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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 01-01-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03057

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INSIDE JANUARY 1, 2013 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOLUME 118 ISSUE 147 50 CITRUS COUNTY Happy New Year ENTERTAINMENT: Good year Film fans hand Hollywood record cash./ Page B4www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . .C8 Community . .C6 Crossword . .C7 Editorial . .A10 Entertainment . .B4 Horoscope . .B4 Lottery Payouts .B4 Movies . . .C8 Obituaries . .A6 Classifieds . .C9 TV Listings . .C7 NEWS BRIEF HIGH 76 LOW 55 Mostly sunny to partly sunny. PAGE A4 TODAY& next morning TUESDAY ASK THE EXPERTS: Health & Life Doctors Bennett, Gandhi, Grillo and Vascimini share their expertise./ Page C1 HEALTH & LIFE: You dont saySpoiler alert, kick the can down the road, trending and bucket list are among a list of baned words./ Page C1 FISCAL CLIFF superfood YOLO at VILLAGE TOYOTA 000DOE7 SEE IT ON PG. C12 SO YOU KNOW Early holiday deadlines for today mean lottery numbers will not be appear in todays Chronicle Look for the payouts printed in Wednesdays edition. Early deadlines also mean stocks will not be in todays paper. The stock markets are closed today. Well permit draws deep concerns M IKE W RIGHT Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER It wasnt the old lumber yard at 142 N.E. 11th St. that has residents and officials concerned, its what someone plans to do with the water underneath. A decision by the Southwest Florida Water Management District to issue a well permit for a company that will sell water to an Ocala bottling plant brought anger and disbelief to the community. Officials and residents were in disbelief upon learning that, while the permit allows 28 million gallons of water to be pumped a year, it didnt require a Fiscal cliff, what now? 2012 Year in REVIEW See WELL / Page A4 Got the day off? Visit the parkThe Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park is open today, New Years Day. Park officials encourage the public to celebrate the holiday with a visit to the park. A new day dawns GERRY MULLIGAN /Chronicle The sun rises over Kings Bay on a late December morning, illuminating both sky and water. AP sources: Deal emerging Associated PressWASHINGTON Working with Congress against a midnight deadline, President Barack Obama said Monday that a deal to avert the fiscal cliff was in sight but not yet finalized. The emerging deal would raise tax rates on family income over $450,000 and individual income over $400,000 a year, increase the estate tax rate and extend unemployment benefits for one year. There are still issues left to resolve but were hopeful Congress can get it done, Obama said at a campaignstyle event at the White House. But its not done. In the building New Years Eve drama, the parties still were at an impasse over whether to put off the automatic, across-the-board spending cuts set to take effect at the beginning of the year and if so, how to pay for that. One official said talks were focused on a two-month SO YOU KNOW Negotiations on a deal to avert the fiscal cliff continued as of press time. Read a detailed news analysis in Wednesdays Chronicle See CLIFF / Page A4 Woman drops 100 pounds, aims for more N ANCY K ENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS Lisa Leeper smiles easily. At 47, she lives at Avante at Inverness, most likely the youngest resident at the nursing care facility. She came there a year ago from Lake County after a hip injury, weighing 412 pounds. She came with four goals: to lose between 200 to 250 pounds (she has already lost more than 100), to get much-needed hip surgery, to be healthy and strong enough to get her own house or apartment, and her ultimate goal to find a nice Christian man, settle down and have a family. Georgette Bass, Avantes activities director, calls her an inspiration. Its not easy losing 100plus pounds, especially when you spend most of your time in a wheelchair, especially when you live in a nursing home. When I go through See HEALTHY / Page A5 Commissioner sets goals for 2013 C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff writerSuccessfully dealing with a difficult economy will be the challenge to the county in the year ahead. These are five goals I would like Citrus County to focus on in 2013, Joe Meek, chairman of the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC), recently told the Chronicle As a county and a local government, if we would focus on these issues, it would be beneficial for our community. Budget issues From the first BOCC meeting, commissioners and county staff will confront the current budget on a schedule at each board meeting for three months. They will divide the budget by function and take it apart to explain how the money is being spent this year and what the shortfall is, what the programs are and how much taxpayers are paying for them. Commissioners and members of the public will comment at each meeting. Then the budget will be put back together again, so the board will learn how much it can fund of what residents want. Commissioners will look at both budget reductions and increases in revenue through other sources for a sustainable, balanced budget without pulling from reserves. Regardless of our issue with Duke (Energy Inc.), we were going to have to go through this process, Meek said. Economic development The BOCC will continue to focus on economic development initiatives to diversify the countys sources of jobs and income. Working with the Citrus County Economic Development Council, the board will continue to focus on targeted industries. Medical care, Port Citrus and tourism also will be areas to be incentivized. As a board, it will focus on See COMMISSIONER / Page A5 MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Activities assistant Nicole Sharpe walks alongside Lisa Leeper at Avante at Inverness as part of Leepers physical therapy. Leeper has lost about 100 pounds in her drive to lead a healthy and happy life. Healthy goals Joe Meek chairman of Citrus County commission.

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E RICA B ROUGH The Gainesville Sun NEWBERRYC ast net fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. Horseback riding and playing bluegrass music. Cheering for the hometown football team on Friday nights, or singing for the church choir on Sunday mornings. Those are seasonings that provide unique flavors to the small towns of North Central Florida. While many of the activities are unique to a specific community, others can be found in several places. Rural North Florida has features that have attracted equestrians, anglers, farmers, and others who are willing to eschew the conveniences of nearby shopping, medical care and schools for the freedom to pursue their outdoor interests. In some cases, those who left the area to pursue a job or an education or for some other reason find themselves returning again and again for the atmosphere they associate with rural life. A big draw each fall is Friday night football, regardless of the weather. With few exceptions, rural high schools have football teams that play under the lights on Friday nights, drawing hundreds of local residents to the stadiums. Valencia Mells, a 1985 graduate of Newberry High School, is among those still sitting in the bleachers every Friday night. I am here every year, every game, said Mells. Its Panther pride in this small town. Its like a closeknit family. Newberry High School graduate Tommy Hemphill, who played tight end for the Panthers nearly 20 years ago, brought his 13-year-old daughter, Taylor, from Orlando to attend this years homecoming game Sept. 28. This field brings back memories, said Hemphill. The family brings you back to town and back to the game. In some communities, there is a specific bit of geography that draws residents together regularly. In Orange Lake, its the lake. We are swamp rats in this community, said Troy Abner, a native of the area. When we get up, we go down to the lake. We like frog legs instead of filet mignon. Abner said he has seen the lake go dry four or five times since he was born in the area in 1962. The bouts of drought can have a significant effect on those who rely on anglers and other visitors. But in good times and in bad times, Orange Lake has a place just like the place found in most small towns the local pub. In the Orange Lake community, the pub is U.S. Veterans Post 102 on U.S. 441. It is part bar, part restaurant and a total social club for patrons. We dont have nothing, said Joe Kutcher of McIntosh. But we sit here and we socialize. This is a gathering hole for us. Its socialization being friends with people you can talk with whether it be right, wrong or indifferent. With daily drink and lunch specials, frequent karaoke nights and special events like the annual Christmas party, the post is a place where guys like Rod Walker of McIntosh feel comfortable and accepted. I live up in the big city (McIntosh). We have a flashing light, Walker said. I wanted to come back to the country people. People around here are just trying to get along. Cyndi Purvis has been bartending at the Orange Lake post for a few years, serving an older crowd, weekend visitors escaping boredom, boaters and locals, she said. We have a preference for country western music here, she said. They come for steak dinner, and stay for karaoke and dancing. Another activity that draws North Florida residents in droves is an annual festival. The region has only a few months each year that dont offer at least a couple of weekend festivals. Windsor has its zucchini fest. Trenton hosts a quilting extravaganza, and in Williston, its the Peanut Festival on the first Saturday in October. Mary and Walter Duvall of Lecanto drove about 40 miles to get to this years ode to peanuts on Oct. 8. We havent seen peanuts this big in a long time, Walter said to Mary as they sampled a few. We come because we like the local, old-time color here. Its all like folks back home. The people are nice, they are country. The feeling of back home or down home is what draws many to other festivals as well, such as the Bluegrass Festival in Palatka at the Rodeheaver Boys Ranch. Sitting in a rocking chair at this years event was Beaufort, S.C., resident Barbara Body. She was munching on fresh popped kettle corn while listening to one of the first bands play. We come to this event faithfully, said Body. My husband (Lou Body) enjoys the music. Lou enjoys the music so much that now his trips to the festival include arranging time to take finger-picking lessons on a dobro. Robert and Shirley Williams of Lake City like to get front-row seats and spend their time between performances reading. We come for the music and the atmosphere, said Robert. The nice thing is you can sit in the front row and you can still hear. The front row is often a preferred seat for another sort of small-town fun. Horse events ranging from trail rides to rodeoing to dressage attract enthusiasts to live, work and play in North Florida. Horses are big animals that require big spaces to compete in. The owners, trainers and fans who are at the events also need big spaces to accommodate the motor homes, travel trailers, horse trailers and other gear they travel with. North Florida, especially Levy and Marion counties, have plenty of space that has proven ideal for all sorts of horse events. At the Florida Horse Park in Marion County, an October event drew riders and trainers from across the state. The three-phase competition involved dressage, jumping and running a cross country course. Paige Ammons, 14, a cross-country rider from Land OLakes, arrived confident and excited to show off the skills she has acquired since beginning to ride five years ago. Horses are my favorite animal, Paige said. They really catch my eye. I like jumping. I like flying through the air. Not every small-town event is structured and organized. A big part of rural life includes time to just enjoy local, everyday activities. For teens in Dixie County, a favorite way to spend time is to cruise along U.S. 19 after the sun sets while looking for their friends. The teens tend to cluster around their pickup trucks in a business parking lot where they can swap stories, laugh and generally enjoy each other face-toface without constant texting. In tiny, coastal Cedar Key on a sunny after-school afternoon, the preference is often walking through town in bare feet just to see whats going on. Cassie Lozier, 11, and Ciera Beckham, 13, who have been best friends since toddlerhood, routinely leave their shoes behind. We go bare-footed because its just like home, said Ciera. Nobody cares. Instead of shoes, the girls said they like to carry cast nets when they head out onto a dock or boat in search of mullet, catfish, pinfish and yellow tip. You never have to go anywhere, said Ciera. You can fish right off your own deck with your own cast nets. A2 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S TATE 0 0 0 D N I N Ideal Health Enrichment Center 5494 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-621-5100 Monday Saturday 9:00 AM7:00 PM By appointment only massage manicures yoga nails acupuncture facials fitness classes pedicures Acupuncture Use any of our other services during the month and receive treatments for only $40 during that month. 90 min. Massage $60 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive a 90 minute massage for only $60. Only one coupon per person. 60 min. Massage $50 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive a 60 minute massage for only $50. Only one coupon per person. Microdermabrasion Facial $45 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive this offer for only $45. Only one coupon per person. 30 Something Special Gel Manicure $18 Manicure Pedicure Combo $30 Must be 30 years or older to qualify for this promotion. Holly Bisagna, LMT MA50585/MM20050 Paula Roberts, LMT MA46821 Sandra Brock, LMT MA22907 Amber Boulerice, LMT MA67821 Mei Fen Harvey, LMT MA67697 Anna Graf, LMT MA67822 Timothy Hillengas, AP AP1082 Michele Di Dimonico, LE FB9745502 Beth Hill, LE FB9721121 Victoria Bell, NT FS879236 Gift Cards Available Online www.ihec.us 000DN3X Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol Rural residents savor laid-back lifestyle ERICA BROUGH /The Gainesville Sun Archer resident Bob Lusnia helps his grandson, Lucas Gruenwald, 3, get on an antique tractor on display Oct. 6 during the annual Central Florida Peanut Festival in Williston.

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Around THE STATE Citrus County Citrus Port Authority to meet Jan. 8 The Citrus County Port Authority will meet at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, in the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100. Among the topics to be discussed is the Port Citrus feasibility agreement with TranSystems. This meeting is open to the public. The Courthouse is at 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. Republican clubs to host school speaker Nature Coast Republican Club and Citrus Republican Womens Club will conduct a monthly meeting Saturday, Jan. 12: coffee at 8:30 a.m., meeting at 9. Linda Powers, Citrus County School Board member, will present Status of our Schools. Group meets at the American Legion Post 155 in Crystal River. Call 352-7462545 for information. Citra Marion County soldier killed in AfghanistanA soldier from north Florida has been killed in Afghanistan. The Department of Defense says Pfc. Markie T. Sims of Citra, in northern Marion County, died Saturday in Panjwal, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. The 20-year-old was assigned to the 38th Engineer Company, 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, under control of the 7th Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.Oviedo Search continues for missing boaters Authorities in central Florida are continuing their search for two fishermen who may have been ejected from their boat on Lake Jesup. The Orlando Sentinel reported rescue teams spent much of Sunday searching for 26-year-old Charlie Jackson and 30-year-old Jason Cobb. Family members told the newspaper the men had gone to a bachelor party on Friday night and set out onto the lake just after midnight Saturday. Crews planned to return to the lake early Monday to search again. Tampa Arrest made in fatal stabbing of man Police arrested a man accused of fatally stabbing someone over $10 worth of marijuana. Hillsborough County Sheriffs deputies said 24-year-old Gerardo Rivera-Pagan is being held in jail on first-degree murder charge. They said he stabbed Ovidio Sanchez on Dec. 23 after he fought with Rivera-Pagans friend at Angels Smoke Shop. The Tampa Tribune reported Sanchez confronted 19-year-old Luis Rivers and stabbed him several times. Authorities said Rivers was covered in blood when he went into a convenience store seeking help. He was taken to a hospital and was in stable condition last week. From staff and wire reports S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Clarification There are no coyotes on the Citrus Springs Golf Course, according to general manager Jay Hayward. A Sound Off on Page C4 in Sundays Chronicle said otherwise. The Chronicle regrets any misunderstanding. Readers can alert The Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660. New law permits headlight flashing In effect as of today Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Flashing your headlights to alert oncoming drivers that police are lurking on the roadside ahead will no longer be illegal in Florida, though a lawyer who has represented ticketed motorists said a new law legalizing the practice still has loopholes. A provision legalizing such speed trap warnings is part of a wide-ranging motor vehicle law taking effect Tuesday with the new year. Other changes range from allowing homeless people to get free state identification cards to creating a pair of new specialty license plates. It also would for the first time permit the state to issue specialty driver licenses and ID cards. Oviedo attorney J. Marcus Jones, who has helped headlight-blinking motorists get their tickets dismissed, said the new law doesnt go far enough. The action of the Legislature in our belief fell short, Jones said. By the time the law was passed in March, the Florida Highway Patrol already had ordered state troopers to stop issuing tickets for high-beam flashing after being hit with a lawsuit Jones filed on behalf of Erich Campbell. The St. Petersburg College student from Land O Lakes was cited for violating an existing law that says flashing lights are prohibited on vehicles except for turn signals. The lawsuit contends the Highway Patrol had been misinterpreting that provision in Floridas traffic code because it was meant only to ban drivers from having strobes or official-looking emergency vehicle lights on their cars and trucks. To clear up any ambiguity, the new law amends that provision to specifically allow motorists to flash their headlights at an oncoming vehicle regardless of intent. A Pinellas County judge dismissed Campbells $115 ticket, but his lawsuit is in trouble. Another judge in Tallahassee ruled its a moot issue because of the new law. Jones, though, has asked Circuit Judge Kevin Carroll to reconsider because of the loopholes he believes it contains. If he can get Judge Carroll to change his mind, Jones then could seek class-action status and try to get refunds for an estimated 2,400 motorists who paid fines for flashing their high beams between 2005 and 2010. The new law also will create additional specialty tags for Vietnam War veterans and those who have won the Combat Infantry Badge. It also allows the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to use email instead of the U.S. Postal Service to send out driver license renewal notices; creates plates for retired governors and federal and state lawmakers; and repeals a provision that says school buses can go no more than 55 miles an hour even if the speed limit is higher. It also would prohibit swamp buggies from operating on state roadways unless permitted to do so by local governments, and allow golf carts to drive on sidewalks that are at least 5 feet wide alongside state highways. Sharing siblings Sister gives kidney to ailing brother N ANCY K ENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS Howard Chambers and his sister Sherrie Matthews believe siblings should share. So, when Chambers needed a kidney, without a moments hesitation Matthews said, Of course Ill give you one of mine. On Nov. 15, thats what she did. Weve always been close, Matthews said. Howard Chambers, 64, was born with only one kidney, although he didnt find out until he was about 20 and got hurt while working on a silo in western New York. At the hospital, doctors couldnt find one of his kidneys on an X-ray and rushed him to another hospital in Erie, Penn., thinking it broke loose somehow. When Chambers learned he only had one kidney, it was an oddity, but nothing to worry about since he was young. When I was in my 30s and had to take a physical for a job, they saw that my creatine numbers were climbing, so we knew someday my kidney would quit, he said. It lasted another 30 years. I was probably 60 when they told me it was really failing. In 1996, Chambers had triple-bypass surgery, which revealed a cancerous mass growing on the back of his heart. I havent been too healthy, he said. A kidney transplant was always on the horizon, but because of his poor health he also developed diabetes the doctors said if he was put on the transplant waiting list for a donor kidney he probably would never get one. Thats when Matthews said he could have hers she was a perfect match. For several years they played a waiting game. Dec. 30, 2011, Chambers went in for surgery to have a dialysis fistula inserted so he could begin dialysis treatment when his kidney completely shut down. However, transplant surgery was out of the question, because Chambers weighed too much. At 274 pounds, he needed to get down to 200 before his doctor would OK him for surgery. So, he set about losing the weight. Three nights a week he went for dialysis treatment and followed a strict renal diet. During the day he rode his bicycle, averaging 100 miles a week, and played shuffleboard. By his surgery date, Nov. 15, he weighed 202 pounds. I was determined, he said. The whole family was at the waiting room at Tampa General, said Deborah Chambers, Howards wife. The only glitch was a tiny kidney stone the doctors found in Matthews donated kidney, which was removed. Both Chambers and his sister, with the companionship of their spouses, spent Thanksgiving recovering from their surgeries at a friends house in Tampa. They sat on the couch while their spouses cooked. Now all of a sudden hes back to normal again, but its a different normal, Mrs. Chambers said. For so many months we had a different way of life. Now, Chambers blood pressure is normal and his diabetes is getting better. The doctor recently cleared him to ride his bike again. Hell be taking anti-rejection drugs for the rest of his life, but thats OK because now he has a rest of his life to look forward to. Were hoping for another 15 years, he said. Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@ chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927. NANCY KENNEDY /Chronicle On Nov. 15, Sherrie Matthews gave her brother, Howard Chambers, the best gift she could give him one of her kidneys. Lyngbya clean-up crew discovers spring vent Volunteers removed 548 tons of algae Special to the ChronicleKings Bay Rotarys One Rake at a Time community service project uncovered another spring vent in Kings Bay while removing Lyngbya on the last day of the year. Right at the end of one of the Hunters Springs canals, fresh clean water could be seen bubbling up through white sand where it had not been seen in years, according to Art Jones, pioneer of the project. Next to the sea wall more water could be seen gushing up where it had been uncovered in November. The canals and springs around Hunters Spring are slowly coming back to life again as ton after ton of thick benthic mats of lyngbya are removed, slowing the internal eutrophication going on in parts of Kings Bay and cleaning the water of pollutants, Jones said. With 2012 coming to a close, another 443 tons of noxious lyngbya algae have been removed since September, making a total of more than 548 tons taken out of Kings Bay since the project began in September 2011. Work has been going well, with cleanups taking place at Hunters Spring basin and canals, Indian River, Three Sisters Springs and canals, Ceder Cove, the northwest boat ramp, the Third Street Pier, Stoney Point, Palm Springs and other various sections of Crystal River and Kings Bay. In the second year of the project the Rotary is averaging more than 7,383 pounds per day of polluting Lyngbya removed from the waters of Kings Bay. With the help of mechanical methods added to help volunteer muscle in restoring water quality, quantity, clarity along with improving fish, manatee and human habitat, things are slowly improving. This year the Lyngbya harvester has also been used to harvest manatee food from Cooter Pond in Inverness to help feed the manatees in the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. Natural native submerged vegetation is lacking in the Homosassa River because of invasive Lyngbya and manatees are hurting for food there also. The Kings Bay Rotary hopes to be taking the One Rake project to the Homosassa River some time in 2013 and is now looking for more sponsors. The next public cleanup will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Jan. 26, at Hunter Springs Park in Crystal River. College students and teachers who were here last year from Darton College in Georgia are coming back to kick-off the new year. For more information contact Art Jones at MrAWJones@aol.com or follow the project on Facebook at Save Kings Bay Watch One Rake at a Time on TV every Sunday at noon on WYKE cable 16 to learn more. To see the project in action search YouTube for SaveKingsBay. Special to the Chronicle Lyngbya is removed from Kings Bay by the trailer-load on one of the last days of 2012.

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delay in the across-the-board cuts but negotiators had yet to agree on about $24 billion in savings from elsewhere in the budget. Democrats had asked for the cuts to be put off for one year and be offset by unspecified revenue. The president said that whatever last-minute fixes are necessary, they must come from a blend of tax revenue and constrained spending, not just budget cuts. And a little more than an hour after Obama spoke, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said it was time to decouple the two major issues. Well continue to work on smarter ways to cut spending, but lets not let that hold up protecting Americans from a tax hike that will take place in about ten hours, he said. Officials emphasized that negotiations were continuing and the emerging deal was not yet final. And a confident Obama, flanked by cheering middle class Americans in a White House auditorium, jabbed Congress, saying lawmakers were prone to last-minute delays. One thing we can count on with respect to this Congress is that if theres even one second left before you have to do what youre supposed to do, they will use that last second, he said. Speaking shortly afterward on the Senate floor, Sen. John McCain said that at a time of crisis, on New Years Eve...you had the president of the United States go over and have a cheerleading, ridiculing-ofRepublicans exercise. The Arizona Republican lost the 2008 presidential race to Obama. Unless an agreement is reached and approved by Congress at the start of the New Year, more than $500 billion in 2013 tax increases will take effect immediately and $109 billion in cuts will be carved from defense and domestic programs Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A residential burglary was reported at 3:29 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28, in the 2900 block of S. Coleman Ave., Homosassa. A commercial burglary was reported at 8:35 a.m. Dec. 28 in the 3100 block of N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando. A residential burglary was reported at 10:26 a.m. Dec. 28 in the 600 block of Bay St., Inverness. A vehicle burglary was reported at 12:46 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 29, in the 3800 block of N. Nokomis Point, Crystal River. A commercial burglary was reported at 9:43 a.m. Dec. 29 in the 600 block of Whispering Pines Blvd., Inverness. A vehicle burglary was reported at 10:04 a.m. Dec. 29 in the 1800 block of S. Juneberry Lane, Inverness. A vehicle burglary was reported at 12:31 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 5400 block of S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. A residential burglary was reported at 1:25 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 6300 block of S. Hancock Road, Homosassa. A vehicle burglary was reported at 8:42 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30, in the 1500 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. Thefts A grand theft was reported at 10:39 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28, in the 800 block of E. Hillsborough Court, Hernando. A grand theft was reported at 1:59 p.m. Dec. 28 at Beverly Hills Boulevard, Beverly Hills. A grand theft was reported at 4:46 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 5500 block of W. Irving Court, Homosassa. A larceny petit theft was reported at 4:56 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 1600 block of W. Redding St., Hernando. A petit theft was reported at 6:16 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 7600 block of W. Drover St., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 9:02 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 3900 block of S. Gemini Point, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 2:55 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 29, in the 700 block of S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. A petit theft was reported at 2:02 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 2400 block of W. Dolphin Drive, Dunnellon. A petit theft was reported at 2:47 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to Lake Highway, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 4:06 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 6300 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 5:18 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 5:21 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 3900 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 5:46 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30, in the 4700 block of E. Marsh Lake Drive, Hernando. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 68 38 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Mostly sunny to partly sunny and warmer.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Increasing clouds with a 20% chance of rain by night. Mostly cloudy with a 50% chance of showers. High: 76 Low: 55 High: 77 Low: 54 High: 70 Low: 52 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 73/39 Record 83/21 Normal 70/43 Mean temp. 56 Departure from mean +0 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month 3.00 in. Total for the year 62.01 in. Normal for the year 51.79 in.*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 5 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.24 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 52 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 49% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and weeds were light and grasses were absent. ** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:44 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:24 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................9:52 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................9:56 A.M. JAN. 4JAN. 11JAN. 18JAN. 26 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 75 59 s Ft. Lauderdale 79 67 s Fort Myers 79 62 s Gainesville 73 55 s Homestead 78 62 s Jacksonville 71 54 s Key West 79 70 pc Lakeland 75 59 s Melbourne 77 60 s City H L Fcast Miami 79 65 s Ocala 74 56 s Orlando 77 58 s Pensacola 73 52 sh Sarasota 77 60 s Tallahassee 73 56 pc Tampa 74 63 s Vero Beach 76 58 s W. Palm Bch. 78 62 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSouth winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a light chop. Mostly sunny today. Gulf water temperature59 LAKE LEVELS Location Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 34 21 pc 29 11 Albuquerque 38 30 .03 pc 35 17 Asheville 51 24 r 45 35 Atlanta 52 30 r 54 42 Atlantic City 42 28 sh 45 28 Austin 61 46 .17 pc 58 33 Baltimore 40 27 sh 45 28 Billings 19 9 pc 29 12 Birmingham 49 34 r 53 40 Boise 23 13 pc 25 3 Boston 32 21 pc 35 16 Buffalo 34 25 sn 25 17 Burlington, VT 27 13 pc 16 2 Charleston, SC 60 26 pc 66 53 Charleston, WV 36 20 rs 37 23 Charlotte 53 26 r 48 40 Chicago 35 31 s 22 14 Cincinnati 36 19 pc 32 12 Cleveland 34 21 pc 29 19 Columbia, SC 57 26 r 57 44 Columbus, OH 34 19 .02 pc 31 12 Concord, N.H. 32 14 c 27 3 Dallas 44 39 .16 s 45 29 Denver 22 13 pc 26 1 Des Moines 33 19 pc 13 6 Detroit 34 17 pc 24 16 El Paso 48 38 s 47 25 Evansville, IN 36 30 .09 pc 33 15 Harrisburg 36 23 c 38 22 Hartford 35 16 pc 36 15 Houston 59 46 .01 r 59 42 Indianapolis 34 27 .02 pc 28 9 Jackson 55 33 r 58 39 Las Vegas 46 37 s 48 32 Little Rock 39 34 .01 pc 44 29 Los Angeles 54 41 s 65 46 Louisville 37 28 c 35 18 Memphis 48 36 r 46 27 Milwaukee 33 25 s 16 10 Minneapolis 18 8 pc 12 4 Mobile 57 35 ts 72 49 Montgomery 56 30 r 61 49 Nashville 42 27 r 44 27 New Orleans 57 42 ts 70 51 New York City 37 28 c 41 24 Norfolk 46 25 sh 47 37 Oklahoma City 38 34 .35 pc 33 21 Omaha 24 17 pc 21 7 Palm Springs 57 38 s 59 38 Philadelphia 37 30 c 43 30 Phoenix 50 41 pc 55 37 Pittsburgh 33 20 sn 29 14 Portland, ME 33 13 pc 29 5 Portland, Ore 35 30 s 41 30 Providence, R.I. 34 18 pc 36 16 Raleigh 50 25 sh 44 39 Rapid City 21 2 pc 29 19 Reno 20 11 pc 32 12 Rochester, NY 35 27 sn 26 17 Sacramento 46 31 s 53 31 St. Louis 39 34 .20 pc 26 14 St. Ste. Marie 31 23 .01 sn 19 7 Salt Lake City 24 12 .01 pc 26 11 San Antonio 59 50 .22 s 62 36 San Diego 53 41 s 62 44 San Francisco 49 37 s 52 37 Savannah 59 27 pc 66 54 Seattle 37 30 pc 42 28 Spokane 25 23 c 22 12 Syracuse 35 27 sn 26 15 Topeka 39 29 .02 pc 23 10 Washington 41 29 sh 44 30YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 80 McAllen, Texas LOW -21 Minot A.F.B., N.D. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/75/pc Amsterdam 45/43/sh Athens 54/47/c Beijing 10/-3/s Berlin 43/36/sh Bermuda 66/66/pc Cairo 67/52/s Calgary 29/16/s Havana 81/67/pc Hong Kong 57/53/pc Jerusalem 60/45/s Lisbon 56/44/c London 45/36/pc Madrid 49/35/pc Mexico City 70/46/pc Montreal 17/10/pc Moscow 26/23/sf Paris 48/35/sh Rio 93/77/pc Rome 50/47/sh Sydney 74/67/sh Tokyo 45/33/s Toronto 26/21/c Warsaw 38/30/pc WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 7:18 a/3:30 a 8:27 p/3:53 p 8:02 a/4:11 a 9:01 p/4:28 p Crystal River** 5:39 a/12:52 a 6:48 p/1:15 p 6:23 a/1:33 a 7:22 p/1:50 p Withlacoochee* 3:26 a/11:03 a 4:35 p/11:21 p 4:10 a/11:38 a 5:09 p/ Homosassa*** 6:28 a/2:29 a 7:37 p/2:52 p 7:12 a/3:10 a 8:11 p/3:27 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 1/1 TUESDAY 9:15 2:33 9:39 1/2 WEDNESDAY 10:00 3:18 10:25 3:43FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR NA NA NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Today's active pollen: juniper, maple, oak Todays count: 7.4/12 Wednesdays count: 9.8 Thursdays count: 8.7 For the RECORD A4 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 Legal notices in todays Citrus County Chronicle 000DM1W Lien Notices . . . C12 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Meadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness office Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946 Report a news tip:Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken .......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage ................................ Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. CLIFF Continued from Page A1 meter so there is no way to monitor the actual withdrawal amounts. Water district officials said they had no choice but to issue the permit, which cost $50. City officials said they didnt learn of the permit until after the period to appeal had expired. City Manager Andy Houston said he didnt know at the time that his office could be alerted anytime someone requests a water-use permit from the water district. Had we been on that register previously, we could have voiced our concerns, Houston said. Were on that list now. Heatherwood Investments LLC of Crystal River and Mistletoe LLC of Ocala requested the permit. They intend to transport water from the site to Consolidated Water Group LLC in Ocala. So far, other than a test well, nothing has occurred on the property. Jackie Gorman, director of planning and development, said the company must submit a site plan that includes restroom facilities, landscaping, well location, expected daily truck traffic amounts and future uses for the property. She said the owners must bring the old lumber yard site up to current code. Any variance of the code will require council approval. Our land development code is one size fits all and sometimes it doesnt fit, Gorman said. If we are in disagreement, we go to the council with it. I dont foresee that happening. Gorman said she hopes the companys trucks will access 11th Street off Citrus Avenue rather than drive through the neighborhood. She also said the company hasnt given her a timeline for when it wants to start pumping water. They submitted their original conceptual site plan a month ago, Gorman said. They have not given me any sense of urgency on this. Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. WELL Continued from Page A1 Associated Press President Barack Obama pauses Monday as he speaks about the fiscal cliff in the South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington. 72 40 0.00

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infrastructure projects. The biggest issue that we must face is diversifying our economy, Meek said. Were going to make sure that we have investment in those diversified markets. Partnership with cities The BOCC will work with the cities of Inverness and Crystal River to develop partnerships to improve the county and the cities and strengthen those relationships. I have met with all the city council members from Crystal River and Inverness, telling them we are going to be looking for ways to partner with you all, Meeks said. Long-range plan In a comprehensive project including both cities, individuals, civic groups, businesses and professional organizations, such areas as tourism, economic development, land use planning, development standards, transportation planning and branding of the county are to be reviewed, similar to Pasco Countys strategic plan that changed and improved growth. We are going to look at some other communities and learn about the process that they went through, Meek said. We can look at our comprehensive plan and tie it in with economic development and transportation planning. Kings Bay The BOCC will work with the city of Crystal River, state government, private individuals and businesses to fund and execute a single project to improve the quality of the Crystal River and Kings Bay. It also could serve as a catalyst for a master plan to address septic pollution and water runoff issues. We allocated $225,000 from our water quality reserve account to the One Rake at a Time project, Meek said. We got unanimous approval from the city council to enter into a memorandum of understanding. Were going to take that MOU to (the Southwest Florida Water Management District) to apply for an out-of-cycle grant, which will be a matching fund of $225,000 to fund Lyngbya and sediment removal out of the bay. That project is moving forward right now.Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer can be reached at cvanormer@chronicle online.com or 352-564-2916. hardships, I remember the scripture verse, I take pleasure in my infirmities ... for when I am weak, then I am strong. Ive overcome a lot, Leeper says. She grew up feeling unloved. A house fire 10 years ago destroyed everything she owned. At one time she was homeless, living in her car, living in a shelter. Her mother tried to kill herself. Her stepfather, whom she adored, died. She gained 250 pounds. But through it all, she learned that she was, indeed, strong. I like to encourage people, Leeper says. I have determination. I tell people, Your past failures, you just have to get past them. Determination you have to keep at it. Leeper grew up in Leesburg. She worked in a daycare center she loves kids and then found a good job in a school cafeteria. In 2003, she lost everything in a house fire and ended up in a womens shelter for six months. I didnt know I could handle such a crisis, she says. At the shelter she was required to take drug and alcohol abuse classes, since most of the women there dealt with those issues, but that wasnt her issue. She felt out of place and prayed that something would fall into her lap. She was at a Wednesday night church service and a piece of paper fluttered through the air and landed on her lap. On it was information for a house to rent. I loved that place, she says. It had knotty pine ceilings I was there for four years until the rent went up and I couldnt stay there. She lived with her mother for a while, but that was difficult. When her mother tried to kill herself with an overdose of pills, she was involuntarily institutionalized for six months and lost her apartment. So, I was homeless again, and the shelter wouldnt take me, so I slept in my car for two months, she says. A friend took her in, but had her move out after a while. Then she found a church that let her sleep there. Eventually, she wound up in the hospital because of her hip until she came to Avante, the only facility that would take her. Through it all, her weight steadily climbed. Leeper says she tried to hide her stress and her worry, her feelings of being unloved and rejected, with eating. By the time she reached 400 pounds and the doctors told her she couldnt have hip surgery until she lost at least 150 pounds, she knew she needed to make some changes, and that it would take all the determination she had. She says the only food she has is the food that Avante serves to everyone, so she has taught herself to say no to the desserts and to watch her portions. At first, people would sneak me things to eat, but I realized I was only hurting myself, she says. Losing the first 100 pounds felt great. I started getting my self-esteem and confidence back. I havent weighed under 300 pounds in 10 years. Exercise is a challenge, but she does what she can. She walks with assistance and can do some exercises from her chair. She says she has a picture in her head of what she wants to look like. I always picture myself weighing 200, she says. I dream about wearing a nice slim outfit, a wrap-around dress with a V-neck, maybe purple or green. I dream about having a fireplace and a house, sitting there cozy with a hubby and a family. Since arriving at Avante, Leeper has served on the resident council. She facilitates a craft group and makes jewelry to sell to raise funds for resident outings. She talks to people, encourages them, tries to get them to see the good in their situation. She helps new people she mothers people, Bass says. We love Lisa. Shes really an inspiration to everyone here. Some days, Leeper feels discouraged. Losing 200 or 250 pounds is a daunting task, so she sets small goals 5 pounds this week, 10 pounds this month. And then theres her future hubby. Thats what keeps her motivated and moving forward, 1 pound at a time. Its what she wants more than anything. I told my mom that Gods going to give me a guy whos gentle and who will treat me like a queen, she says. She says he doesnt exist, but shes wrong. Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@chronicle online.com or 352-564-2927. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 A5 CTA Audio INC. Gift Certificates Available We Will Make Your Car or Truck Feel Great This Holiday Season! 000D6ME With over 15 years experience 3231 E. Thomas St., Inverness (352) 341-4001 from Window Tint by Llumar Come In & Check Out Our Holiday Specials Custom Truck Accessories from: Roll-N-Lock Westin Raptor Custom Wheels from: American Racing KMC Moto Metal ATX & Many Others Stereos & Speakers from: Pioneer Kenwood JVC Memphis Speakers $10 OFF Whole car or truck WINDOW TINT with coupon. Expires 2/5/13 000DLQN Blackshears II Aluminum HWY. 44, CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9722 1-888-474-2269 (TOLL FREE) www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer RESCREEN GARAGE SCREENS NEW SCREEN ROOMS GLASS ROOM CONVERSIONS Wishing You A Happy & Prosperous New Year! 406 NE 1st., Crystal River info@citruspest.com 352-563-6698 866-860-BUGS 000D0WR CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR INSPECTION RODENT PROTECTION CITRUS PEST MANAGEMENT INC. OFFERS IS YOUR HOME RODENT PROOFED? COLD WEATHER IS HERE! www.CitrusPest.com 2012 2012 2012 2012 A+ RATING Did you know 1 female can produce 6-8 litters with 4-12 pups in each litter per year? Rats gnawing pose a serious threat to electrical wires, which could start a fire in your house! HAPPY NEW YEAR! 000DM7C 1/2 mi. South of the Fairgrounds D U D L E Y S A U C T I O N D U D L E Y S A U C T I O N D UDLEY S A UCTION 4000 S. F LORIDA A VE ., (U.S. 41 S) I NVERNESS F LORIDA 34450 Dudleys Auction & Maine-ly Real Estate Central Floridas Largest & Most Diverse Auction Company BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE FOR UP-TO-DATE PHOTOS www.dudleysauction.com ab1667 au2246 Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588 Personal Property sold together w/Dudleys Auction AB1667. The Real Estate by Main-ly Real Estate-C hristine Dudley Lic RE Br oker #381384. AU#4239. Dudleys Auction For real estate inquires contact Chris @ 352-344-9588, Bob Brittain @ 813-317-8007. 12% Buyers Premi um w/2% discount cash or check. Dimensions are approximate. JANUARY 3, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE ENTIRE DUDLEYS AUCTION FAMILY WALK ABOUT AUCTION While the hall is being prepared with the Antique Auction, we set up outside and in with rows of treasures from small to large. ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE AUCTION Incredibly diverse collection of Furniture, Estate Jewelry, Hitchcock Dining Set, selection of primitives, coins, Lg cased Ships mode ls, Carpets, Sterling, art, china, crystal, HUGE VARIETY OF QUALITY ITEMS check website as we get closer to the s ale. JANUARY 10, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION Session #1 outside w/rows of fun & outside furnishings, Session #2 (approx 6pm) inside ~ Always a great variety of items from several estates, ranging from Furniture, household, tools, new items & collectibles. STORAGE UNIT AUCTION Inverness Mini Storage-1925 W. Main St, Inverness, FL 34452. Lien Auction of Several Units. Storage unit lien sale. Locks will be cut starting at 10am & 5 mins before each unit sells. Who knows what will be in there?! JANUARY 15, 2013 AUCTION 10AM ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION Session #1 outside w/rows of fun & outside furnishings, Session #2 (approx 6pm) inside ~ Always a great variety of items from several estates, ranging from furniture, household, tools, new items & collectibles. JANUARY 17, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM LIVE & ONLINE SPORTS & AUTOGRAPHS AUCTION THE STALKERS Sports Memorabilia & signed celebrity items. Features everything from mini helmets, posters, books, jerseys bats & balls to loads of autographed photos, records, and pictures. We will be cleaning out the remainder of Rick The Sta lker Suarez items and have added items from a few other estates. This will be a fun auction with items from sports greats from baseball, golf to football to entertainers. We have been saving some of the best pieces for this sale (Jimi Hendrix Ex perience signed album!) as well as additional stock lot boxes sold to the auction attendees in the audience only JANUARY 19, 2013 PREVIEW 9AM AUCTION 11AM ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION Session #1 outside w/rows of fun & outside furnishings, Session #2 (approx 6pm) inside ~ Always a great variety of items from several estates, ranging from Furniture, household, tools, new items & collectibles. JANUARY 24, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM COMPLETE ANTIQUE STORE LIQUIDATION Florida Porch Antiques-700 block Main St., Leesburg. After 35 years in the trade, Rex Masterman has decided to retire. Contents of this quality Store (in its present location for the past three years) plus the contents of his Renningers Antique Market permanent boot h, stored items from the warehouse and quality furnishings from his personal home will be offered at this auction. Location s ite is the old JC Penny building next door to his historic Downtown Leesburg location. This will be a complete liquidation t o include fine antique furniture, crystal, china, art, decor and more, as well as brass showcases, display items and select contemporary furniture. Rex was the founder of the annual Victorian show in Dallas Texas. The sale will include historic Lak e County memorabilia. More details and photos will emerge as auction time near. Check out limited pics we have on website now. JANUARY 26, 2013 PREVIEW 9AM AUCTION 10AM REAL ESTATE RESTAURANT AUCTION Hwy 19. Restaurant property to be sold at public auction!! Owner retires, must be sold 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, Florida. Directly across from Ellie Shiller Homosassa Springs State Park, 200 +/seat restaurant, parking for 65+/cars, separate party room for 50+/-, parking lot ice machine collects $700.00 month, county sewer and water, new roof, newer A/Cs, newer fire suppression system s, 7198 total sq. ft., 400 amp electric service, natural gas and propane ready, new windows, large kitchen, walk in cooler & freezer, tastefully decorated, tile floors, newer booths, tables & chairs, separate bar area with rear entrance, most ki tchen equipment in place including dbl deck pizza ovens, 60 gas stove, several sandwich prep units, SS tables, sinks, deep fryers, Alto Sham, butcher table, meat slicer, dough mixer, cook, hold unit and more!! Location traffic count 29,000 per day (Florida DOT). Opportunities abound whether expanding or moving up to larger location. Building would also be suitable for franchise or chain location. Assessed value $505,048, taxes 2012 $8,406.31. JANUARY 28, 2013 PREVIEW 9AM AUCTION 10AM JANUARY 31, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM LIVE & ONLINE COIN AUCTION GREAT INVESTMENT Opportunity COINS-GOLD & MORE Featuring Estate Coins from gold to large groupings of Morgan & Peace Silver dollars (including key dates). Th ere will be close to a dozen gold pieces including PCGS70 graded gold coins, Silver dimes, quarters & half dollars, Foreign commemoratives, Proof & Mint sets. Some uncirculated & many graded. Over 200 lots. Additional consignments arriving. Quali ty consignments of silver & gold coins now being accepted for this important sale. Please call Rob or Robert at 637-958 8 to discuss details JANUARY 25, 2013 PREVIEW 4PM AUCTION 6PM J A N U A R Y 6 2 0 1 3 P R E V I E W 1 0 A M A U C T I O N 1 P M J A N U A R Y 6 2 0 1 3 P R E V I E W 1 0 A M A U C T I O N 1 P M JANUARY 6, 2013 PREVIEW 10AM AUCTION 1PM WALK-ABOUT AUCTION While the hall is being prepared with the Antique Auction, we set up outside and in with rows of treasures from small to large. HEALTHYContinued from Page A1 COMMISSIONER Continued from Page A1 We can look at our comprehensive plan and tie it in with economic development and transportation planning. Joe Meek commission chairman. Losing the first 100 pounds felt great. I started getting my self-esteem and confidence back. I havent weighed under 300 pounds in 10 years. Lisa Leeper working to lose up to 250 pounds. WATERING FINES Effective Jan. 1, 2012, Citrus County stopped issuing warnings for first offenders of local watering rules. The county is issuing citations that carry with them a fine of $100. Second violations cost $250, third or more cost $500. Find watering rules in the weather map on Page A4 daily.

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Evelyn Arnett, 90CLERMONT Evelyn Arnett, 90, of Clermont, Fla., passed away Dec. 30, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Memphis, Tenn. Marguerite Barry, 86BEVERLY HILLSMarguerite Ann Barry, 86, of Beverly Hills, Fla., passed away Dec. 27, 2012. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Donald Brownlee, 86INVERNESS Donald N Brownlee, 86, of Inverness, Fla.,passed awayDec. 25, 2012 at Hospice of Citrus County inLecanto. Arrangements by McGan Cremation Service LLC, Hernando. Joaquin Cardona, 96LECANTOJoaquin Cardona (19162012) was a resident of Brentwood Nursing Community in Lecanto. Born in Santiago de Cuba, July 1916, he became a citizen of the USA in 1969, and was proud to be an American. Joaquin travelled the world as a merchant marine, passing a test to work in the engine room, studying from a book and not knowing the English language. He also worked for United Airlines; he was an entrepreneur, founding three businesses in his lifetime. Later in life he drove a taxi in Dade County and at age 85 worked as a supply manager of an insurance company. Joaquin, a generous man, loved the ladies and loved to dance. He found Jesus and soon thereafter became a Deacon at Northside Spanish Baptist Church, Dade County, where he also ministered as church bus driver, church treasurer and member of the church choir for many years. Joaquin died peacefully due to complications of pneumonia Dec. 29, 2012 at 7:35 p.m., with his daughter and granddaughter Alma, at his bedside. Joaquin is survived by his daughter, Alma, of Homosassa; son, Jimmy, of Kissimmee, granddaughters, Alma, Adria, Teresa, of Citrus County, Tanya of Homestead; grandson, Reynold, Los Angeles, Calif.; eight great-grandchildren; two step-grandchildren and one great-greatgranddaughter; also a niece and a number of nephews in South Florida. He was preceded in death by his mother, wife and two younger sisters. A memorial service will be conducted at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 05, 2012 at the Strickland Funeral Home Chapel in Crystal River. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Davis, 84 INVERNESS The Service of Remembrance for Mr. Robert F. Davis, age 84, of Inverness, Florida, will be held 2:00 PM, Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes with Pastor Gordon Condit officiating. Interment will follow at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida. The family will receive friends from 1:00 PM until the time of service, Wednesday at the chapel. In lieu of flowers donations to Hospice of Citrus County or The Path of Citrus County would be appreciated. On December 30, 2012 Bob lost his battle with lung cancer. Born May 18, 1928, he was the son of Felix and Astrid (Nelson) Davis in Lynn, MA. Bob graduated Lynn English H.S., promptly enlisted in the Army at the age of 17 and was sent off to Japan to serve. Returning home he earned his BA from Upsala College, East Orange, NJ where forever after he gladly announced their football games and became an avid alumnus. Bob sang his way through Upsala as a member of their renowned choir, as well as of their other singing groups. Hired by Dunhill Personnel in NYC as a recruiter and the 4th person onboard, he then embarked on a lifelong career with them as VP of Franchising, taking them in 26 years from that original office to 375 offices. Twenty two years ago Bob headed south with his new wife, Jackie, to settle in Citrus County. Deciding that this next phase of his life would be as a Realtor he got his license before leaving NY and 2 years later, convinced Jackie to do the same. He enjoyed a flourishing career with ERA American in Inverness. Bobs passions have included golf, the Red Sox, many other sports, following drum and bugle corps, cruising to play Black Jack and again, the Red Sox. His interests and attention have included the Central Florida Symphony of past, CFCCs Performing Arts Program, mentoring 4th grade math, serving several times each on two HOA boards, and in whatever capacity the Realtors Assoc. of Citrus County needed him. Bob is survived by his wife, Jacqueline (Weinstein), his sons Todd Davis (Michelle), Keith Davis (Kathy), step daughter Juliet Smith and step son Evan Smith (Jennifer). His pride in his children, 4 grandchildren and 4 step grandchildren abounded. His sister Dorthea (DiLisio) predeceased him. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.comWilliam Bill Denny, 82HERNANDO William Bill Earl Denny 82, Hernando, died Dec. 29, 2012 at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Bill was born April 1, 1930 in Shelton, Conn., to the late Earl and Ethel (Bourne) Denny. He served our country proudly in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict. A loving family man, he enjoyed his children and grandchildren. He liked being on the water and was a tinkerer, building and fixing things in his home. He married Marion Bozcan in 1954 and for their 50th wedding anniversary, they enjoyed a vacation with their family at the Outer Banks; a beautiful memory for all of them. Bill was a veteran firefighter for the Old Saybrook, Conn., Volunteer Fire Department. He spent his working career as an engineering supervisor for Electric Boat Company, a division of General Dynamics, manufacturing submarines with more than 30 years of service. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 58 years, Marion; sons, William Denny Jr. (Nancy), Moodus, Conn., Matthew F. Denny (Sheree), Cary, N.C.; daughters, Amanda Denny Tuthill (Michael) Middlefield, Conn., Sharon LaCroix (Paul) Wheaton, Ill., Abigail Ciaglo (Matthew) Colchester, Conn.; sister, Shirley Wells, Massachusetts; 13 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by three brothers and three sisters. A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at 12:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 7, 2013 at St. Scholastica Catholic Church. Inurnment will follow at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell with military honors. The family will receive friends in visitation at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home from 10 to 11 a.m., prior to the Mass. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in his memory to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Thomas Finn, 68 OCALA Thomas Finn, 68, of Ocala, Fla., passed away Dec. 28, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in St. Paul, Minn. William De La Cruz, 88HERNANDO William De La Cruz, 88, of Hernando, Fla., passed away Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012 at Hospice House in Lecanto. A native of Denver, Colo., he was born Sept. 19, 1924 to Juan and Cleotilda (Martinez) De La Cruz, one of nine children. He was raised in Cheyenne, Wyo., and his family then moved to California. Mr. De La Cruz was a quality assurance analyst in the aerospace industry, most recently with Rockwell International, a position from which he retired. He also held positions with Hughes Aircraft and Ford Aerospace during his career and also served his country for more than 20 years in the U.S. Navy. Bill, as he was known by many, moved to Citrus County in 1979 from Ferrisburg, Vt., and was a parishioner of Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, Beverly Hills. He is survived by his wife of nearly 38 years, Barbara A. (Gumm) De La Cruz, Hernando; seven children, Judith Ann Williams (David), Rio Rancho, N.M.; Katherine Mary Kincer (Larry), Marietta, Ga.; Rich De La Cruz (Becky), Silver Lake, Wis.; Lawrence Bennett (Susan), Miami; William Francis De La Cruz (Lora), Boulder, Colo.; Kathy Ann Williams (Kenneth), Mission Vallejo, Calif., and Howard William Bennett (Emma), Miami; siblings, Stella Daggy and Joe and John De La Cruz, all of California; 14 grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren. In addition to his parents, Bill was preceded in death by a daughter, Lee Ann De La Cruz, in 1971 and siblings, Frank, Salvatore, Jimmy, Beatrice and Diana as well as a grandson, Robert. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9 a.m. Thursday, Jan, 3, 2013 from Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, Beverly Hills. Interment will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens with military honors rendered by the U.S. Navy. Friends will be received Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2012 from 6 to 8 p.m., at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family wishes memorial contributions be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464, www.fero funeralhome.com. Tammy Eskridge, 40 HERNANDO Tammy Eskridge 40, of Hernando, Fla., died Dec. 15, 2012 at her home. A memorial service will be 10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 2013 at Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Lyle Gamroth, 59INVERNESS Lyle Gamroth, 59, of Inverness, Fla., passed away Dec. 29, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Lucy Iafe, 93 INVERNESS Lucy Genevieve Iafe, 93, of Inverness, Fla., died Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012 in Inverness. Services for Mrs. Iafe will be in New York at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Daniel Kuhfahl, 48 PITTSBORO, N.C. Daniel E. Kuhfahl 48, of Pittsboro, N.C., died Dec. 28, 2012. He was born Dec. 23, 1964 in Tampa, Fla., the son of Edward and Elaine Kuhfahl. Danny was a U.S. Navy veteran serving from 1983 to 1988. He was a technician for Citrus Pest Management in Crystal River before moving to Pittsboro, N.C., in 2010. As an organ donor, Daniel was giving in death as in life. Survivors include his daughter, Amber Kuhfahl of Crystal River and his mother, Elaine Kuhfahl of Pittsboro, N.C. A memorial service for Daniel will be 12 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 2012 at the Heinz Funeral Home in Inverness. The Reverend Alan Jefferson will preside. Interment will follow with military honors at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to a charity of your choice. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Wilma Newton, 96 MT. DORAWilma Newton, 96, of Mt. Dora, Fla., died Dec. 29, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Flint, Mich. Sandra Lux, 72 INVERNESS Sandra Ann Lux, age 72 of Inverness, Florida, died Saturday, December 29, 2012 in Lecanto, FL. She was born June 24, 1940 in Scranton, PA, daughter of William and Mary (Barron) Roman. She worked as a School Bus Driver. Her hobbies included Stained Glass making, collecting Angels, knitting and crocheting, participating in league bowling and just hanging out with friends. Mrs. Lux was preceded in death by her parents and is survived by her husband, George Lux of Inverness, FL, son, Brian Lux of Alloway, NJ, brother, Joseph Roman of CA, 3 grandchildren, Logan, Kylee and Matthew. Friends who wish may send memorial donations to Hospice of Citrus County P .O. Box 641270 Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneralHome.com. Arrangements by the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory. David Mester, 56LECANTODavid Allen Mester, 56, of Lecanto, passed away Dec. 29, 2012 at Hospice House in Lecanto. A native of Rochester, Pa., he was born May 30, 1956 to Louis J. and Grace I. (Bragg) Mester, one of three children. Mr. Mester was a steelworker in his native Pennsylvania before moving to Citrus County in 1985. He was most recently employed as a dispatcher with Cemex, Inc. David is survived by his wife of 26 years, Priscilla Mester of Homosassa; sons, David Mester Jr., Monaca, Pa.; Cory Mester, Lecanto; daughter, Anne Marie Wingrove (Tom), Freedom, Pa.; son, Wesley South, Beverly Hills; daughter, Jennifer Winburn, Homosassa; sister, Sarah Smith, Middleburg, W.Va.; grandchildren, Alexia, Brian, Tommy, Kylee, Jimmy, Stephen, Stephanie and Ryan. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a grandchild, Austin South and a brother, Robert. www.wilderfuneral.com. Rodney Schafer, 60Rodney C. Schafer, 60, died Dec. 27, 2012. Arrangements by Downing Funeral Home, Spring Hill, Fla. A6 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE INVERNESS BEVERLY HILLS HOMOSASSA 000DKWF Visit us at www.HooperFuneralHome.com (352) 726-2271 1-888-7HOOPER (1-888-746-6737) 501 W. Main Street, Inverness 000DH1T Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000DKSN 000DH1R CARPET TILE WOOD VINYL LAMINATE SERVING CITRUS COUNTY SINCE 1975 527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES 44 W. G ulf To Lake Hwy., L ecanto ( next to landfill ) CCC #2837 Mohawk 60 Day Satisfaction Guarantee on Carpet Hours: Mon. Fri. 8-5pm Sat. 9-1pm Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. 0 0 0 D H B Z To Place Your In Memory ad, Saralynne Miller at 564-2917 scmiller@chronicleonline.com 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000c2nv Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000DGKD Funeral Home With Crematory C h a s E D a v i s Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 MORGAN TYNES Private Arrangements EDWARD FOX Private Arrangements WILLIAM BARKER Private Arrangements ROBERT CARGELL Private Arrangements HERMAN ROESCH Gathering: Sat., Jan. 12 10:00 AM MAURICE MCDANIEL Service: Jan. 11 4:00 PM HELEN MASOERO Mass: Great Barrington, MA WILLIAM DENNY Arrangements Pending FERO FERO Memorial Gardens & Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home Funeral Home 000DM6S Beverly Hills Beverly Hills 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT D IGNITY & R ESPECT Obituaries CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS 352-795-5700 GARDNERAUDIOLOGY.COM 000DL6Y what? HEAR WHAT YOUVE BEEN MISSING. Joaquin Cardona Robert Davis OBITUARIES Phone 352-563-5660. William Denny William De La Cruz OBITUARIES Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. David Mester See DEATHS / Page A7

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Associated PressWINTER GARDEN Floridas tomato and strawberry growers said theyre fighting to keep up with a rising tide of cheaper produce imports from Mexico. Mexican strawberry imports jumped 142 percent from 2008 to 2011, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In the first three quarters of this year, they soared 50 percent compared to the same period in 2011. Mexican imports will likely rise less steeply in the fourth quarter because farmers in both countries faced many of the same unfavorable growing conditions, said Ted Campbell, executive director of the Florida Strawberry Growers Association in Dover, the industrys trade group. But that doesnt mean the Mexican market threat has subsided, Campbell told The Ledger.Theyre not going away. Theyre going to continue to grow, Campbell said. You cant ignore whats going on. Mexican tomato imports also have risen significantly, up 43.7 percent from 2008 through 2011 and another 5.6 percent in the first three quarters of 2012 compared with 2011, USDA figures show. Those numbers reflect Mexican imports of round tomatoes grown in open fields and in hothouses, or covered areas such as a greenhouse. Those varieties most directly compete with Florida round tomatoes, the dominant variety grown here. Mexican hothouse tomatoes, which account for about 75 percent of total imports, pose the bigger threat, federal data shows. Theyve risen 74 percent from 2008 through 2011. In the last five to six years, Mexico has converted from a field culture to a hothouse culture, said John VanSickle, an agricultural economist at the University of Florida in Gainesville who specializes in international trade issues, including tomatoes and strawberries. That trend will continue, he said. Among the factors fueling the transition are better prices and lower production costs, including pesticides, which appeals to U.S. consumers concerned about chemical residues on produce. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 A7 WWW.JOESCARPET.COM F AMILY O WNED S ERVING C ITRUS C OUNTY S INCE 1970 YOUR TOTAL FLOORING STORE 000DHGF 17 Years! INVERNESS 726-4465 138 N. Fla. Ave., US 41 CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9605 6633 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Happy New Year! from 000D8AP Mon., Tues., Thus. & Fri. 8 am 5 pm Wed. & Sat. 8 am Noon, reopen 5 pm Sun. & Holidays 8 am 5 pm (Pick up and drop off only) Where your pet is #1 Grooming & Kennel 2011 2011 2011 2011 Seasons Greetings Serving Citrus County for 25 years 5625 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 352-795-1684 Deshedding Skin & Ear Infections 24 Hr Full Care Boarding Dental Care State of the Art Grooming All Natural Pet Foods NAIL TRIM $ 4 00 Reg. $5.00 w/coupon Call for other holiday specials Angela & Staff T reat Your Pets Best! 000DLQC State Certified CAC010415 352-795-2665 BayAreaCool.com AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING 2012 2012 2012 2012 f r o m A s w e s t a r t t h e n e w y e a r w e w a n t t o t h a n k o u r c u s t o m e r s f o r t h e i r c o n t i n u i n g b u s i n e s s W e k n o w t h e r e a r e m a n y c h o i c e s a n d w e a r e g r a t e f u l t h a t y o u h a v e c h o s e n u s t o s e r v e y o u r a i r c o n d i t i o n i n g a n d h e a t i n g n e e d s W e w i l l a l w a y s t r e a t y o u l i k e f a m i l y a n d g i v e y o u t h e b e s t s e r v i c e i n t o w n H a p p y N e w Y e a r t o Y o u a n d Y o u r s Elmetta June Thomason, 94 INVERNESS Elmetta June Thomason, 94, of Inverness, Fla., died Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012 at Hospice of Citrus County in Lecanto. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Roger Yates, 50BROOKSVILLE Roger Yates, 50, of Brooksville, Fla., passed away Dec. 30, 2012. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Cematory in Lecanto. Ben Overton, 86FORMER FLA. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE TALLAHASSEE Former Florida Supreme Court Justice Ben F. Overton, the first justice appointed by the governor after the switch in the 1970s from elected justices, has died from complications of heart surgery, a spokesman for the court said. Overton, who retired in 1999, was 86. On the court for more than two decades, his legacy includes letting cameras into Florida courtrooms. Overton, who died Saturday in Gainesville, was appointed in March of 1974 by Gov. Reubin Askew, authored more than 1400 decisions and was chief justice from 1976 to 1978. Justice Overton was one of the most influential members of the Court after the sweeping reforms of the 1970s, said Chief Justice Ricky Polston. He will be remembered not only for his far-seeing opinions but also for his efforts in the 1970s to make the state courts more accessible by allowing cameras into our courtrooms. After several justices who had been elected and had to raise campaign cash were charged with ethics violations in the early and mid1970s, Askew overhauled the system, creating the merit retention system in which the governor appoints justices based on a list from a nominating committee. Overton was Askews first appointment to the revamped court. Justices still faced contested re-elections after appointment until Florida voters further amended the constitution in 1976 to create the current merit retention system. Overton was an advocate for that system, under which justices names go on the ballot at the end of their term for voters to decide whether to retain them, rather than have them running against opponents. It is still in place. In addition to making Florida one of the first states to allow television of court cases, he also pushed for the courts creation of a website, one of the first state high courts to do so. He also pushed for the televised recording of every Supreme Court oral argument. DEATHSContinued from Page A6 Death ELSEWHERE From wire reports Associated Press Sheila Tabone, left, has her dogs dressed as impostor wiener dogs Monday while participating in the Key West Dachshund Walk Monday. The event is an annual New Years Eve tradition that this year attracted almost 200 of the short-legged, long-bodied canines, as well as about 30 impostor dogs. Walking the dogs Mexican tomatoes, strawberries have Florida growers concerned Guy Lombardos legacy kept alive Relatives have bandleaders memorabilia M ARYW OZNIAK The News-PressFORT MYERS The history of New Years Eve resides in southwest Florida, where descendants of the late, great bandleader Guy Lombardo try to keep his legacy alive with a treasure trove of memories and memorabilia. Two nieces and a nephew of Lombardo proudly display historical items from Lombardos heyday in their homes in Fort Myers and Sanibel, but much more languishes in two storage units in south Fort Myers. The relatives have offered the overflow to three colleges, but there have been no takers. They would like to see the memorabilia on loan to a place that would archive and display it to the public. Nobody wants it, said niece Gina Lombardo, 52, of Fort Myers. Before there was Dick Clarks New Years Rockin Eve, there was Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians. The orchestra brought in the New Year for millions nationally and internationally for nearly half a century, from the 1929 stock market crash that signaled the start of the Great Depression to Americas 1976 bicentennial. They became an institution, synonymous with the ball drop in Times Square. The popularity of their live performances, first on radio and later on TV, earned Lombardo the nickname Mr. New Years Eve. The band was a partnership between four brothers, Guy, Carmen, Victor and Lebert Lombardo. Carmen was the songwriter, penning many of their hits. He also created the orchestra arrangements and sang. Lebert played trumpet. The New Years Eve tradition was stopped only by the death of Guy Lombardo in 1977 at 75. The legacy of the band, its memorabilia and rights to the orchestra, passed from brother to brother, ending with the death of Lebert in Sanibel in 1993. Now they belong to Leberts children: Elizabeth, 57; Carmen, 50; and Gina. None of the children are involved in the music business. The items displayed in their homes include photographs, record albums, sheet music, awards, and even the bands framed first paycheck from 1918, for $35.70. Even more items have sat in storage for about 40 years, first placed there by Lebert, Gina said. They include at least 100 envelopes stuffed with original band orchestrations hand-written by Carmen; at least 40 boxes of reels of 35 mm tapes, plus many loose, large reels of 16mm tapes of the bands 1950s TV show. The siblings offered it to the Berklee College of Music in Boston and two other colleges but were told there wasnt room, she said. So Gina, her son, James, and Liz make a pilgrimage to the storage units on Sundays, putting the deteriorating tapes, smelling of vinegar, in archival envelopes and reboxing them. They dont know what to do with the orchestrations, many of them yellowing. Anyone younger than the baby boomer generation probably has no knowledge of Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians. But those aged 50-plus remember the crooning singers and big band orchestrations that became known as the sweetest music this side of heaven.

