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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-09-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03054

Full Text


Daylight Savings Time starts Sunday


Mostly sunny.
PAGE A4


CITRU-S CO U N T Yl




wcRONICLE.
www.chronicleonline.com


Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community 50*


60 m
OG


pnus


at VILLAGE TOYOTA
...EA4 PAGE C11


VOL. 118 ISSUE 214


Sex predator set free


Man appeals original conviction and is
released after initially receiving life in prison


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
In 2011, the victim of Russell Glenn
Elmer's decades of sex crimes thought
she had probably seen the last of him
when he was sentenced to life in prison
and was tagged a sexual predator.
But just as it took more than two
decades for Elmer's accuser to summon


enough courage to confront him with
charges, in the two years since his con-
viction things have changed for Elmer,
too.
These days Elmer is still tagged a
predator, but he is out of prison after
serving a new sentence of five years in
prison and with time served since his ar-
rest in 2010. He is also on 7 1/2 years su-
pervised probation.


On Feb. 7, the state at-
torney's office entered
into a plea deal with
:b c45 .l Elmer, 55. Elmer won an
i appeal case last summer
before the 5th District's
Court of Appeals. Evi-
dence the defense
Russell thought should have
Elmer been allowed in the case
still labeled wasn't, according to
a predator. prosecutor Brian Trehy,
who handled the case
during appeal. The district court of ap-
peals sent the case back for retrial, but
Trehy said issues came up about the age


of victim at the time of the abuse back in
1988. During the 2011 trial, the victim's
reported age was 11 in 1988.
"There was some conflict with the age.
The defense said she was more than 12
years old. Then they brought up statute
of limitation issues which we thought
further damaged our chances of a suc-
cessful trial," Trehy said.
Trehy said the Legislature has since
fixed the statute of limitation restriction
and Elmer would have easily been suc-
cessfully prosecuted and convicted if
they had gone by today's rules. In 2010,
See Page A5


Reliving the past


%'
's4--
~ ~ 4


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
Dressed in period costume, Micah Smith, 3, left, and his brother Titus, 4, of Jacksonville, hold their mother's and aunt's hands
Friday afternoon at the Crystal River Raid re-enactment. Festivities started with living history and educational programs for
school children throughout the day. Re-enactment battles are at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Civil War re-enactors invade Crystal River for weekend battles


ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Boom! A puff of
white, cloudy smoke explodes into the
air as children jump and cover their
ears. Some grab the closest hand avail-
able, while others demand "more


smoke" from the cannon.
"I want to do that," exclaimed 9-year-
old Isaiah Johnson excitedly "How far
did the cannon go?"
Roughly 100 children invaded Hol-
cim Ranch on Friday to experience his-
tory at the 16th annual Crystal River
Raid.


History and social studies classes
from throughout Citrus County
marched into the battlefield and camps
for a glance at 19th-century life during
the Civil War Staffed by re-enactors at 15
stations, the accounts of soldiers and
civilians were brought to life.
See I Page A2


Job gains cut unemployment to 4-year low


Rate drops to
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
American job market isn't just
growing. It's accelerating.


7. percent
Employers added 236,000
jobs in February and drove
down the unemployment rate
to 7.7 percent, its lowest level
in more than four years. The


gains signal companies are
confident enough in the econ-
omy to intensify hiring even
in the face of tax increases
and government spending
cuts.
Last month capped a fourth-
month hiring spree in which


employers added an average
of 205,000 jobs a month. The
hiring has been fueled by
steady improvement in hous-
ing, auto sales, manufacturing
and corporate profits, along
See Page A5


Hospital


bond


rating


drops

Moody's cites
legal dispute
PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
In what is becoming an an-
nual event, the Citrus Memorial
hospital bond rating has been
downgraded again. But some
aspects of the report are
questioned.
On Wednesday, Moody's In-
vestors Service announced it
was downgrading the hospital's
(Citrus Memo-
rial Health Sys-
tem) long-term
bond rating db ,
from Ba3 to B3,
affecting $38.5
million of out-
standing bonds. .10
This is the 0
third consecu- Bill Grant
tive year the CCHB attorney
rating has de- took exception
lined, and the to report.
outlook remains negative, ac-
cording to Moody's.
Its rationale for the down-
grade included the ongoing
legal dispute about hospital
control and having less than the
required level of cash on hand
Moody's report cited chal-
lenges to the hospital's finan-
cial picture, including pension
liability, poor operating per-
formance, increasing exposure
to Medicare and declining mar-
ket share with competition
from Seven Rivers Hospital and
two larger providers in Ocala.
The Moody's report also
delves into the tax revenue
issue.
For strengths, Moody's list in-
cludes growth in admissions,
cost controls and the hospital's
debt service reserve fund.
As for future bond ratings
See Page A2


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Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope ........ B6


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Lottery Payouts
Movies ...... .
Obituaries .


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. .A6


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TV Listings ....... C7


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A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013

RE-ENACT
Continued from Page Al
"The main focus of al-
most any re-enactment is
Education Day," said edu-
cation day coordinator Mar-
cie Bruno. "We figure that
the school kids are not
learning what could be
taught out here, through
their school textbooks. To
get a better idea of what
America was like in the
early years and how we got
our country where it is
today, the only way we can
do that is to go into the past
"It is our dedication to
keep history alive," said
Bruno. "This was one of
the greatest events that
America had to go through.
It is important that chil-
dren know that. We are
dedicated historians that
want to school them."
Descendant of General
Sheridan, a Union gen-
eral during the Civil War,
Chuck Sheridan was
quick to inform visitors
with his knowledge of the
Civil War.
"Keeping history alive is
a passion of mine," Sheri-
dan said. "However, one
misconception about the
Civil War was it was about
slavery It was not."
Chase Lofley and his
brother Kyle Lofley lis-
tened carefully to Sheri-
dan's words; however, they
were amazed by the three-


BOND
Continued from Page Al
going up or down, one of
the keys is solving the dis-
pute dating back to
2009 between the Cit-
rus County Hospital
Board and the Citrus Me-
morial Health Founda-
tion Board.
"The negative outlook
reflects our concerns that
governance issues be-
tween the CMHF board
and CCHB will continue to
pressure hospital per-
formance," the report
stated. It also cites
CMHF's $1.1 million in


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MATTHEW BECK/Chronicle
ABOVE: Re-enactor Ralph Epifani helps Cedar Key High School junior Mikayla Pope
while she struggles to hold a Civil War-era rifle to her shoulder Friday during a living his-
tory and educational program for school children. RIGHT: Many of the encampments are
labeled with Confederate or Union colors to identify their loyalties.


* WHAT: 16th annual Crystal River Raid.
* WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Sunday; battles
on both days at 2 p.m.
* WHERE: Holcim Ranch, seven miles north of
Crystal River on U.S. 19.
* COST: $5 admission donation for adults; $2 for
children ages 9 to 17; children age 8 and younger
admitted free.


dimensional history in
front of them Sheridan's
tent and his horses.
He showed them around
his tent and then walked


them to pet his two horses.
Chase said he was enjoying
his adventure and was
learning about the Civil War
during his current studies.


We have to get past the
governance issue.

Bill Grant
attorney for the Citrus County Hospital Board.


legal fees for FY2012.
And it states the CMHF
board and CCHB have
agreed to seek a capital
partner.
But CCHB attorney Bill
Grant took exception to
the report, questioning the
information it was based
on, which was provided by
the foundation. The board
may request another look.
"We have to get past the


governance issue," he
said.
Grant is particularly
concerned about the pen-
sion liability He explained
the employee not man-
agement pension plan
is about $30 million
underfunded.
David Jacobson with
Moody's Public Finance
Group noted that over two
years, the rating has gone


Furthermore, Bruno in-
vites the public to explore
to era of the Civil War and
the mock battle between
Union blue and Confeder-
ate gray, along with horses,
cannons and mortars.
"We have hundreds of
soldiers on the field,"
Bruno said. "It is quite an
experience to witness."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Eryn Worthington
at 352-563-5660, ext.
1334, or eworthington@
chronicleonline. com.

down six notches.
"The growth in pen-
sion liability is up quite a
bit this fiscal year," he
said regarding the down-
grade. "The primary rea-
son seems to be the
liquidity (cash on hand)
decline."
The level of liquidity is
set by covenants related to
two non-rated bank loans
Grant said the hospital
can still operate prof-
itably, which is obvious
by the amount of interest
shown by potential
purchasers.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Pat Faherty at 352-
564-2924 or pfaherty@
chronicleonline. com.


Our Goal Is A

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New Patients & Walk-ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


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Geriatrics
Family & General Medicine
Internal Medicine
Intensive ('are tHospitali
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Active Staff at both Seven Rivers
& Citrus Memorial Hospitals



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Page A3-SATURDAY, MARCH 9,2013



TATE&


(


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONI


CLE


Around the
STATE

Citrus County
Democrats club
to meet Tuesday
The Downtown Democ-
rats Club will meet at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, March 12, at B&W
Rexall Drug restaurant, 214
U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Meetings are the second
Tuesday of each month. Is-
sues and activities are
discussed.
For information, contact
Roger Sewell, president, at
rsewell@tampabay.rr.com
or 352-726-4676.
Free landscaping
class set in Lecanto
The Citrus County Water
Resources Department will
offer a free class on Florida-
Friendly Landscaping.
Gardeners will learn how
to determine environmental
conditions and plan accord-
ingly "Right Plant, Right
Place" is a best manage-
ment practice.
The class is scheduled
from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tues-
day, March 12, in the Exten-
sion classroom at 3650 W.
Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
Preregistration is required
by calling Gina Hamilton at
352-527-5707. For informa-
tion, call 352-527-5708.
New voters league
to meet Tuesday
A newly forming Citrus
County League of Women
Voters will meet at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, March 12, at the
Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Earlier presentations
about the league resulted in
overwhelming support for
the nonpartisan educational
group, which is open to all,
including men. On Tuesday,
organizational items will be
discussed and decided.
For more information,
call 352-465-4225, or visit
Naturecoastuu.org.
Amy Meek to
address CC Council
Amy Meek, CEO for Cit-
rus County United Way, will
speak at 9 a.m. Wednes-
day, March 13, at the Citrus
County Council meeting at
72 Civic Circle, Beverly
Hills. Doors open at 8:30
a.m.; doughnuts and coffee
available.
Meetings are open to the
public. For information,
email thecccsecretary
@gmail.com or call 352-
746-5984.

Tallahassee

Tourists spent
record amount
Tourists visiting the Sun-
shine State spent more
money last year than ever
before.
Gov. Rick Scott said
Thursday that visitors spent
a record $71.1 billion in
2012. That's a nearly 7 per-
cent increase over 2011,
also a record year.
The preliminary spending
figures were compiled by
Visit Florida, the state's
quasi-public marketing arm.

Punta Gorda
Elderly couple dead
after house fire
Authorities say an elderly
couple was found dead fol-
lowing a southwest Florida
house fire.
The Punta Gorda Fire
Department reported police
initially responded to the
home Thursday, and the fire
was already out when fire-
fighters arrived. The Sara-
sota Herald-Tribune
reported rescuers found the
elderly couple inside. Their
names weren't immediately
released.


Officials said the fire
might have been caused by
electrical problems, but that
hasn't been confirmed.
Fire Chief Ray Briggs
said there were no working
smoke alarms in the home.
-From staff reports


Pregnant woman battered


Suspectfaces

multiple charges
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer

FLORAL CITY A Floral City
man faces charges after an incident
Thursday that allegedly resulted in
a pregnant woman being dragged
by her neck and hair, according to
the Citrus County Sheriff's Office.


Allen Justin Gage, 31,
has been charged with ag-
gravated battery on a
pregnant victim, felony
battery domestic by
strangulation and false
imprisonment. No bond
was set.
The felony charges stem
from a physical distur-
bance between the preg-
nant woman and Gage.
The woman said she
was dropped off at Gage's


Allen Justin
Gage
charged with
domestic
battery.


house and they began to
argue outside. Gage then
claimed his father was
coming and grabbed the
woman by her neck and
hair She said was dragged
into the residence, where
she was physically thrown
around.
The woman said she
kicked him off of her and
doused him with pepper
spray until she could get
away


World of work


PAT FAHERTY/Chronicle
Automotive service technology instructor Robert Irving, left, explains the program to a group of potential
students Thursday at Career Expo and Open House at Withlacoochee Technical Institute.

WTI. Focusing on career and technical education


PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer

INVERNESS
U ithlacoochee Tech-
Snical Institute is all
about careers, those
W involving job skills
currently in high demand.
From calibrating industrial-
ize valves to caring for patients
lacking tactile skills, students
practice it daily in the class-
rooms, labs and workshops at
WTI. They come out ready to
work, as they are certified or li-
censed in their selected field.
On Thursday, prospective stu-
dents got a chance to find out in
person what the school offers
during WTI's Career Expo and
Open House.
Providing more than 20 ca-
reer and technical programs
means the facility is equipped
to with up-to-date, industrial-
grade tools and technology Cer-
tified instructors with expertise
and years of experience in the
various fields create a "world of
work" learning environment
They also bring a passion for
various professions, as visitors
discovered.
Robert Irving teaches auto-


ON THE NET
Withlacoochee Technical
Institute: www.wtionline.cc
Futures Cafe menu:
www.wtionline.cc/futures-
cafe.htm. Open for breakfast
7 to 8 a.m., lunch from
11:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

motive service technology in a
shop full of equipment from
basic hand tools to laser-guided
tire balancing. Students are as-
sisted by books in what Irving
described as a "very intense
program."
"There's a need for good tech-
nicians," he said, reflecting on
his 30-plus years in the busi-
ness. "If you want to make a
good living for the rest of your
life. In two years here, you can
jump the scale 10 years."
"But this is not easy," he said.
"I don't make it easy"
In addition to being a popular
eating spot, the full-service cafe-
teria, open to the public, is a
learning lab for the culinary
arts.
In another building, Joseph
Ciaramitaro teaches applied
welding, a skill currently in great
demand with employers contact-


ing the school for workers.
Industrial machinery is an-
other field where qualified
workers are in demand. Student
Jonathan Haffkoss demon-
strated it requires considerable
math along with diagnostic, me-
chanical and fabrication skills.
WTI has programs for stu-
dents in high school and adult
learners. It also offers special
programs including GED prepa-
ration and ESOL classes, along
with community education.
About 550 students are enrolled
in daytime classes with 250 at
night.
"This is our first one, I think
it's been great," said WTI direc-
tor Denise Willis, about the
event. "We've had a lot of
interest"
"I am thrilled that the focus is
on career and technical educa-
tion right now," she said. "We
are right where we need to be.
All of our programs are state of
the art, industry certified."
"The message we carry is, this
not the end of your education
journey," Willis said. "This is
just the beginning."
Contact Chronicle reporter
Pat Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


She also claimed that, during
the altercation, Gage blocked her
in the bathroom and bedroom in
attempts to keep her from leaving.
Reportedly, when deputies ap-
proached Gage, he denied the ac-
cusations. He said his father
dropped him off at home around
midnight. He then cleaned the
house and fell asleep. The
deputies woke him up, he said.
Gage was arrested and trans-
ported to the Citrus County De-
tention facility


Around the

STATE

Ocala

Man gets life for
sexually molesting girl
A man convicted of sexu-
ally molesting a 4-year-old
Ocala girl has been sen-
tenced to life in prison.
The Ocala Star-Banner re-
ported a jury took less than an
hour Thursday to find 42-year-
old Guies U. Johnson guilty on
multiple counts including pos-
session of child pornography
and sexual battery.
The child's mother testified
she met Johnson on an online
dating website after separating
from her husband in 2011. He
eventually moved in with her.
The mother testified she
found a flash drive and micro
SD card in September, which
included a video of Johnson
molesting her daughter, who
is now 5. She identified him
on the video by his voice and
body parts, since his face
wasn't shown.
Defense attorneys argued it
wasn't Johnson on the video.

Tampa

Man gets 40 years for
beating wife to death
A Tampa Bay area man has
been sentenced to 40 years in
prison for beating his wife to
death in front of their son.
A Hillsborough County
judge sentenced 46-year-old
Chunping Lin on Friday. He
was convicted in January of
second-degree murder and
battery.
Authorities said Lin had
been drinking in May 2011
when he began arguing with
his wife, 43-year-old Lixin
Tian, at their Lutz home.
The couple's now-12-year-
old son testified his father
struck his mother multiple
times. After trying unsuccess-
fully to stop the beating, the
boy said he called 911 and
went upstairs to get his 19-
year-old brother to help.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
ported Tian and her sons got
away, but she fell into a coma
a day later. She eventually
died in July 2011.
-From wire reports


Public input sought by reaccreditation assessment team


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County Sheriff's Of-
fice is pursuing national reac-
creditation for communications
through the Commission on Ac-
creditation for Law Enforcement
Agencies (CALEA).
From March 17 to 20, the sher-
iff's office will undergo an on-site
assessment in keeping with its bid
for national reaccreditation
through CALEA's Public Safety
Communications Accreditation
Program (PSCAP).
Starting at 9 a.m. Monday,
March 18, at the sheriff's office


Emergency Operations Center,
3549 Saunders Way in Lecanto,
the agency will set up a static dis-
play of all its communications and
emergency management equip-
ment for inspection by the asses-
sors and the general public.
Sheriff's office personnel will be
on hand to answer questions re-
garding the use and application of
the specialized equipment on
display
According to Capt. Doug Dodd,
CALEA assessors are communi-
cations and law enforcement pro-
fessionals from outside the state
of Florida who are well versed in


the national standards.
"While our agency has been
state accredited since 2000, we
were accredited nationally for the
first time in 2007 and reaccred-
ited in 2010. Every three years, we
must prove our continued compli-
ance with national standards to
stay accredited," Dodd added.
The two-member PSCAP as-
sessment team will include team
leader Maj. Danny Messimer, of
the Marietta Police Department,
Marietta, Ga., and Katherine Mahl
of the Ohio State Highway Patrol,
Columbus, Ohio. During the four
days they're here, the assessors


will review written policies and
procedures, conduct interviews
with communications personnel
and tour facilities where compli-
ance with PSCAP standards may
be observed firsthand.
"PSCAP accreditation clearly
demonstrates that we are follow-
ing a set of nationally proven poli-
cies and operating procedures,"
Sheriff Jeff Dawsy said.
"It not only sets high standards
for our communications center,"
Dawsy said, "but ensures high-
quality service for citizens in
terms of public safety communi-
cations and 911 call-taking."


Company's workers rewarded with 'Beer Cart Fridays'


Associated Press


PORT ORANGE Em-
ployees at a Port Orange
health care staffing com-
pany are allowed to drink
on the company's tab, on
company time, thanks to a
perk known as "Beer Cart
Fridays"
"We put our corporate
culture before profits, and


when you do that, profits
will follow," said Advance
Medical CEO Jennifer
Fuicelli.
She's been rolling out
the beer cart for two years
as part of an "unorthodox
corporate culture" that re-
wards employees for hard
work. Employees are re-
stricted to one beer and
are not allowed to drive


while intoxicated. The
goal isn't to promote drink-
ing, but to let employees
know they are appreci-
ated, which Fuicelli said is
a small price that "pays
huge dividends."
She told the Daytona
Beach News-Journal the
company has a very low
turnover rate.
The company also hosts


costume days for Hal-
loween, barbecues on the
clock and a birthday "get
out of jail free" card, for a
paid day off.
That corporate culture
has helped the organiza-
tion grow from four em-
ployees in Daytona Beach
in 2005 to 350 employees
with locations in Port Or-
ange and Broomfield,


Colo.
Economist Sean Snaith,
director of the Institute for
Economic Competitive-
ness at the University of
Central Florida, said busi-
nesses serving employees
beer can help reduce em-
ployee turnover while also
allowing colleagues to in-
teract with each other on a
different level.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Bill clears to end


traditional pensions


Officials site

cost savings

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Tra-
ditional pensions for new
state and county employ-
ees, including teachers,
would end under a pro-
posal that's advancing
through the Legislature.
The House Appropria-
tions committee on Friday
voted 12-9 along party lines
on a bill that would do
away with guaranteed pen-
sions for workers hired as
of January 2014. It would
replace pensions with indi-
vidual investment accounts
similar to 401(k) plans.


That will save the state
nearly $13 million a year
by 2016, according to Rep.
Jason Brodeur, the Sanford
Republican who's sponsor-
ing the bill (HB 7011).
"This bill reduces the
state's risk, saves the tax-
payers a great deal of
money, keeps every prom-
ise made to every current
state worker, and offers ro-
bust benefits for our future
state workers," he said.
Democrats, labor unions
and other critics are fight-
ing the effort, saying state
and local governments will
have to pay more into the
current pension plan be-
cause there will be fewer
members paying into it
Republicans and busi-
ness groups support
Brodeur's measure.


Lawyer: Man to plead


guilty in hazing death


Associated Press

ORLANDO A man
charged in the hazing
death of a Florida A&M
drum major is going to
plead guilty and cooperate
with prosecutors, his attor-
ney said Friday
Caleb Jackson will plead
guilty to felony hazing and
manslaughter as soon as
April, attorney Chuck
Hobbs said at a hearing
at the Orange County
Courthouse.
Jackson currently is
being held in the Leon
County Jail for violating
his probation.
Drum major Robert
Champion died in No-
vember 2011 in Orlando
after he collapsed follow-


ing what prosecutors say
was a savage beating dur-
ing a hazing ritual. A
dozen former Florida
A&M band members
have been charged with
manslaughter and felony
hazing.
"He has two hopes, the
first being able to help the
state with respect to un-
derstanding and getting a
clearer picture of what
happened the night
Robert Champion died,"
Hobbs said. "He is hopeful
that he can play some
small part in bringing clo-
sure to the family"
Hobbs said no promises
or guarantees have been
made by prosecutors
regarding Jackson's
cooperation.


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office
Domestic
battery arrests
Joseph Ferguson, 24, of
Crystal River, at 9:16 p.m.
Monday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
Jeremiah Windham, 35,
of Inverness, at 5:53 p.m.
Tuesday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
DUI arrests
Dorothy Canada, 56, of
County Road 625, Bushnell, at
9:48 p.m. Sunday on a misde-
meanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to her arrest affidavit, she was
pulled over for speeding in the
area of U.S. 41 and Inverness
Boulevard. She had difficulty
performing sobriety tasks and
told a law enforcement officer
she had consumed six beers
and taken oxycodone for pain.
She refused to submit to a test
of her breath. Bond $500.
Adam Cruz, 25, of Forest
Drive, Inverness, at 11:40 p.m.
Sunday on misdemeanor
charges of driving under the in-
fluence with property damage
and driving under the influ-
ence. According to his arrest
affidavit, he was involved in a


crash on Rehill Street that re-
sulted in damage to the vehi-
cle he was driving and a utility
pole. Tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.167 percent.
The legal limit is 0.08 percent.
Bond $1,000.
Other arrests
Michelle Pascalli, 31, of
South Berkshire Avenue, In-
vemess, at 12:10 p.m. Mon-
day on a Citrus County
warrant for failure to appear in
court for an original felony
charge of battery and original
misdemeanor charge of resist-
ing an officer without violence.
No bond.
Frank Hill, 53, of East
Buckskin Lane, Hemando, at
1:15 p.m. Monday on a felony
charge of failure of a sex of-
fender to register every quar-
ter. Bond $20,000.
Frank Grizzelli, 46, of
Homosassa, at 10:14 p.m.
Monday on a felony charge of
battery on a person 65 years
of age or older. Bond $2,000.
Tyler Cumbie, 18, of
South Easy Street, Lecanto, at
7:40 a.m. Tuesday on a mis-
demeanor charge of trespass-
ing. Bond $500.
Dustin Hill, 22, of East
Mary Lue Street, Inverness, at
11:14 a.m. Tuesday on a Cit-


rus County warrant for viola-
tion of probation on original
felony charges of burglary to a
structure/conveyance and
grand theft. No bond.
Joseph Anaskevich III,
23, of Wright Street, Inverness,
at 3:17 p.m. Tuesday on a
felony charge of scheming to
defraud. According to his ar-
rest affidavit, he is accused of
writing checks resulting in a
loss of more than $1,500 to
SunTrust Bank. No bond.
Robert Dey, 30, of Clay-
more Street, Inverness, at 9:36
p.m. Tuesday on a felony
charge of petit theft and viola-
tion of probation on an original
felony charge of retail theft. No
bond.
Ricky Dorman, 33, of
East lona Lane, Inverness, at
7:27 a.m. Wednesday on a
felony charge of possession
of a controlled substance
(methamphetamine) and Cit-
rus County warrants for viola-
tion of probation on an original
misdemeanor charge of driv-
ing while license suspended
and failure to appear in court.
No bond.
Sara Brandon, 22, of
Okeechobee Court, Floral City,
at 12:42 p.m. Wednesday on a
misdemeanor charge of retail
petit theft. Bond $500.


ON THE NET
For information about
arrests made by the
Citrus County
Sheriff's Office, go to
www.sheriffcitrus.org
and click on the
Public Information
link, then on Arrest
Reports.

Thefts
A petit theft was reported
at 7:54 a.m. Thursday, March
7, in the 3800 block of W. Ed-
ucational Path, Lecanto.
A larceny petit theft was
reported at 9:35 a.m. March 7
in the 4000 block of N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills.
A petit theft was reported
at 12:48 a.m. Friday, March 8,
in the 80 block of Chinaberry
Circle, Homosassa.
Vandalisms
Avandalism was reported
at 8:27 a.m. Thursday, March
7, in the 5600 block of S. Hill-
top Road, Homosassa.
Avandalism was reported
at 12:34 p.m. March 7 in the
7400 block of N. Nature Trail,
Hernando.
M Avandalism was reported
at 10:41 p.m. March 7 in the
1100 block of N. Commerce
Terrace, Lecanto.


notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle



Lien N e6




^A. Foreclosure


SSale/Action Notices........C16



-..... Surplus Property...................C16


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES
City H L F'cast City H
Daytona Bch. 70 54 s Miami 77
Ft. Lauderdale 76 65 s Ocala 75
Fort Myers 79 55 s Orlando 75
Gainesville 73 46 s Pensacola 69
Homestead 76 60 s Sarasota 76
Jacksonville 68 46 s Tallahassee 72
Key West 75 65 pc Tampa 76
Lakeland 75 53 s Vero Beach 73
Melbourne 72 58 s W. Palm Bch. 75


F'cast
s
s
s

s
pc
s
s
s


MARINE OUTLOOK


East winds around 15 knots. Seas 2
feet. Bay and inland waters will have
a moderate chop. Mostly sunny skies
today.


77 35 NA NA NA NA I

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E xclusve daly
B TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 76 Low: 48
Mostly sunny

I SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
i High: 79 Low: 54
Partly cloudy

MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
,If ] High: 80 Low: 62
Partly sunny

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 75/39
Record 88/30
Normal 77/48
Mean temp. 57
Departure from mean -5
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month trace
Total for the year 2.10 in.
Normal for the year 7.04 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 9
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 30.16 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 39
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 28%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
Oak, Juniper, Nettle
Today's count: 10.5/12
Sunday's count: 10.4
Monday's count: 10.7
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly ozone.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/9 SATURDAY 3:10 9:22 3:35 9:48
3/10 SUNDAY 4:56 11:08 5:21 11:33
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................6:35 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................7:45A.M.
*/ C MOONRISE TODAY ...........................5:02A M.
MARCH11 MARCH19 MARCH27 APRIL3 MOONSET TODAY............................ 4:42 PM.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 3:22 a/12:08 p 4:43 p/-
Crystal River" 1:43 a9:30 a 3:04 p/9:32 p
Withlacoochee* 12:51 p/7:18 a ---/7:20 p
Homosassa*** 2:32 a/11:07 a 3:53 p/11:09 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
5:18 a/12:10 a 6:13 p/1:48 p
3:39 a/11:10 a 4:34 p/11:18 p
12:26 a/8:58 a 2:21 p/9:06 p
4:28 a/12:47 p 5:23 p/--


Gulf water
temperature


61
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.13 28.12 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.63 37.62 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.51 38.49 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.81 39.79 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
Albany 41 28 .50 s 44 26
Albuquerque 62 38 .15 pc 48 35
Asheville 51 27 s 61 34
Atlanta 65 32 s 64 45
Atlantic City 38 30 .13 s 48 33
Austin 68 57 .05 ts 75 57
Baltimore 49 33 s 52 35
Billings 46 30 pc 45 27
Birmingham 68 30 pc 65 49
Boise 53 29 s 54 30
Boston 41 28 .36 s 42 29
Buffalo 42 30 s 44 36
Burlington, VT 39 29 s 41 24
Charleston, SC 62 37 s 65 45
Charleston, WV 48 30 s 60 38
Charlotte 58 23 s 64 38
Chicago 40 19 r 44 42
Cincinnati 45 21 pc 55 42
Cleveland 37 23 c 44 36
Columbia, SC 62 30 s 65 39
Columbus, OH 47 30 c 52 41
Concord, N.H. 46 28 .21 s 44 21
Dallas 61 54 .01 ts 70 50
Denver 44 29 sn 34 17
Des Moines 44 26 ts 47 34
Detroit 47 23 c 41 35
El Paso 72 54 pc 60 38
Evansville, IN 52 25 pc 63 50
Harrisburg 47 35 s 52 33
Hartford 40 32 .22 s 44 26
Houston 72 49 pc 74 62
Indianapolis 42 24 pc 52 43
Jackson 70 32 pc 73 55
Las Vegas 53 44 .14 pc 63 47
Little Rock 62 35 pc 70 55
Los Angeles 58 48 .60 s 63 48
Louisville 50 30 pc 61 48
Memphis 64 35 pc 71 56
Milwaukee 36 18 r 40 39
Minneapolis 39 19 sn 37 27
Mobile 74 36 pc 72 54
Montgomery 71 35 pc 67 49
Nashville 58 27 pc 69 49
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 71 42 pc 73 62
New York City 41 31 .54 s 49 36
Norfolk 49 39 s 54 35
Oklahoma City 63 34 ts 64 44
Omaha 53 31 ts 51 30
Palm Springs 63 49 .04 pc 69 50
Philadelphia 45 31 s 54 36
Phoenix 69 47 .69 pc 60 46
Pittsburgh 37 30 s 50 36
Portland, ME 46 29 .11 s 43 26
Portland, Ore 59 30 s 56 37
Providence, R.I. 37 30 .07 s 44 28
Raleigh 55 31 s 60 33
Rapid City 43 22 sn 36 22
Reno 48 32 s 52 25
Rochester, NY 41 30 s 44 33
Sacramento 65 37 s 68 38
St. Louis 54 28 r 65 52
St. Ste. Marie 40 18 c 36 31
Salt Lake City 47 37 c 46 27
San Antonio 69 60 .02 ts 75 60
San Diego 58 50 1.02 pc 60 48
San Francisco 55 46 s 61 44
Savannah 64 36 s 66 46
Seattle 53 36 s 53 42
Spokane 39 29 s 50 32
Syracuse 38 28 .09 s 43 29
Topeka 63 34 ts 61 38
Washington 52 38 s 52 39
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 84 Fort Stockton, Texas LOW -4
Stonington, Mich.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 87/72/s
Amsterdam 41/33/sh
Athens 65/49/c
Beijing 43/23/s
Berlin 36/27/c
Bermuda 65/60/sh
Cairo 76/57/s
Calgary 37/25/s
Havana 76/62/c
Hong Kong 73/69/pc
Jerusalem 63/46/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


61/53/sh
45/34/c
56/38/sh
82/52/s
41/28/pc
23/9/c
53/40/sh
88/77/ts
59/52/pc
82/66/sh
61/35/pc
46/36/s
29/20/sf


C I T R U S


For the RECORD


C O U N T Y


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A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


LOCAI/STATE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Obama staying out of negotiations on gun bills

President local if the legislative process
President hits a roadblock.
i iObama called for a gun con-
embroiled in trol vote in his State of the
Union address on Feb. 12 and
budget battle followed up three days later
with a speech on shooting vio-
lence in his murder-plagued
Associated Press hometown of Chicago. He's 4%
barelv mentioned gun control


WASHINGTON With gun
legislation taking shape on
Capitol Hill, President Barack
Obama has kept a low profile
on an issue he has made a crit-
ical part of his second-term
agenda.
The president has not been
highly visible in the debate dur-
ing the past three weeks as gun
bills are being written. He's
been embroiled in a budget bat-
tle that has dominated his time
and for now is letting Vice Pres-
ident Joe Biden bang the drum
for tighter firearms laws.
White House officials said the
president plans to speak out on
gun control as the issue moves
toward a Senate vote in the com-
ing weeks. But for now, he's stay-
ing out of delicate negotiations
among lawmakers. The White
House says he will become more


publicly in the time since,
other than during a minute of
remarks Thursday, shortly
after a Senate committee ap-
proved a bill to increase gun
trafficking penalties. He
thanked the senators who sup-
ported it and urged other law-
makers to pass it into law.
"I urge Congress to move on
other areas that have support of
the American people from re-
quiring universal background
checks to getting assault weapons
off our streets because we need
to stop the flow of illegal guns to
criminals," Obama said before
signing a revitalized Violence
Against Women Act. The Senate
Judiciary Committee plans to re-
sume voting on gun bills Tuesday,
including an assault weapons ban
and background checks that
Obama wants.


Associated Press
President Barack Obama listens as Vice President Joe Biden about proposals to reduce gun violence.
President Obama promised after the Newtown shootings to put his full weight behind gun control, but
so far that means not doing too much that could get in the way of delicate negotiations over the legis-
lation on Capitol Hill. The president has not been highly visible in the gun debate during the past three
weeks, a critical time when the bills are taking shape.


Two Civil War sailors from USS Monitor buried in Va.


Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Va. More
than 150 years after the USS
Monitor sank off North Car-
olina during the Civil War, two

Navy Honor Guard teams
carry caskets of remains of
two sailors from the Civil War
ship the USS Monitor.
Associated Press


unknown crewmen found in
the ironclad's turret when it
was raised a decade ago were
buried Friday at Arlington
National Cemetery
The evening burial, which
included a gun salute and a
band playing "America the
Beautiful," may be the last
time Civil War soldiers are
buried at the cemetery over-
looking Washington.


"Today is a tribute to all
the men and women who
have gone to sea, but espe-
cially to those who made the
ultimate sacrifice on our be-
half," said Navy Secretary
Ray Mabus, who spoke at a
funeral service before the
burial.
The Monitor made nautical
history when the Union ship
fought the Confederate CSS


Virginia in the first battle be-
tween two ironclads on
March 9,1862. The battle was
a draw.
The Monitor sank about
nine months later in rough
seas, and 16 sailors died. In
2002, the ship's rusted turret
was raised from the Atlantic
Ocean floor, and the skeletons
of the two crew members
were found inside.


JOBS
Continued from Page Al

with record-low borrowing
rates.
Job growth was weaker
much of last year Employ-
ers added an average of
154,000 from July through
October and only 132,000
from March through June.
"The recovery is gather-
ing momentum," Paul Ash-
worth, an economist at
Capital Economics, said in
a note to clients.
The gains could boost
consumer spending,
adding momentum to the
U.S. recovery and helping
troubled economies in Eu-
rope and Asia.
The U.S. economy is
forecast to grow a modest
2 percent this year Growth
will likely be held back by
uncertainty about the fed-
eral budget, higher Social
Security taxes and across-
the-board government
spending cuts that kicked
in March 1. And unem-
ployment remains high
nearly four years after the
end of the Great Reces-
sion. Roughly 12 million
people remain out of work.
The unemployment rate
declined in February from
7.9 percent in January
mostly because more peo-
ple found work. Another
factor was that 130,000
people without jobs
stopped looking for work
last month. The govern-
ment doesn't count them
as unemployed.
The last time unemploy-
ment was lower was De-
cember 2008, when it was
7.3 percent
The unemployment rate
is calculated from a survey
of households. The num-
ber of jobs gained is de-
rived from a separate
survey of employers.
Hiring would be rising
even faster if governments
weren't shrinking their
workforces, as they have



APPEAL
Continued from Page Al

lawmakers changed the
Florida law, in which a
child who is a victim of
certain sex crimes can
only press criminal
charges until age 21.
During the 2011 trial, the
prosecution has insisted
the offenses occurred in
1988, but the defense
queried the timeline, say-
ing Elmer was not even
present in the home at that
time. The victim said the
abuse continued until she
was 15 and always felt
ashamed and guilty, ac-
cording reports.


gained 14,000 jobs last
Jobless rate falls month and 39,000 since
The U.S. unemployment November
rate declined in February Among industry cate-
to 7.7 percent, down from gories, the biggest job
7.9 percent in January. growth in February was in
11 percent ...................................... professional and business
services, which added
10 ................. ......... February 73,000. This category in-
9 7.7% cludes higher-paying jobs
9 .......... ............. ......... in accounting, engineering
8 ........................ ... and information technology
as well as temporary posi-
7 ...................................... tions that typically pay less.
6 ..........................Retailers added 24,000
jobs. Education and health
5 ........... services gained 24,000. And
Seasonally adjusted the information industry,
2008 2009 2010 20112012 which includes publishing,
telecommunications and
SOURCE: Labor Dept. AP film, added 20,000, mostly
in the movie industry
been for nearly four years. The economy is generat-
Governments cut 10,000 ing more higher-paying
jobs in February jobs. That trend is raising
Some $44 billion in average pay, which will
spending cuts kicked in last help offset the hit that
week after Congress failed Americans took from
to reach a budget deal. The higher Social Security
cuts are expected to shave taxes and gas prices.
about a half-point from Hourly wages rose 4 cents
economic growth this year to $23.82 last month. Wages
and lower total hiring by have risen 2.1 percent over
about 30,000 jobs a month the past year, slightly ahead
from April through Sep- of inflation. Higher pay is
tember, according to vital to the economy be-
Moody's Analytics. cause consumer spending
And most workers have drives 70 percent of eco-
had to absorb higher So- nomic activity
cial Security taxes this Hotel chain Cambria
year. Someone earning Suites expects business
$50,000 has about $1,000 travel to rise 5 percent this
less to spend in 2013. A year and next. Cambria, a
household with two high- unit of Choice Hotels In-
paid workers has up to ternational, is building
$4,500 less. nearly 20 hotels around the
Stock prices rose after country, doubling its total.
the report was released It plans to add 110 jobs this
and strengthened later in year and 400 next year to
the day The Dow Jones in- its workforce of 600.
dustrial average rose 67 The improved job mar-
points to 14,397, its fourth ket can also benefit coun-
straight record close, tries that sell goods and
Robust auto sales and a services to U.S. consumers
steady housing recovery and businesses.
are spurring more hiring, "All you have to do is
which will trigger more look at the trade num-
consumer spending and bers," said Bernard Bau-
could lead to stronger eco- mohl, chief global
nomic growth. The con- economist at the Eco-
struction industry added nomic Outlook Group.
48,000 jobs in February; "The strength in the U.S.
it's added 151,000 since economy is leading to
September Manufacturing faster growth in imports."


More than 20 years after
she said the abuse began,
she filed a complaint with
the sheriff's office.
"Nobody is happy about
this or likes to see a case
like this end the way it did
because of a statute of lim-


itation issue," he said.
'At least he is on proba-
tion and a predator for
life." He said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter AB. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


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SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 A5





A6 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


Obituary

Richard
Kah, 72
INGLIS
Richard Lee Kah, 72, of
Inglis, Fla., passed away
Thursday, March 7,2013, at
his home. Born Nov. 5,
1940, he lived in the Yan-
keetown-Inglis area for
more than 40 years. Dick
was self-employed as an
HVAC technician, diesel
mechanic and general
overall repairman, being a
master of many trades.
He was well loved by his
wife, many children,
grandchildren, great-
grandchildren and two
brothers. He was known by
many and will be ex-
tremely missed.
A graveside funeral
service will be conducted
at3 p.m. Sunday, March 10,
2013, at the Cedars of
Lebanon Cemetery in
Levy County under the di-
rection of Strickland Fu-
neral Home Crystal River.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily suggests a memorial
contribution to American
Cancer Society Winn-
Dixie Hope Lodge, 2121
S.W 16th St., Gainesville,
FL 32608.
Sign the guest book at
www chronicleonline. com.

