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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-03-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03048

Full Text


Home sweet home: No. 8 UF beats Alabama /B1


C T R wwwchronicleonlinecoT


www.chronicleonline.com


Morning frost;
partly cloudy,
windy.
PAGE A4


Florida's Best Community 1 Newspaper Serving Florida's Best Community $1


VOL. 118 ISSUE 208


Three months in the deep end


Commissioner Adams wastes no time getting down to business


MIKE WRIGHT
Staff writer
When Scott Adams joined the Cit-
rus County Commission in Novem-
ber, he didn't dip his toe in the
political waters before wading in.
Adams arrived with a cannonball.
Adams, elected to office in August


with 40 percent of the vote in a four-
way race, made it known his way of
doing things is not like his fellow
commissioners.
While other commissioners say
they work in harmony with County
Administrator Brad Thorpe and his
top staff, Adams has taken the op-
posite approach.


During his first three months on
the job, Adams has been openly crit-
ical of Thorpe, County Attorney
Richard Wesch and the top county
directors. He says the county gov-
ernment is top heavy and misman-
aged. He blames the other
commissioners for a budget crisis
and says they are focused on raising


MORE INSIDE
Read samples of emails sent
by Commissioner Adams./A9

taxes and fees, and not cutting
waste.
His colleagues are noticing. cott
"I think he has misplaced enthu- Scott
siasm," Commissioner John Kenney Adams
county
See Page A8 commissioner.


Climbing

the walls for


strawberries

Annual festival serves

up 'berry' delicious

time; ends today
ERYN WORTHINGTON
Staff writer
FLORAL CITY
Cold temperatures and windy
conditions didn't hinder the
die-hard strawberry lovers Sat-
urday The sweet, succulent
fruit seemed to have called to
thousands of hungry bellies, as flats of


* WHAT: 26th
annual Floral
City Strawberry
Festival.
* WHEN: 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. today.
* WHERE: Floral
Park, U.S. 41.
* PRICE: $3 per
person; children
younger than 12
free.
* PARKING:
Limited at Floral
Park. Shuttle
service is offered
continuously
from the
Fairgrounds for
$1 round trip.


strawberries
were carried
away
But don't
worry, plenty of
Ferris Farms
strawberries
are still avail-
able today at
the 26th annual
Floral City
Strawberry Fes-
tival in Floral
City.
The celebra-
tion of the fla-
vorful fruit
continues from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today on U.S.
41, south of Flo-
ral City. Admis-
sion is $2 per


person; children 11 and younger are
admitted free.
White tents line the pathway for fes-


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
Extreme Fun attendant Alex Pich shows how it's done Saturday on the rock
climbing wall at the 26th annual Floral City Strawberry Festival. Those who want to
test their skill Sunday can find it near the north entrance in the children's section.


tivalgoers as more than 100 crafters
aim to catch the wondering eyes. Fes-
tival pageants, entertainment, car
shows, food vendors, a child's play
area and strawberry shortcakes are
also present to satisfy just about
everyone's desires.
"There is so much for us to do here,"
said Bushnell resident Brenda Sar-
gent. "I brought my granddaughter


with me today, because we needed
some time out of the house. I think she
has already eaten three strawberry
shortcakes."
Sargent sat next to her granddaugh-
ter Silivia on the haystacks as she
went through her bag of goodies pur-
chased from vendors. A blue necklace,
See Page A6


A table


of two



cities

Councils, staff

share ideas
A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER Leaders
of Citrus County's two incorpo-
rated cities Inverness and
Crystal River met this past
week to find common ground
and mine for ideas to spur
growth.
The city council members
and respective city managers
wasted little time Thursday be-
fore tossing around suggestions
and potential areas of coopera-
tion. And the exchange also
elicited a few queries, mostly
about how Inverness added
spiff and vitality to its image.
Frank DiGiovanni, Inverness
city manager, said what is seen
today in his city took time and a
capable gathering of staff to
achieve.
DiGiovanni said the city's de-
velopment plan was site-
specific by building an infra-
structural and recreation gem
such as the "regional" park in
Whispering Pines Park and
burnishing the image of the city
center.
"The idea there was to be
able to park in one place and
walk everywhere," DiGiovanni
said.
He said, however, it took an
See Page A4


In death, Facebook photos could be lost


LAUREN GAMBINO
Associated Press
BEAVERTON, Ore. A grieving Oregon
mother who battled Facebook for full access to


her deceased son's account
has been pushing for years for
something that would prevent
others from losing photos,
messages and other memories
- as she did.
"Everybody's going to face
this kind of a situation at some


WHAT TO
DO?
* See a guide
to protect
digital
assets./A13


point in their lives," says
Karen Williams, whose 22-year-old son died in a
2005 motorcycle accident.
The Oregon Legislature responded and took up
the cause recently with a proposal that would


have made it easier for loved ones to access the
"digital assets" of the deceased, only to be turned
back by pressure from the tech industry, which
argued both a 1986 federal law and voluntary
terms of service agreements prohibit companies
from sharing a person's information even if
such a request were included in a last will and
testament.
Lobbyists agree the Stored Communications
Act is woefully out of date but say until it's
changed, laws passed at the state level could be
See Rage A13
Karen Williams poses Feb. 16 with a photo of her
deceased son, Loren, in Beaverton, Ore. Williams
battled Facebook over the right to access
Loren's Facebook page.
Associated Press


Classifieds ....... D5
Crossword .... .. .A16
Excursions ...... .A15


Editorial ......... C2
Entertainment . .B6
Horoscope ....... .B6


Lottery Numbers .B4


Lottery Payouts .B6
Movies ......... .A16
Obituaries ....... .A6


TV Listings ...... A16
Together ........ A18
Veterans Notes .A10-12


.__ CRYSTAL 800-584-8755 EXT.1 CRYSTALAUTOS.COM ,
CHEVROLET 1035 South Suncoast Blvd. Homosassa, FL 34448
^39 MONTH LEASE WITH $2999 TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING WITH APPROVED CREDIT. *0% APR FOR WELL QUALIFIED BUYERS. NOT ALL WILL QUALIFY. +ALL PRICES PLUS TAX TAG FN--,
T 2 AND DEALER FEES WITH $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. **IN DISCOUNTS FROM RETAIL PRICE. OFFERS CAN NOT BE COMBINED. PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK. F1N'NlDA ".


TODAY
& next
morning
HIGH
57
LOW
31


MARCH 3, 2013


6 11845


175III


I SUNDAY I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


ATTENTION

FLORIDA

SNOWBIRDS
I- Ii -i i a d .. ..i I


r' l, .:- -E3i' has been
c air.n i: r people for over
.I 1 I-.'t it comforting
tI.., .,.:... 0-y'lI lbe there
.h r .., .-.eed them,
., -.-r ..u are?"


* Patrick Duffy, Actor


New Location Inside Crystal River Mall (Next to K-Mart)


IOALA LOATIN


p


A2 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013







Page A3 SUNDAY, MARCH 3,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE




Around the Task force targets 'skills gap'


Paper seeks storm
photos, recollections
Nearly 20 years ago, on
March 13, 1993, the No-
Name Storm hit Citrus
County. The Chronicle is
looking for people who
have photos of the storm
and its aftermath. The
paper also wants to hear
your stories and memories
from that event.
Email either Nancy
Kennedy at nkennedy@
chronicleonline.com or A.B.
Sidibe at asidibe@chronicle
online.com or call the news-
room at 352-563-5660 and
ask for Kennedy or Sidibe.
New league to meet
March 12
A newly forming Citrus
County League of Women
Voters will meet at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, March 12, at the
Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Fellowship, 7633
N. Florida Ave., Citrus
Springs.
Earlier presentations
about the league resulted in
overwhelming support for
the nonpartisan educational
group, which is open to all,
including men. On March
12, organizational items will
be discussed and decided.
For information, call 352-
465-4225, or visit Nature
coastuu.org.
Sponsors invited to
shrimp festival 2013
The Rotary Club of Ho-
mosassa Springs is looking
for sponsors for the upcom-
ing Shrimpapalooza 2013
on March 23.
Those interested in spon-
soring the event can partici-
pate in The Rotary Club of
Homosassa Springs' Shrim-
papalooza 2013 parade
with a car, float, trailer, mo-
torcycle or other entry fea-
turing the business. The
parade will be seen by
spectators from Citrus and
Hernando counties and out-
of-area visitors.
After the parade, which
starts at 10:30 a.m. in Old
Homosassa, the festival be-
gins and sponsors can use
their booths to sell wares or
promote their business.
The festival will feature
an array of seafood and
other foods, music, drinks,
crafts and kid-friendly
entertainment.
For information on be-
coming a sponsor, call Tom
Feeney at 352-201-2520 or
email amstaff@infionline.
net.
Water, wastewater
board meets
The Citrus County Water
and Wastewater Authority
will meet at 1 p.m. Monday,
March 4, in the Lecanto
Government Building, 3600
W. Sovereign Path, Room
166, Lecanto.
Board members will dis-
cuss and review customer
complaint surveys and rate
case updates, along with
other items on the agenda.
For information, call 352-
419-6520.


Employers say

workforce lacks

basic 'soft' skills

PAT FAHERTY
Staff writer
The void between high unem-
ployment and unfilled job open-
ings has been defined as "the skills
gap," with county and regional ef-
forts trying to narrow the divide.
"We have formed an EDC com-
mittee on the skills gap with a
cross section of our community
who are concerned about this
issue," outgoing Economic Devel-
opment Council executive direc-


tor John Siefert 1 -
said. "We are
moving forward to
see what we can --
do about it in Cit-
rus County It is -
going to be a focus
or ours."
'"Addressing the John Siefert
Skills Gap," in outgoin EDC
Citrus, Marion executive
and Levy Coun- director.
ties was subject of
2012 report commissioned by
CLM Workforce Connection. It at-
tributed the gap to a variety of is-
sues on both sides of the equation.
The younger generation may have
different workplace expectations,
while employers are not finding
the basic skills, nor soft skills they
require.


The report identifies soft skills
such as critical thinking and prob-
lem solving, verbal and written
communications, teamwork and
ability to get along with others, pro-
fessionalism and general work
ethics. Certain employers, particu-
larly in manufacturing, health care
and information technology, are
having difficulties finding qualified
local workers with specific skills.
"There is a need for additional
training," said Brenda Chrisman,
CLM chief workforce develop-
ment officer. "There are a lot of
jobs out there that are not being
filled. A lot of people are unem-
ployed but do not have the right
skills for the job."
Speaking to the Citrus County
Economic Development Council
last month, she said they had


talked with employers in the
three counties, with Citrus County
being the most vocal. Chrisman
said they learned between 400
and 600 positions could be filled
over the next three to five years
based on expansion.
"We are, as a region, developing
a skills gap task force," she said.
"One of (the) key areas lacking is
individuals with soft skills."
The lack of academic skills -
reading and math -has also been
an issue.
She said they are working with
job applicants on such things as
how they dress, their speech, etc.,
an effort now becoming a
statewide issue.
Contact Chronicle reporter Pat
Faherty at 352-564-2924 or
pfaherty@chronicleonline. com.


Stirring up soulful sounds and good gumbo


ERYN WORTHINGTON/Chronicle
ABOVE: Dagmar Piegler, right, joins Bill "Sauce Boss"
Wharton, left, on stage as she stirs the boiling pot of gumbo
while he entertains the crowd at the Berries, Brew & BBQ on
Friday night in Floral City. RIGHT: Wharton travels the United
States entertaining crowds with his music while making
gumbo that is later served to his listeners. About a hundred
people braved the cold Friday night and headed to Floral City
for the Berries, Brew & BBQ event, which kicked off the 26th
annual Floral City Strawberry Festival. The event wasn't the
only thing spicing up the crowd. Wharton turns up the blues
with his slide guitar and heats the night with a huge pot of
gumbo. Combining his authentic sound with a recipe, he
caters to the crowd's ears with music and their bellies with
gumbo. For more information, visit www.sauceboss.com.


-From staff reports


Orange Line expands service Runners, walkers to hit
tiPn t f ICn v w T I0 1-O


All county covered now

Special to the Chronicle

The county's Orange Line Bus now services
entire Citrus County area.
The purpose of Citrus County Transit is to
provide safe, courteous, clean and reliable
transportation to residents. It offers conven-
ient transportation to shopping and recre-
ation opportunities for a low fee.
The county has a point-to-point appoint-
ment/pickup bus service and runs from
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The Orange Line fixed route operates from
6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, ex-
cluding major holidays. The complete circuit
takes about two hours. By stopping at main
shopping centers coming into and going from
the communities, the route is designed to
help residents in Crystal River, Homosassa
and Floral City, along with routes in Inver-
ness and Beverly Hills.
Officials also hope students will utilize the
line to traverse the county, too.


* TO DOWNLOAD SCHEDULES AND MAPS: Visit
www.bocc.citrus.fl.us. Go to "Departments," "Community
Service," click on "Transportation."
* TO CATCH THE BUS: Locations are shown on the map and
described on the schedule.
* DEVIATIONS: Several stops are shown on the schedule as
a deviation; call Citrus County Transit at 352-527-7630 at
least one hour prior to pickup time. Let the driver know
where your destination will be when you board the bus.
* FARES: Pay full fare with exact change or with ticket -
each time you board the bus.


0 Cash fares $1 per trip.


0 $2 unlimited per day.


* Children 12 and younger free. 0 Monthly ticket $35.
* DESTINATIONS: Let driver know where you want to get off
two stops ahead of time.
* ADA ACCESSIBILITY: Buses are wheelchair accessible. If
you live within a quarter mile of a bus stop and are unable
to get to a stop, contact the Citrus County Transit office
and you may be picked up at your home with 24 hours'
notice.
* QUESTIONS: Emailed transit@citruscountyfl.org or call
352-527-7630.


Chronicle
The sixth annual Scope It Out 5K will be Saturday,
March 9, at CREST School in Lecanto.
Starting at 8 a.m., the event includes a 5K run, a 1-mile
walk and a children's fun run.
A plaque will be given to the group or organization
with the largest number of participants. Awards will be
given to overall male and female and overall masters (40
and up) male and female. All pre-registered entries are
guaranteed an event T-shirt.
Register at www.debbys5k.org or wwwcitrusroad
runners.org.
The 5K run is sponsored by the Debby Hudson Colon
Cancer Foundation. All proceeds benefit The Colon Can-
cer Alliance and the Prevent Cancer Foundation.
Last year's money provided mini-grants to Florida res-
idents who are undergoing treatment for colon cancer
and need help with personal expenses, through the Blue
Note Fund of the Colon Cancer Alliance. It also provided
research funds for colon cancer through the Prevent
Cancer Foundation.
March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month. Colon can-
cer is 90 percent curable if detected early


srees or cope u










Rescuers end effort to find body in sinkhole


Associated Press

SEFFNER The effort
to find the body of a
Florida man who was
swallowed by sinkhole
under his Florida home
was called off Saturday
while crews tried to learn
how far the underground
cavity reaches and
whether more homes are
at risk.
Hillsborough County
Administrator Mike Mer-
rill said rescuers were
ending the effort to find
Jeff Bush's body and they
planned to bring in heavy
equipment Sunday to
begin demolishing the
four-bedroom home.
"At this point, it's really
not possible to recover the
body," Merrill said, later
adding "we're dealing with
a very unusual sinkhole."
Bush, 37, was in his bed-
room Thursday night in
Seffner a suburb of
8,000 people 15 miles east
of downtown Tampa -
when the earth opened
and took him and every-




CITIES
Continued from Page Al

"infrastructure of people"
who stuck around for a
long time and applied
know-how.
"It is a very known quo-
tient of staff," DiGiovanni
added.
The city leaders also
talked about sharing re-
sources such as consultants
and even equipment and
things that need to be pur-
chased in bulk, as suggested
by Crystal River Council-
man Robert Holmes.
Holmes also touched on
the issue of smart growth
in the two cities.
Inverness City Council-


Associated Press
Brenda Bush is escorted by a Hillsborough County Sheriff's deputy Saturday as she
places flowers at a makeshift memorial in front of a home where a sinkhole opened up
underneath a bedroom late Thursday evening and swallowed her son Jeffrey in Seffner.


thing else in his room. Five
others in the house es-
caped unharmed.
On Saturday, the nor-
mally quiet neighborhood
of concrete block homes


woman Marti Consuegra
said as Crystal River's
leaders move forward with
their plans for redevelop-
ment and growth, they
need to think about desig-
nating areas to attract peo-
ple to stop either for
recreation or to shop. She
said maybe the city can
generate brochures an-
nouncing the abundance
of recreational areas.
"You do not want your
town to be a drive-
through," Consuegra said.
"You want people to stop
and spend."
Crystal River Mayor Jim
Farley said the city has
done quite a bit with get-
ting people's attention
with wayfaring signage
and historic markers


painted in Florida pastels
was jammed with cars as
engineers, reporters, and
curious onlookers came to
the scene.
At the home next door to


adorned on spots of inter-
est around the city
Farley suggested a part-
nership with the moniker
the City by the Bay and the
City on the Lake.
Inverness Mayor Bob
Plaisted said leaders
should never forget about
the power of positive
thinking and action.
"Be excited about every-
thing you accomplish,"
Plaisted said.
He also talked about
community involvement
by city leaders such as vol-
unteer work with different
causes.
Plaisted used the occa-
sion to invite Farley to join
him at his next Mayor's
Ball, which aids a "wish"
foundation.


the Bushes, a family cried
and organized boxes. Test-
ing determined their
house also was compro-
mised by the sinkhole, ac-
cording to Hillsborough


Crystal River Council-
woman Paula Wheeler
praised City Manager
Andy Houston for bringing
"class," stability and a vi-
sion to the city.
"We are no longer the


County Fire Rescue
spokesman Ronnie
Rivera. The family, which
had evacuated Friday, was
allowed to go inside for
about a half-hour to gath-
ering belongings.
Sisters Soliris and El-
bairis Gonzalez, who live
on the same street as
Bushes, said rumors were
circulating among neigh-
bors, with people con-
cerned for their safety
"I've had nightmares,"
Soliris Gonzalez, 31, said.
"In my dreams, I keep
checking for cracks in the
house."
They said the family has
discussed where to go if
forced to evacuate, and
they've taken their impor-
tant documents to a stor-
age unit.
"The rest of it, this is ma-
terial stuff, as long as our
family is fine," Soliris Gon-
zalez said.
"You never know under-
neath the ground what's
happening," added El-
bairis Gonzalez, 30.
Experts say thousands


laughingstock," she said.
Inverness City Council-
man Ken Hinkle urged
Crystal River to capitalize
on the city's major calling
card manatees.
"Who else has got the


of sinkholes erupt yearly
in Florida because of the
state's unique geography,
though most are small and
deaths rarely occur.
"There's hardly a place
in Florida that's immune
to sinkholes," said Sandy
Nettles, who owns a geol-
ogy consulting company in
the Tampa area. "There's
no way of ever predicting
where a sinkhole is going
to occur."
Most sinkholes are
small, like one found Sat-
urday morning in Largo, 35
miles away from Seffner.
The Largo sinkhole, at
about 10 feet long and sev-
eral feet wide, is in a mall
parking lot. Such discover-
ies are common through-
out the year in Florida.
The state is prone be-
cause it sits on limestone, a
porous rock that easily dis-
solves in water, with a layer
of clay on top. The clay is
thicker in some locations
- including the area
where Bush became a vic-
tim making them even
more prone to sinkholes.


manatee? No one, and you
can swim with them," Hin-
kle said.
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
PR HI O PR HI LO PR
0.00 58 40 0.00 J 50 40 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
r
pc
pc
PC


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


F'cast
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc
pc


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 15 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will have a moderate chop.
Look for partly cloudy and breezy con-
ditions today. Isolated showers will be
possible early.


59 42 0.00 NA NA NA

THREE DAY OUTLOOK Excus vedaly
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 57 Low: 31
AM frost, partly cloudy, windy

k MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 67 Low: 38
Mostly sunny

. TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY MORNING
J High: 75 Low: 50
[ .. jPartly cloudy

ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Saturday 56/48
Record 88/29
Normal 76/47
Mean temp. 52
Departure from mean -9
PRECIPITATION*
Saturday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 2.10 in.
Normal for the year 6.21 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 5
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Saturday at 3 p.m. 30.03 in.


DEW POINT
Saturday at 3 p.m. 32
HUMIDITY
Saturday at 3 p.m. 43%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
oak, nettle, juniper
Today's count: 9.5/12
Monday's count: 9.2
Tuesday's count: 9.6
AIR QUALITY
Saturday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/3 SUNDAY 10:13 3:59 10:42 4:28
3/4 MONDAY 11:14 4:59 11:43 5:29
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
SSUNSET TONIGHT............................6:32 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:52A.M.
SM OONRISE TODAY................................NONE
MARCH 4 MARCH 11 MARCH 19 MARCH 27 MOONSET TODAY ..........................10:39A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


*From mouths of rivers


City
Chassahowitzka*
Crystal River**
Withlacoochee*
Homosassa***


High/Low
9:40 a/5:09 a
8:01 a/2:31 a
5:48 a/12:19 a
8:50 a/4:08 a


TIDES
**At King's Bay
Sunday


High/Low
9:04 p/4:54 p
7:25 p/2:16 p
5:12 p/12:04 p
8:14 p/3:53 p


***At Mason's Creek
Monday
High/Low High/Low
10:57 a/6:11 a 10:00 p/5:46 p
9:18 a/3:33 a 8:21 p/3:08 p
7:05 a/1:21 a 6:08 p/12:56 p
10:07 a/5:10 a 9:10 p/4:45 p


Gulf water
temperature


62
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Fri. Sat. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.28 n/a 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.74 n/a 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.63 n/a 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 39.92 n/a 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211

THE NATION


20i 3 '


Honolu-d

80s


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp. FcstH L
Albany 36 27 c 38 24
Albuquerque 64 36 pc 67 40
Asheville 42 30 .01 pc 39 22
Atlanta 39 34 pc 46 31
Atlantic City 41 28 pc 44 31
Austin 63 39 s 73 50
Baltimore 41 30 pc 42 27
Billings 62 38 sh 53 30
Birmingham 39 33 pc 46 29
Boise 60 33 c 47 28
Boston 42 34 c 44 30
Buffalo 26 21 sn 25 19
Burlington, VT 32 24 .06 rs 36 25
Charleston, SC 52 36 s 53 32
Charleston, WV 32 27 pc 35 19
Charlotte 46 33 .18 pc 48 26
Chicago 31 23 s 35 24
Cincinnati 31 27 pc 34 24
Cleveland 27 23 .04 sf 27 18
Columbia, SC 50 31 s 50 27
Columbus, OH 31 27 .01 pc 32 21
Concord, N.H. 39 28 c 42 22
Dallas 56 31 s 67 50
Denver 50 26 c 62 30
Des Moines 32 18 c 39 28
Detroit 30 26 pc 28 17
El Paso 70 35 pc 76 54
Evansville, IN 34 30 pc 40 26
Harrisburg 39 31 c 40 24
Hartford 40 34 c 43 25
Houston 57 40 pc 64 53
Indianapolis 30 25 pc 33 22
Jackson 39 27 pc 52 34
Las Vegas 75 49 pc 76 52
Little Rock 44 32 pc 54 35
Los Angeles 82 59 pc 66 50
Louisville 34 29 pc 39 27
Memphis 36 30 .01 c 46 39
Milwaukee 28 20 s 32 20
Minneapolis 32 10 c 33 21
Mobile 47 30 s 54 33
Montgomery 43 35 pc 51 32
Nashville 35 30 .03 pc 42 27
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SUNDAY


Saturday Sunday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 52 38 pc 55 41
New York City 40 34 c 42 29
Norfolk 42 38 pc 46 29
Oklahoma City 51 22 pc 66 46
Omaha 33 20 c 42 32
Palm Springs 84 55 pc 83 51
Philadelphia 42 34 c 44 28
Phoenix 85 51 pc 81 56
Pittsburgh 30 25 .01 c 30 18
Portland, ME 43 31 .02 rs 42 29
Portland, Ore 57 47 pc 51 38
Providence, R.I. 41 34 c 43 28
Raleigh 48 26 s 47 27
Rapid City 63 28 c 55 27
Reno 66 36 sh 53 31
Rochester, NY 27 23 .02 sn 26 20
Sacramento 71 46 c 68 42
St. Louis 36 27 c 41 33
St. Ste. Marie 23 6 s 21 2
Salt Lake City 50 29 sh 48 27
San Antonio 68 38 s 75 48
San Diego 80 54 pc 65 53
San Francisco 63 52 c 59 44
Savannah 51 34 s 53 31
Seattle 57 50 .03 c 50 34
Spokane 53 41 pc 45 27
Syracuse 28 24 .01 sn 30 22
Topeka 38 24 pc 47 34
Washington 39 33 pc 43 28
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 87Yuma, Anz. LOW-24 Crane Lake,
Minn.
WORLD CITIES


SUNDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 90/68/pc
Amsterdam 45/29/c
Athens 53/41/r
Beijing 51/35/s
Berlin 43/30/c
Bermuda 62/59/sh
Cairo 85/53/c
Calgary 30/18/sn
Havana 71/57/pc
Hong Kong 66/62/pc
Jerusalem 79/50/c


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


62/50/sh
46/32/pc
50/36/c
69/39/s
31/27/sn
16/10/sf
47/30/s
86/73/s
54/41/s
73/68/sh
47/39/pc
27/21/sf
41/28/pc


Z- C I T R U S


C 0 U N T Y -"--


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A4 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


STATE


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


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SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 A5


" ,'F


C A





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Citrus crop has tough year


Associated Press

ST PETERSBURG- Florida's citrus
crop has suffered huge losses this year,
with fruit falling from trees and the
overall forecast declining about 10 per-
cent, but the problems shouldn't trans-
late to a price increase at the breakfast
table yet.
Experts and growers say warm, dry
weather; too much fruit on each tree;
and citrus greening disease are the
likely culprits.
Some say this is the year greening -
which is caused by a fast-spreading bac-
teria and is also known as HLB, or, in
Chinese, Huanglongbing- finally trans-
lates into crop losses. Greening is
spread by insects, and there is no cure.
It leaves fruit sour and unusable, and
eventually kills the infected tree.
"I don't think there's any doubt that


we're beginning to see the effects of cit-
rus greening on the industry," said
Adam Putnam, Florida's agriculture
commissioner.
"This is a situation where the state's
signature agricultural commodity faces
an existential threat."
Most of Florida's biggest crop, Valen-
cia oranges, is used for juice, and be-
cause of a surplus from last year,
consumer prices are not expected to in-
crease this year. But they could in the
future.
At the beginning of the season last Oc-
tober, the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture predicted the state's total citrus
crop would yield 154 million boxes of
fruit. But that forecast has been down-
graded to 141 million boxes.
A box of oranges, temples or tangelos
is 90 pounds, grapefruit boxes are 85
pounds, and tangerines are 95 pounds.


t


STEPHEN E. LASKO/For the Chronicle
It was a cool and windy but sunny day Saturday when the 26th annual Strawberry
Festival opened at Floral Park in Floral City. Temperatures did not discourage folks
from coming out to enjoy all the vendors, food and especially strawberry treats this
year's festival had to offer.


BERRIES
Continued from PageAl

a painting of the beach
and a pink-striped scarf
were among the collec-
tions she admired while
Silivia slurped up the re-
maining juice from her
latest strawberry short-
cake. She looked up at her
grandmother and then
laughed as she was sport-
ing a strawberry mus-
tache from the juice.
Around the corner was
Raymond Stephen
Thomas, who demon-
strated his handmade
steel drums recycled from
cans from school
cafeterias.
"This is a high level of
recycling," Thomas said.
"Each and every note on
the drum is matched to
the same note on the
piano."
He played a song on the
steel drum and said he
hoped it brought him sun-
shine. He traveled from
Sanford to Floral City and
enjoyed the arrangement
of this festival.
From whipped cream-
topped berries to frosty
cold beverages, the festi-
val has all of the mouth-
watering desires.
Gainesville resident
Marybeth Engles was bit-
ing into a turkey leg as
steam came rolling out in
the cold air.
"Mmm," was about all
Engles could say as she
chewed away. Her eyes
glowed, as it was apparent
she was having a good
time.
"Wow, this is so good,"
she said. "This is our first
time here. We had con-
templated going to the
strawberry festival in
Plant City, but we decided
to try here first. I can't be-


The strawberry shortcake assembly line is a busy place
Saturday it took two people supplying the
assemblers, two to fill the bowls, four adding whipped
topping and four to serve up the finished shortcake. By
the end of the day Sunday, the festival will have served
thousands of bowls.


lieve how much there is to
do."
Engles was satisfied
with her and her hus-
band's decision to stop in
Floral City. She vows to be
back again next year.
Festivities are not quite
over yet, though, as many
more residents are just a
bite away from a berry


fiJ f 7, 11 ,-- p.IUIA'11-


(hllln Plric'k I)quniiqlllla

Il.mI


sweet day
The festival is spon-
sored by the Citrus County
Chamber of Commerce,
the Floral City Merchants
Association and sustain-
ing partner the Citrus
County Chronicle.
Details are available at
www.floralcitystrawberry
festival.com.


Obituaries


Carol
Calcanes, 74
HOMOSASSA
The Service of Remem-
brance for Mrs. Carol Joan
Calcanes, 74, of Ho-
mosassa, Fla., will be at
2 p.m. Sunday, March 3,
2013, at the Gulf to Lake
Baptist Church with Pas-
tor Lloyd Bertine officiat-
ing. Cremation will be
under the direction of
Hooper Crematory, Inver-
ness, Fla. Online condo-
lences may be sent to the
family at www.Hooper
FuneralHome.com.
Mrs. Calcanes was born
July 5, 1938, in Brooklyn,
N.Y, daughter of the late
Charles and Elizabeth
(Childs) Frohnhoefer. She
died Feb. 27, 2013, in
Gainesville, Fla. She
worked as a salesperson
for Sears and moved to
Homosassa from Laud-
erdale Lakes in 1990. Mrs.
Calcanes was a member of
Gulf to Lake Baptist
Church, Crystal River, Fla.
Survivors include her
husband, Nicholas T. Cal-
canes of Homosassa, Fla.;
son, Nicholas T Calcanes
II of Charlotte, N.C.;
daughter, Christine M. Cal-
canes of Coral Springs,
Fla.; brother, Charles
(Eleanor) Frohnhoefer of
Farmingdale, N.Y; three
grandchildren, Nicholas,
Zachary and Chase Cal-
canes; and two nieces,
Lisa (Joe) Roman and
Laura (Chris) Koch; and
Valerie McKellar
Arrangements are under
the direction of the Ho-
mosassa Chapel of Hooper
Funeral Homes &
Crematory

Lydia
Winant, 88
HERNANDO
Lydia Winant, 88, of Her-
nando, died Saturday,
March 2, 2013. Interment
will be at Florida National
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home with Crematory is
assisting the family with
arrangements.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com




2 .-3.L


I am a crazy guy who loves the beach.
I wonder what it would be like to surf in California.
I hear the waves rolling onto the beach.
I see red flowers floating in the ocean.
I want a world of peace and everlasting life.
I am a crazy guy who loves the beach.
I pretend to be free falling from a bungee cord.
I feel weightless and free.
I touch the heaven as I bounce and shoot upward.
I worry about death.
I cry for justice.
I am a crazy guy who loves the beach.
I understand I will grow old.
I say make the most of life.
I dream about riding dolphins in the ocean.
I try to live a perfect life.


' I..... 1 ,.1 K i. A K nK .L


Sylvia
Snyder, 69
BEVERLY HILLS
Sylvia Eileen Snyder
(nee Peters), 69, of Beverly
Hills, Fla., due to injuries
sustained in an auto acci-
dent, passed away Thurs-
day, Feb. 28, 2013.
She leaves behind
beloved husband Keith R.
Kuperman and was loving
mother of son Roland B.
Snyder and daughter
Laura A. Snyder; and ex-
husband Richard B. Sny-
der. She is also survived by
extended family
S. Eileen was born in
Renovo, Pa., and graduated
with an AA degree from St.
Petersburg Junior College
in 1963. A private memorial
service is pending.
Brown Funeral Home
and Crematory, Lecanto,
Fla., www.brownfuneral
home.com.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

SO YOU KNOW
The Citrus County
Chronicle's pol icy
permits free and paid
obituaries. Email
obits@chronicle
online. com or phone
352-563-5660 for
details and pricing
options.
Deadline is 3 p.m. for
obituaries to appear
in the next day's
edition.
Obituaries must be
verified with the
funeral home or
society in charge of
the arrangements.
Small photos of the
deceased's face can
be included for an
additional charge.
Additional days of
publication or reprints
due to errors in
submitted material
are charged at the
same rates.







GOT0
DEBT?
Bakupc


Thomas
Wepner, 50
JACKSONVILLE
Thomas M. Wepner
(Sparks) was born Aug. 13,
1962, in Bayonne, N.J. He
died Jan. 26, 2013, in Jack-
sonville, Fla.
He graduated from
Johnstown High School in
Johnstown, Pa.
He was a caring and lov-
ing son to mother Dorothy
Lamoureux (Normand);
and brother to Donna Wat-
son (nephews Kyle and
Ryan) and Denise Dinelli
(Adam, David and Nicole).
He spent many years in
Crystal River doing elec-
trical work, which he
loved.
He is also survived by fa-
ther Donald M. Wepner of
Whiting, N.J.; uncle Chuck
Wepner (Linda); aunt Car-
olyn Kavunedus (Tom);
and cousins Charlene
Wepner, Charles Wepner
and Charles Kavunedus.
He will be missed by
friends and family
No services are planned
at this time. A memorial
will be held at a later date.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

FREE OBITUARIES
Free obituaries, run
one day, can include:
full name of
deceased; age;
hometown/state; date
of death; place of
death; date, time and
place of visitation and
funeral services.
If websites, photos,
survivors, memorial
contributions or other
information are
included, this will be
designated as a paid
obituary and a cost
estimate provided to
the sender.
A flag will be included
for free for those who
served in the U.S.
military.




Funeral Home
With Crematory
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For Information and costs,.
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1-352-319-6816
First time attendees only please. I A
*Free cremation does not include Travel Protection Plan


A6 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


A


I




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


King of conchs


Associated Press
Bill Ochse, 76, blows a conch shell while holding his dog
Riley after learning he won the men's division of the 51st
annual Conch Shell Blowing Contest on Saturday in Key
West. Ochse, a visitor from Ocean City, Md., and other
contestants were judged on quality, novelty, duration and
loudness of sounds they produced on the fluted, pink-lined
shells.
Man wins Key West's annual
Conch Shell Blowing contest


Associated Press
KEY WEST A 76-
year-old sailing enthusiast
from Maryland is the win-
ner in the men's division of
the annual Conch Shell
Blowing Contest in Key
West.
Bill Ochse of Ocean City,
Md., impressed the judges
Saturday by playing a
"drum roll" and march ex-
cerpt on his fluted, pink-
lined shell. He said he had
performed once in a conch
orchestra.
Judges evaluated en-
trants from children to
seniors on the quality, nov-
elty, duration and loudness
of the sounds they
produced.
Other winners included
13-year-old Taylor Nasser
of Key West, who blew a
lengthy blast while hula-
hooping.


Taylor Nasser, 13, blows a
conch shell while hula-
hooping.
Conch shells have been
used as signaling devices
in the Florida Keys for at
least 200 years. Native-
born islanders are called
Conchs, and the Keys are
nicknamed the Conch
Republic.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 A7


. . . . .





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Transportation advisory groups to meet Wednesday in Lecanto


Special to the Chronicle
The Citrus County Transportation Plan-
ning Organization (TPO) Transportation
Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and
Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) will


ADAMS
Continued from PageAl

said. "He's got to tone
down his rhetoric and quit
assaulting the senior
staff."
Adams could not be
reached for comment.
Commissioner Rebecca
Bays said recent cases of
Adams openly bickering
with Wesch and Thorpe
are bothersome.
"For us to vet these type
of things in public the way
we're doing, it sets a bad
tone," she said. "We look
very foolish. We don't look
like serious professionals.
When we get to that point
in board meetings, we
should be very strategic at
how we position our
county."
Scott Adam's support-
ers, particularly those on
his popular Facebook
page, see it much
differently
"I think he's doing
great," said Debbie
Ressler, chairwoman of
the Citrus County Hospital
Board and an Adams
backer. "He's reaching out
to citizens and they're
communicating back and
forth. He's opened the
lines of communication
between citizens and gov-
ernment, which is what he
said he was going to do.
He's listening to the
people."
Adams is the only com-
missioner with an official
Facebook page. Because
it's county business, a dis-
claimer warns users any-
thing they post is
considered public record.
He encourages input
and usually responds posi-
tively to suggestions.
Adams also uses his Face-
book posts to criticize the
county commission, top


meet Wednesday, March 6, in Room 280 at
the Lecanto Government Complex, 3600
W Sovereign Path, Lecanto.
The TAC will meet at 1 p.m. and the CAC
will meet at 3 p.m. Any person requiring
reasonable accommodation at this meet-


For us to vet
these type of things in
public the way we're
doing, it sets a
bad tone.


Commissioner Rebecca Bays


The people who
elected him feel
he's done what he
needs to do.


Commissioner Dennis Damato


staff and the media. And,
in most cases, his support-
ers back him up.
When Adams posted
Thursday the 21 proposed
budget cuts he presented
at Tuesday's board meet-
ing, the feedback was pos-
itive to Adams while
critical of the other
commissioners.
'All the other Bozo Com-
missioners just say NO to
every cost saving suggestion
that Scott proposed," Win-
ston Perry wrote. "When
will this ever end???"
Comments like those
make commissioners in-
cluding Chairman Joe
Meek cringe. Commission-
ers say they have cut mil-
lions of dollars in spending
the past four years and are
faced with another $15 mil-
lion in a combination of cuts
and higher taxes or fees.
"Some of the things said
on there are maybe a little
much," Meek said of the
Facebook comments.
"Scott incites people to get
emotional."
MiE
During Tuesday's board
meeting Adams, saying he
was meeting the challenge


Meek proposed that he
offer specific budget ideas,
ticked off the list as other
board members wrote
them down. The list, in
part, included: stopping all
work on Port Citrus, elimi-
nating take-home cars,
combining human re-
sources among the consti-
tutional offices, a total
freeze on hiring and re-
ducing outside consultants
and attorneys.
When he finished, Bays
said she would have appre-
ciated it had Adams also
assigned dollar savings to
each item. Other commis-
sioners remained silent.
Kenney, in an interview
Thursday, acknowledged


ing because of a disability or physical im-
pairment should contact the Citrus
County Administrator's Office, 110 N.
Apopka Ave., Inverness, FL 34450,352-341-
6560, at least two days before the meeting.
If you are hearing- or speech-impaired,



I don't want the
meeting to break down.
The way he goes about
it causes very heated
confrontations.


Commission Chairman Joe Meek


He's got to tone
down his rhetoric and
quit assaulting the
senior staff.


Commissioner John Kenney


he missed an opportunity
to give Adams a pat on the
back.
"I was probably remiss in
not saying thanks for bring-
ing this forward," he said.
Chairman Joe Meek
agreed, but added commis-
sioners may have been dis-
tracted because they knew
from a newspaper story
Adams still planned later
that meeting to make a mo-
tion to fire Wesch.
Meek said Adams'
budget ideas deserve as
much attention and dis-
cussion as anyone else's.
"We take his comments
very seriously," he said.
"That doesn't mean I'll be
for them all or against


use the TDD Telephone 352-341-6580.
The TPO will also meet at 5:15 p.m.
Thursday, March 7, at in the Inverness
Government Center, 212 W Main St., In-
verness. Questions may be directed to
Sheila Martin, TBARTA, at 800-998-7433.


staff on the carpet during
board meetings.
"Even if I don't agree
with some of the things
he's saying or the way he's
going about it, as chairman
I think he needs to be able
to say what he feels and
offer his opinion," Meek
said. "I have tried to make
a conscious effort to let
him get his thoughts out."
On the other hand, Meek
said: "I don't want the meet-
ing to break down. The way
he goes about it causes very
heated confrontations."
Commissioner Dennis
Damato, the board's senior
member who was re-
elected in August to a third
term, has a different take.
"I think Scott's doing
OK," Damato said. "The
main thing, Scott is an out-
spoken guy The people
who elected him feel he's
done what he needs to do.
He has to do what he feels
is right, and his actions
speak for themselves."


them all."
Meek, who was re-
elected in August and as-
sumed the chair in
November for the first
time, has generally al-
lowed Adams to call
Thorpe, Wesch and senior


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LOCAL


Im





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Emails shed light on Adams' interests with citizens


The Chronicle, following
a public records request,
received all the email
Commissioner Scott
Adams sent out and re-
ceived since taking office
in November Here is a
sample:
DEAR COUNTY
STAFF...
Dec. 12, to County Ad-
ministrator Brad Thorpe
and County Attorney
Richard Wesch: "What is
the administrative regula-
tions requirements when
the county's reserve funds
go below policy require-
ments and what's the
process we need to take?
Please respond."
Dec. 19, to Thorpe and
Assistant County Adminis-
trator Ken Frink: "I'd like
to know an approximate
date on the landfill tax as-
sessment can be discussed
with its cost of disposal
that we are charging tax
payers at this time. This is
not good for the tax payers.
At this point there is no ac-
countability for managing
cost for the tax payer."
Dec. 22, to Thorpe,
Frink, water resources di-
rector Ken Cheek and de-
velopment services
director Vince Cautero: "...
I suggested we do not need
two assistant county ad-
ministrators or an assis-
tant public works director.
There is $400,000 in pay-
roll we need to get rid of in
the top administration and
not transfer this anywhere
else either..'.'
Feb. 26, to Wesch: "I'd
like a copy of your contract
this morning possibly


Fk E&t Vw Far T.oc1 V*
,.FavortM riIlC~ffimiX.dnerC~t~dsn 9 PJ


we'c.e to CommI owner Scot AamE.. BSCC = S page 1 cornnmucate iou. Ozwens of C s Coun) B3e a1are ,I
po*t? on THIS pegs e s jectto Ra Ssumnm' na (fu'L d a (; ae) -


Chronicle photo illustration
Commissioner Scott Adams' Facebook page is growing followers at a steady pace.
The page includes the disclaimer, "Be aware posts on THIS page are subject to FL
Sunshine Law (full public disclosure)."


within 30 minutes, let me
know asap."
Feb. 26, to assistant
county attorney Kerry Par-
sons: "How would a mo-
tion need to be made to
eliminate the highest paid
position or the county at-
torney position and keep
assistant and rest of staff?
What would be the proper
wording?"
ATTABOY,
COMMISSIONER
Dec. 13, from Al Cislo,
Homosassa: "Scott, keep
up the fight and I know it is
tough to stand alone. Good
job so far"
Jan. 10, from Phillip
Martin, Inverness: "If you


CR ACI(EP
PATIO CEILIaNG



Mold Free Easy Clean Never N


have upset some of the
thin skinned people in the
county government it is re-
freshing and a long time
coming."
Feb. 13, from Jeff R.
Johnson: "Thanks for tak-
ing part in our County Gov-


ernment, your character
and understanding will
make a difference in due
time. Sorry it doesn't ap-
pear you are making any
new friends with your fel-
low County Commission-
ers....but that's OK, you're


doing exactly what's
needed."
Feb. 14, from Claudia
and Bill Perry, Kensington
Estates: "Thank you for
being an advocate for the
people of Citrus County.
Yes we voted for you and
we are proud we did."
Feb. 17, from Brian
Cornwell: "I'm glad my
district is being repre-
sented by a man who sticks
to his principles and
doesn't care about making
waves amongst his con-
stituents on the commis-
sion. Keep up the good
work."
'A WRECKING
BALL'
Dec. 2, from Charles
"Chip" Jason: "There is no
reason for you to talk down
at him (Thorpe) unless
you're jealous that he has
a more advanced educa-
tion than you do.... Truth-
fully, after discussions
with others, you accom-
plished nothing except the
loss of respect."
Dec. 16, from Edna
Mattos, Citrus County Tea
Party chairwoman: "Quite
frankly Commissioner, at
this juncture, your


overzealous criticism is
coming across as complete
hypocrisy and political
gamesmanship."
Feb. 12, from Tom
Woolford: "I voted for you,
but have been extremely
disappointed in your rela-
tions with the other com-
missioners and staff.... We
need constructive solu-
tions and careful planning,
not a wrecking ball..."
Feb. 15, from Jeralyn
Cross to Chairman Joe
Meek and copied to all
commissioners, regarding
the Feb. 12 board meeting:
"To me, a citizen of this
county, it honestly ap-
peared that Scott Adams
wanted to argue and that, I
am sad to say, is NOT
someone that I want sitting
on a panel representing
me!"
Feb. 26, from Phyllis
Peters: "First, you attack
Brad Thorpe, then
Richard Wesch. Your job is
to work with the other
commissioners to achieve
what is best for Citrus
County and its citizens, not
promote your personal,
unprofessional goals."
Compiled by re-
porter Mike Wright.


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LOCAL


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 A9


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I\n TiS mom enr





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Veterans NOTES


Due to space considera-
tions, the Veterans Notes con-
tain only basic information
regarding each post, as well
as events to which the public
is invited. For more informa-
tion about scheduled activi-
ties, meals and more for a
specific post, call or email that
post at the contact listed.

POST NEws
VFW Riders Group
meets at 10 a.m. Saturday
(different weeks each month)
at different VFW posts
throughout the year. For infor-
mation, call director Gene
Perrino at 352-302-1037, or
email geneusawo@
tampabay.rr.com.
West Central Florida
Coasties, Coast Guard veter-
ans living in West Central
Florida, meet the third Satur-
day monthly at 1 p.m. for
lunch and coffee at the Coun-
try Kitchen restaurant in
Brooksville, 20133 Cortez
Blvd. (State Road 50, east of
U.S. 41). All Coastie veterans
are welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Charlie Jensen at
352-503-6019.
Red Tail Memorial
Chapter 136 of the Air Force
Association meets at 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 21, at Ocala
Regional Airport Administra-
tion Building, 750 S.W. 60th
Ave., Ocala. All are welcome.
Members who wish to donate
items for the Workforce Con-
nection Homeless Veterans


Stand Down should bring
them to this meeting. Call
Mike Emig at 352-854-8328
for more information.
AMVETS William Crow
Post 447, Inglis, is on State
Road 40 East.
For more information about
the post and its activities, call
352-447-1816; email
Amvet447@comcast.net.
The post invites everyone
to come out for the yard sale
beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday,
March 16 and 17. Donations
are needed. Call 352-
447-4473.
Blanton-Thompson
American Legion Post 155
is at 6585 W. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway, Crystal River.
Lounge open at 11 a.m.
Monday through Saturday
and noon on Sunday.
All Legion family members
such as the American Legion,
Auxiliary, Sons of the Ameri-
can Legion, American Legion
Riders and 40/8 families have
dinners from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday and Fridays.
The public is welcome
Everyone is invited to lunch
from noon to 3 p.m. Wednes-
days in the lounge. On Mon-
days and Thursdays, lunch is
served in the lounge and
dining hall.
The post will conduct a Le-
gion Day celebration at 5 p.m.
Friday, March 15, to honor the
American Legion and the
service of its volunteers, as
well as hold a dining-in to
honor all the armed services.


