<%BANNER%>

Citrus County chronicle ( March 24, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 24, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03070

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 24, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03070

Full Text



NCAA: First Sweet 16 bids earned /31


CVE CITRU S COUNT Y --- ---





wwwjIchronlicLJLVillage
______________________________^ ^________________w w w .chronicleonline.com_________


24, 2013 The Best CommunityM Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 229


TODAY & next morning
HIGH LOW
75 53




Scattered storms,
some possibly strong;
chance of rain 70%..
PAGE A4




Memorial Mass
for Hoge set
At 6 p.m. Wednesday,
Bishop Robert N. Lynch
of the
Dio-
cese of
St. Pe-16, at 96. The
ters-
burg
will
conduct
a Me-
morial The Rev.
Mass James
for the Hoge
Rev. died March 16.
James
Hoge, who died Saturday,
March 16, at 96. The
service will be a St.
Scholastica Catholic
Church, 4301W. Ho-
mosassa Trail, Lecanto.
This past week in his
blog on the occasdiocesan
website -a www.dosp.org
p- Bishop Lynch reflected
on Father Hoge and his
contributions to West
Central Florida.
Titled "When Hoge was
in vogue, the bishop
wrote, in part:
"Had he lived long
enough to come to next
Tuesday's Chrism Mass I
would have honored him
on the occasion of his
70th anniversary of his
priestly ordination. What
makes Father Hoge so
unique in our diocesan
history was his service to
this local Church in its
northern counties (Pasco,
Hernando and Citrus). In-
strumental in the estab-
lishment and founding of
all six parishes in Citrus
County, he became
known and beloved by al-
most all Catholics living in
our northernmost county.
He also was instrumental
in pushing for the estab-
lishment of Pope John
Paul his elementary
school, which began its
life as'Citrus County
Catholic Elementary
School.'
AWhen he was a the
'top of his game'rthe
priesthood was very
much in vogue for Father
Hoge and he gave it his
all, and wished to do so
until his last breath."
The public is encour-
aged to attend Wednes-
day evening's Memorial
Mass.


COMMENTARY:
A look back at the
10-year Iraq war./Cl


Magazine features Crystal River


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
Crystal River is getting
some international pub-
licity, thanks to its photo-
genic manatees.


The April issue of Na-
tional Geographic Maga-
zine contains a feature
story with photos of man-
atees in King's Bay and
Three Sisters Springs.
The article delves into


the various issues sur-
rounding the Crystal River
National Wildlife Refuge,
especially regarding inter-
action with humans. It de-
scribes the writer's own
manatee experience.

2013 SERIES


It also talks about the
local economic impact of
manatee tourism, estimat-
ing it at $20 million to $30
million a year The refuge
estimates manatees at-
tract about 200,000 visitors


a year. That is in addition
to other people who visit
King's Bay for fishing,
scalloping or other
activities.


Page A5


Challenge to live


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
School student Micah


This classroom is behind the wheel


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO It's a little
after 8 a.m. and the class is
hardly chipper
Neither, for that matter, are
the instructors. Deputies Ken
Amsler and Rich Briggs
worked a late shift and are
fighting the flu.
But they have a duty to the 12
teens sitting before them:
Save their lives. Prevent
tragedy Send a message, not
just through words but also ac-
tion, that getting behind the
wheel of a car is dangerous.
"This is a serious thing," Am-
sler tells them. "You don't con-
trol a car. You're along for the
ride. You're just guiding it.
Keep that in the back of your
mind."
Welcome to Teen Driver
Challenge, a Florida Sheriff's
Association program offered to
high school students in 27
counties.
Citrus County began the pro-
gram in 2007, shortly after the
deaths of Melissa Hess and
Molly Paquin, two lifelong
friends who had just days ear-
lier graduated from Citrus
High School.
While the program was al-
ready in the works, Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy and Superintendent of
Schools Sandra "Sam" Him-
mel agreed to require it for any
student who wanted a permit


to park at school.
The sheriff's office oversees
the program at a cost of about
$7,000 a year. It's open to all
teens with a driver's license (or
permit if accompanied by an
adult) free of charge. They are
excused from school the day of
the class.
The deputies realize they
have a captive audience. But
they also know what these stu-
dents learn in the next few
hours could mean all the dif-
ference in the world on the
highway
It's sobering instruction. One
video taken from a TV news
helicopter shows a vehicle
rollover on the freeway The
driver is ejected and run over
by passing cars.
"You will come out of that ve-


hicle if your seat belt is not on,"
Amsler says. "I'm not trying to
scare anybody, but these are
the facts."
ME.
Mac Schelstrate, 17, climbs
behind the wheel of his Jeep
Cherokee and gets in line with
the other vehicles.
The Citrus High School jun-
ior admits he isn't thrilled with
being at the Teen Driver
Challenge.
"I take school seriously," he
says. "It's what I do. Plus
there's the gas driving out
here."
The challenge course is set
up with traffic cones in a large
lot behind Lecanto High
School. This is the same place
Withlacoochee Technical Insti-
tute instructors train school
bus drivers.
Schelstrate tells of driving
one day on State Road 200
when he was 16. With no one
around, Schelstrate pushed
the Mercedes he was driving
past 100 mph. He isn't proud of
it.
"I was driving dumb on the
highway," he says.
He wants to drive smart, he
says.
"I'm an angry driver. That's
my issue," Schelstrate says. "I
try to be calm, cool and
collected."
Schelstrate, whose family
See Page A12


Teen course

teaches skills

for the road

Editor's note: The Chronicle
continues today its occasional
2013 series on protecting Cit-
rus County children.
MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO
Seems like everyone
has a crash story.
"I had the green
light and this guy
came out of
nowhere..'.'
"The traffic was heavy and I
didn't notice that she stopped
in front of me ..'.'
"It was raining and sud-
denly I just started sliding..'.'
Tim Hess has a crash story,
too the one that happened
May 27, 2007, on State Road
200, taking the lives his daugh-
ter, Melissa, and her best
friend, Molly Paquin.
Molly and Melissa had just
graduated from Citrus High
School four days earlier. They
were coming home from shop-
ping in Ocala when Melissa's
right tire went off the shoul-
der of the road. She tried to
overcorrect and instead spun
into the opposite lane and was
struck by an oncoming pickup
truck.
During his days of grief that
followed, Hess learned some
startling facts. One, traffic
crashes are the No. 1 killer for
teenagers in the United
States, averaging about 5,000 a
year.
And the second is the lack
of readiness teens have
before they get behind the
wheel.


Page All


Special to the Chronicle
Best friends Molly Paquin, left,
and Melissa Hess died four days
after their Citrus High School
graduation in 2007.


Annie's Mailbox ......A16
Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword ...... .A16


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Numbers . .B4


Lottery Payouts . .B6
Movies ......... .A16
Obituaries ....... .A8


TV Listings ...... A16
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes . .A17


2013 HEVY
AIbU


DRIVE FOR-


U,


. :$PER


2013 CHEVY


DRIVE FOR

SMO.


BUY FO'a I


2013 CHEVY
,ILvicKA Uu


SAVE -

1/UUU


p:-q!q-I
0% AP.JRi


,A CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.1 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
CHEVROLET 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
01 A39MONTHJ LEASE WITH $2999 TOTAL DUE ATSIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT "0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS.NOTALL WILL QUALIFY. +ALL PRICES PLUS TAX TAG N ,
"i.% 2; AND DEALER FEES WITH $100O CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE -"IN DISCOUNTS FROM RETAIL PRICE.OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED PRIOR SALES MAk RESTRICT STOCK -


SUNDAY, MARCH


Citrus County Sheriff's Deputy Rich Briggs offers direction to Citrus High
Jenkins during a recent day at the Teen Driving Challenge course in Lecanto.


6 1184I 5


7511


I rI





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County greens up


Special to the Chronicle
Some 150 volunteers from Seven Rivers Presbyterian Church conducted a one-day
cleanup in Crystal River last spring. Volunteers picked up litter, weeded and trimmed
vegetation, painted the Seminole Club building and parking bumpers and helped Art
Jones with a lyngbya removal event.

Yearlong program keeps community beautiful


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Cleanup-
Greenup is just one local
program of Keep Citrus
County Beautiful. It was
patterned after a national
program called Great
American Cleanup but tai-
lored to our own commu-
nity. Citrus
County
Cleanup-
Greenup is a
yearlong pro- KEEF
gram that c tRI
helps people coUI
improve their
neighbor-
hood by
pitching in to
clean up, This is the se
spruce up, series of we
plant and oth- installments
erwise beau- Citrus Couni
tify our
community.
Any community group
can organize a cleanup in
their own neighborhood or
in another area. KCCB will
provide hints on organiz-
ing, plus grabbers, bags,
gloves and vests for the
event if it is a cleanup.
KCCB may be able to help
with tools for other proj-
ects, too.
The county will waive


e
e


tipping fees at the landfill
for trash.
Longtime annual partic-
ipants here include Bev-
erly Hills, Inverness and
Arrowhead. Last year, a
church group conducted a
one-day event in Crystal
River and several teams
cleaned areas in the city
by picking up
trash, trim-
S ming and
- ,- weeding
ir landscaping,
and painting.
EY Organizers
can include
youth organi-
zations,
homeowners
cond in a or neighbor-
kly hood associ-
about Keep a t i o n s ,
y Beautiful. business ac-
quaintances,
civic clubs,
church groups, or just a
bunch of friends.
Although the program
started as just a "cleanup"
effort, beautification proj-
ects are welcome, too.
Your group could focus
on a roadside or trail litter
collection or picking up
unwanted bulky items (fur-
niture, tires or appliances)
from neighbors who can't


The Citrus County Airboat Alliance group had 75 boats out on the Floral City and Her-


move those items on their nando pools of Lake Tsala Apopka on the cleanup day for last year's Save Our Waters
own. Week event.
You could help with
trimming trees and shrubs pressure wash or repaint the neighborhood or help an email at keepcitrus
or weeding for someone for someone in your remove aquatic weeds countybeautiful@gmail.
who has trouble managing community. from King's Bay com to tell us what project
that task. Or you could plant trees, Look for more informa- you would like to organize,
Your project could be to flowers orveggies in a com- tion on this program at and we will help you get it
make minor home repairs, munity garden to benefit www.kccbinc.org. Send us together.


12 MONTHS i
SAME AS CASH




0%

FINANCING

ONE WEEK ONLY!
lu- ----- m
r~Immm


Owner, Rickey Richardson
Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist


BBVA Compass






I nfl%



24 month CD -1.00% APY

In today's environment, a competitive
rate is hard to find. Until Now.

1-800-COMPASS bbvacompass.com
banking built for you:
Accounts subject to approval. $500 minimum balance required to
earn the advertised Annual Percentage Yield (APY). APY accurate
as of 3/8/2013. Rates are subject to change. Substantial penalty for
early withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings on accounts. Other
limitations may apply See branch for details. BBVA Compass opens
CD accounts that have no certificate known as Time Deposits or
TDs. CDs are FDIC insured up to applicable limits. BBVA Compass
is a trade name of Compass Bank, a member of the BBVA Group.
Compass Bank Member FDIC.
OOO0EJF


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


LOCAL


*







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Restless Heart kicks off fair with concert


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer

INVERNESS Show it,
grow it and show it (or see
it, ride it and eat it) at this
year's Citrus County Fair.
In its 23rd year, the fair
begins at 5 p.m. Monday,
March 25, and continues
through Sunday, March 31.
The midway opens
Tuesday
Starting off big this year,
the Billboard chart-
topping band Restless
Heart will perform at 7
p.m. Monday in the county
auditorium for free with


the price of regular gate
admission.
"This is a big deal for the
fair- this is a well-known
group," said Hal Porter,
fair manager.
Other highlights include
Kachunga and the Alliga-
tor Show, petting zoo,
strolling entertainment
and lots of great music -
from bluegrass to gospel,
patriotic to teen rock and
the ever-popular karaoke
- throughout the week on
the Citrus County Audito-
rium stage.
Fairgoers can browse
through the exhibits such


as plants, arts and crafts,
foods and more. All were
submitted by local county
residents. Porter said ex-
hibit entries were ac-
cepted from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, March 23.
Don't forget to save time
for the food fried cat-
fish, barbecue, sirloin tips,
ice cream and much more.
The fair midway opens
at 5 p.m. Tuesday for "Two
Buck Tuesday" Admission
is $2 and all rides are $2
starting at 5 p.m.
"This used to be Dollar
Night, but inflation got us,"
Porter said.
Wednesday is "Senior &
Military Day" with admis-
sion for seniors 55 and


older and military $5. All
others ages 11 and older
pay $7; children ages 5 to
10 are $3, ages 4 and
younger are free. The fair
opens at 1 p.m. Midway
opens at 5 p.m.
Wednesday is Chronicle
Night with an armband
special for midway rides.
Regular price is $20, or $18
with the Chronicle
coupon.
On Thursday, the fair
opens at 5 p.m. and the
popular Midnight Magic
featuring a $20 midway
rides armband begins at
8 p.m. and ends at 1 a.m.
No re-entry after 8 p.m.
School Day is 1 to 5 p.m.
Friday, with free admis-


sion for students until
5 p.m. A $20 armband spe-
cial runs from 1 to 5 p.m.
and 6 to 11 p.m. for Friday
Night Magic with general
admission prices in effect.
The fair continues Sat-
urday at 10 a.m. (midway
opens at 11 a.m.) for Day-
time Magic $20 armband
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
6 to 10 p.m. for Saturday
Night Magic.
For the second year, the
fair will be open from 2 to
7 p.m. Sunday with no gate
admission and no single
midway tickets sold. Ride
the midway rides for a $22
armband.
Check out the youth ex-
hibits and show your sup-


port for the young people
who have worked hard
raising animals for auc-
tion. The swine show starts
at 7 p.m. Tuesday; sale
starts at 7 p.m. Friday.
Steer show starts at 7 p.m.
Wednesday and the sale
starts at 7 p.m. Thursday
"What's new at the fair is
always exciting, but it's the
tradition that gives you
that hometown feeling,"
Porter said.
The fairgrounds are at
3600 S. Florida Ave. (U.S.
41), Inverness. For infor-
mation, call 352-726-2993.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


Catching shrimp fever


Mardi Gras-style

festival lures many

to Old Homosassa
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

HOMOSASSA
aturday's overcast skies
and chances of rain did
not hinder the droves of
participants who descended
on Old Homosassa for the sec-
ond annual Shrimpapalooza.
Kicking off the Rotary Club
of Homosassa Springs Chari-
table Foundation Inc. festival
was a Mardi Gras-style pa-
rade at 10:30 a.m. Saturday
People lined Yulee Drive in
Old Homosassa for an oppor-
tunity to accumulate layers of
colorful beads around their
necks as they watched 32
"crews" stroll by
"This year's parade was
great," parade organizer
Gregg Mackler said. "Plans
for next year are already
started and it's going to be
even better."
Crystal River High School
marching band, Olde Ho-
mosassa Kart Cruzers, Na-
ture Coast EMS, Citrus
County Cruisers and Art
Shops of Old Homosassa
were among the many
"crews" that overtook the
Mardi-Gras spirit.
Chad Crawford, host of the
Sunshine Network's "How to
Do Florida," was the pa-
rade's grand marshal. He was
in town filming an upcoming
episode of his cable televi-
sion show.
Following the parade,
spectators relocated to the
historic district of Old Ho-
mosassa behind the Ho-
mosassa Civic Club for
shrimp and festivities.
Shrimpapalooza organizer
Mary Beth Nayfield said
3,000 people attended the fes-
tival last year and 5,000 were
expected this year.
"We knew how successful
the seafood festival is and
thought maybe we could do
something (on) the opposite
end of the year," Nayfield said
about the initiative behind
creating Shrimpapalooza.
The festival incorporated
foods, artists and crafters
selling original works and
handcrafted items. It also of-
fered not just shrimp but
desserts and everything in
between. Seventy vendors
had a little bit of everything


STEPHEN LASKO/For the Chronicle
ABOVE: Shrimp was in high
demand Saturday at the
second annual Shrimpapalooza.
Martha Cole, of The Shrimp
Shack in Crystal River, dumps
another load of shrimp into the
boiler to keep up with demand.
RIGHT: The Rotarians from
Inverness participated in the
Shrimpapalooza parade
Saturday in Old Homosassa
with a Joker float, featuring
Olivia Booher, among others,
throwing beads and greeting
the crowds.

for all ages and priorities.
"Wow, I have not had
crepes in a while and did not
expect to see them here at
the festival," festival partici-
pant Sheri Wallace said.


Self-proclaimed "Mayor of Neon
Leons" Rick LaBree is on hand
to greet revelers at the 2013
Shrimpapalooza parade in Old
Homosassa on Saturday.
"This is a really nice little
festival. I think each year it is
going to grow more and more
as the word gets out."
Samantha Jones carried
handmade pottery in one
hand with a black necklace
in the other.
"I know it sounds crazy, but
I have already started my
Christmas shopping for next
year," Jones said.
Jones did not limit her out-
ing to Christmas shopping.
She sampled 10 diverse pots
of gumbo. Contestants en-
tered their secret recipes for
a chance to win $200 for first
place, $100 for second place
and $50 for third.
Along with the king and
queen of Shrimpapalooza,
thousands partied Mardi
Gras-style until 8 p.m. while
enjoying live music, food,
kids zone and arts and crafts.
Shrimpapalooza was spon-
sored by Citrus 95.3 and Fox
96.7, ED.S. Disposal Inc.,
Cedar Key Fish and Crab,
Crystal Motors, Chris Nast,
Citrus County Sheriff's
Office, CEM Solutions,
Sheldon-Palmes Insurance
Inc. and Citrus County
Chronicle.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at
352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online. com.


Crystal River band shell top priority of council meeting


City manager to

update leaders on

musical venue
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer

CRYSTAL RIVER City
Manager Andy Houston will up-
date council members Monday
about the status of the band shell
scheduled for what Mayor Jim
Farley called the "crown jewel
of our park system King's Bay
Park."


Andy
Houston
Crystal River
city manager.


IJ^- '



Jim
Farley
Crystal River
mayor.


Construction of the musical
venue was approved by the city
council in 2011 as part of a
facelift for the bay-side park Ad-
ditions include new toilets and a


* WHAT: Crystal River City
Council meeting.
WHEN: 7 p.m. Monday,
March 25; 6:30 p.m. CRA
meeting.
WHERE: City Hall on
U.S. 19.
ONLINE: www.crystal
riverfl.org.

canoe/kayak launch. The park is
the site of many of the city's spe-
cial events.
The band shell is expected to
cost between $30,000 and $40,000
for the prefabricated structure,


and another $20,000 to $25,000 to
set it up.
The City Council will also:
Discuss options for im-
provements to electronics in the
council chamber;
Consider approving a pro-
fessional services agreement
with Hoyle, Tanner & Associates
for $30,000 to provide complete
engineering design, specifica-
tions and bidding services re-
lated to the diversion of gravity
sewer service running through
the vacant lot at South Citrus Av-
enue and U.S.19 (the Petrella
Property);
Consider approving a re-


vised amendment to the agree-
ment for operation, mainte-
nance and management services
between Crystal River and Veo-
lia Water North America-South
to modify provisions related to
year-end cost adjustments asso-
ciated with electric consump-
tion; and
Consider approving a
budget amendment appropriat-
ing $3,855 for training on the fi-
nancial system (BS&A) software
for new employees in the fi-
nance department.
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


Midway opens Tuesday






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Southern Passover pilgrimage


Rabbi V is ts

smallfewih


communities

in six states

LAURA TILLMAN
Associated Press

JACKSON, Miss. A
Jackson-based rabbi has
begun his third annual
Passover pilgrimage
across the South, visiting
small Jewish communities
where local culture has
put its mark on the ancient
faith in ways unexpected
and unique.
Rabbi Marshal Klaven
(rhymes with "maven") is
director of rabbinic serv-
ices for the Goldring-
Woldenberg Institute of
Southern Jewish Life. He
began his trip Thursday
and planned to visit more
than a dozen small Jewish
communities in six states.
He said the congrega-
tions along the route have a
strong commitment to their
culture, despite their size.
He's looking forward to the
food served during the tra-
ditional holiday meal,
which often includes South-
ern variations like those
found in the Mississippi
River town of Natchez:
matzo balls with gravy.
The Jackson-based Insti-
tute aims to nurture Jewish
congregations throughout
the South, bringing them
educational programming
they might not otherwise
be able to afford. Because
of the intense schedule,
Klaven is splitting up the
list of cities with rabbinical
student Matt Zerwekh.
Klaven said Natchez
will be the smallest com-
munity visited, with fewer


Associated Press
Rabbi Marshal Klaven, director of rabbinic services for the Goldring-Woldenberg
Institute for Jewish Life in Jackson, leads members of St. Philip's Episcopal Church in
a song and dance March 21 during their Seder in Jackson, Miss. Over a nine-day
period that started Thursday, the rabbi and a rabbinical student will visit 13 cities
throughout the South to lead Seders and other services.


than 10 participants, while
Fayetteville, Ga., will
likely be the largest, with
about 100 families. Other
stops are planned in Ala-
bama, Tennessee,
Louisiana and Florida.
The holiday celebrates
the Jewish exodus from
slavery in Egypt. Tradi-
tional foods, such as
haroset, a shank bone and
bitter herbs, are used as
symbols of the Passover
story during the Seder.
Klaven said the story can
be used to explore con-
temporary oppression,
whether by cruel dictators
or personal demons.
"When we are able to
join forces and march to-
gether, we can overcome
them and free ourselves,"
Klaven said.
While traditionally the


Passover Seder takes
place on the first two
nights of the eight-day hol-
iday, the pilgrimage will
include Seders on other
nights as well, so more
cities can benefit from the
rabbi's leadership.
"People often overlook
small communities,
whether they're Jewish or
not, because they're seen
as not having as powerful
a voice, or not as conse-
quential. But they still
demonstrate the best of
what it means to be a close,
comforting religious com-
munity," Klaven said.
One example of can be
found in Crossville, Tenn.,
about 100 miles east of
Nashville. The Upper
Cumberland Jewish Com-
munity in Crossville has
been able to thrive despite


low numbers. On an aver-
age Friday night, anywhere
from 15 to 20 people,
mostly retirees, meet at a
local church to celebrate
Shabbat But this Passover
the group will host an in-
terfaith service for 150
people, led by Klaven.


LocalBRIEFS

Greene to speak at meeting
Property Appraiser Geoff Greene will be guest speaker at
the first in a series of town hall meetings at Central Ridge
Community Center, sponsored by the Bev-
erly Hills Civic Association. B "^
The meeting will be at 7 p.m. Thursday,
March 28, and will last about an hour.
Complimentary coffee and cookies will be
served.
This is a chance to get the firsthand
story about the predicament caused by
Progress Energy and choices the county Geoff
commission must make. The meeting is Greene
open to all.
For more information, call Bonnie
Larsen at 352-746-2657, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Planner to address club
Citrus County Planning and Development Director Vince
Cautero will be the speaker at the Ronald Reagan Republi-
can Assembly meeting at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 6, at 938 N.
Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, in the South Square Plaza.
Refreshments will be available. Donations for CASA are
accepted.
For more information, call 352-257-5381.
WGP Friends slate meetings
The Friends of the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve will have
a strategic planning meeting at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 6, fol-
lowed by a public meeting at 11 a.m. of the Board of
Trustees, Yankeetown's governing board of the WGP, to re-
view the contracted plan for the Ellie Schiller Education Cen-
ter's interior.
The meeting will take place at the WGP, 1001 Old Rock
Road, Yankeetown.
Yankeetown received funds from the Friends to initiate the
planning stage. The town also received funds from the Felburn
Foundation for hardware, furniture and display equipment.
Visit www.withlacoocheegulfpreserve.com or email
friendswgp@gmail.com for more information.
From wire reports


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


Z-1C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -"--1


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
ts
pc
pc
ts
pc
ts
sh
ts
ts


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
ts
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Southwest winds around 20 knots.
Seas 4 to 6 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Showers and
thunderstorms likely today.


84 63 trace 82 62 0.10

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E ausvedaly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 75 Low: 53 *4
Scattered storms, some possibly
strong, rain chance 70%.
k MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 69 Low: 38
Mostly sunny

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 65 Low: 35
Sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 81/60
Record 94/40
Normal 79/51
Mean temp. 71
Departure from mean +6
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.20 in.
Total for the month 1.10 in.
Total for the year 3.20 in.
Normal for the year 9.23 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 4
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 29.86 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 69
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 63%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper, bayberry
Today's count: 6.6/12
Monday's count: 10.1
Tuesday's count: 9.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/24 SUNDAY 3:46 9:58 4:10 10:21
3/25 MONDAY 4:28 10:40 4:52 11:04
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
0 ( e ) SUNSET TONIGHT ............................7:44 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:28A.M.
4 W MOONRISE TODAY...........................5:21 P.M.
MARCH 27 APRILS APRIL10 APRIL18 MOONSET TODAY............................ 5:27A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
4:18 a/12:09 a
2:39 a/10:07 a
12:26 a/7:55 a
3:28 a/11:44 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
5:11 p/12:45 p
3:32 p/10:18 p
1:19 p/8:06 p
4:21 p/11:55 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
5:09 a/12:56 a 5:41 p/1:22 p
3:30 a/10:44 a 4:02 p/11:00 p
1:17 a/8:32 a 1:49 p/8:48 p
4:19 a/12:21 p 4:51 p/--


Gulf water
temperature


68
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.06 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.46 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.33 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.58 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


.. 10 lOS
lg.cnionag.Jn d Honolu,
-* ".-- I- *** H lu6'
-- o,: r s "' "
l 20,R' ....' '_ "
^^ 40pi 80s


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 37 30 pc 40 26
Albuquerque 52 38 pc 51 29
Asheville 57 36 .03 r 43 31
Atlanta 51 45 .22 sh 59 36
Atlantic City 49 28 c 43 38
Austin 76 52 w 63 37
Baltimore 51 26 r 48 36
Billings 33 13 sn 30 15
Birmingham 61 46 1.87 ts 64 34
Boise 41 19 pc 48 27
Boston 44 30 s 46 33
Buffalo 38 28 pc 36 31
Burlington, VT 37 28 pc 37 23
Charleston, SC 56 42 .45 ts 70 46
Charleston, WV 53 24 r 48 32
Charlotte 53 40 .02 r 43 35
Chicago 40 25 sn 35 29
Cincinnati 52 28 rs 36 29
Cleveland 38 20 pc 36 31
Columbia, SC 52 39 .66 r 49 40
Columbus, OH 48 23 sn 35 30
Concord, N.H. 39 18 pc 44 21
Dallas 54 47 .07 w 57 33
Denver 26 17 .21 sf 28 13
Des Moines 39 29 sn 33 25
Detroit 40 23 c 37 29
El Paso 74 59 s 64 45
Evansville, IN 57 36 r 40 29
Harrisburg 45 27 c 45 31
Hartford 45 33 s 47 30
Houston 73 61 w 68 40
Indianapolis 49 34 sn 35 27
Jackson 75 54 w 64 35
Las Vegas 61 46 pc 68 48
Little Rock 48 42 .09 w 52 32
Los Angeles 66 54 s 64 54
Louisville 56 39 r 42 31
Memphis 55 46 sh 57 34
Milwaukee 35 23 sn 35 28
Minneapolis 38 20 sn 35 20
Mobile 76 61 .17 ts 75 42
Montgomery 64 48 .04 ts 76 38
Nashville 54 41 .01 ts 60 32
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


-50s

.,70s.

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 76 65 pc 73 43
New York City 45 32 s 49 36
Norfolk 55 30 r 44 38
Oklahoma City 45 39 w 45 29
Omaha 39 30 sn 34 23
Palm Springs 82 63 s 82 57
Philadelphia 49 31 c 48 35
Phoenix 78 55 s 81 53
Pittsburgh 45 19 rs 39 32
Portland, ME 39 24 s 44 28
Portland, Ore 49 35 pc 58 37
Providence, R.I. 44 28 s 47 31
Raleigh 54 37 r 42 35
Rapid City 25 8 sn 23 12
Reno 55 24 pc 60 32
Rochester, NY 37 29 pc 37 31
Sacramento 68 44 s 74 43
St. Louis 54 37 sn 35 27
St. Ste. Marie 36 14 pc 35 24
Salt Lake City 38 22 .03 pc 41 26
San Antonio 81 57 s 66 38
San Diego 64 56 s 65 57
San Francisco 63 43 s 63 46
Savannah 61 45 trace ts 73 46
Seattle 49 34 pc 54 39
Spokane 40 22 s 48 26
Syracuse 37 29 .18 pc 38 27
Topeka 38 34 .12 sn 33 22
Washington 55 32 r 47 34
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 102 McAllen, Texas LOW-19 Yellowstone
N.P., Wyo.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 86/72/pc
Amsterdam 38/25/c
Athens 64/51/s
Beijing 44/34/pc
Berlin 32/23/s
Bermuda 67/64/r
Cairo 76/52/s
Calgary 28/14/s
Havana 87/70/pc
Hong Kong 79/70/pc
Jerusalem 61/47/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


62/53/c
38/32/c
58/37/c
77/48/pc
39/23/pc
16/12/sn
53/30/c
84/72/ts
64/53/pc
86/64/s
57/36/sh
39/30/pc
30/17/c


ARONICL-E
Florida's Best Communit Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community
To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewflinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
I want to send information to the Chronicle:
MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
44 office
-or Nrve-l Bry rI H.Hv 1624 N.
SOunn ie d Meadowcrest
Aeunk.n Cannonaale Dr Blvd.
Ave A Crystal River,
A s Meadowcrest FL 34429
N I :I "^ : l

SInverness
Courthouse office
To mpkins St. 5? square
106 W. Main
St.,
4 44Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper.
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
Phone 352-563-6363
S4 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Citrus County Chronicle
1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429

PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MAGAZINE
Continued from Page Al

According to the Na-
tional Geographic Society,
the digital version of the
magazine with video is al-
ready out and the print
version is scheduled to hit
the street March 26. The
magazine is published in
English with 37 local-
language editions and has
a global circulation of
about eight million.
One of the manatee pho-
tos from the story was se-
lected as National
Geographic's Photo of the
Month for March and sent
to email subscribers in a
downloadable version suit-
able for computer
wallpaper.
"I think it is going to in-
crease tourism dramati-
cally," said Michael Lusk,
refuge manager "The pho-
tos from Three Sisters
Springs are just breathtak-
ing. I think we are going to
see an increase in eco-
tourism for people who
want to do something they
cannot anywhere else in the
world swim with mana-
tees in crystal-clear water"
He added you can see
manatees in other places
and even get in the water
with them in Brazil and
Belize, but not in clear
water; this is the last place.
Lusk, who was inter-
viewed for the article,
thought it was good over-
all, pretty well balanced
and did a good job of trying
to say "these are the is-
sues" without drawing
judgments or conclusions.
"I think it will be very
good for the local commu-
nity and hopefully will
help raise awareness of is-


Chronicle file
The waters of Three Sisters Springs are crystal clear, offering a unique viewing experience for those who want to
see manatees. The area is featured in the April issue of National Geographic magazine, in print March 26.


sues so we can all talk
about it
"We have to take manag-
ing this resource very seri-
ously," he said,
acknowledging the article


also spotlights Three Sis-
ters Springs and concerns
about getting it open to the
public.
"At this point, I cannot
give a definite date as to


when it will open," he said,
citing issues such as a
public-access entrance on
Cutler Spur Boulevard.
"I understand and hear
loud and clear their desire


to get it open," he said. "We
want to do it in a way that
will be well-managed and
not become an eyesore. We
want to do it right and be
sure the chaos we see on


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 A5

the water does not become
chaos on land.
"Everybody likes mana-
tees. It's just the pressure
of more and more people
coming, and how do we
manage that?" Lusk said.
Projections show Three
Sisters could attract about
3,000 people a day during
the winter
"It turned out beauti-
fully," Marla Chancy, exec-
utive director of the Citrus
County Visitors and Con-
vention Bureau, said re-
garding the article. "It is a
great example of how
unique Crystal River is. It
will garner world attention
and put the city on the
map."
"The Florida tourism in-
dustry has a tremendous
amount of momentum,"
said Will Seccombe, presi-
dent and CEO of Visit
Florida. "Tourism gener-
ates 23 percent of our state
sales tax revenue. It's a big
business on a tremendous
growth curve."
Speaking at Citrus
County Legislative Day
last week, Seccombe men-
tioned the "manatee expe-
rience" as the type of story
they want tourists to take
home.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


( We Welcome You To

SafHue Dental Care.


it' ~6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.


'o~


Cleaning Special 'f Porcelain Dentures Second
0 New Patients Only ; UU Fused to U Opinion
FREE Exam & E-Rays Metastarting at X-ray & Exam
w/Cleaning r9Upper & Lower (New Patients Only)
D0210 D0150 D1110 (For first one) D0210 D0150
Coupon required. Chargeable if eligible from insurance. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. Coupon required. Not valid with any other offers. If not chargeable by insurance. Coupon required.
Not valid with any other offers. Expires 3/31/13 Expires 3/31/13 D2751 Expires 3/31/13 D5510 D5120 Not valid with any other offers. Expires 3/31/13
We offer root canal therapy In our office. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. *codes 0210 & 0272 are chargeable codes & eligible from insurance.




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


uT3?M I S Ii4 *u I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
fiTTKYNT'B? 110 "LgT~yfn~f*^*?^ ^









S&S Food & Beverage 1 1 3 U.S. iHy. 41invernes:



Wasabihop 6185 S.~tTT^ U.S Hwy. 41,u FloralP iBim











Happ TiezTbac So 111E Ivrns Blv. nens
SunocoI8520 N.SCarl G. Rose Hwy., Dunn Ai
IISunco G 11520.lodAv

Sujbs N'SuchFood Mar 3160 W.Pin Rdg Bvd, evrl Hll

















*TBTllT~Tr*^ *' ITnif sro i IR^
hexacvrFoo45 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando








Kwnik'sto4453N.CaS.SunoasteBlvd., Homosassa
SunocrySore28669 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy., Hernando
Discou01ntCigttes & Toacco 270 N. Florida Ave., HIvernand














Homimosassa Country Store 5511 W. Hoy'm osassa [iiTT~ral,?1 Lecatom
SurnacMarto6971 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River










Bob'sFood Mart3795 N. LCantousHwy.,Bevrytly Hills
Kik ing 9709 W. Fort Islad Trail, Crystal Riv
PlzaFood MaBrt 7977 W. Dunnelon Rd., Dunnelff
rSunoco 3761 W. Homoassa Trail, Lecant
SunoatWm^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l Foo Mar 227 S. Sunoas lvdHoinTsffiT4





Texaco Foo tlM art 7593 W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.,^^^^^^^K HomosIassrr





KagrowExpr/tese irs Countywsoe HOSiOSL snhtcsusacs
ShellStton 63 .Sno ldCrunystliver
WeacoFodMr 65W Nrel rat w. Countywdi

Discouent Ciaets& oac 78 .Foid v enanwdo
Homosass Conr tr 51W ooas riLContywd
CSuoo67W.GltoLkHw. Crunystliver
BoWi Fonarn79 .Leat Dixie Counveryils


t se CHOOE T ELL


A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Final Blue Angels air show for year?


4


In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau,
the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels perform their precision
aerobatics over the Florida Keys during the Southernmost
Air Spectacular on Saturday at Naval Air Station Key
West in Key West.

are you upside down
in your mortgage?
let GTE Financial Help you
refinance to a lower rate


Associated Press
In this photo provided by
the Florida Keys News
Bureau, the U.S. Navy's
Blue Angels perform their
precision aerobatics over
the Florida Keys during the
Southernmost Air Spectac-
ular on Saturday at Naval
Air Station Key West in Key
West. The weekend air
show concludes Sunday
and may mark the last
Blue Angels performance
through the end of
September 2013 due to
sequester budget cuts.


Funds for heating, cooling


senior homes available


Special to the Chronicle
Funding is available
through March 31 to help
low-income senior citi-
zens experiencing an en-
ergy-related crisis. The
financial assistance will
pay for utility bills, heat-
ing system repairs and
other energy-related ex-
penses through the
Emergency Home En-
ergy Assistance for the
Elderly Program
(EHEAEP).
As energy costs rise,
many seniors on fixed in-
comes find themselves
behind on utility pay-
ments or without the ca-
pability to heat their
household. Energy assis-
tance is critical for sen-
iors who are more at risk
in extreme temperatures.
The EHEAEP pro-
gram is designed to keep
needy seniors safe and
comfortable in their own
homes through the chill
of winter and often over-
bearing heat of summer
by providing financial
assistance or supplies to


seniors experiencing an
energy crisis.
To be eligible, seniors
must be age 60 or older,
meet the income guide-
lines by household size
and experience a current
energy crisis. An energy
crisis may include past-
due electricity bill or cur-
rent cut-off of utilities, a
broken heating/cooling sys-
tem, or lack of energy sup-
plies such as fuel, space
heaters, blankets, wood,
fans and air conditioners.
Financial assistance is lim-
ited to once per heating


season (October through
March) and once per cool-
ing season (April through
September), for a maxi-
mum of two benefits per
year per household.
If you are experiencing
an energy crisis, or want
information about the pro-
gram, call Elder Options
via the Elder Helpline at
800-963-5337.
Elder Options is a non-
profit organization serving
as the Aging & Disability
Resource Center for the
many counties, including
Citrus.


VOTE FOR US
MARCH 21-APRIL 8






II#to / /i *
pq *I


COSMETIC PLASTIC SURGERY

BREAST AUGMENTATION

A Q&A WITH DR. JAMES ROGERS, D.M.D., M.D.


Easter Day

GrandBuffet

Sunday, March 31, 2013 BEST
$3495Adults $1595 Kids (3-12) e-s,
11:30 am 6:00 pm Sunday Brunch


Call for details and to make your reservations.


at Plantation on Crystal River
9301 W. Fort Island Trail,
Crystal River
KJ 352-795-4211
www.plantationoncrystalriver.com


STATE/LOCAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 A7


We t82
BAR & GRILL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Wilbert
Cody, 42
INVERNESS
Wilbert Cody, 42, of In-
verness, died Saturday,
March 23, 2013.
A celebration of life me-
morial service will be an-
nounced at a later date.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements.

Marcelino
Fuentes, 89
CITRUS SPRINGS
Marcelino Fuentes, 89,
of Citrus Springs, Fla.,
passed away March 20,
2013.
He was
born May
20, 1923, to
Jose and
Avelina
(Acevedo)
Fuentes in
Yabucoa,
Puerto
R i c o Marcelino
Marcelino Fuentes
was a com-
munity leader in his time.
He loved baseball, his gar-
den, playing dominos and
poker, music and dancing.
He was a deacon in Con-
necticut, a machine opera-
tor and a bus driver. He
was the past president of
the Puerto Rican Society
Club in New Britain,
Conn., and was also
awarded the title: Hero of
the Town by Gov. Ella
Grasso.
Marcelino was a beloved
husband, father and
grandfather. He is sur-
vived by his loving wife,
Carmen Fuentes; daugh-
ter, Ivonne; granddaugh-
ter, Olivia; and his son,
Jose; four grandchildren;
one great-granddaughter,
Karina; and one nephew,
Charlie, of New York City,
N.Y.
Visitation will be from 6
to 8 p.m. Tuesday, March
26, 2013, at Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto, Fla. A Mass of the
Resurrection will be at
11 a.m. Wednesday, March
27, 2013, at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church in
Dunnellon, Fla.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Fla., www.brownfuneral
home.com.

DEADLINES
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Phone 352-563-5660
for details.


C.lE. Davi
Funeral Home
With Crematory
Burial Shipping
Cremation

Cremation rj. .iI

For Information and costs,
call 726-8323


John 'Jack'
Stahl, 80
LECANTO
John W "Jack" Stahl, 80,
of Lecanto, Fla., passed
away Wednesday, March
20, 2013, at
his home. J

N e w
Bruns -
wick, N.J.,
he was
born Feb.
12, 1933, to
John and John
Beulah Stahl
(Waldron)
Stahl, one of two children.
Mr. Stahl moved to
Lecanto 20 years ago from
Belle Mead, N.J., and was
a retired engineer at the
Cook and Douglas cam-
puses of Rutgers Univer-
sity in New Jersey with 27
years of service. Jack, as
he was known to many, was
a U.S. Army veteran from
1954 to 1956 and served in
Paris during his
enlistment.
Mr Stahl was a member
of The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints
in Lecanto and is survived
by his wife of 33 years, Bar-
bara A. Stahl, Lecanto; six
children, John Stahl (wife
Diane), Pennsylvania,
Donna Stahl, Rochester,
N.Y, Tracey Collins (hus-
band Ken), Pennsylvania,
Kenneth Lessing (wife
Lora), Bridgewater, N.J.,
Scott Lessing, Pennsylva-
nia, and Raymond Lessing
(wife Michele), Pennsylva-
nia; grandchildren, An-
drew, Kristen, Ashley,
RaeAnn, Gianna, Olivia,
Cody, Heather, Sarah,
Christopher, Travis, John
Jr, Michael and Stephen;
and great-grandchildren,
Michayala and Jack. He
was preceded in death by
an infant sister, JoAnn
Stahl and a great-grand-
child, Matthew Stahl.
Funeral services will be
11 a.m. Tuesday, March 26,
2013, at The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, Lecanto. Interment
will immediately follow at
Florida National Ceme-
tery, Bushnell, at 1:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, at the
family's request, please
make memorial contribu-
tions in Jack's name to
Hospice of Citrus County,
PO. Box 641270, Beverly
Hills, FL 34464. Wilder Fu-
neral Home, Homosassa,
www.wilderfuneral.com.


"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"




Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Faith
Areia-Hopkins,
61
HOMOSASSA
Faith Hope Areia-
Hopkins, of Homosassa,
Fla., was called home to
the Lord on March 6, 2013.
A child of God, she's now
tending
His gar-
dens.
Faith was
born Oct.
10, 1951, in
New Bed-
ford, Mass.
She was a
retired ac- Faith Areia-
c o u n t s Hopkins
manager
for Central Pet Inc.
Faith is survived by her
husband, Greg Hopkins of
Homosassa; sister, Betty of
Pennsylvania; brother,
Bob of Indiana; stepsons,
Adam of Clearwater and
Kenneth of Michigan;
stepdaughter, Sandy of
Michigan; and step-
grandchildren, Sara and
Kyle of Michigan. Faith
was preceded in death by
her mother, Bernice Areia;
sister, Joyce; and brother,
Bruce.
Faith was an avid scuba
diver, gardener and
crafter. She loved arts and
crafts, camping and travel-
ing. She loved life and
family; and was deeply
loved by many R.I.P, my
Sweetie.
A celebration of life and
love will be at noon Satur-
day, March 30, 2013, at
Mariner United Methodist
Church, 7079 Mariner
Drive, Spring Hill. Follow-
ing the service will be a
"potluck" Irish wake at the
family home, 177 Daisy St.,
Homosassa.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.


Woodward, 75
HOMOSASSA
Cecelia Elise (Bodkin)
Woodward, 75, of Ho-
mosassa, passed away
peacefully March 21, 2013,
at her home in Sugarmill
Woods,
under the
loving care
of HPH
Hospice,
George, ..
her hus- A.
band of 35
years, and
sister-in- Cecelia
law, Susan Woodward
Marriott.
Cecelia was born Nov.
23, 1937, in Weston, WVa.,
to the late Mary (Orr) Bod-
kin and Warren G. Bodkin.
She graduated from South
Charleston West Virginia
High School and received
her registered nurse (R.N.)
education from Saint
Mary's Nursing School in
Clarksburg, WVa., after
which she entered the U.S.
Navy Nurse Corps.
She retired from the
Navy in 1995 with the rank
of lieutenant commander
after serving her country
for 22 years active and re-
serve duty. She was sta-
tioned at various Navy
medical facilities includ-
ing San Diego, Calif.,
Alameda, Calif., (where
she met her husband),
Great Lakes, Ill., 29 Palms,
Calif., NAS Key West, Fla.,
and Bethesda, Md. She
was officer in charge of a
combat hospital unit in
Sheboygan, Wis., during
Desert Storm that was
slated for activation when
the conflict ended.
Cecelia and George re-
tired to the Florida Keys
from Virginia in 1995 and
was she a "Pink Lady" for
several years at Fisher-
man's Hospital. She was
also active in the
Marathon Community
Theater's costume depart-
ment. They moved to Sug-
armill Woods in 2005.
Together they traveled ex-
tensively to Ireland, Mex-
ico, Greece, the Holy Land,
around South America,
through the Baltic and


made several river cruises
through Europe.
Cecelia was preceded in
death by her parents and
brother, John Joseph
(Jake) Bodkin. She is sur-
vived by her husband,
George Phelps Woodward
(Captain, USN Ret.); his
sons, Buddy and Todd,
whom she dearly loved;
sister, Mathilde Bosley of
Arlington, Va.; brothers,
Warren G. Bodkin Jr, of
Bunker Hill, WVa., and
Robin Orr Bodkin, Ph.D.,
of Washington DC; and a
number of nieces and
nephews.
She was an active mem-
ber of First United
Methodist Church, Ho-
mosassa, the Citrus County
Christian Women's Club
and the "Daughters of
the King" women's
organization.
In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions in Cecelia's name
can be made to HPH Hos-
pice Foundation, 12107
Majestic Blvd., Hudson,
FL 34667 and First United
Methodist Church of
Homosassa.
A memorial service will
be at a later date. Crema-
tion services have been
provided through the Nep-
tune Society with her
ashes spread at sea.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
All obituaries will be
edited to conform to
Associated Press style
unless a request to
the contrary is made.


