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Citrus County chronicle ( March 31, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 31, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03077

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 31, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03077

Full Text


Sky high: All-Chronicle boys hoops team set /B1
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& next
morning
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57f PAGE A4


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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 236


Adams: I shouldn't pay for public records


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Citrus
County officials are used to
handling large volumes of pub-
lic records requests from citi-
zens who keep a watchful eye
on local government.
Lately, though, the requests


staffers say are running them
ragged are not coming from
citizens.
Commissioner Scott Adams
has requested to view thou-
sands of documents and emails,
sometimes in wide-sweeping
public records requests that of-
ficials say take hours to re-
search and compile.


Adams has paid in some
cases, same as anyone else
whose requests for public
records require extensive staff
time.
But Adams, who is critical of
the higher echelon of county
staff, doesn't think he should
pay for records requests.
"I'm doing this for the citizens


of the county," he said.
County Attorney Richard
Wesch isn't so sure. He said
while the staff generally com-
plies with requests for informa-
tion from commissioners,
Adams' formal public records
requests may exceed the norm.
"You can imagine the staff
hours that go into some of the


requests we've received,"
Wesch said.
He said that while commis-
sioners have an obligation to
their constituency, excessive
public records requests should
move through the board as a
whole to County Administrator


BUSINESS:


Happy Easter


Scooters
Feds say scooter
companies' strategies
amount to Medicare
fraud./Page Dl

COMMENTARY:
Retirement
A survey finds workers'
outlooks on retirement
remains dismal even
though stock markets
have rebounded since the
recession./Page Cl


Dive bomber
One resident worries
about a woodpecker's
loud habits./Page A3


Entertainment
news moving
The Chronicle's enter-
tainment page, currently
on the back page of
Sports, will move to Page
A4 beginning Tuesday,
April 2. The entertainment
page is home to the horo-
scope, Today
in History All!
and enter-
tainment
news.
Lottery re-
sults will continue to pub-
lish in the Sports section.

Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds................ D5
Crossword ............ A16
Editorial .................... C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ....... B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
M ovies ..................... A 16
O bituaries ................A7
Together............... A18


6 I IJ|111 !78207!I o


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Christians across the world consider Easter Sunday the holiest day of the year. Jesus Christ's death and
resurrection from the grave is the fundamental basis of the Christian faith. Above, as depicted in a finely
detailed stained-glass window at St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Crystal River, Christ reveals himself to two
followers named Mary after being resurrected. Scripture reads the women visited the tomb where Christ's
body was placed three days earlier after being crucified, to anoint the body with spices and ointment. When
they arrived, the tomb was empty and the stone sealing it closed was rolled away. "They met the risen
Christ on Sunday morning," said the Rev. Kevin Holsapple, a minister at St. Anne's. "We still meet the risen
Christ on Sunday in the Holy Eucharist." St. Anne's Episcopal Church, on Fort Island Trail, will conduct
services today at 7 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.


S h's g Teen's brain surgery
Sar h' s. Cga: 'deals with seizures

All Sarah Paul wanted for Christmas was to be able to NANCY KENNEDY
wake up without thinking about when and where she Staff writer
would have her next seizure. INVERNESS You can't see it
Would it be in class? Walking in the hallway? In the unless you lift up her hair, but
cafeteria in front of everybody? there's a C-shaped scar that runs
from the top right front of Sarah
The 17-year-old lived in constant anticipation of the Paul's head to her right ear.
inevitable. It's fairly fresh, just a little over
To be seizure-free would mean undergoing a life- three months old, from a hemi-
spherectomy a rare surgical
threatening brain surgery. procedure where one half of the
To go without the surgery would mean a lifetime of brain is removed or disabled.
medicines that would eventually not work all that well, plus aI just wanted the seizures to go
away," Sarah said from her home
living with constant seizures, plus the probability of the in Inverness.
healthy side of her brain also becoming damaged, Her mother, father, brother and
resulting in even more seizures. sister just wanted her to live.
MEI
On Dec. 10, 2012, at All Children's Hospital in St. To fully understand Sarah's
Petersburg, Sarah's family said a prayer, held their breath saga, you need to begin before she
and hoped. ... See SA ge AIO


1/Page A4


Air


Force


buddies


reunite

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Except
for a few more pounds
and fewer strands of hair,
former Air Force buddies
Dirk Gouwens and Chuck
Lilley recognized each
other right away after not
seeing each other for 56
years.
They met at a local In-
verness restaurant Thurs-
day after Gouwens, who
lives in The Villages,
found Lilley through an
Internet search.
Lilley, who's real name
is Millard C. Lilley, is the
only Millard C. Lilley in
the entire United States.
"When I found him in
Crystal River, I thought,
'After all these years,
we're practically neigh-
bors,' Gouwens said.
The two were stationed
at Shaw AFB in South
Carolina from 1955-57.
"I stayed in the Air
Force, but he went his own
way after his four years
were up," Lilley said.
"I wanted to see him
again, because I always
thought about what my
life would've been like if I
had stayed in," Gouwens
said.
Gouwens, 84, had grown
up in German-occupied
Holland. He was only a
boy when the Germans
bombed Rotterdam.
"I was in the middle of
Rotterdam when that hap-
pened," he said. "I don't
like to think about it too
much."
His mother's sisters had
gone to the United States
and in 1947 Gouwen's
mother came to the
United States to visit.
"After five years of war
and terrible things, my
mother fell in love with
the United States from the
moment she entered it,"
he said. "She came back
and put in for
immigration."
It took five years until
they were able to leave
Holland. By that time
Gouwens was 24.
'"As soon as I got here, I
had to register for the
draft and I got drafted,"
he said. "I did my military
See BUDDES/Page A5


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pride awards


KCCB

monthly
program

honors efforts
Special to the Chronicle
Anyone who reads the
Chronicle has no doubt
seen pictures and captions
about "Pride Awards" dur-
ing the past 10 years.
Each month, Keep Cit-
rus County Beautiful rec-
ognizes an individual,
business or community
group for their efforts in
making our community a
great place to live.
Past recipients have
done roadside litter col-
lection, or started a recy-
cling program at their club
or workplace. Others have
done community beautifi-
cation projects, re-
landscaped a community
entrance, or rehabilitated
a run-down building and
turned it into a vibrant
business location.
Award winners have
pitched in to make a park
safer and more attractive,
or started a business that
reuses and recycles valu-
able resources. They have
cleaned up all the ciga-
rette butts from a beach, or
pulled abandoned crab
traps from the water or
tended plants in a ceme-
tery or park.
Turn the page
sideways to see the faces
of the Crystal River Garden
Club, recognized for
ongoing efforts of
landscape maintenance and
beautification at the Crystal
River Cemetery.


This is the third in a
series of weekly
installments about Keep
Citrus County Beautiful.
* To nominate someone
for the monthly Pride
Award, email keep
citruscountybeautiful
@gmail.com.

Awards have been given


for waterway cleanup,
too.
The mission of Keep Cit-
rus County Beautiful is to
encourage personal re-
sponsibility for community
appearance through edu-
cation, activities and
recognition to reduce lit-
ter, promote recycling,
preserve and beautify
neighborhoods, waterways
and public spaces.
Pride awards are an im-
portant part of that
mission.
If you know of a deserv-
ing person or group, let
Keep Citrus County Beau-
tiful know about their ex-
emplary behavior by
mailing keepcitruscounty
beautiful@gmail.com.


Special to the Chronicle
Ann and Bill Covington were recognized for their restoration of the historic Jont Knight
house in Floral City and its reuse as an art gallery and cafe.


8 We Welcome You To |

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A


CITRUS MEMORY L


CHeart
& VASCULAR CENTER


Citrus County's and

CHEST PAIN CENTER WITH PCI
As of February 11, 2013 Citrus Memorial Hospital received full accreditation
as a Chest Pain Center. The accreditation is effective for the next three years.


WATERING FINES
* Citrus County is
issuing citations that
carry with them a fine
of $100 for first
offenders of local
watering rules.
* Second violations cost
$250, third or more
cost $500.
* Find watering rules in
the weather map on
Page A4 daily.


M
Scan this code with
your smartphone
OR reader


502 W. Highland Blvd. Inverness, FL 352.344.6416 HeartOfCitrus.com


A


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


LOCAL


to \







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Hospital starts residency program


Seven Rivers partners with UF


Special to the Chronicle

CRYSTAL RIVER -
Seven Rivers Regional
Medical Center and the
University of Florida have
entered into a letter of
agreement that will bring
the first physician resident
to Seven Rivers Regional's
Crystal River area campus
starting Monday
The first resident is Dr.
Alex J. Dickert, a student
of the Department of Com-
munity Health & Family
Medicine, College of Med-



Around the
COUNTY


icine. Dr Dickert grew up
in Citrus County and lives
locally with his family
while he attends UF He is
the son of local Crystal
River family medicine
physician Dr Jimmy C.
Dickert.
Under the agreement,
Seven Rivers Regional will
act as an external clinical
learning site for a rotation
of physician residents
and/or fellows with the Col-
lege of Medicine at the
University of Florida.
Seven Rivers Regional, in


cooperation with Dr Shaun
F Saint, a Crystal River
general surgeon, will pro-
vide a clinical setting with
a structured educational
experience for residents
and/or fellows within fam-
ily medicine to further
their medical education.
"We are excited to en-


hance our already strong
relationship with UF and
to take part in the medical
education process," said
Joyce Brancato, the hospi-
tal's chief executive offi-
cer "The opportunity to
bring the training of grad-
uate medical students to
our community and our


hospital will serve as a
building block for future
primary care physicians
who hopefully will wish to
establish their own prac-
tice in Citrus County"
Family medicine resi-
dents are required to do
surgery rotations to pre-
pare them for the type of
surgical care and knowl-
edge they will use in the
practice of family medi-
cine. During these rota-
tions, the resident may
work with the physician in
his or her office as well as
within the hospital setting.
While in the office, resi-
dents may see patients, as-


sist with completing his-
tory and physical and do
pre-operative workups.
While in the hospital, gen-
eral surgery residents may
serve as first assists on
certain surgeries and pro-
vide post-operative follow-
up visits.
"In the past, I've worked
with pre-medicine stu-
dents," Dr. Shaun Saint
said. "In that situation, the
student can only observe.
It was something I truly
enjoyed. The opportunity
to mentor and be involved
with a resident who is fur-
ther along in the learning
process is nice."


County fair ends
today in Inverness
For the second year, the
fair will be open on Sunday
from 2 to 7 p.m. with no
gate admission and no sin-
gle midway tickets sold.
Ride the midway rides for a
$22 armband.
The Citrus County Fair-
grounds is at 3600 S.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), In-
verness. For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-2993.
Traffic signal project
to impact traffic
This week, traffic will be
slow through the intersec-
tion of Meadowcrest Boule-
vard and State Road 44
near Crystal River as work-
ers install poles for a new
traffic signal.
There will be temporary
lane closures and traffic
shifts through the work area
on Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Meadowcrest is located
east of Crystal River and is
bordered by S.R. 44 and
County Road 486. The light
is on the south side of
Meadowcrest on S.R. 44, in
front of the Family Dollar
store.
Workers will be directing
traffic in the area during
these two days of pole in-
stallation. The new traffic
signal is anticipated to be
fully operational by the end
of the first week of May.
Water department
offers free plant class
The Citrus County Water
Resources Department will
offer a free class on "Fa-
vorite Plants for Citrus
County."
The class begins with
evaluating existing condi-
tions when planning a land-
scape. The class is
scheduled from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 4,
in the Extension Service
classroom at 3650 W. Sov-
ereign Path, Lecanto.
Pre-registration is re-
quired by calling Gina
Hamilton at 352-527-5707.
For information, call 352-
527-5708.
Parliamentarians set
workshop for April 5
Learn how to properly
handle motions at a work-
shop from 9 a.m. to noon
Friday, April 5, at the Whis-
pering Pines Recreation
Building. The event is spon-
sored by the Citrus County
Unit of Parliamentarians
and Citrus County Parks
and Recreation Board.
Registration fee is $10.
Contact: Bob Hagaman at
352-382-2631, rhagaman@
tampabay.rr.com; or Connie
Taylor at 352-527-2599,
conniemdsj@yahoo.com.
Democrats to meet
in Homosassa
The Southwest Citrus
Democratic Club meets at
10:30 a.m. the first Satur-
day monthly at the Sug-
armill Woods Country Club,
1 Douglas St., Homosassa.
All registered Democrats
are welcome to attend.
For information, email
swdems@gmail.com or call
352-382-0343.
-From staff reports


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Jonathan Bilby dives into the final pit of mud after he had completed the Easter Mud Hunt and collected eggs. After he washed up, he
was hoping to find the golden egg in his heat for a chance to win $1,000 cash.


Boys and Girls

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HERNANDO At a steady
pace, Jonathan Bilby ran over
the last hill of the 2-mile sugar-
sand obstacle course. He com-
pleted the climbing wall,
haystacks, waterslide, trenches
and many more obstacles. But
the challenge was not quite
over as he dove into the thick,
muddy mass of gunk waiting at
the bottom of the hill.
This was the same locale
where momentum became
thick and dirty for 700 runners
who participated in the inaugu-
ral Easter Mud Hunt at the
Berry MX Track in Hernando
on Saturday Wicked Cool
Events and DRC Sports de-
signed the Easter Mud Hunt as
an Easter-themed mud run to
benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County, a non-profit
organization helping children


Clubs benefit fom

in Citrus County.
"DRC Sports puts on
triathlons, running events and
many more events in the
county," said event organizer
Chris Moling. "My staff kept
saying let's do a mud run. We
found the property and the
owner was willing to let us
come in to make this work.
There was a mud run some-
where every weekend except
for Easter weekend. So we said
if it is going to be Easter week-
end, let's call it the Easter Mud
Hunt. Then we decided to put
in the golden egg and cash
prizes, which no one else does
on the course."
The first run was the Com-
petitive Honey Badger Wave,
where runners wore a timing
chip. The top three female and
male runners each won $250
for first place, $150 for second
place and $100 for third.
"Some of the obstacles were


inaugural run

really difficult, while others
were easy, depending on your
physical level," said participant
Angel Ramos. "There was a lot
of heavy sugar sand between
every obstacle."
The majority of the runners
were on a quest for the elusive
golden egg worth $1,000 in an
adult-style Easter egg hunt Six-
teen thousand eggs were di-
vided between five of the six
waves. With a drawstring bag
on their back, they were chal-
lenged to collect eggs in three
different zones for an opportu-
nity to win cash, gift cards,
candy, tattoos and toys.
Bilby, a Homosassa resident
who runs diverse events for
seemeinthedark.com in Miami,
said Saturday's course was de-
signed well.
"It was a great course the way
that it was set up," Bilby said.
"It was short, but intense. This
is great for the charity, commu-


Runners participate in the
Easter Mud Hunt in Hernando
looking for the golden egg.
Some dove in willingly while oth-
ers fell victim to the strength of
the thick, dark mud.

nity and it brings economic dol-
lars to the county Everyone is
just having a great time to-
gether on a Saturday afternoon.
It's great to see these kinds of
races come into the county."


Pair of woodpeckers surprise homeowner


www.thinkstopphotos.com
A similar red pileated woodpecker
has been a guest at a Floral City
residence for three weeks. Every
morning and evening the wood-
pecker has been breaking on
Rose Valent's front window.


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

FLORAL CITY Rose Valent
thought she was home alone on
March 11; however, two sets of
eyes peered through the window,
observing her every move. With a
loud thump at the window, Valent
jumped; she was startled by the
disquieting thud. She quickly
turned to investigate who or what
was at her window.
Two red heads with black bod-
ies glared in her direction.
Quickly, they scurried to the near-
est tree as they noticed her eyes
upon them.
"They were red pileated wood-
peckers," Valent said with excite-
ment. "They are rare and there
were two at my window."
From morning to evening, two
male woodpeckers appeared
daily at Valent's mirrored window.
"Pileated woodpeckers are
monogamous and do not tolerate
intruders on their territory," said


Citrus County Audubon Society
vice president Fred Hile-
man. "This territory can be as
much as 150 to 200 acres. They see
their reflections as intruders and
are trying to drive them away"
Skittish to abrupt movements
or alteration in scenarios, Valent
described the woodpeckers'
habits as repetitive.
"They would flip their wings
first, and then fly over to the
ledge," Valent said. "They would
spread their wings and then bam
into the window six times. They
must have gone between the tree
and the window as least 25 times
in an hour and a half."
The fellow partner in crime
must have gotten stage fright,
though.
"This woodpecker has been by
himself the last several days," Va-
lent said. "When the other one
was with him, he was here all the
time. They would take a 15-
minute break and then be back."
However, Valent is wondering if


her current red pileated wood-
pecker is injured from his repeti-
tive acrobatic performances.
"He hasn't been hitting it quite
as hard lately," Valent said. "He
might have hurt his beak."
No matter how long he stays,
Valent is enjoying the company of
her newfound friend. However,
she knows it needs to wander off
to find a buddy of his own kind.
Neighbors and relatives have
been assisting in seemingly every
home remedy known to mankind.
Pie plates are hung from the win-
dows, a torch light sits in front of
the windows with a rubber snake
dangling from it and Valent has
squirted the birds with water
"Since it is a mirrored surface,
hanging some strips of foil on the
outside for a little time might
deter them from these attacks,"
Hileman said.
Hileman suggested Valent or
anyone with a similar issue visit
the website www.sialis.org/
windowstrikes.htm.


We are excited to enhance
our already strong
relationship with UF ...

Joyce Brancato
Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center CEO.


Muddy mess makes charity money











Groups petition to address MFLs


Special to the Chronichl

SOS NOW, a coalition of
profit organizations and pri
individuals, has filed a foi
petition with the Florida
apartment of Environmental
tection (FDEP) requestir
hearing pursuant to Sec
373.114(2)(a) Florida Statute
The petition asks for ren
in response to the South
Florida Water Management




RECORDS
Continued from Page Al

Brad Thorpe.
"Under our administra-
tion form of government,
commissioners are sup-
posed to work through the
county administration," he
said. "The board of county
commissioners is a single
entity."
Adams seeks
proof of
mismanagement
Adams is affording him-
self use of the public
records law to ferret out
information about the area
that interests him most -
the county landfill.
Adams, who owns a pri-
vate landfill in Sumter
County, has said he be-
lieves the Citrus County
landfill is poorly run and
full of financial waste. The
recent uproar over the
county's trading in of a
1995 pan/scraper is only
fueling Adams' public
records interests.
For example, Adams
sent a public records re-
quest March 16 for all
records regarding the
piece of equipment, in-
cluding "letters, photo-
graphs and films."
While state law does not


trict's recent adoption of mini-
mum flow and levels (MFLs)
which, SOS NOW asserts, would
contribute to the further degra-
dation of the spring-fed Ho-
mosassa and Chassahowitzka
rivers. Both rivers are classified
as Outstanding Florida Waters.
Florida Law requires the
highest level of protection be
provided to Outstanding Florida
Waters (OFWs) and no degrada-
tion of water quality is to be per-


require those seek-
ing public records
to identify them-
selves, Adams
writes he is re- *
questing the
records as a county
commissioner
He also wants to sc
know if anyone in Ad,
the county is talk- co
ing about his com- commi
pany, A.C.M.S.,
which he co-owns with
state Sen. Charlie Dean
and the senator's son,
Charlie Dean Jr.
In a March 8 request
sent to Wesch, Adams said
he wanted to view all the
records since Nov 1, 2012,
to and from assistant
county administrators Ken
Frink and Cathy Pearson,
plus other county officials,
that reference Adams,
Dean Jr, A.C.M.S. and the
county landfill. He also re-
quested all of Commis-
sioners Rebecca Bays' and
Joe Meek's records during
that same time frame.
Adams made a sweeping
request for records associ-
ated with Citrus Recy-
cling's payment of $170,681
in 2011 to cover discrepan-
cies in billing for recycling
materials. Just last week,
Adams sent a similar re-
quest to Wesch for inves-
tigative records about the
Citrus Recycling case that


;ott
ams
unty
issioner.


mitted in OFWs.
The petition asserts SOS
NOW's position that the Federal
Clean Water Act's and Florida's
Administrative Code's anti-degra-
dation policy must be applied to
all regulatory actions on OFWs.
The water district's staff has
stated "Florida's anti-degradation
policy does not apply to water
quantity decisions such as mini-
mum flows and levels," according
to a statement from SOS NOW,


may exist in his
office.
Adams said he is
seeking to uncover
mismanagement
he believes is ram-
pant in county
government
"We are doing
things that are so
dysfunctional,"
Adams said.
Adams has paid


for record searches in
three cases. The A.C.M.S.
request, for example, took
county staffers seven
hours to complete and cost
Adams $139, county
spokeswoman Lindsay
Ubinas said.
'Should
commissioners
get a pass?'
While Adams said he
shouldn't have to pay to re-
ceive records for county
business, he is openly
balking at one charge.
Adams on March 11
asked for a variety of
records from the Eco-
nomic Development Coun-
cil. The request included
all records regarding
FD.S. Disposal and the
EDC since Jan. 1, 2010. It
requested records to and
from several individuals,
including Commissioner
Bays' husband, Mike,
Chamber of Commerce


which substantially disagrees.
The process of setting MFLs
for these two rivers began nearly
five years ago and was subject to
many discussions and meetings
between staff members, environ-
mental organizations and resi-
dents. By coincidence, the SOS
NOW petition was filed just in
time for "Springs Protection
Awareness Month" (April 2013)
as recently proclaimed by state
Sen. Charles Dean, R-Inverness.


president Josh Wooten,
Meek, Wesch and Thorpe.
When board executive
assistant Tobey Phillips in-
formed him the EDC said
it would cost him $450 for
the research, Adams
objected.
"The EDC request is
made by me as a commis-
sioner investigating for
business practices and
possible misconduct,"
Adams replied in an email
to Phillips. "This should
not be chargeable."
He then asked for an
opinion from Wesch, who
wrote that the EDC, while
funded in part by the
county, is not a county
agency
Wesch, in an interview,
said Adams must pay for
the EDC public records re-
quest same as any other
citizen.


SOS NOW awaits FDEP's re-
sponse to the petition, which de-
mands full protection of these
spring-fed rivers and all other
Outstanding Florida Waters cov-
ered by the Clean Water Act.
Noted St Petersburg environ-
mental attorney John R. Thomas
filed the petition with FDEP on
behalf of SOS NOW
For more information, call
Dan Hilliard at 352-447-5434 or
Dr. Katie Tripp at 407-539-0990.


Adams said he quests are "of an
thinks the county individual interest
commission should that is clearly be-
clarify its relation- yond the scope of
ship with the EDC. the duties, respon-
He said the sibilities, and offi-
records request he cial business" of
filed should be the elected official.
handled without Richard Wesch said he
cost Wesch believes many of
Wesch also be- county Adams' requests
lives the commis- attorney. fall into that
sion should look at category
its policy for public "It's going to ripen into a
records requests. The board discussion," he said.
board's administrative "At what point does the
regulation, he said, is board want to charge its
vague as to whether com- own members? Should a
missioners can make re- commissioner get a pass?"
quests that clog up Adams said he would
valuable staff time. continue seeking public
The regulation states records.
commissioners must fol- "If that means me having
low the regular guidelines to pay for something to
of the public records law, help the citizens of Citrus
including paying for exces- County," he said, "then
sive staff time, if the re- that's what I'm going to do."


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR 1 PR HI LO PR
0.00 |. 81 40 0.00 J 77 40 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
68 pc
57 pc
62 pc
63 ts
61 pc
59 ts
63 pc
63 pc
67 pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds from 10 to 15 knots.
Seas 2 to 3 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a light to moderate
chop. Partly cloudy today.


80 41 0.00 NA NA 0.00

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E lusvedaly
-- TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 82 Low: 57
Partly cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 57
Partly cloudy; 30% chance of a shower

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
J High: 80 Low: 55
Partly cloudy; 20% chance of a shower

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 78/42
Record 89/38
Normal 80/52
Mean temp. 60
Departure from mean -6
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.30 in.
Total for the year 3.40 in.
Normal for the year 10.15 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.20 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 40
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 26%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Juniper, Bayberry
Today's count: 8.3/12
Monday's count: 8.7
Tuesday's count: 9.4
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/31 SUNDAY 9:58 3:43 10:28 4:13
4/1 MONDAY 11:03 4:48 11:33 5:18
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O ) SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:48 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:20A.M.
SM OONRISE TODAY................................NONE
APRIL3 APRIL10 APRIL18 APRIL25 MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:28A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
9:41 a/5:05 a
8:02 a/2:27 a
5:49 a/12:15 a
8:51 a/4:04 a


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
8:54 p/4:56 p
7:15 p/2:18 p
5:02 p/12:06 p
8:04 p/3:55 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:41 a/5:57 a 9:42 p/5:42 p
9:02 a/3:19 a 8:03 p/3:04 p
6:49 a/1:07 a 5:50 p/12:52 p
9:51 a/4:56 a 8:52 p/4:41 p


Gulf water
temperature


64
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 27.91 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.35 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.21 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.46 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 55 27 sh 53 39
Albuquerque 72 43 pc 76 47
Asheville 62 39 .10 ts 63 42
Atlanta 69 52 trace ts 71 55
Atlantic City 58 32 sh 52 44
Austin 85 64 ts 82 64
Baltimore 60 34 .01 sh 57 43
Billings 61 41 c 50 23
Birmingham 70 49 .18 ts 72 54
Boise 68 40 s 72 42
Boston 54 40 pc 58 43
Buffalo 49 29 sh 54 33
Burlington, VT 51 28 pc 55 39
Charleston, SC 75 51 ts 76 56
Charleston, WV 62 36 sh 63 41
Charlotte 65 45 .32 ts 69 49
Chicago 59 28 c 53 30
Cincinnati 61 29 c 59 37
Cleveland 56 26 sh 52 33
Columbia, SC 73 53 ts 71 54
Columbus, OH 57 29 sh 56 35
Concord, N.H. 55 29 pc 56 38
Dallas 77 53 .96 ts 75 57
Denver 66 36 pc 68 35
Des Moines 61 47 .13 c 56 26
Detroit 57 32 sh 50 30
El Paso 83 51 s 83 54
Evansville, IN 59 35 pc 63 37
Harrisburg 58 28 sh 55 40
Hartford 58 34 pc 58 41
Houston 79 63 ts 80 63
Indianapolis 59 32 c 56 33
Jackson 73 51 ts 75 58
Las Vegas 84 62 pc 80 60
Little Rock 59 54 .59 pc 72 53
Los Angeles 64 55 c 63 53
Louisville 62 34 pc 63 40
Memphis 59 52 .41 pc 72 50
Milwaukee 57 28 c 47 27
Minneapolis 56 40 .19 pc 38 21
Mobile 76 50 ts 78 60
Montgomery 79 48 ts 74 57
Nashville 60 46 .04 pc 67 44
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 76 55 ts 77 62
New York City 59 40 sh 56 43
Norfolk 61 36 sh 67 52
Oklahoma City 81 53 pc 72 43
Omaha 68 48 .16 c 56 25
Palm Springs 91 69 pc 83 55
Philadelphia 59 35 sh 56 44
Phoenix 87 67 pc 88 61
Pittsburgh 55 26 sh 54 34
Portland, ME 56 32 pc 50 38
Portland, Ore 77 43 pc 71 49
Providence, R.I. 59 41 pc 55 43
Raleigh 66 38 ts 67 51
Rapid City 59 37 .02 c 44 20
Reno 73 39 sh 59 39
Rochester, NY 53 28 sh 53 34
Sacramento 74 50 sh 68 51
St. Louis 55 41 .12 pc 63 35
St. Ste. Marie 46 23 .08 rs 40 18
Salt Lake City 67 43 pc 70 47
San Antonio 85 64 ts 83 66
San Diego 68 59 c 65 58
San Francisco 64 52 sh 62 48
Savannah 77 47 ts 76 57
Seattle 68 42 s 70 48
Spokane 63 36 s 66 39
Syracuse 53 33 sh 53 36
Topeka 72 50 .02 pc 67 34
Washington 61 41 sh 59 46
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 93 El Centro, Calif. LOW 14 Angel Fire,
N.M.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/74/s
Amsterdam 40/25/c
Athens 67/51/pc
Beijing 51/40/pc
Berlin 35/28/c
Bermuda 64/60/pc
Cairo 95/67/pc
Calgary 47/28/pc
Havana 85/67/pc
Hong Kong 79/71/sh
Jerusalem 85/66/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


65/53/sh
45/31/pc
53/46/r
81/54/pc
50/41/sh
35/22/c
45/27/c
80/70/ts
59/51/sh
77/64/c
63/48/sh
50/27/sh
36/31/sn


Z-1C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -"--j


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Meeting Notices....................D7


Miscellaneous Notices.........D7


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N |.1 :"i' l

SInverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. 5? square
106 W. Main
4 44Inverness, FL
S 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
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Phone 352-563-6363
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans fight changes to disability payments


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Veterans groups
are rallying to fight any proposal to
change disability payments as the fed-
eral government attempts to address its
long-term debt problem. They say
they've sacrificed already
Government benefits are adjusted ac-
cording to inflation, and President
Barack Obama has endorsed using a
slightly different measure of inflation to
calculate Social Security benefits. Ben-
efits would still grow, but at a slower
rate.
Advocates for the nation's 22 million
veterans fear the alternative inflation
measure would also apply to disability
payments to nearly 4 million veterans,
as well as pension payments for an ad-
ditional 500,000 low-income veterans
and surviving families.


"I think veterans have already paid
their fair share to support this nation,"
said the American Legion's Louis Celli.
"They've paid it in lower wages while
serving, they've paid it through their
wounds and sacrifices on the battlefield
and they're paying it now as they try to
recover from those wounds."
The changes that would occur by
using the slower inflation calculation
seem modest at first. For a veteran with
no dependents who has a 60 percent dis-
ability rating, the use of the new method
this year would have lowered the vet-
eran's monthly payments by $3 a month.
Instead of getting $1,026 a month, the
veteran would have received $1,023.
Raymond Kelly, legislative director
for Veterans of Foreign Wars, acknowl-
edged veterans would see little change
in their income during the first few
years of the change.


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Air Force buddies Dirk Gouwens and Chuck Lilley recently reunited after not seeing
each other for 56 years. Gouwens, who lives in The Villages, found Lilley, who lives in
Crystal River, through an Internet search last year. They caught up on old times
Thursday at the Olive Garden in Inverness.


BUDDIES
Continued from PageAl
obligation already in Hol-
land, so I could've said no.
But I thought, if this was
going to be my country, if
they want me to serve, I'll
serve. So, I signed up for
the Air Force."
He had gone to Wichita,
Kan., to work on the new
B-47s, but since he wasn't
a U.S. citizen, he couldn't
get a secret clearance and
wasn't allowed on the
flight line.
One day he was told to
put on his dress uniform
and get to the courthouse.
"I thought they were
going to deport me,"
Gouwens said. "They said,
'No, you're going to be
sworn in as an American
citizen."'
Lilley, 77, grew up in
Birmingham, Ala., and en-
listed in the Air Force on
his 17th birthday The two
met in South Carolina and
struck up a friendship.
After Gouwens' enlist-
ment was up, he returned
to New York to work as a
mechanic. Lilley went on to
a military career in civil
engineering, traveling all


over the world. He came to
Florida in 1972, and Gou-
wens came nine years ago.
Gouwens first called Lil-
ley about a year ago, but it
took them this long to actu-
ally meet
"Where I live in The Vil-
lages, (reunions) like this
happen all the time,"
Gouwens said. '"After all
these years, I always won-
dered what happened to
him."
Later Thursday, Lilley
said reuniting with his old


Chuck Lilley
Crystal River veteran.
friend was something he'll
never forget
"The restaurant gave us
our meal for free," he said.
"The waitress said people
were talking about us all
over the restaurant I
served in Vietnam, and
when we came back we
were spit on ... so it feels
good to be acknowledged.
Plus, seeing Dirk we'll
definitely be meeting
again. We barely touched
the surface of things we
wanted to talk about"


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We barely touched the
surface of things we wanted
to talk about.


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 A5




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


---IHERIFF-- '
JEFFREY J.l D~w'


However, these Citrus County stores CHOOSE TO SELL synthetic substances.
Chevron 639 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
A to Z Discount Beverage 3295 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Texaco Food Mart 645 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando
Kwik Stop 5445 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa
Sunoco 6695 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy., Hernando
Discount Cigarettes & Tobacco 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando
Homosassa Country Store 5511 W. Homosassa Trail, Lecanto
Sunoco 6971 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River
Bob's Food Mart 3795 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills


KIN N'ARD
I Inlur Rahab UMMae Thermov


A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Helmut 'Pete'
Bauerle, 71
BEVERLY HILLS
Helmut "Pete" Bauerle,
71, Beverly Hills, died Fri-
day, March 29, 2013, at
HPH Hospice House in
Lecanto. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is assisting the
family with private
arrangements.

Stephen
Schmieder, 33
CITRUS SPRINGS
Stephen Schmieder, 33,
died Monday, March 25,
2013, with his family by his
side. He was born Nov 3,
1979, in Port Jefferson,
N.Y Stephen lived a short
time in
Long Is-
land, N.Y,
before
moving to f
the beauti- ',
ful state of -
Florida
with his
family He Stephen
made the Schmieder
transition
from northerner to south-
erner without difficulty,
making many friends
along the way
Stephen had a conta-
gious smile and a heart of
gold. As a child, he partic-
ipated in sports, winning
countless trophies, he
loved the beach and riding
motorcycles but most of all
in clear thought he loved
to spend time with his fam-
ily Each moment spent to-
gether an everlasting
memory
He is preceded in death
by his father, Kenneth
Schmieder; and his grand-
mother, Carol Taylor. Sur-
vivors include his son, Ian,
the pride and joy of his
life; his loving mother,
Elizabeth Schmieder, and
her fiance, Tony Jackson;
his brothers Paul and
William Schmieder; his
birth father Paul Arnhold
of New York; his sister
Stephanie Arnhold of New
York; brothers Matthew
and Daniel Arnhold of
New York; many aunts, un-
cles, cousins; and a
nephew William
Schmieder
Visitation is from 6 to
8 p.m. Monday, April 1,
2013, at Fero Funeral
Home. Funeral Mass is at
11 a.m. Tuesday, April 2,
2013, at St. John the Bap-
tist Catholic Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Fero Funeral Home,
www.ferofuneralhome.
com.





Donald
Harris, 93
LECANTO
Donald E. Harris, 93,
Lecanto, died Friday,
March 29, 2013.
A funeral tribute will be
at 2 p.m. Monday, April 1,
2013, at Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory The family will
receive friends in visita-
tion from 1:30 p.m. until
the hour of service.

DEADLINE
U Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.








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Bergdoll Jr., 74
HERNANDO
Kenneth R. Bergdoll Jr,
74, formerly of Hernando,
died March 28, 2013, at his
son's home in Inglis. Ken-
neth was born May 27,
1938, in Detroit, Mich., to
the late Kenneth R.
Bergdoll Sr. and Gloria
(Pearce) Hardenstine. He
served his country in the
U.S. Air Force. Kenneth
owned and operated his
own construction busi-
ness. A devoted family
man, he enjoyed reading,
listening to music and so-
cializing with his friends.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are his two sons, Ken-
neth R. Bergdoll III, Inglis,
and Jason and wife Dara
Bergdoll, Williston, Fla.;
daughter Kelli Bergdoll and
husband Jason Back, Ocala;
half-brother Walter Hard-
enstine, St Petersburg; and
sisters Janet and husband
Keith Christie, Molly and
husband John Craig, all of
The Villages, Fla.; and four
grandchildren.
Private arrangements
under the care of Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Sondra
Shinn, 73
DUNNELLON
Sondra L. Shinn, 73, died
peacefully in her home on
Palm Sunday, March 24,
2013. She was born Sept.
22, 1939, in Sydney, Ohio.
Sondra was the daughter
to the late Forest C. and
Hazel Myers. In 1959, she
married her husband,
John Shinn Jr, who resides
in Dunnellon and who took
great care of her up until
her death. In 1969 she
moved to Florida from
Centerville, Ohio. Sondra
was a member of the
Daughters of the American
Revolution and the Red
Hat Society She was an ac-
complished pianist, wife,
mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother who
lived life to the fullest We
love you and we will miss
you until we meet again.
Besides her husband,
John, she is survived by
her children, John Shinn
III of Stockton, Calif., and
Teresa Ann Rockey of West
Palm Beach; her six
grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren.
A memorial Mass will be
celebrated at 11 a.m. Fri-
day, April 5, 2013, at the St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church in Citrus
Springs, followed by a re-
ception at the Womens
Club in Inverness.
Expressions of sympa-
thy can be made online to
robertsofdunnellon.com.


CL E. avi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation


Crem-io ^Memorial Carc

For Information and costs,.
call 726-8323


Lorraine L. Wagner, age 48
of Homosassa, Florida died
peacefully on Sunday, February
17, 2013 at the Cancer
Treatment Center of America in
Philadelphia, PA. Born in
Summit, she had lived in Las
Vegas before moving to Florida
seven years ago. Lorraine was
an Assistant Manager at
Cumberland Farms in
Homosassa, FL for seven years.
She was predeceased by her
father, Carl "Skip" Wagner.
Surviving are her daughter, Lynne
Wagner; her mother, Carol
Wagner, of Homosassa, FL; two
sisters, Sharon Wagner and Elaine
Serafin; her brother, Jason
Wagner; her grandchildren,
Mikayla Wagner, Joshua Curtis
and Angelina Worrick.
Send condolences to
www.damianofuneralhome.com.
Services were held in N.J.
on Feb. 20, 2013
** *M


Stanley
Zipperer, 73
CRYSTAL RIVER
Stanley C. Zipperer, 73,
Crystal River, Fla., went to
be with the Lord on March
28, 2013,
under the
loving care
of family
and HPH '
Hospice )
staff in .
Lecanto,
Fla. Mr. w
Zipperer Stanley
was born Zipperer
June 18,
1939, in Leesburg, Fla., to
his parents Glynn and Eu-
laine Zipperer He was a
store manager for Marion
Tire and Battery both in
Ocala and Crystal River,
Fla. He was a lifelong res-
ident of Leesburg, Fla., till
moving to Crystal River in
2005. Mr Zipperer was a
veteran of the U.S. Marine
Corps and a faithful mem-
ber of the West Citrus
Church of Christ in Crystal
River, Fla.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife, Cyndy Zipperer
of Crystal River, Fla.; three
sons, Christopher (Audrey)
Zipperer and Randy (Deb)
Zipperer both of Lees-
burg, Fla., and Richard
Lee (Susie) Hodge of Ran-
cho Cucumonga, Calif.;
three daughters, Connie
(Rob) Robbins of Fruitland
Park, Fla., Sheila (Metro)
Duke of Cocoa, Fla., and
Cynthia (Jeffrey) Hurlbert
of El Cajon, Calif.; a
brother, Butch Zipperer of
Leesburg, Fla.; two sisters,
Yvonne Ruser of Fruitland
Park, Fla., and Freida
Shaulis of Belleview, Fla.;
13 grandchildren; 11 great-
grandchildren; and many
nieces and nephews. He
was preceded in death by
his parents, Glynn and Eu-
laine Zipperer; an infant
son, Stanley C. Zipperer
Jr; and brothers Ewell,
Tommy and Roger.
Funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. Wednesday,
April 3, 2013, at Page-
Theus Funeral Home,
Leesburg, Fla. A visitation
will be from 5 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday, April 2, 2013, at
the funeral home, with
burial to follow at Lone
Oak Cemetery, Leesburg,
Fla. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made in his
loving memory to HPH
Hospice House of Citrus
County Online condo-
lences may be made to
www.pagetheusfuneral
home.com.

INFORMATION
U Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or phone 352-563-
5660 for details.


Phil Ramone, Grammy-winning

producer, dead at 72


Associated Press

NEW YORK-Phil Ra-
mone, the masterful
Grammy Award-winning
engineer, arranger and
producer whose platinum
touch included recordings
with Ray Charles, Billy
Joel and Paul Simon, has
died at 72, his family said
Saturday
Ramone's son, Matt Ra-
mone, confirmed the
death. The family did not
immediately release de-
tails of the death, but Matt
Ramone said his father
was "very loving and will
be missed."
Few in the recording in-
dustry enjoyed a more
spectacular and diverse
career. Ramone won 14
competitive Grammy
Awards and one for life-
time achievement. World-
wide sales for his projects
topped 100 million. He
was at ease with rock, jazz,
swing and pop, working
with Frank Sinatra and
Aretha Franklin, Stevie
Wonder and Paul McCart-
ney, Elton John and Tony
Bennett, Madonna and
Lou Reed.
Ramone was on hand
for such classic albums as
The Band's "The Band"
and Bob Dylan's "Blood
On the Tracks." He pro-
duced three records that
went on to win Grammys
for album of the year -
Simon's "Still Crazy After
All These Years," Joel's
"52nd Street" and Charles'
"Genius Loves Company."
"I always thought of Phil
Ramone as the most tal-
ented guy in my band,"
Joel said in a statement.
"So much of my music was
shaped by him and
brought to fruition by him.
I have lost a dear friend -
and my greatest mentor"
Ramone also was a pio-
neer of digital recording
who produced what is re-
garded as the first major
commercial release on
compact disc, "52nd
Street," which came out
on CD in 1982. He was
even part of political his-

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


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Arts Advocacy Award honoree Phil Ramone attends the
2008 National Arts Awards presented by Americans For
The Arts in New York. Ramone, the Grammy Award-
winning engineer and producer whose platinum touch
included recordings with Ray Charles, Billy Joel and Paul
Simon, died at 72.


tory, advising presidential
administrations on how to
properly record a news
conference and helping to
arrange the storied 1962
party for John E Kennedy
at Madison Square Gar-
den that featured Marilyn
Monroe crooning "Happy
Birthday"
He thrived whether pro-
ducing music for the
stereo, television, film or
the stage. He won an
Emmy for a TV special
about Duke Ellington, a
Grammy for the sound-
track to the Broadway mu-
sical "Promises, Prom-
ises" and a Grammy for
the soundtrack to
"Flashdance."
He had uncanny in-
stincts and made an art
out of the "Duets" concept,
pairing Sinatra with Bono,
Luther Vandross and
other younger artists, Ben-
nett with McCartney and
Barbra Streisand, and
Charles with Bonnie Raitt
and Van Morrison. In Ra-
mone's memoir, "Making
Records," he recalled per-
suading a hesitant Sinatra
to re-record some of his
signature songs.
"I reminded Frank that
while Laurence Olivier


had performed Shake-
speare in his 20s, the read-
ings he did when he was in
his 60s gave them new
meaning," Ramone wrote.
"I spoke with conviction.
'Don't my children and
your grandchildren de-
serve to hear the way
you're interpreting your
classic songs now?"'
A request from Sinatra
led to another Ramone in-
novation: Singers per-
forming simultaneously
from separate studios.
A native of South Africa,
he seemed born to make
music. He had learned vi-
olin by age 3 and was
trained at The Juilliard
School in New York. Be-
fore age 20, he had opened
his own recording studio,
A&R Recording, where he
served as engineer for
such visiting artists as
Count Basie and Sarah
Vaughan. He had known
Quincy Jones since he was
a teenager and in his 20s
became close to Streisand.
By the end of the 1960s, he
had worked on "Midnight
Cowboy" and other movie
soundtracks and would
credit composer John
Barry with helping him
become a producer


J *OWC s S **CO% @-CS ,
C In fond memory of

* Louis a. Thiel
August 2, 1930 April 1, 2007

* Will always miss the twinkle in your .
. eyes and your smiling face. f
Your loving family &
0 0EDWT
*OCas* cs *4aO'@**% 4@t.*^ *


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


April to5 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
All meals include milk and
juice.
Breakfast
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits.
Wednesday: Sausage
and egg biscuit, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater
tots, cereal variety and toast.
Lunch
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, creamy
macaroni and cheese, yogurt
parfait plate, baked beans,
steamed broccoli, chilled
strawberry cups.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick,
spaghetti with ripstick, Very
Berry Super Salad with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, sweet green peas,
chilled mixed fruit.
Thursday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, nacho
rounds, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, chilled flavored apple-
sauce.
Friday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, mozzarella
maxstix, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, chilled pears.
Middle school
All meals include milk and
juice.
Breakfast
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots.
Friday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate break-
fast round, cereal and toast,
tater tots, grits.


