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Citrus County chronicle ( March 22, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 22, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03068

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903

Material Information

Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Creation Date: March 22, 2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03068

Full Text


Check out our March Madness coverage /Bl


I FR IDAY


Cold start;
warmer afternoon
with clouds.
PAGE A4


MARCH 22, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


CITRU-w:S CO U N T Yl





wcRONICLE.
^& www.chronicleonline.com


203ESAAD W




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Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOL. 118 ISSUE 227


Oil boom not trickling down to consumers


IM W Expertspoint to higher demand from developing world


Associated Press
Costco members fill up with discounted gasoline Oct. 5 at a Costco
gas station in Van Nuys, Calif. U.S. oil output rose 14 percent to 6.5
million barrels per day in 2012, a record increase, but you'd never
know it from the prices at the pump.


Associated Press
NEW YORK-- The U.S. is in-
creasing its oil production faster
than ever, and American drivers
are guzzling less gas. But you'd
never know it from the prices at
the pump.
The national average price of
gasoline is $3.69 per gallon and
forecast to creep higher, possi-
bly approaching $4 by May
"I just don't get it," said Steve
Laffoon, a part-time mental
health worker, who recently
paid $3.59 per gallon to fill up in
St. Louis.
U.S. oil output rose 14 percent


to 6.5 million barrels per day last
year a record increase. By
2020, the nation is forecast to
overtake Saudi Arabia as the
world's largest crude oil pro-
ducer. At the same time, U.S.
gasoline demand has fallen to
8.7 million barrels a day, its low-
est level since 2001, as people
switch to more fuel-efficient
cars.
So is the high price of gasoline
a signal that markets aren't
working properly?
Not at all, experts said. The
laws of supply and demand are
working, just not in the way U.S.
drivers want them to.


U.S. drivers are competing
with drivers worldwide for
every gallon of gasoline. As the
developing economies of Asia
and Latin America expand,
their energy consumption is ris-
ing, which puts pressure on fuel
supplies and prices everywhere
else.
The U.S. still consumes more
oil than any other country, but
demand is weak and imports are
falling. That leaves China, which
overtook the U.S. late last year
as the world's largest oil im-
porter, as the single biggest
See i Page A4


Voice over the airwaves


* Editor's note: In an
economic climate
where jobs are at a
premium, the
Chronicle is featuring
an occasional series,
"Citrus County
Works," profiling
local Citrus County
people and the jobs
they perform. Today:
Skip Mahaffey, disc
jockey at radio sta-
tion WXOF, FOX Clas-
sic Hits 96.7 FM.

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA
t one time, radio
ruled and men
like Casey
Kasem, Cousin Brucie
and Wolfman Jack were
kings of the airwaves.
"What charmed me
about radio to begin
with and what made it
wonderful, it was very
personal," said Skip
Mahaffey, radio disc
jockey at station
WXOF, FOX Classic
Hits 96.7 FM.


Citrus County WORKS


See Page A2 Fox 96.7 DJ Skip Mahaffey, a 30-year veteran radio personality, works from his Homosassa studio.




Longtime Citrus County cattleman remembered


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY Barco, Zell-
ner, Croft, VanNess, Rooks.
Some names are synonymous
with Citrus County.
Keith Barco's roots go back to
the mid-1800s.
"Both of our families were pi-
oneers in Citrus County," said
John Zellner. "Keith was a good
cattleman."


Alan Keith Barco died March
15 at his home in Floral City. He
was 71.
He was laid to rest Wednesday
at Lake Lindsey Cemetery
Barco's friends remembered
him as a quiet man who worked
hard. Agriculture, land, cattle;
that was Barco's passion.
"We weren't close, but I've
known him since we were in
high school," said Jerry Perry-
man. "We'd talk farm machin-


ery; he'd tell me about his hay
business. Once a month I'd go
out to Week's Auction out in
Ocala and I'd always look for
him there, too. He was a good
man."
To Lecanto dairy rancher
Dale McClellan, Barco was his
champion back in 2002 when
McClellan first started his dairy
and was met with bitter
opposition.


"Keith was one of the guys I
met early on who accepted me
into the community," McClellan
said. "He was one of the guys
who helped stabilize the situa-
tion. He was always there when
we the Ag Alliance needed
help putting a good face on the
Ag Alliance and the agriculture
community of Citrus County."
Barco was married to the late
Sybil Barco, another Citrus
County native, who died at age
57 in 2004. Mrs. Barco was a
courthouse fixture for more
than 30 years, working for both
the supervisor of elections and


the property appraiser.
Patrick Clinton, barber at The
Corner Barbershop in Inver-
ness, said he enjoyed having
Keith Barco in his barber chair,
but not because of his hair.
"His hair had a mind of its
own," Clinton said. "It was fun to
see him because we never knew
what it was going to do. When
Keith would leave, we knew the
rest of the day would be easy be-
cause he had the toughest hair
to cut of any of our customers."
Clinton said Barco was mostly
See Page A4


6118Illll1 114 l !lll I


Com ics .......... C9
Community ...... .C7
Crossword ....... .C8


Editorial ........A14
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Numbers . .B4


Lottery Payouts .... B6
M ovies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A6


Classifieds ....... C10
TV Listings ....... C8


2013 CHEVY
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Barco's roots in area ran deep


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


When on the air Skip Mahaffey plays classic rock hits
from his studio.


RADIO
Continued from Page Al

"I grew up in Orange
County, Calif., listening to
93 KHJ from Los Angeles
- Sam Riddle and 'the
real Don Steele,' Dave
Hull 'the Hullabalooer'
(KRLA), 'Rick Dees in the
morning' and Frasier
Smith on KLOS. Radio in
Los Angeles was an amaz-
ing thing to grow up with,"
he said.
Mahaffey jokes and says
radio is the last safety har-
bor for 'C' students; that
it's the perfect job for peo-
ple who like cold coffee
and leftover pizza at 6 a.m.
and who want to sit alone
in a tiny room talking to
nobody But he's also quick
to admit his passion for
what radio once was, still
is and what it can continue
to be, despite the drastic
changes it's been forced to
make because of techno-
logical advances and tough
economic times.
"I got into radio on a
bet," Mahaffey said in be-
tween on-air spots and
playing classic hits from
the radio studio in Ho-
mosassa. "I was dating this
amazing girl ... she bet me
fried chicken. She told me
about an audition at a
broadcasting school; I
wanted the fried chicken,
so I went. It was the second
best thing I ever did the
first was marrying the
girl."
The school, L.A. Broad-
casters, was a group of sea-
soned broadcasters that
included Ed McMahon


WHAT READERS
THINK
Earlier this week,
Chronicle Facebook
friends were asked:
"What makes a
good radio DJ?"
Here's what they
wrote:
"The best DJ is
someone who can
make you laugh and
has a positive atti-
tude." Marcy
Agen
"Best DJ is one who
knows when to talk
and when to shut
up." Chris
Gangler
"A good DJ is funny,
talkative and up on
current events." -
Roger Gould
"Good DJs engage
their listeners." -
Holly Rae Pillman
"A great radio DJ is
one who doesn't
talk over the begin-
ning or ending of
the music, enunci-
ates clearly, and
keeps the 'chatter'
to a minimum so
that we truly hear
news, music,
weather and local
info. An awesome
radio station and DJ
enthusiastically pro-
motes local and
community events."
Patti Griffith

and Los Angeles-based
radio personality Charlie
Tuna.
"They instilled in us the
passion for what we do,"


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Skip Mahaffey says local radio still has an impact on the population and is where listeners tune for important, local
information.


Mahaffey said.
For the next 30 years,
Mahaffey worked in sta-
tions across the country -
Los Angeles, Tulsa, Tuc-
son, Phoenix, St. Louis,
San Diego, back to L.A.,
Columbus, Ohio, then on to
Tampa and Clearwater He
came to Citrus County last
year.
He had worked in the
Tampa area for 10 years
before losing his job in
2009, not uncommon for
thousands of other radio
on-air personalities
across the country, he
said.
"We're now competing
with Pandora and satellite
radio and (smart) phones.
It became 'play the music,
play the music'- and any-
body earning minimum
wage can play music," he
said. "We're working in an
industry now where you've
got one person in a station
that might be heard on six
different stations, and traf-
fic people in Tampa re-
porting traffic for Miami,
Tallahassee, Orlando and
even Mobile, Ala. It's not


uncommon for one person
to wear six, seven, eight
hats and be stretched
thin."
When he left the station
in Tampa, Mahaffey did a
talk radio show from
Clearwater until Steve
Schurdell, owner of WXOF
and Citrus 95, asked him to
come to Citrus County,
originally to mentor the
younger DJs, later to join
the team.
When Mahaffey first
began in radio, he spun
vinyl records and played
commercials from car-
tridges. Today he works
solely with a computer and


sound board.
In the old days, a disc
jockey could talk to the
audience for five or more
minutes and people
would listen, but times
have changed. Now DJs
have less than 10 seconds
to hook the listener and
less than a minute to
finish.
"So, you have to be com-
pelling; you have to be
relevant and you have to
be local, local, local," he
said.
The way people listen to
radio has changed. Even
so, Mahaffey believes that
there will be a place for


local stations with real
human beings who live
and work in the commu-
nity as their listeners.
"No matter how much
music you play, there's still
a need for a human ele-
ment," he said. "Sadly, that
gets lost in all the technol-
ogy. But if you're stuck in
traffic on 1-75 for 45 min-
utes, you want to know
why, and you're going to
turn on the radio. People
still instinctively go to the
radio first."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


ib Fair

Wednesday, March 27
10 a.m. 2 p.m.
College of Central Florida
Citrus Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto

NO CHARGE!
All Job Seekers Welcome!

MEET LOCAL EMPLOYERS INCLUDING:
Caregiver Services
County Sheriff's Office
Citrus Memorial Health
Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
Families Come First
Plantation Inn

YOU WILL ALSO:
Learn about Workforce Connection Services
Register with Employ Florida
Tour the MOBY1 Mobile
Resource Center


DRESS PROFESSIONALLY
Bring Copies of Resume


Call 352-637-2223
or 800-434-JOBS
For the latest job alerts, updates and tips, follow us on
Twitter @WorkforceCLM
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com www.citrus.CF.edu



WORKFORCE COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
iliil I FLORIDA
CITRUS LEVY MARION -an equal opportunity college-
Workforce Connection is a member of Employ Florida and an equal opportunity employer/program Auxiliary aids/services are
available to those with disabilities Telephone numbers may be reached using TDD/TYY equipment via the Florida Relay
Service at 711 For accommodations, call 800-434-5627, ext 7878 or email accommodations@WorkforceConnectionFL com


4


A


A2 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013







Page A3 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013



TATE


c LOCAL
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
'How to Do Florida'
films in Homosassa
The Rotary Club of Ho-
mosassa Springs Charita-
ble Foundation Inc. will
host the second annual
Shrimpapalooza festival on
Saturday. Shrimp, live
music, arts and crafts,
Cajun kick and a special
guest will be featured.
Chad Crawford, host of
the Sunshine Network's
"How to Do Florida," will be
in Homosassa as grand
marshal of the Mardi Gras-
style parade beginning at
10:30 a.m. down Yulee
Drive. The event is sched-
uled to follow the parade.
Crawford, a third-genera-
tion Floridian, and camera-
man Josh Letchworth will
be filming for an upcoming
episode of his cable televi-
sion show.
For more information,
call the Rotary Club of
Homosassa Springs at
352-257-0896.
Benefit bike run
Sunday
More than 100 motorcy-
cles are expected to partici-
pate Sunday in the
Memorial Bike Run and
Celebration of Life Party to
benefit HPH Hospice.
The bike run begins
1:30 p.m. at Cycle Solutions,
1920 N.W. Suncoast Blvd.,
Crystal River and runs to
Mickey's Bar and Billiards,
770 N.E. Fifth St. (State
Road 44), Crystal River.
The bike run is in honor
of Paul "Gangster" Page,
who died Monday, March
18, after a four-month battle
with cancer. It will end with
a celebration of life service
and party at Mickey's Bar
and Billiards.
Donations are being col-
lected for HPH Hospice,
whose staff cared for Paul
in his final weeks of life.
Speaker to talk
about sinkholes
The public is welcome to
attend the TOO FAR gen-
eral meeting at 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 28, at
East Citrus Community
Center, 9907 E. Gulf-to-
Lake Highway (State Road
44), Inverness.
The speaker will be a life-
long resident of Citrus County,
Larry Hartman, who will talk
about sinkholes.
TOO FAR Inc. is an or-
ganization dedicated to pro-
tecting Florida waters. For
more information, call 352-
419-8030.

Gainesville
Mayor charged with
DUI after crash
Gainesville Mayor Craig
Lowe faces a DUI charge
after crashing his vehicle.
The Florida Highway Pa-
trol said the crash happened
about 2:20 a.m. Thursday.
Alachua County Sheriff's
deputies said Lowe appeared
intoxicated when they arrived.
A trooper said Lowe
smelled of alcohol and per-
formed poorly on field sobri-
ety tests. He was charged
with DUI with property dam-
age and careless driving
and taken to jail.
-From staff and wire reports

Correction
Due to incorrect informa-
tion provided to the Chroni-
cle, a story on Page A1 of
Thursday's edition,
"Pan/scraper accounts dif-
fer," requires correcting.
Commissioner Scott Adams
did not meet Bob Schweick-
ert March 13 at the Ring
Power Corp. facility in
Brooksville. Adams said he
visited the facility the follow-
ing day.


The Chronicle regrets the
error.
Readers can alert The
Citrus County Chronicle to
any errors in news articles
by mailing newsdesk@
chronicleonline.com or by
calling 352-563-5660.


Crash snarls 1-75 all day


Associated Press

WESLEY CHAPEL -
One of the Interstate 75
southbound lanes in Pasco
County reopened Thurs-
day evening following a
fiery crash between a trac-
tor trailer carrying mail
and a dump truck, the
Florida Highway Patrol
reported
Crews repaired the
damaged asphalt on one
lane, and the second lane
was expected to be fin-
ished later Thursday, FHP
spokesman Steve Gaskins
said. Northbound traffic
remained open through-
out the day
No one was seriously in-


jured in the morning
crash. Both drivers got out
of their vehicles and were
taken to hospitals for
observation.
Officials from the U.S.
Postal Service were at the
scene to collect mail, much
of which was burned or de-
stroyed in the fire. Postal
service spokeswoman
Debby Fetterly said the
truck was carrying maga-
zines and third-class mail
from Jacksonville to
Tampa. Customers who be-
lieve they may have had
mail on the truck should
call the postal service's
consumer affairs office at
813-354-6265.
Gaskins said south-


FLORIDA HIGHWAY PATROL/Associated Press
A U.S. Postal Service tractor-trailer that caught fire after
crashing into the center median guardrail Thursday on In-
terstate 75 in Pasco County. A dump truck following
behind crashed into the trailer. The drivers were able to
escape both vehicles.


bound traffic was cleared
from 1-75 by about 9:30 a.m.
Traffic was being diverted


to exit 279 toward State
Road 54.
The mail truck crashed


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Gillian Ratcliff of Classic Alpacas Inc. at Tall Pines Farms in Dunnellon shows affection to her alpaca
senior herd sire, Ajax.



Alpaca's best friend


For lovable grazers,
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
DUNNELLON
M elissa the alpaca was
experiencing a bad,
fluffy hair day recently
and the dentist was arriving to
repair her teeth. How could the
day get any worse?
Since the end of 2001, Gordon
and Gillian Ratcliff have owned
and operated Classic Alpacas
Inc. at Tall Pines Farms in Dun-
nellon. Not only do they raise
and sell alpacas, they operate
Florida Alpaca Rescue Mission
(EA.R.M.) as a charitable oper-
ation that rescues, treats and
cares for unwanted, abused
alpacas.
"During the past nine years
we have saved and cared for
over 40 alpacas that were un-
able to be cared for by their
owners, abused or injured,"
Gordon said. "Many were mal-
nourished, infested with para-
sites or victims of predators or
human brutality."
Five male alpacas were res-
cued in 2004 from a circus in
Miami. Several animals, includ-
ing five alpacas, had been
dumped in the middle of a field
in Sebring.
Quickly, Gordon and his wife
headed down to Sebring to res-
cue the abandoned alpacas.
They discovered they had
sores, wounds, scars, swollen
and damaged eyes, broken
noses and a broken hip. Gor-
don said it took months of
twice-daily treatments and
medications before the animals
were restored to sound health.
'A couple of them were hard
to place because they were
afraid of people since they
were beaten," Gordon said. "It's
hard to think of an alpaca being
beaten by anybody, as gentle as
alpacas are. They have no way
of protecting themselves."
Alpacas have few ways to de-
fend themselves. They only
have bottom teeth, which Gor-
don said are not useful for pro-
tection. To protect their alpacas
from coyotes and other preda-


Gordon and Gillian Ratchlifare saviors


5 jr


Alpaca Melissa gathers with the rest of the family for some of Gillian
Ratcliff's love. She said a visit from the dentist was in order for Melissa.


tors, the Ratcliffs have three
large Great Pyrenees dogs.
They know each of their al-
pacas by name and also their
likes and dislikes. The alpacas
have become a beloved part of
Gordon and Gillian Ratcliff's
family
"Each of them is special,"
Gillian said. "We cry every time
we sell one. Our world is fo-
cused around them."
Another business venture for
the Ratcliffs is selling alpaca
fiber. Gordon described the
fiber as hypoallergenic and
hollow, and said it does not
contain lanolin. To wash the
fiber, one must simply dunk it
in regular detergent water and
then dry it.


"During the oil spill we re-
ceived a request for alpaca fiber,"
Gordon said. "Their fiber absorbs
more oil than any other product
They filled pantyhose with the
alpaca fibers and put them on the
big booms in the Gulf of Mexico
to usher the oil to make it go
away When the fiber soaked up
the oil they washed it in deter-
gent and then reused it again."
The Ratcliffs encourage the
community to "come out and
hug" an alpaca.
For more information, visit
www.classicalpacas.com or call
352-465-3679.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


into a construction zone
guardrail before partially
jackknifing into the center
median. A dump truck
crashed into the truck, re-
sulting in the fire.
FHP said the truck was
operated by Jacksonville-
based Pat Salmon & Sons
of Florida. Driver Mark
Alan Berrier, 55, was taken
to University Community
Hospital in Tampa. The
dump truck's driver,
Manuel Francisco Ro-
driguez Rivera, 42, was
taken to Florida Hospital
Wesley Chapel. His truck
belongs to R & D Hauling
of Land 'O Lakes.
An investigation is
continuing.



Springs

the thing

at weekend

festival
AUGIE SALZER
Special to the Chronicle
Many people are work-
ing very hard to reach
their ultimate goal of hav-
ing pure and pristine
water in the region's frag-
ile and precious springs.
The 11th annual Marion
County Springs Festival
(MCSF) is the opportunity
to learn how to make a dif-
ference in preserving this
invaluable natural re-
source. This year's event
will be from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday at Rainbow
Springs State Park.
"We usually have this
event in the fall and de-
cided to change to the
springtime when the
weather was more pleas-
ant," said Lois Brauck-
muller, a volunteer since
the start of MCSE "More of
our temporary residents
are here now and they will
have the opportunity to
attend."
Preserving the Marion
County springs through
awareness and steward-
ship has been the mission
of MCSF since 2000.
A student art show is
planned featuring 120
drawings, sketches and
paintings raising aware-
ness about conservation of
the springs.
"Teachers in the class-
rooms have standards and
guidelines for the students
to follow in making their
art," Brauckmuller said.
"The students have been
working on this project for
a while, and all grades are
represented in the art
show."
There will live music,
food, guided tours, a silent
auction, living history and
an opportunity to talk
to park rangers and
exhibitors.
"Events like this one are
important to residents and
visitors to the area," said
Nicky Aiken, Rainbow
Springs park services spe-
cialist and co-chairwoman
of MCSE
The Citrus County
Audubon Society, the Mar-
ion County Historical Soci-
ety, Friends of Rainbow
Springs State Park and Sil-
ver River State Park and
Friends will be just a few
of the many exhibitors.
"The Rainbow Springs
State Park and the Silver
River State Park will have
a display of interactive
things for children and
adults to have a learning
opportunity," president of
the MCSF committee Lisa
Saupp said. "We want to
focus a lot on the local
family to be a good stew-
ard, not the overuse of our
resources."
Admission to the festival
is included in the $2 park
entrance fee.
Augie Salzer is a corre-
spondent for the River-
land News, a Dunnellon-
based sister paper to the
Chronicle. She can be


reached at Augie@
Thingsin Town. com.


i--






A4 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


OIL
Continued from Page Al

influence on global demand for
fuels. China's consumption has
risen 28 percent in five years, to
10.2 million barrels per day last
year.
"There's an 800-pound gorilla
in the picture now the Chi-
nese economy," says Patrick De-
Haan, chief petroleum analyst at
the price-tracking service
GasBuddycom.
U.S. refiners are free to sell
gasoline and diesel to the high-
est bidder around the world. In
2011, the U.S. became a net ex-
porter of fuels for the first time
in 60 years. Mexico and Canada
are the two biggest destinations
for U.S. fuels, followed by Brazil
and the Netherlands.
Two other factors are making
gasoline expensive:
High oil prices. Brent crude,
a benchmark used to set the price
of oil for many U.S. refiners, is
$108 per barrel. It hasn't been
below $100 per barrel since July
On average, the price of crude is
responsible for two-thirds of the
price of gasoline, according to the
Energy Department
Refinery shutdowns. Refiner-
ies temporarily close in the winter,
when driving declines, to perform
annual maintenance. That lowers
gasoline inventories and sends
prices higher nearly every year in
the late winter and spring.


Associated Press
Drivers navigate congested traffic May 10, 2012 at Copacabana in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 2011, the
U.S. became a net exporter of fuels for the first time in 60 years. Mexico and Canada are the two biggest
destinations for U.S. fuels, followed by Brazil and the Netherlands.


Rising gasoline prices act as a
drag on the economy because
they leave less money in drivers'
wallets to spend on other things.
But because average prices have
remained in a consistent range
- between $3 and $4 per gallon
since the end of 2010 econo-
mists say their effect on growth
has been minimal.


Drivers in Connecticut, New
York and Washington, D.C., are
paying $3.92 or more per gallon
on average, according to the Oil
Price Information Service. Driv-
ers in Rocky Mountain states,
where refineries can tap low-
priced crude from the U.S. and
Canada, are paying far less. Gas
costs $3.42 or less in Wyoming,


Utah and Montana.
For the year, prices are fore-
cast to average $3.55 per gallon,
slightly lower than last year's
record average of $3.63. The
peak for 2013, likely to come this
spring, is expected to fall slightly
short of last year's peak of $3.94.
A major reason cited for high
gasoline prices over the last two


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

years fighting and political ten-
sions in the Middle East and North
Africa doesn't apply this year
Libyan production has returned
after collapsing during the coun-
try's revolution two years ago. And
higher production from the United
States and Saudi Arabia has made
up for Iran's declining output in
the face of Western sanctions.
David Haeussermann, a po-
lice dispatcher in Tampa who
recently paid $3.56 per gallon to
fill his Kia Rondo, hasn't had a
raise in six years. He says higher
prices for gasoline and food in
recent years have prompted him
to cut back on dinners out and to
settle for less fancy food at
home. He doesn't understand
why gasoline costs so much, but
by now he's used to it.
"Three-dollar gas seems to be
a dream right now," he says.
The good news is that the na-
tional average price is 15 cents
lower than last year at this time,
because of slightly lower oil prices
and less concern over the situa-
tion in the Middle East But dis-
ruptions at refineries or pipelines,
or threats to oil supplies around
the world, could send gasoline
prices sharply higher at any mo-
ment, analysts say
Lafoon, the St. Louis man,
consolidates trips and drives as
little as possible to blunt the ef-
fect of high prices. And he never
fills all the way up. It is an exer-
cise in what he calls "magical
thinking" that prices aren't re-
ally what they are.


BARCO
Continued from Page Al

"quiet and stoic," but he
would talk about his cattle
and about ranching.
"I wanted to learn more
about Florida ranching,
and he would very politely
tell me about it and about
the old days in Citrus and
Hernando counties," Clin-
ton said. "He was a real
nice guy, humble and quiet
- with wild hair."
At the time of his death,
Keith Barco was president


of the Citrus County Cat-
tlemen's Association. He
was a longtime supporter
of 4-H and FFA youth pro-
grams and a longtime
member of First Baptist
Church of Floral City
"He was a great guy,"
McClellan said. "He was
always one of the guys we
could call on, a real com-
munity-minded person. I'd
call him a pillar of the
community, and he'll be
missed."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


J MBid Notices.......................... ........................ 15

.Meeting Notices................................................ C15

S. Lien Notices................................................. C15

Foreclosure Sale/Action Notices..C13, C14, C15

Notice to Creditors/Administration.................C13

Dissolution of Marriage Notices.....................C13

Surplus Property....... ............................ C13


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
HI LO PR HI LO PR |HI LO PR
79 39 0.30 70 40 0.10 J 70 42 0.33


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 71 62 pc Miami 79
Ft. Lauderdale 78 70 pc Ocala 75
Fort Myers 81 66 pc Orlando 77
Gainesville 73 55 pc Pensacola 67
Homestead 80 69 pc Sarasota 77
Jacksonville 68 53 pc Tallahassee 70
Key West 79 73 s Tampa 74
Lakeland 80 62 pc Vero Beach 77
Melbourne 76 64 pc W. Palm Bch. 79


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
sh
pc
sh
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


East-southeast winds from 5 to 15
knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Isolated showers possible late today.


70 42 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E xclusvebdaily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 74 Low: 62
Cold start; warmer afternoon with
increasing clouds
W SATURDAY & SUNDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 65
Partly sunny and warm; 30% chance of a
shower
SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 54
Line of showers passes with a cold front

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Thursday 71/45
Record 91/35
Normal 79/50
Mean temp. 58
Departure from mean -7
PRECIPITATION*
Thursday 0.60 in.
Total for the month 0.90 in.
Total for the year 3.00 in.
Normal for the year 8.95 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Thursday at 3 p.m. 29.95 in.


DEW POINT
Thursday at 3 p.m. 31
HUMIDITY
Thursday at 3 p.m. 26%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Juniper, Nettle
Today's count: 8.9/12
Saturday's count: 9.4
Sunday's count: 9.9
AIR QUALITY
Thursday was moderate with pollut-
ants mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/22 FRIDAY 2:24 8:36 2:47 8:59
3/23 SATURDAY 3:05 9:17 3:29 9:40


0
MARCH 27


CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
S SUNSET TONIGHT............................7:43 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:30A.M.
MOONRISE TODAY....................... 3:28 P.M.
APRIL 3 APRIL10 APRIL18 MOONSET TODAY....................... 4:12A.M.


BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Lov
2:03 a/11:12
12:24 a/8:34
12:07 p/6:2
1:13 a/10:1


**At King's Bay
Friday
w High/Low
2 a 3:59 p/11:10 p
4 a 2:20 p/8:32 p
2 a 11:27 p/6:20 p
1 a 3:09 p/10:09 p


***At Mason's Creek
Saturday
High/Low High/Low
3:19 a/12:04 p 4:39 p/--
1:40 a/9:26 a 3:00 p/9:31 p
12:47 p/7:14a --- 7:19 p
2:29 a/11:03 a 3:49 p/11:08 p


Gulf water
temperature


65
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Wed. Thu. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.00 28.09 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.47 37.48 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.33 38.35 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.60 39.60 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
FRIDAY


Thursday Friday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 34 11 c 37 24
Albuquerque 72 49 pc 66 36
Asheville 37 22 pc 48 34
Atlanta 58 33 sh 53 41
Atlantic City 38 29 .06 pc 44 30
Austin 76 48 c 85 65
Baltimore 40 31 s 46 29
Billings 48 33 sn 38 20
Birmingham 51 31 pc 52 49
Boise 45 33 sf 41 25
Boston 35 30 .01 c 41 29
Buffalo 29 20 .01 sn 31 27
Burlington, VT 36 21 sn 35 25
Charleston, SC 60 41 pc 57 48
Charleston, WV 31 23 pc 44 28
Charlotte 48 29 pc 52 37
Chicago 33 14 pc 36 28
Cincinnati 34 21 pc 43 26
Cleveland 29 17 .02 sn 33 24
Columbia, SC 57 33 pc 58 39
Columbus, OH 31 20 pc 40 26
Concord, N.H. 40 11 c 39 24
Dallas 70 51 ts 73 51
Denver 60 32 c 45 27
Des Moines 38 14 pc 37 25
Detroit 35 17 pc 36 26
El Paso 80 55 pc 78 55
Evansville, IN 36 21 pc 41 33
Harrisburg 35 29 pc 45 25
Hartford 37 29 c 40 27
Houston 74 48 c 81 65
Indianapolis 34 16 pc 42 28
Jackson 60 38 ts 63 56
Las Vegas 79 57 s 72 51
Little Rock 49 34 .02 ts 46 41
Los Angeles 67 54 s 66 52
Louisville 36 21 pc 46 30
Memphis 49 31 ts 43 43
Milwaukee 30 13 pc 32 26
Minneapolis 29 7 pc 30 18
Mobile 67 39 pc 68 63
Montgomery 61 37 pc 58 52
Nashville 45 22 pc 49 40
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, LP, Madison, Wi.


Thursday Friday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 65 50 ts 73 64
New York City 40 31 pc 42 32
Norfolk 42 34 s 48 32
Oklahoma City 59 42 pc 50 41
Omaha 33 20 pc 39 27
Palm Springs 89 62 s 85 56
Philadelphia 40 32 pc 45 29
Phoenix 86 65 pc 85 58
Pittsburgh 33 17 c 37 23
Portland, ME 38 20 c 40 26
Portland, Ore 49 39 sh 49 34
Providence, R.I. 39 28 c 41 28
Raleigh 46 37 s 53 35
Rapid City 45 14 sn 37 21
Reno 59 38 s 51 27
Rochester, NY 31 17 sn 34 27
Sacramento 67 39 s 68 41
St. Louis 37 21 pc 43 33
St. Ste. Marie 26 20 pc 32 21
Salt Lake City 52 32 .17 sn 39 22
San Antonio 75 56 pc 87 66
San Diego 64 57 s 65 53
San Francisco 59 44 s 63 45
Savannah 68 41 pc 61 49
Seattle 50 38 .01 sh 48 35
Spokane 44 29 sn 43 24
Syracuse 33 24 sn 35 24
Topeka 34 27 pc 40 30
Washington 41 33 s 48 32
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 92 Thermal, Calif.
LOW-18 Fosston, Minn.
WORLD CITIES


FRIDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/72/s
Amsterdam 41/32/c
Athens 63/46/s
Beijing 41/29/pc
Berlin 32/20/c
Bermuda 60/57/c
Cairo 77/52/s
Calgary 24/10/pc
Havana 86/68/pc
Hong Kong 76/68/c
Jerusalem 77/50/pc


Lisbon 61/52/pc
London 46/41/sh
Madrid 54/37/r
Mexico City 79/48/s
Montreal 30/19/sf
Moscow 19/8/pc
Paris 60/46/pc
Rio 85/73/ts
Rome 57/48/s
Sydney 90/72/ts
Tokyo 64/48/sh
Toronto 37/25/sf
Warsaw 29/16/c


- C I T R U S.


C O U N T Y -"


(ARONICLE
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To start your subscription:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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Where to find us:
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~rJ r ,:, Br I.riI H 1624 N.
k Meadowcrest
Ave""1^ ^ -- Cannondale Dr Blvd.
A'lIe | VCrystal River,
A 'Me adouw.:reil FL 34429
N | \ --

SI Inverness
uu office

T ki n si S t .,10 6 W M a in
41 44- .. L Inverness, FL
'A 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes............................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ............. ................................ Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content ... .................................... Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ...........................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ... . .............................................................................................. 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


AhbllnniArnrpl

lith Annii~rm~rwu qiIP


ITllI ny1oim IVI UI JUn VIV
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Big Bang gets clearer

Planckfinding add 8OMyears to universe's age


Associated Press
PARIS New results from looking at
the split-second after the Big Bang indi-
cate the universe is 80 million years
older than previously thought and pro-
vide ancient evidence supporting core
concepts about the cosmos how it began,
what it's made of and where it's going.
The findings released Thursday bolster
a key theory called inflation, which says
the universe burst from subatomic size
to its now-observable expanse in a fraction
of a second. The new observations from
the European Space Agency's $900 million
Planck space probe appear to reinforce
predictions made decades ago solely on
the basis of mathematical concepts.
The Big Bang -the most comprehen-
sive theory of the universe's beginning
- says the visible portion of the uni-
verse was smaller than an atom when, in
a split second, it exploded, cooled and
expanded faster than the speed of light.
The Planck space probe looked back
at the afterglow of the Big Bang, and
those results have now added about 80
million years to the universe's age, put-
ting it at 13.81 billion years old.
The probe, named for the German
physicist Max Planck, also found that
the cosmos is expanding a bit slower
than originally thought, has a little less
of that mysterious dark energy than as-
tronomers had figured and has a tad
more normal matter


The Planck space telescope, launched
in 2009, has spent 15 1/2 months map-
ping the sky, examining so-called "light"
fossils and sound echoes from the Big
Bang by looking at background radiation
in the cosmos. The spacecraft is expected
to keep transmitting data until late 2013,
when it runs out of cooling fluid.
Inflation tries to explain some nagging
problems left over from the Big Bang,
which formed the universe in a sudden
burst. Other space probes have shown
that the geometry of the universe is pre-
dominantly flat, but the Big Bang said it
should curve with time. Another prob-
lem was that opposite ends of space are
so far apart that they could never have
been near each other under the normal
laws of physics, but early cosmic mi-
crowave background measurements
show they must have been in contact.
Two early inflation theorists Paul
Steinhardt of Princeton and Andreas Al-
brecht of University of California Davis
- said before the announcement they
were sort of hoping their inflation theory
would not be bolstered. That's because tak-
ing inflation a step further leads to a sticky
situation: An infinite number of universes.
To make inflation work, that rapid ex-
pansion may not stop elsewhere like it
does in the observable universe, Albrecht
and Steinhardt said. That means there
are places where expansion is zooming
fast, with an infinite number of uni-
verses that stretch to infinity, they said.


Warm spring predicted


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Gov-
ernment forecasters said
much of the United States
can expect a warm spring
and persistent drought
The National Weather
Service said Thursday
above-normal tempera-
tures are predicted across
most of the Lower 48
states and northern
Alaska. The forecast also
calls for little relief for the
drought-stricken Midwest
and Southwest. Currently,
half the country is experi-
encing moderate to ex-
ceptional drought.
Late snowmelt will
bring a threat of river
flooding along the upper
Mississippi. North Dakota
is at the most risk of flood-


Associated Press
Mike and Marilyn Warzala of Hartford, Wis., play catch
with Remi, a six-month old German Short Haired Pointer,
on the frozen Pike Lake in Hartford on Wednesday morn-
ing. The first day of spring brought high temperatures of
19 and a low of 9 in some areas of Washington County.


ing from the Red River
A cooler spring is pre-
dicted for the Pacific
Northwest and northern
Great Plains. Drier-than-
normal conditions are on


tap for the West and Gulf
Coast. Hawaii is expected
to be cooler and drier
than usual.
The spring outlook cov-
ers April, May and June.


Obituaries


Charles
Burner, 68
CRYSTAL RIVER
Charles Burner, 68, of
Crystal River, died March
20,2013. Local arrangements
are under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto.
Janice
Wing, 96
OCALA
Janice Wing, 96, of
Ocala, died March 20,2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services taking place at a
later date in Hamburg, N.Y
Jack Wilmot
Sr., 74
TAVA RES
Jack W Wilmot Sr, 74, of
Tavares, died March 16,
2013. Local arrangements
are under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services taking place at a
later date in St. Joe, Ind.
Agnes 'Anne'
Rasmussen, 68
HERNANDO
Agnes 'Anne" Rasmussen,
68, Hernando, died March
21, 2013, under HPH Hos-
pice care. Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory is assisting the fam-
ilywith private arrangements.
Sally
Mielnik, 64
CITRUS SPRINGS
Sally J. Mielnik, 64, of
Citrus Springs, died March
20, 2013, under the care
Hospice of Citrus County
in Lecanto. Arrangements
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando.
Charles
Elliott, 96
HERNANDO
Charles L. Elliott, 96, of
Hernando, died Wednes-
day, March 20, 2013, in
Hernando. Arrangements
are under the direction of
the Beverly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory


George
King, 63
CRYSTAL RIVER
George L. King, 63, of
Crystal River, died March
19,2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.
Michael
Walrath, 52
BEVERLY HILLS
Michael J. Walrath, 52, of
Beverly Hills, died March
13,2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Funeral
Home & Crematory in
Lecanto.
Victor Keller
BEVERLY HILLS
A celebration of life for
Victor Keller ofBeverly Hills
will be 3:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 23,2013, at Fero Fu-
neral Home, Beverly Hills.
Allan
Raymond, 74
INVERNESS
Allan I. Raymond, 74, of
Inverness, died March 20,
2013. No services are
planned. Private crema-
tion will take place under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.
Beryl Hall, 74
INVERNESS
Beryl D. Hall, 74, of In-
verness, died March 20,2013,
at Hospice of Citrus County
in Inverness. Arrangements
by McGan Cremation Serv-
ice LLC, Hernando.
Ellen Drake, 93
CRYSTAL RIVER
Ellen C. Drake, 93, of
Crystal River, died March
21,2013. Private cremation
will take place under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home & Crematory
in Lecanto.


Robert
Lazzaro, 90
SPRING HILL
Robert A. Lazzaro, 90, of
Spring Hill, died March 19,
2013. Local arrangements
are under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto, with
services taking place at a
later date in Brook Park,
Ohio.
Donald
Crawfis, 83
OCALA
Donald Crawfis, 83, of
Ocala, died March 18,2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home &
Crematory in Lecanto,
with services taking place
at a later date in Gilboa,
Ohio.

OBITUARIES
Chronicle policy
permits free and
paid obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Call 352-563-5660 for
details.


Saturday mail


cutback still


being debated


No new terms

added to

spending bill

Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
new spending bill passed
by Congress continues the
requirement for six-day mail
delivery, but some law-
makers and postal officials
say plans to cut Saturday
service should proceed.
The financially troubled
postal service last month
announced it would switch

6 1 6zavu
Funeral Home With Crematory
WILLIAM GRATTON
Mass: Fri 9:00 AM
Our Lady of Grace
MARY JANE HILDEBRAND
Graveside: Fri., 2:00 PM
Florida National Cemetery
SID HATTEN
Graveside: Fri. 1:30 PM
Burial: Florida National Cemetery
MYRON WAYNE WATTE
Service: Mon. 2:00 PM
Burial: Hills of Rest
726-8323 00DWD3.

To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com
fill


in August to five-day serv-
ice for first-class mail but
continue six-day package
delivery. The government
at the time was running on
a temporary spending
measure and postal offi-
cials invited lawmakers to
spell out the way ahead in
the 2013 spending bill.
That sweeping funding bill
was approved Thursday
without new language.
Some lawmakers say a
long-standing provision in
the bill mandates six-day
delivery Postal authorities
argue they still will have
delivery over six days. The
difference is that not all mail
will be delivered all six days.


"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"



Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace
1901 SE HwY. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


Sj Look Wkat /
Sst'OPPOEDUp!L%


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CHRONICLE COUPON.




NIGHT
Present this coupon at
ticket booth for $2 off a
.'Midway Armband during
Chronicle Night at the
) Citrus County Fair
"~^\ Armbands regularly priced at $20 \

CHRONICLE NIGHT
OFFER VALID
FOR $2 OFF A
1 ^ -MIDWAY
F F ARMBAND ON
MIDWAY WEDNESDAY
MI D Ml MARCH 27
ARMBAND CHpNiCE
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NEW LOCATION
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FREE LARGE ORDER OF FRIES
With the purchase of any 20" Cheesesteak or Hoagie
Mon.-Fri. 10:30- ? Sat. 10:30- ? If the food runs out we close early!
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Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs


Vendors please call Marybeth Nayfield at 352-795-7297.
I If you'd like to participate in the parade E-mail
Gregg Mackler at Cr.. ... .. rr.rr.r. .-om.
To volunteer please call Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520.

Come Pinch A Little Tail
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Are Moles and Gophers

Killing Your Lawn?

WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES

GUARANTEED!

Call today for a free lawn analysis.
The Gopher

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352-279-9444


A6 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lawmakers set to OK Everglades restoration plan


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE After initial skir-
mishes between environmental groups and
sugar farmers over its wording, the Leg-
islature is moving ahead with a new plan
to help pay for Everglades restoration.
The House gave tentative approval to
the measure on Friday and an identical
version is moving through the Senate.
Rep. Matt Caldwell, R-Lehigh Acres,
called the bill a peace treaty that has been
accepted by the all sides in a dispute that
has been fought over the last two decades.
"While it's not exactly what everyone
wanted to get, it is something everyone
can agree to," Caldwell said.
The legislation will keep intact an ex-
isting tax on farmers who work within a
region of the northern Everglades -
although it calls for the tax rate to
decrease starting in 2027.
The money from the tax will be used for
water quality restoration projects that are
part of an $880 million plan that was ne-
gotiated between Gov Rick Scott and the
federal government.
Both the House bill (HB 7065) and the
Senate measure (SB 768) call for spend-
ing $32 million a year for the next 10
years in an effort to reduce the amount of
phosphorus that enters the Everglades.


"It extends the funding and it creates a
reliable source for Everglades cleanup,"
said Eric Draper, executive director of
Audubon of Florida.
There have been legal battles over the
famed River of Grass since the late '80s
as well as fights over proposed constitu-
tional amendments.
Voters back in 1996 defeated a proposal
to place a penny per pound fee on raw
sugar grown in the northern Everglades,
but voters approved a measure that said
those who cause water pollution in the
Everglades are primarily responsible for
paying to clean it up.
Lawmakers passed a measure in 2003
that laid out a schedule of how long farm-
ers would have to pay taxes for restora-
tion efforts. This year House Republicans
unveiled a bill that would have changed
that schedule.
Sugar growers and environmental
groups, however, worked out a compro-
mise in the last week that has now made
into the legislation.
Gov Rick Scott did not agree with the
initial House version, but has said he
supports passing a measure that helps
carry out the plan he negotiated. Scott is
also seeking an additional $28 million in
state funding for Everglades restoration
this year


Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast
presents


CAR SEAT SAFETY CLINIC

AT CRYSTAL

CHRYSLER/DODGE/JEEP/RAM
How safe is your child's car seat and is it installed
correctly? On Saturday, March 23, you can have your car
seat checked at the Crystal Chrysler/DodgelJeeplRam
in Inverness from 10 am to 2pm.
Certified child passenger safety technicians, Sue Littnan
and Tania Reaves from the Early Learning Coalition of the
Nature Coast will be on hand to help you. They will check
to see that:
The car seat is safe to use and not recalled,
expired or damaged
The car seat is an appropriate seat for
the child's age, height and weight
The car seat is installed securely with all needed
adjustments complete
Please bring the child and the instructions for the safety
seat or booster. There is no cost for this car seat
check-up service.
The Crystal Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep/Ram Dealership is
sponsoring this community safety event to help residents
provide the safest possible transportation for everyone
in their family.


CRYSTAL
----w Jeep a Am


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


Associated Press
The Tamiami Trail bridge in the Everglades, which will allow water from the River of Grass
to flow from north of the Tamiami Trail to the south, was dedicated Tuesday with a ceremony
attended by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar. The mile-long bridge is the first of
several planned bridges intended to increase water flowing into Everglades National Park.