To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


John
Verdone, 80
INVERNESS
John V Verdone, 80, of In-
verness, died Friday, March
22,2013, at HPH Hospice in
Lecanto. John was born
July 2, 1932, in Chicago, Ill.,
the son of Anthony and
Rose Verdone. He was a
pipe fitter John moved to
Inverness in 1984 from
Huntley, Ill. He was a mem-
ber of the Italian American
Club. John was Catholic.
Survivors include his
wife, Genevieve Verdone;
sons, Timothy Verdone
and wife Nancy of Inver-
ness, Fla., and John Ver-
done of Ocala, Fla.; and
grandchildren, Marissa
and Madison Verdone,
both of Inverness, Fla.
The family will receive
friends Monday, March 25,
2013, between the hours of
5 and 7 p.m. at the Heinz
Funeral Home with a fu-
neral service to begin at
6 p.m. Interment will be at
Memorial Gardens in Bev-
erly Hills, Fla. Heinz Fu-
neral Home & Cremation,
Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

* Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material
are charged at the
same rates.






OF HOMOSASSA, Inc.
www.verticalblndsofhomosassa.com

flJ More

Than Just
Lorrie Verticals
,BEST
,Sr *T2" Faux Wood
'~' *Woven Woods
Cellular & Roman Shades
Plantation Shutters
*Ado Wraps
Custom Drapery
Top Treatments
*Etc. M
5454 S. Suncoast Blvd.
(Hwy 19,next to Sugarmill Family Rest.)
^5r33CALL


I Serving Our Community...
Meeting Your Needs! -


5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. M
Lecanto, FL 34461 Richard T. Brown
Licensed Funeral Director
352-795-0111 Fax: 352-795-66941
brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome


LECANTO
INVERNESS
OCALA
TIMBER RIDGE
THE VILLAGES


Tobey Phi I lip, beat breast cancer- twice thanks to advanced treatment at RBOI.

No one expects to get breast cancer at 24. Due to Tobey's young age at the time
of diagnosis, there was no clear path for treatment, but in a two-hour meeting that
included Tobey, her family, Dr. Bennett and his team of RBOI experts, they created
one. After an initial surgery and radiation, then a double mastectomy, Tobey was
declared cancer free. She is now1 happily married with a son who will someday
learn all about how brave his mom -eally is. We helped Tobey write her success
story. Let us help write yours.


Visit RBOI.com or call 352.527.0106
to schedule a consultation.


Be a Success Story.


My son loves when
I do the monster voices.
He doesn't know
I already beat the biggest
monster of all.


/o


New Patient Specials


Full Mouth X-Rays, S

Comprehensive Exam 4
We Met All Y Not in conjunction with insurance
We Meet All Your Offer expires in 30 days
Dental Needs, In house denture lab
eluding Implants Free Denture Consults
Including m ln Financing available

Family Friendly Mostin ced

Call today! 352-527-1614
Alexsa Davila,
SDMD DN 15390
Walton Van Hoose,
DMD DN 18101
Citrus Hills Dental
2460 N. Essex Ave., Hernando
Located in the Hampton Square Plaza
It is our office policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payment has the
nght to refuse to pay cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service,
examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding
to the advertisement for the free discounted-offer or reduced-fee service, examination or
treatment Mmn FeeADAcode D0210, D0150


A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


in(aF&l




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


fl


0
istz ....ng-a
isew Patient


Welcomes
Our Staff


"e elcal
en
Ajen er
I Y y ^-'-^mm!mwb


Appropriate, comprehensive and timely treatment for our patients, with services
conveniently located all in one place, is the sole purpose of Christ Medical Center.
This multi-specialty group offers trusted medical care where physicians and practitioners
work together to speed recovery and keep costs down for the patient. We offer expanded
medical services for new patients and those formerly seen at Citrus Diabetes Treatment
Center. We believe if you choose CMC for your healthcare needs, you'll agree it is
simply the best comprehensive care you will find anywhere.


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 A9


(hr





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Not at home on the range


Know there are cou-
ples who enjoy cooking
together and make it
look like a well-
rehearsed bal-
let. They savor
the aroma of
their secret
recipe for wild
salmon over
lemon cous-
cous, stir each
other's soups
and sample
each other's
sauces. Their MUL
skills are com-
plementary one cuts
and cleans, while the other
sautes and bastes. These
couples can't wait to be in
the kitchen together.
Sue and I are not one of
those couples. When we
are both in the kitchen, we
bump into each other. We
are forever reaching for
the same knife, the same
pan or the same spice at
the same time.
I shut the refrigerator
door at the moment she
wants to open it; I use the
burner on the stove for my
omelet when she wants to
use it for her tea.
She thinks I am in her
kitchen; I think she is in
mine.
I love curry. The smell
alone makes her sick. I
love bell peppers; she's al-
lergic to them. I love to ex-
periment and have never
cooked anything the same
way twice. If it's in the
house, it's in the pan.
I think recipes are a
guideline; she thinks they
are dogma.
I have stolen magazines
from the doctor's office if
they have recipes for
things I might like.
Hey, don't judge me. And


don't tell me I'm the only
one who does that.
Sue, of course, would
never do that.
Her recipes sit
in a well-worn
box, yellowed
with age and
handed down
from her
mother and
grandmother
and earlier gen-
M rations. All
you have to do
.LEN is translate a
few words, like
"gill," "churn" and "sweet-
meats," from medieval to
modern English, and most
of the recipes still work
today It's like eating in
Colonial Williamsburg
every night. Dress up for
dinner and wear your best
buckled shoes.
About twice a week, Sue
will say, "Oh, I forgot to eat
lunch." Should someone
like that even be allowed
in the kitchen? I can re-
member every time in my
whole life when I forgot to
eat never.
Right now I am thinking
about what I'll be having
for lunch two Saturdays
from now what it should
be, how long it will take to
prepare, what I will have
to buy to make it.
Sue would be happy to
live in our much-predicted
future where breakfast is a
red pill, lunch is a blue pill
and dinner is a green pill.
But she never eats break-
fast, so I'd end up eating
her red pill.
Shopping with Sue for
food is a nightmare.
I'll put a box of kosher
salt in the cart and she'll
say, "No, we have some at
home."


Right now I am
thinking about
what I'll be
having for lunch
two Saturdays
from now.

"What about that
chicken?"
"We have chicken in the
freezer."
When we get home, I
ask, "Where is the salt?"
She digs through a cup-
board and hands me a 10-
year-old box of kosher salt
It is as hard as a rock. The
salt is not simply stuck to-
gether but has become one
solid crystal. You'd have to
hire a diamond cutter to
split it. I could sell the
thing on the Home Shop-
ping Network as the
world's biggest non-
precious jewel.
The only thing in the
world harder than this
chunk of stone is the ice-
encrusted mystery chick-
en parts that she has
pulled from the freezer.
Mmmmm, yummy
All we need now is a
knife, a fork and a good
jackhammer.
Thank goodness we
agree on the important
things, like religion, poli-
tics and children. And
we've agreed on one other
big thing: to eat out much
more often.


League of Women Voters officers


Special to the Chronicle
The newly formed League of Women Voters of Citrus County has selected officers.
They are, from left: Dottie Carson, Floral City, treasurer; Maria Pettibone and Susan
Moore, both of Citrus Springs, co-presidents. There had been no active league in the
county for about 12 years. The next meeting will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 9, at
the Central Ridge Library. All men and women are invited. For more information, call
Linda Myers at 352-746-0655.


March 25-29 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
No meals served;
spring break


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Slilced turkey
with gravy, potatoes O'Brien,
carrot coins, sugar cookie,
slice whole-wheat bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Beef and
mushroom penne pasta,
mixed vegetables, garlic
spinach, pineapple, slice
wheat bread with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Baked


chicken thigh with gravy,
mashed potatoes, green
beans, graham crackers,
slice whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Hamburger
patty and bun with ketchup
and mustard, baked beans,
yellow corn with diced
tomatoes, mixed fruit, low-fat


milk.
Friday: Good Friday. All
sites closed.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
Ion. For information, call Sup-
port Services at 352-527-
5975.


Homosassa 621-7700
Crystal River 795-8600 V
Inverness 860-1037
TERMITE SPECIALISTS
SINCE 1967
J3USH.
( PEST CONTROL
Toll Free 1-877-345-BUSH
www.bushhomeservices.com


'REE INSPECTIONS





iw
-' B,
A~iHBzG~t Mu~ln


-IEFNJ APPOINTMENTS.lr r,. ,,,.,,. ,, RECOMMENDED... .
000EFNJ APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED


Expansion we've expanded our services lo meel Ihe
growing needs of the
Nature Coast.
Rapid Response
Oak Hill Hospital lowers above Ihe resi as the only
hospital in the area to offer 24/7 in-house radiology
coverage. Our board-certified team of radiologists are
on-site around the clock, which means you get the
imaging results and consultations you need within
minutes-whether it's 2 a.m. or 2 p.m.
Oak Hill Hospital provides the most comprehensive
nationally accredited radiology services in our area
with caring, highly trained staff.


CT (Adults and Pediatrics)
Adults and Pediatrics
Head
Neck
Chest
Abdomen
Ultrasound
Gynecological
General &Vascular Ultrasound
Service to include: Peripheral Vascular
Cerebrovascular, Abdominal Vascular
Breast and Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy
Nuclear Medicine
Planar
Spect
Nuclear Cardiology
MRI
Head
Spine
Body
Musculoskeletal
MR Angiography
Mammography


INSIST ON OAK HILL HOSPITAL.

National Accreditations


Total Knee &Totll
Hip Replacemeit
CerUcallil


Mnal.niy ik Center
Spinal Fusian Profa


SACR




- Oak Hill

Hospital


11375 CorteO.O ,S ps.E8A.


A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


COMMUNITY


11





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHALLENGE
Continued from Page Al

"They're doing the most
dangerous thing in their
lives and have no profes-
sional training before-
hand," said Hess, an
Inverness resident.
"You're not going to have a
pilot take off in an air-
plane after just reading
about it in a book."
Melissa did not know
how to react when her tire
left the pavement. Today,
because of a statewide
program that kicked off in
Citrus shortly after
Melissa and Molly's death,
other teens may be more
fortunate under identical
circumstances.
The Florida Sheriff's
Association Teen Driver
Challenge teaches young
drivers tips on safe driving
and avoiding crashes.
Unlike driver's training,
which focuses on rules of
the road and staples such
as slowing, braking, park-
ing and maintaining
speed, the Teen Driver
Challenge places partici-
pants in controlled set-
tings where they learn
evasive maneuvers, taking
tight turns and correcting
a skidding car.
Teens bring their own
cars to the driver chal-
lenge. The only time
they're not behind the
wheel is on the "skid pad,"
where a sheriff's deputy
takes teenage passengers
through hydroplane drills.
"The Teen Driver Chal-
lenge puts them through
difficult situations," said
assistant superintendent
of schools Mike Mullen, a
former Citrus High School
principal. "From my son's


TEENS BEHIND THE WHEEL
* Vehicle crashes are the No. 1 cause of death
among teenagers.
* Teenagers make up 14 percent of all drivers.
* Teenagers are 33 percent more likely to be in a
fatal crash than all other age groups combined.
* More than half the crashes that kill teens occur on
weekends. The most dangerous time for a teen on
the road is 9 p.m. to midnight.
* 62 percent of teens who die are passengers.
* 16-year-olds are four times more likely to die in a
crash than any other drivers.
* When a teen driver is involved in fatal crash,
38 percent of victims are in the other car.
* Teens have the lowest seatbelt use of all drivers.
The rate is lower with other teens in the car.
Source: Citrus County Sheriff's Office


perspective, he told me it
was the best thing he's
ever gone through."
Experts: Challenge
has saved lives
Teenagers have a signif-
icant incentive to take the
course: It's required to re-
ceive a parking permit at
the county's three high
schools.
Since the program
began in 2007, nearly 2,500
students, mostly juniors
and seniors, have taken
the Teen Driver
Challenge.
Citrus is the only county
in Florida to offer the
course with cooperation
between the sheriff's of-
fice and school district.
While other counties pres-
ent the course on week-
ends and during summer,
Citrus County students are
excused from school for a
day to complete the
course.
The district offers the
Teen Driver Challenge to
students even if they don't
intend to drive a car to


"We Cater to Cowards!"
General & Cosmetic Dentistry
HONE PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE
FREE SECOND OPINION.
Most Insurance Accepted Lcense #DN

L Ledger Dentistry
0 Jeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.

Ledgerdentistry.com Se HablaEspanol
Next to ACE in Homosassa
(352) 628-3443


school. Sheriff's Sgt. Joe
Palminteri, who heads up
the program, said about a
third of the participants
are not there to qualify for
the parking permit.
"It's their parent's de-
sire," he said.
And, while a Citrus High
School student com-
plained in a letter to the
editor last week about the
pitfalls of not taking the
class she received five
$15 tickets for parking on
campus without a permit
- supporters of the pro-
gram point to a telling
statistic.
According to the Florida
Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles,
Citrus County crashes
claimed 121 lives from
2007 to 2011.
None of those fatalities
involved teenage drivers
who had gone through the
driving challenge, Palmin-
teri said.
Both Palminteri and
school board member Pat
Deutschman say that is not
a coincidence.


They're doing the most
dangerous thing in their lives and
have no professional training
beforehand. You're not going to
have a pilot take off in an
airplane after just reading about
it in a book.
Tim Hess
father of a teenage who died in a vehicluar accident in 2007.


"I actually believe
they're learning something
subconsciously that
they're being a little bit
more responsible and ma-
ture in their decisions,
Palminteri said. "I've had
a student come to me a
year or two later and say, 'I
almost crashed in June,
but I remember something
you talked about."'
Deutschman, who along
with Hess and other com-
munity leaders helped get
the program off the
ground, said the results
are astounding.
"Having been a school
board member the last 14
years, I can tell you I've at-
tended a lot of funerals,"
she said. "There's nothing
more heartbreaking than
attending the funeral of a
teenager, especially one
who died in an accident
that could have been
prevented."
Hess said his daughter
Melissa was not prepared
for the unexpected.
"Something bad hap-
pened and she didn't know
how to get out of it because
she didn't have the skills,"
he said.
With another high
school graduation two
months away, it's a difficult


time of year for Tim and
Lori Hess. But they have
gratitude as well. Their
granddaughter Haleigh,
born 10 months after


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 All

ON THE NET
Teen Driver Challenge:
www.flsheriffs.org/our
_program/youth_
programs/teen-driver-
challenge/

Melissa's death, turns 5
years old today.
The Teen Driver Chal-
lenge serves as a legacy to
Melissa and Molly
"We did not want to see
other families go through
what we went through. It's
a living nightmare," he
said. "We know the girls
continue to make a differ-
ence. Melissa and Molly
have saved kids' lives."


BEVERLY HILLS LIOUORS

3898 N. Lecanto Hwy., (Hwy 491) Beverly Hills, FL 34465

(352) 7496-7723



I - .

- Lm W O V 11 m 6


2IAYSEIL


Sun. 324, Mo. 3/2


2IAY PCA


Sun. 324, Mo 3/2


Sun. 324, Mo 3/2


2 DAY SPECIAL:
Sun. 3/24, Mon. 3/25
Coupon Required.
Limit 2 per household.





A12 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


WHEEL
Continued from PageAl

moved to Citrus County
from Tennessee three
years ago, said he knows of
teens who drink and drive
drunk.
"A lot of kids get trashed
and drive home. Some of
these kids do not need to
be on the road," Schel-
strate says. "Drinking and
driving is more rampant
than people think in Citrus
County. Not just teens -
adults, too. People think
it's an OK thing to do.
There's a lot wrong with it.
Kids come out of parties
blasted and they don't
care."
MEN
Amsler and Briggs di-
rect drivers through a se-
ries of exercises. They
include figure-8 turns that
simulate interstate on-
ramps; forward and back-
ward serpentine, which
teach drivers to make
sharp turns in tight spaces;
evasive-maneuver situa-
tions; and T-shaped
courses that allow drivers
to pull in and back out of
narrow spots.
Briggs says the lane
widths on the course are
the same as on the high-
way He says the course is
designed to give teen driv-
ers the actual feel of real-
life situations.
Schelstrate drives
slowly through each
course. He doesn't want to
hit any of the cones but,
like just about everyone
else, he eventually does.
Briggs keeps an eye on
the drivers.
"This isn't really a pass-
fail type course," he says.
"We want them to learn
their abilities. Get them to
understand their
limitations."
Briggs has taught the
Teen Driver Challenge
since its start in 2007. One
of the program's partici-
pants was his own son,
who at the time was a 16-
year-old CHS student.
"I was probably a little
harder on him than the
others," he says.
The program teaches
young drivers not to over-
react during certain situa-
tions. The course includes
a stretch where the right


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Deputy Rich Briggs hopes students remember safe driving tips when they're out on
the road.


HYDROPLANING
Hydroplaning occurs
when water gets
between tires and the
road. You are riding
on top of the water.
Take foot off gas, no
braking, steer
straight. If start to
slide, turn into the
spin.
Source: Citrus County
Sheriff's Office

wheels leave the pave-
ment onto dirt and gravel.
Instructors tell drivers not
to jerk the car back onto
the pavement because
that's how rollovers
happen.
The lesson is not lost on
Schelstrate.
"You can't do whatever
you want in your vehicle,"
he says.
SE
The skid pad is the high-
light, though it's not nearly
as fun as it once was. Until
last year, teenage drivers


Drinking and driving is more
rampant than people think in
Citrus County. Not just teens -
adults, too. People think it's an
OK thing to do.
Mac Schelstrate
17-year-old driver.


got behind the wheel of a
deputy's car for the skid
and hydroplane exercise.
The sheriff's office de-
cided to play it safe and
now has deputies conduct
the exercise, with
teenagers in the car as
passengers.
Deputy Amsler's in-
structions are simple:
Steer into the skid and
take your foot off the gas
and brake pedals.
He takes groups of stu-
dents onto the wet course,
gaining high speed and
sending the car into spins.
Amsler keeps his hands on


the wheel, but pulls his
foot off the gas. In a brief
moment, the car comes to
a sudden stop.
"Crazy, isn't it?" Amsler
says.
Afterward, Amsler and
Briggs bring teens back
into the classroom.
"Either one of us going
to catch you speeding or
doing something silly?"
Amsler asks.
Briggs says he hopes the
teens remember lessons
when they need them.
"Make sure you hear my
voice," he says, "before
you crash."


SAFETY TIPS
* Make sure tires are properly inflated for control of
car.
* Give yourself 12 to 14 inches from the steering
wheel to be protected from the air bag.
* Wear shoes not flip-flops, which can become
wedged under the brake or gas pedal.
* Do not brake while steering into a turn. Always
brake beforehand and then steer into the turn.
* Before turning from a stop sign, look left, then
right, then left again.
* Watch for motorcycles. They are small and can
easily be hidden in a blind spot.
* Maintain a 2-second distance from the car in front
to give time to stop or avoid problems.
Source: Citrus County Sheriff's office


Mac Schelstrate maneuvers his way through the Teen
Driving Challenge course.

OFF THE ROAD?
One of the biggest mistakes inexperienced drivers
make is over-correcting or jerking the steering
wheel, causing a vehicle to become unstable. This
could cause the vehicle to roll over.
If you run off the road:
Don't panic.
Take foot off the gas and don't brake.
Steer straight until there's a safe return to the lane.
If no safe return, pull all the way off road and bring
car to stop.
Source: Citrus County Sheriff's Office


Innie or Outi


They Hold Identical Digital Technologies

But, which hearing aid style is best for you? The one that
hides inside your ear canal or the one that hides outside of it.
Dan Gardner, CEO of Gardner Audiology, holds his new Innie
hearing aid. He designed it to
hide inside the ear canal.

Participants are being sought for a
.... comparison study of Gardner's
exclusive new completely in canal
hearing aid with a model that is fit
-behind your ear. In exchange for
sharing your opinion on a
questionnaire, you will receive a
r free in office custom fitting of both
models. All services are performed
by audiologists with an advanced
university degree in just one visit.

Call 795-5700
to schedule a candidate screening
3000 Central Florida residents have participated in Gardner Audiology research studies.





i M111 M


INVERNESS
In Office of Ramia Nathan, MD
820 S. Bea Ave., Inverness, FL


CRYSTAL RIVER
700 SE 5thTerr., Ste. 11
Crystal River, FL


www.gardneraudiology.com


TERMITES ARE


SWARMING!




















DuPont lAltrisetTERMITICIDE
-I-
Jl' -^
..'-s


iwww.CitrusPest.com





r For Solutions To All Your Post Problems. Call Today! BBB
406 N.E. 1ST ST., CRYSTAL RIVER CENSE
(352) 563-6698 (866) 860-BUGS "tee


e?TM





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Sheriff's office honors employees


Deputy James Wilson and Deputy Laura Anstead were
awarded the Medal of Distinction for their heroic actions in
the line of duty. Anstead was awarded her medal for
displaying a near-perfect reaction to a life-threatening
situation involving a suspect who wanted to commit
suicide by cop. Wilson was honored for breaking out the
window and pulling an elderly driver from burning wreckage.

Citizens recognized for service


Chronicle
The Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office presented its
annual employee awards
Tuesday honoring those
with long-term service and
various in-service com-
mendations. During the
ceremony, the Citizens'
Academy Alumni Associa-
tion presented Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy with a check for
$1,500 to sponsor the
Awards Ceremony. Other
highlights of the ceremony
include:
Deputy James Wilson
and Deputy Laura Anstead
were awarded the Medal of


Distinction for their heroic
actions in the line of duty.
Kristyn Dominy was
presented with the Com-
munity Hero award for
pulling a child out of a
burning vehicle.
Members of the dive
team and marine unit
awarded Certificates of
Commendation for going
above and beyond the call
of duty to find a murder
weapon in a high-profile
homicide case.
Alexander Walicki
and Kimberly Graham re-
ceived a certificate of ap-
preciation for reporting a
bank robbery in progress.


Special to the Chronicle
Ken Perez, Lt. Elena Vitt, Chrissy Messer, Pam
Ferguson, Capt. David DeCarlo and Capt. Doug Dodd were
presented with pins for 25 years of service by Sheriff Jeff
Dawsy. Not pictured are Deputy Gary Atchison and
Deputy Nevin Jenkins. Also receiving service awards
were: 20 years Pat Alford, Derrick Bogart, Ricky Grant
and Steve Smolensky; 15 years Sherry Cook, Chris
Evan, Buddy Grant, Kim Helms, Dale Johnson, Joe
Labrador, Sherri Leahy, John Novy, Cheryl Peruche,
Shannon Phillips and David Seidenstucker; 10 years -
Jamie Brooks, Chris Dearden, Craig Fass, Nick Fiorentino,
Jon Labelle, Diane Mitros, Travis Parsons, Brian Sanders
and Craig Stevens; 62 others received five-year service
awards.


Frank DeLay, Mary
Delay, Marilynn Green,
Sonny Groves, Debbie
Harper, Sammye Johnson,
Charlie Lugsdin, Sarah
Morelock, Paul Morelock
and Rita Troester were
presented a certificate of
appreciation for providing
home-cooked meals and
refreshments to firefight-


ers fighting muck fires
over a multi-day period in
Arrowhead.
ED.S. Disposal em-
ployees Richard Campbell
and Mark Dye, members of
the Waste Watch, received
a certificate of commenda-
tion for noticing and call-
ing 911 about an elderly
person in distress.


Citizen Kristyn Dominy was presented with the
Community Hero award for pulling a child out of a burning
vehicle. On March 5, 2012, while driving east-bound on
Ozello Trail, Dominy was passed by a vehicle traveling
aggressively on the narrow road. She noticed smoke
coming from the rear of the car and shortly after it turned
into a fireball. The car came to a stop on the side of the
road and a little girl was trapped in her seatbelt with her
mother frantically trying to free the child. The mother's
hair and clothes were on fire when Dominy jumped out of
her car to help save the mother and young child. She got
the little girl out of the car and had the mom and girl roll
on the ground to put the fire out. She called 911, put the
woman and the child in her vehicle in case there was an
explosion, and drove them to her house to wait for the
ambulance to arrive. Mom and child suffered severe burns
and were airlifted to Tampa General for care.


The CCSO Dive Team and marine unit received Certificates of Commendation for
working to find a murder weapon in a high-profile homicide case.


provides the highest quality home health care. We excel
at helping patients stay in their homes and are Citrus
County's ONLY HOSPITAL BASED HOME HEALTH.




* Medical Social Worker

* Skilled Nursing

* Home Health Aide


* Physical


Occupational

*Speech


Give your teeth a spring cleaning!




'39



Exam and X-Rays

With extended hours and convenient
locations, our friendly team has expert
dental care to fit your busy lifestyle.
















Smiles

you


Call Toll Free 877.290.2818 ext. 701
to schedule an appointment today!




Christie Dental of Dunnellon
11902 Illinois St. Dunnellon, FL 34431
Christie Dental of Meadowcrest
6015 U. Nordling Loop Crystal River, FL 34429

ChristieDental.com
New patients only Offers may be combined. Offers have no cash value. Fees may be charged for copies of x-rays. Fee advertised is minimum fee
only. Promotion will remain available for 90 days following the final advertisement for the service. THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON
RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO P, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY
OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING
TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINAION OR TREATMENT. ADA#s: D0140,
D0150, D0120, D0180, D0220, D0201 D0272, D0274. FL Lic DN#15428.


I


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 A13


ork"I











NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Fishing


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gay marriage outcomes unknown


Associated Press
Yumiko Roberts of Port
Orchard is dressed
warmly as she tries to
hook a rainbow trout at
the Kitsap Lake Park
fishing pier Friday. She
has her checked
tablecloth in case it rains.


NASA: Sky flash
likely a meteor
NEW YORK- East
Coast residents were
buzzing on social media
sites and elsewhere Friday
night after a brief but bright
flash of light streaked
across the early-evening
sky in what experts say
was almost certainly a me-
teor coming down.
Bill Cooke of NASA's Me-
teoroid Environmental Office
said the flash appears to be
"a single meteor event." He
said it "looks to be a fireball
that moved roughly toward
the southeast, going on vi-
sual reports."
"Judging from the bright-
ness, we're dealing with
something as bright as the
full moon," Cooke said.
"The thing is probably a
yard across. We basically
have (had) a boulder enter
the atmosphere over the
northeast."
He noted the meteor was
widely seen, with more than
350 reports on the website
of the American Meteor So-
ciety alone.
Woman certain
suspect shot baby
BRUNSWICK, Ga. -
The mother of a baby
gunned down in his stroller
said she
has no
doubt a
teenage
suspect is
the man
who killed
her 13-
month-old
De'Marquise month-old
Elkins son, but
family
members say he wasn't
anywhere near the scene.
"That's definitely him,"
Sherry West said Saturday
when she saw the jail
mugshot of 17-year-old
De'Marquise Elkins, who is
charged as an adult with
first-degree murder. Police
also arrested a 14-year-old
who has not been identified
because he's a minor.
On Thursday morning,
West was pushing Antonio
Santiago in his stroller after
a trip to the post office. She
said a teen, accompanied
by a smaller boy, asked her
for money. One of the teens
fired four shots, then walked
around to the stroller and
shot the baby in the face.
Holder averts
prison furloughs
Attorney General Eric
Holder said he has averted
daily furloughs of 3,570 fed-
eral prison staffers around
the country, moving $150 mil-
lion from other Justice De-
partment accounts to stave
off a serious threat to the lives
and safety of correctional
staff, inmates and the public.
Some 38,000 employees
at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons
supervise 176,000 inmates
at 119 institutions, ensuring
security and providing prison-
ers with needed programs.
In a memo Friday, Holder
said congressional passage
of a spending bill keeping
the government open
through the end of Septem-
ber provides no relief from
$1.6 billion in Justice De-
partment budget reductions
that already took effect.
-From wire reports


US Supreme Court

to hear arguments

in upcoming week

Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court can choose from a
wide array of outcomes in ruling
on California's Proposition 8 ban
on same-sex marriage and the
federal Defense of Marriage Act.
The federal law, known by the
shorthand DOMA, defines mar-
riage as the union of a man and a
woman and therefore keeps
legally married gay Americans
from collecting a range of federal
benefits that generally are avail-
able to married people.
The cases will be argued Tues-
day and Wednesday; rulings are
not likely before late June.
The justices might come out
with simple, clear and dramatic
rulings. Or they might opt for
something narrow and legalistic.
The court could strike down


Associated Press
In this Nov. 3, 2008, photo a man holds up a "Yes on 8" sign as a bus
passes, bearing a sign to "Vote No On Prop 8" in Sacramento, Calif.


dozens of state laws that limit
marriage to heterosexual couples,
but it also could uphold gay mar-
riage bans or say nothing mean-
ingful about the issue at all.
A look at potential outcomes for
the Proposition 8 case:
Q. What if the Supreme Court


upholds Proposition 8?
A. This would leave gay Califor-
nians without the right to marry
in the state and would tell the
roughly 40 states that do not allow
same-sex marriages there is no
constitutional problem in limiting
marriage to a man and a woman.


Papal brothers


Francis and

Benedictpray

side by side

Associated Press
CASTEL GAN-
DOLFO, Italy Two
men in white em-
braced and showed
one another the defer-
ence owed a pope in
ways that surely
turned Vatican proto-
col upside down: A
reigning pope telling a
retired one, "We are
brothers," and insist-
ing they pray side-by-
side during a date to
discuss the future of
the Catholic Church.
Pope Francis trav-
eled Saturday from the
Vatican to this hill town
south of Rome to have
lunch with his prede-
cessor, Benedict XVI, an
historic and potentially
problematic melding of
the papacies.
In a season of ex-
traordinary moments,
starting with Benedict's
resignation and climax-
ing with the election of
the first Latin Ameri-
can pope, Saturday's
encounter provided
perhaps the most en-
during images of this
papal transition as
popes present and past
embraced, prayed and
broke bread together
"It was a moment of
great communion in the
church," said the Vati-
can spokesman, the Rev
Federico Lombardi.


\1


Associated Pre
In this photo provided by the Vatican paper L'Osservatore Romano, Pope Franci
left, and Pope emeritus Benedict XVI pray together Saturday in Castel Gandolf
Pope Francis has traveled to Castel Gandolfo to have lunch with his predecess
Benedict XVI in a historic and potentially problematic melding of the papacies th
has never before confronted the Catholic Church. In the chapel where they prayer
together, Benedict offered Francis the traditional kneeler used by the pope.


Samplings from Anne Frank's tree head to t


Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS
Saplings from the chestnut
tree that stood as a symbol
of hope for Anne Frank as
she hid from the Nazis for
two years in Amsterdam are
being distributed to 11 loca-
tions in the United States as
part of a project that aims to
preserve her legacy and
promote tolerance.
The tree, one of the Jew-
ish teenager's only con-
nections to nature while
she hid with her family,
was diseased and rotted
through the trunk when
wind and heavy rain top-
pled it in August 2010. But
saplings grown from its
seeds will be planted start-
ing in April, when the Chil-
dren's Museum of
Indianapolis will put the
first one in the ground.
The 11 U.S. locations,
which include a park me-
morializing 9/11 victims in


nificance to civil right
social justice in the U.
cording to a news re
from the center
The tree is refer
several times in the
Anne Frank kept durii
25 months she remain
doors until her family
arrested in August 194
"Nearly every mor
go to the attic to blo
stuffy air out of my lu
she wrote Feb. 23,
"From my favorite sp
the floor I look up a
blue sky and the
chestnut tree, on w
branches little rain'
shine, appearing lik
ver, and at the seagull
other birds as they gli
the wind."
A global campaign
save the chestnut
launched in 2007. Th
was granted a last-m
reprieve after a bat
court, but age and n
ultimately brought it d


New York City, an
Arkansas high school that
was the heart of the deseg-
regation battle and Holo-
caust centers in Michigan
and Washington state were
chosen by The Anne Frank


Center USA from 34 appli-
cants.
Winners were selected
based on their commitment
to equality, demonstration
of the consequences of in-
tolerance or historical sig-


Such an outcome probably
would trigger a political cam-
paign in California to repeal
Proposition 8 through a ballot
measure and could give impetus
to similar voter or legislative ef-
forts in other states.
Q. What if the court strikes
down Proposition 8?
A. A ruling in favor of the two
same-sex couples who sued to in-
validate the voter-approved gay
marriage ban could produce one
of three possibilities. The broadest
would apply across the country, in
effect invalidating constitutional
provisions or statutes against gay
marriage everywhere.
Or a majority of the justices
could agree on a middle option
that applies only to California as
well as Colorado, Delaware,
Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, New Jer-
sey, Oregon and Rhode Island.
Those states already treat gay and
straight couples the same in al-
most every respect through civil
unions or domestic partnerships.
The only difference is gay couples
are not allowed to marry Gov John
Hickenlooper, D-Colo., signed his
state's civil unions law Thursday



Rebels


1 seize


air base


in Syria

Capture latest
triumph against
President Assad
Associated Press
BEIRUT Syrian
rebels Saturday seized a
major air defense base
in a strategic region in
the south near the Jor-
danian border, the latest
battlefield triumph for
fighters seeking to top-
ple President Bashar
Assad, activists said.
Fighters with a rebel
group active in the south
stormed and seized con-
trol of the base used by
the 38th Division after a
16-day siege, according
to a statement posted on
websites of the group
known as the Yarmouk
Martyrs Brigade. The
base near the village of
Saida is situated along
the international high-
way linking the Syrian
capital, Damascus, with
Jordan to the south.
Fighting in Syria's
southern provinces bor-
dering Jordan and Israel
has increased sharply in
the past few days. The
ess Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said
so. dozens of people, mostly
0.or opposition fighters, were
at killed in heavy clashes
ed this week in the
Quneitra region along
the cease-fire line be-
tween Syria and Israel
in the Golan Heights.
S The Britain-based
Group, which relies on a
Network of activists on
the ground, said it had
ts and documented the deaths
S., ac- of 35 opposition fighters
lease and contact had been
lost with more than 20
enced others believed to have
diary died in the fighting.
nrig the Dozens of others were
ed in- wounded, the group said.
y was The fighting in the
44. area intensified mid-
ning I week after rebels seized
w the a village and parts of
ungs," other villages, closing in
1944. on the strategic plateau
)ot on Israel captured from
at the Syria in 1967 and later
bare annexed.
hose If the rebels take over
drops the Quneitra region, it
:e sil- will bring radical Is-
ls and lamic militants to a front
de on line with Israeli troops.
The rebel force com-
gn to prises dozens of groups,
was including the powerful
e tree al-Qaida-linked Jabhat
minute al-Nusra, which the
tle in Obama administration


ature labels a terrorist
down. organization.


Associated Press
Actress Julie Mauro discusses the hiding place of Anne
Frank with students following a performance March 18
in the Anne Frank exhibition at the Indianapolis Children's
Museum in Indianapolis. Mauro portrays Miep Gies, one
of Anne Frank's protectors and the woman who preserved
her diary, in a one-person show at the museum.











EXCURSIONS


* Veterans Notes can
be found on Page A17
of today's Chronicle.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


(0


_


SUZETTE LABOY
Associated Press


I

A
/
I I t


.4


-- -
- -.- /
Associated Press
A visitor and her daughter wade Feb. 12 in the
waters of Anne's Beach near Islamorada.


KEY WEST
The Florida Keys offers every
water activity imaginable,
from sailing to sport fishing.
But a fishing charter or
snorkeling excursion will cost you.
Fortunately, the Keys, a series of
islands spanning more than 100 miles
connected by bridges and causeways,
offer plenty to do at no cost, from
sunset views to nature spots. Driving
the toll-free Florida Keys Overseas
Highway south from Florida City to
Key West takes about three hours,
though you'll want to stop to sightsee.
The drive alone is worth the trip: You
feel as though you are floating over
water as you hop from island to island,
with pristine views on either side. It's
also one of the rare places where both
sunset and sunrise can be seen over
the water, depending on which way you
turn your head.
A couple of tips: Bring snorkel and
flippers so you don't have to rent. If
you plan a hotel stay, find one that lets
guests use kayaks for free. You can fish
off the bridges, but you'll need a
license unless you're here on the
state's two Free Fishing Days,
April 6 and June 8.
For more visitor information,
download a free Florida Keys iPhone
app, or visit www.fla-keys.com.


KEY LARGO
If you're heading south into the
Keys from the Miami or Fort Laud-
erdale areas, Key Largo is the first is-
land you hit. State parks offer great
opportunities for bird watching and
nature photography, but many, like
John Pennekamp Coral Reef State
Park, charge entrance fees. So head
to the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center
(near Mile Marker 93) to see rescued
and rehabilitated wild birds. The
bird sanctuary http://fkwbc.org -
accepts donations but has free ad-
mission. Free brochures guide you
through boardwalks surrounded by
falcons and other wild birds in cages.
Watch out for wild pelicans walking
the boardwalk they won't bite but
they also won't get out of your way
Cross over the Mangrove Wetland to
a beach where birds roam freely
A bicycle and pedestrian corridor
known as the Florida Keys Overseas
Heritage Trail starts in Key Largo
(Mile Marker 106) and stretches 70
miles. It will eventually run the
length of the Keys parallel to U.S. 1.

ISLAMORADA
Known for world-class sport fish-
ing, Islamorada, which calls itself a
village of islands, has a vibrant art
scene with a free art walk event (be-
tween Mile Markers 81 and 82) the
third Thursday of each month spon-
sored by the Morada Way Arts & Cul-
tural District www.morada
wayarts.org. Five galleries stay open
late as artists and musicians line the
streets.
Anne's Beach http://floridakeys


treasures.com/Beaches/annesbeach.
shtml at Mile Marker 73 is a quiet
beach with a rocky shore and shallow
clear blue waters. There's limited
parking but it's rarely crowded.
Stop for a picture with a giant lob-
ster known as Betsy at The Rain Bar-
rel Artisan Village, near Mile Marker
87. The popular figure of a crus-
tacean is just one of many drive-by
attractions on U.S. 1.

MARATHON
Sombrero Beach Park is a lovely
community spot with a crescent-
shaped beach, white sand .niid pI)i I,
trees. Facilities include volle.\ bIll
courts, picnic pavilions, pl.\ .rou,,nd
equipment, restrooms, and sIicm eris
No fee to enter or park. It's open
from 7 a.m. until dusk. To get
there from the Overseas
Highway, turn south
on Sombrero
Beach
Road. .

BIG PINE
KEY
The Lower
Keys have a
more laid-bac k
feel than the
northerly islands,
with fewer restau-
rants and tourist at-
tractions. Signs warn
you to slow down and
watch out for Key deer,
an endangered species.
On Big Pine Key, you can


see the small deer with white tails at
the National Key Deer Refuge -
www.fws.gov/nationalkeydeer. You
can't feed them, but you can watch
them feed; you can also bike or jog
here. To see the elusive lower Keys
marsh rabbit, go in early morning
and stay quiet by the tall grass.
You can also tour the Bat Tower on
Sugarloaf Key www.keyshistory
org/SL-Sugarloaf-Keyhtml at Mile
Marker 17. Just don't expect to see
bats. The 1929 structure was built to
lure bats as a way to combat mosqui-
toes Bats stayed away. but the tower
S'tjald-s -


KEY WEST
Key West is known for beautiful
sunsets, and the place to watch them
is Mallory Square -wwwsunset
celebration.org/.
At the Key West Historic Memorial
Sculpture Garden -www.keywest
sculpturegarden.org you'll find 38
bronze busts of prominent men and
women who had homes there, from
Henry Flagler to Ernest Hemingway
and President Harry S. Truman.
Finally, stop at the
southernmost point in
the ,cntinental U.S. for
a picture it the replica
(-r Il1_e ,:,ncrete
b,---.\ s,:, .\ ,:,t can say
Sio,\ were 90 miles
from1. Cuba.


'. *saHW a "- Visitors to Key Largo
.. *: 1 ^stand on a pier and watch
lthe sunset.
|H11If you're heading south into the Keys from
the Miami or Fort Lauderdale areas. Key Largo is
the first island you hit.
State parks offer great opportunities for
bird watching and nature photography.


The Chronicle and The Accent Travel Group If it's selected as a winner, it will be pub- Please avoid photos with dates on the print.
are sponsoring a photo contest for readers of lished in the Sunday Chronicle. Photos should be sent to the Chronicle at
the newspaper. At the end of the year, a panel of judges will 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River,
Readers are invited to send a photograph from select the best photo during the year and that FL 34429 or dropped off at the Chronicle of-
their Dream Vacation with a brief description of photograph will win a prize, fice in Inverness, Crystal River or any
the trip. Accent Travel Office.


