flag atop Lookout
Mountain for the Union
army."
MEN
A painting hangs in Car-
son's living room, a folk art
rendition of an old country
house and a peddler and
his wagon. She painted it
when she was in her 30s.
She would pack a thermos
of coffee and a peanut but-
ter sandwich and sit across
from the house and paint.
"I had a couple from
England come visit one
day and the woman saw
my painting and said, 'Oh,
she's got a Lowry!' There's
a Lowry museum in Man-
chester, England," Carson
says with a laugh. "I said,
'No, it's not a Lowry It's a
Margueritey'"
MEN
At 17, she married a man
twice her age; the mar-
riage ended in divorce.
"He felt he was my fa-
ther, but for years I held
my tongue oh, did I hold
my tongue," she says.
"While I held my tongue I
restored 10 houses and
went to seven universities,
but I only took the classes I
wanted to take and never


A pair of tooth extractors, handmade from her great-great-
great-grandfather rests on her Bible in the living room of
her Homosassa home.


graduated. It's not about
graduating; it's about
learning. Today they've got
it all screwed up. Every-
one's focused on the
diploma and not the learn-
ing."
Carson is a lifelong
learner and a born
teacher. She also has a
great memory and loves to


share her research and
knowledge with anyone
who asks.
Once she and her hus-
band divorced he's now
deceased she began


opening Western wear
stores from Kentucky to
Houston and back to Ken-
tucky She came to Florida
to be near her sister and
opened stores in Daven-
port and Brooksville in the
1980s and 1990s and in Ho-
mosassa in 2004. There's
also a store in Tallahassee.
Ten years ago, she gave
her daughter and two
grandchildren each a store
as an early inheritance.
"Why wait 'til I die and
have to pay all those
taxes?" she says.
MEN
"Baby, let me show you
something."
If Marguerite Carson
takes a liking to you, she'll
invite you to see her mu-
seum, as local business-
woman Lisa Moore
recently found out Moore
had stopped by the Lon-
grider store and was capti-
vated by Miss Marguerite's
life story
"She's an amazing
woman who serves as a
role model for women
today," Moore said. "When
you walk into her museum,
it takes your breath away.
She took so much time
telling me about the his-


Life was
marvelous. We
didn't have a
lot. We didn't
have television,
but we had
radio. I was
raised in a
log cabin, and
we'd make our
own fun.
Marguerite
Carson
about growing up in
London, Ky.

tory of the different
items, and she's so
knowledgeable.
"She's an undiscovered
treasure right here in Cit-
rus County," Moore said.
"Her story is so rich and
full a real inspiration."
Whenever anyone asks
Marguerite Carson if she'd
like to do something, no
matter how far-fetched it
may seem, whether it's
teaching a class, leading a
glee club performance or
running a business, her
answer is always, "Sure,
why not?"
She had a heart attack
23 years ago and her hips
are hurting her, but she
doesn't let anything stop
her. She's lived in man-
sions, she's been poor and
she's been rich. Today, her
1,300-square-foot house
she converted from a
warehouse garage is her
favorite place, with her
museum up front.
Currently, she's writing
her autobiography
Her best advice, she
says, is simple: "Loosen up
your mind, Darlin'. Don't
be set in your ways. And
don't worry There's a time
to live and a time to die,
and there will be time to
worry when you give up
the ghost"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


Named once again among

Nation's Top 100 Hospitals












1\ '


f Citrus Youth Educational Symphonic Orchestra Inc.

The Worldatyourlisand finger tips... The Legacy of CESO







TEACHING CLASSICAL AND


SYMPHONIC MUSIC


to Students 5 to 19 years of age



VISIT OUR WEBSITE & FACEBOOK



Special: Membership & Tuition for 2013 is $100



ENROLL NOW www.CYESO.org



ONLINE or: Seven Rivers Christian School


4221 West Gulf to Lake Highway

Lecanto, Florida

April 11 & 12, 3:30 P.M. to 5:30 P.M.


Bandroom at Gymnasium in Church Office Building


Classes Tuesdays & Thursdays 3:30 to 5:30 P.M. start April 23



CYESO s a Not-for-Profit, 501(CK3Oganizalon, providing a program dedicated to the teaching of dasical
and symphonic muc open to ALL youth ages 5 rough 18 years..
A copy ofe official registration and lnancial infonnsonmay be obtained from the Divison of Consumer
Services by calling loll-ree (800-435-7352) wit the state Registration does not im y endorsement,
appva or recommendation by the st.e..


TRUVEN HEALTH ANALYTICS =-



-.o


Ocala Health


Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital
have once again been named two of the 100 Top Hospitals by Truven
Health Analytics and for good reason. Ocala Health is among an elite
100 hospitals nationwide, having proved that superior patient outcomes
can be achieved while improving efficiency, attaining high marks in
patient satisfaction and practicing smart fiscal management. What
does this mean to our community? Easy access to medical care that
has higher survival rates, fewer complications, a safer environment and
higher patient satisfaction.

For a physician referral, call 1-800-530-1188 or visit OcalaHealthSystem.com.



Ocala Regional Medical Center West Marion Community Hospital
1-800-530-1188 ocalahealthsystem.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Minnie
Colley, 92
DUNNELLON
Minnie Lee Goode Col-
ley, 92, died March 26,
2013. She was born in
Thomaston, Ga., Dec. 18,
1920. Her parents, the late
Thomas B. Goode and
Josephine Self Goode
passed away at an early
age. She married Alton
Colley April 15, 1944, and
they traveled the world
prior to making their
home in Dunnellon. Alton
passed away in 2005.
Besides her husband,
Minnie was preceded in
death by her sisters, Ben-
nie Stewart and Lucille
Eversole; and three broth-
ers, George Goode, Baine
Goode and James M.
Goode. She is survived by
Mr Colley's sister and hus-
band; several nieces;
great-nieces; great-great-
nieces; and nephews.
"Miss Lee," as she was
known by so many, also
leaves many friends at
Lighthouse Baptist
Church and throughout
the area. She will be
missed by all.
Memorial services will
take place at Lighthouse
Baptist Church, 974 WG.
Martinelli Blvd., Citrus
Springs, at 11 a.m. Sunday,
April 14. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in
Mrs. Colley's memory to
Lighthouse Baptist
Church or HPH Hospice of
Citrus County Condo-
lences may be left at
RobertsofDunnellon.com.

Charles
'Cracker'
Holland, 77
HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
Charles Vance
"Cracker" Holland, 77, of
Homosassa Springs, died
April 4, 2013. He was born
in Homosassa Springs,
Fla., to the late Fred and
Virginia Vance Holland. A
member of the Church of
Christ in Lecanto, Vance
was also a talented wood
carver, consummate story-
teller, accomplished ath-
lete and avid sports fan.
He retired as a captain in
the Florida Marine Patrol
after 32
years of
service.
Vance
was pre-
ceded in
death by
Sh i s
youngest
Charles son, Kevin
Holland Holland.
He is survived by his wife,
Mary; daughter, Virginia
Will (Ken) of Homosassa;
son, Casey Holland
(Nancy) of Roswell, Ga.;
grandchildren, Sarah
Bryant (Adam), Taylor Hol-
land, Victoria Holland,
Travis Holland, Sheena
Mantooth (David), Dustin
Will (Allisha), Adam Will
(Patsy; and great-grand-
children, Kayden Bryant
and Kynnedy Will. Vance
loved and was proud of his
family, and was loved and
will be greatly missed by
them.
A memorial service for
Vance will be 10 a.m. Mon-
day, April 8, 2013, at the
Church of Christ in
Lecanto. In lieu of flowers
the family would appreci-
ate donations to Camp
Boggy Creek, a camp for
critically and terminally ill
children, at 30500 Brantley
Branch Road, Eustis, FL
32736 or to Hospice of Cit-
rus County of the Nature
Coast, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.






www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com


S 'Than Just


Lorrie Verticals

6T 2" Faux Wood
Woven Woods
* Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments
S* Etc.
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)

CAL NW


Violet
Lawrence, 83
INVERNESS
Mrs. Violet Ruth
Lawrence, 83, of Inver-
ness, died Friday, April 5,
2013, in Crystal River.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Inver-
ness Chapel of Hooper Fu-
neral Home & Crematory

Janis
Lehowicz, 88
Janis Lehowicz, 88, died
Thursday, April 4, 2013.
Reposing will be at Chas.
E. Davis from 9 to 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, April 9, 2013.
Mass of Christian burial is
at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. Burial will be in
Martinsburg, N.Y.




Harry
Mass Sr., 79
BEVERLY HILLS
Harry L. Mass Sr, 79, of
Beverly Hills, died April 1,
2013. Visitation, 1 to 3 p.m.
Tuesday, April 9,2013, with
military honors to follow
at Fero Funeral Home.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home.




Royal 'Larry'
Rutter Jr., 75
PINE RIDGE
Royal L. "Larry" Rutter
Jr, 75, of Pine Ridge, died
Friday, April 5, 2013.
Arrangements are entru-
sted to Fbro Funeral Home.




Jack Smith, 92
CRYSTAL RIVER
Jack E. Smith, 92, of
Crystal River, Fla., passed
awayApril 2,2013. He was a
World War II Army veteran.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, with a memorial
service taking place at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 9,
2013, at Seven Rivers Pres-
byterian Church in
Lecanto. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests that
memorial donations be
made in his memory to
Seven Rivers Christian
School in Lecanto.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Fritz
Wening, 84
BEVERLY HILLS
Fritz Wening, 84, of Bev-
erly Hills, died Tuesday,
April 2, 2013, at the Health
Center at Brentwood in
Lecanto.
A memorial service for
Mr. Wening will be at 11
a.m. Wednesday, April 10,
2013, at Heinz Funeral
Home. The family will re-
ceive friends from 10:30
a.m. until the hour of serv-
ice. Heinz Funeral Home
& Cremation, Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online.com or call
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


Chaplain gets Medal of


Honor 62 years after death


Associated Press
In the cold, barren hills -
of Korea more than 60 -
years ago, two teary-eyed '."
soldiers stood in a pris- .
oner of war camp where
their chaplain lay dying.
The Rev Emil Kapaun
was weak, his body *
wracked by pneumonia
and dysentery After six
brutal months in the
hellish camp, the once
sturdy Kansas farmer's
son could take no more. -
Thousands of soldiers
had already died, some
starving, others freezing
to death. Now the end was
near for the chaplain.
Lt. Mike Dowe said
goodbye to the man who'd
given him hope during 0
those terrible days. The
young West Point grad i
cried, even as the chap-
lain, he says, tried to com-
fort him with his parting
words: "Hey, Mike, don't
worry about me. I'm In this nda
going to where I always Wichita, Fa
wanted to go and I'll say plain-spoke
aprayerforallofyou." Medal of
Lt. Robert Wood wept, heroism" w
too, watching the Roman months aft
Catholic chaplain bless
and forgive his captors. Now itha
He helped carry Kapaun On April
out of the mud hut and young lieu
up a hill on a stretcher and Wood,
after Chinese soldiers will join t]
ordered he be moved to Kapaun's f
a hospital, a wretched, ers at the
maggot-filled place the where Pre
POWs dubbed "the death Obama wil.
house." There was little endary cha
or no medical care there. of Honor p(
Kapaun died on May 23, "It is abo
1951. said.
These two soldiers The Kor
and many more never sometimes
forgot their chaplain, gotten war,'
Not his courage in swat- by the glob
ting away an enemy sol- World War I:
dier pointing a gun at a long strugg
GI's head. Not his talent Fbrvetera
for stealing food, then are vivid
sneaking it to emaciated the desper
troops. Not the inspiring
way he rallied his "boys," / .
as he called them, urging (.,4 (
them to keep their spir- FuneT
its up. With
The plain-spoken, pipe-
smoking, bike-riding Burial
chaplain was credited Cr.
with saving hundreds of
soldiers during the Ko-
rean War. Kapaun re- Cremation
ceived the Distinguished
Service Cross and many For Inform
other medals. His ex- calli
ploits were chronicled in call 7
books, magazines and a
TV show. A high school Ric
was named for him. His I
statue stands outside his
former parish in tiny
Pilsen, Kan.
But one award, the
Medal of Honor, always t'
remained elusive.
Dowe and other POWs
had lobbied on and off
for years, writing letters,
doing interviews, enlist- --
ing support on Capitol
Hill. Dowe's recommen- 5775 S. S
dation was turned down
in the 1950s. The cam- | v
paign stalled, then picked I vi
up steam decades later. eeti
Kapaun's "boys" grew
old; their determination
did not.



"YourTrusted FamilyOwned
Funeral Home for over 50 Years"
-Yu Tu
FJ~WklU


Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


New Patient Specials

Full Mouth X-Rays, S
Comprehensive Exam 9


We Meet All Your N
Dental Needs, Inh
Including Implants Fre

Family Friendly
Call today! 352-527-1614
Alexsa Davila,
SDMD DN 15390
Walton Van Hoose,
DMD DN 18101
Citrus Hills Dental
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza


ot in conjunction with insurance
Offer expires in 30 days
house denture lab
e Denture Consults
nancing available
Most insurance
accepted.


It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
night to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mm Fee ADA code D0210, D0150
-A


Associated Press
ited photo provided by the Catholic Diocese of
other Emil Kapaun holds out a broken pipe. The
n, pipe-smoking chaplain is receiving the
Honor posthumously for his "extraordinary
Nhile serving as an Army chaplain during the
r. He died in captivity in 1951 about six
er being taken prisoner.


as finally paid off
l 11, those two
Tenants, Dowe
now 85 and 86,
heir comrades,
family and oth-
White House,
resident Barack
1 award the leg-
plain the Medal
osthumously
out time," Dowe
'ean conflict is
called "the for-
"overshadowed
bal cataclysm of
I and the nation's
le in Vietnam.
ans, though, there
war memories:
*ation of eating

E. 6a i
'al Home
Crematory
* Shipping
emation

Veterans & Fa-mil
SMemorial Care"

ation and costs,'
26-8323


weeds plucked from the dirt,
the horror of discovering
buddies who'd died overnight,
the evanescent joy of taking
a few puffs on their chap-
lain's pipe. Many men of the
3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry
regiment, credit Kapaun
for their survival, emotion-
ally and physically
"He's in my prayers
every night," Dowe said. "I
ask him to help me rather
than asking God to help
him."

To Place Your
S"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


h Relaxation ...
LARGEST SELECTION
Seta Adjustable Beds
Ergo 4$
E Motion 1,499Queen
Complete with Gel
Active Memory Foam

2fIi 6Bed uncoast Blvd., Homosassa 621-4500

ng Our Community...
ng Your Needs!





5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


Come join the National Cremation Society for a

FREE Lunch & Informational Seminar
on the benefits of pre-planning your cremation
HiW I,., h lh,. c.,,,,.. ,.,,1,h,'tyou
prefer your loved ones celebrate *
your. ,. 1,. h I about

the relief they II ,..,I ,h,,,,,.-.
Invernes
11: 30 AMi-cuunc
* Affordable options and savings S I
* Veterans benefits
* Worldwide Away-From-Home
Protection
* And much more...
RESERVATION REQUIRED
Limited seating available
CALL NOW!
1-352-319-6816
First time JIiUlAkT ,lAIy please.
*Free cremation does not include Trawl Protation Plan

00EUJ E S0C TY


Lend



Your



Ears M


Hearing in Noise
Comparison
Study
Participants
Sought
Gardner Audiology,
a leader in hearing
satisfaction research, is
seeking participants to
evaluate and compare
a new advanced noise
suppression technology
in hearing aids that hide
inside your ear canal
verses behind the ear
models.
In exchange for
completing a pre and
post-fitting questionnaire
Gardner will loan you the
hearing aid model of your
choice for a free 30 day
field study. Audiologists
with advanced university
degrees will provide all
exams and follow up care
free of charge.
At the end of 30 days
you will return the loaner
aids or purchase them
with a generous discount.
It is your choice.


Call 1-800-277-1182
to schedule a free
candidate screening

3000 Central Florida
residents have participated
in Gardner Audiology
research studies










Crystal River
and Inverness
Offices
www.gardneraudiology.com














OOOEK6E


A8 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


IMPACT
Continued from Page Al

When it came to nonres-
idential development, Cit-
rus' fees were higher than
Hernando's in some cate-
gories and lower in others
- and higher than Mar-
ion's across the board.
Nonresidential impact
fees can mean big dollars
for counties and cities.
Impact fees for the new
Walmart in Lecanto came
to $237,088, according to
Sabrina Atwell, with
the county Department
of Planning and
Development
Tom Dick, assistant city
manager of Inverness, re-
ported the new Publix
project produced $251,424
in impact fees. The city re-
ceived $207,250 with the
county getting $44,174.
Impact fees a one-
time charge were
adopted in 1986 to make
new development pay a
share of the infrastructure
costs created by the devel-
opment. They can cover
schools, transportation,
emergency services, parks,
libraries and public build-
ings. Impact fees are also
charged by cities, includ-
ing Crystal River, Inver-
ness, Dunnellon and
Ocala.
In 2010, with construc-
tion still reeling from the
recession, an impact fee
study commissioned by the
county generalized that
Citrus County's fees were
in the middle range of
fees charged by other
Florida counties.
The study stated other
Florida counties had
found that reduced or sus-


~ji
~=-


. . *.__ ---.---.----. - -- -
1 .; .. . - .. ^ --.-- ,


- ---- .,-- .
.. .: ... .. --_.


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Because of impact fees, large commercial projects like the Publix supermarket currently under construction in Inverness have a significant financial
benefit to the city and county. The impact fee for this project is more than $250,000.


pended impact fees had
little effect on develop-
ment. At the time, Citrus
had suspended its trans-
portation impact fee.
Impact fees were on the
table in early 2011, as com-
missioners wanted impact
fees set at a competitive
rate with surrounding
counties while still collect-
ing enough money for cap-
ital projects without
heavier reliance upon
property taxes. As a result,
the county adopted the
current impact fee
ordinance.
County impact fees for a
1,800-square-foot home
now average about $5,672,
according to the building


"We Cater to Cowards!"
General & Cosmetic Dentistry
HONE PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE
FREE SECOND OPINION.
Most Insurance Accepted license #DN

I SLedger Dentistry
Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.
Ledgerdentistry.com Se Habla Espanol
Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


department. That com-
pares to an average impact
fee for the same size home
of $9,867 in 2004.
But in November 2011,
Hernando County -
which had already re-
duced its fees went a
step further and put a one-
year moratorium on im-
pact fees. That
moratorium was extended
once. In January, the Her-
nando County Board of
Commissioners voted to
reinstate impact fees for


parks, capital facilities
and emergency services in
August 2013.
"Currently, the plan is
restore impact fees
on Aug. 14, 2013, with the
exception of transporta-
tion and education," Her-
nando County Develop-
ment Department finance
specialist Barbara Trent
said. "In November there
will be a hearing with the
Board of County Commis-
sioners about the study on
transportation and educa-


Fri., Apr. 12-9PM Sat., Apr 13- 1PM Sat., Apr 13 9PM
BOBBYFIISS 1ERSEYDIRT HYPEISONA
m '-pi i -? \TBIGENGINE

@ nn Ih )\ I n n .\\.* ,I \ n
I w, I I I, I ,, .. I n.' I ,, .
%. P101 10%1F I PI.IT. IiL%1LH % IINID %
Central FL's Ultimate Biker Destination
1590 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa 352-794-6037
4 Fl l iquorarsi G ll !Ta l i cDp M r a Is


tion impact fees and a de-
termination will be made
about those at that time."
This will initially bring
Hernando's average fee
for single family homes to
$1,367, with the two big-
ticket fees to be decided.
Marion County's mora-


torium on transportation,
fire and educational im-
pact fees has been ex-
tended through Dec. 31,
2013, though some city im-
pact fees are still in effect.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924.


0% APR IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 36 MONTHS!*

A WHOLE LOT OF COMFORT...YOURS FOR ZERO.*
JUST PURCHASE YOUR QUALIFYING TRANE SYSTEM BETWEEN MARCH 15-MAY 31, 2013.



Energy prices have skyrocketed and so

J has demand for systems that cut usage.

Trane's XLi high efficiency systems are

among the most cost-effective options

available today. Maximum comfort and

lower heating and cooling costs-that's

the Trane difference.

Federal tax credits available up to $300


CALL NOW FOR THE LOWEST PAYMENTS ON HIGH-

EFFICIENCY TRANE EQUIPMENT*.


352-746-0098 0"'


H.E. Smith Co. Inc SPECIAL

1895 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto, FL 34461
www.trane.com
LICENSE # RA0035171 IT'S HARD TO STOP A TRANE. REALLY HARD.


*See your participating independent Trane Comfort SpecialistTM dealer or visit Trane.com for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Available through participating independent Trane
Comfort SpecialistTM dealers. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. Valid on qualifying systems only.


HEALTH

SCREENING

Friday, April 19th

Vision Cataract Glaucoma
Blood Pressure Eyeglass Adjustments

Anne Marie Newcomer, OD
Please RSVP 352.628.3029
Homosassa Eye Clinic
4564 S Suncoast Blvd
Homosassa, FL 34446

In association with:
CATARACT&
,,LASER INSTITUTE
gCI/ "Excellence...with love"
0 StLukesEye.com
THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
. .77n ~i T ~ nnm~e~ '( ; n ,n, ,il .nn, i~_ ri ~


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 A9





A10 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


LABOR
Continued from Page Al

such figure since May
1979.
The falling participation
rate tarnished the only ap-
parent good news in the
jobs report the Labor De-
partment released Friday:
The unemployment rate
dropped to a four-year low
of 7.6 percent in March
from 7.7 in February
People without a job who
stop looking for one are no
longer counted as unem-
ployed. That's why the U.S.
unemployment rate
dropped in March despite
weak hiring. If the 496,000
who left the labor force last
month had still been look-
ing for jobs, the unemploy-
ment rate would have risen
to 7.9 percent in March.
"Unemployment
dropped for all the wrong
reasons," said Craig
Alexander, chief econo-
mist with TD Bank Finan-
cial Group. "It dropped
because more workers
stopped looking for jobs. It
signaled less confidence
and optimism that there
are jobs out there."
The participation rate
peaked at 67.3 percent in
2000, reflecting an influx
of women into the work
force. It's been falling
steadily ever since.
Part of the drop reflects
the baby boom generation's
gradual move into retire-
ment But such demograph-
ics aren't the whole answer
Even Americans of
prime working age 25 to
54 years old are drop-
ping out of the workforce.
Their participation rate
fell to 81.1 percent last
month, tied with Novem-
ber for the lowest since
December 1984.
"It's the lack of job op-
portunities the lack of
demand for workers -
that is keeping these work-
ers from working or seek-
ing work," said Heidi
Shierholz, an economist at
the liberal Economic Pol-
icy Institute. The Labor
Department says there are
still more than three un-
employed people for every
job opening.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A help-wanted sign stands March 29 in front of a restaurant in Richmond, Va. U.S.
employers added only 88,000 jobs in March, the fewest in nine months and a sharp
retreat after a period of strong hiring. The slowdown is a reminder that the job market's
path back to health will be uneven.


'I just
wanted a job'
Cynthia Marriott gave up
her job search after an in-
terview in October for a po-
sition as a hotel concierge.
"They never said no,"
she said. "They just never
called me back."
Her husband hasn't
worked full time since
2006. She cashed out her
401(k) after being laid off
from a job at a Los Angeles
entertainment publicity
firm in 2009. The couple
owes thousands in taxes
for that withdrawal. They
have no health insurance.
She got the maximum 99
weeks of unemployment
benefits then allowed in
California and then moved
to Atlanta.
Now she is looking to re-
ceive federal disability
benefits for a lung condi-
tion she said leaves her
weak and unable to work a
full day The application is
pending a medical review.
"I feel like I have no
choice," said Marriott, 47.
"It's just really sad and
frightening"
During the peak of her
job search, Marriott was
filling out 10 applications
a day She applied for jobs
she felt overqualified for,
such as those at Home
Depot and Petco but never


heard back. Eventually,
the disappointment and
fatigue got to her.
"I just wanted a job," she
said. "I couldn't really go on
anymore looking for a job."
'I don't want
a handout'
Young people are leav-
ing the job market, too.
The participation rate for
Americans ages 20 to 24 hit
a 41-year low of 69.6 per-
cent last year before
bouncing back a bit. Many
young people have en-
rolled in community col-
leges and universities.
That's one reason a record
63 percent of adults ages
25 to 29 have spent at least
some time in college, ac-
cording to the Pew Re-
search Center
Older Americans are re-
turning to school, too.
Doug Damato, who lives in



] -
GO
DEBT?
Banrutc
may help
Calu o reoslain


Asheville, N.C., lost his job
as an installer at a utility
company in February


2012. He stopped looking
for work last fall, when he
began taking classes in
mechanical engineering at
Asheville-Buncombe
Technical Community
College.
Next week, Damato, 40,
will accept an academic
award for earning top
grades. But one obstacle
has emerged: Under a re-
cent change in state law,
his unemployment bene-
fits will now end July 1, six
months earlier than he
expected.
He's planning to work
nights, if possible, to sup-
port himself once the ben-
efits run out. Dropping out
of school is "out of the
question," he said, given
the time he has already
put into the program.
"I don't want a handout,"
he said. "I'm trying to bet-
ter myself."
'I chose to take a
step back'
Many older Americans


who lost their jobs are
finding refuge in Social Se-
curity's disability program.
Nearly 8.9 million Ameri-
cans are receiving disabil-
ity checks, up 1.3 million
from when the recession
ended in June 2009.
Natasha Baebler's jour-
ney out of the labor force
and onto the disability
rolls began when she lost
her job serving disabled
students and staff mem-
bers at Purdue University
in West Lafayette, Ind., in
February 2012.
For six months, she
sought jobs in her field,
brandishing master's de-
grees in social education
and counseling. No luck.
Then she just started
looking for anything. Still,
she had no takers.
"I chose to stop and take
a step back for a while ...
After you've seen that
amount of rejection," she
said, "you start thinking,
'What's going to make this
time any different?'"


1M'L


I


re a
lac


- .9 -




Beyond Carpet Cleaning


f P :.


NADCA
FL#CAC1816408
A I J40fl4r-f


0428 SUCRN
NOTICE OF NONAVAILABILITY AND

PRACTICE RELOCATION

JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D.
All Patients of DOCTORS IMAGING GROUP, LLC ("DIG"), seen by
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., are notified that, effective March 15th, 2013,
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D., formerly practicing with DIG at:
Diagnostic Imaging Center
6716 NW 11th Place
Gainesville, Florida 32605
became unavailable to patients at DIG. She will be relocating her practice
of Mammography and Ultrasound imaging to:
Tower Hill Office Park
7550 West University Ave, Suite A
Gainesville, Florida 32607
JUDY M. YANCEY, M.D. will practice as MAMMOGRAPHY &
ULTRASOUND IMAGING CENTER, PLLC. The new practice's
phone number is (352) 727-4911. DR. YANCEY will be available to see
patients beginning June 3rd, 2013.
Patients may obtain a copy of their medical records currently at 6716
NW 11th Place, Gainesville, Florida, by coming to the office and signing a
Request Form. These forms can be obtained at the office of DIG. Patients
may also request in writing that their records: (i) be transferred to DR.
YANCEY, (ii) remain with DIG, or (iii) be transferred to another physician
of the Patient's choice. These requests can be made by either: (i) U.S. Mail
addressed to DIG's office address above, (ii) Telefax to (352) 331-9744 or
(iii) E-Mail to info@doctorsimaginggroup.com 000EoX


IE.YSTE MER,


"f 1


sIAIR UCTS


x: ves


InTRUn 0 0
tjvutMJ 7412tyztz


fm)ttak1^





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fasten your



bucket-list



seat belt


Lots of people are
making Bucket Lists
things they want
to do before they kick the
bucket.
There's a danger in
doing that, and it's not just
tempting fate.
What hap-
pens if you don't
do it all? Or any
of it?
Who wants to .
feel bad they
didn't get to
Paris or Rome,
they never took
that cruise to
Alaska, they Jil
never got to surf MU L
at Waikiki?
Yes, life is
short and we should
squeeze in all the living we
can, but don't forget to re-
ward yourself for all the
things you didn't do.
For every item you put
on your Bucket List, you
should put one on your
Un-Bucket List the list
of all the things you don't
want to do before you die
- like taking a two-week
vacation to North Korea. It
may be on Dennis Rod-
man's Bucket List, but it's
on my Un-Bucket List.
Most of us can be pretty
confident that we're never
going to have to meet with
Kim Jong Un before we
die.
You may have "eat at a
three-star Michelin restau-
rant in France" on your
Bucket List Fine, I hope it
happens, but don't forget
to put "eating raw, giant,
slimy slugs" on your Un-
Bucket List. Trust me,
you'll be happy you did.
Won't it make you happy
when you reach the end of
your days and you get to
tell your friends and fam-
ily that you never did that?
You want a romantic
cruise through the Greek
islands? A trip to the Gala-
pagos? Who wouldn't? But
let your Un-Bucket List
show that you never took a
cruise on the SS
Norovirus, the SS Hit-A-
Rock-And-Capsized, the
SS Attacked-By-Pirates or
the SS Took-Five-Days-To-
Get-Towed-Back-to-Port. I
know facing the end will
be easier for me knowing
that I never had to hire a
lawyer to sue someone for
a lousy vacation.
As you might have
guessed, I've never really
had good luck with Bucket
List-type activities. I'm the
guy who buys the lottery
ticket every week and
never wins, yet my friends
think it would be a good
idea for me to go skydiving.
Well, not so much my


WEEKLY LINEUP
Find a list of
upcoming blood
drives, or learn what
groups offer food or
free meals./Mondays
Nearly a dozen
medical professionals
share their expertise
with columns in
Health & Life./
Tuesday
Read up on all things
school-related in the
Chronicle's Education
section./Wednesdays
Plan menus for the
week from the recipes
in the Food section.
/Thursdays
Plan for weekend
entertainment with
the stories in
Scene./Fridays
See what local houses
of worship plan to do
in the Religion
section./Saturdays
Read about area
businesses in the
Business section.
/Sundays
Pick up tips for home
improvement, saving
money and cashing
in on antiques in
HomeFront./Sundays
Find out what your
neighbors have to say
in the Sound Off and
letters to the editor in


the Commentary
section./Sundays


friends as my wife. She is
practically insisting on it.
At least I'm only out five
bucks when I lose the lot-
tery. If my chute didn't
open, I wouldn't even be
around to ask for a refund,
much less cross
"skydiving" off
my list.
Myo friend
Bob has "climb

on his list. Bob
is the kind of
guy who will
drive around
the supermar-


looking for thed
open spot clos-
est to the front door. The
only way he will get to the
top of Mount Everest is if
the Sherpas carry him to
the top in a heated sedan
chair.
Not all Bucket Lists are
focused on the exotic and
the adventurous; some
have deceptively simple
things like "dance in the
rain," "learn Spanish" or
"say 'I love you' to some-
one every day" Some days,
climbing Everest seems
like a piece of cake com-
pared to saying "I love
you."
Should we be making
these lists at all? Is it bet-
ter to have one great thing
to look forward to, or a
hundred little things? Is
the time you spent making
your Bucket List time you
could have spent at the
beach? Maybe the rule
should be that the only
place we can write our
Bucket Lists is Hawaii. At
least that'd make them one
line shorter And if you live
in Hawaii, you don't get to
make a Bucket List at all.
You're already livin' the
dream.
Me, I'm going to stick
with the Un-Bucket List.
At least that way I know my
obituary headline won't
read "Bungee Cord Acci-
dent Kills Local Man,"
"Sharks Kill Novice Scuba
Diver" or "Vesuvius Re-
buries Pompeii Thou-
sands of Tourists Die."


Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


April 8 to 12 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
cereal variety and toast, grits, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and egg bis-
cuit, cereal variety and toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon bun, ce-
real variety and toast, grits, juice and
milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast round,
cheese grits, tater tots, cereal variety
and toast, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza, hamburger
sliders, Italian super salad with roll, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked beans, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Baked chicken nuggets,
creamy macaroni and cheese, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti with ripstick,
barbecue roasted chicken with roll,
turkey super salad with roll, PB dipper
plate, fresh garden salad, sweet green
peas, flavored craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds, Un-
crustable peanut butter and jelly, yogurt
parfait plate, fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey wrap, PB dip-
per plate, fresh baby carrots, steamed
broccoli, potato smilies, chilled peach
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and egg biscuit,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer,
ultimate breakfast round, cereal variety
and toast, tater tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza, chicken
and rice burrito, PB dipper plate, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broccoli, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.


WATERING FINES [


* Citrus County is issu-
ing citations that
carry with them a fine
of $100 for first of-
fenders of local
watering rules.
* Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


sem
DAPE, S


VOTE FOR US
MARCH 21-APRIL 8

1"N w --

144* SKM gYvS
Breafas Antim SOU H Oen tSA
Famiy Rstaran
cofr Fod Tha TaeIou om


Tuesday: Chicken nuggets with rip-
stick, corn dog nuggets, Italian super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, fresh
baby carrots, sweet peas, potato smi-
lies, chilled strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breaded chicken sand-
wich, turkey wrap, PB dipper plate,
fresh garden salad, tangy baked beans,
flavored Craisins, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds, oven
breaded chicken with ripstick, turkey
super salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots, sweet corn,
peach cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Friday: Chicken Alfredo with ripstick,
hot dog, PB dipper plate, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed green beans, chilled fla-
vored applesauce, fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast sausage pizza,
MVP breakfast, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, grits, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg and cheese
biscuit, ultra cinnamon bun, cereal vari-
ety and toasts, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast egg and
cheese wrap, MVP breakfast, cereal va-
riety and toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and cheese on
loco bread, ultimate breakfast round,
cereal variety and toast, grits, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich stuffer,
ultra cinnamon bun, cereal variety,
toast, tater tots, juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and rice
burrito/pizza, macaroni and cheese with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich,
fajita chicken salad with roll, yogurt par-
fait plate, baby carrots, fresh broccoli,
potato roasters, steamed broccoli, ap-
plesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Orange chicken, MaxStix,
turkey, gravy, noodles and ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, Italian super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait plate, gar-
den salad, cold corn salad, potato trian-
gles, peas, celery, strawberry cup, baby
carrots, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Barbecue roasted
chicken with roll, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sandwich, pizza,
turkey super salad with roll, yogurt par-
fait plate, baby carrots, chilled baked
beans, baked beans, potato roasters,
flavored Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken and rice with
ripstick, hamburger, chicken sandwich,
macaroni and cheese with ripstick, ham
super salad with roll, MaxStix, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad, baby carrots,
green beans, potato triangles, peach


cups, cucumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog, chicken Alfredo with
ripstick, pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, turkey super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby carrots, cold
corn salad, potato roasters, corn, straw-
berry cup, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Italian meatball hoagie,
meatballs in marinara sauce, cheesy
mashed potatoes, Italian beans, hot dog
bun, margarine cup, raisins, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Blended juice, baked
chicken thigh, yellow rice with tomato
and pepper, black beans, white bread,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Grilled chicken breast
patty in marinara sauce, penne noodles
with garlic oil, Tuscan vegetables, rye
bread with margarine, peaches, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Flame-broiled beef patty,
potatoes O'Brien, yellow corn with diced
tomato, hamburger bun, fresh orange,
low-fat milk.
Friday: Tuna salad, pea cheese
salad, marinated broccoli salad, whole-
grain bread, graham crackers, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include: Lecanto,
East Citrus, Crystal River, Homosassa
Springs, Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For more information, call Support
Services at 352-527-5975.


SENIOR COMMUNITY
CENTERS
Five centers offer senior dining
in the area, as well as social
activities and an array of
programs such as health
screenings, health and
consumer education, creative
arts, computer classes and
exercises:
Annie Johnson Senior Center,
1991 Test St., Dunnellon.
Central Citrus Community
Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto.
East Citrus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Inverness.
Inverness Community Center,
1082 N. Paul Drive, Inverness.
West Citrus Community
Center, 8940 W. Veterans
Drive, Homosassa.
For information, visit www.
citruscountyfl.org/commserv/
suppserv/senprog/centers/
senior centers.htm.


A RESOLUTION OF THE CITRUS COUNTY HOSPITAL BOARD OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.



WHEREAS, the Citrus County Hospital Board of Citrus County, Florida, on March 28,
2013, held a regularly scheduled public meeting; and
WHEREAS, the Citrus County Hospital Board of Citrus County, Florida, set forth a
process to examine the future of Citrus Memorial Hospital pursuant to Florida Statute 155.40;
and
WHEREAS, the Citrus County Hospital Board directed its attorneys to set forth a
timeline for all actions to be taken to examine the future of Citrus Memorial Hospital; and
WHEREAS, The Citrus County Hospital Board and Citrus Memorial Health Foundation,
Inc. have mutual interests in seeking the best future outcomes of Citrus Memorial Hospital; and
WHEREAS, the Citrus County Hospital Board conducted a public hearing pursuant to
Florida Statute 155.40 on January 3, 2013 and selected Value Management Group, Inc. (VMG),
to conduct a valuation of Citrus Memorial Hospital and all assets of the Citrus County Hospital
Board and Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.; and
WHEREAS, the Citrus County Hospital Board ratifies and accepts the valuation
produced by VMG, Inc. on March 28, 2013; and
WHEREAS, the Citrus County Hospital Board in a public meeting set forth on March 28,
2013 considered all possible future outcomes for the.future of Citrus Memorial Hospital; and
WHEREAS, Citrus County Hospital Board seeks only the best interests of Citrus
Memorial Hospital and all the citizens of Citrus County; and
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the CITRUS COUNTY HOSPITAL BOARD
of Citrus County, Florida, that:
1. The Citrus County Hospital Board now upon the completion of the evaluation of the
benefit of the sale or lease of Citrus Memorial Hospital has now determined that it is no
longer in the best interest of the affected community (all of Citrus County) to own or
operate a hospital or healthcare system and elects to consider a sale or lease of the
hospital or healthcare system to a third party.
2. The Citrus County Hospital Board directs its attorneys, under the supervision of the
Citrus County Hospital Board and or its designee, to draft, produce, and publish a
Request for Proposal for the sale or lease of Citrus Memorial Hospital and the assets of
the Citrus County Hospital Board and Citrus Memorial Health Foundation, Inc.
3. All Requests for Proposals shall be delivered to the Citrus County Hospital Board on or
before May 16, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. ET.
4. All Requests for Proposals shall be opened on May 16, 2013 at 3:00 p.m. ET by the
Citrus County Hospital Board and or its designee.
5. The Citrus County Hospital Board shall assure that the Citrus County Hospital Board
determines whether there are qualified purchasers or lessees pursuant to Florida Statute
155.40(6) and (7).
6. The initiation of this process does NOT bind the Citrus County Hospital Board to proceed
to sale or lease after consideration of one through five above.
7. The Citrus County Hospital Board maintains its right to cease the process of
consideration of sale or lease at anytime throughout this process in its sole and absolute
discretion.
DULY ADOPTED at a public meeting on the 28th day of March, 2013.
Time Adopted: _12, 5 P.M.


By: 'e^ wern L S'
CITRUS COUNTY HOSPITAL BOARD
CHAIRPERSON
ATTES
CITR N1ALB H BOARD
SECRETARY

{00038669-1}


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 All


IP










After six years on lam, cabin bandit apprehended


Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY -
Troy James Knapp was
dodging authorities, again.
The fugitive with a fond-
ness for whiskey and a dis-
like of living near people
had been wanted for a
string of break-ins for
years at cabins in Utah's
mountains. With each near
miss, each wanted poster
and each threatening note
left behind for law en-
forcement, the legend of
him only grew.
Knapp survived by hol-
ing up inside the cabins,
sleeping in the owners'
beds, eating their food and
listening to their AM radio
for updates on the manhunt
And then, authorities say,
he would take off, stealing
items such as guns and
high-end camping equip-
ment and vanishing into the
woods where he lived off
dandelions and wild game.
Over Easter weekend,
authorities were on his
trail, again.
By Tuesday, his life on
the lam came to an end,
done in by an educated
guess by searchers who
had grown to know his ten-
dencies, the tracks he left
with his snowshoes and


the sounds of him chop-
ping wood outside a cabin
near a mountain reservoir
A team of 14 officers ap-
proached him on snow-
shoes the only way to
quietly sneak up on him -
and called in reinforce-
ments to help corner the
bearded and camouflage-
clad fugitive, a trim 45-
year-old standing 5-foot-8.
Now in police custody,
Knapp is telling authori-
ties how he managed to
evade them for so long
across a mountainous re-
gion stretching for 180 miles.
"He really has a fasci-
nating story to tell, and
right now he's willing to
tell it," Sanpete County
Sheriff Brian Nielson said.
Knapp, born in Saginaw,
Mich., got into trouble with
the law early. As a
teenager, he was convicted
of breaking and entering,
passing bad checks and
unlawful flight from au-
thorities, according to
court records. His most se-
rious offense, an arrest for
felony assault in Michigan,
was reduced in 1994 to a
charge of malicious de-
struction of property after
he agreed to plead guilty
"He says, 'I don't hate
people. I just don't like liv-


Associated Press
Detectives place fugitive Troy James Knapp, right, into custody Tuesday in the moun-
tains outside of Ferron in central Utah. Knapp, dubbed the "Mountain Man" by cabin
owners, was taken into custody in the snowy mountains outside of Ferron in central
Utah after firing several shots at officers in a helicopter, authorities said.


ing with them,"' Sevier
County Sheriff Nathan
Curtis said.
With no known occupa-
tion, Knapp drifted across
the country and ended up
in prison in California for
burglary He fell off the
radar in 2004 when he "went
on the run" while on pa-
role, said Bobby Haase, a
spokesman for the Califor-


nia Department of Correc-
tions and Rehabilitation.
By 2007, Utah authorities
began investigating a string
of cabin burglaries they
believed were tied to one
person. It wasn't until early
2012 that they identified
Knapp as the suspect from
cabin surveillance photos
and fingerprints lifted
from one cabin.


Tracy Glover, chief
deputy sheriff in Kane
County, said it was fairly
easy to identify Knapp's
cabin habits. Knapp would
drink any coffee and alco-
hol he could find, authorities
say Unlike typical burglars,
he never took large or ex-
pensive appliances such
as TVs or stereos. He took
only what he could carry,


mostly camping gear and
weapons he stashed in
abundance in the woods.
He returned to burglarize
cabins more than once, even
swapping one stolen rifle
for another, officials said.
He sometimes tidied up
a cabin, but other times left
it a mess or riddled with
bullets, authorities say He
was known to deface religious
icons. He scrawled notes
for cabin owners, alterna-
tively thanking them or de-
manding they "get off my
mountain." He warned
sheriffs he was "gonna put
you in the ground!"
He stepped on saplings
to avoid leaving dis-
cernible boot tracks and
changed stolen footwear
often to confuse searchers.
He walked alongside trails
instead of on them and kept
mostly to backcountry
The last three nights
Knapp spent as a fugitive
were in a framed log cabin
with a commanding view
of forest roads. Owner Eu-
gene Bartholomew said "it
was kind of messed up"
and "stunk like crazy" It
wasn't his only discovery.
On television news, he took
his first look at Knapp.
"That son of a has
got my coat on," he said.


NYC pressed to settle Central Park jogger case


Associated Press


NEW YORK New
York is a safer, less fearful
place than it was in 1990,
when murders hit an all-
time high, race relations
were raw and the city felt
under siege from drug
dealers and gangs on
wildingg" sprees. But one
major piece of unfinished
business from back then
still hangs over the city
and its legal system: the
Central Park jogger case.
Five black and Hispanic
boys were convicted that
year in the rape and grisly
beating of a white woman
jogging in the park, and
they went on to serve six to
13 years in prison before
their convictions were
thrown out in 2002 be-
cause of evidence linking
someone else to the crime.
They sued police and
prosecutors for $250 mil-
lion. But the lawsuit has
languished for a decade
with no resolution in sight.
Now, a growing chorus of
lawmakers is asking New
York City to settle with the
five men. And the pressure
is likely to build in the
coming weeks with the
broadcast of a documen-
tary on the case by film-
maker Ken Burns. It airs
on PBS on April 16.
"All of us want this over,
but it's about someone tak-
ing responsibility for what
they did to us," said one of
the five, Yusef Salaam,
now 38. "The money can't
buy back our lives."


Associated Press
A jogger passes a parked New York City police car on
April 21, 1989, near the area where a woman, who came
to be known as the Central Park jogger, was raped,
beaten and left for dead two nights earlier.


The attack on 28-year-
old investment banker Tr-
isha Meili occurred April
19, 1989. It was one of the
most notorious crimes in
city history and it mesmer-
ized the nation, serving as
a lurid symbol of the city's
racial and class divide and
its rampant crime.
"Drugs. Guns. Gangs.
New York City was just
crime central at that time,"
said former New York De-
tective Kirk Burkhalter,
recalling an era so blood-
soaked the city had 2,245
homicides in 1990, com-
pared with 414 last year.
When Meili was found
in the brush, more than 75
percent of her blood had
drained from her body and
her skull was smashed.
She was in a coma for 12
days, left with permanent
damage, and remembers


nothing about the attack.
The Associated Press does
not usually name victims
of sexual assault, but Meili
later went public as a mo-
tivational speaker and
wrote a book.
Raymond Santana and
Kevin Richardson, both 14
at the time, Antron McCray
and Salaam, 15, and Korey
Wise, 16, were rounded up
and arrested. After hours
of interrogation, four of
them recorded confessions
on video. At the trials, their
lawyers argued the confes-
sions were coerced. At the
time, DNA testing was not
sophisticated enough to
make or break the case.
In 2002, a re-examina-
tion of the case found that
DNA on the victim's sock
pointed to Matias Reyes, a
murderer and serial rapist
who confessed he alone at-


s c. ou .I.. ..


tacked the jogger. Then-
District Attorney Robert
Morgenthau stopped short
of declaring the Central
Park Five innocent but
withdrew all charges and
did not seek a retrial. (The
statute of limitations for
charging Reyes had run
out; he is serving a life
sentence for other crimes.)
Legal experts say the case
is taking a long time in part
because of the money and
reputations at stake. If it
were to go to trial, lawyers
would have to prove police
and prosecutors acted im-
properly A settlement could
be reached without the city
having to admit wrongdo-
ing, but so far the city
hasn't offered.
And no trial date has
been set.
The defendants' lives
since they got out of prison
have not been easy Wise
was recently re-arrested.
McCray moved away San-
tana sold drugs and was
sent back to prison, but
now, along with Richard-
son and Salaam, has be-
come the public face of the
case, speaking out against
wrongful convictions.
"We are over being
angry Now it's about help-
ing others, raising our own
families right," said San-
tana, now 38.


A


oin us for a unique and supportive remembrance service

presented by HPH Hospice chaplains and bereavement

counselors to memorialize and celebrate the lives of those

who have gone from sight but not from our hearts.


Wednesday, April 10
Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park
9225 W. Fishbowl Drive
Homosassa 34448
2 p.m. (Enter through main gate)
6 p.m. (Enter through gate 3)


pe^^J


Ceec4:7


910


pr


This service is free and open to
anyone who has lost a loved one.




F'r HPhospice
4.f rfit crg.,arz.h.M y Inl..yd,. 198

3545 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465

www.HPH-Hospice.org

527-4600


V HPH Mission Statement
HPH is where excellence in compassionate care maximizes quality of life.


A12 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


NATION


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Nation BRIEFS

Snowmobiler falls
80 feet, but unhurt
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -
An Alaska man who fell about
80 feet after his snowmobile
plunged into a crevasse on a
glacier said he had just de-
cided to turn around because
of concern about avalanche
danger.
Tom Douglas, 41, of Fair-
banks, landed unhurt on his
feet on a ledge Thursday, with
his snowmobile wedged in a
narrow space about 30 feet
above him.
"The area I was on, it was
like, man this just doesn't feel
right," he told the Fairbanks
Daily News-Miner on Friday. "I
turned to get out of there and,
boom, I fell through the air."
Douglas and his machine
fell through a snow bridge as
he led a group of snowmobil-
ers who were conducting ice
and snow tests around Jarvis
Glacier in Alaska's interior. The
other members of the group
determined Douglas was un-
hurt and left to seek help.
Pet pig ravaged by
dogs, stabbed by man
SPRINGFIELD, Ga.--A
Georgia man unleashed his two
pit bulls on a neighbor's pet pig
that got loose in a mobile home
park, then stabbed the animal
23 times in front of children and
other onlookers, authorities said.
The pig named Oliver -
survived and was in critical con-
dition at a veterinarian's office
Friday, said Effingham County
Sheriff's Office spokesman
David Ehsanipoor. He added
Oliver had been stabbed mostly
in his neck and hind parts.
The owner of the dogs, 23-
year-old Benjamin Fullwood,
was charged Wednesday with
felony cruelty to animals,
criminal trespass and obstruc-
tion of a law enforcement offi-
cer, Ehsanipoor said. The
man's bond was set at
$25,000, and a judge ordered
him to have no contact with
domestic animals, Ehsanipoor
said. It was unclear Friday if
Fullwood had an attorney.
Oliver got out of its owners'
yard Wednesday afternoon
and wandered into a mobile
home park in Springfield,
Ehsanipoor said. Residents of
the park were trying to get in
touch with the animal's owner,
when Fullwood unleashed his
two pit bulls on the pig and then
began stabbing him in front of
a group of people, Ehsanipoor
said.
Oliver was expected to
make a full recovery.
Video shows
police HQ deaths
JACKSON, Miss. -A per-
son with knowledge of the in-
vestigation of a police officer
killed by a murder suspect in
an interrogation room said the
shooting was recorded on video.
The person spoke to The
Associated Press on Saturday
on the condition of anonymity
because they were not au-
thorized to talk about the on-
going investigation. The
person also said the suspect,
Jeremy Powell, was not hand-
cuffed during the questioning.
The Mississippi Bureau of
Investigation said Powell
overpowered Det. Eric Smith
on Thursday and took his gun.
Authorities said Powell shot
the veteran detective four
times before killing himself.
Police: Man left
ammo on school bus
PHOENIX- Court records
show a Phoenix man who re-
portedly got on a bus, rode it to
a school and left a gun maga-
zine with 15 rounds of ammu-
nition on the bus was hearing
voices and feared for his life.
The details were spelled out
in a probable cause statement
released Friday in the case of
29-year-old Jeremy West. He's
charged with endangerment,
criminal trespass and having a


weapon on a school property.
Authorities said the man told
an adult bus assistant he was
with a boy who had also just
boarded the Alhambra Ele-
mentary School District bus
on Thursday.
The man got off the bus,
but police were called when a
child found the magazine.
Officers say they later de-
termined that the man ap-
proached the boy in his
neighborhood Wednesday but
was rebuffed.
Police arrested West after
getting tips when news broad-
casts reported a description of
the man on the bus.
-From wire reports


NATION


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 A13


Amid boos, political spending booms


Associated Press

BOSTON Operating
with few rules and lim-
ited oversight, outside
groups spent a record $1
billion to influence last
year's election.
Politicians of all per-
suasions griped about
the meddling. But few
are working to change
laws that ushered in an
unprecedented flood of
money made possible by
a 2010 Supreme Court
ruling that erased years
of campaign finance law.
Instead, political lead-
ers and donors from both
parties are preparing for
the flow of outside
money to intensify New
groups have formed and
others are shaping plans
to come back bigger and
smarter ahead of the
2014 congressional elec-
tions and the 2016 presi-
dential race.
What laws do remain
could become even looser
as the Supreme Court
considers another high-
profile decision.
"The unregulated sys-
tem that we seem to be
headed in will make Wa-
tergate look like a bad
soap opera," said Robert
Zimmerman, a member
of the Democratic Na-
tional Committee's na-
tional finance team, who
helped raise as much as
$500,000 for President
Barack Obama's re-
election effort
"Everybody is focus-
ing on raising more,"
Zimmerman said.
Even as some
fundraisers report fa-
tigue following a vicious
and expensive presiden-
tial campaign last year,
both sides are aggres-
sively courting donors to
help further transform
the political landscape.
Campaigns and politi-
cal parties bound by tra-
ditional fundraising
limits are moving to out-
source research, adver-


* FREE hearing exam
* FREE loss & damage insurance
* FREE lifetime service and cleaning
* FREE in office repairs
* FREE unlimited computer adjustments
* FREE nationwide coverage
See us at
Boomtown Days
in Historic Dunnellon
April 20 & 21, 2013

DUNNELI
^ 20170 E. Pennsylv
in the Dunnellon Bu
352-789-
HOMOSASSA
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.
352-621-8000

Call for appointment!
AUDIBE]
W American. Hearing. Excellent
-!l IA ^^iisi^


Associated Press
Las Vegas Sands Chairman and CEO Sheldon Adelson speaks at a news conference
April 12, 2012, in Macau. Adelson topped the list of political campaign mega donors,
giving more than $90 million to Republican super PACs in all. That included more than
$15 million to the organization backing former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's presidential
bid and another $30 million to Romney's super PAC.


rising, data collection and
issue advocacy to groups
that can accept unlimited
donations while often of-
fering donors anonymity.
The president, too, is in-
tensifying his fundraising
focus to help his party and
a new nonprofit organiza-
tion led by his former cam-
paign manager.
Having promised to
headline at least 20
fundraisers in his final
presidential term for De-
mocrats' campaign com-
mittees, Obama last week
raised millions of dollars
in four events. One was a
$32,400-per person brunch
in Atherton, Calif.
"I'm going to need some
help," Obama told donors.
Donors who gave millions
last fall, largely on the Re-
publican side, are already
lining up to do more.
"I'm going to do every-
thing I possibly can to help
our country and those peo-
ple who believe in our


country," said Republican
donor Foster Friess, who
gave more than $2 million
to a new kind of political
action committee, known
as a super PAC, that fueled
the 2012 presidential cam-
paign of former Sen. Rick
Santorum, R-Pa.
Super PACs can raise
and spend unlimited funds
to help candidates, but can-
not coordinate expenditures
or strategy with a campaign.
Like other donors, Friess
says he's eager to use his
"affluence" to shape policy
fights.
The emergence of super
PACs and other outside


groups, emboldened partly
by the Citizens United de-
cision by the Supreme
Court in 2010, has done
more than anything else to
reshape the contours of
campaign fundraising.
A few federal court
cases have broadly eased
campaign finance rules,
allowing donors to give un-
limited sums.
Many super PACs have
affiliated nonprofit "social
welfare" organizations that
spent hundreds of millions
last year on issue ads.
Those groups don't have to
disclose their donors be-
cause they're governed by


tax law. Open-government
groups have pushed Con-
gress, to no avail, for a law
that would require politi-
cally active groups to dis-
close their finances.
The system faces further
deregulation as the
Supreme Court prepares
to hear a case this year
that could wipe away ag-
gregate annual limits on
direct contributions to
candidates and official
campaign committees.
Officials across the po-
litical spectrum already
acknowledge that there is
little oversight in the new
world of political fundrais-
ing, where the Internal
Revenue Service and Fed-
eral Election Commission
have been reluctant to en-
force what rules remain.
Meanwhile, the number
of outside groups leverag-
ing the tax code to court
major donors is growing.
Obama earlier in the
year converted his victori-
ous re-election campaign
into an unprecedented
nonprofit organization, Or-
ganizing forAction, designed
to influence policy debates
in Washington. Individual
donations to the Obama
campaign were capped at
$2,500 last year; the new
group has no such limits.
Late last month, GOP of-
ficials with strong ties to
the Republican National
Committee started an in-
dependent organization
designed to track and re-
search Democrats in the
coming elections. The group
is intended to counter a
similar organization on
the Democratic side estab-
lished during the last elec-
tion. Both groups can accept
unlimited donations.


* Best hearing aid technology
Honest expert evaluation and
thoroughly explained options
* Most insurances accepted
* Aids custom designed for
your lifestyle
0% financing for one year
* Price match guarantee


OUN
'ania Avenue
siness Center
1559


INVERNESS
2036 Hwy. 44W
352-586-7599


Irrigation
Tune-up
$49.95
(up to 5 zones)


* Retaining Walls
* Landscape Lighting
* Custom Ponds


F'F'8 I 0 pavr pati
^^*^$639


* Outdoor Fireplaces
* Planting Beds
* Pavers

Big reenEggsj6
& Supplies^^


Certified Brick Installers
Certified Pond & Waterfall Installers
ICPI Certified Paver Installers


Financing Available

352-621-7700

Si Come visit our Outdoor Living Showroom at
Hwy 19 & Fair Acres, Homosassa

www.BushHomeServices.com


FREE
15 gal. Tree S
with $500
purchase HOME SERVICES)


[ Free Har~fl~ et


I fLl


RL-1, --,w 1 -
71 ar-?17cfAfew
'0 7ZI7n/'tj/,,,,l,
Solution, lef












NATION


Nat


Nation BRIEFS

Quite the trade


Associated Press
The front of a 1909 Honus
Wagner baseball card is
pictured.
1909 Wagner card
sells for $2.1M
WEST BERLIN, N.J. -A
1909 Honus Wagner baseball
card has been sold for more
than $2.1 million at auction.
The T206 card, originally
released by the American
Tobacco Co., went for
$2,105,770.50 in an online
sale, Goldin Auctions said
Saturday.
While the company said
the price was a record for a
baseball card sold at auc-
tion, a similar Wagner card
in mint condition was pur-
chased for $2.8 million in a
private sale in 2007.
Corrections killing
suspect arrested
DENVER-An alleged
white supremacist gang
member who was arrested
during the investigation into
the killing of Colorado's
prisons chiefs may have
thrown a gun from his vehi-
cle before his arrest.
James Lohr was arrested
early Friday after a brief
chase in Colorado Springs.
Investigators said surveil-
lance video shows a firearm
being thrown from Lohr's
vehicle and two men finding
the gun and later taking it.
Authorities said the men aren't
in trouble, but investigators
want to retrieve the gun.
Authorities had said they
were looking for Lohr and a
fellow 211 Crew prison
gang member as persons
of interest in the slaying of
Tom Clements.
Lohr was arrested on
warrants unrelated to
Clements' death.
The only named suspect
is another 211 member who
died after a shootout.
Recovering soldier
gets Silver Star
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. -
A Fort Campbell soldier who
suffered a traumatic brain
injury has received the Silver
Star for his actions to help
evacuate wounded troops
during a mission in
Afghanistan in 2010.
After receiving the honor
during a Friday ceremony at
the Tennessee-Kentucky state
line, Sgt. 1st Class Matthew
Loheide of Patchogue, N.Y,
immediately re-enlisted in
the Army to serve other
wounded warriors like him.
Loheide and others were
injured when a bomb
dropped on their position
during the operation. De-
spite his injuries and under
fire, Loheide marked a land-
ing zone for helicopters to
evacuate the wounded and
led his soldiers to safety.


CI


&
ITRUS COUNTY (


WORLD


CHRONICLE


Obama: Budget not 'ideal' but has 'tough reforms'


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama says
his soon-to-be released
budget, already criticized
by friends and foes, is not
his "ideal plan" but offers
"tough reforms" for bene-
fit programs and scuttles
some tax breaks for the
wealthy
That's a mix, he con-
tends, that will provide
long-term deficit reduc-
tion without harming the
economy
In his first comments
about the 2014 spending
blueprint he's set to re-
lease Wednesday, Obama
said he intends to reduce
deficits and provide new
money for public works
projects, early education
and job training.


"We don't have to choose
between these goals we
can do both," Obama said
in his weekly radio and In-
ternet address, broadcast
Saturday.
Obama's plan for the
budget year that begins
Oct. 1 calls for slower
growth in government ben-
efits programs for the poor,
veterans and the elderly,
as well as higher taxes, pri-
marily from the wealthy
Some details, made pub-
lic Friday, drew a fierce re-
sponse from liberals, labor
unions and advocates for
older Americans. House
Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, was not impressed,
either.
"It's a compromise I'm
willing to accept in order to
move beyond a cycle of short-
term, crisis-driven decision-


Associated Press
President Barack Obama discusses immigration June 15
at a press conference. Obama's plan for the budget year
that begins Oct. 1 calls for slower growth in government
benefits programs for the poor, veterans and the elderly,
as well as higher taxes, primarily from the wealthy.


making, and focus on
growing our economy and
our middle class for the


long run," Obama said.
Obama proposes spend-
ing cuts and revenue in-


Associated Press
A North Korean vehicle carrying a missile passes by during a mass military parade April 15, 2012, in
Pyongyang's Kim II Sung Square to celebrate the centenary of the birth of North Korean founder Kim II Sung.



How real is the threat?

Experts: US mainland not at risk, but neighbors may be


Associated Press

WASHINGTON
North Korea is widely rec-
ognized as being years
away from perfecting the
technology to back up its bold
threats of a pre-emptive strike on
America. But some nuclear ex-
perts say it might have the know-
how to fire a nuclear-tipped
missile at South Korea and
Japan, which host U.S. military
bases.
No one can tell with any cer-
tainty how much technological
progress North Korea has made,
aside from perhaps a few people
close to its secretive leadership.
If true, it is unlikely the North
would launch such an attack be-
cause the retaliation would be
devastating.
The North's third nuclear test
on Feb. 12, which prompted the
toughest U.N. Security Council
penalties yet, is presumed to
have advanced its ability to
miniaturize a nuclear device.


Experts say it's easier to design
a nuclear warhead that works on
a shorter-range missile than one
for an intercontinental missile
that could target the U.S.
The assessment of David Al-
bright at the Institute for Science
and International Security think-
tank is that North Korea has the
capability to mount a warhead on
its Nodong missile, which has a
range of 800 miles and could hit
in South Korea and most ofJapan.
He said in his analysis, pub-
lished after the latest nuclear
test, that it is an uncertain esti-
mate, and the warhead's reliabil-
ity remains unclear.
Albright contends that the ex-
perience of Pakistan could serve
as precedent.
Pakistan boughtthe Nodong from
North Korea after its first flight
test in 1993, then adapted and
produced it for its own use. Pak-
istan, which conducted its first
nuclear test in 1998, is said to
have taken less than 10 years to
miniaturize a warhead.


