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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03062

Full Text


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PAGE A4


MARCH 16, 2013 Florida's Best Communit


CITRR.U-S CO U N T Yi





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^& www.chronicleonline.com


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399


Expert: EDC lacks vision


Consultant says county lacks


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
LECANTO Andy Houston was
so impressed he said so.
"This is the best day we've spent
in the seven years we've been here,"
the Crystal River city manager said.
Houston was referring to a broad
presentation Thursday by consult-


'shovel-ready'sites for industry


ant Jeannette Goldsmith to the Cit-
rus County Economic Development
Council.
Goldsmith, an expert in economic
development whose visit was spon-
sored by Progress Energy Florida,
developed a detailed plan of obser-
vation after just one day of meeting
with economic leaders and touring
the county.


Her bottom line: The county has
good intentions, but doesn't have the
tools in place today to attract manu-
facturing companies.
The big reason, she said, is the
county's industrial parks are not
served by water and sewer, or they
don't have vacant buildings avail-
able for companies to move in.
And, she said, the county has no


specific plans to serve those sites
with utilities.
Goldsmith also said the EDC lacks
a vision of what it wants to achieve
with economic development.
County Commission Chairman
Joe Meek, who chairs the EDC as
well, said Goldsmith's observations
were spot on.
"It was exactly what we needed to
hear," Meek said Friday "It's exactly
some of the things we've been talking
See Page A5


Mobile meals



serve seniors


Volunteers

deliver food to

the homebound
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
The sun was shining bright as
Dottie Lowery pulled in and
parked her car near the en-
trance to the building. She was
told it was going to be a special
day she had a "celebrity" rid-
ing along.
That didn't faze Lowery, a
five-year volunteer driver with
the county's Home Delivered
Meals Program. She went about
her normal routine of filling the
cooler with milk and ice and
loading it into her trunk. With
one more trip into the building,
she received her list for the day
along with the exact number of
meals.
Compared to other volunteer
drivers' days, Friday was
straightforward for Lowery
She had eight stops to com-
plete. She didn't skip a beat,
Citrus County Commission
Chairman Joe Meek removes
one of the many meals he
helped deliver Friday morning in
Beverly Hills as part of Citrus
County Home Delivered
Meals/March for Meals
celebrity delivery.
MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle


Councilwoman:

Equal membership

appropriate
CHRIS VAN ORMER
Staff writer
Making mergers is tough work, the
county's transportation consultant/man-
ager said Thursday at a meeting of the
Citrus County Transportation Planning
Organization (TPO).
"We're not alone," said Bob Clifford,
who also is director of the Tampa Bay
Area Regional Transportation Author-


ity (TBARTA). "The
other MPOs around the
state are doing the
same thing."
All metropolitan
planning organizations
(MPOs) federally
mandated and federally
funded transportation Bob Clifford
policy-making boards BobClifford
are performing the TBARTA
process for re-
designation of boundaries and board
representation based on 2010 U.S. Cen-
sus information. Citrus' TPO reached
MPO status in the census with the emer-
gence of an urbanized area of
See .Page A5


though, as she swiftly loaded
her meals and Joe Meek,
county commission chairman,
climbed into her front seat
Off they went to Beverly
Hills, to deliver home-bound
residents their dietician-
approved meal for the day
The Citrus County Commis-
sion proclaimed March as
"March for Meals" month and
joined volunteer drivers as they
went about
their routes.
a great program
County offers
to the commu-
nity," Meek
said.
Dottie He thanked
Lowery Lowery for her
delivers meals daily dedica-
to homebound. tion to the pro-
gram and meal
recipients. She was grateful for
his kind words, but didn't let
him slack an inch as she put
him to work.
After each home, they would
return back to the cooler and
prepare for the next residence.
Friday's menu included milk,
beef, cabbage, peas, fruit and a
green cookie.
Citrus County's Home Deliv-
ered Meals Program, operating
under the umbrella of Citrus
County Community Support
Services, has supplied caterer-
prepared hot, noontime meals
See Page A2


Authorities: Meth


cook severely burned


Woman flees scene
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A 54-year-old Homosassa man was
being treated at a burn unit Friday at
Shands Hospital in Gainesville after al-
legedly setting himself alight while
manufacturing methamphetamines, ac-
cording to the Citrus County Sheriff's
Office.
Tactical Unit Sgt. John Novy said


the man, who could not be identified
because he's not been formally ar-
rested yet and is in the hospital, suf-
fered severe burns to his lower
extremities.
"Burns from chemicals used to make
meth tend to be extremely severe,"
Novy said.
"He apparently then got in his car
and drove himself to the Kangaroo
Store on 44 and Rock Crusher and men-
tioned something about Coleman fuel,"
Novy said.
See Page A5


IIII llllII6 '01 1 l84 578 0 0 5


Com ics ......
Community . .
Crossword . .


... C8
. . .C7
. . .C8


Editorial ......... A8
Entertainment . . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Numbers . .B4


Lottery Payouts .... B6
M ovies .......... .C9
Obituaries ....... .A6


Classifieds .....
TV Listings . .


024-0213-CAG-CDJFront
300E81A


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
78
LOW
44


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50* VOL. 118 ISSUE 221


Jeannette
Goldsmith
expert in
economic
development.


Counties grapple with MPOs


. .C10
.. .C9


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---I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kevin Coward, the


'music man' of IPS


Teacher dies

after sudden

illness
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Kevin
Coward made music come
alive.
As the music teacher at
Inverness Primary
School, he brought life
and enthusiasm and
laughter to each of
the school's 686
students.
"Everybody at
Inverness Pri-
mary loved music
because of him,"
said IPS Principal
Marlise Bushman. Ke
"Before he ar- Cow
rived in 2010 we
had kids that had IPS
teachE
never shown an Wedn
interest in music.
Now we have 130 to 150 in
chorus everybody
wanted to be in chorus
with Mr. Coward. He was
an extraordinary
teacher."
Kevin Coward, 44, died
Wednesday after a brief
and sudden illness.
He had grown up in
Michigan and studied
music at the University of
Michigan and earned a
master's degree in voice
performance from the
University of South
Florida.
Coward sang tenor pro-
fessionally and taught
music at the University of
Tampa and then for the
Hillsborough County
school system before com-
ing to Citrus County.
"He was my grandson's
favorite teacher," said
Sharon Concidine. "Every
morning when I dropped


1

ie


OBITUARY: Page A6.

him off at school, Mr. Cow-
ard was opening car doors
and greeting all the kids
with a smile, a hug and my
grandson's favorite a
high five."
IPS art teacher Holly
Herndon described him
as "vibrant."
"He was always
singing," she said. "You
could always hear him
singing from down the
hall. Everyone he spoke to
or met he left fin-
gerprints on their
heart."
One of Coward's
vZ methods of calling
the roll in class:
S instead of saying,
"Here," when he
called the stu-
vin dents' names, he
yard would have them
nusic sing their favorite
*r died food "macaroni
esday. and cheese!" or
"creamed corn!"
Or he would take a
drum and drum the
rhythm to the student's
name.
"He was famous for his
beach balls," Bushman
said. "He always included
a song in his Christmas
program about decorating
the tree with ornaments,
and he'd bring out these
big beach balls his 'or-
naments' and the kids
would bat them around
the cafeteria as they sang.
It became a tradition. And
he was the heart of our
patriotic programs."
Sandy Cross, IPS
teacher and organizer of
the patriotic veterans pro-
grams, said Coward not
only taught music, but
honor and respect, being
a good citizen and the im-
portance of patriotism.
"The kids listened to


him because they loved
and respected him," she
said.
IPS parent Dawn Mar-
tin said she loved seeing
Coward each morning at
drop-off.
"My kids absolutely
loved him," she said.
"They remember the
beach balls in class and
were always happy when
it was music day. Citrus
County lost a great music
educator."
Lauren Reed said Cow-
ard inspired her son with
his love of music and now
he wants to be a musician.
"He told me that Mr.
Coward was the first
music teacher that didn't
'teach out of a book.' I am
very happy that my son
had a chance to have such
an inspiring person in his
life, even if it was for a
short time. My prayers to
his family, friends and all
the students and staff at
IPS," she said.
Paula Castro said, "He
had a chemistry that cap-
tivated his students and
enabled him to build rela-
tionships with our chil-
dren, to teach them and
hold their attention like
not many teachers can. I
am so glad that my child
has had the opportunity to
positively be influenced
by Mr. Coward. He will be
greatly missed."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


MEALS
Continued from Page Al

Monday through Friday to
the homebound since
1979. The meals are deliv-
ered between 10:30 a.m.
and 2:30 p.m.
Senior citizens age 60
and older who are no
longer able to leave their
home without assistance,
qualify for the program.
Serving more than 400
meals daily, organizers
and volunteers work to-
ward the goal of "no senior
goes hungry" in Citrus
County.
"Without the food that
they get every day, a lot of
people would go hungry,"
said Citrus County Senior
Services operations super-
visor Pat Coles.
"The food that we de-
liver is looked at by a di-
etician," Coles said. "It is
one-third the RDA (Rec-
ommended Daily Al-
lowance) needed by an
adult. We know that they
are going to get a protein,
starch, vegetable, milk and
a dessert. They might want
to eat a bowl of ice cream
for dinner, but that is OK
because we know that they
have at least had one
healthy meal during the
day"
An additional benefit
of this program is the
personal contact and
support received from
the local volunteers and
staff. The volunteers pro-
vide a support system
and a daily check on
each client's well-being.
Coles told of a time a
client had fallen and the
volunteer was able to
save their life by check-


HAVE A STORY IDEA?
* Call managing editor Charlie Brennan at 563-5660.


ing in on them and call-
ing for emergency help.
FRndraising and word of
mouth keep this program
running.
"Because of all of the
fundraising that we are
doing and getting the
word out, that helps us to
not have a waiting list,"
Coles said. "Unfortu-
nately, our grants never
go up, but our need does.
That's why we have to
continue to fundraise
and get the word out to
people so that no senior
goes hungry."
The program is funded by
an Older Americans Act
grant The grant pays for the
home-delivered meals, con-
gregate meals at the senior
centers and transportation.
The meals are delivered by
the volunteers who use
their own vehicles.
To sign up for home-
delivered meals or to do-
nate funds, call 352-527-
5975.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334,
or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.


State BRIEF
Crist speaks at
Democrats dinner
LAKEWOOD RANCH -
Charlie Crist, the former Re-
publican governor of Florida,
gave one of his first speeches
as a Democrat on Friday.
Crist was the keynote
speaker at the Manatee
County Democrats' annual
dinner. More than 300 peo-
ple were in attendance, and
many posed for photos with
Crist.
During his half-hour
speech, Crist mentioned
several Democrats Pres-
idents Barack Obama and
Bill Clinton, and the late
Robert F. Kennedy but
did not mention one man:
current Fla. Gov. Rick
Scott, a Republican.
There's been widespread
speculation that Crist, who
switched parties in Dec. 2012,
will challenge Scott in 2014.
Crist spoke about immi-
gration and the state's vot-
ing problems in 2012.
-From wire reports


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A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


LOCAI/STATE


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Page A3 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




ArSTATE"d e Internet cafe ban advances


Citrus County
Fire destroys
Inverness house
A Thursday evening fire
destroyed a house in Inver-
ness, according to a report
by Battalion Chief Keith
Long of Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office Fire Rescue.
Fire crews arrived at the
scene, 1945 S. Mohican
Trail, at 5:18 p.m. and
found the 1,000-square-foot
home 75 percent on fire.
According to the report, a
defensive attack was initi-
ated and officials made
sure the home was unoccu-
pied. A tanker shuttle was
utilized for the water supply
because of lack of hydrants
in the area. The fire was
brought under control at
5:32 p.m.
The state fire marshal is
investigating. The house
and its contents were a total
loss estimated at $120,000.
New recycling
drop-off location
The Citrus County Divi-
sion of Solid Waste Man-
agement has announced a
new recycling drop-off cen-
ter. It is behind the East Cit-
rus Community Center,
9907 E. Gulf-to-Lake High-
way (State Road 44), in the
Gospel Island area of Inver-
ness. This site is sponsored
and maintained by the
Friends of the Community
Centers.
The following materials
are accepted at the center:
Newspaper.
Corrugated cardboard.
All types of paper
(computer paper, junk mail,
magazines, etc.).
Aluminum cans and
clean aluminum foil.
Steel (tin) cans.
Glass bottles and jars.
Plastics No. 1 through
No. 7 (no plastic foam).
Household aerosol
cans.
Aseptic containers
(juice boxes).
Household trash, tires,
paint, electronics and
household hazardous
waste are not accepted at
any of the county's recy-
cling centers.
For information, call the
Division of Solid Waste
Management at 352-527-
7670, or email landfillinfo
@bocc.citrus.fl.us.
20/20 committee to
convene in Lecanto
The Citrus 20/20 Inc.
Save Our Waters Week
Committee will meet at
10 a.m. Monday, March 18,
room 219, Lecanto Govern-
ment Center, 3600 W. Sov-
ereign Path, off County
Road 491.
The purpose of the meet-
ing is to plan and coordi-
nate activities for Citrus
County's annual Save Our
Waters Week, Sept. 20
through 28. All interested
persons are welcome.
For information, call
Lace Blue-McLean at 352-
201-0149.

Fort Lauderdale
Plane crashes in
parking lot; 3 dead
A small plane crashed
into a parking lot near a
South Florida airport Friday
afternoon, killing all three
people onboard and burn-
ing about a dozen cars. No
one on the ground was
hurt.
Fire-Rescue Division
Chief John San Angelo said
the Piper Navajo, a twin-
engine turboprop, began
experiencing engine trouble
shortly after taking off from
Fort Lauderdale Executive
Airport at about 4:30 p.m.
The plane tried to turn
around and make an emer-
gency landing, but it didn't
get back to the airport, he
said. The plane hit a tree
and a fence as it crashed


into a parking lot.
Seven cars and a boat
caught fire.
-From staff and wire reports


House committee

votes to tighten

state statutes

JIM TURNER
The News Service of Florida
TALLAHASSEE With an ex-
panding statewide law enforce-
ment crackdown into
racketeering at strip center gam-
ing parlors and Florida out a lieu-
tenant governor, the House took
the first step on Friday to shutter
the adult arcade industry by fur-
ther prohibiting the electronic
machines and devices they use.
The House Select Committee
on Gaming voted to proceed with
a measure (HB 155) that clarifies
the definition of slot machines
and other gaming machines used
at Internet cafes and adult ar-
cades, which backers of the bill
note are actually already illegal
under state law.
The new law would end a gray


area in state statutes used by op-
erators of Internet cafes that the
games are contests of skill and the
contests are similar to regulated
sweepstakes offerings by places
like McDonalds, Coca Cola, Chuck
E. Cheese's and churches. The
legislation also would overrule
any county and municipal laws
that have been enacted in recent
years attempting to regulate the
businesses.
"These machines have always
been illegal," said Rep. Carlos
Trujillo, R-Miami. "They're con-
sidered games of chance. They're
illegal."
Rep. Jim Waldman, D-Coconut
Creek, cast the lone vote against
the bill. He said the Legislature
might be moving too fast and cast-
ing too broad a net in reacting to
the arrests earlier this week of
people connected to gaming cen-
ters run by Allied Veterans of the
World.
The organization and the indus-
try as a whole came under intense
scrutiny this week as the subject
of a large multistate investigation
into illegal gaming, which has al-


The centers have been able to proliferate
because they have claimed to be charities
and businesses that only offer sweepstakes
prizes, despite numerous critics who
contend they are gambling halls.


ready led to 57 arrests. Allied Vet-
erans of the World also paid for-
mer Lt. Gov Jennifer Carroll for
consulting work. Carroll resigned
Tuesday after she was inter-
viewed by law enforcement
The bill appears on an ex-
tremely fast track to passage.
Leaders in the House and Senate
support the idea and said this
week a measure could be brought
up on the House floor as early as
next week.
Waldman said because of the
speed with which lawmakers are
moving, there may be unintended
consequences, and noted some in-
dustries affected by the bill -
only made public Thursday
evening may not even realize it.
No representatives for the indus-


Working toward a real job


CREST

students

apprentice at

businesses
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER

day mornings,
CREST stu-
dents Becca
Gill, Catherine Eckert
and Megan Baxter put
on their scrubs and
head to Crystal River
Health and Rehab.
They're each as-
signed a wing of the fa-
cility, where they're
responsible for clean-
ing hand rails, trans-
porting residents to
activities or to meals,
delivering mail,
setting tables in the
dining room and any-
thing else they're asked
to do.
"I like what I do,"
said Becca Gill. "My fa-
vorite part is the resi-
dents. They make
things easy for me."
The young women
are part of the CREST
- Citrus Resources for
Exceptional Students
in Transition transi-
tion team school-to-
work program for
students in between
graduating from high
school and "aging out"
at age 22.
Within the next
month or two, Gill, who
turns 21 on March 31,
will begin an appren-
ticeship in the house-
keeping department at
the rehab facility, with
the goal of "real" em-
ployment when she
turns 22 and leaves the
CREST program.
"We'll start her off
one or two days a week
where she'll learn to
make a bed and things
like that," explained
CREST job coach Joni
Kirschner, who stays


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Becca Gill, one of the students in the CREST transition team school-to-work
program, says she loves learning how to work at Crystal River Health and
Rehab. The program teaches job skills to special-needs CREST students who
are in between high school graduation and aging out of the program at 22.


with the students at the
job site.
Not all the special-
needs students will find
employment, Kirschner
said.
"For those who don't
get hired, we encour-
age them to find a place
to volunteer," she said.
"They can still use the
skills they learn in this
program."
Anita Marshall, Crys-
tal River Health and
Rehab activities direc-
tor, said the facility has
already hired one or
two transitional stu-
dents, one who has
been a dishwasher for
five years.
"They're here during
the week and they help


in our housekeeping
department, they serve
residents at our morn-
ing coffee shop, they do
lotion rubs and read
poetry, take people out-
side for strolls. It's in-
tergenerational, too.
The residents really
like being with them."
On Thursday, before
they started working,
the three young women
from CREST sat in the
dining room among a
group of residents lis-
tening to a gospel
music trio, singing
along, talking to the
older people. That's all
part of the program,
learning to relate with
people, to look them in
the eye and speak


clearly
"It's great training for
them," Marshall said.
"They get real-life work
skills in a real-world
environment, so when
they're 22 and age out
of the program, they
can get a job and they
won't have to depend
on government assis-
tance the rest of their
lives."
Gill said she's excited
about one day working
"for real."
"I'll be getting a pay-
check," she said. "It's
going in the bank."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy
at 352-564-2927 or
nkennedy@chronicle
online.com.


Man, 23, gets 20 years in prison


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS A 23-year-old
with seven prior felony convictions
was sentenced Thursday to 20 years
in prison.
Reji Tyre Jamal Smith, of Ho-
mosassa, was sentenced by Judge T
Michael Johnson following his trial
and conviction last month on drug
possession and sale charges.
Late last spring, Smith and 16
others were swept up in Citrus
County Sheriff's Office's Operation
Spring Cleaning.
According to the sheriff's office,
several areas in Crystal River were


targeted because of numer-
ous complaints of drug ac-
tivity in Copeland Park, the
Courtyard Apartments and
surrounding areas.
After conducting long
hours of surveillance and
undercover buys, purchases -
were made from suspected R..ji
dealers, one of whom was e
Smith, CCSO spokeswoman facing
Heather Yates said. In p
The controlled buy occurred one
block away from Copeland Park at
a residence at 870 N.E. First St. The
purchase was for crack cocaine,
said Yates.
Smith was found guilty of sale


within 1,000 feet of a park
and possession with intent
to sell within 1,000 feet of a
park.
Despite pleas from his
family, the prosecution
countered with testimony
from law enforcement that
mithpainted Smith as a career
t y criminal.
0 years He was tagged a habitual
felony offender and sen-
tenced to 20 years on each count,
but they are to run concurrently
The prosecutor was Rich Buxman.
Contact Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline.com.


try were in attendance at the com-
mittee meeting.
The House bill's next stop is the
Rules Committee, and without a
set fiscal impact could quickly
land on the House floor
The Senate companion (SB
1030) is set to go before the Senate
Gaming Committee on Monday
The centers have been able to
proliferate because they have
claimed to be charities and busi-
nesses that only offer sweepstakes
prizes, despite numerous critics
who contend they are gambling
halls that prey on the elderly and
poor and have been able to skirt
the state's regulations and the 35
percent tax rate that licensed
pari-mutuels are charged by
Florida.


St. Pat's

parade

Sunday in

Inverness


Pets can join

Mutt Strut'
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
INVERNESS Sunny
O'Cooter spent the week
searching the streets of In-
verness for the one lucky
four-leaf clover and he
found it.
He can't tell you where,
but he can give you a hint:
somewhere along the route
of Cooter Pond up East
Main Street and around
Courthouse Square and
down Pine Street.
Does Sunny know that is
the same route as the third
annual Inverness St.
Patrick's Day Parade this
Sunday in downtown In-
verness? Beginning at 5:30
p.m., the "feel-good, home-
town parade" will bring 54
entries to splash Inver-
ness with a wee bit of luck
and charm.
"It's a hometown parade
but the enthusiasm from
people coming out for this
is seriously blowing my
mind," said Sharon
Skeele-Hogan, special
events director for the city
of Inverness.
Sunny- the city's mas-
cot-will be present, don-
ning his finest green attire
and celebrating with the
many participating
organizations.
Irish dancers, horses
and buggies, bagpipers, go
karts, prancing horses,
clowns, the Sun Devils
Bugle and Drum Corps,
the School of Dance Arts,
the Citrus Hills Line
Dancers, the Central
Florida Irish Wolf Hound
Association, floats and
much more are expected.
Bark Central Dog Park
will sponsor the Mutt Strut
- decked-out pooches
that march in the parade.
"It is heart-warming
hometown goodness,"
Skeele-Hogan said. "It is
going to be off the hook,
and we are already plan-
ning for next year with a
full weekend of activities."
Dot Fitzpatrick, of one of
Inverness' longtime Irish
families, will encourage
the true Irish spirit as she
leads the parade as the
grand marshal.
For information, visit
www.inverness-fl.gov For
information on joining the
parade with your pooch,
email George Bryant at
info@barkcentraldog
park.com or call 352-341-
BARK
Contact Chronicle re-
porterEryn Worthington at
352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or
eworthington@chronicle
online com.


I
s
>i.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
DUI arrest
Chad Grant, 34, of North-
east 2nd Street, Crystal River,
at 1:48 a.m. Wednesday on a
misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, he was
stopped on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. He had difficulty per-
forming sobriety tasks and
tests of his breath showed his
blood alcohol concentration
was 0.223 percent and 0.216
percent. The legal limit is 0.08
percent. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Jesse Harvey, 30, of
West Lemon Street, Beverly
Hills, at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday on
felony charges of trafficking or
endeavoring to traffic in stolen
property and giving false verifi-
cation of ownership/false iden-
tification to a pawnbroker and a
misdemeanor charge of petit
theft. According to his arrest af-
fidavit, he is accused of pawn-
ing stolen jewelry. Bond
$10,500.
William Hatfield, 58, of
North CroftAvenue, Inverness,
at 9:06 p.m. Tuesday on a mis-
demeanor charge of retail petit
theft. Bond $250.
Mikel Liston, 19, of North
Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River, at 1:16 p.m. Wednesday
on felony charges of trafficking
or endeavoring to traffic in
stolen property and grand
theft. According to his arrest af-
fidavit, he is accused of steal-
ing a laptop computer. The
alleged victim told investigators
the laptop had been taken from
her car at College of Central
Florida in Lecanto. Investiga-
tors located the laptop, which
was equipped with a LoJack
program, in Liston's posses-
sion. Liston had reportedly
used the computer to
log in to Facebook. Bond
$12,000.
Richard Wamser, 59, at
1:56 p.m. Wednesday on mis-
demeanor charges of tres-
passing and possessing an
alcoholic beverage in a


ON THE NET

For more information
about arrests made
by the Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org.


park/recreation area/school in
city limits. Bond $750.
Robert Leavitt, 33, of
South U.S. 41, Inverness, at
1:56 p.m. Wednesday on a
misdemeanor charge of pos-
session of an alcoholic bever-
age in a park/recreation area/
school in city limits. Bond $250.
Denise Schippers, 42, of
West Mink Lane, Homosassa,
at 2:13 p.m. Wednesday on a
Citrus County warrant for a
misdemeanor charge of re-
fusal/failure of a parent to re-
quire a minor student to attend
school. Bond $1,000.
Terence Gernatt, 23, of
North Greco Terrace, Dunnel-
Ion, at 3:15 p.m. Wednesday
on a Citrus County warrant for
two felony charges of posses-
sion of a controlled substance
and misdemeanor charges of
possession of less than 20
grams of cannabis and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
No bond.
Burglary
A residential burglary was
reported at 6:24 p.m. Thursday,
March 14, at Daniel St., Beverly
Hills.
Thefts
A grand theft was reported
at 3:21 p.m. Thursday, March
14, in the 10500 block of E.
Gobbler Drive, Floral City.
An auto theft was reported
at 4:09 a.m. Friday, March 15,
in the 2100 block of N. Ladonia
Terrace, Crystal River.
Vandalisms
A vandalism was reported
at 12:32 a.m. Thursday, March
14, in the 1200 block of Jones
Ave., Inverness.
A vandalism was reported
at 9:03 p.m. March 14 in the
8800 block of S. Florida Ave.,
Floral City.


Rotary sponsors fishing tourney


Benefits Key

Training

Center

Special to the Chronicle

The Key Training Cen-
ter and the Rotary Club of
Inverness are making
waves, along with an in-
creasing number of sup-
porters and sponsors
throwing their lines in for
some exciting changes to
the Key's annual fishing
tournament.
"The members of the Ro-
tary Club of Inverness are
rallying to make this fishing
tournament one of its sig-
nature events," said Eloy
Nunez, president "By tak-
ing over as the host of this
tournament, we are able to
offer the strength of our or-
ganization, our networking
of businesses and volun-
teers and our commitment
to make our pledge of con-
tinued support to the Key
Center a reality"
New location, new
sponsors and new activi-


Inverness needed a fishing

tournament one that

everyone can enjoy.

Frank DiGiovanni
Inverness city manager.


ties warrant a new name,
the Rotarians concluded,
christening the tourna-
ment the Inverness Ro-
tary Bass Blasters to
benefit the Key Training
Center
Coming back to the In-
verness lakes will be the
biggest transformation to
the fundraiser.
The tournament began
at Lake Henderson in 2005,
but several years later the
droughts that lowered lake
levels demanded the tour-
nament launching site be
moved to the Dunnellon
city boat ramp, where
water levels could
accommodate tournament
participants.
But lake levels are
again good, have been
that way for some time
and show signs of re-
maining that way for fu-


ture seasons enough
to make the move back
to the Inverness lakes
feasible.
"We couldn't be more
pleased," said City Man-
ager Frank DiGiovanni,
who assisted in encourag-
ing city support. "Inver-
ness needed a fishing
tournament one that
everyone can enjoy. This
one has all the right ingre-
dients and all the right
people in place."
Rotarian Charlie Wade
has accepted the role of
Bass Blasters chairman,
but was quick to say there
will be a lot of hands and
heads and hearts that will
make this happen.
"We are excited," Wade
said. "We're ready to
make it happen."
Wade said meetings are
in the works with tourna-


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle







1. Bid Notices......................C13





a Surplus Property............C13


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR HI LO PR | HILO PI
NA 74 32 NA ., J72 32 NA


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 76 50 s Miami 78
Ft. Lauderdale 77 63 s Ocala 77
Fort Myers 80 56 s Orlando 79
Gainesville 76 48 s Pensacola 72
Homestead 78 59 s Sarasota 75
Jacksonville 78 48 s Tallahassee 77
Key West 75 67 pc Tampa 76
Lakeland 79 55 s Vero Beach 76
Melbourne 76 52 s W. Palm Bch. 76


F'cast
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


South winds around 10 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have a
light chop. Mostly sunny skies today.


73 36 NA 83 41 NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusive dally
B TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 44
Another cool morning, but sunny
and warmer in the afternoon.
- 1 SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 55
A few clouds, slow warming trend continues.

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
J High: 82 Low: 62
More clouds, warmer, higher humidity. A 20%
chance of a shower in the afternoon.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 70/36
Record 90/31
Normal 78/49
Mean temp. 53
Departure from mean -11
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.20 in.
Total for the year 2.30 in.
Normal for the year 8.03 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 8
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.22 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 34
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 24%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Juniper, Nettles
Today's count: 9.1/12
Sunday's count: 9.6
Monday's count: 10.2
AIR QUALITY
Friday was moderate with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/16 SATURDAY 9:59 3:47 10:23 4:11
3/17 SUNDAY 10:52 4:40 11:16 5:04
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O (- SUNSET TONIGHT............................7:40 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:37A.M.
\0 MOONRISE TODAY.........................10:32A.M.
MARCH19 MARCH27 APRIL 8 APRIL10 MOONSET TODAY .................................NONE

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.

TIDES


*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 9:25 a/5:03 a 8:57 p/4:48 p
Crystal River" 7:46 a/2:25 a 7:18 p/2:10 p
Withlacoochee* 5:33 a/12:13 a 5:05 p/11:58 a
Homosassa*** 8:35 a/4:02 a 8:07 p/3:47 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
10:10 a/5:42 a 9:30 p/5:19 p
8:31 a/3:04 a 7:51 p/2:41 p
6:18 a/12:52 a 5:38 p/12:29 p
9:20 a/4:41 a 8:40 p/4:18 p


Gulf water
temperature


630
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.12 28.09 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.54 37.52 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.42 38.40 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.70 39.67 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


Honolu.a
S 77/63
70S,,


City
Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


Friday Saturday
H L Pcp. Fcst H L
37 18 c 38 19
77 41 pc 77 45
68 27 sh 69 44
55 36 trace s 73 54
50 28 rs 43 30
80 44 s 84 61
55 25 sh 45 34
66 45 sh 54 32
75 37 pc 76 53
63 41 pc 61 41
41 21 c 41 28
34 27 .02 c 32 22
33 15 .02 c 30 15
70 37 s 76 53
59 24 sh 57 36
67 26 pc 76 51
41 30 .19 pc 35 24
54 27 c 52 35
43 30 .01 c 36 24
73 31 pc 77 51
50 29 pc 45 30
37 16 pc 38 20
82 53 pc 85 59
76 44 ts 51 35
61 32 pc 40 23
42 30 pc 36 26
83 45 s 86 54
66 29 c 56 38
53 27 rs 41 30
43 26 c 41 25
79 46 s 81 63
50 27 c 47 30
78 43 pc 79 54
86 60 s 84 60
80 47 pc 77 52
64 54 s 64 54
64 33 c 60 39
76 50 pc 73 51
38 29 .04 sf 32 19
36 32 .16 pc 28 9
72 39 s 73 55
77 36 pc 76 52
76 33 c 70 48


0 O s- ,-- o- T-,

8. I ,.A L





Iv -- ^ *uSrS..l 70 ,u J ...
o, .s.- a-- . ., ."rha '
-- 2-
40 505 -




D'- "
Goses .4. Al



FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 74 46 s 77 58
New York City 46 30 rs 45 31
Norfolk 58 31 sh 68 43
Oklahoma City 81 48 pc 73 47
Omaha 59 33 c 42 26
Palm Springs 95 64 s 92 59
Philadelphia 52 29 rs 42 30
Phoenix 91 62 s 90 62
Pittsburgh 50 27 rs 40 25
Portland, ME 37 16 pc 38 21
Portland, Ore 63 53 sh 51 39
Providence, R.I. 42 24 c 42 26
Raleigh 62 28 pc 76 47
Rapid City 70 39 rs 46 29
Reno 72 36 s 69 38
Rochester, NY 38 24 .03 c 30 22
Sacramento 75 46 s 78 47
St. Louis 70 32 c 51 35
St. Ste. Marie 31 21 .02 pc 19 5
Salt Lake City 68 43 pc 59 39
San Antonio 80 52 s 83 62
San Diego 65 53 s 67 54
San Francisco 60 46 s 65 47
Savannah 58 35 s 77 52
Seattle 58 48 sh 49 39
Spokane 56 39 c 51 34
Syracuse 38 26 .03 c 34 19
Topeka 85 35 c 49 33
Washington 58 33 sh 47 36
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 95 Palm Springs, Calif. LOW 0 Saranac
Lake, N.Y.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 91/75/sh
Amsterdam 42/36/c
Athens 54/39/c
Beijing 48/29/pc
Berlin 39/30/c
Bermuda 64/63/pc
Cairo 75/50/pc
Calgary 16/9/sf
Havana 85/61/c
Hong Kong 73/71/c
Jerusalem 62/46/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


62/55/c
47/36/sh
47/42/sh
69/43/sh
25/10/pc
30/9/rs
47/42/sh
83/74/ts
48/41/s
86/64/pc
59/49/pc
30/16/pc
33/20/s


C I T R U S


For the RECORD


ment experts and local
fishermen to refresh the
guidelines and regula-
tions to make this a tour-
nament successful.
The date has been set
for Saturday, Sept 21, with
participants launching
from Wallace Brooks Park
by 7 a.m. and activities
taking place throughout
the day until the return of
the boats at 3 p.m.
"This is going to be a
family event," said Doug
Lobel, who noted plans
are in the works for such
events as a youth casting
competition in the morn-
ing, a business expo-type
array of booths and dis-
plays to encourage people
to come to the park during
the waiting hours as
well as a lot of food for all
to enjoy. Lobel said that
opportunities for others to
take part in tournament
activities will be an-
nounced in the upcoming
weeks.
For more information
about the Inverness Ro-
tary Bass Blasters Fishing
Tournament to benefit the
Key Training Center, call
352-270-8623.


C O U N T Y -"-


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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


LOCAL





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EDC
Continued from Page Al

about, the absolute necessity
to move forward on some of
these initiatives. We must get
a long-term vision and plan in
place."
Meek said one of new Execu-
tive Director Don Taylor's main
focuses is developing a plan for
economic development
Goldsmith, who hails from
South Carolina and has 17 years
in site selection and economic-
development counseling, said
the county has a lot to offer in
education, work force develop-
ment, available property and
easy access to Interstate 75.
Those attributes mean little,
however, without locations
that are site ready with utili-
ties, permitting, roads and
buildings already in place.


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 A5


The areas that Citrus
County is focused on, includ-
ing the Inverness Airport busi-
ness park and the new
enterprise zone in northwest
Citrus County, have none of
those, she said.
While the county is working
with the city of Inverness to
bring water and sewer to the
airport business park, Gold-
smith said businesses looking
for locations want to see de-
tailed plans for utility expan-
sions that include specific
dates and costs.
Josh Wooten, chief execu-
tive officer of the Citrus
County Chamber of Com-
merce, noted the difficulty of
achieving Goldsmith's recom-
mendations centers on money
The EDC receives about
$110,000 annually from the
county and has one full-time
executive director
"We don't have the staff to


pull it all together and stay on
it," he said.
Goldsmith said she under-
stands the county's situation,
but said it needed a cohesive
plan and vision before it could
target industries for reloca-
tion or expansion.
Meek said that Citrus
County's per capital spending
for economic development is
among the lowest in the state.
But he also said the county has
stumbled along for years with-
out specific direction and it's
time for the community to
make a change.
"We've had decades-plus of
a complete lack of any type of
economic policy in this
county," he said. "We've been
isolationists for years. When
you have an expert like Gold-
smith come in here and say
this is the thing you have to do,
it points out the importance of
us doing it."


Five plusses and minuses for Citrus County to attract
industry, as outlined by Jeannette Goldsmith:
* Diverse potential sites however, none of them "ready" for
immediate occupancy; no buildings; no plans to make them ready.
* Access to rail nearby and easy "connectivity" through county -
however, lack of direct access to interstate.
* Wide availability of water and sewer however, not all industrial
sites have water/sewer and there are no plans in place for water/
sewer at other sites.
* Available work force and education however, skills gap between
construction trades and manufacturing.
* Dedicated economic development leaders however, no clear vision
nor strategic plan.
Goldsmith's recommendations:
* Select one or two sites and invest in getting them "shovel" ready.
* Identify empty buildings for reuse.
* Engage in a county-wide economic visioning plan.
* Identify target industries.
* Develop a proactive marketing plan.
-From staff reports


TPO
Continued from Page Al

Homosassa Springs-Bev-
erly Hills-Citrus Springs
that crossed the 50,000
population threshold.
However, the Florida
Department of Trans-
portation (FDOT) wants to
reduce, rather than in-
crease, the number of
MPOs in the state to deal
with larger regional
boards rather than county-
based groups. Therefore,
FDOT has encouraged the
Citrus TPO to merge with
Hernando County MPO,
and the TPO has been ex-
ercising caution as it ex-
amines this possible
partnership.
In addition, FDOT has
asked many previously es-
tablished MPOs to merge,



METH
Continued from Page Al

He also reportedly men-
tioned something about oth-
ers being at his residence.
Tactical Unit person-
nel decided to do a well-
being check on the home
and uncovered what
Novy calls "every item
used in the manufacture
of meth."
Unit investigators were


such at the three MPOs for
Pinellas, Hillsborough and
Pasco counties.
"FDOT has asked those
MPOs to consider becom-
ing one MPO," Clifford
said. "Those MPOs are
going through that discus-
sion and process."
On behalf of TBARTA,
Clifford said he would be
present at a meeting in
April of the three groups.
The proposed merger of
those three MPOs was
meeting some resistance,
Clifford said.
"The issue really comes
down to how it affects
funding," Clifford said.
Comparable to Citrus
County's new status, High-
lands County also needs to
be part of an MPO and is
looking at partners.
"They didn't think they
fit very well with Polk
County, who were more

greeted by
the nox-
ious smell
of chemi-
cals asso-
ciated
with cook-
ing meth.
Brandy N o v y
Johnson said a
person of search of
interest. the home
revealed
five one-pot cooks in the
home at 306 W Minuteman
St.


than willing to be part of
that discussion," Clifford
said. "Highlands was look-
ing at going on its own.
That didn't fare very well
from the state. Now they
are looking at partnering
with some other counties
that aren't MPOs. Again,
that's not being perceived
very well. But they are in
the same discussion
process we are in trying to
work through and see
what works best for them."
Clifford said the Citrus
TPO could be interested to
see what Highlands might
find as a solution. He con-
tinued to describe the situ-
ation of Sarasota-Manatee,
already a two-county MPO,
that is being asked to
merge with the Charlotte-
Punta Gorda MPO, which it
does not want to do as the
proposed merger would
cross FDOT districts.

