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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-10-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03055

Full Text


Turn clocks forward: Daylight Saving starts today


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C I TRUS CO U N T Y





www.chronicleonline.com
D13 Florida's Best CommunityI Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


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VO. 18 SSE 15


NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER


/ / /


Citrus County Historical Society/Special to the Chronicle
A view of Crystal River City Hall on U.S. 19 engulfed by a river of water on March 13, 1993.



A flood of recollections


Citrus turns into
swimmingpool

March 13, 1993
Editor's note: This story origi-
nally appeared on Page 1A of the
Sunday, March 14, 1993, edition
of the Citrus County Chronicle.
CLINT RILEY
Staff writer
Parts of western Citrus
County became one giant swim-
ming pool Saturday morning.
While many residents were
still asleep, coastal waters 6 feet
above normal surged inland be-
hind the force of hurricane-
strength gusts up to 80 mph.
Within minutes, hundreds of
residents from Homosassa to
Crystal River found themselves
surrounded by water and
stranded.
Streets all along the coast
turned into rivers, and fields
became lakes. Emergency per-
sonnel raced to the aid of resi-
dents, but they too were
overwhelmed by the racing wa-
ters that quickly turned Crystal
River into a submerged city.
The National Weather Service
in Ruskin reported that a tor-
nado touched down Friday night
in Crystal River and damaged or
destroyed about 15 homes and
condominiums and caused
about $1 million in damage.
See TRUS/Page A10


EDITOR'S NOTE


On March 13, 1993, the "No-Name"
storm, packing 80-mph winds and
pushing a 6-foot wall of water, sur-
prised the residents of western Citrus
County, turning streets into rivers and fields
into lakes in just a matter of minutes.
The Citrus County Chronicle is reprinting
stories and photos from 20 years ago while
including the recollections of some of those
whose lives were changed by the disaster.


MORE STORIES INSIDE
* Ozello community changed by
"No-name" storm, Page A2
* Crystal River baby boy born
during storm, Page A3
* Firefighters, fisherman come to
the rescue, Page A4
* Senior citizen calm during flood
crisis, Page A5
* Storm strands grandparents in
Fort Island Trail home, Page A6


For more photos of the
"No-Name Storm,"
click on www.chronicle
online.com/content/
anniversary-no-name-
storm.


'Act of God' to get married


Special to the Chronicle
Jody Krumholtz wed Dolan Smith on March 13,
1993.


Pair exchanges vows
for better or worse'
day of major storm
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS Every wedding
has its snafus, but probably none
like this one had.
Jody Krumholtz was set to marry
Dolan Smith at 7 p.m. Saturday,
March 13, 1993, at the Beverly Hills
Recreation Center.
It was to be a formal affair, com-
plete with ice sculptures, tons of


food and live greenery woven with
lights for the perfect ambience.
Everything was set and then
came the storm.
"It took an act of God to get this
wedding to happen," said Linda
Krumholtz, the bride's mother.
"The groom's side of the family all
lived in Crystal River and Ho-
mosassa. They had tuxedos hanging
from their ceiling fans and they had
to go in by boat to get them. One of
the groomsmen and the ring bearer
didn't show up their houses were
flooded."
Several days before, out-of-state
guests had come to town and were
See MARRED/Page A5


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword .... .. .A16
Chamber ........ .D3


Excursions ...... .A15
Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . .B6


Horoscope . .B6


Lottery . . .B4
Lottery Payouts .B6
Movies ......... .A16


Obituaries ........ A7
TV Listings ...... A16
Veterans Notes .A17


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TODAY
& next
morning

HIGH
78
LOW
52


Partly
cloudy
to sunny
today.
PAGE A4


6 8415


75 Ill


10E7HG


mSUDAY


OW A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER


Flood changes


Ozello forever


I got a call from my mother
in Western New York at
6:15 a.m. Saturday morning,
telling me to get out of my
house because we were
going to have one heck of a
storm.
I was on the fire depart-
ment in Ozello, and we
didn't get "toned out," a
notice to drive around and
tell people to evacuate. The
night before some torna-
does went by, but that was
all.
While I was on the phone,
one of my bedroom win-
dows was sucked out of the
frame and water started
coming into my house. I told
my mom I better go; I
needed to put some stuff up.
Within 15 minutes, 4 1/2
feet of water was in my
house. I had two dogs I
threw the power breakers
off because the outlets were
about to go under water I
got the dogs and we started
swimming down my long
driveway
We got to the intersection
of Ripple Path and Water-
man Drive, and the tide was
pushing us sideways. The
water was coming from two
different directions. I
thought we were going to be
swept out into the river
There was a big uprooted
cedar tree and I thought,
"This is the beginning of the
end."
We finally got to a neigh-
bor's stilt house and stayed
there.
The storm changed the
entire community of Ozello.
Almost every house in
Ozello was flooded there
weren't very many stilt
houses. Afterward, it be-
came mandatory and we
lost a lot of our senior resi-
dents, people who had been
here for many, many years.


The fear of another storm
like that coupled with hav-
ing to build stilt houses and
not be able to climb the
stairs they moved away
For Pirate's Cove at the
end of Ozello Trail, that was
the beginning of the end.
Right after the storm, some
people stayed upstairs in
the restaurant, camping
out We all pitched in to get
it back open, because it was
a gathering place for years
and years. But it was even-
tually demolished.
People pitched in to help
each other Right after the
storm, we had big cookouts.
Everyone's power was out
and we all cooked the food
that was in our refrigerators
before it spoiled. The fire
department opened up and
had tables of food from
other fire departments and
we had a place to get a hot
shower
Other fire departments, I
think it was Floral City,
came to help us, and that
was very helpful.
Ozello used to be a com-
mercial fishing town, and
about the time of the no-
name storm, the net ban
went into effect, so that was
a double kick for Ozello.
There are a lot of new
people out here, and it's be-
come a whole different
community
When storms come or
high tide is predicted, peo-
ple are a lot more cautious.
They will move their cars
out to the bridge, to be safe
rather than sorry
As for me, when I hear of
a big storm, I'm usually the
first one out of the gate.
That was enough for me.
We would've had time to
get out if we had notice, but
we didn't
-Barbara Jean Wilson


( It was like dumping a mammoth bucket in the yard, only the
water was coming from below, not above. ... We looked out the
window and saw scores of stone crab traps, apparently floated
up from the Cedar Key fish docks. ) 7
Terry Connelly
i -.hr,i r.:l. i, H nzioia|., iia n ,],|,-,r
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fly ^~^^^SS~ii


Special to the Chronicle


Charlie's Fish House was surrounded by water March 13, 1993.


Visitors see Florida

for first time in storm


We had come from
Chicago to check out
Florida to see if we
wanted to live here and
were staying at Sawgrass
Villas. We were used to
snowstorms, but weren't
prepared for what we ex-
perienced here.
We were caught in the
storm and found some peo-
ple who were visiting from


Stowe, Vt. they were
here golfing. We banded
with them. I remember we
were hungry and some
kind soul gave us a ride.
We went back to
Chicago, but we came back
a year later. However, we
were not going to move
anywhere west of U.S. 19!
We live in Inverness.
Mary Hornaday


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER


T1 i
Hi5 li (


--~---~-~ -._ --K. -



,- ~- -

-~-~ ~- ~-


Citrus County Historical Society/Special to the Chronicle
This shot of downtown Crystal River, from March 13, 1993, was taken from Citrus Avenue looking toward U.S. 19.



Memories of March 13, 1993


Baby born in

storm turns

20 this year

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER- His
name should've been
Storm.
Born at 6:54 p.m. March
13, 1993, Jared Gusha
made quite an entrance
into the world almost a
splash.
His mother, Eva Allen,
had been at home in Crys-
tal River watching the
water rise inside the house.
Her husband, John
Gusha, worked for then-
Florida Power and was at
work and a friend had
his truck. Gusha was
trapped at the plant, un-
able to get home to rescue
his very pregnant wife.
The baby was one day
overdue.
"It was so nuts," she
said. "I was talking to my
best friend just as the
phone disconnected. I had
told her I was fine, but as
the phone disconnected
water started surging into
my house and I had my
first labor pain. I freaked
out I had never been so
scared in my life."
She had been trying to
save important items, such
as an antique baby cradle,
by putting them up high.
When the water started
coming into her house, she
knew she had to leave, so
she started wading
through the water in the
street to get to the neigh-
bor's house to call 911.
At that time, the water
was only up to her mid-
calf, but it rose fast.
That's when she saw her


Five-year-old girl's


birthday disrupted


ERYN WORTHINGTON/CHRONICLE
Eva Allen gave birth to her son March 13, 1993, during the "No Name" storm. Her son
Jared Gusha will turn 20 on Wednesday.

Of course I don't remember being born on the
day of the storm of the century, but I wish my
mother and Aunt Bev would let me forget it.
Jared Gusha
who was born during the "No Name" storm that hit Citrus County on March 13, 1993.


friend's husband, Jim
Shaffer, and yelled for him
to help her. He parked on
U.S. 19 so he could get her
and take her to safety. As
she tried to reach him, the
current got stronger and
the water level rose, mak-
ing it impossible for her
walk.
Shaffer reached Allen
and carried her a quarter
mile down Fort Island
Trail toward U.S. 19. At
times they hit deep pock-
ets of water and Allen had
to swim while having
contractions.
"It's hard to swim at
nine months pregnant,"
she said.


They finally reached the
parking lot at the corner of
U.S. 19 and Fort Island
Trail. Allen was rushed to
Citrus Memorial Hospital.
"I remember watching
the hail hit the windshield
on my way to the hospital,"
she said. "It was just crazy"
She said her friend sug-
gested she name the baby
Storm.
"I should have he's
like a storm," she said.
"He's feisty and head-
strong, but I love him."
"Of course I don't re-
member being born on the
day of the storm of the cen-
tury, but I wish my mother
and Aunt Bev would let me


forget it," Jared wrote in a
Facebook message. "They
give me a hard time some-
times and tease me. They
call me Storm and keep
telling me how crazy that
day was. The water came
in so fast and there was no
warning.
"I am glad that my Aunt
Bev knew my mom needed
help or I might not be
here. I am really glad that
my name isn't Storm -
and I am glad my family
and friends don't forget my
birthday!"
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


M y daughter's birthday
is March 13, and on
Saturday, March 13, 1993,
we had planned a "Pony
Party" to celebrate her
fifth birthday The invita-
tions were sent, the clown
and pony were confirmed,
and the cake, hotdogs and
drinks were in the refrig-
erator We had everything
we needed for a fun day
with family and friends.
Hours before the party
was supposed to begin, I
stood in our house in Old
Homosassa, built 9 feet
above sea level, watching
the water creep up, slith-
ering like a snake toward
me as the candles on my
daughter's birthday cake
remained unlit
Across the street at my
parents' home, my mom,
little sister and my sis-
ter's best friend were
picking everything off of
the floor, trying to save
whatever they could from
the rising water creeping
under the door. Eventu-
ally, 2 feet of water was in-
side the house. My house
remained dry
Meanwhile, my daugh-
ter, Caitlin, sat on our
front porch in her party
dress and cowboy boots,
watching her brother,
Chadwick, fetch toys, fire-
wood, and other floating
objects that he saw mov-
ing along with the rapid
water. I will never forget
the sight of my son hold-
ing the lime-green cast
that covered his broken
arm over his head, in
breast-deep water, as he
carried a Little Tikes See-
Saw in the other hand.


Caitlin
sat on our front
porch in her
party dress and
cowboy boots,
watching her
brother,
Chadwick,
fetch toys,
firewood, and
other floating
objects that he
saw moving
along with
the rapid
water.

They would cheerfully
deliver the rescued goods
back to their owners the
next day
Eventually, the Birth-
day Girl got to blow out
her birthday candles, and
the food for the party was
shared with the volun-
teers who set up a station
at the Homosassa Baptist
Church. The water went
out the same way it came
in, leaving in its path a
community united in the
face of adversity
Twenty years later,
Caitlin hopes to celebrate
her 25th birthday beneath
sunny skies
DeeDee Pierce
Wilcox


Woman learns what's important


We lived on Sagamon
Point, off State Park
Drive in Crystal River, and
I remember getting up that
morning and noticing the
floor was wet. I thought,
"Did the pool overflow?
Did a water line break?"
It was surreal the
water started coming into
the house.
We went around trying
to save things photo al-
bums, keepsakes, my hus-
band's guns and tools, our
paperwork. Our 10-year-
old daughter gathered up
her stuffed animals, books
and tools.
By 9:40 a.m. the car, our
motor home, the trees
(were) all under water. By
10 a.m. the refrigerator
and the furniture were
floating. It was cold, wet
and nasty
We went into the attic
with food, water, dry
clothes, blankets and pil-
lows and whatever we had
salvaged and stayed there


from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
when the water started to
recede.
We had a good view of
the canal from the attic,
and my husband spotted
two people struggling in a
boat and went to try and
help them.
I don't remember where
we slept that night,
whether it was in the attic
or on our houseboat.
On Sunday, we started
the clean up. The wind
had ripped the screen
cage around the pool and
we found fish in the pool
and a huge alligator turtle
in the driveway
Friends came and did
our laundry And my
daughter's Girl Scout
leader came and got her
doll clothes, dolls and
stuffed animals and made
them new again, which
meant the world to a 10-
year-old girl.
After that, the three of
us lived out of laundry bas-


kets in one room. That be-
came our new normal as
we tore out soggy drywall
and worked to clean up
and rebuild.
There were times of
being depressed and feel-
ing overwhelmed, but it
was a good wake-up call.
We lost a lot of our stuff,
but we realized stuff
doesn't matter We had one
another, and we saw when
things like this happen,
there are a lot of people
who want to help.
It makes you appreciate
your family and friends.
God gives us the people in
our lives who are our
treasures, not our stuff.
Since then, my husband
and daughter have both
died.
But life goes on. You can
cry and moan and say,
"Why me?" or you can
think of it as one of life's
lessons -what doesn't kill
you makes you stronger.
Christine Pope


AFTER THE STORM


Special to the Chronicle
After the storm, Citrus County residents faced the task of cleaning up the damage,
ranging from ripping up soggy carpet to ridding their yards of debris.


U


Check out the Citrus County Chronicle's photo slideshow by clicking
on www.chronicleonline.com/content/anniversary-no-name-storm.


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 A3









NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER



Firefighters, fishermen to the rescue


Utility worker

searches for

those stranded

As a full-time employee
of utilities for the city
of Crystal River, I also was
a volunteer for the Connell
Heights Fire Department.
Recently voted in as cap-
tain, we were prepared
and on standby for the
straight-line storm march-
ing its way across the Gulf
of Mexico. Even with re-
ports of 80 mph sustained
winds, no one thought of
hurricane forces.
On Friday after work, we
got the first call-out for a
tornado touching down at
10 p.m. in the woods and
waters area on State Road
44 west.
I ran to the station and
hopped aboard the rescue
vehicle. Arriving on scene,
multiple units and crews
spilt up for rescue and
evaluation. Making our
way through the debris
field in the darkness of the
storm and power outage
and armed with flash-
lights, we came across a
truck with its keys still
inside.
With a stilt house
nearby, we ascended the
fight of stairs to a set of
double glass doors. We
used a balcony chair to
break through, repeating,
"Fire Department!" as we
entered a bedroom. Not
much damage, a few ceil-
ing tiles on the bed. Then
we saw the tornado had re-


moved all but the one bed-
room from the flooring.
We continued to assist in
search and rescue for a
few hours in the storm, re-
turning to Station 31
(Rockcrusher Road). Mul-
tiple calls started coming
in: power lines down, trees
down on houses, limbs in
roadways and accidents.
As the fire departments
responded to more and
more calls, we called in
East Side (county stations
east of County Road 491) to
assist.
Just as dawn was break-
ing, it appeared we were
out of the storm. The
winds off the gulf were
pushing the high tide in-
land, and as waters levels
were coming up, the order
for evacuation was given
for the west side of
U.S. 19.
We responded with as
many trucks as possible to
move people out. Many
first-in units flooded on
the roadway School buses,
Army reserve trucks and
boats were brought in for
rescue. We set up at
Scotty's hardware (now
Citrus Kia) for triage and
transport to shelters.
At the Plantation Inn,
the wind drove in waves as
white caps over U.S. 19, we
had to relocate to the Kash
'n' Karry (now Sweetbay)
parking lot.
By early afternoon, with
most evacuations winding
down, we went in on an
Army 6X vehicle to bring
out a paralyzed patient ...
all you could see of the
sheriff's cruisers were the
light bars, and our fire de-


Special to the Chronicle
Stranded residents were evacuated from their homes by
volunteer firefighters, fishermen and others who had
access to watercrafts.


apartment vehicles in 4 feet
of saltwater ruined.
After that rescue, I was
assigned to the
bridge (next to the Planta-
tion Inn) for security As
me and a colleague stood
guard, we noticed an eld-
erly woman trying to
sweep water out of her


screen room. We comman-
deered a canoe left at the
bridge and managed to
bring her and two of her
three cats back to the
bridge, avoiding a 10-foot
whirlpool caused by a
broke-loose dock wedge in
the bridge.
Wendell 0. Leigh Sr


A s the water kept rising, my community went into
rescue mode.
After the power went out at 10 a.m., my landline was
the only phone that still had service. Concerned peo-
ple east of U.S. 19 were calling me, wanting informa-
tion about their loved ones.
The roads were blocked. No one could get into
town. My father, Alton Pierce, and my brother, Mandy
Pierce, acted like shuttles, driving the stranded to
U.S. 19 where they could be reunited with their
families.
Mrs. Havens sat in the back of Dad's truck with her
broken leg propped up on the tool box, holding onto
her walker for support.
Dad continued this goodwill service until water
covered the hood of his pickup truck.
My brother used a mullet fishing boat to rescue our
family, friends and neighbors, literally bringing peo-
ple by the boat loads to my house. When Mandy re-
trieved our 80-year-old grandmother, the wind had
picked up. As Mandy maneuvered the boat to my front
door, a gust of wind rocked the boat, and my grand-
mother screamed in terror After 80 years of living in
Homosassa, she did not know how to swim.
Unbeknownst to my brother, his home was being
flooded with more than 3 feet of water Thankfully, he
was able save his treasured gun cabinet our great
uncle had made him, laying it across the top of his
highest piece of furniture.
-DeeDee Pierce Wilcox


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



j Fictitious Name Notices..............D7


SL Meeting Notices...........................D7


Lien Noticese.................................nD7


Self Storage Notices...................D7


S... Surplus Property.........................D7


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdali
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
H L F'cast City H
75 57 pc Miami 79
e 78 69 pc Ocala 79
82 60 pc Orlando 79
79 52 pc Pensacola 71
78 63 pc Sarasota 78
75 52 pc Tallahassee 75
77 70 pc Tampa 80
80 58 pc Vero Beach 77
76 61 pc W. Palm Bch. 76


MARINE OUTLOOK


East-southeast winds at 10-15 knots.
Seas 2 feet. Bay and inland waters will
have a moderate chop. Variably cloudy
today.


76 44 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Exclusivedaily
.. .. ...... ;TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 78 Low: 52
Partly cloudy to mostly sunny

r MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 80 Low: 63
Increasing clouds

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
High: 74 Low: 45
Passing showers; windy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday
Record
Normal
Mean temp.
Departure from mean
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday
Total for the month
Total for the year
Normal for the year
*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9


77/42
88/29
77/48
60
-3

0.00 in.
trace
2.10 in.
7.18 in.


0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.17 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 39
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 28%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, juniper and nettle
Today's count: 10/12
Monday's count: 10.5
Tuesday's count: 8.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/10 SUNDAY 4:56 11:08 5:21 11:33
3/11 MONDAY 5:43 11:55 6:07 12:19
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O ) 09 ( SUNSET TONIGHT.......................7:36 P.M.
SUNRISE TOMORROW.....................7:44A.M.
S ) 0 4 MOONRISE TODAY.....................6:42 A.M.
MAIIll1 MARCII9 MARCHIZ7 APRIL 3 MOONSET TODAY........................ 6:43 P.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://ilame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities'customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


*From mouths of rivers


High/Low
5:18 a/12:10 a
3:39 a/11:10 a
12:26 a!8:58 a
4:28 a,12:47 p


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
6:13 pl/1:48 p
4:34 p/11:18 p
2:21 p/9:06 p
5:23 p/--


High/L
6:05 a/l
4:26 a/1
2:13 a/9
5:15 a/l


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
Low High/Low
:56 a 6:41 p/2:23 p
1:45 a 5:02 p/11:59 p
9:33 a 2:49 p19:47 p
2:55 a 5:51 p/1:22 p


Gulf water
temperature



61
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.12 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.62 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lnverness 38.49 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.79 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211.

THE NATION


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*80s Qs

FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
H LPcp. FcstH L


Albany
Albuquerque
Asheville
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord. N.H.
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Evansville, IN
Harrisburg
Hartford
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Mobile
Montgomery
Nashville


pc
pc
pc
pc
s
pc
pc
pc
pc
s
s
pc
pc
s
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pc
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.04 r
pc
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pc
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27 pc
.41 rs
r
pc
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pc
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.03 r
.52 sn
pc
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KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rainfsnow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
2013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Saturday Sunday
City H L Pcp. Fcst H L
New Orleans 71 51 ts 77 60
New York City 55 35 s 50 36
Norfolk 51 40 s 57 39
Oklahoma City 62 54 .31 pc 47 26
Omaha 54 41 .32 sn 31 18
Palm Springs 70 45 s 78 50
Philadelphia 62 35 s 55 38
Phoenix 58 44 .16 s 72 50
Pittsburgh 54 22 pc 60 43
Portland. ME 44 31 s 43 31
Portland. Ore 58 31 pc 58 45
Providence, R.I. 48 33 s 47 30
Raleigh 62 33 pc 64 42
Rapid City 46 25 pc 41 25
Reno 55 32 s 59 31
Rochester, NY 49 24 pc 59 42
Sacramento 70 39 s 69 42
St. Louis 68 42 .44 r 58 33
St. Ste. Marie 37 20 rs 39 25
Salt Lake City 49 35 s 48 29
San Antonio 77 63 .07 pc 70 39
San Diego 59 51 .20 s 68 49
San Francisco 61 44 s 63 46
Savannah 66 35 pc 69 52
Seattle 55 34 c 54 43
Spokane 50 26 pc 51 37
Syracuse 48 24 pc 55 38
Topeka 57 48 1.28 rs 39 22
Washington 62 34 pc 59 41
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 94 Laredo, Texas LOW-1 Stanley, Idaho

WORLD CITIES
SUNDAY Lisbon 59/52/sh
CITY H/L/SKY London 40/32/sf
Acapulco 89/73/s Madrid 55/40/sh
Amsterdam 35/27/c Mexico City 82/52/s
Athens 67/53/pc Montreal 49/39/pc
Beijing 45/30/pc Moscow 21/6/c
Berlin 29/26/sn Paris 57/39/c
Bermuda 62/61/sh Rio 90/77/pc
Cairo 80/62/s Rome 59/50/pc
Calgary 47/16/pc Sydney 84/68/pc
Havana 82/63/pc Tokyo 72/40/pc
Hong Kong 75/67/pc Toronto 54/39/pc
Jerusalem 62/49/s Warsaw 26/23/sn


~ C I T R U S


F'cast
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C 0 U N TY


LHRONICLL
Florida's Best Communityl Newspaper Serving Florida s Best Community

To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
Citrus County: 352-563-5655
Marion County: 888-852-2340
13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68*
1 year: $121.87*
*Subscription price Includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost
and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details.
There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly
affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for
$13.00 per year.
For home delivery by mail:
In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks
Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeks
To contact us regarding your service:

352-563-5655
Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day
Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
Citrus County 352-563-6363
Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County
residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
I want to place an ad:
To place a classified ad: Citrus 352-563-5966
Marion 888-852-2340
To place a display ad: 352-563-5592
Online display ad: 352-563-5592
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MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280
EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com
Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com


Where to find us:
Meadowcrest
,44 |office
Br..lli i B[,,n| Huv, 1624 N.
Dunkerield MeCnnonaleDr Blvdowcrest
A | Crystal River,
A \\ 'Meadowtresi FL 34429
N \ :1

SI Inverness
TompkinsSt. ua| sire
T. 106 W. Main
St.,
"1 44 Inverness, FL
34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ...................................................................... Publisher, 563-3 2 22
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rno ld ................................................ ............................ .. E d itor, 5 6 4 -2 9 3 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy ........................................................ Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes .......................... ................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes ............................... .............. Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. M ike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
W ire service content .......... ............................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ............................................................. .......................................... 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please
recycle your newspaper
www.chronicleonline.com
Published every Sunday through Saturday
By Citrus Publishing Inc.
1624 N. Meadowerest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429
41FW Phone 352-563-6363
SO POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
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PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL
SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River*
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'(3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER


Senior citizen


remains calm


in flood crisis


My husband and I had
just moved to our
new home in Citrus Hills
in December 1992. I was
here to help my mother
with my father, who had
cancer and not much time
to live. They had lived out
at The Islands in Crystal
River for more than 20
years.
My dad died Dec. 30,
leaving my mother alone.
On Friday, March 13, my
mother wanted me to
come over, but I had guests
coming early Saturday
morning. That night I
heard what sounded like a
train going through the
neighborhood. I got up and
saw the pool water hover-
ing above the pool about 3
inches! Just hovering
there for a second or two,
then it went back into the
pool. It was very freaky. I
kept checking the Weather
Channel, but they had no
information other than the
Northeast was going to get
a snowstorm.
On Saturday morning,
my mother got out of bed
and her carpet was squishy
She got dressed and had
breakfast and by then the
water was at her ankles.
She tried to call me, but
the phone was dead. She
grabbed a black plastic bag
and packed some clothes,
her checkbook, jewelry,
other important docu-
ments and a few decks of
cards my mother loved
to play bridge!
By then the water was up
to her knees. She tried to go
to her neighbor's across the
street who had a two-story
unit, but she couldn't open
the door with the water
pressure. So she sat on top
of the dining room table,
the only dry place. She saw
her neighbors in their boat
in the yard and tried to
wave them down, but they
didn't see her As the water
kept rising she knew she
had to do something.
Meanwhile I was at
home, trying to call my 77-
year-old mother. She had
just lost her husband of
more than 50 years three
months before. I always
thought my mother was
strong and resourceful, but
this was a crisis I wasn't
sure I could handle. I had
freaked out just seeing my
pool water rise out of the
pool the night before. I
kept dialing and checking
the Weather Channel,
which still had nothing
about what was going on in
Citrus County!



MARRIED
Continued from Page Al

staying at the Crown Hotel
in Inverness, which lost
power during the storm
Friday night. So, no one
was able to shower the day
of the wedding.
"I couldn't get my hair
and nails done that day,"
Krumholtz said. "So I had
to walk down the aisle
with chipped nails, but
that's not the worst part.
The wedding dress was at
Patricia's Boutique. That
was when it was in Crystal
River rather than
Brooksville, and they
wouldn't let me come and
get it; it wasn't safe to be
on the road at that time.
"I pretty much threat-
ened them that I had to get
it! So, Patricia had her
husband drive her in so I
could get my daughter's
wedding dress," she said.
The wedding gown situ-
ation, however, was simple
compared to how to get the
DJ to Beverly Hills from
New Port Richey
"The only way for him to
get here was for an airboat
to be in front of him down
U.S. 19, making a wake for
him to travel in to get
there," Krumholtz said.
"And he got there."
She said they never
thought to postpone the
wedding, because of all the
food already prepared and
all the out-of-town guests.


"The best story out of
the whole thing, for their
first dance they played the


My mother, Louise
Knaut, was actually an
amazing woman who kept
her cool. She knew she
had to get out of there, so
she opened the sliding
dining room window and
jumped into the swirling
muddy waters with her
most precious belongings
slung over her shoulder.
She waded in snake-
infested waters up to her
chest and crossed the road
to her neighbor's house.
They pulled her in and sat
on their second floor until
people with boats came by
From there they were
taken to the (raised) club-
house. My mother changed
into dry clothes and pulled
out her cards to see if any-
body wanted to play
bridge!
Back then there were no
smartphones or iPads to
check on what was going
on. People just had to wait
until they were rescued.
Help finally came by heli-
copters and air boaters.
By this time, my mother's
sense of adventure had
been worn out and she
opted for the airboat ride
down to U.S. 19 and what
was then Scotty's, the first
dry spot. From there, they
were bused to the shelter
in Lecanto where I could
pick her up.
One of the items my
mother had grabbed was
her computer disc with
her household inventory
on an Excel spreadsheet,
so she was ready for the in-
surance adjusters when
they arrived.
My father had just died
thinking he had left his
wife in a safe place they
had shared for more than
20 years, and we were glad
he was not there to see
that devastating flood.
With his cancer, he would
not have been able to es-
cape if he had still been
alive. It could have been so
much worse.
I got to know my mother
in a very different way and
with a new respect for her
by how she handled that
horrible storm and its af-
termath. She went back to
The Islands for a short
time but then moved to
Meadowcrest before be-
coming one of the early
residents of Cedar Creek
Assisted Living. You can
still see her in their com-
mercials. She is the lady at
the end of one of them sit-
ting in a big chair reading.
She looks up and smiles.
Susan Knaut Moore

song 'Two Sparrows in a
Hurricane,"' she said.
"They had picked that out
even before we knew a
storm was coming."
On March 13, Jody and
Dolan Smith will celebrate
their 20th anniversary



S-






I( 637-2222


; '"- .-- -



--- ---- -_ .It's under water somewhere.

.-. -" Captain MVlike TayIlor.
, --- .. .:-", : L, ,, : "



Citrus County Historical Society/Special to the Chronicle
The Sun Plaza along U.S. 19 is submerged in water.



Storm blows Crystal River couple out of bed


We lived at River Cove Landing
off Fort Island Trail. My son
had called to say we were under a
tornado watch. We had 18-foot ceil-
ings and huge windows and we could
see the lightning, it was constant
I told my husband, "I'm going to
bed I can't sit here and watch this."
We were only in bed for five or 10
minutes when we were blown out of
bed. Part of the roof came up and


LECANTO
INVERNESS
OCALA
TIMBER RIDGE
THE VILLAGES


we ended up on the floor. My leg
was still on the bed with a piece
of sheetrock on it. We didn't know
what was going on. I thought, "This
is the end."
The sheets and bedspread were
blown out to the patio; there was
devastation everywhere. We lost
our car, our boat, everything.
We rebuilt on the water in Crystal
River, but I couldn't stay there. We


had a 10-room house, but I had to
sell it because of the fear. So, we
sold it, downsized, bought a motor
home and traveled.
Now I live in a doublewide in In-
verness, where we started out in
1974. When a bad storm comes and
I panic, I go into the pantry or to my
daughter's house. That storm 20
years ago scared me.
-Joann Wisnewski


Bud Conklin beat prostate cancer with the help of advanced technologies,
like RBOI's Calypso 4D Localization Treatment.
Not many things slow Bud Conklin down. In his 60s, this Air Force veteran still hits
the gym regularly and completes a weekly 20-mile bike ride. So when he was
diagnosed with prostate cancer, he sought out the most advanced and efficient
treatment available. After discussing his options with RBOI cancer specialist
Dr. Bennett, Bud chose the high-tech Calypso treatment, which works like a GPS
system in the prostate to optimize radiation targeting and minimize side effects.
Bud is now cancer free and proud to say he didn't miss a beat in his fast-paced life.
We helped Bud write his success story. Let us help write yours.


Visit RBOI.com or call 352.527.0106
to schedule a consultation.


We Welcome You To


Value Dental Care

6824 Gulf To Lake Hwy.

Crystal River
352-794-6139


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Be a Success Story.


Dr. Michael Welch, UMU & Associates


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-J-


-J--


AL


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 A5


ODNOI





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER


Storm strands grandparents


Community

answers call to

help victims

At the time of the no-
name storm, I worked
at the Citrus County
Health Department
My husband's grandpar-
ents, William and Veronica
Carlucci, lived on West
Sunny Brook, down by
Dixie Shores in Crystal
River. Despite warnings to
evacuate, they would not.
Grandpa was stubborn.
Born in 1909, he was sure
this was an overreaction.
When my husband and
brother-in-law went to the
corner of Fort Island Trail
and U.S. 19, the authorities
would not let them
through because the flood-
ing had already started.
The neighbors on either
side were flooded, but
Grandma and Grandpa
were dry because their
house was built four feet
higher, although they


Five manatees floated from King's
Bay into the flood water at Port
Paradise condominiums in Crystal
River and ate Pam Rooks' lawn.
"We lost everything, but that was
the only beauty to it," she said.
"Here we are having to crawl out
a window into a canoe and they're
sitting there kinda enjoying it."


could not get out
So, a helicopter went to
the house and the Na-
tional Guard officer car-
ried Grandma by piggy
back to the helicopter.
Grandma, of course, had
lots of conversation with
the young man while she
was being carried by him
and somehow figured out
he was a relative of one of
her neighbors.
They were flown to the


Early Learning Coalition of the Nature Coast
presents

CAR SEAT SAFETY CLINIC

AT CRYSTAL

CHRYSLER/DODGE/JEEP/RAM
How safe is your child's car seat and is it installed
correctly? On Saturday, March 23, you can have your car
seat checked at the Crystal Chrysler/DodgelJeeplRam
in Inverness from 10 am to 2pm.
Certified child passenger safety technicians, Sue Littnan
and Tania Reaves from the Early Learning Coalition of the
Nature Coast will be on hand to help you. They will check
to see that:
The car seat is safe to use and not recalled,
expired or damaged
The car seat is an appropriate seat for
the child's age, height and weight
The car seat is installed securely with all needed
adjustments complete
Please bring the child and the instructions for the safety
seat or booster. There is no cost for this car seat
check-up service.
The Crystal Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep/Ram Dealership is
sponsoring this community safety event to help residents
provide the safest possible transportation for everyone
in their family.


airport in Crystal River
where there were TV and
print reporters. Grandpa
was thrilled to be in the
helicopter. He was a re-
tired air traffic control of-
ficer and a pilot himself.
Grandma lives at Cedar
Creek in Crystal River.
Grandpa died just short of
his 102nd birthday
As for me, I was called to
Red Cross shelter duty as
were most of the Regis-


CRYSTAL
-. -- ... z Jeep V-A--


2077 Highway 44W
Inverness, FL


provides the highest quality home health care. We excel
at helping patients stay in their homes and are Citrus
County's ONLY HOSPITAL BASED HOME HEALTH.




* Medical Social Worker

* Skilled Nursing

* Home Health Aide


* Physical


* Occupational

* Speech


Pair lucky' to return

home, find house dry


tered Nurses at the health
department. I remember
many elderly people com-
ing in soaking wet. There
was so much help from the
community dry clothes,
blankets, quilts and pil-
lows arrived quickly
The local pharmacies
went out of their way to
help get people meds. All
the agencies law enforce-
ment, medical community
and local volunteers -
were working together
I remember some peo-
ple kind of dazed; they
couldn't believe the tide
had come in so quickly
People continued to arrive
through the night, cold,
tired and scared and so
grateful to be in a safe
place. Longtime Crystal
River and Red Level resi-
dents said they had never
seen anything like this,
going back some 50 years.
Regina Epple


W e lived on North
Concord Drive, just
off State Park Drive, and
the water started coming
up so fast, it was like
someone opened the
floodgates. We had no
idea how we were going
to get out of there when
someone came to our
front door in a row boat.
They took us to the Days
Inn.
They had no electric,
water or phone service
working, so we went to
Seven Rivers hospital.
That was the best thing
that could have happened
to us. We had a comfort-
able place to sit and all
the facilities plus they
even gave us some lunch.
We sat in the lobby for a
couple of hours, and down
the elevator came a friend,
Margaret Woodruff, who


(.j KEEP CITRUS COUNTY BEAUTIFUL
-.CITRUS COUNTY
-..... CLEANUP GREENUP PROGRAM
Everyone wants to live, work and play in a clean and green community
and it's up to everyone to improve the overall quality of life in Citrus County.
If you are finally tackling that garage clean out or just spring cleaning,
did you know....
Residents can dispose of the following materials from their home
Free of charge at the landfill, up to the listed limits.....
No Limits on these items!
Bulky waste consisting of furniture, carpeting and padding, box springs and mattresses
o Computer components & all other electronic items
Some metal appliances (stoves, washers, etc.)
Lead acid and rechargeable batteries
o Scrap metal (all lawn equipment must have fluids drained)
Items with limits of 2 per visit 2 times per year
STelevisions and computer monitors
Refrigerators, Freezers, A/C Units
Propane Tanks
Items with other limits
Residential passenger car tires Maximum 5 per visit 2 times per year
Used oil and anti-freeze up to 10 gallons per visit
Fluorescent lamps & mercury containing devices first 6 free
Latex paint maximum 10 gallons per visit
Don't let your trash become Litter....
"Put Waste in Its Place"



*Businesses will be charged business rate. For more information call
Solid Waste Management (Citrus County Landfill) 352 527-7670 or visit web site:
http://www.bocc.citrus.fl.us/pubworks/swm/solid waste.htm
000E9U5


1st Food Truck Rally

@ Rock Crusher Canyon
to Benefit Community Food
Bank of Citrus County

ENJOY TASTY TREATS LISTEN to JAZZ MUSIC
HAVE A GREAT TIME!
"Food Trucks for Families" visiting include Monsta
Lobsta, Firehouse BBQ, Tastebuds, Niffty Fiffty's Diner
Truck, Big Cheese, and Ice Cream Social Club. The
"COOL CORPORATE CATS" are performing live in the
Pavilion. On display are New RAM Trucks from Crystal
Chrysler/Dodge/RAM, New RVs from Alliance Coach,
Touch of Class Corvette Club, and Citrus County
Jeepers. Please bring your family, have some fun, and
help support a very worthy cause.
A portion of all Food and Beverage Sales will be
donated to the Community Food Bank of Citrus County.


Friday, March 15, 2013

4:00 PM to 8:00 PM
275 South Rock Crusher Road
Crystal River, FL

Live Music Food Beer Wine Door Prizes
Donations accepted for the Community Food Bank of Citrus County

"Cool CorporateFree CITRUS COUNT

Performing Live www.chronicleonline.com

Sponsors: ----w Jeep ^
CRUSHER CRYSTAL

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had been visiting her hus-
band. She invited us to
come home with her.
There was another couple
at her home and I was the
designated cook. She had
a freezer full of food.
The next day she had
another couple who had
spent the night in one of
the school houses came
by way of Inverness.
The third day we were
allowed to go home and
were shocked when we
unlocked the front door It
was dry! The water had
gotten into the porches
and the garage, but not
the house.
I thanked the Lord for
this blessing but felt
guilty for the houses
around me that had at
least 14 inches of water in
them.
-Elsa Pence


MOaao


A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


OEgPW


ork"I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obituaries


John Isbell Jr.,
86
HOMOSASSA
John E Isbell Jr.,
beloved husband, father
and brother, 86, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., passed away
March 8,
2013, at
the HPH
Hospice in
Lecanto, "
Fla. .
He was
born July
16, 1926, in
Sayre, Pa., John
to John F Isbell
Sr. and
Edna (Wells) Isbell. Mr. Is-
bell was raised in Athens,
Pa., where he graduated
from Athens Area High
School. He then served in
the U.S. Army during
World War II under Gen.
Patton. After his military
career, Mr. Isbell attended
and graduated from Penn
State University with a de-
gree in commerce and fi-
nance. He retired after 33
years at IBM as senior
pricing analyst for the
space program. He also
worked for Winn-Dixie for
five years and then sold
sports memorabilia at
Howards Flea Market for
15 years. During his ca-
reer, Mr. Isbell lived in
Huntsville, Ala., for 15
years then moved to Mer-
ritt Island, Fla., for 11
years and finally he moved
to Citrus County 23 years
ago. He enjoyed reading,
golf, bowling, Boy Scouts,
church, his family and
helping others. Mr. Isbell
volunteered at several
hospitals and served as a
town council member in
Athens, Pa.
In addition to his par-
ents, John was preceded in
death by his daughter, Cyn-
thia J. Anderson Goens;
granddaughter, Danielle
Melchionne; brother,
Harold Isbell; and brother-
in-law, Herbert Schramm.
He is survived by his
wife of 68 years, Jean M.
(Hunsinger) Isbell; three
children, Linda M. Cole,
Robert J. Isbell and Renee
K. Melchionne; six grand-
children, Shane (Lisa)
Cole, Philip (Rikki-
Michelle) Cole, John Mel-
chionne, Michelle (Sean)
Davy, Joseph (Shantel)
Melchionne and Matthew
(Pamela) Anderson; two
sisters, Norma (Stewart)
Rae and Inga Schramm;
sisters-in-law, Janet
(Claude) House, Marjorie
Isbell and Phyllis Hun-
singer; 14 great-grandchil-
dren; and numerous
nieces, nephews and
cousins.
Visitation will be from
10 a.m. until service time
at 11 a.m. Tuesday, March
12, 2013, at the Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto, Fla.
Pastor Brian Baggs will of-
ficiate. Burial will be at
2 p.m. at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery with
American Legion Post 155
of Crystal River, Fla., giv-


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ing military honors.
In lieu of flowers, me-
morial donations in John's
name can be made to HPH
Hospice in Beverly Hills
or to the local Hospice in
your area.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Fla., www.brownfuneral
home.com.

Nancy
Peck, 62
DUNNELLON
The Service of Remem-
brance for Nancy E. Peck,
age 62, of Dunnellon,
Florida, will be held 5:30
pm, Tuesday, March 12,
2013, at the Inverness
Chapel of Hooper Funeral
Homes with Chaplain Jack
Cushman officiating. Cre-
mation will be under the
direction of Hooper Cre-
matory, Inverness, Florida.
The family requests ex-
pressions of sympathy take
the form of memorial dona-
tions to Hospice of Marion
County, 3231 SW 34th Av-
enue, Ocala, FL 34474 at
www.hospiceofmarion.com
; or the Medical College of
Wisconsin, Office of Devel-
opment, 8701 Watertown
Plank Road, Milwaukee,
WI 53226 (Ann Nattinger's
Breast Cancer Research
Program) at http://
www.mcw.edu/ia.htm.
Online condolences may
be sent to the family at
www. HooperFuneral
Home.com.
Nancy was born October
19, 1950, in Wichita, KS,
daughter of Loren and Es-
ther (Jackson) Peck. She
died February 22, 2013, in
Ocala, FL. Nancy gradu-
ated from the University of
Florida Law School and
worked as a Staff Attorney
for the Citrus County
Courts. She enjoyed read-
ing, animals, history, and
her friends at the Citrus
County Courthouse. She
was also an advocate for
social justice and an avid
fan of the Florida Gators,
NASCAR and Indy Car
Racing. Nancy will be
fondly remembered for
her generosity of time and
resources to support those
in need.
She is survived by her
parents who reside in
Dunnellon, FL and her
brother, Jim Peck and his
wife, Julie of Mequon, WI.




Edward
Richards, 77
BEVERLY HILLS
Mr. Edward B. Richards,
77, of Beverly Hills, died
Friday, March 8, 2013, in
Lecanto.
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Bev-
erly Hills Chapel of
Hooper Funeral Home &
Crematory

VERIFICATION
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.


Donald
Burke, 77
LADY LAKE
Donald P Burke, 77, of
Lady Lake, died Wednes-
day, March 6, 2013.
Burial will be in Penn-
sylvania; local arrange-
ments are under the
direction of Brown Fu-
neral Home and Crema-
tory in Lecanto.

Linda
Gammache, 63
CRYSTAL RIVER
Linda D. Gammache, 63,
of Crystal River, died Fri-
day, March 8, 2013.
Private cremation will
take place under the di-
rection of Brown Funeral
Home and Crematory in
Lecanto.




Joe Gilbreath
Sr., 69
DUNNELLON
Joe Gilbreath Sr, 69, of
Dunnellon, Fla., died
Thursday, March 7.
He was born March 7,
1944, in Alice, Texas. He
lived most of his life in
Dunnellon, except for his
time abroad in the Army,
where he served as a cap-
tain in Vietnam. He
worked for the U.S. gov-
ernment in public rela-
tions. He was the owner of
a fencing company and
was a truck driver. He had
a double major from Fla-
gler County College. He
was Christian.
He is survived by son
Joe D. Gilbreath Jr. of
Tampa, Fla.; and sister
Becky Kimbro of Ocala,
Fla.
Donations may be made
in his memory to Hospice
of Citrus County. Services
will be at a later date.
Florida Cremation Soci-
ety, The Villages.




Lawrence
Healy Jr., 91
HOMOSASSA
Lawrence J. Healy Jr,
91, of Homosassa, died
Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at
the Health Center of
Brentwood.
Graveside service will
be at 1 p.m. Tuesday,
March 12, 2013, at Florida
National Cemetery,
Bushnell.
Wilder Funeral Home is
in charge of arrangements.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.


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NYC soda size rule eyed


Associated Press

NEW YORK At bar-
becue joints, coffee coun-
ters and bottle-service
nightclubs, a coming
clampdown on big, sugary
soft drinks is beginning to
take shape on tables and
menus in a city that
thrives on eating and
going out.
Some restaurants are
ordering smaller glasses.
Dunkin' Donuts shops are
telling customers they'll
have to sweeten and fla-
vor their own coffee.
Coca-Cola has printed
posters explaining the
new rules, and a bowling
lounge is squeezing carrot
and beet juice as a poten-
tial substitute for pitchers
of soda at family parties
all in preparation for
the nation's first limit on
the size of sugar-laden
beverages, set to take ef-
fect Tuesday
Some businesses are
holding off, hoping a court
challenge nixes or at least
delays the restriction. But
many are getting ready for
tasks including reprinting
menus and changing
movie theaters' supersized
soda-and-popcorn deals.
At Brother Jimmy's
BBQ, customers still will
be able to order margari-
tas by the pitcher, cock-
tails in jumbo Mason jars
and heaping plates of
ribs. But they'll no longer
get 24-ounce tumblers of
soda, since the new rule
bars selling non-diet cola
in cups, bottles or pitch-
ers bigger than 16 ounces.
"Everything we do is
big, so serving it in a
quaint little 16-ounce
soda cups is going to look
kind of odd," owner Josh
Lebowitz said.
Nonetheless, he's or-
dered 1,000 of them for
the North Carolina-
themed restaurant's five
Manhattan locations,
rather than take on a fight
that carries the threat of
$200 fines.
'As long as they keep al-
lowing us to serve beer in
glasses larger than 16
ounces, we'll be OK,"
Lebowitz reasoned.
Beer drinkers can
breathe easy: The restric-
tion doesn't apply to alco-
holic beverages, among
other exemptions for var-
ious reasons. But it does
cover such beverages as
energy drinks and sweet-

FREE OBITUARIES
* Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
* If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.




