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Citrus County chronicle ( March 26, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 26, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03072

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 26, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03072

Full Text


No. 1: Tiger wins eighth Bay Hill title /B1


TODAY ,
& next ,
morning
HIGH L
60 Clear but
LOW unseasonably
32 cool.
w PAGE A4


MARCH 26, 2013


C I T R U-C:: 0U N T Y ^S






www.chronicleonline.com


Florida's Best Community1 Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOL. 118 ISSUE 231


FDOT: Parkway

Two-lane extension could save millions of dollars


PAT FAHERTY
Staff Writer
TALLAHASSEE Declaring
the Suncoast Parkway 2 project
has re-energized, Ananth
Prasad, secretary of Florida
Department of Transportation,
described it as a "very impor-
tant project for the state."
Speaking to participants at


the Citrus County Legislative
Day last week, Prasad said they
eventually want to extend the
parkway beyond Citrus County
into Marion and Alachua coun-
ties. He also mentioned a two-
lane alternative.
As previously planned, the
Suncoast 2 project is a 27-mile
expansion of Suncoast Parkway,
which ends at U.S. 98 in north


Hernando County. The p
would extend the park
through Citrus County, e
on U.S. 19 just north of (
Road 488. It would be a
lane divided toll road w
terchanges at U.S. I
Hernando County, State
44 and U.S. 19 in Citrus C
However, Prasad said
lanes would cost about


re-energized

million, but a He labeled the Wildwood
two-lane exten- Florida's Turnpike-Interstate
sion could be 75 exchange as a major choke
projectt built for $200 point and noted the difficulty of
vay up million to $300 getting to Tampa.
ending million. "We've got to try and relieve
County "It would be a congestion," he said. "We need
a four- big economic more capacity Suncoast 2 really
ith in- Ananth driver not only is an important corridor"
98 in Prasad for your county, He said there is $25 million
Road FDOT chief. but for the available for right of way -
'ounty state," he said. which is a start to what's


i, four
t $500


"It would relieve congestion on
1-75."


/Page A5


Swine sales serve those in need


Girls to donate money

from pig auctions to

help good causes

MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
INVERNESS Kylie Philipps
and Jordan Quintanilla have both
shown pigs before at the Citrus
County Fair, so Friday's swine sale is
no big deal.
In one way, though, it's bigger than
ever.
The girls, both members of
Lecanto Levi's 4-H club, are donat-
ing proceeds of their pig sales to
good causes.
Kylie is hoping to raise $5,000 for
Citrus County Blessings, formerly
known as Blessings in a Backpack,
which helps feed students in low-
income families.
Jordan said the proceeds from her
pig's sale will benefit her friend Kyle
Sisson, who is hospitalized in Atlanta
following a dirt-bike accident. (See
accompanying story)
The swine sale
Fair board is 7 p.m. Friday at
president a the fair
familiar face. Citrus High
See story, School sophomore
Page A3. Kylie, 16, is in her
seventh year
County fair showing pigs at
gets into full the fair. Her entry
swing today. was grand cham-
See story, pion the last two
PageA3. years, and she's
hoping for the
same this year with her 265-pound pig,
Sunshine.
"Pigs are just her thing," said her
mother, Stephanie Philipps.
She said she used money in past
years to buy a car and wanted this time
around to do something for the
community
"I want to give back to the commu-
nity that's given so much to me," she
said.
Kylie usually receives $2,000 to
$2,500 in the swine sale. This year,
knowing she was raising money for a
cause, Kylie sought per-pound pledges
beforehand and already has $3,200 to-
ward her goal.
She chose Citrus County Blessings
because her 4-H club helped get the
program off the ground in 2009 and
2010.
"Isn't that the nicest thing?" Bless-
ings program director Debbie Lattin
said. "She's a great kid and she wants
to give back."
Jordan, meanwhile, decided to help
her friend Kyle by donating proceeds
See SWE/PageA5


Com ics .........
Community . . .
Crossword . . . .


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Kylie Philipps gives a drink to her 265-pound Yorkshire Gilt swine Monday morning at the Citrus County Fair while she
waits to register her animal for the swine competition. Philipps, 16, is giving all the proceeds from the sale to Citrus
County Blessings, a program to help feed children of low-income families.


Support surrounds injured

Lecanto High School athlete


Jordan Quintanilla, 15, works Monday
around the livestock pavilion at the
Citrus County Fairgrounds before the
weeklong fair opens. The proceeds
from Jordan's pig sale in the swine
auction will benefit Kyle Sisson, a
hospitalized friend.


Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .B4
Horoscope ....... .B4


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Imagine falling on your neck and
not feeling a thing. Your heart begins
to race as you try to move
your legs to get up, but numb-
ness overtakes your body
That's when you realize
something is terribly wrong.
Last month, this scenario
was reality for Lecanto High
School junior and diver Kyle
Sisson.
On Feb. 16, a day after his Kyle
16th birthday, Kyle was en- injure
joying the day dirt biking and bike a
doing stunts with his friends,
when all of a sudden he went over
his handlebars and broke his neck.
"The kids called 911 and us imme-
diately," said his mother, Mary
Lynne Sisson. "When we got there
he couldn't move his legs, was upset


Lottery Numbers . .B3


d i
icc


and repeatedly screaming, 'I think
I'm paralyzed."'
Due to his condition, Kyle was air-
lifted from the accident scene to
Ocala Regional Medical Center.
He went into neck surgery
the next day and was classi-
fied as having a Level 6 com-
plete spinal cord injury,
which resulted in the loss of
movement and sensation
below his neck.
He was later transferred to
Shepherd's Center in Atlanta
isson for medical treatment and
in dirt- rehabilitation, where he re-
cident. sides today Mary Lynne said
Shepherd's Center is known
to be one of the top rehabilitation
hospitals in the nation. They spe-
cialize in medical treatment and re-
habilitation for people with spinal


Lottery Payouts .... B4
M ovies .......... .C8
Obituaries ....... .A6


See NJURY/Page A5

Classifieds ........ C9
TV Listings ....... C7


I CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.3 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM HOMOSASSA INVERNESS BROOKSVILLE
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III6 1II084578 iU0 5I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JV Welcomes
Sen er Our Staff





.,; X .. . -








Appropriate, comprehensive and timely treatment for our patients, with services
conveniently located all in one place, is the sole purpose of Christ Medical Center.
This multi-specialty group offers trusted medical care where physicians and practitioners
work together to speed recovery and keep costs down 'for the patient. We offer
expanded medical services for new patients and those formerly seen at Citrus Diabetes
Treatment Center. We believe if you choose CMC for your healthcare needs, you'll
agree it is simply the best comprehensive care you will find anywhere.

H Dr. Eihab Tawfik, MD Jihad MNI. Khalil
Internal N Medicine : Cardiologist
Dr. NI. Ali, MD Dawn Goodpaster,
Pain Nlanagement PA-C
Dr. Robert Hofmann, MD Physician's Assistant/
Ophthalmologist : Internal Medicine
Dr. Narin Singer, DPM : Anita L. Grabowski,
Podiatrist : MNISN, FNP-BC
: Nurse Practitioner/
Dr. Nahed Bolis, DPM : Family Practice
o Podiatrist
(Spring Hill location) Joe Arevalo,
71 Dr. Adi, MD : BSN, RN, ARNP
F eramil Practice Nurse Practitioner/
Cardiology
Look for the announcement of our
gastroenterologist coming soon.


Treatm ent Centere
has grown!


*& V S


Y r e t Y Sur life,, UrpaI slon,
I OOOEGJY^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^


L"
I Now Open.1
^^^^^Accepting^
I N-.-ew Patients


A2 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013







Page A3 -TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Thorpe gains certified port credentials


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer

The county administrator re-
turned from a weeklong training
program last week with a new
acronym CPE.
"I'm a certified port executive,
a CPE," said Brad Thorpe, who
also is the county's port director
Thorpe was among 17 people
who trained for 40 hours from
March 11 to 15 in New Orleans,
La., with MacDonnell Group Ma-
rine training program. Other at-
tendees included employees
from Port Manatee, Port New
Orleans, Port Arthur from Jef-
ferson County, Texas, and sev-
eral Canadian ports. The
program was instructed by Cap-
tain Jeffrey W Monroe, MM,
CPE.
"He was a very skilled lec-
turer Good teacher he knew
his stuff," Thorpe said about
Monroe, master mariner, who


has 35 years' experience in the
port and transportation indus-
tries. Monroe serves as an ad-
viser to the Department of
Homeland Security as chairman
of the National Maritime Secu-
rity Advisory Committee.
"We learned about port and
terminal operations, cargo man-
agement, security and safety,
emergency planning, environ-
mental management, strategic
planning and business planning
for a port," Thorpe said. "So we
learned how to run a port from
the very beginning to the end."
Thorpe has been criticized in
the past for lacking experience
as the county's port director
"My point in learning how to
run a port is gaining the creden-
tials that make me more of a pro-
fessional port manager," Thorpe
said. "Now that I've been with a
bunch of other port directors
and staff, I think I have a better
feel for what it would take to op-


rate this port and make
it successful."
Steering the develop-
ment of a new port fell on
Thorpe's shoulders
nearly two years ago, in
May 2011, when Gov Rick
Scott signed legislation
regarding security regula- B
tions at Florida's seaports Tho
that included language co
creating Port Citrus. admin
Thorpe also was criti-
cized for the training expense.
"I paid for all the expenses
myself," Thorpe said. "The
caveat is that if the port is feasi-
ble, I can be reimbursed."
Port Citrus currently is under-
going a feasibility study con-
ducted by TranSystems to be
completed by the end of the year
"The timeline on their con-
tract says they will come to us in
October," Thorpe said. "But I be-
lieve they are going to do a sta-
tus report in June. When


ra
o
u
is


TranSystems lets me
know when they are
going to do the status re-
port, we'll set the date
and the time for the Port
Authority meeting."
With his training,
Thorpe said he gained
ad practical applications.
rpe "We took a scenario of
nty a port that was having a
strator. variety of difficulties and
we had to go through that
process as a class and strategize
how to master-plan that port and
make it run," Thorpe said. "We
all worked through a planning
process to make a model port
work. It was a marketing plan. It
was trying to get tenants back
into the port We had some prob-
lems with transportation: Roads
had to be widened or had to be
put in all of that."
Participants described their
own ports to each other. Thorpe
said he got good feedback


about Port Citrus.
"The reactions were well-
received for this port," Thorpe
said. "Although we are a rela-
tively shallow port, we have a lot
of available land surrounding
the waterways. A lot of ports in
cities have a lot of limitations
based on property and they are
always encroaching on the city
Having a port that is basically
new with a lot of available land
is a big asset for this port"
Land was not the only asset.
"If you look at the infrastruc-
ture, we do have potentially
some rail, a rail spur at the
Progress Energy site," Thorpe
said. "We have the Suncoast
Parkway extension coming
there. We're fairly close to the
inland port on 1-75 and (U.S.) 27.
There are some positives."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916
or cvanormer@chronicle
online.com.


36 years and counting


Fair

president

describes

labor of love

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

INVERNESS
ell Mayberry was
happy Across the
narrow roadway,
the midway was going
up. Behind her, the stage
was being prepared for a
concert by Restless
Heart All around, peo-
ple were putting the final
touches on displays, and
the smell of food was be-
ginning to build.
Mayberry is president
of the Citrus County Fair
Association Board of Di-
rectors and perhaps the
event's biggest booster
Her eyes light up
when she talks about
the midway her spe-
cial interest and
what's in store in the
coming days of the fair.
"I love the fair," she
said. "I love the food."
She has been part of it
for 36 years.
She started as a vol-
unteer back in 1977 and
previously served as
president from 1989-
1991, 1995-1996, 2000-
2010 and was back on
the job in 2012.
"It's a good board and
we work well together,"
she said. "I can't say
enough about the peo-
ple who run the office
for us or the people who
volunteer to help us.
Everybody works and I
love doing it."
She also gave high
marks to Belle City
Amusements, which oper-
ates the rides.
"They are a clean, fun,
family-oriented midway,"
she said.
Charles Panacek,
owner of Belle City
Amusements, expects
the main attraction this
year will be the Rock


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Nell Mayberry has once again taken over the reins as president of the Citrus County Fair Association Board of Directors. Serving
several stints as president, Mayberry has more than 15 collective years of service leading the association.


Come out and have fun at the Fair


Chronicle

The Citrus County Fair midway opens at 5 p.m.
today for "Two Buck Tuesday" Admission is $2
and all rides are $2.
Wednesday is "Senior and Military Day" with ad-
mission for seniors 55 and older and military $5. All
others ages 11 and older pay $7 admission; children
ages 5 to 10 are $3; ages 4 and younger are free. The
fair opens at 1 p.m. Midway opens at 5 p.m.
Wednesday is also Chronicle Night with an arm-
band special for the midway rides. Regular price
is $20, or $18 with the Chronicle coupon. See
Wednesday's Chronicle.
On Thursday, the fair opens at 5 p.m. and the
popular Midnight Magic featuring a $20 midway
rides armband begins at 8 p.m. and ends at 1 a.m.
(No re-entry after 8 p.m.)
School Day is 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, with free ad-
mission for students until 5 p.m. A $20 armband


'N' Roll ride, which
takes three semi-trucks
to transport He said


they have a new kiddy
swing ride called Lolly
Pop, and will have 31


special runs from 1 to 5 p.m. and again from 6 to
11 p.m. for Friday Night Magic with general ad-
mission prices in effect.
The fair continues Saturday at 10 a.m. (midway
opens at 11 a.m.) for Daytime Magic. A $20 arm-
band is good from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and again from
6 to 10 p.m. for Saturday Night Magic.
For the second year, the fair will be open on
Sunday from 2 to 7 p.m. with no gate admission
and no single midway tickets sold. Ride the mid-
way rides for a $22 armband.
Check out the youth exhibits and show your sup-
port for the young people who have worked hard
raising animals for auction. The swine show starts
at 7 p.m. Tuesday; sale starts at 7 p.m. Friday Steer
show starts at 7 p.m. Wednesday and the sale starts
at 7 p.m. Thursday
The Citrus County Fairgrounds is located at
3600 S. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Inverness. For more
information, call 352-726-2993.


rides in all.
Planning and pulling
together the fair is a


year-round effort In ad-
dition to having an out-
standing midway, she


said they bring in new at-
tractions to other parts of
the fair and make the
sure crowd-pleasers re-
turn.
"That's what people
want," Mayberry said.
"What we try to do as
directors is to do what's
best for Citrus County,"
she said. "That's what
we love to do."
The board also keeps
up with how other fairs
are doing things around
the state through the
Florida Association of
Fairs.
"Everybody works,"
she emphasized. "We
meet once a month and
everybody needs to see
what they can do to make
the fair run better"
Contact Chronicle
reporter Pat Faherty at
352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicle
online, com.


Around the COUNTY


Citrus County

Save Waters essay
contest opens
The Citrus 20/20 Save Our
Waters Week Committee's
2013 essay contest has
begun. Essays should focus
on the theme "Water save
it now or lose it forever."
Citrus County students in
grades 6 through 12 are en-
couraged to participate.
Prizes of $100 and $75 are
awarded to the first- and sec-
ond-place winners at the mid-
dle and high school levels.
Winners will also be high-


lighted at the annual Citrus
20/20 fundraiser dinner.
Submissions must be re-
ceived by May 17. Applica-
tions available at:
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/waterres
/conservation/conservation
.htm.
For more information,
please call the Department of
Water Resources at 352-
527-7684.
Pet food
donations sought
Citrus County Animal Serv-
ices is asking for the public's
help in meeting the needs of
financially challenged citizens


who own pets. The goal is to
afford those residents the abil-
ity to feed their pets.
Animal Services is asking
citizens to deliver pet food do-
nations to their local food
bank or to the Animal Serv-
ices shelter in Inverness to
help those residents keep
their animals rather than sur-
render them to the shelter be-
cause they don't have the
money to feed them.
Animal Services staff said
dog food is especially in short
supply. For more information
on how you can help, call
352-746-8400.
Monetary donations may


be mailed to Citrus County
Animal Services, 4030 South
Airport Road, Inverness,
FL, 34450. The shelter is lo-
cated at the end of Airport
Road, which is off U.S. 41 be-
tween the Inverness Airport
and the county
auditorium/fairgrounds, just
south of Inverness.
'Forgotten Films'
series ending
The Nature Coast Unitarian
Universalists wind up the
March series of great films
never shown in Citrus County.
Come see "Beasts of the
Southern Wild" at 3 p.m.


Thursday, March 28, at the
Unitarian-Universalist Fellow-
ship, 7633 Florida Ave. (U.S.
41), Citrus Springs. Sug-
gested donation is $3.
For information, call 352-
4654225, or visit nature
coastuu.org.
Seniors vs. Crime
spotlighted
The new coordinator of the
sheriff's office's Seniors vs.
Crime program, Linda Lepore,
will be the special guest on
Wednesday's "Sheriff's 10-43"
show, which airs at 7:30 p.m.
on cable channel WYKE
channel 16.


Lepore will give an
overview of Seniors vs. Crime
and how it helps citizens who
have been scammed or taken
advantage of.
She'll also explain the other
services the free program pro-
vides.
The "Sheriff's 1043" show
airs live at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday and is rebroad-
cast at 11 a.m. on Fridays.
Prior shows can be seen via
the sheriff's office website,
www.sheriffcitrus.org.
Click on Public Information,
then 10-43 Show for more
information.
From staff reports






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Man, 18, faces


more sex charges

Chronicle his arrest affidavit.
However, investigators
An 18-year-old man began getting word that
charged with lewd Buch had been
and lascivious bat- seeing the girl.
tery on a 14-year- When the girl was
old female last interviewed by in-
November is fac- vestigators, she ad-
ing similar -. mitted to having
charges involving sexual relations
the same girl, ac- with Buch on sev-
cording to the eral occasions
Citrus County Damian since his release
Sheriff's Office. Buch from jail.
Damian D. Buch being held on Buch refused to
of Inverness was $60,000 bond. speak with investi-
allowed bond in the No- gators without an attorney
vember case on Feb. 4 on present. Buch, currently
the condition he stay away jailed on another charge,
from the girl, according to has a $60,000 bond.

State BRIEFS

Man arrested after morning along with his hand-
prison release gun, ColtAR 15 rifle, portable
police radio and ammunition.
ORLANDO --A man is Those items were kept in the
back behind bars after author- trunk.
ities said he robbed a conven- Illegal immigrant
ience store hours after getting
t it f nrison for armed clears hurdle to Bar


robbery.
Orlando Police said Derrick
Daniels was released from
prison Saturday and a few
hours later walked into a con-
venience store and demanded
the cashier give him $40. Ac-
cording to an arrest report, the
46-year-old held a paper bag
over his hand, simulating he
had a gun and threatened to
shoot the cashier if he didn't
get the money.

Suspect steals cop
car from driveway
ST. PETERSBURG-Au-
thorities are investigating after
someone stole an unmarked
patrol car from a detective's
driveway in St. Petersburg.
Detective Matthew Furse
discovered the car was miss-
ing from his home Monday


TALLAHASSEE -An ille-
gal immigrant trying to be-
come a Florida attorney has
passed another "character
and fitness" review as part of
the state's bar examination.
The Florida Board of Bar
Examiners filed paperwork
Monday with the Florida
Supreme Court. Bar examin-
ers investigate candidates'
moral character before admit-
ting them to practice.
The board is seeking an advi-
sory opinion from the court
about whether illegal immigrants
can be attorneys in Florida. That
decision is pending.
Jose Godinez-Samperio's
parents brought him to the
United States from Mexico on
a visitor's visa when he was 9
years old.
-From wire reports


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Arrests
Paul Long, 43, of North
Nature Trail, Hernando, at
3:30 p.m. March 20 on a mis-
demeanor charge of retail petit
theft. Bond $250.
Mary Davis, 27, of South-
east 194th Lane, Inglis, at
3:52 p.m. March 20 on a felony
charge of failure of a sex of-
fender to report name/address
change within 48 hours. Bond
$20,000.
Emilie Catucci, 21, of
Jones Avenue, Inverness, at
5:02 p.m. March 20 on a mis-
demeanor charge of battery.
Bond $500.
Christopher Sizemore,
31, of West Larchwood Street,
Homosassa, at 8:47 p.m.
March 20 on misdemeanor
charges of retail petit theft and
possession of Xanax without a
prescription. Bond $500.
April Hyden, 34, of West
Central Street, Homosassa, at
8:47 p.m. March 20 on misde-
meanor charges of trespassing
in a structure or conveyance
and possession of Xanax with-
out a prescription. Bond $500.
Amanda Massey, 29, of
West State Street, Ho-
mosassa, at 9:49 a.m. March
21 on a Citrus County warrant


for a misdemeanor charge of
obtaining property by means of
worthless check. Bond $150.
Charles Semko, 37, of
West Joni Lee Court, Ho-
mosassa, at 9:45 a.m. March
21 on felony charges of bur-
glary of an unoccupied
dwelling and grand theft. Ac-
cording to his arrest affidavit,
he is accused of burglarizing a
home on North Tyrone Avenue
in Hemando and taking equip-
ment and tools. No bond.
Larry Rice, 42, of South
Alabama Avenue, Homosassa,
at 12:39 p.m. March 21 on a Cit-
rus County warrant for violation
of probation on original felony
charges of sudden snatching
with no weapon and aggravated
battery on a person 65 years of
age or older. No bond.
Burglaries
SA residential burglary was
reported at 11:03 a.m. Satur-
day, March 23, in the 7600
block of W. Homosassa Trail,
Homosassa.
SA residential burglary was
reported at 12:09 p.m. March
23 in the 3000 block of E. Pos-
sum Court, Inverness.
MA commercial burglary was
reported at 12:09 p.m. Sunday,
March 24, in the 8200 block of E.
Fort Cooper Road, Inverness.
SA vehicle burglary was re-
ported at 1:17 p.m. March 24


in the 3500 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:27 p.m. March 24
in the 6300 block of E. Forest
Trail Drive, Hemando.
Thefts
M A petit theft was reported
at 12:20 a.m. Friday, March
22, in the 5600 block of S.
Florida Ave., Floral City.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 1:58 p.m. March 22
in the 4900 block of W.
Meadow St., Homosassa.
M A petit theft was reported
at 3:49 p.m. March 22 in the
1800 block of W. Pine Ridge
Blvd., Beverly Hills.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 5:06 p.m. March 22
in the 5200 block of S. Knob-
hill Terrace, Homosassa.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:19 p.m. March 22 in the
4300 block of E. Archer Lane,
Inverness.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 1:03 a.m. Saturday,
March 23, in the 2300 block of
N. Florida Ave., Hernando.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:57 a.m. March 23 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 6:02 p.m. March 23 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake


Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 11:25 p.m. March 23 in the
40 block of S. Jackson St.,
Beverly Hills.
An auto theft was re-
ported at 2:34 a.m. Sunday,
March 24, in the 800 block of
W. Main St., Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 9:30 a.m. March 24 in the
700 block of S. Scramajott Ter-
race, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 1:16 p.m. March 24 in the
2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
A petit theft was reported
at 4:07 p.m. March 24 in the
8600 block of N. Gilovu Drive,
Dunnellon.
A grand theft was re-
ported at 8:42 p.m. March 24
in the 500 block of W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness.
Vandalisms
SA vandalism was reported
at 7:32 a.m. Saturday, March
23, in the 500 block of E. Hart-
ford St., Hernando.
SA vandalism was reported
at 4:08 p.m. March 23 in the
7900 block of N. Santos Drive,
Dunnellon.
SA vandalism was reported
at 11:57 p.m. Sunday, March
24, in the 9200 block of N.
Cedar Cove Road, Dunnellon.


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 62 40 s Miami 71
Ft. Lauderdale 71 46 pc Ocala 60
Fort Myers 69 42 pc Orlando 64
Gainesville 60 33 s Pensacola 57
Homestead 70 44 pc Sarasota 63
Jacksonville 58 35 pc Tallahassee 58
Key West 70 61 s Tampa 61
Lakeland 64 37 s Vero Beach 67
Melbourne 65 39 s W. Palm Bch. 70


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds from 15 to 20 knots.
Seas 4 to 6 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Skies will be
mostly sunny today.


68 56 NA 67 55 0.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusve dally
B TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 60 Low: 32
Clear but unseasonably cool. Near
freezing at night.


WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING
High: 65 Low: 34
A cold start with a cool afternoon. Plenty of
sunshine and dry air.


THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING
High: 70 Low: 39
Slowly getting milder. Still sunny.


ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Monday 67/52
Record 90/35
Normal 79/51
Mean temp. 60
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Monday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 1.30 in.
Total for the year 3.40 in.
Normal for the year 9.49 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 10
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Monday at 3 p.m. 29.96 in.


DEW POINT
Monday at 3 p.m. 31
HUMIDITY
Monday at 3 p.m. 41/,
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Juniper, Bayberry
Today's count: 9.9/12
Wednesday's count: 8.7
Thursday's count: 8.9
AIR QUALITY
Monday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/26 TUESDAY 5:12 11:24 5:36 11:49
3/27 WEDNESDAY 6:00 6:25 12:13


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT............................7:45 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:26A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY....................... 7:19 P.M.
APRIL 3 APRIL 10 APRIL 18 MOONSET TODAY........................6:41 A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


High/Lo
5:54 a/1:38
4:15 a/11:1
2:02 a/9:07
5:04 a/12:3


**At King's Bay
Tuesday
w High/Low
8 a 6:09 p/1:57 p
19a 4:30 p/11:40 p
7 a 2:17 p/9:28 p
7 a 5:19 p/12:56 p


***At Mason's Creek
Wednesday
High/Low High/Low
6:37 a/2:18 a 6:37 p/2:32 p
4:58 a/11:54 a 4:58 p/--
2:45 a/9:42 a 2:45 p/10:07 p
5:47 a/1:17 a 5:47 p/1:31 p


Gulf water
temperature


64
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Sun. Mon. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.00 28.04 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.45 37.44 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.31 38.30 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.55 39.55 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


*.. .. .. 20s -'
SB"---- -Isos'- .- _
r sancis c o^ 'H eio i ", if!
,' Deriver 1 -er- .
S2Ds


50s1 30-s
Pm Fw 9b

j I A f
On 77 ,Es. *S .

L.n:.noag 5 Jan6a Honolu- iI ...


Os 80s


Monday Tuesday
City H L Pcp. FcstH L
Albany 42 29 pc 43 27
Albuquerque 53 26 pc 64 40
Asheville 40 32 .01 sn 39 26
Atlanta 55 37 .04 pc 46 31
Atlantic City 39 32 1.04 pc 43 35
Austin 59 33 s 64 38
Baltimore 36 32 .76 pc 47 35
Billings 46 10 s 50 28
Birmingham 46 34 pc 47 29
Boise 54 32 c 57 37
Boston 44 33 pc 46 33
Buffalo 40 31 sn 39 30
Burlington, VT 43 22 sn 39 28
Charleston, SC 56 45 pc 56 34
Charleston, WV 41 32 .25 sn 40 30
Charlotte 50 38 .02 pc 50 30
Chicago 38 32 pc 39 29
Cincinnati 36 30 pc 39 26
Cleveland 33 30 .26 sn 38 28
Columbia, SC 51 42 pc 55 33
Columbus, OH 36 32 .07 pc 38 27
Concord, N.H. 43 22 pc 43 23
Dallas 55 32 s 56 38
Denver 27 2 c 42 23
Des Moines 36 28 .03 pc 35 25
Detroit 39 30 pc 41 28
El Paso 61 37 s 69 53
Evansville, IN 36 32 .02 pc 39 26
Harrisburg 38 32 .36 pc 44 29
Hartford 46 32 pc 47 31
Houston 63 38 s 61 40
Indianapolis 34 28 .10 pc 36 23
Jackson 52 34 pc 53 30
Las Vegas 73 50 s 82 58
Little Rock 45 31 s 52 30
Los Angeles 67 52 s 64 54
Louisville 37 32 .02 pc 39 28
Memphis 42 33 pc 49 30
Milwaukee 35 30 pc 36 28
Minneapolis 38 24 pc 35 22
Mobile 58 36 pc 58 35
Montgomery 54 36 pc 52 32
Nashville 39 34 pc 42 28
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
TUESDAY

Monday Tuesday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 59 41 s 56 42
New York City 40 36 .12 pc 48 34
Norfolk 43 36 .14 pc 47 34
Oklahoma City 44 28 s 51 35
Omaha 32 24 s 38 24
Palm Springs 85 57 s 88 59
Philadelphia 39 33 .46 pc 44 32
Phoenix 83 55 s 89 60
Pittsburgh 36 32 .30 sn 40 25
Portland, ME 41 27 pc 43 29
Portland, Ore 61 39 c 60 45
Providence, R.I. 48 31 pc 46 31
Raleigh 48 35 pc 49 30
Rapid City 30 0 pc 41 24
Reno 69 34 pc 65 38
Rochester, NY 40 32 sn 39 30
Sacramento 65 48 pc 71 49
St. Louis 36 30 .03 pc 35 20
St. Ste. Marie 40 28 pc 36 24
Salt Lake City 51 27 c 57 40
San Antonio 62 39 s 66 44
San Diego 67 55 s 63 53
San Francisco 54 46 pc 60 47
Savannah 78 44 .60 pc 56 33
Seattle 61 40 pc 59 45
Spokane 49 27 pc 53 36
Syracuse 43 30 sn 40 28
Topeka 34 23 s 39 24
Washington 39 33 .50 pc 47 34
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87 Yuma, Anz.
LOW -21 Yellowstone N.P, Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


TUESDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/73/s
Amsterdam 41/27/pc
Athens 67/50/pc
Beijing 55/36/pc
Berlin 35/26/c
Bermuda 65/61/pc
Cairo 89/52/s
Calgary 48/27/s
Havana 72/59/pc
Hong Kong 74/72/c
Jerusalem 80/51/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


60/55/r
36/31/c
55/50/sh
73/48/sh
39/30/sh
22/7/c
41/31/c
80/72/ts
52/42/pc
79/68/pc
52/52/sh
43/28/pc
33/22/pc


C I T R U S


F'cast
pc
s
s
s
s
s
s
pc
pc


For the RECORD


jegal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle




Fictitious Name Notices.......................C12



Miscellaneous Notices.........................C12



Notice to

.... Creditors/Administration..........C11, C12


C 0 U N T Y


LHRONICLE
Florida's Best Community Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
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*Subscription price includes a separate charge of. 15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
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FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
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Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
44 office
n jr.-r11Brjni H,,, 1624 N.
Dun en ed Meadowcrest
Dunen I \ .- Cnnun~ale Dr Blvd.
Ave |Crystal River,
I '., \\ ,, M-idwre-I FL 34429
N I \ -" I1

SInverness
Couoffice
TompkinsSt. c Ierswre
41 106 W. Main
St.,
SA Inverness, FL
N4 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ...................................................................... Publisher, 563-3222
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld .......................................................................................... E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes........................... ................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ............................... ............. Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ........................................................... ........................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www. chronicleonline. com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
4M P Phone 352-563-6363
S POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


0
MARCH 27


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


A4 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013


LOCAI/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lyngbya harvesting



meeting Thursday


Special to the Chronicle Save the Manatee Club.
The lyngbya cleanup
At 3 p.m. Thursday, Art project was put on hold on
Jones is hosting a One March 15 due to concerns
Rake at a Time co- raised by Pat Rose
ordination meet- of the Save the
ing at the Manatee Club.
Seminole Club at Concerns included
135 N.E. Third St. turbidity and the
in Crystal River. possible need of a
All federal, state, dredging permit.
county and city "This is only the
agencies that have second time we
jurisdiction and Art Jones have ever had a
permitting author- started lyngbya complaint, and Pat
ity over King's Bay cleanup Rose asked me to
have been invited. project. suspend all opera-
Contractors working on the tions as an act of good faith
project and nonprofits until we can get all parties
with interest in the bay will together to make sure we
be there too, including the are cleaning up King's Bay


in the best possible way,"
Jones said.
Jones acknowledges that
turbidity is a byproduct of
the mechanical removal of
lyngbya.
"When you are removing
massive amounts of rotting
lyngbya from King's Bay,
you get temporary turbid-
ity that is observed to set-
tle out in a short amount of
time," Jones said. "If you
look at where we have
cleaned in the Hunter's
Spring basin and Three
Sisters Springs, the water
is much clearer If you look
where we have not
cleaned yet, the water is
cloudy and turbid."


Gov. shuts down office


after Carroll resignation


Four workers

out ofajob

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Gov Rick Scott is
shutting down the lieu-
tenant governor's office
for now.
Former Lt. Gov.
Jennifer Carroll
resigned earlier
this month after
she was inter-
viewed as part of
an ongoing investi-
gation into an al-
leged widespread
gambling ring. She Jenl
has not been ac- Ca
caused of any fo r
wrongdoing. goe
But part of the
fallout is the decision to
shutter the office until a
successor is named, put-
ting out of work the four
employees who remained.
Emails show that orders
have already gone out to
pack up the office and se-
cure state-owned comput-
ers. Some employees are
already circulating
resumes.
A spokeswoman for
Scott said the decision was
made to save money over
the next few months until
a new lieutenant governor
is appointed.
Scott has repeatedly
said that he will not focus
on finding a replacement


until after the annual leg-
islative session ends in
early May
Melissa Sellers also said
that the decision to shut
down the office is recogni-
tion that the new lieu-
tenant governor would
determine whom to hire.
The Scott administra-
tion says it will try to find
"other opportunities" for
the departing em-
ployees "to serve
in state govern-
ment where their
experience and
background make
them a good fit."
The lieutenant
governor's office
lifer budget is nearly
roll $510,000, accord-
ner ing to Scott's
nant budget office. That
rnor. includes the nearly
$125,000 annual
salary paid to the lieu-
tenant governor. Carroll's
chief of staff John
Konkus has an annual
salary of $100,000.
Carroll abruptly re-
signed after authorities
questioned her about
consulting work she did
for Allied Veterans of the
World before she was
elected lieutenant gover-
nor. Allied is accused of
running a $290 million il-
legal gambling business


that directed most of the
proceeds into its owners'
pockets. Nearly 60 peo-
ple have been arrested
so far.
The scandal led Florida
lawmakers to move ahead
with legislation to ban the
storefront operations
known as Internet cafes
that were operated by Al-
lied and its affiliates.
Florida politicians and
the state's political parties
are also rushing to return
money that they received
from Allied and key play-
ers involved in the scandal.
Both Scott and the Re-
publican Party of Florida
have already announced
plans to donate money to
charity that equals the
amount received from
those associated with the
scandal.
Florida Democrats on
Monday handed out
checks to several veteran
groups located in Broward
and Palm Beach counties.
They said they've identi-
fied Allied and its associ-
ates donated $272,000 to
Democratic campaigns.
Sen. Chris Smith, D-Fort
Lauderdale, called the al-
legations "infuriating" and
said Democrats would not
have not accepted any
money if they had known
about Allied activities.


PARKWAY
Continued from Page Al L _


estimated to be a $100 mil-
lion to $125 million
acquisition.
Christa Deason, public
information officer with
Florida's Turnpike Enter-
prise, said the project will
require about 100 parcels.
Prasad foresees the proj-
ect being more dependent
on user tolls than gas tax
revenues and said regional
transportation finance au-
thorities can accept land
donations for building a
corridor. The authorities
are a way to bring local eq-
uity partners together to fi-
nance a project.
"It's going to be a good
iconic drive for you,"
Prasad said. "It is the right
thing to do for the state."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.