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IN CRYSTAL RIVER 7
Hwy. 19 N.* Crystal River I79 mI31
Parts & Service: Mon-Fri 8 AM to 5:30 PM; Sat 8 AM to 4 PM ...EE5X


S Dudlev's Auction & Maine-lv Real Estate

Du eY's A UTIDNIN
4000 S. FLORIDA AVE., (U.S. 41 S) INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450
Central Florida's Largest & Most Diverse Auction Company
Dudley's Friday Night 3/22/13
EPIC ESTATE COIN & CURRENCY AUCTION
LIVE & ONLINE- PREVIEW 4 PM; AUCTION: 6 PM
In case you haven't been to a Dudley Coin auction, ask around
to your coin collector friends & you will find that we come up
with some of the finest, rarest, oddest coins around... and .
sometimes variations even WE haven't seen! There are ,. .
treasures to be had by the collector at any level.
Large currency incl. $10 Gold note, Irg Silver Certificates, '
1930's $100 bill, blue seals, red seals, foreign paper; Gold incl.
box set of 25 Gold Pandas, 1911 $10 Gold Indian
Head, PCGS Graded MS70 $5 Gold Coin, & other $5 & $10
golds; Silver Dollars inc Carson City, key date Morgan &
J Peace Dollars, key date 1/2 dollars, quarters & dimes, Irg
collection mixed date Morgan & Peace, bags full of Silver
L Quarters & dimes, 51b bag mixed travel, tourist, gaming,
etc tokens & medals; Graded Kennedy half dollars, Graded
Sacagewea & presidential dollars, American Eagles,
Standing Liberty, nice
selection of silver commemorative rounds, ,
Barbers, Busts, Type Date Sets, Mint & Proof
Sets, Uncirculated Eisenhowers, Franklin 0..n
Half Dollars, Irg bags of wheat & steel
pennies inc UNSEARCHED 35+ lbs bag!! ___. .
MARCH 21, 2013 PREVIEW: 12 PM AUCTION: 3 PM AND 6 PM
ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION
Session #1: starts @ 3PM OUTSIDE w/rows of fun & outside
furnishings, Sessions #2: starts @ 6pm INSIDE Always a great variety
of items from several estates ranging from furniture, household, tools, new
items & collectibles.


MARCH 22, 2013
PREVIEW: 10:30AM
AUCTION: 11AM
SOLD
ABSOLUTE!!!


Wooded building lot on
NW 20th St. Crystal River, FL (look for sign). Lot size
100 X 190. Quiet street w/deeded community boat
ramp altkey2868074. Close to Hwy 19 and amenities.


MARCH 22, 2013
PREVIEW: 12:30PM
AUCTION: 1PM
10155 W. PamondehoCir.,
Crystal River, Florida
136 X 184 (.57 acres) spring-fed, lake-front lot in
Spring Run!! Nice high and dry lot, dock OK,
electric boats OK, build your dream home or
weekend getaway!


MARCH 23, 2013 PREVIEW: 8 AM AUCTION: 9 AM REAL ESTATE: 10 AM
REAL ESTATE HOME
S*i 1611 S. Ridgewood Pt., Inverness, Florida. Home and contents must
.j :, old to settle estate!!!!! 3BR, 2BA 1852 sq. ft. home on 100 X 168 lot.
11ii,:. cul-de-sac home has Ig. eat-in kit., office or craft rm., screened
sunroom, 2+ car gar. concrete drive, Ig. liv. rm. w/bay windows, lots of
storage, brick front, nice yard, assessed value $72,135.00 Recent
appraised value $80,000. Contents: Mahogany secretary desk, Cherry corner cabinet, 5 pc. dinette,
maple bedroom furniture, kneehole desk, sofa, recliner, wing chairs, cherry end tables, twin beds, lamps,
treadmill, several quilts, entire rm. filled with craft items, quilting materials, fabric, books, yarns, Pfaff
Creative 1475 CD sewing machine, glass and china, silver plated flatware, and more!!
*1 MARCH 23, 2013 PREVIEW: 2:30 PM AUCTION: 3 PM
THREE BUILDING LOTS
SOLD ABSOLUTE!!!!!
518, 540, 546 W. Bluster PI. Citrus Springs, Florida.
3 wooded 80 X 125 building lots side-by-side, buy one or all!!
Nice quite street in Citrus Springs!!
MARCH 28,2013 PREVIEW: 12 PM AUCTION: 3PM
WALK ABOUT AUCTION
Whil e hall is being prepared with the Antique Auction, we set up outside and in with
rows of treasures from small to large.


Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588 S
BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE FOR UP-TO-DATE PHOTOS www.dudleysauction.com .
a .. .. : --]]


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STATE


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 A7


lylubfe


DEgPW





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


/T J F'


U.S. GOLD COIN RELEASE


EXPERTS PREDICT $5,000/OZI


U.S. GOVT GOLD COIN
SPECIAL VAULT RELEASE

The U.S. Money Reserve Main Vault
Facility today announces what could be
the final release of U.S. government-issued
gold coins previously held in the West
Point Depository/U.S. Mint. For the first
time in recent history, U.S. citizens can
buy these 2013 government-issued $5
gold coins at an incredible at-cost price
of only $171.00 each. An amazing price
because these 2013 U.S. government-issued
gold coins are completely free of dealer
markup. That's correct our cost. Gold,
which is currently around $1,600 per
ounce, is predicted by experts to have the
explosive upside potential of reaching up
to $5,000 per ounce in the future. Please
be advised: Our U.S. government gold
inventory will be priced at $171.00 per
coin while supplies last or for up to 30
days. Call now to avoid disappointment!
Orders that are not immediately received
or reserved with the order center could be
subject to cancellation and your checks
returned uncashed. Good luck. We hope
that everyone will have a chance to
purchase this special U.S. government
gold at this price because it could be going
to $5,000 per ounce. Order immediately
before our vault sells out completely!
Call Toll-Free 1-800-919-1425 today.
AUTHORIZED BY
U.S. CONGRESS
By Executive Order of Congress Public
Law 99-185, Americans can now buy new
government-issued gold. Congressionally
authorized United States gold coins provide
American citizens with a way to add physical
gold to their financial portfolios. Gold
American Eagles are made from solid gold
mined here in America, struck at the U.S.
Mint at West Point and produced with an
official U.S. dollar denomination... making
them legal tender United States gold coins.


Percent Change zz|
- 2003-2013* !


DOW S&P --NASDAQ- GOLD-
*As of 01/14/13







* Many experts are predicting
gold to skyrocket past $5,000
per ounce in the future.

Gold has outperformed the
Nasdaq, Dow and S&P 500 over
the past 10 years.

In our opinion, smart
individuals are moving up
to 30% of their assets into
U.S. government gold coins.
American citizens may never
again have the chance to buy
gold at this price. This could be
a once in a lifetime opportunity.

Now could be the best time
to take your money out of the
bank and transfer it into U.S.
government gold coins.

With the national debt at $16
trillion and rising, gold may
have an upside potential not
seen since the 1980s.

Our U.S. government gold
inventory will be priced at
$171.00 per coin while supplies
last or for up to 30 days. Call
now before these U.S. gold
coins sell out.


GOLD MAY OUTPERFORM
MONEY IN THE BANK

If you had $50,000 in the bank and you
transferred it into gold at today's prices, your
money could potentially grow to three times
its current value. That's right $150,000.
On the other hand, if you leave that same
$50,000 in the bank for 10 years, chances
are, it's only going to be worth the same
$50,000. Unfortunate... but true. When you
convert money to gold, you haven't spent
your money but have transferred its value
from a declining paper currency to a precious
metal that is rising in both market and
numismatic value. This is how the genius of
owning gold may protect your money in
today's very volatile market. Thousands
of individuals have lost their entire fortunes
overnight. Don't let it happen to you. The
gold market is currently very explosive,
with predictions of its price rising to as
high as $5,000 per ounce in the future. In
our opinion, smart individuals are currently
moving up to 30% of their assets into gold.

CALL TO ORDER YOUR
U.S. GOLD COINS TODAY


MASTERCARD VISA AMEX
DISCOVER CHECK BANK WIRE
1 2013 Gov't-Issued Gold Coin $ 171.00
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $8.00)
5 2013 Gov't-Issued Gold Coins $ 855.00
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $15.00)
10 2013 Gov't-Issued Gold Coins $ 1,710.00
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $15.00)
Prices may be more or less based on current market conditions.
THE MARKETS FOR COINS ARE UNREGULATED. PRICES CAN RISE OR FALL
AND CARRY SOME RISKS. THE COMPANY IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE U.S.
GOVERNMENT AND THE U.S. MINT. PAST PERFORMANCE OF THE COIN OR
THE MARKET CANNOT PREDICT FUTURE PERFORMANCE. SPECIAL AT-COST
OFFER IS STRICTLY LIMITED TO ONLY ONE LIFETIME PURCHASE OF 10 AT-
COST COINS (REGARDLESS OF PRICE PAID) PER HOUSEHOUSEHOLD, PLUS SHIPPING
AND INSURANCE. PRICE NOT VALID FOR PRECIOUS METALS DEALERS.


........... ......... ....
SI : I I I
I

IZ




I i U. M


0 2013 U.S. Money Reserve


CALL TO ORDER YOUR U.S. GOLD COINS TODAY!


GOVT-ISSUED GOLD COINS
BEGINNING TODAY, TELEPHONE ORDERS WILL BE
ACCEPTED ON A FIRST-COME, FIRST-SERVED BASIS
ACCORDING TO THE TIME AND DATE OF THE ORDER.

Vault No. CRFL31F-171
Call to order your U.S. Gold today:

1-800-919-1425
MASTERCARD VISA AMEX DISCOVER CHECK BANK WIRE


Free of Dealer Markup:


J ACH




U.S.MONEY
RESERVE


---------------------


.1
awm


A8 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


DIRECT FROM OUR VAULT FA CWTY.. COMPLENLY FREE OF DE4LER MARKUP!





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Dunnellon


development


official to retire


JEFF BRYAN
Riverland News
The city of Dunnellon's
longtime community de-
velopment coordinator
submitted his retirement
papers last Friday, citing
the needs to "pur-
sue other opportu-
nities."
Harold Horne's
retirement takes
effect April 1. He
had been with the
city since 2007.
During his
tenure with the Ha
city, officials stated Ho
in a news release,
Home provided invalu-
able leadership on many
projects throughout the
city, including the current
construction of the Dun-
nellon Branch of the Boys
& Girls Club. He was also
instrumental in coordinat-
ing with the state to de-
velop trail connections in
the area.
City Manager Lisa Al-
giere praised Home's tal-
ent in the area of
economic development.
"Harold's knowledge
has been invaluable to me
and the city overall. He
will be missed and I wish
him well," Algiere said.
In the interim, most of
Home's duties will be han-
dled in part by Algiere and




WipPER1
of Citrus County,,
TEXT... CITRUS + Yo
CLICK... www.Crime.
CALL... 1-888-ANY-TII
Funded by the Office of the Attorney


Public Services & Utilities
Director Eddie Esch. Ac-
cording to Harriet Daniels,
communication coordina-
tor for the city, Algiere and
Esch will not split Home's
salary while the position
remains vacant
"Ms. Algiere ex-
pects to begin ad-
vertising for Mr
Horne's replace-
ment in the very
near future,"
Daniels said. "The
new director will
be tasked with
arold working with the
>rne state to complete
the bridge project.
Ms. Algiere and Mr Esch
will be assisting in the in-
terim as well."
Mayor Nathan Whitt
considered Home a huge
asset to the city and
wished he'd reconsider
"At the same time, re-
tirement is retirement,"
Mayor Whitt said. "I don't
blame him a bit. We cer-
tainly need him and he
had given me the affirma-
tion that he'll still be
around and be able to
jump in on some projects.
We're sorely going to miss
him and certainly wish he
could stick around to see
some of these projects
through. He's a huge asset
to our city and he will be
missed."




Inc.
ur Tip to 274637 (CRIMES)
StoppersCitrus.com
PS (1-888-269-8477)
y General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


'Beer growler' bill
moves forward
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's craft breweries would
be able to sell 64-ounce con-
tainers of beer for customers
to take home under a bill that
won approval in its first Sen-
ate committee stop.
The Senate Regulated In-
dustries Committee unani-
mously approved the
measure (SB 1344) on
Thursday. It's sponsored by
Sen. Jack Latvala.
Florida's growing number
of craft breweries can now
sell 32-ounce and 128-ounce
containers, known as
growlers. The containers are
filled on site from beer taps
as customers order them.
The 64-ounce growlers are
legal in 47 other states, but
are illegal in Florida.
Justin Clark of Tampa's
Cigar City Brewing said it's silly
that they can sell two quart-
sized growlers, but not a half
gallon. He said out-of-state
customers bring in 64-ounce
growlers that can't be filled.
Beer distributors oppose
the bill.
House ready to
ban Internet cafes
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House is giving pre-
liminary approval to a bill that


would ban gambling estab-
lishments commonly known
as Internet cafes.
State legislators briefly de-
bated the measure (HB 155)
on Thursday. They are
poised to approve the bill on
Friday and send it over to the
Florida Senate.
Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville predicts
the bill will be sent to Gov.
Rick Scott before the session
ends in early May. Scott has
not said if he would sign it but
has said "everything's on the
table."
The Legislature is going
after the storefront gambling
dens in the wake of an inves-
tigation into the Allied Veter-
ans of the World charity. It
was accused of running a
$290 million illegal gambling
business that directed most
of the proceeds into its own-
ers' pockets.
Ignition interlock
proposal blocked
TALLAHASSEE -
A proposal that would give
judges the final say on
whether a drunken driver
could opt for an interlock igni-
tion device after a DUI con-
viction has been blocked -
at least temporarily by the
Senate Transportation
Committee.
The panel said there were


too many unanswered ques-
tions to go ahead with the
proposal by Sen. Dorothy
Hukill, a Port Orange Repub-
lican who was trying to shep-
herd the measure (SB 796)
through this session in time
to have it take effect later in
the year.
But an amended version of
Hukill's original proposal left
too many questions for her
Senate colleagues, who post-
poned taking action on the
bill.
Several committee mem-
bers said they were con-
cerned that the expense of
expanding an already suc-
cessful program could make
it unaffordable for many
offenders.


Bill against Shariah
passes panel
TALLAHASSEE -After it
failed last year, lawmakers on
Thursday revived a bill that
would ban Shariah, or Is-
lamic, law and other foreign
laws from Florida courts.
Republican Sen. Alan Hays,
who sponsored the bill, said
his measure was a "preemp-
tive gesture." There are no re-
ported cases in which a Florida
court applied foreign law.
His bill is aimed at divorce
and child custody cases. The
Senate's Governmental Over-
sight and Accountability com-
mittee cleared the bill (SB 58)
by a party-line vote of 6-3.
From wire reports


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Legislative BRIEFS


WEEKLY AQUATIC TREATMENT
SCHEDULE FOR CITRUS COUNTY
Citrus County's Aquatic Services Division plans the following aquatic
weed control activities for the week beginning March 25, 2013
HERBICIDE TREATMENTS
Waterbody Plant Herbicide Used
Inverness Pool Nuphar/Torpedograss/ Glyphosate / 2,4D
Willows /Tussocks
Floral City Floating / Willows / Tussocks / Diquat / 2,4D
Hernando Pool Nuphar / Hydrilla / Willows Diquat / Glyphosate /
2,4D /Aquathol /
Super K
Chassahowitzka River Hydrilla Aquathol
MECHANICAL HARVESTING
Hernando Pool Tussocks Harvesting
Inverness Pool Tussocks / Cabomba Harvesting
All treatments are contingent upon weather conditions and water quality. Treated areas will be identified
with "Warning Signs" indicating the date of treatment and the necessary water use restrictions. For further
information, please call 352-527-7620 or view our website at http.//www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/
aauatics/aauatic services.htm. Citrus County Division of Aquatic Services


STATE


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 A9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Supporters of public schools turn their backs on the East Ramapo school board during
a meeting Tuesday in Spring Valley, N.Y. Allegations of racism and anti-Semitism are
afflicting the district, where the board is dominated by ultra-Orthodox Jews and the
public school children are mostly black and Hispanic.


Barbs of anti-Semitism,

racism rise in school clash


Associated Press

SPRING VALLEY, N.Y.
- School board meetings
descend into shouting
matches. Accusations of
racism and anti-Semitism
fly Angry parents turn
their backs on board mem-
bers in a symbolic stand of
disrespect.
Tension in a suburban
New York school district is
rooted in an unusual dy-
namic: The families who
send their children to pub-
lic schools are mostly His-
panic and African-
American. The school
board is almost entirely
made up of ultra-Orthodox
Jews who send their chil-
dren to private schools
and are bent on keeping
taxes low.
"It's as if the board of di-
rectors of Coke only owned
stock in Pepsi," said
Steven White, an activist
for the public schools.
Public-school parents
accuse the board of the
9,000-student East Ramapo
Central School District of
cutting teachers, guidance
counselors, art programs,
all-day kindergarten and
the high school marching
band, while diverting pub-
lic resources to favored Or-
thodox institutions.
Peggy Hatton, who co-


Judge rules for AP
in copyright dispute
NEW YORK -A federal
judge said Meltwater gained
an unfair advantage in the
marketplace by refusing to
pay a licensing fee to The
Associated Press for its
content.
U.S. District Judge Denise
Cote on Thursday released


hosts a radio program that
features school issues,
said, "It's just becoming
impossible for our stu-
dents to apply to colleges
when the advanced place-
ment classes are cut, the
extracurriculars are cut."
How a public school dis-
trict that's 57 percent
black, including Haitian,
and 29 percent Hispanic,
came to be governed by
ultra-Orthodox Jews is a
case study in changing de-
mographics and the power
of democracy
The district, 25 miles
north of New York City in
Rockland County, has been
settled rapidly in recent
years by Jews from the Ha-
sidic and other sects who
came from their tradi-
tional strongholds of
Brooklyn. They quickly
built their own schools, or
yeshivas, raised large fam-
ilies and became a power-
ful voting bloc. Though not
a majority of the popula-
tion, they have organized
to defeat school budgets
that increase taxes and to
elect members of their own
communities to the board.
At the same time, public-
school supporters are less
organized; many are be-
lieved to be non-citizens
who don't vote. And the
area's older residents have


her written decision in favor of
the AP in its claims that Melt-
water U.S. Holdings Inc. and
its Meltwater News Service
wrongly used AP content with-
out paying a licensing fee.
AP alleged Meltwater, an
electronic news clipping serv-
ice, had been pilfering current
and past material from the
news service.
-From wire reports


also tended to vote against
school budget increases.
At least seven of the
nine board members are
ultra-Orthodox Jewish
men. A man and a woman
who represented the pub-
lic-school community re-
signed from the board in
January, alleging intimida-
tion by the rest of the
board. Two men, one black
and one Jewish, were ap-
pointed to replace them.
The stark division has
led to a flurry of lawsuits
and petitions, and New
York State has inter-
vened, blocking the sale
of a public school build-
ing to a Jewish congrega-
tion and warning the
board to change the way
it uses public special ed-
ucation money for pri-
vate schools.
While state law provides
for a school district to pay
some private school ex-
penses, for transportation,
textbooks and special edu-
cation, the state alleges
that East Ramapo has
been too quick to move
children mostly Jewish
children from the pub-
lic schools into special ed-
ucation schools run by the
Orthodox. Each case fun-
nels thousands of taxpayer
dollars to the private
schools.



S -



P llIP

I(5) l-2


Easter Coloring Pages


are due TODAY!
See all entries and vote for your favorite at
www.chronicleonline.com/eastercoloring2013


CRYSTAL RIVER
M.A.L.L


Don't forget to come
see the Easter Bunny
at the Crystal River Mall.
Sunday 24 ~ 1pm 5pm
Wednesday Friday ~ 2pm 6pm
Saturday 30 ~ 2pm 6pm
Easter Bunny at Mall e 's
Sponsored by: SOD &
NURSERY


Nation BRIEF


A10 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


NATION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Arson convictions challenged over fire science


Associated Press
GATESVILLE, Texas Ed Graf
was given life in prison 25 years ago
for killing his two stepsons by lock-
ing them in a backyard shed and set-
ting it on fire. Two investigators used
photos of the shed's remains to per-
suade jurors that Graf had started
the fire intentionally
By today's standards of fire analy-
sis, though, the investigators may
have been mistaken.
Authorities in Texas and in other
states are beginning to re-examine
cases in which defendants were sent
to prison for setting fires based on
expert testimony about burn patterns
and charring that today is consid-
ered suspect Nine years after Texas
executed Cameron Todd Willingham
for killing his three children in a fire
- a conviction questioned by many
legal advocates and fire experts -

I -- ^ 'm


the state fire marshal and the non-
profit Innocence Project of Texas
are working together to review the
evidence in fire investigations and
identify cases in which convictions
might have been questionable.
Representatives will meet next
month to start reviewing the first six
cases, including Graf's, who was con-
victed in 1988 of setting the deadly
fire in the central Texas town of Hewitt
The National Fire Protection As-
sociation issued its first set of fire in-
vestigation guidelines in 1992.
Before then, fire investigators did
not always use uniform procedures,
said Chris Connealy, the state fire
marshal. Also, advances in scientific
analysis have found other explana-
tions for burn patterns once consid-
ered to be signs of arson.
The Innocence Project, a national
legal reform group, has identified
potentially problematic arson cases


in several states, including one in
Tucson, Ariz., in 1970 in which 29
people were killed.
In Texas, which has had to free
more than 100 inmates wrongly con-
victed in criminal cases, the state In-
nocence Project has narrowed its
working list to about 60 arson cases
of the 1,000 reviewed, chief counsel
Jeff Blackburn said. A state expert
panel, the Texas Forensic Science
Commission, has also made 17 rec-
ommendations for improving how
arson cases are handled.
The widespread attention given the
Willingham case has driven interest in
looking at other arson-related con-
victions. The Forensic Science Com-
mission investigated the case for
years, but was barred by Attorney
General Greg Abbott from issuing a
final report Arson experts hired by
the commission found the 1991 fire
was most likely accidental.


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Ed Graf is
led from
judge's
chambers
by Hewitt
police
detective
Frank
Latham
in 1987
in Waco,
Texas.
As fire
science
changes,
authorities
are being
forced to
re-examine
arson con-
victions.


Associated
Press


NATION


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 All





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Lawmakers


eye rollback


of vehicle fees


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida lawmakers may
roll back sharp increases
in fees for driver's licenses
and auto tags that the state
adopted three years ago to
close a large budget gap.
A top Senate Republi-
can said Thursday that he
will unveil a bill next week
that would cut in half the
fees now charged to
motorists.
Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stu-
art and Senate budget
chief, said he will propose
wiping out an existing tax
break for insurers doing
business in the state in
order to cover the cost.
That tax break is worth
$237 million, according to
state economists.
"My priority is to get
money to our constituents
and not subsidize an in-
dustry that is doing very
well," Negron said.
State legislators con-
fronting a multibillion dol-
lar shortfall in 2009
increased fees to renew car
tags and licenses as part of
a $2.2 billion package of tax
and fee hikes. Lawmakers
also increased the state's
cigarette tax that year
Just about every motor
vehicle fee was raised.
The hikes included a 35
percent increase in annual
tag fees, which went up $5
to $11.40, depending on a
car's weight. The initial
vehicle registration fee
more than doubled, from
$100 to $225. The cost of an
initial driver's license
went up from $27 to $48
and a renewal increased
from $20 to $48.
Top Senate Republicans
agreed with Negron that it
is time to cut the fees.
"During a difficult
budget year, the Legisla-
ture made the hard choice
to increase certain fees as-


sociated with driving a ve-
hicle in lieu of raising
taxes, or taking draconian
cuts to critical state serv-
ices," Senate President
Don Gaetz said in a state-
ment. "However, times
have changed and it is
time that we reprioritize
and evaluate ways to keep
more money in the pockets
of hard working
Floridians."
House Speaker Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, called the Senate
proposal an "interesting
idea."
"I'm not a big fan of
those tag and title fees ei-
ther," Weatherford said.
This marks the second
tax break that the Senate
has targeted for potential
elimination. Insurance
companies pay a state tax
on insurance premiums,
but they also get a credit
equal to 15 percent of the
salary paid to company
employees.
The Senate is also pro-
posing to eliminate a tax
break for banks to help pay
for economic incentives
that would be used to ren-
ovate Sun Life Stadium in
South Florida.
Negron has defended
the potential elimination
of incentives or tax breaks,
saying the Legislature
needs to eliminate out-
dated incentives before
adopting new ones.


Poll: Floridians
favor gun checks
TALLAHASSEE -A new
poll shows Florida voters -
by better than a 9-to-1 margin
- say they would like to see
the state require background
checks on those who want to
buy guns.
A Quinnipiac poll released
Thursday shows 91 percent
favor requiring universal gun
background checks com-
pared to 8 percent who said
they're opposed.
Fifty-one percent said they
favored stricter statewide
gun-control laws compared to
44 percent who were op-
posed. Self-described gun
owners, however, were
against tougher regulations,
with 61 percent opposed to
33 percent in favor of such
measures.
Quinnipiac asked 1,000
registered voters about their
opinions on gun control laws
in a random telephone sur-
vey taken March 13-18. The
poll has a margin of error of
plus or minus 3.1 percent.
Video shows bus
driver kicking child
TAMPA-- Prosecutors
have released a school bus
camera video that shows a
driver pushing an 8-year-old
special needs student off the
bus.
The video was released
Wednesday as part of the
discovery process in an ag-
gravated child abuse case.
Investigators said 41-year-
old Stephanie Wilkerson was
driving the bus to Tampa Bay
Boulevard Elementary
School on Sept. 28 when the
girl tried to get off the bus.


The Tampa Tribune reported
Wilkerson told the girl to wait
her turn.
Police said the girl slapped
and pushed the driver. And
while she was standing on
the bus steps, the driver
placed her foot on the girl's
back and pushed her from
the vehicle.
The child broke a bone in
her ankle.
Fire dept. looks
into response delay
MIAMI BEACH Miami
Beach Fire Rescue officials
are investigating after learning
it took 31 minutes for a crew


to answer a call just two miles
from the nearest fire station.
The Miami Herald reported
a 65-year-old man waiting for
help was pronounced dead
three minutes after the de-
layed crew arrived at his
home March 5.
Fire Capt. Adonis Garcia
said the department is "look-
ing at it from top to bottom."
Records showed the initial
call came in 9:05 a.m. on
March 5 after a woman found
her husband on the floor. She
said he was coherent and
talking when she dialed 911.
The crew was dispatched
seven minutes later. She di-


aled 911 again before they
arrived at 9:36 a.m.
Barge crashes
into bridge
FORT WALTON BEACH -
Authorities said a barge carry-
ing a crane crashed into the
Brook Bridge in Fort Walton
Beach. The Wednesday
crash damaged parts of the
span and ruptured the main
water line to Okaloosa Island.
The Northwest Florida
Daily News reported the
bridge was closed to mo-
torists for hours, causing a
traffic snarl.
From wire reports


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A12 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


STATE






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets
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1600 15,000


1,5 00 ............. ...................... .... ... 14 ,00 0.

1,450 13,500o i
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1,350 ..... ( ..... ... .... ...... ........... F.... 12,500-;-


. N ..... ..

d N D


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,151
3,267
1051
1985
211
19


NASD
1,634
1,538
774
1638
101
12


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14511.73
6218.19
498.51
9066.51
3237.57
1558.71
1145.86
16488.83
950.07


LOW
14383.02
6090.61
495.51
8999.30
3215.69
1543.55
1133.35
16333.79
941.47


CLOSE
14421.49
6117.20
496.40
9009.66
3222.60
1545.80
1135.91
16357.54
943.92


CHG.
-90.24
-100.99
-1.69
-71.43
-31.59
-12.91
-9.97
-131.29
-8.03


%CHG.
-0.62%
-1.62%
-0.34%
-0.79%
-0.97%
-0.83%
-0.87%
-0.80%
-0.84%


YTD
+10.05%
+15.27%
+9.56%
+6.71%
+6.73%
+8.39%
+11.32%
+9.09%
+11.13%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 0- 8.65 3.47 -.06 -1.7 V V V -24.6 -56.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 38.58 36.15 -.04 -0.1 V A A +7.2 +19.4 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 43.15 42.30 -.56 -1.3 V A A +12.6 +34.3 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 0 97.31 95.67 -.46 -0.5 A A A +9.4 +34.6 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.94 12.57 -.21 -1.6 A A +8.3 +30.7 48 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.23 12.21 +.22 +1.8 A A A +7.4 +55.3 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 -0-- 43.43 34.49 -.09 -0.3 A A V -11.8 -4.7 28 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 --0- 47.92 45.23 -.86 -1.9 V A A +14.3 +21.1 14 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 22.81 -.47 -2.0 V A A +44.0 +32.5 41 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 0 57.82 56.31 -.63 -1.1 7 A A +13.1 +33.4 18 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 0 71.13 70.26 -.14 -0.2 A A A +10.1 +17.2 20 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0 51.65 51.59 +.04 +0.1 A A A +11.9 +17.4 26 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 --0 93.67 88.17 -.46 -0.5 V V A +1.9 +5.0 9 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.26 -.10 -0.7 7 A A +2.4 +8.5 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 23.29 -.17 -0.7 V A A +11.0 +20.5 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 71.45 68.95 +.07 +0.1 V A A +11.5 +42.0 23 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0-- 29.27 21.04 -.14 -0.7 7 A A +2.0 -20.5 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 --0- 215.90 212.26 -2.80 -1.3 7 A A +10.8 +7.0 15 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 --0 23.99 21.00 -.15 -0.7 V V V -0.5 +33.5 24
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 --0- 39.98 37.76 -.65 -1.7 V A A +6.3 +27.6 22 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 99.70 98.53 -.24 -0.2 V A A +11.7 +4.2 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -0-- 32.89 28.11 -.21 -0.7 A A A +5.2 -8.8 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 63.58 62.43 +.03 ... A A A +12.1 +25.9 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.88 0 75.81 75.59 -.11 -0.1 A A A +9.2 +29.8 17 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 14.20 37.46 15.53 -.64 -4.0 A V V -21.2 -55.7 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 --0- 20.00 19.28 -.25 -1.3 V V A +6.8 +13.4 35 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.44 8.22 -.18 -2.1 V A A +15.3 +30.7 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 82.19 51.68 -.62 -1.2 V A A +25.0 -29.6 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 97.94 96.00 -.76 -0.8 V A A +11.3 +24.9 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.11 6.06 +.03 +0.5 A A A +6.9 +119.3 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 --0- 35.73 34.29 -.77 -2.2 V A A +11.0 +6.7 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 57.85 56.11 -.25 -0.4 V A A +17.3 +61.0 18 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.73 87.57 -.38 -0.4 A A A +19.4 +47.6 18 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 49.17 48.80 +.20 +0.4 A A A +12.8 +27.8 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 --0 30.07 27.84 -.13 -0.5 A A A +10.5 +7.7 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 73.13 +.14 +0.2 A A A +7.2 +23.2 15 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 46.33 45.81 -.21 -0.5 A A A +23.8 +39.2 21 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months i Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates





The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.91
percent Thurs-
day. Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil fell on
worries that de-
mand will weak-
en from Europe-
an customers.
Natural gas fell
after a report
showed that
supplies are
higher than ana-
lysts expected.





IHi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .06 0.06 ... .08
6-month T-bill .10 0.11 -0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .12 0.13 -0.01 .18
2-year T-note .26 0.26 .37
5-year T-note .79 0.81 -0.02 1.14
10-year T-note 1.91 1.96 -0.05 2.29
30-year T-bond 3.13 3.20 -0.07 3.38


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.87 2.88 -0.01 2.90
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.15 4.15 ... 4.68
Barclays USAggregate 1.89 1.87 +0.02 2.35
Barclays US High Yield 5.64 5.62 +0.02 7.19
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 3.94 3.90 +0.04 4.16
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.09 1.08 +0.01 1.29
Barclays US Corp 2.78 2.76 +0.02 3.51


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 92.45
Ethanol (gal) 2.57
Heating Oil (gal) 2.90
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.94
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.07
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1613.80
Silver (oz) 29.18
Platinum (oz) 1580.10
Copper (Ib) 3.42
Palladium (oz) 755.05
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.34
Corn (bu) 7.33
Cotton (Ib) 0.88
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 387.90
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38
Soybeans (bu) 14.49
Wheat (bu) 7.29


PVS.
92.96
2.59
2.89
3.96
3.12
PVS.
1607.50
28.78
1582.50
3.44
756.40
PVS.
1.26
1.34
7.33
0.89
387.80
1.35
14.20
7.36


%CHG
-1.13
+0.04
+0.15
-0.63
-1.47
%CHG
+0.39
+1.38
-0.15
-0.36
-0.18
%CHG
+0.29
+0.11
+0.07
-1.01
+0.03
+1.78
+2.06
-0.99


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.45 -.15 +5.6 +11.3 +10.8 +6.2
BondA m 12.87 +.01 -0.1 +4.5 +5.6 +4.3
CaplncBuA m 54.52 -.15 +4.2 +11.0 +8.9 +3.6
CpWIdGrIA m 38.91 -.30 +5.0 +12.5 +7.8 +2.4
EurPacGrA m 42.11 -.36 +2.2 +8.1 +5.0 +1.4
FnlnvA m 43.55 -.41 +7.1 +12.6 +10.7 +4.4
GrthAmA m 36.57 -.34 +6.5 +12.4 +9.9 +4.2
IncAmerA m 18.89 -.08 +5.5 +12.3 +10.9 +5.8
InvCoAmA m 32.20 -.26 +7.2 +11.6 +9.5 +4.1
NewPerspA m 32.88 -.37 +5.2 +11.9 +9.3 +4.5
WAMutlnvA m 33.74 -.27 +8.1 +13.2 +12.5 +4.8
Dodge & Cox Income 13.92 +.01 +0.4 +5.6 +6.0 +6.9
IntlStk 36.16 -.21 +4.4 +11.8 +5.7 +1.8
Stock 134.08 -1.37 +10.0 +18.5 +11.4 +4.3
Fidelity Contra 82.43 -.53 +7.2 +9.1 +12.3 +6.3
LowPriStk d 43.04 -.15 +9.0 +13.9 +13.2 +8.6
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 54.98 -.46 +8.9 +12.7 +12.4 +5.4
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.31 -.01 +4.7 +12.8 +10.4 +6.5
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.43 -.04 +1.3 +9.4 +7.1 +8.8
GIBondAdv 13.38 -.05 +1.3 +9.6 +7.3 +9.1
Harbor Intllnstl d 63.21 -.88 +1.8 +7.1 +7.2 +1.8
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.23 +.01 +0.4 +7.9 +6.5 +7.3
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.96 -.32 +5.8 +6.3 +12.3 +6.8
Vanguard 500Adml x 142.40 -1.86 +8.9 +12.7 +12.4 +5.4
5001nv x 142.40 -1.83 +8.9 +12.5 +12.3 +5.3
GNMAAdml 10.83 -.01 -0.2 +2.0 +4.9 +5.4
MulntAdml 14.31 ... +0.2 +5.2 +5.3 +5.5
STGradeAd 10.83 ... +0.4 +3.6 +3.5 +3.9
Tgtet2025 14.28 -.07 +5.1 +9.4 +9.2 +5.0
TotBdAdml 11.00 +.01 -0.3 +3.9 +5.3 +5.3
Totlntl x 15.31 -.14 +2.4 +8.0 +4.6 +0.1
TotStlAdm x 38.82 -.50 +9.4 +13.1 +12.8 +6.2
TotStldx x 38.81 -.49 +9.4 +13.0 +12.7 +6.1
Welltn 35.90 -.19 +6.1 +11.4 +10.1 +6.4
WelltnAdm 62.01 -.33 +6.1 +11.5 +10.2 +6.4
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The S&P 500 fell Thursday for
the fourth time in five days.
Technology stocks slid after
Oracle reported an unexpected
drop in revenue. Producers of
raw materials fell on worries that
worsening debt problems in
Europe will lead to weaker
demand.

Movado Group MOV
Close: $33.23 V-3.89 or -10.5%
The watch maker's fourth-quarter
net income fell 26 percent on a
charge related to the repositioning of
the Coach watch brand.
$40


;-5
L D J F M
52-week range
$21.45 $39.12
Vol.:1.1m(5.7x avg.) PE:20.1
Mkt. Cap: $621.1 m Yield: 0.6%

CatO CATO
Close: $24.27 V-1.45 or -5.6%
The women's clothing retailer's
fourth-quarter net income fell 22 per-
cent and it warned that bad weather
may hurt sales this year.
$28

26

24 D J F M
52-week range
$23.71 $32.32
Vol.: 429.3k (2.7x avg.) PE: 11.1
Mkt. Cap:$668.42 m Yield: 0.8%
Tilly's TLYS
Close: $12.60V-1.16 or -8.4%
The retailer posted a disappointing
forecast for the fiscal year, citing
economic uncertainty and slow cus-
tomer traffic in February.




jD F M
52-week range
$12.00 $19.57
Vol.: 422.6k (4.0x avg.) PE:14.8
Mkt. Cap:$116.95 m Yield:...
Guess GES
Close: $25.01 V-1.94 or -7.2%
The clothing company said that its
fiscal fourth-quarter dropped 24 per-
cent as the company discounted
more of its clothing.
$30
28

24"
D J F M
52-week range
$22.48 I I I $34.10
Vol.: 4.5m (3.8x avg.) PE: 11.1
Mkt. Cap:$2.13 b Yield: 3.2%
Jabil Circuit JBL
Close: $18.60 V-0.88 or -4.5%
The contract electronics manufactur-
er said that its net income fell by 9
percent during the fiscal second
quarter.
$21


16 D J F M
52-week range
$16.82 $25.88
Vol.:11.5m (4.3x avg.) PE:10.1
Mkt. Cap:$3.76 b Yield: 1.7%


Associated Press
Employees of Laiki bank, left, push barriers as riot police try to stop them during an
anti-bailout protest Thursday outside of Cypriot parliament in Nicosia, Cyprus.



Weak Oracle sales, Cyprus


fears weigh on US stocks


Associated Press

Stocks closed lower on
Wall Street Thursday after
Oracle's weak sales results
weighed down big U.S.
technology companies.
Traders also worried about
Cyprus running out of time
to avoid bankruptcy
Major indexes followed
European markets lower
at the open and remained
solidly negative all day
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell as much as 129
points by mid-afternoon
before paring the loss to
close down 90 points.
All three major indexes
felt the drag from technol-
ogy stocks after Oracle re-
ported an unexpected
decline in sales in its fiscal
third quarter. Oracle's re-
sults have an outsized im-
pact on other technology
stocks because it reports
earlier than most of its
peers.
European markets had
closed sharply lower. The
main indexes in Paris and
Frankfurt fell 1.4 percent


and 0.9 percent, respec-
tively, on fear that the cri-
sis in Cyprus will intensify
The European Central
Bank has threatened to
end emergency support of
the nation's banks next
week unless leaders can
secure more funding.
Cyprus must raise about
$7.5 billion in the next four
days to avoid bankruptcy
Several plans have failed,
including a proposal to tax
deposits held by the na-
tion's banks. If the Mediter-
ranean banking haven is
unable to secure a bailout,
its banks will fail and it
could be forced to leave
the euro currency Worries
about that scenario first hit
stock markets Monday
"It's amazing how
quickly things can turn
back to Cyprus and Eu-
rope," said Oliver Cross,
director of research with
Carolinas Investment Con-
sulting LLC in Charlotte,
N.C. Cross spent his day fo-
cused on headlines from
Europe, rather than di-
gesting happier news


about hiring and home
sales in the U.S.
Oracle was the biggest
decline in the S&P 500
index; Juniper Networks
also fell steeply The S&P
500 closed down 12.91
points, or 0.8 percent, at
1,545.80.
The Dow dropped 90.24
points, or 0.6 percent, to
14,421.49. Cisco was the
Dow's biggest loser, fol-
lowed by H-P IBM also lost
ground.
The Nasdaq, which is
weighted heavily toward
tech stocks, fell a full per-
centage point. It closed
down 31.59 points at
3,222.60.
Despite being down for
the week, the Dow remains
near a record high. Its run-
up has been powered by
optimism about the U.S.
economy and the Federal
Reserve's easy-money poli-
cies. The Dow is up 2.6 per-
cent this month. The S&P
500 has gained 2.1 percent
in March, and is 20 points
from its own all-time high
set in October 2007.


Average for unemployment


claims falls to five-year low


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
number of people seeking
U.S. unemployment aid
barely changed last week,
while the average over the
past month fell to a fresh
five-year low. The decline
in layoffs is helping
strengthen the job market
Weekly unemployment
benefit applications rose
just 2,000 to a seasonally
adjusted 336,000, the
Labor Department said
Thursday
During the past four
weeks, applications have
dropped by 7,500 to 339,750.
That's the lowest since Feb-
ruary 2008, just three
months into the recession.
Economists pay close at-
tention to the four-week
average, because it can
smooth out week-to-week
fluctuations. The steady
decline in unemployment
claims signals that compa-
nies are laying off fewer
workers. That suggests
many aren't worried about
economic conditions in
the near future.
"Improvement in labor


Associated Press
A crowd of job seekers attends a health care job fair
recently in New York. Fewer Americans sought
unemployment aid last week, reducing the average
number of weekly applications last month to a five-year


low.

market conditions contin-
ues," Julia Coronado, an
economist at BNP Paribas,
said in a note to clients.
The four-week average
has fallen nearly 15 per-
cent since November. The
trend has coincided with
acceleration in the job
market.
Employers have added
an average of 200,000 jobs
per month since Novem-
ber. That's nearly double


the average from last
spring.
And in February, the un-
employment rate fell to a
four-year low of 7.7 per-
cent.
Jennifer Lee, an econo-
mist at BMO Capital Mar-
kets, said the drop in the
average number of unem-
ployment applications
over the past month sug-
gests job gains in March
could top 200,000.


Business HIGHLIGHTS


Dell buyout intrigue
heightens as deadline looms
SAN FRANCISCO Michael Dell is about
to find out if other bidders think his company is
worth more than he does.
The answer could come Friday, which
marks the end of a 45-day period that Dell
Inc.'s board of directors settled on to allow for
offers that might top a Feb. 5 agreement to
sell the personal computer maker to CEO
Michael Dell and a group of investors for
$24.4 billion.

Lululemon's yoga pants
miscue to hurt 2013 results
NEW YORK Fans of Lululemon's popu-
lar black yoga pants will have to sit tight.
Lululemon Athletica Inc. executives told in-
vestors Thursday the company still hasn't de-
termined the cause behind the too-sheer yoga
pants that had to be pulled off shelves and
taken offline over the weekend. And officials
declined to say when the items would be back.
Executives also indicated that the unaccept-
able sheerness in the Luon black pants isn't
just limited to the March 1 shipments to stores
but also includes pants still in its factories.
As a result the Canadian company said the
withdrawal will mean lost revenue of $12 mil-


lion to $17 million in the first quarter and $45
million to $50 million for the rest of the year,
particularly in the second quarter.

Coca-Cola to cut 750 jobs
across the board in US
NEW YORK Coca-Cola will cut 750 jobs
in the U.S. as it continues to streamline its
business.
The world's biggest beverage maker said the
jobs cuts will be across the board and affected
individuals will be notified in coming weeks. The
cuts represent roughly 1 percent of the com-
pany's workforce of 75,000 in North America.
A spokesman said about a quarter of the cuts
will be in Atlanta, where the company is based.

US homes sales highest
in more than three years
WASHINGTON U.S. sales of previously
occupied homes rose in February to their fastest
pace in more than three years, and more people
put their homes on the market. The increases
suggest a growing number of Americans believe
the housing recovery will strengthen.
The National Association of Realtors said
Thursday sales increased 0.8 percent in Feb-
ruary from January to a seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 4.98 million.
-From wire reports


BUSINESS


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 A13


.. .. .


............ i ........







Page A14 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
M 00 Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


LIFE OF FAITH




Father Hoge's



vision shaped



Citrus County


In his lifetime, the Rev.
James Hoge was known,
among other things, as an
excellent histo-
rian. His mission- THE
ary work and
visionary ap- Fathe
proach to bring- passe
ing Catholicism to at
the area helped to
shape Citrus OUR 01O
County's history. Great
Over a period of left his
six decades, Hoge left his
helped build six citrus
parishes and a
Catholic school. His accom-
plishments were many and
varied.
In 1948, he started a mis-
sion church in Inverness.


In 1985, he
helped usher in
Central Catholic
School of Citrus
County now
named Pope John
Paul II Catholic
School in Lecanto
- which now has
more than 200
students.
In 1991, Hoge
was named the
Chronicle's Citi-
zen of the Year
because of his
many contribu-


S
r
eC
-9

P
n
r
C


Daystar Life Center.
In the 1990s, he served as
president of the county's his-
torical society
SUE:. and was instru-
mental in
Hoge fundraising for
s away the restoration of
96. the Historic
Courthouse
'INION: Those who
knew him just
-an who called him Father
nark on out of reverence
county. and respect.
Obviously, as a
priest, Hoge was a man of
deep faith. But it was his faith
in Citrus County that inspired
him to make changes that will
last decades beyond his life-


* A Mass of
Christian Burial
for the Rev.
James Hoge will
be at 10 a.m.
Saturday, March
23, at St. Leo
Abbey, 33601
State Road 52,
St. Leo, Fla. A
wake will be at
6:30 p.m. Friday,
March 22, also at
St. Leo Abbey.


tions to Citrus County, includ-
ing founding both Citrus
United Basket (CUB) and


,-",,,'',ciaA ila


time.
He preserved
history and faith
with equal enthu-
siasm, leaving an
indelible mark on
our future.
County Com-
mission Chair-
man Joe Meek,
who was a stu-
dent at Central
Catholic when
Hoge was princi-
pal, said: "Our
community is a
better place be-
M"


causeC U 111111.
Yes it is, Joe, and he will be
missed.