OBITUARIES
The Citrus County
Chronicle's policy
permits free and paid
obituaries.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military. (Please note
this service when
submitting a free
obituary.)
Obituaries will be
posted online at www.
chronicleonline.com.
Area funeral homes
with established
accounts with the
Chronicle are charged
$8.75 per column
inch.
Non-local funeral
homes and those
without accounts are
required to pay in
advance by credit
card, and the cost is
$10 per column inch.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an
additional charge.
Larger photos,
spanning the entire
column, can also be
accommodated, and
will incur a size-based
fee.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material
are charged at the
same rates.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Email obits@
chronicleonline.com
or fax 352-563-3280.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Federal workers brace for furloughs


Associated Press

WASHINGTON First there
was a two-year pay freeze. Now
furloughs loom, as federal agen-
cies make personnel costs a
prime target for across-the-board
budget cuts that went into effect
last week. The result: anxiety and
low morale in a workforce often
envied for its job security
"It would certainly put a strain
on things," said Jonathan
Schweizer, 61, an environmental
engineer at the Environmental
Protection Agency in Chicago
who could be forced to take up to
13 days of unpaid leave this year
"I'd probably have to run up
some credit card debt or defer
maintenance on my home that I'd
otherwise consider important."
Government agencies vary
widely in how they are dealing
with the "sequester," as the auto-
matic cuts are called, according
to labor unions that represent
federal workers. Federal workers
could face seven days of fur-
loughs at the Housing and Urban
Development Department, while
Homeland Security personnel
might see twice that number.
More than half of the nation's
2.1 million federal workers could
be furloughed over the next six
months. The federal government


Associated Press
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents and K-9 security dogs keep
watch Feb. 22 at a checkpoint station in Falfurrias, Texas.
Federal workers could face seven days of furloughs at the
Housing and Urban Development Department, but Homeland Security
personnel might see twice that number.


is the country's single largest em-
ployer, with its employees making
up about 1.2 percent of the na-
tion's workforce.
'A lot of people think federal
employees are fat-cat bureaucrats
in Washington, but they don't re-
alize more than 85 percent of
these workers live outside of
D.C.," said Tim Kauffman,
spokesman for the American Fed-


eration of Government Employ-
ees. "A lot of them are not highly
paid folks, like VA nurses and
emergency response workers."
AFGE, which represents more
than 600,000 federal workers, is
trying to keep track of all the dif-
ferent furlough plans as their
members face the prospect of lost
wages during mandatory time off
without pay and growing frustra-


tion about getting work done.
It seems the federal workforce is
under constant attack these days,
particularly from Republican law-
makers who want to shrink gov-
ernment and contend federal
employees are overpaid with more
generous benefits compared to the
private sector Even President
Barack Obama supported the pay
freeze, though he has issued an ex-
ecutive order giving workers a 0.5
percent cost-of-living raise set for
April. Still, Congress could take ac-
tion that prevents the raise from
happening.
The latest unemployment num-
bers offered even more bad news
for government workers as fed-
eral employment, excluding the
U.S. Postal Service, shrank by
4,200 jobs last month. That's the
fifth straight month of cuts, which
may reflect a trend toward
greater belt-tightening.
Schweizer conceded that work-
ing for the federal government
remains a lot more stable than
other industries, but he said the
comfort level has changed.
"We've definitely been
squeezed financially," he said.
"People have left and haven't
been replaced. That puts more
pressure on us as far as getting
the job done and it certainly
hurts morale in my office."


How federal budget cuts could affect you


Associated Press

Government agencies
are already taking steps to
comply with automatic
spending cuts that took ef-
fect March 1.
Some examples:
AIRCRAFT CAR-
RIER: One of the Navy's
premiere warships, the
aircraft carrier USS
Harry S. Truman, sits
pier-side in Norfolk, Va.,
its tour of duty delayed.
The carrier and its 5,000-
person crew were to leave
for the Persian Gulf on
Feb. 8, along with the
guided-missile cruiser
USS Gettysburg.
IMMIGRANTS: Docu-
ments reviewed by The
Associated Press show
that more than 2,000 ille-
gal immigrants have been
freed from jails across the
country since Feb. 15. An
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement spokesman,
however, says the number
is in the hundreds. ICE of-
ficials say they reviewed
several hundred cases of
immigrants and decided
to put them on an "appro-
priate, more cost-effective
form of supervised
release."
AIRPORT CUSTOMS:
People arriving on inter-
national flights were said
to experience delays at
airport customs and immi-
gration booths, including
at Los Angeles Interna-
tional and O'Hare Inter-
national in Chicago.
Officials said Monday
that's because they closed
lanes that would have pre-
viously been staffed by
workers on overtime.
MEN
Examples of other steps
that are planned or
predicted:
AIRLINE FLIGHTS:
There could be wide-
spread flight delays and
cancellations due to fur-
loughs of air traffic con-
trollers, but furloughs
won't start until April be-
cause of the legal require-
ment to give workers
advance notice. Trans-


To Place Your

"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com


'REE INSPECTIONS
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portation Secretary Ray
LaHood predicts flights to
cities such as New York,
Chicago and San Francisco
could have delays of up to
90 minutes during peak
hours. FAA officials have
said they expect to elimi-
nate overnight shifts by air
traffic controllers in more
than 60 airport towers and
close more than 100 towers
at smaller airports. But in-
formation posted online by
the agency shows 72 air-
ports that could lose mid-
night shifts and 238
airports whose towers
could be closed.
DEFENSE: Members
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
paint a dire picture of con-
struction projects on hold,
limits on aircraft carriers
patrolling the waters and
even a delay in the expan-
sion of Arlington National
Cemetery About 800,000
Defense Department civil-
ians face furloughs. The
Pentagon will be forced to
furlough for one day a
week about 15,000 teach-
ers who work at schools
around the world for chil-
dren of people in the mili-
tary Veterans' funerals at
Arlington could be cut to
24 a day from 31. Troops
killed in action in
Afghanistan will be the
priority; they usually are
laid to rest within two
weeks. Beginning in April,
the Army will cancel main-
tenance at depots, which
will force 5,000 layoffs, and
it also will let go more than
3,000 temporary and con-
tract employees. The Air
Force Thunderbirds and
the Navy's Blue Angels
will cancel air show ap-
pearances.
FOOD SAFETY:
There could be an esti-
mated 2,100 fewer food
safety inspections, mean-
ing greater risks to con-
sumers. Worker furloughs
are not planned, but
rather the reduction in in-
spections would come
from cuts in travel spend-
ing. On meat inspections,


Agriculture Secretary
Tom Vilsack said Tuesday
it will be several months
before meat inspectors
are furloughed and each
will likely be furloughed
11 days or 12 days, instead
of 15 days as the Obama
administration indicated
earlier.
TOURISM: The ad-
ministration is canceling
tours of the White House
beginning Saturday, citing
staffing reductions. House
Speaker John Boehner
says Capitol tours will con-
tinue. Visiting hours at all
398 national parks proba-
bly will be cut and sensitive
areas blocked off to the
public. Thousands of sea-
sonal workers looking for
jobs would not be hired, ac-
cording to Interior Secre-
tary Ken Salazar. He and
National Park Service di-
rector Jon Jarvis said visi-
tors would encounter
locked restrooms, fewer
rangers and trash cans
emptied less frequently
NUCLEAR CLEAN-
UP: There could be dis-
ruption of efforts to close
the radioactive waste
tanks currently leaking at
Hanford Nuclear Reser-
vation. The Department of
Energy estimates it will
have to eliminate $92 mil-
lion for the Office of River
Protection at Hanford,
which will result in fur-
loughs or layoffs impact-
ing about 2,800 contract
workers.
Other high-risk sites
facing work delays are the
Oak Ridge Reservation in
Tennessee, Savannah
River Site in South Car-
olina and the Idaho Na-
tional Laboratory
EDUCATION: Some
70,000 students enrolled
in pre-kindergarten Head
Start would be cut from
the program and 14,000
teachers would lose their
jobs. For students with
special needs, the cuts
would eliminate some
7,200 teachers and aides.
The Education Depart-


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ment is warning that the
cuts will impact up to 29
million student loan bor-
rowers and that some
lenders may have to lay off
staff or even close. Some of
the 15 million college stu-
dents who receive grants
or work-study assignments
at some 6,000 colleges
would also see changes.
The 77-member Student
Aid Alliance a coalition
of universities and college
professionals says the
cost to a student could be
as much as $876 annually
in new fees, fewer work-
study hours and reduced
grants for students receiv-
ing federal aid.
CONGRESS: Con-
gressional trips overseas
likely will take a hit.
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, told fel-
low Republicans he's sus-
pending the use of
military aircraft for offi-
cial trips by House mem-
bers. Lawmakers typically
travel on military planes
for fact-finding trips to
Afghanistan or Pakistan,
or other congressional ex-
cursions abroad.
TAXES: The Internal
Revenue Service says tax
refunds shouldn't be de-
layed because it won't fur-
lough workers until
summer. But other IRS
services will be affected.
Millions of taxpayers may
not be able get responses
from IRS call centers and
taxpayer assistance cen-
ters. The cuts would delay
IRS responses to taxpayer
letters and reduce the
number of tax returns re-
viewed, impacting the
agency's ability to detect


and prevent fraud. The
IRS says this could result
in billions of dollars in lost
revenue to the
government.
JOBS ISSUES: More
than 3.8 million people
jobless for six months or
longer could see their un-
employment benefits re-
duced by as much as 9.4
percent. Thousands of vet-
erans would not receive
job counseling. Fewer Oc-
cupational Safety and
Health Administration in-
spectors could mean 1,200
fewer inspections of dan-
gerous work sites.
HEALTH CARE: Hos-
pitals, doctors and other
Medicare providers will
see a 2 percent cut in gov-
ernment reimbursements.
But they aren't complain-
ing because the pain
could be a lot worse if
there was a deal to reduce
federal deficits. The auto-
matic cuts would reduce
Medicare spending by
about $100 billion over a
decade. But President
Barack Obama had put on
the table $400 billion in
health care cuts, mainly
from Medicare. Republi-
cans wanted more.
Obama's health overhaul
law is expected to roll out
on time and largely un-
scathed by the cuts. Part of
the reason is that the law's
major subsidies to help
uninsured people buy pri-
vate health coverage are
structured as tax credits.
So is the Affordable Care
Act's assistance for small
businesses. Tax credits
have traditionally been
exempted from automatic
cuts.


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MARCH 8.-12
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Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
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For book sale information call C -
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Money&Markets


1,560 .............................


I DAYS


S&P 500
Close: 1,551.18
Change: 6.92 (0.4%)


1 ,6 0 0 ............. .. ....................... .........................
1,550
1 ,50 0 ..... i ........ ..... i ........ ..... ? ............ !....... .... .. Z
1 ,500 ......... i ....... ...... ................ I ............ : -

1,450 -i
1 ,4 0 0 .. . . . . ;. . .;. . .
1,350 S O N ....; D J.......F ;.M .


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,561
3,490
2025
1006
360
14


NASD
1,581
1,635
1672
789
260
9


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


Interestrates





The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note rose to 2.04
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of nat-
ural gas rose for
a second
straight day
amid specula-
tion that cold
temperatures
will boost de-
mand for heat-
ing. Wholesale
gasoline, gold
and palladium
rose.




IHi


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .09 0.09 ... .07
6-month T-bill .11 0.11 ... .13
52-wk T-bill .14 0.15 -0.01 .17
2-year T-note .25 0.25 ... .31
5-year T-note .89 0.86 +0.03 .88
10-year T-note 2.04 2.00 +0.04 2.02
30-year T-bond 3.25 3.21 +0.04 3.17


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.97 2.92 +0.05 2.68
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.12 4.08 +0.04 4.61
Barclays USAggregate 1.93 1.89 +0.04 2.13
Barclays US High Yield 5.62 5.69 -0.07 7.26
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.96 3.91 +0.05 3.86
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.16 1.13 +0.03 1.10
Barclays US Corp 2.81 2.78 +0.03 3.33


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 91.95
Ethanol (gal) 2.52
Heating Oil (gal) 2.97
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.63
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.20
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1576.60
Silver (oz) 28.91
Platinum (oz) 1603.90
Copper (Ib) 3.49
Palladium (oz) 780.65
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.28
Coffee (Ib) 1.43
Corn (bu) 7.25
Cotton (Ib) 0.87
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 390.00
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.37
Soybeans (bu) 15.09
Wheat (bu) 6.90


PVS.
91.56
2.43
2.98
3.58
3.12
PVS.
1574.80
28.77
1595.10
3.50
757.05
PVS.
1.28
1.42
7.12
0.87
395.00
1.25
15.04
6.87


%CHG
+0.43
+0.12
-0.15
+1.31
+2.57
%CHG
+0.11
+0.49
+0.55
-0.29
+3.12
%CHG
-0.58
+0.63
+1.93
-0.15
-1.27
+8.90
+0.33
+0.47


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.65 +.04 +6.1 +13.6 +11.5 +6.5
BondA m 12.82 -.03 -0.6 +3.6 +5.6 +4.2
CaplncBuA m 54.73 +.02 +3.7 +11.1 +9.1 +3.7
CpWIdGrIA m 39.35 +.11 +5.8 +14.7 +8.5 +2.4
EurPacGrA m 42.87 +.17 +4.0 +11.0 +6.0 +1.4
FnlnvA m 44.14 +.21 +8.2 +16.0 +11.6 +4.5
GrthAmA m 37.03 +.13 +7.8 +16.2 +10.9 +4.5
IncAmerA m 18.98 +.03 +5.1 +13.1 +11.2 +6.2
InvCoAmA m 32.40 +.11 +7.4 +14.1 +10.2 +4.5
NewPerspA m 33.36 +.09 +6.7 +15.8 +10.2 +4.5
WAMutlnvA m 33.79 +.12 +8.3 +15.2 +13.4 +5.6
Dodge & Cox Income 13.86 -.01 0.0 +4.9 +6.2 +7.0
IntlStk 36.61 +.28 +5.7 +14.7 +6.7 +1.7
Stock 134.61 +.47 +10.4 +22.2 +12.4 +4.4
Fidelity Contra 82.94 +33 +7.9 +13.1 +12.9 +6.2
LowPriStk d 42.44 +.19 +7.4 +14.1 +13.3 +8.3
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 55.15 +.25 +9.2 +16.1 +13.2 +6.0
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m 2.30 ... +4.2 +13.3 +10.6 +6.5
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.58 +.04 +2.1 +9.5 +7.5 +9.0
GIBondAdv 13.54 +.04 +2.1 +9.8 +7.8 +9.3
Harbor Intllnstl d 64.33 +.02 +3.6 +9.2 +8.1 +1.7
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.19 -.02 -0.1 +6.8 +6.5 +7.4
T Rowe Price GrowStk 40.62 +.15 +7.5 +11.9 +13.5 +7.2
Vanguard 500Adml 143.50 +.65 +9.2 +16.1 +13.2 +6.1
5001nv 143.47 +.65 +9.2 +16.0 +13.1 +6.0
GNMAAdml 10.81 -.02 -0.5 +1.7 +4.9 +5.8
MulntAdml 14.32 -.04 +0.1 +4.2 +5.3 +5.5
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.3 +3.3 +3.5 +3.8
Tgtet2025 14.31 +.03 +5.3 +10.9 +9.8 +5.3
TotBdAdml 10.95 -.03 -0.8 +2.6 +5.2 +5.6
Totlntl 15.53 +.03 +3.7 +9.3 +5.3 -0.1
TotStlAdm 39.08 +.21 +9.6 +16.4 +13.6 +6.8
TotStldx 39.06 +.20 +9.6 +16.3 +13.4 +6.7
Welltn 35.88 +.06 +6.0 +12.7 +10.6 +6.7
WelltnAdm 61.98 +.12 +6.0 +12.8 +10.7 +6.8
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


A click of the wrist
gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com


10 DAYS
14,500
14 ,50 0 ................................



13,00 0


12,500 ..( N


HIGH
14413.17
6147.35
489.13
9060.59
3248.70
1552.48
1131.53
16409.42
942.56


LOW
14329.49
6081.42
484.61
9009.39
3227.89
1542.94
1121.19
16306.81
935.48


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 14,397.07
Change: 67.58 (0.5%)


CLOSE CHG. %CHG.
14397.07 +67.58 +0.47%
6143.48 +62.06 +1.02%
488.48 +1.59 +0.33%
9054.44 +41.00 +0.45%
3244.37 +12.28 +0.38%
1551.18 +6.92 +0.45%
1131.25 +9.76 +0.87%
16397.98 +81.49 +0.50%
942.50 +7.93 +0.85%


YTD
+9.87%
+15.77%
+7.81%
+7.24%
+7.45%
+8.76%
+10.86%
+9.36%
+10.97%


Stocks
The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose for a sixth straight day
Friday following a surprisingly
strong jobs report. Employers
hired more workers last month
than economists expected, and
the unemployment rate fell to its
lowest level since December
2008.

Foot Locker FL
Close: $32.79V-2.52 or -7.1%
The shoe store chain's fourth-quar-
ter net income rose 28 percent, but
investors were disappointed with
the retailer's outlook.



I-' I F r 1
52-week range
$27.86 $37.65
Vol.: 9.8m (4.3xavg.) PE:13.4
Mkt. Cap: $4.94 b Yield: 2.4%

Ann ANN
Close: $31.28A2.28 or 7.9%
The retailer posted a better-than-ex-
pected fourth-quarter profit and
strong sales guidance for the cur-
rent quarter and full year.

;-5-

D J F M
52-week range
$23.93 $39.78
Vol.: 4.Om (2.5x avg.) PE:16.6
Mkt. Cap: $1.51 b Yield:...

Pandora Media P
Close: $13.79A2.06 or 17.6%
The Internet radio company's
fourth-quarter financial beat expec-
tations, and said its CEO Joseph
Kennedy is stepping down.

:,

D J F M
52-week range
$7.08 $14.70
Vol.: 37.8m (7.0x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$2.35 b Yield:...
Cooper Cos. COO
Close: $108.23A3.53 or 3.4%
The contact lens and surgical tools
maker's fiscal first-quarter net in-
come rose 37 percent on better
sales of its contact lenses.
$110


I-:' I i r 1
52-week range
$71.40 $109.56
Vol.:881.Ok (2.6x avg.) PE:21.4
Mkt. Cap:$5.23 b Yield: 0.1%
H&R Block HRB
Close: $27.28A2.30 or 9.2%
An Oppenheimer analyst said in a
note to clients that he foresees a
strong tax season for the tax pre-
parer despite a slow start.
$30o

2
1 '
52-week range
$14.35 $27.50
Vol.: 15.7m (3.5x avg.) PE:22.4
Mkt. Cap:$7.4 b Yield: 2.9%


Stocks gain again


Associated Press

NEW YORK -A burst of hiring in Feb-
ruary pushed stocks higher on Wall
Street.
The Dow Jones industrial average
gained 67.58 points, or 0.5 percent, to
14,397.07. The index surpassed its previ-
ous record close Tuesday and logged a
sixth straight increase Friday
The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose
6.92 points, or 0.5 percent, to 1,551.18. The
Nasdaq composite advanced 12.28 points,
or 0.4 percent, to 3,244.37.
U.S. employers added 236,000 jobs last
month and the unemployment rate fell to
7.7 percent from 7.9 percent in January,
the Labor Department reported.
That's far better than the 156,000 job
gains and unemployment rate of 7.8 per-
cent that economists surveyed by FactSet
expected.
The strong job growth shows employ-
ers are confident about the economy de-


spite higher taxes and government
spending cuts.
Optimism that hiring is picking up has
been one of the factors bolstering the
stock market this year Stocks have also
gained on evidence the housing market
is recovering and company earnings con-
tinue to growing.
The Dow has gained 9.9 percent this
year and is trading at record levels, hav-
ing broken its previous record of 14,164
on Tuesday The Standard & Poor's 500
index is up 8.8 percent since the start of
the year, and is less than 1 percent short
of its all-time high close of 1,565 set Oct 9,
2007.
The stock market is drawing in more
investors as it continues to surge.
Investors put $3.2 billion into stock mu-
tual funds in the week ending Wednes-
day, data provider Lipper reported
Friday That's the ninth straight week of
net inflows to stock funds, bringing this
year's total to $59 billion.


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 8.65 3.85 +.09 +2.4 A V V -16.3 -44.6 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 -- 38.58 36.68 +.29 +0.8 A A A +8.8 +23.6 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86- 0 42.61 42.42 +.37 +0.9 A A A +12.9 +34.9 23 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 0 95.92 97.14 +1.56 +1.6 A A A +11.1 +44.9 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 0 12.42 12.07 -.19 -1.5 A A A +4.0 +53.4 46 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 0 12.23 12.15 +.17 +1.4 A A A +6.9 +61.2 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 0-- 43.43 34.39 -.14 -0.4 A V V -12.1 -3.7 28 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 45.13 46.68 +1.68 +3.7 A A A +18.0 +35.5 15 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 22.18 +.46 +2.1 V A A +40.0 +28.6 40 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 56.84 57.39 +1.07 +1.9 A A A +15.3 +36.7 18 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 --0- 71.13 69.64 +.09 +0.1 A A A +9.2 +15.1 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 0 50.19 49.57 -.03 -0.1 A A A +7.5 +15.6 25 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 88.97 +.26 +0.3 V A A +2.8 +6.0 9 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 -- 14.30 12.98 +.15 +1.2 A V A +0.2 +6.9 10 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 -- 23.84 23.77 +.09 +0.4 A A A +13.2 +30.0 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.12 0 70.96 71.37 +1.12 +1.6 A A A +15.4 +50.1 24 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 --- 29.27 21.58 -.31 -1.4 A A A +4.7 -15.4 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 211.79 210.38 +.96 +0.5 A A A +9.8 +7.6 15 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 23.99 21.42 +1.21 +6.0 A V A +1.5 +30.3 25
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 39.98 39.31 +.61 +1.6 A A A +10.7 +36.2 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 -- 100.44 98.71 +1.62 +1.7 A A A +11.9 -0.1 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 --- 32.95 28.00 -.14 -0.5 A A A +4.8 -8.9 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 63.58 62.75 +.11 +0.2 A A A +12.7 +23.2 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.19 0 74.43 74.16 +.22 +0.3 A A A +7.2 +27.9 16 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 14.20 39.73 15.11 +.29 +2.0 V V V -23.3 -61.3 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.00 19.86 +.23 +1.2 A A A +10.0 +18.0 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 0 8.24 8.15 -.07 -0.9 A A A +14.3 +41.7 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 --- 85.90 49.68 +.79 +1.6 A A A +20.1 -28.8 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 97.53 97.24 +.15 +0.2 A A A +12.8 +31.9 21 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.04 5.88 +.03 +0.5 A A A +3.7 +140.7 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06- 0 35.26 35.29 +.09 +0.3 A A A +14.2 +10.1 23 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62- 0 56.89 57.46 +.68 +1.2 A A A +20.1 +58.1 19 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 85.29 -.23 -0.3 A A A +16.3 +46.5 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 47.96 +.48 +1.0 A A A +10.8 +27.4 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 -0- 30.07 27.71 +.74 +2.7 A A A +10.0 +6.0 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 73.03 +.18 +0.2 A A A +7.0 +25.1 15 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 42.00 40.64 +.51 +1.3 V V A +9.8 +25.6 18 1.10


I V'



Associated Press
A board on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial
average Friday. The Dow gained 67.58 points, or
0.5 percent, to 14,397.07. The index surpassed its
previous record close Tuesday and logged a sixth straight
increase Friday.


BERNARD CONDON
AP business writer

NEW YORK Is it too
late?
If you've stayed out of
stocks recently, you might
be worried you've missed
your chance to get back in.
After all, they must be ex-
pensive now that the Dow
Jones industrial average
has risen 120 percent in
four years to a record
high.
The good news is stocks
still seem a good bet de-
spite the run-up. The bad
news: They're no bargain,
at least by some measures,
so don't get too excited.
Many investors obsess
about stock prices. But you
must give equal weight to a
company's earnings. When
earnings rise, stocks be-
come more valuable -
and their prices usually
rise, too.
That seems to be hap-
pening now.
"We've had record prof-
its upon record profits,"
said John Butters, senior
earnings analyst at FactSet,
a research firm. "And esti-
mates are we'll have record
profits this year, too."
What's more, some of
the typical threats to stock
run-ups such as rising
inflation and interest
rates, which often trigger a
recession seem unlikely
to appear soon.
Among reasons to con-
sider stocks again:
MA STRONGER ECON-
OMY: There are no signs of
a recession. And that's en-
couraging for stocks,
which almost always fall
ahead of an economic
downturn. Stocks started
falling two months before
the Great Recession began
in December 2007 and one
year before the recession
that started in March 2001.
Better yet, the economy
may be on the verge of
faster growth. The Labor
Department announced
Friday the unemployment
rate in February dipped
from 7.9 percent to 7.7 per-
cent, its lowest level since
December 2008. Employ-
ers added more than
200,000 jobs each month
from November through
February, compared with
150,000 in each of the prior
three months.
More jobs mean more
money for people to spend,
and consumer spending
drives 70 percent of eco-
nomic activity.
And there has been a
flurry of other hopeful signs
lately Homebuilders broke
ground on new homes last
year at the fastest pace in
four years. Sales of autos,
the second-biggest con-
sumer purchase, are at a
five-year high.
If recent history is any
guide, this economic ex-
pansion is still young. The
expansion that began in
June 2009 is 44 months old.
The previous three expan-
sions lasted 73 months, 120
months and 92 months.
Corporate earnings grow
in expansions, which can
push stocks higher
In the 1982-1990 expan-
sion, earnings of compa-
nies in the Standard and
Poor's 500 stock index
grew 50 percent, according
to S&P Dow Jones Indices,
which oversees the index.
The S&P 500 itself surged
nearly 170 percent.
For 2013, earnings of


the index.
No matter which P/E
you choose, it's important
to think of it as a rough
guide at best. Stocks can
trade above or below their
average P/Es for years.
OPTIMISTIC INVEST-
ORS: A new love of stocks
could prove a powerful
force pushing prices up. In
fact, it can push them up
even if earnings don't
increase.
That's what happened in
the five years through 1986.
Earnings fell 2 percent, but
the S&P 500 almost dou-
bled as small investors who
had soured on stocks
throughout the 1970s re-
turned to the market The
multiple shorthand for
the price-earnings ratio -
rose from eight to nearly 17.
Market watchers refer to
this as "multiple expan-
sion." Will it happen again?
As stocks have surged
over the past four years,
individual investors have
been selling, which is
nearly unprecedented in a
bull market But they may
be having second thoughts.
In January, they put nearly
$20 billion more into U.S.
stock mutual funds than
they took out, according to
the Investment Company
Institute, a trade group for
funds.
Some financial analysts
say we are at the start of a
"Great Rotation." That
would mean investors
shifting money into stocks
from bonds. If that hap-
pens, stocks could soar. It's
too soon to say if the buy-
ing will continue.
LOW INTEREST
RATES: Interest rates are
near record lows. That's
good for stocks because it
lowers borrowing costs for
companies and makes
bonds, which compete
with stocks for investor
money, less appealing.
If you want to kill a stock
rally, then hike interest
rates.
That's what happened in
the run-up to Black Mon-
day, Oct. 19, 1987. In August
that year, the yield on the
30-year Treasury bond
rose above 10 percent. In-
vestors thought, "If I could
make 10 percent each year
for 30 years in bonds, why
keep my money in stocks?"
So they sold and stocks
drifted lower. Then Black
Monday struck. The Dow
plunged 508 points, or
nearly 23 percent its
largest fall in a single day
Today, the yield on the
30-year Treasury bond is
3.2 percent. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note
is 2.05 percent, less than
half its 20-year average of
4.7 percent. It could be
years before rates even re-
turn to that average level.


Buying stocks now may be


less risky than you think


S&P 500 companies are
expected to grow 7.9 per-
cent, then jump another
11.5 percent next year, ac-
cording to FactSet. If that's
right, stocks could rise fast.
But history offers three
caveats: First, if you look
at the 11 expansions back
to World War II, instead of
the last three, they last 59
months on average. By that
measure, the current ex-
pansion is middle aged,
not young.
Second, investing based
on U.S. economic expan-
sions may not work as well
as in the past. Big U.S. com-
panies generate nearly half
their revenue from over-
seas now so you need to
worry about other
economies, too. The 17 Eu-
ropean countries that use
the euro as a currency have
been in recession for more
than a year Japan, the
world's third largest econ-
omy, has struggled to grow.
If the worst is over for
these countries, U.S.
stocks could continue ris-
ing. If the growth drags,
stocks could fall.
Third, earnings fore-
casts are often too high.
They come from financial
analysts who study compa-
nies and advise on stocks
to buy In the past 15 years,
their annual earnings fore-
casts were an average 10
percent too high, accord-
ing to FactSet. Last year,
they got closer: They over-
estimated by 4 percent.
STOCKS REASON-
ABLY PRICED: Investors
like to use a gauge called
price-earnings ratios in
deciding whether to buy or
sell. Low P/E ratios signal
that stocks are cheap rela-
tive to a company's earn-
ings; high ones signal they
are expensive.
Right now, P/Es are nei-
ther low nor high, suggest-
ing stocks are reasonably
priced.
To calculate a P/E, you
divide the price of a stock
by its annual earnings per
share. A company that
earns $4 a share and has a
$60 stock has a P/E of 15.
Most investors calculate
P/Es two ways: based on
estimates of earnings the
next 12 months and on
earnings the past 12.
Stocks in the S&P 500
are at 13.7 times estimated
earnings per share in 2013.
That is close to the average
estimated P/E ratio of 14.2
over the past 10 years, ac-
cording to FactSet. The
P/E based on past earnings
paints a similar picture.
The S&P 500 trades now at
17.6 times earnings per
share in 2012, basically the
same as the 17.5 average
since World War II, ac-
cording to S&P Dow Jones
Indices, which oversees


Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 9,2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz ......................citizen member
SMac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


MUDDLED MIXTURE




Duke CEO wary



of reliance on



natural gas


In a recent meeting with fi-
nancial analysts and in-
vestors, retiring Duke
CEO Jim Rogers said one of
the company's biggest chal-
lenges in the future is being
too reliant on natural gas as a
fuel for electric generating
plants.
He said about
three-fourths of THE I,
the electric power
Duke supplies in Duke CE
Florida is pro- of over-
duced by gas- on natu
fueled plants -
and this percent- OUR OF
age could go up State r
within the next diversity
few years as the generate
two oldest coal-
burning plants at
Crystal River are retired and
the company builds a large
new gas-burning plant.
While natural gas is cur-
rently cheap, there is no
guarantee this will continue.
One reason for the current
low price is the increase in
supply from new discoveries
that require cracking, the in-
jection of high-pressure flu-
ids into deep gas wells to
release the gas. But cracking
has increasingly come under
fire from environmental
groups. Should anti-fracking
legislation be enacted, natu-
ral gas supplies would de-
cline and the price would
increase.
We believe the previous
Progress Energy policy of a di-
verse portfolio of generating
fuels is a sound strategy that
was altered by the decision to
close the Crystal River nuclear
plant. Aside from the terrible
economic impact this decision
will have on Citrus County, it
further reduced the diversity
of fuels used to generate elec-
tric power in the state.
According to reports filed



Another scam warning
OK, I have another scam for
you.
This person calls and he says
he's with your health company
and so he would like to come
over and show you how
you can get more bene-
fits from your health
insurance. And I said,
"Well, how long will
this take?" And he said,
"From 45 minutes to
an hour." I said, "No,
you can't come in my i
home that long." So I
called my health care CAL
and they said they had HP |
not sent anybody out UV
to say this. So you
have to be careful because
they'll come in and, you know,
they'll get into your finances if
they can. So I just thought I'd
warn everybody.
Saltwater intruding
You don't have to be a geolo-
gist, hydrologist or a rocket sci-
entist to see the saltwater
intrusion due to the lack of
fresh water. I have watched the
death of old palm trees in salt
and towering vegetation occur-
ring from the Gulf to (U.S.) 19.
Yes, palms did flourish nearly to
the Gulf shoreline.


S
is
E(
r
Lir



n(
fC
i


with the state Public Service
Commission, during its last full
year of operation, in 2008, CR3
generated about 14 percent of
Progress Energy's electricity,
while natural gas supplied
about 27 percent. As recently as
last year, Progress Energy fore-
cast that by 2018 nuclear would
supply about 17
.SUE: percent of its total
energy and natural
O warns gas would supply
reliance 53 percent.
ral gas. But this will not
happen. With the
2INION: closing of CR3
eeds a and the planned
of power closing of the old-
on fuels. est two coal
plants at the Crys-
tal River site, re-
liance on natural gas will
continue to grow.
We recognize the 2006 law
allowing future cost recovery
for nuclear plants needs
amendment to better protect
utility customers. But we also
believe the state Public Serv-
ice Commission should con-
tinue encouraging diversity
in generating fuels includ-
ing nuclear power, solar and
renewable sources -
through its policies on what
costs utilities are allowed to
recover through rates.
While natural gas may be
the default short-term solu-
tion, for the good of all its cus-
tomers we encourage Duke to
continue planning and devel-
oping alternatives to natural
gas. Part of this planning
should be construction of the
Levy County nuclear plant.
While nuclear has substan-
tial up-front costs, it has the
lowest and most stable fuel
costs of any of large-scale
power generation and would
help insulate customers from
future fluctuations in natural
gas prices.


Don't give or sell any water
from anywhere. What good are
jobs if you don't have water?
The county leaders are selling
the county into extinction.
Show current photo


0579

lose all
days.


Just saw a picture on
the Internet last night
of Trayvon Martin at
17 years old, tattooed,
bearded, 6-foot-2, 175
pounds. Why won't the
media show this pic-
ture? Why do they
show a 5-year-old pic-
ture that's not repre-
sentative at all? If
you're not telling the
truth, then you're lying
and you're going to
credibility one of these


Vehicle not handicapped
I would like to make one
more comment about the
handicapped privileges. Some-
one in the paper ... said a vehi-
cle, not a person, has
handicapped privileges. The
person is handicapped, not the
vehicle. If the handicapped per-
son is not in the vehicle, you're
not to use the handicapped
parking. That's for the person,
OK? The person is handi-
capped, not the vehicle.


Using reserves to
balance budget
Citrus County commission
and administration told the
public the budget was bal-
anced, while all along knowing
they were using the reserves to
supplement the budget not bal-
ancing it.
Also, knowing for several
years the Duke Energy tax
issue was here, only to let this
information out after the elec-
tion. Amazing!
Then, trying to blame Duke
for the biggest tax increase in
Citrus County instead of our
poor management. This is mis-
conduct. As my father told me
one time, son you can't fix the
problem with the same people
who made it, they have too
much to lose.
I assure you, as the taxpayer
representative, I know we have
too much to lose with unac-


"Knowledge of human nature is the
beginning and end ofpolitical education."
Henry Adams, 1907


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Paul sounds alarm on drones


Republican Rand Paul
took to the floor of the
U.S. Senate this week to
filibuster John Brennan's nom-
ination to become head of the
CIA.
"I will speak as
long as it takes," the
junior senator from
Kentucky said, "until
the alarm is sounded
from coast to coast
that our Constitution
is important, that
your rights to trial by
jury are precious,
that no American
should be killed by a Dian,
drone on American OTI
soil without first VoI
being charged with a VOl
crime, without first
being found to be guilty by a
court."
I imagine many Americans
following news of the filibuster,
which lasted nearly 13 hours,
were finding out for the first
time lawmakers such as Paul,
Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of
Texas and a handful of others
are gravely concerned about a
possible threat from the execu-
tive branch against these un-
alienable rights. This makes the
filibuster a success. As Paul
said, sounding the alarm from
"coast to coast" was exactly his
aim.
Was this unusual event the
filibuster heard 'round the
world? At least the country has
been alerted to the fact the
Obama administration, in the
persons of the president him-
self, the attorney general and
the CIA director-designate, has
been alarmingly vague and/or
downright unresponsive to re-
peated, specific questions from
Paul and Cruz. The two sena-
tors want to know whether the
administration believes the
Constitution permits the presi-
dent to order drone strikes
against noncombatant Ameri-
can citizens on American soil,
thus depriving them of their
Fifth Amendment guarantee of
due process and, of course,
their lives.
It is important to note that
neither Paul nor Cruz is ques-
tioning the power of the presi-
dent to defend the country
against an "imminent" threat-
any act of war or terrorism such
as Pearl Harbor or 9/11. They
are not even in this case ques-
tioning the legality of drone at-
tacks on Americans overseas.
Instead, it is the narrow possi-


a
H
I14


ability that the administration
might target noncombatants
here "at a restaurant in
Houston or at their home in
Bowling Green, Kentucky," as
Paul dramatically put it that
has focused the con-
cern of these fresh-
man powerhouses.
And so it should
l concern the rest of
us --and not just the
.- Arab-American citi-
zen Rand Paul in-
voked in hour one,
who, for communi-
cating via email with
West a terrorist-relative in
IER the Middle East,
CESc Paul believes, could
potentially become a
drone target of the
Obama administration. By hour
four, Paul was discussing the
many overseas drone attacks
the U.S. has carried out on what
we know as "caravans" peo-
ple, Paul said, "going from a
place where we think there are
bad people to another place
where there are bad people."
Could it happen here, he
wondered?
"So let's say there are people
going from a Constitution Party
meeting to a Libertarian Party
meeting. Both these groups
don't like big government. They
hate big government... They are
nonviolent as far as I know, but
they were on the fusion list for
potential terrorists," Paul said,
referring to a Department of
Homeland Security report tag-
ging anti-abortion activists; bor-
der advocates; supporters of
Rand's father, Ron Paul; and
others as potential members of
paramilitary groups that law
enforcement should monitor.
'Are we going to kill people in a
caravan going from one meet-
ing to the next?"
People will say the question
is absurd, he readily acknowl-
edged. But if the Obama admin-
istration resolutely fails to
acknowledge the constitutional
limits that specifically rule out
such an assault which al-
ready has plenty of precedent
overseas in the secretly ex-
panding "war on terror" is it
really absurd?
Meanwhile, there is some-
thing else to consider So long as
the Obama administration con-
tinues to demonize its political
opponents as potential domes-
tic terrorists, as Paul says, the
outlandishness of a domestic
drone strike is further worn


down, conditioned into weary
complacency or even mob con-
sensus. We've seen such trans-
formations many times before
in modern- and not always to-
talitarian societies.
All the more reason for the
president to alleviate such
fears with his affirmation that
killing noncombatant Ameri-
cans in America is unconstitu-
tional. But I don't think he's
going to do it. There's not
enough political pressure on
him to do so.
One of the stranger results of
the popular Paul filibuster was
the instant coalescence of an ad
hoc "Calm down, Rand" (read:
shut up) effort. This political
eruption loosely and overlap-
pingly linked "surge" and Arab
Spring diehards, neocon-esque
conservative journals and
blogs, and establishment pooh-
bahs such as Sens. John McCain
and Lindsey Graham.
I think the common ground
here is that these groups basi-
cally favor the Bush-Obama
drone wars that allow them to
believe we are winning, or at
least fighting, the war on terror
groups, even if the unacknowl-
edged reality is that we are los-
ing the free world to what we
might call "noncombatant" (or
pre-combatant) Islamization.
Maybe they think deep inside
that if drone wars were deemed
unconstitutional in any way -
or, worse, ineffective the hol-
low offensives the U.S. contin-
ues to support would eventually
collapse, giving rise to panicky
paralysis. In such an event, the
absurdity of picking off terror-
ist leaders worldwide as a na-
tional strategy to fight "terror"
might emerge with distressing
clarity, while the Islamic law
and money that have almost
wholly engulfed Western insti-
tutions might become frighten-
ingly apparent.
Maybe that's why it seems as
if blind trust in presidential dis-
cretion now trumps the bounds
of the Constitution. But I hope
not.