SWINE
Continued from Page Al

from the sale of her 226-
pound pig Dallas to help
with Kyle's medical ex-
penses.
She and Kyle are in a
program at Lecanto High
School called AVID that's
designed to help advanced
students prepare for the
rigors of college.
"What they don't tell you
is when you join AVID you
become a family," she said.
"My classmates are my
brothers and sisters."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Mike Wright at 352-
563-3228 or wright@
chronicleonline. corn


4(
RELAY
FOR LIFE
S-


HOPE
Our Reason
to Relay


This is Relay For Life, a community event where people
come together to remember loved ones, inspire others
and celebrate life. It's your chance to make a difference in
the fight against cancer. The money you raise will fund
lifesaving research, education, advocacy and service
programs. Call us to register your team for this
unforgettable event. This is the American Cancer Society.


April 5th Crystal River High School
April 12th Lecanto High School
April 19th Citrus High School
For more information call 637-5577


CITRUS MEMORIAL
A, t6 H.-lfa o.,f M...; O y


Ci Iik'idiE
.oh~onioIonIine.~on.


Special to the Chronicle
Kyle Sisson is passionate about his family. From left, are: Kyle, his father Rob Sisson,
his mother Mary Lynne Sisson and his brother Tyler Sisson.


INJURY
Continued from Page Al

cord injuries.
"He remembers the ac-
cident," Mary Lynne said.
"He knows what he did
and he wishes it never
happened. He is trying to
adjust to the thought of a
wheelchair.
"The next step for him
is therapy so that he can
regain what he can," she
said. "That is our main
goal. We take one day at a
time."
Therapy started two
weeks ago and Kyle's in-
jury has been upgraded to
incomplete spinal cord in-
jury since he now has sen-
sations in his feet.
Of his involvement in
athletics, Mary Lynne
said, "Diving was a part
of his life and will never
be taken away from
him."
"Kyle is the all-around
type of athlete that you
want to be a part of your
team because his person-
ality is infectious," said
his diving coach Becky
Harris. "His hard work
and dedication rubbed
off on the other divers.
Also, he was always will-
ing to help his fellow
teammates out. He has
the type of personality
that makes you not only
want to coach him, but be
around him."


Citrus High School ac-
tivities director Laura
Aguilera believes Kyle
can overcome great
obstacles.
"Kyle is a dynamic
young man with a strong
work ethic and a kind
heart," she said. "I have
no doubt that with the
love and support from his
family, friends and the
community, he will over-
come this tragedy"
The Sisson family
thanks all in the commu-
nity for their support and
encouragement. They
have created a website to
update readers on Kyle's
progress: www.caring
bridge.com.
Fundraisers to benefit
Kyle are planned.
Jordan Quintanilla is
donating the proceeds of
her pig's sale at Friday's
swine auction at the Cit-
rus County Fair to Kyle's
family for medical ex-
penses. (See story on Page
Al.)


On April 20, Beef '0'
Brady's in Crystal River is
hosting a pancake benefit
breakfast and silent auc-
tion. April 29, it is also
hosting a dinner benefit
where a portion of pro-
ceeds will be donated to a
fund for Kyle's recovery
and. Plans are also being
arranged for a talent show
and 5 K run.
Rob Sisson, Kyle's fa-
ther, has set up a benefit
account at SunTrust Bank
in Crystal River For more
information, call the bank
at 352-795-8216. Mary
Lynne Sisson also said
cards and letters are ap-
preciated for encourage-
ment. They can be mailed
to Kyle Sisson, Shep-
herd's Center, 2020
Peachtree Road N.W,
Room 425, Atlanta, GA
30309.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


central citrus Rotary club's 23rd Annual Blood screening


ffoarb,, BLOOD TESTING

FOR YOUR GOOD HEALTH!
t Central/

I + i IP + CITRUSMEMORIAL
lwxb)1 A 01) 6IC-h + V


comprehensive Testingat
DRASTICAIY REDUCED PRICES
I Only $82.00*
Rotary Blood Screening Profile
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.)
Additional $68.00
PSA TEST (men only) Test for Prostate Cancer


Additional $68.00
Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing
Additional $68.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.
Additional $68.00


ONE DAY ONLY
Sat., April 13, 2013
6:30am to 9:30am
at the
Forest Ridge Elementary School
in Hernando
"Over $500 Value !t


DO NOT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
O ...nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
and up to the test. Complimentary coffee,
juice and donuts will be served after the test.
Blood drawn by
Citrus Memorial Health System
licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by


Al C TEST Shows your average blood sugar level over Vladimir Vlcko, D.O., Board Certified
past 2-3 months and how balanced your blood sugar is being in Family Practice.
controlled over time, to keep within a healthy range. Please understand that you should discuss the
results of your test(s) with your personal physician.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance
to afford a complete blood screening.
' CUT HERE KEEP UPPER HALF AS A REMINDER--
SEND LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK
Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED: 23rd Annual Blood Screening
Pre-registration is required no later than April10,2013.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to: Use ONE REGISTRATION FORM per person please.
Rotary Club of Central Citrus (Make photocopies if needed.)
dc/o Ed Serra, CPA
6118 West Corporate Oaks Dr. YOU MUST SIGN BELOW
Crystal River, FL 34429
,.t Name:
1 A B S FIRST MIDDLE INITIAL LAST

17 Blood Screening Test...........$82.00 $ Social Securit#:


Optional PSA- (men only)....$68.00 +$___
J Optional Thyroid Panels.......$68.00 +$_
SOptional Cardiac C.R.P........$68.00 +$__
IA1C Test..............................$68.00 +$_


Address:


State: Zip:


Telephone: ( )
Birthdate: / /


Age:_ MALE U FEMALE


TOTAL $

The patient identified above consents to the procedures which may be
performed on an outpatient basis; limited to laboratory procedures.
The undersigned certifies that he/she has read the foregoing and is the patient, the patient's legal representative,
or is duly authorized by the patient as the patient's general agent to execute the above and accept its terms.
PLEASE READ A SIGN FORE SENDING IN.
NO RESERVATIONS.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.
Patient/Parent/Guardian/Conservator/Responsible Party Date
If other than patient, indicate relationship witness Signature Date
OOOEB7K


I


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Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


LOCAI/STATE


TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 A5


n
r

ei
e





A6 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013

Levaughn
'Big Mom'
Robinson, 95
INGLIS
Levaughn F Ellzey
Robinson, 95, passed away
peacefully March 23, 2013,
at her home in Inglis, Fla.
Mrs. Robinson was born in
Branford, Fla., to the late
William Joseph Fletcher
and the late Molly Robin-
son Aug. 7, 1917. "Big
Mom," as she was affec-
tionately known, worked
for Sherwood Medical Inc.
in Deland
for 25
years be-
fore retir-
ing and
moving to
Branford
and then
to Inglis.
Levaughn Big Mom
Robinson enjoyed
working in her garden,
being with her family and,
most of all, cooking for fam-
ily and friends. She was well
known for cooking Thanks-
giving meals for her family
and friends, usually serv-
ing dinner to 40 or more.
She was predeceased by
her husband, Nelson Robin-
son; and her ex-husband of
39 years, William Edward
Ellzey Sr; sister Mabel
Sawyer; son-in-law Buddy
McKay; granddaughter
Melissa Ellzey Combs; and
great-granddaughter Mikayla
Robinson. Big Mom is sur-
vived by her two daughters,
Mary McKay of Inglis and
Wilma Martin (Bill) ofDeland;
her three sons, William El-
lzey Jr. (Karen) of Deleon
Springs, Joseph Emory El-
lzey of St. Cloud and Wof-
fard Kenneth Ellzey (Linda)
of Inglis; seven grandchil-
dren; 11 great-grandchil-
dren; five great-great-
grandchildren; and sister
Margaret Knight of Inglis.
Though our hearts are
broken, we take faith in
knowing that our mother is
with our Heavenly Father.
Big Mom will be remem-
bered for her generous
and caring nature, sense of
humor and commitment to
both family and friends.
Memorial donations can be
made in memory of Lev-
aughn Robinson to Hospice
of Citrus County, Inc., PO.
Box 641270, Beverly Hills,
FL 34464. Visitation will be
held at Lankford Funeral
Home, 220 East New York
Ave., DeLand, FL 32724,5 to
7 p.m. Wednesday, March
27, 2013. Funeral service
will be in the Lankford Fu-
neral Home, 9:30 a.m.
Thursday, March 28, 2013,
followed by a graveside
service at 1 p.m., at Priest
Cemetery, Inglis Florida.
Please visit www.lankford
funeralhome.com to share
a memory with the family

Brian
Ludwick, 54
INVERNESS
Brian D. Ludwick, 54, of
Inverness, died Saturday,
March 23, 2013, at his resi-
dence. Heinz Funeral Home
and Cremation, Inverness.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FL.
funeral.com.


Charles
'Chuck'
Joseph, 88
LECANTO
Mr. Charles J. "Chuck"
Joseph, 88, a longtime res-
ident of Diamond Ridge
Health & Rehab, after a
brief illness passed
through the pearly gates
on March
23,2013. A
Memorial
Service of
2 Remem-
brance for
M r .
-Joseph
will be
Charles held on
Joseph Thursday,
March 28, 2013 at 11:00
a.m. at the Beverly Hills
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes & Crematory The
family will receive friends
at the funeral home one
hour prior to the service
on Thursday Inurnment,
with military honors, will
follow at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell, FL.
The family requests that in
lieu of flowers that dona-
tions in Chuck's memory
be made to the Hospice of
Citrus County or to the Hu-
mane Society of Citrus
County as our father loved
animals.
Chuck had worked as an
accountant for Columbia
Gas and Beckwith Electric
and had been a salesman
for Sears, all while living
in Pennsylvania. While liv-
ing in Florida he had
worked for the Auto
Trader and H & R Block.
He served in the U. S.
Army during World War II
with the 5th Armored Divi-
sion, participated in the
Battle of the Bulge and
was presented with the
Bronze Star He was a Judo
instructor (black belt) in
Pittsburgh, PA and taught
policemen how to defend
themselves. Our father
was confirmed in 1974 by
the Martial Arts of Amer-
ica and studied under
Master T A. Flewellen. In
1946 while serving in the
Army, he played football
for the help of Christians,
Post 486.
Our father leaves be-
hind his son, Mark Joseph
and his wife Fran of Apex,
NC; his daughter, Laure
Joseph Filosa and her hus-
band Phillip of Beverly
Hills; his former wife,
Dorene Joseph of Inver-
ness; his brother, Frank
Joseph and his wife Helen
of Pittsburgh, PA; and his
sister, Elizabeth "Beth"
D'Ippolito of Calfornia. He
is also survived by 2 grand-
sons, Jonathan and Zach-
ery Joseph; several nieces
and nephews and his
"grand-dogs," Rocky, Xena
and Bella.

* For information about
placing obituaries,
call 352-563-5660.


See Day A Wee

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Citrus County


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Clarence
Gordon, 75
DUNNELLON
Clarence Earl Gordon,
75, of Dunnellon, passed
away March 20, 2013, in
the care of his family and
Citrus County Hospice
Home in Lecanto, Fla. Mr
Gordon was born Feb. 26,
1938, in Ellzey, Fla., to the
late Henry and Alice
(Meeks) Gordon. Mr. Gor-
don moved to Dunnellon
after serving in the U.S.
Coast Guard for 10 years
and the Florida National
Guard. He owned Gordon's
Garage in Dunnellon and
later worked as a greens
superintendent of the Cit-
rus Springs Golf Course.
He worked as a U.S. Postal
Service rural carrier out of
the Dunnellon post office
when he retired.
He is survived by his
wife Joylean Gordon of
Dunnellon; three sons,
Barney and Katie Gordon
of Homosassa, Kent Gor-
don of Crestview, Chris
Gordon of Dunnellon;
granddaughter Elizabeth
Gordon of Crestview; and
sister and brother-in-law
Sharon and Tommy Dean
of Bronson.
In lieu of flowers, ex-
pressions of sympathy can
be made to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464 or to New Hope
Baptist Church Building
Fund 8635 W Goodman
Lane Homosassa, FL
34448
Funeral services were
Saturday, March 23, 2013,
at Hiers-Baxley Funeral
Services Chapel, with visi-
tation one hour prior to
the service. Burial fol-
lowed at Ellzey Cemetery
Arrangements are under
the care of Hiers-Baxley
Funeral Services 1301 N.
Young Blvd. Chiefland, FL,
352-493-0050. Online con-
dolences can be made at
our website wwwhiers-


baxley.com.

Jesse
Allender, 88
HOMOSASSA
Jesse L. Allender Jr, of
Homosassa, Fla., passed
away peacefully at home
with his daughters at his

under the
care of
,- .: Hospice
SJ s, of Citrus
0 County on
il March 22,
2013. Born
in Ander-
Jesse son, Ind.,
Allender he was 88
years old and was the son
of Jesse L. Sr. and Ota Al-
lender. He served in the
United States Army during
World War II and was a
master carpenter all of his
life, building everything
from cabinets to homes.
He moved to Homosassa
Springs in 1972.
He was predeceased by
his wife of 46 years, Doris
Allender; his son Michael
Allender; and grandson
Jesse L. Allender IV Jesse
is survived by his daugh-
ters, Judy (Ben) Davidson,
Anderson, Ind., and Betty
(Mark) Allender-Linse-
man, Homosassa; son
Jesse L. "Red" Allender
III, La.; grandchildren
Scott (Angie) Davidson
and Amber (Bob) Peck,
both of Indiana; great-
grandchildren Tyler,
Emily and Brian; and nu-
merous nieces and
nephews.
Jesse's family will re-
ceive friends at Fountains
Memorial Park Chapel be-
ginning at 2 p.m. Friday,
March 29, 2013, with a cel-
ebration of life service be-
ginning at 3 p.m. Interment
will follow at Fountains
Memorial Park. Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa,


Homosassa 621-7700
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inverness 860-1037
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y of Inverness Phone: 76-2611
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Jesse 'Bob'
Ralston Jr., 69
OZELLO
Jesse Robert "Bob" Ral-
ston Jr., 69, of Ozello, Crystal
River, Fla., passed away
Wednesday, March 20,2013,
in Crystal River. He was
born Nov 4, 1943, in Indi-
anapolis, Ind., and he came
here 16 years ago from
Brooksville, Fla. He was a
retired construction su-
pervisor for Sugarmill Woods
Developmentfor many years.
His hobbies were fishing
and his Harley-Davidson.
He was preceded in death
by his wife Kay, May 11,
2007. He is survived by his
son Robert Ralston (Lareina)
of Ozello; and two grand-
children, Christina and
Robert Ralston Jr, both of
St. Petersburg.
Bob enjoyed life and lived
it to the fullest, he was loved
by all in the Ozello com-
munity and will be missed.
Private cremation arrange-


Funeral Home With Crematory
JAMES HANSEN
Burial: Peabody, MA
WILBERT CODY
Pending
JOSEPHINE SCARANO
Private in
Florida National Cemetery
MARY DIETZ
Pending
726-8323 00DWD3


ments are under the care of
Strickland Funeral Home
See Page A7


OBITUARIES
Deadline is 3 p.m.
for obituaries to
appear in the next
day's edition.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


SrnOro unitylome.. UU
352 74-4646



www igniymmoialco


Serving Our Community... |..
Meeting Your Needs!





ij n 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy.
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
S 352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-6694A
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
1,600 ........................... S& P 500
Close: 1,551.69
Change: -5.20 (-0.3%)
1,520 ........ 10 DAYS .........


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com
a ................. ............ Dow Jones industrials
.hClose: 14,447.75
V Change: -64.28 (-0.4%)
:,: 10 DAYS


1 ,6 0 0 ... ............ .......................... ............. ............ .......... 15 ,0 00 ............ .......... ... ........... ............. ......................




5 0....4.. .........2,5000 ........ ... ........... "'........
1 ,4 5 0 13 ,5 0 00 ._... . ...... .

1,350 ........... .............. N D J F M O.N.D.J FM12,5 00 ....."


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,112
2,859
1243
1785
322
26


NASD
1,622
1,638
1156
1257
186
24


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14563.75
6226.27
500.79
9105.34
3263.63
1564.91
1146.82
16552.56
953.53


LOW
14395.00
6102.17
494.79
8989.76
3222.48
1546.22
1132.34
16355.21
941.18


CLOSE
14447.75
6134.48
496.66
9022.95
3235.30
1551.69
1136.91
16414.60
945.85


%CHG.
-0.44%
-0.72%
-0.14%
-0.47%
-0.30%
-0.33%
-0.24%
-0.28%
-0.04%


YTD
+10.25%
+15.60%
+9.62%
+6.86%
+7.15%
+8.80%
+11.41%
+9.47%
+11.36%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.29 0- 8.09 3.38 +.07 +2.1 A V V -26.5 -57.6 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 38.58 36.39 -.04 -0.1 V A A +8.0 +20.5 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 43.15 42.39 -.36 -0.8 V A A +12.8 +35.2 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 0 98.10 97.39 -.71 -0.7 V A A +11.4 +36.9 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.94 12.40 -.16 -1.3 V A A +6.8 +31.3 48 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.24 12.38 +.14 +1.1 A A A +8.9 +63.2 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 0-- 43.43 34.99 -.04 -0.1 V A V -10.6 -3.5 28 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 --0- 47.92 44.49 -.74 -1.6 V A A +12.5 +22.7 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 22.68 -.32 -1.4 V A A +43.2 +33.9 41 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 0 57.82 56.21 -.57 -1.0 V A A +12.9 +32.9 18 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0 71.13 70.28 -.33 -0.5 V A A +10.2 +17.6 20 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0 52.15 51.63 +.24 +0.5 A A A +12.0 +18.3 26 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.02 -.27 -0.3 V A A +2.9 +7.3 9 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.29 +.03 +0.2 A A A +2.6 +9.7 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 23.24 -.13 -0.6 V A A +10.7 +21.4 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 71.45 69.47 -.09 -0.1 V A A +12.3 +42.6 23 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -- 29.27 21.15 -.18 -0.8 V A A +2.6 -20.4 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 --0- 215.90 210.74 -1.34 -0.6 V A A +10.0 +4.9 15 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 --0 23.99 20.93 +.17 +0.8 A V V -0.8 +33.3 24
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 --0- 39.98 38.12 +.29 +0.8 A A A +7.3 +24.2 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 99.70 98.24 -1.03 -1.0 V A A +11.4 +6.7 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.89 28.16 -.09 -0.3 V A A +5.4 -9.0 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 63.78 63.29 -.32 -0.5 V A A +13.7 +28.4 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.88 0 76.25 76.18 +.01 ... A A +10.1 +30.4 17 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 14.20 37.46 15.18 -.25 -1.6 V V V -23.0 -57.3 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 --0- 20.00 19.33 -.03 -0.2 V V A +7.1 +13.9 35 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.44 8.28 +.07 +0.9 A A A +16.1 +28.1 12 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 75.64 51.40 -.65 -1.2 V A A +24.3 -24.0 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 97.94 96.38 -.06 -0.1 V A A +11.8 +23.9 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.22 6.03 -.11 -1.8 V A A +6.3 +124.1 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 --0- 35.73 34.48 +.02 +0.1 A A A +11.6 +5.4 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 57.85 56.54 -.25 -0.4 V A A +18.2 +61.8 18 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 89.50 88.09 -.92 -1.0 V A A +20.1 +49.6 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 49.17 49.16 +.14 +0.3 A A A +13.6 +28.7 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 30.07 28.41 +.38 +1.4 A A A +12.8 +6.5 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 --0- 77.60 74.85 +.57 +0.8 A A A +9.7 +25.2 15 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 46.49 46.19 -.30 -0.6 V A A +24.8 +42.4 21 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months i Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement I Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates





The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.923
percent Monday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil rose to
settle at $94.81
per barrel, its
highest level in
more than four
weeks. The
wholesale price
of gasoline
inched higher,
while natural
gas and copper
fell.




Ili


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .05 0.07 -0.02 .07
6-month T-bill .10 0.10 .13
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .17
2-year T-note .25 0.26 -0.01 .36
5-year T-note .79 0.80 -0.01 1.08
10-year T-note 1.92 1.93 -0.01 2.23
30-year T-bond 3.15 3.15 ... 3.30


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.85 2.85 ... 2.84
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.15 4.15 ... 4.66
Barclays USAggregate 1.88 1.90 -0.02 2.29
Barclays US High Yield 5.68 5.65 +0.03 7.24
Moodys AAACorp Idx 3.91 3.93 -0.02 4.04
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.08 1.09 -0.01 1.25
Barclays US Corp 2.78 2.78 ... 3.45


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 94.81
Ethanol (gal) 2.54
Heating Oil (gal) 2.88
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.87
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.06
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1604.60
Silver (oz) 28.79
Platinum (oz) 1582.90
Copper (Ib) 3.44
Palladium (oz) 755.55
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.36
Corn (bu) 7.33
Cotton (Ib) 0.87
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 382.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.39
Soybeans (bu) 14.37
Wheat (bu) 7.27


PVS.
93.71
2.54
2.88
3.93
3.06
PVS.
1606.20
28.67
1581.70
3.45
759.75
PVS.
1.26
1.35
7.26
0.87
381.90
1.38
14.41
7.30


%CHG
+1.17
+0.08
-0.25
-1.58

%CHG
-0.10
+0.42
+0.08
-0.55
-0.55
%CHG
+0.20
+0.22
+0.96
-0.80
+0.16
+0.90
-0.23
-0.34


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.49 -.06 +5.8 +11.9 +10.9 +6.0
BondA m 12.87 ... -0.1 +4.3 +5.8 +4.4
CaplncBuA m 54.67 -.10 +4.5 +11.4 +9.2 +3.4
CpWIdGrIA m 38.97 -.18 +5.2 +13.2 +8.0 +1.9
EurPacGrA m 42.04 -.22 +2.0 +8.4 +5.2 +0.7
FnInvA m 43.69 -.14 +7.4 +13.5 +10.8 +4.0
GrthAmA m 36.71 -.11 +6.9 +13.3 +10.0 +3.8
IncAmerA m 18.93 -.05 +5.7 +12.8 +11.0 +5.6
InvCoAmA m 32.34 -.11 +7.7 +12.6 +9.6 +3.9
NewPerspA m 32.86 -.18 +5.1 +12.3 +9.3 +3.9
WAMutlnvA m 33.63 -.14 +8.3 +14.1 +12.6 +4.6
Dodge & Cox Income 13.92 ... +0.4 +5.4 +6.1 +7.0
IntlStk 35.69 -.36 +3.0 +10.9 +5.5 +0.9
Stock 134.69 -.54 +10.5 +19.4 +11.5 +3.9
Fidelity Contra 82.90 -.24 +7.9 +10.0 +12.5 +5.8
LowPriStk d 43.08 -.10 +9.1 +14.0 +13.0 +8.1
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 55.19 -.19 +9.3 +13.5 +12.3 +5.1
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.31 -.01 +4.7 +12.8 +10.4 +6.4
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.46 +.05 +1.5 +10.1 +7.2 +9.0
GIBondAdv 13.41 +.04 +1.5 +10.3 +7.4 +9.2
Harbor Intllnstl d 62.97 -.54 +1.4 +7.4 +7.4 +1.0
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.23 ... +0.4 +7.6 +6.6 +7.4
T Rowe Price GrowStk 40.06 -.19 +6.0 +6.7 +12.2 +6.2
Vanguard 500Adml 142.94 -.48 +9.3 +13.6 +12.3 +5.1
5001nv 142.94 -.48 +9.3 +13.4 +12.2 +5.0
GNMAAdml 10.84 +.01 -0.1 +2.1 +5.1 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.31 ... +0.2 +4.9 +5.5 +5.6
STGradeAd 10.83 +.01 +0.4 +3.6 +3.5 +4.0
Tgtet2025 14.30 -.04 +5.2 +9.7 +9.2 +4.6
TotBdAdml 11.00 ... -0.3 +3.6 +5.5 +5.5
Totlntl 15.28 -.10 +2.2 +8.1 +4.9 -0.7
TotStlAdm 38.95 -.12 +9.8 +14.0 +12.7 +5.8
TotStldx 38.94 -.12 +9.7 +13.8 +12.6 +5.7
Welltn 35.98 -.08 +6.3 +11.8 +10.2 +6.2
WelltnAdm 62.14 -.15 +6.3 +11.9 +10.3 +6.3
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
Stocks fell Monday in up-and-
down trading on worries about
Europe's debt problems. The
S&P 500 rose at one point to
within 0.1 percent of its record
high, but drops for industrial
stocks and raw material produc-
ers pulled the index lower in
midday trading.

J.C. Penney JCP
Close: $15.18V-0.25 or -1.6%
A BMO Capital Markets analyst
downgraded the department store
chain's stock on concerns about its
near-term future.
$21


I' 1 F r 1
52-week range
$14.20 $37.46
Vol.: 13.4m (1.Oxavg.) PE: ...
Mkt. Cap: $3.34 b Yield: 5.3%

Red Hat RHT
Close: $48.99 V-1.81 or -3.6%
A Raymond James analyst down-
graded the software maker's stock
rating, citing worries about its
growth prospects for this year.



45 D J F M
52-week range
$46.34 $62.75
Vol.: 7.Om (3.3x avg.) PE:66.2
Mkt. Cap:$9.46 b Yield:...
Research In Motion BBRY
Close: $14.23 V-0.68 or -4.6%
A Citi Investment Research analyst
said that the smartphone maker's
new Blackberry Z10 is not doing as
well in the U.S. as expected.





52-week range
$6.22 $18.32
Vol.:77.8m (1.2x avg.) PE:2.6
Mkt. Cap:$7.46 b Yield:...
Finish Line FINL
Close: $18.19 V-0.55 or -2.9%
A Stern Agee analyst lowered his
rating for the athletic shoes and
clothing retailer citing tough compe-
tition and expenses.
"-'2



S D J F M
52-week range
$16.87 B -I -I -- I $26.16
Vol.:1.1m (1.1x avg.) PE:12.0
Mkt. Cap:$904.19 m Yield: 1.5%
Apollo Group APOL
Close:$18.25A1.21 or 7.1%
The for-profit education company's
second-quarter net income fell 79
percent, but the results still beat
Wall Street expectations.




I. I F r 1
52-week range
$15.98 $43.80
Vol.: 15.7m (5.2x avg.) PE:5.6
Mkt. Cap: $2.05 b Yield:...


Jitters about Europe



drag down stocks


Associated Press

Stocks reversed an early
rise on Wall Street Monday
as traders returned to wor-
rying about the European
economy
Optimism about a deal to
prevent financial collapse
in Cyprus had briefly
pushed the Standard &
Poor's 500 index to within a
quarter-point of its record
closing high, but stocks
soon turned negative.
The S&P 500 and Nasdaq
composite index both
closed down 0.3 percent
The Dow Jones industrial
average slipped 0.4 percent
Stocks turned negative
about an hour into the
trading day Monday as the
initial euphoria about
Cyprus' deal to secure 10
billion euros in emergency
funding was overshad-
owed by renewed con-
cerns about the European
economy
The fear intensified
after a top European offi-



OBITUARIES

The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Paid obituaries may
include information
permitted in the free
obituaries, as well as
date of birth; parents'
names; predeceased
and surviving family
members; year
married and spouse's
name (date of death,
if predeceased by
spouse); religious
affiliation;
biographical
information, including
education, military
service, employment,
organizations and
hobbies; officiating
clergy; interment/
inurnment; and
memorial
contributions.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column
inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit
card, and the cost is
$10 per column inch.
U.S. flags denote
military service on
local obituaries.


cial indicated that in-
vestors in struggling banks
may be forced to take
losses an element of the
Cyprus agreement that
had previously been seen
as unique to that country
All 10 industry groups in
the S&P 500 closed lower,
with industrial and materi-
als companies posting the
biggest losses. Network
technology company
VMware Inc. dove after the
website Business Insider
reported that PayPal and
eBay will remove its soft-
ware from 80,000 servers.
The stock fell $3.65, or 4.6
percent, to $76.50.
Among the biggest drags
on the S&P 500 index were
software maker Red Hat
Inc., online marketplace
eBay Inc. and Textron Inc.,
an aerospace and defense
contractor
Europe still needs a
long-term economic fix,
said David Kelly, chief
global strategist atJ.P Mor-
gan FRinds. Business activ-


ity in the 17 nations using
the euro has declined con-
tinually since September
2011, according to research
by Markit, a data provider.
The region's economy
shrank 0.6 percent in 2012,
according official govern-
ment statistics.
Business activity in na-
tions that use the euro con-
tracted more quickly in
March, according to
Markit's closely watched
survey of purchasing
executives.
European policy makers
have avoided a financial
crisis by flooding the mar-
ket with cash, but they
haven't addressed eco-
nomic hardship on the
ground, Kelly said. In
granting Cyprus' emer-
gency rescue, for example,
lenders demanded eco-
nomic reforms, debt pay-
ments and a banking
overhaul that will result in
heavy losses for bank
bondholders and share-
holders.


DEATHS
Continued from Page A6

Helen Gerald

Hacouzzi, 60 Vanderslice, 69
*lacouzzi, 60 HOMOSASSA
INVERNESS


Helen Marie lacouzzi,
60, of Inverness died Fri-
day March 22, 2013, at
HPH Hospice Care Center
in Lecanto. Private crema-
tion arrangements are
under the care of Strick-
land Funeral Home with
Crematory Crystal River.

Mary Dietz, 58
Mary Josephine Dietz,
58, died March 24, 2013,
under the loving care of
her family and Hospice of
m Citrus
County.

born Sept.
21, 1954,
in Cleve-
land ,
Ohio, to
U- 'the late
Mary Glenn and
Dietz Josephine
(Jaros) Dietz. She was em-
ployed as a state testing
nursing assistant in Ohio.
Mary enjoyed cooking and
baking for her family and
friends. She was an avid
reader who also enjoyed
traveling to many areas.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her husband of 39
years, William Dietz;
daughters Jennifer and
husband Adam Chandler,
Olmsted Township, Ohio,
and Linda Dietz, Berea,
Ohio; her brother James
and his wife Sue Myers,
Brecksville, Ohio; and
grandchildren Nathan and
Marissa.
A funeral tribute to
Mary's life will be 3 p.m.
Saturday, March 30, 2013,
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home. The family
will receive friends in vis-
itation from 2 p.m. until
the hour of service.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES

Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an
additional charge.
Reprints due to errors
in submitted material
are charged at the
same rates.
Email obits@chronicle
online.com or call
352-563-5660.




r Ashohm


Gerald B. Vanderslice, of
Homosassa, Fla., formerly
of Pottstown, Pa., died
March 22, 2013, at Citrus
Memorial hospital in In-
verness, Fla. Mr. Vander-
slice was born Nov 10,
1943, in Pottstown, a son of
the late William and
Bertha (Burger) Vander-
slice Sr He was 69.
Mr. Vanderslice served
in the U.S. Army He most
recently worked as a floor
technician at Walmart He
enjoyed going to the casino
and playing the lottery He
was also a member of the
"Breakfast Club" at the
Sugarmill Restaurant in
Homosassa.
Mr. Vanderslice is sur-
vived by his wife of nearly
42 years, Helene (Scon-
nely) Vanderslice; by his
daughter Terri Vander-
slice; by two grandchil-
dren, Krystle Hige (Glen)
and Steven Lackman; by
his siblings Larry Vander-
slice (Barbara), Linda
Salamone (Richard),
Bertha Kline, Eleanor
Reiner and Rose Harmon.
Also surviving are many
nieces, nephews, cousins,
friends and brothers- and
sisters-in-law. He was pre-
ceded in death by his
daughter Holly Lackman;
and by his siblings John
Burger, Lydia Keeley, Jim
Keeley, Roger Keeley and
William Vanderslice Jr.
Relatives and friends
are invited to attend his fu-
neral service at 11 a.m.
Thursday, March 28, 2013,
at the Good Shepherd
Chapel of the Limerick
Garden of Memories, 44
Swamp Pike, Limerick, PA
19468. Officiating will be
the Rev Will Humes, pas-
tor of the First Methodist
Church of Pottstown.
Friends may call at the
Chapel from 10 a.m. until
the time of the service
Thursday. Interment will
follow in the adjoining
cemetery
In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions may be made to
the family to help defer fu-
neral expenses. Condo-
lences may be expressed
at www.ruggierofh.com.
Arrangements are by the
Moore, Snear, & Ruggiero
Funeral Home Inc.,
Trappe.


352-795-223 Crystal River 3O5 S.E. US 19


BUSINESS


TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 A7







Page A8 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013



OPINION
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz ......................citizen member
M Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose."
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


PROPITIOUS PARTNERSHIP




CMH and YMCA



announce plans



to co-locate


We were pleased to
hear that Citrus Me-
morial Health Foun-
dation board members
agreed to partner with the
YMCA in Citrus County for a
new wellness center in
Lecanto.
The hospital's fundraising
arm has been
working for a THE I
number of years
on donations for a Citrus M,
planned health YMCA to
and wellness cen- on center
ter at the hospital
system's Allen OUR 01O
Ridge property. At
the same time, the GoodL
YMCAisfundrais- for m
ing to establish a comr
long-awaited fa- purp
cility on land do-
nated by Stan Olsen on County
Road 486 near the intersec-
tion with C.R. 491.
The two groups share a
mission of advocating for
and supporting a healthy
community, so it just makes
sense to combine efforts. The
CMH board agreed to con-
tribute $2 million in donor
funds toward the project,
and the YMCA has already


Keep Internet
parlors open
I have read the politicians in
Tallahassee want to close the In-
ternet parlors in Florida. Don't
they realize these places provide
entertainment for many of our
citizens who voluntarily frequent
these establishments? They also
provide rent for vacant stores,
provide jobs, buy snacks, soft
drinks and food from our local
stores. They buy computers,
software, pay electric and water
bills, as well as maintenance to
these once-vacant stores. It will
be a sad day for many if they
elect to close these par-
lors, taking away our O
choice of entertainment.
More Sound Offs,
fewer letters
The reason there are I,
no long columns for the
Sound Off is because
there are such long, CAL
drawn-out letters to the 563
editor. I believe the only 000-
reason they send a let-
ter to the editor is to get their
name in the paper, because a
lot of them don't make any
sense. Give us more Sound Offs.
They're funny and sometimes
you learn something.
Sell drugs,
lose business
I'm calling the Sound Off in
reference to your Sunday article
about synthetic drugs. I just don't
know why Citrus County does
not pass a license law saying to
put an implement into the law if
you sell synthetic drugs, you
lose your license (and) we shut
your establishment down. End
of subject -over with. Imple-
ment the law and push it.
Don't blame coyotes
This is for the "out-of-control
coyote" person: Sorry to hear
about your dog, but if you kept
your pups on a leash as required
by law, or even supervised them,
the coyotes wouldn't be a problem.


raised $2.8 million. The total
project cost is approximately
$8 million.
CMH CEO Ryan Beaty out-
lined the possible change
from the Allen Ridge pro-
posal to the combined project
in a letter to hospital donors,
and has had no negative feed-


SSUE:
memorial,
o partner
al facility.

