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Citrus County chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-06-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03051

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Join community health care talkShare your insights about health and health care in Citrus County. To register, call WellFlorida Council, 352-313-6500, ext. 100. There are six opportunities to share insights, with the first one taking place 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday at the Lakes Regions Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness. City hears update on trailhead projectAt Tuesday nights Inverness city council meeting, the completion of the North Apopka Trailhead Bicycle Boulevard project made strides toward completion with the acceptance of the construction bid submitted by Daly & Zilch Inc. for $499,890. The project, consisting of streetscape from Dampier Street north to the trail crossing, trail crossing improvements, Liberty Park parking lot improvements, median rehabilitation from the trail crossing to the boat ramp, and water system improvements, is scheduled to be completed in time for the annual July 3rd Patriotic Evening in Liberty Park, Liberty Trail and Wallace Brooks Park. Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni said, The transformation of Inverness continues it will definitely be our yellow brick road pulling tourism directly into the downtown. Council president Cabot McBride added, This is a big deal for the city. Also discussed: Single stream curbside recycling is coming soon to city residents at no cost to them; Waste Management has agreed to contribute $10,000 to the city toward the cost of running Whispering Pines Park, plus $5,000 annually during the term of their franchise agreement with the city. Waste Management is very appreciative of extending our contract in partnership with the city of Inverness, said Doug McCoy, Waste Management district manager. Were particularly glad we can be helpful in regards to Whispering Pines Park, a very vital part of the community. MARCH 6, 2013 Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community VOL. 118 ISSUE 211 50 CITRUS COUNTY Softball: Citrus, Lecanto play tight contest /B1 www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . .C8 Community . .C6 Crossword . .C7 Editorial . .A10 Entertainment . .B6 Horoscope . .B6 Lottery Numbers .B4 Lottery Payouts .B6 Movies . . .C8 Obituaries . .A6 Classifieds . .C9 TV Listings . .C7 HIGH 63 LOW 38 Increasingly sunny, windy and cooler. PAGE A4 TODAY& next morning WEDNESDAY C HRIS V AN O RMER Staff writerFollowing on the heels of Januarys fiscal cliff, The Sequester has become the new topic of economic discussion. The Sequester is an $85 billion across-the-board reduction in federal spending that took effect March 1, impacting a great number of services from mental health to public safety, potentially resulting in staff layoffs and pay cuts. Layoffs could affect public school teachers and aides. Enacted by the Budget Control Act of 2011, the spending reductions also will take effect for years 2014 through 2021 unless repealed. The act requires budget cuts of $1.2 trillion during 10 years. All of this will cause a ripple effect throughout our economy, President Obama said Friday.The longer these cuts remain in place, the greater the damage to our economy. The effects will be gradual in Citrus County and may not have a great impact in all cases. In some cases, budget planning has contained the cuts for the current year. County government will take a small hit from a program called Sequester: How it will affect Citrus See CUTS / Page A4 A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER It is a conversation building momentum and may reach its apex at a city workshop. Mayor Jim Farley said no firm date has yet been set, but the issue of building heights perhaps the need to raise them in some areas has been bubbling for a while in the city by the bay. Farley said the citys planning board and many citizens are against elevated height limits. The current height limit in the city is 50 feet. On the other hand, some believe to bring business and dynamism to the sleepy village on Kings Bay, city leaders may have little choice but to go vertical. You see the problem is especially in the waterfront area the lots are too small, said Dr. Paresh Desai, a businessman and proponent of higher height limits in the city. Say the lot is 1,000 square feet. You have no choice but to want to go more vertical so you can have more space for your business. If you dont have that option, you are not going to locate there and that is why businesses dont want to come there, Desai said. He said a change in the height limit also will encourage many other businesspeople to purchase and replace some of the older building lots in the downtown area. City eyes height limits MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle At this time, new buildings in Crystal River are limited to a maximum height of 50 feet. Some residents would like to see the h eight restrictions changed to allow for taller commercial structures in certain areas of the city. Some believe building restrictions could hamper potential development See LIMITS / Page A2 P AT F AHERTY Staff writerWith 100 signed up, an event this week to help job-seekers find a position is filled to capacity, However, it is just one of more than 70 job search and career-related workshops and programs this month in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties. About 15 of those with some repeats are scheduled for Citrus County. The Land That Job Forum is Friday at the College of Central Florida Citrus County Campus. It is a combined effort by United Way, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, Workforce Connection, the college and the Economic Development Council. The forum will help participants locate possible jobs and prepare for interviews through coaching and role-playing. Part of the session will be simulcast at the chambers monthly luncheon. Several other job and career events were scheduled this week in Citrus County. Currently SCHEDULED EVENTS March 7, 12, 26 Targeted Resumes, Inverness. March 7 Career Expo, Open House WTI, Inverness. March 15, 29 Nail That Interview, Inverness. March 7, 21 Navigating New World or Work, Inverness. March 21 Navigating New World of Work, Beverly Hills. March 27 Spring Fling Job Fair, Lecanto. Full calendar this month for job-seekers See JOBS / Page A5 Many organizations planning ahead Associated PressNEW YORK The stock market is back. Five and a half years after the start of a frightening drop that erased $11 trillion from stock portfolios and made investors despair of ever getting their money back, the Dow Jones industrial average has regained all the losses suffered during the Great Recession and reached a new high. The blue-chip index rose 125.95 points Tuesday and closed at 14,253.77, topping the previous record of 14,164.53 on Oct. 9, 2007, by 89.24 points. It signals that things are getting back to normal, says Nicolas Colas, chief market strategist at ConvergEx Group, a brokerage. Unemployment is too high, economic growth too sluggish, but stocks are anticipating improvement. The new record suggests investors who did not panic and sell their stocks in the 2008-2009 financial crisis have fully recovered. Those who have reinvested dividends or added to their holdings have done even better. Since bottoming at 6,547.05 on March 9, 2009, the Dow has risen 7,706.72 points or 118 percent. The Dow record does not include the impact of inflation. Adjusted for that, the Dow would have to reach 15,502 to match its old record, according to JPMorgan Chase. The Standard and Poors 500, a broader index, closed at 1,539.79, 25.36 points from its record. The last time the Dow hit a record, George W. Bush still had another year as president, Apple had just sold its first iPhone, and Lehman Brothers was still in business. But unemployment was also 4.7 percent versus Dow hits record high, erases losses from recession Associated Press A board on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Tuesday shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial average. See DOW / Page A5 NEWS BRIEFS From staff reports Not everyone is cheering, though Page A5 TAKE YOUR PICK DURING OUR MARCH SPRING CLEANING PAGE C10 000E996 at VILLAGE TOYOTA TAKE YOUR PICK DURING OUR MARCH SPRING CLEANING

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The 50-foot limit also includes the roof, which is forcing a business like the new Hampton Inn (which is under construction) to make a flat roof. The building will look like a box. Do they want every building that goes up looking like a box? Desai asked. City Manager Andy Houston said conversation is already shifting toward more flexibility about building heights. I think it depends on the area. I can see where there could be flexibility in the proposed RiverWalk area and parts of U.S. 19, but it will be up to the city council to make any changes, Houston said. Farley, who had been opposed to increases in height limits, said Tuesday a workshop on the matter will be scheduled in the near future. I am opposed to it because a lot of the residents do not like the idea, but we will see what comes out of the workshop. I can be flexible about it too, depending on the area, but if it is like the Port area where residential homes are right next door, no, I will not support it. It will look too much like New Port Richey and Spring Hill, Farley said. Joe Chrietzberg, community activist and longtime city resident, said has some self-described radical notions about height limits. I say bring in eight-story buildings. It probably wouldnt happen in my lifetime, but I believe it will come someday, Chrietzberg said. He blames the opposition to increased height limits on people who are wedded to keeping the city a sleepy fishing village. Chrietzberg said the city has to keep up with the realities of the times and adjust to coming demands. If not, things will keep stagnating and nobody wins if things are not growing. E RYNW ORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESS Karen Dixon-Pulcinis dream came true when her phone rang and she received the call. Doctors had a kidney and pancreas that were a match. Dixon-Pulcini, aCitrus County businesswoman fixture for more than 25 years, had been battling kidney disease as a result ofhaving Type 1 diabetes.The only hope for a curefor Dixon-Pulcini was a transplant. Her call finally came on Feb. 23 and DixonPul cini received both her kidney and pancreas transplant. Now, exactly one week after her transplant, she is home and doing well. Karen is doing fantastic, said Bonnie Peterson, a close friend of Dixon-Pulcini. She is home now and adjusting to what she can do that she couldnt do before. After 27 years of being a diabetic, she in now diabetes-free and no longer has to have dialysis. On a Facebook page created for her, her husband Walt Pulcini wrote, Were so overwhelmed with joy about Karens totally new life. He also wrote that for the last two years DixonPulcini was forbidden from one of her favorite foods cheese. The doctors are now telling her to eat cheese. Dixon-Pulcini is grateful for her health and wanted to thank the community for all of their kindness. She is so thankful for her second chance at life and to the donor family, Peterson said. She is also thankful to the community that has been by her side the whole time. To contact Dixon-Pulcini, visit her Facebook page at facebook.com/ kidneyforkaren or send cards to Cubbys 1065 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34450. Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. Special to the ChronicleCRYSTAL RIVER The Historic Seminole Club building is breathing a sigh of relief after the new owner, Art Jones had threatening trees removed. Five big trees that were dying, broken or hollow and were hanging over the historic structure are now gone. A 100-foot-high crane had to be brought in because the trees were so close to the building. Built in 1924, the community center, with 15-foot beautiful ceilings and original wood floors and wainscoting, was sold by the City of Crystal River to Jones in January 2013. Since the sale, Jones has been stabilizing and repairing the foundation, fixing broken windows, fixing doors and replacing faucets. He intends to keep the building as original as possible and continue to use it as a community center. Presently the Crystal River-Kings Bay Rotary meets there every Wednesday at noon for a catered lunch meeting. The building will also be available for rent to other groups and can accommodate parties up to 65 with tables and chairs or 150 with just seating. The next project on Jones agenda is to remove invasive clumping Bamboo and turn the lumber into a fence, fix the drainage problem on the property that occurs after heavy rains and to increase parking spaces. This spring he plans to give the building a new paint job and bring in wifi. Plans are also being considered to add an outside porch and maybe a commercial kitchen. Those interested in renting the space may contact Jones at 727-642-7659 or email MrAWJones @aol.com. A2 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE L OCAL 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! BLIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000E3KU 000E362 KUMON MATH & READING CENTERS Call Today 726-9694 3380 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.Inverness Lolite Early Learning: Your child will have an early path to success Remedial: Your child needs a little extra help Enrichment: Your child needs new academic challenges 000DXYF A r e y o u n e w t o C i t r u s C o u n t y ? Are you new to Citrus County? You chose the best place to move. Now choose the best physicians to help protect your new life! Call for a free screening appointment with one of our highly regarded specialists in our full service Inverness facility. Proud to be Accredited in both Nuclear Cardiology and Echocardiography! A limited number of appointments are available 1pm-4pm on Fridays for new residents, or those with high risk factors, including family history of heart disease and/or aneurysm, and/or current or former smokers who have no current cardiologist. D u e t o a n Due to an o v e r w h e l m i n g overwhelming r e s p o n s e response, d o n t w a i t t o dont wait to m a k e y o u r make your a p p o i n t m e n t appointment! P l e a s e c a l l 3 5 2 7 2 6 8 3 5 3 Please call 352-726-8353 to schedule your screening today! Inverness (352) 726-8353 308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness Five Locations To Serve You 3 1 s t 31 st 000E6SP OFFER EXPIRES 3/10/13 FOR 4 ROOMS *Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, hal ls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Minimum charges apply. Cannot combine with other offers Residential only; cannot be used for restoration ser vices or air duct cleaning. Must present coupon at time of service. Certain restrictions may apply. Call f or Details. C I T R U S 7 2 6 4 6 4 6 C I T R U S 7 2 6 4 6 4 6 CITRUS 726-4646 M A R I O N 6 2 2 5 8 8 5 M A R I O N 6 2 2 5 8 8 5 MARION 622-5885 Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT EXTENDED OFFER! Clean-up continues at Seminole Club Special to the Chronicle Longtime Citrus County businesswoman Karen Dixon-Pulcini is home recovering from her kidney and pancreas transplant. Local business owner recovering from pancreas, kidney transplant DixonPulcini thanks community Special to the Chronicle Dangerous trees hanging over the Historic Seminole Club in Crystal River are cut and lifted away from the building with a 100-foot crane. LIMITS Continued from Page A1 Owner plans more changes

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Associated Press At left, FAMU student Ryan Rigg, with Dream Defenders, demonstrates on the fourth floor of the Capitol on Tuesday in Tallahassee. The group advocates reforms for school, immigration, Stand Your Ground and voting issues. Sinkhole season lands in Florida MATTHEW BECK /Chronicle Friends of the Library volunteer Jean Racine, of Hernando, packs boxes full of books Tuesday morning as she and a host of other volunteers prepare for the upcoming spring book sale. The sale is not only offering books, but DVDs, puzzles and more. It runs from Friday to Tuesday at the Citrus County Auditorium in Inverness. S TATE & L OCAL Page A3 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE P AT F AHERTY Staff writerCitrus County School District has an ongoing effort to make sure parents are aware of the student breakfast program and try to increase participation. School breakfast participation across Florida, especially by low-income students, was the subject of a report by Florida Impact and the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC). The center is a national anti-hunger organization that lobbies on behalf of federal food and nutrition programs. The report pointed out while more children in the state are participating in the school breakfast program, more than half of the low-income children are missing out. If you look at the report statewide, were about average, said Roy Pistone, director of food services for Citrus County. We constantly encourage students to eat breakfast with us at school; its one of our goals. He said participation in the program is increasing and has risen about 1 percent since last year. We make sure parents know about it, he said, adding they are constantly testing new breakfast ideas and want to increase participation. Pistone said what they do not know is how many students are eating at home or before they come to school. Were in place to feed kids who do not get to eat, he said. We fill a void. Florida must make breakfast more accessible to students, said Dr. Debra Susie, Florida Impacts executive director. Expanding participation in breakfast is one of the most effective ways of promoting health and academic success for low-income children. Improving participation rates will lead to healthier and hungerfree children who start the day ready to learn. The center found Florida schools served 46.9 low-income children breakfast for every 100 who received lunch during the 2011-12 school year an increase from the previous school year when 45.5 of every 100 received breakfast. Citrus County had a participation rate of 42 for every 100 the same year. Every school district in Florida should examine its breakfast program and look at ways to reach even more children with a healthy morning meal, said Crystal FitzSimons, FRACs director of School and Out-of-School Time Programs. Our research shows that higher participation rates are seen with programs that get breakfast out of the cafeteria and into the hands of children, whether thats moving to breakfast in the classroom or using other creative ways to serve breakfast. School district aims to increase participation ChronicleWith the theme of gardens and blossoms and spring in the air, the Friends of the Citrus County Library Systems semiannual book sale happens this weekend. The first sale in 2001 raised $9,907 and the fall 2012 sale raised $47,143 $11 shy of their highest amount raised at the spring 2010 sale. In all, more than $708,500 has been raised and used to purchase new books and materials for the county library system. Here are four things not to miss at this weekends FOCCLS spring book sale: 1. Garden delights. Look for special offerings such as: a signed edition of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopfs autobiography It Doesnt Take a Hero; the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum illustrated collection Milestones of Aviation; an autographed first edition of Cuba: Island of Paradox by R. Hart Phillips, accompanied by newspaper articles and photos of the period; Bob Woodwards The Price of Politics (2012); Playboy: Fifty Years of Cartoons; a copy of the pocketbook New Testament Bible National Edition issued to World War II soldiers in the original mailing box; The Brass Ring, an illustrated memoir by Bill Mauldin; and The Iliad and the Odyssey translated by Alexander Pope (1883 ed.). Also featured are best-sellers from popular authors including Maeve Binchy, Patricia Cornwell, Michael Connelly, Janet Evanovich, Ken Follett and Stuart Woods. 2. Spring shower of values. Look for blue-light specials, BOGOs (buy one, get one) hourly on Sunday, half-price all day Monday and $3 a bag Tuesday. 3. Bonnets, hats and chapeaux. On Sunday, FOCCLS members will don their favorite spring headwear and invites the public to wear theirs. 4. Weather report: Sunny with a chance of winning an e-reader FOCCLS members will sell chances to win a 2013 Kindle Fire HD, valued at $199, for $5 each. Purchase your tickets at the table at the front of the auditorium look for the balloon. Winner does not need to be present to win. IF YOU GO: WHAT: Friends of the Citrus County Library System Spring Book Sale. WHEN: March 8 to 12. HOURS: 5 to 8 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday. WHERE: Citrus County Auditorium, 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness. ADMISSION: Free, except Friday ($5 donation). Bargains in full bloom at FOCCLS semiannual book sale Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida lawmakers opened their annual session with speeches and ceremonial pomp Tuesday, tasked by their governor to grant pay raises to teachers, slash taxes to manufacturers and take other steps to help a rebounding economy. And, yes, even a little bit of work marked the kickoff of the 60-day session that began with ceremonial gestures and peaceful protests. The centerpiece of the first day was Gov. Rick Scotts State of the State speech earlier Tuedsay in which he repeatedly used the refrain its working to insist his policies were turning around Floridas economy. The Republican governor urged legislators to embrace his priorities of granting a $2,500 teacher pay raise and creating more incentives for manufacturers and business to come to Florida. But legislators were also scheduled to take up major legislation within hours. The opening day usually guarantees a contingent of protesters. And they were present. About 100 college students and others filled one corner of the Capitol plaza, holding signs that said, The state is ours, I am human and /5 no more, a reference to a constitutional compromise that counted three-fifths of slaves for purposes of representation. They were part of the Dream Defenders, a group interested in a gamut of issues, including immigration and police brutality. Legislature kicks off with pomp, protest Associated PressSEFFNER As crews entombed a man who was swallowed by a sinkhole near Tampa, the earth opened up again just a few miles away. On Tuesday, in a neighboring county, officials investigated reports of a home cracking, perhaps due to another sinkhole. Across Florida this time of year, its the start of whats unofficially considered sinkhole season, State Geologist Jonathan Arthur said. It coincides with the beginning of the states rainy season and usually lasts until the end of summer. The weather along with man-made factors exacerbate sinkholes, experts say. Arthur said February is usually when the state is at its driest, but its also the start of the rainy season. Senate passes ethics bills on opening day TALLAHASSEE As expected, the Florida Senate passed a pair of ethics bills on the opening day of the 2013 legislative session. The fast-tracked measures (SB 2 and SB 4) each passed on a 40-0 vote Tuesday. There was no debate on either issue. Among other things, the bills seek to stop lawmakers from using political committees to pay for wining, dining and travel unrelated to their positions. It also gives the Ethics Commission power to collect fines from elected officials and allows the governor, state attorneys and the Florida Department of Law enforcement to refer cases to the commission. From wire reports Small ratio of students eat breakfast Were in place to feel kids who do not get to eat. Roy Pistone director of food services for Citrus County.

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Build America Bond (BAB) subsidy, which is used for debt service payments on county bonds. The whole amount of the reduction for this program nationwide is $218 million, to lower the fund to $4.047 billion, said Lindsay Ubinas, public information officer. She said County Budget Director Cathy Taylor had received notice of this cut. Our direct subsidy for debt service payments is $330,000 a year for the 2013-14 budget year, Ubinas said. A cut of 5.1 percent amounts to $16,830. That sum will be another challenge when forming next years county budget. In public schools, Florida will lose about $54.5 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 750 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition, about 95,000 fewer students would be served and about 130 fewer schools would receive funding. Florida also would lose about $31.1 million in funds for 380 teachers, aides and staff who help children with disabilities. However, Citrus County School District prepared for these cuts, said Kenneth Blocker, assistant superintendent, Business Services. We had planned this year for the sequestration, so we have put aside funds in the IDEA, which is the special needs area of about $275,000 and then Title I, which are the supplemental funds from the federal government (for disadvantaged children) of about $393,000 and then Title II, which is for teacher training, which is about $28,000, Blocker said. So it is a total of about $700,000 that we set aside that we did not budget anticipating sequestration of funds. Next year, Blocker said, the school district would be looking at the same number. Higher education will feel the reductions in work-study jobs. About 6,250 fewer low-income students in Florida would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and 1,700 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college. Dr. Tim Wise, vice president of student affairs at the College of Central Florida (CF), said the college would work with low income students with a number of available private, state and local programs and scholarships to help them with tuition costs. CF serves about 200 low-income students. If we had a work-study student who had to lose their position, we might be able to help them with those dollars, Wise said. As a last resort, Wise said work-study students hours could be cut. Typically, a work-study student works for 15 hours a week for minimum wage. Reducing hours would still offer employment while absorbing the financial impact. Whats challenging is that this is happening way into the financial aid year, Wise said. Essentially, it starts in the fall semester. Here we are in the middle of spring and the financial aid year runs through summer. I really think we could supplant or replace that money if it became necessary. Next year could be a different story depending on how much the cuts are. If the sequester holds, CF will have to determine what it will do next. This could bring a lot of political pressure because who wants to cut the poorest of the poor? Wise asked. Thats not going to be very popular. Its certainly not popular with us. Any time you talk about cutting funds to the poorest students, youre really talking about limiting access. Another budget reduction that may be felt in the county would be the loss of up to $404,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence through the STOP Violence Against Women Program, resulting in up to 1,500 fewer victims being served. But that loss will be an indirect impact, said Diana Finnegan, executive director of CASA (Citrus County Abuse Shelter Association). We do not get direct funding from them, Finnegan said. That is a formula grant program that provides funds to prosecutors, law enforcement, courts and victim services. The purpose of STOP is to build partnerships between courts, victim advocates, service providers, prosecution and law enforcement to reduce violent crimes against women. Although we are not affected directly, we are aware of the work they have done around the state to hold perpetrators accountable and improve safety, Finnegan said. Of course, we are concerned that some of this project may suffer as a result of fewer resources. Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvan ormer@chronicleonline.c om. Pat Faherty contributed to this report. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE HI LO PR 74 38 0.00 HI LO PR 71 32 0.00 HI LO PR 74 35 0.00 HI LO PR 71 33 0.00 HI LO PR 82 40 0.00 HI LO PR 72 34 0.00 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Increasing sunshine, windy and cooler THREE DAY OUTLOOK Mostly Sunny and cool to mild Mostly sunny, pleasantly mildHigh: 63 Low: 38 High: 64 Low: 39 High: 70 Low: 41 TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Tuesday 74/35 Record 91/31 Normal 76/48 Mean temp. 55 Departure from mean -7 PRECIPITATION* Tuesday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.00 in. Total for the year 2.10 in. Normal for the year 6.61 in.*As of 7 p.m. at Inverness UV INDEX: 8 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.12 in. DEW POINT Tuesday at 3 p.m. 45 HUMIDITY Tuesday at 3 p.m. 35% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were heavy.** Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms. AIR QUALITY Tuesday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:33 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:49 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................2:39 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................1:33 P.M. MARCH 11MARCH 19MARCH 27APRIL 3 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 63 43 s Ft. Lauderdale 78 50 pc Fort Myers 72 47 s Gainesville 62 35 s Homestead 78 49 pc Jacksonville 60 35 s Key West 79 59 pc Lakeland 68 39 s Melbourne 67 44 s City H L Fcast Miami 79 50 pc Ocala 64 36 s Orlando 68 42 s Pensacola 57 38 s Sarasota 67 46 s Tallahassee 60 34 s Tampa 66 45 s Vero Beach 69 45 pc W. Palm Bch. 76 48 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNorthwest winds from 20 to 25 knots. Seas 3 to 6 feet. Bay and inland waters will be choppy. Mostly sunny today. Gulf water temperature62 LAKE LEVELS Location Mon. Tues. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 28.15 28.14 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.66 37.66 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 38.57 38.55 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.86 39.84 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOK Taken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 41 28 sn 41 28 Albuquerque 60 32 pc 65 40 Asheville 52 34 .68 sn 41 28 Atlanta 65 49 .13 pc 47 31 Atlantic City 49 27 sh 41 35 Austin 68 50 s 65 36 Baltimore 48 27 rs 35 31 Billings 30 6 c 48 30 Birmingham 66 42 .24 pc 50 30 Boise 54 28 sh 51 32 Boston 43 32 rs 42 33 Buffalo 34 20 c 38 30 Burlington, VT 36 24 c 41 29 Charleston, SC 66 41 s 56 37 Charleston, WV 52 31 .16 sn 37 29 Charlotte 57 38 .16 pc 50 32 Chicago 34 29 .58 sn 34 24 Cincinnati 40 36 .10 sn 34 26 Cleveland 36 21 sn 36 25 Columbia, SC 72 37 pc 54 35 Columbus, OH 41 32 .01 sn 34 25 Concord, N.H. 42 26 rs 37 29 Dallas 58 44 pc 60 40 Denver 37 4 s 59 31 Des Moines 33 27 .06 s 32 17 Detroit 36 22 c 38 29 El Paso 64 41 pc 71 48 Evansville, IN 49 33 .09 c 39 26 Harrisburg 44 25 sn 35 31 Hartford 47 29 sh 41 31 Houston 69 56 s 65 41 Indianapolis 37 31 .36 c 33 24 Jackson 69 50 s 54 32 Las Vegas 74 49 pc 72 52 Little Rock 61 44 .08 s 52 31 Los Angeles 61 54 c 60 51 Louisville 48 33 .42 c 37 29 Memphis 64 41 .41 s 49 32 Milwaukee 32 28 .39 sn 34 22 Minneapolis 30 25 .37 pc 30 10 Mobile 74 60 s 59 34 Montgomery 75 48 .06 pc 53 31 Nashville 56 38 .82 pc 43 30 New Orleans 76 60 s 58 41 New York City 49 31 sh 42 33 Norfolk 48 27 .02 sh 47 35 Oklahoma City 50 33 s 52 34 Omaha 34 25 s 36 22 Palm Springs 79 56 s 74 47 Philadelphia 49 31 rs 39 31 Phoenix 81 57 s 81 56 Pittsburgh 44 20 sn 37 26 Portland, ME 44 32 rs 39 30 Portland, Ore 46 42 .05 sh 48 38 Providence, R.I. 47 31 rs 42 32 Raleigh 50 35 .13 rs 46 34 Rapid City 32 5 pc 54 31 Reno 62 31 sn 49 27 Rochester, NY 32 25 c 39 29 Sacramento 59 44 sh 58 40 St. Louis 43 32 .25 s 39 25 St. Ste. Marie 33 10 c 32 22 Salt Lake City 45 25 pc 57 36 San Antonio 69 51 s 67 41 San Diego 60 57 pc 61 52 San Francisco 56 43 sh 55 43 Savannah 70 38 s 56 36 Seattle 49 43 trace sh 48 38 Spokane 40 29 sh 47 32 Syracuse 34 27 c 41 28 Topeka 40 28 s 40 22 Washington 53 32 rs 35 32YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 82 El Centro, Calif. LOW -19 Fraser, Colo. WEDNESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/71/s Amsterdam 52/41/c Athens 58/49/pc Beijing 61/30/pc Berlin 50/32/s Bermuda 65/62/sh Cairo 71/48/s Calgary 19/10/sf Havana 82/62/pc Hong Kong 70/66/pc Jerusalem 55/41/s Lisbon 62/57/sh London 49/43/c Madrid 53/50/sh Mexico City 73/43/s Montreal 36/23/pc Moscow 28/28/sf Paris 52/47/sh Rio 83/74/sh Rome 54/54/sh Sydney 81/64/pc Tokyo 57/49/pc Toronto 39/30/c Warsaw 49/35/s WORLD CITIES Tuesday Wednesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Tuesday Wednesda y City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Wednesday ThursdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 2:21 p/9:02 a /8:42 p 12:49 a/10:22 a 3:26 p/10:11 p Crystal River** 12:42 p/6:24 a 11:10 p/6:04 p 1:47 p/7:44 a /7:33 p Withlacoochee* 10:29 a/4:12 a 8:57 p/3:52 p 11:34 a/5:32 a 10:22 p/5:21 p Homosassa*** 1:31 p/8:01 a 11:59 p/7:41 p 2:36 p/9:21 a /9:10 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 3/6 WEDNESDAY 12:39 6:54 1:08 7:23 3/7 THURSDAY 1:32 7:46 2:00 8:14 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. WEDNESDAY HI LO PR 74 35 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Oak, Nettle, Juniper Todays count: 10.6/12 Thursdays count: 10.1 Fridays count: 10.2 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68* 1 year: $121.87* *Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year. For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655 Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers: Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.com Meadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness office Whos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................ Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946 Report a news tip: Opinion page questions .................................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken .......................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ...................................................... Sarah Gatling, 563-5660 Wire service content .................................................... Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579 The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc. 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. A4 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 Legal notices in todays Cit rus C ounty Chronicle 000E4C8 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . C12 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . . . C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . C12 Tax Deed Notices . . . . . . . . . . C12 Termination of Parental Rights Notices . C11 Surplus Property . . . . . . . . . . C11 WHERE CUTS WILL GO The trillion dollars of reductions are targeted in many areas: The U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which oversees licensing, operations and decommissioning of nuclear power plants including Crystal River and the proposed facility in Levy County, is expecting a $52 million budget cut in the next financial year. However, the agency plans to continue normal operations, though it has warned utilities of possible program delays or deferrals. Whatever the unemployment rate, Florida will lose about $2.3 million in funding for job search assistance, referral and placement, meaning around 78,960 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment. Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for 2,700 children in Florida, reducing access to critical early education. Florida would lose about $3.8 million in funds that provide meals for seniors. The county has not been notified about reductions. Support Services receives funding through the Older Americans Act.This funding along with county match dollars and donations provides more than 110,000 meals to seniors at community centers and through the home-delivered meals programs. Currently, there is not a waiting list for the meals program, thanks to increased donations this past year. Any reduction in federal funding would impact the services provided to Citrus County seniors. Up to 1,600 disadvantag ed and vulne rable childr en could lose access to child care, which is essential for working parents to hold down a job. In Florida around 7,450 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of $509,000. Florida will lose about $1.8 million in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters and biological, chemical, nuclear and radiological events. In addition, Florida will lose about $5 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in 4,500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Florida State Department of Health will lose about $1.4 million, resulting in 35,900 fewer HIV tests. Florida will lose about $970,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives. CUTS Continued from Page A1

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Associated PressWASHINGTON The Dow roared to a record Tuesday. Yet the markets run-up feels worlds away from the lives of many Americans. Here are five reasons why many Americans dont share Wall Streets corkpopping mood: Fewer people have money invested in the stock market, so many missed out on the rally. Americans sold more stocks than they bought for a fifth straight year in 2012, despite unprecedented efforts by the Federal Reserve to juice the market and encourage investment. Americans have sold hundreds of billions of dollars worth of stock the first time on record thats happened during a sustained bull market. The market rise has been powered by companies buying their own stock. The flight from stock markets has coincided with a series of confidence-rattling stumbles: last years botched initial public offerings by Facebook and BATS Global Markets; the 2010 flash crash that sent the Dow plunging 600 points in five minutes; unprecedented volatility related to European and U.S. fiscal policy debates. Confidence in the market was already weak after the harrowing financial crisis that peaked in 2008. Americans who didnt buy stocks early simply havent benefited from the rise that pushed the Dow up 118 percent since its recession low in March 2009. Wages are stagnant and incomes are shrinking. The weak job market is limiting pay. With so many applicants to choose among, employers need not compete for workers by boosting salaries. Hourly wages increased 2.1 percent last year, barely enough to keep up with inflation. Median household incomes fell 4.8 percent between June 2009 and June 2012, after adjusting for inflation, according to a report by Sentier Research, which crunches census and other government data. Meanwhile, Americans are paying down debt. That leaves fewer dollars available for spending. The Social Security tax break is no more. Nearly 80 percent of working Americans are taking home less pay this year because of a tax hike that took effect on Jan. 1. The last-minute tax deal between Congress and President Barack Obama to extend some lower tax rates failed to renew a reduction in Social Security payroll taxes. As a result, the rate increased this year to 6.2 percent from 4.2 percent. The extra 2 percentage points will cost someone making $50,000 about $1,000 a year, and a household with two high-paid workers up to $4,500. Housing may have hit bottom, but it hasnt fully recovered. In a healthy housing market, builders start work on about 1.5 million houses and apartments a year. Last year, they began 780,000. Thats a 41 percent increase from 2009, but not enough to revive big industries like construction that rely on the production of new homes. Home price gains also suggest a slow, uneven healing process. The S&P/Case-Shiller index of home prices started rising in June after 20 straight months of decline. Prices nationwide remain about 30 percent below the peak reached in mid-2006. Despite recent gains, hiring remains slow. The unemployment rate stands at 7.9 percent, an improvement from the 10 percent peak during the recession, but still well above the 5 percent that policymakers strive for during good times. Unemployment affects the broader economy and consumers outlooks in a number of ways. Jobless people contribute less to consumer spending, which accounts for about 70 percent of economic activity. Acrimony over extending long-term benefits for unemployed people has contributed to Washingtons rolling series of budget standoffs, rattling the economy. underway at the college is a program targeting veterans returning to the job marketplace. One in Inverness is Navigating the New World of Work followed by a session on targeted resumes. Both will be repeated in Citrus County later this month. On March 15, a workshop titled Nail that Interview will be held in Inverness. It is designed for individuals who are committed to improving their interviewing skills. And on March 27, the second annual Spring Fling Job Fair will be held the college. It will be an opportunity for job seekers to meet with employers who are hiring and apply for those jobs. This is one of the most robust months weve had in terms of offerings for job-seekersinterested in enhancing their employability skills, Jerry Flanders, Workforce Connections workshop coordinator said. There is something going on every day throughout our threecounty region. Sessions range from two hours to twoand three-days long; all are provided to job seekers at no charge. There is no charge to attend any of the workshops or events, but participants must be fully registered with Workforce Connection through the Employ Florida Marketplace (EFM) at www. EmployFlorida.com; additional workshop registration may also be required. Visit www.Workforce ConnectionFL.com or call 352-291-9559. Anyone seeking a wellpaying occupation that does not require college is invited to the Career Expo and Open House, Thursday, from noon to 2:20 p.m. at Withlacoochee Technical Institute. The event is open to anyone, including high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors interested in seeing what WTI has to offer. We have 10 percent high school students and 90 percent post-secondary students, explained director Denise Willis, at a recent EDC meeting. We have opportunities for students to earn industry credentials. Last year, WTI students earned more than 400 certifications in areas including air conditioning, welding and law enforcement. Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty @chronicleonline.com. 7.9 percent today, a reminder that stock gains have proved no elixir for the economy. Still, the Dow high is another sign that the nation is slowly healing after the worst recession since the 1930s. It comes as car sales are at a five-year high, home prices are rising, and U.S. companies continue to report big profits. The stock gains have helped retirement and brokerage accounts held by many Americans recover. That, in turn, has helped push U.S. household wealth nearly back to its peak before the recession, though many in the middle class are still deep in the hole. Most middle-class wealth is tied up in home values, which are still a third below their peak. Good economic news Tuesday helped lift stocks. Retail sales in the 17 European countries that use the euro rose faster than expected, Chinas government said it would support ambitious growth targets, and a report showed U.S. service companies grew last month at their fastest pace in a year. It feels great, says Marty Leclerc, chief investment officer at Barrack Yard Advisors, an investment firm. In early 2009, when stocks were plummeting, it looked like Armageddon was nigh. Its a lot more fun to be in a rising market. In the depths of the recession four years ago, few investors would have predicted such a fast recovery. Some feared another Great Depression. Banks were collapsing, lending was frozen, world trade was plunging, and stocks were in free fall. People thought we were going to relive the 1930s, says Robert Buckland, chief global stock strategist at Citigroup. He calls the stock gains since pretty remarkable. From its peak in October 2007 to its bottom in March 2009, the Dow fell 54 percent. That was far less than the nearly 90 percent drop in the Great Depression but scary nonetheless. There had been 11 previous bear markets since World War II and none had reached 50 percent. As stock rebounds go, this has been an unusually quiet and uncelebrated one. Typically, bull markets are accompanied by rising trading volume, a surge in young companies going public and Internet chatter over hot stocks. The past four years, none of that has happened. Adding to the chastened mood is lingering fear among many investors that stock gains can disappear in a flash. C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 A5 000E8SA 565 Hwy. 41 South, Inverness MON.-FRI. 9-6 SAT. 10-4 SUN. 12-5 FURNITURE DEPOT 352726-4835 000E95D We Have a Train Load of Top Notch New & Used Furniture On New Mattress & Box Springs! $ 295 Free Delivery & Setup and removal of old mattress QUEEN SIZE Save Big Ethan Allen Thomasville Drexel Broyhill Basset GREEK FESTIVAL ART & VENDOR EXPO 2013 FREE PARKING RAIN OR SHINE Delicious Greek Dinners Greek Music & Daily Door Prizes Art & Specialty Merchandise Vendors Greek Pastries, Desserts & Coffee Shoppe Greek Gyros & Grilled Specialties Pony Rides, Face Painting 20 Ft. Slide & Petting Zoo March 8, 9, 10th Indoor Dinners & Outside Grille Friday & Saturday 11a.m. 8p.m. Sunday 11a.m. 5p.m. ADMISSION $1.00 DONATION Presented by: Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church 4705 W. Gulf to Lake Blvd. (State Rd. 44), Lecanto, FL www.stmichaelgoc.org (352) 527-0766 Co-Sponsored by: 000E1U0 000E8K2 JOBS Continued from Page A1 Dows back, but many arent celebrating Stock market recovery masks deeper problems still afflicting nations economy DOW Continued from Page A1

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Associated PressNEW YORK Yahoos leaked edict under CEO Marissa Mayer that calls remote workers back to the office lit the Twitterverse on fire, angering advocates of telecommuting and other programs intended to balance work and home life. A new study from the nonprofit Families and Work Institute shows a tide moving the other way, with more workers now telecommuting and men significantly more likely than women to be granted the freedom to work at least partially at home. Left mostly unanswered is the question Mayer appears to be dealing with: Is that a good thing? Or has the rise in telecommuting led to a drop in productivity or creativity? Chances are, one telework supporter said, the tech giant just wasnt doing it right. If you dont know where your people are and what theyre doing, then you havent implemented properly, so shes got her hands full, said Kate Lister in San Diego, Calif., cofounder of Global Workplace Analytics, which collects data on the subject for its Telework Research Network. Slogging through decades of research on the value of telecommuting is complicated. Small studies have been done by employer membership organizations, companies looking at their own ranks, consulting firms and government agencies, along with academics. Some use small samples, others rely on a wild array of statistics from the U.S. Census, the Small Business Administration or the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The verdicts are mixed and the research often so focused on a work force or issue related to flex options that its difficult to make conclusions. The new Families and Work Institute study, on the other hand, deals solely with employers in the United States, delving into a broad range of family friendly programs, policies and benefits. The institute found that 63 percent of employers surveyed allow at least some employees to work partially at home on an occasional basis. Thats up from 34 percent in a comparable study done for the institute in 2005. More of the workers were higher-wage earners. Overall, the number of employees who work entirely from home was 3 percent, compared to 64 percent who sometimes do, said Ellen Galinsky, the institutes president and co-founder. Men were significantly more likely than women to work partially at home 67 percent compared to 59 percent of women, partially a reflection of more men in jobs where the option is possible. Men also were more likely to work mainly from home. Neither Lister nor Galinsky has the inside scoop on whats happening at Yahoo, but Galinsky was steadfast about one thing. To take away all flexibility for everyone all the time is an overreaction, she said. If you know that people will be more innovative and collaborative by being together, that is a positive. But sometimes people need time alone. Why do the best ideas occur in the shower, or when were walking the dog? Galinsky and others who study work-life balance dont anticipate a backlash among other employers due to Yahoo. And the company itself followed up an internal memo leaked to the tech blog All things D with a curt statement indicating the prohibition might not be forever. Meantime, Lister said about 2.5 percent of the U.S. civilian population, or about 3 million people, work at home at least half the time, according to U.S. Census data. The rate of growth was slowed by the recession, with some researchers suggesting its flat at the moment. Why isnt the number even higher? The biggest reason is that managers dont trust their employees, Lister said. Theyre still managing the 21stcentury work force with 20th-century styles of commands and controls, back to the days of sweatshops and typing pools. They like to be able to see the backs of their heads. The perceived benefits for workers are clear. While 37 percent of the companies in Galinskys report cite retention of employees as the main reason for developing workplace flexibility and other programs, Lister said 90 percent of teleworkers feel being able to work flexibly improves their quality of life. But what about for employers? The leaked Yahoo memo, written by Jackie Reses, the companys human resources director, said in part: Some of the best decisions and insights come from hallway and cafeteria discussions, meeting new people and impromptu team meeting. Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home. We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together. Researchers in the field note a dearth in credible studies that confirm a boost in creative flow or innovation from face time. And telecommuting may actually boost productivity, at least where it stands in the number of hours worked, said researchers Mary C. Noonan and Jennifer L. Glass in a study of telecommuting published last June in the Monthly Labor Review, a publication of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The two studied employees who work regularly but not exclusively from home and found that for them, telecommuting was not a substitute for working onsite during an agreed upon work week but rather was in addition to a full week, at least half the time. People have only looked at the benefits without seeing that maybe some of these policies can come back to bite you, said Noonan, a sociologist who teaches classes on the American family and statistics at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Victor Keller, 94BEVERLY HILLSVictor R. Keller, 94, of Beverly Hills, passed away Sunday, March 3, 2013, at Woodland Terrace Nursing Center in Hernando. A native of Budapest, Hungary, he was born Sept. 2, 1918, to Frank and Mary Keller. Mr. Keller moved to Beverly Hills from Elmont, L.I., N.Y., 18 years ago and was a retired general manager for a major parking garage enterprise in New York City, a career that lasted 35 years. Victor was a gifted and talented artist and expressed this passion with oil and woodcarving mediums. He is survived by his wife of 20 years, Nell B. Luccioni of Beverly Hills; son, Don Keller (wife Judy Lamb), The Villages, Fla.; daughter, Vicki Warnock (husband Patrick), Freehold, N.J.; son, Mitchell Keller, Tucson, Ariz.; daughter-in-law, Helen Keller, Palm Bay, Fla.; grandchildren, John, Richard Jr., Donna, Laura and Victor; and greatgrandchildren, Daniel, David, Brendan, Connor, Amy and R.J. Victor was preceded in death by a son, Richard Keller; and a halfbrother, Frank Nemeth. Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. www.fero funeralhome.com. Mary Wilmarth, 90HOMOSASSA Mary E. Wilmarth, 90, of Homosassa, died Friday, March 1, 2013, at her home. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Harrison Rogers, 61 INVERNESS Harrison Rogers, 61, Inverness, died Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at his residence. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of private arrangements. A6 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of the arrangements. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. Obituaries Special to the Chronicle From left are John J.J. Kenney, commissioner; Dennis Damato, commissioner; Rebecca Bays, commissioner; Pat Coles, Support Services operations supervisor; Amy Engelken, assistant Community Services director; Scott Adams, commissioner; and Joe Meek, commission chair. March for Meals in Citrus County Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus County Board of County Commissioners has declared March as March for Meals month in Citrus County at the regular meeting of the Board of County Commissioners. This event is a national campaign from the Meals on Wheels Association of America, which brings awareness of senior hunger issues. Citrus Countys program is Home Delivered Meals, which delivers food to seniors who need it throughout Citrus County. The program is funded two ways: a federal grant under the Older Americans Act of 1965 and several fundraisers throughout the year. For more information on any of these events or about any of the Senior Programs, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. UPCOMING EVENTS 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 22 Under the Stars Dance; Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Tickets $10. 8 a.m. Saturday, March 30 Golf for Meals tournament; Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club; $55 entry per golfer. Telecommuting: Was Yahoo doing it right? Associated Press Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer appears Feb. 20 on NBC News Today show in New York to introduce the websites redesign. As Mayer goes about the business of saving Yahoo, which now involves a ban on working from home, a new study shows a significant jump in the number of U.S. employers offering flex time and other quality-of-life perks. 000E8BO Lecanto 11:00 am Monday, March 11, 2013 Holiday Inn Express 903 E. Gulf to Lake Highway RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com 000E5ZC Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons Ward Eye Center 8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa (352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123 M O D E R N MODERN D I A B E T I C DIABETIC S P E C I A L I S T SPECIALIST 000E35Y RISE RISE Construction Construction Visit our new showroom in downtown Inverness 352.419.8900 352.419.8900 109 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34452 www.riseconstructions We specialize in: Kitchen Remodeling, Bathroom Remodeling, Outdoor Living, Patios, Pavers, Gazebos 000E9DZ Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods 000DWD3 Funeral Home With Crematory C h a s E D a v i s Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 AILEEN FITZPATRICK Pending LYDIA WINANT Private Florida National Cemetery JOSEPH LOPEZ Private Arrangements ANTONIO REYES Service: Fri. 3:00 PM Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date. There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place YourIn Memory ad, Judy Moseley at 564-2917 jmoseley@chronicleonline.com 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000DU38 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 A7 000E8P2 Homosassa Springs Plaza 3944 S. Suncoast (Next to Publix) (352) 621-7528 Dr. Henry Meer BOARD CERTIFIED OPTOMETRIC PHYSICIAN

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A8 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000E8A7 Prices Good Wednesday, March 6 through Tuesday, March 12, 2013 *Floor Prep & Trims at Additional Cost. Min. labor charges may apply. All Prior Sales Excluded. See store for details. **While Supplies Last. V isit us at www.cashcarpetandtile.com 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 341-0355 Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 Mohawk Floating Oak Flooring 3/8 Multi Ply Engineered Construction Unilin Locking System Natural Red Oak Finish $ 4 59 Now Sq Ft Material Only 3/8 Strand Woven Bamboo w / U n i l i n w/Unilin L o c k i n g S y s t e m Locking System $ 3 99 Sale 2 Times Harder Than Red Oak 25 Yr Residential/15 Yr Commercial Warranty Choose From, Natural, Carbonized, o r Tiger 20 10 20 20 10 Sq. Ft. Material Only MARINE CARPET 8 WIDE 89 SF Blue, Gray & Brown MATERIAL ONLY ECONOMICAL PLUSH SALE! WITH 7/16 CUSHION $ 1 49 SF INSTALLED TARKETT VINYL Choose from in stock patterns $ 1 59 SF INSTALLED PORCH CARPET $ 1 29 SF INSTALLED From Click Lock Vinyl Plank NAFCO VINYL PLANK SF INSTALLED SHAW NYLON 40 oz. $ 2 79 SF INSTALLED SOFT TOUCH BERBER $ 2 59 SF INSTALLED NATURAL SLATE 20 mil wear layer 100% Waterproof Easy Do-it-yourself Installation $ 3 69 $ 3 99 Was Material Only Sq. Ft. Material Only $ 2 97 Exclusive High-Tech Tritonite Wear-layer 15 Yr Residential Warranty 6 Wood Grain patterns to choose from $ 2 59 C l e a r a n c e C l e a r a n c e Clearance 3/8 Thick Unglazed Textured Finish with Random Variation in Tone 10 Pieces Per Box Textured Saxony Cut Pile Lifetime Soil & Stain Warranty Full 50 Color Designer Palette Durability of Berber with Soft-Touch Feel Lifetime Stain Warranty Solid & Berber Fleck Palette 20 X 20 PORCELAIN TILE $ 1 79 Sq. Ft. Material Only Durable Porcelain Body Several Patterns to Select From In-Stock Limited Quantities S t a r t i n g A t S t a r t i n g Starting A t At S a l e Sale S a l e Sale S a l e Sale S a l e Sale Only

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Associated PressDETROIT Ford Motor Co. said Tuesday it sold a record 11,600 natural gas vehicles last year, more than four times the number it sold two years ago. Its the latest sign natural gas is making inroads as a transportation fuel, particularly for truck fleets, buses and taxis. The consumer market is tougher to crack, but sales are gaining there as well. Natural gas is cheap and plentiful in the U.S. after a spike in production that began in the middle of last decade. At the same time, the price of gasoline and diesel fuel has jumped more than 30 percent. That makes natural gas which also emits fewer greenhouse gases an increasingly attractive option for truck companies and municipalities. But while natural gas may be a good choice for snow plows and trash trucks, which go relatively short distances and can refuel at city-owned pumps, its a tougher call for ordinary consumers. Natural gas cars cost more and there are few public places to refuel them. Those issues need to be addressed if the vehicles are to significantly boost their share of the auto market, which is currently less than 1 percent. General Motors Co. and Chrysler Group recently added natural gas pickup trucks to their lineups. Honda Motor Co. is seeing more interest in its natural gas Civic with record U.S. sales of nearly 2,000 last year and industry experts expect more offerings for regular buyers in the next year or two. Natural gas vehicles arent new. Fords previous peak sales, of 5,491, were in 2001. But they fell out of favor later that decade when the price of natural gas spiked. Ford stopped selling natural gas vehicles in 2004 and didnt start making them again until 2009. During those five years, new technology unlocked vast reserves of natural gas in deep rock formations, creating a glut that has depressed prices. Compressed natural gas or CNG now costs between $1.79 to $3.49 per gallon in the U.S. depending on the location, compared with an average of $3.74 for gasoline and $4.12 for diesel, according to Clean Energy, which operates natural gas fueling stations, and AAA. Its even cheaper for corporate or government buyers, who may pay as little as 80 cents per gallon for their natural gas, according to CNG Now, an industry lobbying group. In the U.S., CNG is sold in units that have the energy equivalent of a gallon of gasoline. No one is quite sure how many natural gas vehicles are on the road. Honda and Chrysler are the only companies that make CNG-ready vehicles in their own factories. Ford and GM make vans and trucks prepared to run on CNG, or on a combination of gasoline and CNG, but rely on outside companies to add about $10,000 worth of equipment, including the natural gas tank. Some drivers convert their cars and trucks on their own. GE, which is currently developing a home fueling station, estimates 250,000 natural gas vehicles are currently in use in the United States. Dave Hurst, a principal research analyst with Pike Research, a division of the consulting firm Navigant, estimates that 20,381 natural gas vehicles were sold in the U.S. in 2012. Ford sold more than half of those, but big truck makers like Navistar and Freightliner and bus makers like New Flyer were also in the mix. Hurst estimates 1,600 CNG buses and 1,500 CNG garbage trucks were sold last year. Hurst expects CNG vehicle sales to grow by 10 percent per year through 2019, when hes forecasting sales of 39,864. In a market where 16 million new cars and trucks are sold each year, thats still less than 1 percent. B USINESS C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 A9 Money & MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,350 1,400 1,450 1,500 1,550 SONDJF 1,480 1,520 1,560 S&P 500 Close: 1,539.79 Change: 14.59 (1.0%) 10 DAYS 12,500 13,000 13,500 14,000 14,500 SONDJF 13,760 14,040 14,320 Dow Jones industrials Close: 14,253.77 Change: 125.95 (0.9%) 10 DAYSAdvanced2249 Declined800 New Highs448 New Lows30 Vol. (in mil.)3,494 Pvs. Volume3,331 1,841 1,688 1729 712 255 24 NYSE NASD DOW14286.3714127.8214253.77+125.95+0.89%+8.77% DOW Trans.6162.846044.676136.72+92.05+1.52%+15.64% DOW Util.489.57485.78488.25+2.47+0.51%+7.76% NYSE Comp.9000.578939.998978.09+77.04+0.87%+6.33% NASDAQ3227.313200.273224.13+42.10+1.32%+6.78% S&P5001543.471525.201539.79+14.59+0.96%+7.97% S&P4001117.411101.961116.67+14.71+1.33%+9.43% Wilshire 500016292.3316103.4716258.46+154.99+0.96%+8.43% Russell 2000928.13920.08927.40+10.72+1.17%+9.19% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD Stocks Recap AK Steel Hold AKS3.421 8.65 3.48-.06 -1.7 ttt-24.3-53.7dd... AT&T Inc T29.958 38.58 36.60+.37 +1.0 sss+8.6+23.1291.80f Ametek Inc AME29.860 42.45 42.22+.52 +1.2 sss+12.4+32.4220.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD64.990 94.75 94.70+.17 +0.2 sss+8.3+43.31.57e Bank of America BAC6.729 12.42 11.55+.14 +1.2 stt-0.5+40.8440.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.350 12.23 11.95+.04 +0.3 sts+5.1+58.8cc... CenturyLink Inc CTL32.053 43.43 35.23+.12 +0.3 stt-9.9-4.5282.16m Citigroup C24.610 44.71 43.60+.66 +1.5 sss+10.2+26.0140.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.469 25.25 23.12-.78 -3.3 tss+46.0+35.0411.00 Disney DIS40.880 55.95 56.48+.68 +1.2 sss+13.4+33.5180.75f Duke Energy DUK59.630 71.13 70.16+.45 +0.6 sss+10.0+15.3203.06 EPR Properties EPR40.049 50.19 48.91+.42 +0.9 sss+6.1+14.1253.16f Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.138 93.67 89.61+.66 +0.7 sts+3.5+5.792.28 Ford Motor F8.828 14.30 12.87+.12 +0.9 stt-0.6+2.2100.40f Gen Electric GE18.020 23.75 23.59+.32 +1.4 sss+12.4+26.5180.76 Home Depot HD46.120 70.30 70.47+.18 +0.3 sss+13.9+50.7231.56f Intel Corp INTC19.233 29.27 21.51+.24 +1.1 sss+4.3-17.7100.90 IBM IBM181.859 211.79 206.53+1.34 +0.7 sss+7.8+4.9143.40 LKQ Corporation LKQ14.637 23.99 20.48-.18 -0.9 stt-2.9+27.924... Lowes Cos LOW24.760 39.98 38.76+.33 +0.9 sss+9.1+38.8230.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.318 100.44 95.81+.74 +0.8 sss+8.6-1.5183.08 Microsoft Corp MSFT26.264 32.95 28.35+.20 +0.7 sss+6.1-9.6150.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.490 62.51 62.97+.47 +0.8 sss+13.1+24.8211.04 NextEra Energy NEE59.190 73.76 73.88+.29 +0.4 sss+6.8+27.2162.64f Penney JC Co Inc JCP15.691 39.73 14.96-1.78 -10.6 ttt-24.1-56.5dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.620 20.00 19.97+.25 +1.3 sss+10.6+15.3360.80 Regions Fncl RF5.460 8.00 7.92+.07 +0.9 sts+11.1+32.4110.04 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.402 85.90 46.63+2.46 +5.6 sts+12.7-37.4dd... Smucker, JM SJM73.200 96.64 97.10+.46 +0.5 sss+12.6+29.2212.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.300 6.04 5.87+.04 +0.7 sss+3.5+133.2dd... Texas Instru TXN26.060 34.66 35.00+.44 +1.3 sss+13.3+7.6221.12f Time Warner TWX33.620 54.16 55.05+.89 +1.6 sss+15.1+48.7181.60f UniFirst Corp UNF55.869 88.35 84.39+.09 +0.1 rss+15.1+43.4170.15 Verizon Comm VZ36.800 48.77 47.69+.58 +1.2 sss+10.2+27.1cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.425 30.07 26.68+1.31 +5.2 sts+5.9-1.11.53e WalMart Strs WMT57.189 77.60 73.72+.46 +0.6 sss+8.0+26.8151.88f Walgreen Co WAG28.530 42.00 40.72-1.05 -2.5 tts+10.0+31.0181.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after s tock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative iss ue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A group of investors disclosed a minority stake in the carbon fiber maker and requested a meeting to oust the companys board. The retailers chairman and CEO, Edward Lampert, disclosed that he bought another 1.24 million shares of the companys common stock. A Jefferies analyst reiterated his Buy rating on the Internet search company and said that its stock price might reach $1,000. The fitness equipment maker posted strong fourth-quarter results, saying that earnings grew more than fourfold to $13.6 million. The Deerfield, Ill.-based drugstore chain said that sales from stores open at least a year fell 0.6 percent in February. The Dow Jones industrial average rose to a record high Tuesday following encouraging reports on the global economy. Strong corporate profit growth and stimulus from the Federal Reserve has helped the Dow more than double since hitting its low in March 2009. 35 40 $45 DJF WalgreenWAG Close: $40.72 -1.05 or -2.5% $28.53$42.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 12.8m (1.9x avg.) $38.48 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 18.4 2.7% 2 4 6 $8 DJF Nautilus NLS Close: $6.69 0.73 or 12.2% $2.20$6.92 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.4m (4.1x avg.) $206.77 m 52-week range PE: Yield: 30.4 ... 600 700 800 $900 DJF Google GOOG Close: $838.60 17.10 or 2.1% $ 556.52$840.15 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 4.0m (1.7x avg.) $224.33 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 26.3 ... 35 40 45 $50 DJF Sears Holdings SHLD Close: $46.63 2.46 or 5.6% $38.40$85.90 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.7m (1.5x avg.) $4.96 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 6 8 10 $12 DJF Zoltek ZOLT Close: $10.52 1.27 or 13.7% $6.02$12.10 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 2.0m (4.7x avg.) $361.47 m 52-week range PE: Yield: 15.9 ... The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.90 percent Tuesday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans. NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.080.08....06 6-month T-bill.110.12-0.01.14 52-wk T-bill.150.15....15 2-year T-note.250.24+0.01.30 5-year T-note.780.76+0.02.87 10-year T-note1.901.88+0.022.01 30-year T-bond3.113.09+0.023.15 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.812.80+0.012.66 Bond Buyer Muni Idx4.054.03+0.024.59 Barclays USAggregate1.861.85+0.012.11 Barclays US High Yield5.735.76-0.037.02 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.853.83+0.023.83 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.061.05+0.011.10 Barclays US Corp2.762.74+0.023.27 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of crude oil climbed higher with stock markets around the world, rebounding from its lowest level of the year. Silver, platinum and prices for other metals also rose. Crude Oil (bbl)90.8290.12+0.78-1.1 Ethanol (gal)2.432.40...+11.1 Heating Oil (gal)2.972.92+1.85-2.4 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.533.53...+5.3 Unleaded Gas (gal)3.153.10+1.61+12.0 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1574.601572.10+0.16-6.0 Silver (oz)28.5628.46+0.37-5.3 Platinum (oz)1585.701566.20+1.25+3.1 Copper (lb)3.503.48+0.39-4.0 Palladium (oz)732.60712.50+2.82+4.3 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.301.30-0.56-0.2 Coffee (lb)1.411.46-3.73-2.3 Corn (bu)7.327.23+1.24+4.8 Cotton (lb)0.860.85+1.25+14.4 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)387.30387.20+0.03+3.6 Orange Juice (lb)1.241.24-0.36+6.4 Soybeans (bu)14.9714.90+0.42+5.5 Wheat (bu)6.966.96+0.04-10.5 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 21.55+.14 +5.6+13.2+11.3+6.1 BondAm 12.89... -0.1+4.0+5.8+4.2 CapIncBuAm 54.76+.32 +3.8+11.0+9.2+3.3 CpWldGrIAm 39.14+.39 +5.2+13.9+8.4+1.9 EurPacGrAm 42.63+.41 +3.4+10.3+5.9+0.9 FnInvAm 43.75+.42 +7.3+15.3+11.3+3.8 GrthAmAm 36.73+.35 +6.9+15.8+10.6+3.8 IncAmerAm 18.93+.12 +4.8+12.6+11.2+5.7 InvCoAmAm 32.21+.30 +6.8+13.7+10.0+3.9 NewPerspAm 33.20+.32 +6.2+15.5+10.1+4.1 WAMutInvAm 33.54+.27 +7.5+14.5+13.1+4.8 Dodge & Cox Income 13.91-.01 +0.4+5.1+6.3+7.1 IntlStk 36.12+.43 +4.3+12.8+6.3+1.0 Stock 133.03+1.48 +9.1+21.2+11.9+3.5 Fidelity Contra 82.52+.82 +7.4+12.9+12.7+5.5 LowPriStk d 42.09+.42 +6.6+13.4+13.0+7.5 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 54.72+.52 +8.4+15.4+12.9+5.2 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.29+.01 +3.8+12.8+10.6+6.1 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.50+.04 +1.5+9.0+7.4+8.9 GlBondAdv 13.45+.03 +1.5+9.2+7.7+9.2 Harbor IntlInstl d 64.11+.64 +3.2+9.2+8.0+1.2 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.24... +0.3+7.2+6.6+7.5 T Rowe Price GrowStk 40.50+.39 +7.2+12.3+13.4+6.4 Vanguard 500Adml 142.38+1.35 +8.4+15.4+12.9+5.3 500Inv 142.35+1.35 +8.4+15.3+12.8+5.1 GNMAAdml 10.87... 0.0+2.1+5.1+5.9 MuIntAdml 14.40-.02 +0.7+4.5+5.5+5.8 STGradeAd 10.83... +0.3+3.3+3.5+3.9 Tgtet2025 14.25+.10 +4.9+10.5+9.6+4.7 TotBdAdml 11.03... -0.1+3.2+5.5+5.7 TotIntl 15.44+.15 +3.1+8.6+5.2-0.7 TotStIAdm 38.72+.38 +8.6+15.6+13.2+5.9 TotStIdx 38.70+.38 +8.6+15.4+13.1+5.8 Welltn 35.74+.23 +5.6+12.2+10.4+6.2 WelltnAdm 61.73+.40 +5.6+12.3+10.5+6.3 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*Mutual Funds Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interest rates Dow keeps going Associated PressNEW YORK The Dow closed at an all-time high Tuesday, beating the previous record it set in October 2007, before the financial crisis and Great Recession. The Dow Jones industrial average closed at 14,253.77, up 125.95 points, or 0.89 percent. The index jumped from the opening bell, climbed as much as 158 points early and peaked at 14,286. Twenty seven stocks in the 30-member Dow advanced, with industrial companies leading the gains. The gains represent a remarkable comeback for the stock market. The Dow has more than doubled since falling to a low of 6,547 in March 2009 following the financial crisis and the onset of the Great Recession. Stocks have rebounded sharply since then, helped by stimulus from the Federal Reserve, even as the economic recovery has been slow and steady. Whether they want to admit it or not, everyone is very impressed with the resilience of the market, said Alec Young, a global equity strategist at S&P Capital IQ. The last time the Dow was this high, Apple had just sold its first iPhone and George W. Bush had another year as president. The U.S. housing market had yet to bottom, and the financial crisis that brought down Lehman Brothers was still a year away. The recovery in stocks may even have been quicker had memories of the financial systems near-collapse not been on investors minds, said Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist at Banyan Partners. Its still pretty close to the front of peoples brains, he said. Thats one of the reasons that people are hesitant to invest in the stock market. The Standard & Poors 500 index rose 15 points, or 1 percent, to 1,539.79, within striking distance of its own record close of 1,565. The Nasdaq composite gained 42 points, or 1.3 percent, to 3,224.13. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose two basis point to 1.90 percent. Gold rose $2, 0.1 percent, to $1,574 and oil advanced 59 cents, to $90.71. +1.4% AP World markets How key international stock markets performed: Milan FTSE MIB Paris CAC40 Sydney ASX All Ordinaries Tokyo Nikkei Zurich Swiss Market Index 15,964.89 3,787.19 5,088.15 11,683.45 7,718.46 Amsterdam AEX 339.58 346.50 +2.0% Brussels BEL20 2,590.68 2,541.90 +1.9% Frankfurt DAX 7,870.31 7,691.68 +2.3% Hong Kong Hang Seng 22,560.50 22,537.81 +0.1% London FTSE 100 6,431.95 6,345.63 15,542.17 +2.7% 3,709.76 +2.1% 5,028.53 +1.2% 11,652.29 +0.3% 7,590.52 +1.7% Previous close Todays close % change Natural gas vehicles making inroads; sales rising Associated Press Garvin Cui fuels up his natural gas vehicle Sept. 4, 2008, at a Clean Energy station in San Francisco. New technology has unlocked vast reserves of natural gas in deep rock formations, creating a natural gas glut that has depressed prices. That makes natural gas more attractive as a transportation fuel. 000E5ZJ Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol 000E961 Are Moles and Gophers Killing Your Lawn? WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES GUARANTEED! Call today for a free lawn analysis. The Gopher & Mole Patrol 352-279-9444

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Page A10 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 Time to move on from Benghazi Why cant Congress get over Benghazi? Four Americans were killed at our embassy when a mob including terrorists attacked. They were not the first embassy killings and wont be the last. The secretaries of State and Defense, the director of the CIA and the top military officer have all testified before Congress. It is a dangerous world and our embassies in many places are being turned into forts. Our Baghdad embassy cost $200 million. I have seen our embassy in Lima and it is a fort located away from downtown. Other more serious loss of life has occurred without investigations. When President Reagan sent a Marine unit to Lebanon and a suicide bomber killed 253, all Americans grieved. When 3,000 Americans were killed by planes crashing into the two World Trade buildings and the Pentagon, there were no investigations. Shortly before the attack, Kenneth Clarke, the chief terrorist authority in the Bush administration, resigned because warnings were ignored. At the same time, FBI agents in Minneapolis and Phoenix reported that Mideastern men were taking flying lessons but didnt want to learn how to take off or land. America paid $1 million to each family of those who died. Once again Americans grieved, but there was no investigation. When Gov. Romney tried to make something out of Benghazi during the presidential debates, the issue got no traction and he admitted that President Obama had done an excellent job in foreign relations. Its past time that Congress stopped wasting time and get to work on Americas business. Stan Clewett Homosassa R ick Scott campaigned for governor on the promise of running Florida like a big business, but the one big business that Florida actually runs is out of control. Citizens Property Insurance Corp. was created a decade ago, supposedly to help residents afford hurricane coverage for their homes. With 1.3 million policyholders, Citizens is the states largest insurer of property. And its been managed about as carefully as amateur night at your local strip joint. In fact, thats where one happy Citizens worker liked to use his company credit card. Last year, Citizens jacked up its rates almost 11 percent, and now it wants legislative approval to go much, much higher. The cost of insuring a home already is one of the heaviest financial loads carried by Florida families. If you wonder what happens to all the hefty premiums, an investigative series by the Miami Herald and the Tampa Bay Timespresents an enlightening snapshot. Basically, the moneys flying all over the place. According to the states chief inspector, Citizens employees and some board members somehow piled up $1.3 million in travel expenses between Jan. 1 and Aug. 31 last year. The tab includes a $633-anight hotel stay in Bermuda for the company Chief Financial Officer Sharon Binnun, as well as expensive visits to Switzerland and London. She jetted through a total of four countries and racked up $35,000 in charges. Citizens customers (and Im one of them) are rightfully curious about the pretense upon which a Florida insurance executive would travel to such exotic places and claim it as a business trip. Meanwhile, senior managers who werent flying anywhere still got reimbursed on more than 50 occasions for meals in their own hometowns. Thats a sweet deal for them, but a sour one for policy holders and taxpayers who bailed out the company after the last bad storm season. Despite the swelling scandal about overspending at Citizens, the current president, Barry Gilway, handed out fat raises to loyal executives including Binnun, his passport-flashing CFO. Scott has expressed dismay over the unseemly pay hikes and exorbitant travel, and wants to ban board members from international jaunts. His long view is to shrink Citizens and attract other big insurance firms into Florida as competition, which he says will lead to lower premiums. Stop laughing. The man really said that. Citizens was devised as a choice of last resort because real insurance companies were bailing out of the state. They didnt want to pay out any more hurricane claims. To now suggest theyre eager to come back to the market and actually lower their rates confirms the governor is living in some weird, parallel universe. Hes not alone lawmakers are pushing the same idea, which will send premiums through the roof. The problem with Citizens is not that its backed by the state. The problem is that Tallahassee isnt paying attention to what the companys doing. Start with the big stuff $604 million in outside contracts with private vendors, often in the absence of bidding. Or the $2.5 million Citizens accidentally overpaid to another insurance company (the funds were discovered by a state auditor and recouped). On a smaller scale, one enterprising underwriter used the Citizens mailroom and computers to promote her line of female sex toys battery-operated entertainment for those long hurricane power outages. The underwriter was eventually fired, though other workers who ran side businesses on company time were not. An investigation by Citizens own Office of Corporate Integrity showed that the company had spent more than $2.4 million hiring lawyers to investigate various allegations of internal misconduct. More unsettling: Citizens paid out about $750,000 in severance to employees, many of whom had been caught doing wrong. One executive who allegedly had an affair with a coworker received a total bye-bye package of $120,000. Soon after its Office of Corporate Integrity began to reveal misspending and misdeeds at the top level, Citizens responded decisively. It fired the four investigators and disbanded the Office of Corporate Integrity. Even Rick Scott says there might be something fishy about that. Under pressure, Citizens last week made public a list of 474 internal complaints that ran the gamut from workplace pornography to fraud, theft and discrimination. The companys Internal Auditor, Joe Martins, says Citizens did a sterling job of handling all these cases. Hes also the same stiff who abolished the Office of Corporate Integrity. Clearly the leadership of Citizens has forgotten who its working for, and where its billions in cash are flowing from the people of Florida. They might not get to vote on their insurance company, but they do get to vote for their governor and their legislators. Keep raising the premiums, and watch for a storm in November.Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132. Those who live by electronics die by electronics. Sic semper tyrannis. Kurt Vonnegut, Player Piano, 1952 This Florida citizen outraged by Citizens insurance CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARD Gerry Mulligan .................................... publisherMike Arnold .............................................. editor Charlie Brennan ........................ managing editor Curt Ebitz .................................. citizen member Mac Harris ................................ citizen member Rebecca Martin .......................... guest member Brad Bautista .................................... copy chief Hospital boards should focus on their mission, not on litigation C itrus Memorial Health Systems mission statement claims it exists to improve the health and quality of life of the people and communities it serves. We urge the hospital systems two governing boards to adhere to its mission statement, and realize further legal wrangling over governance is taking them further and further afield from it. Since 2009, far too much public money and human capital has been flushed away in the war between governorappointed Trustees of the Citrus County Hospital Board, which owns the hospital system, and members of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation board, which leases it from the Trustees and operates the health system. In recent months, it seemed reconciliation was under way. Members of the two boards met without lawyers, agreed to drop a number of pending lawsuits and talked about important shared issues. The only legal matter still pending was the Foundations appeal on the constitutionality of a 2011 law giving oversight power to the Trustees. The appeals court decision was handed down in February, in favor of the Foundations position. The next sound was the Trustees legal engines cranking up again to continue the fight. The big issue: How many members of each group should sit on the combined board? The Trustees want a 5-5-1 format five trustees, five foundation board members plus the hospitals chief of the medical staff. The foundation board wants to keep its current membership. This governance infighting is incredibly disruptive especially now when the valuation of the hospital and its assets are being considered, per state law, for the possibility of a sale or lease. Its past time for a resolution. To members of both boards we say: Get past this power tug-of-war, and get re-focused on your mission. THE ISSUE: Hospital governance wrangling continues.OUR OPINION: Get past this, and focus on your mission. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board. Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board should call 352563-5660. All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out. We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste. Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352563-3280 or email to letters@chronicleonline.com LETTERS to the Editor Florida has no money This is a comment about Rick Scotts expansion of Medicaid along with Obamacare. Well, for one thing, wheres the money coming from? Floridas almost bankrupt. Its economy is suffering just like the rest of the nation. Obamacare is going to kill the middle class and poor, hardworking persons. I myself (am) in that category. Now, in addition to me having to provide for my own family and provide my own medical insurance and help my children, Ill have to be the one paying for all these poor people. How come I dont have free health insurance? I chose to work my whole life and to provide for my family.A lot of these poor people dont want to work two and three jobs to provide for their family. Now they can get it for nothing. So Im glad the Tea Party has withdrawn support for Rick Scott. Boycott cameras Lets all band together and boycott all the cities that have the rip-off red-light cameras installed. Please bring back our friendly Florida.Armadillos and ammoniaTo the person who wishes to get rid of armadillos ruining their yard: Just place rags soaked in ammonia where theyre digging and that will keep all the critters away and your wish will come true. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and h ave less than a minute to record. COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. S OUND OFF CALL 563-0579 At least talk about it Im calling in regard to the recent Chronicle reporting on the board of county commissioner meetings. It seems to me that a majority of the board of county commissioners think new taxes are the only way to balance the budget. You know, theyve hired a consultant to tell them how to do it without calling it a new tax. Cutting expenses is not receiving any serious consideration. Personnel costs is a major component of the budget and it needs to be considered for cuts. Scott Adams has put forth some ideas on cutting personnel expenses but has been ignored. I believe County Commission Chairman Joe Meek is doing a disservice to the citizens of Citrus County by not encouraging the discussion of ideas for cutting expenses.Bring port to voteIm referring to the meeting of the BOCC on Feb. 25. Scott Adams brought up a motion to get rid of the port, get rid of every money-consuming issue surrounding it. And of course, it wasnt seconded, the motion. We are the majority, the people. It is in our best interests, the publics, to negate the port and everything around it. However, the commissioners, it seems to be their thing. So we should bring it up to a public vote. Something so draining of our economics and something so important, we need the publics vote on it. And no one that I know of that Ive spoken to is for it except of course for the BOCC members, minus Scott (Adams). Thank you, Mr. Scott, for standing up for us. C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Hot Corner: THE BUDGET GAP HEAL THYSELVES Carl Hiaasen OTHER VOICES