Law enforcement and
public safety officials have
been sounding the alarm
about the fire dangers as-
sociated with meth labs,
but authorities believe the
one-pot or shake-and-
bake cooking method is
an even more combustible
cocktail than the tradi-
tional method.
The chemicals which
include Coleman fuel, bat-
tery shavings, acetone and
ephedrine are mixed in
an empty liter drink bot-


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Citrus TPO board mem-
ber/Crystal River City
Council member Paula
Wheeler said she wanted
to clarify her position re-
garding previous appor-
tionment discussions.
In the proposed merger
between Citrus and Her-
nando counties, the appor-
tionment plan gives
Hernando six board seats,
one seat more than Citrus.
As Citrus currently has
seven TPO board seats -
three for county commis-
sioners and two for each of
the two city councils In-
verness and Crystal River
- the proposed plan
would seat three county
commissioners and one
member of each city coun-
cil on the Hernando-Citrus
MPO.
"What I have read in two
of the (Chronicle) articles
on what's taken place at

tle. The concentration of
the chemicals builds up
the ether pressure within
the sealed container to
levels beyond which
the containers were built
to withstand, often
exploding.
A woman whom authori-
ties consider a person of
interest in the case report-
edly fled the scene before
officials got there. Novy


this board is an insinua-
tion that the city of Crystal
River and the city of Inver-
ness have a problem with
losing one of their seats if
and when Citrus and Her-
nando combine. I want to
repeat: The only thing that
I have ever said was I
would like the apportion-
ment to be equal."
Wheeler said she was
grateful Crystal River was
being considered for a seat
on the combined board.
"My discussion of equal
apportionment had noth-
ing to do with any individ-
ual entity on this board,
but if I have to make it ab-
solutely 100 percent clear,
I was leaning toward but
never really did say, I think
that if Hernando County
has five county commis-
sioners and one vote from
the city of Brooksville, if
we were combined boards,

said her name is Brandy
Clare Johnson, 21, and
said she is also wanted in
Hernando and Pasco
counties.
Anyone with informa-
tion about Johnson or the
case can call Novy at 352-
726-4488.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter AB. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


and we wanted to make it
equal, that we should have
four Citrus County (Com-
mission) members and one
representative from each
of the municipalities."
Wheeler said she never
suggested Crystal River
was not getting a fair
share. She said Crystal
River has no problem with
losing a seat just that
both counties should have
an equal number of seats
on the new board.
The proposed 6-5 appor-
tionment of board seats is
based on population per-
centages, giving Hernando
County one more voting
seat because it contains 55
percent of the combined
population of the proposed
combined MPO area.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Chris Van Ormer at
352-564-2916 or cvanormer
@chronicleonline. com.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Patrick 'Pat'
Smith, 73
HOMOSASSA
A celebration of life for
Patrick E. "Pat" Smith, 73,
of Homosassa, who passed
away March 12, 2013, will
be 4 p.m. Monday, March
18, 2013, at Wilder Funeral
Home. In lieu of flowers,
please make memorial
contributions in Patrick's
name to HPH Hospice,
12246 Cortez Blvd.,
Brooksville, FL 34613. Ca-
sual attire please, at his
family's request, www.
wilderfuneral.com.

Ida 'Kay'
Shipp, 68
FLORAL CITY
Ida "Kay" Shipp, 68, Flo-
ral City, died March 14,
2013, at her home under
the loving care of her fam-
ily and Hospice of Citrus
County A native of Elkins,
WVa., Kay was born to
John and Emily (Smith)
Louk and
returned
to this
S area in
1995 from
Overland
-"' Park, Kan.
A She was a
I member
Ida of the Flo-
Shipp ral City
United Methodist Church
and enjoyed arts, crafts
and floral arranging.
Left to cherish her mem-
ory is her husband of 46
years Walter L. "Walt"
Shipp, Floral City; two
children, Walter Shipp Jr
of Floral City and "Paula"
Mitcham of Inverness; her
father John Louk of Perry;
two sisters, Sharon Nisler
of Georgia and Donna
Buchner of California; and
four grandchildren, Justin,
Tyler, Hunter and Shelby
There will be a viewing
and visitation at the Chas.
E. Davis Funeral Home
Monday, March 18, 2013,
from 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.,
when the funeral proces-
sion will depart for Hills of
Rest Cemetery. The Rev.
Mary Gestrich will con-
duct graveside services at
11:30 a.m. Following grave-
side services, there will be
a celebration of life serv-
ice conducted by Pastor
Gestrich at 12 p.m. at the
Floral City United
Methodist Church, fol-
lowed by a reception in
Hilton Hall. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorials are being
accepted by Hospice of
Citrus County
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

Alice
Ashley, 77
LECANTO
Alice M. Ashley, 77,
Lecanto, died March 13,
2013. Private arrange-
ments with burial at
Florida National Ceme-
tery under the care of
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory

Eugene
Prince, 84
INVERNESS
Eugene R. Prince, 84, of
Inverness, died Thursday,
March 14, 2013, at his resi-
dence. Private arrange-
ments by Chas. E. Davis
Funeral Home with Cre-
matory, Inverness.

SO YOU KNOW
Chronicle policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online, corn or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,
Judy


Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


Kevin
Coward, 44
INVERNESS
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mr. Kevin Jon
Coward, age 44, of Inver-
ness, Florida, will be held
5:00 PM, Sunday, March

the Inver-
n e s s
Chapel of
o oHooper
Funeral
r -c Homes.
C r e mc a -
tion will
Kevin be under
Coward the direc-
tion of Hooper Crematory,
Inverness. The family will
receive friends from 3:00
PM until the time of serv-
ice Sunday at the chapel.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Mr. Coward was born
October 4, 1968 in Cam-
den, NJ. He died March
13, 2013 in Inverness. Mr
Coward graduated from
the Interlochen Fine Arts
Academy, Interlochen, MI
in 1986. He received his
Bachelors of Music De-
gree from the University
of Michigan and earned a
Masters Degree in Voice
Performance from the
University of South
Florida.
He moved to Inverness,
Florida from St. Peters-
burg in 2003. Mr Coward
was a former Professor of
Music at the University of
Tampa for 3 years, a
music teacher in Hillsbor-
ough County for 7 years;
he was voted Teacher of
the Year at Alexander El-
ementary School in
Tampa and was Instructor
of Music for Inverness
Primary School for 3
years.
Mr. Coward was pre-
ceded in death by his
wife, Carolyn Coward in
2007. Survivors include
his parents, Gail and
Terry Miller of Inverness,
FL and son, Christopher
Bailey Coward.
Kevin's beautiful tenor
voice could bring you to
tears as he sang an
operatic aria. He could
fill your heart with joy
as he sang with his
students. Kevin loved his
students and inspired
them to appreciate music
and share it with their
whole hearts. Kevin
blessed all who know him
by sharing his joy, humor
and love. His great love
for his students, his
beloved wife, Carolyn and
his son, Christopher in-
spires all of us to be car-
ing people, to give to
others and to sing our
hearts out!

OBITUARIES
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
service when submit-
ting a free obituary.)
i Deadline is 3 p.m. for
in the next day's
edition.


iA. E 6. ZafiS
Funeral Home With Crematory
JOHN LOCASCIO
Private Arrangements
Hills of Rest Cemetery
MARY JANE HILDEBRAND
Graveside: Fri., March 22 2:00 PM
Florida National Cemetery
ALICE ASHLEY
Private Arrangements
Honda National Cemetery
EUGENE PRINCE
Service: Robbinsville, NC
IDA"KAY" SHIPP
Call for information
WILLIAM GRATTON
Call for information
726-8323 QQQDWD3


March manatee count falls

Some areas unable to be surveyed due to impaired visibility


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
The number of manatees this
winter in King's Bay and other
county bodies of water is "way off"
highs from the past couple of
winters.
Staff from the Crystal River Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge conducted
the most recent aerial survey of
manatees Thursday and counted
377 sea cows for the whole county
Of that number, 261 were in King's
Bay
Joyce Kleen of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service said the numbers
in King's Bay may have been
skewed a bit because of cloudy
waters.
"King's Bay is usually pretty
clear," Kleen said.
But Kleen added it seems mana-
tee counts in the county have been
way off all winter compared to the
previous few years.


We are off
by about 200 and
we are not yet sure
if they migrated
south or not.

Joyce Kleen
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
employee on lower manatee count.
"We are off by about 200 and we
are not sure yet if they migrated
south or not," Kleen said.
She said the mild winter may also
be a contributing factor for the
lower figures.
The largest number of manatees
in the county so far this winter: 428,
recorded Feb. 1, according to Kleen.
Of those, 283 were in King's Bay
Kleen said during the winter of
2011-12, the county registered its


largest number of manatees 657,
546 of which were in King's Bay In
2010-11, the numbers were 651 and
566 respectively
During winter months, manatees
are known to come in great numbers
from the Gulf of Mexico to stay in
the 72-degree water of the springs.
The survey route stretches from
the Cross Florida Barge Canal, near
Inglis, south to the Homosassa
River. Included along this route are
the Crystal River, King's Bay, the
discharge canal of the Crystal River
area power plant, Salt River and
the Homosassa River, which in-
cludes the Blue Waters. The Cross
Florida Barge Canal, the discharge
canal of the power plant and west-
ern sections of the Homosassa,
Crystal, and Salt Rivers could not
be surveyed due to low sea fog
rolling in, according to the service.
Contact Chronicle reporter A.B.
Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.



le 'Bullitt'


producer


of thedies at 82
Corp.
were Associated Press
d CR
hedge LOS ANGELES The
ion in film producer and director
little whose credits included "The
Magnificent Seven" and
com- "West Side Story" has died.
al Ad- Robert E. Relyea was 82.
funds A spokeswoman for Re-
rinsic lyea said
as de- he died
they March 5 of
,otten natural
eme. causes.
e for Relyea's
ached career
iment spanned
s sub- more than
il of a Robert 40 years.
udge. Relyea He worked
arges with stars such as John
vhose Wayne on "The Alamo"
ition and Elvis Presley on "Jail-
ltiple house Rock."
d Fri- He collaborated with
Steve McQueen on several
against films, including "Bullitt"
4 mil- and "Le Mans."
legally Relyea started as an
earn- MGM crew member in
s. 1955 and served as presi-
nning dent of production at
hedge MGM-United Artists from
iated 1997 to 2001.
He is survived by his
S.A.C. wife, Dorothy; five chil-
.d al- dren; two stepchildren
tions. and grandchildren.


Associated Press ally negative
drug made
WASHINGTON Hedge fund CR and Wyeth 1
Intrinsic Investors will pay more than made public
$600 million in what federal regulators Intrinsic ti
are calling the largest insider trading funds to sel
settlement ever. Elan and V
The Securities and Exchange Com- more than
mission charged the firm with insider The corn
trading in 2012, alleging that one of its plaint Fride
portfolio managers ille-
gally obtained confiden- The SEC said in
tial details about an
Alzheimer's drug trial its complaint tha
from a doctor before the a doctor tippet
final results went public "pp
and made trades from a CR Intrinsic
that information.
The SEC said Friday portfolio manage
that the fund agreed to with safety data
settle the charges and
the parties neither and eventually
admit nor deny the
charges. negative results i
"The historic mone- the trial of an
tary sanctions against
CR Intrinsic and its affil- Alzheimer's drug,
iates are a sharp warn-
ing that the SEC will hold hedge fund The SEC
advisory firms and their funds ac- Sigma Capi
countable when employees break the lion. Sigma
law to benefit the firm," George S. from early i
Canellos, acting director of the SEC's ings of two
Division of Enforcement, said in a The case
statement probe of i
The SEC said in its complaint that funds, mar
Sidney Gillman, a doctor who moon- with S.A.C.
lighted as a medical consultant, tipped CR Intrin
CR Intrinsic portfolio manager Mathew A separate
Martoma with safety data and eventu- legedly ben

NEED A REPORTER?
Call 352-563-5660. Be prepared to leave a message
with your name, phone number and brief description
of the story idea. Approval for story ideas must
be granted before a reporter is assigned.


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0B i


ve results in the trial
by drug firms Elan
two weeks before they
c in 2008. Martoma ar
hen caused several 1
41 more than $960 mill:
Wyeth securities in a
a week.
mission amended its
ay to add S.A.C. Capit,
visors and four hedge
managed by CR Int
t and S.A.C. Capital
t fendants, saying
d each received ill-g
gains from the sche
A representative
S.AC. couldn't be re,
r immediately for corn
The settlement i:
ject to the approve
U.S. District Court j
It does not settle ch
n against Martoma, \
case is still in litige
It was one of mu
settlements reached
day by the SEC.
also settled charges a
tal Management for $1
allegedly profited ilb
information about the
technology companies
s stem from a long-ru:
insider trading by 1
ny of which are affi]
Capital.
Lsic was an affiliate of;
S.A.C. affiliate fun
efited from Sigma's ac


Obituaries


Fund pays $600M to sett


insider trading charges


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A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


A click of the wrist k
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com

14,600" "" "- Dow Jones industrials
,, Close: 14,514.11
1'' 1A Change: -25.03 (-0.2%)
1 3 ,9 6 0 . 1 0 D A Y S -. .. .. ..


Money&Markets
1,600 ........................... S& P 500
-: Close: 1,560.70
Change: -2.53 (-0.2%)
1,480 ........ 10 DAYS .........
1 ,6 0 0 ...... ............. ............. ........... ........... . ............ ......







1,350 ...... ....DF.......m


LOW
14470.50
6231.12
490.20
9091.05
3242.66
1555.74
1138.33
16452.58
949.48


CLOSE
14514.11
6272.67
495.18
9116.68
3249.07
1560.70
1141.83
16498.68
952.48


. ....... . . ..


J F


%CHG.
-0.17%
-0.14%
+0.69%
-0.12%
-0.30%
-0.16%
-0.15%
-0.18%
-0.06%


YTD
+10.76%
+18.20%
+9.29%
+7.97%
+7.60%
+9.43%
+11.90%
+10.03%
+12.14%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 8.65 3.61 +.05 +1.4 V V V -21.5 -52.4 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 38.58 36.43 -.43 -1.2 V A A +8.1 +22.8 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 42.79 42.81 +.03 +0.1 A A A +13.9 +32.6 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 0 97.31 95.43 -.83 -0.9 V A A +9.2 +36.6 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.44 12.57 +.46 +3.8 A A A +8.3 +37.4 48 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.23 11.75 -.09 -0.8 V A A +3.3 +54.6 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 0-- 43.43 34.37 -.38 -1.1 V A V -12.1 -4.4 27 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 0 47.92 47.26 -.20 -0.4 A A A +19.5 +34.9 15 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 --0- 25.25 22.90 +.93 +4.2 A A A +44.6 +26.9 41 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 0 57.82 57.58 -.17 -0.3 A A A +15.6 +34.5 19 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 --0- 71.13 69.95 +.02 ... A A A +9.6 +15.0 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0 50.65 51.33 +1.07 +2.1 A A A +11.3 +15.4 26 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.37 -.46 -0.5 A A A +3.3 +7.1 9 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 14.30 13.45 +.02 +0.1 A A A +3.9 +6.2 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.90 23.44 -.25 -1.1 V A A +11.7 +23.3 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.37 0 71.45 69.05 -1.19 -1.7 V A A +11.6 +44.5 23 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 29.27 21.38 -.28 -1.3 7 A A +3.7 -17.9 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 0 215.86 214.92 -.88 -0.4 A A A +12.2 +7.1 15 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 --0 23.99 21.09 -.55 -2.5 V V ... +38.0 24
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 0 39.98 38.81 -.39 -1.0 V V A +9.3 +30.6 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 0 99.50 99.67 +.36 +0.4 A A A +13.0 +5.1 19 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.95 28.04 -.10 -0.4 A A A +5.0 -11.5 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 63.58 62.07 -.27 -0.4 V A A +11.5 +25.4 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.70 0 74.43 74.47 +.46 +0.6 A A A +7.6 +27.3 17 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 14.20 37.91 15.48 +.09 +0.6 A V V -21.5 -57.5 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.00 19.77 +.15 +0.8 V A A +9.5 +16.0 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.36 8.36 +.05 +0.6 A A A +17.3 +35.3 12 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 85.90 51.82 -.67 -1.3 A A A +25.3 -29.3 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 97.84 97.40 -.44 -0.4 A A A +12.9 +31.4 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.04 5.81 -.05 -0.9 V V A +2.5 +111.6 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 35.73 35.08 -.30 -0.8 V A A +13.6 +12.9 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 57.85 56.65 -.67 -1.2 V A A +18.4 +62.3 18 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 87.00 ... ... A A A +18.7 +44.8 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 48.02 -.46 -0.9 A A A +11.0 +28.0 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 -0- 30.07 27.65 -.15 -0.5 V A A +9.8 +11.6 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 72.50 -.72 -1.0 V A A +6.3 +22.6 14 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 42.95 42.58 -.14 -0.3 A A A +15.0 +31.2 19 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months i Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates
M wH




The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
fell to 1.99
percent Friday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of
crude oil rose to
its highest
settlement level
in more than
three weeks,
and natural gas
jumped to its
highest price
since
November. Gold
rose, while
copper fell.




Ili


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .08 0.09 -0.01 .07
6-month T-bill .11 0.11 ... .14
52-wk T-bill .14 0.14 ... .19
2-year T-note .26 0.27 -0.01 .36
5-year T-note .83 0.87 -0.04 1.09
10-year T-note 1.99 2.03 -0.04 2.28
30-year T-bond 3.21 3.24 -0.03 3.42


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.93 2.96 -0.03 2.93
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.17 4.17 ... 4.66
Barclays USAggregate 1.93 1.93 ... 2.31
Barclays US High Yield 5.56 5.58 -0.02 7.12
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.01 3.98 +0.03 4.14
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.14 1.16 -0.02 1.27
Barclays US Corp 2.82 2.82 ... 3.49


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 93.45
Ethanol (gal) 2.63
Heating Oil (gal) 2.94
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.87
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.16
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1592.50
Silver (oz) 28.82
Platinum (oz) 1592.40
Copper (Ib) 3.51
Palladium (oz) 773.70
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.37
Corn (bu) 7.17
Cotton (Ib) 0.93
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 394.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.39
Soybeans (bu) 14.26
Wheat (bu) 7.23


PVS.
93.03
2.63
2.93
3.81
3.14
PVS.
1590.60
28.77
1589.80
3.52
768.80
PVS.
1.28
1.39
7.33
0.91
395.10
1.37
14.57
7.14


%CHG
+0.45
+0.11
+0.32
+1.57
+0.72
%CHG
+0.12
+0.16
+0.16
-0.44
+0.64
%CHG
-1.78
-1.73
+0.07
+1.80
-0.25
+1.64
-0.65
-0.25


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA x 21.68 -.12 +6.7 +12.5 +11.4 +6.8
BondA m 12.86 +.02 -0.3 +4.5 +5.6 +4.3
CaplncBuA x 54.70 -.49 +4.6 +11.4 +9.3 +3.9
CpWIdGrIA x 39.41 -.19 +6.4 +13.6 +8.5 +2.7
EurPacGrA m 43.10 +.02 +4.6 +10.1 +6.1 +1.7
FnlnvA x 44.20 -.24 +8.7 +14.2 +11.5 +4.7
GrthAmA m 37.08 -.13 +7.9 +14.0 +10.6 +4.7
IncAmerA x 18.94 -.18 +5.8 +12.5 +11.2 +6.4
InvCoAmA m 32.49 -.07 +8.2 +12.4 +10.1 +4.9
NewPerspA m 33.56 -.06 +7.4 +14.4 +10.3 +4.8
WAMutlnvA m 34.13 -.02 +9.4 +14.1 +13.4 +5.9
Dodge & Cox Income 13.89 +.01 +0.2 +5.5 +6.0 +7.0
IntlStk 36.80 +.05 +6.2 +13.3 +6.6 +2.1
Stock 135.93 ... +11.5 +19.8 +12.3 +5.1
Fidelity Contra 82.90 -.32 +7.9 +10.2 +12.6 +6.2
LowPriStk d 43.08 +.01 +9.1 +13.6 +13.4 +8.7
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 55.51 -.09 +9.9 +13.8 +13.0 +6.2
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.33 +.01 +5.6 +13.8 +10.9 +7.1
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA x 13.49 -.06 +1.7 +9.4 +7.3 +8.8
GIBondAdv x 13.44 -.07 +1.7 +9.6 +7.5 +9.1
Harbor Intllnstl d 64.82 +.01 +4.3 +8.8 +8.2 +2.0
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.22 +.02 +0.2 +7.7 +6.5 +7.4
T Rowe Price GrowStk 40.37 -.26 +6.9 +8.3 +12.8 +7.2
Vanguard 500Adml 144.44 -.24 +9.9 +13.8 +13.1 +6.3
5001nv 144.41 -.24 +9.9 +13.7 +12.9 +6.2
GNMAAdml 10.83 ... -0.3 +2.1 +4.9 +5.5
MulntAdml 14.29 ... 0.0 +4.6 +5.2 +5.5
STGradeAd 10.83 +.01 +0.4 +3.6 +3.5 +3.9
Tgtet2025 14.38 ... +5.8 +10.0 +9.7 +5.5
TotBdAdml 10.98 +.01 -0.5 +3.8 +5.3 +5.5
Totlntl 15.59 +.02 +4.1 +8.9 +5.4 0.0
TotStlAdm 39.35 -.07 +10.4 +14.1 +13.4 +7.0
TotStldx 39.33 -.07 +10.4 +14.0 +13.3 +6.9
Welltn 36.19 -.02 +6.9 +12.3 +10.6 +6.9
WelltnAdm 62.52 -.02 +7.0 +12.4 +10.7 +7.0
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age fell Friday for the first time
in 11 days following a worse-
than-expected report on con-
sumer confidence. It was the
first drop for the Dow this
month, and its first fall since it
set a record high last week.


Krispy Kreme KKD
Close: $14.54 V-0.41 or -2.7%
The doughnut store operator said
that its fiscal fourth-quarter net in-
come fell sharply due to a one-time
gain in the prior year.




L D J F M
52-week range
$5.86 [ a $15.33
Vol.: 6.9m (5.3x avg.) PE: 6.5
Mkt. Cap:$948.36 m Yield:...

Aeropostale ARO
Close: $13.75 V-0.76 or -5.2%
The teen retailer posted a loss for its
fiscal fourth quarter and said that it
expects another loss in the current
quarter.
$1,

1_
D J F M
52-week range
$11.76 $23.05
Vol.: 8.2m (3.3x avg.) PE:18.1
Mkt. Cap:$1.08 b Yield:...

Brown Shoe BWS
Close: $17.50 V-0.90 or -4.9%
The owner of the Naturalizer and Fa-
mous Footwear stores posted an
earnings outlook for 2013 that
missed Wall Street expectations.

1-
1-
I -, I r- 1
52-week range
$8.28 $19.64
Vol.:1.3m (3.1x avg.) PE:46.1
Mkt. Cap:$750.63 m Yield: 1.6%

Blyth BTH
Close: $15.38V-1.78 or -10.4%
The seller of candles and weight
loss products posted a weak 2013
earnings forecast and disappointing
fourth-quarter results.




i.' r F t 1
52-week range
$12.66 I I -I $46.15
Vol.: 1.8m (3.3x avg.) PE:6.1
Mkt. Cap:$262.35 m Yield: 1.3%

Destination XL DXLG
Close: $4.92A0.35 or 7.7%
The men's retailer, which owns
Rochester Big &Tall stores, said that
this year would show its strongest
sales growth in seven years.
$54 ,

4,

3.5 D J F M
52-week range
$2.76 $5.00
Vol.:1.1m (5.2x avg.) PE: 6.3
Mkt. Cap:$239.09 m Yield:...


Stocks close lower


Associated Press

U.S. stock markets fell Friday, ending
the longest winning streak for the Dow
Jones industrial average in nearly 17
years.
The Dow dropped 25.03 points, or 0.2
percent, to 14,514.11 The Standard &
Poor's 500 index fell 2.5 points, or 0.2 per-
cent, to 1,560.70, just shy of an all-time
high from October 2007. The Nasdaq
composite index dropped nine points, or
0.3 percent, to 3,249.
The Dow had notched a 10-day winning
streak through Thursday, its longest since
November 1996. The string of wins pushed
the blue-chip index up 484 points, or 3.4
percent, to a Thursday close of 14,539.14.
The index's closing price on Feb. 28, just
before the rally began, was 14,054.49.
Trading Friday was tentative because
investors feared that rising inflation
could cause the Federal Reserve to re-
treat from policies aimed at boosting
markets. The government said that con-
sumer prices increased in February at
the fastest pace in more than three years.
The increase was driven by a spike in
gas prices; the core index, which ex-


cludes the volatile energy and food cate-
gories, increased more modestly But
both figures rose 2 percent compared
with a year earlier, enough to get in-
vestors' attention, said Peter Tchir, who
runs the hedge fund TF Market Advisors.
"It's real and it's a drag, and I think
people are growing concerned that it can
get out of control quickly," Tchir said. He
said signs of economic improvement and
inflation "make them wonder if there will
be continued market pressure on the
Fed" to end its bond-buying programs.
The market's recent rally to multiyear
highs was fueled in part by the Fed's ef-
forts to keep interest rates low and en-
courage investment.
The Dow's win streak matched a 10-day
run that ended on Nov 15,1996. To find a
longer uninterrupted series of gains, you
would have to go back to Jan. 3, 1992,
when the Dow rose for 11 consecutive
days. The index's longest winning streak
was 14 days, ending June 14, 1897.
Stocks opened lower and extended
their losses at 10 a.m. after a closely-
watched index of consumer sentiment
fell to its lowest level since the end of
2011.


Bull runs
The Standard & Poor s 500 index has more than most severe.
doubled in four years and it s one good day away Although the S&P 500 has taken longer than
from reclaiming its record high set in October average to return to its peak, corporate
2007. profits have recovered more quickly.
Since World War II, it has tak,- r..- 1 Companies in the index saw their
S&P 500 an average of less tha-i .. profits climb back to prior levels in
years to fully recover from a bea, two years, compared with an
market and return to its prior peail average of three and a half years
according to S&P Capital IQ. A following other bear markets,
bear market is when the index according to Deutsche Bank.
falls 20 percent or more from The second steepest market decline
peak to trough, which has ince WWII followed the dot-com
happened 12 times since 1945. I nTilosion of 2000-2002. It took a little more
The market s 57 percent plummet than tour and a half years for the market to
from October 2007 through March 2009 was the recover from a 49 percent loss.
Time it took for the S&P 500
Decline in the S&P 500 Bear market to return to prior peak
-29%/, 1946-47 3yr., 1 mo.
-21 1948-49 7 mo.
-22 1956-57 11 mo.
-28 1961-62 i 14 mo.
-22 1966 10mo.
-36 1968-70 i 1 yr., 9 mo.
-48 1973-74 5yr., 9 mo.
-27 1980-82 3 mo.
-34 1987 lyr.,8mo.
-20 1990 4mo.
-49 2000-02 4 yr., 8 mo.
i Average 1 yr., 11 mo.

-57 2007-09 4 yr.+ (ongoing)
SOURCES. Deutsche Bank, S&P Capital IQ Stan Choe, J. Paschke AP





Carnival returns to profit


Travelers still

fear mishaps

Associated Press i


MIAMI The world's
largest cruise line has suf-
fered through a number of
high-profile mishaps. Yet
passengers continue to
book vacations thanks to
discounts, albeit at a
slower pace.
Carnival Corp. offered
more sales to attract wary
passengers after an engine
fire last month crippled
the Carnival Triumph,
leaving 4,200 people
stranded for five days
without working toilets or
power. This week, two
more of its ships had me-
chanical problems, ruin-
ing the vacations of
thousands more travelers.
Carnival Corp. said Fri-
day it earned $37 million,
or 5 cents per share, in the
quarter ending Feb. 28.
That compares with a loss
of $139 million, or 18 cents
per share, a year earlier
But its forecast for the year
came in below analysts'
predictions. Its shares fell
more than 2 percent.
On Thursday, the com-
pany ended the voyage of
the Carnival Dream after
the ship's backup emer-
gency diesel generator
failed, causing problems
with elevators and toilets.
Instead of continuing back
to Florida, Carnival was


Associated Press
The Carnival Dream is docked Jan. 5, 2010, in St.
Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Carnival, the world's largest
cruise line, has suffered through a number of high-profile
mishaps, the most recent occurring Thursday when the
company ended the voyage of the Carnival Dream after
the ship's backup emergency diesel generator failed,
causing problems with elevators and toilets.


forced to charter airplanes
to fly home the ship's 4,300
passengers. The Dream's
next trip, which was sup-
posed to start Sunday, was
canceled. All of the passen-
gers scheduled for that voy-
age will receive a refund
for the cruise and airfare.
The company also said
another ship the Legend
- was having mechanical
problems and would skip its
stop at the Cayman Islands,
heading straight to its final
port in Tampa instead. Car-
nival runs cruises under 10
brands including Holland
America, Princess, Cunard
and its namesake line.
Vacationers have been
wary about booking
cruises ever since the
Costa Concordia also
owned by Carnival sank
off the coast of Italy in Jan-


uary 2012. Passengers
have returned to the seas,
but many needed to be
coaxed by deep discounts.
Asked if they would like
to share how deep the dis-
counts have been for the
various lines, Carnival ex-
ecutives replied, "Not
particularly"
In its earnings release
Friday, the Miami-based
company said advance
bookings for 2013 are be-
hind the same point a year
earlier. The company
blamed Europe's eco-
nomic problems for its in-
ability to raise prices.
North American prices are
up slightly, but those in Eu-
rope and Asia are lagging
behind. Passengers in Eu-
rope are booking vacations
much closer to the date of
departure, Carnival said.


15 ,0 0 0 ................... ............ ............
14,500
14 ,000 ...... ............. ............. ............
1 4 ,0 0 0 .. .. ******* ............. ....... ......

1 3 ,5 0 0 . ....... .
13,000
12,500. 0 N D


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
4,813
3,374
1428
1627
351
35


NASD
2,134
1,617
1088
1361
225
15


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14539.14
6281.24
495.65
9128.77
3260.62
1563.62
1143.21
16529.74
954.00


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 A7


-.. .................







Page A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan ................ ........... publisher
M ike Arnold ................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan................... managing editor
Curt Ebitz .............. .......... citizen member
mN l Mac Harris ........................... citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ................ .......... copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


SUNSHINE WEEK




Public records



in Fla. should



always be open


Florida's government
operates, by law, in the
sunshine.
That means any citizen can
attend government meetings
or walk into a public building
and ask to see public records.
This past week, the Chroni-
cle participated in a
statewide project
to test citizen ac- THE I
cess to records in
each of the 67 Govern
county court- the Su
houses. Reporters
from different pa- OUR OH
pers around the
state were di- Delays
rected to visit the accept
respective Clerk
of the Court's office and ask
to see a specific file. The re-
porters were told not to iden-
tify themselves as being from
a newspaper because every
citizen has the same right of
access.
Some of the clerks made the
files immediately available,
and others had excuses as to
why a release of the informa-
tion needed to be delayed.
In these cases, excuses are
not acceptable.
In the case of Citrus County,
newly elected Clerk of the
Court Angela Vick's office di-
rected the Chronicle reporter
to a computer terminal
where the requested file was
made available in a redacted
format.
Around the state, the re-
sponse was not as good. Other
reporters were told the re-
lease of the court file would
be delayed until confidential
information was deleted from
the files. Some of those de-
lays were 24 hours, but in
four cases the delay was
three days.
We don't consider records to
be open when you have to wait
three days for information.
Other reporters were told it
was inconvenient to release
files because the clerks were
busy or someone was out sick
We don't guarantee consti-
tutional rights only when
convenient.
Florida's politicians spend



Hard to believe
A couple of articles in the
Monday, March 11, Chronicle, I
just don't believe.
One is the landfill. A fire
burned some garbage and that's
supposed to cost $500,000? In
one way, I think it's a good thing
to burn garbage.
There's some plastic 0
lining in the pit where
they dump garbage? I
know we don't want to
contaminate the ground
and that, but they said [!
it burned some of it,
and that's $500,000? {
That's ridiculous.
The other thing I CAL
don't believe is that 58 563-i
percent of people in
your online poll said
they followed doctors' orders
and got the colon cancer
screening. You know, I called
the hospital. I don't believe 58
percent of the people would do
that. Maybe just the people
that voted are people who actu-


a good part of each legislative
session trying to figure out
new reasons to not permit
Floridians to view public
records, speak at public
meetings or gain access to
documents.
The politicians justify the
concealment of records and
meetings by
SSUE* claiming too
SUE: much confiden-
ment in tial information is
shine. available and that
information could
'INION: be used for nefar-
ious purposes.
are not The Florida So-
table. city of Newspa-
per Editors
sponsors Sunshine Week
each year in an effort to raise
public awareness about the
slow erosion of citizen rights
through the closing or
records and meetings. The
week begins on Sunday.
The politicians convince
themselves they are doing the
public's business by limiting
access to its own information
and meetings. They are not.
In most cases, the politi-
cians are protecting friends or
special-interest groups that
don't want pesky citizens pay-
ing attention to their actions.
"Transparency" is a buzz-
word we hear frequently
these days in Tallahassee.
But to politicians, the term
usually means they should
have the right to see what
their political enemies are
doing.
The public has the right to
see and understand how tax
dollars are being spent and
how government business is
conducted. During Sunshine
Week, we urge our readers to
contact the members of our
legislative delegation and tell
them to stop creating new ex-
emptions to the state's open-
records laws.
And at the same time, read-
ers should tell all public offi-
cials that they have the right
to access public records any
time they want to see them.
Citizens are the "public" in
public records and meetings.


ally had it done, you know. But
most people don't do it be-
cause of the cost and the dis-
comfort.
Donation or admission?
I'm calling about the Shrim-
papalooza that you have adver-
tised in the paper and
|JND it shows up here in the
corner it's a $2 dona-
lE tion. That's not unlike
anything else you do
here. Arts and crafts,
home shows ... always
a "donation."
I wish (they) would
av pull out a dictionary
every now and then
)579 and look up the differ-
ence between a dona-
tion and an admission
because a donation is some-
thing that we do of our own
free will and not something
that we have to do to get into
these things. That's admission.
Look it up. You might learn
something.


I
r
Ir

p

pi


I

[


Close to the vest
"County officials said they
honored Randy Messer's re-
quest he be laid off- even
through he planned to resign
anyway so Messer could file
for unemployment." (Mike
Wright article, Citrus County
Chronicle, March 5.)
I can not believe commis-
sioners all of them will do
nothing other than ask a multi-
tude of questions of adminis-
trator Brad Thorpe and
attorney Richard Wesch con-
cerning the curious retire-
ment/layoff of a former FDS
employee/county employee.
Or will four commissioners
sit silent, as they did after
Thorpe and Wesch kept se-
cret until November 2012
that which they learned in
March 2012. What secret was
that? Duke/Progress Energy
would pay but $19 million of
a $35 million Citrus County
tax bill.
James McIntosh
Lecanto

Thanks for help
I just want to thank Crystal
River Health and Rehab on
12th Avenue in Crystal River
All the staff helped arrange a
very special birthday party for
one resident who turned 101
on March 8, Tom Nicholson.
Without the help of Annette
Marshall and Chris Delgado,
this would not have been a suc-
cess. Through their kindness
and efforts, they arranged for
Tom to be brought to his
Florida home community via a
special wheelchair-assisted


"Freedom is a very great reality. But it
means, above all things, freedom from lies."
D.H. Lawrence, 1930


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Cultural change super-sized


DOUGLAS COHN AND
ELEANOR CLIFT
WASHINGTON
ugary drinks are killing
us, but is it government's
role to regulate the sale of
super-sized sodas? New York
Mayor Michael Bloomberg said
yes, citing a dramatic rise in the
rates of diabetes and obesity,
conditions that contribute to ill-
ness and premature death and
strain resources in the public
health system.
Taxpayers foot the bill for
these costly health outcomes.
That's why Bloomberg believes
he has the responsibility, and
the power, to restrict the avail-
ability of the extra-large sugar-
laden drinks that have become
the new normal in restaurants,
coffee shops, theaters and fast-
food establishments.
The 16-ounce size Bloomberg
wants to regulate would still be
available at convenience stores
and at the bodegas that dot the
city's streets. Milkshakes would
be exempt They contain sugar,
but aren't simply empty calories
because of their dairy base.
Critics howled "nanny state,"
and the discrepancies in the
law regulating a fountain
soda purchased at a Dunkin'
Donuts differently from one
bought at a convenience store
- introduced a host of legal
questions.
The soda industry brought a
lawsuit challenging the consti-
tutionality of the mayor's order,
and won the first round this
week in what could be a pro-


Other VOICES


tracted legal battle. Justice Mil-
ton A. Tingling Jr, writing for
the State Supreme Court of
Manhattan, called Bloomberg's
initiative "arbitrary and capri-
cious." He said the exceptions
threaded throughout the law
would result in confusion and
conflicts throughout the city.
The result, he wrote, would be
"uneven enforcement, even
within a particular city block,
much less the city as a whole.
The judge is right: Why is it
OK to buy a Big Gulp at your
neighborhood 7-Eleven, but it's
not OK to buy a 16-ounce coffee
with sugar at Dunkin'
Donuts?
Put another way, though, why
is it OK to ban smoking in
restaurants and public places,
but it's not okay to ban smoking
in your local private law firm?
The answer is the government
takes the first action on behalf
of the public, and the local law
firm and virtually every other
business establishment in the
country follows suit on its
own because smoking bans have
become the new cultural norm.
Bloomberg is in the last year of
his third term as mayor, and he
clearly wants to leave a big
legacy in terms of public health
and safety He is spearheading
an anti-gun violence group, con-
tributing money to elect politi-
cians in tune with his agenda. He
has had success on his healthy
living agenda, banning trans-fat
in New York restaurants and re-


quiring fast food restaurants to
publish calorie counts.
He was in the vanguard of
elected officials to call for a
smoking ban in bars and restau-
rants in New York. Everybody
laughed at first, but no one's
laughing anymore, and they're
not smoking in bars and restau-
rants anymore either The city
council extended the ban to
public parks and beaches in
2011, and there are fewer ciga-
rette butts to be found in Central
Park, but it's mostly the conse-
quence of a changed culture, not
aggressive NYPD enforcement.
Last year, there was a flurry of
stories Bloomberg would be
pushing a ban on smoking in-
doors in homes. The pushback
from the public and on editorial
pages was significant enough
that if the mayor was considering
such a policy, he was prompted to
come forward and say nothing
like that was in the works.
But he's not backing off on
sugary drinks, and if he can tai-
lor a proposal that is more uni-
form and approaches the issue
the way government did with
smoking bans, Bloomberg could
well be at the forefront of a wel-
come public policy revolution
and cultural change.

Douglas Cohn and Eleanor
Clift author the Washington
Merry-Go-Round column,
founded in 1932 by Drew
Pearson.


