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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03063

Full Text


Final two: Gators, 'Canes advance to finals /B1


Increasing
clouds, 20 %
chance of rain.
PAGE A4


C I T R 0 N T Y RmS





www.chronicleonNICine.com
^& www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


-99-


VOL. 118 ISSUE 222


Pan/scraper video raises blushes


CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
An item of heavy equipment
described as "in pieces" at last
week's county commission meet-


St. Patrick's Day
Parade today
The third annual St.
Patrick's Day Parade
takes to the streets of
downtown Inverness be-
ginning at 5:30 p.m.
today. The "feel-good,
hometown parade" will
stretch from Cooter Pond
up East Main Street
around Courthouse
Square and down Pine
Street.
The parade will bring
festivities to the streets
with dancers, go karts,
clowns, cars and various
organizations eager to
share the green theme.
And don't miss the Mutt
Strut full of dressed-up
pets.


SPECIAL SECTION:
County fair
Pull
and
save
this
handy
guide
to the
Citrus
County
Fair, running from
March 25 to 30./Inside
COMMENTARY:


Sales ptich
"Grand bargain" a tough
sell./Page C1
* Column: Women's
Political Network honors
pioneers./Page All
* More letters to the
editor./Page A10
SIKORSKI'S ATTIC:


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The Citrus County Sheriff's Office is tak-
ing a phased approach in its interdiction
efforts regarding synthetic drugs, which
have reached alarming highs across the
nation, according to Major Crimes Lt.


ing was somehow made whole
the next day for an operation
demonstration that appeared in a
video on the Internet, making for
red faces among county staff.
"I was floored to find out the


machine was repaired and re-
assembled," Ken Frink, assistant
county administrator and public
works director, said Thursday
Frink had cause for embarrass-
ment because the Citrus County


Kevin Purinton.
Sheriff's officials began by preaching
corporate responsibility by reaching ac-
cords with various stores not to peddle the
products, which are legal but are used as
intoxicants. They also launched major
See BATTLE/Page A4


Board of County Commissioners
(BOCC) on Tuesday approved by
a 4-1 vote buying a replacement
for the machine, called a
See VDEO/Page A5


Substantial battle


In the know
Antiques expert John
Siksorki writes about
this box./Page E4

Annie's Mailbox ......A18
Classifieds ............ D5
Crossword .............A18
Editorial ............. C2
Entertainment ..........B6
Horoscope ................B6
Lottery Numbers ......B4
Lottery Payouts ........ B6
Movies ..........A18
O bituaries ................A6
Together..........A20


6 I!AIIjl lcll8j2 o0


Builders join in Parade of Homes


MORE INSIDE
* Read more about the
Parade of Homes
inside HomeFront.
OME RONT I"


CHARLES
LAWRENCE
For the Chronicle
Local home builders
Gold Crest Homes, Hart-
land Homes and Dream
Custom Homes have very
different types of models
on display in this year's
Citrus County Spring Pa-
rade of Homes.
They range from the
small and affordable to
luxurious. Builders of all
three local homes on dis-


Photos, click
on this story at
www.chronicle
online.com.
play hope their entries will
find appeal with buyers.
This year's Parade of
Homes, which runs
through March 24, in-
cludes three local models
and a dozen other models MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
in Hernando County. The "Don Valencia," constructed by Dream Custom
There is also a virtual Homes, offers a large, open family room that looks onto
a large pool deck and cabana. It is one of the homes on
See PAADE/Page A7 display through March 24 during the Parade of Homes.


2013 DODGE
GRAND


U im


I'llI


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-- CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM HOMOSASSA INVERNESS BROOKSVILLE


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PLUS TAX TAG AND DEALER FEES WITH $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
57


Parris Island

leader says

women can

take combat
Associated Press
PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. The first fe-
male Marine Corps general in charge of its
tough-as-nails basic training site on Parris
Island says she's confident women in the
Corps will be able to handle combat.
Brig. Gen. Loretta Reynolds says the Pen-
tagon's lifting of the combat exclusion
against women earlier this
year means commanders
will be able to "just use the
talent that they have. Just
use it where they need it.
That's awesome."
Reynolds was the first
woman to command a Ma-
rine base in a combat zone
when she was put in charge Bri. Gen.
of Camp Leatherneck in Loretta
Afghanistan in 2010. As Reynolds
head of the 1st Marine Ex- first female
peditionary Force's head- Marine general
quarters group, she basic training
oversaw the base in Hel- at Parris
mand province that grew to Island, S.C.
house 20,000 Marines.
She also commanded a communications
battalion in Iraq from 2004 to 2005 in
battle-scarred Fallujah.
Now, the Marine Corps has entrusted her
with training all its women and nearly half
its men. She said young Marines aren't as
concerned about gender as they are about
a commander's ability to lead.
"Anytime you're going to take your
Marines into harm's way, they are looking
for leadership that is calm, assertive, sure
of themselves," Reynolds said in her first
extended interview since the ban was
lifted. "And quite honestly, I don't think that
some of these young Marines care if it's a
male or a female. They just want to be
properly led."
Reynolds said she doesn't think the type
of basic training male and female recruits
endure on the swampy, insect-filled island
outside Beaufort will change much, given
the Pentagon's lifting of the ban.
"We already work them pretty hard," she
said. "We think we give them a solid
foundation."
As one of only two basic training sites for
the Marines, Parris Island holds near-
legendary status in the branch's lore. After
12 weeks of arduous training, about 17,000
men and 3,000 women graduate from the
tough-love of some 604 drill instructors
See LEADER/Page A8


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Citrus County Sheriff's Office Sgt. Ron Frink supervises all of the Citrus County School
District School Resource Officers and says synthetic drugs are problematic for youths. Frink
displays some of the vast variety of synthetic drugs that can be found on store shelves in
Citrus County. He says the drugs are dangerous and made with harmful chemicals.

Sheriffs office continues fight against synthetic drugs


2013 DODGE
JOURNEY


2013 RAM
1500 __


I SLUN DAIYI IV_ '


I:T/I7 :,I:1 ;


^^


- ". E TRUCK
MONTH'
ii]


m'4








Community beautification group marks 11 years


Special to the Chronicle
Keep Citrus County
Beautiful has completed
its 11th year of service to
the community and
there have been many
accomplishments.
The mission of KCCB is
to encourage personal re-
sponsibility for community
appearance through edu-
cation, activities and
recognition, focusing on
reducing litter, promoting
recycling, preserving and
beautifying neighborhoods
and public spaces.
New members, partners
and sponsors to keep these
programs vibrant are al-
ways welcome.
In 2001, a group of a
dozen local citizens con-
tacted Keep America
Beautiful to find out how
to become an affiliate of
that group. After all, KAB
already had almost 50
years of experience in de-
veloping successful pro-
grams for community
involvement. Many still re-
member the KAB TV ads
showing Iron Eyes Cody
tearfully watching a lit-
tered landscape.
The group of local or-
ganizers worked with KAB
trainers and completed all
the prerequisites in record


This is the first in a series
of weekly installments
about Keep Citrus County
Beautiful. Upcoming
installments will focus on
Citrus County Cleanup-
Greenup, Pride Awards,
Snag 'N' Bag, Cigarette
Litter and Citrus County
Recycles.

time. After setting local
goals and priorities, be-
coming incorporated, de-
veloping bylaws, applying
for IRS 501(c)3 status and
choosing a board of direc-
tors, Keep Citrus County
Beautiful became a certi-
fied affiliate in the fall of
2002.
The original group of
organizers included Josh
Wooten, Mike Colbert,
Frank Yetner, C.L. Cal-
loway, Cheryl Neff
Phillips, Susie Metcalfe,
John Quintas, Pete Peter-
son, Joe Turck and Allan
Hayward. Several charter


members have recently
retired from active in-
volvement with KCCB and
a few new volunteers
from the community who
would like to serve on the
board of directors would
be welcomed.
The cities of Inverness
and Crystal River and the
Citrus County Commission
have been actively in-
volved through the years
by providing one KCCB
board member each, rec-
ognizing accomplishments
in the form of proclama-
tions and certificates, co-
sponsoring events and
donating office space.
For many years the state
of Florida offered grant
funding to reimburse
KCCB for litter prevention
and cleanup events, how-
ever those grants have
been discontinued. KCCB
is now dependent on local
support via memberships
and sponsorships for its
operating and program


budget. It continues to
seek grants from sources
that focus on areas that
mesh with its mission.
KCCB has received the
President's Circle Award
from KAB every year since
2005 for being an active af-
filiate and participating in
several defined programs
each year. The national
programs implemented in-
clude: Great American
Cleanup, America Recy-
cles Day, and Cigarette Lit-
ter Prevention.
In addition, KCCB has
started the following local
programs, including Pride
Awards, Snag 'N' Bag, Cit-
rus County Cleanup-
Greenup, Primary School
Readings and Citrus
County Recycles.
In the coming months,
articles will spotlight how
each of these programs
works for the community.
Look for the KCCB
booth at area festivals.
Check out its website


Special to the Chronicle
Mike Colbert and Susie Metcalfe were on hand with Keep
Citrus County Beautiful recently presented a Pride Award
to Colbert for service as the organization's leader for more
than 10 years.
www.kccb.org, leave a volve your community
voice mail message at 352- group in an event. Become
746-9393 or email keep a partner and sponsor. Vol-
citruscountybeautiful@ unteer to be on the board.
gmail.com. Let's all help Keep Cit-
Become a member; in- rus County Beautiful.


I,


Airborne division

golf tournament

slated Saturday


Annual event

raises funds

for military

members

Chronicle
The third annual Daniel
S. Campbell All-Airborne
Chapter, 82nd Airborne
Division Association Golf
Tournament will be Satur-
day, March 30, at the Citrus
Hills Golf and Country
Club.
Congress chartered the
82nd Airborne Division As-
sociation in 1944. The asso-
ciation's nine Florida
chapters, as well as its
chapters nationwide, work
to support assistance pro-
grams benefiting active-
duty service members,
veterans and their families.
Check-in for the four-
person scramble will be at
7:30 a.m. with a shotgun
start at 8:30 a.m. Individu-
als and groups short of
four persons will be com-
bined to make four-person
teams. You do not need to
be a veteran to participate.


Charitable, tax-
deductible contributions
for door prizes and hole
sponsorships for $300 and
$50 are welcome. A $300
hole sponsorship includes
a foursome and business
card ad in the chapter's
monthly newsletter.
Hole sponsorships and
golf tournament registra-
tion form, with donation of
$55 per person, must be re-
ceived no later than March
27. Each participating
golfer's donation includes
golf and cart, beverages on
the course and lunch at
the country club. The tour-
nament features prizes for
a hole-in-one, closest-to-
the-pin and the first, sec-
ond and last finishing
teams, plus door prizes.
Hole sponsors and par-
ticipating golfers and
should make their check
or money order payable to
Daniel S. Campbell Chap-
ter and send it with their
registration form to
Stephen C. Leonard, 3848
E. Wilma St., Inverness,
FL, 34453.
For registration form,
hole sponsorship or infor-
mation, call 352-726-3693
or email teacup47@
yahoo.com.


Citrus County's
2012 World"'s
F Greatest


Baby Shower
May 13, 2013
at the Citrus County Auditorium

Expecting a baby? Come to our Baby
Shower! Learn about taking care of
yourself and your baby. Parents of
infants under 6 months old are also
invited. There will be exhibits, games,
door prizes, a scavenger hunt and gifts
for moms, dads and babies!
S Call 228-9047 1 L'
for information.
Visit the Chronicle booth at
Episietnt ta bo me toouBb
\O\ this event to learn about our o
\ Cutest Baby Contest!
int
invited 1_).NTer illbCxibis gms


12 MONTHS i
SAME AS CASH




0%

FINANCING

ONE WEEK ONLY! I
I mm
--- --OAL -L-ATON


Owner, Rickey Richardson
Licensed Hearing Aid Specialist


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Dig into archaeology of Nature Coast


Presenter to explain prehistoric and

historic cultural resources of region


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
Researchers say inhabitants
today have distanced them-
selves throughout time from na-
ture and historic culture. With
March being Archaeology
Month, Crystal River Preserve
State Park is hosting a program
to educate the public on the be-
ginning of time for the United
States and the Nature Coast all
the way up through the historic


contact period.
Beginning at 3 p.m. Tuesday,
March 19, at the Crystal River
Preserve State Park headquar-
ters auditorium, Gary D. Ellis,
director of the Gulf Archaeology
Research Institute, will bring
the past to the present with a
two-hour comprehensive
overview.
"What I try to do as part of di-
rector of Gulf Archaeology Re-
search Institute is provide
public programming to reintro-


IF YOU GO
TIME: 3 p.m.
DATE: Tuesday, March 10.
m PLACE: Crystal River
Preserve State Park.
PRESENTER: Gary D. Ellis,
director of Gulf Archaeology
Research Institute.

duce the public to the nature
and extent of the prehistoric and
historic cultural resources along
the Nature Coast, specifically in
Citrus County," Ellis said.
He explained if time allows,
he will launch into the initial pi-


oneering of the region and cover
all the way through the Semi-
nole Wars. Furthermore, he said
Citrus County is the ideal loca-
tion for such research and
presentation.
"We have everything here
from the earliest people in the
new world all the way to the de-
velopment of complex and so-
phisticated Native American
cultures," Ellis said. "The con-
text over time is almost over-
whelming. Every cultural stage
seems to have hunter and gath-
erer all the way up to linked and
stratified societies with formal
leadership. It is really cool."
Ellis will discuss archaeologi-


cal research along the Nature
Coast and Citrus County.
"I wind up with what we have
here and what is happening to it
from a human and natural im-
pact," Ellis said. "Also I mention
what everyday citizens can do to
help provide protection and
conservation of these resources.
It is what every person's role is
in the protection of our shared
heritage."
For information, call Ellis at
352-464-4274 or email him at
gari.arch@gmail.com.
Contact Chronicle reporter
Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
@chronicleonline. com.


Around the
COUNTY
Bicycle Boulevard
work starting
Construction begins
Monday on the city of Inver-
ness Bicycle Boulevard
project on North Apopka
Avenue. Improvements in-
clude resurfacing, addition
of bike lanes, sidewalk im-
provements, landscaping
and storm water upgrades.
The Withlacoochee State
Trail crossing will be en-
hanced for safety and visi-
bility, including flashers to
alert motorists to trail traffic.
Plus parking and sidewalk
improvements will be made
at Liberty Park.
Construction will impact
traffic flow on North Apopka
from Dampier Street to Vine
Street. Though two-lane
traffic will be maintained as
much as possible, flagged
one-way detours will be
necessary, causing slowed
traffic and slight delays.
The Bicycle Boulevard
project is scheduled to be
completed by June.
For questions or com-
ments, email the Public
Works Department at
pworks@lnverness-FL.Gov
or call 352-726-2321.
FWS scoping
meeting planned
U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service will have a "public
scoping meeting" for the
Crystal River National
Wildlife Refuge Compre-
hensive Conservation Plan
(CCP) from 6 to 9 p.m.
Tuesday, March 19, in
the Magnolia Ballroom at
the Plantation resort, 9301
W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal
River.
For more information, call
352-563-2088 or visit www.
fws.gov/crystalriver/
WGP Friends slate
meetings
The Friends of the With-
lacoochee Gulf Preserve
will have a strategic plan-
ning meeting at 9 a.m. Sat-
urday, April 6, followed by a
public meeting at 11 a.m. of
the Board of Trustees, Yan-
keetown's governing board
of the WGP, to review the
contracted plan for the Ellie
Schiller Education Center's
interior. The meeting will be
at the WGP, 1001 Old Rock
Road, Yankeetown.
Yankeetown received
funds from the Friends to ini-
tiate the planning stage. The
town also received funds
from the Felburn Foundation
for hardware, furniture and
display equipment.
Visit www.withlacoochee
gulfpreserve.com or email
friendswgp@gmail.com for
more information.
WRPC directors
meet Thursday
The next meeting of the
Withlacoochee Regional
Planning Council Board of
Directors is scheduled for
7 p.m. Thursday, March 21,
at the WRPC office at 1241
S.W. 10th St., Ocala.
As stated in a previous
email, a majority quorum
will be needed, so respond
to Glenda Roberts via email
at groberts@wrpc.cc or call
her at 352-732-1315 ext.
216 to indicate your ability
to attend.
-From staff reports


Fighting at the Fort


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
U.S. soldiers fight back against the Seminole Indians for their property in a re-enactment of the Seminole Indian War at Fort Cooper.
Soliders shoot a canon at the Indians as one militiaman lies dead nearby.


Seminole Indian

War comes alive

at state park

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Whether
they chose to walk down the
path or ride the tram, specta-
tors had one mission to
watch the Seminoles fight the
U.S. soldiers battle.
Fort Cooper Days, a two-day
event with battle re-
enactments, continues today
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Fort
Cooper State Park, 3100 S. Old
Floral City Road, Inverness.
Re-enactments will be at
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Hundreds of visitors watched
the Saturday re-enactment that
portrayed the battle on April 4,
1836, at Fort Cooper, which was
surrounded by 500 Seminole
Indians. One U.S. soldier's neg-
ligence cost him his life.
"Pvt. Cook made a mistake by
trying to run off and didn't
know what to do before a Semi-
nole came and killed him," said
Ty Beswick, who portrayed Pvt.
Cook during the re-enactment.
"One soldier was killed and 20
militias were severely
wounded."
Before and after the re-
enactment, guests visited with
men and women portraying
U.S. settlers, soldiers and Semi-
noles. Period acts, living history
demonstrations, crafts, food
and exhibits educated those
who wanted to learn more
about Florida's history and
their heritage.
"Seminoles found here knew
the soldiers were out of food,"
said Earl DeBary, a Seminole
Indian re-enactor. "They knew
that they were getting close on
ammunition. They didn't really
want to fight them; they just
wanted them to leave."
Fort Cooper State park


9V -Yu~ /.

Ait
rJ~k~L1i


ABOVE: Pvt. Cook
is the only fatality
during the Second
Seminole War at
Fort Cooper. An
Indian takes him
by surprise in the
re-enactment of
the Seminole War
at Fort Cooper.
RIGHT: Seminole
Indian re-enactor
Steve Cramer
looks at his enemy
as he is about to
fight.


ranger Dianne Drye stressed
during the re-enactments can-
nons and guns will fire and
black-powder smoke will be


. -, WHAT: Fort Cooper Days.
** a 0 WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today with re-enactments
at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
0 WHERE: Fort Cooper State
Park, 3100 S. Old Floral
City Road, Inverness.
0 ADMISSION: $6 for
adults, children 12 years
old and younger free.
0 CONTACT: www.florida
stateparks.org/fortcooper/
or call (352) 726-0315.



Pvt. Cook
made a mistake by
trying to run off
and didn't know
what to do before
a Seminole came
and killed
him.
r Ty Beswick
/ who portrayed Pvt. Cook.
"We recommend people get
here at least 30 minutes prior to
the re-enactment to allow for
ample time to get to the fort
site," Drye said.
Mobility-impaired trans-
portation will be available for
those in need at the West end of
the picnic area.
Fort Cooper Days was hosted
by the Friends of Fort Cooper
State Park. Admission money
will be used to support other
events at the park such as
Nights of Lights. Funds are
Also used to make park
improvements.
For information about the
event or the park, visit
www.floridastateparks.org/fort
cooper/ or call 352-726-0315.
present. Protective barriers are Contact Chronicle reporter
in place and pet owners should Eryn Worthington at 352-563-
consider their pet's sensitivity 5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington
to loud sounds. @chronicleonline. com.












Tax time tips for taxpayers


Special to the Chronicle

As residents prepare for the
April 15 deadline of filing their
income tax returns with the IRS,
Citrus County Sheriff's Office is
encouraging consumers to be
extra vigilant against predatory
or downright fraudulent tax re-
lief offers from a tax preparer,
suspicious or phishing emails,
or Stolen Identity Tax Refund
Fraud (SIRF). Below are a few
scams residents should lookout
for:
U SIRF: Identity thieves are
finding new ways to gather per-
sonal information to file fraudu-
lent tax returns. With stolen


Social Security numbers, crooks
are claiming fake income and
withholding information to at-
tain fraudulent refunds.
While there is no foolproof
way to protect one's identity, the
sheriff's office advises:
1) Do not give out your Social
Security number over the
phone, mail or the Internet un-
less you know who you are deal-
ing with.
2) Check your credit report for
free at www.annualcredit
report.com.
U Tax software phishing
scams: The growing popularity
of tax preparation software has
led to a rise in email scams tar-


geted at do-it-yourself taxpayers.
In addition to stealing finan-
cial information, some of the
phishing emails contain fake
Web links that could download
viruses. To avoid falling prey, do
not respond to emails requesting
your password, log-on or bank
account information, particu-
larly one claiming to be from the
IRS or a tax software provider.
Consumers should remember
the IRS does not use email to ini-
tiate contact with taxpayers about
issues related to their accounts.
U Tax relief scams Beware
of tax preparation firms claim-
ing they can obtain larger re-
funds than other preparers, who


base their fee on a percentage of
the amount of the refund, who
ask you to sign a blank tax form
or refuse to provide a preparer
tax identification number.
Proceed with caution should
anyone claim they can free you
from having to pay the IRS or
can settle debt for pennies on
the dollar.
For consumers with adjusted
gross incomes of $57,000, the IRS
offers a "FreeFile" service at
www.freefile.irs.gov.
If you receive a notice from
IRS or learn from your tax pro-
fessional more than one tax re-
turn for you was filed, respond
immediately by calling the IRS


ID Protection Specialized Unit
at 800-908-4490, ext. 245. If you
have received a fraudulent
email or been contacted by sus-
picious fraud preparer, contact
the Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice Fraud Line at 352-249-9139.
To arrange to have someone
come to your community to talk
about this or another safety or
security topic, call 352-249-9139
or visit the Seniors vs. Crime
storefront, 4093 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, next to
Main Street Restaurant and
Grill. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday. No appointment is
necessary


BATTLE
Continued from Page Al

advertising campaigns
highlighting the perils of
the drug's use.
Phase two, said Purin-
ton which the agency is
getting ready to unleash -
will focus on purchasing
the drugs, testing them for
banned chemicals and
making arrests.
And, phase three will
entail going to the county
commission to draft an or-
dinance banning the sale
of synthetic drugs in the
county. The city of Ocala
and Hillsborough and
Broward counties have
similar laws in place.
"The challenges we are
facing are because of the
profit margin. A lot of the
stores are telling us they
make a lot of money selling
these products," Purinton
said.
"But we try to tell them
about corporate responsi-
bility: don't sell something
that is targeting kids. Don't
put the profit margin over


..,.






'F




MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Synthetic drug users
routinely smoke the
product in spite of warnings
such as, "not for human
consumption," printed on
label.

the welfare of the chil-
dren," Purinton added.
He said his agency is
now uncovering another
alarming element in the
drug's scourge use
among people older than
age 60 has spiked.
"It is causing a lot of
seizures and people who
are high on it would often
go commit crimes," Purin-
ton said.
The effects of synthetic


drugs include agitation,
extreme nervousness,
nausea, vomiting, tachy-
cardia (fast, racing heart-
beat), elevated blood
pressure, tremors and
seizure, hallucinations
and dilated pupils. Use of
bath salts pseudo co-
caine is also associated
with paranoia, hallucina-
tions and violent behavior
Renna Jablonskis, the
executive director of Part-
ners for a Substance-Free
Citrus, said her organiza-
tion began working with
the sheriff's office to
spread word about the
drugs.
"What is amazing is that
many people don't know
anything about the drugs
and that they are more
dangerous than the regu-
lar marijuana and the
other drugs out there,"
Jablonskis said.
She said there is a peti-
tion campaign under way
with more than 2,500 sig-
natures of county resi-
dents urging ridding the
county of the products.
Jablonskis' organization
also sponsored an art con-


test among middle and
high school students in the
county that drives home
the message "Synthetic
Drugs Kill."
Three students won and
their artworks are cur-
rently displayed on
posters and billboards
across the county.
Jablonskis said her
group in tandem with the
sheriff's office is getting
ready to release ads pub-
lishing the names of eight
or nine stores that con-
tinue to sell the mind-al-
tering drugs.
Synthetic marijuana,
often known as K2 or


Spice, and bath salt prod-
ucts are usually sold in
stores as herbal incense
and plants and contain
warnings the product is
not to be ingested. But,
Purinton said, the packets
are clearly packaged to at-
tract the attention of kids.
"How can you say it's not
to attract kids when the
packets have pictures of
Scooby Doo on them?" he
asked.
He said a challenge law
enforcement faces is
whenever a chemical is
banned, the manufactur-
ers who are often over-
seas simply alter the


chemical makeup and
reintroduce the product
on the market. At last
count, 144 chemicals have
been banned.
According to the White
House Office of National
Drug Control Policy, at
least 38 states including
Florida have taken action
to control one or more
these chemicals. Before
2010, synthetic cannabi-
noids were not controlled
by any state or at the fed-
eral level.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline com.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle


Fictitious Name Notices...............D8

Bid Notices................................D8

Meeting Notices................. D7, D8

Miscellaneous Notices.................D7

.Self Storage Notices...................D7


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR HI O PR IHILO PR
0.00 NA NA NA k. J74 37 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
c
pc
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


H L
80 69
79 57
80 62
72 63
77 62
75 58
79 61
79 64
77 68


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a light chop. Patchy fog early, then
partly cloudy today.


77 42 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E lusvedaly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 57 *
Increasing clouds; 20% chance of
an evening shower:

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 82 Low: 61
Partly sunny; 20% chance of a PM shower

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 81 Low: 54
Partly sunny; 50% chance of passing showers

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 76/40
Record 92/35
Normal 78/49
Mean temp. 58
Departure from mean -6
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.20 in.
Total for the year 2.30 in.
Normal for the year 8.18 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.12 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 37
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 24%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
oak, juniper, nettle
Today's count: 8.8/12
Monday's count: 9.6
Tuesday's count: 10.1
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/17 SUNDAY 10:52 4:40 11:16 5:04
3/18 MONDAY 11:43 5:31 5:55
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O (- SUNSET TONIGHT............................7:40 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:36A.M.
\0 0 MOONRISE TODAY.........................11:15A.M.
MARCH19 MARCH27 APRIL3 APRIL10 MOONSET TODAY ..........................12:23A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
10:10 a/5:42 a
8:31 a/3:04 a
6:18 a/12:52 a
9:20 a/4:41 a


**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
9:30 p/5:19 p
7:51 p/2:41 p
5:38 p/12:29 p
8:40 p/4:18 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
11:03 a/6:28 a 10:12 p/5:56 p
9:24 a/3:50 a 8:33 p/3:18 p
7:11 a/1:38 a 6:20 p/1:06 p
10:13 a/5:27 a 9:22 p/4:55 p


Gulf water
temperature


63
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.09 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.52 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.40 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.67 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


Saturday
City H LPcp.
Albany 34 20
Albuquerque 72 46
Asheville 77 47
Atlanta 74 52
Atlantic City 43 36 .10
Austin 84 52
Baltimore 52 39
Billings 48 25
Birmingham 76 53
Boise 58 34
Boston 39 30
Buffalo 29 26
Burlington, VT 27 18
Charleston, SC 82 54
Charleston, WV 70 43 .23
Charlotte 79 56
Chicago 36 30
Cincinnati 63 37 .15
Cleveland 35 30 .21
Columbia, SC 83 58
Columbus, OH 53 37 .07
Concord, N.H. 34 23
Dallas 81 57
Denver 54 39
Des Moines 39 32
Detroit 34 28 .16
El Paso 84 60
Evansville, IN 66 48
Harrisburg 45 32 .23
Hartford 38 30
Houston 81 59
Indianapolis 47 38
Jackson 78 51
Las Vegas 86 61
Little Rock 79 59
Los Angeles 60 53
Louisville 73 57
Memphis 75 58
Milwaukee 30 25 .02
Minneapolis 27 19 .01
Mobile 75 46
Montgomery 79 46
Nashville 77 62


Sunday
FcstH L
s 34 15
s 69 42
sh 65 44
pc 73 57
pc 43 32
pc 86 62
c 45 35
sh 45 21
pc 72 60
pc 48 29
s 38 24
pc 30 21
pc 24 13
pc 76 54
sh 44 41
c 70 47
pc 34 29
r 40 38
s 33 28
pc 78 53
pc 39 35
s 32 14
pc 70 53
w 60 28
pc 40 31
s 33 23
s 81 53
r 42 38
pc 43 30
s 40 23
pc 80 64
pc 39 33
pc 79 59
s 80 56
r 66 51
pc 63 53
r 44 36
r 65 56
pc 29 25
pc 29 22
pc 74 61
pc 75 58
r 59 53


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY

Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
New Orleans 76 52 pc 76 64
New York City 40 32 .11 pc 42 29
Norfolk 72 47 .09 c 48 38
Oklahoma City 78 57 pc 51 42
Omaha 39 30 pc 44 30
Palm Springs 94 64 s 89 60
Philadelphia 47 35 .04 pc 43 29
Phoenix 87 61 s 88 57
Pittsburgh 39 34 .04 pc 38 33
Portland, ME 36 24 s 32 17
Portland, Ore 52 48 .03 sh 50 39
Providence, R.I. 39 29 s 41 20
Raleigh 77 46 c 56 38
Rapid City 33 28 .14 sh 51 23
Reno 68 37 s 62 33
Rochester, NY 30 25 pc 30 21
Sacramento 76 42 s 73 44
St. Louis 64 42 r 43 37
St. Ste. Marie 20 6 s 22 11
Salt Lake City 59 43 pc 47 31
San Antonio 84 54 pc 87 62
San Diego 61 53 pc 65 54
San Francisco 61 47 pc 63 46
Savannah 72 50 pc 77 54
Seattle 50 46 .17 sh 48 38
Spokane 51 40 rs 45 29
Syracuse 31 23 s 31 20
Topeka 53 40 rs 43 35
Washington 59 43 .03 c 46 35
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 96 Thermal, Calif. LOW -20 Minot AFB,
N.D.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 89/73/pc
Amsterdam 45/36/sh
Athens 55/43/pc
Beijing 70/31/pc
Berlin 41/31/s
Bermuda 67/62/sh
Cairo 69/47/pc
Calgary 16/7/sn
Havana 84/64/pc
Hong Kong 75/71/sh
Jerusalem 55/46/sh


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


60/44/sh
48/32/sh
56/34/r
75/48/pc
21/16/s
32/12/c
51/32/r
80/73/ts
50/50/c
75/61/pc
59/54/c
34/23/pc
35/24/s


-1 C I T R U S


C O U N T Y -u--


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A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VIDEO
Continued from Page Al

pan/scraper, that has been
used at Citrus County's
Central Landfill. The land-
fill would get a Caterpillar
hydraulic excavator in-
stead, at a cost of $161,586.
Commissioner Scott
Adams opposed the pur-
chase because he said he
did not think the landfill
carried the volume of work
to merit the purchase.
With 11,000 hours of use on
the pan/scraper, Adams
said if it had been main-
tained, "It's almost brand
new."
At the BOCC meeting,
Commissioner J.J. Kenney
asked about repairs for the
pan/scraper, to which
Casey Stephens, Solid
Waste Management Divi-
sion director, said the
county had spent $420,000
in repairs since 2000 when
the warranty ran out.
Stephens said currently
the repair of the machine's
differential would cost
$35,000, and he could not
predict the expenses of fu-
ture repairs.
RingPower, a Brooks-
ville business that repairs
heavy equipment, would
give the county $36,000 in
trade for a new machine,
Stephens said. The
new $161,586 excavator -
which Frink and Stephens
requested at a previous
BOCC meeting because it
would work more effi-
ciently at the landfill than
the pan/scraper would
have a five-year or 7,500
hours warranty that would
cover everything except
travel time and labor
hours.
"The governmental re-
placement cost on the pan
would be roughly another
$625,000," Stephens said.
"Or we could continue as
we have been and do the
repairs, but then I would
be pretty sure that I'd be
talking to you again next
year on some additional
repairs."
Inverness resident
Robert Schweickert Jr.
suggested selling the


pan/scraper on the Inter-
net for more than Ring-
Power's trade-in offer, but
Frink said it would be dif-
ficult to sell a piece of bro-
ken equipment.
Frink then announced
he had received informa-
tion from Larry Brock,
deputy public works direc-
tor, that the pan/scraper
was disassembled and the
county would have to pay
for the repair and putting
it back together if the
board wanted to sell it.
"I would not recom-
mend we do that because
it is down there in pieces
right now," Frink said.
Schweickert, however,
went to RingPower on
Wednesday and found the
pan/scraper up and
running.
"I had no idea what I'd
find there," Schweickert
told the Chronicle.
Schweickert recorded a
video of the machine fully
assembled and moving
under its own power He
posted it to YouTube. His
story and a link to the video
are posted on Schweick-
ert's blog at wwwground
hogresearch.com.
"We had it down to them
for diagnosis and repair on
the differential late in
2012," Frink told the
Chronicle.
The repair cost ex-
ceeded the amount Pubic
Works could do without
board approval. At a meet-
ing in January, the board
decided to buy the excava-
tor instead of repairing the
pan/scraper, Frink said.
"The excavator was in
the budget for replacing
the pan," Frink said. "We
called RingPower up and
told them we're not going
to move forward with it
and to get us a price on the
excavator."
Frink admitted he had
made a statement on the
record that the
pan/scraper was in pieces
at RingPower.
"It was my full under-
standing it was," Frink
said. "We were unaware
that any repairs or assem-
bly had taken place. We got
on the phone with Ring-
Power to find out what in


CODERED WEATHER SIGNUP
* To register for the Citrus County Sheriff's Office's
CodeRED weather program, visit www.sheriffcitrus.
org/EM/ and click on "CodeRED
Registration" near the center top
of the page.
* Enter the location to be
monitored and your contact
details if using a cellphone,
you may choose to receive text
alerts, but standard text messaging
rates may apply.
* Choose which types of warnings to receive: general
notifications and/or severe weather warning about
tornadoes, severe thunderstorms or flash floods.
* You may choose to create an account to easily
manage your preferences.
* A map appears to verify the location designated
and list all the preferences chosen. Once satisfied
with the settings and the terms and conditions of
use, click "Submit."
* Those without computer access may call 352-746-
6555 or visit a local library for assistance.


Look Wkat





CHRdNICLE COUPONS




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To the chagrin of county employees, this pan/scraper said to be "in pieces" at a repair
shop was videotaped by Inverness resident Robert Schweickert Jr. in one piece and
functioning properly. County Commissioner Scott Adams was the sole commissioner
who voted against replacing the pan/scraper with a new $161,586 excavator.


the world was happening."
A few emails were ex-
changed. James D. Carney,
RingPower foreman, said
his company "decided to
finish the assembly of the
machine with the thoughts
that either way Citrus


County decided to go that
the machine would have to
be reassembled."
In other words, the
pan/scraper ultimately
would be repaired for
county use or for resale.
Carney replied to


Stephens that the differen-
tial was sent to Tampa for
disassembly and quoting,
not repair.
No one at the county au-
thorized putting the ma-
chine back together.
"I decided that the ma-


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 A5

chine would need to be re-
assembled, so I did this at
our own risk," Carney
wrote.
Carney also said no one
at the county was notified
that the work had been
done.
"I was communicating
with sales department,
waiting to determine if Cit-
rus County was going to re-
pair or replace machine
with an excavator," Carney
wrote.
Adams, who did not re-
turn phone calls seeking
comment, posted a link to
the video on his Facebook
page.
Clearing up the mystery
still raises issues for Frink.
He said he was embar-
rassed to have given incor-
rect information to the
board, but it was based on
the information he had.
He also disagrees with a
county vendor using
county equipment in an
amateur video.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


Leonard
Amaral, 76
HOMOSASSA
Leonard Frank Amaral,
76, of Homosassa, Fla.,
passed away March 15,
2013. Born Jan. 12, 1937, in
Gloucester, Mass., to
Leonard
R. and
Margaret
(Greel)
Amaral, ,*
Leonard
moved to -
Citrus
County 27
years ago Leonard
from New Amaral
Hamp -
shire. He was a retired
salesman and a member of
St. Scholastica Catholic
Church.
He is survived by his
wife, Phyllis M. Amaral;
seven children, Russell
(Rusty) Amaral, Donna Clif-
ford, David Amaral, Scott
Smith, Pamela Gallant,
Nancy Miller and Suzanne
Brown; one brother,
Stephen W Amaral; 16
grandchildren; and several
great-grandchildren,
nieces and nephews.
Family will receive
friends from 2 p.m. until
service time at 4 p.m. at
Brown Funeral Home on
Monday, March 18. Private
cremation will follow
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Bonnie
Armstrong, 60
INVERNESS
Bonnie J. Armstrong, 60,
of Inverness, Fla., passed
away Saturday, March 16,
2013, at her residence. She
was born Nov. 9, 1952, to
the late Franklin and Mary
Lee (Sehy) Armstrong.
Bonnie was a clerk in the
retailing business and ar-
rived in this area in 1964,
coming from Orlando, Fla.
She was a Catholic, and
enjoyed gambling, fishing,
going to yard sales and
spending time with her
family and her dogs, Pee-
wee and Blondie.
She is survived by one
son, Otis Lee Baxter of In-
verness, Fla.; five broth-
ers, David, Dickie, Danny,
Bobby and Dennis Arm-
strong; two sisters, Lita
Thomas and Lynn Weed;
friend, Mark Emmons; and
many nieces and nephews.
Private arrangements
are under the care of Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
with Crematory, Inverness.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Harry
Barfoot, 78
HUNTINGTON
STATION, N.Y.
Harry Barfoot, 78, of
Huntington Station, N.Y,
died Thursday, March 14,
2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto.




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Alan Barco, 71 Randy Cole, 66
FLORAL CITY CRYSTAL RIVER


Alan Keith Barco, 71,
Floral City, died at home
March 15, 2013. A native of
Brooksville, Fla., he spent
most of his life in Citrus
County as
a rancher.
He was
born Nov
13, 1941, to
the late ..
Joe N. and --
Catherine
Landrum i .
Barco. He Alan
was a long- Barco
time mem-
ber of the First Baptist
Church of Floral City,
president of the Citrus Co.
Cattlemen's Association,
and was a longtime sup-
porter of local 4-H and
FFA youth programs.
Keith is survived by two
children, Brenda Barco,
Floral City, and Leanne
(Scott) Halstead, Lecanto;
his brother, Gary Barco of
Tallahassee, Fla.; two sis-
ters, Joanne Mishou, Flo-
ral City, and Jane Gibson,
Tampa; brother-in-law
Eddie Beville, Hiawassee,
Ga.; sister-in-law Lily
Davis, Inverness; three
grandchildren, Morgan
Cook and fiance Kason
Sundberg, Jennifer and
Caitlyn Smolensky. He was
preceded in death by his
wife, Sybil Barco, on Oct.
10, 2004; and their son, Jeff
Barco, on April 25, 1979.
Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, March 20,
2013, from the Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
the Rev Eddie Quates offi-
ciating. Burial will follow
in Lake Lindsey Cemetery
Viewing hours will be from
5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday Fol-
lowing the burial, family
and friends are invited to
the Cattlemen's Associa-
tion Building for a time of
fellowship. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorials requested
to Hospice of Citrus
County in memory of his
beloved wife, Sybil Barco.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Steven
DeMeyer, 61
INVERNESS
Steven Guy DeMeyer, 61,
of Inverness, died Wednes-
day, March 13,2013.
Private arrangements
are with Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home With
Crematory

Ronald
Kruk, 70
GREEN BAY, WIS.
Ronald Kruk, 70, of
Green Bay, Wis., died
Thursday, March 14, 2013.
Local arrangements are
under the direction of
Brown Funeral Home and
Crematory in Lecanto.



To Place Your
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Randy V Cole, 66, of
Crystal River, Fla., died
Friday, March 15, 2013, at
his home. He was born
June 19, 1946, in Home-
stead, Fla., the son of
Julius and Mary Cole.
Randy retired from
Southern Bell where he
had been a lineman. He
moved to Crystal River 13
years ago from Hayesville,
N.C. He was Baptist.
Survivors include his
daughter, Shannon Cole,
Inverness, Fla.; brothers,
Joe and Dean Cole, both of
Henderson, N.C.; sisters,
Glenda Arve, Hayseville,
N.C., and Nancy Aubke,
Hiawassee, Ga., Donna
Tyre, Homestead, Fla.; two
grandchildren, Christina
Cole and Kylie Mills, both
of Inverness, Fla.; and
great-grandson, Vance
DiCamillo of Inverness,
Fla.
A memorial service for
Mr. Cole will be from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday,
March 23, 2013. The serv-
ice will take place at
11 a.m.
Heinz Funeral Home &
Cremation, Inverness, Fla.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

Donald
Lawnzak, 74
DUNNELLON
Donald Clifford Lawn-
zak, 74, of Dunnellon, died
Saturday, March 9,2013, in
Ocala.
Services were private.


Mary Jane
Hildebrand, 89
INVERNESS
Mary Jane (Ash) Hilde-
brand, 89, Inverness,
passed away on a beautiful
spring day on March 13,
2013, sur-
rounded
by her
family and
the staff of
Hospice of -
Citrus
County at
New Hori-
zon's Sen-
ior Citizen Mary Jane
Home. Hildebrand
Mary
Jane was born June 7,
1923, in Phoenix, Ariz., to
the late Gerald L. and Mer-
cedes (Meux) Ash. She was
a Miami pioneer, who saw
the city in its infancy She
graduated from Ponce de
Leon High School and en-
joyed sailing on Biscayne
Bay She was employed as
a teletypist at the historic
Pan Am Sea Plane Base in
Coconut Grove on Dinner
Key. Mary Jane relocated
to Inverness in 1987. She
was a talented artist and
member of the Citrus
County Art League, where
she taught others portrait
painting and received
many local art show
awards for her work. She
was Catholic by faith.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory are her three daugh-
ters, Mary Jane Brooks,
Staten Island, N.Y, De-
lores "Lori" Weyrick and
Cheryl Hildebrand, both of
Miami; two grandchildren;


"I


and four great-grandchil-
dren. She was preceded in
death by her husband of 57
years, Charles B. Hilde-
brand, on Jan. 31, 2006;
and her brother and sister.
We would like to extend
our heartfelt gratitude and
thanks to the wonderful
caregivers of Hospice of
Citrus County and the New
Horizon's Senior Citizen's
Home. Graveside commit-
tal will be at 2 p.m. Friday,
March 22, 2013, at Florida
National Cemetery in
Bushnell. The procession
to the cemetery will form
at the Chas. E. Davis Fu-
neral Home with Crema-
tory at 1:15 p.m. In lieu of
flowers, the family re-
quests memorial dona-
tions in Mary Jane's
memory to Hospice of Cit-
rus County, PO. Box
641270, Beverly Hills, FL
34464.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Russell
Wheater Jr., 81
PRESCOTT, MICH.
Russell George Wheater
Jr, 81, of Prescott, Mich.,
died Thursday, March 14,
2013. Private cremation
arrangements are under
the direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto.


Ann 'Anne'
Matteson, 87
DUNNELLON
Ann "'Anne" B. Matteson,
87, passed away March 13,
2013, in Ocala, Fla. She was
born in Bristol, R.I., to
Joseph and
Virginia
Borges.
She moved
to Fort A M
Laud-
erdale in
1976 and
relocated
again to Ann
Dunnellon Matteson
in 1993.
She is the wife of the
late Robert A. Matteson;
mother of Linda (Randy)
Smith of Dunnellon, and
Robert (Tom) Matteson of
Inverness; grandmother of
Jennifer, Eric and Ryan
Smith; and great-
grandmother of five.
A memorial service will
take place at 2 p.m. Satur-
day, March 23, 2013, at
Roberts Funeral Home
Chapel with Fr. Kevin Mac-
Gabhann presiding. The
family requests guests wear
purple for the service in
Ann's honor. Donations can
be made to the Breast Can-
cer Foundation or Hospice
of Marion County Condo-
lences may be left at
RobertsofDunnellon.com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


The "Don Valencia" by Dream Custom Homes is a four-
bedroom home with three bathrooms and a three-car
garage. The model is in Pine Ridge.


entry For more informa-
tion, see today's HomeFront
section.
Gold Crest Homes'
model "The Glory" in Bev-
erly Hills has 1,603 square
feet of living space with
total square footage of
2,121.
Included in this model
are three bedrooms and
two baths with a focus on
energy efficiency and low
maintenance.
"With market conditions
the way they are, we felt
people would be downsiz-
ing and going for more
basic homes," said Kath-
leen Gilbert, vice presi-
dent of Gold Crest. "With
an aging population and
today's economic condi-
tions, we think that people
don't want to deal with the
upkeep and cost of having
a 4,000-square-foot home."
Spring Hill-based Hart-
land Homes' model "The
Francesca" follows the
same pattern, though
slightly more spacious at


S -




Call' s fo

Pau Miiel P.A.I1T I 1"
(352 637222


2,120 square feet with four
bedrooms, two baths and a
two-car garage.
Shannon Brening, a
Hartland company repre-
sentative, said this model
is "a great family home for
retirees."
Dream Custom Homes
sees the market headed to-
ward luxury and is offer-
ing its "Don Valencia"
model, which is twice the
size of the other two local
offerings.
The 4,737-square-foot
Don Valencia has four bed-
rooms, three baths and a
columned grand entryway
Its master bathroom has
three showerheads.
The gourmet kitchen
has granite countertops.
"Lots of people sell their
homes up north, which
often hold a lot of value,"
said Matt Burich, presi-
dent of Dream Custom


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
This cabana, set across the pool deck from the rest of the house, offers plenty of options for a homeowner. The
cabana's current configuration includes a billiards table, flat-screen television, a bar and mini kitchen, creating an
ideal "man cave" environment.


Homes. "They cash out
after 30 years and buy a
mini-mansion in Florida.
"We're on the upswing
economically. There is
about a four-month supply
of homes on the market
right now in Florida and
values of homes are up
about 12 percent across
the nation."


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Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast
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CAR SEAT SAFETY CLINIC

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correctly? On Saturday, March 23, you can have your car ,A
seat checked at the Crystal Chrysler/DodgelJeeplRam
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Certified child passenger safety technicians, Sue Littnan
and Tania Reaves from the Early Learning Coalition of the '
Nature Coast will be on hand to help you. They will check
to see that:
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The car seat is an appropriate seat for
the child's age, height and weight
The car seat is installed securely with all needed
adjustments complete
Please bring the child and the instructions for the safety
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SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 A7





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Female recruits box during training Feb. 21.
Female recruits box during training Feb. 21.


LEADER
Continued from Page Al

who determine whether
the recruits are worthy of
pinning on the Eagle,
Globe and Anchor emblem
worn by Marines.
"What we're looking for
here is character, intellect
and potential to carry
forth our legacy," Reynolds
said.
In January, Defense Sec-
retary Leon Panetta lifted
the so-called combat ex-
clusion that kept women
from serving in units that
engage the enemy, such as
the infantry, tank and spe-
cial forces units of the
Army and Marine Corps.
Their leaders, the service
chiefs, have yet to deter-
mine exactly what the
physical standards are for
those jobs, and some roles
may still exclude women.
Minimum physical re-
quirements for many hard-
core combat jobs had
never been established,
and the effort to come up
with them is still in under
way, Reynolds pointed out.
"There's a lot more work
to do to figure it out," the
general said.
The Corps has proposed
adapting its twice-yearly
physical fitness test to re-
quire that women com-
plete at least three
chin-ups, a standard that
men must currently meet.
Data is being collected to
see whether the standard
is appropriate.
In the past decade, men
and women have found
themselves fighting side-
by-side when combat has
overtaken support units
once considered behind
combat lines. More than
150 women have been
killed in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
About 7 percent of
Marines are female, com-
pared to about 14 percent
overall for the armed
forces.
Reynolds is one of the
two active-duty female
general officers in the Ma-
rine Corps. There are also
two other female generals
in the Marine Corps
Reserve.
Female Marines
Pausing from training on
a recent day, recruit Jen-
nifer Martinez of
Greenville, Texas, said she
followed her father and
grandfather into the mili-
tary, although they both
served in the Air Force.
The 18-year-old said she
thinks she could serve in a
combat zone.
"Boot camp has pre-
pared you for everything,"
said Martinez. "It's pre-
pared you mentally, physi-
cally, emotionally
Especially with the drill
instructors. They do a
great job of yelling."
Overseeing one com-
pany of female recruits
and drill instructors, 1st
Sgt. Rena Bruno said she
commanded men during a
deployment to Iraq. The
petite 110-pound veteran
of 13 years in uniform said
that, as a logistics man-
ager, she dealt with dan-
gerous convoy duty and
learned "to hold my pistol
a little closer to my body"
"My Marines were look-
ing at me to guide them
and ensure their safety
There was no time to re-
ally question that," Bruno
said of being a female
commander
Bruno said women have
to train for the challenges,
including upper body
workouts so they could
pull another Marine out of


harm's way, climb up a
rope or carry battle armor
and weaponry
"We are focusing more
on the whole upper body
because we are going to be
required to do pull-ups,"
Bruno said. "So a lot of our
PT (physical training) ses-
sions are geared toward
that."
And can she do pull-ups?
"Guaranteed, I can get
up on a pull bar and knock
out eight, very easy for
me," she said.
Told of Bruno's com-
ments, Reynolds lauded
the varied roles women
have played on the
battlefield.
"It's not all kicking down
doors. It's a lot about en-
suring the security of the
locals. It's a lot of the
counter-insurgency mis-
sions," that require infor-
mation female Marines


Associated Press
Female recruits form up Feb. 21 at the Marine Corps
Training Depot on Parris Island, S.C. Brig Gen. Loretta
Reynolds, the first female general in charge of Parris
Island's basic training, says she is confident women in
the Corps will do well in combat, if need be.


can glean from locals that
the males cannot, the gen-
eral said.
And even the 6-foot, fit
and trim Reynolds, who
played basketball at the
Naval Academy and still
goes on early morning
runs with her recruits, is
preparing for the pro-
posed new standards.
"I'm not ashamed to tell
you I can't do a pull-up yet,
but I'm working on it!" the
48-year-old Reynolds said
with a laugh.