PINION:
synergy
multiple
unity
oses.


I
0


back, he said.
While the
YMCA will own
the facility, the
hospital will
share amenities
including a swim-
ming pool, exer-
cise equipment
and classroom
space for health
and wellness edu-
cation and prac-
tice. Its central


location will make it conven-
ient to users countywide, and
activities will cater to all ages.
Citrus County has been
looking for a YMCA for many
years, and the hospital sys-
tem needs a place to share its
expertise and assistance for
wellness and education. This
collaboration is smart busi-
ness and good for the
community.


Local gas tax option
This is in response to the gen-
tleman who was wondering
about why gas prices are lower
in Hudson and higher here. I
suggest he remember back
when gas was hovering around
$1 a gallon and the Citrus
County Board of Commission-
ers put a 6-cent-per-gallon in-
crease on our gasoline in this
county. That is one of the rea-
sons. One must remember
everybody is in the tax game
when it comes to gasoline, so
it's all going to be different
county to county, state to state.
Editor's note: There
|JND are two local gas tax op-
tions Florida counties can
W choose to adopt. Both
Pf Citrus and Pasco (Hud-
son's county) adopted
the 6-cent local option.
However, Citrus is one of
20 Florida counties that
has adopted the full 5-
cent "additional local op-
tion" tax. Four other
)5 7 counties, including Her-
nando (2 cents), adopted
a portion of the 5-cent additional
local option tax. For more informa-
tion, visit http://edr.state.fl.us or
http://dor.myflorida.com.
Keep old passports
In regard to old passports: I
was a consulate officer for a long
time. There's no need whatsoever
to destroy a passport. In fact, if
you have visas and such like in
it, it can be a nice memento to
have. The only thing the State
Department would do is probably
clip a corner of the front cover
and that's it. They are also still
good as one of the accepted
pieces of federal identification
which you can use for a number of
things now, including things like
driver's licenses and entrance to
certain types of federal buildings.
Garlic's gone global
I went to a store to buy some
garlic bulbs distributed by a com-
pany in Longwood, Fla. Garlic that's
from China. What's wrong with
that picture?


Not socialism
I keep reading the opinion
letters suggesting we are
headed toward socialism. Not
so! We may be headed toward a
welfare state in which the gov-
ernment provides for those who
cannot provide for themselves.
This does not include Social
Security, in which the employee
pays 50 percent and the em-
ployers pay 50 percent (The
employer looks at his or her 50
percent as part of wages.)
On the other hand, we are
well on our way to an oligarchy
in which the rich and the pow-
erful control the government
through the election process fi-
nancing and then through their
lobbyists control the legislative
process.
Socialism is where the gov-
ernment assumes control of
the entire economic system -
manufacturing, retailing, etc.
Jack Mann
Crystal River

Ban deadly minds,
not guns
E.G. Yerian's letter of March
18 reiterates Edna Mattos' com-
ment that AR-15s did not exist
when the Second Amendment
was written. The statement is
painfully obvious. So what?
Other deadly hardware existing
today that the framers of the
Constitution could not have
even imagined include biologi-
cal and chemical weapons, mo-


"Those who make the worst use of their time
are the first to complain of its brevity."
Jean de La Bruy&re, "Characters," 1688


Foundation can win by losing


DR. MARK FALLOWS
DR. Gus FONSECA
DR. PARESH G. DESAI
Special to the Chronicle

wenty-three years ago, on
March 1, 1990, a lease was
signed between the Cit-
rus County Hospital Board
(CCHB) the lessor and the
Citrus Memorial Health Foun-
dation (CMHF) the lessee -
in attempts to save pension
money, develop business rela-
tions with local physicians and
bring a certain financial stabil-
ity to the public hospital.
The reason for which this
arrangement was originally
made has not been served. The
hospital has lost millions of dol-
lars during both a good and bad
economy, as the tax burden on
citizens has increased. The hos-
pital's relationship with local
physicians has never been
worse.
For three consecutive years,
the bond rating has dropped.
The foundation's reason for this
loss changes every year. Some
reasons they have provided in-
clude: locum tenens ex-
penses stemming from firing
radiologists, competition from
local physicians and other hos-
pitals, the downturn of the
housing market in Citrus
County, poor payer mixes, re-
duced Medicare reimburse-
ments, an increase in the
Medicare population, RAC au-
dits, and conflicts between the
two boards.
Moody cited poor financial,
pension liability, and poor op-
erating performance behind
downgrading of the bonds. In-
terestingly the foundation


Other VOICES


never blamed themselves or
their top management. A de-
tailed analysis by the Agency
for Health Care Administration
(AHCA) also revealed financial
under-performance of the hos-
pital. Today, the total operating
losses are $7 million to $9 mil-
lion per year and there is $53
million in bond debt that the
Citrus County taxpayers are re-
sponsible for paying.
Despite this poor manage-
ment, the hospital has excelled
in providing excellent medical
care through the efforts of its
physicians and staff. In our
opinion, the poor performance
of the hospital stems from the
poor management of the hospi-
tal, failed ventures and a stag-
nant board made up of directors
who have been there since 1990.
This private, self-elected foun-
dation group has prevented
new, young blood from improv-
ing the hospital and is suggest-
ing a 7-7-1 makeup for a
combined board, solely, so that
they can remain in power.
Florida law 2011-256 states
that the CCHB must have ma-
jority. The matter is now to be
decided by the Florida
Supreme Court. The CCHB
made the right decision on Feb.
22, 2013, to appeal to the high-
est state court to return hospi-
tal control to the trustees.
During the last 23 years, the
foundation has remained in
power by becoming the major-
ity and it is time for this to be
overturned and return the pub-
lic asset to the trustees.
We are physicians, and as
stewards of health care re-


sources propose a simple solu-
tion to this complex problem.
We suggest the CMHF voluntar-
ily break the lease, dissolve the
foundation and return the pub-
lic asset to the board of trustees.
The three newest members of
the foundation should join the
hospital board to maintain oper-
ational continuity. We also rec-
ommend that the hospital chief
of staff (as a voting member) and
the presidents (nonvoting) of the
Florida Wellcare Alliance and
Citrus County Medical Society
be part of the board.
We should be prepared to act
before it is too late. Pope Bene-
dict XVI stepped down as the
leader of one of the largest
structured religious institutions
in the world by admitting to his
failing physical and mental
strength. What a brave and
courageous decision. The most
beneficial decision for the citi-
zens of Citrus County would be
for the CEO of the hospital and
the director of the foundation to
recognize they are unable to
successfully perform the job
they were assigned. As hard as
it may be to do, they need to
break the lease and resign for
the betterment of Citrus County.
Citrus Memorial Health Foun-
dation would therefore win by
losing.

This piece was co-written by
Dr Mark Fallows, past
president of the Florida
Wellcare Alliance; Dr Gus
Fonseca, past-president of the
Citrus County Medical Society,
and Dr Paresh G. Desai.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


bile rocket launchers, guided
missiles, manned and un-
manned flying weapons sys-
tems, submarines and nuclear
warheads to name but a few.
In Revolutionary War days,
British soldiers (as well as na-
tive hostiles, highwaymen,
thieves and other assassins)
were equipped with single-
shot, muzzle-loading, black-
powder charged, flintlock
muskets. The unfortunate Con-
tinental Army had only ... well,


what do you know? Those pa-
triots had single-shot, muzzle-
loading, black powder-charged
flintlocks as well. Aside from
the British advantage in num-
bers of heavy guns, even the ar-
tillery of the day was the same.
The point? The framers' in-
tent was not only to provide for
protection of individual lives
and property, but also to pro-
vide for an armed militia for
the defense of our borders. In
1776, the populace was far
more equitably armed and
able to provide both functions
than it is today Today, crimi-
nals attacking us in our homes,
on the streets and even in our
schools and workplaces can be
expected to be armed with su-
perior weaponry because
criminals are lawbreakers by
definition and they will pay no
attention to your proposed
bans on so-called "assault
weapons." Those who think
that criminals will adhere to
the law or that "assault
weapons" will not be available
are, at best, naive or unin-
formed and are the most likely
to be dead in the event of inva-
sion of home, school, work-
place or border.
It is not the weapon that is
deadly, but rather the mind of
the person holding it. Find a
way to ban deadly minds and
the "weapons problem" will be
moot!
Jim Langenmayr
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS X to the Editor





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Angry Birds roosting at NASA


Officials hope game lures youths to science, math


Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL -
Angry Birds have a new
space coop.
At NASAs invitation, the
game birds are roosting at
Kennedy Space Center for
the next 11/2 years in an ef-
fort to lure youngsters to the
cosmic wonders of math
and science.
The huge interactive ex-
hibit opened March 22 and
immediately packed in the
kids, including this re-
porter's 7-year-old son
who couldn't get enough of
the mirrored maze and the
design-your-own Angry
Bird and play-the-game
stations.
It's called Angry Birds
Space Encounter and is
the first of its kind.
Astronaut Donald Pettit,
a chemical engineer and
father of 12-year-old twin
boys, announced the col-
laboration between NASA
and Angry Birds creator
Rovio Entertainment a
year ago while living
aboard the International
Space Station. He
squeezed in as much
physics as he could in the
YouTube announcement.
"Wow, this could be a


great venue for getting
some physics and getting
some math and getting
some science into some-
thing that has the connota-
tion as just an empty
brain-draining video game
that sucks out the creativ-
ity from the minds of
young people," Pettit told
The Associated Press at
the grand opening.
"And so I thought, well,
maybe I could help make
a difference on this and
bring the idea of a game
up to a different level,
where unbeknownst to
the kids playing it,
they're learning a little
bit of math and physics at
the same time."
Enter the concepts of
parabolic trajectories, hy-
perbolic trajectories, ellip-
tical trajectories and even
Holman transfer orbits,
"which is what we do with
spacecraft going from
Planet A to Planet B."
"There's all this stuff la-
tent in this game, particu-
larly if you tend to be a
geek, or an uber-geek or
what I'm actually calling
now a super-uber-geek,"
Pettit said. 'All of this stuff
can be mined out of this
game and it can be used as


an excuse to learn more. If
you're not in any of those
categories as a kid, you can
still play the game and be
entertained."
Parent Alert: If a Ph.D.
astronaut like Pettit en-
dorses Angry Birds Space,
it must be worthwhile.
Toss in space shuttle At-
lantis, making its museum
debut in another few
months, and the educa-
tional value goes sky-high.
The $100 million At-
lantis display, just a few
minutes' stroll from Angry
Birds Space Encounter,
opens June 29.
Angry Birds is "a nice
prelude to Atlantis and it
will be a nice complement
as well," especially for
children, said John Stine,
Delaware North Co.'s di-
rector of sales and events
at Kennedy Space Center
Visitor Complex.
"They're going to learn
something about Angry
Birds and they're going to
really be inspired when
they go to Atlantis."
The Finnish-based
Rovio Entertainment has
another Angry Birds
Space exhibit up its sleeve
at another locale in the
near future, said Dan


Associated Press
Guests take their best shot in a competition with fellow players using mini-Angry Birds
launched in a slingshot to zap space pigs at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Com-
plex in Cape Canaveral. The online game Angry Birds is the inspiration for the new
attraction at the space center, where most of the exhibits focus on space exploration
and NASA history.


Mitchell, the company's di-
rector of location-based
entertainment.
"But you can't get a
much more true-to-life
space theme than being
here at Kennedy Space
Center," Mitchell said as
his 6-year-old daughter
waited none too patiently
at the exhibit entrance.
The 4,485-square-foot


exhibit features six inter-
active stations, including
4-foot-high Eggsteroids
Slingshots that children
can use to launch mini
Angry Birds at enemy pigs,
and a laser-beam obstacle
course set on the Red
Planet
A reporter's son had to
be dragged away after
more than an hour inside


the noisy, darkened cham-
ber noisy and dark for
grown-ups, that is. The
Florida sunlight beck-
oned, with the outdoor
play area, rocket garden
and shuttle launch-simula-
tor ride.
"Want to go back to the
Angry Birds?" he pleaded
a few days later.
"Pleeeease."


State BRIE FS
Miami officer gets four years Lawmakers seek fun
in drug-related case review at former s


MIAMI -A former Miami police sergeant
has been sentenced to four years in prison
after evidence showed he planted drugs on
suspects, stole money from drug dealers and
lied to investigators.
A federal judge sentenced 40-year-old Raul
Iglesias on Friday. He was convicted in Janu-
ary of eight charges, including two civil rights
violations, following a two-week trial. Iglesias
was an 18-year veteran of the Miami Police
Department. He was relieved of duty in 2010.
Trial evidence showed Iglesias planted cocaine
on one suspect and stole drugs and money from
others. Other evidence showed that $800 went
missing from a box of money Iglesias thought was
drug profits. In fact the money was an FBI plant.


TALLAHASSEE Florida sena
ing for an additional $200,000 in ste
inspect the site of a now-defunct re
where an untold number of bodies
Sen. Kelli Stargel said Monday th
the funding is "the right thing to do"a
closure for families who lost loved or
cemetery at the former Arthur G. Do
Boys. The Panhandle school at Mar
dosed in 2011, largely for budget re
Stargel said the funding would
section by University of South F
searchers who have been using i
penetrating radar and test excavw
cate and identify gravesites.


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WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Cypriot banks to get haircut


Country will keep banks closed until Thursday to prevent panic


World BRIEFS

Butterflies


Associated Press
Law enforcement officers
bow their heads Monday
during the memorial for
Tom Clements, the chief
executive of the Depart-
ment of Corrections who
was shot and killed on
the doorstep of his home
last week in Monument,
Colorado.

4 stabbed in Pa.
Target store
PITTSBURGH -Author-
ities said four people have
been stabbed inside a Tar-
get store in Pittsburgh, in-
cluding a 16-year-old girl
who is in critical condition.
Officers were called to
the store in the East Liberty
section of the city shortly
after 5:30 p.m. Monday. Po-
lice said a suspect was ar-
rested at the scene.
Stockton pushes
for bankruptcy
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -
Lawyers for the California
city of Stockton said Mon-
day it has cut its budget and
services to the bone and
has no choice about trying
to become the most popu-
lous U.S. city to enter
bankruptcy.
Creditors countered that
the city has failed to cut
enough spending or even
seek a tax increase to avoid
Chapter 9 bankruptcy
protection.
The arguments came as
the city faced off Monday
with its creditors in U.S.
Bankruptcy Court at a trial
to decide the issue.
Senator now backs
gay marriage
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.
- Missouri Sen. Claire Mc-
Caskill said she now be-
lieves that gay couples
should be allowed to marry,
a change from her previ-
ously nuanced stance dur-
ing last year's re-election
campaign in which she de-
fended the right of Missouri
voters to outlaw same-sex
weddings.
The Democratic sena-
tor's support for gay mar-
riage is a matter of both
personal belief and public
policy, her spokesman said
Monday. McCaskill declared
her position on her blog
Sunday evening in advance
of U.S. Supreme Court ar-
guments on the topic later
this week.
Missouri voters over-
whelmingly adopted a con-
stitutional amendment in
2004 defining marriage as
between a man and a
woman.
Protests target
anti-abortion bills
BISMARCK, N.D. -
More than 300 abortion-
rights activists carried signs
and chanted, 'Veto! Veto!
Veto!" in a demonstration
Monday at the state Capitol
protesting a package of
measures that would give
the state the toughest abor-
tion restrictions in the
nation.
North Dakota lawmakers
moved Friday to outlaw
abortion in the state by
passing a resolution defin-
ing life as starting at con-
ception, essentially banning
abortion in the state.
The North Dakota House
approved the bill 57-35 Fri-
day, sending it to voters
likely in November 2014.
The Senate approved it last
month.
From wire reports


Associated Press

NICOSIA, Cyprus -
Cyprus has extended the
closure of its banks for two
more days until Thurs-
day a sudden postpone-
ment that comes after the
country's leaders spent
days struggling to come up
with a plan to raise the
money needed to secure
an international bailout.
Banks in the country
have already been closed
for more than a week to
prevent a run on deposits.
All except the country's
two largest lenders had
been due to open Tuesday
morning after the country
clinched an eleventh-hour
deal with the 17-nation eu-
rozone and the Interna-
tional Monetary Flnd to
provide Cyprus with a
bailout.


Without that deal, the
country's banks would
have collapsed, dragging
down the economy and po-
tentially pushing it out of
the eurozone.
The decision to keep
banks closed two more
days was announced late
Monday The Central Bank
said that "for the smooth
functioning of the entire
banking system, the fi-
nance minister has de-
cided, after a
recommendation by the
governor of the Central
Bank, that all banks re-
main shut up to and in-
cluding Wednesday"
Banks have been closed
since March 16 to avert a
run on deposits as the
country's politicians strug-
gled to come up with a way
to raise enough funds to
qualify for the bailout. An


initial deal that would
have seized up to 10 per-
cent of people's bank ac-
counts spooked depositors
and was soundly rejected
by lawmakers early last
week.
ATMs have been func-
tioning, but many run
quickly out of cash, and a
daily withdrawal limit of
100 euros was imposed on
the two largest lenders,
Bank of Cyprus and Laiki.
Under the deal reached
in the early hours of Mon-
day morning in Brussels,
Cyprus agreed to slash its
oversized banking sector
and inflict hefty losses on
large depositors in trou-
bled banks to secure the 10
billion euro bailout.
The new plan allows for
the bulk of the funds to be
raised by forcing losses on
accounts of more than


100,000 euros in Laiki and
Bank of Cyprus, with the
remainder coming from
tax increases and privati-
zations.
People and businesses
with more than 100,000
euros in their accounts at
Laiki face significant
losses. The bank will be
dissolved immediately
into a bad bank containing
its uninsured deposits and
toxic assets, with the guar-
anteed deposits being
transferred to the nation's
biggest lender, Bank of
Cyprus.
Deposits at Bank of
Cyprus above 100,000
euros will be frozen until it
becomes clear whether or
to what extent they will
also be forced to take
losses. Those funds will
eventually be converted
into bank shares.


Hottest seat in town


Associated Press
Sabrina Canela from Arizona covers up from the snow Monday while waiting in line outside the Supreme
Court in Washington, a day before the court will hear a same-sex marriage case.

High price to see Supreme Court hear gay marriage cases


Associated Press


WASHINGTON- The most ex-
pensive ticket to "The Book of
Mormon" on Broadway: $477. The
face value of a great seat for this
year's Super Bowl: $1,250. Guar-
anteed seats to watch the U.S.
Supreme Court hear this week's
gay marriage cases: about $6,000.
Tickets to the two arguments
that begin Tuesday are techni-
cally free. But getting them re-
quires lining up days or hours
ahead, or paying someone else to.
The first people got in line Thurs-
day, bringing the price of saving a
seat to around $6,000.
For some, putting a value on the
seats is meaningless.
"It's just not possible," said
Fred Sainz a spokesman for the
Human Rights Campaign, the na-
tion's largest gay rights organiza-
tion, which began employing two
people to stand in line Thursday
The court will hear arguments
Tuesday over California's ban on
same-sex marriage. On Wednes-
day, the court will take up the fed-
eral Defense of Marriage Act, the
1996 federal law that defines mar-
riage as between one man and
one woman. Supporters and op-
ponents of same-sex marriage say
the cases are so potentially his-
toric that they want to be inside
the courtroom to watch, no matter
what the cost in time or money
Part of the reason the seats are
so coveted is the court doesn't allow
TV broadcasts of its arguments, so
coming in person is the only way to
see the justices at work. The court
has said it will release transcripts
of the hearings, as well as audio
recordings, roughly two hours after
each case ends, but advocates say
that's no substitute for being there.
Seats, meanwhile, are at a pre-
mium because there aren't that
many The courtroom seats about
500 people, but seats are reserved
for court staff, journalists and
guests of the justices and lawyers


Court raises questions


about generic drug deals


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Supreme
Court justices appeared trou-
bled Monday over whether to
stop deals between pharma-
ceutical corporations and their
generic drug competitors that
the government says could keep
cheaper forms of medicine
from American consumers for
longer periods of time.
Justices heard arguments
from the Justice Department
against what the government
calls "pay-for-delay" deals or
"reverse settlements."
Such deals arise when
generic companies file a chal-
lenge at the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration to the patents that
give brand-name drugs a 20-
year monopoly The generic
drugmakers aim to prove the
patent is flawed or otherwise
invalid, so they can launch a
generic version well before the
patent ends.
Brand-name drugmakers
then usually sue the generic
companies, which sets up what
could be years of expensive liti-
gation. When the two sides
aren't certain who will win, they

arguing the case. After those peo-
ple are seated, there will be about
100 seats Tuesday for lawyers who
are members of the Supreme Court
bar and at least 60 seats for the gen-
eral public. An additional 30 seats
for the public will rotate every
three to five minutes. Tickets for all
those seats are handed out on a
first-come, first-served basis.
For the most controversial cases,
the line to get those tickets can start


often reach a compromise deal
that allows the generic com-
pany to sell its cheaper copycat
drug in a few years but years
before the drug's patent would
expire. Often, that settlement
comes with a sizable payment
from the brand-name company
to the generic drugmaker
Drugmakers say the settle-
ments protect their interests
but also benefit consumers by
bringing inexpensive copycat
medicines to market years ear-
lier than they would arrive in
any case generic drugmakers
took to trial and lost. But fed-
eral officials counter that such
deals add billions to the drug
bills of American patients and
taxpayers, compared with what
would happen if the generic
companies won the lawsuits
and could begin marketing
right away
The Obama administration,
backed by consumer groups
and the American Medical As-
sociation, wants the court to
stop the deals because it says
they profit the drug companies
but harm consumers by adding
$3.5 billion annually to their
drug bills.

to form about a day before. When
the court heard three days of argu-
ments on health care last year, the
first people arrived three days early.
This time, the line started even
earlier By Monday morning there
were more than three dozen peo-
ple waiting, even as snow was
falling. Several in the line said
they were being paid, while oth-
ers included college students and
a substitute teacher


Associated Press
A boy plays with a butter-
fly Monday during the
launch of the Natural His-
tory Museum's "Sensa-
tional Butterflies" exhib-
ition in London. The exhi-
bition will run until
Sept. 15.

Egypt orders
arrest of activists
CAIRO -After Egypt's
Islamist president vowed
action against opponents,
the nation's top prosecutor
on Monday issued arrest
warrants against five promi-
nent activists over clashes
between the Muslim Broth-
erhood and protesters.
The warrants heightened
the latest in a series of
crises plaguing this nation
of some 90 million since the
ouster of autocrat Hosni
Mubarak's ouster.
Report: Tycoon
died from hanging
LONDON -A post-
mortem examination found
that self-exiled Russian ty-
coon Boris Berezovsky died
by hanging, and there was
nothing pointing to a violent
struggle, British police said.
Thames Valley Police
said Monday that further
tests, including toxicology
examinations, will be car-
ried out. The force did not
specify whether the 67-
year-old businessman
hanged himself, but they
have said there was no evi-
dence to suggest anyone
else was involved in the
death.
Supporters want
tougher gun treaty
UNITED NATIONS -
Supporters of a strong U.N.
treaty to regulate the multi-
billion-dollar global arms
trade on Monday criticized
the latest draft for not being
tough enough to halt the
trade in illicit weapons,
which fuel wars and kills
thousands of innocent
civilians.
Hopes of reaching agree-
ment on what would be a
landmark treaty were
dashed last July when the
United States said it
needed more time to con-
sider the proposed accord
- a move quickly backed
by Russia and China. In
December, the U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly decided to
hold a final conference and
set Thursday as the dead-
line for reaching agreement
on a treaty.
Whether the 193 U.N.
member states will be able
to reach consensus on a
text in the coming days re-
mains to be seen.
Guatemalans
deny genocide
GUATEMALA CITY A
group of retired soldiers and
their relatives have
launched a campaign to
deny that a genocide oc-
curred in Guatemala.
About 24 people began
collecting 5,000 signatures
Monday in support of their
campaign outside the
Supreme Court's building,
where strongman Jose
Efrain Rios Montt is being
tried on charges of geno-
cide and crimes against
humanity.
The protesters are hold-
ing signs that read "There
was no genocide here" as
speakers blasted
Guatemala's national an-
them and military
marches.
From wire reports












SPORTS


* L.A.
Kings
beat
Chicago
with late
goal
/B2


0 Baseball/B2
0 Basketball/B2
0 Hockey/B2
0 Scoreboard/B3
0 Tennis/B3
0 Entertainment/B4


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Lightning hire
Cooper as coach
TAMPA- The Tampa Bay
Lightning have hired Jon
Cooper as their new coach.
The team announced the
move on Monday night.
Cooper had been coaching
Syracuse of the AHL, Tampa
Bay's top minor league affiliate.
He is replacing Guy Boucher,
who was fired Sunday after 2
1/2 years with the team.
Cooper will coach his first
game for the Lightning on Fri-
day night against the New Jer-
sey Devils.
Dan Lacroix and Steve
Thomas will handle coaching
duties when the Lightning host
the Buffalo Sabres tonight. The
pair will then remain as assis-
tant coaches for Cooper.
The Lightning, at 13-18-1,
are in next-to-last place in the
Eastern Conference.
Hamlin has fracture
in lower back
Denny Hamlin suffered a
compression fracture in his
lower back during Sunday's
last-lap crash at Fontana, Calif.
Joe Gibbs Racing disclosed
the injury Monday and said
Hamlin was expected to be re-
leased soon from a Southern
California hospital to return
home. He has what is called an
L1 compression fracture; es-
sentially, the first vertebra in the
lumbar section of his spine
collapsed.
There was no immediate
word on how long his recovery
would take.
Hamlin was hurt during a
crash with Joey Logano at the
end of Sunday's race. He com-
plained of lower back pain
afterward.
Minnesota fires
coach Tubby Smith
MINNEAPOLIS Minnesota
has fired Tubby Smith one day
after the Golden Gophers lost to
Florida in the NCAA tournament.
Athletics director Norwood
Teague announced the decision
Monday and said it was time for
a "fresh set of eyes" on the
program.
Smith was 124-81 (.610) in six
seasons at Minnesota. He ar-
rived in 2007 from Kentucky, im-
mediately ramping up
expectations for a team that was
buried by an academic cheating
scandal.
Smith won 20 games five
times. But he went just 46-62 in
Big Ten play and never finished
higher than sixth in the confer-
ence. The Gophers made three
NCAA tournament appearances
under Smith. They beat UCLA
this year before losing on
Sunday.
Costa Rica protests
snowy loss to US
ZURICH FIFA says it is
studying a protest from the
Costa Rica soccer federation,
which wants a World Cup quali-
fier against the United States
replayed after losing 1-0 in a
snowstorm.
FIFA says its administration
"will now analyze the content of
the letter and next steps will be
determined in due course."
Costa Rica says players'
"physical integrity" was af-
fected, "ball movement became
impossible" and field markings
were not visible in Friday's
game. It urged FIFAto punish
match officials, including ref-
eree Joel Aguilar of El Salvador.


Hurricanes roll in Big
KEITH CHARTRAND base via singles, Citrus third baseman Tyler
Correspondent Beagan faced an 0-2 count with two outs.
Down to his last strike, Beagan brought in the
OCALA The Citrus Hurricanes baseball first run of the game with an RBI single. Bea-
squad defeated host Ocala Vanguard 7-3 Mon- gan advanced to second on the throw and
day in the first round of the eight-team Big Wilkinson ended up on third.
Sun Challenge. "Beagan did some real good two-strike hit-
Hurricanes starting pitcher Chad Dawson ting," Bogart said.
got his second consecutive win, pitching 5 2/3 The third baseman was 3 for 3 on the night
innings, giving up just one run on four hits. Dawson followed Beagan in the order and
"Chad has thrown that well all year. This helped his own cause immensely The junior
was actually an off night for him because the hit the fourth Citrus single of the inning, driv-
ball was up," Citrus head coach Brady Bogart ing in both Wilkinson and Beagan. The Hurri-
said. "But for him to be able to battle, keep canes were up 3-0.
them scoreless (until the fourth inning) and do "Yeah, pitcher here can swing it pretty
his job to get another win is good for him." good," Wilkinson said.
Dawson and his pitching counterpart, Pre- Wilkinson would play a major part in help-
ston Stephens, had the game scoreless until ing Dawson getting out of a couple jams in the
the fourth inning. It looked like Stephens was next two innings.
going to get through the fourth inning Stephens tried to start a Vanguard rally with
unscathed. a single to lead off the bottom of the fourth. It
With Brooks Brusher and Rob Wilkinson on was erased when Dawson took a come backer


o0.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods hits a shot from the third tee Monday during the final round of the Arnold Palmer Invitational in Orlando. Woods re-
claimed the No. 1 ranking in the world with his eighth victory at the event.

Tiger back on top of rankings after eighth career victory at Bay Hill


Associated Press

ORLANDO-Tiger Woods is back to No.
1 in the world with a game that looks as
good as ever
Woods walked off the 18th green Monday
waving his putter over his head his
magic wand this week at Bay Hill to ac-
knowledge the fans who have seen this act
before. He won the Arnold Palmer Invita-
tional for the eighth time to tie a PGA Tour
record that had not been touched in 48
years.
This win had extra significance. It re-
turned Woods to the top of the world rank-
ing for the first time since the final week of
October 2010, the longest spell of his career
"It's a byproduct of hard work, patience
and getting back to winning golf tourna-
ments," he said.
Woods never let anyone closer than two
shots in the final round at Bay Hill that was
delayed one day by storms. With a conser-
vative bogey he could afford on the last
hole, he closed with a 2-under 70 for a two-
shot win over Justin Rose.
Next up is the Masters, where Woods will
try to end his five-year drought in the
majors.
Woods fell as low as No. 58 in the world
as he coped with a crisis in his personal life
and injuries to his left leg. One week after
he announced he was dating Olympic ski
champion Lindsey Vonn, Woods celebrated
his third win of the season, and his sixth
going back to Bay Hill a year ago.
"Number 1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!" Vonn tweeted mo-
ments after his win.
Like so many other victories, this one
was never really close.
Rickie Fowler pulled to within two shots


with a 25-foot birdie putt on the 14th hole,
but after he and Woods made bogey on the
15th, Fowler went at the flag on the par-5
16th and came up a few yards short and
into the water Fowler put another ball into
the water and made triple bogey
"I was swinging it well. I made a few
putts, and trying to put a little pressure on
them, let them know I was there," Fowler
said. "Just would like to have that 7-iron
back on 16. Just kind of a touch heavy"
Woods played it safe on the 18th, and
nearly holed a 75-foot par putt that even
drew a big smile from the tournament host
Woods tied the tour record of eight wins
in a single tournament Sam Snead won the
Greater Greensboro Open eight times from
1938 to 1965 at two golf courses. Woods tied
his record for most wins at a single golf
course, having also won eight times at Tor-


rey Pines, including a U.S. Open.
"I don't really see anybody touching it for
a long time," Palmer said while Woods
made his way up the 18th fairway "I had
the opportunity to win a tournament five
times, and I knew how difficult that was."
Rose, who played the first two rounds
with Woods, closed with a 70 to finish alone
in second.
He pulled to within two shots of Woods
with a birdie on the 16th. Woods was in the
group behind him in the fairway bunker on
the par 5, and hit 8-iron over the water and
onto the middle of the green for a two-putt
birdie to restore his margin.
"He plays every shot like he plays them
on Sunday," Rose said. "His intensity is the
same on Thursday often as it is on Sunday,
See Page B3


March 25, 2013-TigerWoods
Aug. 12, 2012 Rory Mcllroy (32 weeks)
May 27, 2012- Luke Donald (11 weeks)
May 6, 2012 Rory Mcllroy (3 weeks)
April 29, 2012 Luke Donald (1 week)
April 15, 2012 Rory Mcllroy (2 weeks)
March 18, 2012 Luke Donald (4 weeks)
March 4, 2012- Rory Mcllroy (2 weeks)
May 29, 2011 Luke Donald (40 weeks)
April 24, 2011 Lee Westwood (5 weeks)
Feb. 27, 2011 Martin Kaymer (8 weeks)
Oct. 31, 2010 Lee Westwood (17 weeks)
June 12, 2005-Tiger Woods (281 weeks)
May 22, 2005-Vijay Singh (3 weeks)
April 10, 2005 -Tiger Woods (6 weeks)
March 20, 2005 -Vijay Singh (3 weeks)
March 6, 2005-TigerWoods (2 weeks)
Sept. 6, 2004- Vijay Singh (26 weeks)
Aug. 15,1999- TigerWoods (264 weeks)


Sun opener

Pirates win South Lake
Tournament opener
The Crystal River baseball team earned a 5-1
victory over Leesburg in opening-day action at
the South Lake Tournament on Monday, behind
the pitching and hitting of Derrick Rogers.
Rogers allowed one run and struck out seven
in seven strong innings of work on the mound.
He also smacked a two-out, two-run double
early in the game to give the Pirates a lead.
Crystal River returns to the tournament
Wednesday to face Nature Coast at 6 p.m.
-From staff reports

from Vanguard first baseman Vinny D'Am-
brosio and fired it to Wilkinson to start a 1-6-3
double play Later in the inning, after two
Knights reached base by error, Wilkinson
See Page B3


Aug. 8,1999 David Duval (1 week)
July 4,1999 -Tiger Woods (5 weeks)
March 28,1999 David Duval (14 weeks)
June 14,1998 -Tiger Woods (41 weeks)
May 17, 1998 Ernie Els (4 weeks)
May 10, 1998 -TigerWoods (1 week)
April 12, 1998- Ernie Els (4 weeks)
Jan. 11,1998 -Tiger Woods (13 weeks)
Sept. 7,1997 Greg Norman (18 weeks)
July 6,1997-Tiger Woods (9 weeks)
June 29,1997 Greg Norman (1 week)
June 22, 1997- Ernie Els (1 week)
June 15,1997-TigerWoods (1 week)
April 27,1997 Greg Norman (7 weeks)
April 20,1997-Tom Lehman (1 week)
June 18,1995 Greg Norman (96 weeks)
Aug.14, 1994 Nick Price (44 weeks)
Feb. 6, 1994 Greg Norman (27 weeks)
July 19, 1992 Nick Faldo (81 weeks)


April 5, 1992- Fred Couples (15 weeks)
March 29, 1992- Nick Faldo (1 week)
March 22, 1992- Fred Couples (1 week)
April 7, 1991 lan Woosnam (50 weeks)
Feb. 3,1991 Nick Faldo (9 weeks)
Oct. 14,1990 Greg Norman (16 weeks)
Sept. 2,1990 Nick Faldo (6 weeks)
Aug. 20,1989 Greg Norman (54 weeks)
April 2, 1989 Seve Ballesteros (20 weeks)
March 26, 1989 Greg Norman (1 week)
Nov. 13,1988 Seve Ballesteros (19 weeks)
Nov. 6,1988 Greg Norman (1 week)
Oct. 30,1988 Seve Ballesteros (1 week)
Nov. 29,1987 Greg Norman (48 weeks)
Nov. 22,1987 Seve Ballesteros (1 week)
Sept. 14, 1986- Greg Norman (62 weeks)
April 27,1986 Seve Ballesteros (20 weeks)
April 6, 1986 Bernhard Langer (3 weeks)


Lohse, Br
reach 3-ye
PHOENIX- K'
waited all winter a
found a home with
Lohse and the E
ized a three-year c
worth $33 million c
big boost to their s
tion exactly a wee
season opener at
against Colorado.
"I'm really happy
to come over," Loh
ing a news confer
waukee's spring tr
Lohse enjoyed I
son in the majors I
going 16-3 with a
and helping the St
dinals earn an NL
spot. He is 118-10
with a 4.45 ERA in


brewers
.ar deal
,le Lohse
nd finally
Milwaukee.
Brewers final-
contract
on Monday, a


FGCU savors its ride to NCAA Sweet 16


Associated Press


suspect rota- FORT MYERS Sherwood
k before the Brown only wanted a bagel.
home The Florida Gulf Coast star
walked into a restaurant on cam-
y to be able pus Monday and was quickly sur-
hse said dur- rounded. People wanted auto-
ence at Mil- graphs. People wanted photos.
ne at fMil- People just wanted to yell words of
gaining facility, encouragement
his best sea- A school that opened a mere 22
last year, years ago finds itself front-and-
2.86 ERA center in March Madness, one of
t. Louis Car- only 16 college basketball teams
wild-card left from a field of 68, hoping to win
9 lifetime the NCAA national championship.
112 seasons. "I had no idea it was going to be
-From wire reports like this, but I'm loving it," Brown
said as he made his escape from


the shop. "I feel like we're getting a
lot of America behind us. I guess
you could say we're a part ofAmer- -
ica's team at this point"
And the Eagles spent the day sa-
voring their moment
Lines in the campus bookstore
snaked from one side to the other,
more than 100 people waiting for
the chance to pay for their FGCU
shirts and hats. Phone lines were
jammed by those seeking tickets
for this weekend's South Regional,
and even the university president
half-seriously wondered if he
would be able to obtain what he
needed. And as they arrived at Associated Press
classes, players were met with Florida Gulf Coast players celebrate with coach Andy Enfield in
applause. the team's locker room Sunday after winning a third-round game
See Page B3 against San Diego State in the NCAA tournament in Philadelphia.


with a roar


All-time No. 1 golf world rankings









Brown lifts Kings past Blackhawks 5-4


Associated Press


CHICAGO Dustin Brown converted
his own rebound with 1:27 remaining, lift-
ing the Los Angeles Kings to a 5-4 victory
over the Chicago Blackhawks on Monday
night
Brown's first attempt went off the back
of Blackhawks defenseman Johnny
Oduya, but it bounced right back to the
captain, who sent it past Corey Crawford
for his 12th of the season. Anze Kopitar
set up the score by winning a faceoff in
Chicago's end.
Kopitar also had a goal in the second
period to end Los Angeles' scoreless
streak at 150 minutes, 35 seconds.
Michael Frolik had two goals and an as-
sist for Chicago, which has lost two in a
row. Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews
also scored.
Predators 3, Oilers 2
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Sergei Kostitsyn
had a goal and an assist to lead the
Nashville Predators to a 3-2 win over the
Edmonton Oilers.
Kevin Klein and Chris Mueller also scored
for Nashville, which its third straight.
Martin Erat added two assists for the
Predators. He has seven points (one goal,
six assists) in his past three games.
Corey Potter and Shawn Horcoff scored
for the Oilers in their third consecutive loss.