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Associated PressMOPTI, Mali Deep inside caves, in remote desert bases, in the escarpments and cliff faces of northern Mali, Islamic fighters are burrowing into the earth, erecting a formidable set of defenses to protect what has essentially become alQaidas new country. They have used the bulldozers, earth movers and Caterpillar machines left behind by fleeing construction crews to dig what residents and local officials describe as an elaborate network of tunnels, trenches, shafts and ramparts. In just one case, inside a cave large enough to drive trucks into, they have stored up to 100 drums of gasoline, guaranteeing their fuel supply in the face of a foreign intervention, according to experts. Northern Mali is now the biggest territory held by alQaida and its allies. And as the world hesitates, delaying a military intervention, the extremists who seized control of the area earlier this year are preparing for a war they boast will be worse than the decade-old struggle in Afghanistan. Al-Qaida never owned Afghanistan, said former United Nations diplomat Robert Fowler, a Canadian kidnapped and held for 130 days by al-Qaidas local chapter, whose fighters now control the main cities in the north. They do own northern Mali. Al-Qaidas affiliate in Africa has been a shadowy presence for years in the forests and deserts of Mali, a country hobbled by poverty and a relentless cycle of hunger. In recent months, the terror syndicate and its allies have taken advantage of political instability within the country to push out of their hiding place and into the towns, taking over an enormous territory which they are using to stock arms, train forces and prepare for global jihad. The catalyst for the Islamic fighters was a military coup nine months ago that transformed Mali from a once-stable nation to the failed state it is today. On March 21, disgruntled soldiers invaded the presidential palace. The fall of the nations democratically elected government at the hands of junior officers destroyed the militarys command-and-control structure, creating the vacuum which allowed a mix of rebel groups to move in. With no clear instructions from their higher-ups, the humiliated soldiers left to defend those towns tore off their uniforms, piled into trucks and beat a retreat as far as Mopti, roughly in the center of Mali. They abandoned everything north of this town to the advancing rebels, handing them an area that stretches over more than 240,000 square miles. Its a territory larger than Texas or France and its almost exactly the size of Afghanistan. Turbaned fighters now control all the major towns in the north, carrying out amputations in public squares like the Taliban did. Just as in Afghanistan, they are flogging women for not covering up. Since taking control of Timbuktu, they have destroyed seven of the 16 mausoleums listed as world heritage sites. The area under their rule is mostly desert and sparsely populated, but analysts say that due to its size and the hostile nature of the terrain, rooting out the extremists here could prove even more difficult than it did in Afghanistan. Malis former president has acknowledged, diplomatic cables show, that the country cannot patrol a frontier twice the length of the border between the United States and Mexico. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, known as AQIM, operates not just in Mali, but in a corridor along much of the northern Sahel. This 4,300-mile-long ribbon of land runs across the widest part of Africa, and includes sections of Mauritania, Niger, Algeria, Libya, Burkina Faso and Chad. One could come up with a conceivable containment strategy for the Swat Valley, said Africa expert Peter Pham, an adviser to the U.S. militarys African command center, referring to the region of Pakistan where the Pakistan Taliban have been based. Theres no containment strategy for the Sahel, which runs from the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea. Earlier this year, the 15 nations in West Africa, including Mali, agreed on a proposal for the military to take back the north, and sought backing from the United Nations. Earlier this month, the Security Council authorized the intervention but imposed certain conditions, including training Malis military, which is accused of serious human rights abuses since the coup. Diplomats say the intervention will likely not happen before September 2013. In the meantime, the Islamists are getting ready, according to elected officials and residents in Kidal, Timbuktu and Gao, including a day laborer hired by alQaidas local chapter to clear rocks and debris for one of their defenses. They spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear for their safety at the hands of the Islamists, who have previously accused those who speak to reporters of espionage. The al-Qaida affiliate, which became part of the terror network in 2006, is one of three Islamist groups in northern Mali. The others are the Movement for the Unity and Jihad in West Africa, or MUJAO, based in Gao, and Ansar Dine, based in Kidal. Analysts agree that there is considerable overlap between the groups, and that all three can be considered sympathizers, even extensions, of al-Qaida. The Islamic fighters have stolen equipment from construction companies, including more than $11 million worth from a French company called SOGEASATOM, according to Elie Arama, who works with the European Development Fund. The company had been contracted to build a European Union-financed highway in the north between Timbuktu and the village of Goma Coura. An employee of SOGEASATOM in Bamako declined to comment. The official from Kidal said his constituents have reported seeing Islamic fighters with construction equipment riding in convoys behind 4-by-4 trucks draped with their signature black flag. His contacts among the fighters, including friends from secondary school, have told him they have created two bases, around 120 and 180 miles north of Kidal, in the austere, rocky desert. The first base is occupied by al-Qaidas local fighters in the hills of Teghergharte, a region the official compared to Afghanistans Tora Bora. The Islamists have dug tunnels, made roads, theyve brought in generators, and solar panels in order to have electricity, he said. They live inside the rocks. Still further north, near Boghassa, is the second base, created by fighters from Ansar Dine. They too have used seized explosives, bulldozers and sledgehammers to make passages in the hills, he said. In addition to creating defenses, the fighters are amassing supplies, experts said. A local who was taken by Islamists into a cave in the region of Kidal described an enormous room, where several cars were parked. Along the walls, he counted up to 100 barrels of gasoline, according to the mans testimony to New York-based Human Rights Watch. In Timbuktu, the fighters are becoming more entrenched with each passing day, warned Mayor Ousmane Halle. Earlier in the year, he said, the Islamists left his city in a hurry after France called for an imminent military intervention. They returned when the U.N. released a report arguing for a more cautious approach. W ORLD C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 A9 0 0 0 D 8 5 V David R. Best Attorney at Law Over 35 years practicing in Citrus County 800-282-Best (2378) www.BestLawFirmFlorida.com Personal Injury Medical Malpractice Sex Abuse Cases Disability Cases Areas of Practice: 7655 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Suite 13 Crystal River, FL 34429 0 0 0 D 8 5 V 7449 W. Gulf to Lake Crystal River, FL 000D5HU Stop In And See Us For The BIG NEW YEARS SALE! FREE in home shopping FREE design work VISIT OUR SHOWROOM GET YOUR BEST WRITTEN QUOTE AND THEN COME SEE US! 352-302-2865 www.dreamkitchensandbaths.com Kitchen & Baths Closet Systems Entertainment Centers Granite & Solid Surface Counter Tops Custom cabinets by Wellborn Forest & Showplace Wood YOUR KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING SPECIALISTS! May Peace and Joy Be Yours In The Coming New Year! 000D3VK of the Nature Coast, Inc. BRENDA L. BUTA (owner) 352-563-2727 A1Titlenc@yahoo.com Wishing you a new year filled with new hope, new joy and new beginnings! Thank you for your patronage and we look forward to working with you in the future. Al-Qaida carves out own country in Mali Associated Press Fighters from Islamist group Ansar Dine stand guard Aug. 31 in Timbuktu, Mali, as they prepare to publicly lash a member of the Islamic Police found guilty of adultery. In recent months, al-Qaida and its allies have taken advantage of political instability within Mali to push out of their hiding place and into the towns, taking over an enormous territory which they are using to stock arms, train forces and prepare for global jihad. Lalla Arby, 22, who was beaten by Islamist group Ansar Dine for sitting outside her home in Timbuktu with her head uncovered, poses Oct. 10 for a picture in a headscarf in Bamako, Mali, where she now lives with relatives.

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O PINION Page A10 TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 Make Progress/Duke a partnerT he breakdown in the relationship between Citrus County and Progress Energy/Duke is major gamechanger for the community. The power company the countys largest private employer and taxpayer has always been a strong partner. The companys dispute over paying its property tax bill to Citrus County is the sign of a larger breakdown that must be resolved by county officials. We urge our local leaders to stay out of court and find a negotiated settlement with Progress. We further urge our local leaders to do everything they can to convince power company executives that Citrus County is still an appropriate place for economic expansion. We need the nuclear plant north of Crystal River refurbished and we want future power plant expansion here. We need the jobs, we need the taxes and we need a good working partnership with the largest power utility in America. Keep focus on cleanup Crystal River Rotarian Art Jones launched his One Rake at a Time project last year and got residents, businesses and politicians enthused about protecting the environment. Jones grew tired of listening to people pontificate about cleaning up Kings Bay and decided to do something about it. He coordinated volunteers from all walks of life to climb into the bay and start raking out tons of weeds that were choking off the springs that feed the bay and river. The real beauty of his effort is that people can see that they can make a difference in protecting our environment. Hundreds of tons of weeds have been pulled out of the bay, but more important is that Jones has created some synergy with state and local governments that want to get involved in the positive effort. In 2013 the momentum needs to be carried forward. Weeds need to be pulled from the bay. Sewer systems need to be expanded to stop the pollution from septic tanks. Storm water runoff needs to be diverted from highways. Appropriate fertilizer techniques need to be used to avoid pollution. Art Jones helped empower the community to get something done. Lets do it. Government needs to spend less Our local, state and federal governments all need to spend fewer tax dollars. That means that we as citizens need to expect fewer services from our government. You cannot have one without the other. On the local level it makes sense to have other revenue techniques such as MSBUs available to fund county government, but the bottom line is that we need to spend less during these tough economic times. Expand the local economy We need more jobs in Citrus County and we need to branch out into new types of industry and business. Our longtime dependence on home construction, energy and retail helped make the national recession worse for Citrus County than other areas. We need diversity, and thats why we are supportive of the countys Economic Development Council and county commissions effort to explore the option for a port in northwest Citrus County. The EDC and our county leaders need to get creative in attracting other small businesses and industries that can grow and create jobs. The medical segment is hot because of our aging demographics, but we need to attract other segments so we can limit our economic vulnerability. The tourism segment needs to be expanded and promoted. County and cities working together When Joe Meek was installed as the new chairman of the county commission in December, he appropriately pledged to create a new working relationship with our two cities Inverness and Crystal River. The relationship between our branches of local government has not been good. Part of that is due to politics and poor listening skills, but little effort has been made to see life from the other governments perspective. There need to be regular meetings between the governments and joint goal agreements. Citrus County is unique in that less than 10 percent of our total population lives in the two cities, but much of the commerce and government activity is within the municipal boundaries. Education and jobs Citrus County has a very good education system, but there is at least one weakness that needs attention. A certain percentage of our graduates go on to college and professional careers. But more focus needs to be placed on preparing non-college-bound graduates and under-employed adults with new job skills they can use on the local level. We have the tools in place. The Lecanto branch of the College of Florida and Withlacoochee Technical Institute in Inverness need to launch an expanded effort to work together to strategically train students for jobs that are available in the region. And the two public entities need to be coordinating with local business, the EDC, the chamber and entrepreneurs to better understand what those employment opportunities are. There are jobs available for skilled workers. The education system needs to work with business to connect the dots. Sort out the new hospital issue The leadership of Citrus Memorial hospital has apparently worked out its governance problems, and for that we are appreciative. But there are new health care concerns on the horizon. Citrus Memorial Health System, a public hospital, now must follow a state requirement that it consider a sale or merger of the institution with a for-profit facility. Gov. Rick Scott is opposed to using local property tax dollars to support community hospitals and the new state rules mandate that every public hospital examine other options. That exercise is now under way. It is important that the leaders of our public medical institutions work together to provide the best health care possible for local consumers. The county hospital and the county health department have many redundant services but do a poor job of working together. Taxpayer dollars are used for both and synergies should be fully implemented to improve service and drive down costs. Make the YMCA happen The largest capital campaign in the history of Citrus County will take place in 2013 to help build a YMCA for our community. Citrus County residents and businesses need to step up to the plate and get committed to building a Y. For the last 25 years there have been efforts to get a Y here to help families, children and retirees come together and build community. This is the year to make it happen. Property has been donated on County Road 486 and financial pledges are now needed to move this important project forward.State and county work together While it may not be frontpage news, many in Citrus County dont realize that our state and local elected officials dont like each other or work well together. We are a dysfunctional political family, and the bickering ends up hurting local citizens. Wed like to see our elected officials all make an attempt to set aside their personal political feuds and get to work for the people. We have roads that need to be built, schools that need more funding, environmental areas that need more protecting. We have children at risk, seniors in need and way too many unemployed people. We urge our elected officials to all get over their own egos and get to work. The dependence on drugsWe dont pretend to have the appropriate strategy to implement, but no set of goals for our county can be published without mentioning the drug problem that exists here. So many of the problems we have in our county can be tied back to drug and alcohol abuse. Crime, child abuse and neglect, unemployment, the breakdown of the family structure all run hand in hand with substance abuse. Our nations war on drugs has been about as unsuccessful as our local war on drugs. While the fight against the criminal dealers and manufacturers of drugs must continue in full force, we need other, more productive strategies to deal with the culture of drug use that is so prevalent in our society. Back of every noble life there are principles that have fashioned it. George Horace Lorimer, 1867-1937 Community goals for the New Year CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .......................................... publisherMike Arnold .................................................. editor Charlie Brennan ................................ editor at largeCurt Ebitz ........................................ citizen member Mac Harris ...................................... citizen member Rebecca Martin ................................ guest member Brad Bautista .......................................... copy chief WELCOME TO 2013 15 resolutions for the New Year A swe launch into the New Year, please reflect with me on who we are and where we hope to go in the 12 months ahead. The year 2012 presented great challenges and new responsibilities. Life is about transitions, and as an incurable optimist, I believethe year ahead will open new doors and present valuable opportunities for all of us. Traditionally, New Years resolutions are about making a commitment to do something different in our lives, perhaps going in a new direction from that of the past. In 2013, I resolve: To appreciate my family, friends, and colleagues for who they are, what they mean to me, and to gracefully overlook some things they do (or dont do!). None of us is perfect and accepting that reality helpsrelationshipsflourish. To act upon wrongs that need righting, crass statements that require correction, and offenses that demand just responses. We set a positive example by not accepting negativity in others. To be a valuable teammate and to trust others to do their best. Each of us should know what position we play, and regularly practice our skills to be our personal best. To actively listen to the voices of children and elders.Valuing thewisdom of innocence and experience is both free and priceless. To accept that I dont know everything. By collaborating withothers who know much more, together we can create a great brain trust and blend expertise to make progress. To pleasantly surprise someone every day with a genuine smile and unexpected kindness in word and deed. Lifes subtle gifts of compassion and concern are cherished. To respect and celebrate the diversity of faiths, feelings, and fashions. Differences are natural and honoring each othersperspectives creates mutual admiration. To exercise artistic expression for its intrinsic value. The vitality of the instrumental, literary, dance, visual or vocal arts fuels the soul and expands the mind to new possibilities. To invest a thoughtful minute before I speak or act. Regret is often preventable. Reversing harm is one of lifes most vexing challenges. To honor those who courageously sacrifice for us at home and abroad, care for our health, educate, protect our freedoms and perform the healing and helping arts so that our quality of life is improved. To share even if I think I dont have enough. Setting an example by giving to others in need is one of the best lessons for children to observe. To protect, defend and advocate for people who rely on me. Give special attention to the needs of others of every stage of life who may not know how to find their own voice. To preserve natural environments for their beauty and bounty. Natural settings are home to plantlife and species which are too often victims of our wants, not our needs. To never give up on a person or a cause, despite the challenges we face. Perseverance is an attitude that exemplifies leadership, attracts allies, and creates meaningful change. To speak truth to power, but to be both polite and persistent. Theres a fine line between persistence and pestilence. Resist aggressiveness, but advocate with assertion, confidence and commitment to the cause. Advocating for prevention policies and programs that keep bad things from happening is the most important of all investments. My service as the advocates advocate is a role Icherish. I feel so fortunate to have the friendships and allies Ive nurtured over the years. As I build the 4Generations Institute initiative to promote intergenerational communication, community leadership, policy/ program advocacy and volunteer commitments, I am awed by the power of relationships. Just as in families, the health of a community is in the depth and breadth of relationships among those who share common interests and provide mutual support. In the year ahead I plan to communicate Institutes message to influence the public policy debate on behalf of every age and stage of life. While theres strength in our diversities, theres power in our unity! Jack Levine is the founder of 4Generations Institute in Tallahassee. Email him at jack@4gen.org. THE ISSUE: Hopes riding on 2013. OUR OPINION: Opportunities abound. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the board. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Mike Arnold at 352564-2930. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Taxing responseDuke Energy was required to install equipment to clean the acid rain from their exhausts. They dont earn money from this equipment, so how can you tax them for it? Where are the brains of the tax appraiser to want taxes on this equipment when they were required to install the equipment by law? Now if they tax this equipment, who pays? Of course, the user on the electric bills. So a tax on this equipment only throws the cost off to the taxpayers. Youths respect I agree with the person who called in to complain about nobody standing when our flag passes at a parade. Young people today have no respect for our flag or the freedom it represents. Maybe we should ship them to a country like Iraq where people dont have this freedom and then see how they feel about America. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and h ave less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 Jack Levine GUEST COLUMN Hot Corner: THANKS Thanks for chipping in I would just like to personally thank the lady in the white Ford Fusion that paid for my doughnuts from Dunkin Donuts this morning, Dec. 20. She made my day and I just want to say thank you to her and God bless her and Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Thank you.Help with iPhone I just wanted to thank a very special wildlife park ranger for turning in my iPhone while I was at the park enjoying a wonderful show Thursday night (Dec. 20) and got careless. I just wanted to thank him so very much and wish him a very Merry Christmas. C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE

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Associated PressJOHANNESBURG South Africas agonizing past swept over Alex McLaren, who stepped into sunlight with tears in his eyes after a tour of the Apartheid Museum, an unsparing study of white minority rule and the costly fight against it. Yet South Africa-born McLaren, an American citizen, also found inspiration in the museums exhibition about Nelson Mandela, former prisoner, South Africas first black head of state and one of the great, unifying figures of the 20th century. Mandela, now 94 years old and ailing, was a special figure in the anti-apartheid struggle because of his perseverance, his ability to forgive and to reconcile, and the fact that he appeared when he did, him and others. But mainly him, said McLaren, a retired engineer. There will be a lot of wailing, gnashing of teeth, when he goes, he said, anticipating the grief of South Africa and the world. The delicate health of Mandela, now convalescing behind the high walls of his Johannesburg home, came under scrutiny and speculation during a 19-day stay in a hospital in December. He was treated for a lung infection and had gallstones removed. Regardless of when the end comes, his burnished legacy was written years ago, even if the country he led from the long night of apartheid still struggles with poverty and other social ills. Mandelas place as South Africas premier hero is so secure that the central bank released new banknotes in 2012 showing his face, a robust, smiling image of the icon who walked out of a prisons gates on Feb. 11, 1990 after 27 years in captivity. He is a Nobel laureate, the recipient of many other international awards, the subject of books, films and songs and, when he was active, a magnet for celebrities. In part, what elevated Mandela was his charisma, his ability to charm through humor and grace, and an extraordinary capacity to find strength in adversity. People tend to measure themselves by external accomplishments, but jail allows a person to focus on internal ones; such as honesty, sincerity, simplicity, humility, generosity and an absence of variety, Mandela says in one of the many quotations on display at the Apartheid Museum. You learn to look into yourself. Just four years after being released from prison, Mandela became South Africas first black president in 1994. His successes include the introduction of one of the worlds most progressive constitutions and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a panel that heard testimony about apartheidera violations of human rights as a kind of national therapy session. McLaren, the visitor to the Apartheid Museum, grew up in South Africa and recalled witnessing injustices of apartheid: blacks being arrested or stopped in the street, a black woman being pushed off a bus and a view among many whites that blacks were somehow inferior. Now a resident of Scottsdale, Arizona, 66-year-old McLaren said: South Africa is such a mixed place now. Some of it is falling apart, some of it is really good, some of it is really bad. But you know, its much better than it was, much better than it was. An imperfect country, but one that Mandela, whose clan name, Madiba, means reconciler, guided elegantly through a painful transition. In Mandela: The Authorized Portrait, a collection of accounts about Mandela, lawyer and human rights advocate George Bizos described how Mandela joked about his age (he was 86 at the time) and said he would join the nearest branch of the ANC in heaven. W ORLD C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 A11 000CWEJ 4224 W Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 homeinstead.com HHA299993253 HCS230036 Were by your side so your loved one can stay at home. 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Available in Silver, Gold, & Rose Gold Colors Exceptional Jewelry Custom Designs Quality Repair Personalized Service Celebrate the New Year with sparkles and bangles Associated PressCARACAS, Venezuela President Hugo Chavezs new complications after cancer surgery prompted his closest allies to call for Venezuelans to pray for him on Monday, presenting an increasingly bleak outlook and prompting growing speculation about whether the ailing leader has much longer to live. Vice President Nicolas Maduro looked weary and spoke with a solemn expression as he announced in a televised address from Havana on Sunday that Chavez now confronts new complications due to a respiratory infection nearly three weeks after his operation. He described Chavezs condition as delicate. The streets of Caracas were abuzz on Monday with talk of Chavezs increasingly tough fight, while the news topped the front pages of the countrys newspapers. Hes history now, said Cesar Amaro, a street vendor selling newspapers and snacks at a kiosk in downtown Caracas. He motioned to a newspaper showing side-by-side photos of Maduro and National Assembly President Diosdado Cabello, and said politics will now turn to them. Amaro said he expects a new election soon to replace Chavez. For an illness like the one the president has, his days are numbered now, he said matter-offactly. A government-organized New Years Eve concert had been planned in a downtown Caracas plaza featuring popular Venezuelan bands, but was canceled due to Chavezs condition. The presidents aides sang and prayed at a televised Mass held at the presidential palace, while Chavezs allies urged Venezuelans to keep their president in their prayers. Political analyst Ricardo Sucre said the outlook for Chavez appears grim, saying Maduros body language during his televised appearance spoke volumes. Everything suggests Chavezs health situation hasnt evolved as hoped, Sucre said. He said Maduro likely remained in Havana to keep close watch on how Chavezs condition develops. These hours should be key to having a more definitive prognosis of Chavezs health, and as a consequence make the corresponding political decisions according to the constitution, Sucre said. Sucre and other Venezuelans said it seems increasingly unlikely that Chavez would be able to be sworn in as scheduled on Jan. 10. The Venezuelan leader has not been seen or heard from since undergoing his fourth cancer-related surgery Dec. 11, and government officials have said he might not return in time for his inauguration for a new six-year term. If Chavez dies or is unable to continue in office, the Venezuelan Constitution says that a new election should be held within 30 days. Before his operation, Chavez acknowledged he faced risks and designated Maduro as his successor, telling supporters they should vote for the vice president if a new presidential election were necessary. Chavez said at the time that his cancer had come back despite previous surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatment. He has been fighting an undisclosed type of pelvic cancer since June 2011. Maduro said on Sunday that he had met with Chavez. We greeted each other and he himself referred to these complications, Maduro said, reading from a prepared statement. Chavez suffers new complications Associated Press A woman walks Monday past a mural of Venezuelas President Hugo Chavez in Caracas, Venezuela. Nelson Mandela convalesces, legacy secure

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New Year Associated Press A trader wearing Happy New Year glasses works on the floor Monday at the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Subway suspect has troubled historyNEW YORK The family of a woman accused of shoving a man to his death in front of a subway train called police several times in the past five years because she had not been taking prescribed medication and she was difficult to deal with, authorities said Monday. Erika Menendez, 31, was being held without bail on a murder charge in the death of Sunando Sen. She told police she pushed the 46-year-old India native because she thought he was Muslim, and she hates them, according to prosecutors. Theyd never met before she suddenly shoved him off the subway platform, because she thought it would be cool, prosecutors said. The victim was Hindu, not Muslim. She laughed and snickered so much during her court hearing last weekend that the judge admonished her. The attorney who represented her only for her arraignment said she acted the same way with him when he tried to speak with her.Gov. signs pardons for Wilmington 10RALEIGH, N.C. Outgoing North Carolina Gov. Beverly Perdue issued pardons Monday to the Wilmington 10, a group wrongly convicted 40 years ago in a notorious Civil Rights-era prosecution that led to accusations that the state was holding political prisoners. Perdue issued pardons of innocence Monday for the nine black men and one white woman who were given prison sentences totaling nearly 300 years for the 1971 firebombing of a Wilmington grocery store after police shot a black teenager. The pardon means the state no longer thinks the 10 four of whom have since died committed a crime. Newtown killers remains claimedHARTFORD, Conn. The body of the man who massacred 26 people at a Connecticut elementary school was claimed by his father, a family spokesman said Monday, but the public may never know what happened with the remains. Like families of other mass killers, Adam Lanzas father has to balance his own mourning with consideration for the victims, intense media scrutiny and the risk that a public gravesite could be desecrated. I know its very sensitive for the family. They have many, many concerns and its a very sad time for them, said Kingston, N.H. Police Chief Donald Briggs, a family acquaintance who helped the Lanzas coordinate services for Lanzas slain mother. Lanza shot and killed his mother, Nancy, inside their Newtown home on Dec. 14 before driving to Sandy Hook Elementary School, shooting his way in and gunning down 20 first-graders and six school employees. He committed suicide as police arrived. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A12 TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE New leader Associated Press South Korean presidentelect Park Geun-hye, without a helmet at center, shouts Monday with members of the special warfare command at a military base in Gwangju, South Korea. Park was elected South Korean president on Dec. 19, becoming the country's first female leader. Protester shot in CairoCAIRO Gunmen drove into Cairos Tahrir Square before dawn Monday and fired at an anti-government sit-in, seriously wounding a protester who had been jailed and tortured by former military rulers after he witnessed the killing of another activist. Two lawyers involved in the case suggested it was a targeted attack. Lawyer Tamer Gomaa identified the seriously wounded activist as Muhanad Samir, 19, and said he was battling for his life with a number of pellets embedded in his skull and in his face. Gomaa said witnesses recognized the attackers and identified them as security agents dressed in civilian clothes. Gomaa quoted witnesses as saying some of the attackers had visited the square hours before and inquired about Samir by name and about others at the sit-in. Pope marks end of difficult yearVATICAN CITY Pope Benedict XVI marked the end of a difficult year Monday by saying that despite all the death and injustice in the world, goodness prevails. Benedict celebrated New Years Eve with a vespers service in St. Peters Basilica to give thanks for 2012 and look ahead to 2013. He appeared tired during the service and used a cane afterward an indication that the busy Christmas season may be taking a toll on the 85-year-old Benedict. In his homily, Benedict said its tough to remember that goodness prevails when bad news death, violence and injustice makes more noise than good. He said taking time to meditate in prolonged reflection and prayer can help find healing from the inevitable wounds of daily life. Pakistan releases 8 Taliban prisonersISLAMABAD Pakistan released eight members of the Afghan Taliban from prison on Monday, including the former justice minister under the Taliban, in a bid to boost the peace process in neighboring Afghanistan, the government said. Pakistan is seen as a lynchpin in efforts to bring about peace in Afghanistan as foreign troops plan to depart the country in 2014. Kabul has been pressing its neighbor to release more prisoners who they hope would bring the Taliban to the negotiating table before the U.S. troops go home. The Pakistanis appear to have an interest in promoting peace across the border, as a resumption of the civil war there could bring harsh consequences on its side as well. We have released some more Taliban prisoners today as our help in the peace process in Afghanistan, Pakistan Foreign Office spokesman Moazzam Khan said. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressWASHINGTON Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is under observation at a New York hospital after being treated for a blood clot stemming from the concussion she sustained earlier this month. Clintons doctors discovered the clot Sunday while performing a follow-up exam, her spokesman, Philippe Reines, said. He would not elaborate on the location of the clot but said Clinton was being treated with anti-coagulants and would remain at New YorkPresbyterian Hospital for at least the next 48 hours so doctors can monitor the medication. Her doctors will continue to assess her condition, including other issues associated with her concussion, Reines said in a statement. They will determine if any further action is required. Clinton, 65, fell and suffered a concussion while at home alone in mid-December as she recovered from a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. The concussion was diagnosed Dec. 13 and Clinton was forced to cancel a trip to North Africa and the Middle East that had been planned for the next week. The seriousness of a blood clot depends on where it is, said Dr. Gholam Motamedi, a neurologist at Georgetown University Medical Center who was not involved in Clintons care. Clots in the legs are a common risk after someone has been bedridden, as Clinton may have been for a time after her concussion. Those are no big deal and are treated with six months of blood thinners to allow them to dissolve on their own and to prevent further clots from forming, he said. A clot in a lung or the brain is more serious. Lung clots, called pulmonary embolisms, can be deadly, and a clot in the brain can cause a stroke, Motamedi said. Clinton still under observation World welcomes 2013 Associated PressLONDON Sydneys skyline erupted in fireworks as Australia ushered in 2013 on Tuesday, while extravagant displays soon followed in Hong Kong and Beijing, and even the once-isolated country of Myanmar joined the party for the first time in decades. Asia greeted the new year with an atmosphere of renewed optimism despite the fiscal cliff impasse of spending cuts and tax increases threatening to reverberate globally from the United States and the tattered economies of Europe, where the party was expected to be more subdued. Celebrations were planned around the world, culminating with the traditional crystal ball drop in New York Citys Times Square, where 1 million people were expected to cram into the surrounding streets. The balmy summer night in Sydney was split by 7 tons of fireworks fired from rooftops and barges, many cascading from the citys Harbor Bridge, in a $6.9 million pyrotechnic extravaganza billed by organizers as the worlds largest. In Myanmar, after nearly five decades under military regimes that discouraged or banned big public gatherings, about 90,000 people experienced the countrys first New Years Eve countdown in a field in the largest city of Yangon. We feel like we are in a different world, said Yu Thawda, a university student who came with three of her friends. Tens of thousands of people lined Hong Kongs Victoria Harbor to view a $1.6 million fireworks display, said to be the biggest ever in the southern Chinese city. In North Korea, cannons boomed at midnight in Pyongyang as people crowded the streets of the capital to watch a fireworks show over the Taedong River. After being in mourning a year ago regarding leader Kim Jong Ils death, North Koreans celebrated the end of a big year that included the rise of new leader Kim Jong Un and the recent launch of a satellite into space. In Indonesia, Jakartas street party centered on a 4-mile thoroughfare closed to traffic from nightfall until after midnight. Workers erected 16 large stages along the normally clogged, eight-lane highway through the heart of the city. Indonesias booming economy is a rare bright spot amid global gloom and is bringing prosperity or the hope of it to its people. In the Philippines, where many are recovering from devastation from a recent typhoon, health officials have hit upon a successful way to stop revelers from setting off huge illegal firecrackers that maim and injure hundreds of Filipinos each year. A health official, Eric Tayag, donned the splashy outfit of South Korean star PSY and danced to his YouTube hit Gangnam Style video while preaching against the use of illegal firecrackers on TV, in schools and in public arenas. The campaign has become viral, Tayag said. In austerity-hit Europe, the mood was more restrained if hopeful. The year 2013 is projected to be a sixth straight one of recession amid Greeces worst economic crisis since World War II. Australia, Asia greet new year with fireworks, festivities Associated Press Fireworks explode Tuesday in the sky above Sydney Harbour during the New Year celebrations in Sydney, Australia. Associated PressPENDLETON, Ore. A federal agency has sent two investigators to the site of an Eastern Oregon tour bus crash that killed nine people. The National Transportation Safety Board said Monday it would look into the conditions on Interstate 84 and the guardrail the tour bus crashed through Sunday morning. It also will examine the operations of the Vancouver, British Columbia, bus carrier. The agency said the 1998model bus rolled at least once when it wrecked on a long descent known for dangerous winter driving conditions. More than 40 people were aboard the bus traveling from Las Vegas to Vancouver. On Monday, 14 remained at a hospital in nearby Pendleton. Sixteen had been sent to other hospitals. The stretch of rural Oregon interstate where a tour bus crashed through a guardrail and plummeted 100 feet down a steep embankment is so notorious that state transportation officials have published a specific advisory warning of its dangers. The bus crashed near the start of a 7-mile section of road winding down a hill. It came to rest at the bottom of a snowy slope, landing beaten and battered but upright with little or no debris visible around the crash site. The East Oregonian said it spoke with two South Korean passengers, ages 16 and 17. Both said through a translator that they were seated near the rear of the bus when it swerved a few times, hit the guardrail and flipped. They described breaking glass and seeing passengers pinned by their seats as the bus slid down the hill. Both said that they feared for their lives. The paper said that the teens, one of whom injured a knee and the other suffered a broken collarbone, were staying at a hotel arranged by the Red Cross. More than a dozen rescue workers descended the hill and used ropes to help retrieve people from the wreckage in freezing weather. The bus driver was among the survivors. Lt. Gregg Hastings said the bus crashed along the west end of the Blue Mountains, and west of an area called Deadman Pass. The area is well known locally for its hazards, and the state transportation department advises truck drivers that some of the most changeable and severe weather conditions in the Northwest can lead to slick conditions and poor visibility. Feds to investigate Oregon bus crash Associated Press Emergency personnel respond to the scene of tour bus crash Sunday, Dec. 30, about 15 miles east of Pendleton, Ore. Secretary of State being treated for blood clot found Sunday

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NHL, NFL/ B2 Sports briefs/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 TV schedule/ B3 Entertainment/ B4 The Duke mens basketball team retained the No. 1 spot in the APs college basketball poll./ B2 S PORTS Section B TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE W ith no county swimming meet, the best way to tell who the top swimmers in the county are is by looking at the results when Citrus, Crystal River and Lecanto compete against one another and how the Hurricanes, Pirates and Panthers do in the postseason. Crystal River senior Abbey Brown, Pirates freshman teammate Anna Lane and Lecanto junior Anabel Marchildon each advanced to the regional level of their sport. Also, the trio were the best in the county in their respective events, making them each a fitting finalist for the Chronicles Girls Swimmer of the Year award. Each athlete put together an impressive resume and deserves recognition. The finalists have standing invitations to the Chronicle sports banquet at the conclusion of the 2012-13 school year, where the winner will be announced. Anna Lane, Crystal River freshman Anabel Marchildon, Lecanto junior Abbey Brown, Crystal River senior Girls Swimmer/Diver of the Year finalists AND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM Brown, Lane, Marchildon three finalists for Girls Swimmer of the Year AllChroniclegirls swimming team Jena Askew, Citrus seniorAskew was a 50-meter freestyle specialist and was one of the few female Hurricanes to have individual success against Crystal River and Lecanto. Abbey Brown, Crystal River seniorPlaced in the 200 and 500-meter freestyle races consolation finals at the Region 1A-1 meet after taking third in both events at the District 1A-3 meet. Marissa Penn, Crystal River seniorFinished fifth in the 100-meter breaststroke and eighth in the 50-meter freestyle at the District 1A-3 meet to advance to the regional level. Anna Lane, Crystal River freshmanCame in the 200 and 500-meter freestyle races consolation finals at the Region 1A-1 meet after taking seventh and fifth, respectively, in the events at the District 1A-3 meet. Anabel Marchildon, Lecanto junior The Panther qualifed for the Region 2A-2 meet after taking sixth in the 100-meter breaststroke and eighth in the 100-meter butterfly.Courtney Toomey, Lecanto senior A senior co-captain for the Panthers, Toomey swam the 500-meter freestyle event.Marissa Buck, Lecanto senior A senior co-captain for Lecanto, she swam the 200 Individual Medley.Breanna Johnson, Lecanto junior The top female diver in the county, Johnson placed sixth at the District 2A-5 meet. Jon-Michael Soracchi ON POINT Photos by MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Making a splash Plethora of NFL coaches fired Monday Eagles ax Reid; Bears let Smith go Associated PressSAN DIEGO By lunchtime Monday, six NFL coaches were looking for work. With the regular season ending the day before, the firings came at a furious clip and within a twohour span, the following were sacked: Andy Reid in Philadelphia, Lovie Smith in Chicago, Norv Turner in San Diego, Pat Shurmur in Cleveland, Romeo Crennel in Kansas City and Chan Gailey in Buffalo, Though he also had a losing record, New York Jets coach Rex Ryan held onto his job while general manager Mike Tannenbaum was let go. Jacksonville fired its GM, Gene Smith, and coach Mike Mularkey could go soon, too. The Chargers and Browns made it a clean sweep. San Diego dismissed GM A.J. Smith along with Turner. Cleveland fired GM Tom Heckert along with Shurmur. Just after the initial round of firings, the Arizona Cardinals sacked coach Ken Whisenhunt. The team also ousted general manager Rod Graves, who had been with the franchise for 16 years. Hed been general manager since 2007. The 50-year-old Whisenhunt had more wins than any other coach in Cardinals history, going 45-51, 4-2 in the playoffs. He had a year worth about $5.5 million left on his contract. Reid was the longest tenured of the coaches, removed after 14 seasons and a Super Bowl appearance in 2005 a loss to New England. Smith spent nine seasons with the Bears, leading them to the Super Bowl in 2006 a loss to the Indianapolis Colts. Turner went 56-40 with the Chargers, the third team to fire him as head coach. San Diego won the AFC West from 2006-09 he was 3-3 in the playoffs but didnt make the postseason the last three years. Gailey was dumped after three seasons with the Bills; Shurmur after two; and Crennel had one full season with the Chiefs. Reid took over a 3-13 team in 1999, drafted Donovan McNabb with the No. 2 overall pick and quickly turned the franchise into a title contender. He led them to a run of four straight NFC championship games, a streak that ended with a trip to the NFL title game. But the team hasnt won a playoff game since 2008 and after last seasons 8-8 finish, owner Jeffrey Lurie said he was looking for Andy Reid Lovie Smith Romeo Crennel Chan Gailey Norv Turner Pat Shurmur Seminoles ready for Orange Bowl No. 12 FSU faces BCS buster N. Illinois Associated PressMIAMI Florida States biggest weakness heading into their Orange Bowl game against Northern Illinois might be Midwestern geography. The Seminoles concede theyd be hardpressed to locate their opponent in an atlas. I could probably find Illinois, receiver Rashad Greene said. I dont really know where the town is. Actually I dont even know the town. Its DeKalb. DeKalb? Seminoles kicker Dustin Hopkins said. Hey, next time Ill know. I thought it was in Chicago, quarterback EJ Manuel said. Cue the cliche: A victory Tuesday night would put Northern Illinois on the map. The No. 16-ranked Huskies have been widely derided as unworthy of a BCS bowl berth, which makes them eager for validation when they face No. 13 Florida State. Were playing a team that is going to be willing to bloody their noses and get after you, Seminoles offensive coordinator James Coley warned. Florida State defensive end Bjoern Werner is a German-born All-American who ended the regular season with 13 sacks, second-most in the nation. Associated Press Orange Bowl No. 13 Florida State (11-2) vs. No. 16 Northern Illinois (12-1) Time: 8:30 p.m. today. TV: ESPN See ORANGE / Page B3 Associated Press Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan leads the Cardinal into todays Rose Bowl against Wisconsin. Cardinal, Badgers meet in Rose Bowl Associated PressLOS ANGELES Although Montee Ball and Stepfan Taylor have barely met, Taylor is pretty sure they would get along famously. We had a quick hello this week, but you can tell weve got a lot in common, the Stanford running back said. At least on the field. In an era of college football dominated by spread schemes and prolific quarterbacks, these two tailbacks personify an old-fashioned, smashmouth approach to offense. Running behind similar massive offensive lines at Wisconsin and Stanford, both backs persevered through slow starts to their careers to earn prominent spots in the record books heading into their big finales in the 99th Rose Bowl. You cant really have a better running back matchup in college football than this one, Wisconsin coach Barry Alvarez said. Ball and Taylor expect to get to know each other while they prepare for the upcoming NFL draft, where theyre both likely to be high picks. Theyll first finish up their college careers against each other when the surprising Badgers (8-5) make their third straight Rose Bowl appearance Tuesday against the favored No. 8 Cardinal (11-2). When Ball is asked about Taylors abilities, he realizes he might as well be describing himself. Were both not blazing fast, but we both do a good job playing to our strengths, Ball said. We run behind our pads, run between the tackles and always stay physical. Weve got a lot of similarities, so its good to see him have success. Just hopefully not too much success in the game. Rose Bowl No. 8 Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5) Time: 5 p.m. today TV: ESPN See ROSE / Page B3 See FIRED / Page B3

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B2 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S PORTS SPORTS BRIEFS Duke still a runaway No. 1 in AP Top 25For the third straight week Duke is the runaway No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25, and for the first time in 16 years Minnesota is in the top 10. The Blue Devils (12-0) received all but two firstplace votes from the 65member media panel on Monday. The next five teams Michigan, Arizona, Louisville, Indiana and Kansas held their places from last week. Syracuse, Ohio State, Minnesota and Gonzaga rounded out the top 10. Michigan (13-0) was No. 1 on two ballots for the second straight week. Minnesota is in the top 10 for the first time since it was third in the final poll of 1996-97. New Mexico, which won at undefeated Cincinnati, returns to the rankings at No. 20 after being out for one week. The Lobos replace UNLV, which dropped out from 20th after losing at North Carolina. Miamis Reggie Johnson out six to eight weeks CORAL GABLES Miami Hurricanes senior center Reggie Johnson will miss much of the Atlantic Coast Conference season with a broken left thumb. Coach Jim Larranaga said Johnson is expected to be sidelined six to eight weeks, A starter since his sophomore season, Johnson has already missed four games. He has played in seven games and is averaging 12.6 points and 10.1 rebounds. The Hurricanes (8-3) host LaSalle on Wednesday and open ACC play Saturday at Georgia Tech.RB Williams wants to stay in CarolinaCHARLOTTE, N.C. Carolina Panthers all-time leading rusher DeAngelo Williams says he wants to remain with the team despite getting benched earlier this season. But the seven-year veteran is the first to admit thats not his decision. Williams said the ball is not really in my court. Williams has three years remaining on a five-year contract worth $43 million that included a $16 million signing bonus. Williams closed the season by setting a franchise record with a career-best 210 yards rushing and two touchdowns in Carolinas 44-38 win over the New Orleans Saints. Williams started the final five games with Jonathan Stewart out with a high ankle sprain. I signed a five-year contract, so that in itself lets you know I want to be back, Williams said as the left the stadium. Nevada RB Jefferson declares for NFLRENO, Nev. Nevada running back Stefphon Jefferson has decided to forgo his senior season and enter the NFL draft this spring. Jefferson set single-season Nevada records in carries (375), yards rushing yards, rushing touchdowns (24) and total scores (25). He ranked second nationally in both rushing yards per game (144.9) and points per game (11.5). The junior from Visalia, Calif., said in a statement issued by the school late Sunday he will always bleed silver and blue but wants to try to take his career to the next level. He thanked the coaches and staff for all they have done to help make him successful. From wire reports NHL talks to restart as year closes Associated PressNEW YORK The NHL and the players association are using the final hours of 2012 to try to get closer to an elusive deal that has so far been well out of reach. Negotiations were scheduled for Monday afternoon at the leagues New York office, marking the first time the NHL and the union will be bargaining in nearly three weeks, and the first time they will do so without mediation since early December. The New Years clock is ticking while the window to reach a labor agreement to save the season is rapidly closing. No one has said exactly how much time remains, but the belief is the NHL wants a shortened season to start no later than Jan. 19. That leaves a little less than two weeks to reach an agreement and stage one week of training camp before the puck would drop on a 48game campaign. The league and the union had informational discussions by conference call and in meetings with staff members that lasted much of Saturday and ended Sunday. Those talks were spurred by the nearly 300-page contract proposal the NHL presented to the union Thursday. The union is expected to make a counteroffer Monday. These will be the first negotiations since the sides met with a federal mediator Dec. 13. All games through Jan. 14 have been canceled, claiming more than 50 percent of the original schedule. The NHL wants to reach a deal by Jan. 11 and open the season eight days later. Bargaining sessions with only the NHL and union havent been held since Dec. 6, when talks abruptly ended after the players association made a counterproposal. The league said that offer was contingent on the union accepting three elements unconditionally and without further bargaining. The NHL then pulled all existing offers off the table. Two days of sessions with mediators the following week ended without progress. A person familiar with key points of the offer told The Associated Press that the league proposed raising the limit of individual free-agent contracts to six years from five seven years if a team re-signs its own player; raising the salary variance from one year to another to 10 percent, up from 5 percent; and one compliance buyout for the 2013-14 season that wouldnt count toward a teams salary cap but would be included in the overall players share of income. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because details of the new offer werent being discussed publicly. The NHL maintained the deferred payment amount of $300 million it offered in its previous proposal, an increase from an earlier offer of $211 million. The initial $300 million offer was pulled after negotiations broke off this month. The latest proposal is for 10 years, running through the 2021-22 season, with both sides having the right to opt out after eight years. If this offer doesnt quickly lead to a new collective bargaining agreement, the next round of cuts could claim the entire schedule. The NHL is the only North American professional sports league to cancel a season because of a labor dispute, losing the 2004-05 campaign to a lockout. A 48-game season was played in 1995 after a lockout stretched into January. It is still possible this dispute could eventually be settled in the courts if the sides cant reach a deal on their own. The NHL filed a class-action suit this month in U.S. District Court in New York in an effort to show its lockout is legal. In a separate move, the league filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board, contending bad-faith bargaining by the union. Those moves were made because the players association took steps toward potentially filing a disclaimer of interest, which would dissolve the union and make it a trade association. That would allow players to file antitrust lawsuits against the NHL. Union members voted overwhelmingly to give their board the power to file the disclaimer by Wednesday. If that deadline passes, another authorization vote could be held to approve a later filing. Associated Press Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Mike Mularkey responds to a question Monday in Jacksonville. After four years of futility, the Jaguars are heading in a different direction with a minimum of a new general manager after firing Gene Smith. Stay of execution Jets coach Ryan, Jags coach Mularkey not fired, but teams GMs given pink slips Associated PressJACKSONVILLE After four years of futility, the Jacksonville Jaguars are heading in a different direction. Coach Mike Mularkey might not be around for the move. The Jaguars fired general manager Gene Smith on Monday after four disappointing seasons, including the worst year in franchise history. Mularkey could be next. Owner Shad Khan is waiting to decide Mularkeys fate until he hires a new general manager, which could happen this week. Mularkey failed to make the Jaguars (2-14) better in his first season, setting a team record for losses and dropping eight games by 16 or more points. Smith was the architect of the roster. He had been with the team since its inception in 1994, working his way up from regional scout to general manager. He has been GM since 2009, compiling a 22-42 record. Not one player he acquired made the Pro Bowl. Now it is time for the Jacksonville Jaguars to begin a new chapter, Khan said in a statement. Were not looking back. Ive made it clear from Day One that we pledge nothing less than to deliver the first Super Bowl championship to Jacksonville. Our fans have been remarkably loyal over the years, and they were truly outstanding this past season. We simply must do better for our fans. Khan said the search for a new GM will begin immediately. Arizona director of player personnel Jason Licht, San Francisco director of player personnel Tom Gamble, and Atlanta director of player personnel David Caldwell have been mentioned as potential replacements. Im determined to find the right man to lead our football operations, someone who shares my vision, understands the commitment we will demand and is qualified and ready to seize this opportunity, Khan said. Khan informed Smith of his decision Monday morning and then delivered the news to Mularkey. Mularkey said he received no assurances he would be retained for a second season. It was a conversation about Genes status, said Mularkey, the former Buffalo Bills head coach who now has lost 20 of his last 23 games. My status was not discussed, and I wont go into detail what was. But until Im told otherwise, Im the head coach of this team. So the Jaguars are in limbo again, much like they were late last season when Khan bought the team from Wayne Weaver for $770 million. Weaver fired coach Jack Del Rio the same day he gave Smith a three-year extension despite Smiths numerous mistakes in the draft and in free agency. Smith handled the coaching search, which started and ended with Mularkey. But the Jaguars made no progress under Mularkey, finishing the year ranked 29th in offense and 30th in defense. You knew something was going to happen, defensive tackle Terrance Knighton said. You didnt know where it was going to start. It obviously started from the top and it will probably make its way down. Knighton is one of numerous free agents who could make the Jacksonville job enticing for prospective GMs. The new GM would be able to rebuild the roster, and the Jaguars have plenty of room under the salary cap and few dead-money contracts. Nonetheless, changes are never easy inside a locker room. With a year like this, you can point fingers everywhere, tight end Marcedes Lewis said. Im not sure what the final straw was, but it happened. Kind of got to move forward and do what you do. Smith changed the way Jacksonville approached personnel moves. He made character as important as ability, but it never paid off the way he envisioned. Finding talent seemed to be the main issue. Smith whiffed on offensive tackle Eben Britton (39th overall pick in 2009), defensive tackle Tyson Alualu (10th pick in 2010) and quarterback Blaine Gabbert (10th pick in 2011). Smith traded up to select Gabbert even though several teams with quarterback needs passed on the former Missouri starter. He also drafted a punter in the third round in April, a move that was mocked locally and nationally. Equally alarming for Khan had to be Smiths penchant for overpaying in free agency: Torry Holt, Aaron Kampman, Paul Posluszny, Clint Session, Dawan Landry, Laurent Robinson and Aaron Ross. Smith did hit on some players, including left tackle Eugene Monroe (eighth pick in 2009), cornerback Derek Cox (73rd pick in 2009) and receivers Cecil Shorts (114th pick in 2011) and Justin Blackmon (fifth pick in 2012). But none of those starters has become a star. And Smith gave up a second-round pick to get Cox and a fourth-rounder to trade up and get Blackmon. Smiths most controversial act came in April, when he chose punter Bryan Anger in the third round (70th pick). Anger was terrific as a rookie, but adding him never seemed like the best call for a team that needed talent and depth at so many other positions. Jets fire GM Tannenbaum, Ryan tabbed to stayFLORHAM PARK, N.J. The New York Jets have fired general manager Mike Tannenbaum and say coach Rex Ryan will be back next season. The Jets finished 6-10 and were in constant turmoil from the moment they acquired Tim Tebow in a trade before the season. Jets owner Woody Johnson said in a statement Monday that like all Jets fans, I am disappointed with this years results. Tannenbaum, who signed off on Tebow trade, has two years left on his contract. Tebow was brought in as a backup for Mark Sanchez but was expected to play a key role in certain offensive schemes. It never worked out. Associated Press New York Jets head coach Rex Ryan walks along the sidelines during the teams 28-9 loss to the Buffalo Bills on Sunday in Orchard Park, N.Y.

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S COREBOARD C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS COLLEGE FOOTBALL 12 p.m. (ESPN2) Taxslayer.com Gator Bowl Mississippi State vs. Northwestern 1 p.m. (ABC) Capital One Bowl Georgia vs. Nebraska 1 p.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl Michigan vs. South Carolina 5 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl Stanford vs. Wisconsin 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl Florida State vs. Northern Illinois 1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Outback Bowl Michigan vs. South Carolina (Same-day Tape) Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Glantz-Culver Line NCAA Football Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Today FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma St.1817(70) Purdue Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Northwestern+21(53) Mississippi St. Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. S. Carolina45(48) Michigan Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Georgia89(61) Nebraska Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Stanford66(47) Wisconsin Orange Bowl At Miami Florida St.1513(58) N. Illinois Wednesday Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida1314(45) Louisville Thursday Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Oregon99(75) Kansas St. Friday Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Texas A&M33(72) Oklahoma Saturday Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Mississippi13(52) Pittsburgh Sunday GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Arkansas St.+14(61) Kent St. Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Miami Alabama79(41) Notre Dame NFL Playoffs Saturday FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Houston54(43) Cincinnati at Green Bay88(46) Minnesota Sunday at Baltimore76(46) Indianapolis Seattle12(45) at Wash.Bowl Glance All Times EST Saturday, Dec. 15 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Arizona 49, Nevada 48 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho Utah State 41, Toledo 15 Thursday, Dec. 20 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Friday, Dec. 21 Beef O Bradys Bowl At St. Petersburg, Fla. UCF 38, Ball State 17 Saturday, Dec. 22 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, East Carolina 34 MAACO Bowl Las Vegas Boise State 28, Washington 26 Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Central Michigan 24, Western Kentucky 21 Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Washington San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl At San Diego Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl At Houston Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Rice 33, Air Force 14 Pinstripe Bowl At New York Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), late Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), late Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), late Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), late Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (93), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At Miami Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (112), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Miami Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)Late Sunday box Redskins 28, Cowboys 18 Dallas0701118 Washington0771428 Second Quarter DalWitten 9 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 7:59. WasMorris 17 run (Forbath kick), 3:28. Third Quarter WasGriffin III 10 run (Forbath kick), 3:10. Fourth Quarter DalFG Bailey 48, 14:09. WasMorris 32 run (Forbath kick), 10:32. DalOgletree 10 pass from Romo (Harris pass from Romo), 5:50. WasMorris 1 run (Forbath kick), 1:09. A,845. DalWas First downs2024 Total Net Yards296361 Rushes-yards22-10042-274 Passing19687 Punt Returns3-783-18 Kickoff Returns5-934-109 Interceptions Ret.0-03-15 Comp-Att-Int20-37-39-18-0 Sacked-Yards Lost2-221-13 Punts4-41.55-41.4 Fumbles-Lost0-01-0 Penalties-Yards1-62-20 Time of Possession26:3433:26 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGDallas, Murray 17-76, F.Jones 524. Washington, Morris 33-200, Griffin III 6-63, Royster 2-9, Moss 1-2. PASSINGDallas, Romo 20-37-3-218. Washington, Griffin III 9-18-0-100. RECEIVINGDallas, Witten 7-56, Bryant 4-71, Hanna 3-20, Ogletree 2-25, Harris 1-25, Vickers 1-11, Murray 1-6, F.Jones 1-4. Washington, Garcon 3-46, Moss 2-22, Morris 2-12, Hankerson 1-12, Paulsen 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALSWashington, Forbath 37 (WR). NFL playoff glanceAll Times EST Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 5 Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m. (NBC) Minnesota at Green Bay, 8 p.m. (NBC) Sunday, Jan. 6 Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS) Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 12 Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Washington, Seattle or Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday, Jan. 13 Washington, Seattle or Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX) Baltimore, Indianapolis or Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS) NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New Orleans AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS) NFL final standings AFC East WLTPctPFPA y-New England1240.750557331 Miami790.438288317 N.Y. Jets6100.375281375 Buffalo6100.375344435 South WLTPctPFPA y-Houston1240.750416331 x-Indianapolis1150.688357387 Tennessee6100.375330471 Jacksonville2140.125255444 North WLTPctPFPA y-Baltimore1060.625398344 x-Cincinnati1060.625391320 Pittsburgh880.500336314 Cleveland5110.313302368 West WLTPctPFPA y-Denver1330.813481289 San Diego790.438350350 Oakland4120.250290443 Kansas City2140.125211425 NFC East WLTPctPFPA y-Washington1060.625436388 N.Y. Giants970.563429344 Dallas880.500376400 Philadelphia4120.250280444 South WLTPctPFPA y-Atlanta1330.813419299 Carolina790.438357363 New Orleans790.438461454 Tampa Bay790.438389394 North WLTPctPFPA y-Green Bay1150.688433336 x-Minnesota1060.625379348 Chicago1060.625375277 Detroit4120.250372437 West WLTPctPFPA y-San Francisco1141.719397273 x-Seattle1150.688412245 St. Louis781.469299348 Arizona5110.313250357 x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division Sundays Games Tennessee 38, Jacksonville 20 Carolina 44, New Orleans 38 Buffalo 28, N.Y. Jets 9 Cincinnati 23, Baltimore 17 Pittsburgh 24, Cleveland 10 Indianapolis 28, Houston 16 N.Y. Giants 42, Philadelphia 7 Chicago 26, Detroit 24 Tampa Bay 22, Atlanta 17 San Diego 24, Oakland 21 San Francisco 27, Arizona 13 Seattle 20, St. Louis 13 Denver 38, Kansas City 3 Minnesota 37, Green Bay 34 New England 28, Miami 0 Washington 28, Dallas 18 End of Regular Season AFC leaders Week 17 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt Manning, DEN58340046593711 Brady, NWE6374014827348 Roethlis., PIT4492843265268 Schaub, HOU54435040082212 P. Rivers, SND52733836062615 Flacco, BAL53131738172210 Dalton, CIN52832936692716 C. Palmer, OAK56534540182214 Fitzpatrick, BUF50530634002416 Gabbert, JAC278162166296 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD Charles, KAN28515095.2991t5 Foster, HOU35114244.064615 Ridley, NWE29012634.364112 Spiller, BUF20712446.01626 Johnson, TEN27612434.5094t6 R. Rice, BAL25711434.45469 Green-Ellis, CIN27810943.94486 Greene, NYJ27610633.85368 Re. Bush, MIA2279864.3465t6 Richardson, CLE2679503.5632t11 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Welker, NWE118135411.5596 Johnson, HOU112159814.360t4 Wayne, IND106135512.8335 A.. Green, CIN97135013.973t11 Thomas, DEN94143415.371t10 Decker, DEN85106412.55513 Johnson, BUF79104613.2636 B. Myers, OAK7980610.2294 Hartline, MIA74108314.680t1 B. Lloyd, NWE7491112.3534 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts A. Foster, HOU171520102 Decker, DEN13013078 Richardson, CLE12111072 Ridley, NWE12120072 Green, CIN11011066 Gronkow., NWE11011066 R. Rice, BAL1091060 Thomas, DEN10010060 H. Miller, PIT808050 Re. Bush, MIA862048NFC leaders Week 17 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt Rodgers, GBY5523714295398 Griffin III, WAS3932583200205 R. Wilson, SEA39325231182610 M. Ryan, ATL61542247193214 Brees, NOR67042251774319 Romo, DAL64842549032819 Manning, NYG53632139482615 Newton, CAR48528038691912 Bradford, STL55132837022113 Freeman, TAM55830640652717 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD Peterson, MIN34820976.0382t12 Morris, WAS33516134.8139t13 Lynch, SEA31515905.0577t11 Martin, TAM31914544.5670t11 Gore, SNF25812144.71378 Forte, CHI24810944.41465 Jackson, STL25710424.05464 Bradshaw, NYG22110154.59376 McCoy, PHL2008404.20342 Griffin III, WAS1208156.7976t7 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Johnson, DET122196416.1535 Marshall, CHI118150812.85611 Witten, DAL11010399.4363 Gonzalez, ATL9393010.0258 Bryant, DAL92138215.085t12 White, ATL92135114.7597 Cruz, NYG86109212.780t10 Crabtree, SNF85110513.049t9 Graham, NOR8598211.6469 Colston, NOR83115413.96010 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Jones, GBY14014084 Peterson, MIN13121080 Morris, WAS13130078 D. Bryant, DAL12012074 M. Lynch, SEA12111072 Do. Martin, TAM12111072 B. Marshall, CHI11011066 M. Turner, ATL11101066 Colston, NOR10010060 Cruz, NYG10010060AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 30, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Duke (63)12-01,6231 2. Michigan (2)13-01,5472 3. Arizona12-01,4743 4. Louisville12-11,4344 5. Indiana12-11,3785 6. Kansas11-11,3136 7. Syracuse11-11,1979 8. Ohio St.10-21,07910 9. Minnesota12-197811 10. Gonzaga12-194613 11. Illinois13-192912 12. Missouri10-29127 13. Florida9-281014 14. Cincinnati12-17618 15. Georgetown10-171815 16. Creighton12-162916 17. Butler10-259118 18. Michigan St.11-244719 19. San Diego St.11-243717 20. New Mexico13-1389 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 B3 21. Notre Dame12-136121 22. Oklahoma St.10-133322 23. NC State10-227023 24. Pittsburgh12-121924 25. Kansas St.10-214925 Others receiving votes: UNLV 52, North Carolina 38, Wyoming 28, Temple 21, VCU 15, Kentucky 13, Wichita St. 11, UConn 9, UCLA 6, Maryland 5, Oregon 3.NBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York219.700 Brooklyn1614.5335 Boston1416.4677 Philadelphia1417.4527 Toronto1120.35510 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami208.714 Atlanta199.6791 Orlando1218.4009 Charlotte723.23314 Washington424.14316 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago1612.571 Indiana1713.567 Milwaukee1613.552 Detroit1122.3337 Cleveland725.21911 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio248.750 Memphis198.7042 Houston1614.5337 Dallas1219.38711 New Orleans723.23316 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City236.793 Denver1715.5317 Minnesota1413.5198 Portland1514.5178 Utah1517.4699 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers256.806 Golden State2110.6774 L.A. Lakers1515.5009 Sacramento1119.36713 Phoenix1120.35514 Sundays Games San Antonio 111, Dallas 86 Detroit 96, Milwaukee 94 Sacramento 118, Boston 96 L.A. Clippers 107, Utah 96 Mondays Games Charlotte at Chicago, late Memphis at Indiana, late Miami at Orlando, late Atlanta at Houston, late Brooklyn at San Antonio, late Phoenix at Oklahoma City, late Todays Games Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Sacramento at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Portland at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m. Memphis at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.NBA leaders Through Dec. 30 Scoring GFGFTPTSAVG Bryant, LAL3030922090330.1 Anthony, NYK2423515268428.5 Durant, OKC2926624182428.4 Harden, HOU2922225475526.0 James, MIA2828511772625.9 Westbrook, OKC2921714762221.4 Aldridge, POR2722911257021.1 Wade, MIA2418511148820.3 Lee, GOL3126010262220.1 Curry, GOL312159962120.0 Pierce, BOS3019714859819.9 Ellis, MIL2921112257019.7 Parker, SAN3022511357719.2 Holiday, PHL272017150218.6 Lillard, POR291849753218.3 Mayo, DAL312009756818.3 Gay, MEM261828247418.2 DeRozan, TOR3121012956518.2 Walker, CHA3020010654218.1 Bosh, MIA2718111548317.9 FG Percentage FGFGAPCT Chandler, NYK144209.689 Jordan, LAC124209.593 McGee, DEN146249.586 Howard, LAL186325.572 Ibaka, OKC173306.565 Lopez, NOR149266.560 Hickson, POR146262.557 James, MIA285520.548 Bosh, MIA181333.544 Griffin, LAC225416.541 Rebounds GOFFDEFTOTAVG Varejao, CLE2513822336114.4 Randolph, MEM2712720833512.4 Howard, LAL3011124435511.8 Asik, HOU309525434911.6 Hickson, POR2811619330911.0 Lee, GOL319424734111.0 Noah, CHI2810219429610.6 Chandler, NYK3012817930710.2 Faried, DEN3213019432410.1 Jefferson, UTA316624531110.0 Assists GASTAVG Rondo, BOS2630211.6 Paul, LAC312929.4 Holiday, PHL272408.9 Vasquez, NOR302648.8 Westbrook, OKC292518.7 Williams, Bro292257.8 Calderon, TOR312367.6 Parker, SAN302207.3 Lawson, DEN322216.9 Nelson, ORL221516.9Baseball calendar Jan. 9 Hall of Fame voting announced. Jan. 9-10 Owners meeting, Paradise Valley, Ariz. Jan. 15 Salary arbitration filing. Jan. 18 Salary arbitration figures exchanged. Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings, Phoenix. Feb. 12 Mandatory reporting date for players participating in the World Baseball Classic in Asia. Mandatory reporting date for all other pitchers and catchers participating in the WBC. Voluntary reporting date for pitchers and catchers not participating in the WBC. Feb. 15 Mandatory reporting date for WBC players not participating in Asia. Voluntary reporting date for position players not participating in the WBC. Feb. 20 Mandatory reporting date for players not participating in the WBC. March 2-11 Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. March 2-19 World Baseball Classic. March 13 Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 27 Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2013 salary. improvement this year. Instead, it was even worse. The Eagles finished 4-12. Andy Reid won the most games of any head coach in Eagles history and he is someone I respect greatly and will remain friends with for many years to come, Lurie said. But, it is time for the Eagles to move in a new direction. Andy leaves us with a winning tradition that we can build upon. Shurmur went 9-23 in his two seasons with the Browns, who will embark on yet another offseason of change the only constant in more than a decade of futility. Cleveland has lost at least 11 games in each of the past five seasons and made the playoffs just once since returning to the NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Ultimately our objective is to put together an organization that will be the best at everything we do, Browns CEO Joe Banner said. On the field, our only goal is trying to win championships. Crennel took over with three games left in the 2011 season after GM Scott Pioli fired Todd Haley. Kansas City will have the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft as a result of having one of the worst seasons in its 53-year history. The only other time the Chiefs finished 2-14 was 2008, the year before Pioli was hired. I am embarrassed by the poor product we gave our fans this season, and I believe we have no choice but to move the franchise in a different direction, Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt said in a statement. Gailey, the former Dallas Cowboys coach, compiled a 16-32 record in his three seasons in Buffalo, never doing better than 6-10. This will probably be, and I say probably, but I think it will be the first place thats ever fired me that Ill pull for, Gailey said. Smith and the Bears went 10-6 this season and just missed a playoff spot. But Chicago started 7-1 this year and has struggled to put together a productive offense throughout Smiths tenure. His record was 81-63 with the Bears. The Rose Bowl is a culmination of two resilient tenures at a notoriously fickle position. Both backs are playing in their third straight BCS bowls: Ball was outstanding in both of the Badgers previous trips to the Rose Bowl, while Taylor had big games in Orange and Fiesta bowls over the past two years. Ball, who won the Doak Walker Award as the nations top running back this season, has scored 82 touchdowns more than anybody in FBS history. Taylor is merely the leading rusher in Stanford history and one score shy of becoming the schools career touchdowns leader as an incredibly durable performer who almost never leaves the field when the Cardinal have the ball. Yet neither Ball nor Taylor started his college career as the main man, instead winning their starting jobs through persistence and hard work. Taylor was a backup to Toby Gerhart as a freshman, getting just 56 carries. He was overshadowed for most of his first three seasons on The Farm with Heisman contenders Gerhart and Andrew Luck in the same backfield before getting the spotlight this year and even then, he was overshadowed on the West Coast by fellow Pac-12 ball-carriers Kenjon Barner at Oregon, KaDeem Carey at Arizona and Johnathan Franklin at UCLA. Yet Taylor broke Darrin Nelsons Stanford career rushing record in the Pac-12 title game, getting 78 more yards to give him 4,212 in his career. With a touchdown against Wisconsin, hell break his career tie with Gerhart at 44 TDs. I dont worry about people paying attention to me as long as were winning games, because thats all you can control, Taylor said. Ball played behind John Clay as a freshman and in a three-back combo with Clay and James White as a sophomore. Ball was frequently the third option in that troika in 2010, particularly when he didnt even play in a win over Ohio State, a setback that left him contemplating a transfer or moving to linebacker. Northern Illinois (12-1) is the first Mid-American Conference team to play in the Bowl Championship Series. The Huskies made it when they cracked the top 16 in the final standings by 0.0404 points, setting off a celebration in DeKalb and a backlash everywhere else. The BCS busters arrived in south Florida without apology. There are a lot of angry people out there, NIU offensive coordinator Bob Cole said. But there are probably 120 of us in the hotel that are really happy about the whole deal. We dont really care what everybody else thinks. The bowl berth meant 17 Huskies would see the ocean for the first time. One story about the team used the phrase bowl bumpkins. We laugh at it, whatever thats supposed to mean, linebacker Tyrone Clark said. We take this as an amazing opportunity for the MAC, the school and the players. Actually, success is nothing new to the Huskies, who are playing in a bowl for the fifth consecutive season. Since October 2011 they have the best record in the country at 21-1. Theyve won 12 games in a row, matching Ohio State and Notre Dame for the longest active winning streak. Quarterback Jordan Lynch leads the nation in rushing and total offense, and he finished seventh in the Heisman Trophy voting. But the Huskies barely beat Army, Toledo and Kansas. They lost to Iowa, which won only three other games. Theyve never beaten an opponent ranked higher than 15th. At a news conference Monday for the head coaches, Florida States Jimbo Fisher agreed to pose with the Orange Bowl trophy. Northern Illinois Rod Carey declined, but not because his team is a two-touchdown underdog. Underdog? What is that? Carey said. Our kids play with a chip on their shoulder all the time. I mean, if we were favored by 21 points Id be more nervous. Until kickoff, its impossible to know how seriously Florida State (11-2) will take a supposedly unimposing opponent. The matchups a letdown for the Seminoles, who wanted to wait another week to play in Miami in the BCS title game. But in the days leading up to the game, the Seminoles said all the right things about Northern Illinois. Were not going to underestimate anybody, receiver Rodney Smith said. Everybody is trying to say NIU doesnt deserve to be here, but as a team were saying theyre here for a reason. Were going to treat them like theyre the No. 1-ranked team in the nation. Theyre No. 1 in DeKalb, anyway, especially in the wake of their Orange Bowl berth. Theyve got signs all over the place in the street back home Go Huskies and Good Luck in the Orange Bowl, Cole said. For what it has done for our community, our players, our school, it has been unbelievable. DeKalb is located an hour west of Chicago, on the banks of the Kishwaukee River, in Rand McNally grid C-10. A good crowd at Huskies Stadium is 18,000, and the towns population of 45,000 would barely fill half of the Orange Bowls seats. In DeKalb youve got your local cornfields, linebacker Clark said. Weve got a lot of space there. And youve got your daily wind. Its just a small town with a nice-size university and a select number of people. Added teammate Sean Progar: Theres not too much to do but play football. Thats what the small-town Huskies will do Tuesday on their biggest stage ever. FIRED Continued from Page B1 ORANGE Continued from Page B1 ROSE Continued from Page B1