Here are five places in the Keys with free highlights for each:


DREAM
VACATIONS
rfopo Co/(






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Grandma is scared


for grandchildren


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 24, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 16:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
3 [WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' a All-Star Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' News Access
Great Performances Andrea Bocelli Oscar Hammerstein II -- Out of My Great Performances Andrea Bocelli performs Best Of... 'G'
SWED PBS 3 3 14 6 performs love songs. 'G' Dreams (In Stereo) 'G' love songs. 'G'
0 [WiFT) PBS 5 5 5 41 Masterpiece Classic Masterpiece Classic |Masterpiece Classic'PG' |To Be Announced Martin
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' All-Star Celebrty Apprentice A troublemaker News Paid
F NBC 8 8 8 8 News disrupts one team. (N) 'PG' Program
News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Emily settles Red Widow "The News Sports
S[WFTVJ ABC 20 20 20 News Home Videos PG' PG'N a score. (N) PG Recorder" (N) PG Night
2013 NCAA Basketball 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) (In The Mentalist (N) (In 10 News Paid
EB [WTB)CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Tournament Stereo) 'PG' Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14' 11pm (N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's Cleveland The Bob's Family Guy American FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
0 WTVTI FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) a Burgers Show Simpsons Burgers 14' Dad 14' (In Stereo) B Notice 'PG'
B [WCJ~ ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge (N) 'PG' Red Widow (N) PG' News Inside Ed.
N D 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
WC IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge Emil settles Red Widow "The News Castle'PG
B [WFTSABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos 'PG' 'PG' a score. (N) PG' Recorder" (N) PG
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order "Shadow" Law & Order "Burned" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
E CWl) IND 12 12 16 '14' 'PG' Theory Theory 'PG' '*PG' '14' '14'
E D WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 *+' "After.Life"(2009) Christina Ricci. Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris Chris Tampa Paid Born/Ride Honor
IM WACRX TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Paid Passion! Journey Paid Connec Jim Raley Dayna Brody
S4 King of Two and Two and Engagement CSI: Miami "Entrance CSI: Miami "Bunk" (In Cold Case "The Last Jere Gui '
S CWTH cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens Half Men Half Men Wound"'14'B Stereo)'PG'B Drive-lIn"'PG'B v.. 1-,1.
Casita Big Rotary Spy Inverness Your Citrus County Court I Spy Y' Eye for an Fam Team
M YKEFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Games Spotlight Eye
ID CWMX) FOX 13 7 7 FOX 35 News at 6 Burgers Cleveland Simpsons |Burgers IFam. Guy |American FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ(N)'PG'B
S[WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. INoticiero Agquy Ahora (SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina'PG'(SS) Saly Pimienta 'PG' Comed. Noticiero
I WXPX ION 17 Monk 'PG' Monk 'PG' Monk 'PG' Law Order: C Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
aEi) s 54 48 7 Ste: ;to Storage: Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Bates Motel'14'"
5448 54 25 27 NY [NY Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
5 5 "The Marine" (2006) John Cena. Thugs The Walking Dead The Walking Dead (N) Talking Dead "This The Walking Dead
S 55 64 55 kidnap the wife of a solder. PG-13' "Prey" 'MA'" 'MA' Sorrowful Life." 14' 'MA'
Wild West Alaska (In Wild West Alaska (In Wild West Alaska (N) Finding Bigfoot: Further Finding Bigfoot (N) (In Finding Bigfoot (In
(AND 52 35 52 19 21 Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'14' (In Stereo) '14' Evidence'14' Stereo 'PG' Stereo) PG'
(1L=Y) 96 19 96 (The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game The Gae Husbands Second Don't Sleep! Hosted by
96 19 96 '14' 14 14' '14' '14' 14 14' '14' T.J. Holmes'PG'
[BAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Married to Medicine Housewives/Atl. Happens Fashion
"My Best *** "Hot Tub Time Machine"(2010, Comedy) John Daniel Tosh: Happy Tosh.O Workaholics Comedy Bill Burr:
27 61 27 33 Friend" Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson. R' BThoughts'MA, L 14'm Central Let It Go
S** "Young Guns 11" (1990, Western) Emilio ** "Overboard"(1987 Comedy) Goldie Hawn. An amnesiac million- CMT Music Awards
_____98 45 98 28 37 Estevez. (In Stereo)'PG-13'airess is duped by a cunning carpenter. (In Stereo) PG' 2012'PGL, rL
[ 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess |On 60 Minutes on CNBC Hotel: Marriott American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
(CN) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Stalker: Reagan Piers Morgan Live CNN Newsroom (N) Stalker: Reagan
( 46 Austin & A.N.T. Austin & Austin & Dog With a Shake It Dog With a Jessie A.N.T Shake It Good Jessie
46 40 46 6 5 Ally'G' Farm'G' AllyG Ally AyG' BlogG' Up!'G' Blog'G' 'G' FarmG' Up! G' Charlie 'G'
(ESPNJ 33 27 33 21 17 World/Poker Winter X Games Tignes. From Tignes, France. (Taped) B SportsCenter (N)
( 34 28 34 43 49 Women's College Basketball |Women's College Basketball |2012 Word Series of Poker "
[EWiN1 95 70 95 48 This Side of Eden World Over Live |Solemn Mass of Palm Sunday From Rome IFeasts Bookmark
S 29 52 29 20 28 "Remember- ***i "The Blind Side" (2009, Drama) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do *** "Twister" (1996) n Hunt. Storm chasers race to
29 52 29 20 28 aTtns" white couple adopts a homeless black teen. PG-13 test a new tornado-monitoring device.'PG-13'
S* "House of D" (2004 Comedy-Drama) "Jack" (1996, Fantasy) Robin Williams, ** "What Dreams May Come" (1998) Robin
(JiL) 118 170 AntonYelchin. (In Stereo PG13Diane Lane. (In Stereo) PG-13' Williams. (In Stereo)'PG-13'"
(Efl 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
[FO1 26 56 26 Diners |Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
[iSFL) 35 39 35 NHL Hockey |Panthers World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
S*** "Taken" (2008, Action) Liam Neeson, ***" 'The Fighter" (2010) Mark Wahlberg. Two brothers *** "The Fighter" (2010, Drama)
(X9) 30 60 30 51 Maggie Grace, Famke Janssen. PG-13 reunite to train for a historic boxing match.'R' Mark Wahlberg. R'
Gr F) 727 67 727 PGA Tour Golf LPGA Tour Golf Kia Classic, Final Round. Central |PGA Tour Golf Arnold Palmer Invitational, Final Round.
S**5 "The Good **+ "The Good Witch's Family" (2011, ** "The Good Witch's Charm" (2012, Frasier PG Frasier
NEE) 59 68 59 45 54 Witch's Gift" (2010) Drama) Catherine Bell, Noah Cappe. B Drama) Catherine Bell, Chris Potter. G'B
302 201 302 2 2 Kings Point (In Stereo) ** "Rock ofAges"(2012, Musical) Julianne "Phil Spector" (2013) Al Pacino. **+ "Cowboys & Aliens"(2011)
S 302 201 302 2 2 MHough. (In Stereo)'PG-13' B Premiere. (In Stereo) M Daniel Craig. PG-13' Be
B 303 202 303 r"Devil" (2010) Real Time With Bill ** "Project X"(2012) Thomas *** "XMen: First Class" (2011, Action) "The
303 202 303 Chris Messina. B Maher'MA'" Mann. (In Stereo)'R'B James McAvoy. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Sitter"'R'
( l 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Extreme Homes 'G' |Hawaii Hawaii House Hunters Reno Hunters Hunt Intl
fiflTl 51 25 51 32 42 he Bible The Jews are enslaved in Babylon. The Bible Jesus brings a dead man back to life. Vikings "Trial" (N) '14' Vikings "Trial"'14'
51 25 51 32 42 '14, V'" (N)'14, V'"
S* "The Killing "Romeo Killer: The Chris Porco Story" (2013, ArmyWives "Blowback" The Client List "Cowboy "Romeo Killer: The
UJE) 24 38 24 31 Secret" (1997) B Docudrama) Eric McCormack. (N) PG Up" 14' Chris Porco Story"
"Born Bad" (2011, Suspense) Meredith *** "Abducted" (2007, Drama) Sarah Wynter. "Teenage Bank Heist" (2012, Suspense)
i50 119 Monroe. (In Stereo) 'NR' B (In Stereo) 'NR' B Maeve Quinlan, Rosa Blasi. (In Stereo) B
"El ** "Hall Pass" (2011) Owen **+ "Two Weeks Notice" (2002) Sandra "Wrath of the Titans" (2012) Girls in
S320 221 320 3 3 Gringo" Wilson. (In Stereo) 'R' Bullock. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' Sam Worthington. PG-13' Bed
[iSNBC) 42 41 42 Caught on Camera ICaught on Camera Caught on Camera |To Catch a Predator Predator Raw |Lockup Orange
Secrets of the Knights Easter Island Wicked Tuna: Hooked Wicked Tuna Mudcats "Dead Man's Wicked Tuna
(flE) 109 65 109 44 53 Templar Underworld 'PG, V' Up (N) "Meltdown" (N) Cover"'14' "Meltdown"
[iIiK 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. Parents Wendell |See Dad Kids' Choice Awards IFull H'se Friends |Friends
(OWii 103 62 103 Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Oprah's Next Master Class Oprah's Next
(nXv) 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped PG' N Snapped (N) 'PG' Snapped: Killer Snapped 'PG'
"Nobel Son" (2007) Shameless "Frank the House of Californication Shameless "Civil House of Calilornicatin Shameless "Civil
340 241 340 4 Alan Rickman. 'R' Plumber' MA' Lies 'MA' Wrongs" (N) 'MA' Lies MA' Wrongs" 'MA'
NASCAR The 10 SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR Faster Faster My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
732 112 732 Victory L. PG, L (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Than Than Car TV PG'
Bar Rescue Bar Rescue "Bro's Got Bar Rescue "Owner Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "In a Car Lot Rescue (N) (In
37 43 37 27 36 "Bottomless Pit" 'PG' to Geaux"'PG' Ousted" PG' 'PG' Pinch" (N) 'PG' Stereo) 'PG'
7 *** "The Pirates! *** "21 Jump Street" (2012, Comedy) Jonah Spartacus: War of the *** "The Amazing Spider-Man" (2012)
370 271 370 Band of Misfits"PG' Hill, Brie Larson. (In Stereo) R'B Damned'MA' Andrew Garfield. (In Stereo) PG-13'B
rlin 36 31 36 NBA Basketball Charlotte Bobcats at Miami Heat. From the Heat Live! Inside the Ship Sportsman Reel Time Fins& Sport
36 31 36 AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (Live) HEAT Shape TV Skins Fishing
"The *** "Dawn of the Dead" (2004, Horror) Sarah Polley. "Zombie Apocalypse" (2011, Horror) Ving "Dead Season" (2011)
31 59 31 26 29 Collector" Milwaukee residents fight zombies in a mall. R' Rhames, Taryn Manning. R' Scott Peat.
(iSS 49 23 49 16 19 "Rush Hour 3" 12013 NCAA Basketball Tournament 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament
**169 53 169 303 "Dial M for Murder" (1954, Mystery) Ray *** "Young Tom Edison" (1940) ***o "Edison, the Man" (1940 Biography) Spencer Tracy,
S169 53 169 30 35 Milland, Grace Kelly. PG Mickey Rooney. 'NR' Rita Johnson, Lynne Overman. 'NR'
Prope Property Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud (In Fast N' Loud "Far-Out Fast N' Loud (In ,i- m i ..,.i "Far-Out
0I1) 53 34 53 24 26 Wars'FG' Wars 'G Stereo)'14' Stereo)'14' Fairlane"'14' Stereo)'14' c iiA.- i
(LJ 50 46 50 29 30 Gypsy Wedding Gypsy Wedding My Big Fat Gypsy Gypsy Wedding Welcome to Myrtle Gypsy Wedding
0 *2* "Red" (2010 Action) Bruce Willis, Morgan "The Ledge" (2011, Drama) Charlie *+ "Brake"(2012) Stephen Dorff. "A
350 261 350 Freeman. (In Stereo) PG-13' Hunnam, Terrence Howard. (In Stereo) 'R'B (In Stereo) R' Get2Gether
2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Third Round: Teams 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Third Round: Teams Southland "Bleed Out"
1S 48 33 48 31 34 TBA. (N) (Live) N TBA. (N) (Live) N 'MA' m
(TOON] ^38 58 38 33 "Percy Jackson & the Olympians" Incredible Looney Oblongs |King/Hill King/Hill |Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
(TRAV) 9 54 9 44 Insane Coaster Waterparks Best Trip Flip Trip Flip Extreme Houseboats Extreme Houseboats Extreme Houseboats
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Upload Upload Upload 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Upload Upload Jokers Jokers
(YLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirs The Golden Girs |Gold Girls Raymond |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
SNCIS "The Tell" 'PG' NCIS "The Good Son" NCIS "The Missionary NCIS "Rekindled" '14' NCIS "Playing With NCIS A terrorist target-
04) 47 32 47 17 18 m (DVS) (In Stereo) 'PG' Position" 'PG' B (DVS) Fire" (In Stereo) 'PG' ing the Navy. 'PG'
CSI: Miami "Die by the CSI: Miami Eric Delko CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami "LA." (In CSI: Miami Getting CSI: Miami Delko for
117 69 117 Sword" '14' returns. '14' '14'" Stereo) '14' Axed" '14' the Defense" '14'
(WGN-EAJ 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! NBA Basketball: Bulls at Timberwolves |Mother News Replay 30 Rock 30 Rock


Dear Annie: My
daughter, "Ash-
ley," is divorced
and has four children.
She has had numerous
volatile boyfriends.
Her latest guy is listed
in the state registry of sex
offenders for molesting
an 11-year-old girl when
he was 19. He served two
years in prison and
claims he is innocent.
Ashley has been letting
the guy stay at
her house. He
is unemployed.
I am fright-
ened for my
grandchildren.
I called the po-
lice, but they
said there is no
prohibition on
having him
live in a home
with young *.
children. The
children's fa- ANN
others have MAIL
been unin-
volved and dis-
interested, but I'm
wondering whether I
should notify them of
what's going on. I also
have considered calling
the local child protection
agency, but I don't want
them to take the children
away from Ashley
If I do any of these
things, she may never
speak to me again, and I
might not get to see the
kids. I will feel terrible if
this guy harms those chil-
dren. What can I do? -
Sitting on the Edge
Dear Sitting: You must
put the children's welfare
above your relationship


Today's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 12 p.m.,
2:25 p.m., 4:50 p.m. No
passes.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
12:25 p.m., 2:50 p.m., 5:15
p.m., 7:40 p.m. No passes.
"The Incredible Burt
Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 3:30 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
12:15 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 7:20 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864


"The Croods" (PG) In 3D.
1:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Croods" (PG) 1:15 p.m.,
4 p.m., 4:30 p.m. No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R)
1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
7:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Admission" (PG-13)
1:50 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Incredible Burt
Wonderstone" (PG-13)
2 p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m.
"The Call" (R) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m.,
7:15 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
4:10 p.m. No passes.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:10 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 7 p.m.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Last but not -
6 Storage container
11 Spiked
16 Counterpart
21 Contend in words
22 Comic's specialty
23 tower
24 Potato state
25 Tested
26 Die down
27 Sheriff's star
28 Flavor
29 Farm animal
30 Over (prefix)
31 Measure
of farmland
33 Oka River city
35 Tax org.
36 Decorative trim
39 Refined
43 Ocean
44 Drop in on
45 Area
47 Mongol
49 Caustic solution
51 Colorful bird
54 Powdered tobacco
57 "Sgt. Pepper's -
Hearts Club Band"
59 Quayle and Rather
63 Fuss
64 Brewed beverage
66 Debatable
68 Captain of fiction
69 Graven image
70 Plaything
72 Fleur-de- -
74 Housetop
76 River deposit
78 Scarlett's home
79 Complete reversal
(hyph.)
82 Related
84 Emotional collapse
86 Cheerful
87 Stringed
instrument
89 Grease
91 Mineral spring
92 Playground game
93 Moose
95 Gentle
97 Fiddling despot
99 rosa
101 A pronoun
104 RR driver
106 Restrain
108 Disney
or Whitman
110 Faux pas


114 Daydreams
117 Handle roughly
119 Inflatable toy
(2 wds.)
121 City near Provo
122 Squad
124 Develop
126 Black cuckoo
127 vera
128 Word
129 Hard fat
131 Laugh out loud
133 Krazy -
of old comics
135 College subj.
136 Punta del -
137 Counselor
139 Vestige
141 Wide-awake
143 Greek letter
145 Sign of the Zodiac
147 Mix up
149 Insect
152 Retired jet letters
154 Veteran (hyph.)
157 Musical interval
161 Annex
162 Ooze
164 British car part
165 Cry of discovery
167 Negligent
168 Century plant
170 Coffee type
173 "- Lucy"
175 Slanted
177 Shiny fabric
178 Chubby
179 Passover meal
180 Utter
181 Handle
182 Beethoven's
"Fur -"
183 Cads
184 Five (prefix)


DOWN
1 Turner's machine
2 Goofed
3 Getting older
4 Take legal action
5 Danson or Nugent
6 Guy
7 Legendary limit
8 Doctors' org.
9 Complete
10 Build
11 --arts
12 Actress Gardner
13 Food fish


Therefore
Cloth workers
Lose
Town in Oklahoma
Small table
covering
Unpleasant task
Steed
Breakfast item
Furrow
Like a moray
401 (k) alternative
Salamander
E pluribus -
English school
Europeans
Old Testament prophet
Send, as payment
Redacts
"-, I'm Adam"
Sun-dried brick
Hue
Pro
Linear measure
Montez
and Albright
Make fit
Waterwheel
Nonstandard speech
Sprite
Implement
Entice
Con game
Custard
Gratuities
Mary Moore
Singer Clapton
Sketched
Chuckle
Fruit with a stone
Dull
Grow together
Pull
Genus of olives
Ali -
Penned
First word
in a toast
Not hidden
Waterfowl
Jefferson's VP
Cargo vessel
Counterfeit
Bowl over
Choose
Ant
Steam bath
Plunder
Spy org.
The subway
in Paris


125 Armed conflict
130 Slave
132 Fury
134 Soft mineral
137 Clio or Erato, e.g.
138 Excessive
paperwork
(2 wds.)
140 Old ship
142 Permit
144 Agreement


Animal enclosure
Feather scarf
Brute
British composer
Fill with joy
Phoenix suburb
- stew
Fracas
Foreign
Manservant
Additional


Public opinion survey
That girl's
By way of
- bono
"- Pinafore"
Poem
Snake
An article


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


3-24 c) 2013 Ul-S, Dist. by Universal Uclick tor UF-S


with Ashley Call the local
child protective agency
and report the situation.
They will investigate to
see whether there is
cause to remove the chil-
dren. If so, it's likely the
kids would be placed
with Ashley's nearest rel-
ative: you.
Dear Annie: "Mom"
thinks her 11-year-old is
too young for sex infor-
mation. As a teacher with
25 years of ex-
perience in a
rural town, I
have found
that most par-
ents are
stunned to find
out how
openly the
kids talk about
S sex in school.
I urge all
parents to be
sure they have
IE'S the final birds-
.BOX and-the-bees
talk with their
children be-
fore they begin elemen-
tary school.
There are now five
types of STDs that are
drug resistant. For this
generation, extramarital
sexual activity is ex-
tremely dangerous. It is
possible to teach children
to delay sex until mar-
riage by putting the focus
on "What is the wise thing
to do?" rather than what
is right or wrong.
Teach your children
that it is wise to first get
an education, then a job,
then marriage, then chil-
dren. Proactive Ten-
nessee Sub


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


41





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.
POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
On March 30, the Legion
Riders will have its annual
poker run, which will begin
and end at the post. The
event is open to all motorcy-
cle organizations and regular
vehicles are welcome.
For information, call Cmdr.
Mike Klyap at 352-302-6096,
or email him at mklyap@
gmail.com. Call the post at
352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
On Wednesday, March 27,
the auxiliary will serve a
shrimp alfredo dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. at the post. Every-
one is welcome. Cost is $7. All
profits support the many pro-
grams of the American Legion
Auxiliary. For more informa-
tion, call Unit President Sandy
White at 352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers ac-
tivities such as meals, bingo,
golf, darts, karaoke, pool and
more for members and guests.
Review the monthly newsletter
for activities and updates, and
call the post at 352-746-0440.
The VFW Post 10087 is off
County Road 491, directly be-
hind Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 352-746-0440.


The Cake Crab Company
Golf League plays at Twisted
Oaks G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Fried fish dinner from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Friday, March 29.
Cost is $8; children younger
than 6 eat for $4. Karaoke by
Mike. The public is welcome.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive,
Inverness, at the intersection
of Independence Highway
and U.S. 41. The chapter hall
is on the corner of Independ-
ence Highway and Paul
Drive. Any disabled veteran
may join us from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. any Tuesday or Thurs-
day at the chapter hall.
Anyone who knows a dis-
abled veteran or their family
who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
DAV Chapter 70 is offering a
$1,000 scholarship for the 2013
school year. The scholarship is
offered to a disabled veteran,
veteran, survivor of a veteran
or dependent of a veteran.
Applications may be picked
up at guidance department of-
fices in area high schools, the
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute, Central Florida Com-
munity College guidance
offices, or by calling John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.


All applications must be re-
turned to the DAV Chapter at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34453 by March 31.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334. One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. Good, clean material
and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org. Men's
Auxiliary meets 7 p.m. first
Wednesday at the post. Call
Neil Huyler at 352-344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at 4.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834


or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252@
tampabay.rr.com. Call or visit
the post for regular events, as
well as meetings. Google us
at VFW 4252, Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and Afghan-
istan. The Korean Campaign
medal remains open, as well.
Call the post for information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call
352-637-0100.
American Legion,
Beverly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many


activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Nominations for officers will
be taken at meetings on
March 26 and April 23 at
7 p.m. Post election is 1 to
6 p.m. May 28, followed by
the meeting and installation of
officers at 7 p.m.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375
Little Al Point, off Arbor Street
in Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first and


third Fridays monthly at the
post home at 4375 Little Al
Point, Inverness. A fish fry will
be served the third Friday,
with fried and baked haddock,
baked potato, baked beans,
coleslaw, tea, lemonade cof-
fee and soft drink for $8.
Serving will begin at 4:30 p.m.
All musicians are welcome, as
well anyone who wants to
come and enjoy the music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at
Citrus Hills Country Club,
Rose and Crown restaurant,
Citrus Hills. Call John Lowe at
352-344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For information

See NOTES/Page A18


Look W at
Ust .,




CHRONICLE COUPONS




NIGHT
Present this coupon at
ticket booth for $2 off a


r
*-


.Midway Armband during
Chronicle Night at the
)Citrus County Fair
\ Armbands regularly priced at $20
-- - - - - -
CHRONICLE NIGHT
OFFER VALID
FOR $2 OFF A
MIDWAY
SO ARMBAND ON
MI DWYi WEDNESDAY
|' MIDWAs MARCH 27
ARMBAND(CIItoidI
E P-=E7B97E000~bff


&kknt CO JCamivar Paradise
1. lu* W June6,2013
4 Nights from
Tampa to Cozumel
Category 4A Category 6B
Interior Oceanvlew
from l ltpp from ofl IDpp
Lower rates may be available.
Please call for details
rates are based on double occupancy and availability at time of bookinQ.


If you want to

advertise here in the

Great Getaways


call 563-5592


PLANTATION Reservation Suggested

' 352-795-5797
Everything Outdoors www.crystalriverdivers.com
Plantation on Crystal River, 9301 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River
Spectacular
SPECIALS





STARS OF AFRICA SPECIAL La, rED rAE
Enjoy 3 nights in Cape Town, 3 nights in Kruger National ParkArea
and 1 night in Johannesburg before embarking on your 4-night safari
cruise, ending with 2 nights in Victoria Falls Hotel Check-in Dates'
March 11, April 15, 29, May 27, June 3, July 8 & 22, 2013
Starting from $8,995* per person
Africa Wildlife Cruises & Included Features
4 nights in a Balcony stateroom All meals included with complimentary wvne and
Full day Chobe National Park game dnve beer on board | Premier hotel accommodations
Exclusive private picnic in Chobe National Park Exclusive luxury safari lodges
Cultural interaction with Kasenu villagers Daily morning/afternoon/evening game drives
Excursions in a mokoro, a traditional dugout All meals, drinks and laundry included at lodges
canoe | Traditional African Boma Dinner onshore terms and conditions apply
1123 Sterling Rd., Inverness, FL 34450
STOP BY AND VISIT US TO CHECK OUT THE DAILY SPECIALS!
TALLY-HO Hidden 352-860-2805
Fe a. www.tallyhovacations.com r
/l5o j ~ dmuir@tallyhovacations.com
A DIVISION OFEDUCATIONAL TOURS FL Seller of Travel 10131


Call Ora @ 1-855-335-8082 Toll Free
IP Casino Resort $159 pp/dblocc
Beau Rivage Resort $189 pp/dbloc
Only two casino visits. $55 in free play & 2 food
coupons. Actual Price. No Gimmicks!!
Escorted. Games, movies, etc. No time for
boredom! Refreshments & food in route.
March 24 & April 7


S Becky's liavel Store
VIKING
RIVER CRUISES Great Trips 2014 Celebrity Cruises-
Grand European Tour Australia
Amsterdam to Budapest New Zealand
May 20 2014
May 20, 2014 March 10, 2014
15 days/13 guided tours/5 countries including Air from Orlando
Big Savings Iu Ai from Ondo
Big savings Starting $3196.00 p/p
Starting 4431.00 p/p Govt taxes and transfers are additional.
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 ( 52 O"85
Located Next to Winn Dixie (552) 527*8855
www ibeekystraveqserviellk] com OOU][OP[F[ I


Citrus County's

2013 World's

Greatest

Baby Shower

May 13, 2013
at the Citrus County Auditorium

Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby
Shower! Learn about taking care of
yourself and your baby. Parents of
infants under 6 months old are also
invited. There will be exhibits, games,
door prizes, a scavenger hunt and gifts
for moms, dads and babies!
Sessions: 3-5pm or 6-8pm ,

Call 228-9047
for information.


All


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 A17


*o





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Wedding=

Dezan/Sleeper

Kilee J. Dezan and
Joshua Sleeper of Floral
City exchanged nuptial
vows at 2 p.m. Feb. 22,
2013.
Chaplain Donna
Viglione from The Wed-
ding Chapel in Inverness
officiated.
Witnesses were Aniela
Cyr, the bride's grand-
mother, and Rebecca
Frazier.


For the RECORD


Marriages 3/11/13 3/17/13
Roy Lamar Lashley,
Crystal River/Lisa Jane Bent-
ley, Crystal River
Geoffrey Earl Livengood,
Inglis/Rickie Ann Holiday,
Inglis
Emmett Merritt, Punta


Gorda/Melanie Joy Russell,
St. Augustine
Charles Saavedra,
Dunnellon/Tracie Sue Nellis,
Dunnellon
Don Lyn Sterling,
Inverness/Malissa Mae
Cooper, Dunnellon


FOR THE RECORD
* Citrus County Clerk of the Courts Office lists of
divorces and marriages: call the clerk at 352-341-
6400 or visit the website at www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.


Matthew V. Zarek
Army Spec. Matthew V. Zarek has
graduated from basic infantry training at
Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of training, the
soldier received training in drill and cer-
emonies, weapons, map reading, tac-
tics, military courtesy, military justice,
physical fitness, first aid, and Army his-
tory, core values and traditions. Addi-
tional training included development of
basic combat skills and battlefield oper-
ations and tactics, and experiencing use
of various weapons and weapons de-
fenses available to the infantry
crewman.
Zarek is the son of Allan and Anne
Marie Zarek of Homosassa.
He is a 2007 graduate of Crystal
River High School. He earned an asso-
ciate degree in 2011 from the University
of Central Florida, Orlando.

Dillon T. Ogle
Army National Guard Pfc. Dillon T.
Ogle has graduated from basic infantry
training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks of training, the
soldier received training in drill and cere-
monies, weapons, map reading, tactics,
military courtesy, military justice, physical
fitness, first aid and Army history, core
values and traditions. Additional training


In SERVICE
included development of basic combat
skills and battlefield operations and tac-
tics, and experiencing use of various
weapons and weapons defenses avail-
able to the infantry crewman.
Ogle is the son of Richelle and Law-
rence Ogle of Hernando. He is also the
grandson of Janice Garbig of Inverness.
Kane A. Mack
Army Pvt. Kane A. Mack has gradu-
ated from basic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the
soldier studied the Army mission, his-
tory, tradition and core values, physical
fitness, and received instruction and
practice in basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare and bayo-
net training, drill and ceremony, march-
ing, rifle marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot marches,
and field training exercises.
Mack is the son of Angela and Herb
Mack of Homosassa. He is a 2012
graduate of Crystal River High School.
Thomas A. Diestler
Army Pvt. Thomas A. Diestler has
graduated from basic combat training at
Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the


soldier studied the Army mission, his-
tory, tradition and core values, physical
fitness, and received instruction and
practice in basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare and bayo-
net training, drill and ceremony, march-
ing, rifle marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot marches,
and field training exercises.
Diestler is the son of Laurie Diestler
of Inverness. He is a 2012 graduate of
Citrus High School.
James E. Holbrook
Army Pfc. James E. Holbrook has
graduated from basic combat training at
Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the
soldier studied the Army mission, his-
tory, tradition and core values, physical
fitness, and received instruction and
practice in basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare and bayo-
net training, drill and ceremony, march-
ing, rifle marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot marches,
and field training exercises.
Holbrook is the son of Randy and
Barbara Holbrook of Floral City. He is a
2012 graduate of Citrus High School.


NOTES
Continued from Page A17

about the 40/8, call the Chef
De Gare Tom Smith at 352-
601-3612; for the Cabane,
call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at www.
Post155.org.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. Visit the
chapter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at


7 p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy
Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: April 13 and
May 11.
SERVICES & GROUPS
The Vietnam Veterans
Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 2, at
the Village Inn Restaurant in
Beverly Hills. The group will
discuss final details for the up-
coming April 20 golf tourna-
ment which is the primary
fundraiser for the 11th Veter-
ans Gathering in March 2014.
All veterans who would like to
participate with the organiza-
tion are welcome. The mis-
sion of WG is to assist
veterans and to keep alive the
memory of fallen comrades in
Southeast Asia and other the-
aters of operation.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.

LEAST CRATE LACED MATCH
ARGUE HUMOR IVORY I IDIAT HO
TRIE ED ABATE BADGE SAPOR
HEN EP1I ACRE ORELLIRS
EDGING CULTURED SEA SEEE
REGION TATAR LYE
MACA W SNU F F LONELY DANS.
ADO TEA MOOT NEMO IDOL
DO0L L L ISOFS IL T 0T AR A
ABOUT FACE TOLD DSTA1LSPRIN
MERR Y HARP LARD SPA TAG
ELK MILD NERO SUB
WHO ENG CURB WALT GAFFE
REVERIES MAUL BEACHBALL
OREM TEAM GROW AN I ALOE
TERM SU ET ROAR KAT SOC
ESTE MENTOR TRACE ALERT
TAU ARISES GARBLED
BEE SST OLD-TIMER OCTAVE
EL L SEEP TYRE AHA LAXX
AGAVE MOCHA ILOVE AT IILT
SATIN PLUMP SEDER SHEER
TREAT ELISE HEELS PENTA


3-24


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


For more information, call
Tom Neaman at 352-
586-7126.
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@tampa
bay.rr.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultraray
1997@yahoo.com.
West Central Florida


Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
The Citrus County Vet-
erans Services Department
has announced a case man-
ager will be available during
the week to assist veterans to
apply for benefits and provide
information about benefits.
The monthly schedule is:
First Wednesday -
Lakes Region Library, 1511
Druid Road, Inverness.
Second Wednesday -
Homosassa Library, 4100
S. Grandmarch Ave.,
Homosassa.
Third Wednesday -
Coastal Regional Library,
8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal
River.
Hours will be 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment to meet with the case
manager, call 352-527-5915.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is


open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'
organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition -Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Open spots still remain
for those couples and individu-
als interested in taking a trip
to Hawaii with a group of vet-
erans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, coor-


dinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for Sept.
17 to Oct. 4. Participants will
visit the islands of Oahu (Hale
Koa Hotel), Kauai (Marriott),
Hawaii (stay in the KMC inside
the volcano) and Maui (Royal
Lahina Resort). Reservations
should be made as soon as
possible. Call McLean at 352-
637-5131, or email dmclean8
@tampabay.rr.com.
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-
rial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092. U Ex-military
and retired military personnel
are needed to assist the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary to
help the Coast Guard with
non-military and non-law en-
forcement programs.Criminal
background check and mem-
bership are required. Email
Vince Maida at vsm440@
aol.com, or call 917-597 6961.


Vendors Wanted


Outdoor Adventure Expo


1 Saturday, April 13th 10am-Spm


Tirme. i A One Day Event at The Crystal River Mall that
me will feature Retailers, Demonstrations,

ru n n ing Seminars and Speakers.

out! Indoor and Outdoor Spaces are Available.


i- Fishing, Camping, Boating,
RV, Patio, ATV, Gardening,
Swimming, Snorkeling,
Cycling, Parks and
Recreation, Tennis, Golf,
Travel, Scuba Diving,
Skateboarding, Motor
Sports and other Outdoor
Activity Organizations
and Retailers will
, be Exhibiting.


Call to Reserve Your Space
352-563-5592
Deadline to join March 25th


_____________________________________O E R


CJO0cts Speed NetworkingHours
$T l THURS., APR. 4,2013 5:30-8:00 PM
v FREE SPEED NETWORKING STARTS AT 6:15 SHARP
Pre-Speed Crystal River Mall Old Sears Mall Entrance -1801 NW US Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
soreMarflesei.aon AN EVENING OF BUSINESS MATCHMAKING
SNew Business Hub O F MA C M
Concept Expand your network Maximize your time New contacts every few minutes
Meet face to face with prospective clients, partners & referrals.
COmWlS l Don't miss this fast paced, exciting and innovative opportunity to expand your Network. Only 100 seats available. Register today!
Pre-registration $10 00 /$15 o00atdoor Cost includes 1 beer or glass of wine and appetizers per ticket Tables for brochures provided Immediately followed by a Mixer


Register &
M F 8:10 5:10
Spa(e is limited to
100 Businesses.
(all Mall Office
352-795-2585


A18 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


TOGETHER










SPORTS


Michigan,
Michigan St.
each into Sweet
16 after Saturday
victories./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 College basketball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 NHL, NBA, NHL/B5
0 Golf, auto racing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Beware charging Tiger at Bay Hill


Woods vaults

to top ofPalmer

leaderboard
Associated Press
ORLANDO The shot
looked daunting to Tiger
Woods, and so did the view from
the bunker behind the eighth
green at Bay Hill. Across a
small lake was a large score-
board that showed Justin Rose
off to such a hot start that Woods
was five shots behind and trying
not to lose ground.
Two shots and two putts
changed everything Saturday in
the Arnold Palmer Invitational.
Woods hit what he called his
best shot of the third round, a 6-


iron from 196 yards that settled 12
feet below the hole on No. 15 to
set up a birdie. Minutes later, he
hit another 6-iron from 183 yards
to 20 feet and
slammed his fist Bay Hil
toward the hole
when he made g To see hoa
eagle, his third in golfers at
as three days. tournament
Just like that, Saturday,
Woods was atop Saturday,
the leaderboard,
a familiar spot for him on this
golf course. He finished off his
round of 6-under 66 with two
pars, and when Rose lost energy
and stumbled over the final hour,
Woods had a two-shot lead.
And that's a daunting view for
everyone chasing him.
Woods is 41-2 on the PGA
Tour when he has the outright
lead going into the final round.
"Just because I've won here


I -
w
th
vit
nt
se


doesn't ensure that I'm going to
win the tournament," Woods
said. "The conditions are differ-
ent. The game might be differ-
ent. But the
scores objective is still to
put myself in posi-
all the tion to win the
e Arnold golf tournament
national and somehow get
did Pae it done on Sunday
e Page B4. Over the course of
my career, I've
done a pretty decent job of that"
Woods was at 11-under 205,


Page B4


Tiger Woods pumps his fist
Saturday after making a putt
for eagle on the 16th green
during the third round of the
Arnold Palmer Invitational golf
tournament in Orlando.
Associated Press


madneSS of arch


No. 1 seed

Gonzaga upset

by Wichita St.
Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY Gon-
zaga's gone.
Cleanthony Early and Ron
Baker scored 16 points apiece
and Wichita State hit a season-
high 14 3-pointers, including
seven straight late, to knock the
top-ranked and No. 1 seeded
Bulldogs out of the NCAA tour-
nament 76-70 on Saturday.
The Shockers (28-8) ad-
vanced to the Round of 16 for
the first time since 2006, while
Gonzaga
For all of becomes
March the first
Madness top seed
to be elim-
m Go to inated.
www.chronicle G o n -
online.com and zaga sur-
click on the vived a
basketball to scare in
get live updates the sec-
on all NCAA ond round
men's against
basketball Southern
games. but could-
n't hold up
against a
fellow mid-major from Kansas
whose motto is "play angry"
Miami having fun,
facing Illini today
AUSTIN, Texas Miami players
are having fun at the NCAAtourna-
ment. Even when having to evacu-
ate during the middle of practice.
After a fire alarm went off Sat-
urday and they were escorted
outside for about 25 minutes, the
Hurricanes were rapping, dancing
and having a good time.
Hurricanes coach Jim Lar-
ranaga said going into the tourna-
ment he was going to have more
fun than any other head coach,
and wanted his players to do the
same. They are one victory away
from the round of 16.
Miami (28-6), the No. 2 team in
the East Regional, plays No. 7
seed Illinois (23-12) today.


Associated Press
Gonzaga forward Elias Harris lays a shot in against Wichita State in the first half Saturday in Salt
Lake City. The No. I seeded Bulldogs were knocked off by the No. 8 Shockers in the West region.


UF vies


for spot in


Sweet 16

Third-seeded

Gators play No. 11

Gophers today
Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas Sunday may
feel like old times for Minnesota's
Tubby Smith and Florida's Billy
Donovan. They certainly are fa-
miliar with each other.
The two coaches have three na-
tional championships between
them and a history of intense
head-to-head competition in the
Southeastern
Conference South
dating to the Regional
late 1990s
when Smith NO. 3 UF
was at Geor- vs. No. 11
gia and Ken- Minnesota
tucky and
Donovan Time: 6 p.m.
started at today.
Florida. mTV:TNT
They'll
renew the ri- What's at
valry for one stake: The
game when winner will
Donovan's advance to the
Gators (27-7), Sweet 16 to
the No. 3 face either
seed in the Florida Gulf
NCAA tour- Coast or San
n a m e n t Diego State.
South Re-
gional, face Smith's No. 11 Go-
phers (21-12). The winner
advances to the round of 16.
Smith, who left Kentucky for
Minnesota in 2007, said he's glad to
see Donovan again because it
means he's got his team playing at a
high level. The Gophers' 83-63 win
Friday night over UCLA was his
first NCAA tournament victory in
six years at Minnesota. The Gators
are a perennial national power.
"We have had our battles,"
Smith said Saturday. "If you're
going up against him, you know
your team has probably risen to
that level of good play"
Smith and Donovan knocked
heads for a decade while leading
two of the premiere programs in
See Page B4


-------- ----------------






S* Check & Top-Off All Fluids
Check Tire Pressure on All4 TIres '
27-Point Inspection I
Battery st t
NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! I
All makes & models. Valid on any vehicle, even if purchased elsewhere' I
16- -- - --- - --- 1 ___
2209 Hiiu aij 44 West Ir uerness. FL 34453
LIMP 352.341.0018
Jloveohevysales.conom
CHE [RLET HOURS OF OPERATION:
CTIE Sales 9AM-8PM Mon.-Frt.: 9AM-6PM Sat.
Sertece 8AM-5PM Mori.-Frt.: 8AM-Noort Sat.


UW SERV i'CE COUPO


"I P~ b-I I


i FREE:
SAVE13% "FReE
& we'll inve rnOwdilsLcountI I Chec Ainm t
___________--------------- -----------


I 'I


,*, Oil Change
FR E & Tire Rotation'
-Wheel Alignment $3495
i WliThePurchiaseof4Tlres i $ t ga1


HONA


2219 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
352.628.4600
lovehonda.com
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Soles 9AM-8PM Mon.-Fri.: 9AM-6PM Sat,: 11AM-4PM Sun.
Service 8AM-5PM Mon.-Frt.; 8AM-2PM Sat.


100E5ZS









Plenty of youth programs in Citrus County


PLA Ystarts

for youngsters

on April 8

Special to the Chronicle
The next season of PLAY will
begin April 8. Citrus County
Parks & Recreation's PLAY pro-
grams are designed for children
ages 3 to 5 who are not quite
ready for the organized sports
leagues with in the county
The PLAY programs offered
in the upcoming session include
basketball at the Citrus County
Resource Center on Mondays or
Wednesday, flag football at Bi-
centennial Park on Tuesdays or
Thursday and cheerleading at
Bicentennial Park on Thurs-


days. The next session will begin
the week of April 8. Boys and
girls are welcome to join the six-
week program. After enroll-
ment, each child receives
age-appropriate sports equip-
ment and a team T-shirt.
Registration is open and spots
fill up fast; space is limited. Call
Crysta Henry, recreation pro-
gram specialist for youth pro-
grams, at 352-527-7543 or visit
www.citruscountyparks.com for
more information.
Youth golf lessons
at Pine Ridge
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, in partnership with Pine Ridge
Golf Course, will offer spring youth
golf lessons at Pine Ridge Golf
Course from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday beginning March 27,
and run for five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 15 are eligible


and the cost is $50 per child. In-
struction will be given by golf pro
Randy Robbins and several volun-
teers. During these lessons partici-
pants will learn putting, driving,
chipping, on-course play and on-
course etiquette. Golf clubs will be
provided, but if your child has his or
her own set we encourage them to
bring them along.
For more information, call Crysta
Henry at 352-527-7543 or Randy
Robbins at 352-746-6177.
Kids Triathlon set for
May 11 in Inverness
The Citrus County Kids Triathlon-
Swim/Bike/Run for children ages 5
to 15 years of age will be May 11 in
Inverness.
Early bird registration fee is $20 if
received by April 14 or $25 if re-
ceived between April 15 and May 8.
There will be two divisions for the


children: Juniors (ages 5 to 10) and
Senior (ages 11 to 15), along with a
Tri4Fun Division for all ages that
wish to try.
For any questions or to register,
contact DRC Sports at 352-637-
2475 or www.Citruskidstri.com.
Girl Scouts plan
Survivor Games
Girl Scouts of West Central
Florida invite interested girls and
adults to join them for Survivor
Games, an action-filled afternoon
at Camp Indian Echo in Hudson on
April 14.
Activities will include archery, fire
building and other activities. Girls
kindergarten through 12th grade are
welcome and are encouraged to
bring a friend.
For $12, a girl can experience the
fun-filled day and become a Girl
Scout. For more details and to


RSVP, contact Roni Francois at
rfrancois@gswcf.org or at
813-262-1798.
Register now
for Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center in
Crystal River will be in June and July
at Soquili Stables.
Eight weeklong sessions will be
offered from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Campers can
learn to ride and care for a horse.
There will be equine activities, in the
saddle and on the ground, as well as
crafts, swimming and more.
For more information and to sign
up, visit the website at www.
faithhavencrc.org/camp_soquili.php,
call 352-206-2990, or email
soquili.stables@gmail.com. Like
Camp Soquili on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/CampSoquili.


Adults, play sports


Soflbal

kickball leagues

available

Special to the Chronicle
Citrus County Parks &
Recreations Men's Softball
League games are played
Monday at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River, with
games at 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30
p.m. Startup date is April
1. Registration for teams
has begun.
For more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Co-ed softball
starts up in April
Co-ed softball is beginning
again April 18 with Citrus
County Parks & Recreation.
Games are played at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal
River at 6:30 p.m. Thursday.
Registration for teams has
begun. For more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7540.
Experience
thrill of kickball
Kickball is an exciting game
that can be played by people
from age 18 and older.
Adult game times will be at
6:30, 7:30 and 8:30 p.m.;
games will last one hour or
nine innings, whichever oc-
curs first. Games are played
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River. The new season will
start April 17. Registration for
teams has begun.
For more information, call
Maci at 352-527-7547.
Flag football to
kicks off soon
The Men's Flag Football
League is for adults age 18
and older, and is a very fast-
paced, physical game. If


Special to the Chronicle
Co-ed softball begins April 18, with games played at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River.


you're up for the challenge,
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation will begin the league
Thursday, April 4.
Parks & Rec hopes to in-
crease the number of teams
to expand competition. For
more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
to begin April 23
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's inaugural beach
volleyball season was suc-
cessful and fun. Ten teams of
four players competed.
The new season will start
April 23. Games are played
beginning at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
days at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River. The team fees,
days and times are dependent
on how many teams sign up.
You don't need to be a star
athlete to play; this league is
geared toward family fun and
exercise. Registration has


begun. For more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Commit to Be Fit
race coming April 6
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union will host a 5K
Commit to Be Fit race Satur-
day, April 6. The race is a
fundraiser for the foundation
that supports the health, educa-
tion and well-being of children
in the communities served by
the nonprofit credit union.
The race will begin at
9 a.m. at Wallace E. Brooks
Park, 328 Dampier St., Inver-
ness. Registration is at 8 a.m.
Registration fee is $20; receive
a $5 discount by becoming a
friend on the COMMIT2BFIT
Facebook page. All runners
will receive a goody bag at the
end of their run. The event is
open to all, and can be
walked, run, strolled or jogged.
Visit active.com to register or
show up the day of the event.


Stumpknockers to
do run and walk
Get your running shoes,
your walking' shoes and your
dog for the inaugural Stump-
knockers Elvis Blue Suede
Shoes 5K Run/1 mile walk or
1 mile dog walk Saturday,
April 27, in downtown Inver-
ness. Registration is at 7 a.m.
at Stumpknockers Restau-
rant, 110 W Main St. The
event begins at 8 a.m.
This event is open to any-
one of any age and will include
music, food and prizes. The
best Elvis costume receives a
$500 prize for 5K runners.
Preregistration is $25 by
April 24 and $30 the day of
the event. To register or for
information, visit to www.
hospiceofcitrus.org or
www.elvis5krun.com.
Proceeds from this event
benefit Hospice of Citrus
County's Herry's Kids Pedi-
atric Services.


Nature Coast boys


win Region C Cup


Speaal to the Chronide
The Nature Coast Soccer Club U-16 boys competitive
team won the Florida Youth Soccer Association (FYSA) Re-
gion C Tournament this weekend after a stellar showing in
the preliminary rounds of the tournament. The Nature
Coast's "Lightning" competitive U-16 boys team is com-
prised of Citrus County high school players from The
team members are Sean Flaherty, Colin Spain, Ryan Stevens,
Jordan Burd, Noah McGinnis, Austin Huntley, Tristan Deem,
Justin Eichler, Evan Chapman, Chad Howard, Matt Lopes,
Matt Cook, Ryan Newton, Jake Thatcher, Ryan Howard and
Jake Penn. The team's coaches are head coach Mike Deem
and assistant Coach Mike Penn.


Kitchen masters half marathon


'.4
(^
**!


Special to the Chronicle
Kerri Kitchen won Grand Master Female Champion at
the fourth annual Florida Beach Half Marathon at
Ft. Desoto Park in St. Petersburg on March 17. Kitchen
is sponsored by Rivers Ventures of Crystal River.


Training with Tebow


Special to the Chronicle
On March 17, a group of Nature Coast Soccer players went to train with Tim Tebow at
D1 Sports Training facility in Orlando. The group was invited by Derrick Smith, a 2008
Lecanto High School graduate and soccer trainer for local athletes wanting to improve
their game. Pictured from left is Taylor Falabella, Emily Hooper, Kylie Rice, Tebow,
Andrea Javier, Kaitlyn Parrow and Jon Bloomquist


4


EA. www.chronicleonline.com/countyfair


SCHONICLE
wwwchronicleonline.com


7
v~]
9


PIH O CONTEST
Take your camera to the fair, take some pictures,
submit them online and you could WIN!
Winning photograph will be the cover photo for the April 20th Special
Section "And The Winner Is"which prints all the winners from the fair.
Here are some ideas!


* Riding the Ferris Wheel Eating Cotton Candy
* You and your entry Getting your face painted


Co-sponsored by:




i Ci us C Faib


B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Michigan teams survive and advance


Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Mitch McGary had 21 points and
14 rebounds, and fourth-seeded
Michigan breezed through Vir-
ginia Commonwealth's vaunted
pressure with a clinical per-
formance, beating the fifth-
seeded Rams 78-53 to advance to
the NCAA round of 16 for the
first time since 1994.
VCU (27-9) was relentless in a
46-point rout of Akron on Thurs-
day night, but the Rams met their
match against Michigan's cool-
headed backcourt Trey Burke
and Tim Hardaway Jr. rarely
looked rattled against VCU, and
although Michigan (28-7) com-
mitted 12 turnovers, the Rams
couldn't turn many of them into
quick scoring opportunities.
McGary, a 6-foot-10 freshman,
set season highs in scoring and
rebounding.
Midwest regional

No. 3 Michigan St. 70,
No. 6 Memphis 48
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Gary
Harris scored 16 of his career-high
23 points in the first half to help
third-seeded Michigan State cruise
past sixth-seeded Memphis 70-48,
putting the Spartans in the round of
16 for the fifth time in six years.
Michigan State (27-8) will play the
winner of the Duke-Creighton game
on Friday in the Midwest Regional
semifinals at Lucas Oil Stadium in
Indianapolis.
The Tigers (31-5) advanced in the
NCAA tournament for the first time in
Josh Pastner's four seasons.
The Spartans' top post players
-Adreian Payne and Derrick Nix
- combined for 27 points and 18
rebounds.
No. 12 Oregon 74,
No. 4 Saint Louis 57
SAN JOSE, Calif. Damyean
Dotson scored 23 points, Carlos
Emory added 14 points and hot-
shooting Oregon sprinted past
fourth-seeded Saint Louis 74-57 in
the NCAA tournament.
Dotson made his first five 3-point-
ers to carry the 12th-seeded Ducks
(28-8) into the second weekend for
the first time since 2007, when they
lost to eventual repeat champion
Florida in the regional final. Oregon
made 8 of 11 shots from beyond the
arc, while the Billikens finished 3 for
21 from long range.


Associated Press
Virginia Commonwealth forward Jarred Guest and Michigan forward Jon Horford tangle up while chasing
to rebound in the first half Saturday in Auburn Hills, Mich.