North Korea also obtained
technology from the trafficking
network ofA.Q. Khan, a disgraced
pioneer of Pakistan's nuclear
program, acquiring centrifuges
for enriching uranium. According
to the Congressional Research
Service, Khan may also have sup-
plied a Chinese-origin nuclear
weapon design he provided to
Libya and Iran.
But Siegfried Hecker at Stan-
ford University's Center for In-
ternational Security and
Cooperation, who has visited North
Korea seven times and been granted
unusual access to its nuclear fa-
cilities, is skeptical the North has
advanced that far in miniaturiza-
tion of a nuclear device.
"Nobody outside of a small
elite in North Korea knows -
and even they don't know for
sure," he said in an emailed re-
sponse to questions from The As-
sociated Press. "I agree that we
cannot rule it out for one of their
shorter-range missiles, but we
simply don't know."


Fertilization' declaration gives some pause


Associated Press


Pastor Rick Warren's TOPEKA, Kan. A
phrase declaring that life
son commits suicide begins "at fertilization"
LAKE FOREST, Calif.- tucked into new abortion
The Southern California legislation in Kansas is
church headed by popular creating concern among
evangelical Pastor Rick abortion rights advocates
Warren announced Saturday that the wording will in-
that Warren's 27-year-old spire new attempts to pre-
son has committed suicide. vent the procedure.
Warren, the author of the Supporters of the meas-
multimillion-selling book ure said the language is no
"The Purpose Driven Life," more than a statement of
said in an email to church principle similar to
staff that he and his wife those found in several
had enjoyed a fun Friday states, including neighbor-
had enjoyed a fun Friday ing Missouri-rather than
evening with their son before an attempt to prevent any
Matthew Warren returned pregnancies from being
home to take his life in a terminated. But advocates
momentary wave of despair." on both sides of the issue
Church spokeswoman acknowledge the wording
Kristin Cole said he died could prove helpful to
Friday night. abortion opponents over
-From wire reports time.


The measure's provision declaring that life begins
at fertilization says that "unborn children have
interests in life, health and well-being that should
be protected" and that their parents also have
"protectable interests" in their children's well-being.


The bill, sent late Friday
to Gov. Sam Brownback,
would block potential tax
breaks for abortion
providers and ban them
from furnishing materials
or instructors for public
school sex education
classes. It also outlaws sex-
selection abortions and
spells out in greater detail
what information doctors
must provide to women
before an abortion.
The measure's provision
declaring that life begins
at fertilization says that
"unborn children have in-


terests in life, health and
well-being that should be
protected" and that their
parents also have "pro-
tectable interests" in their
children's well-being.
Many anti-abortion leg-
islators see 'at fertilization'
statements as symbolic.
But it could underpin law-
suits by prospective par-
ents or grandparents who
want to block abortions or
be cited by abortion oppo-
nents in pushing law en-
forcement officials to
scrutinize clinics, said
Troy Newman, president


of the anti-abortion group
Operation Rescue.
Abortion rights advocates
said Kansas' new restric-
tions won't be as severe as
other states, but they also
don't trust assertions from
abortion opponents that
the language on when life
begins represents only a
statement of principles.
"Could it be used as a tool
of harassment? Absolutely,"
said Holly Weatherford,
lobbyist and program di-
rector for the American Civil
Liberties Union of Kansas
and Western Missouri.


creases that would result
in $1.8 trillion in deficit re-
ductions over 10 years, re-
placing $1.2 trillion in
automatic spending cuts
that are otherwise poised
to take effect over the next
10 years.
Counting reductions and
higher taxes that Congress
and Obama have approved
since 2011, the 2014 budget
would contribute $4.3 tril-
lion to total deficit reduc-
tion by 2023.
Obama's plan includes
$580 billion in new taxes
that Republicans oppose.
There's also a new inflation
formula, rejected by many
liberals, that would reduce
the annual cost of living
adjustments for a range of
government programs, in-
cluding Social Security
and benefits for veterans.


World BRIEFS

Pillow fight!


Associated Press
People take part in a pillow
fight Saturday in Trafalgar
Square in London. A coor-
dinated set of pillow
fights took place in cities
around the world on Sat-
urday. The organizers of
the London event stated
there were only two rules:
Don't hit anyone with a
camera and don't hit any-
one without a pillow.

Americans, doctor
killed in Afghanistan
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan
- Militants killed six Ameri-
cans, including a young fe-
male diplomat, and an
Afghan doctor Saturday in a
pair of attacks in Afghanistan
on Saturday. It was the
deadliest day for the United
States in the war in eight
months.
The violence hours
after the U.S. military's top
officer arrived for consulta-
tions with Afghan and U.S.-
led coalition officials -
illustrates the instability
plaguing the nation as for-
eign forces work to pull
nearly all their combat
troops out of the country by
the end of 2014.
The attacks came just days
after insurgents stormed a
courthouse, killing more
than 46 people in one of the
deadliest attacks of the war,
now in its 12th year.
The three U.S. service
members, two U.S. civilians
and the doctor were killed
when the group was struck
by an explosion while trav-
eling to donate books to
students in a school in the
south, officials and the
State Department said.
Pork found in Ikea's
moose lasagna
STOCKHOLM Ikea
said it has withdrawn
17,000 portions of moose
lasagna from its home fur-
nishings stores in Europe
after traces of pork were
found in a batch tested in
Belgium.
Ikea spokeswoman
Tina Kardum said the
product had only been on
sale for a month when it
was pulled off the shelves
on March 22.
The company didn't
announce the withdrawal
publicly until Swedish
newspaper Svenska
Dagbladet wrote about it
Saturday.
Moose meat is common
in Sweden, though it's not
typically used in lasagna.
-From wire reports











EXCURSIONS
~CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
An oarsman pilots an excursion boat down the Hozu River in August 2012, just outside Kyoto, Japan, as he points out sights to his passengers. The two-hour
ride down the river offers the chance to spot wildlife while threading rocks and rapids, and is an especially appealing outing for a trip with children.



For Kyoto with kids, mix




fun with antiquities


ADAM GELLER
AP national writer
KYOTO, Japan
Rocks to the left of us, rocks
to the right With the Hozu
River rushing in between,
our oarsman swung the
boat hard, threading the
boulders as water splashed overboard
- and onto my 10-year-old daughter's
lap.
You never know how kids will react
to new experiences, but not to worry
"Daddy," my daughter said, beaming
as we headed for more rapids, "this
must be the best summer ever!"
Any parent who has charted a family
vacation hopes for that kind of reac-
tion. But when my wife and I made
plans to take our son and daughter to
Kyoto, I had a few doubts. Kyoto is one
of the highlights of any trip to Japan,
an ancient and fascinating city, packed
with temples and shrines, a place to
savor refined culture.
But can it be kid- and family-
friendly? Most definitely, especially if
you take advantage of the variety
Kyoto has to offer, hop on the city's
easy-to-use bus system, and keep your
eyes open for some of its surprising
travel bargains. With that in mind,
here's a checklist for enjoying Japan's
ancient capital in ways that you and
your kids will enjoy
TOUR OF TASTES: You could
spend months visiting temples and
shrines in Kyoto. But to kids, they can
start to blur. So put some space in be-
tween them. Kyoto is best explored on
foot, leaving lots of opportunities for
stopping off at interesting destinations
along the way to antiquity.
One of our favorite stops was the
Nishiki-koji market, a short bus ride
from downtown, where Kyotoites
stocks their refrigerators and kitchen
cupboards. Nishiki is a long, narrow
street, covered by an arcade and lined


In this August 2012 photo, customers choose from a selection of fresh-baked rice
crackers at a shop in the Nishiki-koji market arcade in Kyoto, Japan. The market,
filled with vendors selling all sorts of snackable delicacies, is a fascinating place
to explore.


with shops selling all sorts of snack-
able delicacies, like just-baked rice
crackers, sashimi on skewers, and cro-
quettes filled with chocolate, as well
as wares like chopsticks and gourmet
cutlery It's as interesting to browse
here as to eat, and many places give
out samples of their edible wares.
MEETA SAMURAI: Visit the Toei
Uzumasa Eigamura (movie village) and
you may well see crews filming a samu-
rai flick or television drama. But even
if the cameras aren't rolling, the "vil-
lage" designed to look like the Japan of
yore is fun to wander, offering the
chance to meet actors in period cos-
tume who are happy to pose for photos.
There's also a theater on site, where
live-action ninja shows are staged.


RIDE THE RAPIDS: We built a day
around the 10-mile ride down the
Hozu, starting with a short train ride
just outside the city and ending in the
lovely neighborhood of Arashiyama.
Guides pole fiberglass boats seating
about 20 people through a deep gorge,
where my 8-year-old son spotted tur-
tles, snakes, deer and numerous water
birds. Ask your hotel or at the excel-
lent tourist information office inside
Kyoto station (tell them you want to go
on the Hozu-gawa Kudari) to help you
call ahead for a reservation, which is
recommended but not required. Tick-
ets cost 3,900 yen ($42) for adults and
2,500 yen ($27) for children older than
3 (credit cards not accepted).
SOAK UP CULTURE: Bathing is an


Nishiki is a long, narrow
street, covered by an
arcade and lined with
shops selling all sorts of
snackable delicacies,
like just-baked rice
crackers, sashimi
on skewers, and
croquettes filled with
chocolate.
almost religious ritual in Japan and
can be the centerpiece of a memo-
rable vacation experience. Kyoto is
not known for the hot springs that dot
much of Japan, but it has a few. We
stopped at Sagano Onsen Tenzan no
Yu, a hot spring spa minutes from
Arashiyama on a charming one-car
train. A cheaper and more plentiful
destination is one of the city's "super
sentos," public baths with multiple
tubs. The tourist office can provide a
sheet in English listing these. In ei-
ther, you wash thoroughly at bathing
stations before entering multiple soak-
ing pools, both indoors and out.
GET FESTIVE: Kyoto hosts many
festivals throughout the year When we
visited Kyoto in August, the city was
celebrating the weeks around the Tan-
abata festival with lights, including
computer-animated projections on the
wall of the city's castle and the launch-
ing of thousands of lighted blue plastic
balls down the Horigawa, a narrow
waterway not far from downtown. In
May, the Aoi Matsuri, held at a pair of
shrines, features a procession of peo-
ple in ancient Japanese court cos-
tumes. In October, the Jidai Matsuri
See Page A17


China's CCTV treats April Fool's joke as real news


Associated Press
BEIJING When Virgin
founder Richard Branson made
an April Fool's Day announce-
ment about starting a glass-bot-
tomed plane service, at least
one major news outlet didn't
see through to the joke.
China's huge state broad-
caster, CCTV, ran it as odd but


real news.
The broadcaster reported it a
day later on the nightly news
program "World Express,"
where Chinese Internet users
quickly spotted the gaffe and
spread the word.
By Wednesday, CCTV had
pulled the clip from its website.
When "World Express" pro-
ducer Xu Qi was reached on


her cellphone by The Associ-
ated Press, she asked for a call-
back later because she was in a
meeting, but later repeated
calls rang unanswered.
CCTV had reported that
Branson's Virgin Atlantic air-
line would start flying the first-
ever glass-bottomed planes
between London and Scotland.
It quoted as the source the
British newspaper The Daily
Mirror which had made it
clear it was in on the joke by re-
minding online readers that it


was April Fool's Day
CCTV also aired photos origi-
nally posted in Branson's blog
on Virgin's official site Monday
and carried by the British
tabloid.
Quoting The Daily Mirror, a
CCTV news announcer said that
passengers need not worry
about safety because the see-
through bottom would be avia-
tion-grade glass.
"Maybe to spice up its pro-
gramming for ratings, CCTV
sometimes fails to check the


source of the information," Bei-
jing journalism professor Zhan
Jiang said.
It is not the first time China's
state media have fallen for
spoof news articles.
When the U.S. satirical web-
site The Onion proclaimed
North Korean leader Kim Jong
Un the sexiest man alive in No-
vember, it ended up as real
news on websites of several
Chinese newspapers, including
the Communist Party's flagship
People's Daily.


Glass-bottomed plane reported






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nightmare comes true


SUN DAY EVENING APR IL 7, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 1 7:30 I 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00 11:30
f [WESH NBC 19 19 News News The Voice More vocalists audition. 'PG' Celebrity Apprentice Celebrity Apprentice News Access
WEDU PBS 3 3 14 6 Extraordinary Women Call the Midwife (In Call the Midwife (N) (In Masterpiece Classic "Defiant Requiem: Voices of As Time
c0 PBS 3 3 14 6 'G'c Stereo) 14' N Stereo) 14' N (N) 'PGC'B Resistance"'(2012)'NR' Goes By
o UWUF) PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin 'PG' NOVA (In Stereo)'G' Call the Midwife '14' Masterpiece Classic "Defiant Requiem: Voices" Martin
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly The Voice "The Blind Auditions, Part 3" More All-Star Celebrity All-Star Celebrity News Paid
S F NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News vocalists audition. 'PG' Apprentice 'PG' Apprentice (N) 'PG' Program
o LWFT) ABC 20 20 20 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (In Revenge "Union" (In Red Widow "Pilot" (In News Sports
ABC20 20 20 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo)'PG' [ Stereo) 'PG' [ Stereo) [ NNight
Evening 10 News 60 Minutes (N) (In The 48th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards Honoring achieve- 10 News Paid
B )CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News (N) Stereo) a ment in country music. (N)(In Stereo Live)'PG, la 11pm (N) Program
FOX 13 13 13 13 FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy Cleveland FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
SLW FOX 1313 13 13 (In Stereo) a Burgers Show Simpsons Burgers 14' Show (In Stereo) a Notice'PG'
B| EWtJL ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge 'PG' Red Widow "Pilot" News Inside Ed.
IND 2 2 2 22,22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
WC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
9 [WFT) ABC 11 1111 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (In Revene "Union" (In Red Widow "Pilot" (In News Castle 'PG'
ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' Stereo)'PG' Stereo) 'PG' Stereo) c
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Expert" Law & Order "Castoff" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
D CWi IND 12 12 16 '14' 14' Theory Theory 'PG'c '14'c 'PG' 'PG'
E D WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "According to Greta"(2009) Hilary Duff. Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris |Chris Tampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
D3 [WACX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Connec Passion! Turning Point 'G' Journey Jim Raley Dayna Brody
King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Simple CSI: Miami "Dispo Day" Cold Case "Free Love" ** "Kickboxer"
ED WT CW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Man" 'PG' '14'm 14'm (1989, Adventure) 'R'
Casita Big Rotary Spy Inverness Your Citrus County Court ISpyY' Eye for an Fam Team
I WYKEFAM 16 1616 15 Dog Club Games Spotlight Eye
IBE CWOX FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Burgers Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers |Fam. Guy |Cleveland FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ (N)'PGC'
n [WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero Agquy Ahora (SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina'PG'(SS) Sal y Pimienta 'PG' Comned. Noticiero
SWXPX ION 17 Monk 'PG' Monk 'PG' c Monk 'PG' Law Order: ClI Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
American American Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck
(E)& 5448 54 25 27 Hoggers Hoggers Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
Ni,. 55 64 55 c*** "Erin Brockovich" (2000, Drama) Julia Roberts. A woman probes Mad Men "The Doorway" Don spearheads a Mad Men "The
5564 55 a power company cover-up over poisoned water. R' new campaign. '14' Doorway"'14'
1 River Monsters: River Monsters: River Monsters: River Monsters "Face Ripper" Deadly predator in River Monsters "Face
M ) 52 35 52 19 21 Unhooked PG' Unhooked 'PG' Unhooked 'PG' a Bolivian river. (In Stereo)'PG' Ripper"' PG'
S** "Why Did I Get Married?" (2007, Celebration of Gospel 2013 Host Steve Harvey; The Sheards (Series The Sheards 'PG' c
(ET) 96 19 96 Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry. 'PG-13' Kirk Franklin. (N) Premiere) (N) 'PG
[iRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Married to Medicine Housewives/Atl. Happens Atlanta
7 7 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh. Jeff Dunham: Controlled Chaos Gabriel I lesias: Aloha Tosh.0 South Park Gabriel Iglesias: Aloha
C 27 61 27 33 '14'm '14'm '14' '14' Fluffy (N '14' MA' Fluffy
knI 98 45 98 28 3 ***7 "Ghost"(1990, Fantasy) Patrick Swayze, *** "Steel Magnolias" (1989) Sally Field. Six iron-willed women gather My Big Redneck
S98 45 98 28 37 Demi Moore. (In Stereo) PG-13_ at a Louisiana beauty parlor. (In Stereo) 'PG' c Vacation'PG'
WNl 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess |On Treasure Detectives Treasure Detectives Treasure Detectives Treasure Detectives
WNNJ 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' Piers Morgan Live CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Austin & Austin & "The Wizards Return: Dog With a Austin & Shake It Jessie A.N.T Austin & Austin & Austin &
S 46 40 46 6 5 Ally G' AllyY7' Alexvs.Alex" Blog (N) AllyG' Up!'G' G' Farm'G' Ally G' AllyG' Ally G'
(ESP 33 27 33 21 17 NCAA Women's College Basketball Women's College Basketball SportsCenter (N)
($PNJ 34 28 34 43 49 MLS Soccer Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Texas Rangers. NHRA Drag Racing
[EWTN 95 70 95 48 Devotions |Crossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime |G.K. |Rosary |Catholic Compass God Bookmark
S** "Batman Returns" (1992, Action) Michael *** "Batman Begins" (2005, Action) Christian Bale. Premiere. Bruce America's Funniest
l)i 29 52 29 20 28 Keaton, Danny DeVito. 'P-13' Wayne becomes Gotham City's Dark Knight. 'PG-13' Home Videos 'PG'
i *** "A Room With a View" (1986, Drama) *** "The Pianist" (2002) Adrien Brody A Jewish musi- ***+ "The English Patient"
118 170 Helena Bonham-Carter. 'NR' cian witnesses the horrors of the Holocaust. (1996) Ralph Fiennes.'R'
fET 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
fFOD) 26 56 26 Chopped Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped (N) Iron Chef America Restaurant: Im.
([SNFL1 35 39 35 NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Cleveland Cavaliers. |Magic UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
S1 ***0 "The Fighter" (2010, Drama) Mark ** "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" (2009) Shia LaBeouf. Sam "Transformers:
9) 30 60 30 51 Wahlberg, Chnstian Bale. 'R' Witwicky holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. Revenge of the Fallen"
GOLE) 727 67 727 LPGA Tour Golf Kraft Nabisco Championship, Final Round. (N) Central |PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, Final Round.
( 6 "Be My Valentine" *** "StraightFrom the Heart" (2003, "The Sweeter Side of Life" (2013, Romance- Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
5968 59 45 54 (2013) Romance) Teri Polo, Andrew McCarthy N Comedy) Kathryn Mordris. NR'
S** "Red Tails" *** "Prometheus" (2012, Science Fiction) Game of Thrones (N) Game of Thrones (In Game of Thrones (In
S 302 201 302 2 2 (2012) 'PG-13' Noomi Rapace. (In Stereo) 'R' c'MA' c Stereo) 'MA' c Stereo) 'MA' c
BiO 303 202 303 Boxing Real Time With Bill ** "Rock of Ages" (2012, Musical) Julianne **t "I, Robot" (2004 Science Fiction) Will
[ 2 303 202 303Maher'MA' c Hough. (In Stereo)'PG-13' c Smith. (In Stereo) PG-13 m
fl 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl You Live in What? Hawaii |Hawaii Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl
Ax Men "Gators & Ax Men "Goldmine" Ax Men "The Hurricane Ax Men "Calling It Vikings "Burial of the Vikings "Burial of the
Mil 51 25 51 32 42 Hand Grenades"'14' '14' Hits"'14' Quits" (N) '14' Dead' (N)'14' Dead"14' c
E, ) 24 38 24 31 The Client List '14' The Client List "Cowboy The Client List'14' m Army Wives The Client List "Hell on Preachers' Daughters
E 24 38 24 31 Up" '14' "Disarmament" (N) 'PG' Heels" (N) '14' '14' c
"Profile for Murder" (2013) Nicki Aycox. A "Cold Spring" (2013, Suspense) Sean Patrick "In Her Mother's Footsteps" (2006) Emma
50 119 serial killer terrorizes a retired profiler. 'NR' Flanery. (In Stereo) 'NR' N Caulfield. (In Stereo) NR' N
"End of "Wrath of the Titans" (2012) *** "Edward Scissorhands" (1990, Fantasy) ** "Dark Shadows" (2012, Comedy) Johnny
(WiAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Days"'R' Sam Worthington. PG-13' Johnny Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13' cN Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13' C
[iSNBCJ) 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |Trafficked: Slavery Sex Slaves City | Lockup
Diners IDipers Supercarrer: USS Wicked Tuna: Hooked Wicked Tuna "All Hands Cocaine Wars (N)'14' Wicked Tuna "All Hands
(PG) 109 65 109 44 53 P P Ronald Reagan 'G' Up (N) on Deck" 14' on Deck" '14'
(tJ 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. ISponge. Sponge. |Sponge. Wendell |See Dad *** "Free Willy"(1993) Jason James Richter.'PG' Friends
(WN) 103 62 103 lyanla, Fix My Life lyanla, Fix My Life Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah: Where Now? Oprah's Next
(DXYI _44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped: Kller Best Ink 'PG' c
n*"The Three Shameless "Order House of Californication Shameless "Survival of House of Californication Shameless "Survival of
(SHiW) 340 241 340 4 Musketeers"(2011) Room Service" 'MA' Lies 'MA' the Fittest" 'MA' Lies MA' the Fittest" 'MA'
SP nI~ 732 11'2 732 Rolex Sports Car Series Racing Barber. (N) SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR My Classic Hot Rod MotoGP Racing Moto2:
732 112 732 (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Car TV Qatar, Race.
ii 37 43 37 27 36 Bar Rescue "Fallen Bar Rescue "Webers of Bar Rescue "Empty Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue A western Bar Rescue "Murphy's
37 43 37 27 36 Angels"'PG' Lies"'PG' Pockets"'PG' 'PG' bar. (N) 'PG' Mess"'PG'
*** "Kill Bill: Vol. 2" ** "Total Recall" (2012, Science Fiction) Spartacus: War of the "Ghost Rider: Spirit of S artacus:
S 370 271 370 (2004) 'R' Colin Farrell. (In Stereo) PG-13' Damned c Vengeance" (2012) 'PG-13' c ar
'S1li) 36 31 36 3 Wide Life Lightning NHL Hockey Tampa Bay LightningatWashington Capitals. Lightning Professional Tarpon Reel MLB
36 31 36 PG' Live! From Verizon Center inwashington, D.C. (Live) Live! Tournament Series Animals'G' Baseball
**+ "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest" (2006, Action) "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra" (2009, Action) Channing "Pirates-
rst 31 59 31 26 29 Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley PG-13' c Tatum, Dennis Quaid.'PG-13' ccDead"
(Li$ 49 23 49 16 19 "Killers"(2010) Ashton Kutcher. **"Due Date" (2010) 'R' (DVS) ** "Due Date"(2010) 'R' (DVS)
**169 53 169 30 35 "The Young Philadelphians" (1959, *** "Spellbound" (1945 Mystery) Ingrid **** "Diaboli ue" 1955, Suspense) Simone
169 53 169 30 35 Drama) Paul Newman. 'NR' c Bergman, Gregory Peck. 'NR' c Signoret, Vera Couzo. 'NR
Deadliest Catch (In Yukon Men "Tough Yukon Men "Fresh Yukon Men "Pray For Yukon Men "Eeling and Yukon Men "Pray For
IB) 53 34 53 24 26 Stereo) '14' Choices" 'PG' Blood" 'PG' Snow" PG' Dealing" 'PG' Snow" 'PG'
Cfl 50 46 50 29 30 Undercover Boss Welcome to Myrtle Gypsy Wedding Gypsy Wedding Welcome to Myrtle Gypsy Wedding
S*** "The King's Speech" (2010) Colin Firth. *** "Your Sister's Sister" (2011) ** "Liberal Arts" (2012) Josh *+ "Why Stop Now?"
S 350261 350 (In Stereo)'R' Emily Blunt. 'R' Radnor. 'PG-13' (2012)'R'
S** "Deep Impact" (1998, Drama) Robert ** "National Treasure" (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries ** "Deep Impact" (1998) Robert
S 48 33 48 31 34 Duvall,Tea Leoni, Elijah Wood. PG-13 c to steal the Declaration of Independence. 'PG Duvall. PG-13'
TOON 38 58 38 33 Movie Incredible Looney Oblongs King/Hill King/Hill Cleveland Fam.Guy Fam.Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Sandwich Paradise Steak Paradise 'G' Trip Flip Trip Flip Wat Wat Wat Wat Wat Wat
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
(VL1 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Grls GoldGirs Gold Grls GoldGirls oldGirls Gold Girls Gold Girds ForeverYoung 'PG' King King
7 7 *"Gone in Sixty Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special "National Treasure:
0^) 47 32 47 17 18 Seconds"'n Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit '14 Victims Unit '14 Book of Secrets"
n. :1 ih6 1 ii :.ee No CSI: Miami "Manhunt" CSI: Miami "Reality CSI: Miami "Sleepless CSI: Miami "Blood CSI: Miami "Fallen" (In
S 117 69 117 ,i 1 '14' c Kills"'14' in Miami" '14' Sugar '14' cc Stereo)'14' c
(WGN 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay TheVampireDiaries


Dear Annie: My 17-
year-old daughter,
"Kylie," has had
behavioral problems
since she was 14. I am a
single mother I work full
time and also have two
sons, one of whom lives
with his dad. Kylie was in
a hospital for three
months for various evalu-
ations and recently lived
in a residential home.
She was released last Oc-
tober on the condition
that she follow the house
rules, obey curfew, finish
high school,
get a job and
start looking
at colleges.
But Kylie
never fol-
lowed the
rules. She
would go out
on Friday
night and not
return until
Sunday morn-
ing. Every ANN
time she
broke parole MAIL
conditions, it
would be reported. Dur-
ing this time, we had fam-
ily counseling, and an
individual clinician saw
Kylie. They offered help
with r6sum6s, job appli-
cations and social
activities.
In December, Kylie met
a 24-year-old man and
ran off with him. This
young man was dis-
charged from the military
because of psychiatric is-
sues. This scares me to no
end. Kylie is now consid-
ered a missing person, al-
though she's been in
contact via text, telling


me to leave her alone.
There is a warrant out to
take them into custody.
Since then, my home has
been robbed of clothing,
food and jewelry I am
sick over this.
Kylie will be 18 in two
weeks. She has no re-
morse for what she's
done. People tell me to let
her go, but how? I am
angry, but I still love her. I
am losing sleep, I'm
scared in my own home,
my 10-year-old can't sleep
alone, my work is suffer-
ing and I'm a
mess. I've
talked to the
police and am
doing my own
detective work
to find her. I
need help. -
Worried Sick in
Connecticut
Dear Con-
necticut: You
are living every
IE'S parent's night-
mare. We don't
BOX expect you to
stop loving
Kylie, but you have an-
other child who needs
your protection now. For
your own safety and that
of your son, it's time to let
Kylie manage her own
life, good or bad, sink or
swim. If you can send her
a text message, let her
know you love her and
wish her well, but she's
on her own. If she is using
house keys to steal from
you, change your locks.
Report any break-ins to
the police. And please get
some emotional support
for yourself at Because I
Love You (bilyorg).


M Todays MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inver-
ness; 637-3377
"Evil Dead" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4 p.m. No
passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D.
1 p.m., 7:25 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) 3:50
p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) In 3D.
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
7:05 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation"
(PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m. No
passes.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Croods" (PG) 4:15 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.


"Evil Dead" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30
p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG)
4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) In 3D.
1:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Power-
ful" (PG) 1 p.m., 7 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Power-
ful" (PG) In 3D. 4 p.m. No
passes.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation"
(PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 5 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"The Call" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 8 p.m.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Perceived
6 Quahog
10 Cooked
a certain way
15 Water barrier
18 Very, in music
19 Used with another
21 Insect stage
22 Black
24 Blarney -
25 Somewhat
26 Of birds
27 Additional
28 Weight unit
29 Sudden pain
31 Vetoes
33 Complain
35 Fencing sword
37 Ship in Greek myth
38 Refuge
39 Sparkle
40 Curie or
Antoinette
42 Kind of candle
43 Misdemeanor
44 Pill relative
46 Hood
47 Eschew
48 Move quickly
52 Picture shows
53 Kind of red wine
54 Cheap
56 "Dear-- or Madam..."
57 Cognizant
58 Puccini heroine
59 Trick
60 Last Greek letter
62 Auction
63 Cuspid
65 Time per.
66 Like a mechanic's
overalls
67 B'way notice
68 Clue
69 Learning
71 Insertion mark
73 Best or Ferber
75 Black cuckoo
76 Waterway
77 Notable time
78 Cabbage salad
82 Bender
84 On the summit
85 Make ready,
for short


86 Goof
87 Method
90 Honest -
91 Relating to horses
93 Branches
94 Part of the eye
95 Stiff
97 Minor
98 Jeans brand
99 State near Miss.
100 Eisenhower's
predecessor
102 Tantalize
104 Lecturer
105 Helot
107 Arab ruler
108 -Coeur Basilica
109 Judge's decision
110 Cravat
112 Wooden shoe
113 Summarize,
for short
114 Cattleman
117 Mortise
counterpart
118 Bristlelike
structure
119 Diner sign
123 Decreased
124 Man in a wet suit
125 Dedicate
127 Pass away
128 Points
of convergence
129 Picture
131 Magazine
employee
133 Spine
135 Beginner
136 Saltpeter
137 Hubbub
138 Remedied
139 Writer Deighton
140 Fierce look
141 Part of DOD (abbr.)
142 Listens to

DOWN
1 Speed
2 Bar legally
3 In unison (2 wds.)
4 Sprinted
5 Usual food and drink
6 Modify
7 Key-
8 Commedia dell'-


Brooks or Gibson
Pale yellow
Poe's bird
Showy flower
One of the Gabors
Hanging loosely
Kicked downstairs
Approximately
Code name
Ghost
Active
- -do-well
Merchandise
Pavlov or
Turgenev
Edge
Holy Roman -
Vagrant
Hog sound
Toward shelter
"The Thinker" sculptor
Goatee location
Craven one
Island
in British legend
Send
Astound
Lost
Fixes fraudulently
Salver
En -
(all together)
Mickey's girlfriend
Strong alloy
Time past
Augusta's state
Fight
New York team
Kind of school
Gladdened
Jelly fruit
Yoko -
Red color
Place of contest
Wine city in Italy
Simple house
Add yeast to
Supplying
with weapons
A joint
Hit repeatedly
Pucker
Springs
Christmas
Pole on a ship
Lab culture


Liquid measure
Formula
Hearsay
Not genuine (abbr.)
"Blue Angel" girl
Ebbing
Stool
College subject (abbr.)
Old gold coin
Sect


Rational
Witty reply
That girl
Harsh
Insurrection
Floating platform
Seething
Mother-of-pearl
Zoo denizen
Assemble (2 wds.)


I
.1


Love
Worn out
Dispatches
- processing
Silver coin
Engrave
Wire measure
Failure
Color


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


3-31 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


A16 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEws
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and din-
ing hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post. El-
igibility in the Auxiliary is open
to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind Ca-
dence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-


bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Turkey dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, April 5. Cost
is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. VOD presentation.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334. One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or Ar-
mitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-


iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast will be
Saturday, April 20. Everyone
is welcome. The all-you-can-
eat breakfast is served from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost is $5
for adults and $3 for children.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m. Thurs-
days at the post.
Call 352-726-5206 for
information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-637-
0100.
The Men's Auxiliary will
have a spaghetti and meatball
dinner from 3 to 5 p.m. Sun-
day, April 14, at the post. Cost
is $7; everyone is welcome.
Music at 5 p.m. will be by
Southern Silk.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post


237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Nominations for officers will
be taken at the meeting April
23 at 7 p.m. Post election is 1
to 6 p.m. May 28, followed by
the meeting and installation of
officers at 7 p.m.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first, third
and fifth Fridays monthly at
the post home at 4375 Little
Al Point, Inverness. Musicians
welcome. Food and soft drink
are available. Afish fry will be
served on the fourth Friday
from 4 to 6:30 p.m. The fish
fry features fried and baked
haddock, fried chicken fin-
gers, baked potato, baked
beans, coleslaw, tea, lemon-
ade coffee and soft drink for
$8. All musicians are wel-
come, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at


6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email eaglerider
@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.citrus
purpleheart.org or call 352-
382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.


LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at
3 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: April 13 and
May 11.
SERVICES & GROUPS
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 2, at
the Village Inn Restaurant in
Beverly Hills. The group will
discuss final details for the up-
coming April 20 golf tourna-
ment which is the primary
fundraiser for the 11 th Veter-
ans Gathering in March 2014.
All veterans who would like to
participate with the organiza-
tion are welcome. The mis-
sion of WG is to assist
veterans and to keep alive the
memory of fallen comrades in
Southeast Asia and other the-
aters of operation.
For more information, call
Tom Neaman at 352-586-
7126.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultra
rayl997@yahoo.com.

See VETERANS/Page A18


ST 35415 / -
Becky's Travel Store
PRINCESS CRUISES


S S S * S
urcuaveup to $2,000N* I on1~I


HMnl,'m ,Interior Balcony
12-Day CGreek Isles- May-Nov. 2013 Between Rome & Venice $1,779* $2,379*
12-Day British Isles May-Aug. 2013 Roundtrip Southampton $1,839* $2,539*
11-Day Scand. & Russia *May-Aug. 2013 Roundtrip Copenhagen $1,869* $2,669*
7-Day Voyage of Glaciers June-Sept. 2013 Between Vancouver & Whittier
Taxes and fees already included *some restrictions apply $899* $1,559*
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ( 5 OO8 5
Located Next to Winn Dixie (552) 527-8855


If you want to

advertise here in the


Great Getaways


call 563-5592


---I


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wedding

Carroll/Schoenauer


Danielle Carroll of
Tampa and formerly of In-
verness exchanged vows
with Tim Schoenauer of
Tampa at Lake Mirror in
Lakeland March 16. Minis-
ter Elvin Harper officiated
at the ceremony
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Richard and Jamie
Carroll of Ennis, Texas,
and Lanny and Roberta
Rowe of Ocala. Her grand-
mother is Janice Rolph of
Crystal River The groom
is the son of Bob Schoe-
nauer and Margie Schoe-
nauer and Paul Star all of
Treasure Island.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father
She wore an embroidered
corset princess ball gown
with a pick up layered
skirt, and brooch bouquet
she made.
The matron of honor
was Karolyn Wilson of

Wedding


obir

Gaffney/Kit

Joelyn Gaffney of Bev-
erly Hills and Theodore
Kit of Lecanto exchanged
wedding vows March 1 at
the Citrus Hills Country
Club. The Christian cere-
mony was performed by
Chaplain Donna Viglione
from The Wedding Chapel
in Inverness.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of John and Jacqueline
Gaffney of Beverly Hills.
The groom's parents are
Siegfried Kit of Brent-
wood, Calif., and Iva and
George Billick of
Seveirville, Tenn.
The maid of honor was
Dawn Bass and John
Lawrence Jr was the best
man.
The bridesmaids were
Lisa Sutherland and
Karen Proulx. Flower girls
were Briauna LaPointe
and Kirstin Lawrence and
the ringbearers were
Logan Billick and Bradley
DeJesus.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 18, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. All are welcome.
Those who ordered a AFA
chapter jacket can pick it up
at this meeting. Call Mike
Emig at 352-854-8328 for
more information.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. To make an appointment
to meet with the case man-
ager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-


Riverview. Bridesmaids
were Crystal dePoo of In-
verness, Renee dePoo of
Inverness, Tara Doolittle
of Inverness, Kelly Wolf of
Orlando, Denise Steele of
Medford, Ore., Megan
Schoenauer of Emmaus,
Pa., and Brittany Schoe-
nauer Junior bridesmaids


were Sydney Cantrell and
Gillian Cantrell.
The best man was John
Holloway of Inverness.
Groomsmen were Rob
Schoenauer, of Emmaus,
Pa., Mike Cantrell of St.
Petersburg, Steve Cantrell
of Inverness, Mike Doolit-
tle, of Inverness, Mike Va-
lerius of Plant City,
Brendan Brunner of Talla-
hassee and Nate Gist of In-
verness. Ushers were
Lance Rowe of Ocala and
Aubrey Carroll of Ennis,
Texas.
Both the bride and the
groom are graduates of
Citrus High School. The
bride is a hairstylist at
d'amico Hair Lounge and
the groom is a conductor
for CSX.
Following a honeymoon
at Sandals, Montego Bay,
Jamaica, the couple is at
home in Tampa.


In SERVICE


Zachary L.
Weygandt

Air Force Airman Zachary
L. Weygandt graduated from
basic military training at Lack-
land Air Force Base, San
Antonio.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical
fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic


training earn
four credits
toward an
associate in
applied sci-
ence degree
through the
Community
Zachary L. College of
Weygandt the Air
U.S. Air Force. Force.
Weygandt
is the son of Connie Wey-
gandt of Dunnellon and Jeff
Weygandt of Homosassa.
He is a 2012 graduate of
Crystal River High School.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


HEIAIRD C LIAIM F R I ED DAIME
A S S AI S H A ED LARVA EBON
S T ON E PA RT AVIANYM OR E
T O N TWI N G E N XES GIR O U S E
E P EE R GO H AVEN G L I T TE R
MAR I E ROMANECRIIME
CAPL ET ROBI S-HU DART
MO VIES MEDOC ST I NG Y S IR
A-WA RE MIMI STUNT OMEGA
S A LE C NIN E C EN GIRE AS Y
S RO H NT LO11R E CAIRIET M
E DNAN I CA N AL E RIA S LA W
SPREE ATOP PREP ERR
S.8_.Y BS E EQ UINER AMI
PUP I L R I G D URS LE V I S
SE TIRIU R SAC SE R LIO NG

AISICOTESABOT RE CA
RANCHER TENON SETA EAT
B A TED D I DE V OT.E DI
FOC I I M A GE D I TOR THORN
TI R O NI T ER UM U L T icU RED
LEN GLARE D UPT HE DS
4-7 (D 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Open spots still remain
for those couples and individ-
uals interested in taking a trip
to Hawaii with a group of vet-
erans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, coor-
dinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for
Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Partici-
pants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai
(Marriott), Hawaii (stay in the
KMC inside the volcano) and
Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
Reservations should be made
as soon as possible.
Call McLean at 352-637-
5131, or email dmclean8@


KYOTO
Continued from Page A15

centers around a parade
that highlights various pe-
riods in Japanese history
MAKE A PILGRIMAGE:
When you're ready to visit
temples and shrines, the
challenge is choosing
which ones. Kiyomizu tem-
ple should be on any itin-
erary Yes, it's choked with
tourists, but worth the trip.
The walk uphill to the tem-
ple is lined with shops,
many giving out samples of
the local sweet called
"nama yatsuhashi," deli-
cious pockets of glutinous
rice flour, filled with red
bean paste or fruit pre-
serves, dusted with sugar
or cinnamon.
We also enjoyed an out-
ing to Fushimi Inari, a
shrine known for its gates,
which are said to number
in the thousands. The
shrine's main buildings
are worth a visit and sit
within a minute or two of a
train station, but you could
spend hours here climbing
the forested hill behind
the shrine, on paths that
lead up through the bright
red gates to ancillary
shrines, with refreshment
stops along the way


WHAT TO EAT: Japan is
one of the world's great
food countries. But while
Kyoto is known for ultra-
expensive and delicate
kaiseki cuisine, there's lots
more that kids will love
and that you can afford. So
try a restaurant specializ-
ing in okonomiyaki, sort of
a dinner pancake, usually
cooked on a grill at your
table, and filled with meat,
vegetables or seafood of
your choice. These are ca-
sual and reasonably
priced places, often popu-
lar with students.
Chances are your kids
will also like yakitori, a se-
lection of chicken and veg-
etables, usually sprinkled
with salt or brushed with a
soy-based sauce, and
grilled on bamboo skew-
ers. It's traditionally bar
food, but is also often
served at some of the
chain restaurants that
offer wide menus.
And don't forget ramen,
the steaming bowls of noo-
dles, with toppings like
roast pork, in your choice
of broth. We arrived in
Kyoto late our first night
and ended up on a floor de-
voted to ramen places in a
department store strad-
dling the train station. Most
ramen places also serve
gyoza, fried dumplings that


are hard to resist.
WHERE TO STAY: It
can be challenging for a
family to travel in a coun-
try where accommoda-
tions are frequently priced
by the person, and Kyoto
has no lack of exquisite,
but expensive lodgings.
But there are bargains, es-
pecially if you're willing to
make do without luxuries.
Some of the streets just
north of Kyoto's train sta-
tion are home to small inns,
some of which offer good
deals. We found a bargain
at Ryokan Ginkaku, a spare
but well-kept lodge popu-
lar with Japanese tour
groups, where a Japanese-
style room with four futons
cost 8700 yen ($94) a night
in August The only catch
for the rate was you had to
provide your own towel or
rent one at the desk.
Japan has also seen a
proliferation of budget ho-
tels in recent years. One of
the biggest chains is
Toyoko Inn, which has
multiple locations in
Kyoto, and where a "twin
room" (in Japan, that
means a room with two
small double beds), cost
less than 10,000 yen ($108).
To look for deals, consider
using an online search en-
gine. One that works well
in Asia is agoda.com.


tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-
rial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed
to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. Call
the Citrus Team Office at 352-
527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann Sand-
strom is associated with the
national service organization,
Yoga For Vets. Free classes
to combat veterans are of-
fered by her at several loca-
tions and times. Call her at
352-382-7397.


A18 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013











SPORTS


UF played
its Orange and
Blue spring
scrimmage
Saturday./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 MLB/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 TV, lottery/B3
0 Golf, NBA, NHL/B4
0 Recreation briefs/B5
0 Basketball/B5
0 Golf, auto racing/B6
0 Sports briefs/B6


Rays' early lead good enough for triumph


Cobb, Johnson

pace Tampa Bay

to 6-0 victory

Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Alex
Cobb scattered four hits in 7 1/3
innings, Kelly Johnson home-
red and the Tampa Bay Rays
beat the Cleveland Indians 6-0
on Saturday night.
Cobb (1-0) struck out six and
walked three as the Rays
blanked Cleveland for the sec-
ond consecutive game. Joel Per-
alta and Cesar Ramos
completed a five-hitter
Tampa Bay got its first hit
when Jose Molina had a one-


out single in the fourth. Johnson
followed with a two-run homer
that put the Rays up 3-0.
Indians catcher Lou Marson
left the game in the fourth with a
cervical-neck strain, when he had
a jarring collision with Desmond


Jennings.
Jennings
walked leading
off the third,
stole second
and third be-
fore being
thrown out at
home on Matt


Tampa Bay
* For the box sc
Tampa Bay Ra
Indians game
story's jump t


Joyce's grounder. Jennings
slammed hard with Marson,
who held onto third baseman
Lonnie Chisenhall's throw.
Marson was replaced by des-
ignated hitter Carlos Santana.
The moves forced Indians
starter Trevor Bauer into the


lineup. He struck out in the
fifth.
Bauer (0-1) had control prob-
lems in his Cleveland debut,
walking his first four batters
and seven overall in five in-
nings. The right-hander, ob-
tained in an
box score offseason trade
with Arizona as
:ore for the part of a three-
ays-Cleveland team deal and
, follow the recalled before
o B3. the game from
Triple A
Columbus, gave
up three runs, two hits and had
two strikeouts during an 105-
pitch outing.
The Rays won the series
opener when Matt Moore and
three relievers combined on a
See Page B3


Associated Press
Cleveland Indians catcher Lou Marson tags out Tampa Bay Rays base
runner Matt Joyce at home after Joyce tagged up and attempted to
score on a fly ball to end the first inning Saturday in St. Petersburg.


Car ds f ly into title game


Louisvil hold of

Wichita St, will

play Michigan
Associated Press h.
ATLANTA The deficit was "
getting bigger, the clock becom- ... .-
ing an enemy and Louisville's -
options were dwindling.
"I just kept telling the guys...
'We're going to make a run. It's
about defense,"' coach Rick
Pitino said. "The tempo is not
ours. Give them their credit, but
the bench won the game for us
tonight. Unbelievable display"
Impressive comeback, too.
Luke Hancock came off the
bench to score 20 points, walk-
on Tim Henderson sparked a
second-half rally with a pair of
monster 3s and Louisville ad-
vanced to the NCAA title game
Saturday night, escaping with a
72-68 victory over Wichita State.
Now the Cardinals (34-5) will
try and win it all for their emo-
tional leader on the bench, in-
jured Kevin Ware. As the final
buzzer sounded, Ware stood up,
grinning as he thrust his arms
above his head. _
Louisville will play Michigan,
who beat Syracuse 61-56, for the..
national title Monday night It is
the Cardinals' first trip to the
title game since they won it all
in 1986.
"We just played super hard,"
said Russ Smith, who led the
Cardinals with 21 points. "No-
body wanted to go home."
Cleanthony Early had 24 for
the ninth-seeded Shockers
(30-9), who nearly pulled off
their biggest upset of all.
Wichita State had knocked off
No. 1 seed Gonzaga and Ohio
See Page B3 .

NCAA Final Four. '
All Times EDT
At The Georgia Dome
Atlanta
National Semifinals ,
Saturday, April 6
Louisville 72, Wichita State 68 I
Michigan 61, Syracuse 56
National Championship Associated Press
Monday, April 8
Louisville (34-5)vs. Michigan(31-7), 9p.m. Louisville's Gorgui Dieng blocks a shot by Wichita State's Fred Van Vleet during the second half of the NCAA Final Four tournament
college basketball semifinal game Saturday in Atlanta. Louisville will play Michigan, who beat Syracuse 61-56, on Monday for the NCAA title.


------------------------------------------------------------------


I HE M UP!


Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check Tire Pressure on All 4 Tires
27-Point Inspection
Battery Test
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! W
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchas.i elsewhere
iL i a- l l l l i- i- i l l i l l l l l l l i


LIOVE SERIVC IIJ.IM


I I *I


S V FREE
3 Alignment
SAVE E13 % 111
You decide the service you need Ch ek swess
& wel give you the discount! Vaid at Love Chevy o LoveHonda Pres may vary y odeli
i ,,,, - ,,,. ,,,, ,, ,,, ... .. ,, ,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,-i-,,-,-,


I I


I I *I


FR Oil Change
F E & Tire Rotation
4*Wheel Alignment Q4 05
Willth The Purchase of 4 Tires I $3 ,9
Valid at Love Chevy or Love Honda Prices may vary by model
A-L --------- -- -- ------


2209 Highway 44 West Inverness, FL 34453
352.341.0018
lovechevysales.comx
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt.; 9AM-6PM Sat.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt.; 8AM-Noon Sat.


Horid~


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovehoncda.com.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt.; 9AM-6PM Sat.; 11AM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Fri.; 8AM-2PM Sat.


WYSJ


m






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
New York




Atlanta
Washington
New York
Philadelphia
Miami


East Division
Pct GB WC
.600 -
.600 -
.600 -
.400 1 1
.200 2 2


East Division
GB WC


NL

Nationals 7, Reds 6,
11 innings
Washington Cincinnati
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Span cf 6 0 0 0 Choo cf 5 1 2 1
Werth rf 5 2 3 1 Heisey If 6 0 1 0
Harperlf 5 1 2 2 Vottolb 4 2 1 0
Zmrmn 3b 4 0 0 0 Phillips2b 6 2 2 1
Tracy b 5 0 1 0 Brucerf 6 1 2 0
Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 5 0 3 2
Dsmndss 5 1 1 1 Cozartss 4 0 1 0
Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0 Mesorcc 4 0 0 0
WRamsc 4 2 2 3 Leakep 2 0 1 0
Detwilr p 2 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 DRonsn ph 1 0 0 0
Storen p 0 00 0 Simon p 0 0 0 0
Berndn ph 1 0 0 0 Paul ph 1 0 0 0
RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Broxtn p 0 0 0 0
TMoorelb 1 00 0 Chpmnp 0 00 0
Hannhnph 1 0 0 0
Hoover p 0 00 0
Totals 42 7107 Totals 45613 4
Washington002 002 100 02 7
Cincinnati 000 100 022 01 6
E-Desmond 2 (4), Harper (1). DP-Washing-
ton 2, Cincinnati 1. LOB-Washington 6, Cincin-
nati 11. 2B-Werth (1), Espinosa (2), Phillips 2
(3), Frazier (2). 3B-Votto (1). HR-Werth (2),
Harper (3), Desmond (1), W.Ramos 2 (2), Choo
(3). S-Cozart.
IP H RERBBSO
Washington
Detwiler 6 6 1 0 1 1
Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 2
Storen 1 3 2 1 0 2
R.SorianoBS,1-3 1 2 2 2 0 0
StammenW,1-0 2 2 1 1 1 4
Cincinnati
Leake 6 6 4 4 4 4
LeCure 1 2 1 1 0 0
Simon 1 0 0 0 0 0
Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 3
Hoover L,0-2 1 2 2 2 0 1
Mets 7, Marlins 3
Miami NewYork
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Pierre If 4 2 2 0 Baxter rf 3 2 1 0
Polanc3b 5 1 1 0 DnMrp2b 4 1 1 1
Stanton rf 4 0 2 0 DWrght 3b 4 2 3 1
Dobbslb 4 0 2 2 I.Davislb 3 1 2 0
Ruggincf 4 0 0 0 Buckc 2 0 1 4
Olivo c 4 0 2 0 Duda If 2 0 0 0
Hchvrr ss 3 0 1 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0
Solano 2b 4 0 1 0 Parnellp 0 00 0
Nolascop 3 0 0 0 Niwnhscf 4 0 0 0
Webbp 0 00 0 RTejad ss 4 00 0
Quallsp 0 00 0 Niesep 2 00 0
Coghlnph 1 00 0 Atchisnp 0 00 0
Edgin p 0 0 0 0
VIdspnph 1 0 0 0
Cowgill lf 1 1 1 1
Totals 36 3112 Totals 307 9 7
Miami 100 010 100 3
NewYork 100 002 31x 7
E-Olivo 2 (2), R.Tejada (4). DP-Miami 1, New
York 1. LOB-Miami 8, New York 6. 2B-Buck
(1).3B-Dan.Murphy (1). HR-Cowgill (2). SB-
Baxter (1), D.Wright (3). SF-Buck 2.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
Nolasco 51-36 3 3 3 3
WebbL,0-1 12-32 3 2 2 0
Quails 1 1 1 1 0 1
New York
Niese 6 8 2 1 2 5
AtchisonH,1 2-3 1 1 1 0 0
EdginBS,1 -1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
LyonW,1-0H,1 1 1 0 0 0 2
Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 1
Braves 6, Cubs 5
Chicago Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
DeJesscf 5 1 1 0 BUptoncf 4 1 2 1
SCastro ss 5 1 1 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 0 0
Rizzolb 5 1 2 2 J.Uptonlf 5 3 3 2
ASorinlf 4 0 1 0 Fremnib 4 1 1 1
Schrhltrf 5 1 2 1 Uggla2b 4 1 1 0
Castilloc 5 02 1 JFrncs 3b 4 0 1 0
Valuen 3b 4 1 2 1 Laird c 3 0 2 0
AIGnzlz2b 5 0 1 0 R.Penass 4 0 1 2
Villanvp 3 0 1 0 Tehernp 1 0 1 0
Russell p 0 0 0 0 JSchafr ph 1 0 0 0
Clevngrph 0 0 0 0 CMrtnzp 0 0 0 0
Fujikwp 0 0 0 0 CJhnsnph 1 0 0 0
Marmlp 0 0 0 0 Varvarp 0 0 0 0
Gearrinp 0 0 0 0
RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0
OFIhrtp 0 0 0 0
Totals 41 5135 Totals 35612 6
Chicago 100 130 000 5
Atlanta 100 000 032 6
One out when winning run scored.
E-J.Francisco (2). DP-Chicago 1. LOB-
Chicago 12, Atlanta 8.2B-DeJesus (1),
Schierholtz (1), J.Upton (1), Laird (2). HR-
Rizzo (2), Valbuena (1), B.Upton (1), J.Upton 2
(5). SB-Castillo (1). CS-B.Upton (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
Villanueva 62-36 1 1 2 6
Russell 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Fujikawa 1 4 3 3 1 1
MarmolL,0-1 1-3 2 2 2 0 0
Atlanta
Teheran 5 8 5 5 1 2
C.Martinez 2 2 0 0 0 0
Varvaro 1-3 2 0 0 1 0
Gearrin 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
O'FlahertyW,1 -0 1 1 0 0 1 1
Cardinals 6, Giants 3
St. Louis San Francisco
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Jay cf 4 0 0 0 Pagan cf 5 1 2 0
MCrpnt 3b 4 2 2 1 Scutaro 2b 4 0 1 0
Hollidylf 5 1 1 1 Sandovl3b 4 1 2 2
Boggsp 0 00 0 Poseyc 4 01 0
Craigib 3 0 1 0 Pencerf 3 1 1 1
Beltranrf 4 0 2 3 Beltilb 3 0 0 0
YMolinc 4 0 0 0 GBlanc If 1 0 0 0
Descals2b 4 1 1 0 Ariasph 1 0 0
Kozmass 4 1 3 1 Kontosp 0 00 0
SMillerp 2 00 0 HSnchzph 1 00 0
Choatep 0 00 0 J.Lopezp 0 00 0
Salasp 0 0 0 0 SCasilp 0 00 0
Mujicap 0 0 0 0 BCrwfrss 3 0 0 0
SRonsnph-lfl 1 1 0 Vglsngp 2 00 0
Mijaresp 0 0 0 0
Torres If 2 0 0 0
Totals 35 6116 Totals 333 7 3
St. Louis 100 031 001 6
San Francisco 011 000 010 3
DP-St. Louis 1, San Francisco 1. LOB-St.
Louis 6, San Francisco 8.2B-Posey (1). HR-
Sandoval (2), Pence (2). SB-Descalso (1),
Pence (1). S-Jay, S.Miller.
IP H RERBBSO
St. Louis
S.MillerW, 1-0 51-34 2 2 4 4
ChoateH,1 2-3 0 0 0 1 0
SalasH,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
MujicaH,3 1 2 1 1 0 1
BoggsS,1-2 1 1 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
Vogelsong L,0-1 51-39 5 5 2 6
Mijares 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kontos 2 0 0 0 0 1
J.Lopez 1-3 2 1 1 0 0


S.Casilla 2-3 0 0 0 0 0


Str Home
L-1 1-1
L-1 0-0
W-2 3-2
W-1 2-3
L-2 1-2



Str Home
W-2 4-1
W-1 3-0
W-1 3-2
W-1 1-1
L-1 0-0


Cincinnati
Chicago
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee


Central Division
Pct GB WC L10
.600 3-2
.400 1 12 2-3
.400 1 12 2-3
.250 lY2 2 1-3
.200 2 2Y2 1-4


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Chicago 3 2 .600 3-2 W-1 3-2 0-0
Detroit 3 2 .600 3-2 W-2 2-0 1-2
Minnesota 3 2 .600 3-2 W-1 2-1 1-1
Cleveland 2 3 .400 1 1 2-3 L-3 0-0 2-3
Kansas City 2 3 .400 1 1 2-3 L-1 0-0 2-3

NATIONAL LEAGUE


West Division
Pct GB WC
.667 --
.600 Y2 -
.500 1 Y2
.400 lY2 1
.200 2Y2 2


Oakland
Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston




Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
Los Angeles
San Diego


Str Home
W-4 2-2
L-1 1-1
L-1 0-0
W-1 0-0
L-4 1-4



Str Home
W-3 2-1
W-3 1-0
L-1 1-1
W-1 2-2
L-1 0-0


Associated Press
Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Max Scherzer throws during the first inning Saturday against the New York
Yankees in Detroit.




Tigers double up Yankees


Associated Press

DETROIT Miguel Cabrera
drove in one of four runs in the
fifth inning on a 4-for-4 day and
the Detroit Tigers beat the New
York Yankees 8-4 Saturday.
Max Scherzer (1-0) gave up four
runs in five-plus innings to pick
up the win in a shaky start, his
first of the season.
Phil Hughes (0-1) allowed four
runs three earned on eight
hits in four-plus innings on a day
he was originally scheduled to
make a rehabilitation start in the
minors.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Blue Jays 5, Red Sox 0
TORONTO John Lackey left with
an injured biceps in his first start since
September 2011, grabbing his right
arm in pain and coming out in the fifth
inning as the Boston Red Sox lost to
the Toronto Blue Jays 5-0.
Lackey (0-1) missed last season
following elbow ligament-replacement
surgery in November 2011. He al-
lowed a two-run homer to J.P. Aren-
cibia in the fourth, and then clutched
his arm and jumped around the
mound in pain after throwing low and
inside to Jose Reyes on a 2-2 pitch
with one out in the fifth

Angels 8, Rangers 4
ARLINGTON, Texas- Albert Pujols
homered twice to offset another tough
day for Josh Hamilton in his second
game back in Texas, and the Los An-
geles Angels beat the Rangers 8-4.
Pujols hit a two-run shot to the lawn
in center field off Matt Harrison in the
first inning and watched Hamilton
strike out twice and fly out behind him
after taking three intentional walks.
Mark Trumbo also had a two-run
homer in the first against Harrison (0-2).

White Sox 4, Mariners 3
CHICAGO -Alex Rios hit a
tiebreaking, two-run homer off Felix
Hernandez in the sixth inning and the
Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle
Mariners 4-3.
With one out and Alejandro De Aza
aboard after a leadoff single, Rios
drove an 0-2 pitch through a tricky wind
and way over the wall in left for his sec-
ond homer in two days.
Hernandez (1-1) allowed four runs
and six hits over 6 1-3 innings in his
first try for win No. 100.

Twins 6, Orioles 5
BALTIMORE Justin Morneau
singled in the tiebreaking run with two
outs in the ninth inning after an error
by Chris Davis, and the Minnesota
Twins got a home run from Chris Par-
malee in a 6-5 victory over the Balti-
more Orioles.
Although Davis picked up his 17th
RBI, he failed to become the first
player in major league history to
homer in the first five games of the
season. The first baseman also
opened the door for the Twins to
snatch their first win in Baltimore since
April 21, 2011.
With the score tied at 5, Baltimore
turned to closer Jim Johnson (0-1) in
the ninth. Davis let a one-out grounder
byAaron Hicks roll through his legs,
and after a two-out walk to Josh Willing-
ham, Morneau singled up the middle.

Athletics 6, Astros 3
HOUSTON Coco Crisp, Jed
Lowrie and Seth Smith homered to


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Boston 0
Chicago White Sox 4, Seattle 3
L.A. Angels 8, Texas 4
Detroit 8, N.Y Yankees 4
Philadelphia 4, Kansas City 3
Minnesota 6, Baltimore 5
Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 0
Oakland 6, Houston 3
Today's Games
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 0-1) at Detroit (Verlander 1-
0), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 1-0) at Toronto (Dickey 0-1), 1:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 0-1) at Philadelphia (Hamels
0-1), 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota (PHernandez 0-0) at Baltimore (Hammel
1-0), 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 1-0) at Tampa Bay (Price 0-
0), 1:40 p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 0-1) at Houston (Harrell 0-1),
2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 1-0) at Chicago White Sox (Sale
1-0), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 0-0) at Texas (Darvish 1-0),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Boston, 2:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturday's Games
N.Y Mets 7, Miami 3
Washington 7, Cincinnati 6, 11 innings
St. Louis 6, San Francisco 3
Philadelphia 4, Kansas City 3
Arizona 9, Milwaukee 2
Atlanta 6, Chicago Cubs 5
San Diego at Colorado, late
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's Games
Miami (Fernandez 0-0) at N.Y Mets (Laffey 0-0), 1:10
p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 1-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 0-
0), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 1-0) at Atlanta (Hudson
0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 0-1) at Philadelphia (Hamels
0-1), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (Kennedy 1-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 0-0),
2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 0-1) at San Francisco (M.Cain
0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 0-1) at Colorado (Chacin 0-0),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

back up a solid performance by starter
Bartolo Colon in his return from a drug
suspension, and the Oakland Athletics
beat the Houston Astros 6-3.
It was the first appearance for
Colon (1-0) since he received a 50-
game suspension for a positive testos-
terone test Aug. 22.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Braves 6, Cubs 5
ATLANTA- B.J. Upton led off the
ninth inning with a homer and his
brother Justin followed one out later
with another long ball that helped the
Atlanta Braves rally past embattled
Chicago Cubs closer Carlos Marmol
for a 6-5 victory.
Justin Upton went 3 for 5 with three
RBIs. He also homered in the first and
now has five homers in Atlanta's first
five games.
The Braves rallied from a 5-1
deficit with three runs in the eighth
off Kyuji Fukijawa and two in the
ninth off Marmol.
Justin Upton's solo shot in the first
inning made it 1-all. He followed with
leadoff double in the eighth and
scored the first of three Atlanta runs
that cut the lead to 5-4.

Mets 7, Marlins 3
NEW YORK John Buck drove in
four runs and was part of a rare um-


pire's call that helped the New York
Mets beat the Miami Marlins 7-3.
Collin Cowgill homered, David
Wright got three hits and slumping Ike
Davis added a pair of singles to lift the
Mets on a brisk afternoon at Citi Field.
New York led 3-2 in the seventh in-
ning moments before plate umpire Jim
Joyce made the unusual call.
Juan Pierre was at second base and
Greg Dobbs hit a two-out single. Pierre
dashed home easily with the tying run
as right fielder Mike Baxter's throw was
10 feet wide of Buck at the plate. Pierre
crossed home but then collided with
Buck as the catcher planted to try and
throw out Dobbs at second.

Nationals 7,
Reds 6, 11 innings
CINCINNATI lan Desmond
made two errors at shortstop that
helped the Cincinnati Reds send the
game to extra innings, then led off the
11th with his first homer of the season
to rally the Washington Nationals to a
7-6 victory.
The Nationals were coming off a
15-0 loss in the series opener, their
most lopsided defeat since baseball
returned to Washington in 2005. The
Reds hit six homers in that one.