Reynolds said she has to
wonder at the new oppor-
tunities now offered
women in uniform. And
while much was barred in
her early days in uniform,
she said she never felt she
was being short-changed.
"I don't remember being
stuck on, 'No, Reynolds,
you can't do that,"' she
said. "If I were to look back
after the career I've had
with regret, shame on me.
I've been blessed. I've had
command at every rank."


.*'.


A


CITRUS MEMORY L


He art

& VASCULAR CENTER


Citrus County's and

CHEST PAIN CENTER WITH PCI
As of February 11, 2013 Citrus Memorial Hospital received full accreditation
as a Chest Pain Center. The accreditation is effective for the next three years.


tES ,rr IRAIF T6|0 r* WSFM"CiE Ir



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S. your smartphone
QR reader


502 W. Highland Blvd. Inverness, FL 352.344.6416 HeartOfCitrus.com


A


A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


tri




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Nugent endorses
Ryan's budget
On Monday, March 11, I
had the privilege to at-
tend Rep. Nugent's
budget townhall meeting
at the Brooksville BOCC
chamber room. What I
witnessed was a one-
sided presentation com-
plete with misleading pie
charts and no discussion
about how to get our
country back on track,
economically Nugent is
content to mouth the offi-
cial Paul Ryan/Ayn Ran-
dian budget plan that was
roundly rejected in the
2012 election: the false
ideology that we can cut
our way to prosperity.
While cutting Social Se-
curity, Medicare, Medi-
caid, public programs and
jobs will be disastrous for
the economy, predictably,
this was the focus of Nu-
gent's town hall. He never
mentioned job-training
programs or education as
means to ensure revenues
by way of good-paying
jobs; his focus was on a
balanced budget reached
through cutting crucial
programs that we, the tax-
payers, pay into our en-
tire adult lives.
Nugent pointed to his
chart showing Americans
are living longer now and
used it as a reason for in-
creasing the retirement
age and to explain why
medical costs are rising.
What he didn't take into
consideration is the rela-
tionship between income
levels and life expectancy
Plainly put, the richer you
are, the longer you live. A
study several years ago by
the Social Security Ad-
ministration found the
life expectancy of males
retiring at age 65 had
risen six years for the top
half of the income distri-
bution, but only 1.3 years
in the bottom economic
half of the country during
the last 30 years. Increas-
ing the eligibility age
would mean fewer bene-
fits for lower-income
workers, who will end up


Letters to THE EDITOR
Look at
the big picture
I am one of the 200 or
so people living in north-
west Citrus County with
arsenic in our water. In
March 2008, the state
arranged to have an ar-
senic filter and reverse
osmosis system installed
in my house; and it has
been serviced annually
ever since.
SI question the wisdom
_-of obtaniing a grant to lay
o water lines to the north-
west part of the county to
serve approximately 200


homes. Our neighbors'
wells on either side are
free of arsenic.
A grant is taxpayers'
money just as my state-
installed arsenic treat-
ment equipment is tax-
payers' money However,
laying the pipe is the first
step. What would the
county charge the home-
owner to connect to the
water line? Would the
homeowner be able to re-
fuse to hook up?
It sounds like a repeti-
tion of what happened to
the people in the south-
ern part of the county


They were forced to hook
up to a new sewer system
at about $10,000 per
household.
Even if the state
stopped servicing my ar-
senic equipment, I would
gladly pay to change the
filters annually rather
than pay $10,000 or so to
hook up to county water.
I hope that the powers
that be consider the big
picture before proceed-
ing with this grant
application.
Robert Norton
Crystal River


-r PEOPL.z TREE. HOLU


subsidizing higher-
income people. Though
Nugent indicated high
medical costs are the
main problem with
Medicare, he never men-
tioned ways to cut costs
like allowing Medicare to
negotiate drug prices and
doing away with fraud
and waste in the system,
which is well
documented.
Another point Nugent
casually made was the
$2.7 trillion borrowed
from Social Security will
never be paid back, so to
save the program, we
must cut benefits. He
failed to include in his
presentation Social Secu-
rity would be fully sol-
vent, including a doubling
of the fund with interest
over time, if it had not
been raided to pay for two
Bush wars. Many repre-
sentatives are content
handing out no-bid mili-
tary contracts, bailing out
banks, condoning corpo-
rate welfare and giving
sweet deals to drug com-
panies doing business
with Medicare, all at the
taxpayers' expense. Nu-
gent never mentioned
these deficit contributors,
only the "need" to cut So-
cial Security, Medicare
and Medicaid -neces-
sary programs for the eld-
erly and powerless.
Rep. Nugent approves
of The Ryan Budget, a


plan that slashes top tax
rates for the wealthy to 25
percent from the current
39.6 percent, and attempts
to balance the budget by
arbitrarily cutting $4.6
trillion over the next
decade by eliminating
public and good-paying
jobs and safety nets. If
you think their plan is
meant to improve the
economy, think again; this
is a Shock Doctrine ap-
proach, designed by ex-
treme think tanks, having
at their core obscene cor-
porate profits, and their
methods of achieving this
model are by creating a
powerless, uneducated,
low-wage society to fur-
ther their clients' finan-
cial gains. Nugent let the
concept slip when he
mentioned we're in a
global economy now and
we must be competitive,
by, in a nutshell, placing
corporate bottom lines
over people.
The scariest thing is
though the majority of
Rep. Nugent's con-
stituents are against these
drastic measures, he and
most of his congressional
counterparts have drawn
safe districts around
themselves so they don't
have to worry come elec-
tion time, and that's the
plan.
Harriet Heywood
Homosassa


I ,


..........
f 9-


....] .. .....
.......... :::: lL^ ^f ^BiirJ *B'itf i^F "j


.ti.-


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A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


OPINION


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


WPNCC to honor pioneers


"You've got to accentu-
ate the positive, eliminate
the negative ... don't mess
with Mr In-Between." -
Johnny Mercer, circa 1944.
JEANNE MCINTOSH
he lyrics from a
1940s song, when
times were really
tough, remain applicable
for us today The Women's
Political Network of Cit-
rus County (WPNCC) has
chosen to accentuate the
positive in planning its
third annual wine-tasting
fundraising event "Cele-
brate Citrus."
We will eliminate the
negative and, instead of
hearing a politician
speak on taxes, gridlock
or the issue of the day,
the WPNCC will salute
four individuals who
make a difference in the
community at our March
19 event. The selection of
the four was not an easy
task. There are so many
people who are dedi-
cated to solving prob-
lems, helping others, and
creating a better Citrus
County.
We poured over arti-
cles, lists and personal
experiences to make our
selections: Art Jones,
Barbara Mills, DuWayne
Sipper and Ginger West.


Art Jones, the Chroni-
cle 2012 Citizen of the
year, initiated the One
Rake at a Time effort to
clean King's Bay. We all
know many organizations
support and participate
in environmental efforts
to clean the bay and
rivers. However, Art got
in the water with his rake
and started a movement.
He now has more than
130 people with rakes
cleaning King's Bay and
has attracted the atten-
tion of elected officials
who are working on state
funding to assist.
Barbara Mills, well
known to returning veter-
ans in our county, in 2007
founded Operation Wel-
come Home to honor ser-
vicemen and -women
returning from service.
She continues this effort
today with the support of
the local community and
businesses. Barbara
headed the Citrus County
Honor Flight effort in
2011 to collect funds for
World War II veterans to
take part in the Honor
Flight program to travel
to Washington, D.C., to
visit the National World
War II Memorial.
DuWayne Sipper, exec-


Guest COLUMN
utive director of The
Path rescue mission,
which provides shelter
and a new life program
for the homeless or dis-
placed, helps residents
overcome addiction,
strengthens families and
develop work ethic to es-
cape the cycle of poverty
The Path operates four
shelter homes, two
stores, a woodworking
training center and a
co-op farm to improve
nutrition.
Ginger West, adminis-
trator of the Family Re-
source Center of Citrus
County, has been helping
children and families in
Citrus County for more
than 20 years. The Family
Resource Center pro-
vides family and parent-
ing classes as well as
clothing and food year-
round. At Christmas the
Sponsor a Child for
Christmas effort helps
about 2,000 children and
provides the community
the opportunity to pro-
vide a child a merry
Christmas anonymously
WPNCC is a political
organization, but once in
a while we have to put
politics aside and accen-
tuate the positive. At


"Celebrate Citrus" on
Tuesday, March 19, from
5:30 to 7:30 p.m., you will
have the opportunity to
do just that. Join us at the
lovely Copp Winery and
Brewery, 11 N.E. Fourth
Ave., Crystal River, for a
glass of wine or beer with
appetizers.
WPNCC is chartered by
the Florida Women's Po-
litical Network. Meetings
and events are open to
all. Membership is open
to Republican women.
WPNCC meets monthly
on the third Tuesday of
each month at the Citrus
County Resource Center
at 2804 Marc Knighton
Court in Lecanto. For in-
formation about the "Cel-
ebrate Citrus" Event or
our meetings, call Jeanne
McIntosh at 352-484-9975.

Jeanne McIntosh
is president of the
Women's Political
Network of Citrus County.
She can be contacted
a t352-484-9975 or via
email atjeannemc@
tampabay.rr com.


Gas price dilemma Clock repairman
I just returned from NO. 3
Miami coming up (U.S.) 19 I was just reading the
through (the) Hudson, New paper today, March 13,
Port Richey area. I O and there was a
was amazed to OIUjND Sound Off about
see the gas price "Clocks fixed,"
was 3.48. Highest wanting to know
I saw in Hudson the name of a
was $3.55. I get repairman for a
up to Citrus grandfather
County and it's clock and I had
$3.79 a gallon. I a Ken Bell. The
don't know if any- CAL phone number
body could explain is 352-794-
that to me. I can- 563-0579 3403 and he re-
not understand paired my
how gas prices could be so grandfather clock.
different within 40 miles of
Crystal River. No coverage


Clock repairman
No. 1
Grandfather clocks to
repair: George Tucci. His
home phone number is
352-794-3512. He lives
in Crystal River. He is very
good. He fixed mine and
I'm well pleased with it.
Clock repairman
No. 2
This is for the fellow
looking for a grandfather
clock to be fixed. A friend
of mine, Phil, at Butlers in
Dunnellon at 352-465-
1431, does that. He's
very good and he's very
reasonable.


for dental
To the person (who)
was annoyed their dentist
did not accept Medicare:
Please realize other than
some oral surgery proce-
dures, Medicare does not,
and never has, covered
routine general dentistry
procedures. It is consid-
ered health insurance
and does not include
dentistry.
Out-of-control
coyotes
I'm all for open season
on coyotes. The coyotes
ripped apart my little
dachshund and they're
just running amok.


Second
Annual


Job Fair


Wednesday, March 27
10 a.m. 2 p.m.


College of Central Florida
Citrus Learning and Conference Center
3800 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto

NO CHARGE!
All Job Seekers Welcome!

MEET LOCAL EMPLOYERS INCLUDING:
Caregiver Services
County Sheriff's Office
Citrus Memorial Health
Crystal River Health
and Rehabilitation
Families Come First
Plantation Inn

YOU WILL ALSO:
Learn about Workforce Connection Services
Register with Employ Florida
Tour the MOBY1 Mobile
Resource Center


DRESS PROFESSIONALLY
Bring Copies of Resume


Call 352-637-2223
or 800-434-JOBS
For the latest job alerts, updates and tips, follow us on
Twitter @WorkforceCLM
www.WorkforceConnectionFL.com www.citrus.CF.edu


WORKFORCE COLLEGE of
CENTRAL
[01111 I g FLORIDA
CITRUS LE V Y MARI N -an equal opportunity college-
Workforce Connection is a member of Employ Florida and an equal opportunity employer/program Auxiliary aids/services are
available to those with disabilities Telephone numbers may be reached using TDD/TYY equipment via the Florida Relay
Service at 711 For accommodations, call 800-434-5627, ext 7878 or e-mail accommodations@WorkforceConnectionFL corn


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OPINION


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 All


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Census: 1 in 3 counties dying


Population hit

hard by aging

Americans

Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
record number of U.S.
counties more than 1 in
3 are now dying off, hit
by an aging population and
weakened local economies
that are spurring young
adults to seek jobs and
build families elsewhere.
New 2012 census esti-
mates released Thursday
highlight the population
shifts as the U.S. encoun-
ters its most sluggish
growth levels since the
Great Depression.
The findings also reflect
the increasing economic
importance of foreign-born
residents as the U.S. pon-
ders an overhaul of a major
1965 federal immigration
law. Without new immi-
grants, many metropolitan
areas such as New York,
Chicago, Detroit, Pitts-
burgh and St Louis would
have posted flat or negative
population growth in the
last year
"Immigrants are innova-
tors, entrepreneurs,
they're making things hap-
pen. They create jobs,"
said Michigan Gov. Rick
Snyder, a Republican, at
an immigration confer-
ence in his state last week.
Saying Michigan should be
a top destination for legal
immigrants to come and
boost Detroit and other
struggling areas, Snyder
made a special appeal:
"Please come here."
The growing attention
on immigrants is coming
mostly from areas of the
Midwest and Northeast,
which are seeing many
residents leave after years
of staying put during the
downturn. With a slowly
improving U.S. economy,
young adults are now back
on the move, departing tra-
ditional big cities to test
the job market mostly in
the South and West, which
had sustained the biggest
hits in the housing bust.
Also seeing big declines
now are rural and exurban


Associated Press
In this Sept. 21, 2008, photo, William LeBeau, 86, right, sits in his golf cart in a
parking spot in the main square in The Villages, Fa. New U.S. Census estimates
show the retirement community of The Villages was the fourth fastest-growing
community in the United States during the past two years and the fastest-growing
one in Florida.
The Villages leads population growth in Florida
Associated Press
ORLANDO New U.S. Census estimates show the retirement mecca of The Villages
was the fourth fastest-growing community in the United States during the past two years and
the fastest-growing one in Florida.
According to Census estimates made public Thursday, The Villages, northwest of Or-
lando, has grown by almost 8 percent since 2010 and had more than 101,600 residents.
The only areas in the United States that grew faster during the past two years were Willis-
ton and Dickson in North Dakota and Andrews, Texas. All are energy hubs that drew energy
workers.
The Villages' growth was driven by retirees.
Eight Florida counties four in central Florida and four in the Panhandle also were
among the nation's 100 fastest-growing counties.


areas, along with industrial
sections of the Rust Belt
Census data show 1,135
of the nation's 3,143 coun-
ties are now experiencing
"natural decrease," where
deaths exceed births.
That's up from roughly 880
U.S. counties, or 1 in 4, in
2009. Already apparent in
Japan and many European
nations, natural decrease
is now increasingly evi-
dent in large swaths of the
U.S.
Despite increasing
deaths, the U.S. popula-
tion as a whole continues
to grow, boosted by immi-
gration from abroad and
relatively higher births
among the mostly younger
migrants from Mexico,
Latin America and Asia.


"These counties are in a
pretty steep downward spi-
ral," said Kenneth John-
son, a senior demographer
and sociology professor at
the University of New
Hampshire, who re-
searched the findings.
"The young people leave
and the older adults stay in
place and age. Unless
something dramatic
changes for instance,
new development such as a
meatpacking plant to at-
tract young Hispanics -
these areas are likely to
have more and more natu-
ral decrease."
The areas of natural de-
crease stretch from indus-
trial areas near Pittsburgh
and Cleveland to the vine-
yards outside San Fran-


central citrus Rotary club's 23rd Annual Blood screening


,ffd,,, BLOOD TESTING

FOR YOUR GOOD HEALTH!
t Central/ l
4: CITRUS MEMORIAL
/s&L 7iffS -s em


comprehensive Testing at
DRASTICALlY i REDUCED PRICES!
m Only $82.00*
Rotary Blood Screening Profile
(Includes: CBC, Lipid Panel, and Chemistry Profiles
including liver enzymes, glucose, and potassium, etc.)
Additional $68.00
PSA TEST (men only) Test for Prostate Cancer


Additional $68.00
Thyroid Panels T4, T3 uptake & TSH testing
Additional $68.00
Cardiac C.R.P. TEST Used to help predict
if a person is likely to have heart disease.


ONE DAY ONLY
Sat, April 13, 2013
6:30am to 9:30am
at the
Forest Ridge Elementary School
in Hernando
'Over $500 Vealue!/I


DO NOT EAT OR DRINK BEFORE YOUR TEST
...nothing to eat or drink for 12 hours before
and up to the test. Complimentary coffee,
juice and donuts will be served after the test.
Blood drawn by
Citrus Memorial Health Svstem


Additional $68.00 licensed phlebotomists and results reviewed by
Al C TEST Shows your average blood sugar level over Vladimir Vicko, D.O., Board Certified
past 2-3 months and how balanced your blood sugar is being in Family Practice.
controlled over time, to keep within a healthy range. Please understand that you should discuss the
results of your test(s) with your personal physician.
Medicare does NOT cover a full screening. If you
don't have medical coverage, this is your chance F
to afford a complete blood screening.
' CUT HERE KEEP UPPER HALF AS A REMINDER--
SEND LOWER HALF WITH YOUR CHECK


PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED:
Pre-registration is required no later than April 10, 2013.
Complete this form and return bottom
half with your check payable to:
Rotary Club of Central Citrus
c/o Ed Serra, CPA
6118 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34429


D Blood Screening Test............$82.00 $___
0 Optional PSA- (men only)....$68.00 +$__
0 Optional Thyroid Panels.......$68.00 +$_
0 Optional Cardiac C.R.P........$68.00 +$___
D A1C Test........................... $68.00 +$_
TOTAL $


" Central Citrus County Rotary Club's
23rd Annual Blood Screening
csamssiE I


I


Use ONE REGISTRATION FORM per person please.
(Make photocopies if needed.)
( YOU MUST SIGN BELOW.
Name:
FIRST MIDDLE INITIAL LAST


Social Security #:
Address:


State: Zip:


Telephone: ( )
Birthdate: / /


_Age: MALE U FEMALE


cisco to the rural areas of
east Texas and the Great
Plains. A common theme is
a waning local economy,
such as farming, mining or
industrial areas. They also
include some retirement
communities in Florida,
although many are cush-
ioned by a steady flow of
new retirees each year
In the last year, Maine
joined West Virginia as the
only two entire states
where deaths exceed
births, which have
dropped precipitously
after the recent recession.


Nation BRIEFS
Pa. college team's bus crashes, kills 2
CARLISLE, Pa. -A tour bus carrying a college's
women's lacrosse team to a game went off the Pennsylvania
Turnpike on Saturday and crashed into a tree, killing the
driver and one passenger and sending others to hospitals,
including some with serious injuries, authorities said.
Lacrosse players from Seton Hill University and three
coaches were among the 23 people aboard when the bus
crashed at 9 a.m., turnpike spokeswoman Renee Colborn
said. It's not clear what caused the crash, but state police
were investigating, said Megan Silverstram of the Cumber-
land County public safety department.
Three of the injured were flown to Penn State Hershey
Medical Center, where one person died, hospital spokes-
woman Danielle Ran said. She did not give the conditions of
the other two. Officials said all other passengers were taken
to hospitals as a precaution.
North Dakota to fight against abortion
BISMARCK, N.D. -As oil-rich North Dakota moves to-
ward outlawing most abortions, it's in a better position than
most states for what could be a long and costly court battle
over its restrictions.
Lawmakers on Friday sent the Republican governor two
anti-abortion bills. One bans the procedure as early as six
weeks into a pregnancy. The other prohibits women from
having the procedure because a fetus has a genetic defect.
Abortion-rights activists have promised a legal battle if the
measures become law.
North Dakota has a budget surplus nearing $2 billion,
thanks to new-found oil wealth.
From wire reports


Put Waste in Its Place
'. ATTENTION
, BlHOM OWNERS
UD^0I0 YOU KNOW..


5o You can bring
r the following
materials for
ji disposal at the
i 1 Central Landfill
4 Free Of
Charge Up To
.. The Listed
Limit...


Televisions & Computer Monitors
Maximum 2 per visit 2 times per year
Computers & All Other Electronic Items
No Charge
Monday Friday 8:00 am 4:30 pm
Saturday 8:00 am 2:30 pm


E~f Soli Wse Management -I I* :. 527-7670I
ole- m a 6 *e60fo b cc ctr sfl u


fxpeiefrce fiheI lieree!


* Honest Professional Compassionate

"Dr. Ledger was very compassionate & friendly.
His staff were very courteous & friendly.
Thank you so much." By Patricia Aggas
"The staff are always pleasant and greet you with a
smile. Humor makes the visit not as uncomfortable.
I actually look forward to going." By Frank Pifer


FREE SECOND OPINION.


Ledger Dentistry.com
License #DN 17606


The patient identified above consents to the procedures which may be
performed on an outpatient basis; limited to laboratory procedures.
The undersigned certifies that he/she has read the foregoing and is the patient, the patient's legal representative,
or is duly authorized by the patient as the patient's general agent to execute the above and accept its terms.
PLEASE READ A SIGN BEFORE SENDING IN.
NO RESERVATIONS.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED. .X
Patient/Parent/Guardian/Conservator/Responsible Party Date
If other than patient, indicate relationship w n
Witness Signature Date
300EB7K


I


I7 SJeremy A. Ledger, D.M.D., P.A.

Se Habla Espa.ol Homosasso (Next to Ace(352)-- -58-3443
"We0Catr to Cwards!


A12 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


NATION


P





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


We're having a baby!


I'm so excited. There's a baby on the
way! I can't tell you how long I've
waited for this- years and years and
years, ever since the wedding. Not my
wedding, silly: Will and Kate's.
I get to call them Will and Kate, even
though they don't know me from Adam,
because I'm a reporter It would be rude
if you did it, but we reporters are almost
part of the family the part of the family
they don't let in the house. And now we're
having a baby!
Our baby will be the most
wonderful baby in the world.
This child's diapers will smell
like roses; its spit-up could be
bottled and sold like vintage
Dom Perignon. I'm just so ex- .
cited, because there's nothing
we reporters get more excited
about than babies. And if their
parents are celebrities or rich
or royal, we really get excited.
And guess what? This baby's JI
parents are all three. I can't MUE
think of a baby who deserves MU
all this attention more, can
you? After all this baby's done for us, how
can we not love it?
We are much too busy reporting on the
babies of celebrities to spend any time
with our own babies. That's why we know
so little about babies who don't have
press agents, lawyers or spokespeople.
One of my own babies, Frank or Bob or
whatever his name is, called me yester-
day It turns out he's graduating from col-
lege, and he wants to make sure I'm not
coming to the ceremony
"You missed my kindergarten gradua-
tion because you were covering a baby
who fell down a well. You never came to
one football game because some birth
mother wanted to keep a baby When I
graduated from high school, you were
covering Tom Cruise's baby Well, Peter
and I don't have time for you. We're busy
with our own lives. And if we ever have
children, we're not going to tell you."
Peter, that's it! My other boy's name is
Peter. Which makes me think, maybe I


II


can do a front-page story on what the roy-
als will name their baby. Wouldn't it be
great if it were a boy and they named him
Prince? He could go through most of his
life as Prince Prince. What if they have
twins? Would one get to be king because
he was born two minutes before his
brother? That doesn't seem fair. It's al-
most as if someone gets to be a wealthy
ruler just because he was born, not be-
cause he earned it or deserved it more
than any other baby
What if it's twin girls and
they both want to be queen?
Better yet, what if it's twin
boys and they both want to be
queen? That'd be the story of
the century, and I'd have it
first because I have it now! It
doesn't matter that it may
never happen. I'm writing it.
It's too good a story not to
print.
M Some wonder if we re-
porters should spend so much
.LEN time chasing the overprivi-
leged parents of an overprivi-
leged baby, a baby we wouldn't be writing
about if its parents were commoners who
lived next door to us. But if the com-
moner's baby fell down a well, then we'd
care about it There'd be hundreds of re-
porters on the front lawn in 12 seconds.
But I'd be there first because I live next
door. I'd get all the exclusive interviews
because we're neighbors, so it's practi-
cally my baby Not that we've ever had the
parents over for dinner or anything. After
all, they are common. What's the baby's
name again?
Will the royal baby fall down a well?
Not unless I can talk my editor into hiring
a team to secretly dig baby-sized wells in
the side yard of Buckingham Palace and
cover them with a thin layer of grass. No,
that's crazy talk. Besides, our paper's
budget is much too tight for that.

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


Head Start slates
outreach event
Crystal River Preschool/
Head Start plans a Commu-
nity Outreach from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Saturday, April 27, so
service organizations can in-
form families of their services,
and the public can learn about
Head Start services.


The program prides itself
on being able to help children
to grow in a nurturing and ed-
ucated environment and help
families as a whole. There will
be sign-ups for free and re-
duced child care.
For more information,
donate door prizes or
participate, call Cozette
Pierce at 352-795-2266 or


email Crystal RiverPreschool
Headstart@gmail.com.
Eagles welcome all
to jam sessions
The Citrus Eagles 3992,
8733 Gulf-to-Lake Highway in
Inverness, welcomes all to
jam sessions from 6 to 9 p.m.
Sunday with B.J. Bear and
Co.


Innie or Outie?T


They Hold Identical Digital Technologies
But, which hearing aid style is best for you? The one that
hides inside your ear canal or the one that hides outside of it.
Dan Gardner, CEO of Gardner Audiology, holds his new Innie
hearing aid. He designed it to
S....hide inside the ear canal.
SParticipants are being sought for a
"1-comparison study of Gardner's
exclusive new completely in canal
hearing aid with a model that is fit
S'. behind your ear. In exchange for
sharing your opinion on a
questionnaire, you will receive a
free in office custom fitting of both
Models. All services are performed
by audiologists with an advanced
university degree in just one visit.

Call 795-5700
to schedule a candidate screening
3000 Central Florida residents have participated in Gardner Audiology research studies.



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CRYSTAL RIVER
700 SE 5thTerr., Ste. 11
Crystal River, FL


www.gardneraudiology.com


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Introducing the 2013


Winners of


"Partners With A Heart"


We celebrate our heroes in
recognition for providing outstanding
support & assistance in the area
of prevention, intervention &
services for substance abuse.


1


Scott Baggerly
Faith Haven
Christian Retreat Center


Derrick Bogart Nancy Buteau Sandy Child Corliss Conway Bruce Deyarmond
Inverness Nature Coast Citrus County The Centers, Inc. Phoenix Program
Middle School Community Church Health Department


Shalay Jackson
Crystal River
Middle School


Alida Langley
Alida Langley's Sewing
and Quilting Shop


Kristy Lindke Kenia Lugo Robert Martin Patricia Mogg
The Path Camp Fellowship of C'i11," .f.iry:
E-Nini-Hassee Christian Athletes Middle School


Kevin Purinton Toby Rowlinson
Citrus County Crystal River
Sheriff's Office High School


Samantha Shephard
Citrus County
Drug Court


Judith Tear
Citrus County
Health Department


Jill Williams
Ci,,,: Hi.1 School


PARTNERS


352-601-6620 352-586-7214
substancefreecitrus.com

..i.. i .. cOCapital City
c l1i,\UlNi UJ Bank
PI Like us on facebook


2013

Partner of the Year

Lt. Kevin Purinton
Citrus County Sheriff's Office






Doug Lobel
Inverness Olde Town Association

Kevin Purinton
2013 Partner of the Year
Citrus County Sheriff's Office

Ray Thompson
Capital City Bank Sponsor


I


I4
viili,


A14 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


March 18 to 22 MENUS


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger slid-
ers, pepperoni pizza, Italian
super salad with roll, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Creamy maca-
roni and cheese, corn dog
minis, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh garden salad, steamed
green beans, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
Very Berry super salad with
roll, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet green peas,


chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
chicken alfredo, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet corn, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Breaded chicken
sandwich, mozzarella
maxstix, PB dippers, fresh
baby carrots, steamed broc-
coli, flavored Craisins, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,


News NOTE


Annual Underwater
Egg Hunt on tap
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation invites children up
to age 12 to join in the annual
Underwater Egg Hunt festivi-
ties Saturday, March 23, at Bi-
centennial Park Pool.
There will be two egg hunts
for different age groups: chil-
dren up to age 6 will hunt
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
children ages 7 to 12 will hunt
from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Admission is free and chil-
dren will need to bring a bas-
ket and swimming attire.
Eggs will be dispersed
throughout the Bicentennial
Park Pool area. The pool itself


will be set up with different
levels of difficulty based on
swimming ability. There will
also be a land-based egg
hunt designed for younger
children and non-swimmers.
Eggs are turned in after the
hunt in exchange for a gift
bag filled with little toys and
candy.
Only 50 people at a time
will be permitted onto the pool
deck. Festivities will include
potato sack races, egg races,
face painting, arts and crafts
stations, food and more.
For more information, call
Bicentennial Park Pool at
352-795-1478 or Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
352-527-7540.


pulled pork barbecue on bun,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed broccoli, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken plate, macaroni and
cheese with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
steamed green beans, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued chicken with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans, po-
tato triangles, chilled peach
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, nacho
rounds, Very Berry super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
Mexicali corn, chilled flavored
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Spaghetti with rip-
stick, mozzarella maxstix, PB
dippers, fresh garden salad,
sweet peas, chilled strawberry
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast


sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato tri-
angles, steamed broccoli,
applesauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Chicken nachos
with Spanish rice, turkey and


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$18,975


1998 FORD FSO S/CREW LARIAT
Was $23,968 N2T307B
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gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, Mexicali corn, po-
tato roasters, baby carrots,
strawberry cups, juice, milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, ham salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, chilled baked beans,
baked beans, potato triangles,
flavored Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Oven-baked
breaded chicken with rice,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, macaroni and cheese
with ripstick, turkey super
salad with roll, maxstix, yogurt
parfait plate, garden salad,
green beans, baby carrots,
potato roasters, strawberry
cup, juice, milk.
Friday: Barbecued chicken
sandwich, pizza, chicken al-
fredo with ripstick, hamburger,
chicken sandwich, Very Berry
super salad with roll, yogurt
parfait plate, baby carrots,
cold corn salad, potato trian-
gles, peas, peach cup, juice,
milk.


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SENIOR DINING
Monday: Lasagna casse-
role, garlic spinach, Italian
vegetable medley, mixed
fruit, slice whole-wheat bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Tuesday: Salisbury steak
with noodles and brown
gravy, garden peas, grape
juice, dinner roll with mar-
garine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chef salad
with ham, cheese, whole
boiled egg and tomato,
French dressing, carrot-raisin
salad, fresh orange, slice
whole-grain bread with
margarine, low-fat milk.
Thursday: Chicken
parmesan, California vegeta-
bles, Italian flat beans,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Meatballs with
brown gravy, rice pilaf, mixed
vegetables, pears, slice white
bread, low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon. For information,
call Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


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COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 A15











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


World BRIEFS

Praying


Obama aims for peace in Mideast


President travels to Israel fr first time


JULIE PACE
White House correspondent
WASHINGTON When Pres-
ident Barack Obama steps into
the Middle East's political caul-
dron this coming week, he won't
be seeking any grand resolution
for the region's vexing problems.
His goal will be trying to keep
the troubles, from Iran's sus-
pected pursuit of a nuclear
weapon to the bitter discord be-
tween Israelis and Palestinians,
from boiling over on his watch.
Obama arrives in Jerusalem


on Wednesday for his first trip
to Israel as president. His first
priority will be resetting his oft-
troubled relationship with now-
weakened Israeli Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
and evaluating the new coali-
tion government Netanyahu la-
boriously cobbled together
The president also will look
to boost his appeal to a skepti-
cal Israeli public, as well as to
frustrated Palestinians.
"This is not about accom-
plishing anything now. This is
what I call a down-payment


trip," said Aaron David
Miller, an adviser on I
Mideast peace to six
secretaries of state who
is now at the Woodrow
Wilson International
Center
For much of Obama's
first term, White House Ba
officials saw little rea- Oba
son for him to go to the
region without a realis-
tic chance for a peace accord
between the Israelis and Pales-
tinians. But with the presi-
dent's one attempt at a
U.S.-brokered deal thwarted in
his first term and the two sides
even more at odds, the White


House has shifted
thinking.
Officials now see the
lowered expectations
as a chance to create
space for frank conver-
sations between Obama
and both sides about
rack what it will take to get
ama back to the negotiating
table. The president
will use his face-to-face
meetings to "persuade both
sides to refrain from taking
provocative unilateral actions
that could be self-defeating,"
said Haim Malka, a senior fel-
low at the Center for Strategic
and International Studies.


Associated Press
A Sabaean Mandean man prays
Saturday on the banks of the Tigris
River during a celebration marking
"Banja" or Creation Feast in central
Baghdad, Iraq. Iraqi Sabaean
Mandeans, followers of an ancient
religious sect that views the Bible's
John the Baptist as savior,
submerge themselves in the Tigris
in an annual five-day ritual.


High-ranking general
defects from Syrian army
BEIRUT -A high-ranking general
in the Syrian army defected Saturday
with the help of rebels and said morale
is low among those still fighting for
President BasharAssad as the civil
war enters its third year.
Maj. Gen. Mohammed Ezz al-Din
Khalouf told AI-Arabiya TV many of
those still with Assad's regime have
lost faith in it.
Activist videos posted online Satur-
day showed Khalouf sitting with a
rebel fighter after his defection and rid-
ing in a car to what the video said was
the Jordanian border.
The video said he was Chief of Staff
for the army branch that deals with
supplies and fuel.
US helicopter crashes in
Afghanistan, killing 1
KABUL, Afghanistan NATO offi-
cials said a helicopter crashed in south-
ern Afghanistan, killing one coalition
service member and injuring another.
Capt. Luca Carniel said there was
no enemy activity in the area when the
helicopter crashed Saturday, and the
cause is being investigated.
Kandahar governor spokesman
Javeed Faisal said the helicopter
crashed in Daman district, a few miles
west of Kandahar City.
Officials did not release the type of
helicopter or nationalities of the
casualties.
Thessaloniki Jews mark
WWII Nazi deportation
THESSALONIKI, Greece Jewish
residents of this northern Greek city
gathered Saturday to commemorate the
70th anniversary of the roundup and de-
portation of this city's Jews to Nazi ex-
termination camps in World War II.
Several hundred people gathered at
the city's Eleftherias (Freedom)
Square, where the first batch of Jews
were rounded up by the occupying
German forces on March 15, 1943.
The crowd held a moment of silence
and then marched to the city's old rail-
way station, where the first trains de-
parted for the Auschwitz-Birkenau
concentration camp complex. A short
ceremony was at the station and flow-
ers laid on the tracks.
Egyptians in south clash
over president's visit
CAIRO Police fired tear gas to dis-
perse thousands of supporters and op-
ponents of President Mohammed Morsi
during clashes that erupted Saturday as
he launched development projects in
southern Egyptian where residents
have long complained of being neg-
lected by the central government.
Morsi was in Sohag province to un-
veil a housing project and new educa-
tion complex when thousands of
anti-government protesters tried to
storm the hall where he was meeting
with local officials. The rioting came as
Morsi was trying to reach out to resi-
dents of Sohag, one of Egypt's poorest
southern cities.


Swiss tourist ga
in central li
NEW DELHI-ASwis
who was on a cycling trip
India with her husband ha
gang-raped by eight men,
Saturday. The attack com
months after the fatal gan
woman aboard a New De
raged Indians.


Irish


Invasion
invasion


Associated Press
Jacob Tidwell, center, and his friends Donavan Mock, left, and Preston Vasquez react to a band during Savannah's 189-year-
old St. Patrick's Day parade Saturday in Savannah, Ga. Started in 1824 by early Irish immigrants to Georgia, the parade has
ballooned into a sprawling street party that makes for Savannah's most profitable tourism event.

Revelers start to mark St. Patrick's Day early


Associated Press
NEW YORK Crowds cheered and
bagpipes bellowed as New York City's
annual St. Patrick's Day parade kicked
off Saturday, and people with a fond-
ness for anything Irish began a week-
end of festivities from the Louisiana
bayou to Dublin's Parnell Square.
With the holiday itself falling on Sun-
day, many celebrations were scheduled
instead for Saturday because of reli-
gious observances.
In New York, the massive parade,
which predates the United States, was
led by 750 members of the New York
Army National Guard. The 1st Battalion
of the 69th Infantry has been marching
in the parade since 1851.
In downtown Chicago, thousands
lined the Chicago River and cheered as
workers on a boat dumped dye into the
water, turning it a bright fluorescent
green for at least a few hours.
In a sea of people in green shirts,
coats, winter hats, sunglasses and even
wigs and beards, 29-year-old Ben May
managed to stand out. The Elkhart, Ind.,


man wore a full leprechaun costume,
complete with a tall green hat
"I've got a little Irish in me, so I'm
supporting the cause," he said.
May bought the outfit online to wear to
Notre Dame football games. But he fig-
ured it was fitting for this occasion, too.
Thousands of revelers gaudily garbed
in green crammed the oak-shaded
squares and sidewalks of downtown Sa-
vannah, Ga., on Saturday, for a celebra-
tion that's a 189-year-old tradition.
Led by bagpipers in green kilts, a pa-
rade kicked off Saturday morning, hours
after customers began lining up at down-
town bars. More than 1,000 worshippers
also packed the pews of the Cathedral of
St John the Baptist for the Mass that tra-
ditionally precedes the parade.
Bev Kehayes, of Greensboro, N.C.,
joined friends near the start of the pa-
rade route. She made hats with green
feathers and flowers just for the occasion.
"It's good, clean fun. Heaven forbid
there's a little alcohol involved," said
Kehayes, who said she's missed only
three of the celebrations in Savannah in
29 years.


Members of the Petri School of Irish
Dance perform Saturday at the Ireland
Chamber of Commerce 17th annual
St. Patrick's Day Breakfast in New York.


Appropriators practice art of compromise


Congressman,

senator work on

budget solution

Associated Press


WASHINGTON She's an
outspoken feminist and former
Qnuinl AXMwuar Na'Q n1ia


UCIaic WUllorkler. ie s a cigar-
ng-raped smoking Kentucky lawyer
ndia But Democratic Sen. Barbara
Mikulski of Maryland and Re-
s woman publican Rep. Harold Rogers
in central have big things in common as
is been they steer the House and Sen-
, police said ate Appropriations committees
ies three toward a spending plan for the
g-rape of a rest of the year that eases the
1lhi bus out- bite of $85 billion in automatic
spending cuts.
Their tiny domain is the only
-From wire reports place in a bitterly divided Con-


Associated Press
House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rep. Hal Rogers, R-Ky.,
and Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., head of the Senate
Appropriations Committee, are the two individuals responsible for
avoiding a government shutdown and taking the edge off automatic
spending cuts called sequester.


gress where bipartisan negoti-
ation thrives, however
uncomfortably
As their bill winds toward
Senate and House approval,
the veteran lawmakers who
have a combined 68 years of
service on Capitol Hill are hop-


ing their exercise is instructive
to the dozens of colleagues,
many elected since 2010, who
frown on compromise.
"If they succeed, perhaps in
their own way they will have
demonstrated to others in this
Congress that this is about con-


ciliation, it's about setting pri-
orities, it's about cutting waste,"
said Jim Dyer, a longtime ap-
propriations aide who's now a
lobbyist "It's about doing your
job as opposed to getting your-
self so wrapped around the ide-
ological axle that you can't
accomplish anything."
Mikulski and Rogers are the
pain managers of the nation's fis-
cal difficulties, the two individu-
als most responsible for averting
a government shutdown March
27 and taking some of the edge
off the automatic spending cuts
known as the sequester
They can't do anything,
though, without the agreement
of Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby,
the top Republican on the Sen-
ate committee, and New York
Rep. Nita Lowy, the senior De-
mocrat on the House committee.
"We are working well to-
gether, now," Shelby said.











EXCURSIONS


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Join boys of ,


summer at


all 30



parks .

MICHAEL LIEDTKE
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO-
If you're a baseball fan
looking to add a new ,
pastime to your vacation \I
itinerary, consider toiir rei.\ hus
n a g l .vill itlduced Ile 1:k
setting a goal to visit all things that wouldn't have been on my
30 of the sport's major radar if I hadn't booked a trip to see a
stadium.
league stadiums. When I went to St Louis to visit
Busch Stadium in 2010, I rented a car
I began my crusade about five years one day and made the two-hour drive
ago, joining a growing number of to Samuel Clemens' childhood home
other zealots making the pilgrimage in Hannibal, Mo., the Mississippi
to baseball's cathedrals. River village that inspired Mark
It has become such a popular pur- Twain's best-known books about the
suit that you can buy baseball-stadium childhood adventures of Tom Sawyer
maps to document where you have and Huckleberry Finn. The Hannibal
been and plot where you still need to visit had a ripple effect when I went
go. The one decorating my den shows to Boston to see Fenway Park,
I'm halfway through my odyssey, with prompting me to rent another car to
14 more fields of dreams still to be drive to Hartford, Conn., to visit the
seen. If you need more memorabilia, custom-built home where he spent
there's also a book called "The Major the happiest and most productive
League Baseball BallPark Pass-Port" years of his adult life. Back in Boston,










Fl[[T[T[ d [F r[r F' r
Lt-;~ ~ UT r


Associated Press
Fans stand in front of the Green Monster scoreboard in September 2012 during
On Field Photo Day at Fenway Park in Boston before a baseball game between
the Boston Red Sox and the Baltimore Orioles.


that provides tips about each stadium,
with slots to file ticket stubs and a
place to "validate" each visit with a
rubber stamp.
But all you really need is a love of
baseball and a passion for exploring
new places to relish this journey
All the baseball teams are based in
major U.S. cities and many of the sta-
diums are situated in bustling down-
town areas with engrossing things to
do and savory places to eat when you
aren't attending a game. These attrac-
tions should help the cause of base-
ball fans trying to recruit a spouse or
other traveling teammates who may
not appreciate the sublime pleasures
of the game.


I also made the short trip across the
Charles River to Cambridge to check
out Harvard University, and wound
up stumbling upon the home of poet
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, where
George Washington also lived for a
short time.
When I went to Baltimore to see a
game at Camden Yards, I took a water
taxi out to Fort McHenry in the
Chesapeake Bay to tour the site
where Francis Scott Key watched
American troops in 1814 successfully
thwart an all-night fusillade by Eng-
lish ships. The heroics at Fort
McHenry inspired Key to write the
ode that became the country's
national anthem.


Many of the stadiums are land-
marks in their own right. My favorite
stops so far have been baseball's old-
est stadiums, Fenway Park (opened in
1912), and Wrigley Field (originally
known as Weeghman Park when it
opened in 1914) in Chicago. Both are
located in wonderful neighborhoods
that turn into street festivals during
the three or four hours leading up to
the game.
The stadiums of more recent vin-
tage all have their merits too, largely
because so many were built to evoke a
sense of nostalgia. This retro move-
ment started in 1992 when Balti-
more's Camden Yards opened and has
carried over to just about every one of
the 22 baseball stadiums that have
opened since then (while I haven't
been to them yet, I understand
Florida's two big-league ballparks are
notable exceptions to this trend).
Most of the newer stadiums boast
signature features designed to set
them apart Even one of the Florida
stadiums, Marlins Park, added dis-
tinctive flair by building a 450-gallon
saltwater aquarium behind home
plate. Chase Field, the Phoenix home
of the Arizona Diamondbacks, fea-
tures a swimming pool behind the
right field fence. Coors Field, the Den-
ver home of the Colorado Rockies,
features small trees and rocks with
running water a tip of the cap to
the gorgeous mountains that can be
seen on the horizon from the
stadium seats.
Most of the teams also set aside
areas inside and outside the stadiums
to pay homage to the greatest players
in franchise history I've already seen
statues of Stan ("The Man") Musial in
St Louis, Ted ("The Splendid Splin-
ter") Williams in Boston, Willie ("The
Say Hey Kid") Mays in San Francisco,
Walter ("The Train") Johnson in Wash-
ington and George ("Babe") Ruth in
Baltimore. In case you are wondering
why the Orioles honor the Bambino
even though he never played for the
team, it's because Camden Yards is
built in an old neighborhood that
once included a bar owned by Ruth's
father (the home where the Babe was
born is still standing, just a short stroll
from Camden Yards).
When drawing up your travel plans,
strive to arrange your stadium visits
so they coincide with your favorite
team's trips to the same destinations.
My favorite stadium sojourns so far
have included my favorite team, the
Oakland Athletics. Those trips gave


me a chance to wear my green-and-
gold Athletics' gear in hostile terri-
tory, which has led to lively repartee
with the fans of the local team. What's
more, your favorite team will appreci-
ate seeing some friendly faces, so
much so that they may be even more
accommodating than usual with re-
quests for autographs and baseballs.
In a further show of support, try to get
tickets behind your team's dugout on
the road. Just keep in mind the loca-
tion of visitor's dugouts vary from sta-
dium to stadium, so double-check
before buying tickets (the visitor's
dugout is on the third-base side of the
field at 18 stadiums and on the first-
base side at the other 12).
After each visit to a baseball sta-
dium, I can hardly wait to go to an-
other one. Despite my ardor,
completing the journey has been a
multiyear process because, like most
baseball fans, I don't have the time or
money to see all the stadiums in a sin-
gle season. Last year, I made it to four
stadiums for the first time, a new sin-
gle-season record for me. Other vaca-
tion commitments this year are likely
to restrict me to a single stadium:
Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City,
Mo., when the Athletics play there in
July
When I finally cross off the final big-
stadium off my list in a few years, I am
going to have to find a new quest.
Well, I hear there are lots of quaint
minor-league baseball stadiums
in rustic towns all across America....


A statue of former St. Louis Cardinals
player Stan Musial is seen outside
Busch Stadium in St. Louis in January.