Lunch
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, maca-
roni and cheese with roll,
turkey super salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, fresh
garden salad, steamed green
beans, flavored Craisins.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, ham-
burger, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, potato triangles,
chilled peach cups.
Thursday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, nacho
rounds, Very Berry Super
Salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
Mexicali corn, chilled flavored
applesauce.
Friday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, mozzarella
maxstix, PB dippers, fresh
garden salad, sweet peas,
chilled strawberry cups.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: No school.
Tuesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, nachos
with Spanish rice, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cold corn
salad, Mexicali corn, potato
roasters, baby carrots, straw-
berry cups, celery, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, fresh
turkey wrap, spaghetti with


ripstick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, pizza, ham salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, chilled baked
beans, baked beans, potato
triangles, flavored Craisins,
juice, milk.
Thursday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, oven-
baked breaded chicken with
rice, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, turkey
super salad with roll, maxstix,
yogurt parfait plate, garden
salad, green beans, baby
carrots, potato roasters, cu-
cumbers, strawberry cup,
juice, milk.
Friday: Chicken nuggets
with ripstick, barbecued
chicken sandwich, pizza,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, Very Berry Super Salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
potato triangles, peas, peach
cup, juice, milk.
SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced ham au
jus, mashed sweet potatoes,
California-blend vegetables,
grape juice, Easter cake,
whole-grain roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Three-bean
beef chili, parslied rice, yel-
low corn, raisins, wheat
crackers with margarine, low-
fat milk.
Wednesday: Egg salad
with lettuce, carrot and
tomato, marinated broccoli
salad, fresh orange, slice
whole-grain bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Salisbury steak
with brown gravy, garlic
mashed potatoes, green
peas, graham crackers, slice
rye bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Friday: Barbecued
chicken thigh, brown rice,
collard greens with turkey
ham, fresh orange, slice
cornbread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at 352-527-
5975.


Museum of Modern Body Art


I was at a doctor's office
in a small town recently
and overheard one pa-
tient in the waiting room
talking to another
"There are four tattoo
parlors on Main Street and
not one dress shop. Is it me,
or has the world run off the
track?"
"No, there's
still a dress shop
on Main Street,"
his friend said.
"It's in the back
of one of the tat-
too parlors."
There was a
time when peo-
ple would buy Ji
clothes to cover
up their tattoos. MUL
Now they buy
clothes to show them off.
The thong peeking above
the low-rise jeans worn by
a woman on a barstool
doesn't begin to cover her
butterfly tattoo. The guy in
the sleeveless T-shirt sitting
next to her has a green
snake coiled around his
arm.
There was a time when
you could live your whole
life, except for an outing to
the circus, and never meet
a woman with a tattoo.
Now all it takes is a trip to
the grocery store. Like so
many things, tattoos have
moved overnight from the
realm of renegades, delin-
quents and outlaws to the
world of PTAs, debutantes
and church picnics. I know
husbands and wives who
have given each other tats
as birthday presents:
"Honey, I love you so much
I'm paying to have a guy
stick needles into you all
afternoon. I hope it doesn't
get infected."


S -
GOT0
DEBTa
BT]ankrptIy
ma help!


Pau s iil P.A


II
-I


I'm not against tattoos.
I'm just wondering why they
have suddenly taken over
the world. Has "You can't
trust anyone without tats"
become the new "You can't
trust anyone over 30"?
Maybe, but I've seen plenty
of older people show up
with brand-new
body art. Now
it's something
you do to feel
younger
When your
child comes
Ilhome during his
first break as a
college fresh-
hM man, you can al-
most bet the
LEN farm he or she
will be sporting
new body art If you're
lucky, the new tattoo won't
be the first thing you see
when your kid walks
through the door
A tattoo used to mean you
were in a motorcycle gang.
Now it means you can af-
ford to go to college. Heck,
kids might be majoring in it
Surely today's tattoo artists
make more money than the
history, philosophy, fine arts
and English majors.
The good news is that
high-paying jobs in the tat-
too industry can't be out-
sourced to China. Tattooing
has to be done right here at
home by highly trained and
board-certified artists. No,
wait, I'm sorry; I was misin-
formed. Tattoos can be done


by almost anyone. Not that
there's any danger in it.
What's the worst that can
happen? You might have to
walk around with a tattoo of
"Mom" misspelled on your
bicep for a few months until
you can get it expensively
lasered off.
It's hard to watch a bas-
ketball or football game
without asking yourself,
when did all this happen?
Instead of watching the ball,
I am looking at the arms of
the players, inked from
wrist to shoulder, and trying
to figure out what the pic-
tures are. Some tattoos
seem to have inspirational
words mixed in among the
symbols and figures, but
things move so fast you can't
read them.
Here's the thing that re-
ally bothers me about tat-
toos. Now that the elders
have them, what will teens
have to do to freak out their
parents? Coming home
with your name tattooed in
Gothic typeface around
your neck isn't likely to
raise the hackles of some-
one who has done the same
thing. Maybe they'll rebel by
getting crew cuts and wear-
ing Perry Como sweaters
and taking dates to the hop.
Their parents will wring
their hands, wondering
what they did wrong.

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTENTION

FLORIDA

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IOALA LOATIN


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 A9





A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


SAGA
Continued from Page Al

was even born.
"Sarah's the third of
three children," said
Myrna Grady-Paul, Sarah's
mother. "It was 1995, I was
pregnant and I had an ul-
trasound appointment to
see if the baby was a boy or
girl."
The next thing she knew,
a doctor was telling her to
be at Shands Hospital in
Gainesville at 8 a.m. the
next day
The baby, whom she and
her husband named Sarah
Elizabeth, had CDH, con-
genital diaphragmatic her-
nia. She had a hole in her
diaphragm and her intes-
tines were up inside her
chest and her heart was
pushed to the side.
"The doctor said to pray
that her liver doesn't go up
into her chest," Grady-
Paul said.
But it had, which meant
the baby's chances of sur-
vival were slim.
"He said girl babies with
this condition do better
than boy babies, so I clung
to that hope," she said.
The four-month wait
until it was safe for Sarah
to be born was agonizing
for the family Grady-Paul
said she used to hug her
swollen belly and grieve.
"When she was born, I
was afraid to even look at
her," she said.
Immediately after her
birth, the tiny Sarah was
taken away and put on a
heart/lung bypass ma-
chine. On day seven, her
hernia was repaired. She
stayed on a scary machine
that needed constant mon-
itoring nurses shining
flashlights to make sure no
blood clots were forming.
"The first time I held her
was when she was 21 days
old," Grady-Paul said. "We
took her to church and the
pastor held her up like she
was Simba in 'The Lion
King.' So many people had
prayed for her We were so
happy she was alive."
She was alive, but like
many babies born with
CDH, she didn't swallow,
so she wouldn't feed. So,
Sarah went back into the
hospital to have a feeding
tube inserted.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
After a stroke, brain damage, years of seizures and several life-threatening surgeries, 17-year-old Sarah Paul is
nothing short of a miracle. Her most harrowing brain surgery to date was Dec. 10. Since then, Sarah has been
seizure-free. She is shown here with her mother, Myrna Grady-Paul.


"It was a simple surgery,
but she coded," Grady-
Paul said. "They did CPR
on her for 10 minutes.
They did a CAT scan on
her and found that she had
had a stroke.
"The stroke was huge,"
she said. "We didn't know
what she would be able to
do."
Sarah Paul lives her life
one-sided. The stroke left
her right arm and hand
paralyzed and her right leg
weak. She has some learn-
ing disability and some pe-
ripheral vision loss. She
probably will never drive.
But her left side is super
strong. She can do pretty
much anything herself ex-
cept tie her shoes.
When she was little she
played T-ball. She would
bat one-handed, somehow
using her weak right hand
to support her left hand.
She'd wear her glove on
her left hand, and if a ball
came, she'd put the glove
under her arm to take it


HEMISPHERECTOMY
* A hemispherectomy is a surgical procedure in
which half of the brain is removed or disconnected.
The deep structures of the brain (the thalamus,
brain stem and basal ganglia) are left intact.
Source: The Hemispherectomy Foundation


off, scoop up the ball and
throw it, then put the glove
back on.
"She never asks for
help," her mother said.
She was 12 when she
had her first seizure.
"I didn't know what it
was," Sarah said. "I was at
school, I think in the
fourth grade. I saw a fan
spinning out of the corner
of my eye."
After five or so years,
even with medication,
Sarah experienced partial-
complex seizures every
few days.
"Sometimes when it was
over, I didn't know where I
was," she said.
She became anxious, al-
ways anticipating the next
seizure. She would become


afraid of seeing ceiling fans
or flashing lights, afraid
they would be a trigger
On the other hand, for
her 10th birthday she did a
300-foot drop on a Sky
Coaster ride with her dad,
Matthew, a law enforce-
ment officer in Tallahas-
see, and she loves riding
Space Mountain at Disney
World.
MEN
All Sarah wanted for
Christmas was to be
seizure-free.
She was "maxed out" on
medications. They were
supposed to control her
seizures, and they did to
some extent, but there


would probably never be
an improvement.
"One of the big fears is
that the seizures would go
to the other side of her
brain," Myrna Grady-Paul
said. "Before her surgery,
they were just in the dam-
aged part. That made it a
little easier to agree to the
surgery."
Easier, but not easy
There was a good chance
Sarah would suffer an-
other stroke during the
risky hemispherectomy
She could be paralyzed.
She could die.
"This was different from
the surgery when she was
born," Grady-Paul said. "I
knew I might lose her then,
but there was no choice.
She had to have the sur-
gery or she would die. This
one was a choice. We
could've kept on with
meds and dealt with the
seizures, but she really
hated them."


READ MORE
See Page All for how
mom Myrna Grady-
Paul wrote about
Sarah Paul's saga in
her own words.

The weekend before her
surgery, Sarah went to the
Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa
and fed some birds. At
school, she had her picture
taken with friends.
"I was nervous, but
happy at the same time,"
she said.
The surgery at All Chil-
dren's Hospital went well.
For Sarah's family, Christ-
mas came early when she
woke up and knew her
name.
"The best thing in the
world was when she
moved her right foot," her
mother said, "because
that's what we thought she
might lose.
"Every little thing she
did from the day we
brought her home as a
baby has been a miracle to
us," she said.
imo
All Sarah wanted was to
be seizure-free, and so far
she is. Three months since
her surgery, she's getting
used to the idea that
they're gone. Her mother
said she seems lighter
now, as if a great weight
has been lifted from her.
"I didn't realize how
much she worried about
them," Grady-Paul said.
"Sometimes I used to
have them in my sleep,"
Sarah said. "Now when I
wake up, I don't think
about them."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Prior to Sarah Paul's
Dec. 10 delicate brain sur-
gery, her mother, Myrna
Grady-Paul, set up a Team
Sarah Paul Facebook page.
Here are some snippets
about Sarah's birth and the
most recent surgery:
* I remember hugging my
belly as hard as I could and
crying for the baby I thought
I might lose. I wanted her to
stay inside of me where she
was safe, but of course, that
was unrealistic ... but this
didn't seem real, either. The
birth defect that threatened
our daughter affects one in
every 2,500 babies and has
a 50 percent survival rate. ...
Our precious girl, chosen by
God to be ours, would be
very sick. I didn't know how
long we'd get to keep her,
but I knew she was a gift
and I was grateful. Her
name, Sarah Elizabeth,
means "Princess, pledged
to God."
* Our daughter would be
born on Tuesday, Aug. 1, if
there was enough surfactant
in her lungs and there
was, just barely. At
4:22 p.m., Sarah Elizabeth
Paul was born. I heard the
tiniest, sweetest little cry,
but I didn't think it was her
because they told me she
wouldn't be able to cry. I
was too scared to look at
her, or touch her.
* For the next 10 days we
waited in vigil by her bed-
side, holding Matthew and
Meagan up high to see her,
their eyes looking adoringly
past the tubes and wires to
the beautiful baby sister
that they waited so long to
meet. How, I wondered,
would I ever be able to tell
them that we might not be
able to bring her home?


* Dec.10, 2012, hours after
Sarah's surgery: Sarah is
still sleeping. They woke her
to do their assessment when
she arrived in PICU and she
followed commands, moved
BOTH feet, a function they
thought she would lose, and
told them her birthday. She
is resting and her color is
improving. Will know better
when she wakes up if any-
thing was affected. In the
meantime, I'll sit and stare
at her.
* Dec. 13, 2012: Today she
took 4 steps and sat in the
chair. Yesterday she smiled.
Today she laughed. Tonight
she lifted her swollen eyelids
so she could watch Carrie
Underwood sing her favorite
song, "How Great Thou Art."
And she didn't sing out loud
to it, but she moved her lips.
I think she's progressing
well, in God's time. I'm
tired, but I don't want to
miss a moment.
* Dec. 20, 2012: She's in-
credible, inspiring, deter-
mined. She reminds me of
my dad. He had a stroke,
too, back in 1984. Sarah's
was in 1995 when she was
only 6 weeks old. They faced
many of the same chal-
lenges and they both over-
came them all.
* Dec. 31, 2012: We have
been blessed! What a way to
end the year! It's been three
weeks today since Sarah's
surgery and she says she's
feeling like herself again! It
is my prayer that God will
continue to heal her and
give her strength in 2013.
To read more of Sarah Paul's
saga, visit Team Sarah Paul
on Facebook (https://www.
facebook.com/?reftn_tnmn#!
/ Tea mSarah Paul?frefts)


Supercomputer to shut down


Associated Press
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
It's the end of the line
for Roadrunner, a first-of-
its-kind collection of
processors that once
reigned as the world's
fastest supercomputer.
The $121 million super-
computer, housed at one
of the nation's premier nu-
clear weapons research
laboratories in northern
New Mexico, will be de-
commissioned today.
The reason? The world
of supercomputing is
evolving and Roadrunner
has been replaced with
something smaller, faster,
more energy efficient and
cheaper Still, officials at
Los Alamos National
Laboratory say it's among
the 25 fastest supercom-
puters in the world.
"Roadrunner got
everyone thinking in new
ways about how to build
and use a supercom-
puter," said Gary Grider,
who works in the lab's
high performance com-
puting division. "Special-
ized processors are being
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included in new ways on
new systems and being
used in novel ways. Our
demonstration with Road-
runner caused everyone
to pay attention."
In 2008, Roadrunner
was first to break the elu-
sive petaflop barrier by
processing more than a
quadrillion mathematical
calculations per second.
Los Alamos teamed up
with IBM to build Road-
runner from commer-
cially available parts.
They ended up with 278
refrigerator-size racks
filled with two different
types of processors, all
linked together by 55
miles of fiber optic cable.


It took nearly two dozen
tractor trailer trucks to
deliver the supercom-
puter from New York to
northern New Mexico.
The supercomputer has
been used in the past five
years to model viruses
and unseen parts of the
universe, to better under-
stand lasers and for nu-
clear weapons work.
There will be no cere-
mony when Roadrunner
is switched off Sunday,
but lab officials said re-
searchers will spend the
next month experiment-
ing with its operating sys-
tem and techniques for
compressing memory be-
fore dismantling begins.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 All





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The South: A near-solid

block against 'Obamacare'


Associated Press
ATLANTA As more Republicans
give in to President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul, an opposition bloc
remains across the South, including from
governors who lead some of the nation's
poorest and unhealthiest states.
"Not in South Carolina," Gov. Nikki
Haley declared at the recent Conserva-
tive Political Action Conference. "We will
not expand Medicaid on President
Obama's watch. We will not expand Med-
icaid ever."
Widening Medicaid insurance rolls, a
joint federal-state program for low-
income Americans, is an anchor of the
law Obama signed in 2010. But states get
to decide whether to take the deal, and
from Virginia to Texas a region en-
compassing the old Confederacy and
Civil War border states Florida's Rick
Scott is the only Republican governor to
endorse expansion, and he faces opposi-
tion from his GOP colleagues in the
Florida Legislature. Tennessee's Bill
Haslam, the Deep South's last governor
to take a side, added his name to the op-
position Wednesday
Haley offers the common explanation,
saying expansion will "bust our budgets."
But the policy reality is more compli-
cated. The hospital industry and other
advocacy groups continue to tell GOP
governors that expansion would be a
good arrangement, and there are signs
that some Republicans are trying to find
ways to expand insurance coverage
under the law.
Haslam told Tennessee lawmakers
he'd rather use any new money to subsi-
dize private insurance. That's actually
the approach of another anchor of
Obama's law: insurance exchanges
where Americans can buy private poli-
cies with premium subsidies from
taxpayers.
Yet for now, governors' rejection of
Medicaid expansion will leave large
swaths of Americans without coverage
because they make too much money to
qualify for Medicaid as it exists, but not
enough to get the subsidies to buy insur-
ance in the exchanges. Many public
health studies show the same population
suffers from higher-than-average rates of
obesity, smoking and diabetes vari-
ables yielding bad health outcomes and
expensive hospital care.
"Many of the citizens who would bene-
fit the most from this live in the reddest of
states with the most intense opposition,"
said Drew Altman, president of the non-
partisan Kaiser Family Foundation.
So why are these states holding out?
The short-term calculus seems heavily
influenced by politics.
Haley, Haslam, Nathan Deal of Georgia


and Robert Bentley of Alabama face re-
election next year. Mississippi Gov Phil
Bryant is up for re-election in 2015.
Louisiana Gov Bobby Jindal is term-lim-
ited at home, but may seek the presi-
dency in 2016. While they all govern
GOP-leaning states, they still must safe-
guard their support among Republican
voters who dislike large-scale federal ini-
tiatives in general and distrust Obama in
particular. Florida's Scott, the South's
GOP exception on expansion, faces a dif-
ferent dynamic. He won just 49 percent
of the vote in 2010 and must face an elec-
torate that twice supported Obama.
iME
At the Tennessee Hospital Association,
president Craig Becker has spent months
trying to break through that barrier as he
travels to civic and business groups
across Tennessee.
"It's really hard for some of them to
separate something that has the name
'Obamacare' on it from what's going to be
best for the state," he said, explaining
personality-driven politics are easier to
understand than the complicated way the
U.S. pays for health care.
Medicaid is financed mostly by Con-
gress, though states have to put in their
own money to qualify for the cash from
Washington. The federal amount is de-
termined by a state's per-capita income,
with poorer states getting more help. On
average in 2012, the feds paid 57 cents of
every Medicaid dollar It was 74 cents in
Mississippi, 71 in Kentucky, 70 in
Arkansas and South Carolina, 68 in Ala-
bama. Those numbers would be even
higher counting bonuses from Obama's
2009 stimulus bill.
Obama's law mandated that states
open Medicaid to everyone with house-
hold income up to 138 percent of the fed-
eral poverty rate $15,420 a year for an
individual or $31,812 for a family of four
The federal government would cover all
costs of new Medicaid patients from 2014
to 2016 and pick up most of the price tag
after that, requiring states to pay up to 10
percent. The existing Medicaid popula-
tion would continue under the old for-
mula. In its ruling on the law, the
Supreme Court left the details alone, but
declared that states could choose
whether to expand.
Hospital and physician lobbying
groups around the country have en-
dorsed a bigger Medicaid program.
Becker said he explains on his road
show that the Obama law paired Medi-
caid growth with cuts to payments to hos-
pitals for treating the uninsured.
Just as they do with Medicaid insur-
ance, states already must contribute their
own money in order to get federal help
with those so-called "uncompensated
care" payments.


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A12 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


NATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cottontail could meet trail's end


Habitat disappearing for once-bountiful bunny


Associated Press
The New England cot-
tontail was once so com-
mon that Massachusetts
author Thornton Burgess
adapted one named Peter
for the children's stories
he penned a century ago.
But the critter that in-
spired "The Adventures of
Peter Cottontail" and the
enduring song that came
later faces an uncertain fu-
ture. Its natural habitat is
disappearing, and without
intervention, it could be
unhappy trails for the
once-bountiful bunny
Conservationists are
hoping a new program to
restore shrub lands across
the Northeast and captive
breeding efforts will help
ensure the New England
cottontail sticks around for


many Easters to come.
"We're making headway,
putting habitat on the
ground in some really key
places," said Anthony Tur,
an endangered species
specialist for the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service. "It's
encouraging."
New England cottontails
were abundant a century
ago, thriving in an envi-
ronment of shrubs,
saplings, weeds and vines
known as young forest. But
in an uncommon turn of
events, it is declining
human activity to blame
for its lost habitat not
urban sprawl.
As neglected agricul-
tural lands reverted back
to forest and those forests
matured, the population of
New England cottontails
thinned. More than 80 per-


cent of their habitat disap-
peared over the past 50
years, according to the
nonprofit Wildlife Man-
agement Institute.
And now conservation-
ists are trying to prevent
the New England cotton-
tail from appearing on the
endangered species list, a
designation that would re-
quire a more urgent- and
costly response that
could restrict land use and
hunting.
The Fish and Wildlife
Service and the National
Resources Conservation
Service are working with
landowners and zoos to re-
store natural habitat and
use captive breeding to re-
build the population.
The government has
been conducting habitat
management and restora-


tion projects for several
years in collaboration with
private landowners, land
trusts and a few Native
American tribes as they try
to bring back the New Eng-
land cottontail.
The New England cot-
tontail is the only rabbit
species native to the region
east of the Hudson River
And while it has struggled
to deal with the changing
landscape, a slightly larger
cousin has thrived.
Imported to the region
for hunting in the early
20th century, the Eastern
cottontail has larger eyes
that have enabled it to
avoid predators better It
multiplied steadily and is
now the dominant species
in the Northeast, often
popping up on roadsides
and in gardens.


Associated Press
Wildlife officials said the New England cottontail could
soon face extinction due to diminishing shrublands
across the Northeast. The only rabbit species indigenous
to the region lost more than 80 percent of its habitat over
the past 50 years.


For conservationists,
protecting the New Eng-
land cottontail from ex-
tinction is worthy in and of
itself. But habitat restora-


tion also benefits the
dozens of other species
that thrive in shrub lands,
including songbirds,
snakes, deer and turkey


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Egg hunt


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


World BRIEFS

Rescued


Associated Press
Tyler Robison, 3, of
Bremerton finds a use for
his candy bucket before
the start of the Eagles
egg hunt Saturday at
Forest Ridge Park in
Bremerton, Wash.


Dozens indicted in
cheating scandal
ATLANTA- A grand jury
has indicted about three
dozen educators in a stan-
dardized test cheating scan-
dal that rocked Atlanta's
public school system.
The indictment of the for-
mer system employees was
announced Friday after-
noon. The cheating scandal
was one of the largest in
the nation.
A 2011 investigation
found cheating on stan-
dardized tests by nearly
180 educators in 44 Atlanta
schools. Investigators say
educators gave answers to
students or changed an-
swers on tests after they
were turned in. Investiga-
tors say teachers who tried
to report the cheating faced
retaliation, creating a cul-
ture of "fear and
intimidation."
Former Superintendent
Beverly Hall was among
those indicted. She faces
charges including racket-
eering, making false state-
ments and theft. She has
previously denied the alle-
gations, and her attorney
couldn't immediately be
reached Friday.


PATERSON, N.J.-A
judge has temporarily stayed
a child support warrant is-
sued for the New Jersey
man who just won a $338
million Powerball jackpot.
Authorities said 44-year-
old Pedro Quezada owes
about $29,000 in back child
support.
Passaic County Sheriff
Richard Berdnik announced
Saturday the warrant has
been stayed until 1:30 p.m.
Monday, when Quezada is
due to appear before state
Superior Court Judge Ernest
Caposela in Paterson.
Quezada claimed a
lump-sum payment on
Tuesday worth $221 million,
or about $152 million after
taxes. Sheriff's department
spokesman Bill Maer said
the state Lottery Division
generally satisfies such
judgments before winnings
are released.
Man killed after
fall from plane
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn.
-Authorities in Tennessee
have found the body of a
man who was thrown from
an experimental aircraft
while an instructor was
teaching him to fly.
Bradley County Interim
Fire Chief Troy Spence said
search crews located the
deceased student pilot at
about 11:45 a.m. Saturday.
He declined to release the
man's name.
Collegedale Municipal
Airport employee Lowell
Sterchi told the Chat-
tanooga Times Free Press
the man was being trained
by an instructor in his Zo-
diac 601 aircraft on Friday
when the canopy came off.
The instructor also was not
identified.
The man's seat belt was
not fastened and he was
thrown out of the plane.
Sterchi said the instructor
landed the plane and was
not physically hurt.
-From wire reports


Pope Francis baptizes a man Saturday during the Easter vigil service in St. Peter's Basilica at the




Pope presides over



Easter vigil service


Associated Press
VATICAN CITY Pope Fran-
cis celebrated a trimmed-back
Easter Vigil service Saturday
after having reached out to Mus-
lims and women during a Holy
Week in which he began to put his
mark on the Catholic Church.
Francis processed into a dark-
ened and silent St. Peter's Basil-
ica at the start of the service, in
which the faithful recall the pe-
riod between Christ's crucifixion
on Good Friday and resurrection
on Easter Sunday
One of the most dramatic mo-
ments of the Easter Vigil service
that usually follows when the
pope would share the light of his
candle with others until the en-
tire basilica twinkled was
shortened this year as were some


of the Old Testament readings.
The Vatican has said these pro-
visions were in keeping with
Francis' aim to not have his
Masses go on too long. The Easter
Vigil service under Benedict XVI
would typically run nearly three
hours. The new pope has made
clear he prefers his Masses short
and to the point: he was even
caught checking his watch during
his March 19 installation cere-
mony Saturday was no different:
The vigil ended just shy of 2.5
hours.
A trimmed-back vigil and
one that started earlier than
usual was just one of the novel-
ties of this Holy Week under an
Argentine Jesuit pope who just
two weeks ago stunned the world
by emerging from the loggia of St.
Peter's Basilica after his election


with a simple "Brothers and sis-
ters, good evening."
He riled traditionalists but en-
deared himself to women and lib-
erals by washing and kissing the
feet of two young girls during a
Holy Thursday Mass at a juvenile
detention center in Rome, when
the rite usually calls for only men
to participate. A day later, Francis
reached out with friendship to
"Muslim brothers and sisters"
during a Good Friday procession
dedicated to the suffering of
Christians from terrorism, war
and religious fanaticism in the
Middle East.
In his homily Saturday, Francis
kept his message simple and tied
to the liturgical readings, recall-
ing how Jesus' disciples found his
tomb empty a day after his death
and were surprised and confused.


Full-scale conflict unlikely


Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea -
North Korea warned Seoul
on Saturday that the Ko-
rean Peninsula had entered
"a state of war" and threat-
ened to shut down a border
factory complex that's the
last major symbol of inter-
Korean cooperation.
Analysts said a full-scale
conflict is extremely un-
likely, noting the Korean
Peninsula has remained in
a technical state of war for
60 years. But the North's
continued threats toward
Seoul and Washington, in-
cluding a vow to launch a
nuclear strike, have raised
worries that a misjudg-
ment between the sides
could lead to a clash.
In Washington, the White
House said Saturday that


the United States is taking
seriously the new threats
by North Korea but also
noted Pyongyang's history
of "bellicose rhetoric."
North Korea's threats
are seen as efforts to pro-
voke the new government
in Seoul, led by President
Park Geun-hye, to change
its policies toward Py-
ongyang, and to win diplo-
matic talks with
Washington that could get
it more aid. North Korea's
moves are also seen as
ways to build domestic
unity as young leader Kim
Jong Un strengthens his
military credentials.
On Thursday, U.S. mili-
tary officials revealed two
B-2 stealth bombers
dropped dummy muni-
tions on an uninhabited
South Korean island as


Associated Press
A man uses binoculars Saturday to watch North Korean
territory at the unification observation post near the bor-
der village of Panmunjom, that has separated the two
Koreas since the Korean War.


part of annual defense
drills that Pyongyang sees
as rehearsals for invasion.
Hours later, Kim ordered
his generals to put rockets
on standby and threatened
to strike American targets
if provoked.
North Korea said in a


statement Saturday that
it would deal with South
Korea according to
"wartime regulations"
and would retaliate
against any provocations
by the United States and
South Korea without
notice.


Man jumps on tracks, saves stranger from train


Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA- The
recovering drug addict
with a long rap sheet who
had just sat down on the
bench at a north Philadel-
phia train station often
wondered if he was a good
person, and perhaps
never considered anyone
thought he was a hero.
But there was no self-
doubt when Christopher
Knafelc's instincts kicked
in Thursday and he leaped
onto the tracks to help a
complete stranger he'd
just seen flail and fall off
the platform.
Now, Knafelc, 32, is
being hailed as a hero and
he's holding his head a lit-
tle higher, viewing the
good deed he did, and the
praise that followed, as an-
other sign he is on the
right path in life.
"It did help reinforce that


I'm a good person," Knafelc
told The Associated Press
in an interview Friday at his
mother's south Philadel-
phia apartment "I ques-
tioned that a lot because of
my colorful past"
Still, Knafelc deflected
the praise by saying he
was just doing the "right
thing."
Knafelc said he has bat-
tled substance abuse in-
cluding heroin and the
powerful pain drug Oxy-
Contin since he was in
middle school in Baden, a
small town outside Pitts-
burgh, and spent years in
and out of rehab.
"I created a pretty deep
hole to come out of," he
said.
Court records show
Knafelc pleaded guilty in
2010 in Pennsylvania to
charges of theft, driving
under the influence, child
endangerment and driving


Christopher Knafelc, 32, rescued a man who had fallen off
a platform in a north Philadelphia subway station.


without a license. Two
years ago, he came to
Philadelphia, where his
mother and a cousin live,
to get a fresh start, he said.
He said he has been
sober since 10 days after
his daughter's birth in July
2010, when he picked her
up from her crib and she
smiled at him.


"That was the most pow-
erful thing I've ever felt in
my life to this day,"
Knafelc said. "It was better
than any high from drugs."
On Thursday afternoon,
he instinctively jumped
down to help the man on
the tracks, knowing that a
train would be arriving
any minute.


Associated Press
Forest guards rescue a
full grown leopard
Saturday from a residential
area in Gauhati, India.
According to the locals,
the leopard came from a
nearby hill in search of
food. The animal had
some serious injuries.


Bomb threat
clears Eiffel Tower
PARIS -The Eiffel
Tower was evacuated Sat-
urday night after an anony-
mous caller phoned in a
bomb threat, police said.
Nearly 1,400 people
were sent away from the
tourist attraction following a
request from tower opera-
tors after the warning, a
Paris police official said. Po-
lice then searched the mon-
ument with sniffer dogs,
and set up a security
perimeter.
No explosives were
found and the site was to
be reopened, the official
said on condition of
anonymity because she
wasn't authorized to speak
publicly.
French authorities have
stepped up counterterror-
ism measures in recent
weeks amid heightened
concern about threats to
France over its military
campaign against al-Qaida-
linked fighters in Mali which
began more than two
months ago.
Official: Mandela
breathing easier
JOHANNESBURG -A
South African official said
Nelson Mandela is breath-
ing "without difficulty" after
having a procedure to clear
fluid in his lung area that
was caused by pneumonia.
South African presidential
spokesman Mac Maharaj
said Saturday the fluid had
been "tapped," allowing the
former president to breathe
more easily.
Maharaj described the
fluid problem as a "pleural
effusion."
He said Mandela, 94, is
suffering from pneumonia,
using a different term for his
ailment. Officials have pre-
viously said Mandela, who
was taken to a hospital on
Wednesday night, has a re-
curring lung infection.
Shroud of Turin
goes on display
VATICAN CITY The
Shroud of Turin went on
display for a special TV
appearance amid new re-
search purporting to date
the linen some said was
Jesus' burial cloth to
around the time of his
death.
Pope Francis sent a spe-
cial video message to the
event in Turin's cathedral,
which coincided with Holy
Saturday, when Catholics
mark the period between
Christ's crucifixion on Good
Friday and his resurrection
on Easter Sunday.
The Vatican has tiptoed
around just what the cloth
is, calling it a powerful sym-
bol of Christ's suffering
while making no claim to its
authenticity.
Francis toed that line
Saturday, calling the cloth
an "icon" not a relic.
Many experts stand by
carbon-dating of scraps of
the cloth that date it to the
13th or 14th century.
-From wire reports


Powerball winner build two K
$29K in arrears Tensions build in two Koreas











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes
can be found on
Page A17 of
today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


In oc nEa


Ed


Reflections on fascinating visit to Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia


65aion (HWo Chi M4inh City)
aniT the South
After 24 hours of air travel, we
were more than ready to get off the
plane and see a guide with our name
on a board to collect us and whisk us
away. Our hotel in Saigon was near
the river and in the heart of the
downtown district Saigon has 9 mil-
lion people and driving around here
is exhausting. The few roads that
exist have way too many little scoot-
ers zipping around, in a chaotic fash-
ion, seeming to follow no traffic laws.
As a former New York cab driver, I
don't think I am brave enough to
drive here.
The economy is booming as a re-
sult of the loosening of economic re-
strictions by the communist party
after 1987. People are free to move
around the country and live and
work where they want. But there is
still little freedom of speech or real
democracy, as only the Communist
party is recognized.
In central Vietnam we visited Hoi
An, which has much of its old Chi-
nese area intact. China Beach is a
booming beach district with luxury
resorts starting to take root in the
area.
As we drive from Hoi An to Hue
through Da Nang, the weather
changes as you cross the central
mountain ranges that separate north
and south Vietnam. Hue was the
home of the Vietnamese emperors
during the 1700 and 1800s. They lived
in an "Imperial City" called the
Citadel, similar to Beijing's "Forbid-
den City" Much of it has been saved
and restored.

4Hanoi anb the WNorth
We then flew to Haiphong, the Gulf
of Tonkin and the Halong Bay area.
Halong Bay is a geologic wonder that
is amazing to see. Towering lime-
stone formations dot the bay Hanoi
still has its old-town district with a
maze of tiny streets impossible to


navigate, filled with thousands of
shops. We travelled by cyclo (bicycle
carriage) through the old district, as
it is difficult to walk on the sidewalks
with almost every square inch of
pavement occupied by street ven-
dors. They honor the tradition of
Buddhism, but I really did not sense
that most are practicing Buddhists.

Laos
Laos, the "Million Elephant
Kingdom," has only 5 million people,
compared to the 90 million in Viet-
nam. The average wage here is less
than $1,000 a year No traffic, hardly
any scooters to dodge. While most
villages have no electricity, we still
found Internet access many places
and saw TV's running off of car
batteries.
Luang Prabang is a city that has re-
tained much of its historical look and
feel. It was the original capital city
with hundreds of Wats (temples).
They really take Buddhism seriously
here. It is part of everyday life. Most
boys train as monks for a year or two.
Every town has at least one Buddhist
temple.
Our hotel was right in the heart of
the city At 4 a.m., I thought we were
under attack but it turned out to be
the temple next door beating the
wakeup drums for the novice monks.
We went out to the streets and joined
the locals as they offered alms (rice)
to the monks at 5:30 a.m.
The town is physically beautiful,
dominated by the surrounding hill-
sides and the Mekong River The
Mekong River defines the border for
much of the country on the west be-
tween China, Myanmar, Thailand and
Cambodia before emptying into
Vietnam.
Eco-tourism is really starting to
take off with hiking trips, as well as
kayaking the Mekong. Luang Prabang
is a fragile place and it is hard to
think of it remaining the same as
tourism increases.
We flew to Vientiane, the capital
city A brief tour of the city revealed
some fabulous Stupas and a quiet,
unhurried city Vientiane is in the
lowlands compared to the mountain-
ous region around Luang Prabang.
Laos is still feeling the effects from
the constant bombing from 1964 to
1973. More bombs were dropped on
this country than what were used on
Europe during World War II. The
problem now is lots of unexploded
ordnance.

Cambo[ia
We stay in Siem Reap, a town just
outside of the Angkor Wat complex,
which should be on everyone's must-
see list. The temples in the complex
are enormous, dating from the 10th


* View a two-minute sampler
of more pictures posted on
YouTube: http://bschwartz.
net/indochina.


Traditional dancers at the ready in Cambodia.


century, built by the Khmer people,
who were probably originally from
northern India.
The structures were built as Hindu
temples and this area, at its peak,
was one of the largest cities in the
world. For its age and considering
how poorly it has been guarded
through constant wars and extreme
poverty, it is still an amazing site with
many bas-relief sculptures covering
the walls depicting Hindu legends.
We timed the visit for sunset to see
the colors as they changed on the Wat
walls. We saw a performance of the
Apsara traditional dance with its in-
tricate finger movements. The
dancers train by stretching fingers
and expanding joint connections


when they are very young.
We also toured a floating village on
the largest Cambodian Lake. The
poverty and filth the people live with
takes your breath away Once you get
outside of the tourist areas, you see
how poor the country is.
-0
Barry Schwartz and his wife, Bette,
live at the end of Ozello Trail with
their mountain-climbing dog, Rowdy.
They are retired teachers who now
split their time between Ozello and
the Colorado Mountains. During the
past 30-plus years, they have hiked,
climbed, scuba dived, sailed or
driven through at least 50 countries.
Email: schwartzbb@gmail.com.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub- Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize. fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
the trip. Accent Travel Office.


'FotYote5 ...

The Southeast Asian countries have been scarred by constant occupation, war
and poverty. China and Siam (now Thailand) occupied the region for hundreds of
years until the French and British split the area as part of their colonization of the
area in the late 1800s. India and Burma (now Myanmar) went to the Brits and
Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam to the French as Indochina. Siam became Thailand,
as a buffer between the two colonial giants.
World War II saw the Japanese occupy the area, but after the war, the French
moved back in until the battle of Dien Bien Phu drove them from the region. In
Vietnam our guide mentioned how difficult it was during the hard times caused when
the communists first took over the south in 1975 and "re-educated" many. In Laos
the Pathet Lao (Communist party) took over the country and "re-educated" the king.
It now operates as the People's Democratic Republic, but is not very democratic, as
it is a one-party system (Communist party).
But the people seem to do what they want and for the past 20 years, policies have
become more open and entrepreneurial. In Cambodia, the Khmer Rouge
communists (led by Pol Pot) staged a civil war in 1975 and ruled Cambodia for about
15 years with a brutal history of re-educating and killing almost 2 million people. Now
Cambodia has elections with at least 10 political parties, but you wonder how open
the elections are, since the same man has been president for 30 years.
While it was rather arduous getting to Southeast Asia, it was well worth the effort.


m






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Son's meltdown


causes concern


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 31, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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TRAV 9 54 9 44 Hamburger Paradise Drive Thru Paradise Trip Flip Trip Flip Beach-n-RVs'PG' MegaYachts (N) 'PG' Jamaica Bared 'PG'
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(WGA 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Chicago Bulls. (N) |Mother News |Replay 30 Rock |30 Rock


D earAnnie: I took a
job at a local book-
store after my po-
sition as a special ed
teacher was downsized.
Now I have a "special ed"
problem at work.
A woman comes in
here once a week with
her son, a mentally chal-
lenged adult. The son is
big and heavy, and his
mother is tiny
and fragile.
Every time
they are here,
the son has a
meltdown.
Today, he k
threw himself
on the floor,
blocking the
checkout
area, and
wouldn't get
up.
I'm used to ANNI
dealing with MAIL
special needs
kids in a
school, but not adults in a
retail establishment
Would it be wrong to
tell his mother we cannot
accommodate her son in
our store the next time
they show up? I realize if
we bar him, it makes us
look mean, but we have a
business to run.
A member of our staff
suggested to the boss that
we make them leave, but
I advised against it If we
can't get him to go volun-
tarily, we would have to
physically escort him to
the sidewalk, and he
would probably struggle.
If he gets hurt in the


SToday's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4:20 p.m.
No passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:10, 7:30 p.m. No passes.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation"
(PG-13) 1:20,4:30, 7:20 p.m.
"The Host" (PG-13)
12:50 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05 p.m.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
1 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 4:40 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 3:50 p.m.
"Oz" (PG) In 3D. 12:45 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Admission" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:05 p.m.