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352 563-5660.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

van service, where all his
friends and neighbors were
waiting to help him and Maria
(Tom's companion of many
years) begin the annual cele-
brations of their birthdays.
Also a special thanks to
Linda Marando, also from
Crystal River Health and
Rehab. Linda came to stay
with Tom to see if any cares or
needs were necessary while he
was at the celebration.
Linda is a real sweetheart,
and with employees like her,
the residents at Crystal River
Health and Rehab are in the
best of hands.
We the people of Crystal
Pointe Community thank you for
helping us give Tom and Maria a
very special day that they both
enjoyed and will cherish.
Rich and Betty Baker
Dick and Kay Hopman
Dunnellon


Cruisers thank you
On behalf of the Citrus
County Cruisers Car Club I
would like to thank the Citrus
County Chronicle and all the
businesses and individuals
who sponsored trophies and
donated to our Chinese auc-
tion and door prizes. I would
also like to thank the car own-
ers who participated in the
29th Manatee Car & Truck
Show, the spectators who can
out to see all the amazing cars,
the vendors and all those who
donated to our fish bowl and
raffle.
In spite of the overcast, cold
and windy weather, we had
more than 150 beautiful cars
on display I would like to
thank the members of the Cit-
rus County Crusiers for brav-
ing the weather and working
all the jobs it took to put on
this show. A special thank-you
goes out to our car show chair-
man Roy Bischoff. Roy did a
great job of organizing and or-
chestrating this year's show.
After awarding the prize
money for the raffle, all re-
maining proceeds go to schol-
arships at Withlacoochee
Technical Institute for stu-
dents enrolled in the automo-
tive program. The donations to
the fish bowl and money taken
in at our Chinese auction go to
charities in Citrus County.
Again, thank you Citrus
County! Hope to see you again
next year at our 30th Manatee
Car and Truck Show.
Kathe Tegen
president, Citrus County
Cruisers Car Club


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS to the Editor


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How about a
second?
Today's editorial (March
5,2013) stated Commis-
sioner Scott Adams should
temper his rhetoric, but re-
grettably they ignored a
valuable tool of reasoning:
Roberts Rules of Order
This modus operandi func-
tions in just about every
form of our government, as
well as in private industry
Can you imagine what
would occur at various
governmental levels, if no
"second" was stated for
any motion? How could
constituents judge the
abilities of elective offi-
cials, denied a demo-
cratic debate? How could
shareholders or bond-
holders evaluate their
personal investments?
What do you think they
would demand of their
boards of directors if all
of their discussions were
circumvented?
During the last public
meeting of the Board of
County Commissioners,
Commissioner Scott
Adams read aloud his
consolidated motion.
Chairman Joe Meeks de-
clared "the motion died
for the lack of a "second."
This happened several
times.
Unfortunately, Adams
missed a strategic oppor-
tunity, to propose each
cost-cutting suggestions
independently: the cut-
ting of commissioners'
salaries, consolidating of-
fices, consultants, com-
bining human resource
departments, stopping
Port Citrus, etc. etc. etc.
and on infinitum.
I think the chair's dec-
laration would almost cer-
tainly negate each
separate motion. The
BOCC would remain mute
so often, even they proba-
bly would be uncomfort-
able, by their own silence.
A wiser solution would
have the chair, upon hear-
ing no comments "sec-
ond" Adams motion,
stating he does so, only


for the purpose of discus-
sion. A debate could have
ensued and the BOCC
would (or not) voiced
their recorded opinions.
A crucial vote would de-
cide its outcome.
More importantly, it
provides a necessary, fun-
damental opportunity for
voters to determine the
honesty and reliability of
elected commissioners;
whether they should re-
main in office and resolve
complicated issues. This
truly is in the best demo-
cratic tradition of our
County
Peter Monteleone
Pine Ridge

Everyone should
contribute
It's not the deficit and
the national debt that are
our problem. The problem
is the government pro-
grams that created them
and continue to feed
them. Most of these pro-
grams would be wrong
even if Bill Gates and War-
ren Buffett wrote a check
for them every month.
They enslave people to
government dependency
They relieve the popula-
tion of the responsibilities
of adulthood. They pro-
vide cradle-to-grave wel-
fare starting with child
care and ending with
elder care.
We have 11 states with
more people of welfare
than are working. We pay
them more on welfare
than they can earn work-
ing so why would they
want to work? The crime is
government recruits peo-
ple to join the welfare rolls
by this kind of behavior
An example of our local
government recruiting
people was brought home
recently by an article in
the paper about the
school system's attempt to
get more children signed
up for the free breakfast
program. They were wor-
ried because less than 50
percent of the students
enrolled in the free lunch


program were enrolled in
the free breakfast pro-
gram. Could it be some of
the parents are fulfilling
their parental responsi-
bilities by getting up and
fixing breakfast for their
children? Nevertheless,
the school system is put-
ting out the word if you
qualify for free lunch, you
also qualify for free
breakfast. Come, let us
take care of you.
We have to admit
Medicare and Social Se-
curity were founded on
careless demographic
models and we must fix
them, otherwise we will
end up like Europe, going
from one fiscal crisis to
another and eventually
collapsing under a crush-
ing debt burden. We don't
have large families today
so we don't have the con-
stant increase in popula-
tion that socialism
demands to function. You
can't fix this by robbing
the rich either, because
even the rich don't have
enough money Everyone
needs to work and con-
tribute before retirement,
not sit home and live off
the work of others.
Harley Lawrence
Homosassa

Explain how
to trim debt
President Obama has
just spent the last two or
three weeks complaining
about the so-called se-
quester cuts. These cuts
only amount to about 3
percent or 4 percent of
the total federal budget
If these minimal cuts
cause so much trouble,
then how does a $17 tril-
lion national debt ever get
paid off? How does a
yearly deficit of $1 trillion
to $1.5 trillion ever get
paid off?
One thing Mr. Obama
has never done is give an
answer to the two above
questions.
Brad L. Block
Homosassa


G6o0e.(o, :,If


Letters to THE EDITOR


Volunteer commissioners
I totally agree with Sunday's paper
(March 10). These county commission-
ers should be volunteers. Stop paying
$60,000. This is ludicrous. And then
we've got to pay their medical, dental,


full benefits, full retirement. Pay them
for life. Stop this insanity. Enough is
enough ... I'm being robbed enough by
the bankers, their inflation and all this.
And now my own people that represent
me is just ripping me off right and left.
Enough is enough.


A u W~BButIchern house
Come Visit 9am-6pm
for your
Specialty Cuts!


The Butchero
The Butcher We'll Beat Any Citrus County Meat Price!*

U B Ak th NgORNED& BEEF P Idu"LB


$r RATT )Iy MAAbNEwSS EBEEP BRIskE PL
Fresh Baked Bread Daily Homemade Sausage Ask about our New England & German Meet & Fish Products
1111111m11k I KI jr


Beef <
All Natural Muscle Meat
Real Ground Chuck (no fillers)....Only $2.99 Ib.
(10 lb. minimum)
Ground Sirloin.................4mf ......$3.39 Ib
(10 lb. minimum) $
Old Fashioned Slab Bacon.................$3.99 Ib
T-Bone Porterhouse...........................$6.99 Ib
N Y S trip ....................................................$ 5 .9 9 lb.


Fresh Talapia..................................$3.99 lb.
G rouper.............................................$8.99 lb.
Haddock Fillet................................$6.99 lb.
Salmon ............=. .......Only $5.99 lb.
Extra Jumbo Shrimp 16-20 ct.....$7.99 lb.
(2 lb. minimum)


Poultry
Chicken Drumsticks ........ 990 lb P o rk


Leg Quarters 10 lb. bag......................$7.99
Boneless Skinless Breast per Ib.......... $2.39
(10 lb bag minimum)


Spare Ribs 3 slab minimum............. $1.99 lb.
Baby Backs 2 slab minimum........... $3.99 lb.
Pork Chops boneless...................$2.99 lb.


Call Ahead Family Packs starting at


Call Ahead Family Packs starting at $25


1 lb. Italian Sausage or 1 Package
Smoked Sausage 4 Center Cut Pork
Chops 1 Whole Chicken
4 Beef Sirloin Sizzler Steaks
* 3 lbs. Ground Chuck 1 lb. Hot Dogs
1 lb. Packaged Bacon


* 1 Piece Top Choice Sirloin Steak
* 1 Piece London Broil
* 3 Ibs. Beef, Chuck Or Shoulder Roast
* 2 Ibs. Italian Sausage
* 4 Beef Sirloin Sizzler Steaks
* 4 Beef Or Pork Cube Steaks
* A C(-nt r C(i it DP rkt (Chnrnc,


* 2 10 oz. N.y. Strip Steaks
* 4 10 oz. Demonic Steaks
* 6 Beef Sirloin Sizzler Steaks
* 3 lbs. Boneless Pork Loin Roast or 3 lbs.
Boneless Pork Loin Chops
or 3 1/2 lbs. Bone-in Pork Loin Roast
* 3 lbs. Beef, Chuck or Shoulder Roast


r----------------- - I UUL, ,,U o 8 Center Cut Pork Chops 8 lbs. Ground Chuck
I 4 bs. Ground Chuck 2-1 lb. Packaged Bacon
2 1/2 Ibs. Boneless-skinless Chicken : 2 1/2 lbs. Boneless-skinless Chicken Breasts
SBreasts (3-4 Breasts) (3 To 4 Breasts)
2 Ibs. Homemade Sausage 1 b. Pollock Fillets (3-4 Pieces) 2 Whole Chickens
With $75 or more purchase 3 Ibs. Chicken Leg Quarters 4 Beef Or Pork Cube Steaks
Must present this coupon.Not valid with Family sacks, 1 lb. Chicken Tenderloins Or 1 lb. Steak 2 lbs. Chicken Tenderloins or 2 lbs. Buffalo
special offers or beer. Your choice. I And Onion Sausage Chicken Breast Strips
L--- ------- -------------------*-
We Deliver wholesale to all restaurants in Citrus & Marion! M7 IE S 0 AS (hheF1~smUt idw
*Vacuum sealing is extra charge. Must be same grade meat.


1 ....Du o a u e f me t s m w i h s .r.a p ox m t. Pi e m y c a ge wth ut noic .


WTS TIME
WE LOOK INTO
HOME
COLLEGINO


Sound OFF


OPINION


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 A9












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Wildfire


*:*

4


Associated Press
A wildfire burns Friday at
Horsetooth Reservoir
west of Fort Collins, Colo.
The fire damaged one
home and has forced the
evacuation of another
subdivision.

Colo. fire burns
in warm weather
FORT COLLINS, Colo.
-An 800-acre wildfire is
burning near homes in
northern Colorado amid
gusty winds and warm
weather and has prompted
more than 50 people to
leave the area.
The fire began Friday
west of Fort Collins and is
burning near the scene of a
large wildfire last summer
that burned 259 homes and
killed one person.
Officials haven't said
how many people or
homes are covered by the
evacuations.
The cause of the fire is
under investigation.
Firefighters have con-
trolled a second, smaller
fire nearby.
White House:
Economy mending
WASHINGTON -The
White House says the
economy is mending,
though it remains vulnera-
ble and faces increasing
long-term challenges from
an aging population.
The annual Economic
Report of the President por-
trays an economy that "un-
questionably stands on
firmer ground" than when
he assumed office in 2009,
but says the aftereffects of
the recession still linger.
In the report, President
Barack Obama says though
the economy is adding jobs,
too many Americans still
can't find full-time
employment.
The report gives a sober
assessment of an aging
population, noting the only
major age group that will
grow faster during the next
30 years than it did during
the last 60 years is people
aged 65 and up. An older
America means greater de-
mands on government
services, a smaller work-
force and less household
consumption.
Wanted fugitive
arrested in Italy
WASHINGTON -A man
placed on the U.S. Mar-
shals Service 15 Most
Wanted Fugitive list for the
execution-style murder of
his estranged wife has
been arrested in Bologna,
Italy.
The Marshals Service
said 42-year-old Miguel Tor-
res had been charged with
first-degree murder in
Reading, Pa., following the
September 2005 slaying.
After Barbara Torres ob-
tained a protective order
against her husband,
Miguel Torres, he allegedly
used a spare key to enter
his wife's vehicle, hiding in
the backseat until she left
work.
She spotted Torres when


she approached, and she
attempted to flee, but he got
out of the vehicle and al-
legedly walked up behind
her and shot her in the
head, near a county
building.


-From wire reports


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Senator shifts stance


Gay marriage views prompt

Republican soul-searching


solidarity on that issue is
hindering President
Barack Obama's efforts to
make higher tax revenue
part of a compromise ap-
proach to deficit spending
and expensive social
programs.
These trends raise the
possibility the GOP reel-
ing after losing the popu-
lar vote in five of the last
six presidential elections
- will lessen its identity
with hot-button social is-
sues and sharpen its em-
phasis on tax and
spending matters.
Portman announced Fri-
day he now supports gay
marriage, linking his stand
to learning one of his sons
is gay
A former U.S. trade rep-
resentative and White
House budget chief, Port-
man is seen as one of the
party's most knowledge-
able and effective leaders.


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -A Re-
publican senator's em-
brace of gay marriage is
the latest sign of soul-
searching in a party strug-
gling to adapt in a society
whose demographics -
and views on emotional is-
sues are changing fast.
Gay marriage still di-
vides the party, with the
conservative wing strongly
opposed. But an increas-
ing number of Republi-
cans, now including Sen.
Rob Portman of Ohio, are
reversing course. Many
others simply downplay
the subject.
With the issue of immi-
gration also shifting rap-
idly under Republicans'
feet, they seem increas-
ingly focused and
united on one overarch-
ing goal: keeping income
taxes from rising. Their


Mitt Romney considered He said he had talked to
Portman to be his running his pastor and others, in-
mate last year Portman eluding Senate Minority
said he told Rom- Leader Mitch Mc-
ney of his son Connell, R-Ky.,
Will's sexuality, but who opposes gay
does not believe it H marriage, and to
affected Romney's o former Vice Presi-
decision. dent Dick Cheney,
As a U.S. House who supports it
member in 1996, Cheney, whose
Portman supported younger daughter
the Defense of Mar- Rob is a lesbian, be-
riage Act, or DOMA. Portman came arguably the
It defines marriage U.S. senator best-known Re-
as between a man from Ohio. publican to em-
and a woman and brace gay
bars federal recognition of marriage with his an-
same-sex marriage. nouncement in June 2009.
Portman's reversal Portman said his previ-
makes him the only Senate ous views on marriage
Republican to openly back were rooted in his
gay marriage. Methodist faith.
"I have come to believe Other prominent Re-
that if two people are pre- publicans who have en-
pared to make a lifetime dorsed gay marriage
commitment to love and include: Sen. John Mc-
care for each other in good Cain's wife, Cindy, and
times and in bad, the gov- daughter Meghan; former
ernment shouldn't deny first lady Laura Bush; for-
them the opportunity to mer national GOP Chair-
get married," Portman man Ken Mehlman and
wrote in an op-ed article in former U.S. Solicitor Gen-
The Columbus Dispatch. eral Ted Olson.


S


0 DOS T7


Associated Press
People shout slogans Friday outside the Portuguese Finance Ministry during a protest by Portuguese civil
servants unions against austerity measures taken by the Portuguese government in Lisbon.


Europe eases austerity whip a little


Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany -
Three and a half years into its gov-
ernment-debt crisis, there are
signs Europe is adopting a gentler
approach toward austerity.
Political leaders aren't backing
away aggressively from budget
cuts and higher taxes, but they
are increasingly trying to temper
these policies, which have stifled
growth and made it harder for
many countries to bring their
deficits under control.
The European Union is slowing
its enforcement of deficit limits
until the region's economy turns
around; countries that were
bailed out by their European
neighbors are being given more
time to repay loans, easing the
pressure to cut budgets further;
and financial leaders, including
the head of the European Central
Bank, say it's time to place more


emphasis on reviving growth.
"There has clearly been a shift
in thinking," said Christian
Schulz, economist at Berenberg
Bank in London.
After the crisis broke out in late
2009, governments dramatically
slashed spending either to
meet conditions for bailout loans,
or to reassure jittery bond mar-
kets they were trustworthy bor-
rowers. This fiscal belt-
tightening was introduced to help
countries reduce their deficits
and pave the way for critical fi-
nancial aid.
Promises of austerity gave the
ECB political breathing room to
get more aggressive. The bank's
pledge last summer to buy unlim-
ited amounts of government
bonds is largely responsible for
taming Europe's financial crisis.
But austerity also inflicted se-
vere economic pain in places
such as Greece, Ireland, Portugal,


Spain and Italy Over time as
the economy of the 17 European
Union countries that use the euro
descended into recession evi-
dence grew that slashing spend-
ing and raising taxes were less
effective at reducing deficits than
initially thought, and perhaps
counter-productive.
Why? Because as economies
shrink, so do tax revenues, mak-
ing it harder to close budget gaps.
The latest eurozone recession,
which began last year, is forecast
to end in the second half of this
year and was the main focus of
Thursday's summit of European
Union leaders in Brussels.
"We are all fully conscious of
the debate, the mounting frustra-
tions and even despair of people,"
said Herman Van Rompuy, presi-
dent of the European Council,
after the meeting ended.
"We also know there are no
easy answers."


House passes bill to streamline job training


Associated Press


WASHINGTON A di-
vided House on Friday
passed Republican legisla-
tion that would end or con-
solidate dozens of
duplicative job training
programs with the objec-
tive of making it easier for
people to gain the skills
they need in a changing
job market It's a goal Pres-
ident Barack Obama says
he shares while disagree-
ing with the way the GOP
would do it The bill would
also increase employers'
influence in who gets job
training grants.
While there is wide-
spread agreement that
current federal job train-
ing programs are ineffi-


cient and overlapping, De-
mocrats voted overwhelm-
ingly against the bill,
saying they were locked
out of the bill-writing
process and the bill would
eliminate programs tai-
lored to serve veterans,
the disabled, ex-prisoners
and other underserved
populations.
Democrats also said giv-
ing employers more power
over programs came at the
expense of unions, com-
munity colleges and other
stakeholders.
The vote was 215-202,
sending the bill to the Sen-
ate, where the Democratic
majority is likely to take a
different approach to job
training reform.
Obama, in his State of


the Union address last
year, said he wanted to
"cut through the maze of
confusing training pro-
grams" so people have a
direct path to the help they
require. But the White
House said it strongly op-
posed the House bill, say-
ing consolidation could
leave some people without
needed assistance.
"The current system is
inefficient and ineffec-
tive," Education and the
Workforce Committee
chairman John Kline, R-
Minn., said in explaining
the legislation that would
eliminate or consolidate
35 federal programs and
create a Workforce Invest-
ment Fund to act as a
single conduit of support


for employers and job
seekers.
"Onerous rules prevent
workers from accessing
the training they need
when they need it, and tax-
payer dollars are being
spent with little accounta-
bility A bloated bureau-
cracy is standing between
workers and the support
they need," he said.
Republicans noted
while there are 12 million
Americans looking for
work, some 3.6 million job
openings remain unfilled.
Kline also denied the
bill would hurt those most
in need of help, saying it
requires funds be re-
served for veterans, disad-
vantaged youths and other
vulnerable groups.


World BRIEFS

Mourning


Associated Press
A supporter of Hugo
Chavez wears a picture of
the late president, and
his iconic red beret, as a
procession Friday brings
Chavez's body to the
military museum in
Caracas, Venezuela.


Fireworks turn
deadly in Mexico
MEXICO CITY- A truck
loaded with fireworks ex-
ploded during a religious
procession in a rural village
in central Mexico on Friday,
killing at least 11 people
and injuring dozens more,
authorities said.
The blast was set off
when a firework malfunc-
tioned and landed on the
truck, igniting the fireworks
it carried, officials said. Sev-
enty people were burned or
had other injuries, and at
least 45 were taken to hos-
pitals, authorities in the
neighboring states of TIax-
cala and Puebla said.
The victims were march-
ing in an annual procession
for the patron saint of Jesus
Tepactepec, a village of
about 1,000 people, about
70 miles east of Mexico
City.
Puerto Rico
teachers protest
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
Dozens of teachers in
Puerto Rico are protesting
a proposal to cut retirement
benefits and increase em-
ployee contributions to help
save the island's crumbling
public pension system.
The teachers gathered
Friday afternoon in front of
the governor's mansion in
colonial Old San Juan.
Union leader Maria Lara
Fontanez said teachers met
with Gov. Alejandro Garcia
Padilla last week to talk
about their concerns, but
said they did not receive
any guarantee the pension
system wouldn't be
changed.
Economists have said
the teachers' pension plan
is slightly healthier than a
plan that covers other gov-
ernment employees in the
U.S. territory.
The protest comes two
days after a similar protest
by hundreds of police
officers.
Vatican criticizes
anti-pope campaign
VATICAN CITY The
honeymoon that Pope
Francis has enjoyed since
his remarkable election hit a
bump Friday, with the Vati-
can lashing out at what it
called a
defama-
tory and
"anti-
clerical
left-wing" Ar- formerly
media
campaign
question-
ing his Pope
actions Francis
during Ar- formerly
gentina's Cardinal Jorge
murder- Bergoglio.
ous mili-
tary dictatorship.
On Day 2 of the Francis
pontificate, the Vatican de-
nounced news reports in
Argentina and beyond res-
urrecting allegations the for-
mer Jorge Mario Bergoglio
failed to openly confront the
junta responsible for kid-
napping and killing thou-
sands of people in a "dirty
war" to eliminate leftist
opponents.
-From wire reports











SPORTS


* Florida
crushes
LSU to
reach
SEC
semis.
/B2


0 Baseball/B2
0 Basketball/B2
0 Golf/B2
0 Softball/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 NASCAR/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Downing takes St. Pat's lead into weekend


Several golfers close

behind in 3-day event
JUSTIN PLANTE
Correspondent
INVERNESS -There was an air of jest
and light-heartedness surrounding the In-
verness Golf and Country Club on Friday
evening, as the county's best male golfers
were geared up from the first day of the 51st
annual St Patrick's Day Golf Champi-
onship. But of course, what else is to be ex-
pected when St Patty's Day is involved?
Through one round, Mike Downing stood
on top after shooting a 70 through 18 holes,
but he was not too far ahead. Just behind
him was Chris Bernhard with a 71 and
rounding out the top three was Mike Russ,
who shot a 72.
Russ, whose son Jason found himself on


top of the third flight shooting a 74, was rel- ture cool, a fact tournament supervisor Jeff
atively on point with his play Shelton was happy about
"I hit the ball well," he said. "I found a "Oh yeah, the weather's great," he said.
swing that Ihaven'thad in a while, and I had "It was a great day The tournament is going
a pretty good round. well, and we have a
That's really all there few golfers under par
was to it" Ifound a swing It'll be a fun
Behind Downing that I haven't had in a weekend."
and Bernhard in the The tournament
championship flight while. went off wonderfully
was Evan Berlin with from the looks it, Mike
a 74 and Rick Powers Mike Russ Downing pointed out
with a 75. who shot a 72 in the first round of the "This golf course is
The second flight St. Patrick's Day Golf Championship. great," he said. '"Jeff
was won by Mike Russ, Shelton really does a
but only four strokes great job putting these
behind him were Mike Kelly and Nate Con- things together and a great job running it
nor, who tied for a 76 each. And just as com- We've got 140 golfers here, so this is a great
petitive was the first flight, consisting of Curt weekend to just come and play"
Madson (75), Charles Kelly (75) and Lee But Downing's thoughts did not just stay
Schultz (76). on the event He was pretty pleased with
They day was complimented by the how he played.
weather, as the sky was clear and tempera- "I played pretty well," he said. "I made a


lot of putts on the back nine, shot a 32 and
got two birdies and an eagle on the back
nine. I grinded all day, got up and down a
few times. But everything worked out good.
I'm really looking forward to the rest of the
weekend. I'm going to go home, hopefully
get some sleep, wake up and hopefully do it
again."
Rounding out the other flights were Dan
Wilson and Dan Keegan, who tied in the
fourth flight with a 77. Ron Comperchio took
the fifth flight with an 86, while Raymond
Jarzyna and Vinnie George won the sixth
and seventh flights, respectively, both with
an 85.
Eighth flight winner Steven Strong, who
shot a 90 in the afternoon, was in good spir-
its, mainly due to his play
"Conditions were great today," he said.
"I'm really excited for the rest of the
weekend."
The tournament continues this morning
at the Inverness Golf and Country Club.


Stinging loss


Saints come back to

defeat Seven Rivers
JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
HOMOSASSA The St. John
Lutheran Saints scored four runs in the
top of the sixth inning to overcome a 1-0
deficit and defeat the Seven Rivers
Christian baseball team 4-1 Friday night
at Dazzy Vance Field, taking over first
place in the District 2A-3 standings.
"In the sixth inning they got some key
hits, and that was the difference in the
game," Warriors head coach Jim Ervin
said. "It was a very well-played game on
both sides, but you can't take nothing
away from St. John and they beat us."
Seven Rivers' Adam Gage was throw-
ing a no-hitter until St. John Lutheran (7-
9 overall, 3-0 district) batters got hot in
the sixth inning. Saints catcher Josh
Harper ripped a single through the mid-
dle, then Ryan Oltz was hit by a pitch to
put runners on first and second base. An-
thony Di Lavore hit a sharp RBI single
into left field to drive in Harper and tie
the game 1-1. Jordan Salamone the
pitcher followed suit by driving in the
go-ahead run with a single. Alex Ro-
driguez blasted a two-run single past the
Warrior shortstop to give the Saints a
4-1 lead.
Despite the big inning, Gage pitched
with great control and went the distance,
fanning nine batters and walking none.
Seven Rivers (5-1 overall, 2-1 district)
tried to mount a rally and loaded the
bases with two outs in the bottom of the
sixth, but Salamone fanned Jimmy
Worster to retire the side. Salamone


STEPHEN E. LASKO/for the Chronicle
Seven Rivers' Parker Pillsbury cuts it close Friday, diving back safely to first base to
avoid the tag by St. Johns first baseman Anthony Di Lavore on a pickoff attempt. The
Warriors lost the game 4-1.


pitched a complete game, striking out
seven and walking two.
"We'll learn from this game.. .we'll get
better from it," Gage said. "We'll proba-
bly have them twice, including the dis-
trict championship, and that's the game
that matters the most. We just need to
come out hard Monday and look what's
ahead of us."
The Warriors struck first as
catcher John Iwaniec, who was 2 for 4


with two singles and a stolen base,
reached on a Saints fielding error in the
first inning and later advanced to third
on a Cory Weiand sacrifice bunt. Gage
drove in the only run of the game for the
Warriors with an infield single to plate
Iwaniec.
"Adam was for sure throwing heat
today," Iwaniec said. "He was taking


PageB4


Lecanto snaps skid in extra innings


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO Back-to-back
doubles by Lecanto High
School seniors Jacob Tourbin
and Shawn Supinski in the
10th inning stemmed a four-
game losing streak by giving
the Panthers a 2-1 victory Fri-
day over visiting 6A-6 oppo-
nent Central.
Tourbin ripped a ground
ball down the right-field line
with one out and scored mo-
ments later on a long drive to
left-center by Supinski, who
has recently stepped in for in-


jured freshman catcher Alex
Delgado.
The Panthers (4-7 overall,
2-3 in District 6A-6) had lost
four of their previous six
games by one run, with two of
those decided in extra in-
nings. They have split their
season matchups with Cen-
tral (5-6, 3-2), which prevailed
10-9 against the Panthers at
home.
"All I know is I had to do it,"
Supinski said of his game-
winning at-bat. "I was tired of
losing by one run. I had to
step up and do my job and
make sure no more innings


were dragged out. This is
going to help us out big time
and boost morale and every-
thing. It was a big win, but we
have to keep pressing on."
Lecanto head coach Dave
Logue said Supinski is defi-
nitely going to play more.
"He's done a heckuva job
behind the plate since Del-
gado went down," he said.
"He's done everything I've
asked and he came up big
twice tonight at the plate."
Lecanto squandered an op-
portunity to end the game in
the eighth when it failed to
score despite rallying for


three base hits. Panthers jun-
ior Levi O'Steen reached on a
single and advanced to sec-
ond on a base hit to deep left
by Supinski. But the junior
ace pitcher was gunned down
at the plate while trying to
score on a line drive to left
field by sophomore third
baseman Ashton Honeggar.
"Fortunately, we were
lucky enough to pull this one
out," Logue said. "I'm still
upset about some of our exe-
cution, but it makes me feel a
little better to come out on
See Page B4


Citrus


girls ace


Hornets

CARL MCDERMOTT
Correspondent
INVERNESS On a sunny
Friday afternoon, the Weeki
Wachee girls tennis team trav-
eled to Inverness to take on the
Citrus Hurricanes.
The Hornets got stung, as the
Hurricanes came away with a 6-
1 victory to bring their season
record to 9-3. The only setback
for the 'Canes was a forfeit in
the No. 3 singles spot.
Hurricanes coach Scott Wa-
ters, in his second year as ten-
nis coach, is happy with the way
his team has played.
"The team you see in practice
is not what you see on the court.
These girls really come to play,"
he said.
The coaches agreed to play
doubles matches first with pro-
set scoring. The Hurricanes
prevailed in both matches.
Junior Melanie Dodd teamed
with sophomore Paige Jordan
to dominate the No. 1 doubles
match 8-0.
Hornet Kasey Gerry took to
the court for her first match of
the year and teamed with jun-
ior Rachel Mullen in the No. 2
doubles. They won two games,
but still fell to the 'Canes duo of
Juliann Johnson and Leah
Stanley 8-2.
In the No. 1 singles match
Dodd remained undefeated in
her high school career, winning
6-0,6-1.
The No. 2 singles match be-
tween Citrus' Jordan and Weeki
Wachee's Ashley Ziel was
closely contested. Jordan took
the first set 6-1, but had to fight
for a 6-3 second-set victory to
win match.
Johnson, the Hurricanes' No.
4 singles player, won 6-0, 6-2, but
endured many lengthy rallies in
the longest match of the day
Stanley had little trouble in
her No. 5 singles match, a 6-1, 6-
0 triumph.
Elizabeth Awtrey is the only
coach Weeki Wachee has had in
its third year of existence.
"Our record and scores don't
accurately reflect the team's
improvement throughout the
season," coach Awtrey said.
The Citrus girls take to the
court Thursday against Crystal
River at home.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Gators advance


Florida dumps

LSUto open

SEC tourney

Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Erik Murphy scored a
career-high 27 points and
grabbed a career-best 12 re-
bounds to help the 13th-
ranked Florida Gators take
the first step Friday toward
trying to add a Southeast-
ern Conference tourna-
ment title to their regular
season championship by
beating LSU 80-58.
SEC commissioner Mike
Slive presented Florida
coach Billy Donovan with
the regular season trophy
before tipoff. Then the
Gators (25-6) started work-
ing toward their first tour-
nament title since 2007
when they wrapped up a
three-peat. They will play
Alabama in the semifinals
today
Scottie Wilbekin added
16 points, matching his
career-best with four 3-
pointers. Michael Frazier II
had 11 and Patric Young 10
for Florida.
Ninth-seeded LSU (19-
12) tried to keep up with the
rested Gators but looked a
step slow with too many
shots just short a day after
beating Georgia to advance.
Charles Carmouche led
the Tigers with 14 points.

ACC Tournament

No. 9 Miami 69,
Boston College 58
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Shane Larkin scored 20 points
and No. 9 Miami pulled away to
beat Boston College 69-58 in
the quarterfinals of the Atlantic
Coast Conference tournament.
Kenny Kadji added 15 points
and Trey McKinney Jones fin-
ished with 12 for the top-
seeded Hurricanes (25-6).
They withstood a serious


Associated Press
LSU guard Andre Stringer heads to the hoop Friday as Florida guard Mike Rosario de-
fends during the Southeastern Conference tournament in Nashville, Tenn. Florida won
80-58.


scare from eighth-seeded BC
(16-17), letting an early 13-
point lead disappear before
making all the plays down the
stretch to avoid becoming the
ACC's first No. 1 seed to lose
its tournament opener since
1997.
Conference
tournament glance
Atlantic Coast Conference
At Greensboro Coliseum
Greensboro, N.C.
Quarterfinals
Miami 69, Boston College 58
N.C. State 75, Virginia 56
Maryland 83, Duke 74
North Carolina vs. Florida State, late
Atlantic 10 Conference
At The Barclays Center
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Quarterfinals
Saint Louis 72, Charlotte 55
Butler 69, La Salle 58
VCU 82, Saint Joseph's 79
Temple vs. UMass, 9 p.m.
Big East Conference
At Madison Square Garden
New York
Semifinals
Syracuse 58, Georgetown 55, OT
Louisville vs. Notre Dame, late
Big Sky Conference
At Dahlberg Arena
Missoula, Mont.
Semifinals


Weber State 76, North Dakota 74
Montana vs. Northern Colorado, late
Big Ten Conference
At The United Center
Chicago
Quarterfinals
Indiana 80, Illinois 64
Wisconsin 68, Michigan 59
Ohio State 71, Nebraska 50
Michigan State 59, Iowa 56
Big 12 Conference
At The Sprint Center
Kansas City, Mo.
Semifinals
Kansas 88, Iowa State 73
Kansas State vs. Oklahoma State, late
Big West Conference
At The Honda Center
Anaheim, Calif.
Semifinals
Long Beach State vs. UC Irvine, late
Pacific vs. Cal Poly Mid
Conference USA
At BOK Center
Tulsa, Okla.
Semifinals
Southern Mississippi 85, UTEP 67
Memphis 85, Tulsa 74
Mid-American Conference
At Quicken Loans Arena
Cleveland
Semifinals
Akron 62, Kent State 59
Ohio vs. Western Michigan, late
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
At Norfolk Scope
Norfolk,Va.
Semifinals
Morgan State 82, Bethune-Cookman 71
N.C. A&T 78, Delaware State 74


Mountain West Conference
At The Thomas & Mack Center
LasVegas
Semifinals
New Mexico 60, San Diego State 50
UNLV vs. Colorado State, late
Pacific-12 Conference
At MGM Grand Garden Arena
Las Vegas
Semifinals
UCLA 66, Arizona 64
Utah vs. Oregon, late
Southeastern Conference
At Bridgestone Arena
Nashville, Tenn.
Quarterfinals
Florida 80, LSU 58
Alabama 58, Tennessee 48
Vanderbilt 64, Kentucky 48
Mississippi vs. Missouri, late
Southland Conference
At The Leonard E. Merrell Center
Katy, Texas
Semifinals
Stephen F. Austin 68, Southeastern
Louisiana 57
Northwestern State 55, Sam Houston State
52
Southwestern Athletic Conference
At Curtis Culwell Center
Garland, Texas
Semifinals
Prairie View 88, Jackson State 75
Southern U. 72, Alabama A&M 59
Western Athletic Conference
At Orleans Arena
LasVegas
Semifinals
New Mexico State 74, Texas State 65
UTSA vs. Texas-Arlington, late


Vogt homer lifts



Rays to 3-1 win


Sabathia

takes mound

for Yankees

Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE -
Stephen Vogt hit a two-
run home run to right
field in the bottom of the
10th inning to give the
Tampa Bay Rays a 3-1 vic-
tory over the Philadel-
phia Phillies on Friday
Phillies starter John
Lannan allowed two hits
and walked one in five
shutout innings.
Shelley Duncan home-
red in the seventh to tie it,
and Rays teammate Evan
Longoria continued his
strong spring with two
more hits.
Matt Moore pitched
five strong innings for
Tampa Bay, striking out
seven while allowing
three hits and two walks.
Yankees 7,
Marlins 3
TAMPA- New York ace
CC Sabathia made his spring
training debut, allowing two
runs and eight hits over five in-
nings in the Yankees' 7-3 vic-
tory over the Miami Marlins.
The left-hander struck out
two and walked one in his first
game since arthroscopic sur-
gery Oct. 25 to remove a
bone spur from his left elbow.
Derek Jeter played short-
stop flawlessly for the second
time since ankle surgery last
fall.
Francisco Cervelli hit a solo
homer in the second, and
Travis Hafner had a two-run
shot in the third off John
Maine. The Florida starter
gave up three runs and three
hits in three innings.
Red Sox (ss) 3,
Orioles 3, 10 inn.
SARASOTA- Ryan Fla-
herty's two-run home run in
the 10th inning earned the


Baltimore Orioles a 3-3 tie
with a Boston Red Sox split
squad.
The Red Sox scored two
runs in the top of the 10th on
a home run by Juan Carlos
Linares and an RBI single by
Ronald Bermudez.
Clayton Mortensen, vying
for a spot on the Red Sox
staff, allowed two hits in
three innings.
Red Sox (ss) 5,
Twins 0
FORT MYERS Boston
starter Felix Doubront limited
Minnesota to two hits in four
innings and Jarrod Saltala-
macchia hit a two-run homer
in the fourth in the second of
the Red Sox's two split-
squad games, a 5-0 night
victory over the Minnesota
Twins.
Doubront had four strike-
outs and walked one.
Mets 5, Braves 2
KISSIMMEE Lucas
Duda homered and Jeremy
Hefner struck out the last six
batters he faced in a five-
inning stint to help the New
York Mets beat the Atlanta
Braves 5-2.
B.J. Upton had a double
and single in three at-bats for
the Braves, raising his spring
average to .444 (20 for 44).
Braves starter Tim Hudson
gave up five hits and two
runs over six innings.

Other spring
training scores
Detroit 4, Toronto 2
St. Louis 5, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 3, Houston 2
Chicago White Sox 15,
Chicago Cubs 3
San Francisco 5, Texas 2
San Diego (ss) 8, L.A.
Dodgers (ss) 7
Milwaukee 4, Cleveland 3
Kansas City (ss) 7, San
Diego (ss) 5
Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 5
Arizona 2, Oakland 2, tie


Scott in the mix


Associated Press

PALM HARBOR -
Adam Scott had a break-
through with his short game
this winter, and it's so good
now he hardly even has to
use it
Scott had a putt for birdie
on 16 holes in a second
round that was without a
bogey and without much
stress. He wound up with a
5-under 66 that left him one
shot behind 31-year-old
rookie Shawn Stefani.
Stefani had to scramble
more than he would have
preferred, though he con-
verted all the putts he felt
he was supposed to make in
his round of 70.
Temperatures finally
began to warm, and without
much wind throughout the
day, the tournament was
wide open going into the
weekend. Stefani was at 7-
under 135, one shot ahead
of Scott and past champion
KJ. Choi, who had a 67.
Twenty players were
within five shots of the lead
at the halfway point, a
group that included every-
one from Sergio Garcia and
Matt Kuchar, to 19-year-old
Jordan Spieth and Erik
Compton, the two-time


heart transplant recipient
whose 65 was the low round
of the day
Scott was right in the
middle of it all, which is
where he wants to be.
The Australian hasn't
shown too many scars from
making bogeys on the last
four holes to lose the British
Open last summer He fin-
ished the year by winning
the Australian Masters,
though it was a month later
when he was working on his
game at home on the Gold
Coast that he experienced a
significant turnaround with
his short game.
"Just had a really nice
feeling going that day, what-
ever it was, and I managed
to get through the whole
shag bag of balls hitting
every chip the same," he
said. "Everything was very
controlled and consistent...
I've felt my confidence grow
on the course with the
pitching and chipping."
Even though the tourna-
ment is at the halfway point,
Stefani's confidence is
growing. He finally made
his first bogey of the tourna-
ment on the seventh hole,
and then rebounded with a
5-iron to 10 feet for birdie
on the par-3 eighth.


Associated Press
Shawn Stefani blasts out of a sand trap Friday on the
seventh hole at the Tampa Bay Championship golf
tournament in Palm Harbor. Stefani leads after 36 holes.