Down under
Bob and Karen Furman of Homosassa spent Christmas in Australia with their
daughter, Susan, her husband, Brent, and two sons, Ty and Jay. Here, they pose at
a man-made beach in the middle of Brisbane. They spent a beach day at Surfer's
Paradise on the Gold Coast and took a ferry trip to Coochiemudio Island. New
Year's Eve was spent at a "bogan" party at a neighbor's home in Mount Cotton.
Upon their departure, Brent remarked "we can do this again next month!"
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


* Veterans
Notes can
be found on
Page A19
of today's
Chronicle.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 17, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII: Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B ID/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 I 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 110:00 10:30 11:00j11:30
) [WESH NBC 19 19 News News Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' a All-Star Celebrity Apprentice (N) 'PG' a News Access
Tenors: Warhorse Great Performances "Phantom of the Opera at the Royal Albert Hall" "The Phantom Drop 7 Foods, Feel
SED PBS 3 3 14 6 Lead of the Opera." PG' c BetterFast
o UWUF) PBS 5 5 5 41 Doc Martin PG' NOVA 'PG' |Call the Midwife '14' Call the Midwife '14' |Call the Midwife '14' Doc Martin 'PG'
SNBC 8 8 8 8 8 News Nightly Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG' All-Star Celebrity Apprentice The contestants News Paid
S FLA News perform a soap opera. (N) 'PG' c Program
News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Revenge "Illumination" Red Widow "The News Sports
WFT AB 20 20 20 News Home Videos 'PG' *PG' N(N) PI'N mEscape" (N) PG c Night
NCAA Championship 60 Minutes (N) (In The Amazing Race (N) The Good Wife (N) (In The Mentalist "Red, 10 News Paid
CD lBTB CBS 10 10 10 10 10 Selection Show Stereo) B (In Stereo) N Stereo)'14' White and Blue" 14' 11pm (N) Program
FOX13 6:00 News (N) Bob's Cleveland The Cleveland Family Guy Bob's FOX1310:00 News (N) News Burn
SWTVT FOX 13 13 13 13 (In Stereo) N Burgers Show Simpsons Show 14' Burgers (In Stereo) N Notice'PG'
Bf WCJit ABC 11 11 4 News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge (N) 'PG' Red Widow (N) PG' News Inside Ed.
ND 2 2 2 22 22 Brody File Stakel/ Truth Great Awakening Love a Place for A. Daniel Jesse Bridging Great
IND 2 2 2 22 22 Terror Transfms Child G' Miracles Wommack Kolinda Duplantis the Gap Awaken
ABC 11 News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time(N) Revenge "Illumination" Red Widow "The News Castle 'PG'
m ABC 11 11 11 News Home Videos'PG' 'PG'Bc(N) PG' BEscape" (N) PG B
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order"Baby It's Law & Order"Blood" How I Met How I Met The Office The Office
EDm ) IND 12 12 16 '14' 14' Theory Theory You" 14' 'PG' '14'M '14'
D WTTA MNT 6 6 6 9 9 "Falling Up"(2009) Joseph Cross. 'NR' Seinfeld Seinfeld Chris IChrs Tampa Whacked Born/Ride Honor
IM WAC TBN 21 21 Dr. C.Stanley Rejoice in the Lord Paid Passion! Journey Paid Connec Jim Raley Dayna Brody
King of Friends 'Til Death Engagement CSI: Miami "Kill Zone" CSI: Miami "A Horrible Cold Case "Flashover ** "0" ri',n Mekhi
IE i cW 4 4 4 12 12 Queens 'PG' 'PG' '14' Mind"'14' 'PG'[ I I-.-,
WY FAM 16 16 16 15 Casita Big Rotary Spy Inveess Your Citrus County Court ISpy'Y' Eye for an Fam Team
IM EFAM 16 16 16 15 Dog Club Games SpotlightEye
ED WCOW FOX 13 7 7 Big Bang Big Bang Burgers Cleveland Simpsons |Cleveland |Fam. Guy |Burgers FOX 35 News at 10 TMZ 'PG'
Mn WVEA UNI 15 15 15 15 14 Corned. Noticiero AqufyAhora(SS) Nuestra Belleza Latina'PG'(SS) Sal y Pimienta'PG' Coed. |Noticiero
M [WPX ION 17 Monk Break-in. 'PG' Monk Murder. 'PG' Monk 'PG' Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl
Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck
A 54 48 54 25 27 Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty Dynasty
S**"GodziIa" (1998, Science Fiction) Matthew The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Talking Dead (N) '14' c The Walking Dead
55 64 55 Broderick, Jean Reno. PG-13' 'MA'c "Prey" (N)'MA' "Prey"'MA' c
S 5235 52 19 21 To Be Announced Wild West Alaska (In Wild West Alaska (N) Gator Boys: Xtra Bites Finding Bigfoot' Virgin Gator Boys: Xtra Bites
52 35 52 19 21 Stereo) 'PG' (In Stereo) 14' (N) 'PG' Sasquatch 'PG' (In Stereo)'PG'
n "BA.P.S"(1997 Comedy) Halle ** "Deliver Us From Eva" (2003, Romance-Comedy) LL Husbands Second Don't Sleep! Hosted by
96 19 96 Berry.'PG-13' Cool J, Gabrielle Union. R' T.J. Holmes'PG'
RlaiV 254 51 254 Housewives/Atl. |Atlanta Social Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Happens Fashion
S*** "I Love You, Man" (2009, Comedy) Paul *+ "Grandma's Boy" (2006, Comedy) Doris Tosh.0 Workaholics Daniel Tosh:
(CC) 27 61 27 33 Rudd, Jason Segel. R' Roberts, Allen Covert. R'B '14' Completely Serious '14'
7 "Blue Collar Comedy Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham Ron White's Vegas Salute to the ** "Blue Collar Comedy Tour:
MY) 98 45 98 28 37 Tour: One for Road' returns with new characters. '14' c Troops 201314, D,L cc One for the Road" (2006)
ftNjj 43 42 43 Paid Paid Princess On 60 Minutes on CNBC Death: It's a Living American Greed 60 Minutes on CNBC
(NN) 40 29 40 41 46 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG' Piers Morgan CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 'PG'
Austin & Austin & "The Wizards Return: Austin & Shake It Jessie Jessie Austin & Jessie Shake It Jessie
iDIiAJ 46 40 46 6 5 Ally G' AllyG' Alex vs. Alex" Ally 'G' Up! G 'G' G' Ally 'G' G' Up! G' G'
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[EWTN 95 70 95 48 Devotions ICrossing World Over Live Sunday Night Prime G.K. Rosary That I May See G' |God IBookmark
( in 29 52 29 200 28I ** "PS. I Love You" ** 2 "Twilight" (2008) Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up ** "Twilight" (2008) Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up
HR) 29 52 29 20 28 (2007)'PG-13' in an unorthodox romance with a vampire, in an unorthodox romance with a vampire.
S ** "Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of "Hellraiser: Inferno" (2000) "Hellraiser: Hellworld" (2005, Horror) Doug "Suspect
118 170 Life" (2003) Angelina Jolie. 'PG-13' Craig Sheffer.'R' Bradley, Henry Cavill. (In Stereo) R' Zero R'
(TNti 44 37 44 32 Fox News Sunday FOX Report (N) Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large (N) Huckabee
( 26 56 26 Diners Diners Worst Cooks Cupcake Wars (N) Worst Cooks Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America
([SEFLJ 35 39 35 Ship Game 365 World Poker Tour World Poker Tour UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour World Poker Tour
S**3 5 "The Twilight Saga: New Moon" (2009) Kristen Stewart. Bella ** "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse" (2010, Romance) Kristen "Twil:
) 30 60 30 51 finds herself drawn into the world of werewolves. 'PG-13' Stewart, Robert Pattinson. PG-13' Eclipse"
(GffLE 727 67 727 LPGA Tour Golf Central |PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Tampa Bay Championship, Final Round.
D "A Taste of Romance" *** "Honeymoon for One" (2011, Romance) "Tom, Dick& Harriet" (2013, Romance- Frasier 'PG Frasier 'PG'
59 68 59 45 54 (2011)'NR' Nicollette Sheridan. NR' Comedy) Steven Weber. c
S 302 201 302 2 2 .zkn"Harry Potter- ** "Tower Heist" (2011, Comedy) Ben Stiller. Girls'MA' Veep'MA' Gids'MA' Veep'MA' Girls'MA' "Project
(f 302 201 302 2 2 zka lan" (In Stereo) PG-13' B M c X"(012)
B 303 202 303 Boxing Real Time With Bill **2 "Sherlock Holmes:A Game of Shadows" Mak. Fast *** "The American" (2010)
l 303 202 303 Maher 'MA' (2011) Robert Downey Jr. cc Five George Clooney 'R' cc
(HlTV) 23 57 23 42 52 Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters |Hunt Intl Extreme Homes 'G' Hawaii IHawaii House Hunters Reno Hunters |Hunt Intl
S .T51 25 51 32 42 The Bible Joshua conquers Jericho. '14, V' The Bibe The Jews are enslaved in Babylon. Vikings "Dispossessed" Vikings "Dispossessed"
IT) 51 25 51 32 42 (N) '14, V' (N) 14' '14'
(IEE) 24 38 24 31 Movie'MA' "Tyler Perry's Madea Goes to Jail" (2009, Army Wives "From the The Client List (N) ** "Tyler Perry's
J 24 38 24 31 Comedy) Tyler Perry.'PG-13' c Ashes" (N)'PG' 14' c Madea Goes to Jail"
S* "Tell Me No Lies" (2007, Suspense) Kelly ** "Family Sins" 2004) Krstie Alley A model "Dead Silent" 1999, Suspense) Catherine
(EiN) 50 119 Rutherford, Kirsten Prout. NR' citizen is accused o terle crimes. Mary Stewart, ob Lowe. 'NR'
S*** "The Long Kiss Goodnight" (1996, ** "Green Lantern" (2011, Action) Ryan ** + "Meet the Fockers" (2004) Robert De
W ) 320 221 320 3 3 Action) Geena Davis. (In Stereo) 'R' c Reynolds. (In Stereo) PG-13' cc Niro. Future in-laws clash in Florida.
[iSNBCJ 42 41 42 Caught on Camera |Caught on Camera Caught on Camera |To Catch a Predator To Catch a Predator |Lockup: Corcoran
The Real Bonnie and Cradle of the Gods 'PG' Wicked Tuna: Hooked Wicked Tuna "Hell on Mudcats (N) '14' Wicked Tuna "Hell on
(a) 1109 65 109 44 53 Clyde '14, V' Up (N) High Seas" (N) High Seas"
[itIR 28 36 28 35 25 Sponge. |Sponge. Sponge. |Sponge. Wendell |See Dad ** "Scooby-Doo"(2002)'PG'B Fdends '14' cc
(WNJ 103 62 103 Master Class Master Class Master Class Oprah's Next Master Class Master Class
WXYJ 44 123 Snapped 'PG' Snapped 'PG' Snapped Snapped (N) Snapped: Killer Snapped 'PG'
SNV 340 241 340 "Payback" (1999) Shameless "Where House of Californication Shameless "Frank the House of Californication Shameless "Frank the
W 340 241 340 4 Mel Gibson. There's a Will" 'MA' Lies 'MA' Plumber" MA' Lies MA' Plumber" 'MA'
Motorcycle Racing SPEED Center (N) Wind NASCAR AMA Pro Racing My Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center
[SPEED 732 112 732 (Live) Tunnel Victory L. Daytona. Car TV PG'
rsiBj 37 43 37 27 36 ar Rescue "Weber's of Bar Rescue "Murphy's Bar Rescue (In Stereo) Bar Rescue "Empty Bar Rescue (N) (In Car Lot Rescue (N) (In
37 43 37 27 36 Lies"'PG' Mess"'PG' 'PG' Pockets"'PG' Stereo)'PG' Stereo)'PG'
S7 ** "Arthur ** "Men in Black3" (2012, Action) Will Spartacus: War of the *** "The Bourne Supremacy" (2004) Matt
S 370 271 370 Christmas"(2011) Smith. (In Stereo) PG-13' Damned 'MA' Damon. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' m
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(S 36 31 36 Bask. Animals G' Exp. Blue G' ShapeTV Skins Fishing Way Olymp
S 31 59 31 26 "Leprechaun 2" ** "Lerechaun" (1992 Horror) Warwick "Leprechaun 2" (1994, Horror) Warwick ** "Leprechaun"
31 59 31 26 29 (1994)'R'B __ Davis, Jennifer Aniston Ken Olandt.'R' Davis, Charlie Heath.'R'N B(1992, Norror)'R'
(iB) 49 23 49 16 19 "Why Did I Get Married Too?" ** "Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself" "Our Family Wedding"
S*** "Young Cassidy" (1965, Biography) Rod *** "The Rising of the Moon" **** "The Quiet Man" (1952) John Wayne. A U.S. boxer
169 53 169 30 35 Taylor, Magge Smith. R' (1957) Cyril Cusack. NR' returns to Ireland and fights for his bride. R'
i 53 Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Amish Mafia (In Stereo) Dual Survival (In Amish Mafia (In Stereo)
53 34 53 24 26 MA' c 'MA' 'MA' 'MA' c Stereo) c 'MA' c
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i ** "The Constant Gardener" (2005, Drama) "Why Stop Now?" (2012) "Budz House" (2012) Wesley *** "Perfect Sense"
i 350 261 350 Ralph Fiennes. (In Stereo) 'R' c Jesse Eisenberg. R' Jonathan. (In Stereo) R' (2011) 'R'
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48 33 48 31 34 Chalice" (2008) Noah Wyle. cN a vicious criminal known as the Joker. PG-13' c (DVS) Extinction" (2007)'R'
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[TL1 32 49 32 34 24 Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girds Gold Girls Gold Girls |Gold Girls Gold Girls GoldGirs Gold Girs Gold Girls King King
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(iS) 47 32 47 17 18 PG' N napped.'PG' caught on tape. 'PG' (DVS) Part" 14' sergeant. 'PG' m
CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami A severed CSI: Miami "Point of CSI: Miami "Kill Clause" CSI: Miami "Count Me CSI: Miami "In Plane
W 117 69 117 '14' leg. 14' Impact"'14'B '14' Out"'14' Sight"'14'B
(WGiN A 18 18 18 18 20 MLB Baseball Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30 Rock |30 Rock


Apologize, try


to mend fences


Dear Annie: My 27-
year-old son,
"Scott," is married
with one child. Twelve
years ago, Scott's mother
and I divorced, and I
think he is still angry
about it. My ex-wife and I
have both remarried, but
Scott wants little to do
with either of us.
Scott rarely
visits. If we
want to see
our grandson,
we have to go
to his place.
They did show
up for Christ-
mas and were
terribly cold to
everyone.
They didn't
even let my
wife hold the
baby, which AN N
broke her MAIL
heart. _
Last week,
we ran into Scott near his
job. He looked as if he
hadn't shaved in weeks.
My wife gave him $20,
and when I saw his car in
the parking lot, I wrote on
the dirty door, "Haircut?"
Three hours later, I got a
text calling me every
name in the book and
claiming I scratched his
car. I did no such thing.
He insisted the reason we
don't speak is because I
make bad decisions.
I've had it with Mr. Un-
grateful. I thought when
Scott became a father he
would understand what
we went through to give
him what he needed. He
was the best kid growing
up, funny and happy


II


Now he hates me, and I'm
not too happy with him,
either But I have a grand-
son I want to see. Now
what? Sad Dad in N.H.
Dear Dad: Some kids
never get over a divorce.
Scott could have bene-
fited from counseling (he
still could), but no one ad-
dressed his particular is-
sues at the
time, and so
they festered.
We agree that
your son seems
difficult and
hypersensitive.
And knowing
that, it was not
a wise move to
criticize him
publicly by
writing on his
dirty car. You
IE'S need to apolo-
BOX gize to Scott for
that. If you
want the rela-
tionship to improve,
please try not to provoke
him, even unintention-
ally Ask him sincerely to
let you know when you
upset him so you can rec-
tify it to the best of your
ability.
A conciliatory gesture
on your part may allow
things to get better


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar Email questions
to anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"The Incredible Burt
Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 3:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:25 p.m.,
4:25 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"The Incredible Burt
Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m.


"The Call" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Dead Man Down" (R)
1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:35 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" In 3D. (PG) 1:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and en-
tertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Affordable
6 Mata -
10 List of candidates
15 Bro or sis
18 Hunters' housing
19 Hues
21 Group of witches
22 "- Lisa"
23 Fervency
24 Brunch item
25 Bay window
26 Chester Arthur
27 Greek letter
28 U.K. county
29 Rotund
31 Coney or Easter
33 Ooze
35 Portable shelter
36 Equine animal
37 Aims
38 Off-white
40 King
of ancient Crete
41 Deer
42 Easily attained
44 Slight addition
45 One of a pair
47 Aerie
51 Fester
52 Modified leaf
53 Whalebone
55 volente
56 Name in
a Rousseau title
57 Players
58 Cousin to a footer
60 Avid
62 Coin
63 Sic -
65 Bend, as a muscle
66 Major
thoroughfare
67 Go out - limb
68 OT book
69 Louts
71 Neck scarf
73 Whitney
or Wallach
75 and outs
76 Lost (2 wds.)
77 Extreme degree
78 Slangy affirmative
81 "Divine Comedy" poet
83 Stylish
84 fixe


85 Drink
87 Confront
90 Tardy
92 Covered
a road surface
94 Existed
95 Ringlets
96 Detective
Queen
98 Seethe
99 Barry and Brubeck
100 Japanese
statesman
101 Filament
103 Kagan of the
Supreme Court
105 Acting ruler
106 Ship area
108 Ventilates
109 Coin-toss result
110 Give in
111 Facilitate
113 "Gay-"
114 Lid
115 Amuses
118 Small rooms
119 Food fish
120 Dispatched
124 Show clearly
125 Military hat
126 Motionless
127 Quid pro-
128 Muses' number
129 Place near India
131 Creed
133 Woo
135 Sower's need
136 Rub out
137 Cleveland or Washing-
ton
138 Degrade
139 Curve shape
140 Was bold enough
141 Filled
with solemn fear
142 Like some floors


DOWN
1 Loud sounds
2 Thoroughbred
3 Murphy or Bauer
4 In the past
5 capital
6 Grits ingredient
7 Watchful


Function
Wrath
Cleans by rubbing
"- Doone"
Fanatical
Links item
Army recruit
Kind of eclipse
Silly
Combos
Stick together
Might
Speak badly of
Embezzled
Woodwind
instrument
Spring
Gherkin
Metallic element
Daisylike flower
Despicable
"- Vice"
Great lack of food
Beast
Rubbish
Fabricated
Capital
of ancient Egypt
Brink
Prophet
Whig's opponent
Change the decor
Popular book (hyph.)
Light wood
Fiddling despot
Cruel remark
Result
ABA member
Write a certain way
- Earth
Hurt
"Do --say..."
Alloy of iron
Graven image
Behaved
Football team
Mom or dad
Aide (abbr.)
Presses
Troublesome
insect
Amino -
Attractive
Gator's cousin
Oh, woe!
White poplar


Places a bet
Western Indians
Lasting 12 months
Remove
Hurried
Fibs
Lively party
Wailed
Conversation
Kind of derby


Curved path
Rang
Invented
Tightly packed
Climbing plants
Trailing foliage
Pursue
Martin or Madden
Peer
Hospital worker


Puzzle answer is on Page 20.


Carried
Pole on a ship
Barge
Time
Nest egg letters
Feline
Kimono sash


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Today's MOVIES

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A18 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.
POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
The post invites everyone
to come out for the yard sale
beginning at 9 a.m. today,
March 17. Call 352-447-4473.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
On March 30, the Legion
Riders will have its annual
poker run, which will begin
and end at the post. The
event is open to all motorcy-
cle organizations and regular
vehicles are welcome.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
On March 22, the auxiliary
will serve a fried fish dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the
post. Everyone is welcome.
Cost is $7. All profits support
the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary.
For more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war


veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Homemade beef stew din-
ner from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday,
March 22. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Everyone is welcome at the
St. Patrick's Day dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. today, March
17. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Information regarding any


post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
DAV Chapter 70 is offering
a $1,000 scholarship for the
2013 school year. The schol-
arship is offered to a disabled
veteran, veteran, survivor of a
veteran or dependent of a
veteran.
The recipient shall be en-
rolled in a full-time course of
instruction leading to a degree
program or to a vocational
skill. Selection shall be con-
ducted by the scholarship
committee and will be based
on the applications submitted.
The procedure requires that
applicants write a statement
detailing course of study,
goals and why they are de-
serving of this award.
Applications may be picked
up at guidance department of-
fices in area high schools, the
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute, Central Florida Com-
munity College guidance
offices, or by calling John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.
All applications must be re-
turned to the DAV Chapter at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34453 by March 31.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the


post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.


Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultra
rayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV


Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman is eligible to
join the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to vfw4252
@tampabay.rr.com. Call or
visit the post for regular
events, as well as meetings.
Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
bingo on Tuesdays and Satur-
days, and "Show Me the
Hand" from 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday at the post.
Call 352-726-5206.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men


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and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191
S. Florida Ave., Floral City.
For information about the post
and its activities, call 352-637-
0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who


has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food is
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at the
post home at 4375 Little Al
Point, Inverness. A fish fry will
be served on the third Friday.
The fish fry features fried and
baked haddock, baked po-
tato, baked beans, coleslaw,
tea, lemonade coffee and soft

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SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 A19


4


M*





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Divorces 2/25/13 to 3/3/13
Karen Antonelli, Lecanto
vs. Nicholas Antonelli,
Hernando
Joshua R. Forget vs.
Catrina L. Forget, Homosassa
Jarrod R. Hamilton vs.
Sarah Hamilton
Carl John Merz, Beverly
Hills vs. Jacqueline Merz
James Christopher
Scwieterman vs. Lissette
C. Scwieterman, Clermont
Lori Ann Walker, Fort
Worth, Texas vs. Jerry Dean
Walker, Hernando
Marriages 2/25/13 to 3/3/13
John Bradley Algeo,
Homosassa/Ruth Irene Algeo,
Homosassa
David Robert Andrus,
Citrus Springs/Diane Aline
Farthing, Citrus Springs
James Charles Boland,
Ocala/Karen Lynn Mikesell,
Ocala
Timothy Jerome Brown,
Beverly Hills/Laurie Ann


VETERANS
Continued from Page A19

drink for $8. Serving will begin
at 4:30 p.m. All musicians are
welcome, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music. Call Norm or Alice at
352-860-2981.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
The Navy Seabee Veter-
ans of America Auxiliary will
meet at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday,
March 19, at Citrus Hills Golf
& Country Club Rose and
Crown restaurant. The group
meets the third Tuesday
monthly this time and loca-
tion. For more information,
call Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565 or email geonan
5565@yahoo.com.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Post155.org.
Voiture and Cabane 1219
welcome everyone to a St.
Patrick's Day celebration be-
ginning at 5 p.m. today, March


Monsegur, Beverly Hills
Frank Joseph Catucci,
Inverness/Anna Julie Catucci,
Inverness
Clifford Joseph Corriveau,
Homosassa/Rita Son
Stimpfling, Homosassa
John Dudley Daniels,
Greensboro, Md./Tabitha Ann
Curtis, Pasadena, Calif.
Thomas Foster Graham,
Inverness/Margaret Mary Hall,
Inverness
Philip John Glowacki,
Inverness/Stacy Danielle
Mattingly, Inverness
Lavontae Antoine King,
Citrus Springs/Victoria Lee
Thorp, Citrus Springs
Nicholas Michael Sanchez,
Beverly Hills/Meghan Leigh
Hirsch, Beverly Hills
Lucas Allen Williams,
Citrus Springs/Sharon Marie
Sollazzo, Citrus Springs
Anthony Zucco,
Homosassa/Candace Sue
Melville, Homosassa


17, at the American Legion
Post 155. A corned beef and
cabbage dinner will be served
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. There
will be draft beer specials and
a full cash bar in a nonsmok-
ing environment in the post's
large dining hall.
Join members for lep-
rechaun races, 50/50
chances, party favors and en-
tertainment by Debi G. Pro-
ceeds will help fund nurses'
training, youth sports, child
welfare, Americanism, box
car, POW/MIA and Carville
Star. Tickets are on sale for a
$10 donation in the post
lounge. A limited number of
tickets will be sold at the door.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.


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For the RECORD


Wedding

Copsey/Funderburk
Sunni Rae Copsey of
Homosassa and James
Michael Funderburk of
Dunnellon exchanged
nuptial vows Nov. 10,
2012, at The Sleepy Hol- r ;
low in Floral City
The ceremony was
performed by Chaplain
Sal Viglione from The k
Wedding Chapel in
Inverness.
Toby LaPierre stood by
as best man and Karen
Baker was maid of honor.


Bonita and Edwin Mar-
tin of Hernando, grand-
parents, and Dawn Smith
of Mechanicsville, Md.,
mother, announce the en-
gagement of Delonte
Smith to Holly Dortch, the
daughter of Deborah and
Paul Dortch Jr of Suitland,
Md.
The prospective groom
is a graduate of Lecanto
High School. The bride-
elect is a graduate of Suit-
land High School in
Maryland.
The couple met and
graduated from The Amer-
ican Musical and Dra-
matic Academy in New
York. The prospective


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Indoor and Outdoor Spaces are Available.


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Cycling, Parks and
Recreation, Tennis, Golf,
Travel, Scuba Diving,
Skateboarding, Motor
Sports and other Outdoor
Activity Organizations
and Retailers will
be Exhibiting.


Call to Reserve Your Space
352-563-5592
Deadline to join March 25th
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C'


Sat., Mar. 23, Old Homosassa, FL

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groom is employed by Jul-
liard School in New York,
and his fiancee is em-
ployed by the Theatre Re-
freshment Co. in New
York.
They plan to marry
sometime next year and
reside in New York.


Engagement

Dortch/Smith


Mardi Gras


Homosassa Stle




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Supported by:

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A20 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


TOGETHER











SPORTS


Rays' Myers won't
make Opening Day
cut, fireworks explode
between Tampa and
Boston, and a pair of
Yankees squads get
blanked./B5

CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Recreational sports/B2
0 Basketball/B3
0 Hockey/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 Baseball/B5
0 Football/B5
0 Golf/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Downing extends lead at St. Pat's Invitational


Stallworth's balloon
hits power lines
MIAMI NFL free agent
Donte Stallworth was hospital-
ized Saturday with serious
burns after the hot air balloon
carrying him and two other
people crashed into power
lines, his agent said.
The 10-year NFL veteran
won't suffer any permanent
damage from the accident in
Homestead, said Drew Rosen-
haus, Stallworth's agent.
"He's going to be OK. He has
some bums, but he's going to be
fine," Rosenhaus said. "He will be
able to continue his NFL career."
Rosenhaus said one of the
passengers was Stallworth's
girlfriend, but he would not say
whether she was hurt.
The National Transportation
Safety Board had no immediate
information about the crash.
Stallworth played in one
game last season for the New
England Patriots, then went on
injured reserve with an ankle
injury. He has 35 career touch-
down catches.
WBC: Dominicans
beat Puerto Rico 2-0
MIAMI -Wandy Rodriguez
pitched six innings, and three
relievers completed a three-hitter
to help the unbeaten Dominican
Republic top Puerto Rico 2-0
Saturday.
Both teams had already
qualified for the semifinals in
San Francisco; the game merely
determined seedings. Puerto
Rico plays two-time defending
champion Japan Sunday night,
and the Dominicans face the
Netherlands Monday night, with
the winners advancing to the
championship game Tuesday.
Nadal beats Berdych
to reach final
INDIAN WELLS, Calif. -
Rafael Nadal rallied to beat
Tomas Berdych 6-4, 7-5 in the
semifinals of the BNP Paribas
Open on Saturday and reach
his fourth ATP Tour final in as
many events.
It was Nadal's 12th straight
win over Berdych. Nadal will be
seeking his third Indian Wells
title in Sunday's final, where
he'll play either top-ranked
Novak Djokovic or No. 7 seed
Juan Martin del Potro.
Team bus crashes;
pregnant coach dies
CARLISLE, Pa. -A road
trip by a college women's
lacrosse team came to a horri-
fying end Saturday when the
team bus veered off the Penn-
sylvania Turnpike and crashed
into a tree, killing a pregnant
coach, her unborn child, and
the driver, and injuring numer-
ous others, authorities said.
Seton Hill University team
players and coaches were
among the 23 people aboard
when the bus crashed just be-
fore 9 a.m. No other vehicle
was involved, and police could
not immediately say what
caused the accident.
Coach Kristina Quigley, 30,
was flown to a hospital but died
there of injuries.
Seton Hill, a Catholic school
of about 2,500 students, said a
memorial Mass was planned
for Sunday night on campus.
From wire reports


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
INVERNESS Mike
Downing consolidated
his lead while the first
flight had a shakeup at
the top on Day 2 of the


51st St. Pat's Invitational
Golf Tournament at In-
verness Golf & Country
Club on Saturday
With five birdies to go
along with an eagle on
Hole 16 off a 50-yard up-
shot, Downing's five-


Late push by Boynton

sends No. 13 UFpast

Tide and into finals
Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Florida finally showed it can win
a close game. All it takes is for
senior guard Kenny Boynton to
answer his coach's challenge.
Held scoreless for the first 25 min-
utes, Boynton had 11 straight points
during a critical 15-0 run Saturday as
No. 13 Florida erased a 10-point, second-
half deficit to beat Alabama 61-51 in a
Southeastern Conference semifinal.
Boynton said he benefited from
Gators coach Billy Donovan's halftime
message to him. The senior guard's sec-
ond-half surge helped Florida end its
season-long frustration in close games.
"He challenged me to come out and
play with confidence," Boynton said.
"Honestly he did challenge me, and I
think I tried to step up to it."
The top-seeded Gators (26-6) advanced
to the championship game Sunday against
No. 3 seed Mississippi (25-8), which de-
feated Vanderbilt 64-52 in the other
semifinal. Alabama (21-12), the tourna-
ment's No. 4 seed, will spend Sunday
See Page B3


under-par 67 earned him
medalist honors for the
second day in a row
while extending his lead
in the championship
flight to six strokes.
"Once again, I putted
extremely well," said


Miami's Julian Gamble (45) blocks a shot by
North Carolina State on Saturday during the
second half in the semifinals of the Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament in Greensboro, N.C.
Miami won 81-71.

'Canes to face UNC
Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C.
D urand Scott knocked down the shots to
turn away North Carolina State's best
pushes, and Shane Larkin provided the steady
floor leadership that kept ninth-ranked Miami
in control.
Scott scored a career-high 32 points to help
the Hurricanes beat the Wolfpack 81-71 on Sat-
urday in the ACC semifinals, earning the pro-
gram's first trip to the final.
See Page 13B4


Downing, who has a two-
day score of 137. "It's just
going my way and hope-
fully it continues.
There're some good
players behind me."
Jason Counsil fired
the day's second-best


round with a one-under-
par 71 and sits second in
the championship flight
with a two-day total of
143. Chris Bernhard
(147) followed up his 71
See Page B4



Busch


holds off


Larson


at finish

Bristol Busch's

second win
Associated Press
BRISTOL, Tenn. Kyle
arson's first chance to get a
ig win in NASCAR ended
vith him claiming a contro-
ersial win.
With a shot at grabbing his
rst Nationwide Series win
aturday, he wasn't going to
rake that same mistake again.
Especially not against Kyle
usch.
Larson stalked Busch over
ie closing laps around Bris-
1l Motor Speedway waiting
o make a move. It came as
iey closed in on the finish
ne, and Larson made a last-
asp push on the high side
iat fell just short as Busch
eld on for his second win of
the season.
* Results But in
/Page B3 chasing the
win the
ght way, the 20-year-old
arson cleaned up some of
le criticism that had followed
im from Daytona last month
after spinning C.E. Falk III
n the final lap of the "Battle
t the Beach" late-model race.
"You certainly want to try
o win races the right way,"
usch said. "He played it
mart today That was good
n his end."
Larson had his win over
alk in the back of his head
during the closing laps at
ristol as he looked for a
lace to try to grab the win.
though he has received
igh praise from Jeff Gor-
on, Tony Stewart and Kasey
Cane as NASCAR's next big
tar, his move in the "Battle
f the Beach" caused many
op Sprint Cup drivers to
openly criticize Larson.
"I was pretty aggressive at
ie "Battle of the Beach" and
didn't want to have any-
ling like that happen again
ind have more people look
t me," Larson said. "I don't
ace that way and didn't
ant to move (Busch). I
wanted to outrace him. I'd
ain a little more respect
iat way, and it made for a
better finish, I think."
Indeed it did, as both driv-
rs closed in on lapped cars
s they neared the finish
ne. Busch chose the low
ne and Larson went high,
ien tried to squeeze his way
ast Busch. Larson's car
bounced off of both the wall
nd Busch's car, but he was
ipped at the finish line by
usch by .023 seconds.


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Associated Press
Florida center Patric Young scores against Alabama on Saturday during the first half in the
semifinals of the Southeastern Conference tournament in Nashville, Tenn.





Gators rise


O00E5ZS









Gainesville doctor wins a frosty Shamrock Scamper
LARRY BUGG from the warmth ofhis bed. "Pretty a good run. It was definitely
Correspondent good time. I enjoyed it. This is TOP FINISHERS chilly I noticed this air was def-
the second year I've done it" Men's overall winner: Joel Rich, Gainesville, 17:23.4. initely cold on my lungs. You run
INVERNESS It could have "I run all the races," Smith Men's masters overall winner: Erik Smith, Beverly Hills, 18:52. flat for the first two miles and
been called the Shamrock Shiver said. "I am from Ohio originally Women's overall winner: Jill ian Felton, Dunnellon, 19:59. then you get hills. Inverness is
Temperatures hovered I like the race. It has a little bit Women's masters overall winner: Jennifer Grow, Inverness, 21:19 always a treat with the hills. I
around the 30s and 40s, but 232 of hills but not too many. We Top ten finishers 6. Brian Casalvieri, Beverly Hills, haven't had this many clothes on
hardy souls still registered for have cold mornings and nice 1. Joel Rich, Gainesville, 17:23.4. 20:04. for running in a long while. I de-
the 15th annual 5K Shamrock running weather." 2. Erik Smith, Beverly Hills, 18:52. 7. Alyssa Weber, Inverness, 20:22. cided to put more clothes on."
Scamper on a cold morning at Alyssa Weber was seventh 3. Israel Diaz, Inverness, 19:19. 8. Greg Buettner, Inverness, 20:36. Paul Dorey, 73, of Hernando,
Citrus High School. overall with a time of 20:22. A 4. Scott Arnold, Dade City, 19:25. 9. Jacob Hensley, Inverness, 20:39. just keeps on rolling along.
Dr. Joel Rich, 43 of sophomore at Citrus High, 5. Jillian Felton, Dunnellon, 19:59. 10. Joe Grinstead, Leesburg, 20:41. Dorey started running when a
Gainesville, won his second Weber is the reigning Chronicle doctor recommended he run to
straight Shamrock Scamper, Cross County Female Runner of "I needed to get my times back ing to get used to the orthotics." strengthen his heart. Dorey had
warming up to a 17:23 winning the Year. down since Igot injured," she said. Crystal River High teacher Laura suffered from heart attacks, but
time. Erik Smith of Beverly Hills She didn't have to run this "I've been injured since Christ- Wingate has become a regular at is healthy and strong today
was second with a 19:52. Smith race. She competed in the Doug mas. I damaged the tissue in my runs and triathlons. The Michi- "I am a little winded, but other
was the Male Masters winner. Patton Memorial Track and foot. It felt good. It was cold and gan native handled the cold and than that OK," he said. "The
"I just like competing," said Field Meet Tuesday at the same I liked it. It is healing. I have to finished 31st with a time of 23:02. colder the better. I always enjoy
Rich, explaining what lured him site. wear orthotics now. It is stretch- "It was great," she said. "I had it, win, lose or draw."


-. . . .l. '.---i

Special to the Chronicle
A group of men plays a game of softball at Bicentennial Park in Crystal River. Registration is ongoing for the next
season of men's softball. For information, call Maci Kepler at 352-527-7547.





Softball on deck


Interested in joining an adult
league? Form a team and join
today! Citrus County Parks &
Recreation Leagues include co-ed
sports such as softball, kickball and
beach volleyball. For the guys, we
offer flag football, softball and bas-
ketball. Call Maci at 352-527-7547 for
information.
Men's softball
Another season of men's softball is
just around the corner. Games are at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River
and are at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and
8:30 p.m. on Mondays. This season is
set to start April 1. Registration has
begun; for more information, call
Maci at 352-527-7547.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled to start


April 18. Games are played at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal River on
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. Registration
has begun; call Maci at 352-527-7547
for information.
Kickball
Our co-ed kickball league is for
adults 18 and older. It is a great way
to meet new people and get some ex-
ercise while having fun! Games are
at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., and 8:30 p.m.
at Bicentennial Park in Crystal
River, lasting an hour or nine in-
nings, whichever comes first. The
new season will begin April 17. Reg-
istration has begun; call Maci at 352-
527-7547 for information.
Flag football
The men's flag football is a league
for adults 18 and older. It is a very


fast-paced, physical game. The
league starts this Thursday, April 4.
We are looking to increase the number
of teams and expand competition. Call
Maci at 352-527-7547 for information.

Beach volleyball
Our first beach volleyball season
was extremely successful! We had 10
teams of four, and we are looking
forward to having even more this
season, which is set to begin April
23. Games are played at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River. Team fees, days and
times are dependent on how many
teams sign up. You don't need to be
an athlete to play; this league is
geared toward having fun. Registra-
tion has begun; call Maci at 352-527-
7547 for information.


Youth sports opportunities abound


P.L.A.Y.
Spaces are filling up fast
for Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's next session
of PLA.
The programs offered in
the upcoming session in-
clude basketball at the Cit-
rus County Resource
Center on Mondays or
Wednesday; flag football
at Bicentennial Park on
Tuesday or Thursdays;
and cheerleading at Bi-
centennial Park on Thurs-
days. The next session will
begin the week of April 8.
Boys and girls ages 3 to 5
are encouraged to join the
six-week program. Each
child receives age-appro-
priate sports equipment
and a team T-shirt.
Space is limited. Contact
Crysta Henry at 352-527-
7543 or visit www.citrus
countyparks.com.

Youth golf lessons
Spring youth golf lessons
will be held at Pine Ridge
Golf Course on Wednesday
evenings at 5:30 p.m. They
will begin March 27 and
run for five weeks. Chil-
dren ages 6 to 15 are eligi-
ble. The cost is $50 per
child. Instruction will be
given by golf pro Randy
Robbins and several vol-
unteers. Participants will
learn putting, driving,
chipping and etiquette.
Clubs provided; if your child
has a set, bring them along.
Contact Crysta Henry at
352-527-7543 or www.citrus
countyparks.com, or call
Randy Robbins at 352-746-
6177.


Super Series
baseball tourneys
The Key Training Cen-
ter's Who's on First and
Florida Premier
Prospects in conjunction
with Citrus County Parks
and Recreation are
proud to present Super
Series baseball tourna-
ments. Super Series
Baseball is one of the na-
tion's largest and fastest-
growing baseball
organizations. The "qual-
ifying" tournaments will
be held at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River on
March 30 and 31 and June
15 and 16. Age groups are
9U, 10U, 11U, 12U and
13U. 12U teams will have
an opportunity to win a
Super Series trip to the
National Championship,
broadcast on CBS Sports.
Call Tim Ramsay and
Adam Thomas at 352-287-
1415 or 786-877-5041.


Underwater
Egg Hunt
What better way is there
to spend a spring Saturday
than at Bicentennial Park
Pool? The event will be
held Saturday, March 23.
There will be two hunts for
different age groups: Chil-
dren ages 0-6 will hunt from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and chil-
dren ages 7 to 12 will hunt
from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Admission is free and
children will need to bring
their own basket and
swimming attire. An appli-
cation of sunscreen is
encouraged.
Eggs will be dispersed
throughout the Bicenten-
nial Park pool area. The
pool itself will be set up
with different levels of dif-
ficulty based on swimming
ability. There will also be a
land-based egg hunt de-
signed for younger chil-
dren and non-swimmers. A


toddler pool will be avail-
able. Eggs are turned in
after the hunt in exchange
for a gift bag filled with
knick-knacks and candy
Call Bicentennial Park
Pool at 352-795-1478, 352-
527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.
St. Paul soccer camp
St. Paul's Lutheran is
hosting a soccer camp dur-
ing spring break, March 25
to 29 at Central Ridge Dis-
trict Park on Lecanto
Highway The camp is for
children from ages 5 to 12
and will run from 8:30 a.m.
until noon. Children will
learn a variety of soccer
skills and the truths of
God's Word.
All kids should wear
shin guards. Cleats op-
tional. $45 per participant
Registration form avail-
able at www.stpauls.edu.
For information, call 352-
489-3027.


Know when to run


and when to rest


very season, my
neighbor harasses
me to get a flu shot
I had refused every year,
but this year she wore me
down. I thought I was im-
mune to the flu for 2013.
Not a chance. I have
chills, fever and aches in
every muscle and joint.
Even my scalp aches. I re-
ally want the aches from
running too long,
weightlifting too much or
paddling too far So here I
am; my wife has me se-
cluded in my bedroom
away from
everyone ex-
cept the dogs.
The big ques-
tion is: How do
you compete, -,
train or even 4
participate
with those nag-
ging symptoms Dr. Ron
- or should DOCT
you? ORD
The viruses
causing the common cold
or upper respiratory ill-
ness cause more disabil-
ity among athletes than
all other diseases and in-
juries combined. Upper
respiratory illness, colds
and flu can have an im-
pact on the lungs, heart
and muscle function that
may lead to prolonged
complications.
In addition, perform-
ance usually also de-
clines during periods of
illness. Being ill during
training or competition is
a distraction that can lead
to alterations in technique
which may result in addi-
tional injury
Most athletes and peo-
ple who work out rou-
tinely do not readily
adjust their training
schedules when feeling
really icky, nor do they
follow the age-old advice
to get more rest, go to bed
and hydrate. So if you are
going to work out while ill
with this virus, which hit
me like a truckload of
sweaty jockstraps, there
are some accommodations
that should be made.
Whenever you have a
fever above 100 degrees,
significant fatigue or
weakness, shortness of
breath, wheezing or a
rapid heartbeat, it is best
to hold off on training or
competing. The "below
the neck" rule can also be
applied. If you exhibit
symptoms from the neck
down, avoid exercise for a
few days.


If you have these signif-
icant symptoms, a poor
workout or performance
won't really help you at-
tain your goals. Unless it is
the Olympic trials finals,
the Florida state champi-
onship or the NCAA Final
Four, it makes it wise to
rest until such symptoms
improve. If it is the club's
golf tournament or the
local 5K, don't risk pneu-
monia. Don't forget: The
pros get paid big bucks to
play when ill.
Some exercise scien-
tists found the
common cold
has little effect
,, on athletic per-
formance and
that exercise
does not aggra-
vate symptoms
such as a runny
Joseph nose or watery
rOR'S eyes. These
ERS guys obviously
did not get hit
with the same bug I have.
The conclusion was that
a little sweating, when
you have a cold, can boost
the immune system's white
blood cell count and help
fight infection. In some
cases, participants even
felt better after working
out. Worth noting was that
this was the common cold
or rhinovirus. The partic-
ipants did note they felt
more tired.
What it comes down to
is timing. If you have sig-
nificant muscle and joint
aches, load up on ibupro-
fen and wait for the aches
to subside. Antibiotics come
into play with an illness
of more than a few days
and with the airways in the
lungs sounding like they
are on fire. Also, a nasal
discharge or coughing up
green-brown gunk warrants
the use of antibiotics.
While athletic activity
can strengthen the effect
of the immune cells that
protect us against viruses
and bacteria, it is only to
a point. Serious athletes
or anyone training at the
high end of their capacity,
such as for a marathon or
other endurance event,
may find their immune
defenses compromised
and have more illnesses.

Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand
and shoulder orthopedic
surgeon at SeaSpine
Orthopedic Institute,
may be reached at
rbjhand@cox.net


The rally will begin at Winding River Park,
Yankeetown. Participants will paddle down
the Withlacoochee to Bennett's Cree
return to Winding River P '


I (IIIOp 11


PERKINS
FINANCIAL GROUP


Fo inomain nreitrtoncllJckShoil
35-47612oreai arn drctr l ae ~ o


0lpm


B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DI
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)





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Celtics top 'Cats; 76ers upset Pacers


Associated Press
BOSTON Paul Pierce had 14
points, eight assists and six re-
bounds before sitting out the fourth
quarter, and the Boston Celtics won
their 11th straight at home, beating
the Charlotte Bobcats 105-88.
Avery Bradley scored 13 and
Courtney Lee had 12 points and five
assists as the Celtics beat the Bob-
cats for the first time in three meet-
ings this season. Two of the Bobcats'
NBA-low 14 wins came against the
Celtics, including a 100-74 blowout
in Charlotte on Tuesday
Kevin Garnett sat out with a
strained left thigh muscle, but the
Celtics had more than enough to
overwhelm the Bobcats this time.
Jeff Green and Brandon Bass
scored 10 apiece as all five starters
were in double figures.


76ers 98, Pacers 91
PHILADELPHIA- Spencer Hawes
had 18 points and career highs with 16
rebounds and seven blocked shots to
lead the Philadelphia 76ers to a 98-91
victory over the Indiana Pacers on Satur-
day night.
Jrue Holiday added 27 points and 12
assists to help the Sixers win for only the
third time in 15 games. While the Sixers
are one of the worst road teams in the
league, they are 19-17 at home.
The Sixers led by one at the end of
the third quarter, then opened the fourth
on a 19-4 run to put away the Pacers.
Evan Turner and Thaddeus Young each
contributed some lead-stretching buck-
ets in the fourth to put all five starters in
double figures.
Roy Hibbert had 25 points and 10 re-
bounds for the Pacers.


Wizards 127, Suns 105
WASHINGTON Martell Webster
scored a career-high 34 points and be-
came the Washington Wizards' first 30-
point scorer this season in a 127-105
victory over the Phoenix Suns.
John Wall added 17 points and 11 as-
sists as Washington won its fourth
straight at home and third straight overall
while setting its season high in scoring.
Emeka Okafor added 17 points and
10 rebounds as Washington snapped a
10-game losing streak to Phoenix, dating
to 2006.
Michael Beasley scored 21 points and
Goran Dragic added 12 points and 11
assists as the Suns lost their fourth
straight and their sixth of eight in March.
Phoenix now owns the worst record in
the Western Conference, a half-game
behind idle New Orleans.


V


~1.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning right wing Martin St. Louis con-
trols the puck Saturday ahead of Carolina Hurricanes
center Jordan Staal during the second period in Tampa.


Johnson, Palat


get firsts in win


over Hurricanes


Associated Press
Syracuse's James Southerland, left, and C.J. Fair fight for control of the ball with Louisville's Stephan Van Treese on
Saturday during the first half at the Big East conference tournament in New York.




Big end to Big East


Louisville keys second-half rally, dominates Syracuse 78-61


Associated Press

NEW YORK Peyton Siva had 11
points and eight assists to lead No. 4
Louisville to a 78-61 victory over No.
19 Syracuse on Saturday night, giv-
ing the Cardinals their second
straight Big East tournament title.
The Cardinals got their third title
by overcoming a 16-point deficit in
the second half- almost double the
previous record in a championship
game and they kept pouring it on
once they got the lead, going ahead
by as many as 18 points.
Second-seeded Louisville (29-5)
won its 10th straight game with its
defense, forcing Syracuse into 20
turnovers and keeping the Orange
off balance during the 24-3 run that
turned the 16-point deficit into a 56-
48 lead with 8:51 to play
No. 7 Kansas 70,
No. 11 Kansas State 54
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Kansas wasn't
about to share this title with Kansas State.
Jeff Withey had 17 points and nine re-
bounds, Perry Ellis and Naadir Tharpe
added 12 points each, and the seventh-
ranked Jayhawks pounded the No. 11
Wildcats 70-54 on Saturday night to
win their ninth Big 12 tournament
championship.
The top-seeded Jayhawks (29-5), who
shared the regular-season title with their
in-state rival, took a 24-16 lead at half-
time and then slowly stretched it in the
second half.
The Wildcats (27-7) struggled to
match Withey and Ellis in the paint.


No. 10 Ohio State 61,
No. 8 Michigan State
CHICAGO -Aaron Craft came on
strong in the second half to finish with 20
points and lead No. 10 Ohio State past
No. 8 Michigan State 61-58 in the semifi-
nals of the Big Ten tournament.
Craft keyed a seven-point spurt mid-
way through the second half that
stretched the lead to eight at 55-47, and
the Buckeyes (25-7) came away with the
win after the Spartans (25-8) pulled
within one. The victory avenged a loss in
last year's championship game.
It was 57-56 after Derrick Nix con-
verted a three-point play for Michigan
State with 1:54 remaining, but Craft hit a
free throw. Thomas grabbed a huge re-
bound off a missed 3 by Shannon Scott
to keep the possession going and scored
in the paint after a timeout to make it a
four-point game, sending the Buckeyes
back to the conference final.
No. 20 Memphis 91,
Southern Miss 79 (20T)
TULSA, Okla. Chris Crawford
scored 23 points, including the go-ahead
3-pointer in double overtime, and No. 20
Memphis beat Southern Miss 91-79 to
win its seventh Conference USA tourna-
ment title in the past eight years.
Crawford, the league's Sixth Man of
the Year, connected on a 3-pointer from
the left wing to put the top-seeded Tigers
(30-4) up 78-76 with 2:44 remaining. He
also had a jumper and a pair of free
throws in a 9-0 run by Memphis soon
after that finally put the game away.


No. 22 Wisconsin 68,
No. 3 Indiana 56
CHICAGO Ryan Evans scored 16
points to help No. 22 Wisconsin upset
No. 3 Indiana 68-56 in the semifinals of
the Big Ten tournament Saturday.
The Badgers allowed only seven
points after the top-seeded Hoosiers
pulled within one with 9:45 left. They
earned their 12th consecutive win
against Indiana, tying a record for any
school against the powerhouse program,
and will play Ohio State in Sunday's
final.
Ben Brust added 12 points for Wis-
consin (23-10), which has won three
straight and six of eight. Sam Dekker
scored nine of his 11 points in the sec-
ond half, including seven in a row during
one impressive burst.
No. 25 VCU 71, UMass 62
NEW YORK Troy Daniels made six
3-pointers to score 20 points, and No. 25
VCU advanced to the Atlantic 10 tourna-
ment title game in its first season in the
conference with a 71-62 win over UMass.
The Rams will face top-seeded Saint
Louis on Sunday in a matchup of the
league's top two teams during the regu-
lar season. The Billikens won 76-62 at
home in their one meeting Feb. 19.
VCU (26-7) forced 24 turnovers to
hold off a pesky Minutemen team that
upset Temple in Friday's quarterfinals.
Rob Brandenberg's 3-pointer as the
shot clock expired finally gave the Rams
some breathing room, putting them up
68-61 with a minute-and-a-half left.