Kwamain Mitchell scored 18
points and Dwayne had 16 points
and nine rebounds for the Billikens
(28-7).
No. 1 Louisville 82,
No. 8 Colorado St. 56
LEXINGTON, Ky. Russ Smith
had another big night, leading four
players in double figures with 27
points, and top-seeded Louisville is
into the Midwest Region semifinals.
The Cardinals put on a defensive
clinic as they dismantled Colorado
State 82-56. Louisville forced the
eighth-seeded Rams into a season-
high 20 turnovers, made Colton Iver-
son look as invisible as a 6-foot-10
guy can be and limited one of the
nation's best rebounding teams to
24 boards, more than a dozen below
their average.
It was the 12th straight win for
Louisville (31-5), which will play Ore-
gon on Friday in Indianapolis.
West regional
No. 6 Arizona 74,
No. 14 Harvard 51
SALT LAKE CITY Arizona put


an emphatic end to Harvard's March
Madness success story with a 74-51
win over the Crimson.
Mark Lyons matched his career
high with 27 points to lead the sixth-
seeded Wildcats (27-7). Arizona
sprinted to a 30-9 lead, as the Crim-
son (20-10) missed 20 of its first 22
shots.
Lyons led Arizona to the pro-
gram's 15th appearance in the
Sweet 16. The Wildcats will play
Iowa State or Ohio State next week
in Los Angeles.
Kenyatta Smith led Harvard with
10 points. Freshman Siyani Cham-
bers lost part of his front tooth after
Arizona's Kevin Parrom elbowed
him in the face.
East regional

No. 3 Marquette 74,
No. 6 Butler 72
LEXINGTON, Ky. -Vander Blue
scored 19 second-half points to rally
third-seeded Marquette out of an-
other hole, and the Golden Eagles
survived No. 6 Butler 74-72 to reach
the Round of 16.
Like November's first meeting be-


tween the teams at the Maui Invita-
tional, won 72-71 by Butler on Rot-
nei Clarke's buzzer-beating
3-pointer, this was a back-and-forth,
high-intensity affair, that came down
to the final shot.
Only this time, Butler missed.
Marquette (25-8) will meet the
winner of Sunday's game between
Illinois and Miami (Fla.) on Thursday
in Washington, D.C.
Clarke's 24 points led Butler (28-9).
Friday's late games

South regional
No. 1 Kansas 64,
No. 16 W. Kentucky 57
KANSAS CITY, Mo.- Jeff
Withey scored 17 points and top-
seeded Kansas struggled to put
away scrappy Western Kentucky in
a 64-57 victory that avoided what
would have been the biggest upset
on a day full of them in the NCAA
tournament.
The Jayhawks (30-5), flummoxed
by the Hilltoppers' full-court pres-
sure, trailed 31-30 at halftime.
Kansas eventually built an 11-point


lead in the second half, but couldn't
put Western Kentucky away until
Ben McLemore's two foul shots with
11 seconds left in the game.
McLemore and Travis Releford
scored 11 each for the Jayhawks
(30-5), who wearily advanced to play
No. 8 seed North Carolina and for-
mer coach Roy Williams in the
South Regional today.
No. 11 Minnesota 83,
No. 6 UCLA 63
AUSTIN, Texas -Andre Hollins
scored 28 points and Minnesota
rolled past punchless UCLA 83-63
in the second round of the NCAA
tournament, a game that could be
Bruins freshman Shabazz Muham-
mad's last in college and coach
Ben Howland's final one leading
the program.
Austin Hollins scored 16 for the
11th-seeded Gophers (21-12), who
advanced to today's third round
against No. 3 seed Florida in the
South Regional. The Gophers
eased some pressure on coach
Tubby Smith by giving him his first
NCAA tournament win in six
seasons.
It was another early-round exit by
the sixth-seeded Bruins (25-10), who
were led by Muhammad's 20 points.
West regional

No. 10 Iowa St. 76,
No. 7 Notre Dame 58
DAYTON, Ohio Freshman
Georges Niang matched a season
high with 19 points and Iowa State,
showing it can do much more than
just fire away from outside the 3-
point line, dismantled Notre Dame
76-58 in the NCAA tournament.
The 10th-seeded Cyclones (23-
11) will play No. 2 seed Ohio State
today. The Buckeyes advanced with
a 95-70 thrashing of lona.
Iowa State led the nation in 3-
pointers this season, but the Cy-
clones were just as effective from
short range in ousting the Fighting
Irish (25-10).
No. 7 San Diego St. 70,
No. 10 Oklahoma 55
PHILADELPHIA- Jamaal
Franklin scored 21 points, James
Rahon had 17 and San Diego State
beat Oklahoma 70-55 to earn its
third NCAA tournament victory.
The seventh-seeded Aztecs (23-
10) will play No. 15 seed Florida Gulf
Coast today in the South Regional.


No. 10 seed USF women knock off Texas Tech


Associated Press

LUBBOCK, Texas Inga
Orekhova scored 20 points, in-
cluding five 3s, to lead No. 10
USF past Texas Tech 71-70.
Andrell Smith added 13 points
in the win over the seventh-
seeded Lady Raiders.
ESPN's TV feed cut out for the
final few minutes with the game
tied, leaving the audience un-
able to see the conclusion.
Texas Tech led most of the way,
but three straight field goals by
Smith with about 13 minutes left
gave South Florida a 46-44 lead.
Christine Hyde hit back-to-
back baskets to tie it at 59 and
Orekhova hit her final 3 to tie it
at 66 with 1:09 left.
Smith hit two free throws,
Tiffany Conner added one and
Alisia Jenkins hit two with four
seconds left to make it 71-67 and
seal the win for the Bulls (22-10).
Bridgeport regional

No. 1 UConn 106,
No. 16 Idaho 37
STORRS, Conn. Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis led six Connecticut
players in double figures as the
Huskies routed Idaho 106-37.
Mosqueda-Lewis finished with 22
points, all in the first half. Morgan Tuck
had 18, and Moriah Jefferson added
16 for the Huskies (304), who ad-
vanced to the second round for the
20th straight time in their 25th consec-
utive tournament appearance.
Stacey Barr had 14 points for
Idaho (17-16).
No. 8 Vanderbilt 60,
No. 9 Saint Joseph's 54
STORRS, Conn. Tiffany Clarke
had 16 points and 12 rebounds to
lead Vanderbilt over Saint Joseph's
in the first round of the NCAA
women's basketball tournament.
Chatilla van Grinsven scored 14
points, all in the second half, for Saint
Joseph's (20-12). Natasha Clound
and Ilze Gotfrida each chipped in 10.
Vandy (23-8) led most of the way.
No. 4 Maryland 72,
No. 13 Quinnipiac 52
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -Alyssa


Thomas had 29 points and 13 re-
bounds, and Maryland spoiled Quin-
nipiac's debut in the NCAA women's
tournament.
The Terrapins (25-7) trailed by
nine in the first half, moved in front
27-23 at the break and dominated
the second half against the smaller
Bobcats, who couldn't stop Thomas'
repeated forays into the lane.
Tianna Hawkins had 23 points
and 16 rebounds for Maryland.
No. 5 Michigan St. 55,
No. 12 Marist 47
COLLEGE PARK, Md. Kiana
Johnson scored 16 points, Annalise
Pickrel added 14 and Michigan
State halted Marist's string of first-
round NCAA upsets.
Jasmine Thomas added 10 points
for the Spartans (25-8). Michigan
State advanced to the second round
for the eighth time in nine NCAA ap-
pearances, a streak interrupted by a
loss to Louisville on the same Col-
lege Park floor a year ago.
Spokane regional

No. 2 California 90,
Fresno State 76
LUBBOCK, Texas- Brittany
Boyd scored 21 points and added a
career-high 13 rebounds to lead Cal-
ifornia over Fresno State.
Layshia Clarendon added 19 points
and Gennifer Brandon had 17 points
and 12 rebounds for California (29-3).
Ki-Ki Moore scored a career-high
33 points on 12-of-28 shooting to
lead Fresno State (24-9).
No. 5 Iowa State 72,
No. 12 Gonzaga 60
SPOKANE, Wash. Chelsea
Poppens scored 19 points, Hallie
Christofferson scored 11 of her 18 in
the second half, and Iowa State (24-8)
ended Gonzaga's dominance at home
in the NCAA women's tournament.
Taelor Karr led Gonzaga (27-6)
with 15 points.
No. 4 Georgia 70,
No. 13 Montana 50
SPOKANE, Wash. Jasmine
Hassell scored 16 points, Shacobia
Barbee added 13, and fourth-seeded
Georgia used a big run midway


Associated Press
South Florida center Akila McDonald lets out a yell as teammate
Courtney Williams looks on Saturday after a first-round game against
Texas Tech in the women's NCAA tournament in Lubbock, Texas.


through the second half to pull away
from Montana for a 70-50 win.
Jasmine James added 11 points
for the Lady Bulldogs (26-6).
Torry Hill led 13th-seeded Mon-
tana (24-8) with 11 points.
Oklahoma City regional

No. 2 Tennessee 83,
No. 15 Oral Roberts 62
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Meighan
Simmons scored 18 points, and the
Tennessee Lady Vols defeated Oral
Roberts in their first NCAA tournament
game of the post-Pat Summitt era.
The Lady Vols (25-7) got points
from all 11 players and improved to
51-0 in NCAA tournament games on
their home floor.
No. 10 Creighton 61,
No. 7 Syracuse 56
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. McKenzie
Fujan scored a career-high 24 points
as Creighton held off a late Syra-
cuse rally to beat the Orange.
Kayla Alexander, the leading
scorer in Syracuse history, had 23
points and eight rebounds for the Or-
ange (24-8).
Fujan shot 6 of 10 from 3-point
range for Creighton (25-7) and had
17 points by halftime.


No. 3 UCLA 66,
No. 14 Stetson 49
COLUMBUS, Ohio Nirra Fields
led UCLA's balanced offense with 13
points and the Bruins rolled to a win
over Stetson.
Jasmine Dixon added 10 points
and 10 rebounds and Atonye
Nyingifa had 10 points and eight re-
bounds for the Bruins (26-7).
Victoria McGowan had 14 points
and 14 rebounds for Stetson (24-9).
No. 6 Oklahoma 78,
No. 11 C. Michigan 73
COLUMBUS, Ohio Joanna
McFarland had 18 points and a ca-
reer-high 17 rebounds and Aaryn El-
lenberg scored 18 of her 22 points in
the second half to lead Oklahoma to
a victory over Central Michigan.
Despite 24 turnovers, the Sooners
had just enough to hold off the
Chippewas (21-12). Crystal Bradford
had a sensational game for CMU
with a career-high 36 points (on 14
of 31 shooting from the field) with 14
rebounds and seven steals.
Norfolk regional
No. 3 Texas A&M 71,
Wichita State 45
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -


Kristi Bellock tied a career high with
18 points and Texas A&M routed
Wichita State.
The Aggies used a big run at the
end of the first half to erase a one-
point deficit and take a 13-point lead
into halftime.
Texas A&M (25-9), which won the
national championship in 2011, is in
the tournament for the eighth con-
secutive season. It was the first trip
for Wichita State (24-10).
No. 4 S. Carolina 74,
No. 13 S. Dakota St. 52
BOULDER, Colo. -Ashley Brun-
ner had 15 points and 11 rebounds
to lead South Carolina to a victory
over South Dakota State.
The Gamecocks (25-7), who won
a school-record 11 Southeastern
Conference games this season,
used their superior athleticism and
stout defense to make quick work of
the 13th-seeded Jackrabbits (25-8).
No. 12 Kansas 67,
No. 5 Colorado 52
BOULDER, Colo.-Angel
Goodrich and Carolyn Davis each
scored 14 points and 12th-seeded
Kansas upset No. 5 seed Colorado
67-52 on the Buffaloes' home floor.
Kansas (19-13) used a 15-0 spurt
spanning halftime to take control
and advance to face fourth-seeded
South Carolina on Monday at the
Coors Events Center.
The Buffaloes (25-7) saw their first
trip to the NCAA tournament in nine
years come to an unexpected end.
No. 6 Nebraska 73,
No. 11 Chattanooga 59
COLLEGE STATION, Texas -
Jordan Hooper made four 3-pointers
in the second half and finished with
21 points, helping Nebraska rally
from nine points down to beat Chat-
tanooga 73-59 in the first round of
the NCAA tournament.
The sixth-seeded Cornhuskers
(24-8) will play third-seeded Texas
A&M (25-9) on Monday night.
Taylor Hall scored 13 and Alex
Black added 12 to lead the 11th-
seeded Lady Mocs (29-4), who had
won 19 in a row.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013




Arnold Palmer
Invitational
Saturday
At Bay Hill Club and Lodge, Orlando
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,419, Par: 72
Third Round
Tiger Woods 69-70-66 -205 -11
Rickie Fowler 73-67-67-207 -9
John Huh 67-69-71 -207 -9
Justin Rose 65-70-72 -207 -9
Thorbjorn Olesen 69-73-66 -208 -8
Fernandez-Castano 69-71-68 -208 -8
Jimmy Walker 69-69-70 -208 -8
Ken Duke 70-68-70-208 -8
Bill Haas 69-66-73-208 -8
Keegan Bradley 74-69-66 -209 -7
MarkWilson 71-68-70 -209 -7
Brian Stuard 74-69-67-210 -6
Brad Fritsch 68-72-70 -210 -6
Henrik Stenson 71-71-69-211 -5
Ian Poulter 72-69-70 -211 -5
Hunter Mahan 71-70-70 -211 -5
John Rollins 68-72-71 -211 -5
Ben Kohles 69-73-70-212 -4
Ben Curtis 72-70-70 -212 -4
Matt Every 72-75-66 -213 -3
Cameron Tringale 72-73-68 -213 -3
Jason Day 71-74-68- 213 -3
John Senden 71-72-70 213 -3
Luke Guthrie 73-67-73 -213 -3
Sean O'Hair 69-76-69 -214 -2
Scott Brown 74-71-69 -214 -2
Erik Compton 72-72-70-214 -2
Billy Horschel 72-73-69-214 -2
William McGirt 74-70-70 -214 -2
Sergio Garcia 72-69-73 -214 -2
VijaySingh 71-68-75-214 -2
J.J. Henry 71-67-76-214 -2
Martin Laird 74-73-68-215 -1
ZachJohnson 70-76-69-215 -1
Kevin Streelman 74-71-70 -215 -1
CamiloVillegas 71-74-70-215 -1
Vaughn Taylor 71-74-70-215 -1
Carl Pettersson 72-72-71-215 -1
Ben Crane 70-74-71 -215 -1
Richard H. Lee 73-70-72-215 -1
Chris Kirk 71-72-72-215 -1
Retief Goosen 73-69-73-215 -1
Charles Howell III 73-69-73 -215 -1
Matt Jones 71-70-74- 215 -1
Bob Estes 71-69-75- 215 -1
Johnson Wagner 76-71-69 -216 E
George Coetzee 73-74-69-216 E
David Toms 74-72-70 -216 E
Josh Teater 75-71-70 -216 E
Pat Perez 71-75-70 -216 E
Francesco Molinari 75-71-70-216 E
David Lingmerth 71-74-71 -216 E
Gary Woodland 70-73-73-216 E
Sang-Moon Bae 71-69-76-216 E
David Hearn 75-71-71 -217 +1
LeeJanzen 73-73-71 -217 +1
NickWatney 69-76-72-217 +1
Bubba Watson 74-71-72-217 +1
Tag Ridings 70-74-73-217 +1
Chris Stroud 72-71-74-217 +1
GregOwen 74-73-71 -218 +2
Lee Westwood 71-75-72-218 +2
Ryo Ishikawa 69-77-72-218 +2
Graham DeLaet 76-69-73 -218 +2
Boo Weekley 72-70-76 -218 +2
Chad Campbell 77-67-75-219 +3
Stewart Cink 70-73-76 -219 +3
Charlie Beljan 76-71-73-220 +4
Harris English 75-72-73-220 +4
Jim Furyk 71-74-75 -220 +4
Robert Allenby 73-74-74 -221 +5
Graeme McDowell 72-74-75 -221 +5
Nicholas Thompson 74-72-75-221 +5
Justin Hicks 74-71-77- 222 +6
Tommy Gainey 72-73-77-222 +6
Doug LaBelle II 73-73-77-223 +7
Rod Perry 76-71-78 -225 +9
Mike Weir 76-70-WD



Sprint Cup

Auto Club 400
Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Auto Club Speedway
Fontana, Calif.
Lap length: 2 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 187.451.
2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 187.217.
3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 187.149.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 187.13.
5. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 186.688.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 186.514.
7. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 186.273.
8. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 185.864.
9. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 185.792.
10. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 185.677.
11. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 185.157.
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chev, 185.085.
13. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 184.876.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 184.715.
15. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 184.625.
16. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.374.
17. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 184.233.
18. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 184.044.
19. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 184.011.
20. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 183.988.
21. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 183.852.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 183.702.
23. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.697.
24. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 183.57.
25. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 183.248.
26. (51) AJ AIImendinger, Chevrolet, 183.113.
27. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 183.02.
28. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 182.825.
29. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 182.658.
30. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 182.639.
31. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 182.519.
32. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 182.473.
33. (93)Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 182.44.
34. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 181.493.
35. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 181.087.
36. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 181.087.
37. (36) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevy, Owner Points.
41. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB


x-New York 42 26 .618 -
x-Brooklyn 40 28 .588 2
Boston 36 32 .529 6
Philadelphia 26 42 .382 16
Toronto 26 44 .371 17
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 54 14 .794 -
Atlanta 38 31 .551 1612
Washington 25 43 .368 29
Orlando 18 52 .257 37
Charlotte 16 53 .232 3812
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 43 27 .614 -
Chicago 37 31 .544 5
Milwaukee 34 34 .500 8
Detroit 24 47 .338 1912
Cleveland 22 47 .319 2012
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 53 16 .768 -
Memphis 46 22 .676 612
Houston 38 31 .551 15


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


For KULthei record[


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S- CASH 3 (early)

1 \ CASH 3 (late)


PLAY 4 (early)
5-1-3-6
PLAY 4 (late)
7 -6-5-4

FANTASY 5
FloridaLottery 2-19- 20- 30- 34

POWERBALL LOTTERY
17-29-31-52-53 6-11-13-24-35-53
POWER BALL XTRA
31 5


On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
11 a.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Firestone Indy Lights
(Same-day Tape)
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) IndyCar: Honda Grand Prix of St.
Petersburg
2:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Auto Club 400 race
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NIT SECOND ROUND
11 a.m. (ESPN) St. John's at Virginia
NCAA TOURNAMENT THIRD ROUND
12 p.m. (CBS) Ohio State vs. Iowa State
2:30 p.m. (CBS) Indiana vs. Temple
5 p.m. (CBS) Kansas vs. North Carolina
6 p.m. (TNT) Florida vs. Minnesota
7 p.m. (TBS) Florida Gulf Coast vs. San Diego State
7:30 p.m. (TRUTV) Mississippi vs. La Salle
8:30 p.m. (TNT) Miami vs. Illinois
9:30 p.m. (TBS) Duke vs. Creighton
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA TOURNAMENT FIRST ROUND
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes:
Delaware vs. West Virginia, Duke vs. Hampton, Kentucky
vs. Navy and Liberty vs. Purdue
2:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Albany
(N.Y.) vs. North Carolina, Dayton vs. St. John's, DePaul vs.
Oklahoma State and Louisville vs. Middle Tennessee State
5 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Cal Poly-
San Luis Obispo vs. Penn State, Florida State vs. Princeton,
Notre Dame vs. UT-Martin and Stanford vs. Tulsa
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Whip-around coverage includes: Baylor
vs. Prairie View A&M, Green Bay vs. LSU, Iowa vs. Miami
and Michigan vs. Villanova
NBA
6 p.m. (SUN) Charlotte Bobcats at Miami Heat
7 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Bulls at Minnesota Timberwolves
BOWLING
1 p.m. (ESPN) PBA Tour League Qualifier, Round 5 (Taped)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Maybank Malaysian
Open, Final Round (Same-day Tape)
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational,
Final Round
2:30 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational, Final
Round
2:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational,
Spotlight Coverage
5 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mississippi Gulf Resort
Classic, Final Round
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: Kia Classic, Final Round
HOCKEY
5 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at New York Islanders
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh
Penguins
8 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Winnepeg Jets
RUGBY
1 a.m. (NBCSPT) Sevens World Series: Hong Kong
(Taped)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Arkansas at Florida
1 p.m. (SUN) Mississippi State at Kentucky
SKIING
12 p.m. (NBC) USSA Nature Valley U.S. Alpine
Championships (Taped)

RADIO
1 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Tampa Bay Rays at New York
Yankees

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Dallas 33 36 .478
New Orleans 24 46 .343
Northwest Division
W L Pct
x-Oklahoma City 51 19 .729
x-Denver 48 22 .686
Utah 34 35 .493
Portland 33 36 .478
Minnesota 24 43 .358
Pacific Division
W L Pct
x-L.A. Clippers 47 22 .681
Golden State 39 31 .557
L.A. Lakers 36 34 .514
Sacramento 25 44 .362
Phoenix 23 47 .329
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's Games
New York 99, Toronto 94
Indiana 102, Milwaukee 78
Oklahoma City 97, Orlando 89
Portland 104, Atlanta 93
Miami 103, Detroit 89
Houston 116, Cleveland 78
New Orleans 90, Memphis 83
Dallas 104, Boston 94
San Antonio 104, Utah 97, OT
Minnesota 117, Phoenix 86
Washington 103, L.A. Lakers 100
Saturday's Games
Detroit 92, Charlotte 91
New York 110, Toronto 84
Chicago 87, Indiana 84
Boston at Memphis, late
Sacramento at Denver, late
Washington at Golden State, late
Brooklyn at L.A. Clippers, late
Today's Games
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 3 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Utah at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Philadelphia at Sacramento, 9 p.m.


Monday's Games
Atlanta at Indiana, 7p.m.
Miami at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Washington, 7 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Pittsburgh 32 24 8 0 48114 83
New Jersey 32 1511 6 36 80 86
N.Y. Rangers 30 1513 2 32 71 73
N.Y. Islanders 31 13 15 3 29 90 105
Philadelphia 30 1316 1 27 81 92
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 31 20 6 5 45 98 77
Boston 30 20 7 3 43 86 64
Ottawa 32 17 9 6 40 83 70
Toronto 32 1712 3 37 97 92
Buffalo 32 1315 4 30 86 100
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Winnipeg 32 1614 2 34 81 96
Carolina 30 15 13 2 32 85 86
Washington 31 1416 1 29 89 88
Tampa Bay 31 1317 1 27101 95
Florida 32 917 6 24 78 113
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Chicago
Detroit
St. Louis
Nashville
Columbus


Minnesota
Vancouver
Edmonton
Calgary


Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
30 24 3 3 51102 66
31 1511 5 35 85 80
29 1611 2 34 87 83
32 1313 6 32 80 86
32 1313 6 32 75 85
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
30 1810 2 38 79 71
31 16 9 6 38 84 83
29 11 11 7 29 72 85
29 11 14 4 26 82 101


Colorado 30 11 15 4 26 77 97
Pacific Division
GP W LOT PtsGF GA
Anaheim 30 22 4 4 48100 76
Los Angeles 31 1712 2 36 88 76
Dallas 31 1513 3 33 83 90
SanJose 30 1311 6 32 71 79
Phoenix 31 1314 4 30 80 87
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
Columbus 5, Calgary 1
Washington 6, Winnipeg 1
Detroit 5, Anaheim 1
Saturday's Games
Ottawa 5, Tampa Bay 3
Minnesota 2, San Jose 0
Vancouver 1, Los Angeles 0
Toronto 3, Boston 2
Buffalo 2, Montreal 1
New Jersey 2, Florida 1
Nashville 5, Columbus 2
Dallas 5, Colorado 2
St. Louis at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary, 8p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
San Jose at Anaheim, 10 p.m.



Spring Training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Kansas City 20 6 .769
Baltimore 16 7 .696
Seattle 18 9 .667
Cleveland 16 10 .615
Detroit 16 11 .593
Chicago 11 10 .524
Tampa Bay 14 13 .519
Texas 14 13 .519
Boston 14 14 .500
Minnesota 13 13 .500
Oakland 10 12 .455
Houston 11 14 .440
Toronto 11 15 .423
NewYork 11 17 .393
Los Angeles 7 16 .304
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Atlanta 18 12 .600
Colorado 13 11 .542
Chicago 15 15 .500
NewYork 11 11 .500
Philadelphia 13 13 .500
Arizona 13 14 .481
St. Louis 12 13 .480
San Francisco 11 12 .478
San Diego 13 15 .464
Pittsburgh 12 14 .462
Miami 11 13 .458
Washington 11 14 .440
Los Angeles 10 15 .400
Milwaukee 9 15 .375
Cincinnati 9 16 .360
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 7, Atlanta 6
Pittsburgh 6, Tampa Bay (ss) 4
Detroit 4, Washington 3
N.Y. Yankees 9, Minnesota 7
Baltimore 6, Tampa Bay (ss) 3
Toronto 1, Boston 0
Houston 3, St. Louis 2
Chicago Cubs 4, Milwaukee 1
Kansas City 13, L.A. Angels 9
Colorado (ss) 14, Texas 9
Cincinnati 6, L.A. Dodgers 5
San Francisco 11, Colorado (ss) 6
N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 2
Arizona 7, Cleveland 5
Seattle 3, San Diego 1
Oakland 4, Chicago White Sox 4, tie
Saturday's Games
Minnesota 6, Tampa Bay 4
Detroit 10, N.Y. Yankees 6
Atlanta (ss) 10, Toronto 5
Miami 6, St. Louis 5
Atlanta (ss) 3, Houston 2
Philadelphia 13, Baltimore 4
N.Y. Mets 3, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 5, Boston 3
Chicago Cubs 7, L.A. Angels (ss) 6
Kansas City 11, Arizona 10
L.A. Angels (ss) 5, Milwaukee 1
Texas 6, Cincinnati 2
Cleveland 10, Seattle 5
Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers, late
San Diego vs. Colorado, late
Today's Games
Miami vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Detroit vs. N.Y Mets (ss) at Port St. Lucie,
Fla., 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Milwaukee (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
Seattle vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10
p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.


St. Louis vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Detroit vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Washington vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla.,
6:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Kansas City at Surprise,
Ariz., 9:10 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:10 p.m.


Americans beat
Costa Rica 1-0
in snow storm
COMMERCE CITY,
Colorado Clint
Dempsey scored early in
his first match as United
States captain as the
Americans beat Costa
Rica 1-0 on Friday in a
key qualifier for next
year's World Cup played
at times in heavy snow.
Plows and shovels
were used to clear snow
from the penalty areas,
center circle and midfield
stripe and a yellow-and-
purple ball was used.
There was even a brief
stoppage in the 55th
minute when it was un-
clear whether the match
commissioner would let
the contest continue.
The game resumed
and as the snow in-


creased, it made the
field resemble a cake
topped with piles of
sugar, and players' hair
turned white as snow
stuck along their scalps.
During injury time,
American defender Geoff
Cameron even playfully
pushed the back of a
grounds crew member
shoveling the field.
"It was difficult out
here to see anything,"
Dempsey said. "We were
able to come together
when we needed to."
As the conditions de-
teriorated, the U.S. sur-
vived Michael Umana's
apparent 70th-minute
goal for Costa Rica goal
that was ruled offside
and came away with the
win. Brad Guzan, in goal
for the Tim Howard, slid
in the snow after balls
like a child in a park.


BAY HILL
Continued from Page B1


two shots ahead of Rickie Fowler (67), John
Huh (71) and Rose, who through four holes
Saturday was six shots ahead of Woods. Rose
had a 39 on the back nine and wound up with
a 72.
Rose had a three-shot lead on the back nine
until he crumbled, making three bogeys over
the last six holes. He attributed that to a lack of
energy, perhaps from the muggy conditions,
but didn't mind his position.
"I just wanted to go out and play a good
round of golf," Rose said. "I wasn't too worried
whether I was two ahead or two behind. The
real day is tomorrow. Obviously, you don't
want to give Tiger too many shots. The back
nine was a shame, but today means nothing
until tomorrow plays out. So hopefully, he
doesn't go get hot tomorrow and then today is
just a memory"
Rose didn't even make it into the final group.
Fowler dropped only one shot on a muggy
day with a short burst of showers, closing with
a par from the back bunker on the 18th. He will
play with Woods in the final round for the first
time since the Memorial, where Woods closed
with a 67 to win and Fowler had an 84.
Fowler was only three shots behind going
into the final round of the Honda Classic at the
start of the Florida swing and closed with a 74.
He also had a bad Sunday at Doral (78), though
he was never in serious contention. Without
knowing where his 67 would leave him at Bay
Hill, he sounded determined to finish stronger
"It was disappointing to play the way I did
those two Sundays, but I felt really good with
where I was at, putting myself in position to go
win a golf tournament or have a good finish
and kind of taking myself out of it," Fowler
said. "So it was a little bit of a kick in the butt
to go out there and finish off tournaments. So
I'm looking forward to tomorrow and seeing if
we can go do that."
Nine players were separated by three shots
going into the final round, though the dynamic
takes on a different vibe at Bay Hill. Woods can
tie a PGA Tour record for most victories at one
tournament. Sam Snead won the Greater
Greensboro Open eight times.
"I have a chance to win tomorrow," Woods
said.



SPOT
Continued from Page B1


the country Smith won a national title with
Kentucky Wildcats in 1998. Donovan won two
with the Gators in 2006 and 2007. They haven't
faced each other in six years.
And long before they were rivals, they were
partners as Kentucky assistants under Rick
Pitino from 1989-1991.
Smith noted that when they first met, Dono-
van was an eager youngster learning the job -
one nickname was "Billy the Kid" and now
he's the most successful coach in the SEC.
"I know he's the dean, so he's getting older
now," Smith joked. "What Billy's been able to
do at Florida has been outstanding. Florida's a
program that really wasn't noted for its basket-
ball and he's taken it to unbelievable heights."
Donovan said both coaches learned some-
thing from Pitino they carry to this day
"The one thing is probably trying to get
players to play together... understanding that
there's a greater good when everybody's sac-
rificing together," Donovan said.
By straight numbers, Smith has a 14-10
edge over his old rival, but Donovan won the
last six meetings.
Donovan said he remembers Smith's teams
always being tough, disciplined and unselfish
on offense. The Gophers have certainly
shown their resilience while playing in the
rugged Big Ten, a conference that already has
two teams in the round of 16 Michigan
State and Michigan and four more playing
for a shot Sunday
Donovan seemed to downplay the coaching
rivalry in the postseason.
"Even though it's Tubby on the other end of
the sideline, I'm not watching him. I'm watch-
ing what's going on on the court," Donovan
said. "All I can say is Tubby is a terrific coach,
he's done a great job with his team."
Minnesota fans weren't so sure about that
when the tournament began. After a 15-1
start, the Gophers slid through a 5-11 finish.
They hadn't won a game since March 2 until
beating UCLA and there had been specula-
tion in the Twin Cities that Smith may be
coaching for his job.
Smith may have dampened the criticism
with the win over UCLA, where Bruins coach
Ben Howland was facing his own critics back
home. Donovan beat Howland's Bruins to win
his first national championship in 2006 and
beat them again in the national semifinal a
year later.


Sports BRIEFS


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Knicks claw Raptors TRas 6:4


Associated Press
Kyle Busch, seen Friday at
Sprint Cup practice, won
the Nationwide Series race
Saturday in Fontana, Calif.


Busch


wins at


Fontana


Driver keeps

Joe Gibbs'

streak alive

Associated Press
FONTANA, Calif. -An-
other Nationwide Series
race at Fontana, another
victory for Kyle Busch and
Joe Gibbs Racing.
Busch certainly isn't
tired of the same old story
Busch earned JGR's
ninth consecutive Nation-
wide victory at Fontana on
Saturday, comfortably
beating Sam Hornish Jr.
for his third win in five
races this season.
Gibbs' Toyotas haven't
lost a Nationwide race on
their unofficial home track
since 2007, with Busch,
Joey Logano and Tony
Stewart navigating the
wide, bumpy track with un-
matched ease. Through
changes in cars, drivers and
crew chiefs, JGR has main-
tained its record streak
Busch pushed ahead
late in a back-and-forth
duel with Nationwide
points leader Hornish's
Ford to win his second
straight Nationwide race,
wrapping it up when Hor-
nish brushed the wall with
two laps to go.
"It's really cool," Busch
said. "They're known for
having great stuff, but
you've still got to be able to
wheel it. I don't think we
were the best car, but we
just chased down that 12
car. Didn't want to see him
win in front of our home-
town crowd."
Busch raced to his record
Nationwide 54th victory in-
cluding six at Fontana, in
front of fans from Toyota
and other sponsors' home
offices, capping a doubly
celebratory day for the win-
ningest driver in Nation-
wide history
What's more, Parker
Kligerman drove his Kyle
Busch Motorsports Toyota
to a career-best fourth-
place finish. Regan Smith
was third, and Austin Dil-
lon came in fifth ahead of
Kyle Larson.
Busch started from the
pole with crew chief Adam
Stevens, who was Logano's
crew chief during his Na-
tionwide victory at Fontana
last year for JGR. Busch led
67 laps and cruised to the
finish, keeping Hornish
comfortably behind him
with his veteran knowledge
of Fontana's quirks.
"Sam put up a heck of a
fight," Busch said. "Those
guys really have something
going for them. Sam has
brought his game so far
this year. We had a lot of
good battle back and forth.
I thought we put on a great
show for the fans."


Associated Press

NEW YORK Carmelo An-
thony scored 28 points, Kenyon
Martin had another big game
against Toronto, and the New
York Knicks finished off a home-
and-home sweep of the Raptors
with a 110-84 victory Saturday
night
J.R. Smith added 25 points for
the Knicks, who beat the Raptors
for the second straight night and
won their fourth consecutive
game. Martin had 18 points and
seven rebounds, a night after he
had 19 points and 11 rebounds in
the Knicks' victory in Toronto
that clinched a playoff berth.
DeMar DeRozan scored 17
points for the Raptors.
Bulls 87, Pacers 84
CHICAGO Luol Deng scored 20
points, Carlos Boozer had 18 and the
Chicago Bulls overcame the absence
of starting center Joakim Noah to
earn an 87-84 victory over the Indi-
ana Pacers.
Deng had 13 points at halftime, but
Chicago's reserves sparked the Bulls'
second-half rally, outscoring Indiana's
reserves 32-15.
The Bulls went on a 13-5 run start-
ing the fourth quarter to take an 81-72
lead. Afour-point play by George Hill
brought Indiana within 87-84 in the
final minute. After a missed driving
shot by Chicago's Kirk Hinrich with 16
seconds left, the Pacers had a chance
to tie, but Paul George had two 3-point
tries go off the rim in the final 10 sec-
onds, including one at the final buzzer.
George led the Pacers with 23 points.


Associated Press
New York Knicks forward Kenyon Martin dunks as the Toronto
Raptors' Jonas Valanciunas and Alan Anderson watch during the first
half Saturday at Madison Square Garden in New York.


Pistons 92, Bobcats 91
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Charlie Vil-
lanueva scored 14 of his 18 points in
the fourth quarter, including a go-
ahead driving layup with 15 seconds
left, and the Detroit Pistons defeated
the Charlotte Bobcats 92-91 to snap
a 10-game losing streak.
Jason Maxiell added 14 points
and Rodney Stuckey had 13 points
and eight assists off the bench for
the Pistons.
Kemba Walker had 25 points and
Bismack Biyombo had 10 rebounds
and 10 rebounds to lead the Bobcats.
Grizzlies 110,
Celtics 106
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Jerryd Bay-
less scored a season-high 30 points


and the Memphis Grizzlies weath-
ered a fourth-quarter rally by
Boston's reserves to escape with a
110-106 victory over the Celtics.
Seven Memphis players finished in
double figures and three recorded
double-doubles. Darrell Arthur, start-
ing for Zach Randolph, scored 18
points, while Randolph had 15 points
and 11 rebounds off the bench.
Paul Pierce led Boston with 26
points, while Jordan Crawford keyed
a fourth-quarter rally, scoring 14 of
his 21 points in the final frame. The
Celtics lost their fourth straight game.
Both teams played without signifi-
cant pieces. Kevin Garnett and
Courtney Lee both sat out for Boston
with left ankle sprains. Memphis cen-
ter Marc Gasol is out indefinitely be-
cause of an abdominal tear.


Senators rule Lightning


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning center Tyler Johnson looks back at Ottawa Senators goaltender Robin Lehner after
a backhand shot during the third period Saturday in Ottawa, Ontario.


Associated Press

OTTAWA -Jakob Silfverberg,
Eric Gryba, Guillaume Laten-
dresse and Daniel Alfredsson
scored in a 7:01 span in the first
period, and Ottawa held off
Tampa Bay 5-3 on Saturday
Alfredsson also had an empty-
net goal in the final minute.
Robin Lehner made 29 saves,
and Marc Methot, who missed
the last game because of a knee
injury, and Kyle Turris each had
two assists.
Tyler Johnson scored twice in
the third period for Tampa Bay
Canucks 1, Kings 0
LOS ANGELES Cory Schneider
made 20 saves en route to his sixth
NHL shutout, Mason Raymond
scored in the first period, and the Van-
couver Canucks beat the Los Angeles
Kings 1 -0 for their third straight victory.
The defending Stanley Cup cham-
pion Kings, coming off a 2-0 home loss
to Dallas on Thursday in which they
had 40 shots, were shut out for the
third time this season. It is the first time
they have been blanked in consecutive
games since Feb. 16-18, 2012.
Wild 2, Sharks 0
ST. PAUL, Minn. Niklas Back-
strom made 33 saves for his first
shutout of the season, and Ryan Suter


had two more assists, leading Min-
nesota past San Jose for the Wild's
season-high fifth straight victory.
Zach Parise and Jared Spurgeon
scored for Minnesota. The Wild are
14-5-1 in their last 20 games, and
have won by at least two goals in
each victory in the streak.
Devils 2, Panthers 1
NEWARK, N.J. Travis Zajac set
up two goals, and the New Jersey
Devils rode another solid perform-
ance by Martin Brodeur to a 2-1 vic-
tory over the Florida Panthers.
Patrik Elias and David Clarkson
scored for New Jersey, and Brodeur
finished with 17 saves as the Devils
won their second straight since the
40-year-old goalie returned to the
lineup after being sidelined a month
with a pinched nerve in his neck.
Maple Leafs 3, Bruins 2
TORONTO Nazem Kadri
scored in the first period, and Frazer
McLaren added a timely goal in the
third as the Toronto Maple Leafs
ended an eight-game losing streak to
the Bruins with a 3-2 victory.
The Bruins tried to rally from a 3-0
hole in the third period, throwing
everything they had at Toronto in the
final minutes. The teams will meet
again on Monday in Boston.


Sabres 2, Canadiens 1
MONTREAL Thomas Vanek
scored two goals to lead the Buffalo
Sabres to a 2-1 win over the Mon-
treal Canadiens.
It was the Sabres' (13-15-4) third
straight win in a run that began with
an overtime victory in Montreal on
Tuesday. Ryan Miller stopped 39
shots in this one for Buffalo.
Stars 5, Avalanche 2
DALLAS Derek Roy, Eric Nys-
trom and Jaromir Jagr each had a
goal and an assist to lead the Dallas
Stars to a 5-2 victory over the Col-
orado Avalanche.
Rookie Jordie Benn got his first
NHL goal and Cody Eakin also scored
for Dallas, which won its second
straight game following a 1-4-1 stretch
in which they were outscored 23-10.
Jamie Benn added three assists.
Predators 5,
Blue Jackets 2
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Taylor Beck
had a goal and an assist during
Nashville's four-goal first period and
the Predators beat the Columbus
Blue Jackets 5-2.
Shea Weber, David Legwand and
Matt Halischuk also scored in the
opening period for Nashville.


Recari on top of LPGA Tour event


Associated Press
CARLSBAD, Calif. Beatriz
Recari drove the green on the
285-yard 16th hole to set up a 4-
foot eagle putt and finished with
a 3-under 69 on Saturday for a
two-stroke lead in the Kia Classic.
Recari, the 25-year-old
Spaniard who won her lone LPGA
Tour title in 2010, had an 11-under
205 total at Aviara Golf Club.
Hall of Famer Karrie Webb
was second after a 70. Winless


since the 2011 Founders Cup in
Phoenix, Webb dropped strokes
with bogeys on Nos. 13 and 17.
Paula Creamer and I.K. Kim
were three shots back. Creamer
had a 71, and Kim shot 70.
Stacy Lewis, playing her first
event since taking the No. 1 spot
in the world from Yani Tseng
with a victory last week in
Phoenix, was four strokes back
after a 69. Trying to win her
third straight tournament,
Lewis had an eagle on the par-5


eighth.
Pavin, Langer among
leaders at Gulf Resort
SAUCIER, Miss. Corey Pavin
birdied his first six holes and fin-
ished with a 5-under 67 to join
Bernhard Langer, Roger Chapman
and Joe Daley atop the leaderboard
Saturday after the second round of
the Champions Tour's Mississippi
Gulf Resort Classic.
Pavin took advantage of Fallen


Oak's soft greens in ideal windless
conditions.
Langer had a 65, Chapman shot
67, and Daley had a 66.
Defending champion Fred Cou-
ples also had a good day, shooting
a 66 to stay within striking distance
at two strokes off the lead. It's a
crowded leaderboard, with 14 play-
ers within three strokes of the lead.
The round was delayed for more
than an hour because of afternoon
thunderstorms.


Tampa Bay's

Price lit up

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE Rays
ace David Price gave nine hits in
five innings and the Minnesota
Twins beat Tampa Bay 6-4
Saturday
Price allowed three runs, two
of them earned, while striking
out seven and walking two.
Braves 10, Blue Jays 5
DUNEDIN Brandon Morrow al-
lowed four of his five runs in the fifth
inning of the Toronto Blue Jays' 10-5
loss to an Atlanta Braves' spilt squad.
Reed Johnson had a two-run sin-
gle, the Braves'fourth consecutive
hit off Morrow with two outs in the
fifth, that pulled Atlanta to 4-3.
Braves 3, Astros 2
KISSIMMEE Julio Teheran
struck out 10 in six hitless innings
and Dan Uggla homered as a split
squad of Atlanta Braves beat the
Houston Astros 3-2 Saturday.
Phillies 13, Orioles 4
SARASOTA-- Chase Utley
homered twice and drove in four
runs, leading the Philadelphia
Phillies to a 13-4 win over the Balti-
more Orioles.
Utley hit a two-run shot in the first
and Ryan Howard followed with his
sixth of the spring.
Marlins 6, Cardinals 5
JUPITER Chris Coghlan hit an
RBI single with two outs in the bot-
tom of the ninth inning off Marc
Rzepczynski, lifting the Miami Mar-
lins over the St. Louis Cardinals 6-5.
Gorkys Hernandez drove in three
runs for the Marlins.
Mets 3, Nationals 1
PORT ST. LUCIE Washington
lefty Gio Gonzalez allowed one run
in six innings, but the New York Mets
beat the Nationals 3-1.
Making his first Grapefruit League
start since pitching for Team USA in
the World Baseball Classic, Gonza-
lez gave up four hits.
Pirates 5, Red Sox 3
FORT MYERS Clay Buchholz
pitched four-hit ball into the sixth in-
ning, but the Boston Red Sox lost 5-
3 to the Pittsburgh Pirates.
The Pirates scored four times in
the eighth.
Tigers 10, Yankees 6
LAKELAND Miguel Cabrera hit
his fourth home run of the spring
and the Detroit Tigers beat the New
York Yankees 10-6 on an afternoon
when the wind was blowing out.
Jhonny Peralta and Kevin Russo
also homered for the Tigers.
Angels 5, Brewers 1
TEMPE, Ariz. Garrett Richards
threw 6 1-3 innings in the longest out-
ing by an Angels pitcher this spring,
leading Los Angeles' split squad over
the Milwaukee Brewers 5-1.
Richards allowed one run and
three hits in his fourth spring appear-
ance and second start.
Cubs 7, Angels (ss) 6
MESA, Ariz. Edwin Jackson
pitched five uneven innings but also
got two hits as the Chicago Cubs
beat an L.A. Angels split squad 7-6.
Jackson allowed five runs and
eight hits. He went 2 for 2 at the
plate and drove in a run.
Indians 10, Mariners 5
PEORIA, Ariz. Scott Kazmir
gave up 13 hits over five innings
while trying to earn a spot in the
Cleveland rotation, and the Indians
beat the Seattle Mariners 10-5.
Kazmir gave up five runs, struck
out five and walked none.
Rangers 6, Reds 2
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Yu Darvish
gave up homers to Joey Votto and
Todd Frazier but showed no prob-
lems with a stiff neck that forced him
to be scratched from his previous
start, and the Texas Rangers beat
the Cincinnati Reds 6-2.
Darvish gave up three hits in five
innings.
Athletics 12, Giants 5
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Yoenis
Cespedes hit a long home run in the
first inning as the spring struggles
continued for Tim Lincecum, and the
Oakland Athletics beat the San
Francisco Giants 12-5.
In Lincecum's fourth start, the


two-time NL Cy Young winner gave
up five earned runs and six hits
while throwing 80 pitches in three-
plus innings.
Royals 11, D'backs 10
SURPRISE, Ariz. -Alex Gordon,
Billy Butler and Elliot Johnson home-
red to power the Kansas City Royals
to an 11-10 victory over the Arizona
Diamondbacks.


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Actors Ryan Reynolds, left, and
Emma Stone at "The Croods"
premiere in New York. Reynolds
voices the character Guy and
Stone voices the character Eep
in the Dreamworks Animation
film.

'Croods' stars cringe at
sound of own voices
NEW YORK They've both
helped make millions at the
box office and are two of Hol-
lywood's most sought after tal-
ents, but "The Croods" voice
stars Ryan Reynolds and
Emma Stone say they still get
self-conscious hearing them-
selves on film.
"It's like hearing your voice
back on a voicemail," said the
24-year-old Stone, who is
known for her trademark
raspy voice. "I still can't be-
lieve I sound like this."
"I can't believe you sound
like this either," joked the 36-
year-old Reynolds in the same
recent interview. He went on
to confess "everyone feels that
way- like there's some sol-
ace in that. I think everyone
feels like that when they hear
their own voice. (It sounds)
kind of shrill and brutal."
They're going to have to get
used to it. The animated
"Croods" opened Friday on
more than 4,000 domestic
screens amid predictions it
will be the weekend's No. 1
movie.
The 3-D film, which also
stars Nicolas Cage, takes
place in prehistoric times and
focuses on the world's first
family, the Croods. Stone is a
teen girl named Eep, who
longs to leave her cave and
see what's out there. Her fa-
ther, voiced by Cage, is overly
protective. One day they meet
a guy named Guy, played by
Reynolds. The Croods and
Guy venture out together and
learn about the world.
This is the first time
Reynolds and Stone have
done an animated movie, and
they hope it rates with some
of their own childhood
favorites.