HRs

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE -
Ben Zobrist and Evan Lon-
goria each hit a two-run
homer in a four-run fifth
inning that carried the
Tampa Bay Rays past the
Pittsburgh Pirates 6-2 on
Monday night.
Zobrist's go-ahead shot
appeared to be helped
over the fence by right
fielder Jose Tabata's out-
stretched glove. Longoria's
first home run of the
spring was a no-doubter.
Russell Martin had two
hits for the Pirates, includ-
ing an RBI double.
Shelley Duncan, in the
running to be a right-
handed bat off the Tampa
Bay bench, hit a solo home
run and added a double.
Rays starter Matt Moore
labored through 4 2/3 wild
innings, allowing only two
earned runs but yielding
six hits and five walks.
Tigers 6, Marlins 3
JUPITER Miguel Cabr-
era's RBI double and Jhonny
Peralta's homer highlighted a
three-run first inning that
helped send the Detroit Tigers
past the Miami Marlins 6-3.
Cabrera had two hits and
scored twice.
Tigers starter Rick Porcello
allowed three runs and four
hits in six innings. He struck
out three and gave up a solo
home run to Rob Brantly.
Marlins starter Wade
LeBlanc gave up four runs and
seven hits in five innings. He
walked one and struck out four.
Orioles 12,
Red Sox 9
SARASOTA- Adam Jones
hit his first two home runs of
the spring, J.J. Hardy homered
and drove in four and Wilson
Betemit also had RBIs before
leaving with a knee injury as
the Baltimore Orioles beat the
Boston Red Sox 12-9.
Betemit had a three-run
home run and sacrifice fly be-
fore spraining a ligament in his
right knee in the fifth.
Orioles Rule 5 draft pick T.J.
McFarland allowed four runs
and eight hits in 3 2/3 innings.
Mets 7, Braves 4
KISSIMMEE Dillon Gee
pitched six scoreless innings
and struck out seven as the
New York Mets topped the At-
lanta Braves 7-4.
Gee allowed two hits and
walked none.
Braves starter Mike Minor
gave up five runs in five innings.
Andrew Brown, Jamie Hoff-
mann and Collin Cowgill home-
red off Minor.
Jason Heyward and Justin


Associated Press
Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford makes a save and deflects the puck into
the safety net above the ice Monday against the Los Angeles Kings in Chicago.


Potter opened the scoring at 7:53 of the


slap shot frorr


opening period, beat Nashville
With the Oilers on the power play, Potter's the stick side.


lead


n the blue line through traffic
e goaltender Pekka Rinne on


Rays


Associated Press
Chicago White Sox second baseman Gordon Beckham tags out Los Angeles Angel
Mike Trout on Monday in the sixth inning in Glendale, Ariz.


Upton hit back-to-back homers
off Mets reliever Robert Carson.
Braves closer Craig Kimbrel,
who has been hit hard this
spring, pitched a scoreless
inning.
Cardinals 4, Twins 3
FORT MYERS Shelby
Miller pitched into the fifth in-
ning, then found out he'd won
the fifth spot in the St. Louis ro-
tation as the Cardinals beat the
Minnesota Twins 4-3.
Miller gave up one run and
six hits in 4 1/3 innings. He
struck out two and walked two.
Twins starter Mike Pelfrey
struck out four, walked one and
gave up one run and five hits in
five innings.
Joe Mauer had two hits and
a walk for the Twins.
Blue Jays 13,
Phillies 4
DUNEDIN J.P. Arencibia
homered twice, Josh Johnson
struck out eight in 5 1/3
shutout innings and the
Toronto Blue Jays beat the
Philadelphia Phillies 13-4.
Arencibia hit a three-run
shot and Jose Reyes had a
two-run triple during an eight-
run second off Phillies starter
John Lannan.
Johnson gave up four hits
and one walk. Lannan al-
lowed 12 runs and 14 hits
over four innings.
Astros 6,
Nationals 4
KISSIMMEE In what
was likely his last game with
the Nationals, Chris Young
pitched four innings without
allowing an earned run in
Washington's 6-4 loss to the
Houston Astros.
Young has a clause in his


contract that allows him to opt
out today if he's not added to
the big league roster. With the
Nationals' rotation set, he is
expected to go elsewhere.
Alex White went five in-
nings for the Astros, yielding
nine hits and four runs.
Padres 3, Rangers 1
PEORIA, Ariz. Texas
Rangers left-hander Derek
Holland pitched six innings,
giving up three runs and six
hits in a 3-1 loss to the San
Diego Padres.
Holland struck out seven
and walked one and also had
an RBI single in the second
inning.
Elvis Andrus was 2 for 5
with a double for the Rangers.
San Diego starter Jason
Marquis also pitched six in-
nings, allowing a run and six
hits with four walks.
Mariners 16, Reds 0
GOODYEAR, Ariz. -
Jesus Montero hit a grand
slam, Michael Saunders
homered among his three hits
and the Seattle Mariners
hammered Homer Bailey in a
16-0 rout of the Cincinnati
Reds.
Saunders connected off
Bailey, and Justin Smoak
added two hits off the right-
hander, driving in three runs.
Montero's slam came off
Wilken De La Rosa.
Bailey was scheduled to
pitch five innings but lasted
only 3 1/3, allowing nine runs
on nine hits and two walks.
Brandon Maurer continued
to impress the Mariners. He
gave up six hits in five in-
nings, striking out seven.
Giants 9, Cubs 3
MESA, Ariz. Ryan Vogel-


song allowed three runs on six
hits in six innings, leading the
San Francisco Giants to a 9-3
win over the Chicago Cubs.
Buster Posey had three hits
and drove in a run, Andres
Torres and Joaquin Arias each
doubled in two runs and Angel
Pagan had two hits and two
RBI for San Francisco.
Left-hander Travis Wood
started for the Cubs and gave
up four runs on seven hits with
four walks in four innings.
Angels 11,
White Sox 5
GLENDALE, Ariz. Chris
lannetta and Alberto Callaspo
homered off White Sox starter
Gavin Floyd, and Mark
Trumbo drove in two runs with
a double to help the Los Ange-
les Angels beat Chicago 11-5.
Floyd, the team's No. 3
starter, allowed six runs and
10 hits over the first three in-
nings before getting on track
and pitching four scoreless
frames. The right-hander was
charged with seven runs and
13 hits in all over seven-plus
innings. He struck out six and
walked one.
A's 9, Brewers 7
PHOENIX Chris Young
hit a grand slam and Josh
Donaldson homered among
his four hits as the Oakland
Athletics backed Bartolo Colon
with a big offensive perform-
ance in a 9-7 victory over the
Milwaukee Brewers.
Scott Sizemore had four hits
and two RBIs for the A's. Colon
gave up three runs and six hits
over five innings.
Brewers starter Chris Narve-
son served up Young's slam in
the fourth. The left-hander al-
lowed six runs on eight hits
and five walks in 3 2/3 innings.


NCAA men's basketball BRIEFS


Late Sunday NCAA
Tournament
Midwest Regional
No. 2 Duke 66,
No. 7 Creighton 50
PHILADELPHIA-
Rasheed Sulaimon scored 21
points, Seth Curry had 17 and
No. 2 seed Duke held off sev-
enth-seeded Creighton 66-50


on Sunday to advance to the
round of 16 for the fourth time
in five years.
A year after they lost their
NCAA tournament opener, the
Blue Devils (29-5) are back in
the regional semifinal for the
23rd time. They'll play No. 3
seed Michigan State (27-8) in
the regional semifinal Friday.
Creighton (28-8) went cold
and never made a serious run
in the second half. Doug Mc-


Dermott scored 21 points but
made only four baskets.
NIT
Providence 77,
Robert Morris 68
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Vin-
cent Council scored seven of
his 12 points in the closing
5:21, including a key 3-point
play off his only basket of the
game, to lift Providence to a


77-68 win over Robert Morris
in the second round of the
NIT on Monday night.
LaDontae Henton led the
Friars (19-14) with 21 points
and Bryce Cotton had 20.
Council added 10 assists.
Providence will face Baylor
in the quarterfinals on
Wednesday night.
Karvel Anderson had 18
points and Russell Johnson
16 for Robert Morris (24-11).


The goal was Potter's first of the season.
Bruins 3, Maple Leafs 2, SO
BOSTON Patrice Bergeron scored the
tying goal with 9:24 left in regulation, then put
Boston ahead in the shootout as the Bruins held
on for a 3-2 victory over the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Milan Lucic also scored for Boston, which ral-
lied from a 2-0 deficit and improved to 11-2-1 at
home this season.
Tuukka Rask had 23 saves through regulation
and overtime, then stopped Nikolai Kulemin on
the Maple Leafs' last chance to extend the
shootout, which Boston led 2-1 on goals by Tyler
Seguin and Bergeron.
Senators 3, Devils 2, SO
OTTAWA- Mika Zibanejad scored the
winner in the shootout to give the Ottawa
Senators a 3-2 win over the New Jersey
Devils.
Chris Phillips and Colin Greening also
scored for the Senators, who got 32 saves
from Ben Bishop. Captain Daniel Alfredsson
also scored in the shootout for Ottawa.
Andrei Loktionov and Marek Zidlicky
scored for the Devils as Martin Brodeur
faced 14 shots.
After a scoreless overtime, Alfredsson
scored on Ottawa's second shootout at-
tempt. The Devils' Travis Zajac tied it 1-1,
then Zibanejad's goal and Bishop's save on
Loktionov ended the game.


Heat reach 27


Associated Press

ORLANDO LeBron
James finished with 24
points, 11 assists and nine
rebounds, and the Miami
Heat won their 27th
straight game by running
away in the final minutes
to beat the Orlando Magic
108-94 on Monday night.
The Heat now are
within six games of
matching the 1971-72 Los
Angeles Lakers for the
longest winning streak in
NBA history
Jameer Nelson had 27
points and 12 assists for
the Magic.
Washington 107
Memphis 94
Washington John Wall
scored a career-high 47
points and added eight as-
sists, Emeka Okafor had 21
points and nine rebounds,
and the Washington Wizards
beat the Memphis Grizzlies
107-94.
Mike Conley led Memphis
with 23 points.
It was Washington's sixth
straight home win.


Pacers 100,
Hawks 94
INDIANAPOLIS Gerald
Green scored 19 points and
Roy Hibbert finished with 17
points and 13 rebounds, lead-
ing the Indiana Pacers past
the Atlanta Hawks 100-94.
The Pacers (44-27) ex-
tended their Central Division
lead to five games over sec-
ond-place Chicago with 11
games to play.
Josh Smith led the Hawks
with 20 points and Al Horford
had 13 points and eight
rebounds.
Hornets 110,
Nuggets 86
NEW ORLEANS Ryan
Anderson scored 23 points,
Brian Roberts doubled his
career high with 18 assists
and the short-handed New
Orleans Hornets beat Denver
110-86, ending the Nuggets'
15-game win streak.
Danilo Gallinari had 24
points for the Nuggets, who
were without starting point
guard Ty Lawson for the third
consecutive game.


UConn rolls


Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. -
Kaleena Mosqueda-
Lewis scored 22 points
and top-seeded Connecti-
cut advanced to the re-
gional semifinals of the
women's NCAA tourna-
ment for the 20th consec-
utive season with a 77-44
win over No. 8 seed Van-
derbilt on Monday night
Freshman Breanna
Stewart added 14 points
for the Huskies (31-4).
Tiffany Clarke had 16
points for Vanderbilt,
which finished 21-12.
Bridgeport Reg.
No. 4 Maryland 74,
No. 5 MSU 49
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -
Alyssa Thomas scored 28
points and Maryland de-
feated Michigan State 74-49
to advance to the round of
16 in the NCAA women's
tournament.
The fourth-seeded Terra-
pins (26-7) will face top seed
Connecticut in the Bridge-
port Regional semifinals.
Annalise Pickrel and
Becca Mills each scored 12
for No. 5 seed Michigan
State (25-9).


Okla. City Reg.
No. 2 Tenn. 68,
No. 10 Creighton 52
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -
Kamiko Williams scored 15
points and Tennessee pulled
away in the second half to
beat Creighton 68-52.
The second-seeded Lady
Vols (26-7) are 52-0 in
NCAA tournament games on
their home floor.
Alexis Akin-Otiko scored
12 points for No. 10 seed
Creighton (25-8).
No. 6 Oklahoma 85,
No. 3 UCLA 72
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Aaryn Ellenberg scored 27
points from the perimeter and
Joanna McFarland handled
things inside with 20 points
and 16 rebounds to lead
Oklahoma (24-10) past UCLA
85-72 in the second round of
the NCAA tournament.
Sharane Campbell added
19 points and Nicole Griffin
had 10 for the Sooners, who
never trailed after a 15-3 first-
half spurt.
Atonye Nyingifa had 18
points, Markel Walker 14 and
Jasmine Dixon 13 for third-
seeded UCLA (26-8).


Associated Press
Connecticut's Caroline Doty, left, and teammate
Stefanie Dolson pressure Vanderbilt's Christina Foggie
on Monday in a second-round game in the women's
NCAA tournament in Storrs, Conn.


B2 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
x-NewYork 42 26 .618 -
x-Brooklyn 41 29 .586 2
Boston 36 33 .522 6V2
Philadelphia 27 43 .386 16
Toronto 26 44 .371 17
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 56 14 .800 -
Atlanta 39 32 .549 1712
Washington 26 44 .371 30
Orlando 18 53 .254 3812
Charlotte 16 54 .229 40
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 44 27 .620 -
Chicago 38 31 .551 5
Milwaukee 34 35 .493 9
Detroit 24 47 .338 20
Cleveland 22 47 .319 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 53 17 .757 -
x-Memphis 47 23 .671 6
Houston 39 31 .557 14
Dallas 34 36 .486 19
New Orleans 25 46 .352 2812
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 52 19 .732 -
x-Denver 49 23 .681 312
Utah 35 36 .493 17
Portland 33 37 .471 1812
Minnesota 24 44 .353 2612
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
x-L.A. Clippers 48 22 .686 -
Golden State 40 31 .563 812
L.A. Lakers 36 34 .514 12
Sacramento 25 46 .352 2312
Phoenix 23 48 .324 2512
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday's Games
Atlanta 104, Milwaukee 99
Miami 109, Charlotte 77
Houston 96, San Antonio 95
Chicago 104, Minnesota 97
Oklahoma City 103, Portland 83
Dallas 113, Utah 108
Brooklyn 102, Phoenix 100
Philadelphia 117, Sacramento 103
Monday's Games
Indiana 100, Atlanta 94
Miami 108, Orlando 94
Washington 107, Memphis 94
New Orleans 110, Denver 86
Utah 107, Philadelphia 91
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, late
Today's Games
New York at Boston, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Memphis at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Houston, 8p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Washington at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 9p.m.
Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Portland, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 33 25 8 0 50116 84
New Jersey 33 1511 7 37 82 89
N.Y Rangers 31 1513 3 33 73 76
N.Y Islanders 32 14 15 3 31 93 105
Philadelphia 31 1316 2 28 82 94
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 31 20 6 5 45 98 77
Boston 31 21 7 3 45 89 66
Ottawa 33 18 9 6 42 86 72
Toronto 33 1712 4 38 99 95
Buffalo 32 1315 4 30 86 100
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Winnipeg 33 1714 2 36 84 98
Carolina 30 15 13 2 32 85 86
Washington 32 1516 1 31 92 90
TampaBay 32 1318 1 27103 98
Florida 33 918 6 24 78 116
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 31 24 4 3 51106 71
Detroit 32 1611 5 37 87 81
St. Louis 31 1712 2 36 92 86
Nashville 33 1413 6 34 83 88
Columbus 32 1313 6 32 75 85
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 31 1910 2 40 86 75
Vancouver 32 17 9 6 40 87 85
Edmonton 31 11 13 7 29 74 91
Calgary 30 1214 4 28 85 103
Colorado 31 11 16 4 26 79 100
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 31 22 5 4 48101 78
LosAngeles 32 1812 2 38 93 80
Dallas 32 1514 3 33 87 97
San Jose 30 1311 6 32 71 79
Phoenix 31 1314 4 30 80 87
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Sunday's Games
Washington 3, N.Y Rangers 2, SO
N.Y Islanders 3, Florida 0
Pittsburgh 2, Philadelphia 1, OT
Winnipeg 3, Tampa Bay 2
Vancouver 3, Colorado 2
Calgary 3, St. Louis 2
Detroit 2, Anaheim 1
Monday's Games
Boston 3, Toronto 2, SO
Ottawa 3, New Jersey 2, SO
Los Angeles 5, Chicago 4
Nashville 3, Edmonton 2
Minnesota 7, Dallas 4
Detroit at Phoenix, late
San Jose at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Florida at Toronto, 7p.m.
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Washington, 7 p.m.


Winnipeg at Carolina, 7 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Tampa Bay 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Montreal at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10 p.m.



Spring training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Kansas City 21 6 .778
Baltimore 18 7 .720
Seattle 19 10 .655
Detroit 18 11 .621
Cleveland 16 11 .593
Oakland 13 12 .520
Tampa Bay 15 14 .517


SCOREBOARD


For the, record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Monday in the Florida Lottery:
..... CASH 3 (early)
..: .. ;. . 6- 4 8
CASH 3 (late)


PLAY 4 (early)
S9-4-7-3
PLAY 4 (late)
9-7-9-3

FANTASY5
S 11 19 22 24 35



On the AIRWAVES=


TODAY'S SPORTS
MLB PRESEASON BASEBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) St. Louis Cardinals at New York Mets
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Washington Nationals at Miami Marlins
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) NIT Tournament, Quarterfinal: Maryland at
Alabama
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament, Second Round. Whip-
around coverage includes: Dayton vs. Kentucky and Delaware
vs. North Carolina
9:30 p.m. (ESPN2) NCAA Tournament, Second Round. Whip-
around coverage includes: Baylor vs. Florida State, Iowa vs.
Notre Dame, LSU vs. Penn State and Michigan vs. Stanford
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m. (TNT) New York Knicks at Boston Celtics
9:30 p.m. (TNT) Los Angeles Clippers at Dallas Mavericks
GOLF
11 a.m. (GOLF) Tavistock Cup, Day 2
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Toronto Maple Leafs
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia Flyers
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Buffalo Sabres at Tampa Bay Lightning
SOCCER
3:55 p.m. (ESPN2) 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualifier: France vs.
Spain
10:15 p.m. (ESPN) 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualifier: Mexico vs.
United States

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. Lecanto at Weeki Wachee
TBA Crystal River in South Lake tournament
Big Sun Challenge at Vanguard High School in Ocala
1:15 p.m. Citrus vs. Carrolwood
SOFTBALL
TBA Lecanto in Hernando Shootout at Tom Varn Park


Texas 15 14 .517
Boston 15 15 .500
Minnesota 14 14 .500
Houston 13 14 .481
Chicago 11 13 .458
Toronto 12 16 .429
New York 12 17 .414
Los Angeles 8 17 .320
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Atlanta 18 14 .563
Colorado 14 12 .538
New York 13 12 .520
Arizona 14 14 .500
Chicago 16 16 .500
San Francisco 13 13 .500
San Diego 15 16 .484
St. Louis 13 14 .481
Philadelphia 13 15 .464
Washington 12 15 .444
Pittsburgh 12 16 .429
Miami 11 15 .423
Los Angeles 11 16 .407
Milwaukee 10 17 .370
Cincinnati 9 18 .333
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets (ss) 10, St. Louis 7
Baltimore 12, Pittsburgh 10
Washington 9, Atlanta 3, 8 innings
Minnesota 14, Toronto 5
N.Y. Yankees 7, Tampa Bay 6, 10 innings
Houston 4, Miami 1, 5 innings
Boston 7, Philadelphia 6
Detroit 9, N.Y Mets (ss) 4
Milwaukee (ss) 7, Colorado 5
San Francisco 5, L.A. Angels 4
Oakland 7, L.A. Dodgers 4
Texas 7, Cincinnati 2
Chicago Cubs 4, Cleveland 3
San Diego 6, Milwaukee (ss) 4
Kansas City 8, Chicago White Sox 2
Arizona 8, Seattle 4
Monday's Games
Baltimore 12, Boston 9
Toronto 13, Philadelphia 4
N.Y. Mets 7, Atlanta 4
St. Louis 4, Minnesota 3
Detroit 6, Miami 3
L.A. Angels 11, Chicago White Sox 5
Seattle 16, Cincinnati 0
San Francisco 9, Chicago Cubs 3
San Diego 3, Texas 1
Oakland 9, Milwaukee 7
Houston 6, Washington 4
Tampa Bay 6, Pittsburgh 2
L.A. Dodgers vs. Kansas City, late
Cleveland vs. Colorado, late
Today's Games
Washington vs. Miami at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs.Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10
p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Texas at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
San Diego vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Houston vs. N.Y.Yankees at Tampa, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Washington (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05


p.m.
Toronto vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta vs. Washington (ss) at Viera, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:35 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Texas vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 3:05
p.m.
Kansas City (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
San Diego vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Houston vs. N.Y Mets at Port St. Lucie, 6:10
p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 7:05
p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Kansas City (ss) at Surprise,
Ariz., 9:10 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:10 p.m.


NCAA Basketball Tournament
Thursday
Regional Semifinals
At Washington
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
Indiana 5Y2 (135Y2) Syracuse
Miami 512 (127) Marquette
At Los Angeles
Ohio St. 4 (13312) Arizona
Wichita St. 4 (135) La Salle
Friday
At Indianapolis
Louisville 10 (128) Oregon
Duke 2 (134) Michigan St.
At Arlington, Texas
Kansas 2 (136) Michigan
Florida 13 (13312) FGCU
Tonight
NIT
Quarterfinals
at Alabama 212 (120) Maryland
College Insider Tournament
Quarterfinals
Evansville 1Y2 (141) at Canisius
at East Carolina 112 (143) Loyola (Md.)
at N. Iowa 1112 (132) Bradley
NBA
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at Boston 1 New York
at Detroit 2 Minnesota
at Dallas 1 L.A. Clippers
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at Toronto -175 Florida +155
at Carolina -130 Winnipeg +110
at Washington-135 N.Y. Islanders +115
at Pittsburgh -165 Montreal +145
at Tampa Bay-130 Buffalo +110
at Philadelphia-115 N.Y Rangers -105
at St. Louis -220 Edmonton +180
at Chicago -230 Calgary +190
at Vancouver -200 Columbus +170


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Reassigned INF Xan-
der Bogaerts, INF Jonathan Diaz and INF Drew
Sutton to their minor league camp.
DETOIT TIGERS-Sent LHP Kyle Lobstein
outright to Erie (EL) and traded C Curt Casali to
Tampa to retain the rights to Lobstein, a Rule 5
Draft selection.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Optioned RHP Chia-
Jen Lo to Oklahoma City (PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Placed 3B Brett
Lawrie on the 15-day DL. Optioned C Josh
Thole and OF Anthony Gose to Buffalo (IL). As-
signed RHP David Bush to their minor league
camp.


TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 B3


I S O R S B IES-


Serena Williams rallies
for 3-set win at Sony Open
KEY BISCAYNE Serena Williams'
match was more than an hour old Monday
before she began providing a soundtrack
for her comeback.
"Come on!" she shouted at her fist
through gritted teeth. Her demeanor trans-
formed after a listless start, Williams rallied
past Dominika Cibulkova in the fourth
round of the Sony Open 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
The top-ranked Williams, seeking her
sixth Key Biscayne title and first since
2008, was down a service break trailing 4-
1 in the second set before she swept the
final five games of the set.
Williams' opponent in the quarterfinals
today will be No. 5-seeded Li Na, who beat


CITRUS
Continued from Page B1

made a great play on a
hot-shot ball up the mid-
dle, getting the force at
second to end the inning.
"We got a little momen-
tum after we turned that
double play," Wilkinson
said. "It kind of got the
dugout fired up and we


started hitting
that"
The
slugged out
hits in the gan
came in the
ning, when
knocked in
and Cody Bog
a single and
spectively -
rus a 5-0 lead
Vanguard a
the fifth, bu


wild card Garbine Muguruza 7-6 (6), 6-2.
American Sloane Stephens started
strong, but lost the last nine games and
was eliminated by defending champion Ag-
nieszka Radwanska 4-6, 6-2, 6-0.
In men's third-round play, 2009 cham-
pion Andy Murray beat Grigor Dimitrov 7-6
(3), 6-3. No. 6-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
defeated Jarkko Nieminen 6-3, 6-3, and
American Sam Querrey advanced when
No. 14-seeded Milos Raonic withdrew be-
cause of illness.
American John Isner hit 20 aces but lost
to No. 9-seeded Marin Cilic, 6-3, 7-6 (3).
No. 3 Maria Sharapova, a four-time run-
ner-up seeking her first Key Biscayne title,
reached the quarterfinals by beating No. 21
Klara Zakopalova 6-2, 6-2.
-From wire reports



g better after panded its lead to 7-1
when Austin Bogart hit a
Hurricanes bases-loaded, two-run
four more double off Vanguard re-
me. Two hits lief pitcher Tim Shotwell.
next half-in- The Knights scored twice
n Brusher offAustin Bogart, making
Kyle Tobin a relief appearance in the
gart-onvia bottom of the seventh. Cy
a walk, re- Yates came in for the
to give Cit- Hurricanes to close it out
l. Citrus (8-6) plays Car-
added one in rollwood today at
t Citrus ex- 1:15 p.m.


man since the rankings began in 1986.
IG Still to be determined is how long
Continued from P B1Woods stays there this time.
Continued from Page B Bay Hill


and that makes Sunday a lot less differ-
ent for him. He plays in that kind of at-
mosphere far more regularly than a lot
of guys do, and it's an adjustment for
most of us. It's a known for him."
Fowler had to settle for a 73 and a tie
for third with Mark Wilson (71), Keegan
Bradley (71) and Gonzalo Fernandez-
Castano (72).
Rory McIlroy had been No. 1 since he
won the PGA Championship last Au-
gust He can reclaim the No. 1 ranking
by winning the Houston Open this
week. Woods heads home to south
Florida for two weeks before the
Masters.
Asked the last time he felt this good
going to Augusta National, Woods
replied, "It's been a few years."
This is the fourth time in his career
he already has three PGA Tour wins be-
fore the Masters he didn't win a
green jacket in any of the previous
years (2000,2003 and 2008). More telling,
perhaps, is that Woods has won back-to-
back starts for the first time since the
Buick Open and Bridgestone Invita-
tional in August 2009.
"I think it shows that my game is con-
sistent," he said. "It's at a high level."
Woods finished at 13-under 275 and
won for the 77th time on the PGA Tour,
moving to within five of Snead's record.
Fowler, his first time playing with
Woods in the final group, opened with
eight pars when he needed to be mak-
ing up ground. And when he finally had
a few openings on the back nine, Woods
refused to let him through.
Woods salvaged a two-putt par with a
7-footer on the 11th hole to keep a three-
shot lead. On the next hole, Fowler
looked to gain some momentum when
he made a 40-foot birdie putt Woods an-
swered with a 25-foot birdie putt.
Fowler was standing off the green when
Woods made it, and turned with the
slightest smile on his face as if to say,
"What can you do?"
The answer at the moment: Not
much.
Woods produced some absurd statis-
tics with the putter this week, making
19 of 28 putts from between 7 feet and
20 feet
He walked off the green to share a
handshake with Palmer, along with a
big smile and some words that Woods
said were best kept private. He left the
course in that familiar blue blazer that
goes to the winner
And he left as the No. 1 player in the
world. It's the 11th time that Woods has
gone back to No. 1, tied with Greg Nor-




FGCU
Continued from Page B1

"It's so brand new," Eagles coach
Andy Enfield said, as emails popped
into his mailbox at a fairly dizzying rate.
"No one knows no one knew what
FGCU stood for, the letters. Now it puts
our university in a national spotlight
and rightly so, because this is a great
place. It's a young, vibrant university
with just a lot of energy I've been try-
ing to tell that story to a lot of people."
The Eagles play Florida in the South
Regional semifinals Friday night, two
wins from a most-improbable trip to
the Final Four. Seeded 15th in their re-
gion, FGCU knocked off No. 2 George-
town and No. 7 San Diego State in
Philadelphia over the weekend to keep
their season going.
Here's maybe the best way to explain
what's happening right now with
FGCU: In a state where the Gators are
back in the regional semifinals, where
the Miami Hurricanes (who lost to
FGCU early this season) are still alive
in the field and look very much like a
title contender, and as the Miami Heat
took a 26-game winning streak into
their game at Orlando on Monday, it's
the Eagles who might be the best story
LeBron James picked them to win
one game in his bracket. Not two,
though.


Arnold Palmer Invitational Par Scores
Monday at Bay Hill Club and Lodge, Orlando
Purse: $6.2 million,Yardage: 7,419, Par: 72
Final:
Tiger Woods (500), $1,116,00069-70-66-70 275 -13
Justin Rose (300), $669,60065-70-72-70- 277 -11
Keegan Bradley (134), $297,60074-69-66-71 280 -8
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, $297,60069-71-68-72 280 -8
Rickie Fowler (134), $297,60073-67-67-73 280 -8
Mark Wilson (134), $297,60071-68-70-71 280 -8
Thorbjorn Olesen, $207,70069-73-66-73 281 -7
Ken Duke (75), $167,40070-68-70-74 282 -6
Bill Haas (75), $167,40069-66-73-74 282 -6
William McGirt (75), $167,40074-70-70-68 282 -6
Henrik Stenson (75), $167,40071-71-69-71 282 -6
Jimmy Walker (75), $167,40069-69-70-74 282 -6
Scott Brown (60), $130,20074-71-69-69 283 -5
Ben Kohles (57), $114,70069-73-70-72- 284 -4
Bubba Watson (57), $114,70074-71-72-67 284 -4
Erik Compton (53), $93,00072-72-70-71 285 -3
Chris Kirk (53), $93,00071-72-72-70 285 -3
John Rollins (53), $93,00068-72-71 -74 285 -3
Brian Stuard (53), $93,00074-69-67-75 285 -3
Camilo Villegas (53), $93,00071-74-70-70 285 -3
Ben Curtis (48), $62,00072-70-70-74 286 -2
Hunter Mahan (48), $62,00071 70-70-75 286 -2
Carl Pettersson (48), $62,00072-72-71-71 286 -2
lan Poulter (48), $62,00072-69-70-75 286 -2
Kevin Streelman (48), $62,00074-71-70-71 286 -2
Vaughn Taylor (48), $62,00071-74-70-71 -286 -2
Retief Goosen (41), $42,16073-69-73-72 287 -1
John Huh (41), $42,16067-69-71-80- 287 -1
John Senden (41), $42,16071-72-70-74- 287 -1
Josh Teater (41), $42,16075-71-70-71 -287 -1
Cameron Tringale (41), $42,16072-73-68-74 287 -1
Johnson Wagner(41), $42,16076-71-69-71 -287 -1
Gary Woodland (41), $42,16070-73-73-71 -287 -1
Matt Every (35), $31,31072-75-66-75 288 E
Brad Fritsch (35), $31,31068-72-70-78 288 E
Zach Johnson (35), $31,31070-76-69-73 288 E
Martin Laird (35), $31,31074-73-68-73 288 E
Francesco Molinari, $31,31075-71 -70-72- 288 E
Chris Stroud (35), $31,31072-71-74-71 288 E
Sang-Moon Bae (29), $24,18071-69-76-73 289 +1
Bob Estes (29), $24,18071-69-75-74 289 +1
Luke Guthrie (29), $24,18073-67-73-76 289 +1
J.J. Henry (29), $24,18071-67-76-75 289 +1
Sean O'Hair (29), $24,18069-76-69-75 -289 +1
Jason Day (24), $18,15471-74-68-77- 290 +2
David Hearn (24), $18,15475-71-71-73 -290 +2
Charles Howell III (24), $18,15473-69-73-75 -290 +2
Graeme McDowell (24), $18,15472-74-75-69- 290 +2
Nick Watney (24), $18,15469-76-72-73 290 +2
Chad Campbell (18), $14,73877-67-75-72 291 +3
Graham DeLaet (18), $14,73876-69-73-73 291 +3
Greg Owen (18), $14,73874-73-71-73 291 +3
Tag Ridings (18), $14,73870-74-73-74 291 +3
Matt Jones (18), $14,73871-70-74-76 291 +3
David Lingmerth (18), $14,73871-74-71-75 291 +3
Pat Perez (18), $14,73871-75-70-75 291 +3
George Coetzee, $13,70273-74-69-76 292 +4
Harris English (12), $13,70275-72-73-72 292 +4
Tommy Gainey (12), $13,70272-73-77-70 292 +4
Richard H. Lee (12), $13,70273-70-72-77 292 +4
Vijay Singh (12), $13,70271-68-75-78 292 +4
David Toms (12), $13,70274-72-70-76 292 +4
Stewart Cink (8), $13,20670-73-76-74 293 +5
Lee Westwood (8), $13,20671-75-72-75 293 +5
Ben Crane (5), $12,83470-74-71-79 294 +6
Jim Furyk (5), $12,83471-74-75-74 294 +6
Justin Hicks (5), $12,83474-71-77-72- 294 +6
Ryo Ishikawa (5), $12,83469-77-72-76- 294 +6
Charlie Beljan (1), $12,40076-71-73-75- 295 +7
Lee Janzen (1), $12,40073-73-71-78 295 +7
Boo Weekley (1), $12,40072-70-76-77 295 +7
Robert Allenby (1), $12,09073-74-74-75 296 +8
Nicholas Thompson (1), $12,09074-72-75-75 296 +8
Doug LaBelle II (1), $11,90473-73-77-74- 297 +9
Billy Horschel (1), $11,78072-73-69-85 299 +11
Rod Perry $11,656 76-71-78-82 307 +19


"Just a hunch," the NBAs reigning
MVP said.
The Eagles 26-10 overall and 13-5
in the Atlantic Sun Conference are
starting their own tradition, since they
have no real tradition yet. Of the 19
banners that sway in their gym to com-
memorate various accomplishments,
the earliest entry on them is for a
women's volleyball trip to the NCAA
Division II tournament in 2004.
The school has about 11,300 stu-
dents, half of whom come from the
state's southwest section. The campus
-which includes a manmade lake and
actual beach where students flock -
sits on 760 acres of land donated by
Ben Hill Griffin III. And that lends a
certain irony to this Eagles-Gators
matchup, given that Florida's football
team plays its home games in what
everyone calls The Swamp but what
officially is named for Ben Hill Griffin
Jr.
FGCU is in such infancy as a school
that its oldest alumni probably have
yet to turn 40.
"I've been in higher ed for a long
time, worked at several institutions,
and I have not experienced anything
like this phenomenon," FGCU Presi-
dent Wilson Bradshaw said. "What has
happened in the last three or four days
has been exceptional. We're getting,
I'm getting, my staff members are get-
ting emails and texts from all over the
country, and it's been very gratifying."