Associated Press

TAMPA Tyler John-
son and Ondrej Palat both
scored their first NHL
goals, and the Tampa Bay
Lightning beat the Car-
olina Hurricanes 4-1 on
Saturday night
Nate Thompson and
Teddy Purcell also scored
for the Lightning, who
stopped a five-game los-
ing streak at home.
Tampa Bay is 3-8 in its
last 11 games.
Eric Staal scored the
only goal for the Hurri-
canes, who dropped to 3-7
against fellow Southeast
Division games.
Tampa Bay, with Math-
ieu Garon starting in goal
each time, has won all
three games this season
against the Hurricanes.
Tampa Bay has beaten
three Carolina goalies -
Justin Peters, Cam Ward
and Dan Ellis.
Johnson put the Light-
ning ahead 1-0 when he
beat Peters from the low
left circle with 9:06 left in
the first.
After Palat scored on a
redirection of Sami Salo's
shot from the blue line at
6:35 of the second, Thomp-
son made it 3-0 with 7:05
to go in the period with a
breakaway goal.
Purcell scored on a break-
away to put Tampa Bay up
4-0 at 3:54 of the third.
Staal ended Garon's
shutout bid during a
breakaway at 6:21.
Bruins 4, Capitals 1
BOSTON Nathan
Horton had a goal and two
assists, Milan Lucic set up
Boston's first two scores on
hustle plays behind the net
and the Bruins beat the
Washington Capitals 4-1.
David Krejci added a goal
and two assists, Rich Pever-
ley had a power-play goal
and Andrew Ference scored
his first of the season on the
eve of his 34th birthday for
the Bruins, who avenged a
frustrating loss against the
Capitals earlier this month.
Bruins backup goaltender
Anton Khudobin made 32
saves, and Lucic had a ca-
reer-high three assists.
Marcus Johansson was
credited with Washington's
goal when the puck caromed
into the net off Bruins de-
fenseman Johnny Boychuk.
Islanders 4,
Panthers 3
SUNRISE, Fla. Casey
Cizikas broke a third-period
tie, and the New York Is-
landers held on to beat the
Florida Panthers 4-3 after
blowing a three-goal lead in
the final frame.
Cizikas took a pass from
Colin McDonald from behind
the net and got it past goalie
Scott Clemmensen from the
left of the crease at 12:55.
Kyle Okposo, Radek Mar-
tinek and Brad Boyes also
scored.


Canadiens 2,
Devils 1
NEWARK, N.J. Big de-
fenseman Jarred Tinordi, in
his NHL debut, set up Tomas
Plekanec's tiebreaking goal
in the third period, and the
Montreal Canadiens extended
their winning streak to five
games with a 2-1 victory
over the New Jersey Devils.
Plekanec deflected a shot
by the 6-foot-6 son of former
NHL defenseman Mark
Tinordi past Johan Hedberg
at 6:49 after the goalie made
an ill-advised clearing at-
tempt from behind his net.
Tinordi got the puck above
the left circle and let it fly.
Colby Armstrong also
scored for Montreal, and
Carey Price made 32 saves.
The Canadiens moved into a
tie with Pittsburgh for the
most points in the Eastern
Conference.
Defenseman Peter Har-
rold scored for New Jersey.
Penguins 3,
Rangers 0
PITTSBURGH Marc-
Andre Fleury stopped 23
shots to break a tie for Pitts-
burgh's career shutout
record with 23, and the Pen-
guins beat the New York
Rangers 3-0 on Saturday for
their eighth straight victory.
Beau Bennett, Pascal
Dupuis and Tyler Kennedy
scored, and Dustin Jeffrey
added two assists as the
Penguins continued to domi-
nate the reeling Rangers.
Pittsburgh has won seven
consecutive meetings with
New York.
Fleury broke a tie with
Tom Barrasso for the club
shutout record.
Henrik Lundqvist made 24
saves for the Rangers, but
New York failed to score for
the third time this season.
The Rangers, the best team
in the Eastern Conference
last spring, trail Pittsburgh by
14 points with six weeks left
in the regular season.
Senators 4,
Sabres 3 (OT)
BUFFALO, N.Y Kyle
Turris scored his second
goal 3:54 into overtime to
give the Ottawa Senators a
4-3 victory over the slumping
Buffalo Sabres on Saturday.
Patrick Wiercioch had a
goal and assist, and Chris
Phillips also scored for Ottawa,
which won for only the second
time in eight games (2-2-4).
The Senators also ex-
tended their string of games
decided by one goal to 11,
which is one short of match-
ing the NHL record set by
Chicago during the 1997-98
season.
Drew Stafford scored
twice, and Mike Weber also
scored for Buffalo, 1-2-3 in
its past six games.
Turris' goal came on the
power play, after Christian
Ehrhoff was penalized for in-
terference.


GATORS
Continued from Page B1

waiting to learn its fate
from the NCAA tourna-
ment selection committee.
Most mock brackets had
Alabama on the wrong side
of the NCAA tournament
bubble at the start of the
week. Alabama went 12-6
in conference play during
the regular season but hurt
its cause by going 1-5 in
December, including home
nonconference losses to
Mercer and Tulane.


"I'll just go to sleep,
wake up tomorrow and see
what they choose," Ala-
bama guard Trevor Lacey
said. "Whatever they
choose, we go from there."
Boynton scored all 16 of
his points during a 7-
minute span. Patric Young
had 13 points and nine re-
bounds for the Gators.
Mike Rosario added 10
points. Trevor Releford
scored 12 points, and Nick
Jacobs and Lacey each
added 11 for Alabama.
Alabama led 37-27 with
16:05 remaining before
Florida reeled off 15


straight points over the
next 5 minutes. In the lone
regular-season meeting
between the two teams,
Florida rallied from eight
points down in the final
12 1/2 minutes to win 64-52
on March 2 in Gainesville.
That 64-52 result repre-
sented Florida's narrowest
margin of victory all sea-
son before Saturday The
Gators entered Saturday
leading the nation in scor-
ing margin (plus-18.9), but
they're 0-5 in games decided
by six points or fewer.
This game started out as
a defensive struggle.


Seven minutes into the
game, Florida led 6-2.
But after missing four of
its first five shots and com-
mitting four turnovers in
the first 5 1/2 minutes, Al-
abama's offense found a
rhythm. The Crimson Tide
shot 55 percent (11 of 20) in
the first half against a
Florida team that hadn't
allowed anyone to shoot 50
percent or better this
season.
Alabama stayed hot
early in the second half
and extended its lead to
37-27 when Releford sank
two free throws with 16:05


remaining.
That's when Boynton
took over the game.
Boynton entered the day
shooting just 38.9 percent,
making him a subject of
criticism for much of his
senior season. Boynton
shot 1 of 7 and scored two
points Friday in an SEC
quarterfinal victory over
LSU, but he didn't get
down on himself and
maintained the support of
his teammates.
First, the senior guard
made a pair of free throws
to cut Alabama's lead to
37-31. Next, he made a


driving basket. Then,
Boynton sank a 3-pointer.
He followed that up with a
fast-break layup that gave
Florida the lead. Boynton
closed this stunning flurry
by going into the paint and
making a shot off the glass
that extended Florida's
advantage to 40-37 with
12:02 remaining.
Boynton added a basket
that put Florida ahead 47-
40 with 9:40 left and a 3-
pointer that made 50-42
with 8:11 remaining. Ala-
bama wouldn't cut the
margin below four points
the rest of the way


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013




Jeff Foxworthy's Grit
Chips 300 results
Saturday at Bristol Motor Speedway,
Bristol, Tenn.
Lap length: .533 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (13) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 300 laps, 144.1 rat-
ing, 0 points, $51,450.
2. (12) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 300, 111.2, 42,
$46,634.
3. (14) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 300, 102.3, 41,
$28,800.
4. (3) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 300, 105.9, 40,
$32,416.
5. (7) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 300, 120.4, 0,
$25,575.
6. (4) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 300, 112, 38,
$21,900.
7. (11) Chris Buescher, Ford, 300, 90.6, 37,
$21,535.
8. (1) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 300, 111.6, 37,
$31,461.
9. (16) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 300, 85.4, 35,
$27,841.
10. (8) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 300, 96.5, 34,
$28,766.
11. (2) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 300, 92.1, 33,
$27,291.
12. (10) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 300, 90.8, 33,
$27,191.
13. (9) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 300, 83.2, 31,
$27,091.
14. (15) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 300, 83.3, 30,
$27,041.
15. (6) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 299, 113.1, 0,
$20,850.
16. (18) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 299, 73.7, 28,
$27,541.
17. (34) John WesTownley, Toyota, 299, 64.1, 0,
$20,200.
18. (17) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 299, 73.2, 26,
$26,816.
19. (26) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 298, 64.6, 25,
$26,716.
20. (29) Scott Riggs, Ford, 298, 59.4, 0,
$27,341.
21. (24) Eric McClure, Toyota, 296, 53.2, 23,
$26,591.
22. (27) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 296, 53.6, 22,
$26,541.
23. (33) MikeWallace, Chevrolet, 296, 53.7, 21,
$26,491.
24. (20) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 293, 60.4, 20,
$26,441.
25. (39) Blake Koch, Toyota, 292, 40.8, 19,
$26,866.
26. (31) Dexter Stacey, Ford, 292, 43.4, 18,
$19,650.
27. (37) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, 291,
37.9, 17, $26,266.
28. (36) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, 285, 35.2,16,
$26,191.
29. (38) Brad Teague, Toyota, 271, 34.1, 15,
$26,141.
30. (35) Jason White, Toyota, accident, 261,
44.7, 14, $25,891.
31. (25) Hal Martin, Toyota, accident, 158, 56,
13, $25,386.
32. (30) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Ford, accident, 157,
51.8, 12, $25,251.
33. (22) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, accident,
122, 62.4, 11, $25,136.
34. (19) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, accident,
104, 60.2, 10, $25,101.
35. (32) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, accident, 102,
38, 9, $18,405.
36. (5) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, engine, 85, 57.5,
8, $24,691.
37. (28) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 38, 29.7,
7, $16,990.
38. (21) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, vibration, 7, 34.2,
0, $16,931.
39. (23) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, ignition, 7,
30.3, 5, $16,830.
40. (40) Michael McDowell, Toyota, handling, 2,
29.2, 0, $16,805.
Race statistics
Average Speed of RaceWinner: 81.872 mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 57 minutes, 11 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.023 seconds.
Caution Flags: 8 for 54 laps.
Lead Changes: 5 among 5 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.AlIgaier 1-62; T.Bayne 63-75;
K.Busch 76-167; B.Keselowski 168-193; K.Har-
vick 194-236; K.Busch 237-300.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps
Led): K.Busch, 2 times for 156 laps; J.Allgaier,
1 time for 62 laps; K.Harvick, 1 time for 43 laps;
B.Keselowski, 1 timefor26 laps;T.Bayne, 1 time
for 13 laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. S.Hornish Jr., 167; 2. J.AII-
gaier, 145; 3. B.Scott, 142; 4. R.Smith, 141; 5.
B.Vickers, 137; 6. A.Dillon, 133; 7. TBayne, 128;
8. A.Bowman, 120; 9. K.Larson, 118; 10.
E.Sadler, 116.



Tampa Bay par scores
Saturday at Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club,
Copperhead Course, Palm Harbor, Fla.
Purse: $5.5 million, Yardage: 7,340, Par: 71
Third round
Kevin Streelman 73-69-65-207 -6
Justin Leonard 71-69-67-207 -6
George Coetzee 71-68-68 -207 -6
Jim Furyk 72-69-67-208 -5
Ben Kohles 72-67-69-208 -5
Greg Chalmers 71-68-69-208 -5
Tag Ridings 68-70-70-208 -5
Luke Donald 70-72-67-209 -4
BryceMolder 72-69-68-209 -4
Jordan Spieth 72-68-69-209 -4
Brian Harman 67-70-72-209 -4
Shawn Stefani 65-70-74 -209 -4
Roberto Castro 69-73-68-210 -3
Justin Hicks 70-71-69 -210 -3
Sergio Garcia 71-67-72-210 -3
Harris English 68-69-73-210 -3
Jimmy Walker 73-68-70-211 -2
Cameron Tringale 71-70-7-211 2
MattKuchar 72-68-71 -211 -2
Jason Dufner 71-66-74-211 -2
Stewart Cink 76-68-68-212 -1
Rory Sabbatini 73-71-68-212 1
Robert Streb 73-70-69-212 -1
Stephen Ames 72-71-69-212 -1
Dicky Pride 69-73-70 -212 -1
Nick Watney 707270-212 -
Pat Perez 71-71-70 -212 -1
Scott Langley 72-70-70 -212 -1
Erik Compton 75-65-72-212 -1
James Driscoll 74-66-72-212 -1
Scott Brown 70-70-72-212 -1
PeterTomasulo 69-68-75-212 -1
K.J. Choi 69-67-76-212 -1
Adam Scott 70-66-76 -212 -1
Lucas Glover 69-7470-213 E
Webb Simpson 73-69-71 -213 E
Boo Weekley 72-70-71 -213 E
Ryan Palmer 71-70-72 -213 E
Brian Davis 71-69-73-213 E
Jerry Kelly 70-70-73-213 E
Jeff Overton 72-72-70-214 +1
George McNeill 72-72-70-214 +1
ChezReavie 69-75-70- 214 +1
Graham DeLaet 73-71-70-214 +1
David Lingmerth 74-70-70-214 +1
Charlie Wi 71-72-71 -214 +1
Sang-Moon Bae 73-7071-214 +1
VijaySingh 69-73-72-214 +1
Tim Herron 71-71-72-214 +1
John Rollins 76-68-71 -215 +2


John Mallinger 74-70-71 -215 +2
Robert Garrigus 72-71-72 -215 +2
Aaron Baddeley 72-71-72 -215 +2
Troy Kelly 72-70-73 -215 +2
Martin Flores 73-69-73-215 +2
Marc Leishman 70-70-75-215 +2
Brendon de Jonge 71-73-72 -216 +3
J.J. Henry 70-74-72-216 +3
Jesper Parnevik 72-72-72- 216 +3
Jonas Blixt 75-69-72 -216 +3
Chris Stroud 75-67-74 -216 +3
Stuart Appleby 74-68-74 -216 +3
Sean O'Hair 73-68-75-216 +3
Martin Laird 73-71-73 -217 +4
Brian Stuard 75-68-74 -217 +4
Brendan Steele 68-75-74 -217 +4
Colt Knost 71-72-74 -217 +4
Billy Horschel 70-73-74-217 +4
Jason Day 70-72-75 -217 +4
Geoff Ogilvy 69-72-76 -217 +4
Richard H. Lee 72-72-74- 218 +5
Daniel Summerhays 71-73-74 -218 +5
Angel Cabrera 74-69-75 -218 +5
Trevor Immelman 70-73-75 -218 +5
Charley Hoffman 71-70-77-218 +5
Josh Teater 74-69-77 220 +7
Troy Matteson 71-72-77-220 +7


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
S CASH 3 (early)

CASH 3 (late)
4-4-6

PLAY 4 (early)
9-5-8-1
PLAY 4 (late)
8-0-3-4

FANTASY 5
5orida 5-8-20- 24- 25

POWERBALL LOTTERY
3-7-21-44-53 1 6- 24- 27 33- 53
POWER BALL XTRA
16 5


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Food City 500. From Bristol
Motor Speedway in Bristol, Tenn.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Gatornationals. From Gainesville, Fla.
(same-day tape)
BASEBALL
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Chicago Cubs at Oakland Athletics. From
Phoenix Municipal Stadium in Phoenix
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (CBS) Atlantic 10 Tournament final: Teams TBA. From
Brooklyn, N.Y.
1 p.m. (ABC) SEC Tournament final: Florida vs. Mississippi.
From Nashville, Tenn.
1 p.m. (CW) ACC Tournament final: Miami (FL) vs. North
Carolina. From Greensboro, N.C.
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament final: Teams TBA. From
Chicago
3:30 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament final: Teams TBA. From
Chicago
6 p.m. (CBS) NCAA basketball championship selection show
NBA BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Orlando Magic at Milwaukee Bucks
1 p.m. (SUN) Miami Heat at Toronto Raptors
3:30 p.m. (ABC) New York Knicks at Los Angeles Clippers
3:30 a.m. (ESPN) New York Knicks at Los Angeles Clippers
(same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Avantha Masters, final
round. From New Delhi, India. (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Tampa Bay Championship, final
round. From Palm Harbor
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Tampa Bay Championship, final
round. From Palm Harbor
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: RR Donnelley Founders Cup, final
round. From Phoenix
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Champions: Toshiba Classic,
final round. From Newport Beach, Calif. (same-day tape)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Boston Bruins at Pittsburgh Penguins
7 p.m. (NBCSPT) Buffalo Sabres at Washington Capitals
SOCCER
1 p.m. (ESPN2) Houston Dynamo at FC Dallas
2 p.m. (UNI) Futbol Mexicano Primera Division Pumas de la
U.N.A.M. vs Club Leon
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
4 p.m. (FSNFL) East Carolina at Alabama-Birmingham (same-
day tape)
TENNIS
3 p.m. (ESPN2) ATP: BNP Paribas Open: men's and women's
finals. From Indian Wells, Calif.

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
New York 38 25 .603
Brooklyn 38 27 .585
Boston 36 29 .554
Toronto 26 40 .394
Philadelphia 25 40 .385
Southeast Division
W L Pct
x-Miami 50 14 .781
Atlanta 36 29 .554
Washington 23 42 .354
Orlando 18 48 .273
Charlotte 14 52 .212
Central Division
W L Pct
Indiana 40 26 .606
Chicago 36 29 .554
Milwaukee 32 32 .500
Detroit 23 44 .343
Cleveland 22 44 .333
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
x-San Antonio 51 16 .761
Memphis 44 20 .688
Houston 36 30 .545
Dallas 31 34 .477
New Orleans 22 44 .333
Northwest Division
W L Pct
x-Oklahoma City 49 17 .742
Denver 45 22 .672
Utah 33 32 .508
Portland 30 34 .469
Minnesota 22 41 .349
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 45 21 .682
Golden State 37 30 .552
L.A. Lakers 35 32 .522
Sacramento 23 43 .348
Phoenix 22 45 .328
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's games
Toronto 92, Charlotte 78
L.A. Lakers 99, Indiana 93
Washington 96, New Orleans 87
Atlanta 107, Phoenix 94
Houston 108, Minnesota 100
Oklahoma City 117, Orlando 104
Dallas 96, Cleveland 86
Miami 107, Milwaukee 94
Denver 87, Memphis 80
Chicago 113, Golden State 95
Saturday's games
Washington 127, Phoenix 105
Boston 105, Charlotte 88
Philadelphia 98, Indiana 91
San Antonio 119, Cleveland 113
Detroit at Portland, 10p.m.
Memphis at Utah, 10p.m.
Sunday's games
Orlando at Milwaukee, 1 p.m.
Miami at Toronto, 1 p.m.
New York at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Golden State at Houston, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.


Pittsbu
New J
N.Y. Is
N.Y. Ra
PhiladE


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF
irgh 29 21 8 0 42106
jersey 29 1310 6 32 72
landers 28 1312 3 29 83
angers 27 1312 2 28 65
elphia 29 1315 1 27 79


Montreal
Boston
Ottawa
Toronto
Buffalo


Winnipeg
Carolina
Tampa Bay
Washington
Florida


Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF
28 19 5 4 42 90
26 19 4 3 41 80
28 14 8 6 34 68
29 1512 2 32 86
28 1014 4 24 73
Southeast Division
GP W LOT PtsGF
28 1511 2 32 76
27 1511 1 31 82
28 1215 1 25 92
27 1115 1 23 73
29 716 6 20 70


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 28 23 2 3 49 95 60
St. Louis 28 1610 2 34 85 80
Detroit 28 13 10 5 31 73 73
Columbus 29 11 12 6 28 64 76
Nashville 28 11 11 6 28 65 74
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Minnesota 27 1510 2 32 70 68
Vancouver 26 13 7 6 32 75 72
Calgary 26 11 11 4 26 75 87
Edmonton 27 1011 6 26 66 79
Colorado 27 1013 4 24 69 84
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 27 20 3 4 44 90 66
Los Angeles 26 1410 2 30 76 69
Phoenix 28 1311 4 30 77 78
San Jose 26 12 8 6 30 62 64
Dallas 27 1212 3 27 69 81
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's games
Philadelphia 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Calgary 6, Nashville 3
Detroit 3, Edmonton 2, OT
Saturday's games
Winnipeg 5, Toronto 4, SO
Columbus 1, Phoenix 0, SO
Boston 4, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 3, N.Y Rangers 0
Ottawa 4, Buffalo 3, OT
Minnesota 6, Colorado 4
Montreal 2, New Jersey 1
Tampa Bay 4, Carolina 1
N.Y Islanders 4, Florida 3
St. Louis 2, Anaheim 1, OT
Chicago 8, Dallas 1
Detroit at Vancouver, 10p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's games
Boston at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Buffalo at Washington, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m.


Spring training
glance
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Kansas City 16 4 .800
Baltimore 12 5 .706
Seattle 14 7 .667
Detroit 13 8 .619
Tampa Bay 13 8 .619
Cleveland 12 8 .600
Chicago 10 7 .588
Boston 12 9 .571
Minnesota 11 10 .524
Texas 10 10 .500
Oakland 8 10 .444
Toronto 8 12 .400
Houston 7 11 .389
NewYork 8 14 .364
Los Angeles 4 12 .250
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Colorado 10 8 .556
San Diego 12 10 .545
St. Louis 10 9 .526
Atlanta 12 11 .522
Washington 9 9 .500
San Francisco 8 9 .471
Chicago 10 12 .455
Philadelphia 9 11 .450
Miami 8 10 .444
Milwaukee 8 10 .444
NewYork 7 9 .438
Pittsburgh 9 12 .429
Arizona 8 11 .421
Los Angeles 7 11 .389
Cincinnati 6 14 .300
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's games
Detroit 4, Toronto 2
St. Louis 5, Washington 1
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 2
Tampa Bay 3, Philadelphia 1,10 innings
Pittsburgh 3, Houston 2
N.Y. Yankees 7, Miami 3
Baltimore 3, Boston (ss) 3, tie, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 15, Chicago Cubs 3
San Francisco 5, Texas 2
Kansas City (ss) 7, San Diego (ss) 5
San Diego (ss) 8, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 7
Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 5
Milwaukee 4, Cleveland 3
Arizona 2, Oakland 2, tie
Boston (ss) 5, Minnesota 0
Colorado 5, Cincinnati 1
L.A. Dodgers (ss) 8, Kansas City (ss) 1
Saturday's games
Detroit 3, St. Louis 0
Baltimore 3, Toronto 1
Minnesota 2, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 0
Boston 9, Tampa Bay 2
Miami 4, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago Cubs (ss) 5, Texas (ss) 1
Chicago White Sox 11, Oakland (ss) 5
Texas (ss) 4, L.A. Dodgers 0
Oakland (ss) 13, L.A. Angels 13, tie
Chicago Cubs (ss) 8, Kansas City 3
Milwaukee 9, Cincinnati (ss) 9, tie
Cincinnati (ss) 7, San Francisco (ss) 6
San Diego 10, Arizona 6
Seattle 5, Colorado 2
Atlanta 4, N.Y.Yankees (ss) 0
Houston vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., late
San Francisco (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear,
Ariz., late
Sunday's games
Baltimore (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, 1:05p.m.
St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Detroit at Lakeland, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, 1:35 p.m.
San Diego vs. LA. Angels atTempe, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Las Vegas,
Nev., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Kansas City at Surprise,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at Glendale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. Arizona at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Colorado vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
6:15 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Seattle vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 9:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
10:10 p.m.


Men's basketball scores
America East Conference
Championship
Albany (NY) 53, Vermont 49
Atlantic 10 Conference
Semifinals
Saint Louis 67, Butler 56
VCU 71, UMass 62
Atlantic Coast Conference
Semifinals
Miami 81, NC State 71
North Carolina 79, Maryland 76
Big East Conference
Championship
Kansas 70, Kansas St. 54
Big Ten Conference
Semifinals
Ohio St. 61, Michigan St. 58
Wisconsin 68, Indiana 56
Conference USA
Championship
Memphis 91, Southern Miss. 79, 20T
Mid-American Conference
Championship
Akron 65, Ohio 46
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
Championship
NC A&T 57, Morgan St. 54
Mountain West Conference
Championship
New Mexico 63, UNLV 56
NCAA Division II
First Round
Ala.-Huntsville 60, Christian Brothers 58
Augustana (SD) 79, Upper Iowa 65
Barton 81, Montevallo 73
Bellarmine 67, Indianapolis 61
Benedict 68, Eckerd 65
Bridgeport 77, St. Anselm 66
Drury 89, Findlay 77
Florida Southern 94, North Alabama 80
Fort Lewis 95, Adams St. 73
Franklin Pierce 90, Bloomfield 78
Indiana (Pa.) 76, East Stroudsburg 68
Lincoln Memorial 82, UNC Pembroke 80


SC-Aiken 94, Belmont Abbey 76
Slippery Rock 69, Winston-Salem 67
St. Mary's (Texas) 75, Cameron 57
West Liberty 114, Bowie St. 82
Wingate 65, Limestone 60
NCAA Division III
Third Round
Amherst 93, Randolph-Macon 76
Cabrini 70, Wooster 63
Middlebury 73, Ithaca 72
St. Mary's (Md.) 84, Morrisville St. 66
St. Thomas (Minn.) 63, Calvin 62
Williams 84, Va. Wesleyan 75
Southeastern Conference
Semifinals
Florida 61, Alabama 51
Mississippi 64, Vanderbilt 52
Southwestern Athletic Conference
Championship
Southern U. 45, Prairie View 44


MIAMI
Continued from Page B1


Larkin added 23 for the top-seeded Hurri-
canes (26-6), who before Saturday had reached
the ACC semifinals just once before as a No. 12
seed making a surprise run before falling to
eventual national champion Duke in 2010. Now
they're heading to Sunday's final to face third-
seeded North Carolina, which beat Maryland in
the other semifinal.
"We're a very hungry team, and we want more
and more," Larkin said. "We're not satisfied with
winning the regular season. We want the ACC
championship, and then eventually we want to
make the national championship game. We're
hungry, and we're not going to settle for anything
less."
Miami led all day and by 19 points late in the
first half against the fifth-seeded Wolfpack (24-
10), who got within six after halftime but could-
n't dig out of that big hole.
Scott had a lot to do with that. The senior
guard went 12 for 18 from the field and 5 for 8
from 3-point range to keep draining the energy
from a home-state crowd wearing plenty of red.
Scott scored 21 points on 10-for-15 shooting as
a freshman in the 2010 semifinal loss to the Blue
Devils, then turned in an even bigger perform-
ance in the Greensboro Coliseum on Saturday
"When I walk into this building, there's a lot of
security guards, a lot of media people, a lot of
people that work for the ACC I think they re-
member me," Scott said. "They always come up
to me like, 'You remember this building and how
(you did) your freshman year' and things like
that.... But I just tell them that was the past. That
game can't win us the game today, yesterday or
tomorrow. I've just got to go out there and do
what I need to do for my team to win, and that's
what I did tonight."
Scott scored 19 points in the first half, the last
coming on two free throws for Miami's biggest
lead at 39-20. N.C. State cut the deficit to 12 at
half then 50-44 on Scott Wood's 3-pointer with 12
minutes left to re-energize a crowd that had gone
silent with Miami's early dominance.
But Scott answered with a straightaway 3,
holding his release long after the ball swished
through the net. Then Larkin banked in a pullup
shot to push the margin back to double figures.
Scott did it again a few minutes later, hitting a
3 over freshman Rodney Purvis as the shot clock
wound down then holding his form again as the
Hurricanes went up 13 with 712 minutes left.
That was his last basket before fouling out with
1:53 left.
"I think at the start I didn't do a good enough
job of pressuring him," Wood said. "I think we
kind of let him kind of get in his comfort zone and
... for any player, once they see a couple of shots
go down, they're tough to guard."
The Wolfpack twice more got the deficit to sin-
gle digits in the final 2 minutes, but Larkin hit
four straight free throws to answer those baskets
then rebounded C.J. Leslie's missed jumper that
signaled an end to the Wolfpack's run.




ST. PAT'S
Continued from Page B1


on Friday with a 76 to stand at third place behind
Council.
Steve Czupka (77 on Day 2), Tom Hendrick and
Donald Rogers are knotted for the lead at 153 in
the first flight. Hendrick, winner of this flight a
year ago, tied for a flight-low of 74 with Evan
Byrd to improve his score by five shots between
the two days, while Rogers carded a 75 to slide
into the three-way tie.
Mike Russ (two-day score of 147) held his lead
in the second flight with a 75. He heads into the
final day with a four-stroke edge on Mike Kelly
(151), who matched Russ' 75 on Saturday Kelly
Brady (156), of Crystal River, climbed into the
second flight's top 3 by bettering his Friday score
by two shots in scoring a 77.
"I putted a little better than I did the first day,"
Brady said. "This is Mike Russ' golf course -
he's local here so I don't know the greens as
well as he does. This year the greens are dried
out and fast, so if you get in the wrong position
it's hard to make a putt or get close."
John Martin (80 on Saturday) and Jason Russ
(86 on Saturday) are in a tight struggle to claim
the third flight with two-day scores of 159 and
160, respectively Three golfers trail that pair in
third place with 167s.
Dan Keegan (155), one of 18 golfers from Mas-
sachusetts in the tournament, narrowly leads
Dan Wilson (156) and Pat Fitzpatrick (157) in the
fourth flight after firing a 78. Fitzpatrick was low-
est on the day in the flight with a 77, while Wilson
carded a 79 to follow up his 77 on Friday
"I've been playing this for 14 years and I'm
doing a lot better than I've ever done," said Kee-
gan, who scored a 77 on Friday "I did a lot more
bumping-and-running today, and getting the ball
up and down, which is how I score well. I've also
putted well no three-putts and no double-bo-
geys in the two days."
Perry Thomas heads the fifth flight at 175 after
a round of 87 Saturday He's closely followed by
Ron Comperchio (176 total) and Brian Fitz-
patrick (177), who worked his way into the top 3
with a flight-low of 85 on the day
Consistent play by Raymond Jarzyna has
earned him a flight-low of 169 after two days in
the sixth group. But Elmer Lewis (170), Gary
Bennett (171) and Frank Fama (172), who fired a
flight-low of 83 on Saturday, are breathing down
Jarzyna's neck.
"Just steady," Jarzyna said of his performance.
"Very steady except for a triple- and double(-


bogey). I played with some nice people that kept
me on my toes. Tomorrow is the big day It's going
to be close. It should be fun."
Tom Benson has a pair of 86s to lead second-
place Vinnie George by five strokes with a 172 in
the seventh flight.
Larry Wood's 88 moved him into first place in
the eighth flight with a two-day total of 179 six
shots ahead of Steven Strong (95 on Saturday).
Jack Sasso (92 on Saturday) sits at third with a
two-day score of 189.
The ninth flight, which is scored by combining
the golfers' handicap score with their tourna-
ment points, is led by Raymond Oates (89 total
points). Nick Nicholas (95) and Jim Cochrane (99)
are second and third, respectively
The fifth through ninth flights tee off at 8:30
a.m. today, St. Pat's final day, followed by the
championship through fourth flights at 1:30 p.m.


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pirates hold fast, stun visiting Indians 4-2


DONALD
WHITAKER II
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER By
the end of the afternoon,
Crystal River High School
(4-8) proved why it should
be a team to watch in Class
5A District 7, beating the
visiting Fort White Indians
4-2 in thrilling fashion.
Fort White, currently
atop the Class 4A District 5


standings, lead off the game
with a walk and a pair of
doubles. Pirates pitcher
Mason Pateracki was
quickly able to stanch the
bleeding, though, sitting
down the next four batters
and allowing only two hits
with three strikeouts over
the next two innings.
The Pirates offense re-
sponded with a three-run
attack at the bottom of the
first. Senior left fielder


Dallas Baldner led off the
Pirates' half of the inning,
being hit by a pitch before
being sent home on a line-
drive double down the left-
field line by Michael Kidd.
Two errors by the Indians
in the bottom of the first
would bring in two more
runs for Crystal River.
From there Crystal River's
defense took control. After
a quiet second inning in
which neither team's pitcher


allowed a runner to pass
second base, the Pirates
defense came up big in the
third. After Fort White
started off the inning with
a hit, Baldner made a diving
catch on a ball hit by Indi-
ans starting pitcher Kevin
Dupree which prevented a
run from scoring and seemed
to give Pateracki a charge,
as the Crystal River starter
threw back-to-back strike-
outs to end the inning.


In the top of the fourth,
Fort White had two run-
ners on first and second
with no outs before the Pi-
rates defense pulled off
another crucial defensive
stop. After pitcher Miller
Henderson came in and
walked the first two bat-
ters, Crystal River put
starting third basemen
Jordan Humphrey on the
mound. On a pitch that
was grounded to the short-


stop, Crystal River pulled
off an improbable 6-4-3
double play to preventing
the runner rounding third
from scoring. With the ex-
ception of putting a runner
on third in the sixth, it was
the last time the Indians
came close to scoring.
Crystal River will next
take the field Tuesday to
play district foe Nature
Coast Tech in Crystal
River.


Myers won't make cut


Rays send hot prospect back to minors; tempers fare between Rodriguez, Aceves


Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE -
Long after they nearly
came to blows, Sean Ro-
driguez still didn't like
what Alfredo Aceves had
to say
The Red Sox right-hander
hit the Rays' second base-
man in the shoulder with
a pitch in the fifth inning
of Boston's 9-2 win over
Tampa Bay on Saturday.
Benches briefly cleared
and Rodriguez had to be
held back as the pair en-
gaged in a shouting match.
"I said it was a split-
finger, my bad," Aceves
said. "I was not trying to
hit him obviously It was a
3-2 game, and you don't
want anybody on base. I
understand he was proba-
bly upset or frustrated be-
cause he got hit, and in the
last at-bat he got a homer"
Rodriguez hit a two-run
shot in the third inning be-
fore coming up with one
out and none on in the
fifth. He wasn't buying
Aceves' explanation.
"He says it got away
from him. I don't know if
I'd agree or disagree, but I
was just kind of upset
when he was still jawing
when I got to first base,"
said Rodriguez, who had
two of the Rays' eight hits.
"He was very apologetic
until I got to first. Then it
was a little different.
"It's just another good
reason for... when we play
Boston. I guess it just
keeps things a little fired
between us, which is
cool," Rodriguez added.
Aceves gave up six
hits and two runs in 4 1-3
innings.
Both managers down-
played the spat.
"I would be more con-
cerned if it was a fastball,
but it was a split that hit
him in the back," said Rays
manager Joe Maddon.
Lyle Overbay, Ronald
Bermudez, Blake Swihart
and Mauro Gomez drove
in two runs each for the
Red Sox, who had 15 hits.
Overbay had a two-run
single off Hernandez in
the first. Hernandez gave
up six hits and struck out
five in five innings.
The Rays managed only
two hits off five Red Sox
relievers.
Wil Myers, the 22-year-
old outfielder acquired in
the seven-player trade in


Associated Press
New York Yankees centerfielder Brett Gardner plays Jermaine Mitchell's fourth-inning triple off the outfield wall
Saturday in Tampa. The Phillies won 7-0.


December that sent James
Shields to Kansas City,
was among six players the
Rays cut Saturday
Myers, regarded as the
Tampa Bay's top prospect,
hit .286 in 35 spring at-
bats. On Saturday, he had
with a single and made a
fine throw from right field
that almost cut down Jose
Iglesias on Ryan Lavarn-
way's seventh-inning sac-
rifice fly
"It was something that I
knew was going to come
eventually and it wasn't a
surprise at all. I'm looking
forward to getting down
there and getting some at-
bats," Myers said. "Every
player feels like they're
big league ready I feel like
I am, but that's not up to
me to decide. I just want to
go down to the minor
leagues and show them
what I can do."

Phillies 7,
Yankees 0
TAMPA- Brennan
Boesch made his Yankees'
debut, starting in right field
and going 0 for 3 Saturday as
a New York split squad lost
7-0 loss to the Philadelphia
Phillies.
New York agreed to a one-
year contract with Boesch on


Friday. The Yankees will be
without outfielder Curtis
Granderson until at least May
due to a broken right forearm.
Domonic Brown hit his
fourth spring training homer,
a three-drive in a four-run
fourth against Hiroki Kuroda,
who allowed four runs two
earned and six hits in six
innings.
Philadelphia opening-day
starter Cole Hamels didn't
make the trip and instead
pitched in a minor league in-
trasquad game, where he
gave up four earned runs and
six hits over five innings dur-
ing an 84-pitch outing.
Braves 4,
Yankees (ss) 0
KISSIMMEE Paul Ma-
holm pitched two-hit ball for
six innings and Juan Fran-
cisco homered to lead the At-
lanta Braves to a 4-0 victory
over a New York Yankees
split-squad on Saturday.
Maholm, who struck out
four and walked one, has not
allowed a run over 14 2-3 in-
nings in his past three spring
starts.
Francisco's two-run drive in
the fifth inning off David
Phelps was his fourth homer
of the spring, and the third
baseman also had a single.


Phelps, who is competing
for a spot in the Yankees ro-
tation, had a 0.64 ERA in his
previous four starts, but he al-
lowed seven hits and four
runs in five innings. He struck
out six and walked one.
Justin Upton, hitless in his
previous nine at-bats, had
two hits for the Braves. The
Yankees finished with just
three hits.
Orioles 3,
Blue Jays 1
DUNEDIN Jake Arrieta
worked into the fifth inning
without allowing a run as he
tries to win the No. 5 spot in
the Orioles' rotation, leading
Baltimore to a 3-1 win over
the Toronto Blue Jays on
Saturday.
In his last two outings, Arri-
eta has given up five hits in 8
2-3 scoreless innings. Arrieta
struck out two and walked
three in 4 2-3 innings
Saturday.
J.A. Happ, who's still not a
contender for the Blue Jays'
fifth starter role despite Ricky
Romero's struggles, allowed
two runs on four hits in 3 2-3
innings while striking out six
and walking none. All the Ori-
oles hits against Happ were
doubles.
Mark DeRosa drove in


Toronto's run with a sixth-in-
ning sacrifice fly.

Marlins 4, Mets 2
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. -
Placido Polanco was 2 for 3
with a double in his return
from an oblique strain that
had sidelined him since
March 1, and the Miami Mar-
lins beat the Mets 4-2 Satur-
day as Justin Turner became
the latest New York player to
get hurt.
Turner, the leading candi-
date to replace injured third
baseman David Wright,
sprained his right ankle in the
fourth inning.
Chris Coghlan was 2 for 4,
including a RBI triple in the
fourth off Shaun Marcum.
Marlins prospect Christian
Yelich added an opposite-
field home run to left in the
eighth against Jeurys Familia.
Marlins starter Henderson
Alvarez, in his return from the
Venezuelan team at the
World Baseball Classic, gave
up one run and three hits in 3
2-3 innings. Kevin Slowey,
who is competing for a rota-
tion spot, gave up one run
and two hits in 4 1-3 innings
with four strikeouts and a
walk.
Marcum allowed two runs
and five hits in four innings.


Three-way

tie for lead at

Innisbrook
Associated Press

PALM HARBOR, Fla. -
Justin Leonard walked to-
ward the 12th green Satur-
day at Innisbrook and saw
a scoreboard that showed
he was tied for the lead in
the Tampa Bay Champi-
onship. He knocked in his
8-foot birdie putt, assumed
he was ahead, and then
never looked at another
board the rest of the day
He might do the same
Sunday
There's no point in star-
ing at scores, not with so
many names separated by
so few shots. Besides, the
Copperhead course at In-
nisbrook is playing so dif-
ficult even in pleasant
weather that it's best not to
think about anything ex-
cept the next shot
"It is hard," Leonard
said after his 4-under 67
put him in a three-way tie
for the lead with Kevin
Streelman and George Co-
etzee of South Africa.
"There's not a whole lot of
birdie holes on those last
six holes. With the greens
getting firmer and faster as
they did today which
I'm sure they will again to-
morrow. You have to be
pretty patient out there
and really pick your spots
pretty carefully"
Miyazato leads
Founders Cup
PHOENIX -Ai Miyazato
pulled back in front in the
LPGA Founders Cup on Sat-
urday, making three birdies in
a four-hole stretch on the
back nine and saving par with
a long putt on the par-4
finishing hole.
The diminutive Japanese
star shot her second straight
5-under 67 after opening with
a tournament-record 64. At
19-under 197, she had a four-
stroke lead over Stacy Lewis
and Jee Young Lee.
Lewis was penalized two
strokes after the round when
it was determined that caddie
Travis Wilson tested the sand
before Lewis played out of a
bunker on the par-4 16th.
That turned a 66 into a 68,
making the third-ranked
Texan's bid to take over the
top spot in the world from Yani
Tseng more difficult Sunday.
Coming off a victory two
weeks ago in Singapore,
Lewis would jump to No. 1
with a victory Sunday, as long
as Tseng finishes third or
worse.


Who's coming, w]

Associated Press ARIZONA CARDINALS
Arrived: Drew Stanton, QB; Rashard Menden-
hall, RB; Jerraud Powers, CB; Yeremiah Bell,
The first week of NFL S; Lorenzo Alexander, LB; Jasper Brinkley,
free agency isn't over yet, LB; Matt Shaughnessy, DE.
and it's already becoming Departed: Kevin Kolb, QB; Adrian Wilson, S;
difficult to keep track of Kerry Rhodes, S; Beanie Wells, RB; Early
Doucet, RB; Stewart Bradley, LB; Fozzy Whit-
who's coming and going. taker, RB.
Anquan Boldin's a 49er, ATLANTA FALCONS
Reggie Bush a Lion, Arrived: Steve Jackson, RB.
Steven ackson a Falcon, Departed: Michael Turner, RB; John Abraham,
Steven Jackson a Falcon, DE; Dunta Robinson, CB; Lawrence Sidbury, DE.
Greg Jennings a Viking BALTIMORE RAVENS
and Wes Welker a Bronco. Arrived: Chris Canty, DT.
Ryan Fitzpatrick's no Departed: Anquan Boldin, WR; Bobbie
Williams, OG; Paul Kruger LB; Dannell Ellerbe
longer a Bill, Dwight LB; Cary Williams CB; Bernard Pollard S.
Freeney's out as a Colt, BUFFALO BILLS
Mike Wallace as a Steeler Arrived: Manny Lawson, LB.
and Nnamdi Asomugha as Departed: Ryan Fitzpatrick, QB; Andy Levitre,
G; Chad Reinhart, OL; Donald Jones, WR.
an Eagle. CAROLINA PANTHERS
That's just for starters. Arrived: Drayton Florence, CB.
Dozens of players have Departed: Gary Barnidge, TE; Jason Phillips,
moved from one team to LB; James Anderson, LB;
CHICAGO BEARS
another in the past few Arrived: Jermon Bushrod, LT; Martellus Ben-
weeks, from the days lead- nett, TE.
ing up to free agency and Departed: NickRoach, LB;Geno Hayes, LB; Matt
then during a feeding Spaeth, TE; Kellen Davis, TE; MattToeaina, DT
CINCINNATI BENGALS
frenzy that began Tuesday Arrived: None.
- when the free-agent Departed: Pat Sims, DT; Manny Lawson, LB;
season opened with a Dan Skuta, LB; Bruce Gradkowski, QB.
flourish. CLEVELAND BROWNS
OU Arrived: Paul Kruger, LB; Desmond Bryant,
Here's a team-by-team DL; Quentin Groves, LB; Gary Barnidge, TE.
glance of notable players Departed: Kaluka Maiava, LB.
who have either arrived or DALLAS COWBOYS
Arrived: None.
departed from NFL teams Departed: Marcus Spears, DT; Kevin Ogle-
through noon Saturday: tree, WR; John Phillips, TE; Dan Connor, LB.


ho's going in NFL


DENVER BRONCOS
Arrived: Wes Welker, WR; Louis Vasquez,
RG; Terrance Knighton, DL; Dominique
Rodgers-Cromartie, CB; Stewart Bradley, LB.
Departed: D.J. Williams, LB, Jason Hunter,
DE; Justin Bannan, DT; Tracy Porter, CB;
Chris Gronkowski, FB; Elvis Dumervil, DL.
DETROIT LIONS
Arrived: Reggie Bush, RB; Jason Jones, DE;
Glover Quin, S.
Departed: Cliff Avril, DE; Gosder Cherilus, T;
Drayton Florence, CB; Sammie Lee Hill, DT
GREEN BAY PACKERS
Arrived: None.
Departed: Greg Jennings, WR; Charles
Woodson, DB.
HOUSTON TEXANS
Arrived: None.
Departed: Kevin Walter, WR; James Casey,
FB/TE; Connor Barwin, LB; Glover Quin, S.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS
Arrived: Gosder Cherilus, OT; Ricky Jean
Francois, DL; LaRon Landry, S; Lawrence
Sidbury, LB; Donald Thomas, G; Greg Toler,
CB; ErikWalden, LB.
Departed: Donnie Avery, WR; Austin Collie, WR;
Dwight Freeney, DE/OLB; Jerraud Powers,
CB; Drew Stanton, QB; Tom Zbikowski, S.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
Arrived: Geno Hayes, LB; Alan Ball, CB;
Justin Forsett, RB; Roy Miller, DT.
Departed: Derek Cox, CB; Terrance Knighton,
DT; Dawan Landry, S; Rashean Mathis, CB;
Laurent Robinson, WR; Aaron Ross, CB; Guy
Whimper, OT
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS
Arrived: Sean Smith, CB; Dunta Robinson,
CB; Bryan Mattison, OL; Anthony Fasano, TE;
Donnie Avery, WR; Chase Daniel, QB: Husain
Abdullah, S; Geoff Schwartz, OL.
Departed: Matt Cassel, QB; Glenn Dorsey,
DE; Brady Quinn, QB; Peyton Hillis, RB; Abe
Elam, S; Ropati Pitoitua, DE; Travis Daniels,
CB; Jake O'Connell, TE.


The Minnesota Vikings have
land Greg Jennings, above, f
MIAMI DOLPHINS
Arrived: Mike Wallace, WR, Dustin Keller, TE;
Philip Wheeler, LB; Dannell Ellerbe, LB; Bran-
don Gibson, WR.
Departed: Sean Smith, CB; Anthony Fasano,
TE; Reggie Bush, RB.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS
Arrived: Matt Cassel, QB; Greg Jennings, WR.
Departed: Percy Harvin, WR; Antoine Win-
field, CB; Jasper Brinkley, LB.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
Arrived: Danny Amendola, WR; Leon Wash-
ington, RB; Donald Jones, WR.
Departed: Wes Welker, WR; Patrick Chung,
S; Donald Thomas, OL.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS
Arrived: Keenan Lewis, CB.
Departed: Jerome Bushrod, LT; Chase
Daniel, QB. Jonathan Casillas, LB.


free-agent frenzy
Bradley Fletcher, CB; Connor Barwin, LB; Patrick
Chung, S; James Phillips, LB; James Casey,
TE; Isaac Sopoaga, DL; Arrelious Benn, WR.
Departed: Nnamdi Asomugha, CB; Do-
minique Rodgers-Cromartie, CB, Cullen
Jenkins, DT; Mike Patterson, DT.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS
Arrived: Bruce Gradkowski, QB;William Gay, DB.
Departed: James Harrison, LB; Willie Colon,
OL; Mike Wallace, WR; Rashard Mendenhall,
RB; Keenan Lewis, DB; Ryan Mundy, S.
ST. LOUIS RAMS
Arrived: Jared Cook, TE.
Departed: Steven Jackson, RB; Danny Amendola,
WR; Quintin Mikell, S; Brandon Gibson, WR.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS
Arrived: DannyWoodhead, RB; King Dunlap, OT;
Chad Rinehart, G;John Phillips, TE; Derek Cox, CB
Departed:Takeo Spikes, LB; Atari Bigby, SS;
Antonio Garay, DT; Randy McMichael, TE.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
Associated Press Arrived: Anquan Boldin, WR; Glenn Dorsey,
agreed to terms on a deal to DL; Dan Skuta, LB.
rom their rivals. Departed: Dashon Goldson, S; Alex Smith,
QB; David Akers, K; Delanie Walker, TE;
NEWYORK GIANTS Isaac Sopoaga, NT; Ricky Jean Francois, DL.
Arrived: Aaron Ross, CB; Ryan Mundy, S; Josh SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
Brown, K; CullenJenkins, DT; Dan Connor, LB. Arrived: Percy Harvin, WR; Cliff Avril, DE;
Departed: Ahmad Bradshaw, RB; Michael Michael Bennett, DL.
Boley, LB; Chris Canty, DT; Kenny Phillips, S, Departed: Leon Washington, RB/KR.
Martellus Bennett, TE. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS
Arrived: David Garrard, QB; Mike Goodson, Arrived: Dashon Goldson, S; Jonathan Casil-
RB; Willie Colon, OL; Anthony Garay, NT. las, LB; Kevin Ogletree, WR.
Departed:Yeremiah Bell, S; Mike DeVito, DL; Departed: JeremyTrueblood, T; Michael Ben-
Shonn Greene, RB; Dustin Keller, TE; LaRon nett, DE; Quincy Black, LB; Arrelious Benn, WR.
Landry, S; Sione Po'uha, NT TENNESSEE TITANS
OAKLAND RAIDERS Arrived: Andy Levitre, G; Shonn Greene, RB;
Arrived: Nick Roach, LB; Kaluka Maiava, LB; Sammie Lee Hill, DT; Delanie Walker, TE; LB
Pat Sims, DT; Jason Hunter, DE. Moise Fokou; George Wilson, S.
Departed: Michael Huff, DB; Darrius Heyward- Departed: Jared Cook, TE; Jordan
Bey, WR; Philip Wheeler, LB; Desmond Bryant, Babineaux, S; Mitch Petrus, G.
DT; Mike Goodson, RB; Dave Tollefson, DE. WASHINGTON REDSKINS
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Arrived:Tony Pashos, OT; JeremyTrueblood, OT
Arrived: Cary Williams, CB; Kenny Phillips, S; Departed: Lorenzo Alexander, LB.