Lawyer: No charges
for Lohan in NYC case
NEW YORK-An attorney
for Lindsay Lohan said New
York City prosecutors will not

an alleged
fight at a Man-
hattan night-
club in
November
Attorney
Marc Heller
said the ac-
Lindsay tress faces no
Lohan formal
charges after
prosecutors were unable to
gather sufficient evidence to
prove the case.
Lohan was arrested Nov 29
on a charge of misdemeanor
assault after an encounter
with a woman at the club Av-
enue in the city's trendy Meat-
packing District
-From wire reports


Birthday -A number of social alliances could offer
you some surprising advantages in the year ahead.
However, affiliations formed for solely commercial
purposes could easily turn out to be liabilities.
Aries (March 21-April 19) Unless you tackle each
of your responsibilities as it occurs, they could begin
to pile up on you. If you slack off, you will lose control.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Be your own person,
even if your position is totally different from that of
your peers. Don't allow anyone to pressure you into
doing something you don't like.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Try not to be too as-
sertive in situations that call for tact. Once you start
rocking the boat, you could get close to capsizing it.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Little of value will be
accomplished if you start making changes every time
you run into a trivial obstacle. To perform produc-


'Mars movie


Associated Press
Actress Kristen Bell in a scene from the teen detective series "Veronica Mars." Creator Rob
Thomas launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund a movie of his cult TV show, which was
canceled after three seasons in 2007. It met its stated goal of raising $2 million in less than 11
hours, meaning it would be greenlit to begin shooting this summer.


'Veronica Mars' campaign rattles movie industry


Associated Press

NEW YORK After years of hope, stalled
efforts and studio frustration, "Veronica
Mars" creator Rob Thomas watched a long-
held dream come to fruition in a sudden digi-
tal rush.
"There were a few minutes of nothing hap-
pening," he said. "Then in an hour, watching
that ticker go was mesmerizing. I had an at-
tention span of, like, four seconds because
everything on my computer screen I wanted
to look at, at the same time. The Twitter feed
was going crazy, the emails were going crazy
and then watching that Kickstarter total go
up."
Thomas last week launched a Kickstarter
campaign to fund a movie of his cult TV show,
which was canceled after three seasons in
2007. It met its stated goal of raising $2 million
in less than 11 hours, meaning it would be
greenlit to begin shooting this summer. It's
surpassed $3.7 million with more than two
weeks still to go.
The resounding, immediate success of the
crowd-funding campaign sent shockwaves
through the movie business. Films had found
much-needed financial support on Kick-
starter before, but "Veronica Mars" is differ-
ent. It's a studio project, owned by Warner
Bros., which produced the show.
The money given by the fervent fans of
"Veronica Mars," which starred Kristen Bell
as a teenage private eye, will go not to a film-
maker operating on his own, but one with the
distribution and marketing muscle of a very
large corporation just one that hadn't pre-
viously been convinced to bankroll a "Veron-
ica Mars" film.
Were donating fans spurring a goliath to ac-
tion, or its unwitting pawns?
The wide majority of "Veronica Mars" fans
couldn't care less. They will get the movie they
craved, as well as the proud feeling of having
played an essential role in the show's resur-
rection.
Maryland fan Matt Clipp typified the eager
contributors, writing: "I am MORE than happy
to donate $100 to this project This movie has
been a dream of mine ever since the series
ended back in 2007. ... LET'S GET THIS
THING MADE, 'VERONICA MARS' FANS!"
While the emotional side is surely the
biggest motivation for most donors, they're
also paying for tangible goods. Rewards range
from an emailed copy of the script ($10 con-
tributions), all the way up to a speaking part
in the film as a waiter who says, "Your check,
sir," (a single $10,000 donation). All money is
refunded if for any reason the film doesn't get
made.
"Most of the people who are pledging are
getting in at the $35 and $50 range where
they're getting a download of the movie, a T-
shirt, a copy of the script at $35, and all of that
plus the DVD and the making-of documentary
at the $50 price point," Thomas said. "So I


Today's HOROSCOPE
tively, you must be consistent.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don't take on so many fi-
nancial obligations you would be reduced to robbing
Peter to pay Paul. Deliberate and skillful manage-
ment of your resources will be required.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There's a possibility you
might start to experience unusual amounts of stress
in your personal relationships. Stop taking everything
so seriously. Relax!
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) You are likely to get an
opportunity to be of assistance to someone who has
been extremely helpful to you in the past. Don't wait
to be asked -jump as soon as you see your
opening.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Dissension could eas-
ily result if you pay too much attention to one friend
while ignoring all your other pals. Unless you treat


Executive producer Rob Thomas answers
questions July 17, 2006, about the upcoming
season of "Veronica Mars" during The CW's
Television Critics Association press conference
in Pasadena, Calif.
don't think anyone's being taken advantage of.
I feel like the rewards are worth it."
Typically in film financing, any investor has
the chance to earn his money back and poten-
tially share in the profits. Slate claimed the
"Veronica Mars" project sets a "terrible
precedent."
Joss Whedon, whose devoted fanboy follow-
ing is similar, if larger, than Thomas', said he
reacted in "unfettered joy" at the "Veronica
Mars" Kickstarter campaign. But Whedon,
who realizes he'll now be hounded to follow
suit with another movie of his canceled cult
TV series "Firefly," acknowledged some trep-
idation about the financial arrangement for
fans.
"I understand that it feels not as pure, and
that the presence of a studio makes it disin-
genuous somehow," Whedon told BuzzFeed.
"But people clearly understood what was hap-
pening and just wanted to see more of the
thing they love. To give them that opportunity
doesn't feel wrong. If it was a truly wrong
move, I don't think it would have worked."
Thomas said he's been in daily contact with
Warner Bros., which approved the plan in ad-
vance. The studio hasn't sought to flaunt its in-
volvement. Executives for its digital wing,
which is planning a limited theatrical release
followed by video-on-demand early next year,
declined to comment.
Kickstarter co-founder Yancey Strickler,
too, declined to comment when asked through
a spokesman about whether corporate in-
volvement compromises Kickstarter's mis-
sion. Kickstarter takes a 5 percent fee from
money raised for successful projects.
Since being founded in 2009, Kickstarter
has raised more than $500 million for some
35,000 creative projects. The "Veronica Mars"
film is far and away its most lucrative movie
project.


everyone equally, you'll be ostracized.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -When in a competi-
tive situation, take care not to underestimate your ad-
versaries. Don't minimize your own skills, by any
means, but be aware of everyone else's.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Guard against incli-
nations to challenge the statements of another just
because his or her beliefs differ from yours. Both of
you could be wrong; both parties could be right.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Someone who is in-
debted to you might request even further financial as-
sistance. The smartest thing to do is to not throw
good money after bad.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -An individual with
whom you're closely associated might make a deci-
sion that affects you as well. If this person's actions
do not serve your interests, take action immediately.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22
Mega Money: 4 7 13 38
Mega Ball: 2
4-of-4 MB 1 winner $500,000
4-of-4 7 $1,011
3-of-4 MB 46 $337
3-of-4 1,159 $39.50
2-of-4 MB 1,261 $25.50
1-of-4 MB 10,402 $3
2-of-4 32,416 $2
Fantasy 5:5 6 7 9 19
5-of-5 5 winners $46,813.22
4-of-5 686 $55
3-of-5 15,274 $6.50
THURSDAY, MARCH 21
Fantasy 5:1 6 10 21 26
5-of-5 3 winners $71,011.18
4-of-5 435 $78.50
3-of-5 11,451 $8

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY


Today is Palm Sunday, March
24, the 83rd day of 2013. There
are 282 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 24, 1913, New York's
Palace Theatre, the legendary
home of vaudeville, opened on
Broadway.
On this date:
In 1765, Britain enacted the
Quartering Act, requiring American
colonists to provide temporary
housing to British soldiers.
In 1944, in occupied Rome, the
Nazis executed more than 300
civilians in reprisal for an attack by
Italian partisans the day before
that had killed 32 German
soldiers.
In 1958, rock-and-roll singer
Elvis Presley was inducted into
the Army in Memphis, Tenn.
In 1980, one of El Salvador's
most respected Roman Catholic
Church leaders, Archbishop Oscar
Arnulfo Romero, was shot to
death by a sniper as he cele-
brated Mass in San Salvador.
In 1989, the supertanker Exxon
Valdez ran aground on a reef in
Alaska's Prince William Sound
and began leaking 11 million gal-
lons of crude oil.
In 1998, two students, ages 13
and 11, opened fire outside
Jonesboro Westside Middle
School in Arkansas, killing four
classmates and a teacher.
(Mitchell Johnson and Andrew
Golden were imprisoned by
Arkansas until age 18, then by
federal authorities until age 21.
However, Johnson has since been
returned to prison on unrelated
charges.)
Ten years ago: Iraqi state tele-
vision showed two men said to
have been the U.S. crew of an
Apache helicopter forced down
during heavy fighting in central
Iraq. (Chief Warrant Officer David
S. Williams and Chief Warrant Of-
ficer Ronald D. Young Jr. spent
three weeks in captivity before
they were released along with five
other POWs.)
Five years ago: The FBI said
authorities had recovered the re-
mains of two U.S. contractors,
Ronald Withrow and John Roy
Young, who were kidnapped in
Iraq more than a year earlier.
One year ago: Rick Santorum
won the Louisiana Republican
presidential primary, beating front-
runner Mitt Romney in yet another
conservative Southern state.
Today's Birthdays: Poet
Lawrence Ferlinghetti is 94. Actor
R. Lee Ermey is 69. Fashion de-
signer Tommy Hilfiger is 62. Co-
median Louie Anderson is 60.
Actor Robert Carradine is 59. Ac-
tress Kelly LeBrock is 53. TV per-
sonality Star Jones is 51. Actress
Lara Flynn Boyle is 43. Actor Jim
Parsons is 40. NFL quarterback
Peyton Manning is 37. Actress
Jessica Chastain is 36.


Thought for Today: "Man must
cease attributing his problems to
his environment, and learn again
to exercise his will his personal
responsibility in the realm of faith
and morals." -Albert Schweitzer,
German-born missionary and
Nobel laureate (1875-1965).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


A LOOK ACKAT L YERS F TE RAQWA


Associated Press y J
Smoke rises from the Trade Ministry in ICOniC imagreS io Wt Al
Baghdad on March 20, 2003, after it was hit by a
missile during U.S.-led forces attacks. U.S. Associated Press
President George W. Bush gives a thumbs up as he
visits the aircraft carrier USS Abraham The images remain fresh even as the memories fade
Lincoln off the California coast May 1, 2003. Later the blinding flash of "shock and awe" bombing, the
in the day, he declared that major combat in Iraq square-jawed confidence of an American president
was finished. leading his people into war, the cowering prisoner
trembling on the ground in the face of a small piece of
-_ American power
Fast forward and the images transform like the war
itself: the pain of an Iraqi mother's loss, grief-scarred
faces of benumbed survivors, terrified soldiers under
fire, mutilated bodies of slain Americans hanging from
a bridge in a town few Americans had ever heard of.
The Iraq war began March 20, 2003, to rid Iraq of a
dictator and eliminate his weapons of mass destruc-
tion. No WMD was ever found. The dictator Saddam
Hussein was caught literally hiding in a hole tried
and hanged.
Yet the conflict dragged on in a grinding litany of bul-
lets, bombs and barbarity. Dusty backwaters like Fal-
lujah, Haditha and Ramadi became household words
for Americans. The war was marked by the savagery of
televised beheadings, Abu Ghraib prison and IEDs.
By the time U.S. troops left in December 2011, nearly
4,500 Americans and more than 100,000 Iraqis had lost
their lives. Hundreds of billions of American taxpayer
dollars were gone.
For Americans, the war's end in December 2011
brought relief and for the men and women who fought
it, joy at reunions with loved ones.
For Iraqis, the war is harder to forget. Its signs are all
around, from shattered bodies of survivors, to ongoing
spasms of violence, to the pock-marked buildings still
unrepaired.
.Ten years after that first attack, Iraq languishes in a
~ state between war and peace.


A statue of
Saddam Hussein
topples in Firdaus
Square in Baghdad
on April 9, 2003.
Captured
former Iraqi leader
Saddam Hussein
undergoes a
medical exam on
Dec. 14, 2003, in
Baghdad, in this
image made from
video.


A woman cries in the stairwell of her home as U.S. soldiers carry out
house-to-house searches July 7, 2004, near Martyrs' Square in Baghdad.
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Chad Touchett, center, relaxes with comrades
from A Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, after a search of one
of Saddam Hussein's bomb-damaged palaces in Baghdad on Monday, April
7, 2003. The tombstone for Army Capt. Russell B. Rippetoe stands
in Section 60 in Arlington National Cemetery. An Army Ranger, Rippetoe
was the first casualty of the Iraq war buried at Arlington National Cemetery.


Celebrating baseball history and Big Ed


E d Hemsworth of In-
verness, who hap-
pens to be my
father-in-law, turned 90 this
week.
To celebrate his birthday,
my wife decided to take
him to a New York Yankees
spring training game in
Tampa.
In his time, Ed was a
great baseball player If not
for World War II, he would
have ended up playing at


the major league level.
My darling wife thought
it would be a great idea to
ask the folks at Steinbren-
ner field in Tampa to give a
little recognition to Ed dur-
ing one of those many
breaks that take place dur-
ing a baseball game.
One of the highlights of
Ed's baseball career was
he played for the Staten Is-
land All Stars before WWII
and one of his teammates


was Bobby Thomson.
Thomson later played for
the New York Giants and
was responsible for one of
the most dramatic mo-
ments in baseball history
It was 1951 when Thom-
son known as the Staten
Island Scot hit the "Shot
heard round the world" to
win the National League
pennant for the Giants. The
Giants were playing the
hated Brooklyn Dodgers


and the 1951 season ended
with the two New York
teams tied. There was a
three-game playoff be-
tween the teams. And after
each side won once, the
season went down to a
winner-take-all game.
The final game was the
first nationally televised
sporting event Think about
that this was the begin-
ning of the nation coming
together for a major sport-


ing event on live TV
In the bottom of the ninth
inning, the Dodgers were
ahead 4-2 when Thomson
came to the plate. Two men
were on base and Thomson
hit a walk-off home run,
winning the pennant for
the Giants. Every baseball
fan in America heard the
Giants play-by-play an-
nouncer repeatedly yell


Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


I







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .......................publisher
H Mike Arnold ................ ................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................managing editor
Curt Ebitz ................... ........ citizen m ember
M Mac Harris ......................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ........................ guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ..................... ........ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


MOVE FORWARD





Parity can




end hospital




power battle


After more than three
years of dispute and
millions of dollars in
legal fees, the Citrus Memo-
rial Health Foundation
(CHMF) and the
Citrus County
Hospital Board THE I
(CCHB) appear
poised to end Hos
their battles and poundati
come together proposal
once again as one
functioning U
board. OUR OF
During its meet- Appr(
ing last week, the proposal
foundation board the cost
took a major step
to end the long
and bitter struggle by offering
a proposal that creates parity
between the boards. The hos-
pital board seems ready to
agree and join the foundation
to end their sometimes bitter
conflict.
Under the proposal, each of
the boards would name seven
members to the new board.
These would be joined by the
hospital's medical chief of
staff to make up the govern-
ing board for the institution.
Along with the 7-7-1 composi-
tion, the CHMF proposal
calls for the CCHB to provide
$5.4 million in tax funding to
the hospital by April 1.
If accepted by the CCHB in
its Monday night meeting, the
proposal would effectively
end the battle between the
two boards that has cost mil-
lions in legal fees, created
tensions within the hospital
organization and led to down-
grades in the hospital's bond
ratings.
The dispute began with a
governance question between
the governor-appointed
CCHB, which owns the hospi-
tal, and the CHMF, which
leases the hospital and oper-
ates it. The two groups once


Great service
at tag office
I, too, would like to say thank
you to the Citrus County tag of-
fice. My wife and I moved down
here recently from up
North and had to get our 0
license renewed. We
went to the Meadowcrest
office, walked in and the
front receptionist smiled
and greeted us like we'd
been old friends. She
was very helpful, told us
to have a seat. Within CAL
minutes, our name was 563-
called. We went to a sta-
tion where this young lady did
everything for us with a smile,
asked how our day was going,
told us where we could go to eat,
gave us all kinds of information
and told us how long she'd been
here. She came from up North.
And it was just a great experi-
ence. The young lady at the front
desk, we didn't get her name,
but the one (who) waited on us,
her name was Kimberly. It was
just wonderful to have people
here at the county (who are)
helpful to you. We're not used to
that from up North.


S

ic
l





tl
71


(


met as a single board, but in
2009 they split into warring
factions. Each board hired at-
torneys and the battle for con-
trol of the hospital began.
In the interven-
ing years, there
$SUE: have been
charges and
pital counter-charges,
)n offers suits and counter-
to unite suits, meetings
ds. and discussions,
and finally legis-
'INION: lation giving con-
ve the trol to the CCHB.
and end This legislation
y battle. was immediately
challenged by the
CHMF, and the
case is still winding its way
through the courts.
Acceptance of the proposed
settlement agreement would
effectively end the litigation
as far as the local boards are
concerned, though state At-
torney General Pam Bondi
may still want to get a final
decision from the state
Supreme Court on the legal
questions underlying the
case.
And of course, should the
hospital be sold or merged
with a larger institution,
which seems increasingly
likely, the whole issue of who
controls the hospital locally
would be moot. The primary
function of the merged board
would be to agree on a price
for the hospital.
Still, we believe board par-
ity whether 7-7-1 or 5-5-1 as
earlier proposed is a fair
and reasonable way to end
this dispute and unite the
boards in moving forward
with the business of the hos-
pital, whatever that business
may be. This battle has gone
on too long, has cost too much
money and has done enough
damage to the hospital. It is
time to end it.


Good spot for
traffic light
I just wanted to compliment
the county or state or whoever's
decision it was to put the traffic
light at (State Road) 44
JND and (County Road) 490.
F The extra light over on
the street or on the side-
walk when you're com-
ing around that corner
makes it extremely easy
to tell the light is going
to change and it has
made a difference in the
)579 way the traffic flows at
that intersection.
Irresponsible pilot
I am an aircraft mechanic and
a pilot with single multi-engine
time far in excess of 12,000
hours, flying full time for nearly
10 years in the military, and I've
never seen such irresponsible
acts as the pilot (who's) taking
off from the Inverness Airport
banking within just a few feet of
the ground and then flying up
over the fairgrounds. If this isn't
stopped and I can get his num-
ber, so help me, the FAA will be
talking to him.


"Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm."
Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Essays: First Series" 1841


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Action speaks loudest


I started One Rake
at a Time to clean
up the swimming
area at Hunters
Spring Park in Crys-
tal River for the kids
and all the other peo-
ple who swim there. I
thought it was awful
this horrible, hairy
and nasty lyngbya Art
algae was taking over OTI
the swimming area VoI
and no one seemed to VOl
be doing anything
about it except
complain.
I knew all about raking the
algae out of the water, because I
had been doing it in the ham-
mock I own next to my house on
King's Bay. I researched and
learned from others all I could
about lyngbya and discovered it
was about the worst possible
thing to have in the water It de-
stroys not only human habitat,
but manatee and fish habitat
too. Lyngbya robs oxygen out of
the water and thick mats of it
were piling up on top of spring
vents choking them off.
I began raking diligently, and
what was once a lyngbya and
mosquito-infested swamp next
to my home, turned into a clear
water hammock full of fish,
frogs, turtles and everything
else, including lots of beneficial
aquatic plants that completely
out-competed the lyngbya until
all the algae had disappeared.
My method was simple, just
keep removing the bad lyngbya
and allow any other plants that
showed up to live. For two solid
years, I battled the lyngbya.
Then, at the beginning of the
third year, there was hardly any
to be found and the place had
become a wildlife sanctuary in
balance.
Things were back the way they
should be. Now the polluted
murky water from King's Bay en-
tered my hammock at high tide,
got cleaned and polished, then
returned to the bay crystal clear.
So why not duplicate the success
on a bigger scale?


LETT

Find your step with
nature


We are all aware change is
inevitable. Other than that, the
only thing we can be sure of
these days is no one is always
right and no one is always
wrong. It follows that speaking
our mind on social issues is
both our right and civic duty.
Liberals want government
out of our private lives. Funda-
mentalists oppose abortion
and gay rights on moral
grounds. I say it is only fair all
voices be heard in the public
square. After all, pollution of
our air and water threatens
everybody's health. Likewise,
global warming affects us all.
Global warming has gained
near universal scientific ac-
ceptance, and it has a rock
solid biblical basis. Let me ex-
plain. As everyone who reads
the Bible regularly already
knows, there was a great del-
uge many years ago. The Bible
reported God flooded the en-
tire earth. Legend has it he si-
phoned the water from the
planet, Mars. Noah and his
family were safe in the ark.
Everyone else drowned. We


Jones
HER
CES


I figured if I could
get things started,
then enough good
people in our com-
munity would help
out. By working to-
gether, we could take
control of our own
destiny and clean up
King's Bay one rake
at a time. Sure
enough, with the Cit-
rus Leadership class
project in the spring
of 2009, dozens of


people showed up to help and
we made a real difference in
the swimming area for the fam-
ilies who enjoy one of the only
fresh spring water swimming
parks in Crystal River that you
can get to by land.
Through that class project
and learning of all the good
things Citrus County has to
offer, I was invited to join the
Kings Bay Rotary I found like-
minded people who believed in
service above self. In other
words, most Rotarians have
found the more you give of
yourself helping others or
working together on common
goals, the more enriched your
own life becomes and the more
you can accomplish.
It was a natural fit for my
Kings Bay Rotary to launch a
five-year service project I cre-
ated to clean up King's Bay in
September 2011. To date, the
One Rake at a Time service
project has now had more than
550 people volunteer to clean
lyngbya algae out of King's Bay
Another beautiful thing is, as
we are cleaning up the mess,
we are learning collectively
how to modify our behavior that
made the mess to begin with.
After raking the horrible lyng-
bya algae out of the water, many
people will never over fertilize
or over water their lawns again.
Some will have their septic sys-
tems checked to ensure they
are operating correctly; others
are hooking up to sewer sys-
tems. Others may approach
their favorite golf courses and


ER


must remember the ark was
not equipped like a modern


ask them about best practices.
Many are sharing their knowl-
edge with friends and neigh-
bors, and a movement has been
born.
Now, every day the bay is just
a little bit cleaner and there is a
little less pollution flowing in to
it. Public agencies are helping
too with funding new sewer sys-
tems, retention ponds and re-
claimed water projects.
To change minds, there is
nothing like a hands-on learn-
ing experience with people
from all walks of life working
together for the good of all.
The bay is finally starting to
heal. And with the help of me-
chanical lyngbya harvesters, we
have removed almost 1,000 tons
of the noxious algae so far I am
convinced we are on the right
course.
To people who say, "Why
bother? It is just going to grow
back."
I say, "Why brush your teeth
every morning? Why make your
bed? Why mow your lawn?"
Some say, "First, stop all the
pollution coming in, then start
the clean-up."
To me, that is a do-nothing at-
titude with a convenient excuse.
The best possible thing we
can do is physically remove lyn-
gbya from the bottom of King's
Bay, where it causes eutrophi-
cation. In others words, all the
thick benthic mats of lyngbya on
the bottom that have built up
over the years are rotting and
destroying everything else with
it. They need to be removed, the
sooner the better
I believe King's Bay and Crys-
tal River are a gift from God.
There is no other place on
Earth like what we have here.
This place we call home is ab-
solutely beautiful. We should be
the very best stewards our envi-
ronment we can possibly be.
Thank you to all who help.

Art Jones is the director of the
One Rake at a Time lyngbya
algae clean-up project.


cruise ship. Without sails or
rudder, it just bobbed up and
down in the water for 11
months and 17 days.
Then Jehovah stretched
forth his hands and the waters
receded. They were divided
into two great rivers. A cold
wind arose and turned these
mighty fountains into great
blocks of ice. One gigantic slab
of ice covered the North Pole
and one the South Pole. Since
the ice is still there, global
warming is very dangerous. If
the polar caps should melt, we
shall all drown.
Many other fantastic stories
are found throughout the
pages of the Bible. God gave
mankind the power of speech
and the faculty of reason so we
may discern right from wrong.
Let us not further waste these
precious gifts in petty squab-
bling. Think about it. Even
almighty God cannot reverse
the relentless passage of time.
That's right, folks. Time
marches on. We must get in
step with nature or we shall
surely perish.
Franklin G. Aretz
Beverly Hills


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


Sto the Editor


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Writer's dilemma: To embellish or not


Believe the em- never, ever suggest
bellishment ques- Gerry polished-up his
tion is easily t. story in any way.
answered, depending First, some 2 1/2
on whether what is decades ago, he per-
written is presented sonally decided to
as news or entertain- allow me to make my
ment. And, I'm con- words come to life in
vinced most readers print. And he has let
have little trouble me continue to do this
distinguishing the Fred Brannen ever since.
difference. A SLICE Next, my view of the
Now, with that said, OF LIFE current circumstances
a few weeks ago my is, after a few levels of
friend, the publisher the newspaper's hier-
of one ofAmerica's great commu- archy, ultimately, he is still my
nity newspapers, the incompara- boss. One thing I've learned over
ble Gerry Mulligan, told a lively the years is, regardless of the job,
tale about caring for both grand- you don't indiscriminately dis-
children and parents. I would pute what the boss says.


Besides, I could identify with
his discussion about being at a
doughnut shop, with his sweater
inside out and chocolate from a
previous day's donut still on his
face. Cheryl and I, too, have
seven grandchildren and we've
been left in charge of 'em from
time-to-time. It also reminded
me of an incident which hap-
pened several years ago regard-
ing the possibility of readers
taking exception to what they
believe is unbelievable.
I'd written about becoming
distracted by an extraordinarily
pretty woman who was sitting a
few tables away from Cheryl and
me in a local restaurant only to
eventually realize the lovely


lady who'd caught my eye was in
fact a reflection of my sweet-
heart in a mirror covered-wall. A
few days after the article was
published, while we were out
eating breakfast, a conversation
became very uncomfortable.
We southern boys don't take
being called bald-faced liars
lightly and that's precisely what
one of our breakfast buddies of
northern heritage called me.
Cheryl helped to defuse the sit-
uation by backing up my version
of the story, but acknowledging it
might have been slightly, ever so
slightly, embellished.
Was Gerry's recent column
embellished? It makes little dif-
ference. It wasn't news, it was en-


tertainment. It was delightful en-
tertainment, especially the part
about letting personal hygiene go
while taking care of grandbabies.
I know from personal experi-
ence that does in fact happen.
Back to the question. Was
Gerry's story embellished? Did
he really show up at a doughnut
shop totally disheveled and with
a chocolate daub from the previ-
ous day still on his chin?
Only he, the missus, the grand-
children and the young woman
at the donut shop know for sure.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Nothing is truly free


in the United States


Letters to THE EDITOR


Father Hoge made a
difference
In December 1978, my wife
Judy and I first met Father James
Hoge. The Chronicle had an arti-
cle which invited people to volun-
teer to make up and deliver
Christmas baskets to those in
need. The gathering was at the
county auditorium in Inverness
on a Saturday morning in early
December
When my wife and I showed up,
we walked into the auditorium
and saw no one.
So I yelled out, "Is there any-
one here?"
A voice responded from behind
the stage curtain and there we
found John T Barnes, the county
recreation director, sweeping the
floor Later that morning, John in-
troduced us to Father Hoge.
This Christmas Basket work
had been organized by Father
Hoge and John Barnes as a proj-
ect for Citrus United Basket,
which the two of them were heav-
ily involved in forming. You see,
in those days, we did not have a
United Way in Citrus County and
between these two guys CUB was
formed to help the needy Father
Hoge provided the game plan and
John provided the county govern-
ment support. In the next couple
of weeks, we put together and de-
livered 250 Christmas Baskets.
This was a type of giving to the
community Father Hoge and John
Barnes participated in. The
Christmas Basket program con-
tinued from then on.
Since John was influential in
the county government, he and
Father Hoge convinced the
county administration to allow
CUB to have a temporary build-
ing at the back end of a parking
lot across from the old county
courthouse, where the sheriff's
office is now, to be used for the
distribution of clothes and food to
the needy Later when the new
county courthouse was built,
CUB's facilities moved to the
basement of the old courthouse,
since it had been vacated by the



WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

"The Giants win the pennant.
The Giants win the pennant" as
Thomson ran around the bases. It
was an immortal moment in
sports.
This brings us back to 2013 when
I am on the phone with the mar-
keting department with the New
York Yankees explaining the con-
nection to Ed Hemsworth and his
90th birthday
"He played on the All Star team
with Bobby Thomson," I said.
"Who?" the young woman in the
marketing department asked.
"Bobby Thomson, the Shot
Heard Round the World," I said.
"Could you spell that," she
asked.
Hmmm. This wasn't working. She
did not know who Bobby Thomson


building department and the
clerk of the court. CUB was there
about 5 years.
In 1979 or 1980, it was decided
to have huge yard sale sponsored
by CUB in Homosassa in an open
field right on U.S. 19. At that time,
my wife and I were heavily in-
volved with CUB, my wife being
the secretary/treasurer and me as
a general volunteer. I was tasked
to obtain a couple of boxes of hot
dogs for the event. Since I was
relatively new to the area and
working at the GTE satellite sta-
tion, I didn't know too many peo-
ple in business. Therefore, I
decided to go see Father Hoge at
St Benedict's and get a sugges-
tion as to who to approach for a
donation. Wells it turned out to be
a very amusing exercise.
When I arrived at St. Bene-
dict's, Father Hoge wasn't there.
But he arrived about 3 to 4 min-
utes after.
At the time Father Hoge had
several peacocks and a bunch of
guinea hens running loose
around the church. Someone in
the church had cleaned up the
area and was burning the trash at
the rear of the church. Well, the
fire got away from them and a
small woods fire had started.
When Father Hoge saw the fire,
he was quite upset. Although
there was no outspoken cursing,
he let the responsible person
know he had birds laying in the
wilds around the church and he
did not want see any of them
killed because of foolish
negligence.
He then proceeded to assist me
and told me to go to the meat mar-
ket that used to be in the small
strip mall next to where the Pure
Oil station in Crystal River is and
inform them Father Hoge had
sent me to them for a donation of
two 10-pound boxes of No. 8 hot
dogs. I'm sure the owner was
most likely one of Father Hoge's
parishioners.
Later, we would interface for
various reasons and one of those
interfaces was playing in the
Church Golf League at Citrus


was, so there wasn't much chance
we were going to get a 'shout out' at
the stadium. The young lady was
really nice, but she told me there
lots of important things to an-
nounce during a game and the
spots had already been filled.
So here's my own shout-out for
Ed Hemsworth of Inverness, Fla.
He was a really good baseball
player who attended St. Michael's
College in Vermont where he also
played basketball. At the end of his
sophomore year in 1943, he joined
the Navy and like most other
young men of his generation
joined the war effort.
At least one major league team
expressed an interest in calling Ed
to play baseball in the Big Time,
but the priority of war and family
got in the way
Bobby Thomson, who died a few
years ago, will always be remem-
bered as a hero for the "Shot heard
round the world." But guys like Ed


Hills on Tuesdays.
I always enjoyed being i
Father Hoge and my wife
said he was the best busin
meeting manager ever. Wh
ran a CUB meeting, it seld
more than 15 to 20 minute
There was no banter; it wa
strictly business.
"Such and such is what:
to be done and as your lea
is what you need to do!"
He was a true delegator
got the necessary done in
manner.
Father James Hoge was
act supreme and all will m
and his contribution to ou:
and community.
Dan Groner (Presb


Don't shut dov
game rooms
A problem has come up
you may already know. I ju
wind of it from my neighb(
door Her daughter works
of these little game rooms
ral City.
Our government or state
ernment is closing down a
these places, which will pi
of people out of work. I th(
maybe you with the power
press could find out why
I know you're not as old
but ever since I was 15 yea
our government has been
care of the other side and
ing our country
I can understand when
son has an income it's real
to feel like a poor person.
of the lucky ones. I get a So
Security check and a pens
check from (the) Board of
tion in New Jersey, which
amounts to $1,600 a month
That would be a lot of m
back in the '40s but not no'
I'm 77 years old and I th
whoever created this prob
no heart for anyone.
George Schlh
Fl


Hemsworth who let a wa
the way of his personal opp
ties will always be a her
The folks at Steinbrenn
might not remember wha
Thomson and Ed Hemswi
for this country, but we do
And here's the final cha
darling wife was not abo
baseball ignore her fathe
she went to the Yankee-I
game Wednesday she
along a poster that congra
her Dad for his 90th birth
went down and waved the
in front of her section
crowd sang "Happy Birth
Ed Hemsworth.
"By the time we were
sounded like the whole s
was singing," she said.


Gerry Mulligan is the pub1
the Chronicle. Email hI
gm ulligan@chronicleonli


GREG BIANCE
Guest column

Let the whining begin
about overpaid government
workers amassing great
wealth from years of earn-
ing top salaries. Yes, that
would be my wife and I. We
have ordered our Rosetta
tutorial and look out Paris,
here we come. I don't think
so Tim.
Government workers, like
older people, are consid-
ered disposable. I find con-
tradiction in this thought.
> The same people who now
want to cut government em-
ployees are those who have
reaped the benefits of gov-
ernment service, but no
longer want to pay for it
Nothing is free.
So how does this sound?
Cut teachers, police officers
around and service clerks at the
always local level. They are big gov-
ess ernment. Extravagant gov-
ien he ernment wages have led to
lom ran wasteful use of our tax dol-
s. lars. I sucked the dollars
as right out of every taxpayer,
including my on paycheck.
needs Here is a great idea.
der this Every person who lives in
Citrus County must volun-
and he teer 20 hours a week as a pa-
a timely trolmen, office clerk or
teacher.
a class- Cut the pay on these big
a class- government workers. Will
iss him our police force be willing to
r lives take a bullet for you for less
money? How about $15 an
)yterian) hour? Is that a good deal?
Lecanto Will teachers work for $15
an hour, share their expert-
ise, inspire students, grade
Vn papers nights and weekends
with no overtime?
This big government cur-
that rent rhetoric presents as
ist got deep-pocketed government
or next jobs.
for one When our elders prom-
in Flo- ised us a better lifestyle if
we went to college, it was a
gov- lie. I could have learned a
11 of trade such as plumbing or
ut lots electrical and earned more
ought than I currently make with
Sof the two college degrees.
Today, one out of four kids
as I am, will go to college and gradu-
irs old, ate. They cannot afford it,
taking but to heck with a long-term
neglect- investment for potential
higher wages. I know it was
a per- their choice to better them-
lly hard selves and do extra work to
I'm one achieve a dream of becom-
ocial ing middle class or better. It
ion was their choice to pay off
Educa- student loans for 10 to 15
years with moderate exis-
tence. I know I did that.
Now people want to fur-
oney their downgrade the value of
w. earning a college degree or
ink working in public service.
)lem has How much is the patrol-
man's life worth? Life is not
oendorn worth much these days
onor when one is in a mindset of
oral City disposable people.
Fire the overpaid and un-
derworked teachers who
ar get in take enormous pensions
portuni- and retire in the best com-
ro to me. munities in America.
ter field I know I am going to buy a
t Bobby nice big home in one of the
north did best subdivisions. My bank
1. account is bountiful after 30
pter. My years of teaching in Citrus
ut to let County. Pass the mullet roe
r. When caviar with my Ripple wine,
Red Sox please.
brought Obviously sarcasm lingers
atulated in these words, but I do
day She know nothing is free in this
e poster world.
and the My cousin lives in a simi-
iday" to lar size house in upstate
New York. Her taxes are
done, it nearly 11 times greater than
stadium my taxes in Citrus County
The cost of government
(teachers, police and service
workers) is definitely dirt
fisher of cheap here. I know that and
im at you know that. Yet when you
ne.com. say government waste, we


are the waste you refer to.
We often hear from those
far to the right politically
speaking of exorbitant gov-
ernment leadership
salaries; however, these
wages were set by state
statute. I have not heard our
state legislators taking
salary cuts or reducing their
fantastic insurance plans
that exceed anything my in-
surance covers. Shut them
down, but we are the work-
ing force. Eighty-seven per-
cent of the school budget is
dedicated to pay for the reg-
ular workers.
Our community needs to
rally around us and realize
police and teachers need
support in preserving and
growing our future. For
those who can afford to in-
vest, consider it a societal
investment. Turning away is
not the right thing to do.
My gut feeling is the state
and local parties will reject
our worth and prep our de-
mise. The writing is on the
walls, but nobody is reading
it. They just stare like cars
passing an accident on a
busy highway
Schools will be faced with
severe cutbacks after the
Progress Energy fiasco. If
my taxes were doubled, they
would still be less than 20
percent of what my cousin
pays up north and yet the
complaining grows louder.
My reality as a high school
biology teacher is my classes
will rise way above the 25
students per class as the dis-
trict tries to stuff the space.
More kids, less money is the
new plan and nobody cares.
They are trying to work with
an insufficient budget. If we
do not support the deficit
with taxes, then it will hap-
pen. Load up the teachers
with more kids leading to
more lost time working
nights and weekends in this
cushy government job.
I think the notion of let-
ting the government work-
ers go and cutting them off
after a few years of service
is the underlying plan.
I can hear them now:
"Fire anyone over 10 years
and hire the least experi-
enced worker for a lower
salary"
This evolving business
model is seeping into our
community's schools as I
speak. What a great way to
get the best service from
your local workers. Again,
the hidden plan is to prove
how terrible our scores will
be and now they can priva-
tize schools. This will be
their solution to a better
America.
So, police officers, you are
loved and respected by your
community. Will you take a
bullet for less money? Hey,
you will still have a job, just
learn to duck quicker.
Teachers, I want you to in-
spire our youth and share
your great wealth of knowl-
edge, but how does less
money and larger classroom
sizes sound? Come on, you
are used to giving one for
the team.
Remember you get what
you pay for, but we will talk
in 10 years from now and I
will remind you of your
grave sins of business and
education mixing like oil
and water. 1 will say I told
you so, but an actual list of
names would be best. You
and I might have to pay a lit-
tle more or the inevitable
decline is apparent.
Nothing is free in this
world.


GregBiance is a former
Citrus County teacher of
the year


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Letters to THE EDITOR


Smart enough
to do better
This letter is regarding
the woman who has re-
cently been found guilty
of murder and sentenced
to prison.
She claims to have been
raised by a mentally dis-
abled mother and is bipo-
lar herself. If these facts
are correct, this is indeed
an unfortunate outcome.
This is just one example
of how far off the mark we
are in dealing with the
mentally ill and the re-
sulting effects on the rest
of society.
Fortunately, we have
made great strides from
the days of indiscriminate
institutionalizing and mis-
treatment of the mentally
ill. Laws now protect the
rights of the mentally dis-
abled. They, nor their doc-
tors, can be forced to
reveal their medical back-
grounds or treatment and,
in many states, cannot be
forced into treatment.
We should ask ourselves
how some of these laws af-
fect society and often the
disabled individual as
well. What good purpose
does it serve if the un-
treated or under-treated
individual commits
crimes against society and
is incarcerated or be-
comes the victim of crime,
homelessness, illness or
even death?
Treatment and drugs
for mental illness are out
of the price range of many
Americans. This is espe-
cially true for the men-
tally ill in view of the fact


that they may have diffi-
culty holding a meaning-
ful job. Government
assistance is often un-
available or woefully in-
adequate due to funding
cut backs.
While there are well-
intentioned federal laws
to protect the education
and privacy of the men-
tally ill, some can have
unintended conse-
quences. An example is
the Individuals with Dis-
abilities Education Act
known as IDEA. This is a


federal law which man-
dates all children with
disabilities, including
those with mental illness,
must be provided a Free
Appropriate Public Edu-
cation (FAPE). This law
provides all disabled, spe-
cial-education students
may request an Individ-
ual Education Plan (IEP).
These students will
usually receive their edu-
cation in the regular
classroom. Many are in
treatment and do quite
well.


However, what could
happen if the parents of a
special-education bipolar
student should decide to
stop their child's treat-
ment? Under the law, they
cannot be forced to con-
tinue it. What can be done
to protect the safety of the
bipolar student, the other
students and the school
staff? The answer is rela-
tively little. Unless the
student makes a specific
threat or actually com-
mits a harmful act, his or
her privacy is protected


under the law and he
must be permitted to at-
tend school.
After a mass shooting in
this country everyone
wonders, "Where was the
family, the teacher, the
guidance counselor, the
scout leader or the clergy
while the child was grow-
ing up?" Sadly they were
there folks, helplessly gag-
ordered by those well-
intentioned laws of ours.
They were hoping and
praying the unthinkable
would never happen. But


SUBMIT LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
All letters must be signed
and include a phone
number and hometown,
including letters sent via
email. Names and home-
towns will be printed;
phone numbers will not.
Letters must be no longer
than 600 words. Writers
will be limited to four
letters per month.
SEND LETTERS TO:
The Editor, 1624 N.
Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429.
Or, fax to 352-563-3280,
or email to letters@
chronicleonline.com.

sometime it does happen.
Then comes the public
outcry for gun-control,
which I agree with in the-
ory only Of course, there
should be required back-
ground checks before a
gun permit is issued. But
under the current laws,
would it reveal mental
disorder and course of
treatment? Highly un-
likely Should the laws
protect the rights of men-
tally incompetent individ-
uals to make health
decisions for themselves
even if the decision com-
promises the safety of
everyone's life including
his own?
Surely the best legal
minds in this great coun-
try of ours can figure out
how to protect the rights
of the individual without
compromising the rights
of all the individuals.
Adrienne Jacobs
Pine Ridge


2nd Annual

-3uaegass d& ClVuig

/lusic 7esUioal
at Fort Cooper State Park
Saturday April 20th
RAIN OR SHINE
CRAFTS 10am to 4pm
ANTIQUE AUTOS
GREAT FOOD
STickets...$9.00@ gate
Advance...$6.00
Children Under 12 Free
Hosted by the 3100 S. Old Floral City Rd
Friends of Inverness 352-726-0315
Fort Cooper No Coolers
j ,, \ .1 or Alcohol


American Irish Club

Annual Invitational

Golf Tournament

Saturday April 6TH
Seven Rivers Country Club
Hole-in-One Prize
2013 Ford Fusion 2-year Lease
Sponsored by Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln of Crystal River
Sign in by 11:15am
Shotgun start at 12:30pm

Scramble Best Ball Format
Cost $55 per person includes
golf, cart, prizes, & lunch
Social hour with cash bar and appetizers
during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm.
For information and sign-up contact:
Dave Horsman 897-1398
Russ Doring 795-4548
Herb Duval 794-7465


Course Rules Apply. No Denim or T-Shirts


Rotary Club of Inverness
ANNUAL CHARITY

GOLF TOURNAMENT


8:30 a.m.


Saturday


Shotgun Start April 13


for information call
726-6496
or
212-0232 .


Inverness
Golf &


Cs Reo


A


atteCrsalRive PoeSqarnBil dn


at the Crystal River Power Squadron Building
845 NE 3rd Ave., Crystal River (

APRIL 17,2012
Doors open 11:30 a.m.
Lite Lunch 12:00 Noon
Play begins at 1:00 p.m.
SGals & Guys. Come have fun and enjoy the c
companionship of friends & new acquaintances.
RAFFLE BASKETS and PRIZES



Call Jennie al 382-0808.

r .,"!: 1^, L I ,
S/... ( i I
/ I I!


March 30th 9 a.m.
4th Annual Sugarmill Woods
Community Food Drive
Annual food drive organized by residents of Sugarmill
Woods to benefitWe Care Food Pantry.
Call 352-503-7355 for more information

March 30th 8 a.m.
Golf for Meals
$55 per golfer, $150 Hole Sponsorship,
$350Team and Hole Sponsorship
At 7 Rivers Golf and Country Club. Four person Scramble,
50/50, prizes for closest to the pin, lunch during the event,
hole-in-one prize. For more information 352-527-5975.

April 5th 6 p.m.
Relay for Life Crystal River
At Crystal River High School
Call 212-4857 for more information.

April 5th 7:10 p.m.,
bus leaves 3:30 p.m. from Citrus County Resource Center
Florida Rays Baseball vs. Cleveland Indians
Entrance fee $45
This year we were offered something special from the Rays!E
We will be using the Rays Fan Express Bus with Fox Sports
Florida!E Call 352-527-5978 for more information.

April 6th 11 a.m
Fabulous Fashions- Fashion Show
Entrance fee: $20
Fashion's by Belle's of Crystal River. Enjoy a great lunch and
fashions by Belle's of Crystal River. Call 352-563-2271 for
information.

April 6th 12:30 p.m.
American Irish Club
Invitational Golf Tournament
Entrance Fee: $55 Teams of 4 golfers play a scramble best ball
tournament in 2 flights (men and mixed). Cost includes golf,
cart, prizes and lunch. Reception includes cash bar, light
appetizers, prize awards and door prizes drawing.
Call 352-897-1398 for more information.

April 6th 12:30 p.m.
Wine Shop II and Burkes of Ireland
Entrance Fee: $40 Tickets go on sale March 17.
If you bring a jar of peanut butter and a jar of jelly,you will
get $5 off admission.Taste from over 100 choice wines and
beers from top wineries and breweries.
Call 352-795-0956 for information.