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Pulitzer


winner


Lewis


dies at 85

Associated Press

BOSTON Two-time
Pulitzer winner Anthony Lewis,
whose New York Times column
championed liberal causes for
three decades, died Monday
He was 85.
Lewis worked for 32 years as
a columnist for the Times, tak-
ing up such causes as free
speech, human rights and con-
stitutional law. He won his first
Pulitzer in 1955 as a reporter
defending a Navy civilian
falsely accused of being a com-
munist sympathizer, and he
won again in 1963 for report-
ing on the Supreme Court.
His wife, Margaret Marshall,
the former chief justice of the
Massachusetts Supreme Judi-
cial Court, confirmed his death.
Lewis saw himself as a de-
fender of decency, respect for
law and reason against a tide
of religious fundamentalism
and extreme nationalism.
He wrote his final "Abroad
at Home" column for the
Times on Dec. 15, 2001, warn-
ing against the U.S. fearfully
surrendering its civil liberties.
"The hard question is
whether our commitment to
law will survive the new sense
of vulnerability that is with us
all after Sept 11," he wrote. "It
is easy to tolerate dissent
when we feel safe."
Joseph Anthony Lewis was
born in New York City on March
27, 1927, the son of a nursery
school director and a textile
company director He attended
the elite Horace Mann School
in the Bronx and graduated
from Harvard College in 1948.
He joined the Timesin 1948 and
spent most of his career there.
He studied law for a year at
Harvard in the 1950s so he could
go on to cover the Supreme
Court for the Times, and served
as chief of the newspaper's Lon-
don bureau from 1965 to 1972.
When Lewis retired, he told
the Times his career had led
him to two conclusions.
"One is that certainty is the
enemy of decency and human-
ity in people who are sure they
are right, like Osama bin Laden
and (then-Attorney General)
John Ashcroft," he said. "And
secondly that for this country
at least, given the kind of ob-
streperous, populous, diverse
country we are, law is the ab-
solute essential. And when
governments short-cut the law,
it's extremely dangerous."


Associated Iress
New York Times reporter Anthony
Lewis reads about the Pulitzer
Prizes on May 6, 1963, at the
Boston bureau of The Associated
Press, as he won the year's
Pulitzer for national reporting.


Book REVIEW


Associated Press



The battle for today


Review: Angry Days'popular history at its finest


JERRY HARKAVY
Associated Press
"Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh,
and America's Fight Over World War II,
1939-1941" (Random House), by
Lynne Olson
The bitter feelings that divided the na-
tion during the Vietnam buildup and
the Iraq invasion have become fading
memories. But far fewer Americans still re-
call the even more passionate debate over
our stance toward Nazi Germany during the
first two years of World War II.
That tumultuous time between the invasion
of Poland and the attack on Pearl Harbor
gave rise to a conflict at home that pitted iso-
lationists against interventionists. Larger-
than-life figures, from President Franklin D.
Roosevelt to aviator Charles Lindbergh, were
leading players in that ferocious battle in
which the stakes couldn't have been higher
In "Those Angry Days," journalist-turned-
historian Lynne Olson captures that period in
a fast-moving, highly readable narrative punc-
tuated by high drama. It's an ideal comple-
ment to her previous books about Britain's
Tory rebels who brought Winston Churchill to
power andAmericans who assisted England while
it stood alone against a triumphant Germany
The question of whether to intervene on
Britain's behalf, or even to amend neutrality
laws by shipping supplies to the beleaguered
nation, divided families and friends.
Olson presents as a prime example the
poignant story of celebrated author Anne
Morrow Lindbergh, who was caught between


her husband's leadership of the campaign to
keep America out of the war and the efforts of
her mother and sister on behalf of intervention.
Roosevelt, according to the author, was
overly cautious and hesitant, preferring to fol-
low public opinion rather than lead it "He was
intimidated by congressional isolationists,
whose strength he tended to exaggerate, and
was loath to challenge them," Olson writes.
Pioneering a tactic that would be used by
subsequent presidents, Roosevelt sought to
discredit his opponents by questioning their
patriotism and went on to enlist the FBI to
wiretap their phones and seek derogatory in-
formation that could be used against them.
One figure who stands tall is Republican
Wendell Willkie, whose break with his party's
isolationism strengthened his bid for presi-
dent. The author conveys the excitement of
the 1940 convention that chose Willkie as the
unlikely GOP nominee and the campaign that
ended with FDR's election to an unprece-
dented third term.
Arrayed against the interventionists were
many high-ranking military officers and the
America First movement, whose anti-Semitic
strains came to the surface in a Lindbergh
speech that left him discredited among many
Americans who once glorified him.
"Those Angry Days" is popular history at its
most riveting, detailing what the author rightfully
characterizes as "a brutal, no-holds-barred
battle for the soul of the nation." It is sure to
captivate readers seeking a deeper under-
standing of how public opinion gradually
shifted as America moved from bystander to
combatant in the war to preserve democracy


Legion accepts CBS apology over 'Amazing Race'


Associated Press

NEW YORK-The na-
tional commander of the
American Legion said he
accepts CBS' apology for
a passage on "The Amaz-


ing Race" where coni
ants visited the wreck
of an American I
bomber in Vietnam.
The segment a:
March 17 and angel
many veterans, part


Birthday In coming months, you could become in-
volved with a powerful partner in a large, complex en-
terprise. The chances of success look encouraging,
provided you are both striving for the same goals.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Be cognizant of the
odds against you when you set out to address a ca-
reer situation. Don't waste time doing it the hard way if
you don't have to, regardless of precedent.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Think twice before you
stop doing something the way it's always been done.
If you leap into a new method without the proper
preparation, you might be sorry.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Don't overpower a
friend with your contrary views. If he or she isn't inter-
ested, imposing your ideas won't go over too well.


test- larly those who served in turn
cage the Vietnam War As part Be
B-52 of its scavenger hunt editi
game, contestants on the Race
ired show had to visit the site read
ered in Hanoi, which Viet- gizir
hicu- namese authorities fami

Today's HOROSCOPE


Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You could have a short
fuse when it comes to your tolerance for minor irritations.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Unless you have something
complimentary to say to co-workers, it might be best if
you don't say anything at all.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) If you are too demand-
ing, the very persons you are trying to control are
likely to rebel. Treat everyone with respect.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Your behavior with out-
siders is likely to be far more respectful and pleasant
than it is with your mate and/or family.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) It's extremely important
that you stop and think before you speak, regardless
to whom. You could carelessly say something difficult
to retract.


ed into a memorial.
before this Sunday's
ion of "The Amazing
e," host Phil Keoghan
d a statement apolo-
ig to veterans and
lies who may have


been offended.
American Legion Na-
tional Commander
James Koutz accepted
the apology, saying he be-
lieved it was sincere and
heartfelt.


Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -You're pretty good
at giving advice, but not so when it comes to following
guidance. This will be especially true when it comes to
resource management.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Owing to much impa-
tience on your part, you could damage your recent
headway on an important venture. Try to take things
one step at a time.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You're an imaginative
person, but your thinking might be more negative than
positive today. Don't allow a dark outlook to screen
opportunities from your view.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Don't make important
financial decisions without first checking with the par-
ties involved.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B3.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24
Fantasy 5:5 12 16 23 27
5-of-5 3 winners $59,898.09
4-of-5 308 $94
3-of-5 8,829 $9
SATURDAY, MARCH 23
Powerball: 17 29 31 52 53
Powerball: 31
5-of-5 PB 1 winner $320 million
No Florida winner
5-of-5 13 winners $1 million
2 Florida winners
Lotto: 6 11 13 24 35 53
6-of-6 No winner
Fantasy 5: 2 19 20 30 34
5-of-5 2 winners $141,911.18

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, March 26,
the 85th day of 2013. There are
280 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 26, 1979, a peace
treaty was signed by Israeli Prime
Minister Menachem Begin and
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
and witnessed by President
Jimmy Carter at the White House.
On this date:
In 1812, an earthquake devas-
tated Caracas, Venezuela, caus-
ing an estimated 26,000 deaths,
according to the U.S. Geological
Survey.
In 1874, poet Robert Frost was
born in San Francisco.
In 1892, poet Walt Whitman
died in Camden, N.J.
In 1917, the Seattle Metropoli-
tans became the first U.S. team to
win the Stanley Cup as they de-
feated the Montreal Canadiens.
In 1958, the U.S. Army
launched America's third success-
ful satellite, Explorer 3.
In 1962, the U.S. Supreme
Court, in Baker v. Carr, gave fed-
eral courts the power to order
reapportionment of states' legisla-
tive districts.
In 1982, groundbreaking cere-
monies took place in Washington
D.C., for the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial.
In 1988, Jesse Jackson
stunned fellow Democrats by
soundly defeating Michael S.
Dukakis in Michigan's Democratic
presidential caucuses.
In 1997, the bodies of 39 mem-
bers of the Heaven's Gate techno-
religious cult who'd committed
suicide were found inside a rented
mansion in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.
Ten years ago: The Senate ap-
proved a $2.2 trillion budget that
provided less than half the $726
billion in tax cuts President
George W. Bush wanted.
Five years ago: Behind the
Pentagon's closed doors, U.S.
military leaders told President
George W. Bush they were wor-
ried about the Iraq war's mounting
strain on troops and their families,
but indicated they'd go along with
a brief halt in pulling out troops
during summer 2008.
One year ago: As demonstra-
tions swirled outside, Supreme
Court justices began hearing ar-
guments on challenges to Presi-
dent Barack Obama's historic
health care overhaul.
Today's birthdays: Conductor-
composer Pierre Boulez is 88.
Retired Supreme Court Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor is 83.
Actor-director Leonard Nimoy is
82. Actor Alan Arkin is 79. House
Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi
is 73. Actor James Caan is 73. Au-
thor Erica Jong is 71. Journalist
Bob Woodward is 70. Rock singer
Steven Tyler (Aerosmith) is 65.
Comedian Martin Short is 63. TV
personality Leeza Gibbons is 56.
Actress Jennifer Grey is 53. Col-
lege and Pro Football Hall of
Famer Marcus Allen is 53. Basket-
ball Hall of Famer John Stockton


is 51. Rock musician James Iha is
45. Actress Keira Knightley is 28.
Thought for Today: "Life is
denied by lack of attention,
whether it be to cleaning windows
or trying to write a masterpiece."
- Nadia Boulanger, French music
teacher (1887-1979).





I N S.- I IDII


Section C TUESDAY, MARCH 26,2013


H HEALTH


&


LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


* Yai Yai
/Page C2
U Dr. David
B. Raynor
/Page C4


Living with brain injury


March is Brain Injury
Awareness Month
CHARLES LAWRENCE
Chronicle correspondent
J onathon Foley was severely brain
in July 1997, when a car he was a
passenger in hit a tree on a back
road. The accident happened in
Pennsylvania and the driver of the car
died. After the crash, he was taken to a
hospital emergency room in Pittsburgh,
where he spent three weeks in the inten-
sive care unit.
March is Brain Injury Awareness Month.
Every year, 1.7 million U.S residents expe-
rience traumatic brain injuries (TBI).
Some 3.1 million people live with lifelong
disabilities because of it. Frequently,
causes of TBIs are falls, car crashes, work-
place accidents and assaults.
According to his mother, Christa, her son
was in a coma for seven months. Foley's
brain was swollen.
After being discharged from ICU, Foley
was sent to an in-patient rehab clinic
where he spent 11 months recovering from
the accident. Christa Foley and Jonathon's
father, Joseph, took shifts looking after him
every day
The road to recovery since that time has
been marked by hard work, slow improve-
ments and bureaucratic disappointments
for this Citrus Springs family Joseph
Foley's insurance paid for his initial care
until he was an adult, when his family ap-
plied for Medicaid.
"Our experience with Medicaid was not
good after he became an adult," Christa
Foley said. "He still had his feeding tube in
and could barely lift his head to eat his ce-
real, and they only sent in an aide for six
weeks and that was it.
"The doctors wanted to give up on him
and put him in a nursing home," Christa
Foley said. Eventually, Jonathon started
waking up and watched comedies on TV
A call to Medicaid representatives was
not returned.
After being discharged from the rehab
center, it took a year before he could eat
cereal on his own. His family would do
stretching exercises on a floor mat. Medi-
caid eventually provided 12 visits a year to
a physical therapist, where they worked to
improve his mobility
Foley is currently wheelchair bound and
sees Pete Navarro, a physical therapist at
Citrus Health and Rehab, where he does
functional exercises and hopes to improve
the coordination of his upper and lower
extremities. Navarro has been working
with Foley on and off for about four years.
"We do basic standing exercises. We
work on coordinating movements, weight-
bearing, squatting and rotational exercises


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
John Foley is assisted to his feet by his mother, Christa, Thursday afternoon in their Citrus
Springs home. The young man suffered a traumatic brain injury as a teenager as a result of
a car accident.


to keep his body moving so he's not so rigid
and linear," Navarro said. "He can't stand
without assistance and has no sense of bal-
ance. He currently speaks at a 12-year-old
level, although he is now 30 years old."
His family has served as Jonathon's care-
takers since the accident.
"Jon is my first priority every day,"
Christa Foley said. "He's very happy, lov-
able and always hugging and kissing. He's
very witty and smart."
When asked how he feels, Jonathon says
See Page C5


Language skills
L earning a lan- difficulty seems to be
guage, or a new the way an adult ap-
foreign lan- proaches a new lan-
guage, is difficult. guage as opposed to a
Many of us have expe- -w- child.
rienced that during As adults, we worry
high school and col- about things like gram-
lege, and common mar, and correct trans-
sense would dictate lations, which seem to
learning a language is hold us back from be-
a skill that would seem Dr. Denis Grillo coming fluent in a for-
to be better suited to EAR, NOSE eign language, whereas
an adult than a child AT a child does not have
But in reality, the op- TROAT these barriers.
posite is true. If you think about it,
Learning a foreign language, children are born into an envi-
such as French or Spanish, is im- ronment where they're con-
portant nowadays with our world stantly inundated with words,
travel and global economy But it
is still a formidable task, and the See Page C4


ON THE NET
* Brain Injury Association of America:
www.biausa.org/living-with-brain-
injury.htm
* National Institute of Neurological
Disorders: www.ninds.nih.gov/
disorders/tbi/tbi.htm
* Centers for Disease Control: www.cdc.
gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm62
10a5.htm?s_cidmm6210a5_x
* Brain Injury Association of Florida:
www.biaf.org/


Some wee little facts


M ost patients
are familiar
with the re-
quest for a urine sam-
ple when they visit
their doctor's office.
However, many are un- ,
aware of the plethora
of information that can
be gleaned about their
body from the lowly Dr. Udai
urine sample! URO
Though more than a TOI
hundred different
tests can be done on
the urine, the routine test done in
your doctor's office will often
check the color, specific gravity,
pH, protein, glucose, nitrites, leu-
cocyte esterase, ketones, biliru-


yf
L
D


* bin and blood.
Many factors can af-
fect the color of the
urine. How dark or
light the urine looks
mainly depends on
your fluid intake.
Some medicines, vita-
min B supplements,
beets and rhubarb can
a Kumar turn urine yellow or
.OGY brown. Blood can
OAY make urine appear
smoky or red-brown,
depending on the
amount of blood in the urine.
Specific gravity is an indicator
of the concentration of your
urine. The normal kidney can
See Page C5


Dr. C. Joseph
Bennett
NAVIGATING
CANCER


Get


ready


to


Relay

Y es, Relay for Life
season is upon
us, and it is time
for all of us to get ready
to Relay
One person can make
a difference. One event
can make a difference.
For those of you who
have attended a Relay
for Life, you know what I
am talking about. For
those of you who have
not, make this year your
first to experience this
life-changing event.
Many people ask me
where Relay for Life got
See Page C5


Dr. Sunil Gandhi
CANCER &
BLOOD
DISEASE


Advance

in breast

cancer
A 75-year-old pa-
tient of mine was
diagnosed with
breast cancer in 1981.
Unfortunately for her,
cancer spread to the
bones and lungs in 2003,
almost 22 years after
first diagnosis. She has
been on many different
chemotherapy drugs for
the past 10 years.
In spite of all this, she
is travelling around the
world and has an excel-
lent quality of life. At the
same time, over 10 years
she needed many differ-
ent chemotherapy
regimens.
Her cancer is Her-2
neu positive. This is
See Page C4


* So you know: The information contained in the Health & Life section is not intended to cover all possible directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic
reactions, or adverse effects and is not intended to replace consultation with a physician.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spring fever: Time to make a fashion statement


H ello, my
friends! The
weather is
changing and every-
one wants to jump
into spring. We are
ready to dress with
brighter colors,
change our hair and
makeup, get fit and
start planning our Yai
vacas. LIFI
First step is to check si
out the spring fashion
forecast. The hot
clothing colors for spring are
HOT orange, pistachio, graphic
black and white designs, soft
sherbet tones with pewter, warm
weather leathers in all colors
and styles, tuxedo black-and-
white ensembles for women,
bright lace fabric dresses, wild
tropical prints, sandals with


L
i
E
Y


blocked heels, flat
forms (which is a plat-
form flat), graphic
cut-out designs on
shoes, bright-colored
hand bags and acces-
sories to complement
Hair fashion brings
a retro look with hair
accessories like a
Yai scarf head wrap,
" 'N' head bands with de-
.LE tail like bows or bling,
low ponytails, tousled
updos, low messy
buns, slicked back and chic, rock
and roll waves, major blond faux
hawks with pastel pop colors
such as pink and purple.
It is amazing how these dras-
tic "make a statement" hair de-
signs look on mature women; it
is like wearing a sculpture
around that expresses your per-


sonal style. Don't be afraid to try
a modern design, as it really
makes a statement of your confi-
dence and comfort level with
your style.
Remember that age definitely
does not hold you back on being
beautiful and stylish. This rule
also applies to men. You would
be surprised at how a sculpted
design with some edgy texturiz-
ing will change your entire look.
Yes, even men need their hair
sculpted with the head shape
and texture to break it up.
A great hairdresser can also
blend any thinner areas in for
balance. Also, there are many
natural and healthy products on
the market now to assist in thin-
ning hair.
An amazing hair fiber that
comes in a shaker jar the color
of your hair can be used to fill in,


camouflaging the sparse areas.
It is very becoming for people
to express themselves with their
unique style. The public sees
business professionals with
modern hairstyles as updated
and cutting-edge with their
profession.
Remember, the first impres-
sion is the most important one,
so create an up-to-date look that
is uniquely yours and you shall
surely increase your success!
Makeup trends shout out lips
with bold, bright colors. The
brows are talking with thick,
dramatic color, the liner is exag-
gerated and the eyes tell a story
with color, nude and shimmer Of
course, the bronzer is dusting
the face with a beach glow.
Again, mineral makeup is
amazing, with richer color,
longer lasting, SPF and all-


natural vitamins.
Work on getting fit with a pro-
fessional program that is safe
and designed specifically for
you. Take one day at a time set-
ting realistic goals. Combine
your workouts with healthy
eating.
Have someone to answer to, as
it really works. A fitness buddy
drill sergeant inspecting you will
surely prevent cheating.
Have fun with your spring
fever makeover!

Yai Yai has 20 years of
international hairdressing
experience and has been a
Citrus County business owner
since 1996. She can be reached
atyaiyai@yaiyai.me, 352-795-
7625, www.yaiyai.co or
www.yaiyai.me.


Health NOTES


"Making the Placement
Decisions" free presentation,
2 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, at
the HPH Hospice office, 3545
N. Lecanto Highway in Bev-
erly Hills.
Jerry Fisher, program spe-
cialist for the Alzheimer's As-
sociation Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, will provide informa-
tion on different types of facili-
ties and levels of care. He will
discuss what to look for in
finding a good facility and
help determine what pro-
grams are available to help
pay for the placement.
HPH will also host free,
20-minute memory screen-
ings for individuals age 50
and older who are concerned
about memory loss. Partici-
pants will meet privately with
Fisher. The screening does
not provide an exact diagno-
sis and is not for people who
have dementia or
Alzheimer's; however, the
screening does help to deter-
mine if there are serious
memory problems, according
to the Alzheimer's Associa-
tion. The screenings will be
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day and Tuesday, April 15 and
16, at the HPH offices. Regis-
trations are required and can
be made by calling HPH at
352-527-4600.
INVERNESS Free
sleep screening from April 1
to April 15. Call Community
Sleep Disorders Center at
352-637-5599 to schedule a
time to receive a free in-home
screening device that pro-
vides real-time results. The
device can be picked up at
the Sleep Center at 2224
State Road 44 W., Inverness.
No appointment is needed
and no preparation is required
for this overnight screening.
The Community Sleep Dis-
orders Center of America is
the only sleep center in Inver-
ness and has earned the Joint
Commission Accreditation of
Sleep Disorders Centers.
Free memory screen-
ings by appointment only, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday,
April 17, Alzheimer's Associa-
tion, Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter "Memory Mobile" at
Superior Residences of
Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway, (State Road
44 west of the Greek Ortho-
dox Church). Call 352-746-
5483 to reserve a time.
There will also be informa-
tion on Alzheimer's disease,
referrals to community re-
sources, care consults and
Alzheimer's care training
schedules. Sponsored by; the
Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter,
the Florida State Department
of Elder Affairs, and Senior
Choices of Southwest Florida
Inc.
SPRING HILL-Access
Health Care LLC lectures are
at 5:15 p.m. at 5350 Spring
Hill Drive, conducted by Maria
Scunziano-Singh, M.D.
April 11 Finding Fulfill-
ment in Life: Know your
desires.
April 25 Thyroid Prob-
lems Need to be Addressed.
Dr. Maria is board certified
in internal medicine and is a
Diplomate of the American
Board of Internal Medicine.
Her practice focuses on com-
bining traditional medicine
with holistic treatments to
maximize patients' health care
and nutrition.
For information and to reg-
ister, call 352-688-8116.
Free oral cancer
screenings Saturday, April
27, by TimothyA. Brant, M.D.,
and C. Joseph Bennett Jr.,
M.D., in observance of the
16th annual Oral, Head and


Neck Cancer Awareness
Week on. The screening is
painless and takes 10 min-
utes. If diagnosed early these
cancers can be more easily
treated without significant
complications and the
chances of survival increase
tremendously. Appointments
are required and being sched-
uled now. Call Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute
(RBOI) at 352-527-0106.
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers: To find a
donor center or a blood drive
near you, call 352-527-3061.
Donors must be at least 17, or
16 with parental permission,
weigh a minimum of 110
pounds and be in good health
to be eligible to donate. A
photo ID is required.
The Lecanto branch office
is at 1241 S. Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491), open
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays (7 p.m. Wednes-
days), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Sunday.
The Inverness branch is at
301 W. Main St., open from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. week-
days, (6:30 p.m. Wednes-
days), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Saturday and closed Sun-
days. Visit www.lifesouth.org.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues-
day, March 26, Walmart Su-
percenter, West Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
0 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 27, Bella
Vita Spa & Fitness at Terra
Vista, Skyview Crossing,
Hernando.
Noon to 5 p.m. Thursday,
March 28, Sumter Electric Co-
operative, Sumterville.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,
March 29, Love Motorsports,
South Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Satur-
day, March 30, Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State Park,
South Suncoast Boulevard,
Homosassa.
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sun-
day, March 31, Walmart Su-
percenter, North Lecanto


Highway, Lecanto.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day, April 1, Walmart Super-
center, 2461 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Inverness.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday,
April 2, Bealls, 346 N. Sun-
coast Blvd., Crystal River.
Diabetes Alert Day,
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 28, at
the Inverness Walmart Phar-
macy, sponsored by Citrus
Memorial Diabetes Center. Di-
etitians and a diabetes educa-
tor will be on-hand to help
residents better recognize risk
for type 2 diabetes.
Diabetes Alert Day was
created by the American Dia-
betes Association to encour-
age citizens to think about risk
for diabetes. As part of the
Alert Day, diabetes risk tests
will be available to highlight
potential risks for prediabetes
or type 2 diabetes.
An RSVP is not necessary
to take the seven-question


test or speak to the diabetes
educator and dietitians.
SPRING HILL Oak
Hill Hospital H2U Partner's
Club events during April. The
hospital is at 11375 Cortez
Blvd., Spring Hill, 1.9 miles
east of U.S. 19 on State Road
50. Visit OakHillHospital.com.
H2U Partner's Club events
and activities are open to
members only. Membership is
open to Hernando, Pasco and
Citrus County residents for
$20 a year, which includes
membership in the HCA na-
tional H2U program.
April 2 Hearing
screening and ear wax re-
moval, 10 a.m.
April 2 Friendly Four
Band, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
0 April 4 -AARP Tax Aid,
9 a.m. to noon.
April 8 -AARP driving
classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
April 9 Friendly Four


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


B.K. Patel, M.D.
Internal Medicine


H. Khan, M.D.
Board Certified Family Pactice


Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive Care (Hospital)
Long-Term Care (Nursing Home)
Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals




Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am


Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
308 S. Line Ave.
Inverness
(352) 344-5511


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


^ Accepting New OB/GYN Patients

Rose Mary Sobel. NID ..j .h,j.-F, '.N F c :
Jackie Duncan. IRNP- N .rI d .c...ii I j I

Crqsta" [ jer" '11 omen's death Center

%..,] -I ri 1 ,, \ M ,, I% l |%1.15.|791U0878A




Is that dizziness,
numbness or confusion a

Mini-stroke?


HEALTHconnect has the specialists and information you need.
A TIA, or ministroke, can be difficult to recognize. Nearly 40 percent of those experiencing
a TIA will later have a stroke and the risk is especially high the first few days after the
event. Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center provides premier stroke care in alliance with
UF&Shands. Join us to learn more about TIAs and stroke prevention.

Mini-strokes: Causes, Symptoms & Treatments
Thursday, April 4, 11:30 a.m.
Featuring Mary Anne Kolar, D.O., Emergency Medicine and
Patricia Dourm, RN, Stroke Team Champion
SRRMC Medical Offices Building, Community Room
6201 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
Program is free. Lunch will be served.

Let HEALTHconnect link good living with good health.

&SEVEN RIVERS


Registration is required.
352.795.1234


i REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
SevenRiversRegional.com
Your Life. Our Story.
epent Member of te MeStaf


Band, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
April 10 AARP driving
classes, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
*April 11 -AARP Tax Aid,
9 a.m. to noon.
April 15 Cards/"Manip-
ulation," 9 a.m.
April 16 Friendly Four
Band, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
*April 23 Hearing
screening and ear wax re-
moval, 10 a.m. to noon.
April 23 90s+ Club,
10:30 a.m.
April 24 Meet & Eat at
Cafe Gennaro, Big Lots plaza,
12:30 p.m.
April 24 Smoking Ces-
sation Support, 2 p.m.
April 30 Blood pres-
sure test, 10 a.m.
SPRING HILL Oak Hill
Hospital's For Your Health


community education pro-
gram, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 3, at First United
Methodist Church, 8831 W.
Bradshaw St., Homosassa,
1/2 mile west of U.S. 19 on
Bradshaw.
Niloufer Kero, M.D.,
FACOG (Fellow of the Ameri-
can Congress of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists), will pres-
ent "Advances in Minimally
Invasive Gynecologic
Surgery."
Admission is free and a
complimentary dinner will be
served. Seating is limited and
reservations are required.
Call 352-628-6060 in Cit-
rus, or register online at
OakHillHospital.com/For
YourHealth.
See Page C3


A 20130





Community-Wide

Fitness Challenge
TEAM POINTS RECORD
February 4- March 17
Week 6
STEPS CHALLENGE TOTAL
JUST GETTING STARTED
Almost There 365,500
Baby Steppin' Bear Cubs 249,524
CRL 37,658
Fiscally Fit 404,823
Step It Up 290,600

1 GETTING THERE
CRPS Accelerated Steppers 382,625
Pets n' Steps 408,799
Trinity Walkers 217,500

JOCKS
CRPS Steppin' Tweeners 677,091

MINUTES CHALLENGE TOTAL
JUST GETTING STARTED
Biker Buddies 2,982
Cubs in Minute Training 2,047
Genesis 1,819
Government Gals & a Guy 2,012
Healthy Heroes 2,173
Homosassa Hikers 2,650
LifeSouth Depounders 1,583
Teale 1,559
X Nu Toned 1,970

GETTING THERE
All Hours 2,030
Bookin' It 1,303
Citrus County YMCA "Y"Id Cats 2,248
CPR Exercise Warriors 1,464
Early Birds 2,370
Empress Girls 1,487
Fantastic Four 1,322
FitnessKins 2,239
HPH-Because We Care 1,612
JCM Motivators 2,185
Minute Tracking Tweeners 1,481
Muffets 551
Pooch Walkers 3,815
Sassy Striders 1,500
Team Citrus 95 2,345
Witness the Fitness 1,043

JOCKS
Fabulous Flab Fighters 2,080
Jazzercise Junkies 7,473
Mimpop 3,390
R & R Exemplar 6,242
Wrinkles in Time 4,790

AM& -jvk-


C2 TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2013


HEALTH & LIFE


)0EEMX





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Medications can help manage asthma


q1 My 12-year-old son has
asthma. What can you
tell me about asthma in
chil ren?
A: The incidence of
asthma in children is
rising and the FDA
recently (2012) pro-
vided a consumer in-
formation update '.
about this lung prob-
lem that affects
breathing.
Asthma is a chronic Richard I
lung disease that in- Richard
flames and narrows ASK
the airways. In the PHARIV
past the stereotypical
asthmatic child was
frail and inactive, relying on an
inhaler to breathe.
The good news is better treat-
ment options are now available,
allowing children with asthma
to live active, independent lives.
The Food and Drug Administra-
tion (FDA) works to make sure
that the drugs and devices used
to treat asthma are safe and
effective.
The bad news is the number of
reported cases of asthma in chil-
dren has been rising. In 2010,


there were 7 million children
with asthma, 9.4 percent of
Americans younger than 18, ac-
cording to the Centers
for Disease Control
and Prevention, up
from 6.5 million, or 8.9
percent, in 2005.
One reason may be
doctors are diagnos-
S ing more kids as asth-
df matic. Illnesses once
known as bronchitis
or a croupy cough are
[offmann now being recognized
THE as asthma.
IACIST Its symptoms may
include coughing,
wheezing (a whistling
sound when you breathe), chest
tightness and shortness of
breath, according to the Na-
tional Heart, Lung and Blood In-
stitute (NHLBI).
Uncontrolled asthma can lead
to chronic lung disease and a
poor quality of life, and may
slow growth.
It is recommended that par-
ents work with a pediatrician,
and an allergist or pulmonolo-
gist (lung specialist) if needed, to
develop and follow an asthma


action plan that details the treat-
ment options when certain
symptoms occur
The things that make asthma
worse are known as "triggers."
They include:
0 Season and climate changes.
0 High levels of air pollutants.
0 Tobacco smoke.
0 Mold.
0 Mites, roaches.
0 Plant pollen.
0 Pet dander.
0 Strong scents, like perfumes.
In addition, certain factors
may increase a child's risk of de-
veloping asthma:
Family history of asthma.
Multiple episodes of wheez-
ing before age 2.
Living in crowded housing.
A family member who
smokes.
Obesity.
While asthma is never
"cured," a variety of FDA-ap-
proved medications can help
manage symptoms.
For quick relief of severe
symptoms, doctors will pre-
scribe "rescue" medications,
such as albuterol, which open
up the bronchial tubes in the


lungs. The goal is not to use it,
but have it available at home,
school, etc., just in case it is
needed.
To stabilize chronic and per-
sistent symptoms, doctors will
prescribe "controller" medica-
tions. The most common, safe
and effective controller medica-
tions are the inhaled corticos-
teroids (ICS). With regular
treatment, they improve lung
function and prevent symptoms
and flare-ups, reducing the need
for rescue medications.
Children whose asthma is
triggered by airborne allergens
(allergy-causing substances), or
who cannot or will not use ICSs,
might take a type of drug called
a leukotriene modifier. These
come in tablet and chewable
forms, though for many people
they tend to be less effective
than ICSs, especially for more
severe asthma.
For more severe cases that
are not controlled with ICSs or
leukotriene modifiers alone,
adding long-acting beta agonists
(LABAs) such as salmeterol or
formoterol might be recom-
mended. the FDA cautions


against using LABAs alone with-
out an ICS, and recommends
that if one must be used, it
should be for the shortest time
possible.
Most asthma medications are
inhaled.
Babies and toddlers use a neb-
ulizer, a machine that delivers
liquid medication as a fine mist
through a tube attached to a face
mask.
Older children can use a me-
tered dose inhaler or dry-
powder inhaler
To ensure the proper dose of
medication gets into a child's
lungs, doctors might also pre-
scribe a device called a spacer,
or holding chamber that at-
taches to the inhaler. Spacers
are helpful in younger children
who have difficulty with the tim-
ing and coordination needed to
use an inhaler

Richard P Hoffmann,
Pharm.D., has been a
pharmacist for more than 40
years. Send questions to him at
2960 E. Coventry Court,
Hernando, FL 34442.