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Associated Press
Customers at Brother Jimmy's BBQ call cheers Friday
with 24-ounce and 16-ounce beverages in New York.
The nation's first limit on the size of sugar-laden bever-
ages is set to take effect Tuesday in New York City.
Customers will no longer get 24-ounce tumblers of soda,
since the new rule bars selling non-diet cola in cups,
bottles or pitchers bigger than 16 ounces.


ened fruit smoothies.
City officials say it's a
pioneering, practical step
to staunch an obesity rate
that has risen from 18 to
24 percent in a decade
among adult New York-
ers. Health officials say
sugar-filled drinks bear
much of the blame be-
cause they carry hun-
dreds of calories a
32-ounce soda has more
than a typical fast-food
cheeseburger without
making people feel full.
The city "has the ability
to do this and the obliga-
tion to try to help," the
plan's chief cheerleader,
Mayor Michael Bloom-
berg, said last month.
Critics say the regula-
tion won't make a mean-
ingful difference in diets
but will unfairly hurt
some businesses while
sparing others. A cus-
tomer who can't get a 20-
ounce Coke at a sandwich
shop could still buy a Big
Gulp at a 7-Eleven, for in-
stance, since many con-
venience stores and
supermarkets are beyond
the city's regulatory reach.
New Yorkers are di-
vided on the restriction. A
Quinnipiac University
poll released last week
found 51 percent opposed
it, while 46 percent


Mickey Wright
7/31/28 3/10/05
Mickey's golfing with the
angels now. Hit it good, darlin'.
Jack
000E8BE


approved.
"I don't know if the state
should be our surrogate
parent," Peter Sarfaty, 71,
said as he drank a diet
cola with lunch in Man-
hattan this week. "You get
the information out there,
but to tell people what
they can or can't do? As if
it's going to stop them."
Business organization
ranging from the massive
American Beverage Asso-
ciation to a local Korean-
American grocers' group
have asked a judge to stop
the size limit from taking
effect until he decides on
their bid to block it alto-
gether He hasn't ruled on
either request.
Many businesses aren't
taking chances in the
meantime.
Dominic Fazio, the
manager of a Penn Sta-
tion pizzeria, has stopped
ordering 32-ounce and 24-
ounce cups, though he
calls the regulation
"ridiculous."
"But I guess the law is
the law, right?" said Fazio,
who put up an explana-
tory sign Coca-Cola Co.
provided. The Atlanta-
based soda giant said in a
statement that helping
small businesses prepare
was "the responsible
thing to do."

To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,
Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 A7


mmmmw





A8 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013

News NOTES

New league to
meet March 12
A newly forming Citrus
County League of Women
Voters will meet at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, March 12, at the Na-
ture Coast Unitarian Univer-
salist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Earlier presentations about
the league resulted in over-
whelming support for the non-
partisan educational group,
which is open to all, including
men. On March 12, organiza-
tional items will be discussed
and decided.
For more information, call
352-465-4225, or visit
Naturecoastuu.org.
PFLAG will meet
in Lecanto
PFLAG Lecanto (Parents,
Family and Friends of Les-
bians and Gays) will meet
from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday,
March 12, at Unity Church of
Citrus County, 2628 W.
Woodview Lane, Lecanto.
PFLAG's mission is to pro-
mote the health and well-
being of LGBT persons, their
families and friends. Meetings
are open to everyone and
provide an opportunity for dia-
log, discussion and support,
as well as education about
LGBT issues and concerns.
This month will feature special
guest Dr. Emily Frank Hoon,
who will talk about about
transsexual issues and an-
swer questions participants
may have. Dr. Hoon is a li-
censed clinical psychologist
practicing in Gainesville.
For more information, call
Linda at 352-419-2738 or
email pflag.lecanto@
gmail.com.


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal
variety and toast, grits, juice
and milk variety.
Wednesday: Sausage
and egg biscuit, cereal vari-
ety and toast, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater
tots, cereal variety and toast,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
hamburger sliders, Italian
super salad with roll, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Baked chicken
nuggets, macaroni and
cheese, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, steamed
green beans, chilled straw-
berry cups, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
turkey super salad, with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, sweet green peas, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Nacho rounds,
Uncrustable PBJ, yogurt par-
fait plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet green peas, chilled
strawberry cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Hot dog, turkey


wrap, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, steamed broccoli,
potato smiles, chilled peach
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.

Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultimate break-
fast round, cereal and toast,
tater tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Pepperoni pizza,
chicken and rice burrito, PB
dippers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed broccoli, chilled ap-
plesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Chicken
nuggets with ripstick, corn
dog nuggets, Italian super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh baby carrots,
sweet peas, potato smiles,
chilled strawberry cups, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Breaded
chicken sandwich, turkey
wrap, PB dippers, fresh gar-
den salad, tangy baked
beans, flavored Craisins, fruit
juice, milk variety.


Thursday: Nacho rounds,
oven-baked breaded chicken
with ripstick, Very Berry super
salad, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, peach cups, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Friday: Chicken alfredo
with ripstick, hot dog, PB dip-
pers, fresh baby carrots,
steamed green beans, chilled
flavored applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.

High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sand-
wich stuffer, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety, toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken and
rice burrito, pizza, macaroni
and cheese with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, fajita chicken salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
baby carrots, fresh broccoli,
potato roasters, steamed
broccoli, applesauce, juice,
milk.


Tuesday: Orange chicken
with maxstix, turkey and
gravy over noodles with
riptick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, yogurt parfait plate,
garden salad, cold corn
salad, potato triangles, peas,
celery, strawberry cup, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Barbecued
roasted chicken with roll,
spaghetti with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
pizza, turkey super salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, chilled baked beans,
baked beans, potato trian-
gles, flavored Craisins, juice,
milk.
Thursday: Fajita chicken
and rice with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich,
macaroni and cheese with
ripstick, ham super salad with
roll, maxstix, yogurt parfait
plate, garden salad, baby
carrots, green beans, potato
triangles, applesauce, cu-
cumbers, celery, juice, milk.
Friday: Hot dog on bun,
chicken alfredo with ripstick,
pizza, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Very Berry super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait,
baby carrots, cold corn salad,
potato roasters, corn, straw-
berry cup, juice, milk.


SENIOR DINING
Monday: Sliced meatloaf
with mushroom gravy, scal-
loped potatoes, green peas,
applesauce, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Meatballs with
tomato gravy, rotini noodles,
mixed vegetables, mixed
fruit, slice whole-grain bread
with margarine, low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Chicken
chop suey over steamed rice,
green beans, gingered car-
rots, peaches, slice whole-
grain bread with margarine,
low-fat milk.
Thursday: Tuna pasta
salad, marinated broccoli
salad, fresh orange, Graham
crackers, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Irish stew,
steamed cabbage, green
peas, St. Patrick's Day
cookie, slice rye bread,
low-fat milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South
Dunnellon.
For information, about the
Senior Dining program, call
Support Services at 352-
527-5975.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


March 11 to 15 MENUS


COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


News NOTES


Lady Elks plan
Spring Fling party
The Ladies of the West Cit-
rus Elks will stage its annual
Spring Fling Card Party from
11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday,
March 12, at the West Citrus
Elks Lodge, 7890 Grover
Cleveland Blvd. in
Homosassa.
For a donation of $12, have
luncheon provided by Chef
Ken, as well as lots of cards,
games, door prizes and raf-
fles. Call Theresa at 352-341-
1116, Carol at 352-341-3603
or Jeannette at 352-527-2638
for tickets or information.
Proceeds will benefit local
charities.
County council to
meet March 13
The Citrus County Council
will meet at 9 a.m. Wednes-
day, March 13, at 72 Civic Cir-
cle, Beverly Hills. Doors open
at 8:30 a.m.; doughnuts and
coffee available.
Guest speaker will be Amy
Meek, new CEO for Citrus
County United Way. She will
address changes being made
in the focus and efforts of our
local United Way, and report
on its Friday, March 8, "Land
That Job" event at the College
of Central Florida Citrus
Campus.
Meetings are open to the
public. For more information,
email thecccsecretary@
gmail.com or call 352-
746-5984.
Hadassah to
host card party
The Hadassah Women's
Organization will host a
Dessert Card Party at 1 p.m.
Thursday, March 14, at
KellnerAuditorium, 102 Civic
Center, Beverly Hills.
Admission is $5. There will
be door prizes. Bring your
own tile, card or board game.
For reservations, call 352-
746-0616.
CR Computer Users
convene March 13
Crystal River Users Group
will meet at 6 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 13, at Crystal
Oaks Clubhouse, 4958


Crystal Oaks Blvd.
Member Gordon Nichols
will make a presentation
about his new Epson scanner,
which includes software to
scan and enhance old photos
and film slides in new ways. It
scans a picture to find out
what editing is required, then
makes the desired changes
and rescans to get the results
already edited.
Coffee and refreshments
will be served at 6 p.m., with a
short meeting at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by the presentation.
The meetings are open and
free to everyone. For informa-
tion, visit www.CRUG.com.
Wisconsities to
gather March 13
The Wisconsin Club will
meet at 11:30 a.m. Wednes-
day, March 13, at the Crystal
Point Club House,
Summertree Street, off North
Citrus Avenue.
Those who attend are
asked to bring a covered dish
to pass that will serve eight to
10 people. Plans for the April
brat fry will be discussed.
For information, call Joyce
at 352-860-1292.
Genealogy group
to meet at church
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will meet at
10 a.m. Tuesday, March 12,
at at the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints,
3474 W. Southern St.,
Lecanto.
Guest speaker, Jack Butler,
a professional genealogist,
will talk about "Organizing
Your Genealogy in the Com-
puter Age."
The lecture addresses the
how and why of using modern
genealogy software to organ-
ize and track research and
the results of that research,
and also deals with using a
computer to organize and
manage the mass of records
and other artifacts we all tend
to collect as a result of
research.
Guests are welcome. For
information, call Mary Ann
Machonkin at 352-382-
5515 or go to www.citrus
genealogy.com.


Red Cross slates classes
The public is invited to participate in upcoming Ameri-
can Red Cross classes in March. Scheduled training is:
Disaster Services Orientation 9 to 10 a.m.
Wednesday, March 13. Learn more about the American
Red Cross and the opportunities available to volunteer
in disaster relief operations locally and nationally.
Client Casework 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 13. Learn how to work directly with clients
following up Disaster Action Team responses and in dis-
aster relief operations. Evaluates disaster-related needs
of clients, provides appropriate financial support and
prepares client records.
Damage Assessment Basics 10:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 15. The course encom-
passes the tasks and responsibilities of the disaster as-
sessment activity on a disaster relief operation. This
new course is designed for local community volunteers,
primarily Disaster Action Team members.
To find out how to sign up for these American Red
Cross classes and learn about future classes, call
352-620-0500.


Dine with an
archaeologist
Crystal River State Archae-
ological Site will host Lunch
with the Archaeologist at
11:45 a.m. Wednesday,
March 13, and Thursday,
March 21.
Bring a sack lunch and sit
and dine with Gary D. Ellis, di-
rector of Gulf Archaeology
Research Institute, at the out-
door amphitheater by Mound
A. Participants will talk about
all things archaeological.
For more information, email
Ellis at gari.arch@gmail.com
or call him at 352-464-4274.
Master gardeners
slate clinics
The March free Master
Gardener Plant Clinics will be
about lawn maintenance. Dis-


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cussion will be about each
type of "warm-season" turf
grass commonly found here,
good and bad points of each,
particular care requirements
and common turf pests and
diseases.
The remaining schedule is:
Tuesday, March 12-
1 p.m. at Lakes Region Li-
brary, Inverness;
Wednesday, March 13 -
1:30 p.m. at Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills;
Wednesday, March 20 -
1 p.m. at Citrus Springs Li-
brary, Citrus Springs;
Tuesday, March 26 -
2 p.m. at Homosassa Library,
Homosassa.
Master Gardeners will be
present to answer questions
or look at samples of plant-
related concerns. For informa-
tion, call 352-527-5700.


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 A9


r;;-,~





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NO-NAME STORM: 20 YEARS LATER


CITRUS
Continued from Page Al

County emergency offi-
cials, however, could not
confirm that information
Saturday night
There were no deaths or
serious injuries in Citrus
County that could be di-
rectly related to the storm,
officials said.
There were minor in-
juries associated with the
tornado, a weather service
spokesman said.
Florida Power Corp.
emergency crews worked
throughout the night to try
to restore power to some
380,000 customers
statewide who lost elec-
tricity Friday night and
early Saturday morning.
At 5 a.m. Saturday, all
10,000 Crystal River cus-
tomers lost power, al-
though by noon, a
company spokesman said,
all but some 2,000 had
their electricity restored.
Company spokesman
Mark Jacobs said that
workers hoped to get as
many residents back on
line as possible before
plunging temperatures, as
low as the mid-20s, hit the
region Saturday Forecast-
ers said those freezing
temperatures will con-
tinue through Saturday
night.
Phone services were
also interrupted, a United


Telephone spokesman
said, with some areas, es-
pecially in the flooded
coastal region, not restored
as of Saturday night
Residents in other parts
of the county were not af-
fected. Extremely high
winds from the late winter
storm that swallowed the
Southeast whipped the
county through the night
and all day Saturday, caus-
ing widespread property
damage from the wind and
downed trees.
By 11 a.m., County Com-
mission Chairman Gary
Bartell declared a local
state of emergency Gov.
Lawton Chiles declared 21
counties, including Citrus,
a disaster area.
It was too early to esti-
mate the damage the
storm inflicted on the
county, sheriff's spokes-
woman Gail Tierney said.
The Florida National
Guard and everyone with
an available boat or four-
wheel drive vehicle were
called in Saturday to help
officials evacuate
stranded coastal residents
and campers before a 4
p.m. high tide.
"The water is still ris-
ing," Citrus County
Sheriff's Department
spokesman Pat Fisher said
around 3 p.m. "I don't
think anyone anticipated
the storm surge that came
with this storm."
County emergency offi-
cials called the storm the


worst in recent memory and
its affects are widespread.
Floodwaters spilled
onto the floor of the old
Crystal River bank build-
ing at the corner of U.S. 19
and Citrus Avenue in
downtown Crystal River.
Rusty Harry, county
emergency management
assistant, said officials
predict that Saturday's
storm surge at high tide
should surpass the highest
flood marking by one to
two feet at the former
bank.
"I've been here 15 years
and we've never had any-
thing like this," county
Emergency Medical Serv-
ices Director Steve
Lovenguth said.
Hurricane Elena sat off
the coast in Sept. 1985
lashing Citrus, but
Lovenguth said that storm
and its subsequent flood-
ing doesn't compare to Sat-
urday's disaster.
"With Elena we had
warning. With this, what
did we have?" Lovenguth
said as he prepared to
launch his department's
pontoon boat on County
Road 44 in Crystal River
Emergency officials
were bracing Saturday
night for another surge of
water to hit the coastline
about midnight when the
third high tide of the storm
was predicted. Security
was in place, where feasi-
ble, Saturday night to
guard abandoned neigh-


A bulldozer
scoops up
debris from
the storm
as well as
the ruined
carpets by
floodwaters
from the
No-Name
storm in
March
1993.








Special to
the Chronicle
borhoods, Ms. Tierney
said.
Residents should be
able to return to their com-
munities to assess damage
about 6 a.m. Ms. Tierney
said.
Of immediate concern to
emergency personnel Sat-
urday morning was getting
residents in Old Ho-
mosassa, Ozello and in the
waterfront communities
and campground that line
County Road 44, also
known as Fort Island Trail.
"We're trying to evacu-
ate an entire city," Crystal
River Police Chief Roger
Krieger said. "It's a mess."
Around 10 a.m. the
Florida Highway Patrol
closed U.S. 19 both direc-
tions into Crystal River
Traffic was bypassed
onto Northeast Eighth Av-
enue to State Road 44 be-
fore flooding shut that
bypass down too. As the
water steadily moved in-
land, so to did unusable
evacuation routes.
Evacuees were shuttled
from boat to boat and onto
school buses. The buses
moved the residents to
American Red Cross shel-
ters at either Rock
Crusher Elementary
School, Citrus Spring Ele-
mentary School and
Lecanto High School.
However, those who did
not wish to be evacuated
were not forced to leave.


What's in a



(no) name?


Twenty years ago, the
No-Name Storm blew
into Crystal River, and
turned our world upside
down.
I always thought it un-
fair that they called it the
"No-Name" storm as it
had many names:
Windy, Sparking
Power Lines, Unexpected
and Shocking, I Hear the
Train Coming, There's
Water On The Floor, I
Hear Airboats!?
Hurry! We Have To
Go; Oh No! Don't Open
the Front Door!
Get the Dogs Pick
Up the Children, The
Water is Too High, Watch
the Current!
Where is The Road?
There's a Snake! No
It's Okay Just a Swim-
ming Armadillo
Cold and Wet; What
Will Happen, Mommy?
Just Pray, God Knows
Where We Are
Our Angels: Butch
and Joe in a Pickup Truck
Rescued and We
Have Each Other
White Caps on the
Plantation Putting Greens


and on Fort Island Trail
SA Warm Cup of Coffee
at Scotty's, Boarding the
Yellow Rescue Bus,
Everyone Wet and Shiv-
ering With Sad Eyes
Signing in With the
Red Cross; Mommy, My
Legs Hurt
Bug Bite Welts;
Scary; Kind Help and
Comforting EMTs
When Can We Go
Back? What Will We
Find?
Waiting; Opening The
Door To The Most Nause-
ating Smell Ever, Stormy
Devastation, Dear God,
Will Our Lives Ever Be
Normal Again?
So No-Name storm,
your names are still
etched in our memories...
Those who experienced
all you had to offer, No-
Name storm, they share a
knowing nod of the head,
a glistening eye, as they
remember many names,
different for all involved,
but we, the survivors, will
never forget where
we were March 13,1993.
-Mary C.
Schlumberger


"We saw the dining room table
float by ... I found a crystal
pitcher of ours that was unbroken
and the covered china dish. The
crystal pitcher was on the dining
room table. How it got over there
on the other side of the bay is a
mystery which will never be
solved," said Joanne Niebuhr
of Bunts Point in Crystal River.


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A10 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SWAT finds drugs in home Red tide causing


Two brothers I I recordd number of


arrested on

drug charges

ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Crystal River Primary
School's after-school care
was put on lockdown for
safety reasons Thursday as
two brothers were ar-
rested for selling drugs out
of their parents' home
near the school, according
to the Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office.
William Elijah Wilson,
28, and Quadrey Kyle
Sweeney, 21, both of North-
east Sixth Street, are fac-
ing charges of trafficking in
cocaine, drug parapherna-
lia, possession of a firearm
by a convicted felon, pos-
session of firearm with a
removed serial number
and possession schedule I,
II or III drugs with intent to
sell. Wilson's bond is
$71,500. No bond was set
for Sweeney
SWAT team members
entered the unlocked
home with a search war-
rant after deploying flash-
bang grenades and found
Sweeney inside.
Sweeney said he and
Wilson shared a bedroom.
However, he denied
knowledge of any illegal
contraband. When asked if
he had sold cocaine from
the residence, he looked
down at his feet and did
not respond.


Quadrey
Kyle
Sweeney


William
Elijah
Wilson
Special to the Chronicle
SWAT team members,
above, entered a home near
Crystal River Primary
School on Thursday. They
found drugs and a weapon,
right.
While the SWAT team
searched the home, Wilson
returned.
Reportedly, Wilson
stated he wanted to help
his brother who recently
had been released from
prison and said he's take
the criminal charges. He
told the sheriff's office
where cocaine could be
found in the bedroom and
said he had purchased it
two days prior with intent
to sell. He also told of a
highpoint .380 handgun in
his television stand.
Investigators found
$3,000 in cash bound with
metal binder clips, which
was collected for evidence.


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Investigators also found
31.5 grams of cocaine,
424.6 grams of cannabis
with 37.1 grams individu-
ally packaged, a .380 hand-
gun with the serial
number removed, 58 .380
ammunition rounds, five


9mm ammunition rounds,
one 16-gauge shotgun
shell, two digital scales
and multiple small distri-
bution size baggies.
Both men were arrested
and taken to the Citrus
County Detention Facility.


manatee deaths


by a toxin in the algae
bloom. As of Friday, the
number killed this year hit
149, and the number could
surpass the current record
by the end of the weekend.
DeWit said the toxins in
the bloom likely settled
onto the sea grass that
manatee eat, causing
them to become para-
lyzed and eventually
drown. The grass beds
will also likely retain
their poisonous coating
for another two months.
Nearly a dozen mana-
tees have been rescued
and are being treated at
the Lowry Park Zoo in
Tampa.
Red tide turns the
water into a rust color, re-
leasing large amounts of
toxins.


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG--A
deadly algae bloom is
causing a record number
of manatee deaths in
Florida, state biologists
said.
A red tide bloom has
been killing 10 or more
manatees a day and the
deadly algae bloom shows
no sign of letting up any
time soon, the Tampa Bay
Times reported Friday
"This is probably going
to be the worst die-off in
history," said Martine
DeWit, a veterinarian
who oversees the state's
marine mammal pathol-
ogy laboratory
The record for mana-
tees killed by red tide was
set in 1996 with 151 killed


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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 All





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Redaction causes delays in getting court files


Associated Press
ORLANDO It seems like a
reasonable idea: Before the
records in a criminal or civil
case can be made public,
Florida's clerks of court must
purge them of all Social Secu-
rity, credit card and bank
numbers.
But in many of the state's 67
counties, that task has caused
delays in the release of records
available to the public under
Florida's public records laws.
Even though very few records
have such information, every
file has to be screened to make
sure they are free of personal in-
formation under a new law that
went into effect last year Delays
in getting the court records can
prevent information about cases
from being released in a timely
manner. This is important not
only to the media, but to individ-
uals and businesses that need
quick access to cases they wish
to learn about.
The Associated Press and
newspapers throughout the
state visited every county's clerk
of court offices in recent weeks
to see whether each is comply-
ing with the law and how much
of a delay it is causing in the re-
lease of information. The proj-
ect, under the direction of the
Florida Society of News Editors,
was done in conjunction with
this year's Sunshine Week, an
annual initiative starting Sun-
day to promote greater trans-
parency in government
In order to test the effect of
the new requirement, represen-
tatives from 31 news organiza-
tions requested to view the hard
copies of two civil cases and two
criminal cases in all 67 counties.
The criminal cases were gener-
ally one week old and six
months old, as were the civil
cases. Requests for 268 records
were made.
The news organizations
found:
In just over half of the coun-
ties, there was a delay in re-
trieving the records whether
it was because personal infor-
mation needed to be redacted,
because the file wasn't yet in the
clerk's office or because the file
couldn't be found.
The need to review and
redact a file of personal infor-
mation led to some kind of delay
in more than a fifth of the total
records requested by the news
organizations.


Technology aids public records searches


Citrus County passes

annual test ofclerk's office
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS I, like other reporters in
Florida's 67 counties who went into their re-
spective clerks of courts offices in the past cou-
ple of weeks, anonymously requested to view
hard copies of four random files from the
past half year two civil and two
criminal.
When my number was called, I
stepped up and made my request, but the
clerk told me since 2011 all files that are <'
available to be viewed online can only be
viewed that way and pointed me in the 1
direction of the computer terminals in r
the office and the others in the entry An,
area of the courthouse building. Vi
I was not asked why I wanted to view Citrus
the files, nor was I asked to fill out any clerk o
paperwork or produce identification -
all things which can deter or delay members of
the public from getting access to public infor-
mation under Florida's public records laws.
I went online and easily viewed all four files
online, albeit in their redacted or edited versions.


Of the 61 files that required
some kind of personal informa-
tion removed, the delay was a
day or more in almost two-thirds
of the cases. In four cases, the
delay was three days.
In seven cases, no answer
was given about how long it
would take to remove the per-
sonal information, or testers
were told they would be con-
tacted by the clerks' office when
the redacting was finished but
were never contacted.
In other cases, court records
couldn't be retrieved because a
deputy clerk was out with a sick
child, a clerk's office employee
said she was too busy to retrieve
them and, six times, computer
problems prevented the records
from being looked up
electronically
Testers were asked to iden-
tify themselves in 18 counties,
even though that is not required
under state law the records
are supposed to be available to
anyone.
Although Florida's public
records laws don't spell out how
long it should take to retrieve a
record, the courts have ruled a
record should be produced in no


g
if
f


"We are here to serve the public and we're al-
ways looking for new ways to make it easier for
people to get the information they asked for,"
Citrus County Clerk of Courts Angela Vick said.
Vick said since 2011, court files get imaged and
placed online. Her office has redaction software
to automatically edit files as they get uploaded.
'And if it is an older case, the redaction typi-
cally takes about an hour or two to complete,"
Vick said.
The Florida Society of News Editors conducts
this annual exercise to coincide with Sunshine
Week, which starts Sunday, "to promote
greater transparency in
government"
And, this year, it also was to test the ef-
fects of a new law passed last year re-
3 quiring clerks' offices to redact certain
personal information, such as Social Se-
-y curity numbers and names of victims in
some cases. The redaction process, some
argue, can prevent information about
'cka cases from being released in a timely
Countymanner.
courts From the results of this year's exer-
cise, it appears the redaction rule is in-
deed slowing down the request process
but in Citrus County, and in a handful of oth-
ers, technology is making it look seamless.
Contact Chronicle reporterAB. Sidibeat352-
564-2925 or asidibe@chronicleonline. com.


more time than it takes to re-
trieve the record and review and
redact exempt information, at-
torney Jon Kaney said.
"So the reasonable time to re-
view a document looking for ex-
empt numbers ordinarily should
be a matter of hours, not day,"
Kaney said. "There is no al-
lowance in the right of access for
'getting around to it.' The duty to
provide access to records is
equal in dignity to any other
duty of a records custodian."
The mandate that personal in-
formation be removed from
court records went into effect
last year during a period of
major transition for court clerk
offices statewide. The 67 clerks
of courts are required to convert
to an electronic system by the
end of this year, and the clerks
offices are in various stages of
meeting that goal. The redaction
requirement was added to
Florida's public records to pro-
tect privacy as files become
available electronically and
more easily shared.
"I think there are still growing
pains here," said Jon Mills, a
University of Florida law pro-
fessor. "The removal of personal


information, things like Social
Security and other things, we al-
ways knew that was going to be
important, and not necessarily
easy"
Delays and errors
In most cases where retrieval
was delayed, the reason was
personal information needed to
be redacted. But in Wakulla
County in the Panhandle, two
criminal files couldn't be re-
trieved because they were in the
office of the deputy clerk, who
was out with a sick child.
In Hardee County, computers
meant for members of the public
to view files electronically only
showed the cases' dockets the
list of documents filed but
didn't provide access to actual
documents. A deputy clerk, in an
attempt to assist, tried finding
the documents on her computer
behind the counter but was un-
able to get them. The media rep-
resentative was told he could
view the hard copies since the
electronic versions were un-
available, even though he had
been told only minutes before he
couldn't view hard copies unless
he was an attorney in the case.


The removal
of personal
information,
things like
Social Security
and other things,
we always knew
that was going to
be important, and
not necessarily
easy.
Jon Mills
law professor at
University of Florida.
In Clay County, when the
media representative asked to
see the hard copies of two crim-
inal files, the deputy clerk in-
sisted the tester view them
electronically and then said she
didn't have time to pull the hard
copies.
In the 31 counties where there
was no delay, hard copies were
available in 20 counties and the
cases could only be viewed elec-
tronically by computers in the
clerks' offices in the other 11.
The counties where hard
copies were available tended to
be in rural counties, where
cases that only could be viewed
electronically tended to be in
larger counties in Central
Florida and along the Gulf
Coast.
Despite the redaction re-
quirement, Social Security num-
bers were left in files in
Columbia, Gilchrist, Hardee and
Hernando counties.
Electronic transition
As the clerks' offices transi-
tion from paper to electronic,
many offer members of the pub-
lic review of both hard copies
and electronic files.
In Lake County, recently
redacted cases can be retrieved
electronically without delay on
the offices' computers. But re-
trieving hard copies took one
day for civil files and three days
for criminal files, as deputy
clerks needed time to remove
personal information.
Lake County Clerk of the Circuit
Court Neil Kelly said conversion
See FILES/Page A13


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Church hosts special baby shower


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
Many of the women who attended the baby shower Saturday at Suncoast Baptist
Church have been buying and collecting baby items for months. Baby shower items
were stacked high on a table.


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
HOMOSASSA The
women of Suncoast Bap-
tist Church have found a
way to support mothers
who are facing unex-
pected pregnancies.
They gathered Saturday
in their church fellowship
hall for a baby shower to
benefit Life Choice Care
Center in Inverness and
Crystal River. Expecting
mothers were invited to
share in their ministry
"I was at a Christian
women's club and one of
the women responded that
they have a baby shower
every year," said event co-
ordinator Chris Beilharz.
"The light bulb went off
and I thought that is the
Holy Spirit. Why can't we
do that?"
Speaking at the baby
shower was Life Choice
Care Center executive di-
rector Kathy Davis, who
offered words of advice,


pamphlets and visuals to
those who may be consid-
ering abortion.
"We are trying to get a
program together where
mothers will be given an
ultrasound when they
come into our office,"
Davis said. "Maybe if they
see the visual of their baby
inside of them, they will
change their mind about
abortion."
Women of the church lis-
tened to the presentation
by Davis, ate cake and
desserts and then "oohed"
and "ahhed" over teeny
outfits and toys. Many of
the women have been buy-
ing and collecting baby
items for months. This was
evident at their baby
shower as items were
stacked high on a table.
Each guest was asked to
bring an unwrapped baby
gift suitable for a newborn.
The Life Choice Care
Center, which helps preg-
nant and new mothers in
need, always needs items


Life Choice Care Center
executive director Kathy
Davis spoke to women Sat-
urday at Suncoast Baptist
Church about opportunities
available to unexpectedly
pregnant woman instead of
abortion.
such as: diapers, "onesies,"
bottles, diaper bags, re-
ceiving blankets; also car
seats, strollers and cribs.
For information about
the center or contributing
baby items, call Davis at
352-341-5176 or the church
at 352-621-3008.


FILES
Continued from Page A12
to an electronic system
eventually will speed up
the time it takes to redact
personal information.
"As time goes on, the old
(unredacted) files become
less in demand," Kelly said.
"Over time, everything will
be electronic and it will be
redacted as it goes
through."
The clerks weren't given
any extra money to comply
with the redaction
requirement.
About $1.3 million was
spent on redaction soft-
ware in the Orange County
Clerk of Courts Office,
where the four court files
were obtained electroni-
cally without any delay by
the news organizations'
representative.
Walton County
It has been a greater
headache at a time of
major budget cuts in
smaller counties. The Wal-


ton County Clerk of Courts
Office spent $54,000 on
software that only redacts
the personal numbers. A
deputy clerk still must go
through a file that needs
redacting to make sure
other information, such as
the names of juveniles or
confidential informants,
isn't included in the file.
Documents aren't automat-
ically reviewed for redact-
ing information when a file
is created because prose-
cutors and public defend-
ers need to see the
unedited file, said Linda
Warren, director of court
services at the Walton
County Clerk of Courts Of-
fice.
When a public records
request is made, deputy
clerks must retrieve the
files from the records de-
partment, make copies,
read through them, cross
out sensitive information
and then put the redacted
version in the hard file. The
redacted version is then re-
viewed by a supervisor
When the member of the


public is done viewing it
under the observation of a
deputy clerk, the redacted
version is shredded and the
original copy is returned to
the file, Warren said.
"It's a big burden," War-
ren said. "There is no
choice but to redact after
the fact."
The redaction usually
only takes a few hours,
Warren said, but the expe-
rience of the media repre-
sentative was quite
different. She was told to
leave her phone number
and she would be con-
tacted when the files were
available. She never was.
When questioned about
that, Warren said a review
showed the worker who
had helped the media rep-
resentative that day had
been filling in, since there
was a shortage of workers.
She didn't normally work
in that area and had for-
gotten to make the request
"I apologize that the ex-
perience in Walton County
was the way it was," War-
ren said.


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NATION


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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


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1 i


BRIEFS

iter


Rebels free UN captives


Associated Press


BEIRUT Rebels in
Southern Syria freed 21
SJ U.N. peacekeepers Friday
| H after holding them hostage
for four days, driving them
to the border with Jordan
i after accusations from
Western officials that the
little-known group had tar-
nished the image of those
Associated Press fighting to topple Presi-


Mike Kronberg helps his
son, Christopher, put on a
pair of Easter-themed
eyewear Saturday during
the annual Easter egg
hunt at Shenandoah City
Park in Shenandoah,
Texas. Approximately 40
kids raced for Easter
eggs, rode ponies and
posed for photos with the
Easter bunny.


Coroner: Seven
killed in Ky. fire
GRAY, Ky. Fire
erupted Saturday at a rural
Kentucky home, killing two
adults and five children in-
side, a coroner said.
Knox County Coroner
Mike Blevins said Saturday
afternoon that the adult vic-
tims found inside the ranch-
style home were a woman
and her boyfriend. The
woman was the mother of
three of the children who
died, while two other chil-
dren were from another
family, he said.
Details about their identi-
ties were being withheld
until relatives were notified.
Library to display
Gettysburg text
WASHINGTON -The
Library of Congress plans
to display a copy of the Get-
tysburg Address over a six-
week period starting later
this month.
The John Hay copy is
one of five known manu-
script drafts of President
Abraham Lincoln's famous
1863 address, which began
with the words, "Four score
and seven years ago."
It will be on display in the
Library's Thomas Jefferson
Building from March 22 to
May 4 as part of the "Civil
War in America" exhibition.
That exhibition, which
commemorates the 150th
anniversary of the Civil War,
will be extended until Jan. 4.
Flights fueled
by cooking oil
NEW YORK -A Dutch
airliner is flying from New
York to Amsterdam on a
fuel mix that includes left-
over oil from frying
Louisiana's Cajun food.
The KLM flights from
Kennedy Airport are pow-
ered by a combination of 25
percent recycled cooking oil
and 75 percent jet fuel.
After the first such flight
Friday, the concept will be
tested on 24 round-trip trans-
Atlantic trips every Thursday
for the next six months.
KLM executive Camiel
Eurlings jokingly told the
New York Post "it smelled
like fries" while the plane
was being fueled.
The waste oil from frying
up crawfish, cracklins and
other Cajun specialties is
refined at a Louisiana plant,
then trucked to JFK.
KLM said the cooking oil
reduces polluting carbon
emissions up to 80 percent.


Fest


A giant kite
soars over
Saturday d
Community I
at John Hu
Huntsville, Al


-From wire reports

ival










Associated Press
named Willy
the crowd
luring the
Kite Festival
nt Park in
la.


aentm asnar Assaa.
The abduction and the
tortured negotiations that
ended it highlight the dis-


organization of the rebel
movement, which has hin-
dered its ability to fight
Assad and complicates
vows by the U.S. and oth-
ers to provide assistance.
It also has raised con-
cerns about the future of
U.N. operations in the
area. The Filipino peace-
keepers were abducted
Wednesday by one of the
rebel groups operating in
southern Syria near the
Jordanian border and the
Israeli-occupied Golan
Heights, where a U.N.


force has patrolled a
cease-fire line between Is-
rael and Syria for nearly
four decades.
Activists associated with
the group, the Yarmouk
Martyrs Brigade, gave dif-
ferent reasons for seizing
the 21 men. First they de-
manded all government
forces leave the area.
Then they suggested the
peacekeepers were
human shields against gov-
ernment attacks. Then
they declared them "hon-
ored guests" held for their


own safety.
They also released
videos online, including
one Saturday of a bearded
rebel commander with his
arms around two peace-
keepers' shoulders, flash-
ing a V for victory sign.
On Saturday, after nego-
tiations the top U.N. offi-
cial in Damascus
described as "long and dif-
ficult," the rebels changed
the plan to deliver the
peacekeepers to a U.N.
team, instead taking them
to the Jordanian border.


Difference of opinion in Egypt


Associated Press
An Egyptian soccer fan of the AI-Ahly club wearing a Guy Fawkes mask shouts slogans in front of the club
Saturday in Cairo, Egypt. An Egyptian court on Saturday confirmed the death sentences against 21 people
for taking part in a deadly soccer riot but acquitted seven police officials for their alleged role in the violence.
Fans enraged by the verdict torched the soccer federation headquarters and a police club in Cairo in protest.

Soccer fans rampage over court verdicts from deadly melee


Associated Press

CAIRO Egyptian soccer fans
rampaged through the heart of
Cairo on Saturday, furious about
the acquittal of seven police offi-
cers while death sentences
against 21 alleged rioters were
confirmed in a trial over a sta-
dium melee that left 74 people
dead.
The case of the Feb. 1, 2012 sta-
dium riot in the city of Port Said
at the northern tip of the Suez
Canal has taken on political un-
dertones not just because police
faced allegations of negligence in
the tragedy but also because the
verdicts were announced at a
time when Egypt is in the grip of
the latest and most serious bout of
political turmoil in the two years


since Hosni Mubarak's ouster
Saturday's verdicts also were
handed down against the back-
drop of an unprecedented wave of
strikes by the nation's police force
over demands for better working
conditions and anger over what
many believe are attempts by
President Mohammed Morsi and
his Muslim Brotherhood to take
control of the police force.
Tensions over the riot which
began when supporters of Port
Said's Al-Masry club set upon
fans of Cairo's Al-Ahly club after
the final whistle of a league game
that the home team won have
fueled some of the deadliest
street violence in months. Police
guarding the stadium, mean-
while, faced allegations ranging
from not searching people enter-


ing the stadium to failing to inter-
vene to stop the bloodshed.
Shortly after the verdict was
announced Saturday, angry fans
of Cairo's Al-Ahly club who had
gathered in the thousands outside
the team's headquarters in cen-
tral Cairo went on a rampage,
torching a police club nearby and
storming Egypt's soccer federa-
tion headquarters before setting
it ablaze.
The twin fires sent plumes of
thick black smoke billowing out
over the Cairo skyline, prompting
Defense Minister Abdel-Fattah
el-Sissi to dispatch two army hel-
icopters to extinguish the fires.
At least five people were in-
jured in the protests over the ver-
dict, a Health Ministry official
told the MENA state news agency


Sistine chimney installed as conclave nears


Associated Press


VATICAN CITY The
Vatican sought Saturday to
quash speculation that di-
visions among cardinals
could drag out the con-
clave to elect the new
pope, while preparations
for the vote plowed ahead
with firefighters installing
the Sistine Chapel chim-
ney that will tell the world
when a decision has been
reached.
But the specter of an in-
conclusive first few rounds
of secret balloting re-
mained high, with no clear
front-runner heading into
Tuesday's papal election
and a long list of cardinals
still angling to discuss the
church's problems ahead
of the vote.
"You don't have your
mind absolutely made up"
going into the conclave, U.S.
Cardinal Justin Rigali, who
participated in the 2005
conclave that elected Bene-
dict XVI, told The Associ-
ated Press this week. "You
have your impressions."
The Vatican spokesman,
however, took pains to
stress the "vast," near-
unanimous decision by the
115 cardinal electors to set
Tuesday as the conclave


- -.. .k f
Associated Press
Firefighters place the chimney on the roof of the Sistine
Chapel on Saturday, where cardinals will gather to elect
the new pope at the Vatican.


start date and noted no
conclave in the past cen-
tury has dragged on for
more than five days.
"I think it's a process
that can be carried out in a
few days without much dif-
ficulty," spokesman the
Rev Federico Lombardi
told reporters.
While Tuesday's initial
voting will likely see a
broad number of candi-
dates nominated, subse-
quent rounds will quickly
whittle down the field to
those candidates who are
likely to obtain the two-
thirds, or 77 votes neces-
sary for victory, he said.


"This process of identi-
fying the candidates who
can receive the consensus
and on whom cardinals
can converge is a process
that can move with notable
speed," Lombardi said.
The Vatican was cer-
tainly going full-throttle
Saturday with prepara-
tions: Inside the frescoed
Sistine Chapel, workmen
staple-gunned the brown
felt carpeting to the false
floor that has been con-
structed to even out the
stairs and cover the jam-
ming equipment that has
been installed to prevent
cellphone or eavesdrop-


ping devices from working.
Off in the rear left-hand
corner sat the stove, a cen-
tury-old cast iron oven
where the voting ballot pa-
pers are burned, sending
up puffs of smoke to tell
the world if a pope has
been elected (white
smoke) or not (black).
After years of confusion,
the Vatican in 2005 in-
stalled an auxiliary stove
where fumigating cases
are lit.
The smoke from those
cases joins the burned bal-
lot smoke in a single cop-
per pipe that snakes up
the Sistine's frescoed
walls, out the window and
up on the roof where fire-
men Saturday fitted the
chimney top.
Elsewhere in the Apos-
tolic Palace, officials took
measures to definitively
end Benedict XVI's pontif-
icate, destroying his fish-
erman's ring and the
personal seals and stamps
he used for official papers.
The act coupled with
Benedict's public resigna-
tion and pledge of obedi-
ence to the future pope -
is designed to signal the
end of his papacy so there
is no doubt a new pope is
in charge.


World BRIEFS

Mandela in
hospital for tests
JOHANNESBURG-
Nelson Mandela, the former
South African president and
anti-
apartheid
leader,
was ad-
mitted to
a hospital
Saturday
for a
sched-
uled med- Nelson
ical Mandela
check-up and doctors said
there is no cause for
"alarm," the president's of-
fice said.

larly soothing language to
explain previous hospital
stays for 94-year-old Man-
dela, but in those cases he
later turned out to have
more serious conditions.
Kenya winner
gets 50.07 pct
NAIROBI, Kenya -
Uhuru Kenyatta, the son of
Kenya's founding father,
was named the winner of
the coun-
try's pres-
idential
election
Saturday
with
50.07
percent of
the vote,
but his Uhuru
but his Kenyatta
opponent winner.
refused to
concede,
alleging
multiple
failures in
the elec-
tion's in-
tegrity
that he
said has Raila
put Odinga
Kenyan challenger.
democ-
racy on trial.
Supporters of Kenyatta
- a man accused by an in-
ternational court of helping
to orchestrate the vicious vi-
olence that marred the na-
tion's last vote flooded
the streets, celebrating in a
parade of red, his cam-
paign's color.
Refusing to accept de-
feat, Prime Minister Raila
Odinga said the election
process experienced multi-
ple failures and that he
would petition the Supreme
Court.
Venezuela sets
April 14 election
CARACAS, Venezuela
- Venezuela's electoral
council has set a presiden-
tial election forApril 14 to
choose the successor to
President Hugo Chavez.
Acting President Nicolas
Maduro will run as the rul-
ing party candidate.
The coordinator of the
opposition coalition said
Henrique Capriles is being
offered that bloc's candi-
dacy. Capriles lost to
Chavez in an October
election.
Chavez later anointed
Maduro as his chosen suc-
cessor before undergoing
surgery in December for the
cancer that led to his death
Tuesday.
Greeks protest
planned gold mine
THESSALONIKI, Greece
More than 10,000 people
have taken to the streets of
Greece's second largest
city to protest a planned
gold mine they see as an
environmental risk.
Police blocked the
crowd's march to the Cana-
dian Consulate in Thessa-
loniki, but Saturday's
protest took place and
ended peacefully. Eldorado
Gold Corp., based in Van-
couver, Canada, has been
granted the rights to the
gold mine in Halkidiki penin-


sula, east of Thessaloniki.
The company has estab-
lished a camp employing
1,200 people and plans to
begin digging soon.
-From wire reports






* Veterans Notes can be found on Page A17 of
today's Chronicle.


EXCURSIONS
~CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


oroccan hammams


Courtyard of a typical hammam. i Neil relaxes near ancient ruins in the Sahara Desert.


Socializing, refreshing in traditional bath houses


When traveling in
China, there is not a
more interesting
activity than to ride a
pedi-cab (rickshaw in the old
days), through the hutongs (old
neighborhoods) in Beijing.
A visit to Turkey would not be
complete without a visit to
Pamukkale and a dip in the
famous hot thermal waters of
the travertines, enjoyable and
relaxing.
Likewise, a trip to Morocco is not complete with-
out a visit to a hammam, which is a bath house
where the locals go for a cleansing of their bodies.
The hammam has been an important part of Mo-
roccan culture since Roman times.
Many of the hotels in Morocco have hammams
and I am told that most are more westernized by
offering fragrances and other services, as well as
use of traditional black olive soap and lava clay
Local hammams, however, serve a more funda-
mental need as a weekly, or more frequent, bath
and relaxation, self-administered, while interact-
ing with family or friends.
I was in the small town of
Tinghir, Morocco, when our
guide invited our group of 10,
men and women, to accom-
pany him to the local ham-
mam explaining that the
women and men do not share
the same facilities. I was the
only volunteer, so off we went
to the hammam he frequents
when in Erfoud.
Neil Sawyer Upon arriving, we entered
SPONTANEOUS the reception area, where we
TRAVELER exchanged our street clothes
for loose-fitting shorts, putting
our clothes and shoes in a
basket for safekeeping while
we bathed. I followed my host through two rooms
before arriving at the third and final room with
steaming fountains of hot water
A male attendant directed me to have a seat on
the tile floor, after he had thoroughly scrubbed the
area, with my back against the wall where several
other men were seated in the same position. Others
were washing themselves, most likely their weekly
bath, while my attendant began to scald me with
steaming hot water, followed by scrubbing me with
gloves that felt like course sandpaper to exfoliate
my skin. I didn't anticipate, however, that more than
one or two layers would be removed. I exaggerate a
bit, but now know the meaning of "deep cleaning."
We moved to another room that was not quite so
hot, and sat on the tile floor with backs against the
wall, along with others who were at the same stage
of cleansing. To say this was the torture chamber
would be a stretch, so let's just call it a deep mas-
sage with a lot of flexing of joints to a degree that I


Special to the Chronicle
Neil at the ornate entrance to a Moroccan hotel. Many hotels in Morocco have hammams and most are
westernized by offering fragrances and other services.


didn't think possible. This procedure encompassed
my entire body, head to toe, and hardly a spot was
overlooked. This was undoubtedly the most thor-
ough massage that I have ever had. Most locals,
however, are there for bathing and do not routinely
get the message.
I was then washed down with a softer scrub, with
warm water rather than hot, and began to cool
down. The time frame for these two procedures
was about 20 minutes each, although most locals
spend more time, as the hammam is often a social
event.
The next room we entered was cooler and I sat
with my back against the wall cooling down, con-
templating the event My mind and body were in a
complete state of peace and relaxation, and the
cool tile was welcome refreshment It was here that
I was handed a towel in preparation for our depar-
ture and proceeded back to the dressing room
where we had entered. What a wonderful experi-
ence for body and mind, as I pondered when I
might arrange another hammam.