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We need real answers, not rhetoric Somehow President Obamas reality doesnt quite match real life reality. His State of the Union speech sounded more like a Lets hold hands and solve the worlds problems with money we dont have speech to me. In the middle of a depression and $16 trillion in national debt, Obama wants to spend money on a long wish list of fairy tales: from early childhood education to infrastructure to green energy to climate change to redesigning high schools to, and get this one, eradicating poverty around the world. Were broke, addicted to spending and hes worried about poverty around the world? One in three Illinois residents lives in poverty. Maybe he should worry about us before he tackles world poverty. Obama says were in recovery, we have jobs, we have cleared away the rubble of crisis and we have a strong state of the union. He must have missed the fact that fourthquarter gross domestic product was negative. Our economy is actually in contraction. And 11,000 Americans join the food stamp rolls every day. This is a recovery? Obama said jobs are doing better. According to data from Bloomberg, from December 2011 to January 2013, nonfarm payrolls were down by 587,000. With a loss of 587,000 jobs and 8.5 million Americans dropping out of the workforce since Obama became president and real unemployment is almost 15 percent, Obama disbanded his Jobs Council. Now that the election is over why talk about jobs? Obamas claim that we can create middle-class jobs with wind, solar and other green energy projects is wishful thinking. Spain is the Green Energy Capital of Europe, yet its economy has collapsed (26 percent unemployment and 56 percent youth unemployment) and 2.2 jobs for every green job created was destroyed. Green jobs arent the answer. Obama said we sold a lot of cars last year. What he didnt tell us was our tax money propped up the sales. Federal government purchase of cars was up by more than 70 percent. Obama pointed to the housing recovery. If your home went from $500,000 down to $100,000, but in the past year soared to $125,000, thats a recovery. With homeowners in bankruptcy and foreclosure, that $25,000 increase versus a $400,000 loss during Obamas first term isnt very helpful. Lets celebrate his housing recovery while ending what Obama calls loopholes must be some kind of joke. That loophole Obama refers to is the mortgage deduction. If he takes that away in the middle of a housing collapse, hell cause another housing collapse. President Obama claims hes already cut $2.5 trillion from the budget. Were halfway home to $4 trillion in cuts he said. The fiscal cliff deal added $4 trillion to the national debt. The cuts that were made were revealed by the Office of Management and Budget to be money that was never going to be spent anyway. Obama cut nothing. Sen. Obama called President George W. Bush unpatriotic for adding $4 trillion to the national debt in eight years, but as president he added $6 trillion in only four years and says were halfway home to solving our debt problem, thinks the sequestration that cuts only $85 billion out of a $3.5 trillion budget is harsh, devastating and reckless. Howsthat kind of thinking going to solve our debt problem? Will more debt spent on green energy and early childhood education will get us halfway home? Thats one heck of a plan. Gerard Del Vecchio Hernando O PINION C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 A11 T h e G e n e r a l S t o r e Custom Easter Baskets For All Ages! Candy and Gifts for Easter or any occasion! 000E836 In the of Downtown Crystal River 639 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River 352-564-0311 Mention This Ad for 99 Cone 000E8ES Color and submit your entry at the Crystal River Mall when you visit Easter Bunny or mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle. View the entries at www.chronicleonline.com and vote for your favorite. The contest is open to all children between 4-12 in these age categories: 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. The deadline to enter is March 22. How do I submit my entry? Complete the entry form and deliver to Crystal River Mall Easter Bunny Display Or mail them to Citrus County Chronicle c/o coloring contest 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, Florida 34429 Enter the Easter Coloring Contest One prize awarded per age group Childs First Name Last Name Age Phone Number 000E4RV A T i s k e t A T a s k e t A T i s k e t A T a s k e t A Tisket A Tasket C o l o r P e t e r R a b b i t C o l o r P e t e r R a b b i t Color Peter Rabbit A n d T h e B a s k e t A n d T h e B a s k e t And The Basket 000E7YB Happy Easter West 44., Inverness US 41, Inverness Inside Walmart, Hwy. 44 Inverness 000E83E 000E3DT 136 N. Indianapolis Ave. Hernando, FL 3 5 2 5 2 7 3 3 7 8 352-527-3378 Chocolatesbyvanessa@yahoo.com Chocolates by Vanessa H o p o n O v e r f o r s o m e Hop on Over for some D e l i c i o u s E a s t e r T r e a t s Delicious Easter Treats! 000E7Q6 Plantation Pointe Plaza 521 W. Fort Island Trail, Suite A Crystal River, FL 34429 352-794-6146 (w) www.clembaby.com (e) ClementineBabyBoutique@gmail.com Letters to THE EDITOR

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Late storm barrels through Midwest Associated PressCHICAGO A late winter storm packing up to 10 inches of snow sent officials in weather-hardened Chicago into action Tuesday to prevent a repeat of scenes from two years ago, when hundreds of people in cars and buses were stranded on the citys marquee thoroughfare during a massive blizzard. The storm was part of a system that started in Montana, hit the Dakotas and Minnesota on Monday and then barreled through Wisconsin and Illinois on its way to Washington, D.C., where it was expected late Tuesday night. As the storm pushed toward the Mid-Atlantic region, people there were gathering supplies and airlines were canceling flights. Since the 2011 blizzard that dumped 20 inches on Chicago, the nations third-largest city has had it pretty easy snowwise. But the storm moving through Tuesday could end up dumping the most there since that blizzard, after a relatively mild winter last year and a slow start to this years. Some in Chicago were caught off guard by the last gasp from Old Man Winter. I thought it was just media hype, said Stacia Kopplin, who was fleeing her financial services job shortly after noon and walking through the blast of wet snow to catch a train home to the suburbs. Schools were closed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, where officials urged caution on snow-slickened roads. In western Wisconsin, a semitrailer slid off a snow-covered interstate near Menomonie and into the Red Cedar River, killing one person. Authorities said they were searching for a second person, believed to be a passenger. Airlines canceled more than 1,100 flights at Chicago airports, prompting delays and closures at others around the region. Airlines along the storms projected path were already cutting flights too, including about 450 on Wednesday, most of them at Dulles and Reagan National airports in the Washington area, according to Flight Aware.com. Daniel Baker, CEO of the flight-tracking service, said he expected the numbers to rise. In St. Paul, Minn., where 7 inches of snow had fallen, 55year-old Mario Showers was shoveling sidewalks around a downtown church. With Minnesota, aint no telling when the snows gonna come, you know, said Showers. The way I think about it is that, youve got four seasons, and every season brings about a change, you know. So, youve got to take the bitter with the sweet, thats all. So this is the bitter right now. But in Virginia, the forecast was already causing a run at some supermarkets At the Food Lion in Staunton, shelves that were stocked ahead of the storm were being cleared by customers. Bread, milk, eggs and beer, all the necessities, manager Everett Castle said. People in Washington, D.C., were bracing for 3 to 7 inches. The mountains of western Maryland could get up to 16 inches by Wednesday night. Minor tidal flooding was possible along the Delaware coast, the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay and the lower Potomac River, the National Weather Service said. As miserable as things could get for commuters, taxi driver Balwinder Singh of Herndon, Va., said he was looking forward to the storm. People tip better in the snow, he said. As the heaviest snow fell in Chicago, residents were working their shovels and snow-blowers. Mike Morawski, 53, was helping clear the sidewalk in front an older neighbors home. We dont want her digging out, he said. Shes a tender, little woman, a piano teacher. She doesnt need to be shoveling. Allowed Associated Press Airline passengers will be able to carry small knives, souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes beginning in April under a policy change announced Tuesday. TSA to allow knives on planes WASHINGTON Airline passengers will be able to carry small knives, souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes beginning next month under a policy change announced Tuesday by the head of the Transportation Security Administration. The new policy conforms U.S. security standards to international standards, and allows TSA to concentrate its energies on more serious safety threats, the agency said in a statement. The announcement, made by TSA Administrator John Pistole at an airline industry gathering in New York, drew an immediate outcry from unions representing flight attendants and other airline workers, who said the items are still dangerous in the hands of the wrong passengers. FDA panel sees risk in bone drugWASHINGTON A panel of federal health experts says a longestablished bone strengthening drug should no longer be used by women because there is little evidence it works and it may actually increase the risk of cancer. The Food and Drug Administration panel voted 129 that the risks of the inhalable osteoporosis drug calcitonin salmon outweigh its benefits when used to treat brittle bones. Novartis and UpsherSmith market the drug in nasal spray form as Miacalcin and Fortical, respectively. But health authorities around the world have been reviewing the drugs safety after two recent studies showed a slightly higher rate of cancer among patients taking calcitonin pills. The drug is also available as an injection to treat other conditions, including excess calcium in the blood. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS N ATION & W ORLD Page A12 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Exhibited Associated Press On Wednesday, the Smithsonians National Museum of Natural History will unveil this Royal Butterfly Brooch, created in 2009 by Taiwanese jewelry artist Cindy Chao. The brooch is made of 2,300 gems with four large-faceted diamond slices. Venezuelas Chavez dies Associated PressCARACAS, Venezuela President Hugo Chavez was a fighter. The former paratroop commander and fiery populist waged continual battle for his socialist ideals and outsmarted his rivals time and again, defeating a coup attempt, winning re-election three times and using his countrys vast oil wealth to his political advantage. A self-described subversive, Chavez fashioned himself after the 19th century independence leader Simon Bolivar and renamed his country the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. He called himself a humble soldier in a battle for socialism and against U.S. hegemony. He thrived on confrontation with Washington and his political opponents at home, and used those conflicts to rally his followers. Almost the only adversary it seemed he couldnt beat was cancer. He died Tuesday in Caracas at 4:25 local time after his prolonged illness. He was 58. During more than 14 years in office, his leftist politics and grandiose style polarized Venezuelans. The barrel-chested leader electrified crowds with his booming voice, and won admiration among the poor with government social programs and a folksy, nationalistic style. His opponents seethed at the larger-than-life character who demonized them on television and ordered the expropriation of farms and businesses. Many in the middle class cringed at his bombast and complained about rising crime, soaring inflation and government economic controls. Chavez used his countrys vast oil wealth to launch social programs that included state-run food markets, new public housing, free health clinics and education programs. Poverty declined during Chavezs presidency amid a historic boom in oil earnings, but critics said he failed to use the windfall of hundreds of billions of dollars to develop the countrys economy. Inflation soared and the homicide rate rose to among the highest in the world. Before his struggle with cancer, he appeared on television almost daily, frequently speaking for hours and breaking into song or philosophical discourse. He often wore the bright red of his United Socialist Party of Venezuela, or the fatigues and red beret of his army days. He had donned the same uniform in 1992 while leading an ill-fated coup attempt that first landed him in jail and then launched his political career. Associated Press Venezuelas President Hugo Chavez, pictured in June 2011, died Tuesday at age 58. He was first diagnosed with cancer in June 2011. Snow, snow, snow Associated Press Travelers make their way past snow-covered cars parked in the parking lot Tuesday at OHare International Airport in Chicago. Your chances of dying by 2023? Test offers a clue L INDSEY T ANNER AP medical writer CHICAGO Want to know your chances of dying in the next 10 years? Here are some bad signs: getting winded walking several blocks, smoking and having trouble pushing a chair across the room. Thats according to a mortality index developed by San Francisco researchers for people older than 50. Test scores may satisfy peoples morbid curiosity, but researchers say their 12-item index is mostly for use by doctors. It can help them decide whether costly health screenings or medical procedures are worth the risk for patients unlikely to live 10 more years. Its best to take the test with a doctor, who can discuss what the score means in the context of patients own medical history, the study authors say. The index wasnt meant as guidance about how to alter your lifestyle, said lead author Dr. Marisa Cruz of the University of California, San Francisco. Instead, doctors can use the results to help patients understand the pros and cons of such things as rigorous diabetes treatment, colon cancer screening and tests for cervical cancer. Those may not be safe or appropriate for very sick, old people likely to die before cancer ever develops. The 12 items on the index are assigned points; fewer total points means better odds. Men automatically get 2 points. In addition to that, men and women ages 60 to 64 get 1 point; ages 70 to 74 get 3 points; and 85 or over get 7 points. Two points each: a current or previous cancer diagnosis, excluding minor skin cancers; lung disease limiting activity or requiring oxygen; heart failure; smoking; difficulty bathing; difficulty managing money because of health or memory problem; difficulty walking several blocks. One point each: diabetes or high blood sugar; difficulty pushing large objects, such as a heavy chair; being thin or normal weight. The highest, or worst, score is a 26, with a 95 percent chance of dying within 10 years. To get that, youd have to be a man at least 85 years old with all the above conditions. For a score of zero, which means a 3 percent chance of dying within 10 years, youd have to be a woman younger than 60 without any of those infirmities but at least slightly overweight. Its hardly surprising a sick, older person would have a much higher chance of dying than someone younger and more vigorous, and its well known that women generally live longer than men. But why would being overweight be less risky than being of normal weight or slim? One possible reason is thinness in older age could be a sign of illness, Cruz said. Other factors could also play a role, so the index should be seen as providing clues but not the gospel truth, the research suggests. The findings were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Grants from the National Institute on Aging and the American Federation for Aging Research helped pay for the study. Kyle Maroff and his son Kayden, 6, of East Moline Ill., speed down the sledding hill Tuesday in Schadt Park, Silvis, Ill.

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Golf/ B2 Baseball/ B3 Bowling, tennis/ B3 Sports briefs/ B4, B5 TV, lottery/ B4 Basketball, hockey/ B5 Entertainment/ B6 Offensive outburst powers Lightning past Devils./ B5 S PORTS Section B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Canes boys tennis overcomes Pirates J AMES B LEVINS CorrespondentINVERNESS Matt Allen was able to nab visiting Crystal Rivers lone point in Tuesday evenings meet against Citrus as the two county rivals met each other for the first time this season. Despite the Pirate No. 1 seed Allen taking down the Hurricanes No. 1 Kyle Everett in two straight sets (6-2, 6-2); Crystal River couldnt claim any other points as Citrus cruised by 6-1 for the meet win. Im glad I was able to keep up today against Citrus, Allen said of his match. Being able to hold my own against a very good player. Keeping up with his rallies is hard. Hes a very hard hitter so it was all I could do to keep up with his momentum. Overall it was a really good match, Allen continued. I was getting angles and making him run more. It just turned out to be a really good match. Citrus No. 2 Grey Pospiech defeated Crystal Rivers Ryan Johnson 6-4 in the first set while a 7-5 tiebreaker second set settled the match in Pospiechs favor. Michael Hetland battled it out in the No. 3 singles match, taking the win for Citrus 6-4, 6-2 over Crystal Rivers Ben Epstein. Cane singles players Brady Hayes and Joe Kerry cleaned up in No. 4 and 5 singles play. Hayes made quick work of Pirate Matt White (6-1, 6-4) while Kerry slugged out a three-set winner Lecanto girls edge Citrus on home courts J OE K ORNECKI III CorrespondentLECANTO The Lecanto Panthers girls tennis team narrowly defeated its county foe Citrus for the second time this season, 4-3 on a cold, windy day Tuesday. Citrus High School took three of the five singles matches but were swept in both doubles matches. They beat Citrus twice this year, and Im proud of them, Lecanto head coach Sammie Hall said. They need more stamina for districts ... and need to improve on a few of their shots, but Im proud of them overall. Citrus High School head coach Scott Waters said his team is young and optimistic. (Im) particularly impressed with Melanie (Dodd), who has won 45 in a row going back to middle school, he Crystal Rivers No. 1 seed prevents shutout, but Citrus prevails 6-1 See TENNIS / Page B4 See GIRLS / Page B4 Citrus rally on bases falls short Swing of the bat C.J. RISAK CorrespondentLECANTO Erica Corlew wasnt having a good game at the plate at least until the sixth inning. The freshman shortstop had flied out and grounded out in her first two appearances for the Citrus softball team in its county rivalry game at Lecanto. In the sixth inning of this scoreless tie, April Desomma reached base with a lead-off walk issued by the Panthers Danielle Yant, then Desomma stole second. Corlew didnt let the opportunity pass her by. She sent a long fly over Lecanto outfielder Lilly Parrishs head, the ball reaching the base of the left field fence for a run-scoring double. One out and a wild pitch later, Corlew scored what proved to be the game-winning run as the Hurricanes held on for a 2-1 victory. Tonight I really didnt hit very well, Corlew said, who scored her teams second run on Chelby Lawlers sacrifice fly. But it was my pitch. I just STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the Chronicle The throw to Lecanto catcher Amber Atkinson is wide as Citrus High School shortstop Erica Corlew slides into home for the first of two runs Tuesday at Lecanto High School. The Hurricanes took a 2-1 victory over the Panthers in District 6A-6 play. Corlews RBI double, run the difference for Citrus in 2-1 win over Lecanto Citrus centerfielder Aaron McIntyre tags the ball in the second inning of Tuesdays game against Lecanto. The Hurricanes won 2-1. Springstead girls tennis downs Crystal River 7-0 L ARRYB UGG CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Nikki Moynihan would love to have a better forehand. If she did, the Crystal River High School No. 1 tennis singles player might have had a little more fun Tuesday night at the Pirates tennis court. Moynihan lost 6-3, 6-1, to Springstead High Schools Bryn Buckner. Moynihan is now 0-4 for the season. My forehand was doing really bad, Moynihan said. I need to get low and show through it. I am just having a lot of problems with my forehand. I expected to win at least one or two (of her singles matches). Springstead beat Crystal River 7-0 in the high school tennis match. Crystal River (0-4) is normally a powerful force in girls tennis, but Springstead (8-2) easily defeated the Citrus County teams Crystal River on Tuesday and Citrus High last week. Springsteads Scarlett Semack beat Crystal Rivers Veronica Williams 7-6, 7-6, in the No. 2 singles, while the Eagles Sara Guerrero beat the Pirates Anna Lane 6-1, 6-2, in No. 3 singles. For Springstead, Robyn Cotney beat Olivia Parker 6-0, 6-0, in No. 4 singles and teammate Alison Wilfong took No. 5 singles over Crystal Rivers Kelsey Schroeder 6-1, 6-0. The Eagles Buckner and Guerrero beat Moynihan and Williams 8-4 in a pro-set in the No. 1 doubles. Springsteads Cotney and Semack beat the Pirates Lane and Parker 9-8. The Pirates were missing their usual No. 3, Crystal Menietti. They are rebuilding this year, said Springstead coach Rick Scholl, who is the tennis director at Sugarmill Woods. They lost three or four people last year. We are a young team. We have a lot of talent and a lot of depth. I think Bryn played a tough match and won yesterday. Her knees have been bothering her. The Pirates are rebuilding and learning to find encouragement in improvements. Three of our five top players graduated, Crystal River coach Cindy Reynolds said. We are into playing good teams. We havent been playing any pushover teams. We have played private schools and in our county. My top two are doing better. My top two improve every day. They become more aggressive and offensive every day. They are hitting better. For more photos, click on this story at www.chronicle online.com. Canes baseball loses 9-8 to Eagles S EAN A RNOLD CorrespondentINVERNESS A Citrus rally in the seventh inning came up just short in a seesaw district battle with Springstead. With the Hurricanes down 95 entering the bottom of the seventh, junior catcher Cody Bogart launched his second home run of the game and his third of the year to help fuel a three-run burst before his Citrus baseball club fell 9-8 to the Eagles at home on Tuesday. The Canes (3-4 overall, 1-1 in District 6A-6) loaded the bases twice off four walks following Bogarts two-run blast that scored sophomore right fielder Brooks Brasher, who earlier reached on a catchers interference call. A two-out walk by senior second baseman Kyle Tobin scored sophomore shortstop Robert Wilkinson before senior reliever Ryan Nicoll retired the final batter with a strikeout. Eagles senior ace Brandon Brosher (one hit and two walks allowed) fanned 10 Cane batters in the first four innings, but three hit batters and a Brasher RBI single helped Citrus stay alive early and trail just 4-3 after four innings before Brosher was relieved by senior Nic Pasarella (three hits allowed, five walks, one strikeout). Citrus junior starter Chad Dawson (seven hits, one walk, three strikeouts) kept the ball in the zone through 5 2/3 innings, but six Cane errors limited his and freshman reliever Austin Bogarts (two strikeouts, two walks, one hit) effort on the mound. Youll give the worst team in America a chance to win if you make errors on routine plays, Citrus coach Brady Bogart said. Chad did exactly what he needed to do. He gets people out early with his fastball, breaking ball and change-up. Hes learned how to pitch and he gives us a chance to win every time he goes out there, but unfortunately we havent backed him up very good, tonight, and in one-run games against Forest and South Sumter. Citrus jumped ahead 5-4 in the fifth with a home run to leftcenter by Cody Bogart (four See SWING / Page B4 See SHORT / Page B4

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B2 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE G OLF 000E1XQ W E C A R E F O O D P A N T R Y SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURNAMENT Ladies and Gentlemen are Welcome! 000DS6E Saturday, March 16th Registration: 8:00 a.m. Shotgun Time: 9:00 a.m. SEVEN RIVERS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB $60 per person $200 per foursome To register, call 503-7355 including greens fees, cart ,lunch and thank you gifts. Harley Davidson Hole in One Prize American Irish Club American Irish Club Annual Invitational Annual Invitational Golf Tournament Golf Tournament Saturday April 21st Saturday April 21st Seven Rivers Country Club Seven Rivers Country Club Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun start at 12:30pm Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun start at 12:30pm Scramble Best Ball Format Scramble Best Ball Format American Irish Club Annual Invitational Golf TournamentSaturday April 6THSeven Rivers Country ClubSign in by 11:15am Shotgun start at 12:30pm Scramble Best Ball FormatCost $55 per person includes golf, cart, prizes, & Cost $55 per person includes golf, cart, prizes, & Social hour with cash bar and appetizers Social hour with cash bar and appetizers during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm. during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm. Cost $55 per person includes golf, cart, prizes, & lunch Social hour with cash bar and appetizers during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm.Course Rules Apply Course Rules Apply No Denim or T-Shirts No Denim or T-Shirts Course Rules Apply No Denim or T-Shirts www.chronicleonline.com For information and sign-up contact: For information and sign-up contact: Dave Horsman 897-1398 Dave Horsman 897-1398 Russ Doring 795-4548 Russ Doring 795-4548 Herb Duval 794-7465 Herb Duval 794-7465 For information and sign-up contact: Dave Horsman 897-1398 Russ Doring 795-4548 Herb Duval 794-7465 000DWBO HOLE-IN-ONE On March 1, Rich Vehrs made a hole-in-one on the 11th hole using an 8-iron. The shot, from 110 yards out, was witnessed by Claire Moran and Sandy Koppell.BRENTWOOD On Feb. 20, the Wednesday point quota group played. First+8 Jim Keifferand Bob Smith Second+6 Bob OBrienand Rolf Kettenburg Most over quota+5 Joe Goyette Closest to the pin: No. 2 & 4Bob OBrien 50/50 winner: Glenn Connelly Feb. 23, Saturday Scramble results. First Bob Myers, L. T. Schull, Irv Rayburn, Nel Lamoreux Second Ruth Doring, Russ Doring, Dick Sherman, Margaret Roberts Third Frank Hughes, Dennis Ronk, Dick Emberly, Jerry Krause Closest to the pin: No. 2Mike ODonaghue No. 4L.T. Schull Feb. 24, Sunday Scramble results. First Wayne Brooks, Rolf Kettenburg, Bruce Liston, Woody Jones Second Bob Staker, Jan Lassiter, Don Oslance Third Steve Leonard, Herm Gardner, Maggie Cart Closest to the pin: No. 2 (Men)Jim Pearson (Ladies)Mona Evans No. 4(Men)Bruce Liston (Ladies)Maggie Cart 50/50 winner:Ron Cart Feb. 25, Mens Group results. First(MOC) +7 Jim Pearson Second+7 Steve Leonard Most over quota:(MOC) + 5 Pat Foss Closest to the pin: No. 2George Jones No. 4Charlie KuntzCITRUS HILLS MEN On Feb. 27, the Citrus Hills Mens Golf Association on the Oaks Golf Course played 2, 3 Alt. First-27 Curt Mesler, Jerry McClernon, Bruce Cohoon, Bob Prince Second-22 (MOC) Chuck Hanner, Harvey Schrank, Clive Affleck, Len Feutz Third-21 Pete Lindley, John Keller, John Bechler, Bob Jones Fourth-19 (MOC) Tony Barone, Mac McDuff, Joe Konie, Lou PulgranoCITRUS SPRINGS MEN On Feb. 28, the Citrus Springs Mens Association played team points. First167 Rick Hancock, Don Gonczi, Dave Miner, Woody Miner (blind) Second156 Pete Clutter, Harvey Jenkins, Walt Norton, Glen Robertson Third151 Leon Smith, Ed Starling, Woody Miner, Bill Mannix Closest to the pin: No. 4Harvey Jenkins No. 8Pete Clutter No. 11Rick Hancock No. 14Russ Woodworth No. 16Woody Miner WOMEN On March 1, the Chicks with Sticks played Points Quota. Lois Bump+4 Marj Sibley+4 Vickie Colebank+3 Ginny Hearns+3 Mary McConnell+3 Carol Lanzillo+3 Roberta Gendron+2 Jan Kominski+2 Bev McGonnigal+2 Closest to the pin: No. 4Mary McConnell No. 8 & 11Vickie Colebank No. 16Carole Seifert Chicks with Sticks, a ladies points quota league, meets every Friday morning at Citrus Springs. Interested players with GHIN handicaps should call Carole at 352-746-2082 or Jan at 352-344-9550.EL DIABLO On Sunday, Feb. 24, the format was Quarter Medal. Men Members: Low Gross83/71 Tony Borgia Low Net87/72 Paul Langevin Men Non-member: John Hrobuchak93/76 Ladies Members: Low Gross105/68 Pat Lampasona Low Net115/77 MaryAnn Conroy Ladies Non-member: Terry Hrobuchak102/82 On Monday, Feb. 25, the format was a 9 Hole Scramble. First26.25 Jon Townsend, Pete Palmer, Logan Crume, Dayle Montgomery Second26.375 Doc Freer, Debbie Marino, Clint Fisher, Ghost Third28 Ray Humphreys, Jack Durden, Mike Pombier, Bob Montgomery Fourth28.75 Bob Marino, Curtis Karr, Ed Stup, Ghost Fifth30.75 Jeff Sprague, Nats Redweb, Rory Natzke, Ghost Closest to the pin: No. 6Doc Freer No. 8Team of Ray, Jack, Mike, Bob Birdie points5 Team of Doc, Debbie, and ClintIG&CC The Inverness Golf & Country Clubs Womens Golf Association played its championship Feb. 12 and 19.Scores were totaled for the two 18 hole matches. Red Tee First Gross169 Sonja Dixon First Net142 Sue Sasso Silver Tee First Gross175 Bev Black First Net132 Diane Rozzi Second Net134 Lavera Sasser Third Net136 TereWoodLAKESIDE On Feb. 28, the LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League played. Nanna Hansen+8 Amy Thomas+7 June Goyette+2 Closest to the pin: No. 2 & 8Mary McConnell No. 15Jean Cunningham LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League meets at 9 a.m. Thursdays and is now open to all area ladies. No membership dues are required. Occasional play welcomed. Interested players with GHIN handicaps should call Jan at 352-344-9550. 7 RIVERS On Feb. 28, the 7 Rivers Mens Golf Association played a scramble tournament. First66 Dave Stanley, Gene Kelly, Dick Shephard, Al Silliman Second68 Bob Cox, Joe Muscaro, Bill Stallings, Dick VanPoucked Closest to the pin: No. 7Bob Cox No. 11Bill StallingsSOUTHERN WOODS On Feb. 27, the Southern Woods Mens Golf Association played Best Net Ball of the 2 Man Team. Flight 1 First-11 Carl Pedersen, Frank Nolan First-11 Ben Lee, Ken Moody Flight 2 First-10 Brian Hadler, Rich Perry Second-9 Gary Mosey, Tom Hendricksen Third-8 Phil Jasper, Rich Spay Russ Fortune, Mike Theodore Third-8 Tom Venable, Mike Medland Flight 3 First-7 Glenn Harwood, Jack Sandlas, Bill Long First-7 Gene Askins, Erv Koch Closest to the pin: No. 4Ken Moody No. 8Erv Koch No. 17Brian HadlerSUGARMILL WOODS MEN On Feb. 28, Sugarmill Woods Country Club Mens Golf Association played Best 2 of 4 Plus Bonus. Flight 1 First-31 Dick Tuxbury, Dennis Borras, George Lentowitz, Paul VanTassell Second-25 Mike Howard, Hank Robinson, Tom Venable, Joe George Flight 2 First-24 Mel Schroeder, Dan Martinko, Frank Wander, Jack Winner Second-22 Jim Bodenstein, Tony Valente, Mike Theodore, Tom Jones Flight 3 First-23 (Tie) Ernie Pettine, John Lawrey, Charlie McCreery, Bill Lent First-23 (Tie) Zane Megos, Bob Mason, Bob Carriveau, Ed Jones Golfers of the week: Low Gross78 Mike Howard Low Net63 Frank Siemietkowski Low Net65 Sr. Bob Carriveau Closest to the pin: Oak No. 3Bob Gunderman Oak No. 6Bob Carriveau Cypress No. 3Kyle Muzina Cypress No 6Mike Theodore Local LEADERS A s the 44th annual Lollypop Invitational at 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club is almost upon us (March 12 and 13), I see many of our 7 Rivers members out playing and practicing a little bit more than usual. This tournament is one of Citrus Countys most popular womens events of the year. Great competition and camaraderie, good food and an annual skit written and presented by the members of 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club it is a tournament that hits on all cylinders. This year the 7 Rivers membership is bragging about the good course conditions and how well-stocked the golf shop is, which leads me to write about competition and how different it is from everyday golf with your friends. Each day golf comes with its own set of issues but things seem to intensify when golfers play in competition. From first-tee jitters to dealing with the unknown ... tournament golf can be fun or it can be miserable. Here are a few thoughts to improve tournament play and make it more fun. First-tee jitters affect the greatest of players and it certainly affects us as well. When we get nervous, we tend to grip our clubs tighter and swing faster. When pressure hits on the golf course, the first muscles to get tense are the small muscles in your hands. This is the time when you catch yourself holding on to the club for dear life. Relax, take a deep breath and lighten up on the death grip! This will allow your tempo to stay smooth throughout your swing. When your tempo gets too fast, swing flaws get exaggerated, so stay loose, keep the blood flowing, breathe deeply and swing smoothly. Play your game dont try to pull off heroic shots that are low percentage. This adds up fast on the scorecard. Play smart and to your strengths. Try to aim for the middle of the green on your approach shots. Dont fall for the occasional sucker pin tucked behind a bunker. Take one more club than usual according to the yardage to the green. This may help with elevated greens, the wind or a poor shot. If you are a good putter, try to two-putt on each green. Never ever criticize yourself. Be patient, encouraging and talk to yourself with respect just like you speak and treat other people. You can be only be an idiot for so long before you must move on and leave the past behind. Forgive yourself for mistakes. In tournament play, the pace of play is usually slower than normal. Countless times I have heard golfers talk about the pace of play during competition and how it negatively affected their performance. Slow play will only affect performance if you let it. Be mentally prepared for this. Be thorough in your preshot routine. Be ready when it is your turn and you will never be the source of slow play. Tournament play in Citrus County is strong: fill your entry form out and send it in. And dont forget the Presidential Invitational coming in April. Another great event you do not want to miss! Marion Walker is the general manager at Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club in Crystal River. She can be reached at marion7rivers@ tampabay.rr.com. Stay cool and calm on course Marion Walker MOVE WITH MARION Rorys bad call McIlroys way out of mess is to be like Woods D OUG F ERGUSON AP golf writer DORAL The statement released by his handlers was almost as bad as the kids decision to walk out on the tournament. It was the first big mistake of his career, at a time when the golf world was enthralled by such a young talent. He was criticized by the press and by his peers for his selfish behavior, though there was hope he at least would learn from his mistake. This was Tiger Woods, 1996. In his fourth straight PGA Tour event since turning pro, the 20-year-old Woods effectively locked up a spot on tour with his tie for third in the B.C. Open. The next week he had another sponsors exemption to the Buick Challenge. Woods showed up at Callaway Gardens before abruptly leaving town, and IMG released a statement that he was exhausted. It looked even worse when Woods didnt even stick around for the Fred Haskins Award dinner to honor him as college player of the year. Eleven days later, Woods won in Las Vegas and all was forgotten. Thats the best way out for Rory McIlroy. Good golf goes a long way. McIlroy laid the foundation for seeking forgiveness in a 25minute telephone interview Sunday night with Sports Illustrated. He said what everyone else suspected: It was frustration over his game and not pain from his wisdom tooth that led him to walk out on the Honda Classic just eight holes into his second round. He was 7-over par, and with his second shot in the water on No. 18, it was about to get worse. So he turned in his scorecard and bolted for the parking lot. What I should have done is take my drop, chip it on, try to make a 5 and play my hardest on the back nine, even if I shot 85, McIlroy told the magazine. What I did was not good for the tournament, not good for the kids and the fans who were out there watching me. It was not the right thing to do. Expect to hear much of the same when he speaks Wednesday at Doral. He was practicing at The Bears Club just hours after he withdrew from the Honda Classic. Ernie Els saw him practicing his tail off all weekend, and then McIlroy played Monday afternoon in the Pro-Member tournament at Seminole. They spoke privately. Thats all the Big Easy would share. Well see what he says tomorrow, Els said. It really doesnt matter. Most reasonable people know by now Boy Wonder made a boyish blunder. Jack Nicklaus weighed in by saying if only McIlroy had waited five more minutes, he would have thought the better of leaving. Theres nothing McIlroy can do to change that now, and nothing he can say that will change anyones opinion. When it comes to being where hes at, youve got to maybe think a little bit more than two minutes, Els said. In a couple of years time, he wont even think about this or talk about this. If he wins this week, it will be the last thing we talk about. It will be history, and thats what it should be. Its something thats happened and we should move on from that. Hes a great kid. Hes a great player. And if he admits hes made a mistake, then thats that, and lets move on. Associated Press Rory McIlroy withdrew from the Honda Classic last weekend, blaming a hurting wisdom tooth.

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S PORTSC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 B3 352-489-5045 8690 N. Golfview Dr., Citrus Springs, FL citrusspringsgolf.com 000E6K5 Citrus Springs GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Come And Play The Areas Best Maintained Golf Course Mention this ad while booking your tee times and Play for just $32 before noon and only $24 after 1:00 PM All Day Sat. & Sun Just $29 Offer Expires 3/16/13 000E8JJ Golf at Plantation after 2:00 PM any day except Sunday $ 25 00 + tax C a l l 3 5 2 7 9 5 7 2 1 1 C a l l 3 5 2 7 9 5 7 2 1 1 Call 352-795-7211 to book a tee time no more than 3 days in advance. Offer cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon valid for up to 4 players. Proper golf attire required. Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/13. for only per person Valid for play on the Championship Course only. 000E5L1 51st Annual St. Pats Championship Golf Tournament March 15, 16, & 17 at Inverness Golf and Country Club For more information 726-2583 or 586-6510 We hope you will join us for three exciting days of golf, camaraderie, food and prizes! All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 29, 2013 For information call Dennis King or Dan Crishon (352) 249-1236 golf Monday, April 8th, 2013 Monday, April 8th, 2013 15th ANNUAL CLASSIC SCORE S UGARMILL W OODS C OUNTRY C LUB S UGARMILL W OODS C OUNTRY C LUB Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa, Florida Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa, Florida 000DPXZ www.citruscounty.score.org www.citruscounty.score.org To register with PayPal enter following To register with PayPal enter following e-mail address: citruschapter@live.com e-mail address: citruschapter@live.com Tournament Sponsor $100 Tournament Sponsor $100 Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards banquet, banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome) at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2013 11:00 a.m. Registration 11:30 a.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start 5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony per golfer $ 60 I t is not official until the last match of the competition has been played, but the 3.5 Women Adult 55 and over team from Skyview has an unbeatable lead. If they win their last match, they will be one of the few teams to become district champions without a loss. With this district title, they qualify for the sectional/ regional championships in Daytona Beach. The Skyview team is captained by Ann Sulinski and her team members are April Manley, Michelle Jones, Jacqueline Bennett, Marti Little, Ruth Branson, Margie McLellan, Ann Finnin and Nelva Polich. The next league will be the Mixed 18 and over in the following division levels: 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0. The deadline for a team commitment and player rosters is March 10. The league start date is March 16. As you can tell by the level numbers, this is a combined level event, meaning the combined rating of the two players in a mixed doubles cannot be higher than the division level. So at the 5.0 level, each player can be rated 2.5 and the difference between them can be no larger than 1.0, meaning one can be 2.0 and the other 3.0. This league is open to anybody who turns 18 at any date in 2013. Tuesday Team TennisResults for Feb. 26: Rained out. The women-only league is geared toward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested in playing or want to captain a team, contact chairwoman Candace Charles at 352563-5859 or candacecharles @tampabay.rr.com.Citrus Area Senior Ladies 3.0/3.5 Tuesday LeagueResults for Feb. 26: Rained out. To play in this league, a player must be at least 50 years of age or older, with a 3.0/3.5 rating. The league is always looking for players to sub for teams. For information, email chairwoman Lucy Murphy at wjlrmurphy@embarqmail.com or 527-4239. Thursday Morning Citrus Area Doubles League Results for Feb. 28: Skyview def. Bicentennial Babes, 6-4; The Bratz def. Skyview Aces, 5-4; Skyview Advantage def. Sugarmill Woods, 8-1; Pine Ridge Fillies def. Pine Ridge Mavericks, 5-4. For information, contact chairwoman Diane Halloran at 352-527-7763 or tdhfla@ tampabay.rr.comLadies on the CourtResults for Feb. 28: Marta and Phyliss. Ladies on The Court play at 8:30 a.m. Thursdays at Le Grone Park courts in Crystal River. Bring a new can of balls and 50 cents. Two out of three tiebreak sets are played. For information, contact Barbara Shook at dshook@ tampabay.rr.com or 352-795-0872. Friday Senior Ladies Doubles 3.0-3.5 League Results for Feb. 29: Riverhaven Eagles def. Pine Ridge Mustangs, 4-1; Bicentennial Flyers def. Meadowcrest Aces, 4-0; Sugarmill Woods def. Citrus Hills Hot Shots, 3-2. All players must be at least 50 years of age or older with a 3.03.5 rating. Players cannot be a member of a team and sub. For information, email chairwoman Sue Doherty at suedoherty@prodigy.net.USTA Leagues3.5 Adult 55+ Women: Skyview def. The Villages, 2-1. Record 7-0. Ruth Branson/April Manley won, 6-4, 6-4; Anne Finnin/Nelva Polich won, 6-2, 6-2; Michelle Jones/Ann Sulinski lost, 6-3, 6-3. 7.0 Adult 65+ Women: Bicentennial Park record 1-3. Skyview record 0-4. Schedule for the rest of 2013: 18-up Mixed (3 doubles): March to May. 40-up Adult (3 doubles, 2 singles) May to July. 40-up Mixed (3 doubles) August to October. Combo Senior and Adult (3 doubles) October to December. Start recruiting! If you have any questions for information in our District 4 (south) call or e-mail Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157 or vacocala@gmail.com or ustaflorida.com. TournamentsTBA: The JCT Tournament of Champions Event will be at Sugarmill Woods/Oak Village Tennis Complex. Players who would like to enter should email jjeanette3saj@ aol.com. Provide your name, age, grade in school, city, cell phone, name of school and seeding information if it applies. Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle tennis columnist, can be reached at hoera@juno.com. Another USTA champ Eric van den Hoogen ON TENNIS Youth bowler Roberts at top of game Special to the ChronicleTrevor Roberts, a 17year-old Crystal River High School junior, is already one of the best bowlers in Citrus County. Its likely you could expand to include the whole country as there are very few adults much less youth bowlers among the millions of aficionados of the sport who can claim a 231 average. Among his achievements are three 11-in-a-row games, two perfect 300 games and an 800 series. He also has won a state singles title, a doubles title in the Pepsi Tournament and additional titles in the South West Florida Classic and the Burkins Tournament. Trevor began his bowling career at the age of 5 in a PeeWee league and continued through the Youth Program sponsored by the Greater Citrus USBCA. Just this year, he decided to leave the youth program so he could compete with some of the countys best bowlers in the Wednesday Night Mens Match Play League where top bowlers compete against each other in head to head matches. Trevor doesnt limit himself to just bowling. Hes also an A student at Crystal River High School and plans to go to college to earn a degree in engineering. In addition, he wants to become a professional bowler. In his spare time, he works part-time for Manatee Bowling Center. Trevor credits his success in bowling to the support from his family, help from volunteer youth coaches and lots of hard work and practice. The Greater Citrus County Bowling Association is hosting the Mens County Tournament at Manatee Lanes on March 16 and 17. It is not too late to send your applications in, as the extended date for closing entries is March l4. Rays down Twins Associated PressFORT MYERS Liam Hendriks worked out of a jam after left-fielder Josh Willingham lost a fly ball in the sun, but the Minnesota Twins still lost to the Tampa Bay Rays 8-5 Tuesday. Hendriks, trying to win a spot in Minnesotas rotation, allowed two runs and four hits in three innings. He pitched three innings, giving up two runs off four hits while striking out three. Rays pitcher Matt Moore struggled with his mechanics. He struck out two but gave up two hits and two walks in 2 2/3 innings. USA, 4, White Sox 4, 9 innings, tie GLENDALE, Ariz. The U.S. team played the Chicago White Sox to a draw. In its first of two exhibition games before the World Baseball Classic, manager Joe Torres team fell into a four-run hole through five innings, and needed three RBIs by Giancarlo Stanton and a run-scoring triple by David Wright to forge a 4-4 tie in a game called after nine innings. Dominican Republic 15, Phillies 2 CLEARWATER Jose Reyes, Hanley Ramirez and the Dominican Republic put on a relentless offensive display in their first exhibition game ahead of the World Baseball Classic, amassing 28 hits in a 15-2 romp over Cole Hamels and the Philadelphia Phillies. Reyes led off the game with a single and the Dominican Republic team never let up, roughing up Hamels for 12 hits and eight runs in 2 2/3 innings. Reyes, Robinson Cano and Ramirez each homered. Royals 8, Athletics 2 SURPRISE, Ariz. Bruce Chen and Luke Hochevar combined to allow one run in six innings, and the Kansas City Royals remained undefeated for spring training with an 8-2 victory over the Oakland Athletics. Oaklands Bartolo Colon, gave up five runs and seven hits in two innings. The 39-year-old right-hander has allowed eight runs six earned on 12 hits in four innings in losing his first two starts. Brett Hayes and Brandon Wood homered for the Royals, who are 10-0-1. Canada 7, Brewers 4PHOENIX Michael Saunders homered and Justin Morneau drew a bases-loaded walk, helping Canada beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-4 Tuesday in a prep game ahead of the World Baseball Classic. Tyson Gillies and Cale Iorg had RBI singles for Canada in a four-run eighth off loser Michael Gonzalez. Left fielder Adam Loewen jumped against the wall to take away an extra-base hit from Josh Prince with two on and two outs. Padres 7, Dodgers 3PEORIA, Ariz. Clayton Kershaw gave up four runs and seven hits in three-plus innings, his third straight sub-par outing of the spring, and the Los Angeles Dodgers lost 73 to the San Diego Padres. Kershaw has given up nine runs on 17 hits in eight innings. San Diego catcher Nick Hundley homered off Kershaws 65th and final pitch. Angels 6, Reds 4 TEMPE, Ariz. Recovering from offseason surgery on his right knee, Albert Pujols went 0 for 3 in his first spring training appearance of 2013 as the Los Angeles Angels beat the Cincinnati Reds 6-4 Tuesday. Jay Bruce hit a pair of solo homers for the Reds, off Tommy Hanson in the second and Scott Downs in the fourth. Rockies 6, Cubs 2 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Todd Helton got his first hit of spring training and Jeff Francis pitched four scoreless innings to carry the Colorado Rockies to a 6-2 victory over the Cubs. Helton, a .320 hitter who was limited to 69 games and hit a career-low .238 while struggling with hip problems last season, gave Colorado a 1-0 lead in the first with an oppositefield ground-rule double. Nationals 7, Astros 1VIERA Rafael Soriano threw a scoreless inning of relief in his debut with Washington and the Nationals beat the Houston Astros 7-1. Soriano signed a two-year, $28 million contract in January to become the Nationals new closer. The right-hander faced three batters in the seventh and struck out one. Houstons J.D. Martinez reached base against Soriano, but pinchrunner Brandon Barnes was thrown out trying to steal. Orioles 6, Blue Jays 6, 10 innings DUNEDIN Steve Pearce hit two home runs, Conor Jackson and Luis Exposito each homered as the Baltimore Orioles and Toronto Blue Jays played to a 6-6, 10-inning tie. Jackson, who had three hits, Pearce and Exposito homered in a four-run sixth inning off Toronto reliever Esmil Rogers. Home runs by Jackson and Pearce were back-to-back. The Orioles also homered four times Sunday against Philadelphia. Pirates 10, Spain 0 BRADENTON Gaby Sanchez went 3 for 3 with a double, home run and two RBIs, leading the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 10-0 rout of Spains World Baseball Classic team. Rhiner Cruz, a Houston Astros reliever and one of just two players with major league experience on the Spanish roster, allowed three runs in one inning. The right-handed hitting Sanchez will likely platoon at first base with Garrett Jones this season but played third base against Spain. Athletics 4, Italy 3 PHOENIX Jed Lowrie had two hits that including an RBI double and Yoenis Cespedes drove in a pair of runs to help the Oakland Athletics beat Italy 4-3 in an exhibition ahead of the World Baseball Classic. The Chicago Cubs Anthony Rizzo homered in the fourth for Italy, which opens the WBCs first round Thursday against Mexico. Minnesota Twins minor leaguer Chris Colabello also homered and Washington farmhand Mike Constanzo added an RBI double in the ninth. Associated Press Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria takes a cut Tuesday against the Minnesota Twins in Fort Myers. Tampa Bay won 8-5.

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C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE S COREBOARD On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS BICYCLING 12 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Paris-Nice, Stage 3, from Chatel-Guyon to Brioude (Same-day Tape) COLLEGE BASKETBALL 10 a.m. (SUN) Clemson at Virginia Tech (Taped) 7 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at Maryland 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgetown at Villanova 8 p.m. (38 MNT) Vanderbilt at Florida 9 p.m. (ESPN2) West Virginia at Oklahoma 11 p.m. (ESPN2) Stanford at California NBA 7:30 p.m. (FSNFL and SUN) Orlando Magic at Miami Heat 9 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at San Antonio Spurs NHL 8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Colorado Avalanche at Chicago Blackhawks SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League: Round of 16 Juventus FC vs Celtic FC Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING 4 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River 4 p.m. South Sumter, Central at Citrus Spring training AMERICAN LEAGUE WLPct Kansas City1001.000 Seattle101.909 Baltimore72.778 Tampa Bay84.667 Chicago53.625 Cleveland85.615 Boston65.545 Minnesota65.545 Houston55.500 Toronto55.500 Detroit56.455 Oakland56.455 Texas37.300 New York38.273 Los Angeles28.200 NATIONAL LEAGUE WLPct Washington53.625 Miami43.571 Colorado65.545 San Diego76.538 Arizona55.500 Atlanta66.500 Philadelphia55.500 Los Angeles45.444 San Francisco45.444 St. Louis45.444 Chicago57.417 Milwaukee46.400 Pittsburgh37.300 New York25.286 Cincinnati211.154 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Tuesdays Games Toronto 6, Baltimore 6, tie, 10 innings Washington 7, Houston 1 Tampa Bay 8, Minnesota 5 Cleveland 4, San Francisco 3 San Diego 7, L.A. Dodgers 3 L.A. Angels 6, Cincinnati 4 Kansas City 8, Oakland 2 Colorado 6, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 2, N.Y. Yankees 0 Todays Games Toronto vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Boston at Fort Myers,1:35 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Thursdays Games Toronto vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 6:05 p.m.NBA standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York3621.632 Brooklyn3426.5673 Boston3227.5425 Philadelphia2336.39014 Toronto2338.37715 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami4414.759 Atlanta3326.55911 Washington1939.32825 Orlando1744.27928 Charlotte1347.21732 Central Division WLPctGB Indiana3822.633 Chicago3426.5674 Milwaukee3028.5177 Detroit2339.37116 Cleveland2040.33318 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio4714.770 Memphis3919.6726 Houston3328.54114 Dallas2633.44120 New Orleans2140.34426 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4316.729 Denver3922.6395 Utah3228.53311 Portland2831.47515 Minnesota2037.35122 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers4319.694 Golden State3427.5578 L.A. Lakers3030.50012 Phoenix2139.35021 Sacramento2140.34421 Mondays Games New York 102, Cleveland 97 Miami 97, Minnesota 81 Orlando 105, New Orleans 102 Milwaukee 109, Utah 108, OT Denver 104, Atlanta 88 Portland 122, Charlotte 105 Golden State 125, Toronto 118 Tuesdays Games Boston 109, Philadelphia 101 L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, late Denver at Sacramento, late Todays Games Utah at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Toronto at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Chicago at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursdays Games Oklahoma City at New York, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.NHL standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh231580308167 New Jersey231085255665 N.Y. Rangers211182245553 Philadelphia2411121236872 N.Y. Islanders2310112227078 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Montreal231454327159 Boston201433316046 Ottawa231274285244 Toronto231490286857 Buffalo249132206377 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Carolina221381276762 Tampa Bay2310121218173 Winnipeg2210111215668 Florida237115195983 Washington219111195962 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago232003437544 Detroit231184266360 St. Louis211182246061 Nashville23995234759 Columbus237124185369 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver211164266158 Minnesota221192245256 Edmonton22895215462 Calgary20884205768 Colorado21894205162 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Anaheim211533337560 Phoenix221183256763 Dallas221192246163 Los Angeles201172245448 San Jose201064244744 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Mondays Games Phoenix 5, Anaheim 4, SO Toronto 4, New Jersey 2 Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 3 Los Angeles 5, Nashville 1 Tuesdays Games Columbus 4, Edmonton 3, SO Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 2 N.Y. Islanders 6, Montreal 3 Washington 4, Boston 3, OT Carolina 4, Buffalo 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Florida 4, Winnipeg 1 Detroit 2, Colorado 1 Chicago 5, Minnesota 3 San Jose at Vancouver, late St. Louis at Los Angeles, late Todays Games Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Jose at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Phoenix at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursdays Games Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Florida at Washington, 7 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Tuesday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 8 0 7 CASH 3 (late) 1 9 5 PLAY 4 (early) 6 3 3 3 PLAY 4 (late) 1 9 9 6 FANTASY 5 16 24 33 35 36 MEGA MONEY 1 18 28 36 MEGA BALL 19 B4 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 over Devin Reed 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. The results continued in favor of Citrus as the Hurricanes swept the two matches in doubles play. Citrus Everett and Pospiech won the pro set 8-4 over Crystal Rivers Allen and White in No. 1 doubles. Canes duo Hetland and Hayes scored an identical win over the Pirates Johnson and Epstein 8-4 in No. 2 doubles. Were improving, Citrus assistant coach Holly Pospiech said. Were slowly improving. Were working on it and were gaining. The boys are coming along. Citrus did a great job today, Crystal River head coach Bill Reyes said. Were still growing. I was glad to see Matt Allen build some momentum and win. said. (And) that is a pretty incredible feat continuing that streak, especially at this level, and the quality of competition she continues to play. Juliann (Johnson) performed well, he continued. She has been streaky this year, and this was a good night for her. So Im happy to see that, and our No. 5 Leah Stanley moved to 7-1 this year. We have the tools going forward ... and we should be OK. Lecanto (7-2) took three out of the first four matches. Leah Stanley defeated the Panthers Kelena Klippel 6-3, 7-5, and Lecantos No. 3 Simi Shah won in a pro-set 8-1 against Hunter Pospiech. The Citrus No.1 tandem of Dodd and Paige Jordan were defeated in three sets by the sister duo of Amber and Madison Gamble 1-6, 6-3, 2-6. The Gamble sisters have a 7-2 doubles record this season. Lecantos No. 2 doubles Shah/Megan Jervis completed the doubles sweep with 6-2, 6-0 victory over Pospiech/Johnson. Citrus (5-3) won the next two singles matches, as No. 4 Johnson won in straight sets, 6-4, 6-0 over Jervis. No. 1 Dodd (8-0) continued her winning ways by soundly defeating Amber Gamble 6-0, 6-0. Dodd kept up a variety of forehands and backhands to keep Gamble off balance throughout the match. The final and deciding match of the night was the No. 2 singles match between the Canes Jordan and the Panthers Madison Gamble. Gamble cruised in straight sets 6-1, 6-1. It was a good match, Dodd said. It was hard, but it was really cold ... and I can always improve. Everyone played really hard, and everyone did a good job even though I lost my singles, but we did really well in doubles, Amber Gamble said. wanted to put the bat on the ball and hit it hard. It was an important early-season game for both clubs. Citrus improved to 7-2 overall and 2-0 in District 6A-6, while Lecanto slipped to 3-5 overall and 0-2 in district. I thought this was a great game, said Lecanto coach Robert Dupler. Right now, they are the top dog (in 6A-6). They have great pitching, they play great defense and theyre battletested. Citrus pitching was provided by Kelly Abramowich, who surrendered one run on five hits with no walks and nine strikeouts. Three of the hits off of Abramowich came from Lecanto freshman third baseman Amber Hopkins, who followed a twoout, sixth-inning double by Kelsie Lilley with a run-producing single, narrowing the Hurricanes lead to 21. With Hopkins taking second on the throw to the plate, the tying run was in scoring position, but Abramowich pitched out of the jam by fanning Sidney Holstein. Yant nearly matched Abramowich on the mound, giving up two runs on three hits in her six innings on the mound. She walked two and struck out four. This was a great game to be a part of, a great game to watch and a great game to play in, said Citrus coach Larry Bishop, agreeing with his coaching rivals opinion. We made an adjustment (at the plate) in the sixth, and I told the girls after the game I was very pleased with that. No matter what the situation is in the game, they have to be able to come out with this approach. Jessica Liptrap collected three singles to pace the Citrus offense. But it was the Hurricanes defense and pitching that particularly impressed. She had good movement tonight, Dupler said of Abramowichs pitching. She put the ball where she wanted it to go and her curve ball was breaking extremely well. We only got five hits off of her and we didnt really capitalize on the ones we had. Were getting better, but like I told the kids tonight, at some point in time they have to take pride in their position, they cant accept mediocrity. Were beyond making excuses. SWING Continued from Page B1 GIRLS Continued from Page B1 STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the Chronicle Lecanto High School right fielder Sidney Holstein catches a fly ball to end the first inning against the Citrus Hurricanes. RBIs) and an RBI double by junior third baseman Ben Wright that scored Wilkinson. Cody (Bogart) and Ben Wright have put in the time and thats probably why theyre reaping the rewards, Brady Bogart said. But the Eagles (6-1, 2-1) struck back with three runs on two outs in the sixth following a controversial no-call at third base, where it appeared a Springstead runner left for home early on a fly-ball out. Junior second baseman Jake Laferty led off the inning with the double and junior right fielder Kyle Cottilletta later pounded a triple to left-center field to extend the rally for the Eagles. Springstead added two more in the seventh with the help of a pair of Citrus errors. I liked the way we battled, Brady Bogart said. But theres no need to come back if we do what were prone to do here at Citrus High, which is pitch and play defense. We expect our hitters to have a better two-strike approach, and we expect our fielders to make routine plays. As much as we struck out, we did compete against Brosher. Hes going to do that to every team he faces. When you face pitchers like that, youre going to get about four to six base runners and youve got to win 32 instead of losing 9-8 if you make the plays. Citrus plays 6:30 p.m. Friday at Lecanto in another 6A-6 matchup. SHORTContinued from Page B1 TENNIS Continued from Page B1 Warriors baseball routs MeadowbrookThe Seven Rivers Christian baseball team won 12-0 in five innings at Meadowbrook Academy in Ocala on Tuesday. Parker Pillsbury tossed five innings of no-hit baseball with five strikeouts to grab the win for the Warriors. Offensively, John Iwaniec (3 for 4, two RBIs) and Cory Weiand (3 for 3) paced Seven Rivers. The Warriors (3-0) overall host Cornerstone Academy at 5:30 p.m. Friday.Panthers pummel Wolf Pack 16-5The Lecanto baseball team grabbed a 16-5 triumph over West Port in District 6A-6 play Tuesday night in Ocala. From the mound, the Panthers Joey Spell improved to 20 by giving up two earned runs in five innings of work. Offensively, Scott Stearns (double, RBI), Levi OSteen (double, two RBIs, four runs), Nate Hines (three RBIs, run), Shawn Supinski (1 for 1, two RBIs) and Caleb Southey (1 for 2, two RBIs, three stolen bases) paced Lecanto. Lecanto (3-3 overall, 1-1 district) hosts Citrus on Friday.Pirates drop district contest at TavaresThe Crystal River softball team fell 3-1 on the road in district play to Tavares. The result was a marked improvement from the two teams first meeting, an 11-0 win by the Bulldogs. Maegan McMichen (run, stolen base) and Emily Laga (double, RBI) each went 1 for 3 for the Pirates. Bridget Whitley and Chloe Lane each had a hit as well. Rachel Roe (six innings, seven hits, four strikeouts, three earned runs) was the hard-luck loser for Crystal River. CR 5-5 overall, 0-4 District 5A-7) plays 7 p.m. Thursday at home against Eustis. Warriors romps past Mustangs The Seven Rivers Christian softball team took a 22-3 victory at Meadowbrook Academys Ocala campus Tuesday night. Tessa Kacer (3 for 3, five runs, two RBIs, double, homer) led the Warriors charge at the plate and also got the win from the circle by giving up one earned run and four hits while striking out eight batters over five innings. For Seven Rivers, Gabby Wright (4 for 5, two runs, four RBIs, double), Katie Dreyer (3 for 4, two runs, two RBIs) and Allison Green (2 for 3, three runs, three RBIs) also had big nights at the plate. The Warriors (4-2 overall) play Friday at Weeki Wachee. From staff reports Sports BRIEFS

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Associated Press The Boston Celtics Kevin Garnett, left, drives against the Philadelphia 76ers Arnett Moultrie in the first half of Tuesdays game in Philadelphia. S PORTSC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 B5 Associated PressPHILADELPHIA Paul Pierce had 18 points and 11 rebounds, and Avery Bradley scored 22 points to lead the Boston Celtics to a 109-101 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Wednesday night. Kevin Garnett scored 18 points to help the Celtics continued their push up the Eastern Conference standings. The Celtics entered in seventh, but were no more than two games behind the next three teams ahead in the standings. Led by Pierce, the Celtics controlled the game and used a 9-0 run midway through the fourth quarter to seal the win. Last May, these two teams went to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. On Wednesday, the Sixers lost for the ninth time in 10 games and are well out of the playoff race. Jrue Holiday had 18 points and 10 assists for the Sixers, and Thaddeus Young had 19 points and 10 rebounds. The Sixers beat the Celtics twice this season after stretching the Celtics to seven games in last year's playoff series. But the Sixers are a team in freefall because of injuries and a roster ill-equipped to handle the losses of postseason standouts Andre Iguodala and Lou Williams. There was some mild concern late in the fourth period when Holiday, their All-Star point guard, was hurt. Holiday grabbed his right ankle and hobbled back on defense after an awkward drive. He hopped on one foot after a steal attempt went nowhere, but did stay in the game. Like so many teams over the last 15 years, the Sixers had no real answer for Pierce. He hit his first four 3-point attempts, each one more crushing than the last. When the Sixers went on a mini-run to close within eight, Pierce and Jason Terry connected on consecutive 3s to build a comfortable lead. Pierce had averaged 21.8 points over 54 career games against the 76ers. At one point in the first half, both teams were 15 of 32 from the field. The Celtics found other ways to separate themselves from the Sixers: Boston went to the free-throw line and made 3s. The Sixers missed 9 of 11 3-point attempts in the first half and were 0 for 3 from the free-throw line. The Sixers finished 5 of 21 on 3s and 14 of 18 on foul shots They did score 64 points in the paint. Pierce helps Celtics top 76ers Boston climbs up conference standings Associated PressNEWARK, N.J. Nate Thompson scored twice and Martin St. Louis and rookie Alexander Killorn each had a goal and an assist as the Tampa Bay Lightning snapped a five-game losing streak with a 5-2 victory over the struggling New Jersey Devils on Tuesday night. Cory Conacher and Vincent Lecavalier each had two assists as the Lightning won for only the second time in eight games and extended the Devils winless streak to six games (0-5-1). Anders Lindback had 25 saves for the Lightning, surrendering late goals to Adam Henrique and Patrik Elias.Capitals 4, Bruins 3, OTWASHINGTON Eric Fehr scored 37 seconds into overtime, and the Washington Capitals rallied from a three-goal, first-period deficit to beat the Boston Bruins 4-3 in a thriller reminiscent of the teams seven-game playoff series a year ago. Pinched by two defenders, Fehr was falling forward as he got off the shot that hit the upper right post and went in, giving the Capitals their seventh win in 10 games as they attempt to climb out of the lower echelons of the NHL standings. Fehr also got the assist on the game-tying goal with 6:05 to play in regulation, when he worked his way through a crowd into the offensive zone and with four Bruins around him managed to get the puck ahead to Wojtek Wolski for the backhanded stroke past Tuukka Rask.Hurricanes 4, Sabres 3RALEIGH, N.C. Alexander Semin had a goal and two assists, linemate Eric Staal added three assists and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the Buffalo Sabres 4-3. Jiri Tlusty, Joe Corvo and Jussi Jokinen also scored for Carolina. The Hurricanes won their fourth straight and completed a three-game season sweep of the Sabres. Staal picked up his 600th NHL point with the first of his two assists on the night on Tlustys goal in the first period.Blue Jackets 4, Oilers 3, SO COLUMBUS, Ohio Sergei Bobrovsky, replacing an ineffective Steve Mason, made two spectacular shorthanded saves in overtime and stopped both shots he faced in the shootout to lift the Columbus Blue Jackets over the Edmonton Oilers 4-3. Vinny Prospal had a goal and an assist, and Derek MacKenzie and Jack Johnson also scored in regulation. Artem Anisimov and Mark Letestu scored in the shootout for Columbus, which extended its points streak to four games and is the last team to win back-to-games in the NHL this season. Panthers 4, Jets 1 SUNRISE Tomas Kopecky, Shawn Matthias and Mike Santorelli scored for Florida and Jonathan Huberdeau converted a penalty shot in the Panthers 4-1 victory over the Winnipeg Jets. Jacob Markstrom stopped 21 shots for his first win of the season for Florida. Kyle Wellwood scored for Winnipeg and Ondrej Pavelec finished with 22 saves while falling to 8-11-1 this season.Rangers 4, Flyers 2 NEW YORK Rick Nash snapped a third-period tie and then added an insurance goal as the New York Rangers held on to beat the Philadelphia Flyers 4-2 for their third win in a row. Nash fired a shot that sneaked under the right arm of goalie Ilya Bryzgalov 2:50 into the third to give New York its second lead of the game. He doubled the advantage to 4-2 with 8:18 left, fighting off a hook on his hands by defenseman Kimmo Timonen and then making a shift from backhand to forehand to score his seventh goal. Islanders 6, Canadiens 3 UNIONDALE, N.Y. Radek Martinek scored the tiebreaking goal eight minutes into the third period and the New York Islanders handed Montreal its first regulation loss in nearly a month with a 6-3 victory. Martineks shot from the left point on a pass from Kyle Okposo eluded goaltender Carey Price at 7:56. It was the first goal of the season for Martinek. Lightning snap skid Capitals win in OT against Bruins MLB BRIEFS Miller promises Super Bowl title for BroncosDENVER Von Miller is pulling a Joe Namath and its only March. Denvers star passrusher is already guaranteeing a Super Bowl title for the Broncos next year. Miller said hes dedicating the season to his 6-year-old cousin who recently emerged from a coma after a car accident in West Texas that also injured his mother and 8-year-old brother. On Monday, Miller tweeted: You can post this where ever.. Denver broncos will win the Super Bowl in the 2013 season. He added hash tags UJEREMIAH and IGUARANTEEIT58. The linebacker later told The Associated Press when the boy, Jeremiah Clark-Martinez, came out of his coma, he was asked a series of questions to test his memory and among the first things he said was that his cousin, Von Miller, played for the Denver Broncos. That inspired Miller to make his pledge. Bills Merriman announces plans to retireBUFFALO, N.Y. Linebacker Shawne Merriman is calling it Lights Out on his career, announcing on his website he plans to retire. In a message posted Tuesday night on shawne merriman.com, the player wrote he is electing to retire on his own terms, saying he will leave while I know I can still physically play the game. Merrimans decision comes a week before he was eligible to become a free agent, and after spending parts of the past three seasons in Buffalo. Last year, he was cut by the Bills in August before re-signing with them in October. Hes a three-time Pro Bowl selection and the NFLs 2005 defensive rookie of the year. Merrimans best seasons came with San Diego, where he earned the nickname Lights Out for being one of the leagues top pass-rushers. Braves Uggla hit in neck in win over YankeesTAMPA Atlanta second baseman Dan Uggla said he is fine after getting hit by a pitch in the back of the neck during the sixth inning of the Braves 2-0 win over the New York Yankees on Tuesday night. Uggla left the game after being struck by minor leaguer Branden Pinders pitch. Theres a little sensation, Uggla said. Im good. Luckily, I never went black or anything like that. I feel fine. Ichiro Suzuki doubled for the Yankees in his first game since being involved in a vehicle accident. From wire reports Associated PressDURHAM, N.C. Seth Curry scored 20 points in his final home game and No. 3 Duke pulled away to beat Virginia Tech 85-57 on Tuesday night. Fellow senior Ryan Kelly added 18 points in his second straight strong performance since coming back from an injury for the Blue Devils (26-4, 13-4 Atlantic Coast Conference). They shot nearly 52 percent yet struggled for a while before outscoring the Hokies 32-10 during the final 12-plus minutes to finish unbeaten at home for the 17th time in school history. Erick Green scored 25 points on 10 of 19 shooting to lead Virginia Tech (13-17, 4-13), which hasnt beaten a team in the upper half of the league standings all season. No. 9 Kansas State 79, TCU 68 MANHATTAN, Kan. Angel Rodriguez had 21 points and 10 assists and Shane Southwell and Martavious Irving both added 15 points as Kansas State beat TCU. With the Senior Night victory, the Wildcats (25-5, 14-3 Big East) stayed tied with No. 4 Kansas for first place in the Big 12 with one regular season game to play. Kansas State seniors Jordan Henriquez, Irving and Rodney McGruder extended their career win total to 99, more than any class in school history. Kyan Anderson had 29 points for the Horned Frogs (10-20, 1-16), while Devonta Abron added 10.No. 15 Marquette 60, Rutgers 54 PISCATAWAY, N.J. Jamil Wilson scored all 10 of his points in the second half, including the late 3-pointer that put Marquette ahead for good, and the Golden Eagles rallied for a victory over Rutgers. Vander Blue had 22 points and made two game-sealing free throws with 13.9 seconds left for Marquette (22-7, 13-4 Big East), which kept pace with Georgetown and Louisville for the regular season title with one game remaining. Junior Cadougan added points 10 for Marquette. Myles Mack scored 11 points and Jerome Seagears added 10 for Rutgers (13-15, 4-13). The Scarlet Knights held their biggest lead at 35-23 early in the second half. Each time Marquette got close Rutgers answered but, with the Knights leading 50-43, the Golden Eagles went on a 122 run to take their first lead since 2-0. Wilson hit a 3-pointer with 3:05 remaining to make it 55-52. No. 24 Notre Dame 66, St. Johns 40 SOUTH BEND, Ind. Jerian Grant had 21 points and eight assists, Eric Atkins added 15 points and Notre Dame held St. Johns to 18 percent shooting in the second half in a victory. The Fighting Irish (23-7, 11-6 Big East) ended a three-game losing streak to the Red Storm (16-13, 8-9), who lost for the fifth time in six games. Notre Dames Cameron Biedscheid and SirDominic Pointer of the Red Storm got in a skirmish with 1:46 left in the game. Both players were given technicals and ejected. Jack Cooley went 0 for 2 in the first half against St. Johns before scoring 12 points in the second half. Seniors lead No. 3 Duke past Va. Tech, 85-57 Kansas State beats TCU 79-68 Associated Press Tampa Bay Lightning winger Martin St. Louis is tripped up by the New Jersey Devils Travis Zajac during the third period Tuesday in Newark, N.J. The Lightning won 5-2.

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Stewart taking break to direct film NEW YORK Comedy Central said Jon Stewart will take a break from The Daily Show starting in June to direct and produce his first feature film. The network said Tuesday correspondentwriter John Oliver will host the fake news show for the eight weeks of original episodes scheduled during Stewarts hiatus. The British-born Oliver has been a Daily Show regular since 2006. Stewart is expected back in the anchor chair shortly after Labor Day, Sept. 2. The film, titled Rosewater, was written by Stewart and is based on a book by Iranian journalist Maziar Bahari London resident Bahari was falsely accused of being a spy and imprisoned by the Iranian government in 2009 while covering Irans presidential election. Tailor to stars pleads guilty to tax fraud NEW YORK A tailor who counted star athletes including Rickey Henderson and Wilt Chamberlain among his clients has pleaded guilty to skirting about $2 million in sales and income taxes. Mohanbhai Ramchandani pleaded guilty Tuesday, state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said. His company, Mohans Custom Tailors Inc., also has had local stars Patrick Ewing and Darryl Strawberry among its clients and made an appearance on Bravos The Real Housewives of New York City. Ramchandani and his business failed to pay at least $1.7 million in state and local sales taxes since 2002, Schneiderman said. The tailor failed to pay at least $256,000 in personal income taxes from 2007 to 2009, he said. Authorities said a whistleblower first raised concerns over Ramchandanis tax practices. They said one indication of fraud was the use of numbers on his tax forms that added up to multiples of 10, an outgrowth of his belief in numerology. Ramchandani was born in Ahmadabad, India, and moved to the United States in 1972. He could face up to three years in prison at sentencing. He has agreed to pay $5.5 million to settle civil claims. Jepsen drops Scouts event over gay rights NASHVILLE, Tenn. Carly Rae Jepsen is canceling her performance at the national Boy Scouts of America Jamboree because of the organizations exclusion of gays. Jepsen, the Canadian pop singer best known for the inescapable hit Call Me Maybe, made the announcement Tuesday on Twitter. I always have and will continue to support the LGBT community on a global level, she wrote. Rock band Train also has taken a stand, but pursued a different tack in a post on its website Friday. The group asked the BSA to reconsider its policy rather than immediately pull out of the July gathering. Birthday This could be a very interesting year where your earnings are concerned, but dont leave anything to chance. If you put forth the effort and you handle things properly, you could end up making more money than ever. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you employ a little elbow grease, something you desperately want could come within your grasp. However, dont rely on Lady Luck to do everything for you. Aries (March 21-April 19) Lucky you: You have a very dependable friend who will come to your aid when you need it the most. Your pal will help out quietly, but dont let that stop you from showing your gratitude. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Your brain will be like a sponge, enabling you to absorb whatever knowledge you need. Youll use it advantageously, to boot. Gemini (May 21-June 20) One of your best assets is your ability to fit well into others projects, making your input and presence an integral part of the whole. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Youve done your best to improve your negotiating skills. This will become evident when an agreement needs hammering out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Someone you helped in the past has been eager to find a way to repay you in some manner. What he or she ends up doing will be worth more than your original act. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Something quite pleasant as well as a bit extraordinary is likely to develop through the good offices of certain contacts. What transpires will have far-reaching effects. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The life span of a rewarding endeavor can be expanded if you seize the opportunity. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If there is something important you want to discuss with another, the best place to do so would be in a social setting. However, try to lead up to the subject gradually. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Something that could enhance your material interests might develop. It could be quite surprising, but dont waste time being shocked act on it immediately. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Some good news youve longed for might finally arrive. If this is the case, chances are it should come sometime after lunch. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Instead of trying hard to make things happen, youd be wise to let events take their natural course. Besides, youre likely to do better when youre not in the drivers seat. From wire reports Today in HISTORY MONDAY, MARCH 4 Fantasy 5: 14 18 20 30 35 5-of-5No winner 4-of-5241$555 3-of-57,815$27.50 SUNDAY, MARCH 3 Fantasy 5: 6 13 14 24 27 5-of-51 winner$193,412.10 4-of-5272$114.50 3-of-58,513$10 Today is Wednesday, March 6, the 65th day of 2013. There are 300 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On March 6, 1933, a national bank holiday declared by President Franklin D. Roosevelt aimed at calming panicked depositors went into effect. (The holiday was supposed to last four days, but was extended until it was gradually lifted starting March 13.) On this date: In 1836, the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, fell to Mexican forces after a 13-day siege. In 1857, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Dred Scott v. Sandford that Scott, a slave, was not an American citizen and could not sue for his freedom in federal court. In 1912, Oreo sandwich cookies were first introduced by the National Biscuit Co. In 1933, Chicago Mayor Anton Cermak, wounded in an attempt on then-President-elect Franklin D. Roosevelts life the previous month, died at a Miami hospital at age 59. In 1944, U.S. heavy bombers staged the first full-scale American raid on Berlin during World War II. In 1953, Georgy Malenkov was named premier of the Soviet Union a day after the death of Josef Stalin. In 1970, a bomb being built inside a Greenwich Village townhouse by the radical Weathermen accidentally went off, destroying the house and killing three group members. In 1973, Nobel Prize-winning author Pearl S. Buck, 80, died in Danby, Vt. In 1983, in a case that drew much notoriety, a woman was gang-raped atop a pool table in a tavern in New Bedford, Mass., called Big Dans; four men were later convicted of the attack. In 1988, the board of trustees at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., a liberal arts college for the deaf, selected Elisabeth Zinser, a hearing woman, to be school president. (Outraged students shut down the campus, forcing selection of a deaf president, I. King Jordan, instead.) Ten years ago: A somber President George W. Bush readied the nation for war against Saddam Hussein, hurling some of his harshest invectives yet at the Iraqi leader during a prime-time news conference. Five years ago: Twin bombings in a shopping district in Baghdad killed at least 68 people and wounded 130 others. One year ago: Former Texas tycoon R. Allen Stanford was convicted in Houston of bilking his investors out of more than $7 billion through a Ponzi scheme hed operated for 20 years. (Stanford was sentenced to 110 years in prison.) Todays Birthdays: Former FBI and CIA director William Webster is 89. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan is 87. Author Gabriel Garcia Marquez is 86. Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova is 76. Singer Mary Wilson (The Supremes) is 69. Rock musician Hugh Grundy (The Zombies) is 68. Rock singermusician David Gilmour (Pink Floyd) is 67. Actor-director Rob Reiner is 66. Actor Tom Arnold is 54. Actor D.L. Hughley is 49. Rock musician Chris Broderick (Megadeth) is 43. NBA player Shaquille ONeal is 41. Rapper Bubba Sparxxx is 36. Thought for Today: Learn by others mistakes because you do not live long enough to make them all yourself. Author unknown. INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lottery numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www. flalottery.com, or call 850487-7777. Spotlight on PEOPLE Florida LOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Last nights winning numbers, Page B4 Page B6 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Todays HOROSCOPE Carly Rae Jepsen Jon Stewart Associated PressNEW YORKT he scene: a Manhattan art-house theater. The cause: a campaign against the gas drilling process known as fracking thats being led by more than 100 celebrities, including Yoko Ono, Sean Lennon, Robert Redford, Mark Ruffalo and Mario Batali. Outside, demonstrators in hazmat suits circle the theater. Inside, actress Scarlett Johansson attends a benefit screening of Gasland, the documentary film that has become the movements manifesto. Johansson tells The Associated Press that Avengers co -star Ruffalo introduced herto the cause, and she found the film incredibly shocking. The campaign has galvanized hundreds of thousands of followers, but as with many activist causes, the facts can get drowned out by the glitz. Now, some experts are asking whether the celebrities are enlightened advocates or NIMBYs crying Not in my backyard! even as their privileged lives remain entwined, however ruefully, with fossil fuels. Much of the anti-fracking activism is centered in New York City, where concerts, movies and plays use huge amounts of energy, gourmet chefs including Batali cook with gas, and most people the glitterati included heat with gas. Theres no doubt critics of hydraulic fracturing a practice colloquially known as fracking that involves injecting water, sand and chemicals into underground rock to free vast reserves of gas have some legitimate concerns. There have been documented cases of leaking gas ruining nearby well water, of air pollution and of problems from the waste the drilling generates. Experts say those are important parts of the story but far from the whole story. With proper regulation and enforcement, gas provides a very substantial health benefit in reducing air pollution, compared with coal-fired power plants, said Daniel Schrag, director of Harvard Universitys Center for the Environment. That is a theme not adequately covered in the debate over fracking, agreed Michael Greenstone, an environmental economics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a former top adviser to the Obama administration. Greenstone is studying the local health effects of fracking, but he said its not scien tifically accurate to ignore the tremendous health gains from the coal-to-gas shift. The main celebrity antifracking campaign took off last summer when Ono and Lennon, her son, founded Artists Against Fracking. Their family farm sits near gas reserves in New York, and they fear fracking might be allowed in the area. In truth, celebrities are rich, and they use far more energy and resources than anyone else. Theres this grass-roots NIMBY revolt against fracking, said Michael Shellenberger, who heads the Breakthrough Institute, an Oakland-based environmental think tank releasing a report this month on the environmental benefits of natural gas. Even the success that turns people into celebrities often involves tremendous amounts of energy. Restaurateur and Food Network star Batali started with one restaurant. He now has 16 in New York, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Hong Kong and Singapore all using natural gas to cook. Some of his restaurants use a percentage of green power to help offset some of our non-renewable energy consumption, and we are looking to do more in the future, Batali spokeswoman Elizabeth Meltz wrote in an email. Some celebrities acknowledge the complexities. Obviously the entire society is addicted to fossil fuels, and the reason that were fractivists is to try to move toward a renewable economy, Lennon said. That doesnt mean that any of us have extracted ourselves completely from the society itself, because the entire citys running off of oil and gasoline. Associated Press Sundance Institute president and founder Robert Redford speaks Jan. 19 during a press conference at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Redford is among the 100 celebrities leading Artists Against Fracking. Hydraulic fracturing, a new practice colloquially known as fracking that involves injecting water into underground rock to free vast reserves of gas, has been linked to documented cases of leaking gas ruining nearby well water, of air pollution, and of problems from the waste the drilling generates. Celebrity fractivists: Advocates or NIMBYs? In truth, celebrities are rich, and they use far more energy and resources than anyone else. Theres this grass-roots NIMBY revolt against fracking. Michael Shellenberger head of the Breakthrough Institute, an Oakland-based environmental think tank.