April 6th 8 a.m.
Floral City Garden Club Annual Plant Sale
At 8599 E. Marvin Street Floral City
Annual plant sale to raise money to support our scholarship
and community projects.
Call 352-560-3879 for information.


WHgr6YI W FWP4 SW /MRIAeA IS S RID "


FUNDRAISER i"


'/


I


--Elt'%Vm LWI its


C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


COMMENTARY


r-


.\












BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Costly subscriptions


March Madneus iUv


+ Itritp I Iwl n(i-comtl/mji h-1nud -ii If-l


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Associated Press
This screen shot shows Turner's NCAA March Madness Live website. The site allows those who don't have cable or satellite an option
to view all 67 games online for a one-time fee of $4.


Review: March Madness online not for cord-cutters


ANICK JESDANUN
AP technology writer

NEW YORK Finding
March Madness basketball
games online is easier this
year, but watching them isn't if
you've ditched your cable or
satellite TV service.
This is good news for most
Americans those who pay
for cable or satellite service. If
you already get the Turner
channels TNT, TBS and
TruTV on television, you
should be able to watch live
video of every game for free on
computers and mobile devices.
But last year, Turner gave
those who don't have cable or
satellite the so-called cord-
cutters an option to view all
67 games online for a one-time
fee of $4. So if you didn't want
to pay $70 or more each month
for cable service, you could
just pay $4 once for the games.
That was quite a deal. In
fact, it was too good to last.
Turner said the plan all
along has been to eliminate
that option once people got
more comfortable with signing
in with their pay-TV accounts


to watch online. NBC and its
sister cable channels have
been doing that every other
year with the Olympics. HBO,
which like Turner is owned by
Time Warner Inc., makes you
sign in to watch its shows on-
line. There's no online-only
option with either.
It's a concept the television
industry calls TV Everywhere.
The catch is you still need a TV
subscription to watch online.
In doing so, the networks are
discouraging cord-cutting,
which is still uncommon, but
growing fast Networks want to
preserve the fees cable and
satellite companies pay them
for every subscriber who gets
those channels on television.
The good news here is that
to compensate for the disap-
pearing online-only option,
Turner has made it very easy
for online viewers to access
live games of the NCAA men's
college basketball tournament.
That's crucial when games are
during the workday, when ac-
cess to a TV is limited.
For starters, Turner and its
broadcasting partner, CBS
Corp., have centralized where


you can find the games.
Just go to www.ncaa.com/
march-madness on a Windows
or Mac computer or download
the free NCAA March Madness
Live app on an iPad, iPhone or
Android device. You'll see a
schedule of games. Just choose
any already in progress.
Last year, as a Time Warner
Cable subscriber, I had to first
figure out which network was
carrying a particular game and
then go to that network's web-
site to enter my Time Warner
password. Watching on a mo-
bile device required yet an-
other password after paying
the $4 fee. That made March
Madness maddening.
This time, it's one site (or
app) and one password.
I expected I'd need to enter
my password right away. In-
stead, both the website and the
app let me start watching live
games first.
CBS is broadcasting about a
quarter of the early-round
games and most of the later
ones. You can watch as much as
you want of those games online.
The Turner games are lim-
ited to four hours without a


password. You don't have to
use that all at once. The idea is
that you'd use that time to fig-
ure out your account informa-
tion. In my case, it's the same
one I use to access cable bills
online.
But unless you know you're
limited to four hours, you
wouldn't know to look for your
password. In making it easy to
start watching, Turner is also
making it easy to overlook the
limit. You're promised warn-
ings along the way, though I
never noticed any in my
multitasking.
The timer appears tied to
Adobe's video player, so clear-
ing the cookie data files on my
browser didn't reset it. But
after my four hours ran out on
a MacBook, I was still able to
watch on an iMac, an iPad and
an Android phone.
That's good because my pay-
TV password doesn't work. A
few months ago, I downgraded
to a barebones TV service that
excludes the Turner channels.
Time Warner Cable knows that
and won't let me through.


Page D4


Equip self with knowledge for second job fair


rrr9



Laura Byrnes
WORKFORCE
CONNECTION


S spring arrived in
rather tremulous
fashion this past
week and did not make
much of a show of it.
After all, don't we expect
a bright, sunny disposition
out of the first full season of
the calendar year? Sure we
do. Instead, at least on the
official first day of spring,
we got more gray, cloudy
skies and wintery weather
That may seem an apt


metaphor for those among
the 5,200 Citrus Countians
who have felt the chill of a
challenging job market.
Take heart: blue skies are
coming.
The second annual
Spring Fling Job Fair is
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday, March 27, at
the College of Central
Florida's Learning and
Conference Center in
Lecanto. To date, nearly 20


businesses plan to partici-
pate, including Alachua
Mycroschool, B-Scada,
Caregiver Services, Fami-
lies Come First, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office,
Citrus Memorial Health
System, Crystal River
Health and Rehabilitation,
Key Training Center, Na-
ture Coast Physical Ther-
apy and Rehabilitation and
Plantation Inn. For a full
list of participating em-


players, visit www.
WorkforceConnectionFL.
com.
If you want to see your
job-search efforts truly
bloom this spring, then first
go to the job fair. Second,
optimize your time there.
Before the job fair, re-
search the companies that
interest you and learn who
they are and what they do.


Page D4


Organize

finances,

start with

mortgage

Dear Bruce: I'm 35
years old, and I
earn $63,000 a
year I have $8,000 saved
in a federal government
Thrift Savings Plan re-
tirement account My
expenses include $850 a
month for a 6.5 percent
fixed 30-year mortgage,
a $362 car note and a
$5,400 credit card bal-
ance at 19 percent APR,
toward which I nor-
mally pay $300 per
month. I do not have any
money saved for emer-
gencies. I also have a
child who is a junior in
high school, so I foresee
college expenses in the
near future.
How do you suggest I
get my finances in
order? I would like to
save money for an emer-
gency fund, but I also
would like to pay off my
credit card and increase
the money saved in my
retirement account.
Which is the higher pri-
ority? I want to save
money and be debt-free.
-A.D., via email
DearA.D.: First of all,
you have a 6.5 percent
mortgage in days when
3.5 percent to 4 percent
is more normal. Assum-
ing your credit is
halfway decent, apply
for a new mortgage. I
would suggest you go
with a term of 15 years
or less.
My next area to at-
tack would be the credit
card balance at 19 per-
cent, which is exces-
sive. You don't indicate
where the rest of your
money is going, but it
seems you should be
able to pay a good deal
more than $300 a month
toward reducing the
credit card balance. I
hope you're not adding
to it. Another card com-
pany might give you a
better rate if you agree
to transfer the $5,400
balance.
The car note is not ex-
cessively high, and I
don't know if there's any-
thing you can do about
that except pay it off and
keep the car for a rea-
sonable length of time.
It's unlikely you will
be able to put aside
much for your young-
ster's college expenses,
but I don't have a prob-
lem with that. Start
prepping the child for a
community college,
See Page D4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bennett receives
new credential
SPRING HILL- Oak Hill
Hospital announces its Chief
Nursing Officer Melissa Ben-
nett, RN,
BSN, MHA
(Masters in
Healthcare
Administra-
). ha tion), CCRN
(Critical
Care Regis-
Melissa termed
Bennett Nurse),
FACHE
(Fellow of the American Col-
lege of Healthcare Execu-
tives), has passed the Nurse
Executive Advanced Certifica-
tion examination and may
now hold the credential of
NEA-BC (Nurse Executive
Advanced Board Certified).
This achievement signifies
her further commitment to pa-
tient care and professional
development.
For more information about
the American Nurses Creden-
tialing Center go to www.
nursecredentialing.org. or
email certification@ANA.org.
Reynolds expands
medical practice
SPRING HILL- Michael
Bryan Reynolds, D.O., has
added a second location to
at 3480 Del-
tona Blvd.,
Spring Hill.
He also
sees pa-
tients at a
building at
675 Har-
Michael yrSti
Reynolds vard St. in
Brooksville.
Due to the opening of his new
location, same-day appoint-
ments will be available.
Reynolds is board-certified
in family medicine and re-
ceived his Doctor of Osteopa-
thy degree from West Virginia
School of Osteopathic Medi-
cine in Lewisburg, W.Va. He
completed his residency and
internship at Warren General
Hospital in Warren, Ohio.
Reynolds received his Bache-
lor of Science degree from
Marshall University in Hunt-
ington, W.Va.
He is an active member of
the American College of Os-
teopathic Family Physicians
and the American Osteo-
pathic Association.
He and his wife, Diane,
have two sons, Addison and
Michael. Reynolds will see
patients from age 12 through
geriatrics.
Natalia's wins
charity awards
CRYSTAL RIVER Na-
talia's Pizza and Pasta won
first prize in the pizza and ca-
sual dining categories at the
recent second annual "Cook-
ing For A Cause" on Feb. 24
at Crystal River Mall.
While Natalia's won awards
for its pizza, the restaurant
specializes in Italian and
Cuban gourmet cuisine. Own-
ers Bobby and Shirley Gonza-
lez have been in the
restaurant business for more
than 25 years and are cele-
brating two years at their cur-
rent location in Crystal River.
Recently, they introduced a
retail area in the restaurant
dedicated to baked bread,
pastries and imported goods.
Natalia's is at 771 N.E. Fifth
St. in Crystal River. Hours are
open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tues-
day through Saturday.
For information on Natalia's
restaurant, call 352-564-9000
or visit www.nataliaspizza
pasta.com.
Free workshops
at Workforce
OCALA- Workforce Con-
nection of Citrus, Levy and
Marion counties will hold
more than 70 workshops and
special programs in March, in-
cluding a job fair and other
hiring events.
Offerings include resume
and computer labs, interactive
workshops designed to help
participants brush up on their
interview skills, and programs


such as "Navigating the New
World of Work," "Beyond Bar-
riers: Pathway to Employ-
ment" and "Retooling and
Refueling for Veterans" which
focus on job seekers with
specific needs.
Other highlights include:
Second annual Spring
Fling Job Fair from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Wednesday, March 27,
at CF's Citrus Learning and
Conference Center, 3800 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.


Business DIGEST
Cutting hair for humanitarian effort


Special to the Chronicle
The Fifth Street Salon and Spa had a Cut-a-thon and Car Wash for The Humanitarians of Florida Inc. and
SnippetCitrus. From left to right are Desiree Fielding and Tammy Banks from The Fifth Street Salon and Spa,
Maggie Hypes from the Humanitarians of Florida and Mary Lee Johnson from SnippetCitrus.


"This is one of the most ro-
bust months we've had in
terms of offerings for job
seekers interested in enhanc-
ing their employability skills,"
said Jerry Flanders, Work-
force Connection's workshop
coordinator. "There is some-
thing going on every day
throughout our three-county


region. Sessions range from
two hours to two- and three-
days long; all are provided to
job seekers at no charge."
Most workshops are at
Workforce Connection's one-
stop resource centers in
Ocala, Inverness and
Chiefland, as well as at Pa-
triot Job Connection, Work-


force's job placement/
employment services office
for postsecondary students at
CF's Enterprise Center in
Ocala. Other workshops will
be at area libraries and com-
munity centers.
Workshops and events are
free, but participants must be
registered with Workforce


Connection through the
Employ Florida Marketplace
at www.EmployFlorida.com.
For more information, visit
Workforce Connection's Cal-
endar of Events at www.
WorkforceConnection
FL.com or call 352-291-9559.
Workforce Connection's
one-stop resource center in


Citrus County is at 1103 E. In-
verness Blvd. in Inverness.
Trial lawyer
recertified
The law office of Keith R.
Taylor, P.A., is proud to an-
nounce Taylor has been re-
certified as a civil trial lawyer.
Certification is the highest
level of evaluation by The
Florida Bar of competency
and experience within an area
of law, and professionalism
and ethics in practice. The
Florida Bar recognizes experts
in 24 different certification
areas. Only 4,300 of Florida's
87,000 lawyers are board-
certified in any area of law.
According to the Florida
Bar, certification gives any
person seeking a lawyer an
objective representation of
which Florida attorneys are
experts in their practice areas.
Certified lawyers are special-
ists who meet Florida's high
legal standards, and certifica-
tion indicates legal expertise
and dedication to professional
excellence.
Taylor is the only board-
certified civil trial lawyer with
his principal office in Citrus
County. Taylor primarily han-
dles cases involving personal
injury, wrongful death and other
significant civil litigation, includ-
ing contract, real estate, com-
mercial and probate disputes.
Taylor is a graduate of the
University of Florida College
of Law and has practiced law
in Florida since 1993.


,I.I,,


BOB LANE,Accountant
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500


400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


WILLIAMS, ooo
McCRANIE,
WARDLOW
r & CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
Complete Income Tax Service


Crystal River
795-3212


www.wmwccpa.com 726-Inverness130
726-8130


Christine C. Eck, CPA, PA
910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522


Certified Public Accountant


!~S TE!M








TheeSll flll meLefi t





To PceYourM (111


PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA

Federal & Out-of-State Tax Preparation
*/ Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
Payroll Services
www.pwprice.com






" Accurate and affordable service year round
" Experienced, trained tax professionals
" Convenient evening and weekends hours
* Audit assistance
* Electronic filing


Dunnellon (352) 489-4760
Beverly Hills (352) 527-4117
Crystal River (352) 795-4733 / 564-1010
Inverness (352) 726-5349
Homosassa (352) 628-3660


4&R BLOCK'
MITGOOO


Member: Florida Institute of CPAs


S I I ,' I I "
Tax Preparation:

5 'fid i,,,] i.. -iF., ] ',,i, .. i. 11... h ,,,




I Tax Professional 30+ Years Experience
Belinda Brown fED SERRA
Gloria Cain - tn.f 'dMtuI.t uri IM .
r


CALL NOW!


352-563-2911


OFFICES LOCATED IN CRYSTAL RIVER, INVERNESS, HOMOSASSA
ALSO LOCATED INSIDE WALMART


*JACKSON HEWITT
TAX SERVICE
000E8LR


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


BUSINESS


For more information
on advertising call
Judy Moseley at
352-564-2917 or
Yvonne Shepard at
352-563-3273


SWITCH TO US!



DAV $
1 50 LESS


than last year!










D3


IB CITRUS COUNTY
= Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801




Taking Tallahassee in Citrus County-style


Locals descend onto Florida's

A capital city to meet legislators


Legislative Days 2013
kicked off Wednesday,
March 20, with the Ag Al-
liance of Citrus County
cooking barbecue for 100
Citrus County residents and
various members of the leg-
islature. Hosted at the Good-
wood Museum's Carriage
House and sponsored by
Progress Energy, the event
provided indoor and out-
door seating along with live
music by Southern Comfort.


On Thursday, March 21,
the day began with a tour of
the Supreme Court of
Florida. Attendees were
treated to lunch on the 22nd
floor of the capital building.
The lunch, sponsored by
SunTrust Bank, served as
the beginning of an after-
noon packed with senators,
lobbyists and other speakers
addressing the concerns of
Citrus County residents and
answering questions.


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Barbara Gracey
Jh,, Green .Jeweler>.
Cr.est %l Ri\er
... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!



EDC

focuses on

strategic

plan

Recently Jeannette Gold-
smith, a consultant
whose visit was sponsored by
Progress Energy, visited with
Citrus County representatives
and toured the county. Don
Taylor, EDC executive direc-
tor, points out "the consult-
ant confirmed that we need a
comprehensive strategic plan
for economic development,"
and he continued stating that
"we will use her strategic points
as a baseline for our plan."
With the previous loss of
past residential construction
jobs and the current closing
of CR3, Citrus County sits
poised for a new era.
"We have to work through
a strategic plan to define our
future," said Taylor, "and we
have to refocus our efforts to
determine niche industries
that fit our county; and de-
termine those that fit not only
our infrastructure, but also
the personality of the county."
Taylor is excited to head
the EDC at this transitional
time, saying "Citrus County is
resilient and will swing around
this comer to come out
stronger and more stable."


Chamber ambassadors joined with Walter Proctor and associates Dawn Gaskin and Allison Norman from Lange
Eye Care at its ribbon-cutting on March 12. Ambassadors from left: Lillian Smith, Mary Kay Cosmetics; Nancy Hau-
top, Cadence Bank; Mike Buchanan, Excel Printing; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center of Citrus County; Lance Ferrara;
Lisa Nash; Jim Ferrara; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood, and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


Welcome Lange Eye Care

L ange Eye Care has joined the Citrus County Chamber membership. Located at
2629 N. Forest Ridge Blvd., Hemando, the facility is open Monday through Thursday
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call them at 352-527-2775 or visit www.langeeyecare.com.
"We invite everyone to our official grand opening and first annual sidewalk sale on Saturday,
April 6 starting at 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.," said Walter Proctor. "Come enjoy free food, free prizes,
and free vision screenings, as well as discounts up to 75 percent off select merchandise."


T he following Chamber member SCORE even if you
T restaurants want to let you know their his is ourlastchanceto register nan
Easter schedule. Of course, additionalfor theApril 8,213,15thannual 8
restaurants may be open Easter Sunday; Golf Classic brought to you by Sug
however, we recommend that you call SCORE, Counselors to America's Su
and check before checking in. Small RBusin in rtnrshdim wth Rp


Angelotti's Pizza: Closed.
B&W Rexall: Open
6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Golden Corral: Open
regular business hours.
Seagrass Waterfront:
Open; reservations
requested.
Havana House Grill:
Open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.


Neon Leon's: Open
11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Ike's Old Florida
Kitchen: Open 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m.
Taverna Manos: 9 a.m. to
6 p.m.; reservations only.
West 82 at Plantation
on Crystal River:
11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.


the Chronicle. Your support helps
SCORE provide FREE counseling and
business education to all Citrus
County businesses. Tournament play
is $60 per golfer and includes greens
fees, golf cart, lunch, snacks, bever-
ages and prize opportunities. There
will be flight prizes, a putting contest
and a Hole-in-One contest. The tour-


at:
ani
at
rec
Sp,
ava
De
24
liv


Upcoming
Chamber of
Commerce
events
April 2- Ribbon-
cutting at Glasswerx,
Crystal River, 8:30 a.m.
April 4- Ribbon-
cutting at Franklin
Anderson Art Gallery,
Crystal River, 4:30 p.m.
April 10 Ribbon-
cutting for Antonio
Griffin Lawn & Garden
at Crystal River
Chamber, 8:30 a.m.
April 11 Business
After Hours at
Insight Credit Union,
Inverness, 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m.
April 12 Chamber
Lunch at Plantation on
Crystal River, 11:30 a.m.
Remember, coupons
and discounts also
appear on the mobile
and regular websites!
Check out our complete
calendar for community,
entertainment and
fundraising events.

E 91


have to yell 'fore'
ment takes place on Monday, April
(rain date Monday April 15) at
garmill Woods Country Club,
garmill Woods, Homosassa.
gistration starts at 11 a.m., lunch is
11:3o, the shotgun start is at 1 p.m.
d the Awards Ceremony will begin
5:30 p.m. Entries MUST be
*eived by this Friday, March 29.
onsorship opportunities are still
ailable. For more information, call
nnis King or Dan Crishon at 352-
9-1236 or email citruschapter@
e.com.


RE/MAX Realty One, Inverness,

receives New Image Award


K aren Cunningham
shares her excitement
about the company,
"RE/MAX Realty One In-
verness location has
moved for the construction
of the New Publix. Our
new location at 1101 U.S.
41 N. Inverness houses 11
of the county's best agents.
This new location is one of
four locations of RE/MAX
Realty One, Citrus
County's top-producing
company. We handle all of
your real estate needs,
from residential sales,
buyer brokerage and rental
management to all your
commercial needs. Our
agents are involved in the
community and know the
area; this knowledge helps
them to assist buyers to
find the perfect place to
call home. For sellers we


Accepting the award from Rhonda Lestinsky is RE/MAX Realty One's Brogan
Cunningham. Pictured with him are from left: Barbara Mills, agent; Josh Wooten,
Chamber President and CEO; Karen Cunningham, RE/MAX Realty One owner and
John Murphy, chairman of the Chamber.


have a worldwide fran-
chise, which helps our
agents market to all poten-
tial buyers by use of web-


sites and our referral net-
work. RE/MAX Realty
One is here to help you
with all of your real estate


needs. Please call us at
352-637-6200 or come
in and visit us at our new
location."


'Tis grand to be Irish -
even if just for a day
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce got into the
St. Patrick's Day spirit in the Inverness parade, Sun-
day March 17. Carrying the banner are Matthew McGuf-
fin, administrative assistant, Inverness, and Cindi Fein,
communications/public relations coordinator, joined by
Jeff Inglehart, special events coordinator, and youngsters
Amanda and Rachel Schnettler, Brian and Sally Smith
and Jessica Valenzuela. The few errant raindrops didn't
stand a chance against the pot o' gold in this parade,
which more than doubled in size from 2012.


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


d '-


www.thinkstockphotos.com
Hiring home health care can be a tricky business. Use online resources to find the right
employee and follow the proper tax regulations.



Tax tips for hiring



household help


ALEX VEIGA
AP business writer

Taxes. They're just
about the last thing par-
ents might think about
when they hire someone to
watch over their child.
Yet a hefty tax bill is a
possibility for anyone who
pays a nanny, house-
keeper, gardener or other
household employee
enough in annual wages to
trigger a bevy of require-
ments under tax laws.
This year, that financial
threshold is $1,800, and it
makes the person who
hired the household em-
ployee responsible for
paying that worker's fed-
eral and state payroll
taxes, just like any other
business owner They also
must reflect in their own
annual tax return that they
had a household
employee.
"People think if they pay
this person in cash, they
don't have to report it, and
the recipient doesn't have
to pick it up as income,"
said Cindy Hockenberry,
manager of research for
the National Association
of Tax Professionals. "But
there are taxes due on
that, and the IRS wants
their taxes."
Here are six tips on how
to make sure you're not
running afoul of the tax
man when hiring house-
hold help:
1. Sort out independent
contractor or household
employee.
Whether you are on the
hook for your nanny or
maid's payroll taxes begins
with determining if he or
she meets the IRS' defini-
tion of a household em-
ployee, rather than an
independent contractor.
The IRS defines a
household employee as
someone hired to do work
in or around a home, at the
direction and control of
the person who lives in the
home. Meaning, you tell


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

which is significantly less ex-
pensive. Explain to your teen if
he or she gets decent grades in
junior college, it will be possi-
ble to transfer after two years
without any problem to a four-
year institution.
Dear Bruce: My last son is in
college, and his finances are
destroying our relationship. He
seems to think I should finance
his college while he plays and
does what he wants. I told him
to seek his own financing, and
he came back, as I was sure he
would, needing a co-signer. I
am not willing to do that, as I
see his frivolous lifestyle jeop-
ardizing his ability to repay
The problem is, we have
done well for ourselves and
have a high net worth, most of
which is tied up in investments.
We filled out the FAFSA for one
of our sons, only to find out he
didn't qualify for anything and
we were supposed to finance
his education on our own. It's
frustrating to see we pay taxes
for less fortunate kids and we
have to pay the full load.
Any suggestions on how he
can get financing on his own to
finish his degree? T.A., via
email
Dear TA.: You mentioned you
told your son to seek his own fi-
nancing and he came back
needing a co-signer. That's not


them what to do and how
to do it, and perhaps pro-
vide the supplies for in-
stance, if you hire someone
to mow your yard and they
use your lawn equipment.
In the case of a nanny:
'"Any parent would have an
almost impossible case to
make that they don't have
the right to control the
work that's being done in
their private home with
their child," says Kathleen
Webb, president and co-
founder of HomeWork So-
lutions, which provides
payroll and tax services to
people with household
employees.
Other examples of
household workers: Driv-
ers, home-health aides
and maids.
So who wouldn't be a
household employee? If
workers can control how
they do the work, are self-
employed or bring their
own tools, they're likely to
be considered independ-
ent contractors.
2. Determine which taxes
you are expected to pay.
Assuming your nanny or
other hire meets the
household employee stan-
dard, it all comes down to
whether you pay the per-
son cash wages of $1,800 or
more.
If that's the case, you are
required to pay 15.3 per-
cent of their wages in So-
cial Security and Medicare
taxes.
The employer covers
half of those taxes (6.2 per-
cent for Social Security
and 1.45 percent for
Medicare) and can with-
hold the other half from
the employee's paycheck.
The IRS requires employ-
ers withhold additional
Medicare tax if their em-
ployee makes more than
$200,000 in a year.
If your employee is paid
$1,000 or more in any cal-
endar quarter, then you
must also pay federal un-
employment tax of 6 per-
cent of their annual wages.


To find out whether you
have to pay state unem-
ployment taxes, check
here: www.workforce
security. doleta.gov/
unemploy/agencies.asp.
3. Decide early on how
you're going to pay.
The IRS gives you the
option to withhold your
employees' share of their
Medicare and Social Secu-
rity taxes from their pay-
check, or to elect to pay
their share yourself.
Let's say you are looking
to hire a nanny to come
over a couple of nights a
week for three hours. At
the current federal mini-
mum wage of $7.25 an
hour, that's $43.50. Extend
that over a year, and it's
$2,262 triggering the re-
quirement you pay the
nanny's payroll taxes.
Under that scenario, un-
less you have been with-
drawing payroll taxes over
the course of the year,
you'll have to come up
with $173.04 to settle the
nanny's portion of the tax,
and an equal amount for
your obligation as the
employer
4. Verify an employee's
legal status.
The government doesn't
look favorably upon em-
ployers who hire people
who can't legally work in
the U.S.
So the IRS requires em-
ployers and their hires
complete an employment
eligibility verification
form, dubbed 1-9, before
the end of the employee's
first day of work.
The form requires non-
U.S. citizens provide infor-
mation backing up their
legal employment status
and that the employer ex-
amine the information
against a list of acceptable
identification documents.
Once it's filled out, em-
ployers must simply hang
on to the form.
It can be downloaded at
http://www.uscis.gov/files/
form/i-9.pdf.


seeking his own financing.
Tell your son you're not will-
ing to subsidize his frivolous
lifestyle. Tell him if he gets a
job and pays a fair amount of
his expenses, you might be will-
ing to help him. Tell him unless
he straightens up his act, he's
on his own. That is tough love,
but it sounds like just what he
needs.
He is not acting responsibly
by going out and doing what he
wants, and you are not teaching
him a lesson in responsibility
by acquiescing, as apparently
you have done up until now.
Dear Bruce: I am 68, married
and still working full time. I
have a question on term insur-
ance. I had a $50,000 full-life
policy since I was a kid, and
(perhaps foolishly) I let it lapse
a year ago. I hear many ads for
term insurance at reasonable
rates but can't tell if they're
legit or rip-offs. The one com-
pany I'm looking into seems
like a good route to go, but I
want to get your wise input be-
fore doing anything. Jim in
Wisconsin
Dear Jim: You mentioned you
had a policy since you were a
kid and you let it lapse a year
ago. After 60 years of paying
into the policy, was it not paid
up? Are you certain it has
lapsed? My first inclination
would be to check and make
sure. If it was a whole life pol-
icy, there ought to be some
value, maybe enough to con-
tinue to feed the premiums


even though you neglected to.
In the absence of that, at age
68, a term policy may be expen-
sive. If you're a smoker, it's
going to cost you a ton of money
And if you have other health
concerns, companies may not
insure you at all.
You mentioned one life in-
surance company (I have re-
moved its name) that
advertises, and it is certainly le-
gitimate. You can inquire of
several companies, including
the one you mentioned, and
find out exactly how much the
premium would be.
Dear Bruce: My daughter is
separated from her husband.
He has since been receiving
disability (due to lack of want-
ing to work). He informed my
daughter he does not need to
file taxes since he is on disabil-
ity, although he did receive a
1099. My daughter is worried
she will be held liable since
they are not yet divorced due to
lack of funds for an attorney. I
say he still needs to file or he
will be charged with tax fraud,
and since they are separated, it
will say her name on the tax
form.
This man has not worked for
approximately 10 years and
makes his "living" off of other
people. He will ask anyone with
any kind of money for loans and
yet does not pay! M.C.,
Newark, Ill.
Dear M.C.: Just because your
daughter's husband got a 1099
doesn't mean he needs to file. If


the amount reported on the
1099 takes his income above a
certain threshold, then he
would have to file. The fact he's
a bum and is living off other
people is not relevant.
Your daughter really should
do everything possible to con-
clude this divorce. Staying mar-
ried to this guy will only lead to
other problems, and some
could be major.
Dear Bruce: My wife passed
away in early November 2012,
and our car was financed in her
name. It is a new car, and I still
owe $8,500 on it. It was regis-
tered in her name, and when I
called the bank about this, they
told me I have to get a lawyer to
put the car in my name by going
to probate court. Well, there
should be no reason to go to
probate because there was no
estate. I thought when a spouse
died, the surviving spouse
would get whatever was left
without going through probate.
I received a check from the
insurance company for $250,
the balance left after the fu-
neral charges. Also, we have a
mobile home paid for that I put
up for sale for $35,000 and will
end up selling, if I am lucky, for
$25,000. It was in both our
names, and the real estate lady
told me all I would need to sell
it would be the death certifi-
cate. Is this true?
I am 73 years old and just
have Social Security for my in-
come. How do I get this taken
care of without hiring a lawyer


I can't afford? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader: Even though it
may not be large, your wife
does have an estate her
share of the mobile home. You
can still file to have yourself
named administrator of her es-
tate if she didn't have a will,
and I would suggest you do so if
this is the case.
There is no reason you can't
take her estate through probate
without the services of an at-
torney. It may be difficult, but it
can be done. And if you don't
have the money, there is no al-
ternative. I assume you are re-
tired, so, if nothing else, you
have time to do this.
It's entirely possible you can
tell the bank through the pro-
bate court the car is in your
wife's name alone, and the
court will offer to put it into
your name. As to the mobile
home, you will have to go down
to the county offices and ask
how to transfer it to only your
name. The real estate agent
may be accurate when she says
you have to show only the death
certificate.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com or
to Smart Money, PO. Box 7150,
Hudson, FL 34674. Questions
of general interest will be an-
swered in future columns.
Owing to the volume of mail,
personal replies cannot be
provided.


D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


BUSINESS


BYRNES
Continued from Page Dl

Then check out their job openings by
visiting the Employ Florida Marketplace
(EFM) at www.EmployFlorida.com.
If you haven't done so already, set up a
free account on EFM and apply for jobs
that appeal to you and for which you are
qualified. This not only saves time dur-
ing the job fair time you can spend
meeting employers but it demon-
strates to hiring managers you are a se-
rious job candidate.
Something else you will want to do be-
fore the job fair is craft a one-minute in-
fomercial about yourself. Known as your
"elevator speech," it should explain who
you are, your qualifications and accom-
plishments and your special skills and
values that set you apart from other job
seekers. Have one or two specific exam-
ples of what you can do for the company
The last item demonstrates you are a se-
rious contender, have done your home-
work and actually thought about issues
facing the company
Here's why this is so critical: you don't
get a second chance to make a positive
first impression. Employers meet scores
if not hundreds of eager applicants and
may remember only those who stand
out. Your mission is to say one truly
memorable thing employers will
remember.
Think that's easy? It's not. Practice
your infomercial out loud to feel com-
fortable. Your delivery is as important as
the content and should be confident and
enthusiastic, yet natural, never forced or
canned. This isn't rote memorization
you'll want to rattle off in a rush, this is
a conversation starter.
Equally important is preparing your
job fair strategy. Based on your company
research, make a prioritized list of the
employers you would like to meet and
focus your efforts there. That includes
tailoring your resume to the specific
jobs for which you are applying. Tailor
does not mean "make up" or "embell-
ish," it means you should highlight the
work history, education and skills
closely matching the job requirements.
If you plan to meet with three different
employers, have three targeted re-
sumes; you will work with the same re-
sume content, just different packaging.
If you do not know how to do this or
are uncertain about your resume, visit
the Workforce Connection one-stop re-
source center in Inverness at 1103 E. In-
verness Blvd., or call 352-637-2223 to
learn more. We also have a targeted re-
sume lab at 1:30 p.m. March 26 at the re-
source center.
Your resumes need to be clean, crisp
and professional looking. Check care-
fully for spelling and grammatical er-
rors, and then check again. You know
the saying, "Keep calm and carry on?"
Well, now is the time to "keep calm and
proofread."
Yes, even though you will likely apply
electronically, you still should bring
copies of your resume. Here's why: it's a



MADNESS
Continued from Page Dl

Once your four-hour allotment runs
out, you are still able to watch CBS
games live and listen to live audio of
every game. You also have access to re-
plays on computers and recaps on mo-
bile apps shortly after a game
concludes. In addition, you get play-by-
play updates and the latest stats on play-
ers and the teams. A few highlight clips
are also available for free, even before
the game ends.
Live video when you do get it is
sharp. I encountered stuttering only
when I tried to watch three or four
streams on the same Wi-Fi network.
One drawback: You do have to watch a


good ice-breaker and natural spring-
board for your infomercial. The hiring
manager then has a ready reference as
you tick off career highlights. I have wit-
nessed employers make notes on those
resumes such as circling items and
adding exclamation points; it helps jog
their memories after a long day of meet-
ing job seekers.
On the day of the job fair, dress for
success. While there is no charge to at-
tend, appropriate dress is required.
Proper attire demonstrates you take the
job fair seriously and you respect the
time they have invested in meeting you.
This does not mean you have to wear
something expensive or brand new. Just
be clean, neat and well-groomed. Treat
the job fair like a job interview; modest
and conservative trump fancy or fash-
ionable every time.
When you arrive at the fair, turn off
your cell phone and take a purposeful
tour to know the layout and locate the
employers you want to meet. When you
approach the hiring manager, remem-
ber to smile, greet them with a firm
handshake and make eye contact.
Remember, you will have maybe a
minute to make an impression, so make
it count. If you get through your intro-
duction and it looks like the employer
wants to spend more time with you,
show interest and listen carefully to
what he or she is saying. Asking well-
formed questions about the company
demonstrates you have done your due
diligence.
After the job fair, write personalized
thank-you letters to companies interest-
ing you and mention something specific
from your conversation during your
meeting at the job fair Send the letters
out within a day or two of the job fair. It
is OK to enclose a resume with your
thank-you letter; it may draw attention
to your name once again.
Continue to research the companies
interesting to you. After all, the job fair
should be seen as an initial contact, not
the last, and it may lead to a subsequent
interview. As mentioned at the outset, it
is best to be prepared.
You will find more job fair prepara-
tion tips, plus our Dress for Success flier,
by visiting the job candidates page on
the website, www.WorkforceConnection
FL.com. Now is also an excellent time to
follow us on Twitter @WorkforceCLM
for the latest job fair tips and regular up-
dates about hot jobs, upcoming work-
shops and other free job-seeker
services.
Don't forget to explore the myriad re-
sources and enlist the help of our pro-
fessional staff at the Citrus County
Workforce Connection Resource Center,
1103 E. Inverness Blvd. The center is
south of Inverness off U.S. 41. Call us at
352-637-2223 or 800-434-JOBS.


Laura Byrnes, APR is a certified
workforce professional and
communications manager at Workforce
Connection. Call her at 352-291-9559 or
800-434-5627, ext. 1234, or email
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl. com.


short ad when you start a video, on top of
regular ads during breaks in game play
If the game is close, you could miss a key
shot. My other complaint is the lack of
controls for pausing and replaying live
video. You're stuck with the replays cho-
sen by the networks.
I understand why Turner is requiring
a pay-TV subscription, even if I don't
like it. It does need to make money. I
only wish it would offer the option to
pay for just the NCAA games, as it did
last year, for those who don't want to pay
for hundreds of TV channels that go
unwatched.
It is true Turner is now conforming to
industry norms in tying online access to
TV subscriptions. But in retrenching
and following the pack, it is missing out
on an opportunity to become a digital
pioneer.









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 D5


To place an ad, call 563-5966


IFax:(352)563-56651Toll7Free:(8eo mIo


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748




Bath Tub
60 x 42 fiberglass,
drop in unit
with fixtures,
$100. (352) 382-7074
FORD
1978 F150, Shrt. Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598

LAWN
SERVICE

Job requires weed
eater, edging,
hedge trimming,
blowing & general
landscaping.

Must have drivers
license.
LM 352-533-7536


a-I

$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087




Calico Cat
female, spayed,
declawed, free to good
home. call for details
352-726-3922
FREE
10 acres of
pine needles,
(352) 746-7775
Free Dog to a
Loving Home
Female Apricot Poodle
approx 8 Ibs & 3 yrs. old
352-563-1778
Free Dog to a
Loving HomeMale,
11 Ib Chihuahua,
approx 3 yrs. old. Lt tan
w/ specks of brown
352-563-1778
Horse Manure
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
(352) 249-7180


-g
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1/ yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
Female Black Labra-
dor. Bella is a very
friendly dog, lost at
the South end of
Rockcrusher.
Child is heartbroken.
(352) 613-7570
Large Black Cat
23 lbs, green eyes,
extra toes, Name is
Big Foot. Village Drive
Homosassa Area
REWARD.
(352)503-9063
LOST
White Malti-Poo 81bs,
bad haircut, Blind in one
eye his name is squid,
lost on So. Tyler St.,
Beverly Hills
352-476-5746
Lost Young Orange
Cat, male
name Punky
Beverly Hills
Della & Washington St.
(352) 746-4132




Found @ Hunters
Springs Park. Paddle
and other stuff. Please
call to identify.
302.545.7208
FOUND
Tools, lakeside golf
course, call to identify
352-726-3496
Orange/White Tabby
Cat, found in Seven
Lakes Area, Inverness
pls call 352-586-4751




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Looking for a Ride to
Bay City Michigan
for my mid size
Kubota Tractor
Call (989) 387-0197




TEACHER

Fulltime/Part time,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222


If You and Your
Clientele Need
a New Salon

BOOTH RENTAL
Available
TOWN & COUNTRY
(352) 795-6972









IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Criminal
Justice, *Hospitality. Job
placement assistance.
Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized. Call
800-443-5186
www.CenturaOnline.
comr

Avante
At Inverness
Currently seeking
F/T Dietary Aid

Please apply online
at
Avantecenters.com

DENTAL
HYGIENIST

Mon-Thur needed for
friendly private prac-
tice. Please call
344-9500 to arrange
for an interview

Medical Careers
begin here

Train ONLINE forAllied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV certi-
fied. Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

NURSE
PRACTITIONER

Needed for busy
medical practice.
Competitive salary
& benefits. F/T or P/T
Please Call:
(352) 746-1515or
Fax Resume To:
(352) 270-8889

RN's, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.

APPLY IN PERSON
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF

RN's, PT & OT'S
LPN's, Psych
Nurse, & ST.
Office Staff with
med bkground.

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097




AIRLINE
CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career
FAA approved
program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available.
CALL Aviation
Institute of
Maintenance
(866)314-3769

AIRLINES ARE
HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769

Eckerd -
Floral City

Please see our full
listing of open
positions at
www.eckerd.ora


Sdo you possess...
...A DYNAMIC
PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
.... SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS

Seeking an
INSIDE
SALES REP
to help service
existing accounts
and prospect for
new. Full Time with
Comprehensive
Benefits Package
Base Salary plus
Commission

APPLY TODAY:
dikamlot@chronicl
eonline.com


CHRpNIOE I
Drug Screen
Required for Final
Applicant EOE


NOW HIRING
Entry-level to Mgmt.
Exp. Not req'd. Train-
ing provided. Benefit
package offered.
$600-$850/wk. Call
Ashley 352-436-4460

OPTICAL SALES

Optical experience
preferred not required.
Outgoing, quick learner
& Sales experience.Fax
resume (877)408-2732

Real Estate
Salesperson
needed

Call Skip Craven
352-464-1515





Automotive Tech

with experience
tools a must
352-419-6549

CAPTAIN
25Ton & Up Only

Manatee Tours, in
water guide a must.
Apply
River Ventures at
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-12:30PM


CARPENTERS
NEEDED

With 10 years experi-
ence in commercial
framing, We are NOT
looking for Supervi-
sors. Must be knowl-
edgeable in metal &
wood applications,
truss setting, and roof
sheathing. Also need
to be able to get on
roof, and be familiar
with safety harness,
and fall protection,
also a plus to be
versed in hardie sid-
ings and trim. Need
to be quality oriented
with a positive atti-
tude. DFWP,
oolsb,
and transportation re-
quired. Top pay.
Please come in and fill
out an application at
2531 NW 35th St.
Ocala, Fl. 34475
352-690-6334


Driver

Qualify for any
portion of $.03/mile
quarterly bonus: $.01
Safety, $.01 Produc-
tion, $.01 MPG. Two
raises in 1st year.
3 months OTR
experience
(800)414-9569
www.driveknlaht.com


Lead Aquatic
Plant Technician
Announcement
#13-11

Responsible techni-
cal work involving a
variety of tasks
related to aquatic
plant control. Leads
and participates in
work of crews in-
cluding operation of
airboats, handling
and mixing of herbi-
cides. Must possess
or be able to obtain
within six months of
employment a
Public Applicator's
Restricted License

possess a valid
Florida Driver Li-
cense. $11.53 hourly
to start. Excellent
benefits. Full time
position working
4-10 hour days,
Monday-Thursday.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us.
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 29,
2013 EOE/ADA.


DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

LAWN
SERVICE

Job requires weed
eater, edging,
hedge trimming,
blowing & general
landscaping.

Must have drivers
license.
LM 352-533-7536

MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163
NOW HIRING Automo-
tive Line Techs. ASE
&/or Ford Cert. Techs;
Exp.Lite Line Tech;
Competitive Pay & Ben-
efits. 352-493-4297.
Russ Hall for interview
time. Bring Resume To
Appt!
PAVER
INSTALLER
Looking to add 1
helper to our brick
paver crew. Exp.
preferred, but
honest hard worker
OK too.
Call-352-342-9911

PLUMBERS
HELPER I

Must have driver's
I license. Apply @ |
4079 S Ohio Ave.
L Homosassa, FL

Res. Service
Electricians

good driving record
& clean background
352-794-7368

VIDEO
TECHNICIAN

will work w/audio tech
& must have
computer skills
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.
Wiring/Hitches
Tech
Immediate Position
available. Must be Exp.
well motivated, has
transportation, good
driving record. Refs req
352-302-7863 Iv msg




Grass roots Lawn

FT/PT LABORER
Exp. & Dri. lic a must.
352-795-2287

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
OChronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle





PIANO/
ACCOMPANIST

Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHRONICLE


Citrus County
YMCA
Part-Time
Positions

The YMCA has an
opening for these
summer positions:

YMCA
Swim Instructor,
Aquatics
Coordinator,
Front Desk Asst,
Camp Leader
and Coordinator
DFWP/EOE.

For more
information or to
apply visit: www.
ymcasuncoast.org

Office Help

P/T for Country
Store/Reservations
Apply in Person:
Natures Resort
10359 W. Halls
River Road

TEMPORARY
SEASONAL
LIFEGUARD
Announcement
#13-12

Temporary position
lifeguarding at
Bicentennial Park
Pool and Central
Ridge Pool.
May guard for swim
lessons, birthday
parties and special
events. Part time
position working
10-35 hours weekly
on a flexible sched-
ule, including days,
nights, weekends
and holidays. Must
possess a valid
Florida Driver
License. Starting
pay $8.50 an hour.

APPLICANTS
MUST POSSESS AND
MAINTAIN CURRENT
RED CROSS
LIFEGUARD, FIRST
AID AND CPR/AED
FOR THE PROFES-
SIONAL RESCUER
CERTIFICATIONS. WE
WILL NOT TRAIN.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto FL 34461
to apply online. This
position is open until
filled. EOE/ADA.





COMPUTER
TECHNICIANS
TRAINING!
Train for PC Technical
Careers at sctrain.edu
No computer Experi-
ence Needed! Job
placement Assistance
HS Diploma/GED a
Must Start
Immediately!
1-888-872-4677




LAUNDROMAT FOR
SALE CRYSTAL RIVER,
Lrg., Clean, Well Est.
352-795-2399




American Brand
Meat Slicer, meat mkt
size, asking $1500
352-489-9156
FRAMED PRINT
F.F.English, Twilight,
Signed print, ornate
26"x 22" frame. $25.00
Call 352-621-7586
ORNATE FRAME
26.5"x 22.5", With nice
print titled spilt milk.
$25.00
Call 352-621-7586
Phonograph
1923 Free standing
Brunswick. Oak case,
20 records & needles.
Works like new. $650
(352) 746-2306


Collectble


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


NICE GREEN MARBLE
SPA 5 seat / needs
motor frame repair linda
$100. 341-2271




DRYER $100 works
perfect. 30 day warranty
call/text 352-364-6504
Fridgidaire frost free
Freezer,
28" Wide, 59" Tall
$225.
352-637-2735
FRIGIDAIRE GALLERY
DISHWASHER used 3
years White Digital con-
trols NSF sanitize clean
$100 341-0450
RANGE
BIk flat top elec range,
w/ convection oven,
$325; LG BIk over the
range Microwave $125.
Both like new moving
(765) 748-4334
(352) 586-5166
REFRIGERATOR
21.5 CF, White,$125
(352) 794-3674
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER$100 works
perfect. 30 day warranty
call/text 352-364-6504
WHIRLPOOL
ELECTRIC DRYER.
Works well. Good
condition. $70.
527-1239






Saturday, March 30, 10am
811 SWlUSHwy. 19,Cyisialiver, F
See web for details
www.charliefudge.com
13% BP(-3%forcash) t
1-800-542-3877
AU1593/AB1131 g




5 HP ELECTRIC 30
GALLON UPRIGHT
AIR COMPRESSOR
ON WHEELS. NEARLY
NEW. ONLY 350.00
3524640316
8 GALLON AIR
COMPRESSOR
CAMPELL HAUSFIELD
WORKS OK ONLY
$75.00 464-0316
BAND SAW SMALL
BLACK& DECKER
DRILL POWERED
DRILL INCLUDED
ONLY $65.00 464-0316
BENCH GRINDER
ASHLAND 5"
industrial bench
gnrinder.3450rpm.
$35.00 352-527-7840
BOOK Modern Refriger-
ation and Air Condition-
ing excellent condition
$30.00 352-270-0630
LADDER RACK truck
ladder rack for full size
pickup truck
352-364-1771
ROUTER TABLE
STEEL LEGS FIBER-
GLASS TOP ONLY
$60.00 464-0316
SHOPSMITH
CLONE 5 tools in
Table saw, lathe, drill
press, sander,$900.
12" Planner $250.
(352) 628-4265





1111111.