Cardinals 6, Giants 3
SAN FRANCISCO Carlos Bel-
tran hit a go-ahead two-run single in
the fifth against his former team and
Shelby Miller beat the reigning World
Series champion San Francisco Gi-
ants in his second career start, spoil-
ing Buster Posey's MVP party with a
6-3 win for the St. Louis Cardinals.
Pete Kozma had three hits, drove in
a run and scored for St. Louis from the
No. 8 spot in the order, Matt Holliday
singled in a run and Matt Carpenter
added an RBI single in the ninth.
Beltran also hit an RBI single in the
first against Ryan Vogelsong in a
matchup of the teams that won the past
three World Series and a rematch of
last fall's NL championship series won
in seven games by the Giants.

Diamondbacks 9,
Brewers 2
MILWAUKEE- Jason Kubel, Paul
Goldschmidt and Aaron Hill each
homered in Arizona's 9-2 victory over
the injury-depleted Milwaukee Brewers.
Kubel's two-run homer gave the Di-
amondbacks a 3-2 lead in the fourth.
Goldschmidt then hit a two-run drive in
the fourth to make it 6-2. Hill's solo
shot capped the scoring in the eighth
after his RBI double in the first gave
Arizona a 1-0 lead.
Starter Patrick Corbin (1-0) gave up
a run in each of the first two innings,
but settled in to win his season debut.
The right-hander gave up two runs on
eight hits and one walk with two strike-
outs in six innings.
Interleague

Phillies 4, Royals 3
PHILADELPHIA- Pinch-hitter
Kevin Frandsen hit a bases-clearing,
three-run double with two outs in the
ninth off closer Greg Holland to lift the
Phillies to a 4-3 victory over the Kansas
City Royals in front of the smallest
crowd in Philadelphia in four years.
The Phillies had just two hits and
trailed 3-1 to start the inning. Holland
(0-1) walked Chase Utley, Ryan
Howard and Michael Young to load
the bases. After two strikeouts, Frand-
sen ripped a first-pitch fastball to right-
center to knock in all three runners.


AL

Blue Jays 5,
Red Sox 0


Boston

Ellsury cf
Victorn rf
Pedroia 2b
Napoli1lb
Mdlrks 3b
JGoms dh
D.Ross c
BrdlyJr If
Ciriaco ss
Totals
Boston
Toronto


Toronto


ab r h bi
4 0 1 0 Reyesss
2 0 0 0 RDavis rf
b 4 0 1 0 MeCarrlIf
4 0 0 0 Encrnclib
3 0 0 0 Lind dh
3 0 0 0 Arencii c
3 0 0 0 DeRosa 3b
3 00 0 Rasms cf
2 0 0 0 Bonifac 2b
28 02 0 Totals
000 000 000
000 203 00x


ab r h bi
3 02 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 1 0
4 0 0
3 2 1 0
4 1 2 2
3 1 0 0
4 1 1 3
3 00 0
325 8 5
0
5


E-Arencibia (1). LOB-Boston 4, Toronto 6.
2B-Ellsbury (1), Arencibia (3). HR-Arencibia
(3), Rasmus (2). SB-Ellsbury 2 (3), Reyes (2),
Lind (1). CS-Victorino (1).
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Lackey L,0-1 41-35 2 2 1 8
Aceves 32-33 3 3 2 5
Toronto
HappW,1-0 51-31 0 0 3 6
DelabarH,1 12-30 0 0 0 2
Loup 1 0 0 0 0 2
Santos 1 1 0 0 0 1
WP-Happ.
Umpires-Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Bob
Davidson; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, James
Hoye.
T-2:38. A-45,797 (49,282).
Angels 8, Rangers 4
Los Angeles Texas
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Trout If 5 0 2 0 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 1
Aybarss 4 1 1 1 Andrusss 4 1 1 0
Pujols dh 2 22 3 Brkmn dh 3 0 1 0
Hamltn rf 4 1 0 0 LGarci ph-dh 1 0 0 0
Trumolb 5 2 2 2 Beltre3b 4 0 1 0
HKndrc 2b 4 00 0 DvMrp If 4 0 1 1
Callasp 3b 3 0 2 0 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 1
lannett c 4 1 1 1 Przyns c 4 0 1 0
Bourjoscf 4 1 2 1 Morlndlb 4 1 1 1
LMartn cf 4 0 1 0
Totals 35 8128 Totals 364 9 4
Los Angeles 410 002 100 8
Texas 002 001 001 4
E-Beltre (1). DP-Texas 1. LOB-Los Angeles
9, Texas 5.2B-Aybar (2), Trumbo (2), Callaspo
(1), Berkman (3), Beltre (1). 3B-Dav.Murphy
(1). HR-Pujols 2 (2), Trumbo (1), Bourjos (1),
Kinsler (2), N.Cruz (1), Moreland (1). SB-An-
drus (1). S-Callaspo. SF-Aybar, lannetta.
IP H RERBBSO
Los Angeles
HansonW,1-0 6 6 3 3 0 4
S.Burnett 1 1 0 0 0 2
Jepsen 1 1 0 0 0 1
Frieri 1 1 1 1 0 2
Texas
M.Harrison L,0-2 5 8 5 5 4 3
Frasor 2-3 2 2 2 0 0
J.Ortiz 2 2 1 0 1 1
R.Ross 11-30 0 0 1 0
WP-Hanson 2.
Umpires-Home, Wally Bell; First, Larry
Vanover; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Manny
Gonzalez.
T-3:00. A-47,201 (48,114).
Tigers 8, Yankees 4


New York

Gardnr cf
Cano 2b
Youkils 3b
Hafner dh
Wells If
Boesch rf
Cervelli c
Overay 1ib
J.Nix ss
ISuzuki ph
Totals
New York
Detroit


Detroit


ab r h bi
5 0 0 0 AJcksn cf
3 1 0 0 TrHntrrf
2 1 1 0 MiCarr3b
3 1 1 1 Fielder lb
3 1 1 1 VMrtnzdh
4 0 1 0 Dirks If
3 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss
4 0 2 2 Avila c
3 0 0 0 RSantg 2b
h 1 0 0 0
31 46 4 Totals
010 003 000
100 042 01x


ab r h bi
5 33 0
5 2 3 1
4 2 4 1
3 1 1 2
3 0 1 1
4 0 2 2
5 0 2 1
4 0 1 0
4 0 0 0

37817 8
4
8


E-J.Nix (1), Boesch (1). DP-New York 2, De-
troit 2. LOB-NewYork 6, Detroit 11.2B-Youkilis
(3), Overbay (1), Tor.Hunter (2), Mi.Cabrera (1),
Jh.Peralta (1). 3B-Boesch (1). HR-Wells (2).
CS-Fielder(1).SF-Fielder,V.Martinez, Dirks.
IP H RERBBSO
New York
PHughesL,0-1 4 8 4 3 0 4
Logan 1-3 2 1 0 0 0
Phelps 22-36 2 2 1 2
Chamberlain 1 1 1 1 2 1
Detroit
ScherzerW,l-0 5 5 4 4 2 7
Alburquerque H,2 1 1 0 0 2 0
D.DownsH,2 2 0 0 0 1 2
Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 1
Scherzer pitched to 3 batters in the 6th.
RP.Hughes pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
HBP-by Scherzer (Youkilis).WP-Chamberlain.
Umpires-Home, Jerry Layne; First, Brian
O'Nora; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third,
Alan Porter.
T-3:28. A-42,453 (41,255).
Twins 6, Orioles 5


Minnesota
ab
Hicks cf 5
Mauerc 5
Wlngh If 2
Mornea lb 5
Doumitdh 5
Plouffe 3b 2
EEscor3b-ssO
Parmel rf 3
Dozier 2b 3


Baltimore
r h bi
1 0 0 McLothlIf
0 1 0 Machd 3b
1 0 0 Markks rf
2 3 1 A.Jones cf
1 2 1 C.Davislb
0 0 1 Wieters c
00 0 Hardyss
1 2 2 Flahrty 2b
0 0 1 Reimld dh


ab r h bi

4 32 0
5 1 4 0
4 02 3
3 0 1 1
4 00 0
4 00 0
4000
4000


Flormnss 2 0 1 0
Carroll ph-3bl 0 0 0
Totals 33 69 6 Totals 37511 4
Minnesota 014 000 001 6
Baltimore 201 020 000 5
E-Worley (1), C.Davis (1), Wieters (2). DP-
Minnesota 1. LOB-Minnesota 8, Baltimore 7.
2B-Doumit (3), Markakis 2 (2). HR-Parmelee
(1). CS-Hicks (1), E.Escobar (1). SF-Plouffe,
Dozier.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Worley 5 10 5 4 1 2
RoenickeW,1-0 3 1 0 0 1 2
PerkinsS,1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Baltimore
Tillman 32-37 5 5 4 4
McFarland 31-31 0 0 0 5
O'Day 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ji.Johnson L,0-1 1 1 1 0 1 2
HBP-by O'Day (Plouffe).

Rays schedule
April 7 vs Cleveland
April 8 at Texas
April 9 at Texas
April 10 at Texas
April 12 at Boston
April 13 at Boston
April 14 at Boston
April 15 at Boston
April 16 at Baltimore
April 17 at Baltimore
April 18 at Baltimore
April 19 vs Oakland
April 20 vs Oakland
April 21 vs Oakland
April 22 vs N.Y Yankees
April 23 vs N.Y Yankees
April 24 vs N.Y Yankees
April 25 at Chicago Sox
April 26 at Chicago Sox
April 27 at Chicago Sox
April 28 at Chicago Sox
April 30 at Kansas City
May 1 at Kansas City


West Division
GB WC
0 z
) Y2 --
) 1 /2
) lY2 1
) 2Y2 2


B2 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




Phillies 4, Royals 3
Kansas City Philadelphia
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gordon If 4 0 1 0 Revere cf 4 0 1 1
AEscorss 4 0 0 0 Rollinsss 3 0 0 0
Butler 1b 4 01 0 Utley2b 3 1 0 0
Dysonpr 0 00 0 Howard 1b 3 00 0
KHerrrp 0 0 0 0 Carrerpr 0 1 0 0
GHIInd p 0 0 0 0 MYong 3b 3 1 1 0
S.Perezc 4 00 0 Brown If 4 0 0 0
L.Caincf 2 10 0 Mayrry rf 2 1 0 0
Francrrf 4 2 2 0 Quinter c 3 0 0 0
MTejad 3b 3 0 1 2 Frndsn ph 1 0 1 3
Crow p 0 00 0 Lannan p 1 00 0
Hosmerlb 1 00 0 MAdmsp 0 0 0 0
EJhnsn2b 2 01 1 L.Nixph 1 0 0 0
Mendoz p 2 000 Bastrdp 0 00 0
Getz ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 36 3 Totals 28 4 3 4
Kansas City 000 020 100 3
Philadelphia 000 010 003 4
Two outs when winning run scored.
E-Utley (2), Quintero (1). DP-Philadelphia
1. LOB-Kansas City 4, Philadelphia 5. 2B-
Francoeur 2 (2), M.Tejada (1), Frandsen (1).
SB-Dyson (1), Rollins (3). S-E.Johnson,
Lannan.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
Mendoza 6 2 1 1 3 7
Crow H,2 1 0 0 0 0 1
K.HerreraH,2 1 0 0 0 0 2
G.Holland L,0-1 2-3 1 3 3 3 2
Philadelphia
Lannan 7 5 3 3 0 5
Mi.Adams 1 1 0 0 0 1
BastardoW,1-0 1 0 0 0 1 0
HBP-by Lannan (L.Cain).
Umpires-Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Eric
Cooper; Second, Paul Schrieber; Third, Chad
Fairchild.
T-2:47. A-39,475 (43,651).

Diamondbacks 9,
Brewers 2
Arizona Milwaukee
ab rhbi ab rhbi
GParracf 5 02 1 Aoki rf 3 1 2 0
Prado lf-3b 6 1 2 0 Segura ss 4 0 3 1
A.Hill2b 5 1 2 2 Weeks 2b 4 0 1 0
MMntrc 3 1 1 0 AIGnzlz3b 3 0 0 1
Gldschlb 5 3 2 2 Kintzlrp 0 0 0 0
Kubelrf 5 1 2 2 Lucroy c 4 0 2 0
Chavez3b 4 22 0 YBtncrlb-3b4 0 1 0
MtRynlp 0 00 0 CGomzcf 4 00 0
Sipp p 0 0 0 0 KDavis If 3 1 1 0
Pnngtn ss 5 02 0 Figaro p 0 0 0 0
Corbinp 3 0 0 0 Maldndlb 1 0 0 0
Hinske ph 1 0 1 1 Fiers p 2 0 0 0
Bell p 0 00 0 Narvsn p 0 0 0 0
Pollock If 1 0 0 0 Prince If 2 0 0 0
Totals 43 9168 Totals 34210 2
Arizona 100 320 210 9
Milwaukee 110 000 000 2
E-Weeks (1), Lucroy (1), Segura (1). DP-Ari-
zona 2, Milwaukee 1. LOB-Arizona 11, Mil-
waukee 7. 2B-A.Hill (2), Goldschmidt (2),
Segura (1), K.Davis (1). HR-A.Hill (1), Gold-
schmidt (2), Kubel (1). SF-Ale.Gonzalez.
IP H RERBBSO
Arizona
CorbinW,1-0 6 8 2 2 1 2
Bell 1 1 0 0 0 0
Mat.Reynolds 1 1 0 0 0 1
Sipp 1 0 0 0 0 2
Milwaukee
FiersL,0-1 5 9 6 6 1 1
Narveson 1 1 0 0 1 0
Figaro 2 4 3 1 1 2
Kintzler 1 2 0 0 0 0
WP-Narveson.
Umpires-Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Chris
Conroy.
T-3:22. A-30,115 (41,900).

Athletics 6, Astros 3


Oakland


Houston
ab r h bi


ab r h bi


Crisp cf 5 1 2 1 Altuve dh 4 0 1 0
Lowriess 5 1 3 1 RCeden ss 4 0 0 0
Reddckrf 5 1 0 0 Carter If 4 0 0 0
Cespds If 4 0 0 0 C.Penarlb 4 1 1 0
S.Smithdh 4 1 1 1 Maxwllcf 4 1 2 0
Mosslb 3 1 1 0 JCastroc 4 1 2 3
Dnldsn3b 4 1 1 1 JMrtnzrf 4 0 2 0
DNorrsc 4 02 1 Dmngz3b 3 0 0 0
Sogard 2b 4 0 1 1 MGnzlz 2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 38 6116 Totals 34 3 8 3
Oakland 000 104 010 6
Houston 000 300 000 3
E-R.Cedeno (1). DP-Oakland 1, Houston 1.
LOB-Oakland 6, Houston 4. 2B-Crisp (4).
HR-Crisp (2), Lowrie (2), S.Smith (1), J.Castro
(1). SB-Reddick (3), Sogard (1).
IP H RERBBSO


Oakland
Colon W,1-0
Doolittle H,1
Cook H,1
Balfour S,1-1
Houston
B.Norris L,1-1
W.Wright
Keuchel


52-36 5 2 1 4
1-3 2 0 0 0 1
3 3 1 1 0 1


Umpires-Home, Tim Welke; First, Mike Everitt;
Second, Marty Foster; Third, Scott Barry.
T-3:12. A-18,685 (42,060).

MLB leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-CDavis, Baltimore, .556; AJones,
Baltimore, .522; NCruz, Texas, .500; Lowrie,
Oakland, .476; Berkman, Texas, .471; AJack-
son, Detroit, .429; Reyes, Toronto, .421.
RUNS-AJones, Baltimore, 8; Crisp, Oak-
land, 7; AJackson, Detroit, 7; Markakis, Balti-
more, 6; MiCabrera, Detroit, 5; CDavis,
Baltimore, 5; Jennings, Tampa Bay, 5; Lowrie,
Oakland, 5; Reddick, Oakland, 5.
RBI-CDavis, Baltimore, 17; Fielder, Detroit,
8; AJones, Baltimore, 7; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 7;
MiCabrera, Detroit, 6; FGutierrez, Seattle, 6;
Morse, Seattle, 6.
HITS-AJones, Baltimore, 12; NCruz, Texas,
10; CDavis, Baltimore, 10; Lowrie, Oakland, 10;
TorHunter, Detroit, 9; AJackson, Detroit, 9; 6 tied
at 8.
DOUBLES-Crisp, Oakland, 4; Lowrie, Oak-
land, 4; Arencibia, Toronto, 3; Berkman, Texas,
3; CDavis, Baltimore, 3; Doumit, Minnesota, 3;
AJones, Baltimore, 3; Seager, Seattle, 3; Trout,
Los Angeles, 3;Youkilis, New York, 3.
TRIPLES-Andrus, Texas, 2; Maxwell, Hous-
ton, 2; 12 tied at 1.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 4; Morse,
Seattle, 4; Arencibia, Toronto, 3; 14 tied at 2.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 3; Jen-
nings, Tampa Bay, 3; Reddick, Oakland, 3;
AEscobar, Kansas City, 2; McLouth, Baltimore,
2; Reyes, Toronto, 2; Rios, Chicago, 2; Ryan,
Seattle, 2; MSaunders, Seattle, 2.
PITCHING-38 tied at 1.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 14; MHarri-
son, Texas, 12; Straily, Oakland, 11; FHernan-
dez, Seattle, 11; Ogando, Texas, 10; Guthrie,
Kansas City 9; BNorris, Houston, 9.
SAVES-Reed, Chicago, 3; Wilhelmsen,
Seattle, 2; JiJohnson, Baltimore, 2; Hanrahan,
Boston, 2; 12 tied at 1.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-Frazier, Cincinnati, .500; Segura,
Milwaukee, .500; GParra, Arizona, .458; Cud-
dyer, Colorado, .450; Buck, New York, .421; Tu-
lowitzki, Colorado, .421; Weeks, Milwaukee,
.421.
RUNS-Choo, Cincinnati, 7; JUpton, Atlanta,
7; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 6; CGonzalez, Col-
orado, 6; Prado, Arizona, 6; 7tied at 5.
RBI-Buck, New York, 9; Frazier, Cincinnati,
8; Cuddyer, Colorado, 7; Freeman, Atlanta, 7;
Tulowitzki, Colorado, 7; JUpton, Atlanta, 7; Utley,
Philadelphia, 6.
HITS-Frazier, Cincinnati, 11; GParra, Ari-
zona, 11; Cuddyer, Colorado, 9; Segura, Mil-
waukee, 9; Buck, New York, 8; Fowler, Colorado,


SCOREBOARD


For the record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winningnumbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
8-4-8
CASH 3 (late)
1-1-4

PLAY 4 (early)
1-7 -9-3
PLAY 4 (late)
., 8-5-5-8

FANTASY 5
2-4-15-30-34


POWERBALL
4- 7 -8-29-39
POWER BALL
24


LOTTERY
6-7-20-46-48-51
XTRA
3


Friday's winning numbers and payouts:


FRIDAY, APRIL 5
Mega Money: 2 23 37 40
Mega Ball: 8
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 6 $1,222
3-of-4 MB 40 $401.50
3-of-4 789 $60.50
2-of-4 MB 1,256 $26.50
1-of-4 MB 12,280 $2.50
2-of-4 25,135 $2


Fantasy 5:1 11 12 28 30
5-of-5 2 winners $120,862.49
4-of-5 316 $123
3-of-5 10,758 $10


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: STP Gas Booster 500 race
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Firestone Legacy Indy Lights
100 (Same-day Tape)
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Honda Grand Prix of Alabama
race
11 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA SummitRacing.com Nationals
(Same-day Tape)
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at New York Mets
1 p.m. (TBS) New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers
1:30 p.m. (SUN) Cleveland Indians at Tampa Bay Rays
2 p.m. (WGN-A) Seattle Mariners at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Texas
Rangers
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Oklahoma City Thunder
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Los Angeles Lakers at Los Angeles Clippers
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Cleveland Cavaliers
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (CBS) 2013 Reese's All-Star Game (Taped)
4 p.m. (CBS) NCAA Division II Tournament final: Drury vs.
Metro State
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA Tournament Final Four
6:30 p.m. (ESPN) California vs. Louisville
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Connecticut vs. Notre Dame
BICYCLING
8 a.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Roubaix
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBATour League: Elias Cup Finals (Taped)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Valero Texas Open Final
Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Valero Texas Open Final Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kraft Nabisco Championship -
Final Round
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) St. Louis Blues at Detroit Red Wings
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Washington Capitals
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) New Jersey Devils at Buffalo Sabres
BULL RIDING
1 p.m. (CBS) PBR Make Something Great Invitational
(Taped)
SOCCER
5 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: New York Red Bulls at Chicago Fire
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m. (ESPN) Baylor at Oklahoma
TENNIS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA Family Circle Cup final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
No local events scheduled


8; Harper, Washington, 8; Prado, Arizona, 8;Tu-
lowitzki, Colorado, 8; Weeks, Milwaukee, 8.
DOUBLES-GParra, Arizona, 4; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 3; Carpenter, St. Louis, 3; AEllis, Los
Angeles, 3; Gyorko, San Diego, 3; Phillips,
Cincinnati, 3; Prado, Arizona, 3; Quentin, San
Diego, 3; ArRamirez, Milwaukee, 3.
TRIPLES-Cuddyer, Colorado, 1; DanMur-
phy, New York, 1; GParra, Arizona, 1; Utley,
Philadelphia, 1; Votto, Cincinnati, 1; Zimmer-
man, Washington, 1.
HOME RUNS-JUpton, Atlanta, 5; Choo,
Cincinnati, 3; Fowler, Colorado, 3; Frazier,
Cincinnati, 3; Harper, Washington, 3; 13 tied at
2.
STOLEN BASES-McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 4;
Rollins, Philadelphia, 3; DWright, New York, 3;
ECabrera, San Diego, 2; Revere, Philadelphia,
2; Ruggiano, Miami, 2; Valdespin, New York, 2.
PITCHING-37 tied at 1.
STRIKEOUTS-Harvey, New York, 10; ABur-
nett, Pittsburgh, 10; Cueto, Cincinnati, 9; Halla-
day, Philadelphia, 9; Samardzija, Chicago, 9;
Niese, New York, 9; 7 tied at 8.
SAVES-Romo, San Francisco, 3; RBetan-
court, Colorado, 3; RSoriano, Washington, 2;
Kimbrel, Atlanta, 2; 9 tied at 1.


NHL standings


Pittsburg
N.Y. Ran
N.Y. Island


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
gh 39 2910 0 58127 95
tigers 38 1915 4 42 93 90
nders 39 1916 4 42113 119


New Jersey 38 1514 9
Philadelphia 38 1718 3
Northeast Division
GP W L OT
Montreal 38 25 8 5
Boston 37 24 9 4
Toronto 38 21 13 4
Ottawa 37 1912 6
Buffalo 38 15 17 6


39 90 103
37106 118

Pts GF GA
55120 91
52102 79
46117 106
44 93 83
36102 116


Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Washington 38 1917 2 40113 108
Winnipeg 40 1919 2 40 98 120
Carolina 37 1619 2 34 97 115
Tampa Bay 37 1619 2 34119 110
Florida 38 1220 6 30 94 131
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 37 28 5 4 60123 80
Detroit 38 1914 5 43 99 100
St. Louis 36 2014 2 42105 98
Columbus 38 1615 7 39 91 101
Nashville 39 1516 8 38 93 104
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 37 2011 6 46 98 93
Minnesota 37 21 14 2 44100 97
Edmonton 38 1615 7 39100 106
Calgary 36 1319 4 30 97 128
Colorado 37 1220 5 29 89 117
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Anaheim 38 25 8 5 55117 95
Los Angeles 38 2213 3 47111 92
San Jose 37 2011 6 46 94 89
Phoenix 37 1615 6 38101 104
Dallas 37 1717 3 37 99 113
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, N.Y Rangers 1, SO
Buffalo 4, Ottawa 2
St. Louis 3, Columbus 1
Detroit 3, Colorado 2, OT
Dallas 3, Anaheim 1
San Jose 2, Calgary 1
Saturday's Games
Winnipeg 4, Philadelphia 1
Chicago 1, Nashville 0
Los Angeles 4, Edmonton 1
Montreal 2, Boston 1
Toronto 2, New Jersey 1
N.Y. Islanders 4, Tampa Bay 2
N.Y. Rangers 4, Carolina 1
Washington 4, Florida 3
Colorado at Phoenix, late


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 B3


Calgary at Vancouver, late
Today's Games
St. Louis at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 4p.m.
Ottawa at Florida, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Carolina at Boston, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Vancouver, 10p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 10 p.m.



BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE Suspe
Baltimore RHP Daniel McCutchen 50 game
violating the Minor League Drug Prevention
Treatment Program.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Activated
ChrisTillman from the 15-day DL. Optioned
Yamaico Navarro to Norfolk (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS Recalled
Trevor Bauer from Columbus (IL). Placed
Scott Kazmir on the 15-day DL.
HOUSTON ASTROS Recalled LHP
las Keuchel from Oklahoma City (PCL). P
LHP Travis Blackley on the 15-day DL, ret
tive to April 5. Promoted LHP Kyle Hallock
Quad Cities (MWL) to Oklahoma City R
signed RHP Cameron Lamb from exte
spring training to Quad Cities.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS-Agreed to t
with C Mark Fleury on a minor league con
MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned LHP
Robertson to Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES Reinstated
Phil Hughes from the 15-day DL. Optioned
Cody Eppley to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Reinstated
Bartolo Colon from the restricted list. Opti
RHP Dan Straily to Sacramento (PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated
Jeremy Jeffress for assignment. Selecte
contract of RHP Dave Bush from Buffalo
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Cla
RHP Will Harris off waivers from Oakland
COLORADO ROCKIES -Traded C Ra
Hernandez to the L.A. Dodgers for RHP A
Harang and cash considerations and d
nated Harang for assignment.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Sent LHI
Lilly to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal) on a r
assignment.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS Placed
Aramis Ramirez on the 15-day DL. Recall
Josh Prince from Nashville (PCL).
Atlantic League
LONG ISLAND DUCKS -Signed C Ra
Castro.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES -Assigned G K
Dooling and reassigned G Tony Wrotento
(NBADL).
UTAH JAZZ Signed G Jerel McNeal fo
remainder of the season.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS Signed DT
Hall.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DETROIT RED WINGS Recalled C
Sheahan from Grand Rapids (AHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS Recalled C
Timmins from San Antonio (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Reassign
Ryan Ellis to Milwaukee (AHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled F Al
dre Bolduc and D David Rundblad from
land (AHL) on an emergency basis.
COLLEGE
BALL STATE Named James Wh
men's basketball coach.




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
x-NewYork 49 26 .653
x-Brooklyn 44 32 .579
x-Boston 39 37 .513
Philadelphia 31 45 .408
Toronto 29 48 .377
Southeast Division
W L Pct
z-Miami 60 16 .789
x-Atlanta 42 36 .538
Washington 29 47 .382
Orlando 19 58 .247
Charlotte 18 59 .234
Central Division
W L Pct
x-Indiana 48 29 .623
x-Chicago 42 33 .560
Milwaukee 37 39 .487
Detroit 25 52 .325
Cleveland 23 52 .307
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
x-San Antonio 57 20 .740
x-Memphis 51 25 .671
Houston 43 34 .558
Dallas 37 39 .487
New Orleans 26 50 .342
Northwest Division
W L Pct
x-Oklahoma City 56 20 .737
x-Denver 53 24 .688
Utah 40 37 .519
Portland 33 43 .434
Minnesota 29 47 .382
Pacific Division
W L Pct
x-L.A. Clippers 50 26 .658
Golden State 44 32 .579
L.A. Lakers 40 36 .526
Sacramento 27 49 .355
Phoenix 23 53 .303
x-clinched playoff spot
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Cleveland 97, Boston 91
NewYork 101, Milwaukee 83
Philadelphia 101, Atlanta 90
Chicago 87, Orlando 86
Toronto 95, Minnesota 93
Miami 89, Charlotte 79
Oklahoma City 97, Indiana 75
Utah 95, New Orleans 83
Golden State 111, Phoenix 107


Dallas 117, Sacramento 108
L.A. Lakers 86, Memphis 84
Houston 116, Portland 98
Saturday's Games
Washington 104, Indiana 85
Brooklyn 105, Charlotte 96
Miami 106, Philadelphia 87
Minnesota 107, Detroit 101
San Antonio 99, Atlanta 97
Milwaukee 100, Toronto 83
Denver 132, Houston 114
Today's Games
New Yorkat Oklahoma City 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 9 p.m.


handed
es for
n and


RHP
d INF

RHP
LHP

3 Dal-
laced
roac-
Sfrom
Reas-
nded

terms
tract.
Tyler

RHP
RHP
L).
RHP
ioned

RHP
d the
(IL).

imed

among
Aaron
lesig-

PTed
ehab

d 3B
ad OF


amon



Keyon
Reno

orthe


RAYS
Continued from Page B1


two-hitter in a 4-0 win on Friday night
Both benches were warned by the umpires
in the seventh when Cody Allen hit Rays
cleanup hitter Evan Longoria in the buttocks
with a pitch.
Longoria drew the Rays' fourth straight walk
in the first to make it 1-0. Bauer avoided further
damage when James Loney hit a foul pop to
third, and Indians right fielder Ryan Raburn
caught Yunel Escobar's liner and threw out
Joyce as he tried to score from third base.
Shelley Duncan had a sixth-inning RBI sin-
gle, and Loney drove in a pair with a double in
the eighth.
Cleveland had two runners on in the both
second and third innings, but failed to score
after going 0 for 4 with runners in scoring
position.
Bauer made the spot start in place of left-
hander Scott Kazmir, who was placed on the 15-
day disabled list with a strained right rib cage
muscle.

Rays 6, Indians 0
Cleveland Tampa Bay
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 Jnnngs cf 3 1 1 0
ACarerss 4 0 0 0 Joycerf 4 1 1 0
Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 0
Swisherlb 3 0 1 0 Longori3b 3 1 1 1
Brantly If 4 0 0 0 Loney lb 4 0 2 2
CSantn dh-c3 0 1 0 YEscorss 5 1 1 0
Chsnhll 3b 3 0 1 0 Duncan dh 4 0 1 1
Allenp 0 0 0 0 JMolinc 2 1 1 0
Raburn rf 3 0 1 0 KJhnsn If 2 1 1 2
Marson c 0 0 0 0 Fuld If 1 0 0 0
Bauerp 1 00 0
Albers p 0 00 0
Aviles 3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 05 0 Totals 31 6 9 6
Cleveland 000 000 000 0
Tampa Bay 100 201 02x 6
DP-Cleveland 1, Tampa Bay 2. LOB-Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 12. 2B-
Loney (2), Y.Escobar (2). HR-K.Johnson (1). SB-Jennings 2 (3). S-
J.Molina.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
Bauer L,0-1 5 2 3 3 7 2
Albers 1 3 1 1 1 1
Allen 2 4 2 2 1 2
Tampa Bay
CobbW,1-0 71-34 0 0 3 6
Jo.Peralta 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
C.Ramos 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Allen (Longoria).
Umpires-Home, Dale Scott; First, Bill Miller; Second, CB Bucknor; Third,
Todd Tichenor.
T-3:11. A-32,217 (34,078).




CARDS
Continued from Page B1


State on its way to its first Final Fbur since 1965,
Bryan and the Shockers had a 12-point lead on

Louisville with 13:35 to play It was the largest
deficit all tournament for the Cardinals, who
Riley seemed out of sorts after an emotional week
following Ware's gruesome injury; he snapped
Scott his tibia and the bone broke through the skin

ned D during last weekend's Midwest Regional final.
But Louisville had come back to win five
exan- games after trailing by nine points or more al-
Port- ready this year, including rallying from a 16-
point deficit in the title game at the Big East
itford tournament.
This one trumped them all.
"It's tough for Wichita State to lose this game
tonight because they played great We had to
dig in," Pitino said. "Four of our starters had
their worst start of the season. We had to win
the game with our second unit"
Henderson, the walk-on who was forced into
GB increased playing time because of Ware's in-
jury, made back-to-back 3s to spark a 21-8 run.
5102 While Hancock and Behanan were knocking
181/2 down shots, Smith and Peyton Siva were turn-
21 ing up the heat on the Shockers.
After going more than 26 minutes without a
GB turnover, Siva darted in to strip the ball away

19 from Carl Hall. He fed Hancock, who drilled a
31 3 that gave Louisville a 56-55 lead, its first since
41/2 the end of the first half.
42/2 "Down the stretch, we were just loose with
the ball, we just didn't take care of it, pretty
GB much," Wichita State's Malcolm Armstead said.
5 "I can't give you an explanation it just hap-
10o/2 opened "
23 Early would give the Shockers one more
24 lead, converting a three-point play But Siva
scored and then Smith stole the ball and took it
GB in for an easy layup that gave Louisville a 60-58
lead with 4:47 left Louisville fans erupted, and
5/2 even Ware was on his feet, throwing up his
14 arms and clapping. The Cardinals extended the
19Y2 lead to 65-60 on a tip-in of a Smith miss and an-
3012 other 3 by Hancock.

GB Wichita State had one last chance, pulling
within 68-66 on Early's tip in with 22 seconds
31/2 left But the Shockers were forced to foul, and
16/2 Smith and Hancock made their free throws to

27 seal the victory
As the final buzzer sounded, Chane Behanan
GB tossed the ball high into the air and Henderson
and Hancock did a flying shoulder bump at
6 midcourt

23 "It's just a mix of emotions, of feelings. It
27 hurts to have to lose and be the end of the sea-
son," Early said. "But these guys fought to the
end, and we had a great season and keep our
heads high and know the grind doesn't stop."
The Cardinals were the overall No. 1 seed in
the tournament, and they steamrolled their
way through their first four games, winning by
an average of almost 22 points. They limited op-
ponents to 59 points and 42 percent shooting
while harassing them into almost 18 turnovers
a game, setting an NCAA tourney record with
20 steals against North Carolina A&T
The presence of Ware was supposed to pro-
vide even more motivation for Louisville,
which already had some unfinished business
after losing to Kentucky in last year's Final
Four
He urged his teammates to "just go win the
game" before being wheeled off the court on a
stretcher last weekend. Three days later, he
joined the Cardinals as they made the trip to
the Final Four in Atlanta, Ware's hometown.
The Cardinals have modified their warm-up
T-shirts in Ware's honor they now read "Ri5e
to the Occasion," with Ware's No. 5 on the back.
He had a seat at the end of the bench, his right
leg propped up on towels, and every one of the
starters went to shake his hand after being
introduced.






B4 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013

Valero Texas Open
Saturday
AtTPC San Antonio, San Antonio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,435, Par: 72
Third Round
Note: Partial list
Billy Horschel 68-68-70 206 -10
Jim Furyk 69-70-69 208 -8
Charley Hoffman 71-67-70-208 -8
Ryan Palmer 71-71-68 -210 -6
Bob Estes 72-69-69 210 -6
Rory Mcllroy 72-67-71 -210 -6
Padraig Harrington 68-73-70 211 -5
Martin Laird 70-71-70-211 -5
Jeff Overton 69-72-70 211 -5
K.J. Choi 72-67-72 211 -5
Daniel Summerhays69-69-73 211 -5
Marcel Siem 76-67-69 -212 -4
D.J. Trahan 70-71-71 -212 -4
Martin Flores 71-72-70 -213 -3
David Lynn 72-70-71 213 -3
Richard H. Lee 74-70-69 -213 -3
Jason Kokrak 74-68-72 214 -2
Shane Lowry 70-72-72 214 -2
Nicholas Thompson71-73-71 -215 -1
William McGirt 70-72-73-215 -1
Freddie Jacobson 70-74-71 215 -1
Bud Cauley 71-71-73-215 -1
Aaron Baddeley 74-70-71-215 -1
Steve LeBrun 72-69-74-215 -1
Matt Kuchar 74-70-71 215 -1
Charl Schwartzel 72-73-70-215 -1
John Mallinger 73-72-70-215 -1
Ben Kohles 69-70-76 -215 -1
Steven Bowditch 69-69-77-215 -1
Kevin Chappell 75-69-72 216 E
Brian Davis 69-72-75-216 E
Ken Duke 73-68-75 -216 E
Brendan Steele 72-72-72 216 E
Brian Harman 72-69-75-216 E
Alistair Presnell 69-72-75-216 E
Charlie Beljan 71-74-71 -216 E
Neal Lancaster 75-70-71 -216 E
Brendon de Jonge 70-69-77-216 E
Justin Leonard 72-71-74 -217 +1
Paul Haley II 73-70-74 -217 +1
Stuart Appleby 75-69-73 217 +1
Bryce Molder 68-74-75-217 +1
Chris DiMarco 75-69-73 -217 +1
Seung-Yul Noh 73-71-73 -217 +1
Brian Gay 71-70-76 -217 +1
Joe Durant 70-71-76 -217 +1
Nathan Green 69-72-76 -217 +1
Peter Tomasulo 67-73-77 217 +1
Jason Gore 69-71-77 -217 +1
Matt Bettencourt 67-73-77- 217 +1
Ben Curtis 74-71-72-217 +1
Todd Baek 73-72-72-217 +1
Scott Stallings 73-70-75-218 +2
Harris English 68-75-75-218 +2
Brad Fritsch 70-73-75 218 +2
John Merrick 74-71-73-218 +2
Lee Janzen 70-69-79 218 +2
Andres Romero 69-76-73 218 +2
Henrik Norlander 74-71-73-218 +2
John Huh 74-69-76-219 +3
Jeff Gove 71-73-75 -219 +3
Luke List 73-71-75 -219 +3
Peter Hanson 70-71-78 -219 +3
Troy Matteson 76-69-74 219 +3
lan Poulter 70-75-74 -219 +3
D.A. Points 74-71-74 219 +3
Joe Ogilvie 71-74-74 -219 +3
Retief Goosen 70-69-80-219 +3
Russell Knox 73-72-74 -219 +3


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kraft Nabisco
Championship
Saturday
At Mission Hills Country Club, Dinah
Shore Tournament Course,
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Purse: $2 million
Yardage: 6,738, Par: 72, (a-amateur)
Third Round
Note: Partial list
InbeePark 70-67-67-204 -12
Lizette Salas 70-68-69 207 -9
Angela Stanford 70-74-66 210 -6
Suzann Pettersen 68-75-67-210 -6
Karrie Webb 72-71-67 210 -6
Karine Icher 72-70-68 210 -6
Jessica Korda 70-72-68-210 -6
Pornanong Phatlum71-69-70 210 -6
Paula Creamer 74-68-69 211 -5
Caroline Hedwall 71-68-72-- 211 -5
SoYeonRyu 73-71-68-212 -4
Jiyai Shin 70-71-71 212 -4
HeeYoung Park 70-70-72 212 -4
Sarah Jane Smith 72-72-69-213 -3
Hee Kyung Seo 72-70-71 213 -3
Anna Nordqvis 69-72-72 213 -3
Ayako Uehara 72-72-70 214 -2
Caroline Masson 70-73-71-214 -2
Moriya Jutanugarn 70-72-72-214 -2
Cristie Kerr 71-71-72-214 -2
Haeji Kang 72-69-73 214 -2
Jodi Ewart Shadoff 68-72-74 214 -2


Belen Mozo
Catriona Matthew
Stacy Lewis
Na Yeon Choi
MichelleWie
Amy Yang
Giulia Sergas
Chella Choi
YaniTseng
Beatriz Recari
Momoko Ueda
Eun-Hee Ji
Jacqui Concolino
Jennifer Johnson
Jane Park
Se Ri Pak
Mariajo Uribe
Mina Harigae
a-Lydia Ko
a-S. Meadow
Alison Walshe
Gerina Piller
Ai Miyazato
Carlota Ciganda
Christel Boeljon
Natalie Gulbis
Jee Young Lee
Shanshan Feng
Lexi Thompson
Morgan Pressel
Julieta Granada
a-Ashlan Ramsey
Karin Sjodin
Cindy LaCrosse
Vicky Hurs
Mo Martin
Jenny Shin
Sophie Gustafson
Karen Stupples
Ha-Neul Kim
Pernilla Lindberg


74-72-69
72-73-70
73-71-71
68-75-72-
72-70-73-
69-73-73-
70-69-76-
75-72-69
72-75-69
75-70-71
74-71-71
73-71-72-
70-73-73-
72-71-73-
70-73-73-
72-69-75
72-76-69
72-74-71
72-74-71
73-73-71
71-74-72-
73-71-73
74-68-75
76-72-70.
74-73-71
74-72-72-
76-70-72-
78-71-70.
76-72-71
72-75-72-
77-69-73-
71-75-73
72-74-73
72-73-74-
75-74-71
78-71-71
75-74-71
74-72-74
73-72-75
73-75-73-
72-75-74-


Horschel maintains lead


Golfer atop

Texas Open;

Park up at

LPGA major

Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO -Billy
Horsehel was confident
about his chances of stay-
ing on top at the Texas
Open after taking the sec-
ond-round lead.
The relatively unknown
up-and-comer lived up to
his words on Saturday,
holding off an experi-
enced leaderboard to
shoot a 2-under 70 and
take a two-shot lead en-
tering the final round.
Horschel finished sec-
ond at last week's Hous-
ton Open, and he
extended his PGA Tour-
best streak of consecutive
cuts made to 21 this week.
Still, the Florida native
faces the daunting task of
fending off a trailing pack
that includes former major
winners Jim Furyk, Rory
McIlroy and Padraig Har-
rington if he's to earn his
first PGA Tour win today
Just don't try and tell
him that.
"I've never been star
struck out here," Horschel
said. "... I respect all the
veterans out here. I re-
spect everyone that's put
their time (in) out here.
"Butatat the same time,
I'm as confident as I've
ever been, and I feel just
as good as anyone else in
the world right now."
Horschel enters the
final day with a two-shot
lead over Furyk and
Charley Hoffman. He's
four shots ahead of a trio


Associated Press
Billy Horschel watches his tee shot Saturday on the 9th hole during the third round of
the Texas Open in San Antonio. Horschel holds a four-stroke lead with one round left.


that includes former world
No. 1 Rory Mcllroy, who
would like nothing better
than to close out with a win
Sunday on his way to next
week's Masters.
Mcllroy shot a 1-under
71 to reach 6 under overall.
He tied for the low round
on Friday with a 67, but he
was inconsistent off the tee
on Saturday and had four
birdies and three bogeys.
The world No. 2 hit just
7 of 14 fairways for the
second time in the tourna-
ment, continuing his trend
of up-and-down play this
year after an offseason
equipment change.
He only signed up for the
tournament late last week,
in search of as many com-
petitive rounds as possible
before next week- which
will mark the first major
since his PGA Champi-


onship win last August.
Saturday's gusty Texas
wind provided Mcllroy with
a far different challenge
than he'll likely face next
week at Augusta National.
"It was a tough scoring
day," McIlroy said. "It was
hard to really go low
under par.
"... I probably should
have been a couple better,
but at the end of the day,
it's still a solid round, and
I still have a chance com-
ing into tomorrow."
Ryan Palmer had the
low round on Saturday,
posting a 4-under 68.
Park opens up lead
in Kraft Nabisco
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif.
- Inbee Park opened a
three-stroke lead in the Kraft
Nabisco Championship, twice


hitting to 2 1/2 feet to set up
back-nine birdies in a bogey-
free round.
The 24-year-old South Ko-
rean shot a 5-under 67 on
Saturday to reach 12 under
at Mission Hills, putting her in
position for her second major
title and second victory of the
year. She won the 2008 U.S.
Women's Open and added
her fourth LPGA Tour title in
February in Thailand.
Lizette Salas, a stroke be-
hind Park entering the round,
had a 69 to remain second.
Hall of Famer Karrie
Webb, the tournament win-
ner in 2000 and 2006, was
five strokes back at 6 under
along with Suzann Pettersen,
Angela Stanford, Jessica
Korda, Karine Icher and Por-
nanong Phatlum. Stanford
had a 66, the best round of
the tournament.


Heat scorch 76ers


Wizards

surprise

Pacers 104-85

Associated Press

MIAMI LeBron
James scored 27 points in
his return from a strained
right hamstring, five other
Miami players reached
double figures and the
Heat moved closer to se-
curing home-court advan-
tage for the entire NBA
playoffs by topping the
Philadelphia 76ers 106-87
on Saturday night.
Rashard Lewis scored
14 and Norris Cole added
13 for the Heat, whose
magic number for clinch-
ing the league's best regu-
lar-season record was
trimmed to two.
Miami moved to 60-16,
one win shy of matching
the franchise single-sea-
son record. The Heat got
there after outscoring
Philadelphia 29-11 in the
fourth quarter.
Jrue Holiday scored 18
points for Philadelphia,
which got 14 from Evan
Turner and an 11-point,
11-rebound night from
Spencer Hawes.
Wizards 104,
Pacers 85
WASHINGTON John
Wall scored 37 points in a
display of speed and flair to
lead the Washington Wizards
to a 104-85 victory over the
Indiana Pacers.
Wall made 16 of 25 shots,
throwing his palms up after
making an improbable 14-
foot sideways runner and
flexing his muscles to the
fans on the first row after
banking in a fast-break layup.
He even blocked a layup at-
tempt by Roy Hibbert, the 6-
foot-4 point guard rising to
swat the ball away from the
7-foot-2 Pacers center.
Wall also had five assists,
four rebounds and two blocks
for the lottery-bound Wizards.
Nets 105,
Bobcats 96
NEW YORK Deron
Williams had 32 points and
six assists, and the Brooklyn
Nets strengthened their hold
on fourth place in the Eastern
Conference by beating the
Charlotte Bobcats 105-96.
Brook Lopez added 19


Associated Press
Miami Heat forward LeBron James shoots as Philadelphia 76ers guard Damien Wilkins
watches during the first half Saturday in Miami.


points and backup Andray
Blatche had 16 as the Nets
completed a four-game sweep
of the NBA-worst Bobcats.
Brooklyn moved 1 1/2
games ahead of Chicago for
the No. 4 seed and home-
court advantage in the first
round of the playoffs.
Ben Gordon scored 27
points and Gerald Henderson
had 22 for the Bobcats.
Timberwolves 107,
Pistons 101
MINNEAPOLIS Rick
Adelman became the eighth
coach in NBA history to win
1,000 games when the Min-
nesota Timberwolves beat
the Detroit Pistons 107-101.
Nikola Pekovic had 20
points and 13 rebounds, and
J.J. Barea scored 20 points
for the Timberwolves, who
surrounded their 66-year-old
coach when the buzzer
sounded. Adelman grabbed


his wife, Mary Kay, and kissed
her three times as a video trib-
ute played to honor him.
Brandon Knight scored 25
points and Rodney Stuckey
had 20 points and eight re-
bounds for the Pistons, who
have lost 18 of their last 21
games. They turned the ball
over a season-high 24
times, leading to 25 points
for Minnesota.
Bucks 100,
Raptors 83
MILWAUKEE Monta
Ellis had 22 points and nine
assists, and the Milwaukee
Bucks secured their first play-
off berth in three seasons
with a 100-83 victory over the
Toronto Raptors.
Brandon Jennings had 16
points and seven assists,
while Larry Sanders added
12 points, nine rebounds and
six blocks for Milwaukee,
which needed a win and a


Miami victory over Philadel-
phia on Saturday to clinch at
least the eighth seed in the
Eastern Conference. The
Heat beat the 76ers, 106-87.
The win was Milwaukee's
10th straight over Toronto, its
longest active winning streak
over any opponent. And it
pulled the Bucks within two
games of the idle Boston
Celtics for the No. 7 seed.
Alan Anderson led Toronto
with 14 points off the bench,
and QuincyAcy had 13.
Spurs 99,
Hawks 97
SAN ANTONIO Tim
Duncan had 31 points and 14
rebounds to help the short-
handed San Antonio Spurs
escape with a 99-97 victory
over the Atlanta Hawks.
Kawhi Leonard added 23
points and DeJuan Blair had
11 for San Antonio.


Isles beat TB


Associated Press

UNIONDALE, N.Y. -
Matt Martin scored the go-
ahead goal with less than
seven minutes left in the
third period and Evgeni
Nabokov made 19 saves to
lift the playoff-hopeful
New York Islanders to a 4-
2 victory over the Tampa
Bay Lightning on Saturday
night.
Richard Panik and Matt
Carle had goals for the
Lightning.
Rangers 4,
Hurricanes 1
RALEIGH, N.C. Henrik
Lundqvist made a season-
high 48 saves, and the New
York Rangers gave the Car-
olina Hurricanes their club-
record-tying seventh straight
home loss, 4-1.
Derek Stepan and Ryan
Callahan scored 31 seconds
apart, and Rick Nash added a
goal and an assist.
Maple Leafs 2,
Devils 1
NEWARK, N.J. Rookie
Leo Komarov and Tyler
Bozak scored and the Toronto
Maple Leafs extended the
reeling New Jersey Devils'
losing streak to six games
with a 2-1 victory.
James Reimer made 27
saves as the Maple Leafs
strengthened their position in
the tight Eastern Conference
playoff race.
Blackhawks 1,
Predators 0
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Bryan Bickell scored in the
first period, Ray Emery made
20 saves, and the Chicago
Blackhawks beat the
Nashville Predators 1-0 on
Saturday for their third win in
four games.


Emery posted his second
shutout and the 13th of his
career. Chicago is 16-3-4 in
one-goal games.
Kings 4, Oilers 1
LOS ANGELES Jeff
Carter had a goal and an as-
sist, Jonathan Quick made 23
saves, and Los Angeles kept
moving forward in the West-
ern Conference playoff race
with a victory over Edmonton.
Mike Richards and Slava
Voynov also scored for the
defending Stanley Cup
champions.
Jets 4, Flyers 1
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -
The host Jets scored four sec-
ond-period goals in less than
seven minutes, and Ondrej
Pavelec made 30 saves as
Winnipeg beat Philadelphia to
snap a five-game losing streak.
Evander Kane, Grant Clit-
some, Kyle Wellwood and
Bryan Little scored for the Jets.
Capitals 4,
Panthers 3
SUNRISE -Alex
Ovechkin recorded his 12th
career hat trick and added an
assist, and the surging Wash-
ington Capitals survived a late
rally by the Florida Panthers
for a 4-3 victory.
Ovechkin scored twice from
in close on the power play,
and weaved through traffic for
his other goal.
Canadiens 2,
Bruins 1
MONTREAL- Michael
Ryder's power-play goal 57
seconds into the second pe-
riod lifted the Montreal Cana-
diens to a 2-1 victory over the
Boston Bruins in a matchup of
the top two teams in the
Northeast Division.
Alex Galchenyuk also
scored for the Canadiens.


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Lightning's Tyler Johnson shoves New York
Islander John Tavares away from the puck in the second
period Saturday at Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, N.Y.


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UF takes it easy for spring game


Gators offense

centers around

RB Matt Jones

Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Matt Jones
took the opening handoff, found a
hole and nearly picked up a first
down.
Then he headed to the sideline.
For good.
The running back was so im-
pressive during Florida's spring
practice that coach Will
Muschamp decided to give him a
small workload in Saturday's
spring game, which resembled a
routine practice because of
injuries.
"It's the best we could do given
the circumstances," Muschamp
said. "Would I have liked to have
lined up and had a live game and
had 120 snaps? Sure, that would
have been good. But with that
being said, I thought it was a very
productive day and you look at the
situational work as far as moving
the ball, coming out, red-zone
work, one-minute."
The Gators had six 11-on-ll
scrimmage periods, with every-
one in the relatively spare crowd
watching an offense that has
mostly struggled during
Muschamp's two seasons in
Gainesville. Florida ranked 103rd


in the nation in total offense in
2012, up two spots from the previ-
ous year
Many of the Florida faithful
wanted to see whether junior
quarterback Jeff Driskel would
make any passing improvements,
whether the offense would find
any big-play receivers and
whether the patchwork offensive
line would offer more solid
protection.
The answers will have to wait
for Florida's Aug. 31 opener
against Toledo.
Instead, this is what the Gators
know for sure before the season:
Jones will be the offensive center-
piece in 2013.
"He's a physical runner,"
Muschamp said. "He understands
our protection. He's got great
hands in the throwing game.
There's no question he is an all-
around back He can do every-
thing for us, and he's shown it to
us for 14 straight practices."
He pretty much got to rest dur-
ing the 15th and final one.
Without him, the offense looked
fairly pedestrian. The Gators
managed two touchdowns on a
perfect spring day in Gainesville.
Walk-on running back Mark
Herndon scored on a 4-yard run,
and freshman Kelvin Taylor, the
son of former NFL star Fred Tay-
lor, scampered in from 7 yards
out
Driskel completed 9 of 20
passes for 70 yards, with no touch-
downs and no interceptions. He


Associated Press
Florida receiver Kent Taylor looks to run for extra yardage around defensive back Marcus Roberson
during the Gators' Orange and Blue game Saturday in Gainesville.


also ran five times for 28 yards,
but those don't include negative
sack yardage since he was wear-
ing a red, non-contact jersey
Driskel had reasons for the
mediocre numbers.
The Gators played without two
starters on the offensive line and
had nearly as many injuries at re-
ceiver Guards Jon Halapio (knee)
and Max Garcia (back) sat out


most of the drills, while receivers
Latroy Pittman (undisclosed in-
jury in practice Friday), Demar-
cus Robinson (ankle), Solomon
Patton (arm) and Quinton Dunbar
(shoulder) were limited.
Nonetheless, Driskel believes
the unit will be considerably more
advance in the second year under
offensive coordinator Brent
Pease.


Griner earns honor


Baylor center is

Associated Press

player of the year

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS Brittney
Griner has had no equal in her
stellar career at Baylor. Now
she's part of a very select group.
The 6-foot-8 senior star
earned The Associated Press
player of the year award for the
second straight season Saturday
Notre Dame's Muffet McGraw
was selected coach of the year.
Griner is just the third player
to earn the award in consecutive
years, joining Seimone Augustus
of LSU and Chamique Hold-
sclaw of Tennessee. Connecti-
cut's Maya Moore won it twice in
a three-year span.
"Those names are pretty big;
to have my name in there is an
honor," Griner said.
The three-time All-American
got 37 votes from the 40-member
national media panel that se-
lects the weekly Top 25. Stan-
ford's Chiney Ogwumike
received two votes while Notre
Dame's Skylar Diggins earned
the other.
Griner helped hand McGraw's
team its only loss of the season
back in early December. The
Irish haven't lost since, winning
a school-record 30 straight
games. Not bad for a team that
graduated three starters from
last season.
"I think she's one of the best
players to play the game," Mc-
Graw said. "She definitely has
been a really dominating pres-
ence in every way"
McGraw, who also won the
award in 2001, received 24 votes.
She did one of her best coaching
jobs this season, getting the Irish
back to the Final Four for a third
straight season.
"She's well deserving of the
award this year with what we
lost," Diggins said. "To keep us
winning like this that means a
lot. She's a great person and
knows how to win and motivate
her players to give their all for
her. When you have someone
who cares about you, you'll do


Associated Press
Baylor center Brittney Griner was selected as The Associated Press women's college basketball player
of the year Saturday.
anything." cepted it. Final Four, was third.
McGraw was happy to share Last year's winner, Griner's "It's certainly an honor and
the award with her coaching coach Kim Mulkey, was second truly a staff award," McGraw
staff and team who were in at- with seven votes. Cal coach said. "I got the best staff in
tendance for the ceremony and Lindsay Gottlieb, who guided women's basketball and we def-
let out a loud cheer when she ac- the Golden Bears to their first initely are a great team."


"I think it will be a lot better,"
Driskel said. "We have more guys
that can stretch the field. We have
good team speed at the receiver
position. Our line is blocking a lot
better, and us quarterbacks know-
ing when we have the opportunity
to launch the ball. It's kind of
everything working together and
running the ball well to set up
those plays."


Youth BRIEFS

CR Sharks football
signups underway
The Crystal River Sharks
are conducting registration
for the upcoming 2013 season
for all divisions ages 5 through
15 for both football and
cheerleading.
Registration fees are $125
for football and $100 for
cheerleading payable by
check, cash or credit cards.
For more information, contact
Dennis or Toni Treadway at
352-563-2690.
Registrations are at the
Crystal River Mall food court
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The signup dates are:
April 13, 20, 27.
May 4, 11, 25.
June 1,8, 15, 22, 29.
Citrus County Kids
Triathlon coming
A Citrus County Kids
Triathlon feature
swim/bike/run for children
ages 5 to 15 will take place
May 11 in Inverness. Early
bird registration fee is $20 if
received by April 14; $25 from
April 15 to May 8.
There will be two divisions
for the children: juniors, ages
5 to 10, and senior, ages 11 to
15. There will also be a
Tri4Fun division for all ages
who wish to try.
For more information, call
DRC Sports at 352-637-2475
or visit www.Citruskidstri.com.
Register now for
Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center
in Crystal River will be in June
and July at Soquili Stables.
Eight week-long sessions
will be offered from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Campers can learn to ride and
care for a horse.
There will be equine activi-
ties, in the saddle and on the
ground, as well as crafts,
swimming and more.
For more information and
to sign up, visit the website at
www.faithhavencrc.org
/camp_soquili.php, call
352-206-2990, or email
soquili.stables@gmail.com.


Recreation B RI E FS


P.L.A.Y.
The next season of P.L.A.Y.
will begin the week of April 8.
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation's P.L.A.Y. programs are
designed for children ages 3
to 5 who aren't quite ready for
the organized sports leagues
with in the county.
The P.L.A.Y. programs of-
fered in the upcoming session
includes basketball, which will
be held at the Citrus County
Resource Center on Mondays
or Wednesday; flag football,
located at Bicentennial Park
on Tuesday or Thursdays;
and cheerleading, which will
be held at Bicentennial Park
on Thursday. Boys and girls
are encouraged to join the
six-week program. After en-


rollment, each child receives
age-appropriate sports equip-
ment and a team T-shirt.
Please contact Crysta
Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth programs,
at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com,
for more information.
For persons with disabilities
requiring special accommoda-
tions, please contact our of-
fice five days prior to the
program so that proper con-
sideration may be given to the
request. For the hearing-
impaired, please contact
352-527-5901 (TTY) or
352-527-7540 (Voice).
Kayaking camp
Citrus County Parks &


Recreation, in partnership with
2 Sisters Kayak Tours, will
hold kayaking camps this sum-
mer. Each camp will be held
at Hernando Beach Park from
Monday through Thursday and
at Chassahowitzka River on
Friday.
Children ages 8 to 15 are
eligible, and the cost is $80
per child. We will offer four dif-
ferent weeks to choose from
throughout June and July.
Each week will have two time
slots that will accommodate
ages 8 to 11 and ages 12 to
15 separately. During this
camp, children will learn
kayak instruction, water and
boater safety and paddling
techniques.
On Friday, children can put


their skills to the test with a
fun-filled kayak adventure
down the Chassahowitzka
River! Kayaks, life preservers,
dry boxes, whistles and a
camp T-shirt will be provided.
Registration is limited to 12
children weekly for each age
group, so sign up now!
For more information, contact
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation at 352-527-7540 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
Men's softball
Another season of men's
softball is just around the cor-
ner. We encourage all to
come out and witness the tal-
ented Citrus County adult
leagues! Games are at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River


and are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., and 8:30 p.m. on
Monday.
This season is set to start
on April 15. Registration for
teams end April 8; for more in-
formation, call Maci at 352-
527-7547.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is sched-
uled to start up again on April
18. Games are played at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River on Thursdays starting
at 6:30 p.m.
For more information, call
Maci at 352-527-7547.
Kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kick-
ball league is for adults 18 and
up. Games are at 6:30 p.m.,


7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal
River, lasting an hour or nine
innings, whichever comes first.
The new season starts on
April 17. Registration for
teams end April 8; for more in-
formation, call Maci at 352-
527-7547.
Beach volleyball
Our second beach volley-
ball season will begin on April
23. Games are played at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River.
The team fees, days and
times are dependent on how
many teams we have sign up.
Registration for teams end
April 8; for more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7547.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 B5





B6 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


SPORTS


To block, or not to block?


Everyone in

NASCAR has

opinion on practice

Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va. Tony
Stewart says never. Joey Logano
says late in the race. Jimmie
Johnson says to protect a victory
in the final laps, except, perhaps,
if Stewart is behind him because
of the potential consequences.
Theories on blocking and when
it is acceptable vary widely in the
NASCAR garage.
The topic has become a hot one
since the last race two weeks ago
in California, where an infuriated
Stewart confronted Logano's crew
and accused the young driver of
blocking him late in the race.
"I don't like blocking. I never
have, I never will," Stewart said at
Martinsville Speedway "It's our
jobs as drivers to go out there and
try to pass people. That is what rac-
ing is about. We didn't have block-
ing 10 years ago. I don't know
where all of a sudden it became a
common deal or some people think
it's alright to do now and think it's
common practice. I don't believe it
should be common practice."
Others disagree, especially
when trying to hang on for a win.


Associated Press
Sprint Cup driver Tony Stewart thinks the strategy of blocking another
racer on the track has no place in NASCAR.


"Those are decisions we all
make on the track and when you
are in the sport long enough, you
realize what those decisions could
lead to and, honestly, who you
throw a block on," Johnson said.
"They could come back and
haunt you, so as we are trying to
win a race, win for our team, win
for our sponsors, there are these
other elements that you may not
consciously think of, but there is
this quick snapshot that flashes
through your mind when you
throw a block," he continued,
adding that if you see Stewart ap-
proaching in your rear view mir-


ror, "you probably expect some-
thing is going to happen."
Blocking can be keeping a car
in front of you by continually po-
sitioning your car in front of
theirs, or taking away their pre-
ferred line around the track by
adopting it for yourself, even if
it's not your preferred line. The
thinking is if a driver is gaining
on you, taking away his line can
slow that.
At Martinsville, where the
Sprint Cup Series will race 500
laps on Sunday, cars typically
swing wide heading into the turns
at each end of the track, then hug


the inside curb. A blocking ma-
neuver by a leader might cut
down that wide swing, forcing a
challenger to drive higher up in
the turn away from the curb.
It helps to know a fellow com-
petitor's views, and tendencies,
he said.
"He has made that known over
the years, so there are guys that
you probably don't want to do that
to," Johnson said of Stewart "But
then again, at the end of the race I
feel like things go to the next level
and they change and to defend for
a win, you have to take some ex-
treme measures at times."
Logano feels like he was taking
those measures at Fontana, but
wound up getting tangled up with
Denny Hamlin, sending Hamlin
into the wall, and Kyle Busch
passed them both and claimed
the victory
Presented with the same cir-
cumstances in Sunday's Sprint
Cup race, Logano would take into
account where in the 500 laps
they are, but at the end, said he'd
race the same, and thinks Stew-
art would, too.
"Late in the race, I would prob-
ably do the same thing if it's the
right move at the time, but like I
said, early in the race I wouldn't,"
Logano said. "This is one of the
toughest race tracks to get around
and passing cars is hard, so pa-
tience runs low here. It's a give-
and-take race, for sure."