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Kanye West, Kim Kardashian expecting child ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. A kid for Kimye: Kanye West and Kim Kardashian are expecting their first child. The rapper announced at a concert Sunday night that his girlfriend is pregnant. Kardashian was in the crowd at Revel Resorts Ovation Hall with her mother, Kris Jenner and Wests mentor and best friend, Jay-Z West told the crowd of more than 5,000 in song form: Now you having my baby. The crowd roared. And so did people on the Internet. The news instantly went viral on Twitter and Facebook, with thousands posting and commenting on the expecting couple. Most of the Kardashian clan also tweeted about the news, including Kims sisters. Kourtney Kardashian wrote: Another angel to welcome to our family. Overwhelmed with excitement! West, 35, also told concertgoers to congratulate his baby mom and that this was the most amazing thing. Representatives for West and Kardashian, 32, didnt immediately respond to emails about the pregnancy. The rapper and reality TV star went public in March. Kardashian married NBA player Kris Humphries in August 2011 and their divorce is not finalized. Lady Gagas antibullying effort taps Yale expertNEW HAVEN, Conn. Lady Gaga has enlisted a Yale University psychologist in her campaign to end bullying. Marc Brackett a research scientist, is one of seven scholars named to the advisory board of the singers Born This Way Foundation. The New Haven Register reported Brackett has been working on an antibullying project with Facebook. This spring hell head up a new center at Yale devoted to teaching emotional intelligence in schools and other organizations. Brackett, who is deputy director of Yales Health, Emotion and Behavior Laboratory, said understanding how to recognize and regulate emotion makes a big impact on the workplace, family life and school. Its particularly relevant in curbing bullying. Brackett said emotions play a role in memories, relationships, decisionmaking and health. Associated PressLOS ANGELES The big deal for Hollywood is not the record $10.8 billion that studios took in domestically in 2012. Its the fact that the number of tickets sold went up for the first time in three years. Thanks to inflation, revenue generally rises in Hollywood as admission prices climb each year. The real story is told in tickets, whose sales have been on a general decline for a decade, bottoming out in 2011 at 1.29 billion, their lowest level since 1995. The industry rebounded this year, with ticket sales projected to rise 5.6 percent to 1.36 billion by Dec. 31, according to box-office tracker Hollywood.com. Thats still well below the modern peak of 1.6 billion tickets sold in 2002, but in an age of cozy home theater setups and endless entertainment gadgets, studio executives consider it a triumph that they were able to put more butts in cinema seats this year than last. It is a victory, ultimately, said Don Harris, head of distribution at Paramount Pictures. If we deliver the product as an industry that people want, they will want to get out there. Even though you can sit at home and watch something on your large screen in high-def, people want to get out. Domestic revenue should finish up nearly 6 percent from 2011s $10.2 billion and top Hollywoods previous high of $10.6 billion set in 2009. The year was led by a pair of superhero sagas, Disneys The Avengers with $623 million domestically and $1.5 billion worldwide and the Warner Bros. Batman finale The Dark Knight Rises with $448 million domestically and $1.1 billion worldwide. Sonys James Bond adventure Skyfall is closing in on the $1 billion mark globally, and the list of action and family-film blockbusters includes The Hunger Games, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part Two, Ice Age: Continental Drift, Madagascar 3: Europes Most Wanted, The Amazing SpiderMan and Brave. Before television, movies were the biggest thing going, with ticket sales estimated as high as 4 billion a year domestically in the 1930s and s. Movie-going eroded steadily through the 1970s as people stayed home with their small screens. The rise of videotape in the 1980s further cut into business, followed by DVDs in the s and big, cheap flatscreen TVs in recent years. Todays video games, mobile phones and other portable devices also offer easy options to tramping out to a movie theater. Its all been a continual drain on cinema business, and cynics repeatedly predict the eventual demise of movie theaters. Yet Hollywood fights back with new technology of its own, from digital 3-D to booming surround-sound to the clarity of images projected at high-frame rates, which is being tested now with The Lord of the Rings prelude The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, shown in select theaters at 48 frames a second, double the standard speed. For all of the annoyances of theaters parking, pricy concessions, sitting next to strangers texting on their iPhones cinemas still offer the biggest and best way to see a movie. Every home has a kitchen, but you cant get into a good restaurant on Saturday night, said Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Warner Bros. People want to escape. Thats the nature of society. The adult population just is not going to sit home seven days a week, even though they have technology in their home thats certainly an improvement over what it was 10 years ago. People want to get out of the house, and no matter what they throw in the face of theatrical exhibition, it continues to perform at a strong level. Even real-life violence at the movie theater didnt turn audiences away. Some moviegoers thought twice about heading to the cinema after a gunman killed 12 people and injured 58 at a screening of The Dark Knight Rises in Colorado last summer, but if there was any lull in attendance, it was slight and temporary. Ticket sales went on a tear for most of the fall. While domestic revenues inch upward most years largely because of inflation, the real growth areas have been overseas, where more and more fans are eager for the next Hollywood blockbuster. Rentrak, which compiles international box office data, expects 2012s foreign gross to be about $23 billion, 3 percent higher than in 2011. No data was yet available on the number of tickets sold overseas this past year. International business generally used to account for less than half of a studio films overall receipts. Films now often do two or even three times as much business overseas as they do domestically. Some movies that were duds with U.S. audiences, such as Battleship and John Carter, can wind up being $200 million hits with overseas crowds. Whether finishing a good year or a bad one, Hollywood executives always look ahead to better days, insisting that the next crop of blockbusters will be bigger than ever. The same goes this time as studio bosses hype their 2013 lineup, which includes the latest Iron Man, Star Trek, Hunger Games and Thor installments, the Superman tale Man of Steel and the second chapter in The Hobbit trilogy. Twelve months from now, they hope to be talking about another revenue record topping this years $10.8 billion. Ive been saying were going to hit that $11 billion level for about three years now, said Paul Dergarabedian, a box-office analyst for Hollywood.com. Next year I think is the year we actually do it. Birthday What youve learned from experience can be effectively used to your advantage in the year ahead, if youre brave and canny. Knowledge has much power, as youll be able to prove. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Should you find yourself involved in an incident where youre tempted to respond to pettiness with the same, do your best to rise above temptation and instead act responsibly. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) By sizing up business situations realistically, youll quickly discover that you dont have to bargain from weakness. Dont give the other party an edge that isnt there. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) A pleasant surprise might be in store, when you discover that someone whom you thought unaware of your existence instead has some very nice things to say about you. Aries (March 21-April 19) Appearances wont matter so much at present, but a good performance will really count. Youll have little to fear if your efforts and industry live up to your promises. Taurus (April 20-May 20) If a wily antagonist tries to pull something cute over you in front of your friends today, let this person know immediately that youre onto what s/he is trying to do. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Opportunities could be lurking in unexpected places. Dont hesitate for one minute to transform something questionable into what you always knew it could be. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Speak up and say what you believe needs to be said, and not just what you think others want to hear. Sincerity serves a constructive purpose, while evasion causes problems. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) An adversary who usually succeeds using shifty tactics will be no match for you. Youll be ready for this persons guile and will easily circumvent his or her schemes. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Arousing the spirit of cooperation in others is something you do best when youre fully engaged. Dont hesitate to go after the support of some enthusiastic allies if you need it. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When you are motivated by unselfishness, any arrangement you take on is likely to turn out a success. This is because you gain strength from giving and not taking. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You are able to easily adapt to unfamiliar people or groups. Anyone who lacks your talent will be eyeing you with envy for your skill. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Allowing yourself to be intimidated by uncertainties or challenges will only cause more problems, especially where your work or career is concerned. Stay strong. From wire reports Kim Kardashian Kanye West Today in HISTORY SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30 Fantasy 5: 7 16 19 27 33 5-of-52 winners$96,530.59 4-of-5265$117.50 3-of-58,457$10 Todays Highlight: On Jan. 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln signed and issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring that slaves in rebel states shall be forever free. On this date: In 1785, The Daily Universal Register which later became the Times of London published its first issue. In 1892, the Ellis Island Immigrant Station in New York formally opened. In 1913, the U.S. Parcel Post system went into operation. In 1942, 26 countries, including the United States, signed the Declaration of the United Nations, pledging not to make a separate armistice or peace with members of the Axis. In 1953, country singer Hank Williams Sr., 29, was discovered dead in the back seat of his car during a stop in Oak Hill, W.Va., while he was being driven to a concert date in Canton, Ohio. In 1959, Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries overthrew Cuban leader Fulgencio Batista, who fled to the Dominican Republic. In 1962, The Beatles (with Pete Best) auditioned for Decca Records, which opted to sign Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead. In 1983, the current version of the Internet came into being as the Internet protocol suite, commonly known as TCP/IP, became the mandatory standard. In 1984, the breakup of AT&T took place as the telecommunications giant was divested of its 22 Bell System companies under terms of an antitrust agreement. In 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully split into two new countries, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. In 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect. Ten years ago: More than two dozen surgeons in West Virginia stopped performing elective surgeries to protest the high cost of malpractice insurance. (They returned to work two weeks later when they were convinced that the governor and the legislature would address their concerns.) Five years ago: New nosmoking rules went into effect in France, prohibiting people from lighting up in cafes, bars and restaurants. One year ago: A Mount Rainier National Park ranger, Margaret Anderson, was shot and killed by the driver of a car that blew through a checkpoint. (Searchers later found the body of the man, 24-year-old Benjamin Colton Barnes, in a snowy creek.) Todays Birthdays: Former Sen. Ernest Hollings, D-S.C., is 91. Actor Frank Langella is 75. Rock singer-musician Country Joe McDonald is 71. Writercomedian Don Novello is 70. Thought for Today: If you asked me for my New Year Resolution, it would be to find out who I am. Cyril Cusack, Irish actor (19101993). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www.flalottery.com, or call 850-487-7777. Spotlight on PEOPLE Florida LOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Because of early deadlines, Monday lottery numbers are not in todays paper. Page B4 TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Todays HOROSCOPE Ticket rush: Film fans hand Hollywood record cash Associated Press This year was led by a pair of superhero sagas, Disneys The Avengers, below, with $623 million domestically and $1.5 billion worldwide and the Warner Bros. Batman finale The Dark Knight Rises, above, with $448 million domestically and $1.1 billion worldwide.

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000DMNW Little to no out of pocket expense for most Medicare Patients with secondary insurances. For Appointment Call Toll Free 1-855-Gulfcoast (1-855-485-3262) www.gulfcoastspine.net G e t B a c k I n t o G e t B a c k I n t o Get Back Into T h e S w i n g O f L i f e T h e S w i n g O f L i f e The Swing Of Life W i t h W i t h With M i n i m a l l y M i n i m a l l y Minimally I n v a s i v e I n v a s i v e Invasive S p i n e S p i n e Spine S u r g e r y S u r g e r y Surgery Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis Spinal Fractures due to Trauma or Osteoporosis Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to: Minimally Invasive Spine Surgeons James J. Ronzo, D.O. Frank S. Bono, D.O. Board Certified, Fellowship Trained W ell, it is 2013 Happy New Year. I hope all of you had a great time with your family and friends through this holiday season. I enjoyed the relaxation of not going anywhere and just staying home. As we all know, with the New Year comes talk about some resolutions. I thought I would put a different twist on my column today and talk about some of the services dentistry has to offer that people might shy away from and write a small note as to why you shouldnt worry so much about them. Maybe after reading this, you will make some new resolutions. Smile Makeover you may think that this needs to be very involved, time consuming and costly. The truth is that it does not have to be. Go talk to your dentist about what your goals are, and he or she will likely give you many alternatives, one of which should meet your needs. Root Canals they simply are not what most people think of when they hear they need a root You dont say List: No love for fiscal cliff, spoiler alert Associated Press DETROIT S poiler alert: This story contains words and phrases that some people want to ban from the English language. Spoiler alert is among them. So are kick the can down the road, trending and bucket list. A dirty dozen have landed on the 38th annual List of Words to be Banished from the Queens English for Misuse, Overuse and General Uselessness. The nonbinding, tongue-in-cheek decree released Monday by northern Michigans Lake Superior State University is based on nominations submitted from the United States, Canada and beyond. Spoiler alert, the seemingly thoughtful way to warn readers or viewers about looming references to a key plot point in a film or TV show, nevertheless passed its use-by date for many, including Joseph Foly, of Fremont, Calif. He argued in his submission the phrase is used as an obnoxious way to show one has trivial information and is about to use it, no matter what. At the risk of further offense, heres another spoiler alert: The phrase receiving the most nominations this year is fiscal cliff, banished because of its overuse by media outlets when describing across-the-board federal tax increases and spending cuts that economists say could harm the economy in the new year without congressional action. You cant turn on the news without hearing this, said Christopher Loiselle, of Midland, Mich., in his submission. Im equally worried about the River of Debt and Mountain of Despair. Other terms coming in for a literary lashing are superfood, guru, job creators and double down. University spokesman Tom Pink said that in nearly four decades, the Sault Ste. Marie school has banished around 900 words or phrases, and somehow the whole idea has survived rapidly advancing technology and diminishing attention spans. Nominations used to come by mail, then fax and via the schools website, he said. Now most come through the universitys Facebook page. Thats fitting, since social media has helped accelerate the life cycle of certain words and phrases, such as this years entry YOLO you only live once. The list surprises me in one way or another every year, and the same way every year: Im always surprised how people still like it, love it, he said. A s we begin a new year, we all have many things to be thankful for. And many of us, including myself, will make New Years resolutions that will improve our overall health. Over the years, I have discussed on many occasions that controlling our weight, exercising, and avoiding tobacco products could make the greatest impact on life expectancy. Now there is even more data supporting this claim regarding the risk of smoking, and it is not cancer related. New research data now shows that for women without coronary heart disease (CHD) early in life, smoking, even in small quantities, is associated with a significantly Smoking ups cardiac death in women See BENNETT / Page C5 Dr. Sunil Gandhi CANCER & BLOOD DISEASE New Years resolutions I t is New Years Day and we are all excited about it. It brings new hope, new expectations and new resolutions. New Years Day has always been a time for looking back to the past, and more importantly, forward to the coming year. Its a time to reflect on the changes we want (or need) to make and resolve to follow through on those changes. This year I am going to suggest some New Years resolutions, which can help improve your health and cut down on the risk of cancer. 1. Lose weight: Obesity accounts for one in seven cancers in the United States and it also increases the risk for diabetes, high blood pres sure, heart attacks, See GANDHI / Page C5 J anuary brings in the New Year, playoff game parties, bowl games, and of course the Super Bowl. That means lots of people interacting, lots of people touching things, and lots of germs spreading, especially if there are not good hand washing techniques being implemented. We know from previous articles I have written that cold weather brings on a spike in viruses that can live on surfaces that we come in contact with every day. Hand washing is a good way to cut down the transmission of viruses and bacteria that can make us quite sick. In some instances, the transmission of bacteria and viruses can be deadly, and this includes methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, which is a type of staph bacteria that is becoming increasingly more resistant. It used to be thought of as a bacteria that was only found in places like hospitals and nursing homes. Now its more common in the general community. Hand washing seems to have gotten to be a little bit more routine because of these bugs out there. Look at the spike in the use of alcohol-based hand gels, which are a good choice when water is January germs Resolve to worry less about dentistry in new year See VASCIMINI / Page C5 See GRILLO / Page C5 Dr. Denis Grillo EAR, NOSE & THROAT Dr. C. Joseph Bennett NAVIGATING CANCER Dr. Frank Vascimini SOUND BITES Special to the Chronicle Mums the wordDETROIT Lake Superior State Universitys 38th annual list of banished words: H EALTH & L IFE Section C TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 INSIDE Richard Hoffmann / Page C3 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE

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Gulfcoast North Area Health Education Center is partnering with Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute (RBOI), Citrus County Health Department and the First United Methodist Church of Homosassa to provide free sixweek tobacco dependence classes in Inverness, Lecanto and Homosassa. Classes are available during the day and in the evening beginning in January.Anyone interested in quitting tobacco can participate and will be provided with a free and optional supply of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) including patches, gum or lozenges. This program is funded by the Florida Department of Health. To register and find out more, call 813-9291000 or visit www.gnahec.org. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers : Donors in January will be entered in a drawing to win an iPad mini. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 1, Walmart Supercenter, South Sunocast Boulevard, Homosassa. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 2, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, North Suncoast Boulevard, Crystal River. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3, Walmart Supercenter, West Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, Big Lots, Southeast U.S. 19 Crystal River. 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church, West Gulf-toLake Highway, Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, Walmart Supercenter, West Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Inverness. 8:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 5, Arbor Lakes Community, Lake Vista Trail, Hernando. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 6, Walmart Supercenter, South Sunocast Boulevard, Homosassa. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 7, Cypress Creek Academy, West Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto. 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, Withlacoochee River Electric Co-Op, Crystal River. CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center continues the Know Your Stats prostate cancer awareness campaign this month with daily health tips available at facebook.com/srrmc, and is scheduling appointments for a free prostate cancer screening Jan. 30. The prostate cancer screening is available to men older than 40 who have not received a PSA test since January 2012. Call 352-795-1234 for more information. Flu shot clinics areofferedby B&W Rexall Drugs in Inverness. Call Donna Stevenson at 352-726-1555. Nature Coast EMS offer flu shots for $28; however, the flu shot is free with valid Medicare Part B, and many other insurance providers are also accepted. Flu shots are available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, (except holidays), at the Nature Coast EMS administration office on Homosassa Trail at Country Hill Drive in Lecanto. If your organization, business, ALF or other group would like to schedule a flu clinic at your location, call Jane Bedford at 352-249-4751 or email JaneB@naturecoastems.org. The George A. Dame Community Health Center BoardMeetings are at 3 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at the Citrus County Health Department, 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in the first floor conference room. The Citrus Alliance Against Adult Abuse (C4A) monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. For information, call Judy Stauffer at 352-303-2620. Your help is needed to protect our vulnerable against abuse, neglect and exploitation. Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus Inc. will meet the second Thursday monthly in the basement of the Citrus County School Board office in Inverness, 1007 W. Main St. Use the elevator to go to the basement. 8 to 9 a.m. board meeting. 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee, doughnuts, networking. 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. membership meeting. For information, call the office at 352-389-0472 or email substancefree.citrus@yahoo. com. Citrus Memorial Health System will host a free smoking cessation class from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, in the auditorium on the main hospital campus. Tools to Quit is an intense two-hour seminar in which participants receive information on how to select and prepare for their own quit date. A trained Tobacco Cessation Specialist guides participants as they identify triggers and withdrawal symptoms, and brainstorms ways to cope with them. Free nicotine replacement therapy including patches, gum and lozenges will also be provided. Refreshments and educational materials will be available during the seminar. Seating is limited; register online at www.citrusmh.com/events or call 352-560-6266 to reserve a seat. Free eight-week Griefs Journey workshop from 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays beginning Jan. 30 for those who have experienced the death of a loved one, hosted by Paul Winstead, licensed mental health counselor and grief counselor with the Citrus team of HPH Hospice, at the First United Methodist Church of Homosassa. The experience of grieving and mourning the death of a loved one may be the most profound and intense emotional experience we have. Each individual experiences grief differently, but we can often identify with those who have also experienced the death of a loved one and not feel so alone. This educational and supportive course shows grief as a process in which the timing, intensity and order of each persons experiences are unique. Pre-registration is required. For information, call Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Healing Peoples Hearts in Citrus County offers care, comfort and support for community members. Visit HPH-Hospice.org. Nature Coast EMS Citizens Academy will begin Jan. 29, a hands-on opportunity for community members to see and learn what Nature Coast EMS Paramedics and EMTs do every day. Graduates learn skills they can use in actual emergencies, because the academy is focused on hands-on training, showing and teaching the skills that an EMS crew may use. Participants will get to practice starting IVs, intubations (placing a breathing tube), defibrillations, reading heart rhythms and doing a full code on a SIMMAN mannequin. In the final session, participants will take care of a simulated patient in a mock patient care scenario and have the opportunity to ride along with paramedics and EMTs and go on actual emergencies. The Nature Coast EMS Citizens Academy is free and meets from 6 to 9 p.m.every Tuesday for eight weeks. Call 352-249-4700 to register. HPH Hospice, Healing Peoples Hearts, two-day new volunteer orientation from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, and Friday, Feb. 1, at the HPH Team offices, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the WinnDixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH staff believe if you want to do more with your own life, there is no volunteer opportunity more rewarding than working with hospice. Qualifications needed: Caring heart, positive attitude, extra love to share and a big smile that appears on demand. RSVP or receive information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600. Monthly diabetes selfmanagement education classes by Citrus Memorial Diabetes Center at Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center, Sugarmill Woods. These classes, taught by a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, offer an opportunity for those living with diabetes to learn about the importance of physical activity, meal planning and medication. Topics include blood glucose monitoring, problem solving, coping and reducing the risk for diabetes-related complications. To register for a class or to schedule a one-on-one appointment, call 352-341-6110. A physician referral is required. Hospice of Citrus County Inc. offers a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for individuals of all ages who are committed to the hospice philosophy and wish to make a positive impact on the lives of people. The Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift Shoppe is currently seeking those who have an interest in sorting, distributing or operating a cash register. Volunteers are also needed at Herrys Caf. Both are at 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite C., Homosassa. The goal of the Volunteer Department is to provide competent and confident volunteers. All volunteers are required to attend core Volunteer Training Orientation and ongoing in-service trainings throughout the year. Call Volunteer Director Cathi Thompson at 352-527-2020. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Facebook or at www. hospiceofcitrus.org. Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352-527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Inverness Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Snyder Pharmacy, 102 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness, offers a drug Take-Back program to help patients safely dispose of medicines that may be dangerous to others and to the environment. Patients of any pharmacy may bring in unused or expired drugs in their original stock containers for free disposal. For information, call 352-341-1212. Support GROUPS NOTE: The holidays may cause some groups to cancel meetings. Call ahead if unsure. Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter support group: are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers Disease. The support group provides the caregivers an opportunity to reduce their isolation and receive support and knowledge from other caregivers. It helps to share experiences, increase feelings of self-worth, decrease a sense of isolation, learn from others in your situation, learn about community resources, and receive encouragement from other caregivers. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers.Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer Institute-New Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first Thursday monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway. RSVP if you require respite. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at Sandy Oaks RV Resort, 6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call 352-422-5868. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352-596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group 10 a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352-387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, hosts a volunteer meeting at 10:30 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly, September to May. Call 352344-8111. HIV support group 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at Citrus County Health Department, 3700 Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Open to all affected by HIV. Persons attending remain confidential, testing will be anonymous. Reservation not required. Call 352-5270068, ext. 281, if you have any questions. Bereaved Parents of the USA (BP/USA) grief support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced the death of a child, 7 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call Bernadette Passalacqua at 352-746-4664 or visit www.bereavedparents usa.org. Look Good ... Feel Better a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-341-7741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. SPRING HILL Spinal Cord Injury support group, 5 p.m. second Thursday monthly in the gym at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital. Call Dee Hardee at 352-592-7237. NEW PORT RICHEY Community Chatterboxes support group to assist individuals suffering from communication deficits (i.e., aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a result of a cerebral vascular accident or other neurological disorders, 3 to 4 p.m. every other Thursday at Community Hospital, 5637 Marine Parkway, New Port Richey, FL 34652. Caregivers and spouses are encouraged to attend. Call 727-845-0757. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. Womens Breast Cancer Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the second Friday monthly, Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in the Allen Ridge Medical Center, County Road 491, Lecanto. Light lunch served. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. C2 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Pactice Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 308 S. Line Ave. Inverness (352) 344-5511 000DLQH New Patients & Walk-Ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers 000DML4 Health NOTES HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES Support group information will list monthly meetings first, as space is available, then weekly meetings. It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the Chronicle about changes to existing listings. To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-related events open to the public or support group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Information relating to professional training or seminars attended by those in the health care industries are considered business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest listings of Sundays Business section. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362563-5660. Be prepared to leave a detailed message with your name, phone number and the address of the news event. Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions. Publication of submitted information or photos on specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed. See GROUPS / Page C3 000DN96 Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances

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Epilepsy support group at the Lakes Region Library, Inverness. Call Lili Jane at 352344-8765. Mended Hearts of Citrus County for individuals who have or had cardiovascular disease, as well as caregivers and family members, 10 a.m. the second Friday monthly in the Gulf Room in the Historic Citrus High School; parking and transportation available from CMHS parking lot A2. Open to the public. Call Millie King, at 352-637-5525; or CMHS Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. The Area 13 Family Care Council 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday monthly at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities office, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44). All persons interested in issues of those with Developmental Disabilities are encouraged to attend. Call Karen Huscher at 352-7261445 or email isabelfcc13@ yahoo.com. Area 13 covers Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties. There are 15 Family Care Councils with governor-appointed volunteer members, who are individuals with a developmental disability or are a family member. Seeking new members. Contact Huscher at 352-726-1445 or cbettykay@aol.com; facebook.com/groups/33163214018 6772/. Website: www.FCC Florida.org. NAMI-Citrus locally chartered group of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, meets the second Monday monthly at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, on County Road 486 in Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All those with an interest in mental health issues are welcome. Call 352-341-2273. SPRING HILL Healthy Hearts support group open to anyone looking for information on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30 p.m. the second Monday monthly in the cafeteria conference room at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville. Admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus, 352597-6333 in Hernando or visit the website www.OakHill Hospital.com. National Osteoporosis Foundation Citrus County Support Group, 1 p.m. the third Tuesday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Each month offers a different speaker. This is part of the NOFs Affiliated Support Group Program dedicated to providing accurate, timely information and support to people affected by osteoporosis. Call Laura Henderson at 352-341-4778 or email TheBoneZone2010@ yahoo.com. Nature Coast Multiple Myeloma Support Group 6 p.m. the third Wednesday monthly at the Oak Hill Hospital Partners Club (formerly Spring Hill Enrichment Center) at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50), Brooksville. Free dinner buffet will be served. Contact Herb and Dianne Terry at 352-6210672 or hterry1@tampabay.rr. com, or Richard Blustein at 352-428-4536 or Blustein22@ aol.com. SPRING HILL Look Good Feel Better Support Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third Wednesday monthly at the Florida Cancer Specialists, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203, in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call 352-688-7744. Different Strokes for Different Folks stroke support group, 10:30 a.m. to noon the third Thursday monthly in the Inpatient Rehabilitation Multipurpose Room at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River. Call 352-7951234 for details. FFRA (Families and Friends Reaching for the Abilities), third Friday monthly at the Key Training Center in Inverness at 130 Heights Ave. Social time and business meeting at 9 a.m. is followed by a speaker at 10 a.m. Lisa Noble from the Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center will talk about wound care, hyperbaric medicine, diabetes and treating wounds. Call Ron Phillips, president, at 352382-7819 or visit www.ffracitrus. org. The Ostomy Support Group of Citrus County, 2 p.m. the third Sunday monthly in the Cypress Room on the first floor in the Citrus Memorial Health Systems Administrations Annex Building, across the street from the Medical Offices Building at 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352229-4202, Sue at 352-5607918, Mel or Betty at 352-726-3802 or Sharon or Gerry at 352-382-4446. Email OSGofCC@yahoo.com. Celiac support meeting for all people who have celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, 10 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday monthly in the Community Room at the Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Ken Kral at 352-684-4064 or email KenKral@msn.com. Fibromyalgia Support Group meets from 1:30 to 3 p.m. the third Saturday monthly at the organizers homein Inverness. Call Ada at 352637-3364. Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), 2 p.m. the fourth Monday of every quarter at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Monthly meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. The Citrus Memorial Diabetes Support Group, 10:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly on the campus of Citrus Memorial Health System in the auditorium. Januarys program features a representative from Universal Healthcare who will discuss Medicare Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS plans. An RSVP is necessary, as refreshments will be served. Call 352-341-6110. SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Caregivers Support and Information meeting, 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Call Charlotte Downing at 352-422-7044 for directions/ information. Refreshments served. OCALA Ocala Health Stroke Support Group meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Senior Wellness Community Center (9850 S.W. 84th Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call 800-530-1188 to register. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Suncoast Chapter Cancer Support Group (including Multiple Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no charge and light refreshments are provided. Contact: Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient services manager, at 813-963-6461 ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or visit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society website at www.lls.org. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa. Call Bevin Brayton at 352302-9066. SPRING HILL Stroke Support Group noon the fourth Thursday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Pam McDonald at 352-346-6359. PINELLAS PARK Connections fireside-discussion-style support group for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-343-0600; www.wellspringoncology.org. SPRING HILL Amputee support group 7 p.m. the last Monday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Eva Baker at 352592-7232. Weekly meetings Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Recovery from Food Addiction 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Annes Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, in the parish hall library. Call Peg at 410903-7740. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-2708534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352-212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352621-0599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. AC Group 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous : Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41, Floral City. It Works How and Why, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday and noon Sunday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church, Grover Cleveland Boulevard, Homosassa. Recovery on the River, 8 p.m. Monday and Friday, Lecanto Church of Christ, State Road 44 and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of C.R. 491 and S.R. 44. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Information line: 352-382-0851. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Annes Episcopal Church. Call Rita at 352-382-8503. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352-344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C3 Epilepsy drug treats partial-onset seizures Q : I heard a new drug was approved to treat epilepsy. What can you tell me of it? A: The FDA recently (2012) approved Fycompa (perampanel) for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy. Some people with epilepsy do not achieve good seizure control with current treatments, and Fycompa offers a new treatment option because it works in a different way than other anti-epileptic drugs. Fycompa blocks receptors in the brain that are stimulated by the chemical glutamate. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and it is thought to be involved in a number of neurological disorders caused by overexcitation of nerve cells in the brain. During clinical studies involving approximately 1,500 patients with partial-onset seizures, Fycompa helped to significantly reduce the frequency of seizures. The most common side effects of Fycompa reported by patients include dizziness, drowsiness, fatigue, irritability, falls, nausea, abnormal movements, balance disorder, vertigo and weight gain. However, other serious mental problems can occur in some patients. Partial seizures are the most common type of seizure seen in people with epilepsy. Epilepsy is a medical condition that produces seizures affecting a variety of mental and physical functions. According to the Institute of Medicine, epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting 2.2 million people in the United States. About 60 percent of people with epilepsy have partial seizures. In about 25 percent to 30 percent of patients with epilepsy, seizures cannot be controlled with treatment. Richard P Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. Richard Hoffmann ASK THE PHARMACIST See GROUPS / Page C4 GROUPS Continued from Page C2 SPEAKERS AVAILABLE Seven Rivers Regional Speakers Bureau brings customized programs to clubs, churches and other community organizations. Contact Amy Kingery at 352-795-8344 or amy.kingery@hma.com. The Alzheimers Family Organization has speakers available for your organization or club. This presentation will include basic Alzheimers information and the services and programs that the organization offers to the Central Florida community. Call 888-496-8004 or 727-848-8888. SPRING HILL Health Matters Home Care has a Registered Nurse available to do free speaking engagements for your group, club, church or organization. Call 352-686-4493 or 352-686-5593. The Citrus Team of HPH Hospice and its not-for-profit Homecare affiliate, HPH Homecare, provide free, ongoing education to Citrus County residents about their many programs, services and volunteer opportunities. There is no charge for a speaker and the solicitation of funds is never involved. Educational materials are provided at no charge. Call Anne Black, community liaison, at 352-527-4600. Bon Image Most Insurance Accepted 352.503.2019 VEIN AND LASER CENTER Non-Surgical, Highly Effective Treatment To Eliminate Unwanted Leg Veins Spider Vein Treatment after consultation 2 Cardiovascular & Heart Transplant Specialists With Over 25 Yrs. Experience 000D6CT STATE-OF-THE-ART TREATMENT FOR VARICOSE AND SPIDER VEINS Do You Have Painful Achy Legs? 5466 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Lose Weight For The Holidays! CALL FOR OUR HOLIDAY SPECIALS EFFECTIVE WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAMS Seasons Greetings 000DKYR OTHER CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN OCALA & THE VILLAGES NEXT TO BEVERLY HILLS CLEANERS, NEAR INTERSECTION HWY. 491 AND 486 Call Today, Start Losing Tonight! FREE CONSULTATION *Results not typical. On MedaSlim most clients expect t lose 1-2 pounds per week OVERWEIGHT? LOSE up to 30 POUNDS in 30 DAYS!*ANY NEW PROGRAM starting as low as $ 49 00 CALL NOW OR ANY NEW PROGRAM $ 100 off* *medically supervised programs

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7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand smallgroup time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-628-2874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352-6884537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alzsupport.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz.org/ living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-683-9009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program, 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking Group: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support Group: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support Group: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better Group: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support Group: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cypress Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Steve Spielman at 352-2294202, Sue Penner at 352-5607918, Sharon Brummer at 352-382-4446 or Betty or Mel Shipley at 352-341-0005. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352-3446596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-642-0962 or 352527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. Call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a notfor-profit charitable organization providing comprehensively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m., Emeritus at Barrington Place, 2341 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486 east of C.R. 491), Lecanto. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance and a Hospice Care Center in Citrus Health & Rehabilitation Center in Inverness for patients with complicated pain and symptoms. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group 2 p.m. first Thursday monthly, Jerry Fischer, facilitator. Diabetes Support Group 10 am. second Monday monthly, Kim Palmer, facilitator. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 5:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, Lillian Rojas, facilitator. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6:30 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acute-care beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. C4 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE H EALTH& L IFE 0 0 0 D 7 C S Captain Mikes Lazy River Cruises Sightseeing Birdwatching Weddings Sunrise & Sunset Cruises Moonlight Cruises Custom Cruises Located On the Withlacoochee at Stumpknockers Hwy. 200 Citrus & Marion County Line Hernando, FL 352-637-2726 Open 7 Da ys All Y ear Long Gift Certificates Available! 1 & 2 Hour Cruises Happy Holidays! www.lazyrivercruises.com 000D6CQ When Experience Counts Most Glaucoma Treatment Dry Eyes Eyelid Surgery Diabetic Eye Problems Macular Degeneration Cataract & Implant Specialists Board Certified Ophthalmologists LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D. ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Optometrist, DR. GEORGE KAPLAN 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-2526 14003 Lakeshore Blvd., Hudson, FL 727-868-9442 Toll Free 800-282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com Established 1982 Cherish the moments of the season Seasons Greetings! GROUPS Continued from Page C3 Questions arise about Minneapolis license plate data C URTISG ILBERT Minnesota Public Radio ST. PAUL, Minn. Academics and entrepreneurs nationwide have received copies of a massive database that the Minneapolis police department uses to track the location of cars. Where some see business or research opportunities, the city sees a public safety risk. The data come from the citys network of automatic license plate readers cameras that record the locations of hundreds of thousands of cars every month. Minneapolis has received at least 100 requests for data from its license plate scanners over the last five months, ever since the Star Tribunefirst reported on the existence of the data. Most requests came from people who wanted to know where the scanners had spotted an individual license plate. More than a third came from one man, Alex Peterson, who repossesses cars for a living. I see a license plate hit in this neighborhood, and I do work on the Internet and find out they have a relative who lives in that neighborhood and find it at that address, Peterson said. Theres a lot of different ways I can use the information. Minnesota law makes all data collected by the government public, unless it is specifically classified otherwise. Minneapolis dutifully turns over the information to anyone who asks. But earlier in December, the city abruptly changed its approach and asked the state to issue an order rendering the data private for the next two years while it lobbies the Legislature to change the law. It became clear to us that this was creating a real risk to public safety, said Susan Segal, city attorney. Segal said the license plate readers are designed to help police find criminals and stolen cars. In the wrong hands, the data they collect could be used to commit crimes. Victims of domestic abuse, for example, dont want their batterers to know where theyre living or where they may be working, Segal told Minnesota Public Radio News. The city is also concerned about the increasing amounts of data being requested. In addition to inquiries about specific license plates, Minneapolis also received numerous requests for the entire database. Earlier this month, it released a file containing some 2.1 million records covering a three-month period. Nine people received the database. One of them was Mark Pitts of Rogers, who is finishing up a masters degree in statistics. And so I thought it would be an interesting data set for my masters project, and it turned about to be a very interesting dataset as you know, Pitts said. Eight of the license plate scanners are attached to police cars. Pitts said the scanners dont just record the locations of nearby vehicles; they also record the movements of the police. And so you can literally see everywhere they went. I can tell you when they stopped for lunch. I can tell you when they met at the hospital, Pitts said. Theres a lot more information about their activities and movements in this data then there are about any single individual. Thats why Pitts supports making the data private. But some of the other people who have examined the data disagree. Arthur DAntonio, 25, is a California-based Web developer who has requested similar data from other cities around the country. He is exploring whether the data have commercial applications. I personally believe that the data shouldnt be being stored on innocent people at all. But I also believe that if it is, were paying for that, DAntonio said. And so anybody should be able to use it for whatever legal purpose they want to use it for. DAntonio hasnt figured out exactly how to make money using the data, but the fact that automobile repossession companies have been using it, suggests one possibility, he said. Is there any way that we could have made it so that that guy could have obtained that data, quicker, more efficiently, maybe even on the go? DAntonio said. That makes his business that much more successful. He can maybe hire more people. If theres opportunity, I think everybody should be looking to seize it. But researchers and entrepreneurs looking for opportunities in the license plate scanner databases may have missed their chance, at least for now. A recently-issued administrative order classifies the data as private for at least the next three months. It applies to Minneapolis and any other Minnesota cities that collect this data. And the Legislature will likely consider whether to make the data private permanently. Minnesota law makes all data collected by the government public, unless it is specifically classified otherwise. Minneapolis dutifully turns over the information to anyone who asks.

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increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This is based upon research recently published online Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. In this study, researchers from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, prospectively examined the link between cigarette smoking and smoking cessation on the risk of SCD among 101,018 women from the Nurses Health Study without CHD, stroke, or cancer at baseline in 1980. During 30 years of follow-up, the researchers identified 351 SCD events. After controlling for coronary risk factors, current smokers had a significant increased risk of SCD compared with those who had never smoked at all. Among current smokers, the quantity of cigarettes smoked daily and smoking duration were significantly linked to SCD risk in their analysis. The risk of SCD was significantly increased even with small-to-moderate amounts of cigarette consumption (one to 14 per day), and with every five years of continued smoking. After quitting, there was a steady and marked decrease in the risk of SCD over time, and after 20 years of cessation, the risk was equivalent to that of a person who had never smoked. It is clear that there is a relationship between smoking and SCD, and even small-to-moderate quantities of daily smoking were associated with SCD risk. This adds even more fuel to the fire of doubling our efforts toward smoking cessation for all women to prevent SCD. Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a boardcertified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@ rboi.com. etc. Obesity is calculated by Body Mass Index or BMI and try to keep it below 25. 2. Eat healthy: Try to eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Servings are small size, e.g. one small apple may make one serving. Limit intake of red meat and processed meat. Choose whole grains over processed (refined) grains. 3. Exercise: As per the American Cancer Society, engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, above usual activities, on five or more days of the week; 45 to 60 minutes of intentional physical activity are preferable. This helps as follows: Helps control weight. Maintains healthy bones, muscles and joints. Reduces the risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes. Promotes psychological well-being. Reduces the risk of death from heart disease. 4. Smoking: Smoking is the commonest cause of cancer. It causes many cancers including lung, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, bladder, stomach, cervix, kidney and pancreas, and acute myeloid leukemia. It also damages the lungs and heart. Therefore, all smokers should try this year to quit smoking. If you are a nonsmoker, avoid secondhand smoke. 5. Alcohol: If you do not drink alcohol, do not start it for health benefits. If you drink it, drink no more than one drink per day for women or two per day for men. 6. Screening: In general, the earlier we detect cancer, the more curable it is. For women, regular mammograms and pap smears are very important. There is some controversy about screening PSA in men. Both men and women should get a colonoscopy after the age of 50. If you are a smoker or you quit smoking recently (less than the past 15 to 20 years), recent recommendations suggest screening spiral low dose CT scan of the lungs once a year. Please make a resolution that you will follow all current screening guidelines for cancer. You can learn this in detail from the American Cancer Society at www. cancer.org/Healthy/Find CancerEarly/Cancer ScreeningGuidelines/ american-cancer-societyguidelines-for-the-earlydetection-of-cancer. These are some suggestions for New Years resolutions. Some are easy and some may not be easy. All of these help to improve health and cut down on the risk of cancer. Please consider them. Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com or call 352-746-0707. canal. I cannot remember the last time I had a complication with a root canal that lead to disappointment. If this were to happen, the likelihood of the problem is usually known ahead of time and does not come as a surprise. Adult Orthodontics (braces) many adults shy away from braces. As long as you have an orthodontist who is comfortable with adult braces, you will be amazed with the outcome you can have and what a difference it can make in your smile. A New Set of Dentures Dentures have come a long way through the years. They can look like real teeth and can take years off of your appearance. And the fit and comfort that new technology provides will surprise you. Implants Implants have finally made it to the status of routine dentistry. There was a time when I could not say this. As long as you have a good surgeon who works closely with the restoring dentist, implants are predicable. They should always be included in your set of options. Whitening If you are looking for whiter teeth and you are in a hurry, you can have in-office whitening. If you have the time, athome whitening works just as predictably and can save you some money. The days of sensitivity are few and far between. In the event of sensitivity, there are many solutions we have to offer to relieve any discomfort. New Patient Exam You might shy away from an exam because you are worried about what you might hear. The truth is it is better to know what is going on, get your options and make a plan to get you to optimum oral health. I cannot tell you how many times a patient says to me they wish they had done it sooner. Dentistry has so many options to improve oral health and appearance. Take that first step and get your exam you wont be disappointed. I hope this has helped some of you make that resolution to call your dental office for an appointment. I wish all of you a happy, healthy and prosperous new year! Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email info@ MasterpieceDentalStudio. com. not available. However they certainly do not do as well as plain old soap and water. In some instances people think antibacterial soap is better than plain soap, but the downside is that it may promote drug resistant bacteria in the future. Men tend to be more resistant in taking up regular good hand cleaning techniques. It seems sometimes that men are offended at the idea, but they sometimes take the attitude that there are germs everywhere, and that their bodies are not particularly dirty when they use the bathroom, so why bother? The difference is, if you wash your hands, you are less likely to have gastrointestinal or respiratory illnesses. Studies have been done for years, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been warning us about the connection between hand washing and reduction of infection. It is true: germs are everywhere. You may not have them, but you will certainly pick them up when you flush the toilet, or touch door handles. We will never be able to escape germs they are in the environment but better hand washing techniques, and the invention of no touch motion sensing faucets, soap dispensers, and towel dispensers have made it very convenient to wash away the germs. We could all do a better job washing our hands and reducing health care costs, as well as sparing people the agony of being sick. Millions, if not billions of dollars could be saved with good hand washing techniques. Think about that the next time you are at a bowlgame party, with a bunch of friends, and you put your hand in a bowl of chips. You certainly would appreciate the person before you if he had just washed his hands. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit CrystalCommunity ENT.com. H EALTH& L IFE C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C5 GRILLO Continued from Page C1 GANDHI Continued from Page C1 BENNETT Continued from Page C1 VASCIMINIContinued from Page C1 000DL3J T h e C i t r u s C o u n t y F a i r A s s o c i a t i o n p r o u d l y p r e s e n t s T r u c k & T r a c t o r P u l l S a v e o n a d v a n c e d t i c k e t s a l e s O n e D a y : A d u l t $ 8 C h i l d r e n 4 1 1 $ 4 T w o D a y : A d u l t $ 1 5 C h i l d r e n 4 1 1 $ 7 J a n u a r y 2 5 t h o p e n 4 p m p u l l 6 p m J a n u a r y 2 6 t h o p e n 1 0 a m p u l l 1 p m F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c a l l 7 2 6 2 9 9 3 o r g o t o w w w c i t r u s c o u n t y f a i r c o m / t r a c t o r h t m l Sponsored by: Citrus County Chronicle, Eagle Buick GMC, Crystal Motor Car Company Proceeds to benefit Youth Scholarships! 1 4 t h A n n u a l 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330 Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (Removable Braces) Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open Fridays Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. 000DM2U NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! $ 150 00 Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion? FREE Consultation With the Dentist Senior Citizens Discount (Ask For Details) Value $ 215 EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS $ 1,995 Seven Days A Week Rain or Shine Call to see how you can receive 2 Weeks Free 352-563-5655 769452 The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County All of these help improve health and cut down risk of cancer. Please consider them. Associated PressSAN DIEGO Its been almost 60 years since James McEachin returned home with a bullet still lodged in his chest, finding an America indifferent toward the troops who fought in Korea. Now he will get the homecoming parade he had expected. The Defense Department for the first time will put a float in Pasadenas Tournament of Roses one of the most watched parades to commemorate the veterans from a conflict that still casts a shadow over the world. I think its a magnificent gesture and it cures a lot of ills, said McEachin, who will be among six veterans who will ride on the float Tuesday. The 82-year-old author and actor starred in Perry Mason TV movies, among other things. The $247,000 flower-covered float will be a replica of the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. The Pentagons debut comes ahead of events marking the 60th anniversary of the July 1953 armistice that halted the bloodshed but did not declare peace. Col. David Clark said the Pentagon decided to seize the opportunity to sponsor one of the 42 floats in the 124-year-old New Years Day parade to raise awareness about what has been called The Forgotten War. It has taken decades for the success of the wars efforts to be recognized, and the department wanted to remind Americans about the sacrifices that were made by the veterans, most of whom are now in their 80s, Clark said. The war resulted in South Korea developing into a thriving democratic ally in sharp contrast to its bitterly poor, communist neighbor that is seen as a global threat. As a nation, this may be our last opportunity to say thank you to them and honor their service, said Clark, director of the departments 60th Anniversary of the Korean War Commemoration Committee. The war began when North Korea invaded the South to try to reunify the nation, a liberated Japanese colony sliced in two in 1945 by the U.S. and Soviet victors of World War II. North Korea had the upper hand at first, almost pushing a weak South Korean-U.S. force off the peninsula, but then U.S. reinforcements poured in and pushed them back. Then, in late 1950, communist China stepped in and the Americans and South Koreans were forced back to the peninsulas midsection. The two sides battled there for two years before ending with a stalemate. We didnt march home in victory. We did what we were supposed to do, which is stop this aggressive force called communism, said McEachin, a Silver Star recipient. Edward Chang, director of the Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at the University of California, Riverside, said U.S. intervention gave South Korea the opportunity to become one of the worlds major economies. Most Americans simply are not aware of what is happening in Korea and how it happened, he said. More than 36,000 U.S. service members were killed in the conflict, and millions overall. The government did not talk to troops at the time about how pivotal the war was in stopping communism. After the victory in World War II, the Korean conflict seemed to almost provoke shame for Americans, McEachin said. The American public also felt no connection to the fighting in a faraway Asian country, unlike during World War II when airwaves filled with patriotic fight songs, he said. McEachin not only returned to indifference but discrimination as an African American soldier. After the plane carrying returning troops was delayed in Montana by snow, he was turned away from a hotel where his fellow white soldiers were staying. Korea was the first conflict in which all U.S. military units were integrated racially. Clark said the floats veterans reflect that important historical milestone. Clark said its important Americans learn the wars history because the problem is ever present, a point driven home by the heavily mined armistice line, a 2.5mile-wide demilitarized strip stretching 135 miles across the peninsula. Pentagon debuts float in Rose parade to honor vets 000DL7C 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. Expect notes to run no more than once. News NOTES News NOTES Scrapbooking classes start Jan. 9Get your scrapbooking on with Sherrie Geick, at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness. Geick will show how to put memories together in a scrapbook to be treasured by friends and family far into the future. Participants must bring supplies. Cost is $25 for an all-day class, or $12.50 for a half day on Saturdays: Jan. 9, Feb. 16, April 20, May 18, Aug. 17, Sept. 21, Nov. 16 and Dec. 21. For more information, call 352-726-3913 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Wisconsinites plan luncheon Jan. 9 The Wisconsin Social Club welcomes back its snowbirds. The clubs luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9, at the Crystal Point Club House off North Citrus Avenue in DeRosa. The luncheons bring together many former Wisconsinites, and snowbirds bring back news updates about what is now happening in Wisconsin. All those who attend are asked to bring a dish to share. New members are always welcome. For more information, call Joyce at 352-860-1292. Native plant club to meet in B.H. The Citrus Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club. Guest speaker will be Merritt Bryce Garling of Merritt Garling Landscape and Hardscape Services. He will be speaking on the topic of Floridas native cactus. Included in the presentation will be information on potting, planting, grafting, pest and propagation. NYC Transit retirees conveneNew York City Transit Retirees of Florida Chapter No. 9, Citrus County, will meet at 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, at the Beverly Hills Community Building, 1 Civic Circle. All those retired from the New York City Transit System who reside in Citrus County are welcome. Also, any retirees from the NYC Transit System visiting locally are welcome. After the meeting, refreshments will be served. For more information, call President Clarence Redd at 352-527-8418 or Secretary Clarisse DAdamo at 352527-2508. C OMMUNITY Page C6 TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Precious Paws ADOPTABLE Kitties Special to the Chronicle Kittens as sweet and cute as you can imagine are waiting for that special loving home. Most kittens have talents that we as humans can only imagine. Their acrobatic skills are amazing and entertaining, and after a strenuous performance they will curl up for a quick nap, wake up and look for a little loving. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. View pets at www.preciouspaws florida.com, or call 352726-4700. Jazz Society to host jam session The Citrus Jazz Society will host its monthly Open Jam Session from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 6, at the Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center, formerly the Knights of Columbus Hall in Homosassa Springs. The jam session features local and visiting musicians playing old favorites, jazz, swing and Dixieland for listening and dancing pleasure. The public is invited; $7 donation at the door for nonmembers is requested. Bring your own refreshments. Musicians interested in playing may call Tony Caruso at 352-942-9399. Genealogical group to gatherThe Citrus County Genealogical Society will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 3474 W. Southern St., Lecanto. The topic will be Sharing Our Ancestral Heritage. This will be a show-and-tell program. Members are asked to bring an item to share: something that once belonged to an ancestor, a document, photo or story about an ancestor. Guests are welcome. For more information, call Mary Ann Machonkin at 352382-5515, or go to www. citrusgenealogy.com. Model railroaders to meet Jan. 8 The Citrus Model Railroad Club will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, at the Robinson Horticulture Building of the Citrus County Fairgrounds. The January meeting is the annual business meeting where budget, work, preparations for the fair and more are covered. For more information, call Bob Penrod at 352797-6315. Jewelry-making classes on tap The Citrus Springs Library will add a new monthly meeting focusing on jewelrymaking to its calendar. On the second Wednesday of every month, Edna Mikel will teach a class on how to make their own beaded jewelry. Students will learn how to make bracelets, necklaces and earrings. The classes will be at 1 p.m. every second Wednesday. For more information, call 352-489-2313. The library is at 1826 W. Country Club Blvd. in Citrus Springs. Clubs need help with childrenThe Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County seeks volunteers and mentors who have a desire to make a positive difference in the life of a child. Volunteers and mentors can make that difference. Mentors are needed at the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club in Beverly Hills and the Robert Halleen Boys & Girls Club in Homosassa. Volunteers are always needed at all sites. Mentors will be assigned to work with a specific child or children. Volunteers may present special projects, help with homework, play games, read stories, or simply hang out with kids, interacting with them. Both volunteers and mentors will have training. All who work directly with children must pass a background clearance check. Other volunteers are needed to help with office work, assist with fundraising events, aid with maintenance at club sites, or, if experienced, help with grant writing. For more information about volunteering at a Boys & Girls Club of Citrus County, call 352-621-9225. Special to the ChronicleThe Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Clubs annual Soup-A-Thon and Bake Sale will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19. Everyone is invited to enter their favorite soup to vie for the title of Souper Chef. Call now to reserve a spot to win a cash prize of $50 for first place, $25 for second place and $10 for third place. Space is limited to the first 30 soups registered. The clubhouse on 56th Street becomes an old-fashioned county fair, where everyone can join friends and neighbors to sample the delicious soups and vote for a favorite. Visit the Second To None Thrift Shoppe to check out the new arrivals and pick up some homemade treats at Sweet Magnolia Confections. The SoupA-Thon will be a last chance to purchase tickets for the Sweet Magnolia Gift Basket Raffle. The basket, valued at more than $100, is full of beauty products and sweet treats just in time for Valentines Day. Tickets at $2 each, or three for $5 will be on sale starting Jan. 2 at The Second To None Thrift Shoppe, Thursday bingo or at the Soup-A-Thon on Jan. 19. The drawing will be at 1 p.m. after the Souper Chef is crowned. Call the club at 352447-2057, visit its FaceBook page or email yiwomans club@gmail.com to register a soup or for more information. Special to the ChroniclePrecious Paws Rescue continues its low-cost spay and neuter program into 2013 and now offers a second site to purchase vouchers. Gretas Touch Grooming and Doggie Day Care at 7360 S. Florida Ave. in Floral City will sell the vouchers during regular store hours Monday through Friday. Vouchers are also available at the PPR Crystal River Mall Adoption Center from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. The voucher price for dogs is based on their weight, starting at $25 to neuter a male dog up to 50 pounds, and range from $30 to $60 to spay a female dog. Cat spays are $20 and the neuter fee is $10. These surgeries are funded by a combination of discounted surgical fees provided by the Floral City Veterinary Hospital, voucher purchase by pet owners with the remaining costs made up by Precious Paws Rescue donations. The pet owner is responsible to make a surgery appointment directly with the FCVH and transport the pet, along with the voucher, to and from FCVH. Any additional veterinary services must be arranged by the owner and paid for at the FCVH appointment. Precious Paws Rescue is an all-volunteer charity organization dedicated to reducing pet over-population. Between 4 and 5 million pets are euthanized every year in U.S. shelters. For more information, to make a donation or to volunteer, call 352-726-4700. Be on the lookout for the Binocular Brigade on Friday, Jan. 4. If you live within 7.5 miles of the Crystal River Airport you stand a good chance of seeing one or more of the 40-plus volunteers who will be out and about counting birds. According to Darrell Snedecor, pictured, president of the Citrus County Audubon Society, the 113th Christmas Bird Count is a national event conducted in over 2,000 locations, and members of our local birding community have dedicated the entire day to surveying our bird population. This annual effort provides valuable data concerning the ongoing health and viability of our 120-plus bird species and, indirectly, the long-term condition of our environment. So if you see a car with people sporting binoculars and the Audubon Christmas Bird Count sign on the door, give them a wave of encouragement. STEPHANIE LOVELL /Special to the Chronicle Souper competition Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club slates contest, sale Birds Binocular Brigade J anuarys Spotlight of Events features several activities for the community organizations. The public is invited to attend the Crystal River Christian Womens January luncheon at noon Tuesday, Jan. 8. Linda Dumond will give a Bob Ross painting demonstration, and Nada Decker, inspirational speaker, will pose the question: Have you ever felt invisible or un-needed? For luncheon reservations, call Ginny at 352-746-7616. All retired educators and school personnel are invited to attend the Jan. 14 meeting of the Citrus County Retired Educators at 1 p.m. in room 115 of the Withlacoochee Technical Institute in Inverness. Tom Chancey will present the program on the Citrus County Community Food Bank. The Culinary Arts students of the school will provide the refreshments. Call President Cindy Pifer at 352-746-2866, or Ethel Winn, membership chair, at 352-7952533 for membership information. Tom Slagle will give a Nature Coast Ministries presentation at the Jan. 7 dinner meeting of the Crystal River Kings Bay Lions Club at 6 p.m. at Oysters Restaurant in Crystal River. All visiting Lions are welcome. For dinner reservations, call Janice at 352-795-5816. For membership information, call Phyllis Smith at 352382-3544. The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks Spring Fashion Show Luncheon will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25, at the lodge at 7890 Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa. For reservations, call Anne at 352-3821848. The Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club Military Card Party will begin at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16, at the Crystal River Womans Club. Refreshments will be served. For reservations, call Judy at 352-746-0636 by Jan. 9. Call the Art Center Theater box office at 352-746-7606 for tickets to their presentation of Nunsense, to be presented Jan. 11 to 20. VFW Post 4252 and the Ladies Auxiliary will host Cancer Society Aid and Research Benefit Speed Bingo beginning at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9. Call 352-726-5206. The GFWC Inverness Womans Club will host Night With an Author at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Citrus County Historical Courthouse Museum. It will benefit the clubs scholarship fund. For tickets, call 352634-4216. Our Lady of Grace and Knights of Columbus Council 6168 blood drive will be from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, in the church Parish Life Center. Call Leonard at 352-746-3791. The 26th annual Manatee Festival will be Jan. 19 and 20 in Crystal River. For more information, call the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce at 352795-3149. The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade will begin at 9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 21, in Crystal River. Call Bea at 352419-5255. To appear in the February Spotlight of Events, call 352-795-3006, or write to P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 344230803 by Jan. 15. Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Beginning new year with much to do Ruth Levins AROUND THE COMMUNITY Rescue continues spay, neuter program

