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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028315/02903
 Material Information
Title: Citrus County chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Citrus County Chronicle
Publisher: Scofield Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Inverness, Fla.
Inverness, Fla
Publication Date: 03-02-2013
Copyright Date: 2006
Frequency: daily[<1987-1995>]
weekly[ former <1939-1968>]
semiweekly[ former <1980-1981>]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Inverness (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Citrus County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Citrus -- Inverness
Coordinates: 28.839167 x -82.340278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1889?
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 48, no. 51 (June 8, 1939).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 15802799
alephbibnum - 366622
lccn - sn 87070035
System ID: UF00028315:03047

Full Text


Payback: Pirates softball downs rival Citrus /B1


Windy and cold
with a 20 percent
chance of rain.
PAGE A4


CITR S COUNT Y U





1HRONICLE


Killer gets life + 40


No parole possible for Marino


MARCH 2, 2013




Man



lost to


hole


Circuit Judge Ric
Howard sentenced Marino
to life in prison without the
possibility of parole -plus
30 years for carjacking.
Marino, 34, also got 5 years
apiece for two probation vi-
olations. All of the sen-
tences are to run


consecutively Florida does
not have parole.
Howard called Marino
"one the most successful
fakers" for using the crutch
of mental illness to justify
her conduct when she ran
over and killed a 64-year-
old Lecanto woman, Mary
Haynie, following a scuffle
for control of the woman's
vehicle, which she was try


to steal.
Haynie ran out of a pet
grooming business in a
shopping plaza April 7,
2010, and tried to stop
Marino, but Marino pushed
Haynie to the ground and
ran her over with her own
SUV Marino then pro-
ceeded to leave the parking
lot, authorities said.
See Page A4


Jennifer
Marino
guilty of first-
degree murder.


Associated Press
Jeremy Bush, brother of Jeff
Bush, breaks down Friday as
he speaks to the media
about attempting to rescue
Jeff as he disappeared in a
sinkhole in Seffner.

Unstable

sinkhole grows
Associated Press
SEFFNER In a matter
of seconds, the earth opened
under Jeff Bush's bedroom
and swallowed him up like
something out of a horror
movie. About the only thing
left was the TV cable run-
ning down into the hole.
Bush, 37, was presumed
dead Friday, the victim of a
sinkhole a hazard so com-
mon in Florida that state law
requires home insurers to
provide coverage against the
danger.
The sinkhole, estimated at
See Page A2


CITRUS COUNTY WORKS:


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Frances Fecteau
is one of Citrus Springs
Library's first volunteers,
offering support since it
began in 1977. Her main
job is filing all the books in
the card catalog by
hand. Most public libraries
use a computerized online
public-access catalog
system, but the Citrus
Springs Library still does it
the "old-fashioned" way.
The Citrus Springs
Library has a large
collection of audio books
as well as jigsaw puzzles
and VHS tapes, and also a
free magazine exchange
table.


'Biggest little

library in

Florida'
NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CITRUS SPRINGS
he story of the Cit-
rus Springs Li-
brary is a story of
community spirit.
It's a story of hard
work and determination,
of people pooling their
money, time and energy,
a story of limited re-
sources and a limitless
sense of ownership of its
patrons and volunteers.
Run entirely by volun-
teers and one paid li-
brary manager, this small
community library draws
as many as 100 people a
day
"We're the biggest little
library in Florida," said
Pete Louys, library tech-
nical adviser
MEN
On a recent Monday,
the parking lot of the
small 2,640-square-foot
building on Country Club
Boulevard is filled, with
See Page A5


Activity director
Keeping residents active and
engaged is the job of director
Anita Marshall./Page A3


RELIGION:


On a mission
Colleges and universities in
Utah see a decline in student
enrollment as more young
men and women head out for
missionary work./Page Cl


Karyn Langer: Full of vim, vigor and vitality


NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
INVERNESS There was this certain
sausage, Gaspar's linguiqa, a garlicky pork
sausage, that Karyn Langer loved when she
lived in Massachusetts and wanted once
she moved to Inverness after marrying her
husband, David.
Trouble was, -
stores around ,Cf C t
here didn't
carry Gaspar's
linguiqa sausage. But that didn't stop
Karyn.
"We thought she was nuts," said Barbara
Fallon, one the Karyn's many friends. "She
went around to every store trying to get
them to carry it until finally Publix did. We
laughed at her for that, but she was deter-
mined. If she had it in her head, you
See Page A6


Special to the Chronicle
Inverness resident Karyn Langer died Feb. 21
after a long illness. She was 59.


HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE
* Huntington's disease is a progressive,
terminal disease that causes the
degeneration of nerve cells in the
brain.
* It usually causes movement, cognitive
and psychiatric disorders with a wide
spectrum of signs and symptoms,
including involuntary jerking, muscle
rigidity, difficulty walking, thinking,
speaking and/or swallowing, mood,
behavior and personality changes as
well as many more symptoms.
* Most people develop signs and
symptoms in their 40s or 50s.
* Huntington's disease is hereditary. If
one parent has it, there's a 50 percent
risk of a child developing it.
Source: Mayo Clinic


IIII lllIll!8415I78 2!002 5I


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morning


HIGH
60
LOW
34


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
INVERNESS After
nearly three years, the
state got what it wanted
and then some in the case
against convicted killer
Jennifer Marino.