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

The George A. Dame
Community Health Center
Board Meetings are at
3 p.m. the first Wednesday
monthly at the Citrus County
Health Department, 3700 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in
the first floor conference
room.
Support
GROUPS

RBOI has begun a
monthly survivor group with
inspirational guests and
strength-based topics. April's
survivor topic is "how people
are getting their lives back to
a new normal after treatment."
Any cancer survivors and
family are welcome to attend.
The group will be facilitated
by Tommie Brown and Med-
ical Social Worker Wendy
Hall, and will meet from 6 to


7 p.m. April 1 at the RBOI of-
fice at the CMHS Healthcare
Center at Allen Ridge, on
County Road 491 in Lecanto.
Guests will discuss a variety
of interesting topics including
stress management, nutrition
and exercise, benefits of
yoga, reiki and acupuncture,
and other topics which pro-
mote holistic healing, preven-
tion and renewal. There is no
cost to attend. For more infor-
mation, email Tommie Brown
at tbrown009@tampabay.rr.
com or call Wendy Hall,
LCSW, at 352-527-0106.
SPRING HILL-
Leukemia/Lymphoma Sup-
port Group, 5 to 6:30 p.m.
the fourth Tuesday monthly at
the Florida Cancer Institute-
New Hope's Spring Hill Cen-
ter, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite
203 in the Medical Arts Build-
ing next to Spring Hill Hospi-
tal. Call Jeff Haight, R.N.,
group facilitator, at 352-688-
7744.
Caregivers' Support
and Information meeting,


1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday
monthly at St. Timothy
Lutheran Church, 1070 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River.
Call Charlotte Downing at
352-422-7044 for
directions/information. Re-
freshments served.
0 OCALA- Ocala Health
Stroke Support Group
meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the
fourth Tuesday monthly at the
Senior Wellness Community
Center (9850 S.W. 84th


Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call
800-530-1188 to register.
The Leukemia & Lym-
phoma Society Suncoast
Chapter, Cancer Support
Group (including Multiple
Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner
Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is
no charge and light refresh-
ments are provided. Contact:

See GROUPS/Page C4


OF INVERNESS
259 East Highland Boulevard
(Next to Beall's Outlet)
Inverness, FL 34452
E (352) 344-4747


RELINES
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HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2013 C3


H


laow Oalianl e aa.[o nnpnlt ie ma.ren i Palo









Diabetic shoes not necessary for many diabetics


As a podiatrist, I
often have pa-
tients inquire
about diabetic shoes
they happen to see in
the pharmacy or that
their friend or neigh-
bor suggested they
might get.
Patients are often
not aware that not all
patients with dia-
betes qualify for dia-
betic shoes and
inserts, and for good


Dr. David
BEST
FORW


reason. In fact, even many who
do qualify, in my opinion, do not
necessarily need and may not
even end up wearing their
Medicare covered diabetic
shoes.
Unfortunately, sometimes I
come off as the "bad guy" who
tells patients they do not qualify,


or who would really
benefit from a differ-
ent type of shoe other
than diabetic shoes.
l: ^ While I certainly
have many diabetic
patients who ab-
- solutely need either
diabetic shoes and in-
S serts or even custom-
I Raynor molded shoes and
FOOT should wear them all
ARD_ the time, these dia-
betic shoes and in-
serts are very
expensive, and oftentimes not
medically necessary, in my
opinion.
Unfortunately, there has been
abuse by some in this system, so
Medicare has buckled down and
requires strict and extensive
documentation related to the
medical necessity and indica-


tion for these shoes.
The Medicare therapeutic
shoe program is very necessary
and valuable for those patients
with diabetes who qualify and
are at significant risk if they do
not wear these special, accom-
modative shoes.
Per Medicare guidelines, the
diabetic patient must meet one
or more of these criteria: history
of previous amputation in either
foot, history of previous foot ul-
ceration, history of pre-ulcera-
tive calluses, peripheral
neuropathy with callus forma-
tion, foot deformity, or poor cir-
culation in either foot
The specific indication for the
shoes must be well documented.
In addition, the patient has to be
under a comprehensive plan of
care for diabetes.
For this reason, a certificate of


medical necessity is required
from the patient's primary care
physician or internist (M.D. or
D.O.) who actively manages that
person's diabetes. Additionally,
a prescription for said shoes is
required and may be provided
by either a podiatrist (DPM) or
the patient's treating physician.
Fortunately, many patients
with diabetes manage it well
and have feet in good health, so
they do not need diabetic shoes.
For those at risk who have met
the criteria for the diabetic
shoes, this is a valuable part of
the Medicare program.
While I prescribe diabetic
shoes for certain patients, I do
not dispense them myself. If you
need them, I strongly recom-
mend (as does Medicare) that
shoes are fitted and furnished by
a qualified individual, such as a


pedorthist, orthotist or pros-
thestist, or certainly your podia-
trist if he or she does this.
For those patients at risk, I
also urge them to wear their di-
abetic shoes and inserts all the
time and as directed to protect
their feet from harm. They do
patients no good sitting in the
closet not to mention the
waste to Medicare.
Both patients and providers
should be judicious in prescrib-
ing diabetic shoes, but they are
a valuable tool to help prevent
diabetic complications in the
feet for those at risk.


David B Raynor, DPM, is a
podiatrist in Inverness and can
be reached at 352-726-3668 with
questions or suggestions for
future columns.


GANDHI
Continued from Page C1

because one in four breast
cancers has this mutation
in the gene where the pa-
tient's cancer cells make
too much protein called
Her-2 neu.
This kind of breast can-
cers tends to be more ag-
gressive than other types
of breast cancer. They're
also less responsive to hor-
mone treatment.



GRILLO
Continued from Page C1

and hear language early
on. Children tend to figure
out the language purely
from sounds and associa-
tion with objects, and in-
teracting with them. Word
meanings connect to ob-
jects, and as a result, these
words are strung into a
sentence, and speech and
communication develops.
Just to give you an idea,
at 15 months we start see-
ing infants using their first



GROUPS
Continued from Page C3

Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, pa-
tient services manager, at
813-963-6461 ext. 11, Lour-
des.Arvelo@lls.org or visit
The Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society website at
www.lls.org.
Alzheimer's caregiver
support group by
Alzheimer's Family Organiza-
tion, 2 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at Sug-
armill Manor, 8985 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., Homosassa. Call
Bevin Brayton at 352-302-
9066.
The Citrus Memorial
Diabetes Support Group,
10:30 a.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly on the
campus of Citrus Memorial
Health System in the
auditorium.
An RSVP is necessary, as
refreshments will be served.
Call 352-341-6110.
Look Good ... Feel Bet-
ter, a free two-hour session
for women undergoing radia-
tion or chemotherapy, at 3
p.m. the second Wednesday
monthly at the Cancer &
Blood Disease Center,
Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth
Wednesday monthly at the
Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Lecanto. Call
Joann Brown at 352-341-
7741 or the American Cancer
Society at 800-395-5665 to
register.
Emotions Anonymous
12-step support group, noon
the second and fourth Thurs-
days monthly at Central Ridge
Library, Forest Ridge Boule-
vard and Roosevelt, in Bev-
erly Hills. Call Meg at
352-527-2443.
SPRING HILL- Stroke
Support Group, noon the
fourth Thursday monthly at
HealthSouth Rehabilitation
Hospital in the private dining
room. Call Pam McDonald at
352-346-6359.
PINELLAS PARK-
"Connections" fireside-dis-
cussion-style support group
for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the
last Thursday monthly, Well-
Spring Oncology, 6600 66th
St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-
343-0600; www.wellspring
oncology.org.
BROOKSVILLE "Man
to Man" prostate cancer sup-
port group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first


These patients benefit
from a drug called
Trastuzumab or Her-
ceptin, which targets these
cancer cells that over-
express Her2 neu.
A new drug was ap-
proved recently, which is
remarkable. The drug is
actually a combination of
two different drugs. The
Trastuzumab portion of
the conjugate called T
DM1 during clinical devel-
opment T portion
(stands for Trastuzumab)
targets HER2 positive


words.
By 18 months, they are
communicating with many
words.
At 24 months, they are at
about 10 words.
At 30 months, they are at
100 words and two-word
sentences.
At 36 months, they are
using about a 200-word
vocabulary
And at 48 months, they
have about a 600-word vo-
cabulary, and start build-
ing simple sentences.
Infants do better with
learning speech and for-
eign languages because


Monday monthly at the
Florida Cancer Institute-New
Hope's Brooksville Center,
7154 Medical Center Drive.
Call Mary Capo at 352-596-
1926.
Grandparents Raising
Grandchildren Support
Group, 10 a.m. to noon the
first Monday monthly at the
Citrus County Resource Cen-
ter, 2804 W Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall
from Kids Central Inc. will fa-
cilitate the meeting. Call Pam
at 352-387-3540.
OCALA-- The
Alzheimer's and Memory
Disorders support group of
Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first
Monday monthly at the Med-
ical Office Building at West
Marion Community Hospital,
4600 S.W. 46th Court, sec-
ond-floor Community Room.
Call 352-401-1453.
Alzheimer's Associa-
tion-Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter support groups are
attended by caregivers of
loved ones with dementia or
Alzheimer's disease.
The support group provides
the caregivers an opportunity
to reduce their isolation and
receive support and knowl-
edge from other caregivers. It
helps to share experiences,
increase feelings of self-
worth, decrease a sense of
isolation, learn from others in
your situation, learn about
community resources, and re-
ceive encouragement from
other caregivers.
All support groups are free
of charge to caregivers. Our
Lady of Fatima Catholic
Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inver-
ness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday
monthly.
Call Anne Black at 352-
527-4600.
BROOKSVILLE -
Women's breast cancer
support group, 6 to
7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday
monthly at Florida Cancer In-
stitute-New Hope Center at
7154 Medical Center Drive,
Spring Hill. Call Tambra Ran-
dazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128.
SPRING HILL- Care-
giver Support Group, 4:30
to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednes-
day monthly, at the Florida
Cancer Institute-New Hope's
Spring Hill Center, 10441
Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the
Medical Arts Building next to
Spring Hill Hospital. Call
Pamela McGee, facilitator, at
352-688-7744.


cells, at which point the at-
tached chemotherapeutic
molecule DM1 at-
tacks the cancer cells.
The approval was based
on the EMILIA study,
which involved patients
with HER2 positive,
metastatic breast cancer
that had failed treatment
with Trastuzumab and a
taxane. They were ran-
domized to the new drug
or conventional therapy
with lapatinib and
capecitabine (Xeloda).
The new drug is called


they are immersed in an
environment, and they do
not worry about trying to
translate English to a for-
eign language, nor are they
concerned about grammar
Unlike adults, children
get constant feedback from
family members, and it is
generally positive correc-
tion and reinforcement, as
opposed to the adult who
is in a foreign language
class, who has to take tests,
and sometimes does not
get a passing grade. That
negative reinforcement
sometimes hinders an
adult's progress to learn a


Weekly meetings
R.I. Discovery (Recov-
ery International) Abraham
Low self-help systems for
mental health depression,
obsession, stress, fears,
anger. Meetings are 2 to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Crystal
River United Methodist
Church, 4801 N. Citrus Ave.
Call Jackie, 352-563-5182.
"Together We Grow"
Nar-Anon Family Group,
6:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Dunnellon Presbyterian
Church, 20641 Chestnut St.,
Room 204 in office building,
use right-side entrance across
from the Memorial Garden;
Nar-Anon is for family and
friends of addicts.
Find a free local support
group in your area: call 888-
947-8885 or go to
www.NARANONFL.org.
Food Addicts in Recov-
ery Anonymous (FA) is a
free 12-step recovery pro-
gram for anyone suffering
from food obsession, overeat-
ing, undereating or bulimia.
For details or a list of meet-
ings, call 352-270-8534 or
visit www.foodaddicts.org.
0 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday
at Queen of Peace Catholic
Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W.
State Road 200, Ocala.
Depression and anxiety
peer support group meets at
10 a.m. Thursday at Central
Ridge Library.
Bereavement Group,
1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the back hall, St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19 south of
Cardinal Street. Group is
composed of men and
women who are experiencing
grief and are convinced "Life
can be good again." Open to
all. Come or call Anne at 352-
212-0632.
Al-Anon groups meet
regularly in Citrus County. Call
352-697-0497.
Inverness AFG: 8 p.m.
Monday, Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 S.
U.S. 41.
Crystal River AFG:
8 p.m. Tuesday, St. Benedict
Catholic Church, 455 S. Sun-
coast Blvd.
Last Resort AFG:
11:30 a.m. Wednesday, First
United Methodist Church,
3896 S. Pleasant Grove
Road, Inverness.
LecantoAFG: 8 p.m.
Thursday, Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.


Kadcyla and it received
FDA approval in February
The patients who received
the new drug not only had
better survival, but also
had fewer side effects com-
pared to standard therapy
The most common side
effects associated with the
drug are nausea, fatigue,
musculoskeletal pain,
thrombocytopenia, ele-
vated liver enzymes,
headache and constipation.
"This provides a signifi-
cant leap to a whole other
group of drugs, not only for


new language.
Children also get rein-
forced learning through
play and interaction with
adults, which helps them
develop their language
skills. It seems a child's
brain has a pre-pro-
grammed way to learn lan-
guage, whereas adults
have been trained and ed-
ucated already, and have
difficulty reverting back to
that inherent ability that a
child has to pick up a lan-
guage quickly and use it
For a child, actively
learning a language is like
playing; they look forward


Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Crystal River AFG:
11:30 a.m. Thursday at
YANA Club, 147 Seventh St.
(off Citrus Avenue), Crystal
River.
Awareness Lunch Bunch
AFG: 12:30 p.m. Friday, St.
Margaret Episcopal Church,
114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness.
Beginners Al-Anon:
10 a.m. Saturday at Yana
Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Cit-
rus Avenue), Crystal River.
Tuesday Morning Seren-
ity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Alcoholics
Anonymous: If you drink,
and want to stop, call Alco-
holics Anonymous Nature
Coast Intergroup at 352-621-
0599. Visit the website:
www.ncintergroup.com.
AC Group, 7 p.m. Tues-
days at Church Without Walls,
3962 N. Roscoe Road, Her-
nando. Call Laverne at 352-
637-4563. Visit the website:
www.alcoholicsforchrist.com.
SA 12-step Christian sup-
port group meets at 6 p.m.
every Wednesday at Living
Waters Ministries, 12 N. Mel-
bourne St., Beverly Hills. Call
Meg at 352-527-2443. Free
and open to the public.
DUNNELLON Grief
support group, 6 p.m. Thurs-
days at the First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon, 20831
Powell Road. Call the church
at 352-489-2730.
Narcotics Anonymous:
Easy Does It, 8 to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday and Mon-
day; &:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday; The Recovery
Room, 8169 S. Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), Floral City.
It Works How and Why,
noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday;
7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Saturday, YANA
Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St.,
Crystal River.
More Will Be Revealed,
8 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Memorial Hospital Historic
School House: 135 S. Citrus
Ave., Inverness.
Recovery at Work Men's
Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Lecanto Church of
Christ: 797 S. Rowe Terrace,
Lecanto.
Recovery on the River,
7 to 8 p.m. Monday; 8 to
9 p.m. Friday and Sunday;


HER2 because this adds a
new drug for people
who've already seen their
tumor grow through
Trastuzumab as well as
some of the other antibod-
ies such as pertuzumab or
... the tyrosine kinase in-
hibitors such as lapatinib,"
as per Jennifer Litton,
M.D., of the University of
Texas M.D. Anderson Can-
cer Center in Houston.
In my opinion, this is a
great new drug in our ar-
mamentarium in fight
against breast cancer. My


to it, and they enjoy it, un-
like some of us who have
been in language classes,
and have been forced to
undergo repetitive lessons
in translation and expla-
nation, which once again,
seems to hinder the brain's
natural ability to pick up
and enjoy a different
language.
In some learning centers
around the country, this in-
formation has been used
to change the way foreign
languages are taught, and
the impact has been very
significant.
You can now go online,


Lecanto Church of Christ, 797
S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto.
Spirit of Unity, 8 to 9 p.m.
Thursday, Citrus County Fam-
ily Resource Center's out-
reach center: 3848 E.
Parsons Point Road,
Hernando.
Narcotics Anonymous is
not affiliated with any of the
meeting facilities listed. Call
the 24-hour Helpline: 352-
508-1604.
Overeaters Anonymous:
Voices of Recovery, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Monday at the
Senior Center (V.A. building)
on County Road 491,
Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-
746-5019.
The Circle of Love, 1 to
2:30 p.m. Thursday at Our
Lady of Grace Church in Bev-
erly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd.
Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777.
The New Beginning,
7 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of
Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard,
Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at
352-341-0777.
The Encouragers Sup-
port Group has been helping
people deal with depression,
anxiety, bipolar disorder and
more. Weekly meeting. Call
352-637-3196.
Anorexia and bulimia
anonymous 12-step support
group, 5:45 p.m. Monday at
the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Sev-
enth St., Crystal River (behind
the police station). Call Char-
maine at 352-422-3234.
Citrus Abuse Shelter
Association (CASA), 1100
Turner Camp Road, Inver-
ness, offers two free weekly
women's domestic abuse
support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m.
Tuesday and 10:30 a.m. to
noon Wednesdays. Child care
available. Call CASA at 352-
344-8111.
Celebrate Recovery:
support for any hurts, habits,
hang-ups or addictions.
6:30 p.m. Monday at
Oxford Assembly of God
Church, 12114 N. U.S. 301 in
Oxford. Call 352-748-6124.
7 p.m. Wednesday and
Friday at the Christian Re-
covery Fellowship Church,
2242 W. State Road 44. Call
352-726-2800.
7 to 9 p.m. Friday at
Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church's Student Ministries
Building. Dinner available be-
fore the meeting from 6 to
7 p.m. for $4 donation and a
coffee house after. Call 352-


patient is already on
chemotherapy at this time,
but she will go on this new
drug soon.


Dr Sunil Gandhi is a
hematologist and
oncologist He is the
volunteer medical adviser
of the Citrus Unit of
American Cancer Society
Write to 521 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL
34461, email sgandhi
@tampabayrrcom or call
352-746-0707.


or order a CD program,
and with the aid of your
computer, learn a foreign
language at home within a
matter of a few weeks,
which was unheard of
years ago, as many of us
can attest to, as we re-
member the rigidity of for-
eign language classes in
school.


Denis Grillo, D. 0.,
FOCOO, is an ear, nose
and throat specialist in
Crystal River Call 352-
795-0011 or visit Crystal
Comm unityENTcom.


746-6200.
Gulf to Lake Church Min-
istry Complex, West Gulf-to-
Lake Highway in Crystal
River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fri-
days, followed by large- and
small-group time and a Coffee
Cafe at 9. Call 352-586-4709.
Nature Coast Ministries
seeks to help the homeless
and hurting of Citrus County.
We offer referrals to Celebrate
Recovery, call 352-563-1860.
Overcomers Group for
people recovering from addic-
tions to drugs, alcohol or
other out-of-control habits,
8 p.m. Monday at the Sanc-
tuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland
Blvd. Call Paul at 352-628-
2874.
Dunnellon Life Recov-
ery group for adults where
addiction, compulsion and
codependency issues are
dealt with, at 7 p.m. Monday
at Rainbow Springs Village
Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd
St. Road, Dunnellon.
Call Char at 352-465-1644
or Nancy at 352-794-0017.
SPRING HILL-- Parkin-
son's Tai Chi Group, 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday in the pri-
vate dining room at Health-
South Rehabilitation Hospital
of Spring Hill.
Call Charissa Haffner at
352-346-8864.
Organizations
Alzheimer's Associa-
tion-Florida Gulf Coast Chap-
ter affiliated support groups
are for family members, care-
givers and others interested in
learning more about
Alzheimer's disease.
Meetings are open to
everyone and free of charge.
To arrange free respite care
so you can attend a group,
call the Hernando office at
352-688-4537 or 800-
772-8672.
Website: www.alzsup-
port.com Live chat every
Wednesday at noon. Mes-
sage boards open at all times
to post questions and leave
replies. Join the Alzheimer's
Association online community
at www.alz.org/livingwith
_alzheimers_message_board
s lwa.asp.
Crystal River Health &
Rehabilitation Center, 136
N.E. 12th Ave., Crystal River;
2 p.m. third Saturday monthly.
Call Christina DiPiazza at
352-795-5044.
See GROUPS/Page C5


C4 TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2013


HEALTH & LIFE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Well-worn lower implant requires remake


I am 68 years
old and had
a denture
ma e on the top #-
about 15 years ago. At
the same time, I had
five implants put in
my lower jaw. I then
had a bar made and a
denture with a clip
and pins made on top Dr. I
of it. Vasc
My upper is doing SOUNE
fine, but my lower is
so loose the pins and
clip are loose in the denture.
What should I do, as this was
made up north and I have never
found a dentist down here?
Hope you can help.


i1
i
D


A: This is a great
question. I am glad
you asked it, as I bet
.gJ there are plenty of
W people in a similar
circumstance.
First, let me say I
^.& think I know exactly
what you are talking
about. The way you
rank were restored is a
mini very common way to
BITES restore someone. It is
used less often now,
because the cost of
restoration is higher. With the
economy as it is, many people
prefer not to do things this way
For me, it is the only way I do
things.


I am going to ignore the upper,
since you are doing well with it
You might want to consider a
new one simply because of its
age; however, it is not uncom-
mon to build a new lower to an
old upper.
As for the lower, the clip you
have is probably yellow in color
and is called a Hader clip. The
pins you are referring to are
probably on either side of the
denture and key into the bar to-
wards the back These are called
Lew Attachments. This is a great
way to restore someone, but it is
very labor intensive, and a pre-
cise lab is essential.
One of the problems with re-
movable implant restorations is


that through the years things
wear out. This may not have
been discussed with you at ini-
tial placement, but we now know
if the patient enjoys the restora-
tion long enough, it will need to
be remade.
Repair can work in some
cases, but I have found replace-
ment is the way to go. In addi-
tion, it is a good idea to have
relines done on the lower every
few years. In doing this, you can
extend the life of the clips and
pins.
I would suggest you make
some calls to local dentists and
ask if they are familiar with the
types of attachments I men-
tioned. Also ask if they restore


implant cases regularly
Once you find a few dentists to
go to, make a consultation ap-
pointment with them. You
should be able to judge from
there who you want to restore
your lower.
I hope this has helped, and
please remember I could be
wrong on the attachment types.
Good luck!


Dr Frank Vascimini is a dentist
practicing in Homosassa. Send
your questions to 4805 S.
Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa,
FL 34446 or email them to him
at info@MasterpieceDental
Studio. com.


BRAIN
Continued from Page C1

"everything is going good"
and claps his hands after
speaking.
"It's hard to see my son
sitting every day at home,"
Christa Foley said. "I want
to get him physically and


mentally independent as
much as I can."
Medicaid has a waiver
program for people with
traumatic brain and spinal
cord injuries.
Its purpose is "to pro-
vide Medicaid-eligible
clients who meet nursing
home level of care with
long-term community-
based services and sup-


ports necessary to live
safely and independently
in the community."
"From the beginning, he
should've gotten more pro-
fessional help," Christa
Foley said. "He got help
when he was a child, but
after he turned 21, Medi-
caid basically cut him off.
Why would they cut him
off when he still needs


help? That's what I don't
understand."
Medicaid bases its assis-
tance on a set financial
amount, something
Jonathon's parents find
hard to believe.
"Jon gets 12 hours a year
of physical, speech or oc-
cupational therapy
through Medicaid,"
Joseph Foley said. "His


doctor visits are covered,
plus his blood work. Be-
fore he became an adult,
Medicaid provided help
based on his progression
through doctor and thera-
pist recommendations.
Now, it's just a sum of
money Medicaid has al-
lowed, but it's not based on
need."
Despite the challenges,


Jonathon's parents do the
best they can.
'"Jon could use a lot more
rehabilitation. Medicaid
never really provided
what my son really needed
after he became an adult,"
Christa Foley said. "My
husband and I do as much
as we can.
"This kid has a lot of po-
tential to get better."


BENNETT
Continued from Page C1

its start. The American Cancer
Society Relay for Life began in
Tacoma, Wash., as the City of
Destiny Classic 24-Hour Run
Against Cancer.
In the mid-1980s, Dr. Gordy
Klatt, a Tacoma colorectal sur-
geon, wanted to enhance the in-
come of his local American
Cancer Society office. He de-
cided to personally raise money
for the fight by doing something
he enjoyed, running marathons.
In May 1985, Dr. Klatt spent a
grueling 24 hours circling the
track at Baker Stadium at the
University of Puget Sound in
Tacoma for more than 83 miles.
Throughout the night, friends
paid $25 to run or walk 30 min-
utes with him. He raised $27,000
to fight cancer. That first year,
nearly 300 of Dr. Klatt's friends,
family and patients watched as


he ran and walked the course.
While he circled the track
those 24 hours, he thought about
how others could take part. He
envisioned a 24-hour team relay
event that could raise more
money to fight cancer
Months later, he pulled to-
gether a small committee to plan
the first team relay event known
as the City of Destiny Classic 24-
Hour Run Against Cancer. In
1986, 19 teams took part in the
first team relay event on the
track at the colorful, historical
Stadium Bowl and raised
$33,000. An indescribable spirit
prevailed at the track and in the
tents that dotted the infield.
Now look at us today The
American Cancer Society Relay
for Life is a life-changing event
that gives everyone in our com-
munity a chance to celebrate the
lives of people who have battled
cancer, remember loved ones
lost, and fight back against the
disease.
At Relay, teams of people


camp out at our local high
schools, and take turns walking
or running around the track.
Each team is asked to have a
representative on the track at all
times during the event. Because
cancer never sleeps, Relays are
overnight events up to 24 hours
in length.
There are special moments at
each Relay
Our Relays start with a Sur-
vivors Lap, an inspirational time
when survivors are invited to cir-
cle the track together and help
everyone celebrate the victories
we've achieved over cancer.
We also take time, a very spe-
cial moment, to honor and re-
member people who have been
touched by cancer during the
Luminaria Ceremony. Candles
are lit inside bags filled with
sand, each one bearing the name
of a person touched by cancer,
and participants often walk a
lap in silence. As people take
time to remember, those who
have walked alongside others


battling cancer can grieve and
find healing. This is a time that
truly highlights the importance
of defeating this disease. This
moment always drives home the
reason that we do it.
Many people ask me why we
do it, why do we stay up all
night? There are so many rea-
sons. The American Cancer So-
ciety Relay for Life represents
the hope that those lost to can-
cer will never be forgotten, that
those who face cancer will be
supported, and that one day can-
cer will be eliminated.
It is more than just a
fundraiser; it's a life-changing
experience. At Relay, every per-
son in the community has a
chance to celebrate, remember,
and fight back. And every person
who participates joins others in
our community as part of this
movement to end cancer
So, Citrus County, let's get
ready to Relay This year, three
Relay for Life events will take
place in Citrus County. The first


event will take place at Crystal
River High School on Friday,
April 5. The second will take
place at Lecanto High School on
Friday, April 12. Finally, the
third Relay for Life will take
place at Citrus High School on
Friday, April 19.
This year, make an effort to at-
tend at least one of these events.
If you have never Relayed, you
will be moved, and I promise
you, you will be hooked.


Dr C. Joseph Bennett is a
board-certified radiation
oncologist and a member of the
Citrus County Unit of the
American Cancer Society
Watch "Navigating Cancer" on
WYKE TVat 7:30p.m.
Tuesday and at 10 a.m.
Thursday. Ifyou have any
suggestions for topics, or have
any questions, contact him at
522 N. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461, or email
cjbennett@rboi. com.


KUMAR
Continued from Page C1

vary the urine concentra-
tion from 1.005 to 1.030.
When patients with his-
tory of kidney stones, who
have been instructed to
drink plenty of fluids, have
the maximum concen-
trated urine specific grav-
ity of 1.030 repeatedly, it is
obvious they are not fol-
lowing our advice, despite
their protests to the
contrary!



GROUPS
Continued from Page C4

Brooksville: Lykes Me-
morial County Library, 238
Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first
Friday monthly. Call Jerry
Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Brooksville: Oak Hill
Hospital Senior Partners,
11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m.
first Thursday monthly. Call
Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537.
Spring Hill: The Resi-
dence at Timber Pines, 3140
Forest Road; 2 p.m. third
Monday monthly. Call Diane
Koenig at 352-683-9009 or
The Residence at 352-683-
9009. Free respite care pro-
vided, call to reserve.
First United Methodist
Church of Homosassa has
several support groups that
run on a monthly basis. All
groups are open to the public
and free of charge, and meet
at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the
Administration Building:
First Monday: diabetic
support group.
Second Monday:
Alzheimer's/dementia care-
givers support group.
Fourth Monday: stroke
survivors support group.
Memory Lane Respite of-
fered weekly for people with
Alzheimer's/dementia. Any-
one bringing a loved one for
the first time is encouraged to
come early to fill out informa-
tion forms. Call 352-628-4083
for meeting dates.
Citrus Memorial Health
System is a 198-bed, not-for-
profit community hospital that
provides health care services
to residents of Citrus County
and surrounding communi-


The pH of the urine is an
estimation of the acidity of
the urine. In patients with
uric acid stones, we may
prescribe a medication to
make the urine alkaline to
reduce risk of stones. Some
medications work better in
alkaline or acidic environ-
ment, and agents to alter
the pH of the urine are oc-
casionally necessary
Leucocyte esterase indi-
cates the presence of
white blood cells in the
urine and suggests infec-
tion or inflammation in the
urinary tract. Bacteria


ties. Support group meetings
are in the CMHS Administra-
tion Building unless indicated.
ACS Man to Man
Prostate Support and Educa-
tion Program, 11:30 a.m. the
second Wednesday monthly.
Meetings are in the confer-
ence room at the Robert Bois-
soneault Oncology Institute at
522 N. Lecanto Highway in
the Allen Ridge Medical Mall.
Call 352-527-0106.
0 AHEC Quit Smoking
Group: 3 p.m. Tuesday at
Robert Boissoneault Oncol-
ogy Institute, Allen Ridge
Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-
929-1000, ext. 213.
Breast Cancer Support
Group: 11:30 a.m. the second
Friday, Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Call Judy
Bonard at 352-527-4389.
Citrus Cancer Support:
4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday,
cafeteria meeting room. Call
Carol at 352-726-1551, ext.
6596 or ext. 3329.
Cancer Support: at Can-
cer Treatment Center. Call
Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for
date and time.
Diabetes Support Group:
Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at
352-341-6110 for details.
Head and Neck Cancer
Support: Robert Boissoneault
Cancer Institute. Contact
Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106.
Heart-Healthy Eating
Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. sec-
ond Wednesday every other
month, CMHS Medical Office
Building. Call 352-560-6266
or 352-344-6538 to register.
Look Good Feel Better
Group: monthly at Robert
Boissoneault Oncology Insti-
tute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall,
522 N. Lecanto Highway,


causing urinary infection
have an enzyme that con-
verts nitrates to nitrites. A
positive nitrite on the dip-
stick test along with the
leucocyte esterase test is
usually adequate to diag-
nose a urinary infection
and start empiric treat-
ment. Additionally, a cul-
ture and sensitivity test is
needed to identify the cul-
prit organism.
Protein is usually not
found in the urine, and sig-
nificant quantities may in-
dicate kidney disease.
Diabetes, high blood pres-


Lecanto, sponsored by the
American Cancer Society, the
Cosmetology Association and
the Personal Care Products
Council. A licensed cosmetol-
ogist is present to advise
women about many issues.
For dates, times, more infor-
mation or to register, call the
American Cancer Society at
800-395-5665.
Mended Hearts Support
Group: 10 a.m. second Fri-
day, Gulf Room at CMHS His-
toric Building. Call
Cardiovascular Services at
352-344-6416.
Ostomy Support: 2 p.m.
third Sunday, Cypress Room
at CMHS Historic Building.
Call Steve Spielman at 352-
229-4202, Sue Penner at 352-
560-7918, Sharon Brummer
at 352-382-4446 or Betty or
Mel Shipley at 352-341-0005.
Stroke Support Group of
Citrus County: 3 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, CMHS
Annex Building conference
room, State Road 44 across
from Walgreens. Call 352-
344-6596 or 352-344-1646.
Hospice of Citrus
County support groups and
workshops. Call 866-642-
0962 or 352-527-2348.
Grief workshops:
0 1 p.m. Thursday Hos-
pice of Citrus County Clinical
Office, 326. S. Line Ave.,
Inverness.
2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednes-
day Newly Bereaved Grief
Workshop, Wings Education
Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Homosassa.
Grief support groups:
11 a.m. Tuesday-- Our
Lady of Grace Catholic
Church Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
0 9 a.m. Wednesday -


sure and other disorders
may cause the kidney to
leak protein in the urine,
and its presence alerts the
physician to the possible
need to investigate the kid-
ney further.
Blood in the urine can
be caused by urinary
stones, infection or tumors
in the kidney or bladder.
Trauma, strenuous exer-
cise or some benign condi-
tions can also cause blood
in the urine and usually a
CT scan of the kidneys and
cystoscopic bladder exam-
ination is ordered by your


Grief's Journey ... A Walking
Group, Whispering Pines
Park (Parking Area E).
10 a.m. Thursday-
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
2 p.m. second Thursday
- Hospice of the Nature
Coast Levy Office, 24-B
County Road 40 E., Inglis.
10:30 a.m. Saturday-
First United Methodist
Church, 831 Bradshaw St.,
Homosassa.
Evening support groups
(for working people):
6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,
newly bereaved Hospice of
Citrus County Clinical Office,
326 Line Ave., Inverness.
Social support:
10 a.m. Tuesday-
Frank's Family Restaurant,
2780 N. Florida Ave.,
Hernando.
1 p.m. first Thursday -
Mulligan's Grill (formerly
Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell
Bryant Highway (C.R. 486),
Hernando.
11:30 a.m. third Tuesday
- LIFT luncheon
(widows/widowers), Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club; call
352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for
reservations.
Wings education series:
"4th Tuesdays @ 2" -
Wings Education Center,
8471 W. Periwinkle Lane,
Homosassa.
Teen Encounter and
Camp Good Hope Camps
for grieving children/teens of-
fered in April and October.
Suicide Survivors Sup-
port Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Monday at the Hospice of
Citrus County Hospice
House, 3350 W. Audubon
Park Path, Lecanto. The


urologist to rule out signif-
icant pathology. The pres-
ence of visible blood
carries a higher risk than
microscopic blood.
The urine carries away
many waste materials,
minerals and excess fluid
from the blood keeping the
inner milieu of the body
amazingly constant de-
spite our incessant at-
tempts to change it!
As Baroness Karen won-
dered, "what is man, when
you come to think upon
him, but a minutely set, in-
genious machine for turn-


group is free and open to the
public. Participants need not
be hospice families. For infor-
mation, call Lynn Miller at
352-527-2020.
HPH Hospice, in part-
nership with the Alzheimer's
Association Florida Gulf
Coast Chapter, offers Care-
givers Support Groups for
caregivers of dementia or
Alzheimer's patients to pro-
vide information, education
and emotional support in a
safe, comforting and confi-
dential environment.
There is no charge, and
everyone is welcome to join.
Call Sue Piatek at 352-527-
4600 with questions.
First Tuesday, 11 a.m.,
Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S.
U.S. 41, Inverness.
Second Monday, 1 p.m.,
First United Methodist Church
of Homosassa, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. Free
respite care provided, call to
reserve.
Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m.,
Emeritus at Barrington Place,
2341 W. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486 east
of C.R. 491), Lecanto. Free
respite care provided, call to
reserve.
Weekly ongoing Be-
reavement Group from HPH
Hospice and St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
available to anyone who has
experienced the loss of a
loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Thursday at St. Timothy's
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S.
19), Crystal River. There is no
cost to attend. Call Paul Win-
stead at 352-527-4600.
SPRING HILL Oak
Hill Hospital H2U Partner's
Club support groups meet on


ing, with infinite artful-
ness, the red wine of Shi-
raz into urine?"