"The Croods" (PG) 4:30 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:30 p.m., 7 p.m.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) 4:10 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"G.I. Joe" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No
passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
1:20 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
7:30 p.m.
"Oz" (PG) In 3D. 4:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Tyler Perry's Temptation"
(PG-13) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:35 p.m.
"The Call" (R) 2 p.m., 5 p.m.,
8 p.m.
"The Host" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Poetry
6 Abrasive
11 Mischievous child
16 Blueprints
21 Bay window
22 Stopped snoozing
23 Reef material
24 Restrict
25 Yummy
26 Admit (2 wds.)
27 nous
28 Computer maker
29 Compass pt.
30 Kind of statesman
31 Gambling stake
32 Play part
34 Edgar Masters
35 Of teeth
38 Bishop's hat
40 Immediately!
41 Telepathy (abbr.)
42 Camel feature
44 Mention
45 Devilkin
47 In medias -
49 Squeaking sound
52 Gather together
54 Fly
56 Khayyam
60 Spare
61 Neither canned nor
frozen
62 Summit
63 Greet on arrival
65 CIA predecessor
66 Swift
67 Vehicle on runners
68 Ship of 1492
69 Excavate
70 Contend
71 Relative standing
72 Kind of poker
73 That fellow's
74 Kea
76 Farthest
78 Edible mollusk
79 Crooked
80 Firebug's crime
81 Printing need
82 Salver
83 Drill
84 Abbr. in business
85 Odor
88 Say grace
89 Phobia
90 Hold spellbound
94 Page or LuPone
95 Massage


96 Two performers
97 Shower alternative
98 Garden implement
99 A wood
100 A Great Lake
102 Essential-
103 firma
104 Go wrong
105 Played the lead
107 Lubricates
108 Baby grand
109 Den
110 Bill of fare
111 At a great cost
113 Greek island
114 The present time
115 Crazy
117 Itinerary (abbr.)
118 Witching -
119 Portal
121 Science workroom, for
short
124 Escritoire
126 Hits hard
128 Not yet finished
132 Stone or space
133 Letters in genetics
134 Deer
135 Disconnect
139 Cushion
140 Magnate
142 Bring home the -
144 Threadlike
145 Object
147 Penniless
148 African antelope
149 Foundation
150 Little bit
151 Filled
152 Appraises
153 Lacking sense
154 Brought to bay


DOWN
1 Cast a ballot
2 Efface
3 Gone up
4 Harden
5 Isle of-
6 Auditorium
7 Filled
with solemn fear
8 Memory alone
9 Dispute
10 Farm bird
11 Site
12 Artificial
13 Commedia dell'-


14 Spoil
15 Garment fold
16 Nebraska river
17 Backtalk
18 More than
adequate
19 "The Nanny"
butler
20 Precipitous
30 Slippery -
31 Dined
33 Move uncontrolled
36 Larger life
37 Diving bird
39 "- a girl!"
40 Spring
43 Mom or pop
44 Throw
46 Commingle
48 Relative of an org.
49 Garlic piece
50 Copal or amber, e.g.
51 Facilitated
53 Timid
54 Copied
55 Dickens' "Oliver -"
57 operandi
58 Kind of acid
59 King Lear's daughter
61 Bottle
62 Former student, for
short
64 Region of Spain (2
wds.)
66 Undeveloped area
67 Remain
68 Playing card
72 Kill
73 Mister, in Munich
75 Ogee
77 After-dinner candy
78 Grouch
79 Catamaran
82 Test question
answer
83 Edible root
84 Musical passage
85 Muscle contraction
86 Class
87 "- Frome"
88 Self-esteem
89 Bother
90 Merited
91 In front
92 Waterwheel
93 Fabric for towels
96 Properly
97 Outdo
101 Blush


Turning point
One layer among many
Hard liquor
Table scrap
Old European
Master
Biblical boat
Gear tooth
Measure of weight
Confused
Embrace


"- Town"
Gentle ones
Where Greeks
assembled
Sired
Sword
Touches down
Think
John Garner
Moved little
by little


Begone!
Lanchester or Schiapar-
elli
Conceited
Gaelic
Stringed instrument, for
short
Neighbor of Tenn.
Govt. agency
Kid
"Ben- -"


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


process, we'd be sued. I
also advised against call-
ing the police, because
things could get even
more physically rough.
I suggested to the boss
that we wait for the next
time they come to the
store and politely refuse
entry
Do you have any sug-
gestions on how to deal
with these
adults when
they are on out-
ings? New
York Problem
Dear New
York: We con-
tacted the med-
ical director of
the National
Alliance on
Mental Illness
(NAMI), who
said you're to
IE'S be commended
BOX for your sensi-
tivity in not let-
ting a
meltdown escalate into a
physical confrontation.
In this case, the request
can be raised gently with
the mother the next time
she and her son come
into the store.
To avoid discriminat-
ing against a medical con-
dition, the store owner
should state that they are
welcome to return when
they are able to properly
manage the son's
behavior
The mother may need
to talk to her son's doctor
about his treatment plan
in order to address be-
havior issues.


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


COMMUNITY


I
I





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.
POST NEws
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and din-
ing hall.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at
7:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
of every month at the post. El-
igibility in the Auxiliary is open
to mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.
The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-


bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Turkey dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, April 5. Cost
is $8; children younger than 6
eat for $4. VOD presentation.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-


iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast will be
Saturday, April 20. Everyone
is welcome. The all-you-can-
eat breakfast is served from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost is $5
for adults and $3 for children.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206 for infor-
mation.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
The Men's Auxiliary will
have a spaghetti and meatball
dinner from 3 to 5 p.m. Sun-
day, April 14, at the post. Cost
is $7; everyone is welcome.
Music at 5 p.m. will be by
Southern Silk.


American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Nominations for officers will
be taken at the meeting April
23 at 7 p.m. Post election is 1
to 6 p.m. May 28, followed by
the meeting and installation of
officers at 7 p.m.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at the
post home at 4375 Little Al
Point, Inverness. A fish fry will
be served on the third Friday.
The fish fry features fried and
baked haddock, baked po-
tato, baked beans, coleslaw,
tea, lemonade coffee and soft
drink for $8. Serving will begin
at 4:30 p.m. All musicians are
welcome, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Airport Plaza in
Crystal River. Dinner is at


6 p.m. and the meeting fol-
lows at 7 p.m.
All veterans in the Ho-
mosassa/Homosassa Springs
area are invited to be a part of
American Legion Post 166.
This is open to all veterans
who love to ride and would be
interested in forming an Amer-
ican Legion Riders chapter.
Riders members are military
men and women from all
branches of service, as well
as children of service mem-
bers. For more information,
call Clay Scott at 928-848-
8359 or email
eaglerider@gmx.com.
For information about the
post or the American Legion,
call and leave a message for
the post commander, Robert
Scott, at 352-860-2090. Your
call will be returned within 24
to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.0 Citrus 40/8
Voiture 1219 and Cabane
1219 conducts its meetings at
7 p.m. the second Thursday
monthly at the American Le-
gion Post 155 on State Road
44 in Crystal River (6585 E.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway). For
more information about the
40/8, call the Chef De Gare
Tom Smith at 352-601-3612;
for the Cabane, call La Presi-
dente Carol Kaiserian at 352-
746-1959; or visit us on the
Web at www.Postl 55.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-634-
5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at
7 p.m. the second Monday.


LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: April 13 and
May 11.

SERVICES & GROUPS
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 2, at
the Village Inn Restaurant in
Beverly Hills. The group will
discuss final details for the up-
coming April 20 golf tourna-
ment which is the primary
fundraiser for the 11th Veter-
ans Gathering in March 2014.
All veterans who would like to
participate with the organiza-
tion are welcome. The mis-
sion of WG is to assist
veterans and to keep alive the
memory of fallen comrades in
Southeast Asia and other
theaters of operation.
For more information, call
Tom Neaman at 352-586-
7126.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call Ray Thompson at
813-230-9750 or email
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
See VETERANS/Page A18


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2013 World's

Greatest

Baby Shower

May 13, 2013
at the Citrus County Auditorium

Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby
Shower! Learn about taking care of
yourself and your baby. Parents of
infants under 6 months old are also
invited. There will be exhibits, games,
door prizes, a scavenger hunt and gifts
for moms, dads and babies!
Sessions: 3-5pm or 6-8pm

Call 228-9047
00 for information. ,


o0 CI'IONICIp E

Visit the Chronicle booth at this
event to learn about our Cutest Baby Contest!


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SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


In SERVICE


70th ANNIVERSARY


Michael B. Watson
Air Force Airman Michael B. Watson
graduated from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman com-
pleted an intensive,
eight-week program
that included training in
military discipline and
studies, Air Force core
Michael B. values, physical fit-
Watson ness, and basic war-
U.S. Air Force fare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete basic training
earn four credits toward an associate in
applied science degree through the
Community College of the Air Force.
Watson is the son of Michael and
Michele Watson of Dunnellon. He is a
2012 graduate of Crystal River High
School.


Greg K. Thaler
Air Force Airman Greg K. Thaler
graduated from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force
Base, San Antonio,
Texas.
The airman com-
pleted an intensive,
eight-week program
that included training
in military discipline
and studies, Air Force
core values, physical Greg K.
fitness, and basic war- Thaler
fare principles and U.S. Air Force
skills.
Airmen who complete basic training
earn four credits toward an associate in
applied science degree through the
Community College of the Air Force.
Thaler is the son of Cheryl Burrows of
Inverness.
He is a 2012 graduate of Citrus High
School, Inverness.


Matthew V. Zarek
Army Spec. Matthew V. Zarek grad-
uated from basic infantry training at
Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of training,
the soldier received training in drill and
ceremonies, weapons, map reading,
tactics, military courtesy, military
justice, physical fitness, first aid
and Army history, core values and
traditions.
Additional training included develop-
ment of basic combat skills and battle-
field operations and tactics, and
experiencing use of various weapons
and weapons defenses available to the
infantry crewman.
Zarek is the son of Allan and Anne
Marie Zarek of Homosassa.
He is a 2007 graduate of Crystal
River High School.
He earned his bachelor's degree in
2011 from the University of Central
Florida, Orlando.


The Magamolls


Special to the Chronicle
Peter and Jan Magamoll celebrated their 70th wedding
anniversary with a party at noon Wednesday, March 27,
2013, at Sunshine Gardens in Crystal River, where Peter
lives. Peter also celebrated his 94th birthday. The couple
are longtime residents of Florida and have lived in
Homosassa for 25 years. They are pictured here with their
son-in-law, Dr. Bob Adams.


VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard vet-
erans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans
to apply for benefits and pro-
vide information about
benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday-
Homosassa Library, 4100 S.
Grandmarch Ave., Ho-
mosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.


Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition provides food
to veterans in need. Food do-
nations and volunteers are
always welcomed and
needed. The Veterans Food
Bank is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday. The CCVC is on
the DAV property in Inver-
ness at the corner of Paul
and Independence, off U.S.
41 north. Appointments are
encouraged by calling 352-
400-8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inver-
ness. All active duty and hon-
orably discharged veterans,
their spouses, widows and
widowers, along with other
veterans' organizations and
current coalition members
are welcome. The CCVC is a
nonprofit corporation; dona-
tions are tax deductible.
Members can renew with
Gary Williamson at 352-527-
4537, or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Open spots still remain


for those couples and individ-
uals interested in taking a
trip to Hawaii with a group of
veterans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, co-
ordinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy vet-
eran, is scheduled this year
for Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Partici-
pants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel),
Kauai (Marriott), Hawaii (stay
in the KMC inside the vol-
cano) and Maui (Royal
Lahina Resort). Reservations
should be made as soon as
possible. Call McLean at
352-637-5131, or email
dmclean8@
tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency
ServiceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org.
The local Service Source
office is at 2071 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored
with centerpieces with their
names on them at The Old
Homosassa Veterans'
Memorial. Call Shona Cook
at 352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are
needed to assist the U.S.


Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law
enforcement programs.
Criminal background check
and membership are re-
quired. Email Vince Maida at
vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a
partnering agency with the
Department of Veterans Af-
fairs (VA), provides tailored
care for veterans and their
families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions
unique to each military era or
war. It also provides care-
giver education and a recog-
nition program to honor
veterans' services and
sacrifices. HPH Hospice care
and programs do not affect
veterans' benefits.
Call the Citrus Team Office
at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with
the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets.
Free classes to combat
veterans are offered by her at
several locations and times.
Call her at 352-382-7397.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


V E R SE HARSH S C A M P L A N S
O R I EL AWORK E CORAL LI M I T
TASTY LET I N ENTIRE APPLE
ESE ELDER ANTE ACT LEE
DENTAL MITER STAT ESP
HUMP C-TE IMP RES
CRE AK AMASS AVI ATE OMAR
LEAN FESH APEX WELCOME
OSS FRL E ISND ANE IA D IG
V I E RAN201T3U D st y UiS a UiNf A

0 N LTRA YBORE I NC



S* Divorces and I LSed I the state of Florida I R


LAB DES -S LU GS UN ONE
AG'E DTN-A ST G S-E VE-R P A-D
County's ClerkAC F I LA TFor CitrusNG
B R OK ERELAND BAS I S U N C E
S A TE RATES I NANE TR E E D
3-31 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

FOR THE RECORD
0 Divorces and marriages filed in the state of Florida
are a matter of public record, available from each
county's Clerk of the Courts Office.4For Citrus
County, call the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


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A18 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


TOGETHER










SPORTS


Magic can't
ground Hawks
on Saturday
night./B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreation sports/B2
0 Basketball, hockey/B3
0 Dr. Ron Joseph/B3
0 UF basketball/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Baseball, golf tennis/B5
- 0 Entertainment/B6


Syracuse, Wichita State in Final Four


Orange down
Marquette, Shockers
knock off Ohio State
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Using its trap-
ping, shot-challenging 2-3 zone de-
fense to perfect effect, No. 4-seeded
Syracuse shut down No. 3 Marquette
55-39 in the East Regional final Sat-
urday, reaching the Final Four for
Syracuse forward C.J. Fair smiles as
he walks off the court after the
Orange's 55-39 win over Marquette
in the East Regional final of the NCAA
men's college basketball tournament
Saturday in Washington.
Associated Press


the first time in a decade.
Coach Jim Boeheim and the Or-
ange (30-9) haven't been to the na-
tional semifinals since a freshman
named Carmelo Anthony led them
to the 2003 championship.
Syracuse was led by senior for-
ward James Southerland's 16 points.
Marquette (26-9) hadn't scored
fewer than 47 points this season. But
with Syracuse playing Boeheim's
beloved zone throughout, Marquette
kept turning the ball over, seeing its
shots blocked or just plain missing.
Wichita State 70,
Ohio State 66
LOS ANGELES Malcolm Armstead
scored 14 points, Fred Van Vleet
bounced in a big basket with 1 minute
left, and ninth-seeded Wichita State


SPage B4


Florida wins 62-50 to
end FGCU's run
ARLINGTON, Texas Mike
Rosario had 15 points and
Florida is going to an NCAA re-
gional final for the third year in a
row after a 62-50 victory over
Florida Gulf Coast.
Florida Gulf Coast jumped out
to an early 11-point lead against
the Gators.
But No. 3 seed UF (29-7) was
just too strong and too good.
Michael Frazier made a pair of
3-pointer to start a 16-0 run late in
the first half. That came in a 4
1/2-minute span when the Eagles
(26-11) had four turnovers and
missed their only shot. They
trailed the rest of the game.


Boys Basketball Player of the Yearfinalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM


ve the


Adam Gage, Ty Reynolds,
Seven Rivers junior Crystal River junior


High-flying guards Gage,
The 2012-13 season was a revelation
for individual boys basketball
talent in Citrus County.
Adam Gage, Devin Pryor and Ty
Reynolds, all jun-
iors, each averaged
over 20 points per
game and were the
engine that powered
-the Seven Rivers,
S Citrus and Crystal
River teams,
respectively.
Gage is the
returning Chronicle
Jon-Michael Player of the Year
Soracchi and improved upon
ON POINT his stellar sopho-
more season.
But both
Reynolds and Pryor made major strides,
with Pryor leading his 'Canes to their first
district title in eight years and Reynolds
pacing his team in nearly every statistical
category.
The winner will be announced at the
Chronicle sports banquet, which is cur-
rently being planned for after our local
high school graduations in May Full details
will be released soon.
Jon-Michael Soracchi is the Chronicle
sports editor He can be emailed at
jmsoracchi@chronicleonline.com or
reached at 352-564-2928.


rim
rim


Devin Pryor,
Citrus junior


Reynolds, Pryor clearly class of county this year


All-Chronicle boys
basketball team
Ty Reynolds,
Crystal River junior guard
The do-it-all 6-foot-1 perimeter player
averaged 21.5 points, 7.2 rebounds, 3.5
assists and 2 steals per game while helping
the Pirates defeat Citrus, Lecanto and
Seven Rivers over the course of the season.
Devin Pryor,
Citrus junior guard
Six-foot-1 player led the Hurricanes to a
District 6A-6 championship and regional
quarterfinal berth while averaging 21.5
points, 3.8 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 3
steals per contest.
Adam Gage,
Seven Rivers junior guard
Despite drawing a lot of attention from
opponents, the 6-foot-4 swingman and
reigning Chronicle Player of the Year put
up 22.9 points, 9.8 rebounds, 2.3 assists
and 2.1 steals a game as the focal point
of the Warriors' offense and defense.
Mikey Makros,
Lecanto senior guard
A 5-foot-8 sharpshooter, the Panther


averaged 17 points, 3 rebounds, 2 assists
and 2 steals per game. Also set a Lecanto
school record by hitting 12 three-pointers
in one game against Weeki Wachee
en route to a career-high 38-point
performance.
Brandon Burich,
Lecanto sophomore forward
An inside-outside threat, the 6-foot-7
Panther underclassman put up 11 points,
10 rebounds, 2 assists and 1.5 blocks per
game. The rebounds and blocks led
Lecanto in both categories.
Dez Franklin,
Citrus sophomore forward
A 6-foot-2 slasher, the Hurricane improved
upon a promising freshman campaign by
averaging 11.2 points, 5.7 rebounds, 3.1
assists, 1.8 steals and 1.3 blocks a game
for District 6A-6 winner Citrus.
Sam Franklin, Crystal River
sophomore forward
The 6-foot-4 athletic interior presence
led the county with 3.1 blocks per contest
while adding 14 points, 7.7 rebounds and
1.4 steals a game as a Pirate.
Compiled by Sean Arnold and Jon-Michael Soracchi


Teams


finish at


Leopard


Jam

Lecanto comes
in fifth after
huge comeback
TONY CASTRO
Correspondent
BROOKSVILLE Citrus
County's two entries in Satur-
day's second annual, 16-team
Leopard Slam II Softball Tour-
nament at Tom Varn Park Cit-
rus and Lecanto High -
dropped three of four games.
Lecanto (7-11) carved out a
split, rallying from early two-
run deficit for 14 runs in a fifth-
inning explosion to tame the
Chaminade Madonna Lions via
the 10-run mercy rule after five
innings, 15-2.
In the nightcap, Nature Coast
Technical (11-9) finished fifth by
caging the Panthers, 11-4.
Lecanto completed the tour-
nament at 2-2.
At least the Panthers snagged
a win Saturday as Citrus was
roughed up twice.
Early in the morning, Hud-
son-Fivay fireballer Jill
McElderry no-hit the Hurri-
canes 2-0.
How dominant was the junior
right-hander? She retired the
final 15 'Canes she faced after
Rachel Martin reached on a
dropped third strike by rookie
catcher Skyler Doughty to open
the third inning.
In all, McElderry faced two
batters over the minimum (23)
for her second no-no of the sea-
son. Her first arrived against
Wesley Chapel.
On the day, McElderry issued
one free pass (to Jessica Liptrap
in the second) while chalking
up a game-high nine strikeouts.
Fivay supported McElderry
with two runs on three hits in
the third inning off Kelli
Abramowich.
"Our bats were dead," Citrus
See Page B4


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New seasons await


Special to the Chronicle
Men's flag football starts on Thursday, April 4.

Citrus County football, softball, volleyball adult leagues begin


Special to the Chronicle
The men's flag football is a league
for adults 18 and older. It is a very
fast-paced, physical game. If you
are up for a challenge, the league
starts Thursday, April 4.
We are looking forward to in-
creasing the number of teams, and
to expand competition.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to start up
again on April 18. Games are played at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River on
Thursday starting at 6:30 p.m.
Registration for teams end April 1.
For more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Men's softball
Another season of Men's softball is
just around the corner. We encourage
all to come out and witness the talented
Citrus County adult leagues.
Games are at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River and are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30
p.m., and 8:30 p.m. Monday. This sea-
son is set to start on April 15.
Registration for teams end April 8.
For more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed kickball league
is for adults 18 and up. It is a great way
to meet new people and get some exer-
cise while having fun.
Games are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
and 8:30 p.m. at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River, lasting an hour or nine in-
nings, whichever comes first.
The new season starts April 17. Reg-
istration for teams end April 8. For more
information, call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
Our first beach volleyball season was


extremely successful, where we had 10
teams of four and we are looking for-
ward to having even more this season,
which is set to begin on April 23.
Games are played at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
days at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River. The team fees, days and times
are dependent on how many teams we
have sign up.
Registration for teams end April 8.
For more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Commit to Be Fit
race coming April 6
Suncoast Schools Federal Credit
Union will host a 5K Commit to Be Fit
race on Saturday, April 6. The race is a
fundraiser for the foundation that sup-
ports the health, education and well-
being of children in the communities
served by the nonprofit credit union.
The race will begin at 9 a.m. at Wal-
lace E. Brooks Park, 328 Dampier St.,
Inverness. Registration is at 8 a.m. Reg-
istration fee is $20; receive a $5 dis-
count by becoming a friend on the
COMMIT2BFIT Facebook page. All run-
ners will receive a goody bag at the end
of their run. The event is open to all, and
can be walked, run, strolled or jogged.
Visit active.com to register or show
up the day of the event.
Stumpknockers to do
run/walk/dog walk
Get your running shoes, your walking'
shoes and your dog for the inaugural
Stumpknockers Elvis Blue Suede
Shoes 5K Run/1 mile walk or 1 mile dog
walk on Saturday, April 27, in downtown
Inverness. Registration is at 7 a.m. at
Stumpknockers Restaurant, 110 W
Main St. The event begins at 8 a.m.
This event is open to anyone of any
age and will include music, food and


prizes. The best Elvis costume receives
a $500 prize for 5K runners.
Water and comfort stops will be avail-
able along the route. There will be a
comfort station for dogs. Pre-registration
is $25 by April 24 and $30 the day of the
event. To register or for information, go
to www.hospiceofcitrus.org or
www.elvis5krun.com.
Proceeds from this event benefit Hos-
pice of Citrus County's Herry's Kids Pe-
diatric Services.
Girl Scouts plan
Survivor Games
Girl Scouts of West Central Florida in-
vite interested girls and adults to join
them for Survivor Games, an action-
filled afternoon at Camp Indian Echo in
Hudson on April 14.
Activities will include archery, fire
building and other activities. Girls kinder-
garten through 12th grade are welcome
and are encouraged to bring a friend.
For $12, a girl can experience the
fun-filled day and become a Girl Scout.
For more details and to RSVP, contact
Roni Francois at rfrancois@gswcf.org
or at 813-262-1798.
Register now for
Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith Haven
Christian Retreat Center in Crystal River
will be in June and July at Soquili Stables.
Eight weeklong sessions will be offered
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day. Campers can learn to ride and care
for a horse. There will be equine activities,
in the saddle and on the ground, as well
as crafts, swimming and more.
For more information and to sign up,
visit the website at www.faithhavencrc.
org/camp_soquili.php, call
352-206-2990, or email soquili.
stables@gmail.com.


Young kids


ready to PL.A.Y


Special to the Chronicle
The next season of
PL.A.Y will begin the
week of April 8. Citrus
County Parks &Recre-
ation's PL.A.Y. programs
are designed for children
ages 3 to 5 who aren't quite
ready for the organized
sports leagues.
The PL.A.Y programs
offered in the upcoming
session include: basket-
ball, which will be held at
the Citrus County Re-
source Center on Mondays
or Wednesday; flag foot-
ball, located at Bicenten-
nial Park on Tuesdays or
Thursday; and cheerlead-
ing, which will be at Bicen-
tennial Park on Thursdays.
With each enrollment,
the child receives age-ap-
propriate sports equip-
ment and a team T-shirt
Please contact Crysta
Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth pro-
grams, at 352-527-7543 or
visit www.citruscounty
parks.com, for more
information.
Underwater
Egg Hunt
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's annual Under-
water Egg Hunt was held on


Saturday, March 23. Even
with the unpleasant weather,
there was still a great turnout
of over 200 children from the
ages of 0-12.
This was a free event that
allowed participants to hunt
eggs in the Bicentennial Park
Pool in Crystal River and also
on the surrounding grounds.
After a child participated in
one or both egg hunts, they
turned in the eggs in ex-
change for a gift bag filled
with small toys and candy.
While participants waited
their turn, they could pur-
chase food from the Nature
Coast Volunteers and partici-
pate in festivities around the
outside of the pool grounds.
The festivities included: po-
tato sack races, egg races,
temporary tattoos, arts and
craft stations and much more.
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation would like to thank
the following sponsors and vol-
unteers for helping to make
this event possible: Pepsi,
Race Trac of Homosassa,
Race Trac of Crystal River (on
U.S. 19), Walgreens in Crystal
River, Xtreme Fun, Nature
Coast Volunteers, the Crystal
River High School Honor Soci-
ety and all of the other wonder-
ful volunteers who came out.


* -


40
Special to the Chronicle
A child smiles while showing off his haul from Citrus
County Parks and Recreation's Underwater Egg Hunt on
March 23 at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.


CR Sharks football
signups underway
The Crystal River Sharks
are conducting registration for
the upcoming 2013 season for
all divisions ages 5 thru 15 for
both football and cheerleading.
Registration fees are $125
for football and $100 for
cheerleading payable by
check, cash or credit cards.
For more information, contact
Dennis or Toni Treadway at
563-2690.
Registrations are at the
Crystal River Mall food court
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The signup dates are:
April 6, 13, 20, 27.
May 4, 11,25.
*June 1,8,15, 22, 29.
Inverness Storm
signups April 6
Inverness Storm football and
cheer signups for young ath-
letes ages 5 to 15 will take
place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sat-
urday, April 6, at Cox Lumber in
Inverness. There will also be a
yard sale and bake sale.
Inverness Storm's mission:
Familiarize participants with
fundamentals of football and
cheerleading; emphasize im-


portance of teamwork, sports-
manship, self-confidence, and
fitness; provide a fun, safe and
structured environment; inspire
athletes to do their personal
best; and promote academic
health by granting opportuni-
ties to be recognized on a na-
tional level for outstanding
scholastic achievement.
Inverness Storm is a non-
profit league that relies on
community donations and
fundraisers to provide athletes
with safety equipment, travel
costs, uniforms and more. For
more information, visit
www.invernessstorm.com.
Citrus County Kids
Triathlon coming
A Citrus County Kids
Triathlon feature swim/bike/run
for children ages 5 to 15 will
take place May 11 in Inver-
ness. Early bird registration fee
is $20 if received by April 14;
$25 from April 15 to May 8.
There will be two divisions
for the children: juniors, ages
5 to 10, and senior, ages 11 to
15. There will also be a
Tri4Fun division for all ages
who wish to try. For more in-
formation, call DRC Sports at
352-637-2475 or visit
www.Citruskidstri.com.


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus Wildcats 10th grade USSSA basketball team
finished second in the 24/7 Clearwater Shootout on March
I through 3, then went on to win the Gainesville Stampede
tournament on March 23 and 24. They are
8-1 in tournament play. They are co-sponsored by
C.C.H.R.S, a non-profit organization to help youth achieve
academics through athletics. The team is made up of Sam
Franklin, Desmond Franklin, Desmond Simmons, Desmond
Frazier, Andre Hairston, Darius Sawyer, Travis McGee,
TeAndre Hopkins, Reace Kinley and Zachary Saxer.


The 4S0 Annual

Presidential Invitational

APril 19-21.,2013

46* Presidential Format
36 hole individual stroke play.
Flights determined by handicap index.
Championship Flight White Tee Flights
Green Tee Flights
Green tee open to all players 60 years and up. Green tee players with a
handicap index over 20 may choose to play in green tee point quota flight


$199 Entry Includes
Green fee for practice round ($16 cart fee applies)
Tee gift by Titleist Footjoy valued at over $100
* Visa Gift Cards for Flight Winners Friday Night Stag Night Fish Fry
Lunch Following Play Saturday and Sunday
Beverages on Course during play Range Balls


Schedule of Activities
Friday April 19
Practice Rounds Available 12-3 pm (cart fee applies)
5:30-8 pm 9 Hole Scramble and Stag Night
Saturday April 20
7:30-10 am Buffet Breakfast (tournament participants only)
8:30-10:30 am Round 1 tee times off #1 and #10 Lunch following play
Sunday April 21
7:30-10 am Buffet Breakfast (guests welcome at an additional charge)
8:30-10:30 am Final Round tee times off #1 & #10 Lunch following play
3:00 pm Trophy presentation









Rivqe rs
Slf and Country Club. Inc


' 7 Rivers Golf & CC PO Box 1146 Crystal Rivei
j V I '


Sports BRIEFS


B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hawks lift off


Associated Press

ATLANTA Ivan John-
son scored a season-high 21
points off the bench Satur-
day, and Devin Harris had
13 of his 17 points in the
fourth quarter as the Atlanta
Hawks pulled away to beat
the Orlando Magic 97-88.
The Hawks used their
27th different starting
lineup in a game between
short-handed teams, but the
result was familiar. Atlanta
(41-33) has beaten Orlando
10 straight times and is now
fifth in the Eastern Confer-
ence playoff race, a half-
game ahead of Chicago.
Mavericks 100,
Bulls 98
DALLAS Dirk Nowitzki hit
a 3-pointer with 2.9 seconds left
and the Dallas Mavericks rallied
to beat the Chicago Bulls
100-98 on Saturday.
The Mavericks trailed by 12
in the fourth quarter, but Now-
itzki scored Dallas' last eight
points in a closing 15-1 run over
the final 3 1/2 minutes of the
game. He finished with a sea-
son-high 35 points.
After Jimmy Butler missed
two free throws with 15.9 sec-
onds remaining, Nowitzki con-
nected on the winning 3 with
Luol Deng running at him.
Chicago's Nate Robinson then
missed a jumper at the buzzer
that would have tied it.
Rockets 98,
Clippers 81
HOUSTON Jeremy Lin,
Chandler Parsons and Fran-
cisco Garcia scored 15 points
apiece to lead the Houston
Rockets to a 98-81 victory over
the Los Angeles Clippers.
Houston was playing without
shooting guard and leading
scorer James Harden, who
missed his third game of the
season with a right ankle sprain.
Point guard Chris Paul was
the only Clippers starter to play


Associated Press
Orlando forward Maurice Harkless posts up Atlanta Hawks counterpart Kyle Korver on
Saturday night in Atlanta. The Hawks downed the Magic 97-88.


in the final quarter, finishing with
19 points, seven assists and
three steals.
Grizzlies 99,
Timberwolves 86
MINNEAPOLIS Marc
Gasol scored 21 points and the
Memphis Grizzlies pulled away
in the fourth quarter to beat the
Minnesota Timberwolves 99-86
on Saturday night.
Mike Conley scored 19, Zach
Randolph 14 and Darrell Arthur
had 12 of his 15 points in the
fourth quarter for the Grizzlies,
who ended a five-game road
losing streak with their 11th
straight victory over Minnesota.
Ricky Rubio just missed his
second career triple-double with
23 points, 10 rebounds and
nine assists.
76ers 100,
Bobcats 92
PHILADELPHIA- Jrue Holi-
day scored 10 straight points
down the stretch, Evan Turner
finished with 21 and the


Philadelphia 76ers beat the
Charlotte Bobcats 100-92.
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist had 21
for Charlotte, which has the
worst record in the NBA. Gerald
Henderson, who had 35 and 34
in his previous two games, fin-
ished with 19.
Thunder 109,
Bucks 99
MILWAUKEE Kevin Du-
rant scored 30 points, Russell
Westbrook had a triple-double,
and the Oklahoma City Thun-
der beat the Milwaukee Bucks
109-99.
Durant shot 10 of 19 from the
field and 9 of 10 from the free
throw line in becoming the sev-
enth player this season to score
30 points against the Bucks.
Durant is on pace to join
Larry Bird in 1986-87 as the
only players to average more
than 28 points while shooting
over 50 percent from the field,
90 percent from the line and 40
percent from 3-point range.
Westbrook had 23 points, 10


assists and 13 rebounds. Kevin
Martin added 17 points.
Ersan Ilyasova had 29 points
and 14 rebounds for Milwau-
kee. Epke Udoh had his first ca-
reer double-double with 14
points and 10 rebounds.
Kobe passes Wilt for
4th on scoring list
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -
Kobe Bryant has passed fellow
Los Angeles Lakers great Wilt
Chamberlain for fourth place on
the NBA's career scoring list.
Bryant made a pull-up jumper
from the free throw line with
7:54 remaining in the second
quarter to eclipse Chamber-
lain's mark of 31,419 points. He
tied Chamberlain 22 seconds
earlier with a layup.
Bryant entered the game four
points behind Chamberlain.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar tops
the NBA's career scoring list
with 38,387 points, Karl Malone
is second with 36,928 and
Michael Jordan is third with
32,292.


Crosby injured, but Penguins win


Associated Press

PITTSBURGH The
Pittsburgh Penguins over-
came an injury to Sidney
Crosby on Saturday for their
15th straight victory, beating
the New York Islanders 2-0
in Jarome Iginla's debut be-
hind third-period goals from
Matt Cooke and James Neal.
Tomas Vokoun made 35
saves as Pittsburgh moved
within two wins of the NHL
record of 17 straight victo-
ries set by Mario Lemieux
and the 1992-93 Penguins.
Crosby skated off the ice
with a towel covering his
mouth after a slap shot by
teammate Brooks Orpik de-
flected off a stick and hit the
NHL scoring leader in the
face just 1:28 into the game.
Crosby, who immediately fell
to the ice and tossed his stick
in the air, did not return.
Crosby, with 15 goals and
56 points, holds a 10-point
lead over Tampa Bay's
Steven Stamkos in the NHL
scoring race.
Hurricanes 3, Jets 1
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -
Justin Peters made 34 saves
to help Carolina keep its play-
off hopes alive with a victory
over Southeast Division-lead-


ing Winnipeg.
Alex Semin and Eric Staal
each had a goal and an assist,
and Jussi Jokinen also scored
for Carolina. The Hurricanes
snapped a seven-game winless
streak to improve to 16-15-2
and move within four points of
the Jets.
Avalanche 1,
Predators 0, OT
DENVER Tyson Barrie
scored at 50 seconds of overtime
and Colorado beat Nashville.
Semyon Varlamov stopped
34 shots for his third shutout of
the season and the 11th of his
career.
Pekka Rinne had 23 saves
for Nashville.
Flyers 3, Bruins 1
PHILADELPHIA- Mike
Knuble and Matt Read scored,
Ilya Bryzgalov made 33 saves
and Philadelphia snapped a
four-game losing streak with a
victory over Boston.
Ruslan Fedotenko added an
empty-net goal for the Flyers,
who began the day 14th in the
Eastern Conference but only six
points out of the eighth and final
playoff spot.
Nathan Horton scored for the
Bruins.


Canadiens 3,
Rangers 0
MONTREAL- Michael
Ryder and Tomas Plekanec
scored in the first period and
Carey Price made 34 saves and
the Montreal Canadiens shut
out the New York Rangers 3-0.
Brendan Gallagher also
scored while P.K. Subban had
three assists for the Canadiens,
who swept their three games
with New York this season,
outscoring the Rangers 9-1.
Maple Leafs 4,
Senators 0
OTTAWA-- Nazem Kadri
had a hat trick and James
Reimer made 31 saves and the
Toronto Maple Leafs defeated
the Ottawa Senators 4-0.
Joffrey Lupul also scored and
added three assists for the
Leafs, while Kadri also picked
up an assist as Toronto won its
third straight game extended its
point streak to eight games.
Ben Bishop made 19 saves
for the Senators.
Capitals 4,
Sabres 3, SO
BUFFALO, N.Y. -Alex
Ovechkin scored once in regu-
lation and again in a shootout


to help the Washington Capi-
tals rally for a 4-3 win over the
Buffalo Sabres.
Matt Hendricks also scored
for Washington in the shootout,
while Capitals goalie Braden
Holtby stopped both of Buffalo's
shootout attempts. Mike Green
capped a two-goal third-period
rally and forced overtime by
scoring with 40 seconds left.
Panthers 3,
Devils 2, OT
SUNRISE Dmitry Kulikov
scored at 1:43 of overtime and
the Florida Panthers beat the
New Jersey Devils 3-2.
Kulikov's shot from the right
circle beat Martin Brodeur on
the far side and was his first
goal of the season.
Shawn Matthias scored two
goals for the Panthers and Jacob
Markstrom made 24 saves.
Wild 4, Kings 3, SO
ST. PAUL, Minn. Mikko
Koivu scored in a shootout to give
the Minnesota Wild a 4-3 victory
over the Los Angeles Kings.
Koivu also had two assists in
regulation. Matt Cullen also had
a goal, Zach Parise had a goal
and an assist and Niklas Back-
strom stopped 28 shots for
Minnesota.


Exercise,


life and dogs

With today being Easter, the Easter
bunny had to get ready to hide the
Easter eggs for the egg hunt. With
that came the chore of cleaning up the back-
yard and pooper scooping. I started to remi-
nisce about all the roads and trails I had run
with my dogs.
When we moved to Florida several years
ago, we moved with a bunch of dogs. It seems
like every one of our kids had to have his or
her own dog as did mom and dad. After al-
most 17 years, with most of the kids out of the
house and with a great deal of sadness on our
part after most of the
dogs in doggy heaven,
we had no dogs with
whom to run.
So not having learned
from our previous er-
rors of just too many
dogs, we listened to our
8 year-old daughter's
plea and got two more _
-very active, large and
hyper puppies. Dr. Ron Joseph
Nothing seems to DOCTOR'S
relax me more than ORDERS
coming home after a
long day in surgery and
getting pulled around the neighborhood by
my daughter's puppies. Two things immedi-
ately come to mind.
The first being: this is a great workout for
both my legs and upper extremity My shoul-
der muscles have doubled in the last few
months from holding these monsters at bay I
never realized that there were so many
squirrels.
Really, the first thought was that I could not
wait for the puppies to get bigger and pull my
arms right out of the shoulder socket, as
sprained shoulders are an injury I commonly
see from this activity.
The second thought was this was a great
way to get out of the house and take a long run
or walk, albeit somewhat hectic.
Now let me give you the orthopedic sur-
geon's perspective of this wonderful part of
working out with a dog. First and foremost,
never twist a leash around your hand or fin-
gers. I have treated dozens of hand and finger
injuries from dogs taking off after another ca-
nine or squirrel twisting and pulling the leash
securely wrapped around fingers or wrist.
These are some lasting and painful sprains,
frequently necessitating surgery
The most common injuries I see from walk-
ing or running with a dog are associated with
a leash tangling for whatever reason and the
dog owner and dog becoming one and the
same. Falls and joint sprains often result,
ranging from knee cartilage tears to shoulder,
elbow or wrist fractures and dislocations as
well as sprains and strains of every anatomic
part.
In the office, the injured dog owner always
starts the history of the injury with, "you won't
believe how this happened."
Use of a leash is probably the safest
choice for most dogs. Some dogs are more
skilled socially and some are very aggres-
sive. Having run many a trail with my pack
of dogs off the leash, I tended to reconsider
this decision a few years ago when my
daughter was younger. She was approached
by dogs off a leash and tended either to be
too close to a strange dog or the dog would
be menacing.
When leashed, the dog can be controlled
and guided. On a leash, the dog can be pro-
tected as well as protect others. No matter
how well-behaved and voice-controlled, ani-
mals and people do get aggressive every once
in a while.
Dog bites to both the dog and human occur
on outings such as this. Aside from the tissue
crushed in the bite, infection can occur and
the proper antibiotic is most important. While
rabies is well-controlled in domesticated an-
imals such as dogs, it remains an important
consideration.
There are so many positive and great things
to be said about running with man's best
friend but the most important from this doc's
perspective is that I had the pleasure of all of
my dogs' company for 17 to 18 healthy years. I
would come home from work dead tired and
they were there waiting to go for a run, so I
would. Exercise with my dogs sure helps save
my life.
Happy Easter!
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and shoulder or-
thopedic surgeon at SeaSpine Orthopedic In-
stitute may be reached atrbjhand@cox.net


UConn, UK women advance Ell DGoLcUYM


18 Hole Championship
Golf Course
Citrus Springs, FL
Rated 4 .,. .'. i '. '.


Georgia clips top

seed Stanford in

Spokane region

Associated Press

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. Breanna
Stewart and Kaleena Mosqueda-
Lewis each scored 17 points, lead-
ing top-seeded Connecticut over
Maryland 76-50 on Saturday in the
Bridgeport regional semifinals.
Stewart got help from fellow
freshmen Moriah Jefferson, 10
points, and Morgan Tuck, eight
points, in sending the top-seeded
Huskies (32-4) to their eighth
straight NCAA regional final.
Alyssa Thomas, who had aver-
aged 28.5 points in the tournament,
had 13 to lead Maryland, which fin-
ished its season at 26-8. Tianna
Hawkins and Chloe Pavlech each
had 11 points for the Terps.
UConn led 35-26 at halftime, then
opened the second half on a 9-0


run.
The Huskies will play Kentucky
in on Monday night in a rematch of
last year's regional final, which was
played just over 100 miles away in
Kingston, R.I.
The Wildcats beat Delaware 69-
62 earlier Saturday.
Bridgeport regional
Kentucky 69, Delaware 62
BRIDGEPORT, Conn. Jennifer
O'Neill scored 19 points and A'dia Math-
ies added 16 to help Kentucky hold off
Delaware 69-62 in the Bridgeport re-
gional semifinals, bringing to an end the
stellar career of Elena Delle Donne.
It's the second straight season that
Kentucky (30-5) has advanced to the re-
gional final. The Wildcats, who already
have a school record for victories, lost to
UConn last season by 15 points.
Delle Donne had 33 points for
Delaware (32-4) and finished her career
as the fifth all-time leading scorer in
NCAA history. She passed former stars
Cheryl Miller, Chamique Holdsclaw and
Maya Moore on Saturday.


She finished well short of Jackie Stiles'
all-time scoring mark of 3,393 set at South-
west Missouri State from 1998-2001.
Spokane Regional

Georgia 61, Stanford 59
SPOKANE, Wash. Jasmine Hassell
scored six of her 13 points in the final 3
minutes and fourth-seeded Georgia
reached the NCAA women's regional fi-
nals for the first time since 2004 with a
61-59 victory over top-seeded Stanford.
Georgia overcame three major scoring
droughts, including falling behind 9-0 to
start the game, to oust the No. 1 seed
from the Spokane Regional and end
Stanford's hopes of reaching the Final
Four for the sixth straight year.
Jasmine James led Georgia (28-6) with
16 points, including a pair of free throws
with 23.5 seconds left that gave the Lady
Bulldogs a 60-56 lead. It's the 11th trip to
the regional finals for coach Andy Landers
in his long tenure at Georgia.
Chiney Ogwumike led Stanford (33-3)
with 26 points, but was held to eight in
the second half.