I l- Il


:$PER
Mo.





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Engineers work in front of a home Friday where a sinkhole opened up underneath a bedroom and swallowed a man
in Seffner. Jeff Bush screamed for help and disappeared as a large sinkhole opened under the bedroom of his house,
his brother said Friday. Jeremy Bush told rescue crews he heard a loud crash near midnight Thursday, then heard
his brother screaming. There has been no contact with Jeff Bush since then, and neighbors on both sides of the home
have been evacuated.

SINKHOLE
ContinuedfromLPaeA1 When the earth falls out from under you


20 feet across and 20 feet
deep, caused the home's
concrete floor to cave in
around 11 p.m. Thursday
as everyone in the Tampa-
area house was turning in
for the night. It gave way
with a loud crash that
sounded like a car hitting
the house and brought
Bush's brother running.
Jeremy Bush said he
jumped into the hole but
couldn't see his brother. He
had to be rescued himself
by a sheriff's deputy, who
reached out and pulled
him to safety as the ground
crumbled around him.
"The floor was still giv-
ing in and the dirt was still
going down, but I didn't
care. I wanted to save my
brother," Jeremy Bush
said through tears Friday
in a neighbor's yard. "But
I just couldn't do nothing."
He added: "I could
swear I heard him holler-
ing my name to help him."
Officials lowered equip-
ment into the sinkhole and
saw no signs of life, said
Hillsborough County Fire
Rescue spokeswoman Jes-
sica Damico.
A dresser and the TV set
had vanished down the
hole, along with most of
Bush's bed.


The same limestone aquifer that provides Florida with drinking water
can cause disaster when it caves in, resulting in a sinkhole.


Rainwater seeps through layers of
sand and seashells at the Earth's
crust, settling into the Swiss cheese-
like limestone.--- ,


Sand --
Water -' i
table
Shells--- ,
Limestone -


The acidity of the rain eats the
limestone, enlarging the cavity and
thinning its walls. When drought
conditions lower the water table, the
pressure that helped to support the
cavity's structure is eliminated.


When the ceiling of the limestone '
layer can no longer support the weight, the
upper layers fall in. Often the bottom falls below
the water table and the sinkhole fills with ground water.


SOURCE: Florida Geological Survey


"All I could see was the
cable wire running from
the TV going down into the
hole. I saw a corner of the
bed and a corner of the
box spring and the frame
of the bed," Jeremy Bush
said.
At a news conference
Friday night, county ad-
ministrator Mike Merrill
described the home as "se-


Dan DeLorenzo/AP


riously unstable." He said
no one can go in the home
because officials were
afraid of another collapse
and losing more lives. The
soil around the home was
very soft and the sinkhole
was expected to grow.
Engineers said they may
have to demolish the small,
sky-blue house, even
though from the outside


there appeared to be noth-
ing wrong with the four-
bedroom, concrete-wall
structure, built in 1974.
Florida is highly prone to
sinkholes because there are
caverns below ground of
limestone, a porous rock
that easily dissolves in
water. A sinkhole near Or-
lando grew to 400 feet
across in 1981 and de-


Jeff Bush of Seffner is presumed dead after a large
sinkhole opened under his bedroom Thursday night and he
disappeared into it, together with most of the bedroom
furniture.

ON THE NET
www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/feedback/faq.htm# 17


voured five sports cars,
most of two businesses, a
three-bedroom house and
the deep end of an Olympic-
size swimming pool.
More than 500 sinkholes
have been reported in
Hillsborough County alone
since the government
started keeping track in
1954, according to the
state's environmental
agency
Jeremy Bush said some-
one came out to the home
a couple of months ago to
check for sinkholes and
other things, apparently
for insurance purposes.
"He said there was noth-
ing wrong with the house.
Nothing. And a couple of
months later, my brother
dies. In a sinkhole," Bush
said.
Six people were at the
home at the time, includ-
ing Jeremy Bush's wife
and his 2-year-old daugh-
ter The brothers worked
maintenance jobs, includ-


ing picking up trash along
highways.


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A2 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013







Page A3-SATURDAY, MARCH 2,2013



TATE&


LOCAL


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE



Former teacher sentenced in sex-sting case


Beverly Hills man to spend seven

years injai. two years on probation


A.B. SIDIBE
Staff writer
A former middle school
teacher and band leader who
was caught in a sex sting last
summer was sentenced Friday
by Circuit Judge Ric Howard.
Ricky Harris, 63, of Beverly
Hills, was sentenced to seven
years in prison and two years of
sex-offender probation.
Before announcing his sen-
tence, Howard told Harris he be-


trayed "the trust placed in you
as a teacher."
Harris was one of nine people
caught in a Citrus County Sher-
iff's Office dragnet in June 2012
and charged with various Inter-
net child sex crimes. According
to officials, all of those arrested
in Operation Summer Knights
thought they were traveling to
meet minors for sexual activity.
Prosecutor Brian Trehy told
Howard that Harris, though he
was not working as a teacher at the