I will be more experienced in hammam etiquette
next time and will not repeat my actions in the
dressing room, where I dropped my soaked shorts
to the floor as I walked to retrieve my basket of
clothes. My guide rushed over with a towel and cov-
ered me, while explaining that Moroccan men do
not expose themselves to other men.
Rules are rules, to which I quickly complied!
If you are ever invited to participate in this most
therapeutic and practical bath and massage, run,
don't walk, to the hammam, I'm sure you will come
away in the most invigorated mode you've ever ex-
perienced.

Neil and Karyn Sawyer have been residents of
Crystal River for 27 years. They travel frequently,
having been to 48 states, 64 countries and seven
continents. Neil welcomes comments and
questions about travel. Contact him via email
to gobuddy@tampabay.rrcom.


The Bahamas

Jim and Jan Turner of Citrus Hills recently returned from a cruise to Freeport and
Nassau in the Bahamas. While leaving Nassau, Jim captured this picture of the
Hog Island Lighthouse on Paradise Island (formerly Hog Island). This is the oldest
working lighthouse in the Bahamas and is still in operation. The beautiful resort in
the background is the Atlantis.


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Confront hubby


about 'evidence'


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o IWFLJ NBC 8 8 8 8 8 PGA Tour Golf Dateline NBC (In Stereo) 'PG'" All-Star Celebrity Apprentice The teams tackle a News Paid
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 task in Orlando, Fla. (N) 'PG' m Program
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Dear Annie: I am
unable to develop
feelings of love for
my husband of eight
years. In fact, deep in-
side, I despise him.
This is my second mar-
riage, his fourth. In our
early years together, I
began to notice obvious
signs of his having an in-
timate relationship with
another woman. He al-
ways refuted
this vehe-
mently and
became angry
with me for
even saying
such a thing.
But the evi-
dence I've ac-
cumulated is
enough proof
for me. I even
saw this
woman multi- ANN
ple times, and MAIL
the looks she MAIL
gave me were
of the "cat that ate the ca-
nary" variety.
My husband has no
idea that I have evidence,
although I am now posi-
tive he has stopped see-
ing this woman. My
problem is that my heart
has a layer of cement
around it because he has
insulted and disre-
spected my intelligence
by continuing to lie about
it I cannot trust someone
who is unable to be
truthful.
If my husband would
only come forward and
admit his guilt, as hard as
it would be, I would be
able to go through the
process of forgiving this


betrayal. But he is unwill-
ing. It saddens me that he
is still robbing us both of
a better marriage. Any
advice? Heart of Stone
Dear Heart of Stone:
Your heart isn't cement.
You care a great deal and
are trying to protect your-
self from the pain of
being hurt. It's possible
that your "proof" doesn't
tell the whole story Your
husband may
have been less
involved than
your evidence
would indicate,
in which case,
he doesn't be-
lieve he has
anything to
admit. Please
don't play
games with
your marriage.
E'S If you have
BOX proof, show
OX him.
Tell him you
are willing to forgive if he
comes clean, and that not
discussing it honestly
could destroy your
relationship.
If this still doesn't help
you find the reassurance
you need, please con-
sider counseling, with or
without him.


Annie's Mailbox is
written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar Email annies
mailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 Third St.,
Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254.


SToday's MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 12:30 p.m.,
3:40 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and Power-
ful" In 3D. (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7:05 p.m. No passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:20 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:10 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II"
(PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:10 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. No
passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 7 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"Dead Man Down" (R) 2 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:50 p.m.


"Oz: The Great and
Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m., 4 p.m.,
7 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and Power-
ful" In 3D. (PG) 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:15 p.m.,
4:15 p.m., 7:55 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II"
(PG-13) 8 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:40 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard"
(R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:20 p.m..
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Tropical fruit
6 Jeans fabric
11 Wanderer
16 Bank heist
21 Like an egg
in shape
22 Heath genus
23 Bear
24 Texas mission
25 Chili con -
26 Pilfered
27 Mythical king
of Crete
28 Plaster of-
29 That man's
30 Instance
31 Farm implement
33 Grain for a mill
35 Lilly or Manning
36 Trebek of TV
38 Fib
39 Mongrel
40 Eagle
41 Color
42 Of a black wood
44 Musical work
48 British peer
51 Tilted
54 Division
55 Molten rock
57 Ladies and
gentlemen
61 Cravat
62 Power
63 Antler branch
65 Remained upright
66 Lee or Laurel
67 Permissive
70 External ear
72 Cup
73 Turf
74 Plays a part
75 Solemn fear
77 Uncertainty
79 Native of (suffix)
80 Sign on a door
82 Feather scarf
83 Moocher
85 Forest warden
87 Asia -
89 Small drink
90 Mars or Ares, e.g.
91 Small appliance
92 Magical drink
94 Kind of union
96 Blue
97 Wilson's


predecessor
100 cit.
101 Pasta sauce
104 Racket
105 False coin
106 New Deal org.
107 Black cuckoo
108 Sag
110 Get
112 Place for hiding
113 Pester in fun
116 Hebrides
118 Skin
119 Dog with a muzzle
120 Writer
Hemingway
122 Nerve network
123 Fork part
124 Cure
125 Topmost point
127 Ecstatic state
129 Glass square
130 Snake
133 Ordinance
135 Elec. unit
136 Mil. rank
137 The "I"
141 Greek letter
142 Early rock legend
144 Police broadcast (abbr.)
145 Pout
146 Household god
147 Rescued
149 Not appropriate
151 Boundary
153 Steal
155 Mountain nymph
156 Enthusiastic
approval
157 Work for piano
158 Gander
159 Gardner's Mason
160 Tall and thin
161 Stormed
162 Lugged


DOWN
1 Coffee variety
2 Benefit
3 Scandinavian
4 Hard liquor
5 Work in verse
6 Delay
7 Rub out
8 Victory goddess
9 Cover with frosting
10 Search of a kind


Title
Kimono sash
Chinese dynasty
Like a lot
"A Streetcar Named -"
Police rank (abbr.)
Wing
Reduced
Post or Dickinson
O'Donnell or Perez
Earthy lump
Table scrap
Break
Inert gas
- du jour
Wager
Genus of dogs and
wolves
Mountain
Field cover,
for short
Eschewed
Legal matter
Destiny
Rope
for a cowboy
Bar legally
Scholar
Ship of 1492
Part of A.D.
Fruit
with many seeds
Cad
Lawn tool
Stage setting
Wildebeest
Toiled
Got some rest
Playing card
Shorten
Steam or search
Levy
Veto
Knight's title
Acquired
After deductions
- and tuck
Child's vehicle
Purple shade
Gladden
Standoffish one
NNW, e.g.
Playground
attraction
Cooked in fat
Linger
Marquee notice (abbr.)
- de force


River in France
Rights org.
Tweet
Juicy fruits
Ocean
Sixth sense (abbr.)
Ribbed fabric
Big -
Relate
Glass
- and file


Sainted Spanish mis-
sionary
Knock
Hit repeatedly
Noted fabulist
Gaze
Brick of a kind
Recoil
Usher, for example
George or T.S.
Let expire


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


Released
Whirlpool
Store event
ABA member
Self-satisfied
Lend an -
Cushion
Give whirl
NCO rank
Court


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.1


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CImus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEWS
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
The post invites everyone
to come out for the yard sale
beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 16 and 17. Donations
are needed. Call 352-
447-4473.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m. Mon-
day through Saturday and
noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome.
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
The post will conduct a Le-
gion Day celebration at 5 p.m.
Friday, March 15, to honor the
American Legion and the
service of its volunteers, as
well as hold a dining-in to
honor all the armed services.
There will be a grog bowl cer-
emony, group skids, etc. The
public is invited. All veterans
are encouraged to wear their
respective uniforms whether
class A or utility to show their
past service.
The event is informal and
casual attire is preferred. To
RSVP, call the post at 352-
795-6526 or the Cmdr. Mike
Klyap at 352-302-6096, so the
post can get accountability for
meals.
The 40/8 will have a St.
Patrick's Day celebration on
March 17 with the cost of the
meal being $10. This will be a
fun day for the family and all
legionnaires. The public is
welcome.
On March 30, the Legion
Riders will have its annual
poker run, which will begin
and end at the post. The
event is open to all motorcy-
cle organizations and regular
vehicles are welcome.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who
served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
On March 22, the auxiliary
will serve a fried fish dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the
post. Everyone is welcome.
Cost is $7. All profits support
the many programs of the
American Legion Auxiliary.
For more information, call Unit
President Sandy White at
352-249-7663.
H.F. NesbittVFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the


monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind Ca-
dence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf


League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.
Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Pork and sauerkraut dinner
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday,
March 15. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Everyone is welcome at the
St. Patrick's Day dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday, March
17. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and
their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe McClis-
ter is available to assist any
veteran or dependents with
their disability claim by ap-
pointment. Call 352-344-3464
and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
DAV Chapter 70 is offering
a $1,000 scholarship for the
2013 school year. The schol-
arship is offered to a disabled
veteran, veteran, survivor of a
veteran or dependent of a
veteran.
The recipient shall be en-
rolled in a full-time course of
instruction leading to a degree
program or to a vocational
skill. Selection shall be con-
ducted by the scholarship
committee and will be based
on the applications submitted.
The procedure requires that
applicants write a statement
detailing course of study,
goals and why they are de-
serving of this award.
Applications may be picked
up at guidance department of-
fices in area high schools, the
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute, Central Florida Com-
munity College guidance
offices, or by calling John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.
All applications must be re-
turned to the DAV Chapter at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34453 by March 31.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second


Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please


call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the
post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For in-
formation, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast will be
on Saturday, March 16. All-
you-can-eat breakfast from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost is $5
adults and $3 for children.
The public is welcome.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at
ultrarayl997@yahoo.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-
mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League


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membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
"Show Me the Money" from 2
to 4 p.m. Thursday at the
post.
Sunday breakfasts are
open to the public from 9:30
to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $6.
Call 352-726-5206 for
information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org
to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob Her-
manson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m.


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Food will be available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at the
post home at 4375 Little Al
Point, Inverness. A fish fry will
be served on the third Friday.
The fish fry features fried and
baked haddock, baked po-
tato, baked beans, coleslaw,
tea, lemonade coffee and soft
drink for $8. Serving will begin
at 4:30 p.m. All musicians are
welcome, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
On March 16, the auxiliary
will host a St. Patrick dinner
dance with John Thomas and
the Ramblin' Fever Band. Din-
ner will be served from 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. and the band will
play from 7 to 10 p.m.
For more information, call
Norm at 352-860-2981 or
352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 meets the first Monday
monthly at the Olive Tree
Restaurant in Crystal River.
Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the
meeting follows at 7. All veter-
ans in the Homosassa/Ho-
mosassa Springs area are
invited to be a part of Ameri-
can Legion Post 166. For in-
formation about the post or
the American Legion, call and
leave a message for the post
commander at 352-860-2090.
Your call will be returned
within 24 to 48 hours.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.0 The Navy
Seabee Veterans of America
Auxiliary will meet at 9:30
a.m. Tuesday, March 19, at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club Rose and Crown restau-
rant. The group meets the
third Tuesday monthly this
time and location. For more
information, call Nancy
Staples at 352-697-5565 or
email geonan5565@
yahoo.com.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at
www.Postl55.org.
Voiture and Cabane 1219
welcome everyone to a St.
Patrick's Day celebration be-
ginning at 5 p.m. Sunday,
March 17, at the American


Legion Post 155. A corned
beef and cabbage dinner will
be served from 5:30 to 6:30
p.m. There will be draft beer
specials and a full cash bar in
a nonsmoking environment in
the post's large dining hall.
Join members for lep-
rechaun races, 50/50
chances, party favors and en-
tertainment by Debi G. Pro-
ceeds will help fund nurses'
training, youth sports, child
welfare, Americanism, box
car, POW/MIA and Carville
Star. Tickets are on sale for a
$10 donation in the post
lounge. A limited number of
tickets will be sold at the door.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at
www.citruspurpleheart.org or
call 352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom Gal-
lagher at 860-1629 for infor-
mation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.

See VETERANS/Page A18


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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 A17









Many cooperate to keep food bank running


Last month's request
for donations of dry
and canned food to
supplement the shelves of
our Food Bank brought fab-
ulous results, and it's be-
cause of those generous
donations that we can con-
tinue to provide food for our
local veterans and their
families.
Besides the donations by
individuals and visitors to
our area, the Citrus County
Schools delivered five pal-
lets of food their students
and teachers had collected.
We'd like to extend our
thanks to the generosity of
everyone who has been a
part of this.
The Citrus County Veter-
ans Coalition (CCVC)
started out small. Similar to
the likes of other successful
entities, our Food Bank was
at first operated out of a
garage-like setting. The cur-
rent shed-type building was
first brought to the grounds
of the Disabled American



VETERANS
Continued from Page A17

U The Vietnam Veterans


Veterans at 1039 N Paul
Drive, Inverness, in May
2011, and was re-opened for
distribution just two months
later, in July 2011.
Gary Williamson took the
reigns as manager of the
CCVC's Food
Bank upon this
re-opening, and
has done so
ever since. The
clientele has
grown right
along with the
times. We cur-
rently have
more than 100
veterans and Barbara C
their families VErTE
on the roster VIEl
and we're cur-
rently helping
62 veterans and their fami-
lies, which brings the cur-
rent number of people
being helped to approxi-
mately 152.
It's easy to see why your
donations are not only so
important, but also so ap-


Gathering Inc. will meet at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, March 12,
at the Village Inn Restaurant
in Beverly Hills. The group will
discuss the upcoming April 20
golf tournament, which is the


C

Mf


preciated. Gary has a team
made up of about 10 people,
both veterans and civilians,
who volunteer their time to
keep this service available.
There are several ways to
donate cash, canned or dry
food:
We accept
^. donations during
any of our meet-
ings, the second
and fourth Thurs-
days monthly
from 10 to 11 a.m.
from September
to May
See any of
,orcoran our volunteers
ANS' during our new
VS Food Bank oper-
ating hours from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday.
Drop by our main
check-in station at our
monthly yard sales at the
Lady of Fatima Church in
Inverness during the
months of September to
May These sales are typi-


primary fundraiser for the 11th
annual Veterans Gathering.
All veterans who would like to
participate are welcome.
The WG mission is to as-
sist veterans and to keep


cally the second Saturday of
the month. Occasionally, the
dates are changed to the
first Saturday, so make sure
to check our website for up-
to-date information or call
Dan at 352-400-8952. We'll
do our best to have updated
information included in the
greeting for voicemail.
If you wish to sign up to
receive free food from our
Food Bank, justvisit us dur-
ing our operating hours on
Tuesday, present positive
proof of military service
(i.e., your DD-214 or VA
identification card) and fill
out a simple form for our
records with the assurance
that we do protect your
privacy
For those who shop the
"two-for-one" specials or
"buy one, get one free"
deals, it's an ideal way to
gather canned and dry
foods to bring by so our
Food Bank can continue to
keep up with growing
needs.


alive the memory of fallen
comrades, both in Southeast
Asia and other theaters.
For more information, call
Tom Neaman at 352-
586-7126.


Again, we do want to em-
phasize our sincere thanks
to those who have come for-
ward and shared their gen-
erosity with us. You do
make a difference!
0


Barbara L. Corcoran is
the public information
officer of the Citrus
County Veterans Coalition
Inc. She may be
contacted via email at
Barbiel@ccvcfl.org.


Sunday's PUZZLER

Puzzle is on Page A16.


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A18 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


VETERANS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE










SPORTS


Tiger
Woods
pads lead
in Doral./B2



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Baseball, hockey/B2
0 Auto racing/B3
College basketball/B3
SNBA/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Recreational sports/B5
_____ Entertainment/B6


Panther girls track wins CR Invitational


(Philpott) was a half lap behind me." community meet. I am proud of the girls.
That performance helped lead the Danyelle Ulloa, our hurdler, did well.
Lecanto High girls to first place at the Summer Van Quelef had season bests. I
Crystal River Invita- am impressed with the
tional. Lecanto had hurdlers. We set some
158 points. Crystal It's a good marks that the girls
River was fourth with can build on. It's fun to
75.5 points, feeling more for the set the marks here at
Lecanto girls coach girls Crystal River"
Robbie Thompson was Springstead won the
happy for his team. Robbie Thompson boys team total with
"It's a good feeling Lecanto High School girls track and field 134 points. The Crystal
more for the girls," coach on his team's victory Saturday. River High boys were
Thompson said. "The second with 116 points.
girls have the sense of Lecanto's boys were
pride, especially the upperclassmen. It's third with 105 points.
fun to come over to Crystal River for a Farnsworth is becoming one of the top


'Cats claw Gators


No. 11 UF can't

score in last 7:36

during loss at UK
Associated Press
LEXINGTON, Ky. -
Florida coach Billy Donovan
said there was nothing wrong
with his team's execution
down the stretch Saturday
against Kentucky.
The shots were there. They
just weren't falling.
The 11th-ranked Gators did-
n't score in the final 7 1/2 min-
utes and lost 61-57 to
Kentucky in their regular-sea-
son finale.
Florida (24-6, 14-4 South-
eastern Conference) scored
with 7:36 left on Scottie
Wilbekin's 3-pointer that
turned out to be the team's
final points. The Gators went
0 for 11 after that and commit-
ted five turnovers in coughing
up the lead.
"For the most part, we de-
fended pretty well," Donovan
said. "We just couldn't make it
We don't need to shoot 50 per-
cent. But if we make a couple
of chippies around the basket
and maybe one jump shot,
you're right there to win the
game, and you probably do
win the game."
It wasn't that the Gators
were taking forced shots dur-
ing their drought. Patric
Young missed a layup and a
point-blank jump hook.
Wilbekin also missed a layup.
And when Donovan drew
up a play to get an alley-oop
dunk for Casey Prather, the
play worked. But Wilbekin
threw a bad pass, and Prather
couldn't handle it. The ball
sailed out of bounds.


See Page B4


FSU men's hoops knock off0N.C. State
Associated Press North Carolina State 71-67 in the regular- this will give us some confidence as we
season finale for both teams. The win prepare for the ACC tournament."
TALLAHASSEE Defending Atlantic Florida State's eighth of the conference A pair of free throws by Bookert gave the
Coast Conference champion Florida season by five points or fewer, came Seminoles (17-14, 9-9) their first lead of the
State may not repeat next week at less than 48 hours after Virginia second half at57-55. The 6-foot-1 freshman
the ACC tournament, but the fell 53-51 in Tallahassee. from Anchorage added a jumper with 2:01
Seminoles served notice Satur- "What we see is some young- left to snap a tie at 62 with 2:01 left He
day that they still intend to have sters growing up in front of our added three free throws in the final 1:23 of
something to say about it. eyes," said Florida State coach the see-saw contest which featured nine
Freshman Devon Bookert Leonard Hamilton, who has lead changes and nine tied scores. Book-
scored a career-high 18 points weaved a handful of freshmen ert scored 10 points in the final 5:09.
and Michael Snaer added 17 as and two junior college transfers "He knew we needed to have some bas-
Florida State fought back from an eight- into his lineup after losing six seniors off kets," Florida State coach Leonard
point deficit in the second half to defeat last year's titlists. "We are hoping that Hamilton said.


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Farnsworth headlines

Lecanto's effort
LARRY BUGG
Correspondent
CRYSTAL RIVER Claire
Farnsworth had a pretty stress-free two
miles of running Saturday at Earl Bram-
lett Stadium.
The Lecanto High freshman easily
won the 3,200-meter race with a time of
12:32. Springstead's Amber Philpott fin-
ished at 13:24 but wasn't a serious threat.
"It was easy," Farnsworth said. "She


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distance runners in the area and en-
joyed the two-mile race.
"All I worry about is the next meet:"
she said "I ran a 12:09 at Weeki Wachee."
The Crystal River High girls 4x800 relay
team took second with a time of 11:05. De-
laney Caleau, Clarissa Consol, Liz Bruty
and Alexis Ulseth were on the team.
The Crystal River High boys 4x800
relay team won with an 8:30 time. Cory
Pollard and John Vester, John McAteer
and Jared Miller comprised that unit.
Lecanto's Josh Riemer won the boys
discus with a 128-6 distance. Crystal
River's Manual Henriquez was second
See Page B4



Sweet


tourney


here again

44th Lollypop event

tees off Tuesday at

7 Rivers G&CC
KEITH CHARTRAND
Correspondent
Linda Travis, a regular at Seven
Rivers Golf and Country Club for 20
years, has a pretty good idea as to
how one of the most prestigious
ladies amateur golf tournaments in
the surrounding area got its name.
"It is named after the song 'Lol-
lipop,"' Travis said of the tune The
Chordettes
took to No. 2
on the charts 44th annual
in 1958. Lollypop Golf
El1e ven Tournament
years after Tournament
the all-female 0 WHAT:
singing quar- Prestigious
tet made local women's
their big event hosted by
splash, the 7 Rivers Golf
first ever Lol- and Country
lypop Golf Club. The two-
Tournament day, 36-hole
was played at tournament has
Seven Rivers. a field of 68
That was players.
1969. OnTues- 0 WHEN:
day for the Tuesday,
44th consecu- March 12 and
tive year the Wednesday,
ladies-only, March 13. The
two-day, 36- first day's
hole flighted action tees off
tournament at 10 a.m. while
will again tee day two has a
off at Seven 9 a.m. tee time.
Rivers.
"It has such
a rich history because it has been
around so long," said Seven Rivers
general manager Marion Walker,
who will be working her third Lol-
lypop tournament "It is a product of
our (club's) women's golf associa-
tion. Our WGA really, really is the
heart and soul of the tournament. I
can tell you it is a very well-oiled
machine run all by the ladies."
The tournament's long-standing
reputation is glowing because of all
the different facets it succeeds in.
There is food everywhere you turn;
breakfast, lunch and dinner Even
food at the turn Walter Oberti's
specialty hotdogs are a hit. The
planned skit performed by select
ladies after day one has left golfers
laughing for years.
But what really makes the Lolly-
pop stand out is the high quality of
golf.
See Page B4


000E5ZS











Rays batter Phillies 15-7


Yanks' Rivera

announces

plans to retire

Associated Press

CLEARWATER Sean Ro-
driguez and Shelley Duncan
homered and the Tampa Bay
Rays beat the Philadelphia
Phillies 15-7 on Saturday
Ryan Howard hit his fourth
spring homer for the Phillies.
Ben Revere and Humberto
Quintero each added three hits.
Rays starter Jeff Niemann al-
lowed one run and four hits in 3
2-3 innings.
Phillies starter John Lannan
gave up four runs in the third,
including a two-run homer by
Rodriguez.
Braves 2, Yankees 1
TAMPA- Derek Jeter and Mari-
ano Rivera returned from injuries to
make their 2013 spring training de-
buts in the New York Yankees' 2-1
loss to the Atlanta Braves.
The 38-year-old Jeter was a des-
ignated hitter and singled sharply to
left field on his first pitch since break-
ing his left ankle on Oct. 13 in the AL
championship series opener.
Hours after announcing this will
be his final season, the 43-year-old
Rivera made his first game appear-
ance since April 30, throwing a 1-2-3
fifth inning. Looking like his over-
powering self of old, Rivera retired
Dan Uggla on a popup to second,
then threw called third strikes past
Juan Francisco and Chris Johnson.
Braves starter Mike Minor allowed
three hits and two walks in four
shutout innings.
Cardinals 2,
Marlins (ss) 0
JUPITER -Adam Wainwright
struck out six in 4 2-3 innings and
the St. Louis Cardinals blanked a
Miami Marlins split squad 2-0.
Wainwright gave up three hits and
walked one. He had allowed eight
hits and four earned runs over three
innings in his previous spring outing.
Wainwright allowed a pair of
Miami singles to start the game,
then retired the next eight batters.
Marlins starter Jacob Turner
pitched three scoreless innings.
Nationals 8,
Marlins (ss) 7
VIERA- Bryce Harper and Ryan
Zimmerman hit consecutive home
runs and the Washington Nationals
defeated a Miami Marlins split squad .
Harper connected in the fifth inning
for his second homer this spring.


Associated Press
New York Yankees relief pitcher Mariano Rivera, who announced his plans to retire at the end of this
season, delivers a warmup pitch before facing the Atlanta Braves in the fourth inning Saturday at
Steinbrenner Field in Tampa.


Joe Mahoney hit a two-run homer
for Miami.
Blue Jays 4, Tigers 2
DUNEDIN Jose Bautista hit a
two-run homer, doubled and scored
twice for the Toronto Blue Jays in a
4-2 victory over the Detroit Tigers.
Bautista homered in the first in-
ning off Doug Fister. The Toronto
star doubled in his next at-bat, and
the Blue Jays chased Fister with two
more runs before the right-hander
could record an out in the fourth.
Ricky Romero gave up a solo
homer to Detroit's Andy Dirks in the
first.
Twins 5, Pirates 4
BRADENTON -A.J. Burnett pre-
pared for his opening-day start by al-
lowing two runs and two hits in 4 2-3
innings in the Pittsburgh Pirates' 5-4
loss to the Minnesota Twins.
Cole De Vries made his second
start and fourth appearance of
spring training for Minnesota and
gave up one run not earned -
and one hit in three innings.
Minnesota's Ivan De Jesus Jr. hit
a solo homer off Casey Fien in the
fifth that tied the score 2-2.
Mets 9, Astros 6
PORT ST. LUCIE Lucas Duda
and John Buck drove in two runs
each and Ike Davis scored three
times as the New York Mets beat the
Houston Astros 9-6.
Duda went 3 for 3 with a double,
while Buck had two hits and in-
creased his spring training RBIs total
to seven. Davis was 2 for 2 with a
walk, stolen base and a RBI.


Houston's Carlos Pena hit a two-
run homer in the fourth.
Diamondbacks 11,
White Sox 9
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -Adam
Eaton had four hits and Aaron Hill
had three, helping the Arizona Dia-
mondbacks defeat the Chicago
White Sox 11-9.
Eric Chavez had three RBIs for
the Diamondbacks, who piled up six
runs and seven hits in the fourth in-
ning. A.J Pollack had a home run
and two RBIs.
Chicago's Paul Konerko went 2 for
3. He singled leading off the second
against Brandon McCarthy, giving
Konerko hits in seven consecutive
at-bats, then lined out to center in the
third. He hit a three-run homer
against Matt Reynolds in the fifth.
Rockies 8, Angels 6
TEMPE, Ariz. -Albert Pujols hit
his first spring training home run, a
third-inning drive off Juan Nicasio
during the Los Angeles Angels' 8-6
loss to the Colorado Rockies.
Pujols, coming off right knee sur-
gery during the offseason, was 0 for
3 Tuesday against Cincinnati in his
spring training debut. The three-time
MVP again was the designated hitter
against Colorado and went 1 for 3.
Pujols struck out in the first
against Nicasio and also grounded
into a double play in the fifth against
Josh Outman.
Dodgers 3, Mariners 2
GLENDALE, Ariz. -Alex Castel-
lanos hit a two-run homer in the sev-


enth inning, lifting the Los Angeles
Dodgers over the Seattle Mariners.
Castellanos hit his third homer
this spring, connecting against
Yoervis Medina.
Aaron Harang, competing for a
spot in the Dodgers' rotation, al-
lowed two runs and six hits in three
innings. In five innings this spring, he
has given up six runs on 11 hits.
Franklin Gutierrez hit a two-run
single off Harang.
Rangers (ss) 4, A's 3
SURPRISE, Ariz. Brad Snyder
homered and aLeonys Martin added
an RBI single to help the Texas
Rangers beat the Oakland Athletics.
Shane Peterson's two-run single
gave Oakland a 3-2 lead in the sev-
enth, but Snyder homered off Ryan
Cook in the bottom half and pinch-
hitter Jorge Alfaro singled home
Edwin Garcia with the go-ahead run.
Texas took a 2-0 lead in the sec-
ond when Martin hit an RBI single
that left fielder Yoenis Cespedes
charged and overran for an error that
also allowed A.J. Pierzynski to score.
Rangers starter Nick Tepesch al-
lowed one run, three hits and two
walks in three innings.
Rangers (ss) 5,
Padres 2
PEORIA, Ariz. Texas starter
Matt Harrison was scratched be-
cause of an inflamed toe on his left
foot, missing a Rangers' split squad's
5-2 win over the San Diego Padres.
Neil Ramirez and Tanner Schep-
pers both pitched scoreless innings,
starting a nine-pitcher six-hitter.


Texas first baseman Mitch More-
land sat out with a tight right quadri-
ceps and is day to day.
Jim Adduci and Brandon Allen hit
two-run homers for the Rangers.
Royals 13, Giants 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Johnny
Giavotella and Brett Hayes each
drove in four runs, Yordano Ventura
pitched three hitless innings and the
Kansas City Royals beat the San
Francisco Giants 13-2.
Billy Butler and David Lough each
added three hits. The Royals fin-
ished with 20 hits, including nine in 1
2-3 innings against Giants starter
Yusmeiro Petit.
Brandon Belt hit his fourth homer
for the Giants.
Indians 9, Cubs 2
MESA, Ariz. Jason Kipnis hit
his first home run of the spring and
Cedric Hunter also connected, lead-
ing the Cleveland Indians over the
Chicago Cubs 9-2.
Kipnis came into the game hitting
.227 with two RBIs. He led off the
fourth with a home run against re-
liever Brooks Raley.
Hunter had three hits, including a
three-run shot.
Javier Baez, a 20-year-old Cubs
shortstop, homered after David De-
Jesus doubled to open the game.
Reds 6, Brewers 5
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Cesar Iz-
turis boosted his chance to win a
utility job on the Cincinnati Reds, hit-
ting a sixth inning home run off
Travis Webb and an eighth-inning
RBI single against Johnny Hellweg
in the Cincinnati Reds' 6-5 win over
the Milwaukee Brewers.
Logan Schafer drove in two runs
with a single and a double and Don-
nie Murphy hit three hits, including a
double.
Schafer, a third-round pick by the
Brewers in the 2008 amateur draft,
is a candidate to make an opening-
day roster that will be missing Corey
Hart and Mat Gamel.
Orioles 5, Red Sox 2
FORT MYERS Dylan Bundy
pitched two innings in his first spring
start, helping the Baltimore Orioles
beat the Boston Red Sox 5-2.
Bundy, the fourth overall pick in
2011 draft, allowed one unearned
run on a hit and two walks with a
strikeout. The right-hander made his
major league debut last September
in Boston.
Bundy was relieved by Kevin
Gausman, the No. 4 pick in the 2012
draft. He pitched three scoreless in-
nings, giving up two hits and striking
out three.
Boston's Felix Doubront went
three innings, giving up two runs on
four hits and a walk with five strike-
outs for Boston.


Bolts let lead slip away


Montreal wins

4-3 over

Tampa Bay

Associated Press

TAMPA Brendan Gal-
lagher broke a tie with
Montreal's third goal of the
third period, and the East-
ern Conference-leading
Canadiens rallied to beat
the Tampa Bay Lightning
4-3 on Saturday night.
The Canadiens pulled
within 3-2 on Brian
Gionta's power-play goal
3:49 into the third, and
Alexei Emelin tied it at
7:33. Gallagher then put
the puck past Cedrick Des-
jardins from in-close to
give Montreal a 4-3 lead
with 7:57 to play
Steven Stamkos scored
his 19th goal, and Martin
St. Louis had two assists
for the Lightning, who
have lost seven of eight.
Sami Salo and Ryan Mal-
one had the other Tampa
Bay goals.
Islanders 5,
Capitals 2
UNIONDALE, N.Y. John
Tavares scored two power-
play goals in the third period
to lift the New York Islanders
to a 5-2 win over Washington,
ending the Capitals' three-
game winning streak.
Tavares scored his 15th
goal at 12:13 and his team-
leading 16th the 100th of
his career 30 seconds later,
and Evgeni Nabokov made 22
saves for the Islanders. Josh
Bailey, Casey Cizikas and
Frans Nielsen also scored for
the Islanders, who won for the
third time in four games and
improved to 11-11-3.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Lightning goalie Cedrick Desjardins defends the goal from a shot by the
Montreal Canadiens during the first period Saturday in Tampa.


Tavares' first goal came as
Washington's Mike Ribeiro
was serving a four-minute
penalty for high sticking and
unsportsmanlike conduct.
Blue Jackets 3,
Red Wings 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Sergei Bobrovsky had 29
saves in his first career
shutout, and Cam Atkinson
and Nick Foligno took advan-
tage of Detroit giveaways to
score goals in leading the
suddenly hot Columbus Blue
Jackets to a victory over the
Red Wings.
Jack Johnson also picked
up a power-play goal for the
Blue Jackets, who have won
four in a row and earned points
in their last six. For a change
they didn't work overtime. They
had gone to extra time in their
previous five games.
Bobrovsky, acquired in a
trade with Philadelphia last
summer, picked up his first
career shutout in his 99th
NHL game and 16th with
Columbus.


Bruins 3, Flyers 0
BOSTON Tyler Seguin
scored his third goal in two
games and the Boston Bruins
added two more in a span of
just over 2 minutes in a win
over the Philadelphia Flyers.
Tuukka Rask made 23
saves in his second shutout of
the season as the Bruins won
the first of three meetings with
Philadelphia. Goals scored by
Seguin, Chris Kelly and
Daniel Paille in the first period
were all Boston needed
against the slumping Flyers.
Blues 4,
Sharks 3, OT
SAN JOSE, Calif. -
Vladimir Sobotka recorded his
first career hat trick and Patrik
Berglund scored 72 seconds
into overtime to lift the St.
Louis Blues past the San
Jose Sharks.
Berglund's team-leading
12th goal of the season came
after the Blues rallied from
two goals down in the third
period.


Penguins 5,
Maple Leafs 4, SO
TORONTO Sidney
Crosby and James Neal
scored shootout goals, and
the Pittsburgh Penguins beat
the Toronto Maple Leafs 5-4
for their NHL-leading 11th
road win.
Neal opened the shootout
with a goal against James
Reimer before Crosby sealed
the win on Pittsburgh's sec-
ond attempt after Marc-Andre
Fleury stopped Toronto's Tyler
Bozak and Nazem Kadri.
Hurricanes 6,
Devils 3
RALEIGH, N.C. Jiri Tlusty
had two goals, and the surging
Carolina Hurricanes built an
early lead and carried it through
to a 6-3 victory over the slump-
ing New Jersey Devils.
Alexander Semin and Jay
Harrison scored 28 seconds
apart in the first period, and
Jeff Skinner and Chris Terry
- in his NHL debut added
goals for the Hurricanes.


Woods stretches


margin at Doral


Associated Press

DORAL Tiger Woods
hit a tee shot that got
stuck in a palm tree.
That's about the only
thing that didn't fall his
way Saturday in the
Cadillac Championship.
Woods made seven
more birdies on the Blue
Monster at Doral, the last
one from 15 feet on the
18th hole that gave him a
5-under 67 and a four-shot
lead over Graeme Mc-
Dowell heading into the
final round.
Woods has made 24
birdies and taken only 74
putts through three rounds,
both personal bests in his
PGA Tour career
It put him in great posi-
tion to win his 17th career
World Golf Championship,
and his first since 2009.
He has a 39-2 record
when he has the outright
lead going into the final
round on the PGA Tour.
The only time he has ever
lost a lead of more than
two shots was in 2010
against an 18-man field at
the Chevron World Chal-
lenge, when McDowell


beat him in a playoff.
McDowell was six shots
out of the lead with three
holes to play when he
tried to keep it close. His
drive on the 16th finished
just over the green, and
he chipped in for eagle.
He picked up another
shot on the 17th when
Woods' tee shot embed-
ded high into the trunk of
a palm tree. Once his ball
was identified, he took a
penalty drop and made
bogey
The lead was down to
three shots, but not for long.
Woods holed his birdie
putt to reach 18-under
198, and McDowell did
well to stay only four shots
behind with a two-putt
from 85 feet away That
gave him a 69, and an-
other date with Woods in
the final group at Doral.
Phil Mickelson, who
badly wanted to get into
the final group, overcame
a three-putt from 4 feet
for double bogey on the
third hole by making four
birdies the rest of the way
He had a 69, along with
Steve Stricker, and both
were five shots behind.


Associated Press
Tiger Woods hits from the third tee during the third
round of the Cadillac Championship golf tournament
Saturday in Doral.


li :2 in 1. -W W |
.I USNi


B2 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 6 Miami wins ACC title


Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Down to
its third try and last chance,
Miami came through.
Kenny Kadji scored a season-
high 23 points to help the sixth-
ranked Hurricanes win the
Atlantic Coast Conference
championship outright by beat-
ing Clemson 62-49 on Saturday
Kadji also grabbed 12 re-
bounds and Miami (24-6, 15-3 At-
lantic Coast Conference)
clinched its first outright men's
basketball league title after
being foiled in consecutive
losses to Duke and Georgia
Tech. The Hurricanes tied the
school record for victories set in
2001-02, when they went 24-8,
and improved to 14-1 at home in
their regular-season finale.
Baylor 81,
No. 4 Kansas 58
WACO, Texas Pierre Jackson
had 28 points and 10 assists as Bay-
lor finished the regular season with
an 81-58 victory over Kansas to keep
the fourth-ranked Jayhawks from the
outright Big 12 regular-season title.
Cory Jefferson added 25 points
for Baylor (18-13, 9-9 Big 12), com-
bining his usual powerful dunks with
his first three career 3-pointers.
Even after their worst loss in
seven years, Kansas (26-5, 14-4)
will still be the No. 1 seed for next
week's conference tournament in
Kansas City, and now has at least a
share of the last nine Big 12 regular-
season titles.
No. 5 Georgetown 61,
No. 17 Syracuse 39
WASHINGTON On an after-
noon that Otto Porter Jr. didn't make
a field goal until the second half, No.
5 Georgetown used stifling defense
to close its Big East rivalry against
No. 17 Syracuse with a 61-39 victory
that gave the Hoyas the regular-sea-
son conference title.
Markel Starks scored 19, and
freshman D'Vauntes Smith-Rivera
had 15 points, five rebounds and
five assists for the Hoyas (24-5, 14-
4), who will be the No. 1 seed at the
Big East tournament next week in
New York.
Syracuse (23-8, 11-7) was led by
Michael Carter-Williams' 17 points.
No. 8 Louisville 73,
No. 24 Notre Dame 57
LOUISVILLE, Ky. Gorgui Dieng


Associated Press
Miami's Kenny Kadji celebrates after hitting a 3-point shot as he runs down court during the second half
Saturday in Coral Gables. Miami won 62-49 and locked up the ACC regular season championship.


had 20 points, 11 rebounds and five
blocks to help No. 8 Louisville earn a
share of the Big East Conference
title with a 73-57 victory over No. 24
Notre Dame.
Peyton Siva added 13 points and
five assists in his final home game for
the Cardinals (26-5, 14-4 Big East),
who finished tied for first place with
Georgetown and Marquette.
Louisville receives a bye into Thurs-
day's quarterfinals at the Big East
tournament, where coach Rick
Pitino's team will defend its 2012 title.
Garrick Sherman led Notre Dame
(23-8, 11-7) with 14 points. The
Fighting Irish will next play Wednes-
day in the conference tournament at
Madison Square Garden.
No. 13 Okla. St. 76,
No. 9 Kansas St. 70
STILLWATER, Okla. Le'Bryan
Nash scored 24 points, Marcus
Smart added 21 and No. 13 Okla-
homa State hurt No. 9 Kansas
State's chances to win the Big 12
championship by beating the Wild-
cats 76-70.
The Wildcats (25-6, 14-4 Big 12)
came into the day tied with rival
Kansas for the conference lead, but
were left needing the Jayhawks to
lose on the road at Baylor later Sat-
urday to come away with their first
conference title since 1977 in the
Big Eight.
K-State led by as much as nine in
the second half and was up 61-57


following Rodney McGruder's three-
point play with 4:45 remaining. The
Cowboys (23-7, 13-5) didn't allow
another field goal for more than 4
minutes and hit 13 straight free
throws during crunch time to come
away with the win.
Air Force 89,
No. 12 New Mexico 88
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. -
Todd Fletcher hit a 3-pointer with 3.5
seconds remaining to give Air Force
an 89-88 victory over No. 12 New
Mexico.
Tony Snell's 3-point attempt from
the right wing clanged off the iron as
time expired, and Falcons fans
stormed the court to celebrate the
program's first win over a top 15
team. Fletcher's clutch shot came
seconds after New Mexico's Kendall
Williams missed the back end of a 1 -
and-1.
The loss snapped an eight-game
winning streak for the Lobos (26-5,
13-3 Mountain West) and marked
the second win over a Top 25 oppo-
nent for Air Force (17-12, 8-8) this
season.
No. 15 Marquette 69,
St. John's 67, OT
NEW YORK Vander Blue's
driving shot fell through the rim as
the overtime buzzer sounded, giving
No. 15 Marquette a 69-67 victory
over St. John's at Madison Square
Garden, and a share of the Big East


regular season championship, their
first title since joining the conference
in 2005-06.
Blue had 16 points, including four
of Marquette's six in overtime, for
the Golden Eagles (23-7, 14-4 Big
East), who finished second in the
Big East last season and were
picked seventh in the preseason
conference poll in November. This
was their fourth straight win and
sixth in seven games and the
Golden Eagles get a bye to the
quarterfinals on Thursday.
No. 16 Saint Louis 78,
La Salle 54
ST. LOUIS Dwayne Evans had
16 points and 17 rebounds and No.
16 Saint Louis hit 17 of its 20 shots
in a pull-away second half, clinching
a share of the Atlantic 10 title with a
78-54 victory over La Salle.
Kwamain Mitchell had 19 points and
six assists on Senior Day for Saint
Louis (24-6, 13-3 A-10), which won its
first conference title since 1970-71 in
the Missouri Valley. Rob Loe matched
his career best with 20 points, hitting
all seven shots and the Billikens shot
58 percent overall, one game after
shooting a season-worst 30 percent in
an overtime loss at Xavier.
No. 18 Arizona 73,
Arizona St. 58
TUCSON, Ariz. Nick Johnson
scored 17 points, Solomon Hill
added 12 in his final home game


and No. 18 Arizona earned a first-
round bye in next week's Pac-12
tournament with a 73-58 rout over
rival Arizona State.
A late-season slide left Arizona
(24-6, 12-6 Pac-12) needing a win or
some help to avoid playing next
Wednesday in the conference tour-
nament. The Wildcats took care of it
themselves, building a 15-point lead
in the first half and answering a big
second-half run by the Sun Devils
with one of their own.
Kevin Parrom had 13 points in his
final game at the McKale Center.
Utah 72,
No. 19 Oregon 62
SALT LAKE CITY Jason
Washburn had 20 points and 13 re-
bounds, and Jarred DuBois added
15 points and several key baskets
down the stretch to propel Utah past
No. 19 Oregon 72-62.
Jordan Loveridge and Brandon Tay-
lor chipped in 14 points apiece for the
Utes (13-17, 5-13), who won consecu-
tive Pac-12 games for the first time
since joining the league. It also marked
the first time Utah beat a ranked Pac-
12 opponent in league play.
E.J. Singler had 21 points and
seven rebounds to lead Oregon
(23-8, 12-6).
No. 20 Pittsburgh 81,
DePaul 66
ROSEMONT, Ill.- J.J. Moore
scored 21 points off the bench and
No. 20 Pittsburgh shot a school-
record 72 percent to beat DePaul
81-66 in the Panthers' last Big East
regular-season game.
The next stop for surging Pitts-
burgh is its final Big East tourna-
ment, which begins Tuesday at
Madison Square Garden in New
York. The Panthers (24-7, 12-6) will
move into the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence next season.
No. 23 UCLA 61,
Washington 54
SEATTLE Shabazz Muham-
mad scored 21 points, Larry Drew II
came up with another huge shot
against Washington, and No. 23
UCLA clinched the Pac-12 Confer-
ence regular season title with a 61-
54 win over the Huskies.
UCLA earned its third regular-
season crown under coach Ben
Howland. The Bruins won the title
outright after Oregon was upset at
Utah.