Dr the---- i-- eni Gem"





$ a-- $ 8af60 10m-$ 5 t
Pic S[i a c 1!1hgh -] 3 i 3

Mu rsn hs da hc n


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013



Men's NCAA
tournament glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio
Tuesday, March 19
N.C. A&T 73, Liberty 72
Saint Mary's (Cal) 67, Middle Tennessee 54
Wednesday, March 20
James Madison 68, LIU Brooklyn 55
La Salle 80, Boise State 71
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 21
At Rupp Arena
Lexington, Ky.
Butler 68, Bucknell 56
Marquette 59, Davidson 58
At HP Pavilion
San Jose, Calif.
California 64, UNLV 61
Syracuse 81, Montana 34
Friday, March 22
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio
Temple 76, N.C. State 72
Indiana 83, James Madison 62
At The Frank Erwin Center
Austin, Texas
Miami 78, Pacific 49
Illinois 57, Colorado 49
Third Round
Saturday, March 23
At Rupp Arena
Lexington, Ky.
Marquette 74, Butler 72
At HP Pavilion
San Jose, Calif.
Syracuse 66, California 60
Sunday, March 24
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio
Indiana 58, Temple 52
At The Frank Erwin Center
Austin, Texas
Miami 63, Illinois 59
Regional Semifinals
Thursday, March 28
At The Verizon Center
Washington
Marquette 71, Miami 61
Syracuse 61, Indiana 50
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 30
Syracuse 55, Marquette 39
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 21
At The Palace of Auburn Hills
Auburn Hills, Mich.
Michigan 71, South Dakota State 56
VCU 88, Akron 42
Friday, March 22
At Wells Fargo Center
Philadelphia
Florida Gulf Coast 78, Georgetown 68
San Diego State 70, Oklahoma 55
At The Sprint Center
Kansas City, Mo.
North Carolina 78, Villanova 71
Kansas 64, Western Kentucky 57
At The Frank Erwin Center
Austin, Texas
Florida 79, Northwestern State 47
Minnesota 83, UCLA 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 23
At The Palace of Auburn Hills
Auburn Hills, Mich.
Michigan 78, VCU 53
Sunday, March 24
At Wells Fargo Center
Philadelphia
Florida Gulf Coast 81, San Diego State 71
At The Sprint Center
Kansas City, Mo.
Kansas 70, North Carolina 58
At The Frank Erwin Center
Austin, Texas
Florida 78, Minnesota 64
Regional Semifinals
Friday, March 29
At Cowboys Stadium
Arlington, Texas
Michigan 87, Kansas 85, OT
Florida 62, Florida Gulf Coast 50
Regional Championship
Today, March 31
Michigan (29-7) vs. Florida (29-7), 2:20 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 21
At Rupp Arena
Lexington, Ky.
Louisville 79, N.C. A&T 48
Colorado State 84, Missouri 72
At The Palace of Auburn Hills
Auburn Hills, Mich.
Michigan State 65, Valparaiso 54
Memphis 54, Saint Mary's (Cal) 52
At HP Pavilion
San Jose, Calif.
Saint Louis 64, New Mexico State 44
Oregon 68, Oklahoma State 55
Friday, March 22
At Wells Fargo Center
Philadelphia
Duke 73, Albany (N.Y.) 61
Creighton 67, Cincinnati 63
Third Round
Saturday, March 23
At Rupp Arena
Lexington, Ky.
Louisville 82, Colorado State 56
At The Palace of Auburn Hills
Auburn Hills, Mich.
Michigan State 70, Memphis 48
At HP Pavilion
San Jose, Calif.
Oregon 74, Saint Louis 57
Sunday, March 24
At Wells Fargo Center
Philadelphia
Duke 66, Creighton 50
Regional Semifinals
Friday, March 29
At Lucas Oil Stadium
Indianapolis
Louisville 77, Oregon 69
Duke 71, Michigan State 61
Regional Championship
Today, March 31
Louisville (32-5) vs. Duke (30-5), 4:55 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 21
At EnergySolutions Arena
Salt Lake City
Wichita State 73, Pittsburgh 55
Gonzaga 64, Southern 58
Arizona 81, Belmont 64
Harvard 68, New Mexico 62
Friday, March 22
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio


Ohio State 95, lona 70
Iowa State 76, Notre Dame 58
At The Sprint Center
Kansas City, Mo.
Mississippi 57, Wisconsin 46
La Salle 63, Kansas State 61
Third Round
Saturday, March 23
At EnergySolutions Arena
Salt Lake City
Arizona 74, Harvard 51
Wichita State 76, Gonzaga 70
Sunday, March 24
At UD Arena
Dayton, Ohio
Ohio State 78, Iowa State 75
At The Sprint Center
Kansas City, Mo.
La Salle 76, Mississippi 74
Regional Semifinals
Thursday, March 28
At The Staples Center
Los Angeles
Ohio State 73, Arizona 70
Wichita State 72, La Salle 58


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S- CASH 3 (early)
6-1-3
CASH 3 (late)


PLAY 4 (early)
1-3-3-2
PLAY 4 (late)
7 -9-3-3

FANTASY 5
oridaLottery 3- 29- 31- 32- 34

POWERBALL LOTTERY
11-23-26-46-55 4-9-13-40-41-50
POWER BALL XTRA
27 2


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
COLLEGE BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi at Florida
2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Texas Christian at Texas Tech
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Clemson at North Carolina
MLB
8 p.m. (ESPN) Texas Rangers at Houston Astros
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA Tournament regional semifinal
12 p.m. (ESPN) Kansas vs. Notre Dame
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Nebraska vs. Duke
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Oklahoma vs. Tennessee
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Louisville vs. Baylor
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA Tournament regional final
2:10 p.m. (CBS) Florida vs. Michigan
4:55 p.m. (CBS) Duke vs. Louisville
NBA
7 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at San Antonio Spurs
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Detroit Pistons at Chicago Bulls
BOWLING
2:30 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Barbasol Tournament of Champions
BOXING
4:45 p.m. (HBOS) Mike Alvarado vs. Brandon Rios (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Trophee Hassan II,
Final Round
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Shell Houston Open, Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Shell Houston Open, Final Round
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red Wings
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Boston Bruins at Buffalo Sabres
RUGBY
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Japan (Taped)
TENNIS
11:30 a.m. (CBS) ATP Sony Open men's final

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Regional Championship
Saturday, March 30
Wichita State 70, Ohio State 66
FINAL FOUR
At The Georgia Dome
Atlanta
National Semifinals
Saturday, April 6
Midwest champion vs. Wichita State (30-8), 6
or 8:30 p.m.
South champion vs. Syracuse (30-9), 6 or 8:30
p.m.
National Championship
Monday, April 8
Semifinal winners, 9 p.m.
NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-New York 45 26 .634 -
x-Brooklyn 42 31 .575 4
Boston 38 34 .528 712
Philadelphia 30 43 .411 16
Toronto 27 45 .375 1812
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
z-Miami 57 15 .792 -
x-Atlanta 41 33 .554 17
Washington 26 46 .361 31
Orlando 19 55 .257 39
Charlotte 17 56 .233 4012
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 46 27 .630 -
x-Chicago 39 32 .549 6
Milwaukee 35 37 .486 1012
Detroit 24 49 .329 22
Cleveland 22 49 .310 23
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 55 17 .764 -
x-Memphis 49 24 .671 612
Houston 40 33 .548 1512
Dallas 36 37 .493 191/2
New Orleans 25 48 .342 30Y2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 54 20 .730 -
x-Denver 50 24 .676 4
Utah 38 36 .514 16
Portland 33 39 .458 20
Minnesota 26 46 .361 27
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
x-L.A. Clippers 49 25 .662 -
Golden State 41 32 .562 712
L.A. Lakers 37 36 .507 11 Y2
Sacramento 27 46 .370 21Y2
Phoenix 23 50 .315 25Y2
x-clinched playoff spot
z-clinched conference
Friday's Games
Orlando 97, Washington 92
Boston 118, Atlanta 107
New York 111, Charlotte 102
Philadelphia 97, Cleveland 87
Toronto 99, Detroit 82
Memphis 103, Houston 94
Minnesota 101, Oklahoma City 93
Miami 108, New Orleans 89
San Antonio 104, L.A. Clippers 102
Denver 109, Brooklyn 87
Utah 105, Portland 95
Saturday's Games
Dallas 100, Chicago 98
Atlanta 97, Orlando 88
Houston 98, L.A. Clippers 81
Memphis 99, Minnesota 86
Philadelphia 100, Charlotte 92
Oklahoma City 109, Milwaukee 99
Utah 116, Brooklyn 107
Indiana at Phoenix, late
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, late
Portland at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Cleveland at New Orleans, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7 p.m.


Miami at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Boston at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Houston, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Boston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Indiana at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings


Pittsburg
New Jers
N.Y. Ran
N.Y. Islar
Philadelp


Montreal
Boston
Ottawa
Toronto
Buffalo

Winnipeg
Carolina
Washington
Tampa Bay
Florida


EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts
h 36 28 8 0 56
sey 35 1511 9 39
gers 34 16 15 3 35
nders 35 16 16 3 35
phia 34 1417 3 31


GF GA
123 84
88 97
78 84
100 112
90 104


Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
34 22 7 5 49107 83
33 21 8 4 46 95 75
35 1910 6 44 89 76
36 2012 4 44112 100
35 1316 6 32 94 111
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
36 1816 2 38 89 106
33 1615 2 34 92 97
34 1617 1 33 98 96
34 1518 1 31110 103
36 11 19 6 28 88 125


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Chicago 33 25 5 3 53109 73
Detroit 34 1712 5 39 90 85
St. Louis 33 1714 2 36 94 93
Nashville 35 1414 7 35 87 96
Columbus 35 1414 7 35 85 96
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 34 21 11 2 44 97 86
Vancouver 34 19 9 6 44 92 86
Edmonton 33 1313 7 33 83 95
Calgary 33 1316 4 30 93 114
Colorado 34 12 18 4 28 84 108
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 34 23 7 4 50106 88
LosAngeles 34 1912 3 41100 86
San Jose 33 1611 6 38 82 82
Dallas 33 1614 3 35 92 100
Phoenix 34 1415 5 33 92 98
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, Buffalo 3, SO
Minnesota 4, Los Angeles 3, SO
Philadelphia 3, Boston 1
Pittsburgh 2, N.Y Islanders 0
Colorado 1, Nashville 0, OT
Carolina 3, Winnipeg 1
Toronto 4, Ottawa 0
Montreal 3, N.Y Rangers 0
Florida 3, New Jersey 2, OT
Vancouver at Edmonton, late
Phoenix at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Anaheim at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Boston at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


Gators set to take



on Michigan today


Game is at2:20 p.m.

today on CBS;

UCLA hires Alford

Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas Trey Burke
was a 16-month-old toddler the last
time Michigan was playing this late in
the NCAA tournament.
That regional final 19 years ago, a
loss that ended the Fab Five era, was
played in a building that no longer ex-
ists. Where Reunion Arena once stood
near downtown Dallas is now a vacant
lot about 20 minutes from where the
Wolverines finally get another chance
to get back to the Final Four.
"It's definitely crazy," Burke said
Saturday "Just to get this program
moving back in the right direction
means a lot to us."
No. 4 seed Michigan (29-7) plays
SEC regular-season champion and
No. 3 seed Florida (29-7) for the South
Regional title on the raised court at
ultramodern Cowboys Stadium today
The Wolverines advanced largely
because of Burke, the sophomore and
Big Ten player of the year who scored
23 points all after halftime as
they overcame a 14-point deficit
against top seed Kansas. They forced
overtime when Burke hit a long tying
3-pointer with 4.2 seconds left in reg-
ulation and won 87-85 in overtime.
"Yeah, I was surprised at how far I
was," Burke admitted after seeing
multiple replays of the shot that may
just become known as the Fab 3.
Burke also had 10 assists, making
him the first player to have 20 points
and 10 assists in the NCAA round of 16
since 1987. The last to do it? A Provi-
dence player known as "Billy The
Kid" aka Florida coach Billy Dono-
van, who will be on the opposite
bench when his Gators play in their
third consecutive regional final.
"It's funny, my wife says to me this
morning, she asked me the same
question, she said, 'Who was the
player?,"' said Donovan, acknowledg-
ing he already knew and remembered
his numbers (26 points, 10 assists vs.
Alabama). "And I said 'Magic John-
son.' And she said, 'No, you.' I said I'm
glad I'm comparing myself to Magic



FINAL FOUR
Continued from Page B1

earned its first trip to the Final Four since
1965 with a 70-66 victory over Ohio
State.
Van Vleet scored 12 points as the
Shockers (30-8) followed up last week's
win over top-ranked Gonzaga with a nail-
biting victory over the second-seeded
Buckeyes (29-8), whose 11-game winning
streak ended one game short of their sec-
ond straight Final Four.
Wichita State roared to a 20-point lead
with 11 minutes to play after Ohio State
played an awful first half, but LaQuinton
Ross scored 15 of his 19 points after half-
time, leading a ferocious rally to within
three points in the final minutes.



JAM
Continued from Page Bl

skipper Larry Bishop said. "The key
in every game is to put the ball in play;
we didn't
"I thought Kelli (Abramowich) did-
n't pitch poorly I was impressed with
how well we played defensively (con-
verting 30-of-30 chances)."
In its fourth-round game, the Hurri-
canes enjoyed six hits including a
double and two-run homer by fresh-
man Erica Corlew to lead the Pasco
Pirates, 4-2.
But the Dade City crew roared back
behind a four-run fifth inning high-
lighted by a back-breaking three-run
homer by senior Jordan Lane to win,
6-4.
As a result, the Inverness club (11-8)
finished the tourney in 10th pace fol-
lowing a 1-3 effort.
"Again Kelli (Abramowich) hit her
spots except for one inning," Bishop
said. "And it was great to see Erica
(Corlew) bust out. She's been hitting
the ball right at people for a while.
She has the potential to be special."
On the Canes' overall outlook,
Bishop said, "We wanted to play a lot
of kids and we did. We were looking
for some defensive consistency and
we showed some. This was a great
tournament. Credit belongs to (Her-
nando) coach (Kevin) Bittinger for
putting on such a class event. I know
we're glad we came."
Panthers' highlight:


Rallying past Lions
The Lecanto Panthers trailed
Chaminade Madonna, 2-0, thanks to
an RBI double by Megan Sorg and a
subsequent RBI single by Marisa
Aponte in the second.
In the fourth, Bree Martin, who
reached on the first of six Lions er-
rors, scored on another miscue to cut


Associated Press
Florida head coach Billy Donovan
answers a question during a news
conference Saturday in Arlington,
Texas. Florida faces Michigan in the
South Region final today.
Johnson, that's great."
Florida has been to this point each
of the last two years, but it hasn't been
further since winning consecutive na-
tional championships under Donovan
in 2006 and 2007.
In both of those regional final losses
- to Louisville last year and in over-
time to Butler in 2011 the Gators
had 11-point leads in the second half.
This is now the last chance for seniors
Kenny Boynton and Erik Murphy to
get a title of their own.
"Game to game, it's a different feel-
ing," Boynton said. "You think about it
before the game. Once the game
starts, you try to do everything in your
control individually and as a team to
change the outcome. Up to this point,
our team does a great job preparing
the right way"
UCLA hires Steve Alford
as new basketball coach
LOS ANGELES UCLA has hired
Steve Alford as men's basketball coach,
luring him from New Mexico days after
Alford signed a new 10-year deal with
the Lobos.
Athletic director Dan Guerrero says Al-
ford is "the perfect fit for UCLA" because
he connects with a new generation of play-
ers and brings an up-tempo and team-ori-
ented style of play to Westwood.
Alford succeeds Ben Howland, who was
fired last weekend after 10 years at UCLA.
Alford led New Mexico to a 29-6 record
this season that included the Mountain
West regular-season and tournament titles.


Late Friday game

Duke 71, Michigan St. 61
INDIANAPOLIS Seth Curry shot
Duke right into the regional finals and
put Mike Krzyzewski on the verge of an-
other major milestone.
Curry scored 29 points to lead the sec-
ond-seeded Blue Devils past third-seeded
Michigan State 71-61 on Friday night and
into the Midwest Regional final.
If Duke (30-5) beats top-seeded
Louisville (32-5) in Sunday's regional final,
Krzyzewski would tie John Wooden's
record with 12 Final Four trips.
Michigan State (27-9) just couldn't keep
up with Curry and Duke's shooters. The
Spartans were led by Keith Appling with 16
points and Adreian Payne with 14.
Curry's sixth 3 of the game broke a 38-
38 tie early in the second half, sending
Duke on a 9-0 run. It never trailed again.


the lead in half, 2-1.
But Panthers paraded a conga line
- 18 batters to the plate scoring a
season-high 14 runs on 10 hits and
four more Lions errors to blow the
game up.
In the decisive fifth, catcher Amber
Atkinson, who had gone 0-for-2, en-
joyed two hits including a booming
double and two-run single.
Bree Martin, Sidney Holstein and
Lily Parrish each also rapped two hits
in the rally off Lion right-hander Dan-
ica McCabe.
Martin led the Panthers with an
outstanding 3-for-4 effort while Atkin-
son, Parrish, Paige Richards and
Amber Hopkins all chipped in two
hits in the 13-hit Panther hit parade.
The uprising benefitted Martin (3-
1), who scattered four hits behind two
strikeouts and one walk in the five in-
nings she pitched.
"My defense was on fire today,"
Martin said. "I really trust them. And
it was great to see all the bats come
alive. A win like this really helps us
come together and get better pre-
pared for districts."
"There was no panic even when we
were down 2-0," explained the 18-year-
old Atkinson. "We had to slow our bats
down. Once we got in sync, everything
kinda fell into place. To me, a win like
this just boasts our confidence."
Leopard Slam II
final results
15th Place: Weeki Wachee won by for-
feit over St. Pete Catholic (no show)
13th Place: Anclote 20, Poinciana 0 (3
Inns.)
11th Place: Pasco 6, Citrus 4
9th Place: Central 9, Fivay 1
7th Place: Mitchell 5, Chaminade
Madonna 2
5th Place: NCT 11, Lecanto 4
3rd Place: Hernando 9, Gulf 2
Championship: River Ridge 6,
Countryside 2


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rays, Tigers tie in Spring Training finale

Associated Press Mariners 4, Rockies 3


ST PETERSBURG Doug
Fister gave up two runs and
seven hits over six innings for
the Detroit Tigers in a 3-3 tie
with the Tampa Bay Rays in the
exhibition finale for both teams
on Saturday
Fister, scheduled to pitch the
Tigers' home opener Friday
against the New York Yankees,
had four strikeouts. Brayan
Pena hit a two-run homer in the
fifth off reliever Jamey Wright
Matt Moore allowed one hit,
one walk and struck out five in
four scoreless innings for the
Rays. James Loney connected in
the fifth inning and Ryan Roberts
in the sixth against Fister.
Tampa Bay hosts Baltimore in
its regular-season opener Tues-
day The Tigers start the new
season Monday at Minnesota,
where temperatures are
expected to be in the 30s.
Blue Jays 10, Phillies 4
PHILADELPHIA- Jose Bautista
hit his sixth home run this spring and
the Toronto Blue Jays rode their
high-powered offense to a 10-4 vic-
tory over the Philadelphia Phillies.
Playing a lineup of regulars in
their exhibition finale, the Blue Jays
jumped on Philadelphia starter Kyle
Kendrick right away. Bautista took
the right-hander deep with two outs
in the first inning, and Toronto
scored four times in the third -
highlighted by doubles from Jose
Reyes and Edwin Encarnacion.
Red Sox 4, Twins 2
FORT MYERS Felix Doubront
pitched six-hit ball for five scoreless
innings, and the Boston Red Sox
beat the Minnesota Twins 4-2 in the
spring training finale for both teams.
The left-hander walked one, hit a
batter and struck out six.
Twins right-hander Mike Pelfrey
gave up four runs and nine hits in 3
2-3 innings.
Orioles 7, Mets 1
SARASOTA- Nate McLouth hit
two home runs and the Baltimore


U ili ii'ii U................. ....
lAL&ljS^^^B Allr^^^~


Associated Press
Second base umpire Spencer Flynn signals Atlanta Braves base runner Andrelton Simmons safe on a
throw to second over Future Stars infielder Phil Gosselin during the first inning Saturday in Pearl, Miss.


Orioles concluded their spring train-
ing schedule by holding the New
York Mets to one hit in a 7-1 victory.
Miguel Gonzalez, the No. 3 starter
for Baltimore, gave up a leadoff sin-
gle in the fifth to Marion Byrd, who
scored on Ruben Tejada's sacrifice
fly. Gonzalez struck out four and
walked one in five innings.
McLouth hit leadoff homers in the
third and fifth. The first one came
against Dillon Gee, slated to start
the third game of the season for the
Mets against San Diego.
Braves 10,
Future Stars 0
PEARL, Miss. Dan Uggla and
Evan Gattis each hit a three-run
homer, Mike Minor threw four score-
less innings and the Atlanta Braves
beat a team comprised of the orga-
nization's Future Stars 10-0 in an
exhibition game at Trustmark Park.
Chris Johnson had a solo shot for
the Braves, who played their final
game before Monday's home
opener against Philadelphia. Andrel-
ton Simmons and Jason Heyward


started the game with back-to-back
doubles as Atlanta built a 5-0 lead in
the first inning.
Curve 8, Pirates 6
ALTOONA, Pa. James McDon-
ald was tagged for four runs and
three hits in the first inning, and the
Pittsburgh Pirates lost to their Dou-
ble-A Altoona affiliate 8-6 in their
final exhibition game.
Starling Marte hit a grand slam in
the second that tied the score at 4.
Russell Martin also had two hits for
Pittsburgh.
Reds (ss) 9,
Diamondbacks 0
PHOENIX Homer Bailey threw
six innings of one-hit ball and a
Cincinnati Reds split squad beat the
Arizona Diamondbacks 9-0.
Bailey struck out seven, walked
one and retired his final 10 hitters.
Cliff Pennington's one-out single in
the third was the only hit against the
right-hander, and Gerardo Parra
drew the lone walk two batters later.
Bailey also singled and scored dur-


ing Cincinnati's three-run third inning.
Indians 9, Reds (ss) 1
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Carlos San-
tana homered and doubled off
Cincinnati starter Armando Galar-
raga, leading the Cleveland Indians
to a 9-1 victory over a Reds split
squad in the final spring training
game for both teams.
Santana hit his second home run
of the spring in the fourth, a solo
shot. Mark Reynolds, a free agent
signed to DH, walked and scored on
a single by Matt Carson.
Rangers 5, Padres 2
SAN ANTONIO Someone fi-
nally took advantage of the short
right-field wall at the Alamodome
when Leury Garcia lined a three-run
homer over the 285-foot sign to lead
the Texas Rangers past the San
Diego Padres 5-2.
The Rangers swept both games
played in the Alamodome, which is
designed primarily for football and
special events such as the NCAA
Final Four but had not hosted base-
ball until this weekend.


SALT LAKE CITY-- Kendrys
Morales and Justin Smoak homered
and the Seattle Mariners beat the
Colorado Rockies 4-3 in their final
spring tuneup
Morales, who played for the Los
Angeles Angels' Triple-A affiliate in
Salt Lake City from 2006-2008,
ripped a fastball over the left center
fence in the top of the fourth inning
and Smoak went deep in the fifth to
help the Mariners finish with the
best spring training record in team
history at 22-11.
Astros 6, Cubs 3
HOUSTON Houston's
prospects got the best of the
Chicago Cubs.
Playing a lineup of mostly minor
leaguers in their last exhibition
game, the Astros beat the Cubs 6-3.
The Cubs began the game with
most of their regular starters.
Houston right fielder Domingo
Santana was a home run shy of the
cycle and drove in two runs. Astros
shortstop, 18-year-old Carlos Cor-
rea, the top overall pick in the 2012
draft, went 3 for 4 with a sacrifice fly.
Brewers 5, White Sox 4
MILWAUKEE Rickie Weeks hit
a two-run homer in the first inning
and the Milwaukee Brewers beat the
Chicago White Sox 5-4 in the final
spring training game for both teams.
White Sox starter Dylan Axelrod
came on in relief and threw 5 1-3
scoreless innings before tiring in the
eighth. Axelrod, scheduled to start
Friday against Seattle, was pulled
after RBI doubles by Jonathan Lu-
croy and Sean Halton.
Athletics 4, Giants 3
OAKLAND, Calif. Yoenis Ces-
pedes hit a three-run home run and
the Oakland Athletics held on to beat
the San Francisco Giants 4-3 in the
final tuneup for both teams.
Coco Crisp added two hits and
scored twice, and Dan Straily
pitched five scoreless innings for his
first win since early in spring training.


Cink, Haas on top


Golfers tied at

Houston Open

Associated Press

HUMBLE, Texas Seven
players within four shots of the
lead at the Houston Open have
never won on the PGA Tour.
Twelve of them still aren't in the
Masters. One of them includes a
journeyman who had to qualify
Monday just to get a tee time at
Redstone Golf Club.
In a tournament loaded with so
many possibilities, one of the big
surprises is a major champion.
Stewart Cink has not been
heard from very much since that
summer day at Turnberry in
2009 when he beat Tom Watson
to win the British Open. His
highest finish since then was
third, and that was in the four-
man field at the PGA Grand
Slam of Golf. In 81 starts since
becoming a major champion, he
has missed the cut 30 percent of
the time. He has plunged to No.
272 in the world ranking.
Cink finished off another solid
round Saturday by saving par
form the bunker on the 18th hole
for a 4-under 68, giving him a
share of the lead with Bill Haas.
"Tomorrow is a great learning
opportunity for me to get out
there and be nervous and per-
form and try to stay in the mo-
ment and let it happen," Cink
said. "I can't wait."
Indeed, there will be a sense
of urgency in this tournament
Haas, the co-leader after 36
holes at Bay Hill last week,
made seven birdies over his last
13 holes for a 67 and joined Cink
at 11-under 205.
Now comes the hard part, 20
players separated by four shots
on a course where birdies are
available, but the slightest miss


Associated Press
Stewart Cink watches his shot on the 15th hole during the third round
of the Shell Houston Open golf tournament Saturday in Humble, Texas.


can prove costly
"Tomorrow you're going to
have to play very well," Haas said.
"You can't just hang on and hope
everybody else will fall back"
Steve Wheatcroft, who only
got into this tournament through
a Monday qualifier, got off to a
good start and fell back with an
embarrassing finish. Wheatcroft
was tied for the lead when he
shanked a shot from the green-
side bunker on the 18th, the ball
coming out at a 45-degree angle,


over the green and almost into
the gallery He made a 15-foot
putt to salvage bogey for a 72.
Wheatcroft still was only one
shot out of the lead, along with
Ben Crane (67), D.A. Points (71)
and Jason Kokrak (71).
"If you don't catch it perfectly,
it runs across the green into the
water," Wheatcroft said about
his bunker shot. "I opened the
club face just trying to hit a high
soft one and obviously I missed
most of the club face."


Nine players were only two
shots behind, a group that in-
cluded former British Open
champion Louis Oosthuizen (65),
former world No. 1 Lee West-
wood (67), former PGA champion
Keegan Bradley (67) two-time
major champion Angel Cabrera
(69) and Henrik Stenson (68), who
is one round away from playing
his way into the Masters through
being top 50 in the world.
Phil Mickelson finished his
round of 67 before the leaders
teed off, and he closed with a
wedge into 6 feet for birdie. He
wound up five shots out of the
lead, still within range of trying
to add another win before head-
ing to Augusta for the Masters.
"I feel like I've got a low round
in me tomorrow," Mickelson said
before leaving to meet with for-
mer president George H.W
Bush, who attended the tourna-
ment Saturday
Rory McIlroy had a chance to
join the mix. Swinging more
freely, the world's No. 2 player
was poised to reach 6 under for
the tournament with a superb
bunker shot to 5 feet for birdie on
the 13th hole. He missed the putt,
and then missed the 3-footer he
had left and wound up with a
bogey McIlroy short-sided him-
self on the next hole for bogey,
and dropped another shot on the
18th with a tee shot into the water
He had to settle for a 71 and was
at 214, nine shots behind.
"It's the best I've hit it on the
golf course this week," McIlroy
said.
Wheatcroft and Kokrak are
among seven players within four
shots of the lead who have never
won on the PGA Tour, and
Wheatcroft still has high hopes
of winning to get a two-year ex-
emption in the big leagues. He
would be the first Monday qual-
ifier to win since Arjun Atwal in
August 2010 at the Wyndham
Championship.


PGA Houston Open
Saturday
At Redstone Golf Club, Tournament
Course, Humble, Texas
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,441, Par: 72
Third Round
Stewart Cink 71-66-68-205 -11
Bill Haas 68-70-67-205 -11
Ben Crane 69-70-67-206 -10
D.A. Points 64-71-71-206 -10
Steve Wheatcroft 67-67-72 206 -10
Jason Kokrak 66-69-71-206 -10
Bud Cauley 68-74-65-207 -9
Louis Oosthuizen 70-72-65-207 -9
Lee Westwood 68-72-67-- 207 -9
Billy Horschel 68-72-67-207 -9
Keegan Bradley 70-70-67-207 -9
Kevin Chappell 70-70-67-207 -9
Henrik Stenson 69-70-68 -207 -9
Angel Cabrera 66-72-69-207 -9
Cameron Tringale 65-73-69 -207 -9
Brian Davis 67-70-71-208 -8
Greg Owen 68-73-68-209 -7
John Merrick 68-72-69-209 -7
Charley Hoffman 68-71-70-209 -7
DustinJohnson 69-70-70-209 -7
Phil Mickelson 72-71-67-210 -6
Chez Reavie 72-70-68 -210 -6
Graham DeLaet 71-71-68-210 -6
Josh Teater 74-67-69 210 -6
Scott Verplank 72-68-70 -210 -6
John Rollins 65-74-71 -210 -6
D.H. Lee 72-71-68 -211 -5
James Hahn 74-69-68 -211 -5
Tim Herron 69-73-69-211 -5
Matt Jones 68-73-70-211 -5
Charles Howell III 69-72-70-211 -5
Jeff Overton 67-73-71-211 -5
Brendon de Jonge 71-68-72-211 -5
Steven Bowditch 73-70-69-212 -4
Jin Park 69-74-69-212 -4
Daniel Summerhays 72-71-69-212 -4
Kevin Stadler 70-73-69-212 -4
BrandtJobe 69-73-70-212 -4
Brendan Steele 70-71-71-212 -4
Robert Streb 70-71-71 -212 -4
Steve Stricker 73-68-71 -212 -4
Scott Stallings 70-69-73 212 -4
Justin Leonard 71-72-70 -213 -3
Charlie BeIjan 71-72-70-213 -3
Pat Perez 72-71-70-213 -3
Chris Kirk 71-70-72-213 -3
Aaron Baddeley 70-71-72-213 -3
Nicholas Thompson 70-73-71 -214 -2


Chris Stroud
Cameron Percy
Rory Mcllroy
David Lynn
Kelly Kraft
Ross Fisher
Doug LaBelle II
NickWatney
Ricky Barnes
Bob Estes
Hunter Haas
Boo Weekley
George Coetzee
Henrik Norlander
Gary Woodland
Troy Matteson
Harris English
Russell Henley
Jordan Spieth
Wes Short, Jr.
Carl Pettersson
Chad Campbell
Jimmy Walker
Jerry Kelly


71-72-71
73-70-71
73-70-71
72-70-72
70-72-72
73-69-72
71-71-72
71-71-72
73-68-73
71-69-74
69-71-74
70-69-75
72-71 -72
74-68-73
72-70-73
71-71-73
69-74-73
72-70-74
72-70-74
71-70-75
74-69-74
72-71-74
68-71-78
71-72-75


" J Serena tops Sharapova for Sony title


Associated Press


KEY BISCAYNE Ser-
ena Williams danced to
the crowd's roar, spinning
and grinning, hopping and
waving, then spinning
some more.
If her victory celebration
on the stadium court
Serena Williams prepares to
serve Saturday during the
Sony Open in Key Biscayne.
Associated Press


seemed well-rehearsed, it
was. She earned a record
sixth Key Biscayne
women's title Saturday by
beating familiar foil Maria
Sharapova 4-6, 6-3,6-0 at the
Sony Open.
Sharapova set a new stan-
dard for futility in finals.
She completed a career
Grand Slam by winning the
French Open last year, and
won Indian Wells two weeks
ago, but she's now 0-5 in Key


Biscayne finals.
Sharapova playing
nearly flawless tennis for
an hour, before her serve
and groundstrokes began
to lose steam. Williams
swept the last 10 games
and faltered only during
the trophy ceremony
"I felt good today," she
told the crowd with the
smile. "It's so good to be
No. 6 now I mean, the
six-time oh, gosh.


Thank you."
At 31, the No. 1-ranked
Williams became the old-
est female champion at
Key Biscayne. She won the
tournament for the first
time since 2008 and sur-
passed Steffi Graf, a five-
time champion.
"Serena played a great
match," Sharapova said.
"I'm sure we'll be playing
a few more times this
year"


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE

Justin Bieber's
monkey quarantined
BERLIN -Justin Bieber
had to leave a monkey in

after landing
in Germany
last week
without the
necessary pa-
pers for the
animal, an of-
ficial said.
Saturday Justin
The 19-year- Bieber
old singer ar-
rived at Munich airport last
Thursday When he went
through customs, he didn't
have the documentation neces-
sary to bring the capuchin
monkey into the country, so the
animal had to stay with author-
ities, customs spokesman
Thomas Meister said.
Bieber performed in Mu-
nich on Thursday, beginning
the latest leg of his European
tour He later tweeted: "Mu-
nich was a good time. And
loud. The bus is headed to Vi-
enna now U coming?" He
didn't mention the monkey
The Canadian singer is giv-
ing several concerts in Aus-
tria and then in Germany
over the next week.

Judge rules in
Angelina Jolie's favor
LOS ANGELES -A fed-
eral judge says actress An-
gelina Jolie didn't steal the
story for her
movie "In the
Land of Blood
and Honey"
from a Croat-
ian author
City News
Service re-
ported Fri-
day's tentative Angelina
ruling in Los Jolie
Angeles will
throw out the suit accusing
Jolie of copyright
infringement.
In 2011, author James Brad-
dock sued Jolie and the film
company that made the film,
saying it was partly based on
his book "The Soul
Shattering."
U.S. District Judge Dolly M.
Gee wrote in a tentative rul-
ing that the plots, characters
and themes in the two works
were not "substantially" simi-
lar, though both centered on
war romances.

Singer laughs off
skin-lightening talk
NEW YORK-- IndiaArie
is laughing off talk that she
may have lightened her skin.
The R&B songstress is
known for singing about being
authentic and celebrating
one's true self But some ac-
cused India.Arie of lightening
her skin when
a publicity
photo for her
song "Cocoa
Butter" re-
leased this
week made it
look as though
she were sev-
eral shades
lighter than India.Arie
her dark
brown complexion.
But India.Arie took to Twit-
ter on Friday to deny the accu-
sations, saying she has no
desire to bleach her skin be-
cause she loves herself and her
brown skin "more than ever"
She also said that "magnificent
lighting" is the cause for her
"glow."
She added that she'd like to
keep the conversation going,
though, on the issue of racism
and colorism in the black
community
-From wire reports


Birthday In the year ahead, you might experience
a marked improvement in your conditions. However,
be apprised that just because things may be getting
better, if you don't take advantage of opportunities,
nothing will change for you.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Your perceptions
should be accurate, so trust them. If you put too much
stock in what another says, you could easily make a
mistake.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be wary of those offer-
ing incentives or rewards; they may not have your
best interests at heart. Carefully analyze any propos-
als that come your way.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) You might believe that
you're the one who is doing the lion's share of the
work in a joint effort, but you're wrong. Stop whining
and buckle down.


Associated Press
As Jay Leno lobs potshots at ratings-challenged NBC in his "Tonight Show" monologues, spec-
ulation is swirling the network is taking steps to replace the host with Jimmy Fallon next year
and move the show from Burbank to New York.


Remembering a time before


'Tonight' left New York


FRAZIER MOORE
AP television writer

NEW YORK Here's one
of countless punch lines at
NBC's expense: On returning
from vacation, our "Tonight"
show host tells of being
warmly greeted at the airport
by the network boss "just
before he put my shackles
back on."
Sound familiar? Well, this
wisecrack was lobbed by
Johnny Carson in a mono-
logue that aired nearly 50
years ago.
Compare it to one of the
multitude of jokes from cur-
rent host Jay Leno mocking
NBC as it reportedly tries not
to shackle him but, rather,
send him packing:
"T-Mobile announced they're
doing away with contracts," he
declared in a monologue this
week 'Apparently they got the
idea from NBC."
I hate to add to the tonnage
of words speculating on
Jimmy Fallon as the post-
Leno host of a "Tonight" show
relocating to New York. But I
can't help recalling my early
devotion to "Tonight" back
when it, and Carson, called
New York home and how,
before Johnny took it West, I
attended a taping at Manhat-
tan's 30 Rock.
I was just a kid, up with my
parents to see the 1965 New
York World's Fair Its wonders
included the chance to pass in
front of a camera at the RCA
Pavilion and see yourself on
color TV But nothing at the
fair could match the thrill of


seeing Johnny in person.
I was a Carson fanatic. In my
bedroom in Georgia, I had dis-
connected the speaker of my
Philco TV set (surely risking
electrocution) so I could watch
Johnny on the sly, my head-
phones in place, long after my
bedtime had come and gone. In
conversation with my like-
minded pal, Jim, I routinely
spoke ofJohnny as 'J.C."
Warming up for the show
that afternoon, I with my par-
ents had gone on the NBC stu-
dio tour In Studio 8H (a
decade before "Saturday
Night Live"), we caught a
glimpse of the NBC Space
Center being readied for cov-
ering the launch a few days
later of Gemini 5 astronauts
Gordon Cooper and Pete Con-
rad. Then, excitedly, I spied
well-known correspondent
Edwin Newman in the flesh
through the window of the
NBC News offices.
That evening we were back
at what was then known as the
RCA Building for the
"Tonight" taping. I was too
young to be part of the studio
audience, with its minimum
age of 18, but my father hero-
ically had pulled some
strings. We were seated in a
back row safely out of sight so
I wouldn't be visible when the
camera panned the grinning,
waving crowd before each sta-
tion break. But Studio 6B (the
same studio Fallon airs from
today) was, and is, pretty cozy
I could see fine.
The taping began. In those
quaint days, the "Tonight"
show lasted an hour and 45


minutes. The first 15 minutes,
meant to air starting at
11:15 p.m., were fed as filler
for any NBC affiliates whose
late newscast was only 15 min-
utes long. (By 1967, the first 15
minutes was dropped. Then,
in 1980, "Tonight" shed an-
other 30 minutes, establishing
the hour format nearly every
talk show follows to this day)
Not much happened in
those first 15 minutes. An-
nouncer Ed McMahon and
band leader Skitch Hender-
son (predecessor of Doc Sev-
erinsen and gone a year later)
killed time rapping with the
audience and goofing around
with the band.
Then, at 11:30 p.m., the
show started for real. Carson,
at last, made his entrance.
On this Monday in August,
he was returning from several
weeks' vacation (how nar-
rowly I missed some substi-
tute host!), and the greeting he
received was thunderous.
During his monologue, he
showed ancient footage of
Wright Brothers-era planes
that was supposed to docu-
ment his no-frills flight getting
back to New York. Then came
that joke, the one joke I re-
member It was aimed at none
other than General David
Sarnoff, the legendary ruler
of then-NBC parent RCA.
"When I landed at the air-
port," Carson said, "General
Sarnoff was there to welcome
me just before he put my
shackles back on." ("What are
shackles?" I asked my mother,
then laughed uproariously
when she told me.)


Danny Kaye's daughter spreads his legacy


Associated Press "White Christmas" or his televi-
sion shows and specials or his
NEW YORK Dena Kaye music were in the public
frequently hears from people consciousness.
who have vivid stories about Now, in the 100th year of his
how her legendary fa- birth, Dena Kaye is de-
ther, Danny Kaye, af- termined to help a new
fected their lives. generation discover the
Whether it was genius, and the generos-
through his movie per- ity, of her father, who
formances, which died in 1987 at age 74.
ranged from slapstick to "That's one of the rea-
dramatic, or his croon- sons why I am putting my
ing voice, his effortless heart into this centen-
dancing or his charita- Danny Kaye nial," said Kaye, her fa-
ble works, for many, died at age 74 their's only child, during
Kaye provided indelible in 1987. an interview. "My goal is
memories that continue to be the centennial is a springboard.
cherished to this day And that if parents knew him,
But as Dena Kaye explains, the fact that there's going to be
those comments are usually more interest in him, that they'll
from those of a "certain genera- take their children, their
tion" translation, an older grandchildren."
generation. Those fans were So, Danny Kaye is now on
around when classics like Facebook with an official page.


Today's HOROSCOPE
Cancer (June 21-July 22) The key to success is
to attempt only what you are well equipped to handle.
Winging it will meet only with disaster.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It's good to think of your
abilities as extraordinary, if there's some basis for it. If
there isn't, though, you could underestimate the com-
petition and be easily taken down.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Whatever you do, don't in-
volve outsiders in a sensitive domestic matter. They
might mean well, but their input could compound matters.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Boasting or exaggerating
could lead to an embarrassing situation. There is a
strong possibility that you could tell a fish story to a
guy who has a ruler in his pocket.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be certain that you
have your head on straight when it comes to your fi-
nancial dealings. A lack of awareness could cause


His website has been re-
launched with plenty of multi-
media. The Library of Congress
unveiled its new Danny Kaye
and Sylvia Fine Collection,
where countless documents, in-
cluding video, audio and photo-
graphs from Dena's parents'
own collection, are available for
examination on the Internet
"We have a big following on
Facebook and his website is get-
ting a lot of attention," said Scott
Mauro, a producer who is work-
ing with Dena Kaye to coordi-
nate the centennial celebration.
There are also numerous con-
certs, tributes and film screen-
ings planned throughout the
yearlong celebration, which offi-
cially kicked off last December
(and included a Los Angeles-
area screening of the classic
"White Christmas," complete
with man-made snow).


you to lose out.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Carefully examine
the motives of someone making a grandiose problem.
There might not only be strings attached, there could
be chains.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your self-discipline
could be too lax for your own good. Your chart indi-
cates that you're ignoring several undeveloped
opportunities.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) It behooves you to be
as straightforward as you can in a sensitive conversa-
tion with a friend. Honesty is the best policy as long as
you're kind as well.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Success will be denied
you if you insist on nourishing self-doubts. If you don't
think like a winner, you won't act like one, and the re-
sults will loudly reflect it.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29
Mega Money: 12 30 39 44
Mega Ball: 10
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 5 $1,440
3-of-4 MB 45 $350.50
3-of-4 711 $66
2-of-4 MB 1,193 $27.50
1-of-4 MB 10,926 $3
2-of-4 24,325 $2
Fantasy 5:10 26 27 29 36
5-of-5 2 winners $118,738.52
4-of-5 264 $145
3-of-5 10,195 $10.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Easter Sunday, March
31, the 90th day of 2013. There
are 275 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 31, 1943, "Okla-
homa!," the first musical play by
Richard Rodgers and Oscar Ham-
merstein II, opened on Broadway.
On this date:
In 1889, French engineer Gus-
tave Eiffel unfurled the French tri-
color from atop the Eiffel Tower,
officially marking its completion.
In 1913, American financier J.P.
Morgan died in Rome at age 75.
In 1931, Notre Dame college
football coach Knute Rockne, 43,
was killed in the crash of a TWA
plane in Bazaar, Kan.
In 1933, President Franklin D.
Roosevelt signed the Emergency
Conservation Work Act, which cre-
ated the Civilian Conservation
Corps.
In 1949, Newfoundland (now
called Newfoundland and
Labrador) entered confederation
as Canada's 10th province.
In 1953, Stanley Kubrick's first
feature, a war drama titled "Fear
and Desire," premiered in New
York.
In 1976, the New Jersey
Supreme Court ruled that Karen
Ann Quinlan, who was in a per-
sistent vegetative state, could be
disconnected from her respirator.
(Quinlan, who remained uncon-
scious, died in 1985.)
In 1993, actor Brandon Lee, 28,
was accidentally shot to death
during the filming of a movie in
Wilmington, N.C., when he was hit
by a bullet fragment that had been
lodged inside a prop gun.
In 1995, Mexican-American
singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez,
23, was shot to death in Corpus
Christi, Texas, by the founder of
her fan club, Yolanda Saldivar,
who was convicted of murder and
sentenced to life in prison.
In 2005, Terri Schiavo, 41, died
at a hospice in Pinellas Park, Fla.,
13 days after her feeding tube
was removed in a wrenching right-
to-die dispute.
Ten years ago: American
forces battled Iraqi defenders in
fierce street fighting 50 miles
south of Baghdad, pointing toward
a drive on the capital.
Five years ago: HUD Secre-
tary Alphonso Jackson announced
his resignation amid the wreckage
of the national housing crisis.
One year ago: Hundreds of
world landmarks from Berlin's
Brandenburg Gate to the Great
Wall of China went dark as part of
a global effort to highlight climate
change.
Today's Birthdays: Actor
William Daniels is 86. Hockey
Hall-of-Famer Gordie Howe is 85.
Actor Richard Chamberlain is 79.
Actress Shirley Jones is 79. Musi-
cian Herb Alpert is 78. Actor
Christopher Walken is 70. Come-
dian Gabe Kaplan is 68. Former
Vice President Al Gore is 65. Rock
musician Angus Young (AC/DC) is
58. Actor Ewan McGregor is 42.