BASEBALL


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gomez in


awkward


transition


in career

Former 'Wizard'

actress goes wild

in new movies
RYAN PEARSON
AP entertainment writer

LOS ANGELES "A little
awkward" is how Selena
Gomez describes her transi-
tion from Disney girl to Disney
girl gone wild in the new R-
rated independent film
"Spring Breakers," in which
she plays a bikini-clad and
heavily armed college student
bent on a good time with three
friends and some drugs, sex
and violence.
"I am getting a little bit
older, so I wanted to push my-
self and kind of get into a little
bit more of an indie world.
And it was a really great expe-
rience for me. And at the same
time it has been, of course, a
little awkward, but great," the
20-year-old Gomez said Thurs-
day at the film's Hollywood
premiere.
Known for her role on Dis-
ney's "Wizards of Waverly
Place," Gomez actually began
moving to a faster track as
Justin Bieber's now ex-
girlfriend.
"Honestly, it's been a weird
transition. You never really
know what's right or wrong
and you can only do the best
you can," she said.
Directed by art-house fa-
vorite Harmony Korine and
starring James Franco and
Vanessa Hudgens of Disney's
"High School Musical" fame,
"Spring Breakers" follows four
young women on a Florida
coast vacation romp they fi-
nanced with a diner robbery
Some of Gomez's young fans
were gathered outside the Arc-
Light Theatre hoping to catch
a glimpse of the star But she
warned them not to go inside.
"I think they're really here
to see me. I don't think they're
here to see the movie," she
said. "This was a little bit dif-
ferent. So yes, they shouldn't
go see this."
Gomez is also getting atten-
tion these days for her own re-
cent reactions to her split with
Bieber. A breakup song from
her new album called "Rule
The World" just leaked on the
Internet.
"Our love was made to rule
the world. You came and broke
the perfect girl," she sings.
Commenting on the song,
Gomez would only say, "That's
not my first single. But it was a
song I recorded. But you'll get
to know my album a little bit
soon -sooner than later"


Associated Press
Selena Gomez arrives Thursday
at the LA premiere of "Spring
Breakers" at the ArcLight
Hollywood in Los Angeles.


Birthday You are likely to be far more fortunate in
the year ahead than in the past, especially in matters
pertaining to your career and/or earnings. Lady Luck
will step in with a helping hand.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you have something
important brewing that could be materially meaningful,
don't put things off. Your chances for fulfilling your ex-
pectations are best if you act immediately.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It's all up to you as to
what kind of day you'll have. If you think of yourself as
lucky, you will be. Conversely, if you see yourself as
unlucky, be prepared for misfortune.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Something good you al-
ready have going can be improved upon even further.
Make the most of these opportunities while the trends
are in your favor.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Most of the time, you


Associated Press
From left, Selena Gomez, Ashley Benson, Rachel Korine and Vanessa Hudgens are in a scene from
"Spring Breakers."





Hypnotic mix


A couple ofDisney stars turn into 'Spring Breakers'


CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic

Harmony Korine seems to
want it both ways, all day, with
"Spring Breakers," his super-
stylized descent into a sun-
baked hell where bikini-clad,
gun-toting college babes serve
as our guides.
As writer and director, Ko-
rine wants us to be appalled
and aroused, hypnotized and
titillated. He wants to satirize
the debauchery of girls gone
wild while simultaneously
reveling in it. And damned if
he doesn't pull it off.
This is the rare movie I ac-
tually found myself liking
more the longer I spent away
from it and the more I thought
about it mainly because I
couldn't stop thinking about
it. In the moment, I found it
numbingly repetitive, even
boring at times: an obvious
juxtaposition of sex and vio-
lence, of dreamlike aesthetics
within a nightmare scenario.
And it is all of those things.
But it stuck with me, and it
made me appreciate the ge-
nius of Korine's approach.
There is a great deal of gen-
uine artistry in this film,
which is the most polished
and mainstream to date from
the maker of indies such as
"Trash Humpers." The exqui-
site images, which range from
intimately gritty to eerily
glowing, come from Belgian
cinematographer Benoit
Debie, and Cliff Martinez
("Drive") complements them
with a mesmerizing score. But
"Spring Breakers" is also
provocative in various ways -
totally unsurprising from the
guy who wrote Larry Clark's
"Kids" at age 19 depending
on the viewer. In super slo-
mo, as beer-soaked party girls
cavort on the beach to the
thump of electronic dance
music, is that how it actually
feels in the middle of it? Or is
that the frightening extreme
adults imagine when they
dare to ponder what their
kids are up to each March?
The corruption of formerly
squeaky-clean Disney Chan-
nel superstars Selena Gomez
and Vanessa Hudgens may be
Korine's cleverest trick of all:
They get to show some range,
we get to gawk. But James
Franco steals the whole
movie away when he arrives
about halfway through as a
corn-rowed, wanna-be gang-


James Franco stars as a corn-rowed, wanna-be gangster rapper
named Alien (pronounced a-LEEN) in "Spring Breakers."

"Spring Breakers"
U The A24 Film is rated R for strong sexual content, lan-
guage, nudity, drug use and violence throughout. Running
time: 92 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.


ster rapper named Alien (pro-
nounced a-LEEN). It's a
showy, wonderfully weird
performance, but Franco also
finds the vulnerability be-
neath the bravado. And in
playing a complicated, flawed
ringleader, he's much more
effective here than he was in
"Oz the Great and Powerful."
The young women of
"Spring Breakers" have their
own treacherous road to fol-
low. The four longtime friends
(Gomez, Hudgens, Ashley
Benson of "Pretty Little
Liars" and Rachel Korine, the
director's wife) long to escape
the drudgery of their dreary
college life. Spring break in
Florida beckons, and after a
quick-and-dirty, coked-up
diner robbery which three
of the girls pull off without the
help of Gomez's character, the
churchgoing Faith they're
headed South.
Clearly these women al-
ready were headed for trou-
ble long before they got in the
car; they're essentially wild
animals in hot pink nail pol-
ish. They just needed a little
shove, which the promise of
non-stop partying provides.
When they get busted for nar-
cotics possession and the
flashy Alien shows up to bail
them out their fates are
sealed. He talks a lot of trash,
jumping up and down on his
cash-covered bed with a ma-
chine gun in each hand, flash-
ing a devious smile through a


Today's HOROSCOPE
can handle large-scale affairs better than anything
mundane. This is likely to be the case when you take
on an extremely complicated endeavor.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you want to do some-
thing big, you need to talk to a person with clout. It'll
take the support of someone with power for you to
achieve your goal.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There is plenty of justifica-
tion for your hopes to be running high. You'll sense
that you're in a fortunate cycle in which your desires
can become realities.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your greatest benefits are
likely to come not from what you do for your own inter-
ests but from how well you handle things for others.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When you are weighing
whether or not to tackle a critical situation, you should
emphasize the most positive alternatives. Anything


glittering grill. But he's also
lonely and needy, and in these
girls or at least in a couple
of them he thinks he's
found his soul mates.
A scene in which Korine
prominently (and effectively)
uses Britney Spears' "Every-
time" is a microcosm of the
rest of the film, and it is that
mixture of playfulness and
danger. Alien sits down at his
oh-so tasteful poolside piano
and seems to expose himself
emotionally by performing
the haunting, plaintive ballad;
Korine then plays the actual
song over images of Alien's
newfound harem bouncing in
bikinis and girly-pink ski
masks, hoisting rifles in the
air and preparing to go on a
crime spree. But a surprising
amount of suspense reveals it-
self within the ridiculousness
of it all; that's what makes
"Spring Breakers" so hard to
shake.
They never feel like real
people, these curvaceous
banditas, but they are the fu-
ture of America, and this
might be the last, best time of
their lives. We're all screwed,
Korine seems to be saying. It's
very sad but also kinda
sexy
"Spring Breakers," from
A24 Films, is rated R for
strong sexual content, lan-
guage, nudity, drug use and vi-
olence throughout. Running
time: 92 minutes. Two and a
half stars out of four.


well- founded will outweigh most negatives.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) In a situation where
you're earnestly striving to be of assistance to an-
other, you could be pleasantly surprised by how much
will be done for your own cause.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Conditions could
take a turn for the better in the romance department,
especially for those of you who haven't had much to
cheer about lately Cupid hasn't forgotten you.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You could finally dis-
cover that a new hobby has much more to offer than
you realized. Pay attention to the minor details, and all
will be revealed.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -You'll have the ability
to deal with others in an extremely effective way. Peo-
ple will sense that you're a positive catalyst and will
recognize your value.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 15
Mega Money: 1 3 5 26
Mega Ball: 15
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 9 $966.50
3-of-4 MB 102 $186.50
3-of-4 2,039 $27.50
2-of-4 MB 2,070 $19
1-of-4 MB 14,772 $2.50
2-of-4 41,310 $2
Fantasy 5:17 18 27 29 30
5-of-5 3 winners $79,067.67
4-of-5 300 $127.50
3-of-5 10,138 $10.50
THURSDAY, MARCH 14
Fantasy 5: 7 11 -13 16 34
5-of-5 2 winners $107,750.26
4-of-5 307 $113
3-of-5 10,204 $9.50

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 17, the
76th day of 2013. There are 289
days left in the year. This is St.
Patrick's Day.
Today's Highlight:
On March 17, 1973, U.S. Air
Force Lt. Col. Robert L. Stirm, a
freed prisoner of the Vietnam War,
was joyously greeted by his family
on the tarmac at Travis Air Force
Base in California in a scene cap-
tured in a Pulitzer Prize-winning
photograph by Slava Veder of The
Associated Press.
On this date:
In A.D. 461 (or A.D. 493, de-
pending on sources), St. Patrick,
the patron saint of Ireland, died in
Saul.
In 1762, New York's first
St. Patrick's Day parade took place.
In 1906, President Theodore
Roosevelt first likened crusading
journalists to a man with "the
muckrake in his hand" in a speech
to the Gridiron Club in Washington.
In 1912, the Camp Fire Girls or-
ganization was incorporated in
Washington, D.C., two years to
the day after it was founded in
Thetford, Vt. (The group is now
known as Camp Fire USA.)
In 1943, the Taoiseach of Ire-
land, Eamon de Valera, delivered
a radio speech about "The Ireland
That We Dreamed Of."
In 1950, scientists at the Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley an-
nounced they had created a new
radioactive element, "californium."
In 1963, Mother Elizabeth Ann
Bayley Seton, an American, was
beatified by Pope John XXIII. (She
was canonized 12 years later by
Pope Paul VI.)
In 1966, a U.S. midget subma-
rine located a missing hydrogen
bomb that had fallen from an
American bomber into the
Mediterranean off Spain.
In 1970, the United States cast
its first veto in the U.N. Security
Council. (The U.S. killed a resolu-
tion that would have condemned
Britain for failure to use force to
overthrow the white-ruled govern-
ment of Rhodesia.)
In 1993, Helen Hayes, the "First
Lady of the American Theater,"
died in Nyack, N.Y., at age 92.
Ten years ago: Edging to the
brink of war, President George W.
Bush gave Saddam Hussein 48
hours to leave his country. Iraq re-
jected Bush's ultimatum, saying a
U.S. attack to force Saddam from
power would be "a grave mistake."
Five years ago: David Pater-
son was sworn in as governor of
New York; he succeeded Eliot
Spitzer, who'd resigned because
of a prostitution scandal.
One year ago: Bombings killed
at least 27 people near intelli-
gence and security buildings in
the Syrian capital Damascus.
Today's Birthdays: The former
national chairwoman of the NAACP,
Myrlie Evers-Williams, is 80. Former
NASA astronaut Ken Mattingly is


77. Former National Security
Agency Director and former CIA Di-
rector Michael Hayden is 68.
Thought for Today: "History is
not life. But since only life makes his-
tory, the union of the two is obvious."
- Louis D. Brandeis, U.S. Supreme
Court Justice (1856-1941).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


News ANALYSIS


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Associated Press
President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speak to reporters in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in
Washington during last November's meeting of the leadership of Congress to discuss the deficit and economy. Congress appears far
from reaching a deficit-reducing "grand bargain" despite recent talk of "charm offensives" and less partisanship. The Senate's top
Republican said his party will push to trim Medicare and Social Security without yielding another dollar in new tax revenues.




Imperfect sales pitch


'Grand bargain'

a tough sell

in Congress
CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press

WASHINGTON For all
the talk of a presidential
"charm offensive" and possi-
ble thaw in partisanship,
ample signs show Congress is
far from reaching a "grand
bargain" to shrink the deficit.
The Senate's top Republi-
can, standing just outside the
Capitol room where President
Barack Obama was meeting
with Democratic senators
Tuesday, said he will push for
trims to Medicare and Social
Security without yielding an-
other dollar in new tax
revenues.
Democrats have long in-
sisted higher taxes chiefly
on the wealthy must ac-
company any reductions in
those entitlement programs.
There must be a "balanced
approach" to reducing the
deficit, they say
But Republicans say Obama
used his only bit of tax lever-
age in December, in the "fiscal
cliff" resolution. Now they
are pushing Democrats to
confront Medicare's and So-
cial Security's long-term fund-
ing problems without the
political sweetener that liber-
als have always demanded
and Obama called for in his
re-election campaign.
Budgetary solution
"The only way to straighten
America out is to fix the enti-
tlement issue," Senate Re-
publican leader Mitch
McConnell told reporters
Tuesday "There is no revenue
solution to that. It has to be
done by making the eligibility
for entitlements fit the demo-
graphics of America today
and tomorrow."
That was an apparent refer-
ence to raising the eligibility
age for Medicare. McConnell's
office also cited recommenda-
tions to reduce entitlement
benefits for high earners but
stopped short of saying the
Kentucky Republican en-
dorses them.
McConnell said Republi-
cans will use this summer's
debt-ceiling showdown -
when Obama will insist on
higher borrowing capacity to
pay the government's bills -
as a bargaining tool to push
for trimming the costly but
popular Medicare and Social
Security programs.
Democrats who met with
Obama said the president will


Rep. Paul Ryan explained his
new spending plan is intent on
repealing Obamacare.

not entertain such talks.
"He will not negotiate on
the debt ceiling, period. End
of discussion," said Sen. Tom
Harkin, D-Iowa, after Tues-
day's closed meeting.
Ryan's vision
Other sounds of partisan
discord echoed throughout
the Capitol. The top House
Republican budget-writer
predicated his new 10-year
spending plan on repealing
"Obamacare," the president's
signature overhaul of U.S.
health care.
That's politically impossi-
ble, given Obama's re-election
and the Supreme Court's up-
holding of the landmark 2010
legislation.
But Rep. Paul Ryan, the
GOP's vice presidential nomi-
nee last year, said Republi-
cans will not contemplate a
tax-and-spending plan that in-
cludes the health law's
provisions.
Americans will reject the
new law, which "will collapse
under its own weight," Ryan
said. "We will never be able to
balance the budget if Oba-
macare keeps going."
When a reporter told Ryan
that Obama won re-election,
he replied, "That means we
surrender our principles?"
Republicans retained con-
trol of the House in the same
election, Ryan noted.
McConnell, meanwhile,
said the first Republican Sen-
ate effort to amend a Demo-
cratic budget plan will be "to
delay the implementation of
Obamacare until the economy
gets back on track."
Seeking compromise
The tough talk from Ryan
and McConnell came as
Obama expands his efforts to
woo members of both parties.
He is hoping for compromises
to shrink the deficit, overhaul
immigration and reduce gun
violence, among other things.
The president treated 12
Republican senators to din-
ner last week. And in a rare


Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has said the first
Republican Senate effort will be to delay the implementation of
Obama's health care plan.


The only way to straighten
America out is to fix the
entitlement issue. There is no revenue
solution to that.
Mitch McConnell
Senate Republican leader, speaking to reporters Tuesday.


burst of presidential visits to
Capitol Hill, he is meeting
separately this week with
Senate Democrats, Senate
Republicans, House Democ-
rats and House Republicans.
Obama's press office criti-
cized Ryan's 10-year proposal
to reduce federal spending
sharply without raising rev-
enue through tax revisions.
It's bad policy, the statement
said, "not to ask for a single
dime of deficit reduction from
closing tax loopholes for the
wealthy and well-connected."
The statement urged "both
parties to compromise and
make tough choices."
Close watchers of Congress
were not encouraged by the
sharply different budget plans
proposed by House Republi-
cans and Senate Democrats.
"These two sides are more
interested in scoring points
than getting an agreement,"
said Jim Kessler, vice presi-
dent of the pro-Democratic
group Third Way
Revenue or cuts
In his re-election campaign,
Obama called for new rev-
enues of $1.2 trillion over 10
years, combined with spend-
ing cuts to tame the deficit.
House Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, suggested up to $800
billion in new revenues. The
two men ultimately failed to
reach a deficit-reducing
"grand bargain."
Last year's "fiscal cliff" leg-


isolation forced Republicans to
swallow $620 billion in new
revenues. Some Democrats
say Obama should have de-
manded more.
Now, Republicans say, talk
of further tax hikes "is
closed," even though Democ-
rats say they won't consider
entitlement cuts without new
revenues.
Harkin said Obama dis-
cussed a possible grand bar-
gain with Democratic
senators by saying, "Look, we
have staked out a position on
this that we believe is sort of
in the center, where the Amer-
ican people are. And if the Re-
publicans want to pull more to
the right, we're not going
there."
On the House side, the new
Republican 10-year budget
plan "doesn't give an inch,"
said Rep. Chris Van Hollen of
Maryland, the Democrat's top
Budget Committee member "It
doesn't give a quarter-inch."
But Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga.,
who helped describe the new
GOP budget to reporters Tues-
day, said it will protect na-
tional security, care "for the
poor and sick," and boost the
economy
"All of this can be accom-
plished without raising
taxes," Price said.

Charles Babington covers
Congress and national poli-
tics for The Associated Press.


St. Pat's


reveals


ability to


adapt and


evolve
A 1l four of my grand-
parents were born
in Ireland. They im-
migrated to the United
States in search of a bet-
ter life and they found it.
Some of my aunts and
uncles were born in Ire-
land, but both of my par-
ents were born in the
Bronx and grew up in
very Irish neighborhoods.
Our families were not
welcomed with open arms
by other Americans.
There was competition
for employment and hous-
ing. The Irish were
thought to be frequently
intoxicated and unde-
pendable as workers. We
also dressed funny
It took decades for Irish
Catholics to be accepted
in the United States. It
did not matter what John
E Kennedy's politics were
when he ran for president
in 1960, he was one of us
and we were going to sup-
port him.
To this day, you will find
two portraits hanging in
the homes of many older
Irish Catholics: Jesus and
JFK.
I grew up in an ex-
tended family where a
thick Irish brogue was as
common as boiled pota-
toes and really bad cab-
bage. We grew up not
focused on our Irish her-
itage, but instead with a
strong desire to fit in as
Americans.
On this St. Patrick's
Day, it seems like ancient
history when the Irish
were discriminated
against, but it was just two
generations ago. While
immigrants have always
completed the backbreak-
ing work America needed
done, there have always
been groups opposed to
the latest wave of
newcomers.
U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio,
R-Fla., is the son of Cuban
immigrants. He has chal-
lenged all of us to step for-
ward and better
understand the huge His-
panic influx the nation is
experiencing.
Just like the Germans,
Italians, Irish, Jews, Chi-
nese and Africans that
came before, the new
waves of immigrants don't
water down our potency
as a people; they make us
stronger. We are a people
who have all come from
somewhere else.
St. Patrick's Day is a
time when my people cel-
ebrate our ancestry But
we also celebrate being
Americans.
As Sen. Rubio suggests,
we should not fear new
waves of immigrants. We
should have an orderly
process of assimilation,
but we should welcome
them with open arms as
they add new texture to
the great American
experience.
There will be a day
when Sen. Rubio makes a
run for the White House
and we all look back with
humor and wonder what
all the fuss was about.

Gerry Mulligan is
publisher of the
Chronicle. He can be
reached at
gmulligan@chronicle
online, com.







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ........... publisher
M ike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz ........................ citizen member
SMac Harris ........................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ .......... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


NINTENDO MEDAL






Combat






awards






sacred


Napoleon Boi
one of history
est military
acknowledged the v
combat awards,
noting: "A soldier
will fight long and
hard for a bit of
colored ribbon."
Apparently, our
nation's Secretary
of Defense, civil-
ian service secre-
taries and
military service
chiefs do not as-
cribe a similar
value to combat
awards.
Last month, outgo:
retary of Defense
Panetta announced
ation of a Distinguish
fare Medal (DW
recognize the contr:
of drone pilots and cy
cialists who support
tlefield from afar. W
changing character
fare may warrant suc
nition, the
ill-conceived order o
dence ranks it abo
combat awards as th(
Heart and the Bron
Air Medal; and Air
Army and Navy/Marii
mendation Medals fo
Assigning a higher
a medal recognizing
members supporting
tlefield while sitting:
consoles hundreds a
thousands of miles am
to combat awards ea
great physical risk ag
armed enemy makes o
der if senior Pentagon
have lost all perspect
Not surprisingly, t
medal's order of pre(
has prompted combat
to derisively dub it
"Nintendo" medal, as
igniting a firestorm of
from national veter
ganizations such as th
ans of Foreign
American Legion,
Order of the Purpl
and Military Officers


Great cartoc
Finally! Someone in o
has the right stuff.
"Tommy Tucker" car-
toons fighting crime
and drugs -that is
directed to our chil-
dren is written and
illustrated by Tom
Rogers of Inverness.
I've read his cartoons
in your paper and have
seen his coloring
books that have been
distributed throughout
Citrus County schools.
I believe we should
take it one step further
and make sure all the F
schools are involved in t


naparte, ation of America.
's great- Shamefully breaking faith
leaders, with our nation's combat
value of troops and veterans by di-
minishing the
THE ISSUE: value of battle-
THE ISSUE field valor and
New sacrifice, the Pen-
Distinguished tagon's senior
Warfare Medal. leadership arro-
gantly defended
OUR OPINION: the DWM's
Order of ranking.
Order of With howls of
precedence protest falling on
devalues the Pentagon's
battlefield valor deaf ears, na-
and sacrifice, tional veterans
organizations
ing Sec- turned to Congress. In a rare
Leon show of bipartisan unity, Con-
the cre- gress joined the fight against
ied War- the new medal's order of
M) to precedence with the intro-
ibutions duction of HB 833 and SB 470,
ber spe- which U.S. Rep. Richard Nu-
the bat- gent and U.S. Sens. Bill Nel-
hile the son and Marco Rubio support
of war- as co-sponsors.
h recog- Facing mounting public
DWM's and congressional pressure,
)f prece- newly appointed Secretary of
ve such Defense Chuck Hagel halted
e Purple production of the DWM this
ze Star; week and ordered a 30-day
r Force, review to determine whether
ne Com- its ranking above combat
r valor. awards is appropriate. Does
value to it really take a 30-day review
service to see the lack of reason be-
the bat- hind the DWM's controversial
safely at ranking?
nd even Given the 30-day review,
vay than the order-of-precedence bat-
irned at tle is not yet won. Before Con-
;ainst an gress joined the fight,
ne won- Secretary Hagel stated in a
leaders March 8 letter to the Veterans
ive. of Foreign Wars he accepted
;he new the judgment of the service
cedence secretaries and chiefs
it troops that the DWM ranking is
t as the appropriate.
s well as With the battle still in
f protest doubt, local veterans and the
rans or- community at large are urged
ie Veter- to keep up the protest to as-
Wars, sure our nation's combat
Military awards remain sacred sym-
e Heart bols of battlefield valor and
Associ- sacrifice.


>n
ur town


01c







CAL

563-

lorida
these


I


(


ideas and coloring books to
keep the children aware of the
dangers of drugs and crime.
What a wonderful con-
JND tribution to our chil-
J dren and community.
Change of style
If you like your
county commission
meetings to be run like
the Jerry Springer
Show, then Scott
Adams would seem to
mo* be a good fit. But if
) 579 you want to actually be
able to get anything
done, he really needs
to change his style and
adopt a more professional,
work-it-through style.


Extinction is destiny
I noticed a comment in the
Chronicle I feel needs a re-
sponse. The writer raves about
China's accomplishments over
the past 40 years and credits its
economic rise to the fact there
are no unions.
Forty years ago, President
(Richard) Nixon opened diplo-
matic and trade doors with
China. Since then, American
technology and industry have
gone to China to develop their
industrial complex. China has
in the past and still does steal
American technology secrets to
advance its industrial might.
The country was extremely
backward and limited until the
American government decided
to make it an industrial power
The technology the Chinese
acquired came from Americans
educated in this country They
attended American colleges.
Much of this was because they
grew up in the most amazing
time and in the most forward-
thinking country in the history
of the world. The United States
became an industrial and mili-
tary leader in fewer than 100
years. During that time, it
fought two world wars and two
police actions. At home, the
American labor movement
rose. Workers were no longer
slaves to the industrial com-
plex but partners. Workers
started to get fair wages, rea-
sonable time off and medical


"The soldier, above all other people, prays
for peace, for he must suffer and bear
the deepest wounds and scars of war."
Douglas MacArthur, May 12, 1962


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bringing sunshine back


lorida's open-
government
laws have long
been the envy of
other states and in-
deed other nations k
struggling toward the
transparency their
citizens deserve. We
have set national and
international stan- Barbara
dards on this vital FLO
issue, but these days,
the Sunshine State VO
isn't looking so bright.
Over the past year, the gover-
nance of Florida has been
clouded by a perfect storm of
negative press, an ominous con-
vergence of investigative re-
ports accurately exposing our
state's unacceptable deteriora-
tion among the worst of the
worst in terms of access, trans-
parency and public corruption.
Despite our reputation for
having the best, most effective
open government laws in the
United States, Florida received
a miserable D+ for access to
government information in the
State Integrity Investigation, a
collaborative project of the
Center for Public Integrity,
Global Integrity and Public
Radio International. Florida
received a perfect score for our
laws guaranteeing access to
government records, but in
scoring whether those laws are
effectively enforced, we barely
managed a passing grade.
There is no agency in Florida
responsible for enforcing our
right of access to government
information, which means a cit-
izen wrongly denied access to
government information is
sidelined into civil court to
force agency compliance with
the constitutional right of
access.
Another area of concern un-
derscored by the State Integrity
Investigation is the cost of ob-
taining public records. In addi-
tion to the actual cost of


F
1R
I(


copying, our public
records law allows
an agency to charge
a reasonable fee for
the "extensive" use
of agency resources.
"Extensive" is not
defined, however,
and costs can vary
dramatically, even
Petersen when requesting the
RIDA same record from
various agencies.
CES And if the records
requested contain
exempt information that must
be redacted before release, the
costs can be prohibitive and a
genuine and frustrating barrier
to access.
In a report on state trans-
parency efforts released last
March by U.S. PIRG, a federa-
tion of state public interest re-
search groups, Florida received
a score of 59 out of a possible
100 points another D. States
not generally associated with
strong public access laws, such
as Texas and Louisiana, scored
at the top of the list, and most
other states blew past Florida
in the rankings.
Those states with high PIRG
scores were given extra points for
providing user-friendly access to
comprehensive information on
government expenditures at all
levels, allowing citizens and
watchdog groups to monitor and
compare government spending
quickly and easily In contrast,
Florida's transparency websites
are difficult to use and lack many
of the key features identified by
U.S. PIRG as critical in effective
user-friendly Transparency 2.0
websites.
Adding injury to insult, a re-
cent report from the Public In-
tegrity Section of the U.S.
Department of Justice states
Florida leads the nation in pub-
lic corruption. Wow. No. 1 in the
nation, beating out Illinois,
Louisiana and New Jersey,
which are states with well-


known and historical reputa-
tions for dishonest and sleazy
public officials. The DOJ report
focuses on crimes involving
abuses of the public trust by
government officials, and the
current state rankings are
based on the number of state of-
ficials convicted of public cor-
ruption charges since 2000.
The DOJ results should not
be surprising, however, given
Florida's poor scores on access
and transparency Let's do a lit-
tle math: Florida gets a 67 for
access (State Integrity Investi-
gation), a 59 for transparency
(U.S. PIRG report), and a mis-
erable 0 for public corruption.
That's a combined score of 42.
In other words, an E
U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Louis Brandeis said, "Sunlight
is the best disinfectant"
Our legislative leaders are
committed to reforming
Florida's ethics and campaign
finance laws, but we need more
than that to root out corruption
and bolster public confidence.
To bathe our government in
sunshine, we need strong and
effective access laws and better
government transparency
We all need sunshine to flour-
ish, and it is time for everyone
- citizens, watchdogs, advo-
cacy groups, small business
owners, the media, trade organ-
izations, civic associations and
certainly our government to
step up and demand true and
effective reform to our now-
tarnished reputation as the
Sunshine State. It's time to bring
the sunshine back to Florida.

Barbara A Petersen is
president of the First
Amendment Foundation, a
non-profit organization based
in Tallahassee, which acts as
an advocate of the public's
right to oversee its
government. She can be
reached at 800-337-3518.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

insurance. Social Security
came along to help ensure
when the worker was unable to
work at a reasonable pace he
or she could enjoy his or her
senior years with dignity
During this time, our univer-
sity system grew because the
average middle-class family


could afford to send their kids
to college. Eventually, even the
poor were given a chance to ed-
ucate their children. As our cit-
izenry became more affluent-
again much due to unions -
our technology and society ad-
vanced. Our industrial complex
grew and expanded at an amaz-
ing rate with unions represent-
ing most of its employees.
It has been said those (who)
won't learn from the past are
destined to repeat it Unfortu-
nately greed, self-interest and
jealousy are leading this coun-
try away from the very things
that made us great When we ig-
nore our working class, our so-
ciety will flounder and we are
destined to fade into extinction.
Roger Krieger
Beverly Hills

Pay fair share
Maybe President Barack
Obama should make his govern-
ment employees who illegally
owe hundreds of billions of dol-
lars in back taxes pay up before
he talks about raising taxes on
the ones who pay all the taxes
legally If he can't, maybe he
shouldn't be our president any-
more. We pay the government
employees their salaries; the
least these government workers
should do is pay their fair share
of taxes or be fired.
Claude Strass
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS > to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hooray for Hollywood and heading home


"Hooray for Holly-
wood! That screwy,
ballyhooing Holly-
wood." "Hooray for
Hollywood," Johnny g
Mercer and Richard
Whiting, 1937.
A after our
missed oppor-
tunity to see
Costa Rica, Cheryl Fred E
and I enjoyed an- A SK
other two sea days OF
before the Queen
Elizabeth made port
at Manzanillo, Mexico. By this
time, her injured foot had been
given five days of rest and she
was ready to go once more. So
go we did. We visited the shops
around the dock and then took
an interesting bus ride into the


Lr

L


hills, where there
. were more shops as
: well as places to
sample the local
cuisine.
Upon leaving this
port of call, there
would be two more
days at sea before
disembarkation in
rannen Los Angeles.
LICE We enjoyed the re-
LIFE mainder of the cruise
very much, espe-
cially since Cheryl's
legs were back under her and,
using due caution, we were able
to dance. Cheryl and I enjoy
dancing, but to dance on an
ocean liner requires finesse.
First, the boat has a tendency to
move beneath your feet, plus


there are the other dancers.
My sweetheart and I dance
because we like music and love
each other. Throughout the
years, we've learned to make a
few simple steps work well for
us, so long as we do 'em to the
tempo of the tunes. We usually
seek a small venue, a club
where old-time rock 'n' roll is
being played. In such places,
the other patrons are just like
us. They dance for the fun of it.
Unfortunately, it isn't always
this way
There were occasions, espe-
cially toward the end of the voy-
age when, if we were to dance at
all, there was no option but the
main ballroom, where the self-
impressed, semiprofessional
ballroom dancers roam.


Heaven help you if you're as I
am and are just trying to keep
in time with the music without
being run over by folks doing an
Argentine tango! Nonetheless,
we survived the ballroom ver-
sion of bumper cars and contin-
ued to bask in the luxury of the
ship until we reached our
destination.
We'd planned ahead and after
coming ashore in Los Angeles,
we spent an evening at a very
nice hotel, a classy place on
Wilshire Boulevard at Ocean
Avenue with a great view in-
cluding the Santa Monica Pier,
which was less than a mile
away
Soon after our arrival at the
hotel, my own personal tour
guide, the lovely Cheryl, cor-


nered the concierge. The next
thing I knew, we were out and
about seeing the grandeur of
Hollywood. We saw it all, from
the iconic sign on the side of a
hill to riding by the homes of
celebrities to seeing the stars'
names embedded in sidewalks.
Then, the next morning, after
giving thanks once more for
what had been a grand time to-
gether and saying "Hooray for
Hollywood" one last time, we
headed home.
And, as it always is, heading
home was the best part of the
trip.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


AiR FARCE. ( f



Letters to THE EDITOR


Letter misrepresents
writer's message
This is in response to Mary B.
Gregory's recent letter, wherein
she takes offense to my letter of
Feb. 17 regarding the issue of
women serving in direct wartime
combat operations.
At first, I thought perhaps Ms.
Gregory must have been referring
to a letter other than mine. Much
of her commentary would suppose
so. Her letter is quite lengthy, so I
won't attempt to respond to each
and every opinion, several of
which I don't understand, and will
only comment on her opening and
closing paragraphs.
Ms. Gregory's opening remarks
infer I am "intent on denying
women credit for the combat they
are already performing with
honor"
I can only respond by saying
there is nothing further from the
truth. The untrue inference insults
me and reflects unfairly on my 40-
plus years of dedicated service in
the Air Force and as a federal em-
ployee of the Department of De-
fense and my close and
harmonious working relationships
with women, both civilian and mil-
itary Ms. Gregory writes of many
things that appear out of context to
my letter: e.g. soldiers starving,
VIPs, difficulty identifying gender,
lost battalions, etc. I'm confident
these isolated entities might be
fascinating if they were fleshed out
and described in context with my
letter, which expresses the con-
cern by many officials to the re-
cent approval of allowing women
to serve in today's direct wartime
combat.
In addition to my letter, I would
hope Ms. Gregory would read your
excellent editorial on this subject,
along with the accompanying arti-
cle by Ms. Diana West. Excellent.
In her closing paragraph, Ms.
Gregory offers two comments I
would like to respond to.
First, she writes "As long as
women and men are sucked into
the military maelstrom ...."
This statement that uses the
words "sucked into" infers military
service today is conscripted or
mandatory American military serv-
ice at this time is totally voluntary
Secondly, she writes "they de-
serve to get the credit they have
earned."
This, of course, goes without say-
ing and there is absolutely nothing
in my letters to dispute this. In
fact, she should reread my letter's
last paragraph, in which I wrote:
"This missive is not intended, in
any way, to overlook the extraordi-
nary service that women have


* To submit a letter to
editor, email letters@
online.com.

given to this country thr
our history Women hav
in all fields of noncomb
ors and in every war or
times of need. They sho
be recognized, promote
erwise rewarded but no
creasing their chances o
their lives."
No, Ms. Gregory, I'm i
on denying women, or m
matter, credit for anythi
merit, both in and out o
tary I hope all women \
this will not think other
your misleading letter
Jam


How can Flo
be saved'
Now that we are conf
the loss of a major conti
the county's income, we
lose the needed attentic
waters. We can survived
money and heat and ele
without water this will b
wasteland.
Stop the use of septic
where near water (cree.
rivers and lakes). When
began development, the
infrastructure in place 1
this. So if you don't wan
this, get off the septic ta
convert to a system whi
contamination to our on
water resources.
Stop using our aquife
in water-filtration facili
desalination plants. Thi
happen, as any person v
been here for any perio
can tell of the dramatic
tion of our spring-fed ri'
Watchdogs: That was
Southwest Florida Wate
ment District was supp(
instead it makes poor d
about protecting our wa
group needs to get out i:
field, and it might see w
opening to our waters.
The governor needs t
accountable! It is his re
since he appointed the
of the water districts an
ronmental protection gi
D


Yes, unions in<
our price
This letter is in respo
Chuck Weiler's letter "I


the portant for worker rights."
)chronicle Perhaps Mr Weiler was referring
to sweat shops in other countries.
There are no known sweat shops in
the United States. He then states
'oughout employees with low-paying jobs
e excelled need the help of the government
at endeav- through the federal giveaway pro-
in other grams. No argument there. I'm
uld always sure some union employees do bet-
d and oth- ter themselves by becoming quali-
it by in- fied for and getting better jobs. No
of losing argument there either
Perhaps Mr Weiler misunder-
not intent stood my personal experience at
nen for that Jacob Javits Center in New York
ing they City. Mr Weiler said he doubts my
f the mili- experience. Yes, the union work-
who read ers did get the job done in less
wise from than one hour However, the union
guide book requires each worker
to bill a minimum of one hour re-
es W. Willis gardless of how long it takes to do
Homosassa the job. That is why we were billed
for five hours for the five union
rida workers to set up the booth and
? another five hours to take it down.
If you don't believe me, call Jacob
ronted with Javits Center I fail to see how
ributor to plugging in one set of lights to the
must not electrical outlet provided by the
on to our site can cause an electrical fire,
without whether done by me or by a union
ectricity, but worker
become a Mr Weiler goes on to suggest we
would not have firemen, police of-
tanks any- ficers, ambulance drivers or EMTs
ks, streams, if these emergency workers were
i this state not unionized. I ask Mr Weiler
ere was no what does one thing have to do
to prevent with the other, except making our
t to see tax bills higher?
ink and
ch prevents Jack Flynn
ice pristine Lecanto

r and put Connect the dots,
ties and Citrus County voters
is has to
who has I have come to the conclusion
d of time the people who vote in Citrus
degrada- County do not know how to con-
vers. nect the dots. Every election cycle
what they vote in the same people and
er Manage- then write letters to the editor
osed to be; complaining about them.
decisions Our county commissioners are
iters. This all Republicans and helping peo-
nto the ple has never been a Republican
'hat's hap- priority. So why would you think
they would behave any
o be held differently?
sponsibility The one Republican who did all
members she could to fight Progress Energy
.d the envi- for the people of this county was
groups. rewarded by these people not vot-
ing her into office. I know you all
)oug Jordan hate Democrats and call us
Homosassa bleeding-heart liberals, but you
are shooting yourself in the foot by
crease continuing to vote Republican.
IS Learn to connect the dots.
nse to Cheryl Seronick


Unions im-


Homosassa


Return government


to American public


More than a year
and a half ago,
Congress and our
president settled on a plan
to start dealing
with excessive
spending. Con-
gress accepted
the president's
proposal, even
though every-
one knew it was
unrealistic.
Then, with all
that time to
work on refin- Robert I
ing the plan, it GUI
was ignored to- COLI
tally until after
Congress caved
on the fiscal cliff plan in
January
The president, having
intimidated Congress into
caving on the fiscal cliff,
believed he could further
intimidate Congress. This
time, instead of working
on the measure, he had the
nerve to spend several
weeks flying around the
country in Air Force One
telling different groups
how bad his proposal was.
Why did he not stay in
Washington and work on
the issue instead of spend-
ing all that money flying
around the country?
Of course, he never men-
tioned sequestration was
partly his idea. When it be-
came abundantly clear it
was his proposal he was
fighting, the story changed.
Naturally, he has not ad-
mitted it was his idea. No,
he only said the Republi-
cans wanted all these hor-
rible things to happen and
they should have just
backed away from the se-
questration. President
Obama still wants to make
it look like it was the Re-
publicans' idea.
Of course, not all of the
blame goes to the presi-
dent When the sequestra-
tion plan was hatched, it
was used by Congress to
buy time to do something
about the continued exces-
sive deficit spending. Nat-
urally, at the time, it
reported they had dealt
with the excessive spend-
ing issue when, in fact, it
had not.
With an election in the
forefront, there was no
time to be deal with debt.
Just get everyone running
for office elected. Our
country's financial prob-
lems be dammed.
Now sequestration has
happened. Congress of-
fered a way to make it vi-
able without creating
havoc. However, our presi-
dent felt this might work
and make Congress look
good. Had he listened to its
suggestion, it might very
well have worked just fine.
Then he could have
claimed he convinced
Congress to allow him to


I



I
I


save us from such serious
consequences.
At any rate, sequestra-
tion is now the law of the
land, and we
shall see what
will happen.
For sure the sky
will not fall, and
most likely we
will see only a
slight ripple
from it In truth,
the amount of
cuts are such a
tagaman small part of the
EST increased
UMN spending
planned we may
not even notice.
Crises? Why do we buy
the term when it only
means not spending as
much as had been
planned? If I defer the
new car I would like to
have, I still will be able to
handle my regular spend-
ing needs and the car can
wait a while even if I may
have to call a cab once or
twice or hitch a ride with a
friend.
How did we get into such
a mess? We have re-elected
a congressman who thinks
a Pacific island might tip
over if too many people
move there, and a con-
gresswoman who claims
sequestration will cause
the loss of 175 million jobs
even though our workforce
is only 150 million.
In addition, we have a
vice president who says if
you think a burglar may be
near, go on your back
porch and fire a shotgun,
or just fire it through your
front door Someone tried
the latter and now has
been arrested and the bur-
glar got away
At the same time, a pres-
idential candidate was de-
monized because he told
some of his supporters his
main appeal had to be to
those who would be likely
to support him. This was to
get elected so he could
also preside over the other
47 percent he felt sure
would not vote for him and
help to bring them into the
fold of the 53 percent. How
much farther can we go be-
fore we return to a govern-
ment of the people, by the
people and for the people?
Hopefully, we will soon
be on the road to achieve
that goal.
Straight-thinking leaders,
where are you? Once those
leaders are identified, then
the electorate must be edu-
cated to vote for such lead-
ers. That might be more
difficult than finding the
suitable candidates. We
must at least try


Robert E. Hagaman is
Citrus County Republican
state committeeman. He
resides in Homosassa.


Sound OFF

Where are the details?
With all of the support for Scott Adams, I find it very
interesting he has made all kinds of suggestions about
how to save money, but he has put no dollar amount on
anything he intends to save. He criticizes the upper ech-
elon of the county government, which is supervisors,
but he doesn't say how county government will run
without supervisors. He has all kinds of suggestions,
but none of his suggestions has any kind of details of
how he intends to save money on programs that require
spending. He wants to give back $5,000 of his salary,
but he doesn't tell the taxpayers the salary is set by the
Legislature and cannot be changed. That's all I got.
Slow-down in calls?
How come the call-in section is so small lately? The
last few weeks, there's almost nothing there when there
used to be some real funny stories.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Thanks for help
with Junior
Achievement
Junior Achievement in
Citrus County had its an-
nual Bowl-A-Thon on
Feb. 3, at Manatee Lanes
in Crystal River. More
than 345 bowlers partici-
pated in this fun event.
This is the primary
fundraiser for Junior
Achievement, the organi-
zation that provides life
skills educational pro-
grams to elementary, mid-
dle and high school


students in the county.
Last school year, more
than 1,800 students at-
tended JA classes in Cit-
rus County.
JA-Citrus County thanks
all of the businesses that
sponsored the event by
purchasing lane banners.
Their generosity helped
make the event very suc-
cessful. They include:
WAHOO Sertoma; In-
verness Sertoma; Bay
Area Air Conditioning &
Heating; J & J Sod and
Landscaping; Accu-
Search Examination; Joy


Hayes Court Reporting;
Stanley Steamer; Citrus
Hills Village; Haag, Haag
& Frederich, PA.; River
Ventures Swim with Man-
atees; Advanced Towing;
Nick Nicholas Ford; Love
Honda; Crystal Automo-
tive Group; Kane's Ace
Hardware; Scott Adams
Construction; B.H. Gold
and Diamond Exchange;
Task Masters of Citrus
County; Family Jewelry
and Pawn Inverness;
Floral City Airboats;
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home Inc.; Mr Steven
Sachewicz; Taurus Metal


Recycling; Candy Mur-
phy/Investor's Choice Fi-
nancial Group Inc.;
Edward J. Serra, CPA;
West Coast Custom Closet
Systems; Bush Pest Serv-
ices; Waybright Real Es-
tate Inc./Rose Strawn,
Realtor Associate; Ameri-
can Title Services of Cit-
rus County; Inter-County
Recycling; Insurance Den
Inc.; Hooper FRneral
Homes; Don Poss Roofing
Inc.; Harold B. Stephens,
Attorney at Law; Clardy
Law Firm; Eden Law
Group; CTA Audio; Cody's
Original Roadhouse


Need break from
gunfire
I'd like to ask the resi-
dents of DeRosa
Village and Holi-
day Heights
areas in Red
Level if they
could please
give me one
Sunday with no
gunfire all day
long. I'd like to
get some rest if CAL
it's not too
much to ask. 563-
Just, you know,
maybe next Sun-
day everybody just take a
break and not shoot their
guns off, because it's re-
ally hard to rest with gun-
fire going off all day long
in all different directions.
Illegal signs
popping up
Here we go again. After
a one-time cleanup of all
illegal signs on every
street corner, they're
back again, popping up


Restaurant; Citrus County
Chronicle; and The Plan-
tation Inn Golf Resort and
Spa.
A special thanks goes
out to the JA Staff: Jon
Epps and Alex Rolfsen of
the Tampa District JA Of-
fice; Rose Strawn, event
coordinator ofJA-Citrus
County; and John
Dohmen Bob Bonomo,
Marian Nosal, Raenee
Franklin, Amy DeLaPaz,
Mark Klauder and Ed
Blair of the JA-Citrus
County Board who
worked tirelessly to make
the event a success. Also,


-(


all over the county. Please
have the road mainte-
nance or code enforce-
ment and other county
employees rid-
UND| ing around pick
up these signs
L M and call the
phone numbers
and fine the vio-
lators. This
should be an
ongoing
cleanup. Some-
one with author-
ity should see to
0579 this. Help keep
Citrus County
beautiful.
Playground
bathrooms locked
How can I be at the
Levy County playground
right behind the city hall
and the lavatories on
those bathrooms are
locked? I've got a 4-year-
old granddaughter (who)
wants to use it and we
can't get in because
they're locked. How
ridiculous is that?


thanks to Steve McCol-
lough of Manatee Lanes
for his fine support.
Anyone interested in
finding out more about
the activities or volunteer
opportunities at Junior
Achievement in Citrus
County can contact John
Dohmen, JA-Citrus
County Board Chair at
352-249-7544. Junior
Achievement investing
in our children's future.
Staff
Junior Achievement,
Citrus County


Inverness
/1/ Elks Lodge #2522



/cAAFT 5HOW



Sadwlaq

0(4" k23

9:00 am*- 3:00 pm


3580 Lemon St., Hernando

For more information
Call 860-2598

CiiRDiCLE
"OODTJX


American Irish Club

Annual Invitational

Golf Tournament

Saturday April 6TH
Seven Rivers Country Club
Hole-in-One Prize
2013 Ford Fusion 2-year Lease
Sponsored by Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln of Crystal River
Sign in by 11:15am
Shotgun start at 12:30pm

Scramble Best Ball Format
Cost $55 per person includes
golf, cart, prizes, & lunch
Social hour with cash bar and appetizers
during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm.
For information and sign-up contact:
Dave Horsman 897-1398
Russ Doring 795-4548
Herb Duval 794-7465


Course Rules Apply No Denim orT-Shirts


Rotary Club of Inverness
ANNUAL CHARITY

GOLFTOURNAMENT

8:30 a.m. Saturday
Shotgu;Sta ooApril 013

forinformationcall
726-6496 Inverness
or" Golf&
212-0232,. r.,,mntr,*I,,h.


Y.0v A
,0. ..... I
= ;^ o ^(lh
,. -'2 ~~~ ~~, .. . .......


Mardi Gras

Homosasa Stule

Saturday, March 23"' a d
S Z Do.ya on






Rotarg Club of Homosassa Springs CiON AIR E






Vendors please call Marybeth Nayfield at 352-795-7297.
If you'd like to participate in the parade E-mail
Gregg Mackler at Gregg@homosassaprinting.com.
To volunteer please call Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520.

Come Pinch A Little Tail
www.shrimpapalooza.com


March 17th
Inverness St. Patrick's Day Celebration
3/17 St. Paddy events at Dillon;s
St. Patrick's Day Parade including Mutt Strut

March 17th
51st Annual St. Pat's
Championship Golf Tournament
Call 726-2583 or 586-6510 for more information.

March 17th 2 p.m.
Andy Cooney's Forever Irish
Call 746-3947 for more information.

March 22nd 6 p.m.- 9 p.m.
March for Meals
Call 527-5975 for more information.

March 23rd 9:30 a.m.
Withlacoochee Wilderness Challenge
Call 586-2255 for more information.

March 23rd 9 a.m 3 p.m.
Lakeside Craft Show
Call 860-2598 for more information.

March 23rd 8 a.m
3rd Annual Fundraising Golf Tournament
Call 503-7355 for more information.

March 23rd 8:30 a.m
Garden Club Trip to Kanapaha
Botanical Gardens
Call 257-1211 for more information.

March 23rd 7:30 a.m
Knights of Columbus Golf Tournament

March 23rd 6 p.m.- 9:30 p.m.
Music on the Square
Call 201-0149 for more information.

March 23rd 8 a.m
Lowes Vendor Day Event
Call 860-5800 for more information.

March 23rd 11:30 a.m
4th Annual Teen Stock
Call 860-5800 for more information.

March 23rd 10:00 a.m
Shrimpapalooza
Call 563-3275 for more information.