Hot Corner: SQUIRRELS


Squirrels hate pepper safflow
I saw it
To the person who has the pensive
squirrel note in today's paper: run it's
Ace Hardware has a hot pepper cause i
powder you mix in with the bird- only th
seed. Since birds don't have Good li
saliva and the squirrels do, once
they get a taste of it, they will HO
not come back. I've used it and Prob
it works. Prod
birdfee
Safflower seed works a squir
Sometime ago I had trouble then pi
with squirrels eating my bird- upside
seed too, but a friend told me nail in
the squirrels do not like saf- a squir
flower seeds. They're white Place s
seeds, but the birds love them, or puty
so I use that and I have no trou- Have fL
ble with the squirrels eating the try to g
birdseed. Two
Try safflower seed Rega
To the person who was looking Sprinkl
for a powder to sprinkle over pepper
birdfeed so that the squirrels it but it
don't get it: I don't know the an- C. Also
swer to that question, but I do with Pa
know that squirrels do not like they ca



Red light camera scam them a
them.
On the red-light cameras: the timn
Other states that had them, they
all did away with them because Pap
while it did cut back on
T-bone accidents, it in- OUND
creased rear-end acci- U
dents tremendously. So F F
it didn't work anyhow,
and it's all a scam any-
how to make money for
the cities because they
do adjust the light so
you're running the red CAL
light even though you're
not really trying to do it. 563-0579
Other states have
banned them. Now Florida gets much.


ver seeds but birds love it.
t at Lowes. It's more ex-
e to buy, but in the long
much, much cheaper be-
t lasts forever because
e birds are eating it.
uck.
memade remedy
)lem with squirrels and
ders? Place a post where
rel can't jump to and
ut a 5-gallon plastic pail
-down on the post. Put a
the center. You know have
rel-proof birdfeeder.
seeds on bottom of pail
your birdhouse on it.
un watching the squirrels
get at the birdseed.
tips for squirrels
arding squirrel powder:
le the seed with cayenne
r. The squirrels don't like
t gives birds extra vitamin
, you can spray the pole
am or WD-40. This way
in't get up to your feeder.


ifter other states ban
Florida's always behind
ies.
er carrier thanked
I'd like to thank my
paper carrier. I think
her name is Jeanie. I
am very happy with her.
She has my paper there
on those cold, cold
mornings and I just
thought I'd like to say
thank you and my
name is M. Brownlee. I
really, really appreciate
it and I'd like to thank
her. Thank you very


Language baffles
There are so many languages
in our English language. We
don't think much about it until
we are involved in "that" lan-
guage. My examples would be:
contract language
(building/buying a house, etc),
lawsuit language, insurance
language, medical language,
and the list goes on and on.
When we are confronted with
one of these languages, how
many of us truly understand?
We are sitting with someone
nodding their head up and
down as they are putting this
paper in front of your face to
read. By the way, the nodding of
the head up and down is a sell-
ing tool to encourage you to be-
lieve signing this is in your best
interest "according to them."
Too many of us are far too em-
barrassed to say we don't un-
derstand it all, so we sign.
My suggestion to all of us
faced with these issues, impor-


"The most ferocious animals are disarmed
by caresses to their young."
Victor Hugo, 1862


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Don't manipulate parents


First it was called the par-
ent trigger bill, but when
that became a negative
connotation, it was rebranded
the parent empowerment act.
Whew, that's much better.
Unfortunately, it's a mis-
nomer: This bill does not em-
power parents; it
empowers out-of-
state corporate inter-
ests and their
lobbyists to siphon
Florida tax dollars
away from our al-
ready-underfunded
public school system.
The "trigger" re-
ally is a potentially
unreliable grade as- Paula ]
signed to a teacher FLOI
based on their stu-
dents' combined per- VOI
formance on an
ever-changing test. First, their
job security was to be based on
the FCAT results, but the highly
controversial and problem-
plagued test is being phased
out, and its replacement is the
yet-to-be-developed Common
Core.
This same legislation is being
pushed in at least 15 states,
even in states where it has pre-
viously failed. The Florida Leg-
islature, for instance, voted the
bill down in the 2012 session.
Interestingly, parents are or-
ganizing again, against the bill.
In fact, every major parent and
teacher organization has come
out strongly against passage, in-
cluding PTA, NAACP, LULAC,
FEN and FEA.
California's experiment with
the new law has been less than
promising. Parents who wanted
to rescind their petitions were
not permitted to. Parents who
felt misled or who changed
their minds were feeling any-
thing but empowered.
Lawsuits and legal chal-
lenges have been costly and dis-
tracting. The legislation creates
a toxic environment of distrust
instead of fostering an atmos-
phere of cooperation and coor-


D
R
c


dination between the commu-
nity and school personnel.
Any parent has the power to
remove a child from a failing
school. Florida already offers
more choice than most other
states (magnet schools, charter
schools, vouchers, scholarships,
virtual schools and
home schooling). Ad-
ditionally, school-
based personnel,
district personnel and
locally elected school
boards all have vested
interests in doing
_I what best suits every
child and also have
the tools to do it
)ockery Current law al-
IDA ready sets forth a
procedure for dis-
CES tricts to deal with
failing and low-per-
forming schools including:
Converting a school to a
district-managed turnaround
school.
Reassigning students to an-
other school.
Closing the school and re-
opening it as one or more
charters.
Proponents' efforts to paint
this effort as altruistic should
be met with cynicism. Not only
does it not address a need in a
sincere manner, there is more
wrong with this bill:
Charter schools are not sil-
ver bullets. Compare failure
rates.
More tax dollars get di-
verted to for-profit of private in-
stitutions instead of into the
classroom.
The petition process dis-
tracts school personnel from
their primary duty of teaching.
Its implementation would
be in the midst of changing
evaluation process and testing
Parents are not asking for it;
procedures already exist. The
Florida Legislature has already
voted it down, and every major
parent or teacher association
opposes evidence of peti-
tioners' remorse in California


@2013
MRC.org/BMI
bist.by ing Features


where it has passed. Still, here
it is again.
Why? Why are legislators so
anxious to push through policy
that is controversial, divisive
and unsuccessful? This thinly
veiled attempt to enrich private
charter corporations in the
name of empowering parents
will do nothing positive to ben-
efit our students, but instead
will become a self-fulfilling
prophecy to further starve our
public schools leading to more
privatization of the nearly one-
third of our state budget de-
voted to education.
Legislators should drop the
whole complex, disruptive, di-
visive idea. But if they insist on
pushing this misleading effort,
I offer a substitute plan:
Sixty percent of students
need to be represented by a
parent. That parent must come
to the school to sign a petition
and show identification.
If parents differ on the
issue, their vote would not
count (since they effectively
cancel each other out). If the 60
percent threshold is reached, a
vote will be scheduled and will
require 60 percent of total eligi-
ble votes for approval.
Under this scenario, it would
truly be a grassroots effort
rather than a special interest
and lobbyist effort. A simple,
fair and transparent process
would replace a complex and
slanted process. But, most im-
portantly, parents would hon-
estly be empowered to work
with teachers and administra-
tors to do what's best for their
children and for the community
as a whole.
If you really want to empower
parents, start listening to them.

Paula Dockery was term-
limited as a Republican state
senator from Lakeland after
16 years in the Florida
Legislature. She can
be reached at
pdockery@florida voices., com.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

tant issues: Don't be pressured
to sign immediately, take the pa-
pers home to read if it makes
you feel more comfortable. Take
the papers to your attorney if it
makes you more comfortable
but make sure you understand
the lawyer language used. Un-
fortunately not all of these cus-
tomer service (that's all they
truly are) people are looking out


for your best interest.
It still boils down to being
aware of so many important
technical languages.
Debbie Walker
Beverly Hills

Wonderful treasure
I just wanted to take this op-
portunity to express my admi-
ration and appreciation to the
citizens of Crystal River. The
natural beauty of your region
and how it has been preserved
is outstanding. I was moved to
read of the group effort to save
Three Sisters Springs the
important manatee refuge -
and felt privileged to snorkel
along side of them. Amazing!
Thanks again for having the
foresight to save this gem for
wildlife and generations of
people.
Liz Bothfeld
Dodgeville, Wis.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


I





CITRmus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thanks for St.
Pat's parade help
On behalf of the City of
Inverness, I would like to
take this opportunity to
thank everyone who sup-
ported the third annual
City of Inverness St
Patrick's Day Parade.
Whether you rode a
horse, wagon or car,
strutted, beat a drum,
waved a flag (or your
hand), tossed a baton,
walked, blew a horn,
danced, floated down
the parade route or
cheered it on, please
know your presence and
enthusiasm at Sunday's
St. Patrick's Day parade
made it a hometown, off-
the-charts success.
Everyone came away
with a smile and a warm
heart.
A special thank you to
Scott McCulloch, Katie
Cottrell, Deputy Michele
Tewell and members of
the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office. (They can rock
a parade motorcycle, let
me tell you!) Lots of love
to our elected officials, ad-
ministrators and staff,
who adore a St. Patrick's
Day parade as much as I
do. A huge shout-out to
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle for spreading the word
and giving the parade an
audience.
Sincere thanks to the
Fitzpatrick family for the
gracious opportunity to
once again share Miss Dot
to serve as our grand mar-
shal. The Fitzpatrick
name has been associated
with the Inverness com-
munity for more than 60
years and we are proud to
call Miss Dot family
Cooterific thanks to our
Inverness business com-
munity for accommodat-
ing the merry green
visitors who lined the
streets and filled the
restaurant/retail estab-
lishments. And last, but
certainly not least, a
thank-you to the commu-
nity who continues to
come out and support all
of our events. Inverness
Rocks!
And to those who par-
ticipated: the Fitzpatrick
family, Kevin and Mari-
anne Kelly, Bill Gibson
(and his wonderful blue
Model A Ford), Marjorie
Rooks, School of Dance
Arts, Boy Scout Troop No.
457 and their fearless
leader John Murphy, su-
pervisor of elections with
the charming Patrick
Thomas, American Le-
gion Post 77, The Greater
Inverness Olde Towne As-
sociation, Beef '0'
Brady's, Citrus Clowns,
Rotary Club of Inverness,
Citrus Memorial hospital,
Affordable Karting Club,
the Ice Cream Dr, Citrus
County Sheriff's Office
and deputy patrol, com-
munity service officers/
community patrol, Fire
Rescue and state highway
patrol, Noah's Ark Pre-
school, our charming lep-
rechaun Courtney
Engaldo, Tobacco-Free
Florida, Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce,
John Sandora, Larry and
Peg Golitz, Dawn and
Mark Wrightson, Cooter
Teen Alex Calderone,
Cooter Preteen Shanisty
Rogers, Little Miss Cooter
Lillian Shaw, 1 Able Lock-
smith, Nature Coast Cor-


Homosassa
5699 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Janack Plaza
352-621-8000


vair Club, Sun Devil
Drum and Bugle Corp,
Just Horsin' Around, Ser-
toma, Soquili Stables at
Faith Haven Christian
Retreat Center, Citrus
Hills Line Dancers, Mutt
Strut coordinated by
George Bryan from Bark
Central, 4-H Horse Club,
the Citrus County Cham-
ber of Commerce, Citrus
County Christian Home
School Group, Nature
Coast Young Marines, and
lest we forget, our majes-
tic Irish wolfhound pack.
'Twas an awesome day
in the City of Inverness!
Thanks so much for join-
ing the party, and we'll
look forward to seeing
your smiling faces around
the neighborhood.
Sunny Cooter
Trish Nicholas
City of Inverness

The life of
Mrs. Riley
Men who work at other
than desk jobs can't un-
derstand why their wives
who work as secretaries
come home saying "they
are exhausted" after "sit-
ting on their fannies all
day" Well, here are some
reasons.
It is 9 a.m., and you are
given a Dictaphone tape,
approximating two hours'
typing. At 9:40 a.m., your
boss asked, "Are you done
yet?" "Sorry, this is a two-
hour tape," you reply
What you did not mention
to him is he must dictate
with a mouthful of mar-
bles and you are guessing
at some words.
In the "ancient" days
before computers and
memory typewriters, if
one simple word had to
be changed, an extra page
needed to be retyped.
That was usually at
4:40 p.m. and quitting
time was 5 p.m.
Then there was the
rush job, where your boss
stood in back of you while
typing, thinking his show
of urgency would make
the computer/typewriter
keys move faster.
We then go on to answer
the phone you then
learn to fib: "He's in con-
ference." "There is a
client in his office." "I will
remind him you called
yesterday, and he didn't
call you back." You can't
very well say he's practic-
ing putting in his office or
playing a computer game.
Then there are hand-
written drafts of letters
resembling a chicken's
tracks walking across a
sheet of paper Mindread-
ing is a real advantage.
Then there are the let-
ters (20) he hands you at
4:55 p.m. which have been
signed and need to be
folded, put in envelopes
and run through the
postage meter They must
be weighed, certified and
registered.
Finally, you leave 15
minutes late and arrive
home from your "cushy"
desk job and start your
next job dinner, clean-
ing up dishes, mopping
the floors, laundry, etc.
(unpaid slave labor).
We girls sure do have it
easy
Margo B. Blum
Homorsassa


Inverness
2036 Hwy., 44 West
Colonial Plaza
352-586-7599


Dunnellon
20170 E. Pennsylvania Ave.
Dunnellon Business Center
352-789-1559


We don't
need MORE
%un control...

K


We should
enforce
the l ws
we aIready
have...


...repeatedly
tried to
weaken...

A


Vendors Wanted


Outdoor Adventure Expo

Saturday, April 13th 10am-Spm

S' iA One Day Event at The Crystal River Mall that
B will feature Retailers, Demonstrations,
Seminars and Speakers.

Indoor and Outdoor Spaces are Available.


Fishing, Camping, Boating,
RV, Patio, AIV, Gardening,
Swimming, Snorkeling,
Cycling, Parks and
Recreation, Tennis, Golf,
Travel, Scuba Diving,
Skateboarding, Motor
Sports and other Outdoor
Activity Organizations
and Retailers will
be Exhibiting.


Call to Reserve Your Space
352-563-5592
Deadline to join March 25th

- , i wwwchronicleonlinecom


Mardi Gras

Homosassa Style



.I ,A I


IVf I I/ 1,f I


Sat., Mar. 23, Old Homosassa, FL

Parade 10:30 AM, Event Follows


Pre-Palooza Parties
March 8 High Octane Saloon
March 15 Seagrass Resort
March 22 The Shed at MacRae's
Come vote for this year's King & Queen!


Shrimp, Food, Vendors,
Beer & Wine, Arts &
Crafts, Kid's Zone


Great Times & Live Music!


Plus:
Cajun Dave &
Heon Leon

The 2 PM Band


More


Come Pinch A Little Tail


For more information go to www.shrimpapalooza.com


Supported by: Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs bea
upprte b Ameriprise0 .., .,,
CRYSTAL F nanal {-t D.S.S.
AUTOMOTIVE C P C O.iE
--.--.- -A- ... IF C Ord,


Letters to THE EDITOR


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OPINION


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 A15











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and Israeli President Shimon Peres toast Thursday after Obama received the Israeli Medal of Distinction
from Peres during a State Dinner at the president's residence in Jerusalem, Israel.



Obama: 'Peace is possible'


President urges Israelis and Palestinians to return to stalled negotiations


Associated Press

JERUSALEM -Insisting "peace is pos-
sible," President Barack Obama on Thurs-
day prodded both Israelis and
Palestinians to return to long-stalled ne-
gotiations with few, if any, pre-conditions,
softening his earlier demands that Israel
stop building settlements in disputed
territory
The president made his appeal just
hours after rockets fired from Hamas-con-
trolled Gaza landed in a southern Israeli
border town, a fresh reminder of the se-
vere security risks and tensions that have
stymied peace efforts for decades.


Obama, on his second day in the Middle
East, shuttled between Jerusalem and Ra-
mallah, reaching out to the public as well
as political leaders. He offered no new
policies or plans for reopening peace
talks but urged both sides to "think anew"
about the intractable conflict and break
out of the "formulas and habits that have
blocked progress for so long."
"Peace is possible," Obama declared
during an impassioned speech to young
people in Jerusalem. "I'm not saying it's
guaranteed. I can't even say that it is more
likely than not. But it is possible."
The deep disputes dividing the Israelis
and Palestinians have remained much the


same over the years, and include deciding
the status of Jerusalem, defining borders
and resolving refugee issues. Palestinians
have been particularly incensed over Is-
raeli settlements in disputed territories,
and the Israelis' continued construction
has also drawn the condemnation of the
United States and other nations.
Further settlement activity is "counter-
productive to the cause of peace," Obama
said. But in a notable shift, he did not re-
peat his administration's previous de-
mands that Israel halt construction.
Instead he urged the Palestinians to stop
using the disagreement as an "excuse" to
avoid talks.


Syria bombing kills top pro-Assad Sunni preacher


Associated Press


BEIRUT A suicide
bombing tore through a
mosque in the Syrian capital
Thursday, killing a top Sunni
Muslim preacher and long-
time supporter of President
Bashar Assad along with at
least 41 other people.
The assassination of


N.C. abandons pink
stripes on licenses
RALEIGH, N.C.- North
Carolina is abandoning a plan
to give pink-striped driver's li-
censes to certain illegal
immigrants.
The pink licenses drew crit-
icism from some who said it
stigmatized immigrants.
Transportation Department
spokesman Mike Charbon-
neau said Thursday the state
opted against the pink li-
censes because the computer
and printing coding is easier if
the licenses are the same as
those for other drivers.
The state will begin issuing
licenses Monday to young
adults brought to the U.S. as
children without legal authori-
zation. Under an Obama ad-
ministration program, they
now qualify for work permits.
The licenses still say "NO
LAWFUL STATUS."
Shootout might be
tied to Colo. slaying
DECATUR, Texas -A man
who could be linked to the
slaying of Colorado's state
prison chief is likely to die after
being shot by Texas authorities
after a harrowing car chase.
Wise County Sheriff David
Walker said the man is still
unidentified and the suspect is
"basically legally dead," al-
though he remains hooked to
equipment for organ harvesting.
He was stopped while driv-
ing a black Cadillac with Col-
orado plates that matched the
description of a vehicle spot-
ted outside the house of Tom
Clements shortly before he
was fatally shot Tuesday.
The driver opened fire on


Sheikh Mohammad Said Ra-
madan al-Buti removes one
of the few remaining pillars
of support for the Alawite
leader among the majority
sect that has risen up against
him.
The powerful explosion
struck as al-Buti, an 84-year-
old cleric and religious
scholar who appeared often


Nation BRIEFS














Associated Press
A photograph of Staff Sgt. Rex Schad is displayed next
to his flag-draped casket for his funeral Thursday at
LifeChurch.tv in Edmond, Okla. Schad was killed in ac-
tion March 11 in Afghanistan.


the deputy who pulled him
over. He then led authorities
on a 100-mph chase that
ended when he crashed into
a semi, left his car and
opened fire on his pursuers.
Walker said Colorado inves-
tigators are heading to Texas
to determine whether he is
connected to Clements' killing.
Teen intruder killed
after warning
STERLING, Va. Police
said a homeowner fired a
warning shot before fatally
shooting a 16-year-old neigh-
bor who drunkenly entered
the wrong home by mistake.
The Loudoun County Sher-
iff's Office said Thursday that
Caleb Gordley of Sterling
died from a gunshot to the
back of his shoulder.
Caleb died Sunday morn-
ing. His family said he
sneaked out of the house
Saturday night and went
drinking with friends. Walking
home, he mistakenly entered
a similar home two doors


down from his own by crawl-
ing through a back window.
The sheriff's office said
Thursday that the home-
owner gave verbal warnings
and fired a warning shot, but
Caleb continued up the stairs.
Caleb was shot in the back
after passing the homeowner
in a hallway and walking to-
ward a bedroom where oth-
ers were located.


Civil unions signed
into law in Colo.
DENVER Civil unions
for gay couples got the gover-
nor's signature in Colorado
on Thursday, punctuating a
dramatic turnaround in a
state where voters banned
same-sex marriage in 2006
and restricted protections for
gays two decades ago.
Democratic Gov. John
Hickenlooper signed the bill
as dozens of gay couples
looked on during a ceremony
at the History Colorado Cen-
ter near the state Capitol.
-From wire reports


on TV was giving a religious
lesson in the Eman Mosque
in the central Mazraa district
of Damascus, according to
state TV
Suicide bombings blamed
on Islamic extremists fight-
ing with the rebels have be-
come common in Syria's
2-year-old civil war. But
Thursday's explosion


Utility denies fault
in shrimp death
SANTIAGO, Chile En-
desa Chile is denying any
wrongdoing in the death of
thousands of shrimp that
washed ashore in southern
Chile.
Local fishermen have
blamed the country's leading
electricity generator for the
die-off that left a carpet of red
prawns on a beach in Coro-
nel, about 330 miles south of
the capital on Wednesday.
Endesa Chile Project Man-
ager Marcelo said Thursday
company studies indicate the
die-off "is due to the flow of
deep waters coming from the
continental platform, induced
by currents of wind on the
ocean."
Agents caught
in anti-drug op
SANTO DOMINGO, Do-
minican Republic The Do-
minican National Drug
Control agency said 35 sol-
diers and police officers have
been arrested in a crackdown
on drug smuggling to Europe.
Drug control chief Rolando
Rosado said four French citi-
zens were also arrested. Au-
thorities said the four were
attempting to fly 1,562 pounds
of cocaine to Paris on a French-
registered private plane from
the resort area of Punta Cana
when they were arrested.
Rosado said at a news
conference Thursday those
detained include a lieutenant
colonel in the air force as well
as customs drug agents
based at the main interna-
tional airport in Santo
Domingo.


marked the first time a sui-
cide bomber detonated his
explosives inside a mosque.
Syrian TV said 84 people
were wounded in the explo-
sion and showed footage of
wounded people and bodies
with severed limbs on the
blood-stained floor and later,
bodies covered in white body
bags lined up in rows.

WorldBRIEFS


Health

law may

be delayed

by GOP

Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Three years, two elections,
and one Supreme Court
decision after President
Barack Obama signed the
Affordable Care Act, its
promise of health care for
the uninsured may be de-
layed or undercut in much
of the country because of
entrenched opposition
from many Republican
state leaders.
In half the states,
mainly led by Democrats,
officials are racing dead-
lines to connect unin-
sured residents to
coverage now only
months away. In others
it's as if "Obamacare" -
signed Mar. 23, 2010 -
had never passed.
Make no mistake: The
federal government will
step in and create new in-
surance markets in the 26
mostly red states declining
to run their own. Just like
the state-run markets in
mostly Democratic-led
states, the feds will start
signing up customers
Oct. 1 for coverage effec-
tive Jan. 1. But they need a
broad cross-section of peo-
ple, or else the pool will be
stuck with what the gov-
ernment calls the "sick
and worried" the costli-
est patients.
Insurance markets, or
exchanges, are one prong
of Obama's law, providing
subsidized private cover-
age for middle-class house-
holds who currently can't
get their own. The other
major piece is a Medicaid
expansion to serve more
low-income people. And at
least 13 states have already
indicated they will not
agree to that.
Civic leadership from
governors, legislators,
mayors and business and
religious groups is shap-
ing up as a huge factor in
the launch of Obama's
plan, particularly since the
penalty for ignoring the
law's requirement to get
coverage is as low as $95
the first year.


Associated Press
Vehicles litter Highway 2 Thursday near Leduc, Alberta.
A blizzard sweeping across the Canadian plains caused
a chain of traffic wrecks involving a bus, semi-trailer
trucks and cars south of Edmonton, Alberta, sending
about 300 injured travelers to hospitals.


New Archbishop of
Canterbury vested
LONDON The new
archbishop of Canterbury was
formally enthroned Thursday.
Justin Welby is the 105th
Archbishop of Canterbury,
serving as head of the Church
of England and spiritual leader
of the world's 77 million-strong
Anglican Communion.
Chavez backers,
protesters clash
CARACAS, Venezuela -
Students protesters marching
to protest Venezuela's elec-
toral commission and govern-
ment clashed with supporters
of the late President Hugo
Chavez on Thursday.
Both sides threw bottles and
rocks and scuffles broke out. It
was unclear how many people
had been injured, but student
leaders said at least 10 people
from their side had been hurt.
About 300 students were
marching through central
Caracas when they encoun-
tered about 100 Chavez sup-
porters, who began hurling


rocks and bottles. The stu-
dents returned the volley of ob-
jects, and fistfights broke out.
The students were asking
that the commission eliminate
requirements that voters have
their fingerprints recorded be-
fore voting. They were also de-
manding the government not
interfere in politics ahead of an
April 14 vote to replace Chavez.
Villagers lynch car
thief in Egypt
CAIRO Egyptian wit-
nesses and officials said vil-
lagers have beat to death a
young man after catching him
trying to steal a car in a new
case of vigilante violence.
A number of recent lynch-
ings or attempted lynchings
have raised worries over an
increasing breakdown of se-
curity, adding a new chal-
lenge to Egypt's government.
A security official said
dozens of villagers in Ezbat
el-Gindy in the northern Shar-
qiya province caught the man
trying to steal a car at gun-
point Thursday.
-From wire reports


Mohammad
Said
Ramadan
al-Buti


I ,











SPORTS


Some close
games, but not
many major
upsets at NCAA
men's basketball
tournament./B3


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 NBA, NHL/B2
0 MLB, tennis/B2
0 NCAA basketball/B3
0 Sports briefs/B4, B5
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Golf, football, track /B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Gators focus eyes on ultimate prize


No. 3 seed UF

opens with

Northwestern St.

Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas Kenny
Boynton and Erik Murphy ar-
rived at Florida not too long
after the Gators had won consec-
utive national championships.
They are down to their last
chance to get one for themselves.
Boynton and Murphy are part
of the only Florida group to win
consecutive outright Southeast-
ern Conference regular-season
titles, and the seniors helped
cut down the nets after clinch-


ing the second in their final
home game earlier this month.
They have been to the NCAA
tournament every season, this
time as a No. 3
seed in the NCAA to
South Regional.
Except they South
haven't been
able to get NO. 3 UF
Florida back to No. 14 No
the Final Four, State
coming so bit-
terly close the 0 Time: 7:27
last two years. 0 TV: TRU
"We want to
leave that
legacy of just being winners,"
Murphy said. "We've just got to
win every game we can."
Florida (26-7) plays its NCAA
opener against Southland Con-
ference tournament champion


Northwestern State (23-8), a fast-
paced team that constantly shuf-
fles five players at a time on and
off the floor and is the NCAA's


urnament
Region
(26-7) vs.
rthwestern
S(23-8)
p.m. today.


highest-scoring
team (81 points
per game).
Plus, the
Demons were
also a No. 14
seed in their last
NCAA tourna-
ment appear-
ance seven
years ago. They
opened that
tourney with an


upset victory over Iowa.
"Everybody is just reminisc-
ing on the 2006 team," senior
James Hulbin said. "We're just
See .Page B4


Associated Press
Florida guard Kenny Boynton wipes his face during practice
Thursday in Austin, Texas. The third-seeded Gators are scheduled to
play Northwestern State today.


Barreling back


STEPHEN LASKO/For the Chronicle
Lecanto Panthers base runner Jordan Martin was called out at second base Thursday night against the Citrus Hurricanes at
Citrus High School. The Panthers plated two runs late in the game to rally past the Hurricanes 3-2.

Two late runs by Lecanto enough to push past district rival Citrus


C.J. RISK
Correspondent
INVERNESS For the Citrus soft-
ball team, this is becoming a recurring
theme. For Lecanto, the hope is
that it will be.
The Panthers overcame a 2-0 """
Citrus lead with two runs in the
sixth, then got the game-winner
in the seventh and held on to
collect a 3-2 victory in another For mo
close contest Thursday between photos
these two highly regarded Dis- on this
trict 6A-6 rivals. www.d
Lecanto's tying and eventual online,
winning runs both scored on
Hurricane miscues. A walk and a one-
out single by Paige Richards put two
runners on base in the sixth for the Pan-


others, and Amber Russo came through
with a run-scoring base hit to make it a
2-1 game. The runners each advanced a
base on Amber Hopkins' flyout to cen-
ter field, then Richards scored the tying


ore
s, click
; story at
chronicle
.com.


run on a wild pitch.
The Panthers' game-winning
rally started after two were out
in the seventh. Lilly Parrish was
hit by a pitch from Kelly
Abramowich and Amber Atkin-
son followed with a solid hit to
right field that got past Citrus
outfielder Rachel Martin, al-
lowing Parrish to score before
Atkinson was tossed out at
third.


"I just knew it was time for a hit," said
Atkinson, who also had a double in the
third inning. "I just wanted to get the


bat on the ball."
The loss was the third straight in 6A-6
for the Hurricanes when they were tied
or led going into the final two innings.
They previously lost 1-0 to Brooksville
Central and 6-3 to Brooksville Spring-
stead after leading 2-0 after six innings
and 3-2 going into the seventh.
"The last couple of district games we
led or were tied going into the sixth in-
ning and lost it," said Citrus coach
Larry Bishop. "A two-run lead in soft-
ball is not enough. We can't get compla-
cent. We have to learn how to close
games out."
Citrus, 10-5 overall, slipped to 3-3 in
6A-6. Lecanto, figured to be a district fa-
vorite going into the season, has had


Page B4


Citrus


tennis


drubs CR

'Canes netters roll

by Pirates 6-1
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
INVERNESS -The Citrus High
girls tennis team defeated county
foe Crystal River in the Pirates'
regular-season finale 6-1 Thursday
night Citrus (11-3) swept both dou-
bles matches and won four of five
singles matches against a Pirates
squad (1-7) coming off its first win
against district opponent Santa Fe.
"There were some close
matches, and the girls fought hard
... and anytime you head for dis-
tricts ... you want some good com-
petition, and I'm
happy they
came over
and gave us
a bit," Citrus
coach Scott Wa-
ters said.
"I'm proud of the girls today, and
they were working as a unit," Crys-
tal River coach Cindy
Reynolds said. "It
wasn't a total
runaway be- .
cause the indi-
vidual games s
were close, and .. "
there has been lots
of improvement made this year.
"They have gone from picking
up a racquet for the first time to
actually know what they're doing
... and I'm very proud of them,"
Reynolds continued.
The two doubles matches were
played first, and both were pro
sets. The Citrus No. 1 duo of
Melanie Dodd and Paige Jordan
shut out Nikki Moynihan and
Veronica Williams 8-0, and in a
more competitive match, the Cit-
rus No. 2 tandem of Hunter Pos-
piech and Juliann Johnson
defeated Crystal Menietti and
Anna Lane by an 8-5 score.
In the singles matches, Crystal
River's No. 1 Moynihan was de-
feated by Dodd in straight sets 6-0,
6-2. Dodd a junior finished
the regular season with a perfect
13-0 record.
"It was a good match, and she
was a good opponent," Dodd said.
"It was exciting to win."
See Page B4


Lecanto girls tennis wins, Panther boys fall


CARL MCDERMOTT
Correspondent
The girls tennis teams from
Lecanto and Springstead fin-
ished out their regular season
with a non-district match on the
Panthers court. It was a
marathon affair, lasting over 3
1/2 hours and, in the end, the
Lecanto Panthers came away
with a hard-fought 5-2 victory
Lecanto coach Sammie Hall
was happy her team's hard
practices have shown contin-
ued improvement in matches as
the Panthers improved to 10-2.
"I am very proud of our girls
and really looking forward to
districts," Hall said.
The doubles matches were


played first and used pro-set
scoring to determine the win-
ners. The teams split the two
matches in very competitive
contests.
The No. 1
doubles We i
match pitted other ver
the Panthers'
Gamble sis- COurt.
ters, Amber
and Madison, Am
against the Lecanto No. 1 double
Eagles duo of rapport with sist
Bryn Buckner
and Scarlett
Semack. The Lecanto tandem
prevailed 8-4 with half of the
matches going to deuce games.
The Gambles played very
well together and were pleased


r
e


with the outcome.
"We read each other very well
on the court. Our communica-
tion helps us to be successful in
double s,"
A m b e r
ead each Gamble said.
veil on the The No. 2
doubles match
went to Spring-
stead juniors
iber Gamble duo Robyn
as player said of her Cotney and Sa-
er Madison Gamble. rina Singh by a
score of 8-3.
The Pan-
thers put the match away in the
singles competition by taking
four of the five matches. Amber
See Page B4


Gurnani shines in Lecanto tennis loss


DONALD WHITAKER II
Correspondent
LECANTO Rishi Gur-
nani proved why he is the
captain of the Lecanto boys
tennis team (6-6) by dominat-
ing both matches he played
Thursday night against the
now 12-2 Springstead Eagles.
The Panthers' Gurnani, a
junior, played in the most ex-
citing match of the night
against the Eagles' Patrick
Deslourier winning 8-6 in a
pro set at No. 1 singles.
Unfortunately for Lecanto,


the team suffered a 5-2 loss
at the hands of visiting
Springstead.
Gurnani had a slow start,
going down a game with three
games left in the set. For an-
other two games, Richi
matched Deslourier point for
point, but couldn't overtake
him until the fifth game.
That's when Gurnani
turned the tables and took six
of the last nine games to win
the match.
Gurnani shifted his strategy

See Page B4










Bautista, Blue Jays sink Rays


Braves nip

Nationals 4-3

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE Jose
Bautista hit his fifth home run of
the spring, a long solo shot that
helped the Toronto Blue Jays
beat the Tampa Bay Rays 3-1 on
Thursday
Colby Rasmus and Eugenio
Velez also homered for Toronto.
The Rays' only run came in
the sixth inning on an infield
single from James Loney
Four Blue Jays pitchers, led
by starter Claudio Vargas, com-
bined to allow only six hits and
struck out nine.
Roberto Hernandez, compet-
ing for the Rays' fifth spot in the
rotation, pitched six sharp in-
nings, allowing one run and
three hits.
Braves 4, Nationals 3
KISSIMMEE Tim Hudson
tuned up for his opening day start
with six scoreless innings and Justin
Upton hit a towering home run to
lead the Atlanta Braves over the
Washington Nationals 4-3.
Before the game, Braves man-
ager Fredi Gonzalez said Hudson
would make his third opening day
start for Atlanta.
Hudson came into the game with
a 5.40 ERA this spring. He allowed
six hits, struck out five and walked
none while throwing 45 of his 65
pitches for strikes.
Upton's homer leading off the
sixth inning against Nationals starter
Dan Haren cleared the scoreboard
in deep left-center field. It was his
fifth homer of the spring and gave
him 17 RBIs in 20 games.
Haren worked 5 1-3 innings and
allowed eight hits and four runs.
Cardinals 3, Mets 2
PORT ST. LUCIE David
Freese homered in his first game in
a week and the St. Louis Cardinals
beat the New York Mets 3-2.
Freese had been out since March
14 with back stiffness stemming from
a hard fall he took while chasing a
foul ball. The 2011 World Series
MVP hit a leadoff home run in the
fourth and played five innings in the
field.
Mets infielder Justin Turner got a
hit in his return from a sprained ankle.


Atlanta Braves pitcher Tim Hudson delivers during the first inning Thursday against the Washington Nationals in Kissimmee.


He had a pinch-hit single in the sixth,
then went from first to third on hit.
Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright
gave up two runs on three hits, in-
cluding a two-run triple by Matt den
Dekker, in 4 2-3 innings. He struck
out three and walked three.
Astros 7, Tigers 2
LAKELAND Tigers ace Justin
Verlander gave three home runs and
the Houston Astros beat Detroit 7-2.
Carlos Corporan hit two homers
for the Astros. Brandon Laird and
Matt Dominguez also homered
Houston.
Verlander allowed four earned
runs in 5 2-3 innings. He has a 4.74
ERA this spring.
Lucas Harrell, who will pitch the
second game of the season for Hous-
ton, gave up two runs in five innings.
Red Sox 6, Phillies 1
FORT MYERS Boston starter
John Lackey pitched five sharp in-
nings, Philadelphia opening day
starter Cole Hamels threw six good
innings and the Red Sox beat the
Phillies 6-1.


Facing a Red Sox lineup that
looked ready for the regular sea-
son, Hamels gave up one run and
four hits. He struck out five and
walked two.
Lackey allowed one run and four
hits, with no walks and one strikeout.
Shane Victorino's bases-loaded
triple off Michael Stutes highlighted
Boston's five-run seventh.
White Sox 8, Brewers 3
GLENDALE, Ariz. Chris Sale
pitched seven solid innings, Alex
Rios and Alejandro De Aza hit well in
their return from the World Baseball
Classic and the Chicago White Sox
beat the Milwaukee Brewers 8-3.
Sale allowed four hits, including
an inside-the-park home run by
Ryan Braun and another solo homer
by Donnie Murphy.
Rios hit two doubles and drove in
two runs and De Aza doubled and
singled. They faced each other in the
WBC championship game in San
Francisco on Tuesday night, when
De Aza and the Dominican Republic
topped Rios and Puerto Rico.


Dodgers 5, Cubs (ss) 4
TUCSON, Ariz. -Alex Castel-
lanos hit his fourth spring homer, a
three-run drive that led the Los An-
geles Dodgers over a split squad of
Chicago Cubs 5-4.
Castellanos connected against
Scott Feldman, who was making his
third appearance in spring since leav-
ing Texas and signing with the Cubs.
Feldman allowed four runs and seven
hits and struck out five in five innings.
Starlin Castro homered off
Dodgers starter Stephen Fife.
Matt Kemp tripled for the
Dodgers. He is 6 for 33 this spring.
Indians 5,
Diamondbacks 4
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Michael
Brantley hit his first home run of
spring training, a three-run shot off Ian
Kennedy, and the Cleveland Indians
beat the Arizona Diamondbacks 5-4.
Brantley hit a 3-0 fastball from
Kennedy over the right field fence in
the first inning. Omir Santos drove in
two runs with a double and single for
Cleveland.


Associated Press


Martin Prado had a two-run dou-
ble for Arizona.
Carlos Carrasco, competing for
the fifth spot in the Indians' rotation,
allowed four runs on five hits in five
innings to get the victory.
Kennedy, Arizona's opening day
starter, was tagged for five runs on
nine hits in five innings. He struck
out seven.
Athletics 10, Reds 9
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Derek Nor-
ris homered as the Oakland Athletics
roughed up Johnny Cueto and beat
the Cincinnati Reds 10-9.
Cueto allowed five runs on five
hits and two walks in 1 2-3 inning.
Mark Prior, trying to make another
comeback, pitched a scoreless in-
ning for the Reds. He struck out one
and hit a batter.
A's starter Brett Anderson pitched
for the first time in a game since
March 10. He had been out with a
strained right trapezius. The left-han-
der missed most of last season
while recovering from elbow surgery.
Todd Frazier and Derrick Robin-
son homered off Anderson.


Devils weather 'Canes


Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. Mar-
tin Brodeur scored his
third career goal and
made 17 saves in his first
game in a month, leading
the New Jersey Devils to a
4-1 victory over the Car-
olina Hurricanes on
Thursday night.
Brodeur had been out
since Feb. 21 with a
pinched nerve in his
upper back and neck.
Peter Harrold, Adam
Henrique and Andrei
Loktionov also scored to
help the Devils snap a
three-game losing streak.
Jeff Skinner had the
Hurricanes' lone goal
while Dan Ellis made 19
saves in Carolina's fifth
consecutive loss.
Brodeur got credit for
the game's first goal when
Carolina's Jordan Staal
passed the puck back to
the point from behind the
net after a delayed
penalty call against New
Jersey's Marek Zidlicky.
The pass missed in-
tended target Tim Glea-
son and bounced off the
boards near center ice.
Ellis had already skated
toward the bench because
of the delayed penalty and
couldn't get back in time
to prevent the puck from
sliding into the net.
Panthers 3,
Rangers 1
NEW YORK Jacob
Markstrom made 44 saves
and just missed his first NHL
shutout, helping the cellar-
dwelling Panthers get the win
against the playoff-hopeful
Rangers.
The Rangers had gotten
back into eighth place in the
Eastern Conference with
wins on consecutive nights
this week after a three-game
skid. But Markstrom was
sharp and shut down offen-
sively challenged New York.
Markstrom, who has
played in only nine games


Associated Press
New Jersey Devils goalie Martin Brodeur and teammate Marek Zidlicky defend the
goal against Carolina Hurricanes' Jordan Staal during the first period Thursday in
Raleigh, N.C.


since being recalled from
the minors in February,
earned his third NHL win of
the season.
Markstrom lost his shutout
bid when Marian Gaborik cut
the Rangers' deficit to 2-1
with 3:48 left, but the 23-
year-old goalie settled for
wins in back-to-back games.
Canadiens 5,
Islanders 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y.-
Brian Gionta scored the go-
ahead goal 48 seconds into
the third period, P.K. Subban
added two more and the
Canadiens beat the Islanders
for the first time in three tries
this season.
Gionta's 10th goal of the
season came after center
David Desharnais caught a
wobbling puck by the blue
line off a clearing attempt, set
it down and passed it to
Gionta in front.
Subban tied it at 2 with his
eighth goal 10:53 into the
second period and added an
insurance goal midway
through the third.
Michael Ryder and Bren-
dan Gallagher also scored for
Montreal, which is 14-1-4
since losing to Toronto 6-0 on
Feb. 9. Carey Price made 25
saves.


Sabres 5,
Maple Leafs 4, SO
BUFFALO, N.Y.- Steve
Ott scored the decisive goal
in the sixth round of the
shootout, helping Buffalo rally
for the win.
Ryan Miller secured the
victory by getting his left pad
out to stop former Sabres for-
ward Clarke MacArthur's
shootout attempt. Miller
stopped 32 shots through
overtime, and allowed only
Tyler Bozak to score in the
tiebreaker.
Ott set up his successful
shootout goal by driving in full
speed on James Reimer.
Without stopping, Ott slipped
the puck inside the right post
before the goalie had a
chance to get his pad out.
Christian Ehrhoff had a
goal and two assists for Buf-
falo, which won consecutive
games for only the fourth
time this season. Tyler Ennis
had a goal and an assist, and
Marcus Foligno and Jason
Pominville also scored.
Nazem Kadri had two
goals and an assist for
Toronto, which is 1-3-3 in its
past seven games.
Bruins 2,
Senators 1
OTTAWA- Dennis Sei-


denberg scored with 1:04 left
to help the Boston Bruins beat
the Ottawa Senators 2-1.
Patrice Bergeron won a
faceoff in the offensive zone
back to Zdeno Chara, the
Boston captain fed Seiden-
bergand his shot found its
way past goalie Robin
Lehner through a maze of
players.
Daniel Paille also scored
for the Bruins (20-6-3), and
Anton Khudobin made 27
saves.
Kaspars Daugavins scored
for Ottawa, and Lehner also
stopped 27 shots. The Sena-
tors dropped to 16-9-6 after
winning their previous three
games.
Predators 5,
Flames 3
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Mike Fisher scored two goals
and the Nashville Predators
beat the Calgary Flames 5-3
to snap a four-game losing
streak.
Martin Erat, Nick Spaling,
and Brandon Yip had the
other goals for the Predators,
and Pekka Rinne made 19
saves.
Mark Giordano, Blake
Comeau, and Jarome Iginla
scored for the Flames, who
have dropped eight consecu-
tive road games.