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Sprint Cup

STP Gas Booster
500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Martinsville Speedway
Ridgeway,Va.
Lap length: .526 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 98.4.
2. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 98.364.
3. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 98.287.
4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 98.272.
5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 98.185.
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 98.185.
7. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 98.078.
8. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 98.017.
9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 97.962.
10. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 97.962.
11. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 97.947.
12. (56) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 97.941.
13. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 97.85.
14. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevy, 97.78.
15. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 97.719.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 97.643.
17. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 97.613.
18. (51) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 97.513.
19. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 97.458.
20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 97.442.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 97.432.
22. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 97.417.
23. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 97.382.
24. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 97.297.
25. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 97.247.
26. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 97.217.
27. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 97.177.
28. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 97.048.
29. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 96.993.
30. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 96.949.
31. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 96.904.
32. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 96.899.
33. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 96.879.
34. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 96.83.
35. (11) Mark Martin, Toyota, 96.755.
36. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 96.676.
37. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (7) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (83) D. Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.
41. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (87) J. Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 96.543.


Serena downs sister


Younger Williams

defeats Venus to

make Circle final

Associated Press

CHARLESTON, S.C. Serena
Williams routed Venus Williams 6-
1, 6-2 at the Family Circle Cup on
Saturday, the most one-sided match
in the sisters' long rivalry
Serena Williams won her 14th
straight match at the Family Circle.
The top-ranked woman will play for
her second straight title in this tour-
nament Sunday against Jelena
Jankovic. Jankovic, the 2007 cham-
pion, defeated Stefanie Voegele, 6-
4, 6-7 (6), 6-2 in the other semifinal.
This was the first time since 2009
the Williams sisters were playing
each other in a tournament. Serena
has won five straight in their series
and leads 14-10. Serena was en-
couraged to see her older sister
reach the semifinals after her strug-
gles the past 18 months in dealing
with an autoimmune disease.
"We've definitely been through a
lot since our last match. But, yeah,
we all come together at the end and
we just try to love each other like
we always do," Serena said.
Serena surged to a 4-0 lead and
won the first set in 22 minutes.
Venus, who withdrew from her pre-
vious event because of back prob-


Associated Press
Serena Williams hits a forehand shot Saturday during a semifinal match
against her sister Venus Williams at the Family Circle Cup tennis
tournament in Charleston, S.C.


lems, picked up her game a bit in
the second set but it was hardly
enough.
The match ended when Venus
misplayed Serena's final serve. The
sisters shook hands at the net, nei-
ther looking overly pleased. Serena
waited until her sister left the court
to cheers. This victory by Serena
surpassed her 6-2, 6-2 win over
Venus at Miami in 2002.
The matchup drew a single-ses-
sion record of 9,538 to the stadium,
exceeding the previous high in 2008
who watched Serena Williams de-
feat Maria Sharapova in that year's
quarterfinals.
The Williams sisters came off a


long, grueling Friday when both
had to win twice to get this far. Ser-
ena suggested that perhaps the full
day of matches three in less than
24 hours took a toll on Venus.
US trails Serbia 2-1
after Bryan brothers lose
BOISE, Idaho- The United States
trails Serbia 2-1 in a Davis Cup quarter-
final after the top-ranked doubles team
of Bob and Mike Bryan lost to Serbia's
Nenad Zimonjic and Ilija Bozoljac 7-6
(5), 7-6 (1), 5-7, 4-6, 15-13 on Saturday.
Fans in the arena were on the edge
of their seats as the match went
4 hours, 23 minutes.


Associated Press
Driver Johnny Sauter does a burnout as he celebrates
winning the Kroger 250 NASCAR Truck series auto race
Saturday at Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va.


Sauter claims


Kroger 250 race


Driver passes Burton on restart

late in Martinsville win


Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va.
- Johnny Sauter passed
Jeb Burton for the lead
on a restart with 17 laps
to go Saturday and won
the NASCAR truck race
at Martinsville Speedway,
his second victory in two
series races this season.
Sauter earned his
eighth career victory in
the series, and second at
Martinsville.
"Two for two starting
out. This is unbeliev-
able," Sauter said in
Victory Lane.


He got there by passing
Burton, the pole-sitting
rookie making just his
seventh start in the series,
on the outside following a
restart on the 234th of 250
laps, and then holding on
as the field behind him
shuffled.
Matt Crafton rallied to
finish second and Burton
was third, followed by
Timothy Peters and Dar-
rell Wallace Jr.
The next Camping
World Trucks race is on
April 14 at Rockingham
Speedway in North
Carolina.


Sports BRIEFS


Rays pitcher Niemann
put on 15-day disabled list
ST. PETERSBURG The Tampa Bay
Rays have put right-hander Jeff Niemann on
the 15-day disabled list because of soreness
in his pitching shoulder.
The move was retroactive to March 28 and
announced before Friday night's game against
the Cleveland Indians.
Niemann has yet to appear in a game this
season. He competed for the fifth spot in the
starting rotation during spring training and
was moved to the bullpen after Roberto Her-
nandez won the job.
Right-hander Brandon Gomes was
recalled from Triple-A Durham to fill the roster
opening.


Rays apologize for
mascot posing with sign
ST. PETERSBURG The Tampa Bay
Rays apologized for what the team described
as a lapse in judgment by a club mascot pho-
tographed holding an "inappropriate sign" mak-
ing reference to Steve Irwin, a popular
television personality and wildlife expert who
died in 2006 after being attacked by a stingray.
The furry mascot known as Raymond was
handed a "Rays To Do List" by a fan during
Wednesday night's game against Baltimore.
The sign had "1. Steve Irwin" crossed off and
listed the World Series second.
The team issued an apology after a photo
of the mascot holding the sign wound up on
the internet.


-10Om











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
Morning commuters fill the platform in March as they exit a train in New York's Times Square subway station. A historic decline in the
number of U.S. whites and the fast growth of Latinos are blurring traditional black-white color lines, testing the limits of civil rights laws
and reshaping political alliances as "whiteness" begins to lose its numerical dominance.





Our changing face

Rise of Latino population blurs U.S. racial lines
Rise of Latno population blurs U.S. racial lines


HOPE YEN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON

Welcome to the
new off-white
America.
A historic decline in the number of U.S.
whites and the fast growth of Latinos are
blurring traditional black-white color lines,
testing the limits of civil rights laws and
reshaping political alliances as "whiteness"
begins to lose its numerical dominance.
Long in coming, the demographic shift was
most vividly illustrated in last November's
re-election of President Barack Obama,
the first black president, despite a histor-
ically low percentage of white supporters.
It's now a potent backdrop to the immi-
gration issue being debated in Congress
that could offer a path to citizenship for 11
million mostly Hispanic illegal immi-
grants. Also, the Supreme Court is decid-
ing cases this term on affirmative action
and voting rights that could redefine race
and equality in the U.S.
The latest census data and polling from
The Associated Press highlight the historic
change in a nation in which non-Hispanic
whites will lose their majority in the next
generation, somewhere around the year 2043.
Despite being a nation of immigrants,
America's tip to a white minority has never
occurred in its 237-year history and will be
a first among the world's major post-indus-
trial societies. Brazil, a developing nation,
has crossed the threshold to "majority-
minority" status; a few cities in France
and England are near, if not past that
point.
The international experience and re-
cent U.S. events point to an uncertain fu-
ture for American race relations.
In Brazil, where multiracialism is cele-
brated, social mobility remains among the
world's lowest for blacks while wealth is
concentrated among whites at the top. In
France, race is not recorded on govern-
ment census forms and people share a
unified Gallic identity, yet high levels of
racial discrimination persist.


The numbers already
demonstrate that being
white is fading as a
test of American-ness:
More U.S. babies are now born to
minorities than whites, a mile-
stone reached last year.
More than 45 percent of students
in kindergarten through 12th
grade are minorities. The Census
Bureau projects that in five years
the number of nonwhite children
will surpass 50 percent.
The District of Columbia, Hawaii,
California, New Mexico and Texas
have minority populations greater
than 50 percent. By 2020, eight
more states are projected to join
the list: Arizona, Florida, Georgia,
Maryland, Mississippi, Nevada,
New Jersey and New York. Latinos
already outnumber whites in New
Mexico; California will tip to a
Latino plurality next year.
By 2039, racial and ethnic minori-
ties will make up a majority of the
U.S. working-age population, help-
ing to support a disproportion-
ately elderly white population
through Social Security and other
payroll taxes. More than 1 in 4
people ages 18-64 will be Latino.
The white population, now at 197.8
million, is projected to peak at 200
million in 2024, before entering a
steady decline in absolute numbers.
Currently 63 percent of the U.S.
population, the white share is ex-
pected to drop below 50 percent by
2043, when racial and ethnic mi-
norities will collectively become a
U.S. majority. Hispanics will drive
most of the growth, due mostly to
high birth rates, jumping in share
from 17 percent to 26 percent.
Source: The U.S. Census Bureau
(http://www.census.gov)
"The American experience has always
been a story of color. In the 20th century it
was a story of the black-white line. In the


21st century we are moving into a new off-
white moment," says Marcelo Suarez-
Orozco, a global expert on immigration
and dean of UCLAs Graduate School of
Education & Information Studies.
"Numerically, the U.S. is being trans-
formed. The question now is whether our
institutions are being transformed," he said.
The shift is being driven by the modern
wave of U.S. newcomers from Latin Amer-
ica and Asia. Their annual inflow of
650,000 people since 1965, at a rate that's
grown in recent years, surpasses the pace
of the last great immigration wave a cen-
tury ago. That influx, from 1820 to 1920,
brought in Irish, Germans, Italians and
Jews from Europe and made the gateway
of Ellis Island, N.Y, an immigrant land-
mark, symbolizing freedom, liberty and
the American dream.
An equal factor is today's aging white
population, mostly baby boomers, whose
coming wave of retirements will create a
need for first- and second-generation im-
migrants to help take their place in the
workforce.
The pace of assimilation for today's Lati-
nos and Asian-Americans is often com-
pared with that of the Poles, Irish, Italians
and Jews who arrived around the turn of
the 20th century and eventually merged
into an American white mainstream.
There was a backlash. By the 1930s, an
immigrant-weary America had imposed
strict quotas and closed its borders. Those
newly arrived were pushed to conform and
blend in with a white mainstream, bene-
fiting from New Deal economic programs
that generally excluded blacks. The im-
migration quotas also cut off the supply of
new workers to ethnic enclaves and reduced
social and economic contacts between im-
migrants and their countries of origin.
"America of the Melting Pot comes to
End," read a 1924 opinion headline in The
New York Times. The author, a U.S. sena-
tor, pledged that strict new immigration
quotas would "preserve racial type as it
exists here today"
Today, data show Latinos are embrac-
ing U.S. life but also maintaining strong
ties to their heritage, aided by a new
stream of foreign-born immigrants who
See Page C3


Book REVIEW



A compelling case to fear the bomb


Philip Taubman,
"The Partnership: Five
Cold Warriors and Their
Quest to Ban the Bomb"
(Harper Publishers,
478 pages, $30).
During the period
from the end of
World War II until
the collapse of the Soviet
Union in 1991, the pri-
mary focus of global poli-
tics rested on the balance
of nuclear weapons be-
tween the United States
and its allies and the So-
viet Union and its allies.
This was a dangerous 40-


rhetoric?" And on top of
this, we know that Islamic
extremists, such as al-
Qaida, were and are ac-
tively trying to buy the
weapons or at least the
technology.
What the book de-
scribes is the collective
effort of an important
group of Americans who
are trying to drastically
reduce the thousands of
existing nuclear weapons
around the globe.
These five are promi-
nent political figures who
See Page C3


plus years because one
never knew what might
unleash a nuclear war. So
both sides went to great
lengths to arm them-
selves with nuclear mis-
siles and bombs to deter a
potential attack.
In 1991, the entire pic-
ture changed when the
Soviet Union collapsed.


But then everything
changed again because of
the stunning events of
Sept. 11, 2001. Now Wash-
ington's focus shifted to a
nebulous, nonstate
enemy with no fixed ter-
ritory that could be
threatened with nuclear
weapons.
This important book ar-


gues that these leftover
nuclear weapons ought to
be under some control,
and the numbers greatly
reduced. The current
nightmares are, "What
happens if Iran gets the
bomb?" or "What hap-
pens if the new leader of
North Korea follows
through on his bellicose


Once in a

while, it's

good to be

humbled
We all have bad
days.
God sends
bad days to make sure
we remain humble crea-
tures and don't start be-
lieving that we are in
actual control of our lives.
On a recent morning I
had the unfortunate luck
to start my day with a
7:30 a.m. dentist appoint-
ment. The appointment
became more compli-
cated than anticipated,
and after multiple shots
of pain-numbing med-
ication, I left the den-
tist's office with a
swollen face and a right
ear that was no longer
working.
It felt like I came down
too fast in an airplane and
my ears failed to pop.
So there I was with a
swollen face, a slight
drool and ears that
weren't working.
As I drove back to the
office, I was contacted by
a colleague who needed
an urgent favor. She was
having a more serious
medical emergency and
could not make an ap-
pointment I was needed
to step in and help out.
OK, it was important
and I could still walk, so
off I went.
As I drove in a new di-
rection, I had to admit I
had developed a blind-
ing headache from the
dentist's work and I had
to do something about it.
At this point I had a
swollen face, a slight
drool, ears that weren't
working and a blinding
headache.
So I stopped at the
drug store and picked
up some Tylenol and a
Diet Dr Pepper. If the
Tylenol didn't work, the
Dr Pepper would cer-
tainly help.
As I got back into the
car and tried to open the
cap to the Tylenol bottle,
I was dismayed to dis-
cover the little plastic
cap would not come off.
I squeezed and pulled
and lined up the little
arrows, but no luck. The
cap was not coming off.
Not to be outdone by
the evil minds in the
plastics industry, I
climbed into the back of
the car and got my tool
kit. I extracted a pair of
needle-nose pliers and
went to work on the
Tylenol bottle cap.
Now please remem-
ber: I had a swollen face,
a slight drool, ears that
weren't working and a
blinding headache.
It took just one second
of work with those sharp
needle-nose pliers for
me to slip on the stub-
born Tylenol bottle cap
and catch the meat of my
index finger I sliced
through the skin and
began to bleed. And throb.
So now I had a
swollen face, a slight
drool, ears that weren't
working, a blinding
headache and a bleed-
ing finger.
That's when I pulled
the hammer out of the
tool kit and began to slam
the Tylenol bottle like
an East Berliner trying
to knock down the wall.
A woman sitting in the
car next to me looked
over and tried to lock
her doors without being
noticed.
See Page C3


What the book describes is the collective effort
of an important group of Americans who are trying
to drastically reduce the thousands of existing
nuclear weapons around the globe.







Page C2 *SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


"Charm is a glow within a woman that
casts a most becoming light on others."
John Mason Brown, "Vogue," Nov. 15, 1956


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................publisher
Mike Arnold ............... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................... ........ citizen m ember
N Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


RECORDS REQUESTS




Commissioner



deserves pass



on paying for



records


C commissioner Scott
Adams should not be
charged for requesting
public records because keep-
ing an eye on county govern-
ment is what his constituents
elected him to do.
As an elected official,
Adams is responsible for
making sure government is
efficient, free of waste and
fraud. In order to do that, he
must be afforded
the opportunity to THE I,
research areas
where he feels Adams
there may be at pay
wasteful spend- public r
ing, poor decision
making or corrup- OUR OH
tion. Even if he mm
does not uncover should
fraud and waste, should
he has provided
and answer to the segment of
voters who feel local govern-
ment is corrupt.
However, in moving forward
with these requests, Adams
should be cognizant of the
stress and expense that mul-
tiple, far-reaching searches
can cause on staff time and
resources and balance those
requests accordingly.
Additionally, he should be
cautious about requests that
are lodged to assist him fi-
nancially. As commissioner
and the owner of his own pri-
vate landfill in Sumter
County, it is unethical for him
to use his position to further
his business interests. He
should tread carefully in all


Professionals all
To the two ladies from Nature
Coast EMS, the Citrus County
Sheriff's (Office) and Dr. Kelly
Adams from Citrus Memorial
hospital: I can't say enough
about your professionalism and
compassion on Wednesday
evening, March 27, on South
Pleasant Grove Road in Inver-
ness. Just another example of
the county's finest. God
bless all of you for
making a bad situation
better. A true honor to
have you in this county.
Straighten up
I'm calling in regarding
the impact fees, which
is a big deal in Citrus CAL
County. I'd just like to
say that the people, the 563-
folks that run this county
are so inept, it's "jokable."
And I think they should all go to
Washington because that's the
same group that's there. They've
been around for many, many years
and nothing changed in this
county and now they're scream-
ing that everything's got to change
and we have to get new growth.
Were their eyes been opened and
shut all this time? This county's
really got to straighten up.
Heartbroken in Lecanto
To the person who stole the solar
lights at Magnolia Cemetery in
Lecanto: Hope it benefited you, as
that is all we had left to memorialize
our loved ones. Hope your yard
looks nice. God will be your judge.


S
is
i
r(

p

r


areas regarding his own com-
pany, A.C.M.S., and any link to
the county landfill. Exposing
fraud and waste at the county
landfill is an acceptable use
of public requests; however,
using that information to po-
sition his company to benefit
from decisions made about
the landfill is not acceptable.
While Adams' public
records requests have been
many and sweep-
SSUE: ing, he must not
be penalized or
balks treated differ-
ng for ently than other
records. commissioners.
In the past,
'INION: county staff has
always worked
nsioners with commission-
not pay. ers to honor their
public records
requests, and that should not
change simply because of the
volume of requests.
Going forward, Commis-
sioner Adams should con-
sider the impact his larger
public records requests have
on staff time and budget them
accordingly as to not overtax
staff time and resources. He
should also be mindful of
when his requests venture
from public interest to per-
sonal business and consider
offering to pay for those
requests.
When it comes to access to
information for public officials
to make educated decisions
on policies, there should be
no barriers in place.


Differences of opinion
To the caller who thinks and
says that Scott Adams is the
one who doesn't agree with the
other four commissioners: That
person needs a reality check.
The four other commissioners
disagree with everything Scott
Adams says or does. Come on,
Citrus County. Wake up and
smell the coffee.
0%__M- A_-I - dial-


0579


uood to see nflag
It's great to see the
big United States flag
flying again at the en-
trance to Sugarmill
Woods and watching it
being put up. It was
cradled lovingly to
make sure this symbol
of our country did not
touch the ground. Well
done, well done.


Watch the yellow light
I'm calling in reference to
"Obey laws," about the cameras
for the stop-and-go lights in
Dunnellon. If they'll just check
and see that the yellow light is
only 2 to 3 seconds long, they
will understand. They said they
have never gotten a ticket for
running a red light. The only rea-
son some people do is because
if they're right in the middle
when the yellow light comes on
and it shows red at the taillight
of their vehicle, it will show that
they had run the red light, which
they have not. So the other per-
son who did write in or call in is
very mistaken about this.


Support families by



investing in children


When families have the
community support
they need to provide
nurturing experiences for chil-
dren, those children invariably
become productive
adults and ab- A
solutely capable of -
contributing to a
thriving economy
We know that from
our own Publix ex- /
perience with thou-
sands of associates,
and we know it in so
many other ways. Carol
Clearly, those chil- Bar
dren in families OTF
lacking support are
at much greater risk VOI
for child abuse and
neglect, educational challenges
and all sorts of other poor
outcomes.
When we invest in communi-
ties to create environments
where all children can thrive,
everyone benefits. At Publix we


JI

H
1
(


offer many programs to support
families for example, the
Publix Baby Club, Reading Pals
and investments in priorities
established by community-
based United Way
leaders. As we see it,
family-friendly poli-
cies and access to
quality early child
development are
not only good for
families, but also
good for business.
April is Child
enkins Abuse Prevention
nett Month, and as a
IER long-term sponsor of
Children's Week,
DES Publix is pleased to
participate in the
Pinwheels for Prevention
launch event at the Florida
Governor's Mansion, hosted by
First Lady Ann Scott.
We take our responsibility se-
riously to inform the commu-
nity and our policymakers of


the issues facing our children
and families and provide
proven solutions to address
those crucial concerns.
I encourage Florida's leaders
to support increased funding
for programs like Healthy Fam-
ilies Florida, an evidence-
based, voluntary home visiting
program proven to prevent
child abuse and neglect in 98
percent of the high-risk families
served. That investment pays
dividends for today's children
and our communities, state,
and country for generations to
come.
We all share the responsibil-
ity to give children healthy and
nurturing experiences to help
them achieve their fullest po-
tential. The time to do that is
now.

CarolJenkins Barnett is president
of the Lakeland-based Publix
SuperMarkets Charities.


Adams should pay
Commissioner Adams is now
complaining about paying for
public records. According to a
recent article in the Chronicle,
'Adams is affording himself use
of the public records law to ferret
out information about the area
that interests him most the
county landfill. Adams, who
owns a private landfill in Sumter
County, has said he believes the
Citrus County landfill is poorly
run and full of financial waste."
Sometimes things are not what
they appear to be. Disruptive
actions such as these only
serve to distract people from
the real motives that seem to
get buried underneath all the
hoopla. It appears Commis-
sioner Adams has self-serving
ulterior motives for requesting
volumes of information from
the county And if this is so, then
he should pay, or AM.C.S should
pay, for every minute of man-
power hours being expended
by county workers to provide
the information he requested.
It should make no difference
if the request is extraordinary,
time-consuming or not.
Commissioner Adams is part
owner of a landfill business in
Sumter County, AM.C.S., together
with state Sen. Charlie Dean and
his son, Charlie Dean Jr Their
company already acquired a
$20 million landfill contract from
Marion County, and from what
I have heard and based on
Commissioner Adams' actions,
it does appear to be their intent
to also seek the landfill business
for Citrus County It appears
they have already started by
trying to get the landfill busi-
ness from ED.S. Disposal.
Commissioner Adams is be-
coming fixated on this landfill
issue for self-serving reasons -
bad omen. You can't serve two
masters, and by working for
the county and then working
against it, Commissioner
Adams will only create insu-
perable dysfunction and more
problems than what he will
solve. This has got to be a huge
conflict of interest besides


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

being unethical actions involv-
ing a public official. I'm sur-
prised things have gotten this
far in the public forum.
Moreover, this is not the time
to employ divisive, cloak-and-
dagger maneuvers and verbal
badgering. We need solutions
now for the many issues facing
our county, and not more
headaches and turmoil.
The 1995 pan/scraper situa-
tion was unfortunate. Well,
maybe not The facts are that
hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars have already been spent
fixing it How many hundreds
of thousands more should ad-
ditionally be spent repairing
it? These costly repairs do not
increase the value of the
equipment, and besides, it
sounds like this type of heavy
equipment is not what is
needed to better serve the
needs of county projects.
I'm sure once all the vari-
ables are taken into considera-
tion, an appropriate action
plan can be developed amica-
bly, and then Commissioner
Adams needs to move on al-
ready, or come clean.
Edna Mattos
Hernando


Eliminate toll roads
It's been reported that the
secretary of the Florida De-
partment of Transportation,
Ananth Prasad, wants to re-en-
ergize the Suncoast Parkway 2
project and extend the road 27
miles north as an economic boon
and to relieve congestion on
Interstate 75. The Suncoast
Parkway will never realize its
full potential as long as it's a
toll road.
The first American turnpike
toll road was a state enterprise,
authorized by a Virginia act of
1785. American turnpikes thrived
from 1800 to 1840, as did the
passenger stagecoach and the
Conestoga wagon. It may have
been a great way to pay for roads
200 years ago, but not today
Toll roads are grossly ineffi-
cient. They require vehicles to
stop or slow down, causing
backups, accidents, delays and
frustration. Toll collection wastes
time and fuel, raises vehicle
operating costs, and increases
pollution. Collection costs for
infrastructure and employees,
etc., can absorb up to one-third
of revenues (that's a waste of
money that should be going
into roads and bridges). Where
the tolled roads are less con-
gested than the parallel "free"
roads, traffic diversion resulting
from the tolls increases con-
gestion on the free road system
and reduces its usefulness.
Whenever I travel to the Tampa
area, I take 1-75 to avoid the
Suncoast tolls. I never use the
Florida Turnpike for the same
reason. Between registration,
insurance and gas, driving in
Florida is expensive enough.
I'm not exacerbating my costs
by paying unnecessary tolls.
Toll roads are still in use in
only 26 states. Tolls are bad for
the environment, they are bad
for business, and they are not
safe for drivers. Tolls should
be eliminated altogether. The
gas tax is the easiest and
fairest way to collect revenues.
Michael Sullivan
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS \ to the Editor





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


And when the money runs out, we'll go home


Shortly after noon on
Sunday, Sept. 25,
1966, Cheryl and I
arrived in Daytona Beach.
It was our second day as
married folks. As we rode
along Atlantic Avenue, we
came to the Grand Prix
Motel, a small, beachfront
property which appeared
to be clean and well-kept.
I parked, we went into the
office, inquired about
rates and asked to see a
kitchenette. We inspected
the mini-apartment and it
met our expectations. We
showed the desk clerk our
identification and mar-
riage certificate then, for
$9 per night, we were al-
lowed to rent our honey-
moon haven.


We needed to shop for
supplies, including sodas,
snacks, sandwich fixings,
milk, eggs and cereal, but
it was already one o'clock
and shopping could wait.
"Ready for lunch?" I
invitingly asked and, ea-
gerly nodding, my wife
replied, "Yes."
Directly across the
street from the motel was
a Morrison's Cafeteria. In
their heyday, Morrison's
establishments were my
most favorite places to eat.
They served entrees typi-
cal of cafeteria-style din-
ing; nonetheless, the food
was very good. Roast beef
could be ordered to one's
liking and there were nu-
merous other choices.


"Will Morrison's be the money runs out, we'll
OK?" I asked and she an- go home."
swered, "It'll be great." Cheryl laughed comfort-
As we approached the ably; even so, her question
food service had been an
line, I felt my unexpected
wife tug on my and heart-
sleeve. I turned. rending experi-
to face her, and f ence for me.
like a child Later, she
speaking to her would explain
father, she that it was sim-
asked, "What ply what she
may I have?" was used to
I instinc- Fred Brannen doing. During
tively gave a A SLICE those days, on
response, the rare occa-
words for us to OF LIFE sions when her
live by, not only father could
for the rest of our honey- take his family out to eat,
moon, but for the rest of she was the oldest child
our lives: "Anything you and realized the budget
want, baby doll, and when was tight. She never


wanted to put a financial
strain on him and she did-
n't want to put one on me.
This incident endeared
her even more to me; nev-
ertheless, I began to try to
help her fully understand
that, as her husband, it was
my privilege to be her
provider, but she was an
equal partner in our mar-
riage and that included
making decisions about
how to spend whatever
money we might have.
The days passed much
too quickly
The initial thought had
been that we'd go home on
Thursday afternoon, but
evidently Cheryl had been
paying close attention
when I'd proclaimed,


"Anything you want, baby
doll, and when the money
runs out, we'll go home."
As check-out time was
approaching on Thursday,
she asked, "Can we stay for
just one more night?"
I was trying to conceal
my concern and reaching
for my wallet to see how
much cash was left when
Cheryl opened her purse,
reached into an inside
pocket, pulled out a small
but sufficient stash and
gleefully announced, "We
still have money!"
We stayed another night.


Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


-= Letter to THE EDITOR =


Support forward
thinking
On Friday evening,
March 22, I attended a
forum sponsored by Ms.
Brenda Roberts and Mr.
Robert Neff, two of the
candidates seeking mem-
bership on the Pine Ridge
Property Owners Associa-
tion (PRPOA) board of di-
rectors in the upcoming
April 9, election. I was
pleasantly surprised and
humbled to hear such for-
ward thinking by two out-
standing individuals who
have stepped forward
with such passion and de-
sire to serve the Pine
Ride (PR) community to
help move it forward. PR.
has so much to offer if it
were only properly
planned and maintained.
First and foremost, PR. is
an equestrian community
with 27 miles of horse
trails, a barn to board at
least 17 horses, riding are-
nas and pastures. Other
amenities include such
things as several tennis
courts, a shuffleboard
court, a small children's
playground, a community
center that is underuti-
lized, a model airplane
field and an 18-hole golf
course. All of these
amenities are great and
do help to increase prop-
erty values just ask any
real estate agent These
amenities need to be pro-
tected and added to as
funds become available.



FACE
Continued from Page C1

arrive each year. Hispan-
ics, officially an ethnic
group, strive to learn Eng-
lish and 1 in 4 intermarry,
taking a white spouse.
Nowadays, immigrants
face less pressure to con-
form than did their coun-
terparts from a century ago.
Latinos are protected as a
minority, benefiting from
the 1950s civil rights move-
ment pioneered by blacks.
Nearly 40 percent of Latinos
now resist a white identity
on census forms, checking
a box indicating "some
other race" to establish a
Hispanic race identity.


We need a properly
planned entrance for the
County Road 486 entrance,
upgrades to the riding are-
nas, a well-planned and -
executed beautification
project for Pine Ridge
Boulevard, frequent trash
removal to keep our
streets clean and beauti-
ful, a ball field for the
kids in this neighborhood,
safe walking trails and
bike paths, street lights,
and better utilization of
our community center.
First, a good long-range
plan must be developed
that priorities these and
additional projects that
have been presented by
the residents of PR. We all
realize this plan cannot be
all things to everyone. Pri-
oritized projects that
meet the cut should bene-
fit all of PR. and add to
property values.
These things cannot take
place without a forward-
looking planning board to-
gether with unbiased
professional assessments
and guidance. I believe
these two individuals with
their professional back-
grounds, along with their
passion to serve the com-
munity, will make the board
once again transparent to
the residents and move PR.
forward. I urge all PR. res-
idents to give them a call,
make your concerns known
and most of all give them
your support on April 9.
Hugh Morton
Pine Ridge resident


While growing diversity
is often a step toward a
post-racial U.S., sociolo-
gists caution that the poli-
tics of racial diversity
could just as easily be-
come more magnified.
A first-of-its-kind AP poll
conducted in 2011 found
that a slight majority of
whites expressed racial
bias against Hispanics and
that their attitudes were
similar to or even greater
than the bias they held to-
ward blacks. Hispanics
also remained somewhat
residentially segregated
from whites in lower-in-
come neighborhoods, hurt
in part by the disappear-
ance of good-paying, mid-
skill manufacturing jobs
that helped white ethnics


A (VISE) S IP ON REAL ITYrw


Feeding armadillos Deed restrictions Records for free


CAL

563-0579


In other words, is the caller
about armadillos suggesting
going out and buying grubs
and spreading them over
your lawn so that the ar-
madillos don't have to for-
age for food? I don't think
that will work. If they don't
find food in your lawn, they
will go elsewhere. They are
not in my yard and I keep
the bugs out too.


Rising Hispanic population
Hispanics stand to make the biggest U.S. popul
over the next half-century, according to Census
',,,..- Black Asian Hispanic*
2 5 0 m illio n ........................................................................

200




50 ..... .............
50


2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 205
*Hispanic is considered an ethnicity, nota race; Hispanics ca


SOURCE: Census Bureau
rise into the middle class


during most
century


of the 20th


The AP sur
ducted with
from Stanfor


To the guy worried about the
deed restrictions at Sugarmill:
Don't worry. They don't en-
force them anyway. I have a
guy down the street who
brings his work truck home
every night and it sits there
all night and weekends even
though he has a three-car
garage. His lawn is so dry,
even the weeds that get mowed
once a month are dying.


the University of Michigan
and NORC at the Univer-
lation gains sity of Chicago.
projections. Harvard economist
George Borjas projects
that by 2030, the children
........................ of today's immigrants will
earn on average 10 per-
179.0 million cent to 15 percent less than
nonimmigrant Americans,
128.8 million based on past trends, and
9, that Latinos will particu-
S... larly struggle because of
55.3 million high rates of poverty, lack
-i of citizenship and lower
rates of education. In 1940,
40.6 million the children of early 20th-
50 2055 2060 century white ethnics
fared much better on aver-
an be of any race. age, earning 21.4 percent
AP more than nonimmigrants.
rvey was con- About 35 percent of His-
researchers panic babies are currently
d University, born into poverty, com-


I would like to make a
comment about paying for
public records. It said the
requests kept the staffers
running ragged. Don't the
staff get paid to fulfill the
requests for public records?
Mr. Adams should be able
to view any public records
- or anyone else in this
county that they want to
see without having to pay.


pared with 41 percent of
blacks and 20 percent for
whites.
"How America responds
now to the new challenges
of racial and ethnic diver-
sity will determine
whether it becomes a
more open and inclusive
society in the future one
that provides equal oppor-
tunities and justice for
all," said Daniel Lichter, a
Cornell sociologist and
past president of the Pop-
ulation Association of
America.
Associated Press writers
Elaine Ganley in Montfer-
meil, France, Jenny Barch-
field in Rio de Janeiro and
Michelle Rindels in Las
Vegas contributed to this
report.


REVIEW
Continued from Page C1

were known to have had roles in
shaping the U.S. buildup of nu-
clear weapons between the end of
World War II and the collapse of
the Soviet Union. One is Henry
Kissinger, whose book "Nuclear
Deterrence and American For-
eign Policy" shaped our weapons
buildup to counter the U.S.S.R.
He was President Richard
Nixon's secretary of state, guiding
Washington through dangerous
waters. The second is Sam Nunn,
the hawkish Democratic senator
who was the chairman of the Sen-
ate Armed Services Committee.
From that position he was a cen-
tral force behind America's nu-
clear buildup. The third is George
Schultz, a member of Nixon's cab-
inet and later Ronald Reagan's
secretary of state. The fourth,
Sydney Drell, is a physicist with
extensive government experi-
ence. The fifth is William Perry,
an important figure in the devel-
opment of surveillance satellites
and a former secretary of defense.
Each was worried about the
possible use of nuclear weapons
in the post-Cold War period by na-
tion states or terrorist groups.
There were just too many "loose
nukes" spread across the globe in


countries such as Pakistan, India
and Israel; meanwhile, North Korea
and Iran continue to work on their
own nuclear weapon programs.
The United States and Russia
have attempted to make equal re-
ductions in their numbers of nu-
clear weapons, but their solutions
have not entirely fixed the problems
or the threat of nuclear warfare.
After considerable bargaining
among the five men, they decided
to do something to lessen this
threat to future generations. The
opening barrage in their cam-
paign took the form of a long op-
ed piece in early January of 2007
published in the Wall Street Jour-
nal under the headline 'A World
Free of Nuclear Weapons." The
piece was surprising given the
backgrounds of the writers, and it
stirred considerable discussion in
the nuclear weapons community.
Some in the Pentagon strongly
feel that 1,500 operational war-
heads need to be on alert, with an-
other 3,500 in reserve. President
Obama has responded positively
to the idea and has made several
speeches laying out his ideas,
which closely parallel what the
five are pushing. As the president
observed, "Today the Cold War
has disappeared, but thousands of
these weapons have not."
The author of the book, Philip
Taubman, is a well-known jour-
nalist writing on international re-


lations for more than 30 years. His
book can be too technical at times
and one loses track of who said
what and when. The author pres-
ents a dispassionate analysis. His
focus is on the five men and how
they came to challenge this issue.
This issue of "too many nukes"
may end up being more important
and destructive than our current
focus on Islamic terrorism. The
book convincingly argues that we
have been ignoring the spread of
nuclear weapons and are not
making an effective effort to get
these bombs and missiles under
control. It will be a difficult task to
generate the necessary global
support to lessen the great num-
ber of nuclear weapons currently
existing, but the dangers are self-
evident- particularly if you read
this volume.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill
Woods resident who taught inter-
national politics and U.S. foreign
policy at the University ofNotre
Dame for 39 years prior to retir-
ing He served as a chairman of
the Department of Government
and International Studies for six
years, was director ofNotre
Dame's 20 different foreign stud-
ies programs for five years, and
held various other teaching and
administration positions at the
university.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

I finally managed to break
through the Tylenol bottle
and triumphantly tossed the
hammer into the backseat. I
looked over to the woman in
the next car and grinned like
county attorney Richard
Wesch does when he finds
out that Commissioner Scott
Adams is going to miss a
county commission meeting.
It took me a full five seconds
to realize that as I tossed the
hammer I had managed to
knock over the 20-ounce bot-
tle of Diet Dr. Pepper and it
was now emptying into the
driver seat of my car.
Since I was sitting in the
driver's seat of my car, the
temporary elation of remov-
ing the Tylenol cap was re-
placed by the sheer terror of
realizing that I was not soak-
ing wet from a sticky soft drink
So now I had a swollen
face, a slight drool, ears that
weren't working, a blinding
headache, a bleeding finger
and I was sitting in 20
ounces of Diet Dr Pepper.
The woman in the car next
to me backed up and drove
away with a sense of urgency


I got to my colleague's ap-
pointment a few minutes
early and took my suit jacket
from the back of the car. I
thought I could at least use
the jacket to hide the fact
that it appeared I had wet
my pants.
I went to the restroom to
see if I could wipe some of
the Diet Dr Pepper from
my pants, but found there
was no place to hang my
jacket. I carefully folded
the jacket and placed it on
the sink so I could clean up
my pants.
What I did not realize was
that the sink had one of
those motion detectors so
the faucet turned on, water
shot out and my jacket pock-
ets filled up with water.
So I went on to the ap-
pointment with a swollen
face, a slight drool, ears that
weren't working, a blinding
headache, a bleeding finger,
pants soaked with Diet Dr
Pepper and a jacket pocket
filled with water
In case you wonder, the
meeting was not a success.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the Chronicle.
Email him atgmulligan
@chronicleonline. com.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Get rid of impact fees
I was reading the newspaper and talk-
ing about the impact fees and Mr. Dennis
Damato, I guess, doesn't care about what's
going on in this county. The county is
growing up like a weed and leaving, a lot
of people. And if you want to have some
businesses to raise the taxes, I think I'd
rather do that then and just count on the
impact fees for fixing the roads and fixing
the whatnot. Therefore, I'm kind of against
that, on having impact fees. And I think
maybe you ought to give them a chance
to do something, the people that want to
work and open a business. And the town
has to grow and, yes, maybe they are
growing on population and, like he say,
we dropped. Well, you wonder why Mar-
ion County or in Hernando County they
are opening the businesses. And that's
why the more people, maybe if there's a
drop here in county, that's why the peo-
ple are moving into that because it's a lot
easier to work with. And if you're going
to have more impact fees, you take away
from the jobs and you take away from
the people wanting to do businesses. So
I don't agree with Mr. Damato. So there-
fore, my 2 cents is in.
Lower fees to stimulate growth
This is in response to the Citrus
County builders that are so concerned
about growth in the county being
stopped because of the impact fees.
Well, another way to stimulate growth;
why don't you lower your net income on
your houses?


Likes casino idea
I'm reading today's Sound Off (March
29) where several people are asking to
build a casino or turn the Crystal River
Mall into a casino because it's failing.
This is a fantastic idea. This person is a
genius. Not only will it give hundreds and
hundreds of people in Citrus County
jobs, but there will be hardly any unem-
ployment in this area. This is a fantastic
(idea). I hope the commissioners are
looking at this.


No business friendly
I think the outrageous impact fees
are impacting businesses in a very neg-
ative way. Many are leaving this county
for others where there are little or no
impact fees. Citrus is not business-
friendly. Nobody wants to start new
businesses here because they can't af-
ford the impact fees and that means
less jobs for the county's citizens when
we need more jobs the most. Think
about it.
Don't outsource studies
Volunteerism should be the way that
the county could save some money. The
board of commissioners ought to put
out a survey either in the paper or
through flyers and they ought to also
offer a special meeting for volunteers to
come in with expertise so that the
county can save money instead of pay-
ing for outside people to decide at a
high fee whether we need a red light or
a light somewhere or whether we need
impact fees waived. Or even some
lawyer firms might do a little bit of pro
bono work for the county. So you need
to set up a way for finding people with
expertise within our county to save the
county and the citizens some money by
offering ways to have people with ex-
pertise volunteer. It doesn't have to be
many hours a month or even a year, just
their special expertise, to be able to
help the county and the citizens save
some money by not outsourcing at high
fees some of these things.


Turn mall in outlet store
Friday, March 29 Chronicle Sound Off,
"Make mall a casino." People don't have
enough money to live on, you want them
to spend it? Why don't they make the
mall into a shopping outlet sort of like
down the road apiece on 1-75?
Casino idea makes sense
Crystal River Mall. I think it's a good
idea to put a casino there. Think of the
money it would bring to Citrus County.


SOUND OFF
* Call the anonymous Sound Off line at 352-563-0579.
* Be prepared to leave a brief message write it out before calling to make sure
you remember everything you want to say.
* After the beep, speak loudly, slowly and clearly.
* Or try the online Sound Off forum at www.ChronicleOnline.com.
* The Chronicle reserves the right to edit Sound Off messages.


HOMOEREER Saturday, April 20, 2013
OIHhM Earth Day Exhibits in the
I L Garden of Springs:
WILDLIFE FR .


26) 253( 8-5343


10:00am to 4:00pm


Homosss Springs Wildlife State Park

Bring the family out for a day
of fun and learn how you may help to
protect our natural resources!
Many special Earth Day exhibits will be set up
in the Garden of the Springs...Learn about
butterflies bats; native plants, turtles and
much mor .
Exhibitors include: Friends of Homosassa
Springs Wildlife Park, Big Cat .Rescue, Nature
World Wildlife Rescue, Homos:ssa River
Garden Club, Melodie's Bees, Boy St uts, FDS
Disposal, Inc., Withlacoochee Sate Trail,
Friends of Chassahowitzka Wildlife .Refuge,
Homosasse. Rivea Alliance, Save the Manatee
Club, Keep Citrus Beautiful and more.
Beat Puppel Shows al 9:30am & 1:00pm
Regular Patk admission applies lfo enhtance into Wildlife Patk.

VSSSH~tSmSB, -^^^^^^^^^

-^i^iBi


Hot Corner: IMPACT FEES


Hot Corner: CASINO


C4 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


COMMENTARY












CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
Fresh fish rest in ice March 29 while awaiting purchase at the New Fulton Fish Market in New York. The market, located in the Hunts
Point neighborhood of the Bronx, is the world's largest after Tokyo.





Mind the sharks


Fish trading gets fierce at New York's Fulton market


VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press
NEW YORK
Think Wall Street
trading is brutal?
Head up to the
grittiest part of
the South Bronx, where
cutthroat deals are made
in the dead of night on a
massive concrete floor that
reeks of fish guts.
The New Fulton Fish Market is the na-
tion's largest seafood market, and second
in the world to Tokyo's. Here, in a refrig-
erated building the size of six football
fields, fishmongers are frenetically fillet-
ing, selling and packaging seafood -
200 million pounds a year worth close to
$1 billion by some estimates. It is headed
for restaurant tables, stores and mouths
across America.
Glistening under the fluorescent lights
is just about every sea creature. Most
come in by truck, but about half are
flown in from the ends of the Earth: Arc-
tic char from Iceland; mahi-mahi from
Ecuador; hamachi from Japan; branzino
from Greece; salmon from Scotland;
cockles from New Zealand.
Experienced buyers negotiate prices
in seconds, judging quality on a look, a
touch, a smell and often a raw taste.
"You know right away if fish is fresh. It's
like looking into a woman's eyes you know
what's there," said Roberto Nunez, a 44-
year-old Peruvian immigrant who started
out as a dishwasher and has been the buyer
for more than a decade for celebrity restau-
rateurs Lidia Bastianich, her son Joe
Bastianich, and their partner Mario Batali.


A fishmonger tosses a halibut onto a table March 29 at the New Fulton Fish Market.


Five nights a week, Nunez shows up at
1 a.m. to purchase as much as $15,000
worth of seafood, enough to meet the de-
mands of 10 restaurants. What's avail-
able on any given night depends on a
variety of often unpredictable factors,
such as severe weather that keeps fish-
ing fleets in port or a spotty catch in an
overfished ocean.
"This is not like ordering tomatoes or
potatoes," Nunez said. "Seafood is wild."
By 2:30 a.m., one of the key items on
his handwritten list of orders 400
pounds of striped bass remains un-
filled from among dozens of vendors.
"I'm getting nervous," he said.
The day's hundreds of offerings in-
cluding crabs, clams, mussels, slimy
squid, octopus and caviar are spread
out across the floor in ice-lined boxes, a
shimmering spectrum of silvers, pinks,
reds and browns. Buyers, some vying for


the same, scarce items, point to a spe-
cific box and cry out, "That's mine!"
All night, dozens of men in coats and
wool caps work to the soundtrack of
mini-forklifts whizzing around, honking
and spewing exhaust as they move
seafood-laden pallets. The smell is a
mixture of the fishy and the fresh scent
of the ocean.
Nunez finally spots some striped bass.
But when he lifts the gills, "it's no good;
they're brown," he said dejectedly (The
gills should be bright red). Plus the skin
is dry, the eyes are cloudy, and it smells
funky.
The hunt continues for the rest of his
list: scallops, shrimp, squid, monkfish
liver, fluke, shad roe, blowfish.
He spies black sea bass from New Jersey
at $6.75 a pound. "How many do you have?"
See Page D4


Have experience? SCORE wants you!


CORE and the United
States Marine Corps have
something in common: It's
their motto. They both want "a
few good people." If your retire-
ment is lacking in a sense of per-
sonal fulfillment, become a
volunteer. If you've owned a busi-
ness or have worked in the cor-
porate environment, you're
invited to become a SCORE vol-
unteer SCORE wants you!
What and who is SCORE?
SCORE is a national nonprofit
association headquartered in
Alexandria, Va. As the educa-
tional arm of the Small Business
Administration, SCORE is com-
prised of 354 federated chapters.
On a national basis, SCORE
boasts of having 13,000 men and
women who mentor businesspeo-
ple. SCORE volunteers help both
existing businesses and those
people who want to start one.
SCORE's training program
Our mentors are certified by
SCORE national after a short on-


line training program. SCORE's and mentoring support. SCORE
educational experience concen- encourages lifelong learning, as it
trates on the basic principles of makes us better equipped when
SCORE counseling helping others, espe-
techniques. Upon cially where it counts
completion, a senior the most.
mentor is assigned to All SCORE mentors
each new mentor, and are protected from
the counseling skills -. tort actions while
are further refined. serving as a volunteer.
During the initial SCORE members, as
training period, new part of the SBA, enjoy
mentors are provided a unique status, just
experienced guidance Dr Frederick like governmental em-
and eventually will er ployees of the SBA.
counsel clients on their Herzog SCORE mentors
own. Co-counseling is EXPERIENCE therefore need not
always an option MATIERS fear adverse legal ac-
when one mentor or tions. This safeguard,
client's needs indicate the addi- however, will not defend against
tion of other mentors to better criminal behavior!
serve the client. Volunteer ... just do it!


ongoing support & benefits
After the standard orientation
period, national SCORE provides
each mentor with access to its ex-
tensive website. This exclusive
benefit provides a huge advan-
tage for continuing educational


Becoming a SCORE mentor is
not a complicated process. Most
of us already know more than we
think we do. SCORE mentors are
seasoned small-businesspeople
or corporate professionals who
have reached a level of expertise,


maturity and wisdom that can be
easily utilized when helping oth-
ers. Age does have its advantages.
SCORE mentors discover a
sense of accomplishment when
their clients start down the path
to business success. Respect
grows between the client and the
mentor The rewards our mentors
experience may not be monetary,
but the psychological benefit for
the mentor and client is strong.
The SCORE office is located on
the Citrus Campus of the College
of Central Florida. Call 352-249-
1236 for an appointment to dis-
cuss becoming a certified SCORE
business mentor Office hours are
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday If you
call outside of business hours,
please leave your name and
phone number so we can return
the call.

Dr FrederickJ Herzog, Ph.D., is
the immediate past chairman of
SCORE. He can be reached at
therzog@tampabay.rrcom.


Nothing

wrong with

negotiating
DEAR BRUCE:
We have been
renting our
condo for 10 years. It is
in a great location, and it
works well for us.
We recently heard
that our landlord is put-
ting our condo up for
sale. Based on what oth-
ers have sold for in this
area, we know we can
afford to buy it. We
haven't talked to our
landlord, but we would
like to negotiate an offer
for less than what we
think he will ask. We
have taken care of all
the repairs and mainte-
nance on the condo as if
we owned it and have
saved every receipt.
There are some major
things wrong with the
unit that need fixing,
and we would like to use
these as a negotiating
tool.
We don't want to lose
our home, but we feel
we are being fair Should
we offer a lower price?
- Reader, via email
DEAR READER:
There is nothing wrong
with trying to negotiate a
lower price. If you don't
ask, you won't receive.
You should sit down
with your landlord and
talk about current mar-
ket prices. List the vari-
ous problems with the
unit that need to be cor-
rected, and tell him
about the projects you
have completed for
which you would like
some type of credit.
Try to negotiate a
price that will be a win-
win for both parties. If
you offer far less than
the market calls for, your
landlord is liable to get
his back up and say, "I
don't want to negotiate
with you any further,"
and when the leasing
arrangement is over, he
will ask you to move out.
But if you don't come on
too strong, I think you'll
be able to negotiate a
decent price.
DEAR BRUCE: My
husband and I are in our
early 60s. We live on a
fixed income. We are
currently renting, but as
with all rent, it increases
every year My wife and
I have been kicking
around the idea of buy-
ing a home to keep the
monthly cost constant.
What do you think? -
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I
think the idea of owning
has merit, but it all de-
pends on the numbers.
You didn't give me any to
work with. If you can
find a home that will
keep your costs consis-
tent with what you're
paying now in rent, it
may be to your advan-
tage. But how much of
your assets will you have
to put down? What are
the other costs, such as
taxes and insurance?
You have to be realistic
before you make a deci-
sion of this kind.
Fortunately, you don't
have to make a decision
tomorrow morning.
Start looking for a home
in your current area that
is within your budget. I
think you'll find that
buying a home would
not result in any major
reduction in your cost of
living. But in today's
world, unlike a few
years ago, renting is no
longer the bargain it
once was.
See Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*0*4 N


'Ull


wE DONOT HAVE ANY:L "


17 HMR \AG

.22 LR OR MAG o e


.223

'U 9 MM
a 3


ujw~


Ql


Associated Press
A sign notifies customers of a store's ammo shortages Friday at Victor Valley Shooters in Victorville, Calif.


Laws, rumors have ammo flying


Associated Press
ALBANY, N.Y. -Gun enthusiasts
fearful of new weapon controls and
alarmed by rumors of government
hoarding are buying bullets practi-
cally by the bushel, making it hard
for stores nationwide to keep
shelves stocked and even putting a
pinch on some local law enforce-
ment departments.
At a 24-hour Walmart in suburban
Albany, the ammunition cabinet
was three-fourths empty this week;
sales clerks said customers must ar-
rive before 9 the morning after a
delivery to get what they want. A
few miles away, Dick's Sporting
Goods puts up a red rope after am-
munition deliveries so buyers can
line up early to get a number, avert-
ing races up the escalator to the gun
counter. Both stores are limiting
ammunition purchases to three
boxes a day.
In mid-January, two days after
New York became the first state to
toughen laws post-Newtown,
hunter and target shooter Mark
Smith spent $250 to stockpile am-
munition, including $43 for a brick
of 500.22-caliber bullets, commonly
used for target shooting and hunt-
ing small game.


"I had a feeling there was going to
be a huge ammunition shortage,"
said Smith, browsing shotgun shells
this week at Dick's. "Especially .22s.
It's probably the most popular
round out there."
Likewise, the .223 ammunition
used in popular semi-automatic ri-
fles is hard to find.
At Hunter's Haven, a strip-mall
gun shop in the farming community
of Rolesville, N.C., north of Raleigh,
clerk Dean Turnage said ammuni-
tion is going out "as fast as we can
get it in," even though new gun con-
trols are not on the state's agenda.
The run started in November
with President Barack Obama's re-
election, followed by the mass
shooting in December of children
in Newtown, Conn., which led the
president to launch an effort to
strengthen federal gun controls and
several states to tighten their laws.
Connecticut on Thursday became
the latest to crack down as the gov-
ernor signed a measure effective
immediately that adds more than
100 firearms to the state's assault
weapons ban, creates a dangerous
weapon offender registry and insti-
tutes eligibility rules for ammuni-
tion purchases.
Hours before the law took effect,


hundreds of customers streamed
out of Hoffman's Gun Center in
Newington with guns and boxes of
ammunition.
"The bad guys are going to get
guns," said John Power, 56, of Bris-
tol, arguing the new law would not
stop a troubled gunman.
The nation's 100 million firearms
owners are driving the market for
some 10 billion rounds annually,
with demand and gun purchases
both increasing the past several
months, driven partly by fear that
tougher laws will restrict the ability
to buy firearms, said Lawrence
Keane, whose National Shooting
Sports Foundation is based in
Newtown.
"There's a concern by firearms
owners that this administration will
pursue bans on products, bans on
ammunition.... It's not limited geo-
graphically to New York or any-
where else. It is nationwide," he
said.
The major U.S. manufacturers
are running shifts around the clock
to try to meet increased demand,
Keane said. The foundation pro-
jected $1.5 billion from ammunition
sales in 2011 and $2.8 billion from
gun sales, totals that more than
doubled in a decade.


FDIC closes


Arizona bank


Makes fifth

failure of'13
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Reg-
ulators have closed a
small bank in Arizona,
bringing the total number
of U.S. bank closures to
five for this year.
The Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. said Fri-
day that state regulators
closed Gold Canyon Bank,
in Gold Canyon, Ariz.
The bank had about
$45.2 million in assets
and $44.2 million in de-
posits as of Dec. 31.
First Scottsdale Bank,
N.A., based in Scottsdale,
Ariz., agreed to assume all
of Gold Canyon's deposits
and buy essentially all of


the failed lender's assets.
The failure of Gold
Canyon Bank, which had
two branches, is expected
to cost the deposit insur-
ance fund $11.2 million.
U.S. bank closures have
been declining since they
peaked in 2010 in the wake
of the financial crisis and
the Great Recession.
In 2007 just three banks
went under. That number
jumped to 25 in 2008,
after the financial melt-
down, and ballooned to
140 in 2009.
In 2010 regulators
seized 157 banks, the
most in any year since the
savings and loan crisis
two decades ago. The
FDIC has said 2010 likely
was the high-water mark
for bank failures from the
recession. They declined
to a total of 92 in 2011.


Judge approves

$2.43B BofA settlement


Associated Press
NEW YORK A New
York judge has approved
Bank of America's $2.43
billion settlement of a
class action lawsuit
brought by shareholders
over the company's acqui-
sition of former competi-
tor Merrill Lynch.
A judge for the U.S. Dis-
trict Court for the South-
ern District of Manhattan
approved the settlement
Friday The bank pro-
posed the settlement in
late September. The
agreement resolves alle-
gations Bank of America
did not disclose the state
of its finances or those of
Merrill Lynch when it
agreed to buy Merrill in
September 2008.
Judge Kevin Castel said
the settlement was "hard
fought," but called the
final deal was "fair, rea-
sonable and adequate."


"We are pleased that
this matter has been re-
solved," said Bank of
America spokesman
Lawrence Grayson.
Bank of America said
in September that it re-
jected the allegations and
was agreeing to the settle-
ment to end the uncer-
tainties, burden and costs
associated with the suit
The company agreed to
buy Merrill Lynch for $20
billion in stock at the
height of the financial cri-
sis. The deal was struck the
same weekend Lehman
Brothers collapsed. Bank
of America later dis-
closed that Merrill Lynch
was going to take $27.6
billion in losses that year.
Bank of America later
asked for a $20 billion
bailout from the federal
government to help coun-
teract those losses. It had
already received $25 bil-
lion in bailout funds.


Consultant successfully
completes survey
Local environmental consultant
Michael G. Czerwinski and Andrew
Holland, environmental scientist, will
present the results and findings of a
recent Florida Turnpike project at the
2013 spring conference of the
Florida chapter of The Wildlife Soci-
ety in Melbourne, Fla., on April 10 to
12. The paper, entitled "The Effec-
tiveness of Various Bat Exclusion
Methods on Two Interstate Bridges,"
describes the methods used to re-
move (exclude) without harm ap-
proximately 1,000 bats that were
roosting within the joints under two
Florida Turnpike bridge spans in
Lake County.


In March 2005, the Florida De-
partment of Transportation reported
on a statewide survey of bridges
which determined that bats roosted
in about 5 percent of five common
bridge types in Florida, with up to
500 bats residing in any one bridge.
For this project, the bats were ex-
cluded using a system of specialized
netting and exit tubes in advance of
roadway improvements which in-
cluded bridge joint seal replacement
and bridge guard rail installation.
This interim report not only provides
significant observations on bat be-
havior, but other predator-prey rela-
tionships of the bridge microcosm as
the result of weeks of observational
surveys.
Michael G. Czerwinski, P.A. En-


Business DIGEST
vironmental Consultants, in
Lecanto, is a local environmental
firm that provides environmental
permitting and impact assessment
services with a focus on wetlands,
wildlife and endangered and
threatened species, surface and
groundwater quality, hydrology,
wellfield monitoring, sinkholes,
gopher tortoise relocation,
Phase 1 ESAs and contamination
assessments.
Two financial events
slated for April
Nature Coast Financial will host
two seminars this month.
Women and Investing Seminar,
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tuesday,
April 9, in the Garden Room at Cit-


rus Hills Golf and Country Club.
It will be an informative and inter-
active presentation covering:
Unique challenges women in-
vestors face and how to overcome
them.
What to know about invest-
ments before losing a spouse.
Strategies for leaving a legacy
to children and grandchildren.
A light lunch will be provided.
Seating is limited.
Call 352-794-6044 or 352-794-
6043 to register.
Annual Shred Party, 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Tuesday, April 23, in the park-
ing lot of the Century 21 building
next to Brannen Bank on U.S. 19.
Bring any paper you want to have
shredded.


College of Central
Florida boards to meet
The College of Central Florida
Foundation Executive Committee
will meet at 3:30 p.m. April 10 at the
CF Enterprise Center, 3001 S.W.
College Road, Ocala, to discuss
general business.
The CF Foundation Board of
Directors will meet at 4:30 p.m.
April 17 at the CF Founders Hall
Boardroom, Ocala, 3001 S.W. Col-
lege Road, Ocala, to discuss gen-
eral business.
Both meetings are open to the
public. A copy of the agenda will be
available at each meeting. For fur-
ther information, contact the CF
Foundation office.


I \II\ TA I R


IT'S TAX TIME!


There's Still Time Left

To Place Your Ad Call

563-5592






* Accurate and affordable service year round

* Experienced, trained tax professionals
* Convenient evening and weekends hours

* Audit assistance
* Electronic filing


Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352) 795-4733 / 564-1010
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


I&R BLOCK
MITGOOOI


AWILLIAMS,
McCRANIE,
H WARDLOW
& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS


2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
S Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services

www.pwprice .com


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs






.\ i il "i .("nMlria i,..,l inl,,rnl.iliin ,,Iii.,,n



Tax Professional 30+ Years Experience
Belinda Brown ED SERRA
Gloria Cain .- nli,'LJ l,11lL uL1',,,.




Individual Taxes IRS Problem Resolution
Business Taxes E-File Fast & Efficient
Multi state expertise Member FICPA


America Counts on CPAs"
(352) 794-3879
www.edserra.com
6118 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River, FL


D2 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


BUSINESS


For more information
on advertising call
Judy Moseley at
352-564-2917 or
Yvonne Shepard at
1 352-563-3273 1


v










D3


TRUS COUCITRUS COUNTY
n..A* .Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
April 10 8:30 a.m.
Ribbon Cutting -
Antonio Griffin Lawn
& Garden at Crystal
River Chamber
April 11 5 to
7 p.m. Business After
Hours Insight
Credit Union
April 18--4:30 p.m.
Ribbon Cutting -
Christ Medical Center
April 25 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Business
After Hours -
Suncoast Schools
Federal Credit Union
April 26 6 to 10
p.m. Awards Dinner
- Chamber Pillar
Awards at Citrus Hills
May 2 6 p.m.
Golden Citrus Scholars
May 3 11 a.m. Rib-
bon Cutting-- Florida
Cancer Specialist
May 10 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. May Lunch
@ Citrus Hills Golf &
Country Club
May 23 5 to 7 p.m.
Business After Hours
- Sunflower Springs
Assisted Living Facility
Check our complete
Chamber and
Community calendar
at www.citruscounty
chamber.com or
follow the QR code to
see the website on
your smart phone!


OF 0


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Jennifer
Worthington
TDC/Visitors &
Convention Bureau
...FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Give a shout
out to those
who focus on
Customer
Service
The Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce of-
fers its "You Caught My
Eye" program.
The program allows resi-
dents and visitors to recog-
nize employees who go
beyond in their attention to
Customer Service.
Please note: Business
must be located within Cit-
rus County.
Send the following infor-
mation to Cindi Fein, Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, 28 N.W. U.S. 19,
Crystal River, FL 34428:
Name of person you
are nominating.
Business they work for.
Address of business,
including city.
Date of contact.
What stood out about
the service?
Your name.
Your phone number.
Date submitted.