Thank-you LETTER


-1


m


C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS


SProtecting
your
nonprofit
PAGE D2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Not being plugged into technology


Danielle Kerese
IN THE
MEME TIME


Oh no! I forgot my phone! Have
you ever experienced this mis-
fortune?
I was doing fine until I realized my
phone was gone. Then sudden and
overbearing anxiety sank in. Should I
turn around and go home to get it? It's
only 30 minutes away
No. I'm only five minutes from
work; I can't afford to waste gas like
that, or be an hour late to work. I can
stick it out.
An hour passes. Is my sister texting
me?


Hour and a half... is someone call-
ing me?
Two hours ... is there a new photo of
a Chihuahua wearing booties I should
be looking at on Facebook?
Two and a half hours go by I break
down and call my husband.
"Hey! How are you? So, do you
want to meet for lunch and can you
maybe bring me my cell phone?"
Phew! Crisis averted, but I still
have to wait another three hours for
lunch.
Now I'm waiting and testing my


ability to be "unplugged," as the term
goes. In my job, it does not pay to be
unplugged. But I'm trying. This really
should be OK. I spent more than half
my adult life without a cell phone.
How can I possibly be so reliant on it?
I know a lot of people are out there
who don't have a cell phone, or maybe
have one just for emergencies, and
you are thinking: "Hey, this girl is a lu-
natic." That may be true, but I take
comfort in the fact that a lot of you out
See MEME/Page D5


Prepaid

funeral

kindness

to kin
Dear Bruce: I am
61 years old and
had planned to
pay into a prepaid fu-
neral. My friends think
I'm too young for this
and advise I would just
be giving money to the
bank (in an escrow ac-
count). Their sugges-
tions include putting the
money in a CD or life in-
surance. What do you
think? Sam, via email
Dear Sam: I don't
agree with your friends
at all. You could check
out tomorrow or stick
around for another 20
years. The prepaid fu-
neral is a very thought-
ful gift to leave behind.
You decide on the
budget, the type of cere-
mony, cremation vs. cas-
ket burial, etc. Who
better than you to make
those decisions?
Many undertakers sell
prepaid funeral plans.
Then, even though fu-
neral rates go up over
the years, yours does not.
They also should have
some arrangement that
provides a full refund,
with interest, should you
decide to move and, as a
consequence, not need
their services.
Putting the money
into a CD or life insur-
ance is not a bad idea.
It's where your comfort
level lies. With the pre-
paid funeral, however,
you've made a specific
plan. You're not just
leaving a lump sum of
money and requiring
someone else to make
all the decisions.
Dear Bruce: I am a 73-
year-old widow with a
$150,000 balloon mort-
gage coming due in one
year The house is worth
$350,000. I expect to
move in three years to
an independent living
community. Would it be
best to pay off the bal-
loon from part of my sav-
ings (mutual funds) or
refinance the mortgage?
- T.P, via email
Dear TE: You have a
balloon coming due in
one year, but two years
after that you expect to
move into an independ-
ent living community. It
seems to me you should
consider selling the
house now.
A sale is not going to
happen overnight; it
might very well take a
year or more to fix up the
house and get it sold. If
you sell now, you can ask
whatever price you think
is reasonable and, if the
house doesn't move, you
have time to lower the
price. If you are fortu-
nate and someone comes
in with a good offer, you
can sell and either move
to the independent living
community earlier or
rent an apartment or
small home for the next
two years.
If you decide not to
sell now, I would be in-
clined to pay off the
mortgage instead of refi-
nancing for only two
years, assuming you
have the money in sav-
ings. This, of course, as-
sumes the money is not
earning a large return. If
whatever you're in-
vested in is doing ex-
tremely well (I don't
think a mutual fund
See .Page D5








Understanding a corporate veil for a nonprofit


A corporation is
viewed as a
legal entity with
a life of its own.
The "corporate veil" -
is a legal concept sep- >.-J
rating the owners) ,
and shareholders of a
corporation from the
corporate entity itself.
The legal structure of Dr. Fr
a corporation pro- Her
vides limited liability. NONF
Criminal activity and
certain corporate mis- BRI
management can com-
promise this protection.
"Piercing the corporate veil" is
the term used when legal action
penetrates or pierces this shield.
Incorporating a nonprofit pro-
vides limited liability, long-lasting


I






e
r
'I


life and centralized or-
ganization. Addition-
ally, nonprofits can
receive state and fed-
eral taxation relief.
They also have the
protection of the "cor-
porate veil."
Nonprofits are gen-
erally perceived to
derick have a positive image
zog by the public. Facts
ROFIT demonstrate they do
good things. That's a
EFS given. But things can
go wrong. Corporate
negligence can occur and cause
the limited liability to be tested in
the courts. Legal protections can
go away just as easily for a non-
profit as they do in for-profit busi-
nesses.


The very nature of a nonprofit
suggests best practices should be
employed in all areas of manage-
ment. Conduct of and by the offi-
cers and directors should never
overstep the managerial bound-
aries expected of this type of or-
ganization. There is a growing
focus on the activities of non-
profit groups by governmental
agencies, industry and the legal
community. The closer a non-
profit acts like a for-profit com-
pany, the greater the concern.
The greatest risk to the non-
profit is distributing profits or net
earnings to the officers, directors
or members, if there are any
Nonprofits cannot issue shares of
ownership, because there are no
owners. The nonprofit executive
leadership is only stakeholders in


the commitment to service. The
excess of revenue over expenses
in the association coffers must be
retained and devoted only to the
purpose for which the nonprofit
was created.
Even with certain well-defined
financial limitations, nonprofits
are allowed a great breadth of fi-
nancial freedom. A nonprofit cor-
poration can have paid
employees, compensate consult-
ants for services rendered, pur-
chase real estate and make
investments. Officers and direc-
tors can be reimbursed for legiti-
mate out-of-pocket expenses as
they perform their corporate du-
ties of service. Travel, lodging
and meals are typical reim-
bursable expenses when in-
curred in the business of the


nonprofit organization. Officers
and directors can also be com-
pensated for meeting attendance,
because their expertise is essen-
tial to the management of the
organization.
There are other acceptable fi-
nancial ventures in which non-
profits can be involved. Some
examples are: real estate and
building ownership, especially
when it is to house the organiza-
tion; rental income; magazine ad-
vertising revenue; and trade
show and event sponsorship.
The IRS has a category for non-
profits that have high revenue-
producing trade shows and
magazine revenue. Those non-
profits are taxed on the net rev-
enue remaining after all expenses
are paid by the association.


toa0mts Speed Networking Hou
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910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
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To Place Your Ad Call

563-5592



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Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

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Corporate Tax Preparation
Business Accounting Services
QuickBooks Consulting
Payroll Services

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BOB LANE,Accountant W
Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness


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726-8130


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For more information
on advertising call
Judy Moseley at
352-564-2917 or
Yvonne Shepard at
1 352-563-3273 1


SWITH T US


D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE











D3


TgUS CITRUS COUNTY
OA* .Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn
28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


Tallahassee Bus Leaves Wednesday AND Thursday


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Tara Lothian
Verizon Retdil Sale-s.
Invlerne$s
... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Citrus County
Cruisin'





March 17 TODAY
everyone is Irish
Crystal River:
10 a.m. parade. Dress
yourself and your dog
in your best Irish garb
and meet at Burkes of
Ireland fora stroll to the
park and back. Dogs
must be leashed at all
times. Call 352-795-0956.
Inverness: 5:30 p.m.
parade. A short parade
route creates lots of en-
ergy at the annual St.
Patrick's Day parade in
Inverness. For information,
email SunnyatEvents@
Inverness-FL.gov or
call 352-726-2611.
March 23 SHRIMPA-
PALOOZA begins with
an amazing Mardi Gras
parade in the morning,
followed by the Shrim-
papalooza festival held
behind the Homosassa
Civic Association on Yulee
Drive. Enjoy live music,
tons of great seafood
mixed with more than
100 vendors and a kid's
zone. For more informa-
tion, call 352-634-0918.
CORRECTED DATE:
March 23 UNDER-
WATER EGG HUNT at
Bicentennial Park pool
in Crystal River. 11 a.m.
to 2 pm. For informa-
tion, call Citrus County
Parks and Rec at 352-
527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountypa rks.com.
March 25 to 30 THE
CITRUS COUNTY FAIR
at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds, 3600 S.
Florida Ave. Rides, ex-
hibits, animals, food and
fun! For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-2993.
March 30 -
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
SPRING EASTER EGG
HUNT. Photos with Easter
Bunny, other costumed
characters also available.
8 a.m. For information,
call 352-628-5343.
April 8 15th AN-
NUAL SCORE CLASSIC,
SUGARMILL WOODS
COUNTRY CLUB. $60
per golfer, includes
lunch. 1 p.m. shotgun
start, 5:30 p.m. award
ceremony. All entries
must be received by Fri-
day, March 29. For infor-
mation, call Dennis King
or Dan Crishon at 352-
249-1236 or email
citruschapter@live.com.
April 20 Music in the
Park second annual Blue
Grass Festival at Fort
Cooper State Park: Six
terrific bluegrass groups
performing throughout
the day. Classic autos,
art & craft vendors. Ad-
mission adult 13
years old $6 advance/$9
at gate;12 and younger
- FREE. Rain or shine,
bring a chair. No coolers.
Call 352-726-0315 or
email dianne.drye
@dep.state.fl.us.
April 26-28 Florida
Elvis Festival at the His-
toric Citrus County
Courthouse and the Old
Courthouse Heritage
Museum, Inverness, FL
34450. For information,
call 352-341-6427 or
352-341-6436.


Join us for Legislative Day 2013.
There are still a few spots on the bus
to Tallahassee! Come up Wednes-
day to enjoy an evening of BBQ pro-
vided by the Citrus County Ag
Alliance and live music by Southern
Satisfaction.
While room blocks are full; other
hotels have space. Thursday is a


Coffee with


Grab your coffee, tea or orange
juice and sit with us a bit as we in-
troduce a new business right here in
Citrus County.
Business: The Nonprofit Re-
source Center at 1201 W. Beagle Run
Loop, Hernando, FL 34442.
Purpose: to advise staff, officers,
directors and volunteers on the best
practices in managing a nonprofit
organization. Dr. Fred Herzog ex-
plains: "professional guidance in
starting or managing a nonprofit or-
ganization has become crucial to
success and survival in today's com-
plex environment. The Nonprofit
Resource Center will focus on re-
viewing nonprofit organization
structure, review and filing of essen-
tial documents, and an emphasis on
best management practices and
Grant writing."


bustling day with a tour of the
Supreme Court, lunch with keynote
speaker Secretary of Commerce
Gray Swoope, and then an afternoon
with various speakers. The bus re-
turns to the Crystal River Mall and
WTI on Thursday night.
To reserve your space, email Ar-
dath Prendergast at ardath@


citruscountychamber.com.
This annual trip to Tallahassee is
brought to you by the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce and the Cit-
rus County Economic Development
Council.
We thank our generous sponsors
and partners that make this trip pos-
sible: Progress Energy, SunTrust


Inverness


)Rotary

hosts


Business
After





-% The Ni Hours


- The Nonprofit Resource Center


An important feature of the Non- help," says Dr. Herzog.
profit Resource Center will be grant We must remember "Nonprofits
research, writing and availability, are businesses too. They must be
Dr. Herzog holds a pro- managed well to avoid in-
fessional corporate mem- voluntary dissolution, loss
bership in a national of grant benefits and mis-
database that tracks new sion creep. More impor-
and existing grants that are tantly, when there is a
available for nonprofits. perception of poor man-
Why is this type of agement it results in dimin-
counseling important? ished volunteer interest
"Governmental agencies at and support and that leads
both the Federal and State levels are to failure," explains Dr. Herzog. He
scrutinizing all aspects of new and continued on a positive note, "when
existing nonprofits. Citrus County organizational leadership allows for
has more than 700 such organiza- objective and professional examina-
tions. When you add nonprofits tion of the nonprofit's activity to in-
from adjoining counties to the mix, clude Grant Application ... changes
the number climbs to more than can be made and success can result."
4,400 nonprofits. The magnitude of You can reach Dr. Herzog by
this number alone escalates the email at fherzo(g@tampabav.rr.com


need for professional management


Upcoming Chamber
events
March 19 Ribbon-cutting, Quality Inn Conference
Center, Hernando 4:30 p.m.
April 2 Ribbon-cutting, Glasswerx, Crystal River
8:30 a.m.
April 4 Ribbon-cutting, Franklin Anderson Art


U.

I U


Gallery, Crystal River
4:30 p.m.
April 10 Ribbon-
cutting Antonio Griffin
Lawn & Garden @ CR
Chamber 8:30 a.m.
April 11 Business
After Hours, Insight
Credit Union, Inverness
5-7 p.m.
April 12 April Cham-


ber Lunch, Plantation on Crystal River 11:30 a.m.
April 25 Business After Hours @ Suncoast
Schools Federal Credit Union, Inverness 5-7 p.m.
April 26 Chamber Pillar Awards Dinner @ Citrus
Hills Golf & Country Club, 6-10 p.m.
Check out our calendar for a complete listing of
events.


or at 847-899-9000.


Bank and Citrus County Tourist
Development Council.
We also thank Dawn Faherty,
District Aide to State Rep. Jimmie T.
Smith for all her work in contacting
and arranging for many of our
speakers, setting up the tour of the
Supreme Court and distributing the
BBQ invitations in Tallahassee.



Welcome

new

February

Chamber

members

These businesses chose to
invest in Citrus County with a
membership in the Chamber
and we thank them. We hope
that you will support these new
members and visit their facili-
ties/consider using their serv-
ices. The Chamber of
Commerce and Economic De-
velopment Council encourage
you to Shop Citrus First! All
phone numbers listed are 352
area code unless otherwise
noted.
Aaron's Sales & Lease
1850 State Road 44 W.
Inverness
726-8222
Butler Wealth Advisors
511 Hillwood Point
Beverly Hills
249-7738
Cruise Planners/
Land & Cruise Specialist
5625 W. Alameda Lane
Crystal River
563-0307
Florida Manatee
Adventure
288 N. Seabreeze Point
Crystal River
476-7556
Lange Eye Care
2629 N. Forest Ridge Blvd
Hemando
527-2775
Marine Science Station
12646 Fort Island Trail
Crystal River
795-4394
The Nonprofit Resource
Center
1201 W. Beagle Run Loop
Hemando
847-899-9000
Quality Inn Conference
Center
350 E. Norvell Bryant
Highway
Hemando
867-7476


o: DINE
STAY
SHOP





CITRUS CouNTY
Chamber of Commerce


Want to know what is going on in Citrus County? You can follow community happenings
that involve our Chamber members at www.citruscountychamber.com under
News/Events-Community Calendar. Even better, you can load that website to your smart
phone so you ALWAYS know what is going on. Always have the phone number and
address of Chamber members at your fingertips. Where ever you go, What ever you do,
take Citrus County along with you!


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


girtLIE ..--. ,,
-.-


PUT CITRUS COUNTY IN YOUR HANDS


Every Chamber member goes with you!


What to SEE
VIEW Local Ev




w B












SUNDAY
MARCH 17,2013


Promotional information provided by the Citrus County Builders Association






Builder's Connection


Parade of Homes begins


Tour 15 models though March 24


Now is the time to take advan-
tage of the best home prices and
lowest interest rates during the
biggest Parade of Homes for Cit-
rus and Hernando counties in
five years! The 2013 Spring Pa-
rade of Homes for Citrus and
Hernando counties, presented
by Gold Sponsors Cadence Bank


and Florida Public Utilities,
began March 16 and ends March
24. The 2013 Spring Parade of
Homes features 15 models from
the following fine Citrus and
Hernando county builders:
Alexander Custom Homes.
Artistic Homes.
Dream Custom Homes.


Gold Crest Homes.
GreenPointe Homes.
Hartland Homes.
Pastore Custom Builders.
Richard Van Orden Distinc-
tive Homes.
Royal Coachman Homes.
Parade of Homes models will
be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Saturday and
from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday
Parade of Homes judging,


sponsored by Bright House Net-
works, took place Thursday,
March 14, with awards to be an-
nounced Thursday, March 28, at
the Spring Parade of Homes
Banquet, sponsored by Bluewa-
ter Drafting.
Official Parade of Homes
guides could be obtained Friday,
March 15, from 2013 Print Media
Sponsor Tampa Bay Times. Offi-
cial guides can also be picked up


at the CCBA at 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway, Lecanto, FL 34446,
during their regular office hours
of 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday
through Thursday
For more information about
the Parade of Homes models, vir-
tual tours, additional sponsors,
last year's award winners and an
interactive map, please visit
www.CitrusParadeofHomes.com
or call 352-746-9028.


Fourth annual Bull & BBQ Competition


i^-._7__ f-K__ i-4M-a'^

.plop
6A.


The Citrus County Builders Association conducted its fourth annual Bull & BBQ Competition on
Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013. This year's competition was a "Master Chef" contest, which encompassed
Best Chili, Wings, BBQ and Side Dish. The coveted "Best of Show" People's Choice Award includes a
5-foot-tall trophy featured in the CCBA lobby year around. From left are: Best Wings winner Trish Curry
of Curry's Rooftop BBQ (with daughters Rachel and Audrey); Best BBQ winner Mike Curry of Curry's
Roofing; Best of Show winner Anjela Wright of Gold Crest Homes; Best Chili winners Jim and Lori Haussy
of AAA Roofing; and Best Side Dish winner Kathleen Gilbert of Gold Crest Realty. Special thanks to all
participants in this year's cook-off, Suncoast Plumbing & Electric and Porter's Locksmithing.



SEBC, New Southern Home set for July 11-13 in Orlando


ORLANDO With its
popular showcase home in
place and an impressive
line-up of exhibitors, semi-
nars and speakers, the
Florida Home Builders As-
sociation-sponsored South-
east Building Conference
(SEBC) is prepared to cele-
brate its 35th anniversary
in style.
The annual trade show
and educational confer-
ence will be July 11 to 13 at
the Orange County Conven-
tion Center South Hall
Bl, while the New South-
ern Home, built by Nathan
Cross of NWC Construction
Inc., will be on display to
the public Friday, July 12,
and Saturday, July 13. The


2013
SEBC a1




$699,000 home is just south
of Orlando in the city of
Belle Isle and will be a
model for green building
and energy-efficiency
SEBC's trade show com-
ponent will feature a wide
range of products and serv-
ices for the new home
builder and professional


remodeler, including spe-
cialty pavilions featuring
Hurricane Alley, green
building and masonry
In addition to offering all
14 hours of state-required
continuing education for
Florida contractors, the
educational lineup in-
cludes complete tracks of
education on management,
sales/marketing, Green
Building, design/architec-
ture, and technology ... all
presented by industry ex-
perts such as Christine
Hamilton and John
Palumbo.
New in 2013 is our part-
nership with the Energy &
Environmental Building
Alliance (EEBA) and the


Houses that Work educa-
tional session, which will
be presented Wednesday
and Thursday These pro-
grams are designated pro-
grams and offer up to 6.5 of
continuing education for
NAHB designations, engi-
neers, architects and
Realtors.
SEBC is also home to the
Aurora Awards, the pre-
mier building industry de-
sign competition in the
Southeast, which will
honor its winners Saturday
evening, July 13, at the
Rosen Centre' Hotel.
For more on SEBC and
the Aurora Awards, visit
www.sebcshow.com and
www.theauroras.com.


Angle for a spot


in annual


fishing tourney

The 18th annual Family and excited to be able to
Fishing Tournament, pre- create this opportunity for
sented by Exclusive Plat- the veterans and the cap-
inum Sponsor FDS tains alike.
Disposal, has been sched- CCBA will again host the
uled for April 27 and 28 at popular Aaron Monier Me-
the Homosassa Riverside morial Youth Tournament
Resort in Homosassa, with in conjunction with the
the Captain's Meeting to CCBA tournament, and
take place at 6 p.m. Friday, youth registration forms
April 26, at the same loca- are now available online
tion. This year's tourna- and at the CCBA.
ment will boast more than Additionally, the CCBA
$12,500 in cash and prizes Family Fishing Tourna-
based on 125 paid boat en- ment has teamed up with
tries. CCBA expects to beat the Mel Tillis & Friends
2012 totals of 119 paid Fishing Tournament, for a
boats at 98 percent prize second year, to offer the
payout, popular Super Angler Pass.
The 17th annual Family The 2013 Super Angler
Fishing Tournament com- Pass offers fishermen who
mittee was able to present wish to enter both the Mel
the Aaron A. Weaver Chap- Tillis & Friends Fishing
ter 776 Military Order of Tournament (scheduled for
the Purple Heart (MOPH) April 13) and the CCBA
with a check in the amount 18th annual Family Fishing
of $1,513.79 from the 2012 Tournament can save $25
tournament, on each tournament by reg-
The Fishing Tourna- isteringattheCCBAforthe
ment Committee has an- Super Angler Pass no later
nounced not only will they than March 31.
donate a portion of the Gold registrations will
proceedsto to the MOPH close Monday, March 18.
again, but they are work- Silver and Bronze sponsor-
ing with the Homosassa ships are still available and
Guides Association to door prize and goodie
arrange donated time with bucket donations are now
charter captains for up to being accepted. Tourna-
five veterans and their ment information, online
family members to fish registration and payment
during this year's tourna- are available at the events
ment. The veterans will be page of www.Citrus
selected by the MOPH ac- Builders.com, or in person
cording to capacity at the CCBA between the
limits and time hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
availability of Monday through
the donating Thursday
captains. For more infor-
The CCBA nation about
and the 2013 --a participating
Exclusive ---- J in or donat-
PlatinumA ing to this
Sponsor tourna-
FDS Dis- ment ,
posal Inc. are pleased at please contact Executive
the enthusiastic response Officer Donna Bidlack at
to this part of the program 352-746-9028.


Community turns out for 2013 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing


Fair weather and the Boys &
Girls Club of Citrus County
joined the Citrus County
Builders Association and 79
players on the Seven Rivers Golf
& Country Club course for a
game of golf if memory of Jim
Blackshear, sponsored by Love
Chevrolet & Honda, on Saturday,
Feb. 23. Trophies and prizes
were won and a great time was
had by all, with approximately
$2,000 raised for the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.
Congratulations to outing win-
ners Lecanto Veterinary Clinic,
"The President's Team" and
"Here for the Beer" winners the
Citrus County Chronicle team
(not pictured). Special thanks to
all of our sponsors, donors and
volunteers who helped make
this event successful!
Corporate Sponsors: Love
Chevrolet & Honda and Home-
town Values Magazine.
Hole in One Sponsors: Eagle
Buick GMC and Harley David-
son of Crystal River.
Beverage Cart Sponsors:
Citrus Pest Management, Senica
Air Conditioning, Skidmore's
Moving & Storage and Waste
Pro.
Longest Drive Sponsor: Flo-
rian Masonry
Closest to the Centerline
Sponsor: Porter's Locksmithing.
Closest to the Pin Sponsor:


ABOVE: Lecanto Veterinary Hospital's team took first place at the 2013 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf
Outing. From left ate Donovan Anderson; Wade Phillips, DVM; Jason Delapaz; and Golf Outing Chairman
Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready Mix.


The "President's Team" took second place at the 2013 Jim Blackshear Memorial Golf Outing. From left
are Golf Outing Chairman Dan Kern of Gulf Coast Ready Mix, CCBA President Bill Larder of Larder &
Sons Construction and Ken Lindquist of Ken Lindquist Corp. Team members not pictured are Joseph
Chewning and Rufus Miniard of AAA Roofing Inc.
Blackshears II Aluminum. 0 Golf Towel Sponsor: Ro-mac Lumber & Supply


Water Sponsor: AAA Roofing.
Tee and Green Sponsors:
Advanced Pier Technology, Flo-
rian Masonry, Gulf Coast Ready
Mix, Kings Bay Engineering and
Porter's Locksmithing.
Prize and Goodie Bag Spon-
sors: AAA Roofing, Blackshears
II Aluminum, Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County, CenterState
Bank, Crystal River Firestone,
David M. Rom State Farm,
Hometown Values Magazine, Ho-
mosassa Riverside Resort, Ink-4-
Less dba Total Ink, Lecanto
Veterinary Clinic, Manatee
Lanes, Porter's Locksmithing,
Ro-mac Lumber & Supply and
StoreRight Self Storage.
Committee Members and
Volunteers:
Chairman Dan Kern, Gulf
Coast Ready Mix.
John and Dusty Porter,
Porter's Locksmithing.
Kevin Blackshear, Blacks-
hears II Aluminum.
Terri Stewart, Boys & Girls
Clubs of Citrus County.
Wayne Bardsley, Quality
Crafted Builders.
Angela Wright and John
Melchionne, Gold Crest Homes.
Dawn and Emily Peters.
Fred Clark, Total Ink.
Amy Stonestreet, Kathleen
Burroughs, Melissa Richburg
and Mike Gufford of the Boys &
Girls Club of Citrus County.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


H20
Continued from Page Dl

could overtake soda within the next
decade. That's not counting en-
hanced and flavored waters, which
are growing quickly but remain a
small part of the bottled-water
industry
Currently, people drink 21 gallons
of bottled water a year. That com-
pares with 37 gallons of other water,
which includes tap, sparkling, fla-
vored and enhanced waters such as
Coca-Cola's Vitaminwater.
But there are numerous factors
that could tilt the scales in favor of
tap water.
Because of concerns that plastic
bottles create too much waste, ex-
perts say bottled water could be hit
by a public backlash similar to the
one that has whipsawed the soda
industry with pushes for bans and
taxes.
New York City was preparing for
a ban on cups of sugary drinks
larger than 16 ounces which started
Tuesday But Monday a day be-
fore the ban was to begin a judge
invalidated the regulation. Mayor
Michael Bloomberg, who originally
proposed the ban, vowed to appeal
the judge's ruling.
Bottled water already is starting
to face similar opposition. The town
of Concord, Mass., earlier this year
banned the sale of water bottles less
than a liter. And the University of
Vermont became the first public
university to ban the sale of bottled
water
Meanwhile, other cities are wag-
ing campaigns to promote tap water.
New York City, which touts the high
quality of its tap water, offers
portable fountains at events around
the city.
"Good old marketing has con-
vinced people that they should
spend a lot of money on bottled
water," said Salome Freud, chief of
New York City's distribution water
quality operations.
Although companies such as
Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo Inc.
would rather have people buy bot-
tled waters, they're even more in-
vested in getting people to drink
more soda again.
That's because soda and other
drinks the companies make, such


MEME
Continued from Page D1

there know exactly what I
am talking about It's as if I
left part of my brain home
- the part that constantly


Associated Press
Walter Pugh, 83, of Belzoni, Miss., loads a case of his favorite bottled water
on to his shopping basket March 5 at this Jackson, Miss., Sam's Club. The
public's desire for bottled water continues to climb as soft drinks wane and
consumers benefit from the growing choice of waters.


as sports drinks and juices, are
more profitable than bottled water
With bottled water, people tend to
buy whatever is cheapest. That
habit forces companies to keep
prices relatively low, which eats
into profits.
It's why companies are investing
so heavily in developing nations
such as China and India, where the
appetite for soda continues to grow.
In the U.S., annual soda sales are
more than five times as big as bot-
tled water at $75.7 billion a year, ac-
cording to Beverage Digest. In
terms of volume, soda is only twice
as big as bottled water
At Coca-Cola, the No. 1 soda
maker, three-quarters of its volume
in gallons comes from soft drinks,
compared with 8 percent for its bot-
tled waters including Dasani. Pep-
siCo, the No. 2 soda maker, gets 64
percent of its volume from soft
drinks and only 7 percent from its
Aquafina bottled water.
It's why Coca-Cola, which holds
13 percent of the bottled-water mar-
ket compared with PepsiCo's 10
percent, doesn't seem to think bot-
tled water will ever overtake soda.
In an emailed statement, the At-
lanta-based company noted soft
drinks remain a far larger category


craves interaction with
family, friends, acquain-
tances and even strangers.
So yes, I'm addicted to
my phone. I am not proud
of my dependence on a lit-
tle piece of technology like
this. Maybe I should un-
plug for a while, forget


than bottled water and it sees "up-
side" for sodas throughout the next
several years.
However, the company added it
saw "great potential" for bottled
water. Like its competitors, Coca-
Cola said it's focusing on growing its
portfolio of bottled waters prof-
itably by offering brands such as
Smartwater and its flavored Vitam-
inwater, which fetch higher prices.
In the meantime, the chairman
and former CEO of Nestle Waters
North America, Kim Jeffery, is wait-
ing for bottled water's moment in
the spotlight. Nestle, the Swiss com-
pany that makes Poland Spring,
Nestle Pure Life, Deer Park and
other brands, has nearly half of the
share of the bottled-water market.
At a beverage industry confer-
ence late last year, Jeffery noted
bottled water is "the elephant in the
room."
And given the growing warnings
over drinking too many calories -
including from juice, milk and
other sugary drinks Jeffery said
he's confident water will continue
to grow in popularity.
"For thousands of years, water
was beverage of choice for human
beings," he said. "Now we're re-
verting back to that."


about what the rest of the
world is doing. I don't need
to "check in" at the trendy
restaurant, yake pictures
of my self-manicured nails
for Instagram or play
Words with Friends.
My phone just got here!
Maybe someday I'll un-


plug, but for now I'm
plugged in and anxiously
awaiting your questions.
For my fellow plugged-in
peeps: Don't drive and text.
Don't walk and text If you
have to take a call, make a
call, check messages or
post on Facebook, pull over


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

would meet that descrip-
tion), you might wish to
get a new mortgage. But
for two years, I would fix
up the house and recap-
ture the costs when you
sell.
Dear Bruce: I am in the
middle of a divorce. I built
a consulting business
from scratch, and I am the
sole employee. Her attor-
ney said the business is
worth $800,000, with
$150,000 annual gross rev-
enue. Since I am the only
employee, and since with-
out me there is no busi-
ness, how do you put
value on something like
this? Reader, via email
Dear Reader: You have
an interesting conun-
drum, given if you decide
to leave, there is no busi-
ness. On the other hand,
you're not going to do that
because of the $150,000
annual gross revenue.
This could be a battle,
particularly when you're
talking about the $800,000
value of the business. It is
a matter of negotiation,
and I trust you've selected
an attorney who is rea-
sonably adroit in such
matters.
There are enterprises
that hold themselves out
as experts in attempting
to value businesses like
yours. You may want to
consult with one. Also, if I
were you, I would do my
best to have my attorney
negotiate a one-time
price rather than have to
pay a percentage of my
annual income forever.
Another option is an
arrangement where you
would pay what amounts
to alimony for a relatively
modest period.
If there are other assets
to be distributed, you
might try to negotiate an
agreement in which she


and be safe about it. Our
technology addiction isn't
worth getting ourselves or
other people hurt.


Danielle Kerese is the
multi-media designer at
the Citrus County Chroni-


BUSINESS


~Chronicl]ei [I


To place an ad, call 563"5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748


Antique School Desk
Beautiful shape
$125.
(386) 684-2466
CHINA CABINET
Large, Cherry Wood, 3
glass shelves, lots of
storage below. In
good condition $200
(352) 628-5085
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,1 slide, w/AC,
qn. bed, awning, pwr.
tonque jack, corner
jacks, microwave, equili-
zing hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826


C iS-s -cl -gsS --food Ceia M edial Mda


Couch & love seat
white, great condition
$300. Refrigerator,
almond side by side, ice
maker runs perfect
$300. (352) 419-6880
HERNANDO
Newly remodeled 3/2,
Lg. Lot, waterview
$645. mo 1st. last, sec.
352-400-1501
KENMORE
White 21CF Upright
Freezer $100; White 18
CF Refrigerator $100
Both very good cond.
(352) 628-5085
Lund Renegade
16',inc.89 Johnson 70hp
& 94 galvinized trlr.
recent complete interior
overhaul,strong engine
Lot of boat for money!
Ask.$4350, 352-897-
5305 or 412-508-0247


OPEN HOUSE
Sun. 17th, 12N 3PM
4698 N. Jademoor Dr.
Laurel Ridge
PHONOGRAPH
1923 Free standing
Brunswick. Oak case,
20 records & needles.
Works like new. $650
(352) 746-2306
Primary Cleaning
**Free Estimates-
call Kala 352-212-6817
PUPPIES
Miniature Daschunds
2 girls avail, ckc papers,
shots, $350 ea.
786-286-1163
PUPPIES
Miniature Daschunds
2 girls avail, ckc papers,
shots, $350 ea.
786-286-1163
Res. Cleaner
Local established
cleaning company
looking for reliable,
P/T or F/T help.
Willing to work
independently and
as a team player.
Worthwhile work.
Positive personality
a plus. Please call:
352-302-6418



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



63" Mitsubishi TV,
works great, Serta Box
Springs & Metal frames
full sz, black stereo
cabinet on wheels,
exercise ab swing, must
take all 352-489-6146


Free Horse manure &
shavings, excel. for
gardening, & plantings
(352) 746-7044
Looking for a good
home for 1 yr old
male cat. He is part
bengal. Must have
Vet references.
(352) 464-1567
Natural Soil Builder
Horse Manure
You Load. Pine Ridge
(352) 270-9372
Pine Straw &
Leafs You load and
Haul (352) 726-1633
Pure Bred Boxer
Female, 4 1/2
to good home only
(352) 563-0328



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.00Ob,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy",
lost in vicinity of
W. Dunnellon Rd.
Owner is heartbroken.
(352) 400-3302
(352) 795-8662






We lost our cat
03/07/13 he is grey
and white neutered
male, he has grey on
his nose and face and
a white ring going
around the top of his
nose if found please
contact me at
352-422-0378


lbs, green eyes, extra
toes, Name is Big Foot.
REWARD.
(352)503-9063

Lost Bank Envelope
with Money
Inverness, CVS area
NEEDED
(352) 726-7877




BICYCLE
Homosassa, vicinity of
Cardinal & Gross
pls call 352-628-2727

CHIHUAHUA
female, blonde, dk eyes
found in the vicinity of
Mulberry Lp, Pine Ridge
found 3/12. PIs call
Lisa 352-746-1172




Pleasant Grove
Church of Christ
3875 S. Pleasant
Grove Rd. Inverness
IS YOUR FAMILY
STRUGGLING?
SPEAKER:
DAN JENKINS
"God's View
of Your Home"
MAR. 17, 18, 19, & 20
Sun. Class 9:30 am
Sun. Morning 10:30a
Sun. Night 6pm
Mon. thru Wed. 7pm
A meal will be pro-
vided every night 6P




AVAILABLE
Pool Suooly Store
W/Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100,00011 Call Pat
**(813) 230-7177"*


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




SECRETARY
Announcement
#13-10
Moderately difficult
secretarial work
performing exten-
sive clerical duties
and tracks project
costing in Road
Maintenance.
Maintains division
budget, answers
phones, takes mes-
sages, directs calls.
Assists with customer
service, inquiries
and problem resolu-
tion. Minimum of
one year experi-
ence performing
secretarial/clerical
duties. Works four-
10 hour days
Monday-Thursday,
6:30 AM -5:00 PM.
Working knowledge
of the Microsoft
Office Suite of
Products. Starting
pay $9.99 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Please visit
our website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, March 22,
2013 EOE/ADA

#1Em 10 ment source is
www.chronicleonline.com


ASSISTANT
Busy real estate office
needs ambitious, quick
learner with the ability to
multi-task. Real estate
experience preferred.
Fast-paced work
environment providing
quality service.
Send resume to
aoc.chon@gmail.com

Domestai





IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111



Your World








CH RpN I



I r
4 'Mf "6a




. ..lir in. L E-. lii r


Family Support
Coordinator
The Centers
is seeking a Family
Support Coordinator
for our Community
Based Care
programs located
in Marion & Citrus
Counties.
This position trans-
ports children &
families, serves as a
paraprofessional to
case managers who
initiate & provide
svcs. Services
delivered aid in the
prevention of child
abuse & neglect by
providing training &
education to at risk
families. Must have
an acceptable
driving record,
background screen-
ing reqd. Mon to Fri,
flexible hours
needed, primarily
8am-5pm but trans-
portation needs
may be extended
to include over-
nights & weekends.
HS diploma or GED
equiv & 2 yrs exp in
child development
or childcare setting
reqd. Associates or
Bachelor's may
substitute for exp.
Salary is $9-11/hr.
DFWP/EOE/We
E-Verify Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us



Y ml \,di Il rst.
LEI) D )


CHk(ONICiE
E ,; Di


EXP PT Certified
Orthodontics
Asst/Front Office
Call 352-746-0330,
Ask for Vicki.

LPNs-Hospice
Full-time & Part-time
HPH Hospice is a
not-for-profit
community-based
healthcare organi-
zation providing
innovative, skilled
medical care to
patients with
life-limiting illness
and compassionate
support to their
family members.
* Weekends, FT & PT
* Nights, FT & PT
* Evenings, FT & PT
* Days, FT & PT
If you would like
more information,
please call our
recruiter, Cynthia at:
800-486-8784 or
apply online at:
www.HPH-Hospice.
org/careers

--t-4
HP0hospice
EOE
NURSE
PRACTITIONER
Needed for busy
medical practice.
Competitive salary
& benefits. F/T or P/T
Please Call:
(352) 746-1515or
Fax Resume To:
(352) 270-8889


FT BILLING CLERK
Full-time position available in busy
cardiology practice for
EXPERIENCED billing clerk. Must
be fluent in all aspects of
insurance billing and
reimbursement with some
collections experience a plus. High
standard of patient concern and
compassion necessary, and a
professional attitude and
appearance is a must. Competitive
salary including full benefits-
cardiac experience commands a
premium wage! Mon.-Fri., 8-5,
no weekends!
To apply, fax resume, cover letter
and references to 352-259-7982,
or email to
jobs@citruscardiology.org.
DFWP


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 D5

would get the other assets
and you would retain
complete control over
your business.
Dear Bruce: I have an
idea I believe to be
unique in the pet supply
industry, and I have
nowhere to go with it.
There are many compa-
nies that will help you
with your inventions.
However, I can't help but
believe most of them are
not legitimate and they
will take your idea if it's
decent and run with it. -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: Let's take
your last comment first -
most of the companies
that advertise they will
help with inventions are
either not legitimate or, at
the very least, disingenu-
ous. Personally, I would
not have anything to do
with them.
Is your unique idea
something that can be
patented? If you think it
might be, get an attorney's
opinion. If the attorney
agrees, you can look for-
ward to spending a couple
of years and several thou-
sand dollars on the patent
process.
The fact is, most compa-
nies will not talk with
someone such as yourself
unless you have a patent
or sign away all of your
rights. If you get a patent
and can work out an
arrangement with a com-
pany, you have it made.
On the other hand, un-
less you're prepared to in-
vest money in this idea,
what do you have to lose?


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. co
m or to Smart Money, PO.
Box 7150, Hudson, FL
34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be
provided.


cle. She has spent hours
designing websites and
other Internet ventures
and is happy to share her
knowledge. If you have
seen something online
you just don't understand,
email her at DKerese@
chronicleonline. com.







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


Part time Clerk

Must have good,
accurate computer
and clerical skills, and
be able to answer a
multi line telephone.
Apply in Person
NO PHONE CALLS
CYPRESS COVE
CARE CENTER
700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Crystal River EOE

RN's, PT & OT'S
LPN's, Psych
Nurse, & ST.
Office Staff with
med bkground.

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097




AIRLINES ARE
HIRING

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if
qualified Housing
available CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769




FT/PT Servers &
Beverage Cart

Positions Available
at Juliette Falls
Call 352-522-0309
or apply within

Pizza Makers
Cooks
Delivery Drivers
& Dishwashers

APPLY IN PERSON
2492 N. Essex Ave.,
Hernando

SERVERS AND
COOKS
EXPERIENCED ONLY
THE HEN HOUSE
CAFE
206 TOMPKINS ST
INVERNESS




OPTICAL

Have you ever been
accused of being too
happy? Are you able
to find the positive in
any situation?
Citrus Vision Clinic is
seeking optical techni-
cians for fill-in work.
Sales experience a
must, industry experi-
ence preferred. Must
be a quick learner,
computer savvy, and
good with people.
Must have a flexible
schedule and be avail-
able as needed. Apply
in person. 2332 Hwy
44 W, Inverness, FL.

OPTICAL SALES

Optical experience
preferred not required.
Outgoing, quick learner
& Sales experience.Fax
resume (877)408-2732


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179




Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
Honest Reliable
Caring Cert. CNA
will give excellent care
to your loved ones, will
provide background
Check 352-201-4313
0, Need Help?
Certified CNA avail for
prnv duty in-home Health
Care. (352) 453-7255




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


Real Estate
Salesperson
needed

Call Skip Craven
352-464-1515




AUTO
DETAILERS &
MANAGERS

Homosassa Sprgs
& Brooksville
dealerships
Call 727-808-0341

CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH

APPLY IN PERSON AT:
920 E. Ray Street
Hernando

Driver

$0.01increase per
mile after 6 months
and 12 months. $0.03
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or weekly pay.
CDL-A, 3 months
current experience
(800)414-9569
www.driveknight.com
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624

Utilities Mainte-
nance Worker

2 Positions Available
Announcement
#13-09

Semi-skilled manual
work assisting in the
installation, opera-
tion, repair and
maintenance of
sewer forcemains,
gravity lines, man-
holes, lift stations,
water mains, fire
hydrants, water
meters, backflow
devices, valves,
valve boxes and
other appurte-
nances related to
water and waste-
water utility opera-
tions. H.S diploma,
GED certificate or
related vocational
training. Work expe
rience in the repair
of water/ waste-
water mains and
facilities preferred.
Must have or be
able to obtain
Florida CDL Class B
within one year of
employment.
Starting pay
$8.45 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, March 22,
2013 EOE/ADA.


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


1", ll Il I IIISt.


C IRpNICL
S Class feds


WINDOVH

GENIE.
We Clean Windows and Whole Lot Morel
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
ALL Home
Repairs
Small Carpentry
-* Fencing
Screening
A~* Clean Dryer
Vents
< g 4loqd, ',e & Dependable
EI Ep "nce lifelong
352- 344-0905
cell' 400-1722
SLicensed & Insured Lic#37761


Heavy
Equipment
Operator Career!
3 Week Hands On
Training School.
Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Excavators.National
Certifications. Lifetime
Job Placement Assis-
tance. VA Benefits
Eligible!
1-866-362-6497


Key Training
Center-

P/T INSTRUCTOR
ASSISTANTS Needed,
working in class-
room setting with
adults with develop-
mental disabilities.
HS Diploma/GED
required.

P/T BUS DRIVERS
Needed;
CDL Class B w/ P
endorsement. HS
Diploma/GED
required.

ADDIVl in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 'E.O.E.


MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163


UTILITIES
TECHNICIAN I

2 positions available
Announcement
# 13-08

Skilled technical
work with assign-
ments encompass-
ing the operation,
maintenance and
construction of
Citrus County Utilities
water distribution
and wastewater
collection systems.
Some experience
in a related field or
an equivalent com-
bination of training
and experience.
Certification in
backflow (testing/
repair), water distri-
bution or waste-
water collection
preferred. Ability to
respond to after
hours emergency
repairs 24/7. Must
have or obtain
within 1 year of
employment a
valid Florida CDL,
class B. Starting pay
$11.53 hourly.
Excellent benefits.
ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE: Visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 West Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, Fl. 34461

to apply online by
Friday, March 22,
2013 EOE/ADA.


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777

DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 **-

**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194

A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002


BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over Your Old One"'
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!

Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


Exp. Framer

Dri. Lic. & Vehicle
Req. (352) 302-1206
STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resumel801@yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls
VIDEO
TECHNICIAN

will work w/audio tech
& must have
computer skills
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.




*CALL NOW*
Looking to fill
immediate positions
in the CUSTOMER
RELATIONS DEPT
Training, 401(k),
Medical. No Exp.
Necessary. Call
Michelle
352-436-4460

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5prm

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


CHKOMLNdE


Res. Cleaner
Local established
cleaning company
looking for reliable,
P/T or F/T help.
Willing to work
independently and
as a team player.
Worthwhile work.
Positive personality
a plus. Please call:
352-302-6418


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696



Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V'FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


CLASSIFIED



PIANO/
ACCOMPANIST

Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.




SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.







Delivery Person

P/T Requires Drivers
License & lifting up to
100lbs. PIs call
352-628-0808
Laundry Attendant

Apply At: 118 S.
Apopka, Inverness




ATTEND
COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home.
*Medical
*Business
*Criminal Justice
*Hospitality
Job placement
assistance.Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV
authorized. Call
800-443-5186
www.Centura
Online.com

COMPUTER
TECHNICIANS
TRAINING!
Train for PC Technical
Careers at sctrain.edu
No computer Experi-
ence Needed! Job
placement Assistance
HS Diploma/GED a
Must Start
Immediately!
1-888-872-4677
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP.
HSDiploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294



AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177**


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**
Primary Cleaning
S**Free Estimates**
call Kala 352-212-6817
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


AAA ROOFING
Call the "xakh6sten"
Free Written Estimate

$i100 OFF:
,Any Re-Roof |
L Must present coupon at time contract is signed i
Lic./Ins. CCC57537 -- -00EZM









NEED SOMEONE TO
GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?






DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!
352-220-91901


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


**FOR SALE*
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer with 2
commercial mowers, &
Hand Equip. in pairs.
Serious Inquiries Only!
30k obo 352-795-0201

Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiver, D ropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399





American Brand
Meat Slicer, meat mkt
size, asking $1500
352-489-9156

Phonograph
1923 Free standing
Brunswick. Oak case,
20 records & needles.
Works like new. $650
(352) 746-2306




3 ft. Tall Beer Bottle, ex-
act glass replica of a
pilsner bottle $100
(352) 628-1723




I


11111111
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111





NICE GREEN MARBLE
SPA 5 seat / needs
motor frame repair linda
341-2271




DRYER$100 In perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504

HOT WATER HEATER
Works but needs
new thermo
35.00 obo linda
341-2271

Kenmore
Extra LargeCapacity
Washer & Dryer
Excel. cond
$300
352-465-2853

KENMORE
White 21CF Upright
Freezer $100; White 18
CF Refrigerator $100
Both very good cond.
(352) 628-5085


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
r FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


PRESSURE
WASHING AND
I SEALING
OF
CONCRETE/PAVERS
AROUND YOUR POOL.
3 CHOICES OF SEALANT

I Free Estimates
267-304-6162

Week Wachee local.
18yrs exp.




Add an artiic touch to your existing yard
or pool or plan
somelhine
icomp llelflOnew!
"Ohen imitated,


POOL AND PAVER LLCI

I Wt AF 352-400-3188


OVEN, STOVE TOP
AND DISHWASHER
Frigidaire, great cond.
$150 ea. 352-503-6537
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery.
352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504




ANNUAL
SPRING
AUCTION
Farm Ag &
Construction
Sat., March 23, 2013
at 9am
Iron City, GA 11th
Hwy 84 W -6 miles
East of Donalsonville,
GA,DeMott Auction
Co., Inc.
229-985-4565 -
800-985-5699
Terry DeMott, Sr
229-891-1832
Call today to be
included in this
auction!
GA# 002554

Special Auction
MARCH 17, 1pm
Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC
628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
10% BP Min. Bid Auc
AU 4381 /AB 3202




32" Drum Sander
w/roll around stand
$600, 40" Lathe
w/knives $75
352-563-1863
8' FIBERGLASS
STEPLADDER GOOD
SHAPE ONLY 50.00
464 0316
CHOP SAW WHEELS
12x5/32x20mm arbor 3
metal 1 masonry all new
1 used $35 586-8657
Drill Press floor Model,
Powerking, various
speeds excellent
cond. $95.
(352) 341-1714
PRESSURE WASHER
Gas powered Excell
XR2600 with 5 HP
Honda engine. $95.00
352 341 3842



70 INCH BIG SCREEN
TVJVCHD-P700R1U
with 2 HDMI, 2 HD com-
ponent, 3 analog, and 1
PC inputs. Accepts a
Cable Card for receiving
Cable TV without a
"cable box". Good
Condition! $390. Call
(352)746-2778 before
8pm please.



NEW BIFOLD
DOORS/MARVIN
BRAND 2 sets/with
hardware 60" opening
$60 352-419-5549


AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244



A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067**
CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998



CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lie. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300

Remodelin


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713


Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
FREE COMPUTER
SCREEN WORKS/HAS
LIGHT LINES ACROSS
IT LINDA 341-2271
HP Photosmart
Premium wireless,
Printer
print, fax scan, copy
$75.
(352) 341-2830



11 pc PVC Lanai Set
4 cushion chairs, oval
table, 2 cushion rockers
3 high back chairs, serv-
ing tray with wheels
$350 for all 746-7221



2 SETS OF TABLES
glass coffee table
oval 45"x26' w/2 end
tables 24'x18' oval; 14'
round. All w/ brass
frame, high end $$
Each set $200
(352) 425-0667
6 Drawer Dresser
$100.
3 Drawer Dresser
$50.
352-746-7221
Antique School Desk
Beautiful shape
$125.
(386) 684-2466
CAPTAIN'S BED Wood
frame, under bed stor-
age drawer, Twin mat-
tress incl, Good cond.
$50 746-7232
CHINA CABINET
Large, Cherry Wood, 3
glass shelves, lots of
storage below. In
good condition $200
(352) 628-5085
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
COMPUTER DESK
Glass top and metal
desk. 48"x24" $60
352-344-1503
Couch & love seat
white, great condition
$300.
2 Bar stools Swivel,
white Padded $150
(352) 419-6880
DOLPHIN END TABLE
Lovelyperfect glass top
26" X 26"
ceramic bottom, moved
$80 352-419-5549
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT W/ TV. Cherry
Stain, incl. 27" non-HD
TV. Both excellent cond.
$100 746-7232
GLASS
3X5'X1/2"
$20. 352-422-2164
GLASS COFFEE &
END TABLES Blonde
glass coffee & end
tables $150
352-746-3753
GLASS FRONT
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 5ft.long glass
front & top w/drawer
& shelves $200
352-746-3753
GRANDMOTHER
CLOCK NEEDS
REPAIR ONLY 90.00
464 0316
Hamilton Collection
Pub style tall kitchen
table w/4 chairs $250
obo 352-628-3076


-

MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.





Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.

COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838





SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876





COMPLETE Sprinkler
System Check $20.00
Weekend special, SOD
Inspection. 419-2065


DON'T LET YOUR


, DRYER START
IA FIRE!
I H, dde Co '


** High End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
KITCHEN SET
BLOND Kitchen set
w/ cloth chairs $100
352-746-3753
Kitchen Set
Table & 4 padded
chairs on rollers,
swivels, leaf,
mint condition $240
(352) 637-1701
Large Sofa, with
Recliners on ea. end.
has been in den not
used, tan, microfiber,
purchased $1,000 sell
$500 Pet/smoke free
home 352-637-0844
Light Tan, Recliner
Rocker, White Leather
Chair $100 forAll Twin
Box springs & mattress
w/2 stands $100.
352-795-7254
LOVESEAT Light beige
w/pale blue & pink
stripes,textured
fabric.VG cond. non-
smkg. $100 746-7232
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
MOVING SALE
Dining Room set Lt.
wood color & 6
padded chairs $100
(352) 746-0099
MOVING SALE
Leisure Recliner Lt
Brown $100 Sleeper
sofa &loveseat good
cond. White $300.
(352) 746-0099
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Rose Color chair,
& Couch $150.
Corner Computer desk
Black, $75.
352-746-7221
Sleeper sofa,
$100.
Coffee w/ end tables,
$150.
352-746-7221
SOFAAND
LOVESEAT.
Off-white leather. Ex-
cellent condition. $400.
ssumaylo@tampabay.rr.c
om
Solid Medium Oak
2 door, 5 drawer chest,
top lift for jewelry & two
sides for ties, exec.
cond. $200.00 call
765-748-4334
SWIVEL ROCKER
Taupe,Velvet-like
Fabric, Comfy, VG
cond. Smoke Free. $50.
746-7232
TV STAND
glass top $25
352-422-2164
Walnut Entertainment
Center
Like New, $300
317-752-1596



CRAFTMAN EDGER
Hasn't been started in
over Three Years,
$15.00, 352-287-9270
FERTILIZER
SPREADER Scotts walk
behind rotary fertizer
spreader..$10.00
352-746-146
New Tiller
5 hsp, $150
352-341-1714


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lie. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials"

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


GENERAL : .,
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac- Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

35262 14*


QO. 0







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Power Pusher Lawn
Mower 6V2HP, Large
rear wheels, grass
catcher, craftsman,
Like New $150. cash
(352) 341-1714
Riding Lawn
Mower
Murray, 42" 6 speed
grass catcher, $400.
(352) 341-1714




Citrus Springs
Sat, Sun 8a to 5p
Variety of items!
11124 N Tulsa Ter

Estate Sale
Mon 3/18 7am-2pm
Furn, clothing, golf eqip,
bikes, and much more
352-287-9791
Estate Sale
Mon 3/18 7am-2pm
Furn, clothing, golf eqip,
bikes, and much more
352-287-9791
Homosassa
Sat-Mon 8am-
until all is gone, kitch.
items, outdoor furn. and
much more
8939 W. River Glen Ct
INVERNESS
Mulit-Family Sale
Mar. 16, & 17th, 8am-?
S. Vision Circle,
Heatherwood off 581



KIDS SUIT/12 HUSKEY
Worn once
20.00 obo linda
341-2271



10 Formal/Semi Formal
Gowns and dresses in
Sizes 2-24 for $10.00
each 352-586-0082 or
Ipurdin@live.com
16 ft. Black Wrought
Iron Entrance Gate,
w/ running horse and
horse shoes, Beautiful
paid $3,200 Asking
$1,300. (352) 422-5462
Air Compressor
New, 8 gallon tank
type, 150 psi max
$150. cash
(352) 341-1714
BIG SALE!
Keyboard w/ Stand, +
TOOLS & Much Good
Stuff. (352) 860-2303
COMFORTER & SHAM
Mainstays,Twin 2pc.
Reversible,Microfiber,
ex-cond striped or solid
Berry.$15. 746-7232
COMPUTER MONITOR
22" AOC Like New
$95.00 obo
352-621-0248
COMPUTER MONITOR
AOC 19" like new
$75.00 obo
352-621-0248
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK File Cab Printer
shelf Computer Cab
Keyboard Drawer. $100
OBO 563-1073
DELL COMPUTER
Pentium4h/t 2.80ghz 2
CD/DVD Burners, Key-
board & Mouse $99
obo 352 621-0248
EXTENSION LADDER
22 ft Aluminum Exten-
sion Ladder, Good
Condition, $75.00
352-287-9270
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$150 OBO
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Black Cowboy Hat &
Boots 11/2D New $100
(352) 795-7254
Juki Commercial
Sewing Machine, Table
& Motor, just serviced
$550 352-563-1863
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MAYTAG MICROWAVE
over the stove White
$100 563-1073
Necchi Heavy Duty
Sewing Maching
model 3205FA
all metal parts
$70.
(352) 341-7741
NEW BATHTUB 5 feet /
light tan
75.00 linda 341-2271
PERSONAL LIBRARY
approx 600 volumes
classics, religion, poli-
tics, etc..$1500obo


SHOWER DOORS
NEW / 5 FEET/40.00
OBO LINDA 341-2271
SINGER FT WT 221
With carrying
case,excellent
conditionjust serviced
$450 352 270 9254
Steam Vac,
Rotating brushes,
power hand tools
perfect $80. cash
(352) 341-1714
WHITE BIRD CAGE
20x20, 34" high. On
stand with coasters.
$50.00 239404-8589
White Refridgerator
Kenmore 20 cu ft
good cond. freezer top
$135, 42" Round
oak/metal drop-leaf
Table w/4 chairs $40
856-803-6046
WORLD GLOBE
Cram's Imperial, 12 in
w/gold stand, blue seas,
colorful countries.Great
cond. $15. 746-7232




4 wheel Walker
hand brakes, seat,
new $75. cash


(352) 341-1714
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES and
seat. nearly new only
70.00 464 0316
4"TOILET SEAT RISER
NEW ONLY 20.00
352464 0316
Bathtub Chair
slide in type w/backrest
$55, 2 wheel walker
w/ski's $40.00, Reg.
walker $25.00
352-621-0896
BEDSIDECOMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEG 20.00 EA
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS NEARLY NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316
Patten Wheelchair
Vista, Like New
$80 352-341-1714


SHOWER CHAIR
FIBERGLASS WITH
BACKREST ONLY
25.00 464 0316
TUB RAIL CLAMPS ON
THE TUB SIDE FIBER-
GLASS ONLY 20.00
464 0316



Hammered Dulcimer
w.stand & books,
$300, 352-628-3076
Ovation Acoustic/
Electric Bass
w/ case,1996
Celebrity model 174,
$395.
(352) 637-1189
STRAD Model, 4 x 4 old
German Violin
2 Bows, 1 Newer,
1 older, lined case,
$700.
(352) 464-5401, LM
WASHBURN"J3"JAZZ
ARCHTOP
ELECTRIC&CASE,2
EMGS GROVER
TUNERS VINTAGE
SUNBURST, $200
352-601-6625



Antique Brass Hanging
Light fixtures, living
& dining room &
foyer..$40.00,
352-746-1146
CARDBOARD MOVING
BOXES 35 multi sized,
5 rolls paper
used once, $45.00
352419-7376
LAUNDRY SINK
Laundry Sink with
faucet...$35.00,
352-746-1146
REFRIGERATOR
Whirlpool Dormitory
Size Refrigerator
$40.00, 352-746-1146
WAFFLE MAKER
Cusinart Waffle
Maker...$10.00,
352-746-1146




FREE Weider Home
GYM, weight bench,
chin- up bars
you haul 352-637-5423
INVERSION TABLE
Body Champ, adj
height, 250 lb max, folds
to store. Good condi-
tion. $75 746-7232
Life Fitness Elliptical
X3 Machine, 2006,
$1500 352-513-4293
buyer to pick-up & haul
Proform 480 LE
2009 Elliptical exerciser
(Like New) too many
features to list, will fold
for storage $650
352-795-9146
TREADMILL
Proform 785PI, good
cond, Programable,
monitors heart rate&
pulse. W/ incline $425
(352) 746-4091




26" Bicycle
like new ,$100
352-341-1714
9mm Taurus
Special edition $550.
P95 Ruger 9mm
$550 Both Like New
with Holsters
(352) 257-8850
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DOGGY LIFE VEST,
MTI brand,M(8-201b),
orange w/black straps.
Handle on top. NEW
$25, Call 746-7232
GOLF CLUBS
2 complete sets,
I set of Wilsons, never
used, RT handed $130,
2nd set of Wilsons $80
(352) 270-8117
Pool Table
$75
352-637-7221
Powerhouse 1500 ex-
ercise machine.
24 different exercises.
Like new good cond.
$100 (352) 628-5085
Rawlings and Truline
9 Iron & 2 woods Golf
Clubs $15.00
352-628-1723
SCUBA TANK 80 cu.ft.,
Aluminum, silver, US
Divers Brand, w/ J valve
&harness. Good Cond.
$55 746-7232
Titan 25 Caliber
Gorgeous compact
Hand Gun.
$490.
Call (352) 795-0088
After 11:30 am til 7p
TREK 7200 MENS
BIKE 17.5" aluminum
frame, like new $250.00
call 352-465-9395
TRUNK BICYCLE
RACK Allen
Brand-Model 143a,
holds 4 bicycles. New in
Box. $75 746-7232
WATER COOLER
5gal.w/spout. Orange
w/Gatorade logo.Cup
holder on side.Great
cond.$25. 746-7232



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352)457-6199
TRAILER
Hauls 2 jet ski's,
galvanized $300
(352)457-6199


IIIIIIII

Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748

CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

MOTORCYCLES
WANTED
Wanted All Types
Pre-1980. Any Type
Condition- Running or
Not! CASH PAID! Call
Brian (845)389-3239

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369

Wanted Enclosed
Utility Trailer, 4 x 6
in good cond.
Call (352) 489-5415
Leave Message


Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained


Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200















Baby Girl P
Baby Girl P is a 4-y.o.
terrier mix who came
to the shelter because
her family had to
move & could not take
her along. She is a
very beautiful shiny
black color with white
accents & cute upright
ears. Medium sized,
weighs 42 pounds.
Calm energy.
Heartworm-negative.
Walks well on a leash
& gets along very well
with other dogs. She
is very friendly & af-
fectionate, likes to
give kisses. Loves her
human friends. She
will make a wonderful
companion for some
lucky family. Call Jo-
anne @
352-795-1288. "


JEET
Jeet is a favorite @
the shelter, but this
loving, loyal dog
deserves his forever
home. Neutered 3-y.o.
bulldog mix is a beau-
tiful dog, inside & out.
Low energy,
best-suited to a quiet
household. A bit fear-
ful of men (not ag-
gressive, just timid) &
his ideal home would
be a calm family with
no young children, or
a woman living alone.
Would be a
companion/watch
dog, as he will bark if
someone approaches
his yard. Gets along
with other dogs,
bonds with his
humans.
Well-mannered,
loving dog awaits his
chance for
happiness
@ the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
ID # 9609968. Call
352-746-8400


ROSIE
Rosie is 50 lbs of
cuteness, playfulness
& love. This 2-y.o.
spayed bulldog mix is
a love bug & not shy
about letting you know
that. Fun-loving,
sunny outlook,
active & likes toys.
Good with children,
good with other dogs,
doesn't care about
cats, loves people.
She would love a
home where she
could play & then set-
tle down & cuddle with
someone. For an af-
fectionate, happy dog
that you could spoil,
she might be the one
you are looking for.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


Blue Front Amazon,
32 yrs. blind in one
eye to good home.
Not for breeding
$150. w/ cage
(352) 794-3688
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com






* (352) 634-5039 *
PUPPIES
Miniature Daschunds
2 girls avail, ckc papers,
shots, $350 ea.
786-286-1163
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne


Itn

YAGER
Meet Yager a very
funny, well behaved
sweet boy. He doesn't
need much room.
Walks great on a
leash. He's already
neutered. Please call
Victoria for viewing
appointment
352-302-2838




ENGLISH SADDLE
Steuben,Hunter/Jumper
good cond. $450
Boots, ladies sz 7%
slim, $20 call for details
352-341-6991




LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033


Livestock


1985 Force
85 HP, outboard Eng,
w/power lift. low hrs
fresh water only $1200
352-507-1490




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510"

BOAT LIFT
Shore Station, manual,
free standing. Used in
fresh water. Orig. price
$5000, asking $650
(352) 621-0392
CANOE
'94 Old Town 164. Good
Condition, many extras.
$500 (352) 382-2657
Carolina Skiff
21' w/trailer
& lots of extras! $ 5900
352-795-9847
DOCK SPACE
For Rent. Crystal River
$125 mo. up to 22 ft.
Call (352) 257-8850
Glasstron 19'
inboard, outboard,
165 hspwr. exc. cond.
w/trailer $5500.
352-621-6960


















Lund Renegade
16',inc.89 Johnson 70hp
& 94 galvinized trlr.
recent complete interior
overhaul,strong engine
Lot of boat for money!
Ask.$4350, 352-897-
5305 or 412-508-0247
MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
**(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com
Welcraft
16 Ft C. Console, boat,
motor,and trailer
352-746-0348


CLASSIFIED




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$47,000.
352-422-1309




00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
CAR/TOY HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $12,100
For more info call
352-560-7247
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. Island bd.,
+ rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,1 slide, w/AC,
qn. bed, awning, pwr.
tonque jack, corner
jacks, microwave, equili-
zing hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
Holiday Rambler
SAVOY 2008, 26'
sleeps 6, ducted air,
gas & electric heat,
like new, 1 slider
$14,500 352-586-1694
or Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like new,
NADA $29K, Reduced
$19,900 352-382-3298
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
Truck Camper
over the Cab sleeps 5,
air, generator, micro-
wave, oven stove,
electric jacks & awn-
ing. Fits 8ft bed, 3/4
ton or dully $5,200.
(352) 503-2887
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945


"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible Hard top
Kelly B B $10 Ok asking
$5800 obo
352-560-0079
BUICK
1996 Buick Century
auto,cruise,power locks
windows,goodtires,
runs,& drives great,
good mpg, no oil
use,am,fm,cass, $2000
obo ask for Robert
352- 563 -1934
8am til 8pm
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
Chevrolet
2008 Aveo
$6,998
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Crusier
5 speed, power win-
dows, locks- $4,250
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
DODGE
2005, Neon
Automatic transmis-
sion $4400
352-341-0018
FORD
'03, Taurus SE, 8 pass.
wagon,. V6, with most
options, 105k, nice car
private own. asking
$3,750 (352) 419-4501
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 D7


FORD
95 Escort LX Wagon
good cond, runs well,
130k, new tires, $1650
obo 352-601-5110
HONDA
2005 Element, AWD,
good cond, khaki
colored, $6500 (352)
344-1442 or 344-1441
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900ml, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
Mitsubishi
2007 Eclipse, power
windows, automatic
transmission $10,899
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl.....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing
SUBARU
92 subaru loyale good
cond inside and out
258k miles runs great
gets good mpg, $800
obo 352 419 7254



2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551
FORD MUSTANG
2004 MACH-1
23,500 mi; Exc Cond.
Have Extra's. Only 139
made. $16,500. Call
Skip(352) 527-3687
PONT. Trans Am
Convt. BIk, auto, v8
69K miles $12,500
352-746-0348







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





2003 FORD
RANGER edge X-Cab,
4x4,match cap,bedliner,
tow pkg, 4LV6 $8750
352-860-1394 6pm-9pm
DODGE
08 Ram 1500 SXT
quad cab, 46,800mi.
tow pckg, exc. cond.
$15,500 352-527-1880
DODGE
1996 Dakota Sport V6
50,300 actual miles.
Runs great, excellent
shape. $5,500 OBO
Sugarmill
740-705-9004
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
FORD
2003 Explorer, Black
Eddie Bauer, 196,000
Miles, Rebuilt Transmis-
sion $2650 OBO
352-228-7086
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 3rd row
seat, power windows,
locks- $4,995
352-341-0018



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150




JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at


352-628-4600 for
appointment




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244
Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR, low miles
garage kept, like new
Adult Owner $7K obo
(352) 257-8850
Honda
Gold Wing 1984
Exec. Cond, 39k miles
$4200 OBO
352-746-0348


Car


922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board





338-0317 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
03-27 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE


of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
property and equipment
via the internet at





DUNNELLON
UNIT
#0039 RYAN REAVIS
#0119 MICHAEL WETZEL
0203 LARRY QWAN
0237 CINDA SEIBERT
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING,
LUGGAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS,
FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR



Misc. Notice


342-0317 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote- Jason P Redden
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Jason P. Redden
8301 N Tiny Lily Dr
Citrus Springs, FL 34434
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
March 17, 2013.


343-0317 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION: ORDER TO DEMOLISH
CASE NUMBER: 134860
Description of property: AK: 2265558 and legally described as GREEN ACRES ADD 2
LOT 5 UNREC OF LOT 73 FURTHER DESC AS: COM AT SW COR OF LT 73 TH N ODEG 21M
15S E AL W LN OF SD LT 73 515.30 FT TO POB TH CONT N ODEG 21M 15S E AL SD W LN
128.82 FT TO NW COR OF SD LT 73 TH N 88DEG 22M 22S E AL N LN OF SD LT 73 168.58
FT TH S ODEG 21M 33S W 128.83 FT TH S 88DEG 22M 23S W 168.57 FT TO POB SUB TO
EASE ACROSS E 10 FT FOR R/W TITLE IN OR BK 1267 PG 1605 OR BK 2139 PG 95 OR BK
2468 PG 1084

RALPH VELEZ
5296 W OAKLAWN ST
HOMOSASSA, FL

On January 10, 2013, an order was issued by the Citrus County Certified Building Offi-
cial to demolish the structures) on the property located at: 5296 W. Oaklawn St.;
Homosassa, FL. If the property owners) fail to comply with this order, the Code Com-
pliance Division will issue a work order to abate the nuisance condition.
Any persons) having a legal interest in this property may contact the Code Compli-
ance Office within 30 days of this publication. Board of County Commissioners, Dept.
of Planning and Development, Code Compliance Division, 3600 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, FL. 352-527-5350. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.
March 17, 2013.


344-0317 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Citrus
County, Florida, at a regular meeting held on the 12th day of March, 2013, at 2:00
P.M. in the Commission Chambers, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Av-
enue, Inverness, Florida 34450, adopted a Resolution approving street vacation
SV-12-02 filed by Furman & Hilpert Engineering on behalf of Earnest & Joy Gallion,
closing, vacating, abandoning and discontinuing the existing street described on
the attached Exhibit "A", renouncing and disclaiming any right of Citrus County and
the public in and to said existing street, and in and to any lands delineated on said
recorded plat of the same.
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
Board of County Commissioners
of Citrus County, Florida
EXHIBIT A
A PORTION OF N. GULF AVENUE (FORMERLY N. GULF STREET) BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF TRACT D
BLACKBERRY HAMMOCK ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 19, PAGE 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA;
THENCE S 89012'29" W ALONG A WESTERLY PROJECTION OF THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF WEST INVERNESS LANE (FORMERLY WEST INVERNESS AVENUE), A DISTANCE OF
11.88 FEET TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH A SOUTHWESTERLY PROJECTION OF THE
NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF NORTH MARION WAY (FORMERLY MARION
ROAD); THENCE N 32004'23" W ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY PROJECTION, A DISTANCE
OF 103.63 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 45, BLOCK I MAYFAIR GARDEN AC-
RES ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES
141 AND 142 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO
BEING ON THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF NORTH GULF AVENUE (FORMERLY SOUTH
GULF STREET) THENCE N 01001'30" W ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DIS-
TANCE OF 977.31 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE N 89058'30"
E, A DISTANCE OF 65.92 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID
NORTH GULF AVENUE; THENCE S 00059'36" E ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A
DISTANCE OF 1,066.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
March 17, 2013.


345-0317 SUCRN
03/27 Budget Meeting CC Tourist Development Council
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CITRUS COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
will hold a Budget Meeting on Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. at the
Lecanto Government Building, Room 166, Lecanto, FL 34461.
Any person desiring further information regarding this meeting may contact the Ex-
ecutive Offices of the Board of County Commissioners, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, In-
verness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, 110
N. Apopka Avenue, Room 102, Inverness, Florida, 34450 (352) 341-6560, at least one
day before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD tele-
phone (352) 341-6580.

JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the
Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a
record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based (Section 286.0101, Florida Statute).
March 17, 2013.


346-0317 SUCRN
3/28 Specialmeeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
was to hold a SPECIAL MEETING at 10:30 A.M on the 28TH day of March. 2013 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461. However, THIS MEETING HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
March 17, 2013.


347-0317 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
Public Relations Services
Re-bid
RFP # 022-13
The Tourist Development Council is seeking to hire a qualified public relations firm to
develop and implement a strategy based on recent visitor profile research that uti-
lizes public relations tactics to attract individual and group visitors to Citrus County to
stay in paid accommodations.

o Possess an extensive media reach with contacts far pint, internet and broadcast
media in identified targeted niche and affinity markets for Citrus County.
o Respond to editorial leads, proactively write and pitch stories that position Citrus
County as a premier Florida vacation destination.
o Write and distribute press releases that feature special events and assets to cre
ate greater awareness of what the area has to offer.
o Report monthly on PR initiatives, media mentions and value.
o Plan media familiarization tours and recruit qualified media to attend.
o Maintain and update editorial calendar and assist with copy writing
needs.
o Provide a representative quarterly to attend Tourst Development Council meet
ings and provide a public relations report.
o Retdner should not exceed $30,000 annually and should include travel qucrterly
to TDC meetings in Lecanto Florida. Additional public relations initiatives include
ing travel to trade shows or media missions will be considered on an individual
basis.
SEALED Proposals are to be submitted on or before April 11, 2013 @2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, Florida 34461.

A Public Opening of the Proposals is scheduled for April 11, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600
West Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461. The only information con-
veyed at the public opening will be the names of the companies who submitted
Proposals.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations to the public opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Request for Proposal Document for this announcement,
please visit the Citrus County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select
BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of
Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5457.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
March 17, 2013


aeB Bed Lid
** ARE, 8ft. bed,
off of 1995 F350,
$250
(352) 503-2887
CAR DOLLY
custom made, heavy
duty, like new, $850
11111 1 352-795-8986
Tell that special
person '
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi- MASTER TOW
fied ad under 2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
Happy Notes. ged built, ex cond. good
Only $28.50 tires. 4500 Ibs. towing
includes a photo capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
Call our Classi- bmarstonl@mac.com
fied Dept for de- or 352-586-1483
tails
352-563-5966 i
WaIIIIII


govdeals.com, March 4,
until March 22, 2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22, 2013..





VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN
SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- MARCH
27TH @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
March 10 & 17, 2013


Misc. Notice


Metn


Metn


Metn






D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


349-0317 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The public is hereby notified that Citrus County Code Compliance will conduct its
monthly Special Master Hearing on Wednesday, March 20, 2013 @ 9:00AM in the
Lecanto Government Building, Multi purpose Room 166, 3600 West Sovereign Path,
Lecanto, Florida 34461, at which time and place any and all persons interested are
invited to attend. The following cases) will be heard by the Code Compliance Spe-
cial Master; however cases may abate prior to hearing date. If you have questions,
contact Code Compliance at (352) 527 5350.
Atkins, John
820 E Hartshorn Ln, Holder, FI 34445
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, metal, plastics, bricks, and other miscellaneous
materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Brassboys Enterprises Inc.
8690 N Golfview Dr, Citrus Springs, FI 34434
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Did not comply with the conditions of the permit #201105578.
Estafanous, Nash
2350 N Florida Ave, Hernando, FI 34442
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, Shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Failure to obtain building permits for the installation of a door in a
fire wall.
Henry, Phanice Woodrow & Woodrow, Carrie Lee
925 N Colin Kelly Pt, Crystal River, FI 34429
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, furniture, lumber, household
items, and miscellaneous junk.
Holliday Sr., George & Hackney, Wanda *REPEAT VIOLATION"
5462 W Meadow St, Homosassa, FI 34446
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Televisions, plastic containers, household items, and
large amounts of miscellaneous junk.
Hollis EST, Morris ATTN: Terence L. Hollis
5182 N Tanglewood Ave, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Lawnmowers, bedding, paper, plastics, metals, alumi-
num, steel, weights, wood, furniture, garbage, containers, appliances, and other
miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Hollis EST, Morris ATTN: Terence L. Hollis
5182 N Tanglewood Ave, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The yellow car without a tag, small trailer and Chevy truck in the front with-
out proper tags, cut up van that is not operable, and a Jeep parked on the prop-
erty.
Ingley, Elsie F. "DEMOLITION APPEAL**
7904 E Gator Ct, Inverness, FI 34453
Appeal of a demolition order


James M. Heck Revocable Inter Vivos Trust *FINE APPEAL"
3118 N Whitewater Ter, Crystal River, Fl 34428
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Carpet remnants, mattresses, broken furniture, and
other miscellaneous trash and debris.**APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT 9/19/12 HEAR-
ING**
Larry Burk Investments LLC
4487 N Pioneer Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal site or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Bed frames, shelving, 2 screens, a tote, pillow, milk jugs,
and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an unenclosed area.
Madrac BH4 LLC
15 N Fillmore St, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, broken furniture, metal and plas-
tic debris, and other miscellaneous trash and debris.
Owens, Diane E.
8446 S Florida Ave, Floral City, FI 34436
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Household garbage, furniture, lumber, household
items, and miscellaneous junk.
Owens, Marilyn A.
2100 N Picnic Pt, Hernando, Fl 34442
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3150(D), Fences, Hedges and
Walls: Fences shall consist of one or more of the following materials: wood, picket,
field fence, basket weave, lattice, split rail, plank, panels, woven saplings, cast or
wrought iron, chain link or pvc/plastic, except where an agricultural use is author-
ized.
Payne Sr, Bruce William & Pittman, Shirley T.
1080 N Beach Park Dr, Inverness, FI 34453
Construction of a structure (metal carport) without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus
County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No
person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or de-
molish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential
unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within
the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore.
To Wit: A metal carport in the front of the property over the driveway.
Posluszny, Gail
191 W Valerian PI, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The wrecked car under the cover that is parked on the property.
Presley EST, Janie ATTN: Melzie L. Pressley
794 E Hartshorn Ln, Holder, FI 34445
It shall be unlawful for the owner or tenant of any land to permit, cause or have
thereon any accumulation of junk, debris, rubbish and vegetative matter except for
junk stored in enclosed litter receptacles or completely enclosed buildings; except
for junk which will not fit into standard sized litter receptacles and which is set out for
no more than 48 hours for pick up and removal; except for recyclable material
stored in receptacles provided for recycling such materials; except junk stored in a
lawfully established and maintained junk yard, garbage or waste disposal ste or san-
itary landfill; and except for accumulations of vegetative waste on agricultural lands
on the above property, pursuant to Article III, Section 20 31(a) of the Citrus County
Code of Ordinances. To Wit: Wood, construction materials, tires, a/c window unit on
the ground, debris on trailer, and other miscellaneous materials being stored in an
unenclosed area.


Roundtree, James V.
6279 N Khyber Ave, Dunnellon, Fl 34433
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: Large motorhome that appears to be inoperable and does not have a visi-
ble tag or decal.
Schneider, Julie
2962 W Beamwood Dr, Beverly Hills, FI 34465
Construction of a structure without a valid permit, a violation of Citrus County Code
of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part: No person shall erect,
construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or demolish any building or
structure subject to this Code, including a floating residential unit, or set or place a
mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit within the territory covered
by this article, without first having obtained a permit therefore. To Wit: 8x8 shed
Schonbrun, Trustee, Harvey
2875 N Bucknell Ter, Hernando, FI 34442
It shall be a violation of this article for any person, firm or corporation to keep, dump,
store, place or deposit abandoned, unlicensed, inoperable, junked, disabled,
wrecked, discarded or otherwise unused vehicles on any property, street, or high-
way; pursuant to Article IV Section 20 41 of the Citrus County Code of Ordinances.
To Wit: The trailer with the flat tire that has a boat on it and the black Dodge truck
that has no tag on it that is parked on the property.
Warner, John W. & Donna J. *FINE APPEAL*
2472 N Pennsylvania Ave, Crystal River, FI 34428
Violation of the Land Development Code Section 3102(B); Accessory uses and
struc-
tures shall not be occupied as a residence, with the exception of guest
cottages/garage apartments as outline herein. To Wit: Vacate the two travel trail-
ers on the property. "APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT 9/19/12 HEARING*
Warner, John W. & Donna J. *FINE APPEAL*
2488 N Pennsylvania Ave, Crystal River, FI 34428
Construction of a structure (Gazebo, shed, etc.) without a valid permit, a violation
of
Citrus County Code of Ordinances Chapter 18 62(a) which states in pertinent part:
No person shall erect, construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, improve, convert, or
demolish any building or structure subject to this Code, including a floating residen-
tial unit, or set or place a mobile/manufactured home or floating residential unit
within the territory covered by this article, without first having obtained a permit
therefore. To Wit: Installed mobile home on property. "APPEAL OF FINE IMPOSED AT
IMPOSED AT 9/19/12 HEARING*
NOTE: If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Code Compliance
Special Master with respect to any matter considered at this public hearing, he/she
will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which
record
shall include the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a dis-
ability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrator's Office, Cit-
rus County Court House, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450,
phone:
(352) 341 6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341 6580.
MICHELLE LIEBERMAN, SPECIAL MASTER
CITRUS COUNTY CODE COMPLIANCE
March 17, 2013.


923-0322 DCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Royal American Construction is soliciting bids from qualified DBE/MBE/WBE subcon-
tractors and suppliers for the Crystal River Wastewater Project. Plans and specifica-
tions are available electronically for this project at no charge. Please contact Allan
Parauka at 850-769-8981 for more information.
March 13 thru March 22, 2013.


350-0317 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Rct-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of
OZELLO BAIT-N-TACKLE,
located at 2156 South
Waterman Drive, Crystal
River, Florida 34429, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register said name with
Florida Department of
State, Division of Corpora-
tions, Tallahassee, Florida.
DATED at
Crystal


River, FL this 14th day of
March, 2013.
/s/ Tracy
Light
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. March 17, 2013.

348-0317 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under
Rcti-
tious Name Law, pursuant
to Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of


NANA'S HEALTH FOODS,
located at 8022 West
Gulf
to Lake Highway,
Crysytal
River, Florida 34429, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register said name
with
Florida Department of
State, Division of
Corpora-
tions, Tallahassee, Florida.
DATEDat
Crystal
River, FL this 14th day of
March, 2013.
/s/ TJ Ivey
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. March 17, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


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-- Attic PAGE E6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUID


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E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


5278 W. YUMA LANE
PINE RIDGE
3BD/2BA/2CG 2,782 SF Living
* 36'x18' Lanai Gourmet Kitchen
* Luxurious Goldcrest Home Built in 2005
PETER & MARVIA KOROL r t
(352) 527-7842 ]
(352) 422-3875


OPEN HOUSE SUN. MAR. 17 12PM-2PM
16 Dianthus Cf., Sugarmill Woods
Bank-owned 4/2/2 in Sugarmll Woods Built in 2007
Home features tile flooring, real wood cabinets and
2,163 square feet of living space
DIR.: 19 South to left on 98, to right on Oak Village Blvd.
South, to left on Matriaria Court, to left on Dianthus Ct.,
to House #16.
RON MCEVOY (352) 586-2663
www.ronmcevoy.remax.com
Certified Distressed Property Expert


PRETTY AS A PICTURE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG + POOL Remodeled Kitchen
* Granite Counters New Flooring
* Pool Has Pavers, Waterfall & Large Lanai
PETER & MARVIA KOROL
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


SnRENTALS
AVAILABLE
Visit

CLOSE TO TWISTED 0AK!! MAVAILA LE
SEat-n Kit. Wood Fr in GR/DR
* Nice FR w/AC Ext. 3/2/2 Split Plan
SDb. Sinks in Master Ceramic Entryi
* Join Rec. Center Nice Comm.
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Emnull elllesuillOnI lemnx nel
www.noinidntLislinginlo.com


RWM
REALTY ONE

2417 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


S 2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted

3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


NEW! NEW! NEW!
This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath waterfront condo boasts new
18" ile, completely renovated kitchen with new
appliances, Corian countertops, tile back splash and
gorgeous wood cabinets. All NEW BATHS! Overlooks
fie water with its own boat dock! So much for so little.
See this one today!
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpolls@aol.comn
000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


4 m-Ie282


* o uiZaNZo Deautiiui upen vvater view
* Living & Family Rm. Great Fishing on Chain of Lakes
* Split Floor Plan Boat Dock with Uft
* Lg. Screened Lanai Quality Built by Wheeler
GEILA gulaa' ENGLISH 352-249-6961
Email: g.english@remax.net
www.sellingcitruscountyhomes.com


If ~Lib~J,*


CHASSAHOWITZKA RETS.
MOVE-IN READY!! 3BR/2BA Fleetwood
situated on double lot. 1,500 SF, open floor
plan, propane FP, newer appliances, walk-in
closets in all BR, grt. rm., formal DR, breakfast
nook, (2) storage sheds. Home furnishings
available. Double adj. lot 4-sale.
LOU HALLEY (352) 257-9016 I--I
Email: lounlley@tempabay.rr.com


241N eaio Hwy. Beel Hill 52-74 ww .I4XcmI1 .FoiaAeIvres6760


THE HIDDEN GEM OF CITRUS COUNTY
2.81 acres in Pine Ridge. 3BR/2BA solar-heated
pool home with 24x36 RV carport. Private acreage
on a cul-de-sac, horses allowed. Master bath with
garden tub, walk-in closet, and dual sinks. Built-in
2000 with a total of 2,656 sq. ft.
BARBARA MILLS (352) 637-6200 I
Email: barbarajmills@eorthlink.net 1


A Dif'NiiiiiN1nREALTOR


GOLF COURSE VILLA
IN BRENTWOOD
*2BR with DEN ,2-Car Garage
*2000 Built Oversized Screened Porch
* Open Floor Plan Maintenance-Free
* Social Membership includes Terra Vista
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com


AFFORDABLE
& ADORABLE
WATERFRONT
200 ft. off river. 3/2/2
with screened room, dock
& GULF ACCESS

LUC 341 03

LUCY BARNES (352) 634-2103
Email: lucybarnes@remax.net
Visual Tours: www.cryslairiveril.com


i_' -






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EXIT agent soars
into the new year
EXIT Realty Leaders
wishes to
congratu-
late Nancy
Little Lewis
for closing
more than < 7
$1.2 million
so far in
2013. anc
Nancy is Little Lewis
a veteran EXIT Realty
agent who Leaders.
brings a
wealth of knowledge to every
transaction and is always
committed to providing excel-
lent service to her clients. Call
her at 352-794-0888, or visit
her online at www.exitrealty
leaders.com.
Citrus Hills names
top agents
Mary
L'Esper-
ance and
Gloria
Rankin a
have been
named the
top sales
agents for Mary
Citrus Hills L'Esperance
for February Citrus Hills.
2013.
Citrus Hills offers Florida
living in a variety of village
styles including both tradi-
tional single-family homes
and maintenance-free single-
family homes.
The Welcome Center for
the Villages of Citrus Hills is


located at
2400 N.
Terra Vista
Blvd. in Cit-
rus Hills.
More infor-
mation is
available at
www.Citrus Gloria Rankin
Hills.com. Citrus Hills.
Hite renews
with NARPM


Robin Hite, property man-
ager with ERAAmerican Re-
alty in
Beverly
Hills, has
renewed
her mem-
bership in
the National
Association
of Residen- Robin Hite
Robin Hite
tial Property ERAAmerican
Managers Realty.
(NARPM).
NARPM is the professional,
educational and ethical leader
for the residential property
management industry in the
United States.
ERAAmerican/Suncoast
Realty is a full-service real es-
tate company with three of-
fices in Citrus County, and
has served the real estate
needs of Citrus County since
1980.


J ackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor, A HOUSE Realtor@
6, SOLD a287"9022

The Golden Gir WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
BEVERLY HILLS BEAUTY 312 WASHINGTON
Beautiful Beverly model featuring 2/2/1
oversized garage. New kitchen
-r .-ints and countertops, refrigerator,
Q ... .r,.na machine, dishwasher. New
.:rp.i..-j in living room, family room,
l. -:r.-n and hallway. Bathroom updated
...rr. new vanity and sink. Never paint
again! Lfetmewarranty paint. #701611


How to remove odors from luggage


sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


Dear Sara: My relative
just gave me a nice
set of cloth luggage,
but the cases have a musty
odor. Do you have any sug-
gestions for removing it? -
Kay G., email
Dear Kay: I would leave it
open outside on a porch to
air out. Next, use an odor
absorber, such as kitty litter,
baking soda, coffee grounds,
charcoal (which you can


find in the fish section at the
pet store) or newspaper.
Place one or more of these
absorbers in the luggage
and close it tight. After a few
days you can remove the ab-
sorber and the smell will be
much better. In the future,
place some crumpled news-
paper in the luggage when
storing it. You should also
look into the line of odor-
eliminating products from


Smelleze (smelleze.com).
The company sells a pouch
product that is specifically
made for gym bags; I would
expect it to work equally
well on suitcases.
Dear Sara: I have a 15-
pound Butterball turkey
that I purchased frozen in
November 2011. It has been
in my freezer since then.

See FRUGAL/Page E7


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR
r d LEV=


:;
6262 W SETTLER
5/4/3 700993 $379,900


PINE\ RIG


4704 W. RANGER
359371 $249,900


3948 N. BUCKWHEAT
3/2/2 700825 $187,500


6121 N. SILVER PALM 2587 W. ANGOLA 375 W. CRESTMONT346 W. CRESTMONT CT
3252353$148,500 4/3/3 701069 $244,900 2/2/2 700617 $124,900 3/3/2 701184 $189,900

QJUAILnUN
AW &
2435 W. ERIC 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD 7170 N. GRACKLE 7973 N. GOLFVIEW
2/1/1 701256 $52,900 3/2.52 700080 $119,900 3/2/2 700780 $109,900 3/2/2 701136 $124,900




1503 & 1525 W. EVERGREEN
5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 2047 W PARAGON IN. 7239 COTTAGE 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
700929 $279,900 3/2/2 358792 $149,900 3/2w l3+DetCP. 357796 $139,900 3/2/1 700428 $69,900


3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 E3


1






E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013




HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CliKONiCLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Be fire wise for spring


Citrus County is currently experi-
encing rainfall shortages, which
have been compounded by tradi-
tional March winds. These dry, windy
conditions are a recipe for hazardous
wildfire.
Over the past 50 years, more
and more Floridians have
moved out of urban areas and
built homes and businesses in -;.
outlying fringe areas known as
the wild land urban interface. -_
Nearly a third of our popula-
tion now lives in interface
areas where structures inter-
mingle with forests and wild Joan Bi
lands. Thus, it is important that FLOI
Citrus County residents be fire FRIE
wise during this dry season
and pay attention to potential LIV
fire risks.
Assessing Your Fire Risk
With the steady rise of new homes in
undeveloped areas, some homeowners
may wonder if they are in danger of wild-
fires. Find out if you are at risk, and ad-
here to the following recommendations to
reduce the threat of wildfire. With care-
ful management and preparation, fire can
be a positive force in Florida's forests.
Two factors contribute to wildfire risk:
Surrounding land use and types ofvege-


station around the home.
If you live in a subdivision surrounded
by homes and lawns, or in an urban area,
it is unlikely that a wildfire would reach
your house. Like the majority of Floridi-
ans, you are at low risk of wild-
Sfire, and the rest of this article
does not apply to the safety of
your home.
If you have undeveloped or
wooded land near your home,
you could be at some risk in
the event of a wildfire. Take
time now to walk around out-
side your home and look care-
adshaw fully at the nearby land. The
IDA- type, size, and density of the
HNDLY plants determines wildfire
risk. Some places may have
ING characteristics of more than
one category Use the following
criteria to assess your risk.
You are at low risk if you observe:
Moist forest, mostly leafy trees, or
mostly large trees.
Few plants growing low to the
ground.
Oak leaves or other broad leaves cov-
ering the ground.
Bare ground, improved pasture or

See FIRE/Page E12


*i


Inside...


Parade of Homes
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E5
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Box likely made of soapstone, not jade; kewpie dolls


ear John: First off,
please allow me to
congratulate you
on your wonderful and in-
formative arti-
cles. I have
questions on
the jewelry box,
photos en-
closed, my fa-
ther brought
back from
Japan in
around 1955. It
is 10 inches
high by 15 John S
deep, and 7 SIKOF
inches wide. It AT
has no marking
or benchmark
as far as I can see. It has a
great deal of jade inlaid
on the front and sides,
with brass corners and
trim.


I was hoping you could
give me some information
on history, value, and col-
lector interest Thank you
in advance for
what help you
can give. -JL.,
Homosassa
Dear J.L.: I
Sam glad you
sent several
photographs.
The jewelry
box was likely
new when pur-
ikorski chased in the
SKI'S 1950s in Japan.
rIC The overall
quality appears
to be commer-
cial grade, made for the
tourist trade. This fact
also places doubt on the
carved floral insets being
jade. I think they are


made of soapstone. This
can be checked by taking
a pocketknife blade and in
a small spot on one of the
sidepieces try to make a
small scratch. Jade will
not scratch; if it scratches,
it will reveal a white pow-
der-like color indicating
soapstone, not jade. If so,
potential dollar value for
the box would be below
$50.
Dear John: I would like
to know the value of this
See ATTIC/Page E12
Kewpie dolls such as this
one were the brainchild of
Rosie O'Neill, and have
been collected for
decades. This example
could be more than 100
years old.
Special to the Chronicle


I

t
l






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Several varieties of holly thrive in Florida


Seventeen species of Ilex
holly evolved in eastern
North America. Eleven
species, one naturally occurring
hybrid and several varieties
occur in Florida according to
famed naturalist Gil Nelson in
his 2010 book "Best Native
Plants for Southern Gardens."
Nelson's 1994 pocketbook "The
Trees of Florida" was indispen-
sable for field naturalists two
decades ago. In 2003, his point-
form "Florida's Best Native
Landscape Plants" became the
best and most accurate refer-
ence book for Florida gardeners
and professionals. All are avail-
able at the library
A species is a category, kind or


sort of living thing, plant or ani-
mal having similar attributes
and given a logical name or
taxon (plural taxa). Closely re-
lated species are grouped in a
genus (plural genera). There are
about 350 species of Ilex. Sev-
eral closely related genera are
given a family name such as
Aquifoliaceae, with three holly
genera and some 400 individual
species. Species do not usually
crossbreed; however rare ex-
ceptions and man-made manip-
ulations can occur
One naturally occurring hy-
brid is the popular Topal Holly,
Ilex x attenuata, readily avail-
able at garden centers and local
nurseries. One parent is Ameri-


can Holly, L opaca,
ranging from Central
Florida to Maine and
west to eastern Texas.
The other parent is
probably Dahoon
Holly, I cassine, al-
though Myrtleleaf
Holly, I. myrtifolia, is
also a candidate. Both
the latter hollies have Jane
been manually and
successfully crossed JAN
with American Holly GARI
to produce named
cultivars. The resulting plant is
sterile, so cannot reproduce by
seeds. Stock is grown from root-
ing cuttings or grafting stems on
related rootstock. Suckers


sprouting below a
graft will be of the
parent rootstock.
These hybrids are
faster-growing than
American Holly
Topal Holly 'East
Palatka' was selected
in the 1920s from a
naturally occurring
Veber hybrid H. Harold
Hume found near
E'S East Palatka on the
DEN St. John's River in
northeast Florida. It
thrives from Zone 7 to 10. Reach-
ing 40 feet at maturity, 'East
Palatka' has a spread of 15 feet.
Shape is symmetrical, like a
cone. It is frequently pruned to


maintain a small shrub shape
for up to 10 years. Severe prun-
ing leads to disease problems
and ruins the beautiful natural
shape of the tree.
'East Palatka' is evergreen,
drought-tolerant once estab-
lished, thrives in Central and
North Florida's torrid, wet, hot
summers and is pest- and dis-
ease-free locally It sets masses of
bright, red fruit in time for the
winter holidays. Birds relish the
abundant food and find roosting
sites among the dense leaves,
where they are safe from preda-
tors. It flowers around May lo-
cally Green berries swell over the

See JANE/Page E12


REALTY GROUP T
I REALTYoo GROUPe


2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
BILL DECKER 352-464-0647 SUSAN MULLEN 352-422-2133 VICTORIA FRANKLIN 352-427-3777


DETACHED
VILLA
S3 BED, 2 BATH.
2 CAR HILLSIDE
--, VILLAS


DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS Course this 3/2/2 maintenance-free villa is a fantastic buy at this price.
DETACHED VILLA 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR SOUTHGATE VILLAS This beautifully landscaped enhanced maintenance free villa will draw DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS The villa has a therapeutic step in tub in the guest bathroom, the latest in
BRAND NEW NEVER LIVED IN -1 YEAR WARRANTY ON EVERYTHING. Absolutely you in from the moment you walk through the door. Recently painted Well maintained bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage plus den a secure bathing. The Butlers pantry was redesign as a kitchen desk for
beautiful 3/2/2 home in premier gated Terra Vista of Citrus Hills. Family room with inside and out this home features custom surround sound, Kitchen Aid expanded Laurel model, extensive oak molding around windows, easy internet access while cooking. The covered lanai faces south for
beautifully appointed large eat-in kitchen. Master suite features two walk-in appliances, designer lighting fixtures, and so much more all situated in crown molding in tray ceiling, master extra large pantry oak cabinets cool evening breezes. The best of all worlds including all the amenities
closets, double sink and huge walk-in tiled shower. Neutral colors throughout, a great location at Terra Vista of Citrus Hills. Enjoy peaceful evenings on with crown molding extra footage in bedrooms and den, a must see that come with membership, especially use of the exciting Bella Vita Spa
large lanaiwith paversin a secluded backyard. MLS #359385. $274,000 your private screened in lanai. MLS 353555. $225,000 atthis price in Terra Vista. MLS 357742. $232,000 & Fitness Center MLS 354569. $224,900

VILLA 3 l
BATH,
2 CAR
HILLSIDE
VILLAS
i', reduce by -
b e a m iiiiii This one
DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE VILLAS .- SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR HILLSIDE SOUTH This home is all about outdoor living. Great Lanai overlooking the Skyview Golf Elegant maintenance free home in Terra Vista This 3 bedroom 2.5 bath 2 car DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR WOODVIEW VILLAS
Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2.5 baths, great Course is expanded with an open patio complete with lots of room for your grill, garage heated pool/spa home is on the 8th green of Skyview. If you are Beautiful maintenance free pool home, 2 bedrooms with a den, 2 bath, 2 car
room floor plan, expanded and loaded with upgrades. Situated on outdoor patio furniture, and open fire pit. Open floor plan features lots of quality conscious with sophisticated tastes, please don't miss seeing this garage, open floor plan design with a great use of space. All neutral colors,
Sky view golf course with breathtaking views. Oversized lanai with upgrades including maple cabinets, solid surface countertops and an expanded home with neutral colors throughout. This is surely the kitchen of your distinguished Berber carpets create a comfortable, warm yet sophisticated
lush landscape. Located in the premiere community of Terra Vista. shower in the master bath. Professional decorator touches finish off this lovely dreams, with cabinetry, countertops and appliances of the highest quality, atmosphere throughout. Superior condition. Plantation shutters. Maintenance
MLS 357971. $339,000 home. Truly the bestof Florida living. MLS 354017. $219,900 Membership required. MLS 357018. $329,000 free living at it's finest! MLS 701578. $199,000



S L FM TOWNHOME 2 BED, 3 DETACHED VILLA
2. BATH, 1 CAR 3 BED. 2.5 BATH,
TOWNHOMES VILLAS

ll, ,ivnstairsandnicea I. .a Ick paved
--.'- h,,. n .The upstairs has home with
.. ......... s with two baths i. n-law/guest
SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, BRENTWOOD SINGLE FAMILY HOME 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR TERRA VISTA .1 I ft office space.- full bath.
Attractive 3 bedroom, 3 bath split plan home with an extra large Exceptional and Fabulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath 2 car, -- ,, - to all the UD ,,I, decorated and
2 car side entry garage. This home is very open and airy with a large 5375 sq. ft. pool home in the exclusive upscale gated community of Terra and located in a painted, Gourmet Kitchen, Formal dining incorporated with an open floor plan is great
skylight in the kitchen. Great room and dining room have sliders to Vista. Very spacious open island kitchen great space for entertaining. -de-sac. Social for entertaining. Lots of tile, and Wet Bar. Large master suite has hardwood floor,
large screened in lanai, inside laundry Lots of privacy. Social Enjoy a relaxing retreat on the extended screened Lanai. Located on the i1., . Included. #1169 TWO custom walk-in closets. You'll be proud to return to this elegant home wAush
membership included. #1914 $1350.00 quietest of cu-de-sa cs. #5375 $2300.00 ., 1.150 landscaping & on a large corner lot. #9876 $1800


M


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 E5


!