Bulls fall at


home to Blazers


Maryland

rallies to

advance at NIT

Associated Press

CHICAGO LaMarcus
Aldridge scored 28 points,
Damian Lillard added 24
and the Portland Trail
Blazers completed a sea-
son sweep of the Chicago
Bulls with a 99-89 victory
on Thursday night.
Portland improved to
10-25 on the road to take
the season series with the
Bulls for the first time
since the 2008-09 season.
The Blazers beat Chicago
102-94 on Nov 18 in their
other meeting this
season.
Joakim Noah had 18
points and Carlos Boozer
added 16 points and 11 re-
bounds for Chicago, which
shot 44 percent.
Chicago led 21-20 after
the first quarter before
Portland outscored the
Bulls 32-16 in the second
period for a 52-37 halftime
lead.
Portland extended its
lead to 28 in the third
quarter before the Bulls
made a late charge, cutting
the Blazers' lead to 10 with
34 seconds left
Even huge deficits
aren't stopping Heat
MIAMI To go nearly two
months without a loss, it
makes sense that a team
would be winning games in a
variety of ways.
That's very much the case
for the Miami Heat.
Now winners of 24
straight, the Heat have had
to pull off huge rallies in each
of their last two games to
keep the second-longest


streak in NBA history alive.
Miami was down 17 in the
first half and 13 in the fourth
quarter against Boston be-
fore winning, and somehow
escaped a 27-point deficit to
win in Cleveland on Wednes-
day night.
In 13 of the past 14 games
before the trip to Boston, the
Heat never trailed by more
than double digits. Clearly,
they hadn't forgotten what it
was like to have to pull games
out.
College Basketball

Maryland beats
Denver 62-52 in
2nd round of NIT
COLLEGE PARK, Md. -
Dez Wells scored 19 points
and Maryland rallied in the
final nine minutes to beat
Denver 62-52 Thursday night
in the second round of the
NIT.
The Terrapins (24-12)
closed the game with a 23-4
run after trailing 48-39 with
9:15 left. Wells fueled the
surge with nine points.
Maryland will next play the
winner of the Alabama-Stan-
ford game to be played
Saturday.
Chris Udofia scored 24 for
the Pioneers (22-10), includ-
ing 19 during a first half that
featured three ties and 12
lead changes.
Although Udofia picked up
his third foul soon after half-
time, Denver's Brett Olsen
made a three-point play and a
3-pointer within a minute to
put the Pioneers up by nine.
The Terps used five straight
free throws to launch the deci-
sive run. A runner by Seth
Allen put Maryland up 51-50
with 4:09 remaining, the first
time the Terrapins led after
halftime.


B2 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ostly


status quo


Biggest upset is

No. 5 Cowboys

bucked by Ducks

Associated Press

LEXINGTON, Ky. Vander
Blue's layup with one second
left capped Marquette's rally
from a nine-point deficit and
gave the third-seeded Golden
Eagles a 59-58 victory over
Davidson Thursday in the NCAA
tournament.
Blue and Jamil Wilson made
consecutive 3-pointers to bring
Marquette within 58-57 with 11
seconds left. The Golden Eagles
then caught a huge break when
De'Mon Brooks' long inbounds
pass went out of bounds at mid-
court with 5.5 seconds left, pro-
viding another opportunity.
Blue took full advantage after
getting Wilson's inbounds pass,
driving left and finding room for
the winning basket. He then
sealed Marquette's improbable
win by stealing Davidson's last-
ditch inbounds pass at midcourt
to set off a celebration among
players and Golden Eagles fans
at Rupp Arena.
Blue scored seven of Mar-
quette's final 11 points to finish
with 16. Wilson added 14 points
as the Golden Eagles (24-8) won
for the fifth time in six games
and advanced to face Butler in
Saturday's third round of the
East Regional.
Jake Cohen's 20 points led
Davidson (26-8), who seemed in
control leading 49-40 with 61/2
minutes left.
No. 6 Butler 68,
No. 11 Bucknell 56
Andrew Smith had a double-dou-
ble including a career-high 16 re-
bounds, Roosevelt Jones added 14
points and Butler made its free
throws down the stretch to hold off
upset-minded Bucknell.
After trailing for most of the game,
11th-seeded Bucknell got back into it
with a 19-2 second-half run. But
after Joe Willman's jumper cut But-
ler's lead to 43-42 with 6:56 left, the
Bison (28-6) went almost five min-
utes without scoring. Butler went 18-
of-20 at the line in the last 4:43.
Willman scored a career-high 20
points for Bucknell, but the Bison
couldn't overcome an off day by two-
time Patriot League Player of the
Year Mike Muscala. Bucknell's all-
time leading scorer had nine points,
only the second time this season
he'd failed to reach double figures.
No. 12 California 64,
No. 5 UNLV 61
SAN JOSE, Calif. -Allen Crabbe
had 19 points and nine rebounds,
reserve Robert Thurman scored all
12 of his points on dunks and 12th-
seeded California held off fifth-
seeded UNLV 64-61 in the second
round of the NCAA tournament.
Buoyed by the crowd support of a
strong contingent so close to Berke-
ley, the Golden Bears (21-11) held
the Runnin' Rebels (25-10) without a
basket for more than 11 minutes in
the second half. Cal turned a tie
game into a nine-point lead during
that stretch and withstood a late
UNLV push for its first tournament
win since 2009.
The Rebels rallied to within a
point in the final seconds before
missed free throws and a costly in-
bounds pass sealed the loss.
Bryce Dejean-Jones scored 15
points and Anthony Bennett shook off
a poor start to finish with 15 points
and 11 rebounds for UNLV, which
beat Cal 76-75 in Berkeley on Dec. 9.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
No. 3 Michigan St. 65,
No. 14 Valparaiso 54
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Derrick


Associated Press
Oregon guard Damyean Dotson shoots over Oklahoma State guard Markel Brown during the first half of
a second-round game Thursday in the NCAA college basketball tournament in San Jose, Calif.


Nix had 23 points and a career-high
15 rebounds to help power third-
seeded Michigan State past the
14th-seeded Crusaders in the Mid-
west Regional.
The Spartans went on a 26-5 run
in the first half to take control, and
cruised to an easy victory.
Michigan State (26-8) will play
Memphis on Saturday when coach
Tom Izzo's Spartans will be shooting
for a spot in the round of 16 for the
fifth time in six years.
The Crusaders (26-8) were no
match for Michigan State in their first
NCAA tourney in nine years.
No. 6 Memphis 54,
No. 11 St. Mary's 52
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -
Matthew Dellavedova's 3-pointer
from the right wing missed every-
thing as time expired, allowing sixth-
seeded Memphis to hold on for a
win over 11th-seeded Saint Mary's.
The Tigers (31-4) led by 15 in the
first half but nearly gave the game
away in the final seconds.
With Memphis ahead 54-49, Eivi-
das Petrulis banked in a 3-pointer
with 3.1 seconds to play. The Tigers
then lost the ball when the Gaels'
Jordan Giusti deflected the inbound
pass off Joe Jackson of Memphis
and out of bounds.
Saint Mary's (28-7) was out of
timeouts but had a chance to re-
group while officials reviewed the
previous sequence. It didn't matter.
Dellavedova, the career leader in


scoring for Saint Mary's, was able to
get a shot off, but it didn't come
close to going in.
It was the first win in the NCAA
tournament for Memphis since 2009,
when John Calipari was still coach.
The Tigers face third-seeded Michi-
gan State on Saturday.
D.J. Stephens had nine points
and eight blocks for Memphis, and
Jackson had 14 points and seven
assists. Brad Waldow scored 17
points to lead Saint Mary's.
Dellavedova had 10 points,
seven assists and six turnovers in
40 minutes.
No. 4 St. Louis 64,
No. 13 New Mex. St. 44
SAN JOSE, Calif. Dwayne
Evans scored 24 points, Cody Ellis
added 12 points and fourth-seeded
Saint Louis overwhelmed New Mex-
ico State in the Midwest Regional.
Playing through the death of Rick
Majerus in December, Saint Louis
reached another mark for its late
coach. The Billikens (28-6) eclipsed
the 1988-89 team's school record of
27 victories.
Evans shot 11 of 16 and finished a
point shy of his career best to propel
Saint Louis past 7-foot-5 New Mex-
ico State freshman Sim Bhullar. The
Billikens held Bhullar to four points,
11 rebounds and three blocks.
Saint Louis plays Oregon on
Saturday.
Bandja Sy had 17 points and nine
rebounds for the 13th-seeded Aggies


(24-11), who shot just 28 percent.
No. 12 Oregon 68,
No. 5 Oklahoma St. 55
SAN JOSE, Calif. Damyean
Dotson scored 17 points and Ar-
salan Kazemi added 11 points and
17 rebounds to help 12th-seeded
Oregon extend a run that began in
the Pac-12 tournament by beating
fifth-seeded Oklahoma.
Dominic Artis scored 13 points
and helped frustrate Oklahoma
State star freshman Marcus Smart
on the defensive end to give the
Ducks (27-8) their first tournament
win in six years.
Smart came into the game with
the hype of a top NBA prospect but
was held to 14 points on 5 for 13
shooting for the Cowboys (24-9).
No. 1 Louisville 79,
No. 16 N.C. A&T 48
LEXINGTON, Ky. Pay atten-
tion, No. 1s. This is how it's done.
Russ Smith scored 23 points and
set a Louisville NCAA tournament
record with a career-high eight
steals, and Peyton Siva had eight
assists as the Cardinals demolished
North Carolina A&T 79-48.
Louisville finished with a season-
high 20 steals as it forced the Aggies
(20-17) into 27 turnovers. It was the
11 th straight win for the Cardinals
(30-5), who will play Colorado State
or Missouri on Saturday.


WEST REGIONAL
No. 1 Gonzaga 64,
No. 16 Southern 58
SALT LAKE CITY -A March
Madness warm-up turned into a
great escape for Gonzaga.
The Zags got pushed to the limit
by Southern, pulling out a victory in
the closing minutes to avoid becom-
ing the first No. 1 seed to lose to a
16 in the NCAA tournament.
Kelly Olynyk led the Zags (32-2)
with 21 points. They play No. 9 Wi-
chita State on Saturday.
But it was a pair of 3-pointers -
one by Gary Bell Jr., the next by
Kevin Pagnos that staked the
Bulldogs to a 62-58 lead only mo-
ments after the game was tied at 56
with 3:45 left.
Derick Beltran had 21 points to
lead Southern (23-10) and his 14-
foot baseline jumper tied it at 56. But
the Jaguars from the Southwestern
Athletic Conference didn't make an-
other field goal.
No. 9 Wichita St. 73,
No. 8 Pittsburgh 55
SALT LAKE CITY Malcolm
Armstead scored 22 points,
Cleanthony Early added 21 and
ninth-seeded Wichita State ousted
Pittsburgh.
Freshman Steven Adams led
Pitt (24-9) with 13 points and 11
rebounds.
Call Hall added 11 points for the
Shockers (27-8).
The Shockers forced Pitt into 15
turnovers and held the Panthers to
35 percent shooting, including 1 of
17 from 3-point range.
Pitt's leading scorer, Tray
Woodall, missed his first four shots
and finished with two points.
No. 6 Arizona 81,
No. 11 Belmont 64
SALT LAKE CITY Mark Lyons
scored 23 points and the sixth-
seeded Arizona Wildcats rolled
past No. 11 seed Belmont 81-64 in
the second round of the NCAA
tournament.
The Wildcats (26-7) used their
huge size advantage to shut down
the Bruins (26-7), who are 0-6 in
tourney games.
Arizona held a 44-18 edge on the
boards, outscored Belmont 36-18 in
the paint, blocked five shots and out-
shot the Bruins from 3-point range.
The Wildcats made 9 of 17 3-
pointers, including a critical one from
Solomon Hill with 4:40 remaining to
stop an 11-2 Belmont run, and shot
57 percent overall.
Bruins guard lan Clark entered
shooting better than 46 percent from
3-point range but was 3 of 8 from
beyond the arc.
Kerron Johnson led Belmont with
22 points and Clark finished with 21.
SOUTH REGIONAL

No. 4 Michigan 71,
No. 13 S. Dakota St. 56
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. Glenn
Robinson III scored 21 points and
Mitch McGary added 13 points and
nine rebounds, helping fourth-
seeded Michigan overcome a rough
night for Trey Burke in a 71-56
NCAA tournament victory over 13th-
seeded South Dakota State.
Burke made only two field goals
and left the game briefly in the sec-
ond half after a hard fall under the
basket. The star point guard came
back after that, but he finished with
only six points.
Michigan (27-7) advanced any-
way behind Robinson, McGary and
Tim Hardaway Jr., who scored 21
points.
South Dakota State (25-10) trailed
by only four at halftime but couldn't
keep up. High-scoring guard Nate
Wolters was held to only 10 points.
Burke was held in single digits for
the first time all season.


Miami's special season moves into NCAA vs. Pacific


Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas Miami
coach Jim Larranaga was telling
school trustees and anybody else
who would listen last fall that his
second year with the Hurricanes
could be a very special season.
Maybe even the best in school
history
Larranaga might be able to
brag to everybody about having
the best team in the country
"It's almost hard to put in
words how he's really changed
the culture of our entire team.
And just around the university
as a whole," senior Julian Gam-
ble said. "He's really gotten us
back to worrying about the fun-
damentals of the game and
doing little things well."


Already with the ACC regular-
season and tournament titles,
along with a school-record 27
wins, the Hurricanes play their
first NCAA tournament game in
five years Friday Miami is the
No. 2 seed in the East Regional
against Pacific (22-12), the Big
West Conference tourney cham-
pion trying to extend another
game the career of retiring long-
time coach Bob Thomason.
Larranaga took mid-major
George Mason to the NCAA
Final Four in 2006. That makes
him the only ACC coach not at
Duke or North Carolina to take
a team that far.
At Miami, he has a starting
lineup of four seniors and stand-
out sophomore Shane Larkin,
the pick by league coaches as the


ACC's top player. There are six
players on the current roster who
have played at least 100 games.
"That is a little bit striking that
(George Mason) has great senior
leadership, older guys," Lar-
ranaga said. "I think that combi-
nation of youthful enthusiasm
and optimism with experience
and size and toughness, those
teams are similar."
The significant difference is
that most experts never ex-
pected George Mason to even
make the tournament. These
Hurricanes became the first ACC
team to win the outright regular-
season title and then the tourna-
ment and not get a No. 1 seed.
Pacific players are providing
Thomason quite a final ride for
his 25th season at his alma


mater. The coach had said be-
fore this season that it would be
his last, and he likely couldn't
have imagined a better ending.
It is his fifth NCAA tournament
appearance, and first since
three in a row from 2004-06.
"We're trying to make a better
script," Thomason said. "This
turned out really well."
The Tigers ended the regular
season at home, the same day
Thomason was recognized for
his quarter-century at the school,
with a 20-point victory over Big
West regular-season champ Long
Beach State. They then won the
conference tournament and an
automatic NCAA berth.
"That was one of my personal
goals in the beginning of the year
to make sure that coach will be


able to leave on a great note,"
said senior guard Lorenzo Mc-
Cloud, the Tigers' top scorer (11.4
points a game). "I'm thankful that
he can retire in a good way."
Even better would be an upset
victory over the Hurricanes.
Remember, two No. 15 seeds
- Lehigh and Norfolk State -
won in last year's NCAA tourna-
ment.
McCloud remembers those
squads as team-oriented, pass-
ing the ball and helping each
other on both ends of the court.
'"And that's what kind of team
we are," McCloud said. "Any one
of us can get hot ... Any one of us
can go off for a great game. You
never know who is going to do it"
Thomason has won twice in
the NCAA tournament.


NCAA BASKETBALL


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 B3






B4 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 40 26 .606 -
Brooklyn 40 28 .588 1
Boston 36 31 .537 412
Philadelphia 26 42 .382 15
Toronto 26 42 .382 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 53 14 .791 -
Atlanta 38 30 .559 15Y2
Washington 24 43 .358 29
Orlando 18 51 .261 36
Charlotte 16 52 .235 3712
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Indiana 42 26 .618 -
Chicago 36 31 .537 512
Milwaukee 34 33 .507 712
Detroit 23 46 .333 19/2
Cleveland 22 46 .324 20
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 52 16 .765 -
Memphis 46 21 .687 512
Houston 37 31 .544 15
Dallas 32 36 .471 20
New Orleans 23 46 .333 29Y2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oklahoma City 50 19 .725 -
Denver 48 22 .686 212
Utah 34 34 .500 15Y2
Portland 32 36 .471 1712
Minnesota 23 42 .354 25
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 47 22 .681 -
Golden State 39 31 .557 812
L.A. Lakers 36 33 .522 11
Sacramento 24 44 .353 22/2
Phoenix 23 46 .333 24
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday's Games
Portland 99, Chicago 89
Denver 101, Philadelphia 100
Minnesota at Sacramento, late
Today's Games
New York at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Portland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Boston at Memphis, 8p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
Washington at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 31 23 8 0 46110 81
New Jersey 31 1411 6 34 78 85
N.Y Rangers 30 1513 2 32 71 73
N.Y Islanders 30 1314 3 29 88 101
Philadelphia 30 1316 1 27 81 92
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 30 20 5 5 45 97 75
Boston 29 20 6 3 43 84 61
Ottawa 31 16 9 6 38 78 67
Toronto 31 1612 3 35 94 90
Buffalo 31 1215 4 28 84 99
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Winnipeg 31 1613 2 34 80 90
Carolina 30 1513 2 32 85 86
Tampa Bay 30 1316 1 27 98 90
Washington 30 1316 1 27 83 87
Florida 31 916 6 24 77 111
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 30 24 3 3 51102 66
St. Louis 29 1611 2 34 87 83
Detroit 30 1411 5 33 80 79
Columbus 30 1212 6 30 68 79
Nashville 31 1213 6 30 75 84
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Minnesota 29 1710 2 36 77 71
Vancouver 29 14 9 6 34 81 82
Edmonton 29 11 11 7 29 72 85
Calgary 28 11 13 4 26 81 96
Colorado 29 11 14 4 26 75 92
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 29 22 3 4 48 99 71
Los Angeles 29 1710 2 36 88 73
SanJose 29 1310 6 32 71 77
Phoenix 30 1313 4 30 79 85
Dallas 29 1313 3 29 76 88
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Thursday's Games
Buffalo 5, Toronto 4, SO
Montreal 5, N.Y Islanders 2
Florida 3, N.Y Rangers 1
New Jersey 4, Carolina 1
Boston 2, Ottawa 1
Washington 4, Winnipeg 0
Nashville 5, Calgary 3
Vancouver at Phoenix, late
Dallas at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Washington at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Anaheim, 10p.m.
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 2 p.m.
San Jose at Minnesota,2 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at New Jersey, 7p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 8p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Edmonton, 10p.m.


Kans
Baltir
Seatt
Cleve
Tamp
Detro
Bosto
Chica
Minne
Texas
Oakla
Hous
Toron
New'
Los A

Atlan
Color
St. Lo
San [
Arizo
Wash
San F
Philad


Spring Training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
as City 18 6
more 15 6
le 17 7
eland 15 9
a Bay 14 10
Dit 14 11
in 14 12
igo 11 10
esota 12 12
S12 12
and 10 12
ton 10 13
ito 10 14
York 10 16
kngeles 6 13
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L
ta 16 11
ado 11 10
ouis 12 11
Diego 13 14
na 12 13
hington 11 12
Francisco 10 11
delphia 11 13


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr KULthei record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Thursday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
.9-0-1
W CASH 3 (late)

4-4-4
..... > :::, 4- 4- 4

PLAY 4 (early)
6-8-1-6
PLAY 4 (late)
0-3-0-9

FWd LoFANTASY 5
S 1- 6- 10- 21- 26



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
4 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One: Malaysia Grand Prix
qualifying
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Preseason: Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
Brewers
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA Tournament
12 p.m. (CBS) Albany (N.Y.) vs. Duke
12:30 p.m. (TRUTV) Mississippi vs. Wisconsin
1:30 p.m. (TBS) Temple vs. North Carolina State
2 p.m. (TNT) Pacific vs. Miami
2:30 p.m. (CBS) Cincinnati vs. Creighton
3 p.m. (TRUTV) La Salle vs. Kansas State
4 p.m. (TBS) James Madison vs. Indiana
4:30 p.m. (TNT) Colorado vs. Illinois
6:45 p.m. (TBS) Florida Gulf Coast vs. Georgetown
7 p.m. (CBS) lona vs. Ohio State
7:15 p.m. (TNT) Villanova vs. North Carolina
7:15 p.m. (TRUTV) Northwestern State vs. Florida
9:15 p.m. (TBS) Oklahoma vs. San Diego State
9:30 p.m. (CBS) Iowa State vs. Notre Dame
9:45 p.m. (TNT) Western Kentucky vs. Kansas
9:55 p.m. (TRUTV) Minnesota vs. UCLA
NBA
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Oklahoma City Thunder at Orlando Magic
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Detroit Pistons at Miami Heat
BOXING
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Friday Night Fights. Donovan George vs.
David Lopez
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Maybank Malaysian
Open, Second Round (Same-day Tape)
12:30 p.m. (GOLF) Champions Tour: Mississippi Gulf
Resort Classic, First Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Arnold Palmer Invitational,
Second Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: Kia Classic, Second Round
COLLEGE HOCKEY
5 p.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey East Tournament UMass-
Lowell vs. Providence
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Hockey East Tournament Boston
College vs. Boston University
SOCCER
3:55 p.m. (ESPN2) 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualifer: Spain
vs. Finland
10 p.m. (ESPN) 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualifier: United
States vs. Costa Rica

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
5:30 p.m. Oak Hall at Seven Rivers
6:30 p.m. Citrus at Springstead
6:30 p.m. West Port at Lecanto
7 p.m. Tavares at Crystal River
SOFTBALL
5 p.m. Citrus at Bishop McLaughlin
5:30 p.m. St. Francis at Seven Rivers
7 p.m. Crystal River at Lecanto
BOYS TENNIS
3:45 p.m. Lecanto vs. Columbia at CF in Ocala
GIRLS TENNIS
2 p.m. Citrus vs. Columbia in Gainesville
TRACKAND FIELD
TBA Crystal River, Lecanto at Hernando Kiwanis Invitational


Miami 10 12 .455
NewYork 9 11 .450
Chicago 12 15 .444
Los Angeles 10 14 .417
Pittsburgh 10 14 .417
Milwaukee 9 13 .409
Cincinnati 8 15 .348
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams do
not.
Wednesday's Games
Washington 7, Miami 5
Baltimore 7, Toronto 5
Atlanta 18, Pittsburgh 9
N.Y Yankees 4, Boston 0
L.A. Angels 6, Cleveland 5
San Francisco (ss) 0, Milwaukee 0, tie, 10 in-
nings
San Francisco (ss) 6, San Diego 4
Kansas City 7, L.A. Dodgers 2
Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox 2
N.Y Mets 7, Houston 5
Tampa Bay vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
ccd., Rain
Thursday's Games
Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 1
St. Louis 3, N.Y Mets 2
Chicago White Sox 8, Milwaukee 3
Oakland 10, Cincinnati 9
L.A. Dodgers 5, Chicago Cubs (ss) 4
Cleveland 5, Arizona 4
Houston 7, Detroit 2
Atlanta 4, Washington 3
Boston 6, Philadelphia 1
Baltimore 0, Pittsburgh 0, tie, 10 innings
Minnesota 6, N.Y.Yankees 1
L.A. Angels vs. Texas, late
Colorado vs. San Francisco, late
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Seattle, late
Today's Games
Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay (ss) at Port Char-
lotte, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (ss) vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs.Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.


Detroit vs. Washington atViera, Fla., 1:05p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
Kansas City vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Colorado (ss) vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
San Francisco vs. Colorado (ss) at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 7:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
10:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Oakland at Phoenix,
10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta (ss) vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Houston vs. Atlanta (ss) at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. N.Y Mets at Port St. Lucie,
Fla., 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:35
p.m.
Cleveland vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Oakland vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. L.A. Angels (ss) at Tempe,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 10:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:10 p.m.


Jane Park leads Kia
Classic with 6-under 66
CARLSBAD, Calif. Jane Park shot
a bogey-free 6-under 66 to take the lead
after the opening round of the Kia Clas-
sic on Thursday at Aviara.
Park, who lives in Rancho Cucamonga
and went to UCLA, had a one-stroke lead
over Caroline Hedwall and Karrie Webb.
Stacy Lewis, playing her first round
since taking over the No. 1 spot in the



UF
Continued from Page B1

pretty much trying to set our pace for
our own memories in the future, fu-
ture players at our program too. We're
playing with a lot of confidence, we
just play our game."
Instead of national titles like 2006
and 2007, the Gators were coming off
consecutive appearances in the Na-
tional Invitational Tournament when
Boynton and Murphy arrived as highly
touted freshman.
Florida immediately got back to the
NCAA tourney their first year, then
overcame a 13-point deficit in the sec-
ond half of its opener against BYU.
Boynton scored 27 points, but the
Gators lost in double overtime.
They made it to regional final games
each of the past two seasons, and led
late both times. Only to lose to Butler
in 2011 and Louisville last March.
"We can't dwell on the past," Boyn-
ton said. "Right now, it's a new season.
We learned from our mistakes from
last year. We're ready to make a run in
the tournament."
Against Northwestern State, the
Gators better be ready to run.
Demons coach Mike McConathy's
unconventional system involves the
rotation of two groups of five players
in and out of the game similar to a
hockey team switching lines during a



TENNIS
Continued from Page B1

The upset of the day and the only
Crystal River victory of the match -
came when No.2 Williams defeated
the 'Canes' Jordan 7-5, 6-0. With the
score tied at 5-5 in the first set,
Williams broke serve, which gave her
a 6-5 lead, and from that point on won
the final seven games. Jordan finishes
the regular season with a 9-4 record.
"Paige is a real good competitor to
play against, and I think I held my own
against her, and she held her own
against me," Williams said. "It was a
tight match, and our team did really



WINS
Continued from Page B1

Gamble dominated her match in
straight sets winning 6-1, 6-2.
At No. 2 singles, it was more of the
same as Madison Gamble made short
work of her opponent. She took both
sets 6-1, 6-1.
The No. 3 singles match was the af-
ternoon's marathon contest lasting
nearly two hours. Panthers sopho-
more Simi Shah and Springstead's
Cotney of the Eagles met in a match
neither wanted to lose.
Cotney won the first set 7-6 but



BARRELING
Continued from Page B1

trouble finding any kind of win. The
Panthers improved to 2-5 in 6A-6 and
5-8 overall.
The Hurricanes' first run came in
the third inning, which began with a
leadoff single by Jessica Liptrap. A
sacrifice bunt moved her to second
and a single by Aaron McIntyre put
runners at the corners with two outs.
A wild pitch delivered by Lecanto
starter Danielle Yant scored the run.
Citrus increased its lead to 2-0 in
the fourth on a double by Erica Cor-
lew to open the inning and an RBI
double by Melissa Michaud, coming
with two out.
"I thought it was a great game," said
Lecanto coach Robert Dupler, whose



LOSS
Continued from Page B1

slightly to probe a perceived weakness
of his opponent.
"I started to serve softer, so that I
could attack his back hand which
looked a little weaker," Gurnani said.


Gurnani not only won his singles
match but led Lecanto to a victory in
its No. 1 doubles match too. Sam Al-
ford and Gurnani pulled out an im-
pressive 8-1 performance against
Springstead's Vasu Malhora and Carl
Zee.
At No. 2 doubles match, Lecanto's
Lloyd Justo and Dhruv Patel lost to
Springstead's Robert Hoover and
Hank Deslourier 7-3.
Even though Gurnani stood out, the
Panthers had many strong perform-
ances including Alford's single match
in which he split the first two sets (7-6;
8-6 tie break, 3-6) before losing in the


world from Yani Tseng, was four shots off
the lead after a round that she called
frustrating. Lewis is trying to win her third
straight tournament.
Tseng, the Kia Classic winner last
year, was disqualified after oversleeping
and missing her pro-am tee time
Wednesday.
Park started on No. 10 and made the
turn in 2 under. After a par on No. 1, she
birdied four of the next five holes.
From wire reports


game. Each group will play several
minutes at a time.
Only guards Shamir Davis and Jalan
West average 25 minutes a game for
the Demons. There are five Florida
players who get more than that, in-
cluding Boynton as one of two at 32
minutes.
"A former coach that passed away
told me I wouldn't play for myself,"
said McConathy, who first used the sys-
tem as a junior college coach. "The
reason I did this was because we had
so many good players. I was having a
lot of morale issues. So I figured that
if I played 10, I could at least keep 10
happy"
West said the Demons try to pres-
sure and wear down other teams. He
said that style of play holds everybody
on the roster accountable to each
other.
"You're not going to be in the game
the whole time, even if you're hot,"
West said. "You've got to trust your
teammates to get in the game and do
the same thing that you were doing."
The Demons got their automatic
NCAA bid when they knocked off 27-
win Stephen E Austin in the South-
land Conference tournament title
game.
Florida coach Billy Donovan, whose
team blew a 12-point halftime lead
and lost to Mississippi in the SEC tour-
nament finale, doesn't expect North-
western State's style to affect how his
team uses its players.


good ... and it was one of our better
matches."
Crystal River's No.3 Menietti was de-
feated by the 'Canes' Pospiech 6-0, 6-2.
"Well, I feel like as a team we
played well together, and if I can im-
prove anything about my match ... it is
my serving, because I double-faulted
a lot," Pospiech said.
The 'Canes' No.4 Johnson (10-3) de-
feated the freshman Lane 6-0, 6-3, and
the 'Canes' No.5 Leah Stanley (12-1)
was victorious over freshman Olivia
Parker (5-4) in a tough three-set match
6-3, 5-7, 6-4.
"It was a really good match, and I
enjoyed playing her.... She's very con-
sistent, and it was one of the best
matches I played," Stanley said.


needed an 8-6 tiebreaker set to do it.
The second set was not quite as com-
petitive as Cotney prevailed 6-1. The
Eagle finished her season unde-
feated, going 15-0.
Megan Jervis used her good fore-
hand shots to take the No. 4 singles for
Lecanto. She won in straight sets with
scores of 6-1, 6-2.
The Panthers' Andrea DelaCruz
won 6-3, 6-1 at No. 5 singles.
"We ran into a good team today that
came ready to play," Springstead
coach Rick Scholl said. "It was our
fourth match this week and we were
missing our No. 3 player."
Springstead finishes its regular sea-
son with a 13-3 record.

team lost 2-1 to Citrus on March 5, "the
same kind of game we played the first
time, only this time we got one more
(run). I still think (Citrus) is the best
team in the district.
"Our game plan was for us to hit the
ball better, and it was good to see us
hit the ball better tonight. Plus we got
some hits when we needed them, in
the clutch. And we didn't make many
mistakes, we played a little looser, we
had some fun out there."
Breanna Martin, who relieved Yant
in the sixth inning, retired all six bat-
ters she faced and was rewarded with
the pitching win. Abramowich took
the loss for Citrus.
Lecanto hosts Crystal River at 7
p.m. tonight on Teacher's Apprecia-
tion Night. Citrus is idle until next Fri-
day when, together with Lecanto, it
plays in the Hernando Shootout tour-
nament in Brooksville.


tiebreaker set 10-5, against the Eagles'
Zee.
Another match that showed the Pan-
ther spirit was Justo versus the Eagles'
Hank Deslourier. Justo started off
strong winning the first set 6-4 before
losing the last two sets 6-0 and 10-8.
When asked after the game Justo re-
fused to give excuses for his loss and
said he "needs to improve my whole
game" and "more experience will im-


prove my game."
Justo, who is a senior in only in his
second year playing tennis, played like
an athlete who has far more experi-
ence. Finally, the last two singles
matches were played by Lecanto's
Dhruv Patel versus Springstead's
Robert Hoover, Hoover won in straight
sets 0-6 and 3-6. While Harrison King
of Lecanto lost to Marcel Leaman of
Springstead, 2-6 and 4-6.
When asked what things Lecanto
could build on, Panthers coach Jack
Hall said, "volleying and net play are
areas we need to improve."


I S O R T B I E F -


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Two FSU


Seminole athletes theS
afer fere
arrested cha
mom

poolside sho voting lie
pus
Associated Press at al
inju
TALLAHASSEE Two of the M
nation's top sprinters were sus- day
pended by Florida State officials namn
Thursday, hours after the ath- seas
letes were arrested following an Sou
early morning poolside shooting ,",
incident, pen
A police report stated Ronell imn
J. Mance, who won a silver Ran
medal in the 2012 Olympic they
Games in the 4x400 relay, and lete:


sprinters

)hen Newbold, the MVP at our disci
recent Atlantic Coast Con- legal proc
rnce indoor track and field The uni
mpionships, were arrested online ad
ments after Tallahassee po- its stude
were alerted that the shots about suc
e being fired at an off-cam- port of th
student apartment complex Keith Brc
bout 3:30 a.m. There were no
ries reported. A poli
ance, who turned 21 Thurs- Mance
and often goes by his middle Newbold,
ie Joshua, was sitting out the Atlant
son after transferring from door
then Cal. onships,
'he students have been sus- after 1
ded from the team effective alerted
nediately," athletic director fired at
idy Spetman said. "Whether apart
y can return as student-ath-
s will be determined through


suspended from team

line policy and any
seedings."
versity also updated an ..
visory it uses to inform
nts, faculty and staff
ch incidents with a re-
e shooting, spokesman
omery said.
ce report stated Joshua
(pictured) and Stephen
, the MVP at the recent
ic Coast Conference in-
track and field champi-
were arrested moments
Tallahassee police were
d that shots were being
t an off-campus student
ment complex at about "
3:30 a.m. '
Associated Press


LSPRTSBRIFS-


Mets make 3B
Wright team
captain
PORT ST. LUCIE The
New York Mets have made
third
baseman
David
Wright
the fourth
captain in
team
history.
The
Mets David
made Wright
the
announcement Thursday.
Wright joined Keith Her-
nandez, Gary Carter and
John Franco as Mets to be
appointed captain. Franco
was the last player to hold
the honor in 2004.
The 30-year-old Wright
is a six-time All-Star and
the team's career hits
leader. He signed an eight-
year, $138 million contract
extension with the Mets in
the offseason.
Hudson will start
season opener
for Braves
KISSIMMEE -Tim Hud-
son has been picked to
start on opening day for the
Atlanta Braves.
Braves manager Fredi
Gonzalez announced his
choice Thursday. It will be
the third time Hudson has
pitched the opener for At-
lanta. He also made three
opening-day starts with
Oakland.
Hudson will start at
home on April 1 against
Philadelphia.
Hudson was 16-7 with a
3.62 ERA last year. He has
a 105-65 career record in
eight seasons with the
Braves.
Hanley Ramirez
expected to be
out for 8 weeks
TUCSON, Ariz. -
Dodgers shortstop Hanley
Ramirez is scheduled to un-
dergo surgery today on his
injured right thumb and is
expected to be sidelined for
eight weeks.
The Dodgers said Thurs-
day that an MRI indicated
that a ligament in Ramirez's
thumb was torn.
Ramirez suffered the injury
Tuesday night while playing
for the Dominican Republic in
its victory over Puerto Rico in
the World Baseball Classic
championship game in San
Francisco.
Ramirez was at third
base when he suffered the
injury. The Dodgers moved
him to shortstop, his original
position, after obtaining him
from the Miami Marlins on


July 25.
Dr. Steve Shin, a sports-
medicine hand specialist, is
scheduled to perform the
surgery in Los Angeles.
Jeter to only play
exhibition games
in minors
TAMPA- New York
Yankees general manager
Brian Cashman says short-
stop Derek Jeter will play
only in minor league spring
training games for the rest
of spring training.
The move could cut short
how much
time Jeter
would
miss if he
starts the
season
on the
15-day
disabled
list. By not Derek
playing in Jeter
major
league exhibitions, the Yan-
kees want to be able to
backdate Jeter's start time
on the DL if that's necessary.
Jeter missed his third
straight exhibition game
Thursday because of in-
flammation in his surgically
repaired left ankle. The 38-
year-old captain received
an anti-inflammatory injec-
tion on Wednesday.
Cashman hasn't ruled
out Jeter missing the Yan-
kees' regular season
opener April 1 at home
against Boston.
Super Bowl
outage due to
'misoperation'
NEW ORLEANS -An
outside expert investigating
the cause of a partial power
outage during Super Bowl
XLVII has confirmed the
failure occurred because of
the "misoperation" of a relay
device.
Utah-based forensic engi-
neer John Palmer released
his findings Thursday.
Entergy, the company that
supplies electricity to the Su-
perdome, and the stadium's
management company
hired Palmer to perform an
independent analysis of the
Feb. 3 outage.
Entergy has said it be-
lieved the outage was
caused by an electrical
relay device it installed spe-
cially to prevent a power
failure at the dome. Entery
New Orleans President and
CEO Charles Rice says the
company is pleased that
Palmer's analysis con-
firmed the relay operated in
an unpredictable manner.
The partial blackout de-
layed the game between
Baltimore Ravens and San
Francisco for 34 minutes.
From wire reports


Rose blooms in Orlando


Associated Press
Justin Rose watches his shot from the 18th fairway Thursday during the first round
of the Arnold Palmer Invitational golf tournament in Orlando.


Golfer takes

lead with 65

at Bay Hill;

Woods 4 back

Associated Press

ORLANDO Justin
Rose started out as an-
other guy in Tiger Woods'
group Thursday at Bay
Hill. He wound up in the
lead.
Rose put on a clinic
with the putter and ran off
four straight birdies late
in his round for a 7-under
65, giving him a two-shot
lead after the opening
round of the Arnold
Palmer Invitational.
Woods had two sloppy
bogeys from greenside
bunkers and didn't hit it as
well as he did when he
won Doral two weeks ago.
But he made enough key
par saves and manhan-
dled the par 5s to scratch
out a 69, a reasonable start
as he tries to win Bay Hill
for the eighth time and re-
turn to No. 1 in the world.
It was only the sixth
time in 31 rounds at Bay


Hill that Rose broke 70.
"If you had said I
would shoot a 65 on the
range this morning, I
would have probably
said, 'How many holes
have I played?' And that
didn't change much,"
Rose said. "The first five,
six holes out there were a
grind."
John Huh had a chance
to catch him late in the af-
ternoon, but needing a
birdie on the final hole, he
found a fairway bunker on
No. 9 and took bogey for a
67. John Rollins and Brad
Fritsch were at 68.
Rose and Woods played
in the morning, the
tougher side of the draw
because of chilly temper-
atures and a strong
breeze. The rough was
thick without being terri-
bly high. The hole loca-
tions were in spots Woods
had not seen very often.
The scores were reflec-
tive of a challenging
morning until Rose and
Woods began to pick up
the pace on the par-5 16th.
Both made eagle from
inside 15 feet- Woods hit
a 9-iron for a second shot
on a hole that was playing
downwind but that's
where their fortunes


changed. Woods came up
short in a bunker, hit a
poor shot and took bogey
on the 17th. Rose holed a
20-foot birdie putt.
On the front nine, both
made three straight birdies
starting on the par-5 fourth.
Rose doubled his lead over
Woods on the par-3 seventh
with a 12-foot birdie putt,
and Woods came up short
in the bunker and failed to
save par
Also in the group at 69
with Woods were Ryo
Ishikawa of Japan, Nick
Watney, Sean O'Hair and
Bill Haas, who bogeyed
his last two holes.
Woods played the
played the par 5s in 5
under, bringing his career
total at Bay Hill to
118-under par.
British Open champion
Ernie Els played with
Rose and Woods and dis-
appeared quickly The Big
Easy kept pulling his tee
shots and getting into
trouble, dropping five
shots in the opening five
holes. He rallied with a 4-
iron to 2 feet for birdie on
the 18th, and a 9-iron to
about the same tap-in
range on his final hole at
No. 9 to salvage a 75.


Former Dolphins WR Duper released from prison


Associated Press
Former NFL player Mark
Duper. Duper was released
from jail Thursday after he
was charged with allegedly
beating his 17-year-old son
during a series of fights at
their Jacksonville home.


Police: Father beat

son unconscious

Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Former
Miami Dolphins wide receiver
Mark Duper was released from
jail Thursday, charged after po-
lice said he beat his 17-year-old
son during a series of fights at
their Jacksonville home.
Duper, who starred for the Dol-
phins from 1982 to 1992, spent a
night in jail after his arrest
Wednesday on one count of felony
child abuse. He was released
Thursday afternoon after posting
a $5,000 bail, police in Jack-


sonville said.
Authorities said Duper at-
tacked his son, Marcus, three
times and knocked him out twice.
Messages left on Duper's cell-
phone by The Associated Press
were not returned Thursday He
told The Miami Herald the fight
was "a family matter."
"This is not an open book. I
have to deal with this within my
family," he was quoted by the
newspaper as saying.
Duper caught 511 passes for
8,869 yards and 59 touchdowns in
his 11-year career with the Dol-
phins. Duper, who legally changed
his name to Mark Super Duper,
was named to three Pro Bowls
and was a two-time All-Pro selec-
tion. He is a member of the Dol-
phins Honor Roll.


Former Dolphins defensive end
Hugh Green told The Associated
Press by telephone he witnessed
the brawls. He said Marcus Duper
started the fights, thinking he
could "beat his father." Green and
his 18-year-old son had stopped to
visit Duper and his son after at-
tending a charity golf outing in
Miami earlier in the week.
"I saw Mark defending himself
after a young son was defiant,"
Green said.
Green said Duper's wife, the
mother of Marcus, died years ago.
According to Jacksonville police
records, the first fight allegedly
began when Duper learned his
son had sent a threatening text to
the teen's former girlfriend. The
younger Duper denied he had
done anything wrong. Police said


that started an argument between
the two that led to fisticuffs.
The police report stated Duper
"punched his son in the face one
time because he wouldn't listen to
him about picking up his hat." The
report said Duper then "took his
son to the ground, grabbed him,
then picked him up several times
and slammed him to the ground,
causing him to lose consciousness
for a short period of time."
Duper then ordered his son out
of the house, according to author-
ities. The son left but returned to
get a jacket, the report said, which
resulted in a second fight.
Green stepped in to break up
the fight and, the report says, dis-
covered that Marcus Duper "lost
consciousness once again for a
short period of time."


SPORTS


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 B5


PGA

Bay Hill Par Scores
Thursday
At Bay Hill Club and Lodge, Orlando
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,419, Par: 72 (36-36)
(a-amateur)
First Round
Note: Partial list
Justin Rose 32-33 65 -7
John Huh 36-31 -67 -5
John Rollins 34-34 -68 -4
Brad Fritsch 32-36 68 -4
Charley Hoffman 36-33- 69 -3
Ryo Ishikawa 35-34 -69 -3
Tiger Woods 34-35 -69 -3
Nick Watney 35-34 -69 -3
Sean O'Hair 33-36 -69 -3
Thorbjorn Olesen 35-34 69 -3
Bill Haas 32-37 -69 -3
Jimmy Walker 35-34 -69 -3
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 35-34 69 -3
Ben Kohles 37-32 -69 -3
Gary Woodland 35-35-70 -2
Geoff Ogilvy 37-33 -70 -2
Ken Duke 35-35 -70 -2
Tag Ridings 35-35 -70 -2
Zach Johnson 35-35 -70 -2
Ben Crane 36-34 -70 -2
Stewart Cink 35-35 -70 -2
Pat Perez 35-36 -71 -1
Bob Estes 37-34 -71 -1
Matt Jones 36-35 71 -1
Jason Dufner 35-36 -71 -1
Lee Westwood 36-35 -71 -1
Henrik Stenson 37-34-71 -1
Sang-Moon Bae 37-34 -71 -1
David Lingmerth 35-36 -71 -1
Jason Day 35-36 -71 -1
Vaughn Taylor 36-35-71 -1
Hunter Mahan 38-33-71 -1
Chris Kirk 34-37-71 -1
Jim Furyk 34-37-71 -1
Mark Wilson 35-36 -71 -1
J.J. Henry 37-34 -71 -1
Vijay Singh 37-34 71 -1
CamiloVillegas 36-35-71 -1
John Senden 36-35 -71 -1
Matt Every 35-37 -72 E
Boo Weekley 39-33 -72 E
Ian Poulter 37-35 -72 E
Graeme McDowell 37-35 -72 E
Tommy Gainey 36-36 -72 E
Carl Pettersson 34-38 -72 E
Brian Harman 35-37-72 E
Scott Langley 37-35 -72 E
Erik Compton 37-35 -72 E
Brendon de Jonge 37-35 -72 E
Billy Horschel 37-35 -72 E
Tim Herron 37-35 -72 E
Sergio Garcia 38-34 -72 E
Ben Curtis 37-35 -72 E
James Hahn 37-35 -72 E
Cameron Tringale 37-35-72 E
Chris Stroud 34-38 -72 E
Rickie Fowler 35-38 -73 +1
Robert Allenby 36-37-73 +1
Richard H. Lee 37-36 -73 +1
Jeff Overton 36-37-73 +1
Jeff Klauk 38-35 -73 +1
Charles Howell III 38-35-73 +1
George Coetzee 36-37-73 +1
David Lynn 38-35 -73 +1
Phil Mickelson 36-37-73 +1
D.A. Points 37-36 -73 +1
Retief Goosen 38-35 -73 +1
K.J. Choi 36-37-73 +1
Lee Janzen 35-38 -73 +1
Doug LaBelle II 37-36 -73 +1
Luke Guthrie 38-35 -73 +1
William McGirt 39-35 -74 +2
Greg Owen 39-35 74 +2
Seung-Yul Noh 38-36 -74 +2
Kevin Streelman 38-36 -74 +2
Keegan Bradley 36-38 -74 +2
David Toms 36-38 -74 +2
Scott Brown 38-36 -74 +2
Justin Hicks 36-38 -74 +2
Brian Stuard 38-36 -74 +2
Nicholas Thompson 40-34-74 +2
Bubba Watson 38-36 -74 +2
Martin Laird 39-35 -74 +2
Marc Leishman 39-35 -74 +2
Casey Wittenberg 36-38-74 +2
Ernie Els 36-39 -75 +3
Aaron Baddeley 40-35 75 +3
JoshTeater 40-35-75 +3
David Hearn 40-35 -75 +3
Scott Gardiner 37-38 -75 +3
Ross Fisher 38-37 -75 +3
Francesco Molinari 37-38 -75 +3
Harris English 38-37-75 +3












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Jay Leno, host of "The Tonight
Show with Jay Leno," left, and
Jimmy Fallon, host of "Late
Night with Jimmy Fallon" are
backstage at the 70th annual
Golden Globe Awards in Beverly
Hills, Calif.