time of his arrest, was ac- cepted responsibility
tually searching for em- and sought counseling.
ployment in the education The attorney pointed to
field. He could have been ,;. .; an evaluation of Harris
in contact with 13-year- by psychologist Harry
olds, the age of the child Krop that concluded
he thought he was meet- there were "no psycho-
ing for sex during the logical tendencies for
sting, the prosecutor said. Ricky this type of behavior."
"He also brought con- Harris However, Trehy urged
doms with him," Trehy was sentenced the judge to impose the
told the court. to seven years recommended guideline
Several character wit- in prison for sentence of 84 months.
nesses testified on Har- Internet child Harris also pleaded to
ris's behalf, including sex crimes, be spared prison time
two pastors. and be allowed to go into
Harris' attorney, Mark Ro- the ministry or even get back
driguez, said his client has been into band or choir activities. But
contrite from the beginning, ac- Howard said there needs to be


one safe place for kids and peo-
ple they can trust, and that is
school and their teachers.
"You brought dishonor to
yourself by breaking that trust,"
Howard told Harris.
During the sting, personal ads
were posted on many e-commerce
websites such as Craigslist and
several Internet chat sites fre-
quented by children. Experi-
enced undercover "chatters"
were recruited from CCSO, the
Alachua Police Department and
Sumter, Orange and Lake County
sheriff's offices to help.
Contact Chronicle reporter
A.B. Sidibe at 352-564-2925 or
asidibe@chronicleonline. com.


Around the
COUNTY

Two deputies' patrol
vehicles destroyed
At 11 a.m. Wednesday,
sheriff's deputies re-
sponded to a disturbance
on Ella Avenue in Inver-
ness. A caller said a "vi-
cious fight" was in progress
near a campsite in a grassy,
heavily wooded field.
Two deputies arrived,
one right after the other, ac-
cording to the sheriff's of-
fice. About three minutes
after the second deputy ar-
rived, the disturbance was
resolved. But as the
deputies returned to their
vehicles, the odor of burn-
ing underbrush arose near
one of the cars.
While attempting to move
the car, it stalled and flames
shot out from underneath it.
The deputies tried to extin-
guish the blaze with fire ex-
tinguishers, but to no avail.
As the blaze grew, the
second deputy tried to
move his vehicle. As he
approached his car, one of
the tires blew and flames
erupted from his vehicle.
Citrus Sheriff's Fire Res-
cue responded and put out
the fires. No one was in-
jured, but the vehicles were
a total loss.
It is believed the fire
started from the heated un-
dercarriage of one of the
cars and very dry
conditions.
Storm photos and
memories wanted
Nearly 20 years ago -
on March 13, 1993- the
No-Name Storm hit Citrus
County. The Citrus County
Chronicle is looking for peo-
ple who have photos of the
storm and its aftermath.
The paper also wants your
stories and memories from
that event.
Email either Nancy
Kennedy at nkennedy
@chronicleonline.com or
A.B. Sidibe at asidibe
@chronicleonline.com or
call the newsroom at 352-
563-5660 and ask for
Kennedy or Sidibe.
Learn about the
Nature Coast
Gary D. Ellis, director of
the Gulf Archaeology Re-
search Institute, will pres-
ent "Archaeology of the
Nature Coast" at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, March 5, and
3 p.m. Tuesday, March 19,
at Crystal River Preserve
State Park headquarters
auditorium.
Ellis will discuss archae-
ological research along the
Nature Coast and Citrus
County. The public is in-
vited to attend and learn
about what makes this
coast one of the most ex-
citing areas of Florida
archaeology.
For information, email
Ellis at gari.arch@gmail.
com, or call 352-464-4274.
Citrus Springs
MSBU to convene
A Citrus Springs Munici-
pal Services Benefit Unit
meeting will be at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, March 6, at
Citrus Springs Community
Center, 1570 W. Citrus
Springs Blvd.
For information, call Larry
Brock at 352-527-5478.
-From staff reports


Citrus County WORKS





Therapeutic fun



People come in here and they're angry and lonely. They've lost their home, their
car, and now they're in a strange place sharing a room with someone they don't know,
so they come to balloon volleyball and I tell them, 'Hit it like you mean it,' and it gets
their aggression out. It all has a purpose."
Anita Marshall
Crystal River Health and Rehab activities director.


. -.


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Crystal River Health and Rehab activity director Anita Marshall, right, leads Patty Akers in chair exercises. Activities are not just meant
to pass the time, but to engage residents' whole being body, mind and emotions.

Activity director uses games to

exercise clients minds, bodies, souls


Editor's note: In this eco-
nomic climate where jobs are
at a premium, the Chronicle is
running an occasional series,
"Citrus County Works," profil-
ing local Citrus County people
and the jobs they perform.
Today's focus is on Anita Mar-
shall, activity director at Crys-
tal River Health and Rehab.