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794603 Looking For Something Unique? Check out todays Classified ads.SHOP NOW! E DUCATION Section C WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Machining classes open doors to careers S UE L OUGHLIN Tribune-StarTERRE HAUTE, Ind. After David Hohenstein took an introductory machining class at Terre Haute North Vigo High School, he found he liked it and decided to take additional courses. He likes working with metal and seeing what you can transform it into. Machining requires such skills as being able to measure and knowing fractions and decimals, he said. It requires being patient, careful and safe. He finds its easier to learn those math skills in a hands-on class, where he has to apply it. Machining is not his first career choice; hed rather be a police officer. But if that doesnt work out, Id like to be a machinist. He knows a strong demand exists for skilled machinists, in the Wabash Valley and elsewhere. Its a skills gap the Vigo County School Corp. is working to address. Martin Nagy, in his third year as Norths machine tool teacher, has had success this year in generating interest in the program, with 70 students taking introductory classes. Before that, enrollment had been down. To me, its all about exposure. This stuff is so cool and so fun, Nagy told the Tribune-Star. Some will be interested in pursuing it, and others wont, but unless they try it, theyll never know. Guidance counselors work with students to explain what we do and let them make an informed choice. Its not a fit for everybody, the teacher said. Nagy has worked with local industry to learn what they need and also to help him recruit students. Last year during a school open house, representatives of JWS Machine attended, did a demonstration and answered students and parents questions. That way, parents and kids Associated Press Terre Haute North Vigo High School junior David Hohenstein, 17, keeps an eye on a drill bit as he makes parallel clamps in Martin Nagys machining class in Terre Haute, Ind. After Hohenstein took an introductory machining class, he found he liked it and decided to take additional courses. See TOOL / Page C2 Hands-on learning gives students a feel for the job Marathon moments Monster find has geologist fishing for more J OHN G UERRIERO Erie Times-NewsERIE, Pa. Presentday Erie was under a saltwater ocean 364 million years ago. And a top-of-the-foodchain predator in that ancient ocean ate sharks for lunch. And for breakfast and dinner, too. Erie geologist Scott McKenzie is patiently putting together pieces of the skull and shoulder armor of that powerful prehistoric fish, Dunkleosteus, the rest of whose remains are embedded in sandy shale in an Erie County location he cannot reveal in an agreement with the private property owners. Now that spring is almost here, McKenzie, colleagues from other universities and geology students will return to the site to see if erosion through wind, rain and snow have exposed more bones. Were restricted to surface collection, said McKenzie, assistant professor of geology at Mercyhurst University. The landowners dont want a significant hole dug on the land. And digging could damage the missing pieces, he said. Some years, they find nothing. Other years, they find more bones to add to the collection. Its eroding slowly much too slowly for my taste, said McKenzie, who makes several trips to the site during the year. In 10 years, or sooner, McKenzie hopes to have the skull and shoulder armor of Dunkleosteus put together and displayed at the universitys Sincak Natural History Collection, where he is curator. When his work is complete, the specimen will be impressive the head, including the shoulder armor, will rival the front of a Volkswagen Beetle in size, he said. Dunkleosteus was arguably the most terrifying creature during the Devonian period, and its huge jaws opened so fast they created a suction force that pulled prey into its mouth, according to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Among its many fossil specimens of the creature, the museum has a giant armored skull of Dunkleosteus terrelli on display. McKenzie doesnt know if the fish hes reconstructing is the terrelli species until he gathers more material. Dunkleosteus named See FISH / Page C4 STEPHEN E. LASKO /For the Chronicle Runners cross the finish line during the Five Points of Life Kids Marathon Friday at the Lecanto High School track. J AMES B LEVINS CorrespondentLECANTOF irst, the middle schoolage kids took off from the starting line, followed by wave after wave of thirdthrough fifth-graders, for a total of 852 registered students. Some were sprinting, some jogging, but each and every one of them was running with the same goal in mind to finish the last 1.2 miles of a marathon. The Life South fourth annual 5 Points of Life Kids Marathon concluded Friday afternoon at Lecanto High School track. The event was part of Life Souths mission to encourage young children to get active and healthy. Sixteen schools from the county were represented during the meet Central Ridge, Citrus Springs, Crystal River, Floral City, Forest Ridge, Hernando, Homosassa, Inverness, Lecanto, Pleasant Grove and Rock Crusher elementary schools, Citrus Springs, Lecanto, Crystal River and Inverness middle schools and Pope John Paul II Catholic School. Five Points of Life is an affiliate of Life South and strives to educate young people in the five ways you can sustain life through donation: blood, aphaeresis, marrow, organ and tissue and cord blood. The Life South Blood Mobile was on hand for any willing donors. Over the past three months, registered kids have been logging miles after school, during school or at home. Eventually their efforts added up to 25 miles just one mile and 385 yards short of the Olympic marathon distance. The kids were given a chance to finish their goal distance together on the track Friday. The event featured music, food and medals handed out to all runners. Forest Ridge sixth-grader Marleigh Miller performed the national anthem just prior to the start of the race. Implementation coordinator for Five Points, Jay Eckert, was happy to see a large turnout from Citrus County schools, which matched the amount of participants for the same event in Gainesville. The kids marathon started out in Gainesville in 2007, Eckert said. Now its branched out to eight locations including here in Citrus County. Awesome turnout. The Citrus County School District is so supportive, and thats one of the reasons its so big here. Tom Davis, district community development coordinator for Life South, was at the finishing chute, handing out medals to the kids as they crossed the line. Citrus County has set the bar for the kids marathon throughout our system, Davis said. So its quite the event. The P .E. teachers have Running event encourages children to get active to stay healthy S USAN O RR Evansville Courier & PressEVANSVILLE, Ind. When members of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority participated in the Womens Suffrage March of 1913, they were motivated by the hope that women would someday gain the right to vote. According to historical accounts, the marchers were jeered and jostled as they made their way through Washington, D.C. Members of the black sorority had to fight for the right to march next to other women instead of behind them. When alumnae of that same sorority gathered in Evansville on Sunday to mark the 100th anniversary of the event, they celebrated how much has changed since then. There were some bold and brave and courageous women who took a stand on March 3, 1913, for our right to vote, said Stephanie Terry just before the group began a re-enactment of the 1913 march. Terry is a member of Delta Sigma Thetas Evansville alumnae chapter, an organizer of Sundays event and a member of the Vanderburgh County Council. About 40 people took part in the march from the Civic Center to the Each of the children finishing the course received a medallion. Sorority marks 100th anniversary of suffrage march See MARCH / Page C3 See RUN / Page C2

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C2 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E DUCATION Fort Cooper Days Fort Cooper Days 000DT0O For more information, call 726-0315 Sat., March 16 & Sun., March 17 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fort Cooper State Park 3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness Experience Florida History Adults thru 13 yrs. old $6 ~ 12 Yrs. & Under Free Come and Enjoy Second Seminole War & Reenactments at 11a.m. & 2p.m. Period Arts & Crafts Great Food and Refreshments Living History Demonstrations Exhibits/Demonstrations Hosted by Hosted by the Friends of the Friends of Fort Cooper Fort Cooper Knights of Columbus Golf Tournament Saturday March 23 Citrus Hills Oaks course 7:30 am registration 8:00 am tee time $60 per golfer Lunch and Prizes included Shotgun Start Best Ball 000E54V Email rs1@tampabay.rr.com for more information. H ONORS Crystal River High School students Kotcha Schillings and Casidy Newcomer have been selected the West Citrus Elks Lodge students of the month for February. Kotcha Schillings is the son of Todd and Wenona Schillings. He has a 4.2 cumulative GPA and has taken three AP classes, one of which he passed the national exam for and received college credit. Schillings ranks 18 out of 286 seniors. He has always carried a rigorous schedule with honors and AP classes. His senior year he is taking dual enrollment classes at the College of Central Florida. He will graduate with 12 college credit hours. Schillings has more than 100 community service hours. He is a Bright Futures candidate and a Dell Scholarship semifinalist. He is the student leader of First Priority at Crystal River High School. He is also involved in FCA. He played football during his freshman, sophomore and junior years. He received a varsity letter for two years. He is also part of the first graduating AVID class of CRHS. Schillings plans to attend Trinity Baptist College in Jacksonville and pursue a degree in youth ministry and business. Casidy Newcomer is the daughter of Jay and Anne Newcomer. She is a Bright Futures candidate and has a weighted GPA of 4.3. She participated in volleyball, soccer and track. She was named captain of the volleyball team her senior year and earned the best offensive player for her team. She is a county candidate for volleyball player of the year. Newcomer has served as president of the Quill and Scroll International Honor Society and the Future Builders Association. She is an active member of the National Honor Society and the National Society of High School Scholars. She has been editor-in-chief of the yearbook for two years. She was selected as the advertising/marketing winner at a statewide yearbook leadership camp. Newcomer has 100 hours of community service. She has been a volleyball camp counselor, assisted in the summer weightlifting program, worked at the Family Resource Center and worked at community festivals. Newcomer is undecided about her college plans, but has been accepted to Florida Atlantic University, Clemson University, Auburn University and Florida State University. Citrus High School senior Lindsay Connors has been selected as the Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 student of the month for December 2012. Connors is the daughter of Doug and Linda Connors of Inverness. She has a 4.534 weighted GPA and is a member of the National Honor Society. She has more than 84 community service hours, volunteering with the Salvation Army, Relay For Life, NHS, basketball youth camps and volleyball youth camps. She is involved with Link Club, as a student advisory; Key Club, with the student community support group; basketball; softball; Breez, a four-part audition singing group; and National Honor Society. Connors was on the junior homecoming court; senior homecoming court (runnerup); captain of the basketball team her senior year; captain of the volleyball team her senior year; and MVP for volleyball team senior year. She holds the CHS school record for basketball (most 3-pointers made in a season). She made honor roll each quarter all four years. She was on the Chronicle All County Basketball Team and Chronicle All County Volleyball Team. She plans to attend UCF after graduation. Citrus High School sophomore Tara McLeod has been selected as the Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 student of the month for January. McLeod is the daughter of Phill and Heather McLeod. She has a 4.38 weighted GPA and is a member of the SWAT and Interact clubs. She is also a member of the swim team. McLeod has more than 60 hours of community volunteer service. She is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Her interests include sports, reading and spending time with friends and family. She plans to attend a major university and earn a masters degree. F UNDRAISERS Citrus Springs Middle School is holding its annual Falcon Family Festival from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at the school. All proceeds benefit local families in need. The ticket price of $2 includes access to concessions, carnival games and music by the CSMS band. An additional $8 wristband includes unlimited inflatable rides. Monetary contributions to help defray expenses are appreciated. Donated items for a silent auction can be dropped off at the front office during school hours. For more information, call Muriel Dufresne at 352-3442244 ext. 4411. The Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods and the Rotary Interact Club of Lecanto High School have joined together to support the Box Tops for Education fundraiser for Lecanto Primary School. Box Tops for Education labels can be found on more than 300 products that families purchase and use on a daily basis. There are two drop boxes one in the lobby of the Sugarmill Woods Country Club and the other in the Military Outlet Store on West Citrus Avenue in Crystal River. For a listing of the products, go to www.RotarySMW.com. The labels can also be mailed to the Sugarmill Woods Rotary Club. P.O. Box 8, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447. S CHOLARSHIPS ANDCONTESTS The Festival of the Arts Committee is offering $1,500 scholarships to graduating seniors from any Citrus County high school or homeschooled graduating seniors who are interested in continuing their education in the visual arts. Applications may be obtained from their high school guidance counselors or call Jaret at 352-726-0366. Applications must be returned to the Festival of the Arts Committee by April 8. Citrus 20/20 Inc., in support of its Youth Needs aspiration, is offering a $500 scholarship for academic year 2013-14 for collegebound students who have fulfilled the requirements for graduation from an accredited Citrus County secondary school. Scholarship applicants will be evaluated on their SAT/ACT score, GPA, anticipated major, community involvement, extracurricular activities and written essay. Applicants selected as finalists will be interviewed and evaluated by the Citrus 20/20 scholarship committee. Award of the scholarship is contingent upon verification of the recipients enrollment at an institution of higher learning accredited to confer a baccalaureate degree by its office of admissions. Applicants may obtain the scholarship application by visiting the Citrus 20/20s website at www.citrus2020.org or from their high school guidance counselor. Applications must be received no later than 5 p.m. March 15. Applications may be submitted by email to info.citrus2020 @gmail.com or mailed to Citrus 20/20 Inc., P.O. Box 1141 Lecanto, FL 34460-1141. For more information, call Lace Blue-McLean at 352201-0149. The Citrus County Shooting Club is offering scholarship money to students graduating from Citrus County high schools who are planning on a career in some form of law enforcement. Interested students may inquire at their schools guidance office. Applications are available at the clubs website at www.ccsc.us, or by calling Jim Echlin at 352-746-0806, or Luis Michaels at 352-7462414. Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club awards scholarships each year to deserving students who attended Yankeetown School for at least two years and graduated, or will graduate, from Dunnellon High School or Crystal River High School. Also eligible are homeschooled seniors, those attending college and maintain a 3.0 GPA, and those who have worked after graduation but now have concrete plans for resuming their education. To be considered for a scholarship, students are asked to write a personal essay and complete a questionnaire, have a 3.0 GPA or higher and submit teacher and counselor recommendation letters. Those who wish to apply may obtain an application from guidance counselors at Dunnellon or Crystal River high schools, at A.F. Knotts Library on 56th Street in Yankeetown, or download it from the Womans Club website, www.yiwomansclub.com. Selection will be made by members of the YankeetownInglis Womans Club Education Committee. Completed applications should be mailed to: Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club Education Committee, P.O. Box 298, Yankeetown, FL 34498, and must be postmarked no later than April 5. For more information, call 352-447-2057, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, or email yiwomansclub@gmail.com. Disabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness, is offering a $1,000 scholarship for the 2013 school year. The scholarship is offered to a disabled veteran, veteran, survivor of a veteran or dependent of a veteran. The recipient shall be enrolled in a full-time course of instruction leading to a degree program or to a vocational skill. Selection shall be conducted by the scholarship committee and will be based on the applications submitted. The procedure requires that applicants write a statement detailing course of study, goals and why they are deserving of this award. Applications may be picked up at guidance department offices in area high schools, the Withlacoochee Technical Institute, Central Florida Community College guidance offices, or by calling John Seaman at 352-8600123. All applications must be returned to the DAV Chapter at 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34453 by March 31. The Hernando-Citrus County Farm Bureau will award one or more scholarships up to $1,000. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must be a senior, carry at least a 2.5 grade point average and plan to major in an agriculture-related field in college. Application forms are available in the guidance offices of all Hernando and Citrus County high schools and in private schools. All applications must be postmarked or hand delivered to the Farm Bureau office in Citrus County or in Hernando County by April 1. For information, call 352-796-2526 or 800-282-8317. The BFF Society is offering a minimum of two $1,000 scholarships The scholarships are available to all U.S. citizens attending Citrus County schools or Citrus County residents seeking a professional career. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above. Applicants may be subject to an interview. The scholarship must be used to attend an accredited college, junior college or professional school. Applicants may be graduating high school seniors or adult students seeking to further their education. Candidates will be judged on academic achievement and financial need. Scholarships will be awarded for the 2012-13 school year and are to be used for tuition and books only. The check will be made payable to the educational institution for the benefit of the scholarship recipient. Scholarship winners will be notified by April. It will be necessary for the scholarship winner(s) to attend the BFF Society Awards Banquet on May 13 or forfeit the scholarship. If the monies for the scholarships are not used as indicated, all monies will be rescinded to the founding chapter. Applications must be postmarked by March 31. The application must be in its entirety or it will not be considered for review. Kotcha Schillings Casidy Newcomer could talk to an industry professional about employment opportunities and educational requirements, said Doug Dillion, Vigo County School Corp. director of careertechnical education. Thats been one of the challenges. People dont understand enough about machining and industry opportunities, Dillion said. Its one thing for a teacher to tell parents and kids, but it takes on added significance when an employer talks about it. According to Nagy, the cooperation with the local machine shops has been instrumental in helping us out everything from technical advice, to donated materials, to having jobs available for our students when they graduate. The camaraderie with the local shops will be key to our success. Last year, Laurence Cross, general manager at Tri Aerospace, took Nagy to a machining convention in Chicago, and another company took two of Norths guidance counselors. It helped educate the counselors about the opportunities the industry offers. Nagy also attends meetings of a committee that is working to address local companies needs for skilled machinists. Those attending include representatives of industry, education and WorkOne. The group is chaired by Cross, who said the machine shops have a challenge finding skilled workers. Were trying to figure out ways to get the word out that manufacturing in this area is a very good career path. Cross said that Nagy is helping fill that skills gap by his involvement with local industry. The students out of his class are very good in the fundamentals we need from machinists, he said. Part of what the committee wants to accomplish is to make sure we are staying in tune with them (educators), so they have the curriculum that works for us, Cross said. Nagy said there are 26 shops within a 15-mile radius of Terre Haute North, and representatives of several have visited his classes and talked to his students about expectations. The precision machine technology career pathway offers dual college credit opportunity and industry certification, Dillion said. Its a great pathway for kids to go into, with potential to make high wages. The program is also offered at South Vigo and West Vigo high schools. Dillion is concerned that sometimes, there is too much focus on standardized testing. Our ultimate goal is to make every student a productive citizen, Dillion said. We want them to have high skill, high wage, high-demand jobs so they can give back to the community and contribute to the tax base. The machining career pathway is one route to get there, he said. TOOL Continued from Page C1 said. So its quite the event. The P .E. teachers have really embraced this, Davis said. It aims to help the kids to get up off the couch and go run or walk. Superintendent of schools Sandra Sam Himmel took hold of the microphone during the assembly and expounded warmly on the event and its many merits within the school system. Our schools have afterschool running programs and our teachers volunteer to work with the students, Himmel said. And this is like the big finale. Our teachers are excited, our students are excited. I just cant tell you how excited I am to be here. Citrus Springs sixthgrader and runners club member Michael Morrow was the first middle school runner to cross the finish line. Morrow daringly held off a last minute challenger to his lead before powering home on the final curve. We run every week except for one day, Morrow said of his running club. I enjoy it. Crystal River Middle Schools Cheyenne Dohner won the girls middle school race and is no stranger to front running as she also won the county middle school cross country two-mile championship this year for the Pirates. I like to run, Dohner said. Its fun. Bruce Sheffield, the districts coordinator of Health, Physical Education and Special Programs, could be seen hustling about the event. The goal is to get the kids moving, Sheffield said. Nowadays with childhood obesity, were trying to get these kids motivated early. One of my goals is hopefully getting cross country back in the middle schools ... as a feeder for the high schools. Sheffield said. Second-grade student Noah Rawlings of Inverness Primary ran with his dad, Travis Tatman, a Lecanto graduate and member of the 1994 cross country state championship team. My favorite distance to run is three or four miles, Rawlings said. Local sponsors of the event include: Citrus Memorial hospital, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, WYKE, Central Florida College, Citrus Orthopedic and Joint Institute, Christie Dental, Progress Energy, Holiday Inn Express, Walmart, DRC Sports and Calypso Concessions. RUN Continued from Page C1 One of my goals is hopefully getting cross country back in the middle schools ... Bruce Sheffield district coordinator of health and physical education. See CHALK / Page C3 The precision machine technology career pathway offers dual college credit opportunity and industry certification.

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For more information or an application, contact Dianne Micklon at 352-527-7442 or trechuck@tampabay.rr.com. The Daughters of the American Revolution are offering scholarships at three different levels local, state and national. The local Fort Cooper chapter offers a $500 award for a graduating senior girl who has at least a 3.0 grade point average and is accepted at an accredited college or university. The Florida state society DAR provides $500 scholarships for male or female high school graduates and postgraduates with a minimum 3.0 GPA who has been accepted at an accredited college or university. Guidelines and applications are available at Citrus County public and private high schools. The national DAR has many scholarships available for high school and college graduates. For information about them, visit the website www.dar.org. Click on Scholarships and follow the prompts. For more information, contact Shirley Hartley, DAR scholarship chairman, at 352270-8590 or visit the website at www.rootsweb.ancestry. com/~flfccdar/. The SECO Board of Trustees has voted to continue SECOs scholarship program for 2013. The board has authorized an increase in the scholarship amount from $2,500 to $3,000 per student in recognition of the ever increasing cost of higher education. Up to 12 high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory will receive assistance to go on to a college or technical school after graduation. To qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2013. Applications are now available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus and Sumter counties. They must be returned to SECO no later than March 29. The Homosassa Civic Club is offering the Beri Hagerty-Phelps Scholarships to graduating high school students and adults who live within the boundaries of the Homosassa Elementary School District and/or the Homosassa Special Water District. Information and applications are available through guidance counselors at Crystal River High School, Lecanto High School, Withlacoochee Technical School, or College of Central Florida. They are also available at www.homosassaseafood festival.org Applications must be received by March 31. For more information, call 352-6289333 The Citrus Community Concert Choir is now accepting applications for its 2013 scholarship award of $1,500. Application is open to graduating high school seniors or enrolled college students and residents of Citrus County or children of Citrus County residents. Past and present choir members and relatives of choir members are also eligible. Applicantsmay obtainscholarship qualifications and application forms from their school guidance counselors or online at www.citruschoir.com. Completed applications must be received no later than April 30. The College of Central Florida is awarding dozens of scholarships to qualifying students interested in taking honors classes at the Citrus campus this fall semester. A major component of CFs Honors Institute, the Community of Scholars Honors Program offers incoming high school graduates two-year tuition scholarships, currently valued at $3,000 per academic year, while offering partial scholarships to those who are currently attending CF. Students in the honors program are free to pursue the degree option of their choosing at CF, with the scholarship requirement being successful participation in a limited number of honors-level classes that also serve to fulfill degree requirements. Students may also take classes at any of the CF locations each term, and are not bound to enrolling only in classes offered at the Citrus campus. Besides financial benefits, the Community of Scholars offers members priority registration each term. Typically, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.75 is needed to qualify for the Community of Scholars, although applications for those with a slightly lower GPA may be considered in some cases. Students wishing to be considered for scholarships should call Dr. June Hall at 352-746-6721. C LASSESANDCOURSESFor information about outdoors and recreational classes in Citrus County, see the Sunday Sports section of the Chronicle. Sherrie Geick is offering scrapbooking classes at Whispering Pines Park recreation building. The all-day class fee is $25; the 1/2-day class fee is $12.50. Bring your own supplies. The classes are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays. Class dates are April 20, May 18, Aug. 17, Sept. 21, Nov. 16 and Dec. 21. For information, call the park office at 352-726-3913 or go to www.inverness-fl.gov. Withlacoochee Technical Institute is offering GED prep classes Classes are $30 per term and are offered during the day and evening in many locations in Citrus County. In addition to GED preparation classes, adult education students are also offered free career counseling, and financial aid and post-secondary application assistance, as well as free child care for eligible adult education parents. ESOL classes are available for those wanting to learn to speak, read and write English. Tuition scholarships are available to qualified candidates. For information, call Student Services at 352-7262430 ext. 4326 or ext. 4363, or go to www.wtionline.cc/ programs.htm#adult. Withlacoochee Technical Institute would like input from community members regarding what classes they would like to see offered at the school. To offer suggestions, log on to www.wtionline.cc, then click on Community Education and fill out a suggestion form. Join the excitement as the Homosassa Public Library begins a new Celebrate Reading program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Celebrate Reading is a session consisting of two programs geared toward helping preschool and elementary school-age children develop literacy skills, improve their reading and gain a love of books. The first program, PAWS to Read, gives children the opportunity to build confidence in their reading ability by reading aloud to a certified therapist. The second program, Reading Pals, pairs teens and younger children together. Teens read storybooks aloud to one or two younger children at a time. Children may wish to draw or write about a story they like. Listening to stories, talking about stories and reading aloud are great ways to improve literacy skills while having a good time. For information, call the youth librarian at 352-628-5626. Citrus County Parks & Recreation is offering baton classes at the Citrus Springs Community Center. Classes are open to all girls E DUCATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C3 000E83J 2 L O C A T I O N S 7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa 352-628-9588 Highway 44, Crystal River 3 5 2 7 9 5 9 0 8 1 DANS FAMOUS BURGER & FRIES $ 5.95 1 POUND SNOW CRABS $ 9.99 1 1 4 POUND LIVE MAINE LOBSTER $ 15.99 10 FRIED SHRIMP AND FRIES $ 7.99 3:00 6:00 PM EARLY BIRDS $ 9.95 DANS IS WHERE LENT IS MEANT 000DTL3 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1C Next to Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center Mon.-Fri. 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. Accepting New OB/GYN Patient s Fresh Flown-in New England Seafood Fresh Frog Legs Fresh Gator Bites N e w L o c a t i o n N e w L o c a t i o n New Location 8 5 9 U S H W Y 4 1 S I n v e r n e s s F L 8 5 9 U S H W Y 4 1 S I n v e r n e s s F L 859 US HWY. 41 S. Inverness, FL N O W O P E N N O W O P E N NOW OPEN P e p p e r m i n t P a t t i e s P e p p e r m i n t P a t t i e s Peppermint Patties 000E7B9 859 US Hwy 41, S., Inverness, FL 419-4878 Wed. Sun 11 AM 7 PM or until last customer leaves Closed Mon. & Tues. Featuring We accept all major credit cards 000E0T2 000DM2B Anastasias 2494 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL (Heritage Hills Plaza) 352-513-4860 7 AM 8 PM, Mon.-Sat. 7 AM 2 PM, Sun. 000E869 BREAKFAST SPECIAL $4.95 Big Man Plate 3 Pancakes, 2 Eggs, 2 Bacon, 2 Sausages LUNCH SPECIALS $5.95 Gyro, Rueben, Junior Greek Salad with soup All lunch specials come with fries or soup and coleslaw DINNER SPECIALS Two Dinners for $15.99 Homemade Meatloaf, Fried Fish, Calamari All dinner specials come with soup or salad, choice of potato or vegetable and dessert Greek Pastries NOW Available! Evansville Museum, the Evansville Courier & Press reported. As they walked, some held signs with slogans such as Women are citizens too!! and No is not an option. Let us vote!! The march was followed by a short dramatic production at the museum. The drama, written by local resident Kelley Coures, told the story of the 1913 event through both narrators and actors who played sorority members who participated in the event. The characters spoke of their fears, of being spit upon and shoved by onlookers, by seeing crowds of unsympathetic men along the parade route. That 1913 parade was an attempt to renew public attention for the suffragists cause. By that time, the movement had already been active for more than 60 years. (It would be seven more years before the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.) So activist Alice Paul came up with the idea for a parade in Washington. It was to be held one day before Woodrow Wilsons presidential inauguration to capitalize on the crowds in town for that event. According to 2001 article written for the Library of Congress and excerpted on its website, the procession included more than 5,000 participants. Marchers included women from other countries where women could already vote, American women representing various professions, state delegations and men who supported the suffragists cause. Participants marched down Pennsylvania Avenue to the U.S. Treasury Building, where a group of women and children presented an allegorical drama. Along the parade route, participants were heckled and shoved, and the male supporters who marched were ridiculed by onlookers, Helen Keller, the deaf and blind writer and activist, was slated to speak at the event but was so exhausted and unnerved by the unruly scene that she was unable to deliver her speech as planned, according to the Library of Congress article. Delta Sigma Theta groups around the U.S. organized commemorative events on Sunday, including one in Washington, D.C. They did so as part of anniversary celebrations for the sorority, which was formed at Howard University in January 1913. Some of the modern Delta Sigma Theta alumnae said the event gave them new respect for their founding members courage. My mind goes back to how young those girls really were, said Debra Meriweather, who joined the sorority while a student at the University of Evansville. They placed themselves in a life-threatening position. Dr. Ruthie Jimerson, an Evansville dentist and the vice president of the Evansville alumnae chapter, agreed. Jimersons daughter is a high school senior nearly the same age as the sorority members were during the 1913 march. The mother said those young women lived out the advice that she gives to her daughter and daughters friends. Thats what I always tell them: Stand for right. And thats what those young ladies did, and that was amazing to me. MARCH Continued from Page C1 Associated Press Berrien County Michigan Judge Mabel Mayfield, center, organizes marchers during the start of a Benton Harbor-St. Joseph Delta Sigma Theta alumnae chapter Womens Suffrage March Reenactment on Sunday. CHALK Continued from Page C2 See CHALK / Page C4

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C4 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E DUCATION Saturday, March 23 ~ 11:30 a.m. Museum Cafe ~ 10466 W. Yulee Drive in Old Homosassa Bands Include: Jillian Govoni Southern Heart Haley Schroeder Sophie Robitaille Zero Gravity Saint Taylor Gates open at 11:30 a.m. Music starts at noon $5 Adults $2 Teens 12 and under Free B ENEFITING B IG B ROTHERS AND B IG S ISTERS OF C ITRUS C OUNTY 000E5JR Museum Caf Open Bring Chairs No coolers, pets or outside food. www.ncfblues.com Present: the Fourth Annual 2013 For information call 352-503-3498. 000E5J9 Limited seating. Reservations Necessary. Call: 352-341-6427 Proudly Present C oncerts ourthouse at The Old Tickets $ 10 per person Including Refreshments at the 1912 Citrus County Courthouse, Inverness Doors open at 6:15 Music starts promptly at 7 p.m. Edward Jones Financial Services Dillons Cinnamon Sticks, Smith Optical Services, David Rom State Farm Insurance, Dave and Thelma Noble, Rebecca Pujals-Jones, Highlander Caf of Crystal River, Charles Davis Funeral Home and Crematory, Joyces Courtside Pub, Deco Caf, Elegant Catering, 3Js Pizza, Ice Cream Doctor, Winn Dixie Supermarkets, Sweetbay Supermarkets, Suncoast Chiropractic and Anonymous T O B ENEFIT THE C ITRUS C OUNTY H ISTORICAL S OCIETY S PONSORS : Brendan Nolan Thursday, Mar 14, 2013 000E8L6 Friends of the Floral City Library March 15th 5 p.m. 8 p.m. $3 admission March 16th 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Free admission Community House/Lion s Club 8370 E. Orange Ave., Floral City Two Day Event! Great selection of hard cover and paperback books along with up-cycled jewelry, handbags & more at affordable prices. Most hard cover books are $1, paperbacks are 50 Some collectables. Call 352-726-3671 for more infomation. and boys ages 4 to college age. No experience is necessary. For information, call Diane Sorvillo at 352-5276540. All classes are taught by Sorvillo, a former Majorette Queen of America and twotime national champion. Classes and times are: 4:45 to 5:30 p.m. New Beginners (ages 4 to 7). 5:30 to 6:15 Competitive team class. 6:15 to 7 p.m. Solo competitive class. 7 to 7:45 p.m. New Beginners (ages 8 and older). Class fees are $32 per month, or two different classes for $45. Free tutoring is available from state-approved providers to students who scored a Level 1 or Level 2 on the Reading or Math FCAT last spring at all Citrus County Elementary Schools and the Renaissance Center (Title I schools). Enrollment forms will be mailed to all qualifying families. Tutoring is available after school, at day care sites or community centers, in home or online. Spaces are limited, so if requests for free tutoring exceed the amount of funding available, the school district will prioritize services. Neither the Florida Department of Education nor the school district promotes or endorses any particular Supplemental Educational Services provider. For information, call Maribeth Smith at 352-7261931, ext. 2321. M ISCELLANEOUS Delta Kappa Gamma Educational Society will sponsor an informational meeting on Changes in Teacher Evaluation at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14, at the new Crystal River High School Library. Different perspectives on the new evaluation standards will be discussed by Jonny Bishop and/or Susie Swain, Citrus County Schools, and by Melissa Pfeiffer-Hermann of the Citrus County Teachers Association. Interested members of the public and Citrus County teachers are invited to attend. For more information, call DKG President Bonnie Ignico at 352-726-4236or go online to www.dkg.org. Withlacoochee Technical Institute will have a Career Expo and Open House from noon to 2:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at WTI, 1201 W. Main St., Inverness. Enter WTI at the eastern entrance off of Montgomery Street (across from the Suncoast Federal ATM and district services building). For more information, call 352-726-2430, ext. 4326, or visit www.wtionline.cc. A group of students, parents and teachers from Citrus County are going on an educational tour hosted by Education First: Educational Tours based out of Boston, Mass. The group will travel to Dublin, London and Paris from June 17 to 26, 2014. EF Educational Tours helps teachers in North America break down barriers of language, culture and geography by incorporating international travel into their lessons and opening the doors to the Global Classroom. Students will visit historic sites, natural wonders and learn it by living it. EF is the only fully accredited international tour company and a board member of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. A parent meeting will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 12, at Crystal River Middle School auditorium. For more information or to RSVP for the parent meeting, contact Dan Epstein at EpsteinD@citrus.k12.fl.us or 352-613-4478; or Deborah Beck at beckd@citrus.k12. fl.us or 352-422-6921. The tour website is www. eftours.com/1366896 to register for Epsteins group or www.eftours.com/1367131 to register for Becks group. The website link includes pricing information and the tours itinerary. Take Stock in Children of Citrus County is seeking male and female role models to help support new student scholars who will enter the program in the Spring. The program, sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, offers deserving youths in Citrus County a college scholarship and a caring mentor. Take Stock scholars join the program in the sixth, seventh grade or eighth grade and are assigned a mentor who meets with them once a week, during regular school hours, and helps the student achieve the goal of a graduating from high school and going to college. The next mentor training is in March. For information, call Pat Lancaster, program coordinator, at 352-422-2348 or 352-344-0855. The Citrus County YMCA is currently seeking to connect community volunteers through their Y Community Champions program. The Y Community Champions program embraces volunteers to help in a variety of areas with the YMCA organization. The benefits of volunteering include personal development, health and wellness, building relationships and having a community connection. Volunteers are currently needed in the areas of coaching, program assistants, special events and office administration. All volunteers must undergo a background screening. To volunteer at the YMCA, call 352-637-0132, or stop by the office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County are now registering children for the beforeand afterschool programs at each club. Clubs open as early as 6 a.m. for before-school programming, with children remaining until the school bus transports them to their respective schools. Buses also transport children in the afternoon when school is out to the clubs for the afterschool program, with parents picking up children by 6 p.m. To register a child or to learn more about the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County programs, call the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club at 352-270-8841, the Robert Halleen Boys & Girls Club at 352-795-8624, or the Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls Clubs at 352-341-2507, or the administrative office at 352-621-9225. Hernando Elementary School is looking for donations of working Kindles Nooks, iPod Touches, iPads, Internet tablets, digital cameras and digital recording devices to be used by students in the classroom. If you have any used but working electronic devices from the list above or would like to donate a new electronic device, contact Heather Bone or Laura Manos at 352-726-1833 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. To contact someone outside of these hours, call Heather Bone at 352-462-4768. Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County Central Ridge and Robert Halleen clubs seek mentors to work with their members. The two clubs have received federal grants through Boys & Girls Clubs of America, allowing mentors to come into the clubs to serve as tutors and special friends of members. All mentors will undergo complete background security checks with fingerprinting. Cost of background checks will be covered in most cases through grant funding by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Mentors may be assigned more than one child. A training session will be done prior to mentoring. All mentoring will take place at the club sites. Those who are interested, may call Amy Stonestreet at 352-270-8841 or Lane Vick at 352-621-9225. Girl Scouts of West Central Florida (GSWCF) is seeking troop leaders both men and women over age 18, to volunteer as positive adult role models for girls. In addition to troop leaders, GSWCF is seeking volunteers to fill a variety of other positions. For information on volunteering, visit www.gswcf.org or contact Kristie Wiley at 813-262-1765 or volunteer@gswcf.org. Springs Masonic Lodge No. 378 has an ongoing program to fixdonated computers which are then passed on to schoolchildren who cannot afford one. The program will accept computers, printers and monitors. Individuals or businesses who wish to donate computers are asked to call the Lodge secretary at 352-6280338 to arrange for pick-up. The Clerk of the Court is in need of volunteers as Special Service Clerks The clerks office welcomes volunteer applications from students in need of Bright Future community service hours or work-study hours. All time donated is greatly appreciated, and volunteering as few as two or three hours a week is a tremendous help to the clerks office. Consider partnering with the clerks office to meet community service requirements while volunteering as a Special Service Clerk (SSC). SSCs are invaluable members of the clerks office in assisting Deputy Clerks perform many functions for the citizens of Citrus County and serve as liaisons between the clerks office and the citizens of Citrus County. Call the office for information. Call Tanika Clayton, human resources generalist, at 352-341-6483 or send inquiries by email to tclayton@clerk.citrus.fl.us. Students at the College of Central Florida have the option of renting selected textbooks Rented textbooks are available for less than 50 percent of the cost of purchasing a new printed textbook. Many of the textbooks required for CF courses are available for rental at the Ocala campus bookstore, 3001 S.W. College Road, or online at www.CF.edu. Books are rented by the semester and students may highlight or mark rented books just as if they were purchased. CHALK Continued from Page C3 after the late David Dunkle, one of the Cleveland museums former curators varied from 15 to 30 feet in length, and possibly weighed up to 4 tons. McKenzie said the Erie County find likely wasnt a full-grown adult, but still was probably 15 to 25 feet long and weighed about 1 ton. He said it could be the largest of its kind found in Erie County. If you caught him on a rod and reel, youd be in for the fight of a lifetime. And if you fell in (the water), heaven help you because no one else could help you, he said. He displayed the Erie County remains of the ancient fish and pieces of others in a university classroom last week. Talk about Jaws. The giant predator could snap a prehistoric shark in two with its razor-sharp jawbones, according to the Cleveland Museum. And yet it was a bit of an oddity. The fish did not have developed teeth. Instead, the edges of their jawbones kept sharp by rubbing against each other like self-sharpening scissors, the museum said on its website. A special occasion Though McKenzie wont reveal the site, he said the remains would be difficult to locate. They are along the side of a stream bank in a heavily wooded area, and a passer-by also would have to recognize that the bones are embedded in the rock, he said. Some geologists use their tongue to lick bone to distinguish it from rock. The tongue tends to stick to the bone because even all these years later it draws water to the tongue, he said. McKenzie doesnt use that method. Im a little bit of a germophobe, he said. McKenzie and Mercyhurst geology students use tools to strip the rock from the bone. Its a delicate procedure because you dont want to leave any tool marks on the bone, he said. McKenzie gets a lot of help in gathering pieces of this monster fish and pieces of others like it. He frequently relies on collectors to scout out sites and bring in the remains. The shoulder armor he is now reconstructing was found by Kirk McFadden, president of the Gem City Rock and Mineral Society. McFadden lifted it out of the ground and carried it out in a backpack, McKenzie said. McKenzie said its not rare to find scraps of bone, but he called it a special occasion to find a whole plate or the skull and shoulder armor. The body of the fish probably wasnt preserved, he said. Most specimens from North America have been collected from Cleveland shale in Ohio, said Joe Hannibal, curator of invertebrate paleontology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Its really interesting to see somebody put together a reconstructed skeleton based on material from somewhere outside of Ohio, Hannibal said. Its good to have another pair of eyes and another brain there to try to figure out how these bones go together, and Scott has a lot of experience in paleontology and hes very insightful, he said. Hannibal said the rocks of western Pennsylvania are somewhat different from those of the classic fossil fish-collecting areas in the Cleveland area, and represent somewhat different environmental conditions. And so the fossils that Scott has may or may not be somewhat different from the ones in this area, but that remains to be seen, he said. Golden ticket When hes not reconstructing the fish, McKenzie said he keeps the pieces in a storage area with proper ventilation and security. The geologist said he once kept fossils of that fish and other prehistoric species at home until his wife insisted that they be moved because the buckets and buckets and buckets of rock fragments took up too much space. FISH Continued from Page C1 Associated Press Scott McKenzie, 58, assistant professor of geology and curator of the Sincak Natural History Museum at Mercyhurst University, with pieces of shoulder armor bone from a Dunkleosteus, a powerful prehistoric fish that could grow up to 30 feet long and hunted sharks.

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E DUCATIONC ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C5 2013 Universal Uclick () from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________ The Mini Pages popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come. I]Z\025B^c^\025EV\\000Z\234 dd`\025d[\025HiViZh Newspaper in Education Week (March 4-8) is a special week set aside to call attention to how important newspapers are to everyday life both now, while you are in school, and later, when you grow up.Read real news Most of us enjoy reading fiction or make-believe stories. Many of us also like to read about the real world. Reading real-life stories in newspapers and The Mini Page can teach you information-gathering skills that will help you throughout your life. Many reading experts say that although kids should read fiction, they also need to read more nonfiction, or facts. They need to know how to read and understand information that will help them live more interesting and informed lives. We read to gain knowledge. Whether you read a print newspaper or online, newspapers are full of interesting information. Newsy Newspaper Information, Please Newspapers often give information about: Papers touch your life with information you need: Where in your newspaper can you find this information? Put the page number in the boxes below (or find it online). s\000OTHER\000COUNTRIES s\000YOUR\000COUNTRY Weather forecasts help you be prepared. Entertainment sections suggest what movies to see or TV shows to watch. s\000YOUR\000CITY s\000YOUR\000STATE Display ads might feature a new dress for mom. Classified ad sections can help you find a pet. Skimming Skimming the newspaper pages enables readers to pick out quickly the stories they want to read. Next week, The Mini Page is all about quartz. Words that remind us of newspapers are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: ADVERTISEMENT, ART, COMMUNITY, DESIGN, DISPLAY, IDEA, IMPORTANT, KNOWLEDGE, NATION, PERSONALS, PHOTOS, SECTIONS, STORIES, UNDERSTAND, VISUALS, VOCABULARY, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHO, WORDS.Newspapers TRY N FIND NEWSPAPERS ARE FULL OF REAL LIFE! U N D E R S T A N D E S I G N S L A N O S R E P H O T O S S V I S U A L S T O R I E S W E D I S P L A Y T I N U M M O C K N O W L E D G E R E H W R T W H E N A T I O N Z A R T D I H Y R A L U B A C O V K Q S O A D V E R T I S E M E N T H N T N A T R O P M I D E A W F S from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickBasset Brown The News Hounds TM Ready Resources from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: s\000\000 BIT\016LY\017ZVMs\000NEWSEUM\016ORG s\000&IND\000YOUR\000HOMETOWN\000NEWSPAPER\007S\000WEBSITE\000AND\000 visit it. At the library: \000\000s\000h!\000$AY\000IN\000THE\000,IFE\000OF\000A\000.EWSPAPER\000EPORTERv\000BY\000 Mary Bowman-Kruhm from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick The Mini Page, like your local newspaper, often uses captions to give facts about a story and to explain how what is going on in the picture adds to the story. We looked back through our past issues to come up with a few. You will want to read the captions in your newspaper, too. Keep in mind that headlines also give information.A rocket launch Captions Give Facts Read online You may read your newspaper on the Internet. Today many papers have websites or online editions. Papers have started websites for several reasons: \000\000s\000TO\000KEEP\000THE\000COST\000OF\000PAPER\000DOWN\016 \000\000s\000TO\000ATTRACT\000 younger readers who are used to using the Internet. \000\000s\000TO\000PRESENT\000 up-to-the-minute news without waiting for the next print edition. \000\000s\000TO\000REACH\000READERS\000IN\000OTHER\000CITIES\016 \000\000s\000TO\000ADD\000INFORMATION\000THAT\000WON\007T\000FIT\000 into the print version. Newspaper readers may enjoy an online version because: \000\000s\000THEY\000CAN\000KEEP\000UP\000WITH\000LOCAL\000NEWS\000 even when away from home. \000\000s\000IT\000CONSERVES\000 paper resources. \000\000s\000THEY\000CAN\000 email or share stories with friends online. \000\000s\000TYPE\000SIZE\000CAN\000BE\000ADJUSTED\000TO\000MAKE\000 it easier to read. photo courtesy NASAThe Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, Falcon 9 rocket launches the Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station on Oct. 7, 2012.Protective gear Boys wear protective gear while playing lacrosse. Players are not allowed to hit an opponent in the head, on the back or below the waist. photo courtesy US Lacrosse/Peyton WilliamsA seashell home photo by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission A queen conch (kahngk) snail looks out of its shell. The beautiful pink motherof-pearl that coats the inside of the shell is smooth and comfortable against the snails soft body. Rookie Cookies RecipeEasy Tomato Cucumber SaladYoull need: s\000\022\000CUPS\000CHERRY\000OR\000GRAPE\000TOMATOES\f\000HALVED s\000\022\000CUPS\000CHOPPED\000CUCUMBER\f\000UNPEELED s\000 1 \017 4 to 1 \017 2 cup chopped cilantro (optional) s\000 1 \017 4 teaspoon salt s\000\022\000TABLESPOONS\000OLIVE\000OIL s\000 1 \017 4 cup fresh lemon juice s\000\021\000TEASPOON\000SUGARWhat to do: 1. Place tomatoes, cucumber and cilantro in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt. 2. In a separate small bowl, whisk together oil, lemon juice and sugar. 3. Pour lemon mixture over vegetables and stir to coat. 4. Chill for an hour to blend flavors. Serves 4 to 6. You will need an adults help with this recipe.from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick Nancy: Why did the teenager study while flying to his vacation? Ned: He wanted a higher education! Noah: What grade was the eyeball given in math class? Nina: \000*UST\000A\000h#v\001TM !LL\000THE\000FOLLOWING\000JOKES\000HAVE\000SOMETHING\000IN\000COMMON\016\000 Can you guess the common theme or category? Nelson: Why did Cyclops stop teaching? Nelly: He had only one pupil!Mini Spy .Mini Spy often uses newspapers in class. See if you CAN\000FIND\032\000\000s\000QUESTION\000MARK\000\000s\000ROLLING\000PIN s\000PEANUT\000s\000RULER\000s\000LETTER\000,\000s\000TOOTH s\000PENCIL\000s\000CARROT\000s\000BREAD\000SLICE\000s\000LADDER s\000FISH\000s\000BELL\000s\000CANOE\000s\000SHOE s\000MUSHROOM\000s\000STORK\000s\000KITE\000s\000COMB from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickMeet Julianna Bright \000\000*ULIANNA\000"RIGHT\f\000ALSO\000KNOWN\000AS\000#AT\000$OORMAN\f\000 IS\000A\000DRUMMER\000AND\000SINGER\016\000\(ER\000#$\000FOR\000KIDS\000IS\000 h#AT\000$OORMAN\000ONGBOOK\016v She is also a painter who got started with kids music when she painted hundreds of WATERCOLORS\000FOR\000A\000KIDS\007\000EDUCATIONAL\000APP\f\000h,ITTLE\000 ED\000AGON\016v\000HE\000APP\000TELLS\000A\000STORY\000ABOUT\000A\000LITTLE\000 girl picnicking with her animal friends. Julianna is a musical performer on the app as well. Julianna began her career in music by playing drums in a punk band. She had to overcome her shyness before she could sing well. She continues to play in adult bands AND\000PAINTS\000THE\000ALBUM\000COVERS\000FOR\000THE\000#$S\000OF\000THOSE\000BANDS\016 She grew up in Orange County, Calif., and now lives in Portland, Ore. photo by Jason Quigley from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick Information, Please The Mini Page StaffBetty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley A rtist Newspaper stories are written by people who know the facts (reporters) for people who dont (readers). Reporters names, or bylines, are usually placed at the beginning of a story. Vc\025ndj\025[^cY\025V\025Wna^cZ\025Lg^iZ\025^i\025]ZgZ#Fiction \000\000&ICTION\000IS\000NOT\000TRUE\016\000\T\000USUALLY\000HAS\000 a plot, characters, settings, conflict, resolution and a theme. You start at the beginning and read to the end.Nonfiction Nonfiction is true and factual. Photographs, maps and other items that aid in the telling are usually included in a newspaper story. You can skim as you read. While skimming, you discover new subjects you may want to learn more about.Tale-telling stories We can use a pyramid to show how tale-telling stories are different, with the beginning at the top.Sections Stories about certain subjects are often grouped together in sections.How many sections does your paper have? Slow beginning The details build up the suspense A climax at the end Once upon a time there lived a young girl who ... Newspaper stories Rather than trying to build up suspense, newspaper stories put the important facts first. Cinderella and the Prince will marry on Saturday. The romance began Directions Newspapers have aids to guide you through the pages. Eji\025V\025X]ZX`\025^c\025i]Z\025WadX`\025 l]Zc\025ndj/\000\000s\000&IND\000THE\000INDEX\000ON\000\000AGE\000\021\016 \000\000s\000&IND\000A\000hJUMPv\000THAT\000TELLS\000YOU\000 where a story is continued. \000\000s\000!T\000THE\000TOP\000OF\000EACH\000PAGE\f\000FIND\000A\000 folio line that gives the name of the paper and the date. \000\000s\000.EWSPAPERS\000OFTEN\000USE\000MAPS\000 to help show locations. Can you find a map in your newspaper? \000\000s\000&IND\000A\000HEADLINE\000THAT\000MAKES\000 you want to read the story.Letters to the editor Papers often give readers a chance to express their ideas in the letters-tothe-editor section. What would you write a letter about? Ads are created by people who know how to write them to attract customers. L]Vi\025^iZb\025WZ^c\\000VYkZgi^hZY\025ldjaY\025 ndj\025a^`Z\025id\025Wjn Photos that help tell the stories are taken by photographers. Vc\025ndj\025[^cY\025V\025e]did\025XgZY^i\025cZmi\025 id\025V\025e]did\025^c\025ndjg\025cZlheVeZg Daily News photo by Sally Smith HOW INTERESTING! THIS IS NEWS! Who, When, What, Where Why and How Less important details from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickSupersport: Rotnei Clarke Height: 6-0 Weight: 184 Hometown: Verdigris, Okla. Butler University guard Rotnei Clarke missed a few games recently with a sprained neck, the result of smashing into a backboard support in a January game. But most of this season Rotnei has been a pain in the NECK\000FOR\000OPPONENTS\016\000!S\000OF\000LATE\000*ANUARY\f\000HE\000LED\000THE\000HIGHLY\000 ranked Bulldogs in scoring (16.7 points per game average) and ranks among the nations leaders in 3-point shooting percentage. Rotnei, a senior, is one of the sharpest shooters in basketball. He AVERAGED\000\023\023\016\022\000POINTS\000IN\000HIGH\000SCHOOL\000AND\000THEN\000STARRED\000AT\000!RKANSA S\f\000WHERE\000 he scored 51 points in one game. He transferred to Butler in 2011. Butler, superbly coached by Brad Stevens, features a smooth-flowing offense and defensive toughness. Opponents, beware of these Bulldogs and also beware of Rotnei, who has given them added bite. TM

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Submit information at least two weeks before the event. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an event. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES Club plans yard/cake saleThe Afro-American Club will have a yard/cake sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 9, at Christ Way Fellowship, 972 Cristy Way, Inverness (at U.S. 41 and Independence). Items for sale will include clothing, medical supplies, electronics and more. For more information, call Cora Covington at 352527-8802 or Carol Bowers at 352-270-3866. NARFE convenes in InvernessChapter 776 of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE) invites all active and retired employees and surviving annuitants to attend the next meeting on Monday, March 11. The meeting will be at the Kracker Shack Caf, 1314 U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Guest speaker will be Dustin Green, Citrus County Fire Rescue fire inspector. The presentation will be on residential fire safety. The meeting will start at 1 p.m., with a short lunch prior to the meeting. For more information, call 352-270-0185. MOPARS Car Club show is March 16The fourth annual All MOPAR Car Show will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday, March 16, at Crystal Chrysler Dodge, 2077 State Road 44, Inverness. Pre-registration is $15; day of show, $20. Registration will be from 8 to 10 a.m. with 40 awards given at 2 p.m. based on a judging process Bring a fire extinguisher for extra points. Join the club for music, food and some great cars. Call Ken at 352-3411165 or Mike at 352-3411019 for information. Ukulele Club to meet March 16Citrus County Ukulele Club will meet at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Join the club and find out what all the fun is about. Call Gail Lang at 727330-8991, or email ukulelesrfun@gmail.com. C OMMUNITY Page C6 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY C HRONICLE Adopt A RESCUED PET Spud Special to the Chronicle Spud is an unusually handsome 2-year-old male Chihuahua mix. He is a super friendly guy and his playful antics will keep you entertained. He is dog friendly, as well. He is up to date on his vaccinations, microchipped and soon to be neutered. Spud is housebroken, walks well on a leash and his foster mom is working on his crate training. Adopt A Rescued Pet Inc. does home visits prior to adoptions, so can only adopt to the Citrus County area. Call 352-795-9550 and leave your name, number and pets name and for a return call. Check www.adopta rescuedpet.com for more pets and the adoption calendar. Tickets on sale for theme dinner A limited number of tickets are available for the annual theme dinner sponsored by the GFWC Womans Club of Inverness on Friday, March 15, at the Point O Woods Club on Gospel Island. The Wearn Othe Green evening will include traditional Irish food and dessert, door prizes and music, all for $15. Beer and wine will be sold extra. For the third consecutive year, the clubs themed dinner party will feature the music of Johnny Lobo, whose entertainment is full of showmanship, vocals and dancing accompaniment. To reserve a ticket, call Barbara Cooper at 352341-0204. Singles, couples and groups are all welcome. Quilters gather at libraryThe Citrus Friendship Quilters Guild will meet at 1 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at Lakes Regional Library, 1551 Druid Road, Inverness. Meetings are the first and third Thursdays of each month. In addition to the business sessions, there are show-and-tell, workshops and demonstrations. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call Denise Helt at 352344-1675 or Shirley Gorsuch at 352-637-6838. WGP Friends to convene Friends of the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve will meet at 1 p.m. Friday, March 8, at the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve, 1001 Old Rock Road, Yankeetown. Ivan Vicente, visitor services specialist, Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, will discuss future plans for Three Sisters Springs, including manatee protection at the springs. For directions, visit www.withlacoocheegulf preserve.com. Pharmacist to speak at meeting The Citrus County Chapter of Mended Hearts will host speaker Dr. Karen Fisher, pharmacist at Citrus Memorial hospital, at 10 a.m. Friday, March 8, in the Gulf Room at the Historic Citrus High School. Fisher will discuss cardiac medications. She will also be available to answer questions on other medications members might have. Mended Hearts is a national nonprofit support organization that includes heart patients, spouses, caregivers, health care professionals and others interested in helping patients with emotional recovery from heart disease. All meetings are open to the public. For more information call President Millie King at 352637-5525, or CMHS cardiovascular services at 352-344-6416. Garden Club to meet in F.C.The March meeting of the Floral City Garden Club will be at noon Friday, March 8, at the Community Center, 8370 E. Orange Ave, Floral City. The program for March will be about raising roses, presented by Chris McMillan. Program starts at 12:30 p.m. with a business meeting following at 1:30 p.m. All meetings are open to the public. For more information, call club President Christine Harnden at 352-341-3247. M ARCIEB RUNO Special to the ChronicleAs the soft sun of an early March day begins to peek its way through the fog, we can look out over a field and see rows and rows of tents: Confederates on one side of the field and Union encampment on the other side. The aroma of strong coffee and the smell of bacon cooking on open campfires draws us to the camps. The men are talking among themselves, anxious to know how the battle will be fought today. The women will be tending the fire, as the food cooks and they are hustling to get the day started. The children are moving through the camps, looking for their friends to plan a stickball game later in the day. The cavalry horses begin to neigh and prance as their riders bring them fresh hay and water. They seem to sense the excitement of the coming battle. The men begin to fall into formation and march to colors with the cadence of the drums. There, the flags will be raised and the generals will address their men with the plan for the days battle. They are encouraged to do well and uphold their units honor as they prepare for the conflict. Visitors to the Crystal River Raid begin to drift through the camps and see families working and playing together. Children have begun their games and the women will be dressed in their fine period dresses preparing to go shopping in Sutlers Row. This is where the needs of soldiers and their families can be purchased. Sutlers are merchants with tents set up with goods such as clothing, boots and shoes, uniforms, utensils for cooking, toys for the children, books, patterns and fabrics for the ladies to sew with. During the Civil War, many sutlers followed the battles in order to help the soldiers and make a living. Walking through Sutlers Row at the raid, visitors will come across vendors selling funnel cakes or kettle corn. There will be the smell of Indian fry bread stuffed with wild rice and cheese or fruit. Have a sasprilla or root beer. Across the field, find barbecue sandwiches, black-eyed peas and cornbread, fish platters, hot dogs with all the fixins. No one goes hungry at the reenactment. Visitors can become immersed in the encounter as though they stepped back in time. They can chat with the reenactors while walking through the camps. Reenactors are passionate about history and their hobby. Re-enacting the battles and having living history lessons teaches the next generation about what America endured to get to where she is today. Watch battlefield drills and demonstrations and listen to period music the band is playing. Visit the steel barn at 12:15 p.m. to hear a historical speaker take visitors back to the way people lived during the Civil War. Sunday, visitors may attend church with the re-enactors at 10 a.m. Families travel from across the country to participate in reenactments. One could attend a Civil War battle or Living History demonstration or Education Day almost any weekend all across the United States. The reenactors receive no financial help, but are dedicated to reliving history so that we never have to live through another Civil War. As time for the battle nears, the cavalry soldiers begin to exercise their handsome horses. Many of the animals have been reenacting since they were colts. They have learned not to fear the heavy guns and the musket fire as they run across the field. The time for battle is here. The band plays the martial music of the period, and prayers are offered for the safety of all and for peace in the world. An ear-shattering boom cracks across the field as the cannons fire at the opposing line. As many as 20 field pieces, large cannons weighing close to 2,000 pounds, along with smaller cannons that are easily moved across the field will provide the necessary cover for the infantry charge. The field quickly fills and the once-distinct lines become mixed blurs of the Blue and the Gray. The cavalry presents itself to the field with the beautiful horses prancing about and setting the stage for the infantry. As the troops converge, the doctors, wearing white aprons and carrying bags of water, move through the troops to tend to the injured. These doctors are EMTs, nurses and doctors in real life, as the safety of the participants and the audience is of primary concern. Visitors might even see a medical dog carrying medicines on his back to aid the doctors tending the injured. After the battle, continue to visit with the re-enactors and visit the Confederate Surgical Tent to the left of the battlefield. Here, visitors can see the doctors tending to the wounded. As the days fighting concludes, Taps is played for those who have fallen in battle. The re-enactment is meant to honor both sides and is dedicated to the bravery of all Americans who have fought for their country and given their all, and for those who continue to fight for America today.Marcie Bruno is a veteran Civil War reenactor. C itrus County Historical Society had its annual meeting and election of officers on Feb. 1. The new board is: John Grannan, president; Ron Dumas, vice president; Sharon Padgett, treasurer; Teri Hartman, recording secretary; Mary Ann Lynn, corresponding secretary; and Sharon Curtis, Barbara Engaldo, Kandice Bellamy McPherson, Doug Naylor, Bob Roberts, Wendy Stillwell and Linda Yeomans. Congrats to each of you. Heres whats going on: Through April 12 Citrus County Art Teachers Art. Our local art teachers are beyond great. Come out and see their work. Reception for this fine group is 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 21, at the Courthouse. Call 352-341 6427. Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale Citrus County Auditorium, by the fairgrounds on U.S. 41 South, Inverness. The schedule is: Friday, March 8, 5 to 8 p.m., $5 donation; Saturday, March 9, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., no charge; Sunday, March 10, 1 to 4 p.m., no charge; Monday, March 11, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., half-price day; Tuesday, March 12 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., $3 per bag. Cash or checks only. Call 352-746 1334. March 14, 7 p.m. Concert at the Courthouse. Brendan Nolan will join us with his pitch-perfect Irish voice providing original and traditional songs from his native Ireland. Tickets are $10; doors open at 6:30 p.m.; coffee and dessert. Call 352-341 6427. Floral Citys annual Spring Books and Bling Sale Community House, Lions Club Building at 8370 E. Orange Ave., Floral City. Schedule is: Friday, March 15, 5 to 8 p.m., $3 donation; Saturday, March 16, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., no charge. Call 352-726-3671. March 16, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Olde Hernando School Farmers Market and Flea Market. Cost is $10 per space; separate space for animals. Call Doug at 352-302-5565. This is the third Saturday of each month. Sponsor donations now being accepted for the Olde Hernando School: $500 for a door and $200 for a window. Call Doug at 352-302-5565. April 11 Final jazz concert with Cathy DeWitt and Friends from Gainesville. Big Elvis happenings in April: Elvis in Concert starring Ted Torres Friday, April 26 at 7 p.m. on the Courthouse lawn; bring a chair. Free or $25 for VIP Premiere seating. Call 352-341 6427. When Elvis Came to Town Saturday, April 27, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The play will be in the second floor courtroom where Elvis actually sang. Cost is $25. Call 3523416427. Free all-day Elvis Festival Saturday, April 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Courthouse Square. For full details about the Elvis Festival, check ElvisinFlorida.com. Stumpknockers Elvis Blue Suede Shoes 5K Run/Walk Saturday, April 27, beginning at 8 a.m. For details, visit Elvis5Krun.com. Mary Ann Lynn is corresponding secretary for the Citrus County Historical Society. She can be reached at 352-344-2159. County sees busy schedule for March, April Mary Ann Lynn CITRUS CO. HISTORICAL SOCIETY Reliving American history at Holcim Ranch reenactment CRYSTAL RIVER RAID Saturday, March 9, and Sunday, March 10. Gates open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; battle begins at 2 p.m. each day. Re-enactment at Holcim Ranch, 9 miles north of Crystal River on U.S. 19. Entry donation $5 per adult; students 9 through 17, $2; children 8 and younger free. No food or ice chests permitted. Chairs are available for rent, or bring your own. Handicapped parking available; EMTs and Fire Rescue on the field. Special to the Chronicle Reenactors enjoy a night at a Civil War-era ball at last years event.