Reports: Fallon
to replace Leno?
LOS ANGELES -As Jay
Leno lobs potshots at ratings-
challenged NBC in his
"Tonight Show" monologues,
speculation is swirling the
network is taking steps to re-
place the host with Jimmy
Fallon next year and move
the show from Burbank to
New York.
NBC confirmed Wednesday
it's creating a new studio for
Fallon in New York, where he
hosts "Late Night" But the net-
work did not comment on a re-
port the digs at its Rockefeller
Plaza headquarters may be-
come home to a transplanted,
Fallon-hosted "Tonight Show."
The New York Times re-
ported the replacement in a
Wednesday story The Holly-
wood Reporterhad a similar
report March 1, which was
denied by the network.
Looming over NBC is its
failed effort to replace Leno
with Conan O'Brien, which
ended in 2010 with Leno re-
gaining "Tonight" and NBC
losing O'Brien to TBS.

Koppel: NBC hasn't
done Williams favors
NEW YORK Veteran
newsman Ted Koppel, who
reports on Friday's "Rock
Center" about
young offend-
ers in adult
prisons, said
NBC hasn't
done Brian
Williams and
his young
news-
Ted magazine any
Koppel favors with its
scheduling
S shuffles.
The show
debuted on
Halloween
2011 and now
airs Friday
after previ-
ously being on
Brian NBC's sched-
Williams ule for Mon-
day, Tuesday
and Thursday.
"Just when you think some-
body might figure out when it's
on and want to see it the next
week, they move it to another
place," said the former "Night-
line" anchor "That's not help-
ful, and I think Brian deserves
more support than that."
He said Williams is "a pow-
erhouse of a guy, and I think
he's going to emerge tri-
umphant in the end."
"Rock Center" has been av-
eraging 3.8 million viewers a
year this season, although it
recorded less than 2.8 million
last week in its Friday at 10
p.m. time slot, the Nielsen
company said.
Koppel does four or five
stories a year for "Rock Cen-
ter," in addition to some writ-
ing, work at National Public
Radio and lecturing.
-From wire reports


Birthday If you remove some obstacles in your
path, substantial material growth can be achieved in
the year ahead. It'll be up to you, however, to keep
trying your hardest and refusing to settle for
second-best.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -As long as you don't ex-
pect Rome to be built in a day, your chances for get-
ting much of your work completed are excellent. In
fact, what you do finish will be of superior quality.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Friends can ask favors
of you they dare not ask of others. They know you're
the kind of person who'll help out in any way you can.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Your popularity is trend-
ing upward. Even those who have treated you shab-
bily in the past are likely to suddenly shower you with
friendship.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You should focus your


Action-oriented


Associated Press
From left, Aaron Eckhart, Gerard Butler, Finley Jacobsen, Angela Bassett and Robert Forster are
in a scene from "Olympus Has Fallen," which opens today.

Review: 'Olympus Has Fallen' is tense yet generic


TODD MCCARTHY
The Hollywood Reporter

LOS ANGELES In a week
when North Korea posted a
homemade video showing the
U.S. Capitol building being de-
stroyed by a missile, what
more logical response could
Hollywood offer than a macho
thriller about a Secret Service
agent who takes on North Ko-
rean terrorists who attack the
White House?
The first of two similarly
themed action dramas set for
this year ("White House
Down" arrives in June),
"Olympus Has Fallen" will
put to the test the question of
whether American audiences
are ready, 12 years after the
Sept. 11 attacks, to watch,
strictly as disposable popcorn
entertainment, a film in
which the United States and
some of its most prominent
landmarks are devastated by
foreign terrorists.
The answer almost undoubt-
edly will be yes, as the tough-
guy former agent played by
Gerard Butler gets to kick a
whole lot of badass butt while
trying to rescue the president
Although this is the sort of film
in which the fate of the world
hinges, when all is said and
done, on the outcome of a one-
on-one martial arts contest, di-
rectorAntoine Fuqua's notably
bloody child of Die Hard still
generates a fair amount often-
sion and produces the kind of
nationalistic outrage that rock-
ribbed Americans will feel in
their guts.
It seems uncannily timely
the brilliant bad guy here is a
(supposedly) rogue North Ko-
rean who leads a bunch of
skilled commandos on a raid
of the White House that nets
them the president and sev-
eral key members of his staff
as hostages.
At its core, however, "Olym-
pus" is like an '80s or '90s
genre item in which Clint
Eastwood, Bruce Willis or Mel
Gibson outwitted and outmus-
cled shrewd, more formidably
armed opponents. Like East-
wood in "In the Line of Fire,"
Butler (who also produced)
plays a disgraced presidential
agent sidelined and haunted
by a fluky failure (detailed in
a 10-minute prologue) who
suddenly and inadvertently
finds himself back in the thick
of a crisis.
If seemingly far-fetched, the
attack by the North Korean
paramilitary team is nonethe-
less ingenious and pulled off
with somewhat disturbing
ease, given the White House


Gerard Butler, left, and Radha Mitchell are in a scene from
"Olympus Has Fallen."


is described as the best-
fortified location on Earth. It's
also quite violently staged.
While President Asher
(Aaron Eckhart) receives the
South Korean premier and
his entourage, a C-130 comes
roaring in very low over Vir-
ginia and D.C. Knocking out
two Air Force fighter jets, the
terrorist-piloted plane heads
down the mall and over to-
ward the White House, straf-
ing civilians while a second
wave of gunmen launch a
ground attack on the presi-
dential mansion.
Inside, the premier's al-
leged head of security shows
his true colors as the plot's
mastermind. Kang (Rick
Yune) quickly displays the di-
abolical genius worthy of any
Bond villain (which Yune
once played, as another North
Korean in "Die Another
Day"). He rounds up the pres-
ident, Secretary of Defense
(Melissa Leo, in an enjoyably
fierce performance) and a
bunch of other top officials
and takes them down to the
White House's massively se-
cured emergency under-
ground bunker, where he
tortures and kills some of his
hostages and dictates terms,
the keys being the immediate
withdrawal of U.S. troops
from near the Korean demili-
tarized zone and the removal
of the Navy's 7th Fleet from
the area.
Enter Mike Banning (But-
ler), who knows the White
House inside and out due to
his years serving not only the
president but entertaining his
young son Connor (Finley Ja-
cobsen), who's somewhere in
the building and whom Kang
wants as the ultimate bargain-
ing chip. The bulk of the film
thus becomes an elaborate
cat-and-mouse game between


Today's HOROSCOPE =

attention and efforts on meaningful objectives. Some
of your larger goals can be reached at this time, if you
make the effort.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Regardless of what is going
on in your life, maintain a philosophical outlook. By
keeping your attitude positive, you'll be able to get the
best of any negative situation.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Some significant benefits
might come your way, but they won't be of your own
making. Opportunities that seem tailor-made for your
situation will drop right into your lap.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you need to make a dif-
ficult decision, seek a friend who has previously of-
fered you wise advice. This person holds the correct
solution to your problem.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Adequate help will mani-
fest for a difficult development you thought you would


Banning, who, against great
odds, taunts Kang and gradu-
ally reduces his minions'
numbers in several ambushes
and one-on-one struggles, and
the North Korean megaloma-
niac, who begins extracting
the secret codes allowing him
to control the American nu-
clear arsenal.
Meanwhile, stuck with
sedentary roles as officials
sweating it out at the Penta-
gon heavily linked by video,
phones and computers are,
among many others, Speaker
of the House (and acting Pres-
ident) Trumbull (Morgan
Freeman); Secret Service di-
rector Jacobs (Angela Bas-
sett); and Gen. Clegg (Robert
Forster), the gung-ho head of
the Joint Chiefs.
The ordeal is an all-night
affair, and unfortunately
much of the White House ac-
tion plays out in a murky,
muddy darkness that has a
very washed-out look.
To his credit, though, Fuqua
sustains the suspense until
near the end of two hours; only
in the final confrontation be-
tween Banning and Kang does
the face-off seem over-ex-
tended and borderline risible.
Butler comes off pretty
well, as a sort of junior-league
Mel Gibson with a bit less of
the fiery-eyed craziness and
wacky humor but plenty of
grit and no shortage of appeal.
In one-dimensional generic
roles, most of the other per-
formers deliver as expected,
though Yune's exceptional
looks and air of piercing in-
telligence pretty much maxes
out what anyone could do
with this sort of laser-focused
villain figure.
"Olympus Has Fallen," a
FilmDistrict release, is rated R
for strong violence and lan-
guage throughout 120 minutes.


have to manage on your own. Take advantage of it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Being bold and en-
terprising could cause others to think you're taking
huge, unwise risks. However, you'll be aware of your
limitations and will act accordingly.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The nearer you get
to fulfilling your expectations, the luckier you'll be-
come. You merely need to be determined to get what
you want.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Your best asset will
your ability to improve upon the ideas of others. Good
or bad, you'll be able to make your co-workers
schemes better.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Conditions continue to
look extremely impressive where your financial inter-
ests are concerned. Keep searching for new ways to
add to your income. Lady Luck will help.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20
Powerball: 13 14 17 43 54
Powerball: 15
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 3 winners $1,000,000
1 Florida winners
Lotto: 7 11 23 30 35 47
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 29 $4,459.50
4-of-6 2,134 $57
3-of-6 40,405 $5
Fantasy 5:15 17 19 23 35
5-of-5 3 winners $83,102.01
4-of-5 332 $121
3-of-5 11,157 $10
TUESDAY, MARCH 19
Mega Money: 1 21 22 34
Mega Ball: 20
4-of-4 MB 2 winners $2 million
4-of-4 4 winners $3,030.50
3-of-4 MB 49 $676
3-of-4 1,117 $88.50
2-of-4 MB 1,494 $46.50
1-of-4 MB 13,187 $5.50
2-of-4 35,384 $3
Fantasy 5:1 11 13 25 30 5-of-5
1 winner $214,823.80
4-of-5 296 $117
3-of-5 9,583 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Friday, March 22, the
81st day of 2013. There are 284
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 22, 1963, The Beat-
les' debut album, "Please Please
Me," was released in the United
Kingdom by Parlophone.
On this date:
In 1312, Pope Clement V is-
sued a papal bull ordering dissolu-
tion of the Order of the Knights
Templar.
In 1638, religious dissident Anne
Hutchinson was expelled from the
Massachusetts Bay Colony for de-
fying Puritan orthodoxy.
In 1765, the British Parliament
passed the Stamp Act of 1765 to
raise money from the American
colonies, which fiercely resisted
the tax. (The Stamp Act was re-
pealed a year later.)
In 1894, hockey's first Stanley
Cup championship game was
played; home team Montreal de-
feated Ottawa, 3-1.
In 1933, during Prohibition,
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
signed a measure to make wine
and beer containing up to 3.2 per-
cent alcohol legal.
In 1958, movie producer Mike
Todd, the husband of actress Eliza-
beth Taylor, and three other people
were killed in the crash of Todd's
private plane near Grants, N.M.
In 1988, both houses of Con-
gress overrode President Ronald
Reagan's veto of the Civil Rights
Restoration Act.
In 1993, Intel Corp. unveiled the
original Pentium computer chip.
Ten years ago: Anti-war ac-
tivists marched again in dozens of
cities, marshaling more than
100,000 in Manhattan and some-
times trading insults with backers
of the U.S.-led war on Iraq.
Five years ago: Vice President
Dick Cheney, visiting the Middle
East, said the U.S. had an "endur-
ing and unshakable" commitment
to Israel's security and its right to
defend itself against those bent on
destroying the Jewish state.
One year ago: Coroner's offi-
cials ruled singer Whitney Houston
died by drowning the previous Feb-
ruary, but heart disease and co-
caine use were contributing factors.
Today's Birthdays: USA Today
founder Allen H. Neuharth is 89.
Composer-lyricist Stephen Sond-
heim is 83. Evangelist broadcaster
Pat Robertson is 83. Actor William
Shatner is 82. Sen. Orrin Hatch,
R-Utah, is 79. Writer James Pat-
terson is 66. CNN newscaster


Wolf Blitzer is 65. Composer An-
drew Lloyd Webber is 65. Sports-
caster Bob Costas is 61.
Thought for Today: "Kindness
consists in loving people more
than they deserve." Joseph
Joubert, French moralist
(1754-1824).











SCENE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


SHRIMPIN'C







SINGIN'

Shrimpapalooza and Teenstock combine forces

to entertain and feed Citrus Countians, visitors


Homosassa
Shrimpapalooza strikes
on Saturday
The second annual Shrimpa-
palooza begins at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, March 23.
The Rotary Club of Ho-
mosassa Springs is hosting the
one-day event, which includes a
parade, music, food and other
activities for the entire family.
The parade kicks off at
10:30 a.m. along Yulee Drive and
ends at Cherokee Way. Yulee
Drive will be closed off at 10 a.m.
Anyone planning to attend should
be seated at that time.
An afternoon of live music will
follow with popular bands such as
the Mighty Mongo, the Mick
Sharp Band, Cajun Dave & Neon
Leon, The 2 PM Band and others.
While the music plays, large
pots of gumbo will be stirred for
the cook-off. Guests can purchase
cups to taste the secret recipes.
Other activities include a kid's
zone wilh face-painling and arSii
end craft boolhs.
RolarI, members ask for ,a $2
con3lion for Ihe fundraiser.


on vocals/strings/keyboard, Chris
Kopp on lead guitar, Cole Bas-
night on drums and Danny Wat-
son on bass.
Haley Schroeder, a singer/
songwriter who plays guitar and
ukulele.
Sophie Robitaille, who sings
and plays keyboard and guitar.
Saint Taylor with Zac Phillips
and Robbie Dehn.
Visitors should bring chairs,
but leave coolers, food, drink and
pets at home. The Museum Cafe
will serve Cuban cuisine and
drinks for purchase.
Call Susan Mitchell at 352-
503-3498 for information.

Hernando
Crafters set up shop at
annual show
The third annual Lakeside
Craft Show will be from 9 a.m. to


I

m

I


Teenstock to spotlight
young musicians
Teernslock KidIs Helping KiIs
2013 begins ,al noon Sal urda3,.
March 23.. al I31he Museum "JL
Ca3fe. 10466 W. VA'(lee Drive.
in Homoiassi,. oi benefit
the Big Brolhers Big Sislers
cf Cilrus CounlO z
Admission is $5 for
(lullS. $2 for leensi an '
children 12 .and a
younger free. e
Teens will 5,
march in
ithe 1
1 -' -
,- ^ .

iA. -1


sec-
ond
annual
Shrimpa-
palooza pa-
rade prior to the
start of Teenstock.
The musical event spotlights
teen musicians in the Nature
Coast. On the bill are:
Jillian Govoni,
vocals/ukulele.
Zero Gravity with Alex Hand


3 p.m. Saturday, March 23,
at the Inverness Elks
Lodge, 3580 Lemon St.,
Hernando.
Guests will
have a great se-
lection of hand-
made items to
view such as jew-
elry, painted glass, handmade
soaps, embroidery, handmade
purses and much more.
Refreshments will be offered
for lunch such as hot dogs, ham-
burgers, chips and drinks. Pro-
ceeds will benefit the Elks
scholarship fund and charities
supported by the lodge.
Call 352-860-2598.

Inverness
Susanne Smith Band to
entertain downtown
Music on the Square featuring
the Susanne Smith Band will be
from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 23, around the His-
lori Cjouhoui.Se in
Inverness.
The tand fe3lures
Smilh on voc,31s. Ben
Medrano on guiil,r, Ed
Lallin on b.,ss. D,311,s
Helms on ke bcjoar(si an
Sieve Waller on d(rumns.
Bring ,? 1,.wn chair or ,?
b1iankel lo w.lch Ihe free
S concern. Dow1nlowin
reslurinls will be
open.
Call L 3ce
', g Blue-


e. 3n


) perform-
ances will
be at 3 p.m.
Sunday, March 24, at
First Lutheran Church, 1099
State Road 44 W., Inverness,
and 3 p.m. Sunday, April 7, at
Faith Lutheran Church, 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive, Lecanto (in
the Crystal Glen subdivision).
Admission is a $10 donation;
children 12 and younger will be
admitted free.
Donations are the major fund-
ing source for the choir's annual
$1,500 scholarship.
For more information, visit
www.citruschoir.com or call 352-
628-6452 or 352-212-1746.

Crystal River
Underwater egg hunt at
Bicenntenial Park pool
Children up I a3gqe 12 man
parlicipale in Ihe ,nnul Under-
waler Egg Huni on S,3arday.
March 23. 3al Bkicenlennial Park,
Pool.
Twoj eqqgg huinlS will ie Sel up
for differei aqge groups: chilIdren
up io age 6 will huni from 11 ,a.m.
lo 1 p.m. and children ,ages
7 i0 12 will huni
from 1 p.m.
I 2:30 -
p.m. -.


Ill Children
will need Io bring .a
baske andI swimming al-
lire lo Ihe free evenrl.
Eggs will be
dispersed(
Ihrough-

ol[he


201-
0149 or
visit www.
inverness
oldetowne.org for more
information.
Choir spreads 'Joy'
throughout county
The Citrus Community Concert
Choir will sing of "Basket of Joy"
for its spring performances. The


will be permitted on the pool
deck. Other festivities
Include potato sack
races, egg races,
face painting and
arts and crafts
stations.
* Call Bicen-
tennial Park
Pool at 352-795-1478 or Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540, or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com for more
information.
Mall provides musical,
artistic outlet
Crystal River Mall will have
musical and artistic events this
weekend. Activities include:
1 p.m. March 23 -
Karaoke.
0 2 p.m. March 24 Dueling
Banjos.
0 2 to 5 p.m. March 27 -
Hands-on art day with arts and
crafts, face painting, bounce
house and entertainment with
teen star Sophie Robitaille. Free.

Floral City
Learn to precisely dye,
decorate eggs
Joan Swetland will demon-
strate the Pysanky Process of
dyeing and decorating eggs at
6:30 p.m. Friday, March 22, in
Florida Artists Gallery Education
Center, 8219 Orange Ave., Floral
City.
The demonstration will in-
clude explanation of tools, mate-
rials and techniques.
Cost is $5 per person. Call
352-344-9300 for information.

Citrus Springs
Singing Tree performs
Sunday
The Singing Tree will perform
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, March 24,
at Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Church, 7633 N. Florida
Ave., (U.S. 41), in Citrus Springs.
Tickets are $10 and refresh-
ments are available.
From staff reports


pool
area, and
the pool will
be set up with
different levels of
difficulty based on
swimming ability. A
land-based egg hunt
will be designed for
younger children and non-
swimmers. Eggs will be
turned in after the hunt in ex-
change for a gift bag filled
with little toys and candy.
Only 50 people at a time


Hopkins hooks viewers in biopic 'Hitchcock'


I first had to get
over the fact An-
thony Hopkin's
"Hitchcock" feels
like a beefy Hannibal
Lecter to me, but all
in all the pseudo-
biography is charming.
Much more than an
extreme behind-the-
scenes feature of Heather
"Psycho," "Hitch- FOST
cock" is really a sweet
little romance. I have ON
a hunch director
Sacha Gervasi enacted his fan-
tasies through "Hitchcock"- e.g.
Hitchcock is cutely pathetic and
doted on by powerful Hollywood
women but thankfully, Gervasi
erases himself. In turn, it is easy


I
I
*ll


to delight Hopkin's pouty
Lecter-Hopkins and eas-
ier to appreciate Helen
Mirren, Scarlett Johans-
son, Toni Collette and
Jessica Biel's rock-star
performances.
"Hitchcock" finds leg-
endary director Alfred
Hitchcock (Anthony
Foster Hopkins) past his prime.
ER It has been a while since
the round, eccentric fel-
LM low delivered a hit, and
he is eager to prove him-
self again. Hitchcock is deter-
mined to make the pulpy horror
novel, "Psycho," into a movie.
His longtime wife and collabo-
rator, Alma (Helen Mirren), is
doubtful of the sensationalist


"claptrap" at first but ultimately
backs him.
Paramount refuses to fund the
unusual picture, and rating com-
mittees cringe at "Psycho's" im-
plied nudity and violence.
Therefore, Hitchcock doggedly
funds the film himself and enlists
the help of loyal assistant Peggy
Robertson (Toni Collette) and
awesome actors Vera Miles (Jes-
sica Biel), Anthony Perkins
(James D'Arcy) and Janet Leigh
(Scarlett Johansson).
As much as Hopkins irks me at
first, I become fond of him, even-
tually When Hopkins is not hiss-
ing nasty, psychoanalytical, low
blows or lilting "my dear" to
smart ladies, he shakes his
Lecter persona. Hopkins's silent,


hurt expressions and defe.1ted
postures really draw youi in
His Hitchcock character i ,J .
big, powerful guy and liable le
to dish out fantastic in-
sults. But Hopkins puts
helpless, boyish spin on
the creative titan. Most
times man-children are
repugnant, but Hopkins
has this humiliated, re-
morseful air about him.
making Hitchcock loveable
See Page C6
www.hitchcockwlklc :.
Anthony Hopkins
transforms into
Alfred Hitchcock
in the movie
"Hitchcock."





C2 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013

THEATER
"Boeing-Boeing," a
classic bedroom farce about
an American architect dat-
ing three flight attendants,
runs from March 21 to April
14, at Ocala Civic Theatre,
4337 E. Silver Springs Blvd.
$22 adults and $10 for full-
time students (student ID
required for college stu-
dents). 352-236-2274.
"Murder on the
Menu," a murder-mystery
dinner show, 6:15 p.m.
Thursday, March 28, at
Spaghetti Warehouse, in
Tampa. $34.95 for dinner
and show. 813-248-1720
Ruth Eckerd Hall per-
formances:
"HAIR," 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, April 4, and Friday, April
5, and 2 and 8 p.m. Satur-
day, April 6.
"Sex Please, We're
Sixty," April 4 to April 12 at
Ocala Civic Theatre, with
four weekday matinee per-
formances and three


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


evening shows. $22 for
adults, $20 for subscribers,
and $10 for full-time stu-
dents with ID. Service
charge applies to online
purchases. www.ocalacivic
theatre.com or 352-236-2274.
"The Producers,"
7:30 p.m. April 4 through
April 6 and April 11 through
April 13 and 3 p.m. April 7
and April 14, in Charles R.
Dassance Fine Arts Center,
3001 S.W. College Road at
College of Central Florida
on Ocala campus. Doors
open 30 minutes before
each performance. "The
Producers" is a musical
adaptation of Mel Brooks'
famous movie of the same
name. $12 for adults and $6
for students. CF students
free with student ID. 352-
873-5810 or tickets.cf.edu.
Shark Theatre presents
the musical "Avenue Q:
School Edition" April 18
through April 20 in Black Box
Theatre on Nature Coast
Technical High School cam-


Serving up murder


Special to the Chronicle
Cast members of "Murder on the Menu" include: front
row, Richard Buckley, Maria Buckley and Danny Ray
Poison; and back row, Pepper McGowan, Tisha Goble and
J. T. Crowder. The play will be on stage Thursday at the
Spaghetti Warehouse in Tampa.


pus. "Avenue Q: School Edi-
tion" is story of a recent col-
lege grad named Princeton


II


who moves into a shabby
New York apartment on Av-
enue Q. Some characters


II


are puppets and others
human, prompting this musi-
cal to be described as
"Sesame Street for grown
ups." Performances at 7
p.m. Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, with an additional
2 p.m. matinee Saturday. $6
for students and $10 for
adults. Play recommended
for ages 13 and up. The
Black Box Theatre is at 4057
California St., Brooksville.
Call Lori Erickson at 352-
797-7088 ext. 296.
FESTIVALS
10th annual St. Pete
Beach Corey Area Craft
Festival, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 6, and Sun-
day, April 7, at Corey Av-
enue and Gulf Boulevard in
downtown St. Pete Beach.
Free. www.artfestival.com
or 561-746-6615.
The Cedar Key
Spring Fine Arts Festival,
April 13 and 14. www.
cedarkeyartsfestival.com.
Florida Elvis Festival,
Ak MA


April 26 through 28, includ-
ing the original stage pro-
duction of "When Elvis
Came to Town," at the Old
Courthouse Heritage Mu-
seum in Inverness. Week-
end activities include:
Elvis in concert featur-
ing Ted Torres, 7 p.m. Fri-
day, April 26. $25.
"When Elvis Came to
Town" production, 2 and 7:30
p.m. Saturday, April 27. $25.
Gospel music and
brunch, noon Sunday, April
28, at Historic Citrus County
Courthouse. $25. Limit of
120 people.
Stumpknockers Elvis
Blue Suede Shoes 5K
Run/Walk, 8 a.m. Saturday,
April 27. www.Elvis5Krun.
com. Pre-registration $20.
or $25 on race day.
*All-Day Elvis Festival, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April
27, Courthouse Square.
352-341-6427, 352-341-
6488, www.citruscounty
historicalsociety.org.


Fbooc( P~n SnitertainEiwnt
OF OF


Old World


Restaurant


A little off the beaten track, but BAm
well worth the drive is the Old World
Restaurant in Floral City. Serving
continental cuisine, the full menu
offers everything from ossobucco to
roast duck.
The restaurant has been in the same family
since 1981, serving Citrus County residents and many
from neighboring counties. Danny and Olympia Mundrean are your hosts.
There are a number of specials on the menu, a variety of steaks and seafood as well
as a number of house specialties including ribs, pork and chicken schnitzel and Polish
kielbasa. Italian selections include veal, eggplant and chicken parmigiana.
Seafood items range from lobster tails to shrimp and frog legs. They also offer a
variety of choices for Surf'n'turf. Desserts include Black Forest Cake and apple strudel.
Dinners include your choice of homemade soup and bread.There is a children's menu.
Prices range from 58.95 to 529.95.
The restaurant has a full bar offering your favorite cocktail or fine Italian wines.
Open Wednesday thru Sunday, with Wednesday and Thursday hours, 3:00 pm to 8:30
pm.; Friday and Saturday, 3:00 pm to 9:00 pm and Sunday, 11:00 am to 7:00 pm.They
are closed Monday and Tuesday.
Located on the west side of U.S. Hwy 41, they are south of the traffic light in Floral
City. Phone is (352) 344-4443


Is)kd do9N "t/ 41
'I, I, III 1 1- h I ,1 11 L l ', L I -' ,1 -10 ,1 1,, 11 L L L I I,,0 1 ,1 '-
* 1 .' R I l l -. jl I .1 h li .l I i l .1i \\ .. l..1. \ llih
"'iii., !, !,',,j.l lI I 'j* iiii \A ,,M *i..,* u ,,* i ih l .\lM i m l.
[OPEN EASTER 11AM-6PM ,"



-. (IS a ki, %il \ il lhli 1 T 3


MAMA SALLY'S
RESTAURANT

S FI MP$ FULL POUND 1/2 POUNE
ANYwY WAY15 10


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Philly *6
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Southern Omelet T Steak w/Eggs p
Flounder, Talapia, Pork Chops, F $ 1499
Chop Sirloin or Roast Turkey 2 FOR 12


w/SouP Li Uver& Onions, Meatloaf, Eggplant Parmigiana, $ q
Spaghetti & Meatballs, Roasted Pork 2O R-, I Z
,,1 ,.n1.intry Fried Steak 2 u FO _
fl HR S w/French Fries & Cole Slaw 6
n B- REAKfAST ANYTIME A
Sun 7 _c.u.d..t.. ...I.,d i .'44 .t'rt -: 111111


S f Bring AI



Open C e
Easter Sunday .,,,, .,
e .rOpen -,Jpmn Tues lea & Tnurs
Acc;eptI &4 .ff R t i 3.t07i4 Open a7ir-6pr Fri Sat & Sun
9D BREAKFAST- LUNCH
v 'r r r-o ,4 P I RIm o^ A I .i1i I.:ffor ..ron lI


fT'SALLMABOUT WATERFRONT DINING


WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
STEAK NIGHT
s i og 9 Served With Red


All You
Can Eat
Fish Fry
slO"


You %10 OFF
Can Eat YOURNE VISIT
Fried Shrimp *$25 OR MOREX
$1699 COP1 EQID-EP4L/5/1 I


Entertainment for Your Taste Buds!

352-527-7250
3887 N.Lecant0 Hy., Bevery Hills, FL


Tue- Sat 8:00 am to 8:0 pm
Sunday 800 am to 2:00 pm~l
Closed Mondays B c
www.SkeetsBBQ.com


Breakfast ServedRn l D
'til 2pmr Thurs., Fri., Sat. & Sun. 7am-8pm

5490 S. Florida Ave. 1 for .599
(State Road 41) 2 for$ 2
Imy2 for 12. 9


iilnve1 ii 1 L
(352) 341-2040
Mon.- Wed. 7am- 2pm
Thurs., Fri., Sat. & Sun. 7am 8pm


FREE WI-FI


I I~'


HIGHLANDS Restnt
BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER

* LUNCH SPECIALS4"99
M-F 11-3pm Includes Soup & Potato

DINNER 2 FOR 1299
Includes 2 Sides & Dessert


FISH FRY EVERYDAYi! $6
Cole Slaw and French Fries
Open 7 Days AWeek: Mon.-Sat. 7am- 8pm, Sun 7am- 2pm 341 2303
3066 S. Florida Ave. Inverness, FL 344503 -UO0 3O


FRIDAYNIGHT

ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH
With Drink Purchase1


LieU i


SCENE


I


ID
)9





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The birth of a caraholic in April 1930


Heard a very
touching story
from one of our
MOPAR car club
members, Ken Mc-
Neeley, that I would
like to share with you.
His dad, Howard, was
in high school when
he was what we
would now consider a
"caraholic."
Howard's father
was a blacksmith and
a farmer. A black-


Ken McNally
CAR
CORNER


smith had to weld many differ-
ent types of metals to keep the
equipment of the local farmers
in operating order. This back-
ground led all of Howard's 13
brothers and sisters to be some-
what mechanically inclined.
Howard's second-eldest
brother, Vern, was a well-known
"hot rodder" long before the
term was invented. In addition
to working on automobiles, Vern
worked on steam engines,
threshing machines and gas-
driven tractors in an era when
horsepower really meant horse-
powered. Even during the De-
pression, Vern was able to afford
a motorcycle and his own car.
Howard was also a very capa-
ble mechanic and was still in
high school in April 1930. Every
day, he walked to and from
school. Of course, it was 20
miles uphill each way and
snowed year-round with 3 feet
of snow on the ground.
The struggles of walking to
and from school not withstand-
ing, Howard always managed to
take a short-cut home through
the local Ford store. And every


E'


I


day he admired or
drooled over a brand-
new shiny Washing-
ton Blue Ford Model
A Standard Roadster,
with a rumble seat
and bright yellow
Halsey wheels. The
whole car was set off
by a deep red body
pin stripe along the
light blue painted
body line.
Day after day,
Howard stopped and


admired the car. Then at the
family dinner table, he told all
of his brothers and sisters
someday he was going to drive
that car. He saw it in his
dreams. It was the most beauti-
ful car he had ever seen and
probably, he thought, one of the
fastest.
One day on the way home
from school, Howard took his
usual short-cut through the
Ford store and his dreams of
driving the shiny roadster were
shattered. The roadster was
gone. It had been sold.
It was a long, cold walk home.
But to his surprise, when
Howard arrived home, bleak
winter turned to glorious sum-
mer in the twinkling of an eye.
For there sitting in his very own
driveway with its top down and
its rumble seat in the open po-
sition was his brother Vern's
new car a 1930 Ford Model A
Standard Roadster painted
Washington Blue with bright
yellow Halsey wheels and a
deep red stripe on the light blue
body line. Vern bought the
dream car!


While that part of the story
had a happy ending, the final
part did not end as well. In Sep-
tember of that year, Vern was
riding his motorcycle and was
killed by a drunken driver.
The Model A stayed in Vern's
family and was used until the
mid 1940s, when it was re-
placed by a newer model auto-
mobile. The A then sat in a shed
until the early 1990s.
Over that period, several rel-
atives intended to restore the
car, but it never happened. Ken
McNeely purchased the Model
A with all of the documentation
and spare parts. With very little
work, he started and drove the
car before turning it over to a
professional for restoration.
The Model A was as much of
a dream to Ken as it was to his
father. Playing in the car while
it was still in his uncle's shed is
why Ken is also a "caraholic"
today. Through this car, Ken
learned whether you are in
your 90s, or like him just remi-
niscing of his glory days, every-
one was and maybe still is a
teenager at heart.
Ken's dad, Howard, drove the
Model A shortly after it was re-
stored. It was the first time
since he was a young man he
was able to drive the A. Howard
passed away in 2010, but his
dream lives in his son.
Ken feels old cars aren't just a
piece of machinery, they are
windows to our memories.
Upcoming events
March 22: All American
Muscle Night cruise-in at 6 p.m.
at Arby's on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River.


www.earlyford.com
This 1930 Model "A" Deluxe Roadster with rumble seat is similar to
the Model "A" mentioned in the column.


March 23: Daytona Spring
Turkey Rod Run from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. at the speedway in Day-
tona, with $10 admission.
March 23 and 30: Cruise-in
hosted by Citrus County Cruis-
ers at 6 p.m. at Wendy's on U.S.
19 in Crystal River.
April 2: Cruise-in at 6 p.m.


at H
19 in


col

ba


I


o m M m w- U M W m W m


igh Octane Saloon on U.S.
a Homosassa.

Ken McNally is the car
lumnist for the Chronicle.
Contact him at
kenmcnally@tampa
y.rr com or 352-341-1165.


Now Now
4 ers 14 Beers
On Tap On Tap

Dillon's Irish Pub
108 N. Pine Ave
Inverness 341-0100
Tues.-Thur. 3-10pm Fri. 3pm-12am
Sat. Ipm-12am
jb www.dilionspub.com
JBtu=r


MAMA'S KUNTRY KAFE|C "m""-m $1.
J 1 "Home of the Large Portions" BEER CEETEAtSOROA

ANY 2 ENTREES:: FISH FRY I
Lunch or Dinner 6 3
1 salad *FRI. NIGHTS ONLY
Valid with coupon only. Valid with coupon only.
Not combined w/any other offer. Not combined w/any other offer.
Expires 3/31/13 I Expires 3/31/13

M^^^w^^^"a


,j#' }}Fanmily Restaurant 'i
Comfort Foods That Take You Home I


i 0-
**r bhi'bMe'd


- I Z tor I 4.
419-4878 r i h w/French Fries $~991
.& E '.ed Sun II 441M PM or unlil lasluslomer leaves & Cole Slaw $
(U .. Closed Mon & Jue4 M -- I.
9- 4 .18 - 7AA*. 1ICr. 9f 70A-7Aji .n


LaKesie
Bar & Grill
Chef Remco Invites You To Come


Tues.-Sat. I0am-10pm Sun. & Mon. 10am-5pm
4543 E. WINDMILL DRIVE, INVERNESS, FL 34453 H
HwY.41 BETWEEN INVERNESSAND HERNANDO
U 419-6511
.P=? www.restaurantLakeSide.com ,.
W 0 .-l U .- L.. -. ---- B L-P


COMBO PLATTERS:
FRIED FISH & CALAMARI $9.00
FRIED FISH & SHRIMP $10.00 ,perp
All served with coleslaw sweet corn fritters and potato.


Complimentary Glass of Wine kith meal order 1.00-5.00pm & 7.00-8.00pm
0 ARCHANGEL MICHAEL
- .jGREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
4705 W. Gull to Lake Hwy.. Lecanlo. Florida
(352) 527-0766 Ear r. o
i,,f (O5 at the CANTONIS PARISH CENTER .a,",-'


M;CUN


SCENE


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 C3





C4 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013

ARTS & CRAFTS
All Day Art Club, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Old
Homosassa Civic Center,
5530 S. Mason Creek Drive,
behind the fire station. $10.
Bring supplies. Intermediate
and advanced artists wel-
come. 352-795-8774.
Laurie Kansky and
Helene Lancaster's water-
color exhibit will be on dis-
play through March 23 at
Lorna Jean Gallery, 6136 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway in
Crystal River. 352-564-2781.
Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers'
Guild of America, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., first Wednesday
monthly at Faith Evangelical
Presbyterian Church, 200 Mt.
FairAve., Brooksville. Bring
lunch. 352-621-6680 (Citrus),
352-666-8350 (Hernando).
College of Central
Florida's 2013 Student Art
Exhibition, Wednesday,
April 3, at Webber Center
Gallery on Ocala campus at
3001 S.W. College Road.
Opening reception and
presentation 12:30 to 1:30
p.m. Free. Exhibit includes
artworks created by stu-
dents from the Ocala and
Citrus campuses during fall
2012 and spring 2013 se-
mesters. Hours are 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday. 352-873-5809.
Gulfport's First Friday
Art Walk, 6 to 10 p.m. April
5, more than a half-mile
down scenic Beach Boule-
vard. Third Saturday Art
Walk is 6 to 10 p.m. April
19. Gulfport Art Walk is the
first Friday and third Satur-
day of every month, year-
round. Parking free. Free
trolley rides from off-site
parking areas. Pet and fam-
ily friendly. www.Gulfport
MA.com. 866-ART-WALK.
Needlework Fun
Groups, 2 to 4 p.m. first and
third Saturdays monthly,
Wildwood Public Library,
310 S. Palmer Drive, Wild-
wood. 352-748-1158.
els34785@yahoo.com.
Nature Coast Decora-
tive Artists Chapter of the
Society of Decorative Artists
meets at 9 a.m. first Satur-
day monthly at Weeki
Wachee Senior Center off
U.S. 19 and Toucan Trail,
Spring Hill. Short meeting,
show-and-tell and birthday
raffle. On March 30, Sharon
Poorman will teach a Betty
Caithness scene in acrylics
at the senior center.
352-688-4106. www.nature
coastdecorativeartists.com.
Citrus Watercolor
Club meeting, noon second
Friday monthly, United
Methodist Church on
County Road 581, Inver-
ness. Demonstrations by
well-known artists at each
meeting. $5. 352-382-8973
or 352-622-9352. www.
citruswatercolorclub.com.
Manatee Haven Deco-
rative Artists chapter of the
National Society of Decora-
tive Painters, meets second
Saturday monthly at North
Oak Baptist Church, 9324
N. Elkcam Blvd., Citrus
Springs. 352-270-3256 or
dynamite71@juno.com or
manateehavendecorative
artists.org.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Process of Pysanky


Special to the Chronicle
Joan Swetland will demonstrate the Pysanky Process of dyeing and decorating
eggs at 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 22, in Florida Artists Gallery Education Center,
8219 Orange Ave., Floral City. Call 352-344-9300 for information.


Stars of the Day


Special to the Chronicle
Laurie Kansky and Helene Lancaster were featured artists at a recent watercolor
show and wine and cheese open house at Lorna Jean Gallery. Both artists are
members of the Citrus Watercolor Club. Kansky has won awards three years in a
row at the CWC Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park Art Show and five years in
a row in the fine arts division at the Citrus County Fair. Lancaster won the
President's Choice award at the 2013 Homosassa CWC show and has received
Painting of the Month honors for her "Sunset Zebras." Both artists' work will be
on display at the Lorna Jean Gallery, 6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal River,
through the end of March. For more information, call 352-564-2781.


Southeast Regional
Exhibition for artists 18
years or older, who may
submit digital images for ac-
ceptance into exhibition at
the Art Center of Citrus
County. Send entries to
juriedartservices.com be-
fore March 27. $3,500 in
awards will be presented at
artists' reception at 1 p.m.
June 21. For a prospectus
and guidelines, call 352-
746-0924 or visit artcenter
ofcitruscounty.org.
Community Needle-
works Crafters meet at
10 a.m. first Wednesday. All
quilters, knitters and cro-
chet crafters are welcome.
Call Terri at 352-746-1973.
Florida Artists
Gallery's extended hours,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven
days a week, and later Fri-
days and Saturdays for
special events.
Art Center of Citrus
County's regular gallery
hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday to Friday. The Art
Center of Citrus County is
at 2644 N. Annapolis Ave.,
Hernando. 352-746-4089.
DownStairs Art
Gallery and Studio, at 611
N. Citrus Ave., is open.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sun-
day. Pottery lessons avail-
able. 352-249-6170 or
adellisster@gmail.com.
ART CLASSES
The Florida Artists
Gallery, historic Knight
House, 8219 Orange Ave.,
Floral City, offers art classes.
352-344-9300. www.
Floridaartistsgallery.com.
March classes:
Finding your way in
watercolor, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. with break for lunch
Wednesday, March 20
and April 3 and 17. Instruc-
tor Jean W. Morey. Learn to
use limited palette. A work-
shop day on each of pri-
maries plus white. $45 per
class or $40 if paying for
two or more. jeanw.morey
@yahoo.com or
352-586-3701.
Small, private art class
for home-schoolers, 10 to
11:30 a.m. $15. Instructor
Keith Gum. 352-344-9300.
Ongoing classes:
Painting with Acrylics,
1 to 3 p.m. every Friday. In-
structor Connie Townsend.
For beginners to advanced.
$15 per session. 352-400-
9757 or ConnieTown@
aol.com.
Painting with Oils, 1 to
3 p.m. every Tuesday.


BUZZ
SUBMISSIONS
Deadline is 5 p.m.
Friday for the follow-
ing Friday's edition.
For information, call
352-563-5660 and
ask for J.K. Devine.

Instructor Connie
Townsend. For beginners to
advanced. $15 per session.
352-400-9757 or Connie
Town@aol.com.
The Gallery is open from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednes-
day through Saturdays, and
noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday
and Sundays. 352-344-
9300 or www.floridaartists
gallery.com.
Watercolor classes
with instructor Pat Sistrand,
9 a.m. Tuesday, Citrus
Springs Community Center.
$10. www.citruscountyfl.org,
click on Parks & Recreation
to register. 352-465-7007.
Floral City Needle
Artists instructs in quilting,
embroidery, knitting and
crochet for beginners to ad-
vanced levels, 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Tuesday at Floral
City Community House be-
tween the library and the
museum on Orange Av-
enue. Free. 352-344-5896.
Hobby Haven classes:
Acrylic painting with
Lois, noon every Friday. $15.
Classes are at Hobby
Haven & gifts, 1239 S. Sun-
coast Blvd., (U.S. 19), Ho-
mosassa, in Nottingham
Square next to GMC Buick.
352-794-6032.
Lorna Jean Gallery
art classes:
Learn to Draw for ages
8 and older. $15 for group
lessons. Pay for four, re-
ceive one free. Materials in-
cluded. Group and private
lessons available.
Watercolor Painting for
Beginners, 1 to 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday. $15 per session.
Limited to six students.
Learn to design and
create sterling silver jewelry,
1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday in
four-week intervals. $140
for 4 weeks. Materials and
use of tools included. Lim-
ited to four students.
Lorna Jean Gallery is at
6136 W. Gulf-to-Lake Hwy.,
Crystal River. 352-564-2781.
Jewelry making, 1 p.m.
every second Wednesday at
Citrus Springs Library, 1826
W. Country Club Blvd. in Cit-
rus Springs. Instructor Edna
Mikel. Learn to make
bracelets, necklaces and ear-
rings. 352-489-2313.