Diana West's new book is
"American Betrayal: The
SecretAssault on OurNation's
Character," coming in May
2013from St. Martin's Press.
She blogs at dianawest.net,
and she can be contacted via
dianawest@verizon.net.
Follow her on Twitter
@diana_west_.


49FPAI-JOIW-XW1- iUUCLK-if *fl4% to O W D
&NATION UiNDE DRoNS WITH

eijRVEILLANCF
;OR ALL. AIR 5
.0


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or e-mail to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

countable government.
Scott Adams
Inverness

Another
anti-union rant
Mr Lambert is off with his
rant against bad work rules.
This is up to management to
negotiate those work rules out.
If they can't do that, it is on


their heads.
I was told the same thing at a
non-union plant of Lincoln
Electric in Euclid, Ohio, back
in the early '60s, when I was
driving for UPS. Yes, a non-
union plant that had work
rules set up by the company So
..., what's your point?
Very simply, when we have
anything bad, get rid of it. Like
Mitch McConnell and John
Boehner, and all that say "no"
to compromise. Like certain
local politicians who don't
know when to be quiet.
Many unions have given in
to take-back demands to do
what, fatten the fat cats at
the top. How would you like
to work for Walmart or Geor-
gia Pacific?
The Walton's aren't hurting,
neither are the Koch brothers.
Lynn Dostal
Homosassa


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


LETTERS > to the Editor


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rebrandin9 Washinqtol Politicians...


BULL-READED


Letter to the EDITOR


Give women the
credit they are due
James W Willis is intent
on denying women credit
for the combat they are al-
ready performing with
honor.
I share Willis' history of
family members in war
and I can relate. I
wouldn't want women, or
men either, again fighting
with bayonets because
they were out of ammuni-
tion and the enemy was
also, nor searching the
pockets of corpses in the
hope of finding a piece of
hard candy War will
never be humane but we
can safely say no U.S. sol-
dier will again face the
fear of starvation. Much
has been written of the
courage and heroism of
the Lost Battalions but my
father spoke of the gnaw-
ing hunger
Willis writes of young
GIs crawling on their bel-
lies through the mud
under barbed wire while
live bullets whizzed over-
head. VIP's observed our
performance in a night
problem and commented
favorably When an es-
corting officer men-
tioned that we were
women the VIP's ex-


claimed: "Those Are
Women?" We were the
next group out on
bivouac and we had to
chop down trees, dig
ditches and build a "con-
fidence course" with
smooth wire to replace
our infiltration course.
Even in the 1940s,
when women were kept
far from combat areas,
the Army gave women
the same training as
men, in case Congress
changed its mind. They
knew the day would
come and wanted to be
prepared.
Willis commented on
upper body strength,
which varies in both men
and women. I remember
the women in the WAC
motor pool, and they were
awesome. But there were
many military occupa-
tional specialties, what
we called our MOS, that
required less strength
and more know-how.
Willis writes he can't
imagine his beloved
daughter lugging 50
pounds of combat gear
through an enemy-held
jungle, but chances are he
can't imagine her jobless,
broke and hopeless, ei-
ther. Patriotism and ad-
venture were probably


motivating factors for en-
listment in the 1940s, but
in the early 1950s, most
female recruits came
from Appalachia, where
jobs were most scarce. In
an all-volunteer Army, un-
employment is a recruit-
ing factor
There are no longer
theaters of war with front
lines and rear echelons.
Every man and woman
who set foot in Iraq or
Afghanistan was immedi-
ately in harm's way
It would be a better
world if we pursued av-
enues other than war, but
we spend more on de-
fense than all the other
countries combined.
I. E Stone said, "If you
have a six-billion-dollar
candle you will light it."
I still hold signs for
peace as many of us in
Citrus County did during
the ill-advised Iraq war,
and I demonstrated
against the Gulf War in
1991.
As long as women,
along with men, are
sucked into the military
maelstrom they deserve
to get the credit they have
earned.
Mary B. Gregory
Homosassa


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OPINION


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 A9


I












NATION


Nat*


Nation BRIEFS

Winter


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Al-Qaida spokesman on trial


Associated Press
Commuters wait at a bus
stop during snowfall
Friday in New York. A
very wet snow is causing
slippery road conditions
in the metropolitan area.
Snow flurries were
expected to continue
until about noon before
changing to rain.


Army's handling
of PTSD reviewed
SEATTLE -An Army re-
port released Friday finds
the service still has trouble
diagnosing and treating sol-
diers for post-traumatic
stress disorder, despite
more than doubling its num-
ber of military and civilian
behavioral health workers
over the past five years.
Confusing paperwork, in-
consistent training and
guidelines, and incompati-
ble data systems have hin-
dered the service as it tries
to deal with behavioral
health issues, the report
said. It's a crucial issue:
After a decade of war, sol-
dier suicides outpace com-
bat deaths.
The Army and the Veter-
ans Administration plan to
have a joint disability sys-
tem, by which health care
providers in either organiza-
tion will have access to
records, by 2017.
Towns to require
gun ownership
AUGUSTA, Maine -A
town of 140 people in west-
ern Maine is considering an
ordinance making gun own-
ership mandatory, the latest
of a handful of communities
nationwide to pass or con-


sider such a ru
though the me
considered un
Communitie
to Georgia hav
spired to "requ
mend their res
themselves ev
gunman killed
sters and educ
14 in a school
Conn., and raise
among gun ow
an impending r
Second Amend
The article u
in Maine asks,
town of Byron
quire all house
firearms and a
protect the citiz
Backed by g
porters, the ord
tended to pre-e
block gun-cont
Maine Attorney
Janet Mills said
will be "null and
it passes. It is p
a 2011 state la'
municipalities f
firearm regulati
Delta oi
TSA's kni
WASHINGT
head of Delta /
Friday joined ti
opposition to th
portation Secu
tration's new p
passengers to
knives onto pla
Delta CEO F
derson said in
TSAAdministra
tole that he sha
gitimate conce
airline's flight a
about the new
Allowing sm
be carried on b
ban of more th
"will add little v
customer secu
flow in relation
tional risk for o
and customers
said in the letter


Bin Laden's

son-in-law pleads

not guilty in NY

Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sulaiman
Abu Ghaith, the charismatic al-
Qaida spokesman, fundraiser and
son-in-law to Osama bin Laden, is
likely to have a vast trove of knowl-
edge about the terror network's
central command but not much
useful information about current
threats or plots, intelligence offi-
cials and other experts say.


Associated Press


le even WASHINGTON As
asures are President Barack Obama
enforceable. and lawmakers spar over
s from Idaho huge federal deficits,
ve been in- they're confronted by a
ire" or recom- classic contradiction: Most
idents arm Americans want govern-
er since a ment austerity, a survey
26 young- shows, but they also want
gators Dec. increased spending on a
in Newtown, host of popular programs:
sed fears education, crime fighting,
vners about health care, Social Secu-
restriction on rity, the environment and
rest righction more. Less for defense,
dment rights. space and foreign aid.
lp for a vote The newly released Gen-
"Shall the eral Social Survey asked
vote to re- people whether they be-
holds to have lieve spending in specific
ammunition to categories is "too much,"
zens?" "too little" or "about right."
iun rights sup- It covers the public's shift-
linance is in- ing priorities from 1973,
emptively when Richard Nixon was
rol laws, president, through 2012
V General with Obama in the White
, adding it House.
d void" even if "Despite a dislike of
)re-empted by taxes, more people have al-
w that bars ways favored increases in
rom adopting spending than cuts," wrote
ons. the survey's director, Tom
ons. W Smith, of the independ-
pposeS ent research organization
fe policy NORC at the University of
Chicago.
ION The While people's priorities
Air Lines on shift through the years,
he growing they've not changed on one
he Trans- category Foreign aid has
rityAdminis- been stuck firmly in last
policy allowing place since the survey
carry small began. Last year, 65 per-
anes. cent of those surveyed
Richard An- thought there was "too
a letter to much," 25 percent checked
ator John Pis- "about right" and a slim 11
ares the "le- percent said "too little."
rns" of the The numbers are not much
attendants changed from 1973 -
policy, when 73 percent said too
all knives to much on foreign aid,
board after a 22 percent just right and
board after a 5 percent too little.
an 11 years Various polls have con-
alue to the sistently shown the public
irity process believes foreign aid is a far
to the addi- bigger slice of the spending
ur cabin staff pie than it actually is.
," Anderson Foreign aid amounts to
er. loose change, hovering for
-From wire reports years at 1 percent or less of


Abu Ghaith pleaded not
guilty Friday to conspiring
to kill Americans in prop-
aganda videos that
warned of further assaults
against the United States
as devastating as the Sept.
11, 2001, attacks on the
World Trade Center and Sula
the Pentagon that killed Abu C
nearly 3,000 people. son-in
Believed to be more of a Osam
strategic player in bin Lac
Laden's inner circle than
an operational plotter, Abu Ghaith
would be the highest-ranking al-
Qaida figure to stand trial on U.S.
soil since 9/11. Intelligence offi-
cials say he may be able to shed
new light on al-Qaida's inner


Opinions on spending priorities
The long-running General Social Survey tracks views on
whether the government spends too little, about the right
amount, or too much on various public programs.
Americans' views on government spending
Too little About right 0 Too much
Health care
100% i.i...
u...... -mm
8o 111111 II iii i
60
40
20

74 '76 '78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 '90 '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12
Social security
100 ..................... i ......m


60 Il
40
20
0 . , , , ,
'74 76 78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 '90 '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12
Military/National defense


600
I 1111111i 1111|.iii


20
0 '74 '76 '78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 '90 '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12
Foreign aid
100


60 I .
40
20

74 '76 '78 '80 '82 '84 '86 '88 '90 '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12

NOTE: Results are not available for 1992. Questions on Social Security began
with 1984 survey. Numbers may not equal 100 percent due to rounding.
SOURCE: National Opinion Research Center AP
at the University of Chicago


the federal budget, com-
pared with defense spend-
ing and "entitlement"
programs such as Social
Security and Medicare.
Those are among the
biggest deficit drivers and


a focal point in Washing-
ton's recent budget de-
bates. The survey shows
the public is largely op-
posed to cuts in entitle-
ment programs, but tilts
toward cuts in the defense


workings concerning al-
Qaida's murky dealings in
Iran in the past decade,
for example but proba-
bly will have few details
about specific or immi-
nent ongoing threats.
He gave U.S. officials a
iman 22-page statement after
ihaith his Feb. 28 arrest in Jor-
law of dan, according to prosecu-
ia bin tors. They would not
en. describe the statement.
Bearded and balding,
Abu Ghaith said little during the
15-minute hearing in U.S. District
Court in New York in lower
Manhattan just blocks from
Ground Zero and displayed
none of the finger-wagging or stri-


budget
To reach all these con-
clusions, Smith devised an
index that boils down his
findings to a single number
for each category. If every-
one favored more spend-
ing for a given program
area, the maximum score
would be +100; and if
everyone wanted less
spending, the score would
be a negative number, -100.
On this scale, top-ranked
"improving education" in
2012 scored +68.4 while
bottom-rated foreign aid
scored a -60.4.
Support for defense
spending has swung back
and forth between negative
and positive over four
decades. It posted a -28.4 in
1973 near the end of the
politically divisive Viet-
nam War, turned positive
in 1978 and peaked at
+48.9 in 1980. It returned
to negative territory from
1983 to 2000. But after the
Sept 11, 2001, terrorism at-
tacks and the start of the
war in Afghanistan, sup-
port for more defense
spending again went posi-
tive through 2004. But it
turned negative again as
U.S. military involvement
in Iraq increased and has
been negative ever since.
Conversely, Social Secu-
rity has always been in pos-
itive territory Most people
have favored increased
spending on this program
since the mid-80s, with the
exception of 1993 and 1994.
On other issues: Most
Americans in the poll fa-
vored increased spending
for assistance to the poor
(64 percent), improving
the nation's health (61 per-
cent) and Social Security
(56 percent). Most also fa-
vored greater spending on
domestic and social issues
including education (76
percent), developing al-
ternative energy sources
(62 percent), reducing the
crime rate (59 percent),
improving the environ-
ment (57 percent) and
dealing with drug addic-


I
i

r-
m


represent states that favor
Republicans.


Waiting for Chavez's funeral procession


T 1,bi 1- : y-
Associated Press
A woman holds a poster of Venezuela's late President Hugo Chavez under cloths in the colors of the
Venezuelan flag that decorate a light post Friday outside the military academy where Chavez's funeral
ceremony will take place in Caracas, Venezuela. In some ways, the former paratrooper is not going
anywhere: Venezuela announced Thursday it would embalm his body and put it on permanent display.




Survey: Many conflicted on govt spending cuts


t orations that marked his
paganda in the days and
iths after 9/11.
through an interpreter, Judge
vis A. Kaplan asked whether
understood his rights.
bu Ghaith nodded and said,
s."
asked whether he had money to
e an attorney, he shook his
d and said no. He nodded and
d yes when asked whether he
signed an affidavit describing
financial situation.
plann promised to set a trial
e when the case returns to
rt April 8. Bail was not re-
sted, and none was set.
bu Ghaith's lawyer declined
Iment after the hearing.



Democrats

face

challenging

Senate

landscape

Associated Press
WASHINGTON After
a surprising string of victo-
ries last fall, Democrats
now face a challenging ter-
rain as they look to hold
onto their Senate majority
in 2014 and prevent Re-
publicans from gaining full
control of Congress during
President Barack Obama's
final two years. His party
must defend a hefty 21
seats, including seven in
largely rural states that the
president lost last fall.
The task of maintaining
control of the Senate has
grown more daunting in
recent weeks, with four
Senate Democrats an-
nouncing plans to retire.
Sen. Carl Levin of Michi-
gan disclosed his decision
Thursday, following Iowa
Sen. Tom Harkin and
West Virginia Sen. Jay
Rockefeller.
New Jersey Sen. Frank
Lautenberg has also said
he will retire, but Democ-
rats will be heavily favored
to hold the seat
A fifth Democratic re-
tirement could come soon
from South Dakota Sen.
Tim Johnson, who has not
yet announced his
intentions.
Democrats control 55
seats in the Senate, after
November elections in
which they did better than
expected and gained two
seats to pad their majority.
That means Republicans
would need to pick up six
seats next year to take con-
trol for the first time since
2006.
Twenty months before
the mid-term elections,
Republicans are laying the
groundwork to try to capi-
talize on the defense-
playing Democrats, work-
ing to recruit strong candi-
dates in Arkansas, Alaska,
Louisiana, North Carolina,
South Dakota and West
Virginia all states car-
ried by Republican presi-
dential nominee Mitt
Romney last year.
They are also buoyed by
history, which shows the
party controlling the White
House typically loses seats
during the midterm of a
second-term president.
"The map looks pretty
good" for the GOP said
Greg Strimple, an Idaho-
based Republican pollster
for Senate and gubernato-
rial candidates. "If I had a
deck of cards to play, I'd
rather play the Republi-
can deck than the Demo-
cratic deck."
Indeed, Republicans
have only 14 of their seats
up for re-election and only
one Sen. Susan Collins
of Maine is in a state
Obama carried last year
Just two GOP senators
have said they will retire
Mike Johanns of Ne-
braska and Saxby Chamb-
liss of Georgia and they











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CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Hurricane netters breeze by Buffalo


JOE KORNECKI III
Correspondent
INVERNESS The Citrus High
School girls tennis team cruised to
a 6-1 home victory over The Vil-
lages on Friday. The 'Canes won all
the matches played, and the only
defeat was by way of forfeit for Cit-
rus at No. 3 singles due to an
injury.
"Everybody went out and did
well ... and it was a strong team
performance," Citrus head coach
Scott Waters said.
Citrus (6-3) won in decisive fash-
ion in four of the singles matches,


Everybody went
out and did well ... and
it was a strong team
performance.
Scott Waters
Citrus High School girls tennis coach.

and the 'Canes only dropped one
game out of those. No. 1 Melanie
Dodd improved to 9-0 on the sea-
son with a 6-0, 6-0 win over Macki
McDaniels while No. 2 Paige Jor-


dan also shut out her opponent
Lindsey Winegardner by winning
in straight sets, 6-0.
'Canes No. 4 Juliann Johnson
took down Erica Dellinger 6-0, 6-1.
Leah Stanley improved her im-
pressive singles record to 8-1 by
shutting down the Buffalo's Ash-
lynn Counts 6-0, 6-0 at No. 5 singles.
"I think we did really well as a
team," Stanley said.
Citrus dominated both doubles
matches: No. 1 Dodd and Jordan
defeated McDaniels and Wine-
gardner 8-2, while the duo of John-
son and Stanley blew by Daunger
and Counts 8-1 in pro-set matches.


Panther girls tennis team
sweeps past St. John at home
The Lecanto girls tennis team took a 7-0 victory over
Ocala St. John Lutheran on Friday afternoon at Lecanto
High School.
All seven of the matches were won by Lecanto by the
pro-set score of 8-0. The victors were:
Singles
No. 1: Amber Gamble; No. 2: Madison Gamble; No. 3:
Simi Shah; No. 4: Megan Jervis; No. 5: Andrea DelaCruz.
Doubles
No. 1: Gamble/Gamble; No. 2: Shah/Jervis.
Lecanto (8-2 overall) plays 3:30 p.m. at home against
Crystal River.


High School BASEBALL


Seven Rivers

blanks

Cougars, 3-0

Gage fans eight

in shutout win
JAMES BLEVINS
Correspondent
HOMOSASSA The
Seven Rivers Christian War-
riors jumped ahead quickly
in their first at-bat Friday
evening to take an early lead
for what became a low-scor-
ing baseball game against the
visiting Cornerstone Acad-
emy Cougars.
The Warriors allowed no
earned runs on the way to a
3-0 shutout victory over the
Cougars at Dazzy Vance Field
in Homosassa.
Seven Rivers starting
pitcher Adam Gage (1 for 3 at
the plate) hurled for all seven
innings and walked away
with eight strikeouts in the
game.
"Our defense was strong
tonight," Seven Rivers head
coach Jim Ervin said. "Adam
Gage did a nice job tonight.
He only threw 84 pitches.
Cory Weiand (1 for 3) ig-
nited the Warrior bats in the
bottom of the first with his
single and later scored on
Parker Pillsbury's double for
a 1-0 lead.
Seven Rivers' Coy Phillips
popped out to left field to
give the Cougars two outs in
the inning but Garret Griggs
(2 for 3) batted in Gage (who
walked earlier) with his sin-
gle to extend the advantage
to 2-0 before Pillsbury was
thrown out at home to end
the inning.
Weiand made some strong
defensive plays at first base
in the game, turning two key
double plays (one in the sec-
ond inning and one to close
out the game in the seventh).
Cougar catcher Gregory
Jack (1 for 3) tripled in the
second inning but Seven
Rivers' Weiand prevented
that impressive hit from con-
verting into runs on the
scoreboard as Cornerstone's
Devin Gregory popped out to
Weiand and he followed by
throwing out Jack at third for
his first double play in the
game.
Seven Rivers outhit Cor-
nerstone 6-3 in the game, but
the Warriors had to with-
stand one last charge by Cor-
nerstone to cement the
See Page B4


S- ." ** ",.
j -- I.
STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Quick reflexes save the day for Lecanto shortstop Joey Spell as he narrowly beats a pickoff attempt by
Citrus on Friday night at Lecanto High School.



'Canes come out on top


Citrus baseball needs 10

innings to win at Lecanto
SEAN ARNOLD
Correspondent
LECANTO Citrus freshman closer Austin
Bogart scored on a sacrifice fly by junior catcher
Cody Bogart in the top of the 10th inning and
struck out the final pair of Lecanto batters in the
bottom half of the frame to secure a 9-8 road vic-
tory over the Panthers in extended 6A-6 action on
Friday
Lecanto (2-4 overall, 1-2 in District 6A-6) loaded
the bases in the final inning after senior shortstop
Joey Spell singled and senior center fielder Scott


Stearns hit a bomb to right-center for a double,
prompting Citrus (4-4, 2-1 in 6A-6) to intentionally
walk junior starting pitcher Levi O'Steen to load
the bases with one out before the younger Bogart
fanned the next two batters to end the threat.
With Lecanto down 8-7 in the seventh, Panthers
sophomore right fielder Caleb Southey singled
and scored when junior first baseman Jacob
Schenck occupied the Hurricanes' attention on a
mishandled rundown, which sent the game to
extra frames.
Citrus took a 4-3 lead on a two-run home run to
center by Austin Bogart in the fifth, but the Pan-
thers answered with two base hits and a couple of
walks in the bottom of the fifth for a 6-4 advantage.
The 'Canes got four runs in the sixth off five hits
before the Panthers chipped away at that lead
See Page B4


Big inning pushes Eustis past CR
STEVE MCGUNNIGLE district) trailed 5-3 entering the the throw to first, opting to hol
Correspondent fourth, which started with a Okey on third base. But Hagner


CRYSTAL RIVER In a
close game, all it takes is one key
play to lead to one big inning to
swing the momentum dramati-
cally in one direction or the
other.
That was the case Friday
night, as the Crystal River Pi-
rates baseball team unraveled
in the fourth inning, en route to
losing 11-4 to District 5A-7
leader Eustis from Mike Hamp-
ton Field at Crystal River
The Pirates (4-8 overall, 0-4


groundball off the bat of Eustis'
Austin Simmons getting through
the infield on a Crystal River
error.
After Pirates reliever
Kameron Pennington got a
strikeout, Chris Okey's base hit
scored Simmons, and Okey ad-
vanced to second base as the
ball was mishandled in the
outfield.
Okey stole third, then Alex
Hagner reached on a slow roller
to the left of the mound, and
Pennington was unable to make


Heat


win 17th


straight
Associated Press
MIAMI LeBron James
scored 25 points and grabbed
10 rebounds, Dwyane Wade
added 22 points and the
won again,
pulling away
late to beat
the Philadel-
phia 76ers
102-93 on Fri-
day night for
their 17th
straight LeBron
victory James
Chris Bosh
scored 16 points, Ray Allen
added 12 and Shane Battier
scored 11 for the Heat, who
matched the 12th-longest
winning streak in NBA his-
tory and became the first
team in the league to clinch a
playoff spot this season.
Down by nine in the third
quarter, the Heat took a 76-75
lead when James beat the
buzzer to end the period with
a 3-pointer, then took control
with what became a 17-4 run
over a 5-minute stretch of the
fourth.
Thaddeus Young scored 25
points, Dorell Wright added
14 and Spencer Hawes fin-
ished with 13 points and 10
rebounds for the 76ers, who
lost their 12th straight on the
road and 13th straight regu-
lar-season game against
Miami. Jrue Holiday added a
game-high 13 assists for
Philadelphia.
Still, with 12 minutes to go,
this one was far from over.
Philadelphia gave the
Heat all they wanted for the
first three quarters, taking a
quick 18-11 lead, then mak-
ing its first five attempts from
3-point range in the second
quarter, and finally going on
a spurt in the third that had
Miami facing a 60-51 deficit
at one point.
Much as they did in the
first 16 of these wins, the
Heat now winners of 13
straight at home, heading
into Sunday's playoff re-
match in Miami against Indi-
ana found a way
Miami had 10 assists on 12
field goals in the third quar-
ter and took a second-half
lead for the first time on a
brilliant move by Bosh -
who spun to his right, got
fouled by Hawes and scored
See Page B4


di
r


would the take a big lead off
first, eventually drawing a Crys-
tal River pickoff attempt, which
turned into a prolonged run-
down, and watched as Okey
broke from third and scored.
The throw home was late as the
runner scored to make it 7-3 and
Hagner ended up safely on sec-
ond base.
Max Sellers then blasted an
RBI triple down the right field
line to score Hagner, and


Page B4


2013 DODGE

GRAND CARAAN


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SCHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM HOMOSASSA INVERNESS BROOKSVILLE -
i\NNE A ^39 MONTH LEASE WITH $2999 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS. NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY. +ALL PRICES
2 ': PLUS TAX TAG AND DEALER FEES WITH $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Tiger takes control


17 birdies first

two rounds

at Doral

Associated Press

DORAL Tiger Woods
struggled on the practice
range, and he didn't feel
much better two holes into
his second round Friday at
the Cadillac Championship.
He would not have guessed
this would be the day to set
a personal record for
birdies, much less wind up
with a two-shot lead.
"All I need is one shot,"
he said. '"And as soon as I
feel it on one, I can pretty
much carry through. And I
did that today"
It was a 4-iron on the par-
3 fourth hole, the toughest
on the Blue Monster
Woods hit a bullet with a
slight fade at the left edge of
the green and heard the
crowd cheer as the slope
and the grain took the ball
to within 4 feet for birdie.
And just like that, he was
on his way
In a World Golf Champi-
onship with the biggest
names in the hunt, Woods
ran off six birdies in an
eight-hole stretch around
the turn in a clean, crisp ex-
hibition. That sent him to a
7-under 65 and a two-shot
lead over former U.S. Open
champion Graeme
McDowell.
Woods has made 17
birdies in two rounds, his
most ever on the PGA Tour,
though that wasn't the most
important number
"It left me a two-shot
lead," Woods said.
He was at 13-under 131,
his lowest 36-hole score on
tour since the 2009 AT&T
National.
Woods followed that 4-
iron with a wedge he stuffed
to inside 2 feet He added a
collection of 10- to 15-foot
birdie putts, and ended his
big run with another 4-iron
with a totally different
shape, this one high and
soft to 15 feet on the 224-
yard 13th hole. Those par 3s
ranked as the two toughest
at Doral on Friday, and he
birdied them both.
A birdie-birdie finish by
McDowell gave him a 67
and prevented a dream
final group for the weekend
at Doral Woods and long-
time nemesis Phil
Mickelson.
Mickelson, sparked by a
visit to Augusta National
earlier in the week, hit a 9-
iron that stopped inches
from dropping for a hole-in-
one on the par-3 ninth. He


Associated Press
Ernie Els hits from a seventh hole bunker Friday during
the second round of the Cadillac Championship in Doral.


had a 67 and was three
shots behind, along with
Steve Stricker (67).
Rory McIlroy showed
signs of turning the comer
with a 69, although he
ended with a sloppy three-
putt bogey It was his first
round under par this year, a
small consolation for the
world's No. 1 player He was
still 11 shots behind Woods.
Woods, who once owned
these WGCs, has not won
the last 10 he's played. But
after a key putting tip from
Stricker on Wednesday af-
ternoon, Woods looks as
comfortable as ever on a
Blue Monster course where
he has won three times.
"It's going to be tough to
catch him," Stricker said.
"We all know when he gets
out in front, he's tough to
catch and tough to beat
Looks like he's playing well.
Looks like all parts of his
game are working. Yeah,
he's going to be tough to
catch."
The toughest part of the
weekend might be the Blue
Monster
The greens already are
firm and crusty under a
week of sunshine and dry
air. Woods, McDowell and
most everyone else expects
it to only get worse.
"I guess they can let this
place go since they're going
to tear it up on Monday,"
McDowell said.
Donald Trump, who
bought the resort a year ago,
plans a big makeover on the


Blue Monster with con-
struction to start right after
the tournament If that's the
case, it could be reminis-
cent of Bay Hill a year ago,
where Woods outlasted Mc-
Dowell on the final day
"It basically was a U.S.
Open that broke out in Or-
lando," Woods said. "We
don't get too many opportu-
nities where the weather
cooperates, where they can
push the golf course to a
point where it's pretty tough
like that"
Not that he would mind.
Woods has thrived on the
toughest courses over the
years, one reason he has 14
majors.
"It would be fun," he said.
More fun is being atop
the leaderboard, especially
on a course where Woods
has a history of winning. He
has a 35-10 record when he
has at least a share of the
36-hole lead, though he is
only 2-2 in the last year
Those events he failed to
win were the U.S. Open and
PGA Championship.
The star from Northern
Ireland this year has been
McDowell, who won the
World Challenge at the end
of last year at Sherwood
and hasn't missed much of a
beat since returning from a
10-week break. He lost in
the quarterfinals of the
Match Play Championship,
and tied for ninth in the
Honda Classic.
Making up a two-shot
deficit to Woods is never


easy, though McDowell
holds one distinction. He is
the only player to make up
more than two shots to
Woods in the final round,
rallying from four down at
Sherwood in 2010.
"Tomorrow is not about
winning the golf tourna-
ment Tomorrow is about
maintaining position, main-
taining the way I'm playing
and trying to give myself a
chance come Sunday after-
noon," McDowell said. "It
doesn't really matter who
I'm playing with tomorrow.
Tiger always brings his own
interesting little circus in-
side the ropes. But like I say,
I've been there many times
and I always look forward to
playing with him."


World Golf
Championship
Friday, At Trump Doral Golf Club
and Resort, Miami
Purse: $8.75 million
Yardage: 7,334, Par 72
Second Round:
TigerWoods 66-65-131 -13
Graeme McDowell 66-67- 133 -11
Phil Mickelson 67-67-134 -10
Steve Stricker 67-67-134 -10
Bubba Watson 66-69-135 -9
Freddie Jacobson 66-69-135 -9
Charl Schwartzel 71-65-136 -8
Keegan Bradley 68-68-136 -8
Dustin Johnson 68-69-137 -7
John Huh 71-67-138 -6
John Senden 69-69-138 -6
Peter Hanson 67-71 -138 -6
Sergio Garcia 66-72-138 -6
Michael Thompson 69-69-138 -6
Zach Johnson 71-67-138 -6
Rickie Fowler 69-69 -138 -6
Mike Hendry 72-66-138 -6
Jason Dufner 69-69- 138 -6
ThawornWiratchant 69-69-138 -6
lan Poulter 68-70-138 -6
Hunter Mahan 67-72-139 -5
Webb Simpson 72-67-139 -5
Charles Howell III 68-71 -139 -5
George Coetzee 70-69 -139 -5
Alexander Noren 69-70-139 -5
Scott Jamieson 70-69-139 -5
Jason Day 74-66 -140 -4
Justin Rose 68-72-140 -4
NickWatney 69-71-140 -4
David Lynn 71-70 -141 -3
Richard Sterne 70-71-141 -3
Russell Henley 70-72-142 -2
Nicolas Colsaerts 71-71 -142 -2
Adam Scott 72-70 -142 -2
Jim Furyk 72-70-142 -2
Matteo Manassero 71-71 -142 -2
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 72-70-142 -2
Lee Westwood 73-69 -142 -2
Rory Mcllroy 73-69 -142 -2
Ernie Els 73-69-142 -2
Scott Piercy 70-73-143 -1
Geoff Ogilvy 69-74 -143 -1
Bo Van Pelt 68-75-143 -1
Martin Kaymer 76-68 -144 E
Matt Kuchar 72-72 -144 E
Francesco Molinari 78-66 -144 E
Ryan Moore 73-71 -144 E
Marcus Fraser 73-72-145 +1
Rafael Cabrera Bello 71-74- 145 +1
Chris Wood 71-74-145 +1
Louis Oosthuizen 70-75-145 +1
Bill Haas 72-73-145 +1
Tim Clark 72-73-145 +1
Carl Pettersson 71-75-146 +2
Brian Gay 70-76 -146 +2
Luke Donald 70-76-146 +2
Branden Grace 73-74-147 +3
John Merrick 75-72-147 +3
Marcel Siem 75-73-148 +4
Padraig Harrington 76-72-148 +4
Jamie Donaldson 72-77-149 +5
Stephen Gallacher 74-75 -149 +5
Thorbjorn Olesen 75-75- 150 +6
Robert Garrigus 75-75 150 +6
Paul Lawrie 78-73 -151 +7


Drivers eager to



take Gen-6 car


for a real spin


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS A day-
long rainstorm kept
NASCAR's teams mostly
confined to their garages
Friday at the Las Vegas
Motor Speedway
Several drivers felt the
rain was also the only
thing protecting the
track's speed record from
the new Gen-6 race car.
Although Denny Ham-
lin's criticism of the new
car drew heavy attention
and a hefty fine from
NASCAR this week, most
drivers think it's too early
to make any negative
judgment about their
speedy new rides. In fact,
this weekend is the Gen-
6's first real chance to
show what it's got and
the drivers are eager to
get rolling.
"I think as we learn
more and more about
these cars and what
makes them work and
drive better, things can
only get better as far as
the product we put out
there every week," Dale
Earnhardt Jr. said.
While Hamlin correctly
pointed out how many ad-
justments still must be
made to the car, many
more drivers seem in-
trigued by the possibili-
ties and potential in their
eye-catching new vehi-
cles. What's more,
NASCAR and its three
manufacturers built the
new car largely to im-
prove racing on 1.5-mile
intermediate tracks like
the tri-oval in Vegas,
where Brad Keselowski
will start from the pole on
Sunday
The first race in the
Gen-6 was with restrictor
plates at Daytona, a high-
banked, 2.5-mile track. Its
second outing was at
Phoenix on a fairly flat, 1-
mile track with few of the
challenges drivers will
face elsewhere. While
Phoenix featured little
passing or side-by-side
racing, most drivers seem
to think the quality of rac-
ing will improve on the
intermediate tracks that
make up most of their
schedule.
"For a new car, I
thought last week was a
really good debut for it,"
Tony Stewart said. "I per-
sonally think it's off to a
great start, and it's got a
lot of potential. We had
good racing, we had a


Qualifying
canceled by
heavy rain
LAS VEGAS Brad
Keselowski will start on the
pole after heavy rain forced
NASCAR to cancel qualify-
ing for Sunday's race at
the Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.
The track got steady rain
all morning Friday and
again in the early afternoon
after a brief break, forcing
NASCAR to scrap practice
and qualifying for the first
time in Las Vegas.
The speedway urged
fans to take cover from
rain, wind and lightning
when the afternoon storm
broke.
Sunday's field will be set
by points and the NASCAR
rule book, giving the pole to
last season's Sprint Cup
series champion.
Mike Bliss will miss the
race because of the can-
cellation of qualifying.
-From wire report

good finish, and every-
body is going to keep
learning. Everybody has
their piece of the equa-
tion that they will figure
out. You have to start
somewhere, and for it to
debut the way that it has,
I think, has been a very
positive start."
Although Hamlin's pes-
simism got headlines this
week largely because
NASCAR spotlighted it by
fining him $25,000, Earn-
hardt and Stewart are
among the drivers who
are encouraged by their
early experience in the
new cars and Danica
Patrick certainly isn't
complaining after win-
ning her historic pole at
Daytona.
The new cars are
lighter and more aero-
sensitive, but they're def-
initely fast, too: After
Patrick and Mark Martin
barely missed the track
speed records in qualify-
ing for NASCAR's first
two races of the season,
many drivers said they
expected a Vegas record
to fall Friday before the
session was scrapped by
rain. They barely missed
the record during Thurs-
day's open test, a valuable
resource for teams tweak-
ing their cars for the sea-
son ahead.


Longoria's 2-run double helps Rays beat Phillies


Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE Evan Longoria
hit a two-run double Friday, helping the
Tampa Bay Rays beat the Philadelphia
Phillies 3-2 despite a rough outing for AL
Cy Young Award winner David Price.
Price was hit hard, allowing eight hits -
though only two runs in four innings.
Kevin Frandsen had two hits off the left-
hander, including a solo homer in the third.
Michael Young also drove in a run off
Price with a first-inning single, the last of
three straight hits the Phillies put together
to begin the game.
The Rays minimized the damage against
their ace with good defense.
Marlins 6, Yankees 1
JUPITER Nathan Eovaldi allowed one run
in four innings and John Maine followed with two
scoreless innings to help the Miami Marlins beat
the New York Yankees 6-1.
Maine, who hasn't pitched in the major
leagues since 2010, is competing for the fifth
spot in the Marlins rotation.
New York starter Adam Warren allowed four
runs and six hits in four innings. In his previous
two spring training starts, Warren gave up one
run and one hit in five innings.
Miami'sAdeiny Hechavarria had two hits and
two RBIs. Donovan Solano and Rob Brantdy
each had two hits and scored twice. Matt Downs
had an RBI double and a sacrifice fly.
Melky Mesa had two hits and scored a run,
and Thomas Neal had an RBI double for the
Yankees.


Associated Press
Tampa Bay's Evan Longoria hits a double Friday to score two runs in the third inning
against the Philadelphia Phillies in Port Charlotte.


Davis had two hits and three RBIs for the Blue
Jays.
The Braves managed only two singles, in-
cluding a hit by B.J. Upton.


Blue Jays 7, Braves (ss) 1
1Braves (ss) 14, Astros (ss) 9


KISSIMME Josh Johnson struck out five in
3 2-3 perfect innings, leading the Toronto Blue
Jays past a split squad of Atlanta Braves 7-1.
Johnson fanned four of his last five batters
and lowered his spring ERA to 1.17. He was
8-14 with a 3.81 ERA for the Miami Marlins last
season.
Braves starter Kris Medlen allowed three
earned runs, including a homer by Anthony
Gose. He struck out three and gave up five hits.
Gose had three hits and drove in two runs,
improving his spring average to .375. Rajai


KISSIMMEE Freddie Freeman and rookie
Evan Gattis each hit their second home run this
spring and the Atlanta Braves beat the Houston
Astros 14-9 in a meeting of split squads.
Freeman's two-run shot off Jordan Lyles
came in a six-run first inning. Gattis hit a three-
run homer off Sam Demel in the second and
added an RBI double the next inning.
Lyles gave up seven hits and six runs to nine
batters. Demel, the first of seven Houston re-
lievers, allowed five runs while getting only two
outs.


Sean Gilmartin gave up two runs and five
hits in three innings in his first start for the
Braves.
Brandon Barnes hit his third home run of the
spring for the Astros. Marc Krauss also home-
red and Trevor Crowe hit a bases-loaded triple.
Cardinals 16, Nationals 10
VIERA- Jordan Zimmermann was hit
hard, allowing eight runs and nine hits in three
innings during the Washington Nationals'
16-10 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals.
Zimmermann has given up 13 runs and 16
hits over nine innings in three spring training
starts.
Matt Carpenter was 4 for 4 with two doubles
and an RBI for St. Louis, which had 17 hits.
Rob Johnson had two doubles and three


Cactus games washed out
Six afternoon spring training baseball
games in Arizona were rained out Friday.