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W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C7 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE E NTERTAINMENT P HILLIP A LDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn. Charles R. Swindoll, a preacher who founded Insight for Living, said, The secret of living a life of excellence is merely a matter of thinking thoughts of excellence. Really, its a matter of programming our minds with the kind of information that will set us free. The secret of playing bridge excellently is merely(!) a matter of thinking the excellent thought at the right moment. Really, its a matter of programming your mind to sift the information and reach the winning conclusion. In this deal, West leads the diamond jack against seven spades. South wins with his ace and runs a torrent of six trumps and three hearts. What should West discard? In theory, Norths jump to four spades denied a firstor second-round control. But with a true Yarborough (no card higher than a nine), he felt justified in a slight fib. South then hoped he would be able to avoid a diamond loser; maybe partner would have the queen or a doubleton diamond. Since dummy had no help, South had to run his winners, starting with his trumps, and hope that the defenders would err. West started with four painless pitches: two hearts and two clubs. Then, though, when the three top hearts came, he was less comfortable. He was not sure whether to throw diamonds or clubs. What was the key clue? If South had started with a doubleton club, he would have ruffed the second in the dummy. So, since South held at most one club, West had to stay glued to his diamonds. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 L or d s o f War L or d s o f War Hi g h way Th ru H e ll I ns id e C om b a t R escue Al as k a St a t e T roopers L or d s o f War L or d s o f War Al as k a St a t e T roopers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.DrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Mansion WallsMansion Walls48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid. (OXY) 44 123 Guess Who (2005) Bernie Mac.Bad Girls ClubBad Girls Club Guess Who (2005) Bernie Mac. (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Payback (1999, Action) Mel Gibson, Gregg Henry, Maria Bello. R Shameless (In Stereo) MA 60 Minutes Sports (N) L CalifornicationHouse of Lies MA 60 Minutes Sports L (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass TimeStuntbusters PG Stuntbusters Drag RaceDrag RaceAmerican Trucker American TruckerStuntbusters PG Stuntbusters (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36 The Guardian (2006, Drama) Kevin Costner. (In Stereo) PG-13 Fantastic Four (2005) Ioan Gruffudd. Cosmic radiation grants four people unusual powers. PG-13 The Guardian (2006, Drama) Kevin Costner. PG-13 (STARZ) 370 271 370 Colombiana (2011) Zoe Saldana. The Fog (2005, Horror) Tom Welling, Maggie Grace. (In Stereo) PG-13 Underworld: Awakening (2012) Kate Beckinsale. R Priest (2011) Paul Bettany. (In Stereo) PG-13 (SUN) 36 31 36 Inside the Heat Inside the Heat Heat Live! (Live) NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) Heat Live! (Live) Inside the Heat Inside the Heat Inside the HEAT (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Haunted CollectorHaunted CollectorHaunted CollectorHaunted CollectorStranded Seaview Terrace (N) Haunted Collector (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFam. GuyBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Silver River (1948, Western) Errol Flynn, Ann Sheridan. NR Kim Novak: Live Bell, Book and Candle (1958, Comedy) James Stewart, Kim Novak. NR Kim Novak: Live (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Weed Country Rippers (N) Moonshiners (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Untold Stories of ERAddictionAddictionHoard-BuriedHoard-BuriedAddictionAddictionHoard-Buried (TMC) 350 261 350 Rumble Fish (1983, Drama) Matt Dillon, Mickey Rourke. (In Stereo) R Budz House (2012, Comedy) Wesley Jonathan. R A Get2Gether (2005, Comedy) B. Cole. (In Stereo) NR Judge Dredd (1995) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34 Bourne Identity The Bourne Ultimatum (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. PG-13 (DVS) Bostons Finest (N) Southland Under the Big Top (N) Bostons Finest (TOON) 38 58 38 33 GumballGumballGumballNinjaGoDragonsIncredibleKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodFood Truck ParadiseFeed-Feed-Cheese Paradise (N)Hamburger Paradise (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops Cops Full Throttle SaloonFull Throttle SaloonFull Throttle SaloonWorld RecordsFull Throttle Saloon (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondClevelandClevelandKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS A blind photographer. PG NCIS Defiance (In Stereo) PG NCIS Kill Screen (In Stereo) PG NCIS Devils Triangle (In Stereo) Psych Gus gets a girlfriend. (N) PG White Collar In the Wind PG (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Spin City (In Stereo) PG Charmed (In Stereo) Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20ChrisChrisFunny Home VideosRulesRulesRulesRulesWGN News at NineFunny Home Videos D ear Annie : My boyfriends parents are truly wonderful people, but they have taught their son to rely solely on them. He is in his 50s, and they still pay his bills and give him loans, often for toys rather than something necessary. I am self-sufficient. I borrow money from no one, pay my bills and am on a limited budget. I knew my boyfriend was rather self-centered before we moved in together. We discuss nothing about our household, but he talks to his parents about our finances. When they tell him to do something, he complies, even if I am against it. This is causing problems in our relationship. I am afraid my only option is to leave. I love him, but I feel I could never measure up to his parents, and they will keep him a little boy forever. Our relationship needs to move to the next level, but it is impossible with them hanging on for dear life. Frustrated Dear Frustrated : A man in his 50s who still expects his parents to pay his bills and buy him toys is not a responsible adult, and we cannot promise he ever will be. Unless you can convince him or his parents that their indulgence is not in his best interests, you will be fighting an uphill battle. Sorry. Dear Annie : I am a recovering meth addict. Ive been clean for more than five years. However, during my druggie days, I was pregnant five times. I miscarried all of the babies due to my addiction. I am very ashamed of my past. Every day, I live with the guilt of what I did to my innocent unborn children. In the past five years, God has blessed me with two wonderful sons, whom I love more than anything. But how do I deal with the guilt? I have tried talking to friends and family, but Im judged a lot. Its eating away at me. W. Dear W.: Please speak to someone who can be impartial about your past and help you deal with your guilt in a way that allows you to forgive yourself. Your doctor can refer you to a counselor, or you could contact any graduate school counseling department, medical school psychology department, United Way, the YMCA, the Samaritan Institute (samaritaninstitute.org) and the Abraham Low Self-Help Systems at lowselfhelp systems.org. Dear Annie : K complained about a neighbor child she fears is a ticking time bomb. My son fits nearly every category of her profile. He has difficulty in public and prefers to be by himself. He shows a great interest in guns and has few friends, and we had to move him to a different school because he didnt fit in. This does not make him a potential risk. My son struggles every day with epilepsy, along with the side effects of several medications. Children his age can be brutal to those who are different. He withdraws to protect himself. We moved him to a different school because his old one would not provide the resources he needs. Now he can maintain a decent grade point with teachers he respects and likes. His interest in guns is no different from that of other 15-year-old boys in our area, and more importantly, our son has no access to guns. He has a healthy respect for their power. I admit that impulse control is not his strong point, but we work with him to learn what is appropriate. If you get to know him, you will find a nice kid with a good sense of humor, a passion for history and genuine empathy. He doesnt like to see others being mistreated, because he knows how it feels. Thank you, Annie, for saying, We also hope you can be his friend. Thats what my son wants more than anything in the world: someone to accept him for who he is. A Father Who KnowsAnnies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) THIEF STRUM GOVERN DAINTY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: When the actors and actresses celebrated their Oscar award wins, it was a STARRYNIGHT Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. UQTIL LOCTU ORPNEV NEDYOK Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Print your answer here: WEDNESDAY EVENING MARCH 6, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessWhitneyWhitneyLaw & Order: SVUChicago Fire NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Nature Mesopotamian Marshes. PG NOVA Separating Twins PG Inside Natures Giants (In Stereo) PG The Space Age: NASAs Story % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41CapitolBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Nature PGNOVA PGInside NaturesWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Whitney (N) Whitney Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Chicago Fire Leaving the Station NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune The Middle PG NeighborsModern FamilySuburgatory PG Nashville (In Stereo) PG Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G Survivor: Caramoan -Fans vs. Favorites Criminal Minds The Silencer CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) American Idol The female semifinalists perform. (N) (In Stereo Live) FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.MiddleNeighMod FamSuburg.Nashville PG NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayJack Van Impe Great AwakeningJoseph Prince G Place for Miracles A. Wommack CTN Special Life TodayClear Vision Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America The Middle PG NeighborsModern FamilySuburgatory PG Nashville (In Stereo) PG NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudCollege Basketball Vanderbilt at Florida. (N)NUMB3RS PG NUMB3RS PG H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club PGVictor M.ChildMoorePaidTV55Studio DirectHealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half Men Engagement Arrow Trust but Verify Supernatural (In Stereo) Two and Half Men Engagement Friends PG Friends O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Nature Coast Citrus Today County Court Sheriffs 10-43 To Be Announced Straight Talk Med Funny Business PGMovie MA S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangAmerican Idol (N) (In Stereo Live) FOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPor Ella Soy Eva Amores VerdaderosAmor Bravo (N) NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Dirty Harry (1971) RWWE Main Event (N) Robin Hood (2010) Russell Crowe. (In Stereo) PG-13 (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27The First 48 Hot Lot; Blind Faith Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (N) Duck Dynasty (N) Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (AMC) 55 64 55 CSI: Miami Eric Delko returns. CSI: Miami L.A. (In Stereo) Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971, Fantasy) Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson. G Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971) G (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedRiver Monsters: Unhooked PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG Gator Boys Swamp Monster Attack PG Gator Boys Scared Snakeless PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown Wild Out Wednesday. (N) PG HusbandsSecond Coach Carter (2005, Drama) Samuel L. Jackson. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to excel. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Million Dollar ListingMillion Dollar ListingInterior TherapyRachel Zoe ProjectBrad WrldDukes of HappensInterior (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowWorkaholicsSouth Park MA South Park MA South Park MA Workaholics (N) Kroll Show Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Son-in-Law (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino. (In Stereo) PG-13 My Big Redneck Vacation PG (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportThe Car ChasersAll-Star Celebrity Apprentice PG Mad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue (2010) G Pixie Hollow Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G Shake It Up! G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live)NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at San Antonio Spurs.SportCtr (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonCollege Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live)College BasketballCollege Basketball (EWTN) 95 70 95 48SavoringGalleryDaily MassEWTN Live GSaintRosarySaintsFaithCatholicWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Alice in Wonderland (2010, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska. PG Twilight (2008) Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Smile The Black Hole (1979) Maximilian Schell. PG Hellraiser: Inferno (2000) Craig Sheffer. R Hellraiser: Hellworld (2005, Horror) Doug Bradley. R Squeeze (1997) Tyrone Burton. (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX ReportThe OReilly FactorHannity (N)Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 DinersDinersRestaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im. (FSNFL) 35 39 35 ACCIn MagicMagicNBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. (N)MagicIn MagicIn MagicIn Magic (FX) 30 60 30 51AngerTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Knight and Day (2010) Tom Cruise. A woman becomes the reluctant partner of a fugitive spy. The Americans Trust Me (N) MA The Americans Trust Me MA (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralEuro TourGolfGolfOn the Range (N)FehertyThe Haney ProjectCentralPGA Tour (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Happy Days G Happy Days PG Happy Days G Happy Days G Frasier PGFrasier G Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2Beyonc: Life Forrest Gump (1994) Tom Hanks. An innocent man enters history from the s to the s. The Descendants (2011, Drama) George Clooney. (In Stereo) R Real Time With Bill Maher MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Love Actually (2003, RomanceComedy) Hugh Grant. (In Stereo) R Parades End MA Sing Your Song (2011) (In Stereo) NR Michael Buffer Battleship (2012) Taylor Kitsch. (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Income Property GIncome Property GCousinsCousinsProperty Brothers GHuntersHunt IntlProperty Brothers G (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG The Bible Noah endures Gods wrath. V America Unearthed PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Americas Supernanny (N) PG Dance Moms PG (LMN) 50 119 Stolen Child (2011, Suspense) Emmanuelle Vaugier. (In Stereo) NR Like Mother, Like Daughter (2007) Michelle Stafford. (In Stereo) NR The Memory Keepers Daughter (2008, Drama) Dermot Mulroney. NR (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) James Franco. PG-13 Banshee We Shall Live Forever MA Hall Pass (2011) Owen Wilson. (In Stereo) R The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Dennis Quaid. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show (N)Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE C OMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Jack, The Giant Slayer (PG-13) In 3D. 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes. and Over (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m. The Last Exorcism, Part II (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Snitch (PG-13)1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Safe Haven (PG-13)1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Identity Thief (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 and Over (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. The Last Exorcism, Part II (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m. Jack, The Giant Slayer (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Dark Skies (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. Snitch (PG-13)1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) In 3D. 1:10 p.m. No passes. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) 4:10 p.m. Safe Haven (PG-13)1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. A Good Day to Die Hard (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m. Identity Thief (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. Todays MOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix Local RADIO LP ETMDTYO AGP FX XFOOFKV FK G MCCL JFOW XCLT IHGKS EGETM. OWGOX WTGBTK. OWGOX VCHA. YCMLGY LYYGMOWPPrevious Solution: Cormac McCarthys language is perfect. He is in my view the greatest living American prose stylist. Tommy Lee Jones (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-6

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W EDNESDAY,M ARCH 6,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.com To place an ad, call563-5966 Chronicle Classifieds Classifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000E4CF 000E4D0 5pc Bedroom Set 4 poster queen bed Light colored wood, very good cond. $450 352-527-7445 China HutchCorner unit,like new $400,triple dresser w/mirror 12 draws $275 352-860-2792 CHINESE RUG 5x7, wool, nice condition, $50 352-228-7620 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 DAYBED INCLUDING TRUNDLE BED, WHITE with decorative metal frame, like new. $200 352 382 0347 Desk and Printer Cart file drawers, 3 locks desk top cubbies, 53Lx 24D X 28H. Can email pics $100 810-569-4061 Dinette Set :T able w/ leaf, 4 chrs & cushions, hutch. Very good Cond $395. Wood Bookcase w/ Glass doors $145. 1920 Singer Sewing Machine & Cabinet $375 Cash and Carry. (352) 422-5819 Dining Room Set w/4 upholstered chairs, glass-top table, xtra top exc. cond. $200 obo 352-527-3382 DINING SET Ashley 45 square glass & metal tble w/4 metal upholstered chairs,w/ side tble 48x16, lk new $170. 352-746-1272 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET In Original Plastic, Never Used, Org $3000, sacrifice $975. CHERRYBEDROOM SETSolid Wood, new in factory boxes Org. $6000, sacrifice $1995. Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 OAK COMPUTER DESK with hutch 58wide 63tall can text picture call or text $100 352-746-0401 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg. $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN HEADBOARD &TV/DVD STAND beige/gray color/stand 24x26x30hi $50.00 352-794-3020/586-4987 Sofa/Sleeper Full size $175, Broyhill 6ft Leather couch dk maroo, like new $500 860-2792 Swivel Barstools set of 4, padded seats $200, Queen Mattress boxspring, fram Serta Pedic Pillowtop, $150 352-249-3259 TV CABINET composition wood, nice condition, $15 352-228-7620 UPRIGHTSECRETARY lit cabinet; opens as desk, $50, 352-228-7620 aft 10am Wall Recliner New, by Best, Lt Aqua, pd $650 ask.$250, Chair w/ottoman upgraded upholstery Lt. Green patterned, Pd $950 ask. $350 352-419-5836 WICKER HEAD BOARD KING SIZE good condition, $100.00 513 4473 08 Craftsmen Rider Mower. 19.5 Briggs & Stratten Motor, 42 deck w/bagger, & Jack $900 603-863-9750 CRAFTSMAN RIDING MOWER 42 Deck 16HPw/bagger New Battery, Good Shape $650,352-564-0157 Craftsmen Riding Mower, 42 deck 18 hsp engine $450 352-746-7357 Riding Lawn Mower Cub Cadet T-series 35 yrs old extra blades new batty 46cut $1,000 obo within reason Call after 1pm 212-8557 Roto-Tiller Troy-Built Pony rear tine, 5hsp, runs good $200 firm 352-507-1490 Homosassa Yard/Moving SaleGlassTrinkets, Port a potty, Potty Chair both new, tools, & more 5800 S Oak Ridge Dr, lot 44 (Even ridge MH park) 12 CHOPSAW BLADES 12x5/32x20mm arbor 3 metal 1 concrete $30.00 all 352-586-8657 ROUTERTABLE STEELLEGS FIBERGLASSTOPONLY 45.00 464 0316 SHOPSMITH MARK V is 5 TOOLS IN ONE SAW, DRILLPRESS, DISC SANDER, BORING MACH, LATHE. $1000. 352-527-6425 SMALLOLDERAIR COMPRESSOR CAMPELHAUSFIELD 10 GALLON WORKS OK 50.00 464 0316 2 BOXES OF TAPES 2 Large boxes of Reel to ReelTapes Mixed $50.00 352-746-5421 20 NEC Color TV Cable ready, good cond. $75 603-863-9750 CD HOLDER Black Metal 48H Holds 80 cds $15.00 352-628-4210 DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE!Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALLNow! 1888-685-4144 TAPE PLAYER & RECORDERAmpex Reel to Reel Player Recorder $75.00 353-746-5421 LADDER 20 Foot Extension Ladder $50.00 352-746-5421 68 VCR Movies in 4 eight drawer, wood grain containers,$34 for all 352-344-1692 COMPUTER Dell dimension 3000, windows XPhome, 15 flat screen, keyboard, printer, mouse, speakers, $125. Computer Desk $35. Both for $150(352) 382-7074 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Wii Games 6 games @ $15ea. call for titles, firm 352-205-7973/220-4483 11pc White PVC Lanai Furniture w/cushions call for details $325 352-344-0866 PVC Pool Furniture Table & 4 Chairs with all weather cusions $125.00, 2 reclining chairs $70.00 (AWC) 352-220-6037 2 Sets of heavy duty lamps $50.00 352-795-7254 4 pc Living Room Set Tan Floral Pattern good Cond. $300 352-302-7451 BEDROOM SET Eddie Bauer solid pine dresser $250 heavy Qn Arched lt oak headboard $100 2 end tables $20. Sold separately/as a set Call 352-610-6706 Broyhill Tables 1 @ 60 x 26 other is 24 X 48 both are black, sturdy New over $400 ea. sell for $175 ea. 352-419-5836 AVAILABLE Pool Supply S tore W/ Service and Rep air Cash Flowing over a $100,000! Call Pat **(813) 230-7177** **FOR SALE** Lawn & Landscaping Business Active in Citrus County for 10 yrs. 18enc. trailer with 2 commercial mowers, & Hand Equip. in pairs. Serious Inquiries Only! 30k obo 352-795-0201 VINTAGE CHINA CLOSET1040s deco type glass door in front nice cond. wood $100.00 firm 513 4473 Big very nice entertainment center Includes 54 RCA TV $1,500. (352) 628-6985 John Wayne collection, in very nice glass and Oak cabinet $750. (352) 628-6985 NATIONALBUYER in Florida Paying cash for your collectibles,We want your old sports cards, toys and comic books. CASH PAID!! Call TODAY: (800) 273-0312 RECORDS 3 Boxes of Collectable 78 Records $75.00 352-746-5421 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I GE 30 Range Works perfectly $50 352-220-6037 KENMORE SIDE BY SIDE REFRIDG icemaker, ice & water thru door, bisque you pick up $200.00 352-746-0401 Refrigerator 18 cubic ft., 2 yrs.old white, $200 352-533-3147 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 DUDLEYS AUCTION 4AUCTIONSTHURS 3/7 Est ate Auction @Hall prev 12 Auction 3 outside 6pm inside Furniture,Tools, Household, boxes of fun & value 700+lots FRI 3/8 On Site Personal Property Est ate prev 8am auction 9 am 161AnnapolisAve Citrus Hills 34442 entire contents of worldtravelersfurniture, antiques, household, HUGE Star Wars Col & more FRI 3/8 Real Est ate prev 3pm Auction 4pm 5756W Norbis Cir Homosassa 3/2 1 acrehome FR-LR-DR-BR stone Fireplace, clean move in ready 1/3 mi. from Rock Crusher Elementary. MUST SELLTO SETTLE ESTATE SA T 3/9 Real Est ate & Content s prev 8 Auction 9 Real Estate 10am 11 15 N Carnevale TerraceTimberlane Estate 34461 3/2 one acre pool home SOLDABSOLUTE Entire contents inc furniture,Antiques,Art, sterling & more *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 MARINA HELP Part time Hours Vary. Must be able To work weekends. Able To Lift 50lbs. Relate Well With People. Boat Experience Req., Accepting Applications At The Rainbow Rivers Club 20510 The Granada Dunnellon MARKETING REP Calling clients from established database. Some office / clerical required as well Computer exp. helpful. Personable, motivated mature. Salary discussed at interview. 352-382-0770 NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehiclepreferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap -Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle PART TIME CUSTOMER SERVICE REPAre you a customer service champion? Have exceptional computer skills Including Excel. & MS Word Organized & detailed oriented? Enjoy a fast paced challenging work environment? Avail. weekdays & weekends? Join the Citrus County Chronicles Circulation team! Send Resume to: djkamlot@chronicle online.com CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL34429 EOE, drug screening for final applicant SINGLE COPY ROUTES AVAILABLEThis is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. come to 1624 Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-443-5186 www .Centura Online.com MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical OfficeAssistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HSDiploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 OFFICE ASSISTANTN eeded M-F 8am to 4:30pm Quickbooks, Word, Excel Knowledge helpful. Must be self-motivated & capable of working independantly Email To: sccmain@earthlink. net Cook & ServersExperienced only apply in person at Olive Tree Rest. No Calls 963 N. Suncoast Blvd, Crystal River P/T COOK For Health Care Facility, Background screening required. 352-344-5555 ex 102 Skyview Restaurant At Citrus Hills Is Seeking Experienced P/T Servers Cooks Bartender Hostess & Dish WasherCall 352-746-6727 Tue.-Sat. 2p -4:30p For Application Appointment COMMERCIAL INSURANCE CSRCommercial Insurance CSR and inside sales position needed. Knowledge of AMS360 preferred. Email resume to Tracy Fero att fero@fero insurance.com or call 352-422-2160 Licensed Customer Service Rep. For well estabished local insurance agency. We are in need of an Lic. (220 or 440) Customer Service Rep (preferred) Sales Oriented be motivated and a self starter, detailed in your work and an excellent appt. setter. FTposition Send Resume to: rbrice@briceagency.com AUTO DETAILERS & MANAGERS Homosassa, Brooksville & Inverness dealers. Call 727-808-0341 Driver $0.01increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Daily or weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current experience (800)414-9569 www .driveknight.com DRIVERS DriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 DRIVERS DriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 MANATEE TOUR CAPTAIN NEEDED Full Time 727-459-4991 STEELCUTTER / WELDER Inter County Recycling in Lecanto, Fl. is looking for an experienced Steel Cutter, with Welding Experience also. Full time, Pays $13.50 per hour. Drug Free Workplace. E-mail resumes to Resume1801@yahoo .com, No walk-ins or phone calls F/T Maintenance /GroundsSkills required: Electrical, Plumbing, Painting, Mechanical and Grounds Maintenance HVAC certification preferredRiver Reach Apartments 2151 River Reach Cr Crystal River, FL 34428 PHONE/FAX 352-795-8024, EOE Kiz R RUSS Preschool Is looking for Hard working dependable employees FT& PT Certified Only Apply Within 307 Zephyr Street Inverness 344-4106 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Citrus Podiatry Center, PA Medical Receptionist: Part-time M, TU, W 8:30-5pm. Two office locations. $10.50/hr. Vacation, holiday & uniform benefits. Minimum of 2 years exp. in a medical office setting. Send Resume to: P.O. Box 1120, Lecanto, FL 34460-1120 No phone calls or faxes accepted/ no exceptions. DENTAL RECEPTIONIST For High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Now Hiring Nurses and CNAsApply in person Woodland Terrace 124 Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando 352-249-3100 PT Certified DentalAssistant/ Front OfficeCall 352-746-0330, Ask for Vicki. RNs, PT & OTS LPNs, Phsych Nurse, & STCITRUS & HERNANDO (352) 794-6097 440 Licensed InsuranceAgentapply in person: Nature Coast InsuranceAgency Crystal River AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINE CAREERS Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 INSURANCE AGENT Looking for licensed insurance agent with experience. email resume to: david@birdinsurance group.com Todays New Ads MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. PVC Pool Furniture Table & 4 Chairs with all weather cushions $125.00, 2 reclining chairs $70.00 (AWC) 352-220-6037 Sugarmill WoodsSunday Mar. 10, 1-4 PM3 Chinkapin Court Homosassa Fl Nancy Lewis Exit Realty Leaders Wall Recliner New, by Best, Lt Aqua, pd $650 ask.$250, Chair w/ottoman upgraded upholstery Lt. Green patterned, Pd $950 ask. $350 352-419-5836 $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Riding Mowers, & Metals, 8Satelite Dish & MORE 352-270-4087 ADORABLE TERRIER MIX, neutered, housebroken, licensed, crate trained, great dog for family! pls call 352-220-0350 Cement Blocks & Concret Rubble 352-476-1023 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 Female Chihuahua red short-hair Brindel & Female Gray Cat (cat is sick & needs her medicine) lost in the vicinity ofColumbus St. Beverly Hills, pls call 352-422-7578 LOSTRUSSIAN BLUE CATW/PINK COLLAR State Park Drive & Sun Dance Pt,Crystal River. Name is Tiki PLEASE CALL352-446-0783 or 352-476-6539 MIXED BREED HOUND DOG Mostly Black, little bit of Brown, 35TO 40 lbs answers to Daisy, dragging 4ft red/white leash 352-270-0812 Found Lab/Pitt Mix Female, Mini Farms, Zaval Street 352-563-1206 352-875-9918 AVAILABLE Pool Supply Stor e W/Service and Repair Cash Flowing over a $100,000!! Call Pat **(813) 230-7177** FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 Todays New Ads 5ft Glasstop Patio Table $40.Teeter hangups inversion table $150 (352) 382-1977 Broyhill Tables 1 @ 60 x 26 other is 24 X 48 both are black, sturdy New over $400 ea. sell for $175 ea. 352-419-5836 BUICK 93 LeSabre Sedan exc. must see, one owner, 57k ,ask. $3900 obo 352-302-4282 CONCEALED WEAPONS CLASS EVERYSATURDAY 11 am, $40 132 N. Florida Ave. (352) 419-4800 CRYSTAL RIVER TRAIN DEPOT Sat 3/9 8a-1p Huge Community yard sale. 109 NE Crystal St Dinette Set :T able w/ leaf, 4 chrs & cushions, hutch. Very good Cond $395. Wood Bookcase w/ Glass doors $145. 1920 Singer Sewing Machine & Cabinet $375 Cash and Carry. (352) 422-5819 DINING SET Ashley 45 square glass & metal tble w/4 metal upholstered chairs,w/ side tble 48x16, lk new $170. 352-746-1272 EZ go Golf Cart with charger and new Fld dn back seat $1500, Club golf cart w/ charger call for price 352-564-2756 FRENCH DOORS 2 3ft w/enclosed blinds & all hardware $300 352-419-5836 Homosassa Yard/Moving SaleGlassTrinkets, Port a potty, Potty Chair both new, tools, & more 5800 S Oak Ridge Dr, lot 44 (Even ridge MH park) HORIZON TREADMILL exc. cond. $500 ReboundAerobics Jumper (trampoline) $150,352-637-5525 John Wayne collection, in very nice glass and Oak cabinet $750. (352) 628-6985 John Wayne Collection, in very nice glass and Oak cabinet $750. (352) 628-6985 LAKE PANASOFKEE 3bdr 1 ba, cbs home, lake access, great income or live-in property, on beautiful lot, $39,900 call 352-303-4505 PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 ADiabetic needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, call Mike 386-266-7748 Todays New Ads **FOR SALE** Lawn & Landscaping Business Active in Citrus County for 10 yrs. 18enc. trailer with 2 commercial mowers, & Hand Equip. in pairs. Serious Inquiries Only! 30k obo 352-795-0201 2ACRESQuiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $126,500 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. 14 ft. Bumber Pull 2 Horse slant Load Trailer w/ Tack Room, v. good cond. $4,000 Call Tony, Inverness (352) 860-0141 16 ft. Canoe Good, Condition, 2 paddles, $200. (352) 249-0877 99 HARLEY FXDWG 7k mi, stg 3 cam, big blc, 42 drag pipes $7000 obo 727-408-0602 440 Licensed InsuranceAgentapply in person: Nature Coast InsuranceAgency Crystal River Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

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C10 W EDNESDAY,M ARCH 6,2013 C LASSIFIEDS C ITRUS C OUNTY ( FL ) C HRONICLE Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE J Tree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 KINGs LAND CLEARING & TREE SERVICE Complete tree & stump removal hauling, demo & tractor work. 32 yrs. exp. (352) 220-9819 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 REALTREE SERVICE(352) 220-7418 **Tax Specials** RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Estates/Auction Services ESTATE SALES Pricing to Final Check W e Ease S tress! 352344-0333 or 422-2316 Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 PIC PICARDS PRESSURE CLEANING& PAINTING 352-341-3300 TUTORINGAll ages & Subjects Specializing in reading,math and LDMR, autistic 352-628-1171 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. #1 Professional Leaf vac system why rake? FULLLawn Service Free Est 352-344-9273 Helpin Hand Grass Man Cut Clean Mulch Edge FREE ESTIMATES! Russell 352-637-1363 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine Its Tune Up time. 352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 30 yrs. Experience! Int/Ext. Comm/Res. Lic/Ins. Jimmy **352-212-9067** HONEYDOSyour Honey s Dont Do! Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res. Jimmy 352-212-9067 CLEANING BYPENNY Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. 352-503-7800, 352-476-3820 Husband & W ife T eam Exp. *Good Rates* Residential, Free Est. Kevin 352-364-6185 Marcias Best Clean Experienced Expert lic+ref, Free Estimates **call 352-560-7609** NA TURE COAST CLEANING Res. Rate-$20 hr. No Time Wasted! 352-564-3947 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 All Tractor & Tree Work Househld, Equipment & Machinery Moving (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 Merritt Garling Lawn & Landscape Services Lawn/Pavers/Plantings 352-287-0159 DRYOAK FIREWOOD SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80 Delivered & Stacked. 352-344-2696 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts errands etc Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 **BOB BROWNS** Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 ROCKYS FENCING FREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 AFFORDABLE COMPUTER REPAIR (352) 341-5590 114 S. Apopka Ave Inverness 10% Off WITH AD Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 ON SITECOMPUTER SERVICE(352) 341-4150 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352257-0078 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 Adult Family Care HomeAlzheimer Dementia Incontinency (SL6906450) 503-7052 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts errands etc Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips 000E4CO CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE LECANTONice 1 Bdrm $500 352-216-0012/613-6000 NICE APARTMENTS2 Bed / 1 Bath & 2 Bed / 2 Bath Furnished & Unfurnished Close to Progress Energy & the Hospital 1st and Security from $575/month Call 352-795-1795 forAppt. www.ensing properties.com LECANTO Oak Tree Plaza, Office/Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @ $675+ util. & sales tax.1 mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease 352-258-6801 Meadowcrest CR3bd/2ba Villa, $900 mnth.unfurn. $1000 mnth. furn. 352-563-1106 Sugarmill Woods2/2/2 avail April 1, $725. (352) 503-3087 At SM WOODS Great Furn. Studio Apt. $650. All Util. Included (352) 422-1933 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BLACK DIAMOND Homes for rent from $1,100/mo. Bob Coldwell Banker 634-4286 Homosassa 3/2 owner Fin. Compl. Remodeled, fenced back yard, 1800+ sq. ft. $5,000down $525mth 352-302-9217 Owner Finance/Lease Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x 20 block building, New Septic, Handy person, $28,900./Offer 352-422-1916 FLORALCITY DW, 2/2/2 carport Screen room, shed, all you need is a toothbrush to move in $17,500. Lot Rent $183. 352-344-2420 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $8,400 or Lease to Own from $179/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 INVERNESS 55+ 1/1 Fully Furnished, Everythings stays, Like new furn., Washer/Dryer 2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TVs $7,000. (708) 308-3138 LECANTO 55+ PK 1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH, 40x20, shed, handicap access. ramp and shower $25,000. 352-212-6804 Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK 14x60 split 2/2, new heat/ac, remodeled, furn. lg scnd in FLRm. 55 ft crpt w/laundry room, 989-858-0879 STONEBROOK, CR Pondview/Gourmet Kitch, 2Br, MSuite, $51,900, Cridland RE, Jackie 352-634-6340 At SM WOODS Great Furn. Studio Apt. $650. All Util. Included (352) 422-1933 CRYSTAL RIVERFully furn. efficiency w/ equipped kitchen. All utilities, cable, Internet, & cleaning provided. $699/mo 352-586-1813 FLORALCITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 Inverness 2/1 on private estate, no smoking,$650 monthly Utilities included 1st, last, sec. Req. 352-422-2393 NEW 3/2 JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 NO CREDITNO PROBLEM (Everyone Financed with 10K-40% down Private Financing Avail. Call(352) 795-1272 Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John L yons @ 800 622 2832 ext 210 for det ails WE WILL BUYYOURMANUFACTURED Home. from 1976-2013 CALL(352) 795-2377 FLORALCITY Exceptionally Nice 3/2 on Beautiful 1 AC, treed lot, garage, shed, dock, Ideal for Fishing/ Airboats $95,900 716-523-8730 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 4br 2ba Foreclosure Great Condition NEW ROOF Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-2377 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very N ice Quiet, Considering ALL reasonable Cash offers. 352-586-9498 HOME-ON-LAND Only $59,900, 3/2 like new on acre. Tape-ntexture walls, new carpet & appliances,AC & heat! Warranty, $2,350 dwon, $319.22/mo P&I, W.A.C. Owner can finance. Call 352-621-9182 HERNANDO 2/2 $450. mo. 1st last +dep 352-201-2428 Homosassa unfurn, 2/2, bonus room, shed, 4/10th acre, very clean, $495. mo, perfect for retired couple 3771 Millston Pt 352-503-6703 4401 N SUNCOAST BLVD LOT19 2bedroom 1Bath Mobile Home in Thunder Bird Mobile home Park. With Wheel Chair Ramp, Covered Carport, Covered screen Porch.Nice Home in Quiet Community, Centrally Located close to Mall.Comes Partially Furnished,With all Appliances.Lot Rent $235.00Park Rules, 55 or Older, no Pets bigger than 20 pounds. Serious Buyers Only ASKING $9100.00 OR BESTOFFER Toll free 1-877-351-8555 or 352-897-6766 43,900. 3/2,Dblewide. Delivered & set up, New Jacobsen. The only home with a 5 yr. warr., only $500 down and $293.40/ mo. P&I W.A.C. Must See 352-621-3807 2/1, DW, H/A, 12 x 20 glass porch Co. water & sewer, paved rd. No HOA $49,995 firm $15,000 down, own finan. (352) 567-2031 2br 2ba Single Wide 12yearsYOUNG. 14X66. Trade in WILL GO F AST! $14,900YOUR BABY $19,900 Incls Delv, Set, New A/C, skirt & steps,Must See! NO HIDDEN FEES. CALL(352) 795-1272 2br 2ba Repo 2000 Fleetwood SW 14 x 72 / $20K Incls Delv, Set, A/C & heat, skirt & steps ( NO HIDDEN FEES) CALL(352) 795-1272 BIG USED HOMES 32x80 H.O.M. $50,900 28x76 H.O.M. $43,500 28x70 ScotBilt $42,500 40x42 Palm Har. $65k 28X70 Live oak $52,500 We Sell Homes for Hnder $10,000 Call & View (352) 621-9183 HERNANDO 32 Mobile FHAFinancing $2500 Down Town of Hernando1.5AcresCall 1-727-967-4230 Homosassa Dbl. Wide 3/2 95% remodeled inside, 1.25 acres half-fenced, recent roofing & siding, 16x16 workshop,must-see! $69,900 (352) 621-0192 INVERNESS 2b/2 ba, acre off Turner Camp Rd a/c, heat pump 3yrs. old, 30ft scn porch & 48open porch on other side, new septic, 18x31 building w/ 220 electric, shed, fenced, on canal $68,000 352-726-1791 INVERNESS 55+ Park 14 x 58, 2/1, furniture, appliances, shed, scrn. porch, $8,500. (352) 419-5133 LECANTO2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40 $17,900 remld 6yrs ago, new rf,shed, on rented lot $245 mthly, incl water,sewer,trash 352-628-1171 NEW !! 2011 Lot Model Dealer must sell 30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900 NO HIDDEN FEES Price incls: delv, set, skirting, steps, a/c/heat,upgraded appliances, furniture/decor, fo L.R. & F.R. & kitchen (NO HIDDEN FEES!!) MUST SELL CALL(352) 795-1272 2 Maltese Puppies Left, 1 female $650. 1 Male $600, CKC reg. will have Fl. Health Cert.. Call to come play with them, (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 DOGAustralian Shepherd/Terrier Mix. Great watch dog. Needs either a farm or fenced yard. 352 419 7428 Goofy & Midget, These playful Pekinese cuddlers get along famously, can be adopted separtely or as father/son pair. Both are neutered, mirco-chipped, UTD on shots. They are fostered in a cage free home, are house trained & they have been socialized with other dogs and cats. We do home & vet checks. Call 352-419-0223 or visit savingangelspetrescue.com to see more pets looking for their forever homes. Shih-Tzu Pups, Males S tarting@ $400. Registered Lots of colors, Beverly Hills, FL(352)270-8827 www .aceof pup s.ne Sparkle, Hemingway (polydactyl) (extra toes) This young female kitten sparkles with playfulness & affection. INDOOR ONLY. Spayed, UTD, litter trained. We do home & vet checks. Call 352-419-0223www.savingangelspetrescue.com to see more pets looking for homes 14 ft. Bumber Pull 2 Horse slant Load Trailer w/ Tack Room, v. good cond. $4,000 Call Tony, Inverness (352) 860-0141 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 1 Bedroom, 1 bath @$350 inc. H20 Pets considered and section 8 accepted. Call 352-476-4964 For Details! CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES 352-942-3492 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Natalie Hill Urban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Color, Foils, Make-overs, Up-dos, Perms, Cutting and Styling Redken Trained Robbie Ray Urban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Make-overs, Color, Foiling, Precision Cuts, Avant Garde hairstyles and updos. Paul Mitchell Certified. ANSLEY Ansley is a very beautiful and unique Jack Russell.Terrier mix. She is so striking that she attracts attention everywhere she goes. She is 1 y.o. and weighs 40 pounds. She is very smart and a quick learner. Knows basic commands, is housebroken, & gets along with other dogs. Seems OK with cats. You would be blessed to add her to your family. ID # 17387903. Call Victoria @ 352-302-2838. BUD Striking! This is how we describe Bud, a very beautiful, sweet, 2-y.o. black & white American Bulldog/Terrier mix. Has beautiful eyes, one blue & one brown. Loves people & other dogs, has medium energy level, settles down nicely after exercise. Walks well on a leash & sits for treats. Weighs 55 lbs. Heartworm-negative. This funloving boy would make a good family pet. I D #: 17461796. Visit or call Citrus County Animal Shelter @ 352-746-8400. ALLEN BIKE RACK Model 143a-4 Bicycle AllenTrunk Bike Rack, Never used,still in box. $75 746-7232 AR 15, SIG Sauer M400 Enhanced 5.56/223, MagPul Acc. Sig Case, Iron Sights & Red DotScope, w/ammo $2300 Must Have FLCarry Permit 352-746-6769 Beautiful Compact Taurus 22 Caliber New In Box $400. obo (352) 795-0088 After 11 am -til 7p BROWNING CITORI Plus,12 gage, trap/skeet Gun w/leather case $1200 716-835-8084 CAMPING COTAluminum 2 mattress with canvas base and spring suspension. Excellent condition. $25 746-7232 CANOE 12Radisson Green Bark, exc. cond. $400 603-863-9750 CONCEALED WEAPONS CLASS EVERYSATURDAY 11 am, $40 132 N. Florida Ave. (352) 419-4800 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 EZ go Golf Cart with charger and new Fld dn back seat $1500, Club golf cart w/ charger call for price 352-564-2756 FISHING TACKLE Rods/ Lures/Line Hooks, Lead Weights other Misc. Related Items, $2. and up. 352-257-3288 Rawlings and Truline 9 Iron & 2 woods Golf Clubs $15.00 352-628-1723 2013 ENCLOSED TRAILERS, 6x12 with ramp, $1895 ** call 352-527-0555 ** ENCLOSED TRAILERS 6 X 10 $1,650 6 X 12 $1,750 7 x 14, Tandem $2,900 7 X 16 Tandem $3,000 8.5x18, Tandem $3,600 LIMITED QUANITIES 352-564-1299 TRAILER Former construction site trailer, fully insulated/wired. 28l/7h/8w. Garage door one end, fr door other end. $1500 OBO (352) 603-2761 HIGH CHAIR $25 BOUNCE $15 CAR SEATINFANT$15 car seat toddle $15 352-777-1256 PINK INFANTTO TODDLER CARSEAT $30, expires dec 2016 352 634 2122 STROLLER GREEN ANIMAL$25/ 2 JUMPEROO the horse $20 each 352-777-1256 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ADiabetic needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, call Mike 386-266-7748 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES AND SEATFOLDS UP GREATSHAPE 75.00 464 0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER NEW 25.00 464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER BOTH HAVE ADJUSTABLE LEGS 20.00 EACH 464 0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITH FOOT& leg rests only 100.00 464 0316 BASS UKULELE ELECTRIC SOUNDS LIKEAN UPRIGHT22 SCALE $100 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR BLACK&ABALONE W/GIGBAG&XTRAS $95 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR PLAYS, LOOKS, SOUNDS GREAT! ONLY$50 352-601-6625 NEWFENDER AFINITYPBASS W/GIGBAG&FREE AMP$100 352-601-6625 NEWLES PAULSTUDIO LIMITED, LIQUID BLACKW/GROVERS &ALINCOS LESS THAN 1/2 PRICE! @ $175 352-601-6625 8 STRING MORRELL LAPSTEELELECTRIC GUITAR NICE W/LIPSTICK PICKUP $100 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR ALMOSTNEW PLAYS&SOUNDS GREATONLY$40 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR & MANDOLIN Washburn D25S w Hd cse & Manzio pickup. Martini mndln w sft cse. Both vy gd cond. $225 obo. 352-341-0890 BEACH&CAMPING? NICEACOUSTIC GUITAR FULLSIZED USED ONLY$25 352-601-6625 BLACK WASHBURN LES PAULSTYLE GUITAR NEWW/FREE RANDALLAMP$100 352-601-6625 DEAN VENDETTA ELECTRIC GUITAR USED BUTPLAYS NEWONLY$45 352-601-6625 GRANDMAS ORGAN KAWAI SR-2 Book Music, Bench $500, pls call btwn 8-10am. 352-287-3145 BAVARIAN CHINA SERVICE FOR 12+ DINNERWARE w/gold trim. $200 OBO (352) 746-3327 CHINAMikasa fine china, charisma 6 pl setting $60 352-422-2164 WOLF PICTURE, wolf knick knack and wolf dresser box $10.00 all 352-794-3020/5864987 ELECTRICTREADMILL VERYSTABLEAND SMALLONLY100.00 464 0316 EXERCISE BIKE (DP) UPRIGHTTYPE IT ALSO WORKS THE ARMS ONLY75.00 464 0316 HORIZON TREADMILL exc. cond. $500 ReboundAerobics Jumper (trampoline) $150,352-637-5525 RECUMBANTEXERCISE BIKE GREAT FORTHE BACK & LEGS ONLY95.00 464 0316 Treadmill Proform XP, all electronics, including power incline, cost over $800 New Asking $195. (352) 464-0316 16 ft. Canoe Good, Condition, 2 paddles, $200 (352) 249-0877 2 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R VARIOUS COLORS $25ea 352-613-0529 GIRLS 10-12-24 shirts,12 shorts,5 swim suits,leggins,jackets & sweatshirts $15.00 all 352-794-3020/586-4987 MENS SUITS SIZES 34X30 & 36X30, $65 EACH 352-613-0529 PURPLE DRESSES size 12 to 18 I have 6 $60.00 for all. 513-4473 !!!!!225/60 R16!!!!! Great.tread!! Only asking $70 for the pair! (352)857-9232 *****295/40 R20***** Good tread!! Only asking $70 for the pair! (352)857-9232 ~~~225/70 R19.5~~~ Beautiful tread!! Only asking $100 for the pair! (352)857-9232 60 ft white wire closet shelving & misc hdwr, 3ft to 10ft lenghts, $30, 3HPLawn Edger. Needs tune-up. $90 (352) 382-7074 3ft Tall Pilsener Glass Beer Bottle Exact replica $100.00 352-628-1723 5ft Glasstop Patio Table $40.Teeter hangups inversion table $150 (352) 382-1977 AQUARIUM WITH WOODEN STAND 25 Gal Rectangular, 12x16x29, gravel,lighted hood.$100 746-7232 BARBIE HOUSE, BARBIE CAR, barbie guitar and kids keyboard $10.00 for all 352-794-3020/5864987 BENCH LIGHT Florescent Bench Light $10.00 352-746-5421 DANCE CHAIR Pink, with ballet slipper design. Folds up and stores in matching tote. Like New. $25 746-7232 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 FRENCH DOORS 2 3ft w/enclosed blinds & all hardware $300 352-419-5836 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 GLASS 3X5 1/4 352-422-2164 $30. Golf Cart Rear Seat and frame $150 Riding lawn mower attachments, for JD, wheel horse, craftsman $50 (315) 466-2268 GOODYEARTIRE REGATTAP225/60R16 ONLY35.00 464 0316 HONEYWELLAIR PURIFIER 360airflow,3spds,HEPA filter ExcellentCond $100 352-746-7232 LAWN SPREADER SMALLMANUAL GOOD CONDITION $20 352-613-0529 LG OCTANE Verizon CELLPHONE with case and power cord $40.00 call or text 352-746-0401 Lg Recliner/Rocker brown, exc. cond. $125obo NOOK e-reader w/cover, $75 obo 352-527-3874 Love Seat, White Brocade chair, Taupe recliner, TV Sanyo, Misc. Baby Items call for pricing. (352) 403-7863 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Fulls $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 MEGABLOKS DRAGON in box/cd Havocfire #9693 $30.00 352-628-4210 Patio Table & 4 Chairs $50. Freezer, small $75. 352 726-8524 Sears Kenmore propane gas dryer heavy duty, $75. Ryobi 12 miter saw $75 352-507-1490 TYMASTODONS 1/Colosso 2/Giganto $4.00ea. $10.00 all exclnt. cond/tagged 352-628-4210

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W EDNESDAY,M ARCH 6,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 702-0306 WCRN To: Ronald Bailey Case No: 2011-DP-091 Term. of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.:2011-DP-091 IN THE INTEREST OF: C.F.DOB: 01/15/1997 Minor Child NOTICE OF ACTION, SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISOR Y HEARING FOR TERMINA TION OF P ARENT AL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO:Ronald Bailey L/K/A Unknown You are hereby notified that a petition under oath has been filed in the above-styled court for the termination of your parental rights as to C.F. a female child born on 15th day of January, 1997, in Ohio; and for placement of the child with the Florida Department of Children and Families for subsequent adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck of the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on March 25, 2013 at 1:30 PM at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450. YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD, IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700 within seven (7) working days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771, Florida Relay Service 711. THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in the Citrus County Chronicles Classified Section. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013 at Inverness, Citrus County, Florida. ANGELA VICK, Clerk of Courts (SEAL) By:/s/ D. Pennington, Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 27 & March 6, 2013. 922-0322 DAILY CRN Surplus Prop. PUBLIC NOTICE The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will be selling surplus property and equipment via the internet at govdeals.com, March 4, until March 22, 2013. Pub: March 1 thru March 22, 2013.. 000E4CI ab1667 au2246 DUDLEYS AUCTION Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web. MAINE-LY REAL ESTATEPersonal Property sold Dudleys Auction Ab1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.000E9DT Dudleys Auction www.dudleysauction.com FOUR AUCTIONS 4000 S. Florida A ve., Inver ness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fair g r ounds) MA RCH 7, 8, A ND 9, 2013 Thur 3/7 Estate Auction @ HallPrev 12 Auction 3 Outside 6 pm InsideFurniture, Tools, Household, boxes of fun & value. 700 + lotsFri 3/8 On-Site Personal Property EstatePrev 8 a m Auction 9 am161 Annapolis Ave., Citrus Hills 34442Entire contents of world travelers furniture, antiques, household & more. Fri 3/8 Real EstatePrev 3 pm Auction 4 p m5756 W Norbis Cir., Homosassa 3/2 1 acre home FR-LR-DR-BR stone fireplace, clean, move-in ready. 1/3 mi. from Rock Crusher Elementary. MUST SELL TO SETTLE ESTATE.Sat 3/9 Real Estate & ContentsPrev 8 am Auction 9 am ; Real Estate 10 am1115 N Carnevale Terrace Timberlane Estates 344613/2, one acre, pool home. SOLD ABSOLUTE. Entire contents incl. furniture, antiques, art, sterling & more. SUBARU 2011 FORESTER 29K MILES ONE OWNER $17850, 352-628-5100 TOYOTA1997 RAV 4 ONLY89K MILES, NICE $5850, 352-628-5100 RV & BOAT STORAGE @ $21.20. Per Month 352 422-6336 or 352-795-0150 2001 Dodge Ram1500 4x4 sgl. cab,auto, a/c, run great,$5000 obo,105k miles, trailer pkg 352-726-4870 JEEP 2000, Grand Cherokee 4x4, V8 pw, pl, priced to low to list..call adam at 352-628-4600 for appointment CHEVYCONV VAN2007 Rocky Ridge Conv 1500 Chevy Exp. 5.3L V8. Good cond.Leather. TV,Tracvision, play sta. 96k mi. $14,900 obo. 352-341-0890 99 HARLEY FXDWG 7k mi, stg 3 cam, big blc, 42 drag pipes $7000 obo 727-408-0602 CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES 352-942-3492 Harley Davidson 2009 Street Glide Black, 20k, many extras $18,500 firm, pls call **352-422-5448** HARLYDAVIDSON08, 1200cc Sportster 976mi. exc. condition, $9000 (352) 447-1244 KYMCO 2000 ZX 50 Scooter, One owner, 268 miles, windshield, luggage carrier, garage kept. $900 352-212-5286 SUZUKI 2005 Boulevard C90T Runs, looks and sounds good. 1500cc. 7700 mi. Lots of extras. $4900 obo. 352-341-0890 CHEVY 1984 C20 project, long bed, solid body & bed, good glass, dual exhaust, Holly 4 barrel, 350V8, runs, asking $1300 352-628-7243 pls leave message CHEVY EL CAMINO Silver, excel. cond., garaged, $13,500 (352) 270-3824 CHEVY EL CAMINO Silver, excel. cond., garaged, $13,500 (352) 270-3824 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE 1996 Dakota Sport V6 50,300 actual miles. Runs great, excellent shape. $5,500 OBO Sugarmill 740-705-9004 FORD 2004, Ranger $7,990 352-341-0018 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUICK 2005 RANIER 46K MILES CXL LIKE NEW $9850, 352-628-5100 HONDA 1997 CRV priced to sell.its a honda auto, pwr windows call 352-628-4600 for special newspaper pricing KIA 2012 SOUL ONLY7K MILES $15,800 352-628-5100 CHEVROLET 1999, Camaro, Convertible $6,990. 352-341-0018 FORD 1995 Escort wagon 4cyl., Auto, call 352-628-4600 for low price and appointment FORD 2005, Focus $4,850. 352-341-0018 FORD 2010, Edge, 10k miles, Loaded, exc. cond. $18,500 obo 352-400-6007 FORD 2010, Pruis, $17,995. 352-341-0018 FORD 2011 FIESTASDN 36K MILES, S MODEL, ONE OWNER $9950, 352-628-5100 HONDA 2010ACCORD LX 85K MILES, NICE, $12,850 352-628-5110 LINCOLN Towncar 2010 29,900mi, gold w/beige vinyl top, white leather asking, $24,900 352-476-5061 MINI COOPER2008 2DR, HARDTOP ONLY20K MILES, SUPER CLEAN $13980, 352-628-5100 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 NISSAN 2005,Altima $5,895 352-341-0018 PONTIAC 2003 Bonneville must SE, V6, pw.pl.priced to sell..call jan at 352-628-4600 for appointment and pricing SOLD FORD 98 Black Mustang runs well! 2002 JAGUAR XJR 4 DR $7200. Super Charged 4.0 V-8, exc cond, auto trans, leather int, AC, power sun roof, XJR Sport Pkg, factory chrome wheels (352) 637-6443 2004 SSR 5.3 L, Magnaflow super charger, and exhaust 18k miles, $26,500 call 207-546-6551 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com DUTCHMEN TRVL TRAILER 2007 Ranier Model R24Q. 25with 1 slideout. Very good cond. 7300 GVWR with sway bar and wt disbn hitch. $9900 obo. See at Picards Storage. 352-341-0890 ITASCA2007 Navaron 23H Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L, 17 mpg, generator,AC, one slide out, sleeps 5, excellent condition, $50,000 make offer 352-422-1309 JAYCO1996, Designer 5th Wheel, 30 ft, slide out, excellent condition At Lake Rousseau RV PK $7,500. obo 248-672-3452 CAMPER 29 Holiday Rambler Alum fr, lg slide out. great cond. $10,900 352-795-5310 or 410-474-3454 29FTTERRY FLEETWOOD bunk style camping trailer. Tag Behind 96 model. Good shape $3800 (352) 613-2944 CAR/TOYHAULER 2007 32 ft Enclosed Gooseneck w/liv qtrs. $11,900. For more info call 352-560-7247 COACHMAN 30ft. Qn. Island bed, + rear bunk beds, slide out, ducted AC ready to go. Very clean $9,500 (352) 621-0848 FOREST RIVER2010, Surveyor, Sport 189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer, 1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed, awning, pwr. tonque jack, corner jacks, microwave, equilizing hitch, $9000 (352) 382-1826 KZ Toyhauler,0732 like new, full slide new tires, Owan Gen., gas tank, Lrg living area separate cargo $18,000. 352-795-2975 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, kg bd,like new, 60amp serv. NADA $29K asking $25K obo 352-382-3298 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BLUE OX SELF ALLIGNING TOW BAR New with cables & pinlock $600 352-601-4986 LUGGAGE ROOF CROSSRAILS will fit any Chevy Traverse $150 obo 352-503-6414 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ BUICK Regal LS, 4 DR. Loaded, 70K, 24 mpg, leather, V6 auto clean $4,275. 352-212-4882 BUICK 1996 Buick Century auto,cruise,power locks windows,goodtires, runs,& drives great, good mpg, no oil use,am,fm,cass, $2000 obo ask for Robert 352-563-1934 8am til 8pm BUICK 1996 Buick Century auto,cruise,power locks windows,goodtires,runs,& drives great, good mpg, no oil use,am,fm,cass, $2000 obo ask for Robert 352-563-1934 8am til 8pm BUICK 93 LeSabre Sedan exc. must see, one owner, 57k ,ask. $3900 obo 352-302-4282 CADILLAC 1994 DEVILLE 79K MILES, CAR IS PERFECT$4995 352-628-5100 CADILLAC 2005 STS LOW MILES NICE CAR $9850, 352-628-5100 CADILLAC 2011 CTS, LOADED ONLY15K MILES, SUNROOF $27,850 352-628-5100 CHRYSLER2006 PT Cruiser conv. weather is getting nicetime to drop the topcall 352-628-4600 to set appointment to see CORVETTE2006 Victory Red tan leather, Convertible. LS2 400HP. 16K miles, 3LTOption Pkg. $29,900(352)560-7247 HOME FOR SALE NORTON, VA 5Bd/2Ba inc. 3 lots 70miles from Bristol Racetrack $69,000 276-393-0446 OR 276-679-1331 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com 2BD 1BA2 Carport onLake Rousseau Dunnellon 1.4 AC, 168 ft on lake, No flood insurance completely remodedled, Price Reduced$169.000 Barney Chilton 352-563-0116 Gulf Prvt Island home on 15 ac 80 dock. 4/2 All util. Mainland dock & pkg. Jacuzzi house S. McDermott (352) 697-1593 Cridland RE INVERNESS 3/2/2 waterfront pool hm on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot quiet St, whole house generator $229,000 352-419-8337 YOUR High-Tech Water Front Realtor ROD KENNER 352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties CRYSTALRIVER3 Beautiful wooded acre lots, high & dry, live oaks, neighbors adj, $7500ea Crystal Manor 229-377-9697 WINDSHIELD Citabria, brand new PMApart, $150 obo 352-419-6086 2 8ft Kayak Calypsos with 2 paddles, & 2 life jackets, Like New $250 obo for Both (352) 364-7057 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 03 SEAPRO 1790 hp merc. vhf, gps, trol mtr, fullcover, bimini, alum trlr $7200 352-419-5363pm 3 16CANOES2, 2 Seaters, 1, 3 Seater on galvanized trailer w/paddles & lifejackets $1200 352-795-7335 18HP, Evinrude short shaft, manual, good condition. $460. Crystal River (513) 260-6410 ALUMICRAFT 18 ft.,wide rhino lined inside, 25HP Merc., boat mtr. & trailer in great shape $3,700 (352) 563-0328 LET US SELL YOUR BOAT0% FEE!! FREE Bass Pro Shop Gift Card, Call for Details 352-795-1119Mercury & Yamaha Parts and ServiceUS 19 CRYSTALRIVER (just north of the Mall) MONTEREY 07, 180 Bowrider 38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo factory loaded, alum. trlr orig. owner $14k obo 352-419-6086 PENNYAN 1979 27Sports fisherman w/ trailer, needs some work. $4000 OBO (352) 621-0192 TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP,Ttop, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 GAIL STEARNS your Gale ForceRealtor TROPIC SHORES Realty 352-422-4298 gail@citrusrealtor .com www.citrusr ealtor .com Low overhead means savings for you! Waterfront, Foreclosures &Owner financing available. I NEED LISTINGS! I SOLD ALMOST 2-HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor (352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican Realty Phone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSE Realtor Simply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtor Listing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it! 352-476-9649 sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 TONY Pauelsen Realtor 352-303-0619 Buy or Sell now is the time TOP PERFORMANCE Real estate Consultant 3/2 pool home on 10 acres w/ FP, zoned agriculture, walk to all schools. $179,900 (727) 528-2803 or 727-698-0723 LAKE PANASOFKEE 3bdr 1 ba, cbs home, lake access, great income or live-in property, on beautiful lot, $39,900 call 352-303-4505 20 DOCKABLE ACRES St. Lucie Waterway. $159,500. 45mins boatAtlantic; 5mins boat Lake Okeechobee. Beautiful land, abundant wildlife. Gated/Privacy. 888-716-2259 Gulf Atlantic Land, Broker. B eautiful Whispering Pines Villa $79,900 Managed, low Maint. fee indowed for sudden expenses, walk to park 352-341-0170 352-726-5263 FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch, metal roof, appls, CHA, fans, verticals, shed, fence, deck, spklrs, near dog park. $120,000 (352) 586-0872 INVERNESS Block home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $110,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or Mary(607) 657-8379 NICE HOUSE on Nice Street $69,000 2/1/1, Attached carport w/ 12 x 32 scrn. por., built in on 1/2 acre lot fenced 12 x14 matching out building, New roof, stucco paint, flooring, upper line appls, irrigation & water system., taxes & ins. $1,135 yr 606-425-7832 3BD, 2BA, 2Gar, Gas fireplace, on Water, Main Canal, dock large lot with fruit trees. $138,000 (321) 303-2875 3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft., 6823 W. Merrivale Ln Built 2006, Fully Furnished, by Owner, $77,000 obo (260) 348-9667 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139 hunt4houses68 @yahoo.com www.bettyhunts homes.com. Condo for Sale Sugarmill Woods 2/2 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-287-0473 Custom Built 3/2/2 Pool Home on 1.26 acres on Golf Course 2339 sq.ft. living area 3366 sq.ft. under roof Many xtras, price reduced. 352-382-1531 Golf Course Home 3/2/2. Update throughout. Heated pool; Many extras. By appointment (352) 382-2475 2ACRESQuiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $126,500 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips BEVERLYHILLS2/1 w/sunroom, deck on back, new utility shed 352-566-7099 or 606-694-7099 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOU AVIEW TO LOVE www. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. HERNANDO Building Off Hwy 200, $800.mo 352-201-2428 4/3+/4 pool home w/ inlaw suite on 2 ac. HW flrs, granite cntrs. 2009 Custom Home S. McDermott (352) 697-1593 Cridland RE PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 Beverly Hills 2/1 family room and carport, investment or seasonal living $38,900 352-422-2433 HANDYMAN SPECIAL 2/1/1 needs paint & cosmetics $23k **cash only ** 352-503-3245 DUDLEYS AUCTION 4AUCTIONSTHURS 3/7 Est ate Auction @Hall prev 12 Auction 3 outside 6pm inside Furniture,Tools, Household, boxes of fun & value 700+lots FRI 3/8 On Site Personal Property Est ate prev 8am auction 9 am 161AnnapolisAve Citrus Hills 34442 entire contents of worldtravelersfurniture, antiques, household, HUGE St ar Wars Col & more Fri 3/8 Real Est ate prev 3pm Auction 4pm 5756W Norbis Cir Homosassa 3/2 1 acrehome FR-LR-DR-BR stone Fireplace, clean move in ready 1/3 mi. from Rock Crusher Elementary. MUST SELLTO SETTLE ESTATE SA T 3/9 Real Est ate & Content s prev 8 Auction 9 Real Estate 10am 1115 N Carnevale TerraceTimberlane Estate 34461 3/2 one acre pool home SOLDABSOLUTE Entire contents inc furniture,Antiques,Art, sterling & more *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. Starting@$433/mo Inverness 352-726-3476 Lecanto 352-746-0373 Crystal River 352-563-0890 CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1Water Incl. CHA $496. 220-2447 or 212-2051 DUNNELLON Rainbow Springs Rent/Rent To own Georgous, 2/2/2 Country Club Home Fireplace D Washer Carpeted, lanai, spotless 1/2 acre quiet. Special $799. 352-527-0493 Photos: http://ocala .craigslist.org/apa/ 3653804501.html Hernando Rentalsfrom $425.00 @ MO. CallA.W. SkipCraven 352-464-1515 HOMOSASSA 2/1CHA,No pets $500. mo., 1st + sec (352) 628-4210 INVERNESS 121 N. Seminole Ave., Downtown, CBD. Charming 1600 + sq. ft., 2 BR, 2 BA, CB home. Zoned Commercial, w/ formal dining room, lg. mast. bdrm, utility, & solarium, w/ appliances. $800/ 1st, last, w/ sec dep. & ref. Available Monday March 4, 726-3153, leave mesg INVERNESS 3BR/2BA/1, $750. mo 418 Hunting Lodge Dr (352) 895-0744 Cell INVERNESS Country Living on Large acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba. home. Garden and fenced areas. Well & septic, so no water bill! $595. 352-476-4964 SUGARMILL WOODS 4/2/2 1/3ac. $1100. mo. 727-919-0797 HERNANDO Affordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 INVERNESS Nice Waterfront, 2 story Condo 2/2.Great loc. First, last, Sec $675 mo (352) 302-4546 CRYSTAL RIVERSpacy/Private, Must love big dogs. $750. (352) 422-5735 CRYSTALRIVER Office & Warehouse $300-$600, Plantation Rentals 352-634-0129 PUBLISHERS NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275.

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C12 W EDNESDAY, M ARCH 6, 2013 C ITRUS C OUNTY (FL) C HRONICLE 000E993 0% 60 MONTHS FINANCING or SAVE $ 3,000 HURRY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Push Button Start, 6.1 Touch-Screen, 6 Speakers, iPod Control, Tel & Music VIA Bluetooth, Cruise Control, Power Locks, Power Windows HURRY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! HURRY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! MPG 35 MPG 28 Cruise Control, Power Windows, Power Door Locks, Air Conditioning, AM/FM/CD Player www.villagetoyota.com Lets Go Places TAKE YOUR PICK DURING OUR MARCH SPRING CLEANING VILLAGE TOYOTA 352-628-5100 MSRP . . . . . . 17,900 SAVINGS . . . 2,905 NOW $ 14,995 2013 NEW TOYOTA COROLLA NEW 2012 TOYOTA CAMRY MSRP . . . . . . 22,895 SAVINGS . . . 3,900 NOW $ 18,995 MPG 35 NEW 2012 TOYOTA RAV4 NEW 2012 TOYOTA PRIUS MSRP . . . . . . 26,017 SAVINGS . . . . 3,117 NOW $ 22,900 MPG 51 712-0306 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will meet in Regular Session on March 12, 2013, at 1:00 P.M ., in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of conducting the regular business of Citrus County. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrators Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580. Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes). March 6, 2013. 717-0306 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Sheriffs Office of Citrus County, Florida, will begin collective bargaining talks with The Professional Firefighter of Citrus County, Local 4562 on March 7, 2013 at the Withlacoochee Technical Institute located at 1201 W Main Street Inverness FL, 34450, Room 286 beginning at 1:00 p.m. These discussions are open to the public. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Human Resources Office, 1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave, Inverness, Fl 34450, (352)726-4488 a minimum of two days prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone. March 6, 2013. 710-0306 WCRN Patty Jo Bodenhorn File No: 2012-CP-729 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2012-CP-729 IN RE: ESTATE of PATTY JO BODENHORN, DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the Estate of Patty Jo Bodenhorn, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-729 by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedents date of death was October 13, 2012 that the total value of the estate is $55,000.00 and that the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Susan J. Korman, 1700 N. Envoy Drive, Crystal River, FL 34429 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WITH BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2013. Person Giving Notice: /s/Susan J. Korman 1700 N. Envoy Drive, Crystal River, FL 34429 Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 157310209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone: (352) 726-1211 February 27 & March 6, 2013. 711-0306 WCRN Wanda C. McKeever File No: 2013-CP-35 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2013-CP-35 IN RE: ESTATE of WANDA C. McKEEVER, 716-0306 WCRN Martha H. Filler File No: 2013-CP-017 Notice to Creditors (Summ.Admin.) PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-017 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF MARTHA H. FILLER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order or Summary Administration has been enetered in the estate of Martha H. Filler, deceased, File Number 2013-CP-017, by the Citcuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedents date of death was December 1, 2012; that the total value of the estate si EXEMPT PROPETRY and that the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS Andrea Hensley 115 Homewood Drive, Genoa, Illinios 60135 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 6, 2013.. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Andrea Hensley 115 Homewood Drive, Genoa, Illinios 60135 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Rebecca A. Briggs, Florida Bar No. 738441 Rebecca Briggs, P.A. 111 W. Main Street, Suite 205, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone (352) 601-0596 March 6 & 13, 2013. DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Wanda C. McKeever, deceased, whose date of death was January 7, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/Tammy Sue Hiles 12148 Luftburrow Lane, Hudson, FL 34669 Attorney for Personal Representative BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 157310209 C ourthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone: (352) 726-1211 February 27 & March 6, 2013. 2374-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-311 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the followTax Deed Notices ing certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0549 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: DE ROSA INC UNIT 5 REVISED PB 11 PG 29 LOT 5 DESC IN OR BK 890 PG 1116 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: GIROLAMA ORLANDO, GUISEPPE ORLANDO Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 Tax Deed Notices 2372-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-309 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-5939 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: CITRUS SPGS UNIT 23 PB 568 PG 968 LOT 9 BLK 1740 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: ELAINE I BRIGHTMAN Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2373-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-310 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-9771 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: EDEN GARDENS PB 3 PG 46 LOT 1 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: EVELYN CASE, JACK CASE, ESTATE OF LEO CASE, JEWEL HOLVERSTOTT, LAWSON HOLVERSTOTT Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2376-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-313 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of Tax Deed Notices the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2960 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: TOWN OF DUNNELLON LOT 697 DESC IN OR BK 611 PG 321, DC IN OR BK 706 PG 615, OR BK 793 PG 2002, DC IN OR BK 840 PG 10 55 & REF ONLY: OR BK 840 PG 1057 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: WILLIE CLEVELAND 3RD, ESTATE OF JOYCE ANN DIXON Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2375-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-312 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-10018 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: SEVEN LAKES PARK 2ND ADDITION PB 11 PG 122 LOT 6 BLK I NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: BRIAN G MCKENZIE, JAMES T MOORE JR Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2378-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-291 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: JOSEPH G CAPPUCCILLI The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 09-0316 Tax Deed Notices YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: COM AT SE COR OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/4 SEC 14, TH N 1 DEG 37M 41S W AL E LN OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/4 511.60FT TO POB PT BEING ON CTRLN OF EXISTING POLE POWER LN, TH N 1 DEG 37M 41S W AL E LN 153.40 FT TO NE COR OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/ 4 TH S 88 DEG 46M 24S W AL N LN OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/4 348.16 FT, TH S 1 DEG 37M 41S E PAR TO E LN 152.59 FT TO PT ON CTRLN, TH N 88 DEG 54M 25S E AL CTRLN 348.16 FT TO POB SUB J TO 25 FT WIDE EASM AL E BDRY FOR RD R/W DESC IN OR BK 1405 PG 1037 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: ESTATE OF DIANE SPINDLER, NANCY MEYERS, NEAL MEYERS SR, JAMES SPINDLER, JAMES R SPINDLER, JAMES R SPINDLER JR, KRYSTAL SPINDLER, KRYSTAL A SPINDLER, MICHELLE SPINDLER Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 2377-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-314 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: DAVID DIBARTOLOMEO The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-6421 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: PINE RIDGE UNIT 1 PB 8 PG 25 LOT 26 BLK 84 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: CONRADO VALEROS, FELICITAS VALEROS Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 Tax Deed Notices 2380-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2013-060 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: TC 12 LLC The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0619 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: MINI FARMS UNIT 4 UNREC SUB LOT 41 DESC IN OR BK 1105 PG 1016 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: HENRY E BOOTH, MILLIE M BOOTH Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 Tax Deed Notices 2379-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2013-061 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: PENDER NEWKIRK CUSTODIAN TC10U LLC TC 10U LLC TCU 10 LLC The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2314 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: HOMOSASSA TRADEWINDS II A CONDOMINIUM UNIT 129 DECL OF CONDO IN OR BK 1932 PG 1405, TITLE IN OR BK 1373 PG 1036 AND OR BK 1514 PG 1653 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: VAN DER VALK TRADEWINDS INC Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 000E993 VILLAGE TOYOTA



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Join community health care talkShare your insights about health and health care in Citrus County. To register, call WellFlorida Council, 352-313-6500, ext. 100. There are six opportunities to share insights, with the first one taking place 9 to 11 a.m. Thursday at the Lakes Regions Library, 1511 Druid Road, Inverness.City hears update on trailhead projectAt Tuesday nights Inverness city council meeting, the completion of the North Apopka Trailhead Bicycle Boulevard project made strides toward completion with the acceptance of the construction bid submitted by Daly & Zilch Inc. for $499,890. The project, consisting of streetscape from Dampier Street north to the trail crossing, trail crossing improvements, Liberty Park parking lot improvements, median rehabilitation from the trail crossing to the boat ramp, and water system improvements, is scheduled to be completed in time for the annual July 3rd Patriotic Evening in Liberty Park, Liberty Trail and Wallace Brooks Park. Inverness City Manager Frank DiGiovanni said, The transformation of Inverness continues it will definitely be our yellow brick road pulling tourism directly into the downtown. Council president Cabot McBride added, This is a big deal for the city. Also discussed: Single stream curbside recycling is coming soon to city residents at no cost to them; Waste Management has agreed to contribute $10,000 to the city toward the cost of running Whispering Pines Park, plus $5,000 annually during the term of their franchise agreement with the city. Waste Management is very appreciative of extending our contract in partnership with the city of Inverness, said Doug McCoy, Waste Management district manager. Were particularly glad we can be helpful in regards to Whispering Pines Park, a very vital part of the community. MARCH 6, 2013Floridas Best Community Newspaper Serving Floridas Best CommunityVOL. 118 ISSUE 211 50 CITRUS COUNTYSoftball: Citrus, Lecanto play tight contest /B1 www.chronicleonline.com INDEX Comics . . .C8 Community . .C6 Crossword . .C7 Editorial . .A10 Entertainment . .B6 Horoscope . .B6 Lottery Numbers .B4 Lottery Payouts .B6 Movies . . .C8 Obituaries . .A6 Classifieds . .C9 TV Listings . .C7 HIGH63LOW38Increasingly sunny, windy and cooler.PAGE A4TODAY& next morning WEDNESDAY CHRISVANORMER Staff writerFollowing on the heels of Januarys fiscal cliff, The Sequester has become the new topic of economic discussion. The Sequester is an $85 billion across-the-board reduction in federal spending that took effect March 1, impacting a great number of services from mental health to public safety, potentially resulting in staff layoffs and pay cuts. Layoffs could affect public school teachers and aides. Enacted by the Budget Control Act of 2011, the spending reductions also will take effect for years 2014 through 2021 unless repealed. The act requires budget cuts of $1.2 trillion during 10 years. All of this will cause a ripple effect throughout our economy, President Obama said Friday.The longer these cuts remain in place, the greater the damage to our economy. The effects will be gradual in Citrus County and may not have a great impact in all cases. In some cases, budget planning has contained the cuts for the current year. County government will take a small hit from a program called Sequester: How it will affect Citrus See CUTS/ Page A4 A.B. SIDIBE Staff writerCRYSTAL RIVER It is a conversation building momentum and may reach its apex at a city workshop. Mayor Jim Farley said no firm date has yet been set, but the issue of building heights perhaps the need to raise them in some areas has been bubbling for a while in the city by the bay. Farley said the citys planning board and many citizens are against elevated height limits. The current height limit in the city is 50 feet. On the other hand, some believe to bring business and dynamism to the sleepy village on Kings Bay, city leaders may have little choice but to go vertical. You see the problem is especially in the waterfront area the lots are too small, said Dr. Paresh Desai, a businessman and proponent of higher height limits in the city. Say the lot is 1,000 square feet. You have no choice but to want to go more vertical so you can have more space for your business. If you dont have that option, you are not going to locate there and that is why businesses dont want to come there, Desai said. He said a change in the height limit also will encourage many other businesspeople to purchase and replace some of the older building lots in the downtown area. City eyes height limits MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleAt this time, new buildings in Crystal River are limited to a maximum height of 50 feet. Some residents would like to see the h eight restrictions changed to allow for taller commercial structures in certain areas of the city. Some believe building restrictions could hamper potential development See LIMITS/ Page A2 PATFAHERTY Staff writerWith 100 signed up, an event this week to help job-seekers find a position is filled to capacity, However, it is just one of more than 70 job search and career-related workshops and programs this month in Citrus, Levy and Marion counties. About 15 of those with some repeats are scheduled for Citrus County. The Land That Job Forum is Friday at the College of Central Florida Citrus County Campus. It is a combined effort by United Way, Citrus County Chamber of Commerce, Workforce Connection, the college and the Economic Development Council. The forum will help participants locate possible jobs and prepare for interviews through coaching and role-playing. Part of the session will be simulcast at the chambers monthly luncheon. Several other job and career events were scheduled this week in Citrus County. Currently SCHEDULED EVENTS March 7, 12, 26 Targeted Resumes, Inverness. March 7 Career Expo, Open House WTI, In verness. March 15, 29 Nail That Interview, Inverness. March 7, 21 Navigating New World or Work, In verness. March 21 Navigating New World of Work, Be verly Hills. March 27 Spring Fling Job Fair, Lecanto. Full calendar this month for job-seekers See JOBS/ Page A5 Many organizations planning ahead Associated PressNEW YORK The stock market is back. Five and a half years after the start of a frightening drop that erased $11 trillion from stock portfolios and made investors despair of ever getting their money back, the Dow Jones industrial average has regained all the losses suffered during the Great Recession and reached a new high. The blue-chip index rose 125.95 points Tuesday and closed at 14,253.77, topping the previous record of 14,164.53 on Oct. 9, 2007, by 89.24 points. It signals that things are getting back to normal, says Nicolas Colas, chief market strategist at ConvergEx Group, a brokerage. Unemployment is too high, economic growth too sluggish, but stocks are anticipating improvement. The new record suggests investors who did not panic and sell their stocks in the 2008-2009 financial crisis have fully recovered. Those who have reinvested dividends or added to their holdings have done even better. Since bottoming at 6,547.05 on March 9, 2009, the Dow has risen 7,706.72 points or 118 percent. The Dow record does not include the impact of inflation. Adjusted for that, the Dow would have to reach 15,502 to match its old record, according to JPMorgan Chase. The Standard and Poors 500, a broader index, closed at 1,539.79, 25.36 points from its record. The last time the Dow hit a record, George W. Bush still had another year as president, Apple had just sold its first iPhone, and Lehman Brothers was still in business. But unemployment was also 4.7 percent versus Dow hits record high, erases losses from recession Associated PressA board on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Tuesday shows the closing number for the Dow Jones industrial average. See DOW/ Page A5 NEWS BRIEFS From staff reports Not everyone is c heering, though Page A5 TAKE YOUR PICKDURING OURMARCHSPRING CLEANINGPAGE C10000E996at VILLAGE TOYOTATAKE YOUR PICKDURING OURMARCHSPRING CLEANING

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The 50-foot limit also includes the roof, which is forcing a business like the new Hampton Inn (which is under construction) to make a flat roof. The building will look like a box. Do they want every building that goes up looking like a box? Desai asked. City Manager Andy Houston said conversation is already shifting toward more flexibility about building heights. I think it depends on the area. I can see where there could be flexibility in the proposed RiverWalk area and parts of U.S. 19, but it will be up to the city council to make any changes, Houston said. Farley, who had been opposed to increases in height limits, said Tuesday a workshop on the matter will be scheduled in the near future. I am opposed to it because a lot of the residents do not like the idea, but we will see what comes out of the workshop. I can be flexible about it too, depending on the area, but if it is like the Port area where residential homes are right next door, no, I will not support it. It will look too much like New Port Richey and Spring Hill, Farley said. Joe Chrietzberg, community activist and longtime city resident, said has some self-described radical notions about height limits. I say bring in eight-story buildings. It probably wouldnt happen in my lifetime, but I believe it will come someday, Chrietzberg said. He blames the opposition to increased height limits on people who are wedded to keeping the city a sleepy fishing village. Chrietzberg said the city has to keep up with the realities of the times and adjust to coming demands. If not, things will keep stagnating and nobody wins if things are not growing. ERYNWORTHINGTON Staff writerINVERNESS Karen Dixon-Pulcinis dream came true when her phone rang and she received the call. Doctors had a kidney and pancreas that were a match. Dixon-Pulcini, aCitrus County businesswoman fixture for more than 25 years, had been battling kidney disease as a result ofhaving Type 1 diabetes.The only hope for a curefor Dixon-Pulcini was a transplant. Her call finally came on Feb. 23 and DixonPul cini received both her kidney and pancreas transplant. Now, exactly one week after her transplant, she is home and doing well. Karen is doing fantastic, said Bonnie Peterson, a close friend of Dixon-Pulcini. She is home now and adjusting to what she can do that she couldnt do before. After 27 years of being a diabetic, she in now diabetes-free and no longer has to have dialysis. On a Facebook page created for her, her husband Walt Pulcini wrote, Were so overwhelmed with joy about Karens totally new life. He also wrote that for the last two years DixonPulcini was forbidden from one of her favorite foods cheese. The doctors are now telling her to eat cheese. Dixon-Pulcini is grateful for her health and wanted to thank the community for all of their kindness. She is so thankful for her second chance at life and to the donor family, Peterson said. She is also thankful to the community that has been by her side the whole time. To contact Dixon-Pulcini, visit her Facebook page at facebook.com/ kidneyforkaren or send cards to Cubbys 1065 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34450.Contact Chronicle reporter Eryn Worthington at 352-563-5660, ext. 1334, or eworthington@ chronicleonline.com. Special to the ChronicleCRYSTAL RIVER The Historic Seminole Club building is breathing a sigh of relief after the new owner, Art Jones had threatening trees removed. Five big trees that were dying, broken or hollow and were hanging over the historic structure are now gone. A 100-foot-high crane had to be brought in because the trees were so close to the building. Built in 1924, the community center, with 15-foot beautiful ceilings and original wood floors and wainscoting, was sold by the City of Crystal River to Jones in January 2013. Since the sale, Jones has been stabilizing and repairing the foundation, fixing broken windows, fixing doors and replacing faucets. He intends to keep the building as original as possible and continue to use it as a community center. Presently the Crystal River-Kings Bay Rotary meets there every Wednesday at noon for a catered lunch meeting. The building will also be available for rent to other groups and can accommodate parties up to 65 with tables and chairs or 150 with just seating. The next project on Jones agenda is to remove invasive clumping Bamboo and turn the lumber into a fence, fix the drainage problem on the property that occurs after heavy rains and to increase parking spaces. This spring he plans to give the building a new paint job and bring in wifi. Plans are also being considered to add an outside porch and maybe a commercial kitchen. Those interested in renting the space may contact Jones at 727-642-7659 or email MrAWJones @aol.com. A2WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLELOCAL 527-0012 72 HOUR BLIND FACTORY FAUX WOOD BLINDS, TOP TREATMENTS DRAPERY, SHADES, SHUTTERS VERTICALS The Savings Are Yours Because The Factory Is Ours! BLIND S TREETOPS PLAZA 1657 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY LECANTO 2012 2012 2012 2012 www.72-hourblinds.com WELL MEET OR BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE 000E3KU 000E362 KUMON MATH & READING CENTERS Call Today 726-9694 3380 E. Gulf to Lake Hwy.Inverness Lolite Early Learning: Your child will have an early path to success Remedial: Your child needs a little extra help Enrichment: Your child needs new academic challenges 000DXYF Are you new to Citrus County? Are you new to Citrus County? You chose the best place to move. Now choose the best physicians to help protect your new life! Call for a free screening appointment with one of our highly regarded specialists in our full service Inverness facility. Proud to be Accredited in both Nuclear Cardiology and Echocardiography! A limited number of appointments are available 1pm-4pm on Fridays for new residents, or those with high risk factors, including family history of heart disease and/or aneurysm, and/or current or former smokers who have no current cardiologist. Due to an Due to an overwhelming overwhelming response, response, dont wait to dont wait to make your make your appointment! appointment! Please call 352-726-8353 Please call 352-726-8353 to schedule your screening today! Inverness (352) 726-8353 308 W. Highland Blvd., Inverness Five Locations To Serve You 31 st 31 st 000E6SP OFFER EXPIRES 3/10/13 FOR 4 ROOMS *Combined living areas, L-shaped rooms and rooms over 300 sq. ft. are considered 2 areas. Baths, hal ls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Minimum charges apply. Cannot combine with other offers Residential only; cannot be used for restoration ser vices or air duct cleaning. Must present coupon at time of service. Certain restrictions may apply. Call f or Details. CITRUS 726-4646 CITRUS 726-4646 CITRUS 726-4646 MARION 622-5885 MARION 622-5885 MARION 622-5885 Beyond Carpet Cleaning CARPET | TILE GROUT | HARDWOOD | UPHOLSTERY | AIR DUCT EXTENDED OFFER! Clean-up continues at Seminole Club Special to the Chronicle Longtime Citrus County businesswoman Karen Dixon-Pulcini is home recovering from her kidney and pancreas transplant. Local business owner recovering from pancreas, kidney transplant DixonPulcini thanks community Special to the ChronicleDangerous trees hanging over the Historic Seminole Club in Crystal River are cut and lifted away from the building with a 100-foot crane. LIMITSContinued from Page A1 Owner plans more changes

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Associated PressAt left, FAMU student Ryan Rigg, with Dream Defenders, demonstrates on the fourth floor of the Capitol on Tuesday in Tallahassee. The group advocates reforms for school, immigration, Stand Your Ground and voting issues. Sinkhole season lands in Florida MATTHEW BECK/ChronicleFriends of the Library volunteer Jean Racine, of Hernando, packs boxes full of books Tuesday morning as she and a host of other volunteers prepare for the upcoming spring book sale. The sale is not only offering books, but DVDs, puzzles and more. It runs from Friday to Tuesday at the Citrus County Auditorium in Inverness. STATE& LOCAL Page A3WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE PATFAHERTY Staff writerCitrus County School District has an ongoing effort to make sure parents are aware of the student breakfast program and try to increase participation. School breakfast participation across Florida, especially by low-income students, was the subject of a report by Florida Impact and the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC). The center is a national anti-hunger organization that lobbies on behalf of federal food and nutrition programs. The report pointed out while more children in the state are participating in the school breakfast program, more than half of the low-income children are missing out. If you look at the report statewide, were about average, said Roy Pistone, director of food services for Citrus County. We constantly encourage students to eat breakfast with us at school; its one of our goals. He said participation in the program is increasing and has risen about 1 percent since last year. We make sure parents know about it, he said, adding they are constantly testing new breakfast ideas and want to increase participation. Pistone said what they do not know is how many students are eating at home or before they come to school. Were in place to feed kids who do not get to eat, he said. We fill a void. Florida must make breakfast more accessible to students, said Dr. Debra Susie, Florida Impacts executive director. Expanding participation in breakfast is one of the most effective ways of promoting health and academic success for low-income children. Improving participation rates will lead to healthier and hungerfree children who start the day ready to learn. The center found Florida schools served 46.9 low-income children breakfast for every 100 who received lunch during the 2011-12 school year an increase from the previous school year when 45.5 of every 100 received breakfast. Citrus County had a participation rate of 42 for every 100 the same year. Every school district in Florida should examine its breakfast program and look at ways to reach even more children with a healthy morning meal, said Crystal FitzSimons, FRACs director of School and Out-of-School Time Programs. Our research shows that higher participation rates are seen with programs that get breakfast out of the cafeteria and into the hands of children, whether thats moving to breakfast in the classroom or using other creative ways to serve breakfast. School district aims to increase participation ChronicleWith the theme of gardens and blossoms and spring in the air, the Friends of the Citrus County Library Systems semiannual book sale happens this weekend. The first sale in 2001 raised $9,907 and the fall 2012 sale raised $47,143 $11 shy of their highest amount raised at the spring 2010 sale. In all, more than $708,500 has been raised and used to purchase new books and materials for the county library system. Here are four things not to miss at this weekends FOCCLS spring book sale: 1. Garden delights. Look for special offerings such as: a signed edition of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopfs autobiography It Doesnt Take a Hero; the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum illustrated collection Milestones of Aviation; an autographed first edition of Cuba: Island of Paradox by R. Hart Phillips, accompanied by newspaper articles and photos of the period; Bob Woodwards The Price of Politics (2012); Playboy: Fifty Years of Cartoons; a copy of the pocketbook New Testament Bible National Edition issued to World War II soldiers in the original mailing box; The Brass Ring, an illustrated memoir by Bill Mauldin; and The Iliad and the Odyssey translated by Alexander Pope (1883 ed.). Also featured are best-sellers from popular authors including Maeve Binchy, Patricia Cornwell, Michael Connelly, Janet Evanovich, Ken Follett and Stuart Woods. 2. Spring shower of values. Look for blue-light specials, BOGOs (buy one, get one) hourly on Sunday, half-price all day Monday and $3 a bag Tuesday. 3. Bonnets, hats and chapeaux. On Sunday, FOCCLS members will don their favorite spring headwear and invites the public to wear theirs. 4. Weather report: Sunny with a chance of winning an e-reader FOCCLS members will sell chances to win a 2013 Kindle Fire HD, valued at $199, for $5 each. Purchase your tickets at the table at the front of the auditorium look for the balloon. Winner does not need to be present to win. IF YOU GO: WHAT: Friends of the Citrus County Library System Spring Book Sale. WHEN: March 8 to 12. HOURS: 5 to 8 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday. WHERE: Citrus County Auditorium, 3610 S. Florida Ave., Inverness. ADMISSION: Free, except Friday ($5 donation). Bargains in full bloom at FOCCLS semiannual book sale Associated PressTALLAHASSEE Florida lawmakers opened their annual session with speeches and ceremonial pomp Tuesday, tasked by their governor to grant pay raises to teachers, slash taxes to manufacturers and take other steps to help a rebounding economy. And, yes, even a little bit of work marked the kickoff of the 60-day session that began with ceremonial gestures and peaceful protests. The centerpiece of the first day was Gov. Rick Scotts State of the State speech earlier Tuedsay in which he repeatedly used the refrain its working to insist his policies were turning around Floridas economy. The Republican governor urged legislators to embrace his priorities of granting a $2,500 teacher pay raise and creating more incentives for manufacturers and business to come to Florida. But legislators were also scheduled to take up major legislation within hours. The opening day usually guarantees a contingent of protesters. And they were present. About 100 college students and others filled one corner of the Capitol plaza, holding signs that said, The state is ours, I am human and /5 no more, a reference to a constitutional compromise that counted three-fifths of slaves for purposes of representation. They were part of the Dream Defenders, a group interested in a gamut of issues, including immigration and police brutality. Legislature kicks off with pomp, protest Associated PressSEFFNER As crews entombed a man who was swallowed by a sinkhole near Tampa, the earth opened up again just a few miles away. On Tuesday, in a neighboring county, officials investigated reports of a home cracking, perhaps due to another sinkhole. Across Florida this time of year, its the start of whats unofficially considered sinkhole season, State Geologist Jonathan Arthur said. It coincides with the beginning of the states rainy season and usually lasts until the end of summer. The weather along with man-made factors exacerbate sinkholes, experts say. Arthur said February is usually when the state is at its driest, but its also the start of the rainy season. Senate passes ethics bills on opening dayTALLAHASSEE As expected, the Florida Senate passed a pair of ethics bills on the opening day of the 2013 legislative session. The fast-tracked measures (SB 2 and SB 4) each passed on a 40-0 vote Tuesday. There was no debate on either issue. Among other things, the bills seek to stop lawmakers from using political committees to pay for wining, dining and travel unrelated to their positions. It also gives the Ethics Commission power to collect fines from elected officials and allows the governor, state attorneys and the Florida Department of Law enforcement to refer cases to the commission. From wire reports Small ratio of students eat breakfast Were in place to feel kids who do not get to eat. Roy Pistonedirector of food services for Citrus County.