Snacks &
Beverages


-" 299 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy. (441, Lecanto
2 miles west of Lowe's.
352-419-7960
Ron-Thurs lOam-lOpm Fri & Sat 10am-12am Sun 12pm-10pm


IOEEEG


THE SHED


Weekend Events:




Mdrdi Grdi HomoSdwd Stgle
Friday, March 22
Perlfrmance by: Justil Heat 7-11 p.m.
Crowning of King and Queen
2013 Shrimpapalooza
1st Place Prize: Minimum $300 A
Saturday, Marchr23
P MerlI ormIng Day: Southern Sta1.-
SMOTEL, BAITHOUSE & TIKI BAR
5300 S. Cherokee Way, Homosassa
&MM'0 352#628#2602 Ext. 3
VmD Our Welte o mel Us: mw..m.acmmofnmuou -m
IIIII


Mar1i Gras Homosassa Style
S2.0 Saturday, March 23 got
Old Homosassa, FL
Parade 10:30AM, Event to Follow
Shrimp, Food, Beer & Wine, Vendors,
O Kid's Zone, Arts & Crafts
Parade, Live Music, Great Time!
Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs www.shrimpapalooza.com
000EDOV If you'd like to participate in the parade E-mail Gregg Mackler at Gregg@homosassaprinting.com


86Reasons


Tese
Businesses
32 Yrs, Printing
(352) 628-9411
.25 Yrs. Custom Framing
(352) 628-3090
S17 Yrs, Museum
(352) 628-9411
12 Yrs. Museum Cafe
M2rkYhnr (352)e628-1081
.Now! 2013 Live AMEntsHed

F ind f ft 2 10466 Wl I ee Drive
Blues, Inc.C0all For information Homrosassa
SatulrdaN, 0. 2,2013


Friday Nights Pizza
Saturday Chili Dogs
Sunday Subs .


1


QOi


SCENE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MUSEUMS
"An epic struggle:
Florida's Seminole Wars"
a new exhibit in the Floral
City Heritage Hall Museum,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Fri-
day and Saturday in the old
fire station at the east end
of the Floral City Town Cen-
ter on Orange Avenue/
County Road 48. 352-860-
0101, fchc@hotmail.com or
www.floralcityhc.org
Coastal Heritage Mu-
seum tours, 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday, Coastal Heritage
Museum, 532 Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Extended
hours 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the
second Saturday monthly.
Free. 352-795-1755.
Olde Mill House
Gallery & Printing Mu-
seum "Pulp to Print"
workshops, 1 to 5 p.m.
third week of every month
at 10466 W. Yulee Drive,
Old Homosassa. Next work-
shop is Saturday, March 30.
Instructors Master Printer
Jim Anderson and Paper-
maker Keith Gum. $40 per
class two-hour class. Lunch
in Museum Cafe from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
352-628-9411. gemini
graphics30@yahoo.com.
"Out of Abstraction:
Divergent Directions in
Late 20th Century Art"
opens April 6 and closes
June 2, at the Appleton Mu-
seum of Art, College of
Central Florida.
Admission $6 for adults;
$4 for seniors 55 or older
and students 19 and older;
$3 for youths ages 10 to 18;
and free for members, CF
students, children age 9
and under, and active mili-
tary personnel and their im-
mediate families.
"Victorian Interna-
tional," showcasing English
and American decorative
art, furniture and antiques
from the period of Queen
Victoria's reign, opens April
13 and closes June 9. Ad-
mission $6 for adults; $4 for
seniors 55 or older and stu-
dents 19 and older; $3 for
youths ages 10 to 18; and
free for members, CF stu-
dents, children age 9 and


Married artists work on display


Special to the Chronicle
Award-winning married couple Jeanneine Cole's and Chuck Chesnul's work on
display through mid-April at The Gallery Cafe, at 8219 Orange Ave., Floral City.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week. Visit www.floridaartistsgallery.com


or call 352-344-9300.


under, and active military
personnel and their immedi-
ate families.
"New World Treas-
ures: Artifacts from Her-
nando De Soto's Florida
Expedition," Appleton Mu-
seum of Art, College of Cen-
tral Florida, Ocala. Artifacts
discovered recently in Mar-
ion County and will be on
display until Dec. 31 as part
of the statewide 'Viva
Florida 500" anniversary cel-
ebration. Daily admission $6
for adults; $4 for seniors 55
or older and students 19 and
older; $3 for youths ages 10


to 18. Museum hours
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturdays, noon to
5 p.m. Sunday and closed
on Monday, Thanksgiving,
Christmas and New Year's
Day.
DANCE
Afternoon tea dances
and classical ballroom
music, twice monthly at
community centers, hosted
by deejay Sapphire. On the
second Wednesday
monthly, the tea dance is
1:30 to 4 p.m. at Central Cit-
rus Community Center,


2804 W. Marc Knighton
Court, Lecanto. Dance basics
at 1:30 p.m. and advanced at
2:45 p.m. 352-527-5993. On
the last Friday monthly, 2 to
4 p.m. at West Citrus Com-
munity Center, 8940 W. Veter-
ans Drive, Homosassa. $5,
with a portion of the proceeds
going to in-home senior serv-
ices. 352-527-5993 or 352-
795-3831.
"A Celebration of
Dance" concert, part of Na-
tional Dance Week from April
26 to May 5, seeks perform-
ance pieces for the concert.
To participate, call 352-746-


BUZZ SUBMISSIONS
* To submit an event to the Buzz, email newsdesk
@chronicleonline.com and include name of
event; time, date and place; ticket prices; contact
person's name, number and email address; and
any other pertinent information. In the subject
line of the email, type "Attention Buzz."


7606 or email shalyn@
vsdance.com.
Sumter Singles and
Couples dinner dance,
7:30 to 10:30 p.m. the first
and third Fridays monthly at
Lake Panasoffkee Recre-
ation Park in blue building at
1582 County Road 459 off
County Road 470. Dances
open to married, couples,
singles and groups from
churches and RV parks. All
ages welcome. No alcohol.
Finger foods or soda wel-
come. 352-424-1688.
Spirit of Citrus
Dancers will have its St.
Patrick's Day Dance Party
on Saturday, March 16.
Butch Phillips is the deejay.
Saturday, April 6 -
April's Birthday Dance.
Complimentary cake.
Charles Cook, deejay.
Saturday, April 20 -
inaugural Animation Ball.
Butch Phillips, deejay.
Dances are at Kellner Au-
ditorium, Jewish Center in
Beverly Hills. Doors open at
6:45 p.m. Complimentary
dance lesson at 7 p.m.
General dancing from
7:30 to 10 p.m. Admission
$6 for members and $9 for
non-members. Ice and cof-
fee provided. Sodas and
bottled water may be pur-
chased. Call Barb or Jack
at 352-344-1383 or Kathy at
352-726-1495 or visit
www.socdancer.org for
information.
Allan O'Neal sings
and deejays first Saturday
of the month at Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto Hwy.
(County Road 491 across
from Havana House
Cafe) Lecanto. April 6
dance in sold out. May 4
dance in a fundraiser. Call
Reyna Bell for tickets and
information at 352-344-
5411. No dance in June.
Dance tickets are available
for July 6 by calling Linda at


352-464-0004. Dances are
from 6 to 10 p.m. with a free
dance lesson at 5:30 p.m.
$10 at the door, includes
hot and cold hors d'oeu-
vres, soft drink or coffee.
352-464-0004. www.
eventsolutionsbylinda.com.
Ronnie's Academy of
Dance Musical Theatre
Workshops for children
ages 7 and older, noon to
4 p.m. Saturday April 13
and May 11. No experience
necessary. 352-795-1010.
Ballroom dancing
classes, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, at
Citrus County Canning Cen-
ter, Lecanto. Instructor Dr.
Fred Spurlock. $5 for sin-
gles or $7 for couple. 352-
465-7007 or 352-527-7540.
Sunday Night Dances
every week at Knights of
Columbus, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Hwy., Lecanto.
Doors open at 6 p.m. Music
starts at 7 p.m. Coffee, tea
and soda available.
Line dancing classes
with Kathy Reynolds, 1 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, East
Citrus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Inverness. $3 per
class. 352-344-9666.
Inverness Square
Dance Club's beginner
square dance lessons, 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, East
Citrus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, east of Inverness on
State Road 44. 352-860-
2090 or 352-465-700.
Country Line dancing
classes, 9 to 11 a.m.
Thursday, Beverly Hills
Recreation Center. $3 non-
members. 352-746-4882 or
352-527-3738.
Citrus Squares, 7 p.m.
Thursday, fellowship hall of
First United Methodist
Church of Dunnellon, 21501
W. State Road 40, Dunnel-
Ion. 352-489-1785 or 352-
465-2142.


SMRKET Dat Heritage
*MARKET DAY Vlae


MARKET DAY

WITH ART TREASURES



Saturday, 0 9:oo a.m.
March till 3:00 p.m.
23 *



Local Produce, Plants, Pantry, Artistic Talent &
Vintage Collectibles on the 2nd & 4th Saturday of Each Month


on the Grounds of Heritage Village, 657 N. Citrus Ave.
in the of Historic Downtown Crystal River

www.theshoppesofheritagevillage.com
352-564-1400 / heritagevillageo8@yahoo.com


the Qenerat

Srniop


Marg Beth's

Bridal &


Wstu ptt FormalpWear
Custom Easter BasketsFomlea


For All Ages!

Candy and Gifts for Easter
or any occasion!
Mention This Ad for
994 Cone
In the Wof Downtown Crystal River
639 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
352-564-0311


will continue to rent tuxedos
and sell off remaining iin, n, i,
of wedding formal gornii in our
same 1biili,linj, now i., as
"Dajyz Gone By" Antique Shop

652 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River
Open Mon.-Sat. 10:00-5:00
563-0722


JUST A CUPCAKE
s"B<^A? & e~.

Smftlwt",a,- SK442 & I eAft u

Market Day Breakfast /
Farmer's Pie, Biscuits & Gravy

Special Easter cakes, cookies K /
and cupcakes.
Pre-orders gladly accepted!
652 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River, FL 601-1556
justacupcakebakerycafe.com


Local Fresh Seafood Full Liquor Tavern


mez mer Eqes

Give the gift you can use all year!
Costa Del Mar or Maui Jim for the outdoorsman in your life.
Designer Suns for the fashionista!
Call 352-795-2020
to schedule an exam or for any information


i


I


SCENE


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 CS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FARMERS' MARKETS
Inverness Farmers'
Market, about 30 vendors,
fresh produce, homemade
crafts, baked goods and
more, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every
Saturday, Inverness Gov-
ernment Center parking lot.
352-726-2611.
Herry's Market Day,
8 a.m. to noon, last Satur-
day of the monthat Hospice
Thrift Shoppe, 8471 W.
Periwinkle Lane, Ho-
mosassa (behind Wendy's,
east of U.S. 19). Herry's
Market Day is offering free
vendor space. Space is lim-
ited. 352-527-2020.
Beverly Hills Arts,
Crafts and Farmers Mar-
ket, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. first
and third Fridays of each
month at Lake Beverly
Park. Vendor spaces $10.
www.bhcivicassociation.
com. 352-746-2657.
Dunnellon's First Sat-
urday Village Market, in-
cludes a variety of street
vendors, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
first Saturday monthly, Dun-
nellon's Historic District on Duelinj
West Pennsylvania Avenue,
Cedar and Walnut streets.
352-465-2225. p.m. Tues
Floral City Market Ruth EckE
Day, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., and $55.
second Saturday monthly, www.ruth
Floral City, U.S. 41. Pro- U The
duce, homemade crafts, shine Ba
plants, baked goods, etc, 1:30 p.m.
available. frugalfrogdiva@ Citrus Co
gmail.com or 352-344-1000. 9907 E. C
Market Day with Art & (State Ro
Treasures, an outdoor Inverness
event with plants, produce, 352-465-4
arts, crafts, collectibles and 0 John
more, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. sec- tional Co
ond Saturdays on the Show an
grounds of Heritage Village, Mondays
657 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal Communi
River. 352-564-1400. Main St.,
Saturday at the Mar- 352-560-
ket, farmers' market, 8 a.m. C Crys
to 2 p.m. Saturday weekly, in The Pa
in front of the historic Court- any talent
house, downtown groups wl
Brooksville. 3524284275. to perform
Circle Square Corn- the third S
mons Farmers' Market month. Al
summer hours, 9 a.m. to edition. 35;
1 p.m. Thursday. Fresh sea- 0 Sun
sonal produce, flowers, Chapter c
plants, fresh-baked goods, lines is w
handmade soaps, delicious members
pies and more. Circle Square every at 7
Commons is adjacent to On day. Carp
Top of the World Communi- 352-726-!
ties at 8405 S.W. 80th St. in U Dian
Ocala. 352-854-3670. Wednesd
www.CircleSquareCommons Eckerd H,
FarmersMarket.com. www.ruth
Gulfport Tuesday 0 Cent
Fresh Market, includes ter Choir
fresh produce, seafood, art, Moon anc
live entertainment, 9 a.m. to Sunday, /
3 p.m. every Tuesday, United ME
Gulfport waterfront district 1126 E. S
(Beach Boulevard). http:// across fro
gulfportflorida.us/tuesday- Free. 352
morning-fresh-market. U Mari
The Ybor City Satur- concert"(
day Market, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to Broadv
October to May and 9 a.m. day, May
to 1 p.m. June to Septem- MethodisI
ber. Historic Ybor City in E. SilverE
Centennial Park is at Ninth across str
Avenue and 19th Street. Hotel, Oc
813-241-2442. 537-0207
MusIC ocala.org
U 2013
Nature Coast Friends conce01rt
of Blues "2013 Live Music concerns
Series" at Museum Cafe, 10 p.m. F
10466 W. Yulee Drive, Old April 5 thr
Homosassa. $7 nonmem- Diddley C
bers and $5 members. 1Gainesvil
Bring a chair, but no pets, affairs.org
food or outside drink permit- Musica.
ted. Join for $15 per person Api
or $10 per family at any se- April
ries event and get in free. ware and
www.ncfblues.com. ers.Bwem
L cludeBoulware
Lineup includes: mandolin
Saturday, March 23 ware's da
TEENSTOCK "Kids Helping Boulware
Kids." son, Jack
The Singing Tree, guitars/vc
2:30 p.m. Sunday, March Boulware
24, at Nature Coast Unitar- witt on ke
ian Universalist Church, Don Davi
7633 N. Florida Ave., (U.S. child on
41), Citrus Springs. $10. drums res
Refreshments available. Campbell
Nature Coast Festival and Peter
Singers annual Spring U Colk
Concert, 3 p.m., Sunday, Florida's
March 24, at Northcliffe present "
Baptist Church, 10515 Song" at
Northcliffe Blvd., Spring Hill. day, April
Free. Love offering will be DassancE


collected. naturecoast CF Ocala
festivalmusic@rocketmail. S.W. Coll,
com or 352-515-5335. Doors opE
Queen Latifah, 7:30 minutes b



FOSTER
Continued from Page Cl

At times, I just wanted to jump in
the movie console the sad man.
I just cannot help but respect Helen
Mirren as Alma. The woman caters to
poor old "Hitch's" every whim but is
really put together She does not mince
words with her cantankerous husband,


Ready, set, dual, play


Special to the Chronicle
g Banjos will perform at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 24, at Crystal River Mall.


sday, March 26,
erd Hall. $95, $75
727-791-7400.
eckerdhall.com.
Country Sun-
nd, 11:30 a.m. to
Friday, East
immunity Center,
3ulf-to-Lake Hwy.
ad 44 East),
s. Call Annie at
4860.
n Thomas Tradi-
untry Music
d Jam, 6 to 9 p.m.
weekly, Oxford
ity Center, 4027
Oxford. $5.
7496.
stal River Music
irk is looking for
ted individuals or
ho would be willing
m for two hours on
Saturday of any
I are invited to au-
2-601-3506.
coast Harmony
of Sweet Ade-
'elcoming new
. Group meets
7 p.m. every Tues-
ools available.
8666.
na Krall, 8 p.m.
ay, April 3, Ruth
all. 727-791-7400.
eckerdhall.com.
tral Florida Mas-
concert "To the
d Bach!" 3 p.m.
April 28, at First
methodist Church, at
Silver Springs Blvd.
>m old Ritz Hotel.
2-537-0207.
on Civic Chorale
Give My Regards
way" 3 p.m. Sun-
5, at First United
t Church, at 1126
Springs Blvd.
reet from old Ritz
ala. Free. 352-
or www.fumc

"Free Fridays"
series, 8 and
iday nights, from
ough Nov. 8, at Bo
community Plaza,
iversityAve.,
e. www.gvlcultural
or 352-393-8746.
l acts include:
5 Mike Boul-
the Dreamcatch-
bers include: Mike
on guitars/
/vocals; Boul-
aughter, Carolina
on vocals; his
son Boulware on
ocals; Jackson
's mom Cathy De-
yboard/vocals;
d and Rob Roth-
guitar/vocals/
spectively; Dino
on congas/vocals;
r Frizzell on bass.
ege of Central
Patriot Singers
A Celebration of
7:30 p.m. Satur-
20, in Charles R.
e Fine Arts Center,
campus, 3001
ege Road. Free.
en to the public 30
before the perform-


MUSIC REHEARSALS
IN-COUNTY
* Second Sunday Sunset Drum Circle, two hours
before sunset, Sundays, Fort Island Trail Beach
Park, Crystal River, at far end of beach. Circle be-
gins an hour and a half before sunset. Bring drums
and percussion instruments. Chair necessary.
352-344-8009 or 352-746-0655.
* Chorus of The Highlands, the Citrus County chap-
ter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, rehearses
at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday weekly at First United
Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road,
Inverness, 34452. Male singers welcome.
352-382-0336.
* Citrus County chapter of "Chorus of the High-
lands" Barbershop Harmony Society, 6:30 p.m.
every Tuesday in Inverness. 352-382-0336.
* The Nature Coast Community Band, rehearses
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at Citrus County
Canning Plant Auditorium on Southern Street,
Lecanto. 352-746-7567. nccommunityband
@earthlink.net.
* Citrus Community Concert Choir Inc. rehearse at
7 p.m. Tuesday at Faith Lutheran Church
Fellowship Hall, Lecanto. New members welcome
to audition beginning at 6:30 p.m. 352-212-1746.
Music rehearsals run at least once a month, space permitting.


ance. tickets.cf.edu or
352-873-5810.
Special Interest
Crystal River Mall
events in March:
1 p.m. March 23 -
Karaoke.
0 2 p.m. March 24 -
Dueling Banjos.
0 2 to 5 p.m. March 27
- Hands-on art day with
arts and crafts, face paint-
ing, bounce house and en-
tertainment with teen star
Sophie Robitaille. Free.
March 30 FS Music
will host music competition.
If interested in participating,
contact FS Music at 352-
795-5009.
352-795-2585 or
www.thecrystalrivermall.
com or Like us on Face-
book at Crystal River Mall.
Bill Cosby, 5 and
8 p.m. Saturday, March 23,
Ruth Eckerd Hall. $63, $50
and $42. 727-791-7400.
www.rutheckerdhall.com.
Chapter 156 of The
National Association of
Watch and Clock Collec-
tors (NAWCC) meeting,
8 a.m. fourth Sunday
monthly, Hernando Civic
Center, 3848 E. Parson's
Point Road, Hernando. 352-
527-2669.
Growing up Brady,
hosted by Barry Williams
and featuring the new Brady
kids, 1 p.m. Sunday, March
24, at Ruth Eckerd Hall,
1111 McMullen Booth Road,
Clearwater. $75, $50 and
$25. 727-791-7400. www.
rutheckerdhall.com.
Crystal River of Life
Coffee House, Christian
Fellowship, conversation
and music from 7 to 9:30
p.m. Friday, Village Cafe,
789 N.E. Fifth St., State
Road 44. 352-817-6879.
Crystal River Pre-
serve State Park boat tour,
10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Monday, Wednesdays and
Friday, Crystal River Pre-
serve State Park Visitor


exudes this gentle, absolute authority
on movie sets and stays poised when
dealing with bombshell actresses. A lot
of actresses can botch such a bold
character pigeonholing Alma into
being a stoic matriarch or screechy
cougar but Mirren does not It feels
like Mirren takes her role seriously,
and she does not just have fun with it
I think her approach really suits her
professional, serious character
All in all, "Hitchcock" is not per-


Center. $12.50 adults; $10
children ages 7 to 12; free,
children 6 and younger. Tick-
ets on sale in Preserve Visitor
Center one hour prior to de-
parture; arrive no less than 15
minutes prior to departure.
352-563-0450. www.crystal
riverstateparks.org.
Award-winning poet
Jennifer Key reading, 12:30
to 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 5, at
College of Central Florida,
Ocala Campus, Building 8,
Room 110. Book signing fol-
lows. Free. Contact Dr. Ron
Cooper at 352-854-2322, ext.
1295, or cooper@cf.edu.
The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Society
meeting, 1 p.m. first Saturday
monthly, Central Ridge Li-
brary, 425 W. Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills. 352-726-0162.
www.fchns.org.
Sixth annual "The Liv-
ing Art of Bonsai" exhibit
April 10 through April 13 at
Master the Possibilities Cen-
ter, 8415 S.W. 80th St.,
Ocala. Hours are 1 to 4 p.m.
April 10, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
April 11 and 12 and 9 a.m. to
noon April 13. Register for as-
sociated classes, presenta-
tions and demonstrations.
www.masterthepossibilities.
com or 352-861-9751.
The Florida Chapter of
the Historical Novel Society
one-day writing workshop,
Friday, April 12, in Garden
Room at Andre's Restaurant in
Citrus Hills Country Club com-
plex, 505 East Hartford Street,
Hernando. Instructor Judith
Rock, noted best-selling au-
thor. Morning session from
10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. devoted
to determining what or who is
driving plot. Afternoon session
from 1:30 to 4 p.m. deals with
character development. $50
for FCHNS members and $60
nonmembers. Lunch included.
Participants encouraged to
bring a one-page synopsis of
novel or work-in-progress and
a brief, clear statement of their
biggest problem with the plot.
352-726-0162.


fect, but well worth a rental. I give it
a high B+.
With a running time of 98 minutes,
"Hitchcock" is rated PG-13 for some
violent images, sexual content and
thematic material. "Hitchcock" is
available for purchase now and for
rent at Redbox kiosks on April 9.


Heather Foster is a senior at the
University of Florida.


Associated Press
Halle Berry portrays a 911 operator in "The Call."


Review: 'The Call'


a shallow thriller


JAKE COYLE
AP entertainment
writer

In countless films about
emergencies, crimes and
police work, the 911 dis-
patcher is but a bit player,
an anonymous, robotic
voice briefly heard on the
other end of a breathless
call made by our movie's
main players.
But in "The Call," the
911 operator gets a star-
ring role. It would seem to
be long overdue, since
Halle Berry is apparently
among their ranks.
She's a highly profes-
sional emergency operator
in Los Angeles, where the
trauma of a first kidnap-
ping case has forced her to
hang up the headset But,
having shifted to a trainer
position, she's lured back
for a second kidnapping
call when a rookie dis-
patcher can't handle the
frightened pleas from a
teenager trapped in a car's
trunk (Abigail Breslin).
Director Brad Ander-
son (who has a few sturdy
thrillers to his credit:
"Transsiberian," "The
Machinist"), working
from the simple, high-
concept screenplay by
Richard D'Ovidio, ably
cuts between Berry's in-
creasingly emotionally-
attached Jordan Turner
and Breslin's panicking
Casey Welson, contrasting
the fraught strategizing of
Turner with the frantic
police pursuit of the kid-
napper (Michael Eklund).
Turner's cop boyfriend
(Morris Chestnut) is
among those in the hunt.
"The Call" dials up a
shallow thrill ride, but
one efficiently peppered
with your typical "don't go
in there!" moments. But
what once was usual for
Hollywood reliable,
popcorn-eating genre
frights isn't so much
anymore. "The Call" is a
rudimentary, almost old-
fashioned 90-minute es-
cape that manages to
achieve its low ambitions.
To distract and calm


Welson, Turner at one
point asks her her fa-
vorite movie, to which she
replies "Bridesmaids."
The bit has a two-pronged
effect. One, we can't help
but think: Wouldn't it be
nice to instead be watch-
ing something as good as
"Bridesmaids?" But also,
two, to remind us of the
joy of moviegoing, of
which thoughtless movies
like "The Call" are a defi-
nite part.
But while "The Call"
manages to build some
suspense from the trunk of
the car the clever at-
tempts to elicit help, the
dwindling cell phone bat-
tery its deficiencies be-
come less forgivable once
the action turns off the
road. Eklund's psychopath
kidnapper is cartoonishly
drawn and when he has
Welson back at this lair -
and Turner is summoned
from the high-tech, oddly
NASA-like call center -
"The Call" disconnects
with horror film cliches.
Berry, with a ball of
short curly hair, keeps the
film rolling even when it
veers off course. Breslin,
making a leap to more sor-
did territory, has little to
do but be scared. Michael
Imperioli makes a brief
appearance as a con-
cerned bystander, a re-
minder mainly the fine
"Sopranos" actor deserves
considerably better.
From "Phone Booth" to
"Cellular" (a film with
which "The Call" shares
many similarities), phone-
based movies have gener-
ally been bad service for
moviegoers, who so often
would rather look at their
own mobiles in the movie
theater. Perhaps we can
await a sequel to "The
Call" that shifts to the 311
call center, where a pot-
hole complaint spirals
dramatically out of con-
trol. So call me maybe?
"The Call," a Sony Pic-
tures release, is rated R for
violence, disturbing con-
tent and some language.
Running time: 95 minutes.
Two stars out of four


Associated Press
Abigail Breslin portrays a kidnap victim in "The Call."





Inverness
y/ Elks Lodge #2522




1Q OCAFT SHOW



SadatwuyL

(Him&k23

9:00 am- 3:00 pia



3580 Lemon St., Hernando

For more infromation
Call 860-2598


Ci Ii~)NI~:i.~E


-11-


C6 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


SCENE


DOTx







Page C7 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Bank to stage
Relay car wash
Bank of America will
have its third annual car
wash fundraiser for Inver-
ness Relay For Life from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 23, in the parking lot
between Pizza Hut and
Heidi's on Main Street.
Carnival to
benefit charity
Crystal River Winn Dixie
at Meadowcrest on State
Road 44 will have its sec-
ond annual spring fling be-
ginning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 23, to benefit the
March of Dimes.
This year will have a car-
nival theme with bouncy
houses, games, dunk
tanks, races, egg hunts,
food tasting and pictures
with the Easter bunny, plus
more events and food.
Local businesses are in-
vited to set up booths. For
more information, call
Melissa Bussinger at 352-
795-9211 or email
bussingerm@gmail.com.
Show off your
pet at mall
Everyone is invited to
bring their pet and meet at
the Sears parking lot at
Crystal River Mall for a pet
walk from 8 to 10 a.m. Sat-
urday, March 23.
A $5 participation dona-
tion (or more) will benefit
the American Cancer
Society and Citrus County
Humane Society.
For information, call
Lorelie LeBrun at 352-
613-3988.


A Humane Society
CENTRAL FLA.

Smoochie


Special to the Chronicle
Smoochie's mother is un-
able to care for him any
longer. He is a beautiful,
11-year-old, white-
coated, neutered male
mini-Schnauzer.
Smoochie is a playful and
happy boy after he gets
to know you. He likes to
ride, go for walks and is
crate trained. Meet him
and other little dogs at
our weekly Saturday
adoption events from
10 a.m. to noon at Pet
Supermarket, Inverness.
If you must give up your
little dog, call 352-527-
9050. Foster parents are
needed for dogs.


Spot center offers tutoring


Scholarships available for special program


Special to the Chronicle

The Spot Family Center, a local
nonprofit organization based in
Crystal River, has received funding
from Kids Central Inc. and the De-
partment of Children and Families
to offer 40 local students scholar-
ships for its 2013 After School En-
richment Program.
The program serves students in


kindergarten through seventh grade
from 2:45 to 6 p.m. Monday through
Friday
The scholarships are available to
local families who receive free or
reduced-price lunches. Applications
can be picked up at 405 S.E. Seventh
Ave., Crystal River. Scholarships are
given on a first-come, first-served
basis.
The scholarships will offer stu-


dents free academic tutoring, nutri-
tional education and homework as-
sistance, as well as outdoor
activities, arts and crafts, computer
tech labs, reading teams, mentor-
ship and leadership skills.
Space is limited. On scheduled
school early dismissal days, hours
will be 12:30 to 6 p.m. Bus trans-
portation from Crystal River Pri-
mary and Middle School is available
to The Spot.
Registration is required. Call 352-
794-3870 for information.


Mystery Poker Run


Seventh annual event supports Hospice care for


Special to the Chronicle
American Legion Riders
Post 155 Crystal River will
have its seventh annual
Mystery Poker Run at 9
a.m. Saturday, March 30.
Proceeds will benefit vet-
erans served by Hospice of
Citrus County and Hospice
of the Nature Coast


All vehicles are wel-
come. A donation of $10
per hand includes dinner.
The Mystery Poker Run
will begin at the Blanton-
Thompson American Le-
gion Post 155, 6585 W
Gulf-to-Lake Highway,
Crystal River. Registration
begins at 9 a.m. with the
last bike out at 11 a.m. and


last bike in (at the final
stop) at 3 p.m. The final
stop will feature a cash
bar, dinner, raffles, a 50/50
drawing and cash prizes
for the top three poker
hands.
Every year, American
Legion posts and the or-
ganizations within them
raise thousands of dollars


Citrus veterans

for health care organiza-
tions, local children's hos-
pitals, schools, severely
wounded servicemen and
servicewomen and Ameri-
can Legion Scholarship
programs.
For information, call
Tom Poole at 352-422-7674
or email poole22@
gmail.com.


Indiana Day


Special to the Chronicle
Indiana Day was celebrated recently with a special guest, comedian Bennie Woolam, who is 101 years old. Pictured,
from left, are: Bennie Woolam, Theda Dobbs, Janet Bowman, Monnie Bettuo, Loretta Hennessee and Ron Bowman.
Hoosiers are encouraged to keep the third Wednesday of February 2014 in mind for the next Indiana Day.



Learn some new Mac skills with local group


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus Macintosh User
Group is back to its normal
meeting schedule in
March after celebrating its
members with the annual
social in February. The
meeting will be from 7 to 9
p.m. Friday, March 29, with
a question-and-answer
session at 6:30 p.m.


The demo will be Per-
fect Effects 4 Free by Jo-
hanna Foster, CMUG
magazine editor. The club
also hopes to present the
scholarships at this
meeting.
Other club activities for
the month are:
Tuesday, March 26, 1
to 5 p.m. Genealogy
class, Natalie Armitage


and Linda Gasparini.
Thursday, March 28, 1
to 5 p.m. Lab/tune-up.
Registration with topic to
be covered required.
Email John Engberg at
mrbyte@earthlink.net.
Thursday, March 28, 6
to 9 p.m. iPhoto on the
Mac class, Curtis Herrin or
Jack Colson.
Registration is required


for classes. Email Carolyn
Herrin at carolynwherrin
@me.com. Class fee is the
standard $10 for single, $15
for family and $20 for non-
members.
For more information,
visit cmugonline.com or
contact President Alan
Wentzell at cmugpres
@gmail.com or 352-302-
5864.


News NOTES

Nobleton men
to serve pasta
The Nobleton Men's
Club will serve homemade
spaghetti with meat sauce
dinners from 4 to 6 p.m.
Saturday, March 23, at the
Tri-County Community
Center, 28444 Forbes
Road, Nobleton (the old
firehouse).
All dinners are served by
donations only, which will
go toward purchasing toys
for children at Christmas,
food baskets and other
items of need.
Everyone is welcome.
For more information or di-
rections, call Sam Reyka
352-793-7037.
School program
slates sale
Citrus High School's
Project Graduation Class of
2013 will have a fundrais-
ing rummage sale from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 23, at the old Cox
Lumber Building on State
Road 44, across from Winn
Dixie, in Inverness.
Project Graduation is a
program offered by many
high schools in which or-
ganized, adult-supervised
and alcohol-free activities
are offered as part of a
post-graduation party.
Wilderness Circle
to be March 23
Wilderness Circle Spring
Equinox will be at 11 a.m.
Saturday, March 23. It will
be led by Mackie Sanford,
of Cherokee descent.
A chair will be set at the
north gate of the circle for
prayers. If weather permits
a fire will be built in the
center of the circle.
There will be a potluck
dinner, followed by after-
noon music. Bring a guest
and something for potluck.
Call Betty Berger at 352-
447-2736 or email
bberger@bellsouth.net for
directions.
Lions to serve
pancakes Sunday
The Beverly Hills Lions
Club, 72 Civic Circle Drive,
will have its pancake
breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m.
Sunday, March 24.
Cost for adults is $4;
children younger than 12
eat for $2. This includes all-
you-can-eat pancakes,
choice of bacon or sausage
or combo, orange juice and
coffee or tea.
For more information,
call Lion Shirley at 352-
527-1943.
Zen meditation
at Unity Church
The public is welcome to
Zen meditation sessions at
2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Wood-
view Lane, Lecanto (off
County Road 491).
For more information,
call 352-464-4955.


Religion NOTES


Congregation Beth Sholom
Passover Morning Services are 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, March
26 and 27.
The Genesis Project is an intensive, in-
depth analysis and discussion of the entire
text of the Book of Genesis conducted in Eng-
lish, employing classical ancient, medieval
and modern commentators of the biblical text.
Sessions are 7 to 8 p.m. Monday (17 ses-
sions). Fee is $5 per session, plus textbook.
History of Zionism and Israel examines the
origins of modern political Zionism, the devel-
opment of the Jewish community during the
British Mandate period, the struggle for inde-
pendence and the history of Israel since the
establishment of the state in 1948.
Sessions are 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Monday
(17 sessions). Fee is $5 per session, plus
textbook.
Bingo is played at 6 p.m. Tuesday in
Kellner Auditorium.
Congregation Beth Sholom with Hazzan
Mordecai Kamlot as cantor/spiritual leader is
at 102 Civic Circle, Beverly Hills, and offers
Friday (7:30 p.m.) and Saturday (9:30 a.m.)
Shabbat services, as well as social and


cultural activities.
Call 352-643-0995, or email mkamlot2@
gmail.com.

Advent Hope
Bible study is at 10 a.m. Saturday for all
ages. The worship service begins at
11:30 a.m. Saturday. After the service, there is
a weekly potluck.
Vegetarian store is open from 10 a.m. to
noon each Wednesday.
The church is at 428 N.E. Third Ave.,
Crystal River. Call 352-794-0071 or visit
www.adventhopechurch.com.
Inverness SDA
Sabbath school song service starts at
9:10 a.m. Saturday. Children's classes begin
at 9:30; toddler class is at 9:45; adult Bible
study is at 9:50 a.m. Sabbath services begin
at 11 a.m. Pastor John Sabo will speak about
"Jesus is a Good Samaritan."
The Revelation seminar continues at 7 p.m.
Saturday, Monday and Wednesday.
The Thrift Store is open 9 a.m. to noon
Wednesday. Food store is open 9 a.m.
to noon.


The church is at 638 S. Eden Gardens,
4.5 miles east of Inverness off State Road 44.
Call is 352-726-9311. Visit online at www.
sda-inverness.org.
Hernando SDA
Hernando Seventh-day Adventist services
start at 11 a.m. Saturday. A fellowship lunch-
eon will follow the worship service; all are
welcome.
The adult Sabbath school program begins
at 9:15 a.m. Saturday, followed at 10 a.m. by
Bible study. Classes for children are available
at 9:30 a.m.
There is a mid-week meeting at 6 p.m.
each Wednesday.
The church is at 1880 N. Trucks Ave.,
Hernando; phone 352-344-2008.

Glad Tidings SDA
Sabbath school begins at 9 a.m. Saturday
with song, then study, at Glad Tidings SDA
Church. Divine hour follows at 11 a.m.
Elder Shaffer will bring the bread of life this
Sabbath. A vegan lunch follows the service.
Bible study is at 6 p.m. Thursday.
CHIP (Coronary Health Improvement


Program) alumni meet at 5 p.m. the first Mon-
day monthly. Interested persons welcome.
For more information, call Bob at 352-
628-1743.
The church is at 520 N.E. Third Ave. (next
to the BP station), Crystal River.

Homosassa SDA
Norman Deakin will lead the worship serv-
ice at 11 a.m. Saturday. Sue Halstead will lead
the 10 a.m. adult Bible class. The 9:30 a.m.
Sabbath school will be led by Susanne
Adams. Bob Halstead will talk about "Creation
and the Gospel" at the 10 a.m. Sabbath
school Saturday.
There will be a free seminar about healthy
lifestyle and diet at 7 p.m. every Monday in
March.
Tuesday Bible study is at 7 p.m. Thursday
study group is at 10 a.m. The men's study
group meets at 6:30 p.m. Thursday.
The Food Pantry is open from 3 to 4:30
p.m. Tuesday, March 19.
The public is welcome at all events. The
church is at 5863 Cardinal St.
For more information, call Bob Halstead at
352-382-7753.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRIDAY EVENING MARCH 22, 2013 C: Conmast, Citrus B: Bright House Do/: Conmast, Dunnellon& Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 I 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00 110:30 11:00 11:30
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S 96 19 96 106 & Park: BET' p 10 Live Top 10 The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game The Game
96 19 96 Countdown" Freestyle Friday (N)'PG'-
BRAVO) 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. To Be Announced To Be Announced
South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Daily Show Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Workaholics Tosh.0 Tosh.0 ** "Harold & Kumar Escape
S 27 61 27 33 14' '14' Report '14', '14' 14' '14' c From Guantanamo Bay" (2008)
98 45 98 28 37 Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' Reba'PG' ** "Overboard" (1987) Goldie Hawn. An amnesiac mil- "National
98 4 98 8 37 lionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter. 'PG' Lamp."
i[CBC1 43 42 43 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report Treasure Detectives The Car Chasers American Greed Mad Money
f(if) 40 29 40 41 46 The Situation Room Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper Piers Morgan Live Anderson Cooper Erin Burnett OutFront
i Good- Jessie Dog With a Dog With a ***l Up"1,-,',-, Comedy) Voices Phineas Dog With a Good- Jessie A.N.T
46 40 46 6 5 Charlie 'G' a Blog'G Blog 'G' of E i i andFerb Blog 'G' Charlie 'G'a Farm'G'
(EPi 33 27 33 21 17 SportsCenter (N) Winter X Games Tignes. From Tignes, France. (N Same-day Tape) Soccer
ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49 SportsNation(N) NFL Live (N) 30 for 30 Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) (Live) N
(EWTi) 95 70 95 48 Faith |Left Daily Mass Life on the Rock'G' Campus |Rosary Crossing |Evange Christ |Women
America's Funniest America's Funniest America's Funniest America's Funniest America's Funniest The 700 Club (In
29 52 29 20 28 Home Videos 'PG' Home Videos 'PG' Home Videos'PG' Home Videos 'PG' Home Videos'PG' Stereo) 'PG'
** "The Prince & Me" (2004) Julia Stiles. A *** "Muriel's Wedding" (1994) Toni Collette, ** "Mr. Wrong" (1996) Ellen "Georgia"
EEl) 118 170 collegian and a Danish prince fall in love. Bill Hunter (In Stereo) '' DeGeneres.'PG-13' 'R'
(TU) 44 37 44 32 Special Report FOX Report The O'Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O'Reilly Factor
FTD 26 56 26 Diners Diners Restaurant: Im. Diners |Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners |Diners
IFSjF$ ) 35 39 35 UEFA Magic NBA Basketball: Thunder at Magic Magic In Magic In Magic World Poker Tour
S 30 60 30 51How I Met How I Met "Meamind" (2010, Comedy Voices of *** "Megamind" 2010, Comedy) Voicesof "Night at the Museum:
30 60 30 51Will Ferre, Brad Pit, Tina Fey 'PG Will Ferrelf, Brad Pitt, Tina Fey 'PG Smithsonian"
[GOLF1 727 67 727 Central LPGA Tour Golf Kia Classic, Second Round. |PGA Tour Golf Arnold Palmer Invitational, Second Round. Central
S 59 68 59 45 Brady Brady Brady Brady ** "Flicka" (2006, Drama) Alison Lohman, Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG' Frasier 'PG'
L 59 68 59 45 54 Bunch Bunch Bundh Bunch Tim McGraw, Maria Bello. PGB
** ", 1 Robot" (2004) "A Thousand Words" (2012) Road to REAL Sports With Real Time With Bill Real Time With Bill
WID) 302 201 302 2 2 Will Smith. Eddie Murphy.'PG-13' Rios Bryant Gumbel'PG' Maher (N) 'MA' B Maher'MA' cc
h**D3 2 "Wanderlust" (2012, Comedy) Paul Rudd. **n, "Horrible Bosses" (2011) Admission: *** "X-Men: First Class" (2011, Action)
303 202 303 (In Stereo) 'R' a Jason Bateman.'R' a 1st James McAvoy (In Stereo)'PG-13' cc
(IITV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunt Intl IHunt Intl Hunt Intl |Hunt Intl You Live in What? Flea Mar Flea Mar Hunters |Hunt Intl Hunt Intl Hunt Intl
American Pickers American Pickers "Odd American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers I Love the I Love the
STJ 51 25 51 32 42 'PG'c Fellas"'PG' 'PG'c 'PG'c 'PG' c1880's (N) 1880's (N)
ff 1 24 38 24 31 nHoarders 'PG' a Hoarders 'PG' a Hoarders 'PG' a Hoarders 'PG' a Hoarders 'PG' a Project Runway "He
FE 24 38 24 31 __Said, She Said" 'PG'
"Best Friends" (2005) Megan Gallagher. A "The Trainer" (2013, Suspense) Chelsea "Wicked Minds" (2002, Suspense) Angie
LiN) 50 119 vicious woman terrorizes a riend.'NR' Hobbs, Sunny Mabrey. Premiere.'NR' Everhart, Andrew Walker. 'NR'
nWiA) 320 221 320 3 3 *R*"J.Edgar"(2011) **n "Safe House" (2012, Action) Denzel ** "The Hangover Part ll" (2011) Bradley Girls in Lingerie
320 221320 3 3 '"'Washington. (In Stereo) 'R' Nc Cooper, Ed Helms. (In Stereo) 'R' cc Bed MA
ISNBC 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N) Hardball Matthews IThe Ed Show (N) Rachel Maddow The Last Word Documentary
i 109 65 109 44 5i I ne Pirate code 'u' guerrilla Uold Hush Lost Uold or the UarK secret History ot old: I he 400 Million Uollar secret History ort 0 old:
i 109 65109 44 53 'PG' Ages: Revealed Revealed (N) Emerald'PG, V Revealed
iii 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Turtles Turtles Turtles ITurtles Full H'se |See Dad Nanny |Nanny Friends |Friends
WiJ) 103 62 103 Police Women Police- Dallas Police- Dallas Police- Dallas Police- Dallas Police- Dallas
(DXT) 44 123 Movie ** "Eat Pray Love" (2010) Julia Roberts. 'PG-13' *** "Ocean's Thirteen" (2007) George Clooney .Pretty
"Nobel *** "Our IdiotBrother" (2011) ***2, "War Horse" (2011) Emily Watson. A horse sees joy *iY "The Darkest Hour" (2011)
340 241 340 4 Son"'R' Paul Rudd.'R' a and sorrowduringWorldWar.'PG-13' a Emile Hirsch.'PG-13'
732 112 732 NASCAR Racing NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Fontana, Trackside At... (N) SPEED Faster NASCAR Racing
SPEED 732 112732 Qualifying. (N) (Eive) (Live) Center (N) Than
DEA A man informs on DEA A fugitive murder *** "Scarface" (1983 Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer, Steven Bauer. A Cuban immi-
SPiKLfi 37 43 37 27 36 his son.'14' suspect.' 4' grant fights to the top of Miami's drug trade. (In Stereo) 'R' a
71 *** "The Bourne **n2 "Men in Black 3" (2012, Action) Will Spartacus: War of the Spartacus: War of the Spartacus: War of the
Si 370 271 370 Supremacy" (2004) Smith. (In Stereo)'PG-13' a% Damned (N)'MA' Damned 'MA' Damned 'MA'
Inside the Inside the Heat Live! NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Miami Heat. From the Heat Live! Inside the Inside the Inside the
(LUiJ 36 31 36 Heat Heat (Live) AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) (Live) Heat Heat Heat
** "Growth" (2009, Horror) Mircea Monroe, WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) (In Stereo) Merlin "The Drawing of Being Human "For
31 59 31 26 29 Christopher Shand.'NR' N the Dark" (N) Those About to Rot"
[TB1 49 23 49 16 19 NCAA 12013 NCAA Basketball Tournament |2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams TBA.
*** "Gypsy"(1962, Musical) Rosalind **"L'Amore" (1948, Drama) ***Y, "The Flowers of St. "The Machine That
169 53 169 30 35 Russell, Natalie Wood, Karl Malden.'NR' Anna Magnani.'NR' Francis"(1950) Aldo Fabrizi. Kills Bad People"
Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Gold Rush (In Stereo) Bering Sea Gold (In Gold Rush (In Stereo)
fTD 53 34 53 24 26 Nc B N Stereo) B N
(TL] J 50 46 50 29 30 Say Yes |SayYes Say Yes |SayYes Four Weddings'PG' Say Yes |SayYes Borrowed |Borrowed Say Yes Say Yes
S'* "The Scenesters" (2009, Comedy) Sherilyn ** "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part *** "50/50" (2011) Joseph **Y2
tii 350 261 350 Fenn. (In Stereo)'R' a 1"(2011) Krisfen Stewart. 'PG-13c Gordon-Levitt. 'R' "Drones"
2013 NCAA Basketball 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams
rTHTJ 48 33 48 31 34 Tournament TBA. (N) (Live) a TBA. (N) (Live) Na
(ICO 38 58 38 33 Adven |Regular Regular |Regular Cartoon Planet'G' King/Hill King/Hill American |American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy
(TIAV1 9 54 9 44 Bizarre Foods Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures The Dead Files'PG' The Dead Files'PG'
(iiilV) 25 55 25 98 55 Duke NCAA 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament Second Round: Teams TBA. 2013 NCAA Basketball Tournament
[WUL 32 49 32 34 24 Cosby Cosby Gold Girls IGold Girls Gold Girls IGold Girls Gold Girls |Gold Girls Cleveland |Cleveland King |King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special *** "Casino Royale"
1) 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit'14 Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14' Victims Unit'14 (2006)'PG-13'
Charmed "Show Charmed "The Seven Roseanne **n, "Overboard"(1987) Goldie Hawn. An amnesiac mil- Joan & Melissa: Joan
(WE 117 69 117 Ghouls"'PG' a Year Witch"'PG' 'PG' lionairess is duped by a cunning carpenter.'PG' Knows Best?
WOLA 18 18 18 18 20 MLB Baseball Funny Home Videos Mother Mother |Mother |Mother |WGN News at Nine Funny Home Videos


West
* Q J 10 9
VJ 9 5 2
+ 7 4 3
* J 9


South
1 4J
2*
2 NT


North 03-22-13
4 63
Y K Q 10 7 4
SK8 5
* 7 5 2
East
0 8752
V A 6 3
+ 10 9 2
K Q 10
South
4 AK4
S 8
+ AQJ 6
* A 8 6 4 3


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
West North
Pass 1 V
Pass 2 V
Pass 3 NT


East
Pass
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: 4 Q


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Groucho Marx said, "A child of 5 would un-
derstand this. Send someone to fetch a child of
5."
In bridge, it is a "rule" that if you bid a suit on
the first round of the auction and partner does
not raise your suit, then, if you rebid it in on the
second round, you are indicating at least a six-
card suit. You do your utmost not to rebid in a
five-card suit.
However, these days experts permit a rebid in
a five-card suit by responder if opener reverses
on round two.
What is a reverse? Assuming the auction is
uncontested, opener bids first one suit, then a
second suit, and if responder wishes to give
preference to opener's first-bid suit, he must go
to the three-level three clubs in the given se-
quence. After a one-over-one response, a re-
verse shows a very strong hand; usually 18 to 20
high-card points (but perhaps a good 17).
Here, when North rebid two hearts (with six
good hearts, he would have jumped to three
hearts); South continued with two no-trump to
show his spade stoppers; and North raised to
game.
West led the spade queen. What did South do?
Declarer had seven top tricks: two spades,
four diamonds and one club. Realizing that he
did not have time to play on clubs (the defenders
would have taken at least two spades, one heart
and two clubs),
South went after two heart tricks. So, he
played a heart to dummy's 10. When West
proved to have the jack, declarer took nine
tricks.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WARLC


V H- 1T,,I',,. Senices, Inc

ONDUM



PEERRF



POMSIEP
L [ ] <>'


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Great round! I agree.
I wouldn't play Let's just have
anywhere else. fish and chips
--_ . ..t today.