NANCY KENNEDY
Staff writer
CRYSTAL RIVER
To Anita Marshall, bingo
is not just bingo.
"A lot of people think ac-
tivities is just fun and games
and keeping residents busy,"
said Marshall, activities direc-
tor at Crystal River Health and
Rehab.
For example, take bingo.
The game involves hand-eye
coordination and fine motor
dexterity It requires listening
and paying attention. For peo-
ple recovering from strokes, it
helps relearn numbers and let-
ters. It fosters socialization.
"People don't think of the
therapeutic benefits and the
quality of life it gives people,"
Marshall said. "Think of bal-
loon volleyball. Can this per-
son still track with their eyes?
It helps them exercise gross
motor skills.
"People come in here and
they're angry and lonely
They've lost their home, their
car, and now they're in a
strange place sharing a room


with someone they don't know,
so they come to balloon volley-
ball and I tell them, 'Hit it like
you mean it,' and it gets their
aggression out," she said. "It
all has a purpose."
In April 1986, Marshall, 54,
came to Citrus County from
Baltimore looking for work as
a bartender. Instead, she was
hired at Crystal River Health
and Rehab as a patient care
assistant.
"Back then, residents were
given medication or they were
tied into a wheelchair all
slumped over, sitting in a hall-
way," she said. "But I kept
wanting to see my residents
down at activities. It made
things more calming for them
and for the staff. So, I would
get my people up and get them
dressed, put beads and lipstick
on the ladies and take them to
activities."
One day the activity director
told Marshall of an opening in
the activities department,
which, as Marshall described
it, was like Christmas and fire-
works, a birthday party and
winning the lottery all rolled
into one. She became a certi-
fied nursing assistant, working
part-time in activities and
part-time as a CNA as well as
doing housekeeping on the
weekends. When the activities
director left, Marshall took
over and the company paid
for her education and
certification.
Marshall said she sees big


As activity director at Crystal River Health and Rehab, Anita
Marshall says her favorite part is being with seniors such as Wanda
Winn, a resident at the nursing facility.


changes coming in assisted liv-
ing and nursing care facilities
- a big cultural change,
moving from "hallways to
households."
"The 'boomers' are coming,
and they are not going to want
to do things the way we're
doing them now," she said.
"So, what if we get rid of
nurses' stations and turn them
into sitting areas? Let's put in
kitchenettes where people can
fix food, a laundry room so
they can do their own laundry
if they want to. Put in pool ta-


bles and the stuff boomers like
to do.
"We can do so much better if
it was more like a group-home
setting, a home atmosphere,"
she said.
Meanwhile, Marshall said
her main focus is to know the
likes and dislikes of every resi-
dent, to make them feel safe
and comfortable and valued.
"I love my old people," she
said. "It's cliche, but they re-
ally do have so much wisdom
and life experience -they
rock!"






A4 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


Death warrant for man
convicted of killing girl
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has
signed a death warrant Friday for a man con-
victed of kidnapping and killing a girl on her
way to school more than three decades ago.
Larry Eugene Mann is scheduled to die by
lethal injection at Florida State Prison near
Raiford at 6 p.m. April 10.
Officials say Mann abducted 10-year-old
Elisa Nelson in Palm Harbor on Nov. 4, 1980.
Mann took the girl to an orange grove, where
he beat her to death.
Mann was convicted of first-degree murder
and kidnapping in Pinellas County in 1981.
Two teens dead after crash
with drunken driver
ST. CLOUD -Authorities say two teens
are dead after crashing into a suspected
drunken driver in central Florida.
The Florida Highway Patrol reported Randall
Kerley, 47, was driving a truck in Osceola
County Thursday night when he turned left at


KILLER
Continued from Page Al

Haynie later died from
her injuries at Citrus Me-
morial hospital. Marino
was arrested later that day
in Wildwood.
During Friday's sentenc-
ing, Howard was echoing
the words of forensic psy-
chologist Harry Krop, who
worked with Marino and
concluded that she is
prone to a behavior called
malingering, which means
to pretend or exaggerate
incapacity or illness.
During her four-day jury
trial last week which
ended in her conviction
for first-degree murder
and carjacking, her de-
fense team public de-
fenders Devon Sharkey
and Ed Spaight- said she
had an extreme psychotic
episode during the inci-
dent and was therefore in-
sane at the time.
Friday, Sharkey argued


an intersection in front of an oncoming car. The
car hit the right side of Kerley's truck and caught
fire as it hit an SUV stopped at the intersection.
The car's driver, 18-year-old Rachel Price,
and her passenger, 19-year-old Jamaree
Cook, were killed in the blaze. No injuries
were reported to Kerley or the SUV driver.
Troopers reported Kerley showed signs of
impairment after the crash. He was arrested at
the scene and charged with two counts of DUI
manslaughter.
Fluoride returns to
Pinellas County water
CLEARWATER One of the largest coun-
ties in Florida will add fluoride back into its
water after a debate about whether the chemi-
cal is beneficial for fighting tooth decay or toxic
and an affront to personal liberty.
Fluoride was added Friday to Pinellas
County's water, affecting about 700,000 peo-
ple. Plant City in Hillsborough County added
fluoride to water for the first time Friday, affect-
ing about 11,000 households.
-From wire reports


two quick motions for ac-
quittal or a new trial based
on the judge's refusal to
suspend the trial when
Marino had several out-
bursts in the courtroom,
but they were summarily
dismissed by Howard.
Howard called Marino's
outbursts "merely acting
out" and went to buttress
Krop's observations of
Marino as being
manipulative.
He said when the de-
fense was making its case,
she was calm and fine. It
was only when the state
was presenting its case
and things were seemingly
not going her way that she
decided to act out
Prosecutor Pete Ma-
grino urged the judge to
impose the maximum sen-
tence on Marino, who he
called a "manipulative,
evil individual."
Howard also heard from
an emotionally distraught
woman who was a victim
of an attempted carjacking
by Marino in 2009 for