No. 1 Baylor rolls into final


No. 23 FSU

can 't get past

No. 6Duke

Associated Press
DALLAS Brittney
Griner had 19 points, 13
rebounds and a career
best nine assists, and No. 1
Baylor built a quick 25-
point lead in an 80-47 vic-
tory against Kansas State
in the quarterfinals of the
Big 12 women's tourna-
ment Saturday
Griner's effort came five
days after she scored a Big
12-record 50 points in a
win over the Wildcats in
her final regular-season
home game.
Destiny Williams had 20
points to lead the Lady
Bears (30-1).
ACC Tournament
No. 6 Duke 72,
No. 23 FSU 66
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Haley Peters had 17 points
and 13 rebounds including
the go-ahead basket with 4:06
left to help Duke beat
Florida in the Atlantic Coast
Conference semifinals.
Tricia Liston also scored 17
for the top-seeded Blue Devils
(29-2), who never trailed yet
had a tough fight all day with
the fourth-seeded 'Noles (22-9).
Chelsea Davis scored 17
points to lead Florida State.
No. 15 UNC 72,
No. 10 Maryland 65
GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Latifah Coleman scored 15
of her career-high 17 points
in the final 6-plus minutes
and North Carolina beat
Maryland to reach the ACC
tournament finals.
Tierra Ruffin-Pratt added 20
points for the third-seeded Tar
Heels (28-5), who rallied from
a 14-point halftime deficit -
the second-biggest comeback
in the history of the tourna-
ment by shooting 50 per-


I-"-
-l-^^B- -





Associated Press
Duke's Tricia Liston (32) shoots against Florida State
during the second half in an ACC tournament semifinal
game Saturday in Greensboro, N.C. Duke won 72-66.


cent in the second half.
Alyssa Thomas had 26
points and 12 rebounds for the
No. 2 seeded Terps (24-7).
SEC Tournament
No. 19 Tex. A&M 66,
No. 9 Tennessee 62
DULUTH, Ga. Courtney
Williams'jumper with 33 sec-
onds remaining gave Texas
A&M the lead and the Aggies
held on to snap Tennessee's
bid for a fourth straight SEC
tournament title.
Courtney Walker had 18
points to lead four scorers in
double figures for Texas A&M
(23-9).
Taber Spani had a career-
high 33 points for top-seeded
Tennessee (24-7).
No. 7 Kentucky 60,
No. 12 Georgia 38
DULUTH, Ga. Jennifer


O'Neill sank 3-pointers on
each end of a 15-0 run early
in the second half that gave
Kentucky the lead, and the
Wildcats rolled past Georgia
60-38 to earn a spot in the
SEC tournament champi-
onship game.
DeNesh Stallworth had 18
points for No. 7 Kentucky (27-
4), which will face No. 19
Texas A&M in tonight's final.
Jasmine Hassell led No. 12
Georgia (25-6) with 17 points.
Big Ten
Tournament


IIV. AhIIWI IMKtMV""
HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill.
- Sam Ostarello scored 18
points, Courtney Moses had
16 and Purdue beat Nebraska
to advance to the Big Ten
tournament championship.


KKHouser added 13
points, eight rebounds, six
steals and five assists for the
Boilermakers (23-8).
Lindsey Moore scored 22
points for the second-seeded
Cornhuskers (23-8).
Michigan State 54,
No. 8 Penn St. 46
HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill.
- Jasmine Thomas scored
14 of her 19 points in the sec-
ond half and Michigan State
used its stout defense to
upset No. 8 Penn State 54-46
in the Big Ten tournament
semifinals.
Becca Mills added 16
points for the Spartans (24-7),
who held Penn State to 22
percent shooting and enjoyed
a 52-38 rebounding edge.
Penn State (25-5) won the
Big Ten regular-season title
and lost in the tournament
semifinals for the second
straight season. The Lady
Lions fell 68-66 against
eventual champion Purdue
last year.
Penn State star Maggie
Lucas, the conference player
of the year, had 23 points and
nine rebounds.
A-10 Tournament
No. 11 Dayton 74,
George Wash. 49
PHILADELPHIA-Andrea
Hoover had 15 points and
nine rebounds, and Dayton
breezed past George Wash-
ington in the quarterfinals of
the Atlantic 10 Conference
tournament.
The top-seeded Flyers (27-
1), who were unbeaten in
conference play this season,
shot 60 percent (18 of 30) in
the first half for a 43-21 lead
over the Colonials (14-16).


MILWAUKEE Lydia
Bauer scored 22 points and
Green Bay completed an un-
defeated run through the Hori-
zon League with a win over
Milwaukee in the regular-sea-
son finale.


Associated Press
Sam Hornish Jr. comes out of Turn 4 during the
Nationwide Series auto race Saturday in Las Vegas.
Hornish won the race.


Hornish claims


Nationwide race


Hamlin fired

up for Sprint

Cup race

Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Sam
Hornish Jr didn't know
the name of Saturday's
race until he went to the
drivers' meeting for the
Sam's Town 300.
"That's a pretty good one
for me to win," he thought
to himself. 'Already got my
name on the trophy"
Hornish survived two
restarts in the final 15 laps
and held off Kyle Busch to
win the Nationwide Se-
ries race at the Las Vegas
Motor Speedway
Hornish led 114 laps in
his second career Nation-
wide victory, but needed a
strong finish to outrun
Busch, the hometown
driver who won the Na-
tionwide race last week in
Phoenix.
Hornish credited the
win to his dominant car,
all the more impressive
since the drivers got al-
most no practice on the
1.5-mile tri-oval due to
Friday's rain.
"You dream about hav-
ing cars like this," Hor-
nish said. "I think I used
more energy celebrating
than I did actually driving


the car today"
Hamlin could be
fired up for Vegas
NASCAR race
LAS VEGAS Maybe
Denny Hamlin can channel
his fury over his $25,000 fine
from NASCAR into a fast fin-
ish at the Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.
Hamlin got docked for his
pessimistic comments about
the new Gen-6 car, and his
anger over the decision over-
shadowed the week leading
up to NASCAR's third race in
an already interesting season.
While Hamlin stewed and
refused to pay the fine, most
drivers think Sunday is their
first real chance to test their
new rides on the intermediate
tracks they're built to race.
The Vegas race is a bit too
early in the season for gam-
bling, however. While most
teams are still brimming with
optimism after the first two
races of the season at Day-
tona and Phoenix, some
drivers think it's not too early
to start worrying about the
overall standings.
"It's so important to get
that momentum and the
points base established,"
Clint Bowyer said. "We've al-
ready seen teams struggle
the very first two races and
get themselves behind."
Brad Keselowski was
awarded the Vegas pole
after rain scrubbed Friday's
qualifying session.


No. 20 G. Bay 80,
Purdue 77, Milwaukee 56
Nn 21 Nehraska 64


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kans
Baltir
Seatt
Tamp
Cleve
Chica
Minne
Detro
Toron
Bosto
Hous
Oakla
Texas
Los A
New '


St. L
Color
Atlan
Wash
San
Arizo
Milwa
Los A
Phila
Miam
New '
San F
Chica
Pittsb
Cinci


Spring Training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
as City 12 1
more 10 2
tle 11 4
Da Bay 11 4
eland 11 5
ago 6 4
esota 9 6
oit 8 7
ito 7 7
in 7 8
ton 6 7
and 6 7
S6 7
ngeles 3 9
York 3 11
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L
ouis 8 5
rado 7 5
ta 8 8
hington 6 6
Diego 7 8
na 6 7
aukee 6 7
ngeles 5 6
delphia 6 8
i 5 7
York 4 6
Francisco 4 7
ago 5 10
burgh 4 10
nnati 3 11


NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Toronto 7, Atlanta (ss) 1
Atlanta (ss) 14, Houston 9
Tampa Bay 3, Philadelphia 2
St. Louis 16, Washington 10
Detroit 3, N.Y Mets 2
Miami 6, N.Y Yankees 1
L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. San Francisco at
Scottsdale, Ariz., ccd., Rain
Oakland vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., ccd.,
Rain
Texas vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, Ariz., ccd.,
Rain
Arizona vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., ccd.,
Rain
San Diego vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., ccd., Rain
Cleveland vs. Kansas City (ss) at Surprise,
Ariz., ccd., Rain
Baltimore 6, Pittsburgh 3
Minnesota 2, Boston 0
Ciincinnati (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss) at Glen-
dale, Ariz., ccd., Rain
Chicago Cubs vs. Cincinnati (ss) at
Goodyear, Ariz., ccd., Rain
Kansas City (ss) vs. Colorado at Scottsdale,
Ariz., ccd., Rain
Saturday's Games
Washington 8, Miami (ss) 7
Minnesota 5, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 2, N.Y Yankees 1
Toronto 4, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 15, Philadelphia 7
St. Louis 2, Miami (ss) 0
N.Y Mets 9, Houston 6
Texas (ss) 5, San Diego 2
Cleveland 9, Chicago Cubs 2
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 5
L.A. Dodgers 3, Seattle 2
Kansas City 13, San Francisco 2
Texas (ss) 4, Oakland 3
Colorado 8, L.A. Angels 6
Arizona 11, Chicago White Sox 9
Baltimore 5, Boston 2
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Pittsburgh (ss) vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
San Francisco vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix,
4:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Chicago White Sox (ss) at
Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (ss) vs. Seattle at Peoria,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Texas vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
San Diego vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Colorado at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
San Francisco vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale,
Ariz., 4:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05
p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 4:05
p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. Arizona at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 7:05 p.m.



PGA Tour
Cadillac C'ship
Saturday
At Trump Doral Golf Club and Resort,
Doral
Purse: $8.75 million
Yardage: 7,334, Par: 72
Third Round
Tiger Woods 66-65-67-198 -18
Graeme McDowell 66-67-69-202 -14
Phil Mickelson 67-67-69 -203 -13
Steve Stricker 67-67-69 -203 -13
Sergio Garcia 66-72-67-205 -11
Michael Thompson 69-69-67-- 205 -11
Charl Schwartzel 71-65-69 -205 -11
Keegan Bradley 68-68-69-205 -11
Bubba Watson 66-69-71 -206 -10
Freddie Jacobson 66-69-71 -206 -10
Jason Dufner 69-69-69-207 -9
Dustin Johnson 68-69-70-207 -9
Charles Howell III 68-71-69-208 -8
John Senden 69-69-70-208 -8
Peter Hanson 67-71-70-208 -8
Nicolas Colsaerts 71-71-67 209 7
Rickie Fowler 69-69-71 -209 -7
John Huh 71-67-71 -209 -7
Adam Scott 72-70-68 -210 -6
Justin Rose 68-72-70 -210 -6
HunterMahan 67-72-71 -210 -6
Webb Simpson 72-67-71 -210 -6
lan Poulter 68-70-72-210 -6
Alexander Noren 69-70-72-211 -5
Scott Jamieson 70-69-72-211 -5
Scott Piercy 70-73-69-212 -4
Richard Sterne 70-71-71 -212 -4
Russell Henley 70-72-70 -212 -4


For KULthei record[


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:

l: ;.. CASH 3 (early)


CASH 3 (late)



PLAY 4 (early)
0-4-0-1

PLAY 4 (late)
Florda Lotty 6-0-7-7

Because of early deadlines, Powerball, Fantasy 5 and
Florida Lottery were unavailable at press time.



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: KOBALT Tools 400 race
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (SUN) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay Rays
7:30 p.m. (ESPN) World Baseball Classic, Pool C:
Dominican Republic vs. Puerto Rico
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (CBS) Virginia Commonwealth at Temple
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Big South Tournament final: Teams TBA
12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Illinois at Ohio State
2 p.m. (CBS) Missouri Valley Tournament final: Teams TBA
2 p.m. (CW) Virginia Tech at Wake Forest
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) CAA Tournament semifinal Northeastern
vs. TBA
4 p.m. (CBS) Indiana at Michigan
4:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) CAA Tournament semifinal: Teams
TBA
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) Boston Celtics at Oklahoma City Thunder
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Chicago Bulls at Los Angeles Lakers
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Philadelphia 76ers at Orlando Magic
6 p.m. (SUN) Indiana Pacers at Miami Heat
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2 p.m. (ESPN2) ACC Tournament final: Teams TBA
2 p.m. (FSNFL) Big 12 Championship semifinal: Teams TBA
4 p.m. (ESPN2) Big Ten Tournament final: Teams TBA
6 p.m. (ESPN2) SEC Tournament final: Teams TBA
8 p.m. (ESPN2) Pac-12 Tournament final: Teams TBA
BICYCLING
12 a.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Nice, Stage 7 (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
11 p.m. (NBCSPT) Marcus Upshaw vs. Vladine Biosse
(Taped)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship -
Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship -
Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship
spotlight coverage
7:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Puerto Rico Open Final
Round (Same-day Tape)
10:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
9 a.m. (SUN) Minnesota at Florida (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) New York Rangers at Washington Capitals
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Buffalo Sabres at Philadelphia Flyers
SOCCER
10 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: New York Red Bulls at San Jose
Earthquakes
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
11:30 a.m. (FSNFL) UAB at UCF
WINTER SPORTS
7:30 a.m. (NBC) Skiing USSA Sprint U.S. Grand Prix
(Taped)
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Snowboarding Sprint U.S. Grand Prix-
SBX (Taped)

RADIO
1 p.m. (WKYE 104.3 FM) Boston Red Sox at Tampa Bay
Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


George Coetzee
Rory Mcllroy
Lee Westwood
Louis Oosthuizen
Bo Van Pelt
Ernie Els
Jim Furyk
Brian Gay
G. Fer.-Castano
Jason Day
Thaworn Wiratchant
Zach Johnson
Padraig Harrington
Tim Clark
Chris Wood
Ryan Moore
Matt Kuchar
Francesco Molinari
Geoff Ogilvy
Mike Hendry
Luke Donald
Carl Pettersson
Bill Haas
Martin Kaymer
Matteo Manassero
Nick Watney
David Lynn
Stephen Gallacher
Marcel Siem
Branden Grace
John Merrick
Thorbjorn Olesen
Rafael Cabrera Bello
Marcus Fraser
Paul Lawrie
Robert Garrigus
Jamie Donaldson


70-69-73-
73-69-71 -
73-69-71 -
70-75-69 -
68-75-71 -
73-69-72 -
72-70-72 -
70-76-69 -
72-70-73 -
74-66-75 -
69-69-77-
71-67-77-
76-72-68 -
72-73-71 -
71-74-71 -
73-71-72 -
72-72-72 -
78-66-72 -
69-74-73 -
72-66-78 -
70-76-71 -
71-75-71 -
72-73-72-
76-68-73 -
71-71-75-
69-71-77-
71-70-76-
74-75-69 -
75-73-70 -
73-74-72-
75-72-72-
75-75-70 -
71-74-76-
73-72-77-
78-73-72 -
75-75-74 -
72-77-76 -


Sprint Cup
Kobalt Tools 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, Owner Points.
2. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, Owner Points.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevy, Owner Points.
4. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, Owner Points.
6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, Owner Points.
7. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, Owner Points.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, Owner Points.


9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
10. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
11. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, Owner Points.
12. (88) D. Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, Owner Points.
13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, Owner Points.
14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevy, Owner Points.
15. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, Owner Points.
16. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, Owner Points.
17. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
18. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, Owner Points.
19. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, Owner Points.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
21. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, Owner Points.
22. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, Owner Points.
23. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevy, Owner Points.
24. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
25. (42) J.Pablo Montoya, Chevy Owner Points.
26. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, Owner Points.
27. (51) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
28. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, Owner Points.
29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, Owner Points.
30. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Points.
31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
32. (83) D. Reutimann, Toyota, Owner Points.
33. (7) Dave Blaney Chevrolet, Owner Points.
34. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
35. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
36. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, Owner Points.
37. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevy Owner Points.
38. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, Owner Points.
39. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, Attempts.
41. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Attempts.
42. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Attempts.
43. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Attempts.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota.


New Y
Brook
Bosto
Toron
Philac


x-Mia
Atlant
Wash
Orlanc


NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
'ork 38 22 .633
klyn 37 26 .587
n 34 27 .557
to 24 39 .381
lelphia 23 38 .377
Southeast Division
W L Pct
mi 46 14 .767
a 34 28 .548
ington 19 41 .317
do 17 46 .270


Charlotte 13 49 .210
Central Division
W L Pct
Indiana 39 23 .629
Chicago 35 27 .565
Milwaukee 30 29 .508
Detroit 23 41 .359
Cleveland 21 41 .339
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 48 15 .762
Memphis 42 19 .689
Houston 34 29 .540
Dallas 28 33 .459
New Orleans 21 42 .333
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 46 16 .742
Denver 41 22 .651
Utah 32 31 .508
Portland 29 32 .475
Minnesota 21 37 .362
Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 44 20 .688
Golden State 35 28 .556
L.A. Lakers 32 31 .508
Sacramento 22 42 .344
Phoenix 21 41 .339
x-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Games
Oklahoma City 116, Charlotte 94
Indiana 115, Orlando 86
Memphis 103, Cleveland 92
Brooklyn 95, Washington 78
Dallas 102, Detroit 99
Chicago 89, Utah 88
Boston 107, Atlanta 102, OT
Miami 102, Philadelphia 93
Portland 136, San Antonio 106
Sacramento 121, Phoenix 112
Houston 94, Golden State 88
L.A. Lakers 118, Toronto 116, OT
Saturday's Games
Brooklyn 93, Atlanta 80
NewYork 113, Utah 84
Memphis 96, New Orleans 85
Charlotte at Washington, late
Minnesota at Denver, late
Houston at Phoenix, late
Milwaukee at Golden State, late
Today's Games
Boston at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Brooklyn at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Phoenix, 10:p.m.
NewYork at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


Pittsbu
NewJA
N.Y. Ra
N.Y. Is
Philad


NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
urgh 25 17 8 0 34 91 75
jersey 25 11 9 5 27 62 73
angers 23 12 9 2 26 59 57
landers 25 11 11 3 25 76 82
elphia 26 11 14 1 23 72 80


Montreal
Boston
Toronto
Ottawa
Buffalo


Carolina
Winnipeg
Tampa Bay
Washington
Florida


Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
25 16 5 4 36 79 64
22 16 3 3 35 67 48
26 1510 1 31 79 70
25 13 8 4 30 59 51
25 913 3 21 65 80
Southeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
24 14 9 1 29 75 69
24 1211 1 25 61 71
25 1014 1 21 85 79
23 1012 1 21 68 68
25 712 6 20 62 93


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 25 21 1 3 45 80 52
Detroit 25 12 9 4 28 66 63
St. Louis 24 13 9 2 28 74 73
Nashville 24 10 9 5 25 53 59
Columbus 25 912 4 22 58 70
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 23 11 6 6 28 64 63
Minnesota 22 11 9 2 24 52 56
Calgary 22 9 9 4 22 61 73
Colorado 23 910 4 22 59 67
Edmonton 24 811 5 21 54 71
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 23 17 3 3 37 81 60
Phoenix 25 1210 3 27 72 72
San Jose 23 11 7 5 27 54 54
Dallas 24 1210 2 26 67 67
Los Angeles 22 12 8 2 26 62 57
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Ottawa 3, N.Y Rangers 2
Winnipeg 3, Florida 2, OT
Nashville 6, Edmonton 0
Colorado 6, Chicago 2
Anaheim 4, Calgary 0
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 5, Toronto 4, SO
Boston 3, Philadelphia 0
N.Y. Islanders 5, Washington 2
Columbus 3, Detroit 0
St. Louis 4, San Jose 3, OT
Carolina 6, New Jersey 3
Montreal 4, Tampa Bay 3
Phoenix 2, Dallas 1
Minnesota at Nashville, late
Calgary at Los Angeles, late
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.



BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Assigned C
Manuel Pina and OF Luis Durango to their
minor league camp.
NEW YORKYANKEES-Announced the re-
tirement of RHP Mariano Rivera, effective at the
end of the season. Reassigned RHP Tom
Kahnle and LHP Kelvin Perez to the minor
league camp.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Reassigned RHP
Bruce Billings, RHP Sonny Gray and LHP
Justin Thomas to their minor league camp.
National League
SAN DIEGO PADRES Agreed to terms
with RHP Anthony Bass, RHP Brad Boxberger,
RHP Brad Brach, RHP Andrew Cashner, RHP
Fautino De Los Santos, RHP Casey Kelly, RHP
Miles Mikolas, RHP Adys Portillo, RHP Tyson
Ross, RHP Dale Thayer, RHP Nick Vincent,
RHP Joe Wieland, LHP Jose De Paula, LHP
Tommy Layne, LHP Eric Stults, INF Yonder
Alonso, INF Alexi Amarista, INF James Darnell,
INF Logan Forsythe, INF Jesus Guzman, INF
Edinson Rincon, OF Yeison Asencio, OF Jaff
Decker and OF Rymer Liriano on one-year
contracts.


LOLLYPOP
Continued from Page B1


"It is good golf, good competition," Walker
said. "All the ladies in the area who play com-
petitively know what it means to win the Lol-
lypop. If you say you won the Lollypop people
are pretty impressed."
The 68 registered golfers, representing 18
different courses, show the depth of this
year's field as well as its far-reaching draw.
Kathy Butler will make the trip from East Bay
Country Club in Largo while Lynne Busco
will make the trek from Mount Dora Golf
Club. One-time Lollipop champion Karen
Greenway, an on-the-go business women, al-
ways keep the two tournament days open.
"It is a great course, great golf and a well-
run tournament that is worthy of taking time
out of my busy schedule," Greenway said
while on a business trip in California.
The course will play roughly 5,390 yards.
According to Walker, it is one of the longer
courses in the area. Water can also creep up
on the golfers.
"The course does have quite a bit of water,"
said Walker. '"A lot of water doesn't come into
play but it is always in the back of your mind
on some holes."
Last year's tournament winner Briget Broth-
ers, who beat Barbara Breesman in a playoff,
is not in the field this year to defend her title.
The other flight winners from last year include
Jorie Bertine (second flight), Betty Bleakley
(third), Carol Biedscheid (fourth), Shirley
Kupp (fifth), Kay Beaufait and Jessie Helton
(sixth) and Karen Stanley (seventh).
The action begins Tuesday with a 10 a.m.
shotgun. Wednesday's final round will begin
at 9 a.m.



PANTHER
Continued from Page B1


with a 125-9.
Crystal River's Haley Clark won the pole
vault with a 10-0.
Lecanto's Brittany Vickers won the girls
high jump with a 4-10 leap. Crystal River's
Caleau was second with a 4-6.
Other winners included:
Lecanto's Taylor Christian was second in
the girls 100 meters with a 12.92 and in the
girls 200 with a 27.7.
Lecanto's Farnsworth was second in the
1600 meters with a time of 5:42.
Crystal River's Brandon Harris won the
boys 1600 meters with a time of 4:44,
Lecanto's Josh Riemer won the boys shot
put with a 47-2 effort.
Crystal River's Corey Pollard won the
boys high jump with a 6-4.
The Crystal River boys 4x100 relay team
won their event with a 48.6.
The Lecanto girls 4x100 relay team was
second with a 53.75 time.
Lecanto's Summer Van Quelef won the
300 hurdles with a personal best time of 51.75.
The Panthers' Arianna Van Quelef, won
the 400 meters with a 1:03.4.
Lecanto's Thomas Roberts took second in
the 300 hurdles with a 43,55.
Lecanto senior Chloe Benoist took sec-
ond in the 800 meters with a 2:34 clocking.
Crystal River's McAteer won the boys
pole vault with a 13-0 vault. Lecanto's Jeff
Burnett was second with an 11-6.
Crystal River High's Brandon Harris won
the boys 3200 meters with a 10:47. Lecanto's
Mike Lindsey was second.
Crystal River's 4x400 relay was second
with a 3:40.
The Pirate girls were second in the 4x400
with a 4:34 time.




CLAW
Continued from Page B1


With about 15 seconds left and Kentucky up
59-57, Kenny Boynton pulled up for a 15-foot
jumper to tie the game. The ball glanced off
the back rim and bounced out of bounds to
the Wildcats (21-10, 12-6).
Despite the loss, Florida finished the sea-
son as SEC regular-season champions for the
second time in three seasons and third time
in seven years. Five of the Gators' six SEC
championships have come during Donovan's
17-year tenure as coach.
Kentucky's victory clinched the No. 2 seed
in the conference tournament and bolstered
the defending national champions' chances
to land an NCAA tournament bid.
Julius Mays' two free throws with 9.4 sec-
onds remaining capped Kentucky's come-
back.

NBA BRIEFS


Nets 93,
Hawks 80
ATLANTA- Brook
Lopez and Andray
Blatche each scored 18
points, Deron Williams
added 17 and the
Brooklyn Nets won their
third straight game with
a 93-80 victory over the
Atlanta Hawks.
Al Horford finished
with 15 points and 12
rebounds for the Hawks,
who seemed lethargic
after losing in overtime
at Boston on Friday. At-
lanta has lost two
straight and five of six.

Knicks 113,
Jazz 84
NEW YORK- J.R.
Smith scored 24 points
and the New York
Knicks shook off the ab-
sence of Carmelo An-
thony and the shock of
Amare Stoudemire
needing more knee sur-
gery to rout the slump-


ing Utah Jazz 113-84
Alec Burks scored 14
points and Gordon Hay-
ward had 13 for the
Jazz.

Grizzlies 96,
Hornets 85
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
Mike Conley scored 22
points and the Grizzlies
won their fourth straight
with a victory over the
New Orleans Hornets.
Anthony Davis led the
Hornets with 20 points
and 18 rebounds, while
Ryan Anderson scored
17 points.

Wizards 104,
Bobcats 87
WASHINGTON -
The Washington Wiz-
ards, one of the few
NBA teams who can ac-
tually call the Charlotte
Bobcats a nemesis, did
their bit to rectify that
notion, with Trevor Ariza
scoring a season-high
26 points in a victory.


B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Soccer camp scheduled for Spring Break


PLAY program

begins April 8

Special to the Chronicle

All students from 5 years of age to
12 are invited to participate in Spring
Break Soccer Camp from 8:30 a.m.
to noon Monday through Friday,
March 25 to 29, at St. Paul's
Lutheran Church, 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
The cost is $45. All participants
will receive a T-shirt, water bottle
and a soccer ball. For more informa-
tion, call 352-489-3027.
Register now
for Camp Soquili
Camp Soquili 2013 at Faith
Haven Christian Retreat Center in
Crystal River will be in June and July
at Soquili Stables.


Eight weeklong sessions will be
offered from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Campers can
learn to ride and care for a horse.
There will be equine activities, in the
saddle and on the ground, as well as
crafts, swimming and more.
For more information and to sign
up, visit the website at www.
faithhavencrc.org/camp_soquili.php,
call 352-206-2990, or email
soquili.stables@gmail.com. Like
Camp Soquili on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/CampSoquili.
Parks & Rec
gearing up for PLAY
The next season of PLAY begins
April 8. Citrus County Parks &
Recreation's PLAY programs are de-
signed for children ages 3 to 5 who
aren't quite ready for the organized
sports leagues with in the county.
The PLAY programs offered in
the upcoming session include bas-


ketball at the Citrus County Re-
source Center on Mondays or
Wednesday, flag football at Bicen-
tennial Park on Tuesdays or Thurs-
days and cheerleading at
Bicentennial Park on Thursdays.
The next session begins the
week of April 8. Boys and girls are
welcome to join the six-week pro-
gram. After enrollment, each child
receives age-appropriate sports
equipment and a team T-shirt.
Registration is open and spots fill
up fast; space is limited.
Call Crysta Henry, recreation pro-
gram specialist for youth programs,
at 352-527-7543 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com, for more
information.
Youth golf lessons
at Pine Ridge
Citrus County Parks & Recre-
ation, in partnership with Pine Ridge
Golf Course, offers spring youth golf


lessons at Pine Ridge Golf Course
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
beginning March 27, and will run for
five weeks.
Children ages 6 to 15 are eligible
and the cost is $50 per child. In-
struction will be given by golf pro
Randy Robbins and several volun-
teers. During these lessons partici-
pants will learn putting, driving,
chipping, on-course play and on-
course etiquette.
Golf clubs will be provided, but if
your child has his or her own set, we
encourage them to bring them
along.
For more information, call Crysta
Henry at 352-527-7543 or Randy
Robbins at 352-746-6177.
Super Series
Baseball Tournaments
The Key Training Center's
"Who's on First" and Florida Pre-
mier Prospects, in conjunction with


Citrus County Parks & Recreation,
will present Super Series Baseball
Tournaments.
Super Series Baseball is one of
the nation's largest and fastest
growing baseball organizations. The
"qualifying" tournaments will be at
Bicentennial Park in Crystal River on
March 30 and 31 and June 15 and
16. The age groups participating are
9U, 10U, 11U, 12U and 13U.
By participating in a qualifying
tournament, a team can earn points
to become eligible for Super Series
state tournaments in Pensacola, na-
tional tournaments in Burleson,
Texas, and world tournaments in
Round Rock, Texas. All 12U teams
will have an opportunity to win a
Super Series trip to the National
Championship, to be broadcast on
CBS Sports Network.
For more information, call Tim
Ramsay or Adam Thomas at 352-
287-1415.


Adult leagues ready


Special to the Chronicle

The Adult Flag Football League is for
adults age 18 and older, and is a very
fast-paced, physical game. If you're up
for the challenge, Citrus County Parks
& Recreation will be looking to start up
the new league on/around April 4.
Registration is currently ongoing.
Parks & Rec hopes to increase the
number of teams, so as to expand
competition. To pre-register, or for more
information, call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Co-ed softball
begins in April
Co-ed softball is beginning again
April 11 with Citrus County Parks &
Recreation.
Games are played at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday.
Registration begins March 11; $50
fee per team. For more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7540.
Men's softball
played Mondays
Citrus County Parks & Recreations
Men's Softball League games are
played Mondays at Bicentennial Park
in Crystal River, with games at 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m. The tentative
startup date for the next season of this
sport is April 1.
To pre-register, or for more informa-
tion, call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
to begin in April
Citrus County Parks & Recreation's
inaugural beach volleyball season
was successful and fun. Ten teams of
four players competed.
The new season will start April 23.
Registration begins March 11. Games
are played beginning at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at Bicentennial Park in
Crystal River. The team fees, days
and times are dependent on how
many teams sign up.
You don't need to be a star athlete
to play; this league is geared toward
family fun and exercise. For more in-
formation, call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Experience thrill
of kickball
Kickball is an exciting game that


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Parks and Recreation's men's flag football is set to start in April.


can be played by people from age 18
and older. It's a great way to meet
new people and get a little exercise
while having fun.
Adult game times will be at 6:30,
7:30 and 8:30 p.m.; games will last
one hour or nine innings, whichever
occurs first.
Games are played at Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River. The new season
will start April 17.
For more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Register now for
leagues in Inverness
Registration is open for Men's Soft-
ball, Coed Softball and Coed Kickball
at Whispering Pines Park.
Men's Softball starts March 12 and
will play on Tuesdays and Thursdays
with upper and lower divisions. The
cost for a team is $325 and persons
interested must be older than 18 to
participate. There will be 12 games
plus playoffs.
Coed Softball will begin March 11


with Wednesday night play. Coed
Softball has upper and lower divisions
with all participants being older than
18. The cost of a team is $325 with 12
games plus playoffs.
Coed Kickball will begin March 15
with Friday evening play time. There
will be only one division and partici-
pants must be older than 16. The
cost for a team is $175.
Any managers/teams interested
may call Whispering Pines Park at
352-726-3913 or Woody Worley at
352-613-0866, or stop by Whispering
Pines Park Administration Office for
coach packets and registration
information.
Interested in
basketball or soccer?
Citrus County Parks & Rec is con-
sidering starting a Women's Basketball
League, as well as a Men's Soccer
League and Women's Soccer League.
All interested persons are asked to
call Maci at 352-527-7547.


Red Cross course
set for park
The city of Inverness will have an
American Red Cross Lifeguarding
course from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. March
25 to 29. There will also be a prerequi-
site session from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
March 22.
The course will be at Whispering
Pines Park Pool. The cost is $125
and students must provide their own
Lifeguarding Manual, which can be
obtained in PDF format for free
from InstructorsCorner.com or
in printed format for $32 from
ShopStaywell.com.
This is a blended learning course,
meaning that part of the course will
be online and part will be at the pool
facility. Access to the Internet is nec-
essary. Registration is now open;
register immediately to secure a spot.
Classes fill up quickly.
For more information, call Nick
Dunn at 352-726-2611, ext. 1305, or
call the park office at 352-726-3913.


Recreation BRIEFS


Throw shoes in
Beverly Hills
Beverly Hills Horseshoe
Club meets at 8:30 a.m. each
Wednesday. Men, women
and juniors age 10 and older
can join.
There are all levels of play;
handicapped method.
Call Ron Fair 352-746-
3924, or email rfair3@
tampabay.rr.com.
SilverSneakers
location at YMCA
Citrus County YMCA is an
official SilverSneakers loca-
tion for their group exercise
program in Homosassa.
SilverSneakers is the na-
tion's leading exercise pro-
gram designed exclusively for
older adults and is available at
little or no additional cost
through Medicare health
plans, Medicare Supplement
carriers and group retiree
plans.
Group exercise classes
meet at the First United
Methodist Church in Ho-
mosassa on Mondays,
Wednesday and Fridays.
Classes include cardio inter-
val, Pilates, and stability and
strength. To find out if you are
eligible for SilverSneakers,
call your health plan provider.


For more information, call the
YMCA office at 352-637-
0132.
Free yoga class
at Unity Church
Unity Church of Citrus
County, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto, is host site for
a community Divine Yoga
class at 10 a.m. Thursday.
The class is free of
charge and is open to all
ages and physical abilities.
Some of the benefits of
yoga are improved balance,
coordination, strength and
flexibility. Yoga is also help-
ful in counteracting stress
and anxiety.
For more information, call
Sheila Abrahams at 352-270-
8019 or email divineyogas@
gmail.com.
YMCA offers group
exercise program
The Citrus County YMCA
offers group exercise in Citrus
Springs at the Hope Evangeli-
cal Lutheran Church, 9425 N.
Citrus Springs Blvd.
The location offers classes
in Pilates and cardio circuit on
a regular basis beginning.
The Y currently has three
other areas in the county
where group exercise
classes are offered, including
Homosassa, Inverness and


Crystal River. Financial assis-
tance is available to all those
who qualify. For more infor-
mation, call the YMCA office
in Beverly Hills at 352-637-
0132, or visit online at
www.ymcasuncoast.org.
Park offers
tennis lessons
Whispering Pines Park of-
fers tennis lessons with Lind-
say Rodriquez. Pre-registration
and pre-payment are required
at the park office.
Fee for lessons is $100 for
four hours, or $30 per hour.
Times are arranged with the
instructor.
Call 352-726-3913 for reg-
istration and information.
Whispering Pines also offers
racquetball lessons. Call for
information.
Learn to stretch
with Parks & Rec
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers a low-impact
stretching class. This ongoing
class will be from 10 to 11 a.m.
at Citrus Springs Community
Center. Cost is $5 per class.
The low-impact class is
easy, fun with good benefits.
Stretching helps to make
you more flexible and regu-
lar stretching will help mobil-
ity and balance. This helps
to slow down the onset of
common degenerative con-


editions, such as osteoarthri-
tis. Stretching increases
physical and mental relax-
ation and reduces the risk of
joint sprain, muscle strain or
back problems. Low-impact
exercises can improve
health and fitness without
harming weight-bearing
joints. Research suggests
that moderate-intensity, low-
impact activity is just as ef-
fective as high-impact
activity in lowering the risk of
heart disease.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
and click on instructional
classes, or call 352-465-7007.


Zumba at
Citrus Springs
Citrus County Parks &
Recreation offers Zumba
classes with instructor Lynn
DaSilva at Citrus Springs
Community Center. Zumba is
a fitness program designed
with exciting Latin and inter-
national dance rhythms. No
membership or contracts.
Ongoing classes are: 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday;
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday;
and 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
days. Cost is $5.
For more information, visit
www.citruscountyparks.com
or call 352-465-7007.


BRIEFS

Event to benefit
food pantry
The third annual golf
tournament to benefit We
Care Food Pantry will begin
at 8 a.m. Saturday, March
16, at 7 Rivers Golf &
Country Club, Crystal River.
Format is an 18-hole
scramble. Registration of
$6 per golfer or $200 per
foursome includes golf,
carts, lunch and prizes.
Special hole-in-one prize of
a Harley-Davidson motorcy-
cle is provided by Harley-
Davidson of Crystal River.
To register or for more
information, email
kensteidel@yahoo.com, or
call 352-503-7355.
Knights host
inaugural tourney
The Knights of Columbus
will host its inaugural Golf
Tournament March 23 at
the Citrus Hills Golf and
Country Club. Cost is $60
and includes lunch and
door prizes.
Registration starts at
7:30 a.m. with tee time at
8:30 a.m. Register early, as
the number of entrants is
limited. Men and women
are welcome.
Additionally, the Knights
are looking for hole spon-
sors. Sponsorships are $50
and $100.
For more information or
to sign up, call Bill Matos at
352-637-5465 or Charlie
Kowalski at 352-527-8413.
19th annual golf
classic April 13
The Knights of Columbus
Abbot Francis Sadlier
Council No. 6168 will have
its 19th annual Father Willie
Golf Classic, open to men
and women, beginning at
8:30 a.m. with a shotgun
start Saturday, April 13, at
Citrus Hills Golf & Country
Club on the Oaks Course.
Hole sponsorships are
$50 per hole.
Entry fee is $60, which
includes coffee and dough-
nuts prior to the start, green
and cart fees, prizes and
lunch at the country club.
Winning teams will re-
ceive cash prizes. There
will be door prizes, 50/50
prizes and a separate raffle
for a round of golf for four at
the Black Diamond course.
Play will be a scramble
format with four-player
teams. Form a team or the
council can do so. Entries
must be received no later
than April 10 with checks
attached, made out to the
Knights of Columbus.
The field must be limited
to 120 players, so make
reservations soon with Jim
Louque at 352-746 7563.


0lpm


RECREATIONAL SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Actress Valerie Harper, left,
with co-host Dr. Travis Stork
during a taping of "The
Doctors." Harper will appear on
the show Monday to talk about
her brain cancer.

Valerie Harper on
'The Doctors'
NEW YORK -Actress
Valerie Harper plans to dis-
cuss her brain cancer with
some television doctors.
The daytime talk show
"The Doctors" said Harper
will appear Monday to talk
with Travis Stork, Lisa Mas-
terson and Andrew Ordon,
as well as her own team of
doctors.
The 1970s sitcom star has
been diagnosed with a rare
brain cancer and told she
has as little as three months
to live. She said her hus-
band briefly withheld the di-
agnosis from her because it
was so dire.
Harper, 73, played Rhoda
Morgenstern on television's
"The Mary Tyler Moore
Show" and its spinoff,
"Rhoda."
She's given the full hour
of Monday's talk show and is
surprised by former co-stars
Ed Asner and Cloris
Leachman.

Joy Behar leaving
The View'
LOS ANGELES -Joy
Behar will enjoy "The View"
for only five more months.
The 70-year-old comedian
is leaving the ABC daytime
talk show at the end of the
current sea-
son in August.
Behar has
co-hosted the
I show for 16
seasons. She
was among

hosts with co-
Joy Behar creato S
Barbara Wal-
ters when the
series debuted. The current
panel includes Whoopi
Goldberg, Elisabeth Hassel-
beck and Sherri Shepherd.


Osbourne c(
seizure, twee
LOS ANGELES
Osbourne said shi
seizure and docto
ing to figure out w
T
-yea
pet
po
ph
Tw
W Th
an
tat
arn
Kelly tha
Osbourne fan
"be
well wishes."
Osbourne was Ih
ized Thursday aft
ing on the set of E
network's "Fashi
where she serves
elist alongside Jo,
Giuliana Rancic a
Kotsiopoulos.
Osbourne is the
of rocker Ozzy Ost
and "The Talk" co
Sharon Osbourne


Back for more


Associated Press
Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill are in a scene from "Star Wars." Fisher said she's
coming back as Princess Leia for the new "Star Wars" films. The actress confirmed she will
return as the iconic character in an interview posted Wednesday with Florida's Palm Beach
Illustrated. Casting for the films has yet to be announced, but Fisher answered a simple "yes"
when asked if she would reprise her role as Leia.

Lucas says 'Star Wars' trio returning for new film


Associated Press

NEW YORK It appears the Force is still
strong with Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill and
Carrie Fisher.
In an interview posted online Thursday,
George Lucas said the trio from the original
"Star Wars" trilogy will reprise their iconic
roles of Hans Solo, Luke Skywalker and
Princess Leia in the new "Star Wars" film.
Lucas told Bloomberg Businessweek all
three were signed for the new "Episode VII"
film in advance of Lucasfilm's $4 billion pur-
chase by Disney
"We had already signed Mark and Carrie
and Harrison or were pretty much in the
final stages of negotiation," Lucas said.
He added: "Maybe I'm not supposed to say
that. I think they want to announce that with
some big whoop-de-do."
In an interview posted Wednesday with
Florida's Palm Beach Illustrated, Fisher said
she'll be coming back as Princess Leia.
Disney's Lucasfilm was coy in response. In
a statement, a spokesperson for the company
said, "George couldn't say whether they were
signed or not and neither can we. As Yoda
said, 'Always in motion is the future.' Stay
tuned."
The Walt Disney Co. is producing a new


Disney working on standalone
Star Wars movies
PHOENIX Star Wars fans have more than
just Episodes 7, 8 and 9 to look forward to.
Disney CEO Bob Iger said at the annual
shareholders meeting in Phoenix on Wednesday
that the company is developing "some stand-
alone movies" featuring Star Wars characters.
The news is likely to set off a new round of
speculation about what's in store for the Lucas-
film franchise. The buzz has been at fever pitch
levels since The Walt Disney Co. said in October
it was acquiring the studio for $4 billion.
Iger didn't say which characters might be fea-
tured in the standalone films. Some Star Wars
characters such as bounty hunter Boba Fett
have been given bigger treatments in comic
books.

"Star Wars" trilogy to take place after Lucas'
original three space epics. J.J. Abrams is di-
recting the first film. The 70-year-old Ford,
the 61-year-old Hamill and the 56-year-old
Fisher are expected to play smaller, support-
ing roles.
A representative for Ford declined to com-
ment. Hamill's representatives didn't imme-
diately return requests for comment.


Costello, D'Angelo, more perform at Prince tribute


Associated Press


NEW YORK They partied


like it was 1999 the audience
)nfirmS and the musicians at a Prince
ts photo tribute concert at Carnegie Hall.
More than 20 performers, in-
Kelly cluding Elvis Costello, The Roots
e had a and the Waterboys, paid tribute to
)rs are try- the pop icon in a two-hour-plus
why. concert Thursday night. They all
'he 28- joined together onstage to close
ar-old TV the show with "1999."
rsonality Singer D'Angelo took the lead
sted a while putting his arm around Bet-
oto on tye LaVette, Chris Rock and
itter late Costello clapped hands side-by-
ursday of side, and comedian-actress-
IV in her singers Maya Rudolph and
tooed left Sandra Bernhard danced in a
m. She silly manner all while the
inked her crowd cheered.
is for their Many of the performers got into
beautiful character as they sang signature
Prince tunes. Soul singer Bilal
iospital- was wild on "Sister," singing in
ter collaps- various tones like a mad man and
! thrilling the crowd. Bernhard, in
on Police," her leather pants, shimmery shirt
as a pan- and shiny shoes, impressed on
an Rivers, "Little Red Corvette" as she
and George skipped around onstage and
belted high notes. And singer-
daughter songwriter Kat Edmonson cap-
bourne tured the audience with "The
)-host Beautiful Ones," standing still and
singing with only a pianist
-From wire reports onstage.


Birthday Unless someone has something great
to offer you in the year ahead, a partnership arrange-
ment might not be your cup of tea. You might be
more fortunate in an independent endeavor.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It all depends upon
what you value more if you believe material suc-
cess is much better than social triumph, you should
be pleased with what transpires today.
Aries (March 21-April 19) If you get a chance to
implement something you've long thought about,
don't hesitate for one minute. Someone could even-
tually spot what you see and beat you to it.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) Proceed very slowly
when it comes to something that can get quite costly
if it's not handled properly. Acting impulsively could
bruise you financially.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) It's never smart to dis-
regard the opinions of your associates, unless you


Associated Press
Musician Elvis Costello performs
at "The Music of Prince" tribute
concert Thursday at Carnegie
Hall on in New York.
It was one of the only times The
Roots weren't backing up other
performers throughout the con-
cert, which raised $100,000 for
music education programs.
Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson
jammed on the drums and even
took photos of a pregnant
Rudolph when she danced with
one hand on her belly and the
other stroking her hair Rudolph,
who sings Prince covers under
the moniker PRINCEss with


Today's HOROSCOPE
have good justification for doing so. In that case, you
must have absolute proof you are right and they are
wrong.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Try to accurately
gauge the intent of a friend who asks for your opin-
ion. She or he might merely want your endorsement
and not a hard, honest analysis.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) There's a chance you
could become involved in an endeavor that has great
promise but is presented in a manner that disguises
much of its true worth. Carefully check things out.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -An important decision
should be made with a view of its long-range bene-
fits and not merely on the immediate possibilities.
Keep your eyes on the long game.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Although your ideas
should prove to be good when carried out, don't de-
ceive yourself into thinking they are much grander


Gretchen Lieberum, screeched
on "Darling Nikki" and didn't
slow down while performing cho-
reography in heels.
Few words were said to the au-
dience, though Rock thanked the
crowd "for coming" toward the
end of the show.
He impersonated Prince, too,
when reciting the lyrics to "If I
Was Your Girlfriend" with sass.
Comedian-actor Fred Armisen
took on many roles: He recited
lyrics from "Let's Go Crazy,"
played the drums while the Blind
Boys of Alabama sang "The
Cross" and offered light vocals
during "It's Going to Be a Beauti-
ful Night" alongside D'Angelo.
Most of the musicians wore
black onstage, though LaVette
rocked a purple blazer while
singing "Kiss." Other performers
included Eric Leeds, Nina Pers-
son and Talib Kweli. Wendy
Melvoin of the Revolution played
guitar throughout the night, while
St. Paul Peterson and Susannah
Melvoin dancing wildly in a
white suit performed "High
Fashion/Mutiny."
Husband-and-wife Citizen
Cope and Alice Smith sang a duet
version of "Pop Life" and Booker
T Jones was joined by singer
Diane Birch and members of the
YoungAudiences New York Youth
Choir for "Raspberry Beret"


than they actually are. Be a realist.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Provided you don't
take any undue risks, your commercial affairs should
go rather well. It will pay to operate along traditional
lines, instead of taking big gambles.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you are too diffi-
cult to please, your colleagues might lose heart and
stop trying. It's important for you to properly acknowl-
edge their efforts.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You're a creative
thinker, and what you conceive will have excellent
chances for success. Conversely, you're also a good
talker and you could replace productivity with
copious chatter.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Although Lady Luck
tends to favor most of your involvements, when it
comes to financial matters she may still insist you
earn everything you get.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Deadlines prevented the
publication of Saturday's
winning numbers. Check
this spot Monday for the
numbers and payouts.