AFTER FINISHING
THE 18TH HOL-,
THEY STOPPED
TO EAT A ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: MURKY GRIME COMEDY STENCH
I Answer: The technician forgot to change the android's
positronic brain. He needed a "RE-MIND-ER"


ACROSS
1 Meadow
rodent
5 Dress bottom
8 Sierra Madre
gold
11 Assumed
name
13 Famous Khan
14 Hardly any
15 Turn loose
(2 wds.)
16 Optimistic
18 Place of exile
20 Speech
problems
21 Like the flu
23 Barbecue
extra
24 Fly catcher
25 Superman's
attire
27 Charles Lamb
31 Paycheck
abbr.
32 Bond's alma
mater
33 Monthly
expense


34 "Et tu" time
36 Southern and
Blyth
38 Dye vessel
39 Windshield
option
40 "Da" opposite
41 Traveler's
refuge
42 So far
44 Thick
46 Metal grate
49 Harp kin
50 Land
52 Fencing needs
56 Ms. Thurman
of films
57 Pester
58 Well site
59 Hosp.
employee
60 Bad-mouth
61 Rustic road


DOWN
1 Comic strip
prince
2 Yea, to a
matador


3 Found a perch
4 Gung-ho
5 Merry sound
(hyph.)
6 Kind of trip
7 Tree for
autumn color


Want more puzzles?
Check out the 'Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14
15 16 17
18 19 20
21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
3132 33
34 35 36 37 38
39 40 41
4243 44 45
46 47 48 49
394


50 51 52 53 54 55
56 57 58
59 60 61

3-22 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


8 Switch
positions
9 Enlist again
(hyph.)
10 Birds of prey
12 Comfort
17 Alpine peak
19 Obvious
21 "Aida"
composer
22 "Peer Gynt"
creator
23 Famous
Teddy
24 Iota
26 Polo need
28 Denims
29 Foolish
30 Memo abbr.
35 Panache
37 Sound system
43 Veldt grazer
45 Sherpa's
home
46 Old Roman
province
47 Mounties
48 Persia, today
49 Chair parts
51 Moo goo
pan
53 NASA
counterpart
54 One, to Fritz
55 Weathervane
dir.


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I grew up
with a sister who had
substance abuse prob-
lems. While I studied hard,
"Carla" dropped out of school
and led a life of partying. My
parents always made sure she
was well provided
for. Every time they
gave her something
expensive, my .
mother would say,
"Don't worry, you
will get the same in
my will."
Then one day, my
parents told me
they had signed
over the family
home to Carla. She
told them I had
agreed to it, but I ANN
never discussed it MAIL
with her But when I
said this to my par-
ents, they yelled and
screamed and called me a liar.
They said it didn't matter any-
way because they would make
it up to me in the will. They
then told me the value of the
house for the sake of the will,
which was a quarter of its ac-
tual worth. I suggested they
get the house appraised, and
they became angry They also
lied to our relatives about
what happened. Although
when my parents die, it will be
obvious I received nothing
from them.
Annie, I have been a good
son to my parents for my en-
tire life. How can they do this
to me? This hurts so much it's
the first thing I think of when I
wake up in the morning. I am
ready to walk away from my
family I deserve better.
- Left-Out Son
Dear Left Out: You do de-
serve better, but your parents
feel so guilty and obligated to-


L


ward Carla they give her
everything in a misguided at-
tempt to protect her from her-
self. You cannot fix this. But
you can forgive them and
move forward. Accept you are
not likely to get an equitable
share of their es-
tate. If there is a
Ip. specific item you
I would like to have,
it is OK to ask your
parents whether
you can have it now,
and tell them you
p. do not expect any-
.-^. thing more. Once
the inheritance is
off the table, you
will be able to have
a relationship with
IE'S your parents based
.BOX on who they are
and not on what you
deserve to get as a
reward for being a good son.
Dear Annie: I've been in-
vited to the wedding of an old
college friend who is gay I am
a Christian and believe homo-
sexuality is a sin. I will send
my regrets.
My question is: Do I send a
gift? I know traditional wed-
ding etiquette says to send a
gift when invited, but would a
gift say I approve of and sup-
port her decision? What
should I do? Reluctant Gift
Giver
Dear Reluctant: A gift does
not indicate approval of the
marriage. If that were the
case, quite a few people
would not receive one. You
send a gift to wish your friend
well. If you do not wish your
friend well, and you do not at-
tend the wedding, you do not
need to send a card or a
present.
DearAnnie: This is for "Dis-
appearing Connections," the


recently retired aunt who de-
cided to "unburden" herself of
possessions and offered some
of her clothing to a niece.
She's now miffed because the
niece has not thanked her
Stop it! You offered your
niece a bunch of clothes you
no longer wanted, and she was
kind enough to accept them.
Now you are acting like it was
a gift and she needs to send
you a thank-you note for stuff
you didn't want anymore. Go
find a hobby, and give your
clothes to a charity. Trust me,
your niece does not want to
wear clothes from an old lady
She was just being kind by ac-
cepting them in the first place.
- Been There
Dear Been There: There is
NO excuse for not acknowl-
edging receipt of a package,
especially when the niece
asked to have the clothes. And
the clothes were indeed a gift,
regardless of where they orig-
inated. How unconscionably
rude to thank someone only
for those gifts you like. The
niece should have said the
package was received and
thanked her aunt for taking
the time to send it Period.


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www. creators. com


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PRO VE YUCCA
ZOOMED HURRA Y
ALTARS AR G Y LE
PE E R S LU TE
E I DULL|
T W|O JEST M A E
\CH 0 1 D E~ i |
EWOT


HOW E DLOSE
NN ELV YDR IED
MADAME AGENDA
GRATIS LA T JAETE
MI FDT REON


C8 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


6EE... IT' GOT TEETH
MARKS ALL OVER IT..











WO LLP GEA 5IAME
NOT-0o PUOT PON ON
PAPER ALL THE W IS-
pO7 M -AT VVF-
ACQOUItE9 OVER M
LOM LIFETIME.


SHE'S HUMAN!


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


MANAGEMENT EXPERTS
SAY FAT LEADERS ARE
VIEWED LESS FAVOR-
ABLY THAN ATHLETIC
ONES.


--

I I II


THAT'S WHY I
DIDN'T ORDER ANY
DONUTS FOR YOUR
MEETING.


OR DID I CANT
YOU JUST TAKE YOU
FORGET SERIOUSLY
TO DO IT? LOOKING
LIKE THAT.


The Born Loser


F-

TO L&kA k6 OUT +
ELOCUT ON, DOES /



WM- IK .>T


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
S I'D BETTER HE DID,
MAKE SURE THAT HONEY...
ALEXANDER MAOE I HEARD HIM
IT HOME 5Y HIS SHUT HIS <
CURFEW E- EO0OOM


-Aw


( JUST THE SAME, I THINK ID
BETTER MAKE SURE

T4
'1 -


DON'T FORGET TO PUT THE HAM
-,ACK IN THE REFRIGERATOR
1 TH TIME, DEAR


rI -A~ L M lo 7 n


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


At long last, the mystery solved: "Whatever
happened to Chicken Little?"


Doonesbury


Big Nate
~4ELLO, IS THIS CHIEF
METEOROLOGIST
WINK SUMMERS?
WINK' NUMBER. ONE
FAN NATE WRIGHT HERE!







Arlo and Janis -


I -- !. - iI







CONGRATULATIONS ON
GETTING YOUR OLD
JOB BACK, WINK'
I'VE WATCHED "YoU
EVERY NIGHT THIS
WEEK, AND '(OUR,
FORECASTS HAVE BEEM
AWESOME


REMEMBER, YOU'RE
STAFF COUNSEL! YOU
tHOULP WOOK POISEO
TO OFFER HER ADVICE!


" I CAN COUNT TO A HUNDRED, PRETTY 60ON
1LL BE ABLE TO COUNT UP TO YOUR AGE,"


Betty


Frank & Ernest


"I would've done better on the
test but it asked all the
wrong questions."


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R) 12:45 p.m., 3:45 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Croods" (PG) 12 p.m., 2:25 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m. No passes.
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 12:25 p.m., 2:50 p.m.,
5:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:10 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 3:30 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG) 12:15
p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 10:10 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Croods" (PG) In 3D. 1:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:15 p.m. No passes.


"The Croods" (PG) 1:15 p.m., 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Olympus Has Fallen" (R) 1:30 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:25 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:10 p.m., 10:40
p.m.
"Admission" (PG-13) 1:50 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45
p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13) 2
p.m., 5 p.m., 8 p.m., 10:25 p.m.
"The Call" (R) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:05 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m., 7:15
p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG) 4:10
p.m., 10:15 p.m. No passes.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:10
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:45 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 9:40 p.m.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A slenbae


"XHLCR ECSGLHM CHL SNR XHLCR


YLGCOML ND RVLKH RLGVSKWOL,


RVLF CHL XHLCR YLGCOML ND RVLKH


TCMMKNS." PCHRVC XHCVCP

Previous Solution: "I want to give back ... I want to set up orphanages for under-
privileged and abused children." Lindsay Lohan
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-22


Pickles


s0, HOW MOCI LOMKGER
PO You THIMK ITLL-
"fAKE 9YOTo PO'UT
ALL TA-r lIGPOM
PAPER?
---;PlrM |
41 Qpw


.f:' [4. i1


Sally Forth


Dilbert


AWESOME IN TERMS
OF AESTHETICS,
o WINK, NOT '
ACCURACY. 0
So 0 o o o 0 0
0 o


0o L o 0o


COMICS


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 C9








CIO FRIDAY, MARCH 22,2013 CLAS S IF ~ED S CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563"5966


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Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(32 6356. 1TllFe:*88 82240 1Em i:*lsii*scroil.nie0o wbie*w w hoicenin0o


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748



1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible, looks great,
runs good, must sell at
best offer
352-560-0079
2003 Buick
LaSabre Limited, one
owner, 44k miles, mint
cond. $7000 call after
6pm 352-897-5039
2007 4 Winds
28",1 slide out, Qu Bed,
hvy hitch, $8900, Loc in
Inglis, Fl 812-605-1598
30ft 5th WHEEL
w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric, call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945
Beverly Hills
2/1, new paint, cha
no pets, non-smokers
$600 mo. 352-527-1143
BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET T
SAT. MAR 23rd
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt
Blvd.
BUICK
'01, Century,
81,271 miles, $4,200
(352) 465-2823
between 7a-7p
BUYING JEWELRY
AND COINS
Before you sell your
jewelry to a pawn store,
flea market or yard /
garage sale contact us
we pay the most
262-758-9867
Certified CNA avail for
in-home private duty
health care. Ref avail.
Carolyn (352) 453-7255
Citrus Hills Tri-level
on E Hartford
3bd/3ba w/carport
2100 sq. ft., furnished
asking $119,500
704-905-5986
CLUB CAR
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new
batteries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125

YRD SAE

Crystal River
Village
ANNUAL SALE
Over 200 Homes
1601 SE 8th Ave
Sat, March 23rd


CRYSTAL RIVER
Health & Rehab
is Having a
Yard Sale in the
Front Parking Lot
Sat. 23rd, 8a- 1 p
136 NE 12th Ave.
Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009
ENGLISH SADDLE
Steuben,Hunter/Jumper
good cond. $450
Boots, ladies sz 7%
slim, $20 call for details
352-341-6991
FORD
1978 F150, Shrt. Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
Good Cond. $1,499
(352) 564-4598
FORD
1995 F-150XL, white
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab, $2700.
(352) 637-5331 LM

THIS OUT!
FORD
2008 F350 Dually
CrewCab 6.4L
V8Diesel Ex Cond
4x4 grey, 50g Aux
Tank, Moonroof
Leather,towhich,T-gate
LitAssist+step
83000mi $28000
716.9460203,eon-
dak@yahoo.com
FORD
91 Crown Victoria
runs, can be fixed or
used for parts $500
352-637-5331
G-3
Jon Boat, Model 1236
Includes; 9.8 Merc,
fish/depth finder, swivel
seats, full cover & & trier
$1,650. (352) 341-1709
HERNANDO
Friday & Saturday
Kids toys/clothes,
antiques, tools, electron-
ics, adult clothes,
kit./hshld items, furn.,
4320 E. Lake Park Dr.
Hernando
Sat. Only, 9a to 3p
tools, patio, clothing, mis
3440 N Boswell Ter
HOMOSASSA
5565 W Rochelle St
Fri-Sat 8-3 Rain or shine
tools, housewares
Homosassa
Estate Sale
(BIG! For him and her)
March 22,23,24
8:30am-2:00pm
2380 S Palm
Beach Loop, 34448
photo preview at
www.facebook.com/Smoo
thSaleing
Homosassa Springs
3/2, c/h/a $795/mo,
$850 sec
352-628-3696
HONDA
2009, 1300 VTX,
1 owner, immaculate,
over $3500 in options
garage kept, 21k miles
$7900. 352-697-2760
IBENEZ SOUNDTANK
PEDAL Powerlead
PL5. $85. Brand new
in box. 352-465-4860
Inverness
Fri, Sat, 8a to 2p
furn, antiques, hshld
collectibles& much more
3631 E Countryside Dr
Inverness
Sat, March 23, 9a to 2p
Yard Sales thru-out
Park, Something for
Everyone! tools, furn,
etc. Harbor Lights
Resort, 8618 E Gospel
Island Rd.


INVERNESS
Seven Lakes Estates
Friday Only ,8am
antique typewriting
desk, piano, rocking
chairs, dining table, fish
aquarium, riding mower,
& much more
3038 S. Rose Ave.
KEY BOARD
KN 920Like New,114
different rhythm, eve-
rything included. $400
(352) 465-2810
Maple Day Bed
with new trundle and
mattress's $300.
Call
(352) 465-4037
Pine Ridge
Sat Only, 3/23, 9am to ?
DOWNSIZING!, tools,
hshld, Dept. 56
5233 N Mallows Circle
RANGE
BIk flat top elec range,
w/ convection oven,
$325; LG BIk over the
range Microwave $125.
Both like new moving
(765) 748-4334
(352) 586-5166
REFRIGERATOR
21.5 CF, White,$125
(352) 794-3674
SCOOTER
2009 Buddy, 125 CC;
564 mi. Mint Grn color
& mint cond. $1800
(352) 794-3674
SOFA COUCH
3 pc sec w/ 2 recliners
& bed. Good Cond
$300; Qn Size Bed w/
mat/box spring, 2
night stands, dresser
$150 (352) 628-3411
STRONG STEEL
BUILT 4X8 bed 13 "ti-
res VG condition $325
352-897-4154
To Rent for 2013 -14
winter season. Mini-
mum 4 mo. Single
dwelling home prefer-
ably Pine Ridge or adj
to Withlacoochee For-
est. Need room for 2
horses. Ref. avail
(352) 249-7180
TRAILER
6 x 12 w/Ramp,
2 wheels, Excellent
condition $895
(352) 527-3125
Wiring/Hitches
Tech
Immediate Position
available. Must be Exp.
well motivated, has
transportation, good
driving record. Refs req
352-302-7863 Iv. msg



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



Calico Cat
female, spayed,
declawed, free to good
home. call for details
352-726-3922
Concrete Worm Box
34" wide 28" high
7' 6" long, you move
352-637-1937
Free Bagger
for Black & Decker
Electric Mower
352-249-7812
Free Dog to a
Loving Home
Female Apricot Poodle
approx 8 Ibs & 3 yrs. old
352-563-1778


S udoku ****** 4puz.com


62 3


4 1


85 36


56 7


1 6 8


2 49


23 89


9 6


7 13

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and[
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

Allofour
4d4" d 0&#f& structures
Installations by Brian CBC1253853 1ih

.352-625-7519



Permit And -
I Engineering Fees I I
SUp to $200 value I ,

* Siding* Soffit *Fascia* Skirting Roofovers Carports* Screen Rooms *Decks *Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


Free Dog to a
Loving HomeMale,
11 lb Chihuahua,
approx 3 yrs. old. Lt tan
w/ specks of brown
352-563-1778
FREE HORSE
MANURE
352-249-6235
Free Perfect Cedar
Trees approx 22' tall
you dig & hall
352-249-7812
Horse Manure
Easy Access
Pine Ridge
(352) 249-7180



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662
LOST
Pair Prescription eye
glasses March 16th
while at Pine Ridge Yard
sales please Dennis
352-746-9002
LOST
White Malti-Poo 8lbs,
bad haircut, Blind in one
eye his name is squid,
lost on So. Tyler St.,
Beverly Hills
352-476-5746



Found @ Hunters
Springs Park. Paddle
and other stuff. Please
call to identify.
302.545.7208
Found
Precious Young
Female cat
on Grover Cleveland
(352) 621-3679
FOUND
Tools, lakeside golf
course, call to identify
352-726-3496
Orange/White Tabby
Cat, found in Seven
Lakes Area, Inverness
pls call 352-586-4751




Adopt a
Rescued Pet ,.








'nto Warm Homs
View our adoptable
dogs @ www.
adoptarescuedpet
.com or call
352-795-9550

ADOPTIONS
are held every
Saturday
10am-12pm
PetSupermarket
(exceptions listed
below)
Saturday 4/6
10a-3p
Pups in the Park
Liberty Park
Inverness

Saturday 4/13
10:30a -12:30p
PETCO Ocala

We are in NEED
of FOSTERS
to help save
more dogs. To foster
or volunteer please
contact us or come
to visit us at
Pet Supermarket
Inverness

CAT
ADOPTIONS


COME SEE
our adorable cats
and kittens that are
available for
adoption. In their
cage free home
style environment.
WE ARE OPEN
10:00 AM. till 1:00
PM.
& 200 PM 4PM
Monday-Saturday.
All Cats and Kit-
tens are
micro-chipped, al-
tered, & tested for
Feline Luk and
Aids. Up to date
on vaccines for
age
appropriate.
Phone 352-613-1629
Visit us at
www.hofsoha.ora.
or stop by our of-
fices at 1149 N Co-
nant Ave. Corner of
44 and
Conant.
Look for the big
white building with
the bright paw
prints.


Precious Paws
Rescue, Inc.
preciouspaws
florida.com
(352) 726-4700

"RESCUING PETS
FOUR PAWS AT A
TIME"

ADOPTIONS
CRYSTAL RIVER
MALL U.S. Hwy. 19
THurs. Fri. Sat &
Sun Noon-4pm
(closed all 4 days on
Holiday Weekends



PETSUPERMARKET
2649 E. Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Inverness
(Cats & Kittens only)
Regular store hours
Low Cost spay/neuter
vouchersare avail, at
the Crystal River Mall
Adoption Center and
other locations call
352-726-4700 for Info.




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



Looking for a Ride to
Bay City Michigan
for my mid size
Kubota Tractor
Call (989) 387-0197




TEACHER
Fulltime/Part time,
Exp. Req. CDA Pref.
TADPOLES
EARLY LEARNING
(352) 560-4222




OFFICE
ASSISTANT

Busy real estate office
needs ambitious, quick
learner with the ability to
multi-task. Real estate
experience preferred.
Fast-paced work
environment providing
quality service.
Send resume to
aoc.chon@gmail.com




If You and Your
Clientele Need
a New Salon
BOOTH RENTAL
Available
TOWN & COUNTRY
(352) 795-6972











Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




DENTAL
HYGIENIST

Mon-Thur needed for
friendly private prac-
tice. Please call
344-9500 to arrange
for an interview

NURSE
PRACTITIONER

Needed for busy
medical practice.
Competitive salary
& benefits. F/T or P/T
Please Call:
(352) 746-1515or
Fax Resume To:
(352) 270-8889

RN'S, LPN's,
and CNA's

* Must be a licensed
nurse by the state
of Florida or a
Certified CNA
* Long-Term Care
experience
preferred
* Hiring full-time and
part-time employ-
ees, with opening
in all shifts.
APPLY IN PERSON
via fax or email
payroll@health
atbrentwood.com
Ph. (352) 746-6600
Fax. (352) 746-8696
2333 N Brentwood
Cr. Lecanto, Fl 34461
EOE/SF/DF


Eckerd -
Floral City

Please see our full
listing of open
positions at
www.eckerd.ora





Pizza Makers
Cooks
Delivery Drivers
& Dishwashers

APPLY IN PERSON
2492 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernando





S do you possess..
...A DYNAMIC
PERSONALITY
...GREAT CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
....SOLID COMPUTER
SKILLS

Seeking an
INSIDE
SALES REP
to help service
I existing accounts
1 and prospect for
new. Full Time with
Comprehensive
Benefits Package


APPLY TODAY:
dikamlot@chronicl
eonline.com



Drug Screen
Required for Final
Applicant EOE

OPTICAL
Have you ever been
accused of being too
happy? Are you able
to find the positive in
any situation?
Citrus Vision Clinic is
seeking optical techni-
cians for fill-in work.
Sales experience a
must, industry experi-
ence preferred. Must
be a quick learner,
computer savvy, and
good with people.
Must have a flexible
schedule and be avail-
able as needed. Apply
in person. 2332 Hwy
44 W, Inverness, FL.

OPTICAL SALES

Optical experience
preferred not required.
Outgoing, quick learner
& Sales experience.Fax
resume (877)408-2732

Real Estate
Salesperson
needed
Call Skip Craven
352-464-1515




Automotive Tech

with experience
tools a must
352-419-6549

CARPENTERS
NEEDED

With 10 years experi-
ence in commercial
framing, We are NOT
looking for Supervi-
sors. Must be knowl-
edgeable in metal &
wood applications,
truss setting, and roof
sheathing. Also need
to be able to get on
roof, and be familiar
with safety harness,
and fall protection,
also a plus to be
versed in hardie sid-
ings and trim. Need
to be quality oriented
with a positive atti-
tude. DFWP,
tools,
and transportation re-
quired. Top pay.
Please come in and fill
out an application at
2531 NW 35th St.
Ocala, Fl. 34475
352-690-6334


CAPTAIN
25Ton & Up Only

Manatee Tours, in
water guide a must.
Apply
River Ventures at
498 SE Kings Bay
Drive, CRYSTAL RIV.
7:30AM-12:30PM

MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163


PLUMBERS
HELPER
Must have driver's
I license. Apply @ I
1 4079 S Ohio Ave. 1
Homosassa, FL
I=11111=1

Res. Service
Electricians

good driving record
& clean background
352-794-7368

STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume1801@yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls

VIDEO
TECHNICIAN
will work w/audio tech
& must have
computer skills
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.

Wiring/Hitches
Tech
Immediate Position
available. Must be Exp.
well motivated, has
transportation, good
driving record. Refs req
352-302-7863 Iv. msg





NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
I morning delivery of I
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
Other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product i

Apply in Person
1624N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm
Newspaper
I carriers are
independent
contractors, not
Employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


CHkONICLE
-_-- --- ml

PIANO/
ACCOMPANIST
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.


FT BILLING CLERK

Full-time position available in busy
cardiology practice for
EXPERIENCED billing clerk. Must
be fluent in all aspects of
insurance billing and
reimbursement with some
collections experience a plus. High
standard of patient concern and
compassion necessary, and a
professional attitude and
appearance is a must. Competitive
salary including full benefits-
cardiac experience commands a
premium wage! Mon.-Fri., 8-5,
no weekends!
To apply, fax resume, cover letter
and references to 352-259-7982,
or email to
jobs@citruscardiology.org.
DFWP


62 1 3 9 4 787 8 5 5




564789321
192463578
783152649
237618954
4192358674
856947213


LAWN CARE
PERSON NEEDED
lyr experience req.
Call 352-212-1684




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.




YMCA Summer
Camp Front
Desk Assistant
Citrus County, FL
The YMCA
has an opening for
a qualified part-time
front desk assistant
to help with sign in
and sign out of
campers.
Must be 16 years old
or older.
Shifts mornings
6:30am-10:00am
& evenings
3:00pm-6:30pm,
Monday- Friday,
30 35 hours per wk.
Base pay rate is
$7.90 hourly.
DFWP/EOE.
Apply online at
www.ymcasun
coast.org.
Cutoff Date: 4/11/13

YMCA
Swim Instructor
Citrus County, FL
The YMCA
has an opening for
a qualified part-time
Summer Program
Swim Instructor. Must
be 16 years old or
older. Hours are
morning and even-
ing shifts 15 -20
hours per week
Monday Friday.
Must complete the
YMCA Swim In-
structor Course.
Must maintain a cur-
rent CPR/AED and
first aid certification.
Base pay rate is
$8.55 hourly.
DFWP/EOE.

Apply online at
www.
ymcasuncoast.org.
Cutoff Date: 4/11/13




Office Help

P/T for Country
Store/Reservations
Apply in Person:
Natures Resort
10359 W. Halls
River Road

PT Truck Driver
must be able to lift
furniture up to 100lbs
work flexible hours &
pass level 1 & 2
background check.
Please apply in
person at
Daystar: 6751
W. Gulf to Lake Hwy.


American Brand
Meat Slicer, meat mkt
size, asking $1500
352-489-9156

FRAMED PRINT
F.F.English, Twilight,
Signed print, ornate
26"x 22" frame. $25.00
Call 352-621-7586
ORNATE FRAME
26.5"x 22.5", With nice
print titled spilt milk.
$25.00
Call 352-621-7586
Phonograph
1923 Free standing
Brunswick. Oak case,
20 records & needles.
Works like new. $650
(352) 746-2306


Collectble


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




DRYER $100 works
great, includes 30 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504

Fridgidaire frost free
Freezer,
28" Wide, 59" Tall
$225.
352-637-2735
FRIGIDAIRE GALLERY
DISHWASHER used 3
years White Digital con-
trols NSF sanitize clean
$100 341-0450

RANGE
BIk flat top elec range,
w/ convection oven,
$325; LG BIk over the
range Microwave $125.
Both like new moving
(765) 748-4334
(352) 586-5166
REFRIGERATOR
21.5 CF, White,$125
(352) 794-3674
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery.
352 263-7398
WASHER$100 works
great. includes 30 day
warranty call/text
352-364-6504

WHIRLPOOL
ELECTRIC DRYER.
Works well. Good
condition. $85.
527-1239


Do you possess...

RA DYNAMIC EAT
A DYNAMIC CUSTOMER
PERSONALITY? SERVICE
SKILLS?

STRONG
COMPUTER
SKILLS?


Inside Sales Rep FULL TIME
Service existing accounts and
prospect for new. Base salary plus
commission and a comprehensive
benefits package.

Customer Service Rep PART TIME
29-hr/wk provide superior customer
service to our subscribers, early
morning and weekend hours
required.

ApplyToday:
djkamlot@chronicleonline.com
C ... 5" 0 U E



Drug Screen Required for Final Applicant
EOE


CO10 FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CoLcLETIBEsLL AU
Saturday, March 30* lOam
811 SW US Hiyl19, Cystal River,
See web for details
www.charliefudge.com
13% BP -3% for cash)
1-800-542-3877 1
AU1593/AB1131 o

ANNUAL
SPRING
AUCTION
Farm Ag &
Construction
Sat., March 23, 2013
at 9am
Iron City, GA 11th
Hwy 84 W -6 miles
East of Donalsonville,
GA,DeMott Auction
Co., Inc.
229-985-4565 -
800-985-5699
Terry DeMott, Sr
229-891-1832
Call today to be
included in this
auction!
GA# 002554


AUCTION
CONSIGNMENTS
WANTED
Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC
628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
estatelicuidations
andauctions.com
AU 4381 /AB 3202


DUDLEY'S







3 Days
6 Auctions

3/21 ESTATE
ADVENTURE 3pm
outside w/rows of fun
& outside furnishings,
6pm several estates
furniture inc. high end
leather Flexsteel living
room set, household,
appliances, tools, new
items & collectibles
3/22 REAL ESTATE
LOT AUCTION
11:00am
Sold Absolute!!!! NW
20th St. Crystal River
w/deeded use of
comm. boat ramp.
REAL ESTATE LOT
AUCTION 1 pm
10155 W. Pamondeho
Cir. Crystal River,
Lake front lot in Spring
Run!!
LIVE &ONLINE COIN
AUCTION 6pm
Estate Coins- Gold,
US Silver, Foreign,
Proof& Mint sets,
3/23 ONSITE REAL
ESTATE &
CONTENTS: 9am ~
Real Estate 10am
1611 S. Ridgewood
Pt. Inverness, 3/2
1852 sq ft 2+ garage,
Contents: furniture,
quilts, craft & quilting
& fabric, Pfaff Creative
1475 CD sewing
machine++
REAL ESTATE
AUCTION 3
CITRUS SPRINGS
LOTS 3:00 Dm -
Sold absolute!!!
518, 540, 546 W.
Bluster PI. Citrus
Springs
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384





5 HP ELECTRIC 30
GALLON UPRIGHT
AIR COMPRESSOR
ON WHEELS. NEARLY
NEW. ONLY 350.00
3524640316

BENCH GRINDER
ASHLAND 5"
industrial bench
grinder.3450rpm.
$35.00 352-527-7840

SHOPSMITH
CLONE 5 tools in
table saw, lathe, drill
press, sander,$900.
12" Planner $250.
(352) 628-4265


Craftsman 10 inch, 2
hp, radial arm saw,100
dollars. 352-503-3332
TOOLS Ryobi 18Volt 5
Tool Set $75.00 Call
352-637-7142




GARRARD DOUBLE
CASSETTE DECK $20
PLAYS AND REC-
ORDS 44E INVER-
NESS 419-5981
OAK SPEAKER For
Home Theatre Center
Channel SPEAKER
Quality Danish SEAS
2-Way $100 341-0450
TV STAND New model
with smoked glass
shelves and wood top to
bottom legs. $75.00
603-493-2193



2 PR WHITE VINYL
SHUTTERS 14 1/2 x 63
1/2 both for $35.00
352-794-3020/5864987



COMPUTER DESK
L-shaped; 102in with
width 42in L. Excellent
condition. $75
352-489-3914
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
GPS TOMTOM VIA
Lifetime maps and traffic
5in screen use only
once $80.00
Call 352 794 3688
HP Photosmart
Premium wireless,
Printer
print, fax scan, copy
$75.
(352) 341-2830
HP TOWER PC 2GHz
Dual Core 250GB-HDD
1GB-RAM 24xDVD
Card Reader 5.1 $70
341-0450
Wii Games
6 games @ $10ea.
call for titles, firm
352-205-79731220-4483



11 pc PVC Lanai Set
4 cushion chairs, oval
table, 2 cushion rockers
3 high back chairs, serv-
ing tray with wheels
$350 for all 746-7221



2 SETS OF TABLES
glass coffee table
oval45"x26' w/2 end
tables 24'x18'oval; 14'
round. All w/brass
frame, high end $$
Each set $200
(352) 425-0667
2 TUB/BARREL
CHAIRS Brown velour,
about 1 yr old, excellent
condition. $95.00 pr
603-493-2193
6 Drawer Dresser
$100.
3 Drawer Dresser
$50.
352-746-7221
42" Round oaklmetal
drop-leaf
Table w/4 chairs $40
856-803-6046
5pc Blonde Queen
Bedroom Set, like new,
includes boxspring &
mattress $450
352-628-5358 Iv msg
Antique School Desk
Beautiful shape
$125.
(386) 684-2466
BED FRAME will fit twin,
full or queen bed $10
Walter @ 352-364-2583
Classic King
Tempurpedic Bed
Like new w/ head-
board, mattress pad,
pillows & bed spread
$800 obo
(352) 489-0105
COFFEE & 2 END
TABLES Brass w/glass
tops $75.00 for all
352-637-6578
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
Couch & love seat
white, great condition
$300.
2 Bar stools Swivel,
white Padded $150
(352) 419-6880


Couch with 2 throw
pillows, 6ft plaid,
burgandy $175.
Rug 5 x 7 blue,
$25
(352) 637-6578
Dresser & Nightstand
$300, good cond.
352-522-0467
DUAL RECLINING
SOFA in good condition
light beige in color $100
Walter @ 352-364-2583
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER oak veneered
finish, will hold 47" tv in
good condition $25
Walter @352-364-2583
GLASS COFFEE &
END TABLES Blonde
glass coffee & end
tables $150
352-746-3753
GLASS FRONT
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 5ft.long glass
front & top w/drawer
& shelves $200
352-746-3753
High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
Large Sofa, with
Recliners on ea. end.
has been in den not
used, tan, microfiber,
purchased $1,000 sell
$500 Pet/smoke free
home 352-637-0844
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET
In Original Plastic,
Never Used, Org
$3000, sacrifice $975.
CHERRY BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes
Org. $6000, sacrifice
$1995. Can Deliver.
Bill (813)298-0221.
LEATHER RECLINER
dark brown $30.00
352-249-8621
Leather Sofa,dark
brown.very good
condtion-$100.00
352-249-8621
LIKE NEW MOTOR-
IZED BED AND
MATRESS good condi-
tion works perfectly call
$100. 464-4280
Maple Day Bed
with new trundle and
mattress's $300.
Call
(352) 465-4037
MATTRESS SET Full
Pillow Top,Excellent
Condition $100.00
352-249-8621
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
METAL BED FRAME for
twin or full bed-$15.00
Beverly Hills
352-249-8621
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Rose Color chair,
& Couch $150.
Corner Computer desk
Black, $75.
352-746-7221
Sleeper sofa,
$100.
Coffee w/ end tables,
$150.
352-746-7221
SOFA COUCH
3 pc sec w/ 2 recliners
& bed. Good Cond
$300; Qn Size Bed w/
mat/box spring, 2
night stands, dresser
$150 (352) 628-3411
Solid Medium Oak
2 door, 5 drawer chest,
top lift for jewelry & two
sides for ties, exec.
cond. $300.00 call
765-748-4334
Two Italian Gold Globe
Filigree Hanging
Lamps $75 ea.
352-522-0467
WICKER Youth size
White wicker love seat
and chair. $40.00.
Call 352-621-7586




Cub Cadet 2011,50"
Commerical, 0 turn,
only 36 hrs, like new ,
3 sets of blades, paid
$3000., sell only
$2200. firm
352-795-4275
John Deere
42 Deck with Kohler,
$800.
Murray 16HP, $250.
Both have new batter-
ies (352) 344-1310


New Tiller
5 hsp, $150
352-341-1714
Power Pusher Lawn
Mower 6/2HP, Large
rear wheels, grass
catcher, craftsman,
Like New $150. cash
(352) 341-1714
Riding Lawn
Mower
Murray, 42" 6 speed
grass catcher, $400.
(352) 341-1714




BEVERLY HILLS
OUR LADY OF
GRACE CHURCH
FLEA MARKET T
SAT. MAR 23rd
8AM to 1PM.
6 Roosevelt
Blvd.

Brentwood
Moving Sale
Sat 23rd 8:30am-3pm
Jewerly, clothing, golf
1815 W. Shanelle Path
352-287-9791
CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri & Sat 9-3
4006 W Vicksburg Drive
CITRUS SPRINGS
Fri.22, & Sat. 23, 8a-3p
1774 W. Kenmore Dr.

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-2p
Thomasville Furniture,
wallpaper & boarders,
collectibles, gold & sil-
ver jewelry, fenton &
fostona glass.
MUCH MORE
Behind Olive Tree
Restaurant, US 19,
UNITS 80, 81, 82

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. 22 & Sat. 23, 8a-4p
Estate Sale *
Entire contents of
Home & Out Buildings
Antiques, Jewelry &
Lots of Tools
6292 N. Oakfield Point

CRYSTAL RIVER
Health & Rehab
is Having a
Yard Sale in the
Front Parking Lot
Sat. 23rd, 8a-I1p
136 NE 12th Ave.


The
t AGAPE \
HOUSE


CRYSTAL RIVER
HUGE INDOOR
Fundraising Sale
Fri. 22 Sat. 23
8a.-ip.
1st Baptist
Church
700 N. Citrus Ave.
TO BENEFIT
AGAPE HOUSE
A MINISTRY FOR
PEOPLE IN NEED


YARDSALE

Crystal River
Village
ANNUAL SALE
Over 200 Homes
1601 SE 8th Ave
Sat. March 23rd
8a.m. to 2 p.m

NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE

FAIRVIEW ES-

TATES
Sat, March 23rd, 8 -1
over 20 Families
appls, furn, electronics,
ofc, linens, clothes, yard
stuff, tools and more
get map/list on
N. Annapolis Av @
Fairview Entrance
FLORAL CITY
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
Large Bear collection
and odds & ends
5398 S. Perch Drive
HERNANDO
Friday & Saturday
Kids toys/clothes,
antiques, tools, electron-
ics, adult clothes,
kit./hshld items, furn.,
4320 E. Lake Park Dr.


CLASSIFIED




Hernando
Sat. Only, 9a to 3p
tools, patio, clothing, mis
3440 N Boswell Ter
HERNANDO
Yard Sale /Adopt a thon
Sat & Sun 8am-1pm
all Proceeds go to Sav-
ing Angles Rescue
2780 N. Florida Ave
HOMOSASSA
5565 W Rochelle St
Fri-Sat 8-3 Rain or shine
tools, housewares
Homosassa
Estate Sale
(BIG! For him and her)
March 22,23,24
8:30am-2:00pm
2380 S Palm
Beach Loop, 34448
photo preview at
www.facebook.com/Smoo
thSaleing
Homosassa
Fri, Sat, 9a to 5p
furn, tools, collectibles
8505 W Kimberley Ct
INVERNESS
Fri, Sat & Sun, 8-3PM,
Misc. good stuff
1028 N Nashue Ter
Inverness
Fri, Sat, 8a to 2p
furn, antiques, hshld
collectibles& much more
3631 E Countryside Dr
INVERNESS
Sat Only 3/23 8a to 2p
1518 Eden Drive
Inverness
Sat,March 23, 9a to 2p
Yard Sales thru-out
Park, Something for
Everyone! tools, furn,
etc. Harbor Lights
Resort, 8618 E Gospel
Island Rd.