Mock emergency drill aims to help in preparing to be prepared


Members of the Citrus County Chamber of
Commerce and the EDC will take part in a
mock emergency drill on April 16 that is being
organized by the Citrus County Sheriffs Of-
fice. The drill, in conjunction with Emergency
Response Educators and Consultants,
www.erecinc.com, is a tabletop emergency re-
covery that will involve team members from
emergency support areas in the County.
The exercise will build upon skills that the
Chamber and EDC participants learned last


year during a weeklong training at the Emer-
gency Management Institute in Maryland.
Whereas that training focused mostly on the
emergency itself, this exercise will focus on
the recovery following the emergency. In the
event of a real emergency, the Chamber and
EDC will be called on to provide our busi-
nesses with information and to provide sup-
port for them to remain open or get back to
operational status. This is an opportunity to
walk through the steps to prepare for and re-


Come get 'sassified' and shop a bit


MistiFilor has been "sassin'" up hair in Citrus County for 24 years, and now she is doing it in her own shop,
Sassified Salon & Boutique. In addition to hair, nail and waxing services the shop features a unique boutique
that offers a variety of gifts for all ages including bling, candles, jewelry, soap and other accessories. "We
want you to not just feel pampered, but to BE pampered, and with great services, a soothing color scheme
and refreshments available to our clients we think we accomplish that goal. I truly enjoy making people feel
confident and sassy," says Misti. The salon and boutique are at 430 N.E. Third St., Suite 4, Crystal River,
and are open at 10 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and by appointment on Saturday. Call 352-228-4925 to
schedule an appointment. Be sure to come out and join them for their Open House on Friday, April 19, from
4 to 9 p.m. Chamber Ambassadors and representatives gathered on the front stoop of Sassified Salon and
Boutique. Front Row left to right: Sarah Fitts, First International Title, Inc.; Kimberly Brewer, nail tech; Gavin
and Maverick Filor; owner MistiFilor; Angela Pennington; Rhonda Lestinsky, Nature Coast Bank;
Commissioner Dennis Domato. Back row left to right: Tom Corcoran, LifeCare Center of Citrus County; Jeanne
Greene, Inside Citrus; Dan Pushee; Bonnie Hart-Pushee; Lisa Nash; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Jim
Ferrara; and Betty Murphy, Citrus Archives and Computers.


Quality Inn and Conference Center opens


In November 2012, Jubilee Hotels took over the then Citrus Hills Lodge and Conference Center in Hernando,
Florida. In less than three months, the entire hotel was gutted out and the insides were deep cleaned. Our
work included the following: Guest Rooms, Hallways, Hotel Entrance, Hotel Lobby and Swimming Pool. At
the Quality Inn Hernando, we are proud of the changes that we put our sweat and heart into. We not only
want our guests to feel invited, we want the staff to know we care for the property and will nurture the
property to help it grow into a thriving successful hotel. With 50 all-new guest rooms, a 3,000-square-foot
banquet facility for weddings and conferences, nearby restaurants and bars, the Quality Inn Conference
Center is the place to be when visiting beautiful Citrus County, Florida. The property is at 350 E. Norvell
Bryant Highway in Hernando. For reservations, please call 352-527-0015. Visit their website at www.
citrushillshotel.com for photos and more information. Joining members of the local hotel staff as well as
corporate representatives are Citrus County Chamber members and ambassadors: Josh Wooten,
President/CEO Chamber; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County; Kelley Paul, WollinkaWikle Title
Insurance; Dennis Pfeifer, Orkin Pest Control; Janet Mayo; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Mike
Buchanan, Excel Printing; Jim Ferrara; Nancy Hautop; Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; and Jennifer Duca,
Comfort Keepers.


On "like" us on
facebook





On this weeks Chamber Chat...
Terri Stewart Executive Director of the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County shares why this
years Taste of Inverness on Saturday April 13th
is going to be the best one yet! Be sure to get
your $25 advanced tickets early by calling
352-612-9225. Food, live music, art and fun is on
this years menu!
Community support is important to the Mike .I
Scott Plumbing family. Shawn Scott and Pat
Scott share why they have a heart for Citrus *.
County. Learn how this local business has grown
over the years and find out why they are such
valued members of our community!
You have 3 chances to watch Chamber Chat -
Monday 6pm-- Thursday 8am-- Friday 1pm
If you would like your business or local event featured U)'0.I
on Chamber Chat-- at no cost to you-- .
Email Melissa Benefield at Spotlightmelissa@aol.com
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


cover from a potential emergency.
The Comprehensive Emergency Manage-
ment Plan (CEMP) for Citrus County added
a new Emergency Support Function (ESF) 18
last year that focuses on business stabilization
and recovery following an emergency such as
a tornado, hurricane, or other disaster. Bob
Wesch is the Emergency Management Plan-
ner with the Sheriffs office and the Chamber
and EDC were designated by the sheriffs of-
fice to oversee this ESF, known as ESF18.


Welcome
new March
Chamber
members
These businesses
chose to invest in Citrus
County with a member-
ship in the Chamber
and we thank them. We
hope that you will sup-
port these new mem-
bers and visit their
facilities/consider using
their services. The
Chamber of Commerce
and Economic Develop-
ment Council encourage
you to Shop Citrus First!
All phone numbers
listed are 352 area code
unless otherwise noted.
Christ Medical Center
7562 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Crystal River
564-0444
Citrus Cardiology
Consultants, PA
308 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness
726-8353
Florida Cancer
Specialist
2231 State Road 44
Inverness
860-7400
Franklin Anderson
Gallery of Arts
1345b S.E. US. 19
Crystal River
697-2702
Golf Resort Inverness
4555 E. Windmill
Inverness
637-1140
Antonio Griffin Lawn &
Garden
257-0404
JP's Canvas
9530 W. Cedar St.
Crystal River
795-1026
Michelle'z Blindz &
Design
422-1886
Rodan & Fields
1355 W.. Diamond
Shore Loop
Hernando
201-7901
Top Notch Appliance
Repair
1474 W.. Jackson Hill
Court, Lecanto
586-9109


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.










Boneless chicken KFC's latest lure Strikes


Associated Press

NEW YORK In case Ai
cans want to scarf down
fast-food even faster, KFC iss
ping the bones out of its chi(
The fast-food chain says ii
troducing deep-fried bon(
chicken pieces on April 14
alternative to its traditi
breast, thigh and drumstick pi
The new offering reflect
growing popularity of nu
and strips that are easier t.
on the go, as well as Amerin
seemingly endless desire
more convenient foods. KFC
nearly four out of five servir
chicken sold in the U.S. are
boneless.
Based on customer trends
chain says bones could evw
ally disappear from its men



FISH
Continued from Page D1

"One hundred pounds,"
said vendor John Dias.
"How about $5.50?"
Nunez asks.
Dias relents.
Nunez later nabs red
snapper from the Gulf of
Mexico. He feels the fish,
smells his fingers. It's
fresh. OK, 60 pounds.
At another stall, he pops
a raw Nantucket Bay scal-
lop in his mouth, smiling.
It's $20.50 a pound com-
pared to a normal price of,
say, $16. But these are ex-
traordinary, and fresh -
"like a baby's bottom" to
the touch.
Just before 3 a.m., a ven-
dor whispers in Nunez's ear:
Some striped bass might
be on the way maybe.
He waits around for a
while, and sure enough, a
box lid opens to reveal
eight bass from Delaware,
weighing 121 pounds. Now,
where to find at least 180
pounds more? He rushes
off, scouring the cavernous
market. And he gets lucky,
landing 100 pounds.
Not far away, Peter Pan-
teleakis, who owns two
Greek restaurants in Fair
Lawn, N.J., is on a hunt of
his own for the freshest
seafood he can find, such
as the sea scallops that still
move when poked and a
21-pound piece of local



MONEY
Continued from Page D1

DEAR BRUCE: My
brother has fallen on hard
times and has asked for a
$5,000 loan because he
says his house will go into
foreclosure. He says he
will pay us back, but if his-
tory is any indication, he
won't keep his word.
I don't want him to lose
his house, and I have
thought about setting up a
payment plan for him.
Your thoughts? Reader,
via email
DEAR READER: Your
brother's track record in-
dicates that if you decide
to lend him $5,000, that
money is likely to go out
the window. If you can live
with that, then OK.
Even if you come up
with a payment plan, how
are you going to ensure he
makes the payments on
time? If the house were
paid for, you could cer-
tainly take back a mortgage,
but apparently it is not;
otherwise, there wouldn't
be an opportunity for an-
other lender to foreclose.
This is a matter of
whether you can afford to
give your brother $5,000. If
not, as much as you might
like to help, keep your
checkbook closed.
DEAR BRUCE: I have a
brother who has about $1
million. His wife passed
away, so he is taking her
name off of all his invest-
ments. He doesn't want his
stepchildren to get any of
it. He asked me what he
should do. As his sister, he
gives me a little once in a
while, but I can't tell him to
put my name on it. That


would probably make him
mad! He doesn't have a
will and doesn't want one.
What happens to his
money after his demise?
Who can claim the money,
and how do we get it? -
TB., Omaha, Neb.
DEAR TB.: Your brother
doesn't have a will and
doesn't want one. The
question here is, why not?


"Younger people don't tend to
be fans of bones -they've grown up
with nuggets," said KFC spokesman
Rick Maynard, referring to peo-
ple in their 20s and 30s.
Although KFC has more than
18,000 locations worldwide, the
boneless chicken will only be of-
fered in its 4,500 U.S. locations.
The new chicken, which is
skinless and comes in white or
dark meat, are whole muscle
pieces fileted off the bone and
are about twice the size of KFC's
crispy strips. Customers will be
able to order them for the chain's
meal deals, which include two
pieces of chicken, a side, a bis-
cuit and a drink for $4.99.
They also come in buckets,
which include four pieces of
boneless chicken and six pieces
of breasts, thighs and drumsticks


for $14.99. The boneless chicken
option costs the same as the reg-
ular fried chicken.
A piece of the boneless white
meat has 200 calories and 8
grams of fat. A dark-meat piece
has 250 calories.
KFC says it took two to three
years to develop its version of
boneless chicken, which per-
formed strongly in test markets
including Oklahoma City and
Omaha last year
Howard Penney, a food industry
analyst for Hedgeye Risk Man-
agement, noted KFC has been
struggling in the U.S. and has
nothing to lose with the latest move.
Even in the wings category, Pen-
ney noted that boneless varieties
have been growing in popularity.
"People don't want to have to
deal with the bones," he said.


This ima
the comp


A fishmonger takes an order from buyers March 29 at the New Fulton Fish Market.


halibut that a vendor slices
open to reveal clean, rosy
flesh.
The 66-year-old immi-
grant from a village near
Sparta, Greece, who
comes by four nights a
week with his son, first set
foot in the old open-air
Fulton fish market in
lower Manhattan more
than 30 years ago. It was
replaced in 2005 by the
state-of-the-art South


Bronx facility that's open
six nights a week.
Learning from his father,
Nick Panteleakis quotes a
sign on the market wall:
"Good fish ain't cheap, and
cheap fish ain't good."
When huge pieces of tuna
or swordfish worth thou-
sands of dollars come in,
men carrying metal hooks
and razor-sharp knives
leap into action, splitting
them into smaller chunks,


sweating even in the regu-
lated temperature of about
39 degrees.
At about 5 a.m., barter-
ing slows as the sun peeks
over the East River Blood-
stained gloves rest atop the
counters. The forklifts are
buzzing around, loading
18-wheelers outside with
goods that will be trucked
all over the Northeast.
What litters the floor -
heads, guts and other parts


c'at ports





exports

...Associated Press
S. SANTIAGO, Chile-A
S ,i series of fast-spreading
port strikes in Chile are
blocking exports of cop-
per, fruitand wood pulp
and keeping thousands
of workers idle.
The stoppage in the
Associated Press world's top copper pro-
ge provided by KFC shows during nation began in
any's new boneless chicken. the northern port of Ang-
amos more than two weeks
ago, when workers began
demanding a 30-minute
lunch break and a place
to set up a cafeteria. Dock
workers in other north-
ern ports have joined in
solidarity, causing huge
losses for the mining,
timber and fruit industries
in export-dependent Chile.
"The jobs of hundreds
of thousands of Chileans
are being jeopardized,"
Finance Minister Felipe
Larrain said on Thursday
"I'm urging (workers) to
be responsible and solve
this problem soon."
Chile produces about a
third ofthe world's copper
and its stable economy is
S largely built around ex-
ports of minerals. The
red metal alone accounts
for roughly a third of
government revenue,
and the state has a policy
of shoring up national
reserves during periods
of high copper prices.
Chile is also a major
Associated Press global exporter of wine,
salmon and fruit and the
strikes are prompting
is scooped up and sold concerns among state of-
off as well, to make fertil- ficials and industry lead-
izer, pet food, glue. ers about the effect on
As the city awakens and the harvest. The Andean
New Yorkers prepare for country's agricultural
work, the exhausted fish- sector accounts for
mongers trickle out of the 800,000 jobs, or more
South Bronx facility to the than 10 percent of all
surrounding Hunt's Point employment, according to
neighborhood of ware- the government Of those,
houses, truck depots, all- 350,000 people work in
night bars and strip clubs, the fruit sector, thou-
They will be back at night sands of them as owners
to do it all over again, of their own farms.


Your brother's track record indicates
that if you decide to lend him $5,000, ui ON ICLEt
that money is likely to go out the ww.chronicleonline.com
window. If you can live with that,
then OK. Even if you come up with
a payment plan, how are you going ooECDL
to ensure he makes the payments?
Without a will, who can say anyone else.
where his money will go If he dies without a will,
after his demise? who knows? His stepchil- _
As his sister, you may dren may have some kind
very well have the entire of claim. That possibility
claim, but I don't know should goad him into get-
that; other family mem- ting a properly spelled-out'4L .C


bers may be involved. One
thing is certain: It's a lot
more difficult to dictate
how an estate is distrib-
uted without a will than
with one. A will would
spell out clearly whom
your brother would like to
receive his money when
he leaves this Earth. If he's
not willing to draw a will, I
can't answer your question
definitely, and neither can


will.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams
.com or to Smart Money,
P.O. Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of
mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.


VOTE NOW!
April lst-14th

Winning photograph will be the l
cover photo for the April 20th
Special Section "And The Winner
Is"which prints all the winners
from the fair. I l- .


Co-sponsored by:

,&" f ^,


.. p. ,,.


I,.'


www.chronicleonline.com/countyfair j


You're Invited

Help honor Gary Maidhof for his years of
service to Scouting and the community.


Friends :;f Scoiiuting D iinner
Friday April 12 6:30 pm















RSVP to John Murphy (352) 563-3255
jmurphy@chronicleonline.com
000EIOQ


D4 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


v

c
ti






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966





Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


h The Time


. .. 1S ..W, f*I* I.0 % .L


2000 Mercury
Boat Motor 9.9
2 Stroke, low hour,
$500 Firm.
352-465-2042


GRAND
OPENING
Specials
Ray's Gun Shop
Stokes Flea Market,
Bldg "A"
Rt. 44, 4 mi. E. of
Hwy. 19, Crystal River

Ruger 10-22: $239
Ruger Mini 14: $849
Ruger SR 9: $439
S & W-M& P22:$369

Your Headquarters for
Guns, Ammo and
Reloading Supplies
Hours: 8am to 2pm
Tues-Sat
352-527-1660
352-586-7516






$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087





FREE
Broken Cement Block
&
Concrete pieces
352-476-1023
Inverness

FREE
FIREWOOD
352-628-7585

FREE
FIREWOOD
352-746-9868

FREE Puppies
Lab mix, free to good
home puppies, 7 wks
old(352) 464-0871


reeaor ire
Terrier Mix, Female
Good with people,
needs to be only Dog
(352) 445-5166
FREE WOOD
(352) 419-7862
Husky Malamute
2yrs female, curr on all
vac.spayed good dog,
no small animals.
Catahoula, female, 2
yrs old, spayed,curr on
all vac. loves farm work,
good dog
352-422-6474


-g
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd,
Crystal River (CR488)
Owner is heartbroken
400-3302 or 795-8662
Ford Car Keys
Lost in Inverness
by TJ Maxo &
McDonalds
Call (352) 527-8154
REWARD
Lost Male Cat on 4/2,
Dk Gray w/ White Mus-
sel, White paws, pink
nose w/ green eyes.
Missing from
Humanitarian's Parking
Lot on Rte 44 in Crystal
River. PLEASE CALL
IF YOU HAVE SEEN
HIM (352) 382-9303
OR 352-201-0576


Lost/Missing Black Lab
mix "Jax" male, not
neutured, single white
spot on his chest. If you
have any information
that could help locate
him please contact
352-266-9711.


Dunnellon
American Pit Bull
Male, 3yrs color
blue/white cropped ears,
neutered, no collier,
very friendly, missing
Circle M Ranch
area Please call
489-2827 or 270-1373
ShihTzu Dog
Female, blond
almost blind
S. Barbour St. Beverly
Hills (352) 212-3387



Dog found on 4/4/13 on
Carter Rd. in
Homosassa. No collar
or identification. Dog is
male, and looks like a
Sheltie (mini Collie). Call
352-586-3409
Found Small black fe-
male, dog, well
groomed, well
manored. Red high-
lights on Tail
Near Joes Garage
Inverness
(352) 726-6432
HOMOSASSA
Mini Dachshund male
found Easter day on
Grand Cir. & Oaklawn
Please call to identify
352-563-9830



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Live in Care Giver
for your loved ones, Ex-
cellent Referrances Call
Joyce Ann
850-661-1312




DISPATCHER &
BILLING CLERK

Exp. with Excel &
Quick books Helpful,
$8. hr. Please pick
up application at
204 W Grace St.
Inverness.
Applications avail
M-F from 10a-2p.


BELLAVITA
SPA & FITNESS
CENTER
Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs

Part Time
Front Desk
Receptionist
Early Mornings Or
Closing Shifts or
weekends

APPLY IN PERSON
2125 W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.


FT Cosmetology
Educator & Stu-
dent Recruiter

The Salon Professional
Academy in The Vil-
lages is accepting appli-
cations for a full time
Cosmetology Educator
& Student Recruiter. If
you have a passion for
the fast-paced beauty
industry & are looking
for a dynamic career
with full benefits health
insurance, 401 K join
our premiere academy!
Apply online at
www.shearexpress.com.










1 111111I

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


C.N.A.s
Full Time & Part time

If you are ready to
brighten up your
career, join our
caring, dedicated
team. Now hiring
on 3-11 & 11-7 shifts
with excellent
benefits
Apply in person at:
Arbor Trail Rehab
611 Turner Camp Rd,
Inverness
An EEO/AA
Employer M/F/V/D


Come Join
Our Team
LPN FT 3-11
MON. FRI.

Health Ins. availa-
ble and
benefits.
Please apply within:
Cedar Creek
Assisted Living
352-564-2446


F/T RECEPTIONIST
BILLERR

Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512


O SEVEN RIVERS

Join Our Team

SURGICAL RN
Charge
FT M-F
SURGICAL RN
FT and PRN

Apply at Our
Career Center at
www.SevenRivers
Regional.comrn
Phone 352-795-8462
Fax 352-795-8464
6201 N. Suncoast
Bvd. Crystal River Fl.
Stephanie Arduser
Recruiter
EOE Drug/Tobacco
Free Workplace


&Online // :;
C& IT S. ,C- T .0




--.. q .



CHKONICLEf CHI ONIMCL o







(352) 563.5966 <*


Immediate
Need

For fulltime clerical,
Staff Member
for busy medical
facitly. Exp.
preferred,
Email Resume to
ourcenter.hr@
gmail.com


RN's, PT & OUT'S
LPN's, Psych.
Nurse, & ST.

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097






COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
FLO RIDA
-an equal opportunity
college-

College of
Central Florida

Faculty Assoclate
Degree Nursing
(220 Workdays)
Master's in Nursing
and FL Nursing Li-
cense required.
Open until filled.

Faculty Computer
Information
Technology
Master's degree
with 18 graduate
hours in Computer
Science Manage-
ment required.
Open until filled.

Faculty Criminal
Justice (Cltrus)


Open until filled.

Faculty Develop-
mental Math
(2 Vacancies)
Bachelor's degree
in Mathematics
required.
Close date 2/19/13

Commitment to the
college objective of
providing instruction
for diverse student
populations.
A copy of transcripts
indicating the de-
gree conferred must
be submitted with
the application in
order to be consid-
ered for the position.
The degree must be
from a regionally ac-
credited institution.
How to Apply
Go to www.CF.edu,
click on Quick Links
then Employment
at CF. Submit elec-
tronic application,
pool authorization
card and unofficial
transcripts online.
Email copy of
transcripts to
hr@CF.edu or
fax to 352-873-5885.

3001 SW College
Road, Ocala, FL
34474
CF Is an Equal Op-
portunity Employer





r-do- - -
do you possess...
..A DYNAMIC
PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
....SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS

Seeking an
INSIDE
SALES REP
to help service
existing accounts
and prospect for
new. Full Time with
Comprehensive
Benefits Package
Base Salary plus
Commission

APPLY TODAY:
dikamlot@chronicl
eonline.com



Drug Screen
Required for Final
Applicant EOE






DIRECT TECH-
NICIANS
Need Directv Techs
CITRUS COUNTY
and around. Own
Truck, van or SUV.
Need to pass back-
ground and Drug
Test. Independent
1099 contract. Call
for details.
$700-$1000/week.
Call 352 201 7219


MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
PLUMBERS AND
HELPERS
Plumbers and Helpers,
experience required.
Drug-free workplace.
Call 352-728-6053.




CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460

DIRECT CARE
TRAINING
INSTRUCTORS

New Horizons Village,
a residential care facil-
ity for developmentally
disabled adults, is
seeking FT profes-
sional staff to provide
personal care and var-
ious training to these
individuals through
direct care. Several
shifts available.
Basic qualifications
include:
* HS diploma,
* Ability to pass a
mandatory criminal
background invest-
igation, reference
inquiry,and a post-
offer physical exam
& drug screen.
New Horizons Village
offers:
* Competitive wages,
excellent benefit
package & a tobacco-
free campus.
To be considered,
please complete an
application at 1275
N. Rainbow Loop,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
(352) 746-3262.

Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits, Clean work
enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129
Experience Lawn Care

Help Needed
201-0651or 726-9176

FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. ONLY!! Needed
for P/T & Holiday
352-726-9666

MUSIC MINISTER

With 5 yrs Country
Western Christian &
Gospel music exp for
Cowboy Church in
Dunnellon. Must be
able to play one of
the following:
guitar, mandolin, or
fiddle. Must meet Bibli-
cal Ministry standards
as stated in 1 Timothy
3:1-13. Interested par-
ties contact Church
Pastor at
352- 465-6223
after 5:00pm.
NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone

Telemarketers
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

P/T Boat Captain

To run, manatee
tours & kids groups
CONTACT SEAN
(352) 563-0041

RECEPTIONIST
Must apply within at
Curry's Roofing, 1965
N. Dunkenfield Ave.
Crystal River. Starting at
$300.00 per week.

CHIWNoCLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHIONICLE





CLEANING Techs

P/T, Exp. Preferred,
Serious Inquires only
(352) 419-6557

Established Pet Sitting
Service Looking for

P/T PETSITTERS
Must Reside In Rain-
bow Springs Call
(352) 465-5788 for info


SEASONAL PART
TIME HELP
Applicant must have
computer skills, self mo-
tivated, works well with
others and customer
friendly. Must be at
least 18 and have a
valid driver's license
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.

YMCA
Swim Instructor

Citrus County, FL
The YMCA
has an opening for a
part-time Summer
Program Swim In-
structor. Must be 16
years old or older,
complete the YMCA
Swim Instructor
Course and maintain
a current CPR/AED
and first aid certifica-
tion.$8.55 hourly.
DFWP/EOE.

Apply online at
www.
vmcasuncoast.orqa




-FOR SALE-
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer, includes
equipment &Accounts.
Serious Inquiries Only!
16k 352-795-0201

"LAUNDROMAT I
FOR SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER,
Lrg., Clean, Well Est.
352-795-2399




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS



Fri -i I-




130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 0x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27 995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structureslic.com

LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352-299-4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




Antique China
US made Franciscan
China, Desert Rose &
Ivy patterns, several
hard to find pieces, 25%
off price, Too many to
price separately! call
for info 352-270-8366
Antique Furniture
Oak pie safe hutch
$300, Large oak display
case $100
both exec. cond.
352-586-9498
FOSTORIA STEM-
WARE 5 Silver Flute 6"
Champagne/Tall Sher-
bert #6037 $30.00
352-249 8621


Coletb


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


1918 JENNY STAMP
GOOD CONDITION /
NO MARKS
50.00 OBO LINDA
341-2271
FRANCE WINE
FLUTES 6 black stem
clear tops 7" 6oz Bev-
erly Hills $30.00
352-249 8621




NICE GREEN MARBLE
SPA Needs motor &
frame work
100.00 linda 341-2271




APPLIANCES
Hot Point Electric
Range-$150, Kenmore
Dishwasher $50
GE Space Saver Micro-
wave $75
352.212.9324
DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
Refrigerated
Grocery Store
Meat Cooler
6ft Long, 5ft high
all glass, $500
(352) 726-0250
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free
Delivery. 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call or
text 352-364-6504




DUDLEY'S
AUCTIOW





Two Auctions

Antique &
Collectible
Furniture Oriental,
Country,Victonan-
Coins, Estate Jewelry,
Sterling, Listed art,
Lladro, Doulton
Tobies, Hummels,
Waterford, 500+
lots of quality

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




5,000 W Coleman
Genrater
Never Used,
$350.
(719) 660-9824 Cell
No Text Messages
AIRLESS SPRAYER BY
BLACK AND DECKER
$30 NEW IN BOX FOR
PAINT/STAIN ETC IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
BLACK HAND JIG SAW
$10 FINISHING
SANDER $10 BOTH
BLACK AND DECKER
352-419-5981
BREATHING
APPARATUS PAINT-
ING/ YARDWORK $10
MASKS/ CARTRIDGES
419-5981
CRAFTSMAN ANGLE
GRINDER 7 INCH $35
USE AS POLISHER/
GRINDER/CUTTER
419-5981
CRAFTSMAN ROUTER
WITH CASE $25 USED
VERY LITTLE INVER-
NESS 419-5981
FIBERGLASS STEP
LADDER Louisville 8'
ladder excellent
condition $50.00
1-603-455-7878
PIPE THREADER DIE
SET $40 HAND HELD
1/2 INCH, 3/4 INCH
AND 1 INCH INVER-
NESS 419-5981
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 MADE
OF METAL HEAVY
DUTY OLDER STYLE
INVERNESS 419-5981




14" SHARP color tv with
remote $15.00
352-746-0401
26" RCA color tv with
remote $25.00
352-746-0401
28" JVC COLOR TV
WITH REMOTE $25.00
352-746-0401
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529




LANDSCAPE STONES
135 sand/tan geo
stones, 15 cap stones
delivery an option
$250.00 352-746-0401


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 D5


CLASSIFIED







D6 SUNDAY,APRIL 7, 2013


Acer Extensa
Toshiba Stat. lap tops
windows 7 w/web cam
$175.00 each
352-586-6891
COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 15" $20
352-613-0529
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




6 Metal Patio Chairs
Metal with full cushions,
good cond, $95
352-382-0124




2 Single
(TrundleBeds)
w/mattress, 1 bed side
table,1 chest of drawers,
all matching exec. cond.
$200 352-465-2668


8 Pc. Oak King
Bedroom Suite,
paid $6000,
sacrifice $1500 obo
will separate
765-748-4334
352-586-5166
ENTERTAINMENT
CTR, light color wood,
$440; Pub Dinette set
w/2 chairs $225. Both in
great condition
(352) 228-1254
Full Mattress Set
Real Wood Head &
Foot board,color walnut,
exec. cond. like new
very comfortable $175
OBO 352-249-7804
** High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Light Tan Recliner
Rocker, w/ stand light
& magazine rack $100
White Leather Chair,
stand w/light. $100
(352) 795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
OAK TABLE
60"x42" w/ expandable
to 84"x42"with built in
butterfly leafs, 6 chairs,
good cond. $ 300
352-527-0146
PORCH GLIDER SW-
ING for 2, metal & wood
$25.00 352-746-0401
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Quality Mattress Sets
Qn./Full.$199 both Pcs
Twin Matts. $89.95 All
New, Nice 621-4500
RATTAN FURNITURE
42" walnut rattan glass
top table and two chairs
purchased 1 year ago at
Leaders $325,walnut
desk $150,2 whitewash
arched rattan etegeres
$60 EA. Sugarmill
woods 740-705-9004


CLASSIFIED


RECLINER-Black
leather,exc cond.
custom extra large
51' wide $295.
(352) 419-5077
ROCKER RECLINER
Contemporary rocker
recliner, large, camel,
good condition $150.
352-746-4310
ROLL TOP DESK
Oak desk, full size,
good condition. $300
(352) 621-6892
after 6prm
RV SOFA/FUTON 74"
gree n beige floral
$40.00 Beverly Hills
352429-8621
STORAGE OTTOMAN
rectangular shape, slate
blue/green chenille fab-
ric, good cond. No pets/
smoke $45 3524194513
TV CONSOLE TABLE
solid pine, shaker
style w/ 2 doors on
front, great cond. $75
firm 3524194513
TV ROLLING CART
good condition can text
pic $20.00
352-746-0401
TV STAND 36"wide, 26"
tall, with drawer can text
pic $40.00
352-746-0401
TWIN BED W/ SHELF
HEADBOARD $50
352-302-5178
TWIN BUNK BEDS
With Dresser and mir-
ror, chest of drawers
$250, 1920's Kerosene
Lamp $75 Call
352-746-7815
WHITE WICKER WALL
UNIT 23"wide x 76"tall
arched top $45.00
352-746-0401



Custom Made Garden
4x4x12H, $50 all PT
Other sizes avail
Includes delivery
(352) 5274910
Huskee
18 /2, horse riding
lawn mower, 42" cut.
Asking $550
Call before 6pm
352-465 6619
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL $15
352-613-0529
Sears Craftsman
Riding Mower
Good running cond.
New blades last year
$100.
(352) 527-9509



BONSAI PLANTS
Pots, Books, Figurines,
beginner & intermedi-
ate Instruction.
(352) 212-6949



HOMOSASSA
8578 Hwy 19. 4/12-4/13
8-2. Therapy Equip-
ment, Office Chairs &
Supplies, Cabinets, TV
Stands,Shelving,Filing
Cabinets & MORE.
INVERNESS
MOVING SALE
Apr 6th -7th 8am-4pm
Everything must go, be-
hind Inverness car wash
1925 W. Main Street


INVERNESS
Sat. 6 & Sun. 7 8am
ESTATE SALE *
Beautiful light wood,
formal dining furniture,
plus lifetime accumu-
lation of Bric a Brac
Dishes. You Name It
S. Apopka to Left on
6464 E. Morley St.
(352) 726-2980



MEANS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30 $50
EACH 352-613-0529



2 red cedar logs. 3 ft x
20 in dia. and 4 ft x 20 in
dia. with stubs that ex-
tend diameters. FREE,
pick up. 795-2248
4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$20 EACH
352-613-0529
8 Black Upholstered
Dining Room Parson
Chair excel. cond.
$100.
5 Position Marcy
Master Gym Fitness
Center 400 Ib of
weights $250.
(352) 476-8678
144 HANGING FILE
FOLDERS letter size
$10 or free with pur-
chase of file cabinet in
other ad. 341 3607
1/2 HP BENCH
GRINDER- dual 6"
grinding wheels, lights,
guards, 3450 RPMs,
on/off switch. $25
628-0033
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Otis, $10
(352)465-1616
Crafters
Sofa Pillows
200 total-$100 many
patterns ready to sew
together
352-746-6000
CURIO CABINET,
lighted, 4 glass shelves,
71" tall, 29" wide, 10"
deep. $60, (in
Dunnellon) (352)
465-1813
Eric 3- Bike Trailer
Holds 3 trail bikes,
modified, all restored,
Can also hold Harley
or goldwing, $675.
(352) 270-8103
FILE CABINET Hon
brand,4-drawer,vertical,
few scratches on top.
$50 See other ad for file
folders. 341 3607
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
GPS,
Marine Combo Unit
Eagle, 3 yrs. old
$160.
(352) 726-2350
Honda Power
Generator,
Model E G 3500X
Never used,
new in box $650.
(352) 860-2828
LIFEVANTAGE PROT-
ANDIM 30 DIETARY
SUPPLEMENTS /
NEVER OPENED
50.00 LINDA 341-2271
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616


MASTER FORGE
GRILL 2 burner $25
352-513-4614
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX 60.00 464 0316
OAK FILE CABINET
Two drawer with
folder hangers, very
good cond. $65 cash
352-419-4513
OLD TRAFFIC LIGHT
Old new York traffic light
3 signals stop and go
great shape 300.00
352-628-4447
POOL Intex above
ground easyset 15'
round 42" deep+all
accessories, good shape
($50) 212-1596
Ryobi Router Table
$60.
Digital Thermos Stat
$50.
(352) 249-7033
SOLID TEAK arched
shower/pool bench,
brand new never used.
Paid $150, selling $90
firm CASH 3524194513
STEAM CLEANER
Shark canister steam
cleaner
w/attachments.$50.00.
726-2572
STOCK HARLEY
PIPES EXCELLENT
CONDITION
(1340)ONLY 85.00
464-0316
TREADMILL, manual,
folds, easy to use,
sturdy, very good condi-
tion, $60 (in Dunnellon)
(352) 465-1813
UNICYCLE- chrome
frame, 20" x 1.75" tire &
alloy wheel, adjustable
height, Ex., $25,
352-628-0033
WANT TO START A
BAND I want to form a
Band. Classical
Country and 60-80's
Rock, emphasis on
the Beatles.
352-637-2257




4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY 75.00
464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER SO YOU CAN
GET OFF THE TOILET
EASIER ONLY 20.00
4640316
BEDSIDE COMMODE&
ALUMINUM WALKER.
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS ONLY
20.00 EACH 464 0316
Harmor Wheelchair
Lift with swing away,
good cond. $700
Bruno Turning seat,
good cond. $900.obo
(352) 637-3793
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS LIKE NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK VERY LONG SO
YOU CAN SLIDE INTO
THE SHOWER 40.00
464 0316



ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"AS NEW" CONDITION
BLONDE/MAHOGANY
DREDNAUGHT $25
352-601-6625


MORREL "MADE IN
USA" LAP STEEL
ELECTRIC GUITAR 6
OR 8 STRING ONLY
$100 352-601-6625
Spinet Piano
With padded storage
bench Cinnamon
color. Includes heater.
$600. 352- 795-4372
STEREO CHORUS
AMP W/REVERB &
OVERDRIVE 40WATT
ONLY $50
352-601-6625




Area Rug
Approx. 10X 12 Yellow
w/pattern, exec. cond.
$50.00 OBO
352-746-1447
BLINDS 2-faux wood
white, wood trim, metal
casing, heavy duty,
nice, 58" ($30-both)
212-1596
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $16
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529
NEW BATHTUB 75.00 /
5 FT LINDA 341-2271
SHOWER DOORS
NEW 40.00 LINDA
341-2271


Bow Flex Extreme
Exec. cond. cost new
$1400 will take $350
OBO or Trade
352-249-7221
Weights Olympic,
easy curl, +70 lbs. $40.
2 Dumbbells 160 Ibs,
$40. Bar/Dumbbells +
110 lbs+, $40.
(352) 637-6000




3 Gun Cabinets
$125-150, 2 Large Deer
Mounts $125 each,
very reasonable
must sell
352-341-3526
BICYCLE BOYS
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
Bowling balls and carry
bags, 12# 3 oz, 12# 3
oz, and 9#. $20.00
each set. 352 341 3842
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel. cond.
w/ Charger, Delivery
Avail .352-527-3125

GRAND
OPENING
Specials
Ray's Gun Shop
Stokes Flea Market,
Bldg "A"
Rt. 44, 4 mi. E. of
Hwy. 19, Crystal River

Ruger 10-22: $239
Ruger Mini 14: $849
Ruger SR 9: $439
S & W-M& P22:$369

Your Headquarters for
Guns, Ammo and
Reloading Supplies
Hours: 8am to 2pm
Tues-Sat
352-527-1660
352-586-7516


Srs
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ Go Golf Cart
$1,500 Excel. cond.
w/ Charger,
Delivery Available
352-527-3125
Glock 23,
40 cal., 14 round, extra
mags. ammo, holster,
org. case $1,000
(352) 302-6565
GUNS Never used
Mossberg Maverick 12
gauge model 88, 28
inch choke, 2 3/4 + 3
inch shells, 6 shot + 660
rounds $400 firm.
Slightly used Taurus 65,
357 stainless steel, 6
shot, 4 inch barrel, $375
firm. 352 860 1039
PISTOL
38call, Colt, Cobra, blue
steel, 2" barrel, 6 shot,
excel. cond. $600.
Call John
(352) 637-0987
Proform Treadmill
$100 obo
352-628-5451


2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555



Baby Items
Deluxe. High chair $35,
Baby Carriage $40 both
in Exec. Cond.
352-249-7804
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok condi-
tion, $50
(352)465-1616
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




ALL AUTOS WANTED
with or without title. Any
cond. make or model.
We pay up to $10,000
and offer free towing.
(813) 505-6939


AMMUNITION
I buy ammo and pay
top prices.
(352) 302-0962
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492



TWO HONDA EU2000
GENERATORS. Cost
$994 new asking $750
each. (352) 3414898


Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200













Baby Girl P

Baby Girl P, a 4
y.o. Terrier mix,
Heartworm-negative,
housebroken, is black
w/ white accents, up-
right ears. Wt. 42 lbs.
Friendly, affectionate,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/ other
dogs. Calm energy,
gives kisses. A
beautiful, wonderful
companion.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Dixie Girl
Dixie Girl, 5 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
loves people, dogs
& kids. Intelligent,
affectionate,
friendly, gentle, aims
to please. Medium
size. Walks well on
leash, rides well in
car. Beautiful girl.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


m
2 Chinchillas,
w/2 cages,
352-464-3356
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.comrn






*(352) 634-5039








LILLY
Lilly, a 3-y.o. Hound
mix, very sweet, af-
fectionate, bonds

Fawn & white color.
A bit timid in new sit-
uations, walks well
on leash, sits for
treats, weight 50 Ibs.
Good companion
for family who can
spend time w/her.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808. "









OZZIE
Ozzie, 2-3 y.o. Black-
mouth cur mix,
beautiful, weight 50
Ibs, friendly, slightly
shy, likes other dogs
& people, strong,
active, needs strong
handler, no young
children, fenced
yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288. 0

Parrot's Whole Sale
Prices hand fed,baby
nandays, Pr bl front
amazons, prof indian
Ring necks, pr cocka-
tiels & sgl, parkeets
637-6967
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpuDs.ne
Shorkie for Sale
Female, health cert, 1st
shots, 8 wks April 12th
$300 Call Judy
352-344-9803
A







TUCKER
Tucker, 3 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
beautiful, active,
Heartworm-negative,
playful& friendly,
weight 50 Ibs. Experi-
enced handler, no
young children in
family, fenced yard
preferred. Loves
exercise & play.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Males, 8 wks on 4/4,
$450 cash. See the
parents in Lecanto
(727) 242-0732



Registered 6 yr old
buckskin quarter
horse gelding. Asking
$1800 352-634-5581


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




6 HP JOHNSON
Fresh water motor
perfect cond. $450
obo Cryst River
(513) 260-6410 Cell
1985 FORCE
85 HP, Outboard Eng,
w/power lift. low hrs
fresh water only $1200
352-507-1490




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-
22 Ft Pontoon Boat
2004 Odyssey, 115 HP,
4 cyc, '05 Yam. motor
gar. kept, $10,500 obo
(352) 422-2113
ALUMA CRAFT
Magic Tilt, 16ft, alumi-
num John Boat with mo-
tor & trailer
dept. find. & anchors,
excel. cond. low hrs on
mtr., $2,700 cash firm
Floral City
(352) 341-1714
BOAT
motor, trailer, 12' v-hull,
10 hp HONDA
4-stroke+fish-finder,good
shape($750)212-1596
DOCK SPACE
AVAILABLE
In Crystal River
Deep Water Canal, no
bridges (352) 212-4839
OLD TOWN
Discovery, 17ft Canoe
with accessories &
bumper hitch carrier
$475. (719) 660-9824
Cell No Text Messages
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192


69,1


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052





SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150


BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TOP SOIL-
BLACK GOLD
18 YARDS $250 LOAD
CALL (352) 302-6499




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START
.A FIRE!

Hidden Co.i,













Add an artistic touch to your existing yard
'IE^= _ or pool or plan
p something

=- -.-* cnompletely new!
L "Often imitated,
i ^ Ll fi .' .11.'li'fl[f, ,


YOUR INTElOCKING BRICK AVEI RSPECIALIST

COPES
I POOL AND PAVER LLC
I nense 352-400-3188


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352 422-7279 #k**
**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483


WINDOW >
GENIE.
We Cleon Windows nd a Whole Lot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call H&H
Services today!
li#37658 352-476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. Good Rates, Res,
Free Est., Lic#39324
Kevin 352-364-6185


Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**
Primary Cleaning
** Free Estimates-
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


PRESSURE
WASHING AND
SEALING
OF
CONCRETE/PAVERS
AROUND YOUR POOL.
3 CHOICES OF SEALANT
. Free Estimates
.' 352-515-3131

Local business
Weeki Wachee local.
18yrs. exp.


When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
SPools & Pavers
,. Cleaning & Sealing
Grout Painting
IA! Y Residential &
Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service*
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine- It's Tune Up
Time! 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767

LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install ABeautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over" Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838

LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up& Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For YoLu!L
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com





SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876

SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065


GENERAL ['
Stand Alone .S
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

35 1 4*


SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lie. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GRINDING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AAA ROOFING
Call the 7e4akh6usten"
Free Written Estimate
-------------------

*100 OFFi
Any Re-Roof:,
Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000EHZZ






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SEARS
12 ft. Aluminum V
Bottom, galv. trIr.
excel. cond., 4HP
Johnson outbrd,
$500 cash, firm excel.
cond. Floral City
(352) 341-1714
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
-(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $5800. obo
call 906-250-6504
04 Open Road
37', 5th wheel, good
cond. 4 season, 3
slides, can deliver
$17,000 352-341-1106
5th WHEEL HITCH
(Hirch) 4-way tilt &
15K load range
$250 OBO
(352) 422-2113
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. bed., +
rear bunk beds,
slide out, ducted AC
Very clean. Reduced!
$9,000 (352) 621-0848
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
Truck Camper
over the Cab sleeps 5,
air, generator, micro-
wave, oven stove,
electric jacks & awn-
ing. Fits 8ft bed, 3/4
ton or dully $5,200.
(352) 503-2887
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



CAR DOLLY
Custom made,
heavy duty,
like new, $750
352-795-8986



MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 lbs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarstonl@mac.com
or 352-586-1483



"BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191


CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!I
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



03 MITSU SPYDER
Red cony, a real looker!
Auto V6 25mpg. Great
mech'lI cond. Can email
pics. $5600 464-2966
2003 PT CRUISER
58k miles, exec. cond.
$6,000
352-503-2243
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 5 6 3-1 9 02
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
1990 LaSabre
$1,950.
352-341-0018
Buick
2005 Century, 4dr
96k ml, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-422-3198
BUICK
2005, Century
$5,995
352-341-0018
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
Cadillac
'96, Eldorado,
good cond. 130k miles
$3,900 obo
850-653-5497
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th an-
niversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles,
immaculate,loaded,call
for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
07 Taurus SE
79k mi, pwr windw, lock,
cruise control, am/fm/cd
owner, exc. cond.
$5500. 352-302-9217


CHEVROLET
2006 Impala
$6,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
1991 Crown Victoria
$1,500 352-795-7474
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Hereit its,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
MAZDA
'00, MPV LX, 59k miles
$4,000
(352) 527-1330
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2011 Camry LE, 4 Dr,
Excellent Condition
35K mi, $15,000
(352) 419-4486



AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. ARP. 7. '13
1-800-438-8559
BMW
'87, 325i,
Convertible, $5,500.
(810) 399-4450 Cell
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5500 obo
352-628-5451,
601-2214






Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
VOLKSWAGON
'73, Super Beetle, light
blue, custom white
wall tires, excel. cond.
$4,800. (352) 564-0788


DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
quad cab 270,000 miles
needs transmission, en-
gine, AC work good
body, tires $1000 OBO
360ci 352-4644764
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
FORD
1997, F150 $4,995
ex cab low miles
352-341-0018
FORD
2001 Ranger V6, High
Mi, good work truck,
cold air, $2000
(352) 726-0898
FORD
2011 Ranger XLT,
$17,500. KBB, OBO
AutoTrans, Power
Windows, Doors Locks
AM/FM/CD/XM/CB,
Cruise, Bed Cover,Alloy
Wheels, More Pictures
w/email: djameson5
@tampabay.rr.com
cell 410-703-9495
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100


CLASSIFIED



FORD
1999, Explorer
$2,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2010 Escape XLT
loaded V6, Lo Mi.
$16,500 352-249-7702
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150

Misc. otice


SUNDAY,APRIL 7, 2013 D7


1995 Dodge
Caravan, 6 cyc, 7 pass,
runs, great, looks good
$1, 475 352-637-2588
845-588-0759

CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs for more info
call Tom 352-325-1306




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

GOLDWING
1986 Trike, Tri-wing
conversion, always
garage kept, excel.
cond. 33k mi. $9,000
(352) 746-7290

KAWASAKI
2012, Vulcan 900
Classic, full dress, 1,300
mi. like new, $7,250
(352) 341-2149

SOLD
HONDA
'86, Helix, Like New
Kenwood radio. Call
for List of New parts
$2,475

Misc. otice


360-0407 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote Deborah Ryals
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Deborah Ryals
6449 W. Riverbend Rd.
Dunnellon, FL 34433
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of
ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide
voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of
Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 7, 2013

364-0407 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
City of Crystal River
2013 ROAD PAVING
Bid #13-B-07
The City of Crystal Rver will receive sealed bids for 2013 Road Paying. You are
hereby invited to submit a bid for the above referenced project. The Owner is the
City of Crystal River.
Bids will be received until 10:00 AM, on April30,2013, opened and read cloud at
10:05 AM in the Council Chambers at Crystal River City Hall.
DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The work generally consists of resurfacing several exst-
ing roads in the City. The approximate major item quantities are as follows; 9,660
square yards asphalt super-pave 9.5, 1" thick, 3,000 square yards full depth asphalt
reclamation with asphalt emulsion stabilizer, 3,000 square yards asphalt super-pave
12.5, 2" thick, 700 square yards base repair, and tack coating, traffic striping and
maintenance of traffic. Quantities may be increased or decreased at the discretion
of the Owner.
ALL BIDDERS must be properly qualified for the type of work forwhich the BID is
submitted. BIDS must be enclosed in an opaque envelope and marked:
"2013 ROAD PAVING, BID #13-B-07", AND THE NAME OF THE BIDDER
AND THEIR
ADDRESS
BIDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER
CAROL HARRINGTON, CITY CLERK
123 NW HIGHWAY 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428
All contract documents may be examined at City Hall at no charge,
downloaded for free on the City website (www.crvstalriverfl.ora), or picked up at
City hall for no charge. Bidders who utilize the City website for the bid documents
are advised check the website regularly for updates and addendums. Bid pack-
ages may be picked up at the Public Works Department at City Hall, at the address
above, between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. The


contact person is Theresa Krim, 352-795-4216, extension 314 or Lou Kneip at extension
305.
No BIDS may be withdrawn for a perod of SIXTY (60) days after clodng time
scheduled for receipt of BIDS. Work shall be completed within forty five (45) days
from receipt of the notice to proceed by the owner.
The OWNER reserves the eight to reject any and all BIDS for any reason whatso-
ever and waive all informalities. THE OWNER ALSO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SELECT THE
BID RESPONSE THAT IN ITS SOLE DETERMINATION BEST MEETS ITS BUSINESS NEEDS.
April 7, 2013


361-0407 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE
The Citrus County Hospital Board invites interested parties to submit a Proposal for the
purchase or lease for all or some listed properties of the Citrus County Hospital Board
and other listed assets. The RFP shall be submitted to the Citrus County Hospital
Board on or before May 16, 2013 at 2pm, pursuant to the RFP.
Scope of Work for RFP
The Citrus County Hospital Board seeks a prospective bidder to address the following
requirements, pursuant to FS 155.40(6) and (7):
1. The Citrus County Hospital Board now upon the completion of the evduation of
the benefit of the sale or lease of Citrus Memorial Hospital has now determined that
it in no longer in the best interest of the affected community (all of Citrus County) to
own or operate a hospital or healthcare system and elects to consider a sale or
lease of the hospital or healthcare system to a third party.
2. Any sale or lease must be for fair market value, or, if not for far market value, the
lease must be in the best interest of the affected community. A sale or lease must
comply with all applicable state and federal antitrust laws.
To acquire the RFP please go to website of the Citrus County Hospital Board at
www.citruscountyhospitalboard.com.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 7, 2013

362-0407 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY AVIATION ADVISORY BOARD
will meet at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 11, 2013 in Room 166 of the Lecanto
Government Center, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the
Engineering Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or
call (352) 527-5446.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need
a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a
verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes)
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Engineering Division, 3600 W.
Sovereign Path, Suite 241, Lecanto, FL 34461, or call (352) 527-5446, at least two days
before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone
(352) 527-5312.
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 7, 2013.

363-0407 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
RFP No. 024-13
Water and Wastewater Utility Rate Analysis Services
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Proposal to provide specialized services relating to rate analysis of selected utilities
regulated by the Water and Wastewater Authority. Services will be required on an
as-needed bads and involve data request and evaluation, annual report review and
audit, rate design, rate impact analysis, report development and presentation, and
attendance at meetings.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before May 7, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for May 7, 2013 a 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requirng reasonable accommodations to the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on
the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle April 7, 2013


Thanks to our customers, we've just received the 2012 Toyota


President's Award. It's one of the highest honors for a Toyota


dealership. It's also a symbol of our continuing dedication to


satisfying our customers from the


day that you buy a Toyota


and for as long as you gagAchie


own it.


From every department


and every person at our


dealership, we thank J


you. Please stop by soon


and see the award our eresatisfac0


customers helped us receive. oSales,


LARGE TOYOTA

www.villagetoyota.com 352-628-5100




STOYOTA


Let's Go Places


V


Ias -


I Mis. Noices


IMisc.Ntice


I Misc No


MeBng


Metn


MBeetin
I Notices


THANK





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


v~oenamcseia



VEhE? R a UithrnUayflnn @nuzp
rEif DfOip EoSn S~fTron


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE


$2,199 due at signing (after all offers), Tr. i..1 t. I .,i;r, .... ; d, 1. re, license, deter fees and optional equipment extra.
-r.l-oa..- :.Eor. r IF $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.







w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group

Lease For Gualified i n
Lessees O M I


IW W /MO3MONTH LEASE
$2,989 due at signing after all offers) Includes security deposit Tax. tihe license dealer .r_ qhr ,








wI Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Cualified
Lessees


12 ) ,r ., st. iv,- i, ig fer: lh-d,". :, ,ii- o Ta, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extro.








w/ Preferred Equipment Group
*-a~t.~ Ulra Low-Mileage
LesseesrOa~fe
$419duotsinnafealofesInldsscrtdeoi.Txsilense"dale:A U & d g*. -3.ii'.i.


-;- CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2004 CHEVROLET
IMPALA SS
BLACK 40000 MILES, SUPERCHARGED,
LEATHER, SUNROOF, ONE OWNER
-Sa QBSe


2008 BUICK
LUCERNE
CXL SE VS
BURGANDY, LEATHER, SUNROOF LOCAL TRADE.
#200536
014,45B


1999 FORD F350
CREW DRW XLT
GREEN
7.3 POWERSTROKE DIESEL XLT TRIM
96K MILES, & C2T217A
,14,SB22


$4,199 due at signing (offer oll offers), Includes security deposit Tox, title, license, dealer ', rv'.- A : ,:,,l : ..,a.pmr. r u.,
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile o .T,,le. I I 1: S 4 : 4 .


( -) CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2008 VW
BEETLE
SE CONVERTIBLE
BLACK, 52,000 MILES. LEATHER.
EXTRA CLEAN, ONE OWNER, C3S293A
19470,0130


2008 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGAlON, SUNROOF,
3RD SEAT, MC2S241i
*1 ,SS2E


2010 FORD
EDGE
2WO LIMITED
GRAY, LEATHER, SUNROOF
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRAOE. #C3S235A
* -1,sase


2008 CADILLAC 2007 CADILLAC 2009 HONDA 2010 HONDA 2009 CADILLAC 2004 CADILLAC
DTS CTS CRV ACCORD DTS XLR
LUXURY COLLECTION GOLD MIST EX-L V6 EX-L LUXURY COLLECTION CONVERTIBLE
WHITT DIAMOND NAVIGATION. SUNROOF. DRIVER ONLY 16886 MILES LOCAL TRADE, SILVER, 32000 MILES. LEATHER, WHITE DIAMOND. ONLY 13.000 MILES. GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE TAN. 68000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE,
AWARENESS PKG, C3X176A EXTRA CLEAN #C3A309A SUNROOF. ONE OWNER, #C3S289G LEATHER, SUNROOF, ONE OWNER. C3S289A 40,175 MILES, #C382230A EXTRA CLEAN, #C2T200A


2011 BUICK
LACROSSE CXS
BLACK. LOW MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
SUNROOF. LOADED,. C2S269G
2ae,0BB


2010 CADILLAC
DTS
PREMIUM COLLECTION
BLACK, 33,000 MILES, NAV, SUNROOF
HEATED AND COOLED SEATS, IC3X331A
S26,908B


2007 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
AWO
DIAMOND WHITE, 43,000 MILES, SUNROOF
DVDS LOCAL OWNER. C3M286B


2011 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
MOCHA 22,000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF.
HEATED SEATS. #C383270
"amjs00


2012 CHEVROLET
AVALANCHE LTZ
WHITE DIAMOND
16000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV IW)
#C3MOSOA
*43, 9880


2011 TOYOTA
SEQUOIA
PLATINUM SILVER
22,813 MILES, SUNROOF, NAV, OVOS, LOADED
ONE OWNER TRADE, C3S01A
*47,988


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE


- A--. -_-"AS-,AV- A -fW


2005 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
SILVER, 122,000 MILES. NEEDS WORK,
IC383960B
w2,9se


2004 LINCOLN
TOWNCAR
WHfTE
LOCAL TRADE, EXTRA EXTRA MLEAN
*C3X046B
*0,905


2005 HONDA
CIVIC
2DR EX "SE"
BLACK 70,100 MILES, LEATHER,
SUNROOF. ONE OWNER
j*9,90S


2003 CADILLAC
CTS
BLUE, 48,000 MILES, LEATHER. SUNROOF.
LOCAL TRADE, #C2S2728
=..p ,93'19


2002 CADILLAC
ESCALADE AWD
WHITE DIAMOND
SUNROOF. LOCAL TRADE. EXTRA CLEAN
#C3M303A
9*23se0g


2005 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY II
TAN, SUNROOF, LEATHER, HEATED SEATS,
LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3X299A
*10,9BB


WWW.SL. LLLIVALlICAD ILLAC.COMVI


4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700


D8 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


L ~ ~. ...::........ ...:.:


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE





Section E *SUNDAY, APRIL 7,2013


OME


RONT


INSIDE
BI Sikorski's
S1Attic PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


I-


CHEN,


^" *_^,
y r",' .,-"
'.'$ ,t." . ; J..
,.;- ', ., .'


*' A


F1 ri I ;


Ii LI]'


II'S'
~ -C.0 -
S - S
C -


774


L3?


IL
A


IEN L -


(Ill


*U IK


I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


r .


^


'./h I I ;Hl- /,1kA I


8 IjMI











OPEN HOUSE EnIO LIEte, i2o1 .INFO L E3m -
^^^^67^a^TODAY 1-3F~63-^ C52) 3 -2^&^B~f^^
&' (352)tnf,63. 82- Elj?2 ..^ ^Ouej,- ne h, ,, hL 0-^^ 'SStaf ~ ^ f_ ___ *.


* 3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
*Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
* 2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
DIR.: Rne Ridge Blvd. to N on Elkcam, to L on Blossom, to home on R.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL [ I
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


OVER 1/2 ACRE IMMACULATE!!
*3BR, 2 Bath *2-Car Garage
* Enclosed Heat/AC FL Rm. *2-Car Carport
* Granite Counters Updated Baths
*2 Corner Lots Patio & Shed/Workshop

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsllorida.com H


Nicely Maintained 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Features Eat-In
Kitchen, Center Island Gas Cooktop/Oven, Pantry,
Built-In Desk Area, Cathedral Ceilings, Lg Master
Bedroom & Bath, Inside Laundry, 3-Season Room,
Storage Room, Detached 12x16 Workshop, Full
Fenced Backyard. Turnkey Fully Furnished & Ready To
Move In!
MARTHA SATHER (352)212-3929
Email: marliha.salher@remax.nel


OVERSIZED CORNER LOT!!
FR + GR + DR Scrn. Lanai w/Hot Tub
Nice Kitchen + Pantry Beautiful Lot
| Fenced Backyard n Pretty Entryway
3/2/2 Split Plan On the Rails-to-Trails
SELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
NEicelit elllesUllOntr leluifll nelo
E ww.Fl dliLislinglnlo.conma


*2 Parcels Sold Together NEEDS Updating & Repairs
* GR has Stone FP Paddocks for Horses
* Backs up to RR/Forest Lots of Shade Trees
*Very Private! *Room for Toys/Animals
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997 .
Eminll elilesullon IoIemui nel
www.FloniduLislmnglnlo.comn


29 S. OSCEOLA ST., BEVERLY HILLS
* 2BD/2BA/1CG On Corner of Rose
* Florida Room Private Backyard
* Nicely Maintained All Appliances
PETER & MARIA KOROL r!
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


TOTAL MAKEOVER
This 3/2 home has an in-law suite or master suite with
sitting area and private remodeled bath. Brand new
kitchen from cabinets to appliances, remodeled 2nd
bath, new roof. Other features include a large living
room w/brick wood-burning fireplace/stove, family
room, covered back patio, and situated on a quiet lot
with a pond and convenient location.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayne@WayneHemmerich.com r


THE HIDDEN GEM OF CITRUS COUNTY
2.81 acres in Pine Ridge. 3BR/2BA solar-heated
pool home with 24x36 RV carport. Private acreage
on a cul-de-sac, horses allowed. Master bath with
garden tub, walk-in closet, and dual sinks. Built-in
2000 with a total of 2,656 sq. ft. F ]
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 1
Email: barbarajmills@earthlink.niet L i

OPEN HOUSE 11 -2PM







80 W. CYPRESS BLVD.
Beautiful pool home in Sugarmill Woods. 3/2/2 home
featuring 2,426 sq. ft. of living space and view of the
8th hole on the golf course.
DIRECTIONS: Hwy. 19 South to left on Cypress
Blvd. W., to house # 80 on the left.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Disltressed Property Expert









3801 N. SEMINOLE PT., CRYSTAL RIVER
Come witness nature's beautyll This large 5 bedroom, 2 bath
corner lot home boasts 310' of waterfront Located across
from a State Preserve for added peace and quiet All big ticket
items recently replaced AC, roof and windows interior
features include spit plan, Flonda room, enormous giving room
with fireplace, separate formal dining, large kitchen and
Cd., I .il i -I h, l ,i I-. i i
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@holmail.com


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


RWM
REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


* New Kitchen -35' Pool & Spa
* New Custom Master Bath* Summer Kitchen
* New Hickory Floors Massive EntertainmentArea
*Sauna *40-Year Tile Roof
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [?7
Email: sherylpotts@ ol.coin IL .
000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiaing.com


E2 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Make


spray to


stretch


shoes


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


Dear Sara: There
is a spray that is
used with shoe
stretchers. Do you know
what is in that formula?
- Carol W, e-mail
Dear Carol: You can
use equal parts water
and rubbing alcohol on
the inside of the shoe
where you want it
stretched (using a cotton
ball to apply it). Then
use your shoe stretcher
and a hair dryer to
stretch the shoes. Re-
peat until you have the
desired results.
Dear Sara: I have
saved two dozen

See FRUGAL/Page E5


Real Estate DIGEST


kil1
Kathy
Canfield
ERA
Realty.


Sandi
Hart
ERA
Realty.


John Deb
Hoffmeister Infantine
ERA ERA
Realty. Realty.


Jennifer Lou
Lehman Miele
ERA ERA
Realty. Realty.
ERA agents garner
national awards
The following individual
agents were awarded a Cir-
cle of Honor designation by
ERA Franchise Systems
LLC at the 2013 Interna-
tional Business Conference,
March 21 to 24 in Austin,
Texas.
Kathy Canfield, Sandi
Hart, John Hoffmeister, Deb
Infantine, Jennifer Lehman,


Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor, A HOUSE Realtor@
302-3179 SOLD Name
7e46.6 287-9022
The Golden Gir WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY 312 WASHINGTON
Beautiful Beverly model featuring 2/2/1
oversized garage. New kitchen
,'r.,,-ts and countertops, refrigerator,
...,irnI machine, dishwasher. New
.,rp-iirj in living room, family room,
I.:r.-n and hallway. Bathroom updated
...r, new vanity and sink. Never paint
again!Lifetmewarrantypaint. #701611


Joanna
Morris
ERA
Realty.


Greg
Rodrick
ERA
Realty.


Deanna
Rodrick
ERA
Realty.


Harry
Eck
ERA
Realty.


Karen Janice
Stukes Ayers
ERA ERA
Realty. Realty.
Lou Miele, Joanna Morris,
Deanna Rodrick and Greg
Rodrick and the agent teams
of Harry Eck and Karen
Stukes and the Home Team
of Janice Ayers and Bill
Moore received recognition at
the conference.


To qualify
for the Circle
of Success
designation,
y i ERA sales as-
sociates must
have
Bill achieved 25
Moore total closed
ERA units or
Realty. $50,000 in ad-
justed gross
commission (AGC) in 2012.
Associate teams must have
generated 35.5 total closed
units or $100,000 in AGC to
earn this designation.
Citrus Ridge Realty
stars shine
Citrus
Ridge Re-
alty is
proud to an-
nounce that
Kirk and
Amanda
Johnson Kirk and
have closed Amanda
more than Johnson
$3 million in Citrus Ridge
sales for Realty.
2013.
The Johnson team, with
buyer's specialist Tom Bal-
four, continue to do business
with integrity, honesty, knowl-
edge and satisfaction. Con-
tact the Johnson team at
352-746-9000 or by email at
akjohnson@atlantic.net.