"Today was a little bit
more of a struggle," Stefani
said. "Didn't really drive it
super great Didn't hit some
of the best iron shots. But I
scrambled well and I putted
really great When you putt
good, that usually keeps
rounds going, and that's
pretty much what hap-
pened today"
Tampa Bay
Championship
Friday, Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club,
Copperhead Course, Palm Harbor, Fla.
Purse: $5.5 million
Yardage: 7,340, Par: 71
Second Round (partial list):
Shawn Stefani 65-70 -135 -7
Adam Scott 70-66-136 -6
K.J. Choi 69-67- 136 -6
Harris English 68-69 -137 -5
Brian Harman 67-70-137 -5
Jason Dufner 71-66 -137 -5
Peter Tomasulo 69-68 -137 -5
Tag Ridings 68-70 -138 -4
Sergio Garcia 71-67 -138 -4
George Coetzee 71 -68 -139 -3
Ben Kohles 72-67-139 -3
Greg Chalmers 71-68 -139 -3
Marc Leishman 70-70-140 -2
Justin Leonard 71-69-140 -2
Scott Brown 70-70 -140 -2
Matt Kuchar 72-68-140 -2
Jerry Kelly 70-70-140 -2
James Driscoll 74-66 -140 -2
Jordan Spieth 72-68-140 -2
ErikCompton 75-65- 140 -2
Brian Davis 71-69 -140 -2
CameronTringale 71-70 -141 -1
Jimmy Walker 73-68-141 -1
Geoff Ogilvy 69-72-141 -1
Sean O'Hair 73-68 -141 -1
Justin Hicks 70-71 -141 -1
Charley Hoffman 71-70 -141 -1
Ryan Palmer 71-70 -141 -1
Jim Furyk 72-69-141 -1
Bryce Molder 72-69-141 -1
Boo Weekley 72-70 -142 E
Roberto Castro 69-73 -142 E
Scott Langley 72-70 -142 E
Stuart Appleby 74-68 -142 E
Jason Day 70-72 -142 E
Tim Herron 71-71 -142 E
Pat Perez 71-71 -142 E
Kevin Streelman 73-69 -142 E
Troy Kelly 72-70 -142 E
Martin Flores 73-69 -142 E
Vijay Singh 69-73-142 E
Luke Donald 70-72-142 E
Webb Simpson 73-69 -142 E
Nick Watney 70-72 -142 E
Chris Stroud 75-67-142 E
Dicky Pride 69-73 -142 E
Billy Horschel 70-73-143 +1
Lucas Glover 69-74- 143 +1
Trevor Immelman 70-73-143 +1
Aaron Baddeley 72-71 -143 +1
Robert Garrigus 72-71 -143 +1
Sang-Moon Bae 73-70- 143 +1
Troy Matteson 71-72 -143 +1
Colt Knost 71-72 -143 +1
Charlie Wi 71-72- 143 +1
Brendan Steele 68-75 143 +1
Stephen Ames 72-71 -143 +1
Angel Cabrera 74-69- 143 +1
Brian Stuard 75-68-143 +1
JoshTeater 74-69-143 +1
Robert Streb 73-70- 143 +1


B2 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Special to the Chronicle
The top senior basketball players from Citrus and Hernando counties came together Thursday in Lecanto for the first-ever all-star games between the border rivals. Citrus County
came out on top in the girls contest 87-38 and Hernando claimed the boys game 110-82.



Border rivals split all-star hoop games

Hernando boys claim 110-82 victory over Fast start leads Citrus County squad

Citrus County despite 36from Makros past Hernando in girls' contest 87-38


SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent

LECANTO The first boys Hoops Link
All-Star Game provided Citrus and Her-
nando County seniors one more opportu-
nity to put on a show. They followed
through with an entertaining exhibition
that led by Lecanto guard Mikey Makros'
eight 3-pointers and game-high 36 points -
produced 192 points between the two
squads in 40 minutes of regulation.
But despite Makros' outburst, Hernando
boasted a double-digit advantage for most
of the game in winning the State Farm-
sponsored event, 110-82, in the Panthers'
gym on
Thursday
"We just It was a lot
wanted it was a lot
kids to seniors compete
come out
and have a
good time
and that's Lecanto boys bas
what hap- Citrus County head
opened "
Lecanto boys head coach Frank Vilardi
said. "You've got to tip your hat to Her-
nando. They've got a good group of seniors
and they really moved it around well and
made a lot of shots. It was a lot of fun hav-
ing the seniors compete one last time."
Vilardi helped initiate and organize the
event and served as Citrus County head
coach, with Citrus High School head coach
Tom Densmore as an assistant
Hernando grabbed a 6-3 edge on a 3 by
Nature Coast guard Victor Davila (19
points, eight boards) two minutes into the
game and never relinquished the lead.
Hernando High School guard Giovanni
Perez (10 rebounds) paced his squad with
28 points and fellow Leopard guard Jeffrey
Velasquez added 20 points. Nature Coast
forward Wyatt Hessler chipped in 16 points
for the Hernando group, while Sharks for-
ward Yamil Marrero had game-highs of 12
boards and four steals.
Hurricanes forward Abe Juste scored 15


e


sk
co


points and grabbed nine boards for the Cit-
rus team and Panthers center Geoffrey
Ruiz also had nine rebounds to go along
with his 11 points.
Hernando extended its lead in the first
half in spite of missing 17 more field goals
than Citrus during the span. Makros (six re-
bounds) narrowed the margin back to three
points with four consecutive 3-pointers
during a 1:25 stretch near the end of the
opening half.
The Panther senior launched two of
those 3's a couple steps in front of the half-
court line and another against double-
coverage in the right comer near the base-
line. A minute later, he added his seventh 3
of the half
after
brushing
of fun having the off a de-
one last time. fender
with a
pump
Frank Vilardi fake.
ketball head coach, who served as W e
oach for Thursday's all-star game. only had a
couple
practices, but I guess I'm still hot from the
Weeki Wachee game," Makros jokingly said
in reference to his record-breaking dozen
3-pointers against the Hornets in late Jan-
uary "It was definitely a good experience
to play with everyone again. Hernando was
a really good team."
In its waning minutes, the game turned
into a display of alley-oop attempts and
fierce shot-blocks, with Central center Troy
Stewart punctuating the night on a dunk
with 25 seconds remaining.
Central guard Joey Stokes connected on
eight 3-pointers in 10 attempts in the
3-point contest to prevail in the halftime
event.
"We've got a lot of talent in Hernando
County so it was fun to put these kids to-
gether after they've battled one another for
years," said Central head boys basketball
coach Matt Zandecki, who was helming the
Hernando team Thursday "It was a good
time and a lot of fun to coach."


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

LECANTO "It's
bittersweet."
That was Liz Lynch's
reaction to her final high
school basketball game.
Still, that final game may
be worth remembering,
particularly if you were
on the Citrus all-star
team.
In the first-ever Citrus-
Hernando Girls All-Star
Game at Lecanto High
School on Thursday and
sponsored by the Citrus
County State Farm Agen-
cies, the Citrus stars
dominated their Her-
nando counterparts,
jumping in front 21-2 in
the first six minutes.
That led to a 53-19 half-
time advantage and
ended in an 87-38 Citrus
County victory.
Lynch, the smallest
player on the floor at 5-
foot-2 but the most pro-
ductive, afterward
searched for ways to deal
with her mixed feelings.
One thing can't be ar-
gued: She ended her
prep career with a per-
formance anything but
mixed.
It seemed evident her
Citrus County all-star
teammates had similar
approaches on how to
play, which was a prob-
lem for the overmatched
Hernando side.
The local team's
coaches Brian Lattin,
coach at Citrus High
School, with the assis-


I was
really excited
to play with
these
girls.

Liz Lynch
Citrus High School
basketball senior.

tance of Crystal River
coach Jason Rodgers -
had no well-devised plan
on how to approach the
game.
"We'll see how it goes,"
Lattin said. "This is defi-
nitely for fun. How's this:
We'll make adjustments
as necessary as we go
along."
Adjustments weren't
necessary This team of
stars was operating on
high octane, much to the
detriment of their Her-
nando opponents.
Three Citrus County
players reached double
digits in scoring by
halftime. Lynch led the
way with 14 first-half
points, with Citrus High
School teammate Lind-
say Connors adding 11
and Tanika Jackson of
Dunnellon 10.
Defense was the differ-
ence. The Citrus stars
played the same intense
style they had been
taught hard-nosed de-
fense causes turnovers
leading to offensive
opportunities.


The local senior stand-
outs forced 15 turnovers
in the first 10 minutes of
the game and 26 in the
first half. If there was a
problem, it was finding a
way to calm their inten-
sity in the second half of
a "friendly" game.
Lynch finished with a
team-high 19 points,
with Jackson next at 18
and Connors with 14.
Marissa Dubois, also
from Citrus, netted 11
and Seven Rivers Christ-
ian's Andrea Zachar had
10, followed by Crystal
River's Lamechia Rich-
burgh with seven,
Lecanto's Megan
Straight with five and
Citrus' Megan Rogstad
with three.
Top scoring honors in
the game went to
Brooksville Central's
Rhy Venturella, who fin-
ished with a well-earned
20 points. Alyssa Lam-
berson netted 10.
For the Citrus stars, it
was a good way to end
their prep careers.
"I liked it. You don't
have to be serious, just
go out and play," Lynch
said. "And it's cool being
the first to (play in the
all-star game). I was re-
ally excited to play with
these girls. It definitely
would have been awe-
some (to play with them
during the season)."
Added Connors: "I re-
ally liked playing with
the other girls. It's some-
thing we talked about on
the bench."


Seven-run inning

STEVE MCGUNNIGLE negative situations. All sea-
Correspondent son long she's really
stepped up and done a
INVERNESS In a bat- great job for us," Citrus
tle of Lady Hurricanes, the head coach Larry Bishop
Citrus High School girls said.
softball team were a Cate- Abramowich credited
gory 5 storm in a key seven- her team.
run fifth inning, on its way "I felt pretty comfortable,
to a 10-0 mercy-rule victory knowing we're playing good
aver visiting Lake Weir on and scoring runs," she said.
Friday night at Vicki Over- "Our defense played good
man Field. and tight tonight We really
Citrus hurler Kelly played hard as a team and
Abramowich went the dis- we're getting better"
stance for the shortened six- Citrus (10-3) clung to a 2-0
inning win, shutting out the lead through four innings,
purple-and-gold Lady before the decisive fifth
Canes while giving up four frame.
hits and five walks. The host Lady 'Canes bat-
Abramowich registered ted through the order in the
one of her three strikeouts fifth. Emily Ferriera drew a
on the night in a key early one-out walk, then three
moment, fanning Aura Lake Weir errors snow-
Blackburn with the bases balled, leading to seven
loaded and two out in the Citrus runs.
first inning. She also went 1 Jordan Josey's grounder
for 2 at the plate with two back to the mound was
RBIs. thrown away by Lake Weir
"She's really responded (4-11) starting pitcher Irene
well when things have hap- Medina. An infield single
opened and she's been put in off the bat of Amy


guides Citrus softball past Lake Weir


Abramowich loaded the
bases. April Desomma's
slow groundball up the
third base line was fielded
and thrown home, but not in
time, scoring Ferriera to
make it 3-0.
Citrus shortstop Erica
Corlew followed with the
big blow of the night, lining
a three-run single to left
that was kicked around in
the outfield and it was sud-
denly 6-0. Aaron McIntyre's
hot shot back to the pitcher
was thrown away, plating
two more runs, and Kelly
Abramowich got in on the
fun with an RBI line-drive
single to centerfield for a
9-0 lead.
Bishop was pleased with
his lineup's ability to make
the most of its
opportunities.
"Tonight they found the
gaps in the outfield several
times, and when they (Lake
Weir) did make mistakes we
were able to take advantage
of it," Bishop said. "We were
pleased with our aggressive


approach at the plate,
definitely"
After Ferriera doubled in
the sixth, Amy Abram-
owich (3 for 4, RBI, run)
laced a single to left, scoring
Ferriera to end the game.
Citrus' pair of early runs
came on a Kelly Abram-
owich sacrifice bunt in the


first inning to bring home
McIntyre and Ferriera
scored from third on one of
five wild pitches from Med-
ina. Just three of Citrus' 10
runs were earned.
Bishop lauded the play of
middle infielders Corlew
and Ferriera, as well as
rightfielder Rachel Martin,


who threw out two batters
at first base.
Desomma went 2 for 2
with an RBI and a run, Fbr-
riera went 1 for 1 with two
walks and three runs scored
for Citrus, who head into a
vital week of three district
games, by hosting Spring-
stead at 6 p.m. Monday


Dragons Inuade Old Homosassa!
4th Annual Dragon Boat Festival -

cRS Y Saturday, March 16
--......-... DRAGONBOAT RACES


LIVE MUSICe
VENDORSHero'sTribute 8:15AM
FOOD FUN First Race 9AM
FACEPAINT music into the night
KAYAK & PONTOON Fourth Annual Challenge to
RENTALS "Take Home The Jug"


http://meetup.com/Nature-Coast-Dragon-Boat-Canoe-and-Kayak


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 B3






B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013



Lollypop Tournament
March 12-13 in Crystal River
At Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club
Championship Flight
Low Gross Barbara Breesman 159
Low Net First Sonja Dixon 148
Low Net Second Norah Hastings 148
Low Net Third Karen Wood 151
Low Net Fourth BJ McKee 153
Flight 1
Low Gross Linda Travis 168
Low Net First Karen Stacy 136
Low Net Second Jorie Bertine 149
Low Net Third Terri Baun 151
Low Net Fourth Kathy Butler 156
Flight 2
Low Gross Pat Whipple 192
Low Net First Marion Kinder 152
Low Net Second Carol Biedscheid 152
Low Net Third Karen Demicoli 157
Low Net Fourth Phylis Pike 158
Flight 3
Low Gross Shirley Young 205
Low Net First Judy Mcmechan 155
Low Net Second Karen Kozlowsky 157
Low Net Third Lois Bump 159
Low Net Fourth Barb Hart 160
Flight 4
Low Gross Beverly Strong 208
Low Net First Kay Beaufait 153
Low Net Second Mimma Allen 154
Low Net Third Judy Sospenzi 155
Low Net Fourth Nancy Vallimont 158
Flight 5
Low Gross Lorainne Adams 206
Low Net First Shelia Mclaughlin 150
Low Net Second Terri Wood 158
Low Net Third Pepita Park 158
Low Net Fourth Lee Simon 160



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 38 25 .603 -
Brooklyn 38 27 .585 1
Boston 35 29 .547 312
Toronto 26 40 .394 13Y2
Philadelphia 24 40 .375 14Y2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 50 14 .781 -
Atlanta 36 29 .554 141/2
Washington 22 42 .344 28
Orlando 18 48 .273 33
Charlotte 14 51 .215 36Y2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 40 25 .615 -
Chicago 35 29 .547 412
Milwaukee 32 32 .500 712
Detroit 23 44 .343 18
Cleveland 22 43 .338 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Antonio 50 16 .758 -
Memphis 44 19 .698 412
Houston 36 30 .545 14
Dallas 31 34 .477 1812
New Orleans 22 44 .333 28
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 49 17 .742 -
Denver 44 22 .667 5
Utah 33 32 .508 15/2
Portland 30 34 .469 18
Minnesota 22 41 .349 2512
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 45 21 .682 -
Golden State 37 29 .561 8
L.A. Lakers 35 32 .522 1012
Sacramento 23 43 .348 22
Phoenix 22 44 .333 23
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Toronto 92, Charlotte 78
L.A. Lakers 99, Indiana 93
Washington 96, New Orleans 87
Atlanta 107, Phoenix 94
Houston 108, Minnesota 100
Oklahoma City 117, Orlando 104
Dallas 96, Cleveland 86
Miami 107, Milwaukee 94
Memphis at Denver, late
Chicago at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Phoenix at Washington, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Portland, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Utah, 10 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 28 20 8 0 40103 79
New Jersey 28 13 9 6 32 71 79
N.Y Rangers 26 1311 2 28 65 64
N.Y Islanders 27 1212 3 27 79 88
Philadelphia 29 1315 1 27 79 88
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 27 18 5 4 40 88 69
Boston 25 18 4 3 39 76 54
Ottawa 27 13 8 6 32 64 58
Toronto 28 1512 1 31 82 78
Buffalo 27 1014 3 23 70 84
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 26 1510 1 31 81 72
Winnipeg 27 1411 2 30 71 77
Tampa Bay 27 1115 1 23 88 83
Washington 26 1114 1 23 72 78
Florida 28 715 6 20 67 105
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Chicago 27 22 2 3 47 87 59
St. Louis 27 1510 2 32 83 79
Detroit 27 1210 5 29 70 71
Nashville 27 1110 6 28 62 68
Columbus 28 1012 6 26 63 76
Northwest Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Vancouver 26 13 7 6 32 75 72
Minnesota 26 1410 2 30 64 64
Edmonton 26 1011 5 25 64 76
Calgary 25 1011 4 24 69 84
Colorado 26 1012 4 24 65 78
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 26 20 3 3 43 89 64
Los Angeles 26 1410 2 30 76 69
San Jose 26 12 8 6 30 62 64
Phoenix 27 1311 3 29 77 77
Dallas 26 1211 3 27 68 73


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 2, New Jersey 1, SO
Nashville at Calgary, late
Detroit at Edmonton, late
Today's Games
Washington at Boston, 1 p.m.
N.Y Rangers at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 3 p.m.
Winnipeg at Toronto, 7p.m.
Montreal at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Columbus, 7p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Pittsburgh, 12:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Buffalo at Washington, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton, 8 p.m.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr KULthei record[


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
-- CASH 3 (early)
: .. 66-5-7
CASH 3 (late)

PLAY 4 (early)
S 5 5-9-6-1
PLAY 4 (late)
8-2-4-7
FANTASY 5
17 18 27 29 30
MEGA MONEY
1-3-5-26
da Lottery MEGA BALL
15



On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2 p.m. (ESPN2) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Jeff Fox-
worthy's Grit Chips 300
1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Drag Radng Gatornationals, Qualify-
ing (same-day tape)
2 a.m. (NBCSPT) Formula One Racing Australian Grand Prix
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) Kentucky at Florida
MLB BASEBALL
4 p.m. (WGN-A) Kansas City Royals at Chicago Cubs
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11:30 a.m. (CBS) Conference USAToumament, Final:
Southern Mississippi vs. Memphis
11:30 a.m. (ESPN2) America East Tournament, Final:Albany
(N.Y.) at Vermont
1 p.m. (ABC) SEC Tournament, First Semifinal: Florida vs.
Alabama
1 p.m. (CW, ESPN) ACC Tournament, First Semifinal: Miami vs.
North Carolina State
1:40 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament, First Semifinal: Indiana vs.
Wisconsin
3 p.m. (ABC) SEC Tournament, Second Semifinal: Vanderbilt vs.
TBA
3 p.m. (CW, ESPN) ACC Tournament, Second Semifinal: Mary-
land vs. TBA
4 p.m. (CBS) Big Ten Tournament, Second Semifinal: Ohio State
vs. Michigan State
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) SWAC Tournament, Final: Prairie View vs.
TBA
6 p.m. (CBS) Mountain West Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (ESPN) Big 12 Tournament, Final: Kansas vs. TBA
6:30 p.m. (ESPN2) MAC Tournament, Final: Akron vs. TBA
8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Big East Tournament, Final: Syracuse vs. TBA
8:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Southland Tournament, Final: Stephen F.
Austin vs. TBA
10:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Big West Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
11 p.m. (ESPN) Pac-12 Tournament, Final: Teams TBA
BOXING
10:15 p.m. (HBO) Timothy Bradley, Jr. vs. Ruslan
Provodnikov
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGATourAvantha Masters, Third
Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour Tampa Bay Championship, Third
Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour Tampa Bay Championship, Third Round
4 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour RR Donnelley Founders Cup, Third
Round
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGATour Champions: Toshiba Classic, Sec-
ond Round (same-day tape)
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) Carolina Hurricanes at Tampa Bay Lightning
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) New York Islanders at Florida Panthers
SOCCER
8:30 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League Everton FC vs.
Manchester City FC
12:30 p.m. (NBC) MLS D.C. United at New York Red Bulls
3 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS Chicago Fire at Sporting Kansas City
7 p.m. (UNI) Mexicano Primera Division Club America vs. San
Luis FC
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS Portland Timbers at Seattle Sounders FC

RADIO
1 p.m. (WYKE 104.3 FM) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on
the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
1 p.m. Fort White at Crystal River


Spring training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Kansas City 16 2 .889
Baltimore 11 5 .688
Seattle 13 7 .650
Tampa Bay 13 7 .650
Cleveland 12 8 .600
Detroit 12 8 .600
Chicago 9 7 .563
Boston 11 9 .550
Minnesota 10 10 .500
Texas 9 9 .500
Oakland 8 9 .471
Toronto 8 11 .421
New York 8 12 .400
Houston 7 11 .389
Los Angeles 4 12 .250
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Colorado 9 7 .563
St. Louis 10 8 .556
San Diego 11 10 .524
Atlanta 11 11 .500
San Francisco 8 8 .500
Washington 9 9 .500
New York 7 8 .467
Pittsburgh 9 11 .450
Arizona 8 10 .444
Milwaukee 8 10 .444
Philadelphia 8 11 .421
Miami 7 10 .412
Chicago 8 12 .400
Los Angeles 6 10 .375
Cincinnati 5 13 .278
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 7, Miami 3
Tampa Bay 3, Philadelphia 1, 10 innings
Baltimore 3, Boston (ss) 3, tie, 10 innings
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 2


Detroit 4, Toronto 2
St. Louis 5, Washington 1
Pittsburgh 3, Houston 2
Chicago White Sox 15, Chicago Cubs 3
San Francisco 5, Texas 2
San Diego (ss) 8, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 7
Milwaukee 4, Cleveland 3
Kansas City (ss) 7, San Diego (ss) 5
Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 5
Arizona 2, Oakland 2, tie
Boston (ss) 5, Minnesota 0
Colorado vs. Cincinnati, late
Kansas City (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss), late
Today's Games
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. N.Y. Yankees (ss) at Tampa,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs.Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Toronto at Dunedin, 1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs. San Francisco (ss) at
Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Chicago Cubs at Las Vegas, Nev.,
4:05 p.m.
Oakland (ss) vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
Arizona vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
Seattle vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 4:10
p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (ss) vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee,
Fla., 5:05 p.m.
Houston vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 6:05
p.m.
San Francisco (ss) vs. Cleveland at
Goodyear, Ariz., 10:05 p.m.


Crystal River rally



stuns Nature Coast


C.J. RISAK
Correspondent

CRYSTAL RIVER "We just like to
be dramatic."
A summary, and in this instance a
happy one, provided by Crystal River
softball coach Lanna Wentworth after
her team waited until the bottom of
the seventh inning before mounting a
game-winning rally
Trailing 2-0 in a District 5A-7 battle
against Brooksville Nature Coast, the
Pirates put their first three runners
aboard in the seventh before getting
one run on a bases-loaded walk and
two more on a dropped fly ball to edge
the Sharks 3-2.
The win boosted Crystal River's
record to 9-8 overall, 2-5 in 5A-7 play
Nature Coast fell to 8-7 overall, 3-5 in
the district.
"We go to the end of the game, no
matter what," said Rachel Roe, the Pi-
rates' winning pitcher. "We always
feel we can win, no matter what the
score is. We could be behind by one
run or 10 runs or 20 runs, it doesn't
matter."
Roe's happiness was due to the vic-
tory, but it was anchored by her team's
overall performance in the field and
her own play on the mound. The win
comes two nights after a horrible out-
ing against Brooksville Hernando, an-
other 5A-7 opponent, which clobbered
Crystal River and Roe in a five-inning
mercy-rule game, 11-0.
The Pirates' defense was better Fri-
day -not perfect, but improved. They
still had three errors, which doesn't
include a mental mistake that led to


the Sharks' second run. But Roe
fought through it, allowing two runs
(one earned) on four hits, with five
strikeouts and no walks.
That final statistic no walks de-
fines the difference in this game. Roe
adjusted to the way the game was
being called; her pitching opponent,
Nature Coast's Kathryn Gonzalez, did
not. Although Gonzalez kept the Pi-
rates scoreless through six innings,
she ended up walking six in the game.
"We still made some mistakes," said
Wentworth. "But they didn't want to
lose. And Rachel did her job tonight,
she was much better"
The Pirates had one hit in the game
going into the bottom of the seventh,
but Samantha Jenkins started it off
with a single to right. Daniel Gomez
followed with a walk and Chloe Lane
got on with a bunt single to load the
bases. That's when Meagan McMichen
worked Gonzalez for a walk to force in
a run, narrowing the gap to 2-1.
Emily Laga stepped to the plate
with the bases still full and no one out,
and lifted a fly ball to right field that
went off the glove of the outfielder, al-
lowing the tying and game-winning
runs to score.
Nature Coast broke a scoreless tie
in the fourth on a base hit, an error
and a run-scoring ground out by Chy-
loe Gonzalez. The Sharks made it 2-0
in the top of the seventh on a single by
Chyloe Gonzalez and a sacrifice bunt
by Britney Rodriguez, with Gonzalez
racing to third when no one covered
the bag. A bunt single by Brooke Ma-
jors delivered Nature Coast's second
run.


Lecanto girls fall 8-7
at South Lake
The Lecanto High School softball team
dropped an 8-7 back-and-forth affair
against South Lake on Friday night.
The Panthers led 5-1 at one point, but
South Lake rallied to knot the score 5-5
and eventually took an 8-5 lead. Lecanto
pulled to within a run in the top of the
seventh, but left the tying run stranded at
second base.
Breanna Martin had a hit, two runs,
two walks and four stolen bases for
Lecanto and pitched 3 1/3 innings in re-
lief of starter Amanda Myers. Lily Parrish,
Amber Russo and Jordan Martin each
had a hit, run and RBI. Amber Atkins
smacked a pair of hits, scored once and
drove in a run.
The Panthers are back in action Tues-
day at home against district rival Central.
Trinity Catholic edges
Citrus baseball
The Citrus High School baseball team
dropped a tough 4-3 decision Thursday
to Trinity Catholic in Ocala.
Ben Wright allowed three earned runs
on five hits and struck out five in six in-
nings of work for the 'Canes.
Kyle Tobin went 1 for 3 with an RBI
and run scored and Cody Bogart also
had a hit.
Citrus (6-5) is back in action at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday at home against Lecanto.
Kyle Busch sets track
record at Bristol
BRISTOL, Tenn. Kyle Busch won
his first career pole at Bristol Motor
Speedway with a track record qualifying
lap.
Busch turned a lap at 129.535 mph in
his Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota to take the
top starting spot for Sunday's race. It
beat the record of 128.709 set by Ryan
Newman in 2003, which had been the



STINGING
Continued from Page B1

them out left and right. In that one
inning, they hit the ball where we
weren't and there was nothing you
could do about it."
The Saints had a chance to score
in the top of the fourth on two
straight Warriors errors to put Oltz
and Di Lavore on first and second,
but Warriors shortstop Garrett
Griggs who made the previous



SKID
Continued from Page B1

the winning end. We battled good and
I'm proud of the guys. The pitching
and defense were good tonight.
"It's something I'm getting used to,
but I don't like it," Logue added of his
team's habit for close games. "I don't
have gray hair yet, but it's getting
close."
O'Steen fanned four and allowed
eight hits and two walks in eight in-
nings. Senior Joey Spell earned the
win in two innings of relief, striking
out one and yielding two hits and two
walks (one intentional). With the help
of a defense that committed one error
on the night, the pair escaped multi-
ple jams on the mound as the Bear
base runners reached third base in
five different innings.


first sub-15 second lap at Bristol.
Busch's lap was 14.813 seconds,
besting Newman's lap of 14.908.
Kasey Kahne qualified second in a
Chevrolet for Hendrick Motorsports with
a lap at 128.995, and Busch's teammate
Denny Hamlin was third at 128.960.
Pedregon takes Funny Car
qualifying lead
GAINESVILLE Cruz Pedregon
raced to the qualifying lead in Funny Car
at the Amalie Oil NHRA Gatornationals
on Friday.
Pedregon powered his Toyota Camry
to the provisional No. 1 position with a
performance of 4.047 seconds at 296.05
mph. If the effort holds through Satur-
day's final two qualifying sessions, it will
be his fourth No. 1 at this event and the
51st of his career.
Doug Kalitta (Top Fuel), Mike Edwards
(Pro Stock) and Matt Smith (Pro Stock
Motorcycle) also were qualifying leaders
in their categories at the NHRA Mello
Yello Drag Racing Series at Auto-Plus
Raceway at Gainesville.
Kalitta led Top Fuel qualifying with a
3.801 at 325.85 in his dragster, holding
off Shawn Langdon and defending world
champion Antron Brown for the top spot.
Edwards moved to the top of the Pro
Stock order with a national record per-
formance of 6.473 at 214.31 in his Chevy
Camaro.
Smith was quickest in Pro Stock Mo-
torcycle with a 6.804 at 197.28 on a
Buell.

Frost leads Toshiba
Classic after firing 63
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. David
Frost shot an 8-under 63 on Friday to
take a one-stroke lead over Fred Cou-
ples after the first round of the Champi-
ons Tour's Toshiba Classic.

-From staff and wire reports


error at short atoned for his mis-
take by turning a textbook double
play to end the Saints' threat.
The Saints had four hits in the
contest and Seven Rivers had six.
"Seven Rivers played a great
game, and what we had to do is
keep battling back," St. John
Lutheran head coach Russ Harper
said. "We stayed focus and hit the
ball in that sixth inning and I'm
proud of our guys for staying
focused."
Seven Rivers travels to Wildwood
on Monday in a non-district game.


Central loaded the bases with two
in the top of the ninth before ground-
ing out to O'Steen at third base.
Sophomore right fielder Caleb
Southey scored for the Panthers in the
fifth on a wild pitch after boarding on
a walk. Central answered in the sixth
when sophomore right fielder Matt
Clark drove in sophomore first base-
man Thomas Sorrentino on a single to
left.
Bears junior starting pitcher Trevor
McKenna surrendered three hits and
four walks while striking out five in
4.2 innings. Sophomore C.J. Martinez
(three strikeouts, six hits allowed)
kept the Panthers off balance with his
curveball in 4.2 innings of relief.
Lecanto travels to Citrus (3-1 in 6A-
6) for a 6:30 p.m. Tuesday district con-
test.
"I told our guys we've got to win the
rest of our (three) district games,"
Logue said. "That's our goal."


I S O R T B I E F -


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE
Compelling questions...
and maybe a few actual answers


- V U U


I~ULSr WtL5L~


SPEED FREAKS
A couple of questions we
just had to ask ourselves


Io] ** Iiti :j ,H1:OIC:.NEAINGA UZZ


Sorry, don't have your 6


Unfortunately for Danica,
these were the only people she
passed in Vegas.
Who DIDN'T lap Danica
in Las Vegas?
GODSPEAK: Brett Bodine, who
was behind the wheel of the
pace car.

KEN'S CALL: Best I can tell,
Joe Nemechek and a guy
named Ed who was driving the
debris truck. There'll be days
like this.

What do you look for
from the Gen-6 cars
at Bristol?
GODSPEAK: I see parts and
pieces being crushed or just
falling off. You need a Gen-6
tank to win Bristol.

KEN'S CALL: An early issue
involves race-day "rebuilds"
and subsequent returns to
the track. Call it a hunch, but
Bristol might test that issue.


ONLINE EXTRAS
t news-journalonline.
com/nascar

I facebook.com/
nascardaytona

@nascardaytona

Do you have questions or com-
ments about NASCAR This Week?
Contact Godwin Kelly at godwin.
kelly@news-jrnl.com or Ken Willis
at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com

WHAT'S ON TAP?
SPRINT CUP: Food City 500
SITE: Bristol, Tenn.
SCHEDULE: Friday, practice
(Speed, noon), qualifying
(Speed, 3:40 p.m.). Saturday,
practices (Speed, 9 a.m. and
noon). Sunday, race (Fox,
coverage begins at 12:30 p.m.,
green flag at 1 p.m.)
TRACK: Bristol Motor
Speedway (.533-mile oval)
RACE DISTANCE: 500 laps,
266.5 miles


If Denny Hamlin was looking for support in the Las
Vegas garage after being fined $25,000 for criticizing the
Gen-6 cars, he left mighty disappointed. In the military,
when you hear "I have your six," it means "I have your
back." Hamlin's "six" is exposed.
Here is a sampling of comments from drivers who were
asked about Hamlin's fine and his initial refusal to pay:
Dale Earnhardt Jr.: "I think we
were told a couple years ago
to just sort of watch all the
negative comments and
tones... I thought it
was clear to all of us
to be careful how we
said what was on our
mind."
Jeff Gordon: "I
think it's been an
interesting story
for somebody
to challenge that
authority. That is
fine, but at the end of
the day I know whose
sandbox I'm
playing in. I like
the sandbox."


Clint Bowyer: "At the end of the day, we're all in this
together. You guys included. This is an important time for
us. We've got a great thing going with this Gen-6 car."
Hamlin has elected to protest the penalty. The penalty
will likely be upheld in NASCAR's judicial system. Insiders
think the $25K will be quietly deducted from Hamlin's
winnings after a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race in the
coming weeks.

AJ gets 'Smoke's' ride
Roger Penske offered Tony Stewart a ride for this
year's Indianapolis 500 back in December. Stewart
I6 politely declined. Last week, AJ Allmendinger, who
drove Penske's No. 22 Cup Series Dodge in the
first half of the 2012 season, was given that
plum driving assignment.
Allmendinger was suspended by NASCAR
in 2012 for failing a drug test, which forced
Penske to fire the driver. Allmendinger successfully
completed NASCAR's Road To Recovery program, was
reinstated and got a few Cup Series starts at season's
end with another team.
"For me it's amazing to go through the last year
of what happened, to get back to this point," said
Allmendinger, who started the 2012 racing season with a
Rolex 24 victory at Daytona. "For me to be able to run Indy
is amazing. Roger told me the first day when I signed with
him last year, 'Once you're in the family, you're always in the
family.' "
Looking for an Indy 500 dark horse? Look no further.

Lots of numbers in Vegas
If you are in Las Vegas, you have to run the numbers.
Every time the Cup Series races there, it produces a
basket of interesting number combinations. Matt
Kenseth won the race, which made the wheel
spin wildly.
The win was Kenseth's first at Joe Gibbs
Racing, 25th for his career and 50th for
Team Toyota, which started racing at
the marquee level in 2007. The most
.,illi :iil. ,,, ,,i er of all? It was only
III, ,.,,l 1111he in Cup Series history
i -I1._ L,:. k to 1949) that a driver
S.,,,, i,,, is birthday.
ale Yarborough did it
l vice and Kyle Busch
won on his birthday
in 2009. The
number Kenseth
didn't like? He
turned 41 on
Sunday.


* Getty Images/
MATTHEW STOCKMAN
Starting now, The Official
Pose of Denny Hamlin


GODWIN'S BRISTOL PICKS


Godwin Kelly is the Daytona Beach
News-Journal's motorsports editor
and has covered NASCAR for 30
years. Reach him at godwin.kelly@
news-jrnl.com


WINNER: Kyle Busch
REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Kevin Harvick,
Carl Edwards, Brad Keselowski,
Jimmie Johnson
DARK HORSE: Kurt Busch BIGGEST
DISAPPOINTMENT: Dale Earnhardt Jr.


FIRST ONE OUT: Joey Logano
DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: The
factory-stamped sheet metal is
put to its toughest test yet on
Bristol's high banks.


Daytona Beach News-Journal/NIGEL COOK
Amazingly, Tony Stewart can teach Denny how
to just smile and roll with it.
Whatever happened to the
"whispered" fine?
Good question. A couple of years ago, it
came to light that NASCAR was "secretly" fining
drivers for various issues, including public
ridicule of the product fans see on the track. I
put "secretly" in quotes because, in a garage
populated by chatterboxes, nothing remains
secret for long. When the secret inevitably
broke, NASCAR was ridiculed for it.
And now ... ?
Now it looks like the way to do things.
When NASCAR's suits heard Denny Hamlin's
complaints about the Gen-6 cars, they had a
decision to make. They'd assumed everyone was
on board with the "Speak No Evil" agreement,
and Denny had to pay a price. Two years ago,
when the backroom fines went public, NASCAR
caught grief. So they went public this time,
and it appeared a bit heavy-handed, petty and
lubricated with a pinch of paranoia. In other
words, they can't win.
Well, couldn't they just let a guy
speak his mind freely?
That might end up being the best answer.
And it would certainly be easier to police -
just turn your head. But we've seen enough
overachieving from Madison Avenue and enough
bizarre (and, unfortunately, successful) spin
from Washington to know there's something to
be said for "controlling the message." But it sure
makes everyone look silly from time to time.

Ken Willis has been covering a
NASCAR for The Daytona Beach
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com



FEUD OF THE WEEK


Al
Hamlin France
Denny Hamlin vs. Brian France: Hamlin said
he doesn't like the Gen-6 car and was fined
$25,000 by NASCAR CEO and Chairman Brian
France.

Godwin Kelly gives his take: "Hamlin's
comments seem harmless next to the remarks
made by Brad Keselowski during Speedweeks."


2013 SPRINT CUP
POINTS STANDINGS
(after Las Vegas, race 3 of 36)


Driver
Johnson
Keselowski
Earnhardt Jr.
Hamlin
Edwards
Martin
Kenseth
Biffle
Bowyer
Almirola
Stenhouse Jr.
Menard
Gordon
Kahne
Logano
Ambrose
Kyle Busch
Stewart
Harvick
Burton


Points
129
-5
-10
-27
-31
-34
-36
-36
-40
-41
-42
-47
-50
-52
-53
-55
-57
-57
-61
-63


Kenseth confident, comfortable and happy


Matt Kenseth won Sunday's race at
Las Vegas Motor Speedway in his third
start at Joe Gibbs Racing. Kenseth,
who replaced Joey Logano in the No.
20 Toyota, held off a fierce challenge
by Kasey Kahne in the closing laps.
Kenseth became only the third driver
to win a Cup Series race on his
birthday, Kenseth turned 41 on Sunday.
This is part of his post-race interview:
How much of just pure relief is this
win, and how much pressure is off
you now?
"Well, I don't know that it changes a
lot. I mean, I'm not a huge goal person,
but my goal was to win and to win
early. Nobody has put any pressure
on me except for myself, but I also
know that Coach (Joe Gibbs) hired
me to come in there and climb in that
car and win races, so you certainly
want to do that and you don't want to
disappoint people. I'm glad we got a
win, but it's still only Week 3. I feel like
this is the beginning, you know, and we
have a lot of confidence had a lot of
confidence after our first meeting and


decided to go do this and just had a
great feeling about it. And I still do.
"So, it's great to get the win. It's
always great to get a win early in the
season, but you certainly don't want to
act like it stops. You want to go to the
next one and start thinking we go
on a plane to go home, start thinking
about Bristol and what we're going to
try to do there. That's the great thing
about the sport it never stops.
You only get to enjoy it for a couple
days. But to answer your question, it
feels really great to get the win, and
hopefully that'll keep some momentum
going for our team."
People say they have never seen
you that emotional in the last 20 laps
and after the race. You were literally
screaming out there toward the end
of the race.
"There was a lot of reasons for that.
You know, I was pretty comfortable
where I was at. We had cars that could
win races. We had an organization that
could win races. Although I knew, and
I still know, it's not really that much of


a risk and I'm 100 percent sure it was
the right thing and all that but still,
there's some pressure. There's some
unknowns. I hope to have a lot of wins
and, hopefully, championships in front
of me still.
"I mean, to come over there and get
in that car, I know they're expecting me
to perform and do my job. Before this
year I can't remember the last time
I've ever been nervous at all inside of a
race car, and every week it gets a little
bit better. But you're always a little bit
nervous and you want to meet their
expectations or exceed them, and you
want to go do your job to the best of
your ability.
"I'm pretty fired up to win with
these guys. Like I said, I hope there's
a lot more in front of us, but I'm
just really excited to be part of the
organization and part of the family.
They've made me feel so welcome, and
part of that group, and just glad that I
was able to do my job (Sunday)...."