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Build America Bond (BAB) subsidy, which is used for debt service payments on county bonds. The whole amount of the reduction for this program nationwide is $218 million, to lower the fund to $4.047 billion, said Lindsay Ubinas, public information officer. She said County Budget Director Cathy Taylor had received notice of this cut. Our direct subsidy for debt service payments is $330,000 a year for the 2013-14 budget year, Ubinas said. A cut of 5.1 percent amounts to $16,830. That sum will be another challenge when forming next years county budget. In public schools, Florida will lose about $54.5 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 750 teacher and aide jobs at risk. In addition, about 95,000 fewer students would be served and about 130 fewer schools would receive funding. Florida also would lose about $31.1 million in funds for 380 teachers, aides and staff who help children with disabilities. However, Citrus County School District prepared for these cuts, said Kenneth Blocker, assistant superintendent, Business Services. We had planned this year for the sequestration, so we have put aside funds in the IDEA, which is the special needs area of about $275,000 and then Title I, which are the supplemental funds from the federal government (for disadvantaged children) of about $393,000 and then Title II, which is for teacher training, which is about $28,000, Blocker said. So it is a total of about $700,000 that we set aside that we did not budget anticipating sequestration of funds. Next year, Blocker said, the school district would be looking at the same number. Higher education will feel the reductions in work-study jobs. About 6,250 fewer low-income students in Florida would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and 1,700 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college. Dr. Tim Wise, vice president of student affairs at the College of Central Florida (CF), said the college would work with low income students with a number of available private, state and local programs and scholarships to help them with tuition costs. CF serves about 200 low-income students. If we had a work-study student who had to lose their position, we might be able to help them with those dollars, Wise said. As a last resort, Wise said work-study students hours could be cut. Typically, a work-study student works for 15 hours a week for minimum wage. Reducing hours would still offer employment while absorbing the financial impact. Whats challenging is that this is happening way into the financial aid year, Wise said. Essentially, it starts in the fall semester. Here we are in the middle of spring and the financial aid year runs through summer. I really think we could supplant or replace that money if it became necessary. Next year could be a different story depending on how much the cuts are. If the sequester holds, CF will have to determine what it will do next. This could bring a lot of political pressure because who wants to cut the poorest of the poor? Wise asked. Thats not going to be very popular. Its certainly not popular with us. Any time you talk about cutting funds to the poorest students, youre really talking about limiting access. Another budget reduction that may be felt in the county would be the loss of up to $404,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence through the STOP Violence Against Women Program, resulting in up to 1,500 fewer victims being served. But that loss will be an indirect impact, said Diana Finnegan, executive director of CASA (Citrus County Abuse Shelter Association). We do not get direct funding from them, Finnegan said. That is a formula grant program that provides funds to prosecutors, law enforcement, courts and victim services. The purpose of STOP is to build partnerships between courts, victim advocates, service providers, prosecution and law enforcement to reduce violent crimes against women. Although we are not affected directly, we are aware of the work they have done around the state to hold perpetrators accountable and improve safety, Finnegan said. Of course, we are concerned that some of this project may suffer as a result of fewer resources.Contact Chronicle reporter Chris Van Ormer at 352-564-2916 or cvan ormer@chronicleonline.c om. Pat Faherty contributed to this report. CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE HI LO PR 74 38 0.00 HI LO PR 71 32 0.00 HI LO PR 74 35 0.00 HI LO PR 71 33 0.00 HI LO PR 82 40 0.00 HI LO PR 72 34 0.00 YESTERDAYS WEATHER Increasing sunshine, windy and coolerTHREE DAY OUTLOOK Mostly Sunny and cool to mild Mostly sunny, pleasantly mildHigh: 63 Low: 38 High: 64 Low: 39 High: 70 Low: 41TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING THURSDAY & FRIDAY MORNING FRIDAY & SATURDAY MORNING Exclusive daily forecast by: TEMPERATURE* Tuesday 74/35 Record 91/31 Normal 76/48 Mean temp. 55 Departure from mean -7 PRECIPITATION* Tuesday 0.00 in. Total for the month 0.00 in. Total for the year 2.10 in. Normal for the year 6.61 in.*As of 7 p.m. at InvernessUV INDEX: 8 0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate, 7-9 high, 10+ very high BAROMETRIC PRESSURE Tuesday at 3 p.m. 30.12 in. DEW POINT Tuesday at 3 p.m. 45 HUMIDITY Tuesday at 3 p.m. 35% POLLEN COUNT** Grasses and weeds were light and trees were heavy.**Light only extreme allergic will show symptoms, moderate most allergic will experience symptoms, heavy all allergic will experience symptoms.AIR QUALITY Tuesday was good with pollutants mainly ozone. ALMANAC CELESTIAL OUTLOOK SUNSET TONIGHT ............................6:33 P.M. SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:49 A.M. MOONRISE TODAY ...........................2:39 A.M. MOONSET TODAY ............................1:33 P.M. MARCH 11MARCH 19MARCH 27APRIL 3 WATERING RULES BURN CONDITIONS For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestrys Web site: http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire_weather/kbdiTodays Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.City H L Fcast Daytona Bch. 63 43 s Ft. Lauderdale 78 50 pc Fort Myers 72 47 s Gainesville 62 35 s Homestead 78 49 pc Jacksonville 60 35 s Key West 79 59 pc Lakeland 68 39 s Melbourne 67 44 s City H L Fcast Miami 79 50 pc Ocala 64 36 s Orlando 68 42 s Pensacola 57 38 s Sarasota 67 46 s Tallahassee 60 34 s Tampa 66 45 s Vero Beach 69 45 pc W. Palm Bch. 76 48 pc FLORIDA TEMPERATURESNorthwest winds from 20 to 25 knots. Seas 3 to 6 feet. Bay and inland waters will be choppy. Mostly sunny today. Gulf water temperature62 LAKE LEVELSLocation Mon. Tues. Full Withlacoochee at Holder 28.15 28.14 35.52 Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.66 37.66 39.25 Tsala Apopka-Inverness 38.57 38.55 40.60 Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.86 39.84 42.40Levels reported in feet above sea level. Flood stage for lakes are based on 2.33-year flood, the meanannual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year. This data is obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision. In no event will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of this data. If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211. MARINE OUTLOOKTaken at Aripeka THE NATION Albany 41 28 sn 41 28 Albuquerque 60 32 pc 65 40 Asheville 52 34 .68 sn 41 28 Atlanta 65 49 .13 pc 47 31 Atlantic City 49 27 sh 41 35 Austin 68 50 s 65 36 Baltimore 48 27 rs 35 31 Billings 30 6 c 48 30 Birmingham 66 42 .24 pc 50 30 Boise 54 28 sh 51 32 Boston 43 32 rs 42 33 Buffalo 34 20 c 38 30 Burlington, VT 36 24 c 41 29 Charleston, SC 66 41 s 56 37 Charleston, WV 52 31 .16 sn 37 29 Charlotte 57 38 .16 pc 50 32 Chicago 34 29 .58 sn 34 24 Cincinnati 40 36 .10 sn 34 26 Cleveland 36 21 sn 36 25 Columbia, SC 72 37 pc 54 35 Columbus, OH 41 32 .01 sn 34 25 Concord, N.H. 42 26 rs 37 29 Dallas 58 44 pc 60 40 Denver 37 4 s 59 31 Des Moines 33 27 .06 s 32 17 Detroit 36 22 c 38 29 El Paso 64 41 pc 71 48 Evansville, IN 49 33 .09 c 39 26 Harrisburg 44 25 sn 35 31 Hartford 47 29 sh 41 31 Houston 69 56 s 65 41 Indianapolis 37 31 .36 c 33 24 Jackson 69 50 s 54 32 Las Vegas 74 49 pc 72 52 Little Rock 61 44 .08 s 52 31 Los Angeles 61 54 c 60 51 Louisville 48 33 .42 c 37 29 Memphis 64 41 .41 s 49 32 Milwaukee 32 28 .39 sn 34 22 Minneapolis 30 25 .37 pc 30 10 Mobile 74 60 s 59 34 Montgomery 75 48 .06 pc 53 31 Nashville 56 38 .82 pc 43 30 New Orleans 76 60 s 58 41 New York City 49 31 sh 42 33 Norfolk 48 27 .02 sh 47 35 Oklahoma City 50 33 s 52 34 Omaha 34 25 s 36 22 Palm Springs 79 56 s 74 47 Philadelphia 49 31 rs 39 31 Phoenix 81 57 s 81 56 Pittsburgh 44 20 sn 37 26 Portland, ME 44 32 rs 39 30 Portland, Ore 46 42 .05 sh 48 38 Providence, R.I. 47 31 rs 42 32 Raleigh 50 35 .13 rs 46 34 Rapid City 32 5 pc 54 31 Reno 62 31 sn 49 27 Rochester, NY 32 25 c 39 29 Sacramento 59 44 sh 58 40 St. Louis 43 32 .25 s 39 25 St. Ste. Marie 33 10 c 32 22 Salt Lake City 45 25 pc 57 36 San Antonio 69 51 s 67 41 San Diego 60 57 pc 61 52 San Francisco 56 43 sh 55 43 Savannah 70 38 s 56 36 Seattle 49 43 trace sh 48 38 Spokane 40 29 sh 47 32 Syracuse 34 27 c 41 28 Topeka 40 28 s 40 22 Washington 53 32 rs 35 32YESTERDAYS NATIONAL HIGH & LOW HIGH 82 El Centro, Calif. LOW -19 Fraser, Colo. WEDNESDAY CITY H/L/SKY Acapulco 88/71/s Amsterdam 52/41/c Athens 58/49/pc Beijing 61/30/pc Berlin 50/32/s Bermuda 65/62/sh Cairo 71/48/s Calgary 19/10/sf Havana 82/62/pc Hong Kong 70/66/pc Jerusalem 55/41/s Lisbon 62/57/sh London 49/43/c Madrid 53/50/sh Mexico City 73/43/s Montreal 36/23/pc Moscow 28/28/sf Paris 52/47/sh Rio 83/74/sh Rome 54/54/sh Sydney 81/64/pc Tokyo 57/49/pc Toronto 39/30/c Warsaw 49/35/s WORLD CITIES Tuesday Wednesday City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Tuesday Wednesda y City H L Pcp. Fcst H L Weather Central, Madison, Wi. Wednesday ThursdayCity High/Low High/Low High/Low High/LowChassahowitzka* 2:21 p/9:02 a /8:42 p 12:49 a/10:22 a 3:26 p/10:11 p Crystal River** 12:42 p/6:24 a 11:10 p/6:04 p 1:47 p/7:44 a /7:33 p Withlacoochee* 10:29 a/4:12 a 8:57 p/3:52 p 11:34 a/5:32 a 10:22 p/5:21 p Homosassa*** 1:31 p/8:01 a 11:59 p/7:41 p 2:36 p/9:21 a /9:10 p TIDES *From mouths of rivers **At Kings Bay ***At Masons CreekKEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy. SOLUNAR TABLESDATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR (MORNING) (AFTERNOON) 3/6 WEDNESDAY 12:39 6:54 1:08 7:23 3/7 THURSDAY 1:32 7:46 2:00 8:14 FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M. WEDNESDAY HI LO PR 74 35 0.00 Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday. ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday. Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time. Citrus County Utilities customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional watering allowances. To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352527-7669. Todays active pollen: Oak, Nettle, Juniper Todays count: 10.6/12 Thursdays count: 10.1 Fridays count: 10.2 To start your subscription:Call now for home delivery by our carriers:Citrus County: 352-563-5655 Marion County: 888-852-2340 13 weeks: $38.47* 6 months: $67.68* 1 year: $121.87**Subscription price includes a separate charge of .15.5 per day for transportation cost and applicable state and local sales tax. Call 352-563-5655 for details. There will be a $1 adjustment for the Thanksgiving edition. This will only slightly affect your expiration date. The Viewfinder TV guide is available to our subscribers for $13.00 per year.For home delivery by mail:In Florida: $59.00 for 13 weeks Elsewhere in U.S.: $69.00 for 13 weeksTo contact us regarding your service:352-563-5655Call for redelivery: 7 to 10 a.m. any day Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday 7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Main switchboard phone numbers:Citrus County 352-563-6363 Citrus Springs, Dunnellon and Marion County residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.I want to place an ad:To place a classified ad:Citrus 352-563-5966 Marion 888-852-2340 To place a display ad:352-563-5592 Online display ad:352-563-5592 I want to send information to the Chronicle:MAIL: 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429 FAX: Advertising 352-563-5665, Newsroom 352-563-3280 EMAIL: Advertising: advertising@chronicleonline.com Newsroom: newsdesk@chronicleonline.comMeadowcrest office 106 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34450 Inverness officeWhos in charge:Gerry Mulligan ............................................................................Publisher, 563-3222 Trina Murphy............................Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232 Mike Arnold..........................................................................................Editor, 564-2930 Tom Feeney..........................................................Production Director, 563-3275 John Murphy........................................................Circulation Director, 563-3255 Trista Stokes..................................................................Online Manager, 564-2946 Trista Stokes..........................................................Classified Manager, 564-2946Report a news tip:Opinion page questions ..................................................Mike Arnold, 564-2930 To have a photo taken ..........................................Rita Cammarata, 563-5660 News and feature stories....................................Charlie Brennan, 563-3225 Community content ......................................................Sarah Gatling,563-5660 Wire service content ....................................................Brad Bautista,563-5660 Sports event coverage................................Jon-Michael Soracchi,563-3261 Sound Off ................................................................................................................ 563-0579The Chronicle is printed in part on recycled newsprint. Please recycle your newspaper.www.chronicleonline.com Published every Sunday through Saturday By Citrus Publishing Inc.1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429Phone 352-563-6363POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Citrus County Chronicle1624 N. MEADOWCREST BLVD., CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34429 PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT INVERNESS, FL SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280 CITRUSCOUNTY Florida' s BestCommunity Newspaper Serving Floridas Best Community Where to find us:1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL 34429 Blvd. A4WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 Legal notices in todays Cit rus C ounty Chronicle 000E4C8 Meeting Notices . . . . . . . . . . C12 Miscellaneous Notices . . . . . . . . C12 Notice to Creditors/Administration . . C12 Tax Deed Notices . . . . . . . . . . C12 Termination of Parental Rights Notices . C11 Surplus Property . . . . . . . . . . C11 WHERE CUTS WILL GOThe trillion dollars of reductions are targeted in many areas: The U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which oversees licensing, operations and decommissioning of nuclear power plants including Crystal River and the proposed facility in Levy County, is expecting a $52 million budget cut in the next financial year. However, the agency plans to continue normal operations, though it has warned utilities of possible program delays or deferrals. Whatever the unemployment rate, Florida will lose about $2.3 million in funding for job search assistance, referral and placement, meaning around 78,960 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment. Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for 2,700 children in Florida, reducing access to critical early education. Florida would lose about $3.8 million in funds that provide meals for seniors. The county has not been notified about reductions. Support Services receives funding through the Older Americans Act.This funding along with county match dollars and donations provides more than 110,000 meals to seniors at community centers and through the home-delivered meals programs. Currently, there is not a waiting list for the meals program, thanks to increased donations this past year. Any reduction in federal funding would impact the services provided to Citrus County seniors. Up to 1,600 disadvantag ed and vulnerable childr en could lose access to child care, which is essential for working parents to hold down a job. In Florida around 7,450 fewer children will receive vaccines for diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, whooping cough, influenza and Hepatitis B due to reduced funding for vaccinations of $509,000. Florida will lose about $1.8 million in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters and biological, chemical, nuclear and radiological events. In addition, Florida will lose about $5 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in 4,500 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the Florida State Department of Health will lose about $1.4 million, resulting in 35,900 fewer HIV tests. Florida will lose about $970,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives. CUTSContinued from Page A1

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Associated PressWASHINGTON The Dow roared to a record Tuesday. Yet the markets run-up feels worlds away from the lives of many Americans. Here are five reasons why many Americans dont share Wall Streets corkpopping mood:Fewer people have money invested in the stock market, so many missed out on the rally. Americans sold more stocks than they bought for a fifth straight year in 2012, despite unprecedented efforts by the Federal Reserve to juice the market and encourage investment. Americans have sold hundreds of billions of dollars worth of stock the first time on record thats happened during a sustained bull market. The market rise has been powered by companies buying their own stock. The flight from stock markets has coincided with a series of confidence-rattling stumbles: last years botched initial public offerings by Facebook and BATS Global Markets; the 2010 flash crash that sent the Dow plunging 600 points in five minutes; unprecedented volatility related to European and U.S. fiscal policy debates. Confidence in the market was already weak after the harrowing financial crisis that peaked in 2008. Americans who didnt buy stocks early simply havent benefited from the rise that pushed the Dow up 118 percent since its recession low in March 2009.Wages are stagnant and incomes are shrinking. The weak job market is limiting pay. With so many applicants to choose among, employers need not compete for workers by boosting salaries. Hourly wages increased 2.1 percent last year, barely enough to keep up with inflation. Median household incomes fell 4.8 percent between June 2009 and June 2012, after adjusting for inflation, according to a report by Sentier Research, which crunches census and other government data. Meanwhile, Americans are paying down debt. That leaves fewer dollars available for spending.The Social Security tax break is no more. Nearly 80 percent of working Americans are taking home less pay this year because of a tax hike that took effect on Jan. 1. The last-minute tax deal between Congress and President Barack Obama to extend some lower tax rates failed to renew a reduction in Social Security payroll taxes. As a result, the rate increased this year to 6.2 percent from 4.2 percent. The extra 2 percentage points will cost someone making $50,000 about $1,000 a year, and a household with two high-paid workers up to $4,500.Housing may have hit bottom, but it hasnt fully recovered. In a healthy housing market, builders start work on about 1.5 million houses and apartments a year. Last year, they began 780,000. Thats a 41 percent increase from 2009, but not enough to revive big industries like construction that rely on the production of new homes. Home price gains also suggest a slow, uneven healing process. The S&P/Case-Shiller index of home prices started rising in June after 20 straight months of decline. Prices nationwide remain about 30 percent below the peak reached in mid-2006.Despite recent gains, hiring remains slow. The unemployment rate stands at 7.9 percent, an improvement from the 10 percent peak during the recession, but still well above the 5 percent that policymakers strive for during good times. Unemployment affects the broader economy and consumers outlooks in a number of ways. Jobless people contribute less to consumer spending, which accounts for about 70 percent of economic activity. Acrimony over extending long-term benefits for unemployed people has contributed to Washingtons rolling series of budget standoffs, rattling the economy. underway at the college is a program targeting veterans returning to the job marketplace. One in Inverness is Navigating the New World of Work followed by a session on targeted resumes. Both will be repeated in Citrus County later this month. On March 15, a workshop titled Nail that Interview will be held in Inverness. It is designed for individuals who are committed to improving their interviewing skills. And on March 27, the second annual Spring Fling Job Fair will be held the college. It will be an opportunity for job seekers to meet with employers who are hiring and apply for those jobs. This is one of the most robust months weve had in terms of offerings for job-seekersinterested in enhancing their employability skills, Jerry Flanders, Workforce Connections workshop coordinator said. There is something going on every day throughout our threecounty region. Sessions range from two hours to twoand three-days long; all are provided to job seekers at no charge. There is no charge to attend any of the workshops or events, but participants must be fully registered with Workforce Connection through the Employ Florida Marketplace (EFM) at www. EmployFlorida.com; additional workshop registration may also be required. Visit www.Workforce ConnectionFL.com or call 352-291-9559. Anyone seeking a wellpaying occupation that does not require college is invited to the Career Expo and Open House, Thursday, from noon to 2:20 p.m. at Withlacoochee Technical Institute. The event is open to anyone, including high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors interested in seeing what WTI has to offer. We have 10 percent high school students and 90 percent post-secondary students, explained director Denise Willis, at a recent EDC meeting. We have opportunities for students to earn industry credentials. Last year, WTI students earned more than 400 certifications in areas including air conditioning, welding and law enforcement.Contact Chronicle reporter Pat Faherty at 352564-2924 or pfaherty @chronicleonline.com. 7.9 percent today, a reminder that stock gains have proved no elixir for the economy. Still, the Dow high is another sign that the nation is slowly healing after the worst recession since the 1930s. It comes as car sales are at a five-year high, home prices are rising, and U.S. companies continue to report big profits. The stock gains have helped retirement and brokerage accounts held by many Americans recover. That, in turn, has helped push U.S. household wealth nearly back to its peak before the recession, though many in the middle class are still deep in the hole. Most middle-class wealth is tied up in home values, which are still a third below their peak. Good economic news Tuesday helped lift stocks. Retail sales in the 17 European countries that use the euro rose faster than expected, Chinas government said it would support ambitious growth targets, and a report showed U.S. service companies grew last month at their fastest pace in a year. It feels great, says Marty Leclerc, chief investment officer at Barrack Yard Advisors, an investment firm. In early 2009, when stocks were plummeting, it looked like Armageddon was nigh. Its a lot more fun to be in a rising market. In the depths of the recession four years ago, few investors would have predicted such a fast recovery. Some feared another Great Depression. Banks were collapsing, lending was frozen, world trade was plunging, and stocks were in free fall. People thought we were going to relive the 1930s, says Robert Buckland, chief global stock strategist at Citigroup. He calls the stock gains since pretty remarkable. From its peak in October 2007 to its bottom in March 2009, the Dow fell 54 percent. That was far less than the nearly 90 percent drop in the Great Depression but scary nonetheless. There had been 11 previous bear markets since World War II and none had reached 50 percent. As stock rebounds go, this has been an unusually quiet and uncelebrated one. Typically, bull markets are accompanied by rising trading volume, a surge in young companies going public and Internet chatter over hot stocks. The past four years, none of that has happened. Adding to the chastened mood is lingering fear among many investors that stock gains can disappear in a flash.CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 A5 000E8SA 565 Hwy. 41 South, Inverness MON.-FRI. 9-6 SAT. 10-4 SUN. 12-5 FURNITURE DEPOT 352726-4835 000E95D We Have a Train Load of Top Notch New & Used Furniture On New Mattress & Box Springs! $ 295 Free Delivery & Setup and removal of old mattress QUEEN SIZE Save Big Ethan Allen Thomasville Drexel Broyhill Basset GREEK FESTIVAL ART & VENDOR EXPO 2013 FREE PARKING RAIN OR SHINE Delicious Greek Dinners Greek Music & Daily Door Prizes Art & Specialty Merchandise Vendors Greek Pastries, Desserts & Coffee Shoppe Greek Gyros & Grilled Specialties Pony Rides, Face Painting 20 Ft. Slide & Petting Zoo March 8, 9, 10th Indoor Dinners & Outside Grille Friday & Saturday 11a.m. 8p.m. Sunday 11a.m. 5p.m. ADMISSION $1.00 DONATION Presented by: Archangel Michael Greek Orthodox Church 4705 W. Gulf to Lake Blvd. (State Rd. 44), Lecanto, FL www.stmichaelgoc.org (352) 527-0766 Co-Sponsored by: 000E1U0 000E8K2 JOBSContinued from Page A1 Dows back, but many arent celebrating Stock market recovery masks deeper problems still afflicting nations economy DOWContinued from Page A1

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Associated PressNEW YORK Yahoos leaked edict under CEO Marissa Mayer that calls remote workers back to the office lit the Twitterverse on fire, angering advocates of telecommuting and other programs intended to balance work and home life. A new study from the nonprofit Families and Work Institute shows a tide moving the other way, with more workers now telecommuting and men significantly more likely than women to be granted the freedom to work at least partially at home. Left mostly unanswered is the question Mayer appears to be dealing with: Is that a good thing? Or has the rise in telecommuting led to a drop in productivity or creativity? Chances are, one telework supporter said, the tech giant just wasnt doing it right. If you dont know where your people are and what theyre doing, then you havent implemented properly, so shes got her hands full, said Kate Lister in San Diego, Calif., cofounder of Global Workplace Analytics, which collects data on the subject for its Telework Research Network. Slogging through decades of research on the value of telecommuting is complicated. Small studies have been done by employer membership organizations, companies looking at their own ranks, consulting firms and government agencies, along with academics. Some use small samples, others rely on a wild array of statistics from the U.S. Census, the Small Business Administration or the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The verdicts are mixed and the research often so focused on a work force or issue related to flex options that its difficult to make conclusions. The new Families and Work Institute study, on the other hand, deals solely with employers in the United States, delving into a broad range of family friendly programs, policies and benefits. The institute found that 63 percent of employers surveyed allow at least some employees to work partially at home on an occasional basis. Thats up from 34 percent in a comparable study done for the institute in 2005. More of the workers were higher-wage earners. Overall, the number of employees who work entirely from home was 3 percent, compared to 64 percent who sometimes do, said Ellen Galinsky, the institutes president and co-founder. Men were significantly more likely than women to work partially at home 67 percent compared to 59 percent of women, partially a reflection of more men in jobs where the option is possible. Men also were more likely to work mainly from home. Neither Lister nor Galinsky has the inside scoop on whats happening at Yahoo, but Galinsky was steadfast about one thing. To take away all flexibility for everyone all the time is an overreaction, she said. If you know that people will be more innovative and collaborative by being together, that is a positive. But sometimes people need time alone. Why do the best ideas occur in the shower, or when were walking the dog? Galinsky and others who study work-life balance dont anticipate a backlash among other employers due to Yahoo. And the company itself followed up an internal memo leaked to the tech blog All things D with a curt statement indicating the prohibition might not be forever. Meantime, Lister said about 2.5 percent of the U.S. civilian population, or about 3 million people, work at home at least half the time, according to U.S. Census data. The rate of growth was slowed by the recession, with some researchers suggesting its flat at the moment. Why isnt the number even higher? The biggest reason is that managers dont trust their employees, Lister said. Theyre still managing the 21stcentury work force with 20th-century styles of commands and controls, back to the days of sweatshops and typing pools. They like to be able to see the backs of their heads. The perceived benefits for workers are clear. While 37 percent of the companies in Galinskys report cite retention of employees as the main reason for developing workplace flexibility and other programs, Lister said 90 percent of teleworkers feel being able to work flexibly improves their quality of life. But what about for employers? The leaked Yahoo memo, written by Jackie Reses, the companys human resources director, said in part: Some of the best decisions and insights come from hallway and cafeteria discussions, meeting new people and impromptu team meeting. Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home. We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together. Researchers in the field note a dearth in credible studies that confirm a boost in creative flow or innovation from face time. And telecommuting may actually boost productivity, at least where it stands in the number of hours worked, said researchers Mary C. Noonan and Jennifer L. Glass in a study of telecommuting published last June in the Monthly Labor Review, a publication of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The two studied employees who work regularly but not exclusively from home and found that for them, telecommuting was not a substitute for working onsite during an agreed upon work week but rather was in addition to a full week, at least half the time. People have only looked at the benefits without seeing that maybe some of these policies can come back to bite you, said Noonan, a sociologist who teaches classes on the American family and statistics at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Victor Keller, 94BEVERLY HILLSVictor R. Keller, 94, of Beverly Hills, passed away Sunday, March 3, 2013, at Woodland Terrace Nursing Center in Hernando. A native of Budapest, Hungary, he was born Sept. 2, 1918, to Frank and Mary Keller. Mr. Keller moved to Beverly Hills from Elmont, L.I., N.Y., 18 years ago and was a retired general manager for a major parking garage enterprise in New York City, a career that lasted 35 years. Victor was a gifted and talented artist and expressed this passion with oil and woodcarving mediums. He is survived by his wife of 20 years, Nell B. Luccioni of Beverly Hills; son, Don Keller (wife Judy Lamb), The Villages, Fla.; daughter, Vicki Warnock (husband Patrick), Freehold, N.J.; son, Mitchell Keller, Tucson, Ariz.; daughter-in-law, Helen Keller, Palm Bay, Fla.; grandchildren, John, Richard Jr., Donna, Laura and Victor; and greatgrandchildren, Daniel, David, Brendan, Connor, Amy and R.J. Victor was preceded in death by a son, Richard Keller; and a halfbrother, Frank Nemeth. Fero Funeral Home, Beverly Hills. www.fero funeralhome.com. Mary Wilmarth, 90HOMOSASSAMary E. Wilmarth, 90, of Homosassa, died Friday, March 1, 2013, at her home. Heinz Funeral Home & Cremation, Inverness. Harrison Rogers, 61INVERNESSHarrison Rogers, 61, Inverness, died Tuesday, March 5, 2013, at his residence. Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home with Crematory is in charge of private arrangements. A6WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE OBITUARIES The Citrus County Chronicles policy permits free and paid obituaries. Email obits@chronicle online. com or phone 352-563-5660 for details and pricing options. Deadline is 3 p.m. for obituaries to appear in the next days edition. Obituaries must be verified with the funeral home or society in charge of the arrangements. A flag will be included for free for those who served in the U.S. military. (Please note this service when submitting a free obituary.) Free obituaries, run one day, can include: full name of deceased; age; hometown/state; date of death; place of death; date, time and place of visitation and funeral services. Obituaries Special to the ChronicleFrom left are John J.J. Kenney, commissioner; Dennis Damato, commissioner; Rebecca Bays, commissioner; Pat Coles, Support Services operations supervisor; Amy Engelken, assistant Community Services director; Scott Adams, commissioner; and Joe Meek, commission chair. March for Meals in Citrus County Special to the ChronicleThe Citrus County Board of County Commissioners has declared March as March for Meals month in Citrus County at the regular meeting of the Board of County Commissioners. This event is a national campaign from the Meals on Wheels Association of America, which brings awareness of senior hunger issues. Citrus Countys program is Home Delivered Meals, which delivers food to seniors who need it throughout Citrus County. The program is funded two ways: a federal grant under the Older Americans Act of 1965 and several fundraisers throughout the year. For more information on any of these events or about any of the Senior Programs, call Support Services at 352-527-5975. UPCOMING EVENTS 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 22 Under the Stars Dance; Citrus County Resource Center, 2804 W. Marc Knighton Court, Lecanto. Tickets $10. 8 a.m. Saturday, March 30 Golf for Meals tournament; Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club; $55 entry per golfer. Telecommuting: Was Yahoo doing it right? Associated PressYahoo CEO Marissa Mayer appears Feb. 20 on NBC News Today show in New York to introduce the websites redesign. As Mayer goes about the business of saving Yahoo, which now involves a ban on working from home, a new study shows a significant jump in the number of U.S. employers offering flex time and other quality-of-life perks. 000E8BO Lecanto 11:00 am Monday, March 11, 2013 Holiday Inn Express 903 E. Gulf to Lake Highway RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION: 1-888-685-1594 (toll free) www.LargoMedical.com 000E5ZC Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons Ward Eye Center 8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa (352) 489-3579 (352) 628-0123 MODERN MODERN DIABETIC DIABETIC SPECIALIST SPECIALIST 000E35Y RISE RISE Construction Construction Visit our new showroom in downtown Inverness 352.419.8900 352.419.8900 109 W. Main St., Inverness, FL 34452 www.riseconstructions We specialize in: Kitchen Remodeling, Bathroom Remodeling, Outdoor Living, Patios, Pavers, Gazebos 000E9DZ Cellular & Roman Shades Plantation Shutters Ado Wraps Custom Drapery Top Treatments Etc. 628-7888 CALL NOW! Lorrie 5454 S. Suncoast Blvd. (Hwy 19, next to Sugarmill Family Rest.) www.verticalblindsofhomosassa.com OF HOMOSASSA, Inc. More Than Just Verticals 2011 2011 2011 2011 2 Faux Wood Woven Woods 000DWD3 Funeral Home With Crematory Chas. E. Davis Chas. E. Davis 726-8323 AILEEN FITZPATRICK Pending LYDIA WINANT Private Florida National Cemetery JOSEPH LOPEZ Private Arrangements ANTONIO REYES Service: Fri. 3:00 PM Closing time for placing ad is 4 business days prior to run date.There are advanced deadlines for holidays. To Place YourIn Memory ad,Judy Moseley at 564-2917jmoseley@chronicleonline.com 1901 SE H WY 19 C RYSTAL R IVER 352-795-2678 Your Trusted Family-Owned Funeral Home for 50 Years trickland S Funeral Home and Crematory www.stricklandfuneralhome.com 000DU38 Funeral Directors C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L. Pace

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 A7 000E8P2 Homosassa Springs Plaza 3944 S. Suncoast (Next to Publix) (352) 621-7528 Dr. Henry Meer BOARD CERTIFIED OPTOMETRIC PHYSICIAN

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A8WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000E8A7 Prices Good Wednesday, March 6 through Tuesday, March 12, 2013 *Floor Prep & Trims at Additional Cost. Min. labor charges may apply. All Prior Sales Excluded. See store for details. **While Supplies Last. V isit us at www.cashcarpetandtile.com 776 N. Enterprise Pt., Lecanto 746-7830 341-0355 Next to Stokes Flea Market on Hwy. 44 Mohawk Floating Oak Flooring 3/8 Multi Ply Engineered Construction Unilin Locking System Natural Red Oak Finish $ 4 59 Now Sq Ft Material Only 3/8 Strand Woven Bamboo w/Unilin w/Unilin Locking System Locking System $ 3 99 Sale 2 Times Harder Than Red Oak 25 Yr Residential/15 Yr Commercial Warranty Choose From, Natural, Carbonized, o r Tiger 2010 20 2010 Sq. Ft. Material Only MARINE CARPET 8 WIDE 89 SF Blue, Gray & Brown MATERIAL ONLY ECONOMICAL PLUSH SALE! WITH 7/16 CUSHION $ 1 49 SF INSTALLED TARKETT VINYL Choose from in stock patterns $ 1 59 SF INSTALLED PORCH CARPET $ 1 29 SF INSTALLED From Click Lock Vinyl Plank NAFCO VINYL PLANK SF INSTALLED SHAW NYLON 40 oz. $ 2 79 SF INSTALLED SOFT TOUCH BERBER $ 2 59 SF INSTALLED NATURAL SLATE 20 mil wear layer 100% Waterproof Easy Do-it-yourself Installation $ 3 69 $ 3 99 Was Material Only Sq. Ft. Material Only $ 2 97 Exclusive High-Tech Tritonite Wear-layer 15 Yr Residential Warranty 6 Wood Grain patterns to choose from $ 2 59 Clearance Clearance Clearance 3/8 Thick Unglazed Textured Finish with Random Variation in Tone 10 Pieces Per Box Textured Saxony Cut Pile Lifetime Soil & Stain Warranty Full 50 Color Designer Palette Durability of Berber with Soft-Touch Feel Lifetime Stain Warranty Solid & Berber Fleck Palette 20 X 20 PORCELAIN TILE $ 1 79 Sq. Ft. Material Only Durable Porcelain Body Several Patterns to Select From In-Stock Limited Quantities Starting At Starting Starting At At Sale Sale Sale Sale Sale Sale Sale Sale Only

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Associated PressDETROIT Ford Motor Co. said Tuesday it sold a record 11,600 natural gas vehicles last year, more than four times the number it sold two years ago. Its the latest sign natural gas is making inroads as a transportation fuel, particularly for truck fleets, buses and taxis. The consumer market is tougher to crack, but sales are gaining there as well. Natural gas is cheap and plentiful in the U.S. after a spike in production that began in the middle of last decade. At the same time, the price of gasoline and diesel fuel has jumped more than 30 percent. That makes natural gas which also emits fewer greenhouse gases an increasingly attractive option for truck companies and municipalities. But while natural gas may be a good choice for snow plows and trash trucks, which go relatively short distances and can refuel at city-owned pumps, its a tougher call for ordinary consumers. Natural gas cars cost more and there are few public places to refuel them. Those issues need to be addressed if the vehicles are to significantly boost their share of the auto market, which is currently less than 1 percent. General Motors Co. and Chrysler Group recently added natural gas pickup trucks to their lineups. Honda Motor Co. is seeing more interest in its natural gas Civic with record U.S. sales of nearly 2,000 last year and industry experts expect more offerings for regular buyers in the next year or two. Natural gas vehicles arent new. Fords previous peak sales, of 5,491, were in 2001. But they fell out of favor later that decade when the price of natural gas spiked. Ford stopped selling natural gas vehicles in 2004 and didnt start making them again until 2009. During those five years, new technology unlocked vast reserves of natural gas in deep rock formations, creating a glut that has depressed prices. Compressed natural gas or CNG now costs between $1.79 to $3.49 per gallon in the U.S. depending on the location, compared with an average of $3.74 for gasoline and $4.12 for diesel, according to Clean Energy, which operates natural gas fueling stations, and AAA. Its even cheaper for corporate or government buyers, who may pay as little as 80 cents per gallon for their natural gas, according to CNG Now, an industry lobbying group. In the U.S., CNG is sold in units that have the energy equivalent of a gallon of gasoline. No one is quite sure how many natural gas vehicles are on the road. Honda and Chrysler are the only companies that make CNG-ready vehicles in their own factories. Ford and GM make vans and trucks prepared to run on CNG, or on a combination of gasoline and CNG, but rely on outside companies to add about $10,000 worth of equipment, including the natural gas tank. Some drivers convert their cars and trucks on their own. GE, which is currently developing a home fueling station, estimates 250,000 natural gas vehicles are currently in use in the United States. Dave Hurst, a principal research analyst with Pike Research, a division of the consulting firm Navigant, estimates that 20,381 natural gas vehicles were sold in the U.S. in 2012. Ford sold more than half of those, but big truck makers like Navistar and Freightliner and bus makers like New Flyer were also in the mix. Hurst estimates 1,600 CNG buses and 1,500 CNG garbage trucks were sold last year. Hurst expects CNG vehicle sales to grow by 10 percent per year through 2019, when hes forecasting sales of 39,864. In a market where 16 million new cars and trucks are sold each year, thats still less than 1 percent. BUSINESSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 A9 Money&MarketsAclick of the wrist gets you more at www.chronicleonline.com 1,350 1,400 1,450 1,500 1,550 SONDJF 1,480 1,520 1,560 S&P 500Close: 1,539.79 Change: 14.59 (1.0%) 10 DAYS 12,500 13,000 13,500 14,000 14,500 SONDJF 13,760 14,040 14,320 Dow Jones industrialsClose: 14,253.77 Change: 125.95 (0.9%) 10 DAYSAdvanced2249 Declined800 New Highs448 New Lows30 Vol. (in mil.)3,494 Pvs. Volume3,331 1,841 1,688 1729 712 255 24 NYSE NASD DOW 14286.3714127.8214253.77+125.95+0.89%+8.77% DOW Trans.6162.846044.676136.72+92.05+1.52%+15.64% DOW Util.489.57485.78488.25+2.47+0.51%+7.76% NYSE Comp.9000.578939.998978.09+77.04+0.87%+6.33% NASDAQ3227.313200.273224.13+42.10+1.32%+6.78% S&P5001543.471525.201539.79+14.59+0.96%+7.97% S&P4001117.411101.961116.67+14.71+1.33%+9.43% Wilshire 500016292.3316103.4716258.46+154.99+0.96%+8.43% Russell 2000928.13920.08927.40+10.72+1.17%+9.19% HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. YTD StocksRecap AK Steel Hold AKS3.4218.65 3.48-.06 -1.7ttt-24.3-53.7dd... AT&T Inc T29.95838.58 36.60+.37 +1.0sss+8.6+23.1291.80f Ametek Inc AME29.86042.45 42.22+.52 +1.2sss+12.4+32.4220.24 Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD64.99094.75 94.70+.17 +0.2sss+8.3+43.31.57e Bank of America BAC6.72912.42 11.55+.14 +1.2stt-0.5+40.8440.04 Capital City Bank CCBG6.35012.23 11.95+.04 +0.3sts+5.1+58.8cc... CenturyLink Inc CTL32.05343.43 35.23+.12 +0.3stt-9.9-4.5282.16m Citigroup C24.61044.71 43.60+.66 +1.5sss+10.2+26.0140.04 Commnwlth REIT CWH13.46925.25 23.12-.78 -3.3tss+46.0+35.0411.00 Disney DIS40.88055.95 56.48+.68 +1.2sss+13.4+33.5180.75f Duke Energy DUK59.63071.13 70.16+.45 +0.6sss+10.0+15.3203.06 EPR Properties EPR40.04950.19 48.91+.42 +0.9sss+6.1+14.1253.16f Exxon Mobil Corp XOM77.13893.67 89.61+.66 +0.7sts+3.5+5.792.28 Ford Motor F8.82814.30 12.87+.12 +0.9stt-0.6+2.2100.40f Gen Electric GE18.02023.75 23.59+.32 +1.4sss+12.4+26.5180.76 Home Depot HD46.12070.30 70.47+.18 +0.3sss+13.9+50.7231.56f Intel Corp INTC19.23329.27 21.51+.24 +1.1sss+4.3-17.7100.90 IBM IBM181.859211.79 206.53+1.34 +0.7sss+7.8+4.9143.40 LKQ Corporation LKQ14.63723.99 20.48-.18 -0.9stt-2.9+27.924... Lowes Cos LOW24.76039.98 38.76+.33 +0.9sss+9.1+38.8230.64 McDonalds Corp MCD83.318100.44 95.81+.74 +0.8sss+8.6-1.5183.08 Microsoft Corp MSFT26.26432.95 28.35+.20 +0.7sss+6.1-9.6150.92 Motorola Solutions MSI44.49062.51 62.97+.47 +0.8sss+13.1+24.8211.04 NextEra Energy NEE59.19073.76 73.88+.29 +0.4sss+6.8+27.2162.64f Penney JC Co Inc JCP15.69139.73 14.96-1.78 -10.6ttt-24.1-56.5dd... Piedmont Office RT PDM14.62020.00 19.97+.25 +1.3sss+10.6+15.3360.80 Regions Fncl RF5.4608.00 7.92+.07 +0.9sts+11.1+32.4110.04 Sears Holdings Corp SHLD38.40285.90 46.63+2.46 +5.6sts+12.7-37.4dd... Smucker, JM SJM73.20096.64 97.10+.46 +0.5sss+12.6+29.2212.08 Sprint Nextel Corp S2.3006.04 5.87+.04 +0.7sss+3.5+133.2dd... Texas Instru TXN26.06034.66 35.00+.44 +1.3sss+13.3+7.6221.12f Time Warner TWX33.62054.16 55.05+.89 +1.6sss+15.1+48.7181.60f UniFirst Corp UNF55.86988.35 84.39+.09 +0.1rss+15.1+43.4170.15 Verizon Comm VZ36.80048.77 47.69+.58 +1.2sss+10.2+27.1cc2.06 Vodafone Group VOD24.42530.07 26.68+1.31 +5.2sts+5.9-1.11.53e WalMart Strs WMT57.18977.60 73.72+.46 +0.6sss+8.0+26.8151.88f Walgreen Co WAG28.53042.00 40.72-1.05 -2.5tts+10.0+31.0181.10 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIVStocks of Local Interest Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yie ld not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd Loss in last 12 months. A group of investors disclosed a minority stake in the carbon fiber maker and requested a meeting to oust the companys board. The retailers chairman and CEO, Edward Lampert, disclosed that he bought another 1.24 million shares of the companys common stock. A Jefferies analyst reiterated his Buy rating on the Internet search company and said that its stock price might reach $1,000. The fitness equipment maker posted strong fourth-quarter results, saying that earnings grew more than fourfold to $13.6 million. The Deerfield, Ill.-based drugstore chain said that sales from stores open at least a year fell 0.6 percent in February. The Dow Jones industrial average rose to a record high Tuesday following encouraging reports on the global economy. Strong corporate profit growth and stimulus from the Federal Reserve has helped the Dow more than double since hitting its low in March 2009. 35 40 $45 DJF WalgreenWAG Close: $40.72 -1.05 or -2.5% $28.53 $42.00 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 12.8m (1.9x avg.) $38.48 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 18.4 2.7% 2 4 6 $8 DJF NautilusNLS Close: $6.69 0.73 or 12.2% $2.20$6.92 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.4m (4.1x avg.) $206.77 m 52-week range PE: Yield: 30.4 ... 600 700 800 $900 DJF GoogleGOOG Close: $838.60 17.10 or 2.1% $ 556.52 $840.15 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 4.0m (1.7x avg.) $224.33 b 52-week range PE: Yield: 26.3 ... 35 40 45 $50 DJF Sears HoldingsSHLD Close: $46.63 2.46 or 5.6% $38.40 $85.90 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 1.7m (1.5x avg.) $4.96 b 52-week range PE: Yield: ... ... 6 8 10 $12 DJF ZoltekZOLT Close: $10.52 1.27 or 13.7% $6.02$12.10 Vol.: Mkt. Cap: 2.0m (4.7x avg.) $361.47 m 52-week range PE: Yield: 15.9 ... The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.90 percent Tuesday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO 3.25 3.25 3.25 .13 .13 .13 PRIME RATE FED FUNDS 3-month T-bill.080.08....06 6-month T-bill.110.12-0.01.14 52-wk T-bill.150.15....15 2-year T-note.250.24+0.01.30 5-year T-note.780.76+0.02.87 10-year T-note1.901.88+0.022.01 30-year T-bond3.113.09+0.023.15 NET 1YR BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO Barclays LongT-BdIdx2.812.80+0.012.66 Bond Buyer Muni Idx4.054.03+0.024.59 Barclays USAggregate1.861.85+0.012.11 Barclays US High Yield5.735.76-0.037.02 Moodys AAACorp Idx3.853.83+0.023.83 Barclays CompT-BdIdx1.061.05+0.011.10 Barclays US Corp2.762.74+0.023.27 YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO Commodities The price of crude oil climbed higher with stock markets around the world, rebounding from its lowest level of the year. Silver, platinum and prices for other metals also rose.Crude Oil (bbl)90.8290.12+0.78-1.1 Ethanol (gal)2.432.40...+11.1 Heating Oil (gal)2.972.92+1.85-2.4 Natural Gas (mm btu)3.533.53...+5.3 Unleaded Gas (gal)3.153.10+1.61+12.0 FUELS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Gold (oz)1574.601572.10+0.16-6.0 Silver (oz)28.5628.46+0.37-5.3 Platinum (oz)1585.701566.20+1.25+3.1 Copper (lb)3.503.48+0.39-4.0 Palladium (oz)732.60712.50+2.82+4.3 METALS CLOSEPVS. %CHG%YTD Cattle (lb)1.301.30-0.56-0.2 Coffee (lb)1.411.46-3.73-2.3 Corn (bu)7.327.23+1.24+4.8 Cotton (lb)0.860.85+1.25+14.4 Lumber (1,000 bd ft)387.30387.20+0.03+3.6 Orange Juice (lb)1.241.24-0.36+6.4 Soybeans (bu)14.9714.90+0.42+5.5 Wheat (bu)6.966.96+0.04-10.5 AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CHG%YTD American Funds BalAm 21.55+.14 +5.6+13.2+11.3+6.1 BondAm 12.89... -0.1+4.0+5.8+4.2 CapIncBuAm 54.76+.32 +3.8+11.0+9.2+3.3 CpWldGrIAm 39.14+.39 +5.2+13.9+8.4+1.9 EurPacGrAm 42.63+.41 +3.4+10.3+5.9+0.9 FnInvAm 43.75+.42 +7.3+15.3+11.3+3.8 GrthAmAm 36.73+.35 +6.9+15.8+10.6+3.8 IncAmerAm 18.93+.12 +4.8+12.6+11.2+5.7 InvCoAmAm 32.21+.30 +6.8+13.7+10.0+3.9 NewPerspAm 33.20+.32 +6.2+15.5+10.1+4.1 WAMutInvAm 33.54+.27 +7.5+14.5+13.1+4.8 Dodge & Cox Income 13.91-.01 +0.4+5.1+6.3+7.1 IntlStk 36.12+.43 +4.3+12.8+6.3+1.0 Stock 133.03+1.48 +9.1+21.2+11.9+3.5 Fidelity Contra 82.52+.82 +7.4+12.9+12.7+5.5 LowPriStk d 42.09+.42 +6.6+13.4+13.0+7.5 Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 54.72+.52 +8.4+15.4+12.9+5.2 FrankTemp-Franklin Income Am 2.29+.01 +3.8+12.8+10.6+6.1 FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond Am 13.50+.04 +1.5+9.0+7.4+8.9 GlBondAdv 13.45+.03 +1.5+9.2+7.7+9.2 Harbor IntlInstl d 64.11+.64 +3.2+9.2+8.0+1.2 PIMCO TotRetAm 11.24... +0.3+7.2+6.6+7.5 T Rowe Price GrowStk 40.50+.39 +7.2+12.3+13.4+6.4 Vanguard 500Adml 142.38+1.35 +8.4+15.4+12.9+5.3 500Inv 142.35+1.35 +8.4+15.3+12.8+5.1 GNMAAdml 10.87... 0.0+2.1+5.1+5.9 MuIntAdml 14.40-.02 +0.7+4.5+5.5+5.8 STGradeAd 10.83... +0.3+3.3+3.5+3.9 Tgtet2025 14.25+.10 +4.9+10.5+9.6+4.7 TotBdAdml 11.03... -0.1+3.2+5.5+5.7 TotIntl 15.44+.15 +3.1+8.6+5.2-0.7 TotStIAdm 38.72+.38 +8.6+15.6+13.2+5.9 TotStIdx 38.70+.38 +8.6+15.4+13.1+5.8 Welltn 35.74+.23 +5.6+12.2+10.4+6.2 WelltnAdm 61.73+.40 +5.6+12.3+10.5+6.3 TOTALRETURN FAMILYFUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*MutualFunds* Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week. Interestrates Dow keeps going Associated PressNEW YORK The Dow closed at an all-time high Tuesday, beating the previous record it set in October 2007, before the financial crisis and Great Recession. The Dow Jones industrial average closed at 14,253.77, up 125.95 points, or 0.89 percent. The index jumped from the opening bell, climbed as much as 158 points early and peaked at 14,286. Twenty seven stocks in the 30-member Dow advanced, with industrial companies leading the gains. The gains represent a remarkable comeback for the stock market. The Dow has more than doubled since falling to a low of 6,547 in March 2009 following the financial crisis and the onset of the Great Recession. Stocks have rebounded sharply since then, helped by stimulus from the Federal Reserve, even as the economic recovery has been slow and steady. Whether they want to admit it or not, everyone is very impressed with the resilience of the market, said Alec Young, a global equity strategist at S&P Capital IQ. The last time the Dow was this high, Apple had just sold its first iPhone and George W. Bush had another year as president. The U.S. housing market had yet to bottom, and the financial crisis that brought down Lehman Brothers was still a year away. The recovery in stocks may even have been quicker had memories of the financial systems near-collapse not been on investors minds, said Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist at Banyan Partners. Its still pretty close to the front of peoples brains, he said. Thats one of the reasons that people are hesitant to invest in the stock market. The Standard & Poors 500 index rose 15 points, or 1 percent, to 1,539.79, within striking distance of its own record close of 1,565. The Nasdaq composite gained 42 points, or 1.3 percent, to 3,224.13. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose two basis point to 1.90 percent. Gold rose $2, 0.1 percent, to $1,574 and oil advanced 59 cents, to $90.71. +1.4% AP World markets How key international stock markets performed: Milan FTSE MIB Paris CAC40 Sydney ASX All Ordinaries Tokyo Nikkei Zurich Swiss Market Index 15,964.89 3,787.19 5,088.15 11,683.45 7,718.46 Amsterdam AEX 339.58 346.50 +2.0% Brussels BEL20 2,590.68 2,541.90 +1.9% Frankfurt DAX 7,870.31 7,691.68 +2.3% Hong Kong Hang Seng 22,560.50 22,537.81 +0.1% London FTSE 100 6,431.95 6,345.63 15,542.17 +2.7% 3,709.76 +2.1% 5,028.53 +1.2% 11,652.29 +0.3% 7,590.52 +1.7% Previous close Todays close % change Natural gas vehicles making inroads; sales rising Associated PressGarvin Cui fuels up his natural gas vehicle Sept. 4, 2008, at a Clean Energy station in San Francisco. New technology has unlocked vast reserves of natural gas in deep rock formations, creating a natural gas glut that has depressed prices. That makes natural gas more attractive as a transportation fuel. 000E5ZJ Next to ACE in Homosassa ( 352 ) 628-3443 License #DN 17606 Ledgerdentistry.com FREE SECOND OPINION. We Cater to Cowards! General & Cosmetic Dentistry HONEST PROFESSIONAL COMPASSIONATE Most Insurance Accepted Se Habla Espaol 000E961 Are Moles and Gophers Killing Your Lawn? WE CAN CONTROL GOPHERS & MOLES GUARANTEED! Call today for a free lawn analysis. The Gopher & Mole Patrol 352-279-9444

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Page A10WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 Time to move on from BenghaziWhy cant Congress get over Benghazi? Four Americans were killed at our embassy when a mob including terrorists attacked. They were not the first embassy killings and wont be the last. The secretaries of State and Defense, the director of the CIA and the top military officer have all testified before Congress. It is a dangerous world and our embassies in many places are being turned into forts. Our Baghdad embassy cost $200 million. I have seen our embassy in Lima and it is a fort located away from downtown. Other more serious loss of life has occurred without investigations. When President Reagan sent a Marine unit to Lebanon and a suicide bomber killed 253, all Americans grieved. When 3,000 Americans were killed by planes crashing into the two World Trade buildings and the Pentagon, there were no investigations. Shortly before the attack, Kenneth Clarke, the chief terrorist authority in the Bush administration, resigned because warnings were ignored. At the same time, FBI agents in Minneapolis and Phoenix reported that Mideastern men were taking flying lessons but didnt want to learn how to take off or land. America paid $1 million to each family of those who died. Once again Americans grieved, but there was no investigation. When Gov. Romney tried to make something out of Benghazi during the presidential debates, the issue got no traction and he admitted that President Obama had done an excellent job in foreign relations. Its past time that Congress stopped wasting time and get to work on Americas business.Stan Clewett Homosassa Rick Scott campaigned for governor on the promise of running Florida like a big business, but the one big business that Florida actually runs is out of control. Citizens Property Insurance Corp. was created a decade ago, supposedly to help residents afford hurricane coverage for their homes. With 1.3 million policyholders, Citizens is the states largest insurer of property. And its been managed about as carefully as amateur night at your local strip joint. In fact, thats where one happy Citizens worker liked to use his company credit card. Last year, Citizens jacked up its rates almost 11 percent, and now it wants legislative approval to go much, much higher. The cost of insuring a home already is one of the heaviest financial loads carried by Florida families. If you wonder what happens to all the hefty premiums, an investigative series by the Miami Heraldand the Tampa Bay Timespresents an enlightening snapshot. Basically, the moneys flying all over the place. According to the states chief inspector, Citizens employees and some board members somehow piled up $1.3 million in travel expenses between Jan. 1 and Aug. 31 last year. The tab includes a $633-anight hotel stay in Bermuda for the company Chief Financial Officer Sharon Binnun, as well as expensive visits to Switzerland and London. She jetted through a total of four countries and racked up $35,000 in charges. Citizens customers (and Im one of them) are rightfully curious about the pretense upon which a Florida insurance executive would travel to such exotic places and claim it as a business trip. Meanwhile, senior managers who werent flying anywhere still got reimbursed on more than 50 occasions for meals in their own hometowns. Thats a sweet deal for them, but a sour one for policy holders and taxpayers who bailed out the company after the last bad storm season. Despite the swelling scandal about overspending at Citizens, the current president, Barry Gilway, handed out fat raises to loyal executives including Binnun, his passport-flashing CFO. Scott has expressed dismay over the unseemly pay hikes and exorbitant travel, and wants to ban board members from international jaunts. His long view is to shrink Citizens and attract other big insurance firms into Florida as competition, which he says will lead to lower premiums. Stop laughing. The man really said that. Citizens was devised as a choice of last resort because real insurance companies were bailing out of the state. They didnt want to pay out any more hurricane claims. To now suggest theyre eager to come back to the market and actually lower their rates confirms the governor is living in some weird, parallel universe. Hes not alone lawmakers are pushing the same idea, which will send premiums through the roof. The problem with Citizens is not that its backed by the state. The problem is that Tallahassee isnt paying attention to what the companys doing. Start with the big stuff $604 million in outside contracts with private vendors, often in the absence of bidding. Or the $2.5 million Citizens accidentally overpaid to another insurance company (the funds were discovered by a state auditor and recouped). On a smaller scale, one enterprising underwriter used the Citizens mailroom and computers to promote her line of female sex toys battery-operated entertainment for those long hurricane power outages. The underwriter was eventually fired, though other workers who ran side businesses on company time were not. An investigation by Citizens own Office of Corporate Integrity showed that the company had spent more than $2.4 million hiring lawyers to investigate various allegations of internal misconduct. More unsettling: Citizens paid out about $750,000 in severance to employees, many of whom had been caught doing wrong. One executive who allegedly had an affair with a coworker received a total bye-bye package of $120,000. Soon after its Office of Corporate Integrity began to reveal misspending and misdeeds at the top level, Citizens responded decisively. It fired the four investigators and disbanded the Office of Corporate Integrity. Even Rick Scott says there might be something fishy about that. Under pressure, Citizens last week made public a list of 474 internal complaints that ran the gamut from workplace pornography to fraud, theft and discrimination. The companys Internal Auditor, Joe Martins, says Citizens did a sterling job of handling all these cases. Hes also the same stiff who abolished the Office of Corporate Integrity. Clearly the leadership of Citizens has forgotten who its working for, and where its billions in cash are flowing from the people of Florida. They might not get to vote on their insurance company, but they do get to vote for their governor and their legislators. Keep raising the premiums, and watch for a storm in November.Carl Hiaasen is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Readers may write to him at: 1 Herald Plaza, Miami, Fla., 33132. Those who live by electronics die by electronics. Sic semper tyrannis.Kurt Vonnegut, Player Piano, 1952 This Florida citizen outraged by Citizens insurance CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE Founded by Albert M. Williamson You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus EDITORIAL BOARDGerry Mulligan ....................................publisherMike Arnold ..............................................editorCharlie Brennan ........................managing editorCurt Ebitz ..................................citizen memberMac Harris ................................citizen memberRebecca Martin ..........................guest memberBrad Bautista ....................................copy chief Hospital boards should focus on their mission, not on litigation Citrus Memorial Health Systems mission statement claims it exists to improve the health and quality of life of the people and communities it serves. We urge the hospital systems two governing boards to adhere to its mission statement, and realize further legal wrangling over governance is taking them further and further afield from it. Since 2009, far too much public money and human capital has been flushed away in the war between governorappointed Trustees of the Citrus County Hospital Board, which owns the hospital system, and members of the Citrus Memorial Health Foundation board, which leases it from the Trustees and operates the health system. In recent months, it seemed reconciliation was under way. Members of the two boards met without lawyers, agreed to drop a number of pending lawsuits and talked about important shared issues. The only legal matter still pending was the Foundations appeal on the constitutionality of a 2011 law giving oversight power to the Trustees. The appeals court decision was handed down in February, in favor of the Foundations position. The next sound was the Trustees legal engines cranking up again to continue the fight. The big issue: How many members of each group should sit on the combined board? The Trustees want a 5-5-1 format five trustees, five foundation board members plus the hospitals chief of the medical staff. The foundation board wants to keep its current membership. This governance infighting is incredibly disruptive especially now when the valuation of the hospital and its assets are being considered, per state law, for the possibility of a sale or lease. Its past time for a resolution. To members of both boards we say: Get past this power tug-of-war, and get re-focused on your mission. THE ISSUE:Hospital governance wrangling continues.OUR OPINION:Get past this, and focus on your mission. OPINIONS INVITED The opinions expressed in Chronicle editorials are the opinions of the newspapers editorial board.Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons, columns or letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial board. Groups or individuals are invited to express their opinions in a letter to the editor. Persons wishing to address the editorial board should call 352563-5660.All letters must be signed and include a phone number and hometown, including letters sent via email. Names and hometowns will be printed; phone numbers will not be published or given out.We reserve the right to edit letters for length, libel, fairness and good taste.Letters must be no longer than 600 words, and writers will be limited to four letters per month. SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax to 352-563-3280, or email to letters@chronicleonline.com .LETTERSto the Editor Florida has no moneyThis is a comment about Rick Scotts expansion of Medicaid along with Obamacare. Well, for one thing, wheres the money coming from? Floridas almost bankrupt. Its economy is suffering just like the rest of the nation. Obamacare is going to kill the middle class and poor, hardworking persons. I myself (am) in that category. Now, in addition to me having to provide for my own family and provide my own medical insurance and help my children, Ill have to be the one paying for all these poor people. How come I dont have free health insurance? I chose to work my whole life and to provide for my family.A lot of these poor people dont want to work two and three jobs to provide for their family. Now they can get it for nothing. So Im glad the Tea Party has withdrawn support for Rick Scott.Boycott camerasLets all band together and boycott all the cities that have the rip-off red-light cameras installed. Please bring back our friendly Florida.Armadillos and ammoniaTo the person who wishes to get rid of armadillos ruining their yard: Just place rags soaked in ammonia where theyre digging and that will keep all the critters away and your wish will come true. THE CHRONICLEinvites you to call Sound Off with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record. COMMENTSwill be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers. SOUND OFFCALL563-0579 At least talk about itIm calling in regard to the recent Chronicle reporting on the board of county commissioner meetings. It seems to me that a majority of the board of county commissioners think new taxes are the only way to balance the budget. You know, theyve hired a consultant to tell them how to do it without calling it a new tax. Cutting expenses is not receiving any serious consideration. Personnel costs is a major component of the budget and it needs to be considered for cuts. Scott Adams has put forth some ideas on cutting personnel expenses but has been ignored. I believe County Commission Chairman Joe Meek is doing a disservice to the citizens of Citrus County by not encouraging the discussion of ideas for cutting expenses.Bring port to voteIm referring to the meeting of the BOCC on Feb. 25. Scott Adams brought up a motion to get rid of the port, get rid of every money-consuming issue surrounding it. And of course, it wasnt seconded, the motion. We are the majority, the people. It is in our best interests, the publics, to negate the port and everything around it. However, the commissioners, it seems to be their thing. So we should bring it up to a public vote. Something so draining of our economics and something so important, we need the publics vote on it. And no one that I know of that Ive spoken to is for it except of course for the BOCC members, minus Scott (Adams). Thank you, Mr. Scott, for standing up for us. CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Hot Corner: THE BUDGET GAP HEAL THYSELVES Carl HiaasenOTHER VOICES

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We need real answers, not rhetoricSomehow President Obamas reality doesnt quite match real life reality. His State of the Union speech sounded more like a Lets hold hands and solve the worlds problems with money we dont have speech to me. In the middle of a depression and $16 trillion in national debt, Obama wants to spend money on a long wish list of fairy tales: from early childhood education to infrastructure to green energy to climate change to redesigning high schools to, and get this one, eradicating poverty around the world. Were broke, addicted to spending and hes worried about poverty around the world? One in three Illinois residents lives in poverty. Maybe he should worry about us before he tackles world poverty. Obama says were in recovery, we have jobs, we have cleared away the rubble of crisis and we have a strong state of the union. He must have missed the fact that fourthquarter gross domestic product was negative. Our economy is actually in contraction. And 11,000 Americans join the food stamp rolls every day. This is a recovery? Obama said jobs are doing better. According to data from Bloomberg, from December 2011 to January 2013, nonfarm payrolls were down by 587,000. With a loss of 587,000 jobs and 8.5 million Americans dropping out of the workforce since Obama became president and real unemployment is almost 15 percent, Obama disbanded his Jobs Council. Now that the election is over why talk about jobs? Obamas claim that we can create middle-class jobs with wind, solar and other green energy projects is wishful thinking. Spain is the Green Energy Capital of Europe, yet its economy has collapsed (26 percent unemployment and 56 percent youth unemployment) and 2.2 jobs for every green job created was destroyed. Green jobs arent the answer. Obama said we sold a lot of cars last year. What he didnt tell us was our tax money propped up the sales. Federal government purchase of cars was up by more than 70 percent. Obama pointed to the housing recovery. If your home went from $500,000 down to $100,000, but in the past year soared to $125,000, thats a recovery. With homeowners in bankruptcy and foreclosure, that $25,000 increase versus a $400,000 loss during Obamas first term isnt very helpful. Lets celebrate his housing recovery while ending what Obama calls loopholes must be some kind of joke. That loophole Obama refers to is the mortgage deduction. If he takes that away in the middle of a housing collapse, hell cause another housing collapse. President Obama claims hes already cut $2.5 trillion from the budget. Were halfway home to $4 trillion in cuts he said. The fiscal cliff deal added $4 trillion to the national debt. The cuts that were made were revealed by the Office of Management and Budget to be money that was never going to be spent anyway. Obama cut nothing. Sen. Obama called President George W. Bush unpatriotic for adding $4 trillion to the national debt in eight years, but as president he added $6 trillion in only four years and says were halfway home to solving our debt problem, thinks the sequestration that cuts only $85 billion out of a $3.5 trillion budget is harsh, devastating and reckless. Howsthat kind of thinking going to solve our debt problem? Will more debt spent on green energy and early childhood education will get us halfway home? Thats one heck of a plan. Gerard Del Vecchio HernandoOPINIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 A11 The General Store Custom Easter Baskets For All Ages! Candy and Gifts for Easter or any occasion! 000E836 In the of Downtown Crystal River 639 N. Citrus Ave., Crystal River 352-564-0311 Mention This Ad for 99 Cone 000E8ES Color and submit your entry at the Crystal River Mall when you visit Easter Bunny or mail your entry to Citrus County Chronicle. View the entries at www.chronicleonline.com and vote for your favorite. The contest is open to all children between 4-12 in these age categories: 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. The deadline to enter is March 22. How do I submit my entry? Complete the entry form and deliver to Crystal River Mall Easter Bunny Display Or mail them to Citrus County Chronicle c/o coloring contest 1624 N Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, Florida 34429 Enter the Easter Coloring Contest One prize awarded per age group Childs First Name Last Name Age Phone Number 000E4RV A Tisket A Tasket A Tisket A Tasket A Tisket A Tasket Color Peter Rabbit Color Peter Rabbit Color Peter Rabbit And The Basket And The Basket And The Basket 000E7YB Happy Easter West 44., Inverness US 41, Inverness Inside Walmart, Hwy. 44 Inverness 000E83E 000E3DT 136 N. Indianapolis Ave. Hernando, FL 352-527-3378 352-527-3378 Chocolatesbyvanessa@yahoo.com Chocolates by Vanessa Hop on Over for some Hop on Over for some Delicious Easter Treats! Delicious Easter Treats! 000E7Q6 Plantation Pointe Plaza 521 W. Fort Island Trail, Suite A Crystal River, FL 34429 352-794-6146 (w) www.clembaby.com (e) ClementineBabyBoutique@gmail.com Letters toTHE EDITOR

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Late storm barrels through Midwest Associated PressCHICAGO A late winter storm packing up to 10 inches of snow sent officials in weather-hardened Chicago into action Tuesday to prevent a repeat of scenes from two years ago, when hundreds of people in cars and buses were stranded on the citys marquee thoroughfare during a massive blizzard. The storm was part of a system that started in Montana, hit the Dakotas and Minnesota on Monday and then barreled through Wisconsin and Illinois on its way to Washington, D.C., where it was expected late Tuesday night. As the storm pushed toward the Mid-Atlantic region, people there were gathering supplies and airlines were canceling flights. Since the 2011 blizzard that dumped 20 inches on Chicago, the nations third-largest city has had it pretty easy snowwise. But the storm moving through Tuesday could end up dumping the most there since that blizzard, after a relatively mild winter last year and a slow start to this years. Some in Chicago were caught off guard by the last gasp from Old Man Winter. I thought it was just media hype, said Stacia Kopplin, who was fleeing her financial services job shortly after noon and walking through the blast of wet snow to catch a train home to the suburbs. Schools were closed in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, where officials urged caution on snow-slickened roads. In western Wisconsin, a semitrailer slid off a snow-covered interstate near Menomonie and into the Red Cedar River, killing one person. Authorities said they were searching for a second person, believed to be a passenger. Airlines canceled more than 1,100 flights at Chicago airports, prompting delays and closures at others around the region. Airlines along the storms projected path were already cutting flights too, including about 450 on Wednesday, most of them at Dulles and Reagan National airports in the Washington area, according to Flight Aware.com. Daniel Baker, CEO of the flight-tracking service, said he expected the numbers to rise. In St. Paul, Minn., where 7 inches of snow had fallen, 55year-old Mario Showers was shoveling sidewalks around a downtown church. With Minnesota, aint no telling when the snows gonna come, you know, said Showers. The way I think about it is that, youve got four seasons, and every season brings about a change, you know. So, youve got to take the bitter with the sweet, thats all. So this is the bitter right now. But in Virginia, the forecast was already causing a run at some supermarkets At the Food Lion in Staunton, shelves that were stocked ahead of the storm were being cleared by customers. Bread, milk, eggs and beer, all the necessities, manager Everett Castle said. People in Washington, D.C., were bracing for 3 to 7 inches. The mountains of western Maryland could get up to 16 inches by Wednesday night. Minor tidal flooding was possible along the Delaware coast, the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay and the lower Potomac River, the National Weather Service said. As miserable as things could get for commuters, taxi driver Balwinder Singh of Herndon, Va., said he was looking forward to the storm. People tip better in the snow, he said. As the heaviest snow fell in Chicago, residents were working their shovels and snow-blowers. Mike Morawski, 53, was helping clear the sidewalk in front an older neighbors home. We dont want her digging out, he said. Shes a tender, little woman, a piano teacher. She doesnt need to be shoveling. Allowed Associated PressAirline passengers will be able to carry small knives, souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes beginning in April under a policy change announced Tuesday. TSA to allow knives on planesWASHINGTON Airline passengers will be able to carry small knives, souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes beginning next month under a policy change announced Tuesday by the head of the Transportation Security Administration. The new policy conforms U.S. security standards to international standards, and allows TSA to concentrate its energies on more serious safety threats, the agency said in a statement. The announcement, made by TSA Administrator John Pistole at an airline industry gathering in New York, drew an immediate outcry from unions representing flight attendants and other airline workers, who said the items are still dangerous in the hands of the wrong passengers.FDA panel sees risk in bone drugWASHINGTON A panel of federal health experts says a longestablished bone strengthening drug should no longer be used by women because there is little evidence it works and it may actually increase the risk of cancer. The Food and Drug Administration panel voted 129 that the risks of the inhalable osteoporosis drug calcitonin salmon outweigh its benefits when used to treat brittle bones. Novartis and UpsherSmith market the drug in nasal spray form as Miacalcin and Fortical, respectively. But health authorities around the world have been reviewing the drugs safety after two recent studies showed a slightly higher rate of cancer among patients taking calcitonin pills. The drug is also available as an injection to treat other conditions, including excess calcium in the blood. From wire reports Nation BRIEFS NATION& WORLD Page A12WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Exhibited Associated PressOn Wednesday, the Smithsonians National Museum of Natural History will unveil this Royal Butterfly Brooch, created in 2009 by Taiwanese jewelry artist Cindy Chao. The brooch is made of 2,300 gems with four large-faceted diamond slices. Venezuelas Chavez dies Associated PressCARACAS, Venezuela President Hugo Chavez was a fighter. The former paratroop commander and fiery populist waged continual battle for his socialist ideals and outsmarted his rivals time and again, defeating a coup attempt, winning re-election three times and using his countrys vast oil wealth to his political advantage. A self-described subversive, Chavez fashioned himself after the 19th century independence leader Simon Bolivar and renamed his country the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. He called himself a humble soldier in a battle for socialism and against U.S. hegemony. He thrived on confrontation with Washington and his political opponents at home, and used those conflicts to rally his followers. Almost the only adversary it seemed he couldnt beat was cancer. He died Tuesday in Caracas at 4:25 local time after his prolonged illness. He was 58. During more than 14 years in office, his leftist politics and grandiose style polarized Venezuelans. The barrel-chested leader electrified crowds with his booming voice, and won admiration among the poor with government social programs and a folksy, nationalistic style. His opponents seethed at the larger-than-life character who demonized them on television and ordered the expropriation of farms and businesses. Many in the middle class cringed at his bombast and complained about rising crime, soaring inflation and government economic controls. Chavez used his countrys vast oil wealth to launch social programs that included state-run food markets, new public housing, free health clinics and education programs. Poverty declined during Chavezs presidency amid a historic boom in oil earnings, but critics said he failed to use the windfall of hundreds of billions of dollars to develop the countrys economy. Inflation soared and the homicide rate rose to among the highest in the world. Before his struggle with cancer, he appeared on television almost daily, frequently speaking for hours and breaking into song or philosophical discourse. He often wore the bright red of his United Socialist Party of Venezuela, or the fatigues and red beret of his army days. He had donned the same uniform in 1992 while leading an ill-fated coup attempt that first landed him in jail and then launched his political career. Associated PressVenezuelas President Hugo Chavez, pictured in June 2011, died Tuesday at age 58. He was first diagnosed with cancer in June 2011. Snow, snow, snow Associated PressTravelers make their way past snow-covered cars parked in the parking lot Tuesday at OHare International Airport in Chicago. Your chances of dying by 2023? Test offers a clue LINDSEYTANNER AP medical writerCHICAGO Want to know your chances of dying in the next 10 years? Here are some bad signs: getting winded walking several blocks, smoking and having trouble pushing a chair across the room. Thats according to a mortality index developed by San Francisco researchers for people older than 50. Test scores may satisfy peoples morbid curiosity, but researchers say their 12-item index is mostly for use by doctors. It can help them decide whether costly health screenings or medical procedures are worth the risk for patients unlikely to live 10 more years. Its best to take the test with a doctor, who can discuss what the score means in the context of patients own medical history, the study authors say. The index wasnt meant as guidance about how to alter your lifestyle, said lead author Dr. Marisa Cruz of the University of California, San Francisco. Instead, doctors can use the results to help patients understand the pros and cons of such things as rigorous diabetes treatment, colon cancer screening and tests for cervical cancer. Those may not be safe or appropriate for very sick, old people likely to die before cancer ever develops. The 12 items on the index are assigned points; fewer total points means better odds. Men automatically get 2 points. In addition to that, men and women ages 60 to 64 get 1 point; ages 70 to 74 get 3 points; and 85 or over get 7 points. Two points each: a current or previous cancer diagnosis, excluding minor skin cancers; lung disease limiting activity or requiring oxygen; heart failure; smoking; difficulty bathing; difficulty managing money because of health or memory problem; difficulty walking several blocks. One point each: diabetes or high blood sugar; difficulty pushing large objects, such as a heavy chair; being thin or normal weight. The highest, or worst, score is a 26, with a 95 percent chance of dying within 10 years. To get that, youd have to be a man at least 85 years old with all the above conditions. For a score of zero, which means a 3 percent chance of dying within 10 years, youd have to be a woman younger than 60 without any of those infirmities but at least slightly overweight. Its hardly surprising a sick, older person would have a much higher chance of dying than someone younger and more vigorous, and its well known that women generally live longer than men. But why would being overweight be less risky than being of normal weight or slim? One possible reason is thinness in older age could be a sign of illness, Cruz said. Other factors could also play a role, so the index should be seen as providing clues but not the gospel truth, the research suggests. The findings were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Grants from the National Institute on Aging and the American Federation for Aging Research helped pay for the study. Kyle Maroff and his son Kayden, 6, of East Moline Ill., speed down the sledding hill Tuesday in Schadt Park, Silvis, Ill.

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Golf/B2 Baseball/ B3 Bowling, tennis/B3 Sports briefs/ B4, B5 TV, lottery/B4 Basketball, hockey/ B5 Entertainment/ B6 Offensive outburst powers Lightning past Devils./ B5 SPORTSSection BWEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Canes boys tennis overcomes Pirates JAMESBLEVINS CorrespondentINVERNESS Matt Allen was able to nab visiting Crystal Rivers lone point in Tuesday evenings meet against Citrus as the two county rivals met each other for the first time this season. Despite the Pirate No. 1 seed Allen taking down the Hurricanes No. 1 Kyle Everett in two straight sets (6-2, 6-2); Crystal River couldnt claim any other points as Citrus cruised by 6-1 for the meet win. Im glad I was able to keep up today against Citrus, Allen said of his match. Being able to hold my own against a very good player. Keeping up with his rallies is hard. Hes a very hard hitter so it was all I could do to keep up with his momentum. Overall it was a really good match, Allen continued. I was getting angles and making him run more. It just turned out to be a really good match. Citrus No. 2 Grey Pospiech defeated Crystal Rivers Ryan Johnson 6-4 in the first set while a 7-5 tiebreaker second set settled the match in Pospiechs favor. Michael Hetland battled it out in the No. 3 singles match, taking the win for Citrus 6-4, 6-2 over Crystal Rivers Ben Epstein. Cane singles players Brady Hayes and Joe Kerry cleaned up in No. 4 and 5 singles play. Hayes made quick work of Pirate Matt White (6-1, 6-4) while Kerry slugged out a three-set winner Lecanto girls edge Citrus on home courts JOEKORNECKIIII CorrespondentLECANTO The Lecanto Panthers girls tennis team narrowly defeated its county foe Citrus for the second time this season, 4-3 on a cold, windy day Tuesday. Citrus High School took three of the five singles matches but were swept in both doubles matches. They beat Citrus twice this year, and Im proud of them, Lecanto head coach Sammie Hall said. They need more stamina for districts ... and need to improve on a few of their shots, but Im proud of them overall. Citrus High School head coach Scott Waters said his team is young and optimistic. (Im) particularly impressed with Melanie (Dodd), who has won 45 in a row going back to middle school, he Crystal Rivers No. 1 seed prevents shutout, but Citrus prevails 6-1 See TENNIS/ Page B4 See GIRLS/ Page B4 Citrus rally on bases falls short Swing of the bat C.J. RISAK CorrespondentLECANTO Erica Corlew wasnt having a good game at the plate at least until the sixth inning. The freshman shortstop had flied out and grounded out in her first two appearances for the Citrus softball team in its county rivalry game at Lecanto. In the sixth inning of this scoreless tie, April Desomma reached base with a lead-off walk issued by the Panthers Danielle Yant, then Desomma stole second. Corlew didnt let the opportunity pass her by. She sent a long fly over Lecanto outfielder Lilly Parrishs head, the ball reaching the base of the left field fence for a run-scoring double. One out and a wild pitch later, Corlew scored what proved to be the game-winning run as the Hurricanes held on for a 2-1 victory. Tonight I really didnt hit very well, Corlew said, who scored her teams second run on Chelby Lawlers sacrifice fly. But it was my pitch. I just STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleThe throw to Lecanto catcher Amber Atkinson is wide as Citrus High School shortstop Erica Corlew slides into home for the first of two runs Tuesday at Lecanto High School. The Hurricanes took a 2-1 victory over the Panthers in District 6A-6 play. Corlews RBI double, run the difference for Citrus in 2-1 win over Lecanto Citrus centerfielder Aaron McIntyre tags the ball in the second inning of Tuesdays game against Lecanto. The Hurricanes won 2-1. Springstead girls tennis downs Crystal River 7-0 LARRYBUGG CorrespondentCRYSTAL RIVER Nikki Moynihan would love to have a better forehand. If she did, the Crystal River High School No. 1 tennis singles player might have had a little more fun Tuesday night at the Pirates tennis court. Moynihan lost 6-3, 6-1, to Springstead High Schools Bryn Buckner. Moynihan is now 0-4 for the season. My forehand was doing really bad, Moynihan said. I need to get low and show through it. I am just having a lot of problems with my forehand. I expected to win at least one or two (of her singles matches). Springstead beat Crystal River 7-0 in the high school tennis match. Crystal River (0-4) is normally a powerful force in girls tennis, but Springstead (8-2) easily defeated the Citrus County teams Crystal River on Tuesday and Citrus High last week. Springsteads Scarlett Semack beat Crystal Rivers Veronica Williams 7-6, 7-6, in the No. 2 singles, while the Eagles Sara Guerrero beat the Pirates Anna Lane 6-1, 6-2, in No. 3 singles. For Springstead, Robyn Cotney beat Olivia Parker 6-0, 6-0, in No. 4 singles and teammate Alison Wilfong took No. 5 singles over Crystal Rivers Kelsey Schroeder 6-1, 6-0. The Eagles Buckner and Guerrero beat Moynihan and Williams 8-4 in a pro-set in the No. 1 doubles. Springsteads Cotney and Semack beat the Pirates Lane and Parker 9-8. The Pirates were missing their usual No. 3, Crystal Menietti. They are rebuilding this year, said Springstead coach Rick Scholl, who is the tennis director at Sugarmill Woods. They lost three or four people last year. We are a young team. We have a lot of talent and a lot of depth. I think Bryn played a tough match and won yesterday. Her knees have been bothering her. The Pirates are rebuilding and learning to find encouragement in improvements. Three of our five top players graduated, Crystal River coach Cindy Reynolds said. We are into playing good teams. We havent been playing any pushover teams. We have played private schools and in our county. My top two are doing better. My top two improve every day. They become more aggressive and offensive every day. They are hitting better. For more photos, click on this story at www.chronicle online.com. Canes baseball loses 9-8 to EaglesSEANARNOLD CorrespondentINVERNESS A Citrus rally in the seventh inning came up just short in a seesaw district battle with Springstead. With the Hurricanes down 95 entering the bottom of the seventh, junior catcher Cody Bogart launched his second home run of the game and his third of the year to help fuel a three-run burst before his Citrus baseball club fell 9-8 to the Eagles at home on Tuesday. The Canes (3-4 overall, 1-1 in District 6A-6) loaded the bases twice off four walks following Bogarts two-run blast that scored sophomore right fielder Brooks Brasher, who earlier reached on a catchers interference call. A two-out walk by senior second baseman Kyle Tobin scored sophomore shortstop Robert Wilkinson before senior reliever Ryan Nicoll retired the final batter with a strikeout. Eagles senior ace Brandon Brosher (one hit and two walks allowed) fanned 10 Cane batters in the first four innings, but three hit batters and a Brasher RBI single helped Citrus stay alive early and trail just 4-3 after four innings before Brosher was relieved by senior Nic Pasarella (three hits allowed, five walks, one strikeout). Citrus junior starter Chad Dawson (seven hits, one walk, three strikeouts) kept the ball in the zone through 5 2/3 innings, but six Cane errors limited his and freshman reliever Austin Bogarts (two strikeouts, two walks, one hit) effort on the mound. Youll give the worst team in America a chance to win if you make errors on routine plays, Citrus coach Brady Bogart said. Chad did exactly what he needed to do. He gets people out early with his fastball, breaking ball and change-up. Hes learned how to pitch and he gives us a chance to win every time he goes out there, but unfortunately we havent backed him up very good, tonight, and in one-run games against Forest and South Sumter. Citrus jumped ahead 5-4 in the fifth with a home run to leftcenter by Cody Bogart (four See SWING/ Page B4 See SHORT/ Page B4

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B2WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEGOLF 000E1XQ W E C A R E F O O D P A N T R Y SCRAMBLE GOLF TOURNAMENT Ladies and Gentlemen are Welcome! 000DS6E Saturday, March 16th Registration: 8:00 a.m. Shotgun Time: 9:00 a.m. SEVEN RIVERS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB $60 per person $200 per foursome To register, call 503-7355 including greens fees, cart ,lunch and thank you gifts. Harley Davidson Hole in One Prize American Irish Club American Irish Club Annual Invitational Annual Invitational Golf Tournament Golf Tournament Saturday April 21st Saturday April 21st Seven Rivers Country Club Seven Rivers Country Club Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun start at 12:30pm Sign in by 11:15am Shotgun start at 12:30pm Scramble Best Ball Format Scramble Best Ball Format American Irish Club Annual Invitational Golf TournamentSaturday April 6THSeven Rivers Country ClubSign in by 11:15am Shotgun start at 12:30pm Scramble Best Ball FormatCost $55 per person includes golf, cart, prizes, & Cost $55 per person includes golf, cart, prizes, & Social hour with cash bar and appetizers Social hour with cash bar and appetizers during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm. during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm. Cost $55 per person includes golf, cart, prizes, & lunch Social hour with cash bar and appetizers during the awards ceremony at 4:45 6pm.Course Rules Apply Course Rules Apply No Denim or T-Shirts No Denim or T-Shirts Course Rules Apply No Denim or T-Shirts www.chronicleonline.com For information and sign-up contact: For information and sign-up contact: Dave Horsman 897-1398 Dave Horsman 897-1398 Russ Doring 795-4548 Russ Doring 795-4548 Herb Duval 794-7465 Herb Duval 794-7465 For information and sign-up contact: Dave Horsman 897-1398 Russ Doring 795-4548 Herb Duval 794-7465 000DWBO HOLE-IN-ONEOn March 1, Rich Vehrs made a hole-in-one on the 11th hole using an 8-iron. The shot, from 110 yards out, was witnessed by Claire Moran and Sandy Koppell.BRENTWOODOn Feb. 20, the Wednesday point quota group played. First +8 Jim Keifferand Bob Smith Second +6 Bob OBrienand Rolf Kettenburg Most over quota+5 Joe Goyette Closest to the pin: No. 2 & 4Bob OBrien 50/50 winner: Glenn Connelly Feb. 23, Saturday Scramble results. First Bob Myers, L. T. Schull, Irv Rayburn, Nel Lamoreux Second Ruth Doring, Russ Doring, Dick Sherman, Margaret Roberts Third Frank Hughes, Dennis Ronk, Dick Emberly, Jerry Krause Closest to the pin: No. 2 Mike ODonaghue No. 4 L.T. Schull Feb. 24, Sunday Scramble results. First Wayne Brooks, Rolf Kettenburg, Bruce Liston, Woody Jones Second Bob Staker, Jan Lassiter, Don Oslance Third Steve Leonard, Herm Gardner, Maggie Cart Closest to the pin: No. 2 (Men)Jim Pearson (Ladies)Mona Evans No. 4(Men)Bruce Liston (Ladies)Maggie Cart 50/50 winner:Ron Cart Feb. 25, Mens Group results. First (MOC) +7 Jim Pearson Second +7 Steve Leonard Most over quota:(MOC) + 5 Pat Foss Closest to the pin: No. 2 George Jones No. 4 Charlie KuntzCITRUS HILLSMEN On Feb. 27, the Citrus Hills Mens Golf Association on the Oaks Golf Course played 2, 3 Alt. First -27 Curt Mesler, Jerry McClernon, Bruce Cohoon, Bob Prince Second -22 (MOC) Chuck Hanner, Harvey Schrank, Clive Affleck, Len Feutz Third -21 Pete Lindley, John Keller, John Bechler, Bob Jones Fourth -19 (MOC) Tony Barone, Mac McDuff, Joe Konie, Lou PulgranoCITRUS SPRINGSMEN On Feb. 28, the Citrus Springs Mens Association played team points. First 167 Rick Hancock, Don Gonczi, Dave Miner, Woody Miner (blind) Second 156 Pete Clutter, Harvey Jenkins, Walt Norton, Glen Robertson Third 151 Leon Smith, Ed Starling, Woody Miner, Bill Mannix Closest to the pin: No. 4 Harvey Jenkins No. 8 Pete Clutter No. 11 Rick Hancock No. 14 Russ Woodworth No. 16 Woody Miner WOMEN On March 1, the Chicks with Sticks played Points Quota. Lois Bump+4 Marj Sibley+4 Vickie Colebank+3 Ginny Hearns+3 Mary McConnell+3 Carol Lanzillo+3 Roberta Gendron+2 Jan Kominski+2 Bev McGonnigal+2 Closest to the pin: No. 4 Mary McConnell No. 8 & 11Vickie Colebank No. 16 Carole Seifert Chicks with Sticks, a ladies points quota league, meets every Friday morning at Citrus Springs. Interested players with GHIN handicaps should call Carole at 352-746-2082 or Jan at 352-344-9550.EL DIABLOOn Sunday, Feb. 24, the format was Quarter Medal. Men Members: Low Gross83/71 Tony Borgia Low Net87/72 Paul Langevin Men Non-member: John Hrobuchak93/76 Ladies Members: Low Gross105/68 Pat Lampasona Low Net115/77 MaryAnn Conroy Ladies Non-member: Terry Hrobuchak102/82 On Monday, Feb. 25, the format was a 9 Hole Scramble. First26.25 Jon Townsend, Pete Palmer, Logan Crume, Dayle Montgomery Second26.375 Doc Freer, Debbie Marino, Clint Fisher, Ghost Third28 Ray Humphreys, Jack Durden, Mike Pombier, Bob Montgomery Fourth28.75 Bob Marino, Curtis Karr, Ed Stup, Ghost Fifth30.75 Jeff Sprague, Nats Redweb, Rory Natzke, Ghost Closest to the pin: No. 6Doc Freer No. 8Team of Ray, Jack, Mike, Bob Birdie points5 Team of Doc, Debbie, and ClintIG&CCThe Inverness Golf & Country Clubs Womens Golf Association played its championship Feb. 12 and 19.Scores were totaled for the two 18 hole matches. Red Tee First Gross169 Sonja Dixon First Net142 Sue Sasso Silver Tee First Gross175 Bev Black First Net132 Diane Rozzi Second Net134 Lavera Sasser Third Net136 TereWoodLAKESIDEOn Feb. 28, the LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League played. Nanna Hansen+8 Amy Thomas+7 June Goyette+2 Closest to the pin: No. 2 & 8Mary McConnell No. 15Jean Cunningham LakeSide Ladies Points Quota League meets at 9 a.m. Thursdays and is now open to all area ladies. No membership dues are required. Occasional play welcomed. Interested players with GHIN handicaps should call Jan at 352-344-9550.7 RIVERSOn Feb. 28, the 7 Rivers Mens Golf Association played a scramble tournament. First 66 Dave Stanley, Gene Kelly, Dick Shephard, Al Silliman Second 68 Bob Cox, Joe Muscaro, Bill Stallings, Dick VanPoucked Closest to the pin: No. 7 Bob Cox No. 11 Bill StallingsSOUTHERN WOODSOn Feb. 27, the Southern Woods Mens Golf Association played Best Net Ball of the 2 Man Team. Flight 1 First -11 Carl Pedersen, Frank Nolan First -11 Ben Lee, Ken Moody Flight 2 First -10 Brian Hadler, Rich Perry Second -9 Gary Mosey, Tom Hendricksen Third -8 Phil Jasper, Rich Spay Russ Fortune, Mike Theodore Third -8 Tom Venable, Mike Medland Flight 3 First -7 Glenn Harwood, Jack Sandlas, Bill Long First -7 Gene Askins, Erv Koch Closest to the pin: No. 4 Ken Moody No. 8 Erv Koch No. 17 Brian HadlerSUGARMILL WOODSMEN On Feb. 28, Sugarmill Woods Country Club Mens Golf Association played Best 2 of 4 Plus Bonus. Flight 1 First-31 Dick Tuxbury, Dennis Borras, George Lentowitz, Paul VanTassell Second-25 Mike Howard, Hank Robinson, Tom Venable, Joe George Flight 2 First-24 Mel Schroeder, Dan Martinko, Frank Wander, Jack Winner Second-22 Jim Bodenstein, Tony Valente, Mike Theodore, Tom Jones Flight 3 First-23 (Tie) Ernie Pettine, John Lawrey, Charlie McCreery, Bill Lent First-23 (Tie) Zane Megos, Bob Mason, Bob Carriveau, Ed Jones Golfers of the week: Low Gross78 Mike Howard Low Net63 Frank Siemietkowski Low Net65 Sr. Bob Carriveau Closest to the pin: Oak No. 3Bob Gunderman Oak No. 6Bob Carriveau Cypress No. 3Kyle Muzina Cypress No 6Mike Theodore LocalLEADERS As the 44th annual Lollypop Invitational at 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club is almost upon us (March 12 and 13), I see many of our 7 Rivers members out playing and practicing a little bit more than usual. This tournament is one of Citrus Countys most popular womens events of the year. Great competition and camaraderie, good food and an annual skit written and presented by the members of 7 Rivers Golf & Country Club it is a tournament that hits on all cylinders. This year the 7 Rivers membership is bragging about the good course conditions and how well-stocked the golf shop is, which leads me to write about competition and how different it is from everyday golf with your friends. Each day golf comes with its own set of issues but things seem to intensify when golfers play in competition. From first-tee jitters to dealing with the unknown ... tournament golf can be fun or it can be miserable. Here are a few thoughts to improve tournament play and make it more fun. First-tee jitters affect the greatest of players and it certainly affects us as well. When we get nervous, we tend to grip our clubs tighter and swing faster. When pressure hits on the golf course, the first muscles to get tense are the small muscles in your hands. This is the time when you catch yourself holding on to the club for dear life. Relax, take a deep breath and lighten up on the death grip! This will allow your tempo to stay smooth throughout your swing. When your tempo gets too fast, swing flaws get exaggerated, so stay loose, keep the blood flowing, breathe deeply and swing smoothly. Play your game dont try to pull off heroic shots that are low percentage. This adds up fast on the scorecard. Play smart and to your strengths. Try to aim for the middle of the green on your approach shots. Dont fall for the occasional sucker pin tucked behind a bunker. Take one more club than usual according to the yardage to the green. This may help with elevated greens, the wind or a poor shot. If you are a good putter, try to two-putt on each green. Never ever criticize yourself. Be patient, encouraging and talk to yourself with respect just like you speak and treat other people. You can be only be an idiot for so long before you must move on and leave the past behind. Forgive yourself for mistakes. In tournament play, the pace of play is usually slower than normal. Countless times I have heard golfers talk about the pace of play during competition and how it negatively affected their performance. Slow play will only affect performance if you let it. Be mentally prepared for this. Be thorough in your preshot routine. Be ready when it is your turn and you will never be the source of slow play. Tournament play in Citrus County is strong: fill your entry form out and send it in. And dont forget the Presidential Invitational coming in April. Another great event you do not want to miss!Marion Walker is the general manager at Seven Rivers Golf and Country Club in Crystal River. She can be reached at marion7rivers@ tampabay.rr.com. Stay cool and calm on course Marion WalkerMOVE WITH MARION Rorys bad call McIlroys way out of mess is to be like WoodsDOUGFERGUSON AP golf writerDORAL The statement released by his handlers was almost as bad as the kids decision to walk out on the tournament. It was the first big mistake of his career, at a time when the golf world was enthralled by such a young talent. He was criticized by the press and by his peers for his selfish behavior, though there was hope he at least would learn from his mistake. This was Tiger Woods, 1996. In his fourth straight PGA Tour event since turning pro, the 20-year-old Woods effectively locked up a spot on tour with his tie for third in the B.C. Open. The next week he had another sponsors exemption to the Buick Challenge. Woods showed up at Callaway Gardens before abruptly leaving town, and IMG released a statement that he was exhausted. It looked even worse when Woods didnt even stick around for the Fred Haskins Award dinner to honor him as college player of the year. Eleven days later, Woods won in Las Vegas and all was forgotten. Thats the best way out for Rory McIlroy. Good golf goes a long way. McIlroy laid the foundation for seeking forgiveness in a 25minute telephone interview Sunday night with Sports Illustrated. He said what everyone else suspected: It was frustration over his game and not pain from his wisdom tooth that led him to walk out on the Honda Classic just eight holes into his second round. He was 7-over par, and with his second shot in the water on No. 18, it was about to get worse. So he turned in his scorecard and bolted for the parking lot. What I should have done is take my drop, chip it on, try to make a 5 and play my hardest on the back nine, even if I shot 85, McIlroy told the magazine. What I did was not good for the tournament, not good for the kids and the fans who were out there watching me. It was not the right thing to do. Expect to hear much of the same when he speaks Wednesday at Doral. He was practicing at The Bears Club just hours after he withdrew from the Honda Classic. Ernie Els saw him practicing his tail off all weekend, and then McIlroy played Monday afternoon in the Pro-Member tournament at Seminole. They spoke privately. Thats all the Big Easy would share. Well see what he says tomorrow, Els said. It really doesnt matter. Most reasonable people know by now Boy Wonder made a boyish blunder. Jack Nicklaus weighed in by saying if only McIlroy had waited five more minutes, he would have thought the better of leaving. Theres nothing McIlroy can do to change that now, and nothing he can say that will change anyones opinion. When it comes to being where hes at, youve got to maybe think a little bit more than two minutes, Els said. In a couple of years time, he wont even think about this or talk about this. If he wins this week, it will be the last thing we talk about. It will be history, and thats what it should be. Its something thats happened and we should move on from that. Hes a great kid. Hes a great player. And if he admits hes made a mistake, then thats that, and lets move on. Associated PressRory McIlroy withdrew from the Honda Classic last weekend, blaming a hurting wisdom tooth.

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SPORTSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 B3 352-489-5045 8690 N. Golfview Dr., Citrus Springs, FL citrusspringsgolf.com 000E6K5 Citrus Springs GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Come And Play The Areas Best Maintained Golf Course Mention this ad while booking your tee times and Play for just $32 before noon and only $24 after 1:00 PM All Day Sat. & Sun Just $29 Offer Expires 3/16/13 000E8JJ Golf at Plantation after 2:00 PM any day except Sunday $ 25 00 + tax Call 352-795-7211 Call 352-795-7211 Call 352-795-7211 to book a tee time no more than 3 days in advance. Offer cannot be combined with other discounts. Coupon valid for up to 4 players. Proper golf attire required. Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/13. for only per person Valid for play on the Championship Course only. 000E5L1 51st Annual St. Pats Championship Golf Tournament March 15, 16, & 17 at Inverness Golf and Country Club For more information 726-2583 or 586-6510 We hope you will join us for three exciting days of golf, camaraderie, food and prizes! All Entries Must Be Received by Friday, March 29, 2013 For information call Dennis King or Dan Crishon (352) 249-1236 golf Monday, April 8th, 2013 Monday, April 8th, 2013 15th ANNUAL CLASSIC SCORE S UGARMILL W OODS C OUNTRY C LUB S UGARMILL W OODS C OUNTRY C LUB Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa, Florida Sugarmill Woods, Homosassa, Florida 000DPXZ www.citruscounty.score.org www.citruscounty.score.org To register with PayPal enter following To register with PayPal enter following e-mail address: citruschapter@live.com e-mail address: citruschapter@live.com Tournament Sponsor $100 Tournament Sponsor $100 Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards banquet, banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome) at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2013 11:00 a.m. Registration 11:30 a.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start 5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony per golfer $ 60 It is not official until the last match of the competition has been played, but the 3.5 Women Adult 55 and over team from Skyview has an unbeatable lead. If they win their last match, they will be one of the few teams to become district champions without a loss. With this district title, they qualify for the sectional/ regional championships in Daytona Beach. The Skyview team is captained by Ann Sulinski and her team members are April Manley, Michelle Jones, Jacqueline Bennett, Marti Little, Ruth Branson, Margie McLellan, Ann Finnin and Nelva Polich. The next league will be the Mixed 18 and over in the following division levels: 5.0, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0. The deadline for a team commitment and player rosters is March 10. The league start date is March 16. As you can tell by the level numbers, this is a combined level event, meaning the combined rating of the two players in a mixed doubles cannot be higher than the division level. So at the 5.0 level, each player can be rated 2.5 and the difference between them can be no larger than 1.0, meaning one can be 2.0 and the other 3.0. This league is open to anybody who turns 18 at any date in 2013.Tuesday Team TennisResults for Feb. 26: Rained out. The women-only league is geared toward players rated 3.0 to 3.5. If interested in playing or want to captain a team, contact chairwoman Candace Charles at 352563-5859 or candacecharles @tampabay.rr.com.Citrus Area Senior Ladies 3.0/3.5 Tuesday LeagueResults for Feb. 26: Rained out. To play in this league, a player must be at least 50 years of age or older, with a 3.0/3.5 rating. The league is always looking for players to sub for teams. For information, email chairwoman Lucy Murphy at wjlrmurphy@embarqmail.com or 527-4239.Thursday Morning Citrus Area Doubles LeagueResults for Feb. 28: Skyview def. Bicentennial Babes, 6-4; The Bratz def. Skyview Aces, 5-4; Skyview Advantage def. Sugarmill Woods, 8-1; Pine Ridge Fillies def. Pine Ridge Mavericks, 5-4. For information, contact chairwoman Diane Halloran at 352-527-7763 or tdhfla@ tampabay.rr.comLadies on the CourtResults for Feb. 28: Marta and Phyliss. Ladies on The Court play at 8:30 a.m. Thursdays at Le Grone Park courts in Crystal River. Bring a new can of balls and 50 cents. Two out of three tiebreak sets are played. For information, contact Barbara Shook at dshook@ tampabay.rr.com or 352-795-0872.Friday Senior Ladies Doubles 3.0-3.5 LeagueResults for Feb. 29: Riverhaven Eagles def. Pine Ridge Mustangs, 4-1; Bicentennial Flyers def. Meadowcrest Aces, 4-0; Sugarmill Woods def. Citrus Hills Hot Shots, 3-2. All players must be at least 50 years of age or older with a 3.03.5 rating. Players cannot be a member of a team and sub. For information, email chairwoman Sue Doherty at suedoherty@prodigy.net.USTA Leagues3.5 Adult 55+ Women: Skyview def. The Villages, 2-1. Record 7-0. Ruth Branson/April Manley won, 6-4, 6-4; Anne Finnin/Nelva Polich won, 6-2, 6-2; Michelle Jones/Ann Sulinski lost, 6-3, 6-3. 7.0 Adult 65+ Women: Bicentennial Park record 1-3. Skyview record 0-4. Schedule for the rest of 2013:18-up Mixed (3 doubles): March to May.40-up Adult (3 doubles, 2 singles) May to July.40-up Mixed (3 doubles) August to October.Combo Senior and Adult (3 doubles) October to December. Start recruiting! If you have any questions for information in our District 4 (south) call or e-mail Leigh Chak at 352-572-7157 or vacocala@gmail.com or ustaflorida.com.TournamentsTBA: The JCT Tournament of Champions Event will be at Sugarmill Woods/Oak Village Tennis Complex. Players who would like to enter should email jjeanette3saj@ aol.com. Provide your name, age, grade in school, city, cell phone, name of school and seeding information if it applies.Eric van den Hoogen, Chronicle tennis columnist, can be reached at hoera@juno.com. Another USTA champ Eric van den HoogenON TENNIS Youth bowler Roberts at top of game Special to the ChronicleTrevor Roberts, a 17year-old Crystal River High School junior, is already one of the best bowlers in Citrus County. Its likely you could expand to include the whole country as there are very few adults much less youth bowlers among the millions of aficionados of the sport who can claim a 231 average. Among his achievements are three 11-in-a-row games, two perfect 300 games and an 800 series. He also has won a state singles title, a doubles title in the Pepsi Tournament and additional titles in the South West Florida Classic and the Burkins Tournament. Trevor began his bowling career at the age of 5 in a PeeWee league and continued through the Youth Program sponsored by the Greater Citrus USBCA. Just this year, he decided to leave the youth program so he could compete with some of the countys best bowlers in the Wednesday Night Mens Match Play League where top bowlers compete against each other in head to head matches. Trevor doesnt limit himself to just bowling. Hes also an A student at Crystal River High School and plans to go to college to earn a degree in engineering. In addition, he wants to become a professional bowler. In his spare time, he works part-time for Manatee Bowling Center. Trevor credits his success in bowling to the support from his family, help from volunteer youth coaches and lots of hard work and practice. The Greater Citrus County Bowling Association is hosting the Mens County Tournament at Manatee Lanes on March 16 and 17. It is not too late to send your applications in, as the extended date for closing entries is March l4. Rays down Twins Associated PressFORT MYERS Liam Hendriks worked out of a jam after left-fielder Josh Willingham lost a fly ball in the sun, but the Minnesota Twins still lost to the Tampa Bay Rays 8-5 Tuesday. Hendriks, trying to win a spot in Minnesotas rotation, allowed two runs and four hits in three innings. He pitched three innings, giving up two runs off four hits while striking out three. Rays pitcher Matt Moore struggled with his mechanics. He struck out two but gave up two hits and two walks in 2 2/3 innings.USA, 4, White Sox 4, 9 innings, tieGLENDALE, Ariz. The U.S. team played the Chicago White Sox to a draw. In its first of two exhibition games before the World Baseball Classic, manager Joe Torres team fell into a four-run hole through five innings, and needed three RBIs by Giancarlo Stanton and a run-scoring triple by David Wright to forge a 4-4 tie in a game called after nine innings.Dominican Republic 15, Phillies 2CLEARWATER Jose Reyes, Hanley Ramirez and the Dominican Republic put on a relentless offensive display in their first exhibition game ahead of the World Baseball Classic, amassing 28 hits in a 15-2 romp over Cole Hamels and the Philadelphia Phillies. Reyes led off the game with a single and the Dominican Republic team never let up, roughing up Hamels for 12 hits and eight runs in 2 2/3 innings. Reyes, Robinson Cano and Ramirez each homered.Royals 8, Athletics 2SURPRISE, Ariz. Bruce Chen and Luke Hochevar combined to allow one run in six innings, and the Kansas City Royals remained undefeated for spring training with an 8-2 victory over the Oakland Athletics. Oaklands Bartolo Colon, gave up five runs and seven hits in two innings. The 39-year-old right-hander has allowed eight runs six earned on 12 hits in four innings in losing his first two starts. Brett Hayes and Brandon Wood homered for the Royals, who are 10-0-1.Canada 7, Brewers 4PHOENIX Michael Saunders homered and Justin Morneau drew a bases-loaded walk, helping Canada beat the Milwaukee Brewers 7-4 Tuesday in a prep game ahead of the World Baseball Classic. Tyson Gillies and Cale Iorg had RBI singles for Canada in a four-run eighth off loser Michael Gonzalez. Left fielder Adam Loewen jumped against the wall to take away an extra-base hit from Josh Prince with two on and two outs.Padres 7, Dodgers 3PEORIA, Ariz. Clayton Kershaw gave up four runs and seven hits in three-plus innings, his third straight sub-par outing of the spring, and the Los Angeles Dodgers lost 73 to the San Diego Padres. Kershaw has given up nine runs on 17 hits in eight innings. San Diego catcher Nick Hundley homered off Kershaws 65th and final pitch.Angels 6, Reds 4TEMPE, Ariz. Recovering from offseason surgery on his right knee, Albert Pujols went 0 for 3 in his first spring training appearance of 2013 as the Los Angeles Angels beat the Cincinnati Reds 6-4 Tuesday. Jay Bruce hit a pair of solo homers for the Reds, off Tommy Hanson in the second and Scott Downs in the fourth.Rockies 6, Cubs 2SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Todd Helton got his first hit of spring training and Jeff Francis pitched four scoreless innings to carry the Colorado Rockies to a 6-2 victory over the Cubs. Helton, a .320 hitter who was limited to 69 games and hit a career-low .238 while struggling with hip problems last season, gave Colorado a 1-0 lead in the first with an oppositefield ground-rule double.Nationals 7, Astros 1VIERA Rafael Soriano threw a scoreless inning of relief in his debut with Washington and the Nationals beat the Houston Astros 7-1. Soriano signed a two-year, $28 million contract in January to become the Nationals new closer. The right-hander faced three batters in the seventh and struck out one. Houstons J.D. Martinez reached base against Soriano, but pinchrunner Brandon Barnes was thrown out trying to steal.Orioles 6, Blue Jays 6, 10 inningsDUNEDIN Steve Pearce hit two home runs, Conor Jackson and Luis Exposito each homered as the Baltimore Orioles and Toronto Blue Jays played to a 6-6, 10-inning tie. Jackson, who had three hits, Pearce and Exposito homered in a four-run sixth inning off Toronto reliever Esmil Rogers. Home runs by Jackson and Pearce were back-to-back. The Orioles also homered four times Sunday against Philadelphia.Pirates 10, Spain 0BRADENTON Gaby Sanchez went 3 for 3 with a double, home run and two RBIs, leading the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 10-0 rout of Spains World Baseball Classic team. Rhiner Cruz, a Houston Astros reliever and one of just two players with major league experience on the Spanish roster, allowed three runs in one inning. The right-handed hitting Sanchez will likely platoon at first base with Garrett Jones this season but played third base against Spain.Athletics 4, Italy 3PHOENIX Jed Lowrie had two hits that including an RBI double and Yoenis Cespedes drove in a pair of runs to help the Oakland Athletics beat Italy 4-3 in an exhibition ahead of the World Baseball Classic. The Chicago Cubs Anthony Rizzo homered in the fourth for Italy, which opens the WBCs first round Thursday against Mexico. Minnesota Twins minor leaguer Chris Colabello also homered and Washington farmhand Mike Constanzo added an RBI double in the ninth. Associated PressTampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria takes a cut Tuesday against the Minnesota Twins in Fort Myers. Tampa Bay won 8-5.

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CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLESCOREBOARD On the AIRWAVES TODAYS SPORTS BICYCLING 12 a.m. (NBCSPT) Cycling Paris-Nice, Stage 3, from Chatel-Guyon to Brioude (Same-day Tape) COLLEGE BASKETBALL 10 a.m. (SUN) Clemson at Virginia Tech (Taped) 7 p.m. (ESPN) North Carolina at Maryland 7 p.m. (ESPN2) Georgetown at Villanova 8 p.m. (38 MNT) Vanderbilt at Florida 9 p.m. (ESPN2) West Virginia at Oklahoma 11 p.m. (ESPN2) Stanford at California NBA 7:30 p.m. (FSNFL and SUN) Orlando Magic at Miami Heat 9 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at San Antonio Spurs NHL 8 p.m. (NBCSPT) Colorado Avalanche at Chicago Blackhawks SOCCER 2:30 p.m. (FSNFL) UEFA Champions League: Round of 16 Juventus FC vs Celtic FC Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider. Prep CALENDAR TODAYS PREP SPORTS BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING 4 p.m. Lecanto at Crystal River 4 p.m. South Sumter, Central at Citrus Spring trainingAMERICAN LEAGUE WLPct Kansas City 1001.000 Seattle 101.909 Baltimore 72.778 Tampa Bay 84.667 Chicago 53.625 Cleveland 85.615 Boston 65.545 Minnesota 65.545 Houston 55.500 Toronto 55.500 Detroit 56.455 Oakland 56.455 Texas 37.300 New York 38.273 Los Angeles 28.200 NATIONAL LEAGUE WLPct Washington 53.625 Miami 43.571 Colorado 65.545 San Diego 76.538 Arizona 55.500 Atlanta 66.500 Philadelphia 55.500 Los Angeles 45.444 San Francisco 45.444 St. Louis 45.444 Chicago 57.417 Milwaukee 46.400 Pittsburgh 37.300 New York 25.286 Cincinnati 211.154 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams do not. Tuesdays Games Toronto 6, Baltimore 6, tie, 10 innings Washington 7, Houston 1 Tampa Bay 8, Minnesota 5 Cleveland 4, San Francisco 3 San Diego 7, L.A. Dodgers 3 L.A. Angels 6, Cincinnati 4 Kansas City 8, Oakland 2 Colorado 6, Chicago Cubs 3 Atlanta 2, N.Y. Yankees 0 Todays Games Toronto vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Boston at Fort Myers,1:35 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10 p.m. Thursdays Games Toronto vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, 1:05 p.m. Washington vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Minnesota (ss) vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Minnesota (ss) at Fort Myers, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Tampa Bay vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Miami vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. Texas vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Seattle (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m. Detroit vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, 6:05 p.m.NBA standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division WLPctGB New York3621.632 Brooklyn3426.5673 Boston3227.5425 Philadelphia2336.39014 Toronto2338.37715 Southeast Division WLPctGB Miami4414.759 Atlanta3326.55911 Washington1939.32825 Orlando1744.27928 Charlotte1347.21732 Central Division WLPctGB Indiana3822.633 Chicago3426.5674 Milwaukee3028.5177 Detroit2339.37116 Cleveland2040.33318 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division WLPctGB San Antonio4714.770 Memphis3919.6726 Houston3328.54114 Dallas2633.44120 New Orleans2140.34426 Northwest Division WLPctGB Oklahoma City4316.729 Denver3922.6395 Utah3228.53311 Portland2831.47515 Minnesota2037.35122 Pacific Division WLPctGB L.A. Clippers4319.694 Golden State3427.5578 L.A. Lakers3030.50012 Phoenix2139.35021 Sacramento2140.34421 Mondays Games New York 102, Cleveland 97 Miami 97, Minnesota 81 Orlando 105, New Orleans 102 Milwaukee 109, Utah 108, OT Denver 104, Atlanta 88 Portland 122, Charlotte 105 Golden State 125, Toronto 118 Tuesdays Games Boston 109, Philadelphia 101 L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, late Denver at Sacramento, late Todays Games Utah at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Orlando at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Toronto at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Chicago at San Antonio, 9 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursdays Games Oklahoma City at New York, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.NHL standingsEASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Pittsburgh231580308167 New Jersey231085255665 N.Y. Rangers211182245553 Philadelphia2411121236872 N.Y. Islanders2310112227078 Northeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Montreal231454327159 Boston201433316046 Ottawa231274285244 Toronto231490286857 Buffalo249132206377 Southeast Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Carolina221381276762 Tampa Bay2310121218173 Winnipeg2210111215668 Florida237115195983 Washington219111195962 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Chicago232003437544 Detroit231184266360 St. Louis211182246061 Nashville23995234759 Columbus237124185369 Northwest Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Vancouver211164266158 Minnesota221192245256 Edmonton22895215462 Calgary20884205768 Colorado21894205162 Pacific Division GPWLOTPtsGFGA Anaheim211533337560 Phoenix221183256763 Dallas 221192246163 Los Angeles201172245448 San Jose201064244744 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Mondays Games Phoenix 5, Anaheim 4, SO Toronto 4, New Jersey 2 Pittsburgh 4, Tampa Bay 3 Los Angeles 5, Nashville 1 Tuesdays Games Columbus 4, Edmonton 3, SO Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 2 N.Y. Islanders 6, Montreal 3 Washington 4, Boston 3, OT Carolina 4, Buffalo 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Florida 4, Winnipeg 1 Detroit 2, Colorado 1 Chicago 5, Minnesota 3 San Jose at Vancouver, late St. Louis at Los Angeles, late Todays Games Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 8 p.m. San Jose at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Phoenix at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Thursdays Games Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Florida at Washington, 7 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. Florida LOTTERY Here are the winning numbers selected Tuesday in the Florida Lottery: CASH 3 (early) 8 0 7 CASH 3 (late) 1 9 5 PLAY 4 (early) 6 3 3 3 PLAY 4 (late) 1 9 9 6 FANTASY 5 16 24 33 35 36 MEGA MONEY 1 18 28 36 MEGA BALL 19 B4WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 over Devin Reed 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. The results continued in favor of Citrus as the Hurricanes swept the two matches in doubles play. Citrus Everett and Pospiech won the pro set 8-4 over Crystal Rivers Allen and White in No. 1 doubles. Canes duo Hetland and Hayes scored an identical win over the Pirates Johnson and Epstein 8-4 in No. 2 doubles. Were improving, Citrus assistant coach Holly Pospiech said. Were slowly improving. Were working on it and were gaining. The boys are coming along. Citrus did a great job today, Crystal River head coach Bill Reyes said. Were still growing. I was glad to see Matt Allen build some momentum and win. said. (And) that is a pretty incredible feat continuing that streak, especially at this level, and the quality of competition she continues to play. Juliann (Johnson) performed well, he continued. She has been streaky this year, and this was a good night for her. So Im happy to see that, and our No. 5 Leah Stanley moved to 7-1 this year. We have the tools going forward ... and we should be OK. Lecanto (7-2) took three out of the first four matches. Leah Stanley defeated the Panthers Kelena Klippel 6-3, 7-5, and Lecantos No. 3 Simi Shah won in a pro-set 8-1 against Hunter Pospiech. The Citrus No.1 tandem of Dodd and Paige Jordan were defeated in three sets by the sister duo of Amber and Madison Gamble 1-6, 6-3, 2-6. The Gamble sisters have a 7-2 doubles record this season. Lecantos No. 2 doubles Shah/Megan Jervis completed the doubles sweep with 6-2, 6-0 victory over Pospiech/Johnson. Citrus (5-3) won the next two singles matches, as No. 4 Johnson won in straight sets, 6-4, 6-0 over Jervis. No. 1 Dodd (8-0) continued her winning ways by soundly defeating Amber Gamble 6-0, 6-0. Dodd kept up a variety of forehands and backhands to keep Gamble off balance throughout the match. The final and deciding match of the night was the No. 2 singles match between the Canes Jordan and the Panthers Madison Gamble. Gamble cruised in straight sets 6-1, 6-1. It was a good match, Dodd said. It was hard, but it was really cold ... and I can always improve. Everyone played really hard, and everyone did a good job even though I lost my singles, but we did really well in doubles, Amber Gamble said. wanted to put the bat on the ball and hit it hard. It was an important early-season game for both clubs. Citrus improved to 7-2 overall and 2-0 in District 6A-6, while Lecanto slipped to 3-5 overall and 0-2 in district. I thought this was a great game, said Lecanto coach Robert Dupler. Right now, they are the top dog (in 6A-6). They have great pitching, they play great defense and theyre battletested. Citrus pitching was provided by Kelly Abramowich, who surrendered one run on five hits with no walks and nine strikeouts. Three of the hits off of Abramowich came from Lecanto freshman third baseman Amber Hopkins, who followed a twoout, sixth-inning double by Kelsie Lilley with a run-producing single, narrowing the Hurricanes lead to 21. With Hopkins taking second on the throw to the plate, the tying run was in scoring position, but Abramowich pitched out of the jam by fanning Sidney Holstein. Yant nearly matched Abramowich on the mound, giving up two runs on three hits in her six innings on the mound. She walked two and struck out four. This was a great game to be a part of, a great game to watch and a great game to play in, said Citrus coach Larry Bishop, agreeing with his coaching rivals opinion. We made an adjustment (at the plate) in the sixth, and I told the girls after the game I was very pleased with that. No matter what the situation is in the game, they have to be able to come out with this approach. Jessica Liptrap collected three singles to pace the Citrus offense. But it was the Hurricanes defense and pitching that particularly impressed. She had good movement tonight, Dupler said of Abramowichs pitching. She put the ball where she wanted it to go and her curve ball was breaking extremely well. We only got five hits off of her and we didnt really capitalize on the ones we had. Were getting better, but like I told the kids tonight, at some point in time they have to take pride in their position, they cant accept mediocrity. Were beyond making excuses. SWINGContinued from Page B1 GIRLSContinued from Page B1 STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleLecanto High School right fielder Sidney Holstein catches a fly ball to end the first inning against the Citrus Hurricanes. RBIs) and an RBI double by junior third baseman Ben Wright that scored Wilkinson. Cody (Bogart) and Ben Wright have put in the time and thats probably why theyre reaping the rewards, Brady Bogart said. But the Eagles (6-1, 2-1) struck back with three runs on two outs in the sixth following a controversial no-call at third base, where it appeared a Springstead runner left for home early on a fly-ball out. Junior second baseman Jake Laferty led off the inning with the double and junior right fielder Kyle Cottilletta later pounded a triple to left-center field to extend the rally for the Eagles. Springstead added two more in the seventh with the help of a pair of Citrus errors. I liked the way we battled, Brady Bogart said. But theres no need to come back if we do what were prone to do here at Citrus High, which is pitch and play defense. We expect our hitters to have a better two-strike approach, and we expect our fielders to make routine plays. As much as we struck out, we did compete against Brosher. Hes going to do that to every team he faces. When you face pitchers like that, youre going to get about four to six base runners and youve got to win 32 instead of losing 9-8 if you make the plays. Citrus plays 6:30 p.m. Friday at Lecanto in another 6A-6 matchup. SHORTContinued from Page B1 TENNISContinued from Page B1 Warriors baseball routs MeadowbrookThe Seven Rivers Christian baseball team won 12-0 in five innings at Meadowbrook Academy in Ocala on Tuesday. Parker Pillsbury tossed five innings of no-hit baseball with five strikeouts to grab the win for the Warriors. Offensively, John Iwaniec (3 for 4, two RBIs) and Cory Weiand (3 for 3) paced Seven Rivers. The Warriors (3-0) overall host Cornerstone Academy at 5:30 p.m. Friday.Panthers pummel Wolf Pack 16-5The Lecanto baseball team grabbed a 16-5 triumph over West Port in District 6A-6 play Tuesday night in Ocala. From the mound, the Panthers Joey Spell improved to 20 by giving up two earned runs in five innings of work. Offensively, Scott Stearns (double, RBI), Levi OSteen (double, two RBIs, four runs), Nate Hines (three RBIs, run), Shawn Supinski (1 for 1, two RBIs) and Caleb Southey (1 for 2, two RBIs, three stolen bases) paced Lecanto. Lecanto (3-3 overall, 1-1 district) hosts Citrus on Friday.Pirates drop district contest at TavaresThe Crystal River softball team fell 3-1 on the road in district play to Tavares. The result was a marked improvement from the two teams first meeting, an 11-0 win by the Bulldogs. Maegan McMichen (run, stolen base) and Emily Laga (double, RBI) each went 1 for 3 for the Pirates. Bridget Whitley and Chloe Lane each had a hit as well. Rachel Roe (six innings, seven hits, four strikeouts, three earned runs) was the hard-luck loser for Crystal River. CR 5-5 overall, 0-4 District 5A-7) plays 7 p.m. Thursday at home against Eustis.Warriors romps past MustangsThe Seven Rivers Christian softball team took a 22-3 victory at Meadowbrook Academys Ocala campus Tuesday night. Tessa Kacer (3 for 3, five runs, two RBIs, double, homer) led the Warriors charge at the plate and also got the win from the circle by giving up one earned run and four hits while striking out eight batters over five innings. For Seven Rivers, Gabby Wright (4 for 5, two runs, four RBIs, double), Katie Dreyer (3 for 4, two runs, two RBIs) and Allison Green (2 for 3, three runs, three RBIs) also had big nights at the plate. The Warriors (4-2 overall) play Friday at Weeki Wachee. From staff reports SportsBRIEFS

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Associated PressThe Boston Celtics Kevin Garnett, left, drives against the Philadelphia 76ers Arnett Moultrie in the first half of Tuesdays game in Philadelphia.SPORTSCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 B5 Associated PressPHILADELPHIA Paul Pierce had 18 points and 11 rebounds, and Avery Bradley scored 22 points to lead the Boston Celtics to a 109-101 win over the Philadelphia 76ers on Wednesday night. Kevin Garnett scored 18 points to help the Celtics continued their push up the Eastern Conference standings. The Celtics entered in seventh, but were no more than two games behind the next three teams ahead in the standings. Led by Pierce, the Celtics controlled the game and used a 9-0 run midway through the fourth quarter to seal the win. Last May, these two teams went to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. On Wednesday, the Sixers lost for the ninth time in 10 games and are well out of the playoff race. Jrue Holiday had 18 points and 10 assists for the Sixers, and Thaddeus Young had 19 points and 10 rebounds. The Sixers beat the Celtics twice this season after stretching the Celtics to seven games in last year's playoff series. But the Sixers are a team in freefall because of injuries and a roster ill-equipped to handle the losses of postseason standouts Andre Iguodala and Lou Williams. There was some mild concern late in the fourth period when Holiday, their All-Star point guard, was hurt. Holiday grabbed his right ankle and hobbled back on defense after an awkward drive. He hopped on one foot after a steal attempt went nowhere, but did stay in the game. Like so many teams over the last 15 years, the Sixers had no real answer for Pierce. He hit his first four 3-point attempts, each one more crushing than the last. When the Sixers went on a mini-run to close within eight, Pierce and Jason Terry connected on consecutive 3s to build a comfortable lead. Pierce had averaged 21.8 points over 54 career games against the 76ers. At one point in the first half, both teams were 15 of 32 from the field. The Celtics found other ways to separate themselves from the Sixers: Boston went to the free-throw line and made 3s. The Sixers missed 9 of 11 3-point attempts in the first half and were 0 for 3 from the free-throw line. The Sixers finished 5 of 21 on 3s and 14 of 18 on foul shots They did score 64 points in the paint. Pierce helps Celtics top 76ers Boston climbs up conference standings Associated PressNEWARK, N.J. Nate Thompson scored twice and Martin St. Louis and rookie Alexander Killorn each had a goal and an assist as the Tampa Bay Lightning snapped a five-game losing streak with a 5-2 victory over the struggling New Jersey Devils on Tuesday night. Cory Conacher and Vincent Lecavalier each had two assists as the Lightning won for only the second time in eight games and extended the Devils winless streak to six games (0-5-1). Anders Lindback had 25 saves for the Lightning, surrendering late goals to Adam Henrique and Patrik Elias.Capitals 4, Bruins 3, OTWASHINGTON Eric Fehr scored 37 seconds into overtime, and the Washington Capitals rallied from a three-goal, first-period deficit to beat the Boston Bruins 4-3 in a thriller reminiscent of the teams seven-game playoff series a year ago. Pinched by two defenders, Fehr was falling forward as he got off the shot that hit the upper right post and went in, giving the Capitals their seventh win in 10 games as they attempt to climb out of the lower echelons of the NHL standings. Fehr also got the assist on the game-tying goal with 6:05 to play in regulation, when he worked his way through a crowd into the offensive zone and with four Bruins around him managed to get the puck ahead to Wojtek Wolski for the backhanded stroke past Tuukka Rask.Hurricanes 4, Sabres 3RALEIGH, N.C. Alexander Semin had a goal and two assists, linemate Eric Staal added three assists and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the Buffalo Sabres 4-3. Jiri Tlusty, Joe Corvo and Jussi Jokinen also scored for Carolina. The Hurricanes won their fourth straight and completed a three-game season sweep of the Sabres. Staal picked up his 600th NHL point with the first of his two assists on the night on Tlustys goal in the first period.Blue Jackets 4, Oilers 3, SOCOLUMBUS, Ohio Sergei Bobrovsky, replacing an ineffective Steve Mason, made two spectacular shorthanded saves in overtime and stopped both shots he faced in the shootout to lift the Columbus Blue Jackets over the Edmonton Oilers 4-3. Vinny Prospal had a goal and an assist, and Derek MacKenzie and Jack Johnson also scored in regulation. Artem Anisimov and Mark Letestu scored in the shootout for Columbus, which extended its points streak to four games and is the last team to win back-to-games in the NHL this season.Panthers 4, Jets 1SUNRISE Tomas Kopecky, Shawn Matthias and Mike Santorelli scored for Florida and Jonathan Huberdeau converted a penalty shot in the Panthers 4-1 victory over the Winnipeg Jets. Jacob Markstrom stopped 21 shots for his first win of the season for Florida. Kyle Wellwood scored for Winnipeg and Ondrej Pavelec finished with 22 saves while falling to 8-11-1 this season.Rangers 4, Flyers 2NEW YORK Rick Nash snapped a third-period tie and then added an insurance goal as the New York Rangers held on to beat the Philadelphia Flyers 4-2 for their third win in a row. Nash fired a shot that sneaked under the right arm of goalie Ilya Bryzgalov 2:50 into the third to give New York its second lead of the game. He doubled the advantage to 4-2 with 8:18 left, fighting off a hook on his hands by defenseman Kimmo Timonen and then making a shift from backhand to forehand to score his seventh goal.Islanders 6, Canadiens 3UNIONDALE, N.Y. Radek Martinek scored the tiebreaking goal eight minutes into the third period and the New York Islanders handed Montreal its first regulation loss in nearly a month with a 6-3 victory. Martineks shot from the left point on a pass from Kyle Okposo eluded goaltender Carey Price at 7:56. It was the first goal of the season for Martinek. Lightning snap skid Capitals win in OT against Bruins MLB BRIEFSMiller promises Super Bowl title for BroncosDENVER Von Miller is pulling a Joe Namath and its only March. Denvers star passrusher is already guaranteeing a Super Bowl title for the Broncos next year. Miller said hes dedicating the season to his 6-year-old cousin who recently emerged from a coma after a car accident in West Texas that also injured his mother and 8-year-old brother. On Monday, Miller tweeted: You can post this where ever.. Denver broncos will win the Super Bowl in the 2013 season. He added hash tags UJEREMIAH and IGUARANTEEIT58. The linebacker later told The Associated Press when the boy, Jeremiah Clark-Martinez, came out of his coma, he was asked a series of questions to test his memory and among the first things he said was that his cousin, Von Miller, played for the Denver Broncos. That inspired Miller to make his pledge.Bills Merriman announces plans to retireBUFFALO, N.Y. Linebacker Shawne Merriman is calling it Lights Out on his career, announcing on his website he plans to retire. In a message posted Tuesday night on shawne merriman.com, the player wrote he is electing to retire on his own terms, saying he will leave while I know I can still physically play the game. Merrimans decision comes a week before he was eligible to become a free agent, and after spending parts of the past three seasons in Buffalo. Last year, he was cut by the Bills in August before re-signing with them in October. Hes a three-time Pro Bowl selection and the NFLs 2005 defensive rookie of the year. Merrimans best seasons came with San Diego, where he earned the nickname Lights Out for being one of the leagues top pass-rushers.Braves Uggla hit in neck in win over YankeesTAMPA Atlanta second baseman Dan Uggla said he is fine after getting hit by a pitch in the back of the neck during the sixth inning of the Braves 2-0 win over the New York Yankees on Tuesday night. Uggla left the game after being struck by minor leaguer Branden Pinders pitch. Theres a little sensation, Uggla said. Im good. Luckily, I never went black or anything like that. I feel fine. Ichiro Suzuki doubled for the Yankees in his first game since being involved in a vehicle accident. From wire reports Associated PressDURHAM, N.C. Seth Curry scored 20 points in his final home game and No. 3 Duke pulled away to beat Virginia Tech 85-57 on Tuesday night. Fellow senior Ryan Kelly added 18 points in his second straight strong performance since coming back from an injury for the Blue Devils (26-4, 13-4 Atlantic Coast Conference). They shot nearly 52 percent yet struggled for a while before outscoring the Hokies 32-10 during the final 12-plus minutes to finish unbeaten at home for the 17th time in school history. Erick Green scored 25 points on 10 of 19 shooting to lead Virginia Tech (13-17, 4-13), which hasnt beaten a team in the upper half of the league standings all season.No. 9 Kansas State 79, TCU 68MANHATTAN, Kan. Angel Rodriguez had 21 points and 10 assists and Shane Southwell and Martavious Irving both added 15 points as Kansas State beat TCU. With the Senior Night victory, the Wildcats (25-5, 14-3 Big East) stayed tied with No. 4 Kansas for first place in the Big 12 with one regular season game to play. Kansas State seniors Jordan Henriquez, Irving and Rodney McGruder extended their career win total to 99, more than any class in school history. Kyan Anderson had 29 points for the Horned Frogs (10-20, 1-16), while Devonta Abron added 10.No. 15 Marquette 60, Rutgers 54PISCATAWAY, N.J. Jamil Wilson scored all 10 of his points in the second half, including the late 3-pointer that put Marquette ahead for good, and the Golden Eagles rallied for a victory over Rutgers. Vander Blue had 22 points and made two game-sealing free throws with 13.9 seconds left for Marquette (22-7, 13-4 Big East), which kept pace with Georgetown and Louisville for the regular season title with one game remaining. Junior Cadougan added points 10 for Marquette. Myles Mack scored 11 points and Jerome Seagears added 10 for Rutgers (13-15, 4-13). The Scarlet Knights held their biggest lead at 35-23 early in the second half. Each time Marquette got close Rutgers answered but, with the Knights leading 50-43, the Golden Eagles went on a 122 run to take their first lead since 2-0. Wilson hit a 3-pointer with 3:05 remaining to make it 55-52.No. 24 Notre Dame 66, St. Johns 40SOUTH BEND, Ind. Jerian Grant had 21 points and eight assists, Eric Atkins added 15 points and Notre Dame held St. Johns to 18 percent shooting in the second half in a victory. The Fighting Irish (23-7, 11-6 Big East) ended a three-game losing streak to the Red Storm (16-13, 8-9), who lost for the fifth time in six games. Notre Dames Cameron Biedscheid and SirDominic Pointer of the Red Storm got in a skirmish with 1:46 left in the game. Both players were given technicals and ejected. Jack Cooley went 0 for 2 in the first half against St. Johns before scoring 12 points in the second half. Seniors lead No. 3 Duke past Va. Tech, 85-57 Kansas State beats TCU 79-68 Associated PressTampa Bay Lightning winger Martin St. Louis is tripped up by the New Jersey Devils Travis Zajac during the third period Tuesday in Newark, N.J. The Lightning won 5-2.

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Stewart taking break to direct filmNEW YORK Comedy Central said Jon Stewart will take a break from The Daily Show starting in June to direct and produce his first feature film. The network said Tuesday correspondentwriter John Oliver will host the fake news show for the eight weeks of original episodes scheduled during Stewarts hiatus. The British-born Oliver has been a Daily Show regular since 2006. Stewart is expected back in the anchor chair shortly after Labor Day, Sept. 2. The film, titled Rosewater, was written by Stewart and is based on a book by Iranian journalist Maziar Bahari. London resident Bahari was falsely accused of being a spy and imprisoned by the Iranian government in 2009 while covering Irans presidential election.Tailor to stars pleads guilty to tax fraudNEW YORK A tailor who counted star athletes including Rickey Henderson and Wilt Chamberlain among his clients has pleaded guilty to skirting about $2 million in sales and income taxes. Mohanbhai Ramchandani pleaded guilty Tuesday, state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said. His company, Mohans Custom Tailors Inc., also has had local stars Patrick Ewing and Darryl Strawberry among its clients and made an appearance on Bravos The Real Housewives of New York City. Ramchandani and his business failed to pay at least $1.7 million in state and local sales taxes since 2002, Schneiderman said. The tailor failed to pay at least $256,000 in personal income taxes from 2007 to 2009, he said. Authorities said a whistleblower first raised concerns over Ramchandanis tax practices. They said one indication of fraud was the use of numbers on his tax forms that added up to multiples of 10, an outgrowth of his belief in numerology. Ramchandani was born in Ahmadabad, India, and moved to the United States in 1972. He could face up to three years in prison at sentencing. He has agreed to pay $5.5 million to settle civil claims.Jepsen drops Scouts event over gay rightsNASHVILLE, Tenn. Carly Rae Jepsen is canceling her performance at the national Boy Scouts of America Jamboree because of the organizations exclusion of gays. Jepsen, the Canadian pop singer best known for the inescapable hit Call Me Maybe, made the announcement Tuesday on Twitter. I always have and will continue to support the LGBT community on a global level, she wrote. Rock band Train also has taken a stand, but pursued a different tack in a post on its website Friday. The group asked the BSA to reconsider its policy rather than immediately pull out of the July gathering. Birthday This could be a very interesting year where your earnings are concerned, but dont leave anything to chance. If you put forth the effort and you handle things properly, you could end up making more money than ever. Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) If you employ a little elbow grease, something you desperately want could come within your grasp. However, dont rely on Lady Luck to do everything for you. Aries (March 21-April 19) Lucky you: You have a very dependable friend who will come to your aid when you need it the most. Your pal will help out quietly, but dont let that stop you from showing your gratitude. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Your brain will be like a sponge, enabling you to absorb whatever knowledge you need. Youll use it advantageously, to boot. Gemini (May 21-June 20) One of your best assets is your ability to fit well into others projects, making your input and presence an integral part of the whole. Cancer (June 21-July 22) Youve done your best to improve your negotiating skills. This will become evident when an agreement needs hammering out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Someone you helped in the past has been eager to find a way to repay you in some manner. What he or she ends up doing will be worth more than your original act. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Something quite pleasant as well as a bit extraordinary is likely to develop through the good offices of certain contacts. What transpires will have far-reaching effects. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) The life span of a rewarding endeavor can be expanded if you seize the opportunity. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) If there is something important you want to discuss with another, the best place to do so would be in a social setting. However, try to lead up to the subject gradually. Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Something that could enhance your material interests might develop. It could be quite surprising, but dont waste time being shocked act on it immediately. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Some good news youve longed for might finally arrive. If this is the case, chances are it should come sometime after lunch. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Instead of trying hard to make things happen, youd be wise to let events take their natural course. Besides, youre likely to do better when youre not in the drivers seat. From wire reports Today inHISTORY MONDAY, MARCH 4 Fantasy 5: 14 18 20 30 35 5-of-5No winner 4-of-5241$555 3-of-57,815$27.50 SUNDAY, MARCH 3 Fantasy 5: 6 13 14 24 27 5-of-51 winner$193,412.10 4-of-5272$114.50 3-of-58,513$10 Today is Wednesday, March 6, the 65th day of 2013. There are 300 days left in the year. Todays Highlight: On March 6, 1933, a national bank holiday declared by President Franklin D. Roosevelt aimed at calming panicked depositors went into effect. (The holiday was supposed to last four days, but was extended until it was gradually lifted starting March 13.) On this date: In 1836, the Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, fell to Mexican forces after a 13-day siege. In 1857, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Dred Scott v. Sandford that Scott, a slave, was not an American citizen and could not sue for his freedom in federal court. In 1912, Oreo sandwich cookies were first introduced by the National Biscuit Co. In 1933, Chicago Mayor Anton Cermak, wounded in an attempt on then-President-elect Franklin D. Roosevelts life the previous month, died at a Miami hospital at age 59. In 1944, U.S. heavy bombers staged the first full-scale American raid on Berlin during World War II. In 1953, Georgy Malenkov was named premier of the Soviet Union a day after the death of Josef Stalin. In 1970, a bomb being built inside a Greenwich Village townhouse by the radical Weathermen accidentally went off, destroying the house and killing three group members. In 1973, Nobel Prize-winning author Pearl S. Buck, 80, died in Danby, Vt. In 1983, in a case that drew much notoriety, a woman was gang-raped atop a pool table in a tavern in New Bedford, Mass., called Big Dans; four men were later convicted of the attack. In 1988, the board of trustees at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., a liberal arts college for the deaf, selected Elisabeth Zinser, a hearing woman, to be school president. (Outraged students shut down the campus, forcing selection of a deaf president, I. King Jordan, instead.) Ten years ago: A somber President George W. Bush readied the nation for war against Saddam Hussein, hurling some of his harshest invectives yet at the Iraqi leader during a prime-time news conference. Five years ago: Twin bombings in a shopping district in Baghdad killed at least 68 people and wounded 130 others. One year ago: Former Texas tycoon R. Allen Stanford was convicted in Houston of bilking his investors out of more than $7 billion through a Ponzi scheme hed operated for 20 years. (Stanford was sentenced to 110 years in prison.) Todays Birthdays: Former FBI and CIA director William Webster is 89. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan is 87. Author Gabriel Garcia Marquez is 86. Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova is 76. Singer Mary Wilson (The Supremes) is 69. Rock musician Hugh Grundy (The Zombies) is 68. Rock singermusician David Gilmour (Pink Floyd) is 67. Actor-director Rob Reiner is 66. Actor Tom Arnold is 54. Actor D.L. Hughley is 49. Rock musician Chris Broderick (Megadeth) is 43. NBA player Shaquille ONeal is 41. Rapper Bubba Sparxxx is 36. Thought for Today: Learn by others mistakes because you do not live long enough to make them all yourself. Author unknown. INSIDE THE NUMBERS To verify the accuracy of winning lotter y numbers, players should double-check the numbers printed above with numbers officially posted by the Florida Lottery. Go to www. flalottery.com, or call 850487-7777. Spotlight onPEOPLE FloridaLOTTERIES SO YOU KNOW Last nights winning n umbers, Page B4 Page B6WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE TodaysHOROSCOPE Carly Rae Jepsen Jon Stewart Associated PressNEW YORKThe scene: a Manhattan art-house theater. The cause: a campaign against the gas drilling process known as fracking thats being led by more than 100 celebrities, including Yoko Ono, Sean Lennon, Robert Redford, Mark Ruffalo and Mario Batali. Outside, demonstrators in hazmat suits circle the theater. Inside, actress Scarlett Johansson attends a benefit screening of Gasland, the documentary film that has become the movements manifesto. Johansson tells The Associated Press that Avengers co -star Ruffalo introduced herto the cause, and she found the film incredibly shocking. The campaign has galvanized hundreds of thousands of followers, but as with many activist causes, the facts can get drowned out by the glitz. Now, some experts are asking whether the celebrities are enlightened advocates or NIMBYs crying Not in my backyard! even as their privileged lives remain entwined, however ruefully, with fossil fuels. Much of the anti-fracking activism is centered in New York City, where concerts, movies and plays use huge amounts of energy, gourmet chefs including Batali cook with gas, and most people the glitterati included heat with gas. Theres no doubt critics of hydraulic fracturing a practice colloquially known as fracking that involves injecting water, sand and chemicals into underground rock to free vast reserves of gas have some legitimate concerns. There have been documented cases of leaking gas ruining nearby well water, of air pollution and of problems from the waste the drilling generates. Experts say those are important parts of the story but far from the whole story. With proper regulation and enforcement, gas provides a very substantial health benefit in reducing air pollution, compared with coal-fired power plants, said Daniel Schrag, director of Harvard Universitys Center for the Environment. That is a theme not adequately covered in the debate over fracking, agreed Michael Greenstone, an environmental economics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a former top adviser to the Obama administration. Greenstone is studying the local health effects of fracking, but he said its not scientifically accurate to ignore the tremendous health gains from the coal-to-gas shift. The main celebrity antifracking campaign took off last summer when Ono and Lennon, her son, founded Artists Against Fracking. Their family farm sits near gas reserves in New York, and they fear fracking might be allowed in the area. In truth, celebrities are rich, and they use far more energy and resources than anyone else. Theres this grass-roots NIMBY revolt against fracking, said Michael Shellenberger, who heads the Breakthrough Institute, an Oakland-based environmental think tank releasing a report this month on the environmental benefits of natural gas. Even the success that turns people into celebrities often involves tremendous amounts of energy. Restaurateur and Food Network star Batali started with one restaurant. He now has 16 in New York, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Hong Kong and Singapore all using natural gas to cook. Some of his restaurants use a percentage of green power to help offset some of our non-renewable energy consumption, and we are looking to do more in the future, Batali spokeswoman Elizabeth Meltz wrote in an email. Some celebrities acknowledge the complexities. Obviously the entire society is addicted to fossil fuels, and the reason that were fractivists is to try to move toward a renewable economy, Lennon said. That doesnt mean that any of us have extracted ourselves completely from the society itself, because the entire citys running off of oil and gasoline. Associated PressSundance Institute president and founder Robert Redford speaks Jan. 19 during a press conference at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Redford is among the 100 celebrities leading Artists Against Fracking. Hydraulic fracturing, a new practice colloquially known as fracking that involves injecting water into underground rock to free vast reserves of gas, has been linked to documented cases of leaking gas ruining nearby well water, of air pollution, and of problems from the waste the drilling generates. Celebrity fractivists: Advocates or NIMBYs? In truth, celebrities are rich, and they use far more energy and resources than anyone else. Theres this grass-roots NIMBY revolt against fracking.Michael Shellenbergerhead of the Breakthrough Institute, an Oakland-based environmental think tank.

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794603Looking For Something Unique?Check out todays Classified ads.SHOP NOW! EDUCATIONSection CWEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Machining classes open doors to careers SUELOUGHLIN Tribune-StarTERRE HAUTE, Ind. After David Hohenstein took an introductory machining class at Terre Haute North Vigo High School, he found he liked it and decided to take additional courses. He likes working with metal and seeing what you can transform it into. Machining requires such skills as being able to measure and knowing fractions and decimals, he said. It requires being patient, careful and safe. He finds its easier to learn those math skills in a hands-on class, where he has to apply it. Machining is not his first career choice; hed rather be a police officer. But if that doesnt work out, Id like to be a machinist. He knows a strong demand exists for skilled machinists, in the Wabash Valley and elsewhere. Its a skills gap the Vigo County School Corp. is working to address. Martin Nagy, in his third year as Norths machine tool teacher, has had success this year in generating interest in the program, with 70 students taking introductory classes. Before that, enrollment had been down. To me, its all about exposure. This stuff is so cool and so fun, Nagy told the Tribune-Star. Some will be interested in pursuing it, and others wont, but unless they try it, theyll never know. Guidance counselors work with students to explain what we do and let them make an informed choice. Its not a fit for everybody, the teacher said. Nagy has worked with local industry to learn what they need and also to help him recruit students. Last year during a school open house, representatives of JWS Machine attended, did a demonstration and answered students and parents questions. That way, parents and kids Associated PressTerre Haute North Vigo High School junior David Hohenstein, 17, keeps an eye on a drill bit as he makes parallel clamps in Martin Nagys machining class in Terre Haute, Ind. After Hohenstein took an introductory machining class, he found he liked it and decided to take additional courses. See TOOL/ Page C2 Hands-on learning gives students a feel for the job Marathon moments Monster find has geologist fishing for more JOHNGUERRIERO Erie Times-NewsERIE, Pa. Presentday Erie was under a saltwater ocean 364 million years ago. And a top-of-the-foodchain predator in that ancient ocean ate sharks for lunch. And for breakfast and dinner, too. Erie geologist Scott McKenzie is patiently putting together pieces of the skull and shoulder armor of that powerful prehistoric fish, Dunkleosteus, the rest of whose remains are embedded in sandy shale in an Erie County location he cannot reveal in an agreement with the private property owners. Now that spring is almost here, McKenzie, colleagues from other universities and geology students will return to the site to see if erosion through wind, rain and snow have exposed more bones. Were restricted to surface collection, said McKenzie, assistant professor of geology at Mercyhurst University. The landowners dont want a significant hole dug on the land. And digging could damage the missing pieces, he said. Some years, they find nothing. Other years, they find more bones to add to the collection. Its eroding slowly much too slowly for my taste, said McKenzie, who makes several trips to the site during the year. In 10 years, or sooner, McKenzie hopes to have the skull and shoulder armor of Dunkleosteus put together and displayed at the universitys Sincak Natural History Collection, where he is curator. When his work is complete, the specimen will be impressive the head, including the shoulder armor, will rival the front of a Volkswagen Beetle in size, he said. Dunkleosteus was arguably the most terrifying creature during the Devonian period, and its huge jaws opened so fast they created a suction force that pulled prey into its mouth, according to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Among its many fossil specimens of the creature, the museum has a giant armored skull of Dunkleosteus terrelli on display. McKenzie doesnt know if the fish hes reconstructing is the terrelli species until he gathers more material. Dunkleosteus named See FISH/ Page C4 STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the ChronicleRunners cross the finish line during the Five Points of Life Kids Marathon Friday at the Lecanto High School track. JAMESBLEVINS CorrespondentLECANTOFirst, the middle schoolage kids took off from the starting line, followed by wave after wave of thirdthrough fifth-graders, for a total of 852 registered students. Some were sprinting, some jogging, but each and every one of them was running with the same goal in mind to finish the last 1.2 miles of a marathon. The Life South fourth annual 5 Points of Life Kids Marathon concluded Friday afternoon at Lecanto High School track. The event was part of Life Souths mission to encourage young children to get active and healthy. Sixteen schools from the county were represented during the meet Central Ridge, Citrus Springs, Crystal River, Floral City, Forest Ridge, Hernando, Homosassa, Inverness, Lecanto, Pleasant Grove and Rock Crusher elementary schools, Citrus Springs, Lecanto, Crystal River and Inverness middle schools and Pope John Paul II Catholic School. Five Points of Life is an affiliate of Life South and strives to educate young people in the five ways you can sustain life through donation: blood, aphaeresis, marrow, organ and tissue and cord blood. The Life South Blood Mobile was on hand for any willing donors. Over the past three months, registered kids have been logging miles after school, during school or at home. Eventually their efforts added up to 25 miles just one mile and 385 yards short of the Olympic marathon distance. The kids were given a chance to finish their goal distance together on the track Friday. The event featured music, food and medals handed out to all runners. Forest Ridge sixth-grader Marleigh Miller performed the national anthem just prior to the start of the race. Implementation coordinator for Five Points, Jay Eckert, was happy to see a large turnout from Citrus County schools, which matched the amount of participants for the same event in Gainesville. The kids marathon started out in Gainesville in 2007, Eckert said. Now its branched out to eight locations including here in Citrus County. Awesome turnout. The Citrus County School District is so supportive, and thats one of the reasons its so big here. Tom Davis, district community development coordinator for Life South, was at the finishing chute, handing out medals to the kids as they crossed the line. Citrus County has set the bar for the kids marathon throughout our system, Davis said. So its quite the event. The P.E. teachers have Running event encourages children to get active to stay healthy SUSANORR Evansville Courier & PressEVANSVILLE, Ind. When members of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority participated in the Womens Suffrage March of 1913, they were motivated by the hope that women would someday gain the right to vote. According to historical accounts, the marchers were jeered and jostled as they made their way through Washington, D.C. Members of the black sorority had to fight for the right to march next to other women instead of behind them. When alumnae of that same sorority gathered in Evansville on Sunday to mark the 100th anniversary of the event, they celebrated how much has changed since then. There were some bold and brave and courageous women who took a stand on March 3, 1913, for our right to vote, said Stephanie Terry just before the group began a re-enactment of the 1913 march. Terry is a member of Delta Sigma Thetas Evansville alumnae chapter, an organizer of Sundays event and a member of the Vanderburgh County Council. About 40 people took part in the march from the Civic Center to the Each of the children finishing the course received a medallion. Sorority marks 100th anniversary of suffrage march See MARCH/ Page C3 See RUN/ Page C2

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C2WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEEDUCATION Fort Cooper Days Fort Cooper Days 000DT0O For more information, call 726-0315 Sat., March 16 & Sun., March 17 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fort Cooper State Park 3100 S. Old Floral City Rd., Inverness Experience Florida History Adults thru 13 yrs. old $6 ~ 12 Yrs. & Under Free Come and Enjoy Second Seminole War & Reenactments at 11a.m. & 2p.m. Period Arts & Crafts Great Food and Refreshments Living History Demonstrations Exhibits/Demonstrations Hosted by Hosted by the Friends of the Friends of Fort Cooper Fort Cooper Knights of Columbus Golf Tournament Saturday March 23 Citrus Hills Oaks course 7:30 am registration 8:00 am tee time $60 per golfer Lunch and Prizes included Shotgun Start Best Ball 000E54V Email rs1@tampabay.rr.com for more information. HONORS Crystal River High School students Kotcha Schillings and Casidy Newcomer have been selected the West Citrus Elks Lodge students of the month for February. Kotcha Schillings is the son of Todd and Wenona Schillings. He has a 4.2 cumulative GPA and has taken three AP classes, one of which he passed the national exam for and received college credit. Schillings ranks 18 out of 286 seniors. He has always carried a rigorous schedule with honors and AP classes. His senior year he is taking dual enrollment classes at the College of Central Florida. He will graduate with 12 college credit hours. Schillings has more than 100 community service hours. He is a Bright Futures candidate and a Dell Scholarship semifinalist. He is the student leader of First Priority at Crystal River High School. He is also involved in FCA. He played football during his freshman, sophomore and junior years. He received a varsity letter for two years. He is also part of the first graduating AVID class of CRHS. Schillings plans to attend Trinity Baptist College in Jacksonville and pursue a degree in youth ministry and business. Casidy Newcomer is the daughter of Jay and Anne Newcomer. She is a Bright Futures candidate and has a weighted GPA of 4.3. She participated in volleyball, soccer and track. She was named captain of the volleyball team her senior year and earned the best offensive player for her team. She is a county candidate for volleyball player of the year. Newcomer has served as president of the Quill and Scroll International Honor Society and the Future Builders Association. She is an active member of the National Honor Society and the National Society of High School Scholars. She has been editor-in-chief of the yearbook for two years. She was selected as the advertising/marketing winner at a statewide yearbook leadership camp. Newcomer has 100 hours of community service. She has been a volleyball camp counselor, assisted in the summer weightlifting program, worked at the Family Resource Center and worked at community festivals. Newcomer is undecided about her college plans, but has been accepted to Florida Atlantic University, Clemson University, Auburn University and Florida State University. Citrus High School senior Lindsay Connors has been selected as the Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 student of the month for December 2012. Connors is the daughter of Doug and Linda Connors of Inverness. She has a 4.534 weighted GPA and is a member of the National Honor Society. She has more than 84 community service hours, volunteering with the Salvation Army, Relay For Life, NHS, basketball youth camps and volleyball youth camps. She is involved with Link Club, as a student advisory; Key Club, with the student community support group; basketball; softball; Breez, a four-part audition singing group; and National Honor Society. Connors was on the junior homecoming court; senior homecoming court (runnerup); captain of the basketball team her senior year; captain of the volleyball team her senior year; and MVP for volleyball team senior year. She holds the CHS school record for basketball (most 3-pointers made in a season). She made honor roll each quarter all four years. She was on the Chronicle All County Basketball Team and Chronicle All County Volleyball Team. She plans to attend UCF after graduation. Citrus High School sophomore Tara McLeod has been selected as the Inverness Elks Lodge 2522 student of the month for January. McLeod is the daughter of Phill and Heather McLeod. She has a 4.38 weighted GPA and is a member of the SWAT and Interact clubs. She is also a member of the swim team. McLeod has more than 60 hours of community volunteer service. She is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Her interests include sports, reading and spending time with friends and family. She plans to attend a major university and earn a masters degree. FUNDRAISERS Citrus Springs Middle School is holding its annual Falcon Family Festival from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at the school. All proceeds benefit local families in need. The ticket price of $2 includes access to concessions, carnival games and music by the CSMS band. An additional $8 wristband includes unlimited inflatable rides. Monetary contributions to help defray expenses are appreciated. Donated items for a silent auction can be dropped off at the front office during school hours. For more information, call Muriel Dufresne at 352-3442244 ext. 4411. The Rotary Club of Sugarmill Woods and the Rotary Interact Club of Lecanto High School have joined together to support the Box Tops for Education fundraiser for Lecanto Primary School. Box Tops for Education labels can be found on more than 300 products that families purchase and use on a daily basis. There are two drop boxes one in the lobby of the Sugarmill Woods Country Club and the other in the Military Outlet Store on West Citrus Avenue in Crystal River. For a listing of the products, go to www.RotarySMW.com. The labels can also be mailed to the Sugarmill Woods Rotary Club. P.O. Box 8, Homosassa Springs, FL 34447. SCHOLARSHIPS ANDCONTESTS The Festival of the Arts Committee is offering $1,500 scholarships to graduating seniors from any Citrus County high school or homeschooled graduating seniors who are interested in continuing their education in the visual arts. Applications may be obtained from their high school guidance counselors or call Jaret at 352-726-0366. Applications must be returned to the Festival of the Arts Committee by April 8. Citrus 20/20 Inc., in support of its Youth Needs aspiration, is offering a $500 scholarship for academic year 2013-14 for collegebound students who have fulfilled the requirements for graduation from an accredited Citrus County secondary school. Scholarship applicants will be evaluated on their SAT/ACT score, GPA, anticipated major, community involvement, extracurricular activities and written essay. Applicants selected as finalists will be interviewed and evaluated by the Citrus 20/20 scholarship committee. Award of the scholarship is contingent upon verification of the recipients enrollment at an institution of higher learning accredited to confer a baccalaureate degree by its office of admissions. Applicants may obtain the scholarship application by visiting the Citrus 20/20s website at www.citrus2020.org or from their high school guidance counselor. Applications must be received no later than 5 p.m. March 15. Applications may be submitted by email to info.citrus2020 @gmail.com or mailed to Citrus 20/20 Inc., P.O. Box 1141 Lecanto, FL 34460-1141. For more information, call Lace Blue-McLean at 352201-0149. The Citrus County Shooting Club is offering scholarship money to students graduating from Citrus County high schools who are planning on a career in some form of law enforcement. Interested students may inquire at their schools guidance office. Applications are available at the clubs website at www.ccsc.us, or by calling Jim Echlin at 352-746-0806, or Luis Michaels at 352-7462414. Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club awards scholarships each year to deserving students who attended Yankeetown School for at least two years and graduated, or will graduate, from Dunnellon High School or Crystal River High School. Also eligible are homeschooled seniors, those attending college and maintain a 3.0 GPA, and those who have worked after graduation but now have concrete plans for resuming their education. To be considered for a scholarship, students are asked to write a personal essay and complete a questionnaire, have a 3.0 GPA or higher and submit teacher and counselor recommendation letters. Those who wish to apply may obtain an application from guidance counselors at Dunnellon or Crystal River high schools, at A.F. Knotts Library on 56th Street in Yankeetown, or download it from the Womans Club website, www.yiwomansclub.com. Selection will be made by members of the YankeetownInglis Womans Club Education Committee. Completed applications should be mailed to: Yankeetown-Inglis Womans Club Education Committee, P.O. Box 298, Yankeetown, FL 34498, and must be postmarked no later than April 5. For more information, call 352-447-2057, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, or email yiwomansclub@gmail.com. Disabled American Veterans, Gerald A. Shonk Chapter 70 of Inverness, is offering a $1,000 scholarship for the 2013 school year. The scholarship is offered to a disabled veteran, veteran, survivor of a veteran or dependent of a veteran. The recipient shall be enrolled in a full-time course of instruction leading to a degree program or to a vocational skill. Selection shall be conducted by the scholarship committee and will be based on the applications submitted. The procedure requires that applicants write a statement detailing course of study, goals and why they are deserving of this award. Applications may be picked up at guidance department offices in area high schools, the Withlacoochee Technical Institute, Central Florida Community College guidance offices, or by calling John Seaman at 352-8600123. All applications must be returned to the DAV Chapter at 1039 N. Paul Drive, Inverness, FL 34453 by March 31. The Hernando-Citrus County Farm Bureau will award one or more scholarships up to $1,000. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must be a senior, carry at least a 2.5 grade point average and plan to major in an agriculture-related field in college. Application forms are available in the guidance offices of all Hernando and Citrus County high schools and in private schools. All applications must be postmarked or hand delivered to the Farm Bureau office in Citrus County or in Hernando County by April 1. For information, call 352-796-2526 or 800-282-8317. The BFF Society is offering a minimum of two $1,000 scholarships. The scholarships are available to all U.S. citizens attending Citrus County schools or Citrus County residents seeking a professional career. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above. Applicants may be subject to an interview. The scholarship must be used to attend an accredited college, junior college or professional school. Applicants may be graduating high school seniors or adult students seeking to further their education. Candidates will be judged on academic achievement and financial need. Scholarships will be awarded for the 2012-13 school year and are to be used for tuition and books only. The check will be made payable to the educational institution for the benefit of the scholarship recipient. Scholarship winners will be notified by April. It will be necessary for the scholarship winner(s) to attend the BFF Society Awards Banquet on May 13 or forfeit the scholarship. If the monies for the scholarships are not used as indicated, all monies will be rescinded to the founding chapter. Applications must be postmarked by March 31. The application must be in its entirety or it will not be considered for review. Kotcha Schillings Casidy Newcomer could talk to an industry professional about employment opportunities and educational requirements, said Doug Dillion, Vigo County School Corp. director of careertechnical education. Thats been one of the challenges. People dont understand enough about machining and industry opportunities, Dillion said. Its one thing for a teacher to tell parents and kids, but it takes on added significance when an employer talks about it. According to Nagy, the cooperation with the local machine shops has been instrumental in helping us out everything from technical advice, to donated materials, to having jobs available for our students when they graduate. The camaraderie with the local shops will be key to our success. Last year, Laurence Cross, general manager at Tri Aerospace, took Nagy to a machining convention in Chicago, and another company took two of Norths guidance counselors. It helped educate the counselors about the opportunities the industry offers. Nagy also attends meetings of a committee that is working to address local companies needs for skilled machinists. Those attending include representatives of industry, education and WorkOne. The group is chaired by Cross, who said the machine shops have a challenge finding skilled workers. Were trying to figure out ways to get the word out that manufacturing in this area is a very good career path. Cross said that Nagy is helping fill that skills gap by his involvement with local industry. The students out of his class are very good in the fundamentals we need from machinists, he said. Part of what the committee wants to accomplish is to make sure we are staying in tune with them (educators), so they have the curriculum that works for us, Cross said. Nagy said there are 26 shops within a 15-mile radius of Terre Haute North, and representatives of several have visited his classes and talked to his students about expectations. The precision machine technology career pathway offers dual college credit opportunity and industry certification, Dillion said. Its a great pathway for kids to go into, with potential to make high wages. The program is also offered at South Vigo and West Vigo high schools. Dillion is concerned that sometimes, there is too much focus on standardized testing. Our ultimate goal is to make every student a productive citizen, Dillion said. We want them to have high skill, high wage, high-demand jobs so they can give back to the community and contribute to the tax base. The machining career pathway is one route to get there, he said. TOOLContinued from Page C1 said. So its quite the event. The P.E. teachers have really embraced this, Davis said. It aims to help the kids to get up off the couch and go run or walk. Superintendent of schools Sandra Sam Himmel took hold of the microphone during the assembly and expounded warmly on the event and its many merits within the school system. Our schools have afterschool running programs and our teachers volunteer to work with the students, Himmel said. And this is like the big finale. Our teachers are excited, our students are excited. I just cant tell you how excited I am to be here. Citrus Springs sixthgrader and runners club member Michael Morrow was the first middle school runner to cross the finish line. Morrow daringly held off a last minute challenger to his lead before powering home on the final curve. We run every week except for one day, Morrow said of his running club. I enjoy it. Crystal River Middle Schools Cheyenne Dohner won the girls middle school race and is no stranger to front running as she also won the county middle school cross country two-mile championship this year for the Pirates. I like to run, Dohner said. Its fun. Bruce Sheffield, the districts coordinator of Health, Physical Education and Special Programs, could be seen hustling about the event. The goal is to get the kids moving, Sheffield said. Nowadays with childhood obesity, were trying to get these kids motivated early. One of my goals is hopefully getting cross country back in the middle schools ... as a feeder for the high schools. Sheffield said. Second-grade student Noah Rawlings of Inverness Primary ran with his dad, Travis Tatman, a Lecanto graduate and member of the 1994 cross country state championship team. My favorite distance to run is three or four miles, Rawlings said. Local sponsors of the event include: Citrus Memorial hospital, Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center, WYKE, Central Florida College, Citrus Orthopedic and Joint Institute, Christie Dental, Progress Energy, Holiday Inn Express, Walmart, DRC Sports and Calypso Concessions. RUNContinued from Page C1 One of my goals is hopefully getting cross country back in the middle schools ... Bruce Sheffielddistrict coordinator of health and physical education. See CHALK / Page C3 The precision machine technology career pathway offers dual college credit opportunity and industry certification.

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For more information or an application, contact Dianne Micklon at 352-527-7442 or trechuck@tampabay.rr.com. The Daughters of the American Revolution are offering scholarships at three different levels local, state and national. The local Fort Cooper chapter offers a $500 award for a graduating senior girl who has at least a 3.0 grade point average and is accepted at an accredited college or university. The Florida state society DAR provides $500 scholarships for male or female high school graduates and postgraduates with a minimum 3.0 GPA who has been accepted at an accredited college or university. Guidelines and applications are available at Citrus County public and private high schools. The national DAR has many scholarships available for high school and college graduates. For information about them, visit the website www.dar.org. Click on Scholarships and follow the prompts. For more information, contact Shirley Hartley, DAR scholarship chairman, at 352270-8590 or visit the website at www.rootsweb.ancestry. com/~flfccdar/.The SECO Board of Trustees has voted to continue SECOs scholarship program for 2013. The board has authorized an increase in the scholarship amount from $2,500 to $3,000 per student in recognition of the ever increasing cost of higher education. Up to 12 high school seniors from the cooperatives service territory will receive assistance to go on to a college or technical school after graduation. To qualify, graduates must reside in a home being served by SECO and be enrolled in an accredited college, university or vocational/technical school by the end of 2013. Applications are now available at area high school guidance offices and at any of SECOs customer service centers in Marion, Lake, Citrus and Sumter counties. They must be returned to SECO no later than March 29. The Homosassa Civic Club is offering the Beri Hagerty-Phelps Scholarships to graduating high school students and adults who live within the boundaries of the Homosassa Elementary School District and/or the Homosassa Special Water District. Information and applications are available through guidance counselors at Crystal River High School, Lecanto High School, Withlacoochee Technical School, or College of Central Florida. They are also available at www.homosassaseafood festival.org Applications must be received by March 31. For more information, call 352-6289333 The Citrus Community Concert Choir is now accepting applications for its 2013 scholarship award of $1,500. Application is open to graduating high school seniors or enrolled college students and residents of Citrus County or children of Citrus County residents. Past and present choir members and relatives of choir members are also eligible. Applicantsmay obtainscholarship qualifications and application forms from their school guidance counselors or online at www.citruschoir.com. Completed applications must be received no later than April 30. The College of Central Florida is awarding dozens of scholarships to qualifying students interested in taking honors classes at the Citrus campus this fall semester. A major component of CFs Honors Institute, the Community of Scholars Honors Program offers incoming high school graduates two-year tuition scholarships, currently valued at $3,000 per academic year, while offering partial scholarships to those who are currently attending CF. Students in the honors program are free to pursue the degree option of their choosing at CF, with the scholarship requirement being successful participation in a limited number of honors-level classes that also serve to fulfill degree requirements. Students may also take classes at any of the CF locations each term, and are not bound to enrolling only in classes offered at the Citrus campus. Besides financial benefits, the Community of Scholars offers members priority registration each term. Typically, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.75 is needed to qualify for the Community of Scholars, although applications for those with a slightly lower GPA may be considered in some cases. Students wishing to be considered for scholarships should call Dr. June Hall at 352-746-6721.CLASSESANDCOURSESFor information about outdoors and recreational classes in Citrus County, see the Sunday Sports section of the Chronicle. Sherrie Geick is offering scrapbooking classes at Whispering Pines Park recreation building. The all-day class fee is $25; the 1/2-day class fee is $12.50. Bring your own supplies. The classes are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays. Class dates are April 20, May 18, Aug. 17, Sept. 21, Nov. 16 and Dec. 21. For information, call the park office at 352-726-3913 or go to www.inverness-fl.gov. Withlacoochee Technical Institute is offering GED prep classes Classes are $30 per term and are offered during the day and evening in many locations in Citrus County. In addition to GED preparation classes, adult education students are also offered free career counseling, and financial aid and post-secondary application assistance, as well as free child care for eligible adult education parents. ESOL classes are available for those wanting to learn to speak, read and write English. Tuition scholarships are available to qualified candidates. For information, call Student Services at 352-7262430 ext. 4326 or ext. 4363, or go to www.wtionline.cc/ programs.htm#adult. Withlacoochee Technical Institute would like input from community members regarding what classes they would like to see offered at the school. To offer suggestions, log on to www.wtionline.cc, then click on Community Education and fill out a suggestion form. Join the excitement as the Homosassa Public Library begins a new Celebrate Reading program from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Celebrate Reading is a session consisting of two programs geared toward helping preschool and elementary school-age children develop literacy skills, improve their reading and gain a love of books. The first program, PAWS to Read, gives children the opportunity to build confidence in their reading ability by reading aloud to a certified therapist. The second program, Reading Pals, pairs teens and younger children together. Teens read storybooks aloud to one or two younger children at a time. Children may wish to draw or write about a story they like. Listening to stories, talking about stories and reading aloud are great ways to improve literacy skills while having a good time. For information, call the youth librarian at 352-628-5626. Citrus County Parks & Recreation is offering baton classes at the Citrus Springs Community Center. Classes are open to all girls EDUCATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 C3 000E83J 2 LOCATIONS 7364 Grover Cleveland Blvd. Homosassa 352-628-9588 Highway 44, Crystal River 352-795-9081 DANS FAMOUS BURGER & FRIES $ 5.95 1 POUND SNOW CRABS $ 9.99 1 1 4 POUND LIVE MAINE LOBSTER $ 15.99 10 FRIED SHRIMP AND FRIES $ 7.99 3:00 6:00 PM EARLY BIRDS $ 9.95 DANS IS WHERE LENT IS MEANT 000DTL3 6151 N. Suncoast Blvd., Suite 1C Next to Seven Rivers Regional Medical Center Mon.-Fri. 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. Accepting New OB/GYN Patient s Fresh Flown-in New England Seafood Fresh Frog Legs Fresh Gator Bites New Location New Location New Location 859 US HWY. 41 S. Inverness, FL 859 US HWY. 41 S. Inverness, FL 859 US HWY. 41 S. Inverness, FL NOW OPEN NOW OPEN NOW OPEN Peppermint Patties Peppermint Patties Peppermint Patties 000E7B9 859 US Hwy 41, S., Inverness, FL 419-4878 Wed. Sun 11 AM 7 PM or until last customer leaves Closed Mon. & Tues. Featuring We accept all major credit cards 000E0T2 000DM2B Anastasias 2494 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy., Hernando, FL (Heritage Hills Plaza) 352-513-4860 7 AM 8 PM, Mon.-Sat. 7 AM 2 PM, Sun. 000E869 BREAKFAST SPECIAL $4.95 Big Man Plate 3 Pancakes, 2 Eggs, 2 Bacon, 2 Sausages LUNCH SPECIALS $5.95 Gyro, Rueben, Junior Greek Salad with soup All lunch specials come with fries or soup and coleslaw DINNER SPECIALS Two Dinners for $15.99 Homemade Meatloaf, Fried Fish, Calamari All dinner specials come with soup or salad, choice of potato or vegetable and dessert Greek Pastries NOW Available! Evansville Museum, theEvansville Courier & Press reported. As they walked, some held signs with slogans such as Women are citizens too!! and No is not an option. Let us vote!! The march was followed by a short dramatic production at the museum. The drama, written by local resident Kelley Coures, told the story of the 1913 event through both narrators and actors who played sorority members who participated in the event. The characters spoke of their fears, of being spit upon and shoved by onlookers, by seeing crowds of unsympathetic men along the parade route. That 1913 parade was an attempt to renew public attention for the suffragists cause. By that time, the movement had already been active for more than 60 years. (It would be seven more years before the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.) So activist Alice Paul came up with the idea for a parade in Washington. It was to be held one day before Woodrow Wilsons presidential inauguration to capitalize on the crowds in town for that event. According to 2001 article written for the Library of Congress and excerpted on its website, the procession included more than 5,000 participants. Marchers included women from other countries where women could already vote, American women representing various professions, state delegations and men who supported the suffragists cause. Participants marched down Pennsylvania Avenue to the U.S. Treasury Building, where a group of women and children presented an allegorical drama. Along the parade route, participants were heckled and shoved, and the male supporters who marched were ridiculed by onlookers, Helen Keller, the deaf and blind writer and activist, was slated to speak at the event but was so exhausted and unnerved by the unruly scene that she was unable to deliver her speech as planned, according to the Library of Congress article. Delta Sigma Theta groups around the U.S. organized commemorative events on Sunday, including one in Washington, D.C. They did so as part of anniversary celebrations for the sorority, which was formed at Howard University in January 1913. Some of the modern Delta Sigma Theta alumnae said the event gave them new respect for their founding members courage. My mind goes back to how young those girls really were, said Debra Meriweather, who joined the sorority while a student at the University of Evansville. They placed themselves in a life-threatening position. Dr. Ruthie Jimerson, an Evansville dentist and the vice president of the Evansville alumnae chapter, agreed. Jimersons daughter is a high school senior nearly the same age as the sorority members were during the 1913 march. The mother said those young women lived out the advice that she gives to her daughter and daughters friends. Thats what I always tell them: Stand for right. And thats what those young ladies did, and that was amazing to me. MARCHContinued from Page C1 Associated PressBerrien County Michigan Judge Mabel Mayfield, center, organizes marchers during the start of a Benton Harbor-St. Joseph Delta Sigma Theta alumnae chapter Womens Suffrage March Reenactment on Sunday. CHALKContinued from Page C2 See CHALK/ Page C4

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C4WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEEDUCATION Saturday, March 23 ~ 11:30 a.m. Museum Cafe ~ 10466 W. Yulee Drive in Old Homosassa Bands Include: Jillian Govoni Southern Heart Haley Schroeder Sophie Robitaille Zero Gravity Saint Taylor Gates open at 11:30 a.m. Music starts at noon $5 Adults $2 Teens 12 and under Free B ENEFITING B IG B ROTHERS AND B IG S ISTERS OF C ITRUS C OUNTY 000E5JR Museum Caf Open Bring Chairs No coolers, pets or outside food. www.ncfblues.com Present: the Fourth Annual 2013 For information call 352-503-3498. 000E5J9 Limited seating. Reservations Necessary. Call: 352-341-6427 Proudly Present C oncerts ourthouse at The Old Tickets $ 10 per person Including Refreshments at the 1912 Citrus County Courthouse, Inverness Doors open at 6:15 Music starts promptly at 7 p.m. Edward Jones Financial Services Dillons Cinnamon Sticks, Smith Optical Services, David Rom State Farm Insurance, Dave and Thelma Noble, Rebecca Pujals-Jones, Highlander Caf of Crystal River, Charles Davis Funeral Home and Crematory, Joyces Courtside Pub, Deco Caf, Elegant Catering, 3Js Pizza, Ice Cream Doctor, Winn Dixie Supermarkets, Sweetbay Supermarkets, Suncoast Chiropractic and Anonymous T O B ENEFIT THE C ITRUS C OUNTY H ISTORICAL S OCIETY S PONSORS : Brendan Nolan Thursday, Mar 14, 2013 000E8L6 Friends of the Floral City Library March 15th 5 p.m. 8 p.m. $3 admission March 16th 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Free admission Community House/Lions Club 8370 E. Orange Ave., Floral CityTwo Day Event!Great selection of hard cover and paperback books along with up-cycled jewelry, handbags & more at affordable prices. Most hard cover books are $1, paperbacks are 50. Some collectables. Call 352-726-3671 for more infomation. and boys ages 4 to college age. No experience is necessary. For information, call Diane Sorvillo at 352-5276540. All classes are taught by Sorvillo, a former Majorette Queen of America and twotime national champion. Classes and times are: 4:45 to 5:30 p.m. New Beginners (ages 4 to 7). 5:30 to 6:15 Competitive team class. 6:15 to 7 p.m. Solo competitive class. 7 to 7:45 p.m. New Beginners (ages 8 and older). Class fees are $32 per month, or two different classes for $45. Free tutoring is available from state-approved providers to students who scored a Level 1 or Level 2 on the Reading or Math FCAT last spring at all Citrus County Elementary Schools and the Renaissance Center (Title I schools). Enrollment forms will be mailed to all qualifying families. Tutoring is available after school, at day care sites or community centers, in home or online. Spaces are limited, so if requests for free tutoring exceed the amount of funding available, the school district will prioritize services. Neither the Florida Department of Education nor the school district promotes or endorses any particular Supplemental Educational Services provider. For information, call Maribeth Smith at 352-7261931, ext. 2321.MISCELLANEOUS Delta Kappa Gamma Educational Society will sponsor an informational meeting on Changes in Teacher Evaluation at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14, at the new Crystal River High School Library. Different perspectives on the new evaluation standards will be discussed by Jonny Bishop and/or Susie Swain, Citrus County Schools, and by Melissa Pfeiffer-Hermann of the Citrus County Teachers Association. Interested members of the public and Citrus County teachers are invited to attend. For more information, call DKG President Bonnie Ignico at 352-726-4236or go online to www.dkg.org. Withlacoochee Technical Institute will have a Career Expo and Open House from noon to 2:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at WTI, 1201 W. Main St., Inverness. Enter WTI at the eastern entrance off of Montgomery Street (across from the Suncoast Federal ATM and district services building). For more information, call 352-726-2430, ext. 4326, or visit www.wtionline.cc. A group of students, parents and teachers from Citrus County are going on an educational tour hosted by Education First: Educational Tours based out of Boston, Mass. The group will travel to Dublin, London and Paris from June 17 to 26, 2014. EF Educational Tours helps teachers in North America break down barriers of language, culture and geography by incorporating international travel into their lessons and opening the doors to the Global Classroom. Students will visit historic sites, natural wonders and learn it by living it. EF is the only fully accredited international tour company and a board member of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. A parent meeting will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 12, at Crystal River Middle School auditorium. For more information or to RSVP for the parent meeting, contact Dan Epstein at EpsteinD@citrus.k12.fl.us or 352-613-4478; or Deborah Beck at beckd@citrus.k12. fl.us or 352-422-6921. The tour website is www. eftours.com/1366896 to register for Epsteins group or www.eftours.com/1367131 to register for Becks group. The website link includes pricing information and the tours itinerary. Take Stock in Children of Citrus County is seeking male and female role models to help support new student scholars who will enter the program in the Spring. The program, sponsored by the Citrus County Sheriffs Office, offers deserving youths in Citrus County a college scholarship and a caring mentor. Take Stock scholars join the program in the sixth, seventh grade or eighth grade and are assigned a mentor who meets with them once a week, during regular school hours, and helps the student achieve the goal of a graduating from high school and going to college. The next mentor training is in March. For information, call Pat Lancaster, program coordinator, at 352-422-2348 or 352-344-0855. The Citrus County YMCA is currently seeking to connect community volunteers through their Y Community Champions program. The Y Community Champions program embraces volunteers to help in a variety of areas with the YMCA organization. The benefits of volunteering include personal development, health and wellness, building relationships and having a community connection. Volunteers are currently needed in the areas of coaching, program assistants, special events and office administration. All volunteers must undergo a background screening. To volunteer at the YMCA, call 352-637-0132, or stop by the office at 3909 N. Lecanto Highway in Beverly Hills. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County are now registering children for the beforeand afterschool programs at each club. Clubs open as early as 6 a.m. for before-school programming, with children remaining until the school bus transports them to their respective schools. Buses also transport children in the afternoon when school is out to the clubs for the afterschool program, with parents picking up children by 6 p.m. To register a child or to learn more about the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County programs, call the Central Ridge Boys & Girls Club at 352-270-8841, the Robert Halleen Boys & Girls Club at 352-795-8624, or the Evelyn Waters Boys & Girls Clubs at 352-341-2507, or the administrative office at 352-621-9225. Hernando Elementary School is looking for donations of working Kindles Nooks, iPod Touches, iPads, Internet tablets, digital cameras and digital recording devices to be used by students in the classroom. If you have any used but working electronic devices from the list above or would like to donate a new electronic device, contact Heather Bone or Laura Manos at 352-726-1833 Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. To contact someone outside of these hours, call Heather Bone at 352-462-4768. Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County Central Ridge and Robert Halleen clubs seek mentors to work with their members. The two clubs have received federal grants through Boys & Girls Clubs of America, allowing mentors to come into the clubs to serve as tutors and special friends of members. All mentors will undergo complete background security checks with fingerprinting. Cost of background checks will be covered in most cases through grant funding by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Citrus County. Mentors may be assigned more than one child. A training session will be done prior to mentoring. All mentoring will take place at the club sites. Those who are interested, may call Amy Stonestreet at 352-270-8841 or Lane Vick at 352-621-9225. Girl Scouts of West Central Florida (GSWCF) is seeking troop leaders both men and women over age 18, to volunteer as positive adult role models for girls. In addition to troop leaders, GSWCF is seeking volunteers to fill a variety of other positions. For information on volunteering, visit www.gswcf.org or contact Kristie Wiley at 813-262-1765 or volunteer@gswcf.org. Springs Masonic Lodge No. 378 has an ongoing program to fixdonated computers, which are then passed on to schoolchildren who cannot afford one. The program will accept computers, printers and monitors. Individuals or businesses who wish to donate computers are asked to call the Lodge secretary at 352-6280338 to arrange for pick-up. The Clerk of the Court is in need of volunteers as Special Service Clerks The clerks office welcomes volunteer applications from students in need of Bright Future community service hours or work-study hours. All time donated is greatly appreciated, and volunteering as few as two or three hours a week is a tremendous help to the clerks office. Consider partnering with the clerks office to meet community service requirements while volunteering as a Special Service Clerk (SSC). SSCs are invaluable members of the clerks office in assisting Deputy Clerks perform many functions for the citizens of Citrus County and serve as liaisons between the clerks office and the citizens of Citrus County. Call the office for information. Call Tanika Clayton, human resources generalist, at 352-341-6483 or send inquiries by email to tclayton@clerk.citrus.fl.us. Students at the College of Central Florida have the option of renting selected textbooks. Rented textbooks are available for less than 50 percent of the cost of purchasing a new printed textbook. Many of the textbooks required for CF courses are available for rental at the Ocala campus bookstore, 3001 S.W. College Road, or online at www.CF.edu. Books are rented by the semester and students may highlight or mark rented books just as if they were purchased. CHALKContinued from Page C3 after the late David Dunkle, one of the Cleveland museums former curators varied from 15 to 30 feet in length, and possibly weighed up to 4 tons. McKenzie said the Erie County find likely wasnt a full-grown adult, but still was probably 15 to 25 feet long and weighed about 1 ton. He said it could be the largest of its kind found in Erie County. If you caught him on a rod and reel, youd be in for the fight of a lifetime. And if you fell in (the water), heaven help you because no one else could help you, he said. He displayed the Erie County remains of the ancient fish and pieces of others in a university classroom last week. Talk about Jaws. The giant predator could snap a prehistoric shark in two with its razor-sharp jawbones, according to the Cleveland Museum. And yet it was a bit of an oddity. The fish did not have developed teeth. Instead, the edges of their jawbones kept sharp by rubbing against each other like self-sharpening scissors, the museum said on its website.A special occasionThough McKenzie wont reveal the site, he said the remains would be difficult to locate. They are along the side of a stream bank in a heavily wooded area, and a passer-by also would have to recognize that the bones are embedded in the rock, he said. Some geologists use their tongue to lick bone to distinguish it from rock. The tongue tends to stick to the bone because even all these years later it draws water to the tongue, he said. McKenzie doesnt use that method. Im a little bit of a germophobe, he said. McKenzie and Mercyhurst geology students use tools to strip the rock from the bone. Its a delicate procedure because you dont want to leave any tool marks on the bone, he said. McKenzie gets a lot of help in gathering pieces of this monster fish and pieces of others like it. He frequently relies on collectors to scout out sites and bring in the remains. The shoulder armor he is now reconstructing was found by Kirk McFadden, president of the Gem City Rock and Mineral Society. McFadden lifted it out of the ground and carried it out in a backpack, McKenzie said. McKenzie said its not rare to find scraps of bone, but he called it a special occasion to find a whole plate or the skull and shoulder armor. The body of the fish probably wasnt preserved, he said. Most specimens from North America have been collected from Cleveland shale in Ohio, said Joe Hannibal, curator of invertebrate paleontology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Its really interesting to see somebody put together a reconstructed skeleton based on material from somewhere outside of Ohio, Hannibal said. Its good to have another pair of eyes and another brain there to try to figure out how these bones go together, and Scott has a lot of experience in paleontology and hes very insightful, he said. Hannibal said the rocks of western Pennsylvania are somewhat different from those of the classic fossil fish-collecting areas in the Cleveland area, and represent somewhat different environmental conditions. And so the fossils that Scott has may or may not be somewhat different from the ones in this area, but that remains to be seen, he said.Golden ticketWhen hes not reconstructing the fish, McKenzie said he keeps the pieces in a storage area with proper ventilation and security. The geologist said he once kept fossils of that fish and other prehistoric species at home until his wife insisted that they be moved because the buckets and buckets and buckets of rock fragments took up too much space. FISHContinued from Page C1 Associated PressScott McKenzie, 58, assistant professor of geology and curator of the Sincak Natural History Museum at Mercyhurst University, with pieces of shoulder armor bone from a Dunkleosteus, a powerful prehistoric fish that could grow up to 30 feet long and hunted sharks.

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EDUCATIONCITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEWEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 C5 2013 Universal Uclick () from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.)Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________ The Mini Pages popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come. Newspaper in Education Week (March 4-8) is a special week set aside to call attention to how important newspapers are to everyday life both now, while you are in school, and later, when you grow up.Read real news Most of us enjoy reading fiction or make-believe stories. Many of us also like to read about the real world. Reading real-life stories in newspapers and The Mini Page can teach you information-gathering skills that will help you throughout your life. Many reading experts say that although kids should read fiction, they also need to read more nonfiction, or facts. They need to know how to read and understand information that will help them live more interesting and informed lives. We read to gain knowledge. Whether you read a print newspaper or online, newspapers are full of interesting information.Newsy NewspaperInformation, Please Newspapers often give information about: Papers touch your life with information you need: Where in your newspaper can you find this information? Put the page number in the boxes below (or find it online). Weather forecasts help you be prepared. Entertainment sections suggest what movies to see or TV shows to watch. Display ads might feature a new dress for mom. Classified ad sections can help you find a pet. SkimmingSkimming the newspaper pages enables readers to pick out quickly the stories they want to read. Next week, The Mini Page is all about quartz. Words that remind us of newspapers are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: ADVERTISEMENT, ART, COMMUNITY, DESIGN, DISPLAY, IDEA, IMPORTANT, KNOWLEDGE, NATION, PERSONALS, PHOTOS, SECTIONS, STORIES, UNDERSTAND, VISUALS, VOCABULARY, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHO, WORDS.NewspapersTRY N FIND NEWSPAPERS ARE FULL OF REAL LIFE! U N D E R S T A N D E S I G N S L A N O S R E P H O T O S S V I S U A L S T O R I E S W E D I S P L A Y T I N U M M O C K N O W L E D G E R E H W R T W H E N A T I O N Z A R T D I H Y R A L U B A C O V K Q S O A D V E R T I S E M E N T H N T N A T R O P M I D E A W F S from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickBasset Brown The News Hounds TMReady Resources from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: visit it. At the library: Mary Bowman-Kruhm from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick The Mini Page, like your local newspaper, often uses captions to give facts about a story and to explain how what is going on in the picture adds to the story. We looked back through our past issues to come up with a few. You will want to read the captions in your newspaper, too. Keep in mind that headlines also give information.A rocket launchCaptions Give Facts Read online You may read your newspaper on the Internet. Today many papers have websites or online editions. Papers have started websites for several reasons: younger readers who are used to using the Internet. up-to-the-minute news without waiting for the next print edition. into the print version. Newspaper readers may enjoy an online version because: even when away from home. paper resources. email or share stories with friends online. it easier to read. photo courtesy NASAThe Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, Falcon 9 rocket launches the Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station on Oct. 7, 2012.Protective gear Boys wear protective gear while playing lacrosse. Players are not allowed to hit an opponent in the head, on the back or below the waist.photo courtesy US Lacrosse/Peyton WilliamsA seashell homephoto by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission A queen conch (kahngk) snail looks out of its shell. The beautiful pink motherof-pearl that coats the inside of the shell is smooth and comfortable against the snails soft body. Rookie Cookies RecipeEasy Tomato Cucumber SaladYoull need: 14 to 12 cup chopped cilantro (optional) 14 teaspoon salt 14 cup fresh lemon juice What to do:1. Place tomatoes, cucumber and cilantro in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt. 2. In a separate small bowl, whisk together oil, lemon juice and sugar. 3. Pour lemon mixture over vegetables and stir to coat. 4. Chill for an hour to blend flavors. Serves 4 to 6. You will need an adults help with this recipe.from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick Nancy: Why did the teenager study while flying to his vacation? Ned: He wanted a higher education! Noah: What grade was the eyeball given in math class? Nina:TM Can you guess the common theme or category? Nelson: Why did Cyclops stop teaching? Nelly: He had only one pupil!Mini Spy .Mini Spy often uses newspapers in class. See if you from The Mini Page 2013 Universal Uclick TM from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickMeet Julianna Bright She is also a painter who got started with kids music when she painted hundreds of girl picnicking with her animal friends. Julianna is a musical performer on the app as well. Julianna began her career in music by playing drums in a punk band. She had to overcome her shyness before she could sing well. She continues to play in adult bands She grew up in Orange County, Calif., and now lives in Portland, Ore. photo by Jason Quigley from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickInformation, Please The Mini Page StaffBetty Debnam Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Daley A rtist Newspaper stories are written by people who know the facts (reporters) for people who dont (readers).Reporters names, or bylines, are usually placed at the beginning of a story.Fiction a plot, characters, settings, conflict, resolution and a theme. You start at the beginning and read to the end.Nonfiction Nonfiction is true and factual. Photographs, maps and other items that aid in the telling are usually included in a newspaper story. You can skim as you read. While skimming, you discover new subjects you may want to learn more about.Tale-telling stories We can use a pyramid to show how tale-telling stories are different, with the beginning at the top.Sections Stories about certain subjects are often grouped together in sections.How many sections does your paper have? Slow beginning The details build up the suspense A climax at the end Once upon a time there lived a young girl who ...Newspaper stories Rather than trying to build up suspense, newspaper stories put the important facts first. Cinderella and the Prince will marry on Saturday. The romance began Directions Newspapers have aids to guide you through the pages. where a story is continued. folio line that gives the name of the paper and the date. to help show locations. Can you find a map in your newspaper? you want to read the story.Letters to the editor Papers often give readers a chance to express their ideas in the letters-tothe-editor section. What would you write a letter about? Ads are created by people who know how to write them to attract customers. Photos that help tell the stories are taken by photographers. Daily News photo by Sally Smith HOW INTERESTING! THIS IS NEWS! Who, When, What, Where Why and How Less important details from The Mini Page 2013 Universal UclickSupersport: Rotnei ClarkeHeight: 6-0 Weight: 184 Hometown: Verdigris, Okla. Butler University guard Rotnei Clarke missed a few games recently with a sprained neck, the result of smashing into a backboard support in a January game. But most of this season Rotnei has been a pain in the ranked Bulldogs in scoring (16.7 points per game average) and ranks among the nations leaders in 3-point shooting percentage. Rotnei, a senior, is one of the sharpest shooters in basketball. He he scored 51 points in one game. He transferred to Butler in 2011. Butler, superbly coached by Brad Stevens, features a smooth-flowing offense and defensive toughness. Opponents, beware of these Bulldogs and also beware of Rotnei, who has given them added bite. TM

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Submit information at least two weeks before the e vent. Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed. Submit material at Chronicle of fices in Inverness or Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to community@chronicleonline.com. Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an e vent. Publication on a special day cant be guaranteed. News NOTES News NOTES Club plans yard/cake saleThe Afro-American Club will have a yard/cake sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 9, at Christ Way Fellowship, 972 Cristy Way, Inverness (at U.S. 41 and Independence). Items for sale will include clothing, medical supplies, electronics and more. For more information, call Cora Covington at 352527-8802 or Carol Bowers at 352-270-3866.NARFE convenes in InvernessChapter 776 of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE) invites all active and retired employees and surviving annuitants to attend the next meeting on Monday, March 11. The meeting will be at the Kracker Shack Caf, 1314 U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Guest speaker will be Dustin Green, Citrus County Fire Rescue fire inspector. The presentation will be on residential fire safety. The meeting will start at 1 p.m., with a short lunch prior to the meeting. For more information, call 352-270-0185.MOPARS Car Club show is March 16The fourth annual All MOPAR Car Show will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday, March 16, at Crystal Chrysler Dodge, 2077 State Road 44, Inverness. Pre-registration is $15; day of show, $20. Registration will be from 8 to 10 a.m. with 40 awards given at 2 p.m. based on a judging process Bring a fire extinguisher for extra points. Join the club for music, food and some great cars. Call Ken at 352-3411165 or Mike at 352-3411019 for information.Ukulele Club to meet March 16Citrus County Ukulele Club will meet at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at Coastal Region Library, 8619 W. Crystal St., Crystal River. Join the club and find out what all the fun is about. Call Gail Lang at 727330-8991, or email ukulelesrfun@gmail.com. COMMUNITYPage C6WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013 CITRUSCOUNTYCHRONICLE Adopt ARESCUED PET Spud Special to the ChronicleSpud is an unusually handsome 2-year-old male Chihuahua mix. He is a super friendly guy and his playful antics will keep you entertained. He is dog friendly, as well. He is up to date on his vaccinations, microchipped and soon to be neutered. Spud is housebroken, walks well on a leash and his foster mom is working on his crate training. Adopt A Rescued Pet Inc. does home visits prior to adoptions, so can only adopt to the Citrus County area. Call 352-795-9550 and leave your name, number and pets name and for a return call. Check www.adopta rescuedpet.com for more pets and the adoption calendar. Tickets on sale for theme dinnerA limited number of tickets are available for the annual theme dinner sponsored by the GFWC Womans Club of Inverness on Friday, March 15, at the Point O Woods Club on Gospel Island. The Wearn Othe Green evening will include traditional Irish food and dessert, door prizes and music, all for $15. Beer and wine will be sold extra. For the third consecutive year, the clubs themed dinner party will feature the music of Johnny Lobo, whose entertainment is full of showmanship, vocals and dancing accompaniment. To reserve a ticket, call Barbara Cooper at 352341-0204. Singles, couples and groups are all welcome. Quilters gather at libraryThe Citrus Friendship Quilters Guild will meet at 1 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at Lakes Regional Library, 1551 Druid Road, Inverness. Meetings are the first and third Thursdays of each month. In addition to the business sessions, there are show-and-tell, workshops and demonstrations. Visitors are welcome. For more information, call Denise Helt at 352344-1675 or Shirley Gorsuch at 352-637-6838. WGP Friends to conveneFriends of the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve will meet at 1 p.m. Friday, March 8, at the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve, 1001 Old Rock Road, Yankeetown. Ivan Vicente, visitor services specialist, Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, will discuss future plans for Three Sisters Springs, including manatee protection at the springs. For directions, visit www.withlacoocheegulf preserve.com. Pharmacist to speak at meetingThe Citrus County Chapter of Mended Hearts will host speaker Dr. Karen Fisher, pharmacist at Citrus Memorial hospital, at 10 a.m. Friday, March 8, in the Gulf Room at the Historic Citrus High School. Fisher will discuss cardiac medications. She will also be available to answer questions on other medications members might have. Mended Hearts is a national nonprofit support organization that includes heart patients, spouses, caregivers, health care professionals and others interested in helping patients with emotional recovery from heart disease. All meetings are open to the public. For more information call President Millie King at 352637-5525, or CMHS cardiovascular services at 352-344-6416. Garden Club to meet in F.C.The March meeting of the Floral City Garden Club will be at noon Friday, March 8, at the Community Center, 8370 E. Orange Ave, Floral City. The program for March will be about raising roses, presented by Chris McMillan. Program starts at 12:30 p.m. with a business meeting following at 1:30 p.m. All meetings are open to the public. For more information, call club President Christine Harnden at 352-341-3247. MARCIEBRUNO Special to the ChronicleAs the soft sun of an early March day begins to peek its way through the fog, we can look out over a field and see rows and rows of tents: Confederates on one side of the field and Union encampment on the other side. The aroma of strong coffee and the smell of bacon cooking on open campfires draws us to the camps. The men are talking among themselves, anxious to know how the battle will be fought today. The women will be tending the fire, as the food cooks and they are hustling to get the day started. The children are moving through the camps, looking for their friends to plan a stickball game later in the day. The cavalry horses begin to neigh and prance as their riders bring them fresh hay and water. They seem to sense the excitement of the coming battle. The men begin to fall into formation and march to colors with the cadence of the drums. There, the flags will be raised and the generals will address their men with the plan for the days battle. They are encouraged to do well and uphold their units honor as they prepare for the conflict. Visitors to the Crystal River Raid begin to drift through the camps and see families working and playing together. Children have begun their games and the women will be dressed in their fine period dresses preparing to go shopping in Sutlers Row. This is where the needs of soldiers and their families can be purchased. Sutlers are merchants with tents set up with goods such as clothing, boots and shoes, uniforms, utensils for cooking, toys for the children, books, patterns and fabrics for the ladies to sew with. During the Civil War, many sutlers followed the battles in order to help the soldiers and make a living. Walking through Sutlers Row at the raid, visitors will come across vendors selling funnel cakes or kettle corn. There will be the smell of Indian fry bread stuffed with wild rice and cheese or fruit. Have a sasprilla or root beer. Across the field, find barbecue sandwiches, black-eyed peas and cornbread, fish platters, hot dogs with all the fixins. No one goes hungry at the reenactment. Visitors can become immersed in the encounter as though they stepped back in time. They can chat with the reenactors while walking through the camps. Reenactors are passionate about history and their hobby. Re-enacting the battles and having living history lessons teaches the next generation about what America endured to get to where she is today. Watch battlefield drills and demonstrations and listen to period music the band is playing. Visit the steel barn at 12:15 p.m. to hear a historical speaker take visitors back to the way people lived during the Civil War. Sunday, visitors may attend church with the re-enactors at 10 a.m. Families travel from across the country to participate in reenactments. One could attend a Civil War battle or Living History demonstration or Education Day almost any weekend all across the United States. The reenactors receive no financial help, but are dedicated to reliving history so that we never have to live through another Civil War. As time for the battle nears, the cavalry soldiers begin to exercise their handsome horses. Many of the animals have been reenacting since they were colts. They have learned not to fear the heavy guns and the musket fire as they run across the field. The time for battle is here. The band plays the martial music of the period, and prayers are offered for the safety of all and for peace in the world. An ear-shattering boom cracks across the field as the cannons fire at the opposing line. As many as 20 field pieces, large cannons weighing close to 2,000 pounds, along with smaller cannons that are easily moved across the field will provide the necessary cover for the infantry charge. The field quickly fills and the once-distinct lines become mixed blurs of the Blue and the Gray. The cavalry presents itself to the field with the beautiful horses prancing about and setting the stage for the infantry. As the troops converge, the doctors, wearing white aprons and carrying bags of water, move through the troops to tend to the injured. These doctors are EMTs, nurses and doctors in real life, as the safety of the participants and the audience is of primary concern. Visitors might even see a medical dog carrying medicines on his back to aid the doctors tending the injured. After the battle, continue to visit with the re-enactors and visit the Confederate Surgical Tent to the left of the battlefield. Here, visitors can see the doctors tending to the wounded. As the days fighting concludes, Taps is played for those who have fallen in battle. The re-enactment is meant to honor both sides and is dedicated to the bravery of all Americans who have fought for their country and given their all, and for those who continue to fight for America today.Marcie Bruno is a veteran Civil War reenactor. Citrus County Historical Society had its annual meeting and election of officers on Feb. 1. The new board is: John Grannan, president; Ron Dumas, vice president; Sharon Padgett, treasurer; Teri Hartman, recording secretary; Mary Ann Lynn, corresponding secretary; and Sharon Curtis, Barbara Engaldo, Kandice Bellamy McPherson, Doug Naylor, Bob Roberts, Wendy Stillwell and Linda Yeomans. Congrats to each of you. Heres whats going on: Through April 12 Citrus County Art Teachers Art. Our local art teachers are beyond great. Come out and see their work. Reception for this fine group is 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 21, at the Courthouse. Call 352-341 6427. Friends of the Library Spring Book Sale Citrus County Auditorium, by the fairgrounds on U.S. 41 South, Inverness. The schedule is: Friday, March 8, 5 to 8 p.m., $5 donation; Saturday, March 9, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., no charge; Sunday, March 10, 1 to 4 p.m., no charge; Monday, March 11, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., half-price day; Tuesday, March 12 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., $3 per bag. Cash or checks only. Call 352-746 1334. March 14, 7 p.m. Concert at the Courthouse. Brendan Nolan will join us with his pitch-perfect Irish voice providing original and traditional songs from his native Ireland. Tickets are $10; doors open at 6:30 p.m.; coffee and dessert. Call 352-341 6427. Floral Citys annual Spring Books and Bling Sale Community House, Lions Club Building at 8370 E. Orange Ave., Floral City. Schedule is: Friday, March 15, 5 to 8 p.m., $3 donation; Saturday, March 16, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., no charge. Call 352-726-3671. March 16, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Olde Hernando School Farmers Market and Flea Market. Cost is $10 per space; separate space for animals. Call Doug at 352-302-5565. This is the third Saturday of each month. Sponsor donations now being accepted for the Olde Hernando School: $500 for a door and $200 for a window. Call Doug at 352-302-5565. April 11 Final jazz concert with Cathy DeWitt and Friends from Gainesville. Big Elvis happenings in April: Elvis in Concert starring Ted Torres Friday, April 26 at 7 p.m. on the Courthouse lawn; bring a chair. Free or $25 for VIP Premiere seating. Call 352-341 6427. When Elvis Came to Town Saturday, April 27, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The play will be in the second floor courtroom where Elvis actually sang. Cost is $25. Call 3523416427. Free all-day Elvis Festival Saturday, April 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Courthouse Square. For full details about the Elvis Festival, check ElvisinFlorida.com. Stumpknockers Elvis Blue Suede Shoes 5K Run/Walk Saturday, April 27, beginning at 8 a.m. For details, visit Elvis5Krun.com.Mary Ann Lynn is corresponding secretary for the Citrus County Historical Society. She can be reached at 352-344-2159. County sees busy schedule for March, April Mary Ann LynnCITRUS CO. HISTORICAL SOCIETY Reliving American history at Holcim Ranch reenactment CRYSTAL RIVER RAID Saturday, March 9, and Sunday, March 10. Gates open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; battle begins at 2 p.m. each day. Re-enactment at Holcim Ranch, 9 miles north of Crystal River on U.S. 19. Entry donation $5 per adult; students 9 through 17, $2; children 8 and younger free. No food or ice chests permitted. Chairs are available for rent, or bring your own. Handicapped parking available; EMTs and Fire Rescue on the field. Special to the ChronicleReenactors enjoy a night at a Civil War-era ball at last years event.

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013 C7CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLEENTERTAINMENT PHILLIPALDER Newspaper Enterprise Assn.Charles R. Swindoll, a preacher who founded Insight for Living, said, The secret of living a life of excellence is merely a matter of thinking thoughts of excellence. Really, its a matter of programming our minds with the kind of information that will set us free. The secret of playing bridge excellently is merely(!) a matter of thinking the excellent thought at the right moment. Really, its a matter of programming your mind to sift the information and reach the winning conclusion. In this deal, West leads the diamond jack against seven spades. South wins with his ace and runs a torrent of six trumps and three hearts. What should West discard? In theory, Norths jump to four spades denied a firstor second-round control. But with a true Yarborough (no card higher than a nine), he felt justified in a slight fib. South then hoped he would be able to avoid a diamond loser; maybe partner would have the queen or a doubleton diamond. Since dummy had no help, South had to run his winners, starting with his trumps, and hope that the defenders would err. West started with four painless pitches: two hearts and two clubs. Then, though, when the three top hearts came, he was less comfortable. He was not sure whether to throw diamonds or clubs. What was the key clue? If South had started with a doubleton club, he would have ruffed the second in the dummy. So, since South held at most one club, West had to stay glued to his diamonds. (NGC) 109 65 109 44 53 L or d s o f War L or d s o f War Hi g h way Th ru H e ll I ns id e C om b a t R escue Al as k a St a t e T roopers L or d s o f War L or d s o f War Al as k a St a t e T roopers (NICK) 28 36 28 35 25Sponge.Sponge.Sponge.DrakeFull HseFull HseFull HseFull HseNannyNannyFriendsFriends (OWN) 103 62 103 Mansion WallsMansion Walls48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid.48 Hours: Hard Evid. (OXY) 44 123 Guess Who (2005) Bernie Mac.Bad Girls ClubBad Girls Club Guess Who (2005) Bernie Mac. (SHOW) 340 241 340 4 Payback (1999, Action) Mel Gibson, Gregg Henry, Maria Bello. R Shameless (In Stereo) MA 60 Minutes Sports (N) L CalifornicationHouse of Lies MA 60 Minutes Sports L (SPEED) 732 112 732 NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass TimePass TimeStuntbusters PG Stuntbusters Drag RaceDrag RaceAmerican Trucker American TruckerStuntbusters PG Stuntbusters (SPIKE) 37 43 37 27 36 The Guardian (2006, Drama) Kevin Costner. (In Stereo) PG-13 Fantastic Four (2005) Ioan Gruffudd. Cosmic radiation grants four people unusual powers. PG-13 The Guardian (2006, Drama) Kevin Costner. PG-13 (STARZ) 370 271 370 Colombiana (2011) Zoe Saldana. The Fog (2005, Horror) Tom Welling, Maggie Grace. (In Stereo) PG-13 Underworld: Awakening (2012) Kate Beckinsale. R Priest (2011) Paul Bettany. (In Stereo) PG-13 (SUN) 36 31 36 Inside the Heat Inside the Heat Heat Live! (Live) NBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. (Live) Heat Live! (Live) Inside the Heat Inside the Heat Inside the HEAT (SYFY) 31 59 31 26 29Haunted CollectorHaunted CollectorHaunted CollectorHaunted CollectorStranded Seaview Terrace (N) Haunted Collector (TBS) 49 23 49 16 19KingSeinfeldSeinfeldSeinfeldFam. GuyBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangConan (N) (TCM) 169 53 169 30 35 Silver River (1948, Western) Errol Flynn, Ann Sheridan. NR Kim Novak: Live Bell, Book and Candle (1958, Comedy) James Stewart, Kim Novak. NR Kim Novak: Live (TDC) 53 34 53 24 26Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Moonshiners (In Stereo) Weed Country Rippers (N) Moonshiners (In Stereo) (TLC) 50 46 50 29 30Untold Stories of ERAddictionAddictionHoard-BuriedHoard-BuriedAddictionAddictionHoard-Buried (TMC) 350 261 350 Rumble Fish (1983, Drama) Matt Dillon, Mickey Rourke. (In Stereo) R Budz House (2012, Comedy) Wesley Jonathan. R A Get2Gether (2005, Comedy) B. Cole. (In Stereo) NR Judge Dredd (1995) R (TNT) 48 33 48 31 34Bourne Identity The Bourne Ultimatum (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. PG-13 (DVS) Bostons Finest (N) Southland Under the Big Top (N) Bostons Finest (TOON) 38 58 38 33 GumballGumballGumballNinjaGoDragonsIncredibleKing/HillKing/HillAmericanAmericanFam. GuyFam. Guy (TRAV) 9 54 9 44Bizarre FoodsFoodFoodFood Truck ParadiseFeed-Feed-Cheese Paradise (N)Hamburger Paradise (truTV) 25 55 25 98 55Cops Cops Full Throttle SaloonFull Throttle SaloonFull Throttle SaloonWorld RecordsFull Throttle Saloon (TVL) 32 49 32 34 24M*A*S*HM*A*S*HM*A*S*HCosbyCosbyCosbyRaymondRaymondClevelandClevelandKingKing (USA) 47 32 47 17 18NCIS A blind photographer. PG NCIS Defiance (In Stereo) PG NCIS Kill Screen (In Stereo) PG NCIS Devils Triangle (In Stereo) Psych Gus gets a girlfriend. (N) PG White Collar In the Wind PG (WE) 117 69 117 Charmed Spin City (In Stereo) PG Charmed (In Stereo) Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls (WGN-A) 18 18 18 18 20ChrisChrisFunny Home VideosRulesRulesRulesRulesWGN News at NineFunny Home Videos Dear Annie: My boyfriends parents are truly wonderful people, but they have taught their son to rely solely on them. He is in his 50s, and they still pay his bills and give him loans, often for toys rather than something necessary. I am self-sufficient. I borrow money from no one, pay my bills and am on a limited budget. I knew my boyfriend was rather self-centered before we moved in together. We discuss nothing about our household, but he talks to his parents about our finances. When they tell him to do something, he complies, even if I am against it. This is causing problems in our relationship. I am afraid my only option is to leave. I love him, but I feel I could never measure up to his parents, and they will keep him a little boy forever. Our relationship needs to move to the next level, but it is impossible with them hanging on for dear life. Frustrated Dear Frustrated: A man in his 50s who still expects his parents to pay his bills and buy him toys is not a responsible adult, and we cannot promise he ever will be. Unless you can convince him or his parents that their indulgence is not in his best interests, you will be fighting an uphill battle. Sorry. Dear Annie: I am a recovering meth addict. Ive been clean for more than five years. However, during my druggie days, I was pregnant five times. I miscarried all of the babies due to my addiction. I am very ashamed of my past. Every day, I live with the guilt of what I did to my innocent unborn children. In the past five years, God has blessed me with two wonderful sons, whom I love more than anything. But how do I deal with the guilt? I have tried talking to friends and family, but Im judged a lot. Its eating away at me. W. Dear W.: Please speak to someone who can be impartial about your past and help you deal with your guilt in a way that allows you to forgive yourself. Your doctor can refer you to a counselor, or you could contact any graduate school counseling department, medical school psychology department, United Way, the YMCA, the Samaritan Institute (samaritaninstitute.org) and the Abraham Low Self-Help Systems at lowselfhelp systems.org. Dear Annie: K complained about a neighbor child she fears is a ticking time bomb. My son fits nearly every category of her profile. He has difficulty in public and prefers to be by himself. He shows a great interest in guns and has few friends, and we had to move him to a different school because he didnt fit in. This does not make him a potential risk. My son struggles every day with epilepsy, along with the side effects of several medications. Children his age can be brutal to those who are different. He withdraws to protect himself. We moved him to a different school because his old one would not provide the resources he needs. Now he can maintain a decent grade point with teachers he respects and likes. His interest in guns is no different from that of other 15-year-old boys in our area, and more importantly, our son has no access to guns. He has a healthy respect for their power. I admit that impulse control is not his strong point, but we work with him to learn what is appropriate. If you get to know him, you will find a nice kid with a good sense of humor, a passion for history and genuine empathy. He doesnt like to see others being mistreated, because he knows how it feels. Thank you, Annie, for saying, We also hope you can be his friend. Thats what my son wants more than anything in the world: someone to accept him for who he is. A Father Who KnowsAnnies Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annies Mailbox, Creators Syndicate, 737 Third St., Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annies Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ANNIES MAILBOX Bridge (Answers tomorrow) THIEF STRUM GOVERN DAINTY Yesterdays Jumbles: Answer: When the actors and actresses celebrated their Oscar award wins, it was a STARRYNIGHT Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEby David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. UQTIL LOCTU ORPNEV NEDYOK Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Print your answer here: WEDNESDAY EVENING MARCH 6, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House D/I: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights C B D/I F H6:006:307:007:308:008:309:009:3010:0010:3011:0011:30 ^ (WESH) NBC 19 19 NewsNewsEntAccessWhitneyWhitneyLaw & Order: SVUChicago Fire NewsJay Leno # (WEDU) PBS 3 3 14 6World News Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) (In Stereo) Nature Mesopotamian Marshes. PG NOVA Separating Twins PG Inside Natures Giants (In Stereo) PG The Space Age: NASAs Story % (WUFT) PBS 5 5 5 41CapitolBusinessPBS NewsHour (N)Nature PG NOVA PG Inside NaturesWorldT. Smiley ( (WFLA) NBC 8 8 8 8 8NewsNightly NewsNewsChannel 8 Entertainment Ton.Whitney (N) Whitney Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Chicago Fire Leaving the Station NewsJay Leno ) (WFTV) ABC 20 20 20 NewsWorld News Jeopardy! (N) G Wheel of Fortune The Middle PG NeighborsModern FamilySuburgatory PGNashville (In Stereo) PG Eyewit. News Jimmy Kimmel (WTSP) CBS 10 10 10 10 1010 News, 6pm (N) Evening News Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) G Survivor: Caramoan -Fans vs. Favorites Criminal Minds The Silencer CSI: Crime Scene Investigation 10 News, 11pm (N) Letterman ` (WTVT) FOX 13 13 13 13FOX13 6:00 News (N) (In Stereo) TMZ (N) PG omg! Insider (N) American Idol The female semifinalists perform. (N) (In Stereo Live) FOX13 10:00 News (N) (In Stereo) NewsAccess Hollywd 4 (WCJB) ABC 11 11 4 NewsABC EntInside Ed.MiddleNeighMod FamSuburg.Nashville PG NewsJ. Kimmel 6 (WCLF) IND 2 2 2 22 22Christian Fitness TodayJack Van Impe Great AwakeningJoseph Prince G Place for Miracles A. Wommack CTN Special Life TodayClear Vision Great Awaken < (WFTS) ABC 11 11 11NewsWorld News The List (N) PG Lets Ask America The Middle PG NeighborsModern FamilySuburgatory PGNashville (In Stereo) PG NewsJimmy Kimmel @ (WMOR) IND 12 12 16Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I MetHow I MetThe Office PG The Office PG F (WTTA) MNT 6 6 6 9 9RaymondSeinfeldFamFeudFamFeudCollege Basketball Vanderbilt at Florida. (N)NUMB3RS PG NUMB3RS PG H (WACX) TBN 21 21 StudioThe 700 Club PGVictor M.ChildMoorePaidTV55Studio Direct HealingPaid L (WTOG) CW 4 4 4 12 12King of Queens King of Queens Two and Half MenEngagementArrow Trust but Verify Supernatural (In Stereo) Two and Half MenEngagementFriends PG Friends O (WYKE) FAM 16 16 16 15Nature Coast Citrus Today County Court Sheriffs 10-43 To Be Announced Straight Talk Med Funny Business PGMovie MA S (WOGX) FOX 13 7 7SimpsonsSimpsonsBig BangBig BangAmerican Idol (N) (In Stereo Live) FOX 35 News at 10TMZ PGAccess (WVEA) UNI 15 15 15 15 14NoticiasNotic.Corona de LgrimasPor Ella Soy Eva Amores VerdaderosAmor Bravo (N) NoticiasNoticiero (WXPX) ION 17 Dirty Harry (1971) R WWE Main Event (N) Robin Hood (2010) Russell Crowe. (In Stereo) PG-13 (A&E) 54 48 54 25 27The First 48 Hot Lot; Blind Faith Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck DynastyDuck Dynasty (N) Duck Dynasty (N)Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (AMC) 55 64 55 CSI: Miami Eric Delko returns. CSI: Miami L.A. (In Stereo) Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971, Fantasy) Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson. G Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971) G (ANI) 52 35 52 19 21To Be AnnouncedRiver Monsters: Unhooked PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG Gator Boys Swamp Monster Attack PG Gator Boys Scared Snakeless PG River Monsters: Unhooked PG (BET) 96 19 96 106 & Park: BETs Top 10 Live Top 10 Countdown Wild Out Wednesday. (N) PG HusbandsSecond Coach Carter (2005, Drama) Samuel L. Jackson. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to excel. PG-13 (BRAVO) 254 51 254 Million Dollar ListingMillion Dollar ListingInterior TherapyRachel Zoe ProjectBrad WrldDukes of HappensInterior (CC) 27 61 27 33South Park Tosh.0 Colbert Report Daily ShowWorkaholicsSouth Park MA South Park MA South Park MAWorkaholics (N)Kroll Show Daily ShowColbert Report (CMT) 98 45 98 28 37Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Reba PG Son-in-Law (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino. (In Stereo) PG-13 My Big Redneck Vacation PG (CNBC) 43 42 43 Mad Money (N)The Kudlow ReportThe Car ChasersAll-Star Celebrity Apprentice PG Mad Money (CNN) 40 29 40 41 46The Situation RoomErin Burnett OutFrontAnderson CooperPiers MorganAnderson CooperErin Burnett OutFront (DISN) 46 40 46 6 5GoodCharlie Jessie G Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue (2010) G Pixie Hollow Austin & Ally G A.N.T. Farm G Jessie G GoodCharlie Austin & Ally G Shake It Up! G (ESPN) 33 27 33 21 17SportsCenter (N)College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live)NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at San Antonio Spurs.SportCtr (ESPN2) 34 28 34 43 49AroundPardonCollege Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live)College Basketball College Basketball (EWTN) 95 70 95 48SavoringGalleryDaily Mass EWTN Live GSaintRosarySaintsFaithCatholicWomen (FAM) 29 52 29 20 28 Alice in Wonderland (2010, Fantasy) Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska. PG Twilight (2008) Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. The 700 Club (In Stereo) PG (FLIX) 118 170 Smile The Black Hole (1979) Maximilian Schell. PG Hellraiser: Inferno (2000) Craig Sheffer. R Hellraiser: Hellworld (2005, Horror) Doug Bradley. R Squeeze (1997) Tyrone Burton. (FNC) 44 37 44 32Special ReportFOX Report The OReilly FactorHannity (N) Greta Van SusterenThe OReilly Factor (FOOD) 26 56 26 DinersDinersRestaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im.Restaurant: Im. (FSNFL) 35 39 35 ACCIn MagicMagicNBA Basketball Orlando Magic at Miami Heat. (N) MagicIn MagicIn MagicIn Magic (FX) 30 60 30 51AngerTwo and Half Men Two and Half Men Knight and Day (2010) Tom Cruise. A woman becomes the reluctant partner of a fugitive spy. The Americans Trust Me (N) MA The Americans Trust Me MA (GOLF) 727 67 727 CentralEuro TourGolfGolfOn the Range (N)Feherty The Haney ProjectCentralPGA Tour (HALL) 59 68 59 45 54Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Happy Days G Happy Days PG Happy Days G Happy Days G Frasier PGFrasier G Frasier PGFrasier PG (HBO) 302 201 302 2 2Beyonc: Life Forrest Gump (1994) Tom Hanks. An innocent man enters history from the s to the s. The Descendants (2011, Drama) George Clooney. (In Stereo) R Real Time With Bill Maher MA (HBO2) 303 202 303 Love Actually (2003, RomanceComedy) Hugh Grant. (In Stereo) R Parades End MA Sing Your Song (2011) (In Stereo) NR Michael Buffer Battleship (2012) Taylor Kitsch. (HGTV) 23 57 23 42 52Income Property GIncome Property GCousinsCousinsProperty Brothers GHuntersHunt IntlProperty Brothers G (HIST) 51 25 51 32 42Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG Pawn Stars PG The Bible Noah endures Gods wrath. V America Unearthed PG (LIFE) 24 38 24 31Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Wife Swap (In Stereo) PG Americas Supernanny (N) PG Dance Moms PG (LMN) 50 119 Stolen Child (2011, Suspense) Emmanuelle Vaugier. (In Stereo) NR Like Mother, Like Daughter (2007) Michelle Stafford. (In Stereo) NR The Memory Keepers Daughter (2008, Drama) Dermot Mulroney. NR (MAX) 320 221 320 3 3 Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) James Franco. PG-13 Banshee We Shall Live Forever MA Hall Pass (2011) Owen Wilson. (In Stereo) R The Day After Tomorrow (2004) Dennis Quaid. (MSNBC) 42 41 42 PoliticsNation (N)Hardball MatthewsThe Ed Show (N)Rachel MaddowThe Last WordThe Ed Show WANT MORE PUZZLES? Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.

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C8WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLECOMICS Pickles Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377 Jack, The Giant Slayer (PG-13) In 3D. 1:10 p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No passes. and Over (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m. The Last Exorcism, Part II (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Snitch (PG-13)1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Safe Haven (PG-13)1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. Identity Thief (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m. Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864 and Over (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m. The Last Exorcism, Part II (PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m. Jack, The Giant Slayer (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No passes. Dark Skies (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m. Snitch (PG-13)1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) In 3D. 1:10 p.m. No passes. Escape from Planet Earth (PG) 4:10 p.m. Safe Haven (PG-13)1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. A Good Day to Die Hard (R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m. Identity Thief (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m. Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie listings and entertainment information. Peanuts Garfield For Better or For Worse Sally Forth Beetle Bailey Dilbert The Grizzwells The Born Loser Blondie Doonesbury Kit N Carlyle Rubes Dennis the Menace The Family Circus Betty Big Nate Arlo and Janis Frank & Ernest Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead. TodaysMOVIES WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WSKY 97.3 FM News Talk WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies WFJV-FM 103.3 s to s WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix LocalRADIO LP ETMDTYO AGP FX XFOOFKV FK G MCCL JFOW XCLT IHGKS EGETM. OWGOX WTGBTK. OWGOX VCHA. YCMLGY LYYGMOWPPrevious Solution: Cormac McCarthys language is perfect. He is in my view the greatest living American prose stylist. Tommy Lee Jones (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-6

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WEDNESDAY,MARCH6,2013C 9 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS Fax: (352) 563-5665 l Toll Free: (888) 852-2340 l Email: classifieds@chronicleonline.com l website: www.chronicleon line.comTo place an ad, call563-5966 ChronicleClassifiedsClassifieds In Print and Online All The Time697161 000E4CF 000E4D0 5pc Bedroom Set 4 poster queen bed Light colored wood, very good cond. $450 352-527-7445 China HutchCorner unit,like new $400,triple dresser w/mirror 12 draws $275 352-860-2792 CHINESE RUG 5x7, wool, nice condition, $50 352-228-7620 COMFORTS OF HOME USED FURNITURE comfort sofhomeused furniture.com, 795-0121 DAYBED INCLUDING TRUNDLE BED, WHITE with decorative metal frame, like new. $200 352 382 0347 Desk and Printer Cart file drawers, 3 locks desk top cubbies, 53Lx 24D X 28H. Can email pics $100 810-569-4061 Dinette Set:Table w/ leaf, 4 chrs & cushions, hutch. Very good Cond $395. Wood Bookcase w/ Glass doors $145. 1920 Singer Sewing Machine & Cabinet $375 Cash and Carry. (352) 422-5819 Dining Room Set w/4 upholstered chairs, glass-top table, xtra top exc. cond. $200 obo 352-527-3382 DINING SET Ashley 45 square glass & metal tble w/4 metal upholstered chairs,w/ side tble 48x16, lk new $170. 352-746-1272 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET In Original Plastic, Never Used, Org $3000, sacrifice $975. CHERRYBEDROOM SETSolid Wood, new in factory boxes Org. $6000, sacrifice $1995. Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. Mattress Sets Beautiful Factory Seconds twin $99.95 full $129.95 qn $159.95, kg $249.95 352-621-4500 OAK COMPUTER DESK with hutch 58wide 63tall can text picture call or text $100 352-746-0401 Preowned Mattress Sets fromTwin $30; Full $40.Qn $50; Kg. $75. 352-628-0808 QUEEN HEADBOARD &TV/DVD STAND beige/gray color/stand 24x26x30hi $50.00 352-794-3020/586-4987 Sofa/SleeperFull size $175, Broyhill 6ft Leather couch dk maroo, like new $500 860-2792 Swivel Barstools set of 4, padded seats $200, Queen Mattress boxspring, fram Serta Pedic Pillowtop, $150 352-249-3259 TV CABINET composition wood, nice condition, $15 352-228-7620 UPRIGHTSECRETARY lit cabinet; opens as desk, $50, 352-228-7620 aft 10am Wall Recliner New, by Best, Lt Aqua, pd $650 ask.$250, Chair w/ottoman upgraded upholstery Lt. Green patterned, Pd $950 ask. $350 352-419-5836 WICKER HEAD BOARD KING SIZE good condition, $100.00 513 4473 08 Craftsmen Rider Mower. 19.5 Briggs & Stratten Motor, 42 deck w/bagger, & Jack $900 603-863-9750 CRAFTSMAN RIDING MOWER 42 Deck 16HPw/bagger New Battery, Good Shape $650,352-564-0157 Craftsmen Riding Mower, 42 deck 18 hsp engine $450 352-746-7357 Riding Lawn Mower Cub Cadet T-series 35 yrs old extra blades new batty 46cut $1,000 obo within reason Call after 1pm 212-8557 Roto-Tiller Troy-Built Pony rear tine, 5hsp, runs good $200 firm 352-507-1490 Homosassa Yard/Moving SaleGlassTrinkets, Port a potty, Potty Chair both new, tools, & more 5800 S Oak Ridge Dr, lot 44 (Even ridge MH park) 12 CHOPSAW BLADES 12x5/32x20mm arbor 3 metal 1 concrete $30.00 all 352-586-8657 ROUTERTABLE STEELLEGS FIBERGLASSTOPONLY 45.00 464 0316 SHOPSMITH MARK V is 5 TOOLS IN ONE SAW, DRILLPRESS, DISC SANDER, BORING MACH, LATHE. $1000. 352-527-6425 SMALLOLDERAIR COMPRESSOR CAMPELHAUSFIELD 10 GALLON WORKS OK 50.00 464 0316 2 BOXES OF TAPES 2 Large boxes of Reel to ReelTapes Mixed $50.00 352-746-5421 20 NEC Color TV Cable ready, good cond. $75 603-863-9750 CD HOLDER Black Metal 48H Holds 80 cds $15.00 352-628-4210 DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE!Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALLNow! 1888-685-4144 TAPE PLAYER & RECORDERAmpex Reel to Reel Player Recorder $75.00 353-746-5421 LADDER 20 Foot Extension Ladder $50.00 352-746-5421 68 VCR Movies in 4 eight drawer, wood grain containers,$34 for all 352-344-1692 COMPUTER Dell dimension 3000, windows XPhome, 15 flat screen, keyboard, printer, mouse, speakers, $125. Computer Desk $35. Both for $150(352) 382-7074 Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 Wii Games 6 games @ $15ea. call for titles, firm 352-205-7973/220-4483 11pc White PVC Lanai Furniture w/cushions call for details $325 352-344-0866 PVC Pool Furniture Table & 4 Chairs with all weather cusions $125.00, 2 reclining chairs $70.00 (AWC) 352-220-6037 2 Sets of heavy duty lamps $50.00 352-795-7254 4 pc Living Room Set Tan Floral Pattern good Cond. $300 352-302-7451 BEDROOM SET Eddie Bauer solid pine dresser $250 heavy Qn Arched lt oak headboard $100 2 end tables $20. Sold separately/as a set Call 352-610-6706 Broyhill Tables 1 @ 60 x 26 other is 24 X 48 both are black, sturdy New over $400 ea. sell for $175 ea. 352-419-5836 AVAILABLE Pool Supply S tore W/ Service and Rep air Cash Flowing over a $100,000! Call Pat **(813) 230-7177** **FOR SALE** Lawn & Landscaping Business Active in Citrus County for 10 yrs. 18enc. trailer with 2 commercial mowers, & Hand Equip. in pairs. Serious Inquiries Only! 30k obo 352-795-0201 VINTAGE CHINA CLOSET1040s deco type glass door in front nice cond. wood $100.00 firm 513 4473 Big very nice entertainment center Includes 54 RCA TV $1,500. (352) 628-6985 John Wayne collection, in very nice glass and Oak cabinet $750. (352) 628-6985 NATIONALBUYER in Florida Paying cash for your collectibles,We want your old sports cards, toys and comic books. CASH PAID!! Call TODAY: (800) 273-0312 RECORDS 3 Boxes of Collectable 78 Records $75.00 352-746-5421 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I GE 30 Range Works perfectly $50 352-220-6037 KENMORE SIDE BY SIDE REFRIDG icemaker, ice & water thru door, bisque you pick up $200.00 352-746-0401 Refrigerator 18 cubic ft., 2 yrs.old white, $200 352-533-3147 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 DUDLEYS AUCTION 4AUCTIONSTHURS 3/7 Est ate Auction @Hall prev 12 Auction 3 outside 6pm inside Furniture,Tools, Household, boxes of fun & value 700+lots FRI 3/8 On Site Personal Property Est ate prev 8am auction 9 am 161AnnapolisAve Citrus Hills 34442 entire contents of worldtravelersfurniture, antiques, household, HUGE Star Wars Col & more FRI 3/8 Real Est ate prev 3pm Auction 4pm 5756W Norbis Cir Homosassa 3/2 1 acrehome FR-LR-DR-BR stone Fireplace, clean move in ready 1/3 mi. from Rock Crusher Elementary. MUST SELLTO SETTLE ESTATE SA T 3/9 Real Est ate & Content s prev 8 Auction 9 Real Estate 10am 11 15 N Carnevale TerraceTimberlane Estate 34461 3/2 one acre pool home SOLDABSOLUTE Entire contents inc furniture,Antiques,Art, sterling & more *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 MARINA HELPPart time Hours Vary. Must be able To work weekends. Able To Lift 50lbs. Relate Well With People. Boat Experience Req., Accepting Applications At The Rainbow Rivers Club 20510 The Granada Dunnellon MARKETING REPCalling clients from established database. Some office / clerical required as well Computer exp. helpful. Personable, motivated mature. Salary discussed at interview. 352-382-0770 NEWSPAPER CARRIER WANTEDNewspaper carrier wanted for early morning delivery of the Citrus County Chronicle and other newspapers for home delivery customers. 3 to 4 hours per day. Must have insured and reliable vehiclepreferable a van SUV, or pick up with a cap -Large enough to hold our Sunday product Apply in Person 1624 N Medowcrest Blvd, Crystal River Monday to Friday 8am-5pm Newspaper carriers are independent contractors, not employees of the Citrus County Chronicle PART TIME CUSTOMER SERVICE REPAre you a customer service champion? Have exceptional computer skills Including Excel. & MS Word Organized & detailed oriented? Enjoy a fast paced challenging work environment? Avail. weekdays & weekends? Join the Citrus County Chronicles Circulation team! Send Resume to: djkamlot@chronicle online.com CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE 1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd. Crystal River, FL34429 EOE, drug screening for final applicant SINGLE COPY ROUTES AVAILABLEThis is a great opportunity to own your own business. Unlimited potential for the right person to manage a route of newspaper racks and stores. come to 1624 Meadowcrest Blvd. and fill out an application ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-443-5186 www .Centura Online.com MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDEDTrain to become a Medical OfficeAssistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job readyASAP. HSDiploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 OFFICE ASSISTANTNeeded M-F 8am to 4:30pm Quickbooks, Word, Excel Knowledge helpful. Must be self-motivated & capable of working independantly Email To: sccmain@earthlink. net Cook & ServersExperienced only apply in person at Olive Tree Rest. No Calls 963 N. Suncoast Blvd, Crystal River P/T COOKFor Health Care Facility, Background screening required. 352-344-5555 ex 102 Skyview Restaurant At Citrus Hills Is Seeking Experienced P/T Servers Cooks Bartender Hostess & Dish WasherCall 352-746-6727 Tue.-Sat. 2p -4:30p For Application Appointment COMMERCIAL INSURANCE CSRCommercial Insurance CSR and inside sales position needed. Knowledge of AMS360 preferred. Email resume to Tracy Fero att fero@fero insurance.com or call 352-422-2160 Licensed Customer Service Rep.For well estabished local insurance agency. We are in need of an Lic. (220 or 440) Customer Service Rep (preferred) Sales Oriented be motivated and a self starter, detailed in your work and an excellent appt. setter. FTposition Send Resume to: rbrice@briceagency.com AUTO DETAILERS & MANAGERSHomosassa, Brooksville & Inverness dealers. Call 727-808-0341 Driver$0.01increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Daily or weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current experience (800)414-9569 www .driveknight.com DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 MANATEE TOUR CAPTAIN NEEDEDFull Time 727-459-4991 STEELCUTTER / WELDERInter County Recycling in Lecanto, Fl. is looking for an experienced Steel Cutter, with Welding Experience also. Full time, Pays $13.50 per hour. Drug Free Workplace. E-mail resumes to Resume1801@yahoo .com, No walk-ins or phone calls F/T Maintenance /GroundsSkills required: Electrical, Plumbing, Painting, Mechanical and Grounds Maintenance HVAC certification preferredRiver Reach Apartments2151 River Reach Cr Crystal River, FL 34428 PHONE/FAX 352-795-8024, EOE Kiz R RUSS PreschoolIs looking for Hard working dependable employees FT& PT Certified Only Apply Within 307 Zephyr Street Inverness 344-4106 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I Citrus Podiatry Center, PA Medical Receptionist:Part-time M, TU, W 8:30-5pm. Two office locations. $10.50/hr. Vacation, holiday & uniform benefits. Minimum of 2 years exp. in a medical office setting. Send Resume to: P.O. Box 1120, Lecanto, FL 34460-1120 No phone calls or faxes accepted/ no exceptions. DENTAL RECEPTIONISTFor High Quality Oral Surgery Office. Springhill/Lecanto Experience a must. Email Resume To: maryamoli@ yahoo.com Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com Now Hiring Nurses and CNAsApply in person Woodland Terrace 124 Norvell Bryant Hwy. Hernando 352-249-3100 PT Certified DentalAssistant/ Front OfficeCall 352-746-0330, Ask for Vicki. RNs, PT & OTS LPNs, Phsych Nurse, & STCITRUS & HERNANDO (352) 794-6097 440 Licensed InsuranceAgentapply in person: Nature Coast InsuranceAgency Crystal River AIRLINE CAREERSBecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINE CAREERSTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 INSURANCE AGENTLooking for licensed insurance agent with experience. email resume to: david@birdinsurance group.com Todays New Ads MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. PVC Pool Furniture Table & 4 Chairs with all weather cushions $125.00, 2 reclining chairs $70.00 (AWC) 352-220-6037 Sugarmill WoodsSunday Mar. 10, 1-4 PM3 Chinkapin Court Homosassa Fl Nancy Lewis Exit Realty Leaders Wall Recliner New, by Best, Lt Aqua, pd $650 ask.$250, Chair w/ottoman upgraded upholstery Lt. Green patterned, Pd $950 ask. $350 352-419-5836 $$ CASH PAID $$for junk vehicles. 352-634-5389 FREE REMOV AL Appliances, Window AC, Riding Mowers, & Metals, 8Satelite Dish & MORE 352-270-4087 ADORABLE TERRIER MIX, neutered, housebroken, licensed, crate trained, great dog for family! pls call 352-220-0350 Cement Blocks & Concret Rubble 352-476-1023 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 Female Chihuahua red short-hair Brindel & Female Gray Cat (cat is sick & needs her medicine) lost in the vicinity ofColumbus St. Beverly Hills, pls call 352-422-7578 LOSTRUSSIAN BLUE CATW/PINK COLLAR State Park Drive & Sun Dance Pt,Crystal River. Name is Tiki PLEASE CALL352-446-0783 or 352-476-6539 MIXED BREED HOUND DOG, Mostly Black, little bit of Brown, 35TO 40 lbs answers to Daisy, dragging 4ft red/white leash 352-270-0812 Found Lab/Pitt Mix Female, Mini Farms, Zaval Street 352-563-1206 352-875-9918 AVAILABLE Pool Supply Stor e W/Service and Repair Cash Flowing over a $100,000!! Call Pat **(813) 230-7177** FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 Todays New Ads 5ft Glasstop Patio Table $40.Teeter hangups inversion table $150 (352) 382-1977 Broyhill Tables 1 @ 60 x 26 other is 24 X 48 both are black, sturdy New over $400 ea. sell for $175 ea. 352-419-5836 BUICK93 LeSabre Sedan exc. must see, one owner, 57k ,ask. $3900 obo 352-302-4282 CONCEALED WEAPONS CLASS EVERYSATURDAY 11 am, $40 132 N. Florida Ave. (352) 419-4800 CRYSTAL RIVER TRAIN DEPOTSat 3/9 8a-1p Huge Community yard sale. 109 NE Crystal St Dinette Set:Table w/ leaf, 4 chrs & cushions, hutch. Very good Cond $395. Wood Bookcase w/ Glass doors $145. 1920 Singer Sewing Machine & Cabinet $375 Cash and Carry. (352) 422-5819 DINING SET Ashley 45 square glass & metal tble w/4 metal upholstered chairs,w/ side tble 48x16, lk new $170. 352-746-1272 EZ go Golf Cart with charger and new Fld dn back seat $1500, Club golf cart w/ charger call for price 352-564-2756 FRENCH DOORS 2 3ft w/enclosed blinds & all hardware $300 352-419-5836 Homosassa Yard/Moving SaleGlassTrinkets, Port a potty, Potty Chair both new, tools, & more 5800 S Oak Ridge Dr, lot 44 (Even ridge MH park) HORIZON TREADMILL exc. cond. $500 ReboundAerobics Jumper (trampoline) $150,352-637-5525 John Wayne collection, in very nice glass and Oak cabinet $750. (352) 628-6985 John Wayne Collection, in very nice glass and Oak cabinet $750. (352) 628-6985 LAKE PANASOFKEE 3bdr 1 ba, cbs home, lake access, great income or live-in property, on beautiful lot, $39,900 call 352-303-4505 PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 ADiabetic needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, call Mike 386-266-7748 Todays New Ads **FOR SALE** Lawn & Landscaping Business Active in Citrus County for 10 yrs. 18enc. trailer with 2 commercial mowers, & Hand Equip. in pairs. Serious Inquiries Only! 30k obo 352-795-0201 2ACRESQuiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $126,500 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. 14 ft. Bumber Pull 2 Horse slant Load Trailer w/ Tack Room, v. good cond. $4,000 Call Tony, Inverness (352) 860-0141 16 ft. CanoeGood, Condition, 2 paddles, $200. (352) 249-0877 99 HARLEYFXDWG 7k mi, stg 3 cam, big blc, 42 drag pipes $7000 obo 727-408-0602 440 Licensed InsuranceAgentapply in person: Nature Coast InsuranceAgency Crystal River Your world firstemployment Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com Need a job or a qualified employee? This areas #1 employment source! I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I

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C10WEDNESDAY,MARCH6,2013 CLASSIFIEDS CITRUSCOUNTY( FL ) CHRONICLE Davies Tree Service Serving Area 15yrs. Free Est. Lic & Ins cell 727-239-5125 local 352-344-5932 DOUBLE JTree Service Stump Grinding, bulk mulch, lic/ins 302-8852 KINGs LAND CLEARING & TREE SERVICE Complete tree & stump removal hauling, demo & tractor work. 32 yrs. exp. (352) 220-9819 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 R WRIGHT TREE Service Tree Removal & Trimming. Ins. & Lic.# 0256879 352-341-6827 REALTREE SERVICE(352) 220-7418 **Tax Specials** RON ROBBINS Tree Service Trim, Shape & Remve, Lic/Ins. Free est. 352-628-2825 344-2556, Richard Water Pump Service & Repairs-all makes & models. Call anytime! Estates/Auction Services ESTATE SALES Pricing to Final Check W e Ease S tress! 352344-0333 or 422-2316 Attention Consumers! Please make sure you are using a licensed and insured service professional. Many service advertisers are required by state law to include their state license number in all advertisements. If you dont see a license number in the ad, you should inquire about it and be suspicious that you may be contacting an unlicensed business.The Citrus County Chronicle wants to ensure that our ads meet the requirements of the law. Beware of any service advertiser that can not provide proof that they are licensed to do business. For questions about business licensing, please call your city or county government offices. COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 ys exp lic2875,all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 ATREE SURGEON Lic. & Ins. Lowest Rates Free est. (352)860-1452 All Tractor & Tree Work Land Cleared, Hauling 1 time Cleanup, Driveways (352) 302-6955 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 INTERIOR/EXTERIOR & ODD JOBS. 30 yrs J. Hupchick Lic./Ins. (352) 726-9998 CALLSTELLAR BLUE All Int./ Ext. Painting Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE EST. (352) 586-2996 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling, Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 PIC PICARDS PRESSURE CLEANING& PAINTING 352-341-3300 TUTORINGAll ages & Subjects Specializing in reading,math and LDMR, autistic 352-628-1171 All phases of T ile Handicap Showers, Safety Bars, Flrs. 422-2019 Lic. #2713 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. #1 Professional Leaf vac system why rake? FULLLawn Service Free Est 352-344-9273 Helpin Hand Grass Man Cut Clean Mulch Edge FREE ESTIMATES! Russell 352-637-1363 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 ATYOUR HOMEMower and small engine Its Tune Up time. 352 220 4244 A-1 Hauling, Cleanups, garage clean outs, trash, furniture & misc. Mark (352) 287-0767 ALLOF CITRUS Clean Ups, Clean Outs Everything from Ato Z 352-628-6790 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 LAWNCARE N MORE Leaves, bushes, beds, cleanup, hauling. treework 352-726-9570 30 yrs. Experience! Int/Ext. Comm/Res. Lic/Ins. Jimmy **352-212-9067** HONEYDOSyour Honey s Dont Do! Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res. Jimmy 352-212-9067 CLEANING BYPENNY Wkly., Biwkly., Mnthly. 352-503-7800, 352-476-3820 Husband & W ife T eam Exp. *Good Rates* Residential, Free Est. Kevin 352-364-6185 Marcias Best Clean Experienced Expert lic+ref, Free Estimates **call 352-560-7609** NA TURE COAST CLEANING Res. Rate-$20 hr. No Time Wasted! 352-564-3947 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 All Tractor & Tree Work Househld, Equipment & Machinery Moving (352) 302-6955 AllAROUND TRACTORLandclearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 Merritt Garling Lawn & Landscape Services Lawn/Pavers/Plantings 352-287-0159 DRYOAK FIREWOOD SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK $80 Delivered & Stacked. 352-344-2696 Install, restretch, repair Clean, Sales, Vinyl Carpet, Laminent, Lic. #4857 Mitch, 201-2245 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic#5863 352-746-3777 ANDREW JOEHL HANDYMAN. Gen. Maint/Repairs Pressure Cleaning. 0256271 352-465-9201 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 Af for dable Handyman FAST 100% Guar. AFFORDABLE RELIABLE Free Est 352-257-9508 HANDYMAN DAVE Pressure Wash homes & drive-ways, Hauling Odd Jobs 352-726-9570 AllAROUND TRACTORLand clearing, Hauling Site Prep, Driveways Lic/Ins 352-795-5755 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts errands etc Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 COUNTYWIDE DRY-WALL25 yrs exp. lic.2875, all your drywall needs Ceiling & Wall Repairs. Pop Corn Removal 352-302-6838 #1A+TECHNOLOGIES All Home Repairs. All TVs Installed lic.#5863 352-746-3777 DUN-RITE ELECTRIC Since / Free Est. lic EC 13002699 352-726-2907 **BOB BROWNS**Fence & Landscaping 352-795-0188/220-3194 ROCKYS FENCINGFREE Est., Lic. & Insured 352 422-7279 A 5 STAR COMPANY GO OWENS FENCING ALL TYPES. Free Est. Comm/Res. 628-4002 JEFFS Cleanup/Hauling Clean outs/Dump Runs Lawns/Brush Removal Lic. (352) 584-5374 THE KLEEN TEAM Residential/Comm. Lic., Bonded, Insured (352) 419-6557 AFFORDABLE COMPUTER REPAIR (352) 341-5590 114 S. Apopka Ave Inverness 10% Off WITH AD Diestler Computer New & Used systems repairs. Visa/ MCard 352-637-5469 ON SITECOMPUTER SERVICE(352) 341-4150 BIANCHI CONCRETE INC.COM ins/lic #2579 Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk. Pool deck repair /stain. 352-257-0078 FATHER & SON Decorative Concrete Textures, Stamp,Spray Crack repair, Staining, driveways, pool decks, Lic/Ins 352-527-1097 ROBS MASONRY & CONCRETE Driveways tear outs, tractor work, Lic. #1476, 726-6554 SMITTYSAPPLIANCE REPAIR.Also wanted dead or alive washers & dryers. FREE pick up 352-564-8179 Adult Family Care HomeAlzheimer Dementia Incontinency (SL6906450) 503-7052 HELPING HANDS Transport, shopping Dr. appts errands etc Hablo Espanol 813-601-8199 Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips 000E4CO CRYSTALRIVER2/BR $550. 3BR $750 Near Town 563-9857 ALEXANDER REALESTATE (352) 795-6633Crystal River Apts,2 BR/ 1 BA $400-$500,ALSO HOMES & MOBILES AVAILABLE LECANTONice 1 Bdrm $500 352-216-0012/613-6000 NICE APARTMENTS2 Bed / 1 Bath & 2 Bed / 2 Bath Furnished & Unfurnished Close to Progress Energy & the Hospital 1st and Security from $575/month Call 352-795-1795 forAppt. www.ensing properties.com LECANTO Oak Tree Plaza, Office/Retail, CR 486, 900 sf. @ $675+ util. & sales tax.1 mo. Free w/12 mo. Lease 352-258-6801 Meadowcrest CR3bd/2ba Villa, $900 mnth.unfurn. $1000 mnth. furn. 352-563-1106 Sugarmill Woods2/2/2, avail April 1, $725. (352) 503-3087 At SM WOODSGreat Furn. Studio Apt. $650. All Util. Included (352) 422-1933 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352) 726-2225 BLACK DIAMONDHomes for rent from $1,100/mo. Bob Coldwell Banker 634-4286 Homosassa 3/2 owner Fin. Compl. Remodeled, fenced back yard, 1800+ sq. ft. $5,000down $525mth 352-302-9217 Owner Finance/Lease Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH, 14 x 20 block building, New Septic, Handy person, $28,900./Offer 352-422-1916 FLORALCITY DW, 2/2/2 carport Screen room, shed, all you need is a toothbrush to move in $17,500. Lot Rent $183. 352-344-2420 HOMOSASSASBest Housing Value Modern homes from $8,400 or Lease to Own from $179/mo. $1000.down + Lot rent at Evanridge Community an exceptional 55+Park 352 628-5977 INVERNESS 55+ 1/1 Fully Furnished, Everythings stays, Like new furn., Washer/Dryer 2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TVs $7,000. (708) 308-3138 LECANTO 55+ PK 1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH, 40x20, shed, handicap access. ramp and shower $25,000. 352-212-6804 Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK 14x60 split 2/2, new heat/ac, remodeled, furn. lg scnd in FLRm. 55 ft crpt w/laundry room, 989-858-0879 STONEBROOK, CR Pondview/Gourmet Kitch, 2Br, MSuite, $51,900, Cridland RE, Jackie 352-634-6340 At SM WOODSGreat Furn. Studio Apt. $650. All Util. Included (352) 422-1933 CRYSTAL RIVERFully furn. efficiency w/ equipped kitchen. All utilities, cable, Internet, & cleaning provided. $699/mo352-586-1813 FLORALCITYLAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm. AC, Clean, No Pets (352) 344-1025 Inverness2/1 on private estate, no smoking,$650 monthly Utilities included 1st, last, sec. Req. 352-422-2393 NEW 3/2JACOBSEN HOME 5Yr. Warranty $2,650 down, only $297.44/ mo., Fixed rate W.A.C. Come and View 352-621-9181 NO CREDITNO PROBLEM (Everyone Financed with 10K-40% down Private Financing Avail. Call(352) 795-1272 Palm Harbor Retirement Community homes. $8500 off of any home, 2/2 & 3/2 from $39,900 Call John L yons @ 800 622 2832 ext 210 for det ails WE WILL BUYYOURMANUFACTURED Home. from 1976-2013 CALL(352) 795-2377 FLORALCITY Exceptionally Nice 3/2 on Beautiful 1 AC, treed lot, garage, shed, dock, Ideal for Fishing/ Airboats $95,900 716-523-8730 CRYSTALRIVERLarge 4br 2ba Foreclosure Great Condition NEW ROOF Owner Fin. Avail. CALL(352) 795-2377 FLORALCITY By Owner, 14x 60 2/2 Split Plan w/dbl roof over, w/ porch & carport on fenced 1 acre, Very Nice Quiet, Considering ALL reasonable Cash offers. 352-586-9498 HOME-ON-LANDOnly $59,900, 3/2 like new on acre. Tape-ntexture walls, new carpet & appliances,AC & heat! Warranty, $2,350 dwon, $319.22/mo P&I, W.A.C. Owner can finance. Call 352-621-9182 HERNANDO2/2 $450. mo. 1st last +dep 352-201-2428 Homosassaunfurn, 2/2, bonus room, shed, 4/10th acre, very clean, $495. mo, perfect for retired couple 3771 Millston Pt 352-503-6703 4401 N SUNCOAST BLVD LOT19 2bedroom 1Bath Mobile Home in Thunder Bird Mobile home Park. With Wheel Chair Ramp, Covered Carport, Covered screen Porch.Nice Home in Quiet Community, Centrally Located close to Mall.Comes Partially Furnished,With all Appliances.Lot Rent $235.00Park Rules, 55 or Older, no Pets bigger than 20 pounds. Serious Buyers Only ASKING $9100.00 OR BESTOFFER Toll free 1-877-351-8555 or 352-897-6766 43,900. 3/2,Dblewide. Delivered & set up, New Jacobsen. The only home with a 5 yr. warr., only $500 down and $293.40/ mo. P&I W.A.C. Must See 352-621-3807 2/1, DW, H/A, 12 x 20 glass porch Co. water & sewer, paved rd. No HOA $49,995 firm $15,000 down, own finan. (352) 567-2031 2br 2ba Single Wide 12yearsYOUNG. 14X66. Trade in. WILL GO F AST! $14,900YOUR BABY $19,900 Incls Delv, Set, New A/C, skirt & steps,Must See! NO HIDDEN FEES. CALL(352) 795-1272 2br 2ba Repo 2000 Fleetwood SW 14 x 72 / $20K Incls Delv, Set, A/C & heat, skirt & steps (NO HIDDEN FEES) CALL(352) 795-1272 BIGUSED HOMES 32x80 H.O.M. $50,900 28x76 H.O.M. $43,500 28x70 ScotBilt $42,500 40x42 Palm Har. $65k 28X70 Live oak $52,500 We Sell Homes for Hnder $10,000 Call & View (352) 621-9183 HERNANDO32 Mobile FHAFinancing $2500 Down Town of Hernando1.5AcresCall 1-727-967-4230 HomosassaDbl. Wide 3/2 95% remodeled inside, 1.25 acres half-fenced, recent roofing & siding, 16x16 workshop,must-see! $69,900 (352) 621-0192 INVERNESS2b/2 ba, acre off Turner Camp Rd a/c, heat pump 3yrs. old, 30ft scn porch & 48open porch on other side, new septic, 18x31 building w/ 220 electric, shed, fenced, on canal $68,000 352-726-1791 INVERNESS 55+ Park 14 x 58, 2/1, furniture, appliances, shed, scrn. porch, $8,500. (352) 419-5133 LECANTO2/2 dlb MH 25 x 40 $17,900 remld 6yrs ago, new rf,shed, on rented lot $245 mthly, incl water,sewer,trash 352-628-1171 NEW !! 2011 Lot Model Dealer must sell 30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900 NO HIDDEN FEES Price incls: delv, set, skirting, steps, a/c/heat,upgraded appliances, furniture/decor, fo L.R. & F.R. & kitchen (NO HIDDEN FEES!!) MUST SELL CALL(352) 795-1272 2 Maltese Puppies Left, 1 female $650. 1 Male $600, CKC reg. will have Fl. Health Cert.. Call to come play with them, (352) 212-4504 or (352) 212-1258 DOGAustralian Shepherd/Terrier Mix. Great watch dog. Needs either a farm or fenced yard. 352 419 7428 Goofy & Midget, These playful Pekinese cuddlers get along famously, can be adopted separtely or as father/son pair. Both are neutered, mirco-chipped, UTD on shots. They are fostered in a cage free home, are house trained & they have been socialized with other dogs and cats. We do home & vet checks. Call 352-419-0223 or visit savingangelspetrescue.com to see more pets looking for their forever homes. Shih-Tzu Pups, Males Starting@ $400. Registered Lots of colors, Beverly Hills, FL(352)270-8827 www .aceof pup s.ne Sparkle, Hemingway (polydactyl) (extra toes) This young female kitten sparkles with playfulness & affection. INDOOR ONLY. Spayed, UTD, litter trained. We do home & vet checks. Call 352-419-0223www.savingangelspetrescue.com to see more pets looking for homes 14 ft. Bumber Pull 2 Horse slant Load Trailer w/ Tack Room, v. good cond. $4,000 Call Tony, Inverness (352) 860-0141 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I BRINGYOUR FISHING POLE! INVERNESS, FL55+ park on lake w/5 piers, clubhouse and much more! Rent includes grass cutting and your water 1 Bedroom, 1 bath @$350 inc. H20 Pets considered and section 8 accepted. Call 352-476-4964 For Details! CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES352-942-3492 WANT TO BUY HOUSE or MOBILE Any Area, Condition or Situation Fred, 352-726-9369 Natalie Hill Urban Suburban Hair Studio352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Specialty: Color, Foils, Make-overs, Up-dos, Perms, Cutting and Styling Redken Trained Robbie RayUrban Suburban Hair Studio 352-637-0777 From Cutting Edge to Care Free Make-overs, Color, Foiling, Precision Cuts, Avant Garde hairstyles and updos. Paul Mitchell Certified. ANSLEYAnsley is a very beautiful and unique Jack Russell.Terrier mix. She is so striking that she attracts attention everywhere she goes. She is 1 y.o. and weighs 40 pounds. She is very smart and a quick learner. Knows basic commands, is housebroken, & gets along with other dogs. Seems OK with cats. You would be blessed to add her to your family. ID # 17387903. Call Victoria @ 352-302-2838. BUDStriking! This is how we describe Bud, a very beautiful, sweet, 2-y.o. black & white American Bulldog/Terrier mix. Has beautiful eyes, one blue & one brown. Loves people & other dogs, has medium energy level, settles down nicely after exercise. Walks well on a leash & sits for treats. Weighs 55 lbs. Heartworm-negative. This funloving boy would make a good family pet. I D #: 17461796. Visit or call Citrus County Animal Shelter @ 352-746-8400. ALLEN BIKE RACK Model 143a-4 Bicycle AllenTrunk Bike Rack, Never used,still in box. $75 746-7232 AR 15, SIG Sauer M400 Enhanced 5.56/223, MagPul Acc. Sig Case, Iron Sights & Red DotScope, w/ammo $2300 Must Have FLCarry Permit 352-746-6769 Beautiful Compact Taurus 22 Caliber New In Box $400. obo (352) 795-0088 After 11 am -til 7p BROWNING CITORI Plus,12 gage, trap/skeet Gun w/leather case $1200 716-835-8084 CAMPING COTAluminum 2 mattress with canvas base and spring suspension. Excellent condition. $25 746-7232 CANOE 12Radisson Green Bark, exc. cond. $400 603-863-9750 CONCEALED WEAPONS CLASS EVERYSATURDAY 11 am, $40 132 N. Florida Ave. (352) 419-4800 Concealed Weapons Permit Course DANS GUN ROOM (352) 726-5238 EZ go Golf Cart with charger and new Fld dn back seat $1500, Club golf cart w/ charger call for price 352-564-2756 FISHING TACKLE Rods/ Lures/Line Hooks, Lead Weights other Misc. Related Items, $2. and up. 352-257-3288 Rawlings and Truline 9 Iron & 2 woods Golf Clubs $15.00 352-628-1723 2013 ENCLOSED TRAILERS, 6x12 with ramp, $1895 ** call 352-527-0555 ** ENCLOSED TRAILERS 6 X 10 $1,650 6 X 12 $1,750 7 x 14, Tandem $2,900 7 X 16 Tandem $3,000 8.5x18, Tandem $3,600 LIMITED QUANITIES 352-564-1299 TRAILER Former construction site trailer, fully insulated/wired. 28l/7h/8w. Garage door one end, fr door other end. $1500 OBO (352) 603-2761 HIGH CHAIR $25 BOUNCE $15 CAR SEATINFANT$15 car seat toddle $15 352-777-1256 PINK INFANTTO TODDLER CARSEAT $30, expires dec 2016 352 634 2122 STROLLER GREEN ANIMAL$25/ 2 JUMPEROO the horse $20 each 352-777-1256 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I ADiabetic needs unopened, unexpired boxes of test strips will pay cash and pick-up, call Mike 386-266-7748 4 WHEELED WALKER WITH BRAKES AND SEATFOLDS UP GREATSHAPE 75.00 464 0316 4TOILETSEAT RISER NEW 25.00 464-0316 BEDSIDE COMMODE &ALUMINUM WALKER BOTH HAVE ADJUSTABLE LEGS 20.00 EACH 464 0316 MANUALWHEELCHAIR WITH FOOT& leg rests only 100.00 464 0316 BASS UKULELE ELECTRIC SOUNDS LIKEAN UPRIGHT22 SCALE $100 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC ELECTRIC GUITAR BLACK&ABALONE W/GIGBAG&XTRAS $95 352-601-6625 NEWACOUSTIC GUITAR PLAYS, LOOKS, SOUNDS GREAT! ONLY$50 352-601-6625 NEWFENDER AFINITYPBASS W/GIGBAG&FREE AMP$100 352-601-6625 NEWLES PAULSTUDIO LIMITED, LIQUID BLACKW/GROVERS &ALINCOS LESS THAN 1/2 PRICE! @ $175 352-601-6625 8 STRING MORRELL LAPSTEELELECTRIC GUITAR NICE W/LIPSTICK PICKUP $100 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR ALMOSTNEW PLAYS&SOUNDS GREATONLY$40 352-601-6625 ACOUSTIC GUITAR & MANDOLIN Washburn D25S w Hd cse & Manzio pickup. Martini mndln w sft cse. Both vy gd cond. $225 obo. 352-341-0890 BEACH&CAMPING? NICEACOUSTIC GUITAR FULLSIZED USED ONLY$25 352-601-6625 BLACK WASHBURN LES PAULSTYLE GUITARNEWW/FREE RANDALLAMP$100 352-601-6625 DEAN VENDETTA ELECTRIC GUITAR USED BUTPLAYS NEWONLY$45 352-601-6625 GRANDMAS ORGAN KAWAI SR-2 Book Music, Bench $500, pls call btwn 8-10am. 352-287-3145 BAVARIAN CHINA SERVICE FOR 12+ DINNERWARE w/gold trim. $200 OBO (352) 746-3327 CHINAMikasa fine china, charisma 6 pl setting $60 352-422-2164 WOLF PICTURE, wolf knick knack and wolf dresser box $10.00 all 352-794-3020/5864987 ELECTRICTREADMILL VERYSTABLEAND SMALLONLY100.00 464 0316 EXERCISE BIKE (DP) UPRIGHTTYPE IT ALSO WORKS THE ARMS ONLY75.00 464 0316 HORIZON TREADMILL exc. cond. $500 ReboundAerobics Jumper (trampoline) $150,352-637-5525 RECUMBANTEXERCISE BIKE GREAT FORTHE BACK & LEGS ONLY95.00 464 0316 Treadmill Proform XP, all electronics, including power incline, cost over $800 New Asking $195. (352) 464-0316 16 ft. CanoeGood, Condition, 2 paddles, $200 (352) 249-0877 2 MENS SPORTS JACKETS SIZE 40R VARIOUS COLORS $25ea 352-613-0529 GIRLS 10-12-24 shirts,12 shorts,5 swim suits,leggins,jackets & sweatshirts $15.00 all 352-794-3020/586-4987 MENS SUITS SIZES 34X30 & 36X30, $65 EACH 352-613-0529 PURPLE DRESSES size 12 to 18 I have 6 $60.00 for all. 513-4473 !!!!!225/60 R16!!!!! Great.tread!! Only asking $70 for the pair! (352)857-9232 *****295/40 R20***** Good tread!! Only asking $70 for the pair! (352)857-9232 ~~~225/70 R19.5~~~ Beautiful tread!! Only asking $100 for the pair! (352)857-9232 60 ft white wire closet shelving & misc hdwr, 3ft to 10ft lenghts, $30, 3HPLawn Edger. Needs tune-up. $90 (352) 382-7074 3ft Tall Pilsener Glass Beer Bottle Exact replica $100.00 352-628-1723 5ft Glasstop Patio Table $40.Teeter hangups inversion table $150 (352) 382-1977 AQUARIUM WITH WOODEN STAND 25 Gal Rectangular, 12x16x29, gravel,lighted hood.$100 746-7232 BARBIE HOUSE, BARBIE CAR, barbie guitar and kids keyboard $10.00 for all 352-794-3020/5864987 BENCH LIGHT Florescent Bench Light $10.00 352-746-5421 DANCE CHAIR Pink, with ballet slipper design. Folds up and stores in matching tote. Like New. $25 746-7232 FL. JUMBO SHRIMP 15ct @ $5.00lb, Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb Delivered 352-795-0077 FRENCH DOORS 2 3ft w/enclosed blinds & all hardware $300 352-419-5836 GERBILCAGE $20 352-613-0529 GLASS 3X5 1/4 352-422-2164 $30. Golf Cart Rear Seat and frame $150 Riding lawn mower attachments, for JD, wheel horse, craftsman $50 (315) 466-2268 GOODYEARTIRE REGATTAP225/60R16 ONLY35.00 464 0316 HONEYWELLAIR PURIFIER 360airflow,3spds,HEPA filter ExcellentCond $100 352-746-7232 LAWN SPREADER SMALLMANUAL GOOD CONDITION $20 352-613-0529 LG OCTANE Verizon CELLPHONE with case and power cord $40.00 call or text 352-746-0401 Lg Recliner/Rocker brown, exc. cond. $125obo NOOK e-reader w/cover, $75 obo 352-527-3874 Love Seat, White Brocade chair, Taupe recliner, TV Sanyo, Misc. Baby Items call for pricing. (352) 403-7863 Mattress Trade In Sets Clean and Very Nice Fulls $50., Qn. $75. Kings. $125, 621-4500 MEGABLOKS DRAGON in box/cd Havocfire #9693 $30.00 352-628-4210 Patio Table & 4 Chairs $50. Freezer, small $75. 352 726-8524 Sears Kenmore propane gas dryer heavy duty, $75. Ryobi 12 miter saw $75 352-507-1490 TYMASTODONS 1/Colosso 2/Giganto $4.00ea. $10.00 all exclnt. cond/tagged 352-628-4210

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WEDNESDAY,MARCH6,2013C 11 CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE CLASSIFIEDS 702-0306 WCRN To: Ronald Bailey Case No: 2011-DP-091 Term. of Parental Rights PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA JUVENILE DIVISION CASE NO.:2011-DP-091 IN THE INTEREST OF: C.F.DOB: 01/15/1997 Minor Child NOTICE OF ACTION, SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISOR Y HEARING FOR TERMINA TION OF P ARENT AL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO:Ronald Bailey L/K/A Unknown You are hereby notified that a petition under oath has been filed in the above-styled court for the termination of your parental rights as to C.F. a female child born on 15th day of January, 1997, in Ohio; and for placement of the child with the Florida Department of Children and Families for subsequent adoption, and you are hereby commanded to be and appear before General Magistrate Keith Schenck of the Circuit Court or any judge assigned to hear the above cause, at the Advisory Hearing on March 25, 2013 at 1:30 PM at the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Avenue, 3rd floor, Inverness, FL 34450. YOU MUST PERSONALLY APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD, IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. YOU ARE ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY, BUT ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST NOTIFY THE COURT, AND THE COURT WILL DETERMINE WHETHER YOU QUALIFY FOR AN ATTORNEY TO BE APPOINTED TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS MATTER. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator at the Office of the Trial Court Administrator, Citrus County Courthouse, 110 N. Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone (352) 341-6700 within seven (7) working days of your receipt of this notice; If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771, Florida Relay Service 711. THIS NOTICE shall be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in the Citrus County Chronicles Classified Section. Dated this 30th day of January, 2013 at Inverness, Citrus County, Florida. ANGELA VICK, Clerk of Courts (SEAL) By:/s/ D. Pennington, Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 27 & March 6, 2013. 922-0322 DAILY CRN Surplus Prop. PUBLIC NOTICE The Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will be selling surplus property and equipment via the internet at govdeals.com, March 4, until March 22, 2013. Pub: March 1 thru March 22, 2013.. 000E4CI ab1667 au2246DUDLEYS AUCTION Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Up-to-date photos on web.MAINE-LY REAL ESTATEPersonal Property sold Dudleys Auction Ab1667.Real Estate sold by Main-Ly real Estate #381384. (All dimensions are approx. mol + -) 10% Buyers Premium. Announcements from the block take precedent.000E9DTDudleys Auctionwww.dudleysauction.com FOUR AUCTIONS4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL(1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds)MARCH 7, 8, AND 9, 2013 Thur 3/7 Estate Auction @ HallPrev 12 Auction 3 Outside 6 pm InsideFurniture, Tools, Household, boxes of fun & value. 700 + lotsFri 3/8 On-Site Personal Property EstatePrev 8 a m Auction 9 am161 Annapolis Ave., Citrus Hills 34442Entire contents of world travelers furniture, antiques, household & more.Fri 3/8 Real EstatePrev 3 pm Auction 4 p m5756 W Norbis Cir., Homosassa 3/2 1 acre home FR-LR-DR-BR stone fireplace, clean, move-in ready. 1/3 mi. from Rock Crusher Elementary. MUST SELL TO SETTLE ESTATE.Sat 3/9 Real Estate & ContentsPrev 8 am Auction 9 am ; Real Estate 10 am1115 N Carnevale Terrace Timberlane Estates 344613/2, one acre, pool home. SOLD ABSOLUTE. Entire contents incl. furniture, antiques, art, sterling & more. SUBARU2011 FORESTER 29K MILES ONE OWNER $17850, 352-628-5100 TOYOTA1997 RAV 4 ONLY89K MILES, NICE $5850, 352-628-5100 RV & BOAT STORAGE @ $21.20. Per Month 352 422-6336 or 352-795-0150 2001 Dodge Ram1500 4x4 sgl. cab,auto, a/c, run great,$5000 obo,105k miles, trailer pkg 352-726-4870 JEEP2000, Grand Cherokee 4x4, V8 pw, pl, priced to low to list..call adam at 352-628-4600 for appointment CHEVYCONV VAN2007 Rocky Ridge Conv 1500 Chevy Exp. 5.3L V8. Good cond.Leather. TV,Tracvision, play sta. 96k mi. $14,900 obo. 352-341-0890 99 HARLEYFXDWG 7k mi, stg 3 cam, big blc, 42 drag pipes $7000 obo 727-408-0602 CASH PAID FORJUNK MOTORCYCLES352-942-3492 Harley Davidson2009 Street Glide Black, 20k, many extras $18,500 firm, pls call **352-422-5448** HARLYDAVIDSON08, 1200cc Sportster 976mi. exc. condition, $9000 (352) 447-1244 KYMCO2000 ZX 50 Scooter, One owner, 268 miles, windshield, luggage carrier, garage kept. $900 352-212-5286 SUZUKI2005 Boulevard C90T Runs, looks and sounds good. 1500cc. 7700 mi. Lots of extras. $4900 obo. 352-341-0890 CHEVY1984 C20 project, long bed, solid body & bed, good glass, dual exhaust, Holly 4 barrel, 350V8, runs, asking $1300352-628-7243 pls leave message CHEVY, EL CAMINO Silver, excel. cond., garaged, $13,500 (352) 270-3824 CHEVY, EL CAMINO Silver, excel. cond., garaged, $13,500 (352) 270-3824 I I I I I I I I Tell that special person Happy Birthday with a classified ad under Happy Notes. Only $28.50 includes a photo Call our Classified Dept for details352-563-5966 I I I I I I I I DODGE1996 Dakota Sport V6 50,300 actual miles. Runs great, excellent shape. $5,500 OBO Sugarmill 740-705-9004 FORD2004, Ranger $7,990 352-341-0018 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 BUICK2005 RANIER 46K MILES CXL LIKE NEW $9850, 352-628-5100 HONDA1997 CRV, priced to sell.its a honda auto, pwr windows call 352-628-4600 for special newspaper pricing KIA2012 SOUL ONLY7K MILES $15,800 352-628-5100 CHEVROLET1999, Camaro, Convertible $6,990. 352-341-0018 FORD1995 Escort wagon 4cyl., Auto, call 352-628-4600 for low price and appointment FORD2005, Focus $4,850. 352-341-0018 FORD2010, Edge, 10k miles, Loaded, exc. cond.$18,500 obo 352-400-6007 FORD2010, Pruis, $17,995. 352-341-0018 FORD2011 FIESTASDN 36K MILES, S MODEL, ONE OWNER $9950, 352-628-5100 HONDA2010ACCORD LX ,85K MILES, NICE, $12,850 352-628-5110 LINCOLNTowncar 2010 29,900mi, gold w/beige vinyl top, white leather asking, $24,900 352-476-5061 MINI COOPER2008 2DR, HARDTOP ONLY20K MILES, SUPER CLEAN $13980, 352-628-5100 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 NISSAN2005,Altima $5,895 352-341-0018 PONTIAC2003 Bonneville must SE, V6, pw.pl.priced to sell..call jan at 352-628-4600 for appointment and pricing SOLDFORD98 Black Mustang runs well! 2002 JAGUAR XJR 4 DR, $7200. Super Charged 4.0 V-8, exc cond, auto trans, leather int, AC, power sun roof, XJR Sport Pkg, factory chrome wheels (352) 637-6443 2004 SSR5.3 L, Magnaflow super charger, and exhaust 18k miles, $26,500 call 207-546-6551 WE HAVE BOATSGULF TO LAKE MARINE We Pay CASH For Used Clean Boats Pontoon, Deck & Fishing Boats (352)527-0555 boatsupercenter.com DUTCHMEN TRVL TRAILER2007 Ranier Model R24Q. 25with 1 slideout. Very good cond. 7300 GVWR with sway bar and wt disbn hitch. $9900 obo. See at Picards Storage. 352-341-0890 ITASCA2007 Navaron 23H Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L, 17 mpg, generator,AC, one slide out, sleeps 5, excellent condition, $50,000 make offer 352-422-1309 JAYCO1996, Designer 5th Wheel, 30 ft, slide out, excellent condition At Lake Rousseau RV PK $7,500. obo 248-672-3452 CAMPER29 Holiday Rambler Alum fr, lg slide out. great cond. $10,900 352-795-5310 or 410-474-3454 29FTTERRY FLEETWOOD bunk style camping trailer. Tag Behind 96 model. Good shape $3800 (352) 613-2944 CAR/TOYHAULER 200732 ft Enclosed Gooseneck w/liv qtrs. $11,900. For more info call 352-560-7247 COACHMAN30ft. Qn. Island bed, + rear bunk beds, slide out, ducted AC ready to go. Very clean $9,500 (352) 621-0848 FOREST RIVER2010, Surveyor, Sport 189, 20 ft. Travel Trailer, 1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed, awning, pwr. tonque jack, corner jacks, microwave, equilizing hitch, $9000 (352) 382-1826 KZ Toyhauler,0732 like new, full slide new tires, Owan Gen., gas tank, Lrg living area separate cargo $18,000. 352-795-2975 MACS MOBILE R V REP AIR & MAINT RVTC Certified Tech. 352-613-0113, Lic/Ins. SUNNYBROOK 36 ft. 5th wheel, 2 slides, kg bd,like new, 60amp serv. NADA $29K asking $25K obo 352-382-3298 WE BUYRVS, TRAVELTRAILERS, 5TH WHEELS, MOTOR HOMES Call US 352-201-6945 BLUE OX SELF ALLIGNING TOW BAR New with cables & pinlock $600 352-601-4986 LUGGAGE ROOF CROSSRAILS will fit any Chevy Traverse $150 obo 352-503-6414 **BEST PRICE** For Junk & Unwanted Cars-CALLNOW **352-426-4267** BUYING JUNK CARS Running or Not CASH PAID-$300 & UP (352) 771-6191 MONEYS TIGHT! PRICES R RIGHT! BUY-SELL-RENTCar-Truck-Boat-RV consignmentusa.or g US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR 461-4518 & 795-4440 WE BUY ANYVEHICLEInAny Condition, Title, No Title, Bank Lien, No Problem, Dont Trade it in. We Will Pay up to $25K Any Make, Any Model. 813-335-3794 813-237-1892 Call AJ BUICK, Regal LS, 4 DR. Loaded, 70K, 24 mpg, leather, V6 auto clean $4,275. 352-212-4882 BUICK1996 Buick Century auto,cruise,power locks windows,goodtires, runs,& drives great, good mpg, no oil use,am,fm,cass, $2000 obo ask for Robert 352-563-1934 8am til 8pm BUICK1996 Buick Century auto,cruise,power locks windows,goodtires,runs,& drives great, good mpg, no oil use,am,fm,cass, $2000 obo ask for Robert 352-563-1934 8am til 8pm BUICK93 LeSabre Sedan exc. must see, one owner, 57k ,ask. $3900 obo 352-302-4282 CADILLAC1994 DEVILLE 79K MILES, CAR IS PERFECT$4995 352-628-5100 CADILLAC2005 STS LOW MILES NICE CAR $9850, 352-628-5100 CADILLAC2011 CTS, LOADED ONLY15K MILES, SUNROOF $27,850 352-628-5100 CHRYSLER2006 PT Cruiser conv. weather is getting nicetime to drop the topcall 352-628-4600 to set appointment to see CORVETTE2006 Victory Red tan leather, Convertible. LS2 400HP. 16K miles, 3LTOption Pkg. $29,900(352)560-7247 HOME FOR SALE NORTON, VA 5Bd/2Ba inc. 3 lots 70miles from Bristol Racetrack $69,000 276-393-0446 OR 276-679-1331 FREE Foreclosure and Short Sale Lists Office Open 7 Days a WeekLISA VANDEBOE Broker (R) Owner Plantation Realty 352-634-0129 www.plantation realtylistings.com 2BD 1BA2 Carport onLake Rousseau Dunnellon 1.4 AC, 168 ft on lake, No flood insurance completely remodedled, Price Reduced$169.000 Barney Chilton 352-563-0116 Gulf Prvt Island home on 15 ac 80 dock. 4/2 All util. Mainland dock & pkg. Jacuzzi house S. McDermott (352) 697-1593 Cridland RE INVERNESS 3/2/2 waterfront pool hm on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot quiet St, whole house generator $229,000 352-419-8337 YOUR High-Tech Water Front RealtorROD KENNER352-436-3531 ERA Suncoast Realty SCAN OR GO TOwww. BestNatur eCoast Pr operties.com To view great waterfront properties CRYSTALRIVER3 Beautiful wooded acre lots, high & dry, live oaks, neighbors adj, $7500ea Crystal Manor 229-377-9697 WINDSHIELD Citabria, brand new PMApart, $150 obo 352-419-6086 2 8ft Kayak Calypsos with 2 paddles, & 2 life jackets, Like New $250 obo for Both (352) 364-7057 ** BUY, SELL** & TRADE CLEAN USED BOATS THREE RIVERS MARINE US 19 Crystal River **352-563-5510** 03 SEAPRO1790 hp merc. vhf, gps, trol mtr, fullcover, bimini, alum trlr $7200 352-419-5363pm 3 16CANOES2, 2 Seaters, 1, 3 Seater on galvanized trailer w/paddles & lifejackets $1200 352-795-7335 18HP, Evinrude short shaft, manual, good condition. $460. Crystal River (513) 260-6410 ALUMICRAFT18 ft.,wide rhino lined inside, 25HP Merc., boat mtr. & trailer in great shape $3,700 (352) 563-0328 LET US SELL YOUR BOAT0% FEE!!FREE Bass Pro Shop Gift Card, Call for Details352-795-1119Mercury & Yamaha Parts and ServiceUS 19 CRYSTALRIVER (just north of the Mall) MONTEREY07, 180 Bowrider 38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo factory loaded, alum. trlr orig. owner $14k obo 352-419-6086 PENNYAN 1979 27Sports fisherman w/ trailer, needs some work. $4000 OBO (352) 621-0192 TRI PONTOON BOAT27 Ft., Fiberglass 250 HP,Ttop, trailer included $17,000. 352-613-8453 Phyllis StricklandRealtor Best Time To Buy! I have Owner Financing and Foreclosures TROPIC SHORES REALTY. (352) 613-3503 GAIL STEARNSyour Gale ForceRealtorTROPIC SHORES Realty 352-422-4298gail@citrusrealtor .com www.citrusr ealtor .com Low overhead means savings for you! Waterfront, Foreclosures &Owner financing available. I NEEDLISTINGS!I SOLD ALMOST 2-HOMES A MONTH IN 2012 Lets BREAK that record together!DEB INFANTINERealtor(352) 302-8046 Real Estate!... its what I do. ERAAmerican RealtyPhone: 352-726-5855 Cell: 352-302-8046 Fax: 352-726-7386 Email:debinfantine@ yahoo.com MICHELE ROSERealtorSimply put I ll work harder 352-212-5097 isellcitruscounty@ yahoo.com Craven Realty, Inc. 352-726-1515 SANDI HARTRealtorListing and Selling Real Estate Is my Business I put my heart into it!352-476-9649sandra.hart@ era.com ERA American Realty 352-726-5855 TONY PauelsenRealtor352-303-0619Buy or Sell now is the time TOP PERFORMANCEReal estate Consultant 3/2 pool home on 10 acres w/ FP, zoned agriculture, walk to all schools. $179,900 (727) 528-2803 or 727-698-0723 LAKE PANASOFKEE 3bdr 1 ba, cbs home, lake access, great income or live-in property, on beautiful lot, $39,900 call 352-303-4505 20 DOCKABLE ACRES St. Lucie Waterway. $159,500. 45mins boatAtlantic; 5mins boat Lake Okeechobee. Beautiful land, abundant wildlife. Gated/Privacy. 888-716-2259 Gulf Atlantic Land, Broker. Beautiful Whispering Pines Villa $79,900 Managed, low Maint. fee indowed for sudden expenses, walk to park 352-341-0170 352-726-5263 FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch, metal roof, appls, CHA, fans, verticals, shed, fence, deck, spklrs, near dog park. $120,000 (352) 586-0872 INVERNESSBlock home 2br, 1ba w/ 2porches, oversized gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres. $110,000 Call Buzz 352-341-0224 or Mary(607) 657-8379 NICE HOUSE on Nice Street $69,000 2/1/1, Attached carport w/ 12 x 32 scrn. por., built in on 1/2 acre lot fenced 12 x14 matching out building, New roof, stucco paint, flooring, upper line appls, irrigation & water system., taxes & ins. $1,135 yr 606-425-7832 3BD, 2BA, 2Gar, Gas fireplace, on Water, Main Canal, dock large lot with fruit trees. $138,000 (321) 303-2875 3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft., 6823 W. Merrivale Ln Built 2006, Fully Furnished, by Owner, $77,000 obo (260) 348-9667 4/2 BLOCK HOME, mother in law apt, nice home $65,000. (305) 619-0282, Cell Buying or Selling REALESTATE, Let Me Work For You!BETTYHUNTREALTORERA KEY 1 Realty, Inc. 352 586-0139hunt4houses68 @yahoo.comwww.bettyhunts homes.com. Condo for SaleSugarmill Woods 2/2, 1,850 sq. ft. 35 Beech Street607-287-0473 Custom Built 3/2/2 Pool Home on 1.26 acres on Golf Course 2339 sq.ft. living area 3366 sq.ft. under roof Many xtras, price reduced. 352-382-1531 Golf Course Home 3/2/2. Update throughout. Heated pool; Many extras. By appointment (352) 382-2475 2ACRESQuiet Country Setting 3/2 on 2 acres mol Approx. 1750 sq ft LA front porch, Lg rear screened porch, Patio, 24x30 Steel Building, Steel Carport -great for boat storage, etc. Fenced and crossfenced, Built in 2003 Nice Oaks, Wooded, Citrus Springs area only 20 Min. to Ocala $126,500 Call 352-302-6784 for appt. Tweet Tweet Tweet Follow the Chronicle on www.twitter.com/ citruschronicle news as it happens right at your finger tips BEVERLYHILLS2/1 w/sunroom, deck on back, new utility shed 352-566-7099 or 606-694-7099 UNIQUE & HISTORIC Homes, Commercial Waterfront & Land Small Town Country Lifestyle OUR SPECIALTY SINCE 1989LET US FIND YOUAVIEW TO LOVEwww. crosslandrealty.com(352) 726-6644Crossland Realty Inc. HERNANDOBuilding Off Hwy 200, $800.mo 352-201-2428 4/3+/4 pool home w/ inlaw suite on 2 ac. HW flrs, granite cntrs. 2009 Custom Home S. McDermott (352) 697-1593 Cridland RE PINE RIDGE THIS IS THE PROPERTYYOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3 w/7 car garage/ workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded w/large backyard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community.www centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352-249-9164 Beverly Hills 2/1 family room and carport, investment or seasonal living $38,900 352-422-2433 HANDYMAN SPECIAL 2/1/1 needs paint & cosmetics $23k **cash only ** 352-503-3245 DUDLEYS AUCTION 4AUCTIONSTHURS 3/7 Est ate Auction @Hall prev 12 Auction 3 outside 6pm inside Furniture,Tools, Household, boxes of fun & value 700+lots FRI 3/8 On Site Personal Property Est ate prev 8am auction 9 am 161AnnapolisAve Citrus Hills 34442 entire contents of worldtravelersfurniture, antiques, household, HUGE St ar Wars Col & more Fri 3/8 Real Est ate prev 3pm Auction 4pm 5756W Norbis Cir Homosassa 3/2 1 acrehome FR-LR-DR-BR stone Fireplace, clean move in ready 1/3 mi. from Rock Crusher Elementary. MUST SELLTO SETTLE ESTATE SA T 3/9 Real Est ate & Content s prev 8 Auction 9 Real Estate 10am 1115 N Carnevale TerraceTimberlane Estate 34461 3/2 one acre pool home SOLDABSOLUTE Entire contents inc furniture,Antiques,Art, sterling & more *check website* www.dudleys auction.com 637-9588 10%BP Au2267AB1667 Maine-ly Real Estate #381384 Your Worldof garage sales Classifieds ww.chronicleonline.com CITRUS COUNTYBeautiful 3-4 Bedrm Homes & Duplexes w/1 car garage. Starting@$433/mo Inverness 352-726-3476 Lecanto 352-746-0373Crystal River 352-563-0890 CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1Water Incl. CHA $496. 220-2447 or 212-2051 DUNNELLONRainbow Springs Rent/Rent To own Georgous, 2/2/2 Country Club Home Fireplace D Washer Carpeted, lanai, spotless 1/2 acre quiet. Special $799. 352-527-0493 Photos: http://ocala .craigslist.org/apa/ 3653804501.html Hernando Rentalsfrom $425.00 @ MO. CallA.W. SkipCraven 352-464-1515 HOMOSASSA2/1CHA,No pets $500. mo., 1st + sec (352) 628-4210 INVERNESS121 N. Seminole Ave., Downtown, CBD. Charming 1600 + sq. ft., 2 BR, 2 BA, CB home. Zoned Commercial, w/ formal dining room, lg. mast. bdrm, utility, & solarium, w/ appliances. $800/ 1st, last, w/ sec dep. & ref. Available Monday March 4, 726-3153, leave mesg INVERNESS3BR/2BA/1, $750. mo 418 Hunting Lodge Dr (352) 895-0744 Cell INVERNESSCountry Living on Large acre lot. 3 bd., 2 ba. home. Garden and fenced areas. Well & septic, so no water bill! $595. 352-476-4964 SUGARMILL WOODS 4/2/21/3ac. $1100. mo. 727-919-0797 HERNANDOAffordable Rentals Watsons Fish Camp (352)726-2225 INVERNESSNice Waterfront, 2 story Condo 2/2.Great loc. First, last, Sec $675 mo (352) 302-4546 CRYSTAL RIVERSpacy/Private, Must love big dogs. $750. (352) 422-5735 CRYSTALRIVER Office & Warehouse $300-$600, Plantation Rentals 352-634-0129 PUBLISHERS NOTICE:All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Fair HousingAct which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777.The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275.

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C12WEDNESDAY, MARCH6, 2013CITRUSCOUNTY(FL) CHRONICLE 000E993 0% 60 MONTHS FINANCING or SAVE $ 3,000 HURRY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Push Button Start, 6.1 Touch-Screen, 6 Speakers, iPod Control, Tel & Music VIA Bluetooth, Cruise Control, Power Locks, Power Windows HURRY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! HURRY WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! MPG 35 MPG 28 Cruise Control, Power Windows, Power Door Locks, Air Conditioning, AM/FM/CD Player www.villagetoyota.com Lets Go Places TAKE YOUR PICK DURING OUR MARCH SPRING CLEANING VILLAGE TOYOTA 352-628-5100 MSRP . . . . . . 17,900 SAVINGS . . . 2,905 NOW $ 14,995 2013 NEW TOYOTA COROLLA NEW 2012 TOYOTA CAMRY MSRP . . . . . . 22,895 SAVINGS . . . 3,900 NOW $ 18,995 MPG 35 NEW 2012 TOYOTA RAV4 NEW 2012 TOYOTA PRIUS MSRP . . . . . . 26,017 SAVINGS . . . . 3,117 NOW $ 22,900 MPG 51 712-0306 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Board of County Commissioners will meet in Regular Session on March 12, 2013, at 1:00 P.M ., in the Citrus County Courthouse, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, for the purpose of conducting the regular business of Citrus County. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the County Administrators Office, 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida, 34450, (352) 341-6560, at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 341-6580. Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the Governing Body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a record of the proceedings and for such purpose may need to provide that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes). March 6, 2013. 717-0306 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Sheriffs Office of Citrus County, Florida, will begin collective bargaining talks with The Professional Firefighter of Citrus County, Local 4562 on March 7, 2013 at the Withlacoochee Technical Institute located at 1201 W Main Street Inverness FL, 34450, Room 286 beginning at 1:00 p.m. These discussions are open to the public. Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact the Human Resources Office, 1 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave, Inverness, Fl 34450, (352)726-4488 a minimum of two days prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, use the TDD telephone. March 6, 2013. 710-0306 WCRN Patty Jo Bodenhorn File No: 2012-CP-729 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2012-CP-729 IN RE: ESTATE of PATTY JO BODENHORN, DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the Estate of Patty Jo Bodenhorn, deceased, File Number 2012-CP-729 by the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedents date of death was October 13, 2012 that the total value of the estate is $55,000.00 and that the names and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Susan J. Korman, 1700 N. Envoy Drive, Crystal River, FL 34429 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WITH BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2013. Person Giving Notice: /s/Susan J. Korman 1700 N. Envoy Drive, Crystal River, FL 34429 Attorney for Person Giving Notice BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 157310209 Courthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone: (352) 726-1211 February 27 & March 6, 2013. 711-0306 WCRN Wanda C. McKeever File No: 2013-CP-35 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.2013-CP-35 IN RE: ESTATE of WANDA C. McKEEVER, 716-0306 WCRN Martha H. Filler File No: 2013-CP-017 Notice to Creditors (Summ.Admin.) PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-017 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF MARTHA H. FILLER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order or Summary Administration has been enetered in the estate of Martha H. Filler, deceased, File Number 2013-CP-017, by the Citcuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 N. Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450; that the decedents date of death was December 1, 2012; that the total value of the estate si EXEMPT PROPETRY and that the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME ADDRESS Andrea Hensley 115 Homewood Drive, Genoa, Illinios 60135 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 6, 2013.. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Andrea Hensley 115 Homewood Drive, Genoa, Illinios 60135 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Rebecca A. Briggs, Florida Bar No. 738441 Rebecca Briggs, P.A. 111 W. Main Street, Suite 205, Inverness, FL 34450 Telephone (352) 601-0596 March 6 & 13, 2013. DECEASED, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Wanda C. McKeever, deceased, whose date of death was January 7, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Citrus County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 110 North Apopka Avenue, Inverness, Florida 34450. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/Tammy Sue Hiles 12148 Luftburrow Lane, Hudson, FL 34669 Attorney for Personal Representative BRADSHAW & MOUNTJOY, P.A. /s/Michael Mountjoy, Esquire, Florida Bar Number: 157310209 C ourthouse Square, Inverness, FL 34450, Telephone: (352) 726-1211 February 27 & March 6, 2013. 2374-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-311 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the followTax Deed Notices ing certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0549 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: DE ROSA INC UNIT 5 REVISED PB 11 PG 29 LOT 5 DESC IN OR BK 890 PG 1116 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: GIROLAMA ORLANDO, GUISEPPE ORLANDO Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 Tax Deed Notices 2372-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-309 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-5939 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: CITRUS SPGS UNIT 23 PB 568 PG 968 LOT 9 BLK 1740 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: ELAINE I BRIGHTMAN Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2373-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-310 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-9771 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: EDEN GARDENS PB 3 PG 46 LOT 1 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: EVELYN CASE, JACK CASE, ESTATE OF LEO CASE, JEWEL HOLVERSTOTT, LAWSON HOLVERSTOTT Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2376-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-313 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of Tax Deed Notices the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2960 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: TOWN OF DUNNELLON LOT 697 DESC IN OR BK 611 PG 321, DC IN OR BK 706 PG 615, OR BK 793 PG 2002, DC IN OR BK 840 PG 10 55 & REF ONLY: OR BK 840 PG 1057 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: WILLIE CLEVELAND 3RD, ESTATE OF JOYCE ANN DIXON Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2375-0313 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-312 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: CITRUS COUNTY The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-10018 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: SEVEN LAKES PARK 2ND ADDITION PB 11 PG 122 LOT 6 BLK I NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: BRIAN G MCKENZIE, JAMES T MOORE JR Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on March 27, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 1, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Theresa Steelfox, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: February 20, 2013 February 27, 2013 March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 2378-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-291 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: JOSEPH G CAPPUCCILLI The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 09-0316 Tax Deed Notices YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: COM AT SE COR OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/4 SEC 14, TH N 1 DEG 37M 41S W AL E LN OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/4 511.60FT TO POB PT BEING ON CTRLN OF EXISTING POLE POWER LN, TH N 1 DEG 37M 41S W AL E LN 153.40 FT TO NE COR OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/ 4 TH S 88 DEG 46M 24S W AL N LN OF NE1/4 OF NW1/4 OF NW1/4 348.16 FT, TH S 1 DEG 37M 41S E PAR TO E LN 152.59 FT TO PT ON CTRLN, TH N 88 DEG 54M 25S E AL CTRLN 348.16 FT TO POB SUB J TO 25 FT WIDE EASM AL E BDRY FOR RD R/W DESC IN OR BK 1405 PG 1037 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: ESTATE OF DIANE SPINDLER, NANCY MEYERS, NEAL MEYERS SR, JAMES SPINDLER, JAMES R SPINDLER, JAMES R SPINDLER JR, KRYSTAL SPINDLER, KRYSTAL A SPINDLER, MICHELLE SPINDLER Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 2377-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2012-314 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: DAVID DIBARTOLOMEO The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-6421 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: PINE RIDGE UNIT 1 PB 8 PG 25 LOT 26 BLK 84 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: CONRADO VALEROS, FELICITAS VALEROS Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 Tax Deed Notices 2380-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2013-060 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: TC 12 LLC The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-0619 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: MINI FARMS UNIT 4 UNREC SUB LOT 41 DESC IN OR BK 1105 PG 1016 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: HENRY E BOOTH, MILLIE M BOOTH Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 Tax Deed Notices 2379-0327 WCRN PUBLIC NOTICE APPLICATION: 2013-061 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: PENDER NEWKIRK CUSTODIAN TC10U LLC TC 10U LLC TCU 10 LLC The holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO: 10-2314 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: HOMOSASSA TRADEWINDS II A CONDOMINIUM UNIT 129 DECL OF CONDO IN OR BK 1932 PG 1405, TITLE IN OR BK 1373 PG 1036 AND OR BK 1514 PG 1653 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: VAN DER VALK TRADEWINDS INC Said property being in the County of Citrus, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder on line, on April 10, 2013 at 9:30 A.M. at www.citrus.realtaxdeed.c om. Dated February 14, 2013 ANGELA VICK Clerk of the Circuit Court, Citrus County, Florida By: Bonnie C. Tenney, Deputy Clerk Advertised 4 times: March 6, 2013 March 13, 2013 March 20, 2013 March 27, 2013 000E993 VILLAGE TOYOTA