3 "Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"'
NANCY Direct:
u PONTICOS 352-634-4225

8015 S Suncoast Blvd Homosassa, FL 382-1700 Nancy@Nancyknows.com

N|1 111".11 -Ri~I t J4-J-1Iim1- ad -


BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED!! SWEETWATER "DRIFTWOOD" HAS HEATED
OVER 2,450 SQUARE FEET UNDER AIR!! POOL + SPA AND DUAL PANE WINDOWS!
* Open Great Room 2005 3 Bed Split Plan Corian, Stainless Appliances & Lots of Cabinets
* Master w/Tub/Separate Shower/2 Walk-Ins Lovely Master Suite Adjacent Lot Available
$219,000 MLS#701124 $237,000 MLS#359260
e my vtual toutS I i I


for March 2013. Call Pamela
at 352-794-0888.


Susan
Mastrangelo
Citrus Hills
Realty.


Karis
Geistfeld
Citrus Hills
Realty.


Citrus Hills agents
post top numbers
For the second time in
three months, the team of
Susan Mastrangelo and
Karis Geistfeld have been
recognized as the top sales
agents for March 2013 from
the Villages of Citrus Hills.
The Welcome Center for
the Villages of Citrus Hills is
located at 2400 N. Terra Vista
Blvd. in Citrus Hills. More in-
formation is available at
www.CitrusHills.com.
EXIT offers kudos
to top agent
Congratula-
tions to
Pamela
Shemet with
EXIT Realty
Leaders in
Crystal
River. Pamela Pamela
has won the Shemet
top sales EXIT Realty
agent award Leaders.


Ron
McEvoy
RE/MAX
Realty One.


Agents hit
million mark
Three
agents hit the
$1 million ,
mark in sales I' N.
volume at
RE/MAX Re-
alty One this
week. Ron Len
McEvoy, Palmer
David Ivory RE/MAX
and Len Realty One.
Palmer all
passed this significant mile-
stone by closing more than $1
million dollars in sales vol-
ume. In less than three
months, each of these associ-
ates has accomplished what
only small percentage of Re-
altors do in a year. The asso-
ciates and staff of RE/MAX
Realty One would like to con-
gratulate Ron, David and Len
on their achievement.


Broker Associate 352-270-3255


* 1 d *' i' * t
OPEN HOUSESjy^'~j^^


535 E Charleston Court, Hernando
PRICE REDUCED. 2007 Sanderson Bay
Built Home 4/3/3 with den and office,
2975 sf. ft. of living. Possible in-law set up.
Needs TLC. Motivated Seller.
MLS#342358 $239,900
Directions: 486 to South on Annapolis to
right on Charleston


4394 N. Indianhead Rd, Hernando
2001 Sweetwater Custom Built Home.
2465 sq. ft. of living 3/2/2. 5 ton Energy
Efficient HVAC System installed 7/09.
Home nestled on private 1.10 acre.
$199,900. MLS#357441
Directions: Rt. 486 to north on Annapolis
to end of road, fight on Indianhead to
#4394 on left.


David
Ivory
RE/MAX
Realty One.


JOANN MARTIN
Preferred
REAL ES.TA TE


S
i

lit;,,


I


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 E3


I


I


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Loquat can provide shade, tasty fruit

E dible gardening is grown in a special terra-
today's catchword cotta pot with open pock-
for growing fruit ets staggered around it.
and vegetables in your Starter strawberries put
own garden. A tomato or in each pocket will have
green pepper plant grown lots of root room within

a focal point on a balcony sprout from the original
foor patio. Drip or microir- plant and a series of baby
rigation can be easily in- strawberries will cascade
stalled in water planters. Jane Weber down.
SInexpensive battery- Easy-to-grow strawber-
operated timers attach to JANE'S ries produce from Janu-
the water spigot and then GARDEN ary to April locally.
to the low-pressure micro Replace older plants with
system. Free, do-it-yourself guide new ones in September or October
books are available at home im- Younger plants bear much more
provement stores.
Evergreen strawberries can be See JANE/Page E5


GITTA BARTH
Investors Realty
of Citrus County, Inc. Cell: (352) 220-0466
Visit my website at: www.myflorida-house.com gbarth@myflorida-house.com

JANE WEBER/Special to the Chronicle
Loquat, or Japanese Plum, grows well in Florida's climate. Eaten raw, washed fruit tastes simi- / -,sa
lar to apricot. Crush the fruit with a potato masher, remove the seeds and stew 8 cups of pulp
with one cup of water and 1.5 cups of cane sugar to taste. Store the puree in sterilized glass jars ..
for later use in muffins, quick bread, pies or to stir into a bowl of oatmeal. A BOATER'S DREAM
MOVE RIGHT IN COME TRUE!
NATURE LOVERS BEAUTIFUL CITRUS HILLS!! Sailboat water (no bridges); 240
KAREN E. M ORTON 3/2/2 Ranch on 60 acres, very Enjroythis 332 poo h acre ft of seawall station & float
Hall of Fame Centurion Membe secluded and private setting of privacy! Very well maintained, new home sits high and dry (never
E-mail: kemorton@tampabay rr con perfect retreat! Rolling pasture roof 05/09 Just bring your suitcase and flooded) on 2 lots. Please visit
Website: korernemorton con and mature oaks. Take the tour at move rightin! Community features www.mywaterfronthomeforsale.com
(352) 726-6668 (352)212-7595 BOLD & BEAUTIFUL GOSPEL ISLAND$400,000 MLS 9 9, to find out more about tis home!
LL FREE 1-800-543 5 ACRES First time offered!! MLS #358336! $499,000
ETOLL FREE 1-8O-543-9163 Check out this kitchen with Granite and pull outs* Top
CITY OF INVERNESS **REDUCED!!!! of the line pl less glass window
WHAT A DEAL!!!
J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE overlooking 2488 sq.ft living
I .... E Fl. area* 3 car arage Formal and Casua areas Elegant
dirid of OldInverness. Easy access tocourtouuse, Rails aster bath Nestled in the woods and sheltered by
the trees ** Not seen by the road this dream custom
to -Trails. Public parking lot across the street. home Jewel and only minutes from town. FIRST TIME
Not 72L5IF'$59,0- ED OFFERED PRICE S $296,900! MLS 7113HIII
NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
Villages of Citrus Hills, well known for an
.&I I ft QUICK TRIP OUT INTO active Florida lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on I
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S acre, open floor plan, wood burning
BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY 2BR, 1 BATH 3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET fireplace, a sparkling pool and spacious
WATERFRONT HOME TERIIRAZO FLOORS NEW KITCHEN boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2.5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River covered lanai will make you feel at home
KENSINGTON ESTATES ONE ACRE MAINTENANCE FREE LIVING CABINETS & MICROWAVE *Pull-Out Spice Racks **DUVAL ISLAND ** bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, Oaks East, a gated waterfront fight away. A recent facelift included new
OKto park boatorR 3 bedroomwithden* 27A 0 3BR, 2BA, 2 CAR GARAGE New Kitchen & Cabinets *New Remodeled Bath *French Doors to Dining Rm* OPEN WATERFRONT HOME bonusroom, fireplace, newer roof and community on the Witlacoocee River paint and flooring, and A/C, range and the
I Hw ..1. 1et1 a .... i NeweAgreat place to spend the winter months& windows; great income potential, too! $199,900 garage door were replaced in 2012.
q. ft livin area Large rooms for comfy living ;,...... .. .. ........ I Newer Water Heater Updated Heat Air 2003 Updated 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath CBS home Ne wit ic6 p oe t l be h av d o 0 142.500
e.. .. e o n. o r o ,,,in '"" . " '" '"" '" '" Plum bing & Electric U dated N ew Do or & P lantatio n dro o n 1 h, nine . asM 1 $ 3 5 5 6 $ 2 2 0 0 0 0 w ill b u y y o u th i s p e a c e o f h e a v e n M LS O 7 0 4 7 2 $ 1 4 2 .5 0 0


E4 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E4

fruit I use strawberries as
a perennial, evergreen,
low-maintenance ground
cover plant bordering a
patio and raised vegetable
bed. I always have well-
rooted plants available.
Fruit trees can also be
useful small shade trees.
They often have attractive,
fragrant flowers. Loquat,
or Japanese Plum, Eri-
obotrya japonica, is native
to China and Japan. It
grows well in temperate
Zones 8-10 and tolerates
Florida's Heat Zone 10. It
can grow 25 feet tall, but is
usually pruned much
shorter to allow easier har-
vest of the sweet orange
fruit in March and April.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

Del Monte red grapefruit
slices pint jars. I often give
my jellies and pickles
away, and I thought these
jars would be great for
that, but the labels just
won't come off. I have tried
soaking, and they have
been in the dishwasher
several times, but I still
cannot remove the labels.
I called the company and a
young man only suggested
what I have already tried.
Can you help me? -
Donyta, e-mail
Dear Donyta: Soak the
jars in hot water If there's
still some glue residue, use
vinegar, nail polish re-
mover, baby or vegetable
oil and a plastic or green
Scotch-Brite scrubbie to
remove it. Label removal is
easier if you score the label
first You might have luck
with Goo Gone, WD-40 or
Pledge furniture polish,
too. Run them through your
dishwasher afterward.
Dear Sara: I sometimes
forget to marinate. Is there
anything wrong with just
pouring marinade onto the


Prune after fruit has
been gathered. A practical
method is to snip off the
fruiting branches about
two feet back with a pole
lopper, operated by pulling
its rope. The leafy branch
cushions the ripe fruit,
preventing bruising. Har-
vest and annual pruning
done in one operation.
Readily available loquat
is one of 30 species of Eri-
obotrya. It belongs to the
rose family. The large
evergreen leaves are crin-
kled and leathery, with
light silvery-colored hairy
undersides. They stay on
the tree for up to three
years before shedding.
Blow spent leaves off
planting beds onto the
lawn and mulch them with
a lawnmower. The
chopped leaves soon
decay in Florida's hot wet

meat/poultry and cooking
it? -Pauline, Ohio
Dear Pauline: Marinade
is pretty strong because it's
concentrated, so using too
much directly can result in
a flavor that is overpower-
ing. If you're short on time,
you can brush the mari-
nade onto the meat/poul-
try toward the end of the
cooking process.
The idea is to enhance
the flavor of your meat, so
soaking your meat in it
overnight isn't absolutely
necessary
Dear Sara: We rarely
drink hot chocolate, but
happen to have tons of
mix. What can I do with it
besides make hot choco-
late? -Dob, e-mail
Dear Dob: Give some to
friends or family, or donate
it. You can make chocolate
pudding or a chocolate
shake, or add it to coffee,
pancake batter or oatmeal.
You can use it in baked
goods such as cakes and
muffins, too. Here's an
easy microwave cake-in-a-
mug recipe: howto.wired.
com/wiki/Make_Cakein a
_Mug.
Dear Sara: I'm making a


See FRUGAL/Page E7


summers and provide nu-
trients for fall and winter
flowering and fruit set.
Using chopped leaves as
mulch helps retain soil
moisture, moderates soil
temperatures and de-
creases fertilizer use by
reusing nutrients stored in
the leaves.
Loquats flower some-
time between late Novem-
ber and early January
locally Clusters of white,
fragrant flowers at branch
tips attract pollinators and
butterflies. Fruit sets over
winter, ripening from


March to April. Soil must
be humus-rich and retain
moisture. Weekly irriga-
tion is critical while fruit is
setting.
Drought-stressed lo-
quats will abort immature
fruit during a hard freeze.
One or several seeds may
be in the 1 to 1.5 inch yel-
low fruit.
I plant only the one
large seed from the biggest
fruit grown locally and
adapted to local climate
conditions. Saplings
flower and set fruit after
five to seven years. Train


young trees in an umbrella
shape to shade a patio or
house wall low enough
for picking, but high
enough to place a lounge
chair in the shade.
Eaten raw, washed fruit
tastes similar to apricot.
Crush the fruit with a po-
tato masher, remove the
seeds and stew 8 cups of
pulp with one cup of water
and 1.5 cups of cane sugar
to taste. Store the puree in
sterilized glass jars for
later use in muffins, quick
bread, pies or to stir into a
bowl of oatmeal. Keep jars


in a cool, dark place like
the tile floor in the pantry
Pulp may also be frozen in
baggies or containers, but
then is dependent on
electricity.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County, garden.
For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR







6262 W SETTLER 3948 N. BUCKWHEAT 4710 W. MUSTANG
5/4/3 700993 $359,000 3/2/2 700825 $179,900 3/2/3 359604 $244,900


6121 N. SILVER PALM 2587 W. ANGOA 375W CRESTMONT
3/2.5/2 358309 $148,500 4/3/3 701069 $239,900 222 00617 $124,900




--a--
2435W. ERIC 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD. 7170 N GRACKLE
2/1/1 701256 $52,900 3/2.5/2 700080 $114,900 3/2/2 700780 $109,500




1503~ ~ ~ ~ ~ & 55W ZVRR
5/5/2 car garaOge attached and 2 car detached garage. 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 137 N FRESNO
700929 $259,900 3/22 358792 $149,900 3/2/2. 701884 $129,900


1I N. MLLBUUKNL 1 IKUMAN 421U L. LAL rAKK UK. FAbU N. BATLIN.K
2/2/2 700838 $45,000 I 2/2/1 701074 $54,750 2/1.5 359138 $74,900 3/2/2. 701882 $68,500
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 E5






E6 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information................. 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CH" .oNICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Replace old plumbing


fixtures, save money


any Americans live in regions of
the country where April showers
bring May flowers, but in Florida,
April is one of the driest
months of the year This time of
year is also a peak demand
month for use of public water
and other water sources.
Recognizing this fact, each
year the state of Florida hails
April as "Water Awareness
Month" and requests residents
be particularly conscious of r
the amount of water each per- Joan Bi
son uses. In addition to saving FLOE
money on your utility bill, FRIE
water conservation helps pre-
vent water pollution in nearby LIV
lakes, rivers and local
watersheds.
Conserving water has the added bene-
fit of extending the life of your septic sys-
tem by reducing soil saturation, and
reducing any pollution due to leaks. In
some communities, costly sewage system
expansion has been avoided by commu-
nitywide household water conservation.
Unless your house was built after 1995,


you probably have pre-conservation era
plumbing that guzzles water. Fixing leaks
and replacing old plumbing fixtures with
water-saving models are two
'- easy ways to conserve water
and save money at the same
time.
In fact, repairing leaky
plumbing and installing a few
inexpensive water-saving de-
"" vices in your home could save
up to 20,000 gallons of water
the first year The good news is
adshaw most water conserving devices
lIDA- will reduce water and sewer
M|DLY bills enough to pay for them-
selves within six months. For
ING example, by reducing water
consumption from 9,000 gal-
lons to 8,000 gallons per month, a family
can save an average of $35.93 annually on
its water bill (an estimated savings of
$2.99 per 1,000 gallons per month) or
$66.55 on its combined water and sewer
bill (an estimated savings of $5.55 per
1,000 gallons per month).

See FIXTURES/Page E7


Inside...


Decorating with
plants
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3

For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Marilyn Monroe memorabilia; antique gum machine


Dear John: I have re- paired
cently come across an much;
old wooden
Marilyn Monroe
box that is about 8
by 12 inches and 2
1/2 inches deep. I
absolutely love the
box, but it is al-
ready a little dam-
aged and there is a
crack in the wood
from someone
dropping it. I was John Sikorski
just curious to its SIKORSKI'1
value for two rea- ATTIIC
sons: Is it OK to
have something
like this restored, or will it photogi
ruin its value, and is its value box. Th
so irrelevant (meaning little) nude is
that it would be OK to have it classic
repaired for sentimental rea- Dream
sons? Also, who would you duced
recommend getting it re- good c(


by? Thank you so
I enjoy listening to
your show and
reading your arti-
cles! D.,
Internet
Dear D.: In the
movie star memo-
rabilia category,
Marilyn Monroe
memorabilia is
still high on the
totem pole. The
item in the photo-
S graph is not a Mar-
ilyn Monroe box,
but a box with a
calendar nude
raph of her put on the
e picture of her in the
from a 1955 calendar
titled "Golden
s" which was pro-
in huge quantities. In
ndition, with the cal-


endar attached, it typically
sells in the $50 to $100 range.
If an item is in bad condi-
tion, in need of repair or
restoration, it usually en-
hances the sellability and
dollar value. In this case,
what you have is a marriage
of two separate items not
originally made as it now
appears.
To have the box repaired,
contact the folks at Back in
Time Restoration. The phone
number is 352-373-6949.
Dear John: I have an O.D.
Jennings & Company gum
"Zig Zag" machine I am try-
ing to find the value of. It has
the number on the tag on the
inside. I would like to know
when it was made and what
value it has. H., In-
ternet
Dear H.: You have a trade


stimulator. They were me-
chanical games of chance
that did not have an auto-
matic money payout and
were found in various retail
stores, pool halls, etc. One de-
posited a penny, nickel or
dime, depending on the type
of machine, and could re-
ceive a merchandise payout.
Trade stimulators were pro-
duced in a wide variety of
shapes, sizes, and styles from
See ATTIC/Page E9
This Zig Zag gum machine is
known as a trade stimulator.
Customers would place
money in the device and
might or might not -
receive a piece of gum in
return. Although once popu-
lar, such devices faded from
the market in the 1950s.
Special to the Chronicle


r






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FIXTURES
Continued from Page E6

For a do-it-yourself guide on "fix
it for less," visit www.swfwmd.
state.fl.us/conservation/fixit/fixitl.
php or contact UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension at 352-527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

breakfast sausage casserole, but I
grabbed the regular Jimmy Dean
sausage instead of the sage flavor. I
have some sage; how much do you
think I should mix in with the sausage
to flavor it? S.S., California
Dear S.S.: I wouldn't add more
than 1 tablespoon of sage per pound.
Dear Sara: Can I freeze leftover
cooked rice? Jennifer C., North
Carolina
Dear Jennifer: You can freeze
cooked rice. Let it cool, then pack-
age it in freezer storage bags. Flat-
ten the bag (leaving rice in a layer
about 3/4-inch thick) and squeeze
out any air, or you can even roll the
rice into a ball and wrap with plastic
wrap. To reheat, microwave on high
for 1-2 minutes or until fully re-
heated, or use a frying pan or small
saucepan. Add a bit of water if
needed.
MEN
People either love pizza crust
edges or hate them. If you have a

I OPEN HOUSE SUN 11-3
Connell Heights in Crystal River


.u.Lum 1u1 no1m1 on o Iuit WILt1 o I -I sq. IL.
living area, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, office or 4th
bedroom, crafts room, (2) 2 car garages, 4 car
carport. List Price $194,900, MLS#700296
Dir: Hwy 44, turn south onto Lyle Ave, Left onto W
Pine Cir, Left onto N Sunstyle Ter, Right onto W Paul
Bryant to #5730
Alison Markham &
Steven McClory
EXIT Realty Leaders
352-697-0761
Cell 352-422-3998 352-794-0888


and resources to address youth,
family, community and agricultural
needs.
Programs and activities offered
by the Extension Service are avail-
able to all persons without regard to
race, color, handicap, sex, religion
or national origin.


Dr Joan Bradshaw is director of
University ofFlorida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.

crust-hater in the family, cut his or
her crust edges off prior to serving.
You can stick them in the fridge or
freezer to use later with soups/stews,
spaghetti, casseroles or even egg
dishes at breakfast.
The first reader shares her pizza
end-crust tip:
Bread sticks: When we order
pizza, we usually get deep dish. It
fills you up faster so you can eat
fewer pieces and have leftovers. I
sometimes add some basil and
oregano to an 8-ounce can of tomato
sauce and heat it in the microwave.
Then we cut off the edges of the
pizza crust and dunk it in the sauce
-free breadsticks!
Ranch dressing, barbecue sauce
or any other flavor can be used in-
stead of or in addition to tomato
sauce. S.D., Minnesota
See FRUGAL/Page E14


FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY!
BLACK DIAMOND RANCH HOME
Super clean 3 bedroom, 2 bath with
a 2 car garage is fully furnished!
Over 1,700 sq. ft. living area with
an open floor plan, neutral colors!
Includes all appliances! Vacant!
Priced to sell for only $154,900.
Immediate Occupancy. MLS #358736
For More Information Or To p
Preview This Home Contact : -i
Bob Hedick NEXTGENERATION
352-634-4286 REALTY


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 E7





E8 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


II


(


ii


Clever use of

reenery
a perfect way
to enhance
interiors


'i


a..'

I-mi 1
t
r~Th A


U


I


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associatcd Prcss
arm weather and the first
buds of spring have been
slow to arrive in much of
the country But even if
your garden has yet to grow, you can
add beauty, fragrance and a sense of
springtime to your home by decorat-
ing with lush plants and potted
trees.
Decorating with plants "kind of
fell out of vogue" for a time, says
California-based interior designer
Molly Luetkemeyer "It was such a
'70s thing, or I think people associ-
ated it with the '70s," but if s become
popular again in recent years.
Today, "designer spaces pretty
much always include some element
of life," says interior designer Brian
Patrick Flynn, founder of decorde-
mon. com. "While that can be any-
thing from coral to tortoise shells,
pressed leaves or even a tiny bowl
with a goldfish, the most common
way to add life is with potted plants
and trees."
See PLANTS/Page E10







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

the 1890s until the 1950s, when the public lost
interest.
Your penny gum machine would pay out a
piece of gum, or several pieces if one got the
lucky number. Your trade stimulator has
wonderful appeal. The Art Deco motif adds
to the market interest. Potential dollar value
is in the $1,000 range, depending on
condition.
Dear John: I have a dining set that requires
cane replacement on all of its chairs. Could
you please provide me with the phone num-
ber of anyone in the area that can do this
work? Thank you for your program, articles
and your willingness to share your expertise.
-A.C., Internet
Dear A.C.: I suggest you contact Kathleen
Barnes at Cane Weavers at their website,
www.caneweavers.com or call them at 352-
796-2871.
Dear John: I have a very ornate letter
holder that is sterling silver made by Tiffany
Could you recommend someone for ap-
praisal? L.D., Crystal River
Dear LD.: Letter openers are a large cate-
gory of collector interest. Tiffany-made letter
openers are high on the totem pole of collec-
tor interest. It could be worth hundreds of
dollars, but without a photograph, that is all
I can say If you like, send a couple of good,
clear photos and all the marks that appear on
the opener, then I will finish the story


John Sikorski has been a professional in the
antiques business for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to 1 p.m.
Write to Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala, FL 34478 or asksikorski@aol. com.


KE I "Always There For You"
LEJL"i GAIL COOPER
1 Ii" 1 ull'iilllion Dollar Realior
Cell: (352) 634-4346
Office: (352) 382-1700x309
E-mail me: homes4u3 mindsprmng.com


PEACEFUL GOLF COURSE VIEWS!
* Sought after end unit condo
* 2/2 on first floor
* Recently painted interior
* Florida room has newer carpeting
* Parking right at your door
* Pool and clubhouse steps away
#347098 $79.900


uu I iviloo uu l ui irnlo
* Great chance for 2nd home
*2/2 villa on lot and a half
* Newly painted interior
* New closet shelving
* Dual pane sliders for lanai
* Large pantry closet in kitchen
#359666 $59.900


I NATURE'S PARADISE-FLORAL CITY, FL BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL I
SWaterront -story home on private 2.27 acres. Corner 2.17 acre tract. Paved road & central
Gorgeous setting. $149,900 MLS#358757 water $17,500 MLS#700351


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on large shaded lot.
Carport. Central water. $30,000
MLS#359133


uANK UWNtLU-ILUKAL LIIT, 1L
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. S45000 MLS#701383


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352 302-6714 1M |


H S AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS Fran Perez7 "'
.1*4511 N L.l,n, H..y B1-.1, H.,FL 3445 !z
I % Office: 352-746-3600 13 I:' 58- ,5
.....= ,:n (352) 586-8885








4515 W. BONANZA DR. BEVERLY HILLS
Don't wait too long to see this 5.7 acre GENTLEMEN'S TURN KEY HORSE FARM.
Tree lined circular driveway divided by two 4/5 board paddocks. Lovely expanded
ranch pool home set up as mother/daughter 3500 sq. ft. 6 bdrms. 5 baths 2/1 car
garages. solar heated pool overlooking barn, paddocks and horses. Barn has 4 large
stalls w/separate tack & feed rooms w/wash area. Property has 4 huge paddocks w/
improved pasture. 1 ac. Underground electric dog containment so much for the horse
* person. Must see to appreciate $379,000. Call Fran Perez 352-586-8885.
ALSO: ALMOST 3 ACRE WOODED LOT IN PINE RIDGE FOR $52,000
I I I I


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 E9


See.JVirtual .IIIrs@..i resalehomeII..I IIB.I..m







E10 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013



PLANTS
Continued from Page E8

We've asked Flynn,
Luetkemeyer and Betsy
Burnham of Burnham De-
sign in Los Angeles for ad-
vice on choosing the right
plants, potting them per-
fectly and keeping them
blooming with minimal
effort.
Where to start?
"Talking to someone at a
nursery is a really good
idea," says Burnham, be-
cause employees at garden
stores and plant nurseries
are usually glad to answer
questions about choosing
and caring for plants.
You can choose plants
based on the spot in your
home where you'd like to
keep them (sundrenched
windowsills, shady cor-
ners or in-between spaces
that get a mix of sun and
shade). Or you can select a


plant you love and then
ask for advice on where to
place it.
If you have pets or small
children, ask whether a
plant you're considering is
poisonous. And if you want
plants that need very little
attention, don't be shy
about saying so.
"While I'm a fan of mak-
ing a big statement with
greenery," Flynn says, "I'm
only interested in plants
and trees that are low-
maintenance. Give me
something that requires
daily care and/or delicate
grooming, and it's most
likely to go from green to
brown or black in less than
72 hours."
Fabulous ferns
All three designers like
ferns, such as the maiden-
hair "They're so delicate
and soft," says Luetke-
meyer. "They're fresh, and
they're that pale green
that's the beginning green
of spring."


where to place it.

also look excellent potted
and placed on a pedestal,
coffee table or console
table."
If you want something
larger and bolder than the
delicate maidenhair,
Flynn suggests the
staghorn fern. Just remem-
ber that all ferns do best in
shade rather than direct
sunlight
Flowering plants
"I love plants that flower
in the spring," says
Luetkemeyer, who recom-
mends daffodils, narcissus


and hyacinth.
She also loves gardenia
plants for their heady fra-
grance and shiny leaves.
But they do require a bit of
effort.
"Any plant that's a
woody plant, with a wood
that's exposed, is going to
be a little bit trickier," she
says. Consider researching
gardenias online to learn


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Maidenhairs are fairly
easy to care for: "They
need to be watered," she
says, "but if you water
them, they hang around."
Consider grouping sev-
eral together in small pots
or buying just one large
fern.
"They can ground a
space grouped together in
odd numbers in pots of
varied heights on the
floor," Flynn says.
Or "you can use them to
add life high up in a room
with hanging basket
planters. And then they


You can choose plants based on the spot in your
home where you'd like to keep them (sundrenched
windowsills, shady corners or in-between spaces
that get a mix of sun and shade). Or you can
select a plant you love and then ask for advice on


See PLANTS/Page E14


FIOMOSASSA nice older mobile w/2 CRYSTAL RIVER huge workshop, mobil
bedrooms, 1 bath, large front and rear has been removed, 3 roll up doors, 1 hig
screened porches. Newer roofover in 2010, enough to drive RV in; 18 ft high, has fu
lewer appliances approximately 2 years old bath, washer dryer hookups, half of upstail
Fully fenced backyard with shed. #700919 looks like it was planned on being living are;
$22,500 #359722 $85,000


how much water and how
much light your plant will
need.
And with all potted
plants, Luetkemeyer sug-
gests placing a dish under-
neath the pot to catch and
maintain the water, then
placing a coaster under-
neath the dish to protect
the furniture or floor.
Potted trees
'"A statement tree," says
Burnham, "adds height to
your room, and plays with
the light at a window."
Her clients in southern
California often opt for the
color and fragrance of
small citrus trees in their
homes or at the entrance
to a patio or yard.


WITHLACOOCHEE RIVERFRONT at it's finest! TWO homes, Garage that's 1/2
party house 1/2 shop w/it's own bathroom. Artists Studio/Shed w/it's own
efficiency kitchen & bath. Main home has 3 huge bedrooms, 2 tiled baths. Hickory
cabinets in chef's kitchen w/double convection ovens, gas stove, island for prep.
High ceilings, gas fireplaces in living room & master suite. 2 screened porches,
outdoor grill, beautiful spa/tub. Generator, 2nd home is a 16' wide mobile that's
absolutely stunning w/ hih ceilings, Roman tub, Office, decks & more. Boat house &
2 dock areas. Beautifully landscaped, under huge old oaks. Elec. Gate entry. Fish off
the dock, boat to the Rainbow River. $497,000
11 I [" I"a 3 K
&. Robert & Holly Jones AMERICAN
- 352-287-5020 REALTY & INVESTMENTS
"Always There For You"
SE TA hollyjones@tampabay.rr.com
S4511 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465



Perfect Location,
S, one acre! Upgrades
n'. Inside & Out. 4/2
with a 3 car garage.



Sto Bedstrow, to Princewood, to 1338 W. Sphere Place. Summ EKPQ r
S kitchen & Bar. Inside
open architecture,

wet bar, wood


IK I Ih I I& I I. I








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 Ell



To place an ad, call 563-5966



S- -.. Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


- .ax (352 56-56 1. ...l .re (888 85-24 1 Em il clsi-,scrnceol o I 4e ww*croiceolie So


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL


includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1 MOBILE, No pets
(352) 637-1142




43,900.3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr, only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807






3/2 on 1.5
Acres
FHA Approved
$2600 Down
(Town of Hernando)
352-795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $ 10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908


Lee k
Easter Sale
Family Home Center
Three Lot Model
Clearance
NO HIDDEN FEES
$72,900 30 x 76 4/2
$69,900 30 x 60 3/2
$82,900 32 x 76 4/2
Price Incls: Delv, Set,
A/C Skirting, Steps,
upgraded appliances &
Furniture Remember
The Reason for The
Season 352-795-1272

Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624

Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665


NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181





Own Your
Own Land?
Financing Available to
purchase your next
New or used
Manufactured Home
352-795-1272


-I.-
Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
homes. $8500 off of
any home, 2/2 & 3/2
from $39,900
Call John Lyons 0
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details.
http://www.palmharbor.c
om/model-center
/plantcitv/



MUST SELL


REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377




We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272




INVERNESS
55+ park
on water. Furnished
2bd, 1.5 bath, $595.
Rent inc. grass cutt-
ing and your water.
Call 352-476-4964
for details






For Sale %
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1/4 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $93,900
716-807-8847


Castle Lk/Floral City
2/2/cpt,- near flea mkt,
off US 41, w/lg shed,
LARGE lot. $39,900
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340
Credit Scores
above 575 Qualify for
several land/home
packages in the
Tri-County area
352-795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
HOMOSASSA
**3/2, Fenced Yard,**
NEW Flooring, NEW
AC $5,000 Down,
$435. mo 352-302-9217


MUST SELL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on V4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message


INVERNESS
Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
Florida Room, Carport
$10,000 OBO (352)
419-5114 or 601-4929
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 312 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 352-726-2553
OCALA
2br iba furn. 55+
Comm.16x16 add-on,
sliding dr to private
deck, 28ft encls porch,
& 28 ft storage, $6200
(352) 470-1727




RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336


s -


-AOIlON
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounHtyHomeRentals.comn
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt............ $500
2/1 Nice duplex
4800 S. Wood Way ............... 900
3/2/2 Fully furnishe
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way ..............$725
3/2 DW, newer mobile on 1/2 ACREl
6315 N.Shorewood Dr.............$625
2/1 Floida room
CRYSTAL RIVER
10939 W. Gem St................ $550
2/1 Duplex, close to hospital
2561 N. Seneca Pt.............$1,200
2/2 WaterfrontDW furnished
CITRUS SPRINGS
9047 Travis Dr. ..................... $625
2/2 Neat, clean duplex
8160 N. Dual Dr. .............. $1,300


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST*INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?
Brn us your vacant home

2/3/2 Roomy home $850
3/2 Free standing garage .
2 Acres ........................ $900
2/2.5 Townhome .............. $650
3/2/2 New paint ...
new flooring .................... 850

2/2/2 ................ $850
3/2/2 Pool care, Lawncare incl
Available May..,...$1,050

3/2 Double wide
private setting ............. $750
3/2/2 lawncare included
community pool ..............$950
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
SCheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
S352-726-9010


Nature Coast Landings.
Large RV Site.
Reduced to $39,500.
www.detailsbyowner
or call 352-843-5441




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Studio Apt.
Furnished, All Util. W/D
Rm., Boat dock, cable
TV, $650 mo $250 sec.
352-372-0507


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

Inverness
1/1 $400. & 2/2 $600.
Near Hospital
352-422-2393





CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Avail. Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461
INVERNESS
2/1, In Town, $575
412 Tompkins St.
(352) 895-0744


Home e Finder K-


Fin, Yotr Drean HomW
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS
2 B/R's
Available
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Av.
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

INVERNESS
2/1water incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238

PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 BEDROOMS
APTS HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $741. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants:
For rental info.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
795-7793
TDD
#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OOP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY





CHIEFLAND
FOR LEASE, Nearly
3,000 sf Building on US
19. with signage, ready
to move into. Offices
Kitchen, showroom, &
storage included in
building Call for details '
352-949-0447


CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528

HERNANDO
1,200 sq. ft. OFFICE
on /2 acres, with Ig.
bill board sign on
Hwy 200 $595. mo
352-344-3084

HERNANDO
2,200 sq. ft. Office or
Live In, on /2 Acre,
Asphalt parking
area, Hwy. 200 $795.
mo. 352-344-3084





Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906


LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/21/2, w/ carport,
spacious & very quiet,
$700. mo Call Steve
(352) 697-1525




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CRYSTAL OAKS
2 BR/2 BA., Very Clean
Furnished or unfurn.
Cre ScoreReq.
(352)220-6129




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
CITRUS SPRINGS
2 Story 3BR + Loft, Near
schools, $900. mo.
352-812-1414
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1Clean+Quiet.W/Dry,
lawn,+basic cable incl.
$550/mo.+$750dep.No
pets. 352-795-6282
Crystal River North
2/1 + Den, Country
Setting $550/ mo.,
+dep (352)795-0161
FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
HERNANDO
2,200 sq. ft. Live In,
on V2 Acre, Asphalt
parking area,
Hwy. 200 $795. mo.
352-344-3084

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Opt 3rd
HUGE YARD
$650/mo 1st/last/sec
(352) 422-6978




Gospel Island
clean 2/1,no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
*(352)584-9496**
1305 Hwy 486





CRYSTAL RIVER
Rm for Rent, Pool
Waterfront, fully furn.,
all util. incl'd, $150 wk.
$100 sec.352-364-7057

INVERNESS
Furn Rm, priv full bath,
incls cable/wifi, access
kit & W/D. $400, +1 mo
dep.(352) 613-1123





INVERNESS
3/2/2 furnished,
very nice
352-527-9268





Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906





FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$850. 352-419-4421





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF/I4M

REALTY ONE

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY



UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.













214 NE 3rd Ave.
AND821 NE4th St. I
Crystal River
Kathy Tolle (352) 302-9572


Sun April 7th 1-4 pm
2764 N. Canterbury
Lake Dr.
*Just Reduced*
updated & well
maintained home in
community with
amenities.
From HWY 486 take
Canterbury Lake Dr &
follow to house on Left
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC





PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 % w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164





HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
"cash only
352-503-3245

Town Home
2/2/1 w/glass lanai,
1123 Sq Ft, Maint. free
exterior, new paint &
flooring. exec. unit ready
to move in. The Glen,
55+ comm $52,900
585-797-7907












BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Comoletelv updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090





Highlands West 3/2/1
renovated on two lots
w/pool. Incl. W/D & SS
in new kitchen. $96,000
352-637-2827


Inverness Highlands
4/3/2 $90,500 Nr. hosp.
& schools Pool w/fence,
shed & Ig. bck lanai
(352) 201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.


AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE






AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF,4kC

REALTY ONE





4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


PRICED TO SELL
Condo/Patio home
2/2/2 on golf course
new appliances,AIC,
tile & carpet,updated
kitchen & baths.
352-503-2175


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.














Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

BEST TIME TO BUY.
LOW PRICES!
LOW INTEREST!

BUY NOW

Also Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

3/2/2, 2 V2 acres,
24 ft x 32 ft shop
$175,000
Hernando Area
(352) 726-7755


MAGNIFICENT HISTORIC HOME auise

Sold at or above $150,000
940 NE 4th Avenue, Crystal River, Florida 34428
3 bedroms/2 bathrooms on a.52 acre parcel
2-story Gothic Victorian, Renovated 2006/7, 10'ceilings,
gorgeous pool, 5 fireplaces, garden room
idealfor abed and brealKfst

Telephone Bidding Available
fisherauction.com

800.331.6620

S A 3% Broker Commission


oLiarF1h e r A U ABll l tI t e r n s o fs e
Lamar F11A1U93AI06 t s I vs dIa alle Ims olsak


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I '11 work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Real Estate
Auction





Near
Chassahowitzka Bay
Homosassa, FL
8015 W
Chassahowitzka St.
4BR 2BA 2,356+/- sf
Mobile Home
with 6'x 8' shed.
Open Public
Inspection:
1-4p Sun Apr 14 &
2 hrs before auction
Nominal Opening
Bid: $10,000
Auctions: 12:30p
Thur. Apr. 25
or bid live from
anywhere at
auctionnetwork.
corn
williamsauction.com
800.982.0425
Daniel S. Nelson
Re Lic BK3223097
Thomas L Williams
Auc Lic AU 112
5% Buyer's Premium


3/2.5/2 Residence in Inverness, FL
Will Sell Regardless of Price!
Airport Across the Street 30' x 40' Shop
ALSO:
Beach Lots in St. Augustine & Fernandina
Waterfront COMM in Jacksonville
AUCTION DATE:
April 17, 11AM ET IEl IE
See Website for More Details!
Tranzon Driggers Walter J. Driggers, III,
Lic. RE Broker, FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145
10% Buyers Premium
6RNO .O 87-7443


E12 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


(Nearly) weedless gardening is possible


LEE REICH
Associated Press

For a time many years
back, I would become
nervous every time I
went out to my garden to
weed. The weeds were
so few that I feared
something was wrong
with the soil.
True, I had taken de-
liberate steps to create
this condition, but ini-
tially it was hard to be-
lieve that results could
so well bear out theory
The first step in creat-
ing this "weedless" con-
dition was to stop
turning over or tilling
the ground.
Buried in every soil
are countless dormant
weed seeds just waiting
to be awakened by expo-
sure to light and/or air.
Not tilling whether
with a shovel, garden


fork or rototiller -,
keeps those seeds
buried and dormant
Added bonuses to the





water use and, of course,
not having to go through a
the trouble of tilling. u t

Keep soil intact mat-


I now take great pains
to avoid disturbing the
layering that naturally
develops over time in,
anye soil. Pac ETi
I clean up old "
marigold plants, tomato .
vines and other spent
plants during and at the
end of the growing sea-
son by just jerking them .
out of the ground,

See WEEDLESS/Page E15 This undated photo shows beds in a weedless vegetable garden in New Paltz, N.Y.


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





CITRUS HILLS
Completely Furnished
Condo, in prime loca-
tion 3bd/3ba w/ car
port asking $114,900.
352-419-5268


Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266



BANK
REPOSSESSION
SMITH LAKE,
ALABAMA.
Prime dockable
Homesite $49,900.
Level to water, no
stairs. Build at water's
edge. NEW TO MAR-
KET. Roads and utili-
ties in place. Available
April 20th.
Call (888)713-2870



CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



516 S. Tuck Point
Inverness 2/1/1 Block
home, canal front to
withlacoochee River
Public Auction 4/13
See more at www.
dudleysacution.com
352-637-9588


2BD 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116

Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area,1 OK boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/586-4987


YOU'LL THIS!
Floral City's BEST Lake
House Value! 2 Boat
Docks, 2/2/Den/FP &
more! 1YR Warranty
$159K Realty Connect
212-1446
www.RealtyConnect.me

Lake Rousseau
5311 W. Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
ProperLes.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


30 LOTS FOR SALE
INVERNESS, To Settle
Estate, Sell All or Part
Builders Welcome.
Will cooperate
(239) 332-4141,
(612) 743-4141


HOMOSASSA
9748 W. Halls River Rd
SF Building Lot
approx. 94 x 265
Access via Halls River
Road, or Blue River
Cove Terrace. Public
water & Sewer $11,000
(352) 628-7332






Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available. www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm.
352-795-6336


LEE REICH/Associated Press


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 E13


Waerr


m







E14 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013


PLANTS
Continued from Page E10

"They require light and
require water," Burnham
says, "but they have fabu-
lous floral blooms in addi-
tion to the color of the fruit
Flynn also suggests fig
trees: "Fiddle leaf fig trees
are, hands down, my fa-
vorite," he says. "They're
super architectural and al-
most kind of minimalist.
Since these grow straight
upwards, they're perfect
for corners or flanking a
fireplace or focal point
without growing out and
over it"
"I also use fiddle leaf fig


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

No-knead bread: I saw
your no-knead bread
recipe in a recent column,
so I'd like to share one of
my favorite bread recipes.
Just be warned: This
bread is so good, you might
end up eating both loaves
before they've even had
time to cool!
No-Knead French Bread
1 1/2 cup warm water
(not hot).
1 teaspoon sugar
0 1/4 ounce package ac-
tive dry yeast.
E 3 cups flour
E 1 teaspoon salt.
E 1 tablespoon cornmeal
(to add texture).
shortening or oil to
grease bread troughs.
Put water and sugar in a
large bowl. Sprinkle the
yeast over it and let sit for
10 minutes to activate
yeast. Stir in flour, salt and
cornmeal. The dough will
be spongy and batterlike.
Place a clean towel over
the bowl and let sit in a
warm place until it dou-
bles in bulk (about 1 hour).
Stir dough again. Lightly
grease bread troughs. With
WET hands, form dough
into two ropelike loaves
and place in bread


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


trees in unexpected
places," he says, "just to
add a big burst of life into
an otherwise utilitarian
space such as a bathroom
or even offices. The key to
using them successfully is
ensuring they don't come
into contact with direct
light, and that they're not
exposed to dry heat."

Countertop herbs
"This might be a great
time to put some herbs in
your kitchen," Luetke-
meyer says.
Many grocery stores and
nurseries sell herb plants
such as mint or basil that
are already blooming in
small plastic pots. You can
re-pot them into more at-

troughs. Cover with a
damp cloth and let sit 10
minutes. Place rack in
middle of oven and pre-
heat oven to 375 degrees E
Place troughs in oven and
bake 40-50 minutes, until
golden brown and crusty.
For crustier bread, boil
water and pour into shal-
low pan placed below
troughs. Or you can mist
the bread while baking.
Makes two loaves.
(Note: In dry ingredients
I have added chopped gar-
lic, basil, oregano, parsley,
red pepper seeds, etc. and
then mixed the bread.) -
Bobbie R., Arizona
Hair static: During cold
and dry days, the last three
to four inches of my hair is
filled with static electric-
ity. Rather than using hair
conditioners, I take a
dryer softener sheet and
rub it in my hair. It works!
- Deanne, e-mail
-- -
Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), offering
practical, money-saving
strategies for everyday 1
iving. To send tips,
comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o Uni-
versal Uclick, 1130 Walnut
St., Kansas City MO 64106,
or e-mail sara@frugal
village. com.


tractive containers, then
cluster several together on
a countertop.
Perfect potting
"What you plant some-
thing in makes just as
much of a statement as the
tree or plant itself," says
Burnham.
Take time shopping for
exactly what you want.
'"Add a little extra effort,"
she says, "and you get a re-
ally chic little addition to
your room."
One simple approach is to
"put the plant into a fabu-
lous low basket and cover it
with reindeer moss," Burn-


ham says. "You don't see the
soil, and don't see the plas-
tic container inside."
Luetkemeyer agrees
that it's worth taking time
to choose the right pots:
"You can take the same
plant and pot it four differ-
ent ways and it creates
four different vibes," she
says. A pot is "sort of like
the frame on the piece of
art. It sets the tone."
Non-plant greenery
If you don't wish to com-
mit to even a low-mainte-
nance plant, Flynn
suggests you "work in
fruits in decorative ways."


"Oranges, clementines,
apples and limes ... look
excellent grouped in ves-
sels," he says. "The key to
getting it right is to sepa-
rate them, and not have
different types of fruit
within the same grouping.
My favorite way to use
fruit decoratively is by
placing them in apothe-
cary jars in different
heights and sizes."


Whatever kind you
choose, Flynn is sure
you'll be happier if you
add some kind of greenery
to your home.
"Whether you've got all
the time in the world to
care for something or just
want to be able to squirt a
water bottle on your way
out the door," he says,
"there's definitely some-
thing out there for you."


COMMUNITY PHOTOS
* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to
take photos of community events. Call 352-563-
5660 for details.


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. OI. Ludel 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 ora sowca(352) 746-0744
Properties





OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 12-3 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 NEW LISTING


0 5395 N Allamandra Dr YISl 675 W Doerr Path
MLS 358165 $299,900 MLS 358289 $205,000
Unique! Room for hobby, workshop, Customized 3/2/2 Antigua model with
in-laws w/pool on golf course, nice Florida Rm.
Directions: 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd., Directions: Rte 486 to Terra Vista
Right on Allamandra. Blvd., thru gate, left on Doerr Path.
Host: Richard DeVita 352-601-8273 Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
NEW LISTING _


(,)\ItA 172 W Doerr Path
MLS 701971 $249,900
3BR/2BAvilla with greatview of the 5th Green
of the Championship Skyview Golf Course.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


7h -E -

5575 N Mesa Pt
MLS 700417 $247,900
New 2013 construction, 3/2/3 in scenic Pine Ridge.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


L' 15j/ 1820 E Gale Dancer Cir
MLS 35b ib $283,600
Stunning 3/2.5f3 home with qua ltyfeatures &great views.
Directions: Rt. 44 to Clearview entrance, 1st Rt.
into Belmont Hills entrance to 1st stop sign. Rt.
onto E. Gate Dancer, take 1st left to #1820.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


-'7p\lS 936 W Sun Vista Ct
MLS 702019 $399,900
3/2/2 home w/large sun-lit sitting room &
master bedroom overlooking the park.
Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553


UiiS 116 E Falconry Ct 4 gO 3842 W Northcrest Ct
SMLS 700569 $195,000 MLS 352588 $159,900
Beautiful 3/2/2 home on the 2nd hole of 3/2/2 home on a cul-de-sac offers
the Meadows Golf Course. spacious indoor living.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523


-F



7j'. i1 ill E Hartford SI 30 5a ll 2343 N Pulnam Pl (Pl 790 E GilchrisI CI 27.2a MLS 357326 $59,500 / MLS 357348 $84,900 MLS 357670 $59,900 MLS 356657 $59,000
Clean, fresh, renovated 2/2 condo- an Neat, clean 2 bedroom 2 bath villa in Very attractive and much sought after Maintenance free lifestyle,
easy choice! prime location, ground level condo. PRICED to SELL QUICKLY!!!
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Jack Fleming 352-422-4086
S 2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the rl.
Prudential logo andthe Rocksymbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



WEEDLESS
Continued from Page E13

coaxing out plants with large
roots, such as corn, by first cut-
ting around their main roots
with a garden knife.
I also enrich the soil from the
top down, spreading fertilizers
and compost or other organic
materials right on the surface.
Most of a plant's feeder roots -
the roots that benefit most from
organic materials and fertilizers
-grow near the surface anyway
And near or on the surface is
where organic materials can
also do the most good offering
protection from the pounding of
raindrops and the summer sun.
Still, there are always those
weeds that arrive in the garden


SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013 E15


as seeds hitchhiking in with the
wind or dropped by birds. Each
year, I smother them by spread-
ing a thin, weed-free mulch over
the soil. The mulch of choice de-
pends on the look I want, the
plants and the soil.
Poor soil and hungrier plants
demand the most nourishing
mulch. So every year, compost
gets slathered an inch thick over
the ground where vegetables
grow.
Buckwheat hulls, straw or
wood chips are adequate and at-
tractive for most flowers.

Don't walk on my bed!
Of course, you can't just stop
tilling, throw mulch on the
ground and garden as usual.
Walking on the soil and rolling a
wheelbarrow, garden cart or trac-
tor over it compacts the soil;


tillage is then needed to aerate it
The way to avoid compaction
in the first place is to lay out the
garden with permanent areas
for plants and for traffic. Traf-
ficked areas also need to be
mulched, in this case with some
lean, weed-free material such as
wood chips, gravel or straw.
Planted areas in my vegetable
garden consist of rectangular
beds 3 feet wide surrounded by
18-inch-wide paths. Beds in my
flower garden are more free-
form or have stepping stones.
Planted areas in a vegetable
garden don't need to be raised
beds, however; they can be laid
out flat on the ground.
A big advantage of bed plant-
ing is that you can pack more
plants into less space. Instead of
planting carrots with 18 inches
between rows, four or five rows


can be planted with only a few
inches between them. (That 18
inches is to let you walk between
the rows for planting, weeding
and harvesting. With a 3-foot-
wide bed, you can do all that
from the paths.)
Also, different vegetables, flow-
ers, or vegetables and flowers can
be grown together in beds.

Drip that water
Changing watering technique
was the final step on my road to
"weedlessness." Not all plants
need regular watering, but for
those that do, drip irrigation is
the way to go.
Drip irrigation puts water
near garden plants, so none is
wasted or promoting weed
growth in the areas between
plants or in paths.
This is not to say that with the


above four steps drip irriga-
tion, mulching, keeping traffic
off planted areas, and not tilling
- weeds never appear They do.
But weed problems do not.
What few large weeds do ap-
pear get yanked out of the soil,
roots and all, coaxed out, if nec-
essary, with a garden knife or
trowel at their roots.
Colonies of small weeds are
quickly done in with a "winged
weeder," colinear hoe or some
other hoe with a sharp blade
that can be slid along parallel to
and just a fraction of an inch
below the soil surface.
Also important in keeping a
garden weed-free is to search
regularly for them. With the
above four steps, this activity is
pared down to nothing more
than a few pleasant minutes per
week.


REALTY Gi RO UP
RELT GROUPetoo Rsae


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703


Office in the
Terra Vista
Welcome Center


Ril nFCKFR .2.i4.-n647 SSIIAN Mill I FN -.499.9i VICTORIA FRANKI IN .. -427-.777


leganrue, sirnpiiuity uescriLes UiS i3 veuroor, dam car nriorie. unei
of Terra Vistas most popular floor plans. Enter the foyer and be instantly
captivated by the charm and tasteful decor of this gracious home. Enjoy
looking at the garden from the tiled Lanai to see the glorious array of
flowers, shrubbery & a waterfall. MLS 358547................$234,000


SiNCLE FAMILY HOME 4 BEDROOM BATH 2 CAR CARACE PLUS COLF CART CARACE
FOXFIRE AS GOOD AS IT GETS! One of a kind immaculate 4
bedroom, 4 bath, 2 car garage plus golf cart garage. Custom pool/
spa home with guest suite, situated on the best home site in Foxfire
on Skyview Golf Course. Professionally decorated, to many
upgrades to mention, enjoy exclusive living in this premier courtyard
home. A must see in Terra Vista. MLS 355511 ...............$589,000


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
Well maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage plus den a
expanded Laurel model, extensive oak molding around windows
crown molding in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry oak cabinets
with crown molding extra footage in bedrooms and den, a must see ai
this price in Terra Vista. MLS 357742........... ............. $232,000
DETACHED VILLA
3 BED. 2 BATH. 2 CAR
HILLSIDE VILLAS
.:.-llent
ir,. ir, r,..i .: the
r'I :iI iew
ir.. i /2/2
I. is a
.lli: i.i l I cii. i-nce.I
The villa has a therapeutic step in tub in the guest bathroom, the
latest in secure bathing. The Butlers pantry was redesign as a kitchen
desk for easy internet access while cooking. The covered lanai faces
south for cool evening breezes. The best of all worlds including all the
amenities that come with membership, especially use of the exciting
Bella Vita Spa & Fitness Center. MLS 354569..................$224,900


Surasucaiiy Keoucea!
ssmcomg ob r d Elegant, immaculate with a
fabulous panoramic view!
Don't miss this 3/3/2 home
W^Lon the Skyview Golf Course
of Terra Vista. You won't
believe the upgrades: gas
and solar heated pool & spa w/spillway and caretaker/pool perfector
system, custom glass double entry door, gas fireplace, Corian counters,
upgraded cabinets with top and bottom pull outs, decorative painting,
lighting discharge system ,oversized garage with golf cart door, and so
much more. Newly painted exterior Newly added plantation shutters. Don't
miss this one. Membership Required. MLS 357262.............$349,900

SINGLE FAMILY
4 BED, 2.5 BATH,
3 CAR
WOODSIDE
Spectacular Cordova
model loaded with
upgrades, including
Granite countertops
in your beautiful
Gourmet kitchen with
built in skylight, custom window treatments and gorgeous lighting
fixtures. Formal dining and living areas plus a large family room
give great spaces for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing retreat on your
extended screened Lanai with Shoji Hot Tub. All this plus a 3+ car
garage with a separate golf cart entrance. PRICED TO SELL!
This home is a must see. MLS 353844........ ....... $359,000


DETACHED VILLA 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLA
Beautiful maintenance free home, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, 2 car garage,
open floor plan design with a great use of space, sunroom with
plantation shutters, superior condition, lots of added closet space and
upgrades in every room! Ready to move into on a comer lot in
premiere community of Terra Vista. MLS 355853............$199,000


Terms -.... -6 l eI
Terra VHis ta & B'^-rentU^wood Rentals Social Memer^^Kship incuclec ith allRental


since free living so you
for a sunny atmosphere
.... ................................


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
E VILLAS Very nice fully furnished maintained villa on a less traveled 2 bedroom plus den bright and open Ventura Model comes with maple TOWNHOME 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME
Beautifully street in Terra Vista. Lovely 2 bedroom with a den, separate cabinetry, tile through out living areas, hardwood floors in den and Luxurious Townhome in Brentwood. Partially furnished, 3Bd,
can relax. eat in kitchen with pass through breakfast bar. Combination bedrooms, natural lighting. Den can be used as a third bedroom with 2.5 baths, eat-in kitchen. Sit on the Lanai and enjoy the view
e. Neutral dining and living area overlooks the paved screened lanai. furnishings. Private landscaped backyard. Conveniently located near of the pond surrounded by large Southern Oaks.
..$1,500 Social Club Membership Included. #1273..................$1,400 the main entrance of Terra Vista. #3124............................$1,300 #1226......................... .................................... $1,100


decorated. En
Open great rc
colors through








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RENOVATED TWO BEDROOM, TWO BATH
CONDO IN INVERNESS VILLAGE
M .. I I .. i ly TI a l $luli l .1. il. I' ll ..i .pl


MI i = II _IIIuI $54,900
C.all Is.i.a B.i lan hi r .l ..pt i ? 697?493


. I ,, r i . .. ... hh Ih ,,,,i .... ,1 .
r,1. =, ,, ASKING S8OO.OOO


.1: I .,1 1 h l I. ,,II..... I 'i l:I .l, l ll II I I I I [..
I d..I..J .i.l .l lpd l. I I :I. | i: 1.|, I,. 1 .1..I
l.v .il l . I.I ....I .1IF .1 _"' ll
MI = IIIIII:II $169,500
David Nui Cell 95438358786
O//l 352 726 6668









WATERFRONT 2/2 ON DOUBLE LOT
I :.,I |I -. 1 .:. 1 1.. i.. ... I ..1 .1


,....... ....h rJ~ ~~~r .ih ..
ASKING $63.800
Pt Di,, 352 212 7280
I e p reson .LLss c2pard1 co


* V-I Ii1. _Dr. 11,.1111 I Ir IIr n
* I iA .. i .. l. .l .. .i '.

MI = 1111166i11 $55,000
Willaid Pickiel 2019871
It'I'it'. cIIIUscouni'sold. corn









WIDE OPEN WATERFRONT



. ,,

r1i = ASKING $189,000
Pit Di,352'212 7280
I'',?ll hltntl i t .f slll l c2/1p rtdee c n


MULTI FAMILY

hjii I ii I i hi .I i l l -a I,
Mi.- = i. $349,900
Call Jim Moion to pieneit 422 2173


CITRUS SPRINGS!


1 o66 ine 0I Re n 0.]... li0.1/ I..
;l I ll l ;; I ll ini I l in i 1 .i li i i I '
:,,i,,: Mi 5 = /ill':H6,

lIotaine 0 Regan 5860075


BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED

1. d Ill ,l l I il II l ,. I. lll ll h rl ll ,1


rii = -iv:" $135.000
Cll Jim /l.l-toi it 422 2173
/ ,,.'?l t rh mr ticulJutll hept h-nme


IflUIiHiiHitIE. ilIUiri I V
(GNC) ON HWY. 200
I -a -r ,Ill 'l a, iil ,Iiii a ,'''1i I ,l l I

hlh ..al I' I I h u u "'. 'U''..
'Mit /ll iI.l ASKING S112,500
Call Scott Boigeson 302 5656









A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION



,, ,, ,' ,, 11 I ,-,I ,-, I I .. 11,
,,, ,,, ,,,

ri.: n .I. ASKING $398.900
Pit Di,,> 352' 212 7280
['tell itlPds illil a ;21/gdjldji isOcpi


h .1-h lIp- ,, ,-,-,,,-1 ,,,,, l ,


ri: = .l1 ASKING $148,900
Pit Di, 352'212 7280
r* I h. t Illol c2lp td com












* 3BR. 2 Balh. 2 Cai Gaiage
* II .- ,, 'I I $.i1.1

Mi =l 7lic," $82,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
I'I'i'ir ciliuscouni sold. corn


* l I1 Uh hI I', .Ii. I .
* M TAI h1Hal-.. i
* FjI A l$ .6..6.. II I l. h.i,
* I'l.. I 1. l in, 'ip i UII' TF.AIIl
ML = 71115F, 1 $189,900
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
vw'ir'. clmtuscounlysold. corn


LOCATION LOCATION ,i,,,- ... HIIU
.. I i I,' l .. 1 I I 6 'l1 Ih .. Ill' ,i,,ii ,,, ,
ih 1... 1 h.6. h 1 ,1 I 1,, 1 ,, ,,,1 I ,



Ci" A/i tti S.idit 352 4768727 to ,,i.
.sh io- I, 1. =u358779


nuuE 4/z.aiz um unm mlone!
flUlJh 'II/ZO/ UN UNh Ati$ ;



Ii.I...| ,1..|I l.ia..Iy i ..I ..i $125,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


$229,900
BEAUTIFUL LAKEFRONT HOME 2007



I .M I P SOIn. I .II .2 .I
p1 1 Ih 1 1 1 11 1111. .


Ilirl PArsuops 634i 1213


HAMPSHIRE HILLS
II.t 1 il Hill; ./ i i 'mi 'll h i I l.:. i A



.i.' $205,000
Call Ruth fiedewick 1 3525636866


INVERNESS
3/2/2 CLOSE TO TOWN

Sl. .:.i lir .i Li ..il, 1 .1.i l 'a i l ,i .

PRICED TO SELL!! $84,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


SPACIOUS, LIKE NEW DOUBLEWIDE
PONTOON BOAT INCLUDED

. .... .,J I.,:. h.. :I b .J..... -, _' .ih

f',:llju h- v, J I lj ..ujll h Ihi. l "' 'l lull

MI-. Q=i..i: $90,000
CAll DORIS MINER -'352 726 6668


P


E16 SUNDAY, APRIL 7, 2013







OUTDOOR SHOW* CRYSTAL RIVER MALL APRIL 13
~-r pot~ hii rmn


gwf


P 4


/
/


.u.
~


I'


.9-.-,---


- .-~.-
9.4


--~- -~.

- -~


~-.er a r~ -


U-


-
- -


TO


rk






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gerry Mulligan .. t
Publisher OUTDOOR SHOW CRYSTAL RIVER MALL APRIL 13

Ken Melton-
Community Affairs Editor

Cindy Connolly
Community Affairs
Graphic Artist .
Sarah Gatling
Community Editor
Trista Stokes
Advertising Sales Manager


Citrus Publishing
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-6363

www.chronicleonline.com


Outdoor


Spring is here, Daylight Saving Time
has kicked in, the weather is warmer and
folks are spending more time outdoors.
So, the Citrus County Chronicle and
the Crystal River Mall are joining forces
to sponsor an Outdoor Expo at the mall
Saturday, April 13.
From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the expo will
feature nearly 20 commercial and non-
profit exhbitors both outside and
inside the mall.
Live music will also be performed
throughout the day at the food court
stage.
Free arts and crafts will be available for
the kids.
A rock wall will also be there for par-
ticipants to attempt to defy gravity.
The expo will also feature lots of door
prizes varying in value from $40 to
$75. Registration for the door prizes will
be at the Chronicle s booth.
Outside vendors
* Apopka Marine
* Arrow RV
* Como RV, Auto Sales and Service
* Encore Crystal Isles Resort
* Love Motorsports
* Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln
* Plantation on Crystal River


0


At a glance
What: Outdoor Expo
Where: Crystal River Mall
When: Saturday, April 13
Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Information: 352-795-2585

Inside vendors
* Citrus County Jazzercise
* Citrus Equipment
* Citrus United Basket boat raffle
* Color Country Nursery
* Crystal River Sail & Power Squadron
* Crystal River State Park
* El Diablo Golf and Country Club
* Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park
* Faith Haven Christian Retreat Center
* Homosassa Garden Club
* Inglis Yankeetown Lions Nature Coast
Challenge
* Keep Citrus County Beautiful
* Manatee Paddle
* National Rifle Association
* SRD Distributors


*H The Plantation on Crystal River
can be your resource for all
outdoor recreation needs...
P.1, .1 I i-r. .i I ..I ,, I I i, I I I
,I ,I .tl ,. ,, l
Social and golf memberships are also available
Exclusive Golf Rates Midw k
Play Golf at Plantation week
On Crystal River Pontoon Special
2 5 o00 Full day rental 9am-4pm
$2 +tax
Any day,any time *125
Call 352-795-7211 :
to book a tee time no more than 3 Monday
days in advance. T _
Coupon good for up to 4 players Proper golf Thru Friday
attire required Present coupon for redemption Expires 6/30/13
Restrictions apply Expires 6/30/13 expires 0/1
2,.l


What's Inside

All Terrain Vehicles.............................................. Page 3
F ish ing ................................................................ P ag e 4
Fishing Tournaments .......................................... Page 5
Paddlesports .............. ................................... Page 6
B oating ................................................................ P age 8
Boating Safety .................................................... Page 9
Personal Water Craft ........................................ Page 10
Recreational Vehicles........................................ Page 11


coming to m


coming to mal


JL on Crystal River
9301 W Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429
800-632-6262 or 352-795-4211
www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com


G2 Sunday April 7, 2013


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Knm




th




terr,


you don't feel cramped and
your knees aren't at more
than a 90-degree angle, it's
probably a good size for you.
In between pure work-
horse and play is the sport-
utility vehicle. This
all-terrain model does a little
of both. Designed to carry
and pull minimum weight
loads, it is functional for
many chores. Its mid-sized
tires, mechanics and medium
weight body provide excel-
lent adventures for the
leisure rider, as well.
Once you've purchased
the ATV of your dreams, the
next step is to take a safe
driving course.
They invite and encourage
anyone purchasing an ATV
and their family members to
take this free class. It not
only covers the basics of
ATV maneuverability over
rough terrain and steep hills
but also preps the driver on
how to respond in emer-


agency situations.
Here are a few other safety
tips:
* Drive safely. Contrary to
what some people think,
ATVs are safe vehicles when
driven properly. Two-thirds
of all accidents, for example,
involve passengers. Most
ATVs are not designed to
carry passengers. The addi-
tional weight of a passenger,
even a child, can throw off
the balance and response of
the vehicle. Riders are
strongly urged never to carry
passengers on their ATV
* As with operating any
motorized vehicle, don't
drink, drive or do drugs.
* Avoid riding on roads.
ATVs are designed for soft
surfaces. They handle differ-
ently on hard surfaces. ATVs
also do not have turn signals
and brake lights like other
road vehicles, making them
more likely to be the cause
of accidents.