Rapper Tony Yayo is 35. Actress
Kate Micucci is 33. Jazz musician
Christian Scott is 30. Pop musi-
cian Jack Antonoff (fun.) is 29.
Thought for Today: "So often
we rob tomorrow's memories by
today's economies." John
Mason Brown, American critic and
lecturer (1900-1969).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Chronicle file
Members of the Chapter T of Gold Wing Riders Association based in Inverness prepare to head out on a weekend drive last year. Some
retirees enjoy expensive hobbies like riding on high-end touring Gold Wing motorcycles; however, today's workers are not confident they
will be able to afford such luxuries in their retirement years. The Employee Benefit Research Institute's annual retirement confidence
survey shows nearly half of workers have little or no confidence that they'll have a financially comfortable retirement.




Crisis of confidence

Markets rebound, but survey finds workers' outlooks on retirement dismal


MARK JEWELL
Associated Press
Workers appear to
have little faith that
the economic recov-
ery and the stock market's
climb have left them better-
prepared for retirement.
Confidence in the ability to
afford a comfortable retire-
ment remains at the same
record low level recorded in
2011, and is slightly lower
than last year, according to
the Employee Benefit Re-
search Institute, which has
conducted the study the past
23 years.
Nearly half of workers sur-
veyed in January had little or
no confidence that they'll
have a financially comfort-
able retirement, EBRI said
Tuesday Twenty-eight per-
cent were not at all confident
- the highest level recorded
since the survey began in
1991 with 21 percent
saying they were not too
confident.
About 13 percent were very
confident and 38 percent
somewhat confident, figures
that weren't substantially
greater than the record lows
in the 2011 survey
The survey also shows how
many workers live on the
edge, with little savings be-
sides the equity they may
have if they own a home, and
besides any expected income
from a pension. Fifty-seven
percent said the total value
of their household savings
and investments was less
than $25,000, excluding any
home equity and pension
benefits. Among that group,
nearly half had less than
$1,000 saved.
If there's any positive take-
away, it's that researchers be-
lieve workers who are the
least prepared for retirement
have become increasingly
aware that they need to save
more.
In 2007, for example, confi-
dence numbers were sub-
stantially higher before the
economy sank into a reces-
sion. Seventy percent were


Rocky retirement

Workers' confidence in their ability to afford a comfortable retirement remains
at the same record low level recorded in 2011 and is slightly lower than last
year. The Employee Benefit Research Institute released the findings from its
23rd annual survey on Tuesday. Here's a look at some of the findings:


Percentage of workers and retirees
identifying the following issues as the
most pressing concerns that most
kmericans face:


id



were not at all confident,
with 21 percent saying they U
were not too confident.
Thirteen percent were very
confident and 38 percent
somewhat confident. (

Methodology: 1,003 I
workers aged 25 and older
and 251 retirees who were T
randomly interviewed by
telephone in January. The ]
statistical margin of error is J
plus or minus 3 percentage
points.
either somewhat confident
or very confident that year.
The decline in confidence
in recent years suggests "a
much higher degree of real-
ism" about the need to in-
crease savings rates, said
Jack VanDerhei, EBRI's re-
search director, and co-au-
thor of the report.
That could explain why
confidence remains low, de-
spite the economy's gains
since the recession and a
market rally that lifted the
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age to a record high two
weeks ago.
Despite the realization
that they're not saving
enough, short-term financial
needs are so pressing that
long-term goals become
secondary
"Job security and financial
security continue to be Amer-
icans' major concerns, not re-
tirement," VanDerhei said.
In addition to worrying
about their retirement sav-
ings, workers "lack confi-


Job uncertainty

MVaking ends meet

Government spending

Medical expenses

rhe economy

Paxes

Mortgage payments
dence in their ability to pay that t]
for medical expenses, and ably ]
even basics such as food, calcul
clothing and shelter," he Twc
said. and 4
The survey was co-spon- that s&
scored by EBRI, a private retire
nonprofit research organiza- press
tion, and Matthew Green- most
wald & Associates, a market group
research firm. Two-dozen identi
public and private organiza- the m
tions, including financial (30 pe
services companies, provided perce
funding. About 1,000 U.S. by me
workers aged 25 and older (12 pe
and 250 retirees were ran- Par
domly chosen for telephone of livi
interviews in January The as the
statistical margin of error is ers ei
plus or minus 3 percent. work
The researchers concluded as 401
that fewer than half of work- enough
ers appear to be taking basic Fift
steps needed to prepare for ers an
retirement. For example, 46 report
percent of those surveyed re- with t
ported that they or their half s&
spouse had tried to estimate nitely
how much they'll need to an un
save by retirement to ensure within


WORKERS RETIREES


30

12


27

12


8 14

9 10

8 6

8 5

8 4


hey could live comfort-
The rest made no such
nation.
o percent of workers
percent of retirees said
having or planning for
ment was the most
ing financial issue that
Americans face. Both
s were most likely to
fy job uncertainty as
ost pressing concern
recent of workers and 27
nt of retirees) followed
eting day-to-day needs
recent for each group).
ticipants cited the cost
ng and daily expenses
key reasons why work-
ther don't contribute to
)lace savings plans such
.(k)s or don't contribute
,h.
y-five percent of work-
id 39 percent of retirees
ted having a problem
heir debt levels. About
aid they could defi-
come up with $2,000 if
expected need arose
n the next month.


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Two men

who left

a mark
Citrus County lost
two outstanding
men in recent
days who were short in
stature but giants in
character.
The Rev James Hoge,
the founder of six Catholic
parishes in Citrus
County and the Catholic
elementary school in
Lecanto, was 96 when he
passed away March 16.
Joe Silvestro, 87, saved
souls in a different way
as one of the founders of
the Inverness Little
League program. He
passed away Tuesday
Father Hoge first
came to Citrus County in
1944 to reach the few
residents in the commu-
nity who were Catholic.
The roads were dirt, the
towns were isolated and
World War II was roaring
in Europe and the Pacific.
Over the decades this
county became his life's
work and he helped es-
tablish the Catholic
churches in Inverness,
Crystal River, Beverly Hills,
Homosassa Springs, Citrus
Springs and Lecanto.
One by one he would
help start them up and
then hand them off.
But over that time, Fa-
ther Hoge became an in-
credible advocate for
Citrus County He got in-
volved in the historical
society, numerous non-
profit agencies and
eventually helped start
the county's first Catholic
school in Lecanto.
For almost 70 years,
Father Hoge traveled the
roads of this community
He left a legacy that will
remain for generations.
One of my favorite Fa-
ther Hoge stories was
that he loved to play golf.
At one charity tourna-
ment, he was pared up
with the Rev John Den-
mark, the Methodist
minister who once served
in Homosassa Springs. The
two men of God enjoyed
each other, but they also
liked to argue the details
of their beliefs.
They also argued
about who had the best
golf game.
One day while playing
at this Black Diamond
charity event, their dis-
cussions got so intense
that they drove their golf
cart off one of the rolling
ridges and ended up
crashing into a sand trap.
They both claimed the
other was the driver at
the time.
Fortunately for us,
they did not drive off
one of the cliffs at the fa-
mous golf course or that
would have been the
end of them.
Joe Silvestro was a
Staten Island, N.Y, trans-
plant to Citrus County,
and he was a hoot Joe ran
the popular Silvestro's
See Page C3


Rotary clubs make a difference worldwide


As a past district governor of Ro-
tary International, I want to share
the latest annual report of Rotary
International and the Rotary
Foundation with the my fellow Ro-
tarians, who number almost 250 in
this county alone.
The report shows there are
1,227,189 Rotarians worldwide in
34,533 Rotary clubs in 204 coun-
tries and territories. Of these Ro-
tarians, 379,000 are in North
America and the Caribbean and


328,817 are in Europe.
Each year, 500,000 young people
participate in the New Genera-
tions programs. Rotaract is for
young people between the ages of
18 and 30 and there are 9,388 Ro-
taract clubs in the world with
216,000 Rotaractors. Citrus County
has one Rotaract club established
at the College of Central Florida
and is trying to start another com-
munity-based club soon. For stu-
dents between 12 and 18, Interact


is growing strong with 338,836 In-
teractors in 14,734 Interact clubs
worldwide. Also, each year some
8,000 students from 80 countries
participate in Rotary Youth Ex-
change. Citrus County is currently
hosting students from Belgium,
Brazil and the Netherlands living
with Rotarians and going to high
school here. Additionally, we also
have several students who are rep-
resenting Citrus County in other
countries.


The Rotary Foundation is truly
one of the world's greatest charita-
ble foundations. It earned a grade
of A+ from the American institute
of Philanthropy, a top rating of four
stars from Charity Navigator and full
accreditation from the Wise Giving
Alliance of the Better Business
Bureau. In the fiscal year of 2012,
only 2 percent of Foundation ex-
penditures went to administrative
See Page C3


Paul Slosberg
OTHER VOICES






"Whhat i
Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013



NTY CHROPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


is most contrary to salvation is not sin but habit."
Charles P6guy, "Basic Verities," 1943


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan...................managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
J Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................ guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


NAT GEO SPOTLIGHT




Strategize for



repercussions



of popularity


Did you see the lengthy
story and stunning
photography in Na-
tional Geographic maga-
zine's current edition about
Crystal River and our mana-
tees? This caliber of publi-
cation is the stuff of dreams
for tourism destinations.
Now we need
to make sure our THE I
dreams don't be-
come night- Great w<
mares. publicity'
There are tourism
plenty of cau-
tionary tales OUR 01
about destina-
tions that re- Strategic
ceived the bright manage
spotlight of na- more cri
tional attention than
- and then al-
lowed that attention and re-
sulting human traffic to
change the very things that
made them attractive. We
can't let that happen here.
National Geographic's
headline says it well: "The
Florida manatee is thriving
in Kings Bay, and so is
tourism. Therein lies the
problem."
As the magazine notes, we
have the de facto manatee
capital of the United States
right here in Citrus County.
We actively market that fact,
and millions of dollars of
our local economy depend
on it.
Anyone who has been
around King's Bay on a
pleasant weekend afternoon
has seen the crowds of wa-
terborne tourists, including
large groups from other
cities on commercial out-
ings. It isn't pretty.
Strategic management of
our natural resources makes
sense on so many levels, but
we haven't been able to
make it happen.
There have been prickly
debates about manatee
rules in King's Bay, and a
Three Sisters Spring master
plan has been under discus-


sion for months. Currently,
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service is taking public
comment on the Crystal
River National Wildlife
Refuge's Comprehensive
Conservation Plan, which
describes the refuge's de-
sired future condition and


ISSUE:
worldwide
y for our
economy.

PINION:
resource
cement
tical now
ever.

ing


provides guid-
ance for its man-
agement.
These plans
must include
monitoring of re-
source usage, at
the very least.
Plans in other
successful natu-
ral destinations
support traffic
control in vari-
ous ways, includ-
permits and


appointments. Do we need
that here? Maybe. But we
need to figure it out soon.
More than just natural re-
source management is re-
quired. Crystal River must
move on its community
planning, partnering and in-
vestment initiatives. Focus
on the experience we want
visitors to have, and align all
efforts behind that vision.
Centralize tourism and eco-
nomic development in a Vis-
itor Center/Tourism
Development Council/
Economic Development
Council/Chamber of Com-
merce complex on U.S. 19.
Untangle regulations that
discourage investors and de-
sired development. Encour-
age establishment of
superior small lodging facil-
ities that attract diverse
groups of visitors and pro-
mote the Crystal River ex-
perience.
Think big, think long-term,
think win-win. But think ...
and act. As Theodore Roo-
sevelt said, "In any moment
of decision, the best thing
you can do is the right thing.
The worst thing you can do
is nothing."


FOR MORE INFO
See the online version of the National Geographic article
and photo gallery at http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/
2013/04/manatees/white-text
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is accepting public
comment on the Comprehensive Conservation Plan until
April 2. Email CrystalRiverCCP@fws.gov with comments or
questions.
Find a fact sheet on Three Sisters Spring at the Friends of
the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex website:
http://www.friendsofchazz.org/three-sisters-springs.html.
The Refuge's Facebook page is at: https://www.facebook.
com/CrystalRiverComplex
Check on things yourself using the manatee cam at Three
Sisters: http://www.fws.gov/crystalriver/manateecam.html



OUND Sad sight
W I just got to comment on today, March 21, I saw
one of the nastiest things I believe I've ever seen in
my life. Two (kids) skipping school about 10:45 this
morning at (a convenience store), picking cigarette
butts out of the ashtray. When (I) confronted them
About it, told them that, you know, there might be
AL diseases or whatever that they could contract, one of
563 0579 the little thugs says, "That's why we pinch the filters
63-" off." Is that just nasty or stupid? I'm not sure what.


Take a

WASHINGTON
As the unendurable mo-
notony of the offseason
ends, celebrate base-
ball's return with mental calis-
thenics. Everyone knows it was
former Atlanta Manager Dave
Bristol who said,
"Only trouble I ever
had with chewing
tobacco was that the
orthodontist said my
daughter was going ,
to have to give it up /
because of her
braces." But do you
know:
1. What pitcher in Georg
a 25-3 season had
more complete OTI
games than home VOl
runs allowed?
2. What four players hit home
runs in four decades?
3. What three players hit
home runs as teenagers and
after their 40th birthdays?
4. What two teams lost a
World Series after being one
strike away from winning?
5. Which National League
team has won the most World
Series games?
6. Which four players won
multiple MVP awards between
1940 and 1949?
7. Since the Cy Young Award
began in 1956, what player won
25 or more games three times
but never won the award?
8. Which team has had the
most Cy Young winners?
9. Which four National
League pitchers have won two
consecutive Cy Young Awards?
10. Who received the highest
percentage of Hall of Fame
votes in history?
11. What four former MVPs
have won the Manager of the
Year awards?
12. Of the 106 switch-hitters
with at least 5,000 at bats, which
two hit .300 or better from both
sides?
13. What switch-hitter holds
the record of hitting home runs
from both sides in 13 games?
14. Which two Hall of Fame
second basemen were on the
woeful (66-96) 1964 Houston
Colt .45s?
15. Who pitched no-hitters at
ages 43 and 44?


0

swing a

16. What Hall of Famer par-
ticipated in 12 double plays in
1929 playing right field?
17. Who led the majors in hits
in the 1980s?
18. Who has the highest
stolen base success percentage
(minimum 500
attempts)?
19. Who holds the
shutouts (69) by a
left-handed pitcher?
20. Who is the only
* reliever who had a
season with more
saves than baserun-
e Will ners allowed?
21. What four third
HER basemen have hit
CES 400 home runs while
playing third base?
22. What was the last World
Series in which a pitcher on
each team pitched three com-
plete games?
23. Which two all-time
leaders in sacrifice flies were
teammates in their prime
years?
24. What pitchers threw the
most one-hitters?
25. Which Minnesota Twin
won batting titles in his first two
full seasons?
26. Which Hall of Fame
pitcher retired the side with
nine pitches and nine strikes,
once in each league?
27. Which two players hit
more than 400 home runs and
more than 150 triples?
28. Who hit more than 40
home runs and batted over .400
in the same season?
29. Among active players with
100 or more career home runs,
which two have more walks
than strikeouts?
30. What pair of teammates
hit home runs in the same game
the most times?
31. How many Hall of Fame
pitchers did Joe DiMaggio face
during his 56-game hitting
streak?
32. Who played on the losing
team while setting the record
for most RBIs (12) in a seven-
game World Series?
Bonus question: What Hall of
Famer said, "The Mets just had
their first .500-or-better April
since July of 1992?"


it these

Answers:
1. Ron Guidry (1978).
2. Ted Williams, Willie Mc-
Covey, Rickey Henderson,
Omar Vizquel.
3. Ty Cobb, Rusty Staub, Gary
Sheffield.
4. 1986 Red Sox, 2011
Rangers.
5. Cardinals (56).
6. Stan Musial (1943, 1946,
1948), Joe DiMaggio (1941, 1947),
Ted Williams (1946, 1949), Hal
Newhouser (1944, 1945).
7. Juan Marichal.
8. Dodgers (Don Newcombe,
1956; Don Drysdale, 1962;
Sandy Koufax, 1963, 1965, 1966;
Mike Marshall, 1974; Fernando
Valenzuela, 1981; Orel Her-
shiser, 1988; Eric Gagne, 2003;
Clayton Kershaw, 2011.)
9. Sandy Koufax, Greg Maddux,
Randy Johnson, Tim Lincecum.
10. Tom Seaver (98.84 in 1992).
11. Frank Robinson, Don Bay-
lor, Joe Torre, Kirk Gibson.
12. Frankie Frisch, Chipper
Jones.
13. Mark Teixeira.
14. Nellie Fox, Joe Morgan.
15. Nolan Ryan.
16. Mel Ott.
17. Robin Yount.
18. Tim Raines.
19. Eddie Plank.
20. Dennis Eckersley (1990).
21. Mike Schmidt (509), Eddie
Mathews (486).
22. 1968 (the Tigers' Mickey
Lolich, the Cardinals' Bob
Gibson).
23. Eddie Murray (128), Cal
Ripken (127).
24. Bob Feller and Nolan
Ryan (12).
25. Tony Oliva.
26. Nolan Ryan.
27. Stan Musial, Lou Gehrig.
28. Rogers Hornsby (42 and
.401 in 1922).
29. Albert Pujols, Todd Helton.
30. Hank Aaron and Eddie
Mathews (75 times).
31. Four (Bob Feller twice,
Hal Newhouser twice, Lefty
Grove, Ted Lyons).
32. Bobby Richardson (1960
Yankees).
Bonus: Ralph Kiner, of course.

George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


f IN r SPITE OF SBUE5TRATIOR, WE'RE
STILL. 4om*t6 TE E 66 EB ROL,,,
RT INSTEAD OF A MURMJ G ET 6T EM F


SLETTERS to the Editor


Work together to
rebuild economy
Like many business people
in Citrus County, it was no
surprise to me what the EDC
and commissioners were
told. Citrus County has
played the game of keeping
business out of county for so
long that it became the norm.
So businesses have passed us
by and located in other areas
for years and now we have to
play catch up in a very poor
economic situation.
The main reason is the
lack of a planning commis-
sion with any direction of
where they are going and
how to get there. Now that
the county sees that it's re-
liance on taxes from
Progress Energy has put
them in a situation of now
having to try and come up
with other tax dollars to op-
erate, they are finally taking
the direction they knew they
needed to. However, the
county should not only be
looking at cities and counties
in Florida that have been


successful bringing in busi-
ness and industry, but places
outside of Florida to see how
they have partnered with
their colleges and universi-
ties to help them identify
those companies and areas
that worked best for them.
There are many people now
retired here that could be of
great service to the planning
commission. This is source
we should be looking to tap
for their business knowledge
and experience.
The commissioners will
need all the help they can get
to change a direction for
some reason they haven't
been able to accomplish and
have to be told by someone
outside that what they have
been spending money on has
been a waste of effort, money
and time. Let's hope EDC
and the commissioners get it
right. The survival of Citrus
County depends on it.

Ray Speerly
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via e-mail. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


(


4


C
5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nothing but the blood of Jesus


"This is all my hope and
peace ... nothing but the
blood of Jesus. This is all
my righteousness ... noth-
ing but the blood ofJesus."
"Nothing But The
Blood, "Robert Lowry and
William Doane, 1876
Today is Easter Sun-
day, the day on
which we Christians
recognize the resurrection
of God's Son and our Sav-
ior, the Lord Jesus Christ.
Through the years, I've
consistently used column
space on Easter to discuss
the reality of His birth,
death and resurrection.
I've attempted to tell why I


believe it and describe the
effect such a belief has had
on my life.
My hope has always
been to do this in such a
way as to offend no one but
to help others who want to
believe.
Believing is usually easy
for me, sort of like breath-
ing. But there have been a
few times when my faith
has fled and I've been mo-
mentarily left with seem-
ingly nothing but cold,
hard mental reasoning to
get through a tough spot.
Such was the circum-
stances a couple of years
ago when I had to undergo
what was supposed to be a


simple surgical procedure. ued, resulting in a degree
It didn't go as planned, and of withdrawal trauma.
I found myself in the hos- Other medications, prima-
pital waiting rily pain-reliev-
for several ing drugs, were
days to added. These
gain enough additions did
strength to face I relieve the
an additional pain, but they
procedure. also seemed to
No doubt add to my agi-
about it: I was tated mental
a sick man and state.
death was a Fred Brannen I was a mess,
very real possi- A SLICE both physically
ability. and emotion-
To make OF LIFE ally
matters worse, I became
medication to which my convinced that I was going
body had become accus- to die.
tomed had to be discontin- Not only that, I even


began to question my eter-
nal salvation.
During my career, sim-
ply put, it was my job to
evaluate facts and to help
find solutions for whatever
business decisions my em-
ployer faced. I usually
found the most proficient
way to do this was to get
back to basics, take the
question to its simplest
form and go forward from
there. And, that's precisely
what I had to do regarding
both my sickness and my
salvation while laying in a
hospital bed.
"What can take away my
sins? Nothing but the
blood of Jesus. What can


make me whole again?
Nothing but the blood of
Jesus. Oh, precious is the
flow that makes me white
as snow, no other fount I
know ... nothing but the
blood of Jesus."
Basic faith, belief at the
most elementary level, led
me to again embrace the
security that regardless of
how I felt, the stripes
Christ bore bought my
healing and the blood he
shed on the cross pur-
chased my salvation.

Fred Brannen is an
Inverness resident and
a Chronicle columnist.


S Know Your Current Financial Synk..


A broad vision


for the future of


transportation


Road to recall
Is there someone at the Chronicle
that knows the answer? Can a
county commissioner be recalled or
impeached? I have asked this ques-
tion numerous times and have yet
to hear an answer. Please help.
Editor's note: The short answer:
Yes. However, there are a number of
requirements for initiation of a recall
election. Per the National Conference
of State Legislatures, they are:
"No recall may commence until offi-
cial has served at least one-fourth of
his term.
"Grounds for recall are malfeasance,
misfeasance, neglect of duty, drunken-
ness, incompetence, permanent in-
ability to perform official duties or
conviction of a felony involving moral
turpitude.
"Time for gathering signatures is 30
days.
"Signature requirement varies ac-
cordingo o the number of registered
voters in the jurisdiction: 50 electors
or 10 percent of the total electors,
whichever is greater, in a district of
fewer than 500 electors; 100 electors
or 10 percent of the total electors,
whichever is greater, in a district of
500-1,999 electors; 250 electors or
10 percent of the total electors,
whichever is greater, in a district of
2,000-4,999 electors; 500 electors or
10 percent of the total electors,
whichever is greater, in a district of
5,000-9,999 electors; 1,000 electors


or 10 percent of total electors,
whichever is greater, in a district of
10,000-24,999 electors; 1,000 elec-
tors or 5 percent of the total electors,
whichever is greater, in a district of
25,000 or more electors."
After enough signatures are gath-
ered to force a re-
00UND call election, the
W ^ county supervisor
of elections must
give the target of


himself or herself
via a written state-
CAL 0 .mentnottoex-
ceed 200 words.
563-0579 Thereafter, the
recall committee
must collect additional the signatures of
15 percent of the electors in the relevant
district. The committee has 60 days after
the target of the recall files a defense to
collect those signatures. If the 15 per-
cent threshold is met, the target of the
recall is given five days to resign. If they
refuse, a recall election is scheduled.
Ed's in the mall
Today is Monday, March 25, and
to the person who needs a watch re-
pairman: Go to Ed's in Crystal River
Mall. He used to be in Sears; now
he has his own shop out in the mall.
If you go into the entrance closest
to where Belk is, he's right to the
right of it. He's wonderful, he's honest
and I trust him with all my jewelry.


Cemetery thefts
I buried my wife six months ago.
She died from cancer. I went in
Lowe's and bought some nice lights
that the sun charges the batteries
up. They were butterflies and some-
body just went down there and stole
them. They've stole every light in
the cemetery not only mine, but
there's about 60, 80 people that
had lights and angels that lit up,
solar, like mine. And I wonder if you
could put something in the paper
thanking them for what they've
done. Getting pretty low to steal
from a cemetery. This is at Magno-
lia Cemetery in Lecanto. I had went
up there Saturday and a lot of peo-
ple are really upset. The had a lot of
money and not only in lights, they
stole a lot of stuff. I'd appreciate it
if you could print it in the paper
and God will take care of them kind
of people.

Money unspent
Well, I was very disappointed in
the Shrimpapalooza this year. I
looked forward to it all year long.
When I got off work at 5 o'clock
Saturday, I ran home, I got a
shower, I showed up in Old Ho-
mosassa at 6 and there was seven
tents left. Five people were already
packing up. I took $200 to spend.
They got nothing. Very disappoint-
ing. It was supposed to be there 'til
8. Sad, sad.


STUART L. ROGEL
Special to the Chronicle

Over the past sev-
eral years, vari-
ous counties,
cities and planning or-
ganizations in Tampa
Bay have advanced
plans for a regional
transportation system.
Currently, many are
being seriously consid-
ered, and we, as a com-
munity, will be asked to
decide our support.
Based on our study of
these plans and discus-
sions with public and
private planners and
transportation experts,
we have identified key
milestones that we be-
lieve we can and must
achieve during each of
the next three decades
to create a robust multi-
modal system in Tampa
Bay We have posted the
full text of our Trans-
portation Vision State-
ment on our website at
wwwtampabay.org. Here
are the highlights:
By 2020, Tampa Bay
will complete the Sun-
coast Parkway to U.S. 19;
start construction on a
new Howard Frankland
Bridge; identify funding
and designs for a re-
gional passenger rail sys-
tem; expand tolls; build
express lanes; and estab-
lish regional bus rapid
transit in high-demand
corridors.
By 2030, Tampa Bay
will complete the Port
Manatee connector to In-
terstate 75; complete
managed lanes between
1-75 and the Suncoast
Parkway; complete the
Howard Frankland road-
way and start a rail span;
put 20 miles of rail serv-
ice into operation; have
40 miles of express lanes;
and have 40 miles of bus
rapid transit.


By 2040, Tampa Bay will
complete the Howard
Frankland rail span and
have 60 miles of regional
rail service; 60 miles of
express lanes; and 60
miles of bus rapid transit.
Why is this important?
Our region continues to
grow, and we must provide
infrastructure to connect
people with jobs, schools,
entertainment and retail.
Equally important, like it
or not, we are fiercely
competing with other re-
gions around the country
(and the world) for busi-
nesses and talent Our re-
gional planners and
transportation experts
know this. This is why
they have recommended
the projects we have in-
cluded in our Trans-
portation Vision
Statement. Parents know
this. They have watched
their grown children
move to cities that have
resources we lack.
The Tampa Bay Part-
nership is determined that
our region must convert
these plans into beneficial
projects. Funding, gover-
nance, economic devel-
opment opportunities and
many other issues must
be carefully considered
by business and govern-
ment leaders and infra-
structure experts alike.
Our Transportation Vi-
sion Statement draws a
line in the sand, showing
what we must do to re-
main competitive, with
plenty of lead time to ac-
complish this, provided
we work collaboratively
across party lines and ju-
risdictional boundaries.
This is what all of us in
Tampa Bay want and ex-
pect from our leaders.


Stuart L. Rogel is
president and CEO of the
Tampa Bay Partnership.


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

Deli in New York, and when he moved to
Inverness he opened the original Joe's
Deli. (This, by the way, is still the home of
the best potato salad in Citrus County.)
Joe was a professional drummer (he
appeared on the "Tonight Show" with
Johnny Carson) and was quite the man
about town but his real claim to fame
was his love of baseball and his involve-
ment in the game.
He was a professional umpire, and for
decades could be found at Little League
parks around Citrus County, where he
umpired games.
Overthe years he has thrown my kids out
at home more than I have. I managed a
Little League team for years while our kids
were growing up, and I don't ever remem-
ber being at the park when Joe Silvestro
wasn't wearing blue and calling strikes.
He was one of the founders of the In-
verness Little League program and
helped run it for decades.
Thousands of young people in Citrus
County benefited from his hard work.
He was such a legend in umpiring cir-
cles that he was invited to work the Lit-
tle League World Series.
Both Joe Silvestro and Father Hoge
were on the short side, but they were
giant men in the growth and develop-
ment of Citrus County.
They were good men, and we will
miss them.

Gerry Mulligan is the publisher
of the Chronicle. Email him at
gm ulligan@chronicleonline. com.


ROTARY
Continued from Page C1

expenses and 8 percent to fundraising.
The Foundation directed 90 percent of
its spending to programs, far exceeding
the benchmark of 65 percent that inde-
pendent charity rating service view as a
measure of high efficiency The Rotary
Foundation is more than 35 percent
above what is considered a high effi-
ciency level. Many charities, it is re-
ported, give less than 50 percent to the
cause for which they are collecting
money The past district governor said
he was particularly proud of the Cen-
tral Citrus County club for being a 100
percent EREY club for the past five
years. EREY is defined as "Every
Rotarian, Every Year," which means
that every member of the club made a
personal donation to the Rotary
Foundation.
The Rotary Foundation signature pro-
gram is Polio Plus. When Rotary an-
nounced to the United Nations in 1985
that it was going to take on the task of
trying to eradicate polio from the Earth,
there were 350,000 new cases of polio in
125 polio-endemic countries. Since
then, Rotarians have contributed more
than $800 million dollars and millions
and millions of man hours to the eradi-
cation of polio. Last year, there were less
than 1,000 cases of polio worldwide in
three endemic countries: Afghanistan,
Pakistan and Nigeria.
Jeff Raikes, chief executive officer of
the Gates Foundation, speaking at the
Rotary International Assembly in Janu-
ary 2012, said "In recognition of Rotary's
great work, and to inspire Rotarians in


the future, the Gates Foundation is com-
mitting and additional $50 million to ex-
tend our partnership. Rotary started the
global fight against polio, and continues
to set the tone for private fundraising,
grassroots engagement and maintaining
Polio at the top of the agenda with key
policymakers." The Bill and Melinda
Gates Foundation has given the Rotary
Foundation $355 million for polio erad-
ication efforts
The annual report states that "an esti-
mated two million people die every year
from water-borne diseases, and more
than 1 billion lack access to clean
water" The report gave two examples of
how Rotary Matching Grants are trying
to address these needs. In Kesamu-Kyall
Parish, Uganda, local Rotarians from
the Muyenga club partnered with Ro-
tarians in Belgium on a multi-year
Foundation Grant Project that ad-
dresses needs in three of Rotary's areas
of focus; water and sanitation, disease
prevention and treatment, and eco-
nomic and community development. It
has established a clean water system, a
bakery, a goat breeding program, a vo-
cational center where women sew
dresses and uniforms for orphans and
free mosquito bed nets for the commu-
nity, and a solar powered cold chain fa-
cility that stores vaccines.
Talking about another Rotary water
well project, Walter Hughes, a member
of the Rotary Club of Rocky Mount, Va.
said, "People throughout the village
came to the well with their buckets and
cups in hand. Everyone is silent as one
of the elders starts pumping the handle.
Cheers erupt when the water come
forth. Seeing the smiling faces of the
men, women and children makes all of
the challenges worth it." Walter was


talking about an 80-club effort that is
bringing clean water to villages in
Ghana.
These two projects were done with
Rotary matching grants. Every year we
do more than 800 such grants. We also
have district grants. These are the types
of grants that help the Citrus County Ro-
tary clubs bring more than 100 under-
privileged children Christmas shopping
each year, dictionaries to every third
grader and other programs that have a
direct affect on our community.
The last two pages of the annual re-
port state that the mission of Rotary In-
ternational and the mission of the
Rotary Foundation.
"The mission of Rotary International
is to provide service to others, promote
integrity, and advance world under-
standing, goodwill and peace through its
fellowship of business, professional and
community leaders.
"The mission of the Rotary Founda-
tion of Rotary International is "to enable
Rotarians to advance world under-
standing, goodwill, and peace through
the improvement of health, the support
of education, and the alleviation of
poverty."
Service above self.


Paul Slosbergis a member of the
Rotary of Central Citrus and has been
a Rotarian for25years. He is a past
district governor, district Rotarian
of the Year and has received the three
highest awards that Rotary Interna-
tional presents, "Citation for Meritori-
ous Service" and the "Distinguished
Service Award' from the Rotary Foun-
dation and Rotary International's
"Service Above SelfAward."


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 C3


O





C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013

New cable
company
I would like to know or
have the information of
that new Internet provider
that's come in. It was in
the paper the other day
and didn't think anything
of it and then when I got
my bill and it was so high
from the local one here, I
would like to have
the telephone a
number and the C
name of the new
Internet. So
please put it in
your Sound Off.
It's a cable com-
pany. It was in the
paper on the
right-hand side. I CAL
looked and looked CQ
and looked and U6U


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1(


can't find it.
Don't punish
patrons
I'm calling to voice my
opinion on the pending bill
to outlaw Internet cafes all
over Florida. There is no
doubt that those cafes
who purported to support
veterans and literally stole
the money should be
closed and appropriately
punished. To close all In-
ternet cafes doesn't seem
fair to those who legitimately
run their businesses. More
so, it is unfair to punish
patrons who enjoy their
visits, meet with friends
and have some time to
spend entertained. Many
seniors have no other out-
let and enjoy spending an
hour or two with friends. I
would hope that Gov. Scott
would give thought to those
ideas because he's going
to be up for election pretty
soon and there's an awful
lot of seniors out there.


Don't trust
groundhogs
Punxsutawney (Phil) is
right; we are going to have
an early spring. Our winter
is pretty well over. All we're
doing now is waiting for
the heat to come down.
We're not going to have a
cold winter. The animal is
correct.
Scouts,
JND listen up
FF read the arti-
S cle by Judy
McBreyer about
the need for new
fenced yards at
the Citrus pound.
/ This would be a
wonderful project
579 for the Boy
579 Scouts or A boy
Eagle Scout proj-
ect or any other organiza-
tion. Please, someone,
help out.

Too many opinions
now what?
As advertised in the Cit-
rus County Chronicle, sev-
eral dentists are now
giving second opinions. I
had a problem with my
dentist, so I went to get a
second opinion. I got three
second opinions and every
one of them was different
than the first one. So what
does one person do now?

Sinkhole source
I recently read in the
Chronicle where "the hos-
pital board has the poten-
tial to convert (County
Road) 491 frontage that
now is a drainage pond
into valuable commercial
or office property." And we
wonder where sinkholes
come from?


I I TLE T C ET 1 Br TOMBROE RS I


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County "Super Hero" who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle.
He is also the spokesperson against alcohol, tobacco & prescription drug abuse.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Dogged by time change
Forcing my drooping eyelids to
stay up and carefully unfolding my
weary body, I climbed out of my
comfortable bed an hour early!
Why? Because the clock says so!
Oy vey! Daylight savings time!
Whose cruel idea was this anyway?
Were there no situations to solve,
plans to fulfill, or luncheons to attend?
Were those "in charge" discussing
next week's golf game or camping
trip when a giant light bulb ap-
peared, suggesting clocks be ad-
justed twice yearly? If there was


one good reason for this negatively
anticipated event, maybe I could
push all the bad reasons aside and
suffer less grudgingly I said maybe.
The clock tells me it's 10 a.m.,
but my system knows it's only 9;
therefore, excuse my head resting
on the counter, next to another empty
coffee cup. I'm no young chicken
anymore just ask the crazy roos-
ter down the road. Someone forgot
to tell him to change his clock!
The sun doesn't know about this
inconvenience, animals are unin-
formed; and, regardless of what our
lawmakers say, daylight savings is


not smart, healthy or helpful. In
general and factually, people do
not perform as well, there are more
accidents, and children misbehave
and are crankier at school. This pro-
cedure is counter-productive. A sim-
ple solution would be to choose one
time or the other and leave it alone.
Until then, I'll drag around in my
tiresome world, never changing my
"personal clock." Right now, this
tired creature of habit needs a nap
all this complaining wore me out!
Joanie Welch
Inverness


;M,, IB"CV7i Call Jennie at 382-u0u8. -
? t I ,"I- Anonymous tumpkcl isr8 -' 4
Elvis Fen
CRYSTAL EftabW.fl 4I!.-^F Rlf.KIo\'.b^ ~h < IC N~L--- A^ |
OODPXU 0 11- OD I tLf


L Crystal iver7 PowerT~
and Sail Squadron


COMMENTARY












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


The scooter game


Scooters companies'strategies amount to Medicare fraud feds allege


MATTHEW PERRONE
AP health writer

WASHINGTON
T V ads show smiling
seniors enjoying
A V an "active"
lifestyle on a motorized
scooter, taking in the sights at
the Grand Canyon, fishing on a
pier and high-fiving their
grandchildren at a baseball
game.
The commercials, which
promise freedom and inde-
pendence to people with lim-
ited mobility, have driven the
nearly $1 billion U.S. market
for power wheelchairs and
scooters. But the spots by the
industry's two leading compa-
nies, The Scooter Store and
Hoveround, also have drawn
scrutiny from doctors and law-
makers who say the ads make
seniors think they need a
scooter to get around when
many don't.
Members of Congress say the
ads lead to hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars in unnecessary
spending by Medicare, which
is only supposed to pay for
scooters as a medical necessity
when seniors are unable to use
a cane, walker or regular
wheelchair. Government in-
spectors say up to 80 percent of
the scooters and power wheel-
chairs Medicare buys go to
people who do not meet the re-
quirements. And doctors say
more than money is at stake:
Seniors who use scooters un-
necessarily can become seden-
tary, which can exacerbate
obesity and other disorders.

4 4D patients have been
J. brainwashed by The
Scooter Store," said Dr. Bar-
bara Messinger-Rapport, di-
rector of geriatric medicine at
the Cleveland Clinic. "What
they're implying is that you can
use these scooters to leave the
house, to socialize, to get to
bingo."
The scooter controversy,
which has escalated with a
raid by federal authorities on
The Scooter's Store's New
Braunfels, Texas, headquar-
ters last month, underscores
the influence TV ads can have
on medical decisions. Like
their peers in the drug indus-
try, scooter companies say di-
rect-to-consumer advertising
educates patients about their
medical options. But critics
argue the scooter spots are lit-
tle more than sales pitches
that cause patients to pressure
doctors to prescribe unneces-
sary equipment
The Scooter Store and Hov-
eround, both privately held
companies that make about 70
percent of the U.S. market for
scooters, spent more than $180
million on TV radio and print
advertising in 2011, up 20 per-
cent from 2008, according to
advertising tracker Kantar
Media. Their ads often include
language that the scooters can
be paid for by Medicare or other
insurance: "Nine out of 10 peo-
ple got them for little or no cost,"
states one Hoveround ad.

H overound did not re-
spond to a half-dozen re-
quests for comment. The
Scooter Store, the nation's
biggest seller of scooters, said
most people who contact the
company after seeing the ads
do not ultimately receive a
scooter.
"The fact that 87 percent of
the persons who seek power
mobility products from The
Scooter Store under their
Medicare benefits are disqual-
ified by the company's screen-
ing process is powerful
evidence of the company's
commitment to ensuring that
only legitimate claims are sub-
mitted to Medicare," the com-
pany said in a statement.
The Scooter Store has been
operating with a streamlined
staff in recent days, following
massive layoffs in the wake of
the raid by federal agents.

Insurance executives say
doctors who don't under-
stand when Medicare is sup-
posed to pay for scooters are
partly to blame for unneces-
sary purchases.


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Thinkstock
Power scooters are frequently advertised on TV, but a number of medical professionals caution that the
sales pitches aren't always in people's best interests. "Patients have been brainwashed by The Scooter
Store," said Dr. Barbara Messinger-Rapport, director of geriatric medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. "What
they're implying is that you can use these scooters to leave the house, to socialize, to get to bingo."


Associated Press
This undated screenshot shows a frame grab from a Hoveround
commercial. Members of Congress say the ads by The Scooter
Store and Hoveround have lead to hundreds of millions of dollars
in unnecessary spending by Medicare, which is only supposed to
pay for scooters when seniors are unable to use a cane, walker
or regular wheelchair.


Scooters which are larger
than power wheelchairs and
often include a handlebar for
steering are covered by
Medicare if they are pre-
scribed by a doctor who has
completed an evaluation
showing that a patient is un-
able to function at home with-
out a device.
The doctor fills out a lengthy
prescription form and sends it
to a scooter supplier that de-
livers the device to the patient
and then submits the paper-
work to Medicare for payment.
Medicare pays about 80 per-
cent of that cost, which can
range from $1,500 to $3,500.
The remainder is often picked
up by supplemental insurance
or the government-funded
Medicaid program for low-in-
come and disabled Americans.
The process can help immo-
bile seniors get equipment that
improves their lives.

Ernest Tornabell of Boyn-
ton Beach, Fla., received
a scooter from Pride, a smaller
manufacturer, through
Medicare about six years ago.
Tornabell, 73, suffers from obe-
sity, diabetes and lung disease


and said he used to never
leave his house. Now, using the
scooter he can walk his dog, go
to the grocery store and run
other errands.
"I couldn't really get out and
do anything before. Now I have
a lot more mobility," said Torn-
abell, whose doctor recom-
mended he get the device.
But Dr. Stephen Peake, med-
ical director for the insurer
Blue Cross Blue Shield in Ten-
nessee, said doctors can often
be as uninformed about the
appropriate role of scooters as
patients.
"I talk to a lot of physicians
about this subject ... and after
our discussions, they don't un-
derstand that you can't get a
power mobility device so mom
can go to the park with the
family," Peake said in testi-
mony before the Senate Com-
mittee on Aging last year.
One reason for the confu-
sion? Doctors said scooter
companies are just as aggres-
sive with health professionals
as they are in marketing to
their patients.
Dr. Jerome Epplin of Litch-
field, Ill., who also testified be-
fore the Senate, estimates only


about one of every 10 patients
who ask him for a scooter ac-
tually needs one. But he said
sales representatives from
some scooter companies put
pressure on him by accompa-
nying patients to his office.
The effect is coercive, he said.
"It can be intimidating," Ep-
plin said. "I see it as an inap-
propriate attempt to influence
my clinical judgment when I'm
evaluating a patient."

Allegations of Medicare
fraud within the industry
go back nearly a decade.
In 2005, the U.S. Justice De-
partment sued The Scooter
Store, alleging its advertising
enticed seniors to obtain power
scooters paid for by Medicare,
and the company then sold pa-
tients more expensive scooters
they did not want or need. The
Scooter Store settled the case
in 2007 for $4 million.
As part of the settlement,
The Scooter Store was operat-
ing under an agreement that
made the company subject to
periodic government reviews
between 2007 and last year In
2011, the latest review avail-
able, government auditors es-
timated The Scooter Store
received between $47 million
and $88 million in improper
payments for scooters.
The Scooter Store took no
action to repay the money until
February 2012, when the
Health and Human Services'
inspector general threatened
to bar the company from doing
business with Medicare, which
accounts for 75 percent of its
revenue, according to its con-
gressional testimony
The company said the gov-
ernment's estimate was flawed
and it was willing to repay
$19.5 million in overpayments.
The company has paid about
$5.7 million. The rest is sched-
uled for repayment by 2017.