which she was placed on
probation. The woman
continues to deal with the
trauma of that evening,
which included Marino
trying to yank the woman
by her hair out of her car.
Jason Haynie, the son of
the woman killed by
Marino, tearfully told the
court about his mother's
life as a Montessori
teacher and how badly her
grandson misses her.
"He would jump up to
catch the moon, just to get
a hug from her," he said of
his son, who was 3 years
old when his grandmother
got killed.
Marino also spoke be-
fore the sentencing, saying
she wished to apologize to
the Haynie family
"I am sorry," Marino said.
"If you can just have
mercy on me and send me
to a hospital, I will get bet-
ter and go back to work."
Contact Chronicle re-
porter A.B. Sidibe at 352-
564-2925 or asidibe@
chronicleonline. com.


SFor the RECORD


Citrus County
Sheriff's Office

Domestic battery
arrests
Shay Parry, 30, of Ho-
mosassa, at 3 a.m. Monday
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
Triet Le, 43, of Her-
nando, at 3:16 p.m. Monday
on a misdemeanor charge of
domestic battery. No bond.
Samantha Derouin, 22,
of Dunnellon, at 11:57 p.m.
Monday on a misdemeanor
charge of domestic battery. No
bond.
DUI arrests
William Thompson, 52,
of East Partridge Lane, Floral
City, at 10:58 p.m. Tuesday on
a misdemeanor charge of driv-
ing under the influence with
property damage. According
to his arrest affidavit, he was
involved in a three-vehicle ac-
cident on U.S. 41 north of East
Sunray Lane in Floral City.
Witnesses said Thompson
was driving a small pickup
truck without its lights on and
crossed the center line, strik-
ing a semi-tractor trailer and
then a Hummer. Thompson
told a law enforcement officer
he had consumed alcohol that
day and "was basically an al-
coholic," according to the affi-
davit. Tests of his breath
showed his blood alcohol con-
centration was 0.271 percent
and 0.263 percent. The legal
limit is 0.08 percent. Bond
$1,000.


ON THE NET
* Go to www.sheriffcitrus.org and click on the
Public Information link, then on Arrest Reports.


Harry Everson, 41, of
North Bonnie Point, Hemando,
at 7:04 p.m. Wednesday on a
misdemeanor charge of driving
under the influence. According
to his arrest affidavit, he was
stopped on U.S. 41 south of
Van Ness Road. He had diffi-
culty performing sobriety tasks
and refused to submit to a test
of his breath. Bond $500.
Other arrests
Stacy Ambroselli, 32, of
East Magnolia Street, Floral
City, at 11:26 a.m. Monday on
a felony charge of grand theft,
two felony charges of traffick-
ing or endeavoring to traffic in
stolen property and two felony
charges of burglary. According
to her arrest affidavit, she is
accused of stealing prescrip-
tion medication, committing a
vehicle burglary at First Baptist
Church in Floral City and
stealing a handbag and bur-
glarizing a residence on Old
Floral City Road and stealing
jewelry. Bond $26,000.
Jason Turner, 25, of
Cross City, at 10:06 p.m. Mon-
day on a felony charge of ag-
gravated battery on a
pregnant victim. No bond.
Dean Gregg, 80, of East
Wingate Street, Inverness, at
9:46 p.m. Monday on a felony
charge of simple assault/bat-
tery on a law enforcement offi-
cer. According to his arrest


affidavit, he called 911 be-
cause he believed his friend
was having a heart attack. He
is accused of pushing a re-
sponding law enforcement of-
ficer who attempted to stop
him from driving home while
intoxicated. Bond $5,000.
Tammy Bennett, 40, of
South Arundel Terrace, Ho-
mosassa, at 11:05 p.m. Mon-
day on a Citrus County
warrant for a felony charge of
workers' compensation fraud.
Bond $2,000.
Koleen Posavec, 48,
and Katlyn Clouse, 23, of
West Pinion Lane, Dunnellon,
at 6:10 p.m. Tuesday each on
a felony charge of grand theft.
According to their arrest affi-
davits, they are accused of
stealing miscellaneous items
with a total value of more than
$600 from Walmart in Inver-
ness. Bond $2,000.
Jason Mahoney, 24, of
South Boulevard, Inverness,
at 3:58 p.m. Wednesday on
felony charges of dealing in
stolen property, grand theft,
giving false verification of own-
ership to a pawnbroker and
burglary of an unoccupied res-
idence. According to his arrest
affidavit, he is accused of bur-
glarizing a home on South
Boulevard in Inverness and
stealing musical and electronic
equipment. Bond $41,000.


YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
SPR HI LO PR HI LO PR
0.00 | 71 43 0.00 L ., J60 43 0.00


FLORIDA TEMPERATURES


City
Daytona Bch.
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Homestead
Jacksonville
Key West
Lakeland
Melbourne


F'cast
pc
c
c
pc
c
pc
r
c
pc


City
Miami
Ocala
Orlando
Pensacola
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Vero Beach
W. Palm Bch.