RBIs, Ronny Cedeno also drove in three runs
and Shane Robinson hit a grand slam off
Nathan Karns.
Winner Shelby Miller, making his first spring
training start, gave up two runs and three hits
in three innings.
Micah Owings had a solo home run for
Washington, and Zach Walters hit a two-run
drive.
Tigers 3, Mets 2
LAKELAND Max Scherzer struck out six
in 2 2/3 hitless innings and the Detroit Tigers
defeated the New York Mets 3-2.
Scherzer walked three. He was taken out
after retiring the first two batters in the third
inning.
Mets starter Dillon Gee allowed one hit in
four innings. He gave up one run.
Tigers minor leaguer Tyler Collins hit a solo
home run to break a tie in the eighth. The 22-
year-old outfielder, who hasn't played above
Class A, leads the team with 10 hits this
spring.
Jordany Valdespin homered for the Mets.
Twins 2, Red Sox 0
FORT MYERS Mike Pelfrey struck out
five in three impressive innings to help the
Minnesota Twins beat the Boston Red Sox
2-0.
It was Pelfrey's second scoreless outing
in a row following a shaky spring debut with
his new team.
Red Sox starter Ryan Dempster went 3
2/3 innings, allowing two runs and five hits
with two strikeouts.
Minnesota got to Dempster with two outs
in the third. Aaron Hicks doubled and scored
on Brian Dozier's single. Ryan Doumit's run-
scoring single made it 2-0.
Brian Duensing, Josh Roenicke, Michael
Tonkin and Tyler Robertson combined to
pitch six scoreless innings for the Twins.


B2 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pacers cruise past Magic for 115-86 win


Associated Press

ORLANDO Paul George
had 25 points and Tyler Hans-
brough added 18 and the Indi-
ana Pacers used a big first half
to roll past the Orlando Magic
115-86 on Friday.
Indiana scored 30 points off21
Orlando turnovers and also con-
nected on 11 3-pointers in the
victory
The offensive eruption came
after a late-game offensive melt-
down against Boston on Wednes-
day night that ended in a
last-second loss.
The Pacers ended a three-
game regular-season losing
streak to the Magic. It was also
their second straight game with-
out forward Danny Granger, who
is expected to miss a week rest-
ing a sore left knee.
Arron Afflalo led Orlando with
19 points.
The Magic have lost five of
their past six and haven't posted
a home win since Feb. 10.
Thunder 116,
Bobcats 94
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Kevin Du-
rant had 19 points and seven as-
sists, and the Oklahoma City
Thunder defeated the Charlotte
Bobcats 116-94 for their fourth
straight victory.
Derek Fisher and Thabo Sefolosha
both had 13 points for the Thunder,
who blew open a close game with
19-0 run to start the second quarter.
Serge Ibaka scored 12 points, and
Russell Westbrook and Kevin Martin
each chipped in with 11.
Gerald Henderson scored 21
points to lead the Bobcats, who
have lost nine straight overall and 22
of their last 24 games at home.
Grizzlies 103,
Cavaliers 92
CLEVELAND Marc Gasol
scored 22 points and the Memphis
Grizzlies held off a late run for a
103-92 win over the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
Memphis has won 11 of 12 and is
12-4 since trading star forward Rudy


Associated Press
Orlando's Arron Afflalo drives to the basket Friday between Indiana's David West, left, and Roy Hibbert
during the first half in Orlando.


Gay to Toronto on Jan. 30.
The Grizzlies' previous victory in
Cleveland came on Nov. 29, 2003,
LeBron James' rookie season with
the Cavaliers.
Kyrie Irving, who missed Cleve-
land's morning shootaround with flu-
like symptoms, scored a team-high
24 points.
Mavericks 102,
Pistons 99
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. O.J.
Mayo scored 22 points and the Dal-
las Mavericks held on to beat the
Detroit Pistons 102-99 when Charlie
Villanueva missed a 3-pointer in the


final seconds.
Dallas began the night 4 1/2
games behind eighth-place Utah in
the race for the last playoff spot in
the Western Conference. The Mav-
ericks blew a 15-point lead in the
fourth quarter, allowing Detroit to go
ahead 97-96 on a 3-pointer by Khris
Middleton.
Dirk Nowitzki made two straight
shots to put Dallas ahead by three. It
was 100-99 after Villanueva caught
Jose Calderon's airball and made a
layup with 6 seconds left.
Darren Collison made two free
throws for the Mavericks, and Vil-
lanueva missed from the left corner.


Nets 95, Wizards 78
NEW YORK Deron Williams
made an NBA-record nine 3-point-
ers in the first half, finished with 11
and scored a season-high 42 points
to lead the Brooklyn Nets to a 95-78
victory over the Washington
Wizards.
Williams made his first eight shots
behind the arc, became the first
player in a decade to match the op-
posing team's score in the first half,
and was one shy of the NBA record
of 12 3-pointers as the Nets opened
a huge early lead and coasted.
He missed from straightaway with
1:08 left in the game, leaving him


one shy of the record shared by
Kobe Bryant and Donyell Marshall.
John Wall had 16 points for the
Wizards.
Bulls 89, Jazz 88
CHICAGO Marco Belinelli
made a 3-pointer with 5.9 seconds
left to lift the Chicago Bulls to an
89-88 victory over the Utah Jazz.
Belinelli missed a potential tying
jumper, but got a second chance
when Joakim Noah grabbed the re-
bound. Jimmy Butler then swung the
ball back out to Belinelli in the cor-
ner, and he connected on the fall-
away 3 to put Chicago in front to
stay.
Gordon Hayward missed a
jumper on the other end for Utah,
and Butler secured the rebound as
the horn sounded.
Belinelli and Carlos Boozer had
22 points apiece for Chicago, which
opens a difficult three-game Califor-
nia road trip at the Los Angeles Lak-
ers on Sunday.
Al Jefferson scored 23 points in
his return to the lineup for the Jazz.
Celtics 107,
Hawks 102, OT
BOSTON Jason Terry hit a
tiebreaking 3-pointer with 35 seconds
left in overtime and the Boston
Celtics rallied after blowing a big lead
in regulation and beat the Atlanta
Hawks 107-102.
The Celtics blew a 12-point fourth-
quarter lead and trailed by four in
overtime before outshooting the
Hawks from beyond the arc in
overtime.
Jeff Green, Paul Pierce and Terry
all hit 3-pointers in the OT and the
Celtics held the Hawks without a
point for the final 1:20 to clinch
Boston's fifth straight win.
Pierce finished with 27 points,
seven rebounds and seven assists.
Kevin Garnett had 17 points and
eight rebounds and Terry scored 19,
11 more than Atlanta's reserves
combined.
Josh Smith scored 32 points and
Jeff Teague had 26 points and nine
assists for the Hawks, who outscored
the Celtics 48-32 in the paint.


Lady Vols top Gators in SEC tourney


Seminoles

knock Miami

out ofA CC

postseason

Associated Press

DULUTH, Ga. -
Meighan Simmons scored
20 points and Tennessee
turned back Florida's late
rally to beat the Gators 82-
73 on Friday, extending the
Lady Vols' winning streak
in the Southeastern Con-
ference tournament.
No. 9 Tennessee (24-6),
the three-time defending
champion, has won 10
straight games in the tour-
nament since its loss to
Auburn in the 2009
semifinals.
The Lady Vols will face
No. 19 Texas A&M in
today's first semifinal.
Sydney Moss led Florida
(18-14) with a career-high
22 points. Moss had a steal
and basket with 49 seconds
remaining to cut Ten-
nessee's lead to 75-69 -
the Lady Vols' smallest
lead of the half.
No. 23 FSU 70,
Miami 58
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Alexa Deluzio scored 11 of
her 19 points in the final six
minutes to lead No. 23 Florida
State past Miami 70-58 in an
Atlantic Coast Conference
quarterfinal.
Chelsea Davis added 15
points and Yashira Delgado
had 12 for the fourth-seeded
Seminoles (22-8). They won
their first ACC tournament
game since 2009 also the
last time they reached the
semifinals.
Shawnice Wilson had 18
points and 18 rebounds, and
Suriya McGuire added 13
points for the fifth-seeded
Hurricanes (21-10). They had
23 turnovers yet closed to 48-
44 on Wilson's three-point
play with 7:21 left.
Deluzio followed by hitting
two sets of free throws to put
Florida State up by eight.
No. 5 California 78,
USC 59
SEATTLE Gennifer
Brandon has 17 points and 16
rebounds and No. 5 California


scored the first 11 points on its
way to a 78-59 win over USC
in the quarterfinals of the Pac-
12 Conference tournament.
California, the No. 2 seed in
the tourney despite sharing
the regular season crown with
Stanford, will face No. 14
UCLA in the semifinals
tonight.
Brittany Boyd both added
15 as California (28-2) won its
16th straight. The 28 wins sets
a single-season school record.
Cassie Harberts led USC
(11-20) with 24 points.
No. 6 Duke 79,
N.C. State 65
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Tricia Liston scored 10 of her
26 points during a timely run
that carried No. 6 Duke past
pesky North Carolina State
79-65 in an Atlantic Coast
Conference quarterfinal.
Freshman Alexis Jones
added 17 points for the top-
seeded Blue Devils (28-2).
They advance to face No. 23
Florida State (22-8) on today
in a semifinal.
Marissa Kastanek scored
18 points for the eighth-
seeded Wolfpack (16-16).
No. 7 Kentucky 76,
Vanderbilt 65
DULUTH, Ga.-A'dia
Mathies had 16 points and
five steals and No. 7 Ken-
tucky kept its lead in double
figures the last 25 minutes of
its 76-65 win over Vanderbilt
in the SEC tournament.
Kentucky's largest lead was
22 points at 52-30 early in the
second half.
Kentucky (26-4) had an im-
pressive start to its postsea-
son after setting a school
record with 13 SEC regular-
season wins.
Kentucky advanced to its
fifth semifinal in the last eight
years. Its only tournament
championship came in 1982.
DeNesh Stallworth had 14
points in only 21 minutes for
Kentucky.
Tiffany Clarke had 24
points and 12 rebounds for
Vanderbilt (20-11).
No. 8 Penn St. 76,
Ohio State 66
HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill.
-Alex Bentley scored 20
points, Maggie Lucas added
18, and No. 8 Penn State
beat Ohio State 76-66 in the
quarterfinals of the Big Ten


Associated Press
Florida guard Jaterra Bonds goes up for a basket Friday as
Tennessee's Taber Spani defends during the second half
at the Southeastern Conference tournament in Duluth,


Ga. Tennessee won 82-73.
tournament.
The top-seeded Lady Lions
(25-4) went on a big run early
in the second half to break a
tie and earn a spot in today's
semifinals.
Tayler Hill scored 23 for
Ohio State (18-13) and be-
came the fifth Buckeyes
player to hit the 2,000-point
mark.
No. 10 Maryland 92,
Wake Forest 81, OT
GREENSBORO, N.C.-
Alyssa Thomas had the first
triple-double in Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament his-
tory, and No. 10 Maryland
beat Wake Forest 92-81 in
overtime in a quarterfinal.
Thomas had a career-high
32 points, 13 rebounds and
10 assists for her second
triple-double this season. She
helped the second-seeded
Terrapins (24-6) sidestep a
major scare against a Wake
Forest team they beat by 26
points five nights earlier.


Maryland scored the first 10
points of OT, with Thomas
starting the run by hitting a
twisting layup with 3:45 left.
Chelsea Douglas scored a
career-high 31 points for 10th-
seeded Wake Forest (13-19).
No. 12 Georgia 71,
No. 22 LSU 53
DULUTH, Ga.- Jasmine
Hassell scored 19 points, Tiaria
Griffin added 15 and No. 12
Georgia snapped No. 22 LSU's
seven-game winning streak
with a 71-53 victory in the quar-
terfinals of the Southeastern
Conference tournament.
Adrienne Webb finished with
16 points, Theresa Plaisance
added 13 and Danielle Ballard
had 10 for LSU (20-11).
Georgia has won two straight
and is 5-1 since losing by eight
points at LSU on Feb. 10.
No. 14 UCLA 54,
Utah 43
SEATTLE Jasmine
Dixon and Atonye Nyingifa


both scored 11 points, and
No. 14 UCLA held off Utah's
second-half rally for a 54-43
win over the Utes in the quar-
terfinals of the Pac-12 Confer-
ence tournament.
The Bruins will play No. 5
California in the semifinals on
Saturday night. UCLA (24-6)
was swept by California dur-
ing the regular season.
Michelle Plouffe had 10
points and 14 rebounds for
Utah (18-13), but made just 3
of 13 shots.
No. 15 UNC 62,
Boston College 57
GREENSBORO, N.C. -
Tierra Ruffin-Pratt scored 19
points to help No. 15 North
Carolina beat Boston Col-
lege 62-57 in the Atlantic
Coast Conference tourna-
ment quarterfinals.
Waltiea Rolle added 10 for
the third-seeded Tar Heels
(27-5), who advanced to
today's semifinals to face
10th-ranked and second-
seeded Maryland.
Nicole Boudreau scored
15 for the Eagles (12-19),
the second No. 11 seed to
win a tournament game with
its upset of sixth-seeded Vir-
ginia in Thursday's first
round.
No. 19 T. A&M 61,
No. 17 USC 52
DULUTH, Ga. Kristi Bel-
lock scored 17 points, Karla
Gilbert added 11 in a reserve
role and No. 19 Texas A&M
beat No. 17 South Carolina
61-52 in the Southeastern
Conference tournament
quarterfinals.
The Aggies (22-9) snapped
a three-game losing streak
and will play No. 9 Tennessee
in the semifinals today.
Ashley Bruner had 19 points
for South Carolina (24-7).
No. 21 Neb. 76,
Iowa 61
HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill.
- Jordan Hooper scored 24
points to lead No. 21 Ne-
braska to a 76-61 victory over
Iowa in the Big Ten tourna-
ment quarterfinals.
Lindsey Moore had 13
points and six assists, and
Emily Cady had eight re-
bounds and six assists for the
Huskers (23-7), the second
seed in the tournament.
Theairra Taylor scored 22
points to lead Iowa (20-12).


NHL
= BRIEFS =

Jets 3,
Panthers 2, OT
SUNRISE Dustin
Byfuglien scored with 40.5
seconds left in overtime and
the Winnipeg Jets beat the
Florida Panthers 3-2 on Fri-
day night.
Blake Wheeler and An-
drew Ladd also scored for
Winnipeg.
Ondrej Pavelec made 38
saves.
Shawn Matthias and
Jonathan Huberdeau
scored goals for Florida and
Jacob Markstrom stopped
25 shots.
Senators 3,
Rangers 2
NEW YORK Jakob
Silfverberg broke a tie with
4:41 left, and the Ottawa
Senators snapped a four-
game losing streak by beat-
ing the New York Rangers
3-2.
Zack Smith and Patrick
Wiercioch scored in the first
period, defenseman Sergei
Gonchar had two assists,
and Robin Lehner made 33
saves for the Senators.
Rick Nash and Brad
Richards, in his first game
back following a two-game
injury absence, scored in
the opening period, but the
Rangers had a season-
best, four-game winning
streak broken.
Predators 6,
Oilers 0
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Colin Wilson had a career-
high two goals and two as-
sists, and the Nashville
Predators beat the Edmon-
ton Oilers 6-0 to snap a
three-game skid.
Patric Hornqvist, David
Legwand, Rich Clune and
Zach Boychuk also had a
goal apiece as the well-
rested Predators won for
the first time since Feb. 25,
when they beat Dallas in
overtime, by matching their
season-high with six goals.
Shea Weber had three as-
sists in the first game
against Edmonton this year.
Pekka Rinne made 24
saves for his fourth shutout
this season.
The Oilers are 0-4-1 in
their last five, the last two
their first shutout losses this
season.
-From wire reports


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 B3






B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 37 22 .627 -
Brooklyn 36 26 .581 2Y2
Boston 34 27 .557 4
Toronto 24 38 .387 14Y2
Philadelphia 23 38 .377 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 46 14 .767 -
Atlanta 34 27 .557 12Y2
Washington 19 41 .317 27
Orlando 17 46 .270 30Y2
Charlotte 13 49 .210 34
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 39 23 .629 -
Chicago 35 27 .565 4
Milwaukee 30 29 .508 7Y2
Detroit 23 41 .359 17
Cleveland 21 41 .339 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 48 14 .774 -
Memphis 41 19 .683 6
Houston 33 29 .532 15
Dallas 28 33 .459 1912
New Orleans 21 41 .339 27
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 46 16 .742 -
Denver 41 22 .651 512
Utah 32 30 .516 14
Portland 28 32 .467 17
Minnesota 21 37 .362 23
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 44 20 .688 -
Golden State 35 27 .565 8
L.A. Lakers 31 31 .500 12
Phoenix 21 40 .344 211Y2
Sacramento 21 42 .333 2212
Friday's Games
Oklahoma City 116, Charlotte 94
Indiana 115, Orlando 86
Memphis 103, Cleveland 92
Brooklyn 95, Washington 78
Dallas 102, Detroit 99
Chicago 89, Utah 88
Boston 107, Atlanta 102, OT
Miami 102, Philadelphia 93
Portland at San Antonio, late
Phoenix at Sacramento, late
Houston at Golden State, late
Toronto at L.A. Lakers, late
Today's Games
Brooklyn at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Utah at New York, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Washington, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Milwaukee at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Boston at Oklahoma City, 1 p.m.
Chicago at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 6p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 24 16 8 0 32 86 71
New Jersey 24 11 8 5 27 59 67
N.Y Rangers 23 12 9 2 26 59 57
N.Y Islanders 24 1011 3 23 71 80
Philadelphia 25 11 13 1 23 72 77
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 24 15 5 4 34 75 61
Boston 21 15 3 3 33 64 48
Ottawa 25 13 8 4 30 59 51
Toronto 25 1510 0 30 75 65
Buffalo 25 913 3 21 65 80
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 23 13 9 1 27 69 66
Winnipeg 24 1211 1 25 61 71
Tampa Bay 24 1013 1 21 82 75
Washington 22 1011 1 21 66 63
Florida 25 712 6 20 62 93
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 24 21 0 3 45 78 46
Detroit 24 12 8 4 28 66 60
St. Louis 23 12 9 2 26 70 70
Nashville 24 10 9 5 25 53 59
Columbus 24 812 4 20 55 70
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 23 11 6 6 28 64 63
Minnesota 22 11 9 2 24 52 56
Calgary 21 9 8 4 22 61 69
Edmonton 24 811 5 21 54 71
Colorado 22 810 4 20 53 65
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 22 16 3 3 35 77 60
Dallas 23 12 9 2 26 66 65
LosAngeles 22 12 8 2 26 62 57
San Jose 22 11 7 4 26 51 50
Phoenix 24 11 10 3 25 70 71
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Winnipeg 3, Florida 2, OT
Nashville 6, Edmonton 0
Chicago at Colorado, late
Calgary at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Boston, 1 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Islanders, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 2p.m.
St. Louis at San Jose, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Carolina, 7p.m.
Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y Rangers at Washington, 12:30 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 6 p.m.
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7p.m.
N.Y Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.


San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Anaheim, 8 p.m.


Spring training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
Kansas City 11 1
Baltimore 9 2
Seattle 11 3
Tampa Bay 10 4
Chicago 6 3
Cleveland 10 5
Detroit 8 6
Minnesota 8 6
Boston 7 7
Houston 6 6
Oakland 6 6
Toronto 6 7
Texas 4 7
Los Angeles 3 8
NewYork 3 10
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L
St. Louis 7 5


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FOr KULthei record


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
.:- CASH 3 (early)
3-8-2
-f .CASH 3 (late)

PLAY 4 (early)
9-1-7-1

0-2-0-0
.A FANTASY 5
13-28-30-32-35
MEGA MONEY
14 21 22 39
Fl Loty MEGA BALL
9


On the AIRWAVES

TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
4:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Sam's Town 300
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (CBS) Florida at Kentucky
12 p.m. (ABC, CW) Georgia Tech at Boston College
12 p.m. (ESPN) Syracuse at Georgetown
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Atlantic Sun Tournament final: Teams TBA
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Mississippi at LSU
1:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) La Salle at St. Louis
2 p.m. (CBS) UCLA at Washington
2 p.m. (ESPN) Marquette at St. John's
2 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina State at Florida State
2:30 p.m. (ABC, CW) Clemson at Miami
3:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) San Diego State at Boise State
4 p.m. (CBS) Notre Dame at Louisville
4 p.m. (MNT) Georgia at Alabama
4 p.m. (ESPN) Missouri at Tennessee
4:30 p.m. (SUN) Arizona State at Arizona
5:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Auburn at Mississippi State
5:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Cornell at Harvard
6 p.m. (ESPN) Kansas at Baylor
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Ohio Valley Tournament final
9 p.m. (ESPN) Duke at North Carolina
9 p.m. (ESPN2) West Coast Conference Tournament
semifinal Gonzaga vs. TBA
11 p.m. (ESPN2) West Coast Conference Tournament
semifinal St. Mary's vs. TBA
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (SUN) Big 12 Championship quarterfinal -
Oklahoma State vs. Texas Tech
1 p.m. (FSNFL) ACC Tournament semifinal: Teams TBA
2:30 p.m. (SUN) Big 12 Championship quarterfinal -
Baylor vs. TBA
3:30 p.m. (FSNFL) ACC Tournament semifinal: Teams TBA
7:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Big 12 Championship quarterfinal -
Iowa State vs. TBA
9:30 p.m. (FSNFL) Big 12 Championship quarterfinal -
Oklahoma vs. West Virginia
BICYCLING
12 a.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Nice Stage 6 (Same-day Tape)
BOXING
9:30 p.m. (HBO) Tavoris Cloud vs. Bernard Hopkins
GOLF
12 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship -
Third Round
2 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship -
Third Round
2 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship -
spotlight coverage
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Puerto Rico Open Third
Round (Same-day Tape)
9:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: WGC Cadillac Championship
-Third Round (Same-day Tape)
HOCKEY
7 p.m. (SUN) Montreal Canadiens at Tampa Bay Lightning
SOCCER
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: New England Revolution at
Chicago Fire
SKIING
12:30 p.m. (NBC) USSA Sprint U.S. Grand Prix (Taped)

RADIO
1 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Tampa Bay Rays at Philadelphia
Phillies

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Prep CALENDAR

TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
BASEBALL
7 p.m. Lecanto at Hernando
SOFTBALL
TBA Crystal River in Palm Harbor tournament
TRACKAND FIELD
9 a.m. Citrus, Lecanto at Crystal River meet


Colorado 6 5 .545
Miami 5 5 .500
Milwaukee 6 6 .500
San Diego 7 7 .500
Atlanta 7 8 .467
Philadelphia 6 7 .462
Washington 5 6 .455
Arizona 5 7 .417
Los Angeles 4 6 .400
San Francisco 4 6 .400
Chicago 5 9 .357
New York 3 6 .333
Pittsburgh 4 9 .308
Cincinnati 2 11 .154
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Thursday's Games
Houston 4, Washington 2
Baltimore 11, Toronto 10
Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2
Boston 12, Minnesota (ss) 5
St. Louis 7, N.Y Yankees 6
Minnesota (ss) 10, Philadelphia 6
N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 1
L.A. Dodgers 11, Texas 11, tie
L.A. Angels 12, San Diego 3
Seattle (ss) 12, Kansas City 2
Oakland 7, Seattle (ss) 3
Chicago White Sox 8, Chicago Cubs 3
Milwaukee 4, Arizona 3
Cleveland 6, San Francisco 4
Detroit 9, Atlanta 2
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay 3, Philadelphia 2
Atlanta (ss) 14, Houston 9
Miami 6, N.Y. Yankees 1
St. Louis 16, Washington 10
Toronto 7, Atlanta (ss) 1
Detroit 3, N.Y Mets 2
Baltimore 6, Pittsburgh 3
Minnesota 2, Boston 0
San Diego vs. Chicago White Sox, ccd., Rain


Oakland vs. Seattle, ccd., Rain
Texas vs. Milwaukee, ccd., Rain
Arizona vs. L.A. Angels, ccd., Rain
L.A. Dodgers (ss) vs. San Francisco, ccd.,
Rain
Cleveland vs. Kansas City (ss), ccd., Rain
Chicago Cubs vs. Cincinnati (ss), ccd., Rain
Cincinnati (ss) vs. L.A. Dodgers (ss), ccd.,
Rain
Kansas City (ss) vs. Colorado, ccd., Rain
Today's Games
Tampa Bay vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Miami (ss) at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Miami (ss) vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Detroit vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Houston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.
Seattle vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Texas (ss) at Surprise, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Texas (ss) vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Arizona at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 3:10 p.m.
Baltimore vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 7:05


I S P R T S B R I F -


Panthers explode late
against Wolf Pack
The Lecanto softball team snagged an
8-1 win at Ocala West Port on Friday
night. The game was tied at 1-1 heading
into the top of the sixth before the Pan-
thers broke the contest wide open.
Danielle Yant tossed a complete game
for the win giving up one earned run
while registering two strikeouts.
Offensively, Amber Hopkins went 2 for


2 with a triple, two RBIs and a run to
pace Lecanto. Senior catcher Amber
Atkinson was 2 for 4 with a triple, three
RBIs and a run.
Also excelling for the Panthers were
Jordan Martin (2 for 3, two RBIs, run),
Paige Richards (2 for 3, run) and Bre-
anna Martin (two runs).
Lecanto (4-5 overall, 1-2 District 6A-6)
plays Thursday at Springstead.
-From staff report


Big East Conference



completes breakup

Associated Press re-establishing our brand," he said.
He also said they have not deter-
NEW YORK The Big East made mined how the money from the sepa-
its split official Friday, with seven bas- ration agreement will be split among
ketball schools breaking away from the members. The person familiar
the football-playing members in a deal with the negotiations said the bulk of
that takes effect on July 1. the money will go to holdover mem-
Commissioner Mike Aresco told The bers Cincinnati, Connecticut and
Associated Press that the seven South Florida.
Catholic schools which are leaving to The split with the basketball mem-
form a basketball-centric conference bers as well as a new TV deal with
will get the Big East name, along with ESPN for the football schools still
the opportunity to play their league must be ratified by the school presi-
tournament in Madison Square dents. Aresco said that should come
Garden. soon and without glitches.
The football members, most of Next up on the agenda for the foot-
which are newcomers to a conference ball schools, Aresco said, is to find a
that has been ravaged by realignment, 12th member and venues for future
get a cash haul of roughly $100 million, basketball tournaments.
That group includes just one founding The settlement will bring the Big
Big East member Connecticut East back to its origins. When it was
and will have to find a name for what formed in 1979, it banded together a
is essentially a new league. group of mostly small, mostly private
"It's been an arduous four months schools located in and around North-
but we got to the right place," Aresco east cities.
said in a phone interview. "I think The seven schools breaking away
both conferences have good futures." from the football schools include some
Aresco, who will remain commis- of the Big East's founding members
sioner of the football league, would not and most recognizable teams: George-
disclose the financial part of the town, St. John's, Providence, Seton
settlement. Hall, Villanova, Marquette and De-
Aresco said the football schools Paul. They are expected to sign a tele-
have not chosen a conference name vision rights deal with Fox, add at least
and there are no favorites yet "We can two more schools and start competing
get on with reinventing ourselves and in the 2013 fall semester.


S U TOUT o |mound with six strikeouts for the
HUTOU Cougars.
Gage scored the Warriors' third and
Continued from Page B1 final run in the bottom of the fifth off
a Cornerstone error as he took off
victory from third base.
The Cougars rallied in the top of the Strong defensive efforts from Gage
seventh with two runners on and one and Weiand helped the Warriors to
out before Weiand's game-ending dou- keep Cougar bats silent
ble play ended yet another Cougar op- "We didn't make an error tonight in
portunity to score some runs. the field," Ervin said. "Cory Weiand
Adam Dagan pitched a complete made a couple great plays at first base
game for Cornerstone, leaving the with a few line shots."


STR AK He was fired up, and the mood per-

the fourth, when the Heat pulled
Continued from Page B1 away
Miami had some big moments in the
with his left hand anyway, all while early going, including one possession
being off-balance. His free throw put where James had three offensive re-
the Heat up 65-64. bounds two off his own misses -
Wright, whose career started in before scoring, and another when
Miami, hit a 3-pointer to put Philadel- Chris Andersen blocked shots by Evan
phia back up 71-67, before the Heat Turner in succession to set up a pos-
closed the third with a trio of 3-point- session where James got an alley-oop
ers from Mario Chalmers, Battier and dunk.
then James, whose buzzer-beater But Philadelphia didn't go away, fu-
came seconds after he was hit in the eled by the second-quarter 3-point
throat area by Philadelphia's Damien barrage, and nine points by Wright in
Wilkins. just 4:28 of the third quarter.
James shook off the hit, made the 3, The fourth, however, was all Miami,
then took a brief look at the Philadel- even with James on the bench for the
phia bench for emphasis. final minutes.



two hits in three innings of work.
|CITRUS O'Steen went a full six innings and
Contiued from Page B1 allowed three hits and two walks be-
fore Citrus rallied in the sixth. He
struck out six 'Canes on the night.
with a run by Stearns (4 for 6, double, Panthers senior reliever Jacob
triple) on an outfield error Panthers senior reliever Jacob
Austin Bogart struck out five in 2 2/3 Tourbin retired the side in the sev-
innings of work after sophomore enth before departing for freshman
Brooks Brasher relieved junior Alex Delgado in the eighth.
starter Ben Wright (eight strikeouts, Both teams committed five errors
five hits, four walks) and allowed just apiece.



score as well, but was thrown out at
BIG INNING the plate.
Crystal River loaded the bases again
Continued from Page B1 in the second inning, and a Pattison
single just over the glove of a leaping
Jeremy Miglioi's groundout plated Jonathan Mosos at shortstop scored
Sellers for a 9-3 Panthers lead. Casey Purnell, who had reached on a
Pennington induced a groundout to walk
get out of the inning, but the damage Mosos ending the still-bases loaded
was done. threat with a nifty double play, taking
"It was devastating," Crystal River a grounder up the middle and running
head coach Bobby Stack said, "and over to second base before firing to
what's more disappointing is we boot first.
one ball, then all of a sudden we fall The Pirates picked up a run in the
apart. I'd like to say we're a better fifth innin on a Eustis error but that
baseball team than that" g
b a was it for the Crystal River offense.
Hagner finished 3 for 3 with an RBI Eustis starter Wesley Moulden went
and three runs, while Okey went 2 for .
3 with two steals, two RBI, and four five innings, giving up two earned runs
runs for the Panthers. on four hits with six strikeouts and
After Eustis (9-2, 4-0) scored three four walks.
quick runs in the first inning, Crystal we come out and a couple of things
River responded with two runs in the go right, then we kick a ball and every-
bottom half then another in the second body puts their tails between their
to tie it up. legs," Stack said. "It's all mental. We're
In the first, Zack Pattison (2 for 4, young."
RBI, run) reached on an infield single Pirate hurlers Mason Patteracki
with one out, then Michael Kidd and (four earned runs, six hits, strikeout,
Humphreys walked to load the bases, walk) and Pennington (four earned
Austin Wiles' line-drive base hit to runs, five hits, two strikeouts, two
centerfield scored Pattison, and Kidd walks) each pitched three innings be-
came home on an error as the Pan- fore Wiles tossed a scoreless seventh.
others were throwing the ball back in. Crystal River hosts Dunnellon at


Humphreys tried to come around to 7 p.m. Tuesday


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE
Compelling questions...
and maybe a few actual answers


SPEED FREAKS HOT TOPICS: 3 ISSUES GENERATING A BUZZ


A couple of questions we
just had to ask ourselves


AP/ROSS D. FRANKLIN
Don't worry, his backflip
muscles were well-rested.
Carl Edwards has the
backflip. What's your
signature move?
GODSPEAK: I would go with
the Harlem Shake or attempt
the jump known in ballet as
pas assemble.
KEN'S CALL: Gotta go with
the Curly Shuffle until the
knees go bad. Then, it's smiles,
handshakes and, like Bobby
Allison's best days, a 24-ounce
Miller High Life.
Two races in notice
any trends for 2013?
GODSPEAK: Jimmie Johnson's
average finish is 1.5; Carl
Edwards did a victory flip;
Danica crashed out. Nothing
outta the ordinary here.
KEN'S CALL: Strangely
enough, Ricky Stenhouse
Jr. seems to be getting
overshadowed in the "Rookie
of the Year" chatter.

ONLINE EXTRAS
) news-journalonline.
com/nascar

I facebook.com/
nascardaytona

D @nascardaytona

Do you have questions or com-
ments about NASCAR This Week?
Contact Godwin Kelly at godwin.
kelly@news-jrnl.com or Ken Willis
at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com

WHAT'S ON TAP?
SPRINT CUP: Kobalt Tools 400
SITE: Las Vegas
SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (Speed, 3
p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 6:30 p.m.).
Saturday, practice (Speed, 2:30 p.m.)
Sunday, race (Fox, coverage begins at
2:30 p.m., green flag at 3:15 p.m.)
TRACK: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(1.5-mile oval)
RACE DISTANCE: 267 laps, 400.5 miles
NATIONWIDE: Sam's Town 300
SITE: Las Vegas
SCHEDULE: Saturday, race (ESPN2,4 p.m.)
4 Las Vegas Motor Speedway (1.5-mile
oval) RACE DISTANCE: 200 laps, 300
miles


When push




comes to shove


How did Carl Edwards win Sunday at Phoenix
International Raceway? With a little help from his new Ford
friend, 2012 Sprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski.
On the last restart with two laps to go,
Keselowski gave Edwards a big shove past Jimmie
Johnson, who was lined up on the outside of
Edwards.
In days gone by, when Edwards and
Keselowski made contact, it would send one of
their race cars sailing into the wall. As Edwards
said after the race: "We all know that
Brad and I have not had the best
history. It was pretty bad ,ii .
one point."
A checkered flag
heals all wounds, -
and you can thank a
grandson of Henry Ford :,
for helping mend the
fence between fierce
competitors.
'Jim Farley and
Edsel Ford came to
that media day at
the Hall of Fame just
to sit us in a room and
say: 'Look, we want to wil :
a team. We want to do wh .- '
can to help one another,' in.lI HI
was very cool of Brad to Ip". .' ii
Edwards said.
And who is Jim Farley. ,..,
ask? He is Ford's executive : ,
president of global marketing,
sales and service. So, yes,
"Win on Sunday, sell on
Monday" is back in a big way.


Talkin' 'bout
my generation
Denny Hamlin, the guy who
made the big, hold-your-breath pass
for a third-place finish at Phoenix, said
the Generation-6 cars have some catchir
up to do with the old Gen-5 models. He \
not happy with his mount.
"I don't want to be the pessimist, but
it did not race as good as our Generatior
cars," Hamlin said of his No. 11 Toyota. "
more like what the Generation-5 was at t
beginning. The teams hadn't figured
out how to get the aero balance
right. Right now, you just run
single file, and you

GC
Godwin Kelly is the Daytona
Beach News-Journal's motor-
sports editor and has covered
NASCAR for 30 years. Reach
him at godwin.kelly@news-
jrnl.com


cannot get around the guy in front of you."
The first announcement you will hear this week in the
Las Vegas Motor Speedway garage area will be,
'"Denny Hamlin, please report to the NASCAR
hauler."


1 1i


I Petty not a believer
On a Sunday pre-race show, former Cup
Series driver Kyle Petty shared his opinion on
Danica Patrick.
"No, I don't believe the hype," he said. "I'm
-,in, to drnp om-nm of 'The 'in,'' '"iddnm nn
,,, 1. I,,, -, J ,i ll I, I -I i ,lI lI I

h I' ,_ : I ,I, Ih. I:'1 1.h .I

i iid I I II-' II I
S ii: 1 Olh1.II ,,I i .I bul
I I h,., h :,,.I ,lo h oi I,-. :
L,, uhm,.I Ih.,: h,:, l.


AP/ROSS D. FRANKLIN
The fist pump, the chompers,
the flag. .. all signs of a 70-
race skid ending.


)DWIN'S LAS VEGAS PICKS
WINNER: Greg Biffle
REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Kyle Busch, Kasey
Kahne, Brad Keselowski, Jimmie Johnson
DARK HORSE: Kurt Busch
BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT: Carl Edwards
FIRST ONE OUT: Joe Nemechek


DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: Biffle
comes out of nowhere and
dominates from start to finish.
He loves these aerodynamic
tracks.


AP/JOHN RAOUX
Denny, Denny, Denny. See how long you can
remain tight-lipped.
Did Denny Hamlin
break the code?
Even if you never saw the movie "Fight
Club," you still probably heard the famous line
regarding the first rule of Fight Club: "You do
not talk about Fight Club." The prevailing policy
regarding NASCAR and its new Generation-6 car
seems to be that you do not speak ill of Gen-6.
Denny Hamlin, perhaps in a weak moment,
broke ranks and in unspeakable fashion.

What did he say
that was so horrible?
He actually compared Gen-6 to Gen-5. The
early days of Gen-5, to be specific. Gulp! As
Godwin Kelly notes in "Hot Topics" next door,
Hamlin might need a reminder about the "one
big happy family" rule. Sure, it's difficult so
far to get the new cars to pass each other,
and single-file racing seems to be the way to
go (again, "so far"), but you're not supposed to
SAY it.

Then what do you say instead?
A million alternatives are out there. Even
Tony Stewart, never known to be shy about his
honest feelings, found a nice way to describe
the Gen-6 cars after racing them on a "normal"
track in Phoenix: "It will change. But I think
for the first race, it is pretty sporty, so far I
think." Yes, that was two "I thinks." Translation:
Patience isn't always easy, but I think we'll figure
it out. Meanwhile, the cars look pretty good I
think.
Ken Willis has been covering
NASCAR for The Daytona Beach
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com


FEUD OF THE WEEK


U.~l


Patrick Ragan
Danica Patrick vs. David Ragan: Ragan was
minding his own business when Patrick's right-
front tire blew, she hit the wall and took Ragan
with her.

Godwin Kelly gives his take: "This wasn't like
the Gordon-Bowyer flare-up of 2012. Nothing to
see here, folks. Keep moving along."


JIMMIE
JOHNSON
First, then second

third this week?


CARL EDWARDS
Backflipping must
be like riding a bike


BRAD
KESELOWSKI
Surprisingly, no
championship
hangover


JUNIOR
EARNHARDT
Points racer


TONYSTEWART
Strangely quiet
about Goodyear,
Danica & Ryan


CLINT BOWYER
From Emporia,
Kan., same
hometown as
QB Jim Everett


JEFF GORDON
Finishes fourth at
Vegas
this week


MATT KENSETH
He's more of
a Reno guy, we're
guessing


DENNY HAMLIN
First to air
generational strife


9


2013 SPRINT CUP
POINTS STANDINGS
(after Phoenix, race 2 of 36)


Driver
Johnson
Earnhardt Jr.
Keselowski
Hamlin
Bowyer
Biffle
Martin
Gordon
Stenhouse Jr.
Almirola
Edwards
Ambrose
Yeley
Labonte
Burton
Reutimann
Menard
Kenseth
Mears
Newman
Logano
Patrick
Stewart
Montoya
Blaney


Points
90
82
82
72
72
66
65
60
60
60
59
52
50
49
48
48
48
46
45
44
44
42
39
38
38


The day before Sunday's Subway
Fresh Fit 500k at Phoenix International
Raceway, Dale Earnhardt Jr. covered a
wide range of topics with the media.
He talked about everything from going
on a diet to the Daytona 500 and his
finish in NASCAR's Super Bowl.
Why did you start drinking carrot
juice?
"A buddy of mine was talking
about this detox diet, it's like a 15-day
deal and for the first eight days, you
drink prune juice and then the last
half of it you drink carrot juice. ... I'm
not drinking it all the time, but just
during that little detox thing. It was
pretty tough, too. I was surprised I was
able to make it. It was like just fish,
chicken and raw, steamed vegetables
and then there was like two days where
you just ate vegetables and fruit.
That was pretty tough for me to not
have any meat. I think the older you
get the more you have to do to kind
of maintain a healthy weight. That's
really what it's about for me is just
trying to maintain my weight, so I don't


have to keep getting my driver suits
altered throughout the season. Last
year, I was like, 'Man, they're shrinking,
something is wrong with the washer.'
This offseason. I lost a lot of weight,
lost about 15 or 20 pounds and just
trying to do a better job of managing
my calories and stuff like that."
Does that mean no more Hellmann's
(mayonnaise) for you?
"Well, you have to mix it in there
every once in a while. It's part of the
recipes. Like I said, I'm not really a
health freak or anything, but I am
counting calories, I will say that."
What did you take away from the
Daytona 500?
"We got off to a good start, just
like we did last year. I really think that
if you put yourself in a hole early, no
matter how good of a team you are,
you're going to be one of those guys
that are sitting there at Richmond or
the last couple races before the Chase
really digging and worried about your
opportunities and position and worried


about the guys that you have to beat."
Do you think it is important for
NASCAR to come away from the
Daytona Nationwide wreck stronger
for fans?
"Absolutely, and I think NASCAR
is actively seeking solutions and
alternatives to always make the sport
safer, especially, we've done so much
with the physical car itself. There's
always opportunities and other areas
where we can become a safer sport.
I'm sure that, unfortunately, incidents
like that will draw attention, but in the
long term, a lot of positive things will
come out of it. That's what I'm hoping
anyways that we're better off down the
road because of what we experienced,
and it was a terrible experience for
everyone that went through it. It was
difficult to watch and difficult to be a
witness to, but I'm glad that no one
was killed or anything like that. That
was my biggest fear was that we had
lost a life or maybe multiple lives, and
that was going to be really difficult. It
would have been really difficult to race
the next day."