AP/JULIE JACOBSON
No wonder he's been fast ... imagine the
size of his engine if that's the team wrench.


AUTO RACING


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
This Friday photo shows the South
Philadelphia home featured in
1979's "Rocky II."
Yo! Rocky's house in
South Philly for sale
PHILADELPHIA -Want
to live like Rocky Balboa?
The Italian Stallion's house is
on the market.
The home in South
Philadelphia was featured in
the 1979 movie "Rocky II."
The 1,036-square-foot row
house has three bedrooms
and 11/2 bathrooms. Asking
price: $139,000.
Real estate agent Joe
Bianco says the home is for
sale because the woman who
lived there since the time of
filming recently died.
He says the house was
picked for "Rocky II" because
the filmmakers "happened to
like the front of the home and
knocked on the door"

Judge: Group invented
movie to hide fraud
LONDON Five people in
Britain face jail sentences
after being convicted this
week of attempting to bilk the
government of $4.2 million in
a moviemaking scam reminis-
cent of Academy Award-winning
hit '"Argo" -without the heroic
hostage rescue.
Prosecutors and tax author-
ities say the fraudsters
claimed to be producing a
made-in-Britain movie with
unnamed A-list actors and a
19 million-pound budget sup-
plied by a Jordanian firm.
In fact, officials say, the project
was a sham, set up to claim
back millions of pounds in tax.
When the five were arrested
in April 2011, they decided
their best shot at avoiding
charges was to hastily make a
film. 'A Landscape of Lies"
was released straight to DVD.

Sign says TFor Sale,'but
Newtons intend to stay
LAS VEGAS The sign
may read "For Sale" outside
the sprawling southeast Las
Vegas estate Wayne Newton
dubbed "Casa
de Shenan-
doah."
But New-
SIton's wife,
Kathleen
McCrone
Newton, said
Friday that
Wayne even if a bid-
Newton der snatches
up the property at auction
May 31, the "Mr Las Vegas"
crooner and his family have
no intention of moving out.
"We stay here until we
choose to leave. We have that
right," Kathleen Newton told
The Associated Press. "Even if
at some point the property gets
sold, it gets sold with us here."
"We have teed up that issue
for resolution by the judge,"
said Joseph Wielebinski, a
Dallas-based lawyer repre-
senting the property owner,
CSD LLC. "It is anything but
certain whether the Newtons
remain on the property or not"
-From wire reports


Associated Press
Bryan Cranston, as Walter White, is pictured at the fictional restaurant "Los Pollos Hermanos"
in a scene from season 2 of the AMC series "Breaking Bad." A Twisters burrito restaurant in
Albuquerque that serves as the location for the restaurant has become an international tourist
attraction as people come from all over the world to see the spot where a fictional drug trafficker
runs his organization.




Breaking west


Tourists flocking

to Albuquerque

in search of Los

Pollos Hermanos
Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -A fast-
food burrito chain in Albuquerque
has become an international tourist
attraction as people come from all
over the world to see the spot where
a fictional drug trafficker runs his
organization. A pastry shop sells
doughnuts topped with blue candy
designed to resemble crystal meth.
A beauty store has a similar prod-
uct crystal blue bathing salts.
As "Breaking Bad" finishes film-
ing its fifth and final season in Al-
buquerque, the popularity of the
show is providing a boost to the
economy and creating a dilemma
for local tourism officials as they
walk the fine line of profiting from
a show that centers around drug
trafficking, addiction and violence.
"Breaking Bad" follows the fictional
character Walter White, a high school
chemistry teacher turned meth lord.
Albuquerque has seen an unex-
pected jump in tourists visiting
popular sites from the show and local
businesses cashing in on its popu-
larity Tourists are also flocking to
sites that before the show were un-
known and unimportant: the sub-
urban home of White, played by
Bryan Cranston; a car wash that is
a front for a money-laundering op-
eration on the series; a rundown
motel used frequently for filming;
and the real-life burrito joint, which
is a chicken restaurant on the
show. The Albuquerque Conven-


Debbie Ball,
60, owner
of The
Candy Lady
store in
Albuquerque,
N.M.,
displays her
line of
"meth candy"
Aug. 20,
2012.
The store
supplied
some of its
rock candy
to be used
as a prop for
the blue
crystal meth
on the hit
TV series
"Breaking
Bad."


tion & Visitors Bureau
has even created a web-
site of the show's most
popular places around
town to help tourists nav-
igate, and ABQ Trolley
Company sold out all its
"BaD" tours last year at
$60 a ticket.
"They ask if they can
take pictures. They ask if
Gus is here," said Rachel
Johnson, 19, a shift man-
ager at the Twisters bur-
rito restaurant in
Albuquerque's South Val-
ley, referring to the show's
character Gus Fring. The
eatery has served as the
location for the "Los Pol-
los Hermanos" restau-
rant where Fring runs his
drug operation.
Debbie Ball, owner of


The Candy Lady store,
recently capitalized on
the show's popularity by
selling blue "Breaking
Bad" meth treats sugar
rock candy that looks like
the meth sold on the show.
Ball provided her candy as
props for the show in the
first two seasons and said
she has sold 20,000 bags
of the stuff at $1 apiece.
Ball said the show
doesn't glorify the drug
war but rather educates
the public on its dangers.
"Watch it with your
children. Yes, it's dark,"
said Ball. "It actually ed-
ucates you about meth,
about making it and what
actually happens to you
when you walk down that
road."


Titanic find: Lost violin recovered


Associated Press


LONDON The vio-
lin played by the band-
master of the Titanic as
the oceanliner sank has
been unearthed, a
British auction house
said Friday
Survivors of the Ti-
tanic have said they re-
member the band, led by
Wallace Hartley, playing
on deck even as passengers
boarded lifeboats after
the ship hit an iceberg.
Hartley's violin was
believed lost in the 1912
disaster, but auctioneers
HenryAldridge & Son say
an instrument unearthed
in 2006 which has un-
dergone rigorous testing
has proven to be Hartley's.


Birthday -Your earning potential in the year ahead will
be much greater than it has been for a number of years.
Nothing will be handed to you on a silver platter; you're
going to have to earn it the hard way with some
old-fashioned work.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Your determination will
increase considerably once you set your mind to com-
pleting a specific objective. All successes, including
yours, are predicated upon an ability to establish goals.
Aries (March 21-April 19) --You should do quite well
with your shopping, because you're not inclined to take
things at face value. In fact, you're likely to be very inter-
ested in what's behind any facade.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) If you unexpectedly find
yourself dealing with some influential people, don't be in-
timidated by titles, trappings or appearances. You will do
quite well with the big muckety-mucks.


Photo courtesy HENRY ALDRIDGE/Associated Press
The violin played by the bandmaster of the Titanic as
the oceanliner sank is pictured March 15 in Devizes,
England.


The auction house
spent the past seven years
and thousands of pounds
determining the water-
stained violin's origins,
consulting numerous ex-
perts including govern-
ment forensic scientists
and Oxford University.
The auction house
said the rosewood in-
strument has two long


Today's HOROSCOPE
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Even if you're the key
player who pulls off something of significance, allow an
insecure associate who had only a small hand in the un-
dertaking to take a few bows.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) You may have an oppor-
tunity to repeat something you enjoyed moderate suc-
cess with in the past, only this time you will get much
greater results.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Your greatest successes are
likely to come from endeavors you work on with others.
This will be especially true for large-scale enterprises in
which the stakes are high.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Instead of simply demand-
ing your mate do this or that, you should set a good ex-
ample. Your spouse will cooperate if you first show
you're doing your part to share some of the load.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If something in which you're


cracks on its body, but is
"incredibly well-
preserved" despite its
age and exposure to the
sea. It estimated the vi-
olin is worth six figures.
Hartley was one of
the 1,517 people who
perished when the Ti-
tanic struck an iceberg
350 miles south of New-
foundland April 15,1912.


Henry Aldridge and
Son said it researched
the violin's story with a
Hartley biographer as
the instrumentunderwent
forensic testing, uncov-
ering documents that
showed Hartley was
found with a large leather
valise strapped to him
and the violin inside.
The violin apparently
was returned to Hartley's
grieving fiance, the auc-
tion house said, and later
ended up in the hands
of the Salvation Army
before being given to a
violin teacher and ulti-
mately the auctioneers.
Henry Aldridge &
Son said the violin will
go on public display at
the end of the month.


involved hasn't been working out to your satisfaction,
make some constructive changes. It's time to be a victor,
not a victim.
Scorpio (Oct 24-Nov. 22) You have a valuable
friend or acquaintance who can play a pivotal role in
helping you advance a personal interest. Don't be reluc-
tant to solicit his or her help.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Give the requirements
of your loved ones precedence over your own interests,
if at all possible. In the end, you will feel better if you do
your duty.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Benefit can be derived
if you stick to your skill set. If possible, focus on social
activities and take care of worldly interests tomorrow.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -A situation that has been
a liability for quite some time is likely to do an about-face
and start producing much-needed benefits.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 14
Fantasy 5:7 11 13 16 34
5-of-5 2 winners $107,750.26
4-of-5 307 $113
3-of-5 10,204 $9.50
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13
Powerball: 5 9 28 32 38
Powerball: 29
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 5 winners $1,000,000
2 Florida winners
Lotto: 15 30 34 44 47 49
6-of-6 No winner
Fantasy 5: 8 21 25 30 35
5-of-5 2 winners $125,743.90

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March 16,
the 75th day of 2013. There are
290 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 16, 1968, during the
Vietnam War, the My Lai Mas-
sacre of Vietnamese civilians was
carried out by U.S. Army troops;
estimates of the death toll vary be-
tween 347 and 504.
On this date:
In A.D. 37, Roman emperor
Tiberius died; he was succeeded
by Caligula.
In 1521, Portuguese navigator
Ferdinand Magellan reached the
Philippines, where he was killed
by natives the following month.
In 1802, President Thomas Jef-
ferson signed a measure authoriz-
ing the establishment of the U.S.
Military Academy at West Point,
N.Y.
In 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne's
novel "The Scarlet Letter" was first
published.
In 1926, rocket science pioneer
Robert H. Goddard successfully
tested the first liquid-fueled rocket,
in Auburn, Mass.
In 1935, Adolf Hitler decided to
break the military terms set by the
Treaty of Versailles by ordering
the rearming of Germany.
In 1945, during World War II,
American forces declared they
had secured Iwo Jima, although
pockets of Japanese resistance
remained.
In 1972, in a nationally broad-
cast address, President Richard
M. Nixon called for a moratorium
on court-ordered school busing to
achieve racial desegregation.
In 1988, Protestant extremist
Michael Stone launched a one-
man gun-and-grenade attack on
an Irish Republican Army funeral
at Milltown Cemetery in Belfast,
Northern Ireland, killing three of
the mourners.
Ten years ago: Iraqi leader
Saddam Hussein warned that if
Iraq were attacked, it would take
the war anywhere in the world
"wherever there is sky, land or
water." President George W. Bush
gave the United Nations one more
day to find a diplomatic solution to
the standoff.
Five years ago: Protests
spread from Tibet into three neigh-
boring provinces; the Dalai Lama
decried what he called the "cul-
tural genocide" taking place in his
homeland and called for an inter-
national investigation into China's
crackdown on demonstrators.
One year ago: Actor George
Clooney and his father, Nick
Clooney, were arrested during a
protest outside the Sudanese Em-
bassy in Washington.
Today's Birthdays: Comedian-
director Jerry Lewis is 87. Country
singer Ray Walker (The Jor-
danaires) is 79. Movie director
Bernardo Bertolucci is 72. Game
show host Chuck Woolery is 72.
Actor Erik Estrada is 64. Country
singer Ray Benson (Asleep at the
Wheel) is 62. Rock singer-musician
Nancy Wilson (Heart) is 59. Ac-
tress Isabelle Huppert is 58. Actor


Clifton Powell is 57. Rapper-actor
Flavor Flav (Public Enemy) is 54.
Country singer Tracy Bonham is
46. Actress Lauren Graham is 46.
Thought for Today: "Until we
lose ourselves there is no hope of
finding ourselves." Henry Miller,
American author (1891-1980).











RELIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


$


Roanoke Times via Walter Hughes
Walter Hughes, of Union Hall, Va., preaches in the Takora Village in Africa. "I love to be an Evangelist and preach under a tree, and tell
people about God," Hughes said.


Man makes wellness his ministry


DUNCAN ADAMS
The Roanoke Times

ROANOKE, Va.
Neither the village chief's
purported witchcraft nor
the suspicious circum-
stances of a bus crash deterred
Walter Hughes from traveling
back to Ghana in May 2005.
He returned that year
roughly two weeks after an
eventful April visit, his second
to the African country, demon-
strating local news of his death
in a bus wreck was greatly ex-
aggerated.
Although the apparently
sabotaged bus had, in fact,
plunged down a mountainside,
the crash happened after a
mission team led by Hughes
had been dropped off at the


airport for their return to the
United States. And no one on
the bus died.
More recently, in late Janu-
ary, Hughes traveled to trou-
bled South Sudan to
participate in the Carter Cen-
ter's campaign, backed by Ro-
tary International clubs and
many other organizations in
the U.S. and Africa, to rid the
earth of Guinea worm
disease.
A few weeks later, he re-
turned to his home in the
Union Hall community of
Franklin County
"What I'm doing, I never
dreamed I would do," Hughes
said. '"A younger me would be
pretty shocked about the
places I go and the things that
I do."


Hughes, now 52, recalls the
heady days of his employment
at America Online in the
1990s, when innovative ideas
brainstormed in hallway con-
versations migrated quickly to
whiteboard scrawling and
then sometimes found traction
on the road to realization.
He worked in Northern Vir-
ginia as the company's direc-
tor of strategic technology
until his layoff in 1999 after
America Online's acquisition
of Netscape.
After his layoff from AOL,
Hughes and his wife, Susan,
decided to move to Franklin
County
By Hughes' account, begin-
ning about eight years ago,
God skewered every excuse he
could muster to avoid serving


a leadership role in mission
and humanitarian work in
Africa.
In 2005, on the day before
Easter Sunday, Hughes prayed
for guidance: "Lord, let my
words be your words, and let
my will be your will, fill me
with the Holy Spirit and use
me."
"I began to search for what
was next," Hughes said.
That same year, a passage of
scripture from Luke provided
one hint: "For everyone to
whom much is given, from him
much will be required."
Hughes accompanied his
uncles, the Rev Bill Barker
and Johnny Barker, to Ghana
in September 2003. He learned


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Praise


for the


stupid


dance
In case you haven't
heard of Matt Hard-
ing, let me tell you
about him.
A former video game
designer, at age 23 he
quit his job to travel
around Southeast Asia
until his money ran out.
While he was in Hanoi
taking photos, his travel-
ing buddy said, "Hey,
why don't you stand over
there and do your stupid
dance and I'll record it?"
Harding did his stupid
signature dance and
thought the video was
funny, so he started
doing it and recording it
everywhere he went on
his trip and posted it on
his blog for his friends to
see.
Then in 2005 someone
posted it on YouTube
where it went viral.
Everybody was telling
their friends about "the
guy who dances on the
Internet."
Then Stride, a chew-
ing gum company, of-
fered to pay his
See Page C6


Page C5


Argentines celebrate Francis as their 'slum pope'


Pope known

for work

withpoor

Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES, Ar-
gentina For more than a
billion Roman Catholics
worldwide, he's Pope
Francis. For Argentina's
poorest citizens, crowded
in "misery villages"
throughout the capital,
he's proudly known as one
of their own, a true "slum
pope."
Villa 21-24 is a slum so
dangerous most outsiders
don't dare enter, but resi-
dents said Jorge Mario
Bergoglio often showed up
unannounced to share
laughs and sips of mate,
the traditional Argentine
herbal tea shared by
groups using a common
straw.
People here recall how
the Buenos Aires arch-
bishop ditched a limou-
sine and would arrive on a
bus to their little chapel;
how he sponsored
marathons and carpentry
classes, consoled single
mothers and washed the
feet of recovering drug ad-
dicts; how he became one
of them.
"Four years ago, I was at
my worst and I needed
help. When the Mass
started, he knelt down and
washed my feet. It hit me
hard. It was such a beauti-
ful experience," said Cris-
tian Marcelo Reynoso, 27,
a garbage collector trying
to kick a cocaine addiction
through the church's
rehab program.
"When I saw the news


Associated Press
In this 2000 photo, Argentina's Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio speaks during a
Mass in the 31 slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in honor of slain priest Carlos
Mugica, whose picture stands on the altar. Every significant slum in Buenos Aires has
a church, thanks in part to Bergoglio, who was elected pope Wednesday.


on the TV I began scream-
ing with joy, and look, I'm
still trembling," Reynoso
said. "El Chabon (The
Dude) is so humble. He's a
fan of San Lorenzo (the


soccer club), like me. You
talk to him like a friend."
Long after he became a
cardinal in 2001, this
"prince of the church"
wore a simple black T-shirt


with a white collar. For
many at the slum's
Caacupe Virgin of the Mir-
acles Church, it's nothing
short of a miracle their
friend is the pope.


"He was always part of
our slum," housewife
Lidia Valdivieso, 41, said
after praying while resting
her palm on a statue of St.
Expeditus, patron saint of
urgent and impossible
causes. Her 23-year-old
son has cerebral palsy and
is learning carpentry at
the church's technical
school.
"When I heard the news
I couldn't believe it. Hav-
ing a 'papa villero' (slum
pope) is the most beautiful
thing that can happen to
us. I still remember him
going on long walks
through our muddy streets
or talking to our children,"
Valdivieso said.
Inside the concrete
block chapel, there's a
painted message com-
memorating Bergoglio's
inauguration, and another
big painting of Pope John
Paul II, but no sign of
Benedict XVI whatsoever.
Near the altar, there's a
large black-and-white
poster of Carlos Mugica,
an iconic Argentine slum
priest who was killed in
1974 by a right-wing death
squad intent on eliminat-
ing the "liberation theol-
ogy" he preached.
Bergoglio never favored
liberation theology be-
cause of its alliances with
armed leftist guerrilla
movements in the 1970s.
But he has done much to
follow in Mugica's foot-
steps, sponsoring all sorts
of outreach programs in
Argentina's slums.
This can be messy work,
obliging priests to chal-
lenge drug dealers for the
slum-dwellers' alle-
giances, and putting their
beliefs, even their lives, at
See Page C6


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Songs of


Passover
When I was grow-
ing up, the part
of the Seder I
looked forward to (after
chowing down on my fa-
vorite chicken soup with
matza balls and the
candy raspberry choco-
late covered ring jells)
was singing the Passover
songs. In those days, I
would pull out my guitar
and accompany my fam-
ily as we wended our
way through the seder
with music and song.
The Passover seder is
the ritual meal Jews ob-
serve to celebrate their
freedom in ancient days
from the tyrant Pharaoh
of Egypt. According to
the Torah, God sent
Moses to tell Pharaoh to
let His people go, a ref-
erence to the slavery
the Israelites were ex-
periencing. After 10
plagues, the Pharaoh
relented and the Is-
raelites made their way
to freedom. In celebra-
tion of this event, each
year Jews sit down to
this ritual meal and tell
the ancient story of
their redemption.
As with many holi-
days, music and song
make the rituals come
alive and lift the spirit.
The seder is filled with
music from the songs of
praise of the Hallel to
the allegorical Chad
Gadya. Some of the
songs are musical
See Page C6


..- F -=


.. . . ., . '".
- ,^''iT "^
"m I


Zid





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Holy Week
Joy Lutheran Church's
Maundy Thursday worship
service with Holy Communion
is at 6:45 p.m. March 28. The
Seven Last Words of Christ
from the Cross will be pre-
sented on Good Friday from
noon to 2:00 p.m. Easter Sun-
day, March 31, will begin at
6:30 a.m. outdoors in the Me-
morial Garden (weather per-
mitting). The message is
"Amazed Where the Road
Leads," from Luke 24:1-12.
Two services will follow in the
church sanctuary. At 8:30
a.m., the message is "A Twist
in the Road," from John 20:1-
10, and the 10:30 a.m. mes-
sage is "Jesus Leads Me on
the Road," from John 20:11-
18. The bell and vocal choirs
will perform at the last two
services. The public is wel-
come. The church is at 7045
S.W. 83rd Place at State
Road 200, Ocala. Call 352-
854-4509, ext. 221.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to its Holy Week serv-
ices as follows: Maundy
Thursday at 7 p.m.; Good Fri-
day at noon and 7 p.m.;
Easter Vigil Saturday at
8 p.m.; Easter sunrise at
7:15 a.m. and Easter Sunday
services at 8:30 and 11 a.m.
The church is on County
Road 486 opposite Citrus
Hills Boulevard in Hernando.
Call 352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to Holy week serv-
ices: Maundy Thursday serv-
ice at 7 p.m. starts the week.
On Friday, March 29, at
8 a.m., we will walk the cross
from the Hernando intersec-
tion to the church. The Good
Friday service is at noon. The
children's Easter egg hunt
and lunch with a visit from the
Easter Bunny is from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 30.


Easter Sunday sunrise serv-
ice is at 7 a.m. followed by the
regular worship service and
cantata at 10 a.m. Pastor
Jerry Carris welcomes every-
one to all services. Call 352-
726-7245.The church is at
2125 E. Norvell Bryant High-
way (County Road 486),
Hernando.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City will celebrate
Maundy Thursday, March 28,
with its 5th annual presenta-
tion of the play "The Twelve
Soliloquies," written by the
Rev. Louis J. Kovar, at 7 p.m.
This drama is a look into the
lives of those participating in
Jesus' final meal. The scene
depicted on stage occurred in
an Upper Room in Jerusalem
the night before Christ was
crucified. Jesus and the
Twelve Apostles were eating
their Last Supper together be-
fore Jesus' death. The scene
is patterned after Leonardo
Da Vinci's famous painting,
"The Last Supper." Everyone
is welcome to begin Easter
weekend by attending this
historical portrayal of Jesus
with his disciples before his
death. Communion will be
served during the service.
Following the service, light re-
freshments will be served in
the fellowship hall. The church
is at 8545 E. Magnolia St.,
Floral City. Call the office 352-
726-4296 or visit www.fbc
floralcity.org
Faith Lutheran
Church's Holy Week service
schedule is as follows:
Maundy Thursday at 7 p.m.
with Holy Communion; Good
Friday service at 3 p.m.;
Easter Saturday Service at
6 p.m.; and Easter Sunday
sunrise service at 7 a.m. with
continental breakfast from
7:45 to 9 a.m. followed by the
Resurrection service at
9:30 a.m. Congregation is re-
quested to bring live flowers
to decorate the cross in the


narthex on Easter Saturday
and Sunday. Everyone is in-
vited. The church is at 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive in Crystal
Glen Subdivision off State
Road 44 and County Road
490 in Lecanto. Call 352-527-
3325 or visit faithlecanto.com.
Easter events
St. Paul's School stu-
dents and Precious Lambs
Preschool will perform an
Easter pageant at 10:30 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Thursday at St.
Paul's Lutheran Church, 6150
N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-489-3027.
Everyone is invited to the
annual "Breakfast with the
Easter Bunny and Easter
Egg Hunt" from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at
Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. The
all-you-can-eat pancake
breakfast with the Easter
bunny is from 9 to 11 a.m.
Cost is $6 for adults and $4
for children. For tickets, call
352-795-3148 or visit
www.crumc.com by Wednes-
day. Free egg hunts for tod-
dlers, preschoolers and
elementary school-aged chil-
dren every 30 minutes from
9:30 to 11 a.m. There will be
Easter bunny photos, cup-
cake decorating, inflatables,
games and more.
Inverness Church of God
will host a free "Easter
Eggstravaganza" for chil-
dren from noon to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 23, at Floral
Park in Floral City at the lower
pavilion by the playground.
Registration for prizes is at
11:30 a.m. Activities include
hotdog lunch, egg hunt,
prizes, face painting, and a
balloon artist. The public is in-
vited to attend. For planning
purposes, call the church to
register children at 352-726-
4524.
Reflections Church will


celebrate "Family Fun Day"
on Sunday, March 24, at Cit-
rus Springs Middle School.
There is the worship service
at 10:17 a.m., where child-
care, kid's church and nursery
are available. Fun and games
will take place from noon to
2 p.m. An Easter egg hunt,
along with games and con-
cession stands, will also be
available. Proceeds from the
concessions will help fund the
"Reflex Students" trip to camp
this summer.
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church's Youth
Group in Citrus Springs will
host an Easter egg hunt for
children ages newborn to 12
at 10 a.m. Saturday, March
30. The community is invited.
There are three safe areas for
children to hunt eggs, with
age-appropriate prizes. Bring
a basket or bag for eggs. Chil-
dren and parents should meet
at the pavilion area for instruc-
tions. The church is at 9425
N. Citrus Springs Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Call 352-489-5511.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church will celebrate its
Easter Sunday sunrise
service at 6 a.m. followed by
a church breakfast. After the
10:15 a.m. service, there will
be an Easter Egg hunt with
two groups of kids; the older
and the younger children will
be released at separate time
to hunt the eggs.
Celebrate the resurrec-
tion of our Lord Jesus Christ
at First Christian Church of In-
verness at a "SonRise"
service at 7:30 a.m. Easter
Sunday. The "SonRise" serv-
ice will include songs of
praise to God for the gift of
Jesus and celebration of the
promise of resurrection. Dr.
W. Ray Kelley, pastor of
FCCI, will present a special
message concerning the gift
of Jesus our Lord. Following
the service, attendees are in-
vited to enjoy an Easter


breakfast in the Family Life
Center. The adult Sunday
school class at 9 a.m. will
conclude a study of Passion
Week. The family worship at
10:15 a.m. will feature an
Easter musical presentation,
"Lamb of God." The church is
at 2018 Colonade St., Inver-
ness (behind the RaceTrac
Station on State Road 44).
Call 352-344-1908.
Inverness Church of God
invites the community to at-
tend an Easter musical
presentation titled 'Victori-
ous" during the 10:30 a.m.
worship service Sunday,
March 31. The church is at
416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Call the church office at 352-
726-4524.
Peace Lutheran
Church's Easter Sunday
worship service is at 10 a.m.
Everyone is invited to serv-
ices. The church is at 7201 S.
U.S. 41, five miles north of
Dunnellon. Call the church of-
fice at 352-489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline
.com.
Worship
St. Timothy Lutheran
Church will have a Bluegrass
"come-as-you-are" service at
5 p.m. today featuring Annie &
Tim's United Bluegrass Band.
On Sunday, the early service
with Communion is at 8 a.m.
with Sunday school classes
for all ages at 9:30 a.m., cof-
fee fellowship hour at 9 a.m.,
and traditional service with
Communion at 10:30 a.m.
Special services are an-
nounced. A nursery is pro-
vided. The church is at 1070
N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19),
Crystal River. Call 352-795-
5325 or visit www.sttimothy
lutherancrystalriver.com.
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-


day. Father David Balmer also
invites all to "Forgiveness
Vespers" this Sunday follow-
ing the Liturgy. Great Lent be-
gins Monday with Holy
Pascha celebrated May 5.
This week the Great Canon of
St. Andrew of Crete will be
celebrated in four services:
Monday at 3 p.m., Tuesday at
6:30 p.m., Wednesday at
3 p.m. and Thursday at 3 p.m.
Father David will celebrate a
Pre-Sanctified Liturgy at
6:30 p.m. Friday to which all
are invited. The church is at
1277 N. Paul Drive, Inverness
(off U.S. 41 North, across
from Dollar General).The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees
to bring a box or can of food
for distribution at Family Re-
source Center in Hernando.
Call 352-726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the fifth
Sunday of Lent with Holy Eu-
charist services at 5 p.m.
today and 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. A nursery is provided
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Christian Formation is at
9:15 a.m. Godly Play Sunday
school is at 10 a.m. There is a
healing service at 10 a.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study. SOS is from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church.
Evening Bible study is at
7 p.m. Thursday.
Faith Lutheran Church
welcomes the public to the
Saturday service at 6 p.m.
and Sunday service at 9:30
a.m. The church is in Crystal
Glen Subdivision off State
Road 44 and County Road
490 in Lecanto. This week,
Pastor Stephen Lane's ser-
mon is titled "Bad Tenants,"
from Luke 9:9-20. For the last
of the midweek Lenten serv-
ices on Wednesday, the ser-
mon title is, "Is There No

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


a a 0
"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"







ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile westof Plantation m
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


B0 Crystal
E3B River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager a


Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship ih Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479



SALVATION
ARMY CIRUS COUNTY
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 AM.
Lt. Vanessa Miller


I Crystal Diver
Church of God
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
.................10:30 A.M.
,:h] l ]1 r H , ] t ]
-I~




West
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.0






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
SBob Dickey


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRISf
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church
Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


. Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon






HEPKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAKPJNC FAMILY
IN CHPKIST!

CKyTNL J
RIVC -
VJNITCD
M- CTHOD IST
CHURCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
- A Stephen Ministry Provider .


C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

Justice?" The service is at
5 p.m. followed by a potluck
supper in the fellowship hall.
Call 352-527-3325 or visit
faithlecanto.com.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee
hour from 9 to 11 a.m. For the
fifth Sunday of Lent, the Rev.
Craig S. Davies will preach on
the topic, "Overloaded? Over-
whelmed? -You Need Sup-
plication," with readings from
Psalm 62:8 and Matthew 6:9-
13.The class for receiving
new members into the church
family will take place from
noon to 2:30 p.m. Sunday at
the church. Lunch, a nursery
and childcare provided. The
WOW dinner at 6 p.m.
Wednesday is followed by "An
Evening of Parables" pre-
sented by the PresbyPlayers.
Meal reservations are re-
quested. Call 352-637-0770.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, cele-


brates the fifth Sunday in Lent
with worship at 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday school
and Bible class begin at 9:15
a.m. Bible Information Class
is at 1 p.m. Monday. Choir re-
hearsal is at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day. Wednesday midweek
Lenten worship services are
at 4 and 6:30 p.m. Call 352-
489-3027.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort Is-
land Trail North. The church
will celebrate the fifth Sunday
of Lent. Dr. R. Jackson Al-
wood. Bishop Gregory 0.
Brewer will be at the 8 and
10:15 a.m. services Sunday.
He will welcome 11 new mem-
bers to the church. A tradi-
tional corned beef and
cabbage and potato dinner will
follow the second service. St.
Anne's will host Our Father's
Table from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. today. Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets at 8 p.m. Friday
and Mondays in the parish li-
brary. The monthly sing-along
is at 6 p.m. Sunday, March 24.
Annie and Tim's United Blue-
grass Gospel Band will lead
the singing.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate
Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at 8
a.m. Sunday and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m.


which includes children's
church. Adult Sunday school
is at 9:30 a.m. Youth Sunday
school starts at 12:45 p.m. fol-
lowing lunch. Bible study at
the Radcliffes' home is at
7:30 p.m. Monday. Lenten
Bible study on "Facing the
Cross" begins at 12:30 p.m.
following a brown bag lunch.
Feed My Sheep will provide a
hot lunch to those in need at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a healing and Holy
Eucharist service at 12:30
p.m. Stations of the Cross at
noon Friday will be followed
by a "Souper" lunch. Food
pantry hours are from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k


through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The
church is on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando. Call
352-746-7161.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to its new
location at the Realtors Associ-
ation of Citrus County Building
at 714 S. ScarboroAve. on
State Road 44 in Lecanto. The
new worship service time is at
10 a.m. Join us at 9:30
a.m. for a coffee fellowship, fol-
lowed by the worship service.
This Sunday, Pastor Kennie
Berger continues a series of
messages form the book of
Hebrews. The church is non-
denominational. Wednesday
we meet for weekly Bible


study. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
and study begins at 7. The first
Wednesday monthly is the
Faith Journey video lessons
that gives insight and under-
standing to the scriptures as
related to the culture and land
of biblical times. On subse-
quent Wednesdays, we are
studying the book of Galatians.
Call Pastor Kennie Berger at
352-302-5813.
First Christian Church
of Homosassa Springs wel-
comes Lowell Mason, the
"World's Smallest Gospel
Singer." Mason will sing dur-
ing the 10:30 a.m. worship
service Sunday and will pres-
ent a concert during the
evening service at 6. Satur-
day's contemporary service
begins at 5:30 p.m. The
Wednesday evening fellow-
ship meal is served at 6 fol-
lowed by prayer and the video
lesson, "The Time Had Fully
Come," at 7 p.m. Call the
church office at 352-628-
5556. The church is at 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.
Dan Wagner is the minister.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County
welcomes back the Rev. Dee
Graham at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
The Rev. Graham's topic, "500
Years of Searching," asks:
What was Ponce De Leon in


RELIGION


Hernando
Churchof
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M,
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


q Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams,Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
\un.SOTHEM ',r .


_ Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com

j Homosassa Springs
SL, .?LBITH-i ', Al ',Ernm,-CHURCH


Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jes u
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
Swww.fbcfloralcity.org


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...............Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM................. Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1%mi.east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


S .. .... r Children and Families"
2125 E,.Norvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1 miles from Hwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
h. .. . ...I '


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352) 746-9422


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

ChurchLCM
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912




For

Information

On Your

Religious

Advertising


Fis ats
Chrc
OfHenad
Recin ndrstrn
liestrog Jss hist
Sudy coo :0a

Suda Seric


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA








Worship
Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3 - 6


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 C3

search of when he discovered
la Florida 500 years ago? We'll
look into rumors and facts that
tell us how Unitarianism and
Judaism might have played a
role in the life of this explorer
who got the credit for naming
our state. The NCUU meets at
7633 N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41),
Citrus Springs. Call 352-465-
4225.
E If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as
well as a caring church family.
The Sunday morning service
is at 10:30 and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and
encouraging Bible-based
teachings that will build your
faith. Abundant Life is a full-
Gospel, nondenominational
church that believes in the
power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Abundant
Life of Crystal River is at 4515
N. Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org or call 352-
795-LIFE.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River will
celebrate worship service at
See NOTES/Page C5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kosher chefs offer tips for Passover


JIM ROMANOFF
Associated Press

When it comes to matzo,
Chicago chef Laura
Frankel said hers is a love-
hate relationship.
"Matzo and I are frene-
mies," she said of the un-
leavened cracker-like
bread traditionally eaten
during Jewish Passover
celebrations. "On one
hand, matzo is a food you
want to be proud of it's
part of who we are as Jews.
But frankly, it usually
tastes like cardboard."
During Passover, leav-
ened breads and most
grains are prohibited. The
tradition is intended to re-
call the flight of the Jews
from Egypt after being
freed by the pharaoh. As
the story goes, they had no
time to let their bread rise
before baking it. So today,
matzo the production of
which is a highly regulated
process is central to
Passover meals.
It can be eaten as is, or
ground into coarse crumbs
or even a fine cake meal
and used similar to tradi-
tional flours.
"Every year, people will
tell me they made brown-
ies with matzo cake flour
and they were even better
than the real thing," said
Frankel, author of the
cookbook "Jewish Slow
Cooker Recipes." When
she hears this, she usually
thinks, "No, they're not,"
but keeps that to herself.
Leah Schapira, an Is-
raeli-born kosher cook,
has a more comfortable re-
lationship with matzo.
Schapira who co-au-
thored the recent cook-
book, "Passover Made
Easy" is happy to
munch matzo plain, but
when cooking with it tends
to treat it as a blank canvas
upon which to build
dishes. She also notes that
these days matzo is avail-
able in many varieties -
including whole wheat -
many of which taste quite
good.
The matzo toffee bar
crunch from her book is a
great example of using
matzo creatively It's remi-
niscent of the popular con-
fection usually coated with
chopped nuts, but her ver-
sion melds similar flavors
together with the toasty,
crunchy qualities of the
matzo. Schapira, who has
four kids, also uses it as a
"crust" for pizza (though
she cautions that a very


r .S







VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM. & 10:30 A.M.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:15 P.. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
i. .catholicweb.com .:


Tortillas with tomato-mint salsa and guacamole are shown in Concord, N.H.


hot oven is key to ensuring
the matzo doesn't get
soggy).
She and writing partner
Victoria Dwek also devel-
oped a recipe for tortillas
with tomato-mint salsa
and guacamole because
they know how much fam-
ilies like having a taco
night and wanted a
Passover-suitable option.
Still, both Frankel and
Schapira say it's essential
not to be fooled into think-
ing that using matzo
crumbs and meal is the
same as using flour or
breadcrumbs, and they
recommend not going out
of your way to try to use
matzo products to recreate
dishes you might make at
other times of the year
Frankel points out that
matzo, unlike leavened
breads, doesn't have devel-
oped glutens (a protein
that helps bread rise), so
baked goods using matzo
meal and cake meal won't
have the same textures as
ones made with traditional
flour
One of Frankel's tricks
for baking and cooking
with matzo meal and cake
meal is to start out by
emulsifying it by whipping
it together with olive oil
and egg, almost like mak-
ing a mayonnaise. She
uses this technique when
making a matzo cake meal-
based coffee cake and


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH








,/oaJ64f /i'wwh
SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


achieves very light and
fluffy results.
Another favorite of hers
during Passover is fried
green tomatoes made with
a seasoned matzo crumb
coating. But she also regu-
larly makes stews and
soups thickened with a
roux made by browning
matzo meal and either
olive oil or chicken fat.
And as much as Frankel
has her love-hate relation-
ship with matzo, she ends
up embracing it with
plenty of culinary flair
"The key thing," she
said, "is you've got to strive
to not have your cake and
eat it too."
MATZO TOFFEE
BAR CRUNCH
Start to finish: 1 hour
30 minutes
Servings: 18
6 sheets matzo (or
enough to cover a
baking sheet)
1 cup (2 sticks) mar-
garine
1 1/2 cups packed
brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
extract
1 1/4 cups chocolate
chips
Sea salt (optional)
Slivered almonds,
toasted (optional)
Heat the oven to 375 de-
grees. Line a rimmed bak-


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship...... ......10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Flashing .ightl




Todd
Langdon


ing sheet with foil.
Arrange the matzo in a
single layer over the bak-
ing sheet. Set aside.
In a small saucepan over
medium heat, combine the
margarine and brown
sugar Stirring constantly,
melt just until incorpo-
rated. Remove from the
heat and stir in the vanilla.
Pour the mixture over the
matzo, then bake for 10 to
15 minutes, or until deep
golden brown and bub-
bling all over
Remove the baking
sheet from the oven and
immediately sprinkle with
the chocolate chips. Wait 2
minutes for the chocolate
to melt. Using a spatula,
spread the chocolate in an
even layer Sprinkle with
salt and almonds, if using.
Transfer the baking sheet
to the freezer until set.
Break into pieces, then
store in an airtight
container
Nutrition information
per serving: 270 calories;
130 calories from fat (48
percent of total calories);
14 g fat (4.5 g saturated; 2 g
trans fats); 0 mg choles-
terol; 36 g carbohydrate; 1
g fiber; 27 g sugar; 2 g pro-
tein; 125 mg sodium.
(Recipe adapted from
Leah Schapira and Victo-
ria Dwek's "Passover
Made Easy," 2013, Mesorah
Publications.)