I







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Happy Hour with a garden flair


You can use your green thumb to 'grow'your own cocktails


DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Gardening can be an in-
toxicating hobby, espe-
cially if the botany is
booze-related.
Consider the possibili-
ties: grapes fermented into
wine, corn distilled into
bourbon, hops used to fla-


vor beer and fruit to
sweeten liqueurs.
Why run to a liquor store
when you can savor the
harvest from your own
cocktail garden?
Three processes are in-
volved in converting plants
into serviceable drinks:
fermentation, distillation
and mixing, according to


Amy Stewart, author of the
new book "The Drunken
Botanist: The Plants That
Create the World's Great
Drinks" (Algonquin
Books).
"Virtually anything that
produces sugar fruit
and grains can be used
distilled, fermented or
drunk," Stewart said in an


interview. "Most people
get involved with the
mixers."
Fermenting adding
yeasts to turn plant sugars
into alcohol came first,
she said. High-proof bev-
erage alcohol (20 percent
and above) came later with

See DRINKS/Page Ell


PINE RIDGE Prudential CITRUS HILLS
1481 W. Pine Ridge Blvd. VOJ Prude 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 lopri Shos (352) 746-0744
Properties


a


,- 3 5' E Liberty SI
MLS 359601 $179,900
3/2/2 pool home perfect for
entertaining. Enjoy the view of the 9th
green on the Oaks golf course.
Directions: 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd., R on Liberty.
Matt Robinson 352-502-3501
I LA


C ,i 782 E Keller Ct
MLS 700636 $324,900
Furnished 3/2/2, pool & spa. Spacious &
bright overlooking 11th green of the Oaks.
Jane O'Gwynn 352-302-1926


"rjiStt 1390W Double Eagle Ct P och 3077 N Caves Valley Path
MLS 358364 $615,000 MLS 345067 $370,000
On Skyview's 15th Fairway in Foxfire. Spacious, well maintained 3/3/2 with
3/3.5/3, spacious and upgraded. views of #9 on The Ranch Course.
Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Jodie Holder 352-302-2036


P Oa 5395 N Allamandra Dr P~'~aO 3422 N Buckhorn Dr
MLS 358165 $299,900 MLS355561 $299,000
3/2.5/2 pool home w/huge work/hobby Beautifully designed 3/3/2. Detached
shop that could be MIL suite, garage/barn &2.75 acres-readyfor horses!
Joy Holland 352-464-4952 Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213


7)jiSA 460 W Doerr Path
MLS 356086 $325,000
Very nice 3/2.5/2 villa with pool on
Skyview Golf Course.
Helen Forte 352-220-4764


.j- lil 1820 E Gale Dancer Cir
MLS 35blb $283,600
Unique & stunning details, 3/2.5/3 pool
home. Many fine features you must see!
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


,Z) Sj i /W uoerr Path g 755 W Toucan Lp jl 3U3 L Hartlord St 4 3a 631 W Wild Pine Cir
MLS 359119 $199,000 MLS 344859 $99,000 MLS 342911 $59,900 MLS 700571 $54,999
Many upgrades in this 3/2/2 maintenance Immaculate maintenance free 2/2/2 villa. Lower level 2/2 condo overlooking the Well maintained 2/2/1 villa in maintenance
free villa. Come, have a look! Solar tubes provide natural brightness, community pool. True value found here! free, parklike 55+ community.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Helen Forte 352-220-4764 Mark Casper 352-476-8136 Richard DeVita 352-601-8273
0 92011 Prudential Rnancial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential,the g
--, Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
A Bloody Mary with garden-supplied carrot and celery
swizzle sticks. Botanicals can be used to ferment, distill,
mix and decorate alcoholic beverages. Many plants, best
if grown organically, like spearmint (mint julep), olives
(martini), carrots and celery (Bloody Mary) can be used
as garnishes in cocktails.


E6SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HomeFront BRIEFS


Master gardeners
slate clinics
Want to learn about lawn care? The
March free Master Gardener Plant Clin-
ics will be about lawn maintenance. Dis-
cussion will be about each type of
"warm-season" turf grass commonly
found in Citrus County, the good and bad
points of each, particular care require-
ments and common turf pests and
diseases.
The remaining schedule for these free
clinics is:
2 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, at Ho-
mosassa Library, Homosassa.
1 p.m. Tuesday, March 26, at Citrus
Springs Library, Citrus Springs.
Master Gardeners will be present to
answer questions or look at samples of


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

Would you cook it? From what I
have read, the general concern
when food has been frozen that long
is not so much safety as quality. I
have read that one year is the
threshold for quality, so I am think-
ing I could still go for it, but I would
love to hear what you think.
[zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz----Jzzzzzz


plant-related concern. For more informa-
tion, call Citrus County Extension at 352-
527-5700.
Achieve landscaping LAND
goals with class
The Citrus County Water Resources I
Department is offering a free class on
"Favorite Plants for Citrus County" from 2 LARGEST SELECTION OF
to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 4, in the Ex-
tension classroom at 3650 W. Sovereign '
Path, Lecanto. WS
Planning is a process and there are -
several steps you must apply to achieve -
success. Evaluating the existing condi-
tions is where the class begins. Preregis- .
tration is required by calling Gina FLORIDA AT ITS FINEST. 1i I ..1...1 . I' i, ,i1,, 4 .n .
3 bedroom, 2 bath home with game room and lanai. Super Giant Man Cave on
Hamilton at 352-527-5707. For more in- office/workshop. MLS #355889, $330,000. 1007 Telephone PI. Rd. Ask fc
formation, call 352-527-5708.
From staff reports

-Elizabeth, Washington
Dear Elizabeth: My experience
has been that meat or poultry that BUY FOR S59 900 OR RENT. I.d.., ..1 ..,i,
has been frozen in an at-home WATERFRONT w/FL room, fenced yard & boat dock. Central REDUCED-
freezer for an extended period of air. Available NOW! #356970. 10416 E. Gobbler. Jean A!C. Needs i
Cassese-352-201-7034. Cassese 3524
time (over a year) develops freezer mC
burn. Two years is really pushing it
when it comes to quality. The USDA
recommends frozen food be con-
sumed within one year. They also


See FRUGAL/Page E10


V-7 MEW


CHARMING 21 BkUROOM HOMk
ON ALMOST 4 ACRES!
$79,900
Nestled amongst large oaks, the interior of this home
has just been renovated. New flooring, freshly
painted, completely fenced! Two storage buildings,
one car garage & carport. MLS # 701601
Choice of the adjacent acreage available.
For a total of 8 acres!
Directions: From Inverness North on Highway 41,
left on Norvell Bryant Hwy & Left on N. Trucks Ave.
From West on Norvell Bryant Hwy, past Citrus Hills,
turn right on N. Trucks Ave.
Rick Snell
352-794-6100 NEXTGENEATION
REALTY


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


The Glory, constructed by Gold Crest Homes, is a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home that boasts an extra-large kitchen that includes a walk-in pantry.




Spring Parade of Homes


* The Citrus County Spring Parade of Homes is
scheduled this year from March 16 to 24, and
models are open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
* To take a self-guided tour through this year's
Citrus County Spring Parade of Homes, go to
www.citrusparadeofhomes.com.


CHARLES LAWRENCE
For the Chronicle
here is a parade coming
to Citrus and Hernando
counties.
Hosted by the Citrus County
Builders Association, a construc-
tion industry association that in-


eludes 33 builder members, the an-
nual Citrus County Parade of
Homes is one of their promotional
activities.
There are 15 brand new homes
on the tour this year, with one addi-
tional virtual entry The parade in-
cludes new homes in both Citrus
and Hernando Counties, the major-


ity of which are based in Hernando
County.
According the Parade of Homes
Chairwoman, Kathleen Gilbert, this
year's parade includes a variety of
homes, from small to large. Gilbert
is co-owner of Gold Crest Homes, a
See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


PARADE
Continued from Page E8

company that offers
smaller, energy-efficient
homes which she said are
a response to people
wanting to downsize dur-
ing a bad economy.
"We are passionate
about energy conserva-
tion," she said. "The Pa-
rade of Homes is a good
opportunity to find out
why people should buy
new instead of used. It's
just like buying a used
car. If you buy used, you
buy all the trouble that
comes with it. With a new
home comes new fea-
tures. And things have
progressed so rapidly;
like there are a lot more
safety features in new
homes. They are more
durable, stronger and are
really able to protect your
family And there is very
little maintenance cost
for repairs on a new
home. You build it to suit
your needs."


Homes on this year's
parade have a square
footage of living space
ranging from 1,517 square
feet to more than 4,000
square feet.
Dream Custom Homes
has the largest entry in
this year's parade, with a
four-bedroom, three-bath
home on Pine Ridge
Boulevard in Beverly
Hills.
Artistic Homes has the
smallest entry, with a
three-bedroom, two-bath
home in Spring Hill. This
builder also has the
largest number of entries
this year, at four new
homes total.
"There are 10,000 Baby
Boomers retiring every
day and they are going to
discover Citrus County.
With mortgage interest
rates at 3.75 percent, now
is the time to buy," Gilbert
said. "The Parade of
Homes is a wonderful op-
portunity to find out
what's new in the market
and this is the largest pa-
rade we've had in five
years."


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
This model, The Francesca by Hart-
land Homes, is a mid-sized residence
on the 2013 Citrus-Hernando Parade
of Homes. The home is in Pine Ridge.


CLASSIC AND LIVING ON THE WATER! S. AMBRIDGE PT.
CONTEMPORARY This classic contemporary pool home is COUNTRY ESTATE WITH CHARACTER
defines this distinctive 5/4 waterfront the right setting for living the Florida and charm on 5 acrelot in quiet neighborhood
estate pool and separate apar frtment lifestyle Open and airy with the on Ambridge Pt. next to the Withlacoochee
estate w/pool and separate apartment. A plantation shutters diffusing the StateForest and the trails but also very close to
true masterpiece in a park-like setting sunlight. 190 ft. of seawall gives you State Forest and thetrils butalso vey closet
off Lake Tsala Apopka, waiting for plenty of room to dock all the water town! With 2,643 sqft. this 3/3/2 pool home
your family to move right in! toys imaginable! offers a lot of space.
MLS #357471 $399,500 MLS #354435 $489,000 MLS 700379 $129.000


..
J. .. r
f-* _.-. * . ; j -' -- .- .. *^ .-

COILDWOULB
BANKOR


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 E9







E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013



FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

encourage consumers to
freeze turkey at 0 degrees
F or below and caution
that freezer storage times
are for best quality If
frozen continuously,
turkey products will be
safe indefinitely So yours
is safe to cook and eat, but
don't expect high quality I
would thaw it and check
the overall quality before
cooking it.
Dear Sara: I just bought
a muffin pan to make six
jumbo-sized muffins. Com-
pared to regular-sized
muffins, how much longer
should they take to bake?


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-Jean, Missouri
Dear Jean: Generally, at
350 degrees F, they bake
for 20 to 30 minutes. I'd
check at the 20-minute
mark.
Dear Sara: Can you
freeze cereal? It's on sale
here, and I was going to
stock up if it can be frozen.
-H.F, Oklahoma
Dear H.E: Cereal has a
long shelf life, so stocking
up is a good choice. Check
the date on the box. It typ-
ically has a best-if-used-by
date that's about nine to 12
months from the purchase
date. You have plenty of
time to store it and eat it.
You can freeze cereal; the
problem is the amount of
space it takes. Keep in
mind that cereal goes on


i. i, 1 I iI i Iii\ii-i i, ..,, I l hf
CRYSTAL RIVER totally renovated, 2 bdrm Avenue. Each apt. has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
1 bath home with carport, fully fenced 1. 1. I . 1. .1 i ... .. Just
downtown Crystal River, Ig laundry room, 11 I .1 , i, i. n. crystal
currently rented on month to month basis, River water & sewer, progress energy electric.
make a nice investment. #700696 S53.000 #359088 S250.000


sale often and there are
coupons for it regularly,
too. If you're concerned
about having multiple
boxes open at a time, you
can transfer cereal into
plastic zip-enclosure stor-
age bags (gallon-size) and
place the bag right back
into the cereal box.
MEN
Witch hazel is a cheap
product that has multiple
uses. Many people use it
for sunburn or bug-bite re-
lief, or as deodorant. Use it
to clean chrome, glass and
mirrors or to clean jewelry,
too. In a spray bottle, com-
bine 1/2 cup witch hazel, 1
cup of water and about 15
drops of lavender, grape-
fruit, eucalyptus or cedar
essential oil and use the
mixture as an air freshener
or to clean countertops.
The first reader tip
shares another idea:
Use witch hazel to re-
duce irritation: I love
witch hazel. I use it for a
daily astringent and after I
get my eyebrows waxed! I
run home and wash the
area, then wipe away It re-
duces the irritation on my
sensitive skin. Anni,
email


Easy focaccia bread:
This recipe is for people
who are inexperienced
with baking bread:
1 cup warm water
E 1 teaspoon yeast.
1 teaspoon sugar.
1/2 teaspoon salt.
2 tablespoons olive oil.
2 cups flour.
roughly 1/8 cup addi-
tional flour.
additional olive oil.
herbs, Parmesan
cheese or other toppings
as desired.
Mix together first five in-
gredients, then add 2 cups
flour. Cover and let stand 5
to 10 hours at room tem-
perature or until dough is
doubled in bulk and looks
bubbly Sprinkle 1/8 cup of
flour around edge of
dough. Using a rubber
spatula, pull dough away
from bowl, letting flour
drop between bowl and
dough until dough ball is
covered with flour Use ad-
ditional flour sparingly as
needed. Lightly oil a 12 to
14-inch pizza pan with
olive oil and dump dough
onto pan. Spread out
dough into circle. Brush
lightly with more olive oil
and sprinkle with Parme-


ai01 AMERICAN
Lou Mieie 1 Realtore REALTY 9 INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU@ 4511N.LewHnoHw.
Cell: (352) 697-1685 4-360


san, garlic powder, herbs
or toppings of your choice.
Gently pat toppings into
dough to help them stick.
Bake at 400 degrees F for
20 minutes.
Cook's note: I bake this
on a 14-inch round cast-iron
griddle in the oven. I've also
made it at camp on the lids
of two cast-iron Dutch
ovens, with the pots turned
upside down over the
dough. Super-easy and al-
ways a hit I also use this for
pizza crust sometimes by
prebaking it for about five
minutes before adding the
sauce and toppings, then
finishing the baking as di-
rected. -S.D., Minnesota
Replace tomatoes when
they are out of season: I
love tomato powder. I get
mine from the Spice
House (thespicehouse.com
/spices/tomato-powder).
I've used it for homemade
barbecue sauce and a
ketchup substitute. I've
added it to soup and
sauces, too. You can find
recipes for using it at the
Spice House website, as
well as this link to Emer-
gency Essentials: bepre-
pared. com/provident-pant
ry-dehydrated-tomato-
powder-68-oz.html.
The small jar at the
Spice House will give you
enough to test without
spending a lot of money, so
you can see if it works for
you. I now keep a No. 10


can of tomato powder on
hand. I keep the jar stored
in the refrigerator, be-
cause it's a dry environ-
ment due to the frost-free
feature. There are NO
anti-caking ingredients in
the powder; it's pure
tomato powder. I also put a
silica gel packet in the jar
to absorb moisture. Make
sure you don't leave the jar
open in a humid kitchen.
Here are a few uses for
tomato powder:
For thick tomato
paste, mix three parts
water with one part tomato
powder.
U For tomato sauce, mix
four parts water with one
part tomato powder.
For pizza sauce: I mix
three teaspoons tomato
powder with three table-
spoons water I add a shot of
vinegar and a little sweet-
ener (for me, that's agave
nectar or honey), as well as
some Italian or pizza
spices. -Karen, Kansas


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.frugal
village. corn), a website that
offers practical, money-
saving strategies for
everyday living. To send
tips, comments or ques-
tions, write to Sara Noel,
c/o Universal Uclick, 1130
Walnut SL, Kansas City,
MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.


I I 1 I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


DRINKS
Continued from Page E6

distillation, or heating fer-
mented liquids into a
vapor and then re-
condensing that into a
more concentrated mix.
A cautionary note: It's il-
legal to distill anything in
the United States without
a license.
"You can ferment but
you can't distill without the
feds knocking on your
door," Stewart said.
In addition, know your
plants. "Understand what
you're doing if you're out
there gleaning," Stewart
said. '"A lot of plants be-
come solvents when mixed
with alcohol. Don't pick
anything that might be-
come potentially deadly"
A dizzying array of plants
has been converted into al-
cohol over the ages, every-
thing from agave (tequila)
to yams (beer and vodka).
Many plants are used pri-
marily as garnishes, such
as spearmint (mint julep),
olives (martini) and cher-
ries (Manhattan).
The marketplace is un-
tapped for this emerging
type of niche gardening,
said Tim Russell, a
spokesman for Territorial
Seed Co. in Cottage Grove,
Ore. Territorial is teaming


with Stewart to sell a cock-
tail-friendly line of herbs,
fruits, vegetables and
flowers.
'"A lot of young people
are looking to do cooler
things in their gardens like
grow their own cocktail in-
gredients," Russell said.
"We're hoping this will
draw them further into
gardening."
The average liquor bot-
tle contains a great deal
more than straight alcohol,
Stewart writes.
"Once a spirit leaves the
still, it is subject to endless
experimentation with
herbs, spices, fruits, nuts,
bark, roots and flowers,"
she said. "Some distillers
claim to use over a hun-
dred different botanicals
in their secret recipes."
So if distillers are con-
tinuing to experiment, why
not gardeners?
Stewart's garden-
themed recipes can be the
foundation for:
Infused vodkas. Fill a
clean jar with fruit, herbs
or spices and then add
vodka. Seal, store and
sample until your taste
buds tell you it's ready to
drink.
Homemade grena-
dine. Peel a half-dozen
pomegranates, leaving the
seeds and membranes in-
tact. Squeeze and filter
until you've made about


two cups of juice. Pour that
into a saucepan, add 1 to 2
cups of sugar, simmer and
stir in an ounce of vodka,
which acts as a preserva-
tive. The syrup should be
good for about a month.
U Maraschino cherries.
Clean and pit a small
batch of fresh, sour cher-
ries. Loosely fill a Mason
jar with the cherries and
cover with brandy or bour-
bon. Seal the jar and re-
frigerate. Use them in
drinks or over ice cream.

Hop plants are vigorous
climbers and can be
trained to grow on fences
and trellises, like these
alongside a vineyard in
Langley, Wash. Hop seed
cones shown here can be
used to stabilize and flavor
beers in the brewing
process. High-spirited gar-
deners are transforming
their plants into beers,
cocktails and liqueurs.
DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press


Jackie Davis
I American Realty & Investments
OEM 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 Cell
.FAL ESTA. T jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com
7A n F I


"Nancy Knows Sugarmill Woods"f

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New Model at HERITAGE!


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 Ell






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

kewpie doll which is about 4 1/2
inches tall. It is marked Rosie
O'Neill. I know she is at least 100
years old. The dress and frame is
light blue satin material. WP,
Internet
Dear WP: Rose O'Neill created
the cute little pixie-like figures
called Kewpies. They have been a
category of collecting for some
time. They first appeared in a
story by Rose O'Neill in Ladies
Home Journal in 1909 and by 1911
the figurines were available. So
your Kewpie is likely close to 100
years old. Current potential dollar
value is below $50.
Dear John: In about 1942, my
FIRE You
FIREfire-pi
obser
Continued from Page E4 I A
needl
widely spaced grassy trees.
clumps or plants. U C
Open area with grass shrub
and trimmed branches. than 3
You are at medium risk 0 V
if you observe: medium
Thick, continuous neath
grasses, weeds or shrubs. Ii
Continuous thin layer or you
of pine needles and scat- U N
tered pine trees. undev
Scattered palmettos or of den
shrubs up to three feet tall U C
separated by patches of the gr
grass or sand. with v
A clear view into or For
across the undeveloped area medit


BANK OWNED-LECANTO, FL
3BR/2BA on chain linkfenced 2.21 acres.
$74,900 MLS#700399




TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on large shaded lot.
Carport. Central water. S30,000
MLS#359133


aunt was an executive secretary at
Paramount Pictures. Because of
her job, she was on speaking terms
with many of the stars of the day
She frequently asked for a picture
addressed to her niece. I have 12
8-by-10 inch pictures addressed to
me, typically "best wishes to
Donita" then signed with the star's
name. The collection includes the
following pictures: Bob Hope,
Betty Hutton, Barbara Stanwyck,
Dorothy Lamour, Alan Ladd, Bing
Crosby, Paulette Goddard, Ray
Milland, Sunny Tufts, Joan
Caulfield, Veronica Lake, Olivia
DeHavilland. Is there a market for
these? L, Internet
Dear L.: Wow what a list of
names. Yes, there is collector in-
terest in your signed movie star
photographs. Since you are think-
ing of selling them, it would be


live in a high risk,
rone area if you
ve:
thick bed of pine
es and lots of pine

continuous palmettos,
s, or sawgrass more
feet tall.
Tines and small-to-
im trees or palms be-
taller pine trees.
impenetrable shrubs
ng pines.
o clear view into the
'eloped area because
se growth.
connection between
found and the canopy
egetation.
residents living in
tm-risk or high-risk


BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL
Corner 2.17 acre tract. Paved road & central
water. $17,500 MLS#700351


BANK UWnIU-ILUKAL 11 T, IL
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. $45,000


(Kewpie dolls) first
appeared in a story by
Rose O'Neill in
'Ladies Home
Journal' in 1909 and
by 1911 the figurines
were available.

best done through a specialty auc-
tion company Profiles in History
specializes in the category The
website is wwwprofilesinhistory
com. For a second opinion, con-
tact Heritage Auctions in Dallas,
Texas at www.ha.com. Good luck
and let us know how things work
out.
Dear John: I am a retired


areas, make it easy for fire
trucks to get to your house.
Clearly label your street
name and house number
with metal signs and posts.
Make sure the driveway
has a 16-foot clearance of
vegetation, and create a
30-foot wide space around
your home for fire trucks
to maneuver. Create a de-
fensible space that sepa-
rates landscape vegetation
from surrounding forests
and leaves room for fire
fighting equipment to
maneuver.
Inside your defensible
space, trim lower
branches up to 10 feet on
tall trees, remove vines
from trees, and keep
shrubbery away from pine
trees so that a fire on the
ground cannot climb up
these fuel ladders to the
treetops.
Use shrub islands or
patches of perennials


rather than contii
beds of plantings.
trees so branches d
touch each other.
Keep combustible
like wood piles, co]
piles, gas grills, gas
and propane tanks a
30 feet away from
house. Clear away
vegetation, pine ne
and branches.
Use mowed grass,
walkways and mu
plantings near your
Although mulch hel
tain soil moisture, it
be kept moist or it c;
come a fuel source.
Keep large, leafy,
wood trees in your
particularly on the
and west sides of
house. Their shade
portant to cool your 1
and the flat leaves
moisture on the gr
Large pine trees als
vide good shade.


4' ley www.parsleyrealestate.
Real Estate, 352-726-26


plumber from the Philadelphia
area. I have in my possession sev-
eral plumbing codebooks from
early last century Any idea who I
could contact to find out about their
worth or value? -B.R., Homosassa
Dear B.R: I was not able to find
any collector interest, leaving po-
tential dollar value catch-as-
catch-can. You might consider
donating the books to the Histori-
cal Society in Philadelphia.


John Sikorski has been a profes-
sional in the antiques business
for 30 years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's Attic, on
WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box 2513,
Ocala, FL 34478 or ask
sikorski@aol. com.

nuous lower branches and rake
Thin up pine needles.
lo not Remove flammable
plants like saw palmetto,
items wax myrtle, yaupon holly,
mpost red cedar and gallberry
cans, from within 30 feet of your
t least home. These shrubs are
your appropriate further from
dead your home and in natural
needles areas managed with pre-
scribed fire. They contain
gravel resins, oils and waxes that
lched burn readily
home. For more information,
ps re- please contact Citrus
must County Extension at 352-
an be- 527-5700.
Citrus County Extension
hard- links the public with the
yard, University of Florida/IFAS's
east knowledge, research and
your resources to address youth,
is im- family, community and agri-
louse, cultural needs. Programs
trap and activities offered by the
ound. Extension Service are avail-
o pro- able to all persons without
Trim regard to race, color, handi-
cap, sex, religion or national
com origin.

Dr Joan Bradshaw is the
Director of the University
S of Florida/IFAS Citrus
County Extension.


JANE
Continued from Page E5

summer and ripen in
December.
'Savannha' Holly is a
Topal hybrid found in
the 1960s in Georgia. It
looks more like Ameri-
can Holly than does
'East Palatka.' Relatively
faster-growing than its
parent, 'Savannah' (cold
Z7-9, 9-4 heat zone) does
not suffer Central
Florida's hot zone 10
summers as well as
'East Palatka.' It reaches
45 feet tall and about 10
feet wide. It is useful as
a specimen, parking lot,
city and roadside tree.
The third Topal group
is called 'Foster' hybrids.
Nelson wrote they are
naturally occurring
crosses of American and
Dahoon Hollies origi-
nally produced in Besse-
mer, Alabama, in the
1940s. 'Foster' hollies
grow to about 15 to 25
feet tall and 12 feet wide.
Leaves are long and nar-
row, like those of Da-
hoon Holly, but glossy
with spiny lobes like
American Holly
Seeds of hybrid Topal
hollies are sterile, so will
not germinate or pro-
duce seedlings. How-
ever, ample berries
ripen in winter to feed
wildlife.
---*--
Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and
consultant. Semi-
retired, she grows thou-
sands ofnative plants.
Visitors are welcome to
her Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. For an
appointment, call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@
gmail.com.


LAKE TSALA APOPKA WATERFRONT, Spectacular view from the
2nd story of this cute & tidy stilt home. Paved street, nice
neighborhood. Fish the chain of lakes on the Hernando pool. Priced
under Co. Appraiser's Direct Sales Estimate at $69,900.


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybasstampabay.rrcorn www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours )302-6714


E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A dose of 'Downton Abbey' for your home


AMY LORENTZEN
Associated Press

Intrigued by the drama
and inspired by the so-
phistication of British aris-
tocrats in "Downton
Abbey," some fans are plot-
ting to bring the series'
style into their own homes,
from gilded finishes to op-
ulent upholstery to por-
trait paintings.
"We've gone so casual in
the last decade in terms of
home decor. I think there
is a desire to be a little
more formal, or a little
more glamorous," says
Kristie Barnett, an interior
design blogger in
Nashville, Tenn. "That
doesn't mean it can't be
family-friendly"
"Downton Abbey," in
production for its fourth
season, features the noble
Crawley family "upstairs"
and its servants "down-
stairs" in a sprawling
country estate. The char-
acters are struggling to
bring the estate and their
traditional sensibilities
into the 1920s, a time of so-
cial and political ferment.
Ornate drawing rooms,
flowing boudoirs, vibrant
gardens and crisp, clean
servants' quarters make
the gorgeous backdrop for
the PBS Masterpiece
melodrama.
So how do you bring
some of that aristocratic
look into a comfortable
modern home?
Gilded for glamor
One of the simplest ways
to achieve the "upstairs"
look of "Downton Abbey"
is to apply gold metallic
paint for a gilded finish on
wood furniture, picture
frames, mirror edges and
other decorative items, in-
cluding bookends and
lamp stands.
In her living room, Bar-
nett, who blogs at
TheDecorologist.com,


used gold paint to make a
barley-twist coffee table
appear worthy of nobility.
Golden candlesticks and a
crystal doorknob atop
piles of books finish the
look.
"Gilt was all the rage
during the British Edwar-
dian Age," says Barnett.
'"And it's all the rage in my
house."
Furniture flourish
Richly upholstered set-
tees, footstools, chaise
lounges and Bergere
chairs can add a touch of
bygone beauty, but you
should allow plenty of
space for more livable
pieces such as a tradi-
tional sofa. If you can't af-
ford new furniture,
consider adding silk or
damask throw pillows.
Tapestries and oriental
rugs can be affordable and
add the feel of affluence.
Check out Etsycom for
"Downton Abbey"-style
fabrics and textiles.
Lovely lighting
Another easy way to
achieve the upstairs style,
while keeping things prac-
tical and comfortable, is to
hang an ornate light fix-
ture or chandelier.
Affordable plaster or
stencil medallions placed
around light fixtures can
be another eye-catching
element.
Or can use candlelight,
which will bounce off mir-
rors, glass and crystal, cre-
ating the sort of warm glow
that makes the Crawleys'
multi-course dinners look
so enticing.
Windows and walls
The return to detail and
decoration includes opu-
lent upholstery, drapes
and wall coverings, says
Maxwell Gillingham-Ryan,
founder of Apartment-
Therapy.com.
"People seem to be ready


Associated Press
This photo provided by The Decorologist shows a Downton Abbey-inspired salon-style
art grouping in the dining room of Kristie Barnett.


for more and more luxe
materials and dramatic fin-
ishes," he says. "Even wall-
paper, which was trending
modern, is back to classic
floral patterns and English
traditionalism, but often
with a bit of a twist"
Painted walls are
darker, with a gloss finish,
experts say You can create
the upper-crust feel with
bold jewel tones, including
emerald and sapphire.
Also in the traditional
"Downton Abbey" palette,
says Mary Lawlor, manager
of color marketing for Kelly-
Moore Paints, are refresh-
ing pastels and creams. One
of the mansion's expansive
drawing rooms, for exam-
ple, features a pale green
wallpaper further softened


with richly upholstered fur-
niture in a mix of rose and
classic ivory.
The British nobility takes
its heritage seriously, and
there are painted portraits
and landscapes throughout
the show's castle. If you're
at a rummage sale or con-
signment shop, pick up sim-
ilar art and create a small
grouping on one wall. You
don't have to be descended
from these somber-looking
subjects to bring their so-
phistication home.
Lure of the library
While many elements of
"Downton Abbey" style
have a feminine appeal,
there's no mistaking the
bold, masculine feel of
Lord Grantham's library


7 Rod Kenne
- 352-436-3531


I: > I: :o rUN t(.OA TR.iSh
r, Realtor 0ip.i a. ":i
C. ,,li FL -1,".


CRYSTAL RIVER WATERFRONT POOL HOME
iI :. :. I0 t. .I 1 "I nken
. :1 :1I ,,,I I- ,, w ater
I:, 1: 1' I i :i Covered cut-in boat slip/
I1 : 1 1 I pool and amazing
.... I i ... i:- 1 :t, ceramic tile throughout,
..:: I I -I .: :..... : inters, open & bright home!
$415,000
l ii. : I'" I.. |i, ngsBayDrto Lon lst d.


Add jewel-toned leather
furniture or leather throw
pillows to your reading
areas for a twist to the
muted espresso brown
that has been popular in
recent years.
Consider turning a little-
used dining room into a
study, using the table as a
hearty desk fit for the lords
and ladies of your home.
"People are wanting to
do something different in
their dining rooms, so a lot
of dining rooms are being
filled with bookcases,"


Barnett says. She advises
painting bookcases the
same shade as walls, but in
a gloss or lacquer finish.
Simple sensibility
Contrasting with the rich
decor of the show's upstairs
rooms is the subdued, neu-
tral palette and texture of
the downstairs staff's living
and working quarters.
"Think natural materials
like linen, cotton, raw wood,
and a simplistic farmhouse-
type aesthetic that is influ-
encing DIY projects," says
Becki Speakman, trend and
design director for
Michaels Stores.
One way to fashion the
look is to use washed and
softened painter's drop-
cloths for inexpensive cur-
tains and slipcovers.
Lawlor recommends a
palette of grounded grays
and varnished ivory
Creating flourishes of
"Downton Abbey" style
throughout a home can add
interest and refinement.
But give just a nod to the era
- don't try to replicate it
"The idea is to incorpo-
rate some of the glamour
of that time in our modern-
day setting," Barnett says,
"without creating a mu-
seum in our homes."


KE "Always There For You"
PE.L I GAIL COOPER
A" liiiililionii Doiila Re-Ialior
R0 Cell: (352) 634-4346
* Office: (352) 382-1700x309
t= E-mail me: homes4u3-.,mindspring.com


OVER 2700 SQ FT OF LIVING AREA! FANTASTIC INVESTMENT!
4/2.5/2 home with heated pool a 1, 3/2/2 home built in 1999
STile in main living areas l) Screened front entry
Brand new carpeting in bedrooms r Tiled kitchen with pantry
New roof 2007 well for yard "- FL room has newer dual paned windows
* Pool surface refinished in 2012 Two walk-in closets in master suite
Stainless steel appliances Open patio plus storage shed
* Pavered lanai and pool deck Pasture area in rear gives privacy
SGas fireplace in family room r i Home warranty for the buyers
#700437 $169.900 i* #701281 $106,000
See Virt l T ouIrs @ ,.i. w.reIJs IIJ.I.I..I- u .omi


roperieisi.ic


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 E13


re*ast









E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013





Real Estate

Classifieds


30ft 5th Wheel
w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric, call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945

BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!


INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
S1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 is accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!

HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec.+ Ref.
352-628-3019

Homosassa 2/2/cp
Immaculate, upgraded
1560 sq. ft. quiet nbrhd
$675 352-633-1593

HOMOSASSA
nice 2/2,c/h/a, scnd
porch, w/d on
Longfellow, $550 mo.
call 352-503 -7020

INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951



-I.-


must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766

43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807


2/1, DW, H/A, 12x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

v THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624
HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, % acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, incl
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171
Mobile Homes with
acreage
Ready to move in.
Seller Financing with
approved credit. Lots
of room for the price,
3Br 2Ba. No renters
850-308-6473
LandHomesExpress
.com

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181

Palm Harbor Factory
liquidation sale
3 stock models must
go. $39k off select
2012 models
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NEW!! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incIs: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377





For We% Igo
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1% AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-807-8847




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
*Owner Fin. Avail.+<
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 602/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217


MUST SELL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on /4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Ca11386-546-5833
Leave Message
LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Owner Fin./Lease Opt.
2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x
20 block bdg, New
Septic, Handy person,
REDUCED $24,900./
Offer 352-422-1916





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Secials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Melody Pk, INV 2/2
splitplan c/h/a roof-
over, semi- furn, $8500k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340





RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL


Need a Good Tenant?



2/2/1.....................$650
3/2 Free Standing Garage. $900
2/2.5 Townhouse...$650
2/2/1 ..................... $575


2/2/2...................$850


2/2 Carport ........$650
Jennifer Fudge,
SProperty Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010



RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounityHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Son Pt ............... $500

41 Birdilree St ........................$800
2/2/2Swspliousn0rs, hiuel0am
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
6315 N. Shorewod Dr. (HER)..$625
2/1, Florida room
5525 S. Kline Terr. ONV)....$1200
2/2/1 Furn or unfurn home includes lawn care
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 C(leveland (R)................$675
2/2/1 Roomy home close to 7 Rivers Hosp.
1266 N.Seagull Pt.143 (R).. $1,100
2/3 Beautful condo, 3 mo. min.
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2330 W. Silver Hill Lane (L)......$525
2/1 Nice apt., pplances included
9047 Travis Dr. (C5)................$625
2/2 Net,cleand uplea




















CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813


FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375/Mo. $300/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025





ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
AptS, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL MANOR
1 & 2 BEDROOM
(352) 237-8239

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
HOMOSASSA
Lg 2/2, Central Locat,
scrn. por., $550 mo.
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461

CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922

LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed / 1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furn & Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/mo. Call
352-795-1795 for
Appt.www.ensing
properties.comrn





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037





CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528








LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801


INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 2k sq ft,
FIL/S BK/CK req
321-303-0346




INVERNESS
2/1 New Appliances, on
Water, close to town
$575/mo F/L H20 Incld
call 352-400-2626




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225




CITRUS HILLS
Seasonal Rental 3/2
Pool Home, all until.
Included $2,500 mo
352-270-8953




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 + Florida Room
57 S. Columbus
$530.mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1 + Carport $650.
mo. 352-464-2514
CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, no pets
$1000mo 352-270-8953
DUNNELLON
RAINBOW SPRINGS
RENT/RENT TO OWN
Georgous, 2/2/2
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless, quiet. /2AC
Country Club Home
$799. Special
352-527-0493
FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$7501mo. Call
352-563-9796
HERNANDO
Newly remodeled 3/2,
Lg. Lot, waterview
$645. mo 1st. last, sec.
352-400-1501
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1 fenced, Beautiful
(352) 503-3554
HOMOSASSA
4/3, Large yard, lanai,
Fireplace $1,100 mo.
2 sheds (352) 302-9677
Inverness
2/2 Waterfront, first, last
&sec. 1776 S. Moring
Dr. 352-364-2120
INVERNESS
2BR/2BA/CP, $700. m
418 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 Cell
LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2% Free cable
& lawn care $1100.
Social membership
Available 352 527-0456


SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797



-I

FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$850. 352-419-4421

HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed
352-566-7099 or
606-694-7099

New Log Home On
20+ Acres
Only $79,900. Newly
constructed 3BR/2BA,
1740 sf log home.
Ready for your
finishing touches.
FL/GA Border. Call
now 1-800-898-4409
x. 1551

PUBLIC LAND SALE:
NC Mountain Proper-
ties Liquidated almost 2
acres, Cascading Falls
Was $89,000 now
$14,900! Big Mtn Views
$9,900 April 13th
1-877-717-5263 Ext 91.

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOME
AUCTION






8847SSUNCOAST BLVD
Homosassa
3 BR, 3 BA -2,745 SF

6095 EAST SENECA ST
Inverness
2 BR, 2 BA *1,396 SF

TUES, MAR 26,3:00 PM
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
BROOKEVILLE 1-75
* No Back Taxes or Liens
*Insurable Title
Up to 2%
to Buyer's Agents! 2


OPEN HOUSE:
Sat & Sun, Mar 23 & 24
1:00 3:00 pm
HUDSON&
MARSHALL
866.518.9065
see website for
terms & conditions
H&M CQ1035357, AB1l10; B.
G. Hudson, Jr., BK3006464,
AU230


Get Results

In The Homefront

Classified!


Public Auction
Onsite & Online
GLD Food Distributors
d/b/a Phillips Meats &
Seafood
Tues, March 19
@ 10am
Preview: 03/18 12-4pm
1220 Transmitter Rd,
Panama City, FI 32401
Refrigerated Trucks,
Processing Equip, Meat
Grinders, Walk-in
Freezers/Coolers,
Forklifts, Commercial
Appliances, Pallet Rack-
ing, Tools & morel
Visit
www.moeckerauctions.co
for Details, Photos and
Catalog
Moecker Auctions (800)
840-BIDS
15% -18%BP, $100 ref
cash dep
Subj to confirm
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




OPEN HOUSE
Sun. 17th, 12N 3PM
4698 N. Jademoor Dr.
Laurel Ridge


Ln H s

CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697




INVERNESS
Home wanted min.
1800sf, 3/2/2, no dirt
rds. must be in Exce.
Cond. Have cash little
over 90K for quick sale
443-366-5579


Public Auction
Onsite & Online
Public Auction
Onsite & Online
Press Printing Enterprises
Inc
Thurs, March 28 @ 11am
Preview: Day of Sale
9-11am
3601 Hanson Street, Ft
Myers, FI 33916
Offset Press Printing Ma-
chinery & Equipment in-
cluding: 2000
MAN ROLAND Model
R306, 6-Color Sheet fed
Offset Press w/Coater,
Folders,Paper Cutters,
Plate Maker, Vehicles,
Forklift and more'
Visitwww moecker
auctions com for
Details, Photos and
Catalog
Moecker Auctions (800)
840-BIDS
15% -18%BP, $100 ref
cash dep
Subj to confirm
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin




Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available, www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.comrn
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm.
352-795-6336


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!
SUSIn


VAww.dudleysauction.com

SIX REAL ESTATE



FRIDAY, EVAKRCI 22
REAL ESTATE LOT AUCTION Auction 11:00am
Sold Absolute!! Wooded building lot south side of NW 20th St., Crystal River (c-sign),
100x190. Quiet street w/community deeded boatramp. Close to 19.
REAL ESTATE LOT AUCTION Auction 1:00pm
10155 W. Pamondeho Cir., Crystal River 136x184. Lakefront lot in Spring Run!!
Nice high & dry lot, dock ok, electric boats ok. Build home or weekend getaway!!!

SATURDAY, IVIARCH 23
ONSITE REAL ESTATE & CONTENTS Auction 9:00am Real Estate 10am
1611 S. Ridgewood Pt., Inverness. Home & contents must be sold to settle estate!! 3/2-
1852sq.ft. 100x168lot. Eat-in kitchen, office, screened sunroom, 2+ cargarage, g. living roomw/bay
windows, storage, nice yard, appraised @ $80,000. Contents: Mahogany secretary, cherry corner
cabinet, 5 pc. dinette, maple BR furniture, kneehole desk, sofa, recliner wing chairs, cherry end tables, twin
beds, lamps, treadmill, several quilts, entire room filled with craft items,
quilted materials, fabric, Pfaff Creative 1475 CD sewing machine, glass & china and more!
REAL ESTATE LOT AUCTION: 3 CITRUS SPRINGS LOTS Auction 3:00pm
Sold absolute!!
518 W. Bluster PI, 540 W. Bluster PI. & 546 W. Bluster PI., Citrus Springs, FL
wooded 80x125 building lots side-by-side, buy one or all!! Nice quiet street in Citrus Springs

i. l J DUDLEY'S AUCTION
4000. Fiorida Ave., Inverness, Fl
(1/2mile S. of the Fairgrounds) MAINE-LY REAL ESTATE
_- Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352.637.9588. Up.to.date photos on web.
Personal Property sold Dudley's Auction Ab 667 Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384 (All
dimensions are approx mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium Announcements from the block take precedent


PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 2
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community, www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164





Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
Sat. April 6th,
Itam
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.corn









HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only **
352-503-3245












BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090


Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE




3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE
MHm 3/2 w/den
off US 19 newer c/h/a,
furn, clean RV Hkup.
Own/Fin.**$34.900-
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000
Call 850-5854026

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850sq.ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.
Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531
Golf Course Home
3/2/2/2. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475




2 ACRES
Quiet Country Settina
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$126,500
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.









Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503
3/2/2, 2 /2 acres,
24 ft x 32 ft shop
$175,000
Hernando Area
(352) 726-7755
Inverness Highlands
4bd. $92,500 4/3/2 Nr.
hosp. & schools Fence
shed&lg. bk porch b.o
(352)201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.
ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


CirsCut


H
"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855











TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant




3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723
CHIEFLAND
GET-AWAY- No Cell
phone, no garbage
truck, no pavement.
Wild life galore! 4 Room
house on 1/4 acre near
Suwannee River.
16 miles to Cedar Key
$35,000.(478) 550-5012




For Sale"%f
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505




CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaFureCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013 E15


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com
2BD 1%IBA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337
Lake Rousseau
5311 W, Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor








CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


INVERNESS CITY LIMITS

h:...: I ,.I .- i .. r i la,,ul
'* iTFMH', MOTIVATHII hiF.,
Mi l = /iiiiI I ASKING $69,000
Call Stelan Stuati 352 212 0211


LOADS OF .
GOODIES HERE!! -
j%'i :im rjiT funrl Ri00rl I.Rum: frli.: 1 .1: :
I: I ;1H IIII V I h IR T I rji lr R H Hi .. i .:. I
irii :.-i' ASKING $75.900
Pit lD,. 352212 7280
Ihd 1,41,ng .1 i; 2i p tId 4 C -ni


i, .....i I id d I 6i,,I , d ,

Ii ,11 1,,,,,l, r1,, I I.. I.i. II,, Ii. iI
i I, I i 1 h6.1 1
ri. : '. ASKING $94,000
Pit Dil ,352212 7280
['?l? "'p.' c2^/gpfrfd can


BS^S*- ~~~ .** '~
* L,:ii P .' ,,il. I l:I I lI, I lh,,, ,
* M ET. AL $ .:..:. 1 .611 .. .:.I. in .i. ,

* I : I.. l.. ii ,:illin e ,l f Th Alli
Mt 3 = i,:l. u,1 $189,900
Jeanne Pickiel 212-3410
It 'i:i'. cilluscounti sold. corn


HAMPSHIRE HILLS
. ll ,ll. I H ll I I
.l..i I .....I l:l .l. . H I ,I .: l.. .l . H I..


$205,000
Call Ruth iederick 1 352 5636866


LIVELY iJ/ZZ HUME IN
GOLF COURSE COMMUNITY

I,.. ,1 ,, I. h, ,I, ,, h,, ,ih.... i ,h ,


il = "'. .-. REDUCED TO $87,500
CAll Dons Mlinei .it 352 422 4627


HAMPSHIRE HILLS 2.5 ACRES


* -,l l .i. hil i h 11 4 6plip.Ih H
Mt i = illI. ONLY $249,500
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422 2387


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!


.:h .ii h. .h .i.1 1.1 lh I.i . ni u il.v i

ONLY ASKING $189,900
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


COMMERCIAL BUILDING
H i. II u -11. j Tlf in .I .i\ I\ i.ll i nI .I\1



Mi :, = ; A.l ,,,,j $119,900
Call Jim Motion at -122 2173 lot a Iou


NICE LOCATION IN BEVERLY HILLS!



l I.aij .lli. .:a $ .. Ii
Mit = l'ff.li. ASKING ONLY S49,900
Call Maty Paisons at 634 1273
lot you personal tout.


N ,,l: : ._" .a: a:.,:,, I. .il, I .I a,,,l

iM n 1 I .I: I ..i I ,I i .i *Hi .:..:.I

$105,000
Tenyt R. Blanco 352 419 9252


I .i il.Ir I 'II. "ii III I. lii .: *l .,ii


Mlv_ II i, A 1h1:ii, i: IlI
Mi_ = /i:11 il ASKING $165,000
Call NIancy Jenks 352 400 8072


GATED EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

1 111 I nIIl h l-1 hil l- on l 11- -, II .1.,I
i I I I 11 1 d i l i- ii 1. 1. d


$95,000
Call Jim Motton at 352 422 2173 lot
1 out personal tout ol Emetald Hills


WATERFRONT COTTAGE ON 2.4 ACRES

I-. I ... .lh .. ....I ."" h l. l .'.. .....
h. I. ... . .. ... .. I. I..-


rIIi = ".l ASKING $148.900
Pit Di,- ,352'212 7280


l ... .',l ..vi: .'. ,,I l .. all I.. r m.. l.ji .


S i iiiiiii ph i lh. I. .
$155,000
Call Mat itha Sn det 352 476 8727
ask lot fle =701513


* VvII ,,;,,li.i,,-d THREE BEDROOM, TWO BATH,
* eAITILiJI L, i,.,,|,,,,,| POOL HOME W/ A DEN IN PINE RIDGE
* L _,l. I. .:l.:. d.l P.:.i .: A ihil lll .l..I n .l .: m. ,:n.d i.:. .iv i In .
M I = /l :Ic .:*) $ 12 5 ,0 0 0 i.'. ln.. ,:.i i.: l ,, l..]:,ili,,:,,:,
Jeanne ot Willaid Pickiel 212 3410 Mi : = /i:i: ii $168,000
itt'i'i'. ciltuscounti sold. corn Call Isaac Baylon 352 697 2493


COMFORTABLE LIVING
AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE
. ] II...i.1.1 I.. j 1 ) ...11.1..] i.-1 11 -

I:II h i.. ia.I hRP :. f I, rJi.. Hi:I,
r1i =,. I- $48,900
Pit Di,0. 352 212 7280
i /1i t .lip 21p313itd.I c rn


.ii : 11 :11 m: i I ... l .... "I: .
l.,:]I1,,. w.;. IIh. j. l l i h 1 '1.;1 ih4 ... i
Mit = ;'-. hi PRICED TO SELL S129,900
Call Ouade 352 302 7699


* : j .i.h & F
* lF f:,..l f:i $ll i 1.. il

MI, = 1lI '_" $82,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212 3410
wt'I. citiuscounti'sold. coin


BEHOLD THE BEAUTY!
Ihi. p,..ru, I,. la.rd..r.i....i.10".
h..l a 1 _-' I' vI .. .ll l i, l..u I .lh I




MIl.- = .1114 $147,000
Ask lot Madtil n Booth 6374904


BIG PRICE REDUCTION ON INVERNESS HOME!

* A.. ., ...- i c ....I


* IHA I. iA ........1... I ...... ...I
OFFERED AT ONLY $69,900
Call Ehas G Knallah at 352 400 2635
lot showing inlotmation


E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 2013