Relative


gives up


family


money
Dear Bruce: We
are trying to set-
tle my in-laws' es-
tate in Florida since
they both are deceased.
One of the siblings won a
lottery last summer and
now has more money
than he needs. He has
agreed to sign over his
share of the estate. We
were told his children,
as his heirs, could claim
his share by Florida law
for up to four years.
Could they sign the form
as well and that would
solve the issue, or would
his share then go to the
two grandchildren? -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: I'm a lit-
tle perplexed. I must as-
sume both of your
in-laws died without a
will. If there is a will and
one of the heirs decides
he doesn't wish to share
in the estate, that's the
end of it. His share
would be split among
the remaining heirs. I
have no reason to be-
lieve the children of the
sibling who is relin-
quishing his rights can
claim his share.
I don't want to sound
like a broken record, but
I would suggest you con-
sult an attorney if any
appreciable monies are
involved not to handle
the matter, but just for
information as to what
you should do when
your brother signs off.
Dear Bruce: I bought
a home in September
2005 for $360,000. I put
$72,000 down and bor-
rowed $288,000 at a fixed
rate of 5.5 percent for 30
years. After 7 1/2 years, I
owe $249,000. I have
managed to put away
about $100,000, but of
course I make nothing
on my CDs, savings,
IRAs, etc.
Would it be wise for
me to put a sizable sum
of money ($20,000) to-
ward paying off my
mortgage? Would it be
wise to do this if I am
going to stay in the home
for many years, and
would it be wise if I'm
going to sell it in a few
years? Mike in Long
Island
Dear Mike: You make
a valid point: You have
scrimped and saved
$100,000, but you're
making nothing on your
investments. Unless
you're willing to go into
the market, which I
think you should con-
sider, you would be wise
to pay off as much on the
mortgage as possible.
That effectively would
result in getting a 5.5
percent return on your
investment.
You also should apply
for a new mortgage. You
should be able to reduce
your rate by 1.5 to 2 per-
centage points, which is
appreciable. If you
could reduce your mort-
gage to 3.5 percent, you
would save approxi-
mately $4,800 a year in
payments. Even 3.5 per-
cent is much more than
you're getting on your
CDs.
Dear Bruce: We are a
husband and wife in our
70s, and we are consid-
ering selling our residence


. Page D4


. Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Speed networking at
Crystal River Mall
To make about 100 contacts in two
hours, attend an evening of business
matchmaking, Speed Networking, from
5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, April 4, at Crys-
tal River Mall.
Preregistration is $10 or $15 at the
door. Expand your network by maximiz-
ing your time and meeting new contacts
every few minutes. Meet face to face
with prospective clients, partners and
referrals.
Prior to the Speed Networking, a Pre-
Speed event will be at 5 p.m. This will
include a presentation by SCORE and
The Crystal River Mall on a new busi-
ness hub concept for first-time business
owners.
Call 352-795-2585 to register or for
more information.
Citrus Memorial to host
Diabetes Alert Day
The Citrus Memorial Diabetes Center
is hosting Diabetes Alert Day at the In-
verness Walmart pharmacy from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. Dietitians and a diabetes
educator will be on-hand to help resi-
dents better recognize risk for Type 2
Diabetes.
Diabetes Alert Day was created by
the American Diabetes Association to
encourage citizens to think about risk for
diabetes. As part of the Alert Day, Dia-
betes Risk Tests will be available to
highlight potential risks for prediabetes
or Type 2 diabetes.
An RSVP is not necessary to take the
seven question test or speak to the Dia-
betes Educator and Dietitians.


Business DIGEST
fields. They assess the qualifications of
the personnel and the adequacy of facil-
ity equipment. The surveyors report their
findings to the ACR's Committee on Ac-
creditation, which subsequently provides
the hospital with a comprehensive report.
The American College of Radiology is
a national organization serving more
than 32,000 diagnostic and interven-
tional radiologists, radiation oncologists,
and nuclear medicine and medical
physicists with programs focusing on
the practice of medical imaging and ra-
diation oncology and delivery of com-
prehensive healthcare services. The
modalities that have received full ac-
creditation by the ACR include:
CT adults and pediatrics, head,
neck, chest, abdomen.
Ultrasound gynecological, gen-
eral and vascular ultrasound service to
include: peripheral vascular cerebrovas-
cular, abdominal vascular, breast and ul-
trasound-guided biopsy.
Nuclear medicine planar, spect,
nuclear cardiology.
MRI head, spine, body, muscu-
loskeletal, MR angiography.
Mammography.
Oak Hill Hospital has been serving
the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the
largest medical facility in Hernando and
Citrus County (262 acute-care beds), is
one of the area's largest private employ-
ers, and offers Hernando County's only
comprehensive cardiovascular program,
including open heart surgery. Some 300
physicians, 950 associates and more
than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill
Hospital's health care delivery team.
Oak Hill announces


.
k aO Hill imaging department Associates of the Month


receives ACR accreditation
SPRING HILL- Oak Hill Hospital
announces that its Imaging Department
has been awarded accreditation by the
American College of Radiology ACR).
Oak Hill Hospital now has ACR accredi-
tation in the most modalities in the area.
The ACR, headquartered in Reston,
Va., awards accreditation to facilities for
the achievement of high practice stan-
dards after a peer-review evaluation of
the practice. Evaluations are conducted
by board certified physicians and med-
ical physicists who are experts in their


SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital
has announced its Star Associates of
the Month for January. They are EVS
f l, technician Brandi
Belcher and Regis-
tered Nurse Christine
Morrell.
Belcher joined Oak
Hill Hospital's Envi-
ronmental Services
Department in Janu-
Brandi ary 2012. She cleans
Belcher patient rooms and
serves as a volunteer at Oak Hill Hospital.
Belcher lives in Spring Hill with her


grandmother, Ann. Her nomination
came from a nurse in Wound Care who
praised her efficiency and pride in all
she does at Oak Hill Hospital.
For her part, Brandi said she "loves
meeting new people and helping them."
Morrell joined Oak
Hill Hospital in 1993
during the summer
months as a candy
striper. From that
.. point, she knew she
wanted to be in the
medical field and
Christine joined Oak Hill Hospi-
Morrell tal's medical/surgical
unit as a CNA on the fourth floor while
finishing nursing school.
In June, she passed the NCLEX and
came to the overnight shift as an RN on
the fourth floor where she strives to
make sure the needs of her patients are
met, "especially pain, so they can have
a good night's sleep."
Morrell lives in Spring Hill and has
three daughters, Jasmine, 15, Julietta,
8, and Maddison, 7.
Morrell's nomination praised her as a
wonderful nurse. The patient who com-
plimented her said she would never
know she was a new nurse and compli-
mented her for going above and beyond
to make her stay more than comfortable.
Morrell said she enjoys working the
overnight shift because it gives her a
chance to really know her patients and
help them with any concerns they have.
Each month hospital associates are
chosen in a process that involves nomi-
nations and voting by their peers, pa-
tients, patient families and physicians.
All About Nature
is Business of the Month
All About Nature has been selected
as the January Business of the Month at
the Crystal River Mall.
Owner Roger Osborne took an initiative
in January to hand out fliers and brochures
promoting his manatee merchandise at
the Manatee Festival while running spe-
cials for the weekend in his store.
All About Nature features a variety of
manatee merchandise plus several local
farm-produced goods such as local pepper
jellies, local honey, local goat milk soaps,
local cedar birdhouses, and more!
See Page D4


Associated Press
French people watch a live debate with French President
Francois Hollande on Thursday in a bar in the village of La
Bastide Clairence, southwestern France.

France may tax

firms 75 percent

on lavish salaries


Associated Press
PARIS French Presi-
dent Francois Hollande may
have finally found a way to
tax the really rich: by mak-
ing their companies pay
In a televised interview
Thursday night, he said he
wants companies that pay
their employees more than
$1.3 million to pay 75 per-
cent payroll taxes on those
salaries.
The proposed tax, which
still needs to be approved
by parliament, replaces
one of Hollande's signa-
ture campaign proposals:
to tax individuals who
earns more than 1 million
euros at 75 percent.
France's highest court has
thrown out that plan and
the government has been
looking for a replacement.
Hollande said he hoped
the new proposal would
push companies to lower
executive pay at a time
when France's economy is
suffering, unemployment
is soaring and employees
are being asked to take pay
cuts.


While the president reit-
erated his goal of stopping
the rise of unemployment
this year and restarting
growth, he offered no spe-
cific new economic policies.
"The tools are there. We
need to use them fully," he
said on France-2 television.
The new payroll tax
would last only two years.
On the highest salaries,
companies already pay
payroll taxes that add up
to at least 50 percent of the
paycheck.
"What's my idea? It's not
to punish," Hollande said.
"When so much is asked of
employees, can those who
are the highest-paid not
make this effort for two
years?"
Hollande's original plan
for a 75 percent tax on in-
dividuals was also con-
ceived as a largely
symbolic measure. It was
likely to have brought in
only about 100 million to
300 million euros an in-
significant amount in the
context of France's
roughly 85 billion-euro
deficit.


www.wmwccpa.com


Inverness
726-8130


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522 BOB LANE,Accountant


I Certified Public Accountant Member: Florida Institute of CPAs I


* Tax Preparation:


IT'S


TAX


TIME



There's

still time

left to

place your

ad



Call

563-5592


CALL NOW!


Accounting & Income Tax Returns L7.
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities 'I
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


352-563-2911


* Accurate and affordable service year round
* Experienced, trained tax professionals
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Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
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Crystal River (352)795-4733 / 564-1010
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Homosassa (352) 628-3660


4&R BLOCK
MIT0000


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

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D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


BUSINESS


For more information
on advertising call
Judy Moseley at
352-564-2917 or
Yvonne Shepard at
1 352-563-3273 1









D3


u-c' -CITRUS COUNTY
=,. W Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Todd Waterman
Suncoast Plumbing and
Electric, Homosassa
... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!



Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
April 2 Ribbon-
cutting, Glasswerx,
8:30 a.m.
April 4 Ribbon-
cutting, Franklin
Anderson Gallery of
Arts, 4:30 p.m.
April 10 Ribbon-
cutting, Antonio
Griffin Lawn &
Garden, 8:30 a.m.
April 11 Business
After Hours, Insight
Credit Union, 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
April 12 April
Chamber Lunch at
Plantation, 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m.
April 18 Ribbon-
cutting, Christ Medical
Center, 4:30 p.m.
April 25 Business
After Hours, Suncoast
Schools Federal Credit
Union, 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m.
April 26 Chamber
Pillar Awards dinner
at Citrus Hills, 6 p.m.
to 10 p.m.
May 2 Golden
Citrus Scholars, 6 p.m.
Remember, coupons
and discounts also
appear on the mobile
and regular websites!
Check out our complete
calendar for community,
entertainment and
fundraising events.

B ^


Sign up for weather notifications

y ep, it's that time of year again free with the Citrus County Sher- the option to enter a location to How to sign up
the severe weather season iffs Office's CodeRED weather monitor, contact details, andchoose
that comes around every spring program by visiting www.sheriff which warnings you receive. Visit sheriffcitrus.org/EM/
and catches some of us bysurprise. citrus.org/EM/ and clicking on If you do not have computer and click on CodeRED
To stay current on weather CodeRED Registration near the access, call 352-746-6555 or visit Registration, or call
conditions, you may register for center of the page. You will have a local library for assistance. 352-746-6555.


Directly outside the window in this photo is the restaurant's garbage area for recycling and waste. Not a
pretty picture when you are eating a meal. However, the establishment found a simple, inexpensive and
clever way to "fix" the view.

First impressions DO matter


graphic magazine devotes 16
pages to the manatee and
Crystal River. The magazine
boasts a U.S. circulation of 5 million,
monthly! Additionally, the magazine is
circulated worldwide in 36 languages
and has a global circulation of more than
8 million. That translates to a potentially
large tourist influx in the future for Citrus
County and that provides us a perfect
opportunity to review the impressions
that we convey.
Sometimes we become so focused on
our tasks that we stop actually seeing our
space. When a visitor, a tourist, a new
customer or client enters our place of
business, they are looking at the sur-
roundings with interest and quite possibly
a critical eye. And while we all know that


a book should not be judged by its cover,
the truth is that sometimes judgments
are made with a cursory glance.
Take a moment and look at your place
of business with a fresh eye. Could the
trim use a quick paint touchup? Are
there cobwebs that only show when the
light is just right or wrong? Are letters
missing on your sign or signs in front of
your building? Is there a light bulb or
two or three that needs replacing?
Maybe a small area rug would cover up a
poor spot on the floor or add a touch of
warmth to an otherwise sterile environ-
ment. Remember: Once the customer
comes in, you want them to be relaxed,
happy and ready to stay for a while.
Look around and then think outside
the box for creative solutions to visual
concerns.


Check your

calendar &

your closet
T he Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce
will hold its April Members
lunch Friday, April 12, at the
Plantation on Crystal River.
Join us at 11:3o a.m. to meet
new members and mingle
with those you already know.
The 30 minutes before the
lunch are a perfect time to
introduce yourself and your
business to potential clients.
Be sure to bring a stack of
business cards and your
best smile! Our April lunch
is sponsored by The Women
of Sugarmill Woods and
features County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek as guest
speaker. Register at www.
citruscountychamber.com
under the Members Only
tab for discounted prepaid
pricing. Lunch is $22 for
nonmembers, and $20 in-
voice or at the door, and
$18 prepaid for members.
Ladies, put on your party
dress and join us for annual
Chamber of Commerce Pillar
Awards dinner. This year
willhavea"RedCarpet"theme,
and Social Media Designs
will be taking photographs of
those entering this Oscar-
like event. This annual event
honors local businesses and
individuals who have given
of their time and talents to
make Citrus County a bet-
ter place for all of us. The
festivities, held at Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club, will begin with a cash
bar from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.;
dinner from 7 p.m. to 8
p.m.; awards presentations
from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.; and
our auction at 9 p.m.. Tick-
ets are just $35 per person
for this gala. Contact Keith
Pullias if you are interested
in a sponsorship opportu-
nity for this upscale event.


Xtreme Fun has moved!


Come out to Xtreme Fun's new location
at 2211 E. Norvell Bryant Highway,
Hernando, FL 34442. Now in a facility that
offers more room, the company will be ex-
panding its Party Store section that houses
everything one could need to host a party.
Stop by the grand opening April 6. The New
Fox 96.7 is will be doing a remote from noon
to 2 p.m. For that day only, all party supplies
are 50 percent off, there will be Bounce
rental giveaway, a rock wall, inflatables for
the kids as well as free hotdogs, nachos, pop-
corn and water. For the remainder of April,
take 30 percent off all party supplies. Stock
up for graduation, Mother's Day and Fa-
ther's Day festivities. For information, call
Xtreme Fun at 352-419-7965.


Happy Easter from the Citrus

County Chamber of Commerce!
No plans to cook today? The following Chamber member restaurants want to let you
know their Easter schedule. Of course, additional restaurants may be open Easter Sun-
day; however, we recommend that you call and check before checking in.
Angelotti's Pizza: Closed. Havana House Grill: Open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
B&W Rexall: Open 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Neon Leon's: Open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Golden Corral: Open regular business hours. Ike's Old Florida Kitchen: Open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Seagrass Waterfront: Open; reservations Taverna Manos: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; reservations only.
requested. Grumpy Gators: Open at 11 a.m.



Please welcome new BWA members


April Zay
Director, Community Relations
Superior Residences of Lecanto


The Business Women's Alliance of
theCitrus CountyChamber ispleased
to welcome two new members.

The Business Women's Alliance is a com-
mittee of the Chamber for women only.
The BWA holds three luncheons annually,
where women have the opportunity to dis-
cuss ways to increase business and profit.
These events are often packed with more
than 125 local business ladies. Every fall
the BWA hosts the annual Health &Fitness
Expo. Additionally, the BWA passes out
scholarships to young women in the com-
munity. Members or their organization
must be members in good standing with
the Chamber.


Mary Pericht
Assistant Branch Manager
Cadence Bank, Inverness


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


..... .. ..1


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SAC Capital portfolio


manager arrested


Associated Press

NEW YORK A senior
portfolio manager for one
of the nation's largest
hedge funds was arrested
Friday, accused of joining
an insider trading conspir-
acy that the government
said made more than $6
million illegally for the
powerhouse investment
company founded by bil-
lionaire businessman
Steven A. Cohen.
Michael Steinberg, 41,
pleaded not guilty Friday,
hours after he was arrested
at his Manhattan apartment
on insider trading charges
lodged in an indictment
unsealed in U.S. District
Court in New York City The
senior portfolio manager,
who has worked more than
15 years at SAC Capital
Advisors and its Sigma
Capital Management unit,
was released on $3 million
bail. Assistant U.S. Attorney
Antonia Apps told Judge
Richard Sullivan that Stein-
berg made no statements to
authorities after his arrest


His attorney, Barry Berke,
said in a statement that
Steinberg "did absolutely
nothing wrong." He said
Steinberg's trading deci-
sions were based on de-
tailed analysis.
"Caught in the crossfire
of aggressive investiga-
tions of others, there is no
basis for even the slightest
blemish on his spotless
reputation," he said.
In a statement, SAC Cap-
ital, which manages $15
billion, said Steinberg "has
conducted himself profes-
sionally and ethically dur-
ing his long tenure at the
firm."
U.S. Attorney Preet
Bharara said in a statement
that Steinberg "was another
Wall Street insider who fed
off a corrupt grapevine of
proprietary and confiden-
tial information cultivated
by other professionals who
made their own rules to make
money ... Mr. Steinberg
seized on the opportunity
to cash in and tried to keep
his crime quiet, as charged
in the indictment"


DIGEST
Continued from Page D2

Based on its efforts, Crystal River Mall honored
the All About Nature. The award's criteria includes
outstanding visual appearance of the store, creative
displays, use of advertising, thinking outside the
box and outstanding customer service.
All About Nature can be contacted at 352-563-
1425 or visit www.allaboutnature.org
Karen Kanter earns certification
for swallowing disorders
CRYSTAL RIVER Karen Kanter, a speech lan-
guage pathologist, earned the McNeill Dysphagia
Therapy Program (MDTP) certification in January.
The certification enhances rehabilitation services
available to patients with chronic swallowing disor-
ders at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center and
Seven Rivers Rehab & Wound Center.
MDTP is an exercise-based approach to address
chronic swallowing difficulties, called dysphagia, in
adults. Using the MDTP approach, Karen imple-
ments a systematic framework of therapy helping
patients increase the amount and types of food and
liquid items they can successfully swallow.
While not every patient improves following MDTP
intervention, the success rate is more than 90 per-
cent for increased safe oral intake and nearly 70
percent for removal of feeding tubes in chronic pa-
tients who have not responded to previous treat-
ment or therapy.
Kanter has served the patients of Seven Rivers
Regional since 2009 and is the hospital's Stroke
Support Group facilitator. She earned her Bachelor
of Science degree at the University of South Florida
in Tampa, and her master's degree from Seton Hall
University in South Orange, N.J. Kanter has exten-
sive experience working with pediatrics and adults.
To learn more about MDTP and Kanter, call 352-
795-0534.
Two financial seminars
in county during April
Nature Coast Financial will host two seminars
this month.
Women and Investing Seminar, 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, in the Garden Room at
Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club.
It will be an informative and interactive presenta-
tion covering:
Unique challenges women investors face and
how to overcome them.
What to know about investments before losing
a spouse.
Strategies for leaving a legacy to children and
grandchildren.
A light lunch will be provided. Seating is limited.
Call 352-794-6044 or 352-794-6043 to register.
Annual Shred Party, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday,
April 23, in the parking lot of the Century 21 building
next to Brannen Bank on U.S. 19.
Bring any paper you want to have shredded.
Horizon Homecare
named as a top agency
SPRING HILL- Horizon Homecare recently an-
nounced it has been named a top agency of the 2012
HomeCare Elite for the sixth consecutive year.
Homecare Elite is a compilation of the top-per-
forming home health agencies in the United States.
Now in its seventh year, the HomeCare Elite identi-
fies the top 25 percent of Medicare-certified agen-
cies and further highlights the top 100 and top 500
agencies overall.
Co-owner Velvet Baxley credits the dedicated
caregivers and the leadership of co-owner
Stephanie Henchey with the agency's ability to
achieve recognition as one of the HomeCare Elite.
"From day one our goal has been to ensure that
we provide the highest in quality care to our neigh-
bors in the community," Baxley said. "We believe
that combining professionalism with compassion
ensures that our patients achieve the best possible
outcomes and that is what is most important to us.
The fact that we are recognized nationally for
achieving this goal is just a bonus!"
Senica Air Conditioning proudly
celebrates 20 years
Founded in 1993 by Daryl Senica, Senica Air
Conditioning has seen a lot of things happen
throughout the past 20 years, such as the effects of
the No-Name Storm of 1993, a great recession, a
housing boom and bust and many heating and air
conditioning dealers gone out of business.
"Through it all, we've focused on our customers,
because at the end of the day, they're the only thing


SCOOTERS
Continued from Page Dl

Medicare said in a January letter it
accepted the fee based on The Scooter
Store's own assessment of what it owed,
but the agreement "does not absolve
The Scooter Store from any further
liability."
In recent months, Sen. Richard Blu-
menthal, D-Conn., and other members
of the Senate Aging Committee have
pushed Medicare to recover the millions
of dollars spent on unnecessary scooters
each year. Those purchases totaled
about $500 million in 2011, the latest
year available, according to a report by
the Department of Health and Human
Services' inspector general.
Medicare, which said it does not have
control over how companies market the
scooters, launched a pilot program de-
signed to reduce wasteful spending on
scooters.
Under the program, government con-
tractors in seven states review pa-
tients' medical documentation to make
sure they need a wheelchair or scooter
before approving payments for a de-
vice. The program is being tested in a
small number of states including
Florida, California and New York -
because the government must pay con-
tractors extra to review additional
paperwork.
The program has been criticized by
The Scooter Store's executives, who say
contractors are too strict in their re-


that matters," Senica said. "We always provide
them with top-notch service, delivered by factory-
trained and certified professionals. That's why Car-
rier has awarded us Factory Authorized Dealer status."
Senica Air Conditioning is in Spring Hill, but serv-
ices Hernando, Pasco, Hillsborough, Pinellas, Cit-
rus and Marion Counties.
Carrier Factory Authorized Dealer status is only
awarded to those experienced heating and air con-
ditioning dealers who meet the highest standards
and closest inspection (not only for their technical
expertise, but also for their business practices and
customer service quality). Only the top 5 percent of
dealers in the nation qualify. This allows dealers to
give their customers a 100 percent satisfaction
guarantee, backed by the factory.
For information, visit www.SenicaAir.com or call
800-897-2335.
CCA names Kim White VP of
correctional programs division
Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), Amer-
ica's leader in partnership corrections, announces
the promotion of Kim White to vice president of the
correctional programs division from her position as
managing director of inmate programs.
White replaces John Robinson,
who will now be leading Business
Unit 1 as vice president of facility
operations.
"I am humbled, overwhelmed
and excited about the phenome-
nal opportunities CCA has af-
forded me since I joined this
Kim high-performing organization,"
White White said. "I have truly enjoyed
getting to know the staff and learning about the
company's rich history and its great recipe for suc-
cess."
White joined CCA- which manages the Citrus
County Jail in August 2012, after serving 25 plus
years with the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP).
While at the BOP, she held a variety of leadership
roles, including warden and regional director.
White began her career as a correctional officer.
She holds a degree from Kent State University and
completed Harvard University's Executive Educa-
tion Program for senior managers in government.
Oak Hill laboratory
receives accreditation
SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital's laboratory
has again been awarded accreditation by the Com-
mission on Laboratory Accreditation of the College
of American Pathologists (CAP), based on the re-
sults of a recent on-site inspection. Don Menezes,
M.T. (medical technologist), MBA, the administrative
director of Clinical Laboratory Services, was ad-
vised of this national recognition and was congratu-
lated for the "excellence of the services being
provided." Oak Hill Hospital's laboratory is one of
the nearly 7,000 CAP accredited laboratories na-
tionwide.
The CAP laboratory accreditation program,
begun in the early 1960s, is recognized by the fed-
eral government as being equal to or more stringent
than the government's own inspection program.
Oak Hill Hospital's Lab is the only CAP-accred-
ited hospital laboratory in Hernando County. For in-
formation about Oak Hill Hospital's laboratory and
blood bank, email Don Menezes at don.menezes@
HCAHealthcare.com
Oak Hill Hospital
honors associates
Oak Hill Hospital has announced its Star Associ-
ates of the Month for February. Each month, hospi-
tal associates are chosen in a process that involves
nominations and voting by their peers, patients, pa-
tient families, and physicians.
This month's Oak Hill Hospital "Stars" are:
Debora Delgado, R.N., joined the HCAcommu-
nity in 1997 in emergency room
registration at Oak Hill Hospital.
She then went on to Regional
Medical Center Bayonet Point as
v--- a unit secretary in 1998, became
a registered nurse in 2002 and
S' J returned to Oak Hill Hospital in
2008 where she is now a critical
Debora care nurse in our open-heart unit.
Delgado She and her husband, Mark, live
in Spring Hill. Debora has a son and daughter,
David and Crysta, and a stepdaughter, Brittany.
Debora's nomination came from a patient's daugh-
ter who is also a nurse of 24 years. She praised
Debora for her compassion and attention to her
mother as well as the entire family. "As an RN of 24
years myself, Mrs. Delgado exemplifies the practice
of nursing in its truest form," her nominator wrote.


views, rejecting payments for power
chairs genuinely needed.
The reduced payments are hurting
the company, which was founded in
1991. The Scooter Store has spent nearly
$1 million lobbying Congress during the
past two years, almost exclusively fo-
cused on the Medicare review program.
And the company laid off about 370 em-
ployees in the past year, blaming the re-
duced payments it has been getting from
Medicare.
Then, last week, The Scooter Store
notified most of its remaining 1,800 em-
ployees their jobs were being elimi-
nated. The company said in a statement
to the Associated Press that it is operat-
ing with a workforce of 300 employees -
down from the 2,500 workforce it had at
its peak while trying to restructure its
operations.

T he mass layoffs followed a raid in
February by 150 agents from the
FBI, the Department of Justice and the
Texas attorney general's Medicaid fraud
unit. Authorities searched the com-
pany's headquarters.
Federal authorities have declined to
speak about the raid, but scooter indus-
try critics in Congress praised the ac-
tion.
"This raid is a welcome step toward
cracking down on waste and fraud in
Medicare," said Blumenthal, the Con-
necticut senator. "I have urged action to
stop abusive overpayments for such de-
vices costing taxpayers hundreds of
millions of dollars and preying on sen-
iors with deceptive sales pitches."


is extremely knowledgeable in her specialty as
as kind, compassionate, empathetic and al-
s professional." For her part, Debora said what
ikes most about working at Oak Hill is that
ryone works together as a team."
Kathy Harper, R.N., joined Oak Hill Hospital's
atric department as a registered nurse in 2009.
is responsible for clinical management of our
pediatric patients. She lives in
Brooksville and has two grown
daughters, Rebecca and Sarah.
.IF J Her nomination came from a
*4 .-. coworker who praised her for
coming in on her night off to admit
a child who was a direct admis-
sion. "She had worked the night
Kathy before and only had three hours
Harper sleep. She came in quickly, ad-
d, assessed and settled the family until another
e could come in." Kathy has a reputation for
g dedicated and compassionate. For her part
y says what she likes most about Oak Hill is
workers.
Christy Marafino, phlebotomist, joined Oak Hill
3ital's lab in December of 2009. She is a certi-
phlebotomist and concentrates predominantly
e outpatient laboratory at entrance "C" with a
S majority of the patients coming for
pre-op lab work. She lives in Hud-
son and her family consists of her
.--. mother, Wendy, father, Curt, sis-
ter, Jacquelynn, and her brother,
Cody. Christy's nomination came
from a patient who is a leader in
the community and has had
;hristy some experience as a regular pa-
arafino tient in a variety of health care in-
ions. In his nomination he said "anyone who
to have surgery is quite concerned and a bit
ed, and I am no different." He went on to praise
sty as one of the top phlebotomists he encoun-
1 in his "many surgeries I have had in the past."
Iso praised Christy for her genuine concern and
gness to keep him informed on the status as he
through the process of pre-operative proce-
s. Christy said "I enjoy being part of a team that
s make our patients not feel like just a number,
hat we care about them individually whether
are here for days or even just a few minutes."
Seven Rivers, UF
enhance alliance
yven Rivers Regional Medical Center and the Uni-
ty of Florida have entered into an agreement that
bring its first physician resident to Seven Rivers
onal's Crystal River campus starting April 1.
ider the agreement, Seven Rivers Regional will
s an external clinical learning site for rotation of
ician residents and/or fellows with the College
medicine at the University of Florida. Seven
rs Regional, in cooperation with Shaun F. Saint,
a Crystal River general surgeon, will provide a
al setting with a structured educational experi-
for residents and/or fellows within family medi-
to further their medical education.
le first resident to take advantage of the train-
pportunity is Alex J. Dickert, MD, a student of
departmentt of Community Health & Family
cine, College of Medicine. Dr. Dickert grew up
trus County and lives with his family locally
She attends UF. He is the son of local Crystal
r family medicine physician Jimmy C. Dickert, DO.
CMHS awarded
recertification
ter undergoing an intracycle evaluation and
onstrating compliance with nationally devel-
Sstandards for care, Citrus Memorial Health
em has again earned The Joint Commission's
Seal of Approval for both its Primary Stroke
er and Joint Replacement programs.
/ith Joint Commission certification, we are mak-


significant investment in quality on a day-to-
basis from the top down. Joint Commission
meditation provides us a framework to take our
nization to the next level and helps create a
re of excellence," says Linda McCarthy, Citrus
lorial Chief Nursing Officer. "Recertification for
Stroke Center and Joint Replacement programs
v that we're working toward maintaining excel-
e and continually improving the care we provide."
le Joint Commission's Disease-Specific Care
fiction Program, launched in 2002, is designed
aluate clinical programs across the continuum of
. Certification requirements address three core
s: compliance with consensus-based national
dards; effective use of evidence-based clinical
tice guidelines to manage and optimize care;
an organized approach to performance meas-
lent and improvement activities.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

to move into an apartment
Our home should sell for
$150,000 to $170,000.
In your columns in the
local newspaper, you
often advise people who
are considering such a
move the best approach
would be to sell the house,
invest the proceeds at 7
percent and use the in-
come toward the rental.
Our question is, exactly
where may we find in-
vestments that will pay 7
percent?
Being seniors, we may
not wish to get hung up
in the stock market's
fluctuations, but we do
wish to obtain the aver-
age 7 percent you keep
telling us is possible. We
don't expect a guaran-
teed 7 percent return;
even 5 percent to 6 per-
cent would do nicely -
B.W, via email
Dear B.W: You ask
where you can find a 7
percent return on invest-
ment, then go on to say
you don't wish to get
hung up in the stock
market's fluctuations.
Well, you can't have it
both ways.
Many responsible bro-
kers can deliver returns
of 5 percent to 7 percent.
Yes, there may be times
when the market takes a
hit and you will have a
negative return. But on
balance, a return of 5
percent to 7 percent is
not an unreasonable
goal.
You cannot be totally
risk-averse to accomplish
this. You have to be able
to accept the market does
change. In the event you
are totally risk-averse,
you are correct when
you say you will get a low
return, generally 1 per-
cent or less.
Dear Bruce: I've read
your column for years
and appreciate what I've
learned from it.
I'm taking care of an
elderly friend who has
about exhausted her
funds and is looking to
use equity in her paid-
for condo for her contin-
ued care. Can you please
explain the difference
between a reverse mort-
gage and a line of credit?
What are the advantages
and downsides to each?
-JA, Hernando, Fla.
Dear JA: A line of
credit would require im-
mediate payments to re-
tire the loan. Since your
friend has no other
funds, that would not be
the way to go.
A reverse mortgage is
another matter. Simply
put, it would allow her to
borrow against her paid-
in-full condo. You didn't
indicate how elderly your
friend is, but the older
she is, given her life ex-
pectancy is shorter, the
more money she would
be able to borrow on a
reverse mortgage. She
can use the money any
way she chooses. As long
as she continues to pay
the taxes and insurance
on her condo, she can
live there until she
passes away The reverse
mortgage is then repaid
after her death.
Other things being
equal, I would be in-
clined to suggest the re-
verse mortgage.
Dear Bruce: I would
like to know how to find
low credit card interest
rates that last more than
six months. I have excel-
lent credit and know
there have to be some
decent deals out there
somewhere. I have a
very low-interest card at
the moment, but that is
going to change shortly I
need to find a new card
to which I can transfer
my balance of $3,000. -
T.E, via email
Dear TE: I don't know


you're going to find a
credit card with an in-
terest rate that remains
continuously low. At the
very best, you might find
a rate reduced for a few
months but then
bounces back up.
With a relatively mod-
est $3,000 balance, your
emphasis should be on
paying down your balance.
U
Send questions to bruce
@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO.
Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674.


D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


BUSINESS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE DECLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 D5


I h]onicleHI


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds s


I.a: 32)53-65 ol.re:(88 82230 1 m il*lasfid *crnil* nie Iw bst: w*crnilonie0o


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748




77 Key Yamaha
Electric Piano
Clavinova, ex. cond.
$300obo. Floor
Model Drill Press, %
hp, 10sp, $80obo
Wood Lathe w/
chisels& face plates
$80 Rockwell Band
Saw,$50, Makita
10"table saw lhp, $50
352-489-0104

FORD
1978 F150, Shrt. Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598

Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363

HOMOSASSA
Duplex 2/1 eat in
kitchen, tile floors,
laundry rm, $450 +
sec. (352) 263-3382

Plants for Sale
Debe's Garden
Apr.5th-6th 9am-4pm
3903 S. Lecanto Hwy,
across from CFCC
352-586-6590





$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389

FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




Broken Concrete
Pieces, you pick up
352-476-1023




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd,
Crystal River (CR488)
Owner is heartbroken
400-3302 or 795-8662

Car Key for a Chrysler
lost in Inverness. If
found please call
(352) 257-3509

Gold Engraved
Cross on sml box
20"chain, lost in vicinity
of Masonic Building,
Wendy's and WalMart in
Inverness, Sentimental
Value REWARD pls call
352-628-3696


LUl GTAI, J LtGI,
ORANGE AND WHITE
Lucky, an orange and
white cat with three
legs; recent surgery
so missing hair
around amputation.
Went missing Sunday
night or Monday morn-
ing 3/18/2013. Afraid
he may have hitched a
ride under the pick-up
on the way to the
landfill. Please if you
find him, call me and I
will come get him.
352-489-2327




BIk leather vest w/ a
Samsung cell phone
in packet. Found on
Yulee Dr. on 3/29
(352) 464-5890

Found BIk Pomeranian
about 3-4 yrs old
Found in the
Dunnellon/Citrus
Springs area.
(352) 361-4495


Celebrating 80 years
Ardyce (PIE) Preist
Come and join the fam-
ily, everyone to come
out and help celebrate
this mild stone at Red
Level Baptist
Church,11025 W.
Dunnellon Road, April
6th, 12-2 pm for infor-
mation call
352-795-1405










In Loving
Memory
of Regis

a loyal friend
on this
Easter Sunday

Plantation Realty Inc.





FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.00lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




SALON CHAIR
RENTALS, Avail.
INVERNESS 697-2067











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





CAREER EVENT
Family Care
Managers
The Centers
is holding a
Job Fair
Thursday April 4th
from 10a to 1:00p
on-site at our
Admin Bldg #1
5664 SW 60th Ave.
(Airport Rd.) in
Ocala. Bring Photo
ID Background
checks will be
conducted.
We have an
immediate need
for Family Care
Managers (social
work, child welfare
worker) positions in
both Marion and
Citrus Counties.
There will be "on the
spot" interviews for
this position only.
Full benefits pkg for
full-time positions.
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify If you are
unable to attend,
send, fax, or
email resume to:
The Centers HR,
5664 SW 60th Ave.,
Ocala, FL 34474
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us




hri aL


e cr
en

Christ Medical
Center is now
hiring various
positions.

Immediate need for:
Cert Ophthalmology
Tech (COT) and
Ophth. Surgery
Scheduler & Scribe.
Physical Therapy/all
Positions Also look-
ing for Medical Asst.
Those with med. office
exp. encouraged to
apply. Send all
inquires and resumes
to HR@cmc-fl.com.


I Empwww.chronicleonline.com


www.chronicleonline.com


Avante
At Inverness
Currently seeking
F/T Dietary Aid

Please apply online
at
Avantecenters.com

Dental Personnel

General Dental Office
needs well-rounded
person with working
knowledge of Dentrix
software, scheduling
reception & chairside
assisting. Wages
pending experience
and skills. Bring
Resume to:
Assurance Dental
Group PL
526 NW 1st Ave
Crystal River, FL
Ph: 352-613-0196

F/T RECEPTIONIST
BILLERR

Exp. req'd for very
busy medical
office. Computer
skills a must.
Includes benefits.
Fax Resume to:
(352) 563-2512

Licensed
Risk Manager
The Centers
is seeking a Florida
Licensed Risk
Manager (HCRM)
to maintain compli-
ance with govern-
ing standards &
regulations (ie:
OSHA, AHCA, EPA,
FL standards, &
more). This position
coordinates and
oversees the safety
program & training,
participates in com-
mittees for environ-
ment of care &
infection control,
FMLA, workers
comp, incident &
investigative report-
ing, risk assessment,
and emergency
preparedness.
On-call required.
Please Submit Salary
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, The Centers,
Inc., (352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

NURSE
PRACTITIONER

Needed for busy
medical practice.
Competitive salary
& benefits. F/T or P/T
Please Call:
(352) 746-1515or
Fax Resume To:
(352) 270-8889

P/T MEDICAL
ASSISTANT

Experienced
in phlebotomy, ekg's
holter monitors, must
be proficient with
computers & vitals
etc...
Please fax resume
to: 352-628-1620

P/T, DIETARY
AIDE

Looking for:
Responsible
Individual with
flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

PRN Physical
Therapist
Assistant

For home health
care
Fax Resume
352-341-1620

RN's, PT & OT'S
LPN's, Psych.
Nurse, & ST.

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097

TBOSS Therapist

The Centers
is seeking Masters
Level Therapist
for TBOSS position in
Citrus County. Must
have Masters in a
related field of
Human Services and
min 2 yrs exp work-
ing with adults, chil-
dren & adolescents
providing individual,
group & family
therapy.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us

VET TECH

Fulltime, experience
preferred, some
weekends required.
Very busy small
animal practice
in Wildwood.
Call (352) 748-5454
or Fax Resume to
352-748-6964


ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
The Villages Daily Sun
is seeking a highly moti-
vated "hunter" with
proven sales success in
cold/hot calling to cover
the Tampa Bay and
Citrus County areas.
Excellent communica-
tion and customer serv-
ice skills. Experience in
media sales a plus.
Must have reliable
transportation with
excellent driving record.
Competitive comp and
benefits package.
Please submit
resume/cover letter to
vmmapps@thevillages-
meida.com. EEO

AIRLINE
CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career
FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available.
CALL Aviation
Institute of
Maintenance
(866)314-3769

Boys & Girls Club
P/T Assistant Club
Directors, Program
Assistants and
Summer Camp staff.
Apply now website:
citrusbac.comrn
Fax to 352-621-4679.

Eckerd -
Floral City

Please see our full
listing of open
positions at
www.eckerd.ora


Optical Sales
Position

in Citrus County
Experienced Only.
Email Resume to
hec@drsnew
comer.com
or fax: 352-628-6377





BARTENDERS
SERVERS
KITCHEN STAFF

Exp. preferred but
will train motivated
people
Apply In Person Only
Mon-Fri. 8am-1am
& 2pm-4pm
COACH'S PUB
& EATERY
114 W. Main Street
Inverness

ROYAL OAKS
COUNTRY CLUB

Now has the
following openings:

PT Servers
3pm closing

PT Bartender
9am-3pm

Dishwasher/Busser
Days and nights
For more
information call:
854-6557 X3
EEO/DFWP





Acct Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460
to Schedule an
Interview


do you possess...
...A DYNAMIC
PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
....SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS

Seeking an
INSIDE
SALES REP
to help service
existing accounts
and prospect for
new. Full Time with
Comprehensive
Benefits Package
Base Salary plus
Commission
I APPLY TODAY:
dikamlot@chronicl
eonline.com


CH oNICLE
Drug Screen
Required for Final
Applicant EOE


Lic. Real Estate
Salesperson
needed

Call Skip Craven
352-464-1515

OPTICAL SALES

Optical experience
preferred not required.
Outgoing, quick
learner & Sales Exp.
Fax resume to:
(877)408-2732


B

Aquatic Plant
Technician
(2 Positions
Available)
Announcement
#13-15

Broad technical
ma nual work
spraying or me-
chanically removing
aquatic vegetation
from County water-
ways. Ability to
safely operate air-
boats, kicker boats,
automotive and
spray equipment.
High school diploma
or GED certificate
required. Must pos-
sess or be able to
obtain within six
months of employ-
ment a Department
of Agriculture
Pesticide Applicator
License with
Aquatic endorse-
ment. Must possess
a valid Florida Driver
License. $10.77
hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
Full time positions
working 4-10 hour
days, Mon-
day-Thursday.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online
by Friday, April 5,
2013 EOE/ADA.

Automotive Tech

With experience
tools a must
352-419-6549

DECCA CABLE

Is looking for an
EXP TECHNICIAN
Candidate should
possess strong
technical ability in
all areas of CATV.
On-call duty
required and valid
FL drivers with good
driving record.
Apply at Oak Run
SR 200 West & 110th
StreetOr call
352-854-6557 X3

DRIVER, CDL-A

Local Wildwood
Manufacturing Co.
Hrly Pay starting @
$13.00 Fulltimew/
possible overtime,
Benefits Package.
3 yrs exp. and walk-
ing floor trailer exp.
helpful. Some lifting
and physical
activity req. Must be
fluent in English,
reading and writing.
Home every night.
Apply At
1201 Industrial Drive
or Fax Resume
352-330-2214

DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

DRIVERS

Non-emergency
Medical Transport
Co. hiring. Must
have clean Dr Rec.,
Pass Background &
Drug Test. Willing to
work nights and
wkends; Lift 200 lbs.,
Have trans to work.
Please pick up
application
at 204 W Grace St
Inverness.
Appl. avail M-F from
10a-2p. Possible In-
terview at that time.

Exp. Framer

Dri. Lie. & Vehicle
Req. (352) 302-1206


Local Tower
Service Co.

Hiring person capa-
ble of ascending
broadcast towers to
service lights.
Electrical exp pref,
will train. Travel re-
quired throughout
Southeast. Cpy
vehicle and hotel
provided. Exc pay,
per diem, bonus and
benefits. Back-
ground check and
clean FL Dr. Lic
required. Apply in
person at Hilights
Inc. 4177 N. Citrus
Ave, Crystal River,
FL. 352-564-8830

PLUMBER/
PLUMBER HELPER

Inverness, Must have
valid DL and Tools
(352) 257-3631

earthlink.net

Res. Service
Electricians

good driving record
& clean background
352-794-7368








RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough, Trim,
& Service
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood

Retail Manager

wanted for resale
clothing store for
teens & young
adults. Experience
working in junior
brand stores a plus.