L F'cast
48 c
32 pc
39 pc
32 c
45 c
31 c
41 c
42 c
43 c


MARINE OUTLOOK


Northwest winds around 20 knots.
Seas 3 to 5 feet. Bay and inland
waters will be choppy. Partly cloudy
and cold today.


64 46 0.00 --- 63 48 0.001

THREE DAY OUTLOOK E xclusve daily
TODAY & TOMORROW MORNING
High: 60 Low: 34
,i- Windy and cold with a 20% chance
of rain.
S~SUNDAY & MONDAY MORNING
High: 55 Low: 32
Clouds exit, less wind, still chilly. Freeze likely
by night.
I MONDAY & TUESDAY MORNING
High: 68 Low: 38
A cold start, but milder by afternoon with sun-
shine.
ALMANAC


TEMPERATURE*
Friday 62/47
Record 89/31
Normal 76/47
Mean temp. 55
Departure from mean -6
PRECIPITATION*
Friday 0.00 in.
Total for the month 0.00 in.
Total for the year 2.10 in.
Normal for the year 6.08 in.
*As of 7 p m at Inverness
UV INDEX: 7
0-2 minimal, 3-4 low, 5-6 moderate,
7-9 high, 10+ very high
BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
Friday at 3 p.m. 29.99 in.


DEW POINT
Friday at 3 p.m. 4
HUMIDITY
Friday at 3 p.m. 51%
POLLEN COUNT**
Today's active pollen:
oak, nettle, juniper
Today's count: 9.5/12
Sunday's count: 8.3
Monday's count: 9.2
AIR QUALITY
Friday was good with pollutants
mainly particulates.


SOLUNAR TABLES
DATE DAY MINOR MAJOR MINOR MAJOR
(MORNING) (AFTERNOON)
3/2 SATURDAY 9:12 2:59 9:40 3:26
3/3 SUNDAY 10:13 3:59 10:42 4:28
CELESTIAL OUTLOOK
O O 0 SUNSET TONIGHT............................6:31 PM.
SUNRISE TOMORROW .....................6:53A.M.
M OONRISE TODAY .........................11:39 P.M.
MARCH 4 MARCH11 MARCH19 MARCH27 MOONSET TODAY............................ 9:49A.M.

BURN CONDITIONS
Today's Fire Danger Rating is: HIGH. There is no burn ban.
For more information call Florida Division of Forestry at (352) 754-6777. For more
information on drought conditions, please visit the Division of Forestry's Web site:
http://flame.fl-dof.com/fire weather/kbdi
WATERING RULES
Lawn watering limited to two days per week, before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., as follows:
EVEN addresses may water on Thursday and/or Sunday.
ODD addresses may water on Wednesday and/or Saturday.
Hand watering with a shut-off nozzle or micro irrigation of non-grass areas, such as
vegetable gardens, flowers and shrubs, can be done on any day and at any time.
Citrus County Utilities' customers should CALL BEFORE YOU INSTALL new
plant material 352-527-7669. Some new plantings may qualify for additional
watering allowances.
To report violations, please call: City of Inverness @ 352-726-2321, City of
Crystal River @ 352-795-4216 ext. 313, unincorporated Citrus County @ 352-
527-7669.


TIDES
*From mouths of rivers **At King's Bay
Saturday
City High/Low High/Low
Chassahowitzka* 8:41 a/4:19 a 8:20 p/4:14 p
Crystal River" 7:02 a/1:41 a 6:41 p/1:36 p
Withlacoochee* 4:49 a/11:24 a 4:28 p/--
Homosassa*** 7:51 a/3:18 a 7:30 p/3:13 p


***At Mason's Creek
Sunday
High/Low High/Low
9:40 a/5:09 a 9:04 p/4:54 p
8:01 a/2:31 a 7:25 p/2:16 p
5:48 a/12:19 a 5:12 p/12:04 p
8:50 a/4:08 a 8:14 p/3:53 p


Gulf water
temperature


66
Taken at Aripeka


LAKE LEVELS
Location Thu. Fri. Full
Withlacoochee at Holder 28.33 28.28 35.52
Tsala Apopka-Hernando 37.76 37.74 39.25
Tsala Apopka-lInverness 38.65 38.63 40.60
Tsala Apopka-Floral City 3993 39.92 42.40
Levels reported in feet above sea level Flood stage for lakes are based on 2 33-year flood, the mean-
annual flood which has a 43-precent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any one year This data is
obtained from the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is subject to revision In no event
will the District or the United States Geological Survey be liable for any damages arising out of the use of
this data If you have any questions you should contact the Hydrological Data Section at (352) 796-7211