Getty Images/SAM GREENWOOD
As you suspected, Junior was getting too
big for his "britches."


JUAN PABLO
MONTOYA
In the mix early,
and in a
good way


ID


PHOENIX REWIND



Junior admits he's counting calories


I


AUTO RACING


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


etu


to


lz


Florida
LOTTERIES=

SO YOU KNOW
U Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7
Fantasy 5:8 9 18 21 32
5-of-5 No winner
4-of-5 270 $555
3-of-5 9,632 $21.50
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6
Powerball: 6 10 23 41 45
Powerball: 1
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 9 winners $1,000,000
No Florida winners
Lotto: 3 12 39 44 46 51


6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 18
4-of-6 1,322
3-of-6 27,981
Fantasy 5:16 26 -
5-of-5 1 winner
4-of-5 324
3-of-5 9,819


$7,686
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"Oz the Great and Powerful" opened in theaters Friday.

Disney, Sam Raimi gamble


SANDY COHEN
AP entertainment writer

LOS ANGELES Returning to the
mystical land of "The Wizard of Oz" took
more than 70 years and several hundred
millions dollars.
Disney released its highly anticipated
prequel to the 1939 movie classic Friday
Directed by Sam Raimi, "Oz the Great and
Powerful" explores the origins of the wiz-
ard (James Franco) and the witches (Mila
Kunis, Michelle Williams and Rachel
Weisz) in a three-dimensional Oz.
The $200 million production, not count-
ing another $100 million in estimated mar-
keting costs, is a huge gamble for everyone
involved, considering "The Wizard of Oz"
is among the most enduring and beloved
films of all time. Even Raimi, director of
the first three "Spider-Man" movies, de-
scribed the project as "daunting."
The risk is compounded by a general
box-office slump and a poor showing for
last weekend's $200 million big-screen
take on another popular tale, 'Jack the
Giant Slayer," based on 'Jack and the
Beanstalk"
"The plus side is that there's such in-
credible awareness of 'The Wizard of Oz'
that it's going to translate into a mammoth
opening weekend for 'Oz the Great and
Powerful,"' said Dave Karger, chief corre-
spondent for Fandango.com. "The danger
is that many people's natural tendency
will be to compare this to 'The Wizard of
Oz,' and there's no film that will ever live
up to that."
According to a survey done by the site,
nearly all those buying tickets for the new
"Oz" film have seen the original, and the
film is far and away the most popular of
the week, comprising almost 80 percent of
tickets sold.
Franco has loved the world created by
L. Frank Baum since he first saw the 1939
movie on TV as a kid. It inspired him to
read all of Baum's books, which led him to
other fantasy fare such as "Alice in Won-
derland" and the works ofJ. R. R. Tolkien.
But the notion of revisiting the Land of Oz
with an A-list director wasn't enough to
lure Franco to the leading role.
"I already had a lot of faith in the movie
because Sam was attached, but as an Oz
fan, I wanted to be sure that the approach
was sound," the actor said. "They very
smartly did not just do a boy version of


Demi Moore seeks spousal
support from Kutcher
LOS ANGELES Demi
Moore is seeking spousal
support from estranged
husband Ashton Kutcher.
The actress stated in a
court filing Thursday she
also wants the "Two and a
Half Men" star to pay her
attorney's fees in the di-
Demi vorce proceedings.
Moore Kutcher filed for di-
vorce in December, more
than a year after Moore announced the


Birthday There is a strong chance you could be
quite fortunate in the year ahead when it comes to es-
tablishing relationships with influential individuals who
could prove to be very helpful commercially
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) It's not a good day to
make last-minute changes on something that is steadily
moving along on a proscribed course. Instead of mak-
ing any improvement, you could derail the entire
endeavor.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -Although you're pretty
good at convincing people of the rightness of your case,
if you go overboard, you could cause them to backtrack.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) This could be one of
those days you might be able to get a better deal from a
stranger than you could from a friend. It proves it some-
times pays to check outside sources.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) Being too indecisive


on 'Oz the Great and Powerful'


China Girl, voiced by Joey King, left, and James Franco, as Oz, are in a scene from "Oz
the Great and Powerful."


Dorothy and have the same trip through
Oz."
For one, Franco notes the wizard is a con
man and his trip through Oz is very differ-
ent than Dorothy's was.
"He'll be getting into awkward situations,
basically kind of bouncing off of Oz in ways
that Dorothy didn't," the actor said.
While the new "Oz" has plenty of familiar
elements the yellow brick road, Emer-
ald City, witches, munchkins (now multi-
ethnic) "the ways they're interacting
with the protagonist (are) completely dif-
ferent," Franco said.
As the film opens in sepia-toned 1905
Kansas, Franco's Oscar Diggs is a carnival
magician who dreams of fame and fortune
at any cost When a twister whisks him to a
fantastical land bearing his stage name -
Oz whose inhabitants believe him to be
a wizard sent to save them, he can't believe
his luck Power and riches are practically
his for the taking.
But first, he faces three witches, none of
whom are exactly as they seem. Oz be-
friends a few locals, including a flying mon-
key (Zach Braff) and a china doll (Joey
King), and eventually makes the plight of
the people of Oz his own.
Like Franco, Raimi grew up loving the
original "Oz" film.
"I remember it being the scariest movie
I'd ever seen in my life and also the most
touching movie, the saddest, sweetest thing
I'd ever seen," he said. "It was that spirit of
sweetness, of characters becoming com-


Spotlight on PEOPLE


marriage was over Kutcher didn't take a
position in his filings on whether he
should pay Moore any spousal support.
The couple was married in September
2005, and they have no children together.
Kutcher didn't specify when the couple
separated, but Moore listed Nov 17, 2011,
as the breakup date.

Elizabeth Olsen to play
Juliet off-Broadway
NEW YORK Elizabeth Olsen will
soon be a star-crossed lover she'll star
in an off-Broadway version of Shake-
speare's "Romeo & Juliet."


Today's HOROSCOPE
could severely lessen your chances of achieving much
of anything. Take plenty of time to figure out what you
want to accomplish.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) If you're not too discern-
ing about what you want to get done, you could go off in
multiple directions, not knowing where you're heading
or why Have a goal in mind for best results.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Disappointment is inevitable if
you set too high a price on some merchandise and/or
service you're trying to sell. It isn't likely you will be able
to find too many takers, if any
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -You will be held account-
able for any promises or commitments you've made but
haven't as yet come through on. Be ready to pay up,
whether you're ready or not.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) If you don't believe in your-
self or your abilities, you can't expect others to. Your col-


plete by the end of the story that was the
most powerful thing I took away from the
1939 classic and the thing we tried collec-
tively to put in our picture."
Some critics have questioned the casting
of Franco as the wizard. The AP's Christy
Lemire wrote he's "too boyish for the role...
neither charismatic nor self-loathing
enough."
Yet Raimi believes Franco was the per-
fect actor to portray the wizard: "He was
born to play the part"
Franco and Raimi are personal friends,
and the director said he's seen the actor's
growth as a performer and an individual
since they first worked together on 2002's
"Spider-Man."
"I knew James was a moody dreamer,
and that's who Oz is," Raimi said. "He
dreams of being this great man, even if he
doesn't know what greatness is."
The director knew Franco could embody
the selfishness -which Raimi had seen in
the actor when he was younger and the
heart of the wizard.
"Because James had, in his life, been all
of these things, I knew that if he could grab
a hold of them and recognize them and
hold up a mirror to himself- however ac-
tors do that-he could channel everything
he was through this character and really
bring him to life like no one else," Raimi
said.
Franco said playing the role "was really
like I was stepping into the imaginative
world of my childhood."


Classic Stage Company said Thursday
the younger sister of Mary-Kate and Ash-
ley Olsen will help kick off
its 2013-14 season. There's
no word yet on who will
play Romeo.
The actress, who has
gotten good notices for the
films "Silent House" and
"Martha Marcy May Mar-
lene," has just finished the
Elizabeth Spike Lee-directed film
Olsen "Old Boy" opposite
Samuel L. Jackson and
Josh Brolin.
-From wire reports


leagues will see you only as you see yourself.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -An arrangement with
some friends you're presently contemplating might not
be as terrific as it appears on the surface. Look closely
before you leap.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Because of a strong
urge to expedite an important matter, you could easily
do something counterproductive. Try to forgo any deci-
sion-making for the nonce.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) It might take far more
self-discipline than you're able to muster to complete a
tedious assignment. Unfortunately, any disinterest on
your part destroys productivity.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Lady Luck is your
buddy at present, but only up to a point. If you begin to
take foolish risks, she's likely to ignore you and instead
favor someone who isn't trying to beat the odds.


Assucialeu Lre ss


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
U To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March 9, the
68th day of 2013. There are 297
days left in the year. A reminder:
Daylight-saving time begins Sun-
day at 2 a.m. Clocks go forward
one hour.
Today's Highlight:
On March 9,1963, two Los An-
geles police officers, lan Campbell
and Karl Hettinger, were disarmed
and abducted by ex-convicts Gre-
gory Powell and Jimmy Lee Smith
during a traffic stop in Hollywood;
the officers were taken to an onion
field near Bakersfield, Calif.,
where Campbell was shot to
death while Hettinger managed to
escape. (Powell and Smith were
sent to prison; the case was de-
tailed in the book "The Onion
Field" by Joseph Wambaugh.)
On this date:
In 1796, the future emperor of
the French, Napoleon Bonaparte,
married Josephine de Beauhar-
nais. (The couple later divorced.)
In 1916, Mexican raiders led by
Pancho Villa attacked Columbus,
N.M., killing 18 Americans.
In 1945, during World War II,
U.S. B-29 bombers launched in-
cendiary bomb attacks against
Japan, resulting in an estimated
100,000 deaths.
In 1954, CBS newsman Ed-
ward R. Murrow critically reviewed
Wisconsin Sen. Joseph R. Mc-
Carthy's anti-communism cam-
paign on "See It Now."
In 1962, the science fantasy
novel "A Wrinkle in Time" by
Madeleine L'Engle was first pub-
lished by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
In 1977, about a dozen armed
Hanafi Muslims invaded three
buildings in Washington, D.C.,
killing one person and taking more
than 130 hostages. (The siege
ended two days later.)
Ten years ago: Recep Tayyip
Erdogan won a seat in the Turkish
parliament, clearing way for him to
become prime minister.
Five years ago: Spain's gov-
erning Socialists won a second
term, but without a majority in
parliament.
One year ago: A high-profile in-
ternational mission to end the Syr-
ian crisis stumbled before it began
as the opposition rejected calls by
U.N. envoy Kofi Annan for dia-
logue with President Bashar
Assad as pointless and out of
touch after a year of violence.
Today's Birthdays: Singer
Lloyd Price is 80. Actress Joyce
Van Patten is 79. Actor-comedian
Marty Ingels is 77. Country singer
Mickey Gilley is 77. Actress Trish
Van Devere is 72. Singer Mark
Lindsay (Paul Revere and the
Raiders) is 71. Former ABC an-
chorman Charles Gibson is 70.
Rock musician Robin Trower is
68. Singer Jeffrey Osborne is 65.
Country musician Jimmie Fadden
(The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band) is 65.
Actress Juliette Binoche is 49.
Actor Emmanuel Lewis is 42. Ac-
tress Jean Louisa Kelly is 41.
Actor Kerr Smith is 41.
Thought for Today: "Con-
science is the perfect interpreter of
life." Karl Barth, Swiss theolo-
gian (1886-1966).









SRELIGION9,
.L ,EIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


CHRISTOPHER BEHNAN
Livingston County Daily
Press & Argus (Howell)

GENOA TOWNSHIP, Mich.
What was a drab, vacant
building less than two
years ago is now ar-
guably the most unique and
state-of-the-art facility in
Michigan's Livingston County
Completion of the $10 mil-
lion 2/42 Community Church in
Genoa Township wasn't made
possible by a few wealthy
donors, but rather the faith -
and the donations of more
than 1,000 area Christians.
2/42 Community Church ex-
tends across 65,700 square feet
and includes the full-menu


Easter events
Mid-week Lenten service
themes at Peace Lutheran
Church include: March 13 -
"The Right Way to Pray," Luke
11:1-4; March 20 "(Un)fin-
ished Business," Luke 23: 34,
46. Lenten services at 4 p.m.
are followed by a potluck
meal. Maundy Thursday and
Good Friday services are at
7 p.m. Easter worship serv-
ice is at 10 a.m. Everyone is
invited to all services. The
church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41,
five miles north of Dunnellon.
Call the church office at 352-
489-5881 or visit www. Peace
LutheranOnline.com.
St. Paul's School stu-
dents and Precious Lambs
Preschool will perform an
Easter pageant at 10:30 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Thursday,
March 21, at St. Paul's
Lutheran Church, 6150 N.
Lecanto Highway, Beverly
Hills. Call 352-489-3027.
Everyone is invited to the
annual "Breakfast with the
Easter Bunny and Easter
Egg Hunt" from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at
Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. The
all-you-can-eat pancake
breakfast with the Easter
bunny is from 9 to 11 a.m.
Cost is $6 for adults and $4
for children. For tickets, call
352-795-3148 or visit
www.crumc.com by March 20.
Free egg hunts for toddlers,
preschoolers and elementary
school-aged children every 30
minutes from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
There will be Easter bunny
photos, cupcake decorating,
inflatables, games and more.
Inverness Church of God
will host a free "Easter
Eggstravaganza" for chil-
dren from noon to 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 23, at Floral
Park in Floral City at the lower
pavilion by the playground.
Registration for prizes is at
11:30 a.m. Activities include
hotdog lunch, egg hunt,
prizes, face painting and a
balloon artist. The public is in-
vited to attend this fun event
for the children. For planning
purposes, call the church to
register children at 352-
726-4524.
Reflections Church will
celebrate "Family Fun Day"
on Sunday, March 24, at Cit-


Caf6 at the Commons, three-
level playscape, arts school, in-
door athletic field and
preschool.
Those amenities avail-
able to all residents, regard-
less of faith are separate
from an auditorium that drew
2,154 people to the church's
first Sunday services Feb. 17.
"Everybody goes, 'What is
that?' It's a little outside of the
box," the Rev David Dummitt
told the Livingston County
Daily Press & Argus.
"I tell the people it's a gift to
the community," Dummitt
added.
The nonprofit facility
opened to the general public
last week and is open every


day A grand-opening celebra-
tion is planned for Easter Sun-
day on March 31.
The facility is the former
Brighton Athletic Club, which
closed in April 2007 after 35
years of operation. The origi-
nal building was constructed
in 1972.
The nondenominational
Christian church owns the
building and the adjoining 12
acres. Its services were previ-
ously held at Brighton High
School. The Livingston County
location and 2/42's smaller
Ann Arbor campus comprise
one church congregation.
The $10 million project was
funded in part by $5 million
over two years from 1,300


church members roughly
$3,850 per member, if divided
evenly
Dummitt said a "community
center" approach was em-
braced from the beginning, as
was members' desire to give
back to the community
In many cases, members de-
layed buying new cars, going
on family trips and doing
house projects to make that vi-
sion a reality, Dummitt said.
Part of the money raised is
going toward construction of
an outreach 2/42 church in
Haiti.
"We really tried to be inter-
nally focused as a church from

See Page C4


Religion NOTES

Donation


Special to the Chronicle
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Insurance donated a check in the amount of $25,000 for the additional development
of Kingsway Retirement Community, 6150 N. Lecanto Highway, Beverly Hills. Pictured, left, are: Bill Schmidt,
visiting chairman of Thrivent Financial in Jefferson County, Wis.; Allen Leinberger, treasurer of Kingsway; the Rev.
Mark Gabb, pastor of St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Beverly Hills; Peg Weston, associate representative of Thrivent
Financial for Lutherans of Citrus County; and the Rev. Curt Seefeldt, director for church relations for the Lutheran
Home Association in Belle Plaine, Minn., and partner in Kingsway.


rus Springs Middle School.
There is the worship service
at 10:17 a.m., where child-
care, kid's church and nursery
are available. Fun and games
will take place from noon to
2 p.m. An Easter egg hunt,
along with games and con-
cession stands, will be avail-
able. Proceeds from the
concessions will help fund the
"Reflex Students" trip to camp
this summer.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City will celebrate
Maundy Thursday, March 28,
with its fifth annual presenta-
tion of the play "The Twelve
Soliloquies," written by the
Rev. Louis J. Kovar, at 7 p.m.
This drama is a look into the
lives of those participating in
Jesus' final meal. The scene
depicted on stage occurred in
an Upper Room in Jerusalem
the night before Christ was
crucified. Jesus and the
Twelve Apostles were eating
their Last Supper together be-


fore Jesus' death. The scene
is patterned after Leonardo
Da Vinci's famous painting,
"The Last Supper." Everyone
is welcome to begin Easter
weekend by attending this
historical portrayal of Jesus
with his disciples before his
death. Communion will be
served during the service.
Following the service, light re-
freshments will be served in
the fellowship hall. The church
is at 8545 E. Magnolia St.,
Floral City. Call the office 352-
726-4296 or visit www.fbc
floralcity.org
Joy Lutheran Church's
Maundy Thursday worship
service with Holy Communion
is at 6:45 p.m. March 28. The
Seven Last Words of Christ
from the Cross will be pre-
sented on Good Friday from
noon to 2 p.m. Easter Sun-
day, March 31, will begin at
6:30 a.m. outdoors in the Me-
morial Garden (weather per-
mitting). The message is


"Amazed Where the Road
Leads," from Luke 24:1-12.
Two services will follow in the
church sanctuary. At
8:30 a.m., the message is "A
Twist in the Road," from John
20:1-10, and the 10:30 a.m.
message is "Jesus Leads Me
on the Road," from John
20:11-18. The bell and vocal
choirs will perform at the last
two services. The public is
welcome. The church is at
7045 S.W. 83rd Place at State
Road 200, Ocala. Call 352-
854-4509, ext. 221.
Faith Lutheran Church's
Easter schedule is as fol-
lows: Service at 6 p.m. Satur-
day, March 30; Easter Sunday
sunrise service at 7 a.m. with
continental breakfast from
7:45 to 9 a.m. followed by the
Resurrection service at
9:30 a.m. Congregation is re-
quested to bring live flowers
to decorate the cross in the
narthex on Easter Saturday
and Sunday. Everyone is in-


vited. The church is at 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive in Crystal
Glen Subdivision off State
Road 44 and County Road
490 in Lecanto. Call 352-527-
3325 or visit faithlecanto.com
Inverness Church of God
invites the community to at-
tend an Easter musical
presentation titled "Victori-
ous" during the 10:30 a.m.
worship service Sunday,
March 31. The church is at
416 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Call the church office at 352-
726-4524.
Worship
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-
day. Father David Balmer also
invites all to Bible study class
- "The Words of Christ" at
3:30 p.m. Saturday. This

See Page C2


'You



don't



know



God'
Back in 2001, my
pastor announced
to the congrega-
tion, "You don't know
God."
He went on to say, "If
you think there's some-
body too hard for God to
reach or a situation too
difficult for him to fix,
then you don't know
God. You don't know
what he's able and will-
ing to do in a person's
life."
It was a few weeks be-
fore Easter and the pas-
tor asked us to write
down the names of five
people we wanted to see
attend church on Easter
Sunday, even people we
thought would only step
foot in church when hell
became a ski resort.
He dared us to believe
God was able to do what
we considered to be im-
possible.
(Of the five names I
wrote down, none of those
See Page C5


Church


and


history

On the night he was
betrayed, the
rabbi from
Nazareth gave blunt, but
mysterious, instructions
about the rite that would
forever be at the center
of Christian life.
The Gospel of St. Luke
reports: "He took bread,
and gave thanks, and
brake it, and gave unto
them, saying, This is my
body which is given for
you: this do in remem-
brance of me. Likewise
also the cup after sup-
per, saying, This cup is
the new testament in my
blood, which is shed for
you."
These images mysti-
fied the faith's Roman
critics. In his multime-
dia project "Church His-
tory Made Easy," Baptist
scholar Timothy Paul
Jones noted one ancient
pagan wrote this vivid
speculation about Chris-
tian worship: '"An infant
is covered with dough, to
deceive the innocent.
The infant is placed be-
fore the person who is to
be stained with their
rites. The young pupil
slays the infant.
Thirstily, they lick up the
blood! Eagerly they tear
apart its limbs."

See Page C4


Terry Mattingly
ON
RELIGION


..- F -=





C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C1

week's focus is "The Beati-
tudes." The church is at 1277
N. Paul Drive, Inverness (off
U.S. 41 North, across from
Dollar General).The Holy
Myrrhbearers ask attendees to
bring a box or can of food for
distribution at Family Resource
Center in Hernando. The pub-
lic is also invited to attend
Great Vespers in at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday at The Villages at St.
George Episcopal Church,
1250 Paige Place, Lady Lake.
Call 352-726-4777.
Worship services at St.
Timothy Lutheran Church
include a "come-as-you-are"
Communion service at 5 p.m.
Saturday; early service with
Communion at 8 a.m. Sun-
days with Sunday school
classes for all ages at
9:30 a.m., coffee fellowship
hour at 9 a.m., and traditional
service with Communion at
10:30 a.m. Special services
are announced. A nursery is
provided. The church is at
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd.
(U.S..19), Crystal River. Call
352-795-5325 or visit www.
sttimothylutherancrystalriver.
com.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
fourth Sunday of Lent with
Holy Eucharist services at
5 p.m. today and 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday. A nursery
is provided during the 10:30
a.m. service. Christian Forma-
tion is at 9:15 a.m. Godly Play
Sunday school is at 10 a.m.
There is a healing service at
10 a.m. Wednesday followed
by Bible study. SOS is from
9 a.m. to noon Thursday at
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church. Evening Bible study
is at 7 p.m. Thursday.
"The Father Who Did His
Best," from Luke 15, is theme
of Pastor Stephen Lane's ser-


RELIGION


mons for 6 p.m. today and
9:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith
Lutheran Church at 935 S.
Crystal Glen Drive in Crystal
Glen Subdivision off State
Road 44 and County Road
490 in Lecanto. After the Sun-
day service there is a time for
fellowship. Children's Sunday
school and adult Bible studies
are at 11 a.m. The final mid-
week Lenten service at 5 p.m.
Wednesday is on theme, "Is
There No Justice?" A potluck
supper will follow. Palm Sun-
day is March 24. Holy Week
will continue with Maundy
Thursday Holy Communion
service at 7 p.m. March 28
and Good Friday service at
3 p.m. March 29. Call 352-
527-3325 or visit faith
lecanto.com.
Faith Lutheran Church,
in Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to services at
6 p.m. Saturday and 9:30
a.m. Sunday. Following the
Sunday service is a time of
fellowship. Children's Sunday
school and adult Bible classes
are at 11 a.m. Wednesday's
Lenten service begins at
5 p.m. with a covered-dish
supper following in the fellow-
ship hall. Call 352-527-3325
or visit faithlecanto.com.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee
hour from 9 to 11 a.m. For the
fourth Sunday of Lent (Laity
Sunday), the Rev. Craig S.
Davies will preach. The pas-
tor's Lenten study, "The Tur-
bulent Waters of Change,"
begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday
with a prepared dinner fol-
lowed by the study topic, "The
Future!" Meal reservations are
required. The class for receiv-
ing new members into the
church family will take place


from noon to 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day, March 17, at the church.
Lunch, a nursery and child-
care provided. Call 352-
637-0770.
St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort
Island Trail North. The church
will celebrate the fourth Sun-
day of Lent with services at 8
and 10:15 a.m. tomorrow. St.
Anne's will host Our Father's
Table from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. today. A new
men's group modeled after
the Order of St. Andrews
meets in the church library.
Call the church for dates and
time. The young adults meet
for a light meal and Bible
study the first Friday monthly
at one of the group member's
homes. For details, call Dave
or Kathy Jackson at 352-344-
1167. The "Widows Network"
meets the fourth Monday
monthly at various locations.
All widows are invited. The
monthly sing-along is at
6 p.m. Sunday, March 24.
Annie and Tim's United Blue-
grass Gospel Band will lead
the singing. Stations of the
Cross are at 5 p.m. Friday fol-
lowed by a light meal and a
talk by Dr. R. Jackson Al-
wood. Bishop Gregory 0.
Brewer will be at the 8 and
10:15 a.m. services Sunday,
March 17. He will welcome 11
new members to the church.
A traditional corned beef and
cabbage and potato dinner
will follow the second service.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, has
worship services at 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday. A voters'
meeting will follow immedi-
ately at 10:45 a.m. Choir re-
hearsal is at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Midweek Lenten
worship services are at 4 and
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. "Bible
Information Class" is at
3:45 p.m. Thursday. St. Paul's
School students and Precious
Lambs Preschool will perform


an Easter pageant at
10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 21. Spring
Break Soccer Camp is from
8:30 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, March 25-29.
Camp is open to all students
ages 5 to 12 in the commu-
nity. Call 352-489-3027.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate
Holy Eucharist Rite 1 at
8 a.m. Sunday and Holy Eu-
charist Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m.
which includes children's
church. At the 10:30 a.m.
service, the youth will receive
"silver rings" and make a
pledge of purity until mar-
riage. Adult Sunday school is
at 9:30 a.m. Youth Sunday
school starts at 12:45 p.m. fol-
lowing lunch. Bible study at
the Radcliffes' home is at
7:30 p.m. Monday. Lenten
Bible study on "Facing the
Cross" begins at 12:30 p.m.
following a brown bag lunch.
Feed My Sheep will provide a
hot lunch to those in need at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a healing and Holy
Eucharist service celebrating
Gregory the Great at 12:30
p.m. Stations of the Cross at
noon Friday will be followed
by a "Souper" lunch. Food
pantry hours are from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets


from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in Sunday's worship services
at the 8:30 a.m. blended serv-
ice and the 11 a.m. traditional
service. Coffee and dough-
nuts are served in the fellow-
ship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. Go to
www.fbcfloralcity.org or call
352-726-4296.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-
tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The
church is on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando. Call
352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to its various activi-
ties. Adult Bible study with the
Rev. Bob Martin is at
8:45 a.m. Sunday followed by
the 10 a.m. worship service
with the Rev. "Jerry" Carris.
Children's church, a nursery,
and hearing devices for the
hearing impaired are pro-
vided. The Korean worship
service with the Rev. Yoon is
at 2 p.m. Mark Bodenheim
chairs the Men's Connection
at 7 p.m. Monday. Holidaze
Crafters invites all to come
and enjoy crafts and fellow-
ship at 9 a.m. Tuesday. The
HUMW choir meets for prac-
tice at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Darryl
Frenier. On Wednesdays,
Bible study with Pastor Jerry


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Carris is at 1 p.m., Korean
Bible study with the Rev.
Yoon is at 4 p.m., and Bible
study with the Rev. Bob Mar-
tin is at 7 p.m. Cub Scouts
Pack 452 meets at 6 p.m.
Thursday. The United
Methodist Women meet at
9:45 a.m. the second Thurs-
day monthly. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
and meeting takes place the
fourth Saturday monthly.
Share Praise and Fellowship
meets at 6 p.m. the second
and fourth Sunday monthly.
The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to its new
location at the Realtors Associ-
ation of Citrus County Building
at 714 S. Scarboro Ave. on
State Road 44 in Lecanto. The
new worship service time is at
10 a.m. Join us at 9:30 a.m.
for a coffee fellowship, fol-
lowed by the worship service.
This Sunday, Pastor Kennie
Berger continues a series of
messages form the book of
Hebrews. The church is non-
denominational. Wednesday
we meet for weekly Bible
study. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
and study begins at 7. The first
Wednesday monthly is the
Faith Journey video lessons
that gives insight and under-
standing to the scriptures as
related to the culture and land
of biblical times. On subse-
quent Wednesdays, we are
studying the book of Galatians.
Call Pastor Kennie Berger at
352-302-5813.
New Covenant Grace
Fellowship meets at 10 a.m.
Sunday in a member's pri-
vate home. There is also a
healing school on Tuesday
nights and a small group dis-
cussion on Wednesday
nights. The Rev. Larry Silver-
man lead this ministry. Call
Pastor Silverman at 616-
291-9568.

See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and S>


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA .


# Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon


^ First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i lih Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children's Awanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org





"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
for the
Community"


a origSerie1:0AM
CaWe. Pae .&BbeSuy


B Crystal
Q River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager



ST. THOMAS
CATHOLIC

CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.

; .' I [ h. II [ ]1 [ H , ]





SCrystal Qiver

Church of Cod
Church Phone
795-3079
Sunday Morning
Adult & Children's Worship
8:30 & 11:00 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Life Application Service
Jam Session Youth Ministries & Teen
Kid (ages 4-11) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W. Old Tallahassee Rd.
(12th Ave.) Nursery
Provided


t St. Timothy "1
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour @ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M.' 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


Special

event or

weekly

services

Please call

Beverly at

564-2912
for

advertising

information


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUNW
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 A.M.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church

Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
- MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479




HEKE, YOU'LL FIND
A CAKINCG FAMILY
IN CH KST!

CKYTNL
RIVC -
UNITD
ETA CHODIST l
CH UKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
:. A Stephen Ministry Provider ;


SST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service, as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176
www.stannescr.org


SWest
Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352.564.8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






us Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

E If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as
well as a caring church family.
The Sunday morning service
is at 10:30 and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and
encouraging Bible-based
teachings that will build your
faith. Abundant Life is a full-
Gospel, nondenominational
church that believes in the
power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Abundant
Life of Crystal River is at 4515
N. Tallahassee Road. Visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org or
call 352-795-LIFE.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County
welcomes back Renee
Zenaida a frequent speaker
from the Gainesville Unitarian
Universalist Church, at
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Zenaida's
topic is, "Won't You Be My
Neighbor: Confronting Reli-
gious and Cultural Entitlement
in Israel and Palestine." View-
ing the Israeli Palestinian con-


flict, through the Doctrine of
Discovery lens, brings the
conflict closer to our own
backyard by connecting it to
the United States' own treat-
ment of native peoples. Still,
what does that mean to us as
Unitarian Universalists or
even as United States citizens
and residents? What do peo-
ple of our faith have to do with
Jews and Muslims half a
world away, in a "Holy Land"
we no longer aspire to? The
NCUU meets at 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus
Springs.
First Presbyterian
Church of Crystal River will
celebrate its Sunday worship
service at 10:30 a.m. The Rev.
JackAlwood's sermon is titled
"ALL." The food pantry is open
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tues-
day. On Wednesday, choir re-
hearsal is at 3:30 p.m. and the
Lenten study is from 6 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. beginning with a
soup and bread meal. The
topic is, "Learning from Jesus,
the Sermon on the Mount,"
from Matthew 5-7. The com-
munity is invited to attend.
Various church committee
meetings will take place
Thursday. Call church office
for times. A memorial service
for Eleanor Bachman is at
2 p.m. Friday. Call 352-795-
2259 or visit fpcofcrystal
river.com for more information.


Special events
First United Methodist
Church, at 21501 W. State
Road 40 in Dunnellon, contin-
ues its nine-week Dave Ram-
sey Financial Peace
University seminar from 3:30
to 5 p.m. Sunday in the fellow-
ship hall of the church. For
more information or to regis-
ter, call Rick DuCharme at
352-465-2142 or the church
office at 352-489-4026.
March is Missions
Month at Heritage Baptist
Church. Speakers at the Sun-
day evening services at 6 are
as follows: Tomorrow Mark
and Diane Henzler are mis-
sionaries with the Association
of Baptists for World Evangel-
ism. In 2003 they moved to
Managua, Nicaragua, to help
meet the need of training pas-
tors and start churches. Mark
founded and directed the In-
stitute of Church Planters,
which is currently running its
third series of training. March
17 Jeff Randall is the direc-
tor of CWE (Construction for
Worldwide Evangelism).
CWE'S desire is to see peo-
ple from the U.S. have their
lives "transformed" on the for-
eign mission field. Typically
church buildings are con-
structed in only four consecu-
tive one-week trips with a
20-member volunteer team


each week. March 24 -
Danny and Janice Flowers
are missionaries with Baptist
Int. Missions in France. The
Flowers are currently seeking
to expand a church plant in
the Champagne-Ardenne
area of France. The church
also has Sunday school at
9 a.m. and morning worship
at 10:15.
A newly forming Citrus
County League of Women
Voters will meet at 1 p.m.
Tuesday at the Nature Coast
Unitarian Universalist Fellow-
ship, 7633 N. Florida Ave.,
Citrus Springs. Organizational
items will be discussed and
decided. Earlier presentations
about the League resulted in
overwhelming support for this
nonpartisan educational
group open to all, including
men. Call 352-465-4225 or
visit naturecoastuu.org.
The Spirit in the Wind
Fellowship looks at how
Christian and Native Ameri-
can spiritualities blend for
stronger Christian faith. The
public is invited to the next
gathering from 10:30 a.m. to
noon Wednesday at the First
Presbyterian Church in Crys-
tal River, 1501 S.E. U.S. 19,
near the Fort Island Road in-
tersection. There will be cul-
tural studies, Scripture
accompanied by Amerindian
wisdom, fun activities and a


closing circle worship. This is
a fun and free gathering. Call
the Rev. Mike Fonfara, D.
Min., a retired Presbyterian
Church (USA) pastor and
Montaukett Indian Nation
member, at 352-527-8321.
St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will host a
women's retreat with nation-
ally-known speaker and
award-winning author Patricia
Livingston from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Thursday in Hilgert Hall
at St. Benedict Catholic
Church, 455 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. Liv-
ingston is best known for her
touching, storytelling style of
illuminating the presence of
God in everyday life. Cost to
attend the retreat is $10 per
person, including lunch. All
Catholic women are invited.
Seating is limited. For reser-
vations and payment, call
Jolinda at 352-503-6108.
Did you notice that many
films on the "Best 10" lists or
nominated for Academy
Awards, never came to our
area? We noticed, and are
showing four recent but "for-
gotten films" at 3 p.m. Thurs-
days in March at the Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship, 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Cit-
rus Springs. All are welcome
for a $3 donation. The first
film this Thursday is "The
Best Little Exotic Marigold


RELIGION


U Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St. |
(across from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com




p Special
IA1,-,,L'I I,


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lt. 111P Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


I event or

r carv in


wVV klly s r1 Vi.;ub

Please call Beverly at

564-2912

for advertising

information


SB Shepherd

f the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.


Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W. Norvell Bryant Hwy
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)


NCO-


11


Sunday
9:30 AM....................Discovery Time
11:00 AM...............Praise & Worship
6:00 PM ....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM................. Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1%mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


Rev. Stephen Lane

Faith
Lutheran

ChurchLCM..)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com

assuwr o^(tew.


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422
\_______


A ... .....r Children and Families"
2125 E, Norvell Bryant Hwy,.(486)
(1/2 miles from Hwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
h j .. ..J T
I.... ... ... I h 1


Hernando
TheNazarene
A Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL
726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


Homosassa Springs
X SEVNt-DAYADVEN1Sf'QIURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA

oe







Worship

8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

35-4-761


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 C3

Hotel," led by Judi Dench,
Maggie Smith and six other
cash-strapped seniors decide
to outsource their retirement
in a colorful resort in India.
Friendship and romance blos-
som in the most humorous
and unexpected ways, re-
minding us that it is never too
late to find a fresh beginning.
Call 352-465-4225 or visit
naturecoastuu.org.
Unity Mystery Dinner
Theater presents "Murder
Most Green," a St. Patrick's
Day mystery, at 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday, March 15
and 16, at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Tickets are $20. Call
352-746-1270 or email
Unityofcitrus.org.
The next Blood Drive
sponsored by the joint min-
istries of Our Lady of Grace
Church and the Knights of
Columbus Council 6168 is
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, March 16, at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
A complimentary continental
breakfast will be available, as
well as other tokens of thanks
for donors.
Everyone is invited to a
"Tricky Tray Party (Basket
Bonanza)" sponsored by
Catholic Women's Club at
See NOTES/Page C4


Yrr IT MM





C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


OPEN
Continued from Page C1

the beginning," Dummitt said.
The center has two game
rooms, one for children in
grades 1 through 5 and the other
for grades 6 through 12.
Another portion of the complex
accommodates half-court basket-
ball and full-court volleyball.
A series of classrooms have
mock-storefronts based on
Brighton businesses, including a
sweets shop-themed storefront
based on the popular Yum Yum
Tree, and a storefront repre-
senting a Brighton hardware
store.
Another room has a fire de-
partment-themed exterior and
interior.
A serene meeting room is
available to businesses and or-
ganizations at no cost.
The School for the Arts wing
provides space for music teach-
ers to teach private and group
piano lessons. The soundproof
rooms also will be available for
musical rehearsal space.
The arts school offers a vari-
ety of classes, including dance,
music, drama and culinary
arts.
Dummitt said promotion of
the arts was a cornerstone in the
plan.
"God is the creator. To follow
him is creative," he said.
The auditorium houses up to
900 people in padded chairs. It
is equipped with a giant LED
screen, full lighting, sound sys-
tem and space for the church
band to perform.
A planned balcony would
boost capacity to nearly 1,300
people.
Dummitt envisions music and
theater events at the audito-
rium, which he said is equipped
for large-scale productions.
So far, about 30 people have
been hired to run the center,
and Dummitt said he expects to
hire up to another 20 people.
During the week, a retired po-
lice officer provides building se-
curity, and preschool instructors
are trained in pediatric car-
diopulmonary resuscitation.


"Hundreds" of building and
planning professionals, many of
them county-based and church
members, were hired to make the
center a reality, Dummitt said.
Jim Barnas of Brighton-based
Contracting Resources Inc. was
project manager for the 2/42
development.
Genoa Township resident and
church member Eric Rauch was
part of the project's design team.
Rauch, a former civil engineer,
worked with Dummitt and the
project's California-based archi-
tect to transform the former ten-
nis club.
The goal from the start was a
building that would be utilized
every day of the week, rather
than just Sundays for services,
Rauch said.
Part of that vision was placing
the cafe and playscape at the
front of the building.
"We didn't want to build a
building that just had people at
it on Sunday mornings. We re-
ally wanted to be a community
center first and redefine what
that meant for a church," Rauch
said.
"We definitely put the com-
munity first and wanted to just
make sure that we're creating a
space that Livingston county
could use throughout the week,"
he added.
Rauch, a father of two, is the
center's full-time director of
children's ministries.
The church's name derives
from the Bible, Acts of the Apos-
tles, chapter 2, verse 42. The
verse details how early follow-
ers of Christ devoted themselves
to the apostles' teachings, gave
to those who were in need and
praised God.
Dummitt said tithing is "Plan
A"' to keep 2/42 going strong in
the county A backup plan, if
needed, will be fundraising, he
said.
The center is tax-exempt.
He said the center, like many
early hospitals, was built by
Christians in the spirit of giving
and helping those in need.
That spirit, more than dollars
alone, will keep 2/42 Community
Church going strong, Dummitt
said.
"We do it joyfully," he said.