FRIDAY, MARCH 8
Mega Money: 14 21 22 39
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 7 $1,169.50
3-of-4 MB 32 $560.50
3-of-4 926 $57.50
2-of-4 MB 1,510 $24.50
1-of-4 MB 13,668 $2.50
2-of-4 30,717 $2
Fantasy 5:13 28 30 32 35
5-of-5 1 winner $244,230.09
4-of-5 299 $131.50
3-of-5 8,801 $12.50
THURSDAY, MARCH 7
Fantasy 5:8 9 18 21 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 270 $555
3-of-5 9,632 $21.50
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6
Powerball: 6 10 23 41 45
Powerball: 1
5-of-5 PB No winner

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Sunday, March 10, the
69th day of 2013. There are 296
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 10, 1913, former
slave, abolitionist and Under-
ground Railroad "conductor" Har-
riet Tubman died in Auburn, N.Y.;
she was in her 90s.
On this date:
In 1785, Thomas Jefferson was
appointed America's minister to
France, succeeding Benjamin
Franklin.
In 1863, Edward, the Prince of
Wales (and future King Edward
VII), married Princess Alexandra
of Denmark at Windsor Castle.
In 1876, Alexander Graham
Bell's assistant, Thomas Watson,
heard Bell say over his experi-
mental telephone: "Mr. Watson -
come here I want to see you."
In 1933, a magnitude 6.4 earth-
quake centered off Long Beach,
Calif., resulted in 120 deaths.
In 1949, Nazi wartime broad-
caster Mildred E. Gillars, also
known as "Axis Sally," was con-
victed in Washington, D.C., of
treason. (She served 12 years in
prison.)
In 1969, James Earl Ray
pleaded guilty in Memphis, Tenn.,
to assassinating civil rights leader
Martin Luther King Jr. (Ray later
repudiated that plea, maintaining
his innocence until his death.)
In 1973, the Pink Floyd album
"The Dark Side of the Moon" was
first released in the U.S. by Capi-
tol Records (the British release
came nearly two weeks later).
Ten years ago: Facing almost
certain defeat, the United States
and Britain delayed a vote in the
U.N. Security Council to give Iraqi
leader Saddam Hussein an ulti-
matum to disarm.
Five years ago: A suicide
bomber killed five U.S. soldiers as
they chatted with shop owners
while on a foot patrol in central
Baghdad.
One year ago: Rick Santorum
won the Kansas caucuses in a
rout and Republican presidential
front-runner Mitt Romney coun-
tered in Wyoming.
Today's Birthdays: Talk show
host Ralph Emery is 80. Actor
Chuck Norris is 73. Singer Dean
Torrence (Jan and Dean) is 73.
Actor Richard Gant is 69. Rock
musician Tom Scholz (Boston) is
66. Actress Shannon Tweed is 56.
Pop/jazz singer Jeanie Bryson is
55. Actress Sharon Stone is 55.
Magician Lance Burton is 53. Ac-
tress Jasmine Guy is 51. Britain's
Prince Edward is 49. Actor Jon
Hamm (TV: "Mad Men") is 42.
Olympic gold-medal gymnast


Shannon Miller is 36. Country
singer Carrie Underwood is 30.
Actress Olivia Wilde is 29.
Thought for Today: "There is
no tyranny so despotic as that of
public opinion among a free peo-
ple." Donn Piatt, American jour-
nalist (1819-1891).











COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Chronicle file


Key Center program participants cross the finish line during last summer's Run for the Money finale.


I


Debunking myths of

developmental issues
MELISSA WALKER
Special to the Chronicle
March marks National Develop-
mental Disability Awareness
Month. The Key Training Center
joins other organizations across the coun-
try in efforts to increase understanding
and reduce myths of developmental dis-
abilities through community education.
What is a
developmental disability?
Several terms are commonly used when
describing an individual with a develop-
mental disability, including intellectual
disability, developmental delay, mentally
challenged, physically challenged, cogni-
tive disability and mental retardation.
Mental retardation is a term once com-
monly used to describe someone who learns
and develops more slowly than others. But it
is not used as much anymore. Instead, you
might hear terms such as "intellectual dis-
ability" or "developmental delay"
People who have autism, cerebral palsy,
Down syndrome, intellectual disabilities,
Prader-Willi syndrome or certain forms of
spina bifida are considered to have a de-
velopmental disability.
A disability refers to personal limita-
tions representing a substantial disadvan-
tage when attempting to function in
society. People with developmental dis-
abilities may not learn as quickly as oth-
ers or express themselves clearly Others
may have limited ability to take care of
their physical needs or experience lim-
ited mobility Many people have more
than one disability.
Facts, figures of
developmental disability
Nearly 3 percent of the general popula-
tion has a developmental disability, which
means one out of every 10 families is af-
fected. A developmental disability is a life-
long cognitive disability originating
sometime between birth and age 18. The


BIL


TERMS USED TO DESCRIBE
A PERSON WITH
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY
intellectual disability
developmental delay
mentally challenged
physically challenged
cognitive disability
mental retardation

person's general intellectual functioning in-
volving the ability to reason, learn, solve
problems and understand is significantly
below average (roughly an IQ of 70 or
below).
The person's behavior does not meet the
level of personal independence and social
responsibility expected of the person's age
and culture. They have significant limita-
tions in two or more adaptive behaviors,
including the conceptual, social and prac-
tical skills that have to be learned to func-
tion in everyday life situations. Learning
how to handle money, knowing how to
read a name in the restaurant, obeying
laws and following rules, taking medica-
tions, preparing meals and keeping house
are all adaptive behavior skills.
Developmental disability not
the same as mental illness
A developmental disability and mental
illness are not the same condition, al-
though they can occur in the same person.
Unlike mental illness, a developmental
disability is always associated with lim-
ited intellectual capacity, occurs before
age 18 and is a permanent condition. In
contrast, mental illness is not associated
with a particular level of intelligence, may
occur in a person at any age and is often
temporary and treatable. Like all other
persons, individuals with developmental
disabilities can become mentally ill and
can be treated for their mental illness.
Causes of developmental
disabilities
A developmental disability crosses all
racial, social and economic lines and can
occur in any family Several hundred


IES


causes have been discovered, but in 75
percent of the cases the cause remains un-
known. Some known causes include: ge-
netic conditions, use of alcohol or drugs by
the pregnant mother, complications at
birth, childhood diseases (chicken pox,
measles, HIV), environmental health haz-
ards and serious injury to the brain.
Helping people with
developmental disabilities
Helping people with disabilities live
successful lives in our community is what
National Developmental Disability Aware-
ness Month is all about But, how do we do
that? We do it by giving people with devel-
opmental disabilities the opportunity to be
our neighbors, co-workers and friends.
People with developmental disabilities
have hopes, dreams and desires just like
us. They also experience common emo-
tions such as sadness, anger, boredom and
interest. They can learn, adjust socially
and benefit from appropriate education,
training, personal care and opportunities
to work. It is important they be given the
opportunity to make choices about em-
ployment, lifestyle and housing.
The Key Training Center, a nonprofit or-
ganization providing year-round educa-
tional, vocational, recreational and
residential services to adults with develop-
mental disabilities, invites you to dedicate
this month to seeing everyone in your life,
especially persons with a developmental
disability, as people first and foremost.
To learn more about the broad scope of
services and the amazing things happening
in our community for persons with develop-
mental disabilities, consider scheduling a
tour of the Key Training Center by calling
352-795-5541 ext 313. On such a visit, one will
quickly see people with developmental dis-
abilities are people first, and they have the
same desires and needs as anyone. They are
individuals with abilities. As friendships de-
velop, gaps or differences disappear reveal-
ing mutual commonalities which support
the fact that people with developmental dis-
abilities are more like us than different

Melissa Walker is the assistant executive
director of the Key Training Center.


Using military to bring peace into Third World


MICHAEL FRANCIS
Special to the Chronicle
When author Fred Kaplan
started writing "The In-
surgents," he intended
to explain how a relatively small
group of military men and civil-
ians managed to get the army to
adopt a new strategy counter-
insurgency (COIN) suitable for
today's challenges abroad. But
now the leading proponent of
that strategy, David Petraeus, be-
came director of the Central In-
telligence Agency and then
suddenly fell into disgrace as a


BOOK REVIEW
* AUTHOR: Fred Kaplan.
* TITLE: "The Insurgents: David Petraeus and The Plot to Change the
American Way of War."
* PUBLISHER: Simon and Schuster, New York.
* NUMBER OF PAGES: 419.
* COST: $28.


result of an affair with a female
author who was writing a book
about him.
As Kaplan explains in his in-
troduction, since World War I,
U.S. military strategy assumed


war would be powerful, high-tech
armies facing each other in gi-
gantic tank battles on the plains
of eastern Europe between
NATO and the Warsaw Pact. But
after our strategy in Vietnam


proved inadequate against a low-
tech army, a group of U.S. mili-
tary thinkers began looking at
"small wars" such as fought by
European forces against colonial
uprisings. Even the United States
had gotten involved in places
such as El Salvador, Grenada, the
Philippines, Vietnam and else-
where. These were frustrating
conflicts against effective but
poorly armed enemies by Ameri-
can standards; thus a strategy for
these counter insurgencies
seemed necessary


.Page C3


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


A tale


of two


cities
wenty-five years
ago, downtown In-
verness was pretty
much in a shambles.
Many of the old store-
fronts were closed and
the downtown area was
considered dead.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
wanted to four-lane U.S.
41 right through the mid-
dle of town and wipe out
the personality of the
county seat
The FDOT effort
helped jolt business and
government leaders
back into action. FDOT
was convinced to run
Main Street on the west
side of the downtown
area. Citizens got behind
an effort to renovate the
aging old courthouse.
Slowly, a rebirth began.
Inverness City Man-
ager Frank DiGiovanni
took the lead of the mu-
nicipality and kept push-
ing city, county and
business leaders to make
things happen in the
county seat. DiGiovanni
always talked about a big
vision. He saw big things
were possible for Inver-
ness and helped make
them happen.
There were brutal
battles along the way.
The county tried to
move the county seat to
Lecanto. The merchants
association battled
DiGiovanni over who
had the right to set the
rules for downtown. On
several occasions, Di-
Giovanni convinced the
city council to hire out-
side consultants to con-
struct a "vision" for what
Inverness could look
like. We saw big govern-
ment buildings, a thriv-
ing downtown and a
biking community with
lots of amenities.
Only about half of
what DiGiovanni saw in
these "visions" became
a reality. But the reality
is good.
Inverness certainly
has problems, just like
every other small town.
But today Inverness has
become a destination.
People come to eat,
work, bike and live in
Inverness.
And DiGiovanni's vi-
sion, with the assistance
of state grants and smart
public spending, is a
source of pride.
The city takes risks, as
was demonstrated re-
cently when the council
voted to purchase the di-
lapidated Valerie Movie
Theater and turn it into
some type of entertain-
ment gathering center.
The council did not have
a clear idea of where it
was going with the the-
ater, but when you have
vision, you have got to
have faith.
The city of Crystal
River, the county's only
other city, has struggled
for years to find a com-
mon vision. The key
problem was, for 15
years city government
was unstable. Every time
there was a problem, the
council voted to fire its
city manager- the head
of local government
Over a 10-year period,
I think the county fired
nine administrators. We
lost count after a while
and decided if you didn't
last six months as a city
See Page C3







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
M ike A rnold ....................... ................. editor
Charlie Brennan..................managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
mN w Mac Harris ................................ citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ....................... guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ...................... ........ copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


CROSSING BOUNDARIES




No soliciting



business as



elected leader


N ewly elected county Wesch
commissioner Scott tried t
Adams has been very ney fi
critical of his four fellow meeti]
members of the county board. gation
He has made allegations The
about corruption
and even sug-
gested a state at- THE ISSUE:
t o r n e y Soliciting
investigation business as a
might be appro- politician.
private.
Adams' allega- OUR OPINIOI
tions have always
been general and It is
vague. But now inappropriate.
it's the newly
elected commis-
sioner who finds himself on where
the front end of a specific gain. I
complaint that he used his Dama
powers in an inappropriate model
way to benefit a business he ing, p
owns. Commr
Commissioner Adams is tried
the co-owner of a Sumter suran
County landfill. His business agency:
partners are Sen. Charles diate
Dean (R-Inverness) and his Ada
son, Charles Dean Jr. Adams self tc
recently approached William he hol
Ray, the co-owner of ED.S. Whi
Disposal in Lecanto, and vious,
tried to convince him to move claimed
his business to the Sumter wrong
County landfill. ing 1
ED.S. is the largest cus- Adam
tomer at the Citrus County "Me
Landfill. If the company ness, D
moved its $1.2 million busi- uneth
ness, the Citrus County facil- tunity
ity would suffer greatly. perfect
The owner of the garbage The
hauling company said he felt sioner
he was being pressured to porati
move to the commissioner's haule
private business. The h
"This guy's out there trying story.
to sell his own business while him d
he's a commissioner," Ray he mo
told a Chronicle reporter. Sumte
Ray took his complaint to The
Citrus County Commission type
Chairman Joe Meek and said Adam:
he thought Adams' solicita- fellow
tion was unethical. Meek for- The co
warded the complaint to fresh
county attorney Richard Florid


Volunteers risk lives more w
even a
Back where I came from, in one you wh
town we had five high schools, but I g
four middle schools, 13 elemen-
tary schools, six school board
members no pay, 160
volunteer fire depart- p OUND
ment, 13 pieces of appa- ,
ratus, six ambulances, six
firehouses. Know what?
No pay. Police helicopter,
if you need to be flown to f
a hospital for an emer-
gency. Know what? All 1
free. CA
Time to cut bait 563-0579
I'm responding to the
Citrus County commissioners. I'd est, be'
just like to say instead of com- you're
plaining in the newspaper, cut raining
your budgets. Stop raising taxes. Rat i
Water shortage I'm
In my water bill, I got a sheet station
saying that Citrus County is cur- over he
rently under a Phase 1 water in Beve
shortage order established by quite a
Southwest Florida Water Manage- even ge
ment District. Isn't that just great? there. I
Let's have Citrus County give away do som


4. Coincidentally, Adams
to have the county attor-
ired during the same
ng when the abuse alle-
i was made public.
actions by the new
commissioner are
inappropriate
and cross the eth-
ical boundaries of
what we expect
from our elected
officials. No
N: elected official
should use his po-
sition of public
authority to steer
business to a pri-
vate enterprise
he will personally
f Commissioner Dennis
to tried to win a re-
1 job on a county build-
people would howl. If
iissioner Rebecca Bays
to move the county in-
ce policies to her
y, there would be imme-
criticism.
ms needs to hold him-
o the same standard as
lds others.
le the abuse seems ob-
the commissioner
ed he did nothing
g. When confronted dur-
ast week's meeting,
s said:
doing a truthful busi-
not asking for anything
ical, offering the oppor-
for someone to come is
ctly fine in this world."
next day the commis-
r said he meant his cor-
Jon reached out to the
r, not him personally.
auler tells a different
He said Adams called
directly and suggested
wve his business to the
er landfill.
grand irony here is this
of behavior is what
s has been accusing his
commissioners of doing.
)mmissioner needs a re-
er course from the
.a Ethics Commission.


rater so we can be under
worse shortage. Boy, I'll tell
at, they should do their job,
guess they're not.
Rainy day fund
Regarding the article
in the Friday paper
(March 1) about the
water and the weeds in
the Hernando and Inver-
ness pools. Seems like
you never have money.
Why don't you plan
ahead? It wasn't raining
when Noah built the ark.
You can save the money
if you don't need it one
year and let it earn inter-
cause sooner or later
going to need it. It wasn't
when Noah built the ark.
invasion on CR 491
calling about the rat infes-
out in this drainage bin
ere on (County Road) 491
erly Hills. There's been
few rats around. They're
getting into the sheds in
wish the county would
nething about it.


"All that we do is done with an eye to something else."
Aristotle, "Nicomachean Ethics" Fourth Century B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Child Pop-Tart terrorist


WASHINGTON
Rodney Francis is insuffi-
ciently ambitious. The
pastor of the Washington
Tabernacle Baptist
Church in St. Louis
has entered the fray
about guns, violence
and humanity's
fallen nature with a
plan for a "buyback"
of children's toy guns. /
And toy swords and
other make-believe
weapons.
There is, however, Georg
a loophole in the pas- OTI
tor's panacea. He
neglects the problem VO
of ominously nibbled
and menacingly brandished
breakfast pastries.
Joshua Welch a boy, would
not you know; no good can
come of these turbulent crea-
tures who is 7, was sus-
pended from second grade in
Maryland's Anne Arundel
County last week because of his
"Pop-Tart pistol." While eating
a rectangular fruit-filled sugary
something nutritionist
Michelle Obama probably dis-
approves of it, and don't let
Michael Bloomberg get started
-Joshua tried biting it into the
shape of a mountain, but de-
cided it looked more like a gun.
So with gender-specific perver-
sity he did the natural thing. He
said, "Bang, bang."
But is this really natural? Or
is nature taking a back seat to
nurture, yet again? Is Joshua's
"bang, bang" a manifestation of
some prompting in our defec-
tive social atmosphere, and
therefore something society
could and should stamp out?
While some might enjoy dog-
paddling around in this deep
philosophic water, Joshua's
school, taking its cue from Ham-
let, did not allow its resolve to
be "sicklied o'er with the pale
cast of thought." More eager to
act than to think, the school sus-
pended Joshua and sent a letter
to all the pupils' parents, urging
them to discuss the "incident"


- which the school includes in
the category "classroom disrup-
tions" with their children "in
a manner you deem most ap-


ge Will
'HER
ICES


propriate."
Ah, yes. The all-
purpose adjective
"appropriate." The
letter said "one of our
students used food to
make inappropriate
gestures" and al-
though "no physical
threats were made
and no one was
harmed" the code of
student conduct stip-
ulates "appropriate
consequences." The
letter, suffused with


the therapeutic ethic, suggested
parents help their children
"share their feelings" about all
this. It also said the school coun-
selor is available, presumably to
cope with Post-Pastry Trauma
Syndrome.
By now, Americans may be
numb to such imbecilities com-
mitted by the government insti-
tutions to which they entrust
their children for instruction.
Nothing surprises after that. A
5-year-old Pennsylvania girl
was labeled a "terroristic
threat," suspended from school
and ordered to undergo a psy-
chological evaluation because
she talked about shooting her-
self and others with her Hello
Kitty gun that shoots bubbles.
But looking on the bright side,
perhaps we should welcome
these multiplying episodes as tu-
torials about the nature of the
regulatory state that swaddles us
ever more snugly with its caring.
If so, give thanks for the four Min-
nesota state legislators whose bill
would ban "bullying" at school.
They define this as the use of
words, images or actions that
interfere with an individual's
ability "to participate in a safe
and supportive learning envi-
ronment." Bullying may in-
clude, among many other
things, conduct that has a
"detrimental effect" on a stu-
dent's "emotional health." Or


conduct that "creates or exac-
erbates a real or perceived im-
balance of power between
students." Or violates a stu-
dent's "reasonable expectation
of privacy." Or conduct that
"does not rise to the level of ha-
rassment" but "relates to" -
yes, relates to "the actual or
perceived race, ethnicity, color,
creed, religion, national origin,
immigration status, sex, age,
marital status, familial status,
socioeconomic status, physical
appearance, sexual orientation,
gender identity and expression,
academic status, disability, or
status with regard to public as-
sistance, age, or any additional
characteristic defined" in an-
other Minnesota statute.
If this becomes law, it will fur-
ther empower the kind of re-
lentless improvers and
mindless protectors who panic
over Pop-Tart pistols and dis-
cern terrorism in Hello Kitty
bubble guns. Such people in
Minnesota will decide what be-
havior speech, usually -
damages a "supportive learning
environment." They will sniff
out how students' speech or be-
havior have real or perceived
- by whom? effects on the
balance of "power" among stu-
dents. And school bureaucra-
cies will ponder whether what
Sally told Eleanor about Brad's
behavior with Pam after the
prom violated Brad's, or per-
haps Pam's, "reasonable expec-
tation of privacy"
Government is failing spec-
tacularly at its core functions,
such as budgeting and educat-
ing. Yet, it continues to multiply
its peripheral and esoteric re-
sponsibilities, tasks that re-
quire it to do things for which it
has no aptitude, such as think-
ing and making common-sense
judgments. Government nowa-
days is not just embarrassing, it
is let us not mince words -
inappropriate.

George Will's email address is
georgewill@washpost com.


ObaraDoA- Care


LETTER > to the Editor


Budget review
should be standard
I am not a Scott Adams sup-
porter, but in your editorial of
Sunday, March 3, you state
"County Administrator Brad
Thorpe has developed a plan
for systematically examining
where the county spends its
money" If he is just now or has
just recently decided to do
this, then I have to agree with
Scott Adams that he needs to
be fired. That should have
been standard fare forever, not
just recently
I doubt seriously the Chron-
icle will print this, as cover up
is your normal response. The
very least you can do is ex-
plain the statement made and
try to justify it or Brad
Thorpe.
Kerry Williams
Hernando
Editor's note: The statement


in the editorial refers to the
series of regular budget work-
shops Brad Thorpe set in an-
ticipation of the budget
shortfall. During the work-
shops, which began in Janu-
ary, staff breaks the budget
down into smaller pieces to
explain where all the money is
being spent. This activity is de-
signed to give commissioners a
complete picture of the budget
so they can best vote on what
has to be cut out of the budget
once the actual budget for
2013-14 is written and ap-
proved in July The reason it is
so important this year has to
do with the loss of $8 million
this year due to the Progress
Energy decision to challenge
its tax bill and the estimated
loss of another $14 million
next year due to the shutdown
of the nuclear plant and the
notice from Progress Energy it
will once again challenge its
tax bill.


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


OPINIONS INVITED
* The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the opin-
ions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
* Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
* Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
* All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters sent
via email. Names and home-
towns will be printed; phone
numbers will not be
published or given out.
* We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per month.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Doing what wisdom dictates on a trip


W ith the recent scarcely six months
eight-day- later, due to a colli-
debacle suf- sion with an under-
fered by a cruise ship the-surface crag near
and its passengers in Santorini, the Sea Di-
the Gulf of Mexico, it amond sank!
was demonstrated We had no notably
once more things dramatic events on
don't always go as our most recent trip,
planned, especially but things didn't go
when you are at the Fred Brannen exactly as planned,
mercy of ships and A SLICE either.
the sea. OF LIFE Soon after the ship
For Cheryl and me, passed through the
our closest brush with Panama Canal,
catastrophe occurred in 2006. Cheryl stubbed the toes on her
There were no problems when left foot That doesn't sound like
we took an Aegean cruise such a big deal, but the foot
aboard the Sea Diamond, but began to swell and turn all sorts


of interesting shades of blue,
purple and green. (Stop that! I
know what you're thinking! I
might have deserved it, but
there were no matching bruises
on my backside!)
She visited the ship's doctor,
X-rays were taken and the diag-
nosis was her foot was bruised.
There was soft tissue damage,
but no fracture. Nonetheless, the
doctor put her on "light duty" for
a few days. That meant one of
the things we had planned to do
should not be done.
The ship's itinerary after leav-
ing Panama was to continue
north along the Central Ameri-
can coast, then after two sea


days, we would make port at
Puntarenas in Costa Rica. My
sweetheart and I had planned
an all-day excursion there. We
were to begin with a train ride
into the jungle, go boating on
one of the rivers and hike
through the brush with a lengthy
motor coach ride before return-
ing some 10 hours later.
But based on the doctor's ad-
vice, we knew it was best not to
subject Cheryl to what would
have been a grueling day We
canceled our participation in
the tour.
Were we disappointed? Yes, of
course we were because we
wouldn't get to visit Costa Rica.


Did we consider ignoring the
doctor's advice? Yes, but only for
a moment. We knew we must put
aside this off-the-ship adventure.
Instead, we would suffer
through a delightful breakfast
via room service along with two
additional fabulous meals -
lunch and dinner in the main
dining room, as well as going to a
marvelous song and dance show
later that evening in the ship's
theater It was tough, but it was
what we knew wisdom dictated.


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


RAUER.
@OEO1Ws (W3


Book explores


Cracker culture


AO


Letters to THE EDITOR


Change tax refund rules
I was getting my taxes done the
other day, something most of us
don't enjoy A couple of ladies next
to me were mad because they
were only getting back $8,100 in a
refund and she had paid in $650 in
taxes. I'm sorry, but I just had to
say something which I won't re-
peat here.
Now, here's the problem as I see
it. If you don't pay it in, you can't
get it back. To my way of thinking
and many others, change the tax
law to "you can't get back anymore
than you paid in."
Like many people, I have
worked hard, saved and put money
back. However, I've never gotten
more back than I paid in. If we
stop this, we won't have a money
problem in this country for very
long. If I didn't pay it in, it doesn't
matter how many deductions you


WINDOW
Continued from Page C1

manager you couldn't
make the official list
While folks around the
county laughed, the city re-
ally suffered from a lack of
follow-through on creating
a vision plan and working
the plan. Those times have
now changed.
Andy Houston has been
the city manager for five
years and the council is
finding a balance.
Crystal River is in the
same position Inverness


have, you can't get anymore back
than you paid in. I'm retired and
pay taxes, social security and med-
ical out of my paycheck. I don't get
anything back and know many re-
tirees that have to pay each year.
Our Social Security doesn't in-
crease because we continue to
work. If we make too much, we
lost benefits and even the amount
we receive in benefits can be
taxed. So here I am paying my
taxes like many other retirees and
that money is going to someone
who doesn't pay in very much,
more than likely draws food
stamps and get housing
assistance.
Change the tax code so you can't
get back more than you pay in. A
very simple change. No big debate.
Just a few words.
Ray Speerly
Inverness


was 15 years ago. There
are vacant buildings and
too much retail space for
the size of the population.
The Crystal River Mall is
struggling and some of the
shopping centers on U.S.
19 are almost empty.
Terrific things are hap-
pening, too. The Citrus Av-
enue business community
is growing in fits and
starts. A half dozen really
good local restaurants are
within three blocks of each
other along Citrus Avenue
and King's Bay The city
led the purchase of Three
Sisters Springs, and a new
visitor center envisioned


Arming everybody
On Wednesday, Feb. 27, State
Rep. Greg Steube filed HB 1097,
which "would allow a school prin-
cipal to designate one or more
members of school personnel to
carry a concealed firearm or
weapon while performing his or
her official duties." http://myflorida
house.gov/Sections/Bills/billsdetail.
aspx?Billld50391
One wonders: Should the next
slaughter occur in a church or a su-
perstore or a ball game, etc., would-
n't we expect Rep. Steube to
propose amending HB 1097, to
allow the arming of clergy or bag-
gers or referees, etc?
Why wait for the inevitable, I say:
Let's get good list of the etcs. and
arm them all.
James McIntosh
Lecanto


for U.S. 19 could attract a
whole new crowd of
tourists. A great new park
was developed at Third
Street and plans are un-
derway to expand the pop-
ular swimming beach at
Hunter Springs. The
Riverwalk is planned
along King's Bay and the
city recently decided to
bring in a consultant to see
how all the assets can be
tied together.
Almost everyone is real-
izing some new develop-
ment concepts are needed
along King's Bay and Cit-
rus Avenue to make invest-
ment happen.


If Crystal River can
maintain its stability for
the foreseeable future,
the city and its residents
could pull together a 'vi-
sion' plan and then work
the vision. They, like In-
verness, might only
achieve 50 percent of
what is put down on
paper.
But that 50 percent
could be great.


Gerry Mulligan is the
publisher of the
Chronicle. Email him at
gmulligan@chronicle
online.com.


NTIM


BOOK REVIEW
TITLE: "Cracker, The
Cracker culture in
Florida history.
AUTHOR: Dana Ste.
Claire.
WHERE: Bookstore in-
side Historic Court-
house Museum in
Inverness.
HOURS: 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
CALL: 352-341-6427.
NOTE: If we do not
have it, we can order it
for you.

it in and pull out as
needed. Ugh.
Crackers had flash-
lights. They picked up a
dead cabbage palm frond
and lit it. This would go a
long way before burning
out. Then, they would just
pick up another one.
Store purchases were
limited to coffee, salt,
flour, shotgun shells,
whiskey and tobacco.
Cracker architecture:
Single pen cabin; double
pen, saddlebag style and
dog trot See pictures and
floor plans in the book.
Cracker food: corn-
pone is fried and corn
bread is baked.
If you want to eat rat-
tlesnake, go for one at
least 6 feet or longer as
they are very bony A fa-
vorite dish was pelau
(per-loo), which is made
by simmering chicken or
pork until meat falls off
bone; then add enough
rice to feed the group.
A Cracker philoso-
phy: Don't want to move
to town. Rich are too
crooked and poor are too
mean.
Ironically modern: In
the late 19th century,
Kissimmee had America's
first drive-through saloon.
Cowhunters could buy a
drink and not dismount
The book also includes
a list of historic Cracker
sites in Florida with a lo-
cater map for ease in
finding one near you.
These are just some
highlights of the delights
found in the volume
telling of life lived by our
early, hardy settlers.
Many pictures and details
abound in this book.
Read it and enjoy


MILITARY
Continued from Page C1

This book chronicles how a
group of military and civilian
thinkers started a revolution in
military strategy and prepara-
tion for counter-insurgency con-
flicts. They spent months going
through the historical records
and commentaries of these
smaller wars, including the
struggles for independence by
French and English colonies.
Leading the way in developing
COIN was General Petraeus,
who was first in his class at West
Point and recognized in the mil-
itary community as a rising star.
He was made director of the
Army's National War College
(Leavenworth, Kan.) at a time
when the Army's field manual
was set to be updated and re-
vised. Petraeus brought impor-
tant figures who had written on
counter-insurgency many of
whom he had met over the years.
Much of the book describes their
agreements and disputes. It
makes for surprisingly interest-
ing reading.


The first real challenge COIN
faced was the failure of the mil-
itary to bring order to Iraq after
Saddam Hussein's regime top-
pled. Secretary of Defense Don-
ald Rumsfeld had anticipated
the U.S. forces would unseat
Saddam and then quickly turn
Iraq over to whatever govern-
ment was established. But he,
and many of his advisers, failed
to anticipate the problems of
governance and the country fell
into what was for all practical
purposes a chaotic three-sided
civil war between the Shiites,
Kurds and Sunnis. Rumsfeld's
easy military victory rapidly
turned into a staggeringly ex-
pensive occupation.
At this point, three-quarters of
the way into the volume, the
reader senses a triumph for the
new strategy. However, COIN
theory met reality in Iraq.
Some military leaders stuck to
the idea that the U.S. should
simply shoot or imprison the bad
guys. They had no idea of how to
deal with the three quarreling
groups in the country who had
military clashes for more than a
century The Shiites won the
elections but proved to be more


interested in punishing the Sun-
nis and Kurds than trying to
build a stable society.
The tradition in Iraq was what-
ever group had control would
ruthlessly suppress its opponents.
The Shiite government saw the
Kurds and Sunnis as the enemy
rather than fellow citizens.
Some of the U.S. military com-
manders understood the new
doctrine and during the "surge"
coaxed the Sunni leaders into
conflict with the Islamic extrem-
ists such as al Qaeda in Iraq and
not with the Shiites. But the im-
provements under the COIN
doctrine eventually dissolved as
Prime Minister Nouri Kamal al-
Maliki, a Shiite, returned to the
old policy of openly favoring his
followers and repressing his
opponents.
In Afghanistan, there was
some initial hope counter-insur-
gency could work. General Stan-
ley McChrystal of the notorious
Rolling Stone interview was an
advocate of COIN and had a long
friendship with Petraeus. But
after some initial successes,
Afghanistan began to fall apart.
COIN theory was rooted in the
assumption the central govern-


ment had control of the entire
country and the leader had an
interest in getting the various
ethnic groups to cooperate. Alas,
the Afghanistan government had
never had much control outside
of Kabul.
Hamid Karzai seemed only
concerned with protecting his
small group who were profiting
from foreign financial assis-
tance, which was being siphoned
off into the pockets of those
around Karzai. The U.S. Ambas-
sador in Kabul, Karl Eikenberry,
deeply distrusted President
Karzai and continually pushed
the portrait of Karzai as corrupt
and lacking much influence out-
side the capital.
The COIN policy simply didn't
fit the Afghanistan situation.
That was, in part, why Obama
was so ready to remove the
American military presence.
So, what we have in this illu-
minating volume is the story of a
bureaucratic struggle to adopt a
sophisticated counter-insur-
gency strategy because our pre-
vious military efforts in
less-developed countries were
inadequate. Although the reader
becomes sympathetic toward


the counter-insurgency advo-
cates, Kaplan does not step away
from the fact that a strategy
needing a strong indigenous
leadership with control of the
country's territory simply wasn't
there in many circumstances.
COIN is built on interesting
ideas but under the test of the real
world, it has so far been a disap-
pointing solution to an important
problem. This all strikes me as a
warning to Washington leader-
ship that using military force to
bring peace in Third World coun-
tries is more difficult- if not im-
possible and usually more
expensive than we anticipate.


Michael Francis is a Sugarmill
Woods resident who taught in-
ternational politics and U.S.
foreign policy at the University
of Notre Dame for 39 years
prior to retiring. He served as a
chairman of the Department of
Government and International
Studies for six years, was direc-
tor ofNotre Dame's 20 different
foreign studies programs for
five years, and held various
other teaching and administra-
tion positions at the university


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 C3


Special to the Chronicle

The Crackers were
Florida's Plain Folks:
self-reliant, self-sufficient,
honest, practiced a sim-
ple direct approach to
people and problems, in-
dividualism, disdain for
authority, great strength
necessary for living in
isolation.
Crackers are an actual
cultural group who mi-
grated to our state start-
ing in 1821. Crackers
were drawn to Florida by
fertile public land where
wild hogs, cattle and great
fishing could be found in
abundance. They were
primarily of Scottish-
Irish descent.
Many choices for the
origin of the term Cracker
are: cracking whip (lariat
could not be used effec-
tively in dense Florida
scrub); sound of cracking
corn (their main food sta-
ple); hard tack (hard bis-
cuits) used by the settlers;
cracker-box houses. In
addition, dating from the
early 16th Century Eng-
land, Cracker meant
braggart or fast talker.
Take your pick.
In reality, Crackers
were a proud and capable
group of settlers who
tamed our wild but beau-
tiful land. They prevailed
against tropical diseases,
hurricanes, rattlers, cot-
tonmouth, gators, pan-
thers, mosquitoes that
blackened the land -
some described black
clouds of them.
Independence and
freedom of will were im-
portant to Crackers, ma-
terial possessions, not so
much. Everything was
made by hand, at home.
No retail therapy here.
An 1895 photo shows a
Cracker covered wagon: a
wooden-staved water
bucket; stoneware jar;
graniteware pan;
kerosene lantern; shot-
gun; wooden washtub;
chest of cloths. All of their
main possessions. They
truly lived a "make-do"
existence.
Crackers made soap
from lye, brooms from
sage straw, dishes from
wood, dresses from cotton
sacks, cut buttons from
gourds and wove hats
from palmetto. Meat was
preserved in a brine bar-
rel, clean the critter, toss





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Hot Corner: SCOTT ADAMS


Conflict of interest
Just an FYI to all the Scott Adams
supporters: Neither the good-ol'-
boy system nor the Democrats vs.
the Republicans is the problem in
Citrus County. The old adage, "A lit-
tle knowledge is a dangerous thing,"
truly applies in this situation. The
grandstand to take a $5,000 cut in
pay was overshadowed by Mr.
Adams, who, in the next breath,
said there is nothing wrong in tak-
ing $1.2 million in revenue from Cit-
rus County to a private enterprise in
which he just happens to be a part-
ner. I don't know anyone who would-
n't be happy to take a minimal pay
cut and gain that much in revenue.
What happened to conflict of
interest?
Stop neglecting us
Good news is we now finally have
a commissioner, Scott Adams,
(who) is for the people, not bought
and paid for by special interests,
builders and developers. Yes, Com-
missioner Bays, you have hit the
nail on the head. For quite some
time now, the board has not looked
like serious professionals and not
listened to the people who elected
you. You all have feathered your own
nests and those of special interests,
neglecting the needs of our county.
Listen to us, Mr. Adams and his
supporters, and stop the 4-1 vote
against him at every turn. Scott,
keep up the good work. The citizens
of the county are for you.
Tired of same way
Don't worry, Scott Adams. There
are more elections coming and the
silent majority will get you some
help. We're tired of business the
same old way.
Try diplomacy
Scott Adams has some good
ideas and some valid questions. He
just needs to learn a little diplo-


macy in how to get into these
things.
Volunteer
We need more people like Scott
Adams. Citrus County, for way too
many years, has lived with a chain
conspiracy. It's time to change it.
We need our commissioners to be
volunteers (who) don't need to be
paid and we need to listen to peo-
ple, with experience like Scott
Adams.
Picking sides
When it comes to Scott Adams, it
would appear the Chronicle sides
with the board. And as we seem to
be finding out, the board has prob-
lems. Scott Adams is a breath of
fresh air.
Looking for open answers
On Monday, March 4, a caller
called in about Scott Adams should
present some of his ideas on how
to cut the budget. He did do that at
the last meeting. I think he pre-
sented 10 or 12 different areas
where monies could be cut and no-
body was interested. Secondly, I
don't think a lot of people realize
the Board of County Commission-
ers cannot discuss things in private
because of the Sunshine Laws. Any-
thing that is a possibility they might
vote on or talk about or come off at
a future meeting cannot be dis-
cussed in private. It must only be
discussed in public. The Sunshine
Laws are really specific to that. So a
lot of things that come up at the
meetings have to come up there be-
cause they can't come up in a office
discussion among the five county
commissioners. It violates the Sun-
shine Laws. So keep that in mind
when you're critical of what they're
doing, because a lot of things can't
be done any other way but that.
And Scott Adams is asking ques-
tions every taxpayer should be
wanting an answer to because we


don't get them and haven't gotten
them for several years.
Fight the port
I think Scott Adams is doing an
excellent job. It makes the other
county commissioners sit up and
pay attention. This county needs
some tax reductions and the county
commissioners (who) are in there,
all they want to do is spend our
money. And I think Scott should
fight the port from being built.
They've gotten to waste the taxpay-
ers' money and it's time we stop
them.
Investigate use of time
I think I have a simple solution for
the county commissioners. The first
impression I got after attending the
Citrus County Citizens Academy
was we are definitely overstaffed at
that headquarters level in the
county, exactly like our new com-
missioner, Adams, has said. He and
I would agree 100 percent on
staffing overhead, big money. If you
can admit to the fact that we've got
a county administrator (who) needs
two assistants ... in the meantime, I
would suggest maybe some of
those commissioners should spend
a day or two following one of these
senior office positions around and
see how much work and time and
everything is being wasted. I think
it's terrible.
Keep it in the public
Well, I read in the paper this
morning, "Please keep it behind
closed doors." That's what they've
been doing all this time. They kept
the taxpayers from knowing what's
going on. Are people crazy? Who-
ever called that (Sound Off titled
"Squabble elsewhere") in sure is. I
think the taxpayer has a right to
know what's going on. Hooray for
Scott Adams. We need more like
him. Boy, this "behind closed
doors" is crazy.


Setting bad
example
For months, as we've
read of the hospital and
BOCC battles, I've wanted
to tell those in conflict to
"grow up."
We are bombarded with
almost daily headlines
that "air the dirty linen" of
the BOCC. People, there
are ways to accomplish
goals without constant ha-
ranguing
It would seem the art of
compromise is a thing of
the past I fear it's a ram-
pant virus for which no
cure has been found. Peo-
ple in places of leadership
seem to be particularly
vulnerable to this disease.
It's evident in our nation's
government and has some-
how infected state and
local government as well.
Lo and behold, we even
find it occasionally in
some of our churches.
I, for one, am saddened
by the lack of respect that
seems to underlie all of
these situations.
I can only imagine the
effect these reports must
have on people who are
considering Citrus County
as a place to call home.


We're trying to improve
our economic future not
scare potential residents
and businesses away Of
more concern, has anyone
stopped to think for even a
minute about the example
the leaders of our county
and Citrus Memorial are
setting for the young peo-
ple in Citrus County?
We tried to teach our
own children to play
nicely with each other in
the sandbox, to be polite,
to respect their elders and
each other, to try to work
out their differences with-
out saying mean things to
one another, and most of
all to take time to listen to
other opinions.
I don't pretend to have
answers to the problems
before us. I don't even fully
understand what many of
the conflicts are really
about or if the issues are
truly valid. I'm simply ask-
ing those involved take the
time to listen to each other
- really listen with re-
spect and open minds, and
hearts that are open to
recognize an agenda other
than their own.
Barbara Dee Cawley
Beverly Hills


.3


Thursday


,4 5 ifer


15/6


11 g 12.
No IL'


' S.. r 26

31 Y L


Inverness
// Elks Lodge #2522




CRAFT SHOW






W4wwk23

9:00 m* 3:00 pui



3580 Lemon St., Hernando


The American Irish Club
Droeiee


What a perfect way to start your
St. Patricks Day Celebration!
March 17th at the Curtis Peterson Auditorium.


The show starts at 2 p.m.
Doors open at 1:30 p.m.

COMM4


Fort Cooper Days

Sat., March 16 & Sun., March 17
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fort Cooper State Park
3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness
Experience Florida History
Adults thru 13 yrs. old $6 12 Yrs. & Under Free


Come and Enjoy
* Second Seminole War &
Reenactments at 11a.m. & 2p.m.
* Period Arts & Crafts
* Great Food and Refreshments
* Living History Demonstrations
* Exhibits/Demonstrations

(n1 II()KIlE
For more information,
call 726-0315


Mardi Gras

Homo1asa Sta

Saturday, March Zoi
A S2 Donadion


Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs Ci PkONILE







Vendors please call Marybeth Nayfield at 352-795-7297.
| If you'd like to participate in the parade E-mail
5 Gregg Mackler at Gregg@homosassaprinting.com.
To volunteer please call Tom Feeney at 352-201-2520.

Come Pinch A Little Tail
www.shrimpapalooza.com


March 10th 2 p.m.
Salute to the Community
Call 727-595-1700 for more information.

March 12th 11 a.m.
Spring Fling Card Party
Call 352-382-751 for more information.

March 14th 6:15 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Concert at the Old Courthouse
featuring Brendan Nolan
Call 726-9814 for more information.


March 15th 5 p.m.- 8 p.m.
March 16th 8 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Books and Bling Sale
Call 726-3671 more information.


March 15th 17th
51st Annual St. Pat's
Championship Golf Tournament
Call 352-726-2583 or 352-586-6510 for more information.

March 16th & 17th
Inverness St. Patrick's Day Celebration
3/16 Shamrock Scamper 5Kat Citrus High School
Eggs & Kegs at Dillon's
St, Patrick's Day Farmers Market
3/17 St. Paddy events at Dillon;s
St. Patrick's Day Parade including Mutt Strut


March 16th 9a.m.-2 p.m.
Fort Cooper Days
Call 726-0315 for more information.


March 16th Registration 8 a.m. Awards 2 p.m.
4th Annual All MOPAR Car Show
Call Ken at 341-1165 or
Mike at 341-1019
for more information.

March 16th 12 p.m.
Stepping Out inStyle
2013 Fashion Show
Call 352-634-4203 for more information.

March 16th 11 a.m.
1st Annual Fish Fry Fundraiser
Call 352-794-3142 for more information.

March 16th 4 p.m 6 p.m.
Country in the Park
Call 422-6700 or 601-3506 for more information.


Letter to THE EDITOR


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For more infromation
Call 860-2598


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C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


COMMENTARY


.


00










BUSINESS


Workforce
Connection
PAGE D2


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


THE


RICE


r

p


L L


1-


L


Special to the Chronicle


Does workplace wellness save companies money?