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


By Doris A. Black
Special to the Chronicle

Before purchasing an all-
terrain vehicle (ATV), you
should determine what the
primary use of the vehicle is
going to be.
Do you plan to use it as a
workhorse, a toy or both?
There are two basic cate-
gories ofATVs: those de-
signed for work and those
designed for play.
The utility ATV or quad,
as it is sometimes called, is
built for use around the farm.
It can be used for towing,
hauling or carrying gear
from point A to point B.
Because of its heavy-duty
uses, it is built with a num-
ber of mechanical compo-
nents different than that of
the leisure ATV
It has a stiffer suspension,
a heavier and more stable
drive shaft, a hardy transmis-
sion, large tires and very
large racks that can carry up
to 250 pounds. Because it is


easy to drive and has a larger
body for deflecting mud than
a sport ATV, it can also be
used for leisure purposes.
More than 75 percent of
all ATVs sold in America fall
into this category. If a work-
horse is what you need, you
can't go wrong with a utility
quad. Experts recommend
models with automatic trans-
mission for utility use or
steep terrain. Four-wheel
drive is also recommended
to enable the vehicle to be
used 12 months of the year,
no matter what the weather
conditions.
It will even perform ad-
mirably through 10 inches of
snow. Comfort is an impor-
tant consideration if you're
going to spend all day on the
ATV.
Larger men, those over 6
feet, 3 inches or 300 pounds,
may want to purchase a
larger model. Smaller mod-
els will pull the same weight
and will most likely be com-
fortable for everyone else.


If pleasure is your goal,
you might be happier with a
sport ATV Geared for power
and speed, the vehicle is de-
signed specifically for
leisure use and provides
maximum performance. Its
lightweight design, quick-re-
sponse steering and small
tires make it perfect for sharp
turns and high jumps.
It has no racks for hauling
gear and no tow capabilities,
but the suspension and throt-
tle/clutch system provides
the perfect combination of
control for tight comers and
hard landings. You'll get lots
of mud, too, as the outer
body is small.
If you're purchasing your
first sport ATV, experts rec-
ommend starting with a
small model, such as the
300cc 4x4, and working
your way up to the large
500cc 4x4. The difference in
performance between the
two is minimal. As with a
utility vehicle, sit in the
model you intend to buy. If


PC'PKA M 3260 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.
cAg? Inverness, FL *YAMAHA
a sAes & sv 352.726.7773


Sunday April 7, 2013 G3

* Wear body protection.
The most protective piece of
gear the ATV rider can wear
is a Department of Trans-
portation-approved motorcy-
cle helmet. Helmets provide
maximum protection against
injury and debris, while gog-
gles protect eyes against fly-
ing debris and dust. Special
riding boots of thick leather
construction that extend over
the shins provide maximum
coverage, but if those are un-
appealing, boots that extend
over the ankle to protect the
foot and anklebones from in-
jury are OK. For added pro-
tection, wear a riding jersey
to absorb perspiration and
elbow and knee pads and
gloves.
As with any kind of vehi-
cle, safety should come first.
Whether you want an ATV
for work or for fun, it is your
responsibility to make safe
and wise decisions, protect-
ing both yourself and others.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Reasons for

recreational fishing


GET YOUR TICKETS HERE


3rd Annual Citrus United Basket (CUB)

2013 New Boat Drawing Package
Sponsored by: Apopka Marine
Boat Sales & Service
Runner-up Prizes will be picked before the
Grand Prize Drawing. G3 Boats.
Model 1548VBW Jon Boat with Yamaha F15 w/elect. start,
trailer & jack, battery & gas tank, bow fishing seat.
License, title & taxes are ALL INCLUDED.
(Winner option: can upgrade this complete package)

Drawing Sat., June 29, 2013 at 2:00 PM
at Apopka Marine
3260 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness, FL
Employees, Board of Directors and/or their families are not eligible
to enter this raffle for the grand prize or any of the runner-up raffle
prizes. Winner need not be present/Information: 352-344-2242


18 Hole Championship
GOLF AND Golf Course
S11 l COUNTRY Citrus Springs, FL
E 1 L lDO CLUB Rated 4 ..- -... i ..*. ',













A12i 1e il






CallFrDtis
Prce inld ta an cart


By Sam Erickson
Special to the Chronicle

Whether it's for grouper
or trout, fishing can seem
like a pointless, futile en-
deavor to an outsider.
Why stand around for
hours on end, casting a pole
into the water, when you can
just go to the store and buy
some fish? Why take the
time and energy to drive out
to the lake or gulf and get
dirty in pursuit of
something already at your
supermarket?
For many, fishing is their
primary source of recreation,
and there are many reasons
why fishing is worth the
time and effort it takes to be
involved.
Fishing is easy to get into.
More and more, there are
regulations surrounding the
kind of bait and the quantity
of fish you can catch, but if
you've got a pole, some bait
and a body of water with
fish in it, you've got every-
thing you need to go fishing.
Most big box retailers
have fishing sections that
can outfit you within an
hour, and there are lots ofre-


sources in print and online
that can provide you with
the basics you need to get
started.
Fishing is relaxing.
By its nature, fishing re-
quires patience and repeated
activity. It requires you to sit
in one place for a while. For
many people who fish regu-
larly, this is the best aspect
of a fishing trip spending
time without the demands of
traffic, family, phone calls or
work. The primary obliga-
tion when fishing is to sit
down and wait, which gives
many people an expanse of
time difficult to find outside
of the woods.
Because you are outdoors
for long periods of time,
fishing can put you in better
touch with nature. You'll
have time to notice things
that you otherwise wouldn't
- the birds, the trees, the
way the river flows. You'll
also be locked in a battle
with Mother Nature, trying
to sleuth out the best spot
and learning about the ways
that fish move in the lake or
stream.

see Fish Page 5


G4 Sunday April 7, 2013


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CCBA slates



annual tourney


The Citrus County
Builders Association's
(CCBA) 18th annual Fam-
ily Fishing Tournament,
sponsored by Exclusive
Platinum Sponsor FDS
Disposal Inc., will be from
6 a.m., Saturday, April 27,
overnight to 3 p.m.,
Sunday, April 28, come
rain or shine.
Boat captain registration
is 6 p.m., Friday, April 26,
with weigh-in at 3 p.m.
Sunday, April 28, at the
Homosassa Riverside
Resort, Homosassa.
Anglers also desiring to
participate in both the
CCBA tournament and the


April 13 Mel Tillis &
Friends Fishing Tourna-
ment may obtain a "Super
Angler Pass" by signing up
for both at a savings of
$30.
Gold ($1,000), Silver
($750) and Bonze ($500)
sponsorships are available.
Each sponsorship level
includes one free boat
entry, in addition to nu-
merous other benefits.
Participants may register
for the tournament online
at www.ccba.camp9.org.
For more information,
call the CCBA at 352-746-
9028 or email info@citrus
builders.com.


Fish
from Page 4

When you catch fish, you
can get an up-close look at
them, even if you are releas-
ing them. If you are taking
them home, you'll be as
close as you can get to the
source of your food supply,
something that doesn't hap-
pen often these days.
Fishing gives you time to
connect with people.
You can talk with your
family or friends about the
best fishing spots, the right
kinds of gear, the best times
of day or any of the other in-
tricacies of fishing without
having to worry about the
contentious issues or divi-
sive topics within your
circle.
A fishing trip, whether for
a morning, a day or a week,
gives you the opportunity to
share new experiences with


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


Key, Rotary getting ready for

changes in annual tourney


The Key Training Center and the
Rotary Club of Inverness are making
waves, along with an increasing num-
ber of supporters and sponsors throw-
ing their lines in for some exciting
changes to the Key's annual fishing
tournament.
New location, new sponsors and
new activities warrant a new name,
the Rotarians decided, christening the
tournament to now officially be titled
the Inverness Rotary Bass Blasters to
benefit the Key Training Center.
Coming back to the Inverness lakes
will be the biggest transformation to
the successful fundraiser. All who
gathered to study the pros and cons
for such a transition agreed this was a
change that many have been
waiting for.
Rotarian Charlie Wade has accepted
the role of Bass Blasters chairman, but
said there will be a lot of hands and
heads and hearts to make it happen.


"We are excited," Wade said. "We're
ready to make it happen."
The date has been set for Saturday,
Sept. 21, with participants launching
from Wallace Brooks Park by 7 a.m.
and activities taking place throughout
the day until the return of the boats at
3 p.m.
Apopka Marine has grabbed the
Title Sponsorship, which insures that
collectible T-shirts will commemorate
the fishing experience
"We just couldn't ask for better
partners," said Key Center Foundation
Director Neale Brennan. "This group
has made its reputation as being hard
working and extremely dedicated to
its cause. To have them out there
working to help the Key through such
a tremendous, upfront event well,
it's a gift that will be helping many
special men and women and their
families."
For information, call 352-270-8623.


RV SALE

INVERNESS- ______HOMOSASSA
352-344-1411 352-628-1411

Our Commitment To You Is Your Complete S, iitif it i'ii!
Call Show 352-645-0988 Off. 866-1411 BiE


Elml ,, ,


I LINER KegtneRV Dutchmen,
I ~ ~ ; CQO mpanwy ._it_____


Sunday April 7, 2013 G5

a close-knit group and can
give you communal adven-
tures that can strengthen
friendships and family ties.
Fishing can also give you
quiet time away. If you lead
a hectic life, there's no rea-
son why you can't pick up
your pole and head out on a
weekend morning, leaving
the worries of the world be-
hind as you step into a
serene setting. Time discon-
nected from the always-on
world is getting harder to
come by. Fishing allows you
a reason to turn off your cell
phone and step away from
the world for a little while.
There are a lot of reasons
why people choose to spend
their recreational time fish-
ing and why you might
start. It's an easy hobby that
forces you to sit down, relax
and take a look around you.
If you're interested, locate
your nearest fishing hole and
cast a line today.


J-., -.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ixiliary offers A



sports America


Canoeists and kayakers
are boaters, too. Now there
is a new program available
to address the unique
needs of this audience.
Homosassa Flotilla 15-4
of the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary offers
Paddlesports America, a
safety program designed to
attract novice paddle en-
thusiasts. This four-hour
program presents five
chapters of safety
information.
Topics include
Know Your Paddlecraft
- Parts of a canoe and
kayak; understanding pad-
dlecraft characteristics
such as basic types, hull


shapes hull materials,
lengths and widths and
weights; selecting your
paddle for both canoe and
kayak.
Before You Get Under-
way Knowing your
paddlecraft's capacity and
how to file a float plan;
transporting your paddle-
craft; conducting a pre-
departure check; dressing
for a safe trip; loading gear
in a canoe or kayak; stor-
ing your paddlecraft; the
responsibilities when
paddling with others.
Operating Your Boat
Safely How to enter

see Paddle Page 7


Pondering paddling? Prepare before you purchase


By Tresa Erickson
Special to the Chronicle

A friend recently took you
kayaking, and you enjoyed it so
much you decided to take up the
sport. While you could rent a
kayak and may do so until you
get more comfortable with the
sport, you will need to purchase
your own kayak at some point.
Here are some tips.
First, you need to know the
types of kayaks that are available.
These include hardshells, folding
and inflatables. Hardshells, or


rigid kayaks as they are otherwise
known, are made of wood, plas-
tic, fiberglass, or Kevlar, graphite
or carbon fiber, and range in price
and performance.
Folding kayaks are made of
fabric stretched over a wooden or
aluminum frame, and although
they do not perform as well as
hardshells and cost more, they
tend to last longer and retain their
value better. Inflatable kayaks are
the least expensive of the three
and can be stored easily.
In many cases, budget and stor-
age may determine the type of


kayak you buy. If you have lim-
ited money to spend and little
room to store the kayak, then an
inflatable kayak might be ideal.
Once you have some idea of
the type of kayak you would like
to buy, you can focus on finding
one that will suit your boating ac-
tivities, expertise level and body
size. If you intend to go whitewa-
ter rafting, you will need a kayak
designed for that, whereas if you
plan to take long trips in the
wilderness, you may want a tour-
ing kayak.
While experienced paddlers


may lean more toward kayaks
with a tight cockpit and good
final stability, you should look for
a kayak with a large cockpit and
good initial stability, which will
prevent the boat from tipping
over and allow you to maneuver
it more easily as a beginner. If
you are fairly petite, you may
want to look for a lighter, shorter
kayak, which will be easier to
maneuver and transport. If you
are average size or larger, a heav-
ier, longer kayak offering more
stability and larger coverage
might be better.


As you are shopping for a
kayak, take note of the cargo
space and options offered. If
you're planning on taking several
long trips throughout the year,
you'll need a kayak with loads of
room for all of your extra gear,
whereas if you have shorter ex-
cursions in mind, cargo space
may not be an issue. Options will
also factor in your decision. Ac-
cessible hatches, bottle holders,
cockpit covers, deck fittings,
flotation bags and more could
mean all the difference between a
good and bad experience.


G6 Sunday April 7, 2013


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ik


Paddle
from Page 6

and exit a canoe or kayak safely;
securing the paddlecraft and shar-
ing the waterways with others


SAid .' t, N .', I'-'.lih n
System (ATONS);
learning about local hazards
on waterways.
The Legal Requirements of Boat-
ing Vessel registration, hull
identification numbers and who
may operate a paddlecraft; unlaw-
ful operation of paddlecraft; Home-
land Security restrictions; policies
on alcohol and drugs; life jackets;
navigation lights; sound-producing
devices and visual distress signals;
protection of environment and what
to do if in a boating accident. State
specific information may be added
at the end of this chapter.


THIS SEASON DEPE A B

I WANT SOMETHING DEPENDABLE


MS 170 FS 40 C-E NOW JUST BG 55
CHAIN SAW TRIMMER 95 HANDHELD BLOWER ..

WAS $199.95
D design, foWr$ oc l'Lightweight,
Designed for occasional fuel-efficient trimmer
wood-cutting tasks around the home STIHL Easy2Stt
Includes many of the excellent design STIHL Easy2StartTM TH Proven handheld blower at an
features of our professional models system makes r.,s_ affordable price
starting almost a
1$6 7 95 effortless Great for quickly cleaning driveways,
9 16" Bar length. SSE-SAP sidewalks and hard-to-reach places


FREE TRIMMER LNE T ,,:,.. .,..E STIHL has you covered
....-1 ... . .. 1.. .. I, :.. .-., ..i\. i.i .,: ,: W/ vv, ([h pro iecl ve appare l and access ries
Open Monday thru Friday 8am 5pm year round and Saturday 9am -12pm during the Summer Only.
Are you ready for a STIHL'?

6659 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy. Citrus Equipm entiF
Crystal River & Repair Inc.
(Hwy. 486, just east of Hwy. 44) erpacecom
352-795-6635 www.outdoorpowerplace.com


Sunday April 7, 2013 G7


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


Boating Emergencies: What to
Do Minimizing the risk of
drowning, capsizing, swamping or
falling overboard; emergency
techniques; how to deal with cold
water immersion and hypothermia;
understanding heat-related illness;
dehydration; handling weather
emergencies.
The program will be April 10 and
11 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the West
Citrus Community Center, 8940 W.
Veterans Drive, Homosassa. Fee is
$20 for materials. For more infor-
mation or to register, contact Ned
Barry at 352-249-1042.
The auxiliary can use men and
women of every age. It is the vol-
unteer arm of the U.S. Coast
Guard. Call Bob Currie at 352-
232-1516 or email at rgcurrie@bell
south.net.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tips to help pick the proper vessel


By Craig W. Armstrong
Special to the Chronicle

It's 1 a.m. when your eyes pop
open and you sit up straight in bed.
You quickly check your room -
no, nothing's there. The smell of
the outdoors is gone and the sound
of your friends laughing and having
a good time has faded. It was that
dream again!
That dream that won't go away,
that dream that's haunted you for
months, that dream that started
when your friend took the plunge
- literally. It's that dream of be-
coming a boat owner.
As with a new car, a boat can be
a major investment. And as with a
car, you want to buy the boat that's
right for you. The type of boat you
should purchase depends on how
you intend to use it. Here is some
information about different types of
boats and what purpose they serve.
Are you taking to the water to
catch fish? If reeling in the big one
is your reason for buying a boat,
you'll want a fishing boat. There


are several available. All-purpose
fishing boats are usually designed
for one to four people and can be
hauled by a trailer. They can cost
anywhere from a few thousand to
several thousand.
Bass boats are built for speed.
They are outfitted with electronics
and loads of storage space for gear
and almost always outboard pow-
ered, allowing them to reach speeds
of over 60 mph. Bass boats gener-
ally cost more than all-purpose
fishing boats.
Center-console boats have the
controls in the center of the craft,
giving anglers more places on deck
to cast their line. Some also have
small cabins. They can usually hold
up to six people and be hauled by a
trailer. Center-console boats cost
more than bass boats.
If fishing isn't your reason for
hitting the waves, maybe a power
boat is for you. There are many
types available from inflatable ver-
sions to yachts.
Inflatable boats are easy to trans-
port and can be used for short dis-


tances for a number of purposes.
Runabouts have an open or
closed bow, outboard or stem-drive,
and can be used for a number of
different activities from fishing to
water skiing to cruising. Pontoon
boats are large and shaped for sta-
bility. Two pontoons (tubes) are lo-
cated under an aluminum deck,
which is usually covered by a
canopy. Pontoon boats are not rec-
ommended for the high seas.
Houseboats contain living quar-
ters, bathrooms, galleys (kitchens)
and many other comforts of home.
Yachts are elite versions of
houseboats and range in costs from
tens of thousands to millions of
dollars.
This, of course, is just a glimpse
into the vast array of boats avail-
able. If you are serious about buy-
ing a boat, you need to do your
homework. Search online, read the
trade magazines, go to boat shows
and talk to boat owners. A boat is a
major investment, so make sure you
know what you're getting into be-
fore you take the plunge.


544 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
564-0901


MANATEE TOURS:

Paddle Board (Sup)
Sales/Rentals
Fitness/Yoga
Lessons
www.manateepaddle.com
Twitter.com/ManateePaddle
ManateeSup@gmail.com


000EHZI


G8 Sunday April 7, 2013


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


USCG Auxiliary

offers boating

safety class


The U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 15-1 of Crys-
tal River will offer a
one-day boating
safety class, About
Boating Safely, from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, April 14.
After successful
completion of the
class, participants
will earn the Florida
Safe Boater's care.
The auxiliary will
take care of the pa-
perwork and the card
arrives at the partici-
pant's home in a cou-


ple of weeks.
Anyone born after
Jan. 1, 1988, must
have the card to
legally operate a ves-
sel with a 10 HP
motor or greater.
Parents who sign
up with a child will
get a $10 discount.
Cost is $30 and in-
cludes a book, numer-
ous handouts and
instruction by certi-
fied U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary instructors.
To register, call
Linda at 352-
503-6199.


By Craig W. Armstrong
Special to the Chronicle

Millions of Americans
count boating as one of
their favorite activities.
They spend the summer
on the water, and if they
live in warm climates, they
may spend the year enjoy-
ing the waves. But along
with the fun, boaters must
always keep safety in mind.
Every year, people are
killed in boating and boat-
ing-related accidents, and
in most cases, those acci-
dents could have been
avoided.
A significant percentage
of boating accidents each
year are caused by people
being under the influence
of drugs or alcohol.
Operating a boat is not
any different than operating
a car, and we all know the


dangers of drunk or
drugged driving.
This safety precaution is
simple: Don't drink or do
drugs and boat. If your
safety and the safety of oth-
ers is not reason enough not
to mix alcohol and drugs
with boating, remember it's
illegal. There is no differ-
ence between the road and
the water. You can be ar-
rested for DUI (driving
under the influence) and
for BUI (boating under the
influence).
The next thing to con-
sider is the experience of
your captain. Anyone who
operates a boat should be
experienced in many areas.
They should know and
follow all navigational
rules and be able recognize
and react to severe weather
situations. They should
have a backup on board


who knows how to operate
the boat. They should also
make sure at least one per-
son, if not many, know
where the group is going
boating and when they are
expected to return.
Life jackets or PFDs
(personal flotation devices)
are an important part of
boating safety. It is recom-
mended that everyone wear
a life jacket. Children and
people who can't swim
should always use a life
jacket. It is also important
to wear a life jacket when
severe weather strikes.
There are several types of
PDFs available. Choose
one that you will wear.
Boating is an activity that
the entire family can enjoy.
To ensure you enjoy boat-
ing for a lifetime, take the
proper steps to keep every-
one onboard safe.


Come See Us At

THE OUTDOOR EXPO

Crystal River Mall
Sat., April 131h, 10 AM 5 PM


NICK NICHOLAS LINCOLN
IN CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy. 19 N. Crystal River 77371
L Just North of Crystal River Mall 795m7371


SOS: Staying safe offshore


Sunday April 7, 2013 G9


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


It's a very personal thing


By Craig W. Armstrong
Special to the Chronicle

Life is all about choices.
From where we work to
what we have for lunch, we
make millions of decisions
in our lifetime, and for the
most part, they are personal
decisions.
If you love the water but
aren't the boat owner type,
you might want to consider
investing in a personal water
craft (PWC).
PWCs have come a long
way since the first one hit
the water. Original PWCs
were operated from a stand-
ing position, while modem
PWCs are driven from a sit-
ting position and designed to
carry multiple passengers.
There many other im-
provements, but before you
rush out to buy a PWC and a
wetsuit, there are a few
things you need to consider.


First, what do you want
out of a PWC? Do you want
something fast? Is fuel effi-
ciency important? How
much power do you want,
and of course, what about
price? These are questions
you will need to answer be-
fore you think about going
to a dealer.
As with any big purchase,
you will need to do your
homework. Surf the Internet
and find out as much as you
can about the topic. Talk to a
PWC owner and get their
take. Don't know any PWC
owners?
Go to a boat show and
make some new friends.
However, don't be pressured
into making a decision.
Learn as much as you can
about the brands available
and how to stay safe.
For your safety, all new
PWCs have a cutoff switch.
It is usually a lanyard with


one end attached to the ma-
chine and the other attached
to the driver. If the driver
falls off, the lanyard is
pulled and the cutoff switch
is engaged. PWCs are ex-
tremely maneuverable and
after a few times on one,
you might begin to believe
you are more skilled than
you actually are. You may
be tempted to jump higher
waves, cut in front of boats
or take it to its highest speed
- don't. This is when
disaster can strike.
Buy the right PWC for
you, observe the laws in
your area, avoid unneces-
sary risks and take a safety
class.
Safety should always
come before fun.
Remember, owning a
PWC is a personal choice,
and as with all personal
choices, it comes with
responsibility.


G10 Sunday, April 7, 2013


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


.- . ..6 .... .






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Take




hom




for a




spin







By Doris A. Black
Special to the Chronicle

If you enjoy traveling off
the beaten path and getting
up close and personal with
nature, you can do that
without sleeping in a tent, as
many people have
discovered.
Similar to camping, but
without the hassles, travel-
ing by recreational vehicle
(RV) is enjoyed by people
all over the world. Imagine
exploring Australia, Europe
or Africa by motorhome.
Motorhome clubs and
rentals are available on
every continent of the globe.
But how do you know if
RVing is right for you?
The RV lifestyle is one of
independence. RVers enjoy


cape the sunless months or
seek out those faraway
places they only dreamed
about before.
Empty nesters find travel-
ing by RV a convenient way
to combine both pleasure
travel with family visits to
their children or grandchil-
dren who live in other parts
of the country. Bringing
their own bed along for the
trip puts less pressure on the
host and allows RVers the
freedom to move on when
the mood hits.
There are certain charac-
teristics most RVers have in
common. They tend to veer
down side roads that look
promising, they dislike liv-
ing by the timetables of oth-
ers, they prefer to sleep in
the same bed every night
and they relish their sense of
self-reliance.
There are campgrounds
and parks all across the


the carefree lifestyle of trav-
eling from one destination to
another as the whim strikes.
With an RV, you can
travel comfortably as if you
were bringing your home
along for the trip.
You can bring your fa-
vorite possessions or your
favorite pet. You can cook
your own meals and eat
what you want when you
want without worrying
about a dress code.
Who goes RVing? RVing
appeals to a wide variety of
people for different reasons.
Families enjoy RVing be-
cause it brings them closer
together as they adventure
into unknown territory as a
unit.
As they respond to the
daily challenges of living in-


dependently, each family
member becomes stronger
as does the unit as a whole.
Sporting enthusiasts
enjoy RVing because it gets
them where the action is.
Fishermen can reach those
remote streams, skiers their
favorite slopes, and moun-
tain bikers the backcountry,
knowing all the while that
the comforts of home await
their return. Air condition-
ing, hot showers and a bed
are all there after a hard day
of play.
Retirees free from work
commitments revel in the
freedom to travel by RV to
destinations they have been
postponing for years. With-
out the time constraints of a
job, they are free to head
south for the winter to es-


country catering to RVs. Be-
cause of the large amount of
public land, Utah is an
RVer's paradise, but every
state has scenic landscapes,
bustling towns and interest-
ing characters to meet along
the way. Imagine visiting
national parks across the
country with every type of
geographical scenery. From
rainforests and mountain
ranges to lowlands and
deserts, each has its own
wildlife and natural beauty
waiting to be explored.
Enjoy a day of fishing or ca-
noeing, go antiquing in a
small coastal town or visit
your favorite tourist destina-
tion. Enjoy an unobstructed
view of a sunrise over a lake
or find a secluded spot and
listen to the quiet sounds of
the forest or the surf pound-
ing on the beach.
Modem RVs come with
all the necessary luxury


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


But stop In to see us flrst!


"El Quality Products and Service Since 1979"


* New and Pre-Owned RVs
* Full Service Department
* Parts
* Storage
* Consignment
* Trades Welcome

HOMOSASSA
7386 S. Suncoast Blvd.
West side of US 19, just 2 miles N. of
the intersection of US 19 and US 98.
Watch for our large yellow sign.
352-621-0138
www.ArrowRVs.com
OPEN MON-FRI, 9-6 and SAT, 9-5


Sunday, April 7, 2013 Gil

items you could possibly
want, including queen-size
beds, DVD and VCR
players, full-size refrigera-
tors and washer and dryer
capabilities.
They are truly a home
away from home. But even
more luxury awaits those
who want it. Some RV mod-
els include insulated win-
dows, 37-inch plasma TVs,
Bose surround sound speak-
ers, cherry cabinetry, granite
countertops and halogen ac-
cent lighting, making them
small luxury resorts.
If your idea of the ideal
vacation is to check into a
five-star hotel and order
room service, then an RV
vacation is not for you. But
if the brilliance of the Milky
Way seen from the wide-
open spaces of Montana or
New Mexico sounds appeal-
ing, plan to spend your next
vacation with an RV





G12 Sunday April 7 2013 OuTDooRs IN CITRUS ~Imus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus


County

Best


's


Nursery


I /' / ,


nursery


Conveniently 1 .
located in the heart Hernando
of Citrus County ',, liver
ADestination ,nve.,rne
Hlomnosassa Springs
Worth the Drive! Honosa a
Floral City
Mon.-Sat. 9am-5pm, 1"......
Sunday 1 Oam-4pm
Weather permitting.
HWY. 44 LECANTO Two Miles East OfHwy. 491


(352) 746-6465


=Si


Visit Us At
www.ColorCountryNursery.com
Colorcountrynursery@facebook.com


mosop,


G12 Sunday, April 7, 2013


OUTDOORS IN CITRUS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


^








2013 Crm tO


DIRECTORY




Page H2 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


& VASCULAR CENTER

itrus County's and
CHEST PAIN CENTER WITH
of February 11, 2013 Citrus Memorial Hospital received full accreditation
aChest Pain Center. The accreditation is effective for the next three years




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H3


Special thank you to Ledger Dentistry,
Signature Dental Care, PA, and Coast
Dental Inverness for donating a free oral
screening to Citrus County youth.


SIGNATURE wENL CARE, PA
MIA SCNE. DDS


* ^j~f^-l-A COAST
C OFINVERNESSt
^^^OF INVERNESS


I Ledger Dentistry
Lm 1, n-%Iri iu A. tkk'rr Ii 1. A.


A




Page H4 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013

Table of Contents
Choosing a doctor: Q uick tips ................................................................... 10
H healthy snack ideas..................................................................................... 11
Losing weight: Questions for the doctor .................................................12
K keeping kids active ..................................................................................... 15
G et enough folic acid ................................................................................. 22
Prevent allergy and asthma attacks at home ...........................................24
G et enough calcium ................................................................................... 33
Low er your risk of falling ........................................................................... 43
Prevent mosquito and tick bites ...............................................................47
Starting children on weight-loss program ...............................................51
Stay safe in the w workplace ......................................................................... 62
Learn how to m anage stress ..................................................................... 66
Decoding food buzzw ords ......................................................................... 67
Get support if you are a caregiver .............................................................70
Help your family enjoy the sun safely .......................................................72
Eating healthy during pregnancy ...............................................................78
Fixing bad fam ily habits ............................................................................. 79
Help kids reduce sugary beverage intake.................................................82


...... Citrus Pubisihing
iR N1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.
Crystal River, FL 34429
U!.(352) 563-6363
... ,- www.chronicleonline.com

Gerry Mulligan Publisher
Ken Melton Community Affairs Editor
Cindy Connolly Community Affairs Graphic Artist
Sarah Gatling Community Editor
Trista Stokes Advertising Sales Manager

CITRU8- C 0 U N T VY

LI: www.cnronicleonline.com




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H5


Darshan V. Patel, MD


Huang-Ta Lin, MD


727-869-5565 toll-free 855-534-4325
YourHeartBeat.com 114000 Fivay Road, Hudson, FL 34667
Reioal Madkal Caudr BhayoMe Pnh
I Medka Caenta of Trinity
SOak Hil Hospital


Raul Jimenez, MD Rajiva Goyal, MD Kenneth H. Yamamura, MD



SArrhythmia.
CENTER OF FLORIDA
Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point


Luis R. Annoni, MD
Medical Director


0ECUJ




Page H6 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


Directory Index


MEDICAL FACILITIES
C lin ic s ................................................................................................ 9
Em ergency M medicine ................................... .... ............. . ....... 9
H health D epartm ent ..................................... ...... ....... ...... . ....... 9
H o sp ita ls .................... ......................................... .................... 9
Rehabilitation Hospitals .....................................................10
S surgical C enters ....................................... ..... . ... .... .... .... ...... 10

HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS
A llergy, Asthm a & Im m unology.............................. ..................... 11
A alternative M medicine ..................................... .. ...... ........ ...... 12
A nesthesiology .............................................. . .... .... ........ ...... 12
Audiology ............................................... 13
C a radiology ............................................................................ 14
C h iro p ra ctic ................................................................................... 17
Dental
Dentists ............................................... 19
E ndodontics ............................................................................... 23
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.................... ....................23
O rthodontics ..................................................................24
P e rio d o n ta l.......................................................... . ..................... 2 4
Derm atology ................................................... ...................24
Endocrinology.................. ...................................................25
Fam ily/General Practice ............................................................25
G astroenterology ................. ................................................31
G e ria tric s ...................................................................................... . 3 1
H ospitalists ................................................... ....................32
In te rn a l M e d ic in e ............................................................................3 2
N ephrology ................................................... ....................34
N e u ro logy .................................................................................... 35
O bstetrics/G ynecology ......................................................................35
O ncology-Hem atology ..............................................................35
O pthalm ology ................. ...................................................37
O ptom etry ..................................................................................... 38
O rthopedic/Sports M medicine .........................................................39
O tolaryngology (E N T) ................................................................... 40
Pain M anagem ent ......................................................................... 41
Pathology ............................................... 41
Ped iatrics ..................................................................................... 4 1
Plastic-Reconstructive Surgery ...................................................42
P o d ia try .................... ................................................................... 4 4
Psychiatry ............. .............................................................. 44
Psychology .......................................................................44
Pulm onary .................................................. ...................45
R adiology .................... ..................................................... 45
Rehabilitative M medicine ......................................................................46
S leep M medicine ............................................................................. 46
Surgery
Cardiothoracic.................. ................................................46
G enera l-Thoracic-Vascular.......................................................48
U ro lo g y ............................................................................................4 8
W e illness .. ........... ............. ................................................. . 50
Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine........................................ 50


Blood Banks .................................................. ...................54
Diagnostic Im aging .. . ...... .................... ........... .. .. ......54
D ialysis C linics .. . ............................................ ........................ 54
Hearing Exams/Hearing Aids ....................................................54
Home Health Services .......................................................56
Laboratories ................................................. ...................58
Massage Therapy .............. .......................................... 58
M ental Health Counseling........... . ................................. .......... .......... 60
O ptical/O ptical G oods ............................................ ..................... 60
P pregnancy C counseling ...................................... ....................... 61
R e h a b ilita tio n .................................................................................. 6 1

HEALTH RELATED PRODUCTS
A artificial Lim bs/Braces .................................. . ..... ........ ...... 63
H health and N nutrition .... .......... ................... ...... ..............63
Mastectomy Apparel ............. ...............................................63
M medical A lerts ............. ...... ............................................ . 63
Medical Supplies/Equipment ........................ ........................63
Medical Uniforms ........... ............................................ 64
O orthopedic S hoes ...... ............ ................... ...... ..............64
O xyg e n ................................................................. . ..................... 6 4
Pharmaceutical Products ...........................................................64
Pharm acies.................... ...................................................65
W heelchairs/S coote rs ............................................ ..................... 66

COMMUNITY CARE AND SUPPORT
Charitable/Social Services ........................................................70
H o sp ice ......................................................................................... 7 1
Support Groups ........... ............................................ 71

SENIOR FOCUS
A assisted Living ........ .................................................................... 74
Independent Living ...................................... .. ...... ........ ...... 75
N u rsing H o m e s ......................................... ....... ........ .............. .. 7 6
S e n io r S u p po rt ......................................... ....... ........ .............. .. 7 7
Senior C om m unity C enters.................................... ..................... 78


B o w lin g ............................................................................................8 1
G olf C ourses ................................................................................. 81
Gyms and Exercise Clubs ........................................................81
Horseshoe Clubs .................................................... .............. 81
Shuffleboard Courts ..................................... .. ...... .... .... ...... 82
Sw im m ing Pools ....................................... ...... ... .... .... .... ...... 82
Te nnis C o u rts ................................................................................ . 82


i




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H7


14th Anniversary Sale


Thank you, Citrus County... We couldn't have done it without you!


PRESCRIPTION


Lift Chairs

s7999 9

Many Colors and Sizes To Choose Fron
You've Got The Power!
Power Recliners
PUSH BUTTON EASY TO USE 4
Starting at 499


All Recliners On Sale!
s349 u
A UP
s3^ WITH COUPON
MADE IN


SStress-Free 5S3
Recliner 0
FREE OTTOMAN

'50OFF A'NY
V Ou urrRECLINER
L WITH COUPON
APO-
40 F/TWIN SET I Firm
WITH COUPON Com

60 OFF ANY
FULL SET I Firm
WITH COUPON J Doub
Ay King
ANE Y Queen
I U' I/QUEEN SETI Extra
WITH COUPON j Twin
-r -- Full
ANY HarmT
I100 O KING SET I Full
L WITH COUPON j Queen
AMERICA PROUD OF IT!


Or Plush Posture
ort Sets
19995 Queen $3995
s29995 King $49995
Or Plus
le-sided Sets
$69995 Full s39995
$49995 FTER COUPONDISCWNT
i Firm Sets
s299" Queen s4995
s39995 King s6995
on' Gel Memory Style
s699"5 King s10995
S999"9


A A

TSf
FREE SAVE DAY DELIVERY ON ALL IN STOCK ITENS
www.furniturenala eai.icom NEWHOURSMON-FRI9AM-PMSAT9AM5PMSUN11AM5PM 5 7


t


00FCFX




Page H8 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


Advertiser Index

Advanced Fam ily Hearing A id Center ........................................................................... 55
Advanced Urology Specialists ..................................................................................... 49
A udibel Hearing Centers ............................................................................................... 54
Bay Derm atology & Cosm etic Surgery, P.A .................................................................. 24
Brashear's Pharm acy ..................................................................................................... 64
Christ M medical Center..................................................................................................... 26
Christie Dental ....................................................................................................................20
Citrus Cardiology Consultants ..................................................................................... 16
Citrus Hills Dental ......................................................................................................... 21
Citrus M em orial Health System s .....................................................................................2...
Com plete Fam ily Cosm etic & Im plant Denistry ........................................................... 22
Cypress Cove Care Center............................................................................................. 78
Diam ond Ridge Health & Rehabilitation Center........................................................... 76
Dr. Edw ard H. Farrior, M .D .............................................................................................. 43
Furniture Palace & M attress W warehouse .......................................................................7...
G & R Pharm acy ...........................................................................................................65
Health & W ellcare Services of Florida, Inc. (DeG raw ) ................................................. 28
Hernando M medical Center ............................................................................................... 28
Hom e Instead Senior Care ............................................................................................. 56
Dr. Roy Horn/A advanced Health ..................................................................................... 12
HPH Hospice ......................................................................................................................70
Inverness Club ..................................................................................................................75
Ledger Denistry..................................................................................................................21
Life Care Center of Citrus County ................................................................................. 77
M miracle Ear..........................................................................................................................54
M unroe Regional M medical Center ................................................................................. 84
Nature Coast O rthopaedics ........................................................................................... 40
Prem ier Vein Center ....................................................................................................... 47
Regional M medical Center Bayonet Point.........................................................................5...
Robert Boissoneault O ncology Institute ..................................................................... 36
Senior Hom e Care .......................................................................................................57
Dr. G ira S. Shah, M D ..................................................................................................... 33
Suncoast Eye Center ..................................................................................................... 83
Suncoast Prim ary Care Specialists............................................................................... 27
Superior Residence ....................................................................................................... 74
Sunflow er Springs Assisted Living ............................................................................. 74
Tobacco Prevention Florida Health.................................................................................3...
W wholesale Sleep Center ................................................................................................. 28




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H9


MEDICAL FACILITIES


ALLEN RIDGE FAMILY CARE CENTER
WALK-IN CLINIC
Citrus Memorial Health Care Center at Allen
Ridge
540 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
.................................... .......... .. 352-746-2700

Christ Medical Center
7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
.................................... .......... .. 352-564-0444

Citrus County Health Department
GADCHC Walk-In Clinic
Crystal River Campus
117 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River
.................................... .......... .. 352-795-6233

Citrus County Health Department
GADCHC Walk-In Clinic
Inverness Campus
120 N. Montgomery Ave., Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-726-173 1

Lyon, Rolf MD
LYON URGENT CARE CLINIC
155 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
.................................... .......... .. 352-563-0 184

LYON URGENT CARE CLINIC
Lyon, Rolf MD 155 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
.................................... .......... .. 352-563-0 184

Quick Care Med
1907 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-344-2273

SUGARMILL WOODS
FAMILY CARE CENTER WALK-IN CLINIC
Adera, Habtu MD
Khan, Hasibul MD
Tambrini, Alex MD
Citrus Memorial Health Care Center
at Sugarmill Woods
7945 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................................... .......... .. 352-382-6 111


The Centers
3238 S. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
................................................ 352 -628 -5020
After hours ........................... 352-726-7155

Veterans Affairs Out-Patient Clinic
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Ste. A,
Lecanto
..............................................352 -746 -8000



CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM
Adams, Kelly DO
Allen, William MD
Ansari, Masood MD
Arrington, Robert MD
Barnes, Richard MD
Bien, Stephanie DO
DeGraaf, Kenneth MD
Farag, Nagy MD
Farrell, Daniel MD
Hamami, Anwar MD
Jean, Patrick MD
Katanics, Janos MD
Kumar, Priesh MD Lee, Harry MD
Punyani, Sat MD
Scott, J. Douglas MD
Teleszky, Laszlo MD
Tully, Thomas MD
Vergaro, Robert MD
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
............... .. ........................... 954-7 14-6300
................................................ 352 -344 -6569
see our ad Page 2

SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
Cochrane, Christine DO
Davison, James DO
Davison, William MD
Kolar, Mary Anne DO
Martin, Mary Sue MD
Noles, Charles S. MD
Rehman, Arif MD
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
............... .. ........................... 352-795-6560

Emergency Center at TimberRidge
9521 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 5 1-7 5 0 0


Citrus County Health Department
GADCHC
Dental Appointment Scheduling
..................................352-249-9258 Ext. 249
Medical Appointment Scheduling
................................................ 352 -527 -0247
Crystal River Campus
117 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River
..............................................352 -795 -6233
Environmental Health
3600 W. Sovereign Path, Ste. 194, Lecanto
.............................................. 352 -527 -5295
Inverness Campus
120 N. Montgomery Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -17 3 1
Lecanto Main Campus
3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto
.................. .............................. 352 -527 -0068
Lecanto North Campus George A. Dame
Community Health Center
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -2 4 9 -9 2 5 8
see our ad Page 3



Brooksville Regional Hospital
17240 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 6 -5 1 1 1

Citrus Memorial Health System
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -15 5 1

Munroe Regional Medical Center
1500 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala
.............................................. 352 -35 1-7200
see our ad Page 84

Oak Hill Hospital
11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 2 8 -6 4 4 1

Ocala Regional Medical Center
1431 S.W. 1st Ave., Ocala
.............................................. 3 5 2 -4 0 1-10 0 0


continued on Page 10




Page H10 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 9

Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point
14000 Fivay Road, Hudson
..................................... .. ......... 888-74 1-5 119
see our ad Page 5

Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
..................................... .. ......... 352-795-6560

West Marion Community Hospital
4600 S.W. 46th Court, Ocala
..................................... .. ......... 352-291-3000


Comprehensive Medical Rehabilitation
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -8560

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital
of Spring Hill
12440 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 9 2 -4 2 5 0


Ambulatory Surgery Center
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -8406

Citrus Surgery Center
110 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 2 7 -18 2 5

Lecanto Surgery Center
3075 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Lecanto
.............................................. 3 5 2 -5 2 7 -0 10 2


Suncoast Endoscopy Center
3621 E. Forest Dr., Inverness
............................................... 352-637-2787




Choosing a doctor: Quick tips


When you choose a doctor for
yourself or a loved one, make sure to
choose a primary care doctor you
can trust. A primary care doctor can:
* Help you make important deci-
sions, like which screening tests and
shots to get
* Treat many health problems
* Refer you to a specialist when
you need more help with a specific
health issue
When you are choosing a doctor,
look for someone who:
* Treats you with respect
* Listens to your opinions and con-
cerns
* Encourages you to ask questions
* Explains things in ways you can
understand
When you and your doctor work
together as a team, you'll get better
health care. Try the following tips to
find a doctor who's right for you.
Ask for recommendations from
people you know. Getting a refer-
ence from someone you know and
trust is a great way to find a doctor.
* Ask friends, family members,
neighbors, or coworkers if they have


a doctor they like.
* If you are looking for a new doc-
tor because yours is retiring or mov-
ing, ask your current doctor for a
recommendation.
Check with your insurance com-
pany.
If you have health insurance, you
may need to choose from a network
of doctors they've selected. Some
plans may let you choose a doctor
outside the network if you pay a
bigger share of your health care
costs.
* Call your insurance company
and ask for a list of local doctors
who take your insurance plan.
* See if your insurance company
has a Web site you can use to search
for a local doctor who accepts your
plan.
If you don't have health insurance,
you'll have to pay for health care out
of pocket, which can be very expen-
sive. For help finding insurance,
visit http://finder.health
care.gov.
Call your top choices.
Once you have a few doctors in
mind, call their offices to learn more


about them. The answers to the fol-
lowing questions may help you
make a decision:
* Is the doctor taking new patients?
* How long will it take to get an
appointment?
* How long do appointments usu-
ally last?
* Is the doctor part of a group prac-
tice? Who are the other doctors?
* Who will see you if the doctor
isn't available?
* Which hospital does the doctor
use?
* Can you get lab work and x-rays
done in the office?
* What is the office's cancellation
policy?
* If you have a medical condition,
does the doctor have experience
treating it?
* If you are more comfortable
speaking to a doctor in a language
besides English, is there a doctor or
nurse who speaks that language?
* Does the doctor offer evening or
weekend appointments?

SOURCE: wn'.Iwiculthifuih1crgoi




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page Hll


HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS


Allergy, Asthma

& Immunology

ADVANCED ALLERGY, ASTHMA
AND IMMUNOLOGY
Alibrahim, Ayman MD
Allen Ridge Medical Mall
508 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
.................................... .. ........ .. 352-746-3336
Oak Hill Medical Plaza
11329 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
.................................. .. ........ .. 352-596-2715

Alibrahim, Ayman MD
ADVANCED ALLERGY, ASTHMA
AND IMMUNOLOGY
Allen Ridge Medical Mall
508 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
..............................................352-746-3336
Oak Hill Medical Plaza
11329 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
.................................. .. ........ .. 352-596-2715


ALLERGY, ASTHMA AND
IMMUNOLOGY CENTER
Alshaar, Ayham MD
314 S. Line Ave., Inverness
............ ...................... ........... 3 5 2 -8 6 0 -14 14
11333 Cortez Blvd., Ste. 409, Brooksville
.............................................. 352 -597 -4499

Alshaar, Ayham MD
ALLERGY, ASTHMA AND
IMMUNOLOGY CENTER
314 S. Line Ave., Inverness
............ ............................... .. 3 5 2 -8 6 0 -14 14
11333 Cortez Blvd., Ste. 409, Brooksville
.............................................. 352 -597 -4499

DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD
HEALTH & WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -3872
see our ad Page 28


HEALTH &WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD
McCollough, Barney PA
Tzivanis, James PA
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................. ........................... 352-794-3872
see our ad Page 28

Marcus, Jeffrey MD FACS
821 Medical Court East, Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -3 13 1

McCollough, Barney PA
HEALTH & WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -3872

Nathan, V. Rama MD
FACS 820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -6 3 7 -19 19

Tzivanis, James PA
HEALTH & WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -3872


continued on Page 12




Healthy snack ideas


* "Ants on a log" (celery with
peanut butter and raisins)
* Fresh or canned fruit (in 100%
juice, not syrup) with fat-free or
low-fat vanilla yogurt
* Whole-grain crackers with low-
fat cheese
* Frozen grapes (rinse and freeze
grapes overnight)
* Whole-wheat bread or apple
slices with peanut butter
* Quesadillas (low-fat cheese on
a whole-wheat tortilla)
* Unsalted pretzels or air-


popped popcorn
* Baked tortilla chips and salsa
* Whole-wheat pita bread with
hummus
* Water or fat-free or low-fat
milk

Put fresh fruit in a bowl at eye-
level in the refrigerator or on the
kitchen counter. It will be easier
for kids to see and grab.

On the go
Put dried fruits and nuts, fresh


veggies, or fruit in small baggies.
Pack low-fat string cheese sticks.

Set the rules
Teach your kids to ask before
they help themselves to snacks.
Eat snacks at the table or in the
kitchen, not in front of the TV.
Serve snacks in a bowl. Don't let
kids eat snack foods directly out
of the bag or box.
Drink water or fat-free or low-
fat milk instead of soda or juice.
SOURCE: www.healthfinder.gov




Page H12 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 11
Alternative Medicine

ADVANCED HEALTH
Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 10A,
Crystal River
............... .... .... .... .... .... ... 352-563-2597
see our ad this Page

Advanced Health
Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Suite 10A
Crystal River, FL
352-563-2597
Chiropractic
Acupuncture
Nutrition
Massage

CITRUS ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
Samuels, Joseph DOM
2639 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Lecanto
.................................. ............ 352-746-5669


CRYSTAL RIVER CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Twiner, Owen J. DC
6460 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., step. 2,
Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -6 3 13

Donaire, Ernesto G. MD
FAMILY GENERAL PRACTICE
255 S.E. 7th Ave., step. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8620

Donaire, SusanaT. MD PA
FAMILY GENERAL PRACTICE
255 S.E. 7th Ave., step. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8620

FAMILY GENERAL PRACTICE
Donaire, Ernesto G. MD
Donaire, Susana T. MD PA
255 S.E. 7th Ave., step. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8620

Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA
ADVANCED HEALTH
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, step. 10A, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2597


Samuels, Joseph DOM
CITRUS ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE
2639 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Lecanto
..............................................352 -746 -5669

Twiner, Owen J. DC
CRYSTAL RIVER CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
6460 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, step. 2,
Crystal River
............. ... ........................... 352 -795 -63 13

Anesthesiology

Aboveienin, Karim MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
................................................ 800 -437 -2672

Bavetta, Ludwig MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
..............................................800 -437 -2672


continued on Page 13


see our ad this Page


Losing weight: Questions for the doctor


Alternative
rMedicine
Practitioner
Druq free leading eda techniques
.=,,a that help the body heal
,I 'I I i, l ,,l ll l, lnh ,,l II"

1 ,i 1 ,ii ,,, Il j,
Look Better. Feel Better. Be Better.

t -J, '6_


Losing weight is never
easy. Before you start a
diet, talk to your doctor
or nurse about a healthy
weight-loss plan that's
right for you.
Screening and counsel-
ing for obesity are cov-
ered under the Affordable
Care Act. Depending on
your insurance plan, you
may be able to get these
services at no cost to you.
Talk to your insurance
provider.
What do I ask the doctor?
It helps to have ques-
tions for the doctor or
nurse written down be-
fore your appointment.
Print out this list of ques-
tions, and take it with you
the next time you visit the
doctor. You may want to
ask a family member or


close friend to go with
you to take notes.
* How does my weight
affect my health?
* Do I have a health
problem that is causing
me to be overweight?
* How will losing
weight help me?
* What is a healthy
weight for me?
* How much weight do
I need to lose?
* How long should it
take me to lose weight?
* What are healthy ways
to lose weight and keep it
off?
* How do I change my
eating habits?
* What kinds of physical
activity do I need to do?
* Could a weight-loss
program help me?




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H13


from Page 12
Black, Michael MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
.................. ................... ........... 800-437-2672

Calodney, Leonard MD
CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-795-8380

Chunduri, Aparna MD
CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-795-8380

CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
Calodney, Leonard MD
Chunduri, Aparna MD
Goethe, Robert C. MD
Lee, William MD
Outerbridge, Yi-Hwa MD

Riehn, David G. DO
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................... ........... 352-795-8380

Darling, James MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
................................... ........... 800-437-2672

Deballi, Peter MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
.............................................. 800-437-2672

Diehr, Jerry MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
................................... ........... 800-437-2672

Fallows, Christopher M. DO
GULFCOAST ANESTHESIA SPECIALISTS
70 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. 200, Lecanto
................... .............. ............. 352-527-4444

Fazai, Zulfiqar MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
................................... ........... 800-437-2672

Glogover, Philip MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
................................... ........... 800-437-2672


Goethe, Robert MD
CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
...... .......... .......................... 352-795-8380

GULFCOAST ANESTHESIA SPECIALISTS
Fallows, Christopher M. DO
Hashim, Mark MD
520 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................ .......................... 352-527-4444

Hashim, Mark MD
GULFCOAST ANESTHESIA SPECIALISTS
520 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................ .......................... 352-527-4444

Howard, Cameron MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
..............................................800 -437 -2672

Lee, William MD
CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
... ................. .......................... 352-795-8380

Mercado, Herbert MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
............ ........................... 800-437-2672

Outerbridge, Yi-Hwa MD
CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
...... .......... .......................... 352-795-8380

Riehn, David DO
CRYSTAL RIVER ANESTHESIA PA
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
..............................................352 -795 -8380

SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
Aboveienin, Karim MD
Bavetta, Ludwig MD
Black, Michael MD
Darling, James MD
Deballi, Peter MD
Diehr, Jerry MD
Fazai, Zulfiqar MD
Glogover, Philip MD
Howard, Cameron MD
Mercado, Herbert MD
Reichback, Jay A. MD
Smith, Arthur MD
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
............ ........................... 800-437-2672


Smith, Arthur MD
SHERIDAN HEALTH CORP.
1613 N. Harrison Parkway #200, Sunrise
..............................................800 -437 -2672


Audiology

Conter, Jodi MS
GARDNER AUDIOLOGY
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 11, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -5700
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
(in the office of Dr. Ram Nathan)
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 19 -6 5 6 5

Davis, Joanie AuD
GARDNER AUDIOLOGY
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 11, Crystal River
..............................................352 -795 -5700
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
(in the office of Dr. Ram Nathan)
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 19 -6 5 6 5

GARDNER AUDIOLOGY
Gardner, Dan MS
Conter, Jodi MS
Davis, Joanie AuD
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 11, Crystal River
..............................................352 -795 -5700
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
(in the office of Dr. Ram Nathan)
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 19 -6 5 6 5


r Gardner Audiology

Daniel Gardner
700 SE 5th Terrace, Suite 12
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-5700
* Be Seen By An Audiologist
* Field Study Participation
* Free Guide To Better Hearing
* Visit Website For Testimonials
gardneroffice@tampabay.rr.com
www. GardnerAudiology. com


continued on Page 14




Page H14 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 13

Gardner, Dan MS
GARDNER AUDIOLOGY
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 11, Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-795-5700
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
(in the office of Dr. Ram Nathan)
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 19 -6 5 6 5


Cardiology
Abadier, Ralph MD
FACC CARDIOVASCULAR SERVICES LLC
212 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
.................... ................. ........... 352-4 19-6537

Alonso, Joseph R. MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
.................... ................. ........... 352-86 1-98 11

Ansari, Mohammad MD
HEART ASSOCIATES
5606 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-795-9266

Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.............. ..... ........ .. 352-795-4165
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
................................... ........... 352-726-8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
...... ..................... .... 352-726-8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101, Leesburg
.................... ................. ........... 352-3 15-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
.................... ................. ........... 352-75 1-3356
see our ad Page 16

Brooks, Andre MD
HEART OF FLORIDA
CARDIOVASCULAR CONSULTANTS
5973 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................... ................. ........... 352-628-32 12

Cacodcar, Surexa S. MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
.................... ................. ........... 352-387-3 159

CARDIOVASCULAR SERVICES LLC
Abadier, Ralph MD FACC
212 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
....................... ............ ............. 352-419-6537


CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
Liu, Tong MD PhD
20661 Ned Love Ave., Dunnellon
................................................ 352 -873 -4733
8550 N.E. 138th Ln., Bldg. 400, Ste. 101,
Lady Lake
Luo, Lan MD FACC
20661 Ned Love Ave., Dunnellon
................................................ 352 -873 -9557
8550 N.E. 138th Ln., Bldg. 400, Ste. 101,
Lady Lake
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
Alonso, Joseph R. MD FACC
.. ............ ..... ...... .................... 3 5 2 -8 6 1-9 8 1 1
Cacodcar, Surexa S. MD FACC
......... ..................................... .. 3 5 2 -3 8 7 -3 15 9
Dresen, William F MD FACC
......... ... .... .......................... 352-873-2223
Luo, Lan MD FACC
................ ................................ 352 -873 -9557
Mittal, Vijay K. MD FACC
............................................... 352 -873 -0003
Rai, Swaroop K. MD FACC
................................................ 352 -873 -2323
Stone, Ira M. MD FACC
................................................ 352 -237 -4004

CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
Attanti, Srinivas MD FACC
Delfin, Luis MD FACC
Gonzalez, Javier M MD FACC
Kannam, Hari MD
Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
Nerello, Nishant MD
Pasupuleti, Suman MD
Rivero, Abel MD
Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI
Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
Walker, Dennis J. MD
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 5 1-3 3 5 6
see our ad page 16


Delfin, Luis MD FACC
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
..............................................352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................. ............................. .. 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
................... .......................... 352 -75 1-3356
see our ad Page 16

Dresen, William F. MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
................... .......................... 352-873-2223

Feldman, Robert L. MD
OCALA HEART AT
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
11527 W. Emerald Oaks Dr., Crystal River
................... .......................... 352 -794 -6090

Gonzalez, Javier M. MD FACC
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.............................................. .. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
... .............. ......................... ..... 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
..............................................352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101, Leesburg
................. ............................. .. 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 5 1-3 3 5 6
see our ad Page 16

Han, Richard 0. MD
OCALA HEART AT
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
11527 W. Emerald Oaks Dr., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -6090

HEART ASSOCIATES
Ansari, Mohammad MD
Kannam, Hari MD
Manyam, Bose S. MD
5606 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
.............................................. 352 -795 -9266


continued on Page 15




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H15


from Page 14
HEART OF FLORIDA CARDIOVASCULAR
CONSULTANTS
Brooks, Andre MD
5973 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................... ................. ........... 352-628-3212

Kannam, Hari MD
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
............... .................... ........... 352-795-4165
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.......................... ...... ... 352-726-8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
..... ...................... .... 352-726-8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................... ................. ........... 352-315-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
.................................. ........... 352-751-3356
see our ad Page 16


Liu, Tong MD PhD
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
20661 Ned Love Ave., Dunnellon
................................................ 352 -873 -4733
8550 N.E. 138th Ln., Bldg. 400, Ste. 101,
Lady Lake
................................................ 352 -873 -4733
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala ......352-873-4733

Luo, Lan MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
20661 Ned Love Ave., Dunnellon
..............................................352 -873 -9557
8550 N.E. 138th Ln., Bldg. 400, Ste. 101,
Lady Lake
.... ........................................... 352 -873 -4733
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
................................................ 352 -873 -9557

Manyam, Bose S. MD
HEART ASSOCIATES
5606 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9266


Miryala, Vinod MD FACC
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
... ............................................ 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
..... ........... ............................. .. 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
... .............. .......................... 352-751-3356
see our ad Page 16

Mittal, Vijay K. MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
..............................................352 -873 -0003


continued on Page 17


Run, Skip,



Hop ...Fun!

By Bev Bennett
CTW Features

Parents eat all their veg-
gies at meals, fasten their
seatbelts when driving
and floss their teeth. They
take these steps knowing
that their personal health
is at stake. More impor-
tantly it sets a good exam-
ple for children.
Getting active should
also be part of that lead-
by-example to-do list.
"As a pediatrician I ad-
vocate physical activity for
kids," says Julie Boman,
MD.
"It helps anyone's body.
You're healthy; your body
is healthy; your bones are
healthy," says Dr. Boman,


pediatrician, Children's
Hospitals and Clinics of
Minnesota, Minneapolis
campus.
Unfortunately, if many
parents think physical ac-
tivity means push-ups or
laps around the gym,
which most likely will
lead to meet even more re-
sistance than with flossing.
The challenge is to make
activity an appealing part
of the day. Otherwise, it's
all too easy to avoid, say
health experts.
"I've seen enough of this
problem," says Linda L.
Caldwell, PhD.
"It can't be exercise. Peo-
ple don't go out and exer-
cise. It has to be fun," says
Caldwell, professor of
recreation, park and
tourism management and
human development and
family studies, Penn State
University, University
Park, Pa.
The payoff is that once
you make physical activity


pleasurable your family
will do it.
What's more if your
children develop this
healthy lifestyle now it
will carry over to their
adulthood, according to
Caldwell.
"Fifty percent of what a
person does in adulthood
starts as a kid," says Cald-
well,
The key is to start early
and be consistent.
Embrace physical activ-
ity as soon as you have
children, says Dr. Boman.
She suggests playing on
the floor with a 6-month
old as a natural part of life.
"From the time my chil-
dren were young we were
out running with the kids
in strollers. Then [when
the children were older]
on bikes together," says
the pediatrician.
Don't be lulled by the
television. Children under
age 2 shouldn't be watch-
ing in any case, says Dr.


Boman
Instead, take a cue from
pediatrician's family activ-
ities, including soccer,
jump rope, cross-country
and downhill skiing and
tennis.
Caldwell encourages
families to add more of the
physical to their outings.
Hike through a wooded
area to bird watch, bike to
a museum or join a neigh-
borhood cleanup, says the
leisure expert.
As everyone develops
their stamina and skills
they'll discover unantici-
pated rewards.
"There's bonding, learn-
ing and competence," says
Caldwell.
Children may turn ac-
tivities into rituals, such as
a Labor Day walk on the
beach or Thanksgiving
hike through the woods.
"Family rituals and
habits are absolutely won-
derful as long as they're
healthy," Caldwell says.