RELIGION


HISTORY
Continued from Page C1

How can anyone learn these
kinds of human details, asked
Jones, and come away thinking
that history is boring? The stories
and lessons of church history are
especially important, he said, for
millions of evangelical Protes-
tants who attend the many mod-
ern megachurches flocks with
few, if any, denominational ties
that bind that have helped re-
shape the landscape of American
religious life.
"Taking church history seriously
helps us sink our roots into some-
thing deeper than the present,"
said Jones, who teaches at South-
ern Baptist Theological Seminary
"One of the dangers of this whole
post-denominational world we live
in is that people can lose their
rootedness and lose a sense that
generations of Christians have
passed the faith on to us."
This is especially important in
the age of "The Da Vinci Code"
and other works of popular cul-
ture that can leave people think-
ing "there is no heresy and that
there is no orthodoxy," he said in
a telephone interview. "What
you're left with is a lot of compet-
ing voices and the sense that
everything is up for grabs."
This is tricky territory for
Protestants in churches born
through the work of John Calvin,
Martin Luther and other reform-
ers who to varying degrees -
questioned the authority of an-
cient traditions preserved in
Roman Catholicism or Eastern
Orthodoxy It's even harder to
stress church history, said Jones,
in today's rapidly changing inde-
pendent churches that embrace
modern media and other market-
place trends.
In these flocks, "tradition" is
often measured in months or
years, not centuries.
Thus, Jones opened the
"Church History Made Easy"
book with a reference not to
St. John Chrysostom, St. Augus-
tine, Calvin, Luther or even Billy
Graham, but to a classic
"Peanuts" strip by the late
Charles Schulz. In it, Sally Brown


is writing a paper on "church his-
tory" To address this subject, she
writes, "We have to go back to the
very beginning. Our pastor was
born in 1930."
Digging into ancient church his-
tory can leave some Protestants
-both liberals and conservatives
- facing questions about which
traditions to embrace, which to
adapt and which to avoid. Take,
for example, the penitential sea-
son of Lent that leads to Easter
One Baptist progressive, Cen-
tral Baptist Theological Semi-
nary President Molly T Marshall,
recently noted "since the earliest
times of the Church, there is evi-
dence of some kind of Lenten
preparation in the 40 days lead-
ing up to Easter (not counting the
Sundays) After the legalization of
Christianity in CE 313, Lent de-
veloped patterns that continue, at
least in the West."
In recent years, she added,
something unusual has hap-
pened: "Many Baptists are learn-
ing the significance of paying
attention to Lent"
Some Baptists will welcome
that kind of connection to church
history, noted Jones, while others
will not His own congregation re-
cently observed Ash Wednesday,
"ashes and all," leading some
Southern Baptists to think "we've
gone Catholic," he said.
The goal is not to uncritically
accept symbols, rites and experi-
ences merely because they are
ancient, he said. For evangelicals,
the goal is to find what they be-
lieve is the doctrinal core they
share with Catholics, the Ortho-
dox and other believers through
the ages.
"There is what C.S. Lewis
called a 'mere Christianity' a core
of Christian tradition that can
serve as our touchstone," he said.
"There was an orthodoxy with
a little 'o' a tradition you can
trace back to the apostles. That's
why church history matters."
--a
Terry Mattingly is the director of
the Washington Journalism
Center at the Council for
Christian Colleges and
Universities and leads the
GetReligion.org project to study
religion and the news.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

11 a.m. Saturday, March 16,
in the parish hall at Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church,
550 U.S. 41 S., Inverness.
Donation of $5 includes 20
tickets. Each extra 10 tickets
costs $1. Free coffee and
dessert provided. Lunch avail-
able for purchase.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala is accepting reserva-
tions for its Passover Seder
to take place at 6 p.m. on the
second night of Passover,
Tuesday, March 26, at the
Stone Creek Country Club
and Grill in Ocala. The Seder
will feature a complete meal
with rituals with a liberal, con-
temporary feel. Most of the
Seder will be done in English.
The service will be facilitated
by Judi Siegal and Sonia Pe-
terson with those in atten-
dance as participants. The
cost is $30 for members, $35
for nonmembers and guests.
For reservations and more in-
formation, call Estelle at 352-
861-2542 or Sonia at
352-307-3662 by March 21.
Congregation Beth Israel is a
liberal, inclusive, contempo-
rary congregation affiliated
with the Jewish Reconstruc-
tionist Movement.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women's
annual fashion show, "Fabu-
lous Fashions," is at 11 a.m.
Saturday, April 6, at Citrus
Golf and Country Club. Fash-
ions are from Bealls of Crystal
River. Lunch served for a do-
nation of $20. Entrees are
tilapia almondine, baked
stuffed chicken and London
broil. For tickets, call Joan at
352-563-2271.
The Council of Catholic
Women at Our Lady of Grace
Parish will present its "Show-
ers Bring Flowers" Fashion
Show at noon Thursday, April

See NOTES/Page C5


First United

Methodist


of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor


8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
BPraise & WorshipE


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260


Inverness
V Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10 a.m.
Communion 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


Sidid., Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to Io i' ,, ,l ,', t, .,,


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
W orship... ............. 10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(A The F/alhint, Liiht



PIllor I
Todd >
Langdon



SFirst

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452

LPastor,
Dairold
us g

Bettye
Rushing

















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .comr












VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.

SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 Am. & 10:30 AM.


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 P.M.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.M. to 3:15 P.M. Sat.
or By Appointment

WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
i. .catholicweb.com .A


First aptist

of Lake, foatseam,
SBC
Joseph W. (Joe) Schroeder,
Pastor
SERVICES
Sunday 11:00am
& 6:00pm
Wednesday 6:00pm
Magnifying God's name by
bringing people to Jesus
7854 W. Dunnellon Rd (CR 488)
Ph. 352-795-5651
Cell 352-812-8584
Em ail: 7 ,,, ., ,
Check us out on Facebook









Hwy.44E@
SWashington Ave., Inverness U

S Sunday Services
S Traditional
S8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
S Casual Service
S 9:30 AM
S11:00 AM Service
STapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
Fellowship & Youth Groupm
5to7PM 0
SWeb Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

SChurch Office 637-0770
Pastor Craig Davies
EmI


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all. J

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! !!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

11, in the Parish Life Center, 6 Roo-
sevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills. Belk's
fashions modeled. Also featured is a
"Musical Interlude" by Matter of
Taste, Citrus County Quartet, raffle
prizes, floral money trees, "Share
the Wealth," and luncheon catered
by John Mason. For tickets ($15),
call Char Fontaine at 352-746-9490
before 8 p.m. by April 2. Tickets are
limited to 200. Proceeds go to
needed items for the church and
charitable contributions. Call Candy
Sasser at 352-794-3232.
For Feinstein's 16th Annual
$1 Million Giveaway to Fight
Hunger, Alan Shawn Feinstein will
add money to donations given to the
Beverly Hills Community Church's
Food Pantry. Donations must be re-
ceived by April 30, and can include
cash, checks, and/or food items.
The more donations made to the
food pantry, the more Feinstein
money will be added to the donation.
Ladies, come to "The Well" for
refreshment and prophetic prayer
ministry at 7 p.m. the first Friday
monthly at FresHope Ministries,


RELIGION


2991 E. Thomas St., Inverness. If
you are hurting, need to hear a word
from God, and/or spiritual growth
and strength, then this is the night
just for you. Come comfortable and
come expecting to receive. You will
not leave the same way you came
in. If you desire prayer and can't
come to "The Well," we will schedule
a phone call with you for prayer. Call
352-341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
Sales & such
St. Thomas the Apostle Council
of Catholic Women will have its an-
nual rummage sale from 9:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. Friday on the grounds
of St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic
Church, 7040 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa. Rain date is Friday,
March 22. Space rental are available
for $15. Call 352-503-7172.
Peace Lutheran Church's an-
nual rummage sale is from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 13. Shop-
pers will find many great bargains.
To donate items to the sale, call
Thelma Grams at 352-465-3877.
The church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41,
five miles north of downtown Dun-
nellon. Call the church office at 352-
489-5881 or visit
www.PeaceLutheranOnline.com.


Helping Hands Thrift Store, a
ministry of Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church, is open from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through
Saturday at 604 U.S. 41 S. Pro-
ceeds fund the food pantry. The
store accepts donations of house-
hold items, clothing and small appli-
ances. Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
Women of all ages are wel-
come to a free "Ladies Tea" at
11 a.m. today at Calvary Chapel,
960 S. U.S. 41, Inverness. Come
dressed in green and enjoy great
food and fun. Call 352-726-1480.
Come and enjoy a St.
Patrick's Day dinner from 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. Friday at Parsons Memo-
rial Presbyterian Church on River-
side Dr in Yankeetown. Takeouts
are available at 352-447-2506.
Meals consist of corned beef, cab-
bage, potatoes, carrots, dessert and
Irish soda bread all for $6.50.There
will be a drawing for a $50 money
tree. Tickets for the drawing are $1
each or six for $5.
The Kitchen Committee of First
Baptist Church of Floral City will host
a "Spring Banquet," at 6 p.m. Fri-
day. The fun-filled evening includes
dinner and entertainment. Hand-


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 C5


made crafts and baked goods will be
available for purchase. There will be
an auction of a quilt made by the
ladies from FBC. Cost is $10 per
person with the proceeds going to
the Kitchen Remodeling Fund. For
more information or to purchase tick-
ets, call the church office at 352-
7264296 or visit
www.fbcfloralcity.org.
The third Saturday supper is
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 16, in the Dewain Farris fel-
lowship hall at the Community Con-
gregational Christian Church, 9220
N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Menu in-
cludes corned beef and cabbage,
pie, coffee and tea. Cost is $10 for
adults and $5 for children. Tickets
can be purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church at
352-489-1260.
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Knights of Columbus Council 6168
will host their "Spring Fling Lunch-
eon" from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
day, March 19, at the Knights of
Columbus Hall, 2389 W. Norvell
Bryant Highway, Lecanto. Doors
open at 10:30 a.m. The event in-
cludes tricky tray baskets, money
trees, raffles and door prizes. Bring
a baby item or a monetary donation
for the Pregnancy and Family Life


Center and receive a free door prize
ticket. Tickets ($15 each) include
the lunch buffet catered by John
Mason, coffee, dessert and door
prizes. For information and/or tick-
ets, call Char Fontaine at 352-746-
9490, Pat Louque at 352-746-7563
or Peggy Goss at 352-746-7942.
Net proceeds are donated to local
nonprofit organizations and a schol-
arship fund to a Citrus County high
school graduate. Tickets are limited
to 160.
St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church, on the corner of U.S. 41
and State Road 40 East in Dunnel-
Ion, hosts its fish fry from 4 to 6
p.m. Friday during lent through
March 22, in the church pavilion.
Cost is $7 for adults and $3.50 for
children. The fish fry is open to the
public.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers have re-
sumed from 4 to 6 p.m. the third Fri-
day monthly through May 17 in the
Jack Steele Hall at 86 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills. A donation of $8 per
person or two tickets for $15 in-
cludes all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce, Italian
bread, dessert and coffee or tea.
Come and enjoy a delicious meal.
Tickets are available at the door.


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

people came to church
that Easter, although since
then two of the five have.)
I thought of the pastor's
five names thing recently
when he mentioned a most
improbable convert to
Christianity. Her name is
Rosario Champagne But-
terfield, a pastor's wife in
Durham, N.C. In her re-
cent book, "The Secret
Thoughts of an Unlikely
Convert," she describes
her life before Jesus: uni-
versity professor of Eng-
lish and women's studies,
fervent feminist, radical
atheist, leftist student of
Freud, Hegel, Marx and
Darwin, in a long-term les-
bian relationship, active in
GLBT causes.
She viewed herself as
principled and caring,
compassionate and moral.
She and her partner were
active in AIDS causes,
children's health and liter-
acy and Golden Retriever
rescue.
She was perfectly con-
tent with her "happy,
meaningful and full" life
and didn't want to change
anything.
She said her under-
standing of Christianity
was from her own encoun-
ters with angry Christians
holding signs, mocking her
"butch" haircut at Gay
Pride marches.
"I despised Christians,"
she wrote. "Those who
professed the name of
Jesus commanded my pity
and wrath."
In 1997, she wrote an ar-
ticle in her local Syracuse,
N.Y, newspaper attacking
the "unholy trinity of
Jesus, Republican politics
and patriarchy" She re-
ceived a ton of mail fan
mail and hate mail.
One letter, however, was
neither It was from a local
Reformed Presbyterian
pastor, Ken Smith, who
neither preached at her
nor condemned her. In-
stead, Smith encouraged
her to explore the kinds of
questions she admired -
"How did you arrive at
your interpretations?
How do you know you're
right? Do you believe in
God?"
Smith and his wife in-
vited Butterfield to dinner
and met her friends. They
talked openly about books
and politics and sexuality
"They did not act as if
such conversations were
polluting them," she wrote,
although she knew they
disagreed with her Also, to
her surprise and relief, the
Smiths didn't invite her to
church. She didn't feel like
their fix-it project, which
made her feel safe to be
their friend.
She started reading the
Bible "the way a glutton
devours," she wrote.
Although she couldn't
get enough of it, she also
didn't like what it said -
she didn't want God mess-
ing up her life.
"I counted the cost of
following Jesus, and I did
not like the math on the
other side of the equal
sign," she wrote.
And yet, the beauty of
Jesus and the promise of a
life much richer and fuller
- even though much,
much different- from the
one she had been living
was irresistible. The irre-


sistible grace of God even-
tually won her over
As a result, she lost her
lifestyle, her worldview,
her lesbian partner. Yet,
she wrote, she gained so
much more.
Butterfield was an un-
likely convert, but aren't
we all? No one is born lov-
ing Jesus, and it's human
nature to fight against him
- some seem to fight
harder and more out-
wardly than others.
Even so, if nothing is im-
possible with God and
with him all things are
possible (Mark 10:27), then
no person is beyond saving
and no situation is beyond
redeeming, whether it's
changing a person's heart,
drawing people to church
on Easter or any other
Sunday morning or raising
the dead.
"I am the Lord, the God
of all mankind," God told
the prophet Jeremiah. "Is
anything too hard for me?"
(Jeremiah 32:27).
Well, is there?
If you think so, then you
don't know God.

Nancy Kennedy is the
author of "Move Over,
Victoria -I Know the
Real Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy@
chronicleonline. com.


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
, -, I,.h i-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
-.PJl Home of the
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!




"First ForChrist"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study

344-1908


Vendors Wanted


Outdoor Adventure Expo


Saturday, April 13th 10am-Spm


A One Day Event at The Crystal River Mall that
will feature Retailers, Demonstrations,
Seminars and Speakers.

I Indoor and Outdoor Spaces are Available.


Fishing, Camping, Boating,
RV, Patio, AIV, Gardening,
Swimming, Snorkeling,
Cycling, Parks and
Recreation, Tennis, Golf,
Travel, Scuba Diving,
Skateboarding, Motor
Sports and other Outdoor
Activity Organizations
and Retailers will
be Exhibiting.


Call to Reserve Your Space
352-563-5592
Deadline to join March 25th


-A LLwwwchroncleonlnecom


NORTHRIDGE
CHURCH




"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Bible Study
(Fellowship 6:30-7:00pm)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the corner ofSR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813 4

47 Years of
I RST Bringing Christ
to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 AM.
726-1637
Missouri Synod
s www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer 2
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


INVERNESS
CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service...........8:30 A
Sunday School.................9:30
Contemporary Service.. .10:30
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes................. 7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 PM
Teens.............................. 7:00 PM
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"


Our Lady of

Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy, 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
r Weekday Mass: 8 A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
\ 9:00 and 11:00A.M. /
726-1670



Special event

or weekly

services

Please call

Beverly at

564-2912

for

advertising

information


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033

SPRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM -Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM- Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
Les Eperamos!
David Pihero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!" "

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS












COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Ne NOTESSpaghetti with Shriners
Seminar focuses


on good health
If you could learn how to
add 10 years to your life,
would you do it?
Homosassa Seventh-
day Adventist Church will
offer a healthy eating and
lifestyle seminar at 7 p.m.
each Monday in March, at
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Everyone is welcome to
attend the free sessions to
hear presenters talk about
eight secrets to good
health. People who follow
the lifestyle typically stick to
a vegetarian diet based on
fruits, vegetables, beans
and nuts and get plenty of
exercise. They are also
focused on family and com-
munity.
The next meeting will be
March 11. For more infor-
mation, call 352-628-7950.
Genealogical
group to gather
The Citrus County Ge-
nealogical Society will meet
at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March
12, at at the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, 3474 W. Southern
St., Lecanto.
Guest speaker, Jack
Butler, a professional ge-
nealogist, will talk about
"Organizing Your Geneal-
ogy in the Computer Age."
The lecture addresses the
how and why of using mod-
ern genealogy software to
organize and track re-
search and the results of
that research, and also
deals with using a com-
puter to organize and man-
age the mass of records
and other artifacts we all
tend to collect as a result of
research.
Guests are welcome.
For information, call Mary
Ann Machonkin at 352-
382-5515 or go to www.
citrusgenealogy.com.
Lions Club to
serve pancakes
The Beverly Hills Lions
Club, 72 Civic Circle Drive,
will serve its pancake
breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m.
Sunday, March 10.
Cost for adults is $4; chil-
dren younger than 12 eat
for $2. On the menu are all-
you-can-eat pancakes,
choice of bacon or sausage
or combo, orange juice and
coffee or tea.
For information, call Lion
Shirley at 352-527-1943.

Humanitarians
OF FLORIDA

Zelda


Special to the Chronicle
Sweet young Zelda is
only 1 year old and al-
ready knows how to wear
a black and white
tuxedo. This friendly
young mom is now look-
ing for her own home. All
our adult cat adoption
fees are presently half
price at $27.50. We also
have many more cats
and kittens that need
homes and are all fully
vetted and microchipped.
Visitors are welcome
from 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.
and 2 to 4 p.m. Monday
through Saturday at the
Humanitarians' Man-
chester House on the
corner of State Road 44
and Conant Avenue, east
of Crystal River. Call the
Humanitarians at 352-
613-1629 for adoptions,
or view felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.


Dinner to raise funds to transport sick children to hospital


Special to the Chronicle


The Citrus Shrine Club, in
conjunction with Dean Lovell
Concrete Inc., will sponsor a
"' fundraiser for the transportation of
9 children for treatment at the
Sb Shriners Hospitals for Children.
A spaghetti lunch will be served
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday,
March 16, and will include salad,
rolls and iced tea for a donation
of $7. The event will be at the
Citrus Shrine Club, 468 N.
i Woodlake Ave., Inverness.
4 Members of the Egypt
A s Shrine Center in Tampa have
; I sponsored many children for
decades for treatment and
have provided transportation
for them and their families.
Close to 300 patients have been


transported from Citrus County to the
hospitals for at least one trip since 2008,
and most times additional trips are
needed. An emergency air flight can cost
as much $24,000 for one trip.
Shriners Hospitals for Children in
Tampa is adjacent to the campus of the
University of South Florida, allowing it to
share world-class doctors and provide
unique teaching opportunities. The
hospital focuses on treating children with
a host of orthopedic and neuromusculo-
skeletal conditions. Shriners support and
fund Shriners Hospitals and Burn Centers
across the United States, Canada and
Mexico, where children with special needs
and their families are cared for regardless
of their ability to pay
For tickets or more information about
the spaghetti lunch or the Shriners
Hospitals for Children, call 352-419-7088.
Tickets will be available at the event


Truck rally for Food Bank


Family-friendly eve

Special to the Chronicle
The first Food Truck Rally at Rock
Crusher Canyon to benefit the Com-
munity Food Bank of Citrus County
will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, March
15, at 275 S. Rock Crusher Road,
Crystal River
"Food Trucks for Families" at the
event will include Monsta Lobsta,
Firehouse BBQ, Tastebuds, Nifty
Fifty's Diner Truck, Big Cheese and
Ice Cream Social Club.
The Cool Corporate Cats will per-


form in the pavilion. On display will
be vehicles including new Ram
trucks by Crystal automotive, new
recreational vehicles from Alliance
Coach and vehicles from Touch of
Class Corvette Club and Citrus
County Jeepers.
The public is invited to co ime iind
enjoy tasty treats,
live jazz and vehi-
cle displays, all for
free admission.
A portion of the
proceeds from food


and beverage sales will benefit the
Community Food Bank; donations
will also be accepted.
For more information, call 352-
628-3663 or visit www.community
foodbankofcitruscounty. org.


I I


CMUG slates activities for March


Special to the Chronicle
Citrus Macintosh Users
Group is back to its normal
schedule in March with a
meeting from 7 to 9 p.m.
Friday, March 29, with a
question-and-answer
session at 6:30 p.m.
The demo will be Per-
fect Effects 4 Free by Jo-
hanna Foster, CMUG
magazine editor The club
also hopes to present the


scholarships at this
meeting.
Other club activities for
the month are:
Tuesday, March 12, 1
to 5 p.m. Mac workshop.
Registration with topic to
be covered required.
Email Bill Dean at
bjdean@embarqmail.com.
Thursday, March 14, 1
to 5 p.m. iDevice work-
shop. Registration with
topic to be covered re-


quired. Email Carolyn
Herrin at carolynw
herrin@me.com.
Tuesday, March 26, 1
to 5 p.m. Genealogy
class, Natalie Armitage
and Linda Gasparini.
Thursday, March 28, 1
to 5 p.m. Lab/tune-up.
Registration with topic to
be covered required.
Email John Engberg at mr-
byte@earthlink.net.
Thursday, March 28, 6


to 9 p.m. iPhoto on the
Mac class, Curtis Herrin or
Jack Colson.
Registration is required
for classes. Email Carolyn
Herrin at carolynwher-
rin@me.com. Class fee is
the standard $10 for single,
$15 for family and $20 for
nonmembers.
For more information,
visit cmugonline.com or
call President Alan
Wentzell at 352-302-5864.


NAMI appreciates all types of help


Our next NAMI Citrus meeting who have completed the Mental
will be on Monday, March 11, Health Court program, we know
with doors opening these are dollars well
at 6:30 p.m. at Good Shep- spent
herd Lutheran Church on Speaking of contribut-
State Road 486 in Her- 1 ing, many people have a
nando. Our speaker will be small insurance policy,
Kathy Kinney of the Mental possibly taken out when
Health Court, who will give they were children. Did
us an update on all the you know you can make
good things going on with NAMI Citrus the benefi-
the court. ciary of such policies, or
This is yet another thing even take out a new pol-
we do: provide a monthly icy with the beneficiary
stipend to Kathy to help Marilyn Booth being a nonprofit such
with necessary funds NAMI as NAMI Citrus? Even a
needed by some prospects CITRUS portion of such benefits
for the Mental Health may be designated for
Court program. nonprofits.
Always, budget constraints limit We guarantee such funds will be
what we may do, but after hearing put to very good use for those we
glowing success stories from those serve. And speaking of serving, if


you wish to contribute your time and
service, this is always welcome. Part
of our general meeting time will be
given to suggestions as to ways
prospective members can help this
cause.
Yet another way someone in our
community could be a NAMI con-
tributor: Our treasurer had to resign
due to family matters. If you are a
service-oriented, numbers-oriented
person, call our Warm Line at 352-
341-2273. You just may get the "red
carpet" treatment!
Everyone is welcome at the March
11 meeting. Hope to see you there!

Marilyn Booth is a member
of the Board ofDirectors of
NAMI Citrus, of the National
Alliance on Mental Illness.


Investing in good charities for best effects


We watched "60 Minutes" this ing very wealthy and has limited
past week and my heart was choices as to where to invest money
saddened and awestruck to As is the rule of supply and demand,
watch about how China they keep buying apart-
has built millions of ments so that their invest-
apartments. ments keep rising; there
I'm sure in the begin- must be a shortage of
ning there were grand apartments to buy if the
thoughts of building up H prices keep going up.
the country for the popu- This should not be con-
lation explosion that it is fused with a housing bub-
famous for The segment ble like the one in
made it clear right up America where mortgages
front that most of these were sold to people who
buildings were empty. DuWayne Sipper could not afford their pay-
The problem? The peo- THE PATH ments. But a bubble it is. It
ple who need them can- HOME should make all of us
not afford them. think that affordable
The country has kept housing that is not really
building the apartments to keep mil- affordable is a disaster It does not
lions of workers employed. The matter where the income level of
money engine appears to be the any country is, the level of where the
middle class, which has or is becom- poor can afford housing is what it is.


After many years of working for a
nonprofit corporation, I can tell you
I think it is one of the most merciful
inventions that man has ever come
up with. This vehicle of providing a
solution to those who most need it is
truly a God-breathed idea. Not only
should a charity that truly meets
needs be defended, it needs to be
strengthened.
This concept puts us ahead as a
Godly nation that gives private in-
vestors a way to put money to work,
by choosing charities to perform
services that touch their hearts. God
bless America!

DuWayne Sipper is the executive
director of The Path of Citrus
County, a faith-based homeless
shelter. Call him at 352-
527-6500 or email sipperd
@bellsouth.net.


News NOTES

Sew-Ciety to
gather March 11
The Florida Sewing
Sew-Ciety will meet at
9 a.m. Monday, March 11,
at the Citrus County Can-
ning Facility, 3405 W
Southern St., Lecanto.
The program for the
meeting will be "Wrapped
Cord Placemats," an easy
and versatile technique with
many applications. All
sewing enthusiast are wel-
come to attend.
For more information,
call Jan at 352-746-5380 or
Dee at 352-527-8229.
Calligraphers
meet March 14
The Creative Calligra-
phers of Citrus Springs will
meet Thursday, March 14,
at the Citrus Springs Me-
morial Library, 1826 W.
Country Club Blvd. in Citrus
Springs.
At 12:30 p.m., there will
be a practice session for
members to work on the
lower case letters in the
Gothic hand. This will be
followed at 1 p.m. by a brief
business meeting. Mem-
bers will show the work
they have been doing dur-
ing the past month. There
will be some St. Patrick's
Day and Easter themes for
the library showcases.
New members are al-
ways welcome. For this
particular meeting, Barbara
Fife will offer a program on
adding a border to embel-
lish work. For more infor-
mation, call the library at
352-489-2313.
Learn to write
your memoirs
There's still time to regis-
ter for the Writing Your
Memoirs workshop at the
Scrap and Stamp Art Stu-
dio, 587 Gulf-to-Lake High-
way, Lecanto, from
10:30 a.m. to noon Tues-
day, March 12.
Claudine Dervaes, au-
thor-publisher of 16 books
and writer of the Travel Talk
in 26 newspapers, will pres-
ent the seminar. If you're
thinking about your legacy
and want to make some
sense of your existence, a
memoir provides the value
and opportunity. Cost is
$15 and includes handouts.
For registration and infor-
mation call Dervaes at 352-
726-5026 or Vicki at
352-637-4200.
C.R. Garden Club
to meet March 11
The Garden Club of
Crystal River will meet at
1 p.m. Monday, March 11 at
the Crystal River Preserve
on State Park Road.
Speaker will be Steven
Davis, who is the Florida
Yards & Neighborhood co-
ordinator in landscaping
conservation with the Citrus
County Extension Service.
All meetings are open to
the public. A business
meeting will take place after
the program. For more in-
formation, call club Presi-
dent Libby Wentzell at
352-257-1211.
NARFE convenes
in Inverness
Chapter 776 of the
National Active and Retired
Federal Employees Associ-
ation (NARFE) invites all
active and retired employ-
ees and surviving annui-
tants to attend the next
meeting on Monday,
March 11.
The meeting will be at
the Kracker Shack Cafe,
1314 U.S. 41 North, Inver-
ness. Guest speaker will be
Dustin Green, Citrus
County Fire Rescue fire in-
spector. The presentation
will be on residential fire
safety. The meeting will
start at 1 p.m., with a short
lunch prior to the meeting.


For more information,
call 352-270-0185.


* Submit information at least two weeks before the
event.
* Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


ent will featureplenty offood,fiun, music





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING MARCH 9, 2013 C: Conmast, Citrus B: Bright House D1i: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B D/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 I 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 10:00110:30 11:00o 11:30
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West
SA 10 8 7 4
V Q 9 8
* 32
* Q 10 3


South
1 NT
2 NT


North
4 632
V K J
+ A Q 10 8 5
* A 8 7


03-09-13


East
4 Q 9
V 10 5 4 3 2
* K 7 4
* 6 5 4


East
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: % 7

Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Soren Kierkegaard said, "I see it all perfectly;
there are two possible situations one can ei-
ther do this or that. My honest opinion and my
friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it you
will regret both."
How depressing if true. At the bridge table,
when you are faced with two choices, you have
to pick one of them or the game will grind to an
unexpected stop! And often one choice will be
successful.
In this deal, South is in three no-trump. West
leads a fourth-highest spade seven and East
puts up the queen. Declarer has two choices -
win trick one or duck it. Which should he select?
West's one-spade overcall would not meet
with universal approval, but it is almost de
rigueur among tournament players these days.
Get into the opponents' auction, especially if you
can bid spades. Then, they must go up one level
to outbid you in a suit.
South starts with six top tricks: one spade
(given the opening lead), two hearts, one dia-
mond and two clubs. The extra tricks can be ob-
tained from the diamond suit And if that finesse
is winning, declarer will win at least one over-
trick. But what if the finesse is losing?
Then East might return a spade through
South's holding, and West might cash four tricks
in the suit. To try to stop that from happening,
declarer should duck the first trick; let East take
it.
East will return his second spade, but when
he regains the lead with the diamond king, he
will not have a spade left. Or, if he did, spades
must be 4-3 and South would lose only three
spades and one diamond.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SSHOT

1-T..I. ri- Services, Inc

SYENDE



PAI CEE



YESQUA


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
We can't run this Jumble!
Get me a replacement.
-F'You're going to need to do
better than this or else!












,OOV ,NOUGHTHEY MIGHT
.--

-- ..""






&FT --- (NOT REALLY.)
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: m
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PRIOR OFTEN WALNUT ACCESS
Answer: Death Valley is so hot thanks in part to its -
"LOW-CATION"


ACROSS
1 Crossword
diagram
5 Thai temple
8 Hew
12 Veil
13 Freud, to
himself
14 Not rosy
15 She, in Seville
16 Recent arrival
18 Justice Kagan
20 Frat letter
21 "The
Simpsons"
bartender
22 Joined genes
25 Famous Khan
28 Mild expletive
29 Flat floater
33 Array
35 Vermont tree
36 Overwhelm
37 More recent
38 Quite a few
39 Superman's
girl
41 "Play it
again, -"


42 Kind of derby
45 1040 expert
48 Oz. or lb.
49 Lowest ebb
53 Dairy cow
56 Roman
historian
57 Golden rule
word
58 Currently
59 bien,
monsieur!
60 Cat cry
61 Explosive
letters
62 Cajun veggie

DOWN
1 Clarified
butter
2 Little creek
3 Inactive
4 Faculty heads
5 Victory
6 Acid in
vinegar
7 Sharp blow
8 Navy noncom


Answer to Previous Puzzle


9 Miva -
of soccer
10 Butter
substitute
11 French father
17 Prompt
19 Orchard pest


23za aesars law
24 "Phooey!"
25 Kind of radio
26 Big party
27 Nefertiti's god
30 2BR units
31 Leaping
insect
32 Technical
word
34 Clark and
Orbison
35 Brick worker
37 Ad (wing it)
39 Dirge
40 Alternative
43 Grain morsel
44 Knife brand
(hyph.)
45 Sidekick
46 Corn bread
47 Low voice
50 Nightfall
51 Centurion's
highway
52 Sub -
(secretly)
54 Boar's mate
55 Yukon
neighbor:
Abbr.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: As a geria-
trician, I know how
thrilled patients are
when they are released from
the hospital and how upset-
ting it is to be readmitted a few
weeks, or even just days, later.
One in five older
patients is readmit-
ted to the hospital
within 30 days of P-
leaving it. Each
year, these repeat
hospital visits add
billions of dollars to
national health
care costs. Fortu-
nately, there are
things people can
do.
Patients and
their family mem- ANN
bers should ques- MAIL
tion their doctors,
nurses and phar-
macists about anything they
don't understand. If questions
aren't answered, miscommu-
nication or misunderstand-
ings can lead to complications.
Patients should repeat the in-
structions back to their doc-
tors and nurses. That
demonstrates whether or not
they understand what to do.
Most important, patients
should leave the hospital with
a written plan that includes
information on how to take
care of their condition, when
their follow-up visits will be,
what medications to take and
complications to watch for.
We've put together a patient
checklist and care transition
plan that anyone can down-
load at www.CareAboutYour-
Care.org. Thank you for
sharing this information and
for helping people stay well. -
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD,
President and CEO, Robert
Wood Johnson Fobundation


Dear Dr. Lavizzo-Mourey:
Thank you so much for shar-
ing this practical and worth-
while information with our
readers. Everyone going to the
hospital should take this in-
formation with them. Please
make sure that you,
a family member or
a friend has all of
the information be-
fore you are dis-
charged. It could
keep you from a re-
turn visit.
Dear Annie: My
brother just got en-
gaged. He and his
girlfriend have two
kids. Usually, this is
a happy time for
IE'S families, but eight
.BOX months ago, my
brother's fiancee
cheated on him. We
weren't sure the younger child
was my brother's, but he took a
DNA test that proved she is his
little girl.
At that time, my brother de-
cided to keep his family to-
gether and work things out,
which I greatly admire. But we
just found out that his fiancee
is talking, mailing and texting
the guy she cheated with. My
brother still wants the wed-
ding to go on and would like
the rest of us to mind our own
business.
Annie, I really think this is a
bad decision for my brother. I
worry his girlfriend will con-
tinue to cheat and hurt my
brother over and over Do I say
something, or keep my mouth
shut and plaster on a fake
smile? Love My Brother
Dear Love Your Brother:
Say nothing more. Your
brother knows how you feel,
and he has asked you to accept
his decision. He understands


the consequences. We think he
would greatly appreciate your
support right now, and we
hope you can plaster on that
smile and provide it.
Dear Annie: This is for all
those retirees who don't know
what to do with themselves.
A year ago, my health forced
me into an early retirement.
All of my co-workers and most
of my friends lived far from my
home. During my first week
off, I heard of a yoga class at
the local senior center. As a
baby boomer, I thought I was
too young to go to a "senior"
center. But that one class has
led to a group of retired edu-
cators, like me, who go bicy-
cling twice a week in good
weather and meet for lunch in
the cold season.
I volunteer at the senior
center, take painting classes at
a local art center and meet lots
of retired folks with similar in-
terests. I have made some
good friends, found a great
traveling companion and have
a lot of fun.
Please point early retirees
to senior centers. Remember
that you need to go some-
where at least half a dozen
times before you begin to feel
at home. Retired and Busy
-

Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to an-
niesmailbox@comcast net, or
write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox visit the
Creators Syndicate Web page
at www.creators. com.


South
4 K J 5
V A 7 6
J96
K J 9 2
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
West North
14 2*
Pass 3 NT


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


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AL I G E E K I IS I
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ENTERTAINMENT


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 C7


41






CS SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013

Peanuts





-'. ., 6 p/PAM FLUTTER
SLuTTER'WAAA liMP

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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Garfield


-~-~


I HOPE MY IN3OuRANCE
COVERS THIS
50RT OF THING..


Pickles


Sally Forth


Dilbert

I AM MORDAC, THE
PREVENTER OF INFOR-
MATION SERVICES, AND
I FORBID YOU FROM
USING THE SHARED
COLOR PRINTER FOR
ROUGH DRAFTS!


For Better or For Worse -

LE HaFWveTo START SHe-USESTOo MUCH
CoK -CTN& LEZZIE By LRNGURGE.SME'
RONUNCITON. OLD eNOUGH-TO SPERK
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Beetle Bailey

COSMO'V E VE GIVEN YOUR
ADVICE PROBLEM A LOT
CORNER OF THOUGHT


The Grizzwells


The Born Loser


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


Blondie
WHAD'VA THINK A5OUT SKIPPING
--SATURDAY DELIVERIES?'-

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AFFECT OUR FOOT-
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Big Nate

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W1,EL, AS YOU KIDS LIKE
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"You're in luck. We have one seat left.
Oh, right. ... Never mind."


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ANY PLAYERS WX6 PLEA5
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"Daddy's all better he's dressed
in REAL CLOTHES!"


"SET WrOUR CLOCK AREA 1ONIGMT, AmNP IALL
COME OVER AN HOUR EARLIER TOMORROW."


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Frank & Ernest


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Today ysMOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 12:30 p.m.,
3:40 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 9:40 p.m. No passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:10 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.
No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.,
10:10 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 7 p.m., 10:15 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"Dead Man Down" (R) 2 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,
7:50 p.m., 10:35 p.m.


"Oz: The Great and Powerful" (PG) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m., 10 p.m. No passes.
"Oz: The Great and Powerful" In 3D. (PG)
1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. No
passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:55 p.m., 10:15 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II" (PG-13) 8 p.m.,
10:20 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:40
p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:55 p.m. No passes.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:15 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:20 p.m., 9:45 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:40 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M slenba d


"KZYBY NBYW'K JNWO KZMWUI KZNK


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Previous Solution: "My music had roots which I'd dug up from my own child-
hood, musical roots buried in the darkest soil." Ray Charles
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-9


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COMICS






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion BRIEFS


Judge rules Mo. library
violated First Amendment
ST. LOUIS -A federal judge has or-
dered a small library in southern Missouri
to stop blocking access to websites re-
lated to Wicca and other minority reli-
gions, calling it a violation of patrons'
First Amendment rights.
U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber
issued the ruling Tuesday in St. Louis in
a case involving the Salem Public
Library.
"Even libraries that are required by
federal law to install filtering software to
block certain sexually explicit content
should never use software to prevent pa-
trons from learning about different cul-
tures," Tony Rothert, an attorney for the
American Civil Liberties Union of Eastern
Missouri, said in a statement
Wednesday.
Library director Glenda Wofford de-
clined comment. A message seeking
comment from the library's attorney was
not immediately returned.
The ACLU sued last year on behalf of
Salem resident Anaka Hunter. Salem is a
largely Christian community of 5,000 res-
idents in the Missouri Ozarks.

Iraq's Chaldean Church
enthrones new patriarch
BAGHDAD Iraq's Chaldean
Catholic Church enthroned a new patri-
arch during a ceremonial mass held
under tight security in Baghdad.
The Wednesday mass at St. Joseph's


Chaldean church in downtown Baghdad
marked the final step as Louis Sako, 64,
replaced Emmanuel III Delly, who has
retired.
Iraqi troops sealed off all roads leading
to the church in the middle-class neigh-
borhood of Karradah and worshippers
were searched by security forces before
going in.
Last month, bishops of the Eastern rite
church chose Sako, archbishop of Kirkuk
since 2003, as their patriarch and later,
Pope Benedict XVI approved the
election.
Sako was ordained in 1974, earned
two doctorates in Rome and Paris in the
1980s and then returned to Iraq. He has
written books on church fathers. He
speaks Arabic, Chaldean, French, Eng-
lish and Italian.
Since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, Iraqi
Christians have suffered repeated vio-
lence by Islamic militants and hundreds
of thousands have fled the country.