Associated Press
WASHINGTON Your
bosses want you to eat your
broccoli, hit the treadmill and
pledge you will never puff on a
cigarette. But a new study
raises doubts that workplace
wellness programs save the
company money
In what's being called the
most rigorous look yet inside
the wellness trend, independ-
ent researchers tracked the
program at a major St. Louis
hospital system for two years.
Hospitalizations for employ-
ees and family members
dropped dramatically, by 41
percent overall for six major
conditions. But increased out-
patient costs erased those
savings.
The study in Monday's issue
of the journal Health Affairs
has implications for a debate
taking place at companies
around the country: how much
pressure can you put on work-
ers to quit smoking, lose
weight, and get exercise before
it turns into unwelcome med-
dling, or worse, a slippery
slope toward a new kind of
health discrimination?
Wellness programs started
out offering gym memberships
and modest cash rewards for
participating in a health as-
sessment focused on changing
bad habits. But employers
have been upping the ante,
linking the programs to insur-
ance discounts or penalties
that can add up to hundreds of
dollars.
Most major companies now


When you make an investment in
wellness and prevention, you
shouldn't expect an immediate
return.
Steven Lipstein
present of BJC HealthCare, a hospital system.


have wellness programs, and
smaller firms are signing up.
President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul law al-
lows employers to expand re-
wards and penalties, provided
workers are also given a path
to address lifestyle issues that
could undermine their health.
"The immediate payback in
terms of cost is probably not
going to be there," said econo-
mist Gautam Gowrisankaran
of the University of Arizona at
Tucson, lead author of the
study
But he noted there could be
other benefits not directly
measured in the study, such as
reduced absenteeism and
higher productivity.
And there's also a risk.
"It's definitely true that
there is a downside,"
Gowrisankaran said. "You are
going to be charging people
different rates based on their
wellness behavior, and that
could limit their ability to buy
health insurance."
Obama's law forbids insur-
ers from charging more if you
get sick. But wellness incen-
tives could mean you'd be pe-
nalized for the questionable


choices that might get you sick.
Some previous studies have
shown savings from wellness
programs, while others found
little change or even higher
spending.
Steven Noeldner, an expert
with the Mercer benefits con-
sulting firm, said well-
designed programs generally
show a positive return of
2 percent by the third year
Gary Claxton of the Kaiser
Family Foundation, which pro-
duces a widely-cited annual
survey of workplace health
plans, said the financial im-
pact is difficult to measure.
'"A lot of employers think it's
the right thing to do and
they're not so much interested
in measuring," Claxton said.
The new study provides an
in-depth look at the experi-
ence of BJC HealthCare, a hos-
pital system that in 2005
started a comprehensive pro-
gram linked to insurance dis-
counts. BJC employs 28,000
people and provides health in-
surance for 40,000, including
family members. The over-
whelming majority partici-
pated in the wellness program.
The program focused on six


lifestyle-influenced condi-
tions: high blood pressure, di-
abetes, heart disease, chronic
lung problems, serious respi-
ratory infections and stroke.
Employees had to join the pro-
gram to get the hospital's most
generous level of health insur-
ance, called the Gold Plan. For
family coverage, for example,
the hospital paid nearly $1,650
more of costs in the Gold Plan.
Employees in the wellness
program had to complete a
health risk assessment that in-
cluded height, weight, blood
pressure, cholesterol, blood
sugar and other measure-
ments. They also signed a
pledge to maintain a healthy
diet and exercise regularly.
Smokers had to get help to
quit. Spouses were also re-
quired to sign the health
pledge and, if they smoked, get
help.
The study tallied up BJC's
medical costs before the well-
ness program and for two
years after It also compared
those costs with expenses of
two other big local employers
that did not have wellness pro-
grams. That was done to con-
trol for the possible impact of
new drugs or medical
innovations.
The results were counter-in-
tuitive: A surprisingly large
drop in hospitalizations for the
six conditions targeted by the
wellness program, but in-
creased costs for medications
and outpatient visits. When
those were added to the cost of
See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


THI


F


Costs


money


to


satisfy


needs
Dear Bruce: I am
66, single and re-
tired with a
$2,000-a-month pension.
I am not Social Security
qualified, and I am cov-
ered by Medicare Parts
A and B, as well as
health insurance. I have
about $300,000 invested
(age/risk appropriate),
and other than a little
arthritis, I'm healthy
I own my home out-
right, with about $2,000
in taxes. The home is
valued anywhere from
$150,000 to $190,000 in
this small town. I have
no debt of any kind and
live well within my
means. My car is a 2012
model, and I owe noth-
ing on it. I covered my
final expenses years ago
and carry a small life in-
surance policy fully paid
up through my federal
employment. I think I
have my bases covered.
My lovely 1950s home
has three bedrooms
and a fairly large yard.
It's in a good neighbor-
hood. I want a smaller,
single-level home with
a garage, preferably not
a condo. A newer,
smaller house would
cost more than my cur-
rent house; even
though some of the up-
keep would be less,
taxes and insurance
would be the same. I do
not want to enter into a
mortgage situation at
my age and income.
Is there something
you can tell me I can't
see? It basically comes
down to quality of life. I
am not ready to rent or
move to the senior facil-
ity yet, but I see the ben-
efit of making a move
before one has to.
I really have no one to
bounce this off of, so I
hope you can give me
some ideas. My three
children all live three to
four hours away, and
there is really not even a
reason to stay in this
town. I do not desire to
live in real close prox-
imity to my children. -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: It seems
to me you have the
world by the tail. You
have adequate income
and no debts. The only
See Page D4


I IN SI DE I I.I=





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Effects of sequestration on Workforce Connection


In recent days, we
have been asked
to detail exactly
how big a bite the se-
questration might take
out of local services
available for job seek-
ers and employers. /
The short and honest f .
answer is, at this point,
we do not know when, Laura
where or if the se- WORK
quester axe will fall or CONNI
how much it will lop
off.
Here's what we do know.
Workforce Connection is part
of Florida's network of 24 re-
gional workforce boards. Total
money amount from all federal
funding streams for workforce
services amounts to $324,900,122
for this fiscal year, which ends
June 30.
Without delving too deep into
the weeds or getting all wonky,
this reflects workforce system
funding from multiple programs
for employment and training
services delivered to Florida em-
ployers, workers and job seekers.
Those programs include the
Workforce Investment Act, Tem-
porary Assistance for Needy Fam-
ilies, Wagner-Peyser, Veterans and
Supplemental Nutrition Assis-
tance Program. Re-employment


Byrnes
FORCE
SECTION


Assistance, more uni-
versally known as Un-
emplo y ment
Compensation, is also
included in the tally,
but administration and
oversight of the pro-
gram is handled by the
Florida Department of
Economic Opportu-
nity, not Workforce
Connection or any of
the other regional
workforce boards.


Earlier this week, in
this paper, you read "Florida will
lose about $2.3 million in funding
for job search assistance, referral
and placement, meaning around
78,960 fewer people will get the
help and skills they need to find
employment."
That is the direct quote from a
fact sheet released by the White
House which enumerated other
potential funding hits to the state.
While we are concerned about
potential cuts to funding fund-
ing which provides services that
contribute to the economic vital-
ity of our community it is prob-
ably premature to declare the sky
is falling.
More important, if you are af-
fected by the sequestration,
please know Workforce Connec-
tion stands ready to assist you.


Services provided at no charge
throughout the three-county re-
gion of Citrus, Levy and Marion
counties, include:
Presentations to affected
workers explaining workforce
services.
Assistance to displaced
workers in filing Re-employment
Assistance Claims (Unemploy-
ment Compensation).
Direct job referral and place-
ment services.
Job Fairs and other special
employment events.
Access to mobile One-Stop
Career Centers.
Referral to community agen-
cies for supportive services.
Information on training op-
portunities for new positions or
careers.
These year-round services ben-
efit employers and affected work-
ers and will continue. For
example, on March 27 we are
holding a job fair in partnership
with the College of Central
Florida at CF's Learning and
Conference Center in Lecanto.
Fbr employers, the job fair is an
efficient, effective way to meet
and conduct an initial screening
of job applicants, share informa-
tion about their company and
open positions, and schedule in-
terviews. It is no cost to them.


And, as always, employers re-
ceive Workforce Connection's lo-
gistical and staff support
For job seekers, the merits of
having a diverse group of local
employers in one place at one
time are obvious.
With today's electronic appli-
cation process, how many times
have you felt you have been elim-
inated without being given a
chance because your application
is prescreened? How many times
have you said, "If only I could get
an interview, if they could get to
know me, I know I can land the
job?"
Well, here's your chance to
meet with actual hiring man-
agers, make the kind of impres-
sion that could get the
all-important foot in the door
Toward that end, we can help
you get ready for the job fair or in-
terview, too. This month, we are
offering more than 70 workshops
throughout the region, with many
in Inverness, Beverly Hills, Crys-
tal River, Homosassa and
Lecanto. The workshops range
from computer basics and open
resume labs to two- and three-day
sessions designed to help job
seekers stand out from the crowd.
In addition, our trained place-
ment specialists can offer one-on-
one consultations, and suggest


ways to polish resumes and prep
for interviews as well as suggest
skills and aptitude assessments to
guide you to training programs,
internships, on-the-job training
or job referrals. Of course, you
will be plugged into the power of
the Employ Florida Marketplace,
a one-stop online resource for job
listings, education and training
opportunities, career building as-
sistance and more. EFM is used
by Workforce Connection to con-
nect you to employers in our own
region as well as statewide.
To recap, no one is happy about
the sequestration, but right now
we have to wait and see how per-
vasive and deep the cuts go. In
the meantime, it is business as
usual for Workforce Connection,
and that business is helping em-
ployers find, train and retain top
talent and helping job seekers en-
hance their employability skills
and connecting them with em-
ployers.

Laura Byrnes, APR is a Certified
Workforce Professional and
communications manager at
Workforce Connection. Please
contact her at (352) 291-9559 or
(800) 434-5627, ext 1234 or
lbyrnes@workforceconnectionfl.
com.


WILLIAMS,
McCRANIE,
a WARDLOW
K 4& CASH, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBstC ACCOUNTANTS

2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS to serve you!
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795-3212


Inverness
726-8130


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Accounting & Income Tax Returns
Fixed & Equity Indexed Annuities
(352) 344-2888 (352) 344-2599
(352) 344-2480 Fax (352) 637-5500

400 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL. 34450
43 Years in Business 31 Years in Inverness



PRICE & COMPANY, P.A.
Certified Public Accountants
795-6118
Serving Citrus County for over 30 years

Charles E. Price, EA

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Corporate Tax Preparation
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D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


BUSINESS











D3


U CO CITRUS COUNTY

n..A* .Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


What a weekend!


YOU CAUGHT
MY EYE ...
Kaylee Renfro
West Coa-st E.'\e
Institute. Leeninto
... FOR OUTSTANDING
CUSTOMER SERVICE!


Citrus County
Cruisin'





March 16 DRAGON
BOAT RACES in Old Ho-
mosassa. This may be
the most fun festival on
the circuit. It's the kick-
off for the busy summer
season of racing in the
U.S. Only 12 teams will
be allowed to enter, as
we want to keep it a fun,
fast-moving event. Each
team can compete in
the 300-meter sprints,
the long 3,000 meters
and our infamous barrel
race. To register, visit
www. riversidereso rts.
com/Homosassa-Dragon-
Boat-Festival.html

March 16 and 17 -
FORT COOPER DAYS
Second Seminole War
re-enactment held twice
daily at 11 a.m. and 2
p.m., depicting events
that took place during
the construction of the
fort. Period military and
Seminole camps open
for visitors to explore.
Living history demon-
strations held through-
out the day. Event-
related arts and crafts,
exhibits, entertainment
and great food and re-
freshments. Admission
$6; children 12 and
younger free.

March 17 -
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
Crystal River:
10 a.m. parade. Dress
yourself and your dog
in your best Irish garb
and meet at Burkes of
Ireland fora stroll to the
park and back. Dogs
must be leashed at all
times. Call 352-795-0956.
Inverness: 5:30 p.m.
parade. A short parade
route creates lots of en-
ergy at the annual St.
Patrick's Day parade in
Inverness. For information,
email SunnyatEvents@
Inverness-FL.gov or
call 352-726-2611.

March 23- SHRIMPA-
PALOOZA begins with
an amazing Mardi Gras
parade in the morning,
followed by the Shrim-
papalooza festival held
behind the Homosassa
Civic Association on Yulee
Drive. Enjoy live music,
tons of great seafood
mixed with more than
100 vendors and a kid's
zone. For more informa-
tion, call 352-634-0918.

March 25 to 30 THE
CITRUS COUNTY FAIR
at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds, 3600 S.
Florida Ave. Rides, ex-
hibits, animals, food and
fun! For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-2993.

March 30 -
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
SPRING EASTER EGG
HUNT. Photos with Easter
Bunny, other costumed
characters also available.
8 a.m. For information,
call 352-628-5343.
March 30 UNDER-
WATER EGG HUNT at
Bicentennial Park pool
in Crystal River. Noon
to 3 pm. For informa-
tion, call Citrus County
Parks and Rec at 352-
527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountypa rks.com.


Now that we have all
had a few days to
rest up from the
weekend's activities, I just
wanted say: What a great
weekend we had in Floral
City!
Thanks to all of our hard-
working volunteers from the
Floral City Merchants Asso-
ciation, the Friends of the
Floral City Library, the Flo-
ral City Garden Club, the Cit-
rus County Agricultural
Alliance and Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce. I
think we put on a great show
for all of our visitors this
weekend.
The Berries, Brew and BBQ
kickoff partywas a great suc-


cess. Bill "The Sauce Boss"
Wharton put on a great show.
Leon and the guys at the Ag
Alliance cooked up some
killer food for the event too!
Many thanks to all the vol-
unteers who helped set up,
assisted during the event and
stayed to help clean up. Thanks
especially to Dave and Terri
Hartman for providing the
tents, chairs, sound and
lights for the performance.
The FCMA "Hospitality
Tent" we set up at the Straw-
berry Festival was a big hit.
Thanks to all the folks who
volunteered their time to
chat with the guests about
Floral City and keep the ta-
bles neat and clean. Thanks


to the Garden Club for the
charming decorations on the
tables and once again, thanks
to Dave and Terri for provid-
ing the tent and chairs.


I saw a lot of nice interaction
between our guests and our
volunteers at the hospitality
tent. I think we all showed a
lot of genuine enthusiasm


Welcome Soquili Stables at Faith


Haven Christian Retreat Center


Chamber ambassadors joined with Soquili Stable staff to mark the official Chamber membership. From left
are: Diane Baggerly, owner; Merlyn Lewis, trainer and instructor; Josh Wooten, president/CEO of the
Chamber of Commerce; Tom Corcoran, LifeCare Center of Citrus County; Nancy Hautop, Cadence Bank;
Janet Mayo; Bill Hudson, Land Title of Citrus County; Scott Baggerly, owner; Nicholle Fernandez, The Villages
of Citrus Hills; George Bendtsen, Insurance by George; Sarah Fitts, First International Title; Rhonda Lestinsky,
Nature Coast Bank; and Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control. Also joining in the celebration was, fifth from
right, MarkMusto, vice president and director of sales of Sibex, Inc.


New Chamber member Soquili Sta-
bles features horseback riding and
riding lessons. Also available are
buggy rides with miniature horses on its 60
acres of wooded trails. Additionally, the
stable offers Camp Soquili, a weeklong day
camp that runs from June 3 through Aug.
2. Each week will provide a new adventure
that will encompass horsemanship and rid-
ing in addition to activities such as crafts
and swimming. Camp runs 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday and is designed for


students who will be entering grades 4
through 11 in the fall of 2013. Soquili Sta-
bles is a part of Faith Haven Christian Re-
treat Center, which is designed to facilitate
community, teambuilding and education
in a Christianity-based environment. The
stables are at 10970 W. Bentbow Path in
Crystal River. Riding is by reservation only.
You may call the stables at 352-206-2990
or visit www.soquili.com. Follow Soquili
Stables on Facebook at www.
facebook.com/soquili.stables.florida.


FLORAL CITY. FLORIDA


On this week's Chamber Chat...
* Wendell Husebo, publisher of Nature Coast Healthy Liv-
ing Magazine, co-hosts Chamber Chat this week and talks
about this outstanding publication that focuses on all as-
pects of living a healthy life. Wendell also shares the excit-
ing news about Healthy Living Magazine 'The Show' airing
on WYKE in April!
* The Village Crier Shop Local Expo is back this month,
and Necia Ratliff has all the details on this FREE event!
Mark March 30 on your calendar for door prizes, free
demonstrations, food and lots more!
* Alpacas are not llamas, and Jean Riley from Alpaca
Magic USA in Homosassa is going to prove it! This week's
Chamber Chat will feature a LIVE ALPACA on the set. His
name is Adam and we can't wait to ask him what life as an
alpaca is like Jean will have to translate.
You have three chances to watch Chamber Chat:
Monday at 6 p.m., Thursday at 8 p.m. and Friday at 1 p.m.
If you would like your business or event featured on
Chamber Chat at no cost to you email Melissa
Benefield at spotlightmelissa@aol.com.
"LIKE" Chamber Chat on Facebook for clips of past
segments and updates on our weekly show!


Btou$/t to#ou hp
the dttash foesitt
fkamiaet of
Comme'tce and
the 4flocal&ita.
(dektc/antb
04hIodlation


THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS
PARTNERS AND SPONSORS-


Berries, Brew & BBQ Sponsors
brought to you by Citrus County Chamber of Commerce,
'loral City Merchants Association, Agriculture Alliance of
citruss County. Sponsored by: Chas. E. Davis Funeral
iome, Ferris Farms, Floral City Heritage Council, Insurance
resources & Risk Management, Mike Bays State Farm
insurance, M & B Dairy, Moonrise Resort, SECO (Sumter
electric Co-Op), Sibex, Sunshine Springs Assisted Living
acilityand West Central Solutons,

Princess Pageant Sponsors
& W Rexall Drug, Beef O'Bradys,-Inverness, Mama's
Wintry Kafe, New Concepts International Hair Salon, RJ
looting, Virgilio Insurance Services and WaI-Mart,
nverness.

Princess Pageant Winners
Little Miss Strawberry Princess -Kirsten Schaak
Miss Strawberry Princess-Ivy Lewis


Festival Sponsors 2013
Platinum Corporate Sponsor: Sonic
Platinum Media Sponsor: Tampa Bay Times
Sustaining Partner: Citrus County Chronicle
Presenting Sponsors: FDS and The Fox 95.3 /96.7
Gold Sponsor: Sibex
Silver Sponsors: Florida Lottery, Hometown
Values, Nature Coast EMS and Ted Williams
Museum,
Bronze Sponsors: Insight Credit Union, Neon
Leon's/ Ike's Old Florida Kitchen,Nick Nicholas
Ford, Rock Monster, Inc And SuncoastSchools
Federal Credit Union.
Friend of the Festval Sponsors: Brannen Bank/
Floral City Branch, Citrus Buyers Guide, Crime
Stoppers of Citrus County, Insight Credit Union,
Life Care Centerof Citrus County, M & B Dairy,
Regions Bank, and Schnettler Construction ,
Gate Sponsors: Citrus County Chronicle, Insight
Credit Union, Nature Coast Bank, and Sun Trust
Bank,


when we were telling people
about our town and all the
things we have to do here. I
think many of the people we
talked to will come back and
visit us and our businesses in
the future. Great job everyone!
I continue to be amazed at
the outpouring of dedicated
volunteers that come for-
ward for an event like this.
We really couldn't do any-
thing without you all.
We want everyone in our
brother/sister organizations
to know how much the FCMA
appreciates their efforts.

Dudley Calfee
President, Floral City
Merchants Association


News You


,an Use
Congratulations to Chamber
ember Homosassa But-
rfly for a wonderful write-up
1Visitflorida.com!
Follow this link to read it:
vw.visitflorida.com/insiders/
mily/action.blog/8483-
Dmasassa-butterfly-brings-
th-knowledge-and-smiles.
The Southwest Florida
rater Management Dis-
ict is now on Pinterest. The
cial media page, found at
nterest.com/SWFWMD
arks the district's continued
pension into the growing
)rld of social media. The pur-
Dse of the district's Pinterest
age is to provide another in-
ractive resource of informa-
in for the public and direct
ople to WaterMatters.org.
Public Scoping Meeting on
e Future Management of
crystal River National
wildlife Refuge will be held
lesday, March 19, from 6
m. to 9 pm in the Magnolia
>om at the Plantation on
ystal River. For more infor-
ation visit www.fws.gov/
ystalriver/ or call the refuge
manager at 352-563-2088.
Space is still available for
ifers for the third annual
mndraising Golf Outing
r the We Care Food
mntry. Have some fun
arch 16 at Seven Rivers Golf
Country Club and help the
ngry in Citrus County. Fee is
5o for one golfer, $200 per
ursome. For more informa-
*n, visit www.wecare
odpantry.org or call 352-
28-4921.


Thank You,
Citrus
County
Neon Leon's and Ike's Old
Florida Kitchen thank Citrus
County for the overwhelming
support offered during our
recent YMCA fundraiser and
the taping of the pilot for the
reality series "Meal Ticket:
Extreme Catering."
This event would not have
been possible without the
help of the following people:
Presenting Sponsors:
Sheldon Palmes Insurance
and Lollygaggers.
Our hosts: Ross Hammock
Ranch, MacRae's of Ho-
mosassa and Linda's Groom.
Platinum Partners:
Plantation Inn of Crystal
River, Hickory Island Hotel,
Pine Lodge Bed and Break-
fast, Suncoast Plumbing and
Electric, Yankeetown Realty,
Brown Funeral Home, Bon-
nee Jones LLC, Jerry and
Donna Rowe, James and
Linda Petrovich, Chuck and
Carole Keller, Sherry Somers,
Guy and Debbie Watkins,
Donna Vaughn, Mr. and Mrs.
Perry Padgett, Jim and Linda
Witherow, Patricia Ann
Adams, Jim and Jacque Ras-
mussen, Anna Ferrari/Kim
Falasz, Lisa Moore/
Tina Stegall, Raymond and
Patricia Havey, Trotter Re-
alty/ BonitaAmonte.


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Public relations group
focuses on web design
Getting down to the nitty-gritty of
web design was the focus of the Na-
ture Coast chapter of the Florida
Public Relations Association's
monthly meeting in March.
The program featured guest
speaker Steve Tallman from Nature
Coast Web Design. Steve has a
commercial art and electronic graph-
ics design background and focused
his discussions on technical informa-
tion, content and web page design.
'You must make your web page
user focused," Tallman said. "Google
is looking for good content that makes
you the subject matter expert."
He explained Google also looks
for the trust factor on a web page,
including information such as a tele-
phone number and address. Busi-
nesses have to continually change
their web page with updated infor-
mation to engage the page visitors
so they spend more than the aver-
age seven seconds looking at the
materials, he said. Web pages must
have clear and concise headers,
and links must be relevant to the
business.
"Hire someone who knows what
they're doing designing web pages
so that you can successfully engage
and attract visitors to your business,"
Tallman said.
During lunch, FPRA and industry
professionals from around Florida
provided advanced quality educa-
tional programming for the member-
ship. Subject matter included:
business and marketing communi-
cations, crisis communications, pub-
lic relations ethics, emergency
communications planning, or suc-
cessful media strategy and commu-
nications. These kinds of education
programs would cost serious dollars
in this economy, but are available to
the membership for the price of the
luncheon. The monthly chapter
meetings are held at the Citrus Hills


Featuring Web design


Special to the unronicle
Steve Tallman from Nature Coast Web Design was the featured
speaker at the Nature Coast chapter of the Florida Public Relations
Association's meeting. He discussed technical information, content
and web page design.


Golf and Country Club in the Garden
Room.
For information about FPRA and
the Nature Coast Chapter, contact
Katie Mehl, APR, FPRA Nature
Coast Chapter president, at 352-
344-6501 or email kmehl@citrusmh.
org.


Hernando pharmacist
to fight Parkinson's
Citrus County pharmacist Richard
Hoffmann is bringing his personal
passion for Parkinson's research
and his professional expertise to a
new role as a consumer representa-


tive on a commit-
tee of the U.S.
Food and Drug
Administration. In
his role on the Pe-
ripheral and Cen-
tral Nervous
System Drugs Ad-
visory Committee, Richard
Hoffmann will Hoffman
evaluate potential
new drugs to treat the neurological
disorders affecting millions of peo-
ple, including his wife, Margaret.
Hoffmann was selected based
upon his experience as a pharmacist
and medical writer and his volunteer
work as a trained research advocate
with the Parkinson's Disease Foun-
dation (PDF). He has been active in
the Parkinson's disease cause since
Margaret was diagnosed with young
onset Parkinson's disease five years
ago. Last year, the couple underwent
training to join PDF's Parkinson's Ad-
vocates in Research (PAIR) pro-
gram, which aims to speed new
treatments by pairing people with
Parkinson's and care partners with
the research community. They spent
the past year educating their com-
munity about Parkinson's disease re-
search studies.
Hoffmann said it is an opportunity
to ensure the voices of people with
Parkinson's disease and their loved
ones are heard by the research
community.
"I understand all too well from our
family's experience the need for bet-
ter treatments for neurological dis-
eases. My goal is to be a protector
of the consumer and the liaison for
people who live with neurological
diseases such as Parkinson's dis-
ease," Hoffmann said. "I will repre-
sent their viewpoint and their
urgency, while ensuring that poten-
tial new drugs being reviewed are
not only effective, but safe."
Dr. Hoffmann's four-year term with
the 11-member committee began in
February.


SECO annual meeting
Saturday, March 23
SUMTERVILLE Sumter Elec-
tric Cooperative will conduct its an-
nual membership meeting Saturday,
March 23, on the grounds of the Co-
op's headquarters compound in
Sumterville.
"This year SECO marks its 75th
Anniversary," SECO CEO Jim Dun-
can said. "Our annual meeting is at-
tended by many members from all
across our service territory and is al-
ways a great event. The fact that
this year commemorates our 75th
year of service to our customers and
communities makes this meeting
very special."
Those attending will be treated to
refreshments and entertainment fea-
turing Margo Rochelle & Rodeo
Drive. In SECO's 75th anniversary
celebration tent, members will see a
wide range of displays showcasing
new customer programs for 2013.
They also will be given the knowl-
edge to conserve energy and iden-
tify scams.
Each registered member receives
a gift and is eligible for the big raffle
at the end of the business meeting.
Top prizes include a refurbished 4x4
extended cab Dodge Dakota pick-up
truck and cash awards of $1,500,
$1,000 and $500.
Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.
and continues until the business
meeting at 10:30 a.m.
"The annual meeting is one of the
things that distinguishes electric co-
operatives from other types of utili-
ties. Aside from having a lot of fun
and learning more about their Co-
op, members get to nteract one-on-
one with the employees who work
on their behalf all through the year,"
Duncan said.
SECO is a member-owned, not-
for-profit utility serving 176,000 mem-
bers and their families in parts of
Marion, Lake, Citrus, Sumter, Pasco,
Hernando, and Levy counties.


MONEY
Continued from Page D1

thing you want to do is get
into a smaller house.
Let us assume you will
have to spend an addi-
tional $50,000 to accom-
plish this. (You seem to
think it will cost you more.)
So what? You reduced
your investments to
$250,000, which is still an
adequate "rainy day" fund.
Your $2,000 monthly in-
come should allow you to
live a comfortable life.
You also might want to
consider a part-time job.
At 66, you're hardly ready
for the rocking chair. I
wish you well.
Dear Bruce: Our home
is situated on three acres,
two of which have been
kept in their natural state.
Now the property has
been discovered by local
kids who ride their motor-


PRICE
Continued from Page D1

the wellness initiative it-
self, "it is unlikely that the
program saved money,"
the study concluded.
BJC President Steven
Lipstein said he doesn't
dispute the conclusion, but
he remains committed to
the wellness program and
would invite the re-
searchers to take another
look now
Is the program saving
money?


cycles, hang out on the
property and I don't know
what all.
I don't care, but my wife
is getting upset. She thinks
if they get injured on our
property, we're on the
hook. I don't think it's such
a big deal. What do you
think? RN., New Mex-
ico
Dear R.N.: I think it is
important to correct this
situation, so I'm with your
wife on this one. If you
don't at the very least post
the land against tres-
passers and do your best to
keep them off, you likely
could be accused of oper-
ating or maintaining an at-
tractive nuisance if one of
those kids gets injured.
Whether posting "keep
off" signs or chasing away
the kids is enough is an-
other story You might wish
to get the police involved if
the kids won't listen to you.
Furthermore, be certain
you have adequate liabil-

"I do not know that," said
Lipstein. "I can tell you
that our health benefit ex-
penses go up every year."
Lipstein said encourag-
ing employees to make
healthy lifestyle decisions
and rewarding those who
do reflects corporate val-
ues, not just the bottom
line.
"It's not easy to change
human health outcomes in
the short term," he added.
"When you make an in-
vestment in wellness and
prevention, you shouldn't
expect an immediate
return."


ity insurance. "Adequate"
isn't $10,000 or $15,000- it
should be total coverage of
several million dollars that
results from combining the
maximum from your
homeowners policy with
an umbrella policy I know
that sounds like a great
deal, but the extra cost is
not excessive, and it's
amazing what type of alle-
gations can be made.
Dear Bruce: My hus-
band and I are in our mid-
70s. We want to protect our
home from the state in the


Shrimp, Food, Vendors,

Beer & Wine, Arts &

Crafts, Kid's Zone


Great Times & Live Music!


Plus:
Cajun Dave &
Neon Leon

The 2 PM Band


More


Come Pinch A Little Tail
For more information go to www.shrimpapalooza.com

Supported by: Rotary Club of Homosassa Springs %A i
AmeripriseW. Fo I :.
CRYSTAL Anc"' _i ... .. .
AUTOMOT.IVE .anm w. c chronicle
AII---wI4 ),-3 ix jH\ INWL
i mc w. ww io o O


event either of us should
be sent to a nursing home.
We want to put the house
in trust in our children's
names.
We trust our children
completely and know they
would not defraud us in
any way A lawyer friend
suggested we have the
spouses of each child sign
release forms stating they
would not try to collect in
the event any of them
should divorce.
Our home is our main
asset. My husband is in


favor of this proposal, but I
am concerned about losing
control of my home. -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: You men-
tioned you trust your chil-
dren, and I have no
problem with that in terms
of fraud. But you should
recognize unless the trust
is very clear and specific,
if one of your children
were to get into financial
trouble, such as an auto-
mobile accident, and did-
n't have enough insurance,
the asset your home -


could be attached.
In addition, if either of
you wind up going into a
nursing home and attempt
to be covered by Medicaid,
the state will have a right
to move against your home
upon your demise if this
transaction took place in-
side the "look-back" pe-
riod of five years.

Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams. corn
or to Smart Money, PO. Box
7150, Hudson, FL 34674.


fI


Hardi Gras


Homosassa Style


.
.. ...... ...


Sat., Mar. 23, Old Homosassa, FL

Parade 10:30 AM, Event Follows


Pre-Palooza Parties
March 8 High Octane Saloon
March 15 Seagrass Resort
March 22 The Shed at MacRae's
Come vote for this year's King & Queen!


fI /


D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


BUSINESS










CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE DECLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 D5


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


F o





..- :,_. --
S -. --
ma. -_.. ".,.. .. ..


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Tim e


Fa:(5)5356 Tl re 88 5-340 1Em i: lssI esT hroilenh e-cmI wbi* w w~hoicleh Iec


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748




Bed Lid
ARE, 8ft. bed,
off of 1995 F350,
$250
(352) 503-2887
Hamilton Collection
Pub style tall kitchen
table w/4 chairs $250
obo 352-628-3076
Hammered Dulcimer
w.stand & books,
$300, 352-628-3076

Lakefront Beauty
Open House
Sat 11-3pm /
Sun 12-3pm
7734 S. Shore Acres
Floral City
$169,900.
(352) 212-1446
ealty Connect

MHm 3/2 w/den
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a, furn, clean
RV Hkup.**$39.900o
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340

P/T Helper
Position

available for Window
Treatment Store
no exp. necessary
must be professional
P/T hours vary
apply @1657 W Gulf
to Lk Hwy, Lecanto

Truck Camper
over the Cab sleeps 5,
air, generator, micro-
wave, oven stove,
electric jacks & awn-
ing. Fits 8ft bed, 3/4
ton or dully $5,200.
(352) 503-2887




$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087


FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077




Bracelet Lost
Applebees
Crystal River
REWARD
(352) 563-5527

Female Chihuahua
red short-hair Bnndel &
Female Gray Cat (cat is
sick & needs her
medicine) lost in the
vicinity ofColumbus St.
Beverly Hills, pls call
352-422-7578

Lost Diamond Tennis
Bracelet
Dunnellon,
Near Beall's Outlet
or Winn Dixie
REWARD!
(352) 533-3147


Mm Pin/ Terrier Mix 30
Ibs black, tan, white
stripe on neck. Last
seen 02/28/13 wearing
black collar. Comes to
the name Fogel. His
family misses him VERY
MUCH!! Contact Allegra
352-586-1808
*REWARD*

Pekingese mix, All BIk
with hot pink tail, 17
lbs. Lost 3/7 in down-
town Inverness area
REWARD 352-476-3134

Very Old Walker/Beagle
Mix Hound near Turner
Camp Rd. walks with
a limp and needs
medication, has
micro chip, pls call
352-726-4678 or
352-476-3410


BOXER MIX
Hernando area
near 486
Call to Identify
352-560-7335
Bracelet Found
in front of Winn-Dixie
Saturday Morning
Will the gentlemen
that already con-
tacted the Marion
Co. Sherif Dept.
regarding the lost
bracelet please call.
(979) 583-6336
Found Lab/Pitt Mix
Female, Mini Farms,
Zaval Street
352-563-1206
352-875-9918




AVAILABLE
Pool Supplv Store
W/Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100,00011 Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177"
Free Safe Boating
Class. US Power
Squadron 3/16/2013
at the Homosassa
Wildlife Park 9:00-5:30.
Just the cost of mate-
rials and lunch. Call
Tom (352) 382-2806

PRAYER TO ST
JUDE

May the Sacred Heart
Of Jesus be adored,
glorified, loved and
praised throughout
theworld now and
forever, Sacred Heart
of Jesus, pray for us,
St. Jude, worker of
miracles, pray for us
St. Jude, helper of the
hopeless, pray for us.
Say this prayer 9
times a day for 7 days
and your prayer will be
answered. It has
never been known to
fail. Publication must
be promised. Thank
you St. Jude for your
help. SH




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077


Stanley Steemer
F/T Office Position

Hrs. Tues. thru. Fri. 9-6
Sat. 7:30-3pm
Computer exp.,
Multi line phone.
Call 352-726-6452
For Interview
Email: jo.white@
steemer.com
Fax 352-726-8895







LIIIIII




Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
OnWy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
1111111I













Christ Medical
Center is now
hiring various
positions.

Immediate need for:
Radiology Recpt,
DME Recpt. with
billing exp. and
Physical Therapy
Recpt. Also looking
for Medical Asst.
Those with med. office
exp. encouraged to
apply. Send all
inquires and resumes
to HR@cmc-fl.com.


Citrus Podiatry
Center, PA

Medical
Receptionist:
Part-time M, TU, W
8:30-5pm.
Two office locations.
$10.50/hr. Vacation,
holiday & uniform
benefits. Minimum
of 2 years exp. in
a medical office
setting.
Send Resume to:
P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120
No phone calls or
taxes accepted/
no exceptions.


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST

For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
ahoorcom


FIT DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Dental Exp. a must!!
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry

Health Care
Professional

A growing home
health agency needs
per diem RN, LPN, PT,
OT, ST, SW, HHA for
Citrus and Hernando
counties. Please
email resume to
ellie.scarfone ace
homecareflorida.com
or fax resume to
352-563-0992.
HHA License #
212040961

LPNs-Hospice
Full-time & Part-time

HPH Hospice is a
not-for-profit
community-based
healthcare organi-
zation providing
innovative, skilled
medical care to
patients with
life-limiting illness
and compassionate
support to their
family members.

Weekends, FT & PT
Nights, FT & PT
Evenings, FT & PT
Days, FT & PT
If you would like
more information,
please call our
recruiter, Cynthia at:
800-486-8784 or
apply online at:
www.HPH-Hospice.
org/careers



















Nurse, &-ST
HPfhospice
EOE


RN
UNIT MANAGER
Full Time

Seeking a dynamic
experienced
RN Leader to
join a progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will have
a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and man-
agement abilities,
great organizational
skills and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Excellent benefits
Apply in Person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Invernes s, FL
Send resume to:
ATDON@Southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer, M/F/V/D


RN's, PT & OUT'S
LPN's, Phsych
Nurse, & ST

CITRUS &
HERNANDO
(352) 794-6097





440 Licensed
Insurance Agent

apply in person:
Nature Coast
Insurance Agency
Crystal River


EXPERIENCED
Personal Lines
CSR

CITRUS COUNTY'S
OLDEST & LARGEST
Ins. Agency is looking
for Exp.Licensed CSR
to join our staff. We
provide excellent
office environment,
Health Ins. & 401K.
Send Resume To:
droberts@thehagar
group.com


FINANCE
DIRECTOR

THE CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER
is seeking
applicants for the
position of
Finance Director.
Position reports
directly to the City
Manager and is
responsible for
financial reporting,
budget development,
utility billing,
collections, human
resources, risk
management, and
payroll/benefits
administration.
Required qualifica-
tions include a
degree in
accounting/business
administration and
prior experience in
governmental
accounting. Salary
range is $50,688 to
$71,806. Letters of
application, with a
full resume, should
be mailed to:
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428 and be
postmarked no later
than March 15, 2013.
Envelopes should be
marked as "Finance
Director Applicant".
Equal Opportunity
Employer




Cook & Servers

Experienced only apply
in person at Olive Tree
Rest. No Calls
963 N. Suncoast Blvd,
Crystal River
Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced
W P/T Servers
w Cooks
w- Bartender
w- Hostess &
w Dish Washer

Call 352-746-6727
Tue. Sat. 2p -4:30p
For Application
Appointment




Licensed
Customer
Service Rep.

For well established
local insurance
agency. We are in
need of a Licensed
(220 or 440)
Customer Service
Rep (preferred)
Sales Oriented
be motivated and a
self starter, detailed
in your work and an
excellent appt. setter.
FT position
Send Resume to:
rbrice@brice-
agency.com

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River

SALES
Good Benefits,
401K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace




AUTO
DETAILERS &
MANAGERS

Homosassa Sprgs
& Brooksville
dealerships
Call 727-808-0341

Carpet Cleaners

Full Time Positions
Stanley Steemer
Clean FI MVR record
22 yrs or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
Paid training, 401k,
holiday pay.
Fax: 352-726-8895
or Email: cj.white@
steemer.com

LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Experience. Must
have valid
DL. and own
transportation
Please leave
experience history
on msg.
352-533-7536 or
email resume to:
LGS.Florida@gmail.c
om

LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Experience. Must
have valid
DL. and own
transportation
Please leave
experience history
on msg.
352-533-7536 or
email resume to:
LGS.FIlorida@gmail.c
om


FIT CARPENTER
All Phases of
Construction-Kit/Bath
Renovation Exp. Req.
Valid D.L. Req.
Background Checks
6374629

MANATEE
TOUR
CAPTAIN
NEEDED
F/T, 25 Ton Master
727-459- 4991

RV TECHNICIAN
Need a certified &
experienced RV techni-
cian. Apply in person
2524 Hwy 44
W Inverness only.

STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resumel 801 @yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls





CUSTOMER
RELATIONS
*Call Now!* Looking
to fill immediate
positions. Training,
401(k), medical.
No exp. necessary.
$550-$800 a week.
Call Karen
352-436-4460


Experienced
AC Installers

Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Dave
(352) 794-6129
-----Dq
NEWSPAPER

CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle
H H.. UE
CHRONICLE






PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP

Are you a customer
service champion?
Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
Organized &
detailed oriented?
Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
*Avail. weekdays
& weekends?

Join the Citrus
County Chronicle's
Circulation team!

Send Resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com

CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
FL 34429
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant





SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE

This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.

CmRONICLE


INVERNESS
DOMINO'S PIZZA

NOW HIRING
DRIVERS
Flexible evening
hours available.
(352) 637-5300

P/T Helper
Position

available for Window
Treatment Store
no exp. necessary
must be professional
P/T hours vary
apply @ 1657 W Gulf
to Lk Hwy, Lecanto

SITE UTILITY
CONTRACTOR

Hiring experienced
employees, for all
underground utility
trades. Valid driver
license preferred.
Competitive pay
Excellent benefits in-
cluding medical,
dental, vision & 401K
EOE/Drug free
workplace.
applications
avaialble
Ridgeview Apts
880 SE 8th Avenue
Crystal River




AVAILABLE
Pool Suppl Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
**(813) 230-7177**



"FOR SALE**
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer with 2
commercial mowers, &
Hand Equip. in pairs.
Serious Inquiries Only!
30k obo 352-795-0201
Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiverDropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED

30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED

40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27,995 Installed

+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures LLC
866-624-9160
Lic # C BC 1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



18 IN KNIFE
$20 obo Linda
341-2271
1918 JENNT STAMP
good condition/no
marks25.00 obo Linda
352-341-2271
John Wayne
collection,
in very nice glass and
Oak cabinet
$750.
(352) 628-6985
SWORD 55 INCHES
LONG WITH CASE
$40. OBO
LINDA 341-2271

A


11111111
Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
" with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111
TY MASTODONS
1/Colosso 2/Giganto
excInt cond/tagged
$10.00
352-628-4210


5 SEAT SPA Green
marble,needs motor
frame 100.00
Linda 341-2271



DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
KENMORE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIDG
icemaker, ice & water
thru door, bisque you
pick up $200.00
352-746-0401
OVEN, STOVE TOP
AND DISHWASHER
Frigidaire, great cond.
$150 ea. 352-503-3567
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER $100 in
perfect working condi-
tion. 30 day warranty
call/text 352-364-6504



Spindle Shaper
$40, Dust Collector
w/roll-around base
$45 352-563-1863
32" Drum Sander
w/roll around stand
$600, 40" Lathe
w/knives $75
352-563-1863
AIR COMPRESSOR
RUSTY, OLD CAMP-
BELL HAUSFIELD, 10
GAL. WORKS GREAT
$50 464-0316
ROUTER TABLE
STEEL LEGS & FIBER-
GLASS TOP ONLY $40
464-0316
SHOPSMITH MARK V
is 5 TOOLS IN ONE-
SAW, DRILL PRESS,
DISC SANDER, BOR-
ING MACH, LATHE.
$1000. 352-527-6425



70 INCH BIG SCREEN
TV JVC HD-P700R1U
with 2 HDMI, 2 HD com-
ponent, 3 analog, and 1
PC inputs. Accepts a
Cable Card for receiving
Cable TV without a
"cable box". Good
Condition! $390. Call
(352)746-2778 before
8pm please.
20" NEC Color TV
Cable ready,
good cond. $75
603-863-9750
SANYO 36" COLOR
remote, works good
Not a flat screen
$50.00
352-628-4210
TELEVISION 26 inch
color $15- 220-4158
YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529



ELECTRIC SERVICE
GROUND ROD 8'
$6 352.244.2821



COMPUTER HP
Windows 98
complete with
all accessories
$75.00 352-628-4210
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469



11pc White PVC Lanai
Furniture w/cushions
call for details $325
352-344-0866

For Sale %H
PATIO TABLE AND 4
CHAIRS Glass top out-
door table with 4 chairs
with cushions. $150.00,
352-228-1986



2 CHINESE RUGS
each 5x7, very nice,$15
each 352-228-7620
2 Sets of heavy duty
lamps
$50.00
352-795-7254
3 Cushion Couch
off White Floral, Swivel
Rocking Chair, Mauve
$150 for both, Glass
Rattan Table, $70
352-513-4133
4 pc Living Room Set
Tan Floral Pattern
good Cond. $300
352-302-7451
BEDROOM SET Eddie
Bauer solid pine dresser
$250 heavy Qn Arched
It oak headboard $100 2
end tables $20. Sold
separately/as a set
Call 352-610-6706
Big very nice
entertainment center
Includes
54" RCA TV
$1,500.
(352) 628-6985
Broyhill Tables
1 @ 60" x 26"
other is 24" X 48"
both are black, sturdy
New over $400 ea.
sell for $175 ea.
352-419-5836
CHINESE RUG 5x7,
wool, nice condition,
$50 352-228-7620


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
COUCH & LOVESEAT
Taupe,w/double reclin-
ers, couch has center
console w/cupholders &
masg, & loveseat has
rocker recliner on both
sides $250 both. exc.
cond 352-228-0294
Dinette Set:Table w/
leaf, 4 chrs & cushions,
hutch. Very good
Cond $395. Wood
Bookcase w/ Glass
doors $145.
1920 Singer Sewing
Machine & Cabinet
$375 Cash and Carry.
(352) 422-5819
Dining Room Set w/4
upholstered chairs,
two beveled glass-top
table, Like New.
$150 obo
352-527-3382
DINING SET
Ashley 45" square glass
& metal tble w/4 metal
upholstered chairs,w/
side tble 48"x16", Ik new
$170. 352-746-1272
ESTATE SALE
Kitchenette Set $250,
Bedroom Set $300, 3pc.
Wall Unit $500, Enter-
tainment Center $50, 3
Computer Desks $SOea
Teak Wood carved tbles
$1200. 352-476-5464
FURNITURE
2 BAR STOOLS=$25
EACH
jeff theref_05@yahoo
FURNITURE
2 MATCHING
CHAIRS=$75
jeff theref_05@yahoo
FURNITURE
SOFA=$50
jeff the ref_05@yahoo
SUGARMILL WOODS
Hamilton Collection
Pub style tall kitchen
table w/4 chairs $250
obo 352-628-3076
Kitchen Set
Table & 4 padded
chairs on rollers,
swivels, leaf,
mint condition $295
(352) 637-1701
LEATHER RECLINER
tan,very nice condition,
$75 352-228-7620
aft 10am
Light Tan, Recliner
Rocker, White Leather
Chair $100 forAll Twin
Box springs & mattress
w/ 2 stands $100.
352-795-7254
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
living room chair with
ottoman $30-
352-220-4158
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
PILLOWTOP Queen
set, $2200 new,
absolutely perfect,$100
352-228-7620
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
QUEEN HEADBOARD
& TV/DVD STAND
beige/gray color/stand
24x26x30hl $50.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
Sleeper sofa, couch,
end tables & coffee ta-
bles, Kit. set w/ 4 chairs,
Blue recliner 2- 3 drawer
dressers, 1- 6 drawer
dresser, $750 for all
(352) 746-7221
Sleeper sofa, w/ match-
ing drapes, corner
computer desk, 8pc
lanai/pool set, 4 cushion
chairs 2 cushion rockers
$650 for all, 746-7221


FURNITURE
ROCKER CHAIR=$50
jeff there 05@yahoo
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
black leather both have
2 reclining seats and 2
cup holders. 3 years old
like new $650.00
352-419-4187
Swivel Barstools
set of 4, padded seats
$200, Queen Mattress
boxspring, fram
Serta Pedic Pillowtop,
$150 352-249-3259
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard,
special offer, $15
(352)465-1616
TV CABINET
composition wood,
nice condition, $15
352-228-7620
UPRIGHT SECRETARY
lit cabinet; opens as
desk, $50,
352-228-7620 aft 10am
Wall Recliner
New, by Best, LtAqua,
pd $650 ask.$250,
Chair w/ottoman
upgraded upholstery Lt.
Green patterned, Pd
$950 ask. $350
352-419-5836
Walnut Entertainment
Center
Like New, $300
352-513-4133
WINGBACK CHAIR
eggplant colorlike new,
$40 352-228-7620