There will be a grog bowl cer-
emony, group skids, etc. The
public is invited. All veterans
are encouraged to wear their
respective uniforms whether
class A or utility to show their
past service.
The event is informal and
casual attire is preferred. To
RSVP, call the post at 352-
795-6526 or the Cmdr. Mike
Klyap at 352-302-6096, so the
post can get accountability for
meals.
The 40/8 will have a St.
Patrick's Day celebration on
March 17 with the cost of the
meal being $10. This will be a
fun day for the family and all
legionnaires. The public is
welcome.
On March 30, the Legion
Riders will have its annual
poker run, which will begin
and end at the post. The
event is open to all motorcy-
cle organizations and regular
vehicles are welcome.
For more information about
the post and its other activi-
ties, call Cmdr. Mike Klyap at
352-302-6096, or email him at
mklyap@gmail.com. Call the
post at 352-795-6521.
American Legion Auxil-
iary Unit 155 meets at 7:30
p.m. the fourth Tuesday of
every month at the post. Eligi-
bility in the Auxiliary is open to
mothers, wives, sisters,
daughters, granddaughters,
great-granddaughters or
grandmothers of members of
the American Legion and of
deceased veterans who


served during war time (also
stepchildren); stepchildren;
and female veterans who
served during wartime. Call
Unit President Sandy White at
352-249-7663, or member-
ship chairman Barbara
Logan, 352-795-4233.
All profits support the many
programs of the American
Legion Auxiliary. For more in-
formation, call Unit President
Sandy White at 352-
249-7663.
0 H.F. Nesbitt VFW Post
10087, Beverly Hills, offers
activities such as meals,
bingo, golf, darts, karaoke,
pool and more for members
and guests. Review the
monthly newsletter for activi-
ties and updates, and call the
post at 352-746-0440. The
VFW Post 10087 is off County
Road 491, directly behind
Cadence Bank.
The Monday golf league
plays at different courses. Call
Leo Walsh, 746-0440. The
Cake Crab Company Golf
League plays at Twisted Oaks
G.C. Monday at 8 a.m.
Check with Jack Gresham for
tee times.
The VFW Mixed Golf
League plays Thursdays al-
ternating between Twisted
Oaks Golf Club and Citrus
Springs Country Club. Tee
time is 8 a.m. New players,
both men and women, are
welcome. You do not have to
be a member of the VFW to
join. Lunch follows. Call John
Kunzer at 352-746-0440.


Edward W. Penno VFW
Post 4864, 10199 N. Citrus
Springs Blvd., Citrus Springs,
352-465-4864. The post is a
nonsmoking facility; smoking
is allowed on the porch.
Afghanistan and Iraq war
veterans are wanted for mem-
bership. Call 352-465-4864.
Baked chicken dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, March
8. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Karaoke by Mike. The public
is welcome.
Everyone is welcome at the
St. Patrick's Day dinner from
5 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday, March
17. Cost is $8; children
younger than 6 eat for $4.
Information regarding any
post events and meetings is
available at the post or call
352-465-4864.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 70 meets
at 2 p.m. the second Tuesday
monthly at the chapter hall,
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, at the intersection of In-
dependence Highway and
U.S. 41. The chapter hall is on
the corner of Independence
Highway and Paul Drive. We
thank veterans for their serv-
ice and welcome any disabled
veteran to join us from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. any Tuesday or
Thursday at the chapter hall.
This is also the time that we
accept donated nonperish-
able foods for our continuing
food drive.
Our main function is to as-
sist disabled veterans and


their families when we are
able. Anyone who knows a
disabled veteran or their fam-
ily who requires assistance is
asked to call Commander
Richard Floyd 727-492-0290,
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207,
or 352-344-3464.
Service Officer Joe
McClister is available to assist
any veteran or dependents
with their disability claim by
appointment. Call 352-344-
3464 and leave a message.
Ambulatory veterans who
wish to schedule an appoint-
ment for transportation to the
VA medical center in
Gainesville should call the
veterans' service office at
352-527-5915. Mobility chal-
lenged veterans who wish to
schedule an appointment for
transportation to the VA med-
ical center in Gainesville may
call the Citrus County Transit
office for wheelchair trans-
portation; call 352-527-7630.
For more information about
chapter activities, veterans'
benefits or membership, Call
Ken Stewart at 352-419-0207;
leave a message, if desired,
should the machine answer.
DAV Chapter 70 is offering
a $1,000 scholarship for the
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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


VETERANS
Continued from Page A12

2013 school year. The schol-
arship is offered to a disabled
veteran, veteran, survivor of a
veteran or dependent of a
veteran.
The recipient shall be en-
rolled in a full-time course of
instruction leading to a degree
program or to a vocational
skill. Selection shall be con-
ducted by the scholarship
committee and will be based
on the applications submitted.
The procedure requires that
applicants write a statement
detailing course of study,
goals and why they are de-
serving of this award.
Applications may be picked
up at guidance department of-
fices in area high schools, the
Withlacoochee Technical In-
stitute, Central Florida Com-
munity College guidance
offices, or by calling John
Seaman at 352-860-0123.
All applications must be re-
turned to the DAV Chapter at
1039 N. Paul Drive, Inver-
ness, FL 34453 by March 31.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Auxiliary Unit No. 70
meets at 2 p.m. the second
Tuesday of the month at the
DAV building at 1039 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness. Phone
Commander Linda Brice at
352-560-3867 or Adjutant
Lynn Armitage at 352-341-
5334.One of the DAVA's proj-
ects is making lap robes and
ditty, wheelchair and monitor
bags for needy veterans in
nursing homes. All who wish
to help in our projects are wel-
come. We need to make the
items certain sizes, so please
call for information. We also
collect toiletry items for the
veterans. Good, clean mate-
rial and yarn are needed.
For information about pro-
grams, or to donate items, call
Brice at 352-560-3867 or
Armitage at 352-341-5334.
Eugene Quinn VFW
Post 4337 and Auxiliaries
are at 906 State Road 44 E.,
Inverness. Call the post at
352-344-3495, or visit
www.vfw4337.org for informa-
tion about all weekly post ac-
tivities. Men's Auxiliary meets
7 p.m. first Wednesday at the


post. Call Neil Huyler at 352-
344-3495.
The public is welcome at
the post and auxiliaries' an-
nual Chili/Cornbread Cook-off
and Chinese Auction today,
Sunday, March 3. All entries
must be in by 1 p.m. for judg-
ing at 2 p.m., with prizes for
first, second and third places.
Auction tickets go on sale
at 1 p.m., with drawings to
pick the winners at 3 p.m.
This year's auction items in-
clude John Deere collectibles,
a cedar chest, jewelry, knick-
knacks and more. The kitchen
will be open for lunch.
For more information, call
Jean Hays at 352-637-2124,
or the post at 352-344-3495.
The American Legion
Wall Rives Post 58 and Aux-
iliary, 10730 U.S. 41, Dunnel-
Ion. Post and auxiliary meet
the first Wednesday of the
month at 7 p.m. Dunnellon
Young Marines meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday.
The public is welcome at
bingo beginning at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Doors open at
4 p.m.
Everyone is welcome at
free AARP income tax service
through April 10 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Wednesday. For
information, call Wayne Sloan
at 352-489-5066.
A Law & Order Awards Din-
ner will be held at 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 9, to honor six
firefighters and law enforce-
ment officers in the commu-
nity. By reservation only.
The outdoor flea market
and pancake breakfast will be
on Saturday, March 16. All-
you-can-eat breakfast from
7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Cost is $5
adults and $3 for children.
The public is welcome.
For information about activ-
ities and the post, call Carl
Boos at 352-489-3544, or
email boosc29@gmail.com.
Marine Corps League
Ladies Auxiliary Citrus Unit
498 meets at 6:30 p.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at the
VFW in Beverly Hills. Call JV
Joan Cecil at 352-726-0834
or President Elaine Spikes at
352-860-2400 for information.
New members are welcome.
Membership fee is $30 a year.
Any female relative age 16 or
older who is a wife, widow,
mother, mother-in-law, step-


mother, sister, daughter, step-
daughter, grandmother,
granddaughter, aunt or
daughter-in-law of an honor-
ably discharged Marine and
FMF Corpsman eligible to join
the auxiliary, and female
Marines (former, active and
reserves) are eligible for
Marine Corps League
membership.
Leroy Rooks Jr. VFW
Post 4252 and Ladies Auxil-
iary 3190 N. Carl G. Rose
Highway, State Road 200,
Hernando; 352-726-3339.
Send emails to
vfw4252@tampabay.rr.com.
Call or visit the post for regu-
lar events, as well as meet-
ings. Google us at VFW 4252,
Hernando.
The public is welcome at
"Show Me the Money" from
2 to 4 p.m. Thursday at the
post.
Sunday breakfasts are
open to the public from 9:30
to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $6.
Call 352-726-5206
for information.
Dumas-Hartson VFW
Post 8189 is on West Veter-
ans Drive, west of U.S. 19 be-
tween Crystal River and
Homosassa. Call 352-795-
5012 for information. VFW
membership is open to men
and women veterans who
have participated in an over-
seas campaign, including
service in Iraq and
Afghanistan. The Korean
Campaign medal remains
open, as well. Call the post at
the phone number above for
information.
Joe Nic Barco Memo-
rial VFW Post 7122, 8191 S.
Florida Ave., Floral City. For
information about the post
and its activities, call 352-
637-0100.
American Legion, Bev-
erly Hills Memorial Post
237, 4077 N. Lecanto High-
way, in the Beverly Plaza, in-
vites all eligible veterans to
join or transfer to our Post
237 family. There are many
activities and monthly events,
and our Legion, Sons of the
Legion, Legion auxiliary and
Legion Riders are active in
support of veterans and our
community.
Stop by the post or visit the
website at www.Post237.org


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(352) 628-3443


to view the calendar of up-
coming events and regularly
scheduled activities open to
all members of the Legion,
VFW and AMVETS and their
auxiliaries. Visit or call the
post at 352-746-5018.
The Korean War Veter-
ans Association, Citrus
Chapter 192 meets at the
VFW Post 10087, Beverly
Hills, at 1 p.m. the first Tues-
day monthly. Any veteran who
has seen honorable service in
any of the Armed Forces of
the U.S. is eligible for mem-
bership if said service was
within Korea, including territo-
rial waters and airspace, at
any time from Sept. 3, 1945,
to the present or if said serv-
ice was outside of Korea from
June 25, 1950, to Jan. 31,
1955. Call Hank Butler at 352-
563-2496, Neville Anderson at
352-344-2529 or Bob
Hermanson at 352-489-0728.
Allen-Rawls American
Legion Post 77 and Auxil-
iary Unit 77 meet the first
Thursday monthly at 4375 Lit-
tle Al Point, off Arbor Street in
Inverness. Call Post Cmdr.
Norman Brumett at 352-860-
2981 or Auxiliary president
Marie Cain at 352-697-3151
for information about the post
and auxiliary.
All are welcome at bingo at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday; doors
open at 4:30 p.m. Food
available.
The post hosts jams with
Nashville artist John Thomas
and the Ramblin' Fever Band
from 6 to 9 p.m. the first and
third Fridays monthly at the
post home at 4375 Little Al
Point, Inverness. A fish fry will


be served on the third Friday.
The fish fry features fried and
baked haddock, baked po-
tato, baked beans, coleslaw,
tea, lemonade coffee and soft
drink for $8. Serving will begin
at 4:30 p.m. All musicians are
welcome, as well anyone who
wants to come and enjoy the
music.
For more information, call
Norm or Alice at 352-860-
2981 or 352-476-2134.
The post and auxiliary will
host its Gigantic Yard Sale at
8 a.m. Saturday, March 9. Ta-
bles are available to rent for
$10. Doughnuts, sweet rolls
and coffee available in the
morning; hot dogs, chips, cof-
fee and soft drinks available
for lunch.
On March 16, the auxiliary
will host a St. Patrick dinner
dance with John Thomas and
the Ramblin' Fever Band. Din-
ner will be served from 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. and the band will
play from 7 to 10 p.m.
For more information, call
Norm at 352-860-2981 or
352-476-2134.
U.S. Submarine Veter-
ans (USSVI)-Sturgeon Base
meets at 11 a.m. the first Sat-
urday monthly at the Ameri-
can Legion Post 155, 6585 W.
Gulf-to-Lake Highway, Crystal
River. Visitors and interested
parties are always welcome.
Call Base Cmdr. Billy Wein at
352-726-5926.
American Legion Post
166 American Legion Post
166 will meet at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, March 4, at the Olive
Tree restaurant in the Airport
Plaza on U.S. 19 in Crystal
River. Dinner begins at 6 p.m.


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The group will be laying the
groundwork for getting an
American Legion Riders
chapter started. All veterans
who served during times of
conflict and who live in the
area from Homosassa
Springs, Homosassa,
Lecanto, Sugarmill Woods
and Chassahowitzka are wel-
come. All veterans who love
to ride and who would be in-
terested in the American
Legion Riders chapter are
also invited.
For more information, call
Clay Scott (Legion Rider) at
928-848-8359, or Robert
Scott at 352-860-2090, or
write to American Legion Post
166, P.O. Box 767,
Homosassa Springs, FL
34447-0767.
Seabee Veterans of
America (SVA) Island X-23
welcomes all Seabees and
Honeybees to its monthly
meeting at 10:30 a.m. the
third Tuesday monthly at Cit-
rus Hills Country Club, Rose
and Crown restaurant, Citrus
Hills. Call John Lowe at 352-
344-4702.
Citrus 40/8 Voiture 1219
and Cabane 1219 conducts
its meetings at 7 p.m. the sec-
ond Thursday monthly at the
American Legion Post 155 on
State Road 44 in Crystal
River (6585 E. Gulf-to-Lake
Highway). For more informa-
tion about the 40/8, call the
Chef De Gare Tom Smith at
352-601-3612; for the Ca-
bane, call La Presidente Carol
Kaiserian at 352-746-1959; or
visit us on the Web at

See VETERANS/Page A12





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Musings on mutability of time


or me, the first sign of time: 6 a.m. Sue wouldn't be up
spring is the ritual of set- for a couple of hours at least, so
ting the clocks to daylight I got dressed and went out to get
saving time. Unfortunately, I breakfast and read the paper.
don't know how to An hour later, I
change the time on asked the waitress
most of my clocks. My what time it was, and
thermostats have she said 4 a.m. Slowly,
clocks, as do the mi- I realized that I hadn't
crowave, the car, the hooked up the com-
fridge, the stove, the puter to the hotel's
teakettle, the coffee Wi-Fi; it still showed
maker, the phone and the time from where
the printer. My actual we left. Now I'd wake
clock changes the Sue if I tried to go
time automatically, as JIM back in the room. I
does my computer. At learned a hard lesson
least I thought it did. MULLEN about how long you
We took a trip four can nurse a cup of cof-
time zones away a few weeks fee in an all-night diner.
ago, and I got out of bed in a If there's one great thing about
strange hotel room in the dark of being stupid, it's that you get
night. I didn't want to wake Sue, used to it, whereas smart people
so I peeked under the lid of my probably feel all surprised and
computer tablet to check the foolish when they do dumb


things. Sue was not surprised at
all to hear my story four hours
later She's used to it.
The fact that the changing of
the clocks comes almost exactly
six weeks after Groundhog Day
is sheer coincidence. I don't
know about you, but I'm finding
that fewer and fewer people rely
on hibernating animals for accu-
rate weather predictions. A
week or two after Groundhog
Day, no one can remember if the
animal saw his shadow or not.
And I find it hard to believe that
a Pennsylvania groundhog and a
Florida groundhog would be in
agreement very often. If you ask
me, the basic flaw in groundhog
meteorology is that winter is not
the same everywhere.
Spring forward, fall back;
that's the ticket Simply set your
clocks ahead one hour before
you go to bed on March 9, and


you'll be enjoying an extra hour
of daylight. Well, not really.
There's still the same amount of
daylight; we've just all decided
to use it differently
Of course, try telling this to
your pets. They are not getting
the message that the time has
changed. So the dog wonders:
"Why are you going to bed so
early? That's OK, I'll just keep
you awake for another hour.
Why aren't we going for a walk
the same time as yesterday?
What's with dinner coming an
hour early?"
It takes the dog about three
weeks to adjust to the new sleep
schedule. The cat? He never
learns. I can talk until my face is
blue, but he's never going to
change things for my
convenience.
Nor will the sun. The sun, the
reason we have all reset our


clocks in the first place, will now
be directly in my face on the way
home each night for a month.
Why, oh why, did someone think
making streets that go east and
west was a good idea?
Is city planning really that
hard? I can't even see whether
the stoplight by the grocery store
is green or red. Now I keep in
the glove compartment that
smoked piece of glass that I used
to watch the last solar eclipse. It
comes in handy on the drive
home.
Sue thinks my theory about
detecting the first sign of spring
doesn't hold water. "Everybody
knows the first sign of spring is
when the snowbirds return," she
said. "They're never wrong."

Contact Jim Mullen at
JimMullenBooks. com.


VETERANS
Continued from Page All

www.Postl55.org.
Voiture and Cabane 1219
welcome everyone to a St.
Patrick's Day celebration be-
ginning at 5 p.m. Sunday,
March 17, at the American Le-
gion Post 155. A corned beef
and cabbage dinner will be
served from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
There will be draft beer spe-
cials and a full cash bar in a
nonsmoking environment in
the post's large dining hall.
Join members for lep-
rechaun races, 50/50
chances, party favors and en-
tertainment by Debi G. Pro-
ceeds will help fund nurses'
training, youth sports, child
welfare, Americanism, box
car, POW/MIA and Carville
Star. Tickets are on sale for a
$10 donation in the post
lounge. A limited number of
tickets will be sold at the door.
Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 Military Order of the
Purple Heart (MOPH) meets
at 1 p.m. the third Tuesday of
January, March, May, July,
September and November at
the Citrus County Builders As-
sociation, 1196 S. Lecanto
Highway (County Road 491),
Lecanto. All combat-wounded
veterans, lineal descendants,
next of kin, spouses and sib-
lings of Purple Heart recipi-
ents are invited. To learn more
about Aaron A. Weaver Chap-
ter 776 MOPH, visit the chap-
ter's website at www.
citruspurpleheart.org or call
352-382-3847.
Marine Corps League,
Samuel R. Wall Detachment
1139 meets at 7 p.m. the third
Wednesday monthly at DAV
Post 70 in Inverness at the in-
tersection of Independence
Highway and U.S. 41 North.
All Marines are welcome. Call
Jerry Cecil at 352-726-0834
or Wayne Howard at 352-
634-5254.
Marine Corps League
Citrus Detachment 819
meets at 7 p.m. the last
Thursday monthly at VFW
Post 10087 on Vet Lane in
Beverly Hills, behind Superior
Bank. Social hour follows. All
Marines and FMF Corpsmen
are welcome. Call Morgan
Patterson at 352-746-1135,
Ted Archambault at 352-382-
0462 or Bion St. Bernard at
352-697-2389.
Gilley-Long-Osteen
VFW Post 8698 is at 520
State Road 40 E., Inglis, one
mile east of U.S. 19. The
Men's Auxiliary meets at 7
p.m. the second Monday.
LAVFW meets at 5 p.m. and
the membership meeting is at
6:30 p.m. the third Wednes-
day at the post. Call the post
at 352-447-3495 for informa-
tion about the post and its
activities.
Fleet Reserve Associa-
tion, Branch 186 meets at 3
p.m. the third Thursday
monthly at the DAV Building,
Independence Highway and
U.S. 41 North, Inverness. Call
Bob Huscher, secretary, at
352-344-0727.
Herbert Surber Ameri-
can Legion Post 225 meets
at 7 p.m. third Thursday at the
post home, 6535 S. With-
lapopka Drive, Floral City. All
eligible veterans welcome.
Call Commander Tom
Gallagher at 860-1629 for in-
formation and directions.
Landing Ship Dock
(LSD) sailors meet at Denny's
in Crystal River at 2 p.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly. Call
Jimmie at 352-621-0617.
Suncoast U.S. Navy


Armed Guard and Merchant
Marine Veterans of World
War II meetings for 2013 will
be at 11:30 a.m. at Kally K's
restaurant in Spring Hill.
Dates are: March 9, April 13
and May 11.

SERVICES & GROUPS
Rolling Thunder
Florida Chapter 7 meets the
second Saturday monthly at
the DAV building at 1039 N.
Paul Drive in Inverness. This
is an advocacy group for cur-
rent and future veterans, as
well as for POWs and MIAs.
Florida Chapter 7 welcomes
new members to help pro-
mote public awareness of the
POW/MIA issue and help vet-
erans in need of help. Full
membership is open to all in-
dividuals 18 years or older
who wish to dedicate time to
the cause. Visit the website at
www.rollingthunderfl7.com for
more information about the
group, as well as information
about past and future events.
Rolling Thunder would be
happy to provide a speaker
for your next meeting or
event. Call club President Ray
Thompson at 813-230-9750
(cell), or email him at ultra
rayl997@yahoo.com.
Citrus County Veterans
Coalition provides food to
veterans in need. Food dona-
tions and volunteers are al-
ways welcomed and needed.
The Veterans Food Bank is
open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tues-
days. The CCVC is on the
DAV property in Inverness at
the corner of Paul and Inde-
pendence, off U.S. 41 north.
Appointments are encour-
aged by calling 352-400-
8952. CCVC general
meetings are at 10 a.m. the
fourth Thursday monthly at
the DAV building in Inverness.
All active duty and honorably
discharged veterans, their
spouses, widows and widow-
ers, along with other veterans'


organizations and current
coalition members are wel-
come. The CCVC is a non-
profit corporation; donations
are tax deductible. Members
can renew with Gary
Williamson at 352-527-4537,
or at the meeting. Visit
www.ccvcfl.org.
Hunger and Homeless
Coalition Anyone who
knows of a homeless veteran
in need of food, haircut, voter
ID, food stamps, medical as-
sistance or more blankets is
asked to call Ed Murphy at
the Hunger and Homeless
Coalition at 352-382-0876, or
pass along this phone num-
ber to the veteran.
Open spots still remain
for those couples and individ-
uals interested in taking a trip
to Hawaii with a group of vet-
erans, their families and
friends. The annual trek, coor-
dinated and led by Don
McLean, a U.S. Navy veteran,
is scheduled this year for
Sept. 17 to Oct. 4. Partici-
pants will visit the islands of
Oahu (Hale Koa Hotel), Kauai
(Marriott), Hawaii (stay in the
KMC inside the volcano) and
Maui (Royal Lahina Resort).
Reservations should be made
as soon as possible. Call
McLean at 352-637-5131
Warrior Bridge, devel-
oped by nonprofit agency Ser-
viceSource, is to meet the
needs of wounded veterans.
Call employment specialist
Charles Lawrence at 352-
527-3722, ext. 102, or email
charles.lawrence@service
source.org. The local Service
Source office is at 2071 N.
Lecanto Highway, Lecanto.
Purple Heart recipients
are sought to be honored with
centerpieces with their names
on them at The Old Ho-
mosassa Veterans' Memo-
rial. Call Shona Cook at
352-422-8092.
Ex-military and retired
military personnel are needed


are Important, ----
OOOE7TW APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED MEMBER


Eye Center
8490 W. Homosassa Trail, Homosassa

(352)489-3579 (352) 628-0123
Board Certified American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
Board Certified National Board of Examiners for Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons


to assist the U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary to help the
Coast Guard with non-military
and non-law enforcement pro-
grams.Criminal background
check and membership are
required. Email Vince Maida
at vsm440@aol.com, or call
917-597 6961.
HPH Hospice, as a part-
nering agency with the De-
partment of Veterans Affairs
(VA), provides tailored care
for veterans and their families.
The program is provided in
private homes, assisted living
facilities and nursing homes,
and staff is trained to provide
Hospice care specific to ill-
nesses and conditions unique
to each military era or war. It
also provides caregiver edu-
cation and a recognition pro-
gram to honor veterans'
services and sacrifices. HPH
Hospice care and programs


In SERVICE


Ryan F. Gardner
Air Force Airman 1st Class
Ryan F. Gardner graduated
from basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base, San
Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in mili-
tary discipline and studies, Air
Force core values, physical fit-
ness, and basic warfare princi-
ples and skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward


do not affect veterans' bene-
fits. Call the Citrus Team Of-
fice at 352-527-4600.
Yoga teacher Ann
Sandstrom is associated with


an associate
in applied
science de-
gree through
the Commu-
nity College
of the Air
Force.
Ryan F. Gardner is
Gardner the son of
U.S. Air Force Daphne
Smith of
Lecanto and
Lon Gardner of Beverly Hills.
He is a 2012 graduate of
Lecanto High School.


the national service organiza-
tion, Yoga For Vets. She of-
fers free classes to combat
veterans. Call her at 352-
382-7397.


GOT A NEWS TIP?
The Chronicle welcomes tips from readers about breaking news. Call the
newsroom at 563-5660, and be prepared to give your name, phone number,
and the address of the news event.
To submit story ideas for feature sections, call 352-563-5660 and ask for
Mike Arnold. Again, be prepared to leave a detailed message.
NEED A REPORTER?
Approval for story ideas must be granted by the Chronicle's editors before a
reporter is assigned. Call Editor Mike Arnold at 352-563-3225.





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VETERANS & COMMUNITY





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


FACEBOOK
Continued from PageAl

unconstitutional.
"Everybody wants to do the
right thing, but the hard legal re-
ality is the federal communica-
tions act," said Jim Hawley, a vice
president at TechNet, an industry
group that represents companies
such as Google and Microsoft.
Oregon lawmakers moved
ahead anyway with a proposal
that would have given "digital as-
sets" everything from photos
and messages stored online to in-
tellectual property and banking
information the same treat-
ment as material property for es-
tate purposes.
"I think it's time for us to really
look at what we can do now," said
Democratic Sen. Floyd Prozan-
ski after hearing Williams testify
about her loss last month.
Two weeks later, however, lan-
guage in the bill that would have
covered social media accounts,
from Facebook to Flikr, was
stripped as tech lobbyists said
the federal law and company pri-
vacy policies trumped anything
the bill would have included.
"I recognize the emotional toll
these types of decisions can have
on a family who's lost a loved
one," Prozanski said Thursday
"But some of these issues may
have to be addressed when we
have more information than we
currently have."
Still, the problem persists and
discussions on the issue are
gaining momentum. As unlikely
as such a case might be, even if a
person willingly gives over login
and password information to
someone whom they authorize
to access a given digital account,
it would violate most terms of
service agreements and both
people could be charged with
cybercrimes and face civil ac-
tion from Internet companies
under current law.
Currently, five states have dig-
ital assets laws, which vary
widely This group includes Okla-
homa, which passed a law two
years ago allowing estate lawyers
to access digital assets, even so-
cial media accounts. That meas-
ure did not face the opposition
that has emerged in Oregon.
"There is some question if laws
like the one we passed in Okla-
homa, would stand up to a chal-
lenge by Facebook and Gmail
saying their terms of service
agreements supersede laws like


this one and the one being dis-
cussed in Oregon," said Ryan
Kiesel, a former Oklahoma legis-
lator who wrote the law.
"That's a question that remains
to be answered," he added.
Several other states, including
Nebraska guided in part by the
story of Williams' 22-year-old son,
Loren are also considering
proposals. And the Uniform Law
Commission, a nonprofit, non-
partisan group that writes model
legislation for states to help stan-
dardize laws around the nation,
is examining the issue.
"This law is a real need as we
have moved into a digital world,"
said Lane Shetterly, an Oregon
attorney and a representative on
the commission's drafting com-
mittee. The group is responsible
for standardizing a range of leg-
islation, including commercial
transaction regulations and child
custody laws.
Proponents say the need is
clear Without clarity or direc-
tion, the digital information left
behind by a deceased person can
spark emotional legal battles, pit-
ting big business against devas-
tated families. And as more and
more memories are being stored
online, new tools are necessary
to make sure loved ones can eas-
ily access personal details that
could be lost forever
"If this were a box of letters
under his bed, no one would have
thought twice," Williams said.
Months after the death of her
first-born son, who was away at
college in Arizona, Williams
found comfort in his Facebook
page. There, she was able to click
through photos and letters that


helped ease the pain of her loss
- for two hours.
She learned of the page from
his friends and wanted access to
his memories to keep them from
being deleted, which was Face-
book's policy at the time. Un-
aware of Internet privacy
regulations, she reached out to
Facebook for help. As she waited
for a response, one of his friends
provided a tip that helped her
discover his password.
"It was like a gift," she said.
Shortly after, however, the site's
administrators changed the pass-
word, citing company policy in
denying her. Williams sued and
won, but she never received the
full access she sought. Eventually,
the account was taken down. In
the end, she gained little more
than a symbolic victory and a role
as champion of a cause that didn't
exist before the digital age.
Kiesel, the former Oklahoma
lawmaker, says the various at-
tempts at legislation have
sparked a long overdue conver-
sation about estate planning for
digital assets.
"I think that, because of the
wide prevalence of online ac-
counts and digital property, the
federal government will ulti-
mately need to pass some legisla-
tion that provides greater
uniformity," he said.
Congress, however, has no cur-
rent plans to take up the matter
U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor, an
Arkansas Democrat who heads
the Senate Commerce Subcom-
mittee on Communications and
Technology, is not planning to in-
troduce any digital assets pro-
posals and has not heard any


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 A13


earch

atures
Photos
Notes
Groups
Events


edit


Posted Items
Stats and More
k utyour
Il page


-1


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SDisplaying 0 stores
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Digital memories: Protect yours


Associated Press

Estate planning attorney
James Lamm, who writes the
blog "Digital Passing," advises
people to plan ahead for their
virtual afterlives. Your best bet
is to make sure valuable mem-
ories and intellectual property
are stored somewhere besides
a social media account so
back up your photos on a USB
flash drive.
Still, given the prevalence of
social media in today's world,
Lamm advises these four steps
as a sort of digital estate plan-
ning guide to help ensure your
wishes are carried out even
though, he says, with the law as
it stands currently, there are no
guarantees.
KEEP A LIST: Make a list
of all your digital accounts in-
cluding social media, email,
online banking, investment,
gaming and any other virtual
profile you can think of. In-
clude your login information,
such as usernames and pass-
words, and encryption data.
PUT SOMEONE IN

come up, his press secretary said.
Also, a bill aimed at modernizing
the Stored Communications Act
failed in the House Judiciary
Committee last year.
"This is not going to happen
overnight," said Greg Nojeim, of
The Center for Democracy and
Technology, a Washington, D.C.-
based nonprofit, public policy
group. He said changes to the
Stored Communications Act
were being discussed by industry
groups, "but none that would
help these families."
Under current law, Internet
companies that provide storage
for digital assets are prohibited
from disclosing account informa-
tion, even to families, without a
court order, which can be costly
and difficult to obtain.
Even then, there are no guar-
antees. Facebook, for example,
citing its terms of service agree-
ment won't provide access, even
if a judge orders them to do so.
Facebook will not comment on
pending legislation or specific
cases other than to defer to their
service agreement, which states,
in part, "We may access, preserve
and share your information in re-
sponse to a legal request (like a


CHARGE: Tell your estate
planner where to find that list
and give that person explicit
instructions for how you want
the information handled. Do
they hit the delete button? Or
do they notify the company to
memorialize your site?
Don't ask this decision-
maker to commit a crime by
logging in to your accounts, but
if the law changes in the future
this step could make it more
likely your wishes are fulfilled.
WILL POWER: If you have
a will, it's best to include your
digital assets there. Some on-
line information has real fi-
nancial value, and it's good to
cover all your assets. A McAf-
fee survey found, on average,
Americans believe the finan-
cial and emotional value of
their digital assets are worth
about $55,000.
HOPE FOR THE BEST:
Sometimes, you can do every-
thing right and still not get the
results you want. Until there is
more legal clarification, you
just have to do everything you
can and hope it works out.

search warrant, court order or
subpoena) if we have a good faith
belief that the law requires us to
do so."
The pending Oregon legisla-
tion now covers only digital as-
sets of commercial or financial
value such as online banking
information.
"It's absolutely devastating,"
Williams said.
Since she began her quiet cru-
sade after her 2007 court victory
yielded limited, temporary ac-
cess to her son's account, the so-
cial media landscape has
changed considerably, but there
is still no industry standard.
Where Facebook once deleted
the accounts of deceased users,
for example, pages can now be
memorialized for public view.
Many predict the problem will
grow as long as there are no es-
tate laws in place to determine
what happens to virtual property
left behind by the deceased.
Without a clear law, estate
managers can be charged with
cybercrimes for attempting to ac-
cess clients' digital accounts, said
Victoria Blachly, a Portland at-
torney who helped draft the ini-
tial Oregon proposal.


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NEW TECHNOLOGIES AROUND EVERY CORNER
* 36 ICU (Intensive Care Unit) Private Rooms
with safety-enhancing Alaris* IV pumps and convenient "head of bed" hook-ups for
dialysis are available
* New Nurse Call System lets patients reach their nurse with a discreet,
easy-to-use handset
* TotalCare SpO2RTP ICU Beds with advanced functions and safety features-like a built-
in scale, comfortable resting positions, and a vibration/percussion mode
* Revolutionary i-STATP System allows for bedside blood testing with accurate, lab-quality
results in minutes thru wireless technology
* 18 PACU (Post-Anesthesia Care Unit Recovery Rooms specially designed for prompt,
one-on-one care following surgery
* 6 Integrated Operating Suites fully equipped with the latest technology, including a
robotic-assisted surgical system
* 24/7 In-House Radiology Coverage-the region's only hospital offering this service-
provides immediate imaging results, whether it's 2 a.m. or 2 p.m.

National Accreditations:


if -I~ -


Total Knee &Total Hip
ReplacementCerlilication




Primary Slioe Cetur
Spinal Fusion Progm


9


Commission
: on Cancer




ACRZ
RADIOLOGY


Oak Hill
Hospital

11375 Cortez Blvd. (SR 50), Spring Hill
352-596-6632 Hernando I 352-628-6441 Citrus
OakHillHospital.com


Associated Press
This Feb. 16 photo shows a printout of the Facebook page for Loren
Williams, now deceased. Under current law, Internet companies that
provide storage for digital assets are prohibited from disclosing
account information, even to families, without a court order, which
can be costly and difficult to obtain.


I











NATION


&


WORLD


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Obama, GOP brace for budget blame game


Across-the-board cuts in effect;

both parties accuse one another


Associated Press


WASHINGTON Se-
vere spending cuts now the
law of the land, President
Barack Obama and con-
gressional Republicans re-
fused Saturday to concede
any culpability for failing
to stave off what both par-
ties acknowledged was a
foolhardy way to slash $85
billion in federal spending.
The still-fragile economy
braced itself for the gradual
but potentially grave impact
of the across-the-board cuts,


which took effect Friday
night at the stroke of
Obama's pen. Hours earlier,
he and congressional lead-
ers emerged from a White
House meeting no closer to
an agreement
Even as they pledged a
renewed effort to retroac-
tively undo the spending
cuts, both parties said the
blame rests squarely on
the other for any damage
the cuts might inflict.
There were no indications
either side was wavering
from entrenched positions


that for weeks had
prevented
progress on a deal
to find a way out:
Republicans refus-
ing any deal with
more tax revenue
and Democrats
snubbing any deal Bar
without it. Oba
"None of this is
necessary," Obama
said in his weekly radio
and Internet address Sat-
urday "It's happening be-
cause Republicans in
Congress chose this out-
come over closing a single
wasteful tax loophole that
helps reduce the deficit"
The president said the
cuts would cause "a ripple


effect across the
economy" that
would worsen the
R ^v longer they stay in
place, eventually
costing more than
750,000 jobs and
disrupting the lives
ck of middle-class
arna families.
In the GOP-
controlled House,
Republican lawmakers
washed their hands of the
mess, arguing bills they
passed in the last Congress
to avert the cuts absolved
them of any responsibility
Those bills passed with lit-
tle to no Democratic sup-
port and were never taken
up by the Senate.


SAMPLING OF BUDGET CUTS
* Defense Department: One of the Navy's premiere
warships, the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman,
sits pier-side in Norfolk, Va., its tour of duty delayed.
* Department of Homeland Security: Hundreds of
illegal immigrants have been freed from jail across
the country. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
officials say they had reviewed several hundred
cases of immigrants and decided to put them on
an "appropriate, more cost-effective form of
supervised release" Tuesday.
* Health Care: Hospitals, doctors and other Medicare
providers will see a 2 percent cut in government
reimbursements because once cutback takes ef-
fect, Medicare will reimburse them at 98 cents on
the dollar.
* Veteran funerals: Burials at Arlington National
Cemetery could be cut to 24 a day from 31,
meaning delays for troops from past wars.


Police officers


photograph


license plates

Authorities claim data

helps with crime

Associated Press
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Little Rock
may not be a likely terrorism target or a
gang crime hotspot, but the Arkansas
capital has decided to follow the exam-
ple of high-security cities by expanding
electronic surveillance of its streets.
A police car with a device that photo-
graphs license plates moves through the
city and scans the traffic on the streets,
relaying the data it collects to a com-
puter for sifting. Police say the surveil-
lance helps identify stolen cars and
drivers with outstanding arrest
warrants.
It also allows authorities to monitor
where average citizens might be at any
particular time. That bothers some res-
idents, as well as groups that oppose
public intrusions into individual pri-
vacy The groups are becoming more
alarmed about license plate tracking as
a growing number of police departments
acquire the technology
Though authorities in Washington,
D.C., London and Chicago conduct ex-
tensive electronic surveillance of public
areas to detect security threats or deter
gang crime, "Today, increasingly, even
towns without stoplights have license
plate readers," said Catherine Crump, a
New York-based staff attorney with the
American Civil Liberties Union.
In Little Rock, even some city officials
wonder about keeping data on drivers'
movements.
"It bothered me particularly if some-
one wasn't guilty of a crime or didn't
have any active warrants or hadn't com-
mitted a crime," city director Ken
Richardson said.
However, Little Rock Police Chief Stu-
art Thomas said the law enforcement
benefits outweigh any concerns about
possible abuse of the information,
which, as a public record, is legally
available for anyone to see. He said the
department may get more of the devices.


Associated Press
A camera is mounted near the rear
window of a police car in Little Rock, Ark.
The device is part of a system that scans
traffic on the streets, relaying the data it
collects to a computer for sifting.


Associated Press
The turret of the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor is lifted out of the ocean Aug. 5, 2002, off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C.




Finally laid to rest


Ceremony for sailors of USS

Monitor stirs familial ties


Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. -A cen-
tury and a half after USS
Monitor sank, the interment
of two unknown crewmen
found in the Civil War iron-
clad's turret is bringing to-
gether people from across
the country with distant but
powerful ties to those who
died aboard.
The ceremony Friday at
Arlington National Ceme-
tery in Washington will in-
clude Monitor kin who
believe the two sailors -
whose remains were dis-
covered in 2002 are their
ancestors, despite DNA
testing failing to make a
conclusive link. But the
families stress the inter-
ment pays homage to all 16
Union sailors who died
when the ship went down,
and nearly 100 people from
Maine to California are ex-
pected to attend.
"When I learned they
were going to do a memo-
rial and have the burial at
Arlington, it was like, 'I
can't miss that,"' said Andy
Bryan of Holden, Maine,
who will travel with his
daughter Margaret to the
capital.
He said DNA testing
found a 50 percent likeli-


hood Monitor crewman
William Bryan, his great-
great-great-uncle, was one
of the two found in the sum-
mer of 2002, when the 150-
ton turret was raised from
the ocean floor off Cape
Hatteras, N.C.
"If it's not William Bryan,
I'm OK with that," Bryan
said. "This is a once-in-a-
lifetime thing, and I feel
like I should be there."
The same holds true for
Diana Rambo of Fresno,
Calif. She said her mother,
Jane Nicklis Rowland, was
told of the ceremony for
Monitor crewman Jacob
Nicklis a week before her
death in December, at age
90. He was Rowland's great-
uncle. That, Rambo said,
makes the interment espe-
cially poignant.
Rambo, too, suspects
Nicklis was one of the two in
the turret. "We know he was
on the ship," she said. "We
know he was one of the 16."
Two weeks ago, Navy Sec-
retary Ray Mabus said the
two would probably be the
last Navy personnel from
the Civil War to be buried at
Arlington. He'll speak at the
interment.
"It's important we honor
these brave men and all
they represent as we reflect


This undated file photo released by NOAA shows the USS
Monitor before it sank during the Civil War.


upon the significant role
Monitor and her crew had
in setting the course of our
modern Navy," he said.
The ceremony is sched-
uled on the 151st anniver-
sary of the Battle of
Hampton Roads. On March
8, 1862, the Brooklyn-made
Monitor fought the CSS Vir-
ginia in the first battle be-
tween two ironclads. The
Virginia, built on the carcass
of the U.S. Navy frigate USS
Merrimack, was the Confed-
erate answer to the Union's
ironclad ships. The two-day
battle ended in a draw.
The Monitor sank nine


months later in rough seas
southeast of Cape Hatteras
while under tow by the USS
Rhode Island. Dubbed a
"cheese box on a raft," the
Monitor was not designed for
rough water. Sixteen of the
Monitor's 62 crew members
died. The crew of the Rhode
Island was able to rescue 50
people. Most of the dead
were lost at sea. The wreck
was discovered in 1973.
Retired Navy Capt. Bar-
bara "Bobbie" Scholley was
commanding officer of the
team about 40 divers who
descended to the Monitor
wreck in 2002.


WorldBRIEFS


Libyan official: Egyptian the detainees would soon be deported.
detainees to be deported NATO says 2 Afghan boys
_t _l -* * -


TRIPOLI, Libya -A Libyan security official
says 50 Egyptians, who were arrested in Beng-
hazi last week for allegedly spreading Christian-
ity, are being charged with illegally entering and
working in the country and will be deported.
A video circulated this week on social net-
working sites purportedly showing a group of
Christian Egyptians, who said nearly 100 Cop-
tic Egyptians were being held for allegedly
spreading Christianity.
The Libyan security official, speaking Saturday
on condition of anonymity according to rules, said


acciaentally KIIled
KABUL, Afghanistan International forces
accidentally killed two Afghan boys during an
operation in southern Afghanistan, the U.S.-
led coalition said Saturday.
Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, the com-
mander of U.S. and allied forces in
Afghanistan, offered his "personal apology
and condolences to the family of the boys who
were killed" and said the coalition takes full re-
sponsibility for the deaths.
From wire reports


An Egyptian protester
holds an anti-Muslim
brotherhood poster
showing defaced images
of Egyptian Islamist
President Mohammed
Morsi, center left, and
Muslim Brotherhood
leader Mohammed
Badie, center right,
during a protest
Saturday in support of
victims of Friday's
clashes in the Nile Delta
city of Mansoura, Egypt.
Associated Press






* Veterans Notes can be
found beginning on Page
A10 of today's Chronicle.


EXCURSIONS
~CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Dreamn


Accent Travel and the Chronicle have
chosen winners for the 2012 Dream Vacation
photo competition. These are the three favorite


photos, plus two honorable mentions.
For details about how to compete
in 2013, see the Dream
Vacation information
with this week's


photo.


Vacation


Ecuador adventure


-.4


4.
4 -~


Howard and Nancy Geer of Crystal River rang in the new year in Ecuador in
2012. they celebrated with the locals with fireworks. bonfires and more.
They took a tour into the heart of the country to visit the Andes Mountains.
hike the rainforest and travel down the Amazon River. Here. Howard blows
a dart through a six-foot blow gun used in the Amazon for hunting.
He hit the wooden monkey target!


Ridge took a two-week cruise
with friends from Kentucky on
the Rhine and Danube rivers.
Starting in Amsterdam. the
boat made stops in such
historic cities as Cologne,
Nuremberg, Salzburg and
SVienna, where this picture
was taken. The tour included
many smaller but picturesque
towns and villages along the
way before ending in
Budapest, Hungary.


Adopt a Rescued Pet '"-j
members (from left) Gail
Palmer. Judy Dunlap and Abby .
Scowcroft took two weeks off and. '
with their friend Pat Riley of Ohio. took -.
a dream vacation to Australia. In addition to "
the wonderful tourist sites such as Sydney ..
Harbor. the opera house. Great Barrier Reef and the
outback, to name a few. they also visited several animals
sanctuaries. There, they were able to hold and pet koala bears,
wombats, wallabies and kangaroos, beautiful birds and more.


Visit to Greece -
Al and Gloria Schroedel of
Hernando recently visited
the Acropolis in Athens,
Greece. The main
structure in the
background is the
Parthenon, constructed
during the period 447 to
432 B.C. The Parthenon
was the main temple
dedicated to Athena, the
Greek goddess of wisdom
and protector of the city of
Athens. The Parthenon
symbolizes ancient Greece
and continues to inspire
architects across the
world.


Tahoe with Twain
On a recent visit to Reno,
Nev., Tom Hampton of
Inverness and Patricia
Sorlingas of Floral City
enjoyed a luncheon cruise on
Lake Tahoe with "Mark
Twain." Lake Tahoe is the
second deepest lake in the
United States and the 10th
deepest in the world, with a
maximum depth of 1,645 feet
and an average depth of
1,000 feet. The lake is 6,225
feet above sea level.


Work and Witness
Alan and Peggy Webber of Pritchard Island, Inverness, and Don Monin, a winter
resident of Inverness, recently returned from a Work and Witness missions trip to
Lesotho in South Africa. They accompanied a group of Nazarenes from various
churches in the Pittsburgh District of the Church of the Nazarene. Their mission
was to build a primary school in the village of Ha Ralejoe. Years ago, the chief of
the village gave the Nazarene church a site to build a church and it was built in
memory of Don's wife, Nancy. The school that is being built on the same site is in
memory of Peggy's parents and her brother-in-law, Dale Stotler's, parents.
Special to the Chronicle


DREAM
VACATIONS


The Chronicle and The
Accent Travel Group are
sponsoring a photo con-
test for readers of the
newspaper.


Readers are invited to
send a photograph from
their Dream Vacation with a
brief description of the trip.
If it's selected as a win-
ner, it will be published in
the Sunday Chronicle. At
the end of the year, a
panel of judges will select
the best photo during the
year and that photograph


will win a prize.
Please avoid photos
with dates on the print.
Photos should be sent
to the Chronicle at 1624
N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429
or dropped off at the
Chronicle office in Inver-
ness, Crystal River or any
Accent Travel Office.


d


IO
te^






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Mom wants to fix


relationship


SUNDAY EVENING MARCH 3, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DII:Comcast Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
C B ID/I F H 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 1 8:30 9:00 I 9:30 110:00110:30 11:00 11:30
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News World America's Funniest Once Upon a Time (N) Red Widow "Pilot; The Contact" Marta's loving News Sports
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S 350 261 350 Jolie, Clve Owen. (In Stereo) R' Premiere. (In Stereo) PG-13' Fiennes. Premiere. (In Stereo) R'
1 48 33 48 31 34 "Sherlock Holmes" (2009, Action) Robert Downey Jr. The detec- *** "Double Jeopardy"(1999, Suspense) Southland "Babel" (In
48 33 48 31 34 tveand his astute partner face a strange enemy PG-13 Tommy Lee Jones. R' Stereo)'14'c
TOON 38 58 38 33 *** "Surf's Up" (2007, Comedy) 'PG' Incredible |Looney Oblongs |King/Hill KingHill Cleveland Fam. Guy Fam.Guy
TRAV 9 54 9 44 Luxury Yachts 'G' Extreme Houseboats Tricked Out Trains Tricked Out Trailers Mega RV Countdown Killer RV Upgrades
truTV 25 55 25 98 55 Upload Upload Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn Storage Storage Storage Storage Pawn Pawn
TVLJ 32 49 32 34 24 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special "Resident Evil:
0U)I 47 32 47 17 18 Victims Unit '14 1 4 Victims Unit Victims Unit144 4 Victims U n14 Victims Unit'14 Afterlife" (2010)
CSI: Miami Shocking CSI: Miami "Flight Risk" CSI: Miami "Target CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami "Chip/Tuck" CSI: Miami "Presumed
(WE) 117 69 117 discovery.'14'B '14' Specific"'14'B '14'B '14'm Guilty"'14'
(WGiNA) 18 18 18 18 20 Videos |Bloopers! Bloopers! |Mother Mother |Mother Mother |Mother News |Replay 30 Rock |30 Rock


Dear Annie: My
daughter just gave
birth to our first
grandson. The problem is,
she and her husband plan
to take the baby to his par-
ents' house for babysitting,
even though I offered. We
both live nearby I'd love to
watch him at least one or
two days a week
I find my son-in-law to
be arrogant and rather dis-
respectful. I
get the im-
pression that
he is encour-
aging our
daughter to
have a nega-
tive attitude
toward us. Be-
fore they were
married, we
were close to
her, but now
there is a huge
rift I am hurt ANN
by her actions. MAIL
They are steal-
ing my joy of
having a grandchild. I am
lucky if I get to see the
baby twice a week for an
hour at a time. I have of-
fered to help with dishes
and laundry, and occasion-
ally, they let me do those
things. My husband and I
are generous and give
them lots of baby gear and
food. It's as if I need to
bring a gift to hold my
grandson.
Life has not been easy
the past five years. My only
parent died, and my sib-
lings are squabbling over
the estate, creating an es-
trangement. Three years
ago, I was diagnosed with
cancer. Due to all of this


stress, I have had two shin-
gles outbreaks in the past
two months. I always
thought that when my only
daughter became a
mother, we would become
closer
This hurts so much that
I have trouble sleeping.
When I talk to my daugh-
ter about more time with
the baby, she says, "We'll
see," and that she needs to
talk to her hus-
band about it.
And nothing
changes. How
do I fix this? -
S Sad Grandma
Dear Sad: We
know many
grandparents
would consider
H- an hour twice a
week to be a
blessing, so we
caution you not
E'S to be overly fo-
BOX caused on the
downside of
your relation-
ship. There may be myriad
reasons why your daugh-
ter prefers her in-laws to
babysit Some of it may be
that you seem depressed
and stressed, partly due to
your medical problems
and sibling issues.
Talk to your daughter
gently Tell her you love
her and her family, and ask
how you can improve
things between you.


Email anniesmailbox@
comcast.net, or write to:
Annie's Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate,
737 Third St., Hermosa
Beach, CA 90254.


Today MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 -
Inverness; 637-3377
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:10 p.m.,
4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m. No
passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:30 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II"
(PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m.,
7:40 p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4p.m., 7p.m.
"Identity Thief'" (R) ID re-
quired. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.,
7:10 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9;
564-6864
"21 and Over" (R) 1:45 p.m.,
4:45 p.m., 7:45 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II"
(PG-13) 1:55 p.m., 4:55 p.m.,


7:55 p.m.
"Jack, The Giant Slayer"
(PG-13) In 3D. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. No
passes.
"Dark Skies" (PG-13) 1:15
p.m., 4:15 p.m., 7:15 p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) In 3D. 1:10 p.m. No
passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth"
(PG) 4:10 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1 p.m.,
4 p.m., 7 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard"
(R) 1:50 p.m., 4:50 p.m.,
7:50 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:20 p.m.,
4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com
for area movie listings and
entertainment information.


Sunday PUZZLER


ACROSS
1 Lawbreaker
6 Make moist
11 Cake serving
16 Chassis
21 Relating to sheep
22 Place of contest
23 Oak-to-be
24 Garment part
25 Desire
26 Not needed
28 French writer
Zola
29 Stringed
instrument,
for short
30 Police rank (abbr.)
31 Kindled
32 Employ again
34 TV network
35 Withered
37 Height (abbr.)
38 Mock-up
40 Grassy area
41 King Cole
42 Floating platform
44 Polite behavior
46 Grime
49 Scuffle
52 High point
53 Recipe measure
55 North Carolina city
59 The ones there
60 Christmas carol
61 Bull's-eye
64 Pioneer Daniel -
65 Flowing garment
66 Head covering
67 Rodents
68 Baste
70 Fish in a can
71 Spherical body
72 Male pig
73 Landing place
74 Book of maps
76 Transgression
77 Irritable
79 --de deux
80 Ait
82 Thoroughfare
84 Wild disturbance
85 Operates
86 Secure
with cables
87 Tackle box item
88 Argue
90 von Bismarck
91 Poem
92 Hide


Actress
Thurman
Spore case
Arm bone
- chip stock
The "I"
Additional
Drunken one
Cry like a donkey
Layer
Mineral springs
Coral island
Scattered remains
- Tyler Moore
Jobs or Madden
Became aware of
- generis
Gripping tool
Closer
to one's heart
Stone and space
Impervious
material
Steep
Dead lang.
Mire
Gas jet
Very popular
Lab burner
Honest -
It's in the shin
Cup edge
Abundant
Pole
Make dry
One who's involved
Perceived
Publish
Cordial flavoring
Extent
Come to be
Brilliance
Does a farm job
Garden tool
Alma -


DOWN
1 Concentrate
2 Draw out
3 Body organ
4 United
5 Trap of a kind
6 Solidified lava
7 Break forth
8 Part of DOD (abbr.)
9 Opp. of WSW
10 Witch
11 Sir-- Raleigh


Old French coin
Portal
Thin porridge
Occurred afterward
Run away
Farm animal
Of bees
Kind of toast
Put into office
Name for a pooch
Eatery
Uttered
Rub out
Food and drink
Money,
disparagingly
Simian
Act
Make funny faces
Massage
Horse's gait
Band
for sharpening
Job
Unethical mogul
(2 wds.)
Needy
Annoy
Domestic
employee
Girl in the funnies
Intended
Ark builder
Contest result
Bitterness
- Aviv
Party giver
The Show Me State
Failure
Flora and fauna
Breathe heavily
African plant
Pebble
By way of
Places
Kind of water
Legendary bird
Traveled ways
"Three
Musketeers" writer
Overact
Potter's need
Century plant
Also-ran
Food fish
- Palmas, Spain
Tiresome talker
"Bom Free" lioness
Short


106 Throw
107 Poker ante
109 Table part
111 Coach
112 Source of ore
113 Red or Yellow
115 Actress Moore
117 Dracula,
for example
118 Be too fond
120 Inferior


Friendly nations
Secular
Less harsh
- lazuli
Disconcert
Not at all wordy
Lane or Sawyer
Depend
Characteristic
Of a country
in Europe


Snake
Therefore
Diva's song
Sounded
Stage signal
Meas. in recipes
Gym mat
Showy performer
Time


Puzzle answer is on Page A18.


2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


I
.1


A16 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY
SCHOOLS
Elementary school
Breakfast
Monday: MVP breakfast,
cereal variety and toast, tater
tots, juice and milk variety.
Tuesday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, cereal variety
and toast, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Wednesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, cereal variety and
toast, tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal variety and toast,
grits, juice and milk variety.
Friday: Ultimate breakfast
round, cheese grits, tater tots,
cereal variety and toast, juice
and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Hamburger slid-
ers, pepperoni pizza, Italian
super salad with roll, fresh
baby carrots, tangy baked
beans, chilled applesauce,
fruit juice, milk variety.
Tuesday: Creamy maca-
roni and cheese, corn dog
minis, yogurt parfait plate,
fresh garden salad, steamed
broccoli, chilled strawberry
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Wednesday: Spaghetti
with ripstick, oven-baked
breaded chicken with ripstick,
Very Berry super salad with
roll, PB dippers, fresh baby
carrots, sweet green peas,
chilled mixed fruit, fruit juice,
milk variety.
Thursday: Half day:
Chicken nuggets, fresh baby
carrots, celery sticks, flavored
Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Friday: Half day: Chicken
sandwich, fresh baby carrots,
celery sticks, applesauce, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Middle school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety and toast,
tater tots, grits, milk and juice
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage and
egg biscuit, ultra cinnamon
bun, cereal and toast, tater
tots, milk and juice variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk vari-
ety.
Thursday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, ultra cinna-
mon bun, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultimate breakfast
round, cereal and toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
pulled pork barbecue on bun,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, steamed broccoli, chilled
applesauce, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Tuesday: Oriental orange
chicken, macaroni and
cheese with roll, turkey super
salad with roll, yogurt parfait
plate, fresh garden salad,
steamed green beans, fla-
vored Craisins, fruit juice, milk
variety.
Wednesday: Hamburger,
barbecued chicken with roll,
PB dippers, fresh baby car-
rots, tangy baked beans, po-
tato triangles, chilled peach
cups, fruit juice, milk variety.
Thursday: Half day:
Chicken sandwich, fresh baby
carrots, steamed green
beans, strawberry cups, fruit
juice, milk variety.
Friday: Half day: Hot dog,
fresh baby carrots, sweet
corn, chilled applesauce, fruit


Special to the Chronicle
Senior Friends for Life
will welcome a special
guest speaker following
lunch at its regular
monthly luncheon meeting
Monday, March 11, at In-
verness Golf and Country
Club, 3150 S Country Club
Blvd.
Fran Reisner is a na-
tional award-winning pho-
tographer known for an
innovative style, creating
storytelling images. Her
journeys have taken her to
many foreign countries.
Presently, she and her
dogs Jazzy and Sadie -
are enjoying the Nature
Coast while shooting the


juice, milk variety.
High school
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
sausage pizza, MVP break-
fast, cereal variety, toast, tater
tots, grits, juice and milk
variety.
Tuesday: Sausage, egg
and cheese biscuit, ultra cin-
namon bun, cereal and
toasts, tater tots, juice and
milk variety.
Wednesday: Breakfast
egg and cheese wrap, MVP
breakfast, cereal and toast,
tater tots, juice and milk
variety.
Thursday: Ham, egg and
cheese loco bread, ultimate
breakfast round, cereal and
toast, grits, tater tots, juice
and milk variety.
Friday: Breakfast sandwich
stuffer, ultra cinnamon bun,
cereal variety, toast, tater tots,
juice and milk variety.
Lunch
Monday: Chicken tenders
with rice, pizza, macaroni and
cheese with ripstick, ham-
burger, chicken sandwich, fa-
jita chicken salad with roll,
yogurt parfait plate, baby car-
rots, fresh broccoli, potato tri-
angles, steamed broccoli,
applesauce, chilled apple-
sauce, juice, milk.
Tuesday: Nachos with
Spanish rice, turkey and
gravy over noodles with rip-
stick, hamburger, chicken
sandwich, Italian super salad
with roll, maxstix, yogurt par-
fait plate, garden salad, cold
corn salad, Mexicali corn, po-
tato roasters, baby carrots,
celery strawberry cup, juice,
milk.
Wednesday: Fresh turkey
wrap, spaghetti with ripstick,
hamburger, chicken sand-
wich, pizza, ham salad with
roll, yogurt parfait plate, baby
carrots, chilled baked beans,
baked beans, potato triangles,
flavored Craisins, juice, milk.
Thursday: Half day:
Chicken sandwich, pepperoni
pizza, stuffed crust pizza, po-
tato triangles, green beans,
baby carrots, peach cups,
juice, milk.
Friday: Half day: Ham-
burger, pepperoni pizza,
stuffed crust pizza, potato tri-
angles, baby carrots, corn,
chilled applesauce, juice,
milk.

SENIOR DINING
Monday: Cream of tomato
soup, meatloaf sandwich on
whole-grain bun, ketchup,
apple juice, raisins, low-fat
milk.
Tuesday: Frankfurter on
bun with mustard, coleslaw,
baked beans with tomato, car-
rot coins, graham crackers,
low-fat milk.
Wednesday: Birthday cele-
bration: Slice yellow cake,
beef and macaroni with
cheese, green beans, corn
with red pepper, slice Italian
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Thursday: Chicken thigh
with coq au vin sauce, herb
mashed potatoes, spinach,
peaches, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Friday: Barbecued pork ri-
blet, green peas, mashed po-
tatoes, chunky cinnamon
apples, slice whole-grain
bread with margarine, low-fat
milk.
Senior dining sites include:
Lecanto, East Citrus, Crystal
River, Homosassa Springs,
Inverness and South Dunnel-
lon. For information, call Sup-
port Services at
352-527-5975.


scenery here.
Reisner has won numer-
ous national and interna-
tional awards for her work
On three occasions, she
was the Dallas Photogra-
pher of the Year and has
had some of her speeches
noted in major books and
magazines.
Everyone is welcome to
the luncheon. Registration
will be at 11 a.m., with
lunch at 11:45 a.m. The en-
trees are vegetable
lasagna, or pork loin with
mango chutney Reserva-
tions must be made by
Tuesday, March 5, by call-
ing Myrna Hocking at 352-
860-0819 or Teddie Holler
at 352-746-6518.


Stitchers to
gather March 6
The Sandhill Crane Chap-
ter of the Embroiderers' Guild
of America will meet from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 6, at Faith Evan-
gelical Presbyterian Church,
200 Mount Fair Ave.,
Brooksville.
A tag sale to include many
embroidery-related items
such as kits, stitching materi-
als and more will be the high-
light of the meeting. Open
stitching will take place until
2 p.m. Bring a lunch and
enjoy the day. Membership is
open to anyone who is inter-
ested in stitching, from the
most experienced to those
who would like to learn to
stitch. Mentors are available.
For more information, call
352-666-8350.
Nordic sons meet
in Spring Hill
The Sons of Norway, Sun
Viking Lodge No. 607 will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Friday,
March 8, at Holy Cross
Lutheran Church, 6193
Spring Hill Drive, Spring Hill.
All are welcome at the St.
Patrick's Day Celebration


featuring corned beef sand-
wiches, coleslaw, potato
salad and cupcakes. Price is
$10 for adults, $4 for ages 13
to 16 and free for children 12
and younger.
For reservations, call Clair
at 352-596-2171 or Gail at
727-863-3145 no later than
Tuesday, March 5.
Shuffleboarders
to meet in March
The next Executive Board
meeting of the Beverly Hills
Shuffleboard club will be at
3 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, at
the Central Ridge Library.
The members meeting will
be at 3 p.m. Thursday, March
14, at the Community Center.
This month there will be a
Strawberry Social.
New members are sought;
come to one of the members'
meetings or just come to the
courts. The club shuffles at
1 p.m. until the first of April;
then at 9:30 Monday through
Friday. For more information,
call Vice President Sharon
Pineda at 352-527-8488.

New league to
meet March 12
A newly forming Citrus


County League of Women
Voters will meet at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, March 12, at the
Nature Coast Unitarian Uni-
versalist Fellowship, 7633 N.
Florida Ave., Citrus Springs.
Earlier presentations about
the league resulted in over-
whelming support for the
nonpartisan educational
group, which is open to all,
including men. On March 12,
organizational items will be
discussed and decided.
For more information, call
352-465-4225, or visit
Naturecoastuu.org.
Citrus Springs
MSBU to convene
A Citrus Springs Municipal
Services Benefit Unit meeting
will be held at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, March 6, at
Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd.
For more information, call
Larry Brock at 352-527-5478.

Companions
sought for seniors
The Nature Coast Volun-
teer Center is currently seek-
ing people for its Senior
Companion Program.


To become a Senior Com-
panion you must be 55 years
of age or older, not em-
ployed, have your own vehi-
cle, a valid driver's license
and insurance. The positions
are open to income-eligible
people and opportunities are
available in Inverness, Floral
City, Hernando, Beverly Hills
and Citrus Springs.
Training is provided, with a
commitment to work a mini-
mum of 20 hours per week,
and in exchange receive a
stipend, mileage allowance,
paid vacation and sick time
while helping housebound
seniors to stay independent.
Senior Companions typi-
cally visit their clients once a
week and assist with a vari-
ety of tasks.
For more information, call
Sue at 352-527-5959.

Zen meditation
sessions at Unity
The public is welcome to
Zen meditation sessions at
2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto (off County
Road 491).
For more information, call
352-464-4955.


Vendors Wanted


Outdoor Adventure Expo


Saturday, April 13th 10am-Spm


A One Day Event at The Crystal River Mall that
will feature Retailers, Demonstrations,
l 4 Seminars and Speakers.

i Indoor and Outdoor Spaces are Available.


Fishing, Camping, Boating,
RV, Patio, AIV, Gardening,
Swimming, Snorkeling,
Cycling, Parks and
Recreation, Tennis, Golf,
Travel, Scuba Diving,
Skateboarding, Motor
Sports and other Outdoor
Activity Organizations
and Retailers will
be Exhibiting.


Call to Reserve Your Space
352-563-5592
Deadline to join March 25th

('P--- --L P1 F
..wwwchroncleonneco


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PARIS COLLETTE Travel inar Invitation
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August 30, 2013 NEW ENGLAND Inverness Women's Club
OTHEDAYSRUNVALA WITH ROUND TRIPAIR (openformen and women)
AIRFROMTAMPA, October 1-7, 2013 Wine and
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Inside $555.04pp
Airfare and add'l taxes not included
All rates are based on d

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Starting at $8131pp
Eastern Caribbean Cruise.
All port and Gov't fees included.


10 Days
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Rates 9
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Taxes are additional


= March4to 8 MENUS


News NOTES


Photographer to

speak at meeting of

senior Friends


ST 35415

Becky's NWovel Store
STARLITE CRUISE
DAY TRIP f 10 DAY BRMSH
With Lunch LANDSCAPES
Along Departure Sept 26, 2013
Gulf Coast Visiting Edinburgh, London, Cotswolds, and Wales
March 20th $3949 per person*
$71 Including IncludingairfarefromTampa
Transportation From 9 nights hotel accommodations
Beverly Hills I 8 breakfasts, 3 dinners
3557 N. Lecanto Hwy., Beverly Hills, FL 34465 (52 5278855
Located Next to Winn Dixie (352)5278 5
www'beekystrave ervice com OOOEGF


COMMUNITY


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 A17





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


David Gasiorek and Judy Reed an-
nounce the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Nicole Gasiorek, to Robert Brashear
Jr, son of Robert and Dianne Brashear of
Inverness.
The bride-elect is a 2004 summa cum
laude graduate of Lecanto High School
and the Academy of Environmental Sci-
ence. In 2007, she received her Bachelor
of Arts in Business from Saint Leo Uni-
versity She earned her master's degree
in criminal justice: forensic science in
2012. She is now pursing an educational
path in the health care field and is em-
ployed by Brashear's Pharmacy
The prospective groom is a 2005 grad-
uate of Citrus High School. He is store
manager and co-owner of Brashear's


103rd
BIRTHDAY Divorces a
are a matt
county's C
County, ca
website at

Van Alstein
VI
U Veterans N
this week
Chronicle.



Puzzle is


Betty Van Alstein of For-
est View Estates, Ho-
mosassa, celebrated her
103rd birthday with neigh-
bors and friends on Feb.
26,2013.
She lived in Hollywood,
Calif, and Iowa before
coming to Florida, where
she now lives in her home
with her caregiver and a
devoted neighbor.


Pharmacy, which is an independent
pharmacy in Lecanto.


FOR THE RECORD
and marriages filed in the state of Florida
:er of public record, available from each
;lerk of the Courts Office. For Citrus
all the clerk at 352-341-6400 or visit the
www.clerk.citrus.fl.us.

VETERANS & IN SERVICE
Notes and In Service news can be found
beginning on Page 10 in today's


Sunday's PUZZLER

s on Page A16.


F E L ON B E D E W WEDGE F RAME
O V I NE A R E N A A C O R N L A P EL
CO V ET SUPEMRFLUOUS EMI L E

-RA T D-EC RUM DIRT
SCmRAC D lRlPEAK TlPH AM
T HO0SE N E L T A RGET BOO N E
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SPORTS


Tampa Bay
Lightning try to
take down the
Boston Bruins
on Saturday./B5


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


0 Recreation sports/B2
0 Baseball, tennis/B3
0 Auto racing/B3
0 Scoreboard/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
0 Basketball, hockey/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


Two co-lead Honda Classic


Guthrie, Thompson

tied atop PGA Tour

event in Florida

Associated Press
PALM BEACH GARDENS -
Michael Thompson felt like he was
playing in a U.S. Open whenever he
saw his golf ball in the rough or the
scores on the leaderboard at the
Honda Classic.
No one was going anywhere Sat-
urday at PGA National.
In cool, blustery conditions on a
course with water hazards at nearly
every turn, the strategy was to keep
the head down and keep big numbers
off the scorecard. Thompson and








Defel


Prather comes

up big for UFin

win over 'Bama

Associated Press
GAINESVILLE No. 8
Florida showed the kind of re-
siliency that could come in
handy in the postseason.
Casey Prather had 10 points
and nine rebounds, most of
them in the second half, and
the Gators rallied from an
eight-point deficit to beat Ala-
bama 64-52 on Saturday
The Gators used a 15-0 run
late in the second half fu-
eled by Prather-to pull away
from the Crimson Tide and re-
main unbeaten (14-0) at home.
Even though Florida won
its 13 Southeastern Confer-
ence games by double digits,
this one easily could have
gone the other way
"Casey, thank God, gave us
good minutes," coach Billy
Donovan said. "If he didn't
play well, we probably would
have had a hard time winning
the game."
Erik Murphy led Florida (23-
5, 13-3 SEC) with 15 points.
Kenny Boynton added 13, and |
Scottie Wilbekin chipped in 11.
But there's no doubt
Prather was the key. He
played relentless defense and
was equally impressive on the
other end. With Prather lead-
ing the way, Florida outscored
Alabama 23-5 over the final 10
minutes of the game.
"I was definitely trying to
bring energy because we
looked a little dead offen-
sively and defensively,"
Prather said.
Trevor Releford led the
Tide (19-10, 11-5) with 12
points. Trevor Lacey and Nick
Jacobs added 11 points apiece. --
Florida made just 2 of 13
shots from 3-point range, but
made up for it by making 22 of
26 from the free-throw line.
Alabama was 4 of 10 from
the charity stripe.
The Tide really went cold Flori
See Page B4 durii


PGA Tour rookie Luke Guthrie man- vaging par after hitting into the water
aged to do that well enough to share on the par-5 18th. That gave him a 70
the lead going into the final round. and put him only two shots behind.
Guthrie was tested He was tied with
his first time in the Honda Classic scores Geoff Ogilvy, who ap-
last group on tour pears to have
and made a collec- 0 For Saturday's third round snapped out of his
tion of solid pars on results, see Page B4. putting doldrums
his final eight holes that cost him dearly
for a 1-over 71. on the West Coast.
Thompson accepted his bogeys and Ogilvy recovered from three bogeys
finished with a two-putt birdie on in four holes at the start of his round
the 18th for a 70. by making a 7-foot birdie putt at the
They were at 8-under 202, and end for a 70.
while the conditions were tough,
equally daunting were some of the See Page B4
names behind him. Michael Thompson watches his sec-
Lee Westwood, who moved his ond shot from a bunker onto the
family down the road from PGA Na- 17th green Saturday during the third
tional over the Christmas break, ral- round of the Honda Classic in Palm
lied over the last five holes by Beach Gardens. His first shot rolled
chipping in for birdie, making an 18- back into the bunker.
foot birdie putt on the 17th and sal- Associated Press


f The thrill



IsIU ofsports


Associated Press
ida forward Casey Prather tries to get to the basket as Alabama center Moussa Gueye defends
ng the second half Saturday in Gainesville. The No. 8 Gators came away with a 64-52 victory.


Watching NASCAR and
Danica Patrick last week-
end, my wife and I thought
about the thrill of driving a race
car and the never-ending risk of
the crashes in every race. The
thrill drivers derive in this sport is
matched in many ways by the thrill
the spectators experience.
A few years ago as I launched my
paraglider off the top of a moun-
tain in the foothills of the Andes, I
thought,
"What in the
world am I
doing?"
What kind of
a sport is
jumping off
a mountain _'_
with a para-
chute?
What I was
doing was Dr. Ron Joseph
experienc- DOCTOR'S
ing the thrill ORDERS
of a sport
that allows
soaring like a bird with breathtak-
ing views, as well as a sport neces-
sitating an effort to carry a
90-pound pack up several thou-
sand feet, but the risk is ever-pre-
sent as is the thrill.
Thrill, risk and sports go hand in
hand and, in some sports, much
more so than in others. I have
often written about athletes taking
performance-enhancing drugs, the
end product being elevated adren-
aline, cortisol and endorphin pro-
duction by the body It is amazing
the number of sports that naturally
produce these same chemicals -
not only the athlete, but also the
fan watching.
There is a reason extreme sports
have taken hold, ranging from cage
fighting to extreme alpine skiing to
free fall skydiving from a platform
in space.
Any type of physical activity that
causes pain or stress, such as ex-
ercise, releases endorphins in the
brain. Excitement or engaging in
risky activities triggers the release
of endorphins, serotonin and cor-
tisol as well. Drug addicts seek the
release of endorphins and these
brain chemicals as part of a drug-
induced high, whereas athletes ob-
tain this as a byproduct of sports
and the thrill of the sport. The
same holds true for spectators.
Endorphins are a morphine-like
chemical that helps combat stress
See Page B4





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Casting a success
Special to the Chronicle I |


It started out a gray and breezy
morning at Citrus County Parks and
Recreation's ninth annual Kid's
Fishing Clinic on Feb. 23 in Crystal
River
The rain held off and the sun
came out, making it a warm and en-
joyable day Parker the Frog was on
scene to entertain and take pictures
with participants and their fami-
lies. More than 300 children be-
tween the ages of 5 and 15 came out
to enjoy the day and learn about
fishing and our local water envi-
ronments from FWC, DEP and a
wonderful group of volunteers.
Participants learned things such
as knot tying, the proper way to han-
dle a fish, the right tackle to use and
what type of sea life are in the Gulf
of Mexico. After visiting each sta-
tion, participants received their
free rod and reel thanks to Fish
Florida and fished off the Fort Is-
land Trail Park Pier After fishing,
each participant received a goodie
bag provided by Sea Tow filled with
fishing information and extra
tackle.
Sponsors included:
Florida Fish and Wildlife Com-
mission, Fish Florida, Department
of Environmental Protection, Bar-
nacle Bill's Bait & Tackle Shop,
Sweetbay, Beef'O' Brady's of Crystal
River, Crystal River Power
Squadron, Blue Water Bait and
Tackle, Homosassa Guides Associa-
tion, Twinn Rivers Marina, Sea Tow,
MacRae's of Homosassa, Beverly
Hills Fishing Club, Dunkin' Donuts,
Pepsi, Crystal River Eagles, Lowes
Home Improvement, Value Dental
Care, Vicky & Greg Nixon, Timber-
lane Family Dentistry, Plantation on
Crystal River, Crystal River Kayak
Company, Central Florida Urology
Specialists, VFW Men's Auxiliary
10087, VFW Women's Auxiliary
10087, American Legion Post 237
Beverly Hills and Nature Coast
Volunteers.
Youth golf lessons
Citrus County Parks and Recreation,
in partnership with Pine Ridge Golf
Course, will hold spring youth golf les-
sons. Lessons are at Pine Ridge Golf
Course on Wednesday evenings from
5:30 to 6:30 p.m. They will begin
Wednesday, March 27, and run for five
weeks. Children ages 6 to 15 are eligi-
ble and the cost is $50 per child. In-
struction will be given by golf pro Randy


Special to the Chronicle
Kids practice casting their reels at the 9th Annual Kid's Fishing Clinic on
Feb. 23 in Crystal River.


Robbins and several volunteers.
For more information, call
Crysta Henry, recreation program
specialist for youth programs, at
352-527-7543 or Randy Robbins at
352-746-6177.
Super Series baseball
coming to county
The Key Training Center's Who's on
First and Florida Premier Prospects in
conjunction with Citrus County Parks and
Recreation are proud to present Super
Series Baseball Tournaments. Super Se-
ries Baseball is one of the nation's
largest and fastest-growing baseball or-
ganizations. The qualifying tournaments
will be at Citrus County's Bicentennial
Park in Crystal River on March 30 and
31 and June 15 and 16.


For more information, call Tim Ram-
say or Adam Thomas at 352-287-1415
or 786-877-5041.
Underwater egg hunt
Citrus County Parks and Recreation
will host its Underwater Egg Hunt on Sat-
urday, March 23, from 11 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. for children up to the age of 12.
There will be two egg hunts for different
age groups: Children up to age 6 will hunt
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., while children age
7 to 12 will hunt from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Admission is free and children will
need to bring their own basket.
For more information, call Bicenten-
nial Park Pool at 352-795-1478, Citrus
County Parks & Recreation at
527-7540, or visit www.citruscounty
parks.com.


Adult softball


title decided


Various other

adult leagues

restarting

Special to the Chronicle
The men's softball winter
season is over, though not
without an exciting finish.
Reflection's Church 2
took a 20-10 victory over
Advanced Fitness for the
league championship.
Each took a direct path to
the title game.
In the first round of
playoffs, second place 'Re-
fection's Church 2' faced
off against third place '01'
Guys with Help.' After ex-
changing runs for almost
the entire game, Reflec-
tions Church 2 came out
on top, staying in their sec-
ond place spot for the
championship game.
In the second round,
first place 'Advanced Fit-
ness' was matched up
against fourth place 'Re-
flection's Church 1.'
Though a hard-fought
game by Reflection's
Church 1, Ricardo Valle
and his Advanced Fitness
team went on to win the
second round of playoffs.
Men's flag football
The men's flag football
league is for adults 18 and
older. It is a very fast-paced,
physical game. If you are up
for a challenge, the league is
starting March 14.
We are looking forward to in-
creasing the number of teams,
and to expand competition.
Registration is ongoing. For
more information, call Maci at
352-527-7547.
Men's softball
We encourage all to come
out and witness the talented
Citrus County adult leagues.
Games are at Bicentennial


Park in Crystal River and are
at 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and
8:30 p.m. on Mondays. The
next season is set to start
April 1.
Registration begins on
March 4. For more informa-
tion, call Maci at 352-527-
7547.
Kickball
Our exhilarating co-ed
kickball league is for adults
18 and up. It is a great way
to meet new people and get
some exercise while having
fun.
Games are at 6:30 p.m.,
7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. at Bi-
centennial Park in Crystal
River, lasting an hour or nine
innings, whichever comes
first. The new season will start
April 16.
Registration will begin
March 1. For more information,
call Maci at 352-527-7547.
Beach volleyball
Since the first beach volley-
ball season was extremely
successful, the next season
begins April 23.
Games are played at
6:30p.m. Tuesday at Bicen-
tennial Park in Crystal River.
The team fees, days and
times are dependent on how
many teams we have sign up.
Registration will begin on
March 11. For more informa-
tion, call Mad at 352-527-7547.
Co-ed softball
Co-ed softball is scheduled
to start up again April 11.
Games are played at Bicenten-
nial Park in Crystal River on
Thursday starting at 6:30 p.m.
Registration will begin March
11. For more information, call
Maci at 352-527-7547.
Women's basketball
Citrus County Parks and
Recreation is looking to start
a women's basketball league.
Please call Maci if
interested in playing at
352-527-7547.


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RECREATIONAL SPORTS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Cobb dominant in start for Rays

T three runs on three hits in two in-
Tampa Bay beats nings, including a solo home run by
Baltimore4-1....Craig Gentry.
Baltimore 4-1 _Athletics 6, Rockies 3


Associated Press

PORT CHARLOTTE Alex
Cobb rebounded from a rough
outing to pitch three overpower-
ing innings, and the Tampa Bay
Rays beat the Baltimore Orioles
4-1 Saturday
Cobb, who struggled to get
through two innings against
Boston on Monday, allowed just
one hit and struck out five on 36
pitches.
Orioles left-hander Brian Ma-
tusz yielded consecutive homers
to Rays shortstop Yunel Escobar,
a two-run shot, and second base-
man Ryan Roberts.
Rays closer Fernando Rodney
kept his perfect spring alive
after pitching a hitless third. He
struck out one.
Grapefruit League

Yankees 10,
Tigers (ss) 3
TAMPA- Ivan Nova allowed an
infield single over two scoreless in-
nings and the New York Yankees
stopped a seven-game losing streak
by beating a Detroit Tigers split
squad 10-3.
Trying to make the rotation after
faltering down the stretch last sea-
son, Nova struck out one during an
outing in which he threw 22 of 27
pitches for strikes. The right-hander
went 12-8 with a 5.02 ERA last year,
down from 16-4 the year before.
New York's Brett Gardner had two
hits, and has at least one hit in all six
of his spring training games this
year.
Blue Jays 11, Phillies 6
DUNEDIN Ryan Howard hit a
two-run homer off R.A. Dickey, but
Jose Reyes and the Toronto Blue
Jays touched up Cliff Lee in an 11-6
victory over the Philadelphia Phillies.
Reyes and Melky Cabrera each
doubled and Edwin Encarnacion
had an RBI single in a two-run first
inning off the 2008 AL Cy Young
Award winner. Lee allowed five hits,
including Emilio Bonifacio's solo
shot in the second.
Dickey, the reigning Cy Young
Award winner didn't fare much better.
He gave up four straight hits in the
first doubles by Kevin Frandsen
and Michael Young, Howard's homer
and a single by Domonic Brown.
Nationals 6, Cards 2
JUPITER -Adam Wainwright
struggled with location in his second
spring-training start, giving up five


The Detroit Tigers' Omar Infante swings Saturday against the New York Yankees in Tampa.


runs and eight hits over three in-
nings in the St. Louis Cardinals' 6-2
loss to the Washington Nationals.
Gio Gonzalez won his second exhi-
bition start for the Nationals, allowing
two runs and five hits in three innings.
Kurt Suzuki doubled off the Cardi-
nals' ace leading off the second and
scored on Chris Marrero's single.
One out later. Anthony Rendon
homered on a drive more than
halfway up the batter's eye beyond
the center-field wall.
Red Sox 2, Twins 1
FORT MYERS Justin Morneau
homered in his final game with Min-
nesota before leaving for the World
Baseball Classic, but the Twins lost
to the Boston Red Sox 2-1.
Morneau, who will play for Canada
in the WBC beginning Friday, led off
the fourth inning with a drive that
landed in a pond behind the right-
field wall at Hammond Stadium.
Juan Carlos Linares went deep
for Boston off starter Kyle Gibson.
Marlins 8, Mets 8, tie
PORT ST. LUCIE Matt Harvey
gave up a leadoff homerun to Mar-
lins prospect Christian Yelich before
settling down to strike out four in 2 2-
3 innings, and the New York Mets
and Miami tied 8-8.
Harvey allowed one run, three hits
and walked one. He retired five in a
row after Yelich's homer, including
three by strikeout.
Marlins starter Alex Sanabia, who
is competing to be the team's No. 5
starter, pitched two scoreless in-
nings and struck out one.
Astros 6, Braves 5
KISSIMMEE Carlos Pena hit


his first home run for the Houston
Astros in a 6-5 victory over the At-
lanta Braves.
Houston starter Dallas Keuchel
pitched two scoreless innings.
Kris Medlen, slated to start on
opening day for the Braves, went
three innings in his second start of
the spring and allowed one run.
Tigers (ss) 4, Pirates 1
LAKELAND Miguel Cabrera hit
his third home run of the spring and
Drew Smyly pitched three perfect in-
nings for a Detroit Tigers split squad
in a 4-1 victory over the Pittsburgh
Pirates.
Austin Jackson had one of De-
troit's three hits and scored twice.
Cabrera, the reigning AL MVP and
Triple Crown winner, was scheduled
to leave Tigers camp later in the day,
along with teammates Omar Infante
and Anibal Sanchez, to join Team
Venezuela for the World Baseball
Classic.
Grapefruit League

Giants 9, Cubs 7
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Pablo
Sandoval hit a towering home run,
the only blemish for Carlos Vil-
lanueva, and the San Francisco Gi-
ants beat the Chicago Cubs 9-7.
Gregor Blanco drove in two runs
for the Giants, who are losing eight
players to the World Baseball Clas-
sic after this weekend.
Villanueva, a candidate for the
Cubs starting rotation, gave up one
run on four hits over three innings.
He walked one and struck out two.
Yusmeiro Petit gave the Giants a
nice outing in place of Tim Lince-
cum, who was scratched because of


a blister on his right middle finger.
Mariners 9, Dodgers 5
PEORIA, Ariz. Franklin Gutier-
rez hit yet another home run for the
Seattle Mariners in a 9-5 victory over
the Los Angeles Dodgers, their
eighth straight win.
Catcher Mike Zunino also went
deep in a three-run third inning
against Dodgers starter Chris Ca-
puano. The Mariners have hit 20
homers in nine games this spring.
Gutierrez also had a double and
drove in four runs.
White Sox 4, Reds 0
GLENDALE, Ariz. Jose Quin-
tana got off to a great start again. He
knows from experience there's a
long way to go.
Quintana, who started strong and
faded late as a rookie last season,
pitched three perfect innings for the
Chicago White Sox in their 4-0 vic-
tory over the Cincinnati Reds.
Corner infielder Conor Gillaspie
hit his second homer of the spring
and outfield prospect Jared Mitchell
homered and doubled in a run.
Rangers 7,
Diamondbacks 1
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Matt Harri-
son bounced back from a rough first
outing to throw three scoreless in-
nings and the Texas Rangers went on
to beat the Arizona Diamondbacks.
The left-hander, an 18-game win-
ner last season, allowed three hits in
three scoreless innings. In his first
start last Sunday, Harrison threw 40
pitches in one inning, allowing four
runs on six hits against Kansas City.
Lefty Wade Miley made his first
spring start for Arizona, giving up


PHOENIX Josh Reddick hit
three-run home run in the third in-
ning, leading the Oakland Athletics
to a win over the Colorado Rockies.
Reddick entered the game with
one hit in his first eight at-bats of
spring training but broke out of the
slump with two hits. Brandon Moss
also homered for the A's.
Oakland starter Tommy Milone
pitched two scoreless innings in his
first start. Milone again figures to be
an integral part of the starting rota-
tion after going 13-10 last season
and leading the team in innings
pitched with 190.
Padres 11, Indians 8
GOODYEAR, Ariz. Logan
Forsythe had two triples in a seven-
run third innings, and the San Diego
Padres rallied to beat the Cleveland
Indians after starter Edinson
Volquez was pounded for six runs in
the first.
Forsythe led off the third with a
triple off Ubaldo Jimenez. He hit a
two-run triple with two outs off Ed-
ward Parades.
Volquez gave up six runs and six
hits in the first, including a three-run
homer by Ryan Raburn.
Royals 9, Giants (ss) 5
SURPRISE, Ariz. Eric Hosmer
went 3 for 3 with a home run and
two doubles, Mike Moustakas hit a
two-run shot and the Kansas City
Royals beat a San Francisco Giants
split squad 9-5.
The Royals remained the only un-
defeated team in spring training with
an 8-0-1 record. The Giants fielded
a team of mostly minor leaguers and
non-roster invitees.
Jeremy Guthrie, who re-signed
with the Royals in the offseason for
$25 million over three years, made
his first Cactus League start. He
gave up two runs and four hits in two
innings.
Brewers 4, Angels 3
PHOENIX Injuries suddenly
are coming in bunches for the Mil-
waukee Brewers.
Aramis Ramirez doubled for his
first hit of the spring but left Milwau-
kee's 4-3 victory over the Los Ange-
les Angels with a strained left knee.
Ramirez snapped an 0-for-10
start with a bloop double down the
left-field line in the third inning. After
time was called, he stepped off the
bag and was met by the team trainer
before walking slowly back to the
dugout. He will be re-evaluated on
Sunday and is day to day.


Kyle Busch breaks through


Driver ends

Nationwide

losing streak

Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. -
Kyle Busch spun his
wheels at the start/finish
line for a few extra rota-
tions, filling the track and
grandstand with a fog of
white smoke.
After waiting so long to
win on the Nationwide
Series again, it felt like
the first time and he was
going to enjoy it.
Overcoming a mid-race
gaffe on pit road with a
dominating performance,
Busch led 142 laps at
Phoenix International
Raceway on Saturday to
end a 24-race Nationwide
winless streak.
"It was a phenomenal
day for us to get back to
Victory Lane, feel the
taste of it again," said
Busch, whose last Nation-
wide win was Sept. 9,
2011, at Richmond. "I was
almost nervous, feeling
like it was my first win
even though it was, I
think, No. 52 in the series.
It's nice to be back."
Busch had a rough 2012
by his own high stan-
dards, finishing 13th in
the Sprint Cup standings
with just one victory de-
spite leading the second-
most laps. He also failed
to win in 22 Nationwide
races for his own team
and came up empty in
three trucks races.
Busch signed a deal to
stay with Joe Gibbs Racing
to drive the No. 18 Sprint
Cup car this season and
agreed to race for the team
on the Nationwide circuit
He bounced back from


Associated Press
Kyle Busch smiles as he celebrates his win of the
Nationwide Series auto race Saturday in Avondale, Ariz.


a rough start at Daytona
in the season opener by
earning the pole at
Phoenix and was clearly
the fastest car all day dur-
ing the 200-lap race
around the mile oval.
Despite a penalty for
entering pit road too fast,
Busch eclipsed 11,000 ca-
reer laps during the race
and picked up his 52nd
Nationwide victory, ex-
tending his own record.
He's won seven times at
Phoenix, including five in
the Nationwide Series.
It also was Toyota's 75th
Nationwide victory, 41 of
those coming with Busch
at the wheel.
Brad Keselowski fin-
ished second and Justin
Allgaier overcame body
damage on his car from
an early wreck to finish
third. Trevor Bayne fin-


ished fourth, followed by
Elliott Sadler
Danica set to move
on after Daytona
AVON DALE, Ariz. Dan-
ica Patrick's experience at
the Indianapolis 500 helped
her handle the frenzy that
came with the Daytona 500.
Already one of the most
popular drivers in auto rac-
ing, Patrick became the cen-
ter of attention last weekend
at Daytona, where she be-
came the first woman to win
a Sprint Cup pole and the
first to lead green-flag laps.
The accomplishments sent
Danicamania into high gear,
her face appearing all over
the news, everyone watching
her every move, even the
daughters of fellow drivers
asking to meet her.


Tennis blowing in the wind


ERIC
VAN DEN HOOGEN
Correspondent

Windy conditions met
the players Saturday at
Crystal River High School.
Lobs floated from the
right part of the court all
the way to the left and a lot
of shots all of a sudden just
died. The big servers espe-
cially had a hard time put-
ting their biggest weapon in
play because it was hard to
get the toss in the right spot.
Even so, the more than 70
entries had a good time.
The matches today start
at 10 a.m. because of the ex-
pected cold temperatures
in the early morning. If you
want to donate some non-
perishable foods and/or
gently used clothing, the
volunteers will be at the
courts from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The results for the first
day were as follows:
Women's A Doubles
Anna Mirra/Lisa Steed def.
Carrie Ingersoll/Nancy Smith,
6-1, 6-4; Linda Martin/Judy
Long def. Jane Wilson/Carlyn
Prefontaine, 6-1, 6-2.
Women's B Doubles
Round Robin
Candace Charles/Lynn
Finman def. Micki Brown/Sally
deMontfort, 6-2, 4-6, 10-3;
Candace Charles/Lynn Finman
def. Veronica Williams/Maddie
Lewis, 6-2, 6-1.
Women's B Singles
Mahima Tatambhotla def.
Beth Ensing, 6-0,6-0; Maddie
Lewis def. Mirabelle Tahiri,
6-4, 6-0.
Men's A Singles
Shea Monroe def. Malik
Tahiri, 7-5, 6-1; Kevin Scholl
def. Fred Graves, 6-3, 6-3.
Semis: Chris Lavoie def.
Randy Robbins, 6-1, 6-2;
Kevin Scholl def. Shea Mon-
roe, 7-6, 6-4.
Men's B Singles
Michael Hetland def. Chris
Milton, 3-6, 6-4, 10-3; AJ
Glenn def. Dakota Willey, 6-4,


2-6, 15-13; Len Calodney def.
Dave Goddard, 6-3, 6-0; Ken
Berthiaume def. Alex Sener-
pidia, 4-6, 6-3, 10-8.
Semis: Michael Hetland
def. AJ Glenn, 6-4, 6-2; Len
Calodney def. Ken Berthi-
aume, 6-2, 6-0.
Consolation Semis: Chris
Milton def. Dakota Willey, 6-4,
6-1; Alex Senerpidia def.
Dave Goddard, 6-3, 6-1.
Men's A Doubles
Mike Brown/Eric van den
Hoogen def. Jim Lavoie/Chris
Lavoie. 6-7, 7-5, 10-5;
Dave deMontfort/Chuck
Cooley def. Andy Belskie/
Barney Hess 6-4, 7-6.
Men's B Doubles
Dave Goddard/Ken Berthi-
aume def. AJ Glenn/Michael
Hetland, 6-4, 6-3; Dakota Wil-


ley/Jesse deWitt def. Fred
Mango/Vinnie Tremante, 4-6,
6-2, 10-3; Chris Milton/Alex
Senerpidia def. Chris
Young/Marcial Irizarry, 6-4, 7-6.
Semis: Dakota
Willey/Jesse deWitt def. Dave
Goddard/Ken Berthiaume,
3-6, 6-4, 11-9.
Mixed Doubles A
Anna Mirra/Mike Walker
def. Antoinette van den
Hoogen/Kevin Scholl, 6-2,
2-6, 1-6; Linda Martin/Chuck
Cooley def. Jane Wilson/
Randy Robbins 6-1, 4-6, 10-3.
Mixed Doubles B
Mirabelle Tahiri/Malik Tahiri
def. Kelly Goddard/Dave
Goddard, 6-4, 6-3; Veronica
Williams/Matt Allen def. Mad-
die Lewis/Dakota Willey, 6-3,
6-7, 10-5.


_Ik _


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W II 7 I F. I ;II IN M I


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 B3






B4 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013




Spring Training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
Kansas City 8 0 1.000
Seattle 8 1 .889
Baltimore 6 2 .750
Houston 5 2 .714
Chicago 4 2 .667
Tampa Bay 6 3 .667
Minnesota 5 3 .625
Cleveland 6 4 .600
Boston 5 4 .556
Toronto 5 4 .556
Detroit 4 5 .444
Oakland 3 5 .375
Texas 2 6 .250
New York 2 7 .222
Los Angeles 1 6 .143
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct
Colorado 5 3 .625
St. Louis 4 3 .571
Arizona 4 4 .500
Chicago 4 4 .500
Miami 3 3 .500
San Diego 5 5 .500
San Francisco 3 3 .500
Washington 3 3 .500
Los Angeles 3 4 .429
Philadelphia 3 4 .429
New York 2 3 .400
Atlanta 3 6 .333
Milwaukee 3 6 .333
Pittsburgh 2 6 .250
Cincinnati 2 8 .200
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 4
Houston 8, St. Louis 8, tie
Philadelphia 10, N.Y Yankees 5
Baltimore 6, Pittsburgh (ss) 5
Minnesota 8, Miami 7
N.Y Mets 6, Detroit 2
Cleveland 9, Chicago White Sox 7
Seattle 8, Texas 6
L.A. Angels 16, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 8
Arizona 6, Chicago Cubs 2
San Diego 7, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5
Kansas City 3, Cincinnati 2
San Francisco 13, Oakland 9
Colorado 5, Milwaukee 2
Washington 6, Atlanta 5
Boston 5, Pittsburgh (ss) 2
Saturday's Games
Detroit (ss) 4, Pittsburgh 1
Boston 2, Minnesota 1
Toronto 11, Philadelphia 6
N.Y Yankees 10, Detroit (ss) 3
Washington 6, St. Louis 2
Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore 1
Houston 6, Atlanta 5
N.Y Mets 8, Miami 8, tie
Milwaukee 4, L.A. Angels 3
Kansas City 9, San Francisco (ss) 5
San Francisco (ss) 9, Chicago Cubs 7
Seattle 9, L.A. Dodgers 5
San Diego 11, Cleveland 8
Oakland 6, Colorado 3
Chicago White Sox 4, Cincinnati 0
Texas 7, Arizona 1
Today's Games
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Toronto vs. Philadelphia (ss) at Clearwater,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Miami atJupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Houston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Seattle vs.Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. San Diego at Peoria,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Houston vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:35 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m.
Colorado vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05
p.m.
San Francisco vs. Chicago White Sox at
Glendale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05
p.m.
Cleveland vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:10 p.m.




NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 35 20 .636 -
Brooklyn 34 26 .567 312
Boston 31 27 .534 512
Philadelphia 23 34 .404 13
Toronto 23 37 .383 1412
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 42 14 .750 -
Atlanta 33 24 .579 912
Washington 18 39 .316 2412
Orlando 16 43 .271 2712
Charlotte 13 45 .224 30
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 37 22 .627 -
Chicago 34 25 .576 3
Milwaukee 29 28 .509 7
Detroit 23 38 .377 15
Cleveland 20 39 339 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 46 14 .767 -
Memphis 38 19 .667 612
Houston 32 28 .533 14
Dallas 26 32 .448 19
New Orleans 21 39 .350 25
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 42 16 .724 -
Denver 38 22 .633 5
Utah 32 27 .542 1012
Portland 26 31 .456 1512
Minnesota 20 35 .364 2012
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 43 18 .705 -
Golden State 33 27 .550 912
L.A. Lakers 29 30 .492 13
Phoenix 21 39 .350 211Y2
Sacramento 20 40 .333 22/2
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 104, Golden State 97
Chicago 96, Brooklyn 85
Milwaukee 122, Toronto 114, OT


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Saturday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
8-0-9
CASH 3 (late)
5-1-0

PLAY 4 (early)
4-1-8-4
PLAY 4 (late)
9-0-0-4

FANTASY 5
oridaLottery 5-18-23-24-28

POWERBALL LOTTERY
3-8-13-41-56 7 10 -L15T-T17R-19 38
POWER BALL XTRA
16 3



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
TV
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m. (FOX) Sprint Cup: Subway Fresh Fit 500
NBA
1 p.m. (ABC) Miami Heat at New York Knicks
3:30 p.m. (ABC) Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles
Clippers
6 p.m. (FSNFL) Memphis Grizzlies at Orlando Magic
8 p.m. (ESPN) Chicago Bulls at Indiana Pacers
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (ESPN) Purdue at Wisconsin
3:30 p.m. (SUN) Washington State at Washington
4 p.m. (CBS) Michigan State at Michigan
4 p.m. (CW) Virginia at Boston College
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida State at Virginia
1 p.m. (SUN) Florida at South Carolina
2 p.m. (CBS) Florida State at North Carolina
2 p.m. (MNT) LSU at Texas A&M
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Saint Joseph's at Dayton
4 p.m. (ESPN2) North Carolina at Duke
CYCLING
12 p.m. (NBCSPT) Tour of Oman. (Taped)
1 p.m. (NBCSPT) Paris-Nice Prologue (Same-day Tape)
GOLF
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic Final Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGA Tour: Honda Classic Final Round
3 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic Spotlight
Coverage
7 p.m. (GOLF) LPGATour: HSBC Women's Champions-
Final Round (Same-day Tape)
9:30 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic Final Round
(Same-day Tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE GYMNASTICS
6 p.m. (ESPN2) Alabama at Arkansas (Taped)
HOCKEY
12:30 p.m. (NBC) Chicago Blackhawks at Detroit Red
Wings
7:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins
COLLEGE LACROSSE
5:30 p.m. (SUN) Orange Bowl Classic -Army vs. Michigan
(Taped)
MOTORCYCLE RACING
12 p.m. (CBS) Monster Energy AMA Supercross World
Championship (Taped)
FISHING
7 a.m. (ESPN2) Bassmaster Classic Day 2 (Taped)
10 p.m. (ESPN2) Bassmaster Classic Championship
(Taped)
BULL RIDING
1 p.m. (CBS) PBR Dickies Iron Cowboy IV (Taped)
SOCCER
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2) MLS: New York Red Bulls at Portland
Timbers
TRACKAND FIELD
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) USA Indoor Championships

RADIO
BASEBALL
1 p.m. (104.3 WYKE FM) Minnesota Twins at Tampa Bay Rays

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.


Minnesota at Portland, late
Today's Games
Miami at New York, 1 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Memphis at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 7 p.m.
Detroit at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
New York at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Orlando at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Utah at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Denver, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Portland, 10 p.m.
Toronto at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Women's
Top 25 fared
Saturday
1. Baylor (28-1) beat West Virginia 80-49.
Next: vs. Kansas State, Monday.
2. Notre Dame (27-1) beat Providence 92-57.
Next: vs. No. 3 UConn, Monday.
3. UConn (27-2) beat South Florida 85-51.
Next: at No. 2 Notre Dame, Monday.
4. Stanford (28-2) beat Washington State 72-
50. Next: Pac-12 tournament.
5. Duke (26-2) did not play. Next: vs. No. 15
North Carolina, Sunday.
6. California (27-2) beat Washington 78-50.
Next: Pac-12 tournament.
7. Penn State (23-4) did not play. Next: at No.
20 Nebraska, Sunday.
8. Tennessee (23-5) did not play. Next: at No.
10 Kentucky, Sunday.
9. Maryland (22-6) did not play Next: vs.
Wake Forest, Sunday.
10. Kentucky (24-4) did not play. Next: vs. No.
8 Tennessee, Sunday.
11. Georgia (23-5) did not play Next: vs. Van-
derbilt, Sunday.
12. Dayton (25-1) did not play Next: vs. Saint
Joseph's, Sunday.
13. Texas A&M (21-8) did not play Next: vs.
LSU, Sunday.
14. South Carolina (22-6) did not play. Next:
vs. Florida, Sunday.
15. North Carolina (26-4) did not play. Next: at
No. 5 Duke, Sunday.
16. Louisville (23-6) did not play. Next: at No.
22 Syracuse, Monday.


17. UCLA (22-6) did not play. Next: at Arizona,
Sunday.
18. Delaware (25-3) did not play Next: vs.
Drexel, Sunday.
19. Colorado (23-5) did not play. Next: at Ore-
gon State, Sunday.
20. Nebraska (22-6) did not play. Next: vs. No.
7 Penn State, Sunday.
21. Green Bay (24-2) beat Illinois-Chicago
67-36. Next: vs. Loyola of Chicago, Tuesday.
22. Syracuse (22-6) lost to Villanova 77-75,
30T. Next: vs. No. 16 Louisville, Monday.
23. Iowa State (20-7) lost to TCU 61-58. Next:
vs. Oklahoma State, Monday.
24. Florida State (21-7) did not play. Next: at
Virginia, Sunday.
25. Purdue (20-8) did not play Next: vs. Illi-
nois, Sunday.




NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
Pittsburgh 22 14 8 0
New Jersey 21 10 6 5
Philadelphia 23 11 11 1
N.Y Rangers 19 9 8 2
N.Y. Islanders 21 8 11 2
Northeast Division
GP W L OT
Boston 18 14 2 2
Montreal 21 13 4 4
Ottawa 22 12 7 3
Toronto 22 13 9 0
Buffalo 22 912 1
Southeast Division
GP W L OT
Carolina 20 11 8 1
Winnipeg 21 1010 1
Tampa Bay 21 911 1
Florida 21 610 5
Washington 20 811 1


Pts GF GA
28 77 64
25 52 56
23 66 68
20 48 49
18 61 73

Pts GF GA
30 54 38
30 64 50
27 50 41
26 64 55
19 58 70

Pts GF GA
23 60 57
21 55 64
19 73 67
17 53 79
17 55 59


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 21 18 0 3 39 68 40
St. Louis 20 11 7 2 24 59 57
Detroit 21 10 8 3 23 60 57
Nashville 21 9 7 5 23 45 52
Columbus 21 512 4 14 47 65
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 19 10 5 4 24 54 52


Minnesota
Edmonton
Colorado
Calgary


Anaheim
Phoenix
Dallas
Los Angeles
San Jose


20 10 8 2
20 8 8 4
19 8 8 3
19 7 8 4
Pacific Division
GP W L OT
20 15 3 2
21 10 8 3
21 10 9 2
18 10 6 2
19 9 6 4


22 45 49
20 49 54
19 49 58
18 53 66

PtsGF GA
32 71 55
23 62 59
22 57 62
22 47 42
22 45 43


NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Saturday's Games
Buffalo 4, New Jersey 3, SO
Phoenix 5, Anaheim 4, SO
Philadelphia 2, Ottawa 1
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 2
Washington 3, Winnipeg 0
Pittsburgh 7, Montreal 6, OT
Carolina 6, Florida 2
Los Angeles at Vancouver, late
Nashville at San Jose, late
Today's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 3 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
New Jersey at Toronto, 7p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Nashville at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.




Honda Classic
Saturday
At PGA National (Champion Course),
Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,110, Par: 70
Third Round


Luke Guthrie
Michael Thompson
Lee Westwood
Geoff Ogilvy
Rickie Fowler
Charles Howell III
YE.Yang
Peter Hanson
Keegan Bradley
Justin Rose
Graham DeLaet
Darron Stiles
Erik Compton
James Driscoll
Lucas Glover
Tom Gillis
Nicholas Thompson
Boo Weekley
David Lynn
Brandt Jobe
Kyle Stanley
Ben Kohles
Bob Estes
Graeme McDowell
Sean O'Hair
Russell Henley
Charl Schwartzel
Mark Wilson
Chris Stroud
Jeff Klauk
Robert Streb
Tiger Woods
Retief Goosen
George McNeill
Stewart Cink
Fabian Gomez
Daniel Summerhays
Brian Stuard
Matteo Manassero
Trevor Immelman
Steven Bowditch
Ben Crane
Freddie Jacobson
Brendon de Jonge
Dustin Johnson
Branden Grace
Chris Kirk
Doug LaBelle II
Matt Jones
Scott Stallings
Nicolas Colsaerts
Brendan Steele
Vaughn Taylor
Kevin Streelman
Greg Chalmers
Brian Gay
Kevin Stadler
Jeff Overton
Jason Dufner
Ryan Palmer
Martin Kaymer
Ernie Els
Hank Kuehne
Ross Fisher
Cameron Percy
Patrick Reed
Steve Marino
Jamie Donaldson
Marc Leishman
D.A. Points
Gary Woodland
Justin Hicks
Billy Horschel
Brad Fritsch
Jason Bohn


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Sprint Cup
Subway Fresh Fit 500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 138.074 mph.
2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 137.862.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 137.804.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 137.673.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 137.164.
6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 137.143.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 137.075.
8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 136.924.
9. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 136.882.
10. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 136.861.
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 136.835.
12. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 136.731.
13. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 136.654.
14. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 136.602.
15. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 136.483.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 136.364.
17. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 136.291.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 136.266.
19. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 135.936.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 135.89.
21. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 135.87.
22. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 135.44.
23. (51) A.J Allmendinger, Chevy, 135.44.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 135.267.
25. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 135.247.
26. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 135.1.
27. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 135.064.
28. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 134.917.
29. (42) J. Montoya, Chevrolet, 134.821.
30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 134.705.
31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 134.695.
32. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 134.373.
33. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 134.343.
34. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 133.814.
35. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 133.774.
36. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 133.591.
37. (30) D. Stremme, Toyota, Owner Points.
38. (33) L. Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
39. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (10) D. Patrick, Chevy, Owner Points.
41. (87) J. Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Points.


DOCTOR
Continued from Page B1


and pain and provides a healthy sense of
wellbeing. Serotonin is another chemical se-
creted by the brain that controls mood pat-
terns. Adrenaline provides the "fight or
flight" response and stimulates heart and
brain to increased performance levels. Brain
derived nerve factor, BDNF, is produced dur-
ing exercise or stress to help protect nerve
connections in the brain.
As athletes, there is a constant attempt for
thrill and subsequently stress in the sport.
Spectators similarly pick sports that get them
excited and stressed.
In alpine ski racing, few remember the
slalom races but most remember the down-
hill crashes. The differences in the athletes
between the slower speed technical event
like slalom and the high-speed downhill is ev-
ident in the risk taking personalities of the
racers themselves. Even figure skating be-
came more popular when Nancy Kerrigan
was knee-capped by her competitor, thus
adding more thrill to the sport.
Football, hockey and soccer are viewed as
much for the risks and thrills of the impacts
and fisticuffs as for the technique of the game.
The thrill seeking and risk-taking behaviors
in some of these sports are attributed to the
feeling of being more alive. Another theory
deals with evolution and that a less evolved
part of the brain that deals with survival and
reproduction has programmed impulses that
stimulate some people to take risks.
But as either an athlete or spectator, his-
tory has shown us as the poet Robert Brown-
ing wrote, "Our interest's (lie) on the
dangerous edge of things"
Ron Joseph, M.D., a hand and shoulder or-
thopedic surgeon at SeaSpine Orthopedic In-
stitute, maybe reached at rbjhand@cox.net.




TURF
Continued from Page B1


from the field, making just two baskets after
taking a 45-37 lead with 12:23 remaining.
"You've got to be able to manufacture some
offense," coach Anthony Grant said. "We had
opportunities that we let slip away"
Missed shots, bad passes, charges, Alabama
did a little bit of everything to give up the lead
on the road. It was the complete opposite of
what Alabama did right during a 14-4 run that
put the Tide ahead.
"Defensively, we weren't as locked in as we
were during that stretch," Lacey said.
The Gators gladly took advantage en route
to clinching a first-round bye in the SEC tour-
nament Florida later secured at least a share
of the SEC regular-season title when
Arkansas beat Kentucky. Donovan's team
needs one more win to clinch the league tour-
nament's top seed.
Donovan cared little about those accom-
plishments after the game. He was more con-
cerned about his team's problems.
Florida used a 12-0 run to open up a dou-
ble-digit lead early in the game, making this
look like it would be another lopsided affair
But the Gators stopped making shots and
starting giving up baskets at every turn. It was
concerning for Donovan because it's the kind
of emotional letdown he has tried to rid his
team of the last two years.
Instead of moving the ball and getting
everyone involved, the Gators started taking
ill-advised shots and trying to do too much.
"We've deviated from who we are and
we've got to get back to that," Donovan said.



HONDA
Continued from Page B1


By one shot, Ogilvy missed staying in the
top 50 at the end of last year for an automatic
invitation to the Masters. He has slipped to
No. 79, but a win Sunday would take care of
that, and runner-up alone at least should get
him into the top 50 and earn a spot at Doral
next week.
The Australian summed up the day perfectly
"Even par for the day was never going to go
backward," Ogilvy said. "It was only going to
go forward, and I did that."
Eleven players were separated by four
shots going into the final round, a group that
included Charles Howell III, Keegan Bradley,
Justin Rose and Rickie Fowler, who surged
into the picture with a birdie-eagle finish for
a 69. He was the only player among the last 46
players to tee off who broke par.
None of the top 20 players going into Sat-
urday did better than 70.
"The rough is definitely, exactly like a U.S.
Open," Thompson said. "You just have to take
your medicine and make your bogey, just try
to eliminate the doubles out here and just try
to play smart golf and know that you're going
to make a couple birdies."
Missing from the mix was Tiger Woods.
Woods had hoped to post a low score to at
least get into contention and was headed that
way with a 32 on the front nine. But he didn't
make another birdie the rest of the way, and
took a double bogey on the par-3 17th when
his shot plugged into the bank short of the
green and he never found the ball. He wound
up with a 70, not a bad score under the con-
ditions, but not good enough to achieve what
he wanted. He was eight shots behind.


Woods was nine shots out of the lead a year
ago after 54 holes, closed with a 62 and was
runner-up by two shots to Rory McIlroy
Instead of the No. 1 player at the top of the
leaderboard, there is a pair of players who
have never won on the PGA Tour, two players
who realized that a victory today would get
them into the Masters. Thompson hasn't been
to Augusta National since 2008 as a U.S.
Amateur finalist.
It might help that the expectations will
hang on those behind them.
"You definitely see the names," Guthrie
said. "I would like to see them all up there, and
hopefully, right behind me. You want to com-
pete, you want to play against the best and lay
it all on the line tomorrow on the back nine.
Hopefully, they're all there and we're battling."


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


No. 3 Duke nips No. 5 Miami


Kelly scores 36 to

push Blue Devils

to 79-76 triumph

Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Duke's
Ryan Kelly scored a career-high
36 points in his return from a
foot injury that had sidelined
him since January to propel No.
3 Duke past No. 5 Miami 79-76.
Kelly was 10 of 14 from the
field including 7 of 9 from 3-
point range- for the Blue Devils
(25-4, 12-4 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence), who avenged a blowout
road loss in January by grinding
out a tough win in Cameron In-
door Stadium.
Quinn Cook added 15 points
as Duke built a 10-point lead
with about 2 minutes left then
held off a frantic rally by Miami.
Shane Larkin scored 25 points
to lead the Hurricanes (23-5, 14-
2), who missed two 3s in the final
seconds to tie it. Larkin came up
short on the first over Kelly Du-
rand Scott ran down the re-
bound and fired a pass to the left
corner to Rion Brown, whose
final 3 clanged off the rim as the
horn sounded.
No. 1 Indiana 73,
Iowa 60
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. Cody
Zeller overcame a sluggish start to
score 22 points and Kevin "Yogi"
Ferrell added a career-high 19 as
No. 1 Indiana got past Iowa 73-60.
The Hoosiers (25-4, 13-3 Big Ten)
rebounded from this week's loss to
Minnesota. But it was no typical
night for Indiana's shooters, who
were 38.9 percent from the field and
didn't hit a 3-pointer until the final
minute.
But Indiana played defense and
took care of the ball.
Iowa (18-11, 7-9) committed 14 of
its 19 turnovers in the first half and
shot just 38.2 percent from the field.
Roy Devyn Marble scored 18 of his
20 points in the second half to lead
Iowa, while Aaron White had 14.
No. 2 Gonzaga 81,
Portland 52
SPOKANE, Wash. Elias Harris
had 20 points and nine rebounds as
No. 2 Gonzaga beat Portland 81-52
to stake a claim to its first-ever No. 1
ranking in The Associated Press'
Top 25.
Kelly Olynyk added 15 points and
11 rebounds for Gonzaga (29-2, 16-


Associated Press
Duke's Ryan Kelly drives to the basket as Miami's Shane Larkin defends during the first half Saturday
in Durham, N.C. Kelly scored 36 points as No. 3 Duke won 79-76 against No. 5 Miami.


0 West Coast), which had already
clinched the West Coast Conference
regular season title and the top seed
in next weekend's tournament. Gary
Bell Jr. added 14 points.
No. 6 Kansas 91,
West Virginia 65
LAWRENCE, Kan. Ben
McLemore scored a Kansas fresh-
man-record 36 points, and Jeff
Withey came within one block of a
triple-double.
McLemore, a 6-foot-5 redshirt
freshman, went to the bench with a
little more than 5 minutes left after
hitting 12 of 15 shots from the field,
including 5 of 6 from beyond the 3-
point arc. He had seven rebounds
and four assists.
Withey's nine blocks ran his Big
12-and Kansas-career record to
281. He had 14 points and 10 re-
bounds as the Jayhawks (25-4, 13-3
Big 12).
No. 10 Louisville 58,
No. 12 Syracuse 53
SYRACUSE, N.Y. Luke Han-
cock hit a 3-pointer from the corner
to break a tie with 50 seconds left for
Louisville, which lost to Syracuse
earlier this season.
It was the third straight loss for
Syracuse (22-7, 10-6 Big East).
Louisville (24-5, 12-4) snapped a
three-game losing streak against
Syracuse, and the Cardinals did it
before a stunned crowd of 31,173.
Russ Smith led Louisville with 18


points, Hancock had 12, all on 3s,
and Gorgui Dieng finished with 11
points and 14 rebounds.
C.J. Fair had 19 points to lead the
Orange, James Southerland added
13 and Michael Carter-Williams 11.
No. 13 Kansas St. 64,
Baylor 61
WACO, Texas Rodney Mc-
Gruder hit a 3-pointer at the buzzer
and 13th-ranked Kansas State
pulled out a 64-61 victory after a
failed desperation inbound pass
gave the Wildcats one more chance.
Instead of settling for overtime
after K-State's Shane Southwell
missed badly with 1 second left, the
Bears (17-12, 8-8 Big 12) brought
seldom-used Jacob Neubert off the
bench to try a length-of-the-court in-
bound pass.
But the ball went out of bounds
without being touched, so the Wild-
cats got it under their own basket
with the second still on the clock.
After a timeout, Angel Rodriguez
inbounded to McGruder on the right
wing.
McGruder had 18 points to lead
Kansas State (24-5, 13-3), which
won its fifth straight to maintain a
share of the Big 12 lead with sixth-
ranked Kansas with two regular sea-
son games left.
No. 14 New Mexico 53,
Wyoming 42
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -Alex


Kirk had 15 points and nine re-
bounds and New Mexico clinched
the Mountain West Conference reg-
ular season title.
The Lobos (25-4, 12-2 MWC)
went 21 for 27 from the free throw
line in winning or sharing the title for
fifth time in the last six seasons.
Cameron Bairstow contributed 13
points and nine rebounds and
Kendall Williams had six assists for
the Lobos.


STILLWATER, Okla. Markel
Brown scored 18 points, Le'Bryan
Nash added 16 and Oklahoma State
corralled Texas star Myck Kabongo.
A showcase of two of the Big 12's
marquee point guards ended up
being a sloppy one, with Kabongo
committing a career-high seven
turnovers while the Cowboys' Mar-
cus Smart had five.
Oklahoma State (22-6, 12-4 Big
12) took advantage of two of
Kabongo's turnovers to score the
final eight points of the first half and
start an 18-2 run that carried beyond
halftime. By the time it was over, the
Cowboys were firmly in front at 47-
33 after Nash drove through traffic
for a right-handed slam.
The Longhorns (13-16, 5-11)
couldn't duplicate their comeback
from a 22-point deficit in the final 8
minutes of regulation in an overtime
win against Oklahoma on Wednes-
day night.


No. 19 Memphis 76,
UCF 67
ORLANDO Joe Jackson
and Chris Crawford both scored
19 points and Memphis claimed
its eighth Conference USA
championship.
Adonis Thomas added 12 points
for the Tigers (25-4, 14-0 CUSA),
who gave coach Josh Pastner his
100th career win, all at Memphis.
Keith Clanton had 29 points and
six rebounds for UCF (19-10, 8-6).
Kasey Wilson added 11 points and
Isaiah Sykes had 10 points, nine re-
bounds and five assists.
VCU 84,
No. 20 Butler 52
RICHMOND, Va. -Troy Daniels
scored 14 of his 20 points in the first
half and VCU's full-court pressure
overwhelmed Butler from the outset.
In a much anticipated rematch of
their unlikely meeting in the national
semifinals in Houston in 2011, the
Rams (23-6, 11-3 Atlantic 10) domi-
nated, forcing 14 turnovers in the
first half, one more than Butler's av-
erage for a game, and converted
them into 24 points on their way to a
45-21 lead.
Butler (22-7, 9-5) scored the first
seven points after halftime to close
within 17, but Briante Weber and
Treveon Graham both scored five
points in a 10-4 run and it was
pretty much over, allowing the
Rams to clinch one of the top four
seeds in the conference tourna-
ment later this month.


MILWAUKEE Jamil Wilson tied
his career-high with 19 points and
Chris Otule added a season-high 16
on 8-of-8 shooting as Marquette won
its 25th consecutive home game.
Wilson scored 17 points in the sec-
ond half, including seven down the
stretch, for the Golden Eagles (21-7,
12-4 Big East). His two free throws
were the final points in the game.
Jerian Grant scored 21 points and
Eric Atkins added 16 for Notre Dame
(22-7, 10-6).
No. 25 La. Tech 88,
San Jose State 61
RUSTON, La. Raheem Ap-
pleby scored 16 points and No. 25
Louisiana Tech extended the na-
tion's longest winning streak to 18
games, clinching at least a share of
its first Western Athletic Conference
championship with an 88-61 victory
over San Jose State.


Bruins bounce Bolts Bulls cut down


Tampa Bay

can't hold 2-0

lead in loss

Associated Press

BOSTON Brad Marc-
hand scored a tiebreaking
goal on the power play
with 2:16 left in the third
period, completing
Boston's comeback from a
2-0 deficit with a 3-2 vic-
tory over the Tampa Bay
Lightning that extended
the Bruins' winning streak
to six straight.
Marchand's 11th goal of
the season came late in a
double-minor high stick-
ing penalty to Brendan
Mikkelson. It was the sec-
ond power-play goal of the
game for the Bruins, who
had not scored at home
with a man advantage en-
tering the game.
Steven Stamkos and
Alexander Killorn scored
for Tampa Bay, both on
power plays in the first
period.
Flyers 2,
Senators 1
PHILADELPHIA- Jakub
Voracek and Wayne Sim-
monds scored goals and Ilya
Bryzgalov stopped 33 shots
to help Philadelphia defeat
Ottawa.
The win gave the Flyers a
.500 record for the first time
this season, at 11-11-1.
Philadelphia has won five of
its last seven games.
Marc Methot scored for the
Senators, who lost in regula-
tion for the first time since
Feb. 16.
Sabres 4,
Devils 3, SO
BUFFALO, N.Y. Jason
Pominville scored twice in reg-
ulation and added a shootout


Associated Press
The Tampa Bay Lightning's Brendan Mikkelson and the Boston Bruins' Chris Bourque
battle along the boards during the second period Saturday in Boston.


goal, and Buffalo extended its
winning streak to three games
by beating New Jersey.
Tyler Ennis also scored in
the shootout while Ryan Miller
stopped both shootout at-
tempts after making 28 saves
in regulation.
Adam Henrique, Steve
Bernier and Andrei Loktionov
scored for the Devils.
Capitals 3, Jets 0
WINNIPEG, Manitoba -
Braden Holtby stopped 35
shots and Mike Ribeiro had a
goal and an assist and Wash-
ington defeated Winnipeg.
Matt Hendricks and Todd
Brouwer, with his team-lead-
ing ninth goal of the season,
also scored for Washington.
It was Holtby's third shutout
of the season.
Winnipeg's Ondrej Pavelec
made 18 saves for the Jets,
who had a three-game win-
ning streak ended.
Penguins 7,
Canadiens 6, OT
MONTREAL Brandon
Sutter's second goal of the


game 52 seconds into over-
time lifted the Pittsburgh Pen-
guins to a wild 7-6 victory over
the Montreal Canadiens.
Sutter took a pass from
Simon Despres on a rush,
stepped around Max Pa-
cioretty, and beat goalie Carey
Price with a high shot to help
Pittsburgh end a two-game
skid and avoid being swept on
a three-game road trip.
Matt Cooke and Chris Ku-
nitz, both netted two goals,
and Sidney Crosby also
scored for Pittsburgh (14-8).
Brian Gionta had a pair of
goals, and Brandon Prust, Pa-
cioretty, David Desharnais and
P.K.
Hurricanes 6,
Panthers 2
RALEIGH, N.C. Jussi
Jokinen scored twice and
added an assist, and Riley
Nash netted his first goal as
part of a three-point night in
the Carolina Hurricanes' 6-2
win over the Florida Panthers.
Eric Staal also had two
goals for the Hurricanes, Jiri
Tlutsy scored his 10th in 11


games, and Alexander Semin
had three assists.
Carolina moved into sole
possession of first place in the
Southeast Division with its first
win over a division opponent.
The Hurricanes had been 0-5
against Southeast foes and
10-3-1 against the rest of the
Eastern Conference.
Cam Ward made 22 saves
for the Hurricanes, who won
their second straight at home.
Carolina had lost six of seven
against the Panthers.
Coyotes 5,
Ducks 4, SO
GLENDALE, Ariz. Steve
Sullivan scored the tying goal
with 6:28 remaining in regula-
tion and then netted the lone
goal in the shootout to lift the
Phoenix Coyotes past the
Anaheim Ducks 5-4.
Lauri Korpikoski scored
twice, Matthew Lombardi
added a goal, and Mike Smith
stopped 31 shots through
overtime and then all three
shootout attempts for the
Coyotes, who won for the
second time in three games.


Phily slpspast

Golden State

Associated Press

CHICAGO Joakim
Noah had 21 points and
10 rebounds, Carlos
Boozer scored 20 points
and the Chicago Bulls
beat the Brooklyn Nets
96-85 on Saturday
The Bulls went on a 19-
0 run that started in the
second quarter and
stretched into third, giv-
ing them an 18-point lead.
They opened March on a
winning note after going
5-8 in February, just their
second losing month in
2 1/2 seasons under coach
Tom Thibodeau.
Noah followed up the
third triple-double of his
career with another ter-
rific performance that
also included four blocks.
He committed five
turnovers, but even so it
sure was an impressive
follow-up to Thursday's
gem, when he had 23


points, 21 rebounds and a
career-high 11 blocks in a
win over Philadelphia.
Boozer added eight re-
bounds. Jimmy Butler
had 13 points, Nate
Robinson and Kirk Hin-
rich scored 12 apiece,
and the Bulls won their
second straight after
dropping seven of 10.
76ers 104,
Warriors 97
PHILADELPHIA- Evan
Turner had 22 points, 10 re-
bounds and nine assists,
Jrue Holiday scored 27, and
the Philadelphia 76ers
snapped a seven-game los-
ing streak with a 104-97 vic-
tory over the Golden State
Warriors.
Thad Young had 14 points
and 16 rebounds and Royal
Ivey chipped in with 17
points for the Sixers, who
are5 1/2 games behind Mil-
waukee for the final playoff
spot in the Eastern Confer-
ence with 25 games left.
Stephen Curry scored 30
and Klay Thompson added
29 for the Warriors, who've
lost four in a row.


Associated Press
Chicago Bulls center and former University of Florida
standout Joakim Noah, right, celebrates with forward
Carlos Boozer after Brooklyn Nets forward Kris
Humphries fouled during the first half Saturday.


No. 15 Oklahoma St. 78, No. 22 Marquette 72,
Texas 65 No. 21 Notre Dame 64


Nets 96-85


SPORTS


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Spotlight on
PEOPLE


Associated Press
Attorney for Lindsay Lohan,
Mark Heller arrives at court
Friday in Los Angeles. A judge
refused Friday to delay Lindsay
Lohan's trial on reckless driving
and other charges and
admonished her attorney,
saying he needs help on the
case.

Judge won't delay
Lohan case
LOS ANGELES -A judge
refused Friday to delay Lind-
say Lohan's trial on reckless
driving and other charges and
admonished her attorney, say-
ing the lawyer needs help on
the case.
Superior Court Judge
James R. Dabney advised
New York lawyer Mark Heller
his pleadings weren't appro-
priate under California law.
Heller was told to get assis-
tance from another attorney
or Lohan would be required
to attend hearings to gauge
his ability to represent her
Dabney also said there was
no good reason to delay the
March 18 trial, noting he was
skeptical more time would
allow Lohan to demonstrate
she had changed after years
of run-ins with the law.

Susan Boyle to make
screen acting debut
LONDON Susan Boyle is
making her big-screen acting
debut in a Christmas-themed
British period drama.

tish singer ap-
pears in "The
U Christmas
Candle," a
story of angels
and wishes set
in an English
village in the
Susan 1890s.
Boyle The movie
also stars
British actors Lesley
Manville, John Hannah and
Susan Barks, who recently
played Eponine in "Les
Miserables."

George Lopez to host
Playboy Jazz Festival
LOS ANGELES George
Lopez is taking over as master
of ceremonies of the annual
Playboy Jazz Festival.
The comedian was an-
nounced as the
festival's new
host Thursday
at an event at
the Playboy
Mansion.
Bill Cosby
previously
served as the
George festival's host
Lopez for more than
30 years. Cosby
was a fixture at the gathering
of jazz luminaries since the
first festival was held in 1979.
Lopez said Cosby called him
to give him advice on the gig.
His tips included not letting
musicians in his dressing room
"because they'll eat all your
food and drink all your drink,"
Lopez said jokingly
The festival is June 15 and 16
at the Hollywood Bowl.


Birthday In coming months, be careful not to forfeit
what you have in hand to pursue a hopeful "maybe."
Your best opportunities for gains, both financial and so-
cial, lie in finishing what you start.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) -Your image could be
fragile, so it wouldn't be surprising to find adversaries
looking for chinks in your armor. Be extra careful when
around those who might be envious.
Aries (March 21-April 19) -All a bad attitude will do is
cause you to be self-defeating and greatly lessen your
chances for success in any form. Don't look for goblins
behind every door.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) It might prove wise to look
gift horses in the mouth. Something tantalizing but
worthless is likely to be on offer all it's meant to do is
lure you into giving up your hard-earned money.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) To appease another, you


Biblical


Associated Press
Roma Downey portrays Mary, the mother of Jesus, in a scene from "The Bible," premiering today
at 8 p.m. on History.


Husband and wife behind 'The Bible'miniseries


Associated Press

NEW YORK Mark Bur-
nett was taken aback by the
scale of what his wife, actress
Roma Downey, had in mind
when she suggested over tea
one morning four years ago
they make a television minis-
eries based on the Bible.
"Momentarily, I think he
thought I'd lost my mind,"
Downey recalled. "He went
out on his bicycle and he
prayed on it and he came
back and said, 'You know
what, I think it's a good idea. I
think we should do it to-
gether' We shook hands and
haven't looked back."
The series debuts at 8 p.m.
today on History, the first of
five two-hour chunks that will
air each weekend. The finale
airs Easter Sunday
Different stories in the
Bible have been Hollywood
fodder for years. Burnett, the
prolific producer behind
"Survivor" and "The Voice,"
said no one had tried to tie it
all together and use modern
computer graphics to bring
images like Moses parting the
Red Sea to life on screen.
Instead of being all-
encompassing, they tried to
concentrate on stories in
depth and on characters who
would emotionally engage the
audience. The first episode il-
lustrates the wisdom of that
approach: it flounders at the
start with a discussion about
the world's creation but be-
comes more gripping when
the emphasis turns to the
lives of Abraham and Moses.
Burnett said he believes
there's a growing "Biblical il-
literacy" among young
people.
"It's like saying you never
heard of Macbeth or King
Lear," he said. "In school, you
have to know a certain
amount of Shakespeare, but
no Bible. So there's got to be a
way to look at it from a pure
literature point of view. If it
wasn't for the Bible, arguably
Shakespeare wouldn't have
written those stories."
Downey, the former star of
"Touched By an Angel," said
she wanted to be part of some-
thing that would glorify God.
After pitching their idea to
several networks, Burnett and
Downey found a fit with
Nancy Dubuc, History's pres-
ident and general manager.
She likes the challenge of


Diogo Morcaldo as Jesus, center, being baptized by Daniel
Percival, as John, in a scene from "The Bible."


ideas that seem unwieldy
History made the 2010 minis-
eries "America the Story of
Us," which was a big hit, and
2012's "Mankind the Story of
All of Us," which wasn't Last
spring's miniseries on the
Hatfields and McCoys was an
eye-opening success.
Burnett and Downey have
been building anticipation for
"The Bible" by previewing it
at churches and for religious
leaders. Rick Warren, Joel Os-
teen and Cardinal Donald
Wuerl, archbishop of Wash-
ington, have all endorsed the
work.
"The faith community is
going to sample it, unques-
tionably," Dubuc said.
"Whether they stay or go re-
mains with the TV gods. Our
job has been to present this as
an epic tale of adventure."
History's own campaign is
not targeting a religious audi-
ence, emphasizing some of
the dramatic scenes to sug-
gest audiences won't be
preached to. The screening
Downey and Burnett have
sweated the most was when
their teenage children
showed it to some friends.
"We knew that we could
make it heartfelt," Downey
said. "We knew we could
make it faithful. But we
wanted to be sure that we
could make it cool."
Downey spent nearly half of
2012 in Morocco supervising
filming, beginning in the cold
of February and ending in the
blistering heat of July
"We wanted it to be gritty
and authentic," she said. "We
didn't want it to look like
somebody had just stepped
out of the dry cleaners."


Today's HOROSCOPE
might agree to do something that would serve that per-
son's best interest, not yours. Once you say yes, you
will be held to your word.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) Have some common
sense when it comes to health issues. Don't eat or drink
too much of anything your system doesn't handle well.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Unless you keep unruly
whims in check, you're apt to do something silly you
would greatly regret. Trade on your strengths, not on
your weaknesses.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Unfortunately, when seek-
ing advice, you are likely to go to persons who will tell
you what you want to hear instead of the truth. It's use-
less to select those who won't level with you.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Don't use flattery on some-
one who truly doesn't deserve it. Insincerity would
lessen the worth of your words to others.


Her husband flew back and
forth to the United States,
where he worked on his other
programs. Downey said she
initially had no intention of
appearing onscreen, but
stepped in when they had
trouble casting an actress for
an older Mary, mother of
Jesus.
Except for Downey, few of
the actors involved are well
known in the United States.
Portuguese TV star Diogo
Morgado portrays Jesus
Christ, and many of the other
lead actors are based in
Britain.
The television airing of
"The Bible" on History is only
the beginning for this project.
Lifetime will air a repeat
each week after a new
episode appears on History It
will air internationally, and a
DVD package will go on sale
this spring. The series' scripts
are bound together into a
book. Producers will make a
theatrical release movie of a
portion of the story, and are
looking at showing it in stadi-
ums this fall.
"More people will watch
this than any of our other se-
ries combined over the next
three decades," Burnett said.
Even better, their marriage
survived the grueling process
intact even stronger,
Downey said.
"Nobody has taken on the
broad vision from Genesis to
Revelation, and I think we
probably realized at midpoint
why no one had done it be-
fore," she said. "It was mad-
deningly complicated and
extraordinarily hard work.
We approached it humbly, but
we were exhilarated by it."


Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -You had better put your
blinders on if you find yourself browsing in stores that
carry merchandise you can't afford. Your sales resist-
ance is likely to be extremely low.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -Allowing self-doubts
to dominate your thinking could severely impede your
progress. Either have more confidence in yourself or
bluff your way through things.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -Any problems you ex-
perience are likely to be of your own making. If you find
yourself getting caught in a tight squeeze, it will proba-
bly be due to a sin of omission.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -When doing business
with someone new, be on guard even if the other party
has been recommended by a friend. It's smart to take
some time to judge this person's character before jump-
ing in with both feet.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

FRIDAY, MARCH 1
Mega Money: 17 22 25 33
Mega Ball: 9
4-of-4 MB No winner
4-of-4 5 $1,498.50
3-of-4 MB 48 $342
3-of-4 1,024 $47.50
2-of-4 MB 1,444 $23.50
1-of-4 MB 12,711 $2.50
2-of-4 26,629 $2
Fantasy 5:13 16 23 25 27
5-of-5 2 winners $125,237.21
4-of-5 367 $110
3-of-5 10,846 $10
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28
Fantasy 5:5 6 17 24 30
5-of-5 5 winners $44,311.02
4-of-5 300 $119
3-of-5 9,759 $10

INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY


Today is Sunday, March 3, the
62nd day of 2013. There are 303
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 3, 1931, "The Star-
Spangled Banner" became the na-
tional anthem of the United States
as President Herbert Hoover
signed a congressional resolution.
On this date:
In 1845, Florida became the
27th state.
In 1849, the U.S. Department of
the Interior was established.
In 1863, President Abraham Lin-
coln signed a measure creating
the National Academy of Sciences.
In 1913, more than 5,000 suf-
fragists marched down Pennsyl-
vania Avenue in Washington,
D.C., a day before the presidential
inauguration of Woodrow Wilson.
In 1923, Time magazine,
founded by Briton Hadden and
Henry R. Luce, made its debut.
In 1945, the Allies fully secured
the Philippine capital of Manila
from Japanese forces during
World War II.
In 1969, Apollo 9 blasted off
from Cape Kennedy on a mission
to test the lunar module.
In 1991, motorist Rodney King
was severely beaten by Los Ange-
les police officers in a scene cap-
tured on amateur video.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush offered a rough
blueprint for adding drug benefits
to Medicare.
Five years ago: A gunman
opened fire inside a Wendy's
restaurant in West Palm Beach,
Fla., killing a paramedic who'd
gone back to fetch a missing meal
toy for his child; the gunman
wounded five others before turn-
ing the gun on himself.
One year ago: Conservative
talk show host Rush Limbaugh
apologized on his website to
Georgetown University law stu-
dent Sandra Fluke, whom he had
branded a "slut" and "prostitute"
after she testified to congressional
Democrats she wanted her col-
lege health plan to cover her birth
control.
Today's Birthdays: Socialite
Lee Radziwill is 80. Movie pro-
ducer-director George Miller is 68.
Actress Hattie Winston is 68.
Singer Jennifer Warnes is 66.
Actor-director Tim Kazurinsky is
63. Singer-musician Robyn Hitch-
cock is 60. Actor Robert Gossett is
59. Actress Miranda Richardson is
55. Actress Mary Page Keller is
52. Olympic track and field gold
medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee is
51. College Football Hall of Famer
Herschel Walker is 51. Contempo-
rary Christian musician Duncan
Phillips (Newsboys) is 49. Rock
musician John Bigham is 44. Ac-
tress Julie Bowen is 43. Country
singer Brett Warren (The Warren
Brothers) is 42. Gospel singer
Jason Crabb is 36. Singer Ronan


Keating (Boyzone) is 36. Actress
Jessica Biel is 31.
Thought for Today: "Happi-
ness always looks small while you
hold it in your hands, but let it go,
and you learn at once how big and
precious it is." Maxim Gorky,
Russian writer (1868-1936).












COMMENTARY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


Associated Press
Occupational Therapist Brandy Meredith, left, holds up Shelley the tortoise for Mary Hall, center, and Dolores Messer recently at
Chautauqua Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in DeFuniak Springs. A federal Office of Inspector General's report states Medicare
dollars are being paid out to nursing facilities that fail to meet basic quality of care standards. Chautauqua Rehabilitation and Nursing
Center is rated a five-star facility at medicare.gov.




Costly, unhealthy care


Medicarepaid

$5.1B on poor

nursing homes

GARANCE BURKE
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -
Medicare paid billions in tax-
payer dollars to nursing homes
nationwide that were not
meeting basic requirements to
look after their residents, gov-
ernment investigators have
found.
The report, released Thurs-
day by the Department of
Health and Human Services'
inspector general, said
Medicare paid about $5.1 bil-
lion for patients to stay in
skilled nursing facilities that
failed to meet federal quality
of care rules in 2009, in some
cases resulting in dangerous
and neglectful conditions.
One out of every three times
patients wound up in nursing
homes that year landed in fa-
cilities failing to follow basic
care standards laid out by the
federal agency that adminis-
ters Medicare, investigators
estimated.
The elderly and other pa-
tients who need daily help
from a nurse or therapist typi-
cally are sent to skilled nursing
facilities, which can get reim-
bursed by the government for
much of the care they provide.
By law, they need to write up
care plans specially tailored
for each resident, so doctors,
nurses, therapists and all other
caregivers are on the same


ON THE WEB
* The OIG report: http://l.usa.gov/VaztQm
* The Medicare nursing home database: http://l.usa.gov/
MSkcLt


page about how to help resi-
dents reach the highest possi-
ble levels of physical, mental
and psychological well-being.
Poor records
Not only are residents often
going without the crucial help
they need, but the government
could be spending taxpayer
money on facilities that could
endanger people's health, the
report concluded. The findings
come as concerns about health
care quality and cost are gar-
nering heightened attention as
the Obama administration im-
plements the nation's sweep-
ing health care overhaul.
"These findings raise con-
cerns about what Medicare is
paying for," the report said.
The review also drew sharp
criticism Thursday from the
head of the Senate Special
Committee on Aging.
"Spending taxpayers' money
on facilities that provide poor
care is unacceptable," said the
committee's chairman, Sen.
Bill Nelson, D-Fla. "The gov-
ernment must do a better job
of ensuring Medicare benefici-
aries receive the highest qual-
ity of care."
Failing plans
Investigators estimate in one
out of five stays, patients'
health problems weren't ad-
dressed in the care plans,
falling far short of government
directives. For example, one
home made no plans to moni-


tor a patient's use of two anti-
psychotic drugs and one de-
pression medication, even
though the drugs could have
serious side effects.
In other cases, residents got
therapy they didn't need,
which the report said was in
the nursing homes' financial
interest because they would be
reimbursed at a higher rate by
Medicare.
In one example, a patient
kept getting physical and occu-
pational therapy even though
the care plan said all the
health goals had been met, the
report said.
Study statistics
The Office of Inspector Gen-
eral's report was based on
medical records from 190 pa-
tient visits to nursing homes in
42 states that lasted at least
three weeks, which investiga-
tors said gave them a statisti-
cally valid sample of Medicare
beneficiaries' experiences in
skilled nursing facilities.
That sample represents
about 1.1 million patient visits
to nursing homes nationwide
in 2009, the most recent year
for which data was available,
according to the review.
Recommendations
Overall, the review raises
questions about whether the
system is allowing homes to get
paid for poor quality services
that may be harming residents,
investigators said, and recom-


mended the Centers for
Medicare & Medicaid Services
tie payments to homes' abili-
ties to meet basic care re-
quirements. The report also
recommended the agency
strengthen its regulations and
ramp up its oversight The re-
view did not name individual
homes, nor did it estimate the
number of patients who had
been mistreated, but instead
looked at the overall number
of stays in which problems
arose.
In response, the agency
agreed it should consider tying
Medicare reimbursements to
homes' provision of good care.
CMS also said in written com-
ments it is reviewing its own
regulations to improve en-
forcement at the homes.
"Medicare has made signifi-
cant changes to the way we pay
providers thanks to the health
care law, to reward better
quality care," Medicare
spokesman Brian Cook said in
a statement to AP "We are tak-
ing steps to make sure these fa-
cilities have the resources to
improve the quality of their
care, and make sure Medicare
is paying for the quality of care
that beneficiaries are entitled
to."
CMS hires state-level agen-
cies to survey the homes and
make sure they are complying
with federal law, and can re-
quire correction plans, deny
payment or end a contract with
a home if major deficiencies
come to light. The agency also
said it would follow up on po-
tential enforcement at the
homes featured in the report.

See Page C3


US debt crisis threatens nation, individuals


PAUL HIBBARD
Special to the Chronicle

When is the big crash
going to happen?
Everyone knows cuts
are necessary. Arguments
seem to be cut what and
how much? Does Congress
actually have the nerve to
balance a budget? The his-
torical mindset of the past
60 years suggests no.
Let us assume Congress
finally balances the budget
and starts paying down the
deficit by $100 billion
every year. Federal debt
would then be paid in
2178; 165 years from now.
The Democrats' solution
is:
1. Raise taxes on the
most affluent.
2. Cut spending years
down the road (they are
not saying what they will
cut).


DEBT CRISIS BY THE NUMBERS
* 1957 Last time Congress had a balanced budget.
* $5.7 trillion dollars estimated U.S. Revenue for 2013.
* $227.1 billion estimated interest cost on federal debt in 2011.
* $448 billion estimated interest cost on federal debt in 2013.
* $1 trillion deficit spending, estimated, on average for 2010, 2011, 2012.
* $16.58 trillion present federal debt.
* $16.58 trillion estimated GNP 2013 (plus or minus).
* 47 percent all current households paying no taxes.
* 14.3 percent 44.2 million citizens on food stamps cost is $78 billion yearly.
0 311,591,917 U.S. census 2011 population count.


The Republican posi-
tion is:
1. Don't raise taxes.
2. Cut a little bit of
spending now.
While Republicans de-
layed minimal cuts and al-
lowed minimal tax hikes
- in an apparent effort to


compromise Democrats
and President Obama ap-
pear to be allowing cuts to
happen. President Obama,
meanwhile, is telling the
American public the Re-
publican Congress can
stop these hurtful cuts any
time. Sen. Bill Nelson last


Sunday said they have cut
trillions from budget. He
did not, however, say
specifically what was cut
or the date the cuts would
take effect.
Reality is the U.S. gov-
ernment continues to
spend money they do not


have. An analogy would
be:
You are married for 60
years. You love your wife
so you give her a credit
card as a wedding gift. You
make $57,000 a year. You
wife enjoys travel, fine
wine, dining out, a good
car, loves her children and
so on. Everything your
household spends is put
on this card. Each year, the
total bill is $60,000. There
is no problem in the begin-
ning, but now you need a
new car, kids are college
age and your debt now is,
with interest, $230,000.
You need a car so you
can go to work, children
need an education so they
can get a good job, house
needs repairs, etc. Your
debt surges larger. What
do you do? Ask for a raise?

See Page 03


Gerry Mulligan
OUT THE
WINDOW


Caring


for the


young


and old
Traveling on the
journey through
life includes some
stops along the way that
yank at your ability to
cope.
During the past few
months, all four of our
parents have been stay-
ing in Citrus County. My
wife's parents are per-
manent residents and
mine are snowbirds. At
the same time, we have
seven grandchildren of
our own with the eighth
one due later this
month.
During the same week
last month, we found
ourselves babysitting
our son's three kids dur-
ing a weekend and then
searching for lost par-
ents and their parapher-
nalia on Citrus Avenue
in Crystal River on
Valentine's Day
We understand why
they call ours the "sand-
wich generation."
After spending the
weekend in charge of
the three kids, all under
the age of 7, I gained
new appreciation for
grandparents who raise
their grandchildren.
After three days, we
were exhausted from a
lack of sleep and over-
come by poor personal
hygiene. (Who has time
to shower?)
We watched the
grandkids at our son's
home in St. Augustine
and had great fun. But
by Saturday evening, the
7-year-old had devel-
oped a temperature and
we were forced to re-
member proper health
care protocols. Izzy told
me when she had a tem-
perature her Dad would
give her Tylenol, and
then rub her back until
she fell asleep. So that's
what I did.
As I lay there, the
other two darlings real-
ized they were missing
something, so they all
climbed into bed. I
scratched backs for six
hours and earned a total
of 15 minutes of sleep. I
don't think there is any
age where 15 minutes of
sleep is enough, but at
my point in life it can be
near fatal.
When the sun came
up, I made the obliga-
tory drive to Dunkin
Donuts for some coffee
to jolt me back to the
real world. And yes, I
went in the clothes I
slept in and I had not
looked in the mirror.
"Give me a large cup
of coffee and six choco-
late donuts with sprin-
kles," I told the Dunkin
Donut's clerk.
"Sir," the nice high
school-aged clerk said,
"Do you know you have
your sweater on inside
out?"
"Coffee," I replied.
"And you are wearing
it backwards," she told
me.
"Donuts," I replied.
The clerk looked at
me very closely and
said, "You have some-
thing chocolate smeared
on your cheek."
"Yesterday's donuts,"
I said.
She kindly leaned over
and wiped yesterday's


PageC3







Page C2 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013



PINION


"No man is so tall that he need never stretch
and none so small that he need never stoop."
Danish proverb


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE
EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .............. ...........publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
00N Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ..........................guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista ............... ..........copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


TOUGH SLEDDING AHEAD




Budget woes



requires hard



fiscal choices


W ith the county facing what t
a budget shortfall of their n
$14 million, the or it
county commission is staring county
in the face of the stark real- Accor
ity it must either dramati- only $
cally cut services or lion of
increase revenue to pay for county
them.
There is no
other choice. For THE ISSUE:
the past several Citrus County
years, the county government face
has balanced its revenue shortfall
budget by cutting
costs such as staff OUR OPINION
reductions and
using money Time to face
from its reserves. budget realities
But the reserve and come up wit
fund is running bold solutions.
dry, and further
staff reductions mean major reveni
service cuts. stitue
County Administrator In ti
Brad Thorpe has developed sion h;
a plan for systematically ex- to whi
amining where the county vocal
spends its money and letting large
the commission decide what sion m
to keep and what to elimi- chang,
nate. However, the process In s
so far has not been particu- next y
larly effective in bringing facing
the commission to agree- have a
ment, partly because it has reside
been muddied by posturing sioner
and political quarreling. service
We are no fan of the petty ing th.
political posturing by Com- reveni
missioner Scott Adams, but not in
at the same time, we believe comm
the commission should at balan
least examine the possible they s
budget cuts he has proposed. and p(
While they may or may not econo
make sense to implement vestin
and may or may not save grams
substantial amounts of growth
money, in the current eco- This
nomic situation, all ideas cult si
need to be on the table and ing i
discussed openly, regardless require
of who brings them or how openn
they got there. coope
At the same time, the com- the co
mission cannot delude itself distra
into thinking a few simple acteri.
nips and tucks such as elimi- meetii
nating take-home cars or with si
freezing spending on semi- officer
nars and classes will make a soluti(
dent in the revenue shortfall. real ec
The hard fact is, much of ingthe


Save money on stamps We mu
phone
Why is it charities feel the My pho
need to mail donation
requests once a month?
The cost of printing, OUND
stuffing the envelopes
and postage comes out FF
of our donation money.
It's time to call or write
these charities that two f
requests a year is
enough.
Eye test specs CAL
If you renew your 563-0579
Florida driver's license
and wear corrective
lenses, bring a copy of your lat- move t(
est eye doctor's report. Do they they do
clean and calibrate those optical cause v
machines at the driver's license you like
office? Are the people giving the is, then
eye tests opticians or optomet- like the
ric doctors? Just wondering. North.
Bogus phone charges it is uhe
there ar
The other day there was an ar- County.
ticle on bogus phone charges. now.


he county spends is ei-
randated by the state,
goes to services the
/ is required to fund.
ding to county officials,
20 million to $22 mil-
f the $231 million total
y budget is discre-
tionary spending.
This leaves
very little wiggle
room and some
es tough choices for
I. commissioners,
because every
N: program up for
possible elimina-
tion has a con-
s stitu en cy
th advocating for
keeping it and
every proposed
ue increase has a con-
ncy arguing against it.
he past, the commis-
as too often responded
chever group was most
or who brought the
t crowd to a commis-
.eeting. But times have
ed.
getting the budget for
ear, the commission is
decisions that will
real impact on county
rnts. Even if commis-
's choose significant
e reductions, balanc-
e budget without new
ue will be difficult, if
possible. And while
issioners struggle to
ce the county budget,
till must look forward
position the county for
mic recovery by in-
g in projects or pro-
to drive future
h.
is a delicate and diffi-
ituation, and navigat-
t successfully will
re creative thinking,
ess to new ideas and
ration. We encourage
mission to avoid the
actions that have char-
zed their last two
ngs and work together
taff and constitutional
rs to come up with bold
ons to address the very
economic problems fac-
e county.


st have plenty of bogus
charges in Citrus County.
ne bill's residence line is
$19.50 and I pay
$26.15. Can you imag-
ine $6.65 in extra
charges?
We like it the
way it is
A friendly note
(about) Iris Farrell's let-
ter in today's Chronicle,
Feb. 22, "Make Citrus
more like up North."
Iris, dear, first thing you
need to do when you
o Florida is forget how
o things up North, be-
we really don't care. If
Citrus County the way it
don't try to change it
way they may do it up
And if you like it the way
North, then just stay
nd don't move to Citrus
You have a good day


Behind the
WASHINGTON
Progressives are remark-
ably uninterested in
progress. Social Security
is 78 years old and myriad so-
cial improvements have added
17 years to life expectancy since
1935, yet progressives insist the
program remain frozen, like a
fly in amber.
Medicare is 48 years -3
old and the compe-
tence and role of
medicine have been
transformed since
1965, yet progres- '
sives cling to
Medicare "as we
know it." And they
say the Voting GeorgE
Rights Act, another OTH
48-year-old, must re-
main unchanged, VOI(
despite dramatic
improvements in race relations.
The question concerning
which the Supreme Court
heard oral arguments last
Wednesday was whether
Section 5 of the VRA is still con-
stitutional, given the disap-
pearance of the conditions that
once made it acceptable as a
temporary and emergency
truncation of states' sovereignty
under federalism. In 2008, two
years after the fourth renewal
of the act, Barack Obama won a
higher percentage of the white
vote than did Al Gore and John
Kerry in 2000 and 2004, respec-
tively Today Mississippi has
more black elected officials -
not more per capital, more -
than any other state. Yet de-
fenders of the continuing ne-
cessity of Section 5 merely
shrug about the fact that race is
no longer a barrier to either the
nation's highest office or to
state and local offices in what
once was the state most em-
blematic of resistance to racial
equality
Last Wednesday, Chief Jus-
tice John Roberts, noting Mas-
sachusetts has the worst rate of


minor changes in voting proce-
dures. It has been extended
four times, most recently in
2006 for 25 years. The 2006


----
George Will's email address
is georgewill@washpost. com.


LETTERS to the Editor


Nugent's ideals
too far right
This is in response to a letter
by David Matthews regarding
my comments about U.S. Rep.
Rich Nugent. If he were to go
to the Wikipedia website, he
would find that in Nugent's bio
he's a member of the tea party
caucus.
Additionally, he did sign
Grover Norquist's contract
when first elected (Nov 28,
Ocala Star-Banner). His deci-
sion not to re-sign this time may
have something to do with the
voter results and public outcry
I knew Rep. Nugent when he
was sheriff (Hernando County).
I worked with him when I was
Crystal River police chief and
when I was employed by the
Department of Juvenile Jus-
tice. I have no problem with
his character, only his politics.
I have been a lifelong Republi-
can and was one of a very
small group when I moved to
Citrus County in 1988. The
Republican Party has moved
away from my beliefs. I believe
that regardless of who is presi-
dent or what party controls
Congress, the well-being of the
United States and the Ameri-
can people comes before any
other ideology The blanket
concept of no new taxes is not


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
Groups or individuals are
invited to express their opinions
in a letter to the editor.
Persons wishing to address the
editorial board, which meets
weekly, should call Charlie
Brennan at 352-563-5660.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

in the best interests of this
country Many economists be-
lieve that during an economic
decline is exactly when gov-
ernment needs to spend more
to bolster the economy


His stand regarding Sandy is
admirable, if it did not affect
Americans in need. It is only a
matter of time before Florida
will be in a similar situation.
I would be very supportive if
now, when there is no current
disaster, to see a bill from ei-
ther Nugent or Rubio that
would make it mandatory that
no unnecessary earmarks
could be attached to any aid
bill. The time to make correc-
tions is before there is a criti-
cal need not when people
are suffering.
As to your comment about
him not taking money from
fringe groups because he does
not need it, I would question
your source. Politicians don't
refuse money unless there are
problems attached.
Roger B. Krieger
Beverly Hills

Read my bio
So I'm not included in the
buffoons that Mrs. Bays was
suggesting the board was,
please read my bio on the
BOCC website: wwwbocc.
citrus.fl.us/commissioners/
adams_scott.htm; don't include
me with the buffoons.
Scott Adams
Inverness


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I


times on voting fights
white turnout compared to House vote was 390-33, the Sen-
blacks, and Mississippi has the ate vote was 98-0; obviously, the
best, asked Solicitor General political class's piety about the
Donald Verrilli: "Is it the gov- act has extinguished thought
ernment's submission that the about its necessity. But one rea-
citizens of the South are more son forjudicial review-for ac-
racist than the citizens of the tive judicial engagement in the
North?" Verrilli said no. His an- protection of constitutional
swer was obviously false. Oth- rights and arrangements is
erwise, the the political class, with its ma-
administration joritarian temptations, cannot
would favor extend- be trusted to do so.
ing Section 5 to the In 1982, Section 2 of the VRA
entire nation. was amended to say the act is
Justice Anthony violated whenever nomination
Kennedy asked Ver- and election processes "are not
rilli why the govern- equally open to participation"
ment, which by minority voters. And equality
purports to believe of participation is said to be de-
Will the VRA remains nied whenever minority voters
ER necessary and there "have less opportunity than
are not regional dif- other members of the elec-
iES ferences in racism, torate to ... elect representa-
does not want to tives of their choice."And
make the VRA universally ap- representatives "of their
plicable. Verrilli replied "his- choice" has been construed to
tory remains relevant" and mean representatives who are
Congress considered it "prudent" members of the same minority
in 2006 to maintain Section 5's This expresses two tenets of
"deterrent and constraining ef- progressivism's racialism. One
fect" It was prudent, and history is identity politics: Your race is
is relevant, only if the citizens of your political identity The
the South remain more racist other is categorical representa-
than the citizens of the North. tion: Members of a race can be
Verrilli did not deny Section 5 understood and represented
takes a toll on federalism, only by members of this race.
Kennedy, whose vote is apt to be By this reasoning the VRA
decisive, described the toll dis- has become an instrument for
approvingly as a federal "trustee- what Roberts has hitherto
ship" over the covered states and called "a sordid business, this
jurisdictions. Citing the Marshall divvying us up by race."
Plan and other excellent laws not Each renewal of the 1965 act
necessary forever, Kennedy said: should have involved sifting the
"Times change." most recent voting results, but
Not for progressives, they the most recent data used in
don't. Section 5 was enacted as 2006 was from 1972. By 2031,
a temporary response to many this data will be 59 years old.
measures employed, primarily Unless the court stops this per-
in the South, to disenfranchise nicious silliness, in 2031 Sec-
minorities. It requires nine tion 5 will no doubt be renewed
states and some jurisdictions in a fifth time, perhaps for 34
others to get federal permission years, through the centennial of
- "pre-clearance" for even this temporary measure.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Panama Canal: Seizing an opportunity


here is ab-
solutely no way
to give a com-
plete commentary on
the Panama Canal in
such short column
space besides, I'm
sure if I tried, I would
bore most of you
readers out of your
minds. Fred B
So, very briefly,here A SI
are the nuts and bolts:
The canal cuts 48 OF I
miles across the isth-
mus of Panama in territory which
was first Colombian, then French,
then American, and since 1999,
has been Panamanian.
The French first attempted to
create the canal in 1881, but
after setbacks including massive
deaths because of disease, they
abandoned the effort 12 years
later in 1893. After some 10 years
of negotiation, in 1903 the Amer-
icans assumed the project,
which they completed in 1914.


3r
L
L


It is a marvel of en-
gineering expertise
which uses locks and
lakes to accomplish a
water pathway which,
above all else, works.
The locks are devices
which raise and lower
the water level in cer-
tain areas, thereby
rannen moving ships up and
-ICE over higher places;
and the lakes used
are deep enough to
handle ships and
allow some respite for the man-
made efforts.
Our passage through the canal
on the Queen Elizabeth took
nine hours and was a grand ad-
venture. The Panama Canal is
indeed a diamond among the en-
gineering jewels of our modem
world.
Speaking of diamonds, on the
day we crossed the canal, the
designated evening dress code
was formal. As dinner time ap-


proached, I'd already put on my
fancy duds, but Cheryl was just
beginning the process of getting
ready when I asked, "Is there
anything I can get you?"
My sweetheart replied, "I
know I could call room service,
but since I'm not dressed, it
might be embarrassing. Would
you please go up to the lido deck
and get me a cup of coffee?"
Not a problem. The lido deck
offered food 24 hours a day and
finding a cup of coffee would be
a breeze. Or, at least that's what
I thought. Once there, I couldn't
locate the beverage service area,
so I stopped a young couple and
asked if they might know where
I could get a cup of coffee. The
young man invited me to follow
them to the appropriate place
and he even asked the server to
prepare a cup of coffee to my
Cheryl's specifications.
With a capped cup in hand, I
thanked him and said, "Trust
me. Right now, I'll score more


points with this cup of coffee
than I would with a pair of dia-
mond earrings."
He glanced at his lady who
confirmed, "He's right. Getting
us what we need when we need
it is the very best way to our
hearts! Diamonds are a girl's
best friend, but sometimes a cup
of coffee can mean more."
I teased about recognizing an
opportunity and seizing it.
On my way back to our state-
room, I revisited the events of
the day and felt a great sense of
pride in my countrymen of yes-
teryear for accomplishing what
seemed to be an impossible task
- they most certainly saw an op-
portunity and seized it.
Once back in our quarters, I
snickered in thinking on how at
that particular moment, a hand-
delivered cup of coffee not only
meant more to Cheryl than dia-
monds, it was a personal coup
for me which ranked right up
there with the building of the


Special to the Chronicle
Cheryl and Fred dressed to the
nines for a night of gaiety aboard
ship January 2013.
Panama Canal!


Fred Brannen is an Inverness
resident and a Chronicle
columnist.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Some good
over the horizon
Progress/Duke Energy's
nuclear power plant was a
veritable Sword of Damocles
that was hanging over the
head of every property
owner in Citrus County. One
radiated burp out of that
plant would have sent prop-
erty values plummeting. The
abyss could have lasted for
years, even decades, which
means the loss of the plant
certainly will do some good
for our local economy, and
here is why
In 1997, my wife and I
were temporarily housed in
a New Port Richey condo-
minium, from which we trav-
eled to a dozen or so
counties, looking for a place
to permanently settle.
After making our choice,
we often heard this from
family, friends, or total
strangers: "You know, they
have a nuclear power plant
in Citrus County!"
With concern in their
voices, or sometimes with a
smirk, lots of them said that.
In 2006, Florida's Chief Fi-
nancial Officer, Tom Gal-
lagher, seeking his party's
nomination for governor, ad-
dressed a group of Republi-
cans in Citrus Hills.
Someone asked him, "How
do you feel about nuclear
power plants?" Gallagher's
eyebrows went up as he
firmly stated, "I know I
wouldn't live near one!"
At that, poor Tom lost his
audience, but unintention-
ally had made an interesting
point: Even highly posi-



WINDOW
Continued from Pag

donuts from my check. Then
handed me a bag with to(
donuts. And coffee.
***
Later that same week, I go
phone call from my own mo
She told me her purse was i
ing. We were on the way h
from a nice Valentine's Day
ner at Skyview Restaurant v
she called.
The story ended up being m
more complicated.
My parents had their
Valentine's dinner at Fat Cat's
then walked to Burke's Irish
to listen to some music. Aft
while, they decided to call
night. My father went to use
restroom before heading ho
My mother went outside and
into the car to wait. The only p
lem was she sat in the wrong
And she waited.
My father came out and got
his car (a rental they are no



DEBT
Continued from Page Cl

(increase taxes) Work a
second job? (create new
taxes) Go bankrupt and
start over? Severely re-
duce your lifestyle? Die
and leave debt to children?
Congress (Democrats and
Republicans) have been
doing this and continue to
do the same instead of deal-
ing with the problem.
I wondered if I was the
only one getting this, so I
surveyed 17 friends (re-
tired, educated, upper- (
middle income class):
Who is responsible for
budget? A. President B. I


tioned people who should Duke Energy that th,
know better are afraid of not all about taxation
nuke plants, and there are they can embrace au
lots of them. I'm betting that Citru
So, now, with the nuclear will get that new plain
plant kaput, there are fresh
legions outside this county, James
outside this state, even out-
side this country, who
heretofore would not con- Becoming m(
sider Citrus County a safe bankrupt
place in which to live and The other day I wa
work but now will. ing the Sound Off an
And there is icing to be had to the editor sections
for this cake. Duke Energy is seemed to be filled A
going to build a gas-fueled ative comments. Wh
power plant "somewhere in about our president,
Florida," and Citrus County lady, Congress or loc
is in the running. cians, the opinions o
Should our county commis- sounded so incredib
sioners be able to convince and small.


familiar with) and he waited. But you
When you are in your mid-80s, Citrus Coun
your waiting skills have mostly The next
SC1 been all used up. So they both one of the
began to grow grouchy Fat Cat's,
ishe After an undetermined period found a pur
day's of time, my mother realized she sonal item:
was not in her own car. She drove back
jumped out of the parked vehicle parents ar
t the and went looking for my father (Fran's wife
their. and his car They managed to re- at the Chrc
miss- unite and return home. apartment .
lome That would have been the end Maybe ti
din- of the story if they had not gone small tower
when looking for my mother's purse. help out ot]
They realized when she jumped I am not so
nuch out of the strange vehicle she had
left behind valuable personal I am a me
own items. Missing was the purse, that gets t(
sand cash, credit cards, airline tickets generation
Bar and the appropriate personal in- the older gE
ter a formation that would make the the "sandwi
it a theft of one's identify pretty darn us it's like a
the easy provolone
ome. Needless to say, I was back on Diet Dr. Pei
d got Citrus Avenue at 10:30 p.m. walk- have it eve]
)rob- ing around looking for the missing whelming.
car items. After an hour of sneaking
around parking lots and dealing Gerry Mul
into with a helpful sheriff's deputy, I of the Chi
t too had to call it quits. No luck. gmulliganC


COSTLIEST FEDERAL BUDGET ITEMS
Medicare /Medicaid ($0.81 trillion Obamacare is
expected to increase this value)
Social Security ($0.775 trillion funded by work-
ers and employers not government)
Defense $0.667 trillion
NEEDED SPENDING CUTS
Congress-mandated spending cuts (sequester) are
estimated to save $86 billion (interest on current
debt is +/- $440 billion).
Raising federal income taxes, even 10 percent on
everyone would generate $0.51 trillion.
To balance present federal budget, Congress will
have to cut, at minimum, another $0.5 trillion.


Congress C. Both
Results: A.3 B.5 C.9
(Correct answer C. Both)
Historically the process is:


presi
budg
provw
the p


dent submits
et, Congress votes ap
al/or amends, sends
)resident the revised


ey are
n; that
sterity,
is County
at.
McIntosh
Lecanto


Then I turned to
ary pages and saw
gelic face of a little
10-year-old girl wh
battle with cancer.
ing a prayer for he
family, I thought ag
children torn to sh
Newtown m bhv n as


1ya
orally If finding fault w
t first family takes p:
as read- over working toget
d letters cures for these dea
s which eases and insane v
with neg- because of political
ether filiations, then we
first have become mora
al politi- rupt as well as fina
f some
ly petty Evi
C,


know what, we live in
nty. C
t day Fran Donohoe,
regular musicians at
called to say he had
'se and some other per-
s in his car. He even
to town to meet my C
id return the purse. bas
0, Barbara, had worked Am
nicle in our sales de- cia
large
hat happens in every ing
n that honest people sai
her honest people, but ope
sure. anc
e but
ember of the age group cor
o babysit the younger clu
and offer assistance to the
generation. They call it "
ich generation" and for tre,
really thick roast beef, ual
on a fresh roll with a at
upper. You're just glad to hai
n when it can be over- doc
me
hai
lligan is the publisher the
ronicle. Email him at V
gchronicleonline.com. rel;


version for his approval or
veto.
I do not believe this
process has happened re-
cently
Could the U.S. govern-
ment go bankrupt? A. Yes
B. No
Results: A. 9B. 8
(Correct answer A. Yes)
Go bankrupt, default on
loans; of course. You and I
can, companies can, why
not government?
What costs most in fed-
eral budget? A. Defense B.
Social Security C.
Medicare/Medicaid D. Fed-
eral Employee Benefits
a Results:A.9B.O C. 3D.5
- (Correct answer C.
s Medicare/Medicaid)
I Even with the wars, de-


the obitu-
the an-

o lost her
After say-
r grieving
gain of the
reds in
sault rifle.
ith our
recedence
her to find
adly dis-
iolence
l party af-
as a nation
ally bank-
ncially
yn Skurow
rystal River



ARE
Continued fro


Findings tri
Greg Crist, a Wa
sed spokesperson
erican Health C
tion, which repr
gest share of ski
facilities na
d overall nurs
orators are well
d follow federal
t added he could
mment on the rep
sions without h
chance to read
Our members b
atment with th
's personal hea
the forefront.
nds-on process,
actors and eve
mbers in an eft
nce the health o
patient," Crists
Virginia Fichera
atives in two


fense comes i
cial Security
funded by ind
employers. I
employed. I
twice empl
bution and em
tribution. I fin
believe some
this is a gove
pense. Social
solvent for se
years. Feder
benefits are
but small co
Medicare an
costs that are o
funded by ind:
With a bala
and $100 b
yearly on pri
long to rep
debt? A. 16 y


Thank-you LETTER


United Way thanks
community donors
Thank you, thank you, thank you. Cit-
rus County is truly a special place. Our
community has once again proven its
steadfast commitment to making real,
lasting change.
The United Way of Citrus County is
wrapping up our annual campaign and
we are so overwhelmed by the tremen-
dous outpouring of support and contri-
bution that has been made this year.
Even though we are all facing eco-
nomic uncertainty, we saw a huge jump
in several of our corporate campaigns,
as well as a big jump in employee par-
ticipation rates. We also were able to
expand our campaign into several new
businesses, which was really exciting.
Chronicle readers, like you, made a
tremendous contribution as well. We
loved reading all of the notes and let-
ters of support that were submitted
along with your generous contributions.
We had the great opportunity to visit
several of our corporate donors this
week to say "thank you" to our individ-
ual supporters. United Way contribu-
tors are committed to improving lives
in Citrus County. Through a concerted
effort to focus our funding on the root
causes of social need, we are making
big strides in the areas of education, in-
come and health. Our board of direc-
tors is focused on funding initiatives
and causes that truly result in commu-
nity impact. Through the support of our
community, the goals for collective im-
pact will be realized. We appreciate
donors and supporters like you who
give, advocate and volunteer
Thank you Citrus County! Thank you
for caring! Thank you for your commit-
ment! Thank you for your loyalty! From
the bottom of our hearts, thank you.
Amy Meek
president and CEO
United Way of Citrus County


homes in New York, said she
would welcome a greater
push for accountability at
)m Page C1 skilled nursing facilities.
"Once you're in a nursing
ue home, if things don't go right,
rue? you're really a prisoner," said
ashington- Fichera, a retired professor
on for the in Sterling, NY '"As a con-
Care Asso- cerned relative, you just want
resents the to know the care is good, and
killed nurs- if there are problems, why
nationwide, they are happening and
ing home when they'll be fixed."
regulated Transition failures
guidelines
d not fully Once residents are ready to
port's con- go back home or transfer to
having had another facility, federal law
it. also requires the homes write
egin every special plans to make sure pa-
e individ- tients are safely discharged.
alth needs Investigators found the
This is a homes didn't always do what
involving was needed to ensure a
*n family smooth transition.
fort to en- In nearly one-third of cases,
outcome of facilities also did not provide
said. enough information when the
a, who has patient moved to another set-
nursing ting, the report found.


in third. So- years C. 1,600 years
Sis totally Results: A 2 B. 9 C. 5
ividuals and (Correct answer B. 160
was self- years)
had to pay Does federal deficit con-
oyee contri- cern/worry you? A. Yes
nployer con- B. No
nd it hard to Results: A 15B.2
cone thinks (I would like to point out
ernment ex- the only two answering B
Security is had no children or grand-
everal more children.)
al employee Apparently most of us
substantial, are worried about federal
compared to debt, but I seem to be the
d Medicaid only one writing about it.
)nly partially Hope I have increased
ividuals. your concern to a point
nced budget you will no longer be com-
illion paid placent. Please tell your
incipal how representatives to balance
ay present the budget now. Let us all
rears B. 160 hope it is not too late.


COMMENTARY


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 C3





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Fighting tyranny
In reply to (the letter) more
guns? I think not Gun defense?
Oh yes, the theory that becoming
a victim is somehow morally su-
perior to defending yourself and
your family Makes perfect
sense. If you think a theater
filled with armed citizens is
scary, imagine a disarmed popu-
lace against a tyrannical govern-
ment I'm sorry if my patriotism
offends you.
Gene Pelt
Homosassa

Sequester prediction
There's a good chance on
March 1, Congressional Repub-
licans will allow the Budget
Control Act "sequester" provi-
sion to take effect. If they do so,
what follows is a desperate,
probably futile, attempt to fore-
stall the liberal media's pre-
dictably slanderous assault on
Republicans with data pro-
vided by American Enterprise
Institute resident scholar John
Makin.
Makin contends the budget
cuts won't be as painful as liber-
als protest.
The act mandates across-the-
board cuts of $110 billion a year
over 10 years totaling $1.1 tril-
lion. Makin's data show this
amounts to barely 2.5 percent of
projected spending between
2014 and 2023. The $110 billion
in cuts scheduled for 2014 will
reduce government spending
(currently $3.6 trillion) by only
0.3 percent
The downside is, the com-
bined effect of the president's
January tax increases and se-
quester cuts narrows the gap
between spending and income
by $170 billion a year or $2 in
budget cuts for every $1 in rev-
enue increases.


) 1L OM YTCE O o o


Tommy Tucker is a Citrus County superhero who will guide you to a healthier lifestyle. He is also the spokesperson against alcohol, tobacco
and prescription drug abuse.


Clearly, the sequester will
have only a minimal impact on
the budget deficit but likewise,
it will have only minimal effect
on the economy Besides, con-
gressional Democrats have yet
to offer anything better.
Contrary to the current lib-
eral mantra, the Democrats own


the Budget Control Act. More
Senate Democrats voted in
favor of the bill than Republi-
cans (45-28) and House Democ-
rats disempowered themselves
voting 95 for, 95 against
Ironically, their support of
the act has given Republicans a
powerful bargaining chip a


fallback position. The se-
quester cuts may be inadequate
to the nation's needs, but with-
out a better deal they provide
Republicans the best alterna-
tive to a negotiated solution.
Since the sequester cuts are
tolerable and since the Democ-
rats have done this to them-


selves, when the liberal media
reviles Republicans for "cost-
ing us thousands of jobs," know
they are being unreasonable,
unfair and just plain dishonest.
But then, what else is new?
John McFadden
Inverness


'Will ccLeean


usicc AFestival 2018

From Noon

Friday, March 8

To Sunset

Sunday, March 10
at Sertoma Youth Ranch at On-Site Camping
Entertainment by Florida's
Best Songwriters and Singers
Florida Songwriting Contest
Workshops Arts and Crafts
Food Children's Activities
Bring your Lawn Chairs
-Rain or Shine-
For camping information, call 352-465-2167.
For more about the festival visit
www.willmclean.com
CII1 )M .


110r.L _t 1 V7.,:-
Tournament Sponsor $100
Includes: Name displayed at tournament and awards
banquet, Media Recognition, Free greens fee (foursome)
at Sugarmill Woods Country Club during 2013
11:00 a.m. Registration
11:30 a.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Shotgun Start
5:30 p.m. Award Ceremony
AllEntries Must Be Received by Friday, March 29,2013
For information call Dennis King or Dan Crishon (352) 249-1236
-SH~i ^ ^ 'I M^


SCOPE

Run/Walk for Colon Cancer Awareness














Saturday, March 9, 2013 8:00AM
CREST School
Lecanto, Florida
Register at www.debbys5k.org
Debby Hudson Colon Cancer Foundation 501(c)(3)
Proceeds to benefit The Prevent Cancer Foundadoni
and Colon Caicer Alliance
OOODUJB ______


CARE FOOD PAO r


SCRAMBLE


GOLF TOURNAMENT

Saturday,

March 16th
SEVEN RIVERS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
Registration: 8:00 a.m.
Shotgun Time: 9:00 a.m.
$60 per person
$200 per foursome :,,.
including greens fees, L'i.
cart .lunch and


March 3rd 8:00 a.m.
29th Annual Manatee Car & Truck Show
Show cars-$1i5 pre-registered, spectators are free!
at Crystal Dodge, Chevrolet,Jeep & Nissan, Homosassa.
Every year the Citrus County Cruisers put on a classic car
show for the public and the ($) proceeds go to 3 local charities
(i.e. CUB, KeyTraining, etc.) and we also sponsor 3-4
scholarships at WTI in the automotive field.
Call 352-422-1061 for more information.
March 3rd 1:30 p.m.to 4:00 p.m
Open Jam Session
$7 Entrance Fee
The Citrus Jazz Society will host its monthly Open Jam Session
at the Catholic Charities Citrus Community Outreach Center,
formerly Knights of Columbus Hall in Homosassa Springs.
The jam session features local and visiting musicians playing
old favorites,jazz,swing,and Dixieland for listening and
dancing pleasure. Bring your own refreshments. Musicians
interested in playing may call Roy Hoskins at 352-382-1875.

March 3rd 1:30 p.m.to 4:00 p.m
"Dollar$ for Scholar$" Doo-Wop
$10 Entrance Fee
50s & 60s music featuring the fabulous singing group "Lola &
The Saints. Call 352-344-0855 for more information.
March 8th March 10th
Noon Friday to Sunset Sunday
Will McLean Festival
Florida Acoustic Music Festival
Weekend tickets $32, Children under 12 Free
At the Sertoma Youth Ranch.
For more information call 489-3766.
March 8th
Friends of the Citrus County
Library System Spring Book Sale
$5 Friday evening only,all other times are free
At the Citrus County Auditorium.
Semi-annual book sale fundraiser to benefit the Citrus County
Library System. Event begins on Friday evening and runs
through Tuesday afternoon with various times each day. Call
352-746-1334 for more information.
March 8th
Doors open at 6:30pm; dinner and program begin at 7pm.
5th Annual FPRA Roast 'n Toast
$75 per ticket/$700 table sponsorship
At the Citrus Hills Golf and Country Club
Chris Moling is the guest of honor at the 5th Annual FPRA
Roast 'n Toast fundraiser. Expect laughter and tears as
Roastmaster Frank DiGiovanni, City of Inverness Manager,
moderates a team of Moling's closest friends through
slapstick humor and heartfelt tales. All proceeds benefit the
FPRA Nature Coast Chapter,a local organization of public
relations and journalism professionals.
Call 352-344-6501 for more information.


C4 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


COMMENTARY











BUSINESS
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press
A home is for sale Jan. 3, 2012, in Mount Lebanon, Pa. Qualifying for a home loan remains a hurdle for anyone without a solid personal
balance sheet.




Financing a home


Six tips to get

credit in shape

to buy a house
ALEX VEIGA
AP Business Writer
After years in the doldrums,
the housing market appears
back on track. Home sales and
prices are up, and mortgage
rates remain near historic
lows, reinvigorating the appeal
of homeownership.
But qualifying for a home
loan remains a hurdle for any-
one without a solid personal
balance sheet.
"Now the requirements are
much stricter," said Erin
Baehr, a certified financial
planner in Stroudsburg, Pa.
"You have to have the right in-
come, you have to have the
right credit score and you have
to have the right down pay-
ment to get the best rates out
there."
In addition, a tight supply of
homes for sale in many mar-
kets means sellers often have
the leverage that comes with
receiving competing offers.
That means buyers with the fi-
nancial flexibility to raise their
offer stand a better chance of
winning out another reason
to bolster one's finances before
entering the homebuying fray
Here are six tips to become
financially prepared to pur-
chase a home:
1. Assess financial
picture and how much
house you can afford.
Before you get too involved
in looking at listings, take some
time to evaluate your finances
thoroughly. If you're a first-
time buyer and haven't been
saving money or have been liv-
ing paycheck-to-paycheck
while dealing with college
loans and other debt, you'll
likely have to make major
lifestyle changes to get in the
best position to buy a home.
Ultimately, you want to get
an idea of how much of your


monthly income you can rea-
sonably afford to spend on a
home.
Stew Larsen, head of Bank
of the West's mortgage banking
division, suggests using a
rough formula that lenders
use: Add up the monthly house
payment- principal, interest,
taxes and insurance and
subtract it from your gross
monthly income. The house
payment shouldn't be more
than 28 percent to 30 percent
of the monthly income.
Bankrate Inc. has online cal-
culators to help estimate how
much you can afford based on
your income and expenses.
Here's one: http://apne.ws
/12bNGkc.
2. Budget like you're
already a homeowner.
You've figured out roughly
how much money you should
devote to housing. But can you
actually live on that amount,
especially when you consider
other costs, such as repairs,
utilities, which often run
higher than in apartments,
and if you live in a condo-
minium, homeowner associa-
tion fees?
Baehr recommends renters
calculate the extra monthly
costs that come with home-
ownership and start setting
aside that amount. This ac-
complishes two goals: Saving
money for a down payment
and getting them accustomed
to the financial constraints of
homeownership.
"Start to put that money
away and see if you can live
without it," Baehr said. "If you
can't do it now, you're not going
to be able to do it later"
3. Shoot for
20 percent down.
While some loan programs
allow homebuyers to make a
down payment of as little as 3.5
percent of the purchase price,
experts said you will need to
save enough for at least a 20
percent down payment to get
the lowest interest rate and
avoid having to pay private
mortgage insurance, or PMI.
If you're a military veteran,


Special to the Chronicle
Before starting your home search, experts advise people to have
their financial documents in order.


you can qualify for a loan pro-
gram enabling veterans to ob-
tain a mortgage without a
down payment
Even if you end up getting a
loan that requires private
mortgage insurance, once
you've made enough payments
to build your stake in the home
to 20 percent, you can apply to
have PMI waived. And until
then, PMI is tax-deductible.
In addition to a down pay-
ment, you'll also have to set
money aside for closing costs,
which can run into the hun-
dreds or sometimes thousands
of dollars.


4. Tackle any credit
score problems early.
A person's credit score is a
critical element of how
lenders determine how much
money homebuyers can bor-
row and at what interest rate.
Baehr said buyers seeking a
shot at the most favorable in-
terest rate on a home loan
must generally have a FICO
score of at least 720 out of 850.
Loans backed by the Federal
Housing Administration re-
quire a FICO score of at least

See .Page D4


SCORE's 15th annual golf classic next month


Dr. Frederick
Herzog
EXPERIENCE
MATTERS


CORE's 15th annual
Golf Classic is sched-
uled for April 8, with a
rain date of April 15. Mark
your calendar! Join SCORE
mentors, sponsors and play-
ers at Sugarmill Woods
Country Club.
SCORE's annual golf out-
ing is a high-value golf bar-
gain, especially if you and
your friends like to golf at a
private club.
The golf schedule is:
11 a.m. -Registration.


11:30 a.m. Lunch buf-
fet with beverages and
dessert.
1 p.m. Shotgun Start.
5:30 p.m. Awards
ceremony
Prize opportunities in-
clude $1,200 for golf prizes
and $1,700 for raffle prizes.
Bid in the silent auction on
bargains for foursomes to
have access to more than 20
golf clubs.
Your odds to win some-
thing are better than Vegas!


The cost is $60 per player,
including green fees with a
cart, the high-quality lunch
buffet, snacks and beer after
your round.
And the prize opportuni-
ties are better than any golf
outing, bar none!
SCORE offers tourna-
ment sponsors additional
value.
For $100 sponsors receive:
Company name dis-
played at event and banquet
Company name pub-


lished in Citrus County
Chronicle.
Chances for two no-
charge ads in the Chronicle.
Drawing for $500 in ad-
vertising on WYKE.
Two hole-on-one with
the prize for a new car and
motorcycle, respectively
Free green fees at Sug-
armill Woods for a foursome
during 2013.
To be a sponsor, buy a
See Page D4


Bruce Williams
SMART
MONEY


Best


way to


pay for


college
Dear Bruce: My
daughter will be
going to college
next year. What is the
best approach to paying
for college when one
hasn't prepared finan-
cially? I have outstand-
ing credit, and I do have
the ability to make
monthly payments. -
Reader, via email
Dear Reader: Student
loan markets, like all
credit markets, have
been upset by the credit
crunch and today's
economy If you have ex-
cellent credit, you may
be able to borrow
against an asset such as
a home. And loans such
as the PLUS (Parent
Loan for Undergraduate
Students) are still
available.
You should meet im-
mediately with the fi-
nancial aid office of the
school your daughter
will attend. You also
should have a chat with
your local banker Fi-
nancing college is more
difficult today, but it's
not impossible.
Dear Bruce: Someone
told me it's OK to trans-
fer credit card balances
to a new card to take ad-
vantage of a low promo-
tional rate, then move
the balance later, when
the rate is about to in-
crease, to another credit
card with the same offer.
Isn't it a bad thing to
have that much open
credit? Reader, via
email
Dear Reader: If you
carry a balance and your
credit is good enough
banks are offering you
low introductory inter-
est rates, there's nothing
wrong with transferring
every six months or so,
as long as you cancel the
first credit card. I have
no quarrel with that.
However, if you can't
pay off your credit card
bill every month and
the majority of Ameri-
cans do carry balances
at high interest rates -
you can't afford to be
charging those items.
Dear Bruce: My friend
and I have been debat-
ing which is better, a
credit card that gives
cash back or one that of-
fers reward miles? This
has been an ongoing dis-
cussion, and I would like
to know who is right.
I believe the only way
to go is to get the cash
back. I don't do a lot of
traveling, so why would
I need the miles? She
just cannot understand
why I would want cash
back.
So who is right? What-
ever you say, we will
agree to disagree. -
Susan, via email
Dear Susan: I hate to
disappoint both of you,
but it really depends on
the person and his or
her habits. There's no
right or wrong.
Using the mileage
credit card, you can get
a coach ticket to any-
where in the country for
a fixed number of miles.
If you have to cash in
25,000 miles to get a
ticket that you can buy
for $200, that's not a very
good deal. On the other


Page D4


, E ......









Companies struggle Smart 'stickers' track items
4- %M1Cj4 Mimi r4 _______________


PETER SVENSSON
AP technology writer
BARCELONA, Spain-
Mobile money may seem
like a hot concept, but
consumers aren't warm-
ing to it
At the world's largest
cellphone trade show,
here in Barcelona this
week, the 70,000 atten-
dees are encouraged to
use their cellphones -
instead their keycards -
to get past the turnstiles
at the door. But very few
people took the chance to
do that. The process of
setting up the phone to
act as a keycard proved
too much of a hassle.
It's a poor omen for an
industry that's eager to
have the cellphone re-
place both tickets and
credit cards. Companies
are building chip anten-
nas into phones that let
the gadgets interact with
"tap to pay" terminals
and other devices
equipped with short-
range sensors, like sub-
way turnstiles. But getting
the technology to do
something useful and


convincing people to
adopt it is a slow process.
To make a payment in a
store with your cell-
phone, "you need a lot of
things to align," said
Reed Peterson, who
heads the Near-Field
Communications initia-
tive for the GSM Associa-
tion, a global trade group
for the wireless industry
The phone needs to be
properly equipped with
NFC hardware and soft-
ware; the store needs to
have the proper equip-
ment and training. The
phone company needs to
support the transaction,
and banks and payment
processors need to be in
on it.
Some of these things
have fallen into place, Pe-
terson said, but the net-
work of commercial
agreements that supports
these payments needs to
expand. And consumer
demand remains elusive.
"I want to get to the
point where the con-
sumer goes into the store
and says 'Show me only
the phones that have
NFC'," Peterson said.


Associated Press
A man uses the NFC payment Visa system Wednesday
at the Mobile World Congress, the world's largest
mobile phone trade show, in Barcelona, Spain.


o t popularize use of
mobile money


Find missing

things with

phones, iPads
PETER SVENSSON
AP technology writer
BARCELONA, Spain -
Jimmy Buchheim is be-
having oddly.
On the floor of the
world's largest cellphone
trade show in Barcelona,
Spain, he's looking at the
screen of his iPod Touch,
taking a few steps, and
then looking again. Now
and then he backtracks or
turns, and looks again.
Slowly, he confines his
movements to a smaller
and smaller area. Then he
drops to his knees, and
checks the screen again.
He scrabbles forward.
"There we are!" he said.
Buchheim has found his
keys, which had been hid-
den behind a wastebasket
by a skeptical reporter On
the key ring is a small disc,
slightly bigger than a quar-
ter. That's what Buchheim
was homing in on, with his
iPod. It allowed him to
find his keys, hidden out of
sight in an apartment-
sized booth.
Buchheim's Davie, Fla.-
based company, Stick-N-
Find Technologies, wants
to give people a way to find
things, whether it's keys,
wallets, TV remotes, or cat
collars.
There's no real trick to
sending out a radio signal
and having a phone pick it
up. That's been done be-
fore. What makes the
Stick-N-Find practical is a
new radio technology
known as Bluetooth Low
Energy, which drastically
reduces the battery power
needed to send out a sig-
nal. That means the disc
can be small, light enough


Associated Press
A man holds the Stick-N-Find product Wednesday at the Mobile World Congress, the
world's largest mobile phone trade show, in Barcelona, Spain. Stick-N-Find
Technologies, wants to give people a way to find things, by using a new radio
technology known as Bluetooth Low Energy, which drastically reduces the power
consumption of a transmitting device.


for its sticky back to ad-
here to a lot of surfaces,
and be powered by a
watch-type battery that
lasts up to two years with-
out recharging. The signal
can be picked as far as 300
feet away, but that's under
ideal circumstances. On
the floor of the wireless
show, with a multitude of
Wi-Fi transmitters jam-
ming the airwaves, the
range was roughly 20 feet.
One downside to Blue-
tooth Low Energy: It does
not come cheap. Stick-N-
Find charges $50 for two
"stickers" from its first
production run, which
starts shipping next week.
It gave early backers a bet-
ter deal 4 discs for $65
- on crowdfunding site
Indiegogo, where it had
sought to raise $70,000
from donors and ended up
getting $931,970 by the
time the campaign ended
last month.
Another downside is few


devices can pick up the
signals. The latest two
iPhones can do it, as can
the latest iPod Touches
and iPads. The latest high-
end Samsung smart-
phones work, too.
Bluetooth Low Energy is
expected to become a stan-
dard feature in phones,
but it's not yet
Whatever device you
use, it won't tell you ex-
actly where your sticker is
located. All it can tell is
how far away it is. That
means finding something
is a process of walking
around and checking
whether you're getting
"hotter" or "colder." Of
course, often you don't re-
ally need to know where
your wallet is: knowing it's
within 8 feet and therefore
somewhere in the car with
you is assurance enough.
Buchheim said the com-
pany has plans to add
direction-finding features.
Users can also set up a


virtual "leash" between a
sticker and a Bluetooth de-
vice. Depending on the set-
tings, when the two devices
move a certain distance
away from each other, the
sticker starts beeping or the
device's screen shows an
alert. That way, you could
use a sticker in your wallet,
linked to your phone, to let
you know if you're leaving
either one behind.
Buchheim sees this as
just the start for what
Bluetooth Low Energy can
do. Stick-N-Find is work-
ing with a museum that's
interested in putting stick-
ers on its exhibits, so they
can issue tablets or other
devices to visitors that can
sense the proximity of ex-
hibits, and say "Hello, this
is the statue of so-and-so,"
Buchheim said.
It could even end up as a
technology for the blind -
one that tells them where
their belongings are, he
said.


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910 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River, FL 563-2522
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D2 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


BUSINESS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE








SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013
Promotional information provided
by the Citrus Chamber of Commerce.


CITRUS COUNTY
Chamber of Commerce


numberr connectionn

28 N.W. U.S. 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3149 401 Tompkins St., Inverness, FL 34450 352-726-2801


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Citrus County
Cruisin'





March 16 DRAGON
BOAT RACES in Old Ho-
mosassa. This may be
the most fun festival on
the circuit. It's the kick-
off for the busy summer
season of racing in the
U.S. Only 12 teams will
be allowed to enter, as
we want to keep it a fun,
fast-moving event. Each
team can compete in
the 300-meter sprints,
the long 3,000 meters
and our infamous barrel
race. To register, visit
www. riversidereso rts.
com/Homosassa-Dragon-
Boat-Festival.html
March 16 and 17 -
FORT COOPER DAYS
Second Seminole War
re-enactment held twice
daily at 11 a.m. and 2
p.m., depicting events
that took place during
the construction of the
fort. Period military and
Seminole camps open
for visitors to explore.
Living history demon-
strations held through-
out the day. Event-
related arts and crafts,
exhibits, entertainment
and great food and re-
freshments. Admission
$6; children 12 and
younger free.

March 17 -
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
Crystal River:
10 a.m. parade. Dress
yourself and your dog
in your best Irish garb
and meet at Burkes of
Ireland fora stroll to the
park and back. Dogs
must be leashed at all
times. Call 352-795-0956.
Inverness: 5:30 p.m.
parade. A short parade
route creates lots of en-
ergy at the annual St.
Patrick's Day parade in
Inverness. For information,
email SunnyatEvents@
Inverness-FL.gov or
call 352-726-2611.

March 23 SHRIMPA-
PALOOZA begins with
an amazing Mardi Gras
parade in the morning,
followed by the Shrim-
papalooza festival held
behind the Homosassa
Civic Association on Yulee
Drive. Enjoy live music,
tons of great seafood
mixed with more than
100 vendors and a kid's
zone. For more informa-
tion, call 352-634-0918.
March 25 to 30 THE
CITRUS COUNTY FAIR
at the Citrus County
Fairgrounds, 3600 S.
Florida Ave. Rides, ex-
hibits, animals, food and
fun! For more informa-
tion, call 352-726-2993.
March 30 -
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
SPRING EASTER EGG
HUNT. Photos with Easter
Bunny other costumed
characters also available.
8 a.m. For information,
call 352-628-5343.
March 30 UNDER-
WATER EGG HUNT at
Bicentennial Park pool
in Crystal River. Noon
to 3 pm. For informa-
tion, call Citrus County
Parks and Rec at 352-
527-7540 or visit www.
citruscountyparks.com.


Positive changes at Citrus County


Economic Development Council

Don Taylor, former Progress Energy financial manager, named executive director


Over the past year, the EDC
worked on a plan to create a
vision for the EDC five years
into the future. One facet of that plan
was to seek a replacement for John
Siefert as executive director, who said
two years ago that he was ready to re-
tire from the 40-plus hours each week
that he gives to the EDC. We are now
pleased to welcome Don Taylor as the
new executive director of the Citrus
County Economic Development
Council. Don already has immersed
himself in the EDC and is hitting the
ground running.
Don brings a strong background of
more than 30 years in financial man-
agement to the EDC. Recently retired
from Progress Energy, his last posi-
tion there was as financial manager at
the Crystal River nuclear plant. Pre-
vious to that he served in various fi-
nancial capacities for energy
companies in North and South Car-
olina and Colorado.
Don and his wife Sue moved to Cit-


c uscu\.
CITRUS COUNT,
Economic Developr r
Council, In. I


Don brings a strong background of more than 30 years
in financial management to the EDC. When he and his
wife Sue moved to Citrus County in 2001, he immediately
involved himself in the fabric of our county.


rus County in 2001 and he immedi-
ately involved himself in the fabric of
our county. He is a 2001 graduate of
the Leadership Citrus program, and
served on the College of Central
Florida Foundation board of direc-
tors, chaired CF's Taste of Citrus for
two years, and served on the EDC
board of directors as treasurer during
the time when the EDC reorganized
and partnered with the Chamber of
Commerce in 2009. Currently, he
serves on the boards of CF's district
board of trustees, the Citrus County
Art League as treasurer, and the
United Way of Citrus County, where
he is a past president. Additionally,
Don is a current board member on the


Welcome Tammy's

Eatery & Sub Shop


N -.. .N W-' ". .
Joining Tammy's team members Brent Jonika, Phoenix Stokes, Nikkolle
Lisiecki and Tammy and Richard Guicciardini are Chamber ambassa-
dors Sarah Fitts, First International Title; George Bendtsen, Insurance
by George; Crystal Ashe, Health Center at Brentwood; Bill Hudson,
Land Title of Citrus County; Kelly Paul, Wollinka Wikle Title Ins.; Mike
Buchanan, Excel Printing; Dennis Pfeiffer, Orkin Pest Control; and Lisa
Nash, all enjoying a sub from Tammy's Eatery and Sub Shop.
T ammy's Eatery and Sub Shop is a new restaurant
and Chamber member at 7781 S. Suncoast Blvd.,
Homosassa. This full-service restaurant serves
breakfast, lunch and dinner and offers delivery as well
as takeout service. Menu choices include waffles, pan-
cakes, skillets and meal combos for breakfast and din-
ner. Subs, burgers, appetizers and specials are offered
throughout the day. Beer is available and wine will be in
the near future. Hours are Monday through Saturday
from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday it is open from 8 a.m. to
8 p.m., with breakfast available until 1 pm. Visit the
website at www.tammyseateryandcatering.com. Call
Tammy's at 352-503-2046.


Rise Construction joins

Chamber of Commerce
N ew Chamber member -
Rise Construction is r, Lo r l R
owned by Charley Rise,
a third-generation builder/con-
tractor who takes pride in his
work. As an enthusiastic and
artistic builder, he works hard
to please his customers from
start to finish. Charley shares
his philosophy, saying "fulfilling
my homeowners' dream and
delivering what they want and
need in a timely fashion is the
basis of my company. Through-
out the years I've spent in the
construction industry, learning S-
from my father and older con-
tractors, I feel I have developed
the necessary skills to perform.
Whenyou hire Rise Construction,
you not only get a dedicated
contractor, but a full design and
engineering team as well." Rise
Construction holds a state Rise Construction owner Charley Rise,
buildinglicense,stateroofingli- center, is flanked by his children Willow
cense and home-inspection i- and Sebastian as he cuts the ribbon on his
cense.Servicesprovidedinclude official Chamber membership. Joining him
custom homes and additions, are, left to right: Sarah Fitts, First Interna-
barns, garages, bathrooms and tional Title; Tom Corcoran, Life Care Center
kitchens. Stop by and visit the of Citrus County; Josh Wooten, president
beautifulshowroomthatdisplays and CEO of the Chamber; Lisa Nash; Joe
thequalityofworkyoucanexpect Velez, marketing and sales manager for
from this company. Rise Con- Rise Construction; city of Inverness repre-
structionisatlo9W.MainStreet, sentatives Frank DiGiovanni, Debbie Davis,
Inverness. They can be reached Sharon Skeele-Hogan and Ocean Moberg;
at 352-419-8900 or by visiting Nicholle Fernandez, Villages of Citrus Hills;
www.riseconstructions.com. and Jennifer Duca, Comfort Keepers.


Citrus County Chamber of Commerce
and chairs the legislative committee.
Along with naming the new execu-
tive director, the EDC has promoted
Ardath Prendergast to manager of
economic development and projects.
In that capacity, Ardath will help to di-
rect and coordinate the activities of
the EDC as well as oversee all EDC
programs and projects.
Although John is stepping down as
executive director, he isn't going far
from the EDC. He will continue to
serve on the EDC board of directors as
the SCORE representative and hold a
place on the executive committee. He
will also act as director emeritus for
the EDC to assist with the transition


and attend meetings as needed so that
our reach as the EDC continues to grow.
This change continues to move the
EDC forward. The partnership
formed three years ago between the
EDC and the Chamber is an unquali-
fied success that Don and Josh
Wooten, president and CEO of the
Chamber, will continue to build with
assistance from Joe Meek as presi-
dent of the EDC and John Murphy as
chair of the Chamber. Our alliance
with one another and our partnership
with SCORE, SBDC, Workforce Con-
nection, the College of Central Florida
and the Agricultural Alliance continue
to grow and strengthen. We look
ahead to a good future for our county.


Upcoming Chamber events


March 20 & 21 Legislative Days in
Tallahassee; make reservations now at
www.citruscountychamber.com.


hI2 Remember, coupons and discounts also
appear on the mobile and regular website!
r Check out our complete calendar for com-
munity, entertainment and fundraising events.



Give a shout out to employees
who focus on customer service
The Citrus County Chamber of Commerce is proud to promote its
"You Caught My Eye" program. The program allows residents
and visitors to recognize employees who go beyond in their at-
tention to customer service. In addition to the employee's name
appearing in the newspaper, the Chamber of Commerce sends a
letter to the employee's manager noting the recognition. We are
excited to offer such interaction between businesses and com-
munity residents. So, go ahead, give a shout out!
r-------------------------------------------------------------------
Please note: Business must be in Citrus County.

YOU CAUGHT MY EYE ...
for OUTSTANDING customer service!
PERSON you are nominating
BUSINESS they work for
ADDRESS of business
City DATE of contact
WHAT STOOD OUT ABOUT THE SERVICE?


Your name
Your phone number
Date submitted
SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: CINDI FEIN, CITRUS
COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 28 N.W. U.S. HWY.
19, CRYSTAL RIVER, FL 34428, or fax to 352-795-1921.




The February New

Image Award goes to...


Chamber president Josh Wooten and chairman John Murphy join
with ambassador Jennifer Duca in presenting the February New
Image Award to Rev. Mark Gabb of Kingsway of Beverly Hills.
K ingsway of Beverly Hills! Just opened in the fall of
2012, Kingsway of Beverly Hills is an independent
senior living center for adults 55 years of age and
better. This rental community, nestled in 70 acres of quiet
wooded landscape on the campus of St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, currently offers 10 villas with spacious floor plans,
vaulted ceilings, Whirlpool appliances and 1.5-car garages.
Call for an appointment to visit this community managed by
The Lutheran Home Association. Their motto is, "Kingsway:
It's Where You Want to Be." Call 352-465-6006 or visit the
website at www.kingswayofbeverlyhills.com.


u. -k





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Business DIGEST


Lambert in 2013
for leaders group
Florida Realtors recently
selected Cheryl Lambert of
RE/MAX Realty One to partic-
ipate in its fifth annual Leader-
ship Academy. Lambert is one
of 14 Realtors statewide to be
selected for this program.
The Leadership Academy
was established in 2008 to
identify emerging Realtor
leaders ready to get involved,
make a difference and en-
hance their leadership skills.
The goal of the Academy is to
empower its participants to
develop the skills needed to
lead a committee, a Realtor
association or a community
activity.
"We are very excited about
this year's program and its
participants," 2013 Leader-
ship Academy Committee
Chairman Mark Palace said.
"My committee did a wonder-
ful job of interviewing and se-
lecting our 14 participants;
we're looking forward to a
great class this year!"
Members of the Leadership
Academy will participate in
classroom activities, group
and independent study ses-
sions, team-building and goal-
setting exercises, leadership
techniques and communica-
tion skills enhancement. In
addition, they will collectively
work on their class project de-
signed to promote greater
awareness of the need for
organ donation.
Lambert's volunteer activi-
ties include service as 2010-
2012 Technology Chairman,
2011 Director, 2012 Presi-
dent-elect and 2013 President
of the Realtor Association of
Citrus County, committee
service on Florida Realtors
2012 Business Trends and
Technology Forum, 2012
board of directors, 2012 Local
Board/Association President-
elect Information Exchange,
and 2012 Board Leadership
Forum; the Inverness Old
Towne Association, and the
Florida Low Income Housing
Associates.
"My goal is to gain as much
knowledge of the Realtor or-
ganization and to participate
on committees that will make
a difference," Lambert said. "I
believe that every committee
contributes in one way or an-
other. As an industry we need
to move forward in many dif-
ferent ways, we need to have
a better understanding of


In appreciation of Heads & Tails Lounge


Special to the Chronicle
Hospice of Citrus County Development Director Linda Baker, left, presents a plaque to
Heads & Tails Lounge owner Chrissy Hodges in appreciation of her support of Hospice
of Citrus County. Heads & Tails Lounge is at 9211 S. Florida Ave. in Floral City. More
than 100 riders participated in the inaugural Heads & Tails Lounge Poker Run fundraiser
Saturday, Jan. 12. Proceeds went to support patients and families served by Hospice
of Citrus County.


technology, a better under-
standing how other genera-
tions will be purchasing and
communicating to learning dif-
ferent ways to streamline how
we do everyday business."
Lambert believes in the im-
portance of keeping the Amer-
ican dream alive at every
level.
"I believe that by volunteer-
ing to participate on state/na-
tional-level committees, these
goals can be met, and will
allow for each participant to
bring it back to their local as-
sociations to only make us
stronger," she said.


Reynolds opens
health care practice
BROOKSVILLE -Access
Health Care
announces
the opening
of the prac-
tice of
Michael
Bryan
Reynolds,
D.O., at 675
Bryan Harvard
Reynolds Street,
Brooksville,
in the office formerly occupied
by Dr. Frankenberg.


Dr. Reynolds comes to Ac-
cess Health Care from Largo,
where he was in private prac-
tice. Reynolds is board certi-
fied in family practice and has
served as medical director for
Interim Health Care Home
Health & Hospice.
Reynolds received his Doc-
tor of Osteopathy degree from
West Virginia School of Osteo-
pathic Medicine in Lewisburg,
W.Va. He completed his resi-
dency and internship at War-
ren General Hospital, Warren,
Ohio, and received his Bache-
lor of Science degree from the
famous Marshall University in


Huntington, W.Va.
Reynolds is an active mem-
ber of the American College
of Osteopathic Family Physi-
cians and the American Os-
teopathic Association. He and
his wife, Diane, have two
sons, Addison and Michael.
Reynolds accepts patients
from ages 12 through geri-
atrics and same day appoint-
ments are available.
For more information and
to schedule an appointment,
call 352-544-0610.
Pulsipher opens
family practice
SPRING HILL--Access
Health Care announces the
opening of the practice of Dan
W. Pul-
sipher,
D.O., at
7556 Spring
Hill Drive,
Spring Hill.
Dr. Pul-
sipher is
DanW board certi-
Dan W.
Pulsipher fied in fam-
ily medicine
and a Diplomate of the
American Board of Family
Medicine.
Pulsipher comes to Access
Health Care with a wide range
of experience in family medi-
cine and urgent care. He most
recently had a private practice
in Fitzgerald, Ga.
Pulsipher received his Doc-
tor of Osteopathic Medicine
degree from the Philadelphia
College of Osteopathic Medi-
cine in Philadelphia. He then
completed a rotating intern-
ship at the Shenango Valley
Campus of the Horizon Hos-
pital System in Farrell, Penn.
Pulsipher completed his fam-
ily medicine residency at the
Medical College of Georgia -
Satilla Regional Medical Cen-
ter in Waycross, Ga.
He is a member of the
American Academy of Family
Physicians and the Florida
Academy of Family Physi-
cians. He and his wife live in
Spring Hill with their two dogs.
For more information or to
schedule an appointment, call
352-610-9960.
Citrus hospital gets
new accreditation
Citrus Memorial Health Sys-
tem was granted full chest pain
center accreditation from the
Society of Cardiovascular Pa-
tient Care (SCPC). Citrus Me-
morial is the first and only


hospital in its service area to re-
ceive this level of accreditation.
Hospitals that receive
SCPC accreditation have
achieved a higher level of ex-
pertise in dealing with patients
who arrive with symptoms of
heart attack. They emphasize
the importance of standard-
ized diagnostic and treatment
programs that provide more
efficient and effective evalua-
tion as well as more appropri-
ate and rapid treatment of
patients with chest pain and
other heart attack symptoms.
They also serve as a point of
entry into the health care sys-
tem to evaluate and treat
other medical problems and
help promote a healthier
lifestyle to reduce the risk fac-
tors for heart attack.
The accreditation process
required close coordination
between local EMS respon-
ders, Citrus Memorial's heart
and vascular center, emer-
gency room, pharmacy and
other departments throughout
the hospital. Prior to receiving
accreditation, surveyors vis-
ited Citrus Memorial to assess
the facility and protocols for
rapid diagnosis and treatment
of patients with chest pain and
other heart attack symptoms.
As a chest pain accredited
hospital, Citrus Memorial has
the processes in place to:
Reduce the time from
onset of symptoms to diagno-
sis and treatment.
Treat patients more
quickly during the critical win-
dow of time when the integrity
of the heart muscle can be
preserved.
Monitor patients to ensure
they are not sent home too
quickly and are receiving treat-
ment for their condition in the
most appropriate time frame.
"We are extremely proud of
achieving this accreditation as
a chest pain center," said
Ryan Beaty, president and
CEO of Citrus Memorial
Health System. "It has been a
rigorous process and our
team has worked hard to meet
this elite mark of excellence.
This is yet another example of
how we continue to raise the
bar for the health and wellbe-
ing of our community."
Only 12 percent of hospitals
nationwide have full chest pain
accreditation. For more infor-
mation about Citrus Memorial's
new chest pain accreditation or
the Citrus Memorial Heart and
Vascular Center visit www.
citrusmh.com.


HOME
Continued from Page Dl

580, but you'll pay a higher in-
terest rate.
Prospective homebuyers
should check their credit report
for any errors weighing down
their credit score. Disputing er-
rors can take months, so it's best
to get this process going well be-
fore you'd like to buy a home.
Baehr recommends getting
started six months in advance.
A major component of one's
credit score is the ratio between
how much credit you have avail-
able versus how much debt
you're carrying. You can im-
prove your credit score by pay-
ing down debt over time,
another reason to get started
well before you apply for a
mortgage.
Consumers are entitled to a
free credit report every 12


Associated Press
A sale pending is outside a home Jan. 5 in Mount Lebanon, Pa. After
years in the doldrums, the housing market appears back on track.
Home sales and prices are up, and mortgage rates remain near
historic lows, reinvigorating the appeal of homeownership.


months from each of the credit
bureaus: Experian, TransUnion
and Equifax. You can get copies
at www.annualcreditreport.


com.
In addition, avoid taking on
new debt in the months before
you set out to buy a home, as new


loans or credit cards can ding
your credit score temporarily.
Even borrowers who like to
use their credit cards often and
pay down the balance every
month should refrain or ease
back on using credit cards for a
couple of months before apply-
ing for a home loan, Baehr said.
5. Get financial
documents in order.
When it comes time to for-
mally apply for the loan, lenders
will probe deep into your finan-
cial records.
Get ahead of the requests by
pulling together at least three
months of bank statements, pay
stubs, and at least two years of
income tax filings.
If you're going to be receiving
financial help from family on the
down payment, the bank will
want to know the source. That
might mean your benefactor
may also need to show bank
statements related to their fi-


nancial gift to you as well, Baehr
said.
6. Get pre-approved
for a loan.
Before you begin your home
search, ask a lender to assess
how much you can borrow. Once
the lender issues you a pre-ap-
proval letter, it's a solid indica-
tion of what you can spend.
"It's not like having cash in
hand, but it's almost as close,"
Larsen said.
One caveat: Understand the
difference between a pre-
approval letter and being
prequalified for a loan.
Being prequalified for a loan
doesn't commit the lender. It's
basically an opinion drawn from
a cursory assessment of your fi-
nancial profile. A preapproval
letter is preceded by a thorough
credit and income review,
though the loan won't go through
until all of the borrower's finan-
cial information is verified.


MONEY
Continued from Page Dl

hand, if you can use the
same 25,000 miles to get a
ticket that might cost you
$700 or $800, that's a great
deal. Some programs
allow you to redeem
mileage for merchandise
and hotel stays, not just
airline tickets. One caveat:
You have to be careful to
use your mileage before it
expires. Of course, the
percentage that you re-
ceive on a cash-back card
is also a variable.
I travel a good deal, so
the mileage credit card
works best for me.
Dear Bruce: Can you
explain a little about CDs?
I want to leave some extra
money to one of my chil-
dren, and a relative sug-
gested buying CDs. This
way it would not be in the
will, as I don't want the
other children to feel like
I am favoring one over an-
other. One child has more
need, and one of the oth-
ers cannot understand


that. RE, via email
Dear RP: As I have said
many times in my column
and on my show, I
wouldn't feel any guilt
about giving one child
more than another. Needs
vary, and everyone should
understand that You have
every right to leave what-
ever to whomever.
You can buy a CD in
your name with a provi-
sion it will become that
child's upon your death.
Nobody has to know you
set it up this way Just be
certain the beneficiary
knows the CD is there, so
he or she can contact the
institution quickly and
have the money turned
over to him or her
Dear Bruce: My wife
and I, both retired, re-
ceived a nice inheritance
in the form of stocks and
bonds. The investment
company and the repre-
sentative who dealt with
us are in our hometown,
but we have since moved
many states away
Should we continue
with this same office and
representative, or should


we now deal with the com-
pany's office in our new
town? Of course, the origi-
nal representative would
like to keep us; we just
don't know if this is wise or
not. -Joseph in Michigan
Dear Joseph: Given the
representative handling
the stocks and bonds ap-
parently has done a de-
cent job and had the
confidence of your bene-
factor, and considering
your lack of knowledge in
this area, I would have no
problem keeping the in-
vestments with the origi-
nal representative. The
fact he or she is in another
state has no relevance.
I originally lived in New
Jersey and now live in
Florida. I still have invest-
ments with a company in
my first hometown. In
today's world, no matter
where the broker is, he's
in your backyard.
Dear Bruce: Is there
any way I can protect my-
self from my husband's
debt? Reader, via email
Dear Reader: You have
asked a profound and
deep question to which


there is no absolute
answer.
First, it depends on
what you have signed dur-
ing your marriage. Gener-
ally speaking, a husband
and wife are considered
liable for debts incurred
during the marriage. Even
if the courts decide your
husband is responsible as
far as creditors are con-
cerned, you as his wife
- are very much on the
notes.
If you are as concerned
as you appear to be, you
should consult an attorney
in your state and find out
precisely what you can do
now to protect your inter-
ests. Time is your enemy;
get on it.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.
corn or to Smart Money,
P.O. Box 7150, Hudson,
FL 34674. Questions of
general interest will be
answered in future
columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal
replies cannot be
provided.


HERZOG
Continued from Page Dl

round for a foursome and
receive advertising and
public recognition for your
business for a reduced
cost of $300. You will save
$40 with the package
price.
The golf classics format is
a four-person scramble.
The contest will include
flight prizes, putting com-
petitions and two hole-in-
one contests.
To register with PayPal,
email citruschapter@
live.com. To register
through the mail, send or
delivery checks to SCORE,
3810 S. Lecanto Highway,
Lecanto, FL 34461. Make
checks payable to SCORE
No. 646. All entries must
be received by Friday,
March 29.
Tournament co-chair-
persons are Dennis King
and Dan Crishon. Call the
SCORE Office at 352-249-
1236 for more information.
Citrus SCORE is a
chapter of a national non-


profit organization. We
are an educational arm of
the Small Business Ad-
ministration. As such, we
coach and counsel any
and all small business-
people on starting a new
business or growing an
existing one. We are vol-
unteers and SCORE does
not charge for its mentor-
ing services.
We have served more
than 4,000 small busi-
nesses in Citrus County
since our inception more
than 14 years ago. The
funds we receive go to pay
our tournament expenses
and if any excess revenue
is left, SCORE use it to
support other nonprofits
in our community and pay
office expenses incurred
in operating the chapter
business.
Our motto is "For The
Life Of Your Business."


Dr FrederickJ Herzogis
the immediate past
chairman and president
of Citrus SCORE. He can
be reached attherzog@
tampabay.rrcom.


D4 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


BUSINESS










To place an ad, call 563-5966


Clarified 1
..., ch^ \^y *. I fl p.sfi


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748
A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748



A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
CRYSTAL RIVER
APTS

Now Renting 1 & 2
BDR units starting at
$518. mo. AVery
Nice Place to Come
Home To. Quiet,
Clean, Well
Maintained, Beautiful
off Road Setting
on Rt 486 near
Publix, WinnDixie &
New Walmart 5 min.
away. Situated on 4
Beautiful Acres. Mgr
Lives on Site. Central
Laundry Room on
Site. Must meet
Some Income
Requirements.
(352) 795-1700





DOGS two S/f Jack
Russell's don't need to
go together Must be
only dogs. Fenced yard
a must. Free to Good
Home only
352-746-0100
FORD
1995 E350 16' Box
Truck, 7.3, Tommy lift-
shelving, 198kmiles
$4800 352-586-1736
House Cleaner

Timely, accurate &
exp. w/references
352-302-6418
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998
Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings


Min Pin/ Terrier Mix
301bs Black/Tan with
white stripe on neck.
Last seen 02/28/13
wearing black collar. Co-
mes to the name Fogel.
His family misses him
very much!!
Contact Allegra,
3525861808
*reward*
ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
* 352422-7279 **
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369
Wanted a
Mrs. Doubtfire

for 2 boys, ages 6 & 10
352-527-9133



FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087



INVERNESS
Free Oak fire wood
parkside ave. on left at
power pole help yourself



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 35-795l-0077


.LA. CI VVALL. I
lost in the vicinity of
Wendy's & Outback
Steakhouse in
Inverness. Please Call
to verify important
cards inside
352-464-0852

CHIHUAHUA
his name is Bo
weighs approx 7 lbs. Igt
Tan, lost in vicinity of
Fairview Estates,
missing since Saturday
Reward 352-697-1937

Mens Watch lost in the
vacinity of Bealls and
TJ Maxx in Inverness.
Reward offered (352)
270-8488


Mm Hin/ lerner Mix
301bs Black/Tan with
white stripe on neck.
Last seen 02/28/13
wearing black collar. Co-
mes to the name Fogel.
His family misses him
very much!!
Contact Allegra,
3525861808
*reward*

MIXED BREED HOUND
DOG, Mostly Black, little
bit of Brown,
35 TO 40 lbs answers
to Daisy, dragging 4ft
red/white leash
352-270-0812




Found Yorkie
Female,
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 249-7454

Small Black and Tan
dog w/ collar. In Dun-
ellon Rainbow Lake
Estates Saturday Even-
ing. (352) 445-9564




AVAILABLE
Pool Suoolv Store
W/Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100,00011 Call Pat
**(813) 230-7177"*

PARTY PONY
NEEDED
April 20th Crystal
River
**352-613-0592*




FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.OOlb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Wanted a
Mrs. Doubtfire

for 2 boys, ages 6 & 10
352-527-9133





Citrus Podiatry
Center, PA

Medical
Receptionist:
Part-time M, TU, W
8:30-5pm.
Two office locations.
$10.50/hr. Vacation,
holiday & uniform
benefits. Minimum
of 2 years exp. in
a medical office
setting.
Send Resume to:
P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120
No phone calls or
faxes accepted/
no exceptions.

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST

For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
vahoo com


FIT DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Dental Exp. a must!!
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry

Medical Careers
begin here


.Train ONLINE for Allied
Health and Medical Man-
agement. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV certi
fled. Call 888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnline.com

















www.chronicleonline.com


P/T Activities
Director/
Caregiver

CNA/Caregiver
352-344-5555


P/T CNA'S/HHA
Homemaker's
& Companions

Have level 2 bckgrnd
ck cpr certified &
prior employment
verification
(352) 597-4084


PT Certified
Dental Assistant/
Front Office

Call 352-746-0330,
Ask for Vicki.


Residential
SA Educator
The Centers is
seeking an Educator
to provide educa-
tional services to
adolescents in our
24/7 residential
substance abuse
treatment facility in
Lecanto. Teach les-
son plans according
to each county's
requirements, i.e.,
math, social studies,
science, English,
etc. Assist individu-
als with special and
specific needs,
interactions and
goals. Bachelors in
field of Edu or Hu-
man Services & exp
reqd. Middle School
or HS level State of
FL teaching certifi-
cation preferred.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, The Centers, Inc.
(352) 291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us


RN
UNIT MANAGER
Full Time

Seeking a dynamic
experienced
RN Leader to
join a progressive
customer service
oriented team.
Candidate will have
a stable work
history, excellent
clinical and man-
agement abilities,
great organizational
skills and effective
delegation and
monitoring of
clinical systems.
Excellent benefits
Apply In Person at:
ARBOR TRAIL REHAB
611 Turner Camp Rd
Invernes s, FL
Send resume to:
ATDON@Southern
LTC.com
An EEO/AA
Employer, M/F/V/D


TBOSS Therapist

The Centers is
seeking Masters
Level Therapist
for TBOSS position in
Citrus County. Must
have min 2 yrs exp
working with adults,
children & adoles-
cents providing
individual, group
& family therapy.
Full benefits pkg
DFWP/EOE/
We E-Verify. Fax or
e-mail resume to
HR, the Centers, Inc.,
(352)291-5580,
jobs@thecenters.us
For more info visit
www.thecenters.us





AIRLINE CAREERS

- Become an Aviation
Maintenance Tech. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. Job
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
(866)314-3769

FINANCE
DIRECTOR

THE CITY OF
CRYSTAL RIVER
is seeking
applicants for the
position of
Finance Director.
Position reports
directly to the City
Manager and is
responsible for
financial reporting,
budget development,
utility billing,
collections, human
resources, risk
management, and
payroll/benefits
administration.
Required qualifica-
tions include a
degree in
accounting/business
administration and
prior experience in
governmental
accounting. Salary
range is $50,688 to
$71,806. Letters of
application, with a
full resume, should
be mailed to:
City Manager,
123 NW Highway 19,
Crystal River, FL
34428 and be
postmarked no later
than March 15, 2013.
Envelopes should be
marked as "Finance
Director Applicant".


Equal Opportunity
Employer


AIRLINE CAREERS

Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance
Career
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
(866)314-3769

INSURANCE
AGENT

Looking for licensed
insurance agent with
experience.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

OFFICE
ASSISTANT

Needed M-F
8am to 4:30pm
Quickbooks, Word,
Excel Knowledge
helpful. Must be
self-motivated &
capable of working
independently
Email To:
sccmain@earthlink.
net




Exp. Breakfast
Cook

Must cook eggs in a
pan! Apply in person
or call between
2pm to 4pm
Shrimp Landing, Inglis
352-447-5201

P/T COOK

For Health Care
Faciltiy Backgroud
screening required.
352-344-5555 ex 102

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
Experienced
e- P/T Servers
Cooks
e- Bartender
Hostess &
e* Dish Washer

Call 352-746-6727
Tue. Sat. 2p -4:30p
For Application
Appointment




Acct Specialist
Filling Immediate
Openings;
benefits offered and
training provided.
Call 352-436-4460
to Schedule an
Interview


CHIRONICLE


ADVERTISING
INSIDE SALES
Representative

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting applications
for an
Advertising
Inside Sales
Representative.

Must have mini-
mum of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
c Must be able to
maintain current
account base as well
as prospecting for
new clients over the
phone.
F Fast paced envi-
ronment that requires
ability to multi task
with ease.
SComputer profi-
ciency a must.
Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.

Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
(352)564-2935
or email:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.corn

Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE

COMMERCIAL
INSURANCE CSR

Commercial Insurance
CSR and inside sales
position needed.
Knowledge of AMS360
preferred. Email
resume to Tracy Fero
at tfero-afero
insurance.com
or call 352-422-2160
Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River
SALES
Good Benefits,
401 K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace




A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic

Must have valid
driver's license.
Min. 3 yrs. Exp.
Applv in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895W. Gulf to Lake


Hwy, Lecanto
DWFP


AutoTechnician

Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
Automotion,
Floral City
352-341-1881

Carpet Cleaners
Full Time Positions
Stanley Steemer
Clean FI MVR record
22 yrso or older. Drug
free, background
check. Benefits
Paid training,
401k, holiday pay
911 Eden Dr
Inverness,
fax 726-8895
ci.whitei
steemer.com

Driver

$0.01increase per
mile after 6 months and
12 months. $0.03
Quarterly Bonus.
Daily or weekly pay.
CDL-A, 3 months
current experience
(800)414-9569
www.driveknight.com
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
DRIVERS
Driver Trainees Needed
NOW! Become a driver for
Werner Enterprises. Earn
$800 per week! Local CDL
Training (877)214-3624
Exp. Residential
Electrician
Min. 4 yrs. exp.
Rough-Ins and Trims.
Familiar with Citrus
County Codes,
needs valid DL, tools,
own transportation
Apply in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W.Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto
DWFP


Your World

Sq9a9ge-)N tLE



(,I RO )NwCLE


Parts Support
Associate

Sumter Electric
Cooperative, a
large electric distri-
bution company,
has an immediate
opening for an ex-
perienced truck
Parts Support
Associate in the
Fleet section of HR &
Corporate Services
located at 380 SR
471, Sumterville, FL,
33585.

Requirements in-
clude a HS
diploma/GED; FL
Class B CDL (or abil-
ity to obtain one
within 6 months of
hire); excellent
driving record; and
a minimum of two
years' experience in
truck parts inventory
ordering, distribution
and delivery.
Excellent telephone,
customer service,
verbal communica-
tion, computer data
entry, and Internet
search skills are also
required. Candi-
dates must demon-
strate the ability to
perform a truck
parts search and
competent skills
utilizing MS Word,
Excel and Outlook.
Truck parts distribu-
tor or electric utility
fleet experience
and fluency in
Spanish are pre-
ferred. Normal work
hours are 8-hour
shifts, M-F, between
the hours of 7:00am
- 5:00pm.

Minimum starting
pay is $14.80/hour
and includes an
excellent benefit
package. Back-
ground check,
post-offer physical
exam and drug
screen are required.
Applications will be
accepted online
only beginning
3/1/13 through
3/15/13 at:
https://www.seco
energyjobs.com

SECO is an
EEO/AAP/ E-Verify
Employer. M/F/D/V


Fax:(352 56356651 TlliFre: 888)85223401 E ai:casiifiied~hoicleoni nejm Iwest:ww^ho


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 D5


-I- H


AUTO DETAILERS
& MANAGERS
Homosassa, Brooksville
& Inverness dealers.
Call 727-808-0341

LAWN
MAINTENANCE

Experienced only
need apply.
Must have valid
DL. and own
transportation
Please leave
experience history
on msg.
352-533-7536 or
email resume to:
LGS.Florida@gmail.c
om

REFACING
LAMINATOR

Cabinets &
Countertops,Top Pay,
352-503-7188

Roofers/Laborers

All Phases, Tile
(352) 564-1242
STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume1801@yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls
STUCCO
Mechanic Wanted

Crew leader
position
All inquiries
Please call:
(3521 746-5951




Community
Center Aide
Announcement
# 13-07

Full time position
assisting volunteers
and clients at the
Central Ridge Com-
munity Center in
Beverly Hills. HOURS
AND DAYS OF
WORK VARIES
WEEKLY. Must be
able to lift at least
fifty (50) pounds.
Must possess valid
Florida Driver
License. Starting
pay $7.79 hourly.
Excellent benefits.

ALL APPLICATIONS
MUST BE SUBMITTED
ONLINE:
Please visit our
website at www.
bocc.citrus.fl.us
You can also visit
one of the local
Libraries or the
Human Resources
Department,
3600 W Sovereign
Path, Suite 178,
Lecanto, FL 34461
to apply online by
Friday, Mar. 8, 2013
EOE/ADA


APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500
F/T Maintenance
/Grounds

Skills required:
Electrical, Plumbing,
Painting, Mechani-
cal and Grounds
Maintenance HVAC
certification
preferred

River Reach
Apartments
2151 River Reach Cr
Crystal River, FL
34428
PHONE/FAX
352-795-8024, EOE

NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV, or pick up
with a cap Large
enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pm

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


Cf.l- m E






Your\0rkld first


Need a jobI)
or a
qualified
employee?


This area's
#1
employment
source!


CHRONICLE
L-1
( I


YOUR CHOICE



EXPERIENCE Q BUICK


BRAND NEW 2013

BUICK LACROSSE
36 '--


24 MONTH LEASE INCLUDES: t'!(
* 2 YEARS MAINTENANCE
*2 YEARS SIRIUS/XM RADIO
* 2 YEARS ONSTAR DIRECTIONS k
& CONNECTIONS


0 MAINTENANCE FEES


U X E IECU-S C


BRAND NEW 2013
GMC SIERRA

EXT. CAB SLE
20 -

*V6 AUTO A/C
AM/FM STEREO
STABILITRAK*
*CRUISE CONTROL
CHROME FRONT BUMPER


0% FINANCING AVAILABLE


MO.
LEASE*


VIEW OUR ENTIRE
INVENTORY ONLINE!


*-i "* i


1275 S. Suncoast Blvd./ I US Hwy 19

Homosassa 352-795-6800


*2013 GMC Sierra: 39 mo. closed end lease, $3,559 total due at signing. 2013 Buick LaCrosse: 24 mo. closed end lease, $3,139 total due at
< signing. Plus tax, tag, title and 499.50 dealer fee. Includes all available incentives and rebates assigned to dealer. 12,000/mi., year, $.20/mile for
overage. Lessee pays for excess wear. WAC. (1) See dealer for details. (2) WAC. See dealer for details. Prices subject to change due to
manufacturer's incentives. Photos for illustration purposes only.


h~ tii fniki]


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MARINA HELP

Part time Hours Vary.
Must be able To
work weekends.
Able To Lift 501bs.
Relate Well With
People. Boat
Experience Req.,
Accepting
Applications At The
Rainbow Rivers Club
20510 The Granada
Dunnellon


MARKETING REP

Calling clients
from established
database. Some
office / clerical
required as well.
Computer exp.
helpful. Personable,
motivated mature.
Salary discussed
at interview.
352-382-0770






House Cleaner

Timely, accurate &
exp. w/references
352-302-6418






ATTEND
COLLEGE ONLINE
from Home.

*Medical
*Business
*Criminal Justice
*Hospitality
Job placement
assistance.Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified.
SCHEV
authorized. Call
800-443-5186
www.Centura
Online.com


MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES
NEEDED

Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant.
NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you Job
ready ASAP.
HSDiploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
(888)374-7294





AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100.000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177*





Laudromat for Sale
CrystalRiver,Dropoff
Svc. Lg, Clean, Well
Est. 352-795-2399


CLASSIFIED







D6 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS






A -

130 MPH
25 x 303x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED

30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$15,995. INSTALLED

40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-1 0x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed

+ A local Fl. Manufact.
+ We custom build-
We are the factory
+ Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
+ Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
+ All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor
www. metal
structuresllc.com




Antique Wooded
Tool Box
Loaded with Machinist
tools $400
352-344-1713

VINTAGE CHINA
CLOSET 1040's
deco type glass door in
front nice cond. wood
$100.00 firm 513 4473




18 IN LARGE KNIFE
stainless steel
20.00 obo linda
341-2271

700 50's & 60's LP's
Record Player & CD
Recorder $350 for all
352-527-6955

1918 JENNY STAMP
Good condition
no marks
50.00 OBO linda
341-2271

NATIONAL BUYER
in Florida
Paying cash for your
collectibles, We want your
old sports cards, toys and
comic books. CASH
PAID!! Call TODAY:
(800)273-0312

RECORDS 3 Boxes of
Collectable 78 Records
$75.00 352-746-5421

SWORD the sword of
the holy grail 44" $100
352 447 4380 after
12PM

SWORD WITH CASE
50.00 obo linda
341-2271




NICE DARK GREEN
MARBLE SPA Needs
motor & frame work.
100.00 firm Linda
341-2271


Applance


2 FEDDER WINDOW m
AIC UNITS Basically
NEW 5yrs old but only 2 LA
weeks of use. 5k BTU Ex
$75 each 352-634-1882 $50.C


DISH WASHER GE
white, Energy Star,
good condition. $100.
352 382 0347
KENMORE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIDG
icemaker, ice & water
thru door, bisque you
pick up $200.00
352-746-0401
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179




TYPEWRITER Electric
Pansasonic R200
Typewriter $40.00
352-746-5421




DUDLEY'S






AUCTION
_3/3L Antique &
Collectible 1pm Fur-
niture, Estate Jewels,
Sterling, art, coins
& more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comrn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




12" CHOP SAW
BLADES
12x5/32x20mm arbor 3
metal 1 concrete $30.00
all 352-586-8657
BENCH GRINDER
ashland industrial 5"
bench grinder.
3450rpms.$35.00.
352-527-7840
ROUTER TABLE
STEEL LEGS FIBER-
GLASS TOP ONLY
45.00 464 0316
SHOPSMITH MARK V
is 5 TOOLS IN ONE-
SAW, DRILL PRESS,
DISC SANDER, BOR-
ING MACH, LATHE.
$1000. 352-527-6425
SMALL OLDER AIR
COMPRESSOR
CAMPEL HAUSFIELD
10 GALLON WORKS
OK 50.00 464 0316




2 BOXES OF TAPES 2
Large boxes of Reel to
Reel Tapes Mixed
$50.00 352-746-5421
CD HOLDER
Black Metal 48"H
Holds 80 cd's
$15.00
352 -628-4210
DISH Network.
Starting at $19.99/month
(for 12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY
Installation! CALL Now!
1-888-685-4144
SANYO 36" Color TV
with remote
works good
$50.00
352-628-4210
TAPE PLAYER &
RECORDER Ampex
Reel to Reel Player
Recorder $75.00
353-746-5421
VCR/DVD EMERSON
player/recorder
with remote
$25.00
352-628-4210


ADDER 20 Foot
tension Ladder
00 352-746-5421


COMPUTER
Dell dimension 3000,
windows XP home,
15" flat screen, key-
board, printer, mouse,
speakers, $125. Com-
puter Desk $35. Both
for $150(352) 382-7074
COMPUTER HP
Windows 98
complete with
all accessories
$75.00 352-628-4210
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




DUDLEY'S






AUCTION

3/3: Antique
& Collectible 1pm
Furniture, Estate
Jewels, Sterling, art,
coins & more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comr
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267AB1667




2 Sets of heavy duty
lamps
$50.00
352-795-7254
3 pc. brown micro-
fiber couch, asset &
dbl rocker recliner 10
mos. old. New cond.
$425.
Large coffee Table
$60. (352) 794-3085
4 pc Living Room Set
Tan Floral Pattern
good Cond. $300
352-302-7451
8 pc Oak King
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334
48" Round Oak
Pedestal Tble $90
& 6 drawer wooden
desk $50
352-726-5159
5pc Bedroom Set
4 poster queen bed
Light colored wood, very
good cond. $450
352-527-7445
China Hutch 2 pc,
2 doors on hutch,
very good condition
$150; (352) 527-0137
China Hutch
Corner unitlike new
$400,triple dresser
w/mirror 12 draws $275
352-860-2792
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK W/ HUTCH in
great condition, office
quality $100 call
352-257-3870
DAY BED INCLUDING
TRUNDLE BED, WHITE
with decorative metal
frame, like new. $200
352 382 0347
Deacon's Bench
Made from Hatch Cover
of 1900 Sailing Vessel,
Originally sold atAber-
crombie & Fitch in NYC
$300 352-746-0100
Dining Room Set w/4
upholstered chairs,
glass-top table, xtra top
exc. cond. $200 obo
352-527-3382
Estate Sale
Whole house full of
Furn. and access.
Qu Bed Set $475
Call for appt. to view
352-794-3693


[--
GREEN BASSETT
SOFA in great condition
w/ throw pillows $100
call 352-257-3870
KING SIZE MATTRESS
& BOXSPRINGS
ortho, like new
$100 set, 352-527-9218
Large Armoire, like
new $160.
Rattan and glass
Armoire, 5 shelves
$100
(352) 794-3085
Large Coffee Table
$60.
Heavy Swann Mirror
$80
(352) 794-3085
Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$125.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $75.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET
In Original Plastic,
Never Used, Org
$3000, sacrifice $975.
CHERRY BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes
Org. $6000, sacrifice
$1995. Can Deliver.
Bill (813)298-0221.
Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
MATTRESS WITH BOX
SPRINGS Queen,firm,
non smokers, no pets.
$65 352 382 0347
Motorized Recliner
King size,black vinyl
rocker/recliner, 7 mo
old, $400
(352) 489-6341
OAK COMPUTER
DESK with hutch
58"wide 63"tall can text
picture call or text $100
352-746-0401
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Sofa/Sleeper
Full size $175,
Broyhill 6ft Leather
couch dk maroo, like
new $500 860-2792
Swivel Barstools
set of 4, padded seats
$200,Cmplete
Bedroom QueenSet,
Serta Pedic Pillowtop,
$200 352-249-3259
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, spe-
cial, asap. $15
(352)465-1616
TRUNDLE BED
w/ 2 mattress'
$195; double mattress
w/ box spring & frame.
Like new, $175
(352) 586-0493
Twin Hide-A-Bed
brown tweed
exc. cond. $100
765-748-4334
WICKER HEAD
BOARD KING SIZE
good condition, $100.00
513 4473
WINE CABINET
WOOD, off white
EUC..Holds 20 bottles
of wine. $45.00
352-249-7212
Winged back Chair
Beige
$40.00
(SMW)
352-503-7536
X-wide cushioned
wicker chair & foot-
stool, 4 pillows, $125
(352) 425-0667




CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER 42" Deck
16HP w/bagger New
Battery, Good Shape
$650, 717-574-1119


CLASSIFIED



Craftsmen Riding
Mower, 42" deck
18% hsp engine
$450 352-746-7357
Roto-Tiller
Troy-Built Pony
rear tine, 5hsp, runs
good $200 firm
352-507-1490




l CANNA BULBS f
2 colors, $1 ea.
352-212-5244




HOMOSASSA
Sat. 2 & Sun. 3 8a-?
NO EARLY BIRDS
3510 S. Lee Way
off Rosedale




2 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$25ea 352-613-0529
10 PAIR MENS JEANS
SIZE 32 / 5.00 EACH
LINDA 341-2271
CAMOUFLAGE PANTS
/ LIKE NEW size 31
waist/ 15.00 obo Linda
341-2271
DEPMETED JEANS /
NEW Size 33 slim /
10.00 linda 341-2271
KIDS PINNED
STRIPPED SUIT size
16 husky/20.00 Linda
341-2271
Men's Durango Boots
11% D & Harley
Davidson Boots 9'/2D
both pairs $150
352-795-7254
MENS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30, $65
EACH 352-613-0529
PURPLE DRESSES
size 12 to 18 I have 6 ,
$60.00 for all. 513-4473




FAX AND COPIER
Panasonic excellent
condition $20
352-628-3418
HP COMPUTER
PRINTER SCANNER
excellent condition $25
352-628-3418



!!!!!225/60 R16!!!!!
Great.tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
*****295/40 R20*****
Good tread!! Only
asking $70 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
---225/70 R19.5---
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes,
basket s, Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
60 ft white wire closet
shelving & misc hdwr,
3ft to 10ft lenghts, $30,
31/2HP Lawn Edger.
Needs tune-up. $90
(352) 382-7074
20" GIRLS BIKE
glamour girl
silver/blue,basket &
streamers $30.00
352-794-3020/5864987
3ft Tall Pilsener
Glass Beer Bottle
Exact replica $100.00
352-628-1723
BENCH GRINDER
ashland industrial 5"
bench grinder.3450
rpm. $35.00.
352-527-7840
BENCH LIGHT
Florescent Bench Light
$10.00 352-746-5421
BICYCLES One 26"
Mens 15 speed $25
Two 20" boys w/helmets
$15. ea. 716/860-6715


i-
BOX OF KIDS BOOKS
large box of books
and misc girls toys
$15.00 for all
352-794-3020/5864987
coleman 2 burner,dual
fuel camping
stove.new.never
used.$60.
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077
Garden Tracker,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk ,1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
GENERATOR
portable, 5550 watts
8550 starting watts
never used $350
352-795-2399
Golf Cart Rear Seat
and frame $150
Riding lawn mower
attachments,
for JD, wheel horse,
craftsman $50
(315) 466-2268
GOODYEAR TIRE
REGATTA P225/60R16
ONLY 35.00 464 0316
Hand Craft Books
and Magazines
$100 for all
(over 300 items)
352-746-5974
Hitch bar w/ ball for
$15
352-341-1649
KIDS 8 + VOLCANO
KIT Smithsonian / 7.00
Linda 341-2271
leaning post with bases,
3 rod holders, clean,
$60.00 obo.
1-352-726-2350
LG OCTANE Verizon
CELL PHONE with case
and power cord
$40.00 call or text
352-746-0401
Lg Recliner/Rocker
brown, exc. cond.
$125obo NOOK
e-reader w/cover, $75
obo 352-527-3874
LIGHT HER FIRE
TAPES & BOOK By
Dr Kreidman NEW
25.00 OBO Linda
341-2271
Love Seat, White Bro-
cade chair, Taupe re-
cliner, TV Sanyo, Misc.
Baby Items
Under $200 for all
(352) 403-7863
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125, 621-4500
MEGA BLOKS
DRAGON in box/cd
Havocfire #9693
$30.00
352-6284210
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike, 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
must have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, $30
(352)465-1616
NEW BATH TUBLIGHT
TAN / 75.00 OBO
LINDA 341-2271
Patio Table &
4 Chairs
$50.
Freezer, small $75.
352 726-8524
PRINT 1901 40x30 THE
ACCOLADE MEDIEVAL
FRAMED $100
352 447 4380
AFTER 12PM
RHEEM HOT WATER
HEATER 30 gal / needs
thermo
50.00 /OBO Linda
341-2271
ROUTER Black &
Decker Router 1 1/2
HP- Brand New $50.00
353-746-5421


SHOWER GLASS
DOORS NEVER USED
50.00/obo Linda
341-2271
SPREADER
SMALL MANUAL
GOOD CONDITION
$20 352-613-0529
TRUCK WINDOW
rear/solid
factory tint
for GMC $50.00
352-628-4210
TY MASTODONS
1/Colosso 2/Giganto
$4.00ea. $10.00 all
exclnt. cond/tagged
352-628-4210
UTILITY SINK
Like new, w/valve
ready to install
$30, 352-503-2959
Wacker GP 5600
Commercial
Generator 120/240V
Low Hrs. $600.
(352) 563-0328
WINDOWS
Wht vinyl, db sliding,
gas filled, (2) 90 x 58
$50.00 Pr. you remove
352-201-1735



2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
1 Med. size $250.
1 Large $325
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER NEW 25.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM
WALKER BOTH HAVE
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
20.00 EACH 464 0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT &
leg rests only 100.00
464 0316
TUB RAIL Medline
Bathtub Deluxe
Safety Rail
$30.00
352-628-4210
WALKER 4WHEEL
seat&basket hand brake
good condition
$50.00
352-628-4210



"FAT STRAT" STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $45
352-601-6625
"FAT STRAT" STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS,SOUNDS,LOOKS
GREAi! ONLY $45
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
BEAUTIFUL! BLACK
W/ABALONE $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACKAGE
DEAL W/EVERYTHING
YOU NEED, IN BOX
$60 352-601-6625
"NEW" EPIPHONE
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMP,GIGBAQTUNER,ST
RAP & MORE $90
352-601-6625
8 STRING MORRELL
LAP STEEL PRO
MODEL W/LIPSTICK
PICKUP ONLY $100
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR &
MANDOLIN Washburn
D25S w Hd cse &
Manzio pickup. Martini
mndln w sft cse. Both vy
gd cond. $225 obo.
352-341-0890
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
DREDNAUGHT LOOKS
NEW! PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT!
$45 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PERFECT FOR
BEGINNERS PLAYS &
SOUNDS GOOD ONLY
$25 352-601-6625


ACOUSTIC
W/GIGB
ACCESORIE
& SOUNDS
$50 352-6
DEAN VEI
ELECTRIC
PAULOWAI
PLAYS GR
352-601
FENDER MI
ELECT
GUITAR,BL
KIDS OR TF
352-601
FENDER
AFFINITY PR
BASS W/FF
AMP&GIGB
352-601
Forming C
Ban
(352) 52
KEYBOARD
Model P
small pc
with ad
$30.00 352-
RESOPI
GUITAR(D
ROUND NEC
& CHROM
$100 352-6
WASHBUR
ELECTRIC
BEAUTIFUL
FINISH LP S
352-601



BAVARIAN
SERVICE F
DINNERWAI
trim. $20
(352) 74'
BREAD MAI
condition, B
$15 (352)4
KENMORE
MACHINE
Free Arm Jus
Sews Grea
352 270
KIRBY CI
VACUM CLE
many attack
including rug
$75 352 3
LAMPS 21
Aztec Lan
Shades
352-746
Used Movin
60 assorted
paks heavy w
6 reg paper,
without rod,
com. boxes.
352-419
VACUUM C
Kenmore 12
Eureka HZ 6'
Uprights
352-746


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE



GUITAR Teauu Tompac
BAG & Taurus 22 Caliber
ES PLAYS New In Box
GREAT! $400. obo
01-6625 (352) 795-0088
NDETTA After 11 am til 7p
GUITAR, BICYCLES Wildwood
NA BODY Huffy & Iverson Bike
!EAT $45 $30.00 352-746-5421
-6625 BIKE CARRIER Auto
INI STRAT Bell Delux Bike Carrier
FRIC for 2 $30.00
ACK,FOR 352-746-5421
RAVEL $50 BROWNING CITORI
1-6625 Plus,12 gage, trap/skeet
SQUIRE Gun w/leather case
RECISION $1200 716-835-8084
REE 30W CAMPING STOVE
BAG $100 coleman 2 burner,dual
-6625 fuel,camping stove.
Country new. never used.
d. $60.00. 352-527-7840
7-1430 CLUB CAR. 2006
'YAMAHA w/ Charger, good
SS-12 tires, almost new bat-
irtable teries, garage kept
apter $1500 must sell
-6284210 352-527-3125
HONIC Concealed Weapons
)OBRO) Permit Course
CK BLACK DAN'S GUN ROOM
AE"NEW" (352) 726-5238
601-6625 ECLIPSE ELLIPTICAL
RN LYON space saver exercise
GUITAR like new, $150
L BLACK 352-422-0311
STYLE $50 EZ GO GOLF CART
-6625 Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756
N CHINA FISHING TACKLE
FOR 12+ Rods/ Lures/Line
RE w/gold Hooks, Lead Weights
0 OBO other Misc. Related
6-3327 Items, $2. and up.
KER Good 352-257-3288
readman, PAINT BALL GUNS (2)
465-1616 brass eagle .68 caliber
SEWING co2 powered
Portable $45.00
st Serviced 352-794-3020/5864987
at $75.00 Rawlings and Truline
09254 9 Iron & 2 woods Golf
LASSIC Clubs $15.00
ANER with 352-628-1723
chments Schwinn Bicycle
renovator. Ladies Red 26 "
82 0347 cruiser, Used once.
Threeway Asking $95
nps with (352) 341-5053
$25.00 Two Bikes
3-5421 male & female
ng Boxes 26" 18 spds, both
h sizes, 3 for $125
white paper, 352-503-2959


2 wardrobe
assorted
$100 cash
9-7376
LEANERS
.0 Amps &
0 Quick UP
$50.00
3-5421


Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE AND
SMALL ONLY 100.00
4640316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 75.00
464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE Sears
Pro Form Stationary
Bike, eliptacle arms,
digital pulse monitor $80
352-212-5286
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE GREAT
FOR THE BACK &
LEGS ONLY 95.00
464 0316
Treadmill Proform XP,
all electronics, includ-
ing power incline,
cost over $800 New
Asking $195.
(352) 464-0316



AR 15, SIG Sauer
M400 Enhanced
5.56/223, MagPul
Acc. Sig Case, Iron
Sights & Red DotScope,
w/ammo $2300 Must
Have FL Carry Permit
352-746-6769


2009 24 x 9 Trailer,
tandem axel, rear ramp,
side door, AC, 200 mi
$2750 (727) 207-1619
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555
CAR TOW DOLLY
new tires, $700
352-503-6972
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
6 X 10 $1,650
6X12 $1,750
7 x 14, Tandem $2,900
7 X 16 Tandem $3,000
8.5x18, Tandem $3,600
LIMITED QUANTITIES
352-564-1299
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352) 603-2761
Utility Trailer
4 x 8 ft, like new,
lots of extra's $500
352-527-3948
UTILITY/BOAT
TRAILER TIRES
4-trailer tires ST-205
175 D14 with galva-
nized rims tires are
about 70% $150.00
3524194187



PINK INFANT TO
TODDLER CARSEAT
$30, expires dec 2016
352 634 2122
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, ok condition.,
$50 (352)465-1616


U nsw w Z Z Y


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
CNA, Seeking in home
position, female w/
refs. Inverness Area
desired 352-201-2120
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518




JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374


(1 "1I' 1\

Y0toI \\OIId first.

li) Da)




i ,


THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469

ON SITE
COMPUTER SERVICE
(352) 341-4150




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patios-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078
FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097
ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554




AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199


COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907



**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352422-7279**



DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696



#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777
ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201


Affordable Handvman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *k
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 A*
Affordable Handyman
V FAST. 100%Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE- Free Est
352-257-9508 *
HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




*K&K Cleaning**
"Good Rates-
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
"call 352-560-7609"
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557


All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955

AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




Merritt Garling Lawn
& Landscape Services
Lawn/Pavers/Plantings
352-287-0159




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
w FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273

Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edge
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767


ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
*352-212-9067**
CHRIS SATCHEL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIORIEXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300


MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.



Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838


#1 Employment source is

www. niclenline.
www.chronicleonline.com


A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452

All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852

KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819

LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570


R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
"Tax Specials*

RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Lic/Ins. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316


DON'T LET YOUR
DRYER STARTING
A FIRE!
-Flat Rale-No S
IH idden Col I:I



call

-g1 20-


*ss
AAA ROOFING

CG l the akah6uste "
Free Written Estimate

$100 OFF:
,Any Re-Roof:
I Must present coupon at time contract is signed 1
Lic./Ins. CCC057537 000E5ZM


BATHFITTER

"One Day Bath Remodeling"
In Just One Day,
We will InstallA Beautiful New Bathtub
or Shower "Right Over"Your Old One!!!
Tub to Shower Conversions Too!!!
Visit our Ocala |
Showroom or call
1-352-624-8827
For a FREE In-Home Estimate!
BATHFITTER.COM


Add an artisic touch to your existing yard

W^ _& or pool or plan


S.- completely new!
l~xw: n "Often imit ted,
nevel dupliated"


YOUR INTEIl OCKING BRICK VPAEI RSPE CIALIST

O COPES
I POOL AND PAVER LLC
Licensed 352400-3188
&. Insured 352-400-3188|


WINID)N
GENIE
We (leaon Windows and o Whole Lot More!

Window Cleaning
Window Tinting
Pressure Washing
Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES
352-503-8465
Bonded & Insured
www.windowgenie.com/springhill


GENERAL AJ-
Stand Alone .,. 'el
Generator

Thomas Electric, LLC
Residential/Commercial Service

Generac-Centurion
Guardian Generators
Factory Authorized Technicians
ER0015377

352-621-1248


W.






SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 D7


A Diabetic needs
unopened, unexpired
boxes of test strips will
pay cash and pick-up,
call Mike 386-266-7748

CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Natalie Hill
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling
Redken Trained


Robbie Ray
Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777
"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"
Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.
Paul Mitchell
Certified.




2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258









ANSLEY
Ansley is a very
beautiful and
unique Jack
Russell.Terrier mix.
She is so striking that
she attracts atten-
tion everywhere she
goes. She is 1 y.o.
and weighs 40
pounds. She is very
smart and a quick
learner. Knows basic
commands, is
housebroken, & gets
along with other
dogs. Seems OK
with cats. You
would be blessed to
add her to your
family.
ID# 17387903.
Call Victoria @
352-302-2838.









BUD
Striking! This is how
we describe Bud,
a very beautiful,
sweet, 2-y.o. black
& white American
Bulldog/Terrier mix.
Has beautiful eyes,
one blue & one
brown. Loves peo-
ple & other dogs,
has medium energy
level, settles down
nicely after exercise.
Walks well on a
leash & sits for treats.
Weighs 55 lbs.
Hearwonrm-negative. 1his
funbving boy
would make a
good family pet.
I D #: 17461796.
Visit or call Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter @ 352-746-8400.


DOG Australian
Shepherd/Terrier Mix.
Great watch dog.
Needs either a farm or
fenced yard.
3524197428

DOG Training & Kennel
crittersandcanines.com





* (352) 634-5039 *






Goofy & Midget, These
playful Pekinese cuddlers
get along famously, can be
adopted separately or as
father/son pair. Both are
neutered, mirco-chipped,
UTD on shots. They are
fostered in a cage free
home, are house trained &
they have been socialized
with other dogs and cats.
We do home & vet checks.
Call 352-419-0223 or visit
savingangelspetrescue.com
to see more pets looking
for their forever homes.


DOGS two S/f Jack
Russell's don't need to
go together Must be
only dogs. Fenced yard
a must. Free to Good
Home only
352-746-0100
Fish Tanks,
and stands,
352-447-1244
Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpUDs.ne


Sparkle, Hemingway
(polydactyl) (extra toes)
This young female kitten
sparkles with playfulness
& affection. INDOOR
ONLY. Spayed, UTD,
litter trained. We do home
& vet checks. Call
352-419-0223wwwsavmngangel-
sp1etescuecomto see
more pets looking for
homes



FOR RENT
BARN & PASTURE
Approx. 10 acres
room for 2-4 horses
Lighted, security.
Water furnished
off Citrus Ave/495
(352) 628-0508
LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033





WINDSHIELD
Citabria, brand new
PMA part, $150 obo
352-419-6086



2 8ft Kayak Calypso's
with 2 paddles,
& 2 life jackets,
Like New
$250 obo for Both
(352) 364-7057



BUY, SELL*
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
**352-563-5510**
03 SEAPRO
17' 90 hp mere. vhf,
gps, trol mtr, fullcover,
bimini, alum trlr $7200
352-419-5363pm
3 16' CANOES
2, 2 Seaters, 1, 3 Seater
on galvanized trailer
w/paddles & lifejackets
$1200 352-795-7335
18HP, Evinrude
short shaft, manual,
good condition.
$460.
Crystal River
(513) 260-6410
ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
















MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trer in
orig. owner $14kobo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailed
included Boat$17,000.s
Canwtolor, nDet s










Used Clean Boats

(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com



DUTCHMEN TRVL
TRAILONTER








2007 Ranier Model
R24Q. 25' with 1
slideout. Very good
cond. 7300 GVWR with
sway bar and wt disbn
hitch. $9900 obo. See at
Picard's Storage.
352-341-0890


ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$50,000 make offer
352-422-1309
JAYCO
1996, Designer 5th
Wheel, 30 ft, slide out,
excellent condition At
Lake Rousseau RV PK
$7,500. obo
248-672-3452



'05 CAMPER
29' Holiday Rambler
Alum fr, Ig slide out.
great cond. $10,900
352-795-5310 or
410-474-3454
29FT TERRY
FLEETWOOD bunk
style camping trailer.
Tag Behind 96 model.
Good shape $3800
(352) 613-2944
CAR/TOY HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $11,900.
For more info call
352-560-7247
COACHMAN
30ft. Qn. Island bed, +
rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equilizing
hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Licl/Ins.
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945



LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414



"BEST PRICE*
For Junk & Unwanted
Cars- CALL NOW
-352-426-4267**
BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ



BUICK
'00, Regal LS, 4 DR.
Loaded, 70K, 24 mpg,
leather, V6 auto clean
$4,475. 352-212-4882
Buick Century
Custom, 57k mi, extra
clean, full power. Runs
excellent $4500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850,352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
97 Deville, 102k miles
clean, sharp, $2800
352-503-6972
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser cony....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see


CORVETTE
2006 Victory Red
tan leather, Convertible.
LS2 400HP. 16K miles,
3LT Option Pkg.
$29,900(352)560-7247
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Edge,
10k miles, Loaded,
exc. cond.$18,500 obo
352-400-6007
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950,352-628-5100
FORD
98 Black Mustang
runs well! $3000
Iv msg 352-344-0093
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440
NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
OLDSMOBILE
89 Cutlass Ciera
2dr, runs well, good
paint, $700
614-570-9902
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing
SOLD
MERCURY
05 Grand Marquis Exc.
cond. 63.9kmi,leather,
smk free, orig. owner



2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443
AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAR 3. '13
1-800-438-8559




2002 Ford F 150 Sport
4X4 Super Cab 4 Dr,
Auto, Black, 5.4 V8,
Runs Great. $5500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
DODGE
1996 Dakota Sport V6
50,300 actual miles.
Runs great, excellent
shape. $5,500 OBO
Sugarmill
740-705-9004
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440



BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100


FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE, COME SEE ALL


OUR CARS, TRUCKS, VANS AND SPORT UTILITY


VEHICLES WITH ALL PRICES DRASTICALLY SLASHED!


M


a


THERE WILL BE





NO SALES OPL





NAGERS OR EMPLIYEIS






ON THE PREMISES.

(NO ONE WILL EVEN BE AVAILABLE TO ANSWER THE PHONES)


Because new models are arriving daily, management has been ordered to
eliminate excess inventory. All prices will be slashed and will be clearly
posted on each vehicle. Bring a pen and paper. Write down the stock
number and price. Come in as early as possible on Monday, March 4, 2013





FIRST COME FIRST SERVED!










>Jeep DOD J6 sl


AUTOMOT


IVE


1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL

14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL




CRYSTALAUTOS.COM


FREE HOME

EVALUATION




* Your Homes Current Market Value

* How To Sell Your Home Fast
& For Top Dollar

Improvements that add value

Staging Your Home

And Much More

No obligation and 100% free.

Call now 352-634-3829

_|EXIT Realty Leaders
i w 352-634-3829
... .. .. R ... i l .


WWW.GXiffealtyleat M


EXIT REALTY LEADERS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED







D8 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150



JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment



CHEVY CONV VAN
2007 Rocky Ridge Cony
1500 Chevy Exp. 5.3L
V8. Good cond.Leather.
TV, Tracvision, play sta.
96k mi. $14,900 obo.
352-341-0890

Y-111 1.i1l lst.
L L


FORD
1994 AreoStar XLT
good cond, clean, cold
air, ready to roll
352-637-0441




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492







Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
**352-422-5448**
KYMCO
2000 ZX 50 Scooter,
One owner, 268 miles,
windshield, luggage car-
rier, garage kept. $900
352-212-5286

Misc.otice


HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
classic 976mi. show-
roomcondition, $9250
obo (352) 447-1244
SUZUKI
2005 Boulevard C90T
Runs, looks and sounds
good. 1500cc. 7700 mi.
Lots of extras. $4900
obo. 352-341-0890
Triumph
1971, Rebuilt upper end
of motor, runs like new,
reliable vintage bike,
$3,200 352-586-8396



922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners
will be selling surplus prop-
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 4,
until March 22, 2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22, 2013..


Misc Notic


333-033 SUCRN
Elig. To Vote- terry Nevills, Sr & Brandon DeBose
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to the following, at last known address:
Terry L. Nevills, Sr. Brandon J. DeBose
5710 S. Live Oak Dr. 228 Pleasant Grove Rd
Floral City, FL 344367 Inverness, FL 34452
You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elections in Inverness, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of in-
eligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter
registration system. If further assistance is needed, contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions at the below listed address or call 352-341-6747.
Susan Gill
Citrus County Supervisor of Elections
120 N. Apopka Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
March 3 2013.


334-0303 SUCRN
3/14/13 Meeting of the Citrus County Economic Development Council, Inc.
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Citrus County Economic Development Council,
Inc. will meet on Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 8:30 am. at the College of Central Flor-
ida, Lecanto, Florida.
Any person requiring reasonable accommodation at this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact 352-795-2000, at least two (2) days
before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the Council with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which record shall include the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
BY: John Siefert, Executive Director
March 3, 2013.

335-0303 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Invitation to Bid
ITB No. 019-13
Contractual Painting Services

Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide services for interior and exterior painting of County maintained facili-
ties.
Minimum Requirements For Submittina A Bid
Bidder shall meet, at a minimum, the following requirements to be determined a re-
sponsive and responsible Bidder at the time of Bid Submittal:
1. Have bonding capacity for the value of the project if the project exceeds
$100,000.
2. Attend Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference and Site Visit
3. Must have a business tax identification number.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before March 20, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy
Crawford, Purchasing Manager, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sover-
eign Path, Suite 266, Lecanto, FL 34461.


A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for March 20, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requiring reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearng or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "BIDS" on the left hand side of
the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management & Budget/Purchasing at (352)
527-5457.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
March 3, 2013.

336-0303 SUCRN
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
ITB No. 020-13
Asphalt Concrete for Surface Leveling
Including Sand Seal Coat (if needed)
Solicitation Overview
Citrus County Board of County Commissioners invites interested parties to submit a
Bid to provide unit pricing for furnishing and installing Type SP-9.5 and Type SP-12.5
Asphalt Concrete, including Sand Seal Coat, for various road maintenance projects.
The road maintenance projects will take place at various times throughout the year
depending upon County's road maintenance requirements. The maintenance proj-
ects will not involve the filling of potholes. The maintenance projects will be gener-
ally limited to repairing small sections of roadways. The need for these Services may
also be for the placement of asphalt concrete on the roadways that have been ap-
proved. As such, the volume of the various types of asphalt concrete required for
the maintenance of Citrus County's roadways will vary from project to project, as will
the type of asphalt concrete. The purchase of the asphalt concrete services will be
on an as-needed basis with no guarantee of volume of asphalt concrete purchased
and installed nor type used.
SEALED Bids are to be submitted on or before April 2, 2013 @ 2:00 PM to Wendy Craw-
ford, Office of Management & Budget, 3600 West Sovereign Path, Suite 266,
Lecanto, FL 34461.
A Public Opening of the Bids is scheduled for April 2, 2013 @ 2:15 PM at 3600 West
Sovereign Path, Room 280, Lecanto, Florida 34461.
Anyone requirng reasonable accommodations at the Public Opening because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Office of Management &
Budget at (352) 527-5457 at least two days before the meeting. If you are hearing or
speech impaired, use the TDD telephone (352) 527-5312.
To obtain a copy of the Bid Documents for this announcement, please visit the Citrus
County Website at www.bocc.citrus.fl.us and select "PURCHASING/BIDS" on the left
hand side of the Home Page. Or, call the Office of Management &
Budget/Purchasing at (352) 527-5413.
CITRUS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Joe Meek, Chairman
March 3, 2013.

337-0303 SUCRN
3/28 Specialmeeting- Citrus County Transit
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
will hold a SPECIAL MEETING at 10:30 A.M. on the 28TH day of March. 2013 at the
Lecanto Government Building at 3600 W. Sovereign Path, Room 166, Lecanto, FL
34461.
Any person requiring special accommodations or desiring further information regard-
ing this meeting may contact the Transportation Supervisor of Citrus County Transit,
1410 S. Lecanto Highway, Lecanto, FL. 34461-9015. Telephone: (352) 527-7630.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC: Any person who decides to appeal any decision of the gov-
erning body with respect to any matter considered at this meeting will need a rec-
ord of the proceedings and for such purposes may need to provide that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which includes testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based. (Section 286.0101, Florida Statutes)
JOE MEEK, CHAIRMAN
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA
March 3, 2013.


326-0217 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Portions of Inverness Middle School will be received
by the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:30p.m. local time March 21, 2013, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of


not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Pime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Inverness Middle School, 1950 U.S. Highway 41
North, Inverness, FL 34450, Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur March 7, 2013, 3:30 pm.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, FL 32803, (407) 228-4242 or (407)
797-4953 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board
in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the re-
turn of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the open-
ing of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA

BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17, 24 & March 3, 2013.


327-0217 SUCRN
Inv, to Bid
PUBLIC NOTICE
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed bids for furnishing of all labor and materials and performing all work neces-
sary and incidental to Re-roofing Portions of Lecanto High School will be received by
the Citrus County School Board prior to 2:00p.m. local time March 21, 2013, in the
Purchasing Department, Citrus County School Board, Building 200, 1007 West Main
Street, Inverness, Florida, 34450-4698. Immediately following all bids received will be
opened and read aloud in Building 200, Purchasing Department.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in the amount of
not less than five percent (5%) of the maximum amount of the Bid as a guarantee
that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will within ten (10) calendar days after writ-
ten notice being given of bid acceptance, enter into a written Contract with the
Citrus County School Board, in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a
surety bond satisfactory to the Citrus County School Board equal to one hundred
percent (100%) of the Contract amount.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her Bid for a period of thirty (30) days after the date set
for the opening of the Bids.
All prime contractors must hold a Citrus County School Board Certificate of
Pre-qualification to bid on Citrus County School Board construction projects. Prime
contractors must be pre-qualified by the Citrus County School Board prior to submit-
ting a bid. Prime contractor's bids must be within the bid limits specified on their
pre-qualification certificate. For contractor pre-qualification information call the Cit-
rus County School Board Facilities and Construction Department at 352/726-1931,
ext. 2208.
Pre-bid Conference:
A. A mandatory pre-bid conference for Prime Contractors, and optional for
sub-contractors, will be held at Lecanto High School, 3810 W. Educational Path,
Lecanto, FL 34461, Cafeteria.
B. Conference will occur March 7, 2013, 1:30 pm.
Bidders may obtain a maximum of two (2) sets of Contract Documents from Rogers
& Sark Consulting, Inc., 2021 Palm Lane, Orlando, FL 32803, (407) 228-4242 or (407)
797-4953 upon deposit of a check made payable to the Citrus County School Board
in the amount of $100.00 per set. A refund of this deposit will be made upon the re-
turn of these Documents in satisfactory condition within ten (10) days after the open-
ing of Bids.
The Citrus County School Board reserves the absolute right to award the Bid to the
lowest, responsive Bidder, to waive any informality or irregularity in any Bid, or to re-
ject any and all Bids received based solely on the Board's determination of the best
interests of the School District.

CITRUS COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
INVERNESS, FLORIDA


BY: Sandra Himmel
Superintendent of Schools
February 17, 24 & March 3, 2013.


**A



I -ets o laes I


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED

Metn


B


B


IB


IB


Bi


Meetn


Metn


Mt


IBite


IB


I B






Sikorski's
-- Attic PAGE E4


HOMEFRONT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE REAL ESTATE GULID


A squeaky rubber dog bone by
HomeGoods Inc. Interactive toys
that squeak when held are en-
tertaining for dogs. The key is to
rotate the selection; like chil-
dren, pets get bored when the
same toys are always out. Tak-
ing away and reintroducing toys
keeps dogs and cats engaged
(www.homegoods.com).
Associated Press


PET TOYS, E8


GARDENING TIPS, E4


SEE COMPUTE USTINBS


I .


I ..







E2 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


1- -A Ii J l


ENJOY E-Z LIVING!!
* Beautiful Kitchen Maple Cabinets
*3/3/2 + Office Huge Screened Lanai
* Lrg. Fam. Rm. Very Tasteful Decor
* Really Nice Master Bath Lge. Garage
ELLIE SUTTON 352-287-3997
Emnuil elliesullon _i emuix nel
www.Flo iduLislinglnlo.com


* 4BD/3BA/3CG Over 3,600 SF Living
* 2nd Story Bonus Rm. or 4th Bedroom w/Bath
* Office or Den Many Extras
PETER & MARVIA KOROL !'.
(352) 527-7842
352) 422-3875


OI UNIn1nU1 pool nome! Lovely
3/2/3+ den boasts a solar heated pool &
spa, gas fireplace, RV pad with 50 amp,
large open kitchen. Upgrades include
flooring, custom window treatments and
baths. Enjoy your morning coffee in the
breakfast nook overlooking your pool.

CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


REDUCED TO SELL!!
Live the good life in Crystal River Great 3/2/1 lovingly
cared for, on 2 pretty fully fenced lots Some amenities
include RV/boat storage, 12x13 utility bldg w/attached
carport Roof, soffits & gutters in 2005, A/C 2005
Guys check out the MANCAVE garage/work area 9'
ceiling, plumbed, insulated and cabinets GALORE
Sellers want to hear offers
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


Za S. Ub tULA il., UtVt'HL HILLb
* 2BD/2BA/1CG On Corner of Rose
* Florida Room Private Backyard
* Nicely Maintained All Appliances

PETER & MARVIA KOROL Ci
(352) 527-7842
(352) 422-3875


LECANTO
* Beautiful 3BR/2BA/2CG Split Floor Plan
* Great Room Lg. Kitchen w/Eat-In Area
* Office Plantation Shutters
* Screened Lanai
LEN PALMER (352) 212-2611
Email: lenpalmer@remax.net


UVEn IlL Abn-E IPNIPLbULAIEl.
*3BR, 2 Bath *2-Car Garage
* Enclosed Heat/AC FL Rm. *2-Car Carport
* Granite Counters Updated Baths
* 2 Corner Lots Patio & Shed/Workshop

KELLY GODDARD 352-476-8536
Email: kellygoddardsellsflorida.com











REALTY ONE

24/7 INFO LINE

637-2828

HERE'S HOW:
1 Buyer calls exclusive
24/7 Info Line
637-2828


2 Buyer enters house
number when
prompted


3 Buyer listens to
property
presentation in
English or Spanish









IT'S ALL ABOUT THE VIEW!
45 Ft. on the Water *No Flood Zone
1,800 Living Sq. Ft. 16x12 Observation Deck
20/24 Detached Workshop *Boat House
In-Ground Pool *Acre Lot
SHERRY POTTS (352) 697-5500 i
Email: sherylpotts@aol.com
Website: www.CryslalRiverLiving.com


WINTER VISITORS...Grab this one up before you
head back North! Fully furnished 2/2 SW on
double lot. Excellent condition. Amenities include
large vinyl-windowed screen porch, one-car attached
carport, and two sheds (10xl 2 & 12x1 6). Priced to
sell.
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


HOMOSASSA
WOWI What a bargain for this 2,052 sq ft 4/2
Redman situated on a beautifully landscaped 1/2 acre
corner lot Two huge covered decks, front & back, formal
living/dining, fam rm w/wood-burning FP Large
bedrooms Master with retreat/office/den So much room
for the family in this lovely home Fenced backyard
w/2 sheds Don't snooze and lose this onel
CHERYL NADAL (352) 302-3555
Email: cnadal@remax.net


242 N. LeaI Hwy. Bevrl Hil 2-82w wRtAIo 0 .FoiaAeIvres6760


CRYSTAL RIVER!!
3 bedroom, 2 bath doublewide,
located on 1 fenced acre, shed, 2-car
detached carport, separate living and
family room with fireplace, lots of
cabinets in kitchen, front porch.
DIANNE MACDONALD (352) 212-9682
Email: dimfl@yahoo.com Q


JUST REDUCED $20,000!
Come live the casual Florida
lifestyle. Open floorplan with tons
of natural light. Pool, spa, and
distant sunsets await! Call 24HR
hotline for more info!
KIM DEVANE (352) 637-2828
Email: kim@kimdevane.com






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


EXIT Realty
Leaders shines
The Wade Team is proud
to announce that EXIT Realty
Leaders has taken
place in every category in the
monthly broker report for Exit
Realty Florida in January.
The office was No. 8 in new
listings taken, No. 4 in total
listings, No. 15 in total agent
count, No. 8 in sales volume,
No. 6 in sales volume per
agent, No. 6 in closed sides,
No. 4 in closed sides per
agent, and No. 8 in gross
closed commissions.
Agents receive
national recognition
Jackie Davis and Dawn
Theroux of ERA American
Realty in Inverness were
awarded a Circle of Achieve-
ment designation by ERA
Franchise Systems LLC, a
global franchise leader in the
residential real estate
industry.
To qualify for the Circle of
Achievement designation,


Jackie Dawn
Davis Theroux
ERA ERA
American American
Realty. Realty.
ERA sales as-
sociates must
have
achieved 45
total closed J
units or _
$100,000 in tv
adjusted atieve
gross corn- ERA
mission Suncoast
(AGC) in Realty.
2012.
Steve Latiff of ERA Sun-
coast Realty in Crystal River
was awarded a Leaders' Cir-
cle designation.
This designation recog-
nizes the ERA network's high-
est level of excellence in real
estate sales.


MEET AND GREET
Clubs are invited to submit information about
regular meetings for publication on the
Community page each weekday.
Include the name of the organization, the time,
day and place of the meeting, whether it meets
weekly, biweekly or monthly, and whom to call for
details.
Send information attn: Community Page Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd., Crystal River, FL
34429, or fax to (352) 563-3280, attention:
Club meetings.



Jackie Gaffney Jason Gaffney -
Realtorei, A HOUSE Realtor@
302-3179 s Nanie! 2879022
746-6700 WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.
The Golden Gir WEEKS REALTY, 5 BEVERLY HILLS BLVD.


A great no-knead bread recipe


Sara Noel
FRUGAL
LIVING


Dear Sara: I am look-
ing for a recipe for
no-knead bread that
was printed in your column
several years ago. -Russell
M., email
Dear Russell: I'm not sure
if it's the one that was pub-
lished previously, but here's
a popular one from one of
my community members:
No-Knead Bread:
61/2 cups all-purpose flour


2 packages instant dry
yeast.
3 tablespoons sugar.
1 tablespoon salt.
3 cups warm water.
2 tablespoons shortening.
butter.
No kneading necessary
on this. Preheat oven to 375
degrees E In large mixing
bowl, combine 3-1/2 cups
flour, yeast, sugar and salt.
Mix well. Add warm water


(125 degrees or so) and
shortening to flour mixture.
Blend at low speed until
moistened; beat 3 minutes
at medium speed. By hand
gradually stir in remaining
flour to make a stiff batter.
Cover and allow to rise in
warm place until doubled
(about 30 minutes). Stir
down batter. Spread in

See FRUGAL/Page E10


Amanda & Kik Johnson Tom Balfour Lil Avenus & Hal Steiner Art Paty
BROKERASSOC. -REALTOR,GRI REALTOR REALTOR-BROKER REALTOR


6262 W SETTLER
5/4/3 700993 $379,900


PINE RIDG


PINERIDG


...........
2435 W. ERIC 10953 N. TARTAN 6560 N. DELTONA BLVD 7170 N. GRACKLE 7973 N. GOLFVIEW
2/1/1 701256 $52,900 4/2/2 355923 $99,900 3/2.5/2 700080 $119,900 3/2/2 00780 $109,900 3/2/2 701136 $124,900




1503 & 1525 W. EVERGREEN
5/5/2 car garage attached and 2 car detached garage. 4210 E. LAKE PARK DR. 2047 W. PARAGON LN. 7239 COTTAGE 9328 N. CITRUS SPRINGS BLVD.
700929 $279,900 2/1.5 359138 $81,900 3/2/2 35892 $149,900 21CPDet.4+CPDet. 357796 $139,900 3/2/1 700428 $69,900


S ,. M.LLUOUKNL. 1~ IKUMAN 21bolo L. VLNU5 bLbU b. ,ANNA LILT
2/2/2 700838 $45,00 2/2/1 701074 $54,750 3/2 700201 $24,900 3/2 359137 $59,900
3521 N. LECANTO HWY., BEVERLY HILLS, FL 34465 1-888-789-7100


Real Estate DIGEST


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 E3






E4 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013



HOMEFRONT
HomeFront is a weekly real estate section
published Sundays in the Citrus County Chronicle.
Newspaper and Online advertising information...352-563-5592
.............................. .............. advertising@chronicleonline.com
Classified advertising information..................352-563-5966
News information.......................................... 352-563-5660
................................. ............. newsdesk@chronicleonline.com
Online real estate listing........www.ChronicleHomeFinder.com
"The market leader in real estate information"

CHIlONICLE


HOMEFRONT'S REAL ESTATE DIGEST
Submit information for Real Estate Digest via email
to newsdesk@chronicleonline.com or fax to 352-
563-3280, attention HomeFront.
News notes submitted without photos will not be
reprinted if the photo is provided later.
Email high-resolution JPEG (.jpg) photos to
newsdesk@chronicleonline.com, attn: HomeFront.
Digest photos are kept on file for future use.
The Chronicle reserves the right to edit news notes
for space and/or clarity.
For details, call the newsroom at 352-563-5660.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Get a leg up on early


spring garden chores

Have you been having a severe case especially those made from shredded or
of Spring fever and are eager to chipped wood, have decomposed some-
get outdoors, especially what or have been washed
during the few weeks prior to away by heavy rains.
the official spring gardening The only tools you need to
season? Get started on the spread mulch are your own
checklist of spring garden two hands. Before mulching
chores and get a jump on the the flower garden, be sure to
primavera gardening season. pull any and all weeds that you
Spring-Flowering Bulbs: It's can find; while mulch stops
not unusual for the foliage of m weeds from growing, it's a good
early spring-blooming bulbs to idea to help it along by remov-
turn brown, especially at the Joan Bradshaw ing the weeds that you do see.
tips, when temperatures drop FLORIDA- Once you have the weeds out of
suddenly Although the foliage FRIENDLY the way, you begin to spread
may not look its best, the bulbs the mulch. It's generally rec-
themselves will be just fine LIVING ommended that you maintain
and will flower on schedule. at least three inches of the


Now is a good time to do a quick sketch of
where your bulbs are. This will help
when the foliage fades later in the year
and you begin planting annuals and
perennials in the same bed. You'll have a
map of where the bulbs are and avoid de-
stroying them as you dig.
Mulch Makeover: This is the ideal time
of year to inspect your mulch, particularly
its depth. Chances are organic mulches,


mulch, as it needs to be deep enough to
keep any growing weeds from getting
light.
Spring Cleaning for Bird houses: Bird
houses and nesting boxes should be
cleaned and disinfected at least once
each year. Cleaning will keep the house
and box useful longer and reduce bird
See CHORES/Page E5


Inside...


Pet toys
PAGE E8
Jane Weber
PAGE E7
Real Estate Digest
PAGE E3
For current property trans-
actions, use the search fea-
tures on the website for the
Citrus County Property
Appraiser's Office:
www.pa.citrus.fl.us.


Tiffany china looks nice, but holds little collector interest


Dear John: I have a
tea set comprised of
six cups and
saucers, a creamer, sugar
bowl and teapot.
I have enclosed a
photograph of
the set. The
backstamp says
"The Mt. Ver-
non" by Lenox,
with the L set in
a green wreath.
Also in green let-
ters is Tiffany &
Co., with each John S
piece numbered SIKOF
in gold, for in- AT"
stance 373/448.
I have found
that the designer was Frank
G. Holems, noted for de-
signing china for the White
House, and it is of 1911 vin-
tage. I hope you can help


h

I
1


me first with the true value
and second, who you think
would be interested in pur-
chasing the set? I look for-
ward to any
advice you can
give me. J.E,
Inverness
Dear J.E: You
have an attrac-
tive teaset manu-
factured by
Lenox and sold
by Tiffany &
Company.
ikorski Tiffany is a name
SKI'S that has wide
'lC market recogni-
tion. Most collec-
tors of Tiffany
decorative arts have little to
no interest in Tiffany china
tableware. Lenox is also a


See ATTIC/Page E13


Special to the Chronicle
This china set was manufactured by Lenox and sold by Tiffany & Company While many Tiffany items are popular
among collectors, there is little interest in Tiffany china.






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CHORES
Continued from Page E4

parasite problems.
Begin by removing old nest-
ing material and scrub with a
solution of one part bleach to
nine parts water Be sure to
thoroughly rinse all inside
walls of the bird house and
allow it to completely dry prior
to closing it back up. While you
have the house opened up,
now is a good time to thor-
oughly inspect the structure of
the house to ensure the hard-
ware is still firmly in place and
the panels are sound. Prior to
closing the bird house and re-
mounting it, place 2 to 3 inches
of sawdust in houses for all
cavity nesters, such as chick-
adees and woodpeckers. To
make life a little easier for our
feathered friends, create a
pile of ready-for-the-taking
nesting materials (yarn, string
or soft twine) and locate it
close to the birdhouse.
Other Spring Prep Yard
Tasks:
Clean gutters to prevent
water from damaging plants
below.
Cut back ornamental


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 E5S


Prior to closing the bird house and re-
mounting it, place 2 to 3 inches of
sawdust in houses for all cavity
nesters, such as chickadees and
woodpeckers.


grasses to about 6 inches tall.
Remove dead wood and
suckers from trees and
shrubs, both evergreen and
deciduous.
Dig and divide emerging
perennials.
Scrub clay pots.
Clean and sharpen tools.
Remove leaves from the
bottom of ponds or other
water features.
Inspect and thoroughly
clean feeders, filling them
with fresh seed once they dry
Give bird baths a good
scrubbing and refill with water
If you are a newcomer to
Citrus County or haven't taken
advantages of the services of-
fered to our residents, please
stop by our office at 3650 W
Sovereign Path, Suite 1,
Lecanto, FL 34461 or call 352-
527-5700 to have your ques-
tions answered.


Citrus County Extension
links the public with the Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS' knowl-
edge, research and resources
to address youth, family, com-
munity and agricultural needs.
All programs and related ac-
tivities sponsored for, or as-
sisted by, the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences are
open to all persons without
discrimination with respect to
race, creed, color, religion, age,
disability, sex, sexual orienta-
tion, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or af-
filiations, genetic information
and veteran status as pro-
tected under the Vietnam Era
Veterans' ReadjustmentAssis-
tance Act

Dr Joan Bradshaw is Direc-
tor of UF/IFAS Citrus County
Extension.


Sign up now for


homebuyers class


Special to the Chronicle

Citrus County Housing Services
will offer a First Time Homebuyer
class from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 9, at the Citrus County
Resource Center 2804 W. Marc
Knighton Court, Lecanto.
Participants who attend the entire
session will receive a Certificate of
Completion required for the SHIP
and Neighborhood Stabilization
Programs. The class encompasses
the entire home-buying process in-
cluding preparing credit and fi-


nances, shopping for a home, home
inspection, fair housing, available
loan products, loan pre-approval
and closing. Industry professionals
will present and answer questions.
The session is free, but reserva-
tions must be made. Call Jen at 352-
527-7522 or Pat at 352-527-7526, or
email Jennifer. Pollard@bocc.
citrus.fl.us to register. The event is
sponsored by Citrus County Hous-
ing Services and Cheryl Lambert of
RE/MAX Realty One.
Lunch will be provided by Cheryl
Lambert Child care is not available.


GITTA BARTH
REALTOR
Cell: (352) 220-0466
gbarth@ myflorida-house .com


- NORTHRIDGE ESTATES -
Villages of Citrus Hills, well known for
QUICK TRIP OUT INTO an active Florida lifestyle! 3/2/2 home on
THE GULF OF MEXICO! NATURE'S 1 acre, open floor plan, wood burning
3/3/1 Spanish style home, seawall and BEST KEPT SECRET i
boat slip on deep water canal no 3/2 5/2 pool home on 1+ acre in River .., I .... II,,,,I ... I .I.,,
bridges to the Crystal River! Tile floors, Oaks East, a 1 I ,r, ,,t tnght away.Arecent facelift included new
bonus room, fireplace, newer roof and community onthe ,, i, paint and flooring, and A/C, range and
windows; great income potential, too! $199,900 the garage door were replaced in 2012.
MIS 359564 $220.000 will buy you this peace of heaven! MLS 700472 $142.500


* *DWOLL
BANKOR






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Rainscaping can solve storm runoff problems


Rainscaping features can be ex-
pensive and complicated or simple
and cheap, like this rain barrel cap-
turing water from a downspout on a
rural home in northern Belgium.


Designs aim to

protect, conserve

DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press

Stormwater runoff can quickly
drain a homeowner's wallet. The
flooding erodes yards, soaks base-
ments, pollutes streams and
wastes a precious resource.
But rainscaping- an integrated
system of directed water flow and
See RAIN/Page E11


DEAN FOSDICK/Associated Press
Art complements science on this settlement pond in Seattle's Northgate neighborhood. Sediment ponds slow the flow of storm water,
allowing particles and pollutants to settle out.


JOANN MARTIN
Preferred
REAL ESTA TE


BANK OWNED-INVERNESS, FL BANK OWNED-LECANTO, FL
Commercial location near courthouse on S. 2.25 acres fenced. 3BR/2BA Corner location.
Apopka. $86,900 MLS#356806 $74,900 MLS#700399


TO SETTLE ESTATE-FLORAL CITY, FL
3BR/2BA doublewide on large shaded lot.
Carport. Central water. 32,900
MLS#359133


BANK UWNtIU-ILUKAL Ul T, IL
Two story 3BR/2BA home on .6 acres.
Must see. S45.000


352-270-3255


"Always There For You"
PE40 GAIL COOPER
6. 4 iiui inillio oDulla, Realiol
R., Cell: (352) 634-4346
1 Office: (352) 382-1700x309
/ = E-mail me: homes4u3.'mlndsprlng.com



a^. "


OPE HOSS SUDY P


535 E Charleston Court 2918 W Beamwood Drive
Hernando Pine Ridge
2007 Sanderson Bay Built Home 4/3/3 2271 sf of living 3/2.5/2 heated in-ground
with den and office 2975 sf. ft. of living, pool with resurfaced pool deck 2012, new
carpeting, new front lawn 2011. Offered at
Possible in-law set up. Needs TLC. $249,900 MLS#357431.
Motivated Seller MLS#342358 $269,900 Dir: Rte 491 to Pine Ridge Blvd to left on
Directions: 486 to South on Annapolis to Baywood to right on Beamwood to house
right on Charleston on right.


I .. J -- -- I-------II
PERFECT HOME FOR LARGE FAMILY! CAN'T BEAT THE PRICE!
*4+office/3/3 with pool on 2 lots 2/2 villa on a lot and a half
2700 sq ft of living area Freshly painted with neutral color
Granite kitchen opens to family room New shelving in kitchen pantry & closets
Cozy fireplace in the living room Dual pane slider out to lanai
Hardwoods in dining and office Master bedroom has walk-in closet
Home warranty for the buyers Southern rear exposure
#351467 $279,000 #359666 $64,900
See .JVirtua .IIIou ,..i@ JJwIJr IIJI.I..Ie IIB.I..m


CALL Roy Bass TODAY (352)726-2471 !
Email: roybass tampabay.rr.com www.allcitrusrealty.com After Hours 352302-6714


E6SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


1







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Walter's Viburnum makes attractive garden specimen


W alter's Viburnum, V
obovatum, grows natu-
rally as an open shrub
up to a small tree 30 feet tall. Ma-
ture Walter's Viburnum alter-
nated with native plums line one
side of the entry walk to Rain-
bow Springs State Park. Both
small trees flower from Febru-
ary to March. Selected named
varieties include "Densa,"
"MrsShiller's" and "Whorled
Class." Each have different
growth habits and only grow 8 to
10 feet tall.
Native Walter's Viburnum is a
rangy, twiggy, large shrub or
small tree. The distance be-
tween leaf nodes is up to 3
inches. With leaves that far


apart, it does not
make a dense bush
without frequent
pruning. Stalk-less
leaves, 1 to 3 inches
long, are opposite
each other along the
twigs.
It ranges from
Florida north to -
South Carolina and Jane
west to Alabama,
growing in coastal JAN
plains, forests with GAR
deep sedimentary
soils and woods underlain with
limerock, in cold zones 6 to 9 and
heat zone 10 to 6. It is evergreen
in Florida but deciduous further
north. Pure native plants are


Weber
IE'S
DEN


best left in the woods
rather than in a home
garden.
"Densa" is the most
popular named vari-
ety One plant was
found with closely-
spaced, inch-long
leaves, a dense,
rounded form and a
profuse flowering
habit. Millions of
plants have been
cloned from cuttings.
Growers usually


stick two or three cuttings in
each cell of a propagation tray
The trays are kept in a mist
house until roots form. Rooted
plugs are potted in 6-inch-


diameter, 6-inch-deep black
plastic pots, laced with a nine- to
12-month time-released fertil-
izer, sprinkled with a pre-emer-
gent herbicide to deter weed
growth and placed in rows on
carbon-black, woven ground
cover fabric and watered daily
If one stem cutting should die
or get broken, the remaining
clones will still bush out and be
marketable within a year.
"Densa" in 6-inch pots is some-
times clipped to force business
and control occasional errant twig
growth. Vigorous plants will be re-
potted in 10-inch diameter pots,
tip pruned and fertilized again.
Within six months, these will be
full, dense and ready for sale.


Black pots contain carbon,
which resists breaking down in
full sun for up to five years.
Pressed peat or cardboard pots
used in the cold north would de-
compose quickly in Florida's
torrid wet conditions. A 6 inch
diameter by 6 inch deep round
pot contains about 28 cubic
inches. A U.S. gallon measures
231 cubic inches, 4 quarts, or
3.785 liters. So a 6-by-6 pot is less
than either a quarter of a U.S.
gallon, a U.S. quart or a liter in
volume.
Our federal government has
strict laws concerning weights
and measures, but some retail


See JANE/Page E10


REALTY G RO UP
RELT GROUPo Rsae


U


Terra Vista Realty Group, LLC Office in the
2400 North Terra Vista Blvd., Hernando, Florida 34442 Terra Vista

(352) 746-6121 (800) 323-7703 Welcome Center
Rii nFCKFR 32.4f64-&647 SiSAN Mill I FN -.499.9-13 VICTORIA FRANKI IN 32-497-3777


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Drastically Reduced! Don't miss this 3/3/2 home on the Skyview Golf Course of
Terra Vista. You won't believe the upgrades: gas and solar heated pool & spa w/
spillway and caretaker/pool perfector system, custom glass double entry door, gas
fireplace, Codan counters, upgraded cabinets with top and bottom pull outs,
decorative painting, lighting discharge system, oversized garage with golf cart
door, and so much more. Newly painted exterior. Newly added plantation shutters.
M LS 357262..................................................... .............................. $ 3 4 9 ,9 0 0


DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS
Beautiful bright villa 2 bedrooms, den (or 3rd bedroom), 2 baths, freshly painted SINGLE FAMILY, 4 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Open and spacious floor plan Located in the lovely Village of Brentwood Kitchen One of the few Paloma Model homes available! Great open floor plan, hardwood
contains plenty of cabinets, utility closet and a skylight Neutral tile everywhere floors, oversized pool, and handicapped accessible Situated on a cul-de-sac,
except the newly carpeted living room & bedrooms Top it off with a screened lanai all tranquil oak tree setting offers an abundance of privacy Guest bedrooms have direct
nicely situated on a fully landscaped lot A great place for someone who is looking to bath access Loaded with upgrades, central vac, Surround sound, designer double
live an active and carefree life Minutes to golf course, pool, sauna, hot tub, exercise entry door, Oversized garage with golf cart garage door Must come see this
room at Brentwood recreation center MLS 700872.......... ........... $139,000 spectacular home! MLS 356921.... ...................... ............... $399,000


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS
This beautifully landscaped enhanced maintenance free villa will draw you in from
the moment you walk through the door Recently painted inside and out this home
features custom surround sound, Kitchen Aid appliances, designer lighting fixtures,
and so much more all situated in a great location at Terra Vista of Citrus Hills Enjoy
peaceful evenings on your private screened in lanai MLS 353555.........$225,000


DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE VILLAS SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 2 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH
Featuring an excellent view of the 5th hole of the championship Skyview G olf Course this 3/2/2 Large roomy open splt floor plan home featuring 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, officeden,
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, WOODVIEW VILLAS maintenance-free villa is a fantastic buy at this price. The villa has a therapeutic step-in tub in SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, HILLSIDE SOUTH living room, open kitchen with breakfast bar, screened lanai and a 2-car attached
Well maintained 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage plus den a expanded Laurel model, the guest bathroom, the latest in secure bathing. The butlers pantry was redesign as a kitchen Very popular Windward model 3 bedroom plus den 2,5 baths, great room floor plan, garage Dining area overlooking private backyard Upgrades include Corian
extensive oak molding around windows, crown molding in tray ceiling, master extra desk for easy interet access while cooking. The covered lanai faces south for cool evening expanded and loaded with upgrades Situated on Skyview golf course with breathe- cuntertps, ceramic tile plantation uttered windows, lots of cabinets in the
large pantry oak cabinets with crown molding extra footage in bedrooms and den a breezes. The best of all worlds including all the amenities that come with membership, taking views Over-sized lanai with lush landscape Located in the premiere kitchen Corner lot with huge trees and situated close to all amenities
must see at this price in Terra Vista MLS 357742.... .....$232,000 espec ially use of the exciting Bella Vita Spa & Fitness Center MLS 354569....$224,900 community of Terra Vista MLS 357971 ................................................ $339,000 MLS 700761 $249,900


-~


E, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, BR
split-plan home with an extra large
en and airy with a large skylight in th
iders to large screened in lanai, inside


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3 BED, 3 BATH, 2 CAR, TERRA VISTA DETACHED VILLA, 3 BED, 2.5 BATH, 2 CAR, SKYVIEW VILLAS
.' A Exceptional and Fabulous describe this 3 bedroom (plus a den) 3 bath, 2-car, In prestigious gated community of Terra Vista Immaculate 3/2 5/2 w/den Private
DETACHED VILLA, 2 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR, BRENTWOOD VILLAS 5,375 sq ft, pool home in the exclusive upscale gated-community of Terra Vista. brick-paved courtyard home with separate in-law/guest suite with full bath Designer
Located in the community of Brentwood Freshly painted and new carpet Immaculate Very spacious open island kitchen great space for entertaining. Enjoy a relaxing decorated and painted, gourmet kitchen, formal dining incorporated with an open
unfurnished detached villa 2 bedrooms widen, 2 bath, 2-car garage Open floor plan retreat on the extended screened lanai. Located on the quietest of cul-de-sacs. floor plan is great for entertaining Lots of tile, and wet bar Large master suite has
with lots of space Sodal dub membership included #2902.........................$ 1,100 #5375 .......................................................................................................... $2,300 hardwood floor, TW O custom walk-in closets #9876.................................$ 1,8 00


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 E7




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Pick the


right pet


toys


Wise
choices
help
keep

friends
active


A GREEN interactive feeder
from The Company of Animals,
LLC. Treat mazes for dogs and cats
make it a challenge to extricate the
treats, engaging the animal's mind and
making the reward more satisfying
(www.companyofanimals.co.uk).
Associated Press


II


V


,~v., ~


E8 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


Ej







CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


TOYS
Continued from Page E8

American Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals' adoption center
in New York City.

Dogs
"Scent-oriented dogs
will respond best to
games that involve seek-
ing out something that has
an odor, so hide treats
around the house that
they have to locate," she
says. "Buy toys that you
can hide treats inside,
and the dog has to tumble
it to get at them."
Intelligent dogs need
mental stimulation just as
people do, says Wells.


Spot's Seek a Treat slid-
ing puzzle and Discovery
Wheel might fill the bill.
Company of Animals has
a Twister treat-finding
game. The Kong line of
toys are pack pleasers;
the toys have holes at one
end to hide treats, and the
heavy-duty rubber con-
struction makes them
tough enough for larger
dogs. (Available at many
pet stores, or at www.
wag.com; www.company
ofanimals.co.uk)
Big, energetic dogs will
have fun chasing the
sturdy Varsity Ball. And
for a little humor, con-
sider Moody Pet's Hu-
munga lips-, tongue- or
moustache-shaped chew
toys that give your dog a
hilarious visage when


Realtor


AEN Oe ID SV.INDY EK


they're holding them.
(www.varsitypet.com;
www.moodypet.com)
Dogs that love to inter-
act love to tug and
Wells says that, contrary
to some opinion, tugging
can be a great game.
"It's all about who's in
control of the game. You
decide when you play it,
when the toy must be re-
leased, when it must be
dropped," she says.
Teaching these skills
early in a puppy's life
makes play a lifelong joy
But even a rescue dog can
learn, with patience and


understanding.
Try a tennis ball at-
tached to a rope, which
makes retrieving and
throwing easy no slob-
bery balls to grip. Petco
also offers Bamboo's
Combat Bone, a soft and
floatable bone-shaped
tugger, while Homegoods'
extensive pet department,
HG Pet, has great squeak-
and-fetch options too.
(www.petco.com,
www.homegoods.com)
Sturdy coils of small,
medium or large marine-
grade rope also do the
job, but for multi-dog tug


action, consider Ruff
Dawg's four-handled rub-
ber toy (www.wag.com)
If you've got a ball-lov-
ing dog, you've probably
spent hours throwing one;
tennis balls seem to be
the toy of choice. For
something a little differ-
ent, consider the Mystery
Tree, which requires the
dog to trip a lever to re-
lease the ball. And for
truly energetic canines,
get the Hyperdog
Launcher, which shoots
up to four balls 220 feet
via a slingshot-like con-
traption. No more


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 E9

goober-y hands or sore
throwing arms. (www.
activedogtoys.com)
Some dogs love hide
and seek; Kyjen has a
plush tree trunk you stuff
with mini squirrels for
Dog to extricate.
(www.kyjen.com)
And how about chasing
bubbles? Activedogtoys.
com has the automatic
Bubbletastic and Bubble
Buddy, which blow bacon-
or chicken-scented
bubbles.
Perform a toy test: Does

See Page E10


M J A

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E10 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


JANE
Continued from Page E7

nursery businesses flout it
and are rarely fined or rep-
rimanded. The little 4-by-4
inch pots of herbs and veg-
etables currently being
sold locally are not in pint
(8 fluid ounce) containers.
How difficult would it be to
change the signs to show an
accurate, honest pot size in
inches or centimeters?
In any pot, selected
named varieties of Wal-
ter's Viburnum are a wel-
come addition to the
garden. "Densa" flowers
for four to six weeks, start-
ing in February locally, but
later further north. There
can be a second flowering
in September or October if


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E3

greased 9-by-5 or 8-by-4
bread pans. Cover and
allow to rise until batter
reaches tops of pans,
(about 20 to 30 minutes)
Bake at 375 degrees F for
35 to 40 minutes until
golden brown. Remove
from the pans and brush
with butter. Allow to cool.
Cook's notes: I did
everything in my
KitchenAid mixer and
nothing by hand. Once I
got to the stage of gradu-
ally adding the remaining
3 cups of flour, I noticed
that I did not need all 3
cups and stopped after
adding 2 cups. I only
waited 15 minutes after
baking before slicing, and
it sliced very nicely! -
Rosie, Canada
Dear Sara: I have some
questions for the lady in
one of your recent
columns who buys her
vinegar at Sam's Club.
What kind of vinegar does
she purchase, and how
does she use it for laun-
dry? -Nancy T, email
Dear Nancy: She is


fruit containing seeds are
pruned off in May or June.
Fruit is eaten by birds in
fall.
The dense bushes pro-
vide nest sites and cover
from predators. Bees and
butterflies sip the nectar
from the clusters of small
white flowers. Walter's
Viburnum makes an excel-
lent hedge specimen and
component in a privacy
screen.


Jane Weber is a profes-
sional gardener and con-
sultant. Semi-retired, she
grows thousands ofnative
plants. Visitors are
welcome to her
Dunnellon, Marion
County garden. Call 352-
249-6899 or contact
JWeberl2385@gmail. com.

using white vinegar in her
washing machine as a fab-
ric softener when she does
a load of laundry Add 1/4
to 1/2 cup to your rinse
cycle. It can be added to
your dishwasher as a rinse
aid, too. However, if you
find that your rinse aid
compartment has a rubber
component, simply fill a
cup with vinegar and place
it in your top rack before
you run the cycle.
Dear Sara: Do you have
any ideas about how to re-
move wood stain or var-
nish from a door that has
gotten onto very light beige
carpeting? I had no idea
what was causing this stain
until I caught my cat uri-
nating on the door I imag-
ine the urine removed
some of the stain/varnish
from the door and it has
seeped into the carpet. -
PeggyM., email
Dear Peggy: You can try
spraying WD-40 on the car-
pet and blotting it with a
soft cloth. If you find the
WD-40 leaves an oil stain,
use Dawn dishwashing liq-
uid and water to remove the
oil stain. I suggest testing an
inconspicuous area first

See FRUGAL/Page E12


PETS
Continued from Page E9

your pet respond best to a
plush toy, a ball or an in-
teractive food toy?
On his website Cesar-
sway.com, dog behavior
specialist and TV show
host Cesar Millan advises
that toys can help a dog
learn not to bite. With pup-
pies, introduce toys quickly
as substitutes for hands.
Wells suggests some
easy-to-make homemade
toys. Poke holes in a 2-liter
soda bottle and fill it with
a few kibbles: Pawing the
bottle will randomly re-
lease the treats.
A popular treat at shel-
ters is a savory ice pop.
"We put some treats in
deli or carry-out contain-
ers, then fill them with
water or chicken stock"
and freeze them, she says.
Caregivers also scent
objects with cinnamon,
clove or lavender at dif-
ferent times of day, she
says, depending on
whether they want to en-
ergize or soothe their
furry charges.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


When you leave the
house for a long period,
Wells say, "limit the num-
ber of toys you leave out.
Just like children, pets get
bored if their entire toy
box is available to them
every day"
Cats
Cats appreciate an in-
teresting toy as much as
dogs do. Kitty condos,
which often have several
elevations and platforms
to climb, sit on and hide
in, are excellent choices.
"Vertical hiding places
and sanctuaries are very
important to cats," notes
Wells, since they seek
these out in the wild.
Look for upholstered
versions in kneadable
micro plush, or carpet
remnants.
Scratching posts made
of sturdy jute will save
your furniture, and can be
purchased or made at


are excellent choice

home. A feline version of
the mouse exercise wheel
is available at Catwheel
company com.
Other homemade cat
toys include toilet paper
rolls filled with catnip or
treats, which the cats re-
lease by batting the toy
around, and wands made
out of rulers, rubber
bands and feathers, Wells
says. Cats get their own
version of the ice pop, she
says: 3-ounce drink cups
filled with cat food and
chicken or beef stock, and
then frozen.
A fun interactive family
toy might be the Abo Cat
Tunnel: Kids and pets
chase each other through
a nylon tube. The Bergan


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Catnip Cyclone involves a
circular track on which a
cat spins a ball filled with
catnip; the more twirls,
the more catnip aroma re-
leased. A feathery teaser
can be attached. The Cat-
action Magneticat pro-
vides a magnetized bug on
the end of a wand that
bobbles around while
your cat tries to catch it.
(www.petco.com)
The Ba Da Beam Rotat-
ing Laser Cat Toy features
a battery-operated laser.
(www.drsfostersmith.com)
At Catchannel.com, find
tips on making your own
versions of wand, tug and
climbing toys out of boxes,
paper bags and other
household items.


Jackie Davis
M American Realty & Investments
* g g 117 S. Hwy. 41 Inverness, FL
ERA (352) 634-2371 cell
A -... ATE jackie@bjdavis.com
For a Visual Tour of my listings and all MLS: bidavis.com

TOWERING OAK TREES ADORN l '
THIS BEAUTIFUL COMMUNITY A
and fram e this 3 :......... i. i ,.
pool home. Sittir, ... ", ,
acre you'll find a ,-,,h,
porch leading inty tt ,,-, BIiL J
iv in g ro o m a n d u. .,,,, | , .
kitchen with breakfast bar, nook; a family room with stone fireplace. The split plan has a
pocket door that seperates the guest wing where the hall bath also exits to the pool.
Interior laundry, a 2-car garage with a bump-out work area; a separate storage shed
attached to the rear of the home. The roof was new in 2012; freshly painted inside and
out. Near our amazing 46-mile Rails-To-Trails. $183,900 MLS 701238

HIGH CLASS,
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* Built in 2012-
*3 Bed, a3 bath, .
3-car garage
*THE best kitchen
* Unfinished 2nd floor
apartment


Cats appreciate an interesting toy as much as
dogs do. Kitty condos, which often have several
elevations and platforms to climb, sit on and hide






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


RAIN
Continued from Page E6

settling basins can convert those
losses into gains by providing new
wildlife habitat, beautifying proper-
ties and in some cases providing
food for the dinner table.
"It's becoming a pattern of capture
and reuse rather than simply moving
the water off," said Pat Sauer, Rain-
scaping Iowa Program administrator
"There are more options out there
than just rain gardens. We're looking
more comprehensively at what can
be done on the landscape."
Numerous state and local groups
are holding workshops and provid-
ing rebates for residents who add
such refinements to their properties
as rain barrels, cisterns, permeable
paving, settling ponds, green roofs
and berms.
"Iowa is providing training for
professionals certified rainscap-
ers who are designing some of
those programs," Sauer said.
"Many of these agencies also build
large-scale infiltration systems proj-
ects on public lands," said Cleo
Woelfle-Erskine, who along with
Apryl Uncapher wrote "Creating
Rain Gardens." (Timber Press, 2012).
Landscapers often merge art with
science. "In Portland, Ore., many park-
ing lots and curb strips sport swales
(depressions) and retention basins,
often decorated with sculptures of
leaping fish," Woelfle-Erskine said.
Rainscaping, though, can be expen-
sive and complicated. So why bother?
'"A rain garden is not only a beau-
tiful, low-maintenance, water-saving
garden, but can additionally provide
habitat and forage for local fauna,
sustain select edibles for harvest, re-
duce pollution, flooding and erosion
to nearby rivers and become a daily
reminder of the importance of water
conservation," Uncapher said.
Yards vary, and rainscaping de-
signs must be site specific. Some
suggestions:
Perk. Conduct a soil test to see if
your yard will percolate (drain) rain-
water, Sauer said. "If it doesn't perk,
then all you'll be left with is standing
water. If your yard is hard, like con-
crete, you'll have to improve the soil."
Plant native. Prairie plants and
woodland seedlings with deep roots
help soak up stormwater, filter pol-
lutants and recharge groundwater
levels, Sauer said. "Using native
plants also helps ensure they'll sur-


vive their new setting."
Installing a residential rain gar-
den, which is a saucer-like depres-
sion in the ground that captures rain
from a downspout, driveway or
patio, is the simplest and least ex-
pensive way to retain stormwater,
Woelfle-Erskine said. But here's his
kicker: "They won't work if your
yard is uphill from your house."
Use permeable materials like
bricks, paving blocks or gravel on
driveways and walkways, with spacing
that allows water to seep into the soil.
Edibles. Berries, asparagus, fid-
dlehead ferns, fruit trees, winter
squash, Brussels sprouts and culi-
nary and tea herbs can be creative
additions in the right rain garden
sites, but use them with care. "Be
aware of where the water is flowing
into your rain garden from," Unca-
pher said. "Rain gardens serving to
intersect runoff from potentially
polluted surfaces are not ideal for
edibles unless soil and water nutri-
ents are tested and monitored."
Rain gardens and related rain-
scaping features give homeowners a
chance to be part of the stormwater
and pollution solution, while serving
aesthetic and functional purposes,
said Bob Spencer, RainWise pro-
gram manager for the City of Seattle.
"Not only are the gardens attrac-
tive landscaping, they are protecting
our water bodies and the creatures
that live there," he said.


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 Ell






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Workshop to teach about rain barrels -HomeFronJ
e eFroF case nn


Special to the Chronicle

The Citrus County
Florida-friendly Land-
scaping program has part-
nered with The Green
Footprint of Crystal River
to offer rain barrel
workshops.
Participants help assem-
ble their own rain barrel to
take home after the class.


FRUGAL
Continued from Page E10

MEN
Croutons can be used for
more than just a salad top-
ping. They come in a wide
variety of flavors, so add
them on top of soup or
cook them into your
omelets or breakfast
casseroles.
The first reader tip
shares how she uses them:
Use for croutons: When
a recipe requires bread-
crumbs, I use croutons
that I have put through my
mini food chopper. I can
buy a bag of croutons for $1
or so, compared to $3-4 for
breadcrumbs. We don't eat
a lot of bread in our home,
so I don't have leftover
bread to use. The croutons
are a quick, easy and inex-
pensive substitute. Jill
H., email
Reusing grocery bags: I
take my own bags to the
store, but I continue to use
the fruit and vegetable
bags as needed. I have sev-
eral uses for them.
I use a bag to collect the
stems, leaves, skins and
whatever else is removed
from fresh vegetables. The
bag goes in the freezer, and
whenever it gets full, I
make my own vegetable
broth. I also use these bags
when we travel, to store
things like lotion, hair


A rain barrel workshop
will be from 3 to 4:30 p.m.
Monday, March 4, at the
extension services build-
ing in the Lecanto Govern-
ment Complex.
Also, two workshops will
be conducted during Mar-
ket Day at The Shoppes of
Heritage Village, 657 N. Cit-
rus Ave. in Historic Down-
town Crystal River, from

spray and anything else
that could leak in the suit-
case. The bags also come
in handy when we take our
dog for walks. Nancy T,
email
Multi-grain cereal: I've
started eating cold cereal.
Unfortunately, the multi-
grain cereal with fruit in it
that I like is REALLY ex-
pensive, whether it's on
sale or not So, I've started
putting a "base layer" in
the bowl, made up of corn
flakes, unsweetened
puffed wheat, Cheerios or
whatever sort of plain ce-
real I can get cheaply
Then I put a layer of the
expensive stuff on top.
Works fine! Judi, New
Hampshire
Use for vinegar: When I
have a cold, I drink a ta-
blespoon of apple cider
vinegar in some water. I
find it stops post-nasal
drip and keeps the sinuses
clearer, especially at night.
If I catch it early enough, I
am able to shorten the cold
cycle by preventing the
drip from going down my
airways. -Nancy T, email
Detangle doll hair: Use
shampoo, conditioner and
detangler, just like you
would on your own hair If
it's extra matted, try soak-
ing the doll's head in fab-
ric softener and very hot
water Soak, rinse and then
use a brush or comb. It just
takes patience. -Pauline,
Ohio


SidSley www.parsleyrealestate.com
Real Estate, Inc. 352-726-2628O





AWESOME OPEN LAKEFRONT! Looks like it could be in an Orvis
Catalogue, this 2/2 "cabin" has pine floors, high beamed cypress
ceilings and pecky cypress walls. Beautiful craftsmanship! Florida
room addition is light with lots of windows and super views. Island
kitchen. Loft makes 3rd sleeping area. Fish right off the dock or boat
the chain of Tsala Apopka Lakes. $ 1 59,000.


Sign up for class today


10:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to
2:30 p.m. Saturday, March 9.
The cost per barrel is
$45, which includes the
necessary spigot and
screen. For each barrel
purchased, The Green
Footprint donates $4 to a
scholarship fund for Citrus
County students pursuing a
degree in a field that pro-
motes environmental con-
servation and stewardship,
such as environmental sci-
ence, agriculture, horticul-

Save money for Christ-
mas 2013: Join the 52-week
money challenge. Save
money in small incre-
ments that gradually in-
crease. Read more at
frugal village. com /
forums/money-
challenges/151476-52-
we e k -m o ne y-
challenge.html.
Pressure canner tips:
I've taken an interest in
canning over the past few
years for nutritional rea-
sons. Everything store-
bought has way too much
salt in it, not to mention
other additives.
If you can grow your own
produce, have access to ex-
cellent farmer's markets or
have nutritional concerns, I
think canning is a good in-
vestment It also helps if
you can get the equipment
inexpensively I paid $2 for
one of my canners at a
garage sale, then spent an-
other $8 online to get the
manual for it, for a total cost


ture or other related field.
Call Julie or Tracy at
352-257-5403 to reserve a
spot. Phone credit card
payments and cash are ac-
cepted (no checks). Pre-
registration is necessary
For more green learning
opportunities, also register
for the Little Green Foot-
prints Herb Gardening
Youth Activity workshop
scheduled for 10:30 a.m. to
noon and 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, April 13.

of $10. I've picked up jars
here and there, and I also
inherited a bunch. If I had
to go out and buy every-
thing at full retail price in
order to get started, I don't
think I would.
Here's an excellent step-
by-step illustrated guide
that not only tells you how
to can, it tells you why
things need to be done a
certain way: extension.
usu.edu/utah/htm/fcs/food-
preservation-
canning/usda home_canni
ng. S.D., Minnesota


Sara Noel is the owner of
Frugal Village (www.
frugalvillage.com), a site
that offers practical,
money-saving strategies
for everyday living. To
send tips, comments or
questions, write to Sara
Noel, c/o Universal Uclick,
1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City MO 64106, or email
sara@frugalvillage.com.


BRIEFS


favorite plants
The Citrus County Water
Resources Department will
offer a free class on "Florida-
friendly Landscaping" from 2 to
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 12.
"Right Plant, Right Place"
is a best-management prac-
tice. Determine environmen-
tal conditions and plan
accordingly. The class will be
in the Extension classroom
at 3650 W. Sovereign Path,
Lecanto. Preregistration is
required by calling Gina
Hamilton at 352-527-5707.
Call 352-527-5708.
Master gardeners
slate clinics
Want to learn about lawn
care? The March free Master
Gardener Plant Clinics will
be about lawn maintenance.
Discussion will be about
each type of "warm-season"
turf grass commonly found in
Citrus County, the good and
bad points of each, particular
care requirements and com-
mon turf pests and diseases.
The schedule for these
free clinics is:
2 p.m. Wednesday,
March 6, at Floral City Library.
1:30 p.m. Friday, March
8, at Coastal Region Library,
Crystal River.
1:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 9, at Central Ridge Li-
brary, Beverly Hills.
1 p.m. Tuesday, March
12, at Lakes Region Library,
Inverness.
1:30 p.m. Wednesday,


Rod Kenner, Realtor
iiL352-436-3531


AVMSUN(COATR-iii


64 E. CYPRESS BLVD.* HOMOSASSA
Magnificent Lindhorst Classique IV model on double
lot! No expense was spared on upgrades! Formal
B .' living & dining rooms, ultra luxury eat-in kitchen w/
Corian counters & breakfast bar open to bright &
spacious family room. Cabana bath opens out to
greenbelt area & large patio. Beautiful master
Suite & bath. 10 zone irrigation system and room
fora pool.
$259,000
Directions: W. Cypress Blvd., stay Rt. on
S -. Cypress Cir, to Cypress Blvd. East., Home on left


March 13, at Central Ridge
Library, Beverly Hills.
1 2 p.m. Tuesday, March
19, at Homosassa Library,
Homosassa.
1 p.m. Tuesday, March
26, at Citrus Springs Library,
Citrus Springs.
Master Gardeners will be
present to answer questions
or look at samples of plant-
related concern. For more in-
formation, call Citrus County
Extension at 352-527-5700.
Green thumb
gardening classes
Have you been wanting to
try growing vegetables, fruit
or flowers, but are con-
cerned about having a brown
thumb? UF/IFAS Citrus
County Extension, in con-
junction with United Way, is
offering workshops to en-
hance knowledge and gar-
dening abilities. Workshops
will be presented in March to
hone gardening skills.
Gardening in Small
Spaces Container Grow-
ing, 10 a.m. Friday, March 8.
Paydirt in Your Yard -
Composting, 10 a.m. Friday,
March 15.
To participate in any of the
workshops, preregister by
calling 352-527-5700. Space
is limited and preregistration
is required. A $5 registration
fee will be charged.
All workshops will be at
University of Florida/IFAS
Citrus County Extension,
3650 W. Sovereign Path,
Suite 1, Lecanto.
From staff reports


E12 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

ATTIC
Continued from Page E4

name with wide recognition in the
collecting marketplace, but the set
you have is low on the totem pole. I
think you would be better off pass-
ing the set on in the family
If you are determined to sell, Re-
placements Limited might be inter-
ested in buying it. The phone
number is 800-REPLACE (737-5223).
Good luck.
DearJohn: This vase has no mark-
ing on it. My husband's mother had
this for years, she is 98, and inher-
ited from her mother. It is very de-
tailed and is in excellent condition.
What can you tell me about it and its
value? L. W, Floral City
Dear L.W: I wish you had in-
cluded a photograph of the backside
and bottom of your pretty vase. It ap-
pears to be made of milk glass. I
think it was made in the Bristol area
of England during the last quarter of
the Victorian era circa 1880. Poten-
tial dollar value is below $100, short
of a lucky day
Dear John: I am curious as to the
material in this lampshade along
with the value, age, and whether it
used for gas or electric lighting.
I only have hearsay history on it.
A great-grandfather who was a
chimney sweep in the Boston area
acquired this from an old home in
Boston. I assume he received it
sometime in the 1920s to 1940s,
when he was most active in his work
in that area.
The fixture itself is missing and it
is unknown if it was electric pow-
ered or gas powered; rumor has it
that the home was being demolished
to make way for improvements. It is
an inverted dome shade. The lead-
ing is brass. The material appears to
be a shell or some form of plastic. It
has almost a mica shimmer to it
when looked at close.
The dot at the center of the shade
appears to be a pearl. The exterior
of the shade is yellowed, I assume by
time and age. The yellowing does
flake off if rubbed too hard.
The interior has preserved its col-
oring. It measures 18 inches across at
the widest point of the dome and is
about 7 1/2 inches high. The base has
a scalloped effect to it Any informa-
tion you could pass on to me is greatly
appreciated. TB., Beverly Hills
Dear T.B.: I suspect your leaded
glass lampshade was made in Amer-
ica during the first quarter of the


Special to the Chronicle
This vase appears to be done in milk
glass, and probably dates from the
last quarter of the Victorian era.

20th century It could have been
used for either electric or gas. If
there are no manufacturer's marks,
which are often found along the in-
side edge of the shade, it would sell
in the $500 range. If you find maker's
marks, send good quality photo-
graphs and all the information.
U
John Sikorski has been a
professional in the antiques
business for 30 years. He hosts a
call-in radio show, Sikorski's Attic,
on WJUF (90.1 FM) Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. Write to Sikorski's
Attic, PO. Box 2513, Ocala, FL 34478
or asksikorski@aol. com.


INCREDIBLE WATERFRONT HOME
SITUATED IN A PRIME LOCATION!
$394,900
Deep water canal close proximity to Crystal River
3 docks & 2 boat lifts. This 2 Story home comes
complete with elevator & screened lanai 3 BR's Huge
Master & Sitting room Large living area & outstanding
kitchen. Media room & hobby room New Seawall &
A/C. 1st Year Home Insurance premium included at
closing! MLS #351676
Directions: HWY 19 North to Left on 19th. Left on
20 Ave. House on right Hand Side corner of 20th
Ave and 15th St.
Paul Rawlins: ,,.
352-3822700 NEXTGENEATION
REALTY


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 E13
This leaded glass lamp-
shade probably dates
from the first part of the
20th century. It might
sell in the $500 range,
although the value could
vary depending on the
maker.
Special to the Chronicle


*Iou AM lNN AMERICAN
.LOU lyleE eRealtor ET REALTY & INVESTMENTS
ALWAYS THERE FOR YOU 4511 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills, FL 34465
Cell: (352) 697-1685 2st-7a-3Ann








E14 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


To place an ad, call 563-5966


BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
* 1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
HERNANDO
2/2 $450 mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
LECANTO 2/2
S/W, $450 Furn.
352-746-7595
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$475/mo $400 dep pool
and clubhouse
3526284441




must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr
war., only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&I W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/1,DW, H/A, 12x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031
HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230


must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incls Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272


V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incls Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272

BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183

Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192


INVERNESS
2b/2'2 ba, 'i acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/1/V2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133



s--



NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incls: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded




CALL (352) 795-1272
NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fxed ate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272
Palm Harbor Retire-
ment Community
homes. $8500 off of
any home, 2/2 & 3/2
from $39,900
Call John Lyons a
800-622-2832 ext 210
for details

Get Results

In The Homefront
Classifieds!


$$$$$$$$
-I.-



WE WILL

BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377





For Sale%4
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1% AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
4Owner Fin. Avail.+
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182

Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217

Owner Finance/Lease
Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH,
14 x 20 block building,
New Septic, Handy
person, $28,900./Offer
352-422-1916


CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Specials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882
FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879
STONEBROOK, CR
Pondview/Gourmet
Kitch, 2Br, MSuite,
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340

.state


ACTION
RENTAL MANAGEMENT
REALTY, INC. J
352-795-7368
ww.CitrusCountyHorneRentals.corn
HOMOSASSA
41 Birlilree St ........................$800
2/2/2 SMW spacious rooms, lnal
2278 Sandburg Pt ..................$500
2/1 dupFex, ncl. lawncare
HERNANDO
5164 N. Dewey Way .............. $775
3/2 DW newer mole on 1/2 ACR t
6315 N. Shorewood Dr...........$625
2/1, Florida room
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods Dr..............$750
2/2/1 Close to mall, uity room and shed
11280 Bayshore Dr.............$1,000
2/2 Furnished on canal,comm. pool
8520 N.I Sannon Ave .......... $I,300
2/2/2 Newer home, nice neighborhood
CITRUS SPRINGS
9047 Travis Dr........................$625
2/2 Duplex, newer home

J.W. MORTON
PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT LLC.
1645 W. MAIN ST
INVERNESS, FL

Need a Good Tenant?



3/2/2.................$800
2/1/1...................$650
3/2 Condo........$650
2/3/2.................$850

2/2/Carport ...........$650

3/2/2 ...................$800
2/2/2 ...................$850
Jennifer Fudge,
Property Manager
SCheryl Scruggs,
Realtor-Associate
352-726-9010




CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857


-ll

At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio Apt.
$650. All Util. Included
(352) 422-1933
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Inverness
2/1 on private estate, no
smoking,$650 monthly
Utilities included 1st,
last, sec. Req.
352-422-2393
Inverness South
Sm. Cottage furnished
all utilities included
$450 mo352-560-0370,
727-916-1119 Cell
N. CRYSTAL RIVER
800sq, ft. 1 Bdr
12mi. north of Seven
Rivers Hospital, w/d
Direct TV, non-smoker
(horse-stall available)
$650mo. 352-586-9598




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Apts, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000


Get

Results in

the

homeront

classifieds!


CRYSTAL RIVER
APTS
Now Renting 1 & 2
BDR units starting at
$518. mo.A Very
Nice Place to Come
Home To. Quiet,
Clean, Well
Maintained, Beautiful
off Road Setting
on Rt 486 near
Publix, WinnDixie &
New Walmart 5 min.
away. Situated on 4
Beautiful Acres. Mgr
Lives on Site. Central
Laundry Room on
Site. Must meet
Some Income
Requirements.
(352) 795-1700


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed /1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furnished &
Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & the
Hospital
1st and Security from
$575/month
Call 352-795-1795
for Appt.
www.ensing
properties.com





CRYSTAL RIVER
SNICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037




CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF, exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528


LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801




HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool, H20 Incl
$900. mo. + $900. sec.
No pets 407.415-0622
www.moverightin.com
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346
Meadowcrest CR
3bd/2ba Villa,
$900 mnth.unfurn.
$1000 month. furn.
352-563-1106




At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio Apt.
$650. All Util. Included
(352) 422-1933
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Beverly Hills Rental
1/1 with carport, $500
monthly and $500 Se-
curity deposit.
352-249-6098
BLACK DIAMOND
Homes for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
CRYSTAL RIVER 2/1
Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
Floral City
immaculate 2/1
1 or 2 established adults
no pets or smokers
$550mo + deposit
352-860-1887
Sugarmill Woods
2006,4/2/2, appl. inc.
$900, 319-371-9843


,k Chronicle








CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River

352-563-0890






Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 () MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515

Homosassa
Springs 3/2 c/h/a
$795/mo, + 850
sec.(352) 628-3696
INVERNESS
121 N. Seminole Ave.,
Downtown, CBD.
Charming 1600 + sq.
ft., 2 BR, 2 /2 BA, CB
home. Zoned Com-
mercial, w/ formal
dining room, Ig. mast.
bdrm, utility, & solar-
ium, w/ appliances.
$800/ 1st, last, w/ sec
dep. & ref. Available
Monday March 4,
726-3153, leave mesg
INVERNESS
1bdllba Cottage
wllaundry facilities
$350m. (352) 212-3385
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large % acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Large turn. 1 BR home
in 55+ community,
Great location just off
the water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $550
(352) 344-1380
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797




HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225
Rom


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacy/Private, Must
love big dogs. $750.
(352) 422-5735
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Priv.
Rm./Ba. share kit. $400
everything Included
352-875-5998

INVERNESS
$110wkly incl. all, +
meals ,tv, Lk side,
no smoking/drinking,
background check
352-257-5795


CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129



Non-Smoking Male
w/2 indoor cats,2 out-
door dogs, Ref. Avail.
352-697-9646




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial








Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com


UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
www.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.

AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number

RF4MC
REALTY ONE


TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vista's.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905


Fiid YoWr t)reazm HOmew
Search Hundreds of Local Listings
www.chroniclehomefinder.com


realestates

AUCTION





5 WILLIAM TELL LN
Beverly Hills, FL
2,384/- SF Office Bldg
on .38'- Acres Zoned GNC
Agent: Marvin Puryear
Coldwell Banker
352.394.5900


3% to Buyer's Agents!
OPEN
INSPECTION:
Wed &Thurs, Mar 13 & 14
12:00- 2:00 pm

HUDSON&
MARSHALL
866.539.9547
5% buyer's premium.
5% down, ofwhich $5,000 in
certified funds required
see website for
terms & conditions
H&M CQ1035357, AB110; B. G.
Hudson, Jr., BK3006464, AU230





HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428




4/3+/4 pool home w/
inlaw suite on 2/A ac.
HW firs, granite cntrs.
2009 Custom Home
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE
PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 %
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164





Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433


HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
"cash only **
352-503-3245




Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263

FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, appls, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872

INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1ba
w/ 2porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379

NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $69,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line appl's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875





AUTOMATED
Home Info 24/7
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE





3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667


AUTOMATED
Home Info 2417
CALL 637-2828
and enter the
house number



REALTY ONE


4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell





4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026











Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,

Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-287-0473

Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531

Golf Course Home
3/2/2/2. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475


Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
cornn
www.citrusrealtor
.corn
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.

I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!


DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor
Simply put
I '11 work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515


Get
Results in
the
homefront
classified!


CirsCut


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com


SANDI HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855





3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723




20 DOCKABLE
ACRES
St. Lucie Waterway.
$159,500. 45mins
boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.

HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2%Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331





"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNatureCoast
iProp es.com
To view
great waterfront
properties"




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697


SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013 E15


H
2BD 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
Gulf Prvt Island home
on 15 ac 80' dock. 4/2
All until. Mainland dock
& pkg. Jacuzzi house
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337
YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor








E16 SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


* IIJI.III UI I r -l.llJIJ


2 Lois
* 2200 Ii i...-.i '
* Granile counleis hickory Iloors
HuI =m I i_' ,. $179,500
Jeanne ot Il'illaid Pickel 212 341/0
ni'ii' CitlusCounon Sold corn









A FINE HOME IN PERFECT CONDITION





IrI = I. ASKING $398,900
Pt D ,o 352'212 7280
.iI h. .1ntl i.1i .1 2/ nd ?,4. igm


NEED LAND AND A BIG HOUSE?

d 1,1i ,,, I .

ill = 'I 1 $290,000
Call I 'cAl Root Realtom *4ssocIatei
352 2/2 1926 o, housescitus -pinal comn


BIG LAKE HENDERSON


1 ,,111 h, .-1, I, lI' h- .i-i.u
$99,000 YES ONLY $99,000
NOT A MISPRINT
C.ill/ ll..h.i SI der 352 416 8121
and .isk to ile =358181


BRAND NEW INVERNESS
WATERFRONT HOME!


f H,;hl n i V VIJ hiy i' h I.Jl I ,m ,

ASKING $199K
Call Ouade Feesei 352 302 7699


DUPLEX
-. I ...w II ..p l .in I h .j I..in


Mti = ? ?': ASKING $73,000
Call Jim Motion lot a loui of this
investment piopeily at 422 2173


COMFORTABLE LIVING
AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE


. .. l .l 1 1 I .. I ... I I i.. H

Ml = '.ii. $48,900
Pat an is 352 212 1280
I'ien listing c21pitda.i is corn


* e '... ,:ilh I.l
* V.' .H 'l.: ij .."u ....... "
* :.-I .' I i.I.,1. j. l q., i,, v.. II.. lh ....

i'. = 5,.1 'l$350,000
Jeanne Pickiel 212.3410
i',ii, CilinsCounti Sold corn
1 -


FOXWOOD BEAUTY



MG =h1111_" $128,000
Nancy Jenks 352 400 8072 icelll
72606668 tollicel


SUGARMILL WOODS GOLF COURSE
_.. ,,r, I H I
I ii'. I-f I., ..-.. I "r. *-f II.-. .. HI.:.l

ASKING ONLY $63.500
CaI [I,, G i, 1m i tul IL, at i' it 35? Jtll ?2635










CITRUS SPRINGS!
i.v. ll y f jl: h .I I4 .1 .. .il h.n I .,ill, ., int



Mti =/iii/ill $59,900
lonaine 0 Regan 586 0075











* If A.,.1 1 I.. .I i. i
* I .l l I-IF. ,:ll .v i .d- li.n


Mi 3 = "I!/ $259,500
Call Chailes Kelly 352 422-2387


* ... h l., l i l I .1:i
* N ii. .' ,uui.i ulu.u..l .]i ..il i.u ui.l.l..:.hu l i
Mi_:, = 'i/_i $115,000
Jeanne B Willaid Pickiel 212 3410
ii:'i:rl. ciltuscounlysold. corn


1001 LOUNDS


MI_ = i/IlIII) $69,000
Call Stelan Stuai 352 212 0211
ot Isaac Baylon ,`352 697 2493


IF YOUR LOOKING FOR A COOKIE CUTTER
HOME THIS ISN'T FOR YOU
I I d II.llr i I l li i i i I i i i, P i. i I i I .. i.


I i l .1 i.. d... .ii ... .' .i l i ne mil. .e


SPRING IS BECKONING YOUI
I s l il. I Boo II I. 0 .34 0

W hl,. ... h .. .. All I I. ili .

Il'., =/ Ihi41 $51,000
Ask lot I/Marti n Booth 637 4904


,,,' .... hI,,, .... .. I ,, I I,,'61 ..I 1 .,,1

I hi.1.' .iI h..I. I I. I .. I .. .. iii .... .. I I
ASKING S138,900
hlie li,siag ii In II ,.~ t L Li ,st l L