UN aid agency cancels
Gaza marathon
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip The United
Nations canceled a planned marathon in
Gaza after the Palestinian territory's
Hamas rulers banned women from par-
ticipating, in a new attempt by the Islamic
militant group to impose its ideology in-
side the crowded coastal strip.
The dispute threatened to further
strain the already delicate relationship
between Hamas and the United Nations.
Gaza sportswomen met the news with


resignation, saying their cor
city had made it difficult to
before the ban.
Since seizing power in Ga
Hamas has issued a number
meant to constrain the freed
women. But a number of the
fizzled in the face of public o
making the ban on female rL
somewhat surprising. Hama
recently relaxed some of its
ders imposing its conservati
tion of Islamic law.
The race was meant to ru
length of the tiny territory -
slightly shorter than the office
a 26.2 mile marathon. Some
registered, including 266 Pa
women and 119 women froi

Museum returns
to estate of col
BERLIN -A Stuttgart mi
returned a 600-year-old pail
estate of Jewish art dealer
who was forced to sell his c
fore fleeing Nazi Germany.
The oil painting "The Virg
attributed to the Master of F
unidentified Flemish artist fr
1400s was turned over b
lerie Stuttgart at a ceremony
the Canadian Embassy in B
Stern closed his gallery in
pressure from the Nazis and
paintings before fleeing Ger
settling in Montreal.


iservative so-
train even

aza in 2007,
3r of edicts
loms of
ese initiatives
opposition,
runners
is had also
;rirnr


Cardinals set



Tuesday for



start of conclave


Associated Press


,,anier Io- VATICAN CITY Car-
ve interpreta- dinals have set Tuesday
as the start date for the
in the entire conclave to elect the next
which is pope, a milestone in this
:ial length of unusual papal transition
e 800 people and an indication that
ilestinian even without an obvious
n abroad. front-runner, the cardi-

painting nals have a fairly good
idea of who best among
Hector them can lead the
museum has Catholic Church and
nting to the tackle its many problems.
Max Stern, The conclave date was
collection be- set on Friday afternoon
during a vote by the Col-
in with Child," lege of Cardinals who
lemaile an have been meeting all
Sthe early week to discuss the
om the early church's problems and
y Staatsga- priorities and the qualities
y Tuesday at a new pope must possess.
erlin. Tuesday will begin with
11937 under a morning Mass in St.
d sold its Peter's Basilica, followed
many and re- by a solemn procession
into the Sistine Chapel
From wire reports and the first round of se-


cret balloting in the
afternoon.
Only one vote is held
the first afternoon. If
black smoke is sent
snaking out of the chapel
chimney to indicate there
is no immediate victor,
the cardinals will retire
for the day They will re-
turn Wednesday for two
rounds of balloting in the
morning, two rounds in
the afternoon until a
pope has been chosen.
In the past 100 years, no
conclave has lasted
longer than five days.
That said, there doesn't
appear to be a front-run-
ner in this election for a
successor to the retired
Benedict XVI, and the
past week of delibera-
tions has exposed sharp
divisions among cardi-
nals about some of the
pressing problems facing
the church, including of
governance within the
Holy See itself.


To place an ad, call 563-5966


Classifieds


In Print


and


Online


All


The Time


Fa:(5)56-65 1TllFe:(88.5-301 E al:-lasfedI@-huicloninh c mI w bie w hroi h lie~o


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
3 WHEEL BIKE
HDCP Person needs
adult bike for phy
therapy. Must be road
worthy. (352) 527-9897
16 ft. Black Wrought
Iron Entrance Gate,
w/ running horse and
horse shoes, Beautiful
paid $3,200 Asking
$1,300. (352) 422-5462
70 INCH BIG SCREEN
TV JVC HD-P700R1U
with 2 HDMI, 2 HD com-
ponent, 3 analog, and 1
PC inputs. Accepts a
Cable Card for receiving
Cable TV without a
"cable box". Good
Condition! $390. Call
(352)746-2778 before
8pm please.
AUTO
DETAILERS &
MANAGERS

Homosassa Sprgs
& Brooksville
dealerships
Call 727-808-0341


EXPERIENCED
Personal Lines
CSR
CITRUS COUNTY'S
OLDEST & LARGEST
Ins. Agency is looking
for Exp.Licensed CSR
to join our staff. We
provide excellent
office environment,
Health Ins. &401K.
Send Resume To:
droberts@thehagar
group.com
HONDA
2005 Element, AWD,
good cond, khaki
colored, $6500 (352)
344-1442 or 344-1441
INGLIS
Sat& Sun 10am
NO EARLY BIRDS
Antiques, Collect-
ibles and more!
18134 SE Hwy 19, 2V2
miles past traffic lite


INVERNESS
Boy Scout
Family Sale
10 Families
1 location, Furniture,
TV, Tools, Kids Stuff
180 S. Pine Ave
Behind Walgreens

INVERNESS
Saturday 3/9, 10am
LOTS OF
GREAT STUFF *
7686 E. SHORE DRIVE


INVERNESS
1 BR., Pool & Laundry.
(352) 637-1805
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
Kitchen Set
Table & 4 padded
chairs on rollers,
swivels, leaf,
mint condition $295
(352) 637-1701
Lecanto 21212
immaculate, $750+
1 mo. security
352-447-2031
LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033
Necchi Heavy Duty
Sewing Maching
model 3205FA
all metal parts
$70.
(352) 341-7741
TELESCOPE Celestron
14" Schmidt Cassegrain
with CGE series mount,
tripod and post. Serious
scientific instrument.
Over $7K new. Asking
$5K. 352-726-7898
TITAN PISTOL
25 cal, semi auto 8 shot
3", NEW, $250, call
John 352-637-0987



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389


OOOE4CF
Sudoku ****** 4puz.com

4 9 1


1 897 3


5 1


3 8


6 4


4 5


8 _6

9 712 8


6 3 1

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.

All of our
structures
withstand
Installations b BrianB 253853 ish

'm-4f S %"<4. 352-628-7519


' FREE.T J
Permit And ill
I Engineering Fees
SUp to $200 value -

*Siding *Soffit *Fascia *Skirting *Roofovers *Carports Screen Rooms *Decks* Windows Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



Cement Blocks
& Concret Rubble
352-476-1023



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



Bracelet Lost
Applebees
Crystal River
REWARD
(352) 563-5527
Female Chihuahua
red short-hair Brindel &
Female Gray Cat (cat is
sick & needs her
medicine) lost in the
vicinity ofColumbus St.
Beverly Hills, pis call
352-422-7578
Lost Diamond Tennis
Bracelet
Dunnellon,
Near Beall's Outlet
or Winn Dixie
REWARD!
(352) 533-3147


Min Pin/ Terrier Mix 30
lbs black, tan, white
stripe on neck. Last
seen 02/28/13 wearing
black collar. Comes to
the name Fogel. His
family misses him VERY
MUCH!! Contact Allegra
352-586-1808
*REWARD*
Pekingese mix, All BIk
with hot pink tail, 17
lbs. Lost 3/7 in down-
town Inverness area
REWARD 352-476-3134
Very Old Walker/Beagle
Mix Hound near Turner
Camp Rd. walks with
a limp and needs
medication, has
micro chip, pls call
352-726-4678 or
352-476-3410



BOXER MIX
Hernando area
near 486
Call to Identify
352-560-7335
Bracelet Found
in front of Winn-Dixie
Saturday Morning
Will the gentlemen
that already con-
tacted the Marion
Co. Sherif Dept.
regarding the lost
bracelet please call.
(979) 583-6336
Found Lab/Pitt Mix
Female, Mini Farms,
Zaval Street
352-563-1206
352-875-9918


AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100,00011 Call Pat
**(813) 230-7177"*

Free Safe Boating
Class. US Power
Squadron 3/16/2013
at the Homosassa
Wildlife Park 9:00-5:30.
Just the cost of mate-
rials and lunch. Call
Tom (352) 382-2806




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077










Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
On ly$28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966







khris I




Christ Medical
Center is now
hiring various
positions.

Immediate need for:
Radiology Recpt,
DME Recpt. with
billing exp. and
Physical Therapy
Recpt. Also looking
for Medical Asst.
Those with med. office
exp. encouraged to
apply. Send all
inquires and resumes
to HR@cmc-fl.com.

Citrus Podiatry
Center, PA
Medical
Receptionist:
Part-time M, TU, W
8:30-5pm.
Two office locations.
$10.50/hr. Vacation,
holiday & uniform
benefits. Minimum
of 2 years exp. in
a medical office
setting.
Send Resume to:
P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120
No phone calls or
faxes accepted/
no exceptions.


DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST
For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
yahoo.com


FIT DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Dental Exp. a must!!
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry

Medical Careers
begin here
Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV certi-
fied. Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com




440 Licensed
Insurance Agent
apply in person:
Nature Coast
Insurance Agency
Crystal River

AIRLINE CAREERS

- Become an Aviation
Maintenance Tech. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. Job
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
(866)314-3769

AIRLINE CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
(866)314-3769

EXPERIENCED
Personal Lines
CSR
CITRUS COUNTY'S
OLDEST & LARGEST
Ins. Agency is looking
for Exp.Licensed CSR
to join our staff. We
provide excellent
office environment,
Health Ins. & 401K.
Send Resume To:
droberts@thehagar
group.com




Cook & Servers

Experienced only apply
in person at Olive Tree
Rest. No Calls
963 N. Suncoast Blvd,
Crystal River


Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced
P/T Servers
- Cooks
0, Bartender
* Hostess &
0 Dish Washer
Call 352-746-6727
Tue. Sat. 2p -4:30p
For Application
Appointment




Licensed
Customer
Service Rep.

For well established
local insurance
agency. We are in
need of a Licensed
(220 or 440)
Customer Service
Rep (preferred)
Sales Oriented
be motivated and a
self starter, detailed
in your work and an
excellent appt. setter.
FT position
Send Resume to:
rbrice@brice-
agency.com

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River
SALES
Good Benefits,
401 K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace




AUTO
DETAILERS &
MANAGERS

Homosassa Sprgs
& Brooksville
dealerships
Call 727-808-0341

Driver

$0.01 increase per
mile after 6 months and
12 months. $0.03
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or weekly pay.
CDL-A, 3 months
current experience
(800)414-9569
www.d rivekniaht.com
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
FIT CARPENTER
All Phases of
Construction-Kit/Bath
Renovation Exp. Req.
Valid D.L. Req.
Background Checks
637-4629


479315628|
6 124897753

3 5 6 7 9 1 8 41
356791842
821654937
794832165
183547296
967123584
245968371


MANATEE
TOUR
CAPTAIN
NEEDED
F/T, 25 Ton Master
727-459- 4991
RV TECHNICIAN
Need a certified &
experienced RV techni-
cian. Apply in person
2524 Hwy 44
W Inverness only.
STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resumel801 @yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls



EXP'D LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Crystal River, F/T No
record. Must have
trans. & valid DL.
(352) 220-2374

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
1 morning delivery of 1
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
Other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
I day. I
Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
* SUV, or pick up
I with a cap Large I
enough to hold our I
Sunday product
Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
arn 5pmr
Newspaper
I carriers are I
S independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


L-_M-- E


CHRONICLE

PART TIME
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP

*Are you a customer
service champion?
* Have exceptional
computer skills
Including Excel. &
MS Word
* Organized &
detailed oriented?
* Enjoy a fast paced
challenging work
environment?
*Avail. weekdays
& weekends?
Join the Citrus
County Chronicle's
Circulation team!
Send Resume to:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com
CITRUS COUNTY
CHRONICLE
1624 N. Meadowcrest
Blvd. Crystal River,
FL 34429
EOE, drug screening
for final applicant





SINGLE COPY
ROUTES
AVAILABLE
This is a great
opportunity to own
your own business.
Unlimited potential
for the right person
to manage a route
of newspaper racks
and stores.
come to
1624 Meadowcrest
Blvd. and fill out an
application.





SITE UTILITY
CONTRACTOR

Hiring experienced
employees, for all
underground utility
trades. Valid driver
license preferred.
Competitive pay,
Excellent benefits in-
cluding medical,
dental, vision & 401K
EOE/Drug free
workplace.
applications
avaialble
Ridgeview Apts
880 SE 8th Avenue
Crystal River


Classifieds,


RELIGION


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 C9







CIO SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


Experienced
AC Installers

Own Tools & Truck,
TOP PAY, Call Dave
(352) 794-6129

INVERNESS
DOMINO'S PIZZA

NOW HIRING
DRIVERS
Flexible evening
hours available.
(352) 637-5300




ATTEND
COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home.

*Medical
*Business
*Criminal Justice
*Hospitality
Job placement
assistance.Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV
authorized. Call
800-443-5186
www.Centura
Online.com

MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASARP.
HSDiploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294




.- AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100000!! Call Pat
"(813) 230-7177**




"FOR SALE-
Lawn & Landscaping
Business Active in
Citrus County for 10 yrs.
18' enc. trailer with 2
commercial mowers, &
Hand Equip. in pairs.
Serious Inquiries Only!
30k obo 352-795-0201
Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiver,Dropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS




II---



130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED

30 x30 x9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15.995. INSTALLED

40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 Ox 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
527.995 Installed

+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com



18 IN KNIFE
$20 obo Linda
341-2271
John Wayne
collection,
in very nice glass and
Oak cabinet
$750.
(352) 628-6985


1918 JENNT STAMP
good condition/no
marks25.00 obo Linda
352-341-2271
NATIONAL BUYER
in Florida
Paying cash for your
collectibles, We want your
old sports cards, toys and
comic books. CASH
PAID!! Call TODAY:
(800) 273-0312
SWORD 55 INCHES
LONG WITH CASE
$40. OBO
LINDA 341-2271

.4


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII




5 SEAT SPA Green
marble,needs motor
frame 100.00
Linda 341-2271




DRYER $100 in perfect
working condition. 30
day warranty call/text
352-364-6504
KENMORE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIDG
icemaker, ice & water
thru door, bisque you
pick up $200.00
352-746-0401
OVEN, STOVE TOP
AND DISHWASHR
Frigidaire, great cond.
$150 ea. 352-503-3567
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179
WASHER $100 in
perfect working condi-
tion. 30 day warranty
call/text 352-364-6504




DUDLEY'S







4 AUCTIONS

THURS 3/7 Estate
Auction @Hall
prey 12 Auction 3
outside 6pm inside
Furniture, Tools,
Household, boxes of
fun & value 700+lots
FRI 3/8 On Site
Personal Property
Estate prey 8am
auction 9 am
161 Annapolis Ave
Citrus Hills 34442
entire contents of
worldtravelers-
furniture, antiques,
household, HUGE
Star Wars Col & more
FRI 3/8 Real Estate
prev 3pm Auction 4pm
5756W Norbis
Cir Homosassa
3/2 1 acrehome
FR-LR-DR-BR stone
Fireplace, clean move
in ready 1/3 mi. from
Rock Crusher
Elementary. MUST
SELL TO SETTLE
ESTATE
SAT 3/9 Real Estate
& Contents
prey 8 Auction 9
Real Estate 10am
1115 N Carnevale Ter-
race Timberlane Es-
tate 34461 3/2 one
acre pool home
SOLD ABSOLUTE
Entire contents inc fur-
niture, Antiques, Art,
sterling & more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384


/" Spindle Shaper
$40, Dust Collector
w/roll-around base
$45 352-563-1863

32" Drum Sander
w/roll around stand
$600, 40" Lathe
w/knives $75
352-563-1863

AIR COMPRESSOR
RUSTY, OLD CAMP-
BELL HAUSFIELD, 10
GAL. WORKS GREAT
$50 464-0316

ROUTER TABLE
STEEL LEGS & FIBER-
GLASS TOP ONLY $40
464-0316

SHOPSMITH MARK V
is 5 TOOLS IN ONE-
SAW, DRILL PRESS,
DISC SANDER, BOR-
ING MACH, LATHE.
$1000. 352-527-6425




70 INCH BIG SCREEN
TV JVC HD-P700R1U
with 2 HDMI, 2 HD com-
ponent, 3 analog, and 1
PC inputs. Accepts a
Cable Card for receiving
Cable TV without a
"cable box". Good
Condition! $390. Call
(352)746-2778 before
8pm please.

20" NEC Color TV
Cable ready,
good cond. $75
603-863-9750

DISH Network.
Starting at $19.99/month
(for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY
Installation! CALL Now!
1-888-685-4144

SANYO 36" COLOR
remote, works good
Not a flat screen
$50.00
352-628-4210

TELEVISION 26 inch
color $15- 2204158

YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529

YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529




ELECTRIC SERVICE
GROUND ROD 8'
$6 352.244.2821




68 VCR Movies
in 4 eight drawer, wood
grain containers,$34 for
all 352-344-1692

COMPUTER HP
Windows 98
complete with
all accessories
$75.00 352-628-4210

Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

Wii Games
6 games @ $15ea.
call for titles, firm
352-205-7973/220-4483




11pc White PVC Lanai
Furniture w/cushions
call for details $325
352-344-0866


For Sale
PATIO TABLE AND 4
CHAIRS Glass top out-
door table with 4 chairs
with cushions. $150.00,
352-228-1986




2 CHINESE RUGS
each 5x7, very nice,$15
each 352-228-7620

2 Sets of heavy duty
lamps
$50.00
352-795-7254

3 Cushion Couch
off White Floral, Swivel
Rocking Chair, Mauve
$150 for both, Glass
Rattan Table, $70
352-513-4133


i--
4 pc Living Room Set
Tan Floral Pattern
good Cond. $300
352-302-7451
5pc Bedroom Set
4 poster queen bed
Light colored wood, very
good cond. $450
352-527-7445
BEDROOM SET Eddie
Bauer solid pine dresser
$250 heavy Qn Arched
It oak headboard $100 2
end tables $20. Sold
separately/as a set
Call 352-610-6706
Big very nice
entertainment center
Includes
54" RCA TV
$1,500.
(352) 628-6985
Broyhill Tables
1 @ 60" x 26"
other is 24" X 48"
both are black, sturdy
New over $400 ea.
sell for $175 ea.
352-419-5836
China Hutch
Corner unit,like new
$400,triple dresser
w/mirror 12 draws $275
352-860-2792
CHINESE RUG 5x7,
wool, nice condition,
$50 352-228-7620
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
COUCH & LOVESEAT
Taupe,w/double reclin-
ers, couch has center
console w/cupholders &
masg, & loveseat has
rocker recliner on both
sides $250 both. exc.
cond 352-228-0294
DAY BED INCLUDING
TRUNDLE BED, WHITE
with decorative metal
frame, like new. $200
352 382 0347
Desk and Printer Cart
file drawers, 3 locks
desk top cubbies, 53L x
24D X 28H. Can email
pics $100 810-5694061
Dinette Set:Table w/
leaf, 4 chrs & cushions,
hutch. Very good
Cond $395. Wood
Bookcase w/ Glass
doors $145.
1920 Singer Sewing
Machine & Cabinet
$375 Cash and Carry.
(352) 422-5819
Dining Room Set w/4
upholstered chairs,
two beveled glass-top
table, Like New.
$150 obo
352-527-3382
DINING SET
Ashley 45" square glass
& metal tble w/4 metal
upholstered chairs,w/
side tble 48"x16", Ik new
$170. 352-746-1272
ESTATE SALE
Kitchenette Set $250,
Bedroom Set $300, 3pc.
Wall Unit $500, Enter-
tainment Center $50, 3
Computer Desks $50ea
Teak Wood carved tbles
$1200. 352-476-5464
FURNITURE
2 BAR STOOLS=$25
EACH
jeff the ref 05@yahoo
FURNITURE
2 MATCHING
CHAIRS=$75
jeff the ref 05@yahoo
FURNITURE
ROCKER CHAIR=$50
jeff the ref05@yahoo
FURNITURE
SOFA=$50
jeff there 05@yahoo
SUGARMILL WOODS
Kitchen Set
Table & 4 padded
chairs on rollers,
swivels, leaf,
mint condition $295
(352) 637-1701
LEATHER RECLINER
tan,very nice condition,
$75 352-228-7620
aft 10am
Light Tan, Recliner
Rocker, White Leather
Chair $100 forAll Twin
Box springs & mattress
w/ 2 stands $100.
352-795-7254
LIVING ROOM CHAIR
living room chair with
ottoman $30-
352-220-4158
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
PILLOWTOP Queen
set, $2200 new,
absolutely perfect,$100
352-228-7620
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808


Fu-nt


QUEEN HEADBOARD
& TV/DVD STAND
beige/gray color/stand
24x26x30hi $50.00
352-794-3020/5864987
Sleeper sofa, couch,
end tables & coffee ta-
bles, Kit. set w/ 4 chairs,
Blue recliner 2- 3 drawer
dressers, 1- 6 drawer
dresser, $750 for all
(352) 746-7221
Sleeper sofa, w/ match-
ing drapes, corner
computer desk, 8pc
lanai/pool set, 4 cushion
chairs 2 cushion rockers
$650 for all, 746-7221
SOFA & LOVE SEAT
black leather both have
2 reclining seats and 2
cup holders. 3 years old
like new $650.00
352419-4187
Sofa/Sleeper
Full size $175,
Broyhill 6ft Leather
couch dk maroo, like
new $500 860-2792
Swivel Barstools
set of 4, padded seats
$200, Queen Mattress
boxspring, fram
Serta Pedic Pillowtop,
$150 352-249-3259
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard,
special offer, $15
(352)465-1616
TV CABINET
composition wood,
nice condition, $15
352-228-7620
UPRIGHT SECRETARY
lit cabinet; opens as
desk, $50,
352-228-7620 aft 10am
Wall Recliner
New, by Best, LtAqua,
pd $650 ask.$250,
Chair w/ottoman
upgraded upholstery Lt.
Green patterned, Pd
$950 ask. $350
352419-5836
Walnut Entertainment
Center
Like New, $300
352-513-4133
WINGBACK CHAIR
eggplant color,like new,
$40 352-228-7620



2 RAIN BARRELS
HOSE SPIGOT ON
THE BOTTOM, 55
GALLONS, ONLY $40
EACH. 464-0316
08 Craftsmen Rider
Mower. 19.5 Briggs &
Stratten Motor, 42" deck
w/bagger, & Jack $900
603-863-9750
COMPOSER 30 GAL-
LON ROTATES ON
STAND TO MIX IT UP
ONLY $60 464-0316
Craftsmen Riding
Mower, 42" deck
18% hsp engine
$450 352-746-7357




BEVERLY HILLS
Fri, Sat 9 to ?
patio furn, LH Golf
Clubs, & much more!
152 W Goldentuft Ct

BEVERLY HILLS
Fri. 9-4 & Sat. 9-1
101 S. Lincoln Ave.
Large walker, port.
singer sewing mach.,
Furniture, sm. appl's,
cobbler bench
LOTS OF MISC.

BEVERLY HILLS
MULTI FAMILY
Rain or Shine
Fri & SAT 8am to 2pm
3580 W Mustang Blvd
CRYSTAL RIVER
11th ANNUAL SALE
Thurs & Fri, 8a to 4p,
Sat 8 to ?
Furn, Lawn equip.tools,
accessories & TV's &
much more!!!
7124 W. Avocado St.

CRYSTAL RIVER
BIG SALE
Friday & Sat., 8a-2p
5 Pc. Thomasville wall
unit, gold & silver
jewelry, antiques,
fenton glass, women
clothing and MUCH
MORE Behind Olive
Tree Restaurant, US
19, UNITS 80, 81, 82
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat 9a-5p
HH Items, tools, welder,
10544 N. DawnFlower
Pt 352-795-8639
CRYSTAL RIVER
MEADOWCREST
Community Yard Sale
Saturday, March 9th
8-2p in Winn-Dixie
Parking Lot/Hwy. 44.


CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri. & Sat. 8am-Until
6125 W. Woodside Cir,
CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat, Sun 3/9 & 3/10
8am to 4pm
12350 W Anemone Ct
CRYSTAL RIVER
TODAY! 9a-3p, 5 FAM
Purses, Baskets,
Frames, computer
desk, coffee table,
whit ped. sink,Teddy
Bears, KK, clothing
5847 W. PINE CIRCLE
Off Rockcrusher Rd.
CRYSTAL RIVER
TRAIN DEPOT
Sat 3/9 8a- I p
Huge Community
yard sale.
109 NE Crystal St

FLORAL CITY
Sat., March, 9th
8a-2p
Tarawood Commu-
nity Neighborhood
Yard Sale, 3 miles S.
of Floral City Hwy 41

FLORAL CITY
Thur, Fri, Sat, 8-4
Household, Office,
jewelry, clothes, MISC.
7200 E. Hampton Ct.

FLORAL CITY
Withlapopka
Community Center
11104 E. Founder Dr
SAT ONLY March 9th
8am to 2pm
HUGE ANNUAL
RUMMAGE SALE
Plant Sale, Book Sale
Bake Sale, Pancake
Breakfast 8a to 10a
Hot Dogs& Bratslla
to 2p, cold drinks
available for info call
Mary @352-344-2460

HERNANDO
MOVING SALE *
Fri. 8 & Sat. 9 8a-3p
Furniture, antique
dishes, glassware, No
tools, toys or clothes.
4126 Bluewater Drive
Follow Signs off 200
& Lake Park Drive
HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat, Sun 8-3
Household, Furniture
7485 S Gordon Pt

HOMOSASSA
Sat. & Sun., 8a-6p
Gas Stove, Furniture,
Lamps Clothes,
Stereo & Records,
& BrickABrack
5510+5548 SE Delilah
Pt. Greenacres to
Canary Palm to
Oaklawn to
Old Field to Meadow
to Delilah Point
352-503-7284

Homosassa
Yard/Moving Sale
GlassTrinkets, Port a
potty, Potty Chair both
new, tools, & more
5800 S Oak Ridge Dr, lot
44 (Even ridge MH park)

INGLIS
Sat &Sun 10am
NO EARLY BIRDS
Antiques, Collect-
ibles and more!
18134 SE Hwy 19, 2V2
miles past traffic lite

INVERNESS
ANNUAL Community
YARD SALE
Stoneridge Landing
2 miles South of
Fairgrounds
SAT. MAR. 9, 8A-12N

INVERNESS
Beta Sigma Phi,
Annual Yard Sale,
plus two families on
Sat. & Sun. 8a-1p
12595 E Boy Scout
Rd. (44 E turn rt be-
fore the river on boy
scout). follow signs.
antiques, furniture,
clothing, electronics,
kitchen &horse stuff,
tools & jewels etc..


INVERNESS
Boy Scout
Family Sale
10 Families
1 location, Furniture,
TV, Tools, Kids Stuff
180 S. Pine Ave
Behind Walgreens

INVERNESS
Fri & Sat 8am-5pm
Multi Families
910 N. Sable Palm Way




INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, 8a to 4p
2417 S Shelly Ave


3-9 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UClick or UFS, 2013

"No wonder you're having difficulty walking.

You've got an armchair back here!"





Thank You For 15 Years, of Votes


/ BEAur FULtI ESULS


WWILLA ; <
CONSTRUCTION CoRP
a Es 988




call 352-28-2/21 21 IL


INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, March 8 & 9
8am ? entrance on
Sunfish and Shad
across from
Community Center
East Cove, East and
West gates Hwy. 44-E
INVERNESS
Sat Only 8a to 3:30p
Small Yard Sale in
Melody Mobile Home Pk
INVERNESS
Sat Only 9a to 3p
tools, glass, hshld
4222 E Flying Eagle Ct

INVERNESS
Saturday 3/9, 10am
LOTS OF
GREAT STUFF *
7686 E. SHORE DRIVE

INVERNESS
Veterans Yard Sale
Our Lady of Fatima
Church
Saturday 7:30a-1 :30p
550 US HWY 41 S.
Call 352-400-8952
for vendor space, $10
Please Bring
A Can Good to help
feed veterans
LECANTO
Crystal Oaks subd. -
8am to 2pm. table, bar
stools, silverware, silk
plants,small appliances,
TVs, mikasa china,
household items, edger,
tools, ladders and
household items.
5091 W Mapleleaf Ct
Multi Family
FLORAL CITY
Fri, Sat, March 8 & 9
8am to 2pm
dishes, some furn, col-
lectibles, Tupperware,
& misc. Duvall Island
7560 S Grovewood Lp


MOVIN G



Pine Ridge
Sat Only 8a to 1 p
5150 N Pink Poppy






HOMOSASSA
Fri, Sat, Sun 8 to 4
furniture, lamps,
housewares,
artwork, tools,
old fishing poles,
electronics
10038 S. York Way
Miss Maggie Dr, Left
on Jade, Left on
Mesa to end


Homosassa SMW
Sat. Mar. 9th, 8am
5 S. Dahoon Court
ENTIRE HOUSEHOLD
All Priced to sell!
LECANTO
Sat. Mar. 9th 9am-?
Vintage furn., collecti-
bles, kitchen items,
tools, bed, crib, ETC.
235 N. Hedrick Ave.
Sugarmill Woods
Fri. 8, 8-2 & Sat. 9, 8-1
Estate Sale Some Tools
3 Oleander Lane



2 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$25ea 352-613-0529
BOYS PINNED
STRIPED SUIT Worn
once 25.00 obo Linda
341-2271
FLOWER GIRL
DRESSES, WHITE
Sizes 4T, 4/4T and 6X
$15.00 each
352400-5650
MENS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30, $65
EACH 352-613-0529




!!!!215/50 R17!!!!!
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
....225/65 R17 ...
Nice tread!! Only asking
$70 for the pair! (352)
857-9232
-----245\65 R17---
Great tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352) 857-9232
2 Windshields for
Harley Daivdson FXD
$125.
(352) 422-3033
16 ft. Black Wrought
Iron Entrance Gate,
w/ running horse and
horse shoes, Beautiful
paid $3,200 Asking
$1,300. (352) 422-5462
5ft Glasstop Patio Table
$40. Teeter hangups
inversion table $150
(352) 382-1977
AQUARIUM WITH
WOODEN STAND
25 Gal Rectangular,
12x16x29, gravel,lighted
hood.$100 746-7232
BARBIE HOUSE,
BARBIE CAR, barbie
guitar and kids
keyboard $10.00 for all
352-794-3020/5864987
BIG SALE!
Keyboard w/ Stand, +
TOOLS & Much Good
Stuff. (352) 860-2303


BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,
$10, special offer
(352)465-1616
CAR TOP CARRIER
BAR TYPE $25
352.344.2821
CURIO CABINET,
lighted, 4 glass shelves,
71" tall, 29" wide, 10"
deep, $75 (in
Dunnellon) (352)
465-1813
DANCE CHAIR Pink,
with ballet slipper de-
sign. Folds up and
stores in matching tote.
Like New. $25 746-7232
Fish Aquarium
50 gallons, cabinet
stand, lights & filter
$150 OBO
(352) 621-0392
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077
GERBIL CAGE
$20 352-613-0529
GRILL HOLDER FOR A
BOAT EXTENDABLE
ARMS FOR SAFETY
MOUNTS TO SIDE $50.
464-0316
HONEYWELL AIR
PURIFIER 360-
airflow,3spds,HEPA
filter ExcellentCond
$100 352-746-7232
HOW WATER HEATER
works/needs thermo
40.00 obo Linda
341-2271
Juki Commercial
Sewing Machine, Table
& Motor, just serviced
$550 352-563-1863
LAWN SPREADER
SMALL MANUAL
GOOD CONDITION
$20 352-613-0529
Lg Recliner/Rocker
brown, exc. cond.
$125obo NOOK
e-reader w/cover, $75
obo 352-527-3874
Love Seat, White Bro-
cade chair, Taupe re-
cliner, TV Sanyo, Misc.
Baby Items call for
pricing.
(352) 403-7863
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good con-
dition, green/ black/
white color, $30
(352)465-1616
Necchi Heavy Duty
Sewing Maching
model 3205FA
all metal parts
$70.
(352) 341-7741


A S=


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179




Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374




AFFORDABLE
COMPUTER REPAIR
(352) 341-5590
114S. Apopka Ave
Inverness
10% Off WITH AD

Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469


ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199





COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**
**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002




DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handvman
SFAST. *100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
*k 352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
Ki 352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




CLEANING BY PENNY
Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly.
352-503-7800,
352-476-3820
Husband & Wife Team
Exp. *Good Rates*
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609**

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
w FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641

Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570

Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lie/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067**
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570

PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300





TUTORING
All ages & Subjects
Specializing in
reading,math and
LDMR, autistic
352-628-1171






All phases of Tile
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lie. #2713





MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lie/Ins.





COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs! Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.





A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

D & R TREE SERVICE
Lawn & Landscape
Specialist. Lic. & Ins.
Free Est. 352-302-5641


Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15vrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932
DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lie/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


GLASS 3X5 1/4"
352-422-2164 $30.
NEW BATHTUB
Tan/5 ft
75.00 Linda 341-2271
New Screen Door
for a 2 car garage
has privacy screen
$425 352-249-7212
Patio Table &
4 Chairs
$50.
Freezer, small $75.
352 726-8524
Sears Kenmore
propane gas dryer
heavy duty, $75. Ryobi
12" miter saw $75
352-507-1490
SHOWER DOORS New
/ 40.00 obo Linda
341-2271
TEA CART, wicker,
standard size, excellent
condition, $75 (in
Dunnellon),
(352)465-1813
TELESCOPE Celestron
14" Schmidt Cassegrain
with CGE series mount,
tripod and post. Serious
scientific instrument.
Over $7K new. Asking
$5K. 352-726-7898
TRAILER TIRE,
brand new, fits pontoon
trailer,$15 352-22-7620
TREADMILL, Cory
Everson, manual, fold-
ing, sturdy. Good condi-
tion. $75 (in Dunnellon).
(352) 465-1813
TRUCK WINDOW
GMC rear/solid
factory tint, $50.00
352-628-4210



4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
ONLY $60. 464-0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER, NEW, ONLY
$20 464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM WALKER
BOTH HAVE ADJUST-
ABLE LEGS $20 EACH
464-0316
SHOWER CHAIR WITH
BACKREST &
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
ONLY $25. 464-0316
TUB RAIL MEDLINE
bathtub deluxe
safety rail $30.00
352-628-4210
WALKER 4WHEEL
seat,basket,hand brake
collapsible, $50.00
352-628-4210



"BASS UKULELE"
ELECTRIC SOUNDS
LIKE AN UPRIGHT 22"
SCALE $100
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
BLACK&ABALONE
W/GIGBAG&XTRAS
$95 352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PLAYS,
LOOKS, SOUNDS
GREAT! ONLY $50
352-601-6625
"NEW"FENDER
AFINITY P BASS
W/GIGBAG&FREE
AMP $100
352-601-6625


"NEWLES PAUL STU-
DIO LIMITED,"LIQUID
BLACK"W/GROVERS
&ALINCOS LESS
THAN 1/2 PRICE! @
$175 352-601-6625
8 STRING MORRELL
LAP STEEL ELECTRIC
GUITAR "NICE"
W/LIPSTICK PICKUP
$100 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
"ALMOST NEW"
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT ONLY $40
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR &
MANDOLIN Washburn
D25S w Hd cse &
Manzio pickup. Martini
mndln w sft cse. Both vy
gd cond. $225 obo.
352-341-0890
BEACH&CAMPING?
"NICE" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR FULL SIZED
USED ONLY $25
352-601-6625
BLACK WASHBURN
LES PAUL STYLE
GUITAR"NEW"W/FREE
RANDALL AMP $100
352-601-6625
DEAN VENDETTA
ELECTRIC GUITAR
"USED BUT PLAYS
NEW"ONLY $45
352-601-6625
GRANDMA'S ORGAN
KAWAI SR-2
Book Music, Bench
$500, pls call btwn
8-10am. 352-287-3145
KIDS FENDER ELEC-
TRIC GUITAR! BLACK
3/4 SIZE 22"SCALE
SINGLE PICKUP $40
352-601-6625
Ovation Acoustic/
Electric Bass
w/ case,1996
Celebrity model 174,
$395.
(352) 637-1189
STRAD Model, 4 x 4 old
German Violin
2 Bows, 1 Newer,
1 older, lined case,
$700.
(352) 464-5401, LM



AREA RUG machine
woven 23" X 39" tan &
moss green background
$10.00 603-493-2193
BOY LAMP w/stand.
Appox 53" H $25.00
603-493-2193
CHINAMikasa fine
china, charisma
6 pl setting $60
352-422-2164
FLOOR PLANT in wo-
ven basket 48" H
$10.00 Call
603-493-2193
FLORAL CENTER-
PIECE Magnolias & Ivy
18"H X 16"W w/2 can-
dle sticks $20.00
603-493-2193
Hunter Douglas
1" Horiz. Aluminum Blind
still in box 72 W x 50 L
brushed aluminum Color
$75.00 352-503-6149
TWO EASTER
WREATHS grapevine
w/Easter flowers & eggs
Apppox 15" $6.00 (2)
call 603-493-2193
WOLF PICTURE, wolf
knick knack and wolf
dresser box $10.00 all
352-794-3020/5864987


CHIN-UP DIP BARS
FREE STAND $20.00
352-637-5423
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
NON FOLDING SMALL
& STURDY ONLY $90
464-0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP),
UPRIGHT TYPE. IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS. ONLY $75
464-0316
HORIZON TREADMILL
exc. cond. $500
Rebound Aerobics
Jumper (trampoline)
$150,352-637-5525
Life Fitness Elliptical
X3 Machine, 2006,
$1500 352-513-4293
buyer to pick-up & haul
RECUMBENT
EXERCISE BIKE
GREAT FOR THE
BACK. ONLY $95
464-0316
WELDER MODEL
155 WEIGHT BENCH
$25.00 352-637-5423
Floral City Area
WElDER PRO 4300
HOME GYM Needs to
be cleaned. Works
$30.00 352-637-5423



12" Boys SpiderMan
Bicycle w/training
wheels $30
352-613-0529
ALLEN BIKE RACK
Model 143a-4 Bicycle
Allen Trunk Bike Rack,
Never used,still in box.
$75 746-7232
Beautiful Compact
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$400. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p
BROWNING CITORI
Plus,12 gage, trap/skeet
Gun w/leather case
$1200 716-835-8084
CAMPING COT Alumi-
num 2" mattress with
canvas base and spring
suspension. Excellent
condition. $25 746-7232
CANOE
12' Radisson Green
Bark, exc. cond. $400
603-863-9750

CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
EZ go Golf Cart
with charger and new
FId dn back seat $1500,
Club golf cart w/ charger
call for price
352-564-2756
Titan 25 Caliber
Gorgeous compact
Hand Gun.
$600.
Call (352) 795-0088
After 11:30 am til 7p
TITAN PISTOL
25cal, semi auto 8 shot
3", NEW, $250, call
John 352-637-0987


2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 3-5-527-0555**
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352)457-6199



HIGH CHAIR $25
BOUNCE $15 CAR
SEAT INFANT $15 car
seat toddle $15
352-777-1256
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, $50
(352)465-1616
STROLLER GREEN
ANIMAL $25/ 2 JUMP-
EROO the horse $20
each 352-777-1256

Sell r Swa


*


Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
IIIIIIII



3 WHEEL BIKE
HDCP Person needs
adult bike for phy
therapy. Must be road
worthy. (352) 527-9897
A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted Donated
Tall Book Shelves
and Storage Shelves
for A Humane Society
of Central Florida
Pet Rescue Inc.