2 RAIN BARRELS
HOSE SPIGOT ON
THE BOTTOM, 55
GALLONS, ONLY $40
EACH. 464-0316
08 Craftsmen Rider
Mower. 19.5 Bnggs &
Stratten Motor, 42" deck
w/bagger, & Jack $900
603-863-9750
COM POSTER 30 GAL-
LON ROTATES ON
STAND TO MIX IT UP
ONLY $60 464-0316




HOMOSASSA
Sat. & Sun., 8a-6p
Gas Stove, Furniture,
Lamps Clothes,
Stereo & Records,
& BrickABrack
5510+5548 SE Delilah
Pt. Greenacres to
Canary Palm to
Oaklawn to
Old Field to Meadow
to Delilah Point
352-503-7284
Homosassa
Yard/Moving Sale
GlassTrinkets, Port a
potty, Potty Chair both
new, tools, & more
5800 S Oak Ridge Dr, lot
44 (Even ridge MH park)
INGLIS
Sat &Sun 10am
NO EARLY BIRDS
Antiques, Collect-
ibles and more!
18134 SE Hwy 19, 2V2
miles past traffic lite




BOYS PINNED
STRIPED SUIT Worn
once 25.00 obo Linda
341-2271
FLOWER GIRL
DRESSES, WHITE
Sizes 4T, 4/4T and 6X
$15.00 each
352-400-5650
MEDICAL SCRUBS, 3
pair Cherokee Brand
pants, size M, $10 each,
worn 1 or 2 times.
352-637-1102


!!!!! 215/50 R17!!!!!
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
*****225/65 R17***
Nice tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair! (352)
857-9232
----~~~~245\65 R17 ~~~~
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
2 Windshields for
Harley Daivdson FXD
$125.
(352) 422-3033
16 ft. Black Wrought
Iron Entrance Gate,
w/ running horse and
horse shoes, Beautiful
paid $3,200 Asking
$1,300. (352) 422-5462
5ft Glasstop Patio Table
$40. Teeter hangups
inversion table $150
(352) 382-1977
AQUARIUM WITH
WOODEN STAND
25 Gal Rectangular,
12x16x29, gravel,lighted
hood.$100 746-7232
BARBIE HOUSE,
BARBIE CAR, barbie
guitar and kids
keyboard $10.00 for all
352-794-3020/5864987
BIG SALE!
Keyboard w/ Stand, +
TOOLS & Much Good
Stuff. (352) 860-2303
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,
$10, special offer
(352)465-1616
CAR TOP CARRIER
BAR TYPE $25
352.344.2821
CURIO CABINET,
lighted, 4 glass shelves,
71" tall, 29" wide, 10"
deep, $75 (in
Dunnellon) (352)
465-1813
DANCE CHAIR Pink,
with ballet slipper de-
sign. Folds up and
stores in matching tote.
Like New. $25 746-7232
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$150 OBO
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077
GRILL HOLDER FORA
BOAT EXTENDABLE
ARMS FOR SAFETY
MOUNTS TO SIDE $50.
464-0316
HONEYWELL AIR
PURIFIER 360-
airflow,3spds,HEPA
filter ExcellentCond
$100 352-746-7232
HOW WATER HEATER
works/needs thermo
40.00 obo Linda
341-2271
Juki Commercial
Sewing Machine, Table
& Motor, just serviced
$550 352-563-1863
Lg Recliner/Rocker
brown, exc. cond.
$125obo NOOK
e-reader w/cover, $75
obo 352-527-3874
Love Seat, White Bro-
cade chair, Taupe re-
cliner, TV Sanyo, Misc.
Baby Items call for
pricing.
(352) 403-7863
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MEGA BLOKS Dragon
Havocfire #9693
in box/cd
$30.00
352-628-4210


352-422-2164 $30.
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good con-
dition, green/ black/
white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Necchi Heavy Duty
Sewing Maching
model 3205FA
all metal parts
$70.
(352) 341-7741
NEW BATHTUB
Tan/5 ft
75.00 Linda 341-2271
New Screen Door
for a 2 car garage
has privacy screen
$425 352-249-7212
Sears Kenmore
propane gas dryer
heavy duty, $75. Ryobi
12" miter saw $75
352-507-1490
SHOWER DOORS New
/ 40.00 obo Linda
341-2271
TEA CART, wicker,
standard size, excellent
condition, $75 (in
Dunnellon),
(352)465-1813
TELESCOPE Celestron
14" Schmidt Cassegrain
with CGE series mount,
tripod and post. Serious
scientific instrument.
Over $7K new. Asking
$5K. 352-726-7898
TRAILER TIRE,
brand new, fits pontoon
trailer,$15 352-22-7620
TREADMILL, Cory
Everson, manual, fold-
ing, sturdy. Good condi-
tion. $75 (in Dunnellon).
(352) 465-1813
TRUCK WINDOW
GMC rear/solid
factory tint, $50.00
352-628-4210



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
ONLY $60. 464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER, NEW, ONLY
$20 464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS $20 EACH
464-0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACKREST &
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ONLY $25. 464-0316
TUB RAIL MEDLINE
bathtub deluxe
safety rail $30.00
352-628-4210
WALKER 4WHEEL
seat,basket,hand brake
collapsible, $50.00
352-628-4210



"BASS UKULELE"
ELECTRIC SOUNDS
LIKE AN UPRIGHT 22"
SCALE $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
BLACK&ABALON E
W/GIGBAG&XTRAS
$95 352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PLAYS,
LOOKS, SOUNDS
GREAT! ONLY $50
352-601-6625
"NEW"FENDER
AFINITY P BASS
W/GIGBAG&FREE
AMP $100
352-601-6625
"NEW"LES PAUL STU-
DIO LIMITED,"LIQUID
BLACK"W/GROVERS
& ALINCOS LESS
THAN 1/2 PRICE! @
$175 352-601-6625


CLASSIFIED



8 STRING MORRELL
LAP STEEL ELECTRIC
GUITAR "NICE"
W/LIPSTICK PICKUP
$100 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"ALMOST NEW"
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT ONLY $40
352-601-6625
BEACH&CAMPING?
"NICE" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL SIZED
USED ONLY $25
352-601-6625
BLACK WASHBURN
LES PAUL STYLE
GUITAR"NEW"W/FREE
RANDALL AMP $100
352-601-6625
DEAN VENDETTA
ELECTRIC GUITAR
"USED BUT PLAYS
NEW"ONLY $45
352-601-6625
GRANDMA'S ORGAN
KAWAI SR-2
Book Music, Bench
$500, pls call btwn
8-10am. 352-287-3145
Hammered Dulcimer
w.stand & books,
$300, 352-628-3076
KEYBOARD YAMAHA
Model PSS-12
small portable
with adapter
$30.00 352-628-4210
KIDS FENDER ELEC-
TRIC GUITAR! BLACK
3/4 SIZE 22"SCALE
SINGLE PICKUP $40
352-601-6625
Ovation Acoustic/
Electric Bass
w/ case,1996
Celebrity model 174,
$395.
(352) 637-1189
STRAD Model, 4 x 4 old
German Violin
2 Bows, 1 Newer,
1 older, lined case,
$700.
(352) 464-5401, LM




AREA RUG machine
woven 23" X 39" tan &
moss green background
$10.00 603-493-2193
BOY LAMP w/stand.
Appox 53" H $25.00
603-493-2193
CHINAMikasa fine
china, charisma
6 pl setting $60
352-422-2164
FLOOR PLANT in wo-
ven basket 48" H
$10.00 Call
603-493-2193
FLORAL CENTER-
PIECE Magnolias & Ivy
18"H X 16"W w/2 can-
dle sticks $20.00
603-493-2193
Hunter Douglas
1" Horiz. Alumium Blind
still in box 72 W x 50 L
brushed aluminum Color
$75.00 352-503-6149
TWO EASTER
WREATHS grapevine
w/Easter flowers & eggs
Apppox 15" $6.00 (2)
call 603-493-2193
WOLF PICTURE, wolf
knick knack and wolf
dresser box $10.00 all
352-794-3020/5864987



CHIN-UP DIP BARS
FREE STAND $20.00
352-637-5423
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
NON FOLDING SMALL
& STURDY ONLY $90
464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP),
UPRIGHT TYPE. IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS. ONLY $75
464-0316


HORIZON TREADMILL
exc. cond. $500
Rebound Aerobics
Jumper (trampoline)
$150,352-637-5525
Life Fitness Elliptical
X3 Machine, 2006,
$1500 352-513-4293
buyer to pick-up & haul
RECUMBENT
EXERCISE BIKE
GREAT FOR THE
BACK. ONLY $95
464-0316
TREADMILL
Proform 785PI, good
cond, Programable,
monitors heart rate&
pulse. W/ incline $425
(352) 746-4091
TREADMILL
Proform 785PI, good
cond, Programable,
monitors heart rate&
pulse. W/ incline $425
(352) 746-4091
WElDER MODEL
155 WEIGHT BENCH
$25.00 352-637-5423
Floral City Area
WElDER PRO 4300
HOME GYM Needs to
be cleaned. Works
$30.00 352-637-5423



12" Boys SpiderMan
Bicycle w/training
wheels $30
352-613-0529
ALLEN BIKE RACK
Model 143a-4 Bicycle
Allen Trunk Bike Rack,
Never used,still in box.
$75 746-7232
Beautiful Compact
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$400. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p
BROWNING CITORI
Plus,12 gage, trap/skeet
Gun w/leather case
$1200 716-835-8084
CAMPING COT Alumi-
num 2" mattress with
canvas base and spring
suspension. Excellent
condition. $25 746-7232
CANOE
12' Radisson Green
Bark, exc. cond. $400
603-863-9750

CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ go Golf Cart
with charger and new
FId dn back seat $1500,
Club golf cart w/ charger
call for price
352-564-2756
Titan 25 Caliber
Gorgeous compact
Hand Gun.
$600.
Call (352) 795-0088
After 11:30 am til 7p
TITAN PISTOL
25cal, semi auto 8 shot
3", NEW, $250, call
John 352-637-0987



2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555 **
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352)457-6199


HIGH CHAIR $25
BOUNCE $15 CAR
SEAT INFANT $15 car
seat toddle $15
352-777-1256
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, $50
(352)465-1616
STROLLER GREEN
ANIMAL $25/ 2 JUMP-
EROO the horse $20
each 352-777-1256




WEDDING BAND
Ladies 14K gold
sz 6-1/2, $75.00
352-628-4210


Sell r Swa


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
wit a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
OnIy $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




3 WHEEL BIKE
HDCP Person needs
adult bike for phy
therapy. Must be road
worthy. (352) 527-9897
A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted Donated
Tall Book Shelves
and Storage Shelves
for A Humane Society
of Central Florida
Pet Rescue Inc.













Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained


Robbie Ray

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.


Welcome Miki
to Karen's hair salon
ong. from Long Island,
Ny, speaks spanish &
englshover 20 yr.
exp. please call for
appt. 352-628-5200


DuuG Australian
Shepherd/Terrier Mix.
Great watch dog.
Needs either a farm or
fenced yard.
352 419 7428
DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com


LILITH
Lilith is a lovely 2-y.o.
Hound mix. Weighs
50 Ibs, already
spayed. She is loving
& shy, very quiet &
well-mannered.
Warms up quickly
when she feels safe.
Walks well on a
leash, sits for treats,
loves to play & loves
people. She is a
wonderfully sweet
girl who thrives on
love & attention. If
you have room in
your heart for this
sweet loving girl,
call Citrus County
animal Services @
352-746-8400.
Ask for# 17998751
& rescue Lilith.

Shih-Tzu Pups,
Males Registered
Lots of colors,
Beverly Hills, FL
(352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne


I Bauy -1


-S


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179






Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052







SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518






JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114 S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150



BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


-ZS3I N


GENIE
We Clean Windows and a Whole to; More!
Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/spnringhill


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
**k 352 422-7279 *
"BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696


Add an artistic ouch to your existing yard
or pool or plan

:. : ompleheiy new!
i%_ "Ofteninitate
... .. ."._ 1n. e Iv du lk nt "



qnIsff bo rdc a b11Me10 0
OUI INTEOIN BPOW KPAVIISPECIAIST


POOL AND PAVER LLC

& Insured 352.400.3188





Ron's Affordable
Handyman Services
'* All Home
Repairs
\ Small Carpentry
Fencing
Screening
ean Dryer

Alord.^it'el & Dependable
Ei neence lifelong
352.344-0905
S .ell 400-1722
SLicensed& Insured Lic.#37761


Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *


HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067



CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609"t
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557



All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755


NEED SOMEONE TO

GET RID OF YOUR JUNK?

WE MAKE IT




DISAPPEAR FOR LESS
IF YOU WANT IT
TAKEN AWAY...CALL FOR A
FREE ESTIMATE TODAY!

352-220-91901





BATHFITTER
"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will Install A Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Rght Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641



#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
0r FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244


GENERAL I
Stand Alone
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377








AAA ROOFING

Call the "%4akuustes"
Free Written Estimate


$100 OFF
Any Re-Roof:
Must present coupon at time contract is signed.
ic./Ins. CCC5'7537 ~ ESZM


A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*"352-212-9067"*
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300




TUTORING
All ages & Subjects
Specializing in
reading,math and
LDMR, autistic
352-628-1171


All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713






MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.






Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.


COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


PRESSURE
WASHING AND
SEALING
OF
CONCRETE/PAVERS
AROUND YOUR POOL.
3 CHOICES OF SEALANT

S.L Free Estimates
~ 267-304-6162

tj S ". Weeki Wacheelocal.
w i 18yrs exp


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955
D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641
Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827
REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
**Tax Specialst
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825



344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!



ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


I.1DYR ET L 11NH


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TRIXIE
"Trixie is a pretty
2-y.o. terrier mix,
weight 50 pounds.
Nicely marked,
fawn & white in
color, Heartworm
-negative. Walks
well on a leash, sits
for treats, easy to
train, is treat- moti-
vated. No young
children please.
Would make a
great companion,
loves people & has
good energy. Is lov-
ing & affectionate.
She waits for her for-
ever home at the
Citrus County
animal Shelter @
352-746-8400. ID
number is 18728509.


-j






TUCKER
Tucker is a 3 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
beautiful, in great
physical shape.
Weight 50 lbs &
Heartwam-negatke. He
isavery ac-
tive young dog &
should be the only
dog in the family.
Would do best with
a strong experi-
enced handler &
without young chil-
dren in the home.
Needs a lot of exer-
cise & a fenced
yard is strongly rec-
ommended. Playful
& friendly, sits for
treats, chases a ball
& actually returns it!
Loves his human
friend.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL 34429












YAGER
Is Approx 6 yrs old,
weighs 701lbs, and is
an American Staffie.
He is HW negative,
walks well on leash,
ignores other dogs
and casts. He is very
sweet & good
tempered. AND, is
price! Under Foster
Care at this time.
Please call Victoria for
viewing appointment
352-302-2838





LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033




Pigs For Sale
$35 and up
352-342-9473









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-ivestock


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
1111111II




2 8ft Kayak Calypso's
with 2 paddles,
& 2 life jackets,
Like New
$250 obo for Both
(352) 364-7057




** BUY, SELL**
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*"352-563-5510"

03 SEAPRO
17' 90 hp merc. vhf,
gps, trol mtr, fullcover,
bimini, alum trlr $7200
352-419-5363pm
18HP, Evinrude
short shaft, manual,
good condition.
$460.
Crystal River
(513) 260-6410
Bayliner
1999Trophy, 22ft Cuddy
cabin, 120hp Mercury
Force,26ft dual axel
trailer, to many extras to
list. $6500 OBO
352-201-1847cell
BOAT LIFT
Shore Station, manual,
free standing. Used in
fresh water. Orig. price
$5000, asking $650
(352) 621-0392


















MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
ong. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086


inboard, outboard,
165 hspwr. exc. cond.
w/trailer $5500.
352-621-6960
PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Welcraft
16 Ft C. Console, boat,
motor,and trailer
352-746-0348




ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$47,000.
352-422-1309




00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
2003 Coachman
24 ft self contained,
sleeps 6 $4200 obo
(C)352-476-1113
(H)352-513-5135
29FT TERRY
FLEETWOOD bunk
style camping trailer.
Tag Behind 96 model.
Good shape $3800
(352) 613-2944
CAR/TOY HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $11,900.
For more info call
352-560-7247
COACHMAN 30ft
T/T, QOn. Island bed, +
rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equalizing
hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
Holiday Rambler
SAVOY 2008, 26'
sleeps 6, ducted air,
gas & electric heat,
like new, 1 slider
$14,500 352-586-1694
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serve. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
Truck Camper
over the Cab sleeps 5,
air, generator, micro-
wave, oven stove,
electric jacks & awn-
ing. Fits 8ft bed, 3/4
ton or dully $5,200.
(352) 503-2887
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




Bed Lid
ARE, 8ft. bed,
off of 1995 F350,
$250
(352) 503-2887
BLUE OX SELF
ALLIGNING TOW BAR
New with cables &
pinlock $600
352-601-4986
Truck Tires
4- Firestone Steeltechs
LT 265 x75 x16
A-T 10 ply, $325
352-795-2975




**BEST PRICE*"
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*"352-426-4267"*
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not -*
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ




BUICK
'00, Regal LS, 4 DR.
Loaded, 70K, 24 mpg,
leather, V6 auto clean
$3,975. 352-212-4882
BUICK
1996 Buick Century
auto,cruise,power locks
windows,goodtires,
runs,& drives great,
good mpg, no oil
use,am,fm,cass, $2000
obo ask for Robert
352- 563 -1934
8am til 8pm
BUICK
93 LeSabre Sedan
exc. must see, one
owner, 57k ,ask. $3900
obo 352-302-4282


CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Cruiser,
$4,990.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
HONDA
2005 Element, AWD,
good cond, khaki
colored, $6500 (352)
344-1442 or 344-1441
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
HYUNDAI
2005, Accent
$4,900
352-341-0018
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing




2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443




922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board


CLASSIFIED




2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551
CHEVY
1984 C20
project, long bed, solid
body & bed, good glass,
dual exhaust, Holly 4
barrel, 350V8, runs,
asking $1300
352-628-7243
pls leave message
CHEVY
'87, EL CAMINO
Silver, excel, cond.,
garaged, $13,500
(352) 270-3824
PONT. Trans Am
Convt. BIk, auto, v8
69K miles $12,500
352-746-0348








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On ly$28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





DODGE
1996 Dakota Sport V6
50,300 actual miles.
Runs great, excellent
shape. $5,500 OBO
Sugarmill
740-705-9004
DODGE
2000, Dakota,
crew cab
$3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
1995 E350 16' Box
Truck, 7.3, Tommy
lift-shelving, 198kmiles
$2200 352-586-1736
FORD
91 F250 Turbo Diesel
100k mi. tow pkg.
$6900 bo 352-978-0658

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440





BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100




of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus
p r o p -
erty and equipment via


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 D7


HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997, 4 Runner,
$4,750.
352-341-0018




RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150




JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment




DODGE
1998, Caravan
$1,995.
352-341-0018




99 HARLEY
FXDWG 7k mi, stg 3
cam, big blc, 42" drag
pipes $7000 obo
727-408-0602
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244
Honda
Gold Wing 1984
Exec. Cond, 39k miles
$4200 OBO
352-746-0348

ONE OWNER
KAWASAKI
Kawasaki 2007 Clas-
sic Lt Factory
2053cc in mint con-
dition with only 550
miles. Garage kept
and covered. Looks
and runs great. Red
and Black with many
extras. $6750 Phone
352-726-8124

KYMCO
2000 ZX 50 Scooter,
One owner, 268 miles,
windshield, luggage car-
rier, garage kept. $900
352-212-5286




the internet at
govdeals.com, March 4,
until March 22, 2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22,2013..


338-0317 SUCRN
Personal Mini Storage
03-27 Lien Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
THE FOLLOWING TENANTS
WILL BE SOLD FOR CASH
TO SATISFY RENTAL LIENS
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FLORIDA STATUTES, SELF
STORAGE FACILITY ACT,
SECTIONS 83-806 AND
83-807:
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE





339-0310 SUCRN
3/21 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that
the undersigned intends to
sell the vehicle described
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713 78 The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding

Meeting
Notices^


DUNNELLON
UNIT
#0039 RYAN REAVIS
#0119 MICHAEL WETZEL
#0203 LARRY QWAN
#0237 CINDA SEIBERT
CONTENTS MAY INCLUDE
KITCHEN, HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS, BEDDING,
LUGGAGE, TOYS, GAMES,
PACKED CARTONS,
FURNI-
TURE, TOOLS, CLOTHING,
TRUCKS, CARS, ETC.
THERE'S NO TITLE FOR
VEHICLES SOLD AT LIEN





on thursday March 21,
2013
at 9'00 am on the premises
where said vehicle has
been stored and which are
located at, Smitty's Auto,
Inc, 4631 W Cardinal St,
Homosassa, Citrus County,
Florida, the following'
Year:1970 Make: Kawa-
saki Model: 500 CC

303t iSUng
Nortices


SALE.
OWNERS RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO BID ON UNITS.
LIEN SALE TO BE HELD ON
THE PREMISES- MARCH
27TH @ 2:00PM.
VIEWING WILL BE AT THE
TIME OF THE SALE ONLY.
PERSONAL MINI STORAGE
DUNNELLON
11955 N FLORIDA AVE
(HWY 41)
DUNNELLON, FL 34434
352-489-6878
March 10 & 17, 2013






Vin# KAF-24896
Purchase must be paid for
at the time of purchase in
cash only Vehicle sold as is
and must be removed at the
time of sale Sale is subject
to cancellation in the event
of settlement between
owner and obligated party
March 10, 2013


MeetingB
Notices^^


340-0310NSUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

ITBNo.011-13

MC 22 Sewer Transmission Improvements

MC-22 is a master sanitary sewage pump station, owned and operated by Citrus
County and located on US19 and West Dixieland Street. The Citrus County Board of
County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a Bid to construct a new
10" force main and that will convey the sewage from MC-22 to another of the
County's master stations (MC-10) and provide crossings to service existing and future
customers. In addition, improvements and various relocations of MC-22's existing
force main system shall be constructed. This project will include but is not limited to
the following:

All piping, valves, fittings and appurtenances, Jack & Bore casings, Horizon
tal Directional Drilling pipe installations and associated materials and activities
required for completion of the project.
Minimum Reauirements for Submitting a Bid

Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Underground Utility Contractor License
2. To submit a bid the Contractor shall have at least one individual certified in
Work Zone Safety, Intermediate Level or Maintenance of Traffic MOT Certifi
cation.
3. All other required licenses/Certifications to perform this Scope of
Services

SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 4, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Craw-
ford, Citrus County Board of County Commissioners, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite
266, and Lecanto, FL 34461.

A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 4, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 283, Lecanto, Florida 34461.

Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meetings. If you are hearing
or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Document for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select 'BIDS/PURCHASING" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.

CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
March 10, 2013


341-0310 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Nolce under
Fdtlous
Name Law, pursuant to
Section 865-09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN, that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of


LION'S SHARE PROMO-
TIONS, located at 505
Hemlock Street,
Inverness,
Florida 34452, in the
County of Citrus, intends
to register said name
with
Florida Department of
State, Division of Corpo-
rations, Tallahassee, Flor-


ida.
DATED at
Inverness
this 7th day of March,
2013.
/s/ Gabriel
Oakes
Owner
Published one (1) time in
the Citrus County Chroni-
cle. March 10, 2013




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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2013 F-150 SUPER CAB STX
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11 j r 1 1 ll Pl I I I I I I ;j I


S2UUI FURD KUWN VILIUKIA LA
$4,950


2001 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
4x4
$8,950


2008 GRAND MARQUIS LS
$13,950



2010 FORD EDGE SE
$19,950


2UUI HUNDA LIVIL EA
$6,950


2008 VOLKSWAGON DUN BUGGY 2004 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX
$6,950 $6,950


2005 FORD TAURUS SEL 2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS LS 08 FORD TAURUS SEL
$9,950 $11,950 $12,950



2006 TOYOTA AVALON XLS 2007 FORD FI50 CREW 2008 LINCOLN MKX
Lariat, 4x4, FX Sport AWD
14950 $16,950 $17,950
L1 1I"7I0


2012 FORD E150 CARGO VAN 2010 LINCOLN MKS
O ne owner
$21,950 $25,950



2013 FORD FLEX LIMITED 2011 LINCOLN MKX
$32,950 $32,950


$25,950


2UUU RUKU KANUtK ALl 2UUR LINOULN IUWNIAK
Ext. Cab
$7,950 $8,950


2008 HUNDAI SANTA FE
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$13,950


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2013 MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE 2011 LINCOLN TOWN CAR 2012 HONDA CRV EXL
Signature Limited 6,000 Miles
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4x4, Loaded 11,000 Miles
$39,950 $49,500


Nick Nicholas

Call Toll Free Crystal River tNoa
77.70 C.7371


Hy. 19 N. 795-7371
1 Based on 211 CY sales. 2 Based on analysis of data published by EPA, 11/10. *Prices
and payments include all incentives and Ford Factory rebates with approved credit. Plus
tax, tag, title and administrative fee of $399. Ford Credit Financing required. Not all buyers
will qualify. See dealer for details. Dealer is not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures are for illustration purposes only. Prices and payments good through 3/31/13.


SLINCOLN


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D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013






Section E SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013



OME


RONT


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GUI


Sikorski's
-- Attic PAGE E6


I 3-


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,~
.I~Y ~h
',i2*~ 4


t


.1


Light-up plastic planters
added to an outdoor family
room give it nighttime use in
thi' design by Brian Patrick
Fl n for Hayneedle.com. In
or fol the planter to work.
it il requires being
plu Wlrnto a nearby outlet
wit attached co and
an 1f1asion cord. J ,


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#1- ,







E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013



V7 2417NLINE '^ 24f7TNFO i'C2617
I p E 526328 CEntOh LN Enter I


6145 W. RIO GRANDE DR.
PINE RIDGE
* 3BD/2BA/2CG Under Construction
* Dream Custom Home Builder Feature
* 2,464 SF Living
Call Listing Agent for Details
PETER & MARVIA KOROL !V.
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


IMMACULATE & SPACIOUS -
OVERSIZED LANAI!!!
*3BR, 2 BATH & OFFICE *LARGE 2-Car Garage
* Conan Counters Family room w/Wood Floors
* Jacuzzi Tub Updated HVAC
* Over 2,400 Sq. Ft. Living Central Vacuum
KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellstlorida.com


6722 W. SENTINEL BLUFF PATH
PINE RIDGE FARMS
*Gorgus 10 Acre Fenced Estate *3BR/2.5BA/3CG
* Lg. kitchen w/Granite Countertops Office
*14 Ft. Ceilings/Crown Moling Beautiful Master Suite
* Double-Sded Fireplace Healed Pool & SpLanai

LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611 D
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2763 BEAMWOOD DR., PINE RIDGE
NOWII Describes this beautiful Pine Ridge home No expenses
iparedl Large 3/2/2 split plan home with separate office space
Interior features boast light & bright spaces, gourmet upgraded
kitchen travertine tile throughout, formal dining, bar/sitting area,
Window treatments and much more Exterior offers fresh paint,
solar heated pool, fenced rear yard, large patio area, workshop,
fenced garden to name a few
DAVID IVORY 352-613-4460
Email: davidsivory@hotmail.com


7v %


I : I I I I
LOVELY 3RD FLOOR END UNIT with gorgeous
views of the Sugarmill Golf course. Roomy open
floor plan, split bedrooms, Ig. master bath
w/separate tub/shower, double sinks, vanity/
dressing area & walk-in closet. Sliders to the
4-season windowed balcony with large storage
closet. Inside laundry. Everything you need for full-
time or seasonal living. Priced to sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


NEW FLOORS! FRESH PAINT!
*2004 3/2/2 Car Garage Super Energy Efficient
* Tankless Water Heater *Thermal Pane Windows
*36 Ft. Screened Lanai Boat Dock
* Incredible Views Great Fishing Lake
*Incredible Buy at $259,900
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500
Email: sherylpotls@aol.com I '
000dt48: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


This updated home has two living areas. Upstairs has a
completely remodeled kitchen w/granite, new cabinets
and appliances, hardwood floors, large living area and
master bedroom. Downstairs are 3 bedrooms and
bath, family room w/ fireplace, second kitchen, and
laundry. Situated on over 1 acre with a spa and 4-car
detached garage. Lots of bang for the buck.
WAYNE HEMMERICH (352) 302-8575
Email: Wayane@WayneHemmerich.com


241N aio Hwy. Beel Hill 52-74 ww .I4XcmI11N lriaAeIvres6760


REWA
REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish


WORKSHOP, HOME, AND ACREAGE!
This big 4 bedroom home also includes a nearly
new 800 square foot workshop/storage building,
2.4 acres and a covered patio. Almost 1,800
square foot of living area in this home complete
with fireplace, central H/A, big kitchen, laundry
room and 2 baths. Paved road, fencing and more.

STEVE VARNADOE 795-2441 OR 795-9661
Email: stevevarnadoe@remax.net






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Real Estate DIGEST


Charlene Peggy
Angelo Price
EXIT EXIT
Realty Realty
Leaders. Leaders.
EXIT Realty
agents grab
top spots
Congratu-
lations to
Charlene
Angelo and E
Peggy
Price with
EXIT Realty
Leaders in Nancy
Little
Crystal Lewis
River. Char- EXIT
lene and Realty
Peggy have Leaders.
won the top
listing agent award for
February 2013. Call them
at 352-794-0888.
Congratulations also to
Nancy Little Lewis.
Nancy won the top selling
agent award for February
2013. Give Nancy a call at
352-794-0888.
Landmark
agents off to
strong start
Landmark Realty is
pleased to announce that


the sales
team of
Tomika
Spires-
Hanssen
and Kim-
berly Fuller
Kimberly
exceeded Fuller
their 2012 Landmark
goal with Realty.

of more
than $12
million.
Moving right
along in
2013, they T
have al- Tomika
ready sur- Spires-
passed the Hanssen
$2 million Landmark
mark. Realty.
Tomika and Kim specialize
in foreclosure sales and
investment properties.
Call either of them at
Landmark Realty at 352-
726-5263.
RE/MAX Realty
agents join
elite group
The associates and staff
of RE/MAX Realty One
are pleased to announce
that two of their agents re-
cently qualified for 2013
Million Dollar Club.
Jody Broom and
Johnny Holloway have
both passed the $1 million
mark in sales volume this
year.
Jody is an agent in the


How to clean


stove drip trays


Jody Johnny
Broom Holloway
RE/MAX RE/MAX
Realty One. Realty One.
Crystal River RE/MAX of-
fice and Johnny works our
of the Inverness office.
Hartman
gets ball rolling
for 2013
ERA American Realty
& Investments is proud to
announce the latest pro-


duction level
achieved by
an agent of
its Beverly
Hills office
for 2013.
Sue Hart-
man has al-
ready
surpassed
the $1 mil-
lion mark in


Sue
Hartman
ERA
American
Realty.


closed sales volume in
2013.
ERAAmerican Realty is
proud to recognize the
achievement of this fine
real estate professional.
Sue Hartman can be
reached at the Beverly
Hills office of ERAAmeri-
can Realty by calling 352-
746-3600.


D ear
Sara:
W e
have an old
electric stove
(the coil type)
with burner
drip trays. I
guess they
must be alu-
minum or Sar
some sort of FRU
coated steel. LIV
Stuff has
burned on over the past
few years, and though
we've scrubbed them and
even thrown them in the
dishwasher, they still look
awful. Is there any way to
clean them? We've used
the foil ones that you put
over the permanent ones,
but that just felt wasteful.
I would love to get the
real ones clean. Is there a
secret? Maisie,
Massachusetts
Dear Maisie: You can


CAT FARREL
(352) 400-32
; KELLER WILLIAMS
Cat@CatSell


OPE HOSE TODA 123 3OO
2864Churhil Way Herand


I


use oven
cleaner on
them, or place
them in your
oven and run
the self-
Scleaning oven
feature. An-
other method
is to sandwich
Noel your drip trays
GAL between sec-
NG tions of news-
paper, then slip
the whole thing into a
plastic garbage bag. Add
two cups of ammonia to
the bag and close it, then
let it sit overnight. When
you take the trays out, they
will wipe clean. If you
have any black chunks
from cooking spills that
don't flake off with ease,
apply baking soda and hy-
drogen peroxide and
scrub away the remaining

See FRUGAL/Page E4


HomeFront BRIEFS

Achieve landscaping
goals with class
The Citrus County Water Resources
Department is offering a free class on
"Favorite Plants for Citrus County"
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 4, in
the Extension classroom at 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Planning is a process; evaluating
the existing conditions is where the
class begins. Preregister by calling
Gina Hamilton at 352-527-5707. Call
352-527-5708 for more information.
Free class on
favorite plants
The Citrus County Water Resources
Department will offer a free class on
"Florida-friendly Landscaping" from 2
to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 12.
"Right Plant, Right Place" is a best-
management practice. The class will
be in the Extension classroom at 3650
W. Sovereign Path, Lecanto. To pre-
register, call Gina Hamilton at 352-
527-5707. Call 352-527-5708 for more
information.


87
S REALTY ..--
1 + o W BEAUnIFUL WAIERFRONI HOME |
sCitrusFI.com 50+ on Water 2 Bedr/2 ths/2 Car Gar w/Famly Rm
Clearview Est. with Pool ...
E Hartford St, Hernando
WOutdoor living at
Sit's best. 3/2


:,, 1: |, PRISTINE SOUTHERN WOODS HOME!
entertaining. MLS 359131 $179,900 3 Bedrm/2 Bths/Famil Rm/Pool3 Car Garage


OPEN~ HOUS [e1I H 10,1 11- muM
3691 Lak Tod D..ro ae


DULMK rMIt IU rLfL rIV/I"t J/Z/Z in garea
community. New 15 Seer Heat Pump in 2011,
whole house high quality water purifier system,
over 2000 sq ft. of living space. Turn-key home
$189,900
Direction: 200 North to right into Arbor Lakes,
Left on Cove Park Trail, Right on East Lake Todd
Dr to home on left.
Lili Garcia 352-302-9129 m


3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage
MOVE IN CONDITION
MLS# 359724
Directions: 486 to Canterbury Lakes Estates
Drive. Right on Churchill. Home on left
Alan DeMichael 352-613-5752
Jeanne Gaskill 352-476-5582
0 AMERICAN .EA4Q
ERA REALTY& INVESTMENTS 1 352-746-3600


, Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney
Realtor%-' A HOUSE Realtor@
302-3179 SOLD Nanfe!
746-6700oo 287.9022
The Golden Girl WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
3165 N. DELEON
BEVERLY HILLS
Home is neat as a pin, just move
right in. 2 bedroom, living plus
family room, eat-in kitchen,
2 bath and 1 car gar. Fence
yard. Home says. Come buy me
today. #701459 $69,900


BEAUTIFUL BUILDER MODEL!
3 Bedrm/2 Baths/2 Car Garage


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 E3






CITRUS CouNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Catching up on


spring gardening


L ast Feb-
ruary,
Central
Florida (cold
zones 8b and 9)
suffered hard
freezes for two
consecutive
mornings. Win-
ter had started
early, with three Jane
frosty mornings
in November JAN
followed by a GAR
warm Decem-
ber with only two frosty
mornings. Plants had their
necessary chill hours and
seemed to think winter
was over early We had
some good rains over the
winter, too. Many plants
continued green and grow-
ing until the hard freeze
hit in mid-February Some
tender new weed
seedlings in the lawn and
flower beds were killed by
February's freezes.
Carolina Jessamine
bloomed spectacularly in
January Some Redbud
trees and native plums
bloomed early in mid-Jan-
uary rather than in Febru-
ary. Peaches forming by
early January were frozen


dead in Febru-
ary My peach
tree continued
to bloom into
March and is
setting fruit
again.
The High-
bush Blueber-
ries needed
Weber only 45 chill
hours (under 35
E'S degrees), so
DEN they were in
bloom in Febru-
ary but had not started to
set fruit. Rabbiteye Blue-
berries need more chill
hours, so they did not bud
up until late February
Frost is still a possibility
until mid-March.
The Camellias and Azal-
eas were in full bloom
when the February freeze
hit. Petals and plump buds
were frozen. The types
that only flower for three
to four weeks had few buds
left to bloom in late Febru-
ary Repeat-blooming 'En-
core' types shed the
freeze-killed buds and
started to flower again
after 10 days to two weeks.

See JANE/Page E10O


JOANN MARTIN
Referred
REAL ESTA TE


352-270-3255


MLS


OEN 'HOUSES SUNDAY I P]


3700 N Honeylocust Drive
Beverly Hills FL
1650sf of living area 2 Bedroom 2 bath 2
car garage, roof replaced 2006, move in
ready. Asking $69,900.00
Dir: 486 to North on Forest Ridge Blvd. to
right on N. Honeylocust to #3700


101 S. Harrison
Beverly Hills FL
Imperial Executive II with lots of storage,
roof replaced in 2004, fenced yard,
circular driveway. Priced at $65,000.
Dir.: Rte 491 to Roosevelt to Harrison to
#101


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

caked-on food. This works for oven
racks, too. If you ever replace the
trays, opt for the black trays, which
look nicer longer, in my opinion.
Dear Sara: I purchased an enor-
mous amount of used baby clothing
from a friend. All of it is brand-
name and the vast majority of it was
very well-kept; however, there are a
few pieces that have stains, which I
would like to get out. I have no idea
what most of these stains are. So,
what are your best tricks for remov-
ing stains from baby or children's


clothing? -M.K, Canada
Dear M.K: Try using either a bar
of Fels-Naptha or applying a mix-
ture of Dawn dishwashing liquid
and a tablespoon of ammonia. Rub
gently and rinse. Or soak the cloth-
ing overnight in a big bucket of hot
water with 1/2 cup of powdered Cas-
cade and 1/2 cup of Clorox 2 (or use
just OxiClean), then launder as
usual. You can also use a mixture of
Dawn dishwashing liquid, hydrogen
peroxide and baking soda. Apply
the mixture to the stains, let it set
and scrub with a toothbrush. Laun-
der as usual. Place the garment out-
side in the sun, too. It works as a
natural bleach.
Dear Sara: Pulverizing spices


and herbs? I used my electric mini-
chopper to make celery powder and
celery flakes from dehydrated cel-
ery (Basically, what was left after I
strained the powder off was what I
called "flakes" and will use for
soups, etc.) It worked OK, but it took
a good while to do it What kind of
gadget can I use to make celery,
onions, dried garlic and bell pep-
pers into powder without so many
"re-dos"? S.P, Louisiana
Dear S.E: I'd use a mortar and
pestle, a pepper mill or a coffee
grinder. In some cases, such as for
cinnamon, you can use a
microplane.

See FRUGAL/Page E7


1481 Pine Ridge Blvd. kmW Prudential 20 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465 Florida Showcase Hernando, FL 34442
(352) 527-1820 ora sowca(352) 746-0744
Properties


OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-3 NEW LISTING



bitO 1246 E Cleveland St-
2 tMLS 70029u7 $112,500 LL -
2/2/2 peace tranquilityt found here. 1868W Rulland Dr
Move-in rea"y. -1868 W Rulland Dr
Directions:486toAnnapolis, rton MLS 701453 $59,900
Bismark, left on Eisenhower, it on Conveniently located, 2/1/2, large pool,
Cleveland. fenced yard.
Jack Fleming 352-422-4086 Dick Hildebrandt 352-586-0478


NEW LISTING
^..M^" j'--


-rU 4f i11 435 E Keller C,
MLS 700431 S334,900
Incredible 3/2/2, pool,furnished w/ many
desirable features.
Direction: 486 to south on Citrus Hills
Blvd, left on Keller Ct
JoAnn Condit 352-212-9774


"fl.u e 2725 N Page Ave 1094W Skyview Landings Dr
MLS358012 $499,000 MLS 356539 $375,000
Custom Cracker home 3/3/+ lots more, 3/2.5/2 villa w/many fabulous features
metal-roof, 5 acres, you won't want to miss.
Sandra Olear 352-212-4058 Paula Fuhst 352-613-7553


_fAW I 1284 N Lombardo Ave
MLS 701377 $159,000
Spacious, renovated 3/2/2 plan pool
home. A great value!
Mark Casper 352-476-8136

n-_




U4llS 60 E Ireland Ct
MLS 700370 $249,700
New 2013 3/2/3 on the Oaks Golf Course.
High efficiency windows/insulation.
Phil Phillips 352-302-3146


3298 W Daffodil Dr 375 E Liberty St Olei 1075 S Softwind Lp 370 N Buckwheal PI
MLS 358091 $221,000 MLS 359601 $179,900 MLS 352259 $128,000 MLS 356804 $89,900
3/2/2w/pool on golf course. 3/2/2 pool home designed for Spacious 3/2/3 home, corner lotw/"no- 2/2/pool home at end of cul-de-sac.
Meticulously maintained, fantastic view. entertaining. On the Oaks Golf Course. build" behind it. What a buy!
Teresa Boozer 352-634-0213 Matt Robinson 352-502-3501 Florence Cleary 352-634-5523 Joy Holland 352-464-4952
2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the
Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.


J J ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ..... 1111 r-- = I I 1 r ......1.....


E4SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


I


!
V
I
I






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Maintaining Washington's famous cherry trees


S. 7... ]| Gift from Japan poses unique issues


LEE REICH
Associated Press

In many parts of the country, you
don't have to look far to see cherry
trees in bloom in coming weeks.
Still, more than half a million visi-
tors annually embark on a spring
pilgrimage to Washington, D.C., to
see the ones there.
Besides sheer profusion, those
cherries have history They were a
gift from Japan as thanks for our
help during the Russo-Japanese
War of 1905. Howard Taft was secre-
tary of war then; he was president
when the first cherry tree was low-


ered into the ground in 1912 by his
wife, Helen.
Aging trees
Alas, no tree lives forever, and
those original cherries have been
succumbing to age despite efforts to
coddle them along. It wouldn't seem
right to stick just any old cherry
trees into the ground to replace
those that fail. After all, these par-
ticular trees symbolize a bond with
Japan and have stood witness to his-
tory Besides, there are a number of
different cherry species and


See CHERRIES/Page E13


Associated Press
In this March 18, 2012, file photo, cherry blossom trees are in bloom around the Tidal Basin, with
the Jefferson Memorial in the background in Washington. The cherry blossoms draw about
1 million visitors each spring. This year marks the 101st anniversary of the gift of trees
from Japan.


(352) 726-6668 (432) 2 12-I-lY \'
TOLL FREE 1-800-543-9163 CUSTOM COUNTY CHARMER
ON 2 ACRES ** NOW $115,000
J.W. MORTON REAL ESTATE Bright and cheery bedrooms, 2 baths *
1 i u- ',, i. -: --:-- FI iA Nice and open kitchen Great room Screen
S .,. : c: :,. lanai All fenced. Central Citrus County
|,..;, :.. ..-.c : ,. r paved road. NOW ONLY $115,000
- I S .r ,;.,=:,=ri;.t,=rn,, .-. .r :. -r,,_;..-, -=-rn_-. MIS 358681

OPEN HOS SUDY 20030


.OPEN SPACE GREAT GATHERING PLACES
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COLDr'fiaLL~
BANjej


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 E5






E6 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
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................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
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CHR ONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
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For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


4-H livestock teaches


record-keeping basics
Youth can gain a lot of valuable seen as a mundane chore, record-keeping
knowledge and skills in 4-H, espe- can help 4-H'ers, as well as their parents
cially through 4-H clubs and long- and adult leaders, realize more of the
term projects. But kids are usually so value of their involvement in clubs,
busy having fun, they don't al- a m camps, projects, and other ed-
ways recognize the life skills or ucational activities. The Ani-
other competencies they learn / mal Project Record provides a
while participating. | place for 4-H members to keep
One of these long-term proj- their animal inventory, health
ects that many of our 4-H'ers j ., records, feed, bedding, equip-
enjoy is raising animals to ment, and project cost infor-
enter into the Citrus County i nation. Keeping a 4-H record
Fair's livestock shows. After book will help youth:
many months of preparation, U Learn how to organize
the 4-H'ers are nearly ready to | themselves.
exhibit their animals begin- U Learn how to set reason-
ning Sunday, March 24, with Amy Duncan able goals.
heifers. Monday, March 25, fea- YOUNG U Appreciate what they've
tures rabbits; Tuesday, March IDEAS learned this year from the
26, swine; Wednesday, March goals they reached.
27, steer; Thursday, March 28, U Recognize what they
poultry; and Saturday, March 30, horses. learned in their 4-H project.
Visit the Fair's website at www.citrus U Explain what they've learned.
countyfair.com for the complete livestock U Keep track of costs of their project.
schedule. U Gather information needed to apply
Each of the youth exhibitors must com- for awards and scholarships.
plete a record book for their project ani-
mals. Although record books are often See 4-H/Page E7


Inside...


Outdoor lighting
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E4
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Antique chairs; pier mirror; and ... a porcelain hand?