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca.com



First Baptist
Ckhwck
of Lake Roasseaw,
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Email: us o. r on ...I -. ,,I.Febook...
Check us out on Facebook


MATTHEW MEAD/Associated Press


TORTILLAS
WITH TOMATO-
MINT SALSA
AND
GUACAMOLE
Start to finish: 1 hour
Servings: 4
For the tortillas:
1 cup matzo cake
meal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cups water
For the filling:
2 tablespoons olive
oil
1 medium yellow
onion, finely diced
1 pound lean ground
beef
2 teaspoons chili
powder
1 teaspoon garlic
powder
1 teaspoon salt
For the tomato-mint
salsa:
2 cups grape toma-
toes, halved
1 tablespoon
chopped fresh mint
1 jalapeno pepper,
seeded and minced
1/4 small red onion,
finely chopped
1 tablespoon white
wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt


Hwy.44E@
* Washington Ave., Inverness U

* Sunday Services *
* Traditional *
8:00 AM & 11:00 AM U
* Casual Service :
* 9:30 AM
11:00 AM Service
* Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
U Fellowship & Youth Group m
* 5 to 7 PM 0
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U


Em


1/4 teaspoon ground
black pepper
For the guacamole:
1 ripe avocado
Juice of 1 lime
1/2 small red onion,
finely diced
1/2 tablespoon olive
oil
1/2 tablespoon white
wine or cider vinegar
Garlic powder, to
taste
Salt, to taste
1/2 cup prepared
coleslaw, to serve
To prepare the tortillas,
in a small bowl, whisk to-
gether the matzo meal,
salt, egg, olive oil and
water Set aside to rest for
5 minutes.
Coat a nonstick skillet
with cooking spray, then
heat over medium. Scoop
1/2 cup of the batter and
drop it into the pan. Cook
for5minutes, then flip and
cook for another 5 minutes.
Remove the tortilla from
the pan and set aside. Re-
peat with remaining batter
To prepare the meat fill-
ing, in a large saute pan
over medium, heat the oil.
Add the onion and cook,
stirring often, until soft,
about 5 minutes. Add the
meat and cook, stirring
constantly, until com-
pletely browned. Season
with chili powder, garlic
powderand salt. Set aside.
To prepare the tomato-
mint salsa, in a small bowl,
stir together the tomatoes,
mint, jalapeno, onion,
vinegar, salt and pepper
Set aside.
To prepare the gua-
camole, in a small bowl,
combine the avocado, lime
juice, red onion, olive oil,
vinegar, garlic powder and
salt. Mash until the gua-
camole reaches the de-
sired texture.
To serve, spread gua-
camole in the center ofeach
tortilla. Top with meat and
tomato-mintsalsa. Top each
tortilla with 2 tablespoons
coleslaw and fold up.
Nutrition information
per serving: 620 calories;
330 calories from fat (53
percent of total calories);
37 g fat (14 g saturated; 0.5 g
trans fats); 125 mg choles-
terol; 45 g carbohydrate; 7
g fiber; 6 g sugar; 30 g pro-
tein; 1080 mg sodium.
(Recipe adapted from
Leah Schapira and Victo-
ria Dwek's "Passover
Made Easy," 2013, Mesorah
Publications.)


U-
irst Unite


Methodilist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
SPraise & WorshipE
Ug' ;


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS


C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

10:30 a.m. Sunday. Parish
Associate Reverend Sheryle
Lyman's sermon is titled "Ex-
travagant Gratitude." Sunday
school begins at 9 a.m. The
food pantry will not be open
this week. The Lenten study
from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday begins with a
soup and bread meal, fol-
lowed by "The Sermon on the
Mount" study from Matthew 5-
7. The Presbyterian Women
will host their annual Lenten
Communion breakfast at
9 a.m. Saturday, March 23.
The theme, "A River of Hope,"
will begin in the sanctuary
with a Communion worship
service featuring guest
speaker, the retired Rev.
Denise Stringer. A continental
breakfast will follow in West-
minster Hall. The community
is welcome; register by calling
the office at 352-795-2259 or
visit fpcofcrystalriver.com.
Special events
First Baptist Church of
Lecanto will celebrate its first-
ever "Spring Festival" today.
There will be a movie and
games for children at 4 p.m. A
potluck or covered-dish meal
with desserts will be served at
5 p.m. All members of the
church and friends in the
community are invited to at-
tend. Come and bring a
friend. The church is one-half
mile south of the intersection
of State Road 44 and County
Road 491 in Lecanto.
A Blood Drive spon-
sored by the joint ministries of
Our Lady of Grace Church
and the Knights of Columbus
Council 6168 is from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. today at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
A complimentary continental
breakfast will be available, as
well as other tokens of thanks
for donors.
Everyone is invited to a
"Tricky Tray Party (Basket
Bonanza)" sponsored by
Catholic Women's Club at
11 a.m. today in the parish
hall at Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41
S., Inverness. Donation of $5
includes 20 tickets. Each
extra 10 tickets costs $1. Free
coffee and dessert provided.
Lunch available for purchase.
Unity Mystery Dinner
Theater presents "Murder
Most Green," a St. Patrick's
Day mystery, at 6:30 p.m.
today at Unity of Citrus, 2628
W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
Tickets are $20. Call 352-746-
1270 or email Unityofcitrus
.org.
First United Methodist
Church, at 21501 W. State
Road 40 in Dunnellon, contin-
ues its nine-week Dave Ram-
sey Financial Peace
University seminar from
3:30 to 5 p.m. Sunday in the
fellowship hall of the church.
For more information or to
register, call Rick DuCharme
at 352-465-2142 or the
church office at 352-
489-4026.
March is Missions
Month at Heritage Baptist
Church. Speakers at the Sun-
day evening services at 6 are
as follows: Tomorrow Jeff
Randall is the director of CWE
(Construction for Worldwide
Evangelism). CWE'S desire is
to see people from the U.S.
have their lives "transformed"
on the foreign mission field.
Typically church buildings are
constructed in only four con-
secutive one-week trips with a
20-member volunteer team
each week. March 24 -
Danny and Janice Flowers
are missionaries with Baptist
Int. Missions in France. The
Flowers are currently seeking
to expand a church plant in
the Champagne-Ardenne
area of France. The church
also has Sunday school at
9 a.m. and morning worship
at 10:15.
Everyone is invited to the
2013 Gospel Meeting Sun-


day through Wednesday at
Pleasant Grove Church of
Christ, 3875 S. Pleasant
Grove Road, Inverness. The
speaker is Dan Jenkins. "The
Oasis From the Garden of
Eden," is the topic during the
Sunday class at 9:30 a.m.
The topic at the 10:30 a.m.
Sunday service is "God's
View of Your Home, the Only
View." Dinner on the grounds
will follow. For the Sunday
evening service at 6, the topic
is "Marriages that Last, Avoid-
ing Divorce." A fellowship
meal will be provided each
weeknight at 6 followed by


services at 7 p.m. Topics in-
clude: Monday- "The Key to
Rearing Godly Children."
Tuesday- "Solving Marital
Problems." Wednesday -
'Your Home, the Church and
Heaven." Call 352-344-9173.
Recent but "forgotten
films" are shown at 3 p.m.
Thursday in March at the
Unitarian Universalist Fellow-
ship, 7633 N. Florida Ave.
(U.S. 41), Citrus Springs. All
are welcome. A $3 donation is
suggested. On March 21,
Richard Gere stars as a
hedge fund manager in "Ar-
bitrage," a thriller about love,
loyalty and money. This movie
never played in Citrus County.
Call 352-465-4225 or nature
coastuu.org.
The Rev. Jess Burton,
pastor of Lighthouse Baptist
Church, Citrus Springs, and
facilitator for the "Good News
Club" at Romeo Elementary
School, will give a presenta-
tion on the "Good News Club"
ministry at 7 p.m. Thursday at
St. Margaret's Episcopal
Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave.,
Inverness. This presentation
is intended for lay and or-
dained church leadership in
the Citrus County area. This
ministry brings the "Good
News" to area elementary
schools in an after school pro-
gram. Currently, this ministry
is in 33 of 34 Marion County
schools, and in two of the Cit-
rus County elementary
schools, Homosassa and For-
est Ridge Elementary. This
meeting is being promoted by
the Citrus Christian Clergy As-
sociation and hosted by St.
Margaret's Episcopal Church.
It is estimated that four out of
five children in Citrus County
schools are un-churched and
that 80 percent of present-day
adults made a decision to ac-
cept Christ by the age of 14.
How can a child make a deci-
sion to believe in Jesus with-
out having heard the "Good
News" of Christ? St. Mar-
garet's would like to partner


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
, i,,,,, ',.h-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
S Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!




W First




of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


Pastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


"Where everyo~ne isspecial!"

"Jesus Christ-cenwtra tem





WtI H~t viHIN
of our worship"
Sufnday Schoo1lTKB
9:30n aB~l~m. ^

OFFICE: (352r726110


with other area churches to
bring the "Good News" to
these children. The "Good
News" doesn't change, the
curriculum is proven; the Lord
just needs "laborers for the
harvest." Call Pastor Gene
Reuman, president of the Cit-
rus Christian Clergy Associa-
tion at 352-726-3153.
Hope Springs Sharing
Center will present a free
workshop titled "Oh
Lord... Now What?" from 9
a.m. to noon Saturday, March
23, at St. Timothy Lutheran
Church, 1070 N. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. Partici-
pants will explore individual
goals and dreams while using
a process designed to help
discover answers to some of
the roadblocks to success life
often presents. Workshop
participants will work through
a series of guided self-reflec-
tion exercises designed to
teach individuals how to sort
through the clutter of day-to-
day life and access goals that
often become buried by stres-
sors and other demands on
time. Participants will learn re-
alistic methods for breaking
down goals into easier-to-
achieve steps. Hope Springs
Sharing Center offers an alter-
native to mental health coun-
seling by giving clients the
opportunity to work through
life's challenges in a safe,
confidential and nonjudgmen-
tal atmosphere. Clients work
one-on-one with a facilitator to
develop individual plans for
feeling stronger and moving
forward. To pre-register or for
more information, call Amy
Prodan at 352-212-5649 or
email hopespringssharing
center@live.com.
All students from 5 years
of age to 12 are invited to par-
ticipate in St. Paul's Lutheran
Church's spring break soc-
cer camp from 8:30 a.m. to
noon Monday through Friday,
March 25-29. Cost is $45. All
participants will receive a T-
shirt, water bottle and a soc-


PRIMER IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bblicos
Les Esperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship 10:45 AM
Sid.., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"Aplaceto ,i,"'a \ i i.' ,n.',,


cer ball. Call 352-489-3027.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala is accepting reserva-
tions for its Passover Seder
to take place at 6 p.m. on the
second night of Passover,
Tuesday, March 26, at the
Stone Creek Country Club
and Grill in Ocala. The Seder
will feature a complete meal
with rituals with a liberal, con-
temporary feel. Most of the
Seder will be done in English.
The service will be facilitated
by Judi Siegal and Sonia Pe-
terson with those in atten-
dance as participants. The
cost is $30 for members, $35
for nonmembers and guests.
For reservations and more in-
formation, call Estelle at 352-
861-2542 or Sonia at
352-307-3662 by Thursday.
Congregation Beth Israel is a
liberal, inclusive, contempo-
rary congregation affiliated
with the Jewish Reconstruc-
tionist Movement.
Everyone is invited to a
"Revival" at 6:45 p.m. nightly
Friday through Wednesday,
April 5-10, at First Baptist
Church of Dunnellon. The
speaker is Dr. Rocky Branch
of Rocky Branch Evangelistic
Ministries. Call the church at
352-489-2730 or visit fbc
dunnellon@bellsouth.net.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women's
annual fashion show, "Fabu-
lous Fashions," is at 11 a.m.
Saturday, April 6, at Citrus
Golf and Country Club. Fash-
ions are from Bealls of Crystal
River. Lunch served for a do-
nation of $20. Entrees are
tilapia almondine, baked
stuffed chicken and London
broil. For tickets, call Joan at
352-563-2271.
Ladies, get out your fa-
vorite outfit, especially the
"bling," and join hundreds of
other ladies on Saturday, April
6, for an awe-inspiring
evening filled with joy, laughter
and entertainment. The Bling
Fling "Sparkle for Jesus"
event is being presented by A


F 47 Years o
IRST Brnging Christ
FIR I Ito Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

i Sunday School
& Bible Class
T 9:00 AM.
S 726-1637
S Missouri Synod
www.1 stlutheran. net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Women's Heart, the women's
ministry outreach at Gulf to
Lake Church in Crystal River.
This ladies banquet will take
place at the Citrus Springs
Community Center and in-
cludes motivational speaker
Mary Courtney, who will sing,
share her walk with the Lord
and give her testimony. Tick-
ets ($22.50) can be pur-
chased at the church, 1454 N.
Gulf Ave., Crystal River. Doors
open at 5:15 and the night of
fun kicks off at 6 p.m. Call
Laura at the church office at
352-795-8077.
Abbot Francis Sadlier
Council 6168 Knights of
Columbus will hold its tradi-
tional pilgrimage to Mary
Queen of the Universe
Basilica on Monday, April 8.
Noonday Mass will be cele-
brated at the main altar. Lunch
follows at Red Lobster. The
bus leaves the council in
Lecanto at 8:30 a.m. and re-
turns by 5:30 p.m. Free coffee
and doughnuts will be served
at 8 a.m. in the council hall.
For reservations, call Jim
Grossman at 352-564-4245.
Bus payment of $20 per per-
son is due by Tuesday, April 2.
For Feinstein's 16th An-
nual $1 Million Giveaway to
Fight Hunger, Alan Shawn
Feinstein will add money to
donations given to the Beverly
Hills Community Church's
Food Pantry. Donations must
be received by April 30, and
can include cash, checks,
and/or food items. The more
donations made to the food
pantry, the more Feinstein
money will be added to the
donation.
People of all religions are
welcome to bring their inspira-
tional writings and prayers to
share during "Interfaith De-
votionals" at 2 p.m. Sun-
days. Refreshments served.
For directions and/or more in-
formation, call Sandi at 352-
364-6035.

See NOTES/Page C6


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness |
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


INVERNESS
I5 CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 A
Sunday School.................9:30
Contemporary Service.. .10:30
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes................ 7:00 E
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 E
Teens............................. 7:00 EM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy. 41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S 7
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


RELIGION


Our Lady of

Fatima

CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/e Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass:4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June-August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M.
726-1670




t "First For Christ"...John 1l:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study





NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Bible Study
(Fellowship 6:30-7:00pm)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S.Scarboro Ave.
(on the corner ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


\ro,


a is

(hlu


wO


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 C5


MINISTRY
Continued from Page C1

then about a small
school, in a slum near
Kumasi, that Bill had
helped start. Hughes
participated when the
brothers traveled to
northern Ghana, where
they often preached be-
neath sheltering trees.
In 2005, when Hughes
led a team back to the
slum near Kumasi, they
learned that a village
chief planned to close
the school and sell the
land it occupied. The
chief had been blocked
by a court order. Hughes
and his team began
working to expand the
school gradually, over
a couple of years, adding
classrooms, a kitchen, a
small library, electricity,
running water and a
computer lab.
Hughes said the chief
was angry about losing
the court case and the
work of Hughes' team.
He said he believes that
opposition led someone
to tamper with the bus'
brakes.
Hughes said the initial
emphasis of work in
Ghana was on building
schools and churches.
But he said a man's ques-
tion during a presenta-
tion one night led him to
investigate the utility of
building water wells.
And that became a focus,
along with a recent cam-
paign to address Buruli
ulcer disease.
Hughes said he has wit-
nessed Christians and
Muslims working together
in Ghana to build wells.
"I prayed that every
drink of water would be
a drink of peace," he
said. "People with hope
have a future. If they
don't have hope, all they
have is the past."


i I
ad


it

lh





C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C5

Ladies, come to "The
Well" for refreshment and
prophetic prayer ministry at 7
p.m. the first Friday monthly
at FresHope Ministries, 2991
E. Thomas St., Inverness. If
you are hurting, need to hear
a word from God, and/or spiri-
tual growth and strength, then
this is the night just for you.
Come comfortable and come
expecting to receive. You will
not leave the same way you
came in. If you desire prayer
and can't come to "The Well,"
we will schedule a phone call
with you for prayer. Call 352-
341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.

Sales & such
Red Level Baptist Church
will have a car wash/yard


POPE
Continued from Page C1


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


sale from
today at \
River. All
ing the yc
and the c
camp. Ca
The
semi-an
fundrais
place froi
Friday ar
22 and 2
Church,T
Crystal R
to purcha
and misc
Our
Catholic C
Hills will i
door flea
to 1 p.m.
on the ch
Rooseve
early Hills
Highway
Shoppers
50 comm
vendors

impact
huge,"
priest, I
Vedia.
Came


risk. Sometimes compro- Bergogl
mises must be made. washed
Just a few steps from the young mr
chapel, melted candles ter "ThE
stand in a red shrine to the back, t
pagan folk hero Antonio and cc
"Gauchito" Gil, a 19th cen- Vedia sa
tury outlaw revered desk lay
among Argentina's poor a huge,
for sharing his stolen line: "F
bounty with the poor. "You
Many Argentines are as church
likely to pray for miracles change,
from "Gauchito" as they are fact thz
from authorized Catholic name F
saints, but Bergoglio didn't It says:
object to the shrine's pres- around
ence next to his chapel, selves t
"For more than 20 years was St.
he came here. He's always and noN
been close to us and his live it."


PASSOVER
Continued from Page C1

renditions of the text; others are com-
posed melodies of Middle Ages origin
- or even recently composed ones,
such as those by the late Debbie
Friedman, whose song about Miriam
is a favorite with my congregation.
The seder opens with the chant-
ing of the individual steps to the
service. The blessings of sanctifica-
tion over wine and candles also
have a distinct chant. The opening
lines of welcome for all to partici-
pate in the seder have a lovely syn-
copated melody and are sung in
Aramaic, the language of Israel
2,000 years ago, when the seder rit-
ual was standardized. The famous
Four Questions the youngest child
asks about the seder has two
chants: One is Sephardic in origin
and one is a traditional Talmudic
chant
The mentioning of the Ten
Plagues has an interesting musical
component also. Drops of wine are
taken with a fingertip at each men-
tion of a plague and the name of the
plague is chanted in a mournful
drone. A diminished cup symbol-
izes sadness; the drone reminds us
that the Egyptians suffered so the
Israelites could gain freedom.
The antithesis of the plague chant
is the famous "Dayenu." This por-
tion lists the numerous miracles


8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Wendy's in Crystal
proceeds go to send-
)uth on a mission trip
children to summer
all 352-212-3126.
Agape House
nual spring
ing sale will take
m 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
id Saturday, March
3, at First Baptist
700 N. Citrus Ave.,
River. Funds are used
ise Bibles, toiletries
ellaneous items.
Lady of Grace
Church in Beverly
host its monthly out-
a market from 8 a.m.
Saturday, March 23,
lurch property at 6
It Boulevard in Bev-
off North Lecanto
(County Road 491).
s are welcome. Up to
lercial and private
are expected to dis-

on this slum is
said the parish
Lorenzo "Toto" de

ras followed
io once as he
the feet of 12
nen at a rehab cen-
en he kept coming
making confession
unseling them,"
aid. On the priest's
y a newspaper with
one-word head-
RANCISCO."
can tell that the
is going to
"Vedia said. "The
at he chose the
rancisco says it all.
Let's stop messing
and devote our-
;o the poor. That
Francis' message
w 'Francisco' can


play their wares. Commercial
vendors and private individu-
als are welcome to bring and
sell goods. Spaces are avail-
able for $10. "Hot Diggity
Dogs," a mobile kitchen, will
serve breakfast and lunch
items. Flea markets take
place the fourth Saturday
monthly except in June, July
and August. Next month's flea
market is April 27. For more
information or to reserve a
space, call Rose Mary at 352-
527-6459 or e-mail wje-
selso@tampabay.rr.com.
Food & fellowship
The third Saturday
supper is from 4:30 to 5:30
p.m. today in the Dewain Far-
ris fellowship hall at the Com-
munity Congregational
Christian Church, 9220 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd. Menu in-
cludes corned beef and cab-
bage, pie, coffee and tea.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5

In his first appearance
at St. Peter's Square, the
first Latin American pope
bowed to the crowds and
asked for their blessing.
Back in Argentina, his
friends in the slums rec-
ognized the gesture as the
same sort of humility that
won their hearts.
In the 13th century, St.
Francis of Assisi made it
his mission to respond to
the poor and show
through simplicity and
love, a stronger founda-
tion for the church could
be built.
Pope Francis' "mission
is now to go on a pilgrim-
age to all lands, to walk
with the people, to lead a
church that walks," said
Mercedes Trovato, 24, a
youth volunteer who wore
a wooden cross around


and blessings that were given to the
Israelites. The word means, "it is
enough for us." This lively tune
crops up at Jewish gatherings all
during the year and is a catchy
melody to sing. It is a favorite with
wedding and dance bands all over
the world.
Debbie Friedman's famous song
about Miriam at the Reed Sea is an
example of a modern composed
song. It celebrates Miriam and the
women who danced and praised
God with song as soon as the Is-
raelites reached freedom's shores.
This lively tune is a paean to the in-
volvement of the women in the path
to freedom.
One of the most famous seder
songs comes at the end of the seder
It is sung in Aramaic and is entitled
"Chad Gadya," or "One Kid." The
form is similar to the rhyme 'This is
the house that Jack built" or "The
Twelve Days of Christmas," where
the stanza before is repeated and
added to the additional verses. The
allegorical nature of the song
makes for an interesting story
In the song, a little goat bought by
a father for two coins is assaulted by
a cat, dog, stick, fire, water, ox, rit-
ual butcher, and the Angel of Death.
Each of these devours or destroys
the object before it. The various ob-
jects and animals have special
meaning. The father stands for God,
the coins Moses and Aaron, the en-
suing items are the nations that
conquered Israel: the cat, Assyria;


for children. Tickets can be
purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the
church at 352-489-1260.
Music & more
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N. Florida
Ave., Hernando, will host The
Browns in concert Sunday,
March 10. It's truly a family
affair when The Browns hit
the stage. Their gospel music
styling exudes excitement
and offers a life-changing ex-
perience to all who hear
them. They deliver the pow-
erful message of the gospel
through word and song that
engages audiences of all
ages. Doors open at 5 p.m.
There is no cost to attend this
event, but a love offering will
be collected. Celebration
Sounds, the orchestra and
choir of Hernando Church of
the Nazarene, will open the
concert at 5:45 p.m.

her neck.
Bergoglio's friends say
he's fundamentally shy
He hardly ever grants
media interviews, prefer-
ring to speak from the pul-
pit. But he did agree to
chat recently with Jaidr
Flores, a 22-year-old host
on the parish's Radio FM
La 96.
"He was hesitant at
first. But I convinced him,
and at the end of the in-
terview, he started laugh-
ing and said: "You did it!
You got me on air!'" said
Flores. "One day I went to
visit him at his office and I
was amazed to see how
many pictures of the vol-
unteers and recovered
drug addicts from this
community he had on his
desk. He truly cares for
us."


the dog, Babylon; the stick, Persia;
the fire, Macedonia; the water,
Rome; the ox, the Saracens; the
butcher, The Crusaders; and the
Angel of Death, the Turks who ruled
Palestine. The song ends on a hope-
ful note and wish for a messianic
age, when the Holy One will destroy
the foreign rulers of the Holy Land
and will vindicate Israel as the law-
ful ruler of its land and destiny
Other interpretations are accepted,
but most would accept the interpre-
tation I have presented.
There are many other songs such
as "Adir Hu" ("God is Great") that
were added during the Middle Ages
and "Eliyahu HaNavi," or "Elijah
the Prophet," a song of redemption.
Many people sing the Israeli na-
tional anthem, "Hatikvah," or "Ani
Ma'amin," a song to honor those
killed in the Holocaust, just to men-
tion a few.
May the song of freedom wend its
way into the hearts of us all and
may it burst out in joyful melody
with the promise of redemption for
all those oppressed. Happy
Passover!
Passover begins on the eve of
March 25 and continues for eight
days.

Judi Siegal is a retired teacher
and Jewish educator She lives in
Ocala with her husband, Phil. She
can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. com.


GRACE
Continued from Page Cl

expenses for another trip
around the world to make
another video. Who
wouldn't agree to that?
Both videos are scene
after scene of Harding
doing his stupid dance by
himself in front of famous
places and landmarks. To-
wards the end of recording
the second video, Matt
went to Rwanda. Since he
couldn't find any famous
landmarks to dance in
front of, he went to a small
village and danced with a
bunch of kids.
The kids and Harding
had so much fun dancing
together Harding realized
he was doing it all wrong,
that dancing with people is
a whole lot more interest-
ing than dancing alone in
front of monuments.
He went to Stride and told
them they needed to send
him out again, this time to
dance with people and
the company agreed to it
Harding's fourth
"Where the Hell is Matt?"
video was released in
2012. At this writing it has
received more than 92 mil-
lion views. (Go to
http://www.youtube.com/us
er/mattharding2718)
I love watching these
videos. Harding dances
with firefighters, Bolly-
wood dancers, people in
wheelchairs, cheerlead-
ers, kangaroos and wal-
ruses and lots of kids. He
dances on tops of moun-
tains and bridges, in front
of (and in) fountains and in
the rain, in alleys and
desert sand, on city streets
and on an aircraft carrier
He has danced with as
few as five people and as
many as 180. He has danced
in about 90 countries, in-
cluding the United States
- Maldives and Malaysia,
Argentina, Costa Rica,
North and South Korea,
Slovakia, Namibia, Tonga,
Trinidad and Tobago.
People send him emails
asking him to come to their
country, asking if they
could dance with him.
He said on his blog,
"Everybody was so happy
just to be a part of this
'thing' that connects peo-
ple all over the world."
Harding truly is on to


something. He is awkward
and geeky, very much an
everyman wearing baggy
shorts and faded t-shirts,
doing his stupid dance in
the middle of people doing
their stupid dances.
The word I think of is "ex-
uberant" The people are
exuberant as they dance
with unabashed stupidness
and awkwardness, jumping
and clapping and leaping,
sometimes staying in step
and in rhythm, but often not
They just want to be a
part of this "thing." As it
catches on, this "thing"
grows and more people
want to join in.
It reminds me of the best
way the kingdom of God
increases, with joyful, exu-
berant, sometimes awk-
ward evangelism.
It's my opinion (al-
though I may be wrong),
but I think we Christians
have neutered the gospel
by reducing evangelism to
a polished set formula, a
to-do checklist. We take
people down the "Roman
Road" in the Bible or show
them "Four Spiritual
Laws" in a booklet and at
the end hope they'll recite
a "sinner's prayer."
But I don't know how
well that works. Where's
the joy in that? Truly, the
kingdom of God is so much
more. It's not a checklist,
but a celebration of for-
giveness and freedom.
We once were lost and
now Jesus has found us.
We were former enemies
of God and now his
friends, his adopted chil-
dren, eternally safe.
What if, we who call
ourselves followers of
Christ, just start dancing
that message wherever we
go? Not literally, although
that might be fun, but with
our lives, our awkward,
imperfect, exuberant,
transformed by Jesus
lives.
How many more people
would want to join us?


Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email at nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


Vendors Wanted


Outdoor Adventure Expo


Saturday, April 13th 10am-Spm


A One Day Event at The Crystal River Mall that
will feature Retailers, Demonstrations,
Seminars and Speakers.

Indoor and Outdoor Spaces are Available.


Fishing, Camping, Boating,
RV, Patio, ATV, Gardening,
Swimming, Snorkeling,
Cycling, Parks and
Recreation, Tennis, Golf,
Travel, Scuba Diving,
Skateboarding, Motor
Sports and other Outdoor
Activity Organizations
and Retailers will
be Exhibiting.


Call to Reserve Your Space
352-563-5592
Deadline to join March 25th
SI T 0 U N T

IdM.,,.L.L


Friends of the Floral City Library


1


*y &
Ia


I II


March 15th March 16th
5 p.m. 8 p.m. 8 a.m. 2 p.m.
$3 admission free admission

Community flouse/Lion's Club
8370 Orange Ave., floral City

Two Day Evenft


WGreat selection of hard cover and
paperback books along with up-cycled
jewelry, handbags & more at affordable
prices. Most hard cover books are $1,
II paperbacks are 500. Some collectables.
Call 352-726-3671 for more information.

SCH"OICLE

LOOOEBL6


RELIGION







Page C7 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Center offers free
quilting classes
Free quilting classes are
offered from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at the Tri
County Community Associ-
ation Center, 28444 Forbes
St., Nobleton (the old
Nobleton Firehouse).
The classes are offered
to everyone experienced
and inexperienced. Instruc-
tors will help you get
started and show how it's
done. If you know what you
are doing and just wish to
hang out and sew with oth-
ers who love quilting, bring
quilting materials and join
the group. You will need to
provide your own materials
for sewing and a sewing
machine.
If you don't know what
you'll need, come to the
class and instructors will
help get you started. For
more information, call
Marge at 352-568-0216.
Ukulele Club to
meet at library
Citrus County Ukulele
Club will meet at 1 p.m.
today, March 16, at Coastal
Region Library, 8619 W.
Crystal St., Crystal River.
Don't miss out on the
"ukulele craze," join the Cit-
rus County Ukulele Club
and find out what all the fun
is about.
Call Gail Lang at 727-
330-8991, or email ukulele
srfun@gmail.com.
Seabees auxiliary
gathers March 19
The Navy Seabee Veter-
ans of America Auxiliary will
meet at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday,
March 19, at Citrus Hills
Golf & Country Club Rose
and Crown restaurant.
The group meets the
third Tuesday monthly this
time and location.
For more information,
call Nancy Staples at 352-
697-5565 or email geonan
5565@yahoo.com.
Cemetery work
set for Lecanto
The annual spring clean-
ing of the Magnolia Ceme-
tery in Lecanto will begin at
9 a.m. Saturday, March 23.
All are invited to
participate.
For more information,
call 352-302-9480.


Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA


Special to the Chronicle
Ayn, a bright-eyed young
tabby, is gentle and play-
ful and would make a
good addition to any
home. All our adult cat
adoption fees are
presently half price at
$27.50. We also have
many more cats and kit-
tens that need homes
and are fixed, fully vetted
and micro-chipped. Visi-
tors are welcome from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2
and 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the
corner of State Road 44
and Conant Avenue, east
of Crystal River. Call the
Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions,
or view most of the
Hardin Haven's felines
online at www.petfinder.
com/shelters/fl186.html.

* Submit information at
event.


Seminole Soiree


Floral City Heritage Council slates new event at museum


Special to the Chronicle

The Floral City Heritage Council
will sponsor a "Seminole Soiree"
from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 22, at
the Floral City Heritage Hall Mu-
seum, 8394 E. Orange Ave., in the
Town Center.
The council's event is presented
not only to introduce the new ex-
hibit "An Epic Struggle: Florida's
Seminole Wars," but also as a
fundraiser for the museum. The new
exhibit explores in depth the Sec-
ond Seminole War and the role of
Fort Cooper in the Seminoles' strug-
gle to retain their territory Maps,
text, prints and artifacts are drawn
together to bring history to life at the
Citrus County museum.
A number of individuals who have
played a key role in uncovering and
furthering the knowledge of


Florida's Seminole War history have
been invited to attend the evening
gathering. In the tradition of the mu-
seum's "Summer Whites on Opening
Nights" program, the evening will
include a wine tasting with hors
d'oeuvres and background music for
$10 per person.
The museum will offer an oppor-
tunity for a drawing and the Mu-
seum "Country" Store will be open
for the evening with an array of
Seminole-related items for sale. A
selection of Seminole prints by Guy
LaBree, the artist endorsed by the
Seminole Tribe of Florida, will be
available, as well as history books
relating to the time period, and chil-
dren's coloring books.
Hand-strung bead necklaces in
the tradition of the Seminoles have
been made by a council member
who is also a member of the Friends


of Fort Cooper. Seminole pumpkin
seeds, native to Florida and culti-
vated by the Seminoles, will be
available for spring planting and
sales of the seeds will benefit the
Friends of Fort Cooper.
Also available in the Museum
Store are totes, potholders, aprons
and throws, all embroidered with
Cho-illy-hadjo, the name of the
Seminole Indian village that once
was situated on the north shore of
Lake Consuela in the heart of pres-
ent-day Floral City.
Advance tickets for the Seminole
Soiree may be purchased through
the museum from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday and Saturdays.
For more information, call mu-
seum Director Frank Peters at 352-
860-0101 or email the-fchc
@hotmail.com. Visit www.floralcity
hc.org.


Learning about Brazil


Special to the Chronicle
Central Citrus Rotary President Ken Swade welcomes Rotary Youth Exchange student Maria Clara Leopassi Villas
of Brazil.

Youth Exchange student speaks to Rotary of Central Citrus


Special to the Chronicle
The Rotary of Central
Citrus was recently hon-
ored with a visit and pres-
entation by Maria Clara
Leopassi Villas Boas from
Brazil.
The young lady with
many names goes by
"Clara." Clara is a Rotary
Exchange student who is
spending a year away from
her home in Campinas-
Sao Paulo City, Brazil. Her
current host family -
Kelly, Morgan and Tom
Slaymaker- came to sup-
port her, as well as another
exchange student here


from Denmark, Matilda
Kristenson. Clara's pres-
entation was about her
country and her city. She
has spoken at many of the
Rotary Clubs in the area as
a requirement to partici-
pate in the program.
Rotary's Long Term
Youth Exchange Program
is an opportunity for high
school students to experi-
ence a year of education
overseas in a wide range of
countries.
For more than 75 years,
students and host families
have broadened their
horizons through Rotary
Youth Exchange. More


than 80 countries and
more than 8,000 students
each year participate in
the program, which is ad-
ministered at the regional
level by Rotary districts
and at the local level by
Rotary Clubs.
The Long Term Youth
Exchange Program is rec-
ognized by many partici-
pants, parents and schools
as the best student ex-
change program in the
world. It is the largest of its
type and it is backed by
Rotarians who provide the
program's infrastructure.
Students stay with host
families arranged by the


host Rotary club. In most
cases, the student stays
with three or four host
families during the year.
This allows students expe-
rience life in a foreign cul-
ture with several family
units.
All host families are ap-
proved by the host club
and go through a series of
checks before approval.
The Rotary Club of Cen-
tral Citrus meets every
Wednesday morning at
Skeet's Family Barbecue
in Beverly Hills. For more
information, call Karen
Stephenson at 352-
746-4355.


Literary group to meet March 20


Special to the Chronicle

The Crystal River Woman's Club
Literary Group will meet at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 20, at the club-
house on Citrus Avenue.
Speaker will be Flossie Benton
Rogers, who has just had a book
published. Rogers was a longtime
employee of the Citrus library sys-
tem, just recently retired. She will
share with her experiences and au-


thoring talent.
She is the author of
"Wytchfae," a paranormal
romance series published by
Secret Cravings Publishing.
"Wytchfae Runes" is her
debut novel, and she re-
cently signed a contract with
the publisher for six more
books in the series.
"Guardian of the Deep -
Wytchfae 2" is scheduled for


.---ll


Flossie
Benton
Rogers


release in June 2013. A fifth-
generation Floridian, she is
a former teacher and library
director, and a founding
member and secretary of the
Sunshine State Romance
Authors, Romance Writers
of America Chapter No. 225.
The public is invited.
There is no charge. For in-
formation, call Jo Ann Ryan
at 352-382-1138.


News NOTE


Civic club offers
scholarships
The Homosassa Civic Club
is offering the Beri
Hagerty-Phelps Scholarships
to graduating high school

least two weeks before the


* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


students and adults who live
within the boundaries of the
Homosassa Elementary
School District and/or the
Homosassa Special Water
District.
Information and applica-


tions are available through
guidance counselors at
Crystal River High School,
Lecanto High School,
Withlacoochee Technical
School, or College of Central
Florida.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


They are also available at
www.homosassaseafood
festival.org
Applications must be
received by March 31. For
more information, call 352-
628-9333.


News NOTES

Purple Heart
group to convene
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) will
meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday,
March 19, at the Citrus
County Builders Associa-
tion, 1196 S. Lecanto High-
way (County Road 491),
Lecanto.
Note that this is a new
start time for the bimonthly
meeting.
All combat-wounded vet-
erans and parents, lineal
descendants, spouses and
siblings of living or de-
ceased Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. Visit
www.citruspurpleheart.org
or call 352-382-3847.
Audubon Society
meets at Unity
Citrus County Audubon
Society will meet at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 20, at
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto.
Guest speaker will be
Gary Kuhl, an active mem-
ber of the Florida Conser-
vation Coalition and an avid
photographer of Florida
wildlife and natural land-
scapes. His presentation,
"Citrus County's Treasures
-Wildlife and Wild
Places," will focus on some
of the areas he has ven-
tured into and the photos
he has been able to cap-
ture. Attendees will be privy
to Kuhl's knowledge of
some of the best places in
Citrus County for birding
and wildlife photography.
All CCAS events are
open to the public. For a list
of upcoming events, visit
CitrusCountyAudubon.com.
Career Fair set
for school
Junior Achievement of
Citrus County, in conjunc-
tion with Lecanto High
School, will host a Career
Fair from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, March 19, at the
Lecanto High School gym.
More than 25 Citrus
County businesses will pro-
vide information about ca-
reer opportunities related to
their business. They will
also explain the types of
skills they look for in job ap-
plicants and give students
hints on how to obtain
those skills. Many students
are undecided as to what
they will do after high
school and it is the goal of
the fair to provide them with
career opportunities so that
they will remain in Citrus
County after they complete
their education.
Call John Dohmen,
Junior Achievement-Citrus
County board chairman, at
352-249-7544.
Committee to
plan vets' week
The Veterans Apprecia-
tion Week Ad Hoc Coordi-
nating Committee will have
its initial planning meeting
for Citrus County's 21st an-
nual Veterans Appreciation
Week at 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 20, in
the Conference Room of
the Citrus County Chronicle
building, 1624 N. Meadow-
crest Blvd., Crystal River.
All veterans' service or-
ganizations and individual
veterans are also welcome.
For more information,
call committee chairman
Chris Gregoriou at 352-
795-7000.
All invited to
Pickin' Party
Everyone is invited to an
Acoustic Bluegrass and
Old-time Pickin' Party be-
ginning at 1 p.m. Sunday,
March 17, at Nature's Re-
sort on Halls River Road in
Homosassa.
The Pickin' Party will be


staged every Sunday and
the event is free and open
to the public.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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6 4 3


South
24
2 NT


North 03-16
4 74
V 865
* 10 5 4 2
* K J 9 7
East
A K 6 3 2
V K 9 4 3
+ 9 8 6
452


South
* A5
AQ
SK Q
* A Q


1-13


J 10
J
10 8


Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
West North East
Pass 2 + Pass
Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: 4 Q


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

George S. Kaufman, a playwright, director
and producer who died in 1961, said, "Once
upon a time there were three bears: Papa Bear,
Mama Bear and Camembert."
In the better-known story about the three
bears, Goldilocks entered their house through
the front door and ate the baby bear's porridge
- presumably leaving the cheese in the fridge!
At the bridge table, as we have been studying
this week, we need entries for a variety of rea-
sons. In this deal, it is to take some finesses. How
should South play in three no-trump after West
leads the spade queen?
South's sequence showed a balanced hand
with 23 or 24 points (or a good 22). North
shrugged his shoulders and raised to game.
South starts with six top tricks: one spade, one
heart and four clubs. He could establish three
winners in diamonds, but surely the defenders
would then take at least one diamond and four
spades.
Instead, declarer must assume that the heart
finesse is working and chase after one spade,
four hearts and four clubs. However, South
might need to take the heart finesse three times.
This requires three doors entries to the
dummy And they are available if declarer is
careful with his clubs.
After winning the second (or first) trick with
his spade ace, South leads his club eight and
overtakes with dummy's nine. He is on the
board, so he takes a heart finesse. Next, declarer
overtakes his club 10 with dummy's jack and
takes a second heart finesse. Then he leads the
club queen to dummy's king, takes a third heart
finesse, and claims.


J THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMI
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knure
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Wow'You just
one letter to each square, can't miss I guessnaram
to form four ordinary words, today. a natural.
LEEGA 1

~"1 T.. ri- 1L Services, Inc

DONUM /



TOONIN

L 1I L J THE ZOM 1E WAS SUCH A
GOOP ARCHER BECAUSE
CILPAD AIM WAS --
ICI LPAD I _______


LJIDILD


Now arrange the circledletters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


E
k


Print your answer here: c
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: HAVOC PRONE DELUGE ZODIAC
Answer: After five marathon victories in a row, he lost...
But he didn't mind...He'd HAD A GOOD RUN


ACROSS
1 Hindu
range
5 Be cranky
10 Kind of ring
12 Was a
working cat
13 Vouch for
14 Dude from
Delhi
15 Wing tip
16 Sit-ups
strengthen
them
18 Tijuana "Mrs."
19 Harbor vessel
23 Ugh!
26 Vicksburg
fighter
27 Ballooned
30 Mountain lion
32 Like Dolly the
sheep
34 Trace element
in salt
35 Roman
magistrate
36 Corker
37 Lawyers' gp.


38 Ike
39 Tidal wave
42 Navy noncom
45 Countdown
start
46 Scratch
50 Take for
granted
53 Pseudopod
possessor
55 Animal with
tusks
56 14-line poem
57 Rock-strewn
58 Over here!

DOWN
1 Kin's partner
2 Till
3 Trapshooting
4 Majesty
5 Took the title
6 Govt. agency
7 Wife of Osiris
8 Close by
9 Ms. Ferber
10 Faux -
11 Knickknack


Answer to Previous Puzzle


12 Japanese
soup
17 Consumer
protection
org.
20 Planet next


21 Sparkling
22 Walked over
23 Here, to Henri
24 Nippy
25 Striped
antelope
28 Oklahoma
town
29 Use a
blowtorch
31 Gold layer
32 Beach huts
33 Fiddle-de- -
37 "Wheel of
Fortune" buy
(2 wds.)
40 Sporty trucks
41 Screen
images
42 Cornfield
noises
43 Teen's exam
44 Scandinavian
capital
47 Hubble
component
48 Help a burglar
49 Thai temple
51 Subject for
Keats
52 Very, in
Veracruz
54 Swab the
deck


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I desper-
ately need your help. I
thoroughly love my
solitude. I love to garden,
cook, sew and read. I grill
every few weeks and make it a
fantastic outdoor experience
just for me.
I could hardly
wait to retire so I
could finally enjoy :.
myself completely
Unfortunately, it
didn't turn out that
way Between my
neighbors, relatives
and even former in-
laws, my time is no
longer my own.
I am interrupted
while doing yard
work or sitting on ANN
my deck. And MAIL
heaven forbid I
begin to grill. One
person has figured out how
often I grill and tends to arrive
at that time and finagle an in-
vitation. When I make an ex-
cuse to prevent the intrusion,
he turns it into a guilt trip.
I am at the end of my rope. I
no longer look forward to good
weather, because I know it
means another season being
bothered by intrusive people.
How do I stop this without
turning everyone into an
enemy? Want My Solitude
Back
Dear Want: These people
are taking advantage of you,
and you are permitting it be-
cause you fear they will dis-
like you otherwise. Don't be
afraid to set boundaries on
this behavior. It's perfectly OK
to say you are not up to having
company, that you would pre-
fer to be alone, that you don't
have enough food to invite
them for dinner or that you
cannot entertain at the mo-


I
L


ment. You don't have to give
excuses or reasons. It is your
home. Escort them to the door
while repeating that you are
so sorry you cannot accommo-
date them. If you do it enough,
they will understand that you
are not the local
coffee shop, and
they will be more
respectful of your
time.
Dear Annie: I
was dating this
amazing girl for a
few months, when
all of a sudden, she
up and told me her
feelings toward me
had changed.
She won't tell me
IE'S what happened or
.BOX why she doesn't
want me in that way
anymore. The most
confusing part is that she still
calls me at 3 in the morning
just to talk, or gets me to stay
up all night because she can't
sleep and doesn't want to be
alone. When I see her, she still
has that look on her face that
says I just made her day
It's very confusing, and I
don't know what to make of it.
I still have feelings for her. It's
been a few months, and I don't
know how to broach the sub-
ject. Dazed and Confused
Dear Dazed: For your own
mental health, please break
things off completely We don't
doubt that this girl is fond of
you, but not in a way that will
make you happy She is treat-
ing you like a puppy: some-
thing to cuddle when she's
feeling low, but otherwise left
in the kennel.
Tell her you are finished
taking on the role of platonic
confidante, and stop answer-
ing her late-night calls. You


cannot get over her if you re-
main involved in the hope that
she will change her mind. You
can do better.
DearAnnie: "Animal Lover"
makes a valid point that no
one wants an animal to soil
their carpets. I have a
solution.
Please tell your readers that
there are doggie diapers (for
females) and belly bands (for
males) that can be found at pet
shops and on the Internet. My
elderly boy wears his belly
band daily because his med-
ication causes frequent
urination.
These options should make
it easier for hosts to welcome
their canine guests. It also
provides pet owners options
for their own homes. There is
no reason to give up your eld-
erly or medicated canine or to
suffer unnecessarily That's
when our furry children need
us the most. Please Share


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast.net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and car-
toonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


AEGEAN KEWPIE
REH I RE H E LENA|
MEPLALBBADS
BBC MUCKY YDS
ERA ALAl FOI L
RIN KRAT MAUVEl
ANNEX STABBED
TEEN RUIN ER G
ESS MAPLE TSE

GHOSTS E VADED
YANKEE RELATE
MISSY R E G AL


3-16


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT


i






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Peanuts


Garfield


Pickles

YOU 65A "GULLIBLE'"
REALLY SLOWLY, ti
SOUMV56 L E.
S&GREEI BGEAS." /
a -rlq I-r







Sally Forth


I HOPE HE UNDER5TOOD...
MAYBE HE DID...MAYBE HE
DIDN'T.. I GUESS I'LL
NEVER KNO)...










LlKE GReEM EAMS,
GRAMPA, IT1TSLT
SSoUt50 S LiKE
&OLLBLE,


F^


tikHyw



/ fLz- ____-___ '


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


I HAVE MY OWN NARRATIVE
ABOUT TRYING TO BE AN ADULT
AND A BETTER
HUSBAND AND i
FATHER. WITH \ "--'
JACKIE HAVING i
A KID, SHE'LL
HAVE TO -/
BECOME MORE /
MATURE AND
A GOOD
PARENT,
3-I


Dilbert


The Grizzwells


DO SOMETHING
THAT'S WORTH A
MILLION DOLLARS.
I JANT TO SEE
WHAT THAT LOOKS
LIKE.


YOU CAN YOU
DON'T TURN MY
SOUND DIET COKE
ENTIRELY INTO
SINCERE. WINE?


The Born Loser


WIAT'5 NEw-SWOTRk'( TOt(' |E \6EY-RRONW RIAEGoUNoV WELL,wE5P\-W \Rtsl5>OWNAN7
SW,, Rt 5Ak ,OW 5\ KW 1 TOtA', '0 WE &E OMTO
50 We S iy) ,NOgE l/fA SO W TEOZ &01
.... " "WEFw .WKS | > N .F. OF WINTER!
^F? sr 11 KI5C17-


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
- HONEY, 010 YOU FORGET YOU
PROMISED TO WORK ON CHORES
THIS WEEKEND?
StAM WORKINS...
THE FIRST STAGE
A- / IS rO /SUI.LIZB THE

'f i VC"L=Ti?*5


LOOK 1. LITTLE
CLOSER, SWEEHA T t
III L i HEVY!





S -

. :. I -*7i -,I, I -I I V


I SURE
S, I /ISUALIZE
S THAT!


Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


Doonesbury


Big Nate
STILL-
TRYING NOPE.
TO RE- I'VE
INVENT BEEN
THE STYMIED.
CH4- EE.
ArOODLE






Arlo and Janis


THE ONLY SOLUTION
15 TO GET R.D OF
THE DOODLE AL-
TOGETHER, LEAVING
THE DELICIOUS
TASTE To STAND
ALONE


YOU GRANTED,
INVENTED.. IT'S NOT
CHEESE?'QUITE THE
BREAKTI4ROUGH
I'il HOPED
e^


'"MY MOM ALWAYS MAKES SURE I HAvE
LOTS OF CLEAN STUFF TO GET PIRT-y.'

Betty


"I'm keeping' the window open so
I can see if my new sweater
is warm enough for me."


Frank & Ernest


Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 3:50 p.m.,
10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
12:45 p.m., 7 p.m. No passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10:05 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:25 p.m., 4:25 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" (PG-13)
1:45 p.m., 5 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:25 p.m.


"The Call" (R) 2 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Dead Man Down" (R) 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m.,
7:35 p.m., 10:20 p.m.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No
passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:40 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No
passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie
listings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: d slenba n


"YNH ZNW KJR'M LGJH AHACL MWRGC


VAMLNWM ERNVARF ZNW'HG AHACL,


JRX VJRMARF MN UNWRX MLJM YJKM


ARMN MLG YPNNH."


- TGRRAYGH


JHOCMHNRF

Previous Solution: "You can always tell when a man's well-informed. His views
are pretty much like yours." Bob Hope
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-16


THIS COULD ARE YOU EVEN '
TURN OUT TO TALKING TO ME, TED?|
BE A GREAT YOU LOOK LIKE YOU'RE
CONFLUENCE ADDRESSING THE
\ OF PLOT r BOOKCASE ACROSS
LINES! THE ROOM.


COMICS


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 C9














To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


.a: ..)53-66 0l


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748




4 FAMILY
Crystal River
Sat. & Sun 3/16 & 3/17
9am 214 NE 2nd Ave
Behind Post Office

6 Drawer Dresser
$100.
3 Drawer Dresser
$50.
352-746-7221

11 pc PVC Lanai Set
4 cushion chairs, oval
table, 2 cushion rockers
3 high back chairs, serv-
ing tray with wheels
$350 for all 746-7221

2003 FORD
RANGER edge X-Cab,
4x4,match cap,bedliner,
tow pkg, 4LV6 $8750
352-860-1394 6pm-9pm

30ft 5th Wheel
w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric. call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945

American Brand
Meat Slicer, meat mkt
size, asking $1500
352-489-9156

Bathtub Chair
slide in type w/backrest
$55, 2 wheel walker
w/ski's $40.00, Reg.
walker $25.00
352-621-0896

BEVERLY HILLS
Neighborhood Sale
Sat 9a-2p, Furn, Honda
Generator, Tools, Hshld,
Hundreds of items
N MELBOURNE ST

Chassahowitzka
Sat., Mar. 16, 8a-4p
10018 S. Riviera Point

CITRUS HILLS
Forest Ridge
Village
ANNUAL SALE
Saturday 3/16
***7*** HOUSES
Across from school
on Forest Ridge
Blvd

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. Only 16th, 8A-4P
2 FAMILY SALE *
5441 W. Paul Bryant Dr

a....


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966


'03, Taurus SE, 8 pass.
wagon,. V6, with most
options, 105k, nice car
private own. asking
$3,750 (352) 419-4501
Honest Reliable
Caring Cert. CNA
will give excellent care
to your loved ones, will
provide background
Check 352-201-4313
INVERNESS
Home wanted mm.
1800sf, 3/2/2, no dirt
rds. must be in Exce.
Cond. Have cash little
over 90K for quick sale
443-366-5579
INVERNESS
Mulit-Family Sale
Mar. 16, & 17th, 8am-?
S. Vision Circle,
Heatherwood off 581
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 2k sq ft,
F/L/S BK/CK req
321-303-0346
LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2'/2 Free cable
& lawn care $1100.
Social membership
Available 352 527-0456
OFFICE
ASSISTANT

Busy real estate office
needs ambitious, quick
learner with the ability to
multi-task. Real estate
experience preferred.
Fast-paced work
environment providing
quality service.
Send resume to
aoc.chon@gmail.com
OPTICAL
Have you ever been
accused of being too
happy? Are you able
to find the positive in
any situation?
Citrus Vision Clinic is
seeking optical techni-
cians for fill-in work.
Sales experience a
must, industry experi-
ence preferred. Must
be a quick learner,
computer sawvvy, and
good with people.
Must have a flexible
schedule and be avail-
able as needed. Apply
in person. 2332 Hwy
44 W, Inverness, FL.
PERSONAL LIBRARY
approx 600 volumes
classics, religion, poli-
tics, etc..$1500obo
**call for details**
352-341-0170
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Tnmming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
Rose Color Chair,
& Couch
$150.
Corner Computer Desk
Black, $75.
352-746-7221



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



63" Mitsubishi TV,
works great, Serta Box
Springs & Metal frames
full sz, black stereo
cabinet on wheels,
exercise ab swing, must
take all 352-489-6146


Sudoku


mA,


Free Horse manure & OFFICE
shavings, excel, for OFFICE
gardening, & plantings ASSISTANT
(352) 746-7044
Natural Soil Builder Busy real estate office
Horse Manure needs ambitious, quick
You Load. Pine Ridge learner with the ability to
(352) 270-9372 multi-task. Real estate
Pure Bred Boxer experience preferred.
Female 42 Fast-paced work
to good home only environment providing
(352) 563-0328 quality service.
Send resume to
aoc.chon@gmall.com


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077



Black Labrador I I I I I I I I
Retriever, about 1% yrs
old, answers to "Buddy", Tell that special
lost in vicinity of person
W. Dunnellon Rd. Happy Birthday
Owner is heartbroken. With a classi-
(352) 400-3302 fied ad under
(352) 795-8662 Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
03/07/in3cludes he is a photo

Call our Classi-h
field Dept for de-










contact me at Asst/Front Officel
352-422-03783
Call 352-746-0330,



Homosassa, vicinity of
Cardinal & Gross Oncology Experience
pis call 352-628-2727 a plus, but not
We lost our catr Excellent
and white neuteredAHUA benefits.
female, he has gr, dk eyes on ax Resume to:

around in the vicinity op of his Orthodontics352-795-2017







found 3/12. Ps callease
Lisa 352-746-1172 NURSE
Cuc PRACTITIONER
NeededAsk for Vickibusy






Cardinal & Gross Onmedical practice.


3875 S. Pleasant required (352) 746-55or
Grove Rd. Inverness Fax Resume to:
IS YOUR FAMILY (352)e270-8889'
STRUGGLING? -
DA in the vicINS Part time Clerk
"God's View
Mulberry Lp, Pine Ridg Must have good,
of You r ond accurate computerP
MAR. 17, 18, 19, & 20 and clerical skills, and
Nebe able to ansr busy
Sun. Class 9:30 am multitline telephone.
Sun& Morning 10:benefi30ats. FppT or Person
Church of Christn. Night 6pm NO PHONlease Call:






Mon3875. Plthru Wed. 7pm CYPRESS COVE
A meal will be pro- CARE CENTER
vided every night 6P 700 SE 8TH AVENUE
Grove Rd. Inverness Fax Rivesume To:
IS YOUR FAMILY (352) 270-8889
STRUGGLING? ________ -_









of Yol Surl Home" accurate computer






W/Service. 17, 18, 19, & 20 and Repaircl / Servers &ls, and
be able to aCash Flowing over answer a






$100,00011 Call Pat Beverage Cart
Sun Cass 930 am muPositions Available

Call 352-522-0309
Sun Mong 30a or apply withinP
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP NO PHONE CALLS
MSton thru Wed abs $6.001b7p CYPRESS COVE
deered eyn 352-795-gh7 6P 700 SE 8TH AVENUEs
CDrysta R ive OE









SAVAILABLEAPPLY IN PERSON
OlW/Ser disable and Reair FT/PT Servers &
Cash Flowing over a Bevble erage Cartndo
Vehicle for D Positions Available






ETC. (352) 503-6651 SERVERS ANDC
COOKS
EXPERIENCED ONLY
OOOE4CF THE HEN HOUSE

4puzFL.co 206 TOMPKIJUMBO SHRIMNS ST
APPLY INVERNESS
1 INVERNESS


6 _41 35


7


7 42 _


3 2


89 6


2


74 51 9


47

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, andl
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.


structures

Installations b Brian CBC1253853 winds


OPTICAL

Have you ever been
accused of being too
happy? Are you able
to find the positive in
any situation?
Citrus Vision Clinic is
seeking optical techni-
cians for fill-in work.
Sales experience a
must, industry experi-
ence preferred. Must
be a quick learner,
computer sawy, and
good with people.
Must have a flexible
schedule and be avail-
able as needed. Apply
in person. 2332 Hwy
44 W, Inverness, FL.

OPTICAL SALES

Optical experience
preferred not required.
Outgoing, quick learner
& Sales experience.Fax
resume (877)408-2732

Real Estate
Salesperson
needed

Call Skip Craven
352-464-1515


SeA 44352-628-7519 B


iF-E E EST- AUTO
Permit And DETAILERS &
IEngineering Fees MANAGERS
% Up to $200 value I
-. - 00 . .. Homosassa Sprgs
*Siding Soffit -Fascia Skirting *Roofovers Carports -Screen Rooms Decks Windows Doors-Additions & Brooksville
dealerships
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com Call 727-808-0341


BIa 9ii_.76f5f341_ _


CERTIFIED OR
HIGHLY EXP'D
SPRAY TECH

APPLY IN PERSON AT:
920 E. Ray Street
Hernando

Exp. Framer

Dri. Lic. & Vehicle
Req. (352) 302-1206

Key Training
Center-

P/T INSTRUCTOR
ASSISTANTS Needed,
working in class-
room setting with
adults with develop-
mental disabilities.
HS Diploma/GED
required.

P/T BUS DRIVERS
Needed;
CDL Class B w/ P
endorsement. HS
Diploma/GED
required.

Appoolv in person at
5399 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy., Lecanto FL
34461 *EO.E.*

MACHINIST

Turbine Broach Co.
is hiring manual and
CNC toolmakers with
grinding exp. A/C,
overtime and
benefits. Inquire at
(352)795-1163

STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume 801 @yahoo
.corn, No walk-in's or
phone calls

VIDEO
TECHNICIAN

will work w/audio tech
& must have
computer skills
Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.





NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


CikpNi(iIdE





SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CHONICLE


SITE UTILITY
CONTRACTOR

Hiring experienced
employees, for all
underground utility
trades. Valid driver
license preferred.
Competitive pay,
Excellent benefits in-
cluding medical,
dental vision & 401K
EOE/Drug free
workplace.
applications
avaialble
Ridgeview Apts
880 SE 8th Avenue
Crystal River


PIANO/
ACCOMPANIST

Needed at Hernando
United Methodist
Church
Call 726-7245
For application.




Delivery Person

P/T Requires Drivers
License & lifting up to
100lbs. PIs call
352-628-0808

Laundry Attendant

Apply At: 118 S.
Apopka, Inverness




AVAILABLE
Pool Suooppl Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
**(813) 230-7177**



**FOR SALE**
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer with 2
commercial mowers, &
Hand Equip. in pairs.
Serious Inquiries Only!
30k obo 352-795-0201

Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiver, Dropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399




American Brand
Meat Slicer, meat mkt
size, asking $1500
352-489-9156




3 ft. Tall Beer Bottle, ex-
act glass replica of a
pilsner bottle $100
(352) 628-1723


a


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




NICE GREEN MARBLE
SPA 5 seat / needs
motor frame repair linda
341-2271




DRYER$100 In perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty. Call/text
352-364-6504
HOT WATER HEATER
Works but needs
new thermo
35.00 obo linda
341-2271
Kenmore
Extra LargeCapacity
Washer & Dryer
Excel. cond
$300
352-465-2853
OVEN, STOVE TOP
AND DISHWASHER
Fngidaire, great cond.
$150 ea. 352-503-6537
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER OR DRYER
$135.00 Each. Reliable,
Clean, Like New,
Excellent Condition.
Free Delivery.
352 263-7398
WASHER$100 In per-
fect working condition.
30 day warranty
Call/text 352-364-6504




ANNUAL
SPRING
AUCTION
Farm Ag &
Construction
Sat., March 23, 2013
at 9am
Iron City, GA 11th
Hwy 84 W -6 miles
East of Donalsonville,
GA,DeMott Auction
Co., Inc.
229-985-4565 -
800-985-5699
Terry DeMott, Sr
229-891-1832
Call today to be
included in this
auction!
GA# 002554


DUDLEY'S
-ATCTrol





2 AUCTIONS

3/14 THURS
Estate Adventure
3pm outside,6pm
inside Drexel-
Broyhill- Thomasville,
appliances, lawn
tractor, tools

3/16 SAT
Diecast Cars
& Trucks 11 am Live
& on Line Franklin &
Danbury Mint and
more sold
in groups and
individually -catalog &
photos on web

*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

Special Auction
MARCH 17, 1pm
Estate Liquidations
and Auctions LLC
628 SE HWY 19
Crystal River
352-228-4920
10% BPMin. BidAuc
AU 4381 /AB 3202





2" Spindle Shaper
$40, Dust Collector
w/roll-around base
$45 352-563-1863

32" Drum Sander
w/roll around stand
$600, 40" Lathe
w/knives $75
352-563-1863

8' FIBERGLASS
STEPLADDER GOOD
SHAPE ONLY 50.00
4640316

CHOP SAW WHEELS
12x5/32x20mm arbor 3
metal 1 masonry all new
1 used $35 586-8657

Drill Press floor Model,
Powerking, various
speeds excellent
cond. $95.
(352) 341-1714

PRESSURE WASHER
Gas powered Excell
XR2600 with 5 HP
Honda engine. $95.00
352 341 3842




70 INCH BIG SCREEN
TVJVC HD-P700R1U
with 2 HDMI, 2 HD com-
ponent, 3 analog, and 1
PC inputs. Accepts a
Cable Card for receiving
Cable TV without a
"cable box". Good
Condition! $390. Call
(352)746-2778 before
8pm please.




NEW BIFOLD
DOORS/MARVIN
BRAND 2 sets/with
hardware 60" opening
$60 352-419-5549




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

FREE COMPUTER
SCREEN WORKS/HAS
LIGHT LINES ACROSS
IT LINDA 341-2271

HP Photosmart
Premium wireless,
Printer
print, fax, scan, copy
$75.
(352) 341-2830


6
3
1
4
2
9
7
5




11 pc
4 cus
table,
3 high
ng t
$350
MAS
bL



K


24197835S
51428796
79564283
65382971
38971564
12746358
46835129
832 219 647


c PVC Lanai Set
ihion chairs, oval
2 cushion rockers
back chairs, serv-
ray with wheels
for all 746-7221
TER FORGE 2
turner grill $25
513-4614


2 SETS OF TABLES
glass coffee table
oval 45"x26' w/2 end
tables 24'x18' oval; 14'
round. All w/ brass
frame, high end $$
Each set $200
(352) 425-0667
6 Drawer Dresser
$100.
3 Drawer Dresser
$50.
352-746-7221
11 pc Tube lanai Set
/pool set, 4 cushion
chairs 2 cushion rockers
$350 for all, 746-7221
Big very nice
entertainment center
Includes
54" RCA TV
$1,500.
(352) 628-6985
CAPTAIN'S BED Wood
frame, under bed stor-
age drawer, Twin mat-
tress mcl, Good cond.
$50 746-7232
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
COMPUTER DESK
Glass top and metal
desk. 48"x24" $60
352-344-1503
DOLPHIN END TABLE
Lovely,perfect glass top
26" X 26"
ceramic bottom, moved
$80 352-419-5549
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT W/ TV. Cherry
Stain, mcl. 27" non-HD
TV. Both excellent cond.
$100 746-7232
GLASS
3X5'X1/2"
$20. 352-422-2164
GLASS COFFEE &
END TABLES Blonde
glass coffee & end
tables $150
352-746-3753
GLASS FRONT
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 5ft.long glass
front & top w/drawer
& shelves $200
352-746-3753
Glass Rattan Table,
$70
317-752-1596
GRANDMOTHER
CLOCK NEEDS
REPAIR ONLY 90.00
464 0316
Hamilton Collection
Pub style tall kitchen
table w/4 chairs $250
obo 352-628-3076
SHigh End Used
Furniture 2NDTIME
AROUND RESALES
270-8803,2165 Hy 491
KITCHEN SET
BLOND Kitchen set
w/ cloth chairs $100
352-746-3753
Kitchen Set
Table & 4 padded
chairs on rollers,
swivels, leaf,
mint condition $240
(352) 637-1701
Large Sofa, with
Recliners on ea. end.
has been in den not
used, tan, microfiber,
purchased $1,000 sell
$500 Pet/smoke free
home 352-637-0844


LARU MAN
Coffee Table
40x40x16
Brown $100.00
601-7816
Light Tan, Recliner
Rocker, White Leather
Chair $100 forAll Twin
Box springs & mattress
w/ 2 stands $100.
352-795-7254
LOVESEAT Light beige
w/pale blue & pink
strinpes,textured
fabrc.VG cond. non-
smkg. $100 746-7232
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
MOVING SALE
Dining Room set Lt.
wood color & 6
padded chairs $100
(352) 746-0099
MOVING SALE
Leisure Recliner Lt
Brown $100 Sleeper
sofa &loveseat good
cond. White $300.
(352) 746-0099
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Rose Color chair,
& Couch $150.
Corner Computer desk
Black, $75.
352-746-7221
Sleeper sofa,
$100.
Coffee w/ end tables,
$150.
352-746-7221
Sleeper sofa, couch,
end tables & coffee ta-
bles, Kit. set w/ 4 chairs,
Blue recliner 2- 3 drawer
dressers, 1- 6 drawer
dresser, $750 for all
(352) 746-7221
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
black leather both have
2 reclining seats and 2
cup holders. 3 years old
like new $650.00
352-419-4187
SOFAAND
LOVESEAT.
Off-white leather. Ex-
cellent condition. $400.
ssumaylo@tampabay.rr.c
om
Solid Medium Oak
2 door, 5 drawer chest,
top lift forjewelry &two
sides for ties, exec.
cond. $200.00 call
765-748-4334
SWIVEL ROCKER
Taupe,Velvet-like
Fabric, Comfy, VG
cond. Smoke Free. $50.
746-7232
TV STAND
glass top $25
352-422-2164
Walnut Entertainment
Center
Like New, $300
317-752-1596




SPREADER Scotts walk
behind rotary fertizer
spreader...$10.00
352-746-146
New Tiller
5 hsp, $150
352-341-1714
Power Pusher Lawn
Mower 6/2HP, Large
rear wheels, grass
catcher, craftsman,
Like New $150. cash
(352) 341-1714
Riding Lawn
Mower
Murray, 42" 6 speed
grass catcher, $400.
(352) 341-1714


- Home e Finder -
www. chroniclehomefinder.com


tin Your Drum, HoW&
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


[ 11J 11 7 I I1I 1T--


C0O SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED


******









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




4 FAMILY Friday & Sat 8am
Crystal River Refrig, diswasher,
Sat. & Sun 3/16 & 3/17 stove, BR set, chairs,
9am 214 NE 2nd Ave and many HH items.
Behind Post Office 3038 S. Rose Ave.,
BEVERLY HILLS Seven Lakes Estates
Neighborhood Sale INVERNESS
Sat 9a-2p, Furn, Honda Mulit-Family Sale
Generator, Tools, Hshld, Mar. 16, & 17th, 8am-?
Hundreds of items S. Vision Circle,
N MELBOURNE ST Heatherwood off 581

Chassahowitzka INVERNESS
Sat., Mar. 16, 8a-4p MultiFamily Sale
10018 S. Riviera Point 5741 S Bristol &
-----------5400 E Tenison Sat.
CITRUS HILLS March 16 8am-Noon
Forest Ridge Inverness
Village Sat Only, 8a to 2p
ANNUAL SA 3634 E Lake Nina Dr
ANNUAL SALE
Saturday 3/16
***7*** HOUSES M O V I IG
Across from school M
on Forest Ridge S A L.E
Blvd
INVERNESS
Citrus Springs Sat Only, March 16
Sat, Sun 8a to 5p 10am to 5pm
Variety of items! Lots of Good Stuff!
11124 N Tulsa Ter 3944 E. Sanders St
INVERNESS
CRYSTAL OAKS Sat. 3/16 8am-1pm
COMMUNITY SALE Making Space: shop
SAT 8A-2P; Hwy 44 tools & tool chests, o/d
tools & furn, kit.ware.
Crystal River 1566 E. Saint CharlesPI
BIG YARD SALE INVERNESS
SAT only 7a -2p Thurs Friday
Furniture, Household & Saturday
items 2 Craftman & 1 White
36 NE 4th St, CR Riding Mowers.
Boston Whaler 25hsp
CRYSTAL RIVER New Yamaha, nice
Sat& Sun. 9a to 4p fishing boat, 9.9
Great Sale! Evlnrude,trailer.
New & Lightly used. handtied flies, plugs,
8584 W. Candleglow St generator, tools,
hshld, Misc. good
DUNNELLON clean items, some old.
Fri, Sat 9am to 4pm 44 E. 1 Mi. right on
antiques, Lenox, Fen- Tranquil to Red Barn
ton & Crystal, Sarah
Coventry & Avon LECANTO
jewelry, furn, hshld CRYSTAL OAKS
2 sheds, etc. 5398 Saturday. 16th, 8am-?
W Grovepark Rd, off GIANT 3 FAMILY SALE
Rt 488, follow sign 5090 W. Kristina Loop
S Too Much to List!
Homosassa If it's not Here you don't
Fn 3/15 Sa 3/16 8a 4p need it
Kenwood Oaks Sale PINE RIDGE
Forest Ter off Oaklawn 3979 N. Buckhorn Dr
Sat. 8-2pm. Tools, fur-
MLMn iM nature, marble fireplace,
kitchen, bar mirrors, RC
models, clothing, more.
Homosassa Estate sale. 486 to Pine
Fn, Sat, 9a to 3p Ridge Blvd. L Pony, R
2 Estate & Buckhorn.
Neighborhood
furn, sml apple, books


puzzles, ca s, etc.
7619 W Radiance Ln
Hmssa TrI @ Citco

Homosassa
Sat-Mon 8am-
until all is gone, kitch.
items, outdoor furn. and
much more
8939 W. River Glen Ct

INVERNESS
ESTATE SALE *
Sat., March 16th,
8:00 am -4:00 pm,
300 Vista Ave.
King bedroom set
w/Sleep Number
mattress, furniture,
china, glassware,
silver tea service,
pottery, art, bicy-
cles, exercise equip-
ment, huge selec-
tion tools, scaffold-
ing, work bench,
gardening, fishing
rods, tackle, 16' cus-
tom Gheenoe w/
15hp Yamaha & trlr.





INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, 9a to 4p
hshld goods, canoe
generator, clothes, furn
costume jewelry
NO EARLY BIRDS
8820 E Rosemont St

INVERNESS
Fri. & Sat. 8am-2pm
Contents of home,
furniture, lamps,
ceiling fans, glass-
ware. Priced to sell
205 Cabot St.

INVERNESS
Huge Community
Yard Sale
Over 15 Homes!
Fri, March 15th &
Sat, March 16th
8a to 3p, off 581
In "The Ranches"


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
Honest Reliable
Caring Cert. CNA
will give excellent care
to your loved ones, will
provide background
Check 352-201-4313
r Need Help?
Certified CNA avail for
priv duty in-home Health
Care. (352) 453-7255




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374



AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


PINE RIDGE
Community Sale
3/16 8 am-1 pm Get
your map at Subs &
Such or
http://www.pineridge-
assn.com/news.htm







PINE RIDGE
Thurs, Fri, Sat,8 am
Everything must Go!
5735 Lena Drive

Sugarmill Woods
"MOVING SALE**
Fn, Sat, 8a to 2p
47 Chinaberry
entrance to Golf View
Sugarmill Woods
Estate Sale (cash only)
Sat-Sun 10am-5pm
2 Pine St, Homosassa




Citrus Springs
Thur, Fn, Sat 7a -3p
Entire Household!
2441 W Nautilus Dr




KIDS SUIT/12 HUSKEY
Worn once
20.00 obo linda
341-2271



2 Windshields for
Harley Daivdson FXD
$125.
(352) 422-3033
16 ft. Black Wrought
Iron Entrance Gate,
w/ running horse and
horse shoes, Beautiful
paid $3,200 Asking
$1,300. (352) 422-5462


ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic.(352) 364-2120
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777


--rCompressor
New, 8 gallon tank
type, 150 psi max
$150. cash
(352) 341-1714
BIG SALE!
Keyboard w/ Stand, +
TOOLS & Much Good
Stuff. (352) 860-2303
COMFORTER & SHAM
Mainstays,Twin 2pc.
Reversible,Microfiber,
ex-cond striped or solid
Berry.$15. 746-7232
COMPUTER MONITOR
22"AOC Like New
$95.00 obo
352-621-0248
COMPUTER MONITOR
AOC 19" like new
$75.00 obo
352-621-0248
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK File Cab Printer
shelf Computer Cab
Keyboard Drawer. $100
OBO 563-1073
DELL COMPUTER
Pentium4h/t 2.80ghz 2
CD/DVD Burners, Key-
board & Mouse $99
obo 352 621-0248
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$150 OBO
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
Homemade Quilt
Tops 5 for $100;
Black Cowboy Hat &
Boots 11V2D New $100
(352) 795-7254
Juki Commercial
Sewing Machine, Table
& Motor, just serviced
$550 352-563-1863
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MAYTAG MICROWAVE
over the stove White
$100 563-1073
Necchi Heavy Duty
Sewing Maching
model 3205FA
all metal parts
$70.
(352) 341-7741
NEW BATHTUB 5 feet /
light tan
75.00 linda 341-2271
PERSONAL LIBRARY
approx 600 volumes
classics, religion, poli-
tics, etc..$1500obo
**call for details**
352-341-0170
SHOWER DOORS
NEW/5 FEET/40.00
OBO LINDA 341-2271
SINGER FT WT 221
With carrying
case,excellent
condition,just serviced
$450 352 270 9254
Steam Vac,
Rotating brushes,
power hand tools
perfect $80. cash
(352) 341-1714
WHITE BIRD CAGE
20x20, 34" high. On
stand with coasters.
$50.00 239-404-8589
White Refridgerator
Kenmore 20 cu ft
good cond. freezer top
$135, 42" Round
oak/metal drop-leaf
Table w/4 chairs $40
856-803-6046
WORLD GLOBE
Cram's Imperial, 12 in
w/gold stand, blue seas,
colorful countries.Great
cond. $15. 746-7232




4 wheel Walker
hand brakes, seat,
new $75. cash
(352) 341-1714
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES and
seat. nearly new only
70.00 464 0316
Bathtub Chair
slide in type w/backrest
$55, 2 wheel walker
w/ski's $40.00, Reg.
walker $25.00
352-621-0896
BEDSIDECOMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEG 20.00 EA
352-464-0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT-
RESTS NEARLY NEW
ONLY 100.00 464 0316


DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
r** 352422-7279 **

**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
e FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


OETAT RISER
NEW ONLY 20.00
352-464 0316
Patten Wheelchair
Vista, Like New
$80 352-341-1714
SHOWER CHAIR
FIBERGLASS WITH
BACKREST ONLY
25.00 464 0316
TUB RAIL CLAMPS ON
THE TUB SIDE FIBER-
GLASS ONLY 20.00
464 0316



"BEATER" USED
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PLAYS GREAT! GOOD
FOR "BEACH"$20
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR & EXTRAS
LOOKS,PLAYS,
SOUNDS,GREAT! $40
352-601-6625
"NEW" STRAT STYLE
GUITAR METALLIC
FINISH 2 SINGLE,1
DOUBLE PICKUP $40
352-601-6625
**FREE 30W AMP"
WITH FENDER
AFFINITY BASS BLACK
W/GIGBAG!"AS NEW"
$100352-601-6625
DEAN ELECTRIC
GUITAR
HUMMBUCKINGS,
PLAYS GREAT! $40
352-601-6625
FENDER MINI STRAT
KIDS GUITAR 3/4 SIZE
SINGLE HUMMBUCK-
ING "NEW"$40
352-601-6625
Hammered Dulcimer
w.stand & books,
$300, 352-628-3076
MORRELL LAP STEEL
BURGANDY FINISH
CHROME LIPSTICK
PICKUP $100
352-601-6625
Ovation Acoustic/
Electric Bass
w/case, 1996
Celebrity model 174,
$395.
(352) 637-1189
STRAD Model, 4 x 4 old
German Violin
2 Bows, 1 Newer,
1 older, lined case,
$700.
(352) 464-5401, LM
WASHBURN ELEC-
TRIC GUITAR BLACK,
W/HUMMBUCKINGS
LIKE NEW $50
352-601-6625
WASHBURN"J3"JAZZ
ARCHTOP
ELECTRIC&CASE,2
EMGS GROVER
TUNERS VINTAGE
SUNBURST, $200
352-601-6625



Antique Brass Hanging
Light fixtures, living
& dining room &
foyer..$40.00,
352-746-1146
CARDBOARD MOVING
BOXES 35 multi sized,
5 rolls paper
used once, $45.00
352-419-7376
LAUNDRY SINK
Laundry Sink with
faucet..$35.00,
352-746-1146
REFRIGERATOR
Whirlpool Dormitory
Size Refrigerator
$40.00, 352-746-1146
WAFFLE MAKER
Cusinart Waffle
Maker...$10.00,
352-746-1146




INVERSION TABLE
Body Champ, adj
height, 250 Ib max, folds
to store. Good condi-
tion. $75 746-7232
Life Fitness Elliptical
X3 Machine, 2006,
$1500 352-513-4293
buyer to pick-up & haul
Proform 480 LE
2009 Elliptical exerciser
(Like New) too many
features to list, will fold
for storage $650
352-795-9146
TREADMILL
Proform 785PI, good
cond, Programable,
monitors heart rate&
pulse. W/ incline $425
(352) 746-4091


Affordable Handyman
* FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
call 352-560-7609"
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


CLASSIFIED




26" Bicycle
like new ,$100
352-341-1714
9mm Taurus
Special edition $550.
P95 Ruger 9mm
$550 Both Like New
with Holsters
(352) 257-8850
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
DOGGY LIFE VEST,
MTI brand,M(8-201b),
orange w/black straps.
Handle on top. NEW
$25, Call 746-7232
GOLF CLUBS
2 complete sets,
1 set of Wilsons, never
used, RT handed $130,
2nd set of Wilsons $80
(352) 270-8117
Pool Table
$75
352-637-7221
Rawlings and Truline
9 Iron & 2 woods Golf
Clubs $15.00
352-628-1723
SCUBA TANK 80 cu.ft.,
Aluminum, silver, US
Divers Brand, w/ J valve
&harness. Good Cond.
$55 746-7232



Tactical Personal
Defense Class at
the Inverness VFW,
Sat. Mar. 16, 10 am
Advanced
Instruction for
Persons interested in
Carrying concealed
firearms For Info Call
352-220-4386

Titan 25 Caliber
Gorgeous compact
Hand Gun.
$490.
Call (352) 795-0088
After 11:30 am til 7p
TREK 7200 MENS
BIKE 17.5" aluminum
frame, like new $250.00
call 352-465-9395
TREK 820 MENS BIKE
$25.00 as is call
352-465-9395
TRUNK BICYCLE
RACK Allen
Brand-Model 143a,
holds 4 bicycles. New in
Box. $75 746-7232
WATER COOLER
5gal.w/spout. Orange
w/Gatorade logo.Cup
holder on side.Great
cond.$25. 746-7232




2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555 **
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352)457-6199
TRAILER
Hauls 2jet ski's,
galvanized $300
(352)457-6199


Sell r Swa


*A&





Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII


CURB APPEAL
Yardscape, Curbing,
Flocrete. River Rock
Reseals & Repairs.
Lic. (352) 364-2120
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
0 FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748

CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492

WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369

Wanted Enclosed
Utility Trailer, 4 x 6
in good cond.
Call (352) 489-5415
Leave Message


Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained











Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
originally from Long
Island, Ny. Miki has
excelled to the status
of Master Stylist.

She speaks
Spanish & English

She has been serv-
ing the Crystal River
area clients for over
20 yr. For a free con-
sultation or to make
an
appointment call
352-628-5200


JEET
Jeet is a favorite @
the shelter, but this
loving, loyal dog
deserves his forever
home. Neutered 3-y.o.
bulldog mix is a beau-
tiful dog, inside & out.
Low energy,
best-suited to a quiet
household. A bit fear-
ful of men (not ag-
gressive, just timid) &
his ideal home would
be a calm family with
no young children, or
a woman living alone.
Would be a
companion/watch
dog, as he will bark if
someone approaches
his yard. Gets along
with other dogs,
bonds with his
humans.
Well-mannered,
loving dog awaits his
chance for
happiness
@ the Citrus County
Animal Shelter.
ID # 9609968. Call
352-746-8400


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*"352-212-9067"*
CHRIS SATCHEL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 CIA


3 16 Laughingstock International Inc, Dist by Universal UCIick for UFS, 2013

"You forgot the stool!"


Thank You pfor 15 Years

SI BEAurIFUL ReSbLT!C


WWILLLI
coSIRUCTION CORP
iNN^Esi i8


Baby Girl P
Baby Girl P is a 4-y.o.
terrier mix who came
to the shelter because
her family had to
move & could not take
her along. She is a
very beautiful shiny
black color with white
accents & cute upright
ears. Medium sized,
weighs 42 pounds.
Calm energy.
Heartworm-negative.
Walks well on a leash
& gets along very well
with other dogs. She
is very friendly & af-
fectionate, likes to
give kisses. Loves her
human friends. She
will make a wonderful
companion for some
lucky family. Call Jo-
anne@
352-795-1288. "











LILITH
Lilith is a lovely 2-y.o.
Hound mix. Weighs
50 lbs, already
spayed. She is loving
& shy, very quiet &
well-mannered.
Warms up quickly
when she feels safe.
Walks well on a
leash, sits for treats,
loves to play & loves
people. She is a
wonderfully sweet
girl who thrives on
love & attention. If
you have room in
your heart for this
sweet loving girl,
call Citrus County
animal Services @
352-746-8400.
Ask for# 17998751
& rescue Lilith.


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713







MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.






Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


ROSIE
Rosie is 50 Ibs of
cuteness, playfulness
& love. This 2-y.o.
spayed bulldog mix is
a love bug & not shy
about letting you know
that. Fun-loving,
sunny outlook,
active & likes toys.
Good with children,
good with other dogs,
doesn't care about
cats, loves people.
She would love a
home where she
could play & then set-
tle down & cuddle with
someone. For an af-
fectionate, happy dog
that you could spoil,
she might be the one
you are looking for.
Call Anne @
352-586-2812.


TRIXIE
"Trixie is a pretty
2-y.o. terrier mix,
weight 50 pounds.
Nicely marked,
fawn & white in
color, Heartworm
-negative. Walks
well on a leash, sits
for treats, easy to
train, is treat- moti-
vated. No young
children please.
Would make a
great companion,
loves people & has
good energy. Is lov-
ing & affectionate.
She waits for her for-
ever home at the
Citrus County
animal Shelter @

number is 18728509.


CUNTYWIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



SOD SOD SOD &
DECORATIVE ROCK
*Installation Specialist*
John (352) 464-2876



SPRINKLERS & SOD
Complete Check &
Adjust, Full System
$49 (352) 419-2065



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955




Your World










C*pOmNCLE


TUCKER
Tucker is a 3 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
beautiful, in great
physical shape.
Weight 50 Ibs &
Heartworm-negltive He
isaveiyac-
tive young dog &
should be the only
dog in the family.
Would do best with
a strong experi-
enced handler &
without young chil-
dren in the home.
Needs a lot of exer-
cise & a fenced
yard is strongly rec-
ommended. Playful
& friendly, sits for
treats, chases a ball
& actually returns it!
Loves his human
friend.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL 34429


TF

YAGER
Meet Yager a very
funny, well behaved
sweet boy. He doesn't
need much room.
Walks great on a
leash. He's already
neutered. Please call
Victoria for viewing
appointment
352-302-2838



#1 Employment source is







ww chronldeonllne corn


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service

Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, liclins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
**Tax Specialst

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lidlns. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


I et


es!P









OnCITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Blue Front Amazon,
32 yrs. blind in one
eye to good home.
Not for breeding
$150. w/ cage
(352) 794-3688
Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne



ENGLISH SADDLE
Steuben,Hunter/Jumper
good cond. $450
Boots, ladies sz 7V
slim, $20 call for details
352-341-6991



LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033


Livestock


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




30ft 5th Wheel
w/slideout on private
prop. $350 inc. all
electric, call for details
352-228-4303 or
928-379-1945
HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
2/1%, Big Lot, Near 19
$425 mo. + Sec. + Ref.
352-628-3019
Homosassa 2/2/cp
Immaculate, upgraded
1560 sq. ft. quiet nbrhd
$675 352-633-1593
HOMOSASSA
nice 2/2,c/h/a, scnd
porch, w/d on
Longfellow, $550 mo.
call 352-503 -7020
INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951





must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1 Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/1, DW, H/A, 12x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incis Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272


BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
Furnished
Mobile Home
single wide
with screen room
$4,000
(352) 344-9624
HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230
INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, 1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
Lake Panasofkee
3/2 on 4 lots,fenced,
c/h/a, owner financing
avail, good cond.
937 CR 454, call for
details 352-793-5359
or 813-833-4665
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, mncl
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171





NEW !! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
Demo your mobile
home/free tear down
at Palm Harbor New
mobiles $39k off list
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210

$$$$$$$$

WE WILL
BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377





ForSale10
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1 %AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-807-8847




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
-Owner Fin. Avail. -
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY '99
3BR/2BA on 1.10 Acres
Clean Move in ready
$3,000 down
$358.83/mo WAC
Call 386-546-5833
Leave Message

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&l, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182


FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 602/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498
Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
backyard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217


MUST SELL

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$65,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS '08,
4BR/2BA, on /4 Acre
on paved rd. Fenced
yard. $3000. down,
$417.53 WAC.
Call386-546-5833
Leave Message
LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Owner Fin./Lease Opt.
2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x
20 block bdg, New
Septic, Handy person,
REDUCED $24,900./
Offer 352-422-1916



CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. Only 16th, 8A-4P
2 FAMILY SALE *
5441 W. Paul Bryant Dr
CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Melody Pk, INV 2/2
splitplan c/h/a roof-
over, semi- furn, $8500k
Cridland RE, J.Desha
(352) 634-6340




RV SITES
Annual Rental Avail
55+Park on Lake
Rousseau & The
Withlacoochee River,
betw. CR & Dunn.
Boatslips, baitshop,
seasonal activities
www.LakeRousseau
RVPark.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm
352-795-6336





ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC.
352-795-7368
www.Citrus(ounlyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
2278 S. Sandirg IPt................500
2/l Niceduplex
41 Binltree St........................$800
fi/2MWspaUioums, u hi
HERNANDO/INVERNESS
6315 N.Shorew d Dr. (HER).. $625
2/1, Flrid oom
5525S. KieTerr. (INV)........$1200
2/2/1l Furn or unfun home includes lawn care
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 C(leveland ((R)................$675
2/2/1 Roomy home close to 7 Rivers Hosp.
1266H.Segull Pt.#143 (()....$1,100
2/3 Beautiful condo, 3 mo. min.
CITRUS SPRINGS/LECANTO
2330 W. Silver Hill Lane (L)......525
2/1 Nice rpt., (pplances included
9047I navis Dr.i(6S) ................ $625


CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813

FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375/Mo. $300/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL MANOR
I & 2 BEDROOM
(352) 237-8239

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815

CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 2/2, clean, quiet
incl. water $575. mo
HOMOSASSA
Lg 2/2, Central Locat,
scrn. por., $550 mo.
352-563-2114,
352-257-6461

CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed / 1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furn & Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/mo. Call
352-795-1795 for
Appt.www.ensing
properties.com




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF,exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528






LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool, H20 Incl
$900. mo. + $900. sec.
No pets 407-415-0622
www.moverightin.com

INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 2k sq ft,
F/L/S BK/CK req
321-303-0346




INVERNESS
2/1 NewAppliances, on
Water, close to town
$575/mo F/L H20 Incld
call 352-400-2626




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225


CITRUS HILLS
Seasonal Rental 3/2
Pool Home, all util.
Included $2,500 mo
352-270-8953




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1/1 + Florida Room
57 S. Columbus
$530.mo. 352-422-2798
BEVERLY HILLS
3/1 + Carport $650.
mo. 352-464-2514
CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, no pets
$1000mo 352-270-8953

DUNNELLON
RAINBOW SPRINGS
RENT/RENT TO OWN
Georgous, 2/2/2
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless, quiet. h2AC
Country Club Home
$799. Special
352-527-0493

FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
HOMOSASSA
2/1 fenced, Beautiful
(352) 503-3554
Inverness
2/2 Waterfront, first, last
& sec. 1776 S. Morning
Dr. 352-364-2120
INVERNESS
2BR/2BA/CP, $700. m
418 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 Cell
LECANTO
BLACK DIAMOND
3/2/2'/ Free cable
& lawn care $1100.
Social membership
Available 352 527-0456
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




FLORAL CITY
Lake House 3/1 Furn.
$850. 352-419-4421
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225




INVERNESS
Rm. for Rent, furn.
Share large DW, Util.
incl'd, $325 + $100
sec. 352-726-0652




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


BEVERLY HILLS WUI BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed 1. Olympic medal metal wheeled away (1) Everyanswer is a rhyming
352-566-7099 or pair of words (like FAT CAT
606-694-7099 I I I i l___ and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Spoiled kids' "Animal House" houses (1) they will fit in the letter
Specializing- in squares. The number after the
Acreage,Farms definition tellsyou how many
Ranches & 3. Aviated into and out of (1) syllables in each word.
Commercial I 1 @ 2013 UFS Dist byUniv UcickforUFS

A 4. Loud, boisterous Idaho capital (2)


5. Actor Carell's tree branch growths (1)


6. More heated window in a sloping roof (2)


Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


7. Varnished now-vanished U.S. luxury car (2)


(laVIOVd U Onlb3V 'IL HHHOMaI HW *'9 SHAVYISHAIS 's
SIO8 ASION' HOfl0IHIMAaId'E S iSv SlvM S IM IO 1'H09 'I
3-16-13 SHHASNV








I v I I '






BEST N-4


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428





PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3'
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164





Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
Sat. April 6th,
1Tam
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.comr


V


HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only **
352-503-3245










BRENTWOOD VILLA
2/2/2 cul-de-sac
Completely updated!
1816 W. Jena Ct
OPEN SUN 12-3PM
$96,900
PRICED TO SELL!
FSBO 610-248-2090




Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $69,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appi's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832



3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875



3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667
MHm 3/2 w/den
off US 19 newer c/h/a,
furn, clean RV Hkup.
Own/Fin.$3**4.900
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340



4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www. bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850sq. ft. ,
35 Beech Street
607-538-9351

Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531

Golf Course Home
3/2/2/2. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor

Best Time To Buy!

I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures

TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailseliscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'll work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


2007 DODGE
QUAD-CAB SPORT
HEMI w/too many options to list!
As Low as $275 mo*
*WAC $1000 Down plus taxtag/tle fees


CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129 I
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO



21'KEY LARGO 210CC00
Well Maintained Mercury 150XL
Humminbird 300TX Fish Finder Bimini Top
S Galvanized Trailer with New Bunks & Carpet

^ -- $11,750

THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510



2008 BASS

TRACKER 170 PRO
Livewell 2 Pedestal Fishing Seats
MotorGuide 12v 46# Trolling Motor


CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597|


2005 FORD F-150
SUPER-CAB
LOW MILES, Auto, Loaded!
As Low as $199 mo*
*WA C $1000 Down plus taxtag/tle fees


CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO ( 5 -0



S19TRIUMPH 190 BAY
SYamaha F100 Four Stroke *Bimini Top
* Matching Galvanized Trailer
with spare tire

..$9,995
THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510



2006 SWEET WATER 2086ES
TUSCANY PONTOON BOAT
-- Bimini Top* Change Room* Port-a-potty
Mooring Cover
$13,495 1

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


2008 DODGE 1500
BIG HORN
LEATHER w/All the Goodies!
As Low as $343 mo*
*WAC $1000 Down plus tax/tag/ttle fees

CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO


CALL FOR DETAILS


-._ 563-3206


\ -"


As low As $18 per ad.



2010 CAROLINA SKIFF198ELV
'' k. I I [ in l incs Box, T-Bags, Spreader Lights
I : l ... H,, lil, rs Pow er Pole Pro Series
-- M-^ Cill- ]t i .1nl Trolling Motor with Quick Release

-$26,900
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-25971


Citrus Coun
Homes I


C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 C13


2 ACRES
Quiet Country Setting
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Mm. to Ocala
$126,500
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.











SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855









El



TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619

Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant


3/2/2, 2 /2 acres,
24 ft x 32 ft shop
$175,000
Hernando Area
(352) 726-7755
Inverness Highlands
4bd. $92,500 4/3/2 Nr.
hosp. & schools Fence
shed&lg. bk porch b.o
(352)201-1252.
Pre-qualify please.




3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723

CHIEFLAND
GET-AWAY- No Cell
phone, no garbage
truck, no pavement.
Wild life galore! 4 Room
house on 1/4 acre near
Suwannee River.
16 miles to Cedar Key
$35,000.(478) 550-5012





For &Sale ,
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner

Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


MODELS NOW OPEN


,x1, Of Citrus Inc.
M =Fa-book CBC049056

8016 S. Suncoast Blvd. 352-382-4888
Hwy. 19, 4V2 miles south of Homosassa Springs.

New Model at HERITAGE!


2BD 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116


CRYSTAL RIVER
2 Story, 5BR/3Bath
2 boat slips near
KINGS BAY $425,000.
Make Offers
352-563-9857


INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337


Lake Rousseau
5311 W, Riverbend Rd.
2/1 & carport. New
roof and kitchen
many upgrades.
Room to ad, Citrus irri-
gation, shop or gar-
age, 170 ft. on lake, 2
boat houses, 2 bed-
room cabin with deck
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904
(815) 980-8642



YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ROD KENNER
352-436-3531
ERA
Suncoast Realty









SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
Properties.comr
"To view
great waterfront
properties"







INVERNESS
Home wanted mm.
1800sf, 3/2/2, no dirt
rds. must be in Exce.
Cond. Have cash little
over 90K for quick sale
443-366-5579


CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697




Waterfront Mobile
Home Lots on
Lake Rousseau &
Withlacoochee River
Adjacent to adult RV
park. Water, sewer
available. www.
Lake RousseauRV
Park.com
OPEN HOUSE
Sun 3/17 & Sat 3/23
from 1-5pm.
352-795-6336




1985 Force
85 HP, outboard Eng,
w/power lift. low hrs
fresh water only $1200
352-507-1490




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**

BOAT LIFT
Shore Station, manual,
free standing. Used in
fresh water. Orig. price
$5000, asking $650
(352) 621-0392
CANOE
'94 Old Town 164. Good
Condition, many extras.
$500 (352) 382-2657
Carolina Skiff
21' w/trailer
& lots of extras! $ 5900
352-795-9847
DOCK SPACE
For Rent. Crystal River
$125 mo. up to 22 ft.
Call (352) 257-8850
Glasstron 19'
inboard, outboard,
165 hspwr. exc. cond.
w/trailer $5500.
352-621-6960

















MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1978 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $2900
OBO (352) 621-0192


BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LK MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
*(352)527-0555**
boatsupercenter.com
Welcraft
16 Ft C. Console, boat,
motor,and trailer
352-746-0348



ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$47,000.
352-422-1309



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
CAR/TOY HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $12,100
For more info call
352-560-7247
COACHMAN 30ft
'05, T/T, Qn. Island bd.,
+ rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
Holiday Rambler
SAVOY 2008, 26'
sleeps 6, ducted air,
gas & electric heat,
like new, 1 slider
$14,500 352-586-1694
w, Just Reduced
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, king bd, like new,
NADA$29K, Reduced
$19,900 352-382-3298
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
Truck Camper
over the Cab sleeps 5,
air, generator, micro-
wave, oven stove,
electric jacks & awn-
ing. Fits 8ft bed, 3/4
ton or dully $5,200.
(352) 503-2887
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



Bed Lid
ARE, 8ft. bed,
off of 1995 F350,
$250
(352) 503-2887
CAR DOLLY
custom made, heavy
duty, like new, $850
352-795-8986


MASTER TOW
2009 77T tow dolly Rug-
ged built, ex cond. good
tires. 4500 Ibs. towing
capability. $795.
tread width 44-77 inches
bmarstonl@mac.com
or 352-586-1483




"BEST PRICE**
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
**352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




1991 Mercedes 500 SL
Convertible Hard top
Kelly B B $1 Ok asking
$5800 obo
352-560-0079
BUICK
1996 Buick Century
auto,cruise,power locks
windows,goodtires,
runs,& drives great,
good mpg, no oil
use,am,fm,cass, $2000
obo ask for Robert
352- 563 -1934
8am til 8pm
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
Chevrolet
2008 Aveo
$6,998
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Crusier
5 speed, power win-
dows, locks- $4,250
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see


DODGE
2005, Neon
Automatic transmis-
sion $4,400
352-341-0018
FORD
'03, Taurus SE, 8 pass.
wagon-. V6, with most
options, 105k, nice car
private own. asking
$3,750 (352) 419-4501
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
95 Escort LX Wagon
good cond, runs well,
130k, new tires, $1650
obo 352-601-5110
HONDA
2005 Element, AWD,
good cond, khaki
colored, $6500 (352)
344-1442 or 344-1441
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
Mitsubishi
2007 Eclipse, power
windows, automatic
transmission $10,899
352-341-0018

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing
SUBARU
92 subaru loyale good
cond inside and out
258k miles runs great
gets good mpg, $800
obo 352 419 7254




922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board



Bid Ntice


2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551

FORD MUSTANG
2004 MACH-1
23,500 mi; Exc Cond.
Have Extra's. Only 139
made. $16,500. Call
Skip(352) 527-3687
PONT. Trans Am
Convt. BIk, auto, v8
69K miles $12,500
352-746-0348





11111111

Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





2003 FORD
RANGER edge X-Cab,
4x4,match cap,bedliner,
tow pkg, 4LV6 $8750
352-860-1394 6pm-9pm

DODGE
08 Ram 1500 SXT
quad cab, 46,800ml.
tow pckg, exc. cond.
$15,500 352-527-1880

DODGE
1996 Dakota Sport V6
50,300 actual miles.
Runs great, excellent
shape. $5,500 OBO
Sugarmill
740-705-9004

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
p r o p -
erty and equipment via



Bid Ntice


BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
FORD
2003 Explorer, Black
Eddie Bauer, 196,000
Miles, Rebuilt Transmis-
sion $2650 OBO
352-228-7086
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
SUZUKI
2002, XL7 3rd row
seat, power windows,
locks- $4,995
352-341-0018




RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150




JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adamant
352-628-4600 for
appointment




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244
Honda '06
CBR 1000 RR, low miles
garage kept, like new
Adult Owner $7K obo
(352) 257-8850
Honda
Gold Wing 1984
Exec. Cond, 39k miles
$4200 OBO
352-746-0348




the internet at
govdeals.com, March 4,
until March 22, 2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22,2013..


Bid Ntice


923-0322 DCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Royal American Construction is soliciting bids from qualified DBE/MBE/WBE subcon-
tractors and suppliers for the Crystal River Wastewater Project. Plans and specifica-
tions are available electronically for this project at no charge. Please contact Allan
Parauka at 850-769-8981 for more information.
March 13 thru March 22 2013.


CLASSIFIED






CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fw


$2,199 due at signing (offer all offers)} Includes security deposit, Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment exta,
Mileage charge of $0 25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36








wI Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Oualified
Lessees A-


S W IMO.36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (after all offers) Includes security deposit Tax, lille, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $64,165. 165.36.







w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Oualified
Lessees


U 3 . .. ., ."I l,_ 1 ._.lro Includes security deposit. Tax, tidle, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
.,l ,I i" nr,Ik. :s l,0,000 miles, MSP $43,405.36








wI Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For ualiffied
Lessees


/MO.36 MONTH LEASE

$2,839 due at signing (after all offers) Includes security deposit Tax, litle, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra
Mileage charge of $0 25/mile over 30,000 miles MRSP $44,995 36,


" CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2008 BUICK
LUCERNE
CXL SE V6e
BURGANODY LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE,
4200536
*T4.es


1999 FORD F350
CREW DRW XLT
GREEN
7.3 POWERSTROKE DIESEL XLT TRIM
96K MILES, *C2T217A
ma I 'a S B B


2004 LEXUS
LS 430
GRAY, ONE OWNER TRADE IN,
=1 I58ABB
jo B5eSSB


- CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED


2008 CADILLAC
SRX
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF,
3RD SEAT #C2S2418
o-1e e E


2007 CADILLAC

GOLO MIST, 31,530 MILES, LUXUIW
PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, SUNROOF, C383130
a*#1 WB


2008 CADILLAC
DTS
LUXURY COLLECTION
WHITE DIAMOND, NAVIGATION. SUNROOF, DRIER
AWARENESS PKG. C3X176A


2009 CADILLAC 2004 CADILLAC 2010 BUICK 2011 BUICK 2012 QMC 2011 CADILLAC
DTS XLR LACROSSE LACROSSE CXS TERRAIN SLT DTS
LUXURY COLLECON CONVEX TIBLEA.C COLDR SEMIA N COOLD MIST
GRAY LUXURY P E, TAN.68000 MILES. LOCALTRADE, BRANDY, LEATHER SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, BLACK, LOW MILES. MICHROME WHEELS000 MILES ONEOWNER NAVY R SEATS
40175MES 2230A EXTRA CLEAN. C2T200A 200536 6_R LOADED 2_e EXTRA CLEM. C2SB273A LOCAL TRADE, #C3X266A
-s 0,311 -s0sa g gg a4,400 8,88 g5g ggg age7y g


2010 CADILLAC
SRX LUXURY
BLACK
LEATHER SUNROOF NAVIGATION LOCAL TRADE
#03431 50A
s 7.-1
207-8a


2010 CADILLAC
SRX
PREMIUM, SILVER
30,201 MILES, NAV, SUNROOF, HEATED AND
COOLED SEATS. #X383200
s ,c -


2008 CADILLAC
ESCALADE
ESV
BLACK, ULTRA LUXURY COLLECTION, NAV,
DOD'S.L EOAD
5BBEPBB


2006 CADILLAC
XLR
BLACK, ONLY 29,000 MILES. LOCAL TRADE IN,
SC3A252A


2012 CHEVROLET
AVALANCHE LTZ
WHITE DIAMOND
16000 MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAV DVD
iC3MDSOA
tCM00
8;4 So98E3


2011 TOYOTA
SEQUOIA
PLATINUM SILVER
22,813 MILES, SUNROOF. NAV. DVOS LOADED
ONE OWNER TRADE. C3S301A
047.909


-- A -B, ---r0 I A :


2002 CADILLAC
DEVILLE
SILVER
71,000 MILES, LUXURY COLLECTION
,#3A 18
7,r4BB


2000 ACURA
TL
GRAY
ONLY 47,000 MILES. SUNROOF, LEATHER
ONE OWNER TRADE. #C3A238A
2,92 8


2000 TOYOTA
4-RUNNER
SRS
SILVER, LEATHER ROOF. LOCAL TRADE-IN,
o C3MO18B
=G,2SS


2004 LINCOLN
TOWNCAR
WHITE
LOCAL TRADE. EXTRA EXTRA CLEAN
*C3X046B
ag, 2SS


2004 CADILLAC
CTS
SILKING GREEN, ONE OWNER LOCAL TRADE,
79,000 MILES. NC3A272A
69 ,, 3


2002 CADILLAC
ESCALADE AV
WHITE DIAMOND
SUNROOF. LOCAL TRADE. EXTRA CLEAN
C3M303A
J 0 49 jr m e


AWWW.A U LL.SLIIVA OCAL CAD LLL-AC.COEMV


00EC1R0 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700


C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


VA DOaW &MfDt&b DQ7 E16 ESMa
UvTjamma Q~03 Bi~iaflajB)
MMUr~TjTbMngRrAMM3 coeamom


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-,e ki s Ac r,


Safety Luxury Performance Engineering Service


Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands!t


APR
FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS
AVAIABLE ON NEWX lcine


* ZERO DOWN AVAILABLE
* ZERO PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
* ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT


I NEVH13 c RXj~ ^ 3AcvBEByBi I


Luxury Starts Here!
Lease $209 per
for 2 mo.

B -


Aggressive Yet Elegant'
Lease $349 per
for mo.


Urban Achiever'
Lease $39 per
for 399 Mo.

t


State of The Art Togetherness!!
Lease $43 per
for ma o.


.1. twl "e r-DX5pM ttiWKyttli CJ MSP :W. .. 4- 1- apwl.. -- .W, 0 ' .- 0-,, -1 15.1,, .. .. ^ loo w'v lo i, --* p Wi W OW M. lu W ** l Mh MS* al M ON No. I10 "i..---f OWof 6.- Wr~~ 41 TIr ..l S);C H-wtite il OX 5 !tA4UX lcy
1T-H MW &P!S > tii~tipa~ tOty H~i-.->* -- *> ... *. ; /1... - . . . I*.- ^ -. ..i- .... . . ]. i* .., .- ,.> il .. .j... . . .. j . .j .-..... .aaa ..,.l t ...a> i .* */ \ .. .
lT[IaiiCJYeaill S Ra i.3* A; cm a-l .li a,')" zaa..u,$ U O al C r m l ~ f S O S u i .' . . .j ,w -..., . . **. .. i .1 1' k. . . 1.. . *** ;. * u s..' .,.r .,', -ii. .*.. . . . . . . ..M r S* i - *- i r ,
Dnit iraDopab.. n"W ainil c :.l a -ii~.,w M SPPS ntl seiift ai~i lam Hnnhl^ l~ n c!!n Cat..arawa'a-i* at ESatwi, S*aO aal a mai.,3 lkattK i .ia;* l a.intat Sn .... w ait.. ri lSat.i p i OCK Kit.t~ tpf ta- na'itii~ wiM kfS a~fiil3 XO( biti'te m tflt ^ hMSRPol R i:C .an- a -

1 2008 HONDA
A'C'CORD


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 C15


I TII i1N I I%%1I11111 t
Top Safety PiCk*"


I e SUB


IHJASF3DJV
$^l^x


A. 9Zoi'*cU


l.t>l.ll>
NnSmir


2012 INFINITE
G37 S)NITI





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


[


0


0


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=( e 1


III~Lt


S- The First
50 People
Thru The Door


I =


-"1 ==I[


* el


00 Dodge
Dakota,
Crew Cab.,
Early Bird Gels It'
5900


02 Chrysler
PT Cruiser
5 Speed
Buy it Today!
I .88


OS Dodge
Neon
Auto, AC, CD, PW, PL,
SXT Clean!
A9M


06 Chevy
Impala LS
White, 4 Door
31 MPG!
S,2m


04 Ford
Ranger
Ext Cab. XL, 5 Speed,
3.0L. Clean!
@,h WW ^-B


OS Ford
F250
Superauty, Crew Cab,
Auto. V8
kB, WW-


05 Audi
A4
Convertible, Auto, Needs
Someone To Love Hrl
0,u.


04 Ford
Expedtllon
XLT Aulo V8 Cheap 3rd
R.w Seat SUV


OS Hyundal
accent
Aulo Har.:hJD c. Nice Car,
I,,e Pn'al'
ii^P J


OS Chevy
Aveo
4 Door, Auto,
AC, CD,
702 w


as NIssan
Xterra
Sport, Black Beauty! Low
Price, Of Road Capable
STMGSe


Os mercury
Sable
LS, Ride In Comfort,
Dependable Cadr
7,M5


03 Ford
Ext Cab, XLT, Auto, V8
Ready To Work!
6W8.o


05 Pontlac
Montana
SV6, Van, Clean,
Great Prce!
Sal.-


nu H UlU.
V8L LT
Saw,.s


07 anM
Sierra
Crew Cab Cnrome.Wneeals,
Fitergimls Topper
s.aes


09 Chevy
Cobalt
LT. Auto, 4 Cyl,
4 Door
$9.3"


04 Chevy
Malibu Mcxx
Suede Interior, LT,
Clean, Hatchback
sota se --b-L


OB Chevy
Cobalt
Sport, Yellow,
Clean, 2DR
Sa,.W


02 Chevy
Camoro
Z28, 6 Speed, V8,
Red and T-Tops
^h au II


06 Chrysler
Town & Country
LWB, LX, Auto,
59K Miles
gobaas f


04 Linclon
LS
nqie In Siyle Cnampgrine
Tasil Or Coa-Cola PrFe
SB.9-


02 Chevy
SIIverado
Ext Cab, VS, Auto, Topper,
Nice Truck, Great Price
-0.- .S-


11 Nissan
Versa
Au:,. Halichack Clean
VarranTry
"10'oa


07 Mitsublshl
Edipse
GT V6 Au1rT PW PL,
R ad rna Ready'
*0AW m


10 Chrysler
PT Crulser
Auto, 4 DR,
Clean!


09 Hyundal
Sonata
AurC. 4 Dr.1
Berige
lno,-
VU!;miU


07 Dodge
Caravan
\T LwM Mles CI-A.e I;
Mir Van in Toon'


"I


10 Pontiac
Vibe
4 Dr, 4Cyl,
Red Hot!
Sat3aSB


10 cnrysler
PT Cruiser
Classic, Auto.,
Low Miles!
aStsLSSS


OS Tovota
Tundra
V8 AUTO
Crea, Cii SR5
U.$2s


06 Honda
CR-V
Clear, Aulo C1l.
Grei-i Gai Savinvg SUv,
age,ees


11 Chevy
Impala
4 Dr, Auto,
V6, Cleani
assrae--


12 Kla
Forte
4 Door,
Great Gas Saver 36 MPG
P.wrB


08 Mercury
Sable
New Style'
Loaded
Fwe -
*B,T7M


11 Chevy
Cruze
Auto, 4 Door,
Great Gas Saver!
61SwSs


11 MItsubishl
Galant
Auto,
AC, CD
essT,


04 Jeep
Wrangler
X M.Jel AulO LUleO
3 3 Tires New Top'
IS 1; a A


08 Chevy
Mallbu
4Dr, Auto, AC, CD,
Only 45K Miles
sB,9-SF


12 Hyundal
Glantra
Touring.
Hatchback, Auto
$MS92


06 Ford
P150
Super Crew, 4x4X. LT,
Chrome Wheels, Loaded
$1e,99b


10 Chevy
Sljverado
Reg CaD Aulo 2WD,
1 K Miles'
dP 0 ~ --
wwaj~pw


09 Chevy
HHR
LT Aulo AC Only7KMilesI
Certified
AM,99S


03 Chevy
SlIverado
Dually, Crew Cab.
S 1L 6 Sp .jed
*"7aM


07 Chevy
SlIverado
Cas-i:. RegjCat 4,4.
lopp.r R ,1 LOw Mlle &
^s4^99"


10 Chrp ler
V6 C..-: Vanrll.
FW. PL Cru.e
errjwa9


08 Dodge
Caravan
GrarO SAT Auto
LOW LOO MlleP


09 Chevy
Equinox
LT,
Onvly 10K Mlas!
*"lows


iz cnevy
Equinox
Leather, Auto, PW, PL,
LS Model
Sm,4-a


11 Chevy
Slhverade5is"
WT, Auto, V8,
Low Miles!
',ae-


1i pora
Escape
LImited, Loaded,
Low Miles!
pssm .


08 Dodge
Ram
Crew Cab, 4x4.
Big Truckl, Ready To Huntl
sehUaes Jk


12 Chevy
Colorado
Crew Cab LT LIKE NEW,
Orly 1.087 M 's
$5,a-


08 Chevy
Avalanche
Black, LT2, Leather.
Chrome 20" Wheels
S3,o47


10 Chevy
Sliverado
Crew Cab LT 20 Wneeis,
AuTO RED,


10 BuIck
Enclave
Leather, CXL, Chrome,
All Powerl
*2aDoss


E


* *I [F:


."J=


mi


A I


C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


1=Mmp- -7


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t-_r


=i


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fprlLP-A




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0


A


-..
II,' .


New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
M4Ixhl F3Sa i jAnj rrar TrandgrrsT
D4veFor Ovy..


Plus S790 destination charge and options.


V F-Vheck anyRWe
in the woirlf
rrrnw^!]!


New 2013 Honda New 2013 Honda FIT,.iI'
ACCORD LX SEDAN r,-.,-,: w ri s*

DriAe For Oni D Arive For Onl
$16 = s229.
m .i .. .


New 2012 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD
I.o RU' .cEW. Ca &. :-s .*. TIh 0 ',' TT B
Seir; Vn,?W Sire r NA'owSa s m Pe Ls
SA EI Now Onlu..u

S;7~ W 0bf%


New 2012 Honda
SRIDGELINE RT
0t K 'E, 4B'1,4 h Thjbe'. i7 n 1-T Ec- FB ~ P

SAVE.E Now vOnm..

$27.416


New 2013 I
Honda
ODYSSEY LX

l SA Now -.or-..


6 MON 7WA
4CWTM/mh


New 2012 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
FdWTF*.'lJh A.Lr lHF ,-te.ai '/Hit nW I r,.'n't,
Al"-- Liury Arwntffes Ard -vrTr h'Aml'w-.ia ed
SAVEF Mow Only..
4;ifs sy3^


#H77864
$1,580
S--R-t^Mso
WL S


#PH74866
$11,480


12 KICEFa*
#P 7733
$14130


*H7813
Cyr"


#H/7804
$11,S93


IDOHdrAccvdr
#O7797
$14962


$7,629




$11,637


#H7788
$16 135


#H77S5 #H7810
$2,880 $480


ma MaO
$8,000a $8n29a
#H7"0 #H7MSf
$00 $259


aia4ssea
#PH7487
i" f"am


1OTo)76s/i2
$148,900W


#H7802




$19,38


O5MazdaMPV
SH7782
S4pao


$ffTv7
$14277


12HyiundaEAtaWsg
#H7778
$12,380


12TokT*taoma
#H7799
$24,380


LwPontlxG6 a3Tojv43Wwew
*H7683 3H7801
$5,370 $5,5


$ToyTa 7ry l6an$dS ,up,
#H7670 #1H71
ltass IS I,##


w 7myuaiu llAMsaWsnicamort
#H7639 #401
$12,709 $13,415

Plus Many
More To
Choose Frmn'


SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013 C17


ias 0


1/


OIL


MaodraCM
#H7815
L7B1S
$2,700o




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Loaded with innovation. Fueled by efficiency.
_, Now get our best offers on America's favorite Brand.


F


I


NO W UiG3T062 1U
2013 ESCAPE SE
$26,670 MSRP
-700 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,000 Bonus Cash

*24.970


Anniversary
Same Owcation!
Same Location!


W W W G3T048 w
2013 EDGE SE
$28,890 MSRP
-400 Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
-1,500 Bonus Cash

*27,990


Go Further


2013
$38,405
-$720
-1,000
-2,000

*3


EXPLORER XLT
MSRP
Special Discount
Nick Nicholas Ford Lincoln Discount
Bonus Cash


ford.com


,&68


Certified Pre-Owned


2011 FORD TAURUS
$18,950


All Ford Certified
Pre-owned Vehicles
Come With:


S2010 FORD EDUE SE
$19,950


t*A**


U G3T111 W
2013 F-150 SUPER CAB STX
$34,745 MSRP
-1,500 STX Discount
-1,500 Ford Credit Customer Cash
-1,000 STX 5.0L Customer Cash
-500 5.0L Special Cash
-2,500 Customer Cash

*27.745


* 172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
* 7-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty coverage**
* 12-month/12,000-mile Ford Comprehensive Limited Warranty Coverage**
* Vehicle history report 24/7 Roadside Assistance

Certified Pre-Owned


2010 LINCOLN MKS 2011 LINCOLN TOWN CAR 2011 LINCOLN MKX
One Owner Signature Limited
$25,950 $27,950 $32,950
3 I


*Not all buyers will qualify for Ford
Credit limited-term financing on
select vehicles APR varies by
term See dealer for complete
qualifications and program details
**See your dealer for limited-
warranty coverage details Vehicle
availability varies by dealership


2001 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX 2001 HONDA CIVIC EX
$4,950 $6,950


2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA IX
$6,950


2003 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
$8,950


2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
4x4
$8,950


2UUO rvKu IHURU KL J
$9,950


I0 MERKLUK KNDU MUKQUI) LS UO RUKU IAUKU3 EL 2UUVI BUICK KRUENLVOUU LAL
$11,950 $12,950 $12,950


2008 HUNDAI SANTA FE 2008 MERCURY MARINER PREMIER 2008 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950 $13,950 $13,950

r~ W aptfwfl aS


2006 TOYOTA AVALON XLS
$14,950
. idh


2007 FORD FI50 CREW
Lariat, 4x4, FX Sport
$16,950


2012 HONDA CRV EXL
6,000 Miles
$28,950


2008 LINCOLN MKX
AWD
$17,950


2013 FORD FLEX LIMITED
$32,950


$21,950
r f-


2011 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ
4x4, Loaded
$39,950


$25,950


11 $26,950


Nick Nicholas

Call Toll Free Crystal River Nioas
27770C.7271


Hy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 211 CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 3/31/13.


SLINCOLN


CrvsR i


2007 FOURWINDS 37' HURRICANE
11,000 Miles
$49,500


Off1 I-I l7-I !/1 I
or Visit Us Online
www.nicknicholasfordLINCOLN.com


C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 2013


Lk*NI


....... .....


I
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