Udaya Kumar M.D.,
FRCS Urol, Dip. Urol
(London), is certified by
the American Board of
Urology and the Board of
Urology of U.K and
Ireland. He is a former
professor of urology with
University ofArkansas for
Medical Sciences. Contact
him at 3475 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Homosassa, FL
34448 or 352-628-7671.


the campus of Oak Hill Hospi-
tal, 11375 Cortez Blvd.,
Spring Hill.
Diabetes Support Group
- 10 am. second Monday
monthly, with Kim Palmer.
Multiple Myeloma Sup-
port Group 5:30 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, Diane
Terry, facilitator.
Kidney Education Sup-
port Group 2 p.m. third
Wednesday monthly, Mary
Jane Talty, facilitator.
ALS Support Group -
2 p.m. the third Thursday
monthly. with Katie Mitchell.
Epilepsy Support Group
- 3 p.m. fourth Saturday
monthly, with Lillian Rojas.
Leukemia and Lym-
phoma Society Support
Group 6 p.m. fourth
Wednesday monthly, Lordes
Arvelo, facilitator.
Crohn's Disease Support
Group 6 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del
Pilar, facilitator.
H2U Partner's Club events
and activities are open to
members only. Membership is
open to Hernando, Pasco,
and Citrus County residents
for $20 a year. Some 300
physicians, 950 associates
and more than 350 volunteers
comprise Oak Hill's team.


MASTERPIECE
m DEN TAL STUDIO
The art of optimum-quality dentistry.

Always
Welcoming
wPatients
FRANK J. VASCM I I l .
4805 S. Suncoast i v
Homosassa, FL 31 1 .1
S352-628-00112 -
*I. m *


HEALTH & LIFE


TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2013 C5







C Page C6 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013

OM McUNITY


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES Pamn nalakfa naNews NOTES


Squadron plans VVIII VUV I UH W
dnon toui,


arE u pan ty
The Crystal River Power
and Sail Squadron will host
a light lunch and a Military
Card Party Wednesday,
April 17, at the clubhouse,
845 N.E. Third Ave. in
Crystal River.
Doors open at
11:30 a.m.; lunch will begin
at noon and play will start
at 1 p.m. It is helpful to
make reservations for ta-
bles of four, but fewer are
OK and the squadron can
sometimes fill in.
Tickets are $12 per per-
son and can be purchased
by calling Jennie at 352-
382-0808. Proceeds will
benefit the CRPS to con-
tinue its efforts to promote
safe boating and education
in the community.
Sugar Babes
to get together
In lieu of the regular
monthly meeting of the
Central Florida Sugar
Babes Doll Club, members
will have the annual birth-
day luncheon at 11 a.m.
Wednesday, March 27, at
Skyview Restaurant in
Terra Vista.
This month is the quar-
terly raffle. All interested
persons are welcome.
Sugar Babes Doll Club is a
member of the United Fed-
eration of Doll Clubs.
For more information,
call Laurie at 352-382-2299
or Barbara at 352-
344-1423.
All welcome at
pet loss session
Hospice of Citrus County
Wings Community Educa-
tion will present a Pet Loss
Workshop at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, March 27, at
the Wings Education Cen-
ter, 8471 W. Periwinkle
Lane, Suite A, Homosassa.
The workshop will be
beneficial for those who
have lost an animal and
want to learn strategies to
help heal the grief. Lucia
Hartman, Wings grief serv-
ices specialist, will moder-
ate the presentation. The
workshop is free and reser-
vations are suggested.
To RSVP or for more
information, call Lynn Miller
at 352-621-1500.


Precious Paws
ADOPTABLE


Participants sought for Citrus County Art Center activities


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Art Center will
offer "A Celebration of Dance" con-
cert in conjunction with National
Dance Week, April 26 to May 5.
"A Celebration of Dance" will be
just a part of several NDW activities
designed to bring mainstream expo-
sure to dance, as well as encourage
people to get active and live a less
sedentary lifestyle.
Other major events include a
countrywide flash mob being held
on April 27.


"We are so proud that the Citrus
County Art Center has put so much
time and effort organizing this con-
cert showcasing dancers across Cit-
rus County," said Cathy Graziano,
co-director of National Dance Week.
"It is so much in the spirit of what
we are trying to accomplish during
dance week, as we work getting
dancers together with the commu-
nity to promote health awareness
and the fun of getting your body
moving."
"This concert is so exciting, as it
will celebrate dancing, artistic ex-


pression, a means of fun fitness and,
for some, a spiritual expression,"
said Shalyn Barker, event organizer
and volunteer. "We will celebrate
dance as an art form that is good for
the body, mind and soul."
The Citrus County Art Center is
seeking performance pieces for the
concert of all different genres from
ballet, ballroom, tap, hip hop, folk,
Indian, modern, Irish and more.
Groups that would like to partici-
pate may call the Citrus County Art
Center at 352-746-7606, or email
Barker at shalyn@vsdance.com.


All MOPAR Car Show


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus MOPARS Car Club (members who helped pictured here) had its fourth annual All MOPAR Car Show on
Saturday, March 16, at Crystal Chrysler Dodge in Inverness. The weather was beautiful and the cars and trucks
looked great, with 40 awards being presented. The club thanks all those who attended the show and, in particular,
the Nature Coast Mustang Club members who helped with the judging.




Update driving skills with AARP


Special to the Chronicle

Florida is a mandated state and
any insurance company doing busi-
ness in Florida must give a discount
to those completing an AARP Safe
Driving Course, open to all age 50
and older Update to earn a discount
and learn about newly enacted
motor vehicle and traffic laws.
Course fee is $12 for AARP mem-
bers; $14 for all others.
Call the listed instructor to
register:


Crystal River, Homosassa
March 25 and 26, 9 a.m. to noon,
Seventh-day Adventist Church, 5863
W Cardinal St., Homosassa. Call
Arty Appelbaum at 352-382-3272.
March 26 and 27, 9 a.m. to noon,
First United Methodist Church, 8831
W Bradshaw Blvd., Homosassa. Call
Frank Tobin at 352-628-3229.
April 8 and 9, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m.,
Seven Rivers Hospital Annex. Call
Hedda Smith at 352-527-8144.
April 23 and 24, 9 a.m. to noon,
St. Benedict Church Parish Hall, 455


S Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River Call
Pat Hubbell at 352-586-2731.
Inverness, Hernando, Floral City
April 16 and 17, 9 a.m. to noon,
Inverness Elks Lodge, 3580 Lemon
St. Hernando, Call Bob Dicker at
352-527-2366.
Beverly Hills, Lecanto,
Citrus Hills, Citrus Springs
April 8 and 10, 8:15 to 11:15 a.m.
Citrus County Resource Center, 2804
W Mark Knighton Court, Lecanto,
same building as VA clinic. Call
Theresa Williams at 352-746-9497.


Midge


Learning about grace at Women's Event


Special to the Chronicle
Midge is a Chihuahua/
dachshund mix, not yet 1
year old. She weighs 10
pounds and is learning to
walk on a leash but there
is so much else to see
and do she gets dis-
tracted. She gets along
with other dogs, is very
playful and will escape if
given the opportunity.
She needs a fenced yard
and a steady hand with
training and obedience.
She will make a great
family pet. Cats are OK,
but if they run, she thinks
it is play time. The Pre-
cious Paws Adoption
Center in the Crystal
River Mall adoption cen-
ter is open noon to 4 p.m.
Thursday through Sun-
day. The adoption center
will be closed for the
Easter weekend -
Thursday, March 23,
through Sunday, March
31. View pets at
www.preciouspaws
florida.com or call 352-
726-4700.


It was an elegant and festive
evening in Victory Hall at the
First Baptist Church in Crystal
River as Shandry Hembree and her
team of volunteers spread out the
welcome mat to one and all for their
annual Women's Event.
"Reflections of a Lovely Lady,
Chosen By Grace" featured Eva
Kroon Pike, who shared
in narrative and song,
her own compositions,
accompanying herself on
guitar and ukulele.
Adopted at a few
weeks old, the tapestry of
her life unfolded, and we
identified with her sto-
ries intently An advocate
for adoption, Pike part-
ners with the Florida Ruth ]
Baptist Children's Home, AROUI
a Christ-centered organi-
zation that provides serv- COMM
ices for abused,
neglected and orphaned children
and promotes adoption and other
related ministries for the children
and families.
One song at a time, one story at a
time, we were enthralled with her
life story A poignant video, "Grace
That Chose Me," was shown at this
year's Baptist Convention.
Having given her first solo at age
3, Pike has always had a passion for
music from contemporary to
country and Southern gospel.
She has appeared in concert halls
and festivals around the nation, and
was honored to perform for Ruth


I
K


Graham.
An avid writer, she journals her
thoughts and prayers which evolve
into her songs. Alternating with gui-
tar and ukulele, her songs revealed
her deep and abiding faith. One,
"Perfectly Imperfect," said it all.
Her music ministry began when
she was 16 with a Southern gospel
group. She credits her
Nashville producer with
the encouragement
needed to begin compos-
ing songs about her adop-
tion to affirm just how
special adopted children
are to have been "chosen"
by grace.
Joining with Pike in the
singing of "Amazing
evins Grace," was a memorable
D THE highlight of this most spe-
cial evening, bonding us
UNITY as women of faith.
Pike cautioned us that
even though distractions surround
us, we can stay focused as she sang
"Take Me to the Holy Ground." With
"Let Me Shine," it was all about our
charge to share love for a perfect
design.
Her song, "Forgettable," was in-
spired when her parents miracu-
lously survived an accident on the
way to Nashville, with Pike telling
us that everything is forgettable ex-
cept the miracles that occur, often
unnoticed, but felt from the heart.
Revealing she writes in order to
remain strong and at peace, her
newest album, "Not Listening," is


about giving time to help others,
about trying and hoping and waiting
in the hallway until the doors of op-
portunity are opened to us.
Her song, "It's all About Love,"
was about finding a way to the truth,
giving, helping, sharing.
"Thinking About Change" was
about changes that occur on our
life's journey: the joy, the pain, the
valleys, the mountains and the
things we cannot change.
The Sowing Seeds of Love group
from the church presented Pike a
lovely prayer blanket with each lit-
tle knot representing a prayer for
Pike as she continues her amazing
ministry
Laura Lou Tolle and Kathy Tolle
were recognized for a Kay Tolle Me-
morial gift of the banquet linens and
choir sashes.
Hembree, chairwoman of the
event, spoke passionately in appre-
ciation to her event team, which in-
cluded the Baptist men servers, and
donors of more than 40 door prizes,
many handmade, sharing the intent
of the opportunity to reach out to
women of all faiths with a beautiful
dinner, to share in loving fellowship
and encourage women to find a
church home.

Ruth Levins participates in a
variety of projects around the
community Let her know about
your group's upcoming activities by
writing to PO. Box 803,
Crystal River, FL 34423.


Village Ladies
postpone party
The Ladies of Crystal
River Village have post-
poned their Military Card
Party to benefit the Family
Resource Center of Crystal
River. It was originally
scheduled for Thursday,
March 28, at Crystal River
Woman's Club, 320 N.
CitrusAve., Crystal River.
The party has been post-
poned until May.
Call Barbara Atwood at
352-794-6681 or Caryl
Kershner at 352-795-5287
for information.
Take chances on
car for B&GC
The Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County car give-
away, the largest fundraiser
the clubs do each year, will
be May 25 at 1 p.m. at
Love Chevrolet, 2209 State
Road 44 W., Inverness.
Tickets are $25 and are
available from Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County
board members, Love
Chevrolet, Love Honda,
Ink-For-Less-Plus, Frugal
Frog, TD Banks, Cadence
Banks, Suncoast Plumbing
& Electric, Tally-Ho Vaca-
tions, Investors Choice Fi-
nancial Group, WYKE, CSI
Hair Salon, at club sites in
Inverness, Homosassa and
Beverly Hills, at www.citrus
bgc.com, and by calling
352-621-9225.
The winner of the draw-
ing will have a choice of a
2013 Chevy Malibu or a
2013 Equinox SUV or the
cash value of the vehicle.
Funds earned through the
car giveaway supplement
donations and grants that
keep the clubs open and
programs running. For
more information, call 352-
621-9225.
Woman's club
plans card party
The Crystal River
Woman's Club will host a
Military Card Party and
luncheon Thursday,
April 11, at the clubhouse,
320 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal
River.
Doors open at 11:30 a.m.
Lunch at 11:45 a.m. Tickets
are $12 and it is recom-
mended to make reserva-
tions for tables of four.
First, second and third
table winners receive
money. Two entry tickets
will be drawn for two free
tables to the next sched-
uled card party. Other
prizes will be awarded.
Proceeds from the event
help meet community
needs and sponsor schol-
arships for adult women.
Tickets may be pur-
chased by calling Lois at
352-382-0777.
Green to speak at
town hall session
Property Appraiser Geoff
Greene will be guest
speaker at the first in a se-
ries of town hall meetings
at the Central Ridge Com-
munity Center, sponsored
by the Beverly Hills Civic
Association.
The meeting will be at
7 p.m. Thursday, March 28,
and will last about an hour.
Complimentary coffee and
cookies will be served.
The meeting is free and
open to all.
For more information,
call Bonnie Larsen at 352-
746-2657, from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m.
Get goodies, help
Relay effort
Inverness Relay For Life
Team Breast Friends in-
vites the public to come get
Easter goodies and help
raise funds to find a cure
for cancer.
The team will have a
bake sale from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, March 30,
at Red's Restaurant, State
Road 200 in Hernando.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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West
A J 9 3
V 9 7 5 2
*63
4 K Q J 4


South
2* J
2 I
7


North 03-26-13
* KQ 74
S6
* J 10 9 5 4 2
L 8 5
East
4 10
V J 10 8 3
K 8 7
10 9 6 3 2
South
4 A8 6 5 2
V AK Q 4
+ AQ
d A 7


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
West North
Pass 2 *
Pass 6 6
Pass Pass


East
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: 4 K


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Surrealist painter Salvador Dali said, "At the
age of 6, I wanted to be a cook. At 7, I wanted to
be Napoleon. And my ambition has been grow-
ing steadily ever since."
If your partner's ambition in the bidding car-
ries you to heights that your cards do not justify,
try to find a line of play that will justify his
optimism.
In today's deal, for example, suppose North
and South soar to seven spades. West leads the
club king. What should South do?
The first three bids in the auction are pre-
dictable (unless you have some snazzy responses
to a strong, artificial and forcing two-club open-
ing bid). Then, though, North's actual choice of
six spades would not meet with universal
approval.
A jump to four hearts would be popular if it
were read as a splinter bid, showing some val-
ues, four-plus spades and at most a singleton
heart. When North jumped to the small slam,
though, South read his partner for strong
trumps, so thought his four aces justified rais-
ing to the grand slam.
Declarer has to assume the diamond finesse
is winning. But he still needs to be careful with
his entries. South should win with his club ace,
cash two hearts to discard dummy's club loser
(and to reduce the undertricks should things
take a nasty turn), play off the spade ace, and
lead a spade to dummy's queen.
He continues with a diamond to his queen,
the diamond ace, a spade to dummy's king, and
a diamond ruff. Then he can claim because
dummy is high, stating that he will ruff a heart
or a club to get over there.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LIGNF

,1- T.. I. Serwces, Inc

OGGIN



WYTTEN'



DYLLOB
7" I ^ ^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
I've decided to expand
our factory since my
designs have taken off.



\boss

..0



-
I -


THF OWNER OF THE
TOUPFF COMPANY
WAS A ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here: I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: ALIAS NOVEL HARDLY BEHAVE
I Answer: The newscaster used makeup to cover his -
HEAD LINES


ACROSS
1 Auto safety
feature
4 Nursery word
8 Actor
Sharif
12 Tear
13 Could hear
- drop
14 Mall event
15 Lime cooler
16 Stonehenge
builder
17 Discharged
18 Pekoe packet
20 Munro's pen
name
22 Distort data
23 Boat runway
25 Casual wear
(hyph.)
29 Suffix for
"forfeit"
31 Bear
constellation
34 Just as I
thought!
35 Slangy
summons


Herr's abode
Resinous
substance
Snakes
Little
swallow
Most senior
Bookish
type
Turn sharply
Was sorry
about
The jitters
Wading bird
Object of
adoration
Fiber-rich
grain
Boil or
broil
Cafe au -
Eur. airline
- d'oeuvres
Ancient harp
Paramedic


DOWN
1 "I smell -"


Answer to Previous Puzzle


BEADR D V E| R B
BELA EOE ELEE
BLAH INCENSED
SILENT PEAKS

RADAR FIERCIE
EWES MAGS USE
SOL WINS REITE
LIEKOING CELDRAR
ELI RAP
TONED LEMONY
SHALEOI L REAM
AIDE MRI TATLE
ROAD SET ST | EM


2 Waits
patiently
3 Command
to Fido
4 Colorful
parrots


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Takedown -
A thousand
G's
Hill builders
Port near
Kyoto
Upper limits
Tavern fare
Blushing
Sweater
letters
Easel display
Hold up
Corridor
- no idea!
Marathon
USN officer
Cousins of
"um"
Sprinkle
Better
Supply the
banquet
Kind of poem
Lithe
Crisp breads
Call to mind
Kingdom
Pickle choice
Roulette color
Bill, briefly
I, to Fritz
Halloween
greeting
Bad hair -


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: When I
married three years
ago, my hubby and I
were best friends. Then his
mother moved to town, and
everything went downhill.
My in-laws disrespected and
trashed my rental
home. I was hurt
that they would do
this, because I was P-
extremely nice and
financially gener-
ous to them. Ever
since, she has been
working to turn
everyone against
me, including my
husband.
If he doesn't do
what she wants, she
makes him feel ANN
guilty. She has put MAIL
so many nasty ideas
into his head that
he has turned into a different
person.
It's not only her. His entire
family is selfish, uneducated
and manipulative, and they
have a very "macho" mental-
ity I don't much care for this
new version of the man I
married.
Do I give him time and hope
he changes back? Or is this
simply who he was all along
and I was wrong about him? -
Beth in Baltimore
Dear Beth: We think this is
the version of your husband
that is most familiar to him.
When he is around his family,
he reverts to type.
It doesn't mean he can't be-
have differently if he is moti-
vated enough, but he has to
recognize the family dynamic
and assert himself. It may re-
quire spending less time
around his relatives, and he
may be unwilling to do that.
The real question is


whether he likes being the guy
he is now or wants to be the
man you married. Talk to him
about it, and if necessary, get
counseling.
DearAnnie: When company
comes and snacks are put out,
I always include a
small spoon so that
treats like candy
and nuts can be re-
moved without a
person touching the
entire contents. But
many guests don't
get the point.
One person came
in saying he had
been suffering from
the flu and was still
feeling under the
IE'S weather, so we
.BOX should keep our
distance. He then
proceeded to pick
through the nut bowl, even
though there was a ladle in it I
threw the rest of the nuts in the
trash and hoped other guests
hadn't been contaminated.
Please remind people that
their hands don't belong in a
shared bowl unless they've
just scrubbed for surgery
Thanks. Staying Healthy
Dear Healthy: Many people,
sick or well, don't consider
that sticking their fingers into
a shared bowl of snacks can
transmit the germs on their
hands to the next person. (So
can a frequently handled serv-
ing piece.)
You can ask your guests to
please use the serving pieces
because it's cold and flu sea-
son, etc., but some folks will
pay no attention. Another op-
tion is to serve snacks that do
not require that your guests
reach into the same
receptacle.
Dear Annie: I started to cry


when I read the letter from
"Heartbroken in New York,"
whose husband drank. I made
the choice to end my marriage
of 21 years because I could no
longer take the Jekyll and
Hyde man I was married to.
Nothing I did was "right." I
was "boring and unsponta-
neous." The truth was, I was
being sensible. He would
drink, decide I was dull and
then leave to go to a bar. Many
of our fights were because I
hid the car keys from him.
Eventually, he stopped coming
home and went directly to the
bar
I finally asked him to leave
and not return unless he
agreed to counseling. It was
then he admitted he is gay
I was relieved. I thought he
would be happier now he was
being honest. But he is the
same mean jerk to his partner,
and he is still drinking.
I now wish I had left him
years before. I did an injustice
to my kids by exposing them to
his verbal abuse for so long.
It's better to be alone than to
have someone who treats you
like this. The Grass Is
Greener


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Email
your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737
Third St., Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. To find out more
aboutAnnie's Mailbox and
read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers
and cartoonists, visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www creators. com.


3-26


ENTERTAINMENT


TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2013 C7


41






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


C8 TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 2013

Peanuts


Pickles

EARL, TWAT PLAGIC. \
BAG IAS 6EEK STiCK
UP lM114I TREE FOR
OVER A YEAR --









Sally Forth


I HAVE IT ALL
F[6URED OUT..


ALL I NEED 16 ONE
HIT, AND I CAN RAlSE
AW LIFETIME BATTING
AVERAGE TO .001 !









I MeAlM SOME1>M&,
AT -rAQOESi T tr-
VOLv/E CROPPI G
VOWiM TgeE E; EE



j--
7 lq !


For Better or For Worse


I'M uST GoiNG6-To

L OMIN -m "







Beetle Bailey

Beetle Bailey


WHY DON'T YOU I CAN'T
JUST BITE THE EARS O THAT.
OFF IT NOW BEFORE
YOUR MOM EVEN HAS
A CHANCE?

C A T^
/^ '


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


I DON'T FEEL GOOD
ABOUT THIS, BUT
IT'5 THE ONLY WAY
TO GET YOU REPLACED
UNDER WARRANTY.


, ;. \- / ,nno-
F 1 .*Tz


The Born Loser


"IFOR I GRADUATE T\AFFUE! 2AE 7TWS-O1'i SPEN\IMG TRE F RST
6RUEK, | TWSR\ R OU CSEM AA TWO WEEK50FPJURE N TRE-
WJ | ^-^=__-/<,V-CADOR hi^BAW. ^-


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
NO PERSONAL MAIL AGAINST IVE GOT AN IDEA! I'LL WRITE A IT'S 50 GREAT TO E IN TOUC-
LETTER TO YOU, AND YOU WITH SOMESOY AGAIN! >-
I--S L _"' *- ff-, 1 1WRITE 8ACK TO ME' o u-. .
' "'5 ALL M A A - .SAID
T ESE 'I' 1 '- ,' W |I

OON'T*'..' i I
GET AN* I ."..., -
LETTERS .--- -, '- "



Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


SSO THAT' W/lHERE
I'., START MY HEN IF6,
THE WAY HENRY PEUTSCH-
ENPORF PIP [/HEN HE
MOY.P TO CO.ORAO...










I WANT A LIME ONE.
BUT HOW DO Y KNoW
IF THIS GREEN ONE
IS LIME ? IT MIGHT
BE SOUR APPLE, AND
HATE SOUR APPLE !
SMELL
IT AND q4
SEE. -,F


... AP
CHANA6P
HIS NAME
TO JOHN
PEWYWR!
(^


*YOu I GUY OUGHT THE 'SUPER SOAKER'FOR ME.
PIP YOU SERIOUSLY THINK I WOULPNT USE IT?"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"G.I. Joe: Retaliation" (PG-13) In 3D. 7 p.m.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50 p.m.
No passes.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 12:25 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 3:30 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
12:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 7:20 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"G.I. Joe: Retaliation" (PG-13) In 3D. 7 p.m.


"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 1:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
No passes.
"The Croods" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Admission" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m.
"The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13) 2
p.m., 5 p.m., 8p.m.
"The Call" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
4:10 p.m. No passes.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 9 slenba n


"DSGED HZG UY KISPZG WSIDYD,


KZXFGE HWZIEYT FTYZD ZGT


DGYZXFGE OZDK KWY YES'D


TYCYGDYD ZGT FGKS KWY SOYG


LFGT." PSWG LZMYI

Previous Solution: "Enthusiasm is nothing: It comes and goes. But if one be-
lieves, then miracles occur." Henry Miller
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-26


Garfield


THIS SFRETTV N/ice! I
RveN'T BFN IN IF
LUKBRAV SI&CE I WS
IN UNIvERSlTV y




^ Iir46


I'D LIKE TO BEA PART I'VEGOT
OFYOURTEAMAND JUSTTHE
SERVEA VITAL FUNCTION / JOB FOR


NOW, NEXT !THI 5IN'T
WEEK..4 EXACTLY
WHAT HAP
IiN MINP
C.ELP


Doonesbury


Big Nate


SNIFFASNIFFASNIFFA
S41FFA-SNUFFA SNUFFA
SNUFF SNUFF NO.RT
SNIFFA SNIFFASNIFFA
SNUFFA SNUFF SNIFF


Arlo and Janis


COMICS








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE DECLASSIFIED


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


L.^ ^ FB(2 5S6Tl l Fr8 8 2 3 0 E .ail:^ r *B *I w w cr onclo lie~o71 8 *5 .
r^^^B^3^^*;nr^^zn^^i^ ^EyM^ iu~j1 *-*1-C-^0


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748



(2) Kindle Keyboard
E readers with leather
covers, excellent
condition. Both for $100
Tel. 352 382-2591
3 pc. Brown Wicker
Bdrm Set, very good.
cond. $350. Ashley
Beige Leather
rocker/recliner $250
352-586-6125
21 CUBIC FT UPRIGHT
FROST FREE
FREEZER Kenmore
Elite. Excellent condi-
tion. Glass shelves.
$300 (352) 697-0301
APACHE
'04, Slide in Truck
Camper, Clean,
excel. cond. $6,200
(352) 637-0306







Ash
A female tortoise shell
8 month old kitten, spayed,
up to date on shots,
friendly & lovable ready &
looking for a home to call
her own, call SaingAngels
352-419-0223or see us at
www.savinganglespetres-
cue.com
Bass Tracker
17' flatbottom, alum.V
nose, w/galvanized trlr,
$950. Will take guns
trade 906-285-1696
Buick
2005 Century, 4dr
96k ml, pwr window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd, asking $4900.
352-422-3198
CHEVROLET
'03, Malibu, V6, 36K,
excellent shape
$6,500
(352) 637-0306
CRYSLER
'99, Seabring Cony.
45k miles, garage
kept, great cond.
leather seats $3,500
(352) 746-0940
FORD
07 Taurus SE
79k mi, power window,
Ick, cruise control,
am/fm/cd 1 owner, exc.
cond.$5500.
352-302-9217
FORD
1978 F150, Shrt. Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598
INVERNESS
Furn Rm, priv full bath,
incls cable/wifi, access
kit & W/D. $400, +1mo
dep.(352) 613-1123
KAWASAKI
2012, Vulcan 900
Classic, full dress, 1,300
mi. like new, $7,250
(352) 341-2149


Your World







CHRON CLE


Leather Sectional
Sofa, with 1 reclining
end w/ chaise on
other end, pullout full
size sleeper, matching
recliner, brown
Paid $2,500 Sell $1,100
(352) 637-0844
POOL TABLE/ UP-
RIGHT FREEZER
Pool table great condi-
tion 88" /50" asking
350.00.Upright freezer
67"/33"works good
asking $150.00.
352-422-6231 after 5pm
Table Saw 10",
3hsp, Craftsman
w/legs, new in box
$100 352-563-2155
TOYOTA
'08, Camary LE, auto
trans, 65,200 mi., gold
color, excel. cond.
$12,500. 352-527-2729
Uberti 1858 Target
Carbine, color case
frame, Walnut stock,
exc. cond. 45 long colt
$400 352-441-0645



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



FREE
10 acres of
pine needles,
(352) 746-7775



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black & White
Shihtzu, 9 yr old male
lost at South Rockpoint,
Floral City
pis call 269-366-7429
Large Black Cat
23 lbs, green eyes,
extra toes, Name is
Big Foot. Village Drive
Homosassa Area
REWARD.
(352)503-9063
Lost Young Orange
Cat, male
name Punky
Beverly Hills
Della & Washington St.
(352) 746-4132



Found
Chain Saw
off Citrus Ave.
(845) 986-7575
TOPEAK PANORAM
Found in Inverness.
352-208-5959



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




TEACHER
Fulltime/Part time,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222


If You and Your
Clientele Need
a New Salon
BOOTH RENTAL
Available
TOWN & COUNTRY
(352) 795-6972











Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On y%$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





Avante
At Inverness
Currently seeking
F/T Dietary Aid
Please apply online
at
Avantecenters.com

NURSE
PRACTITIONER

Needed for busy
medical practice.
Competitive salary
& benefits. F/T or P/T
Please Call:
(352) 746-1515or
Fax Resume To:
(352) 270-8889

P/T, DIETARY
AIDE
Looking for:
Responsible
Individual with
flexible hours.
Apply in Person:
700 SE 8th Ave
Crystal River, 34429
DFWP, EOE

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
APPLY IN PERSON
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, FI34461
EOE/SF/DF




Eckerd -
Floral City

Please see our full
listing of open
positions at
www.eckerd.ora


S udoku **AA*r 4puz.com


47 1 _8 26


8 7 2 9


6 4


53 21


6 5


48 67


2 5


3 9 6 2


52 3 7 94

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andl
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


Allofour
dW4ed 4& structures

Installations by Brian CBC 1253853 win

352-628-7519



Permit And I-
I Engineering Fees I '
Up to $200 value I

* Siding* Soffit *Fascia* Skirting Roofovers Carports* Screen Rooms *Decks *Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


BARTENDERS
SERVERS
KITCHEN STAFF
Exp. preferred but
will train motivated
people
Apply In Person Only
Mon-Fri. 8am-11am
& 2pm-4pm
COACH'S PUB
& EATERY
114 W. Maln Street
Inverness



Sae -H- el


do you possess...
...A DYNAMIC
PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
....SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS
Seeking an
INSIDE
SALES REP
to help service
existing accounts
and prospect forI
new. Full Time with
Comprehensive
Benefits Package
Base Salary plus
Commission I
APPLY TODAY:
dikamlot@chronicl
eonline.com


CHRpNidE
Drug Screen
Required for Final
Applicant EOE


Lic. Real Estate
Salesperson
needed
Call Skip Craven
352-464-1515






CAPTAIN
25Ton & Up Only

Manatee Tours, in
water guide a must.
Apply
River Ventures at
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-12:30PM


CARPENTERS
NEEDED

With 10 years experi-
ence in commercial
framing, We are NOT
looking for Supervi-
sors. Must be knowl-
edgeable in metal &
wood applications,
truss setting, and roof
sheathing. Also need
to be able to get on
roof, and be familiar
with safety harness,
and fall protection,
also a plus to be
versed in hardie sid-
ings and trim. Need
to be quality oriented
with a positive atti-
tude. DFWP, tools,
and transportation re-
quired. Top pay.
Please come in and fill
out an application at
2531 NW 35th St.
Ocala, Fl. 34475
352-690-6334



MACHINIST
Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163


PLUMBERS
HELPER I
Must have driver's
license. Apply @ |
4079 S Ohio Ave.
Homosassa, FL
I 11111=1


Res. Service
Electricians

good driving record
& clean background
352-794-7368








RESIDENTIAL
ELECTRICIANS
Rough, Trim,
& Service
Full Benefits /EOE
APPLY AT:
Exceptional Electric
4070 CR 124A Unit 4
Wildwood

VIDEO
TECHNICIAN
will work w/audio tech
& must have
computer skills
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.

Wiring/Hitches
Tech
Immediate Position
available. Must be Exp.
well motivated, has
transportation, good
driving record. Refs req
352-302-7863 Iv msg





NEWSPAPER
B


CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


iCHiNiiE
L--- --- m

PIANO/
ACCOMPANIST

Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

C",oNicE


Do you possess...

IneSal Rp GREAT
A DYNAMIC CUSTOM
PERSONALITY? SERVICE
SKILLS?

STRONG
COMPUTER
SKILLS?


Inside Sales Rep FULL TIME
Service existing accounts and
prospect for new. Base salary plus
commission and a comprehensive
benefits package.

Customer Service Rep PART TIME
29-hr/wk provide superior customer
service to our subscribers, early
morning and weekend hours
required.

ApplyToday:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com
C I...A. .."M 0


wwwchronicleonline.com
Drug Screen Required for Final Applicant
EOE


SALON CHAIR
RENTALS, Avail.
352-697-2067



ORNATE FRAME
26.5"x 22.5", With nice
print titled spilt milk.
$25.00
Call 352-621-7586
Phonograph
1923 Free standing
Brunswick. Oak case,
20 records & needles.
Works like new. $650
(352) 746-2306

Coletbl


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



NICE GREEN MARBLE
SPA 5 seat / needs
motor frame repair linda
$100. 341-2271



DRYER $100 works
perfect. 30 day warranty
call/text 352-364-6504
RANGE
BIk flat top elec range,
w/ convection oven,
$325; LG BIk over the
range Microwave $125.
Both like new moving
(765) 748-4334
(352) 586-5166
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New, Excel-
lent Condition. Free
Delivery. 352 263-7398
WASHER$100 works
perfect. 30 day warranty
call/text 352-364-6504




DUDLEY'S






Auction
Estate Adventure
Auction
Thur 3-28
3pm outside
6pm inside
Several Estates
quality furniture, tools,
contents, 01'Caddy
SLS, 98' Merc Grand
Marquis 1 owner,
estate car.