Page H16 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


CITRUS
CARDIOLOGY
Consultants, PA.
www.citruscardiology.org


6"cdlte JuJA"/


ICANL ICANL
I G We are proud to be
an Accredited
Nu, doog Nl, Mede Nuclear Cardiology
.............. aLaboratory


aoctdia/c 6(ae.


Kenneth L. Savage, MD


Dennis J. Walker, MD


Gisela Trigo, MD, FACC


Louis Delfin, MD, FACC


Stephen H. Stark, MD, FACC


Srinivas Attanti, MD, FACC


Suman Pasupuleti, MD


Harl Kannam, MU


Nisnant Nerella, MU


FREE SCREENING FRIDAYS

CALL 352-795-4165 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
We Are A Full Service Practice Serving Citrus County
Five Days A Week

NOW OFFERING CARDIAC PET TESTING
IN OUR VILLAGES OFFICE
With Free Transportation
I From Inverness


Cy&dtal 9wo
760 S.E. 5th Terrace
Crystal River, FL 34429
(352) 795-4165


qn- oe"wessm
308 W. Highland Blvd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(352) 726-8353




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H17


from Page 16

Nerello, Nishant MD
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.................................. ........... 352-795-4165
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
......................... ...... ... 352-726-8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
......................... ...... ... 352-726-8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
.................................. ........... 352-315-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
................................... ........... 352-751-3356
see our ad Page 16

OCALA HEART AT
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
Feldman, Robert L. MD
Han, Richard 0. MD
Potu, Prasad MD
Santoian, Edward C. MD
von Mering, Gregory 0. MD
11527 W. Emerald Oaks Dr., Crystal River
.................................. ........... 352-794-6090

Pasupuleti, Suman MD
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................ ................... ........... 352-795-4165
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.... ....................... .... 352-726-8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............................................. 352-726-8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
.................................. ........... 352-315-0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
................ ................... ........... 352-751-3356
see our ad Page 16

Potu, Prasad MD
OCALA HEART AT
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
11527 W. Emerald Oaks Dr., Crystal River
................................... ........... 352-794-6090

Rai, Swaroop K. MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
................................... ........... 352-873-2323


Rivero, Abel MD
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
.. ............. ........................... 352 -75 1-3356
see our ad Page 16

Saluck, Brian H. DO FACC FACOI
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................... ......................... .. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
........................................ .... 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
..............................................352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 5 1-3 3 5 6
see our ad Page 16

Santoian, Edward C. MD
OCALA HEART AT
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
11527 W. Emerald Oaks Dr., Crystal River
..............................................352 -794 -6090

Stark, Stephen H. MD FACC
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
...... ........... ............................. .. 3 5 2 -3 15 -0 6 2 7
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
.............................................. 352 -75 1-3356
see our ad Page 16

Stone, Ira M. MD FACC
CENTRAL FLORIDA HEART CENTER
3310 S.W. 34th St., Ocala
..............................................352 -237 -4004


Trigo, Gisela MD FACC
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
..............................................352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............................................ 352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
..... ........ ......................... ....... 352 -3 15 -0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
.............................................. 352 -75 1-3356
see our ad Page 16

von Mering, Gregory 0. MD
OCALA HEART AT
SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL
11527 W. Emerald Oaks Dr., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -6090

Walker, Dennis J. MD
CITRUS CARDIOLOGY CONSULTANTS PA
760 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 16 5
308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
..............................................352 -726 -8353
211 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
............................................. 352 -726 -8353
601 E. Dixie Ave., Medical Plaza 101,
Leesburg
..... ........ ......................... ....... 352 -3 15 -0627
910 Old Camp Road, Bldg. 210, Lake
Sumter Professional Plaza, The Villages
............... .. ........................... 352-75 1-3356
see our ad Page 16

Williams, Stanley MD
511 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
..............................................352 -860 -0202


Chiropractic

ADVANCED HEALTH & CHIROPRACTIC
Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 1 OA,
Crystal River
.............................................. 352 -563 -2597

Barber, Sean A. DC
NECK & BACK CARE CENTER
912 N.E. 5th St., Crystal River
.............................................. 352 -563 -5055


continued on Page 18




Page H18 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 17

Bennett, Michael L. BS DC
SUNCOAST CHIROPRACTIC &
NEUROLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
375 N.E. 10th Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 6 3 -6 4 7 1

BETTER HEALTH CHIROPRACTIC PA
McFarland-Bryant, Cheryl DC
6166 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-795-89 11

Carter, James C. DC PA
INVERNESS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
2202 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-726-4441

CHANEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Chaney, William DC DIBCN
3470 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
. ......................... ...... ... 352-270-8869
4056 Commercial Way, Spring Hill
.................. ................... ........... 352-686-6385

Chaney, William DC DIBCN
CHANEY CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
3470 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
............................................. 352-270-8869
4056 Commercial Way, Spring Hill
..................... .............. ............. 352-686-6385

CHRISTIAN CHIROPRACTIC CENTER
Christian, Jennifer DC
5354 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..................... .............. ............. 352-628-523 1

Christian, Jennifer DC
CHRISTIAN CHIROPRACTIC CENTER
5354 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................. ................... ........... 352-628-5231

CITRUS CHIROPRACTIC GROUP
Dumbadse, Ross T. DC FACO
Jones, Andrew J. DC
2320 N. Sunshine Path, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -5350

CITRUS CHIROPRACTIC GROUP
Hoffman, Kevin L. DC
2202 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-726-4441

CITRUS REGIONAL
CLINIC OF CHIROPRACTIC
Fowler, Jeffrey A. DC
108 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-344-1300


Collins, A. Quenten DC
6982 W. Jackson Lane, Homosassa
................................................ 352 -628 -4520

CRYSTAL RIVER CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Twiner, Owen J. DC
6460 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Ste. 2,
Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -6 3 13

Daniels, Steven DC
KINNARD CHIROPRACTIC
2611 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -0554

Doran, Peter J. DC
3291 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 0 3 -6 8 13
1653-B W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 2 7 -9 0 10

Dumbadse, Ross T. DC FACO
CITRUS CHIROPRACTIC GROUP
2320 N. Sunshine Path, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -5350

Fowler, Jeffrey A. DC
CITRUS REGIONAL
CLINIC OF CHIROPRACTIC
108 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 4 -13 0 0

Grau, Jose MD
PHYSICIANS INJURY MEDICAL CENTER
8546 W. Homosassa Trail, Ste. 7, Homosassa
................................................ 352 -628 -6699

Grause, Christian DC
KINNARD CHIROPRACTIC
2611 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -0554

Hensley, Scott H. DC
406 Tompkins Street, Inverness
.................................... .... .. 352 -726 -1557

Hoffman, Kevin L. DC
CITRUS CHIROPRACTIC GROUP
2202 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -4 4 4 1

Horn, Roy A. DC FIAMA
ADVANCED HEALTH & CHIROPRACTIC
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 10A,
Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2597


INVERNESS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
Carter, James C. DC PA
2202 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -4 4 4 1

Irven, Nancy I. DC
IRVEN CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 2, Crystal River
....... ... ... ..... ........................... 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -9 1 1 1

IRVEN CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH CENTER
Irven, Nancy I. DC
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 2, Crystal River
................. ........................... 352 -795 -9 111

Jones, Andrew J. DC
CITRUS CHIROPRACTIC GROUP
2320 N. Sunshine Path, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -5350

KINNARD CHIROPRACTIC
Daniels, Steven DC
Grause, Christian DC
Kinnard, Jeffery DC
2611 State Road 44 W., Inverness
.............................................. 352 -726 -0554

Kinnard, Jeffery DC
KINNARD CHIROPRACTIC
2611 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -0554

Lewandowski, Russell DC
RUSSELL CHIROPRACTIC
& WELLNESS CENTER
3348 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -0888

McFarland-Bryant, Cheryl DC
BETTER HEALTH CHIROPRACTIC PA
6166 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -8 9 1 1

NECK & BACK CARE CENTER
Barber, Sean A. DC
Oliverio, Anthony B. DC
912 N.E. 5th Street, Crystal River
.............................................. 352 -563 -5055

Oliverio, Anthony B. DC
NECK & BACK CARE CENTER
912 N.E. 5th Street, Crystal River
.............................................. 352 -563 -5055

continued on Page 19




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H19


from Page 18


PHYSICIANS INJURY MEDICAL CENTER
Grau, Jose MD
Thomas, Richard DC
8546 W. Homosassa Trail, Ste. 7, Homosassa
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-628-6699

RUSSELL CHIROPRACTIC
&WELLNESS CENTER
Lewandowski, Russell DC
3348 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-726-0888

SAMPSON CHIROPRACTIC
Sampson, Eric A. DC
948 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-564-0460

Sampson, Eric A. DC
SAMPSON CHIROPRACTIC
948 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-564-0460

SECOND FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC CENTER
Seconi, Trevor F DC
2220 State Road 44 West, Ste. C-2,
Inverness
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-34 1-3 111

Seconi, Trevor F. DC
SECOND FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC CENTER
2220 State Road 44 West, Ste. C-2,
Inverness
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-34 1-3 111

SUNCOAST CHIROPRACTIC &
NEUROLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
Bennett, Michael L. BS DC
375 N.E. 10th Ave., Crystal River
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-563-6471

Thomas, Richard DC
PHYSICIANS INJURY MEDICAL CENTER
8546 W. Homosassa Trail, Ste. 7,
Homosassa
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-628-6699

Twiner, Owen J. DC
CRYSTAL RIVER CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC
6460 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Ste. 2,
Crystal River
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-795-6313


Dental


DENTISTS

ASSURANCE DENTAL GROUP PL
Ross, Eric J. DMD
526 N.W. 1st Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -3939

Akel, Amire DMD
AKEL DENTAL
5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill
................................................ 352 -596 -9900

AKEL DENTAL
Akel, Amir DMD
5445 Commercial Way, Spring Hill
................................................ 352 -596 -9900

Aves, Renato DDS
BRIGHT NEW! DENTAL
900 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -0 15 1

Baker, Richard DMD
COAST DENTAL
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 6, Crystal River
................ ............................ 352-795-73 16

Beckton, Tedra DMD
CHRISTIE DENTAL OF MEADOWCREST
6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
................................................ 8 7 7 -2 9 0 -2 8 18
see our ad Page 20

Beliveau, Victor DMD
CITRUS SPRINGS FAMILY DENTAL
9535 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352 -465 -3008

Berk, Lars DMD
THE DENTIST PLACE
12009 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 352 -596 -8988

Bernal, Ingrid DDS
NATURE COAST DENTISTRY
3835 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
............... ............................ 352-746-3525

BEVERLY HILLS DENTAL CENTER
Lewis, Raphael C. DDS PA
1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 3 7 -1 1 17


Bland Jr.,Teddy DMD MS
MID FLORIDA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
22 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -270 -8860

Bogart, Douglas DMD PA
3581 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -9500

BRIGHT NOW! DENTAL
Aves, Renato DDS
Moore, Julie DMD
Shuayb, Mujib DMD
900 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -0 15 1

Burbank, John DDS
COAST DENTAL
8389 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -382 -0444

Camargo, Gelson DDS
NATURE COAST DENTISTRY
3835 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -3525

CARL W. MAGYAR DDS PA
Magyar, Carl W. DDS
Lackey, Mark A. DMD
Paredes, Nina J. DMD
510 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -8585
8415 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 8 2 -14 5 4

CHRISTIE DENTAL OF DUNNELLON
Park, Ilmoon DMD
11902 Illinois St., Dunnellon
................................................ 8 7 7 -2 9 0 -2 8 18
see our ad Page 20

CHRISTIE DENTAL OF MEADOWCREST
Beckton, Tedra DMD
Tran, Hang DMD
6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
................................................ 8 7 7 -2 9 0 -2 8 18
see our ad Page 20

CITRUS CARE DENTAL
ASSOCIATION PL LC
Padgett, Gary S. DDS
514 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -3800


continued on Page 20




Page H20 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 19

CITRUS COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
GADCHC PEDIATRIC DENTAL SERVICES
2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -2 4 9 -9 2 5 8

CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS PA
Holland, Edwin L. DDS
Pichardo, Edgar L. DMD
2231 State Road 44 West, Unit 101,
Inverness
.................................... .. ........ .. 352-726-5854

CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES
Davila, Alexa DMD
Davila, Jose DDS
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
.................................... .. ........ .. 352-527-16 14
see our ad Page 21

CITRUS SPRINGS FAMILY DENTAL
Beliveau, Victor DMD
9535 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs
.................................... .. ........ .. 352-465-3008


COAST DENTAL
Baker, Richard DMD
Cooper, Richard DMD
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 6, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -7 3 16

COAST DENTAL
Burbank, John DDS
OhIsson, John DDS
8389 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -382 -0444

COAST DENTAL
Kokkas, Thanos DDS MS
2689 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 3 7 -1 1 14

COMPLETE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA
1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -12 2 3
see our ad Page 22

Cooper, Richard DMD
COAST DENTAL
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Suite 6, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -7 3 16


DARBY & JOHNSON PA
Darby, Jr., John F DDS
Johnson, Timothy M. DMD
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................. ........................... 352-795-9000

Darby Jr., John F. DDS
DARBY & JOHNSON PA
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9000

Davila, Alexa DMD
CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 2 7 -16 14
see our ad Page 21

Davila, Jose DDS
CITRUS HILLS DENTAL ASSOCIATES
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
................. ........................... 352-527-16 14

Eshkov, Martin DDS PA
GULF COAST DENTAL ASSOCIATES
259 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness
352-344-4747
continued on Page 21


We are Florida's affordable,
convenient choice for dental
care services. From teeth
cleaning to oral surgery and
everything in-between, Christie
Dental provides dependable,
full-service care.


e Oral Hygiene
e Crown & Bridge
Smiles you love. Cosmetics

Convenience Oral Surgery
e Root Canal Therapy
VOU need Periodontal Disease
y and more!
Call Toll Free 877.290.2818
to schedule an appointment today!


I CHRISTIE DENTAL


Ilmoon Park, DMD
Christie Dental of Dunnellon
11902 Illinois St. Dunnellon, FL 34431


ChristieDental.com
FL Lic DN#15428


Hang Tran, DMD & Tedra Beckton, DMD
Christie Dental of Meadowcrest
6015 U. Nordling Loop Crystal River, FL 34429




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H21


from Page 20
Fagan, Ronald J. DDS PA
1128 W. Main Street, Inverness
.................... ................. ........... 352-344-2275

Gardner, Stephen DMD
THE DENTIST PLACE
12009 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
.................... ................. ........... 352-596-8988

Grote, Stephen C. DDS PA
120 Ella Ave., Inverness
.................... ................. ........... 352-726-1556

GULF COAST DENTAL ASSOCIATES
Eshkov, Martin DDS PA
259 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness
.................. ................. ........... 352-344-4747

Holland, Edwin L. DDS
CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS PA
2231 State Road 44 W., Unit 101, Inverness
....................... ............ ............. 352-726-5854

Hosner, John DDS PA
1118 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-795-3 13 1


Issa, Issa DMD
THE DENTIST PLACE FOR KIDS
12005 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 352 -596 -5063

Johnson, Timothy M. DMD
DARBY & JOHNSON PA
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9000

Kokkas, Thanos DDS MS
COAST DENTAL
2689 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 3 7 -1 1 14

Lackey, Mark A. DMD
CARL W. MAGYAR DDS PA
510 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
.............................................. 352 -527 -8585
8415 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 8 2 -14 5 4

LEDGER DENTISTRY
Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..............................................352 -628 -3443
see our ad this Page


Ledger, Jeremy A. DMD PA
LEDGER DENTISTRY
3640 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................... .......................... 352-628-3443
see our ad this Page
Lee, Jennifer DMD
SMILES ON CITRUS PL
535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -18 8 1

Lewis, Raphael C. DDS PA
BEVERLY HILLS DENTAL CENTER
1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -0330

Magyar, Carl W. DDS
CARL W. MAGYAR DDS PA
510 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -8585
8415 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 8 2 -14 5 4

MASTERPIECE DENTAL STUDIO
Vascimini, Frank J. DDS
4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.............................................. 352 -628 -00 12
continued on Page 22


Citrus Hills Dental
Now Doing Mini Implants
Free Denture Consults
In House Denture Lab
Financing Available


Se habla espaiol .


www.citrusniiisaenTai.com
Call today! 352-527-1614
2460 N. Essex Avenue, Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza


General & Cosmetic Dentistry Dentures
HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE
FREE SECOND OPINION

"We Cater to Cowards!"
Whether you're looking for a smile makeover
or a cleaning our friendly staff will make you
feel comfortable without the sales tactics or the
lecture. Dr. Ledger's expertise will give
you a beautiful, healthy smile.





J''A J-10 -JuiJ jl J,, ijl

SLedger Dentistry
0 Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.
Homosassa Next to Ace
(352) 628-3443
Lice #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com
OOE20J




Page H22 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 21
MID FLORIDA PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
Bland Jr., Teddy DMD MS
22 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills
.................... ................. ........... 352-270-8860

Moore, Julie DMD
BRIGHT NOW! DENTAL
900 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-795-0 15 1

NATURE COAST DENTISTRY
Bernal, Ingrid DDS
Camargo, Gelson DDS
3835 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
.................... ................. ........... 352-746-3525

Ohlsson, John DDS
COAST DENTAL
8389 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................. ................. ........... 352-382-0444

Padgett, Gary S. DDS
CITRUS CARE DENTAL ASSOCIATION PL LC
514 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................... ........... 352-746-3800


Paredes, Nina J. DMD
CARL W. MAGYAR DDS PA
510 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -8585

Park, Ilmoon DMD
CHRISTIE DENTAL OF DUNNELLON
11902 Illinois St., Dunnellon
................................................ 8 7 7 -2 9 0 -2 8 18
see our ad Page 20

Pichardo, Edgar L. DMD
CITRUS DENTAL OF INVERNESS PA
2231 State Road 44 West, Unit 101,
Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -5854

Rajani, Anjali DDS
THE DENTIST PLACE FOR KIDS
12005 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 352 -596 -5063

Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
TIMBERLANE FAMILY DENTISTRY
1972 N. Future Terrace, Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 4 6 -9 1 1 1


Ross, Eric J. DMD
ASSURANCE DENTAL GROUP PL
526 N.W. 1st Ave., Crystal River
................. ........................... 352-795-3939

Schnell, Lisa DDS
SIGNATURE DENTAL CARE PA
7062 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
.................. ........................... 352 -794 -7425

Sedlak Sr., Thomas M. DDS PA
3288 E. Thomas Street, Inverness
.. ............. ........................... 352-344-3448

Sherman, Philip DMD
VALUE DENTAL CARE INC.
6824 Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
..... ........ .......................... 352-794-6 139
4122 Rowan Rd., New Port Richey
...................... ..........................7 2 7 -3 7 2 -0 10 0
7357 Spring Hill Dr., Spring Hill
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 8 4 -12 7 4
continued on Page 23


4.,


New Patients A Free Consults A Emergency Care
* CEREC One-Visit Crowns U Extractions U Fillings
* Implants U In-House Specialty Care U Cleanings
* Lumineers and Veneers U Root Canal Therapy U Sealants
* Dentures, Partials & Bridges U Periodontal Gum Care U And much more!
* Invisalign (clear alternative to metal braces) U AAID/ICOI
352-795-1223
1815 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
S2 www.rswansondental.com
PROFESSI COVEI PI F Dr. Richard C. Swanson


Get enough



folic acid


The Basics
Women of childbear-
ing age (typically ages
11 to 49) need an extra
400 micrograms (mcg)
of folic acid every day.
Folic acid is found in vi-
tamins and foods like
breakfast cereals that
have 100% DV (Daily
Value) of folic acid.

Why is folic acid
important?
Everyone needs folic


acid in their diet. Folic
acid is especially impor-
tant for women who are
pregnant or who may
become pregnant.
It's important to get
enough folic acid, even
when you aren't plan-
ning to get pregnant.
Folic acid is a vitamin
that can prevent birth
defects. It's needed dur-
ing the first few weeks
of pregnancy, often be-
fore a woman knows
she's pregnant.





from Page 22
Shuayb, Mujib DMD
BRIGHT NOW! DENTAL
900 N. Suncoast Blvd, Crystal River
................. .................... ........... 352-795-0 15 1

SIERRA DENTAL GROUP
Sierra, Pablo J. DMD
Toro, Edgardo J. DMD
2333 Forest Drive, Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-726-2849

Sierra, Pablo J. DMD
SIERRA DENTAL GROUP
2333 Forest Drive, Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-726-2849

SIGNATURE DENTAL CARE PA
Schnell, Lisa DDS
7062 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................. .................... ........... 352-794-7425

Skipper, Jay DMD
VALUE DENTAL CARE INC.
6824 Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
. ............ ......... ............ . 352-794-6139
4122 Rowan Rd., New Port Richey
. ............ ......... ............ . 727-372-0100
7357 Spring Hill Dr., Spring Hill
....................... ............ ............. 352-683-1274

SMILES ON CITRUS PL
Lee, Jennifer DMD
535 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
....................... ............ .............. 352-795-188 1

Snyder, Kevin G., DDS PA
6173 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................. .................... ........... 352-795-1074


Richard C.

Swanson
D.M.D., P.A.
1815 SE Hwy. 19
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-1223
* Implants/Root Canal Therapy
* Dentures/Partials & Bridges
* Invisalign
* Lumineers/Verneers/Cleanings
www.rswansondental.com


Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H23
Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA Welch, Michael DMD
COMPLETE FAMILY DENTISTRY VALUE DENTAL CARE INC.
1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River 6824 Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -1223 ...................... .... ............. .. 352 -794 -6 139
see our ad Page 22 4122 Rowan Rd., New Port Richey
.................. .......... ......... ........ .. 727-372-0 100


THE DENTIST PLACE
Berk, Lars DMD
Gardner, Stephen DMD
12009 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 352 -596 -8988

THE DENTIST PLACE FOR KIDS
Issa, Issa DMD
Rajani, Anjali DDS
12005 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 352 -596 -5063

Thomas, Charles D. DMD
5382 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -628 -5635

TIMBERLANE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Rogers, Mark C. DDS PA
1972 N. Future Terrace, Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 4 6 -9 1 1 1

Toro, Edgardo J. DMD
SIERRA DENTAL GROUP
2333 Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -2849

Tran, Hang DMD
CHRISTIE DENTAL OF MEADOWCREST
6015 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
................................................ 8 7 7 -2 9 0 -2 8 18
see our ad Page 20

VALUE DENTAL CARE INC.
Sherman, Philip DMD
Skipper, Jay DMD
Welch, Michael DMD
6824 Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 4 -6 13 9
4122 Rowan Rd., New Port Richey
................................................ 7 2 7 -3 7 2 -0 10 0
7357 Spring Hill Dr., Spring Hill
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 8 4 -12 7 4

Vascimini, Frank J. DDS
MASTERPIECE DENTAL STUDIO
4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 2 8 -0 0 12


7357 Spring Hill Dr., Spring Hill
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 8 4 -12 7 4

Williams, Hany DMD PA
4361 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -628 -7788


ENDODONTICS

CALA HILLS ENDODONTICS
OF CITRUS COUNTY
LeCorn, Demetrick DMD MS
601 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -249 -3284

COMPLETE FAMILY DENTISTRY
Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA
1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -12 2 3
see our ad Page 22

LeCorn, Demetrick DMD MS
CALA HILLS ENDODONTICS
OF CITRUS COUNTY
601 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -249 -3284

Swanson, Richard C. DMD PA
COMPLETE FAMILY DENTISTRY
1815 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -12 2 3


ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

Brockett, Robert L. DMD FAAOMS
CITRUS ORAL &
MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY
6129 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
............... ... ........................... 352-795-4994

CITRUS ORAL &
MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY
Brockett, Robert L. DMD FAAOMS
6129 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -4 9 9 4


continued on Page 24




Page H24 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 23
DENTOFACIAL INSTITUTE
Hashemian, Michael M. MD DMD
591 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
.................... ................. ........... 352-527-8000

Hashemian, Michael M. MD DMD
DENTOFACIAL INSTITUTE
591 N. Lecanto Hwy., Lecanto
.................... ................. ........... 352-527-8000


ORTHODONTICS

Reed, Juddson R. DMD MS
REED ORTHODONTICS
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-795-6262

REED ORTHODONTICS
Reed, Juddson R. DMD MS
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-795-6262


Wexler, Donald L. DDS PhD PA
WEXLER ORTHODONTISTS
573 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -9927

WEXLER ORTHODONTISTS
Wexler, Donald L. DDS PhD PA
573 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -9927

PERIODONTAL

DARBY AND JOHNSON PA
Darby, Jr., John F. DDS
Johnson, Timothy M. DMD
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9000

Darby, Jr., John F. DDS
DARBY AND JOHNSON PA
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9000

Johnson, Timothy M. DMD
DARBY AND JOHNSON PA
6175 W. Corporate Oaks Drive Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9000


Dermatology

BAY DERMATOLOGY &
COSMETIC SURGERY PA
Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD Board Certified
Esguerra, David DO FAOCD Board Certified
Broughton, Brandi PA-C
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -503 -2002
see our ad this Page

Bonomo, Brian PA-C
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -2200

Broughton, Brandi PA-C
BAY DERMATOLOGY &
COSMETIC SURGERY PA
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -503 -2002
see our ad this Page

continued on Page 25


Prevent allergy


and asthma


attacks at home


The Basics
Your home could be
making you and your
family sick. If someone
in your family has aller-
gies or asthma, take
steps to make your
home a healthier place.
How can I prevent al-
lergy and asthma at-
tacks at home?
Start by getting rid of
these common causes of
attacks:


* Mold or dampness
* Dust mites (tiny bugs
that live in dust)
* Pets with fur, includ-
ing cats and dogs
* Cockroaches (roaches
and their droppings
may cause asthma)
* Rodents (mice and
rats)
* Secondhand smoke
* Wood smoke

SOURCE . i i, ,irh'ri.i, ,...'




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H25


from Page 24
Chatham, Kristy PA-C
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
....................... ............ ............. 352-746-2200

Collins, Margaret MD
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................. .................... ........... 352-746-2200

DERMATOLOGY CENTER
Dewberry, Charles DO
931 S. U.S. 41, Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-637-13 10

Dewberry, Charles DO
DERMATOLOGY CENTER
931 S. U.S. 41, Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-637-13 10

Dorton, David W. DO FAOCD
Board Certified
BAY DERMATOLOGY &
COSMETIC SURGERY PA
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................. .................... ........... 352-503-2002
see our ad Page 24

Esguerra, David DO FAOCD
Board Certified
BAY DERMATOLOGY &
COSMETIC SURGERY PA
7739 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................. .................... ........... 352-503-2002
see our ad Page 24

Massullo, Ralph MD FAAD
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................. .................... ........... 352-746-2200

SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
Collins, Margaret MD
Massullo, Ralph MD FAAD
Wartels, Michael MD FAAD
Welton, William MD FAAD
Bonomo, Brian PA-C
Chatham, Kristy PA-C
Watkins, Erin PA-C
Estes, Elizabeth ARNP
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................. .................... ........... 352-746-2200


Wartels, Michael MD FAAD
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
..............................................352 -746 -2200

Watkins, Erin PA-C
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
..............................................352 -746 -2200

Welton, William MD FAAD
SUNCOAST DERMATOLOGY
AND SKIN SURGERY CENTER
525 N. Dacie Point, Lecanto
................ ............................ 352-746-2200


Endocrinology

Castor, Arturo MD
ENDOCRINE CLINIC OF WEST FLORIDA
DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY CENTER
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................. ............................. .. 3 5 2 -7 9 9 -7 6 14
12130 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 9 -7 6 14

CITRUS DIABETES TREATMENT CENTER
Tawfik, Eihab MD PA
Christ Medical Center
7562 Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -0444
see our ad Page 26

ENDOCRINE CLINIC OF WEST FLORIDA
DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY CENTER
Castor, Arturo MD
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 9 -7 6 14
12130 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 9 -7 6 14

Tawfik, Eihab MD PA
CITRUS DIABETES TREATMENT CENTER
Christ Medical Center
7562 Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -0444
see our ad Page 26


Family/

General Practice

ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
Mendoza-Gonzalez, Mariel MD
Barnhurst, Mark PA-C
6279 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -522 -0094
Varlakov, Grigor MD
Messiah, Nabil PA-C
8365 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................. ............................... 352 -382 -0258
Tambrini, Alex MD
8371 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.............. ..... ........................... .. 352 -503 -2065
Benson, Dalton MD
Kronenthal, Charles PA-C
Kronenthal, Gretchen PA-C
1903 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -5500

ADERA & ADERA PA
Adera, Habtu MD
Adera, Jill DO
227 Ella Ave., Inverness
............... .. ........................... 352-34 1-2800

Adera, Habtu MD
ADERA & ADERA PA
227 Ella Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-2 8 0 0

Adera, Jill DO
ADERA & ADERA PA
227 Ella Ave., Inverness
................ ........................... 352-34 1-2800

ALLEN RIDGE FAMILY CARE CENTER
WALK-IN CLINIC
Citrus Memorial Health Care Center
at Allen Ridge
540 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -2700

Alugubelli, Venkat R. MD FAAFP
BEVERLY HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
3737 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................ ............................ 352-746-15 15

Barnhurst, Mark PA-C
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
6279 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -522 -0094


continued on Page 27




Page H26 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


hri s a

eical
/enu *


Dr. Eihab Tawfik, MD
Internal Medicine
Dr. M. All, MD
Pain Management
Dr. Rnbert Hlofmann. MD
Oplltll.,ll |ol-.glS t
Dr. Narin Singer, DPM
Pldidt IH io )
Podiatrist
'iirni' Hill location)


Dawn tioodpaster.
PA-C
Physician's Assistant/
Internal Medicine
Anita L Grabhwwki.
MSN. FNP-BC
Nurse Practitioner/
Family Practice
Joe Arevalo,
BSN, RN, ARNP
Nurse Practitioner/
Cardiology


Welcomes

Our Staff


.iV 111111-,,ll


Appropriate, comprehensive and timely treatment for our patients with services
conveniently located all in one place, is the sole purpose of Christ Medical Center.
This multi-specialty group offers trusted medical care where physicians and practitioners
work together to speed recovery and keep costs down for the patient. We offer expanded
medical services for new patients and those formerly seen at Citrus Diabetes Treatment
Center. We believe if you choose CMC for your healthcare needs, you'll agree it is
simply the best comprehensive care you will find anywhere.
Look for the announcement of our cardiologist
and gastroenterologist coming soon.


-v gi
Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center i
has grown!


ww.CriteciclentrL0o


You helh Yorlie OraDin


- L
CEi .




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H27


from Page 25
Bellam, Rajendra MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
11011 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
....................... ............ ............. 352-465-1199

Benson, Dalton MD
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
1903 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.................... ................. ........... 352-344-5500

BEVERLY HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
Alugubelli, Venkat R. MD FAAFP
3737 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
.................... ................. ........... 352-746-15 15

Bradley, Robbie L. PA-C
MEADOWCREST FAMILY PHYSICIANS, PA
6199 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -0644

CITRUS HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
Ruben, Bradley H. DO
Collins, Elizabeth NP
2484 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
.................... ................. ........... 352-746-1358


Co, Alistair W. MD
SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352 -489 -2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -382 -8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-5 5 2 0
see our ad this Page

Connor, Tara DO
INVERNESS FAMILY CARE
2401 Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -3777

Robert M Corbett, DO
521 SE Fort Island Trail, Suite E
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-563-5858
* Laser Therapy
* Certified Family Practice
* Walk-In Urgent Care
* Aviation Medical Examiner
* Accident & Rehabilitation Medicine


Corbett, Robert M. DO
521 S.E. Fort Island Trail, Ste. E, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -5858

Deven Medical
Center
Deven, Ulhas, MD
Pike, Elizabeth, ARNP
11707 N. Williams St.
Dunnellon, FL 34430
352-465-1919
41 N. Inglis Ave.
Inglis, FL
352-447-2122

DEVEN MEDICAL CENTER
Deven, Ulhas MD
11707 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 6 5 -19 19
41 N. Inglis Ave., Inglis
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 4 7 -2 12 2
continued on Page 28


ts




S- Primdary Care Specialists
Inverness?%, Homomsassa (
3733 E Gulf to Lale w 7991 S Suncoast Blvd 104
341-5520 382-8282




Page H28 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 27
Deven, Ulhas MD
DEVEN MEDICAL CENTER
11707 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
.................. ................... ........... 352-465-19 19
41 N. Inglis Ave., Inglis
.................. ................... ........... 352-447-2122

DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD
HEALTH & WELLCARE SERVICES
OF FLORIDA INC
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-746-18 18
see our ad this Page

Dickert, Jim C. DO
MEADOWCREST FAMILY PHYSICIANS PA
6199 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-795-0644

Donaire, Ernesto G. MD
FAMILY GENERAL PRACTICE
255 S.E. 7th Ave., Ste. 1, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-564-8620


Donaire, SusanaT. MD PA
FAMILY GENERAL PRACTICE
255 S.E. 7th Ave., Ste. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8620

FAMILY GENERAL PRACTICE
Donaire, Ernesto G. MD
Donaire, Susana T. MD PA
255 S.E. 7th Ave., Ste. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8620

FAMILY PRACTICE ASSOCIATES
Holstein, Robert B. DO
101 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -5533

Figueroa, Pablo MD
INVERNESS FAMILY PRACTICE
2222 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -860 -0633

FLORIDA FAMILY CARE
MEDICAL CENTER
Mendizabal, Mario A. MD PA
255 S.E. 7th Ave., Ste. 3, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -5888


FLORIDA FAMILY HEALTH
MEDICAL CENTER
Savage, Olga M. DO
5311 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -2 0 1-3 10 0

Gelin, John D. MD
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
7648 S. Florida Ave., Floral City
................... .......................... 352-726-3700

Gonzalez, Carlos F. MD
SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352 -489 -2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................... ... ....................... .. 352 -382 -8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-5 5 2 0
see our ad Page 27

Grau, Jose MD
PHYSICIANS INJURY MEDICAL CENTER
8546 W. Homosassa Trail, Ste. 7, Homosassa
... ................. .......................... 352-628-6699


continued on Page 29


Primary Care Services

For The Entire Family
Uninsured?
Check Out
our Preferred Family Medicine


Spt Heart Attack Prevention
Stroke Prevention
Diagnostic Ultrasounds
AI Diabetes Care


00ECEE


I Dr.John R.DeGraw
Board Certified in Family Medicine

S.. Chris Lane, PA-C
Medicare, Medicaid
& Most Insurance
Plans Accepted!
Walk-ins Welcomed!

-IEALTH WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA, INC.
352-794-3872
5915 W.Gulf To Lake Hwy., Crystal River, FL
www.health-wellcare.com


WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES P.A.
Shirish Patel MD
In Family Practice Since 1987
_aart Complete Lab Work
W* EKG
S* Physical Exam
Minor Surgery
Flu Vaccine
Medicare Blue Cross Blue Shield Assignmpnts Arreptpd
-E- Mon. Fri. 9-7 Sat 9-2









S Mattress Sets
SFutons Daybeds Etc.

WH L SALE SLEEP CENTER
\ Your Hometown Mattress Store Since 1994
UI j 1 1298 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., (Hwy. 486), Hernando
352-344-8882
Open Mon.-Sat.




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H29


from Page 28

Hasan, Ghassan A. MD
700 S.E. 5th Terr., Ste. 6, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-794-6 15 1

HEALTH &WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
DeGraw, Johnnie R. MD
McCollough, Barney PA
Tzivanis, James PA
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-746-18 18
see our ad Page 28

HERNANDO MEDICAL CENTER
Patel, Shirish MD
Mazur, Barbara ARNP
2669 N. Florida Ave., Hernando
.................. ................... ........... 352-637-2550
see our ad Page 28

Holstein, Robert B. DO
FAMILY PRACTICE ASSOCIATES
101 S. Osceola Ave., Inverness
..................... .............. ............. 352-726-5533

HOMOSASSA PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE
McPhee, Robert DO CMD
8281 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..................... .............. ............. 352-62 1-4762

INVERNESS FAMILY CARE
Connor, Tara DO
Brandt, Valerie ARNP
2401 Forest Drive, Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-344-3777

INVERNESS FAMILY PRACTICE
Figueroa, Pablo MD
2222 State Road 44 West, Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-860-0633

Irvine, David MD
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 7, Crystal River
.................. ................... ........... 352-563-1720

Kamat, Seema V. MD
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
450 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills
.................. ................... ........... 352-527-6646


Khan, Hasibul H. MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 0 3 -2 0 1 1
308 Line Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 4 -5 5 1 1

KINGS BAY FAMILY CARE PA
Mueller, Michael DO
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -2273

Kronenthal, Charles PA-C
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
1903 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -5500

Kronenthal, Gretchen PA-C
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
1903 State Road 44 West, Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -5500

Kumar, Mariananda MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
3400 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -2227
405 N. Central Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-2 4 0 0

Li, Charles S. MD
7647 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Ste. 6,
Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -17 18

Lumapas, Neal MD
12030 S. Ohio St., Dunnellon
................................................ 352 -465 -3730

Lyon, Rolf MD
LYON URGENT CARE CLINIC
155 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 6 3 -0 18 4

LYON URGENT CARE CLINIC
Lyon, Rolf MD 155 S.E. U.S. 19, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 6 3 -0 18 4

MANATEE MEDICAL CENTER
Ward, Elaine C. DO
4930 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -628 -7747


McCollough, Barney PA
HEALTH & WELLCARE
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................... .......................... 352-794-3872
see our ad page 28

McGhan, Darrin PA-C
Hyatt, Ina ARNP
756 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -5 5 4 4

McPhee, Robert DO CMD
HOMOSASSA PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE
8281 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 2 1-4 7 6 2

MEADOWCREST FAMILY PHYSICIANS PA
Dickert, Jim C. DO
Bradley, Robbie L. PA-C
6199 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -0644

Mendizabal, Mario A. MD PA
FLORIDA FAMILY CARE MEDICAL CENTER
255 S.E. 7th Ave., Ste. 3, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -5888

Mendoza-Gonzalez, Mariel MD
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
6279 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -522 -0094

Messiah, Nabil PA-C
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
8365 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -382 -0258

Mueller, Michael DO
KINGS BAY FAMILY CARE PA
9030 W. Fort Island Trail, Ste. 1, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -2273

Mullally, Brian A. MD
11515 W. Emerald Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................... .......................... 352 -794 -3862

NATURE COAST PRIMARY CARE
Savage Jr., Kenneth L. DO
927 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -436 -4328

PAPALA FAMILY PRACTICE
Padala, Lakshmi N. MD
936 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -436 -4326


continued on Page 30




Page H30 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 29

Padala, Lakshmi N. MD
PADALA FAMILY PRACTICE
936 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -436 -4326

PALADIN FAMILY PRACTICE PA
Slaby, Brian MD
Summers, Joshua MD
330 S. Line Ave., Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-726-4499

Patel, Bhadresh, K. MD IM
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
.................. ................... ........... 352-746-0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................. ................... ........... 352-503-20 11
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-344-55 11

Patel, Shirish MD
HERNANDO MEDICAL CENTER
2669 N. Florida Ave., Hernando
.................. ................... ........... 352-637-2550
see our ad Page 28

Pena, Awilda MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
.................. ................... ........... 352-746-0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
..................... .............. ............. 352-503-20 1 1
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
.................. ................... ........... 352-344-55 11

Perez, Tomas MD
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
450 W. Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills
.................. ................... ........... 352-527-6646

Peterson, Timothy N. MD
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
7945 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................. ................... ........... 352-382-5000

PHYSICIANS INJURY MEDICAL CENTER
Grau, Jose MD
8546 W. Homosassa Trail, Ste. 7, Homosassa
.................. ................... ........... 352-628-6699


Reddy, Venugopala MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
3400 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -2227
405 N. Central Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-2 4 0 0

Ruben, Bradley H. DO
CITRUS HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
2484 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 4 6 -13 5 8

Savage Jr., Kenneth L. DO
NATURE COAST PRIMARY CARE
927 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -436 -4328

Savage, Olga M. DO
FLORIDA FAMILY HEALTH
MEDICAL CENTER
5311 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -2 0 1-3 10 0

Schmidt, Peter D. MD
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
10334 N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 6 5 -10 0 2

Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD
SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352 -489 -2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -382 -8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-5 5 2 0
see our ad Page 27

Slaby, Brian MD
PALADIN FAMILY PRACTICE PA
330 S. Line Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -4499

Sudduth, Julie E. DO
CITRUS PRIMARY CARE
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -6930

SUGARMILL WOODS FAMILY CARE
CENTER WALK-IN CLINIC
Citrus Memorial Health Care Center
at Sugarmill Woods
7945 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 8 2 -6 1 1 1


Summers, Joshua MD
PALADIN FAMILY PRACTICE PA
330 S. Line Ave., Inverness
............... .. ........................... 352-726-4499

SUNCOAST PRIMARY
CARE SPECIALISTS
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
Co, Alistair W. MD
Gonzalez, Carlos F MD
Sembrano-Navarro, Catherine MD
Villacastin, Alexander T. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Maria N. ARNP-BC
Villacastin, Sheila M. ARNP-BC
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352 -489 -2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
............................. .................. 352 -382 -8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-5 5 2 0
see our ad Page 27




Primary Care Specialists
Alex Villacastin, MD
Catherine Sembrano-Navarro, MD
Carlos F. Gonzalez, MD
Alistair Co, MD
Maria Villacastin, ARNP
Shiela Villacastin, ARNP
Alexander Villacastin,
3733 E Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness
352-341-5520
7991 S Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
352-382-8282
10489 N Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
352-489-2486
Lab EKG X-ray
Pulmonary Care

Tambrini, Alex MD
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLS
8371 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -503 -2065

Toth, Nolan C. DO
216 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -17 7 0


continued on Page 31




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H31


from Page 30
Tzivanis, James PA
HEALTH & WELLNESS
SERVICES OF FLORIDA INC.
5915 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
.................... ................. ........... 352-794-3 13 1
see our ad Page 28

Varlokov, Grigor MD
ACCESS HEALTHCARE LLC
8365 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................... ................. ........... 352-382-0258

Villacastin, AlexT. MD
SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
....................... ............ ............. 352-489-2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
......................... ............ ........... 352-382-8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Inverness
....................... ............ ............. 352-34 1-5520
see our ad Page 27

Ward, Elaine C. DO
MANATEE MEDICAL CENTER
4930 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................... ................. ........... 352-628-7747

WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Kumar, Mariananda MD
Reddy, Venugopala MD
3400 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
.................... ................. ........... 352-746-2227
405 N. Central Ave., Inverness
....................... ............ ............. 352-341-2400

WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Khan, Hasibul H. MD
Patel, Bhadresh K. MD
IM Pena, Awilda MD
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
.................... ................. ........... 352-746-0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
.................... ................. ........... 352-503-20 11
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
....................... ............ ............. 352-344-55 11

WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Bellam, Rajendra MD
11011 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
.................... ................. ........... 352-465-1199


Gastroenterology

ADVANCED GASTROENTEROLOGY
Wallis, B. Jeffrey MD PA
6152 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -3900

Bikkasani, Purnachander R. MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Chandrupatla, Sreekanth R. MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

CITRUS GASTROENTEROLOGY PA
Martensson, Johannes MD PhD
Grabowski, Anita ARNP
Taylor, Samantha ARNP
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
..................... ...........................352 -344 -8080

GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
Bikkasani, Purnachander R. MD
Chandrupatla, Sreekanth R. MD
Hellstern, Paul MD
Mathur, Siddharth MD
Ram, Anil K. MD
Reddi, L.R. MD
Shinde, Trupti S. MD
Singu, Bheema MD
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Hellstern, Paul MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Martensson, Johannes MD PhD
CITRUS GASTROENTEROLOGY PA
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -8080


Mathur, Siddharth MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Ram, Anil K., MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Reddi, L.R. MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Shinde,Trupti S. MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Singu, Bheema MD
GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES
6410 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -2450
3653 E. Forest Drive, Inverness
................................................ 352 -563 -2450

Suncoast Endoscopy Center
3621 E. Forest Dr., Inverness
................................................ 352 -637 -2787

Wallis, B. Jeffrey MD PA
ADVANCED GASTROENTEROLOGY
6152 W. Corporate Oaks Dr., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -3900


Geriatrics

Alugubelli, Venkat R. MD FAAFP
BEVERLY HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
3737 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 4 6 -15 15


continued on Page 32




Page H32 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 31


BEVERLY HILLS MEDICAL CENTER
Alugubelli, Venkat R. MD FAAFP
3737 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................ ..................... ........... 352-746-15 15

Callueng, Jose A. D. MD PA
8468 W. Periwinkle Lane, Ste. C, Homosassa
................ ..................... ........... 352-628-7270

HOMOSASSA PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE
McPhee, Robert DO
8281 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................ ..................... ........... 352-62 1-4762

McPhee, Robert DO
HOMOSASSA PRIMARY MEDICAL CARE
8281 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................ ..................... ........... 352-62 1-4762


Hospitalists

CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM
Ali, Munsif, MD
Bhattari, Birendra MD
Bisht, Ajay MD
Chang, Khai MD
Cheema, Shahbaz MD
Khadka, Deepali MD
Malik, Usman MD
Rasheed, Ameer MD
Shenai, Nisha MD
Todorovic, Boris MD
Zaman, Waheeduz MD
Zeljko, Thomislav MD
10250 S.E. 167th Place St., Ste. 5-1,
Summerfield
................ ..................... ........... 352-307-9925
................ ..................... ........... 352-307-8442

INPATIENT CARE SPECIALIST
Azizullah, Abu MD
Rogozina, Svetlana MD
Zaman, SM Hasahuz MD
3609 S.E. 49th Ave., Ocala
..................... .............. ............. 63 1-74 1-9703

SEVEN RIVERS
REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
Desaraju, Chakradhar MD
Kompella, Rama Rao MD
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
..................... .............. ............. 352-795-8490


Internal Medicine


Abraham, Sunoj MD FCCP
CITRUS PULMONARY CONSULTANTS
& SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER
5616 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
........ ............................ .......... 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -19 9 9
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -19 9 9

Acevedo, Angela MD
6202 W. Corporate Oaks Drive, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -9697

Amar, K. MD
APOLLO MEDICAL CENTER PA
3535 Little Road, New Port Richey
................................................ 727 -375 -0848

APOLLO MEDICAL CENTER PA
Amar, K. MD
Chowdappa, Jay MD
3535 Little Road, New Port Richey
................................................ 727 -375 -0848

Assumpcao, Tamra PA-C
PED I.M. HEALTHCARE
1990 N. Prospect Ave., Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -6888

Balakrishnan, Velukutty MD
105 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -344 -2440

Bellam, Rajendra MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
11011 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 6 5 -1 19 9

Callueng, Jose A. D. MD PA
8468 W. Periwinkle Lane, Ste. C, Homosassa
................................................ 352 -628 -7270

Chowdappa, Jay MD
APOLLO MEDICAL CENTER PA
3535 Little Road, New Port Richey
................................................ 727 -375 -0848

CITRUS DIABETES TREATMENT CENTER
Tawfik, Eihab MD PA
Christ Medical Center
7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -0444
see our ad Page 26


CITRUS PULMONARY CONSULTANTS
& SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER
Abraham, Sunoj MD FCCP
Sevilla, Oliver MD FCCP
Shah, Vikram N. MD FCCP
Shukla, Manoj B. MD FCCP
5616 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
... .. .... ................................ 352 -795 -1999
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness
.............................................. 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -19 9 9

DEVEN MEDICAL CENTER
Deven, U.T. MD
11707 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
.. ............................................. 3 5 2 -4 6 5 -19 19
41 N. Inglis Ave., Inglis
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 4 7 -2 12 2

Deven, U.T. MD DEVEN MEDICAL CENTER
11707 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
.. .. ............... ........................... 352 -465 -19 19
41 N. Inglis Ave., Inglis
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 4 7 -2 12 2

Eslava-Fernandez, Arnelle V. MD
204 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1 -1 15 9

Fox, Dennis MD FACP
104 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 2 6 -4 8 18

Gillikin, Sheila MD
TRI-COUNTY INFECTIOUS DISEASE
CONSULTANTS LLC TRAVEL MEDICINE
212 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 3 3 -0 2 15

Govantes, Carlos G. MD
114 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
................................................ 352 -637 -3030

Greene, Maryellen PA-C
PED I.M. HEALTHCARE
1990 N. Prospect Ave., Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -6888

INTERNAL MEDICINE
& PEDIATRICS WELLNESS CENTER
Wilson, Carlene P. MD
Dowe, Joy ARNP
Scarbrough, Donna ARNP
6038 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -5070


continued on Page 33




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H33


from Page 32
Jaimangal, Hemwattie DO
TRI-COUNTY INFECTIOUS DISEASE
CONSULTANTS LLC TRAVEL MEDICINE
212 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-633-0215

Kamat, Vikas MD
840 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-637-6300

Khan, Hasibul H. MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-746-0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-503-2011
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
...................... .............. ............ .. 352 -344 -55 11

Kumar, Mariananda MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
3400 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-746-2227
405 N. Central Ave., Inverness
................ ....................... ........ .. 352-341-2400


Liu, Jr., Alexander 0. MD
2 W. Lemon Street, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -2525

Liu, Blessilda B. MD
2623 N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Hernando
................................................ 352 -746 -4684

Lumapas, Neal MD
12030 S. Ohio St., Dunnellon
................... .......................... 352-465-3730

Nathan, Meena R. MD
840 S. Bea Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -637 -6300

Ng, Chi-Kwong MD PA
905 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -5767

Patel, Bhadresh K. MD IM
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 0 3 -2 0 1 1
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 4 -5 5 1 1


Get enough calcium


Your body needs cal-
cium to build strong
bones when you are
young and to keep bones
strong as you get older.
Everyone needs calcium,
but it's especially impor-
tant for women and girls.
Girls ages 9 to 18 need
1,300 mg (milligrams) of
calcium every day.
Women ages 19 to 50
need 1,000 mg of calcium
every day.
Women over age 50
need 1,200 mg of calcium
every day.
Calcium can help pre-
vent osteoporosis.
One in 2 women and 1
in 4 men over the age of
50 will break a bone be-
cause of osteoporosis.
Some people don't know


they have osteoporosis
until they break a bone.
Calcium helps to keep
your bones strong and
less likely to break.
There are 2 easy ways
to get your calcium:
1.Eat foods with cal-
cium, such as:
* Fat-free or low-fat
(1%) milk, yogurt, and
cheese
* Broccoli, spinach, and
other green leafy vegeta-
bles
* Tofu with added cal-
cium
* Soy-based drinks with
added calcium soymilkk)
* Orange juice with
added calcium
2.Take a calcium pill
every day.
SOURCE: 7,,,,, h. ,ithrfi,( t ,...'


PED I.M. HEALTHCARE
St. Martin, Dacelin MD FAAP
Shammas, Lilia MD
Assumpcao, Tamra PA-C
Greene, Maryellen PA-C
Hayden-Brown, Brenda ARNP
Touchton, Mary Melisa ARNP
1990 N. Prospect Ave., Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -6888

Pena, Awilda MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
............ ......... .................... 352 -503 -20 11
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 4 -5 5 1 1

Prentice, Charles A. MD
214 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -9006

continued on Page 34



Serving
Citrus County
i With A

10 Commitment
to Compassion
L Communication


:mm "







I On Stffa
I .





203 S. Seminole Ave.
Inverness, Florida

Office:352-726-7800




Page H34 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 33

Reddy, Venugopala MD
WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
3400 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
.................................... .......... .. 352-746-2227
405 N. Central Ave., Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-34 1-2400

Ruiz LLanes, Jorge MD PA
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 5, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -3882

St. Martin, Dacelin MD FAAP
PED I.M. HEALTHCARE
1990 N. Prospect Ave., Lecanto
.................................... .......... .. 352-527-6888

Sevilla, Oliver K. MD FCCP
CITRUS PULMONARY CONSULTANTS
& SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER
5616 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
... ........ ....... .......... .... .. .. 352-795-1999
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-795-1999

Shah, Gira S. MD
203 S. Seminole Ave., Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-726-7800
see our ad Page 33

Shah, Vikram N. MD FCCP
CITRUS PULMONARY CONSULTANTS
& SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER
5616 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
... ........ ....... .......... .... .. .. 352-795-1999
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-795-1999

Shammas, Lilia MD
PED I.M. HEALTHCARE
1990 N. Prospect Ave., Lecanto
.................................... .......... .. 352-527-6888

Shukla, Manoj B. MD FCCP
CITRUS PULMONARY CONSULTANTS
& SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER
5616 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
... ........ ....... .......... .... .. .. 352-795-1999
131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness
.................................... .......... .. 352-795-1999


SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
Villacastin, Alex T. MD
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
................................................ 352 -489 -2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 352 -382 -8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-5 5 2 0
see our ad Page 27

Tatambhotla, Anu R. MD PA
4049 S. Ohio Ave., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 2 8 -10 0 0

Tawfik, Eihab MD PA
CITRUS DIABETES TREATMENT CENTER
Christ Medical Center
7562 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -0444
see our ad Page 26

Torralba, Victoria L. MD FACR
730 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -7795

TRI-COUNTY INFECTIOUS DISEASE
CONSULTANTS LLC TRAVEL MEDICINE
Gillikin, Sheila MD
Jaimangal, Hemwattie DO
212 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -6 3 3 -0 2 15

Velazquez, E. MD
700 S.E. 5th Terrace, Ste. 1, Crystal River
.............. ........................... 352-795-14 14

Villacastin, AlexT. MD
SUNCOAST PRIMARY CARE SPECIALISTS
10489 N. Florida Ave., Citrus Springs
........ ............... ....................... .. 352 -489 -2486
7991 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
........... ..... .......................... 352-382-8282
3733 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-5 5 2 0
see our ad Page 27

WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Khan, Hasibul H. MD
Patel, Bhadresh K. MD
IM Pena, Awilda MD
Beverly Hills Medical Center
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy, Beverly Hills
................................................ 352 -746 -0600
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 0 3 -2 0 1 1
308 S. Line Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 4 -5 5 1 1


WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Kumar, Mariananda MD
Reddy, Venugopala MD
3400 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
................. ............................... 352 -746 -2227
405 N. Central Ave., Inverness
................................................ 3 5 2 -3 4 1-2 4 0 0

WEST FLORIDA MEDICAL ASSOCIATES
Bellam, Rajendra MD
11011 N. Williams St., Dunnellon
................................................ 3 5 2 -4 6 5 -1 19 9

Wilson, Carlene P. MD
INTERNAL MEDICINE &
PEDIATRICS WELLNESS CENTER
6038 W. Nordling Loop, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -563 -5070



Nephrology

CITRUS NEPHROLOGY
ASSOCIATES, INC.
Padala, Smita MD
Reddy, Padma V. MD
Shah, Sanjiv MD
7415 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -14 15

Padala, Smita MD
CITRUS NEPHROLOGY
ASSOCIATES, INC.
7415 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -14 15

Prentice, Charles A. MD
214 S. Pine Ave., Inverness
............... .. ........................... 352-726-9006

Reddy, Padma V. MD
CITRUS NEPHROLOGY
ASSOCIATES, INC.
7415 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -14 15

Shah, Sanjiv MD
CITRUS NEPHROLOGY
ASSOCIATES, INC.
7415 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy, Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -14 15


continued on Page 35




Sunday, April 7, 2013 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Page H35


from Page 34

Neurology

CITRUS NEUROSCIENCE INSTITUTE
Parikh, Bharat V. MD
5596 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
................. .................... ........... 352-795-6999

Parikh, Bharat V. MD
CITRUS NEUROSCIENCE INSTITUTE
5596 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy, Crystal River
................. .................... ........... 352-795-6999

Sami, Arif MD PA
208 S. Apopka Ave., Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-726-8081

Stanley, Beena M. MD
511 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-860-0202

Tatambhotla, Gopal MD
534 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -527 -9500


Obstetrics/
Gynecology

Antony, Thomas MD
GENESIS WOMEN'S CENTER
800 Medical Court E., Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-726-7667

Citrus Memorial Baby Block
and Women's Center
502 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-344-6576

CRYSTAL RIVER WOMEN'S
HEALTH CENTER
Sobel, Rose Mary MD FACOG
Duncan, Jackie ARNP
6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Ste. 1C, Crystal
River
................. .................... ........... 352-794-0878

GENESIS WOMEN'S CENTER
Antony, Thomas MD
Pottinger, Carlos MD
Rodriguez, Carlos MD
Rojas, Armando L. MD
Epple, Regina ARNP
Strickland, Melanie ARNP
800 Medical Court East, Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-726-7667


Pottinger, Carlos MD
GENESIS WOMEN'S CENTER
800 Medical Court East, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -7667

Redrick, Scott MD FACOG
SUNCOAST OBSTETRICS
& GYNECOLOGY
582 S.E. 7th Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8245

Rodriguez, Carlos MD
GENESIS WOMEN'S CENTER
800 Medical Court East, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -7667

Rojas, Armando L. MD
GENESIS WOMEN'S CENTER
800 Medical Court East, Inverness
................................................ 352 -726 -7667

Sobel, Rose Mary MD FACOG
CRYSTAL RIVER WOMEN'S
HEALTH CENTER
6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Ste. 1C,
Crystal River
................................................ 352 -794 -0878

SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL WOMEN'S
& FAMILY CENTER
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 9 5 -2 2 2 9
(BABY)

SUNCOAST OBSTETRICS
& GYNECOLOGY
Redrick, Scott MD FACOG
582 S.E. 7th Ave., Crystal River
................................................ 352 -564 -8245

Townsen, Philip MD
12017 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville
................................................ 352 -799 -6700

Oncology-Hematology

Acevedo, Patrick MD
FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS
& RESEARCH INSTITUTE
2231 State Road 44 West, #203, Inverness
................................................ 352 -860 -7400
8575 N.E. 138th Lane, Ste. 103, Lady Lake
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 5 0 -2 2 13


Bennett Jr., C. Joseph MD
ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
522 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 2 7 -0 10 6
see our ad Page 36

Bishay, Sawsan MD
FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS
& RESEARCH INSTITUTE
7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 9 6 -19 2 6

Brant, Timothy A. MD
ROBERT BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY INSTITUTE
Prostate Cancer Treatment Facility
522 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................... .......................... 352-527-0 106
see our ad Page 36

CANCER AND BLOOD DISEASE CENTER
Chirayath, Marion MD
Fonseca, Gustavo A. MD FACP
Gandhi, Sunil G. MD FACP
Rao, V. Upender MD FACP
521 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -0707

Chirayath, Marion MD
CANCER AND BLOOD DISEASE CENTER
521 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -0707

CITRUS HEMATOLOGY & ONCOLOGY
Dela Cruz, Jr., Servillano E. MD
Englund, Craig W. MD
Harrer, William V. III MD
Sweetser, Matthew G. MD
770 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
....................... ....................... .. 352 -795 -6674
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd., Ste. A, Homosassa
... ........... ............................ 352-795-6674
801 Medical Court East, Inverness
................................................ 352 -637 -4490

Dela Cruz, Jr., Servillano E. MD
CITRUS HEMATOLOGY & ONCOLOGY
770 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -6674
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd. Ste. A, Homosassa
................................................ 352 -795 -6674
801 Medical Court East, Inverness
................................................ 352 -637 -4490
continued on Page 36




Page H36 Citrus County (FL) Chronicle Sunday, April 7, 2013


from Page 35

Englund, Craig W. MD
CITRUS HEMATOLOGY
& ONCOLOGY
770 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
. ......... ...................... ...... 352-795-6674
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd., Ste. A,
Homosassa
................. .................... ........... 352-795-6674
801 Medical Court East, Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-637-4490

FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS
& RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Acevedo, Patrick MD
2231 State Road 44 West, #203,
Inverness
................. .................... ........... 352-860-7400
8575 N.E. 138th Lane, Ste. 103,
Lady Lake
................. .................... ........... 352-750-22 13


FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS
& RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Bishay, Sawsan MD
Gandle, Larry MD
Li, Mary M. MD PhD
Malhotra, Vikas MD
Matzkowitz, Arthur MD
Tang, Thomas MD
7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 9 6 -19 2 6

FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS
& RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Hussein, Maen MD
lyengar, Vasundhara MD
1400 N. U.S. 441, Bldg. 500, Ste. 526,
Lady Lake
................................................ 352 -753 -9777

FLORIDA REGIONAL CANCER CENTER
Rao, Jayanth G. MD MRCP FAAR
Sandrapaty, Ravi MD
3406 N. Lecanto Hwy, Ste. A, Beverly Hills
................................................ 3 5 2 -7 4 6 -1 10 0


Fonseca, Gustavo A. MD FACP
CANCER AND BLOOD DISEASE CENTER
521 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -0707

Gandhi, Sunil G. MD FACP
CANCER AND BLOOD DISEASE CENTER
521 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto
................................................ 352 -746 -0707

Gandle, Larry MD
FLORIDA CANCER SPECIALISTS
& RESEARCH INSTITUTE
7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill
................................................ 3 5 2 -5 9 6 -19 2 6

Harrer, William V. III MD
CITRUS HEMATOLOGY & ONCOLOGY
770 S.E. 5th Terrace, Crystal River
................................................ 352 -795 -6674
7955 S. Suncoast Blvd., Ste. A, Homosassa
................................................ 352 -795 -6674
801 Medical Court East, Inverness
................... .......................... 352-637-4490


continued on Page 37


Bud Conklin beat prostate cancer with
the help of advanced technologies, like RBOI's
Calypso 4D Localization Treatment.
Not many things slow Bud Conklin down. In his 60s,
this Air Force veteran still hits the gym regularly
and completes a weekly 20-mile bike ride. So when he
was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he sought out the
most advanced and efficient treatment available. After
discussing his options with RBOI cancer specialist Dr.
Bennett, Bud chose the high-tech Calypso treatment,
which works like a GPS system in the prostate to
optimize radiation targeting and minimize side effects.
Bud is now cancer free and proud to say he didn't miss
a beat in his fast-paced life. We helped Bud write his
success story. Let us help write yours.


SROBERT
BOISSONEAULT
ONCOLOGY
INSTITUTE
Be a Success Story.


' Visit RBOI.com or call 352.527.0106
to schedule a consultation.
000ECU2


~~1~