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


hp, radial arm saw,100
dollars. 352-503-3332
TOOLS Ryobi 18Volt 5
Tool Set $75.00 Call
352-637-7142



GARRARD DOUBLE
CASSETTE DECK $20
PLAYS AND REC-
ORDS 44E INVER-
NESS 419-5981
OAK SPEAKER For
Home Theatre Center
Channel SPEAKER
Quality Danish SEAS
2-Way $100 341-0450
TV STAND New model
with smoked glass
shelves and wood top to
bottom legs. $75.00
603-493-2193



2 PR WHITE VINYL
SHUTTERS 14 1/2 x 63
1/2 both for $35.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
KITCHEN SINK
with Moen faucet and
spray. $40.00
Call 352-613-4279



COMPUTER DESK
L-shaped; 1021n with
width 421n L. Excellent
condition. $75
352-489-3914
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
HP TOWER PC 2GHz
Dual Core 250GB-HDD
1GB-RAM 24xDVD
Card Reader 5.1 $70
341-0450
Wii Games
6 games @ $10ea.
call for titles, firm
352-205-7973/220-4483



11 pc PVC Lanai Set
4 cushion chairs, oval
table, 2 cushion rockers
3 high back chairs, serv-
ing tray with wheels
$350 for all 746-7221



2 SETS OF TABLES
glass coffee table
oval 45"x26' w/2 end
tables 24'x18' oval; 14'
round. All w/ brass
frame, high end $$
Each set $200
(352) 425-0667
2 TUB/BARREL
CHAIRS Brown velour,
about 1 yr old, excellent
condition. $95.00 pr
603-493-2193
6 Drawer Dresser
$100.
3 Drawer Dresser
$50.
352-746-7221
42" Round oaklmetal
drop-leaf
Table w/4 chairs $40
856-803-6046
5pc Blonde Queen
Bedroom Set, like new,
includes boxspring &
mattress $450
352-628-5358 Iv msg
Antique School Desk
Beautiful shape
$125.
(386) 684-2466
Black Desk Chair
$20
82" Merlot color sofa
$50
(352) 382-1885
Classic King
Tempurpedic Bed
Like new w/ head-
board, mattress pad,
pillows & bed spread
$800 obo
(352) 489-0105
COFFEE & 2 END
TABLES Brass w/glass
tops $75.00 for all
352-637-6578
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
Couch & love seat
white, great condition
$300.
2 Bar stools Swivel,
white Padded $150
(352) 419-6880


Customer Service Rep PART TIME
29-hr/wk provide superior customer
service to our subscribers, early
morning and weekend hours
required.

ApplyToday:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com
**C ..... T "M e


l^wwwc hronicleonline.com
Drug Screen Required for Final Applicant
EOE


Couch with 2 throw
pillows, 6ft plaid,
burgandy $175.
Rug 5 x 7 blue,
$25
(352) 637-6578
Dresser & Nightstand
$300, good cond.
352-522-0467
Entertainment
Center, Whitewashed
color will fit up 34" TV,
$50; Pine wood
wine rack $20
(352) 382-1885
FOUTON
Exc Cond. blue,
maroon and beige
colored. Call after
6pm$75 (352) 746-4901
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Large Sofa, with
Recliners on ea. end.
has been in den not
used, tan, microfiber,
purchased $1,000 sell
$500 Pet/smoke free
home 352-637-0844

LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET
In Original Plastic,
Never Used, Org
$3000, sacrifice $975.
CHERRY BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes
Org. $6000, sacrifice
$1995. Can Deliver.
Bill (813)298-0221.
LEATHER RECLINER
dark brown $30.00
352-249-8621
Leather Sofa,dark
brown.very good
condtion-$100.00
352-249-8621
Maple Day Bed
with new trundle and
mattress's $300.
Call
(352) 465-4037
MATTRESS SET Full
Pillow Top,Excellent
Condition $100.00
352-249-8621
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
METAL BED FRAME for
twin or full bed-$15.00
Beverly Hills
352-249-8621
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Rose Color chair,
& Couch $150.
Corner Computer desk
Black, $75.
352-746-7221
Sleeper sofa,
$100.
Coffee w/ end tables,
$150.
352-746-7221
SOFA COUCH
3 pc sec w/ 2 recliners
& bed. Good Cond
$300; Qn Size Bed w/
mat/box spring, 2
night stands, dresser
$150 (352) 628-3411
Two Italian Gold Globe
Filigree Hanging
Lamps $75 ea.
352-522-0467
WICKER Youth size
White wicker love seat
and chair. $40.00.
Call 352-621-7586




B&D 22"
Hedge Trim $25
527-8880
Cub Cadet 2011,50"
Commerical, 0 turn,
only 36 hrs, like new ,
3 sets of blades, paid
$3000., sell only
$2200. firm
352-795-4275
New Tiller
5 hsp, $150
352-341-1714
Power Pusher Lawn
Mower 6V2HP, Large
rear wheels, grass
catcher, craftsman,
Like New $150. cash
(352) 341-1714
Riding Lawn
Mower
Murray, 42" 6 speed
grass catcher, $400.
(352) 341-1714
Toro Mower,
$175.
John Deere Edger
$20.
352-527-8880


HERNANDO
Yard Sale /Adopt a thon
Sat & Sun 8am-1pm
all Proceeds go to Sav-
ing Angles Rescue
2780 N. Florida Ave

CHERRY'S
MARKET DAY
FREE VENDOR
SPACE!
Produce, Seafood,
Floral Needed!
Outdoor Flea Market
held on the grounds
8471 W Periwinkle Ln
HOMOSASSA
(Behind Wendy's)
Last Saturday Every
Month 8am -Noon
Sat., Mar. 30th
Call Caroline at
352-527-2020

HOMOSASSA
Sat & Sun 8a-4p
6237 W Holiday

INVERNESS
Moving Sale
Sat. April 30th
7:30am-?
Entire Workshop
tools(craftsman)Drill
press, 12" band saw,
belt sanders,grin,hand
tools & access, selling
all in one lot, will con-
sider individual, make
offer for lot. high bid
takes all
1215 S Fir Terr, Inv
352-201-4132


YARD SALE
INVERNESS
Sat.23rd & Sun.24th
8:00am-2:00pm
1333 North Toro Drive
LECANTO
Sat & Sun 9a-3p
Everything must go!
So491, R on Noble,
4th Left; So. Hills Point,
on the end left side.
(352) 628-0035




CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat-Wed 9a 2pm.
5535 W Bunglow Ct




COAST GUARD AUX.
FLOATATION JACKET
Long sleeves. XL
(48/50). Ex cond.$100.
352-563-6410
SHOES BLACK PAT-
TEN LEATHER Size 9
1/2 ww excellent cond.
$20. 352-563-6410
TUXEDO ACCESSO-
RIES One black bow tie
and cummerbund, and
one black and gold.
$10. for 2 352-563-6410
Tuxedo black size 52.
Pants waist 47 49" adj.
Worn twice. $75.
352-563-6410
TUXEDO WHITE
PLEATED SHIRT 18 -
18 1/2, 4 blk & gold but-
tons and cuff links.
$10. 352-563-6410




4 FLORAL DISPLAY
VINTAGE CLEAR
GLASS FROG $15 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
27" Color TV $25,
Old Singer Sewing
machine Bench
& accessories $25.
Liquor Cabinet $30
352 344-1541
Air Compressor
New, 8 gallon tank
type, 150 psi max
$150. cash
(352) 341-1714
BARBIE
HOUSENAN/GUITAR
AND kids keyboard
$10.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
Bath Tub
60 x 42 fiberglass,
drop in unit
with fixtures,
$100. (352) 382-7074
BENCH GRINDER
ASHLAND 5" industrial
benchgrnder.34
50rpm.$35.00.
352-527-7840


NEW HOME


SALES

Well established, award-
winning, Citrus County golf
and country club community
is seeking enthusiastic, top
producing sales
professionals looking to be
well rewarded for results!
High energy, passion for
excellence and a current
RE license preferred.
Outstanding new home
product line, world-class
amenities, and
unparalleled support.


Email resume, references to.
nancy@citrushills.com. |


CLASSIFIED









D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


5X10 AREA RUG
Nice rug, $30.00
352-621-0142
BICYCLE 10" Girls
Beginning, Pink Purple,
good shape. All
accesornes. $30.00
352-564-9311
BIG MAN LEATHER
JACKET Brown 5xl
$50.00 352-628-6277
Desota Classic
Adult 3 Wheel Bike, like
new, Dark Green with
basket $125
Located In Inverness
573-281-9226
DINNERWARE
Pfalzgraff/Tea Rose, 8
places 90 pieces,
w/Glasses & Dishes.
$75. 352-637-1613
DRAGON EGGS
MEGA BLOKS
5 dragon eggs
2 with cds
$100.00 352-628-4210
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.OOlb
Delivered 352-795-0077
FRAMED COMMEMO-
RATIVE SILVER
DOLLAR MATT very
nice piece. $25.00
352-513-4519
GOLD WEDDING
BAND
14k gold size 6-1/2
$100.00
352-628-4210
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Black Cowboy Hat &
Boots 11/2D New $100
(352) 795-7254
HONDA SHADOW
AREO STOCK
EXHAUST 2005,mint
$50.00 352-621-0142
Kenmore Sewing
machine in cabinet
$50.00, 60" computer
desk with file drawers
352-382-4651
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
New Standing
Stainless Steel
Towel Rack $20
352-522-0467
PERSONAL LIBRARY
approx 600 volumes
classics, religion, poli-
tics, etc..$1500obo
**call for details**
352-341-0170
PLAYHOUSE STEP 2
playhouse step 2
beige/green $75
352-364-1771
PLAYSTATION 2
GUITAR HERO 2 cd
and guitar $15.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
Radio Stereo System
w/ record player, $50.
Century Safe $150.
352-344-1541
SAMSONITE GAR-
MENT BAG For hanging
clothes. Inside and
outside pockets, like
new $30 603-493-2193
SINGER FT WT 221
With carrying
case,excellent
condition,just serviced
$450 352 270 9254
Snap-On Tools
30 screw & nut drivers
sockets & wrenches
$140, Snap-On shop
vac, stainless steel, $60
315-466-2268
TY MASTODONS
1/colosso 2/giganto
excellent condition
tagged $10.00
352-628-4210


NEUT BATHTUB
5 feet / light tan
75.00 linda 341-2271
UNIVERSAL CHROME
TRACTION BARS
Nice,$30.00
352-628-6277
WALLPAPER $25
PREPASTED 3 DOU-
BLE ROLLS 165 SQ FT
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
352-419-5981



4 PRONG CANE
Adjustable $10.00
Crutches $8.00 Call
352-613-4279
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT & BRAKES
ONLY 75.00 464 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET UP FROM
IT ONLY 20.00
4640316
Bathtub Chair
slide in type w/backrest
$55, 2 wheel walker
w/ski's $40.00, Reg.
walker $25.00
352-621-0896
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON EACH ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
Handi-Cap Lg Wheel
Walker w/seat
$65, Handi-cap
Shower Chair, New
$50. 352-522-0467
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS NEARLY NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
Scooter Carrier
For Car or Truck
$350.
(352) 621-3987
WALKER ALUMINUM
with basket and adj.
legs. Ex. cond. $15.
352-563-6410



"NEW" 6 STRING
BANJO "GUITJO"
"BANJTAR" WHAT-
EVER W/RESONATOR
$100 352-601-6625
30 WATT SUZUKI
BASS AMP LIGHT
WEIGHT & POWER-
FUL FOR $30
352-601-6625
BLACK PRECISION
BASS FENDER
AFINITY MODEL
W/GIGBAG LIKE NEW!
$85 352-601-6625
Electric Accordion w/
sound equip. Rolland
Electric Organ w/
Bench 352-344-1541
ELECTRIC GUITAR
LIKE NEW PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT!
ONLY $40
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/30WATT AMP 2
HUMMBUCKINGS
PLAYS GREAT $65
352-601-6625
Guitar Amplifier
Behreinger
Ultracoustic ACX 1000,
2 channels. Handles 2
instruments & 1 mic.
$200 (352) 382-1875
HAWAIIAN LAP STEEL
MORRELL "MADE IN
U.S.A.!"VERY NICE
CONDITION $100
352-601-6625
IBANEZ SOUNDTANK
PEDAL PHASER PH5,
new in box. $50.
352-465-4860


IBENEZ SOUNDTANK
PEDAL Powerlead
PL5. $85. Brand new
in box. 352-465-4860
KEY BOARD
Techniques, KN 920,
Like New, 114 different
rhythm, Call for Info
$400 (35 2) 465-2810
KEYBOARD Casio with
stand. Like New $99.00
One touch preset,
song memory. Call
352-613-4279
KEYBOARD YAMAHA
Model PSS-12
portable
has adapter
$30.00 352-628-4210
LANEYGC LEAD AMP
50 watt, 12"speaker,
high quality, good cond.,
needs cleaning.
$100 352-465-4860
SD2000 ACOUSTIC
GUITAR LIKE NEW IN
ORIGINAL BOX WITH
ACCESSORIES $45
352-601-6625
TEACHERISTUDENT
PACKAGE 3 "NEW"
ACOUSTIC GUITARS!
ONLY $100!
352-601-6625



3 MINI MUFFIN TINS/4
SMALL BREAD PANS
$8 LARGE GREEN
MIXING BOWL $10
419-5981
4 KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS WITH LIDS $10
NEW IRIDESCENT
WHITE QUICHE DISH
$10 419-5981
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $150 OBO
Breville Juicer, exc
cond w/ extra's $20
(352) 746-3327
FLOOR LAMP
Bamboo look base,
attached table & shade
white and tan $45.00
603-493-2193
FLOOR PLANT
(GREEN) Large Leaf, in
woven basket. approx 4
feet tall $10.00
603-493-2193



PRO FORM ELECTRIC
TREADMILL ALL OP-
TIONS INCLUDING
POWER INCLINE
NEARLY NEW 350.00
3524640316
Recumbent Bike
Nordic Track
$75.obo
(440) 812-5154



2 BRASS EAGLE .68
CALIBER co2 powered
paint ball guns $20.00
for both 352-794-3020
or 352-586-4987
3 WHEELED ELEC-
TRIC BICYCLE MIAMI
SUN WITH PALMER 12
VOLT MOTOR AND
REAR BASKET ONLY
285.00 464 0316
AEROMAX BIKE
WHEELS NEW. 7-10
speed Rim brake Vuelta
hubs Bladed spokes
$199 341-0450
BOWLING BALLS AND
CARRY BAGS, 12# 3oz,
12# 3 oz, and 9#.
$20.00 each set.
352-341-3842


CLUB CAR
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new
batteries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125

CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800

Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
King Cobra SS -1 Irons
and mallet putter.
4 PW plus putter.
$100 (352) 794-6203
JUGS BASEBALL
TOSS PACKAGE 1
Baseball toss machine,1
instant screen, 1 Bag
with toss machine balls.
$250.00 Please leave a
message 352-513-4446
Winchester Mod. 70
bolt action 243 WSM
new in box with factory
scope, $595 will take
30-30 lever on trade
906-285-1696




2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
** call 352-527-0555 **
STRONG STEEL
BUILT 4X8 bed 13 ti-
res VG condition $325
352-897-4154
TRAILER
6 x 12 w/Ramp,
2 wheels, Excellent
condition $895
(352) 527-3125
TRAILER
Hauls 2 jet ski's or
2 motorcycles,
galvanized. $300
(352) 457-6199




BUYING JEWELRY
AND COINS
Before you sell your
jewelry to a pawn store,
flea market or yard /
garage sale contact us
we pay the most
262-758-9867


Sell r Swa


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369



BRAKEBUDDY RV
PORTABLE BRAKING
SYSTEM $100.00
352-527-4319


Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained


Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200


BRUNO
Bruno a 3-y.o.
Shepherd/Retriever
mix, is Heartworm
-negative &
super -gentle, calm,
easy-going. Weight
70 lbs. Gets along
with other dogs,
walks well on a
leash. Beautiful,
affectionate, a
perfect dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009


LOST CAT, 3 LEGS,
ORANGE AND WHITE
Lucky, an orange and
white cat with three
legs; recent surgery
so missing hair
around amputation.
Went missing Sunday
night or Monday morn-
ing 3/18/2013. Afraid
he may have hitched a
ride under the pick-up
on the way to the
landfill. Please if you
find him, call me and I
will come get him.
352-489-2327


Mature Male Timneh
African Grey, prefers
male companion $300
with med. cage
352-726-5379


SADIE
Sadie is an 8-y.o.
spayed female
black lab mix. When
she came into the
shelter she had a
large tumor protrud-
ing from her neck
which was removed
by our shelter vet.
The tumor surpris-
ingly was non-
malignant. Sadie is
now being fostered
& her wound has
healed. She is a shy,
quiet dog, not a
barker, friendly, af-
fectionate, knows
her name & sits &
comes on com-
mand. Weight 35
lbs. She is house-
broken, likes walks,
likes treats, likes the
outdoors, is good
with children. She
eats slowly & should
not be rushed. Sa-
die would be an
ideal companion for
an older couple or
a single individual,
as she is a calm dog
who seeks peace &
quiet. Call Kathy @
352-465-0812.


PUPPIES
Miniature Daschunds
2 girls avail, ckc papers,
shots, $350 ea.
786-286-1163












SALLIE
Sallie is a sweet,
joyful white trerrier
mix with black spots
ovstrangerbody. She
is about 1-y.o. &
came to the shelter
because her family
could not afford to
keep her She is a
slim & trim dog, easy
to handle, although
slightly shy with
strangers. She
warms up quickly,
however, & sits for
treats. Likes to walk
on a leash. She ap-
pears housebroken
& gets along very
well with other dogs.
She is Heartworm
-negative. Weight
35 Ibs. This pretty &
affectionate girl is
hoping for a good
home with a loving
family. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.

Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne




ENGLISH SADDLE
Steuben,Hunter/Jumper
good cond. $450
Boots, ladies sz 7%
slim, $20 call for details
352-341-6991




LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033


Livestock


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**

2002 16.5 Ft Lund
50 hp Honda 4 stroke
and trailer includes GPS
and Sonar $5900
904-440-1010
Clearwater Skiff
16', 2010-2011 25hp
YAM, elec., 821b, T.M. &
charger, cover, 3hr use
$7700. 352-447-2967
G-3
Jon Boat, Model 1236
Includes; 9.8 Merc,
fish/depth finder, swivel
seats, full cover & & trier
$1,650(352) 341-1709

















Lund Renegade
16',inc.89 Johnson 70hp
& 94 galvanized trlr.
recent complete interior
overhaul,strong engine
Lot of boat for money!
Ask.$4350, 352-897-
5305 or 412-508-0247
MANTA
1981 28ft, 2 inch, Boat
& trailer, No motor,
Good Condition
5,000. (773) 736-0244
MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $13,200
obo 352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192
SWEETWATER
2008 18 ft. Pontoon,
60HP, Yamaha, 4
stroke, $9,999, no trlr.
(352) 257-9496
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com




WINNEBEGO
1995, Brave, 23 ft,
Class A excel. cond.,
wood floors, granite
counter tops, by appt.
Only (352) 527-8413




00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
4 Winds Trailer
Express, 2006,
26' DSL, 12'slide out
$12,500. 352-228-0984


2007 4 Winds
28",1 slide out, Qu Bed,
hvy hitch, $8900, Loc in
Inglis, Fl 812-605-1598
COACHMAN
'07, 4 New tires, 1 slide
out, Great Condition
Clean, Move In cond.
$15,500. 352-637-2735
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. Island bd.,
+ rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like new,
NADA $29K, Reduced
$19,900 352-382-3298
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945






MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 Ibs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarston 1 @mac.com
or 352-586-1483




**BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-4264267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible, looks great,
runs good, must sell at
best offer
352-560-0079
2003 Buick
LaSabre Limited, one
owner, 44k miles, mint
cond. $7000 call after
6pm 352-897-5039


9am. *t


0 lo


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
Certified CNA avail for
in-home private duty
health care. Ref avail.
Carolyn (352) 453-7255




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**

"BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
j AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
s FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handvman
s/FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V' RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
All Home Repairs
Accepting all Major CC
Lic#38893,
Call Art 352-201-1483
Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
**call 352-560-7609**


IDJR11EINGI1


Add an arislk douch to your existing yard DON'T LET YOUR
Sor pool or plan DRYER START
Something i A FIRE
'!comphlpOIOy new! Fa Ra -No
l^.., OfteninitMateil, Fla_ _ Ce
-r:AzTHiddenCI
~t4tnevet dupiateJ"


YOURINTERLOCEKINO BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST

COPES
POOL AND PAVER LLC
Ssud 352-400-3188








We Clean Wnd nd a Whole tot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
All Home
SRepairs
Small Carpentry
E'- Fencing
Screening
A lean Dryer
'Vents
"' "1frdti.e & Dependable
Eq:,ience lifelong
352-344-0905
1 400-1722
;ured Lic.#37761


GENERAL' K
Stand Alone i.
Generator -

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-124


Primary Cleaning
w **Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
a' FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-I Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
**352-212-9067**
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


NEED SOMEONE TO

GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS

IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!

352-220-9190


SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065




A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
**Tax Specials**

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


AAA ROOFING
Call th "/Ceak6ustens
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed
Lic./ns. CCCO57537 0 E ZM


in E 5n:

"Repaint

,J'i Specialist" g
lnIn r,,:r .. Eolnr,


FREE ESTIMATES -

.352-/65-6631


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


I. OS N PA. RI


1-352-200-2508
Dr. Vent
1-855-4DR-VENT
Locally Owned 15+ Yrs.
Lic./ins., Ba2i2L--JI


|




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


- -v


e ." ,


e


IA


New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
4xv0jd iBKEW Abredc TrmajiatsTir;
Drive For Ory..

$1491
$ s i.,-


Plus $790 destination charge and options.


' "Check
i the m


New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
MDei Ry2F3~E Autl m F TraoyrAri
mwiGc K.


New 2012 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD
it Flte cw'.',, Cae Sa 'Ier o CiV 'r/Tp EB:
Sei rr prfir j r Amra' SaJ hO T- i-y
SAMEM Aow nlyc..
$21. 997


New 2013 Honda FIT,,r.L
Hf!e mlia' wk.iS.
For .d d -


New 2013
Honda LX
ODYSSEY LX
PWAe RL+EW
SAVF NAow Only...
I. 027,193


New 2012 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
,wl rI~ CE ,' 4'Wd iTh, r.I' hl TI Vf Cl a. ,u,
Cn ise CcTk', ,'- P7,I kt / F&e_ L.e r l..h
SAVAE Mow a ny...
'27,416


New 2012 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
FMSoe TFV3CJ Nkirud iata% tiJ Swiei Ad C ari.
Al T-i Li.avy ir- tesitArd Rxr To D 'ibr Yxj med.
S4i"E J1wow fmniay..
^^IfS837j


97Honda
Civic
#H7849



05Ponac
| Montana


OHyundai
Elantra
#H7842
$900


M Font
Mustang
Mo7B45
1=6100
#$740M


SedonaEx
#M7844



08Honda

$10#000


O2To)ta
Cam$y
##784S
$3,000


0wnyunali
Eantra
#M7837
$45W


0 TOyota
Cam$1y4277
$10,277


Civic
#H7836


w Cleay
Cobalt
#H7771
$6042


Che/mVy
Imp$il
#PH7486
$1r,4m0


06 Pontiac 05 Buick
Vibe Rendezvous
#H7840 #H7828
$4,500 $4,521


sLexus
Sedan
#H7841
$6,30


08Dodgev
Grand Caravan
#H7804
$YYO


07Dodge
GrandCaravan
#PH7821


11MitSUDi si
Galant
#H74015
SI41s


WPoniac
G6
#H7683




O6JeepLlArwty

$7,0W


10Toyota


us Many MoA e To Choose From!


~AI~


.7I/Pj


~il


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 D7


to qr


4i 4m


/loo


w









D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


05' LINCOLN TOWN
CAR GARAGE KEPT,
Two-Tone, LOADED
65K ml, $10,500.
352-860-0164
BUICK
'01, Century,
81,271 miles, $4,200
(352) 465-2823
between 7a-7p
CADILLAC
2011 DTS, northstar
4.6L-V8, Luxury collec-
tion 25k miles, excel.
cond. auto, XM
radio, Tuscan Bronze
$33,500 352-382-0042
Chevrolet
2008 Aveo
$6,998
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Crusier
5 speed, power win-
dows, locks- $4,250
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
DODGE
2005, Neon
Automatic transmis-
sion $4,400
352-341-0018
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
91 Crown Victoria
runs, can be fixed or
used for parts $500
352-637-5331
Mitsubishi
2007 Eclipse, power
windows, automatic
transmission $10,899
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE V6 pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call Jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing
TOYOTA
2010 Prius Perfect
Condition. Approx.
28,000 miles. 50 mpg.
Under warranty until
December. $17,500
352-249-7203


a ^^^^


2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551

FORD MUSTANG
2004 MACH-1
23,500 mi; Exc Cond.
Have Extra's. Only 139
made. $16,500. Call
Skip(352) 527-3687

MUSTANG GT 03
63K, Showcar, Super-
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $14,500 obo
352-228-4012




CHEVROLET
1989 Silverado new
tires, needs starter in-
stalled good work truck
$1200 352-364-1771

DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Truck
$2000. 352.795.3708
captainwalton@aol.com

DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Work
Truck. needs trannie
work, good engine/body
$900 352-364-1771

FORD
1995 F-150XL, white
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab, $2700.
(352) 637-5331 LM


V THIS OUT!
FORD
2008 F350 Dually
CrewCab 6.4L
V8Diesel Ex Cond
4x4 grey, 50g Aux
Tank, Moonroof
Leather,towhtch,T-gate
LftAssst+step
83000ml $28000
716.9460203,eon-
dak@yahoo.com

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




FORD
2003 Explorer, Black
Eddie Bauer, 196,000
Miles, Rebuilt Transmis-
sion $2650 OBO
352-228-7086


m^^^^^


HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 3rd row
seat, power windows,
locks- $4,995
352-341-0018



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150




FORD
1978 F150, Shrt Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598
JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment



CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
HARDLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244
HONDA
1981 Silver Wing GL
500 Hard removable
luggage.CB AM/FM 47K
$1000 9am4pm
352-503-3347
HONDA
2009, 1300 VTX,
1 owner, immaculate,
over $3500 in options
garage kept, 21k miles
$7900. 352-697-2760
Motor Bike
50 CC, like new, 400
miles, runs great
$750 OBO
(352) 746-0167
(315) 439-6005
SCOOTER
2009 Buddy, 125CC;
564 mi. Mint Grn color
& mint Cond.$1800
(352) 794-3674;
YAMAHA
2005, Majesty, YP 400
step thru motorcycle
scooter, exc. shape,
only 2200 miles, $3200
352-419-4419


a^^^^


355-0324 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Planning Commission
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Hearing Date: Thursday, April 4, 2013 6:30 p.m.
The City of Crystal River Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on Thursday,
April 4, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers (123 NW Highway 19, Crystal
River, Florida) to consider the following case.
PC#13-003: ORDINANCE 13-0-07 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER,
FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR A SMALL-SCALE AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN, RECLASSIFYING TWO (2) ADJOINING PROPERTIES (.25 ACRES (MOL), LOCATED AT
906 & 254 NE 5th STREET FROM HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (HDR) LAND USE TO
OFFICE/SERVICE COMMERCIAL; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDI-
NANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


PC#13-004: ORDINANCE NO. 13-0-08 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE OFFICIAL ZON-
ING MAP OF THE CITY OF CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA, REZONING TWO (2) ADJOINING
PROPERTIES (.25 ACRES (MOL), LOCATED AT 906 & 254 NE 5th STREET FROM
PUBLIC/INSTITUTIONAL TO GENERAL COMMERCIAL AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 1; PRO-
VIDING FOR REPEAL OF CONFLICTING ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Pursuant to the provision of Chapter 286, Florida Statutes, Section 286.0105, if a per-
son decides to appeal any decision made by the Planning Commission with respect
to the matters considered at this public hearing, he/she will need a record of the
proceedings, at that, for such purpose he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record may include the testimony and ev-
idence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of disa-
bility or physical impairment should contact the City of Crystal River, Building and
Zoning Office, 123 NW Highway 19, Crystal River, Florida 34428, (352) 795-4216 Ext.
306, at least two (2) days before the meeting.
The Commission invites comments from concerned citizens either in person or by
submitting written comments to the City of Crystal River. For more information call
(352) 795-4216 Ext. 306.
March 24,2013.

351-0324 SUCRN
Elig, To Vote- Billy Bishop & Patricia Hall
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Billy Bishop Patricia N. Hall
4429 S Alita Ter 2267 E Goldpearl Ln
Homosassa, FL 34446 Hernando, FL 34442
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
Published one (1) time in the Citrus County Chronicle Mar.24, 2013

924-0331 DCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
SEEKING OFFICE SPACE IN BETWEEN
LECANTO AND INVERNESS
Workforce Connection, a governmentally-funded organization is seeking approxi-
mately 3,500 sq ft or more of office space in Citrus County. Preferable locations
would be in or in-between Lecanto and Inverness.
Prefer office space with at least 4 private offices, room for additional cubicles (at
least 12), break room, open resource area for customers, at least 4 bathrooms, con-
ference room and computer lab.
Must be ADA compliant. Need ample parking and occupancy beginning at end of
June,2013.
Interested parties may send responses to:
Val Hinson
Workforce Connection
3003 SW College Rd, Suite 205
Ocala, FL 34474
352 873-7939, ext 1203
FAX: 352 873-7956
Email: vhinson@clmworkforce.com
Workforce Connection is an EOE Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are
available upon request to individuals with disabilities using TTY/TDD equipment via
the Florida Relay Service at 711.
March 24 through March 31,2013.


352-0324 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 023-13
Mowing/Trimming/Litter Pick-up
Curbed Roadways/Medians/DRAs
The Board of County Commissioners of Citrus County, Florida invites interested parties
to submit a Bid to provide mowing, trimming and litter pick-up services for various
Curbed Roadways/Medians/DRAs in Citrus County.
Minimum Requirements For Submitting A Bid
Bidder must presently have, or will procure at time of award of a contract, person-
nel, materials and equipment necessary to perform the services outlined in this Invi-
tation to Bid.
Bidder must have an individual on site during the mowing, trimming and litter pick-up
who is certified in work zone safety (Maintenance of Traffic (MOT) Intermediate
Level) in accordance with the Florida Department of Transportation requirements.
A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on March 27, 2013 @ 9:00 AM at the
County's Maintenance Complex Road Maintenance Building located at 1300 S.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 5, 2013 at 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,


Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 5, 2013 at 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at this meeting because of a disabil-
ity or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management & Budget at
(352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. At the Home Page, select "BIDS" on the
left hand side of the screen. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
March 24,2013.

353-0324 SUCRN
04/11 Special meeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a SPECIAL MEETING at 10:30 A.M. on the 11TH day of April. 2013 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
March 24,2013.

356-0324 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
CITRUS COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL DISTRICT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS #2013-02
ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES
HELICOPTER HANGAR AND PESTICIDE STORAGE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
The Citrus County Mosquito Control District, "District", requests that interested parties
submit formal sealed responses for the above referenced project.
The District invites interested parties to submit a Response to provide Architectural
services for the construction of a Helicopter Hangar and Pesticide Storage Building
on a site adjacent to the District's Headquarters on North Lecanto Highway in
Lecanto, Florida. The general style and design of the building will be consistent with
the District's adjacent Headquarters Building. The District reserves the right to with-
draw and cancel this request for qualifications, at any time without liability to any re-
spondents or prospective respondents. The District reserves the right to retain all re-
sponses submitted and to use any ideas in a response regardless whether that re-
sponse is selected. The specifications and requirements package which governs this
request may be obtained from Joel Jacobson, Director, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461 by contacting the Director at iiacobson@citrusmosauito.ora and
requesting an electronic copy of the documents.
Attendance at a pre-response conference is NOT mandatory. The conference will
be held on April 2, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., 968 N. Lecanto Hwy, Lecanto Fl. Sealed re-
sponses must be received at the District office on or before 2:00 p.m., April 15, 2013.
All questions should be directed to Joel Jacobson, Director at
iiacobson@citrusmosauito.ora
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any and all for-
malities. By order of the Board of Commissioners of the Citrus County Mosquito Con-
trol District.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the Citrus County Mosquito Control Dis-
trict, 968 N. Lecanto Hwy. Lecanto, Fl. 34461 (352) 527-7478, at least two days before
the meeting.
Any person who wishes to appeal any decision made by the Board, Agency or
Commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, will
need a record of the proceedings, and that for such purpose, may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
J. J. Grow,
Chairman of the Board
March 24, 2013


354-0324 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notce under
Rcl-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under


the fictitious name of ICE
COLD AIR, located at 102
US Highway 41 South, In-
verness, Florida 34450, in
the County of Citrus, in-
tends to register said
name with Florida De-
partment of State, Divi-
sion of Corporations, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.


DATED at
hverness
this 14th day of March,
2013.
/s/E.K. Redmond
OPS 102 LLC
Manager
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. March 24, 2013.


-li
: ." .4, ..'U'

r ^


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


m^^^^^


Imic


B
Meeting^f
I Noices IB


B
Meeting^^
I Not^ices I


B


IMicN


MBeting
I Notices I


IB ]


MBeetin
I Not -^ice






Sikorski's
Attic PAGE E6
PAGE E6


OMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


Ui .JJ U_ ,IJ:
.' .i


411


S,


PTTfl


;,I


iffijJ


* L IIM


k II1 1k"


Canadian textile artist Cristina Larsen crafts winsome stuffed
felted bunnies and chicks in a rainbow of hues. She uses
merino wool to make all the felt. dyes the colors and stitches
every toy by hand (www.etsy.com/shop/textileplatypus).


A,


I .







E2SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013

24 7IFLIENW N HOUSE 11-2'

(352)637.21637-2828 En 82oseO E
'6352)637-282


UPDATED AC IN 2012!!
* Lge Kit. w/Gas Range Lots of Tile/Wood in DR
*3/3/2 + 2 Car Det Gar. Set Back Off The Road
' Cozy Gas Fireplace Wide Concrete Drive
* House Shingles 2012 Short Drive to Gulf/Rivers
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Emnel elliesullon Mleinmu nel
www...oduL. s.i.nginlo.com


3501 W. BLOSSOM DR.
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
*3BD/3BA/2+CG + POOL Newly Remodeled Kitchen
*Wonderfully Maintained ON THE GOLF COURSE
*2,000+/- Living Area Gas Fireplace/Great Rm.
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


60 S I KELLNER BLVD.
*2BD/1.5BA/2CG Warm & Comfortable
* Beautifully Maintained Living RM & Fla RM
* Enclosed lanai Larger lot

PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842 k l.
(352) 422-3875

OPEN HOUSE


Great for car collector, or RV storage Home intenor features
Travatine floors stainless steel appliances and much more Sell
motivated look fodayl
DIR.: From Hw. 41 N Dunnellon (about 7 miles out of city) to
Hwy. 328 R, to W 165th Court Rd. (on left),
home on L see sign. If -
DAWN WRIGHT (352) 400-1080
Email: dawnwright@remax.net


RAINBOW SPRINGS 1 ACRE LOT
* 3 BR, 2 Bath 2 Car Garage
* Private Level Lot Double Pane Windows
* Roof Shingles 2013 Enclosed Florida RM
* Freshly Painted Move in READY

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com










REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:


4/3 Pool Home. Boaters Paradise is like
living at a resort. Located on deep water
canal just off Crystal River. MLS #356697
Directions: 19 N to left on W 1 9th St. to left on
21st Ct. To left on NW 15th St.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


Paint me, too!
Love my natural openness and I'll
return years of quiet enjoyment!
Private pool home in upscale
neighborhood. 7
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
Email: kim@kimdevane.com


NEW on the OUTSIDE!
Flashback '70s on the INSIDE!
Great BIG POOL home.

Email kim@kim evane.com


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




fill atia


This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath waterfront condo boasts new
18" tile, completely renovated kitchen with new
appliances, Corian countertops, tile back splash and
gorgeous wood cabinets. Al NEW BATHS! Overlooks
the water with its own boat dock! So much for so little.
See this one today!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
000d148: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com

2417 INFO LINE
52) 6377-2
Entih rh se #1258





SHANANDOAH
* Custom Built 4/4.5/3 + Office Gated Community
* Two Master Suites Formal Living & Dining & Roonms
* Gourmet Kitchen w/Granie Family Room w/Firephce
*Bonus Room *41x19 Combo Workshop/Storage
KEVIN & KAREN CUNNINGHAM
(EI 352) 637-6200
Email: kcunningham@remax.net E |


A TRUE FOUR BEDROOM HOME!
Big master bedroom has walk-in closet and
shower. Great room with catherdral ceilings.
Central water and sewer. Located in golfing
community but no homeowner's fees.
Fenced backyard. Beautiful location.
JENNIFER STOLTI (352) 637-6200
Email: jenniferSlollz@remax.netl
www.CitrusCounlyHomes.com


$30,000 PRICE REDUCTION
on this lovely 3/2 with extra Ig. garage, pool
home with office. 2323 sf living area in very
open floor plan double tray ceiling & crown,
solar heated caged pool with waterfall, invisible
fencing. Front porch and lush
landscaping get A+ for curb appeal.
IODY BROOM (352) 634-5821
Email: team@citrusrealty.com


242 N.1 LeaI Hwy. Bevrl Hil 2-82w wRtAIo 01 .FoiaAeIvres6760


THE HIDDEN GEM OF CITRUS COUNTY
2.81 acres in Pine Ridge. 3BR/2BA solar-heated
pool home with 24x36 RV carport. Private acreage
on a cul-de-sac, horses allowed. Master bath with
garden tub, walk-in closet, and dual sinks. Built-in
2000 with a total of 2,656 sq. ft.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200
Email: brbaraimills@earthlink.net






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Welcome colorful birds into your garden


S spring has arrived.
There should be no
more frosty morn-
ings until November. Mi-
gratory birds are passing
through Florida on their
way from the tropics to
northern breeding
grounds. Migrants that
spent winter locally have
mostly flown north to se- Jane
cure breeding territories.
Nesting boxes should JAN
have been cleaned out by GARI
February and their open-
ing doors secured against predators.
A 3-liter plastic bottle or other pred-
ator guard around the pole below
the nest box prevents snakes, rac-
coons and squirrels from climbing
up to raid the nest. Duct tape (sticky
side out around the pole and under
the predator guard) will trap fire
ants, which often kill nestlings.
Each bird species prefers a spe-
cific height, hole size and floor area.


Veber
E'S
DEN


In Florida, 13 avian cavity
nesters will take advan-
tage of man-made nest
boxes. Specifications are
available from the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS
website. House finches
and wrens sometimes
make nests in wall
wreaths and baskets right
beside front entry doors.
Mealworms are a fa-
vorite of bluebirds and
other garden breeders.
Grow mealworms in a


ventilated plastic container using
chunks of raw potato on which they
feed and reproduce. Put mealworms
out daily in sight of the nest box.

See JANE/Page E10
The house finch nest, complete with
a clutch of eggs, was found near a
house in Pine Ridge
Special to the Chronicle


BANK OWNED-LECANTO, FL
I 3BR/2BA on chain link fenced 2.21 acres.
| $74,900 MLS#700399


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on large shaded lot.
Carport. Central water. $30,000
MLS#359133


BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL I
Corner 2.17 acre tract. Paved road & central
water. $17,500 MLS#700351


ISANK UWNtLU-LUKAL 11 T, IL
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. $45,000


-l Garci
1 Relt Leaer 352302912


DRIVE BY WON'T DO HERE! Much bigger than it looks! Need to go
in and see. Living room, great kitchen, lots of cabinets, dinning room,
family room w/fireplace, 2 bedrooms and 1 bath. Large detached
garage, double lot. The seller has don all the work. This is move in
ready. $74,900. MLS #700404. Seller motivated


f3 AMERICAN REALTY & INVESTMENTS Fran Perezp7 -
NNE"- 4511 N L-,ni,, H., B-,!,H,II..1k FL 3445
H I Office: 352-746-3600 1 I''oh ,
S, (352) 586-8885T k







4515 W. BONANZA DR. BEVERLY HILLS
Don't wait too long to see this 5.7 acre GENTLEMEN'S TURN KEY HORSE FARM.
Tree lined circular driveway divided by two 4/5 board paddocks. Lovely expanded
ranch pool home set up as mother/daughter 3500 sq. ft. 6 bdrms. 5 baths 2/1 car
garages. solar heated pool overlooking barn, paddocks and horses. Barn has 4 large
stalls w/separate tack & feed rooms w/wash area. Property has 4 huge paddocks w/
improved pasture. 1 ac. Underground electric dog containment so much for the horse
person. Must see to appreciate $379,000. CallFran Perez 352-586-8885.
ALSO: ALMOST 3 ACRE WOODED LOT IN PINE RIDGE FOR $52,000
:= a :i = ai:-= ai:-= a -:


COME SEE THIS VERY LOVELY
HO M E ...........


:,, and spa, summer kitchen and
..li more. $173,000
Directions: From 491 N, right onto Whispering Oak Loop, (1st entrance to
Oak Ridge) Left on N. Misty Oak Ter., Right on Forest Oak.


; JOANN MARTIN
Bre I oPeferred2
IJREA Z ESTA TE
Broker Associate 352-270-3255 HlS


2822 Churchill Way
Canterbury Lakes Estates Hernando
3/2/2 with caged in-ground pool, 1839 sf.
of living, split floor plan, new carpet
Asking $146,900 MLS#700801
Directions: 486 to entrance of Canterbury
Lakes to riqht on Churchill to #2822 on left.


Jackie Caffney Jason Gaffney F --
Realton.. A HOUSE Realtor.,
A 02-3179 SOLDN3met 287.9022
746-6700 -L8 9
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
521 S. JACKSON ST. BEVERLY HILLS
||'|'' fAbsolutely darling fully tiled throughout Beverly
tJ ]^ uhII ^j the way this home flows. Living room plus family
L J room w/eat-in kitchen & laundry rm. Newly
remodeled Kitchen with white cabinets and
appliances and elegant glass back splash. Totally
remodeled main bath. Fenced yard to secure your precious pets & fabulous Oak tree
for just the right amount of shade while sitting out on you 13 x 12 patio. Home is
priced to sell quickly. Don t miss out on this turn key home. Bring Offers!!


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours (35, 302-6714 1


872 E. Ray Street
Hernando
3/2/2 with 1593 sf. ft. of living
1 acre lot, split floor plan
All for only $99,900. MLS#359410
Directions: 486 to South on Annapolis to
left on E Rav, Look for our signs


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 E3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Use capillary action to feed seedlings


LEE REICH
Associated Press

Ready Set. Go. Growing
seedlings indoors seems almost
like a race. Of course, it has a
staggered start, with onions al-
ready growing strongly and
tomatoes not yet sown.
Watering these seedlings is
crucial: Timely watering keeps
them chugging along apace; two
or three days of neglect could
spell death.
A simple way to automatically
water seedlings is to rely on the
soil to draw water up from below
by capillary action. This is just
how various types of commer-
cially available seedling-grow-
ing kits work (available online
from such sites as
gardeners.com, leevalleycom,
burpee.com and charleysgreen-
house.com).
Soil watered by capillary ac-
tion stays constantly moist,
rather than swinging between
the extremes of having plant
roots cry out for air and then for
water


Capillary watering itself is
nothing new. For years, capillary
matting a thick, water-ab-
sorbent fabric that does not rot
- has been available, mostly to
commercial greenhouse grow-
ers. The idea is to let one end of
the fabric dip down into a water
reservoir while the remainder
rests flat on a horizontal surface.
Pots of plants sit on the flat mat
If the pots likewise have flat bot-
toms and the soil within is right
up against the bottom of the
pots, then a capillary water con-
nection is established through-
out. As plants drink in water, it is
replenished by water drawn up
from the mat which is, in turn,
drawn up from the reservoir.
These capillary-watering seed
starters are nifty setups that
make it convenient to raise
seedlings in your home. A small
plastic pan holds water. Into the
pan fits a Styrofoam or plastic
"table" on which sits the mat,
with one end dipping into the
water. A multi-celled Styrofoam
or plastic planting tray sits atop
the mat


The whole setup is about the
size of a three-ring notebook, or
half that, depending on the num-
ber and size of the cells. Right
now, my broccoli, Brussels
sprouts, cabbage and kale
seedlings 24 seedlings in
about a square foot of space -
are growing in 1-1/2 inch square
cells. In about a month, I'll have
cucumbers and melons started
in propagators with slightly
larger cells.
A few other features round out
these systems. A clear plastic
cover maintains humidity while
seeds are germinating, then
tucks neatly out of the way under
the reservoir. The underside of


the "table" looks like a peg-
board, and can be flipped over to
pop seedlings up out of their
cells when they are ready for
transplanting. Plant roots knit
the soil together to keep it intact
during transplanting. And after
a good cleaning, the whole setup
is ready for re-use year after
year
Capillary watering does have
drawbacks. Water evaporating at
the surface of the soil leaves fer-
tilizer salt residues. These
residues can accumulate in the
soil and draw water out of the
roots the same way potato chips
dry out your lips. Seedlings gen-
erally do not spend enough time


in containers to bring on this
problem, especially when care is
taken not to over-fertilize. If nec-
essary, occasional watering from
above will wash the salts down
and out of the soil.
Another problem is that of
seedling roots growing out
through the bottom of their cells
and into the matting. Then
plants become difficult to re-
move from their cells and lose
too many roots when they are fi-
nally ripped away I avert this
problem by periodically lifting
the planting tray up off the mat
beginning when the seedlings
See SEEDLINGS/Page Ell


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@myflorida-house.com


COLDIA181.1
HAVIeRO


E4SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Master gardeners
slate clinics
Want to learn about lawn
care? The March free Master
Gardener Plant Clinics will be
about lawn maintenance. Dis-
cussion will be about each
type of "warm-season" turf
grass commonly found in Cit-
rus County, the good and bad
points of each, particular care
requirements and common
turf pests and diseases.
The remaining schedule for
these free clinics is:
1 p.m. Tuesday, March
26, at Citrus Springs Library,
Citrus Springs.
Master Gardeners will be
present to answer questions
or look at samples of plant-re-
lated concern. For more infor-


mation, call Citrus County Ex-
tension at 352-527-5700.
Achieve landscape
goals with class
The Citrus County Water
Resources Department is of-
fering a free class on "Fa-
vorite Plants for Citrus
County" from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, April 4, in the Exten-
sion classroom at 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Planning is a process and
there are several steps you
must apply to achieve suc-
cess. Evaluating the existing
conditions is where the class
begins. Preregistration is re-
quired by calling Gina Hamil-
ton at 352-527-5707. For
more information, call 352-
527-5708.