Appvy in Person
Key Training Center,
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto FL
__ EOE"





CAREGIVERS
NEEDED

All Shifts Apply At
HOME INSTEAD
SENIOR CARE
4224 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto

GROUNDS
MAINTENANCE
WORKER
Announcement
#13-14

Heavy manual work
involving grounds/
parks maintenance
tasks. Heavy lifting,
pushing, bending,
climbing and reach-
ing required. Ability
to work outdoors in
hot/cold tempera-
tures under noisy
conditions. Current
valid Florida Driver
License required.
FULL TIME POSITION
WORKING TUES-
DAY-SATURDAY,
7:00AM-3:30PM.
$7.79 hourly to start.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online

by Friday, April 5,
2013 EOE/ADA


Do you possess...


A DYNAMIC CRTOMAE
PERSONALITY? CUSTOMERVICE
E A SERVICE
SKILLS?

STRONG'V,
COMPUTER
SKILLS?


Inside Sales Rep FULL TIME
Service existing accounts and
prospect for new. Base salary plus
commission and a comprehensive
benefits package.

Customer Service Rep PART TIME
29-hr/wk provide superior customer
service to our subscribers, early
morning and weekend hours
required.

ApplyToday:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com

C .. IC" LE

www.chronicleonline.com
Drug Screen Required for Final Applicant
EOE


B
Exp. Landscape
Technicians

2 positions available,
must be able to
operate Zero Turn
Mowers, String
Trimmers, Edger, Etc.
Call Dave
(561) 662-3999

NEED MONEY?
Like to Talk on Phone

Telemarketers
Needed
Daily/Weekly Bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

NEWSPAPER

CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle






CHPNICLE

SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CH IONICLE





Cleaning Person

P/T, 10-15hrs wk
(352) 400-2772

Delivery Person

P/T Requires Drivers
License & lifting up to
100lbs. PIs call
352-628-0808

SEASONAL PART
TIME HELP
Applicant must have
computer skills, self mo-
tivated, works well with
others and customer
friendly. Must be at
least 18 and have a
valid driver's license
Pinch-A-Penny Inv.



"FOR SALE*-
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer, includes
equipment & Accounts.
Serious Inquiries Only!
16k 352-795-0201


"LAUNDROMAT"
FOR SALE
CRYSTAL RIVER,
Lrg., Clean, Well Est.
352-795-2399





TABLES GREAT FOR
YARD SALES Two
32"x96" tables 3/4" ply-
wood. $50 each Call
697-5565





ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS


130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED
30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED
40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed
+ A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com





Antique China
US made Franciscan
China, Desert Rose &
Ivy patterns, several
hard to find pieces, 25%
off price, Too many to
price separately! call
for info 352-270-8366


Collectble


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





RANGE
BIk flat top elec range,
w/ convection oven,
$325; LG BIk over the
range Microwave $125.
Both like new moving
(765) 748-4334
(352) 586-5166


RerigeratorFreezer
Kenmore, Side by Side
White $450.
Upright Freezer, GE
White $150.
(352) 513-4393
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free
Delivery. 352 263-7398



5 HP ELECTRIC 30
GALLON UPRIGHT
AIR COMPRESSOR
ON WHEELS. NEARLY
NEW. ONLY 350.00
352 464 0316
CRAFTSMAN ANGLE
GRINDER $35
POLISHERSANDER,GRIND
ERAND CUTTER
419-5981
DEWALT RADIAL ARM
SAW with stand.
$50.00 Call 697-5565
MAKITA MITER SAW
255mm Model 2401B
$50.00 Call 697-5565
NEW MVP SUPERLINE
BUFFER/POLISHER
WITH CASE $15 FOR
WAXING CARS,
BOATS 419-5981
PIPE THREADER DIE
SET $40 BRAD
PINCHER, DRIVES
BRAD NAILS
SQUEEZE OF HAND
$15 419-5981
ROCKWELL BELT
SANDER $100 HEAVY
DUTYOLDER STYLE,
MADE OF METAL NOT
PLASTIC 419-5981
STANLEY ROUTER
WITH GUIDE $50
RIVET GUN WITH
CASE AND RIVETS $5
INVERNESS 419-5981
Wood-Metal Cutting
Band Saw 16"
on portable stand
w/extra blades
$225.352-726-7789



STEREO RECEIVER
Sharp Bookshelf Set
wturntabdb,cassetlerecorder,3
Ow speakers
$35. 465-8495
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET 5 GOOD
CONDITION $90
352-613-0529



CANON SCANNER
4400F with 35mm
adapter Works with
Windows XP. $25.
(352)563-6410
COMPLETE
COMPUTER SYSTEM
Desktop computer,
keyboard, speakers,
mouse, color printer, 19
inch flat screen monitor.
Online capable. Works
great. $200.00 for all.
352-513-4127
COMPUTER MONITOR
DELL 15" $25
352-613-0529
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



2 Qu Beds$150 ea, 2
bedroom suites $250ea,
new futon $175, couch
$70, dinning room set
$100 all exec. cond.
bargain prices(Sugarmill
Woods)352-503-3087
2 Single
(TrundleBeds)
w/mattress, 1 bed side
table,1 chest of drawers,
all matching exec. cond.
$200 352-465-2668
3 pc. Brown Wicker
Bdrm Set, very good.
cond. $350. Ashley
Beige Leather
rocker/recliner $250
352 -586-6125


-] Home Finder-

www.chroniclehomefinder.com


F~aYour tDreAw H-tO

Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.ch roniclehomefinder.com


rr,


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 D5







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


a
8 pc Oak King
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334
BEDROOM SET -
5 pcs, King size w/
mattress & box spring,
dresser, 2 end tables
& armoire VG cond.
$600 (352) 628-1603
Black Desk Chair
$20
82" Merlot color sofa
$50
(352) 382-1885
CHINA CABINET,
cherry with lighted glass
shelves and drawers,
good condition $100
352-726-9758
Coffee table
w/ end tables, $75.
blue recliner $100
352-746-7221
Colonial StyleCouch
w/wood trim asking
$75.00
352-419-7383
Entertainment
Center, Whitewashed
color will fit up 34" TV,
$50; Pine wood
wine rack $20
(352) 382-1885
Four Pillow Sofa
88" long, beige, like new
$75. Heavy wood
Coffee Table, 48" long,
w/ 2 drop leaves, $25
352-563-1947
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET
In Original Plastic,
Never Used, Org
$3000, sacrifice $975.
CHERRY BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes
$895. Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Maple Day Bed
with new trundle and
mattress's $300.
Call
(352) 465-4037
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
OAK TABLE
60"x42" w/ expandable
to 84"x42"with built in
butterfly leafs, 6 chairs,
good cond. $ 300
352-527-0146
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30,
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Quality Mattress Sets
Qn./Full.$199 both Pcs
Twin Matts. $89.95 All
New, Nice 621-4500
RATTAN BAR STOOLS
4 stools with backs.
All in good condition.
$40 each
(352) 795-3795
RECLINER LAZY BOY,
LT. BLUE/GRAY, clean,
N/S, no pets $65
home 352-726-3730,
cell 352-422-0201


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted COM1
dead or alive washers (35
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also Wanted
Dead or Alive Washers BIAN
& Dryers. FREE PICK INC.C
UP! 352-564-8179 Drive


Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518



JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/l MCard
352-637-5469




Your World










CONCLE
C no n .c


CHAIR small black
swivel rocker asking
$25.00 352- 419-7383
Sofa Bed with match-
ing love seat, floral
design, bamboo arms,
exec. cond. $100
352-249-7804
STEP 2 CHILDREN'S
TWIN BED with storage
under bed, like
new.$100.00
352-726-9758
TV, SANYO,
32" with remote, Excl
Cond, $40 home
352-726-3730
cell 352-422-0201



410 Gage
Shot Gun, New
$110.
(352) 628-5708
Air Compressor
New, 8 gallon tank type,
150 psi max $150
Bolnes Tiler 2 cye. 31 cc
$150 cash only firm
(352) 341-1714
Craftsman
Riding Mower
38" Cut, Deck has
holes, runs good $250
(352) 628-5708
CRAFTSMAN WEED
TRIMMER Straight shaft
2 cycle 25 cc, in new
cond with orig box. $95
3524194513
Huskee
18 /2, horse riding
lawn mower, 42" cut.
Asking $550
Call before 6pm
352-465 6619
John Deere Riding
Mower, 42" deck
15% Briggs & Stratton
Engine, automatic w/
grass catcher $700
352-746-7357
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL MANUAL $15
352-613-0529
Toro Mower,
$175.
John Deere Edger
$20.
352-527-8880




Plants for Sale
Debe's Garden
Apr.5th-6th 9am-4pm
3903 S. Lecanto Hwy,
across from CFCC
352-586-6590




HOMOSASSA
Golden Eagle Plaza,
Rt.19, Barrier Free,
Something for all!
Plants for Sale
Debe's Garden
Apr. 5th-6th 9am-4pm
3903 S. Lecanto Hwy,
across from CFCC
352-586-6590




MENS SPORTS JACK-
ETS SIZE 40R VARI-
OUS COLORS $20
352-613-0529


ON SITE
PUTER SERVICE
52) 341-4150



NCHI CONCRETE
OM ins/lic #2579
Nays-Patios-Sidewlk.
ruol U~kP. irFl


ool Uleck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/I ns 352-795-5755



COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **


PRESSURE
WASHING AND
SEALING
OF
CONCRETE/PAVERS
AROUND YOUR POOL.
3 CHOICES OF SEALANT
&a Free Estimates
. *- 352-515-3131
'. Local business
Week Wacheelocal.
18 yrs. exp.


MENS SUITS SIZE
34X30 & 36X30 $50
EACH 352-613-0529
PGH STEELER SKI
JACKET Men's med
NFL Very Good Cond
$25. Dunnellon
465-8495




77 Key Yamaha
Electric Piano
Clavinova, ex. cond.
$300obo. Floor
Model Drill Press,
% hp, 10sp, $80obo
Wood Lathe w/
chisels& face plates
$80 Rockwell Band
Saw,$50, Makita
10"table saw lhp, $50
352-489-0104

Bath Tub
60 x 42 fiberglass,
drop in unit
with fixtures,
$100. (352) 382-7074
BEDROOM LAMPS 2
Bedroom Lamps 3- Way
w/shades $20.00
352-746-5421
BICYCLE BOYS SPI-
DERMAN 12" WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
$30 352-613-0529
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,
special offer for only $10
(352)465-1616
Crafters
Sofa Pillows
200 total-$100 many
patterns ready to sew
together
352-746-6000
EGYPTIAN RUG
5x8 rug,,, $30.00
352-621-0142
GOLD WEDDING
BAND
14K size 6-1/2
$100.00
352-6284210
GPS TOMTOM VIA
Lifetime maps and
traffic 5"screen $60.00
obo 352 794 3688
MEGA BLOKS
5 Dragon Eggs
with dragons
2 with cds
$100.00 352-628-4210
MIRROR 3 good condi-
tion mirrors 67.1/4 X 39
7/8-67 1/16X39
7/8--70 7/8 X 39 7/8
30.00 each U-pick up
352 270 1775
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, green/ black/
white color, $30
(352)465-1616
OLD TRAFFIC LIGHT
Old new York traffic light
3 signals stop and go
great shape 300.00
352-6284447
ROUTER Black &
Decker Router 1 1/2 HP
Brand New in box
$50.00 352-746-5421
RV TIRE 295.80R 22.5
Michelin XZA-2 used RV
tire 85% tread ready for
road or spare. 100.00.
352 270 1775
RV TIRE NEW 255.70R
22.5 never mounted RV
or Truck tire new 335.00
sell $100.00
352 270 1775


**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST* 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE. Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
VRELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
Y RELIABLEr Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
PeRELIABLE. Free Est
*O 352-257-9508 *
All Home Repairs
Accepting all Major CC
Lic#38893,
Call Art 352-201-1483
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067


Add an artisticiouch to your existing yard
Spool or pool or plan

: ompletlel new!
"Often imitated,
neve dupikted"


rOUR INTERIOO NOM ARIICKM VIR SPECIALIST


POOL AND PAVER LLC
L Insurd 352-400-3188


GERBILCAGE20
352-613-0529
STEP 2 Large PLAY-
HOUSE with front
porch, kept indoors,
good condition. $100
352-726-9758
TENT about 6-7 feet
tall and wide, blue and
white colored, good
condition, $20
(352)465-1616
TRUCK WINDOW
rear/solid GMC
factory tint $50.00
352-628-4210
TV SONY 25 INCH
WITH REMOTE works
great will play for you.
U-PICK UP Pine Ridge
$40.00 352 270 1775
TYPEWRITER
Panasonic Electric
Typewriter R200
$45.00 352-746-5421
VACUUM CLEANER
Eureka Upright HZ 60
Vacuum $15.00
352-746-5421
VACUUM CLEANER
Kenmore Upright
12.0 Amps $35.00
352-746-5421



TUB RAIL MEDLINE
Deluxe Bathtub
safety rail
$30.00
352-628-4210
WALKER 4WHEEL
Basket,seat,handbrake
collapsible
good condition
$50.00 352-628-4210
WHEELCHAIR LIFT
Easily load folding
wheelchair(not
scooter)to vehicle hitch
$100. 465-8495



"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR W/EXTRAS
SPRUCE(MAHOGANY-
PLAYS GREAT! $50
352-601-6625
"TWANG!" LAP STEEL
GUITAR MADE IN
U.S.A.! BEAUTIFUL
LOOK & SOUND $95
352-601-6625
40 WATT STEREO
CHORUS DELAY RE-
VERB AMPLIFIER
W/OVER DRIVE $50
352-601-6625
BASS EFFECTS
PEDALS ZOOM B1
MULTI & ELECTROHA-
RMONEX "MOLE" $50
352-601-6625
CRATE BASS AMP
LIGHT&POWERFUL
W/TUNER,O/D,& OC-
TAVE CONTROL $50
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS & SOUNDS
GREAT W/EXTRA
STRINGS $40
352-601-6625
Guitar Amplifier
Behreinger
Ultracoustic ACX 1000,
2 channels. Handles 2
instruments & 1 mic.
$200 (352) 382-1875
KEY BOARD
Techniques, KN 920,
Like New, 114 different
rhythm, Call for Info
$400 (35 2) 465-2810


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820

Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**

Primary Cleanina
S**Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755

TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120


CLASSIFIED



COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER $10
EACH 352-613-0529
Kirby Vacuum
Gen 5
wall attachements,
exec. cond. $99.
301-616-4860
POOL TABLE/ UP-
RIGHT FREEZER
Pool table great condi-
tion 88" /50" asking
350.00.Upright freezer
67"/33"works good
asking $150.00.
352-422-6231 after 5pm
Portable Generator
5250 watts $250,
Window AC unit,
new in box $100
352-527-1330



PRO FORM ELECTRIC
TREADMILL ALL OP-
TIONS INCLUDING
POWER INCLINE
NEARLY NEW 350.00
3524640316



3 Gun Cabinets
$125-150, 2 Large Deer
Mounts $125 each,
very reasonable
must sell
352-341-3526
3 WHEELED ELEC-
TRIC BICYCLE MIAMI
SUN WITH PALMER 12
VOLT MOTOR AND
REAR BASKET ONLY
285.00 464 0316
12 Gage Winchester,
1,200 Pump
$250.
22 Cal. 16 shot Semi
automatic w/ scope
$135. (352) 628-5708
BICYCLE Girls 26 inch
Kulana like new purple
$60.00 352 794-3422
BIKE Wildwood Huffy
Bike $20.00
353-746-5421
Club Car Golf Cart
'03, Charger, sides &
top cover', Garaged
$2,500 (352) 746-0940
CLUB CAR
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new
batteries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
JUGS BASEBALL
TOSS PACKAGE 1
Baseball toss machine,1
instant screen, 1 Bag
with toss machine balls.
$250.00 Please leave a
message 352-513-4446
Specialized 24 Speed
Road Bike, like new
$600 OBO
352-586-4630



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
STRONG STEEL
BUILT 4X8 bed 13" ti-
res VG condition $325
352-897-4154


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
* FULL Lawn Service*
Free Est. 352-344-9273
AFFORDABLE LAWN
CARE Cuts Starting $15
Res./Comm., Lic/Ins.
563-9824, 228-7320
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and Small
Engine- It's Tune Up
Time! 352-220-4244


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYERVSTART



Flai Rale- No n e
Hidden Co. i


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRAILER
6 x 12 w/Ramp,
2 wheels, Excellent
condition $895
(352) 527-3125




ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, ok condition,
$50 (352)465-1616
TODDLER BED, in-
cludes mattress, great
condition. $50.00
352-726-9758
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, $15,
very special offer
(352)465-1616




BURIAL PLOTS
Two burial plots
side by side
Each $2000.00
Beverly Hills Memorial
Gardens, Inc
Garden of Ten Com-
mandments 191 L&M
Phone 1-706-782-9743
em'


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
ALL AUTOS WANTED
with or without title. Any
cond. make or model.
We pay up to $10,000
and offer free towing.
(813) 505-6939
AMMUNITION
I buy ammno and pay
top prices.
(352) 302-0962
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
WANTED
new or used (if in great
cond.) Vitamix Blender,
Please call
352-382-3681


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lie. (352) 584-5374



30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067"
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


AAA ROOFING
Call the "Aak6usten"
Free Written Estimate

$100O OFF:

,Any Re-Roof ,
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed I
Lic./Ins. CCCO57537 000ESZM










When mopping

isn't enough call...

Mr. Tile Cleaner
Showers Floors Lanais
Pools & Pavers
C leaning & Sealing
, t ^ Grout Painting
I R x1 Residential &
:-- l Commercial

586-1816 746-9868


WANTED TO BUY
1985 to 1995 Toyota
Pick Up Truck
Ext. Cab, 4 cyl., 2 WD
running or not, no junk
(419) 832-9261


Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200














Baby Girl P

Baby Girl P, a 4
y.o. Terrier mix,
Heartworm-negative,
housebroken, is black
w/ white accents, up-
right ears. Wt. 42 lbs.
Friendly, affectionate,
walks well on leash,
gets along w/ other
dogs. Calm energy,
gives kisses. A
beautiful, wonderful
companion.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


BRIT
Brit, an 8 y.o. female
Australian Cattle
Dog mix, weighs 42
lbs. Mellow, sweet,
friendly, gentle,
calm, walks well on
a leash. Bonds
quickly with people,
gets along with
other dogs.
Beautiful dog.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


m







Ash
A female tortoise shell
8 month old kitten, spayed,
up to date on shots,
friendly & lovable ready &
looking for a home to call
her own, call SaingAngels
352-419-0223or see us at
www.savinganglespetres-
cue.com


I am a male mimi apricot
poodle, looking for my
forever home. I am very
played back, hansome,
nutered up to date on
shots. Call Saving An-
gles pet rescue at
419-0223 or 726-1006
Visit us at
www.savinganglespetres-
cue.com for more info










JASMINE
Jasmine, a 2-y.o.
blue-fawn Bulldog
mix, weighs 60 Ibs.
Heartworrm-negatve,
good with dogs &
children, not cats.
Very friendly & af-
fectionate, had an
unfortunate early
life, needs a good
home now.
# 17896004.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


JEET

Jeet, a neutered
3-y.o. Bulldog mix
is beautiful,
well-mannered, bonds
strongly with humans.
A bit fearful of men,
ideal for calm family
without young children,
or a woman
living alone, a good
watchdog. Weight 55
Ibs. Gets along
with other dogs.
# 9609968.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876
SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-9190






Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry

Screening
Clean Dryer
Vents
g 411., dutle & Dependable
SE q.,,ence lifelong
3 52.344-0905
cell' 400-1722
Licensed & Insured Lic#37761


SADIE
Sadie is an 8-y.o.
spayed female
black lab mix. When
she came into the
shelter she had a
large tumor protrud-
ing from her neck
which was removed
by our shelter vet.
The tumor surpris-
ingly was non-
malignant. Sadie is
now being fostered
& her wound has
healed. She is a shy,
quiet dog, not a
barker, friendly, af-
fectionate, knows
her name & sits &
comes on com-
mand. Weight 35
Ibs. She is house-
broken, likes walks,
likes treats, likes the
outdoors, is good
with children. She
eats slowly & should
not be rushed. Sa-
die would be an
ideal companion for
an older couple or
a single individual,
as she is a calm dog
who seeks peace &
quiet. Call Kathy @
352-465-0812.









r

SALLIE
Sallie is a sweet,
joyful white terrier
mix with black spots
over her body. She
is about 1 y.o. &
came to the shelter
because her family
could not afford to
keep her. She is a
slim & trim dog, easy
to handle, although
slightly shy with
strangers. She
warms up quickly,
however, & sits for
treats. Likes to walk
on a leash. She ap-
pears housebroken
& gets along very
well with other dogs.
She is Heartworm
-negative. Weight
35 lbs. This pretty &
affectionate girl is
hoping for a good
home with a loving
family. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.



SLII \ I I1St.

E )( Da


CHEftkoNifL


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials"
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over'Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM






WIND

We lean Windows and o Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


I


deea ir esOfty


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






(352) 634-5039 *
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne
Yorkshire Terriers
Males, 8 wks on 4/4,
$700 cash. See the
parents in Lecanto
(727) 242-0732




LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033




Horse Pasture for Rent
$150/Mo. Near riding
trails (352) 586-1855
Registered 6 yr old
buckskin quarter
horse gelding. Asking
$1800 352-634-5581

1-0a r


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510-

2002 16.5 Ft Lund
50 hp Honda 4 stroke
and trailer includes GPS
and Sonar $5900
906-440-1010
2006 Manitou
Oasis Pontoon loaded,
Suzuki,115 Hp, 4 stroke,
road king Galv. trailer,
Exec. Cond. $13,999
352-527-0324


Bass Tracker
17' flatbottom, alum.
V nose, w/galvanized
trailer, $950
906-285-1696
Clearwater Skiff
16', 2010-2011 25hp
YAM, elec., 821b, T.M. &
charger, cover, 3hr use
$7700. 352-447-2967
G-3
Jon Boat, 12ft' 9.8
Merc, trailer, trolling
motor, swivel seats
fish/depth finder, boat
cover $1,650


















MIROCRAFT
2008, 12ft John Boat,
92 Evinrude, 3HP, '96
trailer, spare & cover
All excellent $825.
(352) 228-4190
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192
SEA NYMP BOAT
14FT Alumin. hull with
"V" bottom, no motor or
trailer. $400
352-382-4511

V Bottom 12Ft
Alum. boat, Johnson
5hp ob motor, & trailer
good cond. $400 cash
firm 352-341-1714
WANTED TO BUY
Pontoon Boat
Needing Repair
(352) 637-3983
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE

Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



1994 Bounder 34'
Basement Model 460
Ford w/banks 7000
onan auto levelers &


$6500 207-318-8319



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $5800. obo
call 906-250-6504
APACHE
'04, Slide in Truck
Camper, Clean,
excel, cond. $6,200
(352) 637-0306

COACHMAN
'07, 4 New tires, 1 slide
out, Great Condition
Clean, Move In cond.
$15,500. 352-637-2735


COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. Island bd.,
+ rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
w- Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like new,
NADA $29K, Reduced
$19,900 352-382-3298
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945






MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 lbs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarstonl@mac.com
or 352-586-1483



"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267-*
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible, looks great,
runs good, must sell at
best offer
352-560-0079
Buick
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-422-3198


CARK UAhRAG KEP I,
Two-Tone, LOADED
65K mi, $10,500.
352-860-0164
BUICK
2006 Lacrosse CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
'03, Malibu, V6 36K,
excellent shape
$6,500
(352) 637-0306
Chevrolet
2008 Aveo
$6,998
352-341-0018
CHEVY
2008, Cobalt, 2 DR,
automatic, power
windows, power locks,
cold A/C, Call for
Appointment
352-628-4600
CHRYSLER
'01, Seabring limited,
convertible, runs,
needs some
mechanical work,
148k mi $1,500. obo
352-302-2688
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Crusier
5 speed, power win-
dows, locks- $4,250
352-341-0018
DODGE
2005, Neon
Automatic transmis-
sion $4,400
352-341-0018
FORD
07 Taurus SE
79k mi, pwrwindw, lock,
cruise control, am/fm/cd
owner, exc. cond.
$5500. 352-302-9217
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
FORD
2004, Mustang,
Looking for a sports
car? Here it is,
6 cyl. automatic,
appointment Only
Call 352-628-4600
HONDA
2013 Civic LX,
Priced to sell,
Serious callers only
352-628-9444
HYUNDAI
2000 Elantra Wagon
56,250 org. mi,auto,a/c,
AM/FM cruise, grt cond.
$4100. 352-726-6973
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mitsubishi
2007 Eclipse, power
windows, automatic
transmission $10,899
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
TOYOTA
'08, Camary LE, auto
trans, 65,200 mi., gold
color, excel, cond.
$12,500. 352-527-2729
TOYOTA
2011 Camry LE, 4 Dr,
Excellent Condition
35K mi, $15,000
(352) 419-4486


CLASSIFIED




2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551
LINCOLN
2002, Towncar
Executive,
Good cond. $6,200
352-628-5451,601-2214
MGA
1961, 1500,
Good Condition
Runs well, $7,500. obo
(352) 860-0855
MUSTANG GT 03
63K, Showcar, Super-
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $14,500 obo
352-228-4012







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
VOLKSWAGON
'73, Super Beetle, light
blue, custom white
wall tires, excel. cond.
$4,800. (352) 564-0788




CHEVROLET
1989 Silverado new
tires, needs starter in-
stalled good work truck
$1200 352-364-1771
DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Truck
$2000. 352.795.3708
captainwalton@aol.com
DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Work
Truck. needs trannie
work, good engine/body
$900 352-364-1771
FORD
1995 F-150XL, white
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6'bed w/ cab, $2700.
(352) 637-5331 LM

*' THIS OUT!
FORD
2008 F350 Dually
CrewCab 6.4L
V8Diesel Ex Cond
4x4 grey, 50g Aux
Tank, Moonroof
Leather,towhitch,T-gate
LitAssst +step
83000mi $28000
716.946.0203
eondak@yahoo.com

FORD
2011 Ranger XLT,
$17,500. KBB, OBO
AutoTrans, Power
Windows, Doors Locks
AM/FM/CD/XM/CB,
Cruise, Bed Cover,Alloy
Wheels, More Pictures
w/email: djameson5
@tampabay.rr.com
cell 410-703-9495


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 D7


DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
Priv Party will pay cash
for clean, low mil.
Dakota or similar
truck. (352) 746-2439
TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100



FORD
2010 Escape XLT
loaded V6, Lo Mi.
$17,500 352-249-7702
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
2007, Element,
Hard to find,
cold A/C, runs great,
Must See,
Call (352) 628-4600
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
SATURN
07 VUE, V6 Auto,
4 Whs down towable,
ISr owner, $7295 (352)
621-5463 or 207-1080
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 3rd row
seat power windows,
locks- $4,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150



FORD
1978 F 150, Shrt Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598



CHEVY
2003 Venture Van,
7 pass. and priced to
sell. Call 352-628-4600
For appointment
DODGE
2013 Grand Caravan
Wheelchair van with 10"
lowered floor, ramp and
tie downs for more info
call Tom 352-325-1306


2005 Suzuki
Burgman 400,12K mi-
les, Garg. kept, great
shape$3,295
352-601-1718
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492


'1 III .I I l1 st.
L. -, /,

Class iedts


HONDA
1981 Silver Wing GL
500 Hard removable
luggage.CB AM/FM 47K
$1000 9am-4pm
352-503-3347


HONDA
2009, 1300 VTX,
1 owner, immaculate,
over $3500 in options
garage kept, 21k miles
$7,900. 352-697-2760


Misc. Notice


HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244
KAWASAKI
2012, Vulcan 900
Classic, full dress, 1,300
mi. like new, $7,250
(352) 341-2149
SCOOTER
2009 Buddy, 125 CC;
564 mi. Mint Grn color
& mint Cond.$1800
(352) 794-3674;


Misc. Notice


357-0331 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
In accordance with S. 163.356(3)(c), Floida Statutes, the annual report for the Crystal
River Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) has been filed with the City of
Crystal IRver and the report is available for inspection during business hours in the of-
fice of the City Clerk, as well as in the office of the CRA. This report includes informa-
tion on activities for the preceding fiscal year, and a complete financial statement
setting forth assets, liabilities, income and operating expenses as of the end of the fis-
cal year The CRA Office is located at 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida.
March 31, 2013.


359-0331 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote- Richard A. Roberts
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Richard A. Roberts
2075 N. Donovan Ave
Crystal River, FL 34428
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of
ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide
voter registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of
Elections at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle Mar.31, 2013


924-0331 DCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
SEEKING OFFICE SPACE IN BETWEEN
LECANTO AND INVERNESS
Workforce Connection, a governmentally-funded organization is seeking approxi-
mately 3,500 sq ft or more of office space in Citrus County. Preferable locations
would be in or in-between Lecanto and Inverness.
Prefer office space with at least 4 private offices, room for additional cubicles (at
least 12), break room, open resource area for customers, at least 4 bathrooms, con-
ference room and computer lab.
Must be ADA compliant. Need ample parking and occupancy beginning at end of
June, 2013.
Interested parties may send responses to:
Val Hinson
Workforce Connection
3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205
Ocala, FL 34474
352 873-7939, ext 1203
FAX: 352 873-7956
Email: vhinson clmworkforce.com
Workforce Connection is an EOE Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are
available upon request to individuals with disabilities using TTY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at 711.
March 24 through March 31, 2013.


358-0331 SUCRN
04/11/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central Flor-
ida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.


BY: Don Taylor, Executive Director


March 31, 2013.


SOU CHI


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


$14,979


$500


KMF CASH $500

$13.979


,' I i'J I


ON MOS'

VEHICLE


1 !1'


SO
NEW
2014!


35


$24,504
MILITARY DISCOUNT $500 y'
LOYALTY/COMP BONUS CASH $500
KMF $500
s23,00 4
NEWT STAYFoa1
.Or0PTIMA FREE Ft
MILITARY DISCOUNT $500
SLOYALTY/COMP BONUS CASH $500
KMF $500
$19 9e69*16


H U RRY! These Deals End Monday
RECEIVE A GIFT CARD WORTH UP TO $500


S


WIN $25,000 DOLLARS CASH
LECONDITIONESTIMATESAREBASEDON 100MILESPERYEARDRIVINGAVERAGEVEHICLECONDITIONMILEAGE&EOUIPMENTOULD
ALLRIGHTSRESERVED'BBLCKBOOK@SAREGISTEREDTRADEMARKOFHEARSTBUSINESSMEDIACORPORATIONREPRODUCTIONOF
SIN ANY FORM BY ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL MEANS INCLUDING INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETR IEVAL SYSTEMS IS STRICTLY
MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTY EXPRESS OR MLED AS TO TE ACCURACY OF TH DATA, THAT THE DATA IS FREE FROM ERRORS NAD
PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE ALL PARENTS ARE 39 MONTH AL RICES WITH MILITARY LOYALTY OR COMPETITIVE NOT EVERYONE WILL
NEWH KIAi.B


Citrus
Mon Fri: 9:00am 7:00pm, Sat 9:00am 6:00pnm
Afb ~Sunday Noon 5:00pm


KiA


1850 S.E. HWY. 19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL


I Homre ( w w-citiru skiLi-a-4comn


MILITARY DISCOUNT


I [! I


352-564-8668


D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013





Section E -SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


INSIDE
1 Sikorski's
r AtticPAGE E4


I .


-V


,if
a


CIl;


r


Interior designer
Phoebe Howard
seated on a daybed
in a finished
bedroom she
designed in New
York City.
: .:..] F < ;


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.4;
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* /


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A






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EASTER BUNNY LIVES NEARBY
* Beautiful Lg. Kitchen Maple Cabinets
*3/3/2+ Office Huge Screened Lanai
'Open Fam. Rm. *Very Tasteful Decor
SFabulous Master Bath Lge. Garage
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Emiul elliesullon lemunix nel
www.Flo iduL isinginlo.com


3501 W. BLOSSOM UD.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
*3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
* Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
* 2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL in
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


GREAT PRICE FOR IMPERIAL MODEL!!!
1980 Built 2BR, 2 Bath '2-Car Garage
* Circular Drive Private Backyard
'Eat-In Kitchen 'Family Room
* 18x 15 Screened Porch Updated HVAC 2008

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
H1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

I 3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish








OPEN MODERN FLOOR PLAN
Fresh paint and BEAUTIFUL NEW FLOORS say "Move Right In!"
SUPER ENERGY-EFFICIENT LAKEFRONTHome. This amazing
properly built in 2004 boasts a TANIIESS WATER HEATER THERMAL
PANE WINDOWS and LAKE VIEWS "TO DIE FOR"! After a day
exploring 3,700 acre Lake Rousseau... Entertain fiends on
your SPACIOUS10 x 36 screened lanai. Extra storage in an 8 X 12 shed
foryourtoys. Priced below replacement cost.
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 I
Email: sherylpolls@aol.coin
000d148: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


SHINY NEW METAL ROOF
* 145 Feet on the Water 2,200 Living Square Ft.
* Magnificent Open Water View 20x24 Detached Workshop
* Full Acre Lot Inground Pool
* 16x 12 Observation Deck Boat House with New Roof
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 [
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


INVERNESS POOL HOME
Close to shopping, schools, and hospital.
3BR/2BA home with fenced backyard.
2-car garage, out-building, screen room,
and Fla room.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I
Email: barbrajmills@earthlink.net


BEAUTIFUL

CORNER LOT

5.7 acres in Pine Ridge.
sunny and cleared.




CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net








CRYSTAL RIVER
WINTER VISITORS...Grab this one up before you
head back North! Fully furnished 2/2 SW on
double lot. Excellent condition. Amenities include
large vinyl-windowed screen porch, one-car attached
carport, and two sheds (10x1 2 & 12xl 6). Priced to
sell. -
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


2421 N. LecnI Hw. Beel il 2-82w wRtA~o 0 ..Hy 1NIvres6760


60 S I KELLNER BLVD.
* 2BD/1.5BA/2CG Warm & Comfortable
* Beautifully Maintained Living RM & Fla RM
* Enclosed lanai Larger lot

PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


FLUORAL CITY
1/1 on .24 of an acre on corner lot. 908 sq. ft.
of living near multiple boat ramps that connect
to Lake Duvall big detached garage/workshop
cast iron fireplace.


E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Steve
McClory
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


Alison
Markham
EXIT Realty
Leaders.


EXIT agents
soar in 2013
EXIT Realty Leaders
wishes to congratulate Steve
McClory and Alison
Markham for closing more
than $1 million so far in 2013.
Steve and Alison are power
agents who bring a wealth of
knowledge to every transac-
tion and are always commit-
ted to providing excellent
service to their clients.
Reach them at 352-794-
0888 or online at www.exit
realtyleaders.com
ERA gets national
recognition
ERAAmerican/Suncoast
Realty of Citrus County re-
ceived national recognition
from global real estate com-
pany ERA Franchise Systems
LLC for high total adjusted
gross commission (AGC)
achievement and total resi-
dential units closed in 2012.
With more than $2.2 million
in total AGC last year and 789
residential units, ERAAmeri-
can/Suncoast Realty ranked
in the top 50 ERA Companies
nationally in each category.
The prestigious award was


announced at the 2013 ERA
International Business Con-
ference March 21 to 24 in
Austin, Texas.
ERAAmerican/Suncoast
Realty has served the real es-
tate needs of Citrus County
residents since 1980, with of-
fices in Beverly Hills, Crystal
River and Inverness.


Tip to remove lipstick stains


Dear Sara: I acciden-
tally washed a tube
of lipstick in a load of
whites. It is all over every-
thing. I tried rewashing it
with OxiClean, to no avail. I
tried spot cleaning and gave
up because there are hun-
dreds of spots on each arti-
cle. Any ideas? N.M.,
Wisconsin
Dear N.M.: Try shaving
cream, vodka or hair spray


Blot stains using a white
washcloth so you can see
how much of the stain is lift-
ing, then launder as usual. If
that doesn't work well
enough, try blotting with
glycerin, rubbing alcohol or
denatured alcohol, then
apply Dawn dishwashing
liquid and launder as usual.
A fellow reader, Meg,
emailed a tip recently that
worked on lipstick. She sug-


gested Carbona stain re-
mover products. Carbona
can be purchased online at
carbona.com.
Dear Sara: I once had a
recipe for a bread starter
that was kept in the fridge
and fed with instant pota-
toes every four days or so,
then made into bread. Do
you have this recipe or

See FRUGAL/Page E10


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


Maria Carl
Fleming Manucci -
Prudential Prudential
Florida. Florida.

Prudential adds Amanda & Kik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
two new agents BROKERfASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR-BROKER REALTOR


Prudential Florida Show-
case Properties would like to
introduce two new additions
to the team.
Maria Fleming and Carl
Manucci bring with them 15
years each of real estate ex-
perience in the Citrus Hills
Villages.
Maria can be reached at
352-422-1976 and Carl at
352-302-9787.

DIGEST GUIDE
News notes submitted
without photos will not
be reprinted if the
photo is provided later.
Digest photos are
kept on file for future
use.


. Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney [-
Realtore_ A HOUSE Realtor ,
302"3179 SOLDN3nae' 287.9022
746-6700 o8 I79M0 v
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


Happy Easter

From the Gaffiheys
ro


S e S


;, -

6262 W SETTLER 3948 N. BUCKWHEAT
5/4/3 700993 $359,900 3/2/2 700825 $179,900





6121 N. SILVER PALM 2587 W. ANGOLA 375 W. CREST
325235839$148,500 4/3/3 701069 $239,900 2/2/2 700617 $12




2435 W. ERIC 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD. 7170 N. GRAC
2 0256 $52,900 3/2.5/2 700080 $114,900 3/2/2 700780 $10




1503 & 1525 W. 7EVERGREEN
5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 2047 W PARAGON LN. 137 N
700929$259,900 3 2 2 35872 $149,900 3/2/2. 7018




a nN. 2EL c aUrKdGE ah d "" -.U N . -S L.LI_


31 N. MELBOURNE 18 TRUMAN 4210 E. LAKE PA
2/2/2 700838 $45,000 2/2/1 701074 $54,750 2/1.5 359138 $8
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34


i*Kt.NU !25 N. u11KU' 'PINWn D.VU.
84 $129,900 3/2/1 700428 $69,500





RK DR. 5269 S. BAYLINER
1,9001 3/2/2. 701882 $68,500
465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


m


m


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 E3






E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013




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HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The importance of



family meal time

Most people have heard it is im- for parents to model healthy eating
portant to eat meals together as a habits. Family meals can also be a great
family, but many may not know time to introduce young children to new
why Families who eat meals and healthy foods. Introducing
together three or more times a children to healthy foods when
week are more likely to have they are young is important in
children who eat more fruits order to establish eating habits
and vegetables and are a that lead to lifelong health.
healthier weight Below are some tips for mak-
In addition, children who ing family meals a part of your
eat meals with their families family's routine.
perform better in school, have Tips for family meal times:
better social and emotional U Try to have family meals as
functioning, and engage in less often as possible some fam-
risky behaviors in adoles- Monica Payne ily meals are better than none.
cence. There are also benefits CONSUMER E Plan when your family will
to the parent-child relation- eat together and write it on
ship. For some families, meals SCIENCE your calendar.
are the only time parents and U Eat family meals at the
children spend together during the week- kitchen or dining room table.
days. Meal times provide parents with op- U During family meals, turn off the tel-
portunities to support their children and vision, computer, and cell phones. Re-
teach them manners and listening skills. turn calls and texts at a later time.
Family meal times are also important U Include children in preparing for
for healthy lifestyle habits. They provide and/or cleaning up after meals.
a time for parents to become more aware
of their child's current eating habits and See MEALS/Page E6


Inside...


Hiring a decorator
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Staffordshire ceramics a popular category for collectors


Dear John: The attached
photo is of a statue that a
friend of mine brought


back from England in
1959. Is it of any value
and where can I sell
it? -JB., Homosassa
DearJ.B.: You have
a Staffordshire fig-
urine. The Stafford-
shire district in
England was a ce-
ramics mecca where
there were a number
of small towns pro-
ducing a wide variety
of decorative porce-
lain and pottery.
Staffordshire figures


perhaps more on a lucky day
Dear John: I enjoy your arti-
cles on antiques in our Citrus


11,w h I I
John Sikorski
SIKORSKI'S
ATTIC


have been a specific category of
collecting for a long time. The
one you have depicts an organ
grinder. The overall condition
appears to be excellent Poten-
tial dollar value is $75 to $150,


County Chronicle
newspaper. I have
never asked anyone
about this artist from
1845. It was given to
my daughter by her
mother-in-law and
her mother before
that. The photos are
not the best condi-
tion, as you can see,
but I would like to
know more about it. I
am sending three
photos and hoping to
hear anything about


this photo. It is 19 inches by 23
inches. -JK, Inverness
Dear J.K: I cannot make out a
signature on your picture. You
mention the date 1845; does that
appear on the back of the pic-


ture, and is there an artist name?
The photograph of the picture is
not very clear but it appears you
have a hand-colored print of a
painting. If this is correct, poten-
tial dollar value is below $100.
If you like, send a couple of
good, clear photographs, in-
cluding the back of the picture,
and include the name of the
artist. Then perhaps we can fin-
ish the story
Dear John: I would like to
know the value of a table plus a
table with three chairs. The first
table is wood with legs whose
feet are round. The name on the
bottom of the table is Walter of
ABASH #5.
The other table with three
chairs is wood. The top of the
table has a wood border and the
interior has a raised grain look.
On the bottom of one of the chairs
is a tag. It reads "Under penalty


of law tag, District of Colorado ap-
proved July 3, 1926, Kansas ap-
proved March, 1923, Minnesota
approved April 24, 1929."
In addition, I have a wine
rack that is wood. It holds six
bottles and on the sides has a
design with the date 1928. I
would appreciate any help I can
get of what their value would be.
- KB., Internet
Dear KB.: Relative to the an-
tiques and vintage furniture
market, the names you mention
are of no significance. In order
to help further, I need
photographs of the pieces in
question. The wine rack sounds
See ATTIC/Page E6
This figure of an organ grinder is
from Staffordshire, England.
Staffordshire figurines are a
specific category of collecting.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Got backyard chickens?



Give them a 'food forest'


Cared for properly, birds provide benefits


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

It's one thing to get permits from the
local authorities and reach agree-
ment with the neighbors. Before you
set up housekeeping for a small flock
of chickens, also be sure to provide
the proper surroundings to keep them
from flying the coop.
Chickens are like any other birds
invited into the yard; they need food,
water and cover to be healthy and
happy, said Jessica Bloom, author of
"Free Range Chicken Gardens: How
to Create a Beautiful Chicken-
Friendly Yard" (Timber Press. 2012).
"It's best if you can create some
beneficial habitat for your free-
ranging chickens particularly
plants they can eat from," Bloom said
in a telephone interview from her
home at Mill Creek, Wash. "That also
gives them some shelter and a general
sense of well-being."
She calls that a "food forest" a di-
verse and multi-layered mix of tree
canopy, berry-laden shrubs, vines,
groundcover and planting beds.
"You can create a food forest gar-
den in any aesthetic style in a typical
urban, suburban or rural backyard,"
Bloom said.


Chickens can be great for a back-
yard: They control pests, aerate yards,
and supply fertilizer and eggs. They're
entertaining, too.
But they also love to scratch and
peck when foraging, and that can de-
stroy gardens.
Fence garden areas, particularly
when the plants are small and at their
most sensitive, Bloom said. Use con-
tainers so chickens can't reach high
enough to get at their contents.
Hen houses, chicken coops or
night shelters are a must for every
flock, especially to ward off preda-
tors, she said.
"If they are well designed, these
little structures can be fun, colorful
and add an attractive element to any
garden."
A few more suggestions for getting
things started:
It's easier to build a flock by buy-
ing chicks than by trying to hatch your
own, Bloom said. "That's something to


A-CitrusCounty

^^N~rEW


consider for later, though, be-
cause seeing the cycle of life is
pretty amazing."
You don't need roosters
unless you want to breed your
own chickens, said David
Frame, an extension poultry
specialist with Utah State Uni-
versity. "Not having a rooster
will help keep the noise down
in an urban setting, where
they're often illegal," he said.
"But personally, I'd rather hear
a rooster crow in the morning
than listen to a dog bark"
Have everything ready be-
fore you bring home your birds.
"Some people pick up their
chickens at the local feed store
and say, 'Now what?"' Frame
said. "Know what you need and
have it available."
Chickens will eat almost
anything, including table
scraps, grass and insects. "But
they have to have a balanced
diet," Frame said. "Get some
sort of commercial chicken-


Associated Press
A laying hen strolls by a frost-damaged stand of hostas on a
residential property near New Market, Va. Chickens like to
scratch and peck while ranging freely about the yard. While that
may provide a wide array of food for the birds, it could destroy
gardens, especially when the plants are small and are at their
most sensitive state.
feed that's loaded with vita- your plants if you want to com-
mins and minerals." post it," said Jennifer Cook,
Keep living areas clean to with Colorado State University
prevent disease and rodents. Extension.
Chicken manure makes great Chickens can be trained to
fertilizer but it's extremely do a number of things like re-
high in nitrogen. "You defi- turning to the coop at night
nitely want to cure used litter when called. Frequent han-
for a while before putting it on dling makes them tamer


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WE


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 E5






E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


MEALS
Continued from Page E4

Make sure family
meals are stress-free by
talking about fun and
happy things and includ-
ing your child in the
conversation.
Remember, it is never
too late to start having
family meals!
Families of young chil-
dren may be interested in
participating in the follow-
ing program that is offered
at the Citrus County Ex-
tension office starting in


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


September 2013.
This fall, the Citrus
County Extension Office,
in collaboration with re-
searchers at the University
of Florida, is inviting fam-
ilies to participate in a
new program. The Healthy
Kids program is a family-
based healthy lifestyle
program for young chil-
dren 3 to 7 years of age and
their parents who live in
Citrus County.
The program is de-
signed to help families
make lasting changes to
support a lifestyle with
better nutrition and physi-
cal health.


Given the many de-
mands on children and
families, helping children
establish healthy eating
and exercise patterns
while they are young is
more important than ever.
The no-cost, four-month
program will begin in Sep-
tember 2013 and is cur-
rently enrolling families.
Parents and children
will participate in 12
group meetings with other
families. Parents will
learn and practice strate-
gies to encourage their
child to adopt healthier
eating and activity habits.
The importance of fitting


in family meals will also be
discussed. Children will
play fun games and try
new and healthy foods.
Families are eligible for
the Healthy Kids Program
if they have a child who is
between 3 and 7 years of
age, at the higher end of
the growth curve, living
with their parent or legal
guardian in Citrus County.
All group meetings will
be conducted at the Citrus
County Extension office,
located at 3650 W Sover-
eign Path, Suite 1,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
Families will be com-
pensated $10 at each meet-


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ing to help with trans-
portation costs.
Families who want to
know more about the
Healthy Kids Program or
who are interested in par-
ticipating are invited to
call the Healthy Kids Of-
fice toll free at 866-
673-9623.
Citrus County Extension
links the public with the
University of Florida/
IFAS' knowledge, research
and resources to address
youth, family, community
and agricultural needs. All
programs and related ac-
tivities sponsored for, or
assisted by, the Institute of


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

interesting, but I need
photos of it also in order to
help you.
Dear John: I have been
reading your articles on
antiques in the Chronicle.
In the past I think you have
answered questions on the
value of antique pocket
watches. Six months ago, I
received two pocket
watches from my uncle
who passed away Can you
help me with value, or do
you know someone who
can? Thanks for your help.
- TD., Internet
Dear TD.: Yes, I would be
glad to help you. I have been
a member of the NAWCC,


Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences are open to all per-
sons with non-
discrimination with re-
spect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability,
sex, sexual orientation,
marital status, national
origin, political opinions
or affiliations.
Article adapted from:
Dr Crystal Lim, research
assistant professor at the
University of Florida.


Monica Payne is the
Family and Consumer
Sciences Agent for Citrus
County Extension.

National Association of
Watch and Clock Collectors,
for more than 30 years. In
order to help you, I need a
couple of photographs of
each watch front and back.
Also, all the information
that appears on the inside of
the case covers and the no-
tations that appear on the
movement I look forward to
your photographs.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


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Beautiful 3 Bedroom 2 bath home with
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in Canterbury Lakes Estates.
Priced at 169,900.00 MLS#701542






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


An overview of vines popular in Florida gardens


V ines are an essential com-
ponent of home gardens
and the natural environ-
ment. Vines provide beautiful
flowers and sweet fragrance, as
well as nectar for butterflies and
hummingbirds, Bees gather
pollen to make honey.
Florida's State Butterfly, the
Zebra Longwing, is a pollen-eat-
ing butterfly dependent on vine
flower pollen. It lays eggs only
on Passion vines. After pollina-
tion, flowers develop seeds and
fruit for bird food.
Vines can adorn tree trunks
and trellises and provide shade
on arbors and pergolas. Vines
can even be used as ground
cover plants.


Bignonia capriolata, Cross
vine, is an evergreen, perennial
vine with pairs of deep green,
shiny leaves about 2 to 3 inches
long. It climbs using curling ten-
drils to grasp bark, twigs or
fence wire. The large, trumpet-
shaped flowers make a spectac-
ular show in March and April
locally
The bottom of the flower has a
small, five-lobed calix The five-
lobed corolla is a deep red-or-
ange outside and yellow inside.
The seeds develop in a beanlike
capsule. Cross vine grows natu-
rally in humus-rich, moist soil.
Amend sandy soil with ample or-
ganic decayed material like the
fine mulch from Central Landfill


on State Road 44 be- be dug up severed
tween Lecanto and from the mother plant
Inverness. and relocated else-
Campsis radicans, where in the garden.
Trumpet creeper, is a Tubular, 3-inch long
native deciduous flowers are orange-
climbing plant that red, appearing from
twines up trees, late spring through
fences and buildings, summer. The bright
It attaches by mats of flowers attract polli-
fine roots that de- Jane Weber nators and nectar
velop from the woody seekers such as
stems. JANE'S hummingbirds and
Compound leaves GARDEN butterflies.
have seven or more Gelsemium sem-
toothed leaflets. Campsis climbs pervirens, Carolina or Yellow
high into the tree canopy, but is Jessamine, is a native, ever-
not parasitic or harmful to its green, perennial, climbing vine
host. Stems creeping along the popular with retirees from the
ground will root up and later can north and snowbirds. It has co-


pious bright yellow flowers in
January and February It re-
minds gardeners of the temper-
ate northern forsythia that
cannot survive hot,wet Florida
summers.
A harbinger of spring, Yellow
Jessamine attracts butterflies,
but has finished flowering be-
fore migratory hummingbirds
arrive in March and April. It has
a pleasant sweet fragrance, suf-
ficient nectar and pollen to at-
tract pollinators.
It is critical for attracting pol-
linators to fertilize strawberries,
peaches, nectarines and blue-
berries that flower in January

See JANE/Page E10


Sia i i s. a


U


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Office in the
Terra Vista
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SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 E7









So you want to hire a Wcrdor..


V


k


C A


III


p. ~


FI


Associated Press
A finished bedroom designed by interior designer Phoebe Howard in New York City. Howard advises homeowners to communicate closely with their designer as they plan the
decorating of their home, then step back and trust that the finished product will please them.

Design professionals can give home a special touch, but clarity and communication important


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press
ome-decorating television shows
and shelter magazines have many
Americans dreaming about invit-
ing an expert interior designer into
their homes.


It looks so effortless when a popular
designer arrives in a whirlwind of cre-
ative ideas and quick-working crafts-
men. By the end of an hour of cable TV,
he or she has transformed a hopelessly
drab home into a stylish oasis.
But what's it really like to hire a de-
signer? How can you make sure it's a


successful and not too expensive -
collaboration?
As with a good marriage, says interior
designer Phoebe Howard, the relation-
ship between designer and homeowner is
about communication, trust and respect
Many homeowners find a designer by
asking friends whether they've used


one. Designer Cathy Davin, founder and
president of Davin Interiors in Pitts-
burgh, says new clients are often re-
ferred to her by previous clients.
Others discover her online, she says.
Interior designers generally keep a


Page E9


E8SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DECORATOR
Continued from Page E8

portfolio of photos of rooms they've
designed on their websites. Browse
through as many as you can in your
area, noting photos that fit with
your vision for your home.
Training varies: An interior de-
signer "typically has a bachelor's
degree in interior design, and in
several states must be certified,"
Davin says. They can collaborate
easily with engineers, contractors
and architects, and should have a
full understanding of color, propor-
tion and other elements of design.
A decorator "might be just some-
one who has a flair for decorating
and wants to hang up a shingle,"
Davin says, and it's possible their
style will fit perfectly with yours.
But they probably won't have as
much training as a designer.
The American Society of Interior
Designers (ASID) offers a database
of certified members that is search-
able by location.
As you meet with potential design-
ers or decorators, see who makes
you feel comfortable, Howard says.
You're going to "open up your per-
sonal space" to the person you hire,
so along with vetting their work,
make sure your personalities mesh.
Howard, who is based in Florida,
says a good designer should be able
to tell you whether you can have
what you're envisioning for the
money you're able to spend. Be re-
alistic and clear when discussing
your budget.
Design fees vary around the coun-
try, but Davin says they tend to range
between about $4 per square foot
(for limited services like choosing a
room's color palette and furniture
layout) to $10 or more per square
foot for full project management
Get cost estimates in writing and
be sure you know exactly what is
included. If you make any changes
to a project after hiring a designer,
get those adjustments in writing as
well. The folks at ASID suggest
keeping a folder with printouts of
all agreements and correspon-
dence about your project.
Extra calls or extra meetings cost
money and slow the project down,
so have notes ready and be pre-
pared each time you call or meet
with your designer.
Davin suggests starting with a
meeting at your home with all deci-


sion-makers present. Couples
should try to work out disagree-
ments before sitting down with the
designer; experts can be good
sounding boards but they won't
want to take sides in a battle.
As you make design choices,
Howard says, do your homework:
Touch the fabrics and study the col-
ors to be sure you like them. Comb
through websites and magazines,
showing your designer what you
have in mind.
And trust your instincts: If a de-
signer or a particular decision re-
ally feels wrong, don't go with it.
But also remember that you've
brought in a professional for their
creative input.
Do "get yourself to a certain com-
fort level, because you have to take
the leap of faith," Davin says. 'A lot
of people's fear is that they're going
to end up with this crazy living room
that doesn't feel like them at all."
But if you've taken time to choose
someone who shares your taste and
understands what you want, then
"allow them to stretch you and push
you" at least a little, she says.
Discuss timing. Design projects
can move slowly Davin says redec-
orating a master bedroom or family
room can take at least three
months. Design and decorating
work for a home that's not yet built
might take 18 months or more.
When choosing a designer, be sure
to ask previous clients how the per-
son handled changes or challenges.
"It's impossible to install a job of
any size without something going
wrong," Howard says. "Something's
going to break. Something's going
to be measured wrong.. Things
happen and things get fixed."
Try not to make too many
changes, since that can increase
the possibility of confusion and
mistakes.
If a problem arises, it's best to
cool down before approaching the
designer. And at the end of the
project, Howard advises clients to
leave home during the final instal-
lation work.
"The installation is the moment
that the decorator worked for
months and months and months
on," she says. "They need to have
their space to kind of make a mess
and get things done."
So rather than critiquing the
project when it's only partially in-
stalled, she says, wait for the "red
carpet moment" when the finished
product is revealed.


HOT FORECLOSURES FOR SALE!
9 Golden St, ev Hills ................................. 22,900
200 Harvard St, Inveness ............................. 24,900
S Withlapopka, Floral Ci ......................... $24,900
1260 E Wacker, Hemando ............................. $29,900 ..
6600 E Hayden [n, Inverness ......................... $34,900 HARD TO FIND 4 I ,,,, ...... .... .......... i I. I
WHAT AN EGGTASTIC FIND Yard is fenced, large shed. Quaint country feel to home
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66 Roosevelt vd, evenly Hills ......................$44,900 #357508 $134,500 Debbe Tannery 352-613-3983 $58,900 # 701914 10455 Buck Lane
6022 Wingate St, Inveness.... ..................... 7,250
806 Shelley ellrr, Inverness $447,040
9277 1E Moccasin Slough Rd, Inv ................. $42,900
6745 N Castlebury Rd, Hernando ................... $41,900
202 S Fillmore, Beverly Hills .......................... $48,900
5941 ECarmel [n, Inverness ......................... $49,900
1115 E Bucknell Ave, Inverness ...................... $49,900 .
591 Marlene Inverness 49900 GOOD GOLLY MISS MOLLY- Finally an affordable EASTER SPECIAL FOR RENT OR BUY $59,900
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10085 S Evans Pt, Inverness .........................$52,900 #700941 $79,900 1861 Elderberry Ln. Jean Cassese 352-201-7034
6242 E Wingate St, Inverness .... .......53,900
303SAdams, Bevey Hills......... ......... $54,900 BEA UTIFUL BU ILDA BLE HO M ESITES
7526 N Boss Avenue Dunnellon .... ......... $54,900
916W Catrler Lane, ev Hills .......................$62,900 EMERALD HILLS 1.0 AC #355413.......................... $18,500
6715 Red Robin, Inverness ............................$69,900 DUVAL ISLAND LAKEFRONT .33 AC #359155...........$67,500
7416 E Gospel Island Rd, Inv .........................$69,900
1579NFoxboroCt, Crystal River .............. $79,900 CYPRESS SHORES 1.46AC#357344.................... $19,225
862 Pritchard Island, Inverness ....................... $84,900
3336 E Paula n, Inverness $85,900 JEAN CASSESE 352-201-7034
6036 E Willow, Inverness .............................. $89,900
6080 W Cheryl In, Homosassa ..... ......... $84,900
1032 S Bel Air D, Inverness ........ .............. $8.... 4,900
13578 Sw 86th Avenue, Ocala ....................$100,900
5555 S Leonard Terr, Inverness ....................$109,900
7414 Cricket Dr, Citrus Springs .................. $109,900
225 Braemer, Inverness .............................. 5114,900 BE YOUR OWN BOSS! LAKEFRONT LOCATION
800 Cresview Circle N, W ildw ood ................ $ 112,500 i ,, l l u i buui ,u , i. uu .iy buui SLA SH IED ,, ... i-t -h . .i -....
rentals. Serious inquiries only. #359161 has a beautiful view of the neighboring horse ranch. Family
9018 N Hammond Way, Dunnellon ...............$119,900 Jean Cassese 352-201-7034 rm, 2 1334 S Condlenut Ave, Homosassa .............. $134,900
30 CR 532, Bushnell ............... .....$.... 139,900
2329 W Springlake Di, Dunnellon .... .....$144,900
8847 S Suncoast Bvd, Homosassa .........$.... 149,900 ,
387 Liberty, Herando ................................$159,900
9429 N Nest Pt Dunnellon ...........................$159,900 _FABULOUS MEADOW REST FORECLOSURE!
17 Byrsonima Ct W, Homosassa .... ......... 164,900 .. 11. OU
2 Iberis Ct, Homosass $.... ...... 184,900 WHEN YOU KNOW you deserve the best take a look at paint,flooring, porch and more
4326 I ha n o $185,90 this 3 bdrm home Great room, wood & granite. In site of the Only $79,900 MLS# 1700560.
4320 Indianhead, Henmando........................$185,900 Trail. $147,500 #359476 Call Kim Fuller 352-212-5752

1643 E St Charles PI, Inverness ..... ......... $189,900
2334 N Sheriff, Beverly Hills ........................$199,900
1323W Skyview Crossing D Hemando ........$199,900
4839 CR 309b, Lake Panasoffkee .........$.... 213,350
4920 CR134b, Wildwood ..........................$279,900
6854 W Sentinel Post Path, Bev Hills ...........$424,900 WOOT! WOOT! i . .. ...i....1 .i
Call Tomika Spires-Hnssen 586-6598 A HONEY FOR THE MONEY! 2007 4/2.5/2 home 1,603 living remodeled and ready to move in for onl,
Fuller 21 52 with 2888 living for ONLY $109,900 MLS 359607. $74,900! MLS 359339.
or Kim Fuller 212-5752 7414 Cricket. Ca Tomika Snires-Hanssen 352-586-6598 Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen. 352-586-6598.


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 E9






E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013


JANE
Continued from Page E7

and February Fallen blossoms can
be gathered to decorate a white plate
along with Azalea and Camellia
flower heads and sprigs of resurrec-
tion fern. The pretty table arrange-
ment lasts for several days.
Loniscerra sempervirens, Coral
honeysuckle, has bright red tubular
flowers in bunches at the tips of
stems. It blooms in abundance from
February to May and then sparsely
throughout summer and fall.
This native is critically important as
a nectar source for butterflies and hum-
mingbirds. It is a strong climber, twist-
ing its stems around any nearby prop.
Some selected, other-colored coral hon-
eysuckles will not climb and remain as
ground covers and tripping hazards.
They can be laboriously hand-trained to


cover chain-link fences and trellises.
Hummingbirds frequent climbing vine
flowers, but not those on the ground in
my garden. I root up both in pots to
share with visitors.
Native vines can be attractive and
strong growers, needing no supple-
mental irrigation once established and
no fertilizers or pesticides. They are a
necessary component of Florida's
ecosystems. Exotic invasive alien
species must be weeded out to save
our natural environment and the na-
tive creatures which depend on it.
A list of highly invasive exotic species
is on the internet at www. fleppc.org.

Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-retired,
she grows thousands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to her Dunnel-
lon, Marion County, garden. For an
appointment, call 352-249-6899 or
contactJWeberl2385@gmail.com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

another starter bread
recipe? Lee, Mississippi
Dear Lee: Here's a link to
a potato flake starter recipe:
vabutter.tripod.com/ginnys
recipes/id36.html.
And here's a recipe for
Amish Friendship bread (no
potato flakes) that you might
enjoy, too:
Starter:
1 tablespoon active dry
yeast.
0 1/2 cup warm water
1 cup milk.
1 cup flour
0 1 cup sugar
For bread:
1 cup vegetable oil.
0 1 cup sugar


2 cups flour
1/4 teaspoon baking
powder
1/2 teaspoon baking
soda.
3 eggs.
1/2 cup milk.
1 small box instant
vanilla pudding mix.
1 teaspoon cinnamon.
1/2 teaspoon salt.
1 cup raisins, chocolate
chips or nuts, optional.
Cinnamon sugar:
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cinnamon.
For starter: Dissolve yeast
in warm water in a deep
glass, plastic container or
half-gallon zipper-type bag.
Stir in milk, flour and sugar
Beat until smooth. Cover.
Your first batch of starter
has fresh yeast, so skip 10-
day directions and go di-


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

rectly to splitting your
starter
Don't refrigerate or use a
metal spoon.
Day 1: Begin or receive
starter
Day 2: Stir with wooden
spoon (or squish baggie).
Day 3: Repeat day 2.
Day 4: Repeat day 3.
Day 5: Add 1 cup sugar, 1
cup flour, 1 cup milk.
Day 6: Stir with wooden
spoon (or squish baggie).
Day 7: Repeat day 6.
Day 8: Do nothing.
Day 9: Do nothing.
Day 10: Add 1 cup sugar, 1
cup flour and 1 cup milk.
Put 1 cup of starter in each
of three containers. Give two
away and keep one. This will
begin their day 1.


See FRUGAL/Page El1


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


u M l AMERICAN
OU 1ee Realor ERA REALTY & INVESTMENTS
A ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Cell: (352) 697-1685 Beverly Hills, FL 34465
M Cell: (352) 697-1685 o .asA-7-Ann


COLD^TeLL
HAVIeRO






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wall decals:


A simple way



to add style


Associated Press
WALLTAT.com's "Kids on Swings" decal, a popular
choice for parents decorating nurseries. Parents like
the flexibility of wall decals that can be easily changed
as kids grow.

Designs allow great flexibility


MELISSA KOSSLER
DUTTON
Associated Press

During a recent home
remodel, Diane Wright
decided the stairway


leading to her garage
needed some perking up.
So she went online and
found a wall decal roost-
ing love birds on a branch.

See DECALS/Page E12


KEY "Always There For You"
..... l GAIL COOPER
W. iulinlli,:n Do.llar Rl .alor
Cell: (352) 634-4346
lb Office: (352) 382-1700x309
_ 4 E-mail me: homes4u3' mindsprmng.com


5-BEDROOM HEATED POOL HOME!
* Custom design 5/3/3 2939 sq ft living
* Built in 2004 on .36 acre corner lot
* Zodiac kitchen Corian baths
* 2 AC systems security system
* All rooms vaulted central vacuum
* Sunsetter awning on pool
#701153 $325.000


SET UP WITH 2 MASTER SUITES!
* 3+Cabana room/3/3 2036 sq ft living
* Quiet cul de sac location
* Central vacuum security system
* Newer interior paint built in 2006
* All rooms are vaulted
* Plantation shutters laminate flooring
#352049 $147.000


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

For bread: To the re-
maining batter, add veg-
etable oil, sugar, flour,
baking powder, baking
soda, eggs, milk, vanilla-
pudding mix, cinnamon
and salt. Beat until well
blended. Add 1 cup
raisins, chocolate chips or
nuts if desired. Grease two
loaf pans well, and sprin-
kle with cinnamon sugar,
coating bottom well. Pour
batter into bread pans and
sprinkle remaining cinna-
mon sugar onto tops of
loaves. Bake at 325 de-
grees for 1 hour -submit-
ted by Jeannie, Kansas
NOE
Readers sometimes
have trouble finding Arm
and Hammer Super Wash-
ing Soda for purchase. If
you're unable to find a
nearby retailer through
armandhammer.com, you
can make washing soda at
home. The first reader tip
tells you how:
Homemade washing
soda: Sprinkle baking soda
onto a pan and bake at 400
degrees for 30 minutes to


an hour You'll see a visible
difference in color and tex-
ture. -Bridge, Indiana
Chocolate corn chip
crunch:
3 quarts popped
popcorn.
3 cups Corn Chex cereal.
3 cups broken corn
chips.
1 11-ounce package
butterscotch chips.
3/4 pound dark choco-
late candy coating.
In a very large bowl,
combine the popcorn, ce-
real and corn chips. Set
aside. In a saucepan over
medium-low heat, melt the
butterscotch chips and
candy coating; stir until
smooth. Pour over the pop-
corn mixture and toss to
coat. Spread into two
greased 15-by-10-inch bak-
ing pans. When cool
enough to handle, break
into pieces. Makes about 5
quarts. Q.M., Florida
Cream soup mix: I keep
a bag of instant "cream
soup" mix in my fridge all
the time, and I use it for
recipes that call for any
type of cream soup:
2 cups powdered milk.
3/4 cup cornstarch.
1/4 cup instant chicken
bouillon.


1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon thyme
(optional).
1/2 teaspoon basil
(optional).
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Combine and store in an
airtight container (I use a
zipper bag).
To make stroganoff that
tastes just like the Ham-
burger Helper kind, add
1/3 cup mix to browned
hamburger and precooked
egg noodles. Add 1/3 cup
milk, 3/4 cup water and 2
tablespoons sour cream;
mix thoroughly and bring
to simmer This tastes so
much like the packaged
stuff that my son didn't
know I was doing some-
thing different for months.
To use for soup, combine
1/3 cup mix and 1 1/2 cups


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Ell

water and bring to boil,
stirring often. Add diced
celery, sliced mushrooms,
chopped broccoli or
chopped chicken.
To use for recipes call-
ing for a can of cream
soup, use 1/3 cup mix and
1 1/4 cups water; boil for a
few minutes, stirring often.
-Elphie, email


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www
frugalvillage.com), a web-
site that offers practical,
money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.


REAL ESTATE, INC.
5569 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY.
MS CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429
OFFICE: (352) 795-6633
WWW AT LRYT CO'-M SAI (S AT LEYR -COM


IAG O DU SV.N D A


PsW www.dudleysauction.com

REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS
APRI L -13, 20 1- 3
Preview 10am Auction 11am
HOME IN INVERNESS -.7
516 S Tuck Pt.
Inverness, FL 34450
Move-in ready canal front
2/1 home is 1,076 sq. ft. dead endstreet, new appliances, new
kitchen with oak cabinets, newer A/C, Ig enclosed lanai, dock
permit in place, 95 X 140 lot. Access to Withlacoochee River.
Preview 1pm Auction 2pm
INVERNESS VILLA
3342 S. Belgrave Dr.
Inverness, FL 34452
3/2 end unit Royal Oaks 1,813 under
roof. County $80k, move-in ready with tile & Berber, vinyl
window enclosed porch. HOA $195 mo. includes: water, sewer,
cable, garage, exterior maintenance, use of pool, clubhouse.
DUDLEY'S AUCTION
S4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL
SPj (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds) MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE
| Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Abl667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All
dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.


I ''
BEST
"aw
S-1tor
ro


IJ SeeJ irua To.s .resalehomes4u.1.!







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Wall Word's Love Birds wall decal in the stairway of Diane Wright's home. Wright painted the dark and dreary dry
walls bright green with a black trim, and added the Love Birds decal to liven the largest wall.


Associated Pres
WALLTAT.com's 3D wall decal in a drawing room. De
cals are growing in popularity because they can easily bi
installed and removed without damaging walls or paint.

UNBELIEVABLE WATERFRONT
UNDER $100KI That's right, new
carpet, paint, tile, MOVE IN READY.
Bring your flats boat, kayak, canoes,
and have a Florida's picture perfect ride
to the Halls River and the Homosassa
River. Located at the end of the canal with great privacy. This waterfront
dplinht i nrpaf fnr thp annlpr nr water Invpr MOTIVATFn SFI I FR!


DECALS
Continued from Page Ell

"I love them. It adds some
individuality," said Wright,
s who also has used decals in
- other parts of her home on
e Kiawah Island, S.C.
Wall decals have taken
off as an easy, affordable
and temporary way to
transform a room, said in-
terior designer Darla
Blake of Unique & Chic In-
teriors in Irvine, Calif. The
flexible vinyl decals come


in dozens of colors and
hundreds of designs,
everything from animals
and music notes to funky
patterns and religious sym-
bols. There are words and
sayings. And some compa-
nies make custom decals.
"Having a tree in your
bathroom, or a park bench
and bicycle on a wall be-
hind a sofa, or a bridge
going to nowhere brings a
smile to everyone who en-
ters the room," Blake said.
The decals make it easy
to personalize a room,
which is popular right


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ea, EIs ,. 352-726-2628 I 3BR/2BA on chain link fenced 2.21 acres. Corner 2.17 acre tract. Paved road & central
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Spotless 3 bedroom 2 bath CB home on 2.9 acres. Enclosed,
tiled Florida Room, Granite Counter in kitchen. Wood laminate,
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Priced to sell at $119,000.


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on large shaded lot.
Carport. Central water. 30,000
MLS#359133


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Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. $45,000 MLS#701383


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Email: roybass@tampabay. rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After ours 302-6714


now, she said. "You can
easily find something to
reference your personal-
ity, your job or your
lifestyle," she said.
Wright has used decals as
an inexpensive border in a
bedroom and above photos.
"It's certainly a whole
lot less than hiring a
painter," she said.
Price varies by size, but
a decal around 25 inches
by 50 inches would usually
be less than $100.
Barbara Irvine of Syra-
cuse, N.Y, chose a verse
from one her favorite hymns
to decorate the space above
her kitchen sink The words,
"Come ye thankful people,
come," prompt her to count
her blessings, she said.
She installed them her-
self by slowly rubbing
them off their paper back-
ing with a tool similar to a
tongue depressor.
"They come with very
good instructions," said
Irvine, who ordered the
custom phrase from Wall
Words in Santa Ana, Calif.
"It's fairly easy You do
want to get them level."
The words are designed
to easily go on and off, said
Carrol Caldwell, owner of
Wall Words. She advises
using painter's tape to at-


tach the paper backing to
the wall before firmly rub-
bing the decal onto the wall.
"It brings back how im-
portant words are in your
life," she said. "It's way to
add something that is very
meaningful and helps you
through the day"
And the decals peel
right off when you're done
using them, she said.
Easy removal makes de-
cals especially attractive to
renters, students in dorms
and parents decorating
nurseries, said Jordan
Guide, chief executive and
founder of Walltat.com.
They can add impact to
a small room without tak-
ing up space, added inte-
rior designer Linda Hunt
of Creatively Yours Cus-
tom in Richmond, Va. She
often puts them in powder
rooms to make the space
feel larger. She has had
clients' monograms made
and installed in their mas-
ter bath. She also uses de-
cals in kitchens and foyers.
Once, she used them to
create text for a "memory
wall" that a client had in
honor of her deceased
brother.
"The possibilities of
what you can put together
are endless," Hunt said.


E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Real Estate


Classifieds

L '., j ltiA~a ,-j,-- IT".


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 E13


To place an ad, call 563-5966


--'-
BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!






INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

LECANTO
2 BR, Remodeled,
CHA, priv. lot. deeded
community $500 mo.
(352) 746-5253





must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766

43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908
Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624
Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, incl
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181





For Sale
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 114 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $93,900
716-807-8847


Castle Lk/Floral City
2/2/cpt,- near flea mkt,
off US 41, w/Ig shed,
LARGE lot. $39,900
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message
HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182


MUST SEILL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on /4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message
LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Mobile Homes
with land.
Ready to move in.
Owner financing with
approved credit.
3Br 2Ba. No renters.
850-308-6473.
LandHomes
ExDress.com

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


-U
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 352-726-2553
OCALA
2br 1ba furn. 55+
Comm.16x16 add-on,
sliding dr to private
deck, 28ft encds porch,
& 28 ft storage, $6200
(352) 470-1727




RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336








Rea .state


- ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
5585 W. Irving C................... $750
2/2/l btof liAWspg e
6 Kahlk C .............. $1300
4/2/2Mff lW Pool Hor ludes pool ar In core
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way...............$725
3/2 DW, newer mobile on 1/2ACREI
6315 N. Shorewood Dr...............$625
2/1 Flornda room
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 Cleveland...................$675
2/2/1, Superclen roomry ho close llto 7 Rl e H al
1266 N. Seagull Pt. #143......$1100
2/3 Beautful 2 story Condo. 3 mo. minimum
LECANTO/CITRUS SPRINGS
1933 W. Shanelle Path (L)......$1200
45W. Kentwood PI. (CS)...$1300
3//fifi Plhee )[, blrooms, open mthIlre e

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?



3/2/1 All Tile Villa...$725
2/2/1 Villa...................$700
2/2 Waterfront............$700


3/2/2 Pool Home...$1,050


3/2 Mobile....................$750
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
SCheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010

Over 3,000 Homes
and Properties
listed at
www.naturecoast
homefront.com


Home Finder

www.chroniclehom- finder.com


tint Yowr Dreun, HOW*me

Search Hundreds of Local Listings

www.ch roniclehomefinder.com

7r357








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nature Coast Landings.
Large RV Site.
Reduced to $39,500.
www.detailsbyowner
or call 352-843-5441

-m

CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
HOMOSASSA
Lg 2/2, Central Locat,
scr. por., $550 mo.
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461

HOMOSASSA
Duplex 2/1 eat in
kitchen, tile floors,
laundry rm, $450 +
sec. (352) 263-3382

INVERNESS
2 BIR's
Available
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Av.
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.





INVERNESS
2/1, In Town, $600
412 Tompkins St.
(352) 895-0744
LECANTO
remodeled, 1 Bd $525
352-216-0012/613-6000

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed /1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furn & Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/mo. Call
352-795-1795 for
Appt.www.ensing
properties.comn


PELICAN BAY
APARTMENTS
2 BEDROOMS
APTS HOMES
Monthly rent starting
at $741. Plus Utilities
Carpet, Appliances,
Central Heat & Air
Rental Assistance
available to quali-
fied applicants:
For rental info.
& applications
9826 West Arms Dr.
Crystal River,
795-7793
TDD
#1-800-955-8771
Mon-Fri., 9:00-5:0OP
Equal Housing
Opportunity
Provider & Employer










LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801
Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906



CITRUS HILLS
2/2/2, w/ carport,
spacious & very quiet,
$750 mo Call Steve
(352) 697-1525



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 + Florida Room
57 S. Columbus
$530.mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878
Beverly Hills
2/1/cp Clean $550mo.
1st./ Last/ Sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 FL room, no pets
$600 352-464-1950
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
BEVERLY HILLS
Rent to Own 2 /1 '/2/
Fl. Rm $2,500 down
$475 mo.
(352) 726-9369
CITRUS SPRINGS
2 Story 3BR + Loft, Near
schools, $900. mo.
352-812-1414


CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352- 341-4178
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
No Pets, $790.
mo.
River Links
Realty
352-628-1616

Crystal River
3/2, newly renovated
all appl, trash, water,
septic, inc. 1 blk fm
Plantation & Kings Bay
$795 352-795-8963

FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210

INVERNESS
2/1/1 $600 mo+ sec
(352) 860-2070

INVERNESS
very nice, newer 3/2/2
upgraded appliances
$900. month.
352-302-6450




Gospel Island
clean 2/1,no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




HERNANDO
@ RESTAURANT
FOR LEASE, 3,200 Sf.
kitchen ready, up to
code, Ig. parking lot.
**(352)584-9496**
1305 Hwy 486




BEVERLY HILLS
Private Rm w/full bath
Furnished, W/D, Some
meals avail. $450. mo.
1st & Ist. 352-464-5845

CRYSTAL RIVER
Must have income &.
Respect. Near Puibix's,
Furn., Clean, Cable,
w/d, $115wk/440mo
$130/470 563-6428

INVERNESS
Furn Rm, priv full bath,
incls cable/wifi, access
kit & W/D. $400, +1 mo
dep.(352) 613-1123

INVERNESS
Room for Rent, furn'd
Share large Dbl Wide
Utility incl'd., $325 +
$100 sec.352-726-0652


Reasonable
Office/Storage/Manf
Space, Flexible Areas
Shamrock Industrial PK
6843 N.Citrus Ave.
(352)795-1906




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed
352-566-7099 or
606-694-7099
PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"







"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
**cash only **
352-503-3245
Town Home
2/2/1 w/glass lanai,
1123 Sq Ft, Maint. free
exterior, new paint &
flooring. exec. unit ready
to move in. The Glen,
55+ comm $52,900
585-797-7907


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
Sat. April 6th,
Iam
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.corn













Use Your Tax Money
for a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
located at, 6515 S.
Tropicana Ave.
Lecanto $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then
Call (800)282-1550












BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090





Highlands West 3/2/1
renovated on two lots
w/pool. Incl. W/D & SS
in new kitchen. $96,000
352-637-2827

Inverness Highlands
4/3/2 $90,500 Nr. hosp.
& schools Pool w/fence,
shed & Ig. bck lanai
(352) 201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.


Hme


H
* Just Reduced *
2/2 Updated home in
Canterbury Lake
Estates. Great Location
Backs up to Greenbelt
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC

Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


H
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE






Cf Ni dsLE
Class;fieds


Get Results


In The Homefront

Classifieds!


H
AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!
BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351





2 ACRES
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$126,500
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
BEST TIME TO BUY.
LOW PRICES!
LOW INTEREST!

BUY NOW
Also Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503

3/2/2, 2 V2 acres,
24 ft x 32 ft shop
$175,000
Hernando Area
(352) 726-7755


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


3/2.5/3 Residence in Inverness, FL
Will Sell Regardless of Price!
Airport Across the Street 30' x 40' Shop
ALSO:
Beach Lots in St. Augustine & Fernandina
Waterfront COMM in Jacksonville
AUCTION DATE:
April 17, 11AM ET g]] ]
See Website for More Details!
Tranrza Driggen Walter Driggen III V
Lic. RE Broker, FL Lic# AU707 & AB3145
TRNZNCO 8737-43


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!






DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515








SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Get
Results in
the
homefront
declassified!


TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




For Sae 9
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505



CITRUS HILLS
E. Hartford 3bd/3ba
w/carport 2100 sq. ft.,
furnished
asking $119,500
704-905-5986
Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266




BANK
REPOSSESSION
SMITH LAKE,
ALABAMA.
Prime dockable
Homesite $49,900.
Level to water, no
stairs. Build at water's
edge. NEW TO MAR-
KET. Roads and utili-
ties in place. Available
April 20th.
Call (888)713-2870




2BD 1%'BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116


"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week
LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857

Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area, 1 OK boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/586-4987

Lake Rousseau
5311 W, Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642


CirsCut


I www.chronicleonline com


Home *Finder
wwwc o finder corn


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor










ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty







SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafureCoast
Properlies.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available. www.
Lake RousseauRV
Parkcorn
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pin.
352-795-6336


. ...


C I R U S._ G O U N T Y
H KONICLE



(352) 563-5966


www.chronicleonline.com


SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 E15


You've Got It!






Somebody






Wants






It!


-4980B








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUPER NICE 2/1.5/1 WITH BOTH ENCLOSED
PORCH AND SCREEN ROOM

I l, ,,i l.,h l,, ,i ,, Ih ., h -- i I ,, ,i,, 1 -



Asking $67,900.00 Mi. m iI 1
Pal Davis t3521212 7280
I-il litfing iii I ?pIe unil i ic'Pm







TWO COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OVER 6,400 SF!
211 NE 41h Sliwlo Chidland Floida 34626
* lFFimh, E I I Ali ll i li l I llh0 I I "I li i


I l1l '1- 1,11', n 1,- 1
* II I ,hII ,1111 rl I 11 1 1, I I 1

OFFERED AT ONLY $199,000


IJ[1. 1,11 1111) I., ll ., l.. -- ,-l -,1 3.1111
[-..iI.I : .W l h ..I h..i., l.:.j

I..,i Asking $153,900.00

Pal Davis 352 212 7280.
Fil zIdting lIII clIp.ilHd.nii ISi


INVERNESS GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB
:. .i .. . .1.1 H .I ...I v K i.llf, v w1 i .
I' In f I 1 ..I h, ....i .,i.. r[j. H1 i..Ih .....I II.....
...i. il 1. l . I.. ..I.I ,0 l l l = 1 .1 1 ?
PRICED TO SELL $129,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


INVERNESS HIGHLANDS

L ,i. liil ?, iil i i .:... m ilh i ni
p....l M I _= I=1I11'I:I:.
SHORT SALE $74,900
Call loiaine 0 Regan 586 0075


4 12-4PM
S.LA


* ,I .- IIii i HI....
1 1 A ,A ,:, .,: ,,,, i u ,i, i I,:,,,, _-ii. :
* V.- iJ l.. .i ..i 8632 E. Sora CT
S f ..ii.: .... W.....I .... Oak Park Mobile Home Park
* 3 C.: r D ,l .i ch ,, rm. .l 2 r C. -. llch | . .i I ,li l ,
. = '5:,71 $350,000 ' HilMO
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410 |AR GREAT BUY $13.500.
It'It'I-t ciliuscounlrsold. coin Call Dot, Min' 422 4621 loI m into


* IN I ) IlN P il 'INI


* 2 Lois. = iIIi':: ,i $179,500
* )VrF. 2200 -,.i L..i .jM Ai :.i
* GCanile Counleis. Hickory Floois
Jeanne ao Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
n'I'I'. Cii usCouniL'Sold. corn









$49,000 WATERFRONT

I nh III, '. ,' i I m I.h h. h- ,- i
,, Ih- l- l, I Ih Ih n h II, I',-,,I, Ih

(ill ,;; ,.. 1 S .'td I.", 4. 1 -p. 01.1


PRIME LOCATION IN TOWN
OF INVERNESS MULTI USE
BUILDING ZONED CSD


I I .1 i .'.l I *.1 i .j I l.lI... i .

Mti= ..'4'. ASKING $450,000.
Call Jim Miloon at 422 2173


WIDE OPEN
WATERFRONT

" I p ''ilI I iII I I, I 'l l 'I'




Asking $189,000.00 Mi 'i
Pal Dais t3521212 7280
lil listing it liii eilpilluhliscon


19.75 ACRES WITH BOARD FENCING
*m 1.I ... I 0- l'.. I,, ir i- f
lil I iiiiihiill I--illl Idl l i, f ii i i LI ildili ii
* r, , ,i_ n l i n, , I H I , , l ,- I' I I ':, '. I Ii I Id 0 . l h ,
AII Mr I I II ,$ i , l, l .. ', I Il '
-Ml il $140,000 '-.. ASKING 5375,000
Call Case; Keatse :J \1' Mi/llon Call Jim llohio 422 2/73
Real Estate 3527266668 to wten this loe/ll .icre.ige







COUNTRY HOME
hpnl- ie 1 11 11 i- I-u h h ,l- I, I l 8 ,ilh HI"l I

ll I .l h h,- l h I ,IIll I l,, .1 , 1 h Il lh V II IVI .. Il l l.. .l
h,.I,, ,,,, 111, ul 0 -k -1 Il ,I, l -AIITIfIII I A N i APINI:.
lIh l l "d, 1 tl 1, I 111,, 1. l'1" 1.1 l.,, ll l_, U l--v f l.i.l Ip*il h .
Asking S228,900.00. i1 *, '111 = 7Ii'": $125,000
Pal Davis t3521212 7280 Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
li'il hosting 1iii 1 i ?lp.ilda.i tS cm i''i.tl CliutsCounti'Sold. coin


WATERFRONT:

h, r. .,1.1I" "' ;In ..I ^, f,., lle.J vi,, .l..0.n
.. I I. .. .l i I .. ...i ] ..i ;.J.l i l I 111

$130,000
Call Rulh Fiedeick I 352563 6866


THIS WILL MAKE YOU SMILE

I (4.1., 1 ,l .,i. I"" ...", l h...I I inj

i i ..illl il 13 1 ,W lli s p Il l l il. hl....l1
M1 !. = fi 1iI' $124,900
____niiiimnlfvwiw.W.Vid _


BRAND NEW INVERNESS WATERFRONT HOME!

10 .wy.. vvII$-v in 61.
wjl. .ll V Vi:l] ll11.l ll6 %1 I ,III ll I I1
ONLY ASKING S189,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


I


E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013