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E NTERTAINMENTC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C7 P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. First, a happy and healthy New Year to all of my readers. When you play Chicago and everybody passes, it can be fun to have a goulash (or ghoulie). Each player sorts his hand: spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs. The cards are stacked, cut once, and dealt in groups. (I like 4-3-3-3/3-4-3-3/3-3-4-3/3-3-3-4, but some people prefer 5-5-5-5/5-5-5-5/3-3-3-3.) Long suits abound, and bidding must be adjusted because most suits will break something-zero. This deal occurred during one of my play classes after a passout. South opened four spades. West, the most cautious player in the group, characteristically passed. He should have overcalled four no-trump, showing a two-suited hand. This would presumably have resulted in a final contract of five hearts by East after five clubs five diamonds (both red suits) five hearts. No doubt South would have doubled and the likely result would have been down one. The play in four spades was fascinating. West led the diamond ace and East discarded the club two. South ruffed, cashed the spade ace, and continued with the spade queen, throwing diamonds from the board. East won and shifted to the heart king, which declarer brilliantly ducked. South took the next heart trick with his ace and played three more rounds of spades, giving East the lead when he had only clubs left. He had to bring the dummy to life, and declarers three remaining hearts evaporated. Contract made! Did you see Easts resource? Under the spade ace, he should have kept the spade two. Then when South led the fifth spade, trying for the endplay, East would have been able to underplay with his two, leaving South on lead, forced to lose three more heart tricks and go down two. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers (N) Diggers (N) PG Diggers (N) PG Doomsday Preppers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.MarvinFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Prison Diaries Prison Diaries Unfaithful: StoriesUnfaithful: StoriesIn the BedroomUnfaithful: Stories (OXY) 44 123 Top ModelTop ModelTop ModelTop ModelModelTop ModelTop (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 School of Rock Our Idiot Brother (2011) Paul Rudd. R The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 Brokeback Mountain (2005, Romance) Heath Ledger. (In Stereo) R (SPEED) 732 112 732 Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. An innocent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. (In Stereo) R Tattoo Night. (STARZ) 370 271 370 Colombiana (2011) Zoe Saldana. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Haunted Mansion (2003) Eddie Murphy. PG Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011) Johnny Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13 Underworld (SUN) 36 31 36 College Basketball: Orange Bowl Classic ACC Road Trip SpecialAlong the Way Along the Way XTERRA USA Championship Transat Quebec-St. Malo Sailing UF Bowl Preview Inside the Heat (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 The Hangover (2009, Comedy) RBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Hello, Dolly! (1969, Musical Comedy) Barbra Streisand. G The Pink Panther (1964, Comedy) Peter Sellers, David Niven. NR The Asphalt Jungle (1950, Crime Drama) Sterling Hayden. NR (DVS) (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) PG Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) PG Dual Survival Unbraided (N) Dual Survival Mars on Earth To Be AnnouncedDual Survival (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30HoneyHoneyHere Comes HoneyTotally T-Boz PGThe SisterhoodSin City Rules (N)The Sisterhood (TMC) 350 261 350 Chasing Amy (1997, RomanceComedy) Ben Affleck. (In Stereo) R My Week With Marilyn (2011, Drama) Michelle Williams. R I Dont Know How She Does It (2011) PG-13 Barb Wire R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 The Dark Knight (2008, Action) Christian Bale. PG-13 (DVS) Castle XK (In Stereo) PG Castle Almost Famous PG Castle Murder Most Fowl PG CSI: NY The Thing About Heroes (TOON) 38 58 38 33 DragonsDragonsDragonsLooneyLevel UpAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Mysteries-MuseumThe SmithsonianHotel ImpossibleWatWatNFLFoodAirport Airport (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55PawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnHardcorePawnPawnPawnPawn (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24RoseanneCosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed (In Stereo) PG Charmed (In Stereo) PG CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20CheersCheersFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineFunny Home Videos D ear Readers: Happy New Year. We hope 2013 will be the best year ever for each and every one of you. May you be blessed with good health, close family, kind friends, love and laughter. We hope you will make this the year you vow to be kinder and more compassionate so you can help the world become a better place in which to live. In honor of the day, here is poem written by William Cullen Bryant in 1859: A Song for New Years Eve Stay yet, my friends, a moment stay Stay till the good old year, So long companion of our way, Shakes hands, and leaves us here. Oh stay, oh stay, One little hour, and then away. The year, whose hopes were high and strong, Has now no hopes to wake; Yet one hour more of jest and song For his familiar sake. Oh stay, oh stay, One mirthful hour, and then away. The kindly year, his liberal hands Have lavished all his store. And shall we turn from where he stands, Because he gives no more? Oh stay, oh stay, One grateful hour, and then away. Days brightly came and calmly went, While yet he was our guest; How cheerfully the week was spent! How sweet the seventh days rest! Oh stay, oh stay, One golden hour, and then away. Dear friends were with us, some who sleep Beneath the coffinlid: What pleasant memories we keep Of all they said and did! Oh stay, oh stay, One tender hour, and then away. Even while we sing, he smiles his last, And leaves our sphere behind. The good old year is with the past; Oh be the new as kind! Oh stay, oh stay, One parting strain, and then away. Dear Annie : Several years ago, you printed a piece on New Years Day that I thought was terrific. It was called Golden Rules for Living. It was simple and made so much sense. If you can find it, would you consider reprinting it? Your Fan in Madison, Wis. Dear Fan: With pleasure. Thanks for giving us the time off. Golden Rules for Living by Miriam Hamilton Keare 1. If you open it, close it. 2. If you turn it on, turn it off. 3. If you unlock it, lock it up, 4. If you break it, admit it. 5. If you cant fix it, call in someone who can. 6. If you borrow it, return it. 7. If you value it, take care of it. 8. If you make a mess, clean it up. 9. If you move it, put it back. 10. If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it. 11. If you dont know how to operate it, leave it alone. 12. If its none of your business, dont ask questions. Dear Annie : Please tell Nervous in Vermont, the young man who is longing to let his family know he is a transgender male, that Vermont is extremely fortunate to have an organization, Outright Vermont, that supports LGBTQ youth. He will be able to connect with a dedicated and skilled staff, as well as with other youth who will understand what he is experiencing. Outright Vermont (outrightvt.org) is located in Burlington. This young man also could investigate whether his school has a Gay-Straight Alliance or similar organization. He also can speak with his school or SAP counselor (if he is comfortable doing so) for support and strategies to talk with his mother. A Vermont GSTA Adviser and SAP Counselor Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more visit www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) HOBBYBLURB MUFFLE TRENDY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: With each glass of champagne, the party guest was becoming MORE BUBBLY Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. WATIA TARIO CALAPE SARTHH Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Ans: TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 1, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessBettyBettyBettyBettyParenthood (N) NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Great Performances The Vienna Philharmonic performs. (N) G Great Performances Jewish artists excel on Broadway. (N) PG New Tricks Dockers PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Great Performances (N) GGreat Performances (N) PGWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Parenthood Keep on Rowing (N) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Shark Tank PG (DVS) Happy Endings Apartment 23 Nashville (In Stereo) PG (DVS) Eyewit. News Nightline (N) (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G NCIS Extreme Prejudice (In Stereo) NCIS: Los Angeles Betrayal Vegas A maid is murdered. 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NewsFox 13 Special TMZ (N) PG The Insider (N) Ben and Kate Ben and Kate New Girl New Girl FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Shark Tank PGHappyApt. 23Nashville PGNewsNightline 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningWord ofPlace for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Shark Tank PG (DVS) Happy Endings Apartment 23 Nashville (In Stereo) PG (DVS) NewsNightline (N) @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PaidThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidStudio DirectHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Engagement Hart of Dixie (In Stereo) PG Emily Owens, M.D. (N) (In Stereo) Two and Half Men Engagement Friends Friends PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15CrosswordsCitrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Windy City PokerMobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangInside Ben-KateBen-KateNew GirlNew GirlFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPor Ella Soy Eva Amores VerdaderosAmor Bravo (N) NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG StorageTexas StorageTexas Storage: NY Storage: NY Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG (AMC) 55 64 55 The Walking Dead Better Angels The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Seed The Walking Dead Sick The Walking Dead Walk With Me The Walking Dead Killer Within (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedRaised Wild Dog Girl of Ukraine PG Raised Wild (In Stereo) PG Raised Wild Bird Boy of Fiji Raised Wild Dog Girl of Ukraine PG (BET) 96 19 96 Meet the Browns (2008) Diary of a Mad Black Woman (2005, ComedyDrama) Kimberly Elise, Steve Harris. PG-13 Madeas Family Reunion (2006, Comedy) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days AtlantaHousewives/Atl.AtlantaDecorators How to Lose (CC) 27 61 27 33 ComingAmer. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba Go Far PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Redneck Island PG (CNBC) 43 42 43 60 Minutes on CNBCSteve Jobs: Bil.60 Minutes on CNBCAmerican GreedAmerican GreedMob Money: (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Shake It Up! G GoodCharlie Girl vs. Monster (2012) Olivia Holt. A savvy teen must battle an immortal monster and her army. Let It Shine (2012, Comedy-Drama) Tyler James Williams. (In Stereo) Frenemies (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 172013 Rose Bowl Stanford vs. Wisconsin. (N) (Live)2013 Discover Orange Bowl Florida State vs. Northern Illinois. (N) (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49SportsCenter (N)NFL Live ProFILEProFILENFL PrimeTimeNFL Live SportsCenter (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48ChoicesHolinessDaily MassMother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryFootprints of God: MaryWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Dirty Dancing (1987) Jennifer Grey. A sheltered teen falls for a street-wise dance instructor. Burlesque (2010) Cher. Premiere. A small-town gal finds her niche at a neoburlesque club. PG-13 The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Deception My Father, the Hero (1994) Grard Depardieu. PG The Crossing Guard (1995, Drama) Jack Nicholson. (In Stereo) R Ransom (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson. Premiere. (In Stereo) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX ReportThe OReilly FactorHannity (N)Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 My. DinMy. DinChoppedChopped GChoppedChopped Belly UpChopped G (FSNFL) 35 39 35 World Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Easy A (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley. PG-13 The Proposal (2009) Sandra Bullock. A woman pretends to be engaged to evade deportation. The Proposal (2009) Sandra Bullock. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 GolfPGA Tour Golf Hyundai Tournament of Champions, Final Round.PGA Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54 The Case for Christmas (2011, Fantasy) Dean Cain, Rachel Blanchard. Moonlight and Mistletoe (2008, Drama) Candace Cameron Bure. NR Help for the Holidays (2012, Fantasy) Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2 BreakinRules Puss in Boots (2011) Voices of Antonio Banderas. Big Miracle (2012) John Krasinski. PG Les Miserables The Debt (2010, Drama) Helen Mirren, Tom Wilkinson. (In Stereo) R (HBO2) 303 202 303 Die Hard With a Vengeance (1995) Bruce Willis. (In Stereo) R The Big Year (2011, Comedy) Steve Martin. PG The Big Year Beginners (2010, Drama) Ewan McGregor. (In Stereo) R (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52RV 2013 (N) GHGTV Dream HomeLove It or List It GHawaiiHawaiiHuntersHunt IntlIslandIsland (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Swamp People Never Say Die PG Swamp People ColdBlooded PG Swamp People King of the Swamp PG Swamp People Man Down PG Swamp People PG Swamp People Endgame PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms SpecialDance Moms (Season Premiere) Abby holds an open audition. (N) Double Divas (N) Dance Moms Special (LMN) 50 119 Secrets of Eden (2012, Crime Drama) John Stamos, Anna Gunn. NR The Surrogacy Trap (2013, Drama) Adam Reid. Premiere. NR My Neighbors Keeper (2007, Drama) Laura Harring. NR (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3Hunted Sam awakes in the hospital. MA Hunted Polyhedrus MA Hunted Khyber (In Stereo) MA Hunted Sam is exposed as a spy. MA Cowboys & Aliens (2011) Daniel Craig, Harrison Ford. (In Stereo) NR (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show (N)Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show

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C8 T UESDAY, J ANUARY1, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMICS Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Parental Guidance (PG) 11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Les Miserables (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Django Unchained (R) ID required. 11:15 a.m.. 3:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes. Jack Reacher (PG-13)11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Monsters Inc (G)In 3D. 11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Monsters Inc (G)3:50 p.m. The Hobbit (PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes. The Hobbit (PG-13) 4 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Les Miserables (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Django Unchained (R) ID required. 12 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes. Parental Guidance (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m. Jack Reacher (PG-13)11:25 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m. This is 40 (R) ID required. 11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m. Monsters Inc. (G)2:10 p.m. Monsters Inc (G)In 3D.11:45 a.m.,4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.No passes. The Guilt Trip (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. The Hobbit (PG-13) In 3D. 11 a.m., 6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. The Hobbit (PG-13) 3 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6:30, 9:50. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES HEHVN CTDH WT S BYWMH GCZHCTH OSVPG SL ZH. ZN THB NHSVG VHGCMKLWCT WG TCL LC OSVP OSDP. LKDPHV DSVMGCT Previous Solution: Learn from the mistakes of others. Please drink responsibly, and its never acceptable to drink and drive. Kim Kardashian (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-1 Pickles WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock WRZN-AM 720 News Talk Local RADIO

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T UESDAY,J ANUARY1,2013C9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.com Toplace an ad, call563-5966 Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time Chronicle Classifieds637551 000DM1J 000DM1S 0 0 0 8 X H A For more information on how to reach Citrus County Readers call 352-563-5592. Medical NEEDED Experienced, Caring & Dependable CNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offered LOVING CARE (352) 860-0885 Medical MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST Busy medical office looking for exp. receptionist. Must be familiar with billing & able to multi task. Fax resume to: 352-746-5784 Medical F/T RN IV Exp. preferred For physicians office with benefits. Send Resume to: Blind Box 1787M. Citrus Co. Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal RIver, Florida, 34429 Medical ARNPor PAWanted Part Time for a busy Pediatric Practice in Crystal River, Send Resume to:lindapracticemgr @t amp abay .rr .com Lost Lost Millie our 13 yr oldTimnehAfrican Grey flew out of house somewhere between 488, 495 and Lake Rousseau area. Heartbroken..794-3256 Found FOUND Grey dog on Glenn STInverness. On Saturday 12/29/12 Please call to identify. 352-613-0269 FOUND SHELTIE DOG IN INVERNESS AROUNDTHEAREAOF INDEPENDENCE (352) 212-6182 Gold Wedding Band found in Inverness Rails to Trails. Call & Identify (352) 860-1228 Hounddog approx 6mo old Brown & white. Found in the area of Mini Farms -Dunklan/ Dunnellon (352) 465-7625 Pomeranian, Female found in Old Homosassa, Shadytree Path area. Call to identify (352) 621-3130 Domestic Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Medical LPN, CNA Full time/Part time Receptionist Part time APPL Y WITHIN HEALTH CENTER AT BRENTWOOD2333 N Brentwood Cir Lecanto, FL (352) 746-6600 EOE D/V/M/F Drug Free Facility OUTPATIENT SURGERY CENTERRN OPERATING ROOMEXPERIENCED ONLY! CST-Graduate of approved Surgical Tech program and Certified-ONLY Excellent working environment, comprehensive benefit package, competitive pay and no call, nights, or weekends. Fax Resume to: 352-527-1827 www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Dining Room Set Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! (352) 563-5966 640985B Todays New Ads LIVING RM SET 7 PCS EXC COND. $600 & PATIO TABLE W/6 CHAIRS. $150 954-531-8295 Lost Millie our 13 yr oldTimnehAfrican Grey flew out of house somewhere between 488, 495 and Lake Rousseau area. Heartbroken..794-3256 MAYTAG NEPTUNE ElectricDryer Runs great, Sensor dry. First $125 takes it! (352) 464-4690 TOURING KAYAK KITSILANO by Current Design, Paddle, PSD, Carrier, Cockpit cover, P/U bed extender. $800 (954) 608-6923 Free Services $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks. $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 Free Offers FREE Twelve cockatiels & 3 large cages. Call after 8am (352) 341-0703 SHEPHERD MIX male, blonde, approx. 3 yrs. old. need fenced yard, loving home 352-489-6072 Good Things to Eat FRESH CITRUS @ BELLAMYGROVEGreens, Strawberries, Broccoli, Gift Shipping, 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Todays New Ads 2008 Dodge Ram Big Horn 5.7 Hemi 30k Great cond. $19,000 Call Fred(352) 628-6470 $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 Beverly Hills 3 bedroom. 1 bath. OWNER FIN. W/$5OOO DN $822mo NO CREDITCK Just remodeled,new roof, tile, block, w/sep. 2car garage (352) 793-7223 COLLECTOR BUYING STERLING SILVER FLATWARE & U S SILVER COINS. 352-601-7074 FOUND Grey dog on Glenn STInverness. On Saturday 12/29/12 Please call to identify. 352-613-0269 GE Refrigerator White Runs & looks good. Clean $125. (615) 633-6841 or (931)-267-8838 GE STOVE FLATTOP-White 2yrs old. Features Steam clean oven. $300 352-419-7077 HOMOSASSA **3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 476-7077 LEATHER/SUEDE JACKETS Womens, can email pics. Size 8-12 $25. each or 3 for $60. 352-513-4027 LEATHER/SUEDE JACKETS Womens, can e-mail pics. Size 8-12 $25. each or 3 for $60. 352-513-4027

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C10 T UESDAY,J ANUARY1,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE 000CUG6 FLOOR INSTALLATION TILE WOOD LAMINATE352-563-0238 302-8090 Lic.# CC2544 One Day Bath RemodelingIn Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!! Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827 For a FREE In-Home Estimate! BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELING BATHFITTER000D42Z 000D5A Y WINDOW TINTING W orld Class Window TintingReduce Heat, Fade, Glare AUTO HOME OFFICEMarion & Citrus 352-465-6079 Free Estimates 000D8CQ CLEAN UPS & CLEAN OUTS NEED SOMEONE TO GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?IF YOU WANT IT TAKEN AWAY...CALLFOR A FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!352-220-9190 W E M A K E I T DISAPPEAR FOR LESS 000D8CZ ALUMINUM 6 Seamless Gutters Screen Rooms Car Ports Hurricane Protectionallextalum13@yahoo.com Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED352-621-0881 FAX 352-621-0812 A L L E X T E R I O R A L L E X T E R I O R ALL EXTERIOR A L U M I N U M I N C A L U M I N U M I N C ALUMINUM, INC. ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248 Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator000D9FE CARPET CARE C O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E C O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E COMPLETE CARPET CARE Lic & Ins Specializing in: Specializing in: Carpet Stretching Carpet Stretching Carpet Repair Carpet Repair 000DD16 Gift Certificates AvailableC ARPET & U PHOLSTERY C LEANING LLC 352-282-1480 cell 352-547-1636 officeFree In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND P A VERS Add an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE! COPES POOL AND PAVER LLC000DN92 Copes Pool & Pavers 000DMZN ROOFING AAA ROOFING Call the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411 Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $ 100 OFF Any Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed 000DO9G WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES 352-683-0093Bonded & Insured www.windowgenie.com/springhill 352-465-6631 PAINTING Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000CUWQ 0 0 0 D 2 Y 4 HANDYMAN Rons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer Vents Affordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722 Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 Services COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 Tree Service ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 DOUBLE J Tree Serv. Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT Tree Service Tree removal & trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 Water 344-2556, Richard WATER PUMPSERVICE & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Painting CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Pressure Cleaning CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Remodeling All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 RV Services MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Lawnmower Repair ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine service & repair. 352 220 4244 Moving/ Hauling A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, lawn maint. furn. & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 HAULING FREE ESTIMATES scrap metals haul for FREE(352) 344-9273 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 746-3444 Painting Chris Satchell Painting ASAP 30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins. 352-464-1397 Kitchen & Bath The T ile Man Bathroom Remodel Specializing in handicap. Lic/Ins. #2441. 352 634 1584 Landclearing/ Bushhogging LARR YS TRACT OR SER VICE FINISH GRADING & BUSHHOGGING ***352-302-3523*** Landscaping CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 Lawn Care GOT LEAVES Let our DR VAC Do the work! Call 352-502-6588 Handyman Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Home/Office Cleaning CLEANING BY PENNY Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly. GREAT RATES 352-503-7800, 476-3820 Fencing **BOB BROWNS**Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 ROCKYS FENCING Free Est., Lic. & Ins., 352 422-7279 Handyman 1 CALL & RELAX! 25yrs Exp in 100% property maint & all repairs, call H&H Services today! lic#37658 352-476-2285 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed Lic.#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Concrete BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Side walks. Pool deck repair /Stain 352257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic.(352) 364-2120 Drywall COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 Electrical #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed Lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Automotive MaximumAuto Repair & Performance Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts, Classic car restoration, tires new & used, Performance engines. (352) 419-6549 Clean Up/ Junk Removal JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 746-3444 Computers AFFORDABLE COMPUTER REPAIR We Come to You! 352-212-1551, 584-3730 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Appliance Repair SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 Auto Body Repair MaximumAuto Repair & Performance Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts, Classic car restoration, tires new & used, Performance engines. (352) 419-6549 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com 000DM1M Pets BELLA Bella is a beautiful silvery brindle Cattle Dog/Shepherd mix, came to the shelter because her family lost their home. She is 4 years old, spayed, housebroken, microchipped, and Heartworm-negative, weighs 45 pounds. Walks well on a leash, gets along with other dogs and is very, very playful. Fenced yard is preferred, but can jump a low fence. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips Sporting Goods ROUGH RIDER STOCKMAN POCKET KNIFE New in box, 3 blades $14 860-2475 SOLD Full Set of new Taylor Made Burner Plus Irons used 4 times, can no longer use, original price TOURING KAYAK KITSILANO by Current Design, Paddle, PSD, Carrier, Cockpit cover, P/U bed extender. $800 (954) 608-6923 Baby Items BABYSTROLLER Deluxe model with canopy $25 860-2475 Sell or Swap Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Coins GOLDEN COINS 7 DIFFERENT PRESIDENTCOINS $5.00 EACH LINDA 352-341-4449 Household ANIMAL/BIRD CAGE Heavy wire/wood.On wheels&Upright. $45. 352-344-3472 CORNINGWARE Various sizes-no covers $2 each 352-527-8287 Fitness Equipment EXERCISE BIKE FAN TYPE WORKS THE ARMSTOO great shape only $85. 352-464-0316 PUNCHING BAG Hangs from ceiling, great work-out. Do not use any more. Exc. shape. $25. 352-746-4160 PURSUITEXERCISE BIKEALL ELECTRONICS SUPER SAPE $100. 352-464-0316 ROWING MACHINE BY BODYROW GETIN SHAPE $85. 352-464-0316 Sporting Goods CLUB CAR ELECTRIC NEWTIRES, BATTERY CHARGER & NEW COVER. EXC COND. CASH ONLY$2500 (352) 503-2383 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 General LEAD CRYSTALVASES $10/15 Lenox/European 4/7 352-527-8287 LEXMARK COMPUTER COPIER both inks inc. needs cable $10 352-382-1191 LPS Songs from 60s,70s & 80s. Original Artists. Records in exc.cond.$100 obo.Must buy all 352-746-4160 MOVING/STORAGE BOXES -20 new/4 sizes 26x20x5, 22x15x27, 27x16x27,24x24x24 $3 ea. 352-422-0294 NEW PAPER SHREDDER electric, never used $20.00 352-382-1191 ORECK XLUPRIGHT VACUUM CLEANER WORKS GREAT(ITS AN ORECK) ONLY$100. 352-464-0316 POOLITEMS salt, de earth,10 ft poles with brushes, net, $10 each 352-382-1191 PRESIDIO PHONE AND ANSWERING UNIT works fine $20.00 white color 352-382-1191 QUANTUM 6000 POWER CHAIR. 2 new batt w/ wty, charger, and more. Value $15,000. $2,500 obo (352) 527-2085 TODDLER HEADBOARD Brand New Metal Headboard, $15 (352)465-1616 TYPEWRITER Elec.w/all features.Carrying case,owners manual & xtra tape cartridge.Like new.$50 352-746-4160 WESTELLCOMPUTER WIRELESS BOX includes box and cables $25.00 obo 352-382-1191 WHITE LARGE NUMBERS PHONE big letters so you can see $20.00 352-382-1191 WIRE SETS TV wires,phone sets,cables all lengths new $5.00 each 352-382-1191 Business Equipment ADDING MACHINE Unisonic Desk Top 12 Digit Memory Elec. Printing Calculator $25. 352-746-4160 Medical Equipment 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES AND SEATGREATSHAPE ONLY$85. 352-464-0316 ALUMINUM WALKER & BEDSIDE COMMODE ONLY$20. EACH 352-464-0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITFOOTRESTS $100. 352-464-0316 SHOWER CHAIR WITH BACK WHITE FIBERGLASS WITH ADJUSTABLE LEGS ONLY$30. 352-464-0316 TRANSPORT WHEELCHAIR (small wheels) Very light w/ footrests.ONL Y $100. 352-464-0316 Coins BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. WeAlso Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 COLLECTOR BUYING STERLING SILVER FLATWARE & U S SILVER COINS. 352-601-7074 Furniture Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN SIZE MATTRESSAND BOX SPRING Very good condition $100 Call Walter @ 352-364-2583 Rattan Entertainment Center Old Florida style, off white -Great Shape $100. 352-464-0955 Garden/Lawn Supplies SOLD Craftsmen Tractor 24 hsp. includes trailer, spreader, charge auto transmission $750 Clothing LEATHER/SUEDE JACKETS Womens, can e-mail pics. Size 8-12 $25. each or 3 for $60. 352-513-4027 PANTS,LADIES 18 Tall, corduroy, Navy Blue, washed once 352-344-3472.$8. TJ MAX GIFTCARDS 50.00 FOR 40.00/25.00 FOR 20.00 WILLVERIFYTOYOU LINDA352-341-444 General 3 MINITURE DOLLS nicely dressed old all for $25. 352-382-1191 14.4 ELECTRIC DRILL SETbrand new in carrying case $65. or OBO 352-382-1191 40 PC. RATCHETSET all sizes rachets and sockets $20. 352-382-1191 50.00TJ MAX GIFT CARD SELLING FOR 40.00 Will meet you there to verify to you. linda 352-341-4449 103 PC. SOCKETAND WRENCH SETnew never used 470. or obo 352-382-1191 ANTIQUE ELECTRIC IRON this is from the 50s works great $25. Firm 352-382-1191 BREADMAKER Good condition, Breadman, $10 (352)465-1616 DUDLEYS AUCTION **HAPPYNEW** **YEAR!!!** TWOAUCTIONSThurs Jan 3rd WalkAboutAuction 3pm w/full yard of treasures, inside and out Furniture, tools, misc. antiques, box after box Sun Jan 6th Antique & Collectible Auction 1pm Quality Furniture from Victorian to Deco, Art, lighting, jewelry, wonderful selection of vintage Mexican Stoneware, toys, coins, Roseville+++check website www.dudleysauction. com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 FORD HOOD good condition. 85 F150 type. $45. 352-302-7451 LEAD CRYSTALVASE Exc Cond $15 7H x 4D 352-527-8287 TVs/Stereos SONYTV 52 sony tv, rear projection, with sony surround unit. can see working. $ 75. 352-795-4674 STEREO (AIWA) Multi Disk,Cassette,AM/FM Player w/side speakers. Exc. sound. $35 352-746-4160 Building Supplies SKYLIGHT26 BY26 NEW BUBBLE TYPE NOTUSED ONLY$45. 352-464-0316 SOLOTUBE NEW (SKYLIGHT) NEVER INSTALLED. LIGHTUP THATDARK ROOM $100. 352-464-0316 Computers/ Video 480W POWER SUPPLY like new $30 inverness 864-283-5797 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 TOSHIBASATELLITE LAPTOPgood condition, $100 (352)465-1616 Furniture Black/gold/glass coffee and 2 end tables, entry table, mirror and corner piece-$100 Call Elaine Simons 352-637-2464 Dining Room Set glass top table & 4 chairs $300 obo, Kitchen set, table & 4 chairs w/oak finish $50 obo 352-382-2450 Home Office Desk Maple, Great Condition $500 obo, White Formica Student Desk, good condition $25 obo, 352-382-2450 KING SIZED MATTRESS AND BOX SPRINGS good cond. $75 Call Walter @ 352-362-2583 LEATHER LA-Z-BOY ROCKER RECLINER Taupe in color. In acceptable condition. Some leather wear. mechanisims work good. $150 OBO 746-7355 LEATHER LOVE SEAT Ivory Leather Love Seat in good condition. $150 OBO 746-7355 LEATHER SOFA& LOVESEAT burgundy, excellent condition 352-746-0855 Leather Sofa, Chair & Ottoman, 1 coffee, 2 end tables.Twin bed, mat. set & head board. Round dining room table w/ 4chrs. Lamp. $600 for all (404) 242-7117 LIVING RM SET 7 PCS EXC COND. $600 & PATIO TABLE W/6 CHAIRS. $150 954-531-8295 LIVING ROOM SET SOFA, lOVESEAT& ENDTABLES. EARTH TONES, EXC COND $425 obo(352) 302-8265 LOVE SEATLIKE NEW.CALLFOR E-MAIL PICTURE LINDA 352-341-2271 MATTRESS SETSBeautiful Factory Seconds Twin $99.95, Full $129.95 Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95 352-621-4500 PAIR OF KING SIZED BOX SPRINGS Good condition $25 for the pair. Call Walter @ 352-364-2583 PAULS FURNITURE & THRIFT SHOP Daybed w/ trundle & Mat. Homosassa 628-2306 Collectibles 1918 JENNYSTAMP good condition.Call for e-mail picture. $100.OBO Linda 352-341-2271 ELVIS SUN RECORDS All 5 Sun Records-1954-55. Re-issues. VG-Mint. $75. 352-560-0046 Appliances GE Refrigerator White Runs & looks good. Clean $125. (615) 633-6841 or (931)-267-8838 GE STOVE FLATTOP-White 2yrs old. Features Steam clean oven. $300 352-419-7077 GE WASHER Good working condition $75 KENMORE Dryer Also Good condition $75 (812) 207-5691 KENMORE DRYER white, looks good, works great. Guarenteed. $100 352-476-9019 KHOLER CASTIRON SINK White,dbl basin, standard, excellent condtion. $75. 352-513-4027 MAYTAG NEPTUNE ElectricDryer Runs great, Sensor dry. First $125 takes it! (352) 464-4690 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 WASHER OR DRYER $135 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like new, Excellent Condition. Free Del. 352 263-7398 Auctions DUDLEYS AUCTION **HAPPYNEW** **YEAR!!!** TWOAUCTIONSThurs Jan 3rd WalkAboutAuction 3pm w/full yard of treasures, inside and out Furniture, tools, misc. antiques, box after box Sun Jan 6th Antique & Collectible Auction 1pm Quality Furniture from Victorian to Deco, Art, lighting, jewelry, wonderful selection of vintage Mexican Stoneware, toys, coins, Roseville+++check website www.dudleysauction. com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Fri, 01/04 Preview @ 4pm,Auction@ 6pm General Merchandise **WE BUY EST A TES ** 6055 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy 200 Hernando AB3232 (352) 613-1389 Tools 10 GALLON CAMPBELL HAUSFIELDAIR COMPRESSOR WITH HOSE ONLY$65. 352-464-0316 General Help Apartment Maintenance PositionAvailableCo. seeking P/TMaintenance. Requires own tools, experience & reliable transportation. Position requires plumbing, HVAC, electrical, and painting skills. Please apply during the hours of 9am-1pm, Monday-Friday at WildwoodTownhomes, 301 E. Gulf Atlantic Hwy, and Wildwood or email csaunders@ hallmarkco.com Part-time Help PRO SHOP PERSONNEL & OUTSIDE CART ATTENDANTPart time position, some golf knowledge required, Must have excellent people skills & flexible hours Apply in Person at Sugarmill Woods Golf & Country Club 1 Douglas St. Homosassa Fl. Schools/ Instruction SPRING HILL January Classes COSMO DA YS January 14, 2013 COSMO NIGHTS January 14, 2013 BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013 MASSAGE DA Y January 14, 2013, MASSAGE NIGHTS January 14, 2013, SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENES International School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363 www.isbschool.com Antiques DUDLEYS AUCTION **HAPPYNEW** **YEAR!!!** TWOAUCTIONSThurs Jan 3rd WalkAboutAuction 3pm w/full yard of treasures, inside and out Furniture, tools, misc. antiques, box after box Sun Jan 6th Antique & Collectible Auction 1pm Quality Furniture from Victorian to Deco, Art, lighting, jewelry, wonderful selection of vintage Mexican Stoneware, toys, coins, Roseville+++check website www.dudleysauction. com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Medical P/T, DIETARY AIDE Looking for Responsible Individual with flexible hours. Apply in Person: 700 SE 8th Ave Crystal River, 34429 DFWP, EOE Professional PRODUCTION MANAGER for Citrus County strawberry, blueberry, and citrus farm. Full time, year round position. Must be willing to relocate to Floral City, Florida. Responsible for: Supervision of irrigation technician and spray technician. Operation and light maintenance of irrigation systems, spray equipment, tractors and other farm vehicles. Interaction with Harvest Manger to ensure production yield and quality. Requires detailed knowledge of: Agricultural chemicals and spray equipment, calibration and maintenance. Irrigation, fertigation, chemigation equipment, calibration and maintenance. Diesel pumps and wells. Record keeping and daily logs.Tractors and other farm equipment. Computers -MS office suite, internet. CollegeAgricultural Degree a plus. Private Pesticide Applicators License a plus. Starting salary commensurate with experience, plus housing, vehicle, insurance, 401K, bonus after 1st year. Respond with resume FERRIS FARMS 7607 S FLORIDAAVE, FLORALCITY, FL 34436 Trades/ Skills Exp. Marine Fork Lift Driver7 day shift **Apply in Person** Twin Rivers Marina 2880 N. Seabreeze Pt Crystal River Fl 34429 no phone calls pls General Help Property Manager forApartment Community An established property management company is seeking a F/Tseasoned professional Property Manager for an RD complex in Floral City. Must be highly skilled at communication and working in an organized manner. We offer a competitive salary and an excellent benefit package including 401(k). On site apartment a possibility. Please send resume or apply at: Floral Oaks Apts. 8092 S. Floral Oaks Cir, Floral City, FLor email-csaunders@ hallmarkco.com.

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T UESDAY,J ANUARY1,2013C11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000DODZ AUTOMOTIVE JOB FAIR Saturday, January 5, 2013 10am-1pm Finance Manager Office Clerk Lot Porters Sales Apprentice Entry Level Technician Customer Service Representative Receptionist Experienced Technician Sales Professionals PLANTATION INN MAGNOLIA ROOM 9301 Fort Island Trail Crystal River, FL 34429Call 1-800-584-8755 Ext. 611 For More Information 20 FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS 000DM1Q Real Estate For Sale From mobiles to mansions, From Gulf to Lakes, give me a call, I sell em all! 352-422-4137 nancy .wilson@ yahoo.com Nancy J. Wilson Realtor Broker-Associate SRESGRI Waybright Real Estate, Inc. Motivated seller wants this gone!!! 6 acres w Big SHOP, Nice 2/2/2 House, porches Barns, pond, pvd rd, Concrete drive. $ 149K MLS 357108. www.crosslandrealty. com 352 726 6644 PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage Farms/Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 344-8018 RCOUCH.com Condos/Villas For Rent INVERNESS 2/2/1 Lg Condo Waterfront Community with heated pool Non-smoker, pet restrict. $665. mo 317-442-1063 Duplexes For Rent HOMOSASSA2/12/1 $525 mo 2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb. Pets? No smoking. 1st & sec. 352-212-4981 Efficiencies/ Cottages HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 Rental Houses BLACK DIAMOND EXCLUSIVE 3/2/2 3389 N Bent Tree Pt 1650 SF, Pool, $1285/mo (740) 398-9585 Rent: Houses Furnished CRYSTALRIVERCrystal Paradise Estates 3/2 Clean, turn-key, fenced yard. Sec + Credit Check $750. Call 352-220-6032 Rent: Houses Unfurnished BEVERLYHILLS1/1, Carport, Carpet $500.mo. 352-302-3987 Cit.Hills/Brentwood 2/2/2 on golf course. Club included $900/mo 516-991-5747 CITRUS HILLS2/2 Townhouse condo full appliances, carport, Citrus Hills membership included Prudential Florida Showcase Properties call 352-476-8136 CRYSTALRIVER3/2 on 10 Acres, W/ inground pool $1000/mo(352) 621-3135 HERNANDO 2 bedroom. 2 bath single family home with garage, screened patio, & community pool/clubhouse privileges. $875/month, 980-285-8125 INVERNESS 2/1 near hospital fam. room, scn porch. $600 352-422-2393 INVERNESS 3/2 Brand New, Granite tops, marble flrs, SS Ap $895(352) 634-3897 SUGARMILL WOODS 3/2/2 Quiet w/ fire plc Rent or rent to own. $800/mo 352-382-2904 352-697-0458 Waterfront Rentals HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 INVERNESS 2/2, Unfurn. waterfront Lake Henderson, lg florida rm, lg carport w/work area, fire pit, access to private boat ramp. $750 mo. Call after 9am (352) 726-6320 Lake Front Home on Gospel Island, spectacular views spacious 3/2/2, For Rent, $700 or Sale (908) 322-6529 Rent or Sale CHASSAHOWITZKA Charming 2br 1.5ba, newly remodeled in quiet area. 980sq ft $60,000. Owner Fin ., 10% down amortized over 15yrs at 7% 5-yr balloon. Possible trade for land/home in TN or GA. call 352-382-1800 Real Estate For Sale ESTATE SALE in Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Large developed site and a separate gated storage lot; plus almost new 5th-wheel with slides, screened gazebo, and storage building. All for $79,900. For more info and pictures, click on www.detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 Mobile Homes In Park FLORALCITY 55 + Park. Fully furn., 2/2, DW, 2 Carports, screened porch& remodeled. Fun park lots of activities! Lot Rent $176. $17,500. 352-344-2420 INGLIS 3/2 Furn., screened porch. Lot rent $295 Includes amenties $ 15,000 (352) 212-8873 INVERNESS Harbor Lights 55+ park, on Big Lake Henderson. Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl. new floors, screened porch, shed, & carport. $13,500 (352)344-1828 INVERNESS PARK55+ 14X60, 2/2, new roof, all appliances, partly furn. screen room, shed, 352-419-6476 LECANTO 55+ PK 1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH, 40x20, shed, handicap access. ramp & shower $25,000. 352-212-6804 Lecanto Senior Park 3 bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66 S/W Mobile home furnished. 12x22 Screened porch, 2 sheds, roof over, new plumbing, new hot water heater, new skirting, very clean, painted in 2011. Call 815-535-7958 RV Spaces For Rent INVERNESS RV Spaces. Bring your own boat and fishing gear.AGE 55+ community. Lot rent only $360-$375 including electric. Edge Water Oaks 352-344-1380 Sale or Rent HOMOSASSA Large 3br 2ba MH Rent to Own Ready to Move In Owner Financing A vail CALL(352) 795-1272 Real Estate For Rent CRYSTALRIVER3/2 on 10 Acres, With inground Pool $1000/mo(352) 621-3135 Apartments Furnished CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Hse. Near Twn 563-9857 Apartments Unfurnished Alexander Real Estate (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts2 BR/1 BA$400-$500 ALSO HOMES & MOBILESAVAILABLE CRYSTALRIVER1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments for Rent 352-465-2985 CRYSTALRIVERSp acious 2/1 lawn, water, sewr & garb. W/D hk up $500.mo $250 dep No Pets 352-212-9205 352-212-9337 FLORALCITYFREE Use of boat ramp, fishing dock, canoe & Jon boat rentals. 1 BR $300/$200 dp.Trails End Camp,AFriendly Place to Live 352-726-3699 HOMOSASSA 2/1 Incld water, trash & lawn. $550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 INVERNESS 1 BR & 2 BR Garden & TownhouseApts. $512 to $559 a mo WSG included, small pets welcome. Barrier Free Unit AvailableGATEHOUSE APTS (352) 726-6466 Equal Housing Opportunity Retail/Office Rentals Homosassa SpgsSmlRestaurant/Pizza Shop for Rent, $800 269-369-2509 LECANTO Oak Tree Plaza, Office/ Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @ $700+ util. & sales tax.1 mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease 352-258-6801 Condos/Villas For Rent CITRUS HILLS2/2Furn w/ membership, Seasonal/Annual 352-476-4242, 527-8002 Pets 5 TinyYorkies $550 and up, Small, Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2 females,1 Male Maltese, Raised in loving home. CKC Reg. health certs, & puppy pacs. Parents on site come watch them play (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 MINIATURE POODLES miniature poodle pups born 10/16/12 Health Cert 1 apricot & 1 black female & 1 black male almost potty trained, raised in our home. $500 cash call 352-419-5662 or karaluv3@yahoo.com NICKY Nicky is a 2 y.o. lab/bulldog mix, weighing about 78 pounds, and is Heart-worm negative. Is very sweet and loveable, very intelligent. However, he is a big, strong dog who needs a strong person to handle him, and a fenced yard is strongly recommended. He knows how to sit for treats and wants to please his human friend very much. He is available now at the Citrus County Animal Shelter. Call 352-746-8400 RED MINIATURE POODLE PUPS 7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND 1 FEMALE; $850. REGISTRATIONAND HEALTH CERTIFICATES;AVAILABLE 12-22-12. CALL 352-419-8233 OR janiceannross@msn.com SENEGALPARROT $350 WITH CAGE, FEMALE VERYGOOD BIRD. CASH ONLY EXC. HEALTH (352) 503-2383 Feed/Fertilizer /Supplies LG DOG CRATE black finish 48length x29 width 35 height $45 (352) 527-0982 Livestock Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Mobile Homes For Rent HOMOSASSA 2/1, NICE SWMH BigYard, Fenced Backyard, Screened Back Porch, In nice area on Paved Street. Pets Allowed $495.pr mnth Ist, Last, $300 Deposit. Call 352 634-3862 or 352-794-3760 HOMOSASSA 3/2D/W $650 mo., 1st, last, sec. Very nice home.Ask for Walter (561) 248-4200 LECANTOLEISUREACRES 3/2 water & garbage incl. $600mo. (352) 628-5990 Mobile Homes For Sale 2BR, 1 BA,on your own 75x 150 lot, no fees! new enclosed sunroom, lg laundry room furn, 2 storage buildings, 5111 Castle LakeAve. S of Inverness on SR 41 $39,500 (740) 255-0125 3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car carport on 1 acre. split layout, steel roof, caged pool, 20x25 ft deck, lg storage building, Furnished Modular $76,900, 5215 Bridget Pt, Castle Lake Park Inverness 352-597-7353 HERNANDO 3BR 2BAMH Ready to move in FHA& Owner Financing avail. call 352-795-1272 Palm Harbor Homes Stilt Homes Waterfront, Beach www .plantcity .p alm harbor .com John Lyons 800-622-2832 Mobile Homes and Land CRYSTALRIVERNice Large 4br 2ba MH READYTO MOVE IN! Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-1272 HERNANDO/486 1+acre, 2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man Cave/Work Shop w/AC 28x40, $47,500 J. Desha Cridland Real Estate (352)634-6340 HOMOSASSA **3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 476-7077 HOMOSASSA 2ba 1 ba MH needs complete rehab. Good shed, well & septic. 6524 W.Akazian $12,500 (603) 860-6660

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C12 T UESDAY,J ANUARY1,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE Lien Notices 512-0101 TUCRN 1/18 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that on 1/18/13 at 10:30 am the following motor home will be sold at public auction pursuant to F.S. 715.109: 1984 FORD #1FDKE30L1EHB31996. Last Tenants: Regina Boger & John L Boger. Sale to be held at MHC Operating LP dba Crystal Isles RV Resort 11419 W Fort Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429 813-241-8269. January 1 & 8, 2013. OF CRYSTAL RIVER Citrus Countys Volume Sales Leader www.villagetoyota.com 352-503-4121 VILLAGE TOYOTA000DOE5 We Deliver The Best Showroom Buying Experience Cars Customer Service Come See Why We Are Rated The Best! All Remaining 2012 MODELS Will Be SOLD THIS WEEK 0% To Make Room For The Incoming 2013s! Available on 13 Different Models! Savings up to $ 6000 Off MSRPAll Offers Expire Jan. 2, 2013 Vehicles Wanted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Cars 94 OLDS MOBILECUTLASS CIERA SEDAN 6CYRUNS & LOOKS GOOD. ASKING $1575. 352-637-2588 or 845-588-0759 2000 Chevy Corvette Metallic Bowling Green Std shift, one owner, & garage kept. See to appreciate. (352) 621-9874 A XMAS SALE BUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RVCONSIGNMENTUSA.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET 2000 IMPALA $4995 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 2003AVALANCHE $6850 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET 2004 TRAILBLAZER 4 X 4 $6999 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET Lumina GL, 4 Door, loaded, low miles, V6, pwr., garaged, clean $3,750. (352) 212-9383 CHEVROLET Lumina GL, 4 Door, loaded, low miles, V6, pwr., garaged, clean $3,750. (352) 212-9383 CHRYSLER2001 TOWN & COUNTRY $4550 352-341-0018 MAZDA 2006 Miata MX5 Grand Touring 40K Miles, Auto Transmission, Cloth Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk (6), $13,250 352-400-1551 MR2 SPYDER 2002TRD model, 1 owner. Mint condition. Garage kept, no accidents, smoking, or pets. New soft top & leather seats. C352-464-7501. $13.5K. NISSAN 2005ALTIMASE V6 $7495 352-341-0018 OLDS 98 REGENCY Brougham. 4dr w /fp, orig. 1989, 163k orig., V6-24mpg, new tires & brakes, 2nd owner $1550 (352) 637-1074 SATURN ION2007, 4 cyl,4dr. gold, auto,AC,CD, 27k miles exc. cond. many extras $8300 obo 352-382-0428 TOYOTA Camry LE, Silver. leather interior, very good condition, 86k miles. $8900 (352) 637-2838 Classic Vehicles 1971 CHEVELLE CONVERTIBLE stunning, 40k+ invested fully restored, 350 auto, buckets, consistant show winner, high end stereo, red w/ white top & interior $24,900, 352-513-4257 AUTO SWAP/ Corral CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN., 6, 2013 1800-438-8559 Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details 352-563-5966 Trucks 2008 Dodge Ram Big Horn 5.7 Hemi 30k Great cond. $19,000 Call Fred(352) 628-6470 A XMAS SALE BUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RVCONSIGNMENTUSA.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 FORD 2004 F150XL4x4,115K miles, Camper top, V8, White reg. cab $7000.00 352-746-9150 Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVYTRAILBLAZER LT 05exc. cond. asking $7000 obo, in Hernando (904) 923-2902 Motorcycles Suzuki Burgman 400 Candy apple red, exc. cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi per gallon, luggage back, & garage kept. $4500 (352) 897-4549 HONDA 2007 Full Size Shadow. Harley,1100CC, Chrome, bags, trade?, 70mpg $3,500. Crystal River (727) 207-1619 Waterfront Homes Open Waterfront on Lake Hernando 3,300 sf under roof 2,000 liv., 3/2/1. den & fam. rm. cage inground pool. 2 lrg. sheds, dock, on 1 acre $269,900 813-240-7925 YOUR High-Tech Water Front Realtor ROD KENNER 352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties Citrus County Land **Heatherwood 581** access to game reserve & Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres well, septic, no impact fees, $30,000 by owner, sold as is (352) 422-0435 ACRE LOT with well, septic and power pole, impact fee credit, high and dry, trees, $11,000 obo (352) 795-3710 Lots For Sale HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot, wet lands on Lee Woods Drive 112 x 114 ft. river access, but not on River $7,000. 352-621-1664 Boat Accessories 2005 BOAT TRAILER 18 to 21 ft boat. Tandem axle.All tires, lights, axles, & guides in exc. cond. MUST SEE! Asking $895 OBO. Priced $350 below value. Call / txt(352) 422-7737 BOAT TRANSIT TRAILER Very lg., dbl. axles up to 33 ft.Any boat type! $1800 or OBO (813) 244-3945 Boats 15 ftALUM. BOAT WIDE DEEPV, 25HPELEC. START, TRAILER. OLDER BUT CHEAPER! $995 (352) 341-4949 1988 27 ft Sportscraft Coastal Fisherman, cabin cruiser, $10k OBO (813)-244-3945 AIRBOAT15ft, Rivermaster 6 cyl, ContinentalAircraft engine, warp-drive prop, $7000 352-637-1391 BAYLINER 1984cuddy cabin, hard top, Volvo motor,AQ125A, needs tune-up. Has 2 props, fish/depth finder, 2001 Rolls float on trailer worth $1000 Comes w/spare motor Has service manual, 2nd owner $2500 call Doug after 4pm352-212-8385 or 352-564-0855 HURRICANE DECK BOAT2003 Hurricane Deck Boat with 2003 90hp Yahama 4 Stroke engine. Excellent condition. Includes trailer, bimini top, winter cover, stereo, fishfinder, gps porta potti,new interior, livewell plus full coast guard safety equip New bottom paint 2011 Very economical on fuel $8500 Contact Phil Tomko at 352-220-9435 No calls before 8:00 am TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP, T top, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com Recreation Vehicles NATIONALRV2006Tropical One owner,34ft, 26000 miles,no smoke/pets, 300HPCummins diesel,2 slides, 6 new tires, 3yr warranty,many extras. $87000. Well maintained. 352-341-4506 Campers/ Travel Trailers MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. WE BUYRVS, Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes Call US 352-201-6945 Vehicles Wanted $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks. $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ A XMAS SALE BUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RVCONSIGNMENTUSA.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot LARRYSAUTO SALES, Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 Citrus County Homes GAIL STEARNS Realtor Tropic Shores Realty (352) 422-4298 Low overhead = Low Commissions Waterfront, Foreclosures Owner financing available Ive SOLD 20 Properties this year! I NEED LISTINGS! DEB INFANTINERealtor (352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERA American Realty Phone:(352) 726-5855 Cell:(352) 302-8046 Fax:(352) 726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MERRY CHRISTMAS! ....and, Happy New Year! MICHELE ROSE Realtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 Quiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Dunnellon/Citrus Springs area, only 20 Min. to Ocala $132,000 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. Tony Pauelsen Realtor 352-303-0619 Buy or Sell Ill Represent YOU ERA American Realty Waterfront Homes FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a Week LISAVANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com CRYSTALRIVER2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2 boat slips near KINGS BAY$425,000. Make Offers 352-563-9857 DUNNELLON Here is that home on Lake Rousseau thatyou have always wanted! 2br 1 ba on 1.43 acres w/168ft lake frontage. Completely remodeled all new interior & windows. No Flood Insurance! Priced reduced from $369,000 to $169,000 Call Bernie (352) 563-0116 Real Estate For Sale Fero Cemetery -Beverly HillsTwo Plots Under Lrg Shaded Oak TreeRow 251 -Lots D & E Only $2500 for Both (1/2 Price) 352-364-4010 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989 LET US FIND YOU A VIEW TO LOVE www. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644 Crossland Realty Inc. Open House Brentwood of Citrus Hills 2/2/2 Quiet culdesac. Totally remodeled Hrwd flrs,ceramic,cpt. scrn lanai, lscp yard. Must see! New on market FSBO 1816 W. Jena Ct Lecanto OPEN SAT&SUN 11-2 $97,500 NO agents please 610-248-2090 Beverly Hills Homes Beverly Hills 3 bedroom. 1 bath. OWNER FIN. W/$5OOO DN $822mo NO CREDITCK Just remodeled,new roof, tile, block, w/sep. 2car garage (352) 793-7223 Citrus Hills Homes HERNANDO Citrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 Hernando Homes Lowest Priced Home inARBOR LAKES **OPEN HOUSE** 2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR & Gated Comm. 10a-3p 4695 N. Lake Vista Trl (352) 419-7418 Inverness Homes INVERNESS Block home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $130,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or David 607-539-7872 Floral City Homes FLORALCITY 3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot, best offer -inspection Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5, Home will be sold Sunday night to highest bidder 727-288-6020 Crystal River Homes CRYSTALRIVER3/2 on 10 Acres, W/ inground pool $1000/mo(352) 621-3135 Homosassa Homes OWNER SACRIFICE $100,000. 4 yrs. Ago, Selling for $29.900 CALL 352-564-0207 Forest View/Gated 55+ The Meadows Sub. 2/2/1, New roof, NewAC & Appliances Move In, clean cond. 3876 S. Flamingo Terr. Asking $58,000 (352) 382-5558 Homosassa Springs Homes HOMOSASSASPRINGS 2/2/2 Great Country home on 2 acre landscaped lot, in great neighborhood. Move in Ready! Call for appt. 126K 352-503-6511 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/3 HEATED POOL lot s of extras SELLER MOTIVATED! reduced to 210k 352-688-6500 or 352-212-5023 Buying or Selling REALESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNT,REALTOR ERAKEY1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. Citrus County Homes Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503



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INSIDE JANUARY 1, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOLUME 118 ISSUE 147 50 CITRUS COUNTYHappy New Year ENTERTAINMENT:Good yearFilm fans hand Hollywood record cash./ Page B4www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . .C8 Community . .C6 Crossword . .C7 Editorial . .A10 Entertainment . .B4 Horoscope . .B4 Lottery Payouts .B4 Movies . . .C8 Obituaries . .A6 Classifieds . .C9 TV Listings . .C7 NEWS BRIEF HIGH76LOW55Mostly sunny to partly sunny.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning TUESDAY ASK THE EXPERTS:Health & LifeDoctors Bennett, Gandhi, Grillo and Vascimini share their expertise./ Page C1 HEALTH & LIFE:You dont saySpoiler alert, kick the can down the road, trending and bucket list are among a list of baned words./Page C1 FISCAL CLIFFsuperfoodYOLO at VILLAGE TOYOTA 000DOE7 SEE IT ON PG. C12 SO YOU KNOW Early holiday deadlines f or today mean lottery numbers will not be appear in todays Chronicle. Look for the payouts printed in Wednesdays edition. Early deadlines also mean stocks will not be in toda ys paper. The stock markets are closed today. Well permit draws deep concerns MIKEWRIGHT Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER It wasnt the old lumber yard at 142 N.E. 11th St. that has residents and officials concerned, its what someone plans to do with the water underneath. A decision by the Southwest Florida Water Management District to issue a well permit for a company that will sell water to an Ocala bottling plant brought anger and disbelief to the community. Officials and residents were in disbelief upon learning that, while the permit allows 28 million gallons of water to be pumped a year, it didnt require a Fiscal cliff, what now? 2012 Year inREVIEW See WELL/ Page A4 Got the day off? Visit the parkThe Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park is open today, New Years Day. Park officials encourage the public to celebrate the holiday with a visit to the park. A new day dawns GERRY MULLIGAN/ChronicleThe sun rises over Kings Bay on a late December morning, illuminating both sky and water. AP sources: Deal emerging Associated PressWASHINGTON Working with Congress against a midnight deadline, President Barack Obama said Monday that a deal to avert the fiscal cliff was in sight but not yet finalized. The emerging deal would raise tax rates on family income over $450,000 and individual income over $400,000 a year, increase the estate tax rate and extend unemployment benefits for one year. There are still issues left to resolve but were hopeful Congress can get it done, Obama said at a campaignstyle event at the White House. But its not done. In the building New Years Eve drama, the parties still were at an impasse over whether to put off the automatic, across-the-board spending cuts set to take effect at the beginning of the year and if so, how to pay for that. One official said talks were focused on a two-month SO YOU KNOW Negotiations on a deal to a vert the fiscal cliff continued as of press time. Read a detailed news analysis in Wednesdays Chronicle. See CLIFF/ Page A4 Woman drops 100 pounds, aims for moreNANCYKENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS Lisa Leeper smiles easily. At 47, she lives at Avante at Inverness, most likely the youngest resident at the nursing care facility. She came there a year ago from Lake County after a hip injury, weighing 412 pounds. She came with four goals: to lose between 200 to 250 pounds (she has already lost more than 100), to get much-needed hip surgery, to be healthy and strong enough to get her own house or apartment, and her ultimate goal to find a nice Christian man, settle down and have a family. Georgette Bass, Avantes activities director, calls her an inspiration. Its not easy losing 100plus pounds, especially when you spend most of your time in a wheelchair, especially when you live in a nursing home. When I go through See HEALTHY/ Page A5 Commissioner sets goals for 2013 CHRISVANORMER Staff writerSuccessfully dealing with a difficult economy will be the challenge to the county in the year ahead. These are five goals I would like Citrus County to focus on in 2013, Joe Meek, chairman of the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC), recently told the Chronicle. As a county and a local government, if we would focus on these issues, it would be beneficial for our community. Budget issues From the first BOCC meeting, commissioners and county staff will confront the current budget on a schedule at each board meeting for three months. They will divide the budget by function and take it apart to explain how the money is being spent this year and what the shortfall is, what the programs are and how much taxpayers are paying for them. Commissioners and members of the public will comment at each meeting. Then the budget will be put back together again, so the board will learn how much it can fund of what residents want. Commissioners will look at both budget reductions and increases in revenue through other sources for a sustainable, balanced budget without pulling from reserves. Regardless of our issue with Duke (Energy Inc.), we were going to have to go through this process, Meek said. Economic development The BOCC will continue to focus on economic development initiatives to diversify the countys sources of jobs and income. Working with the Citrus County Economic Development Council, the board will continue to focus on targeted industries. Medical care, Port Citrus and tourism also will be areas to be incentivized. As a board, it will focus on See COMMISSIONER/ Page A5 MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleActivities assistant Nicole Sharpe walks alongside Lisa Leeper at Avante at Inverness as part of Leepers physical therapy. Leeper has lost about 100 pounds in her drive to lead a healthy and happy life. Healthy goals Joe Meekchairman of Citrus County commission.

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ERICABROUGH The Gainesville Sun NEWBERRYCast net fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. Horseback riding and playing bluegrass music. Cheering for the hometown football team on Friday nights, or singing for the church choir on Sunday mornings. Those are seasonings that provide unique flavors to the small towns of North Central Florida. While many of the activities are unique to a specific community, others can be found in several places. Rural North Florida has features that have attracted equestrians, anglers, farmers, and others who are willing to eschew the conveniences of nearby shopping, medical care and schools for the freedom to pursue their outdoor interests. In some cases, those who left the area to pursue a job or an education or for some other reason find themselves returning again and again for the atmosphere they associate with rural life. A big draw each fall is Friday night football, regardless of the weather. With few exceptions, rural high schools have football teams that play under the lights on Friday nights, drawing hundreds of local residents to the stadiums. Valencia Mells, a 1985 graduate of Newberry High School, is among those still sitting in the bleachers every Friday night. I am here every year, every game, said Mells. Its Panther pride in this small town. Its like a closeknit family. Newberry High School graduate Tommy Hemphill, who played tight end for the Panthers nearly 20 years ago, brought his 13-year-old daughter, Taylor, from Orlando to attend this years homecoming game Sept. 28. This field brings back memories, said Hemphill. The family brings you back to town and back to the game. In some communities, there is a specific bit of geography that draws residents together regularly. In Orange Lake, its the lake. We are swamp rats in this community, said Troy Abner, a native of the area. When we get up, we go down to the lake. We like frog legs instead of filet mignon. Abner said he has seen the lake go dry four or five times since he was born in the area in 1962. The bouts of drought can have a significant effect on those who rely on anglers and other visitors. But in good times and in bad times, Orange Lake has a place just like the place found in most small towns the local pub. In the Orange Lake community, the pub is U.S. Veterans Post 102 on U.S. 441. It is part bar, part restaurant and a total social club for patrons. We dont have nothing, said Joe Kutcher of McIntosh. But we sit here and we socialize. This is a gathering hole for us. Its socialization being friends with people you can talk with whether it be right, wrong or indifferent. With daily drink and lunch specials, frequent karaoke nights and special events like the annual Christmas party, the post is a place where guys like Rod Walker of McIntosh feel comfortable and accepted. I live up in the big city (McIntosh). We have a flashing light, Walker said. I wanted to come back to the country people. People around here are just trying to get along. Cyndi Purvis has been bartending at the Orange Lake post for a few years, serving an older crowd, weekend visitors escaping boredom, boaters and locals, she said. We have a preference for country western music here, she said. They come for steak dinner, and stay for karaoke and dancing. Another activity that draws North Florida residents in droves is an annual festival. The region has only a few months each year that dont offer at least a couple of weekend festivals. Windsor has its zucchini fest. Trenton hosts a quilting extravaganza, and in Williston, its the Peanut Festival on the first Saturday in October. Mary and Walter Duvall of Lecanto drove about 40 miles to get to this years ode to peanuts on Oct. 8. We havent seen peanuts this big in a long time, Walter said to Mary as they sampled a few. We come because we like the local, old-time color here. Its all like folks back home. The people are nice, they are country. The feeling of back home or down home is what draws many to other festivals as well, such as the Bluegrass Festival in Palatka at the Rodeheaver Boys Ranch. Sitting in a rocking chair at this years event was Beaufort, S.C., resident Barbara Body. She was munching on fresh popped kettle corn while listening to one of the first bands play. We come to this event faithfully, said Body. My husband (Lou Body) enjoys the music. Lou enjoys the music so much that now his trips to the festival include arranging time to take finger-picking lessons on a dobro. Robert and Shirley Williams of Lake City like to get front-row seats and spend their time between performances reading. We come for the music and the atmosphere, said Robert. The nice thing is you can sit in the front row and you can still hear. The front row is often a preferred seat for another sort of small-town fun. Horse events ranging from trail rides to rodeoing to dressage attract enthusiasts to live, work and play in North Florida. Horses are big animals that require big spaces to compete in. The owners, trainers and fans who are at the events also need big spaces to accommodate the motor homes, travel trailers, horse trailers and other gear they travel with. North Florida, especially Levy and Marion counties, have plenty of space that has proven ideal for all sorts of horse events. At the Florida Horse Park in Marion County, an October event drew riders and trainers from across the state. The three-phase competition involved dressage, jumping and running a cross country course. Paige Ammons, 14, a cross-country rider from Land OLakes, arrived confident and excited to show off the skills she has acquired since beginning to ride five years ago. Horses are my favorite animal, Paige said. They really catch my eye. I like jumping. I like flying through the air. Not every small-town event is structured and organized. A big part of rural life includes time to just enjoy local, everyday activities. For teens in Dixie County, a favorite way to spend time is to cruise along U.S. 19 after the sun sets while looking for their friends. The teens tend to cluster around their pickup trucks in a business parking lot where they can swap stories, laugh and generally enjoy each other face-toface without constant texting. In tiny, coastal Cedar Key on a sunny after-school afternoon, the preference is often walking through town in bare feet just to see whats going on. Cassie Lozier, 11, and Ciera Beckham, 13, who have been best friends since toddlerhood, routinely leave their shoes behind. We go bare-footed because its just like home, said Ciera. Nobody cares. Instead of shoes, the girls said they like to carry cast nets when they head out onto a dock or boat in search of mullet, catfish, pinfish and yellow tip. You never have to go anywhere, said Ciera. You can fish right off your own deck with your own cast nets. A2TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESTATE 000DNIN Ideal Health Enrichment Center 5494 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa 352-621-5100 Monday Saturday 9:00 AM7:00 PM By appointment only massage manicures yoga nails acupuncture facials fitness classes pedicures Acupuncture Use any of our other services during the month and receive treatments for only $40 during that month. 90 min. Massage $60 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive a 90 minute massage for only $60. Only one coupon per person. 60 min. Massage $50 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive a 60 minute massage for only $50. Only one coupon per person. Microdermabrasion Facial $45 If pre-pay your following appointment before you leave, you can continuously receive this offer for only $45. Only one coupon per person. 30 Something Special Gel Manicure $18 Manicure Pedicure Combo $30 Must be 30 years or older to qualify for this promotion. Holly Bisagna, LMT MA50585/MM20050 Paula Roberts, LMT MA46821 Sandra Brock, LMT MA22907 Amber Boulerice, LMT MA67821 Mei Fen Harvey, LMT MA67697 Anna Graf, LMT MA67822 Timothy Hillengas, AP AP1082 Michele Di Dimonico, LE FB9745502 Beth Hill, LE FB9721121 Victoria Bell, NT FS879236 Gift Cards Available Online www.ihec.us 000DN3X Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol Rural residents savor laid-back lifestyle ERICA BROUGH/The Gainesville SunArcher resident Bob Lusnia helps his grandson, Lucas Gruenwald, 3, get on an antique tractor on display Oct. 6 during the annual Central Florida Peanut Festival in Williston.