2004 KEYSTONE
LAREDO 5TH WHEEL
29' 1 Slide Excellent
Condition NADA
$11,050 Asking $10,000
352-270-9265


DuO Australan
Shepherd/Terrier Mix.
Great watch dog.
Needs either a farm or
fenced yard.
352 419 7428








LILITH
Lilith is a lovely 2-y.o.
Hound mix. Weighs
50 lbs, already
spayed. She is loving
& shy, very quiet &
well-mannered.
Warms up quickly
when she feels safe.
Walks well on a
leash, sits for treats,
loves to play & loves
people. She is a
wonderfully sweet
girl who thrives on
love & attention. If
you have room in
your heart for this
sweet loving girl,
call Citrus County
animal Services @
352-746-8400.
Ask for # 17998751
& rescue Lilith.


Sparkle, Hemingway
(polydactyl) (extra toes)
This young female kitten
sparkles with playfulness
& affection. INDOOR
ONLY. Spayed, UTD,
liter trained. We do home
& vet checks. Call
352-419-0223wwwsavingangel-
spetescue.comto see
more pets looking for
homes







TRIXIE
"Trixie is a pretty
2-y.o. terrier mix,
weight 50 pounds.
Nicely marked,
fawn & white in
color, Heartworm
-negative. Walks
well on a leash, sits
for treats, easy to
train, is treat- moti-
vated. No young
children please.
Would make a
great companion,
loves people & has
good energy. Is lov-
ing & affectionate.
She waits for her for-
ever home at the
Citrus County
animal Shelter @
352-746-8400. ID
number is 18728509.


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 CI1

I


CLASSIFIED


2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258







TUCKER
Tucker is a 3 y.o.
Shepherd mix,
beautiful, in great
physical shape.
Weight 50 lbs &
Heartworm-negative. He
is a very ac-
tive young dog &
should be the only
dog in the family.
Would do best with
a strong experi-
enced handler &
without young chil-
dren in the home.
Needs a lot of exer-
cise & a fenced
yard is strongly rec-
ommended. Playful
& friendly, sits for
treats, chases a ball
& actually returns it!
Loves his human
friend.
Call Joanne @
352-795-1288.CRYS-
TAL RIVER, FL 34429


Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne


YAGER
Is Approx 6 yrs old,
weighs 701bs, and is
an American Staffie.
He is HW negative,
walks well on leash,
ignores other dogs
and casts. He is very
sweet & good
tempered. AND, is %
price! Under Foster
Care at this time.
Please call Victoria for
viewing appointment
352-302-2838






LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033


Tell that special
person
" Happy Birthday
with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111






HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428


The Best New Cars Make The Best Used Cars


TOYOTA PRIUS ]


s24,995


2012

TOYOTA PRIUS

-- 25,995


2010

TOYOTA PRIUS


18,995


2008

TOYOTA PRIUS


S15,995


2011

TOYOTA PRIUS


S19,995


* 2008

TOYOTA PRIUS


*13,995


2010

TOYOTA PRIUS

s16, 995


dik ^ 2007

E TOYOTA PRIUS


10,995




2010

TOYOTA PRIUS

s- 18,995


ToyotaCare
Featuring a complimentary maintenan pan
with roadside assistance.


VILLAGE TOYOTA



352-628-5100 www.villagetoyota.com


Iet


WORDY GUID BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Wettish tented area (1) Every answer is a rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Adorably pretty savage (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Turtle covering odor (1) syllables in each word.
S1@2013 UFS,Dist.byUniv.UclickforUFS
4. Strong and bulky southpaw (2)


5. Holiday marching event sham (2)


6. Sneaky manipulator's art stands (2)


7. Michigan State team milk holders (2)


SNOJIHD SKNVIVdS 'L STSV3 STv13HA '9 aVHVHJH3D (vVd '
X ATI A AdH rTIIWS TIHS T2 311flM 31113 7 dVJ3 dWNV *t
3-9-13 SIMASNV


Livestoc


I et




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Li L


S-T


~h
~kI


New 2013 Honda
CIVIC LX SEDAN
WDei FG3eDE'/Di i rnA 7fmis


$149:


Plus S790 destination charge and options.


New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Wmi CR2F3DEW ,L.Nim i Taira'rrsior
FDrie j OnFry.

MId6J a


New 2013 Honda FITT'

Sime For c n-l..
l. 1 /


New 2012 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD

,fgn~d~hnTa tTe'br


New 2012 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
'.to YX I FCEV 4kJ W ti Th' Tr I I, N &" ,:WN Ffc
C-JISE 'Tl tV-E Aid A Rda Lie r*.Cta
SAVE NFow Ony
$27,4 16"


New 2013
Honda
ODYSSEY LX


JsS^ P O-


New 2012 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Model Ta3CJrt'. Atm& rt oi*t i %4 E1 W CjiM.Pt-k
A NIe -.nxr, A mn sWerf ,1d BjRjcTo [a 't"''ar 'r' Need
SAWVEY ow a aOtr..
s 26,B37


I '1' II /I I


~il


6 OA
I.IfWTEPOW nRW
wj WARAmf17
1WIf"Ol


WPtOacBbwvm@
#H7764




$6,042


08 CheyIpair
#PH748S
$11,480


12KkFate
$ s1 fort
StPH7733


=
8H7873


#H7789
$6,252


$11raw93


SHonvdaAccotd
17797


A


M781S
, 7oo


a/rAbda@ykLX
AY177M1
$7,629


08 HndaOssey
#H17806
$11,637


11HomasCR V
#H778M
$16,135
qSp a car


a- Mrwo
99avwgandCa.SE 0rscdwanbw
7785# Ht7810



OtElmmeiw@CobaS 09Hyund~waiSaa
$000 $459
IIgg im I


0A'ILacrsse
PH7487
$1 1i,


TOToyata5iem
700prtraf
$18s900


$11,580
traaarsa
#H7m22
sttlas


$Z1FiE0cpe
$19,380


77772
$1,4277


10ToPaCamy Faf&pw rw
#H$0, #H7M1
$f456f $f4,380


12H)udWaiap Wa Vanhew M
#23778 #,7o9
$S2g~fV $127L7.9


12ToytaTxma
OH7799
$24,38


itsu siGalat
817401


Plus Many
MoreTo
choose Fimn'


1 0-' I *


'"Check.
in the li
FAZwwk
AF WW


C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


A


7 TA._


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w


C",.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


v :. 4


i


kii"


: 9:1:


I Friday & I

Saturday

ONLY!


LUNCH

SERVED

11:30AM -

S1:30PM


00 Dodge
Dakota
Crew Cab.
Early Bird Gets ItL
$.,5o0


05 Hyundal
Accent
A lr e narct- a le Car.
I J,,e Pn,:iI
S 6.995


09 Chevy
cobalt
LT, Auto, 4 Cyl,
4 Door
soMas


02 Chrysler
PT Cruiser
5 Speed
Buy It Today!
s$31, t


08 Chevy
Aveo
4 Door, Auto,
AC, CD,
S 7.=k8


04 Chevy
Malibu Maxx
Suede Interior, LT,
Clean, Hatchback
$a& 6-


05 Dodge
Neon
Auto, AC, CD, PW, PL,
SXT Clean!
SAMOS


03 Nissan
Xterra
Sc t. Biad Beur', L'-w
Price 0n Road CaOpaD






08 Chevy
cobalt
Sport, Yellow.
Clean, 2DR
s$aaWW


06 Chevy
impala LS
White, 4 Door
31 MPG!
$6., m


05 Mercury
Sable
LS. Ride In Comfort,
Dependable Carl
$7ea9w


02 Chevy
Camaro
Z28, 6 Speed, V8,
Red and T-Tops
$9,00 9


04 Ford
Ranger
Ext Cab, XL, 5 S ed,
3.0L, Cleanl
oe M


03 Ford
Ei Cac LT ; T ur'..V8
Reaa, T.:). Wor


06 Chrysler
Town & Country
LW8 LY Autr,,
," M, le
$9,.e-


03 Ford
F250
Superduty, Crew Cab,
Auto, V8
$6~ ^^h99


05 Pontiac
Montana
SV 'Van Cl. ar
Gr ral FrC'


04 LInclon
Ls
Pide In 3,i' Charnc arig
LTa,', On C'.rC. iCFr ,.-
$9.-a


03 Audl
A4
Convertible, Auto, Needs
Someone To Love Her!
$6.-


02 Chevy
Snlverados oo
HD. Auto,
VS, LT
MAWgSI


02 Chevy
Silverado
EKI Cab, VB, Aubi TowomI
Nice Truck, Greri Pnv :
so^ee ^^B


04 Ford
Expedition
XLT, Auto, V8, Cheap 3rd
Row Seat SUV
$6,-ek


07 GMc
Sierra
Crew Cab, Chrome Wheels,
Fiberglass Topper
MSa.-S


11 Nissan
Versa
Auto, Hatchback, Clean,
Warranty
emo.a&ea


07 Mitsublshl
Edlipse
GT V AiiR PVW PL
Rel jir .Raadr l






10 Pontiac
Vibe
.. Dr Cyl
Rc-d Holl
a,8m8 1 I


9, FALOJ-



94


10 Chrysler
PT Cruiser
Auo DR. 4n
Cle"






10 Chrysler
PT Cruiser
C .SSic Aule,


09 Hyundal
Sonata
Aul, 4 D'0r
Be a1 .






05 Toyota
Tundra
V8, Auto.
Crew Cab, SR5
$13,95 |


07 Dodge
Caravan
S .T Lo.. MV r, CI, net I
Mrn Van in Twin'
e*o.ee


06 Honda
CR-V
Clean, Auto, 4 Cyl,
Great Gas Saving SUVI
$19%V


11 Chevy
impala
4 Dr, Auto,
V6, Clean!
onlAM


12 Kla
Forte
4 Door.
Great Gas Saver! 36 MPG






12 Chevy
Equinox
Leather, Auto, PW, PL,
LS Model


08 Mercury
Sable
New Style!
Loaded
--799


11 Chevy
Cruze
Auto, 4 Door,
Great Gas Saver!
MSiS


t11 Chevy
Silverados1500
VJT A.uto 8,
L.,A M-.eI
$ 9,a -


11 Mitsubishi
Galant
Auto,
AC, CD
$15,977


04 Jeep
Wrangler
X Model, Auto, Lifted,
33" Tires. New Top!
*e6,aB


12 Ford
Escape
Limited, Loaded,
Low Miles!
61*907


08 Chevy
Mallbu
4Dr, Auto, AC, CD,
Only 45 MIles
61m,003


12 Hyundai
Elantra
Touring,
Hatchback, Auto
*1G.09e


08 Dodge
Ram
Crew Cab, 4x4,
Big Truck!, Ready To HuntI
$21,905


06 Ford 09 Chevy
FIS0 HHR
Super Crew, 4x4X LT, T Aul,.. AC Oni" 7K Miles!
Chrome Wheels, Loaded Cerli-,.!


10 Chevy
Sllverado
Re LCao ui 2WYD
I-l' Mimii,'
6tC,005


12 Chevy
Colorado
Crew Cab, LT, LIKE NEW,
Only 1,087 MilesI
6s5,033


03 Chevy
Sllverado
Dually L ra. Cib.
6 1 L. E Spe d
WAM


08 Chevy
Avalanche
IBIl. LTr' Leaih.r
:hiT.,iTi Wh, -i,
eeS,047


07 Chevy
Sllverado
Cia::,c R-qCIC j.14
Tupppr Red L,% Moles






10 Chruler
300
V6, Cool Vanilla,
PW, PL, Cruise
1,SaW


10 Chevy
Sllverodo
Crew Cab, LT, 20" Wheels,
Auto, REDi
asm,995


* I


08 Dodge
Caravan
Grand, SXT, Auto,
Low, Low Miles!
Is.ASM


09 Chevy
Equinox
LT
Only 10K Miles'
momee


10 Buick
Enclave
Leather, CXL, Chrome,
All Power!
6n0*995


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Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brands!t


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"Top Safety Piks"


APR
FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS
AVAJLAWI N EW Ae..'


* ZERO DOWN AVAILABLE
* ZERO PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
* ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT


Luxury Starts Here!
Lease $209 per
for 2 mo.
,*-^-l ^S


Aggressive Yet Elegant!
Lease $349 per
for -t mo.


Urban Achievedr
Lease $ p er
for 3 mo.


State of The Art Togethemess!'
Lease $439 per
for meio.


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C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


2012 TOYOTA
AVALON
I


*Oh







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


HOMOSASSA
2 /2MH, SW Irg. scrn.
rm. covered parking
$500 mo. 1st last sec.
(352) 302-2395

INVERNESS
1 BR $325. mo.
2 BR $350/mo. Both
$500. dep. No Pets
352-726-7951


-I..


must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766

43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807

2/1, DW, H/A, 12 x 20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031


V' THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incis Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192

INVERNESS
2b/2% ba, '1/ acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791

LECANTO
2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40
$17,900 remld 6yrs ago,
new rf,shed, on rented
lot $245 mthly, incl
water,sewer,trash
352-628-1171


NEW!! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
Vlew 352-621-9181





NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272

Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
homes. $8500 off of
any home, 2/2 & 3/2
from $39,900
Call John Lyons &
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377


INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1'2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133




For Sale1'
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 14 AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
+Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on % acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217


CLASSIFIED




LECANTO
16 X 66, MH, 3/2,
21/2 Acres, Quiet,
Consider all reasona-
ble cash offers
(352) 302-9624
Owner Finance/Lease
Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH,
14 x 20 block building,
New Septic, Handy
person, $28,900./Offer
352-422-1916





CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882

FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420

HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access, ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 C15


ACTION-
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. j
352-795-7368
www.CitrusCounlyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA/CHASSOHOWITZKA
8140 Miss MaNie Dr.#1 (H)...S55
2/1 W terontduplex,rentinmcludesu tlesiw/cap
2 Balsam Ct.S. (H)............... ,400
4/3/3W ol ines pool an. i i m wn
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way(HER).....$775
3/2 DWnewer[ mobile on/2 ACRE!
6315 N. Shorewood Dr. (HER)..S625
2/1, Florida room
CRYSTAL RIVER
9779 Cleveland (CR)................S675
2/2/1 Roomy home close to Rives Hasp.
1266 N,SeigullPft, #143 ((R....SIl0
2/3 Beautiful condo, 3 nmo. mn.
BEVERLY HILLS/CITRUS SPRINGS
9 Daniel St. (BH)......................$650
2/1 Neat, clean, quiet loaton
8160 N. DuvalDr.(CS).........$1,300
3/2/2P fool home,furnished, includes cap on ulms





CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857

FLORAL CITY
1/1, $375/Mo. $300/
Sec. Includes septic
water, trash. No pets.
(352) 344-5628

FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025

Inverness
2/1 on private estate, no
smoking,$650 monthly
Utilities included 1st,
last, sec. Req.
352-422-2393


CI TRUS couNTY UN
For more information on how to reach C w.Tc e

Citrus County readers call

352-563-5592. www.chronicleonline.com

Scarborough 2010


OOOBXGZ


ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633

Crystal River
Apts, 2 BR/1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE

CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
INVERNESS
2/1, Beautiful Apt.
Clean 352-341-1029.
INVERNESS
2/1water/trash incl. 1st
fl, livkit tile, bedrooms
carpeted, screen patio
$525 1st and Sec.
352-344-0238
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000

NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed / 1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furnished &
Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & the
Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/month
Call 352795-1795
for Appt.
www.ensing
properties.com




CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037
CRYSTAL RIVER
LG 2/1 water, sewer,
garbage, W/D hkup,
lawn inc. $475 mo.
(352) 212-9205
or 352-212-7922
INVERNESS
1 BR., Pool & Laundry.
(352) 637-1805




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528






LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $675+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool, H20 Incl
$900. mo. + $900. sec.
No pets 407-415-0622
www.moverightin.com
INVERNESS
1/1 Condo in Royal
Oaks $575/mo Pool
Incld's Water/ Sewer/
Trash/WD 352302-7406
Sugarmill Woods
2/2/2, avail April 1,
$725. (352) 503-3087




CRYSTAL RIVER
New Furn Studio $650
All Util Incl w/pool
352-270-3527
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225
HERNANDO
Lovely Lakeview, Furn.
Cottages 1/1, All Util.
Incld, 386-208-2495




BEVERLY HILLS
2/2/2, $750 mo. 1st &
last (352) 422-4872

CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890



0UAoL O

CITRUS HILLS
AREA, HERITAGE
55+ Gated Community
3/2 builders model,
never lived in, no pets
$1000mo 352-270-8953
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051

DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493
Photos: http://ocala
.craigslist.org/apa/
365380450 1.html

Hernando
Rentals
from $500.00 1 MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

HERNANDO
Riverlakes Manor 2/2


Blk home/tiled $650
mo. (352) 464-0647
HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210
INVERNESS
3BR/2BA/1, $750. mo
418 Hunting Lodge Dr
(352) 895-0744 Cell
INVERNESS
Large furn. 1 BR home
in 55+ community,
Great location just off
the water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $550
(352) 344-1380
Lecanto 2/2/2
immaculate, $750+
1 mo. security
352-447-2031
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797


HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
INVERNESS
Nice Waterfront, 2 story
Condo 2/2.Great loc.
First, last, Sec $675 mo.
(352) 302-4546




CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv.
Rm./Ba. share kit. $400
everything Included
352-875-5998
INVERNESS
$115 wk incl. meals
55 + park, Lk side
no smoking/drinking,
bkgrnd check $200 dep.
352-257-5795
INVERNESS
Room & Private Bath
$425. mo. 341-1544




CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129




BEVERLY HILLS
2/1 w/sunroom, deck on
back, new utility shed
352-566-7099 or
606-694-7099

PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial







L
Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





Bankruptcy Auto
Auction

Online & Onsite -
Everyone welcomed!
Friday, March 15 @
10am
Preview: Day of Sale
9-10am
3613 N 29th Ave,
Hollywood, Fl 33020
Variety of vehicles
including: Nissan,
Volkswagen, Ford,
Honda, Jeep, Dodge
Visit- www.
moeckerauctions.com
for
Details, Photos and
Catalog
Moecker Auctions
(800) 840-BIDS
10% -13%BP, $100
ref. cash dep.
Subj to confirm.
AB-1098 AU-3219,
Eric Rubin





Lakefront Beauty
Open House
Sat 11-3pm /
Sun 12-3pm
7734 S. Shore Acres
Floral City
$169,900.
(352) 212-1446
Realty Connect

Sugarmill Woods
Saturday 3/9 12p-4p
211 Pine St. Save
$25,0000 Just Reduced.
3000 SF $235,000
Call 850-585-4026


Sugarmill Woods
Sunday Mar. 10,1-4 PM
3 Chinkapin Court
Homosassa Fl
Nancy Lewis
Exit Realty Leaders




HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428




PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car garage/ work-
shop & in-law suite on
5.83 acres.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community. www.
centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
"cash only*
352-503-3245




DUDLEY'S
AUCTrOW





4 AUCTIONS

THURS 3/7 Estate
Auction @Hall
prev 12 Auction 3
outside 6pm inside
Furniture, Tools,
Household, boxes of
fun & value 700+lots
FRI 3/8 On Site
Personal Property
Estate prey 8am
auction 9 am
161 Annapolis Ave
Citrus Hills 34442
entire contents of
worldtravelers-
furniture, antiques,
household, HUGE
Star Wars Col & more
Fri 3/8 Real Estate
prev 3pm Auction 4pm
5756W Norbis
Cir Homosassa
3/2 1 acrehome
FR-LR-DR-BR stone
Fireplace, clean move
in ready 1/3 mi. from
Rock Crusher
Elementary. MUST
SELL TO SETTLE
ESTATE
SAT 3/9 Real Estate
& Contents
prey 8 Auction 9
Real Estate 10am
1115 N Carnevale Ter-
race Timberlane Es-
tate 34461 3/2 one
acre pool home
SOLD ABSOLUTE
Entire contents mc fur-
niture, Antiques, Art,
sterling & more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667
Maine-ly Real Estate
#381384




Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263
INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379
NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $69,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


l







C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013




4BD/3BA. Save 2 AC. RE
$25,000 Just Reduced. Quiet Country Seti
3000 SF, heated pool, 3/2 on 2 acres m
Granite, SS Appliances, Approx. 1750 sq ft
Wood, Tile and Carpet. front porch, Lg re
2 Car Gar, greatroom, screened porch, Pa
fireplace $235,000 24x30 Steel Buildil
Call 850-585-4026 Steel Carport gr
for boat storage, e
Fenced and cross
fenced, Built in 20
Condo for Sale Nice Oaks, Wood(
Sugarmill Woods Citrus Springs arc
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft., only 20 Min. to Oc
35 Beech Street $126,500
607-287-0473 Call 352-302-678
for appt.

Custom Built 3/2/2 I TNEED
Pool Home on 1.26 ISOLDALMOS
acres on Golf Course 2-HOMES A MOA
2339 sq.ft. living area IN 2012
3366 sq.ft. under roof Let's BREAK the
Many xtras, price 's BREAK togeth
reduced. 352-382-1531 record togethe


Golf Course Home
3/2/2 /2. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475


BETTY POWELL
Realtor



352-422-6417


bipowell@
netscape.com

"Spring is in the
air ... Buyers
Everywhere!"

ERA
American Realty


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
Email: Gail@
gailsellscitrus.com
Web: www.
aail sellscitrus.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


tina
-S
;z
oli
LA
ar
atio,
ng,
eat
etc.
s-
03
ed,
ea
ala
84




T
NTH
at
r!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.cornm


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I 'll work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855


Lake Rousseau
Stilt House 3/1/2 &
carport. New roof,
new kitchen and
many upgrades.
Plumbed for add'i
bath, 170' frontage.
lake deck,2 Boat
houses, 20'x 40' shop.
Full irrigation on I acre
with 8 citrus trees.
$179,500.
(815) 847-8904





3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723


CHIEFLAND
GET-AWAY- No Cell
phone, no garbage
truck, no pavement.
Wild life galore! 4 Room
house on 1/4 acre near
Suwannee River.
16 miles to Cedar Key
$35,000.(478) 550-5012






For Sale iU
LAKE PANASOFKEE
3bdr 1 ba, cbs home,
lake access, great
income or live-in
property, on beautiful
lot, $39,900 call
352-303-4505





Crystal River Waterfront
Condo 2 bedroom.
1-1/2 bath. Beautiful
condo for sale by owner.
Located in the "Islands"
which is minutes from
the beach, fishing and
golfing. Enjoy catching
fish and blue crabs from
your private dock. Year
round heated pool and
tennis courts. Very
private and quiet.
$78,000 352-586-1266






20 DOCKABLE
ACRES
St. Lucie Waterway.
$159,500. 45mins
boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.


HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2/2Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331




-g

"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


2BD 11%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodeled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


L!J ES'V I1.

SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNau-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697



2 8ft Kayak Calypso's
with 2 paddles,
& 2 life jackets,
Like New
$250 obo for Both
(352) 364-7057




BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*352-563-5510*
03 SEAPRO
17' 90 hp mercy. vhf,
gps, trol mtr, fullcover,
bimini, alum trlr $7200
352-419-5363pm
18HP, Evinrude
short shaft, manual,
good condition.
$460.
Crystal River
(513) 260-6410
Bayliner
1999Trophy, 22ft Cuddy
cabin, 120hp Mercury
Force,26ft dual axel
trailer, to many extras to
list. $6500 OBO
352-201-1847cell
BOAT LIFT
Shore Station, manual,
free standing. Used in
fresh water. Orig. price
$5000, asking $650
(352) 621-0392
Glasstron 19'
inboard, outboard,
165 hspwr. exc. cond.
w/trailer $5500.
352-621-6960










/Lj7rrk =H


CLASSIFIED



MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Welcraft
16 Ft C. Console, boat,
motor,and trailer
352-746-0348



ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$47,000.
352-422-1309



00 GULFSTREAM
5th Wheel Camper,28'
super slideout, owner
no smoking, $7000 obo
call 906-250-6504
2003 Coachman
24 ft self contained,
sleeps 6 $4200 obo
(C)352-476-1113
(H)352-513-5135
29FT TERRY
FLEETWOOD bunk
style camping trailer.
Tag Behind 96 model.
Good shape $3800
(352) 613-2944
CAR/TOY HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $11,900.
For more info call
352-560-7247
COACHMAN 30ft
T/T, Qn. Island bed, +
rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean.
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
Holiday Rambler
SAVOY 2008, 26'
sleeps 6, ducted air,
gas & electric heat,
like new, 1 slider
$14,500 352-586-1694
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



BLUE OX SELF
ALLIGNING TOW BAR
New with cables &
pinlock $600
352-601-4986
LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
Truck Tires
4- Firestone Steeltechs
LT 265 x75 x16
A-T 10 ply, $325
352-795-2975


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
*352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



BUICK
'00, Regal LS, 4 DR.
Loaded, 70K, 24 mpg,
leather, V6, auto clean
$3,975. 352-212-4882
BUICK
1996 Buick Century
auto,cruise,power locks
windows,goodtires,
runs,& drives great,
good mpg, no oil
use,am,fm,cass, $2000
obo ask for Robert
352-563-1934
8am til 8pm
BUICK
93 LeSabre Sedan
exc. must see, one
owner, 57k ,ask. $3900
obo 352-302-4282
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CHRYSLER
2002, PT Cruiser,
$4,990.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice...time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
HONDA
2005 Element, AWD,
good cond, khaki
colored, $6500 (352)
344-1442 or 344-1441
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
HYUNDAI
2005, Accent
$4,900
352-341-0018
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing


2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
2004 SSR
5.3 L, Magnaflow super
charger, and exhaust
18k miles, $26,500
call 207-546-6551
CHEVY
1984 C20
project, long bed, solid
body & bed, good glass,
dual exhaust, Holly 4
barrel, 350V8, runs,
asking $1300
352-628-7243
pis leave message
CHEVY
'87, EL CAMINO
Silver, excel. cond.,
garaged, $13,500
(352) 270-3824
PONT. Trans Am
Convt. BIlk, auto, v8
69K miles $12,500
352-746-0348







Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only%$28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





DODGE
1996 Dakota Sport V6
50,300 actual miles.
Runs great, excellent
shape. $5,500 OBO
Sugarmill
740-705-9004
DODGE
2000, Dakota,
crew cab
$3,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
1995 E350 16' Box
Truck, 7.3, Tommy
lift-shelving, 198kmiles
$2200 352-586-1736
FORD
91 F250 Turbo Diesel
100k mi. tow pkg.
$6900 bo 352-978-0658


-m-
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997, 4 Runner,
$4,750.
352-341-0018



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150



JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment



DODGE
1998, Caravan
$1,995.
352-341-0018



99 HARLEY
FXDWG 7k mi, stg 3
cam, big blc, 42" drag
pipes $7000 obo
727-408-0602
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Honda
Gold Wing 1984
Exec. Cond, 39k miles
$4200 OBO
352-746-0348


HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
976mi. exc. condition,
$9000 (352) 447-1244



KAWASAKI
Kawasaki 2007 Clas-
sic Lt Factory
2053cc in mint con-
dition with only 550
miles. Garage kept
and covered. Looks
and runs great. Red
and Black with many
extras. $6750 Phone
352-726-8124
KYMCO
2000 ZX 50 Scooter,
One owner, 268 miles,
windshield, luggage car-
rier, garage kept. $900
352-212-5286



922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 4,
until March 22,2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22,2013..



212-0309

SACRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given
that the undersigned in-
tends to sell the vehicles)
below under Florida Stat-
utes 713.78. The under-
signed will sell at public
sale by competitive bid-
ding on the premises
where said vehicles)
have been stored and
which is located at
Adam's 24 Hr Towing,
6403 W. Homosassa Trail,
HomosassaCitrus County,
Florida the following:
DOS: 03/20/13 @8 AM
2006 Dodge VIN#
1D7HA18N46J179111
DOS: 03/21/13 @ 8AM
1996 CHEVY VIN#
1GCCS19X4T8141544
DOS: 03-22-13 @8 AM
1998 Saturn VIN#
1G8ZK5277WZ217908
DOS: 3-26-13@8 AM
2008 Dodge VIN#
ID8GT28K28W245917
Purchase must be paid
for at the time of sale in
cash only. Vehicle(s) sold
as is and must be re-
moved at the time of
sale. Sale is subject to
cancellation in the event
of settlement, between
owner & obligated party.
March 9, 2013.


213-0314 SA& THCRN
Vs. Brian D. Wood Case No: 2012-CA-001228 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY,
FLORIDA Division CASE NO.2012-CA-001228
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP
Plaintiff(s),
vs.
BRIAN D WOOD, et. al.,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February
14 2013 and entered in Case No. 2012 CA 001228 of the Circuit Court of the 5TH Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for CITRUS County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and BRIAN D. WOOD and UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BRIAN D. WOOD and MELISSA B. WOOD and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ME-
LISSA WOOD and CYPRESS VILLAGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. and UN-
KNOWN TENANT#2 and UNKNOWN TENANT#1 are the Defendants, the clerk shall sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Jury Assembly Room of the Citrus
County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida,, at 10:00 a.m. on the
21 st day March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order
of Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 1, BLOCK B 121, CYPRESS VILLAGE, SUGARMILL, WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 86 THROUGH 150; PLAT BOOK 10,
PAGES 1 THROUGH 150 AND PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 1 THROUGH 16, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA; AS AMENDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 87 A, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING
FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS.
DATED this 7th day of March, 2013.
By:/s/ Daniel F. Martinez, II, Esq./Florida Bar #438405
GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, PA., Attorney for Plaintiff(s)
2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110, Tampa, Florida 33607 Telephone: (813)
443-5087, Fax: (813) 443-5089
emailservice@ailbertarouplaw.com
"In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to
any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, CITRUS County, 110
NORTH APOPKA AVENUE, INVERNESS FL 34450, County Phone: 352 341 6430 TDD 1 800
955 8771 or 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay Service".
March 9 & 14, 2013.


1996 CHAPARRAL
-wnc 1935 SST CUDDY CABIN
Helm & Companion seats convert to sleepers

CALL FOR DISCOUNTED PRICES

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


2003 HONDA ACE750
Only 7k miles, Classic two-tone paint,
leather bags. Priced to sell quick!

s3,995

HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


i 2003 MITSUBISHI
SPYDER ECLIPSE
Too Fast for a Top! Turbo, 5-speed,
V-6, All the Goodies for $8999.
Call for Your Appt. Now!

CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO (5



Call for Details


563-3206


As Low As $18 per ad


S1996 CHAPARRAL
B Jr 1935 SST CUDDY CABIN
Helm & Companion seats convert to sleepers
Rear seats convert to sun pad Bimini top
CALL FOR DISCOUNTED PRICES

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597|


2007 HONDA TRX420 FWD ES
Only 800 miles, Camo, Elec. Shift.
This thing is nice and well maintained


s3,995
HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


2005 DODGE RAM
- 1500 QUAD CAB
-SMOOTH AS GLASS!
Leather, Tonneau Cover, Loaded
sy- i -_ Today Only $8999

CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO


F 2007cAROLINA SKIFF

S 1780SX1




THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


2006 SWEETWATER 2086ES
TUSCANY PONTOON BOAT
Garmin fish finder, change room,
mooring cover
DISCOUNTED PRICES


CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


795-2597


2005 HONDA SURE 1100
Custom Flame Paint, Windshield, Bags,
Passenger Backrest, 0nly 16k Miles!

B .*4,295


HONDA OF CRYSTAL RIVER
1917 N. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL 352-795-4832


2003 MUSTANG


Automatic, V-6
LOADED, only $5999
-.. Call for Your Appt. Now!

CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY, LECANTO



s17 FT. HURRICANE

FD170GS DECKBOAT
Yamaha C90TLRZ *Bimini Top* GPS
Galvanized Trailer
Was $8,995 NOW $7995

THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


...- I


Citrus County
Homes I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


U- X-1W


wum. IJT


$2,199 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $35,795.36.






w/ Base Preferred Equipment Group
Ultra Low-Mileage -
Lease For Qualified
Lessees


W "'!..W W /MO. 36 MONTH LEASE
$3,319 due at signing (after all ,: ,, Includes security deposit Tax, title, license, dealer Fe_. -rJ ,: .: e .pm r w '',
Mileage charge of $0.25/mile over 30,00)0 ,e.. .,i .a : ,. : 3:






w/ Luxury Collection Preferred Equipment Group


Ultra Low-Mileage
Lease For Oualified
Lessees


$2,739 due at signingg afteril offers), Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Mileage charge of $0,25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $43,405 36






I__ ....._ w/ Preferred Equipment Group
Lease For Oualified


sI/MO 36 MONTH LEASE
$2,839 due at signing (after all offers), Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extr
Mileage charge of $0,25/mile over 30,000 miles. MRSP $44,995,36,


O, CERT FIELD PR E-O WNED :2 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED

2008 BUICK 2008 LINCOLN 2004 LEXUS 2008 MINI 2008 CADILLAC 2007 CADILLAC
LUCERNE COMKZ LS 430 COOPER "S" SRX STS
CXL SE V6 SEDAN BRITISH GREEN LUXURY COLLECTION
BURGANDY LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE WHITE. LEATHER, SUNROOF GRAY, ONE OWNER TRADE IN 32000 MILES LEATHER ROOF AUTO TRANS WHITE DIAMOND. NAVIGATION, SUNROF, 3RD OL MISTt 3,,530 MILES, LUXURY
#200536 ONLY 41,000 MILES, #C312960A #C3X I18A LOCAL TRADE #C383170 SEAT, #C2A2415 PERFORMANCE PACKAGE, SUNROOF, #C383130
g14,408 s144 "B a1S,ggg s7,7 13 sS1 gBB "8gSBg
200B CADILLAC 2010 BUICK 2009 CADILLAC 2004 CADILLAC 2010 BUICK 2011 BUICK
DTS LACROSSE DTS XLR LACROSSE LACROSSE CXS
LUXURY COLLECTION CXL LUXURY COLLECTION CONVERTIBLE COS
WHITE DIAMOND NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, DRIVER GOLD MIST LEATHER, GRAY, LUXURY PACKAGE. TAN, 68000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE. BURGANDY LEATHER, SUNROOF, LOCAL TRADE, BLACK. LOW MILES CHROME WHEELS
AWARENESS PKG, #C3X176A LOCAL ONE OWNER TRADE, #C3S112A 40,175 MILES C382230A EXTRA CLEAN, #C2T200A #200536 SUNROOF, LOADED, #C2S26
s*18,s988 *1.-,988 S1S,988 eS2,988 e24,45Q G2E, BBB
2010 CADILLAC 2010 CADILLAC 20048 CADILLAC 2006 CADILLAC 2011 CADILLAC 2012 CHEVROLET
SRX SRX LUXURY ESCALADE XLR DTS AVALANCHE LTZ
BLACK. LEATHER, SUNROOF LEATHER SUNROOF NAVIGATION LOCAL TRADE BLACK, ULTRA LUXURY COLLECTION, NAV BLACK ONLY 29,000 MILES, LOCAL TRADE IN, VANILLA LATTE, 15,000 MILES, SUNROOF, 16000 MILES LEATHER SUNROOF NAY OVD
#C3XO28H #C343150A DVD S, LOADED C3A252A LOCAL ONE OWNER, #2V8 A C3M050A
=27,49B B27,SB98 |g ,SSS 032,88 35,BB9 *43,9800

2002 OLDSMOBILE 2007 CHRYSLER 2000 TOYOTA 2004 CADILLAC 2005 CADILLAC 2004 CADILLAC
INTRIGUE SEBRING 4 -RUNNER CTS DEVILLE ESCALADE RWD
OLS TOURING 4DR SR5 LUXURY COLLECTION SALVER
SILVER, LEATHER,1SUNRAD SPOILER. CRYSTAL RED, 4CYL, AUTO TRANS, SILVER, LEATHER ROOF, LOCAL TRADE-IN, SILKING GREEN, ONE OWNER LOCAL TRADE, SULKING GREEN, LEATHER TOP ROOF, LOADED, 92050 MILES SUNROOF LEATHER LOADED
ONE OWNER, #C382950A TOURING PACKAGE, #C2S155C #C3M018B 79.000 MILES. #CM3A72A LOCAL TRADE, #C3S187B fct3XO28J


WWWN. S L. LLIVfAIM CALDILLAC. COVI

I 4040 SW COLLEGE ROAD OCALA, FL 352-732-4700


SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013 C17


/MO. 36 MONTH LEASE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


THE


EVENT


$ DOWN sDUEAT
PAYMENT2 SIGNING2

$ 0 ISMONTHS $ MAINTENANCE

PAYMENT2 PLAN2


2. Not all buyers will qualify for Ford Credit Red Carpet Lease. Payments may vary; dealers determine prices. Residency restrictions apply. First month's payment paid
by Ford: Fiesta up to $275; Focus up to $300; Fusion up to $350; Escape up to $350; Edge up to $400; Explorer up to $425. Cash due at signing on Fiesta is after
$500 cash back; Focus is after $750 cash back; Fusion is after $250 cash back; Escape is after $750 cash back; Edge is after $1,500 cash back; Explorer is $2,000
cash back. 3-year/45,000 mile Basic Maintenance Plan on eligible featured vehicles includes a maximum of 4 regularly scheduled maintenance services. Take new
retail delivery from dealer stock by 4/1/13. See dealer for qualifications and complete details. Vehicle shown may have optional equipment not included in payment.

It's Just That Simple... S


2013 ESCAPE SE 2013 EDGE SE
36 mo. Red Carpet lease 3 mo. Red Carpet leas

$278 MO2$317 MC
$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing 0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees e


Family Owned
& Opperated

gn & Ride


2013 FUSION SE
36 mo. Red Carpet lease

$278 MO
$0.00 Down Payment $0.00 Due At Signing
Security Deposit Waived, tax, title & license tees extra


-ESI


MANAGER'S SPECIALS!


k I


1995 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ORVIS 4X4 2004 FORD EXPLORER XLS SPORT TRAC 2002 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA CONVERT 2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX |
Great SUVw/Iots of options. N2T386B Hard to find Sport Trac. N3C102A Don'tthis low mileage Miata NP5792B. Great car. N2C294B
$7,968 $8,968 $8,968 $9,868


2006 FORD EXPLORER XL$
Nice explorer for nol much money. N3C032A


2005 FORD MUSTANG
Low mileage pony car. N2T410A
$13,968


2006 FORD ESCAPE XLI 4X4
A great 4 wheel drive. N2C296B
$13,968


2003 JEEP WRANGLER 4X4 2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT 2007 FORD EXPLORER 4X4 LIMITED 1965 FORD MUSTANG 2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 2006 FORD F150 LARIAT SUPER CREW 2010 FORD FUSION
Extra clean and ready to tow NP5777D A fine IT in the perfect color N3T125A Reduced and loaded4x4. N3T160A Firs lime offered forsalein33yers.N2C033M Room for the whole neighborhood. N3T1058D This one has the wow factor N2T209P This is one fine Fusion. NP5791
$14,968 $16,968 $16,968 $18,000 $19,968 $19,968 $20,968


i2010 TOYOTA PRIUS HYBRID 2011 DODGE RAM 1500 BIG HORN 2011 FORD FLEX SEL 2010 FORD MUSTANG GT I
Only 16k miles & fuel friendly. N3C97A Loaded SLT, CREW CAB. NP5786D I Don't miss this certified SEL N2C292A This is one fun 5.0. N3T107A
$21.968 25.668 $25.668 $26.668


2011 GMC ACADIA
Special edition & loaded. N2T358A
$27.968


2013 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 12010 FORD F150 LARIAT CREW I
Only 9k miles & better than new. N3T317AI Certified & priced way less than new. N3T229AI
$29,968 | $30,668


C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 9, 2013