Dear John: I enjoy your would be worthwhile to have
column every week, and the seat re-caned. I look for-
I would appreciate any ward to receiving any informa-
information you can tion you can share.
give me regarding -M.E, Hernando
the following. At- Dear M.E: It is
tached are images of nice your chairs are
four old chairs that company marked; it
were a gift to my .. will likely make a
daughter in the late difference in the dis-
1980s or early '90s, tant future. Your
and they have been chairs were manu-
in use since then. My factured by the H.I.
daughter's friend in- Seymour Company
dicated they had John Sikorski as marked during
been in her family SIKORSKI'S the last quarter of
for many years. the 19th century. It
One of the cane ATTIC would certainly be a
seats is damaged and good idea to have the
needs repairing. The seat seat cane repaired for practical
frame indicates, "Made by H.I. reasons. The cost may be more
Seymour, Troy, N.Y, Patented than the dollar value of the
Sep. 23, 1862." I would like to chair, but it will be usable.
know if these chairs have any Chairs like yours typically sell
monetary value, and whether it below the $100 range each,


short of good luck.
There was a famous furni-
ture maker, Thomas Seymour,
during the late 18th to early
19th century in Boston, Mass.,
whose furniture is eagerly
sought after by collectors and
sells into the thousands of dol-
lars. You might do some re-
search to see if there is a family
connection to H.I. Seymour.
Dear John: My husband pur-
chased the oak hall tree in the
photo. It came out of a house
built before 1900. It is 8 1/2 feet
tall and more than 4 feet wide.
The beveled mirror is good and
the finish is good. Can you give
me an idea of value? KJR.,
Homosassa
Dear K.J.R.: Based on the
photograph, it is not a hall tree
used to hang hats, coats, and a
place for canes. You have a pier
mirror meant to be placed be-


tween two large windows. I
wish you had included a couple
of photographs of the detail; the
photo is not very clear. I think it
was made in America close to
the end of the Victorian era,
circa 1880. Current market in-
terest is very soft. Potential dol-
lar value is below $500, short of
a lucky day
Dear John: I have a porcelain
hand. It looks like it might be
for gloves. It is marked Oriental
Porcelain, Trenton, NJ. The
date looks like it is 1888. The
printing on it is in blue. There
are also two horizontal parallel
stripes on the base. My grand-
See ATTIC/Page E7
This chair was made sometime
during the last quarter of the
19th century, by H.I. Seymour
Company of Troy, N.Y.
Special to the Chronicle






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E4

MEN
Leftover hamburger or
hot dog buns are delicious
toasted or grilled. Save
them to make garlic bread,
bread pudding, strata,
grilled sandwiches (such
as egg or ham and cheese)
or mini pizzas, which can
be frozen and reheated
later.
The first reader tip
shares another idea:
Use leftover hamburger
and hot dog buns: I use
them to make French
toast I fry them in a pan or
on a griddle and some-
times bake them (at 350
degrees for 45 minutes). -
Lisa, Michigan
Homemade fabric sof-
tener: I have been making
my own fabric softener
since I began making laun-
dry detergent. I love this
recipe:
2 to 3 gallons warm or
room-temperature water.
3 24-ounce or larger
bottles of any scented hair
conditioner.
8 to 10 cups white
vinegar.
Immersion blender/
whisk.
Empty three bottles of
conditioner into 5-gallon


ATTIC
Continued from Page E6

mother picked it up in an
antiques shop in New Jer-
sey some time ago.
I was just wondering if
this is truly from 1888 -
the first 8 is blurry and
what it is. It is currently
holding my necklaces. I
love your column and am
always glad to hear you on
the air H., Internet
Dear H.: Though there is
no specific collector inter-
est in porcelain glove
stands, they are bought and
sold in the marketplace,
due to their fun and deco-
rative applications. I think


bucket. (Rinse the bottles
with water to get all of the
conditioner!) Add vinegar
at these ratios, depending
on the size of your condi-
tioner bottles: 24 to 28 oz,
add 8 cups; 32 ounces, add
9 cups; larger, add 10 cups.
Your clothes will not smell
like vinegar, I promise!
Add 2 gallons water. Mix
well with immersion
blender or whisk. If mix-
ture is too thick, add more
water until it's at a better
consistency.
You can use this right
away Use 1/2 cup per load
in the rinse cycle, or use it
in your Downy Ball. A lot
of people think that the
conditioner is what softens
your clothes, but it's actu-
ally the vinegar. The con-
ditioner is used just for its
scent. -M.D., Ohio
Homemade fabric sof-
tener II:
4 cups Epsom salt
20 drops essential oil.
Put in jar and mix well.
Use 1/4 cup with laundry
detergent. This works in
hot or cold water I use 10
drops lavender and 10
drops lemon essential oil.
- Hope, North Carolina
Cleaning baked-on foods
from pots and pans: Add
dishwasher detergent to
hot water and soak the pan


Page E13


Oriental Porcelain is a
trade name, not an actual
maker. There were numer-
ous porcelain and china
manufacturers in Trenton,
New Jersey during the late
19th century; many of them
produced porcelain glove
stands. Potential dollar
value is catch-as-catch-can.


John Sikorski has been a
professional in the an-
tiques business for 30
years. He hosts a call-in
radio show, Sikorski's
Attic, on WJUF (90.1 FM)
Saturday from noon to
1 p.m. Send questions to
Sikorski's Attic, PO. Box
2513, Ocala, FL 34478 or
asksikorski@aol. com.


4-H
Continued from Page E6

Complete applications and re-
sumes for jobs and college.
Meet requirements to partici-
pate in some county, state, or na-
tional 4-H events.
To help motivate the youth and
measure their success, the fair's live-
stock record books are judged. Volun-
teers utilize a standard score sheet to
assign points grading the books' com-
pleteness, neatness and accuracy
These scores, along with the youth's
scores on other events including pre-


Volunteers utilize a standard score sheet
to assign points grading the books'
completeness, neatness and accuracy.


fair talks, and educational posters
they have created, will add up to a
final tally. These scores will be en-
tered into the Goal Premium Award
program and will translate into actual
cash prizes for the youth.
For information about volunteer-
ing to judge record books or spon-
sor the Goal Premium Awards,
please contact your Citrus County
Extension's 4-H Office by calling
352-527-5712 or email Amy Duncan,


the 4-H agent at amy.duncan
@bocc.citrus.fl.us
Citrus County Extension connects
the public with the University of
Florida/IFAS's knowledge, research
and resources to address youth, fam-
ily, community and agricultural
needs. Programs and activities of-
fered by the Extension Service are
available to all persons without re-
gard to race, color, handicap, sex, re-
ligion or national origin.


Amanda & Kiik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKER/ASSOC. REALTOR, GRI REALTOR REALTOR- BROKER REALTOR


PINE -


F 6262 W SETTLER
| 5/4/3 700993 $379,900 |





S6121 N. SILVER PALM
3/2.5/2 358309 $148,500



I- -
2435 W. ERIC
2/1/1 701256 $52,900


3948 N. BUCKWHEAT
3/2/2 700825 $187,500


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SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 E7






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'Ivy


With skillful use oflighting you can


bring a little bit of indoor comfort to the outdoors


MELISSA RAYWORTH
Associated Press

any Americans have embraced
outdoor decorating, filling their
yards with fluffy sofas, gleaming
end tables and even outdoor rugs.
But what happens when the sun goes
down?
Chris Lambton, landscape designer
and host of HGTV's "Going Yard," ad-
vises his clients to give as much thought
to the lighting of their outdoor space as
they do to the furnishings.
Forget yesterday's glaring porch light,
he says. You can now choose from a
wide range of much subtler lighting op-


tions. Many are inexpensive and stylish
enough to quickly turn a basic patio into
a chic entertaining space.
Here Lambton and two other outdoor
decorating experts Los Angeles-
based designers Jeff Andrews and Brian
Patrick Flynn offer advice on the
newest, most attractive and safest op-
tions for outdoor lighting.
Indulge your indoor style
Many indoor furniture designs and
fabrics are now available as outdoor
items, Lambton says, and the same goes
for lighting. Companies are creating out-
door versions of their most popular in-
door lamps and fixtures.


Flynn is a fan of outdoor chandeliers
on patios or decks that are covered:
"They're an excellent way to make any
humdrum outdoor space feel like an ac-
tual room."
But, he says, choose wisely: "To get
them right, you've got to take scale and
proportion into consideration. Install
one that's too small, and it will look like
an afterthought. Install one that's too
big or hangs too low, and it will com-
pletely overwhelm the space."
Flynn also recommends using floor
lamps and table lamps designed for out-
door use. Prices vary widely (from more
than $1,000 to less than $100), so he sug-
gests hunting online for deals and the


perfect style.
Another option: Create your own out-
door fixture. Many electricians can
rewire your favorite indoor lighting to
be safely used outside, Lambton says.
"Search for whatever fixture you like,"
he says, "then put an outdoor conduit in
and attach it to a switch."
Go vintage
"Vintage is always a key to good light-
ing," Andrews says, "indoors and out-
doors."
"Recently I got these really cool, inex-
pensive Moroccan lanterns" with a vin-

See Page E9


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


LIGHT
Continued from Page E8

tage look. Rather than simply
displaying them on a table,
he hung them from outdoor
branches. "I had them wired
for outside and hid the wires
in the trees," he explains.
When the vintage lanterns
glow from the tree branches
at night, it gives the yard a
"romantic and kind of Euro-
pean feel."
Forget the flood light
Rather than one or two
bright porch lights, all three
designers suggest using a va-
riety of softer lights.
Lambton has used faux
stone blocks with LED lights
hidden inside, alongside tra-
ditional lighting. Flynn has
done the same with illumi-
nated planters.
"Sneaking in ambient light
in unexpected ways is some-
thing I love to do," Flynn
says. "In Los Angeles, I
turned the middle of a fam-
ily's Los Feliz back yard into
a full-fledged family room,
comfy sectional sofa and all.
To bring light to the space, I
used modern, plastic
planters that light up. They
have cords on the back of
them, and connect to exte-
rior outlets. Once turned on,
a light bulb inside the trans-
parent plastic illuminates
and the entire area glows
softly This is so genius be-


cause it requires no electri-
cian whatsoever."
Even simpler options: thin
strips of lights that can be at-
tached along the underside
of deck railings, or strands of
lights in the shape of every-
thing from simple bulbs to
stars, hearts or jalapeno pep-
pers strung overhead.
No matter which style of
light you choose, Andrews
says, add dimmers to your
outdoor light switches.
"Everything in the world," he
says, "needs to be on a
dimmer."
Beyond the backyard
Don't forget to light the far
reaches of your yard,
Lambton says. It will make
your property feel bigger
and banish the feeling of
being enveloped by dark-
ness when you entertain
outside.
It costs little to place a few
small, solar-powered lights at
the bases of trees and
shrubs. He also suggests at-
taching a few to tree
branches. "And I love to up-
light ornamental grasses,"
Lambton says. "It adds nice
depth to the yard."
Don't forget the fire
Fire pits of all sizes -
from huge outdoor fireplaces
to small tabletop containers
- provide golden, flickering
light for your outdoor space.
Display a collection of pil-
lar candles in varying sizes
(battery-powered or real), ei-


their clustered on their own
or tucked inside large, glass
lanterns to "add a bit of
sparkle" to your yard, An-
drews says.
Or create an outdoor chan-
delier with candles: "I tend
to try my hand at rustic do-it-
yourself ideas," Flynn says.
"In my own outdoor dining
room, I suspended a cande-
labra made from reclaimed
pine planks, rope, mason jars
and tea lights above the din-
ing table. When my family
comes over for pizza night, it
creates the perfect
ambience."
Safety and beauty
Home improvement stores
and websites offer a huge
array of options for lighting
outdoor pathways and deck
stairs, adding beauty while
making your space safer
And what about the safety
of leaving lighting out in all
weather? If it's outdoor-
rated, Andrews says, it
should be fine. But keep your
climate in mind.
Flynn prefers not to leave
"most lighting sources out
year-round unless an out-
door space is covered," he
says. "The only type of light-
ing I'm worry-free about for
the outdoors is festival-style
string lights. They're pretty
much the same thing as holi-
day twinkle lights. My fa-
vorite styles are strands with
mini-lanterns; they really
help light the perimeter of a
space."


Pine Ridge Pool Home
5301 N Carnation Dr. Beverly Hills Florida
Spacious family home with light & bright
open floor plan has 4 large bedrooms,
3 full bathrooms, family room with
wood-burning fireplace, a sparkling
in-ground pool and a 3 car garage.
$178,500 MIS 701025
Leconto Hwy 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to Right on Carnation
Dennis Pilon Cel 352-697-2540 W6""
Linda Trevor Cel 954-701-3391 mT.T


J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?


3/2 Condo............$675
2/1/1...................... $650
2/2 Townhouse..$650
Lg. 2/3/2 Home. $850

2/1/Carport..... $650
2/2/1 Available April....$650

2/2/12 ................... $850
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
Cheryl Scruggs,
SRealtor-Associate
g 352-726-9010


I BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-CRYSTAL RIVER, FL
Commercial location near courthouse on S. 3BR/2BA in city limits. Almost / acre.
Anonka. S86.900 MIS#356806 I S34.000 MIS#701466 I


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on large shaded lot.
Carport. Central water. 530,000
MLS#359133


BANK OWNED-FLORAL CITY, FL I
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. S45,000


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471
Email: roybass@tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352302-6714 4


UNIQUE WITH CUSTOM DECOR! CORIAN WITH STAINLESS STEEL!
* 3/2/2 built by Sweetwater 3/2/2 pool home built in 2007
* Over 3700 sq. ft of living Sweeping circular driveway
* New 40-year metal roof in 2012 2300 sq. ft of living corner lot
* Main AC/heat unit new in 2009 Fireplace in family room
* Stunning atrium with new screening Double leaded beveled entry doors
*Home warranty for the buyers Well for the yard
#700779 $242,000 #354014 $207,000
See.Virtual IIIurs..i.ww.reIJ aIJ.I.I.Ie IIB.I..m


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 E9






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


How to decorate


a rental space


JANE
Continued from Page E4

Leaves that froze were
also shed. New leaves that
had sprouted early froze,
too, but were soon
replaced.
Too bad the freeze did
not kill the nests of tent
caterpillars in the cherry,
plum and birch trees.
Reach up, poke a hole in
the web and spray the
moth caterpillars with
contact insecticide like
Raid. The nests are easy to
see before the trees fully
leaf out. A systemic insec-
ticide containing bifen-
thrin will enter leaves and
poison insects and cater-
pillars that chew plant
leaves. Do not use it on
food crops that will be
eaten within six to eight
weeks. Read and follow all
label directions.
Bifenthrin is a broad-
spectrum insecticide. It


comes in a thick, creamy
concentrate from agricul-
tural wholesalers such as
John Deere Landscapes,
who carry name brands
and less-expensive
generic brands. It kills in-
sects on contact
Spray under the leaves
where scale insects live on
Sagos, Coonties, Camellias,
Magnolias, etc. Bifenthrin
enters plant leaves and kills
insects when they suck or
chew and ingest the chemi-
cal insecticide. Bifenthrin is
residual, so it lasts from six
to eight weeks.
The giant, multi-colored
Lubber Grasshopper lays
its eggs in the ground.
Young hatch and emerge
usually about the first of
April. I suspect they will
emerge in March this
spring. Dozens of little
black grasshoppers, a
quarter- to a half-inch in
size with a yellow to or-
ange stripe on the back
will congregate on a single
branch early in the morn-


ing after hatching.
Stroll the garden early to
find these hatchlings. Take
a spray can of insecticide
or a pump-up tank of di-
luted bifenthrin (a quarter-
to a half-ounce in a gallon
of water). Slowly sneak up
on the resting grasshop-
pers and spray upward
from underneath. The
black pests will hop off in
all directions through the
spray Enough poison will
coat their bodies and
breathing holes to kill the
little buggers. You can
stomp on stray escapees.
Lubbers feast on all
lilies. Spray lilies,
Crinums, Agapanthus, Day
Lilies, Amaryllis, etc. with
bifenthrin before juvenile
grasshoppers hatch. One
meal is enough to kill the


small grasshoppers.
Do not spray any butter-
fly caterpillar host plants or
plants where bees, butter-
flies, hummingbirds or
other pollinators gather
pollen or nectar. Many
homeowners hire licenced
professionals to apply
chemical. DYI tip: more is
not better in the case of gar-
den chemicals. Read and
follow label instructions.


Jane Weber is a Profes-
sional Gardener and Con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands of native
plants. Visitors are wel-
come to her Dunnellon,
Marion County garden.
For an appointment call
352-249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.


Associated Press
Stencils create the look of patterned wallpaper on a
rental apartment wall for a burst of color as seen in
"The First Apartment Book: Cool Design for Small
Spaces," by Kyle Schuneman.

Space, budget considerations


MELISSA
RAYWORTH
Associated Press

It's yours, but it isn't. A
rented apartment or
house can be a wonderful
place to live, and a chal-
lenging place to decorate.


The restrictions are
many: Landlords often
want their white walls to
stay white. Many won't let
you do even the most
minor construction. Some
even ask renters not to

See Page E13


' y www.parsleyrealestate.com
IIEM Nmmm


fI"Kl-MI.IJ VVMIEKrK.v NII IVIove rlgni-in ana reiax in inls L DI,
2 BA, doublewide with 2 Florida rooms, 90' on the water with
cement sea wall and dock, shed, mostly fenced, double carport.
Wonderful double lot. View that will make you want to watch the
sunset and fish the days away. MLS 359654 $79,900.


ESS beautifully renovated M/H on 6 acres of land. 12 x 24 workshop
a, 235 bath condo w/high ceiling electric, metal roof over, update
mi, end unit, 2 story w/spiral appliances, fenced and cross fence(
balcony overlooking the water, covered rear porch, front wood decking
$55,000 #353937 $70,000


E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
HOMOSASSA
2/2 MH, SW, Irg. scrn.
rm. covered parking
$500 mo. 1st last sec.
(352) 302-2395
INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951





must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/1, DW, H/A, 12x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272


BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183
HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2b/21/2 ba, 1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, incl
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171





NEW !! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Homes
Demo your mobile
home/free tear down
at Palm Harbor New
mobiles $39k off list
John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377





For Sale %9"
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 11/ AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
4Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217


HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
2/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Owner Finance/Lease
Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH,
14 x 20 block building,
New Septic, Handy
person, $28,900./Offer
352-422-1916




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138

LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804


mm
-A MON

RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
ww. CitrusCountyHomeRentals. com
HOMOSASSA/CHASSOHOWITZKA
8140 Miss Maggie Dr.#I (H)...S550
2/1 Wtdiront i uplex, rent dudesutllies w/cap
2 11alsm (H)...............$1,400
4/3/3 ool hme i S pt rdl i oo l .i n
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way (HER) .....$775
3/2 DW ewe ole on 1/2 AR
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (HER). $625
2/1, Florida room
CRYSTAL RIVER
9179 Cleveland l(R) .............. $675
2/2/1 Roomy ho e close to 7 iversHosp.
1266 N.SeagullPt.#143 (CR)... .$1,100
2/3 Beautiful condo, 3 To. mim.
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
9 Daniel St. (BH) .................. $650
2/1 Neat, clean, quest location
160 N. Dual Dr. (CS)........100
3/2/2 l hmie, funishie, includI qp on rtillt
























FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375/Mo. $300/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628


FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT I Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025


Inverness
2/1 on private estate, no
smoking,$650 monthly
Utilities included 1st,
last, sec. Req.
352-422-2393




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/ 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
2/1, Beautiful Apt.
Clean 352-341-1029.
INVERNESS
2/1 water/trash incl. 1st
fl, ihv,kittile, bedrooms
carpeted, screen patio
$525 1st and Sec.
352-344-0238
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed /1 Bath
&2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furnished &
Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & the
Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/month
Call 352-795-1795
for Appt.
www.ensing
properties.com





CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
HarbourApts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037


CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922
INVERNESS
1 BR., Pool & Laundry.
(352) 637-1805




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528





LERCANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ until. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




HOMOSASSA




INVERNESS
1/1 Condo in Royal
Oaks $575/mo Pool
Incld's Water/ Sewer/
Trash/WD 352302-7406
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, avail April 1,
$725. (352) 503-3087




CRYSTAL RIVER
New Furn Studio $650
All Util Incl w/pool
352-270-3527
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
Cottages 1/1, All Util.
Incld, 386-208-2495


BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, $750 mo. 1st &
last (352) 422-4872
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



EQUAL HOUSING CV

CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, no pets
$1000mo 352-270-8953
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493
Photos: http://ocala
.craigslist.org/apa/
3653804501 .html
FLORAL CITY
Completely Remod-
eled, 2/2/1, waterfront,
Behind Fire Station,
$750/mo. Call
352-563-9796
Hernando
Rentals
from $500.00 a) MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515
HERNANDO
Riverlakes Manor 2/2
BIk home/tiled $650
mo. (352) 464-0647
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210


HOMOSASSA
4/3, Large yard, lanai,
Fireplace $1,100 mo.
2 sheds (352) 302-9677
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/1, $750. mo
418 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 Cell
INVERNESS
Large furn. 1 BR home
in 55+ community,
Great location just off
the water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $550
(352) 344-1380
Lecanto 2/2/2
immaculate, $750+
1 mo. security
352-447-2031
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
INVERNESS
Nice Waterfront, 2 story
Condo 2/22.Great loc.
First, last, Sec $675 mo.
(352) 302-4546




CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv.
Rm./Ba. share kit. $400
everything Included
352-875-5998
INVERNESS
Room & Private Bath
$425. mo. 341-1544




AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


grnc 1


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 Ell








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed
352-566-7099 or
606-694-7099



PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY




Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com



TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.






Lakefront Beauty
Open House
Sat 11-3pm /
Sun 12-3pm
7734 S. Shore Acres
Floral City
$169,900.
(352) 212-1446
ealty Connect

Sugarmill Woods
Sunday Mar. 10, 1-4 PM
3 Chinkapin Court
Homosassa FI
Nancy Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders





HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428





PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164





Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433


HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only **
352-503-3245


I1.Z- .77


For Sale By
AUCTION
Beautiful 2,800 SF
Home on 6 acres in
Pine Ridge Estates,
3 BR/2.5 BA,
Open Floor Plan,
Large Eat-in Kitchen,
Screened Porch
with Pool, 3 Fenced
Pastures for Horses,
Well Maintained
Move-in Ready
Auction held on site
5485 W. Bonanza Dr.
Beverly Hills, Fl.
Sat. A ril 6th,
11am
CALL 352-519-3130
Visit
American Heritage
Auctioneers.comrn












Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1 ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $69,000
2/1 / 1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line apple's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

Rr/MK
REALTY ONE


3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE

MHm 3/2 widen
on land off US 19
newer c/h/a, furn, clean
RV Hkup.**$39.900-
Cridland Real Estate
JDesha 352-634-6340




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell




211 Pine St
4BD/3BA. Save
$25,000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF, heated pool,
Granite, SS Appliances,
Wood, Tile and Carpet.
2 Car Gar, greatroom,
fireplace $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.

Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-287-0473

Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531

Golf Course Home
3/2/272. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475


2 ACRES
Quiet Country Settina
3/2 on 2 acres mol
Approx. 1750 sq ft LA
front porch, Lg rear
screened porch, Patio,
24x30 Steel Building,
Steel Carport great
for boat storage, etc.
Fenced and cross-
fenced, Built in 2003
Nice Oaks, Wooded,
Citrus Springs area
only 20 Min. to Ocala
$126,500
Call 352-302-6784
for appt.


# Employment
I source is...
C1116N


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
gail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.





I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Hme


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855






-





TONY
Pauelsen
Realtor
352-303-0619
Buy or Sell
now is the time

TOP
PERFORMANCE
Real estate
Consultant






Lake Rousseau
Stilt House 3/1/2 &
carport. New roof,
new kitchen and
many upgrades.
Plumbed for add'l
bath, 170' frontage.
lake deck,2 Boat
houses, 20'x 40' shop.
Full irrigation on 1 acre
with 8 citrus trees.
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904





3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723


CHIEFLAND
GET-AWAY- No Cell
phone, no garbage
truck, no pavement.
Wild life galore! 4 Room
house on 1/4 acre near
Suwannee River.
16 miles to Cedar Key
$35,000.(478) 550-5012


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com



2BD / 1BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116


INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337


YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


ForSaleh
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505







20 DOCKABLE
ACRES
St. Lucie Waterway.
$159,500. 45mins
boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.



HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2/%Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331







"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNaf-re'oast
Propertes.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697












Twee


Twe






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E7

overnight. It works like a charm, but
should never be used on aluminum,
because it pits the metal. This method
works well on CorningWare, stainless
and Pyrex-type glass. Dorothy
"Doje"M., North Carolina
Homemade whipped cream: Place a
can of full-fat coconut milk in the
fridge overnight. Open the can and
pour off the liquid. (You can save the
liquid for smoothies.) Scoop the re-
maining hardened coconut milk from
the can and whip it until light and
fluffy, then add flavoring, such as
vanilla. Store any leftovers in the
fridge. -Laura, New York


CHERRIES
Continued from Page E5

varieties not even all pink-flowered,
or double-flowered or weeping cher-
ries are the same.
The 3,000 or so trees sent as a gift in
1912 were mostly Yoshino cherry trees.
Yoshinos are hybrids of unknown
parentage, and come in a number of
varieties, among them those with pink
flowers and upright habit (Afterglow),
white flowers and weeping habit (Pen-
dula), and diminutive size and weeping
habit (Shidare Yoshino).
The earliest replacements for ailing
trees around the Tidal Basin were made
in the 1930s and were of a Yoshino vari-
ety called Akebono ("Daybreak"), which
has double, pink flowers.
The cloning solution
In recent years, efforts were made to
replace ailing trees with genetic repli-
cas of the originals. Such trees would
be exactly the same as the originals,
only younger. Genetic replicas are cre-
ated by cloning, which involves taking
cuttings from the original trees and
rooting them to make whole new ones.
Rooting cuttings from an 80-year-old
tree is not easy, because cuttings gen-
erally root most readily from so-called
juvenile wood. Where do you find ju-
venile wood on an 80-year-old plant? In
sprouts near the base, the original part
of the plant.
Since not all of the original Yoshino
cherries were identical, efforts have
also been made to "fingerprint" them,
using their DNA to better identify and
differentiate them. The greater the ge-
netic diversity that is found the better,


Uses for a coffee canister: I use one
as a scoop for planting soil out of the
bag and for scooping pellets for my pel-
let stove. Jaci, email
Tile grout cleaner Use in a well-ven-
tilated area. Combine 7 cups water, 1/2
cup baking soda, 1/3 cup ammonia and
1/4 cup vinegar. Spray on grout, let set
for an hour, then scrub with a scrub
brush. -AmyJ, Florida


Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers practical,
money-saving strategies for everyday
living. To send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o
Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut SL,
Kansas City, MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage. com.


Kwanzan is perhaps
the most famous
variety of Japanese
cherry.

because a narrow gene pool makes any
planting more likely to be wiped out by
pest problems.
Some of those original cherries are
not even Yoshinos but so-called Japan-
ese cherries, another species with a
similar range in varietal characteris-
tics. Kwanzan is perhaps the most fa-
mous variety of Japanese cherry
A better cherry?
A few other ornamental cherry
species exist, and the one I'd plant
would be Higan cherry Unfortunately,
Higan is not counted among those
trees originally set in the ground
around Washington's Tidal Basin.
While cherries generally are suscepti-
ble to a number of insects and dis-
eases, Higan is one of the most
pest-resistant. It is also longer lived,
faster growing, and more tolerant of
heat and cold than the others.
Higan cherry's qualities do not sacri-
fice beauty. Like other ornamental
cherries, Higan varieties show a range
of ornamental characteristics. For in-
stance, the variety Whitcomb has hori-
zontal, spreading limbs that each spring
are dotted with pink buds that unfold
into almost white blossoms. Pendula is
a variety offering very early, single pink
blossoms on weeping stems. Autum-
nalis is truly unique, not for its semi-
double pink blossoms that unfold in
spring, but because it often puts on a re-
peat performance in autumn.


RENTAL
Continued from Page E10

nail anything to the walls.
Complicating things further, many rental
properties have small rooms and no-frills,
builder-grade light fixtures, doors and cab-
inetry with little personality.
How can you inject some of your per-
sonality into a rented space without en-
raging your landlord?
The first step is to go all in.
"So often people think of their rental as
not theirs, and therefore go through life
not creating a beautiful home or nest,"
says designer Kyle Schuneman, author of
"The First Apartment Book: Cool Design
for Small Spaces" (Potter Style, 2012). "Life
is too short to not create a sanctuary that
represents your unique vision."
Home decorating blogger Wanda Hoffs
gives the same advice to her readers at
recreateanddecorate.com. As an Army
wife, Hoffs has lived in many rental prop-
erties around the country and has learned
to decorate each one as if it were truly
hers.
Here are five ideas from Hoffs and
Schuneman that can help you embrace
your rented space.
Plan carefully
"Usually rentals are small, and I am a
firm believer in function before form,"
Schuneman says. "Sometimes it's a puzzle
piece to get those 'must haves' into your
space the desk, the bed, the couch."
He suggests using old items in new ways:
Does the desk become a footboard?
Should a small bookcase from your old liv-
ing room be tucked into the corner of your
new kitchen?
If your current furniture doesn't fit well
into a rental, Hoffs suggests spending
wisely on new items. Rather than buying
an expensive new piece that fits your
rental perfectly, "use thrift store furniture
and paint it yourself," she says.
Used furniture can be "so inexpensive
that you can sell it at a yard sale if need
be" when you decide to move out of the
rental. "It's not about where you buy it,"
Hoffs likes to tell her blog audience. "It's
how you use it."
No paint
"Wallpaper used to be only for the home-
owner crowd," Schuneman says, "but now
with companies like Tempaper, you can
put up temporary wallpaper that peels on
and peels back off when you're ready to
move."
Hoffs suggests using wall decals, which
now come in a huge range of styles and
sizes, or even duct tape.
"It comes in many great colors and pat-


terns," she says, "and can be used on a wall
in many different patterns, such as the
trending chevron pattern, stripes, or even
to create a border around a wall grouping."
If you want to do just a bit of painting
that could be easily repainted before you
move out, Hoffs and Schuneman both sug-
gest painting a stenciled design on one
wall. Or paint a band of bold color along
the top of your walls.
To make the eventual repainting easier,
Hoffs says, "always know the original color
and brand of paint."
Infuse with color
"If you're afraid to touch your walls or
have a really difficult landlord," Schune-
man says, "bring in the color through fab-
rics and textures around the room. If you
leave your walls white, hang a bold curtain
on the windows and a coordinating couch
that really pops."
Hoffs agrees: "Fabric can be a great, in-
expensive way to add color, pattern and
texture to a room. It can be framed or sta-
pled to a large art canvas to be hung on the
walls," to add a burst of color. You can also
attach fabric temporarily to a wall using
spray starch.
Lush plants are another option: "Bring
in plants to add life, color and to warm up
your home," Hoffs says. Even if you're not
a gardening expert, "there are many low-
maintenance ones for those who do not
have a green thumb." When it's time to
move, they're easy to take with you.
The floor is your wall
"Your floors are a blank slate for de-
sign," Schuneman says. "Treat it as your
fifth wall and find a beautiful rug to
ground the whole space."
Schuneman is a fan of FLOR carpet
tiles, which can be arranged to make what
appears to be a rug of any size. "I love
using FLOR tiles for rentals because they
can be put together in different configura-
tions when you move and can be personal-
ized, so only you have that certain pattern
that represents your style," he says.
Make swaps
Although you can't change the cabinets
in your rented kitchen or bath, Hoffs
points out that you can swap out the hard-
ware on doors and drawers at a very small
cost
"You can always change these back to
the original ones when you start to move,"
she says, as long as you remember where
you've stored the originals.
The same goes for light fixtures. A
change of lighting can add "instant drama"
to your home, Hoffs says, so consider
swapping out the current fixtures with
ones that reflect your taste. Just be sure to
store the landlord's fixtures carefully and
reinstall them properly before moving out.


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 E13






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Spruce up your


cubicle with style


Associated Press
Following the expert advice of several interior designers, this cubicle at a
Thornton, Colo., business was styled using a bold fabric pattern on the fac-
ing cubicle wall and black-and-white patterned contact paper on an upper
cabinet and various accessories. The cubicle is outfitted with items that ap-
peal to its inhabitant: framed photos and mementos of world travels, a few
items picked up at a flea market and the artwork of friends, and inexpensive
boxes to organize paperwork and provide graphic appeal.

Put your personal stamp on workspace


JENNIFER FORKER
Associated Press
We focus so much energy turning a
house into a home, we sometimes
forget to aim our decorating genius
in another notable direction: the of-
fice cubicle.
Home often expresses who we
are, filled as it is with accumulated
treasures and trinkets. But skip on
over to the office cubicle or, for
that matter, an office with actual
walls and it can be a different
story.
Some offices "are so dated. It's
wallpaper from the '70s, falling-apart
furniture and stacks of files gen-
erally, an overall mess," says Sayeh
Pezeshki, a designer who blogs about
decor at The Office Stylist
Considering how much time many
people spend at work, "Your work


space should be cheery and it
should be fun, and it should be per-
sonal to you," says Sabrina Soto, de-
signer host of HGTV's "The
High/Low Project."
A soothing environment cuts down
on work stress, designers believe.
"It really does affect the way that
you work and the way that you feel,"
says Pezeshki.
And she says, "You don't have to
spend a lot of money" doing it.
Bob Richter, an interior designer
and cast member of PBS' treasure-
hunting series "Market Warriors,"
visits flea markets wherever he trav-
els, returning home with one-of-a-
kind mementos.
"I feel like a cubicle or a small of-
fice should feel like a small apart-
ment," says Richter, who lives in a


See CUBICLE/Page E15


E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



CUBICLE
Continued from Page E14

small New York City apartment.
"Things have to be tidy, but there
also has to be an opportunity to
store things easily"
Richter suggests combing flea
markets for unusual boxes and
baskets for storing supplies on
an office desk. He uses old metal
coffee tins and vintage ceramic
planters for holding pens and
other supplies.
"There's a nostalgic vibe to
these items," Richter says.
Soto suggests using lacquered
boxes or stylish fiberboard
boxes, like those sold at The
Container Store.
Good lighting, an attractive
memo board, and at least one
living plant or cut flowers are


SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013 E15


Richter suggests combing flea markets for
unusual boxes and baskets for storing
supplies on an office desk. He uses old
metal coffee tins and vintage ceramic
planters for holding pens and other supplies.


also essential for cultivating
good cubicle ambiance.
Bring a desk lamp from home
for task lighting; it'll cheer up the
space. Bring in low-water, low-
light plants at least one. Two
plants that are good at surviving
indoor light are pothos and
heartleaf philodendron. Peace
lilies also crave low light and are
excellent at cleaning indoor air
"Keep one on your desk," says
Richter. "It feels like there's life
there."


For the memo board, Richter
suggests framing a section of
cork, dry-erase board or good-
quality plywood painted with
chalkboard paint. Frame it in a
vintage frame it's a tenth the
price of a new frame, he says -
or float the memo board inside
the cubicle wall's frame.
Soto likes to paint her frames
in bright colors, as does Pezeshki,
who's all in for the bling. Her own
office not a cubicle is
painted black, purple and metal-


lic silver. Its silver accents in-
clude a gallery wall of ornate
frames and a large floor lamp.
"It's very glam, because I'm
very glam," says Pezeshki. "I like
shiny things and blingy things."
That's the important thing: to
decorate your cubicle according
to your own personality, the
three designers say If you like
sports, use memorabilia. If
you're a movie fan, go that route.
"For me, a place I want to be
is a place surrounded by the
things I love," says Richter. "I
think (the office cubicle) is an
area where you can let your per-
sonality do the talking."
More tips:
Keep it tasteful, says Richter,
and check with your human re-
sources manager before turning
a cubicle into a fully furnished
room. "There's a fine line be-
tween personalizing your desk


and going overboard," he says.
Ditch the sticky notes and
the hanging calendar, which add
clutter, Soto says. Lean a small
dry-erase board against one wall
and jot down notes there. Use an
electronic calendar.
Hang an attractive fabric
along the cubicle walls, attach-
ing it with decorative push-pins.
Hang framed artwork. "Anything
to make the cubicle walls look
like normal walls," Soto says.
Cover bookshelves and cabi-
nets with printed contact paper.
"It instantly pulls together the
look," Pezeshki says. Pick five or
six things currently sitting on
your desk and replace them -
pencil holder, frames, tape dis-
penser- with the look you want.
Add silver accents. And
paint whatever you can,
Pezeshki advises, including the
metal "in/out" box for papers.


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista
(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Rii I DFCKFR 3.2-464-.647 SUSAN Mill I FN -.499.9-13 VICTORIA FRANKI IN .35-427-777


SINGLE FAMIL, HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, FOIFIE
Luxury and storage! With over 3600 square feet of gorgeously appointed living space SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR,HILLSIDE SOUTH
this home has all the options The tall cherry cabinets, Corian countertops, SS Drastically ReducedrElegant, immaculate with a fabulous panoramic view! Don't miss
appliances and walk in butler pantry make this gourmet kitchen the envy of every this 3/3/2 home on the Skyview Golf Course of Terra Vista You won't believe the
cook The massive formal living area is perfect for entertaining with beautiful upgrades: gas and solar heated pool & spa w/spillway and caretaker/pool perfector
Canadian Birch hardwood flooring which carries through to the spacious family room system, custom glass double entry door, gas fireplace, Corian counters, upgraded
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS Large master suite w/sitting area & TWO walk in closets, Split floor plan, Guest cabinets with top and bottom pull outs, decorative painting, lighting discharge
Beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath villa with den and 2-car garage in Brentwood Golf bedrooms w/ direct bath access & huge walk in closets A beautiful terrace garden system, oversized garage with golf cart door, and so much more Newly painted
Community Inside features include large open floor plan, inside laundry enclosed and an oversized 2 car garage with a separate golf cart entrance complete this exterior Newly added plantation shutters Don't miss this one Membership Required
screened Florida room Move-in condition MLS 701407.............. $123,900 fabulous home MLS 700959...............................................................$459,000 MLS 357262.......................................................................................$349,900


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Beautiful bright villa 2 bedrooms, den (or 3rd bedroom), 2 baths, freshly painted, new
carpet Open and spacious floor plan Located in the lovely Village of Brentwood
Kitchen contains plenty of cabinets, utility closet and a skylight Neutral tile
everywhere except the newly carpeted living room & bedrooms Top it off with a
screened Lanai all nicely situated on a fully landscaped lot A great place for
someone who is looking to live an active and carefree life Minutes to golf course,
pool, sauna, hot tub, exercise room at Brentwood recreation center
M LS 700872.............................................. ................................. $ 13 9 ,0 0 0


"----'-''-.:-9, DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
Upscale, elegant, executive 2 bed, plus den, 25 bath home offers a split bedroom
SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 2 BED, 2 .5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH plan with an open floor design Some of the many features are fully insulated sound-
Large roomy open split floor plan home featuring 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, office/den, DETACHED VILLA 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS proof media room with surround sound, projection and a wet bar plus refrigerator
living room, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai and a 2-car attached Skyview Golf Course 2 bedroom 2 bath plus den Home in Terra Vista Maintenance- Fabulous kitchen, breakfast room Formal dining room has its own wet bar/serving BRENTWOOD, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 1 CAR, BRENTWOOD TOWNHOME
garage Dining area overlooking private backyard Upgrades include Corian free living at its best! Upgrades include Corian countertops, staggered cabinets, built- area This home is just like a model, fully upgraded with custom wood cabinets, Contemporary 2/2 51 Townhouse in gated community of Brentwood A spacious
countertops, ceramic tile, plantation shuttered windows, lots of cabinets in the kitchen in entertainment center, Formal dining room plus breakfast nook, lanai with pavers Corian countertops, lots of ceramic tile, French doors to lanai area Den could dining room/great room combination All bedrooms upstairs Half bath downstairs
Corner lot with huge trees and situated close to all amenities Great view of the golf course If you are quality conscious wlsophisticated tastes, possibly be a third bedroom This home has an enormous kitchen, dining room and inside laundry, tile & carpet glass doors open to screen lanai off of living room
MLS 700761........................................................... ...............................$249,900 please don't m iss seeing this wonderful home M LS 700860 .................$254,900 great room for entertaining at its best M LS 700904 ..............................$445 ,000 MLS 359134........................................................................................... $95,000









_.".'f SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, TERRA VISTA DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
SB.. ---',l I Exceptional and Fabulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath, 2-car, In prestigious gated community of Terra Vista Immaculate 3/2 5/2 w/den Private SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS 5,375 sq ft, pool home in the exclusive upscale gated-community of Terra Vista. brick-paved courtyard home with separate in-law/guest suite with full bath Designer Attractive 3 bedroom, 3 bath, split-plan home with an extra large 2-car, side-entry
Located in the community of Brentwood Freshly painted and new carpet Immaculate Very spacious open island kitchen great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing decorated and painted, gourmet kitchen, formal dining incorporated with an open garage This home is very open and airy with a large skylight in the kitchen Great
unfurnished detached villa 2 bedrooms w/den, 2 bath, 2-car garage Open floor plan retreat on the extended screened lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. floor plan is great for entertaining Lots of tile, and wet bar Large master suite has room and dining room have sliders to large screened in lanai, inside laundry Lots of
with lots of space Social club membership induded #2902 .........................$ 1,100 #5375 ..........................................................................................................$2,300 hardwood floor, TW O custom walk-in closets #9876.................................$ 1,8 00 privacy Social membership included #1914...............................................$ 1,35 0


U


S c i









CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


.IIi I..I...I I I.)I....- h... 4. .pf


II I. i. ,, l l l,
M .:, = 1:ili:rii $124,900
Tim Donovan 220 0328


1.. I l Ii6. .6i lll.l.6 I 1... .. ..1 hhhI.ll
i I I .I I hI. 6. 1 i ih i i. I h .1 1 1 I.



PI 1 =ii, 1 ,K.6' i 1isV
I iell i11,1li 111 I u I 1,a 111 ii ;.,.,m


I WATERFRONT ACREAGE TO
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON

I l i h..... ]..I 1,..1 1... .. I
IVI h .().:. $119,900
C.ill Scoft Boigeson 302 5656
to wLen this shce Ho piardise


.OPEN HOUSE TODAY: 1-4PM


HUGE PRICE REDUCTION

a.-i I..i l. 1 .AI I.I I hi. a '"I a -


PRICED TO SELL i" $244,500
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


WELCOME TO YOUR COUNTRY HOME
.hh ... ..... I I I I i.. II


... I. 1.1 1 1. I 1


rii = ': ASKING $228,.900
Pit Di,, ,352'212 7280
T.e, i.ta a i a i ;oc2orndi. com


BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED



. .:.l l 1 ,...H...1. A I... .l ) ... ,.. .I... I.

rilt = il-: $135.000
Cill Jm oilt.on it 422 2173
fj i'ii thMn mntcul,]u 1ept Iin.me


I....... 1 h .. ..
* I I..-i.1i., .-:,.. ,. III. ..
* i: ,. .) l ,. l., .I ,. ,.) ,. ,1 1, h,,
rilt = I $350.000
JA.nn Ph,,c 212 3410
l, ci cottu ,]untI ,Jld comn


NESTLED AMONGST THE TREES i i.
-i h I ,, 1, l I I
6 !,,1 l 1 1 d .. 1 ,, ,



I: =-I :: ASKING $118.000
Cii NAi J-n'.& 352 4008072 ,,eii
352 726 6668 ,.l11,;


I ,,,,......, ,iI ,. ,I. ,I~f ih Il I, ,I ,I h i -l .I





SII li I I SI 5185.000
Cill C.isei Ke.ise 4.6 6549


1.-


GRAND HOME FOR SALE IN INVERNESS!
* I IIII,, l, l.,, ,, I I I.,, ,,, 1,,,,I
I I I, I I


r 11. ll. ALL THIS AND MORE FOR ONL S159.900
C'1 [hiG 7 mlnes fIn dtr ai r*5 ? J100?CW5


2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH AND
2 CAR GARAGE HOME





Mi :, i= ,. ASKING ONLY S89,000
Call Jim Maion to wieio
this beautilul home 422-2173


i, i. I. .. ..... ,h 6.,

.. 1.. U 6 1 id.. h I ,I 1.. 1. .. .. h, U

rhi: '. LISTED AT S44.900
OWNERS WILL 1CNSIDER OFFERS
i. iiin o.., ili e, "! ,-M 00'ee8
*:' i e 1:12 l, at.:i. jiti.:ii, iner tt


WIDE OPEN WATERFRONT
F, h :1 ,,,) I I, _d, ,l,I- I h ,

i i ..... .I ....I. h ..l
rh i In,,i ,, 1 h i

: 1.: '-. ASKING $189.000
Pit D>is ,352212 7280
I las 'l'; ngl i1tzt "i alD.ld3.) ,',om
rI I


su,,ll ih ,,., s, .I ,h ,: 1_ 1. 1i 1i i I Ih..

MI _=-, /=il/i. $44,500
loltaine 0 Regan 586 0075


RIGHT OUT OF BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS



,I ....... .... .i S ,,9 i u

i S318.900r. =
i, n ~ ,, ,,... I ,h .. .


I ,,,,,, .... .. ..... I I. I ,l h.l .! ,, |) .. .. ,
I" l 1 '' I .I] I _I ,ll .- I ,, ], J. I, I 11

$76.200
Cii lllltii S i di t,dii i1 476 8727
iand i4i Iha l1' =701408


COUNTRY CHARMER

']' 1.".. h,,, t' .ilr. ... ...... f I II.
lI l hl. i Ihl Ki m hn h l. 11 ,,,, 1 1 II

c lil. .i 1 I I ., .ci. ir I l- I I. I l u


M1i = i' i1.1 ASKING $165,000
C.ll N.Incl Jenks 352-i00 8072 ice/ll
352 726 6668 ollicel


* H. l 'i l W .inli:d
* l. .: .i.

* _.1 1:1.iii ,:...l _'. *.1:i
* VV.il I I n i lI h .,l p., ilil.
Wi/laid Pickiel 2019871
I 'll'. CIIIuscounl 'sold. corn


ROOM TO ROAM:


hII l .,I, I .I h I,:]lllll'.P A lll

1 1. ..l in ll iii., .ni l.
REDUCED $74,900.
Call Ruth fiedeick I 352 563 6866


LAND SALE:
57 ooo

S ... 99.000 ... .. .... .. ... ..
I d, h1,
,, ',,,,,,,,, ,1.,,. ',,i S15.500
1 v.- ; I. l Oi W 181 86,
hime .< 2 c6 6668


BANK OWNED
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Ihn i sIII l; d I'II:l i:j ,I- ,:ll Ij l ell I l
Il.:..:, I ulh .:.1 li. i i., ndi H Iqi 11
INCREDIBLE BUY AT ONLY S57,500!!
Call Quade feeset 352 302 7699


* I. iill .I I. "il. h illiI


Mi:, .= 'l, $140,000
Jeanne I Willaid Pickiel 212-3410
I'i'ir ciuuscounti$sold. coim


I _11


E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 2013