YARD.SALE
INVERNESS
Sat.23rd & Sun.24th
8:00am-2:00pm
1333 North Toro Drive
INVERNESS
Seven Lakes Estates
Friday Only ,8am
antique typewriting
desk, piano, rocking
chairs, dining table, fish
aquarium, riding mower,
& much more
3038 S. Rose Ave.
INVERNESS
Thurs. Fri. & Sat. 8a-5p
Furn., Video games,
clothes, movies,
trinket's ECT.
2245 W. Main St.,
(Behind Inverness
Car Wash)

PINE RIDGE
Everything Must Go!
Fri, Sat, 9am to 2pm
4095 W Ranger St

Pine Ridge
Sat Only, 3/23, 9am to ?
DOWNSIZING!, tools,
hshld, Dept. 56
5233 N Mallows Circle

MO VIt4G
SA ALE

PINE RIDGE
Thurs, Fri, Sat 8:00am
Everything must go!
4232 N Deckwood DR
(352) 419-0069




CITRUS Springs
Fri. 22, & Sat 23
8:30 -4:30 -pmr
Customers moving
away have to leave
lots of nice items.
Some antiques, front
room furniture, lots
of outside furniture,
& yard art,
lawn mowers, &
books galoure
From Dunnellon
Take 41 North, turn
right on Country
Club Blvd. 2 mi. right
on lorraine Dr. Fol-
low Signs




COAST GUARD AUX.
FLOATATION JACKET
Long sleeves. XL
(48/50). Ex cond.$100.
352-563-6410
SHOES BLACK PAT-
TEN LEATHER Size 9
1/2 ww excellent cond.
$20. 352-563-6410
TUXEDO ACCESSO-
RIES One black bow tie
and cummerbund, and
one black and gold.
$10. for 2 352-563-6410


Tuxedo black size 52.
Pants waist 47 49" adj.
Worn twice. $75.
352-563-6410
TUXEDO WHITE
PLEATED SHIRT 18 -
18 1/2, 4 blk & gold but-
tons and cuff links.
$10. 352-563-6410




4 FLORAL DISPLAY
VINTAGE CLEAR
GLASS FROG $15 CAN
E-MAIL PHOTOS
419-5981
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, basket, hand
brakes & wheel locks,
folds for storage, Ex.,
$50. 352-628-0033
27" Color TV $25,
Old Singer Sewing
machine Bench
& accessories $25.
Liquor Cabinet $30
352 344-1541
5XI10 AREA RUG
Nice rug, $30.00
352-621-0142
Air Compressor
New, 8 gallon tank
type, 150 psi max
$150. cash
(352) 341-1714
BARBIE
HOUSE/VAN/GUITAR
AND kids keyboard
$10.00
352-794-3020/5864987
BENCH GRINDER
ASHLAND 5" industrial
benchgrinder.34
50rpm.$35.00.
352-527-7840
BICYCLE 10" Girls
Beginning, Pink Purple,
good shape. All
accessories. $30.00
352-564-9311
BIG MAN LEATHER
JACKET Brown 5xl
$50.00 352-628-6277
DINNERWARE
Pfalzgraff/Tea Rose, 8
places 90 pieces,
w/Glasses & Dishes.
$75. 352-637-1613
DRAGON EGGS
MEGA BLOKS
5 dragon eggs
2 with cds
$100.00 352-628-4210
EXTERIOR METAL
DOOR Used 36x80
$65.00. 954-328-1773
or 352-513-4519
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
FRAMED COMMEMO-
RATIVE SILVER
DOLLAR MATT very
nice piece. $25.00
352-5134519
GOLD WEDDING
BAND
14k gold size 6-1/2
$100.00
352-6284210
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Black Cowboy Hat &
Boots 11A2D New $100
(352) 795-7254
HONDA SHADOW
AREO STOCK
EXHAUST 2005,mint
$50.00 352-621-0142
Kiln & Accessories
for Sale,
shelves etc.
$200.
(352) 726-8346
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MENS TREK BIKE
Model 820 good bike
$25.00 as is
352-465-9395
New Standing
Stainless Steel
Towel Rack $20
352-522-0467
PERSONAL LIBRARY
approx 600 volumes
classics, religion, poli-
tics, etc..$1500obo
**call for details**
352-341-0170
PLAYSTATION 2
GUITAR HERO 2 cd
and guitar $15.00
352-794-3020/5864987
Radio Stereo System
w/ record player, $50.
Century Safe $150.
352-344-1541
SAMSONITE GAR-
MENT BAG For hanging
clothes. Inside and
outside pockets, like
new $30 603-493-2193
SINGER FT WT 221
With carrying
case,excellent
conditionjust serviced
$450 352 270 9254


30 screw & nut drivers
sockets & wrenches
$140, Snap-On shop
vac, stainless steel, $60
315-466-2268
TRUCK WINDOW
rear/solid GMC
factory tint
$50.00
352-628-4210
TUB RAIL Medline
Deluxe Bathtub
safety rail $30.00
352-628-4210
TY MASTODONS
1/colosso 2/giganto
excellent condition
tagged $10.00
352-628-4210
UNIVERSAL CHROME
TRACTION BARS
Nice,$30.00
352-628-6277
WALLPAPER $25
PREPASTED 3 DOU-
BLE ROLLS 165 SQ FT
CAN E-MAIL PHOTO
352-419-5981
White bathroom cabinet
vanity 30x19 $50.00
352-513-4519 or
954-328-1773.



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH SEAT & BRAKES
ONLY 75.00 464 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER MAKES IT EAS-
IER TO GET UP FROM
IT ONLY 20.00
464 0316
Bathtub Chair
slide in type w/backrest
$55, 2 wheel walker
w/ski's $40.00, Reg.
walker $25.00
352-621-0896
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ON EACH ONLY 20.00
EACH 464 0316
Handi-Cap Lg Wheel
Walker w/seat
$65, Handi-cap
Shower Chair, New
$50. 352-522-0467
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS NEARLY NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316

SOLD
Electric Scooter
very seldom used,
w/ ramp,
WALKER 4WHEEL
basket,seat,handbrake
collapsible,
good condition
$50.00 352-628-4210


WALKER ALUMINUM
with basket and adj.
legs. Ex. cond. $15.
352-563-6410






DUDLEY'S







3 Days
6 Auctions

3/21 ESTATE
ADVENTURE 3pm
outside w/rows of fun
& outside furnishings,
6pm several estates
furniture inc. high end
leather Flexsteel living
room set, household,
appliances, tools, new
items & collectibles
3/22 REAL ESTATE
LOT AUCTION
11:00am
Sold Absolute!!!! NW
20th St. Crystal River
w/deeded use of
comm. boat ramp.
REAL ESTATE LOT
AUCTION 1 pm
10155 W. Pamondeho
Cir. Crystal River,
Lake front lot in Spring
Run!!
LIVE & ONLINE COIN
AUCTION 6pm
Estate Coins- Gold,
US Silver, Foreign,
Proof& Mint sets,
3/23 ONSITE REAL
ESTATE &
CONTENTS: 9am ~
Real Estate 10am
1611 S. Ridgewood
Pt. Inverness, 3/2
1852 sq ft 2+ garage,
Contents: furniture,
quilts, craft & quilting
& fabric, Pfaff Creative
1475 CD sewing
machine++
REAL ESTATE
AUCTION 3
CITRUS SPRINGS
LOTS 3:00 pm -
Sold absolute!!!
518, 540, 546 W.
Bluster PI. Citrus
Springs
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


"NEW" 6 STRING
BANJO "GUITJO"
"BANJTAR" WHAT-
EVER W/RESONATOR
$100 352-601-6625
30 WATT SUZUKI
BASS AMP LIGHT
WEIGHT & POWER-
FUL FOR $30
352-601-6625
BLACK PRECISION
BASS FENDER
AFINITY MODEL
W/GIGBAG LIKE NEW!
$85 352-601-6625
Electric Accordion w/
sound equip. Rolland
Electric Organ w/
Bench 352-344-1541
ELECTRIC GUITAR
LIKE NEW PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT!
ONLY $40
352-601-6625
ELECTRIC GUITAR
W/30WATT AMP 2
HUMMBUCKINGS
PLAYS GREAT $65
352-601-6625
HAWAIIAN LAP STEEL
MORRELL MADE IN
U.S.A.!"VERY NICE
CONDITION $100
352-601-6625
IBANEZ SOUNDTANK
PEDAL PHASER PH5,
new in box. $50.
3524654860
IBENEZ SOUNDTANK
PEDAL Powerlead
PL5. $85. Brand new
in box. 352-465-4860
KEY BOARD
KN 920, Like New, 114
different rhythm, eve-
rything included. $400
(352)465-2810
KEYBOARD YAMAHA
Model PSS-12
portable
has adapter
$30.00 352-628-4210
LANEY GC LEAD AMP
50 watt, 12"speaker,
high quality, good cond.,
needs cleaning.
$100 352-465-4860
SD 2000 ACOUSTIC
GUITAR LIKE NEW IN
ORIGINAL BOX WITH
ACCESSORIES $45
352-601-6625
SD2000 ACOUSTIC
GUITAR LIKE NEW IN
ORIGINAL BOX WITH
ACCESSORIES $45
352-601-6625
TEACHER/STUDENT
PACKAGE 3 "NEW"
ACOUSTIC GUITARS!
ONLY $100!
352-601-6625


hrwaees r ~wy


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
Certified CNA avail for
in-home private duty
health care. Ref avail.
Carolyn (352) 453-7255




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






'our \rld first

Need a johl
Or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


0


JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352422-7279**
**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352465-9201
A HANDYMAN
If Its Broke, Jerry Can
Fix It. Housecleaning
also. 352-201-0116 Lic.
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
v RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
All Home Repairs
Accepting all Major CC
Lic#38893,
Call Art 352-201-1483

Carpentry, Decks,
Docks, Remodeling
Yard Work, Pressure
Wash, Home Repair.
CBC 1253431
(352) 464-3748

HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067


CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**
Primary Cleaning
**Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755
TRACTOR WORK
Bushogging, Mowing,
Grading, Loader work.
$40+$40pr hour, Lic.
Ins. 352-527-7733




CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876


#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
- FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352)419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244









ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790

JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067**

CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397

CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./Ext. Paintitng
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996

* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570

PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300





All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System $39
(352) 419-2065


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials**

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 Cll


3-22 LaughingStock International Inc Dist by Universal UClick for UFS, 2013

"Now that you've cut off my electricity,
how do you expect me to find
my checkbook in the dark?"







C12 FRIDAY, V MARCH 22, 2013


WORDY GURD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE EC
1. Stock the cash register drawer (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair ofwords (like FAT CAT
m and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Church section rolled sandwiches (1) they will fit in the letter
- squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Y-chromosome-carrying orca (1) syllables in each word.
I 02013UFS,Dist.byUniv.Ucick for UFS
4. Bumper-plating-metal hair tool (1)


5. Not-as-strong orator (2)


6. "Olympus" star Angela's plusses (2)


7. Destiny-calling-occupation site (3)


NOIIVJOI iOAV30AL SSSV Sil SSSVfl '9 )IVd H It 3MA
IwOO tMOMI I' IVHAIM 1VIW'R SdVHM ASdV TII TIIHI a'
3-22-13 SHIMSNV


iJ:1; I J dl:1--d


3 MINI MUFFIN TINS/4
SMALL BREAD PANS
$8 LARGE GREEN
MIXING BOWL $10
419-5981
4 KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS WITH LIDS $10
NEW IRIDESCENT
WHITE QUICHE DISH
$10 419-5981
BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $150 OBO
Breville Juicer, exc
cond w/ extra's $20
(352) 746-3327
FLOOR LAMP
Bamboo look base,
attached table & shade
white and tan $45.00
603-493-2193
FLOOR PLANT
(GREEN) Large Leaf, in
woven basket. approx 4
feet tall $10.00
603-493-2193



PRO FORM ELECTRIC
TREADMILL ALL OP-
TIONS INCLUDING
POWER INCLINE
NEARLY NEW 350.00
352 464 0316
Proform 480 LE
2009 Elliptical exerciser
(Like New) too many
features to list, will fold
for storage $650
352-795-9146
Recumbent Bike
Nordic Track
$75.obo
(440) 812-5154
TREADMILL
good condition
$100 obo
352-522-0467



2 BRASS EAGLE .68
CALIBER co2 powered
paint ball guns $20.00
for both 352-794-3020
or 352-586-4987
3 WHEELED ELEC-
TRIC BICYCLE MIAMI
SUN WITH PALMER 12
VOLT MOTOR AND
REAR BASKET ONLY
285.00 464 0316
9mm Taurus
Special Edition
$480.
P95 Ruger 9mm
$480. Both Like New
(352) 257-8850
AEROMAX BIKE
WHEELS NEW. 7-10
speed Rim brake Vuelta
hubs Bladed spokes
$199 341-0450
CLUB CAR
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new
batteries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125


Concealed Weapons
Class at the Inver-
ness VFW, $55.00
10:00 Sat. Mar. 23
Don't Wait
Til It's Too Late!
Walk-ln's Welcome.
Call: 352-220-4386

CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
GOLF CLUBS
2 complete sets,
I set of Wilsons, never
used, RT handed $130,
2nd set of Wilsons $80
(352) 270-8117
GOLF CLUBS
King Cobra SS -1 Irons
and mallet putter.
4 PW plus putter.
$100 (352) 794-6203
SINGLE BICYCLE
RACK in good condition
asking $20.00
352-513-4519
Winchester Mod. 70
bolt action 243 WSM
new in box with factory
scope, $595 will take
30-30 lever on trade
906-285-1696



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
STRONG STEEL
BUILT 4X8 bed 13" ti-
res VG condition $325
352-897-4154
TRAILER
6 x 12 w/Ramp,
2 wheels, Excellent
condition $895
(352)527-3125
TRAILER
Hauls 2 jet ski's,
galvanized $300
(352)457-6199


BUYING JEWELRY
AND COINS
Before you sell your
jewelry to a pawn store,
flea market or yard /
garage sale contact us
we pay the most
262-758-9867


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369




BRAKEBUDDY R V
PORTABLE BRAKING
SYSTEM $100.00
352-527-4319













Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained










Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200


BRUNO
Bruno a 3-y.o.
Shepherd/Retriever
mix, is Heartworm
-negative &
super-gentle, calm,
easy-going. Weight
70 lbs. Gets along
with other dogs,
walks well on a
leash. Beautiful,
affectionate, a
perfect dog.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.


Cute Chihuahua/
Pomeranion Mix
Puppy $60.
Leave Message
(352) 364-3009
PUPPIES
Miniature Daschunds
2 girls avail, ckc papers,
shots, $350 ea.
786-286-1163











SALLIE
Sallie is a sweet,
joyful white terrier
mix with black spots
over her body. She
is about 1-y.o. &
came to the shelter
because her family
could not afford to
keep her. She is a
slim & trim dog, easy
to handle, although
slightly shy with
strangers. She
warms up quickly,
however, & sits for
treats. Likes to walk
on a leash. She ap-
pears housebroken
& gets along very
well with other dogs.
She is Heartworm
-negative. Weight
35 lbs. This pretty &
affectionate girl is
hoping for a good
home with a loving
family. Call Joanne
@ 352-795-1288.
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne



ENGLISH SADDLE
Steuben,Hunter/Jumper
good cond. $450
Boots, ladies sz 7%
slim, $20 call for details
352-341-6991



LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033

Livestock


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!




Your World








CHONCLE


w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric, call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945

HOMOSASSA
2/1%', Big Lot, Near 19
$425 me. + Sec. + Ref.
No Pets 352-628-3019

Homosassa 2/2/cp
Immaculate, upgraded
1560 sq. ft. quiet nbrhd
$675 352-633-1593

LECANTO
2 BR, Remodeled,
CHA, priv. lot. deeded
community $500 mo.
(352) 746-5253





must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766


CLASSIFIED




Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&IW.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/ 1,DW, H/A, 12 x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

v' THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, '1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791


p red aJOB]


I www.chlronicleonline.com I


Crystal River
C.R. Village,2003 Palm
Harbor, 2/2 Liv. Din. Kit,
windowed lanai,
$42,900 352-212-8908
Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, in
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171





NEW!! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View352-621-9181




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
3 stock models must
go. $39k off select
2012 models
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624

$$$s$s$

WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
+Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217



MUST SELL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192


INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on V4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message

LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624

Owner Fin./Lease Opt.
2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x
20 block bdg, New
Septic, Handy person,
REDUCED $19,900.1
Offer 352-422-1916





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977

INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138

LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804

Mobile Home on Lake
2/2 w/ Florida Rm. &
Carport, remodeled
low lot rent, beautiful
$16,000 (618)444-9425
(618) 444-9552


Melody Pk, INV 2/2
splitplan c/h/a roof-
over, semi- furn, $8500k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340




RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336





-ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
S REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
w .CitrusCountyHonmeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
2218 1S.a SiinrgPt.................$500

5585 W.Irving Ct.................. $750
2/2/l Lot lnq spe iabllbb3/31/13
HERNANDO
5164 N.Dewey Way(HER)......775
3/2 DW, newer mobile on 1/2 A I!
6315 N..Shoewood D., (HER)....S625
2/1Flonra room
CRYSTAL RIVER
10939 Gem St (CR).................$550
2/1/1 Duplex, close to hospitalwithW/D
9779 C(leveland....................$675
2/2/1, Super clean close to I River Hospital
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
9047 Traivis Dr. (CS) ................S625
2/2 Affora le duplexnet & clean
9 Daniel St. (BH)......................S650
2/1 Neat, clean, nquetlocaton

Crystal Glen
3/2/2 Large home
$850 1st-Last-Sec
Gloria Bonner
P & R Mid Florida Realty
352-697-0375


CITRUS COUNTY
For more information on how to reach
Citrus County readers call
352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com

Scarborough 2010


o08ax) z


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully Furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
HOMOSASSA
Lg 2/2, Central Locat,
scrn. por., $550 mo.
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461
CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922
INVERNESS
2/1, In Town, $625
water incl'd 412 Tomp-
kins St. (352) 895-0744
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed / 1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furn & Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/mo. Call
352-795-1795 for
Appt.www.ensing
properties.corn






LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




CITRUS HILLS
2/2 Furnished
long or short term
352-527-8002,
or 352-476-4242




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HOMOSASSA
Studio Apartment
All Utilities,WD Included
$575Month
352-302-5853Paul










BLACK DIAMOND
EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2
3389 N Bent Tree Pt
1700 SF, Pool, $1,100
mo. (740) 398-9585




Beverly Hills
2/1, new paint, cha
no pets, non-smokers
$600 mo. 352-527-1143
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 FL room, no pets
$600 352-464-1950
BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1, $600. mo.
352-382-1162,
795-1878
Beverly Hills
2/1/cp Clean $550mo.
1st./Last/Sec
(786)286-1163
BEVERLY HILLS
Lg 2/2/2, CH/A, FL Rm,
fncd yrd, W/D, No Pets
$675. mo. + sec.,
352-726-2280
BEVERLY HILLS
Rent to Own 2/I /1/I
Fl. Rm $25500 down
$475 mo.
(352) 726-9369

DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
RENT/RENT TO OWN
2 Master Beds 2 Full
Baths, 2 Car Garage
Lanai, Fireplace ,
Dishwasher, spotless,
$799. Special
352-527-0493

FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
HERNANDO 312/2
Rent to/or Own $850
mo.www.rickybobs
.com 352-613-5818
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
Homosassa Springs
3/2, c/h/a $795/mo,
$850 sec
352-628-3696
Inverness
2/2 Waterfront, first, last
&sec. 1776 S. Moring
Dr. 352-364-2120
INVERNESS


3/2/2 completely
remodeled $850 mo.
1144 Woodcrest Ave
352-895-0744
INVERNESS
golf course home
2/2/2, beautifully
remodeled $875 mo
8515 Sandpiper Dr
352-895-0744
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




Gospel Island
clean 2/1,no pets,
$700. 352-212-4010

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


CITRUS HILLS
2/2/1 Villa, Rent or
Sale, quaint location,
with Pristine views,
(352) 513-4485
HERNANDO 312/2
Rent to/or Own $850
mo.www.rickybobs
cornn 352-613-5818




CRYSTAL RIVER
Must have income &.
Respect. Near Puibix's,
Furn., Clean, Cable,
w/d, $115wk/l440mo
$130/ 470 563-6428
INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed
352-566-7099 or
606-694-7099

DUDLEY'S
AUCTI1OW






3 Days
6 Auctions

3/21 ESTATE
ADVENTURE 3om
outside w/rows of fun
& outside furnishings,
6pm several estates
furniture inc. high end
leather Flexsteel living
room set, household,
appliances, tools, new
items & collectibles
3/22 REAL ESTATE
LOT AUCTION
11:00am
Sold Absolute!!!! NW
20th St. Crystal River
w/deeded use of
comm. boat ramp.
REAL ESTATE LOT
AUCTION 1 pm
10155W. Pamondeho
Cir. Crystal River,
Lake front lot in Spring
Run!!
LIVE & ONLINE COIN
AUCTION 6pm
Estate Coins- Gold,
US Silver, Foreign,
Proof& Mint sets,
3/23 ONSITE REAL
ESTATE &
CONTENTS: 9am ~
Real Estate 10am
1611 S. Ridgewood
Pt. Inverness, 3/ 2
1852 sq ft 2+ garage,
Contents: furniture,
quilts, craft & quilting
& fabric, Pfaff Creative
1475 CD sewing
machine++
REAL ESTATE
AUCTION 3
CITRUS SPRINGS
LOTS 3:00 pm -
Sold absolute!!!
518, 540, 546 W.
Bluster PI. Citrus
Springs
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comrn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. "Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial









Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.


85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.


Estate Sale
6840 Sorrell Ave.
Homosassa, l
Thurs. & Fri. 8-3
Furniture, Collectibles, o
Tools, John Deere Tractor, -
Freezer & More




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164



Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
Sat. April 6th,
Iam
CALL 352-519-3130
Vlsit
American Heritage
Auctloneers.com









HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $25,900
"cash only -
352-503-3245




Use Your Tax Money
for a Down Payment
Recently Foreclosed
Special Financing
Available, Any
Credit, Any Income
2BD, 1 BTH, 840 sq.ft.
located at, 6515 S.
Tropicana Ave.
Lecanto $59,900
Visit: www.roseland
co.com\AQF
Drive by then
Call (800)282-1550







Pineus Vla $7



BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090




Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379



3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667
MHm 3/2 w/den
off US 19 newer c/h/a,
furn, clean RV Hkup.
Own/Fin.**$34.900*
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340



4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
1305)619-082. ollan


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351

Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531
Golf Course Home
3/2/272. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475




2 ACRES
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$126,500
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

BEST TIME TO BUY.
LOW PRICES!
LOW INTEREST!

BUY NOW

Also Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
3/2/2, 2 '/ acres,
24 ft x 32 ft shop
$175,000
Hernando Area
(352) 726-7755


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.comrn
Inverness Highlands
4/3/2 $90,500 Nr. hosp.
& schools Pool w/fence,
shed & Ig. bck lanai
(352) 201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'll work harder

352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515











SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


CLASSIFIED
















TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant





For Sale
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505




Citrus Hills Tri-level
on E Hartford
3bd/3ba w/carport
2100 sq. ft. furnished
asking $119,500
704-905-5986
Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

2BD 1%'BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857
Crystal River 3/2/2
cbs 2100 sq ft liv
area,10K boat lift,
updated 2011,shed
$239,000
352-794-3020/5864987
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337
Lake Rousseau
5311 W, Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


INVERNESS
Home wanted min.
1800sf, 3/2/2, no dirt
rds. must be in Exce.
Cond. Have cash little
over 90K for quick sale
443-366-5579
To Rent for 2013 -14
winter season. Mini-
mum 4 mo. Single
dwelling home prefer-
ably Pine Ridge or adj
to Withlacoochee For-
est. Need room for 2
horses. Ref. avail
(352) 249-7180




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 C13


Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available. www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm.
352-795-6336




1985 Force
85 HP, outboard Eng,
w/power lift. low hrs
fresh water only $1200
352-507-1490




BUY, SELL-
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510"

Clearwater Skiff
16', 2010-2011 25hp
YAM, elec., 821b, T.M. &
charger, cover, 3hr use
$7700. 352-447-2967
G-3
Jon Boat, Model 1236
Includes; 9.8 Merc,
fish/depth finder, swivel
seats, full cover & & trier
$1,650(352) 341-1709
Lund Renegade
16',inc.89 Johnson 70hp
& 94 galvinized trlr.
recent complete interior
overhaul,strong engine
Lot of boat for money!
Ask.$4350, 352-897-
5305 or 412-508-0247
MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192
SWEETWATER
2008 18 ft. Pontoon,
60HP, Yamaha, 4
stroke, $9,999, no trlr.
(352) 257-9496
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555*
boatsupercenter.com




WINNEBEGO
1995, Brave, 23 ft,
Class A excel. cond.,
wood floors, granite
counter tops, by appt.
Only (352) 527-8413




00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
4 Winds Trailer
Express, 2006,
26' DSL, 12' slide out
$12,500. 352-228-0984
2007 4 Winds
28",1 slide out, Qu Bed,
hvy hitch, $8900, Loc in
Inglis, Fl 812-605-1598
COACHMAN
'07, 4 New tires, 1 slide
out, Great Condition
Clean, Move In cond.
$15,500. 352-637-2735
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. Island bd.,
+ rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,1 slide, w/AC,
qn. bed, awning, pwr.
tonque jack, corner
jacks, microwave, equili-
zing hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like new,
NADA $29K, Reduced
$19,900 352-382-3298
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
Truck Camper
over the Cab sleeps 5,
air, generator micro-
wave, oven stove,
electric jacks & awn-
ing. Fits 8ft bed, 3/4
ton or dully $5,200.
(352) 503-2887
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




CAR DOLLY
custom made, heavy
duty, like new, $850
352-795-8986



MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 Ibs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarstonl@mac.com
or 352-586-1483


"BEST PRICE-
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-4264267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440


WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible, looks great,
runs good, must sell at
best offer
352-560-0079
2003 Buick
LaSabre Limited, one
owner, 44k miles, mint
cond. $7000 call after
6pm 352-897-5039
BUICK
'01, Century,
81 271 miles, $4,200
(352) 465-2823
between 7a-7p

D s Bsolut


CADILLAC
2011 DTS, northstar
4.6L-V8, Luxury collec-
tion 25k miles, excel.
cond., auto, XM
radio, Tuscan Bronze
$33,500 352-382-0042
Chevrolet
2008 Aveo
$6,998
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Crusier
5 speed, power win-
dows, locks- $4,250
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
DODGE
2005, Neon
Automatic transmis-
sion $4,400
352-341-0018
D S 0
M a ria 9


890-0412 FCRN
Diane E. Thomas Case No: 2012 DR 1525 Dissolution of Marriage
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA Case No.:2012-DR-1525 Division:
WILBUR FRANKLIN THOMAS
Petitioner,
and
DIANE ELIZABETH THOMAS
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

TO: DIANE ELIZABETH THOMAS
(Last Known Address): 1106 Trail Ridge Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34453

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for a dissolution of marriage has been filed
against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on WILBUR FRANKLIN THOMAS, whose address is 7062 South Lloyd Tr., Floral
City, FL 34436, on or before April 22, 1203, and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court at 110 N. APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS, FL 34450, before service on Petitioner
or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the petition.
The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property
should be divided: (insert "none" is applicable, the legal description of real property,
a specific description of personal property, and the name of the county in Florida
where the property is located) NONE

Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated March 4, 2013.
(COURT SEAL) Angela Vick, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
March 22, 29 & April 5 & 12, 2013.


876-0322 FCRN
Osmond Samuel Murphy File No: 2013-CP-73 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 2013- CP-73 Div. A
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF OSMOND SAMUEL MURPHY
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of SAMUEL OSMOND MURPHY, deceased, whose
date of death was January 12, 2013, File No. 2013-CP- 73, is pending in the Circuit
Court for CITRUS County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450 The names and addresses of the personal
representative's is set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent s estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice is March 15, 2013.
Personal Representative:
/s/Sarah Beth Murphy-Ellis
706 N. Johnson St., Plant City, FL 33563, (813)545-8350
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/Nancy G. Hubbell, Esquire
1511A Sun City Center Plaza, Sun City Center, Florida 33573, (813)633-1461 FBN
0705047, EMAIL: hubbelln@verizon.net
March 15 & 22, 2013.


877-0322 FCRN
Arlene F. Harty File No: 2013-CP-10 Notice to Creditors (Summ. Admin.)
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2013-CP-10 Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF ARLENE F. HARTY A/K/A ARLENE HARTY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been en-
tered in the estate of ARLENE F. HARTY A/K/A ARLENE HARTY, deceased, File Number
2013-CP-10, by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450; that the decedent's date
of death was June 10, 2011; that the total value of the estate is $54,500.00 and that
the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are:
William Strempel, P.O. Box 2408, Acworth, GA 30102; Scott Strempel, 705 Tanager
Lane, New Lenox, IL 60451; and Sandra Kie f/k/a Sandra Strempel, 16548 W. 147th
Place, Lockport, IL 60441.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this March 15, 2013.
Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ William Strempel
P.O. Box 2408, Acworth, GA 30102
Attorney for Persons Giving Notice:
/s/ H. Michael Evans, Esq., Attorney Florida Bar No. 251674 20702 W. Pennsylvania
Ave., Dunnellon, FL 34431 Telephone: (352) 489-2889 Fax: (352) 489-0852
E-Mail: hmichaelevanspa@yahoo.com
March 15 & 22, 2013.


837-0322 FCRN
Joseph H. Brown File No: 2012 CP 000109 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.:2012 CP 000109
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSPEH H. BROWN,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(formal notice by publication)
TO: JOSEPH BROWN
SEAN BROWN
AND TO ANY AND ALL HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH H. BROWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a PETITION FOR PROBATE OF A LATER DISCOVERED WILL
AND CONFIRMATION OF APPOINTMENT OF SUCCESSOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
has been filed in this court. You are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, on the petitioner's attorney, whose name and address are: DEREK B.
ALVAREZ, ESQ., GENDERS ALVAREZ DIECIDUE, P.A. 2307 West Cleveland Street,
Tampa, FL 33609, on or before April 1, 2013, and to file the original of the written de-
fenses with the clerk of this court either before service or immediately thereafter.
Failure to serve and file written defenses are required may result in a judgement or
order for the relief demanded, without further notice.
Signed on February 19, 2013..
ANGELA VICK, CLERK OF COURTS
As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
Published four (4) times in the Citrus County Chronicle
March 1,8, 15 & 22, 2013.


865-0322 FCRN
Vs. Geofrey Livengood Case No: 2012 CA 001550A Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.:2012 CA 001550A
CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP,
INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEOFFREY LIVENGOOD, et al
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GEOFFREY LIVENGOOD and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEOFFREY
LIVENGOOD
RESIDENT: Unknown
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 4039 NW Blitchon Road, Lot 33, Ocala, FL 34475
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
described property located in CITRUS County, Florida:
Lots 19, in Block 466 of Citrus Springs, Unit 5, according to the map or plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 6, Pages 1 through 14, Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written de-
fenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original
with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, ei-
ther before April 15, 2013 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be en-


FORD
'03, Taurus SE, 8 pass.
wagon,. DOHC,V6, with
most options, 105k, nice
car private own. $3,750
(352) 419-4501


FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment



922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 4,
until March 22,2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22, 2013..


M a


m


Notices to Creditors/
Administration I


Notices to Creditors
Administration 9


Nodces to Creditors/
Administrationils/


FoecosreSa


A Noi c I


Acio Noti ceI







C14 FRIDAY, MARCH 22,2013


FORD
91 Crown Victoria
runs, can be fixed or
used for parts $500
352-637-5331
HONDA
2005 Element, AWD,
good cond, khaki
colored, $6500 (352)
344-1442 or 344-1441
Mitsubishi
2007 Eclipse, power
windows, automatic
transmission $10,899
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing
TOYOTA
2010 Prius Perfect
Condition. Approx.
28,000 miles. 50 mpg.
Under warranty until
December. $17,500
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2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551
FORD MUSTANG
2004 MACH-1
23,500 mi; Exc Cond.
Have Extra's. Only 139
made. $16,500. Call
Skip(352) 527-3687
MUSTANG GT 03
63K, Showcar, Super-
charger, lots of goodies!
Chrome, $14,500 obo
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with a classi-
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includes a photo

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2003 FORD
RANGER edge X-Cab,
4x4,match cap,bedliner,
tow pkg, 4LV6 $8750
352-860-1394 6pm-9pm
DODGE
1996 Ram 1500 Truck
$2000. 352.795.3708
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FORD
1995 F-150XL, white
3L, straight 6, 2WD,
6' bed w/ cab, $2700.
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FORD
2008 F350 Dually
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2003 Explorer, Black
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1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 3rd row
seat, power windows,
locks- $4,995
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352 422-6336 or
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1978 F150, Shrt Bed,
auto, 351, V8,
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JEEP
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pw, pl, priced to low
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JUNK MOTORCYCLES
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08, 1200cc Sportster
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$9000 (352)447-1244
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1981 Silver Wing GL
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2009, 1300 VTX,
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50 CC, like new, 400
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2009 Buddy, 125 CC;
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2005, Majesty, YP 400
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only 2200 miles, $3200
352-419-4419


F Sae


tered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.


This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The
Chronicle.
DATED: March 6, 2013.
(SEAL) Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk of the Court
Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion
noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not
yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days of
your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at:
Citrus County John Sullivan (352) 341-6700
Hernando County Peggy Welch (352) 754-4402
Lake County Nicole Berg (352) 253-1604
Marion County Tameka Gordon (352) 401-6710
Sumter County Lorna Barker (352) 569-6012
March 15 & 22, 2013.


866-0322 FCRN
Vs. Unknown/Mildred Pyles Case No: 09-2011-CA-004359 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.09-201 1-CA-004359
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
ESTATE OF MILDRED D. PYLES, DECEASED, ET AL.
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):
EMMITTE BEARD (CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
Last known address: 4895 WITHLACOOCHEE TRAIL, DUNNELLON, FL 34434
Additional address: 6711 5TH ST W, BRADENTON, FL 34207
RENE BEARD (CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
Last known address: 727 LINCOLN AVENUE, TARPON SPRINGS, FL 34689
Additional address: 238 PETUNIA TER #8100, SANFORD, FL 32771
Additional address: 744 SUNCREST LOOP APT 102, CASSELBERRY, FL 32707
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property:
NW 1/2 OF LOT 78 AND LOTS 79 AND 80, WITHLACOOCHEE HOME UNIT NO.2, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 49
AND 50, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 4895
WITHLACOOCHEE TRAIL, DUNNELLON, FL 34434
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to Lauren E. Barbati, Esq. at VAN NESS LAW FIRM, PLC, Attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 1239 E. NEWPORT CENTER DRIVE, SUITE #110, DEERFIELD
BEACH, FL 33442 on or before April 15, 2013 a date which is within thirty (30) days af-
ter the first publication of this Notice in the CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided to Administrative Order No.
2065
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts within 2 working days
of your receipt of your notice to appear in Court at:
Citrus County John Sullivan (352) 341-6700
Hernando County Peggy Welch(352) 754-4402
Lake County Laurie Crews (352) 253-0900 xl00 Marion
Tameka Gordan (352) 401-6701
Sumter County Lorna Barker (352) 569-6088
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 6th day of March, 2013
(SEAL) Angela Vick, CLERK OF COURT
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
March 15 & 22, 2013.

867-0322 FCRN
vs. Unknown/Richard Hackney Case No: 09-2012-CA-001813 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.:09-2012-CA-001813
NEWEST BANK, F.S.B.
Plaintiff,
v.
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE
ESTATE OF RICHARD HACKNEY A/K/A RICHARD L. HACKNEY, DECEASED; RICHARD
L. HACKNEY, II; PAUL E. HACKNEY; PATRICIA EVANS; UNITED STATES OF AMER-
ICA, ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOP-
MENT; THE GLEN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF CITRUS COUNTY, INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendantss,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE. HERS. DEVISEES. GRANTEES.ASSIGNEES. LIENORS.
CREDITORS. TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE
ESTATE OF RICHARD HACKNEYA/K/A RICHARD L. HACKNEY. DECEASED
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein
TO: ALLOTHER UNKNOWN PARTIESCLAIMING INTERESTS BY THROUGH. UNDER.
AKnU A-AI A IA AMW Un n-KANIK VJI U 1--A-Ki nUI 1IKNUWN- -An UK


AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANTS) WH
SPOUSES. HEIRS, DEVISEES. GRANTEES. OR OTHER CLAIMANTS


whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Cit-
rus County, Florida:
LOT 41, THE GLEN, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 13, PAGES 46 THROUGH 48, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
This property is located at the Street address of: 3631 N. Lucille Drive, Beverly Hills,
Florida 34465
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before April 15, 2013 a
date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.,
Plaintiffs Attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Flor-
ida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's Attorney, or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Citrus County
Chronicle.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 4, 2013.
ANGELA VICK, CLERK OF THE COURT
(COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff: Randolph Clemente, Esq., Jacquelyn C. Herrman, Esq.
Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954) 354-3544, Facsimile: (954) 354-3545
Primary email: rclemente@erwlaw.com, Secondary email: servicecomplete@erwlaw.com
- IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN'S WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a per-
son with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator, at (352) 341-6700, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving your notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
March 15 & 22, 2013.

868-0322 FCRN
vs. Michael Ring Case No: 09-2012-CA-001788 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.:09-2012-CA-001788
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff,
v.
MICHAEL RING A/K/A MICHAEL S. RING; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL RING
A/K/A MICHAEL S. RING; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
NAMED DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendantss,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MICHAEL RING A/K/A MICHAEL S. RING


Last Known Address: 220 North Big Oaks Point
Lecanto, Florida 34461
Current Address: Unknown
Previous Address: 8485 N Ira Martin Avenue
Crystal River, Florida 34428
Previous Address: 94 Stage Harbor Road
Marlborough, CT 06447
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAI iM RING


Last Known Address:

Current Address:


220 ~ Not i Ok on


220 North Big Oaks Point
Lecanto, Florida 34461
Unknown


Previous Address: Unknown
TO: ALLOTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY THROUGH. UNDER.
AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE. WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES. HEIRS. DEVISEES. GRANTEES. OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the un-
known Defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Cit-
rus County, Florida:
LOT 16, BLOCK 1, HOLIDAY HEIGHTS UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF,


Chronicle

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 61 AND 62, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
This property is located at the Street address of: 8485 N Ira Martin Avenue, Crystal
River, Florida 34428
YOU ARE REQUIRED to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before April 15, 2013 a
date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.,
Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Flor-
ida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff's Attorney, or
immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Citrus County
Chronicle.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 4, 2013.
ANGELAVICK, CLERK OF THE COURT
(COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff: Samuel Santiago, Esq., Jacquelyn C. Herrman, Esq.
Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954) 354-3544, Facsimile: (954) 354-3545
Primary email: ssantiago@erwlaw.com, Secondary email: servicecomplete@erwlaw.com
* IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICAN'S WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a per-
son with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator, at (352) 341-6700, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inver-
ness, FL 34450, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving your notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
March 15 & 22, 2013.

869-0322 FCRN
Vs.Nancy E. Layton Case No: 2012 CA 1061 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 5th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No:2012 CA 1061
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS
OF BEAR STEARNS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I TRUST 2007 HE4ASSET BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007 HE4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Nancy E. Layton, Unknown Parties claiming by through under or against the Estate of
Pamela Marie Layton, deceased, whether said unknown Parties claim as spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, trustees, or other claimants; SunTrust
Bank; Capital One Bank (USA), N.A.; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Nancy E. Layton
Residence Unknown
Unknown Parties claiming by through under or against the Estate of Pamela Marie Layton,
deceased, whether said unknown Parties claim as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, as-
signees, creditors, trustees, or other claimants
Location Unknown
If living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against the
above named defendantss, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described prop-
erty in Citrus County, Florida:
Lot 9 of an unrecorded Kenwood Oaks, described as follows: The S 1/5 of the W 14 of
the NW1/ of the SE 14 of the NE 1/4 of Section 36, Township 19 South, Range 17 East.
Subject to an easement across the East 15 feet thereof for road right of way.
Street Address: 05362 S Alice Pt, Homosassa, FL 34446
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, PL, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after
the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court,
otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
DATED on March 4, 2013
(SEAL) Angela Vick, Clerk of said Court
BY:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
CLARFIELD, OKON, SALOMONE & PINCUS, PL., Attorney for Plaintiff
500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (561) 713-1400
March 15 & 22, 2013.

870-0322 FCRN
Vs. William T. Smith, Jr. Case No: 2013CA272 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2013CA272
BRANNEN BANK, a Florida State Banking Corporation successor by merger to
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
WILLIAM T. SMITH, JR., deceased, JANICE
HERRIN SMITH, spouse of WILLIAM T. SMITH JR.,
deceased, SUNTRUST BANK, a National Banking
Association, and CYPRESS VILLAGE PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit
corporation,
Defendants.


CLASSIFIED


=Iu~,,UT.


m


FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2013 C-15


m


TO: WILLIAM T. SMITH, JR. deceased, 22 Cypress Blvd. E, Homosassa, FL
34446
and his unknown heirs, beneficiaries, devisees, grantees, creditors and all other
parties claiming by, through, under or against him, and all other persons, known
or unknown, claiming to have any right, title and interest in the lands hereinafter
described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a Mortgage encumbering the follow-
ing described real property located in Citrus County, Florida:
Lot 5, Block B-P, SUGARMILL WOODS, CYPRESS VILLAGE, according to plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 9, Pages 86 through 150, inclusive, Plat Book 10, Pages 1 through
150, inclusive, Plat Book 11, Pages 1 through 16, inclusive, amended in Plat Book 9,
Page 87A, all of the Public Records of Citrus County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff=s attorney, Donald F. Perrin, Esq., DONALD F. PERRIN,
P.A., Post Office Box 250, Inverness, FL 34451-0250 on or before the 15th day of April,
2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
DATED this 4th day of March, 2013.
(SEAL) ANGELA VICK, Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
Published in the Citrus County Chronicle on March 15 & 22, 2013.


871-0322 FCRN
Vs. Larry Tarantino Case No: 2012CA1871 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO:2012CA1871
RESURGENT CAPITAL SERVICES, LP,
Plaintiff,
VS.
LARRY TARANTINO, TRUSTEE OF TARANTINO CALDERA LIVING TRUST, DATED JUNE
26,2006; et al.,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Unknown Beneficiaries of the Tarantino Caldera Living Trust, Dated
June 26,2006
Last Known Residence: Unknown
Current residence unknown, and all persons claiming by, through, under or
against the names Defendants.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in CITRUS County, Florida:
LOT 11, BLOCK 1426, CITRUS SPRINGS UNIT 21, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 73 THROUGH 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CIT-
RUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE I CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiff's attorney, at 7000 West
Palmetto Park Road, Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL 33433 (Phone Number: (561)
392-6391), within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either before April 15, 2013 on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on March 4, 2013.
(SEAL) ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
March 15 & 22, 2013.

872-0322 FCRN
Vs. Lloyd Tibbetts Case No: 2013 CA 31 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2013 CA 31
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
VS.
LLOYD TIBBETTS; TERRY LINCOLN; et al.,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LLOYD TIBBETTS.
Last Known Residence: 2511 East Mercury St., Inverness, FL 34453.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in CITRUS County, Florida:
LOT 101 IN BLOCK B OF HILTOP, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 42 AND 43, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH 1999 LIMI 60/12 MOBILE HOME, VIN #FLA14614434A AND
FLA14614434B
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE I CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiff's attorney, at 7000 West
Palmetto Park Road, Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL 33433 (Phone Number: (561)
392-6391), within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either before April 15, 2013 on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on March 4, 2013.
(SEAL) ANGELA VICK, As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/Vivian Cancel, As Deputy Clerk
March 15 & 22, 2013.


r


m


893-032 FCRN
04/05 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
The following vehicle will
be sold at public sale,
free of all prior liens, per Fl


891-0322 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER ESTABLISHING OR CHANGING REGULATIONS
AFFECTING THE USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a pub-
lic hearing on April 4.2013 at 9:00 AM, at the Lecanto Government Building, 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Floida. Please note that the PDC meeting
begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a particular item is discussed will vary de-
pending on how fast the PDC moves through the agenda.
PV-13-01 Timothy C. Pitts for Crystal Glen Properties. LLC. is requesting a PLAT VACA-
TION from the Citrus County Land Development Code, to vacate the dedication for
Tract A to the Crystal Club, Inc., as recorded in the plat of Crystal Glen, Plat Book 14,
Pages 21 through 27, public records of Citrus County, Florida. A complete legal de-
scription of the property is on file with the Land Development Division.
Interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the pro-
posed Resolution.
A copy of the proposed application and supporting materials is available for public
inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the Land
Development Division, Suite 141, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Lecanto, Florida. For
more information about this application please contact a Planner at the Depart-
ment of Planning and Development (352) 527-5239. Information regarding the Land
Development Code or Comprehensive Plan is available on the internet at
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us (Click on Departments, Planning and Development, then the
Land Development link).
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect
to any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
March 22, 2013

892-0322 FCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF INTENT TO CONSIDER AN APPLICATION
FOR CONDITIONAL USE OF LAND
The Citrus County Planning and Development Commission (PDC) will conduct a Pub-
lic Hearing on the following application on April 4. 2013 at 9:00 AM in the Lecanto
Government Building, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, Florida. Please
note that the PDC meeting begins at 9:00 AM. The actual time that a particular item
is discussed will vary depending on how fast the PDC moves through the agenda.
CU-13-02 Brian Kowalski. Custom Family Homes for David Huffman & Ursula
Schwuttke A Conditional Use to allow for a guest cottage, exceeding the allowa-
ble square footage, pursuant to Section 3101, Residential Accessory Uses of the LDC.
Property is located in Section 5. Township 17 South. Ranae 16 East; more specifically,
Lot 12340 of an Unrecorded Subdivision, which address is 16219 W River Rd., Inglis FL
A complete legal description of the property is on file with the Land Development
Division.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission with respect
to any matter considered at this hearing, he or she will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and, for such purpose, he or she may need to insure that a verbatim rec-
ord of the proceedings is made, which record includes testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450, (352)
341-6565, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech im-
paired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580.
Chairman
Planning and Development Commission
Citrus County, Florida
March 22 2013


923-0322 DCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Royal American Construction is soliciting bids from qualified DBE/MBE/WBE subcon-
tractors and suppliers for the Crystal River Wastewater Project. Plans and specifica-
tions are available electronically for this project at no charge. Please contact Allan
Parauka at 850-769-8981 for more information.
March 13 thru March 22, 2013.


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