THE NATION


P Honol, ---

,ons FORECAST FOR 3:00 P.M.
SATURDAY


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp. Fcst H L
Albany 41 33 .03 sn 39 26
Albuquerque 60 34 s 59 36
Asheville 39 31 rs 36 25
Atlanta 44 35 c 43 29
Atlantic City 46 31 c 44 30
Austin 70 26 pc 62 35
Baltimore 45 38 c 45 29
Billings 62 31 pc 63 35
Birmingham 44 36 pc 41 26
Boise 56 35 pc 59 39
Boston 41 34 rs 44 32
Buffalo 31 26 sn 28 15
Burlington, VT 38 30 sn 37 25
Charleston, SC 54 39 c 51 34
Charleston, WV 37 32 .01 sn 36 25
Charlotte 48 26 c 45 28
Chicago 30 25 .02 pc 30 17
Cincinnati 37 33 pc 36 23
Cleveland 30 26 .03 c 28 18
Columbia, SC 56 31 c 47 30
Columbus, OH 34 30 pc 34 22
Concord, N.H. 37 25 rs 41 23
Dallas 56 33 pc 56 34
Denver 37 20 pc 54 31
Des Moines 30 26 .01 pc 28 15
Detroit 31 27 pc 28 18
El Paso 63 34 s 66 40
Evansville, IN 38 32 .11 pc 35 21
Harrisburg 42 37 c 39 26
Hartford 48 34 c 44 29
Houston 65 36 pc 53 37
Indianapolis 34 30 .02 pc 33 20
Jackson 48 29 pc 44 27
Las Vegas 74 44 s 72 53
Little Rock 42 32 pc 43 25
Los Angeles 81 54 s 75 55
Louisville 39 33 .06 pc 36 25
Memphis 38 35 pc 38 25
Milwaukee 27 25 pc 30 16
Minneapolis 31 24 pc 30 16
Mobile 60 37 pc 49 28
Montgomery 50 33 pc 44 28
Nashville 40 34 .01 pc 35 24
KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle;
f=fair; h=hazy; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain;
rs=rain/snow mix; s=sunny; sh=showers;
sn=snow; ts=thunderstorms; w=windy.
02013 Weather Central, Madison, Wi.


Friday Saturday
City H LPcp.FcstH L
New Orleans 61 43 pc 50 36
New York City 45 36 c 44 32
Norfolk 50 38 c 46 31
Oklahoma City 44 24 pc 47 29
Omaha 29 24 pc 34 23
Palm Springs 84 53 s 82 56
Philadelphia 46 31 c 45 29
Phoenix 80 46 s 83 57
Pittsburgh 33 29 sn 33 20
Portland, ME 37 32 rs 39 29
Portland, Ore 61 54 r 57 41
Providence, R.I. 49 36 rs 45 30
Raleigh 49 28 c 46 29
Rapid City 47 17 pc 59 35
Reno 68 31 pc 66 40
Rochester, NY 34 26 .05 sn 29 18
Sacramento 73 41 pc 73 50
St. Louis 34 30 .08 pc 34 24
St. Ste. Marie 30 11 s 20 -2
Salt Lake City 45 33 pc 49 35
San Antonio 73 33 pc 66 37
San Diego 80 52 s 76 55
San Francisco 71 46 pc 63 47
Savannah 52 41 pc 51 34
Seattle 59 51 .22 r 54 39
Spokane 51 37 .04 c 51 35
Syracuse 34 30 sn 34 22
Topeka 31 27 pc 37 21
Washington 46 41 c 46 30
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL HIGH & LOW
HIGH 88 Camanllo, Calif. LOW -8 Langdon,
N.D.
WORLD CITIES


SATURDAY
CITY H/L/SKY
Acapulco 88/69/pc
Amsterdam 39/35/c
Athens 55/47/pc
Beijing 45/27/pc
Berlin 42/33/pc
Bermuda 64/62/sh
Cairo 84/68/pc
Calgary 54/28/pc
Havana 72/55/sh
Hong Kong 73/60/sh
Jerusalem 71/59/pc


Lisbon
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio
Rome
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Warsaw


53/46/pc
43/32/pc
56/42/pc
60/34/pc
32/32/sn
16/6/c
44/29/pc
82/70/ts
60/40/sh
70/68/sh
48/32/s
28/18/sf
36/32/c


Z- C I T R U S


C O U N T Y -W--


State BRIEFS


legal notices in today's Citrus County Chronicle





Bid Notices......................C13




-Surplus Property............C13

",:' ... ..... '


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To start your subscription:
Call now for home delivery by our carriers:
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Questions: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday
7 to 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday

Main switchboard phone numbers:
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residents, call toll-free at 888-852-2340.
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rjrlBr,,ir|r H*,* 1624 N.
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A \eadowcre,1 FL 34429
N \ '1:1 :'

SInverness
IE Cuurltwjup office
T o in s ~ u 1 0 6 W M a in
St.,
41 Inverness, FL
> ^ 34450


Who's in charge:
G erry M ulligan ............................................................................ P publisher, 5 63 -3 2 2 2
Trina Murphy ...................... Operations/Advertising Director, 563-3232
M ike A rnold ......................... ........... ................................... Editor, 5 64 -2 93 0
Tom Feeney .................................................... Production Director, 563-3275
John M urphy .................................................. Circulation Director, 563-3255
Trista Stokes.......................................................... Online M manager, 564-2946
Trista Stokes .................................................... Classified M manager, 564-2946
Report a news tip:
Opinion page questions ............................................. Mike Arnold, 564-2930
To have a photo taken.................................... Rita Cammarata, 563-5660
News and feature stories .............................. Charlie Brennan, 563-3225
Com m unity content ................................................ Sarah Gatling, 563-5660
Wire service content .............................................. Brad Bautista, 563-5660
Sports event coverage ........................... Jon-Michael Soracchi, 563-3261
S o u n d O ff ................................................................................................................ 5 6 3 -0 5 7 9
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SECOND CLASS PERMIT #114280


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Well-worn posters are part of the charm of the library's
d6cor.