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AroundTHE STATE Citrus CountyCitrus Port Authority to meet Jan. 8The Citrus County Port Authority will meet at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, in the Citrus County Courthouse, Room 100. Among the topics to be discussed is the Port Citrus feasibility agreement with TranSystems. This meeting is open to the public. The Courthouse is at 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness. Republican clubs to host school speakerNature Coast Republican Club and Citrus Republican Womens Club will conduct a monthly meeting Saturday, Jan. 12: coffee at 8:30 a.m., meeting at 9. Linda Powers, Citrus County School Board member, will present Status of our Schools. Group meets at the American Legion Post 155 in Crystal River. Call 352-7462545 for information.CitraMarion County soldier killed in AfghanistanA soldier from north Florida has been killed in Afghanistan. The Department of Defense says Pfc. Markie T. Sims of Citra, in northern Marion County, died Saturday in Panjwal, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device. The 20-year-old was assigned to the 38th Engineer Company, 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, under control of the 7th Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.OviedoSearch continues for missing boatersAuthorities in central Florida are continuing their search for two fishermen who may have been ejected from their boat on Lake Jesup. The Orlando Sentinel reported rescue teams spent much of Sunday searching for 26-year-old Charlie Jackson and 30-year-old Jason Cobb. Family members told the newspaper the men had gone to a bachelor party on Friday night and set out onto the lake just after midnight Saturday. Crews planned to return to the lake early Monday to search again.Tampa Arrest made in fatal stabbing of manPolice arrested a man accused of fatally stabbing someone over $10 worth of marijuana. Hillsborough County Sheriffs deputies said 24-year-old Gerardo Rivera-Pagan is being held in jail on first-degree murder charge. They said he stabbed Ovidio Sanchez on Dec. 23 after he fought with Rivera-Pagans friend at Angels Smoke Shop. The Tampa Tribune reported Sanchez confronted 19-year-old Luis Rivers and stabbed him several times. Authorities said Rivers was covered in blood when he went into a convenience store seeking help. He was taken to a hospital and was in stable condition last week. From staff and wire reports STATE& LOCAL Page A3TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Clarification There are no coyotes on the Citrus Springs Golf Course, according to general manager Jay Hayward. A Sound Off on Page C4 in Sundays Chronicle said otherwise. The Chronicle regrets any misunderstanding. Readers can alert The Citrus County Chronicle to any errors in news articles by emailing newsdesk@ chronicleonline.com or by calling 352-563-5660. New law permits headlight flashing In effect as of today Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Flashing your headlights to alert oncoming drivers that police are lurking on the roadside ahead will no longer be illegal in Florida, though a lawyer who has represented ticketed motorists said a new law legalizing the practice still has loopholes. A provision legalizing such speed trap warnings is part of a wide-ranging motor vehicle law taking effect Tuesday with the new year. Other changes range from allowing homeless people to get free state identification cards to creating a pair of new specialty license plates. It also would for the first time permit the state to issue specialty driver licenses and ID cards. Oviedo attorney J. Marcus Jones, who has helped headlight-blinking motorists get their tickets dismissed, said the new law doesnt go far enough. The action of the Legislature in our belief fell short, Jones said. By the time the law was passed in March, the Florida Highway Patrol already had ordered state troopers to stop issuing tickets for high-beam flashing after being hit with a lawsuit Jones filed on behalf of Erich Campbell. The St. Petersburg College student from Land O Lakes was cited for violating an existing law that says flashing lights are prohibited on vehicles except for turn signals. The lawsuit contends the Highway Patrol had been misinterpreting that provision in Floridas traffic code because it was meant only to ban drivers from having strobes or official-looking emergency vehicle lights on their cars and trucks. To clear up any ambiguity, the new law amends that provision to specifically allow motorists to flash their headlights at an oncoming vehicle regardless of intent. A Pinellas County judge dismissed Campbells $115 ticket, but his lawsuit is in trouble. Another judge in Tallahassee ruled its a moot issue because of the new law. Jones, though, has asked Circuit Judge Kevin Carroll to reconsider because of the loopholes he believes it contains. If he can get Judge Carroll to change his mind, Jones then could seek class-action status and try to get refunds for an estimated 2,400 motorists who paid fines for flashing their high beams between 2005 and 2010. The new law also will create additional specialty tags for Vietnam War veterans and those who have won the Combat Infantry Badge. It also allows the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to use email instead of the U.S. Postal Service to send out driver license renewal notices; creates plates for retired governors and federal and state lawmakers; and repeals a provision that says school buses can go no more than 55 miles an hour even if the speed limit is higher. It also would prohibit swamp buggies from operating on state roadways unless permitted to do so by local governments, and allow golf carts to drive on sidewalks that are at least 5 feet wide alongside state highways. Sharing siblings Sister gives kidney to ailing brotherNANCYKENNEDY Staff writerINVERNESS Howard Chambers and his sister Sherrie Matthews believe siblings should share. So, when Chambers needed a kidney, without a moments hesitation Matthews said, Of course Ill give you one of mine. On Nov. 15, thats what she did. Weve always been close, Matthews said. Howard Chambers, 64, was born with only one kidney, although he didnt find out until he was about 20 and got hurt while working on a silo in western New York. At the hospital, doctors couldnt find one of his kidneys on an X-ray and rushed him to another hospital in Erie, Penn., thinking it broke loose somehow. When Chambers learned he only had one kidney, it was an oddity, but nothing to worry about since he was young. When I was in my 30s and had to take a physical for a job, they saw that my creatine numbers were climbing, so we knew someday my kidney would quit, he said. It lasted another 30 years. I was probably 60 when they told me it was really failing. In 1996, Chambers had triple-bypass surgery, which revealed a cancerous mass growing on the back of his heart. I havent been too healthy, he said. A kidney transplant was always on the horizon, but because of his poor health he also developed diabetes the doctors said if he was put on the transplant waiting list for a donor kidney he probably would never get one. Thats when Matthews said he could have hers she was a perfect match. For several years they played a waiting game. Dec. 30, 2011, Chambers went in for surgery to have a dialysis fistula inserted so he could begin dialysis treatment when his kidney completely shut down. However, transplant surgery was out of the question, because Chambers weighed too much. At 274 pounds, he needed to get down to 200 before his doctor would OK him for surgery. So, he set about losing the weight. Three nights a week he went for dialysis treatment and followed a strict renal diet. During the day he rode his bicycle, averaging 100 miles a week, and played shuffleboard. By his surgery date, Nov. 15, he weighed 202 pounds. I was determined, he said. The whole family was at the waiting room at Tampa General, said Deborah Chambers, Howards wife. The only glitch was a tiny kidney stone the doctors found in Matthews donated kidney, which was removed. Both Chambers and his sister, with the companionship of their spouses, spent Thanksgiving recovering from their surgeries at a friends house in Tampa. They sat on the couch while their spouses cooked. Now all of a sudden hes back to normal again, but its a different normal, Mrs. Chambers said. For so many months we had a different way of life. Now, Chambers blood pressure is normal and his diabetes is getting better. The doctor recently cleared him to ride his bike again. Hell be taking anti-rejection drugs for the rest of his life, but thats OK because now he has a rest of his life to look forward to. Were hoping for another 15 years, he said. Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@ chronicleonline.com or 352-564-2927. NANCY KENNEDY /ChronicleOn Nov. 15, Sherrie Matthews gave her brother, Howard Chambers, the best gift she could give him one of her kidneys. Lyngbya clean-up crew discovers spring vent Volunteers removed 548 tons of algae Special to the ChronicleKings Bay Rotarys One Rake at a Time community service project uncovered another spring vent in Kings Bay while removing Lyngbya on the last day of the year. Right at the end of one of the Hunters Springs canals, fresh clean water could be seen bubbling up through white sand where it had not been seen in years, according to Art Jones, pioneer of the project. Next to the sea wall more water could be seen gushing up where it had been uncovered in November. The canals and springs around Hunters Spring are slowly coming back to life again as ton after ton of thick benthic mats of lyngbya are removed, slowing the internal eutrophication going on in parts of Kings Bay and cleaning the water of pollutants, Jones said. With 2012 coming to a close, another 443 tons of noxious lyngbya algae have been removed since September, making a total of more than 548 tons taken out of Kings Bay since the project began in September 2011. Work has been going well, with cleanups taking place at Hunters Spring basin and canals, Indian River, Three Sisters Springs and canals, Ceder Cove, the northwest boat ramp, the Third Street Pier, Stoney Point, Palm Springs and other various sections of Crystal River and Kings Bay. In the second year of the project the Rotary is averaging more than 7,383 pounds per day of polluting Lyngbya removed from the waters of Kings Bay. With the help of mechanical methods added to help volunteer muscle in restoring water quality, quantity, clarity along with improving fish, manatee and human habitat, things are slowly improving. This year the Lyngbya harvester has also been used to harvest manatee food from Cooter Pond in Inverness to help feed the manatees in the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park. Natural native submerged vegetation is lacking in the Homosassa River because of invasive Lyngbya and manatees are hurting for food there also. The Kings Bay Rotary hopes to be taking the One Rake project to the Homosassa River some time in 2013 and is now looking for more sponsors. The next public cleanup will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Jan. 26, at Hunter Springs Park in Crystal River. College students and teachers who were here last year from Darton College in Georgia are coming back to kick-off the new year. For more information contact Art Jones at MrAWJones@aol.com or follow the project on Facebook at Save Kings Bay Watch One Rake at a Time on TV every Sunday at noon on WYKE cable 16 to learn more. To see the project in action search YouTube for SaveKingsBay. Special to the ChronicleLyngbya is removed from Kings Bay by the trailer-load on one of the last days of 2012.

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delay in the across-the-board cuts but negotiators had yet to agree on about $24 billion in savings from elsewhere in the budget. Democrats had asked for the cuts to be put off for one year and be offset by unspecified revenue. The president said that whatever last-minute fixes are necessary, they must come from a blend of tax revenue and constrained spending, not just budget cuts. And a little more than an hour after Obama spoke, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said it was time to decouple the two major issues. Well continue to work on smarter ways to cut spending, but lets not let that hold up protecting Americans from a tax hike that will take place in about ten hours, he said. Officials emphasized that negotiations were continuing and the emerging deal was not yet final. And a confident Obama, flanked by cheering middle class Americans in a White House auditorium, jabbed Congress, saying lawmakers were prone to last-minute delays. One thing we can count on with respect to this Congress is that if theres even one second left before you have to do what youre supposed to do, they will use that last second, he said. Speaking shortly afterward on the Senate floor, Sen. John McCain said that at a time of crisis, on New Years Eve...you had the president of the United States go over and have a cheerleading, ridiculing-ofRepublicans exercise. The Arizona Republican lost the 2008 presidential race to Obama. Unless an agreement is reached and approved by Congress at the start of the New Year, more than $500 billion in 2013 tax increases will take effect immediately and $109 billion in cuts will be carved from defense and domestic programs Citrus County Sheriffs OfficeBurglaries A residential burglary was reported at 3:29 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28, in the 2900 block of S. Coleman Ave., Homosassa. A commercial burglary was reported at 8:35 a.m. Dec. 28 in the 3100 block of N. Carl G. Rose Highway, Hernando. A residential burglary was reported at 10:26 a.m. Dec. 28 in the 600 block of Bay St., Inverness. A vehicle burglary was reported at 12:46 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 29, in the 3800 block of N. Nokomis Point, Crystal River. A commercial burglary was reported at 9:43 a.m. Dec. 29 in the 600 block of Whispering Pines Blvd., Inverness. A vehicle burglary was reported at 10:04 a.m. Dec. 29 in the 1800 block of S. Juneberry Lane, Inverness. A vehicle burglary was reported at 12:31 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 5400 block of S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. A residential burglary was reported at 1:25 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 6300 block of S. Hancock Road, Homosassa. A vehicle burglary was reported at 8:42 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30, in the 1500 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa.Thefts A grand theft was reported at 10:39 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28, in the 800 block of E. Hillsborough Court, Hernando. A grand theft was reported at 1:59 p.m. Dec. 28 at Beverly Hills Boulevard, Beverly Hills. A grand theft was reported at 4:46 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 5500 block of W. Irving Court, Homosassa. A larceny petit theft was reported at 4:56 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 1600 block of W. Redding St., Hernando. A petit theft was reported at 6:16 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 7600 block of W. Drover St., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 9:02 p.m. Dec. 28 in the 3900 block of S. Gemini Point, Homosassa. A petit theft was reported at 2:55 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 29, in the 700 block of S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto. A petit theft was reported at 2:02 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 2400 block of W. Dolphin Drive, Dunnellon. A petit theft was reported at 2:47 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to Lake Highway, Inverness. A grand theft was reported at 4:06 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 6300 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 5:18 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 2400 block of E. Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. A petit theft was reported at 5:21 p.m. Dec. 29 in the 3900 block of S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa. A grand theft was reported at 5:46 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30, in the 4700 block of E. Marsh Lake Drive, Hernando.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR 68 38 0.00 HI LO PR NA NA NA HI LO PR NA NA NA YESTERDAYS WEATHER Mostly sunny to partly sunny and warmer.THREE DAY OUTLOOK Increasing clouds with a 20% chance of rain by night. Mostly cloudy with a 50% chance of showers.High: 76 Low: 55 High: 77 Low: 54 High: 70 Low: 52TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Monday 73/39 Record 83/21 Normal 70/43 Mean temp. 56 Departure from mean +0 PRECIPITATION* Monday 0.00 in. Total for the month 3.00 in. Total for the year 62.01 in. Normal for the year 51.79 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 5 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Monday at 3 p.m. 30.24 in. DEW POINT Monday at 3 p.m. 52 HUMIDITY Monday at 3 p.m. 49% POLLEN COUNT** Trees and weeds were light and grasses were absent.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Monday was good with pollutants mainly particulates. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................5:44 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:24 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................9:52 P.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................9:56 A.M. JAN. 4JAN. 11JAN. 18JAN. 26 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 75 59 s Ft. Lauderdale 79 67 s Fort Myers 79 62 s Gainesville 73 55 s Homestead 78 62 s Jacksonville 71 54 s Key West 79 70 pc Lakeland 75 59 s Melbourne 77 60 s City H L Fcast Miami 79 65 s Ocala 74 56 s Orlando 77 58 s Pensacola 73 52 sh Sarasota 77 60 s Tallahassee 73 56 pc Tampa 74 63 s Vero Beach 76 58 s W. Palm Bch. 78 62 s FLORIDA TEMPERATURESSouth winds around 10 knots. Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will have a light chop. Mostly sunny today. Gulf water temperature59 LAKE LEVELSLocation Sun. Mon. Full Withlacoochee at Holder n/a n/a 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando n/a n/a 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness n/a n/a 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City n/a n/a 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 34 21 pc 29 11 Albuquerque 38 30 .03 pc 35 17 Asheville 51 24 r 45 35 Atlanta 52 30 r 54 42 Atlantic City 42 28 sh 45 28 Austin 61 46 .17 pc 58 33 Baltimore 40 27 sh 45 28 Billings 19 9 pc 29 12 Birmingham 49 34 r 53 40 Boise 23 13 pc 25 3 Boston 32 21 pc 35 16 Buffalo 34 25 sn 25 17 Burlington, VT 27 13 pc 16 2 Charleston, SC 60 26 pc 66 53 Charleston, WV 36 20 rs 37 23 Charlotte 53 26 r 48 40 Chicago 35 31 s 22 14 Cincinnati 36 19 pc 32 12 Cleveland 34 21 pc 29 19 Columbia, SC 57 26 r 57 44 Columbus, OH 34 19 .02 pc 31 12 Concord, N.H. 32 14 c 27 3 Dallas 44 39 .16 s 45 29 Denver 22 13 pc 26 1 Des Moines 33 19 pc 13 6 Detroit 34 17 pc 24 16 El Paso 48 38 s 47 25 Evansville, IN 36 30 .09 pc 33 15 Harrisburg 36 23 c 38 22 Hartford 35 16 pc 36 15 Houston 59 46 .01 r 59 42 Indianapolis 34 27 .02 pc 28 9 Jackson 55 33 r 58 39 Las Vegas 46 37 s 48 32 Little Rock 39 34 .01 pc 44 29 Los Angeles 54 41 s 65 46 Louisville 37 28 c 35 18 Memphis 48 36 r 46 27 Milwaukee 33 25 s 16 10 Minneapolis 18 8 pc 12 4 Mobile 57 35 ts 72 49 Montgomery 56 30 r 61 49 Nashville 42 27 r 44 27 New Orleans 57 42 ts 70 51 New York City 37 28 c 41 24 Norfolk 46 25 sh 47 37 Oklahoma City 38 34 .35 pc 33 21 Omaha 24 17 pc 21 7 Palm Springs 57 38 s 59 38 Philadelphia 37 30 c 43 30 Phoenix 50 41 pc 55 37 Pittsburgh 33 20 sn 29 14 Portland, ME 33 13 pc 29 5 Portland, Ore 35 30 s 41 30 Providence, R.I. 34 18 pc 36 16 Raleigh 50 25 sh 44 39 Rapid City 21 2 pc 29 19 Reno 20 11 pc 32 12 Rochester, NY 35 27 sn 26 17 Sacramento 46 31 s 53 31 St. Louis 39 34 .20 pc 26 14 St. Ste. Marie 31 23 .01 sn 19 7 Salt Lake City 24 12 .01 pc 26 11 San Antonio 59 50 .22 s 62 36 San Diego 53 41 s 62 44 San Francisco 49 37 s 52 37 Savannah 59 27 pc 66 54 Seattle 37 30 pc 42 28 Spokane 25 23 c 22 12 Syracuse 35 27 sn 26 15 Topeka 39 29 .02 pc 23 10 Washington 41 29 sh 44 30YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 80 McAllen, Texas LOW -21 Minot A.F.B., N.D. TUESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/75/pc Amsterdam 45/43/sh Athens 54/47/c Beijing 10/-3/s Berlin 43/36/sh Bermuda 66/66/pc Cairo 67/52/s Calgary 29/16/s Havana 81/67/pc Hong Kong 57/53/pc Jerusalem 60/45/s Lisbon 56/44/c London 45/36/pc Madrid 49/35/pc Mexico City 70/46/pc Montreal 17/10/pc Moscow 26/23/sf Paris 48/35/sh Rio 93/77/pc Rome 50/47/sh Sydney 74/67/sh Tokyo 45/33/s Toronto 26/21/c Warsaw 38/30/pc WORLD CITIES Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Monday Tuesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Tuesday WednesdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 7:18 a/3:30 a 8:27 p/3:53 p 8:02 a/4:11 a 9:01 p/4:28 p Crystal River** 5:39 a/12:52 a 6:48 p/1:15 p 6:23 a/1:33 a 7:22 p/1:50 p Withlacoochee* 3:26 a/11:03 a 4:35 p/11:21 p 4:10 a/11:38 a 5:09 p/ Homosassa*** 6:28 a/2:29 a 7:37 p/2:52 p 7:12 a/3:10 a 8:11 p/3:27 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 1/1 TUESDAY 9:15 2:33 9:39 1/2 WEDNESDAY 10:00 3:18 10:25 3:43FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY HI LO PR NA NA NA Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Today's active pollen: juniper, maple, oak Todays count: 7.4/12 Wednesdays count: 9.8 Thursdays count: 8.7 For theRECORDA4TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 Legal notices in todays Citrus County Chronicle 000DM1W Lien Notices . . . C12 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $36.65* 6 months: $64.63* 1 year: $116.07**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .14 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comMeadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness officeWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage ................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. CLIFFContinued from Page A1 meter so there is no way to monitor the actual withdrawal amounts. Water district officials said they had no choice but to issue the permit, which cost $50. City officials said they didnt learn of the permit until after the period to appeal had expired. City Manager Andy Houston said he didnt know at the time that his office could be alerted anytime someone requests a water-use permit from the water district. Had we been on that register previously, we could have voiced our concerns, Houston said. Were on that list now. Heatherwood Investments LLC of Crystal River and Mistletoe LLC of Ocala requested the permit. They intend to transport water from the site to Consolidated Water Group LLC in Ocala. So far, other than a test well, nothing has occurred on the property. Jackie Gorman, director of planning and development, said the company must submit a site plan that includes restroom facilities, landscaping, well location, expected daily truck traffic amounts and future uses for the property. She said the owners must bring the old lumber yard site up to current code. Any variance of the code will require council approval. Our land development code is one size fits all and sometimes it doesnt fit, Gorman said. If we are in disagreement, we go to the council with it. I dont foresee that happening. Gorman said she hopes the companys trucks will access 11th Street off Citrus Avenue rather than drive through the neighborhood. She also said the company hasnt given her a timeline for when it wants to start pumping water. They submitted their original conceptual site plan a month ago, Gorman said. They have not given me any sense of urgency on this.Contact Chronicle reporter Mike Wright at 352563-3228 or mwright@ chronicleonline.com. WELLContinued from Page A1 Associated PressPresident Barack Obama pauses Monday as he speaks about the fiscal cliff in the South Court Auditorium at the White House in Washington. 72 40 0.00

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infrastructure projects. The biggest issue that we must face is diversifying our economy, Meek said. Were going to make sure that we have investment in those diversified markets. Partnership with cities The BOCC will work with the cities of Inverness and Crystal River to develop partnerships to improve the county and the cities and strengthen those relationships. I have met with all the city council members from Crystal River and Inverness, telling them we are going to be looking for ways to partner with you all, Meeks said. Long-range plan In a comprehensive project including both cities, individuals, civic groups, businesses and professional organizations, such areas as tourism, economic development, land use planning, development standards, transportation planning and branding of the county are to be reviewed, similar to Pasco Countys strategic plan that changed and improved growth. We are going to look at some other communities and learn about the process that they went through, Meek said. We can look at our comprehensive plan and tie it in with economic development and transportation planning. Kings Bay The BOCC will work with the city of Crystal River, state government, private individuals and businesses to fund and execute a single project to improve the quality of the Crystal River and Kings Bay. It also could serve as a catalyst for a master plan to address septic pollution and water runoff issues. We allocated $225,000 from our water quality reserve account to the One Rake at a Time project, Meek said. We got unanimous approval from the city council to enter into a memorandum of understanding. Were going to take that MOU to (the Southwest Florida Water Management District) to apply for an out-of-cycle grant, which will be a matching fund of $225,000 to fund Lyngbya and sediment removal out of the bay. That project is moving forward right now.Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer can be reached at cvanormer@chronicle online.com or 352-564-2916. hardships, I remember the scripture verse, I take pleasure in my infirmities ... for when I am weak, then I am strong. Ive overcome a lot, Leeper says. She grew up feeling unloved. A house fire 10 years ago destroyed everything she owned. At one time she was homeless, living in her car, living in a shelter. Her mother tried to kill herself. Her stepfather, whom she adored, died. She gained 250 pounds. But through it all, she learned that she was, indeed, strong. I like to encourage people, Leeper says. I have determination. I tell people, Your past failures, you just have to get past them. Determination you have to keep at it. Leeper grew up in Leesburg. She worked in a daycare center she loves kids and then found a good job in a school cafeteria. In 2003, she lost everything in a house fire and ended up in a womens shelter for six months. I didnt know I could handle such a crisis, she says. At the shelter she was required to take drug and alcohol abuse classes, since most of the women there dealt with those issues, but that wasnt her issue. She felt out of place and prayed that something would fall into her lap. She was at a Wednesday night church service and a piece of paper fluttered through the air and landed on her lap. On it was information for a house to rent. I loved that place, she says. It had knotty pine ceilings I was there for four years until the rent went up and I couldnt stay there. She lived with her mother for a while, but that was difficult. When her mother tried to kill herself with an overdose of pills, she was involuntarily institutionalized for six months and lost her apartment. So, I was homeless again, and the shelter wouldnt take me, so I slept in my car for two months, she says. A friend took her in, but had her move out after a while. Then she found a church that let her sleep there. Eventually, she wound up in the hospital because of her hip until she came to Avante, the only facility that would take her. Through it all, her weight steadily climbed. Leeper says she tried to hide her stress and her worry, her feelings of being unloved and rejected, with eating. By the time she reached 400 pounds and the doctors told her she couldnt have hip surgery until she lost at least 150 pounds, she knew she needed to make some changes, and that it would take all the determination she had. She says the only food she has is the food that Avante serves to everyone, so she has taught herself to say no to the desserts and to watch her portions. At first, people would sneak me things to eat, but I realized I was only hurting myself, she says. Losing the first 100 pounds felt great. I started getting my self-esteem and confidence back. I havent weighed under 300 pounds in 10 years. Exercise is a challenge, but she does what she can. She walks with assistance and can do some exercises from her chair. She says she has a picture in her head of what she wants to look like. I always picture myself weighing 200, she says. I dream about wearing a nice slim outfit, a wrap-around dress with a V-neck, maybe purple or green. I dream about having a fireplace and a house, sitting there cozy with a hubby and a family. Since arriving at Avante, Leeper has served on the resident council. She facilitates a craft group and makes jewelry to sell to raise funds for resident outings. She talks to people, encourages them, tries to get them to see the good in their situation. She helps new people she mothers people, Bass says. We love Lisa. Shes really an inspiration to everyone here. Some days, Leeper feels discouraged. Losing 200 or 250 pounds is a daunting task, so she sets small goals 5 pounds this week, 10 pounds this month. And then theres her future hubby. Thats what keeps her motivated and moving forward, 1 pound at a time. Its what she wants more than anything. I told my mom that Gods going to give me a guy whos gentle and who will treat me like a queen, she says. She says he doesnt exist, but shes wrong.Chronicle reporter Nancy Kennedy can be reached at nkennedy@chronicle online.com or 352-564-2927.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 A5 CTA Audio INC. Gift Certificates Available We Will Make Your Car or Truck Feel Great This Holiday Season! 000D6ME With over 15 years experience 3231 E. Thomas St., Inverness (352) 341-4001 from Window Tint by Llumar Come In & Check Out Our Holiday Specials Custom Truck Accessories from: Roll-N-Lock Westin Raptor Custom Wheels from: American Racing KMC Moto Metal ATX & Many Others Stereos & Speakers from: Pioneer Kenwood JVC Memphis Speakers $10 OFF Whole car or truck WINDOW TINT with coupon. Expires 2/5/13 000DLQN Blackshears II Aluminum HWY. 44, CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9722 1-888-474-2269 (TOLL FREE) www.blackshears.com Licensed & Insured RR 0042388 Years As Your Hometown Dealer RESCREEN GARAGE SCREENS NEW SCREEN ROOMS GLASS ROOM CONVERSIONS Wishing You A Happy & Prosperous New Year! 406 NE 1st., Crystal River info@citruspest.com 352-563-6698 866-860-BUGS 000D0WR CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR INSPECTION RODENT PROTECTION CITRUS PEST MANAGEMENT INC. OFFERS IS YOUR HOME RODENT PROOFED? COLD WEATHER IS HERE! www.CitrusPest.com 2012 2012 2012 2012 A+ RATING Did you know 1 female can produce 6-8 litters with 4-12 pups in each litter per year? Rats gnawing pose a serious threat to electrical wires, which could start a fire in your house! HAPPY NEW YEAR! 000DM7C 1/2 mi. South of the Fairgrounds D UDLEY S A UCTION D UDLEY S A UCTION D UDLEY S A UCTION 4000 S. F LORIDA A VE ., (U.S. 41 S) I NVERNESS F LORIDA 34450 Dudleys Auction & Maine-ly Real Estate Central Floridas Largest & Most Diverse Auction Company BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE FOR UP-TO-DATE PHOTOS www.dudleysauction.com ab1667 au2246 Absentee and phone bids always accepted 352-637-9588 Personal Property sold together w/Dudleys Auction AB1667. The Real Estate by Main-ly Real Estate-C hristine Dudley Lic RE Br oker #381384. AU#4239. Dudleys Auction For real estate inquires contact Chris @ 352-344-9588, Bob Brittain @ 813-317-8007. 12% Buyers Premi um w/2% discount cash or check. Dimensions are approximate. JANUARY 3, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE ENTIRE DUDLEYS AUCTION FAMILY WALK ABOUT AUCTION While the hall is being prepared with the Antique Auction, we set up outside and in with rows of treasures from small to large. ANTIQUE & COLLECTIBLE AUCTION Incredibly diverse collection of Furniture, Estate Jewelry, Hitchcock Dining Set, selection of primitives, coins, Lg cased Ships mode ls, Carpets, Sterling, art, china, crystal, HUGE VARIETY OF QUALITY ITEMS check website as we get closer to the s ale. JANUARY 10, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION Session #1 outside w/rows of fun & outside furnishings, Session #2 (approx 6pm) inside ~ Always a great variety of items from several estates, ranging from Furniture, household, tools, new items & collectibles. STORAGE UNIT AUCTION Inverness Mini Storage-1925 W. Main St, Inverness, FL 34452. Lien Auction of Several Units. Storage unit lien sale. Locks will be cut starting at 10am & 5 mins before each unit sells. Who knows what will be in there?! JANUARY 15, 2013 AUCTION 10AM ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION Session #1 outside w/rows of fun & outside furnishings, Session #2 (approx 6pm) inside ~ Always a great variety of items from several estates, ranging from furniture, household, tools, new items & collectibles. JANUARY 17, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM LIVE & ONLINE SPORTS & AUTOGRAPHS AUCTION THE STALKERS Sports Memorabilia & signed celebrity items. Features everything from mini helmets, posters, books, jerseys bats & balls to loads of autographed photos, records, and pictures. We will be cleaning out the remainder of Rick The Sta lker Suarez items and have added items from a few other estates. This will be a fun auction with items from sports greats from baseball, golf to football to entertainers. We have been saving some of the best pieces for this sale (Jimi Hendrix Ex perience signed album!) as well as additional stock lot boxes sold to the auction attendees in the audience only JANUARY 19, 2013 PREVIEW 9AM AUCTION 11AM ESTATE ADVENTURE AUCTION Session #1 outside w/rows of fun & outside furnishings, Session #2 (approx 6pm) inside ~ Always a great variety of items from several estates, ranging from Furniture, household, tools, new items & collectibles. JANUARY 24, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM COMPLETE ANTIQUE STORE LIQUIDATION Florida Porch Antiques-700 block Main St., Leesburg. After 35 years in the trade, Rex Masterman has decided to retire. Contents of this quality Store (in its present location for the past three years) plus the contents of his Renningers Antique Market permanent boot h, stored items from the warehouse and quality furnishings from his personal home will be offered at this auction. Location s ite is the old JC Penny building next door to his historic Downtown Leesburg location. This will be a complete liquidation t o include fine antique furniture, crystal, china, art, decor and more, as well as brass showcases, display items and select contemporary furniture. Rex was the founder of the annual Victorian show in Dallas Texas. The sale will include historic Lak e County memorabilia. More details and photos will emerge as auction time near. Check out limited pics we have on website now. JANUARY 26, 2013 PREVIEW 9AM AUCTION 10AM REAL ESTATE RESTAURANT AUCTION Hwy 19. Restaurant property to be sold at public auction!! Owner retires, must be sold 4135 S. Suncoast Blvd. (US 19) Homosassa, Florida. Directly across from Ellie Shiller Homosassa Springs State Park, 200 +/seat restaurant, parking for 65+/cars, separate party room for 50+/-, parking lot ice machine collects $700.00 month, county sewer and water, new roof, newer A/Cs, newer fire suppression system s, 7198 total sq. ft., 400 amp electric service, natural gas and propane ready, new windows, large kitchen, walk in cooler & freezer, tastefully decorated, tile floors, newer booths, tables & chairs, separate bar area with rear entrance, most ki tchen equipment in place including dbl deck pizza ovens, 60 gas stove, several sandwich prep units, SS tables, sinks, deep fryers, Alto Sham, butcher table, meat slicer, dough mixer, cook, hold unit and more!! Location traffic count 29,000 per day (Florida DOT). Opportunities abound whether expanding or moving up to larger location. Building would also be suitable for franchise or chain location. Assessed value $505,048, taxes 2012 $8,406.31. JANUARY 28, 2013 PREVIEW 9AM AUCTION 10AM JANUARY 31, 2013 PREVIEW 12PM AUCTION 3PM LIVE & ONLINE COIN AUCTION GREAT INVESTMENT Opportunity COINS-GOLD & MORE Featuring Estate Coins from gold to large groupings of Morgan & Peace Silver dollars (including key dates). Th ere will be close to a dozen gold pieces including PCGS70 graded gold coins, Silver dimes, quarters & half dollars, Foreign commemoratives, Proof & Mint sets. Some uncirculated & many graded. Over 200 lots. Additional consignments arriving. Quali ty consignments of silver & gold coins now being accepted for this important sale. Please call Rob or Robert at 637-958 8 to discuss details JANUARY 25, 2013 PREVIEW 4PM AUCTION 6PM JANUARY 6, 2013 PREVIEW 10AM AUCTION 1PM JANUARY 6, 2013 PREVIEW 10AM AUCTION 1PM JANUARY 6, 2013 PREVIEW 10AM AUCTION 1PM WALK-ABOUT AUCTION While the hall is being prepared with the Antique Auction, we set up outside and in with rows of treasures from small to large. HEALTHYContinued from Page A1 COMMISSIONERContinued from Page A1 We can look at our comprehensive plan and tie it in with economic development and transportation planning.Joe Meekcommission chairman. Losing the first 100 pounds felt great. I started getting my self-esteem and confidence back. I havent weighed under 300 pounds in 10 years. Lisa Leeperworking to lose up to 250 pounds. WATERING FINES Effective Jan. 1, 2012, Citrus County stopped issuing warnings for first offenders of local watering rules. The county is issuing citations that carry with them a fine of $100. Second violations cost $250, third or more cost $500. Find watering rules in the weather map on Page A4 daily.

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Evelyn Arnett, 90CLERMONTEvelyn Arnett, 90, of Clermont, Fla., passed away Dec. 30, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Memphis, Tenn. Marguerite Barry, 86BEVERLY HILLSMarguerite Ann Barry, 86, of Beverly Hills, Fla., passed away Dec. 27, 2012. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Donald Brownlee, 86INVERNESSDonald N Brownlee, 86, of Inverness, Fla.,passed awayDec. 25, 2012 at Hospice of Citrus County inLecanto. Arrangements by McGan Cremation Service LLC, Hernando.Joaquin Cardona, 96LECANTOJoaquin Cardona (19162012) was a resident of Brentwood Nursing Community in Lecanto. Born in Santiago de Cuba, July 1916, he became a citizen of the USA in 1969, and was proud to be an American. Joaquin travelled the world as a merchant marine, passing a test to work in the engine room, studying from a book and not knowing the English language. He also worked for United Airlines; he was an entrepreneur, founding three businesses in his lifetime. Later in life he drove a taxi in Dade County and at age 85 worked as a supply manager of an insurance company. Joaquin, a generous man, loved the ladies and loved to dance. He found Jesus and soon thereafter became a Deacon at Northside Spanish Baptist Church, Dade County, where he also ministered as church bus driver, church treasurer and member of the church choir for many years. Joaquin died peacefully due to complications of pneumonia Dec. 29, 2012 at 7:35 p.m., with his daughter and granddaughter Alma, at his bedside. Joaquin is survived by his daughter, Alma, of Homosassa; son, Jimmy, of Kissimmee, granddaughters, Alma, Adria, Teresa, of Citrus County, Tanya of Homestead; grandson, Reynold, Los Angeles, Calif.; eight great-grandchildren; two step-grandchildren and one great-greatgranddaughter; also a niece and a number of nephews in South Florida. He was preceded in death by his mother, wife and two younger sisters. A memorial service will be conducted at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 05, 2012 at the Strickland Funeral Home Chapel in Crystal River. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Robert Davis, 84INVERNESSThe Service of Remembrance for Mr. Robert F. Davis, age 84, of Inverness, Florida, will be held 2:00 PM, Wednesday, January 2, 2013 at the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes with Pastor Gordon Condit officiating. Interment will follow at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Florida. The family will receive friends from 1:00 PM until the time of service, Wednesday at the chapel. In lieu of flowers donations to Hospice of Citrus County or The Path of Citrus County would be appreciated. On December 30, 2012 Bob lost his battle with lung cancer. Born May 18, 1928, he was the son of Felix and Astrid (Nelson) Davis in Lynn, MA. Bob graduated Lynn English H.S., promptly enlisted in the Army at the age of 17 and was sent off to Japan to serve. Returning home he earned his BA from Upsala College, East Orange, NJ where forever after he gladly announced their football games and became an avid alumnus. Bob sang his way through Upsala as a member of their renowned choir, as well as of their other singing groups. Hired by Dunhill Personnel in NYC as a recruiter and the 4th person onboard, he then embarked on a lifelong career with them as VP of Franchising, taking them in 26 years from that original office to 375 offices. Twenty two years ago Bob headed south with his new wife, Jackie, to settle in Citrus County. Deciding that this next phase of his life would be as a Realtor he got his license before leaving NY and 2 years later, convinced Jackie to do the same. He enjoyed a flourishing career with ERA American in Inverness. Bobs passions have included golf, the Red Sox, many other sports, following drum and bugle corps, cruising to play Black Jack and again, the Red Sox. His interests and attention have included the Central Florida Symphony of past, CFCCs Performing Arts Program, mentoring 4th grade math, serving several times each on two HOA boards, and in whatever capacity the Realtors Assoc. of Citrus County needed him. Bob is survived by his wife, Jacqueline (Weinstein), his sons Todd Davis (Michelle), Keith Davis (Kathy), step daughter Juliet Smith and step son Evan Smith (Jennifer). His pride in his children, 4 grandchildren and 4 step grandchildren abounded. His sister Dorthea (DiLisio) predeceased him. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.comWilliam Bill Denny, 82HERNANDOWilliam Bill Earl Denny, 82, Hernando, died Dec. 29, 2012 at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Bill was born April 1, 1930 in Shelton, Conn., to the late Earl and Ethel (Bourne) Denny. He served our country proudly in the U.S. Navy during the Korean conflict. A loving family man, he enjoyed his children and grandchildren. He liked being on the water and was a tinkerer, building and fixing things in his home. He married Marion Bozcan in 1954 and for their 50th wedding anniversary, they enjoyed a vacation with their family at the Outer Banks; a beautiful memory for all of them. Bill was a veteran firefighter for the Old Saybrook, Conn., Volunteer Fire Department. He spent his working career as an engineering supervisor for Electric Boat Company, a division of General Dynamics, manufacturing submarines with more than 30 years of service. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 58 years, Marion; sons, William Denny Jr. (Nancy), Moodus, Conn., Matthew F. Denny (Sheree), Cary, N.C.; daughters, Amanda Denny Tuthill (Michael) Middlefield, Conn., Sharon LaCroix (Paul) Wheaton, Ill., Abigail Ciaglo (Matthew) Colchester, Conn.; sister, Shirley Wells, Massachusetts; 13 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by three brothers and three sisters. A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at 12:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 7, 2013 at St. Scholastica Catholic Church. Inurnment will follow at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell with military honors. The family will receive friends in visitation at the Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home from 10 to 11 a.m., prior to the Mass. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in his memory to Hospice of Citrus County, P.O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Thomas Finn, 68OCALAThomas Finn, 68, of Ocala, Fla., passed away Dec. 28, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in St. Paul, Minn. William De La Cruz, 88HERNANDOWilliam De La Cruz, 88, of Hernando, Fla., passed away Saturday, Dec. 29, 2012 at Hospice House in Lecanto. A native of Denver, Colo., he was born Sept. 19, 1924 to Juan and Cleotilda (Martinez) De La Cruz, one of nine children. He was raised in Cheyenne, Wyo., and his family then moved to California. Mr. De La Cruz was a quality assurance analyst in the aerospace industry, most recently with Rockwell International, a position from which he retired. He also held positions with Hughes Aircraft and Ford Aerospace during his career and also served his country for more than 20 years in the U.S. Navy. Bill, as he was known by many, moved to Citrus County in 1979 from Ferrisburg, Vt., and was a parishioner of Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, Beverly Hills. He is survived by his wife of nearly 38 years, Barbara A. (Gumm) De La Cruz, Hernando; seven children, Judith Ann Williams (David), Rio Rancho, N.M.; Katherine Mary Kincer (Larry), Marietta, Ga.; Rich De La Cruz (Becky), Silver Lake, Wis.; Lawrence Bennett (Susan), Miami; William Francis De La Cruz (Lora), Boulder, Colo.; Kathy Ann Williams (Kenneth), Mission Vallejo, Calif., and Howard William Bennett (Emma), Miami; siblings, Stella Daggy and Joe and John De La Cruz, all of California; 14 grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren. In addition to his parents, Bill was preceded in death by a daughter, Lee Ann De La Cruz, in 1971 and siblings, Frank, Salvatore, Jimmy, Beatrice and Diana as well as a grandson, Robert. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9 a.m. Thursday, Jan, 3, 2013 from Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, Beverly Hills. Interment will follow at Fero Memorial Gardens with military honors rendered by the U.S. Navy. Friends will be received Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2012 from 6 to 8 p.m., at Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family wishes memorial contributions be made to Hospice of Citrus County, P .O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464, www.fero funeralhome.com. Tammy Eskridge, 40HERNANDOTammy Eskridge, 40, of Hernando, Fla., died Dec. 15, 2012 at her home. A memorial service will be 10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 2013 at Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Lyle Gamroth, 59INVERNESSLyle Gamroth, 59, of Inverness, Fla., passed away Dec. 29, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto. Lucy Iafe, 93INVERNESSLucy Genevieve Iafe, 93, of Inverness, Fla., died Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012 in Inverness. Services for Mrs. Iafe will be in New York at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Home & Crematory. Daniel Kuhfahl, 48PITTSBORO, N.C.Daniel E. Kuhfahl 48, of Pittsboro, N.C., died Dec. 28, 2012. He was born Dec. 23, 1964 in Tampa, Fla., the son of Edward and Elaine Kuhfahl. Danny was a U.S. Navy veteran serving from 1983 to 1988. He was a technician for Citrus Pest Management in Crystal River before moving to Pittsboro, N.C., in 2010. As an organ donor, Daniel was giving in death as in life. Survivors include his daughter, Amber Kuhfahl of Crystal River and his mother, Elaine Kuhfahl of Pittsboro, N.C. A memorial service for Daniel will be 12 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 2012 at the Heinz Funeral Home in Inverness. The Reverend Alan Jefferson will preside. Interment will follow with military honors at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to a charity of your choice. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Sign the guest book at www.chronicleonline.com.Wilma Newton, 96MT. DORAWilma Newton, 96, of Mt. Dora, Fla., died Dec. 29, 2012. Local arrangements are under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Crematory in Lecanto, with services taking place at a later date in Flint, Mich. Sandra Lux, 72INVERNESSSandra Ann Lux, age 72 of Inverness, Florida, died Saturday, December 29, 2012 in Lecanto, FL. She was born June 24, 1940 in Scranton, PA, daughter of William and Mary (Barron) Roman. She worked as a School Bus Driver. Her hobbies included Stained Glass making, collecting Angels, knitting and crocheting, participating in league bowling and just hanging out with friends. Mrs. Lux was preceded in death by her parents and is survived by her husband, George Lux of Inverness, FL, son, Brian Lux of Alloway, NJ, brother, Joseph Roman of CA, 3 grandchildren, Logan, Kylee and Matthew. Friends who wish may send memorial donations to Hospice of Citrus County P .O. Box 641270 Beverly Hills, FL 34464. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.HooperFuneralHome.com. Arrangements by the Inverness Chapel of Hooper Funeral Homes & Crematory. David Mester, 56LECANTODavid Allen Mester, 56, of Lecanto, passed away Dec. 29, 2012 at Hospice House in Lecanto. A native of Rochester, Pa., he was born May 30, 1956 to Louis J. and Grace I. (Bragg) Mester, one of three children. Mr. Mester was a steelworker in his native Pennsylvania before moving to Citrus County in 1985. He was most recently employed as a dispatcher with Cemex, Inc. David is survived by his wife of 26 years, Priscilla Mester of Homosassa; sons, David Mester Jr., Monaca, Pa.; Cory Mester, Lecanto; daughter, Anne Marie Wingrove (Tom), Freedom, Pa.; son, Wesley South, Beverly Hills; daughter, Jennifer Winburn, Homosassa; sister, Sarah Smith, Middleburg, W.Va.; grandchildren, Alexia, Brian, Tommy, Kylee, Jimmy, Stephen, Stephanie and Ryan. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a grandchild, Austin South and a brother, Robert. www.wilderfuneral.com. Rodney Schafer, 60Rodney C. Schafer, 60, died Dec. 27, 2012. Arrangements by Downing Funeral Home, Spring Hill, Fla.A6TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE INVERNESS BEVERLY HILLS HOMOSASSA 000DKWF Visit us at www.HooperFuneralHome.com (352) 726-2271 1-888-7HOOPER (1-888-746-6737) 501 W. Main Street, Inverness 000DH1T Serving Our Community... Meeting Your Needs! Richard T. Brown Licensed Funeral Director Fax: 352-795-6694 5430 West Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 352-795-0111 brownfh@tampabay.rr.com / www.brownfuneralhome.com 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! B LIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000DKSN 000DH1R CARPET TILE WOOD VINYL LAMINATE SERVING CITRUS COUNTY SINCE 1975 527-1811 FREE ESTIMATES 44 W. G ulf To Lake Hwy., L ecanto ( next to landfill ) CCC #2837 Mohawk 60 Day Satisfaction Guarantee on Carpet Hours: Mon. Fri. 8-5pm Sat. 9-1pm Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. 000DHBZ To Place Your In Memory ad, Saralynne Miller at 564-2917 scmiller@chronicleonline.com 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000c2nv Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace 000DGKD Funeral Home With Crematory Chas. E. Davis Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 MORGAN TYNES Private Arrangements EDWARD FOX Private Arrangements WILLIAM BARKER Private Arrangements ROBERT CARGELL Private Arrangements HERMAN ROESCH Gathering: Sat., Jan. 12 10:00 AM MAURICE MCDANIEL Service: Jan. 11 4:00 PM HELEN MASOERO Mass: Great Barrington, MA WILLIAM DENNY Arrangements Pending FERO FERO Memorial Gardens & Memorial Gardens & Funeral Home Funeral Home 000DM6S Beverly Hills Beverly Hills 352 746-4646 352 746-4646 www.dignitymemorial.com S ERVING F AMILIES FOR S ERVING F AMILIES FOR 37 YEARS WITH 37 YEARS WITH D IGNITY & R ESPECT D IGNITY & R ESPECT Obituaries CRYSTAL RIVER INVERNESS 352-795-5700 GARDNERAUDIOLOGY.COM 000DL6Y what? HEAR WHAT YOUVE BEEN MISSING. Joaquin Cardona Robert Davis OBITUARIES Phone 352-563-5660. William Denny William De La Cruz OBITUARIES Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. David Mester See DEATHS / Page A7

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Associated PressWINTER GARDEN Floridas tomato and strawberry growers said theyre fighting to keep up with a rising tide of cheaper produce imports from Mexico. Mexican strawberry imports jumped 142 percent from 2008 to 2011, according to the most recent statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In the first three quarters of this year, they soared 50 percent compared to the same period in 2011. Mexican imports will likely rise less steeply in the fourth quarter because farmers in both countries faced many of the same unfavorable growing conditions, said Ted Campbell, executive director of the Florida Strawberry Growers Association in Dover, the industrys trade group. But that doesnt mean the Mexican market threat has subsided, Campbell toldThe Ledger.Theyre not going away. Theyre going to continue to grow, Campbell said. You cant ignore whats going on. Mexican tomato imports also have risen significantly, up 43.7 percent from 2008 through 2011 and another 5.6 percent in the first three quarters of 2012 compared with 2011, USDA figures show. Those numbers reflect Mexican imports of round tomatoes grown in open fields and in hothouses, or covered areas such as a greenhouse. Those varieties most directly compete with Florida round tomatoes, the dominant variety grown here. Mexican hothouse tomatoes, which account for about 75 percent of total imports, pose the bigger threat, federal data shows. Theyve risen 74 percent from 2008 through 2011. In the last five to six years, Mexico has converted from a field culture to a hothouse culture, said John VanSickle, an agricultural economist at the University of Florida in Gainesville who specializes in international trade issues, including tomatoes and strawberries. That trend will continue, he said. Among the factors fueling the transition are better prices and lower production costs, including pesticides, which appeals to U.S. consumers concerned about chemical residues on produce.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 A7 WWW.JOESCARPET.COM F AMILY O WNED S ERVING C ITRUS C OUNTY S INCE 1970 YOUR TOTAL FLOORING STORE 000DHGF 17 Years! INVERNESS 726-4465 138 N. Fla. Ave., US 41 CRYSTAL RIVER 795-9605 6633 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy. Happy New Year! from 000D8AP Mon., Tues., Thus. & Fri. 8 am 5 pm Wed. & Sat. 8 am Noon, reopen 5 pm Sun. & Holidays 8 am 5 pm (Pick up and drop off only) Where your pet is #1 Grooming & Kennel 2011 2011 2011 2011 Seasons Greetings Serving Citrus County for 25 years 5625 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Crystal River 352-795-1684 Deshedding Skin & Ear Infections 24 Hr Full Care Boarding Dental Care State of the Art Grooming All Natural Pet Foods NAIL TRIM $ 4 00 Reg. $5.00 w/coupon Call for other holiday specials Angela & Staff Treat Your Pets Best! 000DLQC State Certified CAC010415 352-795-2665 BayAreaCool.com AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING 2012 2012 2012 2012 from As we start the new year, we want to thank our customers for their continuing business. We know there are many choices and we are grateful that you have chosen us to serve your air conditioning and heating needs. We will always treat you like family and give you the best service in town. Happy New Year to You and Yours Elmetta June Thomason, 94INVERNESSElmetta June Thomason, 94, of Inverness, Fla., died Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012 at Hospice of Citrus County in Lecanto. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Roger Yates, 50BROOKSVILLERoger Yates, 50, of Brooksville, Fla., passed away Dec. 30, 2012. Private cremation will take place under the direction of Brown Funeral Home & Cematory in Lecanto. Ben Overton, 86FORMER FLA. SUPREME COURT JUSTICETALLAHASSEE Former Florida Supreme Court Justice Ben F. Overton, the first justice appointed by the governor after the switch in the 1970s from elected justices, has died from complications of heart surgery, a spokesman for the court said. Overton, who retired in 1999, was 86. On the court for more than two decades, his legacy includes letting cameras into Florida courtrooms. Overton, who died Saturday in Gainesville, was appointed in March of 1974 by Gov. Reubin Askew, authored more than 1400 decisions and was chief justice from 1976 to 1978. Justice Overton was one of the most influential members of the Court after the sweeping reforms of the 1970s, said Chief Justice Ricky Polston. He will be remembered not only for his far-seeing opinions but also for his efforts in the 1970s to make the state courts more accessible by allowing cameras into our courtrooms. After several justices who had been elected and had to raise campaign cash were charged with ethics violations in the early and mid1970s, Askew overhauled the system, creating the merit retention system in which the governor appoints justices based on a list from a nominating committee. Overton was Askews first appointment to the revamped court. Justices still faced contested re-elections after appointment until Florida voters further amended the constitution in 1976 to create the current merit retention system. Overton was an advocate for that system, under which justices names go on the ballot at the end of their term for voters to decide whether to retain them, rather than have them running against opponents. It is still in place. In addition to making Florida one of the first states to allow television of court cases, he also pushed for the courts creation of a website, one of the first state high courts to do so. He also pushed for the televised recording of every Supreme Court oral argument. DEATHSContinued from Page A6 Death ELSEWHERE From wire reports Associated PressSheila Tabone, left, has her dogs dressed as impostor wiener dogs Monday while participating in the Key West Dachshund Walk Monday. The event is an annual New Years Eve tradition that this year attracted almost 200 of the short-legged, long-bodied canines, as well as about 30 impostor dogs. Walking the dogs Mexican tomatoes, strawberries have Florida growers concerned Guy Lombardos legacy kept alive Relatives have bandleaders memorabiliaMARYWOZNIAK The News-PressFORT MYERS The history of New Years Eve resides in southwest Florida, where descendants of the late, great bandleader Guy Lombardo try to keep his legacy alive with a treasure trove of memories and memorabilia. Two nieces and a nephew of Lombardo proudly display historical items from Lombardos heyday in their homes in Fort Myers and Sanibel, but much more languishes in two storage units in south Fort Myers. The relatives have offered the overflow to three colleges, but there have been no takers. They would like to see the memorabilia on loan to a place that would archive and display it to the public. Nobody wants it, said niece Gina Lombardo, 52, of Fort Myers. Before there was Dick Clarks New Years Rockin Eve, there was Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians. The orchestra brought in the New Year for millions nationally and internationally for nearly half a century, from the 1929 stock market crash that signaled the start of the Great Depression to Americas 1976 bicentennial. They became an institution, synonymous with the ball drop in Times Square. The popularity of their live performances, first on radio and later on TV, earned Lombardo the nickname Mr. New Years Eve. The band was a partnership between four brothers, Guy, Carmen, Victor and Lebert Lombardo. Carmen was the songwriter, penning many of their hits. He also created the orchestra arrangements and sang. Lebert played trumpet. The New Years Eve tradition was stopped only by the death of Guy Lombardo in 1977 at 75. The legacy of the band, its memorabilia and rights to the orchestra, passed from brother to brother, ending with the death of Lebert in Sanibel in 1993. Now they belong to Leberts children: Elizabeth, 57; Carmen, 50; and Gina. None of the children are involved in the music business. The items displayed in their homes include photographs, record albums, sheet music, awards, and even the bands framed first paycheck from 1918, for $35.70. Even more items have sat in storage for about 40 years, first placed there by Lebert, Gina said. They include at least 100 envelopes stuffed with original band orchestrations hand-written by Carmen; at least 40 boxes of reels of 35 mm tapes, plus many loose, large reels of 16mm tapes of the bands 1950s TV show. The siblings offered it to the Berklee College of Music in Boston and two other colleges but were told there wasnt room, she said. So Gina, her son, James, and Liz make a pilgrimage to the storage units on Sundays, putting the deteriorating tapes, smelling of vinegar, in archival envelopes and reboxing them. They dont know what to do with the orchestrations, many of them yellowing. Anyone younger than the baby boomer generation probably has no knowledge of Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians. But those aged 50-plus remember the crooning singers and big band orchestrations that became known as the sweetest music this side of heaven.

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Associated PressMOPTI, Mali Deep inside caves, in remote desert bases, in the escarpments and cliff faces of northern Mali, Islamic fighters are burrowing into the earth, erecting a formidable set of defenses to protect what has essentially become alQaidas new country. They have used the bulldozers, earth movers and Caterpillar machines left behind by fleeing construction crews to dig what residents and local officials describe as an elaborate network of tunnels, trenches, shafts and ramparts. In just one case, inside a cave large enough to drive trucks into, they have stored up to 100 drums of gasoline, guaranteeing their fuel supply in the face of a foreign intervention, according to experts. Northern Mali is now the biggest territory held by alQaida and its allies. And as the world hesitates, delaying a military intervention, the extremists who seized control of the area earlier this year are preparing for a war they boast will be worse than the decade-old struggle in Afghanistan. Al-Qaida never owned Afghanistan, said former United Nations diplomat Robert Fowler, a Canadian kidnapped and held for 130 days by al-Qaidas local chapter, whose fighters now control the main cities in the north. They do own northern Mali. Al-Qaidas affiliate in Africa has been a shadowy presence for years in the forests and deserts of Mali, a country hobbled by poverty and a relentless cycle of hunger. In recent months, the terror syndicate and its allies have taken advantage of political instability within the country to push out of their hiding place and into the towns, taking over an enormous territory which they are using to stock arms, train forces and prepare for global jihad. The catalyst for the Islamic fighters was a military coup nine months ago that transformed Mali from a once-stable nation to the failed state it is today. On March 21, disgruntled soldiers invaded the presidential palace. The fall of the nations democratically elected government at the hands of junior officers destroyed the militarys command-and-control structure, creating the vacuum which allowed a mix of rebel groups to move in. With no clear instructions from their higher-ups, the humiliated soldiers left to defend those towns tore off their uniforms, piled into trucks and beat a retreat as far as Mopti, roughly in the center of Mali. They abandoned everything north of this town to the advancing rebels, handing them an area that stretches over more than 240,000 square miles. Its a territory larger than Texas or France and its almost exactly the size of Afghanistan. Turbaned fighters now control all the major towns in the north, carrying out amputations in public squares like the Taliban did. Just as in Afghanistan, they are flogging women for not covering up. Since taking control of Timbuktu, they have destroyed seven of the 16 mausoleums listed as world heritage sites. The area under their rule is mostly desert and sparsely populated, but analysts say that due to its size and the hostile nature of the terrain, rooting out the extremists here could prove even more difficult than it did in Afghanistan. Malis former president has acknowledged, diplomatic cables show, that the country cannot patrol a frontier twice the length of the border between the United States and Mexico. Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, known as AQIM, operates not just in Mali, but in a corridor along much of the northern Sahel. This 4,300-mile-long ribbon of land runs across the widest part of Africa, and includes sections of Mauritania, Niger, Algeria, Libya, Burkina Faso and Chad. One could come up with a conceivable containment strategy for the Swat Valley, said Africa expert Peter Pham, an adviser to the U.S. militarys African command center, referring to the region of Pakistan where the Pakistan Taliban have been based. Theres no containment strategy for the Sahel, which runs from the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea. Earlier this year, the 15 nations in West Africa, including Mali, agreed on a proposal for the military to take back the north, and sought backing from the United Nations. Earlier this month, the Security Council authorized the intervention but imposed certain conditions, including training Malis military, which is accused of serious human rights abuses since the coup. Diplomats say the intervention will likely not happen before September 2013. In the meantime, the Islamists are getting ready, according to elected officials and residents in Kidal, Timbuktu and Gao, including a day laborer hired by alQaidas local chapter to clear rocks and debris for one of their defenses. They spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear for their safety at the hands of the Islamists, who have previously accused those who speak to reporters of espionage. The al-Qaida affiliate, which became part of the terror network in 2006, is one of three Islamist groups in northern Mali. The others are the Movement for the Unity and Jihad in West Africa, or MUJAO, based in Gao, and Ansar Dine, based in Kidal. Analysts agree that there is considerable overlap between the groups, and that all three can be considered sympathizers, even extensions, of al-Qaida. The Islamic fighters have stolen equipment from construction companies, including more than $11 million worth from a French company called SOGEASATOM, according to Elie Arama, who works with the European Development Fund. The company had been contracted to build a European Union-financed highway in the north between Timbuktu and the village of Goma Coura. An employee of SOGEASATOM in Bamako declined to comment. The official from Kidal said his constituents have reported seeing Islamic fighters with construction equipment riding in convoys behind 4-by-4 trucks draped with their signature black flag. His contacts among the fighters, including friends from secondary school, have told him they have created two bases, around 120 and 180 miles north of Kidal, in the austere, rocky desert. The first base is occupied by al-Qaidas local fighters in the hills of Teghergharte, a region the official compared to Afghanistans Tora Bora. The Islamists have dug tunnels, made roads, theyve brought in generators, and solar panels in order to have electricity, he said. They live inside the rocks. Still further north, near Boghassa, is the second base, created by fighters from Ansar Dine. They too have used seized explosives, bulldozers and sledgehammers to make passages in the hills, he said. In addition to creating defenses, the fighters are amassing supplies, experts said. A local who was taken by Islamists into a cave in the region of Kidal described an enormous room, where several cars were parked. Along the walls, he counted up to 100 barrels of gasoline, according to the mans testimony to New York-based Human Rights Watch. In Timbuktu, the fighters are becoming more entrenched with each passing day, warned Mayor Ousmane Halle. Earlier in the year, he said, the Islamists left his city in a hurry after France called for an imminent military intervention. They returned when the U.N. released a report arguing for a more cautious approach.WORLDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 A9 000D85V David R. Best Attorney at Law Over 35 years practicing in Citrus County 800-282-Best (2378) www.BestLawFirmFlorida.com Personal Injury Medical Malpractice Sex Abuse Cases Disability Cases Areas of Practice: 7655 W. Gulf to Lake Hwy., Suite 13 Crystal River, FL 34429 000D85V 7449 W. Gulf to Lake Crystal River, FL 000D5HU Stop In And See Us For The BIG NEW YEARS SALE! FREE in home shopping FREE design work VISIT OUR SHOWROOM GET YOUR BEST WRITTEN QUOTE AND THEN COME SEE US! 352-302-2865 www.dreamkitchensandbaths.com Kitchen & Baths Closet Systems Entertainment Centers Granite & Solid Surface Counter Tops Custom cabinets by Wellborn Forest & Showplace Wood YOUR KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING SPECIALISTS! May Peace and Joy Be Yours In The Coming New Year! 000D3VK of the Nature Coast, Inc. BRENDA L. BUTA (owner) 352-563-2727 A1Titlenc@yahoo.com Wishing you a new year filled with new hope, new joy and new beginnings! Thank you for your patronage and we look forward to working with you in the future. Al-Qaida carves out own country in Mali Associated PressFighters from Islamist group Ansar Dine stand guard Aug. 31 in Timbuktu, Mali, as they prepare to publicly lash a member of the Islamic Police found guilty of adultery. In recent months, al-Qaida and its allies have taken advantage of political instability within Mali to push out of their hiding place and into the towns, taking over an enormous territory which they are using to stock arms, train forces and prepare for global jihad. Lalla Arby, 22, who was beaten by Islamist group Ansar Dine for sitting outside her home in Timbuktu with her head uncovered, poses Oct. 10 for a picture in a headscarf in Bamako, Mali, where she now lives with relatives.

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OPINION Page A10TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 Make Progress/Duke a partnerThe breakdown in the relationship between Citrus County and Progress Energy/Duke is major gamechanger for the community. The power company the countys largest private employer and taxpayer has always been a strong partner. The companys dispute over paying its property tax bill to Citrus County is the sign of a larger breakdown that must be resolved by county officials. We urge our local leaders to stay out of court and find a negotiated settlement with Progress. We further urge our local leaders to do everything they can to convince power company executives that Citrus County is still an appropriate place for economic expansion. We need the nuclear plant north of Crystal River refurbished and we want future power plant expansion here. We need the jobs, we need the taxes and we need a good working partnership with the largest power utility in America.Keep focus on cleanupCrystal River Rotarian Art Jones launched his One Rake at a Time project last year and got residents, businesses and politicians enthused about protecting the environment. Jones grew tired of listening to people pontificate about cleaning up Kings Bay and decided to do something about it. He coordinated volunteers from all walks of life to climb into the bay and start raking out tons of weeds that were choking off the springs that feed the bay and river. The real beauty of his effort is that people can see that they can make a difference in protecting our environment. Hundreds of tons of weeds have been pulled out of the bay, but more important is that Jones has created some synergy with state and local governments that want to get involved in the positive effort. In 2013 the momentum needs to be carried forward. Weeds need to be pulled from the bay. Sewer systems need to be expanded to stop the pollution from septic tanks. Storm water runoff needs to be diverted from highways. Appropriate fertilizer techniques need to be used to avoid pollution. Art Jones helped empower the community to get something done. Lets do it.Government needs to spend lessOur local, state and federal governments all need to spend fewer tax dollars. That means that we as citizens need to expect fewer services from our government. You cannot have one without the other. On the local level it makes sense to have other revenue techniques such as MSBUs available to fund county government, but the bottom line is that we need to spend less during these tough economic times.Expand the local economyWe need more jobs in Citrus County and we need to branch out into new types of industry and business. Our longtime dependence on home construction, energy and retail helped make the national recession worse for Citrus County than other areas. We need diversity, and thats why we are supportive of the countys Economic Development Council and county commissions effort to explore the option for a port in northwest Citrus County. The EDC and our county leaders need to get creative in attracting other small businesses and industries that can grow and create jobs. The medical segment is hot because of our aging demographics, but we need to attract other segments so we can limit our economic vulnerability. The tourism segment needs to be expanded and promoted.County and cities working togetherWhen Joe Meek was installed as the new chairman of the county commission in December, he appropriately pledged to create a new working relationship with our two cities Inverness and Crystal River. The relationship between our branches of local government has not been good. Part of that is due to politics and poor listening skills, but little effort has been made to see life from the other governments perspective. There need to be regular meetings between the governments and joint goal agreements. Citrus County is unique in that less than 10 percent of our total population lives in the two cities, but much of the commerce and government activity is within the municipal boundaries.Education and jobsCitrus County has a very good education system, but there is at least one weakness that needs attention. A certain percentage of our graduates go on to college and professional careers. But more focus needs to be placed on preparing non-college-bound graduates and under-employed adults with new job skills they can use on the local level. We have the tools in place. The Lecanto branch of the College of Florida and Withlacoochee Technical Institute in Inverness need to launch an expanded effort to work together to strategically train students for jobs that are available in the region. And the two public entities need to be coordinating with local business, the EDC, the chamber and entrepreneurs to better understand what those employment opportunities are. There are jobs available for skilled workers. The education system needs to work with business to connect the dots.Sort out the new hospital issueThe leadership of Citrus Memorial hospital has apparently worked out its governance problems, and for that we are appreciative. But there are new health care concerns on the horizon. Citrus Memorial Health System, a public hospital, now must follow a state requirement that it consider a sale or merger of the institution with a for-profit facility. Gov. Rick Scott is opposed to using local property tax dollars to support community hospitals and the new state rules mandate that every public hospital examine other options. That exercise is now under way. It is important that the leaders of our public medical institutions work together to provide the best health care possible for local consumers. The county hospital and the county health department have many redundant services but do a poor job of working together. Taxpayer dollars are used for both and synergies should be fully implemented to improve service and drive down costs.Make the YMCA happenThe largest capital campaign in the history of Citrus County will take place in 2013 to help build a YMCA for our community. Citrus County residents and businesses need to step up to the plate and get committed to building a Y. For the last 25 years there have been efforts to get a Y here to help families, children and retirees come together and build community. This is the year to make it happen. Property has been donated on County Road 486 and financial pledges are now needed to move this important project forward.State and county work togetherWhile it may not be frontpage news, many in Citrus County dont realize that our state and local elected officials dont like each other or work well together. We are a dysfunctional political family, and the bickering ends up hurting local citizens. Wed like to see our elected officials all make an attempt to set aside their personal political feuds and get to work for the people. We have roads that need to be built, schools that need more funding, environmental areas that need more protecting. We have children at risk, seniors in need and way too many unemployed people. We urge our elected officials to all get over their own egos and get to work.The dependence on drugsWe dont pretend to have the appropriate strategy to implement, but no set of goals for our county can be published without mentioning the drug problem that exists here. So many of the problems we have in our county can be tied back to drug and alcohol abuse. Crime, child abuse and neglect, unemployment, the breakdown of the family structure all run hand in hand with substance abuse. Our nations war on drugs has been about as unsuccessful as our local war on drugs. While the fight against the criminal dealers and manufacturers of drugs must continue in full force, we need other, more productive strategies to deal with the culture of drug use that is so prevalent in our society. Back of every noble life there are principles that have fashioned it.George Horace Lorimer, 1867-1937 Community goals for the New Year CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ..........................................publisherMike Arnold ..................................................editorCharlie Brennan ................................editor at largeCurt Ebitz ........................................citizen memberMac Harris ......................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ................................guest memberBrad Bautista ..........................................copy chief WELCOME TO 2013 15 resolutions for the New Year Aswe launch into the New Year, please reflect with me on who we are and where we hope to go in the 12 months ahead. The year 2012 presented great challenges and new responsibilities. Life is about transitions, and as an incurable optimist, I believethe year ahead will open new doors and present valuable opportunities for all of us. Traditionally, New Years resolutions are about making a commitment to do something different in our lives, perhaps going in a new direction from that of the past. In 2013, I resolve: To appreciate my family, friends, and colleagues for who they are, what they mean to me, and to gracefully overlook some things they do (or dont do!). None of us is perfect and accepting that reality helpsrelationshipsflourish. To act upon wrongs that need righting, crass statements that require correction, and offenses that demand just responses. We set a positive example by not accepting negativity in others. To be a valuable teammate and to trust others to do their best. Each of us should know what position we play, and regularly practice our skills to be our personal best. To actively listen to the voices of children and elders.Valuing thewisdom of innocence and experience is both free and priceless. To accept that I dont know everything. By collaborating withothers who know much more, together we can create a great brain trust and blend expertise to make progress. To pleasantly surprise someone every day with a genuine smile and unexpected kindness in word and deed. Lifes subtle gifts of compassion and concern are cherished. To respect and celebrate the diversity of faiths, feelings, and fashions. Differences are natural and honoring each othersperspectives creates mutual admiration. To exercise artistic expression for its intrinsic value. The vitality of the instrumental, literary, dance, visual or vocal arts fuels the soul and expands the mind to new possibilities. To invest a thoughtful minute before I speak or act. Regret is often preventable. Reversing harm is one of lifes most vexing challenges. To honor those who courageously sacrifice for us at home and abroad, care for our health, educate, protect our freedoms and perform the healing and helping arts so that our quality of life is improved. To share even if I think I dont have enough. Setting an example by giving to others in need is one of the best lessons for children to observe. To protect, defend and advocate for people who rely on me. Give special attention to the needs of others of every stage of life who may not know how to find their own voice. To preserve natural environments for their beauty and bounty. Natural settings are home to plantlife and species which are too often victims of our wants, not our needs. To never give up on a person or a cause, despite the challenges we face. Perseverance is an attitude that exemplifies leadership, attracts allies, and creates meaningful change. To speak truth to power, but to be both polite and persistent. Theres a fine line between persistence and pestilence. Resist aggressiveness, but advocate with assertion, confidence and commitment to the cause. Advocating for prevention policies and programs that keep bad things from happening is the most important of all investments. My service as the advocates advocate is a role Icherish. I feel so fortunate to have the friendships and allies Ive nurtured over the years. As I build the 4Generations Institute initiative to promote intergenerational communication, community leadership, policy/ program advocacy and volunteer commitments, I am awed by the power of relationships. Just as in families, the health of a community is in the depth and breadth of relationships among those who share common interests and provide mutual support. In the year ahead I plan to communicate Institutes message to influence the public policy debate on behalf of every age and stage of life. While theres strength in our diversities, theres power in our unity! Jack Levine is the founder of 4Generations Institute in Tallahassee. Email him at jack@4gen.org. THE ISSUE:Hopes riding on 2013.OUR OPINION:Opportunities abound. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the board. Persons wishing to address the editorial board, which meets weekly, should call Mike Arnold at 352-564-2930.SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Taxing responseDuke Energy was required to install equipment to clean the acid rain from their exhausts. They dont earn money from this equipment, so how can you tax them for it? Where are the brains of the tax appraiser to want taxes on this equipment when they were required to install the equipment by law? Now if they tax this equipment, who pays? Of course, the user on the electric bills. So a tax on this equipment only throws the cost off to the taxpayers. Youths respect I agree with the person who called in to complain about nobody standing when our flag passes at a parade. Young people today have no respect for our flag or the freedom it represents. Maybe we should ship them to a country like Iraq where people dont have this freedom and then see how they feel about America. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 Jack LevineGUEST COLUMN Hot Corner: THANKS Thanks for chipping inI would just like to personally thank the lady in the white Ford Fusion that paid for my doughnuts from Dunkin Donuts this morning, Dec. 20. She made my day and I just want to say thank you to her and God bless her and Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Thank you.Help with iPhoneI just wanted to thank a very special wildlife park ranger for turning in my iPhone while I was at the park enjoying a wonderful show Thursday night (Dec. 20) and got careless. I just wanted to thank him so very much and wish him a very Merry Christmas. CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE

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Associated PressJOHANNESBURG South Africas agonizing past swept over Alex McLaren, who stepped into sunlight with tears in his eyes after a tour of the Apartheid Museum, an unsparing study of white minority rule and the costly fight against it. Yet South Africa-born McLaren, an American citizen, also found inspiration in the museums exhibition about Nelson Mandela, former prisoner, South Africas first black head of state and one of the great, unifying figures of the 20th century. Mandela, now 94 years old and ailing, was a special figure in the anti-apartheid struggle because of his perseverance, his ability to forgive and to reconcile, and the fact that he appeared when he did, him and others. But mainly him, said McLaren, a retired engineer. There will be a lot of wailing, gnashing of teeth, when he goes, he said, anticipating the grief of South Africa and the world. The delicate health of Mandela, now convalescing behind the high walls of his Johannesburg home, came under scrutiny and speculation during a 19-day stay in a hospital in December. He was treated for a lung infection and had gallstones removed. Regardless of when the end comes, his burnished legacy was written years ago, even if the country he led from the long night of apartheid still struggles with poverty and other social ills. Mandelas place as South Africas premier hero is so secure that the central bank released new banknotes in 2012 showing his face, a robust, smiling image of the icon who walked out of a prisons gates on Feb. 11, 1990 after 27 years in captivity. He is a Nobel laureate, the recipient of many other international awards, the subject of books, films and songs and, when he was active, a magnet for celebrities. In part, what elevated Mandela was his charisma, his ability to charm through humor and grace, and an extraordinary capacity to find strength in adversity. People tend to measure themselves by external accomplishments, but jail allows a person to focus on internal ones; such as honesty, sincerity, simplicity, humility, generosity and an absence of variety, Mandela says in one of the many quotations on display at the Apartheid Museum. You learn to look into yourself. Just four years after being released from prison, Mandela became South Africas first black president in 1994. His successes include the introduction of one of the worlds most progressive constitutions and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a panel that heard testimony about apartheidera violations of human rights as a kind of national therapy session. McLaren, the visitor to the Apartheid Museum, grew up in South Africa and recalled witnessing injustices of apartheid: blacks being arrested or stopped in the street, a black woman being pushed off a bus and a view among many whites that blacks were somehow inferior. Now a resident of Scottsdale, Arizona, 66-year-old McLaren said: South Africa is such a mixed place now. Some of it is falling apart, some of it is really good, some of it is really bad. But you know, its much better than it was, much better than it was. An imperfect country, but one that Mandela, whose clan name, Madiba, means reconciler, guided elegantly through a painful transition. In Mandela: The Authorized Portrait, a collection of accounts about Mandela, lawyer and human rights advocate George Bizos described how Mandela joked about his age (he was 86 at the time) and said he would join the nearest branch of the ANC in heaven.WORLDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 A11 000CWEJ 4224 W Gulf to Lake Hwy. Lecanto, FL 34461 homeinstead.com HHA299993253 HCS230036 Were by your side so your loved one can stay at home. Whether you are looking for someone to help an aging family member a few hours a week or need more comprehensive assistance, Home Instead can help. To you, its about making the right choice. To us, its personal. Services Include: Companionship Light Housekeeping Meal Preparation Shopping & Errands Incidental Transportation Respite Care Transitorial Care Personal Care Call for a free, no-obligation appointment: 352-249-1257 000DA5N 2012 2012 2012 2012 000D5VE Specialty Gems Beautiful sterling silver stackable bangle bracelets with Magnetic Clasp. Available in Silver, Gold, & Rose Gold Colors Exceptional Jewelry Custom Designs Quality Repair Personalized Service Celebrate the New Year with sparkles and bangles Associated PressCARACAS, Venezuela President Hugo Chavezs new complications after cancer surgery prompted his closest allies to call for Venezuelans to pray for him on Monday, presenting an increasingly bleak outlook and prompting growing speculation about whether the ailing leader has much longer to live. Vice President Nicolas Maduro looked weary and spoke with a solemn expression as he announced in a televised address from Havana on Sunday that Chavez now confronts new complications due to a respiratory infection nearly three weeks after his operation. He described Chavezs condition as delicate. The streets of Caracas were abuzz on Monday with talk of Chavezs increasingly tough fight, while the news topped the front pages of the countrys newspapers. Hes history now, said Cesar Amaro, a street vendor selling newspapers and snacks at a kiosk in downtown Caracas. He motioned to a newspaper showing side-by-side photos of Maduro and National Assembly President Diosdado Cabello, and said politics will now turn to them. Amaro said he expects a new election soon to replace Chavez. For an illness like the one the president has, his days are numbered now, he said matter-offactly. A government-organized New Years Eve concert had been planned in a downtown Caracas plaza featuring popular Venezuelan bands, but was canceled due to Chavezs condition. The presidents aides sang and prayed at a televised Mass held at the presidential palace, while Chavezs allies urged Venezuelans to keep their president in their prayers. Political analyst Ricardo Sucre said the outlook for Chavez appears grim, saying Maduros body language during his televised appearance spoke volumes. Everything suggests Chavezs health situation hasnt evolved as hoped, Sucre said. He said Maduro likely remained in Havana to keep close watch on how Chavezs condition develops. These hours should be key to having a more definitive prognosis of Chavezs health, and as a consequence make the corresponding political decisions according to the constitution, Sucre said. Sucre and other Venezuelans said it seems increasingly unlikely that Chavez would be able to be sworn in as scheduled on Jan. 10. The Venezuelan leader has not been seen or heard from since undergoing his fourth cancer-related surgery Dec. 11, and government officials have said he might not return in time for his inauguration for a new six-year term. If Chavez dies or is unable to continue in office, the Venezuelan Constitution says that a new election should be held within 30 days. Before his operation, Chavez acknowledged he faced risks and designated Maduro as his successor, telling supporters they should vote for the vice president if a new presidential election were necessary. Chavez said at the time that his cancer had come back despite previous surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatment. He has been fighting an undisclosed type of pelvic cancer since June 2011. Maduro said on Sunday that he had met with Chavez. We greeted each other and he himself referred to these complications, Maduro said, reading from a prepared statement. Chavez suffers new complications Associated PressA woman walks Monday past a mural of Venezuelas President Hugo Chavez in Caracas, Venezuela. Nelson Mandela convalesces, legacy secure

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New Year Associated PressA trader wearing Happy New Year glasses works on the floor Monday at the New York Stock Exchange in New York. Subway suspect has troubled historyNEW YORK The family of a woman accused of shoving a man to his death in front of a subway train called police several times in the past five years because she had not been taking prescribed medication and she was difficult to deal with, authorities said Monday. Erika Menendez, 31, was being held without bail on a murder charge in the death of Sunando Sen. She told police she pushed the 46-year-old India native because she thought he was Muslim, and she hates them, according to prosecutors. Theyd never met before she suddenly shoved him off the subway platform, because she thought it would be cool, prosecutors said. The victim was Hindu, not Muslim. She laughed and snickered so much during her court hearing last weekend that the judge admonished her. The attorney who represented her only for her arraignment said she acted the same way with him when he tried to speak with her.Gov. signs pardons for Wilmington 10RALEIGH, N.C. Outgoing North Carolina Gov. Beverly Perdue issued pardons Monday to the Wilmington 10, a group wrongly convicted 40 years ago in a notorious Civil Rights-era prosecution that led to accusations that the state was holding political prisoners. Perdue issued pardons of innocence Monday for the nine black men and one white woman who were given prison sentences totaling nearly 300 years for the 1971 firebombing of a Wilmington grocery store after police shot a black teenager. The pardon means the state no longer thinks the 10 four of whom have since died committed a crime.Newtown killers remains claimedHARTFORD, Conn. The body of the man who massacred 26 people at a Connecticut elementary school was claimed by his father, a family spokesman said Monday, but the public may never know what happened with the remains. Like families of other mass killers, Adam Lanzas father has to balance his own mourning with consideration for the victims, intense media scrutiny and the risk that a public gravesite could be desecrated. I know its very sensitive for the family. They have many, many concerns and its a very sad time for them, said Kingston, N.H. Police Chief Donald Briggs, a family acquaintance who helped the Lanzas coordinate services for Lanzas slain mother. Lanza shot and killed his mother, Nancy, inside their Newtown home on Dec. 14 before driving to Sandy Hook Elementary School, shooting his way in and gunning down 20 first-graders and six school employees. He committed suicide as police arrived. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE New leader Associated PressSouth Korean presidentelect Park Geun-hye, without a helmet at center, shouts Monday with members of the special warfare command at a military base in Gwangju, South Korea. Park was elected South Korean president on Dec. 19, becoming the country's first female leader. Protester shot in CairoCAIRO Gunmen drove into Cairos Tahrir Square before dawn Monday and fired at an anti-government sit-in, seriously wounding a protester who had been jailed and tortured by former military rulers after he witnessed the killing of another activist. Two lawyers involved in the case suggested it was a targeted attack. Lawyer Tamer Gomaa identified the seriously wounded activist as Muhanad Samir, 19, and said he was battling for his life with a number of pellets embedded in his skull and in his face. Gomaa said witnesses recognized the attackers and identified them as security agents dressed in civilian clothes. Gomaa quoted witnesses as saying some of the attackers had visited the square hours before and inquired about Samir by name and about others at the sit-in.Pope marks end of difficult yearVATICAN CITY Pope Benedict XVI marked the end of a difficult year Monday by saying that despite all the death and injustice in the world, goodness prevails. Benedict celebrated New Years Eve with a vespers service in St. Peters Basilica to give thanks for 2012 and look ahead to 2013. He appeared tired during the service and used a cane afterward an indication that the busy Christmas season may be taking a toll on the 85-year-old Benedict. In his homily, Benedict said its tough to remember that goodness prevails when bad news death, violence and injustice makes more noise than good. He said taking time to meditate in prolonged reflection and prayer can help find healing from the inevitable wounds of daily life.Pakistan releases 8 Taliban prisonersISLAMABAD Pakistan released eight members of the Afghan Taliban from prison on Monday, including the former justice minister under the Taliban, in a bid to boost the peace process in neighboring Afghanistan, the government said. Pakistan is seen as a lynchpin in efforts to bring about peace in Afghanistan as foreign troops plan to depart the country in 2014. Kabul has been pressing its neighbor to release more prisoners who they hope would bring the Taliban to the negotiating table before the U.S. troops go home. The Pakistanis appear to have an interest in promoting peace across the border, as a resumption of the civil war there could bring harsh consequences on its side as well. We have released some more Taliban prisoners today as our help in the peace process in Afghanistan, Pakistan Foreign Office spokesman Moazzam Khan said. World BRIEFS From wire reports Associated PressWASHINGTON Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is under observation at a New York hospital after being treated for a blood clot stemming from the concussion she sustained earlier this month. Clintons doctors discovered the clot Sunday while performing a follow-up exam, her spokesman, Philippe Reines, said. He would not elaborate on the location of the clot but said Clinton was being treated with anti-coagulants and would remain at New YorkPresbyterian Hospital for at least the next 48 hours so doctors can monitor the medication. Her doctors will continue to assess her condition, including other issues associated with her concussion, Reines said in a statement. They will determine if any further action is required. Clinton, 65, fell and suffered a concussion while at home alone in mid-December as she recovered from a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. The concussion was diagnosed Dec. 13 and Clinton was forced to cancel a trip to North Africa and the Middle East that had been planned for the next week. The seriousness of a blood clot depends on where it is, said Dr. Gholam Motamedi, a neurologist at Georgetown University Medical Center who was not involved in Clintons care. Clots in the legs are a common risk after someone has been bedridden, as Clinton may have been for a time after her concussion. Those are no big deal and are treated with six months of blood thinners to allow them to dissolve on their own and to prevent further clots from forming, he said. A clot in a lung or the brain is more serious. Lung clots, called pulmonary embolisms, can be deadly, and a clot in the brain can cause a stroke, Motamedi said. Clinton still under observation World welcomes 2013 Associated PressLONDON Sydneys skyline erupted in fireworks as Australia ushered in 2013 on Tuesday, while extravagant displays soon followed in Hong Kong and Beijing, and even the once-isolated country of Myanmar joined the party for the first time in decades. Asia greeted the new year with an atmosphere of renewed optimism despite the fiscal cliff impasse of spending cuts and tax increases threatening to reverberate globally from the United States and the tattered economies of Europe, where the party was expected to be more subdued. Celebrations were planned around the world, culminating with the traditional crystal ball drop in New York Citys Times Square, where 1 million people were expected to cram into the surrounding streets. The balmy summer night in Sydney was split by 7 tons of fireworks fired from rooftops and barges, many cascading from the citys Harbor Bridge, in a $6.9 million pyrotechnic extravaganza billed by organizers as the worlds largest. In Myanmar, after nearly five decades under military regimes that discouraged or banned big public gatherings, about 90,000 people experienced the countrys first New Years Eve countdown in a field in the largest city of Yangon. We feel like we are in a different world, said Yu Thawda, a university student who came with three of her friends. Tens of thousands of people lined Hong Kongs Victoria Harbor to view a $1.6 million fireworks display, said to be the biggest ever in the southern Chinese city. In North Korea, cannons boomed at midnight in Pyongyang as people crowded the streets of the capital to watch a fireworks show over the Taedong River. After being in mourning a year ago regarding leader Kim Jong Ils death, North Koreans celebrated the end of a big year that included the rise of new leader Kim Jong Un and the recent launch of a satellite into space. In Indonesia, Jakartas street party centered on a 4-mile thoroughfare closed to traffic from nightfall until after midnight. Workers erected 16 large stages along the normally clogged, eight-lane highway through the heart of the city. Indonesias booming economy is a rare bright spot amid global gloom and is bringing prosperity or the hope of it to its people. In the Philippines, where many are recovering from devastation from a recent typhoon, health officials have hit upon a successful way to stop revelers from setting off huge illegal firecrackers that maim and injure hundreds of Filipinos each year. A health official, Eric Tayag, donned the splashy outfit of South Korean star PSY and danced to his YouTube hit Gangnam Style video while preaching against the use of illegal firecrackers on TV, in schools and in public arenas. The campaign has become viral, Tayag said. In austerity-hit Europe, the mood was more restrained if hopeful. The year 2013 is projected to be a sixth straight one of recession amid Greeces worst economic crisis since World War II. Australia, Asia greet new year with fireworks, festivities Associated PressFireworks explode Tuesday in the sky above Sydney Harbour during the New Year celebrations in Sydney, Australia. Associated PressPENDLETON, Ore. A federal agency has sent two investigators to the site of an Eastern Oregon tour bus crash that killed nine people. The National Transportation Safety Board said Monday it would look into the conditions on Interstate 84 and the guardrail the tour bus crashed through Sunday morning. It also will examine the operations of the Vancouver, British Columbia, bus carrier. The agency said the 1998model bus rolled at least once when it wrecked on a long descent known for dangerous winter driving conditions. More than 40 people were aboard the bus traveling from Las Vegas to Vancouver. On Monday, 14 remained at a hospital in nearby Pendleton. Sixteen had been sent to other hospitals. The stretch of rural Oregon interstate where a tour bus crashed through a guardrail and plummeted 100 feet down a steep embankment is so notorious that state transportation officials have published a specific advisory warning of its dangers. The bus crashed near the start of a 7-mile section of road winding down a hill. It came to rest at the bottom of a snowy slope, landing beaten and battered but upright with little or no debris visible around the crash site. The East Oregoniansaid it spoke with two South Korean passengers, ages 16 and 17. Both said through a translator that they were seated near the rear of the bus when it swerved a few times, hit the guardrail and flipped. They described breaking glass and seeing passengers pinned by their seats as the bus slid down the hill. Both said that they feared for their lives. The paper said that the teens, one of whom injured a knee and the other suffered a broken collarbone, were staying at a hotel arranged by the Red Cross. More than a dozen rescue workers descended the hill and used ropes to help retrieve people from the wreckage in freezing weather. The bus driver was among the survivors. Lt. Gregg Hastings said the bus crashed along the west end of the Blue Mountains, and west of an area called Deadman Pass. The area is well known locally for its hazards, and the state transportation department advises truck drivers that some of the most changeable and severe weather conditions in the Northwest can lead to slick conditions and poor visibility. Feds to investigate Oregon bus crash Associated PressEmergency personnel respond to the scene of tour bus crash Sunday, Dec. 30, about 15 miles east of Pendleton, Ore. Secretary of State being treated for blood clot found Sunday

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NHL, NFL/B2 Sports briefs/ B2 Scoreboard/B3 TV schedule/B3 Entertainment/ B4 The Duke mens basketball team retained the No. 1 spot in the APs college basketball poll./B2 SPORTSSection BTUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE With no county swimming meet, the best way to tell who the top swimmers in the county are is by looking at the results when Citrus, Crystal River and Lecanto compete against one another and how the Hurricanes, Pirates and Panthers do in the postseason. Crystal River senior Abbey Brown, Pirates freshman teammate Anna Lane and Lecanto junior Anabel Marchildon each advanced to the regional level of their sport. Also, the trio were the best in the county in their respective events, making them each a fitting finalist for the ChroniclesGirls Swimmer of the Year award. Each athlete put together an impressive resume and deserves recognition. The finalists have standing invitations to the Chroniclesports banquet at the conclusion of the 2012-13 school year, where the winner will be announced. Anna Lane, Crystal River freshman Anabel Marchildon, Lecanto junior Abbey Brown, Crystal River senior Girls Swimmer/Diver of the Year finalistsAND ALL-CHRONICLE TEAM Brown, Lane, Marchildon three finalists for Girls Swimmer of the Year All-Chroniclegirls swimming team Jena Askew, Citrus seniorAskew was a 50-meter freestyle specialist and was one of the few female Hurricanes to have individual success against Crystal River and Lecanto.Abbey Brown, Crystal River seniorPlaced in the 200 and 500-meter freestyle races consolation finals at the Region 1A-1 meet after taking third in both events at the District 1A-3 meet.Marissa Penn, Crystal River seniorFinished fifth in the 100-meter breaststroke and eighth in the 50-meter freestyle at the District 1A-3 meet to advance to the regional level.Anna Lane, Crystal River freshmanCame in the 200 and 500-meter freestyle races consolation finals at the Region 1A-1 meet after taking seventh and fifth, respectively, in the events at the District 1A-3 meet.Anabel Marchildon, Lecanto juniorThe Panther qualifed for the Region 2A-2 meet after taking sixth in the 100-meter breaststroke and eighth in the 100-meter butterfly.Courtney Toomey, Lecanto seniorA senior co-captain for the Panthers, Toomey swam the 500-meter freestyle event.Marissa Buck, Lecanto seniorA senior co-captain for Lecanto, she swam the 200 Individual Medley.Breanna Johnson, Lecanto juniorThe top female diver in the county, Johnson placed sixth at the District 2A-5 meet. Jon-Michael SoracchiON POINT Photos by MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle Making a splash Plethora of NFL coaches fired Monday Eagles ax Reid; Bears let Smith go Associated PressSAN DIEGO By lunchtime Monday, six NFL coaches were looking for work. With the regular season ending the day before, the firings came at a furious clip and within a twohour span, the following were sacked: Andy Reid in Philadelphia, Lovie Smith in Chicago, Norv Turner in San Diego, Pat Shurmur in Cleveland, Romeo Crennel in Kansas City and Chan Gailey in Buffalo, Though he also had a losing record, New York Jets coach Rex Ryan held onto his job while general manager Mike Tannenbaum was let go. Jacksonville fired its GM, Gene Smith, and coach Mike Mularkey could go soon, too. The Chargers and Browns made it a clean sweep. San Diego dismissed GM A.J. Smith along with Turner. Cleveland fired GM Tom Heckert along with Shurmur. Just after the initial round of firings, the Arizona Cardinals sacked coach Ken Whisenhunt. The team also ousted general manager Rod Graves, who had been with the franchise for 16 years. Hed been general manager since 2007. The 50-year-old Whisenhunt had more wins than any other coach in Cardinals history, going 45-51, 4-2 in the playoffs. He had a year worth about $5.5 million left on his contract. Reid was the longest tenured of the coaches, removed after 14 seasons and a Super Bowl appearance in 2005 a loss to New England. Smith spent nine seasons with the Bears, leading them to the Super Bowl in 2006 a loss to the Indianapolis Colts. Turner went 56-40 with the Chargers, the third team to fire him as head coach. San Diego won the AFC West from 2006-09 he was 3-3 in the playoffs but didnt make the postseason the last three years. Gailey was dumped after three seasons with the Bills; Shurmur after two; and Crennel had one full season with the Chiefs. Reid took over a 3-13 team in 1999, drafted Donovan McNabb with the No. 2 overall pick and quickly turned the franchise into a title contender. He led them to a run of four straight NFC championship games, a streak that ended with a trip to the NFL title game. But the team hasnt won a playoff game since 2008 and after last seasons 8-8 finish, owner Jeffrey Lurie said he was looking for Andy Reid Lovie Smith Romeo Crennel Chan Gailey Norv Turner Pat Shurmur Seminoles ready for Orange Bowl No. 12 FSU faces BCS buster N. Illinois Associated PressMIAMI Florida States biggest weakness heading into their Orange Bowl game against Northern Illinois might be Midwestern geography. The Seminoles concede theyd be hardpressed to locate their opponent in an atlas. I could probably find Illinois, receiver Rashad Greene said. I dont really know where the town is. Actually I dont even know the town. Its DeKalb. DeKalb? Seminoles kicker Dustin Hopkins said. Hey, next time Ill know. I thought it was in Chicago, quarterback EJ Manuel said. Cue the cliche: A victory Tuesday night would put Northern Illinois on the map. The No. 16-ranked Huskies have been widely derided as unworthy of a BCS bowl berth, which makes them eager for validation when they face No. 13 Florida State. Were playing a team that is going to be willing to bloody their noses and get after you, Seminoles offensive coordinator James Coley warned. Florida State defensive end Bjoern Werner is a German-born All-American who ended the regular season with 13 sacks, second-most in the nation.Associated Press Orange Bowl No. 13 Florida State (11-2) vs. No. 16 Northern Illinois (12-1) Time: 8:30 p.m. today. TV: ESPN See ORANGE/ Page B3 Associated PressStanford quarterback Kevin Hogan leads the Cardinal into todays Rose Bowl against Wisconsin. Cardinal, Badgers meet in Rose Bowl Associated PressLOS ANGELES Although Montee Ball and Stepfan Taylor have barely met, Taylor is pretty sure they would get along famously. We had a quick hello this week, but you can tell weve got a lot in common, the Stanford running back said. At least on the field. In an era of college football dominated by spread schemes and prolific quarterbacks, these two tailbacks personify an old-fashioned, smashmouth approach to offense. Running behind similar massive offensive lines at Wisconsin and Stanford, both backs persevered through slow starts to their careers to earn prominent spots in the record books heading into their big finales in the 99th Rose Bowl. You cant really have a better running back matchup in college football than this one, Wisconsin coach Barry Alvarez said. Ball and Taylor expect to get to know each other while they prepare for the upcoming NFL draft, where theyre both likely to be high picks. Theyll first finish up their college careers against each other when the surprising Badgers (8-5) make their third straight Rose Bowl appearance Tuesday against the favored No. 8 Cardinal (11-2). When Ball is asked about Taylors abilities, he realizes he might as well be describing himself. Were both not blazing fast, but we both do a good job playing to our strengths, Ball said. We run behind our pads, run between the tackles and always stay physical. Weve got a lot of similarities, so its good to see him have success. Just hopefully not too much success in the game. Rose Bowl No. 8 Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5)Time: 5 p.m. todayTV: ESPN See ROSE/ Page B3 See FIRED/ Page B3

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B2TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESPORTS SPORTS BRIEFSDuke still a runaway No. 1 in AP Top 25For the third straight week Duke is the runaway No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25, and for the first time in 16 years Minnesota is in the top 10. The Blue Devils (12-0) received all but two firstplace votes from the 65member media panel on Monday. The next five teams Michigan, Arizona, Louisville, Indiana and Kansas held their places from last week. Syracuse, Ohio State, Minnesota and Gonzaga rounded out the top 10. Michigan (13-0) was No. 1 on two ballots for the second straight week. Minnesota is in the top 10 for the first time since it was third in the final poll of 1996-97. New Mexico, which won at undefeated Cincinnati, returns to the rankings at No. 20 after being out for one week. The Lobos replace UNLV, which dropped out from 20th after losing at North Carolina.Miamis Reggie Johnson out six to eight weeksCORAL GABLES Miami Hurricanes senior center Reggie Johnson will miss much of the Atlantic Coast Conference season with a broken left thumb. Coach Jim Larranaga said Johnson is expected to be sidelined six to eight weeks, A starter since his sophomore season, Johnson has already missed four games. He has played in seven games and is averaging 12.6 points and 10.1 rebounds. The Hurricanes (8-3) host LaSalle on Wednesday and open ACC play Saturday at Georgia Tech.RB Williams wants to stay in CarolinaCHARLOTTE, N.C. Carolina Panthers all-time leading rusher DeAngelo Williams says he wants to remain with the team despite getting benched earlier this season. But the seven-year veteran is the first to admit thats not his decision. Williams said the ball is not really in my court. Williams has three years remaining on a five-year contract worth $43 million that included a $16 million signing bonus. Williams closed the season by setting a franchise record with a career-best 210 yards rushing and two touchdowns in Carolinas 44-38 win over the New Orleans Saints. Williams started the final five games with Jonathan Stewart out with a high ankle sprain. I signed a five-year contract, so that in itself lets you know I want to be back, Williams said as the left the stadium.Nevada RB Jefferson declares for NFLRENO, Nev. Nevada running back Stefphon Jefferson has decided to forgo his senior season and enter the NFL draft this spring. Jefferson set single-season Nevada records in carries (375), yards rushing yards, rushing touchdowns (24) and total scores (25). He ranked second nationally in both rushing yards per game (144.9) and points per game (11.5). The junior from Visalia, Calif., said in a statement issued by the school late Sunday he will always bleed silver and blue but wants to try to take his career to the next level. He thanked the coaches and staff for all they have done to help make him successful. From wire reports NHL talks to restart as year closes Associated PressNEW YORK The NHL and the players association are using the final hours of 2012 to try to get closer to an elusive deal that has so far been well out of reach. Negotiations were scheduled for Monday afternoon at the leagues New York office, marking the first time the NHL and the union will be bargaining in nearly three weeks, and the first time they will do so without mediation since early December. The New Years clock is ticking while the window to reach a labor agreement to save the season is rapidly closing. No one has said exactly how much time remains, but the belief is the NHL wants a shortened season to start no later than Jan. 19. That leaves a little less than two weeks to reach an agreement and stage one week of training camp before the puck would drop on a 48game campaign. The league and the union had informational discussions by conference call and in meetings with staff members that lasted much of Saturday and ended Sunday. Those talks were spurred by the nearly 300-page contract proposal the NHL presented to the union Thursday. The union is expected to make a counteroffer Monday. These will be the first negotiations since the sides met with a federal mediator Dec. 13. All games through Jan. 14 have been canceled, claiming more than 50 percent of the original schedule. The NHL wants to reach a deal by Jan. 11 and open the season eight days later. Bargaining sessions with only the NHL and union havent been held since Dec. 6, when talks abruptly ended after the players association made a counterproposal. The league said that offer was contingent on the union accepting three elements unconditionally and without further bargaining. The NHL then pulled all existing offers off the table. Two days of sessions with mediators the following week ended without progress. A person familiar with key points of the offer told The Associated Press that the league proposed raising the limit of individual free-agent contracts to six years from five seven years if a team re-signs its own player; raising the salary variance from one year to another to 10 percent, up from 5 percent; and one compliance buyout for the 2013-14 season that wouldnt count toward a teams salary cap but would be included in the overall players share of income. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because details of the new offer werent being discussed publicly. The NHL maintained the deferred payment amount of $300 million it offered in its previous proposal, an increase from an earlier offer of $211 million. The initial $300 million offer was pulled after negotiations broke off this month. The latest proposal is for 10 years, running through the 2021-22 season, with both sides having the right to opt out after eight years. If this offer doesnt quickly lead to a new collective bargaining agreement, the next round of cuts could claim the entire schedule. The NHL is the only North American professional sports league to cancel a season because of a labor dispute, losing the 2004-05 campaign to a lockout. A 48-game season was played in 1995 after a lockout stretched into January. It is still possible this dispute could eventually be settled in the courts if the sides cant reach a deal on their own. The NHL filed a class-action suit this month in U.S. District Court in New York in an effort to show its lockout is legal. In a separate move, the league filed an unfair labor practice charge with the National Labor Relations Board, contending bad-faith bargaining by the union. Those moves were made because the players association took steps toward potentially filing a disclaimer of interest, which would dissolve the union and make it a trade association. That would allow players to file antitrust lawsuits against the NHL. Union members voted overwhelmingly to give their board the power to file the disclaimer by Wednesday. If that deadline passes, another authorization vote could be held to approve a later filing. Associated PressJacksonville Jaguars head coach Mike Mularkey responds to a question Monday in Jacksonville. After four years of futility, the Jaguars are heading in a different direction with a minimum of a new general manager after firing Gene Smith. Stay of execution Jets coach Ryan, Jags coach Mularkey not fired, but teams GMs given pink slips Associated PressJACKSONVILLE After four years of futility, the Jacksonville Jaguars are heading in a different direction. Coach Mike Mularkey might not be around for the move. The Jaguars fired general manager Gene Smith on Monday after four disappointing seasons, including the worst year in franchise history. Mularkey could be next. Owner Shad Khan is waiting to decide Mularkeys fate until he hires a new general manager, which could happen this week. Mularkey failed to make the Jaguars (2-14) better in his first season, setting a team record for losses and dropping eight games by 16 or more points. Smith was the architect of the roster. He had been with the team since its inception in 1994, working his way up from regional scout to general manager. He has been GM since 2009, compiling a 22-42 record. Not one player he acquired made the Pro Bowl. Now it is time for the Jacksonville Jaguars to begin a new chapter, Khan said in a statement. Were not looking back. Ive made it clear from Day One that we pledge nothing less than to deliver the first Super Bowl championship to Jacksonville. Our fans have been remarkably loyal over the years, and they were truly outstanding this past season. We simply must do better for our fans. Khan said the search for a new GM will begin immediately. Arizona director of player personnel Jason Licht, San Francisco director of player personnel Tom Gamble, and Atlanta director of player personnel David Caldwell have been mentioned as potential replacements. Im determined to find the right man to lead our football operations, someone who shares my vision, understands the commitment we will demand and is qualified and ready to seize this opportunity, Khan said. Khan informed Smith of his decision Monday morning and then delivered the news to Mularkey. Mularkey said he received no assurances he would be retained for a second season. It was a conversation about Genes status, said Mularkey, the former Buffalo Bills head coach who now has lost 20 of his last 23 games. My status was not discussed, and I wont go into detail what was. But until Im told otherwise, Im the head coach of this team. So the Jaguars are in limbo again, much like they were late last season when Khan bought the team from Wayne Weaver for $770 million. Weaver fired coach Jack Del Rio the same day he gave Smith a three-year extension despite Smiths numerous mistakes in the draft and in free agency. Smith handled the coaching search, which started and ended with Mularkey. But the Jaguars made no progress under Mularkey, finishing the year ranked 29th in offense and 30th in defense. You knew something was going to happen, defensive tackle Terrance Knighton said. You didnt know where it was going to start. It obviously started from the top and it will probably make its way down. Knighton is one of numerous free agents who could make the Jacksonville job enticing for prospective GMs. The new GM would be able to rebuild the roster, and the Jaguars have plenty of room under the salary cap and few dead-money contracts. Nonetheless, changes are never easy inside a locker room. With a year like this, you can point fingers everywhere, tight end Marcedes Lewis said. Im not sure what the final straw was, but it happened. Kind of got to move forward and do what you do. Smith changed the way Jacksonville approached personnel moves. He made character as important as ability, but it never paid off the way he envisioned. Finding talent seemed to be the main issue. Smith whiffed on offensive tackle Eben Britton (39th overall pick in 2009), defensive tackle Tyson Alualu (10th pick in 2010) and quarterback Blaine Gabbert (10th pick in 2011). Smith traded up to select Gabbert even though several teams with quarterback needs passed on the former Missouri starter. He also drafted a punter in the third round in April, a move that was mocked locally and nationally. Equally alarming for Khan had to be Smiths penchant for overpaying in free agency: Torry Holt, Aaron Kampman, Paul Posluszny, Clint Session, Dawan Landry, Laurent Robinson and Aaron Ross. Smith did hit on some players, including left tackle Eugene Monroe (eighth pick in 2009), cornerback Derek Cox (73rd pick in 2009) and receivers Cecil Shorts (114th pick in 2011) and Justin Blackmon (fifth pick in 2012). But none of those starters has become a star. And Smith gave up a second-round pick to get Cox and a fourth-rounder to trade up and get Blackmon. Smiths most controversial act came in April, when he chose punter Bryan Anger in the third round (70th pick). Anger was terrific as a rookie, but adding him never seemed like the best call for a team that needed talent and depth at so many other positions.Jets fire GM Tannenbaum, Ryan tabbed to stayFLORHAM PARK, N.J. The New York Jets have fired general manager Mike Tannenbaum and say coach Rex Ryan will be back next season. The Jets finished 6-10 and were in constant turmoil from the moment they acquired Tim Tebow in a trade before the season. Jets owner Woody Johnson said in a statement Monday that like all Jets fans, I am disappointed with this years results. Tannenbaum, who signed off on Tebow trade, has two years left on his contract. Tebow was brought in as a backup for Mark Sanchez but was expected to play a key role in certain offensive schemes. It never worked out. Associated PressNew York Jets head coach Rex Ryan walks along the sidelines during the teams 28-9 loss to the Buffalo Bills on Sunday in Orchard Park, N.Y.

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SCOREBOARDCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS COLLEGE FOOTBALL 12 p.m. (ESPN2) Taxslayer.com Gator Bowl Mississippi State vs. Northwestern 1 p.m. (ABC) Capital One Bowl Georgia vs. Nebraska 1 p.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl Michigan vs. South Carolina 5 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl Stanford vs. Wisconsin 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl Florida State vs. Northern Illinois 1:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Outback Bowl Michigan vs. South Carolina (Same-day Tape) Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Glantz-Culver LineNCAA Football Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Today FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG Heart of Dallas Bowl Oklahoma St.1817(70) Purdue Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Northwestern+21(53) Mississippi St. Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. S. Carolina45(48) Michigan Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Georgia89(61) Nebraska Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Stanford66(47) Wisconsin Orange Bowl At Miami Florida St.1513(58) N. Illinois Wednesday Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida1314(45) Louisville Thursday Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Oregon99(75) Kansas St. Friday Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Texas A&M33(72) Oklahoma Saturday Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Mississippi13(52) Pittsburgh Sunday GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Arkansas St.+14(61) Kent St. Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Miami Alabama79(41) Notre Dame NFL Playoffs Saturday FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG at Houston54(43) Cincinnati at Green Bay88(46) Minnesota Sunday at Baltimore76(46) Indianapolis Seattle12(45) at Wash.Bowl GlanceAll Times EST Saturday, Dec. 15 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Arizona 49, Nevada 48 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho Utah State 41, Toledo 15 Thursday, Dec. 20 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego BYU 23, San Diego State 6 Friday, Dec. 21 Beef O Bradys Bowl At St. Petersburg, Fla. UCF 38, Ball State 17 Saturday, Dec. 22 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 43, East Carolina 34 MAACO Bowl Las Vegas Boise State 28, Washington 26 Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu SMU 43, Fresno State 10 Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Central Michigan 24, Western Kentucky 21 Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Washington San Jose State 29, Bowling Green 20 Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. Cincinnati 48, Duke 34 Holiday Bowl At San Diego Baylor 49, UCLA 26 Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. Ohio 45, Louisiana-Monroe 14 Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Virginia Tech 13, Rutgers 10, OT Meineke Car Care Bowl At Houston Texas Tech 34, Minnesota 31 Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Rice 33, Air Force 14 Pinstripe Bowl At New York Syracuse 38, West Virginia 14 Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco Arizona State 62, Navy 28 Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Texas 31, Oregon State 27 Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Michigan State 17, TCU 16 Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), late Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), late Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), late Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), late Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), Noon (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (93), Noon (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 1 p.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At Miami Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (112), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Miami Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)Late Sunday box Redskins 28, Cowboys 18Dallas 0701118 Washington 0771428 Second Quarter DalWitten 9 pass from Romo (Bailey kick), 7:59. WasMorris 17 run (Forbath kick), 3:28. Third Quarter WasGriffin III 10 run (Forbath kick), 3:10. Fourth Quarter DalFG Bailey 48, 14:09. WasMorris 32 run (Forbath kick), 10:32. DalOgletree 10 pass from Romo (Harris pass from Romo), 5:50. WasMorris 1 run (Forbath kick), 1:09. A,845. DalWas First downs2024 Total Net Yards296361 Rushes-yards22-10042-274 Passing 19687 Punt Returns3-783-18 Kickoff Returns5-934-109 Interceptions Ret.0-03-15 Comp-Att-Int20-37-39-18-0 Sacked-Yards Lost2-221-13 Punts 4-41.55-41.4 Fumbles-Lost0-01-0 Penalties-Yards1-62-20 Time of Possession26:3433:26 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHINGDallas, Murray 17-76, F.Jones 524. Washington, Morris 33-200, Griffin III 6-63, Royster 2-9, Moss 1-2. PASSINGDallas, Romo 20-37-3-218. Washington, Griffin III 9-18-0-100. RECEIVINGDallas, Witten 7-56, Bryant 4-71, Hanna 3-20, Ogletree 2-25, Harris 1-25, Vickers 1-11, Murray 1-6, F.Jones 1-4. Washington, Garcon 3-46, Moss 2-22, Morris 2-12, Hankerson 1-12, Paulsen 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALSWashington, Forbath 37 (WR).NFL playoff glanceAll Times EST Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 5 Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m. (NBC) Minnesota at Green Bay, 8 p.m. (NBC) Sunday, Jan. 6 Indianapolis at Baltimore, 1 p.m. (CBS) Seattle at Washington, 4:30 p.m. (FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 12 Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at Denver, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Washington, Seattle or Green Bay at San Francisco, 8 p.m. (FOX) Sunday, Jan. 13 Washington, Seattle or Minnesota at Atlanta, 1 p.m. (FOX) Baltimore, Indianapolis or Houston at New England, 4:30 p.m. (CBS) Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 20 AFC, TBA (CBS) NFC, TBA (FOX) Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 27 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 7 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 3 At New Orleans AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6 p.m. (CBS)NFL final standingsAFC East WLTPctPFPA y-New England1240.750557331 Miami790.438288317 N.Y. Jets6100.375281375 Buffalo6100.375344435 South WLTPctPFPA y-Houston1240.750416331 x-Indianapolis1150.688357387 Tennessee6100.375330471 Jacksonville2140.125255444 North WLTPctPFPA y-Baltimore1060.625398344 x-Cincinnati1060.625391320 Pittsburgh880.500336314 Cleveland5110.313302368 West WLTPctPFPA y-Denver1330.813481289 San Diego790.438350350 Oakland4120.250290443 Kansas City2140.125211425 NFC East WLTPctPFPA y-Washington1060.625436388 N.Y. Giants970.563429344 Dallas880.500376400 Philadelphia4120.250280444 South WLTPctPFPA y-Atlanta1330.813419299 Carolina790.438357363 New Orleans790.438461454 Tampa Bay790.438389394 North WLTPctPFPA y-Green Bay1150.688433336 x-Minnesota1060.625379348 Chicago1060.625375277 Detroit4120.250372437 West WLTPctPFPA y-San Francisco1141.719397273 x-Seattle1150.688412245 St. Louis781.469299348 Arizona5110.313250357 x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division Sundays Games Tennessee 38, Jacksonville 20 Carolina 44, New Orleans 38 Buffalo 28, N.Y. Jets 9 Cincinnati 23, Baltimore 17 Pittsburgh 24, Cleveland 10 Indianapolis 28, Houston 16 N.Y. Giants 42, Philadelphia 7 Chicago 26, Detroit 24 Tampa Bay 22, Atlanta 17 San Diego 24, Oakland 21 San Francisco 27, Arizona 13 Seattle 20, St. Louis 13 Denver 38, Kansas City 3 Minnesota 37, Green Bay 34 New England 28, Miami 0 Washington 28, Dallas 18 End of Regular SeasonAFC leadersWeek 17 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt Manning, DEN58340046593711 Brady, NWE6374014827348 Roethlis., PIT4492843265268 Schaub, HOU54435040082212 P. Rivers, SND52733836062615 Flacco, BAL53131738172210 Dalton, CIN52832936692716 C. Palmer, OAK56534540182214 Fitzpatrick, BUF50530634002416 Gabbert, JAC278162166296 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD Charles, KAN28515095.2991t5 Foster, HOU35114244.064615 Ridley, NWE29012634.364112 Spiller, BUF20712446.01626 Johnson, TEN27612434.5094t6 R. Rice, BAL25711434.45469 Green-Ellis, CIN27810943.94486 Greene, NYJ27610633.85368 Re. Bush, MIA2279864.3465t6 Richardson, CLE2679503.5632t11 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Welker, NWE118135411.5596 Johnson, HOU112159814.360t4 Wayne, IND106135512.8335 A.. Green, CIN97135013.973t11 Thomas, DEN94143415.371t10 Decker, DEN85106412.55513 Johnson, BUF79104613.2636 B. Myers, OAK7980610.2294 Hartline, MIA74108314.680t1 B. Lloyd, NWE7491112.3534 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts A. Foster, HOU171520102 Decker, DEN13013078 Richardson, CLE12111072 Ridley, NWE12120072 Green, CIN11011066 Gronkow., NWE11011066 R. Rice, BAL1091060 Thomas, DEN10010060 H. Miller, PIT808050 Re. Bush, MIA862048NFC leadersWeek 17 Quarterbacks AttComYdsTDInt Rodgers, GBY5523714295398 Griffin III, WAS3932583200205 R. Wilson, SEA39325231182610 M. Ryan, ATL61542247193214 Brees, NOR67042251774319 Romo, DAL64842549032819 Manning, NYG53632139482615 Newton, CAR48528038691912 Bradford, STL55132837022113 Freeman, TAM55830640652717 Rushers AttYdsAvgLGTD Peterson, MIN34820976.0382t12 Morris, WAS33516134.8139t13 Lynch, SEA31515905.0577t11 Martin, TAM31914544.5670t11 Gore, SNF25812144.71378 Forte, CHI24810944.41465 Jackson, STL25710424.05464 Bradshaw, NYG22110154.59376 McCoy, PHL2008404.20342 Griffin III, WAS1208156.7976t7 Receivers NoYdsAvgLGTD Johnson, DET122196416.1535 Marshall, CHI118150812.85611 Witten, DAL11010399.4363 Gonzalez, ATL9393010.0258 Bryant, DAL92138215.085t12 White, ATL92135114.7597 Cruz, NYG86109212.780t10 Crabtree, SNF85110513.049t9 Graham, NOR8598211.6469 Colston, NOR83115413.96010 Scoring Touchdowns TDRushRecRetPts Jones, GBY14014084 Peterson, MIN13121080 Morris, WAS13130078 D. Bryant, DAL12012074 M. Lynch, SEA12111072 Do. Martin, TAM12111072 B. Marshall, CHI11011066 M. Turner, ATL11101066 Colston, NOR10010060 Cruz, NYG10010060AP Top 25The top 25 teams in The Associated Press college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 30, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last weeks ranking: RecordPtsPrv 1. Duke (63)12-01,6231 2. Michigan (2)13-01,5472 3. Arizona12-01,4743 4. Louisville12-11,4344 5. Indiana12-11,3785 6. Kansas11-11,3136 7. Syracuse11-11,1979 8. Ohio St.10-21,07910 9. Minnesota12-197811 10. Gonzaga12-194613 11. Illinois13-192912 12. Missouri10-29127 13. Florida9-281014 14. Cincinnati12-17618 15. Georgetown10-171815 16. Creighton12-162916 17. Butler10-259118 18. Michigan St.11-244719 19. San Diego St.11-243717 20. New Mexico13-1389 TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 B3 21. Notre Dame12-136121 22. Oklahoma St.10-133322 23. NC State10-227023 24. Pittsburgh12-121924 25. Kansas St.10-214925 Others receiving votes: UNLV 52, North Carolina 38, Wyoming 28, Temple 21, VCU 15, Kentucky 13, Wichita St. 11, UConn 9, UCLA 6, Maryland 5, Oregon 3.NBA standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York219.700 Brooklyn1614.5335 Boston1416.4677 Philadelphia1417.4527 Toronto1120.35510 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami208.714 Atlanta199.6791 Orlando1218.4009 Charlotte723.23314 Washington424.14316 Central Division WLPctGB Chicago1612.571 Indiana1713.567 Milwaukee1613.552 Detroit1122.3337 Cleveland725.21911 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio248.750 Memphis198.7042 Houston1614.5337 Dallas1219.38711 New Orleans723.23316 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City236.793 Denver1715.5317 Minnesota1413.5198 Portland1514.5178 Utah1517.4699 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers256.806 Golden State2110.6774 L.A. Lakers1515.5009 Sacramento1119.36713 Phoenix1120.35514 Sundays Games San Antonio 111, Dallas 86 Detroit 96, Milwaukee 94 Sacramento 118, Boston 96 L.A. Clippers 107, Utah 96 Mondays Games Charlotte at Chicago, late Memphis at Indiana, late Miami at Orlando, late Atlanta at Houston, late Brooklyn at San Antonio, late Phoenix at Oklahoma City, late Todays Games Dallas at Washington, 6 p.m. Portland at New York, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m. Wednesdays Games Sacramento at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Portland at Toronto, 7 p.m. Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m. Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m. Memphis at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.NBA leadersThrough Dec. 30 Scoring GFGFTPTSAVG Bryant, LAL3030922090330.1 Anthony, NYK2423515268428.5 Durant, OKC2926624182428.4 Harden, HOU2922225475526.0 James, MIA2828511772625.9 Westbrook, OKC2921714762221.4 Aldridge, POR2722911257021.1 Wade, MIA2418511148820.3 Lee, GOL3126010262220.1 Curry, GOL312159962120.0 Pierce, BOS3019714859819.9 Ellis, MIL2921112257019.7 Parker, SAN3022511357719.2 Holiday, PHL272017150218.6 Lillard, POR291849753218.3 Mayo, DAL312009756818.3 Gay, MEM261828247418.2 DeRozan, TOR3121012956518.2 Walker, CHA3020010654218.1 Bosh, MIA2718111548317.9 FG Percentage FGFGAPCT Chandler, NYK144209.689 Jordan, LAC124209.593 McGee, DEN146249.586 Howard, LAL186325.572 Ibaka, OKC173306.565 Lopez, NOR149266.560 Hickson, POR146262.557 James, MIA285520.548 Bosh, MIA181333.544 Griffin, LAC225416.541 Rebounds GOFFDEFTOTAVG Varejao, CLE2513822336114.4 Randolph, MEM2712720833512.4 Howard, LAL3011124435511.8 Asik, HOU309525434911.6 Hickson, POR2811619330911.0 Lee, GOL319424734111.0 Noah, CHI2810219429610.6 Chandler, NYK3012817930710.2 Faried, DEN3213019432410.1 Jefferson, UTA316624531110.0 Assists GASTAVG Rondo, BOS2630211.6 Paul, LAC312929.4 Holiday, PHL272408.9 Vasquez, NOR302648.8 Westbrook, OKC292518.7 Williams, Bro292257.8 Calderon, TOR312367.6 Parker, SAN302207.3 Lawson, DEN322216.9 Nelson, ORL221516.9Baseball calendarJan. 9 Hall of Fame voting announced. Jan. 9-10 Owners meeting, Paradise Valley, Ariz. Jan. 15 Salary arbitration filing. Jan. 18 Salary arbitration figures exchanged. Feb. 1-21 Salary arbitration hearings, Phoenix. Feb. 12 Mandatory reporting date for players participating in the World Baseball Classic in Asia. Mandatory reporting date for all other pitchers and catchers participating in the WBC. Voluntary reporting date for pitchers and catchers not participating in the WBC. Feb. 15 Mandatory reporting date for WBC players not participating in Asia. Voluntary reporting date for position players not participating in the WBC. Feb. 20 Mandatory reporting date for players not participating in the WBC. March 2-11 Teams may renew contracts of unsigned players. March 2-19 World Baseball Classic. March 13 Last day to place a player on unconditional release waivers and pay 30 days termination pay instead of 45 days. March 27 Last day to request unconditional release waivers on a player without having to pay his full 2013 salary. improvement this year. Instead, it was even worse. The Eagles finished 4-12. Andy Reid won the most games of any head coach in Eagles history and he is someone I respect greatly and will remain friends with for many years to come, Lurie said. But, it is time for the Eagles to move in a new direction. Andy leaves us with a winning tradition that we can build upon. Shurmur went 9-23 in his two seasons with the Browns, who will embark on yet another offseason of change the only constant in more than a decade of futility. Cleveland has lost at least 11 games in each of the past five seasons and made the playoffs just once since returning to the NFL as an expansion team in 1999. Ultimately our objective is to put together an organization that will be the best at everything we do, Browns CEO Joe Banner said. On the field, our only goal is trying to win championships. Crennel took over with three games left in the 2011 season after GM Scott Pioli fired Todd Haley. Kansas City will have the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft as a result of having one of the worst seasons in its 53-year history. The only other time the Chiefs finished 2-14 was 2008, the year before Pioli was hired. I am embarrassed by the poor product we gave our fans this season, and I believe we have no choice but to move the franchise in a different direction, Chiefs chairman Clark Hunt said in a statement. Gailey, the former Dallas Cowboys coach, compiled a 16-32 record in his three seasons in Buffalo, never doing better than 6-10. This will probably be, and I say probably, but I think it will be the first place thats ever fired me that Ill pull for, Gailey said. Smith and the Bears went 10-6 this season and just missed a playoff spot. But Chicago started 7-1 this year and has struggled to put together a productive offense throughout Smiths tenure. His record was 81-63 with the Bears. The Rose Bowl is a culmination of two resilient tenures at a notoriously fickle position. Both backs are playing in their third straight BCS bowls: Ball was outstanding in both of the Badgers previous trips to the Rose Bowl, while Taylor had big games in Orange and Fiesta bowls over the past two years. Ball, who won the Doak Walker Award as the nations top running back this season, has scored 82 touchdowns more than anybody in FBS history. Taylor is merely the leading rusher in Stanford history and one score shy of becoming the schools career touchdowns leader as an incredibly durable performer who almost never leaves the field when the Cardinal have the ball. Yet neither Ball nor Taylor started his college career as the main man, instead winning their starting jobs through persistence and hard work. Taylor was a backup to Toby Gerhart as a freshman, getting just 56 carries. He was overshadowed for most of his first three seasons on The Farm with Heisman contenders Gerhart and Andrew Luck in the same backfield before getting the spotlight this year and even then, he was overshadowed on the West Coast by fellow Pac-12 ball-carriers Kenjon Barner at Oregon, KaDeem Carey at Arizona and Johnathan Franklin at UCLA. Yet Taylor broke Darrin Nelsons Stanford career rushing record in the Pac-12 title game, getting 78 more yards to give him 4,212 in his career. With a touchdown against Wisconsin, hell break his career tie with Gerhart at 44 TDs. I dont worry about people paying attention to me as long as were winning games, because thats all you can control, Taylor said. Ball played behind John Clay as a freshman and in a three-back combo with Clay and James White as a sophomore. Ball was frequently the third option in that troika in 2010, particularly when he didnt even play in a win over Ohio State, a setback that left him contemplating a transfer or moving to linebacker. Northern Illinois (12-1) is the first Mid-American Conference team to play in the Bowl Championship Series. The Huskies made it when they cracked the top 16 in the final standings by 0.0404 points, setting off a celebration in DeKalb and a backlash everywhere else. The BCS busters arrived in south Florida without apology. There are a lot of angry people out there, NIU offensive coordinator Bob Cole said. But there are probably 120 of us in the hotel that are really happy about the whole deal. We dont really care what everybody else thinks. The bowl berth meant 17 Huskies would see the ocean for the first time. One story about the team used the phrase bowl bumpkins. We laugh at it, whatever thats supposed to mean, linebacker Tyrone Clark said. We take this as an amazing opportunity for the MAC, the school and the players. Actually, success is nothing new to the Huskies, who are playing in a bowl for the fifth consecutive season. Since October 2011 they have the best record in the country at 21-1. Theyve won 12 games in a row, matching Ohio State and Notre Dame for the longest active winning streak. Quarterback Jordan Lynch leads the nation in rushing and total offense, and he finished seventh in the Heisman Trophy voting. But the Huskies barely beat Army, Toledo and Kansas. They lost to Iowa, which won only three other games. Theyve never beaten an opponent ranked higher than 15th. At a news conference Monday for the head coaches, Florida States Jimbo Fisher agreed to pose with the Orange Bowl trophy. Northern Illinois Rod Carey declined, but not because his team is a two-touchdown underdog. Underdog? What is that? Carey said. Our kids play with a chip on their shoulder all the time. I mean, if we were favored by 21 points Id be more nervous. Until kickoff, its impossible to know how seriously Florida State (11-2) will take a supposedly unimposing opponent. The matchups a letdown for the Seminoles, who wanted to wait another week to play in Miami in the BCS title game. But in the days leading up to the game, the Seminoles said all the right things about Northern Illinois. Were not going to underestimate anybody, receiver Rodney Smith said. Everybody is trying to say NIU doesnt deserve to be here, but as a team were saying theyre here for a reason. Were going to treat them like theyre the No. 1-ranked team in the nation. Theyre No. 1 in DeKalb, anyway, especially in the wake of their Orange Bowl berth. Theyve got signs all over the place in the street back home Go Huskies and Good Luck in the Orange Bowl, Cole said. For what it has done for our community, our players, our school, it has been unbelievable. DeKalb is located an hour west of Chicago, on the banks of the Kishwaukee River, in Rand McNally grid C-10. A good crowd at Huskies Stadium is 18,000, and the towns population of 45,000 would barely fill half of the Orange Bowls seats. In DeKalb youve got your local cornfields, linebacker Clark said. Weve got a lot of space there. And youve got your daily wind. Its just a small town with a nice-size university and a select number of people. Added teammate Sean Progar: Theres not too much to do but play football. Thats what the small-town Huskies will do Tuesday on their biggest stage ever. FIREDContinued from Page B1 ORANGEContinued from Page B1 ROSEContinued from Page B1

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Kanye West, Kim Kardashian expecting childATLANTIC CITY, N.J. A kid for Kimye: Kanye West and Kim Kardashian are expecting their first child. The rapper announced at a concert Sunday night that his girlfriend is pregnant. Kardashian was in the crowd at Revel Resorts Ovation Hall with her mother, Kris Jenner, and Wests mentor and best friend, Jay-Z. West told the crowd of more than 5,000 in song form: Now you having my baby. The crowd roared. And so did people on the Internet. The news instantly went viral on Twitter and Facebook, with thousands posting and commenting on the expecting couple. Most of the Kardashian clan also tweeted about the news, including Kims sisters. Kourtney Kardashian wrote: Another angel to welcome to our family. Overwhelmed with excitement! West, 35, also told concertgoers to congratulate his baby mom and that this was the most amazing thing. Representatives for West and Kardashian, 32, didnt immediately respond to emails about the pregnancy. The rapper and reality TV star went public in March. Kardashian married NBA player Kris Humphries in August 2011 and their divorce is not finalized.Lady Gagas antibullying effort taps Yale expertNEW HAVEN, Conn. Lady Gaga has enlisted a Yale University psychologist in her campaign to end bullying. Marc Brackett, a research scientist, is one of seven scholars named to the advisory board of the singers Born This Way Foundation. The New Haven Registerreported Brackett has been working on an antibullying project with Facebook. This spring hell head up a new center at Yale devoted to teaching emotional intelligence in schools and other organizations. Brackett, who is deputy director of Yales Health, Emotion and Behavior Laboratory, said understanding how to recognize and regulate emotion makes a big impact on the workplace, family life and school. Its particularly relevant in curbing bullying. Brackett said emotions play a role in memories, relationships, decisionmaking and health. Associated PressLOS ANGELES The big deal for Hollywood is not the record $10.8 billion that studios took in domestically in 2012. Its the fact that the number of tickets sold went up for the first time in three years. Thanks to inflation, revenue generally rises in Hollywood as admission prices climb each year. The real story is told in tickets, whose sales have been on a general decline for a decade, bottoming out in 2011 at 1.29 billion, their lowest level since 1995. The industry rebounded this year, with ticket sales projected to rise 5.6 percent to 1.36 billion by Dec. 31, according to box-office tracker Hollywood.com. Thats still well below the modern peak of 1.6 billion tickets sold in 2002, but in an age of cozy home theater setups and endless entertainment gadgets, studio executives consider it a triumph that they were able to put more butts in cinema seats this year than last. It is a victory, ultimately, said Don Harris, head of distribution at Paramount Pictures. If we deliver the product as an industry that people want, they will want to get out there. Even though you can sit at home and watch something on your large screen in high-def, people want to get out. Domestic revenue should finish up nearly 6 percent from 2011s $10.2 billion and top Hollywoods previous high of $10.6 billion set in 2009. The year was led by a pair of superhero sagas, Disneys The Avengers with $623 million domestically and $1.5 billion worldwide and the Warner Bros. Batman finale The Dark Knight Rises with $448 million domestically and $1.1 billion worldwide. Sonys James Bond adventure Skyfall is closing in on the $1 billion mark globally, and the list of action and family-film blockbusters includes The Hunger Games, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part Two, Ice Age: Continental Drift, Madagascar 3: Europes Most Wanted, The Amazing SpiderMan and Brave. Before television, movies were the biggest thing going, with ticket sales estimated as high as 4 billion a year domestically in the 1930s and s. Movie-going eroded steadily through the 1970s as people stayed home with their small screens. The rise of videotape in the 1980s further cut into business, followed by DVDs in the s and big, cheap flatscreen TVs in recent years. Todays video games, mobile phones and other portable devices also offer easy options to tramping out to a movie theater. Its all been a continual drain on cinema business, and cynics repeatedly predict the eventual demise of movie theaters. Yet Hollywood fights back with new technology of its own, from digital 3-D to booming surround-sound to the clarity of images projected at high-frame rates, which is being tested now with The Lord of the Rings prelude The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, shown in select theaters at 48 frames a second, double the standard speed. For all of the annoyances of theaters parking, pricy concessions, sitting next to strangers texting on their iPhones cinemas still offer the biggest and best way to see a movie. Every home has a kitchen, but you cant get into a good restaurant on Saturday night, said Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Warner Bros. People want to escape. Thats the nature of society. The adult population just is not going to sit home seven days a week, even though they have technology in their home thats certainly an improvement over what it was 10 years ago. People want to get out of the house, and no matter what they throw in the face of theatrical exhibition, it continues to perform at a strong level. Even real-life violence at the movie theater didnt turn audiences away. Some moviegoers thought twice about heading to the cinema after a gunman killed 12 people and injured 58 at a screening of The Dark Knight Rises in Colorado last summer, but if there was any lull in attendance, it was slight and temporary. Ticket sales went on a tear for most of the fall. While domestic revenues inch upward most years largely because of inflation, the real growth areas have been overseas, where more and more fans are eager for the next Hollywood blockbuster. Rentrak, which compiles international box office data, expects 2012s foreign gross to be about $23 billion, 3 percent higher than in 2011. No data was yet available on the number of tickets sold overseas this past year. International business generally used to account for less than half of a studio films overall receipts. Films now often do two or even three times as much business overseas as they do domestically. Some movies that were duds with U.S. audiences, such as Battleship and John Carter, can wind up being $200 million hits with overseas crowds. Whether finishing a good year or a bad one, Hollywood executives always look ahead to better days, insisting that the next crop of blockbusters will be bigger than ever. The same goes this time as studio bosses hype their 2013 lineup, which includes the latest Iron Man, Star Trek, Hunger Games and Thor installments, the Superman tale Man of Steel and the second chapter in The Hobbit trilogy. Twelve months from now, they hope to be talking about another revenue record topping this years $10.8 billion. Ive been saying were going to hit that $11 billion level for about three years now, said Paul Dergarabedian, a box-office analyst for Hollywood.com. Next year I think is the year we actually do it. Birthday What youve learned from experience can be effectively used to your advantage in the year ahead, if youre brave and canny. Knowledge has much power, as youll be able to prove. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Should you find yourself involved in an incident where youre tempted to respond to pettiness with the same, do your best to rise above temptation and instead act responsibly. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) By sizing up business situations realistically, youll quickly discover that you dont have to bargain from weakness. Dont give the other party an edge that isnt there. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) A pleasant surprise might be in store, when you discover that someone whom you thought unaware of your existence instead has some very nice things to say about you. Aries (March 21-April 19) Appearances wont matter so much at present, but a good performance will really count. Youll have little to fear if your efforts and industry live up to your promises. Taurus (April 20-May 20) If a wily antagonist tries to pull something cute over you in front of your friends today, let this person know immediately that youre onto what s/he is trying to do. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Opportunities could be lurking in unexpected places. Dont hesitate for one minute to transform something questionable into what you always knew it could be. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Speak up and say what you believe needs to be said, and not just what you think others want to hear. Sincerity serves a constructive purpose, while evasion causes problems. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) An adversary who usually succeeds using shifty tactics will be no match for you. Youll be ready for this persons guile and will easily circumvent his or her schemes. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Arousing the spirit of cooperation in others is something you do best when youre fully engaged. Dont hesitate to go after the support of some enthusiastic allies if you need it. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) When you are motivated by unselfishness, any arrangement you take on is likely to turn out a success. This is because you gain strength from giving and not taking. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You are able to easily adapt to unfamiliar people or groups. Anyone who lacks your talent will be eyeing you with envy for your skill. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Allowing yourself to be intimidated by uncertainties or challenges will only cause more problems, especially where your work or career is concerned. Stay strong. From wire reports Kim Kardashian Kanye West Today inHISTORY SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30 Fantasy 5: 7 16 19 27 33 5-of-52 winners$96,530.59 4-of-5265$117.50 3-of-58,457$10 Todays Highlight: On Jan. 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln signed and issued the Emancipation Proclamation, declaring that slaves in rebel states shall be forever free. On this date: In 1785, The Daily Universal Register which later became the Times of London published its first issue. In 1892, the Ellis Island Immigrant Station in New York formally opened. In 1913, the U.S. Parcel Post system went into operation. In 1942, 26 countries, including the United States, signed the Declaration of the United Nations, pledging not to make a separate armistice or peace with members of the Axis. In 1953, country singer Hank Williams Sr., 29, was discovered dead in the back seat of his car during a stop in Oak Hill, W.Va., while he was being driven to a concert date in Canton, Ohio. In 1959, Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries overthrew Cuban leader Fulgencio Batista, who fled to the Dominican Republic. In 1962, The Beatles (with Pete Best) auditioned for Decca Records, which opted to sign Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead. In 1983, the current version of the Internet came into being as the Internet protocol suite, commonly known as TCP/IP, became the mandatory standard. In 1984, the breakup of AT&T took place as the telecommunications giant was divested of its 22 Bell System companies under terms of an antitrust agreement. In 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully split into two new countries, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. In 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect. Ten years ago: More than two dozen surgeons in West Virginia stopped performing elective surgeries to protest the high cost of malpractice insurance. (They returned to work two weeks later when they were convinced that the governor and the legislature would address their concerns.) Five years ago: New nosmoking rules went into effect in France, prohibiting people from lighting up in cafes, bars and restaurants. One year ago: A Mount Rainier National Park ranger, Margaret Anderson, was shot and killed by the driver of a car that blew through a checkpoint. (Searchers later found the body of the man, 24-year-old Benjamin Colton Barnes, in a snowy creek.) Todays Birthdays: Former Sen. Ernest Hollings, D-S.C., is 91. Actor Frank Langella is 75. Rock singer-musician Country Joe McDonald is 71. Writercomedian Don Novello is 70. Thought for Today: If you asked me for my New Year Resolution, it would be to find out who I am. Cyril Cusack, Irish actor (19101993). INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www.flalottery.com, or call 850-487-7777. Spotlight onPEOPLE FloridaLOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Because of early deadlines Monday lottery numbers are not in todays paper. Page B4TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE TodaysHOROSCOPE Ticket rush: Film fans hand Hollywood record cash Associated PressThis year was led by a pair of superhero sagas, Disneys The Avengers, below, with $623 million domestically and $1.5 billion worldwide and the Warner Bros. Batman finale The Dark Knight Rises, above, with $448 million domestically and $1.1 billion worldwide.

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000DMNW Little to no out of pocket expense for most Medicare Patients with secondary insurances. For Appointment Call Toll Free 1-855-Gulfcoast (1-855-485-3262) www.gulfcoastspine.net Get Back Into Get Back Into Get Back Into The Swing Of Life The Swing Of Life The Swing Of Life With With With Minimally Minimally Minimally Invasive Invasive Invasive Spine Spine Spine Surgery Surgery Surgery Failed Laser Spine Surgery Spinal Stenosis Herniated Disc Degenerative Disc Disease Scoliosis Spinal Fractures due to Trauma or Osteoporosis Board Certified Spine Surgeons Specializing in the Treatment of Back and Leg Pain Due to: Minimally Invasive Spine Surgeons James J. Ronzo, D.O. Frank S. Bono, D.O. Board Certified, Fellowship Trained Well, it is 2013 Happy New Year. I hope all of you had a great time with your family and friends through this holiday season. I enjoyed the relaxation of not going anywhere and just staying home. As we all know, with the New Year comes talk about some resolutions. I thought I would put a different twist on my column today and talk about some of the services dentistry has to offer that people might shy away from and write a small note as to why you shouldnt worry so much about them. Maybe after reading this, you will make some new resolutions. Smile Makeover you may think that this needs to be very involved, time consuming and costly. The truth is that it does not have to be. Go talk to your dentist about what your goals are, and he or she will likely give you many alternatives, one of which should meet your needs. Root Canals they simply are not what most people think of when they hear they need a root You dont say List: No love for fiscal cliff, spoiler alert Associated Press DETROITSpoiler alert: This story contains words and phrases that some people want to ban from the English language. Spoiler alert is among them. So are kick the can down the road, trending and bucket list. A dirty dozen have landed on the 38th annual List of Words to be Banished from the Queens English for Misuse, Overuse and General Uselessness. The nonbinding, tongue-in-cheek decree released Monday by northern Michigans Lake Superior State University is based on nominations submitted from the United States, Canada and beyond. Spoiler alert, the seemingly thoughtful way to warn readers or viewers about looming references to a key plot point in a film or TV show, nevertheless passed its use-by date for many, including Joseph Foly, of Fremont, Calif. He argued in his submission the phrase is used as an obnoxious way to show one has trivial information and is about to use it, no matter what. At the risk of further offense, heres another spoiler alert: The phrase receiving the most nominations this year is fiscal cliff, banished because of its overuse by media outlets when describing across-the-board federal tax increases and spending cuts that economists say could harm the economy in the new year without congressional action. You cant turn on the news without hearing this, said Christopher Loiselle, of Midland, Mich., in his submission. Im equally worried about the River of Debt and Mountain of Despair. Other terms coming in for a literary lashing are superfood, guru, job creators and double down. University spokesman Tom Pink said that in nearly four decades, the Sault Ste. Marie school has banished around 900 words or phrases, and somehow the whole idea has survived rapidly advancing technology and diminishing attention spans. Nominations used to come by mail, then fax and via the schools website, he said. Now most come through the universitys Facebook page. Thats fitting, since social media has helped accelerate the life cycle of certain words and phrases, such as this years entry YOLO you only live once. The list surprises me in one way or another every year, and the same way every year: Im always surprised how people still like it, love it, he said. As we begin a new year, we all have many things to be thankful for. And many of us, including myself, will make New Years resolutions that will improve our overall health. Over the years, I have discussed on many occasions that controlling our weight, exercising, and avoiding tobacco products could make the greatest impact on life expectancy. Now there is even more data supporting this claim regarding the risk of smoking, and it is not cancer related. New research data now shows that for women without coronary heart disease (CHD) early in life, smoking, even in small quantities, is associated with a significantly Smoking ups cardiac death in women See BENNETT/ Page C5 Dr. Sunil GandhiCANCER & BLOOD DISEASE New Years resolutions It is New Years Day and we are all excited about it. It brings new hope, new expectations and new resolutions. New Years Day has always been a time for looking back to the past, and more importantly, forward to the coming year. Its a time to reflect on the changes we want (or need) to make and resolve to follow through on those changes. This year I am going to suggest some New Years resolutions, which can help improve your health and cut down on the risk of cancer. 1. Lose weight: Obesity accounts for one in seven cancers in the United States and it also increases the risk for diabetes, high blood pres sure, heart attacks, See GANDHI/ Page C5 January brings in the New Year, playoff game parties, bowl games, and of course the Super Bowl. That means lots of people interacting, lots of people touching things, and lots of germs spreading, especially if there are not good hand washing techniques being implemented. We know from previous articles I have written that cold weather brings on a spike in viruses that can live on surfaces that we come in contact with every day. Hand washing is a good way to cut down the transmission of viruses and bacteria that can make us quite sick. In some instances, the transmission of bacteria and viruses can be deadly, and this includes methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, which is a type of staph bacteria that is becoming increasingly more resistant. It used to be thought of as a bacteria that was only found in places like hospitals and nursing homes. Now its more common in the general community. Hand washing seems to have gotten to be a little bit more routine because of these bugs out there. Look at the spike in the use of alcohol-based hand gels, which are a good choice when water is January germs Resolve to worry less about dentistry in new year See VASCIMINI/ Page C5 See GRILLO/ Page C5 Dr. Denis GrilloEAR, NOSE & THROAT Dr. C. Joseph BennettNAVIGATING CANCER Dr. Frank VasciminiSOUND BITES Special to the ChronicleMums the wordDETROIT Lake Superior State Universitys 38th annual list of banished words: HEALTH& LIFE Section CTUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 INSIDE Richard Hoffmann /Page C3 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE

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Gulfcoast North Area Health Education Center is partnering with Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute (RBOI), Citrus County Health Department and the First United Methodist Church of Homosassa to provide free sixweek tobacco dependence classes in Inverness, Lecanto and Homosassa. Classes are available during the day and in the evening beginning in January.Anyone interested in quitting tobacco can participate and will be provided with a free and optional supply of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) including patches, gum or lozenges. This program is funded by the Florida Department of Health. To register and find out more, call 813-9291000 or visit www.gnahec.org. LifeSouth Community Blood Centers: Donors in January will be entered in a drawing to win an iPad mini. To find a donor center or a blood drive near you, call 352-527-3061. Donors must be at least 17, or 16 with parental permission, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health to be eligible to donate. A photo ID is required. The Lecanto branch office is at 1241 S. Lecanto Highway (County Road 491), open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays (7 p.m. Wednesdays), 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays. The Inverness branch is at 301 W. Main St., open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays, (6:30 p.m. Wednesdays), 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and closed Sundays. Visit www.lifesouth.org. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 1, Walmart Supercenter, South Sunocast Boulevard, Homosassa. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 2, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, North Suncoast Boulevard, Crystal River. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 3, Walmart Supercenter, West Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Inverness. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, Big Lots, Southeast U.S. 19 Crystal River. 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church, West Gulf-toLake Highway, Lecanto. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, Walmart Supercenter, West Gulf-to-Lake Highway. Inverness. 8:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 5, Arbor Lakes Community, Lake Vista Trail, Hernando. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 6, Walmart Supercenter, South Sunocast Boulevard, Homosassa. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 7, Cypress Creek Academy, West Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto. 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, Withlacoochee River Electric Co-Op, Crystal River. CRYSTAL RIVER Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center continues the Know Your Stats prostate cancer awareness campaign this month with daily health tips available at facebook.com/srrmc, and is scheduling appointments for a free prostate cancer screening Jan. 30. The prostate cancer screening is available to men older than 40 who have not received a PSA test since January 2012. Call 352-795-1234 for more information. Flu shot clinics areofferedby B&W Rexall Drugs in Inverness. Call Donna Stevenson at 352-726-1555. Nature Coast EMS offer flu shots for $28; however, the flu shot is free with valid Medicare Part B, and many other insurance providers are also accepted. Flu shots are available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, (except holidays), at the Nature Coast EMS administration office on Homosassa Trail at Country Hill Drive in Lecanto. If your organization, business, ALF or other group would like to schedule a flu clinic at your location, call Jane Bedford at 352-249-4751 or email JaneB@naturecoastems.org. The George A. Dame Community Health Center BoardMeetings are at 3 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly at the Citrus County Health Department, 3700 W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto, in the first floor conference room. The Citrus Alliance Against Adult Abuse (C4A) monthly meeting is at 9:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly at HPH Hospice, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. For information, call Judy Stauffer at 352-303-2620. Your help is needed to protect our vulnerable against abuse, neglect and exploitation. Partners for a Substance-Free Citrus Inc. will meet the second Thursday monthly in the basement of the Citrus County School Board office in Inverness, 1007 W. Main St. Use the elevator to go to the basement. 8 to 9 a.m. board meeting. 9:15 to 9:30 a.m. coffee, doughnuts, networking. 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. membership meeting. For information, call the office at 352-389-0472 or email substancefree.citrus@yahoo. com. Citrus Memorial Health System will host a free smoking cessation class from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, in the auditorium on the main hospital campus. Tools to Quit is an intense two-hour seminar in which participants receive information on how to select and prepare for their own quit date. A trained Tobacco Cessation Specialist guides participants as they identify triggers and withdrawal symptoms, and brainstorms ways to cope with them. Free nicotine replacement therapy including patches, gum and lozenges will also be provided. Refreshments and educational materials will be available during the seminar. Seating is limited; register online at www.citrusmh.com/events or call 352-560-6266 to reserve a seat. Free eight-week Griefs Journey workshop from 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays beginning Jan. 30 for those who have experienced the death of a loved one, hosted by Paul Winstead, licensed mental health counselor and grief counselor with the Citrus team of HPH Hospice, at the First United Methodist Church of Homosassa. The experience of grieving and mourning the death of a loved one may be the most profound and intense emotional experience we have. Each individual experiences grief differently, but we can often identify with those who have also experienced the death of a loved one and not feel so alone. This educational and supportive course shows grief as a process in which the timing, intensity and order of each persons experiences are unique. Pre-registration is required. For information, call Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Healing Peoples Hearts in Citrus County offers care, comfort and support for community members. Visit HPH-Hospice.org. Nature Coast EMS Citizens Academy will begin Jan. 29, a hands-on opportunity for community members to see and learn what Nature Coast EMS Paramedics and EMTs do every day. Graduates learn skills they can use in actual emergencies, because the academy is focused on hands-on training, showing and teaching the skills that an EMS crew may use. Participants will get to practice starting IVs, intubations (placing a breathing tube), defibrillations, reading heart rhythms and doing a full code on a SIMMAN mannequin. In the final session, participants will take care of a simulated patient in a mock patient care scenario and have the opportunity to ride along with paramedics and EMTs and go on actual emergencies. The Nature Coast EMS Citizens Academy is free and meets from 6 to 9 p.m.every Tuesday for eight weeks. Call 352-249-4700 to register. HPH Hospice, Healing Peoples Hearts, two-day new volunteer orientation from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30, and Friday, Feb. 1, at the HPH Team offices, 3545 N. Lecanto Highway in the WinnDixie shopping plaza in Beverly Hills. HPH staff believe if you want to do more with your own life, there is no volunteer opportunity more rewarding than working with hospice. Qualifications needed: Caring heart, positive attitude, extra love to share and a big smile that appears on demand. RSVP or receive information by calling Debi Shields, volunteer coordinator, at 352-527-4600. Monthly diabetes selfmanagement education classes by Citrus Memorial Diabetes Center at Citrus Memorial Healthcare Center, Sugarmill Woods. These classes, taught by a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, offer an opportunity for those living with diabetes to learn about the importance of physical activity, meal planning and medication. Topics include blood glucose monitoring, problem solving, coping and reducing the risk for diabetes-related complications. To register for a class or to schedule a one-on-one appointment, call 352-341-6110. A physician referral is required. Hospice of Citrus County Inc. offers a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for individuals of all ages who are committed to the hospice philosophy and wish to make a positive impact on the lives of people. The Homosassa Too Thrift & Gift Shoppe is currently seeking those who have an interest in sorting, distributing or operating a cash register. Volunteers are also needed at Herrys Caf. Both are at 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Suite C., Homosassa. The goal of the Volunteer Department is to provide competent and confident volunteers. All volunteers are required to attend core Volunteer Training Orientation and ongoing in-service trainings throughout the year. Call Volunteer Director Cathi Thompson at 352-527-2020. Visit Hospice of Citrus County on Facebook or at www. hospiceofcitrus.org. Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE program offers free and unbiased information and assistance for all your health insurance issues. In Citrus County, there are four locations ready to serve your needs. For an appointment at any center, call 352-527-5956. Leave your name, telephone number and a short message. A SHINE counselor will return the call. Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. First United Methodist Church, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. St Annes Episcopal Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River. Inverness Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. Snyder Pharmacy, 102 E. Highland Blvd., Inverness, offers a drug Take-Back program to help patients safely dispose of medicines that may be dangerous to others and to the environment. Patients of any pharmacy may bring in unused or expired drugs in their original stock containers for free disposal. For information, call 352-341-1212. Support GROUPSNOTE: The holidays may cause some groups to cancel meetings. Call ahead if unsure. Alzheimers AssociationFlorida Gulf Coast Chapter support group: are attended by caregivers of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers Disease. The support group provides the caregivers an opportunity to reduce their isolation and receive support and knowledge from other caregivers. It helps to share experiences, increase feelings of self-worth, decrease a sense of isolation, learn from others in your situation, learn about community resources, and receive encouragement from other caregivers. All support groups are free of charge to caregivers.Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness, 11 a.m. first Tuesday monthly. Call Anne Black at 352-527-4600. BROOKSVILLE Womens breast cancer support group 6 to 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday monthly at Florida Cancer Institute-New Hope Center at 7154 Medical Center Drive, Spring Hill. Call Tambra Randazzo, R.T., at 352-592-8128. SPRING HILL Caregiver Support Group 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. the first Wednesday monthly, at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Pamela McGee, facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2:30 p.m. the first Thursday monthly at Superior Residences of Lecanto, 4865 W. Gulf-to-Lake Highway. RSVP if you require respite. Call Debbie Selsavage at 352-746-5483. Families Against Multiple Sclerosis Support Group, 11 a.m. the first Saturday monthly at Sandy Oaks RV Resort, 6760 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills, for families, friends and anyone affected by MS. Call 352-422-5868. BROOKSVILLE Man to Man prostate cancer support group, 6 to 7 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Brooksville Center, 7154 Medical Center Drive. Call Mary Capo at 352-596-1926. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group, 10 a.m. to noon the first Monday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W Marc Knighton Court in Lecanto. Pam Hall from Kids Central Inc. will facilitate the meeting. Call Pam at 352-387-3540. OCALA The Alzheimers and Memory Disorders support group of Ocala, 3 to 5 p.m. the first Monday monthly at the Medical Office Building at West Marion Community Hospital, 4600 S.W. 46th Court, second-floor Community Room. Call 352-401-1453. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, hosts a volunteer meeting at 10:30 a.m. the second Tuesday monthly, September to May. Call 352344-8111. HIV support group 3 to 4 p.m. the second Tuesday monthly at Citrus County Health Department, 3700 Sovereign Path, Lecanto. Open to all affected by HIV. Persons attending remain confidential, testing will be anonymous. Reservation not required. Call 352-5270068, ext. 281, if you have any questions. Bereaved Parents of the USA (BP/USA) grief support group for parents and grandparents who have experienced the death of a child, 7 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the First Presbyterian Church, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19 in Crystal River. Call Bernadette Passalacqua at 352-746-4664 or visit www.bereavedparents usa.org. Look Good ... Feel Better a free two-hour session for women undergoing radiation or chemotherapy, at 3 p.m. the second Wednesday monthly at the Cancer & Blood Disease Center, Lecanto, and 3 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Lecanto. Call Joann Brown at 352-341-7741 or the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665 to register. SPRING HILL Spinal Cord Injury support group, 5 p.m. second Thursday monthly in the gym at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital. Call Dee Hardee at 352-592-7237. NEW PORT RICHEY Community Chatterboxes support group to assist individuals suffering from communication deficits (i.e., aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, etc.) as a result of a cerebral vascular accident or other neurological disorders, 3 to 4 p.m. every other Thursday at Community Hospital, 5637 Marine Parkway, New Port Richey, FL 34652. Caregivers and spouses are encouraged to attend. Call 727-845-0757. Emotions Anonymous 12-step support group, noon the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Central Ridge Library, Forest Ridge Boulevard and Roosevelt, in Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Friends of the Blind 9 a.m. to noon the second Friday monthly. Call Butch Shultz at 352-344-2693 for location. Womens Breast Cancer Support Group, 11:30 a.m. the second Friday monthly, Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute in the Allen Ridge Medical Center, County Road 491, Lecanto. Light lunch served. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389.C2TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HEALTH& LIFE Geriatrics Family & General Medicine Internal Medicine Intensive Care (Hospital) Long-Term Care (Nursing Home) Homosassa 4363 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa Springs (352) 503-2011 Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:30pm, Saturday by appt. only 8:00am-11:00am B.K. Patel, M.D Internal Medicine H. Khan, M.D. Board Certified Family Pactice Beverly Hills 3775 N. Lecanto Hwy. Beverly Hills (352) 746-0600 Inverness 308 S. Line Ave. Inverness (352) 344-5511 000DLQH New Patients & Walk-Ins Are Always Welcome Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted Our Goal Is A Healthier You Active Staff at both Seven Rivers & Citrus Memorial Hospitals Primary Medical Care Centers 000DML4 HealthNOTES HEALTH NOTE GUIDELINES Support group information will list monthly meetings first, as space is available, then weekly meetings. It is the responsibility of each organization to inform the Chronicle about changes to existing listings. To submit information about upcoming seminars, health-related events open to the public or support group meetings, email newsdesk@chronicleonline .com attn: Health Notes; fax 352-563-5660 or write to: Health Notes c/o Citrus County Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Information relating to professional training or seminars attended by those in the health care industries are considered business briefs, and would appear in the Business Digest listings of Sundays Business section. To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 362563-5660. Be prepared to leave a detailed message with your name, phone number and the address of the news event. Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicles editors before a reporter is assigned. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit submissions. Publication of submitted information or photos on specific dates or pages cannot be guaranteed. See GROUPS/ Page C3 000DN96 Dr. Pablo Figueroa Se Habla Espaol 2222 Highway 44 W., Inverness Caring is my Profession Call for an Appointment 352-860-0633 ifamilypractice@tampbay.rr.com Accepting New Patients Serving Citrus County Since 1993 WE ACCEPT Medicare Aetna Humana United Healthcare Coventry Medicare Blue Cross/ Blue Shield Cigna Universal And Other Major Insurances

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Epilepsy support group at the Lakes Region Library, Inverness. Call Lili Jane at 352344-8765. Mended Hearts of Citrus County, for individuals who have or had cardiovascular disease, as well as caregivers and family members, 10 a.m. the second Friday monthly in the Gulf Room in the Historic Citrus High School; parking and transportation available from CMHS parking lot A2. Open to the public. Call Millie King, at 352-637-5525; or CMHS Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. The Area 13 Family Care Council 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday monthly at the Wildwood Agency for Persons with Disabilities office, 1601 W. Gulf Atlantic Highway (State Road 44). All persons interested in issues of those with Developmental Disabilities are encouraged to attend. Call Karen Huscher at 352-7261445 or email isabelfcc13@ yahoo.com. Area 13 covers Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties. There are 15 Family Care Councils with governor-appointed volunteer members, who are individuals with a developmental disability or are a family member. Seeking new members. Contact Huscher at 352-726-1445 or cbettykay@aol.com; facebook.com/groups/33163214018 6772/. Website: www.FCC Florida.org. NAMI-Citrus, locally chartered group of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, meets the second Monday monthly at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, on County Road 486 in Citrus Hills. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., speaker at 6:45 p.m. All those with an interest in mental health issues are welcome. Call 352-341-2273. SPRING HILL Healthy Hearts support group open to anyone looking for information on cardiac disease, 4 to 5:30 p.m. the second Monday monthly in the cafeteria conference room at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Brooksville. Admission is free and complimentary refreshments will be served. Seating is limited and reservations are required, call 352-628-6060 in Citrus, 352597-6333 in Hernando or visit the website www.OakHill Hospital.com. National Osteoporosis Foundation Citrus County Support Group, 1 p.m. the third Tuesday monthly at the Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Each month offers a different speaker. This is part of the NOFs Affiliated Support Group Program dedicated to providing accurate, timely information and support to people affected by osteoporosis. Call Laura Henderson at 352-341-4778 or email TheBoneZone2010@ yahoo.com. Nature Coast Multiple Myeloma Support Group 6 p.m. the third Wednesday monthly at the Oak Hill Hospital Partners Club (formerly Spring Hill Enrichment Center) at Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd. (State Road 50), Brooksville. Free dinner buffet will be served. Contact Herb and Dianne Terry at 352-6210672 or hterry1@tampabay.rr. com, or Richard Blustein at 352-428-4536 or Blustein22@ aol.com. SPRING HILL Look Good Feel Better Support Group, 3:30 to 5 p.m. third Wednesday monthly at the Florida Cancer Specialists, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203, in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call 352-688-7744. Different Strokes for Different Folks stroke support group, 10:30 a.m. to noon the third Thursday monthly in the Inpatient Rehabilitation Multipurpose Room at Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center in Crystal River. Call 352-7951234 for details. FFRA (Families and Friends Reaching for the Abilities), third Friday monthly at the Key Training Center in Inverness at 130 Heights Ave. Social time and business meeting at 9 a.m. is followed by a speaker at 10 a.m. Lisa Noble from the Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center will talk about wound care, hyperbaric medicine, diabetes and treating wounds. Call Ron Phillips, president, at 352382-7819 or visit www.ffracitrus. org. The Ostomy Support Group of Citrus County, 2 p.m. the third Sunday monthly in the Cypress Room on the first floor in the Citrus Memorial Health Systems Administrations Annex Building, across the street from the Medical Offices Building at 131 S. Citrus Ave., Inverness. Call Steve at 352229-4202, Sue at 352-5607918, Mel or Betty at 352-726-3802 or Sharon or Gerry at 352-382-4446. Email OSGofCC@yahoo.com. Celiac support meeting for all people who have celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis, 10 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday monthly in the Community Room at the Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Call Ken Kral at 352-684-4064 or email KenKral@msn.com. Fibromyalgia Support Group meets from 1:30 to 3 p.m. the third Saturday monthly at the organizers homein Inverness. Call Ada at 352637-3364. Support for People with Oral and Head and Neck Cancer (SPOHNC), 2 p.m. the fourth Monday of every quarter at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at the Allen Ridge CMHS campus, 522 N. Lecanto Highway in Lecanto. Monthly meetings offer information, support and encouragement to newly diagnosed patients, survivors, family members and friends in a friendly and non-threatening forum. Call Wendy Hall, LCSW, at 352527-0106 or whall@rboi.com. The Citrus Memorial Diabetes Support Group, 10:30 a.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly on the campus of Citrus Memorial Health System in the auditorium. Januarys program features a representative from Universal Healthcare who will discuss Medicare Advantage HMO, PPO and PFFS plans. An RSVP is necessary, as refreshments will be served. Call 352-341-6110. SPRING HILL Leukemia/Lymphoma Support Group 5 to 6:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Florida Cancer Institute-New Hopes Spring Hill Center, 10441 Quality Drive, Suite 203 in the Medical Arts Building next to Spring Hill Hospital. Call Jeff Haight, R.N., group facilitator, at 352-688-7744. Caregivers Support and Information meeting, 1 p.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at St. Timothy Lutheran Church, 1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River. Call Charlotte Downing at 352-422-7044 for directions/ information. Refreshments served. OCALA Ocala Health Stroke Support Group meets 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. the fourth Tuesday monthly at the Senior Wellness Community Center (9850 S.W. 84th Court, Suite 500, Ocala). Call 800-530-1188 to register. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Suncoast Chapter, Cancer Support Group (including Multiple Myeloma), 6 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at the Moose Lodge, 5214 Mariner Blvd., in Spring Hill. There is no charge and light refreshments are provided. Contact: Lourdes Arvelo, LCSW, patient services manager, at 813-963-6461 ext. 11, Lourdes.Arvelo@lls.org or visit The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society website at www.lls.org. Alzheimers caregiver support group by Alzheimers Family Organization, 2 p.m. the fourth Wednesday monthly at Sugarmill Manor, 8985 S Suncoast Blvd, Homosassa. Call Bevin Brayton at 352302-9066. SPRING HILL Stroke Support Group noon the fourth Thursday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Pam McDonald at 352-346-6359. PINELLAS PARK Connections fireside-discussion-style support group for cancer patients, 7 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, WellSpring Oncology, 6600 66th St. N., Pinellas Park, 727-343-0600; www.wellspringoncology.org. SPRING HILL Amputee support group 7 p.m. the last Monday monthly at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in the private dining room. Call Eva Baker at 352592-7232.Weekly meetings Together We Grow Nar-Anon Family Group 6:45 p.m. Wednesdays at Dunnellon Presbyterian Church, 20641 Chestnut St., Room 204 in office building, use right-side entrance across from the Memorial Garden; Nar-Anon is for family and friends of addicts. Find a free local support group in your area: call 888947-8885 or go to www.NARANONFL.org. Recovery from Food Addiction 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Annes Church, 9870 W. Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, in the parish hall library. Call Peg at 410903-7740. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA) is a free 12-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. For details or a list of meetings, call 352-2708534 or visit www.foodaddicts.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at Queen of Peace Catholic Church Main Hall, 6455 S.W. State Road 200, Ocala. Depression and anxiety peer support group meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays at Central Ridge Library. Bereavement Group, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the back hall, St. Thomas Church, off U.S. 19 south of Cardinal Street. Group is composed of men and women who are experiencing grief and are convinced Life can be good again. Open to all. Come or call Anne at 352-212-0632. Al-Anon groups meet regularly in Citrus County. Call 352-697-0497. Inverness AFG: 8 p.m. Mondays, Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church, 550 S. U.S. 41. Crystal River AFG: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Benedict Catholic Church, 455 S. Suncoast Blvd. Last Resort AFG: 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, First United Methodist Church, 3896 S. Pleasant Grove Road, Inverness. Lecanto AFG: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Unity Church of Citrus County, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Crystal River AFG: 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at YANA Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Awareness Lunch Bunch AFG: 12:30 p.m. Fridays, St. Margaret Episcopal Church, 114 N. Osceola Ave., Inverness. Beginners Al-Anon: 10 a.m. Saturdays at Yana Club, 147 Seventh St. (off Citrus Avenue), Crystal River. Tuesday Morning Serenity: 10 a.m. Tuesday at Unity Church, 2628 W. Woodview Lane, Lecanto. Alcoholics Anonymous : If you drink, and want to stop, call Alcoholics Anonymous Nature Coast Intergroup at 352621-0599. Visit the website: www.ncintergroup.com. AC Group, 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Church Without Walls, 3962 N. Roscoe Road, Hernando. Call Laverne at 352637-4563. Visit the website: www.alcoholicsforchrist.com. A 12-step Christian support group meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday at Living Waters Ministries, 12 N. Melbourne St., Beverly Hills. Call Meg at 352-527-2443. Free and open to the public. DUNNELLON Grief support group 6 p.m. Thursdays at the First Baptist Church of Dunnellon, 20831 Powell Road. Call the church at 352489-2730. Narcotics Anonymous: Easy Does It, 8 p.m. Monday and Saturday, Lions Den, U.S. 41, Floral City. It Works How and Why, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday and noon Sunday, YANA Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River. Focus on Recovery, 8 p.m. Thursday, First Christian Church, Grover Cleveland Boulevard, Homosassa. Recovery on the River, 8 p.m. Monday and Friday, Lecanto Church of Christ, State Road 44 and County Road 491, Lecanto; 8 p.m. Sunday 797 S. Rowe Terrace, Lecanto, east of C.R. 491 and S.R. 44. Narcotics Anonymous is not affiliated with any of the meeting facilities listed. Information line: 352-382-0851. Overeaters Anonymous : 5 p.m. Wednesdays at St. Annes Episcopal Church. Call Rita at 352-382-8503. Voices of Recovery, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Senior Center (V.A. building) on County Road 491, Lecanto. Call Dolores at 352-746-5019. The Circle of Love, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Thursdays at Our Lady of Grace Church in Beverly Hills, 6 Roosevelt Blvd. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The New Beginning, 7 p.m. Fridays at Our Lady of Grace, Roosevelt Boulevard, Beverly Hills. Call Carolyn at 352-341-0777. The Encouragers Support Group has been helping people deal with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and more. Weekly meeting. Call 352-637-3196. Anorexia and bulimia anonymous 12-step support group, 5:45 p.m. Mondays at the Yana Club, 147 N.W. Seventh St., Crystal River (behind the police station). Call Charmaine at 352-422-3234. Citrus Abuse Shelter Association (CASA), 1100 Turner Camp Road, Inverness, offers two free weekly womens domestic abuse support groups: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30 a.m. to noon Wednesdays. Child care available. Call CASA at 352-344-8111. Celebrate Recovery : 7 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the Christian Recovery Fellowship Church, 2242 W. State Road 44. Call 352726-2800. 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays at Seven Rivers Presbyterian Churchs Student Ministries Building. Dinner available before the meeting from 6 to HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 C3 Epilepsy drug treats partial-onset seizures Q:I heard a new drug was approved to treat epilepsy. What can you tell me of it? A: The FDA recently (2012) approved Fycompa (perampanel) for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy. Some people with epilepsy do not achieve good seizure control with current treatments, and Fycompa offers a new treatment option because it works in a different way than other anti-epileptic drugs. Fycompa blocks receptors in the brain that are stimulated by the chemical glutamate. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and it is thought to be involved in a number of neurological disorders caused by overexcitation of nerve cells in the brain. During clinical studies involving approximately 1,500 patients with partial-onset seizures, Fycompa helped to significantly reduce the frequency of seizures. The most common side effects of Fycompa reported by patients include dizziness, drowsiness, fatigue, irritability, falls, nausea, abnormal movements, balance disorder, vertigo and weight gain. However, other serious mental problems can occur in some patients. Partial seizures are the most common type of seizure seen in people with epilepsy. Epilepsy is a medical condition that produces seizures affecting a variety of mental and physical functions. According to the Institute of Medicine, epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting 2.2 million people in the United States. About 60 percent of people with epilepsy have partial seizures. In about 25 percent to 30 percent of patients with epilepsy, seizures cannot be controlled with treatment.Richard P. Hoffmann, Pharm.D., has been a pharmacist for more than 40 years. Send questions to him at 2960 E. Coventry Court, Hernando, FL 34442. Richard HoffmannASK THE PHARMACIST See GROUPS / Page C4 GROUPSContinued from Page C2 SPEAKERS AVAILABLE Seven Rivers Regional Speakers Bureau brings customized programs to clubs, churches and other community organizations. Contact Amy Kingery at 352-795-8344 or amy.kingery@hma.com. The Alzheimers Family Organization has speakers available for your organization or club. This presentation will include basic Alzheimers information and the services and programs that the organization offers to the Central Florida community. Call 888-496-8004 or 727-848-8888. SPRING HILL Health Matters Home Care has a Registered Nurse available to do free speaking engagements for your group, club, church or organization. Call 352-686-4493 or 352-686-5593. The Citrus Team of HPH Hospice and its not-for-profit Homecare affiliate, HPH Homecare, provide free, ongoing education to Citrus County residents about their many programs, services and volunteer opportunities. There is no charge for a speaker and the solicitation of funds is never involved. Educational materials are provided at no charge. Call Anne Black, community liaison, at 352-527-4600. Bon Image Most Insurance Accepted 352.503.2019 VEIN AND LASER CENTER Non-Surgical, Highly Effective Treatment To Eliminate Unwanted Leg Veins Spider Vein Treatment after consultation 2 Cardiovascular & Heart Transplant Specialists With Over 25 Yrs. Experience 000D6CT STATE-OF-THE-ART TREATMENT FOR VARICOSE AND SPIDER VEINS Do You Have Painful Achy Legs? 5466 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa Lose Weight For The Holidays! CALL FOR OUR HOLIDAY SPECIALS EFFECTIVE WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAMS Seasons Greetings 000DKYROTHER CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN OCALA & THE VILLAGES NEXT TO BEVERLY HILLS CLEANERS, NEAR INTERSECTION HWY. 491 AND 486 Call Today, Start Losing Tonight! FREE CONSULTATION *Results not typical. On MedaSlim, most clients expect t lose 1-2 pounds per week OVERWEIGHT? 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7 p.m. for $4 donation and a coffee house after. Call 352746-6200. Gulf to Lake Church Ministry Complex, West Gulf-toLake Highway in Crystal River. Dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays, followed by largeand smallgroup time and a Coffee Caf at 9. Call 352-586-4709. Nature Coast Ministries seeks to help the homeless and hurting of Citrus County. We offer referrals to Celebrate Recovery, call 352-563-1860. Overcomers Group for people recovering from addictions to drugs, alcohol or other out-of-control habits, 8 p.m. Mondays at the Sanctuary, 7463 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Call Paul at 352-628-2874. Dunnellon Life Recovery group for adults where addiction, compulsion and codependency issues are dealt with, at 7 p.m. Mondays at Rainbow Springs Village Church, 20222 S.W. 102nd St. Road, Dunnellon. Call Char at 352-465-1644 or Nancy at 352-794-0017. SPRING HILL Parkinsons Tai Chi Group 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the private dining room at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Spring Hill. Call Charissa Haffner at 352-346-8864. Organizations Alzheimers AssociationFlorida Gulf Coast Chapter affiliated support groups are for family members, caregivers and others interested in learning more about Alzheimers disease. Meetings are open to everyone and free of charge. To arrange free respite care so you can attend a group, call the Hernando office at 352-6884537 or 800-772-8672. Website: www.alzsupport.com Live chat every Wednesday at noon. Message boards open at all times to post questions and leave replies. Join the Alzheimers Association online community at www.alz.org/ living_with_alzheimers_ message_boards_lwa.asp. Brooksville: Lykes Memorial County Library, 238 Howell Ave.; 2:30 p.m. first Friday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Brooksville: Oak Hill Hospital Senior Partners, 11361 Cortez Blvd.; 2:30 p.m. first Thursday monthly. Call Jerry Fisher at 352-688-4537. Spring Hill: The Residence at Timber Pines, 3140 Forest Road; 2 p.m. third Monday monthly. Call Diane Koenig at 352-683-9009 or The Residence at 352-683-9009. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. First United Methodist Church of Homosassa has several support groups that run on a monthly basis. All groups are open to the public and free of charge, and meet at 1 p.m. in Room 203 in the Administration Building: First Monday: diabetic support group. Second Monday: Alzheimers/dementia caregivers support group. Fourth Monday: stroke survivors support group. Memory Lane Respite offered weekly for people with Alzheimers/dementia. Anyone bringing a loved one for the first time is encouraged to come early to fill out information forms. Call 352-628-4083 for meeting dates. Citrus Memorial Health System is a 198-bed, not-forprofit community hospital that provides health care services to residents of Citrus County and surrounding communities. Support group meetings are in the CMHS Administration Building unless indicated. ACS Man to Man Prostate Support and Education Program, 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday monthly. Meetings are in the conference room at the Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute at 522 N. Lecanto Highway in the Allen Ridge Medical Mall. Call 352-527-0106. AHEC Quit Smoking Group: 3 p.m. Tuesdays at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto. Call 813-929-1000, ext. 213. Breast Cancer Support Group: 11:30 a.m. the second Friday, Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Call Judy Bonard at 352-527-4389. Citrus Cancer Support: 4:30 p.m. the third Tuesday, cafeteria meeting room. Call Carol at 352-726-1551, ext. 6596 or ext. 3329. Cancer Support: at Cancer Treatment Center. Call Jeannette at 352-746-1100 for date and time. Diabetes Support Group: Call Carol McHugh, R.N., at 352-341-6110 for details. Head and Neck Cancer Support: Robert Boissoneault Cancer Institute. Contact Wendy Hall at 352-527-0106. Heart-Healthy Eating Workshop: 1:30 to 3 p.m. second Wednesday every other month, CMHS Medical Office Building. Call 352-560-6266 or 352-344-6538 to register. Look Good Feel Better Group: monthly at Robert Boissoneault Oncology Institute, Allen Ridge Medical Mall, 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council. A licensed cosmetologist is present to advise women about many issues. For dates, times, more information or to register, call the American Cancer Society at 800-395-5665. Mended Hearts Support Group: 10 a.m. second Friday, Gulf Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Cardiovascular Services at 352-344-6416. Ostomy Support: 2 p.m. third Sunday, Cypress Room at CMHS Historic Building. Call Steve Spielman at 352-2294202, Sue Penner at 352-5607918, Sharon Brummer at 352-382-4446 or Betty or Mel Shipley at 352-341-0005. Stroke Support Group of Citrus County: 3 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, CMHS Annex Building conference room, State Road 44 across from Walgreens. Call 352-3446596 or 352-344-1646. Hospice of Citrus County support groups and workshops. Call 866-642-0962 or 352527-2348 for information. Grief workshops: 1 p.m. Thursday Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326. S. Line Ave., Inverness. 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday Newly Bereaved Grief Workshop, Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Grief support groups: 11 a.m. Tuesday Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church Parish Life Center, 6 Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. 9 a.m. Wednesday Griefs Journey ... A Walking Group, Whispering Pines Park (Parking Area E). 10 a.m. Thursday Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. 2 p.m. second Thursday Hospice of the Nature Coast Levy Office, 24-B County Road 40 E., Inglis. 10:30 a.m. Saturday First United Methodist Church, 831 Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Evening support groups (for working people): 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays, newly bereaved Hospice of Citrus County Clinical Office, 326 Line Ave., Inverness. Social support: 10 a.m. Tuesday Franks Family Restaurant, 2780 N. Florida Ave., Hernando. 1 p.m. first Thursday Mulligans Grill (formerly Mango Grill), 1305 Norvell Bryant Highway (C.R. 486), Hernando. 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday LIFT luncheon (widows/widowers), Citrus Hills Golf & Country Club. Call 352-621-1500, ext. 1728 for reservations. Wings education series: th Tuesdays @ 2 Wings Education Center, 8471 W. Periwinkle Lane, Homosassa. Teen Encounter and Camp Good Hope Camps for grieving children/teens offered in April and October. Suicide Survivors Support Group, 1 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at the Hospice of Citrus County Hospice House, 3350 W. Audubon Park Path, Lecanto. The group is free and open to the public. Participants need not be hospice families. For information, call Lynn Miller at 352-527-2020. Hospice of Citrus County/Hospice of the Nature Coast licensed 1985, is a notfor-profit charitable organization providing comprehensively responsive and compassionate end-of-life services to the terminally ill and their families in 12 counties of North Central Florida. It also provides grief support services for children and adults in the community. HPH Hospice, in partnership with the Alzheimers Association Florida Gulf Coast Chapter, offers Caregivers Support Groups for caregivers of dementia or Alzheimers patients to provide information, education and emotional support in a safe, comforting and confidential environment. There is no charge, and everyone is welcome to join. Call Sue Piatek at 352-5274600 with questions. First Tuesday, 11 a.m., Our Lady of Fatima, 550 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Second Monday, 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church of Homosassa, 8831 W. Bradshaw St., Homosassa. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Fourth Tuesday, 5 p.m., Emeritus at Barrington Place, 2341 W. Norvell Bryant Highway (County Road 486 east of C.R. 491), Lecanto. Free respite care provided, call to reserve. Weekly ongoing Bereavement Group from HPH Hospice and St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, available to anyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at St. Timothys Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1071 N. Suncoast Blvd. (U.S. 19), Crystal River. There is no cost to attend. Call Paul Winstead at 352-527-4600. HPH Hospice, a nonprofit agency initially licensed in 1984, provides, care, comfort and support to individuals affected by a life-limiting illness in Citrus County. In addition to its office in Beverly Hills, it has a Hospice House on Norvell Bryant Highway in Lecanto for patients with limited caregiving assistance and a Hospice Care Center in Citrus Health & Rehabilitation Center in Inverness for patients with complicated pain and symptoms. SPRING HILL Oak Hill Hospital H2U Partners Club support groups meet on the campus of Oak Hill Hospital, 11375 Cortez Blvd., Spring Hill. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group 2 p.m. first Thursday monthly, Jerry Fischer, facilitator. Diabetes Support Group 10 am. second Monday monthly, Kim Palmer, facilitator. Multiple Myeloma Support Group 5:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Diane Terry, facilitator. Kidney Education Support Group 2:30 p.m. third Wednesday monthly, Mary Jane Talty, facilitator. Epilepsy Support Group 3 p.m. fourth Saturday monthly, Lillian Rojas, facilitator. Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Support Group 6:30 p.m. fourth Wednesday monthly, Lordes Arvelo, facilitator. Crohns Disease Support Group 6 p.m. the last Thursday monthly, Isaiah Del Pilar, facilitator. H2U Partners Club events and activities are open to members only. Membership is open to Hernando, Pasco, and Citrus County residents for $20 a year. Oak Hill Hospital has been serving the Nature Coast since 1984. It is the largest medical facility in Hernando and Citrus County (234 acute-care beds), is one of the areas largest private employers, and offers Hernando Countys only comprehensive cardiovascular program, including open heart surgery. Approximately 300 physicians, 950 associates and more than 350 volunteers comprise Oak Hill Hospitals health care delivery team. Visit OakHillHospital.com. C4TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEHEALTH& LIFE 000D7CS Captain Mikes Lazy River Cruises Sightseeing Birdwatching Weddings Sunrise & Sunset Cruises Moonlight Cruises Custom Cruises Located On the Withlacoochee at Stumpknockers Hwy. 200 Citrus & Marion County Line Hernando, FL 352-637-2726 Open 7 Da ys All Y ear Long Gift Certificates Available! 1 & 2 Hour Cruises Happy Holidays! www.lazyrivercruises.com 000D6CQ When Experience Counts Most Glaucoma Treatment Dry Eyes Eyelid Surgery Diabetic Eye Problems Macular Degeneration Cataract & Implant Specialists Board Certified Ophthalmologists LAWRENCE A. SEIGEL, M.D. ALAN M. FREEDMAN, M.D. Optometrist, DR. GEORGE KAPLAN 221 N.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-2526 14003 Lakeshore Blvd., Hudson, FL 727-868-9442 Toll Free 800-282-6341 www.suncoasteyecenter.com Established 1982 Cherish the moments of the season Seasons Greetings! GROUPSContinued from Page C3 Questions arise about Minneapolis license plate data CURTISGILBERT Minnesota Public RadioST. PAUL, Minn. Academics and entrepreneurs nationwide have received copies of a massive database that the Minneapolis police department uses to track the location of cars. Where some see business or research opportunities, the city sees a public safety risk. The data come from the citys network of automatic license plate readers cameras that record the locations of hundreds of thousands of cars every month. Minneapolis has received at least 100 requests for data from its license plate scanners over the last five months, ever since theStar Tribunefirst reported on the existence of the data. Most requests came from people who wanted to know where the scanners had spotted an individual license plate. More than a third came from one man, Alex Peterson, who repossesses cars for a living. I see a license plate hit in this neighborhood, and I do work on the Internet and find out they have a relative who lives in that neighborhood and find it at that address, Peterson said. Theres a lot of different ways I can use the information. Minnesota law makes all data collected by the government public, unless it is specifically classified otherwise. Minneapolis dutifully turns over the information to anyone who asks. But earlier in December, the city abruptly changed its approach and asked the state to issue an order rendering the data private for the next two years while it lobbies the Legislature to change the law. It became clear to us that this was creating a real risk to public safety, said Susan Segal, city attorney. Segal said the license plate readers are designed to help police find criminals and stolen cars. In the wrong hands, the data they collect could be used to commit crimes. Victims of domestic abuse, for example, dont want their batterers to know where theyre living or where they may be working, Segal told Minnesota Public Radio News. The city is also concerned about the increasing amounts of data being requested. In addition to inquiries about specific license plates, Minneapolis also received numerous requests for the entire database. Earlier this month, it released a file containing some 2.1 million records covering a three-month period. Nine people received the database. One of them was Mark Pitts of Rogers, who is finishing up a masters degree in statistics. And so I thought it would be an interesting data set for my masters project, and it turned about to be a very interesting dataset as you know, Pitts said. Eight of the license plate scanners are attached to police cars. Pitts said the scanners dont just record the locations of nearby vehicles; they also record the movements of the police. And so you can literally see everywhere they went. I can tell you when they stopped for lunch. I can tell you when they met at the hospital, Pitts said. Theres a lot more information about their activities and movements in this data then there are about any single individual. Thats why Pitts supports making the data private. But some of the other people who have examined the data disagree. Arthur DAntonio, 25, is a California-based Web developer who has requested similar data from other cities around the country. He is exploring whether the data have commercial applications. I personally believe that the data shouldnt be being stored on innocent people at all. But I also believe that if it is, were paying for that, DAntonio said. And so anybody should be able to use it for whatever legal purpose they want to use it for. DAntonio hasnt figured out exactly how to make money using the data, but the fact that automobile repossession companies have been using it, suggests one possibility, he said. Is there any way that we could have made it so that that guy could have obtained that data, quicker, more efficiently, maybe even on the go? DAntonio said. That makes his business that much more successful. He can maybe hire more people. If theres opportunity, I think everybody should be looking to seize it. But researchers and entrepreneurs looking for opportunities in the license plate scanner databases may have missed their chance, at least for now. A recently-issued administrative order classifies the data as private for at least the next three months. It applies to Minneapolis and any other Minnesota cities that collect this data. And the Legislature will likely consider whether to make the data private permanently. Minnesota law makes all data collected by the government public, unless it is specifically classified otherwise. Minneapolis dutifully turns over the information to anyone who asks.

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increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). This is based upon research recently published online Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. In this study, researchers from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, prospectively examined the link between cigarette smoking and smoking cessation on the risk of SCD among 101,018 women from the Nurses Health Study without CHD, stroke, or cancer at baseline in 1980. During 30 years of follow-up, the researchers identified 351 SCD events. After controlling for coronary risk factors, current smokers had a significant increased risk of SCD compared with those who had never smoked at all. Among current smokers, the quantity of cigarettes smoked daily and smoking duration were significantly linked to SCD risk in their analysis. The risk of SCD was significantly increased even with small-to-moderate amounts of cigarette consumption (one to 14 per day), and with every five years of continued smoking. After quitting, there was a steady and marked decrease in the risk of SCD over time, and after 20 years of cessation, the risk was equivalent to that of a person who had never smoked. It is clear that there is a relationship between smoking and SCD, and even small-to-moderate quantities of daily smoking were associated with SCD risk. This adds even more fuel to the fire of doubling our efforts toward smoking cessation for all women to prevent SCD.Dr. C. Joseph Bennett is a boardcertified radiation oncologist and a member of the Citrus County Unit of the American Cancer Society. Watch Navigating Cancer on WYKE TV at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and at 10 a.m. Thursdays. If you have any suggestions for topics, or have any questions, contact him at 522 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, or email cjbennett@ rboi.com. etc. Obesity is calculated by Body Mass Index or BMI and try to keep it below 25. 2. Eat healthy: Try to eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Servings are small size, e.g. one small apple may make one serving. Limit intake of red meat and processed meat. Choose whole grains over processed (refined) grains. 3. Exercise: As per the American Cancer Society, engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, above usual activities, on five or more days of the week; 45 to 60 minutes of intentional physical activity are preferable. This helps as follows: Helps control weight. Maintains healthy bones, muscles and joints. Reduces the risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes. Promotes psychological well-being. Reduces the risk of death from heart disease. 4. Smoking: Smoking is the commonest cause of cancer. It causes many cancers including lung, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, bladder, stomach, cervix, kidney and pancreas, and acute myeloid leukemia. It also damages the lungs and heart. Therefore, all smokers should try this year to quit smoking. If you are a nonsmoker, avoid secondhand smoke. 5. Alcohol: If you do not drink alcohol, do not start it for health benefits. If you drink it, drink no more than one drink per day for women or two per day for men. 6. Screening: In general, the earlier we detect cancer, the more curable it is. For women, regular mammograms and pap smears are very important. There is some controversy about screening PSA in men. Both men and women should get a colonoscopy after the age of 50. If you are a smoker or you quit smoking recently (less than the past 15 to 20 years), recent recommendations suggest screening spiral low dose CT scan of the lungs once a year. Please make a resolution that you will follow all current screening guidelines for cancer. You can learn this in detail from the American Cancer Society at www. cancer.org/Healthy/Find CancerEarly/Cancer ScreeningGuidelines/ american-cancer-societyguidelines-for-the-earlydetection-of-cancer. These are some suggestions for New Years resolutions. Some are easy and some may not be easy. All of these help to improve health and cut down on the risk of cancer. Please consider them. Dr. Sunil Gandhi is a hematologist and oncologist. He is volunteer medical adviser of the Citrus Unit of American Cancer Society. Write to 521 N. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL 34461, email sgandhi@tampabay.rr.com or call 352-746-0707. canal. I cannot remember the last time I had a complication with a root canal that lead to disappointment. If this were to happen, the likelihood of the problem is usually known ahead of time and does not come as a surprise. Adult Orthodontics (braces) many adults shy away from braces. As long as you have an orthodontist who is comfortable with adult braces, you will be amazed with the outcome you can have and what a difference it can make in your smile. A New Set of Dentures Dentures have come a long way through the years. They can look like real teeth and can take years off of your appearance. And the fit and comfort that new technology provides will surprise you. Implants Implants have finally made it to the status of routine dentistry. There was a time when I could not say this. As long as you have a good surgeon who works closely with the restoring dentist, implants are predicable. They should always be included in your set of options. Whitening If you are looking for whiter teeth and you are in a hurry, you can have in-office whitening. If you have the time, athome whitening works just as predictably and can save you some money. The days of sensitivity are few and far between. In the event of sensitivity, there are many solutions we have to offer to relieve any discomfort. New Patient Exam You might shy away from an exam because you are worried about what you might hear. The truth is it is better to know what is going on, get your options and make a plan to get you to optimum oral health. I cannot tell you how many times a patient says to me they wish they had done it sooner. Dentistry has so many options to improve oral health and appearance. Take that first step and get your exam you wont be disappointed. I hope this has helped some of you make that resolution to call your dental office for an appointment. I wish all of you a happy, healthy and prosperous new year! Dr. Frank Vascimini is a dentist practicing in Homosassa. Send your questions to 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd., Homosassa, FL 34446 or email info@ MasterpieceDentalStudio. com. not available. However they certainly do not do as well as plain old soap and water. In some instances people think antibacterial soap is better than plain soap, but the downside is that it may promote drug resistant bacteria in the future. Men tend to be more resistant in taking up regular good hand cleaning techniques. It seems sometimes that men are offended at the idea, but they sometimes take the attitude that there are germs everywhere, and that their bodies are not particularly dirty when they use the bathroom, so why bother? The difference is, if you wash your hands, you are less likely to have gastrointestinal or respiratory illnesses. Studies have been done for years, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been warning us about the connection between hand washing and reduction of infection. It is true: germs are everywhere. You may not have them, but you will certainly pick them up when you flush the toilet, or touch door handles. We will never be able to escape germs they are in the environment but better hand washing techniques, and the invention of no touch motion sensing faucets, soap dispensers, and towel dispensers have made it very convenient to wash away the germs. We could all do a better job washing our hands and reducing health care costs, as well as sparing people the agony of being sick. Millions, if not billions of dollars could be saved with good hand washing techniques. Think about that the next time you are at a bowlgame party, with a bunch of friends, and you put your hand in a bowl of chips. You certainly would appreciate the person before you if he had just washed his hands. Denis Grillo, D.O., FOCOO, is an ear, nose and throat specialist in Crystal River. Call him at 352-795-0011 or visit CrystalCommunity ENT.com. HEALTH& LIFECITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 C5 GRILLOContinued from Page C1 GANDHIContinued from Page C1 BENNETTContinued from Page C1 VASCIMINIContinued from Page C1 000DL3J The Citrus County Fair Association proudly presents Truck & Tractor Pull Save on advanced ticket sales One Day: Adult $8, Children 4 11 $4 Two Day: Adult $15, Children 4 11 $7 January 25th open 4 p.m. pull 6 p.m. January 26th open 10 a.m. pull 1 p.m. For more information call 726-2993 or go to www.citruscountyfair.com/tractor.html Sponsored by: Citrus County Chronicle, Eagle Buick GMC, Crystal Motor Car Company Proceeds to benefit Youth Scholarships! 14th Annual 1 Regina Blvd., Beverly Hills (Across From Fire Station) 746-0330 Beverly Hills DENTAL CENTER Dentures, Partials & Bridges Invisalign (Removable Braces) Children Welcome Veneers, Bonding, & Extractions One Visit Root Canals Gum Surgery Implants One Hour Whitening Open Fridays Raphael C. Lewis, D.D.S. P.A. 000DM2U NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! $ 150 00 Must Present Coupon At Time Of Visit FMX 00210 Prophy 01110 Initial Oral Exams 00150 The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Need A Second Opinion? FREE Consultation With the Dentist Senior Citizens Discount (Ask For Details) Value $ 215 EXAM, X-RAYS & CLEANING ALL INCLUSIVE IMPLANTS $ 1,995 Seven Days A Week Rain or Shine Call to see how you can receive 2 Weeks Free 352-563-5655 769452 The #1 Provider of News and Advertising Information in Citrus County All of these help improve health and cut down risk of cancer. Please consider them. Associated PressSAN DIEGO Its been almost 60 years since James McEachin returned home with a bullet still lodged in his chest, finding an America indifferent toward the troops who fought in Korea. Now he will get the homecoming parade he had expected. The Defense Department for the first time will put a float in Pasadenas Tournament of Roses one of the most watched parades to commemorate the veterans from a conflict that still casts a shadow over the world. I think its a magnificent gesture and it cures a lot of ills, said McEachin, who will be among six veterans who will ride on the float Tuesday. The 82-year-old author and actor starred in Perry Mason TV movies, among other things. The $247,000 flower-covered float will be a replica of the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. The Pentagons debut comes ahead of events marking the 60th anniversary of the July 1953 armistice that halted the bloodshed but did not declare peace. Col. David Clark said the Pentagon decided to seize the opportunity to sponsor one of the 42 floats in the 124-year-old New Years Day parade to raise awareness about what has been called The Forgotten War. It has taken decades for the success of the wars efforts to be recognized, and the department wanted to remind Americans about the sacrifices that were made by the veterans, most of whom are now in their 80s, Clark said. The war resulted in South Korea developing into a thriving democratic ally in sharp contrast to its bitterly poor, communist neighbor that is seen as a global threat. As a nation, this may be our last opportunity to say thank you to them and honor their service, said Clark, director of the departments 60th Anniversary of the Korean War Commemoration Committee. The war began when North Korea invaded the South to try to reunify the nation, a liberated Japanese colony sliced in two in 1945 by the U.S. and Soviet victors of World War II. North Korea had the upper hand at first, almost pushing a weak South Korean-U.S. force off the peninsula, but then U.S. reinforcements poured in and pushed them back. Then, in late 1950, communist China stepped in and the Americans and South Koreans were forced back to the peninsulas midsection. The two sides battled there for two years before ending with a stalemate. We didnt march home in victory. We did what we were supposed to do, which is stop this aggressive force called communism, said McEachin, a Silver Star recipient. Edward Chang, director of the Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at the University of California, Riverside, said U.S. intervention gave South Korea the opportunity to become one of the worlds major economies. Most Americans simply are not aware of what is happening in Korea and how it happened, he said. More than 36,000 U.S. service members were killed in the conflict, and millions overall. The government did not talk to troops at the time about how pivotal the war was in stopping communism. After the victory in World War II, the Korean conflict seemed to almost provoke shame for Americans, McEachin said. The American public also felt no connection to the fighting in a faraway Asian country, unlike during World War II when airwaves filled with patriotic fight songs, he said. McEachin not only returned to indifference but discrimination as an African American soldier. After the plane carrying returning troops was delayed in Montana by snow, he was turned away from a hotel where his fellow white soldiers were staying. Korea was the first conflict in which all U.S. military units were integrated racially. Clark said the floats veterans reflect that important historical milestone. Clark said its important Americans learn the wars history because the problem is ever present, a point driven home by the heavily mined armistice line, a 2.5mile-wide demilitarized strip stretching 135 miles across the peninsula. Pentagon debuts float in Rose parade to honor vets 000DL7C 4805 S. Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34446 352-628-0012 www.MasterpieceDentalStudio.com Always Welcoming New Patients FRANK J. VASCMINI, DDS

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Early submission of timely material is appreciated, but m ultiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. Expect notes to run no more than once. News NOTES News NOTES Scrapbooking classes start Jan. 9Get your scrapbooking on with Sherrie Geick, at Whispering Pines Park in Inverness. Geick will show how to put memories together in a scrapbook to be treasured by friends and family far into the future. Participants must bring supplies. Cost is $25 for an all-day class, or $12.50 for a half day on Saturdays: Jan. 9, Feb. 16, April 20, May 18, Aug. 17, Sept. 21, Nov. 16 and Dec. 21. For more information, call 352-726-3913 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.Wisconsinites plan luncheon Jan. 9The Wisconsin Social Club welcomes back its snowbirds. The clubs luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9, at the Crystal Point Club House off North Citrus Avenue in DeRosa. The luncheons bring together many former Wisconsinites, and snowbirds bring back news updates about what is now happening in Wisconsin. All those who attend are asked to bring a dish to share. New members are always welcome. For more information, call Joyce at 352-860-1292.Native plant club to meet in B.H.The Citrus Native Plant Society will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9, at the Beverly Hills Lions Club. Guest speaker will be Merritt Bryce Garling of Merritt Garling Landscape and Hardscape Services. He will be speaking on the topic of Floridas native cactus. Included in the presentation will be information on potting, planting, grafting, pest and propagation.NYC Transit retirees conveneNew York City Transit Retirees of Florida Chapter No. 9, Citrus County, will meet at 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 4, at the Beverly Hills Community Building, 1 Civic Circle. All those retired from the New York City Transit System who reside in Citrus County are welcome. Also, any retirees from the NYC Transit System visiting locally are welcome. After the meeting, refreshments will be served. For more information, call President Clarence Redd at 352-527-8418 or Secretary Clarisse DAdamo at 352527-2508. COMMUNITYPage C6TUESDAY, JANUARY 1, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Precious PawsADOPTABLE Kitties Special to the ChronicleKittens as sweet and cute as you can imagine are waiting for that special loving home. Most kittens have talents that we as humans can only imagine. Their acrobatic skills are amazing and entertaining, and after a strenuous performance they will curl up for a quick nap, wake up and look for a little loving. Kittens and cats are available for adoption at the Pet Supermarket on State Road 44 in Inverness during regular store hours. The Crystal River Mall adoption center is open noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. View pets at www.preciouspaws florida.com, or call 352726-4700. Jazz Society to host jam sessionThe Citrus Jazz Society will host its monthly Open Jam Session from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 6, at the Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center, formerly the Knights of Columbus Hall in Homosassa Springs. The jam session features local and visiting musicians playing old favorites, jazz, swing and Dixieland for listening and dancing pleasure. The public is invited; $7 donation at the door for nonmembers is requested. Bring your own refreshments. Musicians interested in playing may call Tony Caruso at 352-942-9399.Genealogical group to gatherThe Citrus County Genealogical Society will meet at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 3474 W. Southern St., Lecanto. The topic will be Sharing Our Ancestral Heritage. This will be a show-and-tell program. Members are asked to bring an item to share: something that once belonged to an ancestor, a document, photo or story about an ancestor. Guests are welcome. For more information, call Mary Ann Machonkin at 352382-5515, or go to www. citrusgenealogy.com. Model railroaders to meet Jan. 8 The Citrus Model Railroad Club will meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8, at the Robinson Horticulture Building of the Citrus County Fairgrounds. The January meeting is the annual business meeting where budget, work, preparations for the fair and more are covered. For more information, call Bob Penrod at 352797-6315.Jewelry-making classes on tapThe Citrus Springs Library will add a new monthly meeting focusing on jewelrymaking to its calendar. On the second Wednesday of every month, Edna Mikel will teach a class on how to make their own beaded jewelry. Students will learn how to make bracelets, necklaces and earrings. The classes will be at 1 p.m. every second Wednesday. For more information, call 352-489-2313. The library is at 1826 W. Country Club Blvd. in Citrus Springs.Clubs need help with childrenThe Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County seeks volunteers and mentors who have a desire to make a positive difference in the life of a child. Volunteers and mentors can make that difference. Mentors are needed at the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club in Beverly Hills and the Robert Halleen Boys & Girls Club in Homosassa. Volunteers are always needed at all sites. Mentors will be assigned to work with a specific child or children. Volunteers may present special projects, help with homework, play games, read stories, or simply hang out with kids, interacting with them. Both volunteers and mentors will have training. All who work directly with children must pass a background clearance check. Other volunteers are needed to help with office work, assist with fundraising events, aid with maintenance at club sites, or, if experienced, help with grant writing. For more information about volunteering at a Boys & Girls Club of Citrus County, call 352-621-9225. Special to the ChronicleThe Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Clubs annual Soup-A-Thon and Bake Sale will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19. Everyone is invited to enter their favorite soup to vie for the title of Souper Chef. Call now to reserve a spot to win a cash prize of $50 for first place, $25 for second place and $10 for third place. Space is limited to the first 30 soups registered. The clubhouse on 56th Street becomes an old-fashioned county fair, where everyone can join friends and neighbors to sample the delicious soups and vote for a favorite. Visit the Second To None Thrift Shoppe to check out the new arrivals and pick up some homemade treats at Sweet Magnolia Confections. The SoupA-Thon will be a last chance to purchase tickets for the Sweet Magnolia Gift Basket Raffle. The basket, valued at more than $100, is full of beauty products and sweet treats just in time for Valentines Day. Tickets at $2 each, or three for $5 will be on sale starting Jan. 2 at The Second To None Thrift Shoppe, Thursday bingo or at the Soup-A-Thon on Jan. 19. The drawing will be at 1 p.m. after the Souper Chef is crowned. Call the club at 352447-2057, visit its FaceBook page or email yiwomans club@gmail.com to register a soup or for more information. Special to the ChroniclePrecious Paws Rescue continues its low-cost spay and neuter program into 2013 and now offers a second site to purchase vouchers. Gretas Touch Grooming and Doggie Day Care at 7360 S. Florida Ave. in Floral City will sell the vouchers during regular store hours Monday through Friday. Vouchers are also available at the PPR Crystal River Mall Adoption Center from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. The voucher price for dogs is based on their weight, starting at $25 to neuter a male dog up to 50 pounds, and range from $30 to $60 to spay a female dog. Cat spays are $20 and the neuter fee is $10. These surgeries are funded by a combination of discounted surgical fees provided by the Floral City Veterinary Hospital, voucher purchase by pet owners with the remaining costs made up by Precious Paws Rescue donations. The pet owner is responsible to make a surgery appointment directly with the FCVH and transport the pet, along with the voucher, to and from FCVH. Any additional veterinary services must be arranged by the owner and paid for at the FCVH appointment. Precious Paws Rescue is an all-volunteer charity organization dedicated to reducing pet over-population. Between 4 and 5 million pets are euthanized every year in U.S. shelters. For more information, to make a donation or to volunteer, call 352-726-4700. Be on the lookout for the Binocular Brigade on Friday, Jan. 4. If you live within 7.5 miles of the Crystal River Airport you stand a good chance of seeing one or more of the 40-plus volunteers who will be out and about counting birds. According to Darrell Snedecor, pictured, president of the Citrus County Audubon Society, the 113th Christmas Bird Count is a national event conducted in over 2,000 locations, and members of our local birding community have dedicated the entire day to surveying our bird population. This annual effort provides valuable data concerning the ongoing health and viability of our 120-plus bird species and, indirectly, the long-term condition of our environment. So if you see a car with people sporting binoculars and the Audubon Christmas Bird Count sign on the door, give them a wave of encouragement.STEPHANIE LOVELL /Special to the Chronicle Souper competition Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club slates contest, sale Birds Binocular Brigade Januarys Spotlight of Events features several activities for the community organizations. The public is invited to attend the Crystal River Christian Womens January luncheon at noon Tuesday, Jan. 8. Linda Dumond will give a Bob Ross painting demonstration, and Nada Decker, inspirational speaker, will pose the question: Have you ever felt invisible or un-needed? For luncheon reservations, call Ginny at 352-746-7616. All retired educators and school personnel are invited to attend the Jan. 14 meeting of the Citrus County Retired Educators at 1 p.m. in room 115 of the Withlacoochee Technical Institute in Inverness. Tom Chancey will present the program on the Citrus County Community Food Bank. The Culinary Arts students of the school will provide the refreshments. Call President Cindy Pifer at 352-746-2866, or Ethel Winn, membership chair, at 352-7952533 for membership information. Tom Slagle will give a Nature Coast Ministries presentation at the Jan. 7 dinner meeting of the Crystal River Kings Bay Lions Club at 6 p.m. at Oysters Restaurant in Crystal River. All visiting Lions are welcome. For dinner reservations, call Janice at 352-795-5816. For membership information, call Phyllis Smith at 352382-3544. The West Citrus Ladies of the Elks Spring Fashion Show Luncheon will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25, at the lodge at 7890 Grover Cleveland Blvd., Homosassa. For reservations, call Anne at 352-3821848. The Gulf to Lakes Pilot Club Military Card Party will begin at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16, at the Crystal River Womans Club. Refreshments will be served. For reservations, call Judy at 352-746-0636 by Jan. 9. Call the Art Center Theater box office at 352-746-7606 for tickets to their presentation of Nunsense, to be presented Jan. 11 to 20. VFW Post 4252 and the Ladies Auxiliary will host Cancer Society Aid and Research Benefit Speed Bingo beginning at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 9. Call 352-726-5206. The GFWC Inverness Womans Club will host Night With an Author at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at the Citrus County Historical Courthouse Museum. It will benefit the clubs scholarship fund. For tickets, call 352634-4216. Our Lady of Grace and Knights of Columbus Council 6168 blood drive will be from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 12, in the church Parish Life Center. Call Leonard at 352-746-3791. The 26th annual Manatee Festival will be Jan. 19 and 20 in Crystal River. For more information, call the Citrus County Chamber of Commerce at 352795-3149. The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade will begin at 9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 21, in Crystal River. Call Bea at 352419-5255. To appear in the February Spotlight of Events, call 352-795-3006, or write to P .O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 344230803 by Jan. 15.Ruth Levins participates in a variety of projects around the community. Let her know about your groups upcoming activities by writing to P.O. Box 803, Crystal River, FL 34423. Beginning new year with much to do Ruth LevinsAROUND THE COMMUNITY Rescue continues spay, neuter program

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ENTERTAINMENTCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLETUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013 C7 PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.First, a happy and healthy New Year to all of my readers. When you play Chicago and everybody passes, it can be fun to have a goulash (or ghoulie). Each player sorts his hand: spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs. The cards are stacked, cut once, and dealt in groups. (I like 4-3-3-3/3-4-3-3/3-3-4-3/3-3-3-4, but some people prefer 5-5-5-5/5-5-5-5/3-3-3-3.) Long suits abound, and bidding must be adjusted because most suits will break something-zero. This deal occurred during one of my play classes after a passout. South opened four spades. West, the most cautious player in the group, characteristically passed. He should have overcalled four no-trump, showing a two-suited hand. This would presumably have resulted in a final contract of five hearts by East after five clubs five diamonds (both red suits) five hearts. No doubt South would have doubled and the likely result would have been down one. The play in four spades was fascinating. West led the diamond ace and East discarded the club two. South ruffed, cashed the spade ace, and continued with the spade queen, throwing diamonds from the board. East won and shifted to the heart king, which declarer brilliantly ducked. South took the next heart trick with his ace and played three more rounds of spades, giving East the lead when he had only clubs left. He had to bring the dummy to life, and declarers three remaining hearts evaporated. Contract made! Did you see Easts resource? Under the spade ace, he should have kept the spade two. Then when South led the fifth spade, trying for the endplay, East would have been able to underplay with his two, leaving South on lead, forced to lose three more heart tricks and go down two. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers Doomsday Preppers (N) Diggers (N) PG Diggers (N) PG Doomsday Preppers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.MarvinFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Prison Diaries Prison Diaries Unfaithful: StoriesUnfaithful: StoriesIn the BedroomUnfaithful: Stories (OXY) 44 123 Top Model Top Model Top Model Top Model ModelTop Model Top (SHOW) 340 241 340 4School of Rock Our Idiot Brother (2011) Paul Rudd. R The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) Kristen Stewart. PG-13 Brokeback Mountain (2005, Romance) Heath Ledger. (In Stereo) R (SPEED) 732 112 732 Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins. An innocent man goes to a Maine penitentiary for life in 1947. (In Stereo) R Tattoo Night. (STARZ) 370 271 370 Colombiana (2011) Zoe Saldana. (In Stereo) PG-13 The Haunted Mansion (2003) Eddie Murphy. PG Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011) Johnny Depp. (In Stereo) PG-13 Underworld (SUN) 36 31 36 College Basketball: Orange Bowl Classic ACC Road Trip SpecialAlong the Way Along the Way XTERRA USA Championship Transat Quebec-St. Malo Sailing UF Bowl Preview Inside the Heat (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19 The Hangover (2009, Comedy) RBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Hello, Dolly! (1969, Musical Comedy) Barbra Streisand. G The Pink Panther (1964, Comedy) Peter Sellers, David Niven. NR The Asphalt Jungle (1950, Crime Drama) Sterling Hayden. NR (DVS) (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) PG Deadliest Catch (In Stereo) PG Dual Survival Unbraided (N) Dual Survival Mars on Earth To Be AnnouncedDual Survival (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30HoneyHoneyHere Comes HoneyTotally T-Boz PGThe SisterhoodSin City Rules (N)The Sisterhood (TMC) 350 261 350 Chasing Amy (1997, RomanceComedy) Ben Affleck. (In Stereo) R My Week With Marilyn (2011, Drama) Michelle Williams. R I Dont Know How She Does It (2011) PG-13 Barb Wire R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 The Dark Knight (2008, Action) Christian Bale. PG-13 (DVS) Castle XK (In Stereo) PG Castle Almost Famous PG Castle Murder Most Fowl PG CSI: NY The Thing About Heroes (TOON) 38 58 38 33 DragonsDragonsDragonsLooneyLevel UpAdvenKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Mysteries-MuseumThe SmithsonianHotel ImpossibleWatWatNFLFoodAirport Airport (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55PawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnPawnHardcorePawnPawnPawnPawn (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24RoseanneCosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondRaymondRaymondKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed (In Stereo) PG Charmed (In Stereo) PG CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20CheersCheersFunny Home VideosMotherMotherMotherMotherWGN News at NineFunny Home Videos Dear Readers: Happy New Year. We hope 2013 will be the best year ever for each and every one of you. May you be blessed with good health, close family, kind friends, love and laughter. We hope you will make this the year you vow to be kinder and more compassionate so you can help the world become a better place in which to live. In honor of the day, here is poem written by William Cullen Bryant in 1859: A Song for New Years Eve Stay yet, my friends, a moment stay Stay till the good old year, So long companion of our way, Shakes hands, and leaves us here. Oh stay, oh stay, One little hour, and then away. The year, whose hopes were high and strong, Has now no hopes to wake; Yet one hour more of jest and song For his familiar sake. Oh stay, oh stay, One mirthful hour, and then away. The kindly year, his liberal hands Have lavished all his store. And shall we turn from where he stands, Because he gives no more? Oh stay, oh stay, One grateful hour, and then away. Days brightly came and calmly went, While yet he was our guest; How cheerfully the week was spent! How sweet the seventh days rest! Oh stay, oh stay, One golden hour, and then away. Dear friends were with us, some who sleep Beneath the coffinlid: What pleasant memories we keep Of all they said and did! Oh stay, oh stay, One tender hour, and then away. Even while we sing, he smiles his last, And leaves our sphere behind. The good old year is with the past; Oh be the new as kind! Oh stay, oh stay, One parting strain, and then away. Dear Annie: Several years ago, you printed a piece on New Years Day that I thought was terrific. It was called Golden Rules for Living. It was simple and made so much sense. If you can find it, would you consider reprinting it? Your Fan in Madison, Wis. Dear Fan: With pleasure. Thanks for giving us the time off. Golden Rules for Living by Miriam Hamilton Keare 1. If you open it, close it. 2. If you turn it on, turn it off. 3. If you unlock it, lock it up, 4. If you break it, admit it. 5. If you cant fix it, call in someone who can. 6. If you borrow it, return it. 7. If you value it, take care of it. 8. If you make a mess, clean it up. 9. If you move it, put it back. 10. If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it. 11. If you dont know how to operate it, leave it alone. 12. If its none of your business, dont ask questions. Dear Annie: Please tell Nervous in Vermont, the young man who is longing to let his family know he is a transgender male, that Vermont is extremely fortunate to have an organization, Outright Vermont, that supports LGBTQ youth. He will be able to connect with a dedicated and skilled staff, as well as with other youth who will understand what he is experiencing. Outright Vermont (outrightvt.org) is located in Burlington. This young man also could investigate whether his school has a Gay-Straight Alliance or similar organization. He also can speak with his school or SAP counselor (if he is comfortable doing so) for support and strategies to talk with his mother. A Vermont GSTA Adviser and SAP Counselor Annies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more visit www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) HOBBYBLURB MUFFLE TRENDY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: With each glass of champagne, the party guest was becoming MORE BUBBLY Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. WATIA TARIO CALAPE SARTHH Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Ans: TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 1, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessBettyBettyBettyBettyParenthood (N) NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Great Performances The Vienna Philharmonic performs. (N) G Great Performances Jewish artists excel on Broadway. (N) PG New Tricks Dockers PG % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41JournalBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Great Performances (N) GGreat Performances (N) PGWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Off Their Rockers Parenthood Keep on Rowing (N) NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune Shark Tank PG (DVS) Happy Endings Apartment 23 Nashville (In Stereo) PG (DVS) Eyewit. News Nightline (N) (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) GNCIS Extreme Prejudice (In Stereo) NCIS: Los Angeles Betrayal Vegas A maid is murdered. 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13NewsFox 13 Special TMZ (N) PG The Insider (N) Ben and Kate Ben and Kate New Girl New Girl FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.Shark Tank PGHappyApt. 23Nashville PGNewsNightline 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayKenneth Hagin Great AwakeningWord ofPlace for Miracles A. Wommack Perry Stone Life TodayPurpose for Life Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America Shark Tank PG (DVS) Happy Endings Apartment 23 Nashville (In Stereo) PG (DVS) NewsNightline (N) @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudHouse House SeinfeldScrubsBaggageExcused H (WACX) TBN 21 21 PaidThe 700 Club (N) GBabersAmazing MannaVoicePaidStudio Direct HealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half MenEngagementHart of Dixie (In Stereo) PG Emily Owens, M.D. (N) (In Stereo) Two and Half MenEngagementFriends Friends PG O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15CrosswordsCitrus Today County Court CancerEvery Minute B. CosbyCrook & Chase (In Stereo) G Windy City PokerMobil 1 The GridS. Rasmussen S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangInside Ben-KateBen-KateNew GirlNew GirlFOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPor Ella Soy Eva Amores VerdaderosAmor Bravo (N) NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint PG (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG StorageTexas StorageTexas Storage: NY Storage: NY Storage Wars PG Storage Wars PG (AMC) 55 64 55 The Walking Dead Better Angels The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Seed The Walking Dead Sick The Walking Dead Walk With Me The Walking Dead Killer Within (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedTo Be AnnouncedRaised Wild Dog Girl of Ukraine PG Raised Wild (In Stereo) PG Raised Wild Bird Boy of Fiji Raised Wild Dog Girl of Ukraine PG (BET) 96 19 96 Meet the Browns (2008) Diary of a Mad Black Woman (2005, ComedyDrama) Kimberly Elise, Steve Harris. PG-13 Madeas Family Reunion (2006, Comedy) Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 How to Lose a Guy in 10 DaysAtlantaHousewives/Atl.AtlantaDecoratorsHow to Lose (CC) 27 61 27 33ComingAmer.Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba Go Far PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Redneck Island PG (CNBC) 43 42 43 60 Minutes on CNBCSteve Jobs: Bil.60 Minutes on CNBCAmerican GreedAmerican GreedMob Money: (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5Shake It Up! G GoodCharlieGirl vs. Monster (2012) Olivia Holt. A savvy teen must battle an immortal monster and her army. Let It Shine (2012, Comedy-Drama) Tyler James Williams. (In Stereo) Frenemies (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 172013 Rose Bowl Stanford vs. Wisconsin. (N) (Live) 2013 Discover Orange Bowl Florida State vs. Northern Illinois. (N) (Live) (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49SportsCenter (N)NFL Live ProFILEProFILENFL PrimeTimeNFL Live SportsCenter (N) (EWTN) 95 70 95 48ChoicesHolinessDaily Mass Mother Angelica LiveReligiousRosaryFootprints of God: Mary Women (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Dirty Dancing (1987) Jennifer Grey. A sheltered teen falls for a street-wise dance instructor. Burlesque (2010) Cher. Premiere. A small-town gal finds her niche at a neoburlesque club. PG-13 The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Deception My Father, the Hero (1994) Grard Depardieu. PG The Crossing Guard (1995, Drama) Jack Nicholson. (In Stereo) R Ransom (1996, Suspense) Mel Gibson. Premiere. (In Stereo) R (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 My. DinMy. DinChopped Chopped G Chopped Chopped Belly UpChopped G (FSNFL) 35 39 35 World Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker TourWorld Poker Tour (FX) 30 60 30 51 Easy A (2010, Comedy) Emma Stone, Penn Badgley. PG-13 The Proposal (2009) Sandra Bullock. A woman pretends to be engaged to evade deportation. The Proposal (2009) Sandra Bullock. PG-13 (GOLF) 727 67 727 Golf PGA Tour Golf Hyundai Tournament of Champions, Final Round. PGA Golf (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54The Case for Christmas (2011, Fantasy) Dean Cain, Rachel Blanchard. Moonlight and Mistletoe (2008, Drama) Candace Cameron Bure. NR Help for the Holidays (2012, Fantasy) Summer Glau, Eva La Rue. (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2BreakinRules Puss in Boots (2011) Voices of Antonio Banderas. Big Miracle (2012) John Krasinski. PG Les Miserables The Debt (2010, Drama) Helen Mirren, Tom Wilkinson. (In Stereo) R (HBO2) 303 202 303 Die Hard With a Vengeance (1995) Bruce Willis. (In Stereo) R The Big Year (2011, Comedy) Steve Martin. PG The Big Year Beginners (2010, Drama) Ewan McGregor. (In Stereo) R (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52RV 2013 (N) GHGTV Dream HomeLove It or List It GHawaiiHawaiiHuntersHunt IntlIslandIsland (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Swamp People Never Say Die PG Swamp People ColdBlooded PG Swamp People King of the Swamp PG Swamp People Man Down PG Swamp People PG Swamp People Endgame PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Dance Moms PG Dance Moms PG Dance Moms SpecialDance Moms (Season Premiere) Abby holds an open audition. (N) Double Divas (N) Dance Moms Special (LMN) 50 119 Secrets of Eden (2012, Crime Drama) John Stamos, Anna Gunn. NR The Surrogacy Trap (2013, Drama) Adam Reid. Premiere. NR My Neighbors Keeper (2007, Drama) Laura Harring. NR (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3Hunted Sam awakes in the hospital. MA Hunted Polyhedrus MA Hunted Khyber (In Stereo) MA Hunted Sam is exposed as a spy. MA Cowboys & Aliens (2011) Daniel Craig, Harrison Ford. (In Stereo) NR (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show (N)Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show

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C8TUESDAY, JANUARY1, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Parental Guidance (PG) 11 a.m., 1:40 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Les Miserables (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Django Unchained (R) ID required. 11:15 a.m.. 3:05 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:50 p.m. No passes. Jack Reacher (PG-13)11:45 a.m., 3:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. Monsters Inc (G)In 3D. 11:05 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Monsters Inc (G)3:50 p.m. The Hobbit (PG-13) In 3D. 12 p.m., 8 p.m. No passes. The Hobbit (PG-13) 4 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 Les Miserables (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3:15 p.m., 7 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No passes. Django Unchained (R) ID required. 12 p.m., 3:40 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes. Parental Guidance (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:15 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:50 p.m. Jack Reacher (PG-13)11:25 a.m., 2:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:40 p.m. This is 40 (R) ID required. 11:50 a.m., 2:50 p.m., 7:45 p.m., 10:45 p.m. Monsters Inc. (G)2:10 p.m. Monsters Inc (G)In 3D.11:45 a.m.,4:45 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9:45 p.m.No passes. The Guilt Trip (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 2:05 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:40 p.m. The Hobbit (PG-13) In 3D. 11 a.m., 6:45 p.m., 10:20 p.m. No passes. The Hobbit (PG-13) 3 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6:30, 9:50. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES HEHVN CTDH WT S BYWMH GCZHCTH OSVPG SL ZH. ZN THB NHSVG VHGCMKLWCT WG TCL LC OSVP OSDP. LKDPHV DSVMGCTPrevious Solution: Learn from the mistakes of others. Please drink responsibly, and its never acceptable to drink and drive. Kim Kardashian (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-1Pickles WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Contemp. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 Classic Rock WRZN-AM 720 News Talk LocalRADIO

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TUESDAY,JANUARY1,2013C9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleonline.comToplace an ad, call563-5966Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time ChronicleClassifieds637551 000DM1J 000DM1S 0 0 0 8 X H A For more information on how to reach Citrus County Readers call 352-563-5592. Medical NEEDEDExperienced,Caring & DependableCNAs/HHAsHourly & Live-in,flex schedule offeredLOVING CARE(352) 860-0885 Medical MEDICAL RECEPTIONISTBusy medical office looking for exp. receptionist. Must be familiar with billing & able to multi task. Fax resume to: 352-746-5784 Medical F/T RNIV Exp. preferred For physicians office with benefits. Send Resume to: Blind Box 1787M. Citrus Co. Chronicle 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal RIver, Florida, 34429 Medical ARNPor PAWanted Part Time for a busy Pediatric Practice in Crystal River, Send Resume to:lindapracticemgr @t amp abay .rr .com Lost Lost Millie our 13 yr oldTimnehAfrican Grey flew out of house somewhere between 488, 495 and Lake Rousseau area. Heartbroken..794-3256 Found FOUND Grey dog on Glenn STInverness. On Saturday 12/29/12 Please call to identify. 352-613-0269 FOUND SHELTIE DOG IN INVERNESS AROUNDTHEAREAOF INDEPENDENCE (352) 212-6182 Gold Wedding Band found in Inverness Rails to Trails. Call & Identify (352) 860-1228 Hounddog approx 6mo old Brown & white. Found in the area of Mini Farms -Dunklan/ Dunnellon (352) 465-7625 Pomeranian, Female found in Old Homosassa, Shadytree Path area. Call to identify (352) 621-3130 Domestic Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Medical LPN, CNA Full time/Part time Receptionist Part timeAPPL Y WITHIN HEALTH CENTER AT BRENTWOOD2333 N Brentwood Cir Lecanto, FL (352) 746-6600 EOE D/V/M/F Drug Free Facility OUTPATIENT SURGERY CENTERRNOPERATING ROOMEXPERIENCED ONLY! CST-Graduate of approved Surgical Tech program and Certified-ONLY Excellent working environment, comprehensive benefit package, competitive pay and no call, nights, or weekends.Fax Resume to: 352-527-1827 www.chronicleonline.com How To Make Your Dining Room Set Disappear...Simply advertise in the Classifieds and get results quickly! (352) 563-5966640985B Todays New Ads LIVING RM SET 7 PCS EXC COND. $600 & PATIO TABLE W/6 CHAIRS. $150 954-531-8295 Lost Millie our 13 yr oldTimnehAfrican Grey flew out of house somewhere between 488, 495 and Lake Rousseau area. Heartbroken..794-3256 MAYTAG NEPTUNE ElectricDryer Runs great, Sensor dry. First $125 takes it! (352) 464-4690 TOURING KAYAK KITSILANO by Current Design, Paddle, PSD, Carrier, Cockpit cover, P/U bed extender. $800 (954) 608-6923 Free Services $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks. $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$200 & UP (352) 771-6191 Free Offers FREE Twelve cockatiels & 3 large cages. Call after 8am (352) 341-0703 SHEPHERD MIX male, blonde, approx. 3 yrs. old. need fenced yard, loving home 352-489-6072 Good Things to Eat FRESH CITRUS @ BELLAMYGROVEGreens, Strawberries, Broccoli, Gift Shipping, 8:30a-5p Closed Sun. 352-726-6378 Todays New Ads 2008 Dodge Ram Big Horn 5.7 Hemi 30k Great cond. $19,000 Call Fred(352) 628-6470 $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 Beverly Hills 3 bedroom. 1 bath. OWNER FIN. W/$5OOO DN $822mo NO CREDITCK Just remodeled,new roof, tile, block, w/sep. 2car garage (352) 793-7223 COLLECTOR BUYING STERLING SILVER FLATWARE & U S SILVER COINS. 352-601-7074 FOUND Grey dog on Glenn STInverness. On Saturday 12/29/12 Please call to identify. 352-613-0269 GE Refrigerator White Runs & looks good. Clean $125. (615) 633-6841 or (931)-267-8838 GE STOVE FLATTOP-White 2yrs old. Features Steam clean oven. $300 352-419-7077 HOMOSASSA**3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 476-7077 LEATHER/SUEDE JACKETS Womens, can email pics. Size 8-12 $25. each or 3 for $60. 352-513-4027 LEATHER/SUEDE JACKETS Womens, can e-mail pics. Size 8-12 $25. each or 3 for $60. 352-513-4027

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C10TUESDAY,JANUARY1,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE 000CUG6 FLOOR INSTALLATIONTILE WOOD LAMINATE352-563-0238 302-8090Lic.# CC2544 One Day Bath RemodelingIn Just One Day,We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub or Shower Right Over Your Old One!!! Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!Visit our Ocala Showroom or call1-352-624-8827For a FREE In-Home Estimate! BATHFITTER.COM BATH REMODELINGBATHFITTER000D42Z 000D5A Y WINDOW TINTINGW orld Class Window TintingReduce Heat, Fade, GlareAUTO HOME OFFICEMarion & Citrus352-465-6079 Free Estimates 000D8CQ CLEAN UPS & CLEAN OUTSNEED SOMEONE TO GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?IF YOU WANT IT TAKEN AWAY...CALLFOR A FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!352-220-9190 WEMAKEITDISAPPEAR FOR LESS 000D8CZ ALUMINUM 6 Seamless Gutters Screen Rooms Car Ports Hurricane Protectionallextalum13@yahoo.com Citrus Lic. #2396 LICENSED & INSURED352-621-0881FAX 352-621-0812A L L E X T E R I O R A L L E X T E R I O R ALL EXTERIOR A L U M I N U M I N C A L U M I N U M I N C ALUMINUM, INC. ELECTRICAL REPAIR 352-621-1248Thomas Electric, LLC Residential/Commercial ServiceGenerac Centurion Guardian Generators Factory Authorized Technicians ER0015377 Stand Alone Generator000D9FE CARPET CAREC O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E C O M P L E T E C A R P E T C A R E COMPLETE CARPET CARELic & Ins Specializing in: Specializing in: Carpet Stretching Carpet Stretching Carpet Repair Carpet Repair000DD16 Gift Certificates AvailableCARPET & UPHOLSTERYCLEANING LLC 352-282-1480 cell 352-547-1636 officeFree In Home Estimates Lifetime Warranty Licensed & Insured352-400-3188YOUR INTERLOCKING BRICK PAVER SPECIALIST Often imitated, never duplicated IS IT TIME TO REFINISH YOUR POOL? POOLS AND PA VERSAdd an artistic touch to your existing yard or pool or plan something completely new! QUALITY WORK AT A FAIR PRICE!COPESPOOL AND PAVER LLC000DN92 Copes Pool & Pavers 000DMZN ROOFINGAAA ROOFINGCall the LeakbustersLic./Ins. CCC057537Free Written Estimate Crystal River563-0411Inverness726-8917 www.aaaroofingfl.homestead.com $100 OFFAny Re-RoofMust present coupon at time contract is signed 000DO9G WINDOW CLEANING Window Cleaning Window Tinting Pressure Washing Gutter Cleaning FREE ESTIMATES 352-683-0093Bonded & Insured www.windowgenie.com/springhill 352-465-6631 PAINTING Ferraros PaintingInterior & Exterior PressureWashing FREE ESTIMATES Repaint Specialist000CUWQ 0 0 0 D 2 Y 4 HANDYMANRons Affordable Handyman Services All Home Repairs Small Carpentry Fencing Screening Clean Dryer Vents Affordable & Dependable Experience lifelong 352-344-0905 cell: 400-1722Licensed & Insured Lic.#37761 Services COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 Tree Service ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 DOUBLE J Tree Serv. Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 R WRIGHT Tree Service Tree removal & trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 Water 344-2556, Richard WATER PUMPSERVICE & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Painting CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Pressure Cleaning CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 Remodeling All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 RV Services MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. Lawnmower Repair ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine service & repair. 352 220 4244 Moving/ Hauling A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, lawn maint. furn. & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS CLEAN UPS CLEAN OUTS Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 HAULINGFREE ESTIMATES scrap metals haul for FREE(352) 344-9273 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 746-3444 Painting Chris Satchell Painting ASAP 30 yrs. Exp. Exc. Ref. Ins. 352-464-1397 Kitchen & Bath The T ile Man Bathroom Remodel Specializing in handicap. Lic/Ins. #2441. 352 634 1584 Landclearing/ Bushhogging LARR YS TRACT OR SER VICE FINISH GRADING & BUSHHOGGING ***352-302-3523*** Landscaping CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic. (352) 364-2120 Lawn Care GOT LEAVES Let our DR VAC Do the work! Call 352-502-6588 Handyman Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Home/Office Cleaning CLEANING BY PENNY Wkly., Biwkly. & Mnthly. GREAT RATES 352-503-7800, 476-3820 Fencing **BOB BROWNS**Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 ROCKYS FENCING Free Est., Lic. & Ins., 352 422-7279 Handyman 1 CALL & RELAX! 25yrs Exp in 100% property maint & all repairs, call H&H Services today! lic#37658 352-476-2285 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed Lic.#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Concrete BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Side walks. Pool deck repair /Stain 352-257-0078 CURBAPPEAL Yardscape, Curbing, Flocrete. River Rock Reseals & Repairs. Lic.(352) 364-2120 Drywall COUNTYWIDE DRYWALL25 ys exp lic2875 all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 Electrical #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed Lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 Automotive MaximumAuto Repair & Performance Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts, Classic car restoration, tires new & used, Performance engines. (352) 419-6549 Clean Up/ Junk Removal JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 746-3444 Computers AFFORDABLE COMPUTER REPAIR We Come to You! 352-212-1551, 584-3730 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Appliance Repair SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 Auto Body Repair MaximumAuto Repair & Performance Repairs, 4x4 lifts, Exhausts, Classic car restoration, tires new & used, Performance engines. (352) 419-6549 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com 000DM1M Pets BELLABella is a beautiful silvery brindle Cattle Dog/Shepherd mix, came to the shelter because her family lost their home. She is 4 years old, spayed, housebroken, microchipped, and Heartworm-negative, weighs 45 pounds. Walks well on a leash, gets along with other dogs and is very, very playful. Fenced yard is preferred, but can jump a low fence. Call Joanne @ 352-795-1288. Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschroniclenews as it happens right at your finger tips Sporting Goods ROUGH RIDER STOCKMAN POCKET KNIFE New in box, 3 blades $14 860-2475 SOLDFull Set of new Taylor Made Burner Plus Irons used 4 times, can no longer use, original price TOURING KAYAK KITSILANO by Current Design, Paddle, PSD, Carrier, Cockpit cover, P/U bed extender. $800 (954) 608-6923 Baby Items BABYSTROLLER Deluxe model with canopy $25 860-2475 Sell or Swap Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Coins GOLDEN COINS 7 DIFFERENT PRESIDENTCOINS $5.00 EACH LINDA 352-341-4449 Household ANIMAL/BIRD CAGE Heavy wire/wood.On wheels&Upright. $45. 352-344-3472 CORNINGWARE Various sizes-no covers $2 each 352-527-8287 Fitness Equipment EXERCISE BIKE FAN TYPE WORKS THE ARMSTOO great shape only $85. 352-464-0316 PUNCHING BAG Hangs from ceiling, great work-out. Do not use any more. Exc. shape. $25. 352-746-4160 PURSUITEXERCISE BIKEALL ELECTRONICS SUPER SAPE $100. 352-464-0316 ROWING MACHINE BY BODYROW GETIN SHAPE $85. 352-464-0316 Sporting Goods CLUB CAR ELECTRIC NEWTIRES, BATTERY CHARGER & NEW COVER. EXC COND. CASH ONLY$2500 (352) 503-2383 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 General LEAD CRYSTALVASES $10/15 Lenox/European 4/7 352-527-8287 LEXMARK COMPUTER COPIER both inks inc. needs cable $10 352-382-1191 LPS Songs from 60s,70s & 80s. Original Artists. Records in exc.cond.$100 obo.Must buy all 352-746-4160 MOVING/STORAGE BOXES-20 new/4 sizes 26x20x5, 22x15x27, 27x16x27,24x24x24 $3 ea. 352-422-0294 NEW PAPER SHREDDER electric, never used $20.00 352-382-1191 ORECK XLUPRIGHT VACUUM CLEANER WORKS GREAT(ITS AN ORECK) ONLY$100. 352-464-0316 POOLITEMS salt, de earth,10 ft poles with brushes, net, $10 each 352-382-1191 PRESIDIO PHONE AND ANSWERING UNIT works fine $20.00 white color 352-382-1191 QUANTUM 6000 POWER CHAIR. 2 new batt w/ wty, charger, and more. Value $15,000. $2,500 obo (352) 527-2085 TODDLER HEADBOARD Brand New Metal Headboard, $15 (352)465-1616 TYPEWRITER Elec.w/all features.Carrying case,owners manual & xtra tape cartridge.Like new.$50 352-746-4160 WESTELLCOMPUTER WIRELESS BOX includes box and cables $25.00 obo 352-382-1191 WHITE LARGE NUMBERS PHONE big letters so you can see $20.00 352-382-1191 WIRE SETS TV wires,phone sets,cables all lengths new $5.00 each 352-382-1191 Business Equipment ADDING MACHINE Unisonic Desk Top 12 Digit Memory Elec. Printing Calculator $25. 352-746-4160 Medical Equipment 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES AND SEATGREATSHAPE ONLY$85. 352-464-0316 ALUMINUM WALKER & BEDSIDE COMMODE ONLY$20. EACH 352-464-0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITFOOTRESTS $100. 352-464-0316 SHOWER CHAIR WITH BACK WHITE FIBERGLASS WITH ADJUSTABLE LEGS ONLY$30. 352-464-0316 TRANSPORT WHEELCHAIR (small wheels) Very light w/ footrests.ONL Y $100. 352-464-0316 Coins BUYING US COINS Top $$$$ Paid. WeAlso Buy Gold Jewelry BeatingALLWritten Offers. (352) 228-7676 COLLECTOR BUYING STERLING SILVER FLATWARE & U S SILVER COINS. 352-601-7074 Furniture Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN SIZE MATTRESSAND BOX SPRING Very good condition $100 Call Walter @ 352-364-2583 Rattan Entertainment Center Old Florida style, off white -Great Shape $100. 352-464-0955 Garden/Lawn Supplies SOLDCraftsmen Tractor 24 hsp. includes trailer, spreader, charge auto transmission $750 Clothing LEATHER/SUEDE JACKETS Womens, can e-mail pics. Size 8-12 $25. each or 3 for $60. 352-513-4027 PANTS,LADIES 18 Tall, corduroy, Navy Blue, washed once 352-344-3472.$8. TJ MAX GIFTCARDS 50.00 FOR 40.00/25.00 FOR 20.00 WILLVERIFYTOYOU LINDA352-341-444 General 3 MINITURE DOLLS nicely dressed old all for $25. 352-382-1191 14.4 ELECTRIC DRILL SETbrand new in carrying case $65. or OBO 352-382-1191 40 PC. RATCHETSET all sizes rachets and sockets $20. 352-382-1191 50.00TJ MAX GIFT CARD SELLING FOR 40.00 Will meet you there to verify to you. linda 352-341-4449 103 PC. SOCKETAND WRENCH SETnew never used 470. or obo 352-382-1191 ANTIQUE ELECTRIC IRON this is from the 50s works great $25. Firm 352-382-1191 BREADMAKER Good condition, Breadman, $10 (352)465-1616 DUDLEYS AUCTION **HAPPYNEW** **YEAR!!!** TWOAUCTIONSThurs Jan 3rd WalkAboutAuction 3pm w/full yard of treasures, inside and out Furniture, tools, misc. antiques, box after box Sun Jan 6th Antique & Collectible Auction 1pm Quality Furniture from Victorian to Deco, Art, lighting, jewelry, wonderful selection of vintage Mexican Stoneware, toys, coins, Roseville+++check website www.dudleysauction. com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 FORD HOOD good condition. 85 F150 type. $45. 352-302-7451 LEAD CRYSTALVASE Exc Cond $15 7H x 4D 352-527-8287 TVs/Stereos SONYTV 52 sony tv, rear projection, with sony surround unit. can see working. $ 75. 352-795-4674 STEREO (AIWA) Multi Disk,Cassette,AM/FM Player w/side speakers. Exc. sound. $35 352-746-4160 Building Supplies SKYLIGHT26 BY26 NEW BUBBLE TYPE NOTUSED ONLY$45. 352-464-0316 SOLOTUBE NEW (SKYLIGHT) NEVER INSTALLED. LIGHTUP THATDARK ROOM $100. 352-464-0316 Computers/ Video 480W POWER SUPPLY like new $30 inverness 864-283-5797 DIESTLER COMPUTER New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 TOSHIBASATELLITE LAPTOPgood condition, $100 (352)465-1616 Furniture Black/gold/glass coffee and 2 end tables, entry table, mirror and corner piece-$100 Call Elaine Simons 352-637-2464 Dining Room Set glass top table & 4 chairs $300 obo, Kitchen set, table & 4 chairs w/oak finish $50 obo 352-382-2450 Home Office Desk Maple, Great Condition $500 obo, White Formica Student Desk, good condition $25 obo, 352-382-2450 KING SIZED MATTRESS AND BOX SPRINGS good cond. $75 Call Walter @ 352-362-2583 LEATHER LA-Z-BOY ROCKER RECLINER Taupe in color. In acceptable condition. Some leather wear. mechanisims work good. $150 OBO 746-7355 LEATHER LOVE SEAT Ivory Leather Love Seat in good condition. $150 OBO 746-7355 LEATHER SOFA& LOVESEAT burgundy, excellent condition 352-746-0855 Leather Sofa, Chair & Ottoman, 1 coffee, 2 end tables.Twin bed, mat. set & head board. Round dining room table w/ 4chrs. Lamp. $600 for all (404) 242-7117 LIVING RM SET 7 PCS EXC COND. $600 & PATIO TABLE W/6 CHAIRS. $150 954-531-8295 LIVING ROOM SET SOFA, lOVESEAT& ENDTABLES. EARTH TONES, EXC COND $425 obo(352) 302-8265 LOVE SEATLIKE NEW.CALLFOR E-MAIL PICTURE LINDA 352-341-2271 MATTRESS SETSBeautiful Factory Seconds Twin $99.95, Full $129.95 Qn. $159.95, Kg. $249.95 352-621-4500 PAIR OF KING SIZED BOX SPRINGS Good condition $25 for the pair. Call Walter @ 352-364-2583 PAULS FURNITURE & THRIFT SHOP Daybed w/ trundle & Mat. Homosassa 628-2306 Collectibles 1918 JENNYSTAMP good condition.Call for e-mail picture. $100.OBO Linda 352-341-2271 ELVIS SUN RECORDS All 5 Sun Records-1954-55. Re-issues. VG-Mint. $75. 352-560-0046 Appliances GE Refrigerator White Runs & looks good. Clean $125. (615) 633-6841 or (931)-267-8838 GE STOVE FLATTOP-White 2yrs old. Features Steam clean oven. $300 352-419-7077 GE WASHER Good working condition $75 KENMORE Dryer Also Good condition $75 (812) 207-5691 KENMORE DRYER white, looks good, works great. Guarenteed. $100 352-476-9019 KHOLER CASTIRON SINK White,dbl basin, standard, excellent condtion. $75. 352-513-4027 MAYTAG NEPTUNE ElectricDryer Runs great, Sensor dry. First $125 takes it! (352) 464-4690 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 WASHER OR DRYER $135 Each. Reliable, Clean, Like new, Excellent Condition. Free Del. 352 263-7398 Auctions DUDLEYS AUCTION **HAPPYNEW** **YEAR!!!** TWOAUCTIONSThurs Jan 3rd WalkAboutAuction 3pm w/full yard of treasures, inside and out Furniture, tools, misc. antiques, box after box Sun Jan 6th Antique & Collectible Auction 1pm Quality Furniture from Victorian to Deco, Art, lighting, jewelry, wonderful selection of vintage Mexican Stoneware, toys, coins, Roseville+++check website www.dudleysauction. com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Fri, 01/04 Preview @ 4pm,Auction@ 6pm General Merchandise **WE BUY EST A TES ** 6055 N. Carl G. Rose Hwy 200 Hernando AB3232 (352) 613-1389 Tools 10 GALLON CAMPBELL HAUSFIELDAIR COMPRESSOR WITH HOSE ONLY$65. 352-464-0316 General Help Apartment Maintenance PositionAvailableCo. seeking P/TMaintenance. Requires own tools, experience & reliable transportation. Position requires plumbing, HVAC, electrical, and painting skills. Please apply during the hours of 9am-1pm, Monday-Friday at WildwoodTownhomes, 301 E. Gulf Atlantic Hwy, and Wildwood or email csaunders@ hallmarkco.com Part-time Help PRO SHOP PERSONNEL & OUTSIDE CART ATTENDANTPart time position, some golf knowledge required, Must have excellent people skills & flexible hours Apply in Person at Sugarmill Woods Golf & Country Club 1 Douglas St. Homosassa Fl. Schools/ Instruction SPRING HILL January Classes COSMO DA YS January 14, 2013 COSMO NIGHTS January 14, 2013 BARBER NIGHTS February 25, 2013 MASSAGE DA Y January 14, 2013, MASSAGE NIGHTS January 14, 2013,SKIN & NAILS Day School Only BENESInternational School of Beauty 1-866-724-2363www.isbschool.com Antiques DUDLEYS AUCTION **HAPPYNEW** **YEAR!!!** TWOAUCTIONSThurs Jan 3rd WalkAboutAuction 3pm w/full yard of treasures, inside and out Furniture, tools, misc. antiques, box after box Sun Jan 6th Antique & Collectible Auction 1pm Quality Furniture from Victorian to Deco, Art, lighting, jewelry, wonderful selection of vintage Mexican Stoneware, toys, coins, Roseville+++check website www.dudleysauction. com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Medical P/T, DIETARY AIDELooking for Responsible Individual with flexible hours. Apply in Person: 700 SE 8th Ave Crystal River, 34429 DFWP, EOE Professional PRODUCTION MANAGERfor Citrus County strawberry, blueberry, and citrus farm. Full time, year round position. Must be willing to relocate to Floral City, Florida. Responsible for: Supervision of irrigation technician and spray technician. Operation and light maintenance of irrigation systems, spray equipment, tractors and other farm vehicles. Interaction with Harvest Manger to ensure production yield and quality. Requires detailed knowledge of: Agricultural chemicals and spray equipment, calibration and maintenance. Irrigation, fertigation, chemigation equipment, calibration and maintenance. Diesel pumps and wells. Record keeping and daily logs.Tractors and other farm equipment. Computers -MS office suite, internet. CollegeAgricultural Degree a plus. Private Pesticide Applicators License a plus. Starting salary commensurate with experience, plus housing, vehicle, insurance, 401K, bonus after 1st year. Respond with resume FERRIS FARMS 7607 S FLORIDAAVE, FLORALCITY, FL 34436 Trades/ Skills Exp. Marine Fork Lift Driver7 day shift **Apply in Person** Twin Rivers Marina 2880 N. Seabreeze Pt Crystal River Fl 34429 no phone calls pls General Help Property Manager forApartment CommunityAn established property management company is seeking a F/Tseasoned professional Property Manager for an RD complex in Floral City. Must be highly skilled at communication and working in an organized manner. We offer a competitive salary and an excellent benefit package including 401(k). On site apartment a possibility. Please send resume or apply at: Floral Oaks Apts. 8092 S. Floral Oaks Cir, Floral City, FLor email-csaunders@ hallmarkco.com.

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TUESDAY,JANUARY1,2013C11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 000DODZ AUTOMOTIVE JOB FAIR Saturday, January 5, 2013 10am-1pm Finance Manager Office Clerk Lot Porters Sales Apprentice Entry Level Technician Customer Service Representative Receptionist Experienced Technician Sales Professionals PLANTATION INN MAGNOLIA ROOM 9301 Fort Island Trail Crystal River, FL 34429Call 1-800-584-8755 Ext. 611 For More Information20 FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS 000DM1Q Real Estate For Sale From mobiles to mansions, From Gulf to Lakes, give me a call, I sell em all! 352-422-4137 nancy .wilson@ yahoo.com Nancy J. Wilson Realtor Broker-Associate SRESGRI Waybright Real Estate, Inc. Motivated seller wants this gone!!! 6 acres w Big SHOP, Nice 2/2/2 House, porches Barns, pond, pvd rd, Concrete drive. $ 149K MLS 357108. www.crosslandrealty. com 352 726 6644 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Specializing in Acreage Farms/Ranches & Commercial Richard (Rick) Couch, Broker Couch Realty & Investments, Inc. (352) 344-8018 RCOUCH.com Condos/Villas For Rent INVERNESS2/2/1 Lg Condo Waterfront Community with heated pool Non-smoker, pet restrict. $665. mo 317-442-1063 Duplexes For Rent HOMOSASSA2/12/1 $525 mo 2/2 $550 mo. incl. garb. Pets? No smoking. 1st & sec. 352-212-4981 Efficiencies/ Cottages HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 Rental Houses BLACK DIAMONDEXCLUSIVE 3/2/2 3389 N Bent Tree Pt 1650 SF, Pool, $1285/mo (740) 398-9585 Rent: Houses Furnished CRYSTALRIVERCrystal Paradise Estates 3/2 Clean, turn-key, fenced yard. Sec + Credit Check $750. Call 352-220-6032 Rent: Houses Unfurnished BEVERLYHILLS1/1, Carport, Carpet $500.mo. 352-302-3987 Cit.Hills/Brentwood2/2/2 on golf course. Club included $900/mo 516-991-5747 CITRUS HILLS2/2 Townhouse condo full appliances, carport, Citrus Hills membership included Prudential Florida Showcase Properties call 352-476-8136 CRYSTALRIVER3/2 on 10 Acres, W/ inground pool $1000/mo(352) 621-3135 HERNANDO2 bedroom. 2 bath single family home with garage, screened patio, & community pool/clubhouse privileges. $875/month, 980-285-8125 INVERNESS2/1 near hospital fam. room, scn porch. $600 352-422-2393 INVERNESS3/2 Brand New, Granite tops, marble flrs, SS Ap $895(352) 634-3897 SUGARMILL WOODS3/2/2 Quiet w/ fire plc Rent or rent to own. $800/mo 352-382-2904 352-697-0458 Waterfront Rentals HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 INVERNESS2/2, Unfurn. waterfront Lake Henderson, lg florida rm, lg carport w/work area, fire pit, access to private boat ramp. $750 mo. Call after 9am (352) 726-6320 Lake Front Home on Gospel Island, spectacular views spacious 3/2/2, For Rent, $700 or Sale (908) 322-6529 Rent or Sale CHASSAHOWITZKACharming 2br 1.5ba, newly remodeled in quiet area. 980sq ft $60,000. Owner Fin ., 10% down amortized over 15yrs at 7% 5-yr balloon. Possible trade for land/home in TN or GA. call 352-382-1800 Real Estate For Sale ESTATE SALE in Nature Coast Landings RV Resort. Large developed site and a separate gated storage lot; plus almost new 5th-wheel with slides, screened gazebo, and storage building. All for $79,900. For more info and pictures, click on www.detailsbyowner.com 352-843-5441 Mobile Homes In Park FLORALCITY 55 + Park. Fully furn., 2/2, DW, 2 Carports, screened porch& remodeled. Fun park lots of activities! Lot Rent $176. $17,500. 352-344-2420 INGLIS3/2 Furn., screened porch. Lot rent $295 Includes amenties. $15,000 (352) 212-8873 INVERNESSHarbor Lights 55+ park, on Big Lake Henderson. Lovely d/w 2/2 new appl. new floors, screened porch, shed, & carport. $13,500 (352)344-1828 INVERNESS PARK55+, 14X60, 2/2, new roof, all appliances, partly furn. screen room, shed, 352-419-6476 LECANTO 55+ PK 1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH, 40x20, shed, handicap access. ramp & shower $25,000. 352-212-6804 Lecanto Senior Park 3 bedroom. 2 bath. 14x66 S/W Mobile home furnished. 12x22 Screened porch, 2 sheds, roof over, new plumbing, new hot water heater, new skirting, very clean, painted in 2011. Call 815-535-7958 RV Spaces For Rent INVERNESSRV Spaces. Bring your own boat and fishing gear.AGE 55+ community. Lot rent only $360-$375 including electric. Edge Water Oaks 352-344-1380 Sale or Rent HOMOSASSALarge 3br 2ba MH Rent to Own Ready to Move In Owner Financing A vail CALL(352) 795-1272 Real Estate For Rent CRYSTALRIVER3/2 on 10 Acres, With inground Pool $1000/mo(352) 621-3135 Apartments Furnished CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Hse. Near Twn 563-9857 Apartments Unfurnished Alexander Real Estate (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts2 BR/1 BA$400-$500 ALSO HOMES & MOBILESAVAILABLE CRYSTALRIVER1 & 2 Bd Rm Apartments for Rent 352-465-2985 CRYSTALRIVERSp acious 2/1 lawn, water, sewr & garb. W/D hk up $500.mo $250 dep No Pets 352-212-9205 352-212-9337 FLORALCITYFREE Use of boat ramp, fishing dock, canoe & Jon boat rentals. 1 BR $300/$200 dp.Trails End Camp,AFriendly Place to Live 352-726-3699 HOMOSASSA2/1, Incld water, trash & lawn. $550 mo. + Sec. 352-634-5499 INVERNESS1 BR & 2 BR Garden & TownhouseApts. $512 to $559 a mo WSG included, small pets welcome. Barrier Free Unit AvailableGATEHOUSE APTS(352) 726-6466 Equal Housing Opportunity Retail/Office Rentals Homosassa SpgsSmlRestaurant/Pizza Shop for Rent, $800 269-369-2509 LECANTO Oak Tree Plaza, Office/ Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @ $700+ util. & sales tax.1 mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease 352-258-6801 Condos/Villas For Rent CITRUS HILLS2/2Furn w/ membership, Seasonal/Annual 352-476-4242, 527-8002 Pets 5 TinyYorkies $550 and up, Small, Tiny & Very Tiny Only 2 females,1 Male Maltese, Raised in loving home. CKC Reg. health certs, & puppy pacs. Parents on site come watch them play (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 MINIATURE POODLES miniature poodle pups born 10/16/12 Health Cert 1 apricot & 1 black female & 1 black male almost potty trained, raised in our home. $500 cash call 352-419-5662 or karaluv3@yahoo.com NICKYNicky is a 2 y.o. lab/bulldog mix, weighing about 78 pounds, and is Heart-worm negative. Is very sweet and loveable, very intelligent. However, he is a big, strong dog who needs a strong person to handle him, and a fenced yard is strongly recommended. He knows how to sit for treats and wants to please his human friend very much. He is available now at the Citrus County Animal Shelter. Call 352-746-8400 RED MINIATURE POODLE PUPS 7 WEEKS;2 MALES AND 1 FEMALE; $850. REGISTRATIONAND HEALTH CERTIFICATES;AVAILABLE 12-22-12. CALL 352-419-8233 OR janiceannross@msn.com SENEGALPARROT $350 WITH CAGE, FEMALE VERYGOOD BIRD. CASH ONLY EXC. HEALTH (352) 503-2383 Feed/Fertilizer /Supplies LG DOG CRATE black finish 48length x29 width 35 height $45 (352) 527-0982 Livestock Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Mobile Homes For Rent HOMOSASSA2/1, NICE SWMH BigYard, Fenced Backyard, Screened Back Porch, In nice area on Paved Street. Pets Allowed $495.pr mnth Ist, Last, $300 Deposit. Call 352 634-3862 or 352-794-3760 HOMOSASSA3/2D/W $650 mo., 1st, last, sec. Very nice home.Ask for Walter (561) 248-4200 LECANTOLEISUREACRES 3/2 water & garbage incl. $600mo. (352) 628-5990 Mobile Homes For Sale 2BR, 1 BA,on your own 75x 150 lot, no fees! new enclosed sunroom, lg laundry room furn, 2 storage buildings, 5111 Castle LakeAve. S. of Inverness on SR 41 $39,500 (740) 255-0125 3bdr/2 full baths/ 2 car carport on 1 acre. split layout, steel roof, caged pool, 20x25 ft deck, lg storage building, Furnished Modular $76,900, 5215 Bridget Pt, Castle Lake Park Inverness 352-597-7353 HERNANDO3BR 2BAMH Ready to move in FHA& Owner Financing avail. call 352-795-1272 Palm Harbor Homes Stilt Homes Waterfront, Beach www .plantcity .p alm harbor .com John Lyons 800-622-2832 Mobile Homes and Land CRYSTALRIVERNice Large 4br 2ba MH READYTO MOVE IN! Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-1272 HERNANDO/486 1+acre, 2br SWMH+ den/flp, Man Cave/Work Shop w/AC 28x40, $47,500 J. Desha Cridland Real Estate (352)634-6340 HOMOSASSA**3/2, Fenced Yard,**NEW Flooring, NEW AC $5,000 Down, $435. mo (352) 476-7077 HOMOSASSA2ba 1 ba MH needs complete rehab. Good shed, well & septic. 6524 W.Akazian $12,500 (603) 860-6660

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C12TUESDAY,JANUARY1,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Lien Notices 512-0101 TUCRN 1/18 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that on 1/18/13 at 10:30 am, the following motor home will be sold at public auction pursuant to F.S. 715.109: 1984 FORD #1FDKE30L1EHB31996. Last Tenants: Regina Boger & John L Boger. Sale to be held at MHC Operating LP dba Crystal Isles RV Resort 11419 W Fort Trail, Crystal River, FL 34429 813-241-8269. January 1 & 8, 2013. OF CRYSTAL RIVER Citrus Countys Volume Sales Leader www.villagetoyota.com 352-503-4121 VILLAGE TOYOTA000DOE5 We Deliver The Best Showroom Buying Experience Cars Customer Service Come See Why We Are Rated The Best! All Remaining 2012 MODELS Will Be SOLD THIS WEEK 0% To Make Room For The Incoming 2013s! Available on 13 Different Models! Savings up to $ 6000 Off MSRPAll Offers Expire Jan. 2, 2013 Vehicles Wanted BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID -$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 Cars 94 OLDS MOBILECUTLASS CIERA SEDAN 6CYRUNS & LOOKS GOOD. ASKING $1575. 352-637-2588 or 845-588-0759 2000 Chevy Corvette Metallic Bowling Green Std shift, one owner, & garage kept. See to appreciate. (352) 621-9874 A XMAS SALEBUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RVCONSIGNMENTUSA.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CHEVROLET2000 IMPALA $4995 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2003AVALANCHE $6850352-341-0018 CHEVROLET2004 TRAILBLAZER 4 X 4 $6999 352-341-0018 CHEVROLET, Lumina GL, 4 Door, loaded, low miles, V6, pwr., garaged, clean $3,750. (352) 212-9383 CHEVROLET, Lumina GL, 4 Door, loaded, low miles, V6, pwr., garaged, clean $3,750. (352) 212-9383 CHRYSLER2001 TOWN & COUNTRY $4550 352-341-0018 MAZDA2006 Miata MX5 Grand Touring 40K Miles, Auto Transmission, Cloth Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk (6), $13,250 352-400-1551 MR2 SPYDER2002TRD model, 1 owner. Mint condition. Garage kept, no accidents, smoking, or pets. New soft top & leather seats. C352-464-7501. $13.5K. NISSAN2005ALTIMASE V6 $7495 352-341-0018 OLDS 98 REGENCY Brougham. 4dr w /fp, orig. 1989, 163k orig., V6-24mpg, new tires & brakes, 2nd owner $1550 (352) 637-1074 SATURN ION2007, 4 cyl,4dr. gold, auto,AC,CD, 27k miles exc. cond. many extras $8300 obo 352-382-0428 TOYOTA Camry LE, Silver. leather interior, very good condition, 86k miles. $8900 (352) 637-2838 Classic Vehicles 1971 CHEVELLE CONVERTIBLEstunning, 40k+ invested fully restored, 350 auto, buckets, consistant show winner, high end stereo, red w/ white top & interior $24,900, 352-513-4257 AUTO SWAP/ Corral CAR SHOW Sumter County Fairgrounds SUMTER SWAPMEETS SUN. JAN., 6, 2013 1800-438-8559 Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 Trucks 2008 Dodge Ram Big Horn 5.7 Hemi 30k Great cond. $19,000 Call Fred(352) 628-6470 A XMAS SALEBUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RVCONSIGNMENTUSA.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 FORD2004 F150XL4x4,115K miles, Camper top, V8, White reg. cab $7000.00 352-746-9150 Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVYTRAILBLAZER LT 05exc. cond. asking $7000 obo, in Hernando (904) 923-2902 Motorcycles Suzuki Burgman 400 Candy apple red, exc. cond., 5090 miles. 61 mi per gallon, luggage back, & garage kept. $4500 (352) 897-4549 HONDA2007 Full Size Shadow. Harley,1100CC, Chrome, bags, trade?, 70mpg $3,500. Crystal River (727) 207-1619 Waterfront Homes Open Waterfront on Lake Hernando 3,300 sf under roof 2,000 liv., 3/2/1. den & fam. rm. cage inground pool. 2 lrg. sheds, dock, on 1 acre $269,900 813-240-7925 YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TO www. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties Citrus County Land **Heatherwood 581** access to game reserve & Tillus Hill, 2.42 Acres well, septic, no impact fees, $30,000 by owner, sold as is (352) 422-0435 ACRE LOT with well, septic and power pole, impact fee credit, high and dry, trees, $11,000 obo (352) 795-3710 Lots For Sale HOMOSASSA Wooded Lot, wet lands on Lee Woods Drive 112 x 114 ft. river access, but not on River $7,000. 352-621-1664 Boat Accessories 2005 BOAT TRAILER 18 to 21 ft boat. Tandem axle.All tires, lights, axles, & guides in exc. cond. MUST SEE! Asking $895 OBO. Priced $350 below value. Call / txt(352) 422-7737 BOAT TRANSIT TRAILER Very lg., dbl. axles up to 33 ft.Any boat type! $1800 or OBO (813) 244-3945 Boats 15 ftALUM. BOAT WIDE DEEPV, 25HPELEC. START, TRAILER. OLDER BUT CHEAPER! $995 (352) 341-4949 1988 27 ft Sportscraft Coastal Fisherman, cabin cruiser, $10k OBO (813)-244-3945 AIRBOAT15ft, Rivermaster 6 cyl, ContinentalAircraft engine, warp-drive prop, $7000 352-637-1391 BAYLINER 1984cuddy cabin, hard top, Volvo motor,AQ125A, needs tune-up. Has 2 props, fish/depth finder, 2001 Rolls float on trailer worth $1000 Comes w/spare motor Has service manual, 2nd owner $2500 call Doug after 4pm352-212-8385 or 352-564-0855 HURRICANE DECK BOAT2003 Hurricane Deck Boat with 2003 90hp Yahama 4 Stroke engine. Excellent condition. Includes trailer, bimini top, winter cover, stereo, fishfinder, gps porta potti,new interior, livewell plus full coast guard safety equip New bottom paint 2011 Very economical on fuel $8500 Contact Phil Tomko at 352-220-9435 No calls before 8:00 am TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP, T top, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com Recreation Vehicles NATIONALRV2006Tropical One owner,34ft, 26000 miles,no smoke/pets, 300HPCummins diesel,2 slides, 6 new tires, 3yr warranty,many extras. $87000. Well maintained. 352-341-4506 Campers/ Travel Trailers MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. WE BUYRVS, Travel Trailers, 5th Wheels, Motor Homes Call US 352-201-6945 Vehicles Wanted $$ TOPDOLLAR $$ For Wrecked, Junk or Unwanted Cars/Trucks. $$ (352) 201-1052 $$ A XMAS SALEBUY-SELL-RENTCAR-TRUCK-BOAT-RVCONSIGNMENTUSA.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 CASH BUYERS Buying Used Cars Trucks & Vans, For used car lot LARRYSAUTO SALES, Hwy 19... 352 564-8333 Citrus County Homes GAIL STEARNS Realtor Tropic Shores Realty (352) 422-4298 Low overhead = Low Commissions Waterfront, Foreclosures Owner financing available Ive SOLD 20 Properties this year!I NEED LISTINGS!DEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERA American RealtyPhone:(352) 726-5855 Cell:(352) 302-8046 Fax:(352) 726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.comMERRY CHRISTMAS! ....and, Happy New Year! MICHELE ROSERealtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 Quiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Dunnellon/Citrus Springs area, only 20 Min. to Ocala $132,000 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. Tony PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619 Buy or Sell Ill Represent YOUERAAmerican Realty Waterfront Homes FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a Week LISAVANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com CRYSTALRIVER2 Story, 5BR/3Bath 2 boat slips near KINGS BAY$425,000. Make Offers 352-563-9857 DUNNELLON Here is that home on Lake Rousseau thatyou have always wanted! 2br 1 ba on 1.43 acres w/168ft lake frontage. Completely remodeled all new interior & windows. No Flood Insurance! Priced reduced from $369,000 to $169,000 Call Bernie (352) 563-0116 Real Estate For Sale Fero Cemetery -Beverly HillsTwo Plots Under Lrg Shaded Oak TreeRow 251 -Lots D & E Only $2500 for Both (1/2 Price) 352-364-4010 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOU A VIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. Open House Brentwood of Citrus Hills 2/2/2 Quiet culdesac. Totally remodeled Hrwd flrs,ceramic,cpt. scrn lanai, lscp yard. Must see! New on market FSBO 1816 W. Jena Ct Lecanto OPEN SAT&SUN 11-2 $97,500 NO agents please 610-248-2090 Beverly Hills Homes Beverly Hills 3 bedroom. 1 bath. OWNER FIN. W/$5OOO DN $822mo NO CREDITCK Just remodeled,new roof, tile, block, w/sep. 2car garage (352) 793-7223 Citrus Hills Homes HERNANDOCitrus Hills Pool Home 4/3/2+, circular drive, 1 acre lot, below $200k 352-527-7856 Hernando Homes Lowest Priced HomeinARBOR LAKES **OPEN HOUSE** 2/2/2 + Den or 3 BR & Gated Comm. 10a-3p 4695 N. Lake Vista Trl (352) 419-7418 Inverness Homes INVERNESSBlock home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $130,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or David 607-539-7872 Floral City Homes FLORALCITY 3/2/1, quiet st, Lg. lot, best offer -inspection Sat, Sun fm 1 to 5, Home will be sold Sunday night to highest bidder 727-288-6020 Crystal River Homes CRYSTALRIVER3/2 on 10 Acres, W/ inground pool $1000/mo(352) 621-3135 Homosassa Homes OWNER SACRIFICE $100,000. 4 yrs. Ago, Selling for $29.900 CALL 352-564-0207 Forest View/Gated 55+ The Meadows Sub. 2/2/1, New roof, NewAC & Appliances Move In, clean cond. 3876 S. Flamingo Terr. Asking $58,000 (352) 382-5558 Homosassa Springs Homes HOMOSASSASPRINGS 2/2/2 Great Country home on 2 acre landscaped lot, in great neighborhood. Move in Ready! Call for appt. 126K 352-503-6511 Sugarmill Woods 4/2/3 HEATED POOL lot s of extras SELLER MOTIVATED! reduced to 210k 352-688-6500 or 352-212-5023 Buying or Selling REALESTATE,Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNT,REALTOR ERAKEY1 Realty, Inc.352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Citrus County Homes Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503