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




5 HP ELECTRIC 30
GALLON UPRIGHT
AIR COMPRESSOR
ON WHEELS. NEARLY
NEW. ONLY 350.00
352 464 0316
8 GALLON AIR
COMPRESSOR
CAMPELL HAUSFIELD
WORKS OK ONLY
$75.00 464-0316
BAND SAW SMALL
BLACK& DECKER
DRILL POWERED
DRILL INCLUDED
ONLY $65.00 464-0316
BENCH GRINDER
ASHLAND 5"
industrial bench
grinder.3450rpm.
$35.00 352-527-7840
BOOK Modern Refriger-
ation and Air Condition-
ing excellent condition
$30.00 352-270-0630
LADDER RACK truck
ladder rack for full size
pickup truck
352-364-1771
ROUTER TABLE
STEEL LEGS FIBER-
GLASS TOP ONLY
$60.00 464-0316
SHOPSMITH
CLONE 5 tools in
table saw, lathe, drill
press, sander,$900.
12" Planner $250.
(352) 628-4265
Table Saw 10",
3hsp, Craftsman
w/legs, new in box
$100 352-563-2155
TOOLS Ryobi 18Volt 5
Tool Set $75.00 Call
352-637-7142


GARRARD DOUBLE
CASSETTE DECK $20
PLAYS AND REC-
ORDS 44E INVER-
NESS 419-5981
SHARP 32" TV WITH
REMOTE $25
352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529


-I,
KITCHEN SINK
with Moen faucet and
spray. $40.00
Call 352-613-4279



(2) Kindle Keyboard
E readers with leather
covers, excellent
condition. Both for $100
Tel. 352 382-2591
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



3 pc. Brown Wicker
Bdrm Set, very good.
cond. $350. Ashley
Beige Leather
rocker/recliner $250
352-586-6125
5pc Blonde Queen
Bedroom Set, like new,
includes boxspring &
mattress $450
352-628-5358 Iv msg
Antique School Desk
Beautiful shape
$125.
(386) 684-2466
Black Desk Chair
$20
82" Merlot color sofa
$50
(352) 382-1885
Classic King
Tempurpedic Bed
Like new w/ head-
board, mattress pad,
pillows & bed spread
$800 obo
(352) 489-0105
CLUB CHAIR full size..
very comfortable.good
cond.$25 352-220-4158
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
Couch & love seat
white, great condition
$300.
2 Bar stools Swivel,
white Padded $150
(352) 419-6880
Couch with 2 throw
pillows, 6ft plaid,
burgandy $175.
Rug 5 x 7 blue,
$25
(352) 637-6578
Dresser & Nightstand
$300, good cond.
352-522-0467

DUDLEY'S






Auction
Estate Adventure
Auction
Thur 3-28
3pm outside
6pm inside
Several Estates
quality furniture, tools,
contents, 01 'Caddy
SLS, 98' Merc Grand
Marquis 1 owner,
estate car.
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Entertainment
Center, Whitewashed
color will fit up 34" TV,
$50; Pine wood
wine rack $20
(352) 382-1885
FOUTON
Exc Cond. blue,
maroon and beige
colored. Call after
6pm$75 (352) 746-4901


S 19-
235694781
753469218
612873945
948521673
194285367
387946152
526317 6 894


Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET
In Original Plastic,
Never Used, Org
$3000, sacrifice $975.
CHERRY BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes
$895. Can Deliver. Bill
(813)298-0221.
Leather Sectional
Sofa, with 1 reclining
end, w/chaise on
other end, pullout full
size sleeper, matching
recliner, brown
Paid $2,500 Sell $1,100
(352) 637-0844
Maple Day Bed
with new trundle and
mattress's $300.
Call
(352) 465-4037
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500 *
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Quality Mattress Sets
Qn./Full.$199 both Pcs
Twin Matts. $89.95 All
New, Nice 621-4500
SOFA COUCH
3 pc sec w/ 2 recliners
& bed. Good Cond
$300; Qn Size Bed w/
mat/box spring, 2
night stands, dresser
$150 (352) 628-3411
Two Italian Gold Globe
Filigree Hanging
Lamps $75 ea.
352-522-0467



B&D 22"
Hedge Trim $25
527-8880
Cub Cadet 2011,50"
Commerical, 0 turn,
only 36 hrs, like new,
3 sets of blades, paid
$3000., sell only
$2200. firm
352-795-4275
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL MANUAL $20
352-613-0529
Toro Mower,
$175.
John Deere Edger
$20.
352-527-8880




INVERNESS
Moving Sale
Sat. April 30th
7:30am-?
Entire Workshop
tools(craftsman)Drill
press, 12" band saw,
belt sanders,grin,hand
tools & access, selling
all in one lot, will con-
sider individual, make
offer for lot. high bid
takes all
1215 S Fir Terr, Inv
352-201-4132




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat-Wed 9a 2pm.
5535 W Bunglow Ct



MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$20EA. 352-613-0529
MENS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30
$50EA. 352-613-0529


2 Large Crab Traps
$25. ea.
(906) 440-1010
4 FLORAL DISPLAY
VINTAGE CLEAR
GLASS FROG $15 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
27" Color TV $25,
Old Singer Sewing
machine Bench
& accessories $25.
Liquor Cabinet $30
352 344-1541
BARBIE
HOUSE/VAN/GUITAR
AND kids keyboard
$10.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
Bath Tub
60 x 42 fiberglass,
drop in unit
with fixtures,
$100. (352) 382-7074
BENCH GRINDER
ASHLAND 5" industrial
benchgrinder.34
50rpm.$35.00.
352-527-7840
BICYCLE 10" Girls
Beginning, Pink Purple,
good shape. All
accessories. $30.00
352-564-9311
BICYCLE BOYS 12"
SPIDERMAN WITH
TRAINING WHEELS
GOOD CONDITION
$30 352-613-0529
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
GERBIL CAGE
$20
352-613-0529
GPS TOMTOM VIA
Lifetime maps and traffic
5"screen $80.00
obo 352 794 3688
Kenmore Sewing
machine in cabinet
$50.00, 60" computer
desk with file drawers
352-382-4651
MULLET FISH NET- 7ft.
radius, 14ft. diameter,
great condition, $35
352-628-0033
NEW BATHTUB
5 feet / light tan
75.00 linda 341-2271
New Standing
Stainless Steel
Towel Rack $20
352-522-0467
PLAYHOUSE STEP 2
playhouse step 2
beige/green $75
352-364-1771
PLAYSTATION 2
GUITAR HERO 2 cd
and guitar $15.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
Radio Stereo System
w/ record player, $50.
Century Safe $150.
352-344-1541
Snap-On Tools
30 screw & nut drivers
sockets & wrenches
$140, Snap-On shop
vac, stainless steel, $60
315-466-2268
WALLPAPER $25
PREPASTED 3 DOU-
BLE ROLLS 165 SQ FT
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
352-419-5981



4 PRONG CANE
Adjustable $10.00
Crutches $8.00 Call
352-613-4279
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT & BRAKES
ONLY 75.00 464 0316


Home Finder
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


aF~I Your tDrwA HoWe
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 C9


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED







C1O TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013


4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET UP FROM
IT ONLY 20.00
464 0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON EACH ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
Handi-Cap Lg Wheel
Walker w/seat
$65, Handi-cap
Shower Chair, New
$50. 352-522-0467
LIFT CHAIR
By Best
New Condition
$450
(248) 770-7100
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS NEARLY NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316



Guitar Amplifier
Behreinger
UltracousticACX 1000,
2 channels. Handles 2
instruments & 1 mic.
$200 (352) 382-1875
KEY BOARD
Techniques, KN 920,
Like New, 114 different
rhythm, Call for Info
$400 (35 2) 465-2810
KEYBOARD Casio with
stand. Like New $99.00
One touch preset,
song memory. Call
352-613-4279



3 MINI MUFFIN TINS/4
SMALL BREAD PANS
$8 LARGE GREEN
MIXING BOWL $10
419-5981
4 KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS WITH LIDS $10
NEW IRIDESCENT
WHITE QUICHE DISH
$10 419-5981
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $150 OBO
Breville Juicer, exc
cond w/ extra's $20
(352) 746-3327
COFFEE MAKER &
ELECTRIC MIXER
15EA.352-613-0529
POOL TABLE/ UP-
RIGHT FREEZER
Pool table great condi-
tion 88" /50" asking
350.00.Upright freezer
67"/33"works good
asking $150.00.
352-422-6231 after 5pm



PRO FORM ELECTRIC
TREADMILL ALL OP-
TIONS INCLUDING
POWER INCLINE
NEARLY NEW 350.00
352 464 0316
Recumbent Bike
Nordic Track
$75.obo
(440) 812-5154



2 BRASS EAGLE .68
CALIBER co2 powered
paint ball guns $20.00
for both 352-794-3020
or 352-586-4987
3 WHEELED ELEC-
TRIC BICYCLE MIAMI
SUN WITH PALMER 12
VOLT MOTOR AND
REAR BASKET ONLY
285.00 464 0316


AEROMAX BIKE
WHEELS NEW. 7-10
speed Rim brake Vuelta
hubs Bladed spokes
$199 341-0450
BOWLING BALLS AND
CARRY BAGS,12# 3oz,
12# 3 oz, and 9#.
$20.00 each set.
352-341-3842
Club Car Golf Cart
'03, Charger, sides &
top cover', Garaged
$2,500 (352) 746-0940
CLUB CAR
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new
batteries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
King Cobra SS -1 Irons
and mallet putter.
4 PW plus putter.
$100 (352) 794-6203
JUGS BASEBALL
TOSS PACKAGE 1
Baseball toss machine,1
instant screen, 1 Bag
with toss machine balls.
$250.00 Please leave a
message 352-513-4446
Uberti 1858 Target
Carbine, color case
frame, Walnut stock,
exc. cond. 45 long colt
$400 352-441-0645



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
STRONG STEEL
BUILT 4X8 bed 13 "ti-
res VG condition $325
352-897-4154
TRAILER
6 x 12 w/ Ramp,
2 wheels, Excellent
condition $895
(352) 527-3125



BUYING JEWELRY
AND COINS
Before you sell your
jewelry to a pawn store,
flea market or yard /
garage sale contact us
we pay the most
262-758-9867


Sell r Swa


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On % $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


CLASSIFIED



AM


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748

CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369





BRAKEBUDDY R V
PORTABLE BRAKING
SYSTEM $100.00
352-527-4319


Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling
Redken Trained


Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.
She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200


BRIT
Brit, an 8 y.o. female
Australian Cattle
Dog mix, weighs 42
lbs. Mellow, sweet,
friendly, gentle,
calm, walks well on
a leash. Bonds
quickly with people,
gets along with
other dogs.
Beautiful dog.
Call Judy @
352-503-3363.


JASMINE
Jasmine, a 2-y.o.
blue-fawn Bulldog
mix, weighs 60 lbs.
Heartworm-negative,
good wh dogs &
children, not cats.
Very friendly & af-
fectionate, had an
unfortunate early
life, needs a good
home now.
# 17896004.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288


LOST CAT, 3 LEGS,
ORANGE AND WHITE
Lucky, an orange and
white cat with three
legs; recent surgery
so missing hair
around amputation.
Went missing Sunday
night or Monday morn-
ing 3/18/2013. Afraid
he may have hitched a
ride under the pick-up
on the way to the
landfill. Please if you
find him, call me and I
will come get him.


SADIE
Sadie is an 8-y.o.
spayed female
black lab mix. When
she came into the
shelter she had a
large tumor protrud-
ing from her neck
which was removed
by our shelter vet.
The tumor surpris-
ingly was non-
malignant. Sadie is
now being fostered
& her wound has
healed. She is a shy,
quiet dog, not a
barker, friendly, af-
fectionate, knows
her name & sits &
comes on com-
mand. Weight 35
lbs. She is house-
broken, likes walks,
likes treats, likes the
outdoors, is good
with children. She
eats slowly & should
not be rushed. Sa-
die would be an
ideal companion for
an older couple or
a single individual,
as she is a calm dog
who seeks peace &
quiet. Call Kathy @
352-465-0812.











SALLIE
Sallie is a sweet,
joyful white terrier
mix with black spots
over her body. She
is about 1-y.o. &
came to the shelter
because her family
could not afford to
keep her. She is a
slim & trim dog, easy
to handle, although
slightly shy with
strangers. She
warms up quickly,
however, & sits for
treats. Likes to walk
on a leash. She ap-
pears housebroken
& gets along very
well with other dogs.
She is Heartworm
-negative. Weight
35 Ibs. This pretty &
affectionate girl is
hoping for a good
home with a loving
family. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.


I Pt


Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne












Ash
A female tortoise shell
8 month old kitten, spayed,
up to date on shots,
friendly & lovable ready &
looking for a home to call
her own, call SaingAngels
352-419-0223or see us at
www.savinganglespetres-
cue.com


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII





BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!
i--








INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
S1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


3-26 0 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2013

"Today's special is all the caviar
you can eat for $600."





Thank You For 15 Years, of Votes

BEAULfRESULT r H



CONST.RUC TON CORP


Call 352-02-
]I "I I L I I tj -. I I i i m I


LECANTO
2 BR, Remodeled,
CHA, priv. lot. deeded
community $500 mo.
(352) 746-5253





must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766

43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES}
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908
Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624
HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230


#1 Employment source is

www.chronicleonline.comi


Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665

LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, inc
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171






NEW!! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
Vlew 352-621-9181


St


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554



AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


GENERAL'
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service
Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
FactoryAuthorized Technicians
ER0015377








AAA ROOFING
Call the e" akh6usen"
Free Written Estimate

:$ 100OFF:

,Any Re-Roof:,
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed 1
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000ESZM


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**

**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER START

A FIRE!
Flai Rale-No
S Hidden Co.


1.855.DR-VEN


NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY! |
352-220-9190


A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
All Home Repairs
Accepting all Major CC
Lic#38893,
Call Art 352-201-1483
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**


POLS ANDPAVERS
I 1 1 "l~V",1 1; i, i.


MYOURINTROCINGBPERSPECIALIST
COPES
I POOL AND PAVER LLC
S-e' 352-400-3188


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old OneT
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


Primary Cleaning
**Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733



CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lie. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876



#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
ri FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-564 1
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from Ato Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
n352-212-9067"
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.




Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
S ALL Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry

Screening
lean Dryer
Vents
411orldua & Dependable
Eqp,,e"nce lifelong
52.344-0905
cell' 400-1722
SLicensed & Insured Lic#37761


SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
I time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials-

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


WINDOW
GENIE

We Clean Windows and a Whole Lot More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
Certified CNA avail for
in-home private duty
health care. Ref avail.
Carolyn (352) 453-7255



JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




*ww -




# 1 Employment


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009

PUPPIES
Miniature Daschunds
2 girls avail, ckc papers,
shots, $350 ea.
786-286-1163


deea ires Oft







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




WORDY GURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Solar body whirled quickly (1) Every answer is a rhyming
I --- __-- ~ pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Uses wiretaps on goons (1) theywill fit in the letter
-- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Event locale's restaurant reads (2) syllables in each word.
S@2013UFS Dist byUniv UclckforUFS
4. Actor Gosling deep-cookin' (2)


5. More magnificent male goose (2)


6. Frat joiner's heavy hammers (2)


7. Signature verifier's road roundabouts (3)


SHIIHVIO SAMVON tL SHOtIS SHWa 'Id '9 HHUNVO9 IHNK '9
NIA i NVAH T' S1NHINa SaINHA T' SOIlHI SOflH 'n N* dS NflS 'I
3-26-13 SH ASNV


New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,000. Delivered to
your site $0 down
financing. John
Lyons 800-622-2832
ext 210




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377






FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $93,900
716-807-8847




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
+Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217

-\ .\ .\
MUST SElL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on 1/4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message
LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Owner Fin./Lease Opt.
2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x
20 block bdg, New
Septic, Handy person,
REDUCED $19,900./
Offer 352-422-1916



INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Melody Pk, INV 2/2
splitplan c/h/a roof-
over, semi- furn, $8500k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340
Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 352-726-2553




RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336


Crystal Glen
3/2/2 Large home
$850 1st-Last-Sec
Gloria Bonner
P & R Mid Florida Realty
352-697-0375



CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

INVERNESS
2 B/R's
Available
KNOLLWOOD
TOWNHOMES
Rental Assistance
Available For
Qualified Applicants
Call 352-344-1010
MWF, 8-12 & 1-5
307 Washington Av.
Inverness Florida
Equal Housing Opp.

1
OPPORTUNITY




L------ J
INVERNESS
2/1, In Town, $625
water incl'd 412 Tomp-
kins St. (352) 895-0744
LECANTO
remodeled, 1 Bd $525
352-216-0012/613-6000
NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed / 1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furn & Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & Hospital
Ist and Security from
$575/mo. Call
352-795-1795 for
Appt.www.ensi ng
properties.com






LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225









BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1700 SF, Pool, $1,100
mo. (740) 398-9585



Beverly Hills
2/1 ac, car port, lania
$550.00 mth 1st & last
352-422-2433
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878
Beverly Hills
2/1/cp Clean $550mo.
1st./Last/Sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/1 FL room, no pets
$600 352-464-1950


Your World

C --- e NIClE




CHtiONIC.E


Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
BEVERLY HILLS
Rent to Own 2/11/2/1
Fl. Rm $2,500 down
$475 mo.
(352) 726-9369
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, $850+ deposit
352- 341-4178
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
No Pets, $790.
mo.
River Links
Realty
352-628-1616
FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
HERNANDO 31212
Rent to/or Own $850
mo.www.rickybobs
.com 352-613-5818
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
3/2/2 completely
remodeled $850 mo.
1144 Woodcrest Ave
352-895-0744
INVERNESS
golf course home
2/2/2, beautifully
remodeled $875 mo
8515 Sandpiper Dr
352-895-0744




Gospel Island
clean 2/1, no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent to/or Own $850
mo.www.rickybobs
.com 352-613-5818



CRYSTAL RIVER
Must have income &.
Respect. Near Puibix's,
Furn., Clean, Cable,
w/d, $115wk/440mo
$130/ 470 563-6428
INVERNESS
Furn Rm, priv full bath,
incls cable/wifi, access
kit & W/D. $400, +1 mo
dep.(352) 613-1123



INVERNESS
3/2/2 Avail.starting in
April Nice, Furn.
Waterfront 527-9268




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


CLASSIFIED




BEVERLY HILLS 211 Pine St
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on 4BD/3BA. Save
back, new utility shed $25,000 Just Reduced.
352-566-7099 or 3000 SF, heated pool,
606-694-7099 Granite, SS Appliances,
~_____~___ Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
Specializing in fireplace $235,000
Acreage,Farms Call 850-585-4026
Ranches &
Commercial Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2,1,850 sq. ft. ,
S35 Beech Street
607-538-9351

Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
Richard (Rick) 3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
Couch, Broker reduced. 352-382-1531
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc. Golf Course Home
(352) 212-3559 3/2/2/2. Update
(52) 21-55 throughout. Heated
RCOUCH.com pool; Many extra's.
__________ By appointment
(352) 382-2475



PINE RIDGEHo
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE 2 ACRES
BEEN LOOKING FOR! Quiet Country Settina
Bring your boat, horses, 3/2 on 2 acres mol
in-laws, there is room Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
for everything! 4/3 % front porch, Lgrear
w/7 car garage/ work- screened porch Patio,
shop & in-law suite on 24x30 Steel Building,
5.83 acres. Steel Carport great
Mostly wooded w/large for boat storage, etc.
backyard. Beautiful & Fenced and cross-
serene. High end fenced, Built in 2003
finishes, immaculate Nice Oaks Wooded
home in equestrian Citrus Springs area
community. www. only 20 Min. to Ocala
centralflestate.com $126500
for pictures/more info. Call 352-302-6784
352-249-9164 for appt










Phyllis
For Sale By Strickland
rSaeI N BRealtor
Beautiful 2,800 SF BEST TIME TO BUY.
Home on 6 acres in LOW PRICES!
Pine Ridge Estates, LOW INTEREST!
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen, BUY NOW
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced Also Owner
Pastures for Horses, Financing
Well Maintained and Foreclosures
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site TROPIC SHORES
5485 W. Bonanza Dr. REALTY.
Beverly Hills, Fl. (352) 613-3503
Sat. April 6th,
1am 3/2/2,2 /2 acres,
CALL 352-519-3130 24 ft x 32 ft shop
Visit $175,000
American Heritage Hernando Area
Auctloneers.com (352) 726-7755









HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
"cash only ** GAIL STEARNS
352-503-3245 your "Gale Force"
Realtor

Ec TROPIC SHORES
-e Realty
352-422-4298
Use Your Tax Money Email: Gail@
for a Down Payment gailsellscitrus.com
Recently Foreclosed Web: www.
Special Financing aall sellscitrus.com
Available, Any Low overhead
Credit, Any Income means
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft. savings for you!
located at, 6515 S. Waterfront,
Tropicana Ave. Foreclosures &
Lecanto $59,900 Owner financing
Visit: www.roseland available.
co.com\AQF
Drive by then
Call (800)282-1550 I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!






BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac A 4.
Completely updated! DEB INFANTINE
1816 W. Jena Ct Realtor
OPEN SUN 12-3PM (352) 302-8046

PRICED TO SELL Real Estate!...
FSBO 610-248-2090 it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
T Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
INVERNE Fax: 352-726-7386
INVERNESS Email:debinfantine@
Block home 2br, lba yahooicome
w/ 2porches, oversized yahoo.com
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379

* Just Reduced *
2/2 Updated home in
Canterbury Lake
Estates. Great Location
Backs up to Greenbelt

Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC MICHELE

ROSE
Realtor

4/2 BLOCK HOME, Simply put
mother in law apt, I 'II work harder
nice home
$65,000. 352-212-5097
(305) 619-0282, Cell isellcitruscounty@
_______________ yahoo.com
^ ^ Craven Realty, Inc.
a .352-726-1515
- I I *


SANDI

Buying or Selling HART
REAL ESTATE, Realtor
Let Me Work
For Youi Listing and Selling
For You! Real Estate
Is my Business
BETTY HUNT I put my heart into it!
REALTOR
352-476-9649
ERA KEY 1 sandra.hart@
Realty, Inc. eracom
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com ERA American
www.bettyhunts Realty
homes.com. 352-726-5855


TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013 Cll


Inverness Highlands
4/3/2 $90,500 Nr. hosp.
& schools Pool w/fence,
shed & Ig. bck lanai
(352) 201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.












TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





For SaWe 'I
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505




Citrus Hills Tri-level
on E Hartford
3bd/3ba w/carport
2100 sq. ft.,furnished
asking $119,500
704-905-5986
Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266




BANK
REPOSSESSION
SMITH LAKE,
ALABAMA.
Prime dockable
Homesite $49,900.
Level to water, no
stairs. Build at water's
edge. NEW TO MAR-
KET. Roads and utili-
ties in place. Available
April 20th.
Call (888)713-2870




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
2BD 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857
Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area,10K boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/586-4987
Lake Rousseau
5311 W, Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty









SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNa'ureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




To Rent for 2013 -14
winter season. Mini-
mum 4 mo. Furnished
home preferably Pine
Ridge or adj to
Withlacoochee Forest.
Need room for 2
horses. Ref. avail
(352) 249-7180


CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697




Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available. www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.comrn
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm.
352-795-6336




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
"352-563-5510-
2002 16.5 Ft Lund
50 hp Honda 4 stroke
and trailer includes GPS
and Sonar $5900
906-440-1010
Bass Tracker
17' flatbottom, alum.
V nose, w/galvanized
trailer, $950
906-285-1696
Clearwater Skiff
16', 2010-2011 25hp
YAM, elec., 821b, T.M. &
charger, cover, 3hr use
$7700. 352-447-2967
G-3
Jon Boat, Model 1236
Includes; 9.8 Merc,
fish/depth finder, swivel
seats, full cover & & trier
$1,650(352) 341-1709
Lund Renegade
16',inc.89 Johnson 70hp
& 94 galvinized trlr.
recent complete interior
overhaul,strong engine
Lot of boat for money!
Ask.$4350, 352-897-
5305 or 412-508-0247
MANTA
1981 28ft, 2 inch, Boat
& trailer, No motor,
Good Condition
5,000. (773) 736-0244
MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $13,200
obo 352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192
SWEETWATER
2008 18 ft. Pontoon,
60HP, Yamaha, 4
stroke, $9,999, no trlr.
(352) 257-9496
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
4 Winds Trailer
Express, 2006,
26' DSL, 12' slide out
$12,500. 352-228-0984
2007 4 Winds
28",1 slide out, Qu Bed,
hvy hitch, $8900, Loc in
Inglis, Fl 812-605-1598
APACHE
'04, Slide in Truck
Camper, Clean,
excel. cond. $6,200
(352) 637-0306
COACHMAN
'07, 4 New tires, 1 slide
out, Great Condition
Clean, Move In cond.
$15,500. 352-637-2735
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. Island bd.,
+ rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like new,
NADA$29K, Reduced
$19,900 352-382-3298
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945






MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 Ibs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarstonl@mac.com
or 352-586-1483



"BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Y* Running or Not Y*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352)771-6191


MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



2003 Buick
LaSabre Limited, one
owner, 44k miles, mint
cond. $7000 call after
6pm 352-897-5039
05' LINCOLN TOWN
CAR GARAGE KEPT,
Two-Tone, LOADED
65K mi, $10,500.
352-860-0164
BUICK
'01, Century,
81,271 miles, $4,200
(352) 465-2823
between 7a-7p
Buick
2005 Century, 4dr
96k mi, power window,
lock, cruise control,
am/fm/cd asking $4900.
352-422-3198
BUICK
2006 CX
92K MILES,
LIKE NEW $8995.
352-628-5100
CHEVROLET
'03, Malibu, V6,36K,
excellent shape
$6,500
(352) 637-0306
Chevrolet
2008 Aveo
$6,998
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Crusier
5 speed, power win-
dows, locks- $4,250
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
CRYSLER
'99, Seabring Conv.
45k miles, garage
kept, great cond.
leather seats $3,500
(352) 746-0940
DODGE
2005, Neon
Automatic transmis-
sion $4,400
352-341-0018
DUDLEY'S






Auction

Estate Adventure
Auction
Thur 3-28
3pm outside
6pm inside

Several Estates
quality furniture, tools,
contents, 01'Caddy
SLS, 98' Merc Grand
Marquis 1 owner,
estate car.

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
FORD
07 Taurus SE
79k mi, pwrwindw, lock,
cruise control, am/fm/cd
owner, exc. cond.
$5500. 352-302-9217
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2002 MUSTANG GT
69K MILES, LEATHER
$8995. 352-628-5100
KIA
OPTIMA HYBRID EX
ONLY 3K MILES,
LOADED
$21995. 352-628-5100
Mitsubishi
2007 Eclipse, power
windows, automatic
transmission $10,899
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville must
SE. V6. pw.. ..pl.....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing
TOYOTA
08, Camary LE, auto
trans, 65,200 mi., gold
color, excel, cond.
$12,500. 352-527-2729



2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551






IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person

fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo


Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


FORD MUSTANG
2004 MACH-1
23,500 mi; Exc Cond.
Have Extra's. Only 139
made. $16,500. Call
Skip(352) 527-3687
MUSTANG GT 03
63K, Showcar, Super-
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $14,500 obo
352-228-4012




CHEVROLET
1989 Silverado new
tires, needs starter in-
stalled good work truck
$1200 352-364-1771
DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Truck
$2000. 352.795.3708
captainwalton@aol.com
DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Work
Truck, needs trannie
work, good engine/body
$900 352-364-1771
DODGE
2004 DAKOTA 4WD
CLUB CAB, SPORT
$8495. 352-628-5100
FORD
1995 F-150XL, white
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab, $2700.
(352) 637-5331 LM

v'THIS OUT!
FORD
2008 F350 Dually
CrewCab 6.4L
V8Diesel Ex Cond
4x4 grey, 50g Aux
Tank, Moonroof
Leather,towhtch,T-gate
LitAssist+step
83000mi $28000
716.9460203,eon-
dak@yahoo.com

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

TOYOTA
2011 TUNDRA
CREWMAX
32K MILES, 4WD,
LEATHER, S/R
$30995. 352-628-5100




FORD
2003 Explorer, Black
Eddie Bauer, 196,000
Miles, Rebuilt Transmis-
sion $2650 OBO
352-228-7086
GMC
2009 YUKON SLE
32K MILES
$24995. 352-628-5100
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
LEXUS
2010 RX350
LOADED, NAV,
PREMIUM RED
$29995. 352-628-5100
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 3rd row
seat, power windows,
locks- $4,995
352-341-0018
TOYOTA
2001 RUNNER
SR5 4WD, V6
ONLY 73K MILES
$9995. 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2002 RAV 4 4WD
74,000 MILES, 4CYL
$8995 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
2005 RAV4
92K MILES, 29 MPG
$9995. 352-628-5100



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150




FORD
1978 F150, Shrt Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....calladam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment



CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244
HONDA
1981 Silver Wing GL
500 Hard removable
luggage.CB AM/FM 47K
$1000 9am-4pm
352-503-3347
HONDA
2009, 1300 VTX,
1 owner, immaculate,
over $3500 in options
garage kept, 21k miles
$7900. 352-697-2760
KAWASAKI
2012, Vulcan 900
Classic, full dress, 1,300
mi. like new, $7,250
(352) 341-2149
Motor Bike
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$750 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
SCOOTER
2009 Buddy, 125 CC;
564 mi. Mint Grn color
& mint Cond.$1800
(352) 794-3674;
YAMAHA


2005, Majesty, YP 400
step thru motorcycle
scooter, exc. shape,
only 2200 miles, $3200
352-419-4419


563-0326 TUCRN
Elmetta S. Thomason File No: 2013CP82 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2013CP82 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELMETTA S. THOMASON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELMETTA S. THOMASON, deceased, whose
date of death was December 27, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representatives
and the personal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent end other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-


l







C12 TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2013


TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 19, 2013
Personal Representative:
/s/ MARIAN L. KASECKY
27 Garden Court, Verona, PA 15147
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Thomas E. Slaymaker, Esquire, Attorney for Marian L. Kasecky
Florida Bar Number: 398535, Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.,
2218 HWY 44 West, Inverness, FL 34453, Telephone: (352)726-6129, Fax: (352)726-0223
E-Mail: tom@slaymakerlaw.com, Secondary E-Mail: marilyn@slaymakerlaw.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle March 19 & 26, 2013

564-0326 TUCRN
Helen Hermann File No: 2013-CP-106 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2013-CP-106
IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN HERMANN,
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Helen Hermann, deceased, whose date of
death was February 8,2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 19, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Bruce Hermann
c/o 213 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, FL 34450
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ Megan T. Fitzpatrick, Esq.
213 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450-4239
352-726-1821, Florida Bar No. 84987
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle March 19 & 26, 2013.


565-0326 TUCRN
Richard Anthony Morrison, Sr. Case No: 2013-CP-53 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2013-CP-53
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF RICHARD ANTHONY MORRISON, SR.
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of Richard Anthony Morrison, Sr., deceased,
whose date of death was December 1,2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue,
Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having daims cr demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,ANYCLAIM FILEDTWO(2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 19, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/GEORGE H. MORRISON
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG &
FRIEDRICH, P.A.
452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
(352) 726-0901, (352) 726-3345 (Facsimile), Forida Bar Number: 0196529
/s/JEANNETTE M. HAAG, Attorney for Estate
jmhaag tampabay.rr.com, jmhaagl @tampabay.rr.com
March 19 & 26, 2013.


566-0326 TUCRN
Kathalyn Datz File No: 2013-CP-67 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2013-CP-67 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF KATHALYN DATZ A/K/A KATHALYN A. DATZ
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of KATHALYN DATZ A/K/A KATHALYN A. DATZ, de-
ceased, whose date of death was December 7,2012, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka
Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal repre-
sentatives and the personal representatives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.


Al other crectars of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAMS NOT RLED WIHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 19, 2013
Personal Representative:
/s/ William Datz
1128 Fathom Avenue, Manahawkin, NJ 08050
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ John A. Nelson
Florida Bar Number:0727032, Slaymaker and Nelson, P.A.,
2218 HWY 44 West, Inverness, FL 34453, Telephone: (352)726-6129, Fax: (352)726-0223
E-Mail: emailservicejohn slaymakerlaw.com
Secondary E-Mail: legals slaymakerlaw.com
Published two (2) times in the Citrus County Chronicle March 19 & 26, 2013

567-0326 TUCRN
Quintin C. Pflasterer File No: 2013CP94 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2013CP94
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF QUINTIN C. PFLASTERER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the ESTATE OF QUINTIN C. PFLASTERER, deceased, File Num-
ber 2013 CP794, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this Notice is served must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the Decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is March 19, 2013.
Personal Representative:
LINDA P. ABSIL
811 St. Regis Court, West Deptford, NJ 08051-2044
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ BRUCE CARNEY, ESQUIRE Carney & Associates, P.A. 7655 W Gulf to Lake Hwy.,
Suite 2, Crystal River, Florida 34429 352-795-8888
March 19 & 26, 2013


568-0326 TUCRN
Efstratious W. Savas File No: 2013-CP-76 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2013-CP-76
IN RE: ESTATE of EFSTRATIOUS W. SAVAS a/k/a EFSTRATIOUS WILHELM SAVAS,
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Efstratious W. Savas, deceased, whose date of
death was January 26 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Flor-
ida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 19, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Electra Diane Paskett
6160 Haddo Way, Dublin, Ohio 43017
Attorney for Personal Representative
BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A.
/s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, 209 Courrthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450
Florida Bar Number: 157310, Telephone: (352) 726-1211
March 19 & 26, 2013.


570-0326 TUCRN
Sylvia B. Popiela File No: 2013-CP-69 Notice to Cred.
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.2013-CP-69 Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF SYLVIA B. POPIELA
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Sylvia B. Popiela, deceased, whose date of
death was January 15, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands


against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 19, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Richard A. DePirro
3631 W. Burgundy Dr., Citrus Springs, FL 34433

Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/H. Michael Evans, Esquire, Attorney for Richard A. DePirro
Florida Bar Number: 251674, 20702 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34431
Telephone: (352) 489-2889, Fax: (352) 489-0852
E-Mail: hmichaelevanspa yahoo.com
March 19 & 26, 2013.


573-0402 TUCRN
William Edward Anderson Case No: 2013-CP-108 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.2013-CP-108
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM EDWARD ANDERSON
DECEASED,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of Richard William Edward Anderson, deceased,
whose date of death was December 27,2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Cit-
rus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Ave-
nue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal represent-
ative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
Al other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDINGTHETIME PERIDDSETFORTHABOVE,ANYCLAIM FILEDTWO(2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is March 26, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/TRACY TREPCYK
c/o 452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
Attorney for Personal Representative: HAAG, HAAG &
FRIEDRICH, P.A.
452 Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness, Florida 34452
(352) 726-0901, (352) 726-3345 (Facsimile), Forida Bar Number: 0196529
/s/JEANNETTE M. HAAG, Attorney for Estate
jmhaag tampabay.rr.com, jmhaagl @tampabay.rr.com
March 26 & April 2, 2013.


924-0331 DCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
SEEKING OFFICE SPACE IN BETWEEN
LECANTO AND INVERNESS
Workforce Connection, a governmentally-funded organization is seeking approxi-
mately 3,500 sq ft or more of office space in Citrus County. Preferable locations
would be in or in-between Lecanto and Inverness.
Prefer office space with at least 4 private offices, room for additional cubicles (at
least 12), break room, open resource area for customers, at least 4 bathrooms, con-
ference room and computer lab.
Must be ADA compliant. Need ample parking and occupancy beginning at end of
June, 2013.
Interested parties may send responses to:
Val Hinson
Workforce Connection
3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205
Ocala, FL 34474
352 873-7939, ext 1203
FAX: 352 873-7956
Email: vhinson clmworkforce.com
Workforce Connection is an EOE Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are
available upon request to individuals with disabilities using TTY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at 711.
March 24 through March 31, 2013.


574-0326 TUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Rctitious Name Law, pur-
suant to Section 865-09,
Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of


POOHS STEAK AND SEA-
FOOD, located at 7629
West Karmac Court,
Homosassa, Florida
34448,
in the County of Citrus,
intends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-


lahassee, Florida.
DATEDat
Homosassa
this 22nd day of March,
2013.
/s/ Thomas
Towers
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. March 26, 2013.


**A



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