LIBRARY
Continued from Page Al

cars parked on nearby
grass areas. Some people
are there for AARP tax
help, but not all.
The library has an entire
wing belonging to the com-
munity's genealogical soci-
ety, which gets a lot of use.
Some people sit and
read or check out books by
signing their names on
cards tucked inside a
pocket glued to the inside
covers, just like in the
"olden days."
Frances Fecteau, one of
the library's first volun-
teers, files books using the
card catalog by hand. Most
public libraries use a com-
puterized online public ac-
cess catalog system, but
the Citrus Springs Library
still does it the "old-
fashioned" way with 3-by-5
cards in wooden drawers.
No barcode scanning, no
computerized checkout.
Bookshelves have been
handmade by volunteer
craftspeople in the com-
munity The furniture is
eclectic some wicker
chairs, some metal, some
wood, a rocking chair in
the children's area, art-
work by local artists line
the walls.
"We have an extensive
collection of jigsaw puz-
zles that people can check
I 1P 417


out," says library manager
Lorna Eastman. "We also
have a free magazine ex-
change table. Bring a mag-
azine you're done with and
take home another."
They also have hun-
dreds of VHS tapes and
audio books, plus a book-
store made from a utility
closet.
They rely on funding
from the bookstore, dona-
tions and money raised
from semi-annual book
sales to supplement the
$11,304 they receive annu-
ally from the county li-
brary system.
"A lot of people like an
old-fashioned library,"
Eastman says. "We're
small, but we're friendly"
MEN
The library began in
1977 in Elyce and Charles
McGrenra's garage the
entire collection on two
shelves and a counter top.
In 1986, Citrus Springs'
developer, Deltona Corp.,
donated five acres of land
along Country Club Boule-
vard for a new library site,
and Dr. John and Virginia
Buelke, two of the library's
founders, donated about
$60,000 toward the con-
struction of the library as a
memorial to their parents.
The building is called the
Citrus Springs Memorial
Library
"When the Buelkes
came to Citrus Springs,
they asked the county for


NANCY KENNEDY/Chronicle
Lorna Eastman, Citrus Springs Library's manager, is the facility's only paid employee. The small library is run by
volunteers and has recently expanded its hours to six days a week.


library services," Eastman
said. "So, the county sent a
bookmobile once a month,
and that was not what they
wanted. They eventually
built this place."
John Buelke died in
2007 and Mrs. Buelke
moved to a retirement
community in Altoona in
2010. The Buelkes are still
considered the patron
saints of this library
The community's ge-
nealogy society built its
own genealogy wing, and
two former patrons left
money in their wills to
build another wing.
"We're a real community
library," Eastman said.
MEN
As low-tech as this li-
brary appears, it hosts a
high-tech side that rivals
many modern libraries. A
visit to its website,
www. citrussprings.org,
opens up a portal of
knowledge, access to thou-
sands and thousands of
free resources. Click on
"Reader's Veranda" to
read entire current or
back issues of popular
magazines from "Air &
Space" to "Yankee," or
read copies of hometown


newspapers cataloged by
town and state.
The "Reference Robot"
page provides access to
reference sources agri-
culture, astronomy, Japan-
ese art, lighting design,
philosophy and physics,
ship building, underwater
archaeology, wildlife and
words. Encyclopedias, dic-
tionaries, Gray's Anatomy,
Bullfinch Mythology
"There's no sign-up, no
fees; it's wide open to the
public from any computer
24/7," Pete Louys said.
A worldwide phone
book on the Power Tools


Add an artidic touch to your existing yard

something
completely new!
"Often imitated
nevet duplicated"

YOURINTERLOCKINGBRICKPAVERSPECIALIST

POOL AND PAVER LLC
Ir,& 352-400-3188


page can help you find a
phone number just about
anywhere in the world, ex-
cluding North Korea.
From the same page, you
can "print your own
paper," such as one or two
pages of graph paper,
music paper or ledger
pages, using your own
printer.
And whatever you do,
DO click on the "Don't
click on this!" box, which
will take you to even more
ever-expanding resources
and features.
"We may be small, but
through our website peo-


ple from around the world
can use our library 24/7,"
Louys said. "It's like we
say, we're the biggest little
library in Florida."
Citrus Springs Memorial
Library is at 1826 W Coun-
try Club Blvd., Citrus
Springs. Increased hours
beginning March 4 are
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday;
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday;
closed Sunday
Contact Chronicle re-
porter Nancy Kennedy at
352-564-2927 or nkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


* Lab

*EKG

* X-Ray

* Pulmonary

Function


Alex Villacastin,
MD


Catherine
Sembrano-Navarro, MD


Pr IP % lj


* Bone Density

* Women's Health

* Minor Procedures

* Chelation


Carlos F. Gonzalez, Alistair Co, MD
MD Family Practice


s -i.E ,1r I ..a L i, L 'a,.ren._e SIla'.\ ':S o li
-prