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Citrus County chronicle ( April 6, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 6, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03083

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: April 6, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03083

Full Text


Close call: Citrus softball downs Central /B1
++: +++ + + + !^


TODAY ea
& next ,
morning <
HIGH ~
76 Mostly sunny.
LOW PAGE A4
50


C I T Rw Un:n 0U N T Y l Iom






www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


VOL. 118 ISSUE 242


Foundation: Pay, or no sale


Hospitalfinancial viability top concern


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Citrus Memorial
Health Foundation board members
said they will block attempts to sell
or lease the hospital unless the Cit-
rus County Hospital Board pays $3


million in the next two weeks.
The foundation board of directors,
following an hour-long meeting Fri-
day behind closed doors with its at-
torneys, rejected the trustees' offer to
settle numerous lawsuits by a series
of actions, including adding the five
trustees to the foundation's board.


Instead, foundation members said
their top concern is making Citrus
Memorial Health System financially
viable and they urged trustees to pay
money budgeted for the hospital.
"The hospital needs funding right
now," hospital Chief Executive Offi-
cer Ryan Beaty said.
Foundation attorney Clark Still-
well said foundation members saw
no need to bring trustees to their


board because the hospital could be
sold in the next six months. After
that, he said, it won't matter how the
board's membership is made up. -
CCHB Chairwoman Debbie
Ressler could not be reached for
comment. Trustee Mike Bays de-
clined to comment
"I can't say anything until Bill Ryan Beaty
Grant looks at it," Bays said, Citrus
See HOSP Page A2 Memorial CEO.


Flags flying for female footballers

Florida one offirst states to
recognize new girls varsity sport
recognize new girls varsity sport -


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
To see a gallery of the
past week's photos,
go to www.chronicle
online.com and click on
the "This Week in
Photos" slideshow link.




NATinN-


Budget battle
President Obama seeks
middle ground./Page
AIO
LOnCAL NFWS-


Golden spike
A model railroad club
celebrates historic
milestone./Page A3


Comics . . . . .C8
Community ...... .C6
Crossword ....... .C7
Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .A4
Horoscope ....... .A4
Lottery Numbers . .B3
Lottery Payouts . .B3
Movies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A6
Classifieds ........ C9
TV Listings ....... .C7


6 118457811|1 2002! 1


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
The bleacher-rattling roar
turned to shouts of "run, run,
run," as the running back
hauled in the quarterback's
pass and dove for the end
zone with one arm extended
and the ball breaking the
plane of the goal line.
The referee's arms shot
above his head, signaling
touchdown, and the running
back, rising to her feet, jiggled
her own Harlem Shake-style
victory dance in the end zone.
High heels have been re-
placed by cleats, and lip gloss
has been traded in for mouth-
pieces; no powder puff here
- this is girls' flag football.
Citrus High School (CHS),
Lecanto High School (LHS)
and Crystal River High
School (CRHS) are battling
each other and other high
schools in the Florida High
School Athletic Association
(FHSAA) state series girls'
flag football teams.
"We are one of the first two
states that recognize girls'
flag football as a high school
sport," said CHS head coach
Mary Kalbaugh. "There are
almost 300 high schools in
Florida that have flag foot-
ball programs. The county
decided to offer another
sport for girls, and flag foot-
ball was one."
Flag football is a modified
form of American football in
which ball carriers are
downed by pulling off a flag


UPCOMING GAMES
Citrus at Lecanto, 5 p.m.
Monday, April 8.
Dunnellon at Crystal
River, 6 p.m. Monday,
April 8.

that is loosely attached to a
belt Add females to the sport,
and girls' flag football evolves.
A ball, a field and belt are
essentially the only resources
needed to play the spring
sport. Kalbaugh broke down
the cost by arguing the field
and facility was already avail-
able. No pads are required
with it not being a tackle
sport. And uniforms could be
borrowed from other sports if
finances are unavailable.
"You could start up the
team pretty easily," Kalbaugh
said. "The girls who are play-
ing are all excellent athletes,
too. Most have played other
sports this year and enjoy
playing something new."
Not only new to the ath-
letes, flag football is new to
the county. Coaches are pos-
itive it is going to grow in
popularity.
See FOOTBAL/Page A2
Citrus High School's Nayomi
DeJesus fights for the ball
with Crystal River's Jamie
Jaster during a recent game.
Flag football as a varsity
sport is new this year in the
Citrus County School District.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Progress reported in

King's Bay cleanup talks


Harvesters may

resume soon
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The harvesters used to suck
noxious algal lyngbya from the
shallows and depths of King's
Bay may be revving up soon,
after what was described as a
"pretty good" meeting between
the parties involved in the
cleanup of the bay and a mana-
tee protection advocacy group.
The engine could crank as
soon as next week, as soon as


Pat Rose
with Save the
Manatee Club.


Art Jones
One Rake at a
Time leader.


the modalities of a monitoring
regime are in place for the
cleanup, according to Art Jones,
the project director.
Jones, along with his cleanup
See CLEANUP/Page A5


Pine Ridge election


pits same vs. new


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
PINE RIDGE Growth vs. no-
growth debates are not limited to
county commission elections.
Factions with two candidates
each are debating similar issues,
complete with accusations of un-
fair campaigning, in an election
known only to Pine Ridge
residents.
Two open slots for the Pine
Ridge Property Owners Associa-
tion, or PRPOA, go up for vote
Monday All Pine Ridge property
owners, whether they live in the
community or not, are allowed


ON THE WEB
pineridgeassn.com

to vote.
Two candidates, incumbent
Joan Kohler and James Clovis,
prefer the status quo they say is
sound fiscal management
Two others, Robert Neff and
Brenda Roberts, say the commu-
nity's growth is stagnant and
needs revitalization.
An anonymous letter signed by
"Pine Ridge Responsible Citi-
zens" has circulated through the
See PRPOAPage A5


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-7


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MON TH
II WE^BI





CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Public comment sought for

sheriff's office reaccreditation


Process starts

Sunday

Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office is pursuing na-
tional reaccreditation for
law enforcement through
the Commission on Ac-
creditation for Law En-
forcement Agencies
(CALEA).
During the days of April
7 to 10, the CCSO will un-
dergo an onsite assess-
ment in keeping with its
bid for national reaccredi-
tation through CALEA's
Law Enforcement Accred-
itation Program.
The agency will set up a
static display of equip-


ment and specialty units
for inspection by the as-
sessors and the general
public at 9 a.m. Monday,
April 8, at the Inverness
Airport. Among the equip-
ment on display will be the
sheriff's office helicopter,
command post, patrol ve-
hicle and motorcycle.
Sheriff's office personnel
will be available to answer
questions about the use
and application of the
equipment.
From 1 to 3 p.m. Tues-
day, April 9, citizens will be
able to give input by call-
ing 352-249-2846. A mem-
ber of the CALEA
assessment team will lis-
ten to callers' comments
regarding the sheriff's
office.
Telephone comments
will be restricted to five


minutes in length and
should address the
agency's ability to comply
with CALEA standards. To
review a copy of these
standards, contact the
sheriff's office Manager of
Information and Media
Services Heather Yates at
352-341-7459.
Members of the public
can also provide com-
ments at a hearing from 6
to 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 9,
at the Emergency Opera-
tions Center, 3549 Saun-
ders Way, Lecanto.
Anyone wanting to sub-
mit written comments
about the ability of the
sheriff's office to meet
CALEA standards may
send them directly to
CALEA, 13575 Heathcote
Blvd., Suite 320,
Gainesville, VA 20155.


Trayvon Martin's parents settle

with homeowners association


Associated Press

SANFORD The par-
ents of a teenager who was
fatally shot by a neighbor-
hood watch volunteer last
year have settled a wrong-
ful-death claim against the
homeowners association
of the Florida subdivision
where their son was killed.
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ported Friday an attorney
for Trayvon Martin's par-
ents Sybrina Fulton and
Tracy Martin filed that
paperwork in Seminole
County and that portions of
it were made available for
public review Friday
According to the news-
paper, the settlement



HOSPITAL
Continued from Page Al

referring to the CCHB
attorney
According to Stillwell,
the foundation's counter-
offer contains three major
points:
The CCHB must pay
$1.5 million immediately
of the $3 million budgeted
this year for the hospital.
Pay the remainder in
monthly installments.
Trustees must pay an-
other $1.5 million of the
amount that the founda-
tion says trustees owe the
hospital prior to this year
If the $3 million pay-
ments do not occur within
15 days of receiving the
offer, the foundation will
not participate or vote on
any sale or lease of the
hospital.
Beaty said the founda-
tion wants to consider
mergers or partnerships
with other hospitals, while
the trustees are seeking
proposals only for a lease
or sale.
A state law requires
public hospitals to con-
sider sale or lease after
conducting an appraisal.
The CCHB voted to con-
tinue the process for a sale
or lease, and asked the
foundation to join in that
effort.
The foundation leases
the hospital from the


amount was marked out in
five pages that it reviewed.
Lower in the agreement,
the parties specify that
they will keep the amount
confidential.
Benjamin Crump, the at-
torney for Trayvon Mar-
tin's parents, declined to
comment Friday. He told
The Associated Press the
filing was confidential.
A telephone message
left Friday evening by AP
with the homeowner asso-
ciation's attorney, Thomas
R. Slaten Jr, wasn't imme-
diately returned.
Martin was fatally shot
in February, 2012 by neigh-
borhood watch volunteer
George Zimmerman dur-


CCHB. About 20 years re-
main on the lease.
Stillwell said any new
lease would require foun-
dation approval. And any
potential buyer would
want foundation approval
as well considering it now
has a lease with the hospi-
tal board.
He said the hospital has
submitted proper paper-


ing a confrontation in a
subdivision in Sanford,
about 30 miles north of
Orlando.
A month-and-a-half
delay in Zimmerman's ar-
rest led to nationwide
protests in the racially
charged case.
Zimmerman has been
charged with second-de-
gree murder in Martin's
death.
Under the terms of the
settlement, Trayvon Mar-
tin's parents and his estate
agreed to set aside their
wrongful-death claim and
claims for pain and suffer-
ing, loss of earnings and
expenses, the Sentinel
reported.


work for reimbursement of
charity care patients but
the hospital board has not
acted on it.
"We're halfway through
the year," Stillwell said,
"and haven't received a
dime."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or mwright@
chronicleonline.com.


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted

H. Khan, M.D. B.K. Patel, M.D.
Board Certified Family Medicine Internal Medicine

Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals



Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am
Relocating Our Inverness Office 4/29/13


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
213 S Pine Ave.
Inverness
(352) 560-3000


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


FOOTBALL
Continued from PageAl

"I thought this would be
a great way to get female
athletes interested in a
new sport that will hope-
fully continue to grow in
Citrus County," said
CRHS head coach Ben
Bennett. "This gives them
the chance to learn some-
thing completely new and
to be competitive."
Shally Morales, CHS
junior varsity wide re-
ceiver, knows first-hand
the learning process.
"I have been off sides so
many times or started
when the play hadn't even
begun," Morales said. "It
is all part of the learning
experience. I have made
so many silly mistakes to
make myself look dumb,
but it happens. At least I
can say I am out here
doing it."
Most enjoy the physical
aspect of participating in
a sport.
"We have proved it is a
girls sport also," Morales
said. "We are out here
working hard and doing
drills like they do. It's both
a guys and girls sport."
Even though some of
the girls already knew a


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Lamechia Richburgh of Crystal River tries to avoid
Citrus' Nayomi DeJesus during a recent game at Crystal
River High School.


lot about the game, ath-
leticism is not required.
"Some girls came know-
ing a lot about football,
others came knowing
nothing," Kalbaugh said.
"The girls have worked
hard and are learning
more each day We are
getting better which is all
you can ask when trying


something new"
"Surprisingly there has
been a good turnout of
fans at each of the games
that we have had this sea-
son," Bennett said.
"Hopefully, the word con-
tinues to get out about this
new sport and people
come to support the
ladies."


Village Cadillac Toyota


Ia^f SAVE WITH SAM


Sam invites new and former customers
to visit him at Village Cadillac Toyota

352-628-5100 Email: sstrom@villagetoyota.com
A A ~ A A


A2 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


LOCAI/STATE







Page A3 SATURDAY, APRIL 6,2013



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONIC


CLE


Around the
COUNTY

Inverness slates
cleanup April 20
The city of Inverness in-
vites all to participate in the
annual Spring Cleanup
Campaign on Saturday,
April 20.
In cooperation with Keep
Citrus County Beautiful, this
effort will coincide with and
support the celebration of
Earth Day, the Great Ameri-
can Cleanup and the Citrus
County Cleanup-Greenup
program.
KCCB and Waste Man-
agement will provide infor-
mation on the importance of
recycling and the advan-
tages to the community.
A kick-off coffee begins at
8 a.m. at the Inverness
Government Center, 212 W.
Main St. Along with coffee
and water, other refresh-
ments will be available.
Local clubs, associations,
and concerned citizens are
encouraged to join the effort
and organize neighbors to
clean their street.
Call 352-726-2611 to
sign up for a specific street
or area in city limits or for
more information.
Essay entries
due May 17
The Citrus 20/20 Save
Our Waters Week Commit-
tee's 2013 essay contest
has begun. Essays should
focus on the theme, "Water
- Save it Now or Lose it
Forever."
Citrus County students in
grades six to 12 may partic-
ipate. Prizes of $100 and
$75 are awarded to the
first- and second-place win-
ners at the middle and high
school level.
Submissions must be re-
ceived by May 17. Applica-
tions are available at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us/waterres/
conservation/conservation.
htm. For details, call the
Department of Water Re-
sources at 352-527-7684.
Seniors sought
for grad section
The Chronicle wants to
include graduating home-
schooled seniors from Cit-
rus County in the upcoming
graduation tab for 2013.
Also welcome are gradu-
ating seniors from out-of-
county schools who reside
in Citrus County.
Send the graduate's
name and a photo to the
Chronicle, Attn: Cindy Con-
nolly, 1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429; or, email cconnolly
@chronicleonline.com no
later than Friday, April 26,
with the photo attached.
Information and photos
can also be dropped off at


the Meadowcr
Crystal River.


Clarifi
Incomplete i
appeared in a
on Page C7 of
day's edition,"
tors." Russ and
Brondyke curr
27 students at
ent schools an
tored more tha
students during
18 years.


Corre
A photo cap
A2 of Thursday
'YMCA, hospit
ment," contained
Paul Mellini se
advisory counc
rus Memorial I
Foundation. Ar
filiation was giv
Bob Collins,
and Gene Dav
on the advisor
The Chronic
errors.
Readers cai
Citrus County
any errors in n
by mailing ne
chronicleonline
calling 352-563


est office in INVERNESS In U.S. history,
when a railroad reached a mile-
-From staff reports stone accomplishment, the people
gathered for a grand "last spike"
ceremony
On Friday, members of the Citrus
cation Model RR Club met at their club-
house in the Otto Allen Building at
the Citrus County Fairgrounds for
information their own "Golden Spike" cere-
photo caption mony, celebrating the completion of
Wednes- their HO Allegheny and Lake Erie
New Men- track rebuilding project
d Norma They modeled
gently mentor their ceremony
three differ- after the nation's
d have men- first ceremony on
in 500 May 10, 1869, in
g a span of Promontory, Utah.
"That was proba- For more
bly the most well- photos, click
known ceremony on this story at
1ctlon and the first in this www.chronicle
country after the online.com.
tion on Page completion of the
y's edition, first transcontinental railroad in
al ink agree- the U.S.," explained Dave Marquis,
ed an error. longtime club member and project
drves on an coordinator
rvcil to the Cit- "It was a big deal back then... big-
,IHospital ger than the Super Bowl or World
ospitancorrect af- Series is today," he added.
incorrect af- At that first ceremony, a solid sil-
enrrJones ver hammer was used to drive a
Gerry Jones solid gold spike into a laurel wood
yis also serve railroad tie donated by California.
Council. At Friday's ceremony, various
;le regrets the members took turns "driving" a
teeny HO gauge-sized gold-painted
n alert The spike to the "off-stage" sounds of a
Chronicle to real spike being struck.
ews articles "Actually, we're not completely
wsdesk@ done with everything, but the track
e.com or by is complete," Marquis said.
3-5660. He said they have been working


Arsenic filter option point of study


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Residents
north of the Crystal River Mall
with arsenic-tainted wells will
have to wait about one year to
learn whether they keep filtering
or connect to county water
But a water connection, if it
comes, is well down the pipeline,
according to the county's water
resources director
Ken Cheek explained the sig-
nificance of the Citrus County
Board of County Commissioners
(BOCC) approving an application
for a study at its March 12 meet-
ing. Currently, about 200 residents
in an unincorporated area be-
tween U.S. 19 and North Citrus


Avenue have arsenic removed
from their drinking-water wells
through a state-funded filtration
program. The study would look at
the feasibility of a county water
line as a long-term solution.
"The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP)
came to us a little over a year
ago," Cheek said. "They asked if
we were willing to serve the area,
which we are."
The county's water line extends
along North Turkey Oak Drive,
ending on the east side of North
Citrus Avenue.
DEP initiated the study and is
footing the cost $204,000 from
the State Revolving Fund (SRF).
"They had their own consultant
out of Tallahassee actually put the


application together on our be-
half," Cheek said. "It's sort of a
joint effort, but all the money
that's being supplied in this phase
is strictly from the state because
they have the issue with the ar-
senic wells."
DEP wants to compare its fil-
tration program with water serv-
ice, but the county needs the data,
too.
"Eventually, we're going to need
to serve everybody in the area
even though the DEP target is just
the wells where they have a prob-
lem," Cheek said.
The study would not commit the
county to a construction project.
When the study produces the
costs, "We can say that's nice to
know, but we're not interested,"


Cheek said.
But if the county is interested, it
could pursue a combination SRF
loan and grant that typically work
out as 65 percent grant and 35 per-
cent loan the latter necessitat-
ing an assessment, depending on
a BOCC decision.
Cheek said the county would
schedule meetings with the resi-
dents affected before moving for-
ward with an assessment.
"If I'm involved in the program,
we tend to want to talk to the peo-
ple first," Cheek said. "If this hap-
pens at all, it will happen in a
multiple-phase type of thing.
There's not the money to do that
scope of a project in one bite."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916.



Man


facing


sex


charges

AMANDA MIMS
Correspondent
A Dunnellon man was ar-
rested Wednesday on a slew
of sex charges after two
women accused him of sex-
ually abusing them when
they were adolescents.
David Lavoie, 44, of
Southwest 183rd Terrace,
faces charges including
two counts
of sexual
battery,
three
counts of
lewd and
lascivious
molesta-
tion, two
counts of David
providing Lavoie
obscene faces multiple
material to charges.
a child, use
of a child in a sexual per-
formance and two counts of
contributing to the delin-
quency of a child, accord-
ing to his arrest affidavit
He is accused of sexu-
ally abusing the girls, who
were between the ages 12
and 15, between Septem-
ber 2006 and February
2007 in Dunnellon in a
S number of ways, including
e inappropriate touching of
the girls and encouraging
one of them to touch him
sexually He also allegedly
had sexual intercourse
S with one of the girls sev-
eral times when she was
12 and 13 years old.
One victim told an inves-
tigator Lavoie provided
both girls with alcoholic
beverages, crack cocaine
and marijuana on multiple
occasions. After the girls
used the substances, Lavoie
played a pornographic DVD
and had the girls perform
sexual acts. The alleged
abuse occurred at B18 Tat-
too Shop, which Lavoie
owned and operated.
Lavoie was taken to the
Marion County Jail, where
his bond was set at $37,000.


State BRIEF

^ Watch out for
suspect's sailboat
TAMPA- Authorities in-
vestigating the case of a fa-
__ their accused of kidnapping
onicle his two sons from their grand-
trus parents' home in Florida have
pike a new clue: a sailboat.
nact Hillsborough County Sher-
iff's detectives said in a news
release Friday that Joshua
who Michael Hakken recently
e're bought a 25-foot, 1972 Mor-
day gan sailboat with a blue hull.
ple Hakken, 35, and the chil-
the dren's mother, 34-year-old
Hal Sharyn Patricia Hakken, are
the prime suspects in the boys'
nty disappearance, officials said.
as y The boat is described as
ii_- having a blue Bimini top,


ard white mainsail, and a blue hull
ong with the word "Salty" and a
3del paw print in white on both
sides, with a white stripe near
lub, the water line.
-From wire reports


CI ,. -
NANCY KENNEDY/Chr
At Friday's Golden Spike ceremony celebrating the completion of Cit
Model RR Club's HO rebuilding project, Tom Williams provided the "sp
pounding" sound effects as other club members watched others re-er
the historic ceremonies of the 19th century railroads.


on their rebuilding project for more
than four years, taking it from one
level to two and adding new
scenery and painted backdrops.
They're also rebuilding the N
gauge layout.
The Citrus Model RR Club, which
began in 1989, invites the public to
come and see its elaborate train
displays from 8 a.m. until noon
every Saturday (except August).
They are also open during the an-
nual county fair
They are also looking for new
members. Currently, the 40 or so
members come from all over Cen-
tral Florida.


"We're mostly retired guys
meet on Friday mornings, but w
going to try meeting on Tues
nights to see if we can get pec
who might be at work during
day," Marquis said.
During Friday's ceremony,
Porter, county fair manager, told
club members, "The Citrus Cou
Fair just got over, and there w;
tremendous response to your
play So, thank you for all your h
work and we look forward to a 1
partnership with the Citrus Mo
Railroad Club."
For information about the cl
visit citrusmodelrrclub.org.


Relay for Life


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Cancer survivors lead off the Relay for Life with a walk around the track Friday at Crystal River High School,
with Michelle Snellings, right, leading the pack carrying the torch. She is accompanied by friend Terry
Lanier, also a cancer survivor, as the group is cheered on by hundreds of spectators lining the track. The
survivors walk kicks off 18 hours of walking as each of 21 teams take turns walking around the track to
raise funds for the American Cancer Society. Relays are planned the next two weekends for Lecanto and
Inverness.


Model railroad club celebrates milestone


'Golden spike'

ceremony marks

historic occasion
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer






A4 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


Today's
HOROSCOPES
Birthday Your aspirations will be el-
evated to new heights in the year
ahead. It could mean a lot of work in a
few cases.
Aries (March 21-April 19)- The
more complicated an assignment is,
the more pride you'll take in fulfilling it.
You'll welcome challenges that would
make others blanch.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) When you
give your word you'll do something for
another, it's an ironclad commitment.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Partici-
pating in one of your favorite activities
with some old friends will bring you
considerable pleasure.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You
won't have to bulldoze your way
through a critical development, but you
will have to be persistent and unflag-
ging in your aims.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Some kind
of special knowledge, skill or know-
how you've acquired over a long time
will be put to good use. It's likely to
gain you admiration from your peers.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Although
you will make a contribution to an en-
deavor, conditions are somewhat un-
usual in that you could benefit more
from others' efforts than from your own.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Events will
help further solidify a strong relation-
ship of long standing. Chances are it
will involve one of your closest friends.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You
have the ability to bring order and bal-
ance into the life of another through a
personal intervention. You'll make your
own determination as to how and
when your help is required.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -
Some of your best opportunities will
develop through social contacts. You
aren't likely to intentionally use any-
body; things will just happen of their
own accord.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Cer-
tain changes are likely to occur that will
prove to be of material benefit. The first
shift in your circumstances is likely to
take place today.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) The
light touch you can sometimes put on
life's serious problems will be a wel-
come tonic for those troubled souls
who cross your path.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) This
could be a good time for a shopping
excursion. You'll have a shrewd eye for
spotting a bargain and will be more
sensible about purchases you make.


ENTERTAINMENT


Riches to rags


Comedy on

income gap a

big-screen hit

Associated Press

MEXICO CITY A con-
struction magnate's preppy
son is forced to drive one of
Mexico City's battered green
buses, while his spoiled sister
waits tables at a cantina in a
miniskirt and non-designer
shoes. Their credit cards
have been canceled, their
BMWs and mansion seized.
OMG!
The Mexican riches-to-rags
movie, "We are the Nobles"
has opened to packed the-
aters in a country with one of
the world's widest income
gaps and a love for laugh-
ing at misfortune. More than
1 million people showed up
in the first week to see the
story of an impresario who
fakes a government raid on
his riches to teach his chil-
dren the value of work.
Only a Hollywood block-
buster featuring Bruce Willis
and DreamWorks' latest 3D
animation beat it at the box
office last weekend, the sec-
ond-biggest opening for a do-
mestic film here in more
than 10 years.
"Latin America is a region
where middle class is very
small," said writer and direc-
tor Gary "Gaz"Alazraki. "So I
thought if you want to cap-
ture the mood of the public
with cinema, that's the first
place to look, the contrast be-
tween rich and poor."
In the movie, patriarch
German Noble's pampered
children get their comeup-
pance when Noble decides
to cut them off.


Associated Press
This undated promotional image released by Warner Bros.
Studios shows actors from left, Luis Gerardo Mendez, Karla
Souza, Juan Pablo Gil and Gonzalo Vega in the movie
"Nosotros los Nobles," or "We are the Nobles." The Mexican
riches-to-rags movie has opened to packed theaters in a
country with one of the world's widest income gaps, and a
love for laughing at misfortune.


People similar to the ficti-
tious Nobles appear on any
ritzy corner of the city, where
Mexico's carefully coiffed,
wearing the highest fashions,
can be seen stepping from
the running boards of their
enormous SUVs, their body-
guards lurking outside as
they go for a workout or pedi-
cure. They have been to the
best schools in the world and


the finest malls in Texas, but
never to one of the city's
ubiquitous, crowded market-
places or a street-food stand.
"I haven't seen the arche-
types of urban Mexico por-
trayed on the big screen so
well in a long time," said
Oscar de los Reyes, an expert
on cinema and society at the
Technological Institute of
Monterrey


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Today in
HISTORY
Today is Saturday, April 6, the
96th day of 2013. There are 269
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On April 6, 1973, Ron Blomberg
of the New York Yankees became
Major League Baseball's first desig-
nated hitter as he faced pitcher Luis
Tiant of the Boston Red Sox at Fen-
way. (Blomberg was walked with
the bases loaded; Boston won the
game, 15-5.)
On this date:
In 1830, the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints was or-
ganized by Joseph Smith in
Fayette, N.Y.
In 1896, the first modern Olympic
games formally opened in Athens,
Greece.
In 1909, American explorers
Robert E. Peary and Matthew A.
Henson and four Inuits became the
first men to reach the North Pole.
Ten years ago: In the Iraq War,
U.S. forces encircled and began fly-
ing into Baghdad's international
airport.
Five years ago: Anti-China
demonstrators caused chaos as the
Olympic torch was relayed through
London ahead of the Beijing games.
One year ago: Five black people
were shot in Tulsa, Okla.; two sus-
pects, Jake England and Alvin
Watts, are accused of targeting the
victims on the basis of race.
Today's Birthdays: Nobel Prize-
winning scientist James D. Watson
is 85. Composer-conductor Andre
Previn is 84. Country singer Merle
Haggard is 76. Actor Billy Dee
Williams is 76. Actor Roy Thinnes is
75. Movie director Barry Levinson is
71. Actor John Ratzenberger is 66.
Actress Marilu Henner is 61. Actor
Michael Rooker is 58. Actress Ari
Meyers is 44. Actor Paul Rudd is 44.
Actor Zach Braff is 38. Actress Eliza
Coupe is 32. Actor Bret Harrison is
31. Actor Charlie McDermott is 23.
Thought for Today: "To be really
cosmopolitan, a man must be at
home even in his own country." -
Thomas Wentworth Higginson,
American clergyman-author (1823-
1911).


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HIl LO PR |HI LO PR
78 64 0.05 I 78 64 Irace J74 64 trace


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


H L
73 58
79 69
81 61
77 51
80 65
72 52
78 69
79 58
75 62


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
5
5
5
5
5
5


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
5
5
5
5
5


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northeast winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 4 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Mostly sunny skies today.


NA NA NA 78 64 race

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive dally
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 76 Low: 50 *i
Mostly sunny


SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 53
Sunny to partly cloudy

f MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 56
Sunny to partly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 75/63
Record 93/38
Normal 81/52
Mean temp. 69
Departure from mean +2
PRECIPITATION*
Friday trace
Total for the month 0.30 in.
Total for the year 3.70 in.
Normal for the year 10.74 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.89 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 5
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 550
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Bayberry, Pellitory
Today's count: 9.8/12
Sunday's count: 8.5
Monday's count: 8.7
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
4/6 SATURDAY 3:04 9:16 3:28 9:40
4/7 SUNDAY 3:46 9:58 4:10 10:22
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
e* O O O I SUNSET TONIGHT............................7:51 PM.
S SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:13A.M.
*/ C MOONRISE TODAY ...........................74:40A.M.
APRIL 10 APRIL 18 APRIL25 MAY 2 MOONSET TODAY............................ 4:34 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:11 a/11:52 a 4:26 p/-
Crystal River" 1:32 a/9:14 a 2:47 p/9:29 p
Withlacoochee* 12:34 p/7:02 a ---/7:17 p
Homosassa*** 2:21 a/10:51 a 3:36 p/11:06 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
4:19 a/12:07 a 5:00 p/12:38 p
2:40 a/10:00 a 3:21 p/10:19 p
12:27 a/7:48 a 1:08 p/8:07 p
3:29 a/11:37 a 4:10 p/11:56 p


Gulf water
temperature


69
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.87 27.91 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.27 37.27 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.13 38.12 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.35 39.34 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


0an9" Kn. .
,, v.f r ,





L. arcner adnea. Honolu< -
, -J -,: .. -
"1"" B~ H ~ ao Mtilln - .=; '


S "s 4o0u 8


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 53 36 s 48 36
Albuquerque 76 50 s 72 50
Asheville 58 37 pc 64 41
Atlanta 48 40 .40 s 70 50
Atlantic City 63 37 .66 s 49 39
Austin 72 36 pc 79 60
Baltimore 65 37 .11 s 54 39
Billings 60 43 .04 c 63 41
Birmingham 66 43 .04 s 74 48
Boise 64 46 .17 sh 61 41
Boston 57 38 s 49 38
Buffalo 44 33 c 51 45
Burlington, VT 48 37 pc 46 34
Charleston, SC 61 45 .07 s 69 48
Charleston, WV 64 39 pc 71 48
Charlotte 66 37 s 66 43
Chicago 45 36 ts 66 45
Cincinnati 63 27 pc 69 51
Cleveland 45 34 c 54 48
Columbia, SC 62 42 s 70 46
Columbus, OH 58 30 c 60 50
Concord, N.H. 58 34 s 49 23
Dallas 68 39 pc 77 58
Denver 72 44 pc 65 40
Des Moines 63 35 ts 68 40
Detroit 51 37 c 53 45
El Paso 86 59 s 88 62
Evansville, IN 67 32 pc 73 53
Harrisburg 63 33 s 51 35
Hartford 61 39 s 53 34
Houston 71 45 pc 76 62
Indianapolis 59 34 pc 67 54
Jackson 67 45 s 74 52
Las Vegas 83 61 s 83 63
Little Rock 69 36 pc 76 54
Los Angeles 67 58 s 67 56
Louisville 68 34 pc 71 54
Memphis 68 41 pc 73 56
Milwaukee 42 33 ts 61 40
Minneapolis 44 28 .07 sh 48 32
Mobile 69 49 trace s 76 54
Montgomery 70 47 .05 s 75 51
Nashville 68 43 pc 72 52
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY

Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 66 50 s 76 61
New York City 64 41 s 52 41
Norfolk 59 44 .48 s 58 38
Oklahoma City 67 33 pc 78 56
Omaha 69 35 pc 71 43
Palm Springs 85 60 s 90 63
Philadelphia 65 39 .09 s 54 40
Phoenix 90 65 s 90 63
Pittsburgh 55 34 pc 57 47
Portland, ME 54 38 s 45 27
Portland, Ore 60 53 .04 sh 57 44
Providence, R.I. 62 38 s 52 34
Raleigh 63 39 .04 s 61 39
Rapid City 60 32 pc 62 43
Reno 66 42 pc 64 38
Rochester, NY 45 34 pc 51 44
Sacramento 68 49 pc 72 50
St. Louis 68 39 pc 74 54
St. Ste. Marie 31 24 sn 34 29
Salt Lake City 66 47 .16 sh 59 41
San Antonio 72 42 pc 79 60
San Diego 65 59 trace s 65 58
San Francisco 64 55 pc 63 48
Savannah 63 46 .69 s 71 51
Seattle 57 51 .41 sh 54 43
Spokane 58 45 .06 sh 58 37
Syracuse 46 35 pc 48 39
Topeka 73 33 pc 75 49
Washington 67 39 .13 s 56 39
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 92 El Centro, Calif. LOW 1 Langdon, N.D.

WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/75/s
Amsterdam 49/29/pc
Athens 73/60/pc
Beijing 58/33/s
Berlin 38/28/c
Bermuda 67/61As
Cairo 89/66/pc
Calgary 41/25/rs
Havana 81/64/pc
Hong Kong 80/67/sh
Jerusalem 74/61/s


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


60/46/pc
50/30/pc
56/35/pc
77/53/pc
39/32/pc
37/29/rs
47/30/c
80/69/ts
61/51/pc
73/59/pc
71/55/ts
37/39/sh
35/30/c


ILLEGAL NOTICES




Fictitious Name Notices......C12

Lien Notices........................C12

Foreclosure Sale/ Action

Notices..................................C12

Self Storage Notices............C12

Cl C I T R U S. C U N T Y




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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Missing family found in Everglades


For the
RECORD


Group safe after getting lost

on airboat outing


Associated Press

MIAMI An Ohio fam-
ily spent a rainy, anxious
night in the vast Florida
Everglades when their air-
boat became stuck in veg-
etation so thick rescuers
could not see them from
the ground. Fortunately,
the searchers could hear
them.
The Schreck family was
found safe Friday when
rescuers heard them blow-
ing whistles and an air
horn. The father, an avid
outdoorsman, said he sim-
ply took a wrong turn and
got stuck.
"Took a right and couldn't
get the boat turned
around," Scott Schreck, 44,
told reporters after he and
his family were brought
back to dry land. "This is
the first time I've been out
here, so obviously I'm a
novice on this body of
water Not the thing to do."
The family was spotted
by a helicopter and even-
tually rode back to land on
the airboat with rescuers.
"We weren't able to see
them, we were only able to
hear them," Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission spokesman
Jorge Pino said. "They are
in good condition."



PRPOA
Continued from PageA5

community. It accuses
Neff and Roberts of
wanting to raise the
property maintenance
fees and plan to spend
hundreds of thousands of
dollars on big-ticket proj-
ects, including a covered
horse arena.
Both Neff and Roberts
deny the accusations, not-
ing that state law related
to private property own-
ers' associations requires
a referendum on spending
more than $50,000 for proj-
ects. Both say they have no
plans to raise fees or put
assessments in place, de-
spite unnamed claims to
the contrary



CLEANUP
Continued from Page Al

partners, Save Crystal
River Inc.'s Steve Lamb
and Bob Mercer and Kings
Bay Rotary's Steve Burch,
met Thursday evening
with Pat Rose of Save the
Manatee Club, and Mark
Edwards, Citrus County
Aquatic Services director,
to settle the contentious
issue of how to best con-
duct cleanup in the bay
"It went very well. We all
agreed to work together
for the restoration of
King's Bay," Jones said.
"We also agreed to put in
place a monitoring process
and we are going to ask
U.S. Fish and Wildlife to
help us in that area since
they are right there,"
Jones added. He hopes to
get everything set up so
machine cleanup may re-
sume next week.
Having a monitoring
regime for the cleanup was
one of the key demands
Rose made before resump-
tion of the cleanup after it
was suspended by Jones.
Rose and others com-
plained about excessive


Officials abandoned a
plan to hoist the family
into a helicopter because
of bad weather
In addition to Scott
Schreck, the family in-
cludes his 42-year-old
wife, Carrie, and three
young boys, who were on
spring break from Seville,
Ohio. They launched the
airboat, borrowed from a
friend, Thursday morning
in extreme western
Miami-Dade County but
did not return by nightfall.
Law enforcement, fire
rescue and wildlife agen-
cies launched a massive
search, using helicopters,
airplanes and at least six
airboats. The area covered
some 1,000 square miles in
three South Florida coun-
ties north of Everglades Na-
tional Park It is covered in
tall, sharp-edged sawgrass
and dark cypress tree
stands that limit visibility.
It's also home to alliga-
tors, Florida panthers,
bears, mosquitos, snakes,
turtles, a vast array of
birds and fish. Finding
anyone lost in such condi-
tions is a challenge, said
Miami-Dade Fire Rescue
spokesman Lt. Arnold
Piedrahita Jr. The boat
was painted in camou-
flage, making it even


Pine Ridge, known for
gently rolling hills and
equestrian trails, has
4,996 residential lots. A
little less than half are
vacant. Property owners
are allowed one vote per
lot; a corporation owning
50 lots, for example, has
50 votes.
Property owners pay
maintenance fees based
on the size of the property.
The annual maintenance
fee for a 1-acre lot is $95.
A five-member board
hires a management com-
pany to oversee mainte-
nance and upkeep of the


Associated Press
Scott Schreck, top right, arrives with his family Friday at Everglades Francis S. Taylor
Wildlife Management Area in Miami-Dade County. The Schreck family, from Ohio, spent
a rainy, anxious night in the vast Florida Everglades when their airboat became stuck
in vegetation so thick rescuers could not see them from the ground.


harder to find.
"It's like looking for a
needle in a haystack," he
said.
Although wet and cold,
the family appeared to be
in good health even after
spending the night in the
wilderness, which was
swept by strong thunder-
storms Thursday and more
rain Friday They were
checked out by para-
medics on shore as a
precaution.
Before they got lost,
Schreck said they fished


for bass and took photos of
alligators. After the boat
got stuck, Schreck said he
built a makeshift lean-to to
provide shelter from rain,
fired off a flare in the night
and had plenty of food and
water on hand. The boys
slept, he said, but he and
his wife did not.
They began getting wor-
ried about their safety, but
then heard an airboat
going back and forth in an
obvious search pattern
Friday, he said.
"If you get into that


there and nobody would
see where they are. Plus,
people walk in the streets
in Pine Ridge."
Neff and Roberts say
that kind of thinking is
preventing Pine Ridge
from growing.
"I'd like to see Pine
Ridge updated," Neff
said. "We've been sitting
here for years and years
and accepting the status
quo. The community's
going backward, not
going forward. It needs
to start looking like we
care about it."
Neff and Roberts say
they support simple im-
provements, such as more
tennis courts.
"We've got a lot of tennis
people," Roberts said. "We
have four courts right now
and could use another


tion of the monitoring
process," Rose said.
He said the monitoring
will involve looking at the
areas to be cleaned before,
during and after cleanup
to make sure "egregious"
harm is not being done to
the habitat. He also ex-
pects turbidity checks, too,
to ensure too much sedi-
ment is not disturbed at
the bottom of the bay
Rose said his organiza-
tion has always supported
the restoration of the bay,
but wants it done responsi-
bly He said he is glad
Jones and the others are
working with him on the
common goal of restoring
King's Bay to its previous
splendor
Jones, too, said he recog-
nizes that his One Rake at
a Time effort shares the
same goals with Rose's
group.
"They want to protect
the manatees and their
habitat. We want to clean
up the bay and restore the
habitat. We should be
friends and now that the
channels of communica-


dense vegetation with an
airboat, it's almost next to
impossible to get out," he
said.
Schreck is a golf pro who
oversees three courses in
northeast Ohio.
"I'm sure he would do it
with a cool, calm manner
and think of the best possi-
ble way to get out of the sit-
uation or to survive in a
situation until help
comes," said Dominic An-
tenucci, executive director
of the Northern Ohio sec-
tion of the PGA.


one."
Clovis, though, said Neff
and Roberts have aligned
themselves with groups
that "want to take over the
community."
Kohler said the board
has done a good job im-
proving Pine Ridge. She
pointed to work in getting
traffic signals at the Pine
Ridge entrances on
County Road 486 and C.R.
491.
"Jamey and I are inter-
ested in good govern-
ment," she said. "What
needs to be replaced and
repaired, we will do."
Results of the election
should be available
Wednesday
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. com.


tion are open, I will be
talking to Pat all the time
and we will try to be as
careful as we can be not to
cause too much turbidity,"
Jones added.
Rose said he and Jones
would also be contacting
the Southwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
trict to help with the
monitoring.
"I think ultimately, the
meeting was positive,"
Rose said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter AB. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


amenities. The board may
raise fees by 25 percent
without a vote.
Members serve stag-
gered two-year terms.
Kohler, who has served
off and on since 2004, said
the projects her opponents
support such as a walk-
ing path are not a good
fit for Pine Ridge.
"The walking path,
which they want to ce-
ment, would need to be
cleaned every day," she
said. "It's in the woods
where we have all kinds of
animals running through.
People could get hurt back


It went very well. We all
agreed to work together
for the restoration of King's
Bay.

Art Jones
One Rake at a Time bay cleanup project.


turbidity, or cloudy water,
being created by the har-
vesters used in the
cleanup. The larger har-
vester was especially
thought to be causing im-
mediate danger to bay
habitat, according to Rose.
Jones's One Rake at a
Time project has for 18
months been raking and,
mostly manually, removing
noxious mats of lygnbya
from the shallows of the
bay Then a small har-
vester with a depth reach
of 5 feet was introduced in
the cleanup. A little more
than a month ago, a bigger
harvester with the depth
reach of more than 10 feet
was introduced as well as
a barge to collect the mats
for disposal.
Rose said he witnessed
the large harvester at work
and it basically amounted


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to dredging and was gin-
ning up plumes of sedi-
ment from the bay floor.
He said he thought if that
continued, the bay faced
imminent harm. Late last
month, when Rose con-
tacted Jones about his con-
cerns, operations were
halted voluntarily
An initial attempt at
talks last week yielded lit-
tle, but generated a huge
crowd of supporters of
Jones' efforts.
Thursday's talks were
done in private and may
have yielded better results.
Friday, Rose said he
thought progress was
made during the talks.
"I am optimistic and I
think progress was made,
especially with the addi-

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Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrest
James O'Keefe, 30, of
West Whippoorwill Street,
Lecanto, at 1:55 p.m.
Wednesday on a misde-
meanor charge of domestic
battery and violation of proba-
tion on an original felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance. No bond.
Other arrests
David Downs, 48, of
West Minuteman Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 10:49 a.m.
Wednesday on a Hemando
County warrant for violation of
probation on an original felony
charge of possession of a con-
trolled substance. No bond.
William Capp, 44, of
East Harvard Street, Inver-
ness, at 1:44 p.m. Wednes-
day on Citrus County
warrants for violation of pro-
bation on original felony
charges of grand theft and
possession of a weapon by a
convicted felon. No bond.
Kyle Weaver, 26, of
WestAntioch Lane, Lecanto,
at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday on
felony charges of trafficking
or endeavoring to traffic in
stolen property, grand theft
and giving false verification
of ownership/false informa-
tion to a pawnbroker. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of stealing
jewelry from a relative and
pawning it. Bond $80,000.
Janie Fudge, 24, of
West Antioch Lane, Lecanto,
at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday on
felony charges of trafficking or
endeavoring to traffic in stolen
property, grand theft and giv-
ing false verification of owner-
ship/false information to a
pawnbroker. According to her
arrest affidavit, she is accused
of stealing jewelry and pawn-
ing it. Bond $90,000.
Jennifer Larocca, 25, of
North Dickens Drive, Dunnel-
Ion, at 2:40 p.m. Wednesday
on a felony charge of grand
theft. According to her arrest
affidavit, she is accused of tak-
ing clothing and electronics
from Walmart in Lecanto.
Bond $2,000.
Burglaries
A residential burglary
was reported at 7:16 p.m.
Thursday, April 4, in the
10700 block of N. Athenia
Drive, Dunnellon.
Thefts
M A petit theft was reported
at 2:54 p.m. Thursday, April 4,
in the 7600 block of W. Taffeta
Lane, Dunnellon.
A petit theft was re-
ported at 5:46 p.m. April 4 in
the 2800 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was re-
ported at 6:33 p.m. April 4 in
the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 9 p.m. April 4 in the
2800 block of Jefferson St.,
Inverness.
Vandalisms
EAvandalism was reported
at 12:48 a.m. Thursday, April 4,
in the 4500 block of N. Carl G.
Rose Highway, Hemando.
A vandalism was re-
ported at 11:40 p.m. April 4 in
the 11400 block of W. Clay-
ton Drive, Homosassa.


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raise property maintenance fees ...


LOCAI/STATE


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Herbivores



for hire


M.




Associated Press
Sylvain Girard, owner of "Ecomouton," shows his flock
used to graze lawns in replacement of lawnmowers
Thursday in Evry, south of Paris. Paris is enlisting the
help of a small flock of sheep to keep the city's grass
trim to replace gas-guzzling lawnmowers.


Paris buys sheep to mow lawns


Associated Press

PARIS Will tourists
soon see flocks of baaing
sheep at the Eiffel Tower
and bleating ewes by
Notre Dame cathedral?
That could be the case,
since Paris City Hall this
week installed a small
flock of sheep to mow the
lawn at the city's gardens,
replacing gas-guzzling
lawnmowers.
Four woolly ewes -
shipped in from an island
off the Brittany coast -
are currently munching
the grass surrounding
Paris Archives building.
The number of sites doing
that could expand from
October in and around
Paris.
The ovine-operation
follows a successful stint
last year by two goats that
were hired privately by
the Louvre to mow the
lawn at Tuileries, central
Paris' grand 17th-century
gardens.
Motorless and inde-
pendent, the four-legged
workers contentedly
munch day and night -
oblivious of France's
strict 35-hour work week.
A similar experiment
in a park outside Paris
even found sheep drop-
pings were a benefit,
bringing swallows back to
the area.
"It might sound funny,
but animal lawnmowers
are ecological as no gaso-
line is required, and cost
half the price of a ma-
chine," said Marcel Col-
let, Paris farm director.
"And they're so cute."
Paris City Hall, mean-
while, has big ambitions
for its sheep. "I can imag-
ine this very easily in
London and New York ...
even Tokyo," said Fabi-
enne Giboudeaux, Paris
City Hall's director of
Green Spaces. "And why
not have them at the Eif-
fel Tower?"


The City Hall initiative
was inspired by a handful
of private French compa-
nies that have been hiring
sheep and goat lawnmow-
ers for quite some time.
Alain Divo is the direc-
tor of one such company,
Ecoterra, whose goats
worked at the Tuileries
last summer. He said hav-
ing animal lawnmowers
is great for biodiversity.
"We installed some at
the Parc des Sceaux (a fa-
mous park outside Paris),
where the swallow popu-
lation had completely dis-
appeared. Because the
droppings attract small
insects, the swallows all
came back in two years,"
he said.
Parisians who cringe at
the sight of poop may
worry sheep droppings
could ruin their pristine
City of Light. But Divo
said goat and sheep poop
crumbles away in days to
an odorless, inoffensive
powder that serves as po-
tent fertilizer for the
grass.
Another company
known as Ecomouton
(Ecosheep in English) has
260 sheep working the
premises of top compa-
nies such as Gaz de
France. Ecomouton plans
to expand that number to
more than 600 sheep by
the end of 2013.
Its director, Sylvain Gi-
rard, said he's surprised
by the initiative's success,
with interest coming in
from countries such as
the Britain, Germany,
Belgium and Russia.
He's said the idea came
to him by chance.
"I have a company my-
self with lawn, and I was
always running about
after the guy who was
meant to mow the lawn.
One day I just thought:
'What if I just put in
sheep?'" said Girard. "It
was a bit of a wacky idea,
but it worked."


Four sheep graze Thursday in a small meadow in a
northern district of Paris as part of an eco-experiment
to use ecological means to maintain Paris green
spaces.

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5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


Donna
Danback, 49
LECANTO
Donna J. Danback, 49, of
Lecanto, Fla., passed away
Wednesday, April 3, 2013,
at her
home. A
native of
Hacken-
sack, N.J.,
she was

March 3,
1964, to
George Donna
a n d Danback
Cheryl
(Hoyer) Fritz, one of four
children. Mrs. Danback
moved to Citrus County 31
years ago from Point
Pleasant, N.J. Her profes-
sional career included a
15-year tenure with Sun-
Trust Bank in manage-
ment followed by an
11-year career with
Lecanto Primary School
as an ESE teacher's aid.
Donna was also a lifelong
homemaker and an avid
sports mom.
She attended Gulf to
Lake Baptist Church in
Crystal River and is sur-
vived by her husband of
nearly 28 years, Larry
Danback, Lecanto; son,
Douglas Danback (wife
Mandy), Riverview;
daughter, Lindsay Dan-
back, Lecanto; son, Dustin
Danback, Lecanto; father,
George Fritz (wife Joan),
Port Orange; brothers,
Michael Diehl, Dunnellon,
and Gregory Fritz, Ridge-
wood, N.J.; sister, Jennifer
Fritz-Lynen, Miami; grand-
daughter, Madalyn Dan-
back, Riverview; five
nieces; and one nephew.
Donna was preceded in
death by her mother,
Cheryl Diehl; and stepfa-
ther, Walter Diehl.
A funeral service of re-
membrance will be at 7 p.m.
Monday, April 8, 2013, at
Wilder Funeral Home, Ho-
mosassa, with the Rev
Lloyd Bertine officiating.
Friends will be received
from 5 p.m., until time of
service. Graveside prayers
will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday,
April 9, at Fountains Memo-
rial Park, Homosassa,
www.wilderfuneral. com.

Caroline
Fluchel, 95
INVERNESS
Caroline Fluchel, 95, of
Inverness, Fla., passed
away peacefully Wednes-
day, April 3, 2013, at Sug-
armill Manor under the
care of Hospice of Citrus
County, in Homosassa. She
was born on March 27,
1918, in St. Louis, Mo., to
the late Joseph and
Karolina (Hrdlicka) Cerva.
Caroline was a school
cafeteria manager, and ar-
rived in this area in 1981,
coming from St Louis. She
was Episcopalian by faith,
and loved cooking, deep
sea fishing, crochet, home
remodeling, trips in fast
cars, and traveling.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 50
years, Frederick Fluchel;
one daughter, Carolyn
Fluchel; and four siblings.
Survivors include one son,
Frederick G. (Susan)
Fluchel Jr; one daughter,
Donna Yarborough, both of
Inverness; eight grandchil-
dren; 17 great-
grandchildren; and five
great-great-grandchildren.
The family will be re-
ceiving friends in visita-
tion between the hours of
2 and 4 p.m. Sunday, April
7, 2013, at Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness. Burial
will follow the next day at
2 p.m., at Fero Memorial
Gardens, Beverly Hills,
Pastor Larry Powers offici-
ating. In lieu of flowers,
the family asks that dona-
tions be made in Caro-
line's name to Hospice of
Citrus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. corn.


Homosassa 621-7700
Crystal River 795-8600


Charles
'Cracker'
Holland, 77
HOMOSASSA
SPRINGS
Charles Vance "Crack-
er" Holland, 77, of Ho-
mosassa Springs, died
April 4, 2013. He was born
in Ho-
mosassa
Springs,
Fla., to the
late Fred -
and Vir- '
g i nia
Vance Hol-
land. A
member of Charles
t h e Holland
Church of
Christ in Lecanto, Vance
was also a talented wood
carver, consummate story-
teller, accomplished ath-
lete and avid sports fan.
He retired as a captain in
the Florida Marine Patrol
after 32 years of service.
Vance was preceded in
death by his youngest son,
Kevin Holland. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Mary;
daughter, Virginia Will
(Ken) of Homosassa; son,
Casey Holland (Nancy) of
Roswell, Ga.; grandchil-
dren, Sarah Bryant
(Adam), Taylor Holland,
Victoria Holland, Travis
Holland, Sheena Mantooth
(David), Dustin Will (All-
isha), Adam Will (Patsy;
and great-grandchildren,
Kayden Bryant and
Kynnedy Will. Vance loved
and was proud of his fam-
ily, and was loved and will
be greatly missed by them.
A memorial service for
Vance will be 10 a.m. Mon-
day, April 8, 2013, at the
Church of Christ in
Lecanto. In lieu of flowers
the family would appreci-
ate donations to Camp
Boggy Creek, a camp for
critically and terminally ill
children, at 30500 Brantley
Branch Road, Eustis, FL
32736 or to Hospice of Cit-
rus County of the Nature
Coast, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.




Robert
Fischer, 85
CITRUS SPRINGS
Robert C. Fischer, 85, of
Citrus Springs, died
Wednesday, April 3, 2013,
while under the care of
Hospice of Citrus County.
Funeral services will be at
10 a.m. Monday at Grace
Baptist Church, 2672 W
Edison Place, Citrus
Springs, FL 34434-7110,
with interment at Florida
National Cemetery at
2:30 p.m. Fero Funeral
Home Beverly Hills pro-
vided information.

Jean
Gaumond, 86
BEVERLY HILLS
Jean P Gaumond, 86, of
Beverly Hills, died
Wednesday, April 3, 2013.
Visitation will be from 6 to
8 p.m. Monday, April 8,
2013, at Fero Funeral
Home. Funeral Mass is at
9 a.m. Tuesday, April 9,
2013, at Our Lady of Grace.

* Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


This is a
WINGED TERMITE
Sfagl Antenae
T*ack



BotttPar 0f Wins Sam Su
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Carolyn
Jones, 72
INVERNESS
Carolyn S. Jones, 72, of
Inverness, passed away
Friday, April 5,2013. She is
survived by her loving
family Services will be an-
nounced for a later date.
Please sign the guest-
book at SouthernFuneral
Care.com.

Janis
Lehowicz, 88
LECANTO
Janis D. Lehowicz, 88, of
Utica, N.Y, and Lecanto,
died April 4, 2013, under
the loving care of her fam-
ily and
Hospice of
Citrus
County.i
Janis was f :
born Feb.
13,1925, in y' {
Turin,
N.Y, to the .
late Simon Janice
and Anna Lehowicz
(Kiska)
Lehowicz. She retired as
the office manager for the
Utica, N.Y. Metropolitan
Insurance Company after
43 years of service. Follow-
ing her retirement, she
wintered with her two sis-
ters in Floral City, enjoying
many friends and activi-
ties. She was a member of
the New York State Club,
Floral City Garden Club,
Floral City Historical
Club, Order of the Eastern
Star, Utica, Herkimer Co.
AARP Chapter. She was
active as a volunteer for
the Rescue Mission, Utica.
She attended Our Lady of
Lourdes Catholic Church
in Utica and Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church in
Inverness. She enjoyed
working in her flower gar-
dens, reading books and
traveling.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are five nieces, Sylvia
Bulson (Robert), Beatrice
Raux, (Ron), Mary Ann Le-
chowicz, Dorothy Baxter
(Robert) and Patty Sey-
mour; three nephews,
Larry G., Bruce D. Lehow-
icz and James Lechowicz
(Toni). She also leaves
grand nieces and
nephews. She was pre-
ceded in death by two
brothers, Sigmund and
Raymond Lehowicz and
two sisters, Elizabeth Sum-
ner and Alice Reed.
A Mass of Christian Bur-
ial will be at 10 a.m. Tues-
day, April 9, 2013, at Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church. The family will re-
ceive friends in visitation
from 9 a.m. until the pro-
cession leaves for the
church. A later graveside
service will be held at
Martinsburg Cemetery in
Martinsburg, N.Y The
family requests donations
to Hospice of Citrus
County, PO. Box 641270,
Beverly Hills, FL 34464 in
lieu of flowers.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.


* U.S. flags denote
military service on
local obituaries.



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Laura
Knapik, 52
CRYSTAL RIVER
Laura Star Knapik, 52,
of Crystal River, died
April 4, 2013, at HPH Hos-
pice, Lecanto. Private cre-
mation services are
entrusted to New Serenity
Memorial Funeral Home
& Cremation Svcs. Inc.,
352-563-1394.

Hazel
Nichols, 72
CRYSTAL RIVER
Hazel Anne Nichols, 72,
of Crystal River, Fla.,
passed away Tuesday,
April 2, 2013, at her home
under the loving care of
her family and Hospice of
Citrus County. Mrs.
Nichols was born Jan. 2,
1941, in Eustis, the daugh-
ter of the late James and
Hazel (Edwards) Avery of
Mt. Dora. She taught his-
tory and foreign languages
in several colleges before
teaching at the Lecanto
campus of Central Florida
College.
She was preceded in
death by her oldest son,
Joel; and her father and
mother. Survivors include
her husband of 42 years,
Byron Nichols; her son, Je-
remy Nichols, the father of
her adored granddaugh-
ters, Elizabeth DeLacy and
Taylor Anne Nichols of
Oklahoma City, Okla.; her
aunt, Mildred Phay of
Mount Dora; and cousins,
DiAnne and Joshua Gus-
sler and Mary Beth Hester.
A graveside funeral
service will be conducted
at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 9,
2013, at the Dunnellon Me-
morial Gardens Cemetery
on State Road 40, west of
Dunnellon. The family
suggests that those who
wish in lieu of flowers may
make a memorial contri-
bution to Hospice of Citrus
County at PO. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464.
Strickland Funeral Home
with Crematory assisted
the family with
arrangements.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


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Graveside Service: Mon. 2:00 PM
Fero Memorial Gardens
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Obituaries


I


A6 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14606.11
6044.78
515.17
9006.41
3206.21
1559.98
1125.57
16436.98
923.56


LOW
14434.43
5878.12
508.69
8906.35
3168.88
1539.50
1107.76
16212.93
909.90


CLOSE
14565.25
6037.36
514.73
9000.25
3203.86
1553.28
1123.97
16376.39
923.28


%CHG.
-0.28%
+0.46%
+0.53%
-0.31%
-0.65%
-0.43%
-0.14%
-0.37%
-0.26%


YTD
+11.15%
+13.77%
+13.60%
+6.59%
+6.11%
+8.91%
+10.15%
+9.21%
+8.70%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 2.88 0- 7.85 3.06 -.02 -0.6 V V V -33.5 -57.4 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 0 38.58 38.02 +.11 +0.3 A A A +12.8 +25.7 30 1.80
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 43.46 40.99 -.45 -1.1 V V V +9.1 +29.1 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 101.59 97.60 -1.95 -2.0 V A V +11.7 +41.3 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 12.94 11.97 +.03 +0.3 V V V +3.1 +30.2 46 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.54 12.01 -.29 -2.4 V V V +5.6 +61.6 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 -0-- 43.43 36.11 +.09 +0.2 A A A -7.7 +0.4 29 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 47.92 43.01 +.24 +0.6 V V V +8.7 +22.2 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 22.02 -.98 -4.3 V V V +39.0 +31.6 39 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 0 57.82 57.70 +.11 +0.2 A A A +15.9 +35.9 19 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0 72.68 72.05 +.26 +0.4 V A V +12.9 +17.7 20 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0 52.99 52.50 -.05 -0.1 A A A +13.9 +18.4 27 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.01 -.76 -0.8 V V +2.8 +8.3 9 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 --- 14.30 12.44 -.21 -1.7 V V V -3.9 +3.2 9 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 22.93 -.15 -0.6 V V V +9.2 +20.6 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 71.45 70.06 -.63 -0.9 A V A +13.3 +44.3 23 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 20.94 -.20 -0.9 V V V +1.6 -21.2 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 --0- 215.90 209.41 -1.90 -0.9 V V V +9.3 +4.2 15 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 23.99 21.32 +.06 +0.3 V V V +1.0 +37.6 25
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 --0- 39.98 38.39 -.24 -0.6 A V A +8.1 +25.5 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 100.81 101.42 +.79 +0.8 A A A +15.0 +6.2 19 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -0-- 32.89 28.70 +.11 +0.4 A A A +7.5 -5.6 16 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 64.23 62.67 -.32 -0.5 V V V +12.6 +27.5 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 61.20 0 79.41 79.54 +.31 +0.4 A A A +15.0 +30.8 18 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 14.10 36.89 15.45 +.37 +2.5 A A A -21.6 -57.2 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.00 19.62 -.04 -0.2 A V A +8.7 +17.0 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 --0- 8.44 7.99 +.02 +0.3 V V V +12.1 +23.8 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 69.29 49.42 -1.07 -2.1 V V V +19.5 -13.8 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 100.14 98.12 -.86 -0.9 V A V +13.8 +24.5 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.27 6.23 +.02 +0.3 A A A +9.9 +125.8 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 --0- 35.73 34.20 -.29 -0.8 V V V +10.7 +9.6 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 58.68 57.88 -.39 -0.7 A A A +21.0 +60.7 19 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 93.00 88.98 -1.30 -1.4 V A V +21.4 +46.1 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 49.86 49.56 +.26 +0.5 A A A +14.5 +33.7 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 --0 30.07 28.14 -.03 -0.1 V A V +11.7 +7.7 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 0 77.60 76.39 +.19 +0.2 A A A +12.0 +29.2 15 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 48.18 47.01 +.42 +0.9 V A V +27.0 +43.1 21 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months i Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates
M wH




The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.71
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
Natural gas rose
jumped for a
second straight
day after a re-
port showed the
country burned
through some of
its glut of supply
last week.
Crude oil fell on
worries about
demand.



112

EM^SB


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .06 0.07 -0.01 .07
6-month T-bill .09 0.10 -0.01 .13
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 ... .18
2-year T-note .23 0.23 ... .34
5-year T-note .69 0.70 -0.01 1.01
10-year T-note 1.71 1.76 -0.05 2.18
30-year T-bond 2.88 2.99 -0.11 3.33


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.59 2.70 -0.11 2.83
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.07 4.11 -0.04 4.60
Barclays USAggregate 1.80 1.84 -0.04 2.27
Barclays US High Yield 5.63 5.64 -0.01 7.25
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.79 3.86 -0.07 4.07
Barclays CompT-Bdldx .97 1.00 -0.03 1.21
Barclays US Corp 2.70 2.74 -0.04 3.45


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 92.70
Ethanol (gal) 2.42
Heating Oil (gal) 2.91
Natural Gas (mm btu) 4.13
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.86
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1575.40
Silver (oz) 27.20
Platinum (oz) 1534.40
Copper (Ib) 3.34
Palladium (oz) 722.75
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.40
Corn (bu) 6.29
Cotton (Ib) 0.87
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 374.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.48
Soybeans (bu) 13.62
Wheat (bu) 6.99


PVS.
93.26
2.42
2.96
3.95
2.90
PVS.
1551.80
26.75
1516.70
3.35
724.30
PVS.
1.27
1.40
6.30
0.88
379.80
1.41
13.72
6.94


%CHG
-0.60
-0.04
-1.82
+4.51
-1.21
%CHG
+1.52
+1.69
+1.17
-0.16
-0.21
%CHG
-0.97
+0.47
-0.16
-1.74
-1.50
+4.94
-0.75
+0.72


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.59 -.05 +6.3 +12.5 +10.8 +6.0
BondA m 12.96 +.03 +0.6 +5.0 +6.1 +4.4
CaplncBuA m 55.08 -.27 +5.3 +12.8 +8.9 +3.2
CpWIdGrIA m 39.09 -.31 +5.5 +14.9 +7.2 +1.4
EurPacGrA m 41.76 -.45 +1.3 +9.2 +3.6 -0.1
FnlnvA m 43.60 -.19 +7.2 +13.7 +9.9 +3.5
GrthAmA m 36.70 -.20 +6.8 +13.3 +9.1 +3.4
IncAmerA m 19.02 -.06 +6.2 +13.7 +10.6 +5.5
InvCoAmA m 32.55 -.16 +8.4 +13.8 +9.2 +3.8
NewPerspA m 32.65 -.30 +4.4 +12.0 +8.1 +3.3
WAMutlnvA m 33.87 -.09 +9.1 +14.6 +12.2 +4.6
Dodge & Cox Income 13.89 +.02 +1.0 +5.9 +6.3 +7.0
IntlStk 35.51 -.13 +2.5 +13.3 +4.0 0.0
Stock 134.08 -.63 +10.5 +21.2 +10.6 +3.6
Fidelity Contra 82.73 -.52 +7.6 +8.5 +11.6 +5.3
GrowCo 99.04 -.58 +6.2 +4.0 +12.2 +6.6
LowPriStk d 43.17 -.28 +9.3 +15.1 +12.1 +7.8
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg x 55.02 -.51 +9.5 +13.6 +11.7 +4.8
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.31 ... +5.2 +14.3 +10.0 +6.1
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.57 +.07 +2.3 +10.7 +6.7 +9.1
GIBondAdv 13.52 +.06 +2.3 +11.0 +6.9 +9.4
Harbor Intllnstl d 62.80 -.51 +1.1 +9.7 +5.8 -0.1
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.95 -.20 +5.7 +5.1 +11.3 +5.7
Vanguard 500Adml 143.19 -.61 +9.5 +13.6 +11.7 +4.9
5001nv 143.18 -.62 +9.5 +13.4 +11.6 +4.8
GNMAAdml 10.91 +.01 +0.7 +2.5 +5.5 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.41 +.04 +1.0 +5.4 +5.9 +5.6
STGradeAd 10.81 ... +0.5 +3.4 +3.6 +4.0
Tgtet2025 14.31 -.04 +5.3 +10.3 +8.6 +4.3
TotBdAdml 11.08 +.03 +0.7 +4.4 +6.0 +5.6
Totlntl 15.19 -.10 +1.6 +10.1 +3.3 -1.6
TotStlAdm 38.91 -.14 +9.6 +13.9 +11.9 +5.5
TotStldx 38.89 -.15 +9.6 +13.7 +11.8 +5.4
Welltn 36.00 -.03 +7.0 +13.0 +9.9 +6.1
WelltnAdm 62.17 -.06 +7.0 +13.1 +10.0 +6.1
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks sank Friday on w
about the job market. Ei
ers hired 88,000 worker
month, the fewest since
The Dow Jones industrial
age was down as much
points in morning trading
pared its loss as the day
gressed.

Hanesbrands
Close: $46.84A1.72 or 3.8
The maker of Hanes under
T-shirts said that it will begi
a quarterly dividend of 20 c
share in June.

4,

d J F
52-week range
$24.64
Vol.:1.7m (1.5x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$4.61 b
J.C. Penney
Close: $15.45 A0.37 or 2.5
Shares of the retailer rose
announced the start of the
its new home shops.
$21




52-week range
$14.10
Vol.: 27.4m (2.0x avg.)
Mkt. Cap: $3.4 b Yie
Southwest Airlines
Close: $12.81 A0.01 or 0.1
The airline's key revenue m
was flat in March, another i
airlines are struggling to se
high-priced tickets.
$14

1 1


52-week range
$7.76
Vol.: 6.8m (0.9x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$9.33 b Yie
Radware
Close: $29.07 V-8.51 or -2
The technology company c
first-quarter earnings and r
forecasts due to weaker-th.
pected sales in certain cou
$40-
-'


d J F
52-week range
$26.76
Vol.:3.6m (15.5x avg.) F
Mkt. Cap:$594.8 m
F5 Networks
Close: $73.21 V-17.21 or-
The networking equipment
ny said that its second-qua
income and revenue will fa
its expectations.



,,,
52-week range
$71.95
Vol.: 12.5m (7.4x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$5.75 b


worries
mploy-
s last
June.
al aver-
as 171
g, but it
-nr _


Stocks end lower


Money&Markets
1,600 ........................... S& P 500
,- ~,:,Close: 1,553.28
Change: -6.70 (-0.4%)
1,520 ........ 10 DAYS .........


Associated Press

NEW YORK Stocks fell on Wall
Street Friday after the government re-
ported a sharp slowdown in hiring last
month that was far worse than econo-
mists had expected.
The Dow Jones industrial average
ended 40.86 points lower at 14,565.25, a
loss of 0.3 percent The index was down
as much as 171 points in the early going,
then rose gradually through the rest of
the day to reclaim much of its early loss.
U.S. employers added just 88,000 jobs
in March, the Labor Department re-
ported. That's half the average of the pre-
vious six months. (See story, below.) The
report was a disappointment for in-
vestors following positive signs on hous-
ing and the job market over the winter
The survey, one of the most closely
watched indicators of the economy,
dented investors' confidence that the
U.S. was poised for a sustained recovery
The stock market has surged this year,
pushing the Dow to another record high
close on Tuesday The index is still up
11.2 percent this year.
"Things are still looking decent, but
there's no doubt that this was a bit of a
disappointment," said Brad Sorensen,
Charles Schwab's director of market and
sector research. "We're watching to see:
is this the start of another soft patch?"
In other trading, the Standard & Poor's


Associated Press
A help wanted sign stands Friday in the window of a barber shop in Richmond, Va. U.S.
employers added just 88,000 jobs in March, the fewest in nine months and a sharp
retreat after a period of strong hiring. The slowdown is a reminder that the job market's
path back to health will be uneven.



Dim labor report shows



US added just 88K jobs


Associated Press


y p- WASHINGTON A
streak of robust job growth
HBI came to a halt in March,
3% signaling that U.S. employ-
wear and ers may have grown cau-
n paying tious in a fragile economy
ents per The gain of 88,000 jobs

was the smallest in nine
7 months. Even a decline in
unemployment to a four-
year low of 7.6 percent was
M A nothing to cheer: It fell
]P$47.08 only because more people
PE:20.2 stopped looking for work
Yield:... and were no longer
counted as unemployed.
5% JCP Friday's weak jobs re-
after it port from the Labor De-
rollout of apartment caught analysts
by surprise and served as
a reminder that the eco-
nomic recovery is still
Slow, nearly four years
after the Great Recession
r ended.
I $36.89 "This is not a good re-
E:... port through and through,"
Id: 5.2% Dan Greenhaus, chief eco-
nomic strategist at broker-
LUV age firm BTIG, said in a
10 note to clients.
measure
sign that Economists had no sin-
11 more gle explanation for why
hiring weakened so
sharply and broadly -
from retailers and manu-
facturers to electronics and
1 building materials compa-
nies. Some said deep gov-
I $13.58 ernment spending cuts that
PE:22.9 began taking effect March 1
Id: 0.3 might have contributed to
RDWR the slowdown, along with
2.6% higher Social Security
ut its taxes. Others raised the
avenue possibility that last month
entries. was just a pause in an im-
: proving job market
Whatever the reasons,
slower job growth will ex-
tend the Federal Reserve's
policy of keeping borrow-
I $40.83 ing costs at record lows.
PE: 581.4 March's job gain was less
Yield:... than half the average of
FFIV 196,000 jobs in the previous
19.0% six months, raising the
compa- prospect that, for the fourth
rter net straight spring, the econ-
II short of omy and hiring could show
strength early in the year,
only to weaken later Some
economists say weak hiring
may persist into summer
1 before rebounding by fall.
I $139.20 The percentage of work-
PE:20.9 ing-age Americans with a
Yield:... job or looking for one fell


Jobless rate fa
The U.S. economy a
88,000 jobs in March
the unemployment ra
to 7.6 percent, down
7.7 percent in Februa
11 percent ......................
10 .. ..............
9
8
7
6
5



SOURCE: Labor Dept.


Friday's re

also show

hiring w

stronger

January a
February t

previous

estimate

to 63.3 percent in
the lowest such f
nearly 34 years.
Stocks plummet
the report but n
their losses later
day The Dow Jone
trial average close
about 41 points.
indexes also decli
The Labor Dep
uses a survey o1
large businesses
ernment agencies
mine how many
added or lost eaci
That's the survey 1
duced the gain o
jobs for March.
The government
separate survey o
holds to calculate
employment ra
counted 290,000
people as unemp
not because they
job but because
stopped looking fo
The percentage
ing-age adults with
looking for one is
that economists
participation rate


lowest since 1979. Nor-
lls mally during an economic
added recovery, an expanding
and economy lures job seekers
ate fell back into the labor market.
from But this time, many have
ary. stayed on the sidelines, and
................ more have joined them.
February Longer-term trends
7.6% have helped keep the par-
Sticipation rate down. The
baby boomers have begun
to retire. The share of men
20 and older in the labor
force has dropped as man-
ufacturing has shrunk.
After expanding from
adjusted the early 1950s through the
..... ......... mid-1990s, the share of
011 2012 women working or looking
AP for work has plateaued.
Fewer teenagers are work-
ing. And some people who
port have left the job market
ed are getting by on govern-
ve ment aid, particularly So-
as cial Security's program for
the disabled.
in Heidi Shierholz, an
economist at the liberal
md Economic Policy Institute,
han said the labor force partic-
ipation among those ages
ly 25 to 54 "prime age"
O' workers has dropped to
kd. 81.1 percent. It hasn't been
lower since 1984.
March, Gary Burtless, senior
figure in fellow in economic studies
at the Brookings Institu-
;ed after tion, noted some Ameri-
arrowed cans have likely stopped
r in the looking for work because
es indus- their unemployment bene-
ed down fits have run out. People
Broader must be looking for a job to
ned. qualify for unemployment
artment benefits.
f mostly "If people aren't collect-
and gov- ing benefits, they have one
to deter- less reason to be out pound-
jobs are ing the pavement looking
h month. for a job," Burtless said.
that pro- Friday's report also
)f 88,000 showed hiring was
stronger in January and
it uses a February than previously
f house- estimated. January job
* the un- growth was revised up
ate. It from 119,000 to 148,000.
fewer February was revised
loyed from 236,000 to 268,000.
found a Those revised totals sug-
;e they gest some hiring might
ir one. have again occurred ear-
of work- lier in the year than usual.
a job or Job gains have averaged
a figure 168,000 in the past three
call the months, close to the trend
It's the of the past two years.


500 index fell 6.70 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 1,553.28. The index logged its worst
week of year, falling 1 percent.
Technology stocks fell the most of the
10 industry groups in the index, dropping
1 percent. Among big decliners in tech
stocks, Cisco Systems fell 43 cents, or 2
percent, to $20.61. Oracle dropped 34
cents, or 1 percent, to $32.03.
Investors were reducing their expo-
sure to risk. The utilities and telecom-
munications industries bucked the
downward trend. Both rose 0.4 percent.
The rich dividends and stable earnings
provided by those companies make them
attractive to investors who want to play it
safe.
Natural gas companies were among
the best performers on the S&P 500 as
the price of the fuel rose 4.5 percent on
concerns about supplies. The price of the
fuel has risen 21 percent since the start
of the year. Cabot Oil & Gas climbed
$3.32, or 5.1 percent, to $67.96 and WPX
Energy gained 80 cents, or 5.2 percent, to
$16.15.
Stocks pared their early losses as some
investors inferred that slowing U.S.
growth meant the Federal Reserve would
stick to its stimulus program. The central
bank is buying $85 billion dollars in
bonds every month as part of an effort to
revive the economy Its actions have been
a big factor pushing the stock market
higher this year.


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 A7






"Love is Nature's second sun.


Page A8 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013



PINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
0 Mac Harris ..........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................ guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .........................copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


DIVERSIFY




Power mix



should include



nuclear option


In recent testimony before
a state House subcom-
mittee, a top
Progress/Duke Energy offi-
cial emphasized that despite
closing the Crystal River Nu-
clear Plant, nuclear power
will be a part of the com-
pany's future en-
ergy mix in THE I
Florida.
Progress En- Top Duk
ergy Florida pres- says nu(
ident Alex Glenn of future
told the commit- port
tee Florida now
gets more than OUR 01
60 percent of its
electric power We
from natural gas,
and while gas is historically
cheap now, gas prices are
volatile and can change
based on a variety of possible
events.
As a result, he told the com-
mittee, Progress/Duke En-
ergy is continuing with plans
for the Levy County nuclear
plant, with full approval of
the project from the federal
government expected by the
end of next year.
We agree that nuclear
should be part of our future
power mix. As we have stated
in the past, we are concerned
that the company is becoming
too reliant on natural gas,
whose price can be affected
by numerous external events.
These include a hurricane in


the Gulf, or a court decision
restricting cracking, the cur-
rent recovery method where
fluids are injected in deep
gas wells to release gas.
With the closed nuclear
plant now becoming a "bone-
yard" where other nuclear


SSUE:
ke official
clear part
re energy
tfolio.

PINION:
agree.


plants can buy
equipment for
pennies on the
dollar, and two of
the coal units at
the plant slated
for closing in the
next few years,
Progress/Duke
Energy is on a
path to increase
the role of natu-


ral gas in our energy supply
over the next decade or more.
The construction of a new
gas-fired generating plant as
now planned will only add to
the region's reliance on a single
fuel for electric power gener-
ation and make us increasingly
vulnerable to the impact of
price fluctuations and possi-
ble supply interruptions.
This is not a good path for
the long-term energy security
of the region. For this reason,
we encourage the power
company to continue with its
plans for the Levy County
plant as a way to hedge
against the uncertainties that
attend heavy reliance on any
one fuel for electric power
generation.


Junk in Apache Shores Turn mall into casino


I'd like to know when the county
code enforcement officer's going
to do something about this junk-
yard down here on the corner of
... (State Road) 200 in Apache
Shores. This stuff is straggling
all over the sidewalks. The wind's
blowing the last couple of days.
It's blowing all over the streets.
Why can't they put this stuff in
the buildings that they own
down there instead of
leaving it all over the
street? O
Move over
Do people not under-
stand that when an
emergency vehicle or a
police car that has
lights and sirens going
means that you give CAL
them the right of way? 5Q6
Today at the corner of U56"
(State Road) 44 and
(County Road) 486, the people
just kept going right through
the light and the police car had
to stop in order to get through
the intersection. It's just de-
plorable that people don't give
up the right of way to our law
enforcement and emergency
vehicles.
Don't give away water
I saw in the paper this morn-
ing that it says they're having a
Save Your Waters essay contest.
Now I think if they put in the
essay, whoever wrote the essay,
the thing, the key would be
don't give our water away to all
these water bottling companies
like you've been doing. If you do
that, we could save a lot more
water and we would even like
conservation. Millions of gallons
are being given away daily and
I'm tired of it.


I


(


The Crystal River Mall seems
to be in its death throes, so why
not clear it out and turn it into a
casino? Make Crystal River a
destination instead of just a
small town you pass through on
your way to the Tampa-St. Pete
area. It would be perfect loca-
tion wise and maybe, just
maybe, bring in new auxiliary
businesses.
Nix impact fees
JND Amazing that the
flC board of commission-
IEr ers can't make up their
. mind about these im-
pact fees. You know, I'm
looking to move my
house off the property
yPs it's on now and I was
considering Citrus
S579 County, but however,
) 5 7 Marion County has no
impact taxes and that's
why they have more business and
they have more people living there.
It's a much nicer community. So
maybe the board of commissioners
might sit down and think about
what they're doing to this area. They
don't want any improvements
here. They don't want anything.
Think about it, people. Get rid
of them. Scott Adams is the
only one that's doing any good.
Pepper them squirrels
This is an answer to a ques-
tion that was posted by some-
one wanting to know what to
sprinkle over birdseed to keep
the squirrels out of it. The an-
swer is cayenne pepper. The
birds don't taste it, but the
squirrels definitely do. So sprin-
kle it over other medium and
mix it up a little bit and you will
still have the birds and no
squirrels.


George Chapman,
"All Fools," 1599


Speech features new, old Jeb


eb Bush and I have never
comprised a mutual admi-
ration society, and no one
will ever likely confuse us with
one. However, there were pas-
sages to admire in his recent
speech to the Conservative Po-
litical Action Con-
ference, which
seems to have been
applauded more
warmly elsewhere
than there.
There were also
things not to like, but
I'm getting ahead of
myself.
Bush's speech was Martin I
momentous for cau-
tioning conserva- FLOI
tives not to be smug VOI
about their personal
successes or so contemptuous
of those who don't make it.
"When we speak to people
and make the case for conser-
vative principles, you should
know that the happy exception
does not always prove the rule,"
he said. "It is not a validation of
our conservative principles if
we can only point to the in-
creasingly rare individual who
overcomes adversity and suc-
ceeds in America.
"Here's reality: If you're for-
tunate enough to count yourself
among the privileged, the rest
of the nation is drowning. If
you're born poor, if your par-
ents didn't go to college, if you
didn't know your father, if Eng-
lish isn't spoken at home, then
the odds are stacked against
you. You are more likely to stay
poor today than at any other
time since World War II."
Was Mitt Romney listening?
Regrettably, however, other
parts of the speech were the
same old Jeb.
Painting with a broad brush,
he denounced liberals as be-
lieving that "anyone who has
climbed to the top 1 percent,
top 10 percent or top 20 percent
has committed some form of


D
R
(


gross social breach, and they
deserve our scorn."
As a liberal, I consider myself
insulted.
I don't envy anyone for doing
well, so long as it's done with
fairness to those who help him
(or her) get there,
and without pulling
up the ladder be-
hind him.
"^ The case for
higher taxes on
those who can afford
them isn't about
punishing or humili-
ating them. It's about
)yckman protecting and per-
fecting the society
UIDA that facilitated their
DES successes.
It would be inter-
esting to know how many well-
paid executives attended public
colleges that their employees'
children can no longer afford.
It's the opposite of protecting
and perfecting when we allow
our schools and colleges to lan-
guish financially, our roads and
bridges to crumble, and mil-
lions of people to continue
struggling for their lives with-
out health insurance.
And it is wrong to hold the
public schools singularly re-
sponsible for allegedly wide-
spread failure especially in
the absence of any showing that
private or even charter schools
can do better overall with the
same demographics.
Bush asserted that for every
child who reaches "full abili-
ties," there are a hundred who
are "stuck in failing and indif-
ferent schools." That strikes me
as a wild exaggeration.
Yes, there are schools where
children do not learn as well as
we would wish. But to put all
the blame on the schools, and
their faculties, is like faulting
the fire department for failing
to save a poorly constructed
house. Many students not a
few from prosperous families -


come from households where
no parent is willing or able to
insist on homework, turn off the
TV or back up the teacher when
she asks for support.
Some children never see a
book until they show up at
school. Jeb's recognition of the
poverty trap implicitly ac-
knowledges this. It's his solu-
tion that's the problem.
The current campaign
against the public schools
smacks of self-fulfilling
prophecy Destroying public
confidence the object of so-
called parent trigger legislation
- is no way to improve them.
The evil in the "accountabil-
ity" demanded by Bush and
other predominantly Republi-
can "reformers" is its emphasis
on standardized testing to
grade schools and teachers and
potentially ruin careers.
Florida has plenty of experi-
ence with the unreliability of
those tests and what they have
done to strip the curriculum of
arts, physical education, recess
and anything else that might get
in the way of what's tested.
They are also an invitation -
for some, an irresistible one -
to corruption. In Atlanta last
week, 35 educators including
a former superintendent were
indicted in the grossest cheat-
ing scheme in American history
The test papers they're accused
of altering turned out to be too
good to be true. According to
the New York Times, the pres-
sure came from the top down.
It does not defend or excuse
those who may be convicted to
ask a simple question: Why is
anyone surprised that such a
thing would happen?

Martin Dyckman is a retired
associate editor of the
newspaper formerly known
as the St. Petersburg Times.
He can be reached at
dyckmanm@bellsouth.net.


LETTERS to the Editor


Use rakes, not swords
I have lived in Crystal
River five years and have
watched the gradual but defi-
nite demise of our springs,
King's Bay and my own canal
because of toxic lyngbia. Hav-
ing met Art Jones in 2012, I
was eager to get involved in
his monumental effort, the
One Rake at a Time cleanup
project. As you probably
know, Art Jones has been
named Citizen of the Year by
the city of Crystal River and
is an active participant in the
Kings Bay Rotary He was re-
cently invited to appear be-
fore state Sen. Charlie Dean's
subcommittee on Environ-
mental Preservation and
Conservation. His presenta-
tion was superb and sup-
ported by Crystal River
Mayor Jim Farley and County
Commission Chairman Joe
Meek. The One Rake at a
Time project got a unani-
mous thumbs-up by all sena-
tors present.
I am willing to bet that
there is not one person in Cit-
rus County who doesn't want
to have clean, pollution-free
water in our "Outstanding
Florida Waterways." I am
also willing to bet that pro-
tecting the manatee popula-
tion is foremost in everyone's
mind. In order to do so, we
must do everything in our
power to clean up King's Bay,
the springs and Crystal
River's fragile aquatic


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

ecosystem. Failing to do
something now to protect
their food source, these won-
drous creatures cannot sur-
vive. Lyngbya algae is
suffocating all natural vegeta-
tion and it must be removed.
Our manatees and our water
are the keys to our economic
survival. With the recent
downward financial trends,


our tourism industry is tee-
tering in the delicate balance
between prosperity and dis-
aster for Crystal River and
Citrus County
I am challenging each and
everyone of you to take re-
sponsibility for our environ-
ment, to be part of the
solution, not the problem.
Urge your friends and neigh-
bors to use less water, less
fertilizer, less pollutants and
stop being negative. Take
positive action to preserve
the quality of this magnifi-
cent place we choose to live.
Together we can make
tremendous strides in cor-
recting years of abuse. Please
get involved today.
Sharon Kerner
Crystal River

Excellent leadership
I wish to join those who
saw fit to commend an impor-
tant office in Citrus County. I
refer to the Tax Collectors'
Office. Particularly since that
office is negative in nature,
"Who likes taxes?" I have
found the folks working there
have been helpful and effi-
cient with a great attitude. I
found the supervisor of elec-
tions with the same attitude.
This, in my opinion, indicated
superior leadership at the
top of these two offices.
Neville Anderson
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Keep harvesters
running
A baby manatee was
born in the water in
front of my house yester-
day morning. I wish I
could have seen it hap-
pen, but I heard about it
from an excited neigh-
bor who witnessed the
birth. By the time I spot-
ted it, the baby was
being taught by its
mother how to nurse
and rise to the surface
to breathe. It was an
awesome experience to
witness, as the mother
would roll on her back
with the infant between
her flippers, showing it
the world. After several
hours, the afternoon
wind began to pick up
and bits of the invasive
algae, lyngbya, began
floating in, as it does
most every day. Only this
day, the lyngbya contin-
ued to come in thicker
and thicker.
Due to my location, the
wind tends to blow most
of the lyngbya directly to
my shoreline, so I keep a
'One Rake at a Time' pon-
toon barge along my sea-
wall and rake up as much
of this noxious weed as
possible when its comes
in. I can usually keep the
surface area of upper
Hunter Springs Run look-
ing pretty good. Only yes-
terday, the lyngbya didn't
stop coming. It came in
faster and thicker and no
matter how much of it I
raked up onto the barge,
it kept getting worse. I
was definitely losing the
battle trying to do it all
manually
This is disturbing
enough when it just inter-
feres with swimming,
boating or fishing. But yes-
terday, I noticed that the
mother was having to take
her baby to areas not nor-
mally used by the mana-
tees in order to find clear
water where the baby
could surface to breathe.
Ordinarily, I would have
expected the manatees to
enter the House Spring
enclosure, next door,
where I regularly enjoy
watching up to a dozen
manatees lounging there
during cold weather.
But there were no
manatees in House
Spring yesterday I
walked over to take a
look at this normally
pristine spring. A thick
mat of lyngbya had
blown into the spring
area, completely cover-
ing the surface of the
water with a layer sev-
eral inches thick. Not
even an experienced
adult manatee would
have been able to get a
breath of air, much less
a newborn. I was
stunned, since I had
never seen that much
lyngbya fill up House
Spring before, and it
was also continuing to
drift in and fill in the
entire end of Hunter's
Spring Run.
That was when it oc-
curred to me the har-
vester machines that
normally maintain some
control over the lyngbya
growth had not been oper-
ating for the last couple
weeks. They hadn't
stopped because they


weren't effective at re-
moving tons of lyngbya
and they hadn't stopped
because they were lack-
ing any of the necessary
agency approvals and per-
mits. They had stopped
because one group in
Crystal River apparently
believes it knows more
than all the other agen-
cies, manatee tour groups
and regular folks like me,
a retired biologist. This
manatee club is now
threatening lawsuits to
keep the lyngbya from
being removed, because
they mistakenly think the
removal of the weed is
more dangerous to the
manatees than leaving it
to grow.
I disagree with that
conclusion, and I'm pretty
sure the manatees would
disagree as well. As the
sun set last night, I was
exhausted from filling the
barge nearly half full of
lyngbya, all the while
watching more of it drift
toward me and the mana-
tees. In the morning, the
mother and baby manatee
were gone. I do hope it
survived.
Doug Sonerholm
Crystal River

RSC budget
opposed
In your "How Your
Lawmakers Voted" sec-
tion for the legislative
week ending March 22,
you referenced the "Con-
servatives' Budget." In
your description of the
proposal, you noted that
spending was reduced
dramatically, tax rates
were reduced and drilling
would be allowed in the
Arctic National Wildlife
Refuge. In my opinion,
you left out one crucial
detail, which was funda-
mentally why I opposed
the RSC budget.
It's worth saying at the
start that the RSC budget
proposal was put forward
by my very good friend
and colleague Rep. Rob
Woodall (R-Ga.). In addi-
tion to serving alongside
one another on the House
Rules Committee, Rob
and I have also worked


closely together on getting
the Fair Tax pushed
through Congress as
well as a Balanced
Budget Amendment to the
Constitution. For the most
part, we very much see
eye-to-eye on the fiscal
challenges facing this
country and what it is
going to take to overcome
them. But at the end of
the day, however, despite
agreeing with many of the
goals and proposals in the
RSC budget, I could not
support RSC's plan to
alter Medicare for those
60 and up.
In my opinion, if you
are 58 or 59 and you have
been planning retirement
your entire working lives
with a specific set of ben-
efits in mind, it is simply
too late to go back and re-
plan with a new system in
mind. Furthermore, the
Board of Trustees of
Medicare have told us
that under their Chief Ac-
tuary's best estimates,
Medicare's main trust
fund will not run out of
funds for 11 years. That
date means that if some-
thing is done soon to save
the program, there is still
time to prevent the trust
fund's demise while still
keeping benefits exactly
as they are for those 55
and up. That is well worth
doing.
I have given my word
that I would do everything
possible to preserve bene-
fits exactly as they are for
anybody 55 and older. The
House Republican budget
proposal, which I did sup-
port, balances the budget
in ten years, reforms our
broken 74,000 page tax
code, prevents Medicare
from crashing in 11 years,
and does so while not
making any changes to the
program for those 55 and
older.
It's also worth noting
that it preserves the exist-
ing Medicare option -
just as it is now for any-
one younger than 55. In
my opinion, the House
Republican budget was
the right choice over the
RSC substitute and that's
why I voted the way I did.
Rep. Rich Nugent


Sound OFF


FOur 18HOS better than two long run.
NO fan Of earl VOting


In response to the headline article in
Tuesday's paper, March 26, about the
parkway being put through with two
lanes to save money. If you're going to
do the job, let's do it right the first time
because it will cost a lot more in the
long run to put in a two-lane highway at
this point and then make it into a four-
lane highway later. So when you're
doing something, do it right the first
time and save yourself money in the


I1VIINVll Ul Wally Vl li
I'm calling about the early voting. I
don't think we should have early voting
and one of the reasons is, what if the
person that you vote for dies? Then
you've lost your vote. I think there
should be more polls open and that way
people could go on the same day. I just
think early voting is ridiculous. There
are other reasons to consider too. How-
ever, I won't go into that now.


NICK NICHOLAS
II I .: P T- L I E I


Arrow RuV




COMO MRV




BOAT SALES C SERVICE




pLANTAON





MOTORSBORTS


Outdoor Adventure Expo


Saturday, April 13th 10am 5pm


Come to the

Outdoor Adventure Expo

at the Crystal River Mail.

Many outdoor activity organizations and
retailers will be exhibiting, as well as a
Kids Arts & Crafts with rock climbing wall.


CI RUS COU E


K> Y[
I.


You're Invited

Help honor Gary Maidhof for his years of
service to Scouting and the community.


Friends ,:,f Scouting Dinner
Friday April 12 6:30 pm















RSVP to John Murphy (352) 563-3255
jmurphy@chronicleonline.com
h O00EIOQ


\[ KI\ [<


OPINION


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 A9












NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nation BRIEFS

Honored


Budget battle


World BRIEFS

Fancy


Associated Press
Bernard Rustad, right,
embraces his former
commander, Lt. Barry
Byrd, on Friday after
Rustad was awarded the
Bronze Star Medal with
Valor at a ceremony in
Billings, Mont. Rustad
was recognized for
helping wounded soldiers
in the midst of an artillery
attack as a medic during
the Vietnam War.


Suspect used
detective's gun
JACKSON, Miss. -A Mis-
sissippi murder suspect used
a detective's gun to kill the
detective and then himself in-
side police headquarters.
Mississippi Bureau of In-
vestigation spokesman
Warren Strain said Friday
that 23-year-old Jeremy
Powell overpowered Jack-
son Police Detective Eric
Smith, took his service
weapon and shot Smith.
Powell then shot himself.
Officials are slowly re-
leasing details of how the
men died Thursday. The
state agency took over the
investigation from the Jack-
son Police Department.
Powell was being ques-
tioned in connection with
the stabbing death earlier
this week of a 20-year-old
Jackson man.
Gun shop
loses license
EAST WINDSOR, Conn.
- A Connecticut shop that
sold a gun to the Newtown
school shooter's mother
has lost its federal firearms
license.
The Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Ex-
plosives revoked the li-
cense of Riverview Gun
Sales in East Windsor,
about 15 miles north of
Hartford, in December. The
agency didn't disclose why.
It was first reported Thurs-
day by The Journal News of
White Plains, N.Y.
Authorities raided the
store for undisclosed rea-
sons shortly after the De-
cember school shootings.
Shop owner David La-
Guercia has said Nancy
Lanza bought a gun from
him years ago, but couldn't
remember what kind.
Adam Lanza killed 20
first-graders and six adults
with his mother's rifle. He
also killed his mother and
himself.
Alleged gang
member arrested
DENVER- An alleged
white supremacist gang
member arrested during the
investigation into the killing of
Colorado's prisons chief will
make his first court appear-
ance Monday.
James Lohr was arrested
early Friday after a brief
chase in Colorado Springs.
Authorities had announced
they were looking for him
and a fellow gang member
as persons of interest in the
slaying of Tom Clements.
The only named suspect
in the case is another mem-
ber of the 211 Crew prison
gang who was killed in a
shootout last month in Texas.
Lohr has a criminal record
dating back to 1992 and was
wanted on three separate
warrants unrelated to the
Clements investigation.
Authorities are investigat-
ing various motives in
Clements' killing, including
whether it was a hit ordered
by the gang.
-From wire reports


Obama seeks deal,

proposes cuts to

Social Security

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Seeking an
elusive middle ground, President
Barack Obama is proposing a 2014
budget that embraces tax in-
creases abhorred by Republicans
as well as reductions, loathed by
liberals, in the growth of Social Se-
curity and other benefit programs.
The plan, if ever enacted, could
touch almost all Americans. The
rich would see tax increases, the
poor and the elderly would get
smaller annual increases in their
benefits, and middle income tax-
payers would slip into higher tax
brackets despite Obama's re-
peated vows not to add to the tax
burden of the middle class. His
proposed changes, once phased in,
would mean a cut in Social Secu-
rity benefits of nearly $1,000 a year
for an average 85-year-old, smaller
cuts for younger retirees.
Obama proposed much the same
without success to House Speaker
John Boehner in December The
response Friday was dismissive
from Republicans and hostile from
liberals, labor and advocates for
the elderly.
But the proposal aims to tackle
worrisome deficits that are adding
to the national debt and placing a
long-term burden on the nation,
prompting praise from independ-
ent deficit hawks. Obama's budget
also proposes new spending for
public works projects, pre-school
education and for job and benefit
assistance for veterans.


President Barack Obama speaks Wednesday at the Police Academy in
Denver. A senior administration official said Friday that Obama's pro-
posed budget will call for reductions in in the growth of federal Social
Security pensions and other benefit programs in an attempt to strike a
compromise with congressional Republicans.


"It's not the president's ideal ap-
proach to our budget challenges,
but it is a serious compromise
proposition that demonstrates that
he wants to get things done," said
White House press secretary Jay
Carney
The budget, which Obama will
release Wednesday to cover the
budget year beginning Oct 1, pro-
poses spending cuts and revenue
increases that would result in $1.8
trillion in deficit reductions over
10 years. That figure would replace
$1.2 trillion in automatic spending
cuts that are poised to take effect
over the next 10 years if Congress
and the president don't come up
with an alternative, thus delivering
a net increase in deficit reduction
of $600 billion.
Counting reductions and higher
taxes that Congress and Obama
have approved since 2011, the 2014


budget would contribute to $4.3
trillion in total deficit reduction by
2023.
The budget wouldn't affect the
$85 billion in cuts that kicked in
last month for this budget year
Once the change is fully phased
in, Social Security benefits for a
typical middle-income 65-year-old
would be about $136 less a year, ac-
cording to an analysis of Social Se-
curity data. At age 75, annual
benefits under the new index
would be $560 less. At 85, the cut
would be $984 a year
Advocates for the elderly say
seniors pay a higher portion of
their income for health care,
where costs rise more quickly than
inflation.
The White House has said the
cost-of-living adjustments would
include protections for "vulnera-
ble" recipients.


Matisse was once Nazi loot


Associated Press

OSLO, Norway The family of a
prominent Parisian art dealer is de-
manding that a Norwegian museum
return a Henri Matisse painting
seized by Nazis under the direction
of Hermann Goering, in the latest
dispute over art stolen from Jews
during World War II.
The painting at the center of the
dispute, Matisse's 1937 "Blue Dress
in a Yellow Armchair," depicts a
woman sitting in a living room. It
has been among the highlights of
the Henie Onstad Art Center near
Oslo since the museum was estab-
lished in 1968 through a donation
by wealthy art collector Niels On-
stad and his wife, Olympic figure-
skating champion Sonja Henie.
Museum Director Tone Hansen
said it had been unaware the paint-
ing was stolen by the Nazis until it
was notified of the fact in 2012 by
the London-based Art Loss Regis-
ter, which tracks lost and stolen
paintings.
She said Onstad bought the paint-
ing in "good faith" from the Galerie
Henri Benezit in Paris in 1950. The
Benezit gallery "has no record of
collaborating with the Nazis, as
many galleries did," she said in an
interview.
Although the war ended almost
70 years ago, disputes over looted
art have become increasingly com-


Associated Press
The painting "Blue Dress in an Yellow
Arm Chair," circa 1936 by Henry Ma-
tisse. The family of a prominent
Parisian art dealer is demanding a
Norwegian museum return a Henri
Matisse painting seized by Nazis
under the direction of Hermann Goer-
ing during World War II, in the latest
dispute over art stolen from Jews dur-
ing the war.
mon in recent years, in part be-
cause many records were lost, and
in part because an international ac-
cord on returning such art was only
struck in 1998.
But the case of the Matisse is
somewhat different in that its for-


mer owner, Paul Rosenberg, was
one of the most prominent art deal-
ers in Paris before the war, which
he survived by fleeing to New York.
Art Loss Register Director Chris
Marinello said the records in this
case are unusually clear
According to a biography pub-
lished by New York's Museum of
Modern Art, Rosenberg was one of
the preeminent modem art dealers
of his day, and personal friends
with Picasso and Matisse, among
others.
Art Registry documents show he
purchased "Blue Dress" directly
from the painter, having noted the
purchase in 1937 and put it on dis-
play in the same year, Marinello
said. After the war, Rosenberg re-
established his business and sought
to recover more than 400 works that
had been taken by the Nazis.
Marinello showed The Associ-
ated Press documents that name
the piece now on display in Norway
as among those missing after the
war
He slammed the Henie Onstad
art museum for "stonewalling." He
said, "The evidence is overwhelm-
ing. They just don't want to resolve
this."
Paul Rosenberg died in 1959. His
family has remained prominent, as
hic cnn Alvoandr'ro was a war heron


and later began his
dealership.


Judge rules on morning-after


Associated Press


WASHINGTON The
morning-after pill might
become as easy to buy as
aspirin.
In a scathing rebuke ac-
cusing the Obama adminis-
tration of letting
election-year politics
trump science, a federal
judge ruled Friday that
women of any age should
be able to buy emergency
contraception without a
doctor's prescription.
Today, women can do
that only if they prove at
the pharmacy that they're
17 or older; everyone else
must see a doctor first U.S.
District Judge Edward Ko-
rman of New York blasted
the government's decision
on age limits as "arbitrary,
capricious and unreason-
able," and ordered an end


to the restrictions within 30
days.
The Justice Department
was evaluating whether to
appeal, and spokeswoman
Allison Price said there
would be a prompt
decision.
President Barack Obama
had supported the 2011 de-
cision setting age limits,
and White House
spokesman Jay Carney said
Friday the president hasn't
changed his position.
"He believes it was the
right common-sense ap-
proach to this issue," Car-
ney said.
If the court order stands,
Plan B One-Step and its
generic versions could
move from behind phar-
macy counters out to drug-
store shelves ending a
decade-plus struggle by
women's groups for easier


PlanB o n:e
One-Step *







The packaging for Teva Women's Health Plao
(levonorgestrel) tablet, one of the brands k
"morning-after pill."


access to these pills, which
can prevent pregnancy if
taken soon enough after
unprotected sex.
Saying the sales restric-
tions can make it hard for
women of any age to buy
the pills, Korman de-


scribed the
tion's decision
before the 201
tial and congre
tions, as
motivated, s
unjustified and
agency preced


Associated Press
A racegoer eats a snack
Friday during Ladies' Day
at Aintree Racecourse
Liverpool, England.

Iran road accident
kills 15 Afghans
TEHRAN, Iran -A road
accident in Iran has killed
18 people after a truck
smuggling fuel slammed
into a sedan packed with
Afghans who were being
brought illegally into the
country.
The semiofficial Fars
news agency says the
crash took place Friday
morning on the outskirts of
the town of Rigan in south-
eastern Iran.
Fifteen of the dead were
Afghan citizens who had il-
legally crossed the border
into Iran. The remaining
three victims were Iranians.
The report says the truck
burst into flames after the
crash.
Iran has one of the
world's worst traffic safety
records, with more than
400,000 accidents and
about 20,000 deaths on its
roads every year. The high
death tolls are blamed on
high speed, unsafe vehi-
cles, widespread disregard
of traffic laws and inade-
quate emergency
services.
Uruguay leader
caught on tape
BUENOS AIRES, Ar-
gentina -Argentines and
Uruguayans are joking
about insulting comments
that Uruguayan President
Jose Mujica was caught
making about his Argentine
ally, President Cristina Fer-
nandez. But politicians in
both countries are con-
cerned about the diplomatic
fallout.
Mujica basically called
Fernandez an "old shrew"
and said she was "worse
than her cross-eyed" late
husband, Nestor Kirchner.
"The cross-eyed guy had
more of a political sensibility.
This one is just stubborn as
a mule," he added.
The comments were
picked up on a microphone
that Mujica thought was
turned off. He said they
weren't intended to be pub-
lic, so he won't apologize.
Egypt satirist
undeterred


; own art CAIRO Undeterred at
being interrogated by
prosecutors, a popular
Egyptian TV satirist is pok-
p la ing new fun at the Egypt-
ian president.
Bassem Youssef-
known as Egypt's Jon
Stewart was interro-
gated this week for al-
"" legedly insulting Islam and
the country's leader, ques-
tioning that drew criticism
,ose from Washington and
rights advocates.
In his weekly Friday TV
show, Youssef said he
"overdid it." He said all his
15msm segments wouldn't focus
on the country's Islamist
President Mohammed
Morsi.
Associated Press Youssef said that after
n B One-Step his visit to the attorney
known as the general, he had decided
not to talk on the show
administra- about Morsi just the at-
, in the year torney general.
12 presiden- The television audience
ssional elec- erupted in applause and
"politically laughter, and then he
scientifically spent a good part of his
d contrary to show ridiculing both.
ent." -From wire reports









S B APRTL S2013
SPORTS


* Magic
fall one
point
short at
Chicago.
/B4


0 Baseball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Sports briefs/B3
0 Basketball/B4
0 Golf/B4
0 NASCAR/B4, B5
0 NCAA Final Four/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Moore, Zobrist lead Rays over Indians 4-0


Associated Press
ST PETERSBURG Matt Moore pitched six
sharp innings and Ben Zobrist drove in three runs
to lead the Tampa Bay Rays over the Cleveland
Indians 4-0 on Friday night.
Moore (1-0) limited the Indians to a pair of hits
by Michael Bourn, walked two and struck out
eight. The 23-year-old left-hander retired his final
eight batters and came out after 100 pitches.
Zobrist, who has driven in a team-leading seven
runs in four games, did most of the damage
against Zach McAllister (0-1) with a pair of
doubles.
Bourn reached on an infield single in the first
and doubled into the left-field corner in the third.
Only two other runners reached base against
Moore, who walked Mike Aviles in the third and
Michael Brantley in the fourth.
Jake McGee and Brandon Gomes each worked
a perfect inning for the Rays. Joel Peralta fin-
ished the two-hitter with a 1-2-3 ninth.
The Indians, who were 0 for 5 with runners in
scoring position, struck out 11 times and didn't


have a baserunner after the fourth inning.
Two of Tampa Bay's four runs off McAllister
were unearned. Cleveland's starter allowed six
hits, walked none and struck out three over six
innings.
Sam Fuld led off the Tampa Bay fourth with a
single and scored on Zobrist's double down the
right-field line. Yunel Escobar drove in Zobrist
from third with a grounder to shortstop to make
it 2-0.
A two-out fielding error by Aviles at third
opened the door for the Rays to add two more
runs on Zobrist's fifth-inning double.
NOTES: The Rays put RHP Jeff Niemann on
the 15-day disabled list because of soreness in his
pitching shoulder. The move was retroactive to
March 28. Niemann, moved to the bullpen after
competing with Roberto Hernandez for the final
spot in the starting rotation this spring, has yet to
appear in a game this season. RHP Brandon
Gomes was recalled from Triple-A Durham to fill
the roster opening. ... The Rays traded minor
league C Stephen Vogt to Oakland for a player to
be named or cash.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's Sam Fuld slides in to score Friday ahead of the throw
to Cleveland Indians catcher Carlos Santana during the fifth inning
in St. Petersburg.


'Canes bear down


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Citrus freshman Erica Corlew steals second base in front of Central shortstop Hannah Charlwood in the first inning Friday night
at Citrus High School. The Hurricanes took a 3-1 victory over the Bears in District 6A-6 play.


Two late runs pushes
C.J. RISK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Last time Citrus soft-
ball ace Kelly Abramowich faced
Brooksville Central the top team in
District 6A-6 she tossed a no-hitter
And lost 1-0.
In Friday's rematch at Citrus High
School, she outdid herself.
Abramowich struck out seven of the
first 12 batters she faced without surren-
dering a hit and never stumbled, in the
end tossing a two-hitter as the Hurri-
canes handled the Bears 3-1.
Abramowich finished with one run al-
lowed on two hits and three walks with
12 strikeouts.
"This was a really big game for us," the
junior standout said. "We went into it
knowing we had to win. We played them
close the first time and lost, so it feels re-
ally good."
In terms of 6A-6, the game meant little.
Central wins the regular-season title with
a 6-2 mark; the Bears are 15-6 overall. Cit-
rus (13-9 overall) and defending champ
Spring Hill Springstead are tied for sec-
ond at 5-3 with Lecanto fourth (4-4) and
West Port fifth (0-8).
According to Citrus coach Larry
Bishop, his Hurricanes and Springstead
are knotted in all the tiebreakers for sec-
ond place, which means the position will
be decided by coin flip.
That coin toss will decide which team,
Citrus or Springstead, will be the home


Citrus softballpast Central in District 6A-6


central hurler Casey Vsetula uncorks a
pitch Friday evening against Citrus.
team when the two face each other in the
opening round of the district tourna-
ment. Districts start with the play-in
game between West Port and Lecanto on
April 15 at Lecanto.
"We came in tonight a little flat, we
haven't played since last Saturday, but we
make no excuses," Central coach Tyson
Ellis said. "We just didn't put our bat on


the ball. We were swinging at a lot of
pitches out of the (strike) zone. We've got
to be more disciplined at the plate."
Knowing that his own team's district
fate had been decided, Ellis started
Casey Vsetula to "try and get her some
work before districts." The move back-
fired quickly when Citrus put its first five
batters on base, with a lead-off single by
Amy Abramowich followed by three
walks and a hit batsman.
Only some questionable baserunning
kept the Hurricanes from scoring more
than one run. Amy Abramowich was
called out after taking her lead off sec-
ond early and Aaron McIntyre was
caught in a run down on a double steal
that allowed April DeSomma to score the
game's first run. Central ace Kaeleen
Koehler replaced Vsetula and pitched
the final 5 1/3 innings, giving up two un-
earned runs on three hits, walking none
and striking out six.
Central tied it when Katie McCarthy
got the Bears' first hit this season off
Kelly Abramowich, a long double to cen-
ter that hit the base of the fence. A wild
pitch moved her to third and she scored
on Alex Eisenhauer's groundout, knot-
ting it at 1-1.
Citrus pushed the winning runs across
without the benefit of a hit DeSomma
reached base on an error by the short-
stop and, with two outs, Erica Corlew's fly
to right field was mishandled, allowing
DeSomma to score and Corlew to reach
See SOFT L/PageB3


High School
BASEBALL



Warriors


cruise by


Blazers
DONALD WHITAKER
Correspondent
INVERNESS The Seven
Rivers Christian baseball team
(10-2) is starting to heat up for
its important game against St.
John Lutheran on Tuesday, de-
feating Inverness Christian
Academy Blazers 17-0.
The Warriors (10-2 overall)
have now won four games in a
row.
SRCS' Parker Pillsbury came
out strong, pitching four solid
innings with six strikeouts and
three walks on 65 pitches with-
out allowing a run. Pillsbury
also went 3 for 4 with six RBIs
and accounted for two runs.
When asked why his velocity
was improving towards the end
of the game, Pillsbury said, "I
was gaining confidence."
See ARRORS/Page B3



'Canes


grind out


victory

SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS It wasn't the
prettiest of wins, but the Citrus
baseball team did what was
needed to potentially stay in the
hunt for the top seed in District
6A-6.
The Hurricanes managed six
runs on just four hits all in
the first two innings to pre-
vail 6-1 over West Port at home
Friday
'Canes head coach Brady
Bogart was disappointed in his
team's play, particularly its 10
strikeouts at the plate, after
watching it perform so sharply
See /Page B3


^.J ,y-


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|- ,INCENTIVES WITH APPROVED CREDIT






B2 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


Baltimore
Boston
Tampa Bay
New York
Toronto




Atlanta
Washington
New York
Miami
Philadelphia


East Division
GB WC L10
0 3-1
) 3-1
01 2-2
0 2 1 1-3
0 2 1 1-3


BASEBALL


Str Home
W-2 1-0
W-1 0-0
W-1 2-2
L-1 1-2
L-1 1-3


East Division
GB WC


NL

Braves 4, Cubs 1
Chicago Atlanta
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Sappelt cf 3 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 1 0 0
DeJess ph 1 0 0 0 Heywrd rf 3 1 0 0
SCastross 4 0 0 0 J.Uptonlf 3 1 1 2
Rizzolb 3 0 0 0 Fremnib 3 0 1 0
ASorin If 3 0 1 0 BUpton cf 3 1 0 0
Hairstnrf 3 1 1 1 Uggla2b 3 00 0
Castilloc 3 0 1 0 JFrncs3b 4 0 1 2
Lillirdg 3b 2 0 0 0 Gattis c 4 0 3 0
Bowdenp 0 00 0 Minor p 3 00 0
DNavrr ph 1 0 1 0 OFIhrt p 0 0 0 0
Rondon p 0 00 0 RJhnsn ph 0 00 0
AIGnzlz 2b 3 0 1 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Feldmn p 1 00 0
Valuen3b 2 00 0
Totals 29 15 1 Totals 304 6 4
Chicago 000 010 000 1
Atlanta 101 020 00x 4
E-Feldman (1). DP-Atlanta 2. LOB-Chicago
1, Atlanta 9. 2B-Alb.Gonzalez (1). HR-Hair-
ston (1), J.Upton (3). SB-Simmons (1), Hey-
ward (1), B.Upton (1). CS-D.Navarro (1).
SF-J.Upton.
IP H RERBBSO
Chicago
FeldmanL,0-1 42-35 4 4 4 1
Bowden 21-30 0 0 0 3
Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 2
Atlanta
MinorW,1-0 71-35 1 1 0 7
O'Flaherty H,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
KimbrelS,2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP-by Feldman (B.Upton), by Rondon
(R.Johnson).WP-Feldman 2.
Umpires-Home, Dan Bellino; First, Ted Barrett;
Second, Alfonso Marquez; Third, Mike DiMuro.
T-2:36. A-33,443 (49,586).

Marlins 7, Mets 5


Miami

Pierre If
Polanc 3b
Stanton rf
Dobbs lb
Ruggin cf
Brantly c
Hchvrr ss
Solano 2b
Sanaia p
Kearns ph
Quails p
MDunn p
Olivo ph
ARams p
Cishek p

Totals
Miami
New York


New York
ab r h bi
4 1 1 0 Vldspncf
5 1 3 2 DnMrp2b
5 1 1 0 DWrght3b
4 1 1 2 I.Davis lb
5 1 2 2 Byrdrf
4 0 2 1 Atchisn p
4 0 1 0 Hwknsp
3 1 0 0 Niwnhsph
2 0 0 0 Duda If
0 1 0 0 Buckc
0 00 0 RTejad ss
0 0 0 0 Turnerph
1 0 0 0 Hefnerp
0 0 0 0 Burke p
0 0 0 0 Rice p
Baxter ph-rf
37 7117 Totals
010 000 501
000 000 302


ab r h bi

4 1 1 3
4 0 1 0
4 1 0 0

0 0 0 0


3 0 1 1
5 0 1 0
3 0 1 0

2 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

35510 5
7
5


E-R.Tejada (3). DP-Miami 1. LOB-Miami 8,
New York 12. 2B-Stanton (2), Ruggiano (2),
Brantly 2 (2), Nieuwenhuis (1), R.Tejada (2).
HR-Dobbs (1), Dan.Murphy (1). SB-Ruggiano
2 (2), Valdespin (2). S-Pierre. SF-Dobbs.
IP H RERBBSO
Miami
SanabiaW,1-0 6 6 0 0 3 1
Quails 1-3 2 3 3 1 0
M.DunnH,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1
A.RamosH,1 1 0 0 0 2 1
Cishek 1 2 2 2 1 2
New York
HefnerL,0-1 6 5 1 1 2 3
Burke 1-3 1 4 1 1 1
Rice 2-3 2 1 1 0 0
Atchison 1 0 0 0 0 0
Hawkins 1 3 1 1 0 1
HBP-by Sanabia (Duda), by A.Ramos (Valde-
spin). PB-Brantly, Buck.
Umpires-Home, Cory Blaser; First, Jim Joyce;
Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Ed Hickox.
T-3:31. A-24,935 (41,922).

Interleague

Royals 13, Phillies 4
Kansas City Philadelphia
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Gordon If 6 2 3 3 Revere cf 4 0 0 0
AEscorss 5 2 2 2 Rollins ss 4 1 1 0
Hosmerlb 5 2 4 3 Utley2b 4 1 2 0
S.Perezc 6 1 1 0 Howard 1b 4 0 2 2
Mostks3b 5 1 3 0 MYong3b 4 0 1 0
L.Cain cf 4 1 1 2 Brown If 4 1 1 1
Francrrf 4 1 1 0 L.Nixrf 4 0 0 0
Getz2b 5 1 3 3 Kratzc 4 1 1 1
WDavis p 1 0 0 0 Kndrckp 2 0 1 0
MTejad ph 1 1 1 0 Horst p 0 0 0 0
B.Chen p 0 0 0 0 Durbin p 0 0 0 0
Butler ph 0 1 0 0 Mayrry ph 0 0 0 0
JGutrrz p 0 00 0 Valdes p 0 0 0 0
EJhnsnph 1 0 0 0
Collinsp 0 0 0 0
Dyson ph 1 00 0
Hochvrp 0 00 0
Totals 44131913 Totals 34 4 9 4
Kansas City 000 023 422 13
Philadelphia 121 000 000 4
DP-Kansas City 2, Philadelphia 1. LOB-
Kansas City 9, Philadelphia 4. 2B-A.Escobar
(1), Hosmer (1), Moustakas (2), Getz (1), Utley
(2). 3B-Gordon (1), Getz (1). HR-A.Escobar
(1), Brown (1), Kratz (1). SB-A.Escobar (2),
Utley (1). SF-L.Cain.
IP H RERBBSO
Kansas City
W.Davis 4 9 4 4 0 2
B.ChenW,1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2
J.Gutierrez H,1 1 0 0 0 0 1
Collins 2 0 0 0 1 3
Hochevar 1 0 0 0 0 0
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick L,0-1 52-38 5 5 2 3
HorstBS,1-1 1-3 3 3 3 1 0
Durbin 1 1 1 1 1 1
Valdes 2 7 4 4 0 0
Horst pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
Umpires-Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Jeff Kel-
logg; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Paul
Schrieber.
T-3:09. A-45,307 (43,651).

This date in baseball
1972 For the first time in history the major
leagues failed to open on schedule because of a
player strike, which started on April 1. The tradi-
tional season opener between Houston and
Cincinnati was canceled and a total of 86 games
were lost before the strike was settled.
1973 -- Ron Blomberg of the New York Yan-
kees became the first major league designated
hitter. With the bases loaded in the first inning, he
was walked by pitcher Luis Tiant, but the Red
Sox won 15-5.
2009 Tony Clark and Felipe Lopez each
homered from both sides of the plate to lead Ari-
zona to a 9-8 victory over Colorado.
2009 Emilio Bonifacio hit the majors' first
inside-the-park homer on opening day since
1968, swiped three bases and had four hits in
Florida's 12-6 victory overWashington.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Chicago 2 1 .667 2-1 L-1 2-1 0-0
Cleveland 2 2 .500 12 2-2 L-2 0-0 2-2
Detroit 2 2 .500 12 2-2 W-1 1-0 1-2
Kansas City 2 2 .500 12 2-2 W-2 0-0 2-2
Minnesota 2 2 .500 12 2-2 L-1 2-1 0-1

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Central Division
W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away
Cincinnati 3 1 .750 3-1 W-3 3-1 0-0
Chicago 2 2 .500 1 1 2-2 L-1 0-0 2-2
Pittsburgh 1 2 .333 1V2 12 1-2 L-1 1-2 0-0
Milwaukee 1 3 .250 2 2 1-3 L-3 1-3 0-0
St. Louis 1 3 .250 2 2 1-3 L-2 0-0 1-3


W
Texas 3
Oakland 2
Seattle 2
Houston 1
Los Angeles 1


Arizona
Colorado
San Fran.
Los Angeles
San Diego


West Division
Pct GB WC I
.750 -
.500 1 -
.500 1 -
.333 1Y2 Y2
.250 2 1


West Division
Pct GB WC
.750 --
.750 --
.750 --
.333 1Y2 1Y2
.250 2 2


Str Home
W-3 1-0
W-2 2-2
L-2 0-0
L-2 1-2
L-3 0-0



Str Home
W-2 2-1
W-3 1-0
W-3 1-0
L-2 1-2
L-1 0-0


Associated Press
Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla turns a double play as Chicago Cubs base runner Alfonso Soriano
slides into second in the fifth inning Friday in Atlanta.



Braves power past Cubs


Justin Upton hits

third HR of year


Associated Press

ATLANTA Justin Upton hit
his third homer in four games and
Mike Minor pitched into the eighth
inning to help the Atlanta Braves
beat the Chicago Cubs 4-1 on Fri-
day night
Juan Francisco had a two-run
single and Minor (1-0) won his first
start of the season, allowing one
run and five hits in 71/3 innings. He
walked none and struck out seven.
After Eric O'Flaherty got the last
two outs in the eighth, Craig Kim-
brel earned his second save by re-
tiring Luis Valbuena on a
groundout, striking out pinch-hitter
David DeJesus and getting Starlin
Castro to fly out
Making his Cubs debut, Scott
Feldman (0-1) threw two wild
pitches, hit a batter and had a field-
ing error in the fourth when he
missed the bag in an attempt to
cover first base.
National League

Marlins 7, Mets 5
NEW YORK-Alex Sanabia won for
the first time in more than two years and
the Miami Marlins gave Mike Redmond
his first victory as a major league man-
ager, beating the New York Mets 7-5.
The Marlins began the day at 0-3 and
were the only team in the majors with-
out a win.
Sanabia (1-0) had been out of the
majors since late in the 2011 season.
He pitched six shutout innings, working
around six hits, three walks and a hit
batter.
Miami took advantage of shortstop
Ruben Tejada's error to score five runs
in the seventh inning for a 6-0 lead. The
Mets rallied and brought the tying run to
the plate a couple of times, but couldn't
catch the Marlins.

Giants 1, Cardinals 0
SAN FRANCISCO Barry Zito
saved San Francisco's season by
beating the Cardinals last fall in the NL
championship series, then delivered
again with a 1-0 victory over St. Louis
as the Giants celebrated their latest
World Series title throughout the home
opener.
Zito outdueled Jake Westbrook in
his season debut. The lefty also had a
key sacrifice bunt that led to San
Francisco's lone run in the fourth,
when Angel Pagan drew a bases-
loaded walk.
The Giants won their 15th straight
with Zito on the mound, including the
postseason. He hasn't lost since Aug.
2 against the New York Mets.

Reds 15, Nationals 0
CINCINNATI Todd Frazier and
Zack Cozart each homered twice, and
the Reds hit six in all including
Xavier Paul's pinch grand slam while
sending the Washington Nationals to
their first loss of the season, 15-0.
Washington was the last major
league team without a loss.
Xavier Paul had his first career pinch-
hit grand slam during a seven-run sev-
enth inning. The Reds had more
homers than the Nationals had hits (5).
Dan Haren (0-1) had a rough time in
his Nationals debut, giving up four


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Detroit 8, N.Y Yankees 3
Texas 3, L.A. Angels 2
Baltimore 9, Minnesota 5
Kansas City 13, Philadelphia 4
Boston 6, Toronto 4
Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0
Oakland at Houston, late
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, late
Saturday's Games
Boston (Lackey 0-0) atToronto (Happ 0-0), 1:07 p.m.
Seattle (FHernandez 1-0) at Chicago White Sox (Axel-
rod 0-0), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Hanson 0-0) atTexas (M.Harrison 0-1), 4:05
p.m.
N.YYankees (Hughes 0-0) at Detroit (Scherzer 0-0), 4:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Mendoza 0-0) at Philadelphia (Lannan 0-
0), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Worley 0-1) at Baltimore (Tillman 0-0), 7:05
p.m.
Cleveland (Bauer 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-0), 7:10
p.m.
Oakland (Colon 0-0) at Houston (B.Norris 1-0), 7:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y Yankees at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Minnesota at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 2:10 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels atTexas, 8:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Kansas City 13, Philadelphia 4
Colorado 5, San Diego 2
San Francisco 1, St. Louis 0
Miami 7, N.Y. Mets 5
Cincinnati 15, Washington 0
Atlanta 4, Chicago Cubs 1
Arizona 3, Milwaukee 1
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, late
Saturday's Games
Miami (Nolasco 0-1) at N.Y Mets (Niese 1 -0), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 0-0) at Cincinnati (Leake 0-0),
1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Miller 0-0) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-0),
4:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Mendoza 0-0) at Philadelphia (Lannan 0-
0), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 0-0) at Milwaukee (Fiers 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 0-0) at Atlanta (Teheran 0-
0), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 0-0) at Colorado (Garland 0-0), 8:10
p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.Burnett 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 1 -
0), 9:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Miami at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Washington at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Kansas City at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Arizona at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.

homers and six runs in four innings.
Homer Bailey (1-0) gave up two hits
in six scoreless innings.

Rockies 5, Padres 2
DENVER Wilin Rosario and
Dexter Fowler homered, helping Jeff
Francis and the Colorado Rockies
beat the San Diego Padres 5-2 in a
festive home opener at Coors Field.
Francis (1-0) was ahead of batters
all afternoon as he scattered five hits
over six sharp innings.
Rafael Betancourt pitched a score-
less ninth for his second save as the
Rockies improved to 12-9 in home
openers.

American League

Tigers 8, Yankees 3
DETROIT Prince Fielder hit a go-
ahead, three-run homer in the fifth in-
ning and added a soaring, two-run
shot in the seventh to lift the Detroit
Tigers to an 8-3 win over the New York
Yankees in the Comerica Park opener.
Doug Fister (1-0) allowed three runs
on six hits including Kevin Youkilis'
two-run homer over five innings. Drew
Smyly pitched four perfect innings and


struck out five for his first career save.
Ivan Nova (0-1) gave up four runs
and five hits over 4 2/3 innings.
The banged-up Yankees took an-
other hit, too. Eduardo Nunez, filling in
for injured shortstop Derek Jeter, was
hit on the right biceps by Fister's pitch
in the fourth inning and left the game.
X-rays were negative.

Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4
TORONTO Mike Napoli hit a
two-run homer and drove in the go-
ahead run with an eighth-inning
groundout, Will Middlebrooks added a
solo shot and the Boston Red Sox
beat the Toronto Blue Jays 6-4.
Junichi Tazawa (1-0) got the win de-
spite allowing a tying homer to Jose
Reyes in the seventh. Andrew Bailey
pitched the eighth and Joel Hanrahan
finished for his second save.
Pinch-hitter Jonny Gomes drew a
one-out walk from Esmil Rogers (0-1)
in the eighth and went to third on
Dustin Pedroia's double. Napoli fol-
lowed with a grounder to third that
was gloved by Maicer Izturis, who fell
down on the play and couldn't recover
quickly enough to throw home.
The Blue Jays put runners at sec-
ond and third with one out in the bot-
tom half, but Bailey got Adam Lind
and Izturis to fly out.

Orioles 9, Twins 5
BALTIMORE Chris Davis ex-
tended his torrid start with a grand slam
and five RBIs, and the Baltimore Orioles
used a five-run eighth inning to beat
Minnesota 9-5 in their home opener.
Davis became the fourth player in
major league history to homer in his first
four games of the season, joining Willie
Mays, Mark McGwire and Nelson Cruz.
He is 9 for 15 (.600) with four homers
and 16 RBIs.
The Orioles trailed 5-4 before loading
the bases with one out in the eighth
against Casey Fien (0-1). After Adam
Jones tied it with an RBI single, Davis
greeted Tyler Robertson with an oppo-
site-field shot to left on the first pitch.
The grand slam set off a wild celebra-
tion from the sellout crowd of 46,653.

Rangers 3, Angels 2
ARLINGTON, Texas lan Kinsler hit
a go-ahead single with two outs in the
eighth inning and the Texas Rangers
gave their fans plenty of reasons to cheer
in the home opener, beating Josh Hamil-
ton and the Los Angeles Angels 3-2.
Hamilton was a five-time All-Star and
the 2010 AL MVP while with Texas be-
fore going to the AL West-rival Angels
with a $125 million, five-year contract
over the winter. He finished 0 for 4 he
was booed when he was introduced,
then cheered when he struck out twice.
Kinsler's sharp single to right was
fielded by Hamilton, who short-hopped
a throw to the plate as speedy Craig
Gentry slid home for the tiebreaking run.

Interleague play

Royals 13, Phillies 4
PHILADELPHIA-Alex Gordon
and Chris Getz each hit bases-loaded
triples and the Kansas City Royals ral-
lied to beat Philadelphia 13-4, spoiling
the Phillies' home opener.
The Royals overcame a 4-0 deficit
to surge past Kyle Kendrick and the
Phillies.
Domonic Brown and Erik Kratz hit
solo homers for the Phillies.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



AL

Rays 4, Indians 0
Cleveland Tampa Bay
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Bourn cf 4 0 2 0 Jnnngs cf 4 1 0 0
ACarer ss 3 0 0 0 Fuld If 4 2 2 0
Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 Zobrist rf 4 1 2 3
Swisherib 4 0 0 0 Longori3b 4 0 1 0
Brantly If 2 0 0 0 Joyce dh 3 0 0 0
CSantn c 3 0 0 0 YEscor ss 3 0 0 1
MrRynldh 3 00 0 Loneylb 3 0 0 0
Aviles 3b 2 00 0 Loaton c 3 0 2 0
Stubbs rf 3 00 0 KJhnsn 2b 3 0 0 0
Totals 28 02 0 Totals 31 4 7 4
Cleveland 000 000 000 0
Tampa Bay 000 220 00x 4
E-Aviles (1). LOB-Cleveland 4, Tampa Bay 3.
2B-Bourn (2), Zobrist 2 (2), Lobaton (1). S-
A.Cabrera.
IP H RERBBSO
Cleveland
McAllister L,0-1 6 6 4 2 0 3
Shaw 2 1 0 0 0 3
Tampa Bay
M.Moore W,1-0 6 2 0 0 2 8
McGee 1 0 0 0 0 0
B.Gomes 1 0 0 0 0 1
Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 2
WP-McAllister 2.
Umpires-Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Dale
Scott; Second, Bill Miller; Third, CB Bucknor.
T-2:21. A-16,019 (34,078).

Tigers 8, Yankees 3
New York Detroit
ab rh bi ab rh bi
Gardnrcf 3 1 0 0 AJcksncf 4 1 2 0
Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 2 0
Youkils3b 4 1 2 2 MiCarr3b 2 2 0 1
Hafnerdh 3 0 1 0 Fielder lb 4 2 2 5
Boesch rf 4 0 1 0 VMrtnz dh 3 0 0 0
Nunez ss 1 0 0 0 Dirks If 3 1 0 0
J.Nixpr-ss 2 0 0 0 JhPerltss 4 0 0 0
ISuzuki If 4 0 0 0 Avila c 4 1 1 1
Overaylb 2 0 0 0 Infante 2b 4 1 2 1
BFrncsph 1 00 0
CStwrt c 4 0 1 0
Totals 32 36 2 Totals 328 9 8
NewYork 000 030 000 3
Detroit 110 031 20x 8
DP-New York 1, Detroit 1. LOB-New York 6,
Detroit 5. HR-Youkilis (1), Fielder 2 (2), Avila
(1). SB-Dirks (1).
IP H RERBBSO
New York
Nova L,0-1 42-35 4 4 2 5
Logan 1-3 1 1 1 1 0
Kelley 2 3 3 3 1 3
D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
FisterW,1-0 5 6 3 3 2 2
SmylyS,1-1 4 0 0 0 0 5
HBP-by Nova (Mi.Cabrera), by Fister (Gardner,
Nunez). WP-Nova, Fister.
Umpires-Home, Alan Porter; First, Jerry Layne;
Second, Brian O'Nora; Third, Hunter Wendelst-
edt.
T-2:58. A-45,051 (41,255).

Orioles 9, Twins 5
Minnesota Baltimore
ab rhbi ab rhbi
Hicks cf 5 0 0 0 McLoth If 5 2 2 0
Mauerdh 5 00 0 Machd3b 4 0 1 1
Wlngh If 5 1 2 0 Markks rf 4 2 2 0
Mornealb 3 1 0 0 A.Jones cf 5 3 3 2
Doumitc 3 1 1 0 C.Davislb 4 1 2 5
Plouffe 3b 3 0 2 0 Wieters c 4 0 2 0
Parmel rf 4 1 1 1 Hardy ss 4 0 1 1
Dozier 2b 4 1 2 3 Flahrty 2b 3 0 0 0
EEscorss 4 0 2 1 ACasill ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Reimlddh 3 1 1 0
Totals 36 5105 Totals 37914 9
Minnesota 000 401 000 5
Baltimore 001 120 05x 9
E-Doumit (1). DP-Baltimore 1. LOB-Min-
nesota 7, Baltimore 10. 2B-Willingham 2 (2),
Doumit (2), AJones (3), Hardy (2). 3B--Dozier
(1). HR-C.Davis (4). SB-McLouth (2). S-
Machado. SF-C.Davis.
IP H RERBBSO
Minnesota
Hendriks 42-38 4 4 1 1
Pressly 1 0 0 0 2 1
DuensingH,2 1 2 0 0 0 0
FienL,0-1BS,1-1 2-3 3 4 4 1 1
TRobertson 2-3 1 1 1 0 1
Baltimore
Arrieta 5 7 5 5 2 5
Patton 11-31 0 0 0 2
AyalaW,1-0 12-32 0 0 0 1
Strop 1 0 0 0 0 1
Arrieta pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBP-by Arrieta (Plouffe). WP-Pressly
Umpires-Home, Chris Guccione; First, Tom
Hallion; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T-3:31. A-46,653 (45,971).
Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 4
Boston Toronto


ab r h bi
Ellsury cf 5 0 1 1 Reyes ss
Nava dh 4 0 1 0 Bonifac 2b
JGomsdh 0 1 0 0 MeCarrlf
Pedroia2b 5 1 2 0 Encrncdh
Napoli 1b 5 1 1 3 Arenciic
Sltlmch c 4 0 0 0 RDavis rf
Mdlrks 3b 5 1 2 1 Rasms cf
Victornrf 5 22 0 DeRosalb
BrdlyJrlf 4 01 0 Lindph-1b
Iglesias ss 0 0 0 0 MIzturs 3b
Ciriaco ss 4 0 2 1
Totals 41 6126 Totals
Boston 010 120 011
Toronto 010 020 100


ab r h bi
5 1 4 2
5 0 1 0
4 0 1 0


25 000
4 1 2 0
3 0 1 0


4 1 1 0

37412 4
6
4


E-Bonifacio 3 (3). DP-Boston 1, Toronto 1.
LOB-Boston 15, Toronto 9. 2B-Pedroia (1),
Middlebrooks (1), Ciriaco (1), Reyes 2 (2), Aren-
cibia (2), R.Davis (1), Rasmus (1). 3B-
Me.Cabrera (1). HR-Napoli (1), Middlebrooks
(1), Reyes (1), DeRosa (1). SB-Ellsbury (1),
Bradley Jr. (1), Ciriaco (1). SF-DeRosa.
IP H RERBBSO
Boston
Doubront 5 9 3 3 0 6
UeharaH,2 1 0 0 0 0 2
TazawaW,1-0 1 2 1 1 0 1
A.BaileyH,2 1 1 0 0 1 1
Hanrahan S,2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1
Toronto
Jo.Johnson 6 9 4 3 2 6
Cecil 11-31 0 0 1 4
E.Rogers L,0-1 2-3 1 1 1 1 1
Jeffress 1 1 1 1 2 1
Doubront pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP-by Jo.Johnson (Iglesias). WP-Doubront.
Umpires-Home, James Hoye; First, John
Hirschbeck; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Jim
Reynolds.
T-3:35. A-45,328 (49,282).

Rays schedule
April 6 vs Cleveland
April 7 vs Cleveland
April 8 at Texas
April 9 at Texas
April 10 at Texas
April 12 at Boston
April 13 at Boston
April 14 at Boston
April 15 at Boston
April 16 at Baltimore
April 17 at Baltimore
April 18 at Baltimore
April 19 vs Oakland
April 20 vs Oakland
April 21 vs Oakland
April 22 vs N.Y Yankees
April 23 vs N.Y Yankees
April 24 vs N.Y Yankees
April 25 at Chicago Sox
April 26 at Chicago Sox
April 27 at Chicago Sox
April 28 at Chicago Sox
April 30 at Kansas City
May 1 at Kansas City






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-New York 49 26 .653 -
x-Brooklyn 43 32 .573 6
x-Boston 39 37 .513 10/2
Philadelphia 31 44 .413 18
Toronto 29 47 .382 2012
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
z-Miami 59 16 .787 -
x-Atlanta 42 35 .545 18
Washington 28 47 .373 31
Orlando 19 58 .247 41
Charlotte 18 58 .237 4112
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 48 28 .632 -
x-Chicago 42 33 .560 512
Milwaukee 36 39 .480 111Y2
Detroit 25 51 .329 23
Cleveland 23 52 .307 2412
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 56 20 .737 -
x-Memphis 51 24 .680 412
Houston 42 33 .560 1312
Dallas 36 39 .480 1912
New Orleans 26 50 .342 30
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 56 20 .737 -
x-Denver 52 24 .684 4
Utah 40 37 .519 1612
Portland 33 42 .440 2212
Minnesota 28 47 .373 2712
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
x-L.A. Clippers 50 26 .658 -
Golden State 43 32 .573 612
L.A. Lakers 39 36 .520 1012
Sacramento 27 48 .360 2212
Phoenix 23 52 .307 2612
x-clinched playoff spot
z-clinched conference
Thursday's Games
Chicago 92, Brooklyn 90
Denver 95, Dallas 94
Oklahoma City 100, San Antonio 88
Friday's Games
Cleveland 97, Boston 91
New York 101, Milwaukee 83
Philadelphia 101, Atlanta 90
Chicago 87, Orlando 86
Toronto 95, Minnesota 93
Miami 89, Charlotte 79
Oklahoma City 97, Indiana 75
Utah 95, New Orleans 83
Golden State at Phoenix, late
Dallas at Sacramento, late
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, late
Houston at Portland, late
Today's Games
Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9 p.m.
Sunday's Games
New York at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Washington at Boston, 6 p.m.
Orlando at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Portland, 9 p.m.


Texas Open
Friday, At JW Marriott, TPC San Antonio,
Oaks Course, San Antonio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,522, Par: 72
Second Round:
Billy Horschel 68-68-136 -8
Daniel Summerhays 69-69-138 -6
Charley Hoffman 71-67-138 -6
Steven Bowditch 69-69 -138 -6
BrendondeJonge 70-69-139 -5
Jim Furyk 69-70-139 -5
K.J. Choi 72-67-139 -5
Retief Goosen 70-69-139 -5
Ben Kohles 69-70-139 -5
Rory Mcllroy 72-67-139 -5
LeeJanzen 70-69-139 -5
Matt Bettencourt 67-73-140 -4
PeterTomasulo 67-73 -140 -4
Jason Gore 69-71 -140 -4
D.J. Trahan 70-71 -141 -3
Brian Gay 71-70-141 -3
Joe Durant 70-71 -141 -3
Nathan Green 69-72-141 -3
Jeff Overton 69-72- 141 -3
Brian Harman 72-69-141 -3
Alistair Presnell 69-72-141 -3
Peter Hanson 70-71 -141 -3
Padraig Harrington 68-73-141 -3
Martin Laird 70-71 -141 -3
Brian Davis 69-72-141 -3
Bob Estes 72-69 141 -3
Ken Duke 73-68-141 -3
Steve LeBrun 72-69-141 -3
David Lynn 72-70 -142 -2
Bryce Molder 68-74-142 -2
Bud Cauley 71-71 -142 -2
Shane Lowry 70-72- 142 -2
Ryan Palmer 71-71 -142 -2
Wes Short, Jr. 71-71 -142 -2
Jason Kokrak 74-68-142 -2
William McGirt 70-72 -142 -2
Harris English 68-75-143 -1
Greg Chalmers 72-71 -143 -1
Scott Langley 73-70-143 1
Cameron Percy 72-71 -143 -1
Scott Stallings 73-70 -143 -1
Justin Leonard 72-71 -143 -1
John Huh 74-69-143 -1
Martin Flores 71-72-143 -1
PaulHaleyll 73-70-143 -1
BradFritsch 70-73-143 -1
Marcel Siem 76-67-143 -1
NicholasThompson 71-73-144 E
Kevin Chappell 75-69-144 E
JeffGove 71-73-144 E
Freddie Jacobson 70-74 -144 E
Aaron Baddeley 74-70 -144 E
Stuart Appleby 75-69 -144 E
Luke List 73-71 -144 E
Jimmy Walker 71-73-144 E
Chris DiMarco 75-69-144 E
Seung-YulNoh 73-71 -144 E
Richard H. Lee 74-70 144 E
Matt Kuchar 74-70 -144 E
Kyle Stanley 74-70 -144 E
Brendan Steele 72-72 -144 E
Johnson Wagner 74-70 -144 E
Joey Snyder III 72-73-145 +1
Troy Matteson 76-69- 145 +1
Charlie Beljan 71-74- 145 +1
lan Poulter 70-75-145 +1
Charl Schwartzel 72-73-145 +1


D.A. Points 74-71 -145 +1
John Merrick 74-71-145 +1
NealLancaster 75-70-145 +1
John Mallinger 73-72-145 +1
Matt Every 70-75-145 +1
Joe Ogilvie 71-74-145 +1
Andres Romero 69-76-145 +1
Brendon Todd 73-72-145 +1
John Peterson 70-75-145 +1
Ben Curtis 74-71-145 +1
Gary Woodland 71-74-145 +1
Russell Knox 73-72-145 +1
Henrik Norlander 74-71-145 +1
Todd Baek 73-72-145 +1
Justin Bolli 76-69-145 +1
Failed To Qualify (partial list)
Chez Reavie 75-71-146 +2
Chris Stroud 73-73-146 +2
TimHerron 77-69-146 +2
Rod Pampling 71-75-146 +2
John Daly 76-70-146 +2
Nick O'Hern 74-72-146 +2
Cameron Tringale 77-69-146 +2
Chad Campbell 75-71-146 +2
Michael Letzig 77-69-146 +2


SCOREBOARD


FOr


record


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
oQa ~0-9-5
9.' CASH 3 (late)
0 7-1-7
4PLAY 4 (early)
9- 7 9-7-8-8
PLAY 4 (late)
7-4-2-8

7 111 -12 -28 -30
MEGA MONEY
2 23-37 -40
MEGA BALL
8

Thursday's winningnumbers and payouts:


THURSDAY, APRIL 4
Fantasy 5: 8 21 32 33 34
5-of-5 3 winners $74,163.88
4-of-5 281 $127.50
3-of-5 85,260 $10.50


Players should verify
winning numbers by
calling 850-487-7777
or at www.flalottery.com.


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m. (SPEED) NASCAR Camping World Truck Series
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar Racing Honday Grand Prix of Ala-
bama, Qualifying (same-day tape)
8 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Racing SummitRacing.com Na-
tionals, Qualifying (same-day tape)
MLB BASEBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Miami Marlins at New York Mets
4 p.m. (FOX) New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers
7 p.m. (WGN) Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves
7 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Rays vs Cleveland Indians
NBA BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. (ESPN, SUN) Philadelphia 76ers at Miami Heat
NCAA MEN'S BASKETBALL
6 p.m. (CBS) NCAA Tournament: Wichita State vs. Louisville
8:30 p.m. (CBS) NCAA Tournament: Michigan vs. Syracuse
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
11 a.m. (ESPN2) Girls National Invitational, Final
1 p.m. (ESPN) Boys National Invitational, Final
2 p.m. (CBS) American Family Insurance Slam Dunk &
3-Point Championships (taped)
HORSE RACING
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Wood Memorial & Santa Anita Derby
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Gators Orange & Blue Debut Spring Scrimmage
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Valero Texas Open, Third Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, Third Round
5 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour Kraft Nabisco Championship, Third
Round
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Capitals at Florida Panthers
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League Soccer Reading
FC vs Southampton FC
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS Soccer Real Salt Lake at Colorado
Rapids
TENNIS
1 p.m. (ESPN2) WTA Family Circle Cup, Semifinal
WINTER SPORTS
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Skiing FS Nationals (taped)

RADIO
6:30 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays pregame
7:10 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Tampa Bay Rays vs. Cleveland
Indians

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
No area events scheduled.


Will Claxton
Robert Karlsson
Aaron Watkins
Donald Constable
J.J. Henry
Robert Allenby
Jonathan Byrd
Zack Fischer
Tom Gillis
Tim Petrovic
Jordan Spieth
Jerry Kelly
James Hahn
Jin Park
Lee Williams
Justin Hicks
Colt Knost
Jamie Donaldson
D.H. Lee
Scott Gardiner
David Lingmerth
Brandt Jobe
Duffy Waldorf
Patrick Reed
Andres Gonzales
Morgan Hoffmann
Gary Christian
Tommy Gainey
Billy Mayfair
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano
Dicky Pride
Bobby Gates
Ross Fisher
Vaughn Taylor
Tag Ridings


76-70-146
73-73-146
78-68-146
76-70-146
73-74-147
75-72-147
73-74-147
75-72-147
74-73-147
74-73-147
71-76-147
73-74-147
76-71-147
74-73-147
76-71-147
77-71-148
74-74-148
74-74-148
73-75-148
76-72-148
77-71-148
74-74-148
76-73-149
74-75-149
75-74-149
73-76-149
77-72-149
72-77-149
77-72-149
75-74-149
76-73-149
76-73-149
76-73-149
75-75-150
73-77-150


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA


Pittsburgh
N.Y. Rangers
N.Y. Islanders


39 2910 0 58127 95
37 1815 4 40 89 89
38 1816 4 40109 117


39 89 101
37105 114

Pts GF GA
53118 90
52101 77
44115 105
44 93 83
36102 116

Pts GF GA
38109 105
38 94 119
34 96 111
34117 106
30 91 127


New Jersey 37 1513 9
Philadelphia 37 1717 3
Northeast Division
GP W L OT
Montreal 37 24 8 5
Boston 36 24 8 4
Toronto 37 20 13 4
Ottawa 37 1912 6
Buffalo 38 15 17 6
Southeast Division
GP W L OT
Washington 37 1817 2
Winnipeg 39 1819 2
Carolina 36 16 18 2
Tampa Bay 36 1618 2
Florida 37 12 19 6


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Chicago 36 27 5 4 58122 80
St. Louis 36 2014 2 42105 98
Detroit 37 18 14 5 41 96 98
Columbus 38 1615 7 39 91 101
Nashville 38 1515 8 38 93 103
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 37 2011 6 46 98 93
Minnesota 37 21 14 2 44100 97
Edmonton 37 1614 7 39 99 102
Calgary 35 1318 4 30 96 126
Colorado 36 1220 4 28 87 114
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Anaheim 37 25 7 5 55116 92
Los Angeles 37 21 13 3 45107 91
San Jose 36 1911 6 44 92 88
Phoenix 37 1615 6 38101 104
Dallas 36 1617 3 35 96 112
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Washington 2, N.Y Islanders 1, SO
St. Louis 4, Chicago 3, SO
Boston 1, New Jersey 0
Philadelphia 5, Toronto 3
Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 0
Montreal 4, Winnipeg 1
Columbus 3, Nashville 1
Phoenix 4, Detroit 2
Vancouver 4, Edmonton 0
Los Angeles 3, Minnesota 0
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, N.Y Rangers 1, SO
Buffalo 4, Ottawa 2
St. Louis 3, Columbus 1
Detroit at Colorado, late
Dallas at Anaheim, late
Calgary at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 3 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Washington at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
St. Louis at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 4p.m.
Ottawa at Florida, 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim, 9 p.m.


the


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 B3


Sabres 4, Senators 2
BUFFALO, N.Y. Brian Flynn and
Jochen Hecht scored third-period goals 12
seconds apart, and the Buffalo Sabres ral-
lied to beat the Ottawa Senators 4-2 on
Friday night.
Steve Ott and Luke Adam also scored
for Buffalo, and Ryan Miller stopped 35
shots. Defensemen Adam Pardy and Mike
Weber each had two assists for the re-
building Sabres, who are still trying to
make a late push for a playoff spot.
Buffalo (15-17-6) is now 12th in the
Eastern Conference.
Marc Methot and Eric Gryba scored for
the Senators. Mika Zibanejad had two as-
sists for Ottawa (19-12-6).
Penguins 2, Rangers 1, SO
PITTSBURGH --Jussi Jokinen cer-
tainly knows how to make an entrance.
The newly acquired Pittsburgh forward
scored a goal in regulation in his debut
and then added the only tally in the
shootout as the Penguins edged the New


I S P R T S B RIE S -


Rutgers AD resigns amid
basketball video scandal
PISCATAWAY, N.J. The Rutgers
basketball scandal claimed two more uni-
versity officials on Friday, including the
athletic director and an interim senior
vice president who were involved in a de-
cision to "rehabilitate" rather than fire the
coach whose abusive behavior was cap-
tured on a video.
University president Robert Barchi's
job appeared to be safe after getting a
public nod of support from the school's
board of governors.
The day began with a letter of resigna-
tion sent to Barchi by AD Tim Pernetti,
who said he hoped his tenure at Rutgers
"will not be judged by this one incident."
When he first saw the video of coach
Mike Rice pushing, shoving and throwing
balls at players in November, Pernetti
said he wanted to fire him on the spot.
However, he said the consensus among
school officials at the time was that it did-
n't warrant dismissal.
Williams sisters win their
way into semis
CHARLESTON, S.C. Top-ranked



SOFTBALL
Continued from Page BI

second. Corlew stole third and got the
'Canes' second run of the inning by
beating the toss home when she was
caught in a rundown.
Chelby Lawler had two of Citrus'
four hits.




CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

in a 15-4 rout of Crystal River on
Tuesday
"To me, it was just a waste of a
night," Bogart said. "Our hitters had no
with-it-ness to want to get better
tonight against two decent pitchers. We
were fortunate to get runs off wild
pitches, but it was just overall an ugly
game. Ten strikeouts -with four look-
ing is just not good enough. It was a
complete 180-degree turn from our ef-
fort versus Crystal River"
Both starting pitchers Citrus jun-
ior Ben Wright (four strikeouts, four
walks, one hit-batter, two hits allowed
in 3 2/3 innings) and Wolf Pack senior
Alec Jewell (five strikeouts, four hits,
five walks, one hit-batter in four in-
nings)- struggled with command. But
Citrus made better use of the opportu-
nity in breaking a 1-1 tie in the second
with three runs on two wild pitches,
two walks and three hits led by an
RBI double from freshman Austin Bog-
art to amass all the production it
would need for the victory



WARRIORS
Continued from Page B1

Inverness Christian (2-4) started off
slowly by allowing 13 runs, three of
which came on errors. John Iwaniec
started off the headaches for the Blaz-
ers by hitting a single past second.
Iwaniec was the first of eight straight
batters to reach base without an out
being recorded in the first inning.
Lance Mosher drove in the first run
of the game by hitting a single to cen-
ter which allowed Iwaniec to score. A
wild pitch would bring in Mosher be-
fore Coy Phillips, who would later
strike out the last three batters of the
game, lined a pitch to centerfield
scoring Pillsbury, bringing their lead
to 5-0 with no outs recorded in the top
of the first inning.
"The key to our season is how well
we are going to hit the ball, night in
night out," Seven Rivers head coach
Jim Ervin said. "Our pitching is solid.
The first out came when Jimmy
Worster hit a sacrifice fly to center
field bringing in Garret Griggs, mak-
ing the score 6-0 for Seven Rivers.
After Iwaniec lined out to first base,
Cory Weiand smashed a pitch to right
field for an RBI double to bring
Phillips home.
The second error of the inning oc-
curred when Blazer centerfielder


Serena Williams ended a long and suc-
cessful day for the Williams family as she
and sister Venus both won twice Friday
to reach the Family Circle Cup semifinals
and set up their first sibling showdown
since 2009.
Serena won her 13th straight match by
defeating sixth-seeded Lucie Safarova,
6-4, 6-1. Earlier, she topped two-time
NCAA doubles champ Mallory Burdette
in a third-round match moved due to
Thursday's 7 1/2-hour rain delay.
Venus also had double duty, rallying
past Varvara Lepchenko in three sets be-
fore ousting 18-year-old Madison Keys
later on Billie Jean King Court.
The Williams sisters next go for a spot
in the finals today. They haven't met in a
tournament since the 2009 Tour Champi-
onships in Qatar. Serena holds a 13-10
lead, although they're 1-1 on clay.
Jelena Jankovic won her 500th career
match with a straight sets win over Euge-
nie Bouchard.
Jankovic will face Switzerland's
Stephanie Voegele in the semifinals.
Voegele rallied from a set down to defeat
second-seeded Carolina Wozniacki 3-6,
6-4, 6-3.
-From wire reports


"We left seven runners on base, and
that was a little disappointing," Bishop
said. "But we put the ball in play and
once we were on the bases we were ag-
gressive. Central is the No. 1 seed and
with good reason. They hit the ball
well, they play good defense and they
have good pitching."
And there's a chance the Bears may
have to deal with Citrus and Kelly
Abramowich one more time.


Bogart entered in relief of Wright
with the bases loaded and two outs in
the fourth and caught senior third
baseman Javy Rivera looking for the
third strike to end the inning with no
damage after starting off the count 3-0.
The freshman southpaw fanned six
more and surrendered no hits over the
ensuing two innings before sophomore
Brooks Brasher allowed no hits, no
runs and one walk in the final inning.
Bogart scored the 'Canes' first run on
a single by Brasher in the first after
boarding on an infield error
Citrus (11-8 overall, 5-2 in District 6A-
6) picked up a run in the fourth on a
sacrifice fly by senior second baseman
Kyle Tobin that drove in sophomore
left fielder Cy Yates (walk), and added
its final run in the fifth by taking ad-
vantage of a wild pitch, passed ball and
a pair of West Port infield errors.
Senior lefty Kenny Cooper struck
out five 'Canes and allowed no hits and
no earned runs in two innings of relief
for the Wolf Pack (2-14 overall, 0-7 in
6A-6).
Citrus makes up Thursday's rainout
at Hernando on Monday and returns to
district play at Central on Tuesday
Both games are 7 p.m.


Matt Beebe lost a ball hit by Adam
Gage in the sun, allowing John Mazza
and Cory Weiand to score. The final
four runs came off a double by Pills-
bury to score Gage and Mosher, a sin-
gle by Griggs to score Pillsbury, and a
single by Mazza that scored Griggs.
Inverness couldn't convert in the
bottom of the first. Down 13-0, the
Blazers loaded the bases before Pills-
bury settled down to record a strike-
out and get a grounder back to the
mound to end the first inning. That
was the last time ICA had a runner in
scoring position.
In the second inning Seven Rivers
scored a run off a single by Gage and
two more runs off a single by Pillsbury
to bring the score to 16-0. The final
run came off a double by Weiand to
score Iwaneic in the top of the third
inning.
"I think more than anything, them
hitting the ball, and we played poor
defense, ICA assistant coach Wes Lau-
ver said, "when you combine those
two, that's how you get a 13-0 first in-
ning."
Inverness Christian junior out-
fielder Tyrel Earnest said there's
room for improvement.
"Batting, actually hitting the ball,"
Earnest said. "If I hit the ball, I would
probably be way better than I am
now."
Seven Rivers plays Tuesday at St.
John Lutheran.


NHL BRIEFS


York Rangers 2-1.
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped 34 shots
and then stoned Rick Nash, Mats Zuc-
carello and Ryan Callahan in the shootout
as Pittsburgh snapped a two-game losing
streak following a 15-game winning run.
Jokinen, acquired in a trade with Car-
olina just before Wednesday's NHL trade
deadline, beat Henrik Lundqvist with a
wrist shot 32 seconds into the third period.
Blues 3, Blue Jackets 1
ST. LOUIS Jake Allen made 26 saves,
and David Backes scored for the second
straight game to lead the suddenly surging
St. Louis Blues to a 3-1 win over the Colum-
bus Blue Jackets.
The Blues have won three in a row after a
three-game skid. St. Louis entered the night
in eighth place in the Western Conference.
St. Louis has won all three meetings with
Columbus this season and 10 of 11 overall.
The Blue Jackets failed to earn a point for
only the third time in 19 games.
-From wire reports





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Johnson on Martinsville pole


Associated Press

MARTINSVILLE, Va. -
Jimmie Johnson knew he
had a fast car the minute
he pulled it onto the track
at Martinsville Speedway
The seven-time winner
on NASCAR's shortest,
trickiest track backed it up
in qualifying with a track
record.
Johnson made his fastest
lap around the 0.526-mile
oval at 98.400 mph Friday,
leading a parade of six
drivers who broke Tony
Stewart's track record
speed of 98.083 mph. It is
Johnson's 30th career pole,
and third in 23 starts at
Martinsville.
"That's the icing on the
cake," Johnson said when
told of the record. "That
makes the day even better
yet. Track records are hard
to come by, so I'm very
proud of that and happy to
have that."
Once he figured out how
fast his car was, Johnson
said, "I just needed to do
my job and not mess up."
The pole position is cov-
eted at Martinsville as


Associated Press
Jimmie Johnson talks to team members Friday after win-
ning the pole for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup ace at
Martinsville Speedway in Martinsville, Va.


much as anywhere because
pit road is tight, and the
spot at the front of pit road
gives the driver unencum-
bered access to the track. It
is essentially the automatic
stall selection of the pole
sitter
"If you get behind or if
you're off-strategy or if you
have any reason that leads
you to lose track position,
that pit stall is worth three
to five positions on the race


track," Johnson said. "It's a
big, big advantage from that
perspective."
Five other drivers also
eclipsed Stewart's mark on
a cooling, later afternoon
surface, led by Marcos Am-
brose at 98.364.
Ambrose arrived 23rd in
points after five races, and
hopes the strong showing
turns into momentum.
"Yeah, it can turn us
around, no doubt," Am-


brose said. "We proved
today that if we get our stuff
right we can do it. We've
just got to get some mo-
mentum and get some con-
fidence back. Our little
team is a tough team, but
we've been knocked
around pretty good. It's like
we've gone nine rounds
with Mike Tyson, but we're
coming back strong here."
He was followed by
Brian Vickers, Joey
Logano, Kasey Kahne and
Jeff Gordon.
The race is one of nine
Vickers will run for
Michael Waltrip Racing in
a job share with Mark Mar-
tin and Waltrip.
"It was two spots not
good enough, but it was
good," Vickers said.
Stewart, whose team has
struggled through the first
five races of the season,
qualified 26th and Danica
Patrick, a rookie driving
one of his cars, qualified
32nd in her first career ap-
pearance at the shortest
track run in NASCAR's
premier series.
Points leader Dale Earn-
hardt Jr. qualified 17th.


Falling short


Bulls edge
Magic, 87-86

Associated Press

CHICAGO- Nate Robin-
son scored 12 of his 19
points in the fourth quarter,
Luol Deng finished with 19
after a slow start, and the
Chicago Bulls beat the Or-
lando Magic 87-86 on Friday
night
Robinson, who scored the
go-ahead basket the previ-
ous night in a two-point win
at Brooklyn, came up big
down the stretch, offsetting
a 27-point performance by
Orlando's Beno Udrih.
He scored nine points
during a 15-4 run that
turned a five-point deficit
into an 87-78 lead. Deng hit
two 3-pointers during that
stretch, and Robinson
capped it with a long
jumper as he crashed to the
floor with 3:51 left
The Bulls did not score
again, but they managed to
pull this one out, anyway,
sending the Magic to their
12th loss in 13 games.
Knicks 101,
Bucks 83
NEW YORK Carmelo An-
thony scored 41 points, tying a
franchise record with this third
straight 40-point game, and the
New York Knicks beat the Mil-
waukee Bucks 101-83.
Anthony, who had 50 points
and 40 in his previous two
games, equaled Bernard
King's 1984-85 mark.
J.R. Smith added 30 points
for the Knicks, who used a
huge third quarter to turn
around the game on the night
they honored their 1972-73
NBA championship team.
Brandon Jennings scored
25 points for the Bucks.
76ers 101,
Hawks 90
ATLANTA-- Evan Turner
had 24 points and 11 rebounds,
and the Philadelphia 76ers
opened with their highest-scor-
ing quarter of the season and
beat the Atlanta Hawks 101-90.
Spencer Hawes added 19


Associated Press
Chicago's Nate Robinson slips Friday and is called for traveling during the second quar-
ter against the Orlando Magic in Chicago. The Magic defenders are E'Twaun Moore,
left, and Doron Lamb.


points and 12 rebounds for the
76ers, who made 16 of 22
shots to lead 40-26 after the
first quarter. Thaddeus Young
had 14 points and 12 boards.
Josh Smith, who led Atlanta
with 19 points, scored to cut
Philadelphia's lead to 54-45
late in the first half. A basket by
Hawes pushed the lead back to
double figures for good.
Cavaliers 97,
Celtics 91
BOSTON Tristan Thomp-
son had career highs with 29
points and 17 rebounds and
the Cleveland Cavaliers ended
a 10-game losing streak with a
97-91 victory over the Boston
Celtics.
Alonzo Gee also had a dou-
ble-double with 16 points and
10 rebounds for the Cavaliers,
who held Boston to 16 points in
the third quarter and held on for
their first win since March 12.
The Celtics played without
team captain Paul Pierce, who
was out with a sore ankle.


Boston has dropped eight of
11 and is singing to the sev-
enth playoff spot in the Eastern
Conference.
Raptors 95,
Timberwolves 93
MINNEAPOLIS Rudy
Gay had 26 points and five re-
bounds to lead the Toronto
Raptors to a rare road victory
in the West 95-93 over the
Minnesota Timberwolves.
DeMar DeRozan had 25
points and Kyle Lowry added
11 points and seven assists
for the Raptors.
Nikola Pekovic had 24
points and eight rebounds
and Andrei Kirilenko added 20
points for the Timberwolves.
Heat 89,
Bobcats 79
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Mike
Miller scored a season-high
26 points on seven 3-pointers,
and the injury-depleted Miami
Heat beat the Charlotte Bob-
cats 89-79.


The Heat won despite play-
ing without stars LeBron
James, Dwyane Wade and
Ray Allen, who were held out
while recovering from injuries.
Rookie Michael Kidd-
Gilchrist had 18 points and 14
rebounds for the Bobcats.
Thunder 97,
Pacers 75
INDIANAPOLIS Kevin
Durant overcame a bruised left
calf to score 34 points and Rus-
sell Westbrook added 24
points, leading the Oklahoma
City Thunder to a 97-75 victory
over the Indiana Pacers.
Oklahoma City (56-20) has
won three straight to move into
a tie with San Antonio for the
top seed in the Western
Conference.
The Pacers (48-28) can
clinch the Central Division title
with a win today at Washington.
Indiana, which had its five-
game win streak ended, was
led by Roy Hibbert with 22
points and David West with 17.


Associated Press
Charl Schwartzel reacts to missing a birdie putt Friday
on the sixth hole during the second round of the Texas
Open in San Antonio.



McIlroy within



3 shots of lead



at Texas Open


Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO Rory
McIlory found the groove
he was looking for when he
made the last-minute deci-
sion to sign up for the
Texas Open.
McIlroy matched the
low round of the day with a
5-under par 67 on Friday
and moved within three
shots of the lead, continu-
ing his last-minute prepa-
rations for next week's
Masters.
The world's No. 2 golfer,
who decided to play in the
tournament late last week,
had seven birdies in-
cluding his final three
holes and overcame a
bogey on No. 9 after driv-
ing into the rough and
catching his left shin on a
nearby cactus.
The misstep dropped
McIlroy to 1 under, but he
rebounded with key putts
on the final three holes for
birdies and pulled well
within reach of the leaders
entering the weekend.
The 23-year-old two-
time major winner is three
shots back of leader Billy
Horschel, who birdied his
last two holes to post his
second straight 4-under 68.
A group of three players
- Daniel Summerhays,
Charley Hoffman and
Steven Bowditch are
two shots back at 6 under,
while McIlroy is tied with
six others at 5 under
Thursday's co-leaders,
Matt Bettencourt and
Peter Tomasulo, each shot
1-over 73s and fell four
shots off the lead.
Bettencourt went as low
as 8 under in the surpris-
ingly calm Texas weather
on Friday morning before
falling back after a stretch
of three bogeys in four
holes once the wind
picked up ever-so slightly
Summerhays also
reached as low as 7 under
before falling back with a
bogey on No. 9, but it was
Horschel who separated
himself with his late flurry
Horschel jumped from
60th to 24th on the money
list after a second-place
finish at last week's Hous-
ton Open. He closed out
Thursday's round with a
birdie, and he one-upped
that on Friday closing
with a pair of 11-foot birdie
putts on No. 17 and 18 to
vault into first
He needed 28 putts on
Friday after taking only 25


a day earlier, but Horschel
hit 11 of 14 fairways after
hitting only seven a day
earlier
Horschel has made the
cut in all nine of the events
he's entered this year, ex-
tending his tour-best
streak to 21 made cuts in a
row, but he has yet to win a
PGA Tour event
Now he faces a leader-
board filled with winning
experienced players be-
hind him, including four
players Mcllroy, Jim
Furyk, Retief Goosen and
Lee Janzen who have
combined to win seven
majors.
Mcllroy is the most re-
cent major winner of the
pursuers, having won the
PGA Championship last
August However, he's
struggled for much of this
year following an equip-
ment change and recently
lost his No. 1 ranking to
Tiger Woods.
Mcllroy has just one top
10 finish this year, and he
decided late last week to
add the San Antonio stop
to his schedule to add com-
petitive rounds prior to
next week's opening major
of the year
LPGA Tour

Inbee Park takes
Kraft Nabisco lead
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif.
Inbee Park took the sec-
ond-round lead Friday in the
Kraft Nabisco Champi-
onship, making three birdies
in a row early on the back
nine and rebounding from a
wind-blown bogey with four
straight pars.
Finishing in gusty condi-
tions on another hot after-
noon at Mission Hills, the
24-year-old South Korean
player shot a 5-under 67 to
reach 7 under.
American Lizette Salas
was a stroke back after a 68,
and Sweden's Carolina Hed-
wall and Italy's Giulia Sergas
followed at 5 under. Hedwall
shot 68, and Sergas had a
69.
Park is seeking her sec-
ond major title after winning
the 2008 U.S. Women's
Open Championship. She
won the LPGA Thailand in
February for her fourth LPGA
Tour victory when 17-year-
old Ariya Jutanugarn closed
with a triple bogey to blow a
two-stroke lead.


Injuries force Florida to tweak spring game


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida's
annual spring game will be little
more than a typical practice.
Because the Gators are down to
five healthy scholarship offensive
linemen, coach Will Muschamp
and his staff decided to alter the
format of Saturday's game.
There will be some 11-on-ll
drills, including the first-team of-
fense against the first-team de-
fense, but those full-contact
scrimmages will be limited in
duration because of depth
issues.
"I'm comfortable with this,"
Muschamp said this week. "I re-
ally am. This is no different than
if we would have a scrimmage.
And to me, it's about getting good-
on-good work. It's about getting
your best players going against


your best players.
"I see some of these spring
games, these guys put their first
group against the rest of them.
You don't get any better doing that
stuff. You get better when you're
going good on good."
Florida, coming off an 11-2 sea-
son that ended with a 33-23 loss to
Louisville in the Sugar Bowl,
opened spring without starting of-
fensive tackle Chaz Green,
backup guard Ian Silberman and
highly touted guard Jessamen
Dunker Green is recovering from
ankle surgery Silberman is com-
ing off shoulder surgery And
Dunker, a redshirt freshman ex-
pected to compete for a starting
job, is suspended indefinitely fol-
lowing his arrest for allegedly
stealing a scooter
Making matters worse, starting
guard Jon Halapio has been lim-


ited because of a shoulder injury
The line got even thinner last
week when guards Max Garcia
and Trip Thurman went down
with injuries. Garcia tweaked his
back, and Thurman tore a labrum
in his shoulder and had surgery
So for the final few spring prac-
tices, the Gators essentially had
five healthy bodies along the 0-
line: offensive tackles D.J.
Humphries and Tyler Moore,
center Jon Harrison, versatile
backup Kyle Koehne and Quin-
teze Williams, a former defensive
lineman who moved to the other
side of the ball this spring.
"It's very disappointing, but
everybody'll be back in the sum-
mer," said Humphries, acknowl-
edging that practice has been
rough with so little depth. "Every-
body'll be back and ready, healthy
for the season, so it'll be cool."


The line is one of the main
questions surrounding the Gators
this season.
Although Florida lost two
starters from last year's unit, the
line is expected to be significantly
improved with the addition of two
transfers: Garcia (Maryland) and
Moore (Nebraska).
Improved line play is key for
Florida trying to upgrade an of-
fense that ranked 103rd in the na-
tion last season.
The Gators also need better
play from junior quarterback Jeff
Driskel, need to replace 1,000-
yard rusher Mike Gillislee, need
to find play-making receivers and
tight ends, and need to replace
six starters on defense.
Normally, the spring game
would gauge how much progress,
if any, Florida has made in those
areas.


Just not this year
"This is a normal, scrimmage-
type situation for us as far as our
football team is concerned,"
Muschamp said. "It's good on
good, and that's all I'm concerned
with."
Maybe so, but Florida's spring
game has been so watered down
that officials decided to make it
free for the first time in decades.
The school also is refunding any
pre-purchased tickets.
So what's to be gained from the
glorified practice?
"I think it's gonna be a great
day to go out and compete in
front of people, have a little
crowd noise, replicate what
we're gonna have to deal with in
the upcoming season," tight end
Colin Thompson said. "People
are battling for positions. It'll be
competition."


B4 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE
Compelling questions...
and maybe a few actual answers


SPEED FREAKS
A couple of questions we
just had to ask ourselves


Daytona Beach News Journal/JIM TILLER
Junior shows the proper excite-
ment level for an early-season
points lead.
How long does Junior
stay on top of the Sprint
Cup standings?
KEN'S CALL: Probably until
Jimmie Johnson decides he
wants to check out the view
from the top.
GODSPEAK: Earnhardt seems
to be all about consistency,
so he may have found a home
until we hit summer.

How well will Mark
Martin do this week in
Denny Hamlin's car?
KEN'S CALL: Run with the
leaders awhile, finish between
8th and 15th, tell everyone how
lucky he is to get the chance.
You know, the usual.
GODSPEAK: Martin doesn't
like to race at Martinsville
and is driving a car he's not
familiar with, so naturally, he
will win Sunday.


ONLINE EXTRAS
Snews-journalonline.
com/nascar

5 facebook.com/
nascardaytona

SJ(@nascardaytona

Do you have questions or com-
ments about NASCAR
This Week? Contact Godwin
Kelly at godwin.kelly@news-jrnl.
com or Ken Willis at ken.willis@
news-jrnl.com

WHAT'S ON TAP?
SPRINT CUP: STP Gas Booster 500
SITE: Martinsville, Va.
SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (Speed,
noon); qualifying (Speed, 8 p.m.,
tape delayed). Saturday, practice
(Speed, 11:30 p.m., tape delayed).
Sunday, race (Fox,
coverage begins at 12:30 p.m.,
green flag at 1:16 p.m.)
TRACK: Martinsville Speedway
(.526-mile, oval)
RACE DISTANCE: 500 laps, 263
miles


The experts have crunched the numbers, and even if
Denny Hamlin misses the next five races, he will still be
eligible for the Chase for the Sprint Cup.
Hamlin is expected to be out until next month with a back
injury, but when he returns, all he has to do is race his way
into the top 20 in the points and have a couple (or three)
wins before the playoffs start in September.
What many folks are not paying much attention
to, though, is the owners' points race. Generally, the
championship driver and car owner are attached at the hip
for the awards banquet in Las Vegas. Maybe not this season.
Owners points don't follow the Chase model. Car owners
are awarded points based on how their car fares in each race.
Right now, there are three car owners who could have a seat
at the championship table and not be joined by their drivers.
The No. 55 Toyota, owned by Michael Waltrip, is the lead
contender. Waltrip shares the ride with Mark Martin and Brian
Vickers. The No. 55 is 14th in the owners points.
The next is the No. 11 Toyota, which is owned by Joe
Gibbs. Hamlin is a long shot for driver honors, but the No. 11
could still nab a piece of the title based on how Hamlin's subs
do in April.
The No. 11 is 11th in the owners points. How ironic would
it be for the No. 11 to win the owners' points, which would
include Martin's one start this weekend at Martinsville?
And there's everybody's favorite underdog, the No. 51
hI- .," In:., L I.1, :FInI I n i Ii11 II : i .:. II,: In lli,:,
flu,: ,. lln : l,,.,n InI:. ,. ,nl 11, -11,,., 11nn : I,- IIInnnn .l flu ,h , i -- n,. I


Godwin Kelly is the Daytona
Beach News-Journal's motor-
sports editor and has covered
NASCAR for 30 years. Reach him
at godwin.kelly@news-jrnl.com


ring before making announcements. Sponsors pay the bills
and yet many times they are taken for granted. When Aaron's
nixed the Mark Martin deal, they showed us who REALLY
carries the weight in the garage area. Money talks.

Getting the vote out
Voting has started that will allow one driver, currently not
eligible for the Sprint All-Star Race on May 18, to gain entry
into the Charlotte Motor Speedway fray. Race fans have two
ways to vote. They can download the NASCAR Mobile '13
app or vote at NASCAR.com. Expect to see some lobbying
by drivers to make the grid, but this vote may be a lock. In
the press release, Sprint said race fans should vote for their
favorite driver "in the hopes of seeing him or her" in the race.
That "her" would be Danica Patrick, who would otherwise
have to win a Cup Series race in the next six weeks to make
the All-Star field.


WINNER: Clint Bowyer
REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Brad
Keselowski, Jimmie Johnson, Jeff
Gordon, Ryan Newman
DARK HORSE: Kurt Busch
BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT:


Danica Patrick
FIRST ONE OUT: Joey Logano
DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: Contact
occurs and we forget all about the
Denny Hamlin-Joey Logano saga...
well, for a weekend.


ie owners




race, too


Daytona Beach News-Journal/DAVID TUCKER
Mark Martin
Aaron's vs. FedEx: Joe Gibbs Racing and FedEx
announced Aarons' Mark Martin as Denny
Hamlin's sub. Aaron's squashed the deal the
next day.
Godwin Kelly gives his take: "Martin has to
be excited and flattered that two corporate
heavyweights are arguing over his services as
a driver."


SPRINT CUP
POINTS STANDINGS
(after Auto Club, Race 5 of 36)
Rnk Driver Pnts
1 Dale Earnhardt Jr. 199
2 Brad Keselowski -12
3 Jimmie Johnson -16
4 Carl Edwards -35
4 Greg Biffle -35
6 Kyle Busch -36
7 Kasey Kahne -40
8 Paul Menard -45
9 Joey Logano -53
10 Denny Hamlin -54
11 Matt Kenseth -58
12 Ricky Stenhouse Jr. -60
13 Kurt Busch -62
13 Clint Bowyer -62
15 Kevin Harvick -69
16 Jamie McMurray -74
16 Aric Almirola -74
18 Jeff Gordon -76
19 Martin Truex Jr. -77
20 Ryan Newman -78
21 Casey Mears -81
22 Tony Stewart -91
23 Marcos Ambrose -92
24 Jeff Burton -94
25 Mark Martin -97


Catching
With all that happened in the first five races of the
season, 2012 Sprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski's
achievements have gone largely unnoticed. He talked to the
media a few days before the Cup Series' race in California.
Can you talk about your fast start to the season?
"Yeah, it has been a solid start. We have done everything
but win a race. There are a lot of things to look forward to for
sure."
Talk about the parity you have seen between
Ford, Chevy and Toyota so far.
"I would agree that there is a lot of parity right now, with
the exception being the restrictor-plate tracks, where I think
it is pretty obvious the Chevrolets are a little bit ahead of
everybody else."

What do you think these feuds do for the sport?
"I hesitate to say it is just feuds. I think it is authenticity.
It is emotions shown with authenticity. Whether it is joy or
anger, that is what the fans crave. They want to see us be
human, and humans are emotional. They want to see it done
in an authentic way. Certainly a fight is one way, but I think
of some happy moments, too. I think of Darrell Waltrip doing
the Ickey Shuffle. Those are things that stick in my mind. I
don't think it just has to be a fight. I think a fight is a water-
cooler conversation, but I just think fans enjoy seeing us
show emotion and doing it in an authentic way."


up with the
You are the best- performing Ford entry so far this season.
What is working so well for you?
"I can tell you it is a big weight off our shoulders to come
out of the gate so strong. It is a quick way of quieting all
those that said when we switched to Ford we were going
to be in a lot of trouble. That is really big for us at Penske
Racing and big for me personally. It shows the strength we
have at every layer, whether as a company, as a team or as
a driver and crew chief combination. It is something I am
exceptionally proud of. Looking at that and knowing we still
haven't reached our potential as far as our Ford relationship
is concerned and that will probably take some time it
makes me feel like when we do reach that potential that we
can be an elite team for years to come."

Talk about Martinsville. What can we expect?
"Martinsville is a place where I have really mixed
emotions about. Early in my career that was a place where
I really couldn't find my butt, to be honest. Now, the last
few times we have been there I feel like we have been
exceptionally strong. We didn't qualify as well as we wanted
to last fall and started in the back, but by the end of the race
we came on really well. I think going back to Martinsville we
are a lot smarter, I am a lot wiser as to what I need and I
think this year, I have to be honest, I am going in feeling like
we can win the race and might be one of the favorites. We
have really turned a corner at that race track, and I am really
encouraged by it."


champ


AP/TERRY RENNA
Can he find success, or anything else, at
Martinsville this week?


Daytona Beach News-Journal/JIM TILLER
Joey's intimidation glare needs a little more
work.
Was the Easter holiday enough
to calm everyone down?
Briefly, perhaps. But let's be honest, Joey
Logano might be young enough to still get an Easter
basket, and if he overdoes the chocolate, there's no
telling what he might get into this week.
So it's not over for a while?
With Denny Hamlin sidelined for several weeks
(maybe more ... honestly, can any doctor really give
a solid timeline on a back injury?) you tend to think
things will settle down. Except now we have Tony
Stewart angry with Joey, a few other drivers in bad
need of turning around their early-season funks,
and, you know, that venue thing.

Venue thing?
This week's offering is Martinsville, which
doesn't exactly include much elbow room. The
only difference between Martinsville and Bristol
is Martinsville's lack of banking, which means the
speeds are slower, which means the intentional
dumping of an opponent tends to look a little less
accidental.
Can it get any more interesting?
Only if Charlie Sheen gets involved. Oh wait, he
is. Well, kinda. It appears that Kyle Busch will do
a guest spot on an upcoming episode of Sheen's
new cable series, 'Anger Management," and really,
you gotta figure the producers flipped a coin to
decide between Kyle and brother Kurt. These days,
this passes for good news in auto racing. It doesn't
matter that so many people consider Sheen a tad
unstable he's a celebrity, by golly, and celebrities
sell.

Ken Willis has been covering
NASCAR for The Daytona Beach
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com



FEUD OF THE WEEK


GODWIN'S MARTINSVILLE PICKS


AUTO RACING


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 B5


EASTERREWIN












The Final Four standing


Louisville Wichita State
Location: Louisville, Ky. Record: 33-5. Location: Wichita, Kan. Record: 30-8.
Nickname: Cardinals. Coach: Rick Pitino. Nickname: Shockers. Coach: Gregg Marshall.
Conference: Big East. Bid: Big East champion. / PSem nalNo. ] Conference: Missouri Valley. Bid: At large.
Region: Midwest. Seed: No. 1. Region: West. Seed: No. 9.
Tournament Record: 68-40, 39 years. L u ,'.icille u /. W cht S Tournament Record: 12-10, 10 years.
Scoring: Team (74.3); Russ Smith 18.9; Gorgui Dieng 10.2; vI ll evs., V*o. V W icJia S't. o Scoring: Team (69.8); Cleanthony Early 13.7; Carl Hall 12.5;
Peyton Siva 9.9; Chane Behanan 9.6. Malcolm Armstead 10.9.
Rebounds: Team (37.0); Gorgui Dieng 10.8; Chane \ 6:09p.m. tonight Rebounds: Team (38.4);
Behanan 6.3. Carl Hall 6.9; Cleanthony
Assists/Turnovers: Team (14.6/12.6); Peyton Siva Early 5.3.
5.8/2.7; Russ Smith 2.9/2.6. Assists/Turnovers: Team
3-pointers: Team (.328); Russ Smith 57; Luke (13.6/12.7); Malcolm Armstead
Hancock 55; Wayne Blackshear 43; Peyton Siva 38. 3.9/2.3; Demetric Williams 2.3/1.7.
Last Ten: 10-0. 3-pointers: Team (.340); Malcolm Armstead
The Skinny: Top-seeded Louisville ran roughshod 61; Cleanthony Early 45; Demetric Williams 32; Nick
through the Midwest Region, and now roll into Atlanta as Wiggins 31.
the heavy favorite to win their first national champi- Last Ten: 7-3.
onship since 1986. The Cardinals who, like Syra- The Skinny: The Shockers built a 20-point lead on
cuse, are moving to the Atlantic Coast Conference Ohio State, then managed to hang on through a nerve-
shook off the incredible shock of Kevin Ware's injury with racking final five minutes to pull off their latest upset. The
about 6 1/2 minutes to go before halftime and blew out second-seeded Shockers are the second No. 9 seed to reach the Final Four since the NCAA starting seed-
Duke. The Cardinals have won 14 straight since a five-overtime loss to ing all teams in 1979. Louisville and Wichita State are former Missouri Valley Conference
Notre Dame on Feb. 9. The Cardinals are winning by an average of conference rivals when the Cardinals were a member in the 1960s and '70s. Louisville holds
nearly 22 points a game in the tournament, a 19-5 edge in the series, but the teams haven't played since 1976.


-From wire reports


-From wire reports


Louisville Cardinals roster
Coach: Rick Pitino


2 Russ Smith
3 Peyton Siva
-5 Kevin Ware
10 Gorgui Dieng
11 Luke Hancock
14 Logan Baumann
15 Tim Henderson
20 Wayne Blackshear
21 Chane Behanan
22 Jordan Bond
24 Montrezl Harrell
25 Zach Price
32 Michael Baffour
44 Stephan Van Treese


Louisville's Russ
Smith dribbles up
court Sunday
against Duke during '
the Midwest Regional 1
final in Indianapolis.
Associated Pr.-


Hometoor,
Brooklyn, N .
Seam.-
Bronx, N -
Kebemer, Sene o1i
Roanoke,
Hartford, ,
Louisville, ,
C h ic .i ,
Cincinr,,,
Louisville, ,
Tarboro, N
Clevela .i
Lexington, ,
Indianap. 1.


0 Chadrack Lufile
2 Malcolm Armstead
5 Demetric Williams
11 Cleanthony Early
15 Nick Wiggins
21 Ehimen Orukpe
22 Carl Hall
23 Fred Van Vleet
31 Ron Baker
32 Tekele Cotton
50 Jake White


Wichita State forward
Carl Hall celebrates
S a basket Saturday
in Los Angeles
a against Ohio
State during
| the West
Regional
k final.


Hometown
Burlington, Ontario
Florence, Ala.
LasVegas
Middletown, N.Y
Toronto
Lagos, Nigeria
Cochran, Ga.
Rockford, Il.
Scott City Kan.
Marietta, Ga.
Chaska, Minn.


Syracuse
Location: Syracuse, N.Y. Record: 30-9.
Nickname: Orangemen. Coach: Jim Boeheim.
Conference: Big East. Bid: At large.
Region: East. Seed: No. 4.
Tournament Record: 60-35, 36 years.
Scoring: Team (70.8); C.J. Fair
14.3; Brandon Triche 13.7; James
Southerland 13.5; Michael Carter-
Williams 12.1.
Rebounds: Team (38.5); C.J. Fair
7.0; James Southerland 5.2; Michael Carter-
Williams 4.9; DaJuan Christmas 4.6.


Assists/Turnovers: Team (14.1/12.4); Michael Carter-
Williams 7.4/3.4; Brandon Triche 3.5/2.7.
3-pointers: Team (.337); James Southerland 83; Brandon
Triche 49; Michael Carter-Williams 35.
Last Ten: 8-2.
The Skinny: The Orange are headed to their first Final Four
since winning it all in 2003. Syracuse shut down Marquette 55-39 to
win the East Regional. The 39 points were the fewest allowed in a regional final since the
shot clock was instituted in 1986. The Orange have held their four tournament opponents to
just under 29 percent from the field (61 of 211) and a paltry 15.4 percent (14 of 91) outside
the arc.
-From wire reports


;higan
Record: 30-7.
;oach: John Beilein.
id: At large.
No. 4.
47-22, 24 years.
Trey Burke 18.8; Tim Hardaway Jr.
3lenn Robinson III 11.0.
; Mitch McGary 6.2; Glenn Robinson III
)rdan Morgan 4.5.


3-pointers: Team (.385); Nik Stauskas 79; Trey -
Burke 72; Tim Hardaway Jr. 70. |
Last Ten: 7-3.
The Skinny: Michigan is headed back to the Final
Four for the first time since the Fab Five era of the
early 1990s, when the Wolverines lost in back-to-back
national title games. The Wolverines are led by soph-
omore Trey Burke, the Big Ten player of the year, and
three freshmen starters. They were downright fabulous against third-seeded Florida after
coming through in an improbable comeback against top-seeded Kansas in the regional
semifinals.
-From wire reports


Syracuse Orangemen roster


Coach: Jim Boeheim
Pos Ht Wt Yr
1 Michael Carter-Williams G 6-6 185 Sc
3 Jerami Grant F 6-8 203 Fr
4 Nolan Hart G 5-10 152 J1
5C.J. Fair F 6-8 215 Jr
10TrevorCooney G 6-4 195 Sc
12 Baye Moussa Keita C 6-10 215 J1
13 Griffin Hoffmann G 6-1 178 Sr
14 Matt Lyde-Cajuste F 6-5 215 Sr
20 Brandon Triche G 6-4 210 Sr
21 Noel Jones F 6-6 230 Jr
23 Russ DeRemer G 6-5 203 Jr
25 Rakeem Christmas F 6-9 242 Sc
32 DaJuan Coleman F 6-9 288 Fr
33 Albert Nassar F 6-6 195 Sc
43 James Southerland F 6-8 215 Sr


Michigan Wolverines roster
Coach: John Beilein


1 Glenn Robinson III
2 Spike Albrecht
3 Trey Burke
4 Mitch McGary
5 Eso Akunne
10 Tim Hardaway Jr.
11 Nik Stauskas
13 MattVogrich
15 Jon Horford
20 Josh Bartelstein
22 Blake McLimans
23 Caris LeVert
32 Corey Person
44 Max Bielfeldt
52 Jordan Morgan


Hometown
St. John, Ind.
Crown Point, Ind.
Columbus, Ohio
Chesterton, Ind.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Miami
Mississauga, Ontario
Lake Forest, III.
Grand Ledge, Mich.
Highland Park, III.
Hamburg, N.Y.
Pickerington, Ohio
Kalamazoo, Mich.
Peoria, III.
Detroit


M)


Michigan guard
Trey Burke brings
_ 1 the ball up court
March 23 against
VCU in their third-
round game in
Auburn Hills, Mich.


Wichita State Shockers roster
Coach: Gregg Marshall


JW "


Mic
Location: Ann Arbor, Mich.
N -' N Nickname: Wolverines. C
Semifinal 2 \ Conference: Big Ten. B
Region: South. Seed: I
y c vs. M ichiga Tournament Record:,
Syracuse vs. Mi chian
yr Scoring: Team (75.5);
.u m / 14.6; NikStauskas 11.5; C
o8. p.m. tOnght / Rebounds: Team (35.2)
5.5; Tim Hardaway Jr. 4.6; Jc
Assists/Turnovers: Team
(14.5/9.4); Trey Burke 6.8/2.2; Tim
Hardaway Jr. 2.3/1.9.


l1


Hometown
Hamilton, Mass.
Hyattsville, Md.
Albany N.Y
Baltimore
Wilmington, Del.
Saint Louis, Senegal
New York
Mount Vernon, N.Y
Jamesville, N.Y
Halifax, N.S.
Wrentham, Mass.
Philadelphia
Jamesville, N.Y
Stuart, Fla.
Bayside, N.Y


Syracuse guard
Brandon Triche
drives the ball
Saturday during
the East Regional
final in Washington. .





Cyf


B6 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


NCAA FINAL FOUR


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Ai


\\









RELIGION,
L ,EIGI ON


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Expanding the flock


Associated Press
Pastor Tom Cabral, of the Redemption Fellowship of Fall River, Mass., talks to a driver waiting for the traffic light to turn green as he
tries to gain support for his church at an intersection in Fall River. The church is one of dozens of churches the Southern Baptist
Convention has planted around New England in the last decade. It's part of a multi-million dollar push by the nation's largest
denomination into territory that's both skeptical of the south and increasingly indifferent to religion.

Southern Baptists explore new pastures with push into Northern states


JAY LINDSAY
Associated Press
FALL RIVER, Mass.
Pastor Tom Cabral still
tells people to meet him
at "the bar," even though
it's his church now. Locals best
remember his worn building
as a former sports bar where a
19-year-old once walked in
and shot three suspected rival
crack dealers.
Eight years later, the mir-
rored walls, parquet dance
floor and bar remain. But the
worst trouble may be found
around the Sunday school
table, where kids try to heed a
handwritten list of rules in-


cluding: "We will walk indoors,
not run."
Redemption Fellowship of
Fall River is one of dozens of
churches the Southern Baptist
Convention has planted
around New England in the
last decade with a multi-mil-
lion dollar push into territory
skeptical of the South and in-
creasingly indifferent to
religion.
Cabral seems unfazed. He's
"indigenous," he explains, a
native of nearby Somerset.
He's so eager to share his faith
that he regularly carries a
wood cross asking, 'Are You
Ready?" to a traffic island in
this southeastern Massachu-


setts city and evangelizes to
anyone who rolls down their
window.
"I really believe that God
wants to change this city," he
said.
Since 2002, the Southern
Baptists have spent roughly
$5.5 million to plant churches
around the region, and have
another $800,000 committed
for this year, said Jim Wide-
man, executive director of the
Baptist Convention of New
England, the Southern Bap-
tist's regional church-planting
arm.
They've started 133 new
churches in that time, a nearly
70 percent increase that brings


their regional total to 325.
No denomination is invest-
ing as much in New England
church planting, though Hart-
ford Seminary professor Scott
Thumma notes that atten-
dance isn't growing as fast as
the number of churches.
Thumma said the roughly
30,500 members the denomi-
nation had in New England
2010 is a 20 percent increase
from a decade ago, according
to the Association of Statisti-
cians of American Religious
Bodies. That growth is about
the same as another reli-
giously conservative group,

See Page C5


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


What's


making


you


happy?

Listen to a weekly
podcast on NPR
called "Pop Culture
Happy Hour," four peo-
ple discussing movies,
TV music and other pop-
culture topics.
At the end of every
show they go around the
table and say what's
making them happy that
week.
The rule is they share
something in the pop
culturesphere that other
people, such as their
podcast listeners, can
participate in so they
can be happy, too. They
might mention a new (or
old) book or movie, an
upcoming event, a fun
website. Sometimes
they share something
personal, which is al-
ways fun because it's a
chance to get to know
these people a little
better
Besides, there are
enough not-happy mo-
ments in life and this is a
great way to end their
show each week. So, I
thought I'd try that this
See Page C5


Church brings old faces under new name


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS New
Beginnings Fellowship in
Hernando has ended and
a New Covenant of Grace
has begun.
"We have formed a brand
new church, although
many of the same people
are still with us," said the
Rev Larry Silverman, pas-
tor of the former New Be-
ginnings church that met in
the old Hernando United
Methodist Church building
on U.S. 41 in Hernando.
Starting at 10 a.m. Sun-
day, New Covenant of
Grace Fellowship will
have its first service as a
church, meeting at the In-
verness Community Cen-
ter, 1082 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, near the inter-
section of U.S. 41 and In-
dependence Highway
Silverman said at the be-
ginning of the year, his
fourth year in ministry in
Citrus County, the church
leadership felt it was time
to make a fresh start.
"We, as a church, have
been catching the revela-
tion of what grace is all
about and it's been trans-
forming lives," he said.



Worship
"Easter A Week Later"
is the sermon title for Pastor
Stephen Lane today at 6 p.m.
and Sunday at 9:30 a.m. at
Faith Lutheran Church in
Crystal Glen Subdivision, off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto. The
church is wheelchair accessi-
ble, hearing assistance is
available from the ushers, and
large-print bulletins are avail-
able. There is also a cry room


Special to the Chronicle
The Rev. Larry Silverman and his wife, Corinne Silverman. The Rev. Silverman is
leading the New Covenant of Grace Fellowship, which meets for the first time Sunday
at the Inverness Community Center, 1082 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, near the
intersection of U.S. 41 and Independence Highway.


"Grace is our identity now,
and we felt that what the
Lord was showing us about
what living in the new
covenant is really about is
what we want to project to
Citrus County."
He said he's come a long



for small children and the par-
ents are able to both see and
hear the service in progress
and participate. Following the
Sunday service is a time of
fellowship and at 11 a.m., the
children's Sunday school and
adult Bible study are avail-
able. Call 352-527-3325 or
visit faithlecanto.com.
First Christian Church
of Homosassa Springs
presents Grace Harmony in
concert during the Sunday
worship service. The monthly


way from how he used to
preach the gospel since
being ordained in 1976.
"Years ago, I used to tell
people: The more you
please God, the more he's
going to be pleased with
you and the more your

Religion NOTES
fellowship dinner will follow.
The men's Saturday fellow-
ship breakfast begins at
8 a.m. Men's Bible study is at
7 p.m. Monday. Women's
Bible study is at 11 a.m. Tues-
day. Saturday contemporary
service begins at 5:30 p.m.
Call the church office at 352-
628-5556. The church is at
7030 W. Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Dan Wagner is the
minister.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites


prayers are going to be an-
swered.' That sounds good,
but it's a religious lie that
so many Christians be-
lieve," he said. "But when-
ever you try to follow God
by thinking, 'If I don't do
this then God won't be


the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. Saturday
and Divine Liturgy Venera-
tion of The Cross at
10 a.m. Sunday. The Great
Lent began on March 18, with
Holy Pascha to be celebrated
on May 5. The public is also
invited to attend Great Ves-
pers at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in
The Villages at St. George
Episcopal Church, 1250
Paige Place, Lady Lake. Fa-
ther David Balmer will cele-
brate a Pre-Sanctified Liturgy


pleased,' where does it
end? How do you know
when you've done enough
to please him? If we're
performance motivated, it
always leads to fear, shame
and condemnation. We
can't measure up we're
never good enough.
"But that's not what the
Bible teaches," he said.
"That's what others have
taught us the Bible says. The
truth is, what Christ has re-
ally done for us, the large-
ness of the new covenant of
grace is so much bigger than
what we have been taught"
Church member Eric
Hillman said he has been
burned out on religion, but
the message of grace has
renewed his passion.
"This church's slogan -
'less religion, more grace'
- is so wonderful, and I
am certain pleases Jesus,"
he said. "We just can't get
enough of Jesus now. It re-
minds me of when I first
was saved, that passion
and joy It's back now."
For information about
New Covenant of Grace
Fellowship in Inverness,
go online at NCGrace.com.
Email them at nhministry
@yahoo.com or call 616-
291-9568.


at 3 p.m. Friday. All are in-
vited. The church is at 1277
N. Paul Drive, Inverness, off
U.S. 41 North across from
Dollar General. The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees
to bring a box or can of food
for distribution at Family Re-
source Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777.
Worship services at St.
Timothy Lutheran Church
include a "come-as-you-are"

See Page C2


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Numbers,


just

numbers
N umbers, just
numbers. Sym-
bols represent-
ing an aggregate group.
Numbers, just numbers.
A system based on 10,
with numerals invented
by the Arabs. Numbers,
just numbers, who can
fathom them all?
Six million: The num-
ber of Jews murdered by
the Nazis during the
Holocaust years be-
tween 1935, when Hitler
took power in Germany,
until the defeat of the
Japanese army and end
of World War II in 1945.
Men, women and chil-
dren. Killed by poison
gas, bayoneting or gun-
shot because they were
Jewish by birth.
Numbers, just num-
bers. Three million: The
number of Jews killed in
concentration camps,
whether by disease, star-
vation or murder.
Numbers, just num-
bers. Two million: The
number of people killed
by the Einsatzgruppen.
These special-duty
troops were assigned to
German army units in-
vading the Soviet Union.
They had the task of
rounding up Jews and
killing them. The victims
were put on trucks,
driven to remote areas
and killed by carbon
See Page C5


..- F -=





C2 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

Communion service at 5 p.m.
Saturday; early service with
Communion at 8 a.m. Sun-
days with Sunday school
classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m., coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with Communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services
are announced. A nursery is
provided. The church is at
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.
19), Crystal River. Call 352-
795-5325 or visit www.
sttimothylutherancrystal
river.com.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
second Sunday of Easter with
Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday. A nursery
is provided during the
10:30 a.m. service. Christian
Formation is at 9:15 a.m.
Godly Play Sunday school is
at 10 a.m. There is a healing
service at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day followed by Bible study.
SOS is from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church. Evening
Bible study is at 7 p.m.
Thursday.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort
Island Trail North. The church
will celebrate the second Sun-
day of Easter at the 8 and
10:15 a.m. Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets at 8 p.m. Mon-
day and Friday in the parish
library. The young adults meet
for a light meal and Bible
study the first Friday monthly
at one of the group member's
homes. For details, call Dave
or Kathy Jackson at 352-344-
1167. The "Widows Network"
meets the fourth Monday
monthly at various locations.
All widows are invited. The
monthly sing-along is at


RELIGION


6 p.m. the fourth Sunday
monthly. Annie and Tim's
United Bluegrass Band will
lead the singing. All are
welcome.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, re-
sumes its regular worship
schedule at 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Bible Information
Class is at 1 p.m. Monday.
Choir rehearsal resumes at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Seniors
meet at 3 p.m. Thursday in
the fellowship room. Call 352-
489-3027.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., and Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m. For the sec-
ond Sunday of Easter, the
Rev. Craig S. Davies will
preach on the topic, "United
We Stand Divided We Fall,"
with readings from 1 Corinthi-
ans 1:10-18. Holy Commun-
ion will be observed. Call
352-637-0770.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,


Renewal services


Special to the Chronicle
North Oak Baptist Church in Citrus Springs will begin
church renewal services at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24,
with the Rev. Freddie Hinson bringing messages of
revival. Nightly services will continue through Saturday,
April 27 and will end with the 10:45 a.m. service Sunday,
April 28. Currently pastor of New Hope Baptist Church in
Hudson, the Rev. Hinson was called into ministry at the
age of 17 after having served in the Army in Belgium. He
came to Florida and has been working in the communities
of Pasco and Hernando county. His ministry has included
Covenant House, a residential re-entry and recovery
facility for men and women, as well as a food bank and
Jobs for Life Employability Skills Institute. The Rev.
Hinson's vibrant gospel messages will touch the hearts of
all who attend. The community is invited to join in these
exciting times. Special music and great fellowship will
be experienced during this renewal time. North Oak
Baptist Church is at the intersection of North Elkcam
Boulevard and North Citrus Springs Boulevard in Citrus
Springs. Child care will be available. Call 352-489-1462.


Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in Sunday's worship services
at the 8:30 a.m. blended serv-
ice and the 11 a.m. traditional
service. Coffee and dough-
nuts are served in the fellow-


ship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. For
more information, www.fbc
floralcity.org or call 352-
726-4296.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and


11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The
church is on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando. Call
352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to its various activi-
ties. Adult Bible study with the
Rev. Bob Martin is at
8:45 a.m. Sunday followed by
the 10 a.m. worship service
with the Rev. "Jerry" Carris.
Children's church, a nursery,
and hearing devices for the
hearing impaired are pro-
vided. The Korean worship
service with the Rev. Yoon is
at 2 p.m. Mark Bodenheim
chairs the Men's Connection
at 7 p.m. Monday. Holidaze
Crafters invites all to come
and enjoy crafts and fellow-
ship at 9 a.m. Tuesday. The
HUMW choir meets for prac-
tice at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Darryl
Frenier. On Wednesdays,
Bible study with Pastor Jerry
Carris is at 1 p.m., Korean
Bible study with the Rev. Yoon
is at 4 p.m., and Bible study


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

with the Rev. Bob Martin is at
7 p.m. Cub Scouts Pack 452
meets at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The United Methodist Women
meet at 9:45 a.m. the second
Thursday monthly. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
and meeting takes place the
fourth Saturday monthly.
Share Praise and Fellowship
meets at 6 p.m. the second
and fourth Sunday monthly.
The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church invites the
public to Sunday services at
9:30 a.m. with celebration of
Holy Communion. The third
Sunday monthly is a casual
service. Coffee hour follows
the service and all are invited.
Large-print service folders are
available. Wednesday Bible
study is at 10:30 a.m. Jacob's
Journey is at 1 p.m. Monday.
YMCA offers exercise classes
Tuesday and Thursday. Call
352-489-5511 for more infor-
mation. The church is at 9425
N. Citrus Blvd., Citrus Springs.
New Covenant Grace
Fellowship of Citrus County
will meet at 10 a.m. Sunday at
the Inverness Community
Center, 1082 Paul Drive,
See Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


Crystal River
CHURCH OF
CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday i
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239



ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
Saturday.....4:30 P.M.
Sunday......8:00 A.M.
................ 10:30 A.M .



-"


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


BE Crystal
E3 River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager






















BAP$ CHURCH
"The









A Pash in the
Heart
of the
can Communityon
with a
Heart
or the
Community"








A Parish in the
Anglican Communion.


To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES --
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


y Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


Attend


the worship


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i lib' Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAgeGroups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 AM.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com











SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey
L Bob Dickey


(J Crystal Diver
Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nurser
Provided




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAPIN FAMILY
IN CHKIST!

CKyNL J
RIV\ I y -
JNITED
MA ETHODIST I
CHUKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
-. A Stephen Ministry Provider ,


ST. ANNE'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River, FL 34429
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org Facebook: St. Ann's


Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple, Rector
Sunday Masses:
8:00 and 10:15 AM
Morning & Evening Prayer:
9:15 AM & 4:15 PM
4th Sunday Gospel Sing-along
6:00 PM
All Welcome. He is Risen!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Inverness (U.S. 41 and Inde-
pendence). This new church is
"low on religion, high on grace
- a church where you feel
better about yourself when
you leave than when you ar-
rived." Everyone is welcome.
Visit www.ncgrace.com.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to Sun-
day worship services at
10 a.m. A coffee fellowship is
from 9:30 to 10 a.m. The
church is non-denominational.
The church's new location is
at the Realtors Association of
Citrus County, 714 S. Scar-
boro Ave., Lecanto, on the
corner of State Road 44 and
Scarboro. Weekly Bible study
takes place Wednesdays.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for
fellowship and coffee, and the
current study on Galatians be-
gins at 7. Call Pastor Kennie
Berger at 352-302-5813.
If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as


well as a caring church family.
The Sunday morning service
is at 10:30 and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and
encouraging Bible-based
teachings that will build your
faith. Abundant Life is a full-
Gospel, nondenominational
church that believes in the
power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Abundant
Life of Crystal River is at 4515
N. Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org or call 352-
795-LIFE.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County will
have its annual meeting at
11 a.m. Sunday after the reg-
ular service at 10:30 a.m. All
members are encouraged to
attend. The NCUU meets at
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S.
41), Citrus Springs. Call 352-
465-4225.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River will
celebrate Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. with a sermon by
Parish Associate Rev. Sheryle
Lyman titled "Benefit of the
Doubt." Sunday school pre-
cedes the service at 9 a.m.


The food pantry will be open
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
day. Call the office at 352-
795-2259 or visit fpc
ofcrystalriver.com for further
information.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs of-
fers a Saturday night worship
service at 7 p.m. A"come-as-
you-are" atmosphere com-
bined with timely messages
and contemporary praise and
worship makes this a positive
experience for people of all
ages. Childcare is provided
for birth through 4 years of
age and a children's group for
kids through third grade meet
at the same time. All are in-
vited to attend. The church is
at the intersection of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard. Call
352-489-1688 or 352-746-
1500 for more information.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, offers the follow-
ing Sunday activities: SON-
rise Sunday school class at
7:45 a.m., blended worship
service at 9 a.m., "Kid's
Church" for ages 4 through
fourth grade during the 9 a.m.
service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at


10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except
the 7:45 a.m. class. On
Sunday evening, Connection
classes are offered and
AWANA begins at 5:15. Mid-
week worship service for
adults is at 6 p.m. Wednes-
days. For the youths, there is
"Ignite," and for children,
"Wednesday Worship Kids."
Call the office at 352-726-
1252 or visit www.fbc
inverness.com.
Peace Lutheran Church
has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups meet at 9 a.m. Sun-
day and 10 a.m. and
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sun-
day morning worship service
is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the
church office at 352-489-5881
or visit www.PeaceLutheran
Online.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 W. Yulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sun-
day school for all ages at
9 a.m. followed by morning
worship at 10:25. Youth Bible
study is at 4:30 p.m. in the fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening


Bible study begins at 6. Life
Care Center is open (food and
clothing) from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m. Monday and Thursdays.
Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church
of Chassahowitzka, 11275
S. Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for
morning worship. Call 352-
382-2557.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following
fellowship, coffee and good-
ies. The morning service be-
gins at 10:45. The evening
service is at 6. Midweek serv-
ices are at 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day. Young Musicians/
Puppeteers meet at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Youth Bible
study for ages 11 and older is
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the sec-
ond and fourth Fridays
monthly in the fellowship hall.
The church is on East Par-
sons Point Road in Hernando.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church at
6918 S. Spartan Ave. in Ho-
mosassa (one mile from U.S.
19, off Cardinal Street). Visit
comeandseefbc.org. Services
are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at


RELIGION


Places


offer Ic


and hai


I Come on over to


SERVICING THE


of worship that


)ve, peace


rmony to all.


"His" house, your spirits will be lifted!SPRINGS

COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


GOSPEL

Hernando Church of Christ
7187 North Lecanto Hwy.
(State Road 491), Hernando, FL
WITH GUEST SPEAKER
ALLE l AI LY
Everyone is invited to attend
5/8/13 through 5/12/13
Time of Service
Wednesday through Friday
@ 7:00pm
Saturday @ 5:00pm
Sunday@ 10:00am
and second service after lunch.
For more information or
directions call
David Smith (352) 400-5222
Jason Yarborogh (352) 249-7785
Jimmy Smith (352) 400-3419


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus

726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church 1
Nursery Available
wwwfbecfloralcity.org


Hernando

.4 Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


- Fist Bptis
' h








SundaySassaSprngs
1045am.. omcun


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services a
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pmr

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hernando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.corn

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Sunday
9:30 AM.................... Discovery Time
11:00 AM...............Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15 PM................ Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
12 mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Ope


Opew

Opew,
Vows 1(
... .. forChilren and Fa lies"
2125 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy. (486)
(/ miles from Hwy. 41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl.org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.

Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran
Church (UMS
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


\of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy,
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
.S(. H)TH AE('i,';4


-


_U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

352-74-71611


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 C3

9:45 a.m. with Sunday wor-
ship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
"King's Kids" and "Flyers" for
K-5 grades from 6 to
7:15 p.m. Sunday. Wednes-
day Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "War-
riors" for grades 6 through
12 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call
352-628-4793.
Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church is nondenomina-
tional. Worship services are at
10 a.m. Sunday. Bible study
is at 6 p.m. Wednesday in
the chapel. Everyone is wel-
come. Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study
at 10 a.m. Sunday, worship at
11, and evening service at 6.
Wednesday Bible study is at
7 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
The church is at the intersec-
tion of State Road 44 and
U.S. 19. Call Evangelist
George Hickman at 352-794-
3372 or 352-795-8883, or
email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion service
at 10:15 a.m. Sunday. Call for
directions: 855-426-4542.
See NOTES/Page C4





C4 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

First Church of God of
Inverness, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to
Sunday morning worship
services at 10:30. Call 352-
344-3700.
Covenant Love Min-
istry meets in building 11 at
Shamrock Acres Industrial
Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. There is a
gospel sing at 7 p.m. Friday.
Regular church services are
at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The
ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Pastor Brian
Kinker at 352-601-4868.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independ-
ent Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
Special events
"Revival" services con-
tinue at 6:45 p.m. today
through Wednesday at First
Baptist Church of Dunnellon.
The speaker is Dr. Rocky
Branch of Rocky Branch
Evangelistic Ministries. Call
the church at 352-489-2730
or visit fbcdunnellon@
bellsouth.net.
The Beverly Hills Jewish
Center, Congregation Beth
Sholom, will hold its Holo-
caust Remembrance Pro-
gram (Yom Hashoah) at
2 p.m. Sunday in Kellner Au-
ditorium, 102 Civic Circle (be-
hind the Jewish Center). The
program will feature a video
story created by students of
the New Media Academy of
Citrus High School, under the
direction of faculty member
Ed Kilpatrick. The video will
tell the story of Nina Jacobs, a
hidden child of the Holocaust,
whose widowed mother gave
birth to her during the Holo-
caust. The students recently
met Nina Jacobs and listened
to her story of survival. The


RELIGION


photographic display, "Gl's
Remember," from the Na-
tional Museum of American
Jewish Military History, will be
available for viewing. The pro-
gram will also include several
Holocaust survivors, or rela-
tives of survivors, from Citrus
County and environs. Musical
offerings will be provided by
local cellist Jim Davis. Spiri-
tual leader Cantor (Hazzan)
Mordecai Kamlot will lead the
audience in songs and
prayers.
Abbot Francis Sadlier
Council 6168 Knights of
Columbus will hold its tradi-
tional pilgrimage to Mary
Queen of the Universe
Basilica on Monday. Noon-
day Mass will be celebrated at
the main altar. Lunch follows
at Red Lobster. The bus
leaves the council in Lecanto
at 8:30 a.m. and returns by
5:30 p.m. Free coffee and
doughnuts will be served at
8 a.m. in the council hall. For
reservations, call Jim Gross-
man at 352-564-4245. Bus
payment is $20 per person.
Lt. Sue Webb of the Dun-
nellon Police Department will
present an introduction to the
Rape, Aggression Defense
(RAD) program at 10 a.m.
Tuesday at the church hall at
Holy Faith Episcopal Church
in Blue Cove, Dunnellon. This
women's defense program
event is sponsored by the
Episcopal Church Women
(ECW) of Holy Faith. It is free
and open to the public. Call
the church office at 352-
489-2685.
Everyone is invited to a
public "Interfaith Holocaust
Remembrance Event" at
4 p.m. Tuesday at the Church
On The Square, Spanish
Springs, The Villages. (Doors
open at 3 p.m.) Speakers in-
clude: Mitchell Bloomer, Holo-
caust Research Center
-Maitland; Dr. Denny Denni-
son, pastor, North Lake Pres-
byterian Church, Lady Lake;
the Rev. Zachariah Harris,
Rock Of Ages Lutheran


Church, Wildwood; the Rev.
Mark Niznik, St. Paul's Parish,
Belleview; and Eitan Zur,
president of Temple Shalom,
whose parents survived the
Holocaust.
Everyone is invited to a
free "Family Fun Night" at
5:30 p.m. the second
Wednesday monthly at Joy
Lutheran Church on South-
west State Road 200 at 83rd
Place, Ocala. This is an hour
of fun, devotion, food and
games followed by a contem-
porary worship service at
6:45 p.m. RSVP by mailing
arab2horses@yahoo.com or
elhjr@embarqmail.com. Call
the church office at 352-854-
4509, ext. 221.
Do you suffer from
Triskaidekaphobia the fear
of No. 13? Hernando United
Methodist Church has the
cure for it. The church will
sponsor an Antique Car and
Truck, Spring Craft Show,
and lunch and UMW bake
sale, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 13. Vehicles
register at 8 a.m. for $10
each. There will be door
prizes, plaques, trophies and
something pertaining to No.
13. The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway
(County Road 486), Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
The student youth group,
Reflex Student Ministry, of
Reflections Church will have a
car wash from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, April 13, at
Citrus Chiropractic, off State
Road 44 in Crystal River (next
door to Dan's Clam Stand).
For $5 they will wash off that
nasty yellow pollen that has
been clinging to your car all
winter. Proceeds will go to-
ward the students' trip to sum-
mer camp.
Nationally known singing
evangelists David and Jill
MacMeeken, along with the
gospel ventriloquist team of
"David & Rusty," will conduct
a "Family Revival" at 6 p.m.
Sunday, April 14, and 7 p.m.
Monday through Wednesday,


April 15-17, at House of
Power Church, on the corner
of Dawson Drive and County
Road 491 in Hernando. The
"Family Revival" features the
comedy of "David & Rusty,"
along with David and Jill's
Southern Gospel-style
singing, Gospel illustrations,
Bible messages, family fun
and more. Pastor George
Dehn welcomes everyone.
Call 352-344-9454.
For Feinstein's 16th An-
nual $1 Million Giveaway to
Fight Hunger, Alan Shawn
Feinstein will add money to
donations given to the Beverly
Hills Community Church's
Food Pantry. Donations must
be received by April 30, and
can include cash, checks,
and/or food items. The more
donations made to the food
pantry, the more Feinstein
money will be added to the
donation.


First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon will offer
its 3rd annual "SPARK Sum-
mer Camp," from 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. June 10 through
Aug. 2. This program also ac-
cepts children with special
needs. There are different
themes, crafts and games for
each week. The church is at
21501 W. State Road 40,
Dunnellon.
People of all religions are
welcome to bring their inspira-
tional writings and prayers to
share during "Interfaith De-
votionals" at 2 p.m. Sun-
days. Refreshments served.
For directions and/or more in-
formation, call Sandi at 352-
364-6035.
The public is welcome to
Zen meditation sessions at
2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto (off County
Road 491). Call 352-464-4955.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Reflections Church Stu-
dent Ministry for middle
school and high school-age
students meets from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Sunday at Citrus
Springs Middle School. Come
join us.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend
and enjoy Christian
fellowship.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church announces
Bingo at 11:30 a.m. Tues-
days and 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days featuring regular, double
and special bingos, together
with a jackpot and "pickle"
See NOTES/Page C5


NEW TO CITRUS COUNTY FLORIDA

An Exciting New Church Arrives!




-N ew Covenant Grace
Fellowship
of Citrus County F!lr, I
'Lowon Religion High on Gracet
A Church where you feel beffer about yourself
when you leave than when you arrived


BEGINNING APRIL 7TH AT 10:00AM


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033




First United

Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion
9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
Praise & WorshipE
-jA


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship ......... 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway


352.422..?535 .

Todd
Langdon

i4ory



Vic ory

in


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Snrid., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place too, I i' , \ ,, i,',,,n.,


road
Efist




5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
SMiles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com
Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion- 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!



W First

Assembly

of God
- |
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

iPastor,
Dairold
A- &
Bettye
Rushing

















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH








you//, W ,'or'.
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or By Appointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
i. .catholicweb.com .A


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .com


Hwy.44E@
SWashington Ave., Inverness U
S Sunday Services
S Traditional
S8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
* 11:00 AM Service
STapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
. 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
U Fellowship & Youth Groupm
S 55to7 PM 0
* Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U


Em


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NUMBERS
Continued from Page C1

monoxide poisoning from
the exhaust of the trucks,
or shot, with graves dug by
the victims before their
deaths. This method was
proven to be not efficient
enough for the Germans,
who later developed the
mass murder system of
gassing Jews in concen-
tration camps.
Numbers, just numbers.
Eight hundred thousand
and seventy Jews were
killed at Treblinka using a
staff of just 150 people.
Numbers, just numbers.
One hundred thousand:
The number of Jews who
died on "death marches."
Half-starved people were
forced to march long dis-
tances to get to slave labor
or extermination camps.
Those who faltered were
shot on site.
Numbers, just numbers.
In Birkenau, 20,000 Poles,
19,000 Gypsies and 12,000
Russian prisoners of war
were murdered.
Numbers, just numbers.
Seven thousand: The
number of Danish Jews
saved from extinction by
the Danish resistance.
Through the efforts of the
Danish resistance, virtu-
ally all the Jews in Den-
mark were allowed to
escape to Sweden, which
was a neutral country
during the Second World
War. The Danish people
never looked at their Jew-
ish countrymen as Jews,
but as Danish citizens, en-
titled to all the rights
Christians enjoyed. Their
bravery is commemorated
in a special exhibit at Is-
rael's monument and mu-
seum to Righteous
Gentiles, Yad Vashem in


FLOCK
Continued from Page C1

the Assemblies of God,
which hasn't emphasized
church planting.
Thumma said Southern
Baptists are drawing im-
migrants and new resi-
dents, but there's little
proof they've reaching
area lifers, including the
large Roman Catholic
population and increas-
ing numbers of
secularists.
"I don't see a third
Great Awakening happen-
ing at the moment,"
Thumma said.
A Pew Forum on Reli-
gion & Public Life study
last year found that since
2007, the Northeast had
the largest percentage in-
crease nationwide of peo-
ple who describe
themselves as religiously
unaffiliated. Meanwhile, a
2012 Gallup poll indicates
the six-state New England
region hosts the country's
five least religious states
(Connecticut is No. 11).
Southern Baptists, the
nation's largest Protestant
group with about 16 mil-
lion members, have been
trying since the late 1950s
to build a northern pres-
ence. But their vigorous,
recent church-planting is
part of a broader, denom-
ination-wide emphasis at
a time when overall mem-
bership is declining.
Wideman said research
indicates the unchurched
are far more likely to be
drawn to a new church
than one that already ex-
ists. And multiple church
plants in neighborhood-
centric urban areas,
though unlikely to draw
huge numbers, aim to cre-
ate enduring Southern
Baptist communities, he
said.
A similarity among the
New England church
plants is that none of their
names include the words
"Southern Baptist."
Thumma said it's a
clear effort to avoid some
of the stereotypes about
Southerners, such as neg-


ative perceptions of their
racial views or reputed
"damn-us-all-to-hell" fun-
damentalism. It's not ma-
licious, he said, but
"they're church-planting
by stealth."
Wideman said they
never deny they're South-
ern Baptist, but if it's a
barrier to sharing the
faith, why broadcast it?
The Southern Baptist


Jerusalem.
Numbers, just num-
bers. Six thousand: The
number of people who
could be gassed at
Auschwitz daily It took
just twenty minutes to do
this using a poison gas
called Zyklon B, origi-
nally developed for use as
a pesticide.
Numbers, just numbers.
One thousand: The num-
ber of concentration
camps ordered built by
Hitler. Combining cen-
turies of anti-Semitism
with racist propaganda,
he was able to rationalize
his diabolical scheme to
kill all the Jews of Europe
to the German people.
And while the German cit-
izens of the towns where
the camps were located
either knew or suspected
or feigned blissful igno-
rance of the goings on,
when the camps were lib-
erated, these citizens
were forced to pay wit-
ness to the inhumane acts
of the Nazis by touring the
crematoria and barracks
where the Jews were held
captive. Many Germans
openly wept at what their
countrymen had done.
Numbers, just numbers.
Fourteen: On the 20th of
January, 1942, 14 high-
ranking Nazi officials
gathered at the German
resort town of Wannsee to
discuss the Final Solution
to the Jewish problem.
This amounted to the
mass murder of the Jews
of Europe, with Adolph
Eichmann at its head. The
grand architect of the
Final Solution was cap-
tured by the Israelis and
hung after a trial in Israel
in 1962.
Numbers, just a solitary
number. Only one. One
person can change the
world for good or evil.

Convention itself has ac-
knowledged this problem
by approving an optional
alternative name last
summer: Great Commis-
sion Baptists.
The main concern,
Wideman said, is that
Northerners will see the
churches as excluding
them. And he has a ques-
tion for Southern friends
who complain about the
tactic: "How well do you
think First Yankee Baptist
Church would go over in
Alabama?"
With a thick North Car-
olina accent, Lyandon
Warren can't hide his
roots. But in seven years
planting churches in West
Pawlet and Poultney, Vt.,
he finds showing a com-
mitment to the local com-
munity is more important.
Many New Englanders
have zero familiarity with
the Bible, so you can't just
throw open the doors of a
new church and expect
people to come in, he said.
Instead, his group reached
out with novel approaches
like offering water and a
diaper-changing station at
a town-wide tag sale. In
Norwich, Conn., Pastor
Shaun Pillay's group vol-
unteers for various tasks,
from filling sand bags to
snow shoveling. It creates
a foothold and trust in the
community, if not converts,
he said.
"They say, 'We like what
you do, but we don't like
your God,"' Pillay said.
Persistence is critical,
said Pillay and Warren,
who emphasize showing
up at the same place, at
the same times, with the
same Christian message,
like Cabral with his cross
at the Fall River
intersection.
Cabral's consistency
paid off with Angelique
Vargas, who was so drunk
she didn't remember the
first three times she met
her future pastor But on a
sober day, the 39-year-old
was surprised when a
stranger called her by
name as she crossed the
street. She listened to his
message, Vargas said, "for
the simple fact that he re-


membered me on my
darkest day"
On a recent February
afternoon, horns honked
and a middle finger flew
as Cabral walked the traf-
fic island. Drivers also
kept engaging him, trying
to answer the question on
his cross, which he'd ex-
plain meant, "Are you
ready to face God when
you die?" Cabral would


* Chronicle photographers will consider requests to
take photos of community events. Call 563-5660
for details.


Hitler will go down in his-
tory as a perpetrator of
evil as the world had
never known. From the
medical experiments
done on inmates, to the
cruel and inhumane con-
centration camps, to the
millions of people, Jews
and non-Jews, whom the
Nazis murdered, his
name will be remem-
bered among the evil,
worse than the Pharaoh
who enslaved the ancient
Israelites, worse than
Haman, who had plans to
murder the Jews of an-
cient Persia, or the Baby-
lonians who destroyed the
first Temple, or the Ro-
mans who destroyed the
second, or the Inquisition,
pogroms and all atrocities
in between none of
these compared to what
would be known as The
Holocaust.
Numbers, a place-
holder known as zero.
Nothing, nada, rien, niets,
niente, nichts: The miles
of track that led to con-
centration camps bombed
by the Allies. Though
what the Nazis were
doing was known to the
Allies, it was believed
bombing the tracks to the
camps would claim too
many lives. Holocaust sur-
vivor and activist Elie
Weisel has often com-
mented about this
decision.
Numbers, only
numbers.
Yom HaShoah, or Holo-
caust Memorial Day,
occurs this year on the
April 7.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish edu-
cator She lives in Ocala
with her husband, Phil.
She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.

share how he knew that
he was, then hand out a
card with a gospel mes-
sage and his church's
address.
"God bless you!" he'd
call as the light changed.
"I want you to go to
heaven!"
Cabral's church has 35
members, barely enough
to cast a decent shadow in
the annex of larger South-
ern Baptist churches. But
Cabral says he's not going
anywhere. He says he
wants to love people, give
them a chance to let God
change them and see how
this church plant goes.
"It's like growing a gar-
den," he said. "You've got
to plant the seed, you've
got to water it and you've
got to be faithful."


FIRST ,B er
Bringing C
*FIRST r I to [Inverrness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
- www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson




S "FirstForChrist"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
344-190


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

game. Doors open at 10 a.m.
Tuesday and 4 p.m. Wednes-
day. Kitchen features "home-
made" soups and sandwiches.
The church is on U.S. 41,
three miles north of Dunnellon.
All widows in the com-
munity are invited to join the
Widows Ministry Group
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't
finished with us yet!" Call
Darla at 352-270-8115.
Lecanto Ala-non meets
at 8 p.m. Thursday at Unity
Church of Citrus County, 2628
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Ladies, come to "The
Well" for refreshment and
prophetic prayer ministry at
7 p.m. the first Friday monthly
at FresHope Ministries, 2991
E. Thomas St., Inverness. If
you are hurting, need to hear
a word from God, and/or spiri-
tual growth and strength, then
this is the night just for you.
Come comfortable and come


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

week and tell you what's
making me happy
Mad Men Season 6!
I make a really good
baked eggplant dish that's
tomatoey and sweet, and it
makes my husband happy,
which makes me happy
When I leave for work
in the morning I have a
view of a lake between
some trees. Sometimes
when it's cold out there's a
layer of mist on top of the
water. Sometimes the sky
is yellow and orange and
lavender. Sometimes the
water is bright blue, de-
pending on what time I
leave the house. Whatever
time I leave, that view al-
ways makes me happy and
I thank God that he allows
me to see it.
A week or so ago I was
bothered by something
I've since forgotten. At the
time a friend suggested
that I go shopping she
knows how much I love
shopping. It made me
happy to tell her I hadn't
bought anything other
than groceries in weeks
and that I hadn't wanted
to. It made me extremely
happy I was happy without
shopping. It makes me
happy when I realize Jesus
is better than even a
sweater that's 60 percent
off.


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 AM
Sunday School..................9:30 M
Contemporary Service.. .10:30
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes.................... 7:00 P,
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 PM
Teens.............................. 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


expecting to receive. You will
not leave the same way you
came in. If you desire prayer
and can't come to "The Well,"
we will schedule a phone call
with you for prayer. Call 352-
341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
Sales & such
Find lots of great deals
on clean items at low prices
during the yard and bake
sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 13, at Parsons
Memorial Presbyterian
Church, 5850 Riverside Drive,
Yankeetown. Hotdogs will be
available for lunch. To con-
tribute to the sale, call 352-
447-6004 for pick up or drop
items off at the church Mon-
day through Thursday.
Peace Lutheran
Church's annual rummage
sale is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, April 13. Shoppers
will find many great bargains.
To donate items to the sale,
call Thelma Grams at 352-
465-3877. The church is at
7201 S. U.S. 41, five miles
north of downtown Dunnellon.
Call the church office at 352-
489-5881 or visit www. Peace

There's a certain color
palette of grayish blues
that makes me very happy
It's the color of winter or
maybe the ocean on a
cloudy day It's soft and
soothing, and restful to my
eyes. A few years ago I
found a duvet cover the
exact shade of this grayish
blue, so I go to bed and
wake up surrounded by
this restful color.
Being near water re-
news and restores me. One
day at work I was having a
tough day, so I finished
early and went and sat on
a bench in the sun by the
lake near my house. I sat
for maybe an hour, not
thinking about anything
except how water renews
my soul.
My laptop makes me
happy
The giant manatee out
in front of the wildlife park
in Homosassa makes me
happy Every holiday
someone dresses it up -
bunny ears for Easter,
Santa hat for Christmas -
and I take a photo of it to
send to my daughter, who
loves manatees. When she
was a kid she painted a
dinner plate with a Nativ-
ity scene, and baby Jesus
looks a lot like a manatee.
We call it the Jesus Plate
- and that also makes me
happy
I have an apple green
iPod that accidentally
went through the washing
machine about a year ago.


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M. \
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M. ,

726-1670


l PRIMER IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM -Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Biblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


RELIGION


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
-,=,, l-'i...-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
a Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH


"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Bible Study
(Fellowship 6:30-7:00pm)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the comer ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813 A


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.


Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 C5

LutheranOnline.com.
The St. Elizabeth Ann
Seton Council of Catholic
Women will host their annual
"White Elephant Rummage
Sale" from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday, April 19, and 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday, April 20. Find
bargains on a variety of
household items, furniture,
small appliances, pots and
pans, dishes, glasses, books,
videos, CDs and more.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
A free men's breakfast
will be served at 9 a.m. today
at Calvary Chapel of Inver-
ness, 960 S. U.S. 41, Inver-
ness. Menu includes eggs,
pancakes, bacon, sausage
and more. Also new at Cal-
vary Chapel is free movies
and popcorn at 6 p.m. Fri-
days. Call 352-726-1480.

It took a while to dry out in
a bag of rice, but it works
perfectly, which makes me
happy My husband and I
listen to downloaded ser-
mons sometimes when
we're out driving. A good
sermon makes me happy
Having someone say,
"I prayed for you today,"
makes me happy I know of
one person who prays for
me every day, and just
thinking about that makes
me smile. Lord knows I
need all the prayers I can
get
Romans 4:7-8 says:
"Happy are those whose
wrongs are forgiven,
whose sins are pardoned."
To know that my past is
wiped clean and so is my
present and future, to rest
in the security of God's
mercy and grace, to trust
that his forgiveness is
without limit, to know that
in Christ "there is there-
fore no condemnation,"
well, that makes me happy
What's making you
happy?


Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over,
Victoria I Know the
Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email at
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.







C Page C6 -SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


NeWSNOTES CF to host art of Mitchell NewsNOTES


Choir getting
ready for 'Joy'
The Citrus Community
Concert Choir will present
its spring concert, "Basket
of Joy," for a final perform-
ance at 3 p.m. Sunday, April
7, at Faith Lutheran Church,
935 S. Crystal Glen Drive,
Lecanto (in the Crystal Glen
subdivision).
Selections include
Mozart's "Ave Verum Cor-
pus," Vivaldi's "Gloria," the
Moses Hogan arrangement
of "Deep River" and a con-
temporary song, "Hallelu-
jah," composed by Leonard
Cohen and recorded and
performed by "11 Divo."
Admission will be a $10
donation; children 12 and
younger will be admitted
free.
Donations are the major
funding source for the
choir's annual $1,500
scholarship. For more infor-
mation, visit www.citrus
choir.com or call 352-628-
6452 or 352-212-1746. In-
formation about the choir's
annual scholarship, includ-
ing application forms, is
also available on the
website.
Applications for the
scholarship must be submit-
ted prior to April 30.
Zumbathon for
Relay April 7
The fourth annual Inver-
ness Relay For Life Zum-
bathon to benefit the
American Cancer Society
will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Sun-
day, April 7, at Key Training
Center's Chet Cole Center,
5521 W. Buster Whitton
Way, Lecanto, on the corner
of State Road 44 and Van
Northwick Road.
Admission is $10, which
includes admission, water,
snacks and door prizes. For
tickets, call Anna Olivero at
352-613-3063, or Marilynne
Dennison at 352-726-6790.
Festival offers
scholarships
The Festival of the Arts
Committee has announced
that $1,500 scholarships
will be offered to graduating
seniors from any Citrus
County high school or
home-schooled graduating
seniors who are interested
in continuing their education
in the visual arts.
Applications may be ob-
tained from high school
guidance counselors or call
Jaret at 352-726-0366. Ap-
plications must be returned
to the Festival of the Arts
Committee by April 8.
NARFE convenes
in Inverness
Chapter 776 of the Na-
tional Active and Retired
Federal Employees Associ-
ation (NARFE) invites all
active and retired employ-
ees and surviving annui-
tants to attend its next
meeting Monday, April 8,
at the B & W Rexall,
Inverness.
A short lunch starts at
1 p.m. and is followed by
the business meeting. The
topic for this month's meet-
ing is Organ Donor and
Transplant Programs, pre-
sented by Maria Copland of
LifeQuest Florida.
For more information, call
352-270-0185.
Pine Ridge group
to convene
The Pine Ridge Civic As-
sociation will meet at 7 p.m.
Monday April 8, at the Pine
Ridge Community Center.
Speaker for the evening
will be County Commis-
sioner Joe Meek, who will
provide information on the
latest developments in the
county and have a
question-and-answer
period. The meeting is open
to civic members and
friends.


Special to the Chronicle

The College of Central
Florida will host the art of
Keith Mitchell at the Cit-
rus Campus through
April 30.
The exhibit will be dis-
played in the upper level
of Dorothea G. Jerome
Building. A reception will
be held Thursday, April 18,
from 5 to 7 p.m. with live
music by Ben Medrano.
Originally born in


Delaware, Mitchell moved
with his family to the Cape
Canaveral area as a child
where his interest in art
began to grow.
His career in the art in-
dustry bloomed after
stretching his own canvas
at 12 and receiving direc-
tion from several local
artists. He won three rib-
bons from Florida Seaside
Art Show for Best
Seascape, Second Best of
Show and the Purchase


Award for his painting of a
local landmark.
Mitchell painted bill-
boards for 34 years until
computers took over that
art. Since retirement he
has painted a series of
landscapes.
Most recently Mitchell
was inspired to do a series
of abstract paintings in oil
which will be displayed at
the exhibition. They are
said to take the viewer
from the depth of depres-


sion to a future bright with
hope.
Exhibit hours are 8:30
a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday
through Thursday; 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday. The
exhibit is closed week-
ends. There is no charge to
attend the exhibition and
reception, which are made
possible by the CF Foun-
dation.
For more information
contact Michele Wirt at
352-854-2322, ext. 6131.


Sons of the American Revolution Awards


During a recent meeting of the Withlachoochee Chapter ROCHELLE KAISER/Forthe Chronicle
of the Sons of the American Revolution two members Charlie Day, left, president of the Withlachoochee
were recognized for their long time membership with Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution,
the chapter. Charlie Day, chapter president, presented thanked Frederick Learned, past president and chapter
a membership award to Jack Townsend, left, for his 15 secretary, with a Certificate of Appreciation for his
years of service to the chapter and Richard Sumner, talents and leadership he provided to the chapter. This
right, for his 10 years of service, is his last meeting before moving out of state.


Charlie Day, president of the Withlachoochee Chapter
of the Sons of the American Revolution inducted two
new members to the chapter as descendants of the
Revolution War. From left are Ron Powell, Benjamin
Warren and Day.


Chapter members Duanne Laughlin, right, is being
recognized by Charlie Day, president of the
Withlachoochee Chapter of the Sons of the American
Revolution for completing the task of proving a
supplement of another ancestor dating back to the
Revolutionary War.


Bobby Stalvey, a deputy
with Hernando County
Detention, is this month's
true hero at the
Withlachoochee Chapter
of the Sons of the
American Revolution. He
saw a vehicle leave the
road, crash into a guard
rail and overturn. He
quickly found the driver
hanging from his seat belt.
With assistance by two
others he was able to
remove the man, even
while the under-carriage
was on fire. From left are:
Danielle Stalvey, his wife,
Deputy Bobby Stalvey and
Ed Gingrich, chapter
member.


The Withlachoochee
Chapter of the Sons of the
American Revolution
began offering a
Revolutionary War poster
contest to students in
elementary schools in
2009. Three teachers
were recognized for
participating in this history
project. From left are:
Larry Sturgeon, chapter
member; Heather
Dancsak, Brooksville
Elementary School; Robin
Hindley, Inverness Primary
School, and Norm Fryer,
chapter member. Not
pictured: Ben Barlow,
Homosassa Elementary
School.


Crystal River Garden Club to meet on April 8


Special to the Chronicle Jim Bruno, a Master Gardener,
will speak about "Propagation by
The Garden Club of Crystal River Air Layering & Cuttings, Seeding &
will meet at 1 p.m. Monday, April 8, Dividing Plants." Examples of how
at the Crystal River Preserve on to divide plants and handouts will
State Park Road in Crystal River. be available.


All meetings are open to the pub-
lic. A business meeting will take
place after the program.
For more information, call club
President Libby Wentzell at 352-
257-1211.


Sew-Ciety to
gather April 8
The Florida Sewing
Sew-Ciety will meet at
9 a.m. Monday, April 8, at
the Citrus County Canning
Facility, 3405 W. Southern
St., Lecanto.
The program will be pre-
sented by Margaret Travis,
owner of Eazy Peazy.
Travis will debut her new
book at the meeting and
will teach a slipper project
from the book.
Those who wish to at-
tend and make the project
are asked to RSVP to Jan
at 352-746-5380 for a sup-
ply list.
FSS meets on the sec-
ond Monday of each
month at 9 a.m. at the
Canning Facility. All sewing
enthusiasts are welcome.
Alzheimer's
program on tap
HPH Hospice and the
Alzheimer's Association
will offer a free presenta-
tion "Making the Place-
ment Decisions" from 2 to
3 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, at
the HPH Hospice office,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway
in Beverly Hills.
Jerry Fisher, program
specialist for the
Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter, will provide information
on different types of facili-
ties and levels of care. He
will discuss what to look for
in finding a good facility
and help determine what
programs are available to
help pay for the placement.
HPH will also host free,
20-minute memory screen-
ings for individuals age 50
and older who are con-
cerned about memory
loss. Participants will meet
privately with Fisher. The
screening does not provide
an exact diagnosis and is
not for people who have
dementia or Alzheimer's;
however, the screening
does help to determine if
there are serious memory
problems, according to the
Alzheimer's Association.
The screenings will be
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday, April
15 and 16, at the HPH of-
fices. Registrations are re-
quired and can be made
by calling HPH at 352-527-
4600.


Society to convene
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will
meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday,
April 9, at the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, 3474 W. Southern
St., Lecanto.
Guest speaker will be
Peter Summers from the
Pinellas County Genealog-
ical Society. He will talk
about "City Directories in
Genealogy Research." City
directories are a valuable
genealogy resource.
Guests are welcome to
attend. For information,
call Mary Ann Machonkin
at 352-382-5515 or visit
www.citrusgenealogy.com.
Women Voters
to meet
The newly formed, non-
partisan, League of
Women Voters of Citrus
County will meet at 10 a.m.
Tuesday, April 9, at the
Central Ridge (Beverly
Hills) Library.
The League will con-
tinue to meet the second
Tuesday morning of each
month. All men and
women are welcome. At
the April 9 meeting, volun-
teer officers will be intro-
duced and a process
begun to select the most
pressing local issue.
For information, call
352-746-0655


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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(s") 370 271 370 Streep.'PG-13', Ferrell. (In Stereo)'PG'a Premiere. (In Stereo)'PG-13'a (2003) 'R'a
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(i) 36 31 36 HEAT Heat (Live) AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (Live) Golf Heat Heat
** "Underworld: Rise ** "Underworld: Evolution" (2006, Horror) "Battledo s" (2013, Horror) Dennis Haysbert, **aY "Blade 11" (2002,
31 59 31 26 29 of the Lycans" Kate Beckinsale. 'R' Craig Sheffer. Premiere.'NR Horror)'R'
(TBIJ) 49 23 49 16 19 King |King Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang |Big Bang BigBang |BiBanang |Big Bang Big Bang Men- |Cougar
T *** "Fora Few Dollars More"(1965, **** "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962, Adventure) Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn. A
1 169 53 169 30 35 Western) Clint Eastwood.'R'a controversial British officer unites Arab tribes against the Turks.'PG'a
53 Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property
T 53 34 53 24 26 MA' I'MA' N Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars Wars
(1LC) 50 46 50 29 30 Lottery Changed Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life Dateline: Real Life
iii 350 261 3 **"Fightville" "Legendary" (2010, Drama) Patricia ** "Saw" (2004) Cary Elwes. *"Sleepstalker" (1995, Horror)
( 350 261350 (2011) 'NR' [ Clarkson. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'[ Premiere. (In Stereo)'R' Jay Underwood. 'R'
S* "Clash of the Titans" (2010, Fantasy) Sam *** "300"(2007, Action) Gerard Butler. Badly outnum- *** "lAm Legend" (2007) Will
(1TJ 48 33 48 31 34 Worthington.'PG-13'a (DVS) bered Spartan warriors battle the Persian army 'R' Smith.'PG-13'a (DVS)
C OOi1 38 58 38 33 Regular |Regular Movie'PG' Venture |Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Cleveland Dynamite |Boon
IA 9 54 9 44 Ext. Terror Rides Extr. Terror Rides Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
iiifiTi 25 55 25 98 55 Wipeout 'PG' a Wipeout 'PG' | Wipeout 'PG' a Wipeout 'PG' a World's Dumbest... Upload Madness
(TvL 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne |Gold Girls Gold Girls The Golden Girls IGold Girls Raymond |Raymond Raymond IRaymond King King
SNCIS "Kill Screen" (In NCIS "Out of the Frying NCIS "Tell-All"'PG' NCIS "Two-Faced"'PG' NCIS "Sins of the *iY "Gone in Sixty
(USJ 47 32 47 17 18 Stereo) 'PG' Pan..."'PG' (DVS) B (DVS) Father" (In Stereo) 'PG' Seconds"N
Joan & Melissa: Joan Joan & Melissa: Joan Joan & Melissa: Joan Joan & Melissa: Joan Joan & Melissa: Joan Joan & Melissa: Joan
S 117 69 117 Knows Best? Knows Best? Knows Best? Knows Best? Knows Best? Knows Best?
WGNLA 18 18 18 18 20 Law Order: Cl MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs at Atlanta Braves. (N) |10th Inn. WGN News at Nine Bones'14'm


North
* Q 8 3
V 10 4 2
SK 10 6


West
4 10 7 5 4
SK Q 7
* 7 5 3 2
4 8 2


& AK


04-06-13


J 5
East
aK J 6
VJ 8 6 5
9 8
Q 10 9 3


South
4 A 9 2
V A 9 3
SAQJ 4
1 764
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: 4 4


SBridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Victoria Beckham, Posh Spice of the Spice
Girls and wife of soccer star David Beckham,
said, "I like a man who can be a real friend, has
a good sense of humor, a good pair of shoes and
a healthy gold card."
There are two words in that sentence that are
very important for bridge experts: card and
sense. Experts are born with card sense, which
is an understanding that because a player did
something, it means that he has or has not got a
particular holding in that suit.
How would a South with card sense handle
this deal? He is in three no-trump. West leads
the spade four, dummy plays the three, and East
puts in his jack. What should declarer do?
When North tables his dummy, he expects the
contract to make easily However, many a de-
clarer would go down. He would understand-
ably take the first trick, play a club to the king,
return to his hand with a diamond, and lead a
club to dummy's jack. Here, East would win with
his queen and shift to a heart (best). Suppose
South takes the second heart. If he then runs di-
amonds, he squeezes East. But declarer proba-
bly tries the clubs, after which he cannot
recover
Instead, South should try for these nine win-
ners: two spades, one heart, four diamonds and
two clubs. But how should he play the spades?
Go back to trick one. East's card was the jack.
When third hand is playing the highest card so
far in the trick, he plays the bottom of equal
cards. So West must have the spade 10. After tak-
ing the first trick, South immediately leads a
spade to dummy's eight. When it pulls out the
king, declarer has his nine tricks.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I CRAHN


-- J --








THF PUCO L5ARCHEV
THF UIL-lNG
B CAU5F IT WAS ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your rY V
answer here: kCTA A IAAA
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: ONION THEME MUTATE REFUSE
I Answer: The polygraph test was the -
MOMENT OF TRUTH


ACROSS
1 Unreal
5 Recede
8 Fiberglass
bundle
12 Blue dye
13 Mr. Tolstoy
14 Splotch
15 Big-ticket -
16 Peak toppers
18 Animate
20 Step on it
21 Not guzzle
22 Domed
building
25 Ego ending
28 Small town
29 Trading
center
33 Black-footed
critter
35 Acapulco
cash
36 South Korean
capital
37 Minor
accident
38 Casts a vote
39 Shortly


41 911 responder
42 Bar attraction
45 PIN prompter
48 Angkor -
49 Compete
in a bee
53 Quiet
56 "Later!"
57 Whodunit
name
58 But is it -?
59 Fierce whale
60 Place
61 Mr. Turner
62 Overflow
(with)

DOWN
1 Fall short
2 Not pro
3 Chicken style
4 First name in


glue 8 "Doctor Who"
5 Raised network
railways 9 Mournful wail
6 Heston epic 10 Pith helmet
(hyph.) 11 Cough syrup
7 Cousin of meas.


19 Dynamite
inventor
23 Egyptian
boy-king
24 "Rag Mop"
brothers
25 In that case
(2 wds.)
26 Trickle
27 Gentle gait
30 Tennis great
Arthur
31 Traipse about
32 Sugar amts.
34 Twice-baked
bread
35 Carnation
colors
37 Alley Oop's
kingdom
39 PLO biggie
40 Character
43 Dazzle
44 Orlando
attraction
45 Does a takeoff
46 Garr of
"Mr. Mom"
47 Soda fountain
treat
50 Dublin's land
51 Fasten a shoe
52 Garden soil
54 Passing grade
55 British inc.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
* Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I've always
had a problem with my
mother and sister
When I was a child, I often
stayed with my grandfather I
loved this man fiercely He
died recently, and the last 10
years of his life
were terrible. My
mother and aunts
rescinded his DNR P-
and disregarded his
wishes about life
support, forcing
him to remain in a
partially vegetative
state for years.
My sister, 'Alice,"
inserted herself
into this drama at
every opportunity
She had to be re- ANN
moved from his MAIL
bedside when she
became hysterical
and lashed out at the nurses.
Alice submitted the death no-
tice to the local paper without
checking with anyone. She left
out many family members,
who are furious and are taking
it out on me. My aunt (the ex-
ecutor of the will) has made it
clear that I won't get the small
tokens my grandfather left me
unless I pick sides.
I doubt Alice's grief is gen-
uine. When I moved away, my
aunts paid her to stay with
Grandpa, and she told me she
was only doing it for the
money My mother and aunts
won't set a date for a memorial
because they're all so busy try-
ing to hurt each other Every
family function becomes a
three-ring circus. How can I
grieve for a grandparent who
meant the world to me when
I'm busy refereeing? Bro-
kenhearted
Dear Brokenhearted: Our
condolences on the loss of


your grandfather Please don't
focus on how genuine your sis-
ter's grief is. If she is behaving
for the sake of drama, so be it.
And the executor of an estate
does not have the legal right to
withhold a bequest. You can
talk to your grand-
father's lawyer
about that. We
know how upsetting
this is for you, but
you would be better
served by staying
out of the family
fights with as much
.' diplomatic neutral-
1 ity and distance as
you can muster
Dear Annie: I
hope you will print
IE'S my "public service"
BOX letter for all con-
tractors and build-
ing managers:
Please place the toilet
paper holder in the restrooms
high enough that one does not
have to bend over to get the
toilet paper out. This is partic-
ularly important in handi-
capped stalls where the paper
dispenser tends to be below
the handrail. Someone with a
back problem will have a great
deal of difficulty reaching
down to six inches from the
floor to get the paper Thank
you. -An Iowa Back Patient
Dear Iowa: Ideally, the toilet
paper holder should be placed
so that the paper (not neces-
sarily the holder) is at elbow
height when one is seated.
DearAnnie: You print lots of
letters from grandparents who
say their kids keep them iso-
lated from their grandchil-
dren. Here's my perspective:
In our extended family, we
have one grandparent who is
an active alcoholic and
hoarder (so we can't visit), two


who smoke multiple packs a
day (so we limit our time), two
who think the best entertain-
ment is mocking us (so we
limit our children's exposure)
and one who believes the
Earth revolves around her
When we had our first child,
all six of these grandparents
descended on our house at
once, stayed for many hours,
offered no assistance whatso-
ever, expected to be waited on
hand and foot, and mocked
our parenting decisions.
These parents ignore what-
ever boundaries we set. They
aren't abusive, and there are
no insurmountable differ-
ences. But they don't respect
that my spouse and I work
long hours and value the lim-
ited time we have together We
don't want to be manipulated,
ignored or berated.
If any one of these parents
treated us respectfully, we
would gladly open our home
to them more often. They say
how selfish my generation is,
but frankly, we have great-
grandparents with whom we
have wonderful relationships
because they show respect
and understanding. We go out
of our way to make sure they
spend time with their great-
grandchildren. -Fed Up with
Grandparents


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions toan-
niesmailbox@comcast net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox, Cre-
ators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more visit
the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www creators. com.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


B RO T B AR E LLK
POORRHERANTAU
C N RAIMENTST
CAELOT B RA SH
RO BEALEE
KE N YA E TS
WR Y FAV A TR AY
HISSEBER GOLDS
IC ESNTERIB ND ERs
CE L L LNDE

GASPUMPS MINT
ELL LES E E LSE
RI A TAOIS G E


ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 C7


WULLAF



ULOTTE
777^^


41






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CS SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013

Peanuts


Pickles


For Better or For Worse


Sally Forth


MAYBE THAT'S NOT THE
THlF I- YOU SHOULD SAY TO THE
I OTHER OF YOUR CHILD.
OH. RIGHT. POINT
// THAT BELLY TOWARDS ME
S5ICAN f-
AOLOGIZE


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
I SEE YOU'VE BEEN YEAH, I
CHECKING OU A SUPPOSE I
LOT OF HOME HAVE
REPAIR
BOOvKS~c l ^f
i l - -,''' \


I THINK I'VE FIGURE NOT THAT
OUT A WAV TO HANDYMAN
MAKE SOME (THING AGAIN,
EXTRA MONEY EAR





I 4G


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


.


It was payback time for the frequent
surprises provided by his neighbors'
Chihuahuas. And though Leonard knew
that revenge is best served cold, his Great
Dane did not offer that option.


"...merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily,
life's a buttercream."


Doonesbury -

YOU NVER C0OT THE
PIPnTr CHANCE. I XAS
PICK Tr9 fHAWOEP ThiH
K ASSOO AS I
I ARRIV6P!








Big Nate
W-HOOPS! SORRY
5BOUT THAT










Arlo and Janis


RATS' MY BAD


ILL TAKE _T
IT FROM K
HERE, MARTY.


YOU DON'T OFTEN "
SEE A RELIEF 1
PITCHER DURING
BATTIN& PRACTICE.
*^SICH .!"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Evil Dead" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13)4 p.m. 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) 3:50 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) In 3D. 12:45 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10 p.m. No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R) 7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Croods" (PG) 4:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 1:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Evil Dead" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.,


10:15 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4:30 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) 4:20 p.m. No passes.
"Jurassic Park" (PG) In 3D. 1:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10:20 p.m. No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m.,
7p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) In 3D.
4 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation" (PG-13) 1:45 p.m.,
5 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Call" (R) 2 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 8 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.7 Classic Hits WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.3, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: Q slenbe lV


"UCPG KRZT UT'ZT EOZTJ, UT'KK CPZT


WRXTZTX. UCPG KRZT UT WPOK GR


EOZT, UOKK ST KRNG WRX PKK


TGTXJOGA."


- KTR SVNMPEKOP


Previous Solution: "I hope they make a video game of me. At least I wouldn't
have any cellulite then." Scarlett Johansson
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 4-6


Garfield


Dilbert


FATI HOW I HAVIYOU CONSIDERED
FEaCHOXOSIN& 1EitMfOLEiNEX(
A GOOD To-D CARDS WrihA R ER
W STAPPf RO BAND AND PeNC.LAP?
THE APP MORE-


COMICS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE DECLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 C9


1 *Crnlef ] Ii Ib ^


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


I.ax (52.63565 Tl.Fee .(8).52230 mal:cls *fed roilenln .0 wbste


04 Open Road
37', 5th wheel, good
cond. 4 season, 3
slides, can deliver
$17,000 352-341-1106
1995 Dodge
Caravan, 6 cyc, 7 pass,
runs, great, looks good
$1, 475 352-637-2588
845-588-0759
2003 PT CRUISER

58k miles, exec. cond.
$6,000
352-503-2243
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. bed., +
rear bunk beds,
slide out, ducted AC
Very clean. Reduced!
$9,000 (352) 621-0848
CRYSTAL
RIVER
SUPER YARD SALE
Saturday 8am-?
6046 W. Woodside
Cir, Crystal River
Custom Made Garden
4x4x12H, $50 all PT
Other sizes avail
Includes delivery
(352) 527-4910
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

YOU'LL v THIS!
Floral City's BEST Lake
House Value! 2 Boat
Docks, 2/2/Den/FP &
more! 1YR Warranty
$159K Realty Connect
212-1446
www.RealtyConnect.me
FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. ONLY!! Needed
for P/T & Holiday
352-726-9666
GPS,
Marine Combo Unit
Eagle, 3 yrs. old
$160.
(352) 726-2350
INVERNESS
3/2/2 furnished,
very nice
352-527-9268
LECANTO
4477 W. Sandy Hill St.
Huge yard/moving sale,
this Saturday the 6th,
8-5. Furniture, tools,
baby items, clothing,
DVDs, kitchen items,
table saw, exercise
equip., roto-tiller,
gardening items. Too
numerous to name.

MOV ItVG
SALE

PINE RIDGE
Fri & Sat 8a 4p
Bedrooms & Dining
Room Final Sale
4232 N Deckwood DR
(352) 419-0069
RECLINER-Black
leather,exc cond.
custom extra large
51' wide $295.
(352) 419-5077


ROCKCRUSHER
Saturday 6th,
8a-lp
Big Annual Sale
see craigs list
for items
5899 W. Vikre Path



Sugarmill Woods
11-2pm SAT
3Bed,Den,FamRm,
Wood Floors, 1 YR
Warranty 31 Pine St
Homosassa $169900
Realty Connect
212-1446
TWO HONDA EU2000
GENERATORS. Cost
$994 new asking $750
each. (352) 341-4898

YMCA
Swim Instructor

Citrus County, FL
The YMCA
has an opening for a
part-time Summer
Program Swim In-
structor. Must be 16
years old or older,
complete the YMCA
Swim Instructor
Course and maintain
a current CPR/AED
and first aid certifica-
tion.$8.55 hourly
DFWP/EOE.

Apply online at
www.
vmcasuncoast.orqa




$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



fertilizer horse manure
mixed with pine shav-
ings great for gardens
or as mulch. U load and
haul.
352-628-9624
FREE
Broken Cement Block
&
Concrete pieces
352-476-1023
Inverness
FREE
FIREWOOD
352-628-7585
FREE
FIREWOOD
352-746-9868
FREE Puppies
Lab mix, free to good
home puppies, 7 wks
old(352) 464-0871
Free Stafford Shire
Terrier Mix, Female
Good with people,
needs to be only Dog
(352) 445-5166
FREE WOOD
(352) 419-7862
Husky Malamute
2yrs female, curr on all
vac.spayed good dog,
no small animals.
Catahoula, female, 2
yrs old, spayed,curr on
all vac. loves farm work,
good dog
352-422-6474



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077


2 Horses Lost
1 Brown
1 gray, white face
blue eye
Inverness Area
Cash Reward
(352) 287-6628
Black Lab Mix
Male, 16 yr. old, name
Alaza, lost in Vicinity of
Citrus Spring
Cairo/sandree, family
heartbroken
352-489-6965
Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd,
Crystal River (CR488)
Owner is heartbroken
400-3302 or 795-8662
Ford Car Keys
Lost in Inverness
by TJ Maxx &
McDonalds
Call (352) 527-8154
REWARD
Lost Antique Rhine-
stone pin shaped like
a bow, Sat. 3/
at College CFCC
on 491 (352) 527-6956
LOST
Dunnellon
American Pit Bull
Male, 3yrs color
blue/white cropped ears,
neutered, no collier,
very friendly, missing
Circle M Ranch
area Please call
489-2827 or 270-1373
Lost Male Cat on 4/2,
Dk Gray w/ White Mus-
sel, White paws, pink
nose w/ green eyes.
Missing from
Humanitarian's Parking
Lot on Rte 44 in Crystal
River. PLEASE CALL
IF YOU HAVE SEEN
HIM (352) 382-9303
OR 352-201-0576


Lost/Missing Black Lab
mix "Jax" male, not
neutured, single white
spot on his chest. If you
have any information
that could help locate
him please contact
352-266-9711.
ShihTzu Dog
Female, blond
almost blind
S. Barbour St. Beverly
Hills (352) 212-3387



Dog found on 4/4/13 on
Carter Rd. in
Homosassa. No collar
or identification. Dog is
male, and looks like a
Sheltie (mini Collie). Call
352-586-3409
Found Small black fe-
male, dog, well
groomed, well
manored. Red high-
lights on Tail
Near Joes Garage
Inverness
(352) 726-6432
HOMOSASSA
Mini Dachshund male
found Easter day on
Grand Cir. & Oaklawn
Please call to identify
352-563-9830



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077


Sudoku ****** 4puz.com


1 3 6


4 83 1


26


86 7




9 43



S92


3 57 6


7 1 3

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and


Live in Care Giver
for your loved ones, Ex-
cellent Referrances Call
Joyce Ann
850-661-1312
Retired Iowa Widower
wants to rent a room
$400 pr mnth. clean
man! (712) 790-8470




DISPATCHER &
BILLING CLERK

Exp. with Excel &
Quick books Helpful,
$8. hr. Please pick
up application at
204 W Grace St.
Inverness.
Applications avail
M-F from 10a-2p.





BELLAVITA
SPA & FITNESS
CENTER
Inside Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club
One of the nations
largest & upscale
country clubs

Part Time
Front Desk
Receptionist
Early Mornings Or
Closing Shifts or
weekends

APPLY IN PERSON
2125 W Skyview
Crossing, Hernando.

FT Cosmetology
Educator & Stu-
dent Recruiter

The Salon Professional
Academy in The Vil-
lages is accepting appli-
cations for a full time
Cosmetology Educator
& Student Recruiter. If
you have a passion for
the fast-paced beauty
industry & are looking
for a dynamic career
with full benefits health
insurance, 401 K join
our premiere academy!
Apply online at
www.shearexpress.com.







Domestic


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





Our Team
LPN FT 3-11
MON. FRI.

Health Ins. availa-
ble and
benefits.
Please aoopl within:
Cedar Creek
Assisted Living
352-564-2446

F/T RECEPTIONIST
BILLERR

Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

Immediate
Need

For fulltime clerical,
Staff Member
for busy medical
facitly. Exp.
preferred,
Email Resume to
ourcenter.hr@
gmail.com



Sales-Help
do you possess...
S...A DYNAMIC
1 PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER I
1 SERVICE SKILLS I
....SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS


DIRECT TECH-
NICIANS
Need Directv Techs
CITRUS COUNTY
and around. Own
Truck, van or SUV.
Need to pass back-
ground and Drug
Test. Independent
1099 contract. Call
for details.
$700-$1000/week.
Call 352 201 7219

MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163
PLUMBERS AND
HELPERS
Plumbers and Helpers,
experience required.
Drug-free workplace.
Call 352-728-6053.




CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

Exp. appt. setters

Top Pay, Hourly.
Benefits, Clean work
enviontment
Dave (352) 794-6129
Experience Lawn Care

Help Needed
201-0651or 726-9176
FLORAL
DESIGNER
Exp. ONLY! Needed
for P/T & Holiday
352-726-9666
MUSIC MINISTER
With 5 yrs Country
Western Christian &
Gospel music exp for
Cowboy Church in
Dunnellon. Must be
able to play one of
the following:
guitar, mandolin, or
fiddle. Must meet Bibli-
cal Ministry standards
as stated in 1 Timothy
3:1-13. Interested par-
ties contact Church
Pastor at
352- 465-6223
after 5:00pm.
NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone

Telemarketers
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500
P/T Boat Captain

To run, manatee
tours & kids groups
CONTACT SEAN
(352) 563-0041
RECEPTIONIST
Must apply within at
Curry's Roofing, 1965
N. Dunkenfield Ave.
Crystal River. Starting at
$300.00 per week.

CHRONICLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.






Your World








CHRNmcLE


CLEANING Techs

P/T, Exp. Preferred,
Serious Inquires only
(352) 419-6557
SEASONAL PART
TIME HELP
Applicant must have
computer skills, self mo-
tivated, works well with
others and customer
friendly. Must be at
least 18 and have a
valid driver's license
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.



*FOR SALE*-
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer, includes
equipment & Accounts.
Serious Inquiries Only!
16k 352-795-0201




LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We GetOff The
Interstate For You!
352-299-4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




Antique China
US made Franciscan
China, Desert Rose &
Ivy patterns, several
hard to find pieces, 25%
off price, Too many to
price separately! call
for info 352-270-8366
Antique Furniture
Oak pie safe hutch
$300, Large oak display
case $100
both exec. cond.
352-586-9498
FOSTORIA STEM-
WARE 5 Silver Flute 6"
Champagne/Tall Sher-
bert #6037 $30.00
352-249 8621



1918 JENNY STAMP
GOOD CONDITION /
NO MARKS
50.00 OBO LINDA
341-2271
FRANCE WINE
FLUTES 6 black stem
clear tops 7" 6oz Bev-
erly Hills $30.00
352-249 8621

4

I


11111111
Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





NICE GREEN MARBLE
SPA Needs motor &
frame work
100.00 linda 341-2271



APPLIANCES
Hot Point Electric
Range-$150, Kenmore
Dishwasher $50
GE Space Saver Micro-
wave $75
352.212.9324
DRYER$100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
Refrigerated
Grocery Store
Meat Cooler
6ft Long, 5ft high
all glass, $500
(352) 726-0250


3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9. Seeking an
INSIDE
SALES REP
4 eAll of our fto help service
structures existing accounts
withstand and prospect for 1
IMpstallations b Bria l new. Full Time with
Installation by rian BC253853 n Comprehensive
Benefits Package
-4'5 ^ ^ S 352-62-7519 Base Salary plus
--" *- T---- Commission

s*_H APPLY TODAY:
I ,EST Ii dikamlot@chroni'cl

I Engineering Fees I I l
SUp to $200 value I -,_ CH, -PNICLE1

SSiding *Soffit *Fascia *Skirting* Roofovers *Carports* Screen Rooms* Decks Windows Doors Additions I Re ug Scr een l
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com Applicant EOE
--- --- J


MICROWAVE
Like new $30
352-302-5178
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free
Delivery. 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty call or
text 352-364-6504
WASHER/DRYER
Old but works. $50
352-302-5178




DUDLEY'S






Two Auctions

Antique &
Collectible
Furniture Oriental,
Country,Victorian-
Coins, Estate Jewelry,
Sterling, Listed art,
Lladro, Doulton
Tobies, Hummels ,
Waterford, 500+
lots of quality

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comrn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




5,000 W Coleman
Genrater
Never Used,
$350.
(719) 660-9824 Cell
No Text Messages
AIRLESS SPRAYER BY
BLACK AND DECKER
$30 NEW IN BOX FOR
PAINT/STAIN ETC IN-
VERNESS 419-5981
BLACK HAND JIG SAW
$10 FINISHING
SANDER $10 BOTH
BLACK AND DECKER
352-419-5981
BREATHING
APPARATUS PAINT-
ING/ YARDWORK $10
MASKS/ CARTRIDGES
419-5981
CRAFTSMAN ANGLE
GRINDER 7 INCH $35
USE AS POLISHER/
GRINDER/CUTTER
419-5981
CRAFTSMAN ROUTER
WITH CASE $25 USED
VERY LITTLE INVER-
NESS 419-5981
FIBERGLASS STEP
LADDER Louisville 8'
ladder excellent
condition $50.00
1-603455-7878
PIPE THREADER DIE
SET $40 HAND HELD
1/2 INCH, 3/4 INCH
AND 1 INCH INVER-
NESS 419-5981
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 MADE
OF METAL HEAVY
DUTY OLDER STYLE
INVERNESS 419-5981



14" SHARP color tv with
remote $15.00
352-746-0401
26" RCA color tv with
remote $25.00
352-746-0401


158372964i
49765832 1
263914578
586493217
734125689
912867435
841536792
325789146
679 241 853


28" JVC COLOR TV
WITH REMOTE $25.00
352-746-0401
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 $90
352-613-0529



LANDSCAPE STONES
135 sand/tan geo
stones, 15 cap stones
delivery an option
$250.00 352-746-0401



Acer Extensa
Toshiba Stat. lap tops
windows 7 w/web cam
$175.00 each
352-586-6891
COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 15" $20
352-613-0529
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



6 Metal Patio Chairs
Metal with full cushions,
good cond, $95
352-382-0124
Wrought Iron Furn.
2 lounge chair, made
in 1920's 2 swivel
chairs, 1 table, 1 6ft
rocker, made in 1950's
2 harp chairs, made
1940's powder coated
in bronze color Set for
$2,000 (352) 860-0855



2 Single
(TrundleBeds)
w/mattress, 1 bed side
table,1 chest of drawers,
all matching exec. cond.
$200 352-465-2668





8 Pc. Oak King
Bedroom Suite,
paid $6000,
sacrifice $1500 obo
will separate
765-748-4334
352-586-5166
BEDROOM SET -
5 pcs, King size w/
mattress & box spring,
dresser, 2 end tables
& armoire VG cond.
$600 (352) 628-1603
COFFEE TABLE $25
352-302-5178
COUCH/TWO RECLIN-
ERS Used $75 OBO
352-302-5178
DINING ROOM
TABLE/FOUR CHAIRS
Like new. $75
352-302-5178
DRESSER 3 drawers,
black, like new. $30
352-302-5178
ENTERTAINMENT
CTR, light color wood,
$440; Pub Dinette set
w/2 chairs $225. Both in
great condition
(352) 228-1254


ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER Fits 61 in. tv.
$75 OBO 352-302-5178
Full Mattress Set
Real Wood Head &
Foot board,color walnut,
exec. cond. like new
very comfortable $175
OBO 352-249-7804
r- High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Light Tan Recliner
Rocker, w/ stand light
& magazine rack $100
White Leather Chair,
stand w/light. $100
(352) 795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
OAK TABLE
60"x42" w/ expandable
to 84"x42"with built in
butterfly leafs, 6 chairs,
good cond. $ 300
352-527-0146
PORCH GLIDER SW-
ING for 2, metal & wood
$25.00 352-746-0401
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Quality Mattress Sets
Qn./Full.$199 both Pcs
Twin Matts. $89.95 All
New, Nice 621-4500
RATTAN FURNITURE
42" walnut rattan glass
top table and two chairs
purchased 1 year ago at
Leaders $325,walnut
desk $150,2 whitewash
arched rattan etegeres
$60 EA. Sugarmill
woods 740-705-9004
RECLINER-Black
leather,exc cond.
custom extra large
51' wide $295.
(352) 419-5077
ROCKER RECLINER
Contemporary rocker
recliner, large, camel,
good condition $150.
352-7464310
ROLL TOP DESK
Oak desk, full size,
good condition. $300
(352) 621-6892
after 6pm
RV SOFA/FUTON 74"
green on beige floral
$40.00 Beverly Hills
352-429-8621
STORAGE OTTOMAN
rectangular shape, slate
blue/green chenille fab-
ric, good cond. No pets/
smoke $45 3524194513
TV CONSOLE TABLE
solid pine, shaker
style w/ 2 doors on
front, great cond. $75
firm 3524194513
TV ROLLING CART
good condition can text
pic $20.00
352-746-0401
TV STAND 36"wide, 26"
tall, with drawer can text
pic $40.00
352-746-0401
TWIN BED W/ SHELF
HEADBOARD $50
352 -302 -5178


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


SATURDAY,APRIL 6, 2013 C9







ClO SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013



SIDE TABLE Black, like INVERNESS
new $20 352-302-5178 April 5th & April 6th
TWIN BUNK BEDS Fri & Sat. 8am-3pm
With Dresser and mir- Community Wide
ror, chest of drawers The Moorings @
$250, 1920's Kerosene Point O'Woods, Off
Lamp $75 Call Gospel Isl. Rd
352-746-7815 INVERNESS
WHITE WICKER WALL Fri 9a-2p & Sat 8a-2p
UNIT 23"wide x 76"tall Teenager boys & girls
arched top $45.00 clothing, men suits,
352-746-0401 household items, more
2636 E. Center St
INVERNESS
S MOVING SALE
Air Compressor Apr 6th -7th 8am-4pm
New, 8 gallon tank type, Everything must go, be-
150 psi max $150 hind Inverness carwash
Bolnes Tiler 2 cyc. 31 cc 1925W. Main Street
$150 cash only firm INVERNESS
(352) 341-1714 Sat. 6 & Sun. 7 8am
Custom Made Garden ESTATE SALE *
4x4x12H, $50 all PT Beautiful light wood,
Other sizes avail formal dining furniture,
Includes delivery plus lifetime accumu-
(352) 527-4910 lation of Bric a Brac
Huskee Dishes. You Name It
82, horse riding S. Apopka to Left on
18 horse rid 6464 E. Morley St.
lawn mower, 42" cut. (352) 726-2980
Asking $550
Call before 6pm INVERNESS
352-465 6619 TWO FAMILY
LAWN SPREADER Sat Only, 8am to 2p
SMALL $15 1215 S. Fir Terrace
352-613-0529
Sears Craftsman INVERNESS
Riding Mower Veterans Yard Sale
Good running cond. Our Lady of Fatima
New blades last year Church
$100. Saturday 7:30a-1:30p
(352) 527-9509 550 US HWY 41 S.
SCall 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10

Please Bring
A Can Good to help
BONSAI PLANTS feed veterans
Pots, Books, Figurines, LECANTO
beginner & intermedi- 4477 W. Sandy Hill St.
ate Instruction. Huge yard/moving sale,
(352) 212-6949 this Saturday the 6th,
Plants for Sale 8-5. Furniture, tools,
Debe's Garden baby items, clothing,
Apr.th-6th 9am-4pm DVDs, kitchen items,
3903S. Lecanto Hwy, table saw, exercise
across from CFCC equip., roto-tiller,
352-586-6590 gardening items. Too
numerous to name.

Ga Ie/ MEMSALE

OLD HOMOSASSA
CITRUS HILLS Annual Neighborhoold
1428 EastAllegrie Dr. Sale Sat, 4/6/13 8-2
April 6 and 7-9am-2pm p.m. Off Mason Creek
CITRUS SPRING and Garcia Road.
Fri & Sat 8am-3pm OLD HOMOSASSA
Pewter, books, Thurs. Fri. & Sat. 8a-4p
jewelry and more INSIDE SALE *
6493 N. Glacier Terr 10360 W Anchorage st
CITRUS SPRINGS f O I _G
7123 Hemingway. Lots ... V. .i
for kids! Quality clothes 5 A I
girls 7 -14, boys 3t -4t, -
toys, plus-sized women
and much more. Sat 8-2 PINE RIDGE
CRYSTAL RIVER Fri&Sat 8a -4p
1460 NW 19th St Bedrooms & Dining
1460 NW 19th St Room Final Sale
SATURDAY ONLY! 8-2 4232 N Deckwood DR
Furniture & household (352) 419-0069
items.
CRYSTAL RIVER Plants for Sale
FRI/SAT 8-4 Debe's Garden
NO EARLY BIRDS Apr. 5th-6th 9am-4pm
HUGE-Clthng,hshld, 3903 S. Lecanto Hwy,
much more across from CFCC
4451 N. Tallahassee Rd 352-586-6590
CRYSTAL
RIVER
SUPER YARD SALE
Saturday 8am-? ROCKCRUSHER
6046 W. Woodside Saturday 6th,
Cir, Crystal River 8a- 1 p
DUNNELLON Big Annual Sale
20861 SW 81st loop see craigs list
Saturday only 8 to for items
1pm-tools, hshld items, 5899W. Vikre Path
golf, furniture. Evervth-


ing must go. 20861 SW
81st loop
DUNNELLON
Moving Sale
Apr. 5,6,7 9am-4pm
4005 SW 183rd Terr
DUNNELLON
SAT AND SUN 9-5
7535 W. GLENDALE
CT



HOMOSASSA
13 Laurelcherry Ct
SMW MOVING SALE
fridge,furn,lighting,etc
Sat April 6 9A-3P
HOMOSASSA
8578 Hwy 19. 4/12-4/13
8-2. Therapy Equip-
ment, Office Chairs &
Supplies, Cabinets, TV
Stands,Shelving,Filing
Cabinets & MORE.
HOMOSASSA
Fri. 5 & Sat. 6, 8am-2p
Lots of Odds & Ends
5591 Jeffrey Point
INVERNESS
*BIG YARD-MOVING
SALE* Sat April 6th,
8 AM-1PM.
1123 Trailridge Ave


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers
& Dryers. FREE PICK
UP! 352-564-8179




Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Palios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120


MENS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30 $50
EACH 352-613-0529



2 red cedar logs. 3 ft x
20 in dia. and 4 ft x 20 in
dia. with stubs that ex-
tend diameters. FREE,
pick up. 795-2248
4 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$20 EACH
352-613-0529
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes, folds for stor-
age, Ex+. $50.
352-628-0033
8 Black Upholstered
Dining Room Parson
Chair excel, cond.
$100.
5 Position Marcy
Master Gym Fitness
Center 400 lb of
weights $250.
(352) 476-8678


ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TOP SOIL-
BLACK GOLD
18 YARDS $250 LOAD
CALL (352) 302-6499




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 *k**
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


144 HANGING FILE
FOLDERS letter size
$10 or free with pur-
chase of file cabinet in
other ad. 341 3607
1/2 HP BENCH
GRINDER- dual 6"
grinding wheels, lights,
guards, 3450 RPMs,
on/off switch. $25
628-0033
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Otis, $10
(352)465-1616
Crafters
Sofa Pillows
200 total-$100 many
patterns ready to sew
together
352-746-6000
CURIO CABINET,
lighted, 4 glass shelves,
71" tall, 29" wide, 10"
deep. $60, (in
Dunnellon) (352)
465-1813
Eric 3- Bike Trailer
Holds 3 trail bikes,
modified, all restored,
Can also hold Harley
or goldwing, $675.
(352) 270-8103
FILE CABINET Hon
brand,4-drawer,vertical,
few scratches on top.
$50 See other ad for file
folders. 341 3607
GERBIL CAGE $20
352-613-0529
GPS,
Marine Combo Unit
Eagle, 3 yrs. old
$160.
(352) 726-2350
Honda Power
Generator,
Model E G 3500X
Never used,
new in box $650.
(352) 860-2828
LIFEVANTAGE PROT-
ANDIM 30 DIETARY
SUPPLEMENTS /
NEVER OPENED
50.00 LINDA 341-2271
MASTER FORGE
GRILL 2 burner $25
352-5134614
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/
black/ white color, $30
(352)465-1616
NEW 3 SPEED
SHIFTER FOR OLDER
CHEVY,FORD,DODGE
IN BOX 60.00 464 0316
OAK FILE CABINET
Two drawer with
folder hangers, very
good cond. $65 cash
352-419-4513
OLD TRAFFIC LIGHT
Old new York traffic light
3 signals stop and go
great shape 300.00
352-6284447
POOL Intex above
ground easyset 15'
round 42" deep+all
accessories, good shape
($50) 212-1596
Ryobi Router Table
$60.
Digital Thermos Stat
$50.
(352) 249-7033
SOLID TEAK arched
shower/pool bench,
brand new never used.
Paid $150, selling $90
firm CASH 3524194513
STEAM CLEANER
Shark canister steam
cleaner
w/attachments.$50.00.
726-2572
STOCK HARLEY
PIPES EXCELLENT
CONDITION
(1340)ONLY 85.00
464-0316
TREADMILL, manual,
folds, easy to use,
sturdy, very good condi-
tion, $60 (in Dunnellon)
(352) 465-1813
UNICYCLE- chrome
frame, 20" x 1.75" tire &
alloy wheel, adjustable
height, Ex., $25,
352-628-0033
VACUUM CLEANER
Dyson Ball Upright
Model DC24 with extra
tools. $200.00
Call 352-621-7586
WANT TO START A
BAND I want to form a
Band. Classical
Country and 60-80's
Rock, emphasis on
the Beatles.
352-637-2257




4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT ONLY 75.00
464-0316


**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
#1 HANDYMAN
All Types of Repairs
Free EST., SR. DISC.
Lic#38893, 201-1483
*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
1 CALL & RELAX!
25vrs Exp in 100%
property maint & all
repairs, call H&H
Services today!
li#37658 352-476-2285
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067


4" TOILET SEAT
RISER SO YOU CAN
GET OFF THE TOILET
EASIER ONLY 20.00
464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE&
ALUMINUM WALKER.
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS ONLY
20.00 EACH 464 0316
Harmor Wheelchair
Lift with swing away,
good cond. $700
Bruno Turning seat,
good cond. $900.obo
(352) 637-3793
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS LIKE NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACK VERY LONG SO
YOU CAN SLIDE INTO
THE SHOWER 40.00
464 0316


ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"AS NEW" CONDITION
BLONDE/MAHOGANY
DREDNAUGHT $25
352-601-6625
MORREL "MADE IN
USA" LAP STEEL
ELECTRIC GUITAR 6
OR 8 STRING ONLY
$100 352-601-6625
Spinet Piano
With padded storage
bench Cinnamon
color. Includes heater.
$600. 352- 795-4372
STEREO CHORUS
AMP W/REVERB &
OVERDRIVE 40WATT
ONLY $50
352-601-6625



Area Rug
Approx. 10 X 12 Yellow
w/pattern, exec. cond.
$50.00 OBO
352-746-1447
BLINDS 2-faux wood
white, wood trim, metal
casing, heavy duty,
nice, 58" ($30-both)
212-1596
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $16
FOR BOTH
352-613-0529
NEW BATHTUB 75.00 /
5 FT LINDA 341-2271
SHOWER DOORS
NEW 40.00 LINDA
341-2271



Bow Flex Extreme
Exec. cond. cost new
$1400 will take $350
OBO or Trade
352-249-7221
Weights Olympic,
easy curl, +70 Ibs. $40.
2 Dumbbells 160 Ibs,
$40. Bar/Dumbbells +
110 lbs+, $40.
(352) 637-6000



3 Gun Cabinets
$125-150, 2 Large Deer
Mounts $125 each,
very reasonable
must sell
352-341-3526
BASKETBALL HOOP
Lifetime 42" portable
basketball system. As
good as new. Selling for
$80.00. 352-527-4808
BICYCLE BOYS
SPIDERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
Bowling balls and carry
bags, 12# 3 oz, 12# 3
oz, and 9#. $20.00
each set. 352 341 3842
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
$, 1,500. Excel. cond.
w/ Charger, Delivery
Avail .352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ Go Golf Cart
$1,500 Excel. cond.
w/ Charger,
Delivery Available
352-527-3125
GUNS Never used
Mossberg Maverick 12
gauge model 88, 28
inch choke, 2 3/4 + 3
inch shells, 6 shot + 660
rounds $400 firm.
Slightly used Taurus 65,
357 stainless steel, 6
shot, 4 inch barrel, $375
firm. 352 860 1039


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. Good Rates, Res,
Free Est., Lic#39324
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**
Primary Cleaning
S**Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


CLASSIFIED



Glock 23,
40 cal., 14 round, extra
mags. ammo, holster,
org. case $1,000
(352) 302-6565
PISTOL
38call, Colt, Cobra, blue
steel, 2" barrel, 6 shot,
excel. cond. $600.
Call John
(352) 637-0987
Proform Treadmill
$100 obo
352-628-5451
Specialized 24 Speed
Road Bike, like new
$600 OBO
352-586-4630




2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555


Baby Items
Baby Items
Deluxe. High chair $35,
Baby Carriage $40 both
in Exec. Cond.
352-249-7804
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks
by rubber, ok condi-
tion, $50
(352)465-1616
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $15
(352)465-1616


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




ALL AUTOS WANTED
with or without title. Any
cond. make or model.
We pay up to $10,000
and offer free towing.
(813) 505-6939
AMMUNITION
I buy ammo and pay
top prices.
(352) 302-0962
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492




TWO HONDA EU2000
GENERATORS. Cost
$994 new asking $750
each. (352) 341-4898


originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200


#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service-
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edqe
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
STEVE'S LAWN SERVICE
Mowing & Trimming
Clean up, Lic. & Ins.
(352) 797-3166
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine- It's Tune Up
Time! 352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Baby Girl P

Baby Girl P, a 4
y.o. Terrier mix,
Heartworm-negative,
housebroken, is black
w/ white accents, up-
right ears. Wt. 42 lbs.
Friendly, affectionate,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/ other
dogs. Calm energy,
gives kisses. A
beautiful, wonderful
companion.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Dixie Girl
Dixie Girl, 5 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
loves people, dogs
& kids. Intelligent,
affectionate,
friendly, gentle, aims
to please. Medium
size. Walks well on
leash, rides well in
car. Beautiful girl.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363


I am a male mimi apricot
poodle, looking for my
forever home. I am very
played back, hansome,
nutered up to date on
shots. Call Saving An-
gles pet rescue at
419-0223 or 726-1006
Visit us at
www.savinganglespetres-
cue.com for more info


JEET

Jeet, a neutered
3-y.o. Bulldog mix
is beautiful,
well-mannered, bonds
strongly with humans.
A bit fearful of men,
ideal for calm family
without young children,
or a woman
living alone, a good
watchdog. Weight 55
lbs. Gets along
with other dogs.
# 9609968.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


LILLY
Lilly, a 3-y.o. Hound
mix, very sweet, af-
fectionate, bonds
w/human friends.
Fawn & white color.
A bit timid in new sit-
uations, walks well
on leash, sits for
treats, weight 50 lbs.
Good companion
for family who can
spend time w/her.
Call Karen @
218-780-1808."


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.comrn




*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
Call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CHRIS SATCHEL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



*ABC PAINTING*
30 + YRS.EXP.LIC./INS
for an EXCELLENT job
call Dale and Sons
352-586-8129
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570


4-6 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIlck for UFS, 2013

"I found another one of these
in his toolbox."





Thank You For 15 Years.of Votes!!


3EAUIFL- REFUI'



ILLI

-F --


2 Chinchillas,
w/2 cages,
352-464-3356









OZZIE
Ozzie, 2-3 y.o. Black-
mouth cur mix,
beautiful, weight 50
lbs, friendly, slightly
shy, likes other dogs
& people, strong,
active, needs strong
handler, no young
children, fenced
yard preferred.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288. 2

Parrot's Whole Sale
Prices hand fed,baby
nandays, Pr bl front
amazons, pr of indian
Ring necks, pr cocka-
tiels & sgl, parkeets
637-6967

Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne
Shorkie for Sale
Female, health cert, 1st
shots, 8 wks April 12th
$300 Call Judy
352-344-9803


TUCKER
Tucker, 3 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
beautiful, active,
Heartworr-negalive,
playful & friendly,
weight 50 lbs. Experi-
enced handler, no
young children in
family, fenced yard
preferred. Loves
exercise & play.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.

Yorkshire Terriers
Males, 8 wks on 4/4,
$450 cash. See the
parents in Lecanto
(727) 242-0732


PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


Registered 6 yr old
buckskin quarter
horse gelding. Asking
$1800 352-634-5581


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


-4




INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1 MOBILE, No pets
(352) 637-1142



43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838
LITTLE JOHNS
MOVERS & STORAGE
Local and Long
Distance Moves
Loading and
Unloading of Pods,
Rental trucks &
Storage Units We
have trucks going
Up & Down 195&175
We Get Off The
Interstate For You!
352 299 4684 *
littlejohnsmovers65
@yahoo.com




SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876
SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352)419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452



I'ii I lust.




Classifieds


--

3/2 on 1.5

Acres
FHA Approved
$2600 Down
(Town of Hernando)
352-795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52 500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908




Easter Sale
Family Home Center
Three Lot Model
Clearance
NO HIDDEN FEES
$72,900 30 x 76 4/2
$69,900 30 x 60 3/2
$82,900 32 x 76 4/2
Price Incls: Delv, Set,
A/C Skirting, Steps,
upgraded appliances &
Furniture Remember
The Reason for The
Season 352-795-1272
Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624

Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665




Own Your

Own Land?
Financing Available to
purchase your next
New or used
Manufactured Home
352-795-1272


All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area i15rs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825
TREE REMOVAL &
STUMP GR ING
Trim/Tree Removal,
55ft. Bucket Truck
10% off Mention Ad
Lic/ins. 352-344-2696




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


d~~olspac.r












WORDY BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Cruelly tease royal Middleton (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Roman war god sears (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Brit actor Owens' Lincoln bills (1) syllables in each word.
S@2013UFS Dist by i Unl Uclickfor UFS
4. Geek urged on, as his horse (1)


5. Waltz composer Johann family place (1)


6. Catch a quick view of dirigibles (1)


7. Suitable to fully overhauling a ship (3)


ONKIldHI DONIll dH'L' SdWIIna SdWI'I'99 SS I H SSflVHIS '
HHfildS IN STAiaSAlSHA IJ saHsJ VIISHW' IVfl' IIIV'I


NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

-A .A A A A A
MUST SElL


REPO
FORECLOSURES
Bank Owned /must sell
Bad Credit No Problem
Minimum needed down
$5000 dollars
Call 352-795-2377




We Will Buy Your
Used Manufactured
Homes 1976-2013
CASH 4 you, less than
30 DAYS
352-795-1272




INVERNESS
55+ park
on water. Furnished
2bd, 1.5 bath, $595.
Rent inc. grass cutt-
ing and your water.
Call 352-476-4964
for details





For SaWle.
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 11 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $93,900
716-807-8847



Castle Lk/Floral City
2/2/cpt,- near flea mkt,
off US 41, w/Ig shed,
LARGE lot. $39,900
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340

Credit Scores
above 575 Qualify for
several land/home
packages in the
Tri-County area
352-795-2377

FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 MH
2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498


HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

HOMOSASSA
*3/2, Fenced Yard,**
NEW Flooring, NEW
AC $5,000 Down,
$435. mo 352-302-9217


MUST SEL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on V4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message
LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624



INVERNESS
Ft Cooper 55+
2/1.5, furnished,
Florida Room, Carport
$10,000 OBO (352)
419-5114 or 601-4929
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 352-726-2553
OCALA
2br 1ba furn. 55+
Comm.16x16 add-on,
sliding dr to private
deck, 28ft ends porch,
& 28 ft storage, $6200
(352) 470-1727




RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336


-AMTON-
( RENTAL MANAGEMENT
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandburg Pt............. $500
2/1 Nice duplex
4800 S. Wood Way............... $900
3/2/2 Fully furnished
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way..............$725
3/2 DW, newer mobile on 1/2A E!
6315 N. Shorewood Dr.............. $625
2/1 Florlida room
CRYSTAL RIVER
10939 W. Gem S.................. $550
2/1 Duplex, close to hospital
2561 N.Senea Pt.............. $1,200
2/2 WaterfrontDW, furnished
CITRUS SPRINGS
9047 Travis Dr...................... $625
2/2 Neat, clean duplex
8160 N. Duval Dr............... $1,300
3/2/2 Pool home, furnished

-IN~

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Studio Apt.
Furnished, All Util. W/D
Rm., Boat dock, cable
TV, $650 mo $250 sec.
352-372-0507
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Inverness
1/1 $400. & 2/2 $600.
Near Hospital
352-422-2393



ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Avail. Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
2 B/R's
Available
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
I Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Av.
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.


OPPORTUNITY



L mmmm
I___I


4-6-13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461
INVERNESS
2/1, In Town, $575
412 Tompkins St.
(352) 895-0744
INVERNESS
2/1water incl. 1st fl,
liv,kit, bdrms carpeted,
screen patio $525 1st
and Sec. 352-344-0238
PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 BEDROOMS
APTS HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $741. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants:
For rental into.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
795-7793
TDD
#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:OP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer


EOUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY




CHIEFLAND
FOR LEASE, Nearly
3,000 sf Building on US
19. with signage, ready
to move into. Offices
Kitchen, showroom, &
storage included in
building Call for details'
352-949-0447


CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528
HERNANDO
1,200 sq. ft. OFFICE
on V2 acres, with Ig.
bill board sign on
Hwy 200 $595. mo
352-344-3084

HERNANDO
2,200 sq. ft. Office or
Live In, on V2 Acre,
Asphalt parking
area, Hwy. 200 $795.
mo. 352-344-3084





LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801
Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906



CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, w/ carport,
spacious & very quiet,
$700. mo Call Steve
(352) 697-1525



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
CITRUS SPRINGS
2 Story 3BR + Loft, Near
schools, $900. mo.
352-812-1414
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
No Pets, $790.
mo.
River Links
Realty
352-628-1616
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/1Clean+Quiet.W/Dry,
lawn,+basic cable incl.
$550/mo.+$750dep.No
pets. 352-795-6282


CLASSIFIED




2/1 + Den, Country
Setting $550/ mo.,
+dep (352)795-0161
FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
HERNANDO
2,200 sq. ft. Live In,
on '2 Acre, Asphalt
parking area,
Hwy. 200 $795. mo.
352-344-3084
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
2/1/1 $600 mo + sec
(352) 860-2070
INVERNESS
Highlands 2/1 Opt 3rd
HUGE YARD
$650/mo Ist/last/sec
(352) 422-6978



Gospel Island
clean 2/1,no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



HERNANDO
Retail/Restaurant*
FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
*(352)584-9496*
1305 Hwy 486



CRYSTAL RIVER
Rm for Rent, Pool
Waterfront, fully furn.,
all util. incl'd, $150 wk.
$100 sec.352-364-7057
INVERNESS
Furn Rm, priv full bath,
incls cable/wifi, access
kit & W/D. $400, +1mo
dep.(352) 613-1123



INVERNESS
3/2/2 furnished,
very nice
352-527-9268



Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906



FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$850. 352-419-4421



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. "Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


[II-]


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com
TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905
UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 C11



211 Pine St 3/2/2, 2 V2 acres,
4BD/3BA. Save 24 ft x 32 ft shop
$25,000 Just Reduced. $175,000
3000 SF, heated pool, Hernando Area
Granite, SS Appliances, (352) 726-7755
Wood, Tile and Carpet. FLORAL CITY
2 Car Gar, greatroom, By Owner, 14x 60 MH
fireplace $235,000 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof
Call 850-585-4026 over, w/porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Condo for Sale Nice Quiet, Considering
C o for S ALL reasonable Cash
Sugarmill Woods offers. 352-586-9498
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,

607-538-9351

PRICED TO SELL
Condo/Patio home
2/2/2 on golf course
new appliances,A/C,
tile & carpet,updated
kitchen & baths.
352-503-2175


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, F.
Sat. AprI 6th,
Sam
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com









HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
**cash only
352-503-3245

Town Home
2/2/1 w/glass lanai,
1123 Sq Ft, Maint. free
exterior, new paint &
flooring. exec. unit ready
to move in. The Glen,
55+ comm $52,900
585-797-7907






-Al-



BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090





Highlands West 3/2/1
renovated on two lots
w/pool. Incl. W/D & SS
in new kitchen. $96,000
352-637-2827

Inverness Highlands
4/3/2 $90,500 Nr. hosp.
& schools Pool w/fence,
shed & Ig. bck lanai
(352) 201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.

* *Just Reduced @*
2/2 Updated home in
Canterbury Lake
Estates. Great Location
Backs up to Greenbelt
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell














Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
crosslandrealty corn
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




INVERNESS
OPEN HOUSE
Apr. 6th-7th 9am-3pm
10409 E. Twila Ct.
607-793-3344

Leek
Sugarmill Woods
11-2pm SAT
3Bed,Den,FamRm,
Wood Floors, 1 YR
Warranty 31 Pine St
Homosassa $169900
Realty Connect
212-1446
Sun April 7th 1-4 pm
2764 N. Canterbury
Lake Dr.
Just Reduced
updated & well
maintained home in
community with
amenities.
From HWY 486 take
Canterbury Lake Dr &
follow to house on Left
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC



PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything!
4/3 % w/7 car garage/
workshop & in-law suite
on 5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164



-








How
To Make
Your
Car
Disappear...

Simply advertise
in the Classifieds
and get results
quickly!




(352) 563-5966

(l )Il( :I.E
www.chronicleonline.com I


-.-




Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
BEST TIME TO BUY.
LOW PRICES!
LOW INTEREST!

BUY NOW
Also Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


CALL FOR DETAILS
.;.563-3206
-. _- :--
S .....- _



As low As 18 per ad


2013 NAUTICSTAR
.- 2000XS OFFSHORE
________ Walk-in Console Rear Bench Seat
HE" ~ "" ^Tandem Torsion Axle Aluminum Trailer w/brakes

$371900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597|


THE "ALL NEW" 2013
HONDA CB1100
Recreating that 70's styling with today's technology along
Sixth an 1100cc incline four cylinder "Need any more be said?"

MSiP S9,999
HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


2012 EXCURSION
121C PONTOON
Vinyl Deck Change Room* 25" Pontoons
_- -e CSOoT D S23 0 INcu[DETs
ClOSOT! VT'Q U UU TRAILER

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE _.
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



PURSUIT 2860 DENALI
7.4GXi DuoProp W/470hrs.
r Bimini Top W/enclosure Bridge Cover
Freshwater System w/3 Sinks

$35,900
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


S-. 2006 SUZUKI


A true classic look. Only 15k miles. Very clean.

$4,999

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


S2006 SEA CHASER

2400 OFFSHORE
Hydraulic Steering Private Head Compartment
*Electronics Road King Aluminum Trailer

$25F900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


GRADY WHITE
263 CHASE
Lae Twin Yamaha 225,
Loaded One Owner, Hi/Dry Kept

1Hi^^^^ $39,90061
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


2010 HONDA SHADOW

PHANTOM
This bike was bought here new.
Only 3,200 m miles onit!


HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


SANDI
HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855











TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
tpauelsen@
hotmail.com
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




CITRUS HILLS
Completely Furnished
Condo, in prime loca-
tion 3bd/3ba w/ car
port asking $114,900.
352-419-5268
Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266




BANK
REPOSSESSION
SMITH LAKE,
ALABAMA.
Prime dockable
Homesite $49,900.
Level to water, no
stairs. Build at water's
edge. NEW TO MAR-
KET. Roads and utili-
ties in place. Available
April 20th.
Call (888)713-2870




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aall sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!







DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email :debinfantine@
yahoo.com













MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'll work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515






C12 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013


on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857
Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area,10K boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/586-4987

YOU'LL THIS!
Floral City's BEST Lake
House Value! 2 Boat
Docks, 2/2/Den/FP &
more! 1YR Warranty
$159K Realty Connect
212-1446
www.RealtyConnect.me
Lake Rousseau
5311 W. Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFu-reCoast
Properties.com
'To view
great waterfront
properties"



Your World

494 "Oe l E




CHkINICII


30 LOTS FOR SALE
INVERNESS, To Settle
Estate, Sell All or Part
Builders Welcome.
Will cooperate
(239) 332-4141,
(612) 743-4141
HOMOSASSA
9748 W. Halls River Rd
SF Building Lot
approx. 94 x 265
Access via Halls River
Road, or Blue River
Cove Terrace. Public
water & Sewer $11,000
(352) 628-7332



Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available. www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm.
352-795-6336




6 HP JOHNSON
Fresh water motor
perfect cond. $450
obo Cryst River
(513) 260-6410 Cell
1985 FORCE
85 HP, Outboard Eng,
w/power lift. low hrs
fresh water only $1200
352-507-1490



BUY, SELL.*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**
22 Ft Pontoon Boat
2004 Odyssey, 115 HP,
4 cyc, '05 Yam. motor
gar. kept, $10,500 obo
(352) 422-2113
ALUMA CRAFT
Magic Tilt, 16ft, alumi-
num John Boat with mo-
tor & trailer
dept. find. & anchors,
excel. cond. low hrs on
mtr., $2,700 cash firm
Floral City
(352) 341-1714
BOAT
motor, trailer, 12' v-hull,
10 hp HONDA
4-stroke+fish-finder,good
shape($750)212-1596
OLD TOWN
Discovery, 17ft Canoe
with accessories &
bumper hitch carrier
$475. (719) 660-9824
Cell No Text Messages
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192
SEARS
12 ft. Aluminum V
Bottom, galv. trlr.
excel. cond., 4HP
Johnson outbrd,
$500 cash, firm excel.
cond. Floral City
(352) 341-1714


WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $5800. obo
call 906-250-6504
04 Open Road
37', 5th wheel, good
cond. 4 season, 3
slides, can deliver
$17,000 352-341-1106
5th WHEEL HITCH
(Hirch) 4-way tilt &
15K load range
$250 OBO
(352) 422-2113
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. bed., +
rear bunk beds,
slide out, ducted AC
Very clean. Reduced!
$9,000 (352) 621-0848
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



CAR DOLLY
Custom made,
heavy duty,
like new, $750
352-795-8986



MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 lbs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarstonl@mac.com
or 352-586-1483



"BEST PRICE"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
"352-426-4267"
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ


MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible, looks great,
runs good, must sell at
best offer
352-560-0079
2003 PT CRUISER
58k miles, exec. cond.
$6,000
352-503-2243
AFFORDABLE
AUTOS & VANS
Everybody Rides
$495 DOWN
$49 PER WEEK
BUY HERE PAY
HERE.
Lots of clean-safe-
dependable rides.
CALL DAN TODAY
(352) 56 3-1 902
"WE BUYS CARS
DEAD OR ALIVE"
1675 Suncoast Hwy.
Homosassa Fl.
BUICK
1990 LaSabre
$1,950.
352-341-0018
Buick
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-422-3198
BUICK
2005, Century
$5,995
352-341-0018
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
Cadillac
'96, Eldorado,
good cond. 130k miles
$3,900 obo
850-653-5497
CHEVROLET
2003 Corvette 50th an-
niversary model,
miilinium yellow, 28,500
miles,
immaculate,loaded,call
for details.
$24,900 Sugarmill
740-705-9004
CHEVROLET
2006 Impala
$6,995.
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
FORD
07 Taurus SE
79k mi, pwrwindw, lock,
cruise control, am/fm/cd
owner, exc. cond.
$5500. 352-302-9217
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600


CLASSIFIED



HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
MAZDA
'00, MPV LX, 59k miles
$4,000
(352) 527-1330
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2011 Camry LE, 4 Dr,
Excellent Condition
35K mi, $15,000
(352) 419-4486



AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. ARP. 7. '13
1-800-438-8559
BMW
'87, 325i,
Convertible, $5,500.
(810) 399-4450 Cell
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $5500 obo
352-628-5451,
601-2214




I I I I I I I II

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII
VOLKSWAGON
'73, Super Beetle, light
blue, custom white
wall tires, excel, cond.
$4,800. (352) 564-0788



DODGE
1998 Ram 1500 Truck
quad cab 270,000 miles
needs transmission, en-
gine, AC work good
body, tires $1000 OBO
360ci 352-464-4764
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
FORD
1997, F150 $4,995
ex cab low miles
352-341-0018


FORD
2001 Ranger V6, High
Mi, good work truck,
cold air, $2000
(352) 726-0898
FORD
2011 Ranger XLT,
$17,500. KBB, OBO
AutoTrans, Power
Windows, Doors Locks
AM/FM/CD/XM/CB,
Cruise, Bed CoverAlloy
Wheels, More Pictures
w/email: djameson5
@tampabay.rr.com
cell 410-703-9495
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100



FORD
1999, Explorer
$2,995
352-341-0018
FORD
2010 Escape XLT
loaded V6, Lo Mi.
$16,500 352-249-7702
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150



1995 Dodge
Caravan, 6 cyc, 7 pass,
runs, great, looks good
$1, 475 352-637-2588
845-588-0759
CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs for more info
call Tom 352-325-1306


CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
GOLDWING
1986 Trike, Tri-wing
conversion, always
garage kept, excel.
cond. 33k mi. $9,000
(352) 746-7290
KAWASAKI
2012, Vulcan 900
Classic, full dress, 1,300
mi. like new, $7,250
(352) 341-2149
SOLD
HONDA
'86, Helix, Like New
Kenwood radio. Call
for List of New parts
$2,475


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.com


217-0406 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the ficititious name of
TOM PRUNTY
IMPROVEMENT
located at 13951 SE 80th
Street, Morriston, FL 32668
in the County of Levy
intends to register the
said name with the
Division of Corporations
of the Florida Department
of State, Tallahassee,
Florida. Dated at Crystal
River, Florida this 3rd day
of April, 2013.
/s/Thomas A. Prunty,
owner
Published one (1) time
in the Citrus County
Chronicle April 6, 2013.


-efSoag


218-0413 SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
STOP & STORE LLC. DBA
OUTBACK SELFSTORAGE
Public Sale
Notice is hereby given
that on April 27th, 2013 at
1:00 P.M. the undersigned
Stop & Store LLC. DBA
Outback Self Storage will
sell at public sale by com-
petitive bidding, the per-
sonal property, believed
to be household goods,
stored with the under-
signed Stop&Store LLC.
DBA Outback Self Stor-
age., 19545 West Hwy 40,
Dunnellon FL 34432.
Tenants and units:
Unit#A140 Christy Barton
HHG
Unit#E511 Jamie Sanders
HHG
We reserve the right to
refuse any and all bids.
April 6th &13th, 2013


219-0413 SACRN (Daniel Hensberry)
PUBLIC NOTICE
Disposal of stored goods and property pursuant to Florida Statute #83.0806.
Notice is hereby given that Picard Self Storage, Inc., located at 1274 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL 34442, with the rental office located at 1274 E. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL, 34442 intends to dispose of personal property/goods
stored by DANIEL HENSBERRY, whose last known mailing address was 28 N Adams
Street, Beverly Hills, FL 34465 for purposes of satisfying delinquent rents and related
collection costs accruing since 12 -1-2012.
Tenant stored goods, if saleable, will be sold on site after this public notice has
been published two times in accordance with Florida Statute #83.806. The sale of
stored goods, if not redeemed by payment in full of all delinquent rents and related
costs, may be sold 15 days from the publication of first notice in accordance with
Florida Statutes.
/s/ W. J. Picard, President & Owner
Published in Citrus County Chronicle, April 6 & 13, 2013.


929-0411 SACRN
Vs.Williamson. Dawn G. 09-2011-CA-004224 NOS
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-2011-CA-004224
GTE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAWN G. WILLIAMSON A/K/A DAWN WILLIAMSON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAWN G.
WILLIAMSON A/K/A DAWN WILLIAMSON; TROY D. WILLIAMSON A/K/A TROY WILLIAM-
SON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TROY D. WILLIAMSON A/K/A TROY WILLIAMSON; IF LIV-
ING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND
IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; BANK OF AMERICA, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION; PINE RIDGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursucantto a Rnd Summcry Judgment of Foreclo-
sure entered on 01/17/2013 in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Citrus
County, Florida, the office of Betty Strifler clerk of the circuit court will sell the prop-
erty situate in Citrus County, Florida, described as:
LOT 6, BLOCK 346, PINE RIDGE UNIT 3, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 51 THROUGH 67, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, www.citrus.realforeclose.com
at 10:00AM, onApril 18.2013
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
By/s/ Maria T. Palacios, Florida Bar #89187
Date: 03/18/2013
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra,9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660,Attorneys for Plaintiff
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to partic-
ipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact John Sullivan, ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 work-
ing days of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at (352) 341-6700.
You can also use the online Florida State Courts System Title II ADA Accommodation
Request Form. Once submitted, this will go to the appropriate ADA Coordinator in
your county.
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle April 6 & 11,2013


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2013 Corolla

2013 Camry

2013 Prius

2013 Highlander Gas

2013 Tacoma

2013 Sienna


2013 Camry Hybrid

2012 Prius C

2013 Prius V

2013 Venza

2013 Tundra

11 Models!


SPECIAL 36* MONTH



LEASE PROGRAMS


2013 Corolla............... 49 per mo. $2,548due 2013 Rav4................... 59 per mo. $2,887 due

2013 Camry................. 99 per mo. $2,598due 2013 Highlander Gas.. 279 per mo. $2,678due

2013 Camry Hybrid.....*249 per mo. $2,648due 2013 Tacoma................ *239 per mo. $2,638due

2013 Prius C................ 199 per mo. $2,598due 2013 Venza................. 79 per mo. $2,678due

2013 Prius.................... 229 per mo. $2,628due 2013 Sienna................. 269 per mo. $2,668due

2013 Prius V................ 279 per mo. $2,678due 2013 Tacoma................*239 per mo. $2,638due

2013 Avalon............... 99 per mo. $2,698due 2013 Tundra............... 99 per mo. $2,698due


352-628-5100

www.villagetoyota.com


With Approved Credit for full and limited term. Cannot combine with other offers. APR must complete sale and delivery between April 2, 2013 and April 30, 3013. Ask our associates for more information.


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with roadside assistance.

2 year /25,000 mile
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when you purchase or lease a new
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Recent College
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Get an additional
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Ask a salesperson for details.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FoelsreSle


Foelsr ae


Foreclosure Salle/
s
Action Notice I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0A
ijenkins Acur^a


Safety I





IA3IN S


APR
FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS
AVAILABLE ON 1W tw.'


Luxury Starts Here'
Lease $2 m per
for 209 mo.


Luxury Performance Engineering Service


Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury BrandsP'


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i3343i3 t^gK i~ ~~i Sn~wi 3343333.3:,3. 3'a3tM6?S 33133 3333.9 30335 aAS303MW l
*TB3433.3430oNW 3313033333333333!033333.3 3 R3 34 4 ? t *ct.i34 '334 3333333 3 3 $3 N a 3.9ta 3 3 33 $4 '33 a .303.3-0341B 30C .333- u 5 30fedt 1l 34l3i13 3t l ,3 133W $4333333 ow3 3 3.333 i? 3ttt 3 sTX $335334 Sii*33.3.33ll33340333431 .304. 5. 30*
33333M63I..... 333.33333344' Acaa 33333.33.3.33 '331$34 333 33 33343331333333333333l333 $ S3334 3333.3' .3333331300333.300333.334143335 0.3003433.3.003.3.413 .35034343.3335333 B333003393333313.383633.334.3135 .3.33.31339 lt333.3333.3134318331 313.3 ".333333 3.3r3.3f. $ 534 3300333343333.1334.33333534133.3.300.3 INII 3330 4 w3 3B0031300333<3.33331.3.333.3433.33
'Qi3333 wt3i03 ii3331 $3.33 434 t~f''^ b S~loi 3.33333t 3.333333331334 a E C.333l,33...3.3a.3.3.0033.3$1333N3 t i. 33.g4.433.3.0 a 3!3333333*333rn.3 13i.w39w3K6*04330.3130.33 333wpwi~r'kiK .3..3 3.1333.c.333n340433349 3133 .333333 303333300 $33 933 33333.3.3*.3.33nEa.3b3nn333333333 340053S!13EK( 34333.333.433333043.3 3333 3333 33 .i .i 31i333 1333 33333tf I3 .3 43 133.33 3 3 3-.X


~.1


2


PRE-OWNED

VEHICLES


~KL


First Year Maintenance Includesd
With All Pro-Owned Vehicles


'17,995




'18,995




'25,995




'30,995


Thank you for reading this All prices are plus tax tag & title Vehicles subject to prior sale Limit
1 trade-in per purchase Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers Sea dealer for
c:.riei t d ~,i' P'rIarrr i subl.:i i. I,:rianle Wrir.ui t".i'e *With a purchase of a used vehicle
Some restrictions may apply- See dealer for details


'18,995


'28,995




'34,995

'gPt'"W JH
VoCumS* fin


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 C13


00 HOD


rifCMriow


1 H


2012 INFINITE
G11 SPTI


AvilbeInIr-O ne ehcls
5 ER1 000 IEN MlaeRstitos


,dldbB-
all!




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Honda

L -


SPRING
EVENT


New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW,
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s169O.


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$14,926 $17,254 $18,728 $20,042


12 Honda
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$20,615


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What LOVE Can Do For Youl I

er352.628.4600 I

EHONDA.COM THrnda
proved credit, 12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2995 cash or trade
yment, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Any dealer installed equipment at additional cost. Not a lease.
approved credt,12,000 miles per year 15 cents per mile thereafter. $2500 cash or trade equity. Payment is plus tax with no
neat, tag and lease and state fees due at signing. Options at additional cost. *** 44 City/Hwy combined. Based on 2012 EPA
on purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain
nt parts. See dealer for details. All preowned vehicles include $2000 cash down or trade equity. Ofers valid thru date of publication.


C14 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[I~IWJE
~TUEVROTAET


-e


II


1
14


W III


Chevy Spadr 1LS
Automatic Transmission


New 2013 Chew Crme LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy INaverse LS
36 month lease


New 2013 Chevy MalIbu LS
36 month Iease l


New 2013 Chevy Sonic Sedan LS
MSRP: $16,430


New 2013 Chew Equinox LS
St #013135, Auto, 4cy. MSRP: $25,030 ,'


SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013 CS15


Sl


- -^r


$


, pilJi




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


La


NEW 2012 F-150 XL
4X4 CREW CAB


NEW 2012 F-250 4X4 NEW 2012 F-350 4X4
CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL CREW CAB LAT DIESEL
.a.A_


MSRP........................ ................. $38,335 MSRP..............................................$57,345 MSRP.................................................. $62,525
Nick Nicholas Discount............................-1,900 Nick Nicholas Discount...........................-4,100 Nick Nicholas Discount...........................-4,900
Retail Customer Cash..........................-3,500 Retail Customer Cash.........................-3,000 Retail Customer Cash.........................-3,000
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash..-1,500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000

$31,435 $49,245 $53,625


NEW 2013 F-150 4X4
LARIAT SUPER CREW CAB


MSRP................................................................................... $36,655
301 A Equipment Group Discount................................................-500
XLT Chrome Package Discount....................................................-750
Nick Nicholas Discount...........s ............................................ ...-1,906
5.0L Special RetailCustomer Customer Cash.................................................500
Retail Customer Cash.................................................................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash......................................1,000
F 150 XLT Bonus Customer Cash.....................................................-500
F 150 Special Retail Customer Cash.........................................-1,000

$27,999


NEW 2013 F-150 4X2
XL SUPER CREW CAB

a-


r.... 1N3I U MSRP................................................... $35,430
MSRP............................................... $51,465 101 A Equipment Gorup Discount.............-...750
502A Equipment Group Discount.............-750 Nick Nicholas Discount.......................-.....1,400
Nick Nicholas Discount...........................2,600 5.0L Special Retail Customer Cash...........-...500
Retail Customer Cash..........................-2,500 Retail Customer Cash..........................-2,500
Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash. -1,000

$44,615 $29,280


1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ORVIS 414 2004 FORD EXPLORER US SPORT TRACK ,|2 ,9.LW ,II M AIIM II wA"VR
Great SUV w/lots of options. N2T386B Hard to find Sport Trac. N3C102A Don't this low mileage Miata NP5792B.
$7,968 $8,968 $8,968


2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX
Great car. N2C294B
$9,868


2006 FORD EXPLORER ALS
Nice explorer for nol much money N3CO32A
$13,968


2005 FORD MUSTANG
Low mileage pony car. N2T410A
$13,968


2006 FORD ESCAPE XLI 4X4
A great 4 wheel drive. N2C296B
$13,968


2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT 2007 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 LIMITED 1965 FORD MUSTANG 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2006 FORD FI50 LARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 FORD FUSION
Extra clean and readyto tow. NP5777D A fine IT in the perfect color. N3T125A Reduced and loaded4x4. N3T160A Firsttimeofferedforsalein33years.N2C033M Room for the whole neighborhood.N3TO8D This one has the wow factor. N2T209P This is one fine Fusion. NP5791
$14,968 $ 16,968 $ 16,968 $ 18,000 $ 19,968 $ 19,968 $20,968


I2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID 1 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 BIG HORN 2011 FORD FLEX SEL I 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT I
Only 16k miles & fuel friendly. N3CO97A Loaded SLT, CREW CAB. NP5786D I Don't miss this SEL. N2C292A This is one fun 5.0. N3T107A |
21.968 I 25.668 $25.668 $26.668 I


2011 GMC ACADIA
Special edition & loaded. N2T358A
$27.968


2013 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 12010 FORD F150 LARIAT CREW
Only 9k miles & better than new N3T3 17A Certified & priced way less thn new N3T229A
$29,968 30,668
alis Dunnellon


C1,6 SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 2013