GET THE WORD OUT
* Nonprofit organizations are invited to submit news
releases about upcoming community events.Write
the name of the event, who sponsors it, when and
where it will take place and other details.
* Include a contact name and phone number to be
printed in the paper.


BrceR2 Ra itlr'usCOUnty
(352637-2 7*r l gs U ~y
m trs~ld
.-J


2 Bedrm/2 Baths/Eat-in Kitchen Family Rm, Lanai
w/Jacuzzi, 2 Boat Docks, 150' + on Water.
Best DEAL on WATER $169,000




www.2285celina.view24hours.com
3 Bedrm/2 Baths/Family Rm, Spacious LivRm &
Dining Area w/Large Kitchen.
Make it YOURS today! $174,900


Tips for cleaning streaky flatware


Dear Sara: Just read
your answer regard-
ing hard-water stain-
ing on glassware. My
problem is my flatware,
which still looks streaked
and dirty. Any suggestions?
- Yvonne S., email
Dear Yvonne: There are a
couple of ways to clean sil-
verware with baking soda.
You can make a paste with
water and baking soda, then
rub it on, rinse and polish
with a soft cloth. Or you can


line a pan with aluminum
foil, set your silverware in it,
pour boiling water over it
and sprinkle 1/2 cup of bak-
ing soda into the pan. Let
the silverware soak for an
hour, then rinse with water,
let it dry flat on a towel and
polish. If you're looking for
a faster solution, wipe flat-
ware with vinegar or club
soda to remove the streaks.
Dear Sara: I was looking
online at your project for
the homemade bath rug


(Note from Sara: frugalvil
lage.com/2012/05/30/new-
uses-for-old-towels/). I have
the canvas, but it seems the
squares are too small for the
towel to fit through. How big
are the squares on the can-
vas you use? I really like this
idea! -NancyE., email
Dear Nancy: Standard
latch-hook canvas works
fine. If you use a smaller-
weave canvas, you will want

See FRUGAL/Page E10


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


PINE RIDGE ntial CITRUS H.L.s
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. r U e l20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 Properties (352) 746-0744
Properties


NEW LISTING


S. 1 Clff' 854 N Kensinalc n Ave
MLS 701772 $216,880
3/2/2 Split plan with a huge
family room and large bedrooms.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


l"Vl 338 W Red Sox Palh
MLS 700094 $479,000
Stunning custom detailed home
on a cul-de-sac.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058


f 3600 W Cogwood Cir
MLS 701674 $139,900
3/2/2 pool home w/spa. At this price,
create your own MASTERPIECE.
Tami Mayer 352-341-2700


d f/t 4074 N Indianriver Dr
MLS 700337 $299,900
Someone built your dream home!
Not a touch forgotten.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086


NEW LISTING


fildl, 130 W Casurina PI ,,lZAd0 3826 N. Parkside Village Ter.
Ml MLS 701745 $66,900 MLS 701797 $38,500
Pristine 2/2, well maintained home. Cozy 1/1 maintenance-free
Pride shows throughout. villa in 55+ community.
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Lori Nickerson 352-220-8434


SIAUS 1673 E Westgate Ln
MLS 356655 $218,000
Perfect home, spacious rooms &
generous outdoor spaces.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
..---


ls ll 675 W Doerr Path
MLS 358289 $205,000
Customized 3/2/2 Antigua model
with nice Florida Rm.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926
EF_


..... .. .- .

,'7ZS1 I 1542 N Killebrew Pt 74 400 E Glassboro Ct 21-5b i 426 N Elliol Way ,t4 aS 2392 N Loma Pt
MLS 347586 $190,000 MLS 700104 $79,500 MLS 700151 $68,500 MLS 358186 $59,000
Strong value on a quiet cul-de-sac; This is it! Great location, great building, 3/2 with seasonal FL room. Neat home Updated 2/2 Mobile on
this is an approved Short Sale. great 2/2 townhome. with lots of character. cul-de-sac in 55+ community.
Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Lon Nickerson 352-220-8434 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523
0 2011 Prudential Rnancial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


HomeFront BRIEFS


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 E5






E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information............ 352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"




HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Attracting pollinators


Did you know on average, one-third
of every food, spice or condiment
we consume or beverage we drink,
and more than half of the world's diet of
fats and oils, are because of pollinators?
Pollinators are essential to
human existence. Approxi-
mately 80 percent of the
world's crop plants depend on
pollination. Strawberries, tan- .,
gerines, apples, blueberries,
carrots, coffee, grapes, melons, -,
peaches and squashes are just
a few examples of crops re- _
quiring pollinators. Without
pollinators, the crops depend- Joan Bi
ent on them for production FLOE
would dissipate. We would not FRIE
have these desirable crops for
consumption, much less the LIV
cotton crops for the clothes we
wear And let's not forget the livelihood of
farmers who depend upon these crops.
So what can you do to support pollina-
tors? It's simple. Create a pollinators' par-
adise in your landscape by planting trees
or shrubs that attract bees, wasps, butter-
flies and hummingbirds. There are many
to choose from, but one plant that has
proven to be a pollinators' paradise is
Weeping Bottlebrush (Callistemon
viminalis).


Weeping bottlebrush is a beautiful
flowering tropical tree or large shrub that
offers a springtime explosion of scarlet
blossoms. This is a well-behaved tree,
with a beautiful form that puts on a spec-
tacular floral display each
spring followed by brief encore
flushes of color throughout the
year
SAn attractive tree even when
not in bloom, this bottlebrush
grows to a height of about 20
feet, forming a wide rounded
crown if the lower branches
are pruned off. Brilliant red
adshaw stamens are arranged into 6-
IIDA- inch cylinders resembling the
MNDLY brushes used to clean bottles.
These beautiful inflorescences
ING dangle from the tips of pendu-
lous branches and wave seduc-
tively in the breeze, enticing pollinators.
This tree is so appealing to pollinators
that a distinct "buzz" sound is audible
when passing by this beautiful tree,
heralding pollinators at work.
Bottlebrushes do well in Florida's
sandy soils and grow best in full sun.
Newly planted bottlebrush will need to
be watered regularly after planting, but

See POLLINATORS/Page E11


Inside...


Easter chic
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E3
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E14
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Measuring the market for John Wayne memorabilia


D earJohn: My daugh- frame are 23 5/8 inches high
ter recently passed by 19 1/2 inches wide. A
away and label on the back
I would appreci- reads, "Tip Free-
ate any informa- man's Painting,
tion you can give Miami FL, 754-
me regarding an 8221, 132 N.E.
oil painting in H 79 St."
her home. Her Any informa-
neighbors tell tion would be
me "it's a very greatly appreci-
v a 1 u a b 1 e ated. I am new to
painting." this area and I
The painting John Sikorski enjoy your arti-
is ofJohn Wayne, SIKORSKI'S cle in the Citrus
and the artist's County Chroni-
signature is ei- ATTIC cle very much. It
their Leo Krone, is so interesting.


Leo Keane, Leo Kone or
something like that. I have
enclosed a photo of the
painting and signature, as
best a copy as I can get. The
measurements of the pic-
ture, not including the


- D.K, Inverness
Dear D.K: I imagine
most of our readers re-
member the actor John
Wayne. In the category of
movie star memorabilia,
John Wayne is still far up


on the totem pole of collec-
tor interest. Most collectors
look for memorabilia that is
connected directly to John
Wayne or to movies that he
appeared in, i.e., theater
lobby cards or posters of
movies, etc. The painting
you have is a very generic
depiction that only con-
nects him to the cowboy
roles he played, placing it
low on the totem pole of
John Wayne collector
interest.
In the photograph of the
signature, I can see the
artist's name is Leo Krone.
I was not able to find any
biographical information
or any record of sales for
Leo Krone. He may still be
living and painting. It could
be that the gallery listed on
the label may be able to


help with information
about the artist. All this
means that potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.
Dear John: Attached is a
photograph of an Imari
vase. Please let me know its
age and value. R.S.,
Internet
Dear R.S.: The vase in
the photograph is not
Imari. Perhaps you sent the
wrong photo. The style is
referred to as Satsuma. It
See ATTIC/Page E7
Even decades after his
death, John Wayne
memorabilia continues to
be popular. Most serious
collectors, however, are
only interested in items
that are directly connected
to the late Hollywood icon.
Special to the Chronicle


r







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

has been produced since the 1600s
in the Japanese province of Satsuma
and is named after the warlord Sat-
suma. There is a wide range of qual-
ity in the Satsuma category The
large vase you have was made dur-
ing the late 19th to early 20th cen-
tury, when large quantities of
commercial grade hand-decorated
pottery were made for export. Po-
tential dollar value is $50 to $100.
Dear John: Enclosed is a picture of
an item we inherited. Could you give


us some idea of its worth and where
we could sell it? It is an Aloha Elvis fig-
ure that plays Blue Hawaii. It is still
full of liquor and in excellent condi-
tion. Any information would be greatly
appreciated. -L W, Floral City
Dear L.W: Elvis memorabilia con-
tinues to attract the oldsters who were
there when Elvis was alive, as well as
the younger generation. However,
most serious collectors are only inter-
ested in memorabilia produced while
Elvis was still living. The figural liquor


bottle of Elvis is low on the totem pole
among Elvis's fans. Potential dollar
value is below $50, short of good luck


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business for
30 years. He hosts a call-in radio
show, Sikorski's Attic, on WJUF
(90.1 FM) Saturdays from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


* The Chronicle has forms available for wedding and engagement an-
nouncements, anniversaries, birth announcements and first birthdays.
* Call 352-563-5660 for copies.


Amanda & Kirk Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKERASSOC., REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR

4AS I lllS 0 S


Special to the Chronicle
This Satsuma vase was produced in Japan, probably in
the late 19th or early 20th century.

(P ik T www.parsleyrealestate.com






BOATER'S PARADISE!! Beautiful waterfront on Floral City Lake.
Just across from the boat ramp. Two rear screened porches facing
the huge professionally built dock and Boathouse. Beautiful Oaks on
the property. Real wood floors in the Great Room. Tile in kitchen
and bathrooms. Two sheds. Interior has been recently painted.
Come check out the views! $198,900.00


3948 N. BUCKWHEAT
3/2/2 700825 $179,900


2435W. ER6560 N. DELTONA BLVD. 7170 N. GRACKLE 7973 N. GOLFVIEW
2/1/13/2.5/2 700080 $114,900 3/2/2 700780 $109,500 3/2/2 701136 $122,500





5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 2047 W. PARAGON IN. 7239 COTTAGE 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
700929 $259,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 I3/2w/3+Det CP. 357796 $139,900 3/2/1 700428 $69,500


1I N. M.LLUUKNL 1I I KUMIAN 41U L. LARL rAKr. UK.
2/2/2 700838 $45,000 I 2/2/1 701074 $54,750 I 21.5 359138 $81,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


6262 W SETTLER
5/4/3 700993 $359,900


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press


Blue Mercury glass from Pottery Barn brings in one of the iconic pastel hues of the Easter season in a fresh new way (www.potterybarn.com).


I rabbit motif. (www.pottery
Welcome springtime with modern takes on Easter decor barn.comr)
W o wAlbany, Ore.-based designers
Jason and Cara Hibbs hand-


KIM COOK
Associated Press


uzzy chicks and cute
bunnies are part of
the pastel pantheon of
Easter decor, and
their charm helps define the
look of the season.
But for those who prefer cele-
brating with a modern aes-


thetic, there are many attrac-
tive decor options that are a tad
less cute and a tad more con-
temporary Some reference
Easter's traditional color
palette in new ways, while oth-
ers put a modem twist on the
holiday's iconic elements.
Pottery Barn has realistic
speckled and robin's eggs that
would make pretty filler for


tabletop bowls and vases. There
are luster-finished glass eggs
here, too, in soft yellow, pink
and blue that would look smart
on a gray or navy tablecloth or
sleek lacquered console. Mer-
cury-glass pillar candle holders
are rendered in an interesting
new shimmery pale blue. And
there's an elegant silver-plated
cake server embossed with a


draw, then screen-print rabbit
images on organic flour sack
cotton tea towels. The charming
result would make a great host-
ess gift. (wwwetsycom/
shop/ohlittlerabbit)
Canadian textile artist
Cristina Larsen crafts winsome
stuffed felted bunnies and
chicks in a rainbow of hues that
have a terrific design-y vibe.


"I use merino wool to make all
my felt. I dye the colors and
stitch every toy by hand," she
says. While Larsen calls them
"toys," they'd be equally at home
as artsy Easter decor (www.etsy
com/shop/textileplatypus)
The key to a modem Easter
look is simple, according to
Kevin Sharkey, executive cre-
ative director for Martha Stewart
Living Omnimedia: "It's about a
controlled color palette."


.Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EASTER
Continued from Page E8

Easter candies can be used
to create a graphic tablescape.
Fill plain glass cylinders or
apothecary jars with single or
multi-colored jellybeans for a
colorblock effect Consider
adding a pillar candle, or place
a smaller plant or vase inside a
bigger container and fill the
spaces in between with
confections.
"Buy a bunch of the same
style chocolate rabbit in differ-
ent sizes and arrange them
going down the center of the
table like a runner," Sharkey
suggests.
Or fill a low tray with color-
ful Peeps, another classic
Easter treat that happens to be
one of Sharkey's favorites. Last
year, he says, Stewart's daugh-
ter, Alexis, gave him "a gift box
full of every color Peep they
make. I brought it into the of-
fice and everyone was taking


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 E9


pictures of it because it was so
cool to look at."
There are some other clever
decorating ideas on Stewart's
website for those with a
slightly crafty hand, like stud-
ding wreaths and Styrofoam
balls with dozens of pussy wil-
low catkins.
Use eggs in interesting ways.
You'll find instructions at
MarthaStewart com on how to
make decorative eggs and
wreaths that have a tailored
look, using muted paint and
trims. Metallic paint and glit-
ter-coated eggs amp up the
wow factor. There are tips too
on using eggshells and egg
cups as vases for diminutive
bouquets of lily of the valley or
pansies.
At Allyou.com, find instruc-
tions on turning eggshells into
tiny votive holders, nestled in
silver egg cups an elegant
Easter dinner idea.
A range of fresh spring hues
and clean, simple style ele-
ments will take your Easter
d6cor from sweet to sublime.


Associated Press
Canadian textile artist Cristina Larsen crafts 000EEPM
winsome stuffed felted bunnies and chicks in a BEST
rainbow of hues. While Larsen calls them "toys," REAL ESTATE, INC. r.
they'd be equally at home as artsy Easter d6cor CR55Y GUvLFT FL 4E HWY
(www.etsy.com/shop/textileplatypus). OC: (352) 795-6633 ealtor
WW~W~E1RUECOM E-Mr TAI SLES( ATI EYRE1COM


Jackie Davis
W American Realty & Investments
* ** 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell a
IEAL E1a8-1 jackie@bjdavis.com n
For a Visual Tour nf mv listings and all MI S: hidavis com


I. .1 .1 e


Custom Homes Villas

MODELS NOW OPEN

BfST/ W Find us on
vet E Facebook
HOMEBUILDER
8016 S. Suncoast Blvd. 352-382-4888
Hwy. 19, 4% miles south of Homosassa Springs.
www.sweetwaterhomes.com swhsales@tampabay.rr.com

New Model at HERITAGE!


0






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


JANE
Continued from Page E3

Some gardeners make a meal-
worm feeder from a plastic jar with
a suitable hole cut out of the end or
lid. This excludes non-cavity nesters
like voracious blue jays and cardi-
nals. Black oil sunflower seed and
raw, unsalted shelled peanuts are a
favorite of these colorful birds.
To encourage ruby-throated hum-
mingbirds to stay and nest in your
garden, be sure to have lots of tubu-
lar red flowers in the yard. Bignonia
capriolata, cross vine; Campsis rad-
icans, Trumpet creeper; Hamelia
patens, Firebush; Lonicera semper-
virens, Coral Honeysuckle, Rusellia;
firecracker plant; and Salvia coc-
cinea, Red salvia/sage are good nec-
tar plants for hummingbirds and
butterflies. Fill several liquid feed-


ers with colorless sugar water.
Hummers are territorial and may
chase other hummers away from
their particular feeder. Be sure to
change and clean sugar water feed-
ers every four or five days to prevent
bacterial and algae growth.
Baby birds need to be fed protein
by their parents. Up to 50 percent of
hummingbird diet is small flying in-
sects. Set a tray of overripe bananas,
orange and apple slices and melon
fruit far from the house. Have a roof
over the tray to shed rain. It will soon
be buzzing with fast-breeding fruit
flies. Hummers fly up to the fruit flies,
hover until an insect is within the
open beak, then snap their mouths
shut, trapping the tiny flies. The rot-
ting fruit will also attract adult but-
terflies needing the minerals and
proteins from the decaying fruit
Hummers make a tiny expandable
nest on sturdy small branches using
spider silk and epiphytic lichens


plucked from tree bark and branches.
Turkey Oak has a rough bark that har-
bors spiders and is naturally a host
prop for air plants, lichens, mosses
and flowering vines. It also is the nat-
ural host plant to feed four of
Florida's butterfly caterpillars.
This native oak makes a fine prop
for climbing flowering vines such as
Coral Honeysuckle, Carolina Jes-
samine, Passionvine, Trumpet
creeper, Cross Vine and Virginia
Creeper. These flowers are nectar-
rich for butterflies and humming-
birds.

Jane Weber is a professional gar-
dener and consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thousands of
native plants. Visitors are welcome
to her Dunnellon, Marion County,
garden. For an appointment, call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E5

to skip some squares. T-
shirt material cut into
roughly 1-inch strips is
preferable over using a
towel. If you use a towel,
cut the strips very thin
(1/4 inch). You can hook it
like latch-hook yarn, tie it
onto the canvas or just
pull the strip through the
canvas and leave it un-
tied. Here's an example
of hooking it onto the can-
vas using T-shirt strips:
xoelle.com/2009/05/t-shirt-
latch-hook-rug-tutorial.
Here's one tying on towel
strips: team-t-adventures
.blogspot.com/2009/08/wip
e-your-feethtml.


Hope this helps.
Dear Sara: Can you give
me any examples of the
websites that give away
free samples, which you
mentioned in a recent col-
umn? I am very interested
because I have two boys
going to college and this
kind of stuff would come
in really handy to help out
with their expenses.
Thanks! -Dave, Arizona
Dear Dave: Try these
brand-sampler and spe-
cial offer sites:
pgtryit.com (Proctor
& Gamble).
samples.target.com
(Target).
AllYou.com/coupons-
deals/daily-free-samples-
00411000069695).


See FRUGAL/Page Ell


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS BRENThOOD, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENThOOD TOWNHOME
This Villa features 2 bedrooms plus a den, 2 baths and a 2-car garage Custom front Contemporary, 2/2 5/1 Townhouse in gated community of Brentwood A spacious
ioor with leaded glass and sidelight, double French doors lead to the den, lots oftile dining room/great room combination All bedrooms upstairs Half bath downstairs
and upgraded carpet, Corian countertops, security system and custom cabinets are Inside laundry tile & carpet Glass doors open to screen lanaioff of living room MLS
ust some of the wonderful features of this home MLS 358986.............$229,000 I 359134.....................................................................................................$89,900


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 4 BED, 4 BATH, 2 CAR, FOXFIRE DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH,2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
AS GOOD AS IT GETS One of a kind immaculate 4 bedroom 4 bath 2-car garage SPACIOUS & OPEN 3/2/2 golf course home in the gated "Brentwood" Community of
plus golf cart garage Custom pool/spa home with guest suite, situated on the best Citrus Hills comfortable open floor plan with a nice view from the lanai Sliding glass
home site in Foxfire on Skyview Golf Course Professionally decorated, to many door to a screened porch The 3rd bedroom is currently being used as a den Home
upgrades to mention, enjoy exclusive living in this premier court yard home A must is filled with natural sunlight Come see this beautiful home and make it your own!
see in Terra Vista M LS 5551159190............................................................$ 5 8 9 ,0 0 0 M LS 59 90..........................................................................................$ 16 9 ,0 0 0


ITerms 6& Months orMore
TerraBI Vl'lilII isMI~l" l~mta &V Brnwo Rentals!^^IS^^ Soia Memerhi inlue with~^^^^^^S^^S all Rental '^Bs-


U


Spcalzn iTerVst


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

SEEDLINGS
Continued from Page E4

are large enough for their roots to
bind the soil together.
Perhaps the worst threat to any
automated system is neglect. I have
almost lost seedlings from forgetting
to check the water level in the reser-


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

StartSampling.com.
instoresnow.walmart.com/In-
Stores-Now-Free-Samples-and-
Savings. aspx (Walmart).
pssstgeneralmills.com (General
Mills).
You can also go to your favorite man-
ufacturer's Facebook page and "like"


POLLINATORS
Continued from Page E6

once established, this tree is toler-
ant of short periods of drought.
Without pruning, weeping bottle-
brush becomes shrubby, making it
an ideal candidate for creating high
hedges or screens to hide unsightly
views. To create a distinctive weep-
ing form, trim the lower branches to
maintain it as a tree.
Plant a bottlebrush at the edge of
a lake or pond, where it resembles a
small but much flashier weeping
willow. For more information on
creating a pollinators' paradise, con-
tact Citrus County Extension at 352-
527-5700.
Citrus County Extension links the
public with the University of


CELINA HILLS
2/2 Home featuring solar heated pool,
1/2 acre lot, open floor plan, and fully
furnished. Don't let this one get away.
MLS# 700992 $133,000
Directions: Rt 486 to Croft Rd right onto
Celina St. Home on the left.
AL ANTONI 352-220-8143
AI.ANTONIH.ERA.Com
' AMERICAN e352-746-3600
ER REALTY & INVESTMENTS -.I OOOEFGC


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 Ell


voir, which only needs to be done
about weekly. It's easy to forget
about watering when so much of the
job is done for you.
Despite these minor shortcom-
ings, these capillary watering sys-
tems for raising seedlings are among
the few horticultural gizmos I rec-
ommend. Before I used them, my
seedlings tethered me to my house
daily throughout April and May

it You'll get a heads-up on any freebies
or promotions they have available.


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (wwwfrugalvillage. com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, comments
or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St.,
Kansas City MO 64106, or email
sara @frugalvillage. com.


Florida/IFAS' knowledge, research L-1 1 W-. ,
and resources to address youth, fam- ...
ily, community and agricultural - GOLF, WATERFRONT, COMMUNITY POOL 8
needs. All programs and related ac- CLUBHOUSE. A.h1 ....... ..... ..... .......
tivities sponsored for, or assisted by, DE OF OWNER I , 190 .I i.ii. ... ~ t $88,500.J u.uuuu -
the Institute of Food and Agricul-
tural Sciences are open to all per- .
sons without discrimination with .
respect to race, creed, color, reli-
gion, age, disability, sex, sexual ori-
entation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affilia-
tions, genetic information and vet- GREAT FIND IN BEVERLY HILLS. I I ... WATERFRONT COMMUNITY. .. POOL HOME .an I I i,, U ..I .e.2....m .
,, 1, h .u1 h In- I h 1i, 1 , 1 1i, l ,, 1. h.....1 I I l.j1. l I I, , l,,i, I I ,,,I I',,T Ii, ,,, ,,II h Il',- h ,.I ' "LI"
eran status as protected under the snow bird retreat. ONLY $54,900. #358130. with garage. Nice views. Enclsed prch. #700432. $219,500.#359408
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjust-
ment Assistance Act .

Dr Joan Bradshaw is Director of
UF/IFAS Citrus County Extension. LIVE THE AMERI(AN DREAM ,1 .l, ,,I, ,
h I. I .... ... .... . ... ... SMALL PRICE....BIG POTENTIAL!!! I. i l'
WOW! 3 or 4 bdrm and lots f room. Shaded by giant living nestled on 1.2 acres. Gourmet kitchen, fireplace, 3/2 2 home, fireplace, fencing, lanai, split plan, covere
I oaks, walk to the Trail. Fenced yard. Ready to move in right workshop . Upgrades Galore ASKING $243,000. por, in need of some TLC. $49,900. #701794. 5941
now. $147,500. #359476. MLS 701079. Call Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Carmel. Tomika Spires Hanssen 352 586 6598.





BEAUTIFUL POOL HOME IN I AM NOT GOING TO FLUFF IT, il, I
SUGARMILL WOODS work! 2004 4/2 Doublewide, 2 two acres (MOL) 2001 3/2/2 PINE RIDGE POOL HOME w/2248 LIVING LA VIDA YUCKA! Bank owned 22 mess fo
$54,900! #701738. 7526 Boss Ave. Tomika Spires- living, 2.8 AC, $189,900! READY TO MOVE IN! 2334 ONLY $24,900. 200 Harvard St. #101369 Tomik(
$134,900 Hanssen 352-586-6598. Sheriff Dr. #359573 Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. Spires Hanssen. 352-586-6598.
This 3/2 home has been tastefully updated with
new carpeting, paint & oak kitchen cabinets. .Wi .Oi
Approximately 1800 sq ft of living area, new BANK OWNED WATERFRONT YS
screened lanai, 2 car garage home is located on a A
quiet cul-de-sac. Convenient to shopping, doctors 7416 Gospel Isln R., Inv $6900
and close to the Suncoast Parkway. MLS #700710
Directions: From Hwy 19 on Cypress Blvd, Right on
Cypress Circle, Right on Shurmard Ct. E, then Left on "" ,.$ 9
Shurmard Ct. N to home on left. :. ..
STOP BUYING CHEAP PERFUME & START FAIRVIEW ESTATES I ".,, A.ll 5..91S. ilene, Inv $49,9
Natalia Ca reo le BUYING CHEAP HOUSES! Bank owned 2/2/21604 pool w/2801 living + new paint + fo'ring + Upgrades
Natalia Carey living, Beverly Hills. ONLY $48,900. 202 S. Fillmore. SUPER DUPER BUY! Move in for ONLY $185,900! 848 E. Moccasin Souh v $49,900
S352-382-2700 NEXT ~E4Io #700187. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. #358696. Tomika Spires-Hanssen 352-586-6598. I








E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013



Chronicle


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call J563-5966


C Classifieds


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!


--I.
HOMOSASSA
2/11, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
No Pets 352-628-3019
Homosassa 2/2/cp
Immaculate, upgraded
1560 sq. ft. quiet nbrhd
$675 352-633-1593
LECANTO
2 BR, Remodeled,
CHA, priv. lot. deeded
community $500 mo.
(352) 746-5253




Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908


43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807

' THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272
Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624


must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.OOPark Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230
Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail. good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665

LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, incl
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181


NEW !! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272
New Palm Harbor
Homes Mobile Condo
$39,000. Delivered to
your site $0 down
financing. John
Lyons 800-622-2832
ext 210



NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272

$$$$$$$$$

WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




For Sale 8m1
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1% AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $93,900
716-807-8847




Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
4Owner Fin. Avail.+-
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182



MUST SELL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on /4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message
LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2C/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Mobile Homes
with land.
Ready to move in.
Owner financing with
approved credit.
3Br 2Ba. No renters.
850-308-6473. Land-
Homes Express.com

Owner Fin./Lease Opt.
2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x
20 block bdg, New
Septic, Handy person,
REDUCED $19,900.1
Offer 352-422-1916


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882


HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new turn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138

LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804

Melody Pk, INV 2/2
splitplan c/h/a roof-
over, semi- furn, $8500k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340

Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 (618)444-9425
(618) 444-9552





RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?



3/2 Free Standing Garage. $900
2/2/1 .....................$650
3/2/2 AvailableApril ....$850
21211.................. $575


21212...................$850

2/2 Carport........$650
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
S352-726-9010


-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounityHomeRentals.corn
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandll P...............$500

5585W. Irvig ................. $750

HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way (HER)..... 5
3/2 DW, newer ileon 1/2 ACR
6315 N. Shorewoo Dr., (HER)....625
2/1 Flondaroom
CRYSTAL RIVER
10939 Gem St. (CR)...............$550
2/1/1 Duplex, close to hospital wnh W/D
9779 (leveland.................... $675
2/2/1, Super clean close to 7 River Hosprtl
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
9047 Travis Dr. (CS) ..............$625
2/2 ffo able duple, net & lean
9 Daniel St. (H) $6..................650
2/1 Neat, clen, iet location

Crystal Glen
3/2/2 Large home
$850 1st-Last-Sec
Gloria Bonner
P & R Mid Florida Realty
352-697-0375


Nature Coast Landings.
Large RV Site.
Reduced to $39,500.
www.detailsbyowner
or call 352-843-5441




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
2/1, In Town, $625
water incl'd 412 Tomp-
kins St. (352) 895-0744
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000


Home I Finder-
wwwch ro nicle ho efinder.com


Fiad YoUr tDrew* MrWn
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehorr efinder.com








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
HOMOSASSA
Lg 2/2, Central Locat,
scrn. por., $550 mo.
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed /1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furn & Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/mo. Call
352-795-1795 for
Appt.www.ensing
properties.com


RAINBOW
GARDEN
APARTMENTS
11850 Rainbow
Garden Circle.
Dunnellon, Fla
(352) 465-3309
TDD #711

OPEN
Mon. & Tues. 9a-4p
Wed. & Thurs. 9a-3p
Friday 9am-Noon
Lunch Noon-lpm

62 years of age or
older, handicap/
disabled, regardless
of age, with or with-
out children

1 & 2 Bedrooms
"This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer."










CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
HarbourApts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037


INVERNESS
RAINTREE
Apartments II
62 YRS OF Age or
Older Hadicapped/
Disabled, regardless
of age with or
without children.
201 E. Hills Street
Inverness Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:00a -4:00p, M-F
This institution is an
Equal Housing
Opporluniry
Em-

pbyer &

provider


INVERNESS
RAINTREE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN
SPECIAL $199
First Months Rent
2BR Available
Starting @ $520.
201 E Hills St.
Inverness, Fl 34452
(352) 726-4330
TDD #711
8:00a -4:00p, M-F
This institution is an
Equal Housing
Opportunity Em-
ployer & provider










LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225









BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1700 SF, Pool, $1,100
mo. (740) 398-9585
Buy 1-3bd Homes From
$1000/mo!
PreForeclosured and
Rent2OWN Homes!
Bad Credit OK! Only 500
Credit Score Min!
To learn more and
access local listings call
1-866-955-0621




Beverly Hills
2/1 ac, car port, lania
$550.00 mth 1st & last
352-422-2433
Beverly Hills
2/1, new paint, cha
no pets, non-smokers
$600 mo. 352-527-1143
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 FL room, no pets
$600 352-464-1950
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878


Beverly Hills
2/1/cp Clean $550mo.
1 st./Last/ Sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
BEVERLY HILLS
Rent to Own 2 /I '2/I
Fl. Rm $2,500 down
$475 mo.
(352) 726-9369
CITRUS SPRINGS
3/2/2, New
Carpet,
No Pets, $790.
mo.
River Links
Realty
352-628-1616

DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
RENT/RENT TO OWN
2 Master Beds 2 Full
Baths, 2 Car Garage
Lanai, Fireplace ,
Dishwasher, spotless,
$799. Special
352-527-0493

FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent to/or Own $850
mo.www.rickybobs
cornn 352-613-5818
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
4/3, Large yard, lanai,
Fireplace $1,100 mo.
2 sheds (352) 302-9677
Homosassa Springs
3/2, c/h/a $795/mo,
$850 sec
352-628-3696
Inverness
2/2 Waterfront, first, last
& sec. 1776S. Moring
Dr. 352-364-2120
INVERNESS
3/2/2 completely
remodeled $850 mo.
1144 Woodcrest Ave
352-895-0744
INVERNESS
golf course home
2/2/2, beautifully
remodeled $875 mo
8515 Sandpiper Dr
352-895-0744




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$850. 352-419-4421

Gospel Island
clean 2/1,no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


CITRUS HILLS
2/2/1 Villa, Rent or
Sale, quaint location,
with Pristine views,
(352) 513-4485

HERNANDO 3/2/2
Rent to/or Own $850
mo.www.rickybobs
.com 352-613-5818





BEVERLY HILLS
Room w/ private shower
Elec. & water included
meals avail. $450. mo.
1st& Ist. 352-464-5845

CRYSTAL RIVER
Must have income &.
Respect. Near Puibix's,
Furn., Clean, Cable,
w/d, $115wk/440mo
$130/470 563-6428

INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652





INVERNESS
3/2/2 Avail. April
Nice, Furn. Waterfront
352-527-9268





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed
352-566-7099 or
606-694-7099


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.






UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Ktchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
Sat. April 6th,
11am
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.com











HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
**cash only **
352-503-3245








Use Your Tax Money
for a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2 BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
located at, 6515 S.
Tropicana Ave.
Lecanto $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then
Call (800)282-1550


BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090




Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379
**Just Reduced**
2/2 Updated home in
Canterbury Lake
Estates. Great Location
Backs up to Greenbelt
Call Myriam Reulen
(352) 613-2644
Weston
Properties, LLC




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF,4F
REALTY ONE





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 E13




S 3/2/2, 2 V2 acres,
1j j 24 ft x 32 ft shop
6I=/ nn


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351
Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531
Golf Course Home
3/2/2/2. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475




2 ACRES
Quiet Country Settina
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$126,500
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

BEST TIME TO BUY.
LOW PRICES!
LOW INTEREST!

BUY NOW

Also Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


hZJI
GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gaal sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com
Inverness Highlands
4/3/2 $90,500 Nr. hosp.
& schools Pool w/fence,
shed & Ig. bck lanai
(352) 201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.






m




# 4Employment

# I source is...


SCtru Hl
Homes^^^










Real Estate DIGEST







Steve Jackie Karen Gary Kathy Lou Dawn Harry Karen Janice Bill Barbara Alan Bobbi Fatone- Jeanne Sandi Sue
Latiff Davis Baxley Baxley Canfield Miele Theroux Eck Stukes Ayers Moore Banks DeMichael DiLego Anderson Gaskill Hart Hartman
ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA
Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty.


I % ERA recognizes top
WEi performers
ERAAmerican Realty and
ERA Suncoast Realty recently
John Deb Jennifer Joanna Deanna Greg Sarah recognized their top producing
Hoffmeister Infantine Lehman Morris Rodrick Rodrick Spencer agents for 2012 at their annual
ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA ERA awards meeting.
Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Realty. Leading the way once again a


DIGEST DEADLINES

* Submit information for the Real Estate Digest by 4 p.m. Thursday for
publication Sunday.
* News notes are published as space is available.
* Submit material, attn: HomeFront, at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; fax to 352-563-3280; or e-mail to newsdesk@chronicle
online.com.


the company's top producer in
2012 was Steve Latiff.
The mega-million dollar pro-
ducer was Jackie Davis.
Multimillion dollar producers
were Karen and Gary Baxley,
Kathy Canfield, Lou Miele,
Dawn Theroux and the teams of
Harry Eck and Karen Stukes
and the Home Team Janice


Ayers and Bill Moore.
Million dollar producers were
Barbara Banks, Alan
DeMichael, Bobbi DiLego,
Coleen Fatone-Anderson,
Jeanne Gaskill, Sandi Hart, Sue
Hartman, John Hoffmeister,
Deb Infantine, Jimmy
Ledsome, Jennifer Lehman,
Joanna Morris, Betty Powell,
Deanna Rodrick, Greg Rodrick
and Sarah Spencer.
ERAAmerican Realty and ERA
Suncoast Realty proudly salute
these fine real estate profession-
als and invite you to contact any
member of the ERA
American/Suncoast team to dis-
cuss your real estate needs.


EXIT takes
top categories
The Wade Team is proud to
announce that EXIT Realty
Leaders has taken
place in every category in the
monthly broker report for Exit Re-
alty Florida In February.
EXIT Realty Leaders was
named No. 8 in in new listings
taken, No. 4 in total listings, and
No. 8 in sales volume.
EXIT Realty Leaders was also
named No. 8 in sales volume per
agent, No. 5 in closed sides, No.
5 in closed sides per agent, and
No. 8 in gross closed
commissions.


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!
352-476-9649
sandra.hartd@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


For SAe B
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505


Citrus Hills Tri-level
on E Hartford
3bd/3ba w/carport
2100 sq. ft., furnished
asking $119,500
704-905-5986
Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266



Your World








.i le I :

C-p.... 1,1", COW,


BANK
REPOSSESSION
SMITH LAKE,
ALABAMA.
Prime dockable
Homesite $49,900.
Bank loss of $120k
per lot, over millionn
on 34 lots, makes
possible a $200k +
homesite for 25 cents
on the dollar. Level to
water, no stairs. Build
at water's edge. NEW
TO MARKET. Roads
and utilities in place.
Available April 20th.
Make early appoint-
ment. Once in a life-
time opportunity. Call
(877)448-6816.




2BD 1 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116

CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857


m
"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week
LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area, 10OK boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/586-4987
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $225,000
352-419-8337


m
Lake Rousseau
5311 W, Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642











W%. A A_


m

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNafurecoast
Properties.corm
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


To Rent for 2013 -14
winter season. Mini-
mum 4 mo. Furnished
home preferably Pine
Ridge or adj to
Withlacoochee Forest.
Need room for 2
horses. Ref. avail
(352) 249-7180





CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697





Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available, www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pmn.
352-795-6336


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.corn
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


#1 Employment source icos
WWW.CilonCCnline.COM


He


a


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


me


s





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




MEN 8(
ERA
REAL ESTATE





I CYI
cy'


SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 E15


ERA Key 1 Realty, Inc. 12
)15 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL OPPO UNT
352-382-1700


Located on U.S. 19 ---
Just North of
ugarmill Woods Entrance


PRESSS VILLAGE OPEN HOUSES

OPEN SUNDAY 12-3PM


ii


I Shortleaf Ct. #701382 $265,000
Lots of new! Oversized 3/3/3, pool


11Sandpine Ct.E. #700724 $115,000
3/2/2, pool, family room, FP


150 Pine St. #700016 $315,000
4/2.5/2, Gorgeous w/pool, golf course


9 Chinkapin Circle #359082 $229,000
3+ office/2.5/2, pool, immaculate, pavered drive/walk


SOUTHERN WOODS OPEN SUNDAY 12-3PM




wood Dr. #349779 $270,000 8 Ryewood Circle #700299 $200,900 97 Woodfield Cir. #700454 $289,000 4 Gingerwood Dr. #353701 $219,900 8 Highwood Path 35607
n., 4/3/3, pool, fam. rm., FP 4/3/2 pool, granite w/stainless, golf course 4/2.5/3, well, hot tub 3/2/3, golf course, pool 3/2/2 On So. Woods G

OAK VILLAGE OPEN SUNDAY 12-3PM
1 Ia& Iri JI I Mm i al ,I.


8 $275,000
C, Pool


73 Oak Village Blvd. #358920 $299,000 20 Calendula Ct. #351467 $279,000
3 + 3 heated pool, rantewstanless, newertile, paint& carpet 4+ofc.3/3, pool, granite kitchen, hardwood and tile


55 Torenia Verbenas Cl. #37 $265,000
3+ofcl2, pool, double lot, expanded garage


| ,.i


B. |


i .i


i


L .. I


L J


L ,I


L i


52 Oak Village Blvd.S #700772 $284,500 141Greenpark Blvd. #385996$198,500
Oversized 3/2/2Y, fam. rm., bonus rm. 4/2/3 Greatroom, pool








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WORK OR LIVE IN UNIQUE, VICTORIAN
ERA HOME ZONED COMMERCIAL
I Ai1 I 4 III h1 1,, ...il l..,Id h
I ,, ,. il I


qhI ll. I.. .. H. H,, I.. 1 1, ,,, l. I 3
rll = .. ASKING $138,900
Pit Dios ,35' 212 7280
146e.l hltini t itl i 2ln/LtdE,.. com


HI. I.. I ... ..:.......lr.l I., I.r ..1 .1.. .:.. ,1 I I1.
1 I ,1 j" 1 1. .1 .)...
. n ........ .. 1.1 j. I .... ..



riL =i l ASKING $148,900
Pt Di -. 352212 7280
1',.o c21plidlo- zi m


SPOTLESS 3/2/2 IN INVERNESS
I. in .i i. A.:.i ll I. ..' 1 1.:..' :l


PRICED TO SELL $89,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699
rI


S162.900 OVER 2 ACRES QUALITY! ..,:....i In .ill., flml,.l..L I in...l il
.. - -.. -II- aa Ia....- .. l,. h.p n h, "6 1- ..,. l
-.,I ,l ,, l, l l ,.n I,, II,,, anlln .. n "' "II 'I 'i II '.1 In nnnn' .n nn
,h I I ... ....... II I n n I, lnj IimlnnI y
l ..11.1. M i') ASKING $138,500
S.. r,,,, ..... r, ,,,, ". Call Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072
Onii ,, a,..,s 116l 1' 1 ,ort 352 7266668


I. .1


* UANILHUUHY LAKE ESIAILS
* _' F e. ,:i. ol,.hl _" :.l .i.an...al.
* Na-ii-aI a.. I Viail e 'a',:,nn
BARGAIN AT $88,900
Jeanne oi Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
w'ivi. CitiusCount 'Sold. corn


IT'S ALL GOOD





1., r i 11111-1
Pit Di> J352 2127280
..i a, .isi c p rf .. c


1 ... -.. ." .. . I .i ..... I.
l i,. u l I ". lh. n. lrn

..I nl I If lh nn I,, IH ..


Il; = I PRICED TO SELL S19,900
Call Nildj Cino 352 210 0202


MOBILE HOMES IN 55+ PARKS
FROM $10,000 TO $85,000
i)M_ WITH II AIllI Of AMf NITll 3
3i)M_ VVITH I )VW VLOT ElNT
Please Call Dons Mine 352 7266668











S165,900 THE LANDINGS AT INVERNESS
hI Ih, i \ i ,,,, h, an ,i i. .... 1 ',,1,1I
.. I I .,,I l., .I h Ih I, I3.1 ,,6,.. ,i


I ii1 II 1, ii 111 "II 4
Ml.ri Pursons 352 634 1273


BANK OWNED
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Tlii ni in ii l" i aaa I naIl-,all ili l l lI-
l_.. ,:1h .d i(..Jlh .I Inb n. n i -nn H s 11
INCREDIBLE BUY AT ONLY S57,500!!
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


CITRUS SPRINGS!




h ,inl l i n n~ ln l I f l., : lin, l l i I, l
MI = h/I-II 1 $59,900
lottaine 0 Regan 5860075


IhI .. 1 I h II.] . ...] .....1, .. . ..] 1 ..)...


.. l ..I ..I .... I. I. ....l r .:. HI:I lm i. ...1 1:11
r11 = l-rv44 ASKING $119,800
Pt Dio, 352' 212 7280


....1,1.I, ,,II,,,
.., . .

S .. .............. .
OFFERED AT ONLY S262.000
I', .lll,. ,, f"t,,u ....... a.' ,,,,,,. 411 1 ',


UM %XULUEMN rumuU
I -l. W.id. _3I..111 i.j I 1,;I&... .j : n.] .i:.,,I
1'i-. _Ball, a Iai I. a Ii i ,al p I

2 LoIs. = /I1111":. $179,500
0,va, 2200 ,1n II 1Ivnn,,.I .l '
Granile Counleis. Hickory Floors
Jeanne io Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
rit'ti'r. CiliusCountlSold. com


M* ,B B.il, POOL H.,in.:
* I,,a I y., i,


M1 =11hll"' $213,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
wr':w'r citiuscounti sold. coin


INVERNESS TRIPLEX
..I .l ". IA, llh i 1 nII


Mn_. =ir.'l ?$240,000
Call Jim Moi ton to see this
investment piopeity' at 422 2173


II \ nniJ .J..h I i....h .i ,* ih i I,: ..* v" .1 h .. i..
a. V l l' ,:1 In..nnl l...n.. l \ i..u \'\ i l >.
". ".v h... "..i H n'n,. nJ.. l_: I. b..,:l .J....l
r .h. J. .i.j l.. l..j l... . jll, ...,Ihb....
. II. th.. :.. .':.J $6127,500
Call Ruth Fiedetick / 352 563 6866


GOLF COMMUNITY WITH NO ASSOC. DUES



Id... I.. .' i .. i H HI H IIi I nlh I 1 l I .II .



d i.i tIai, ..I, =3587792 1 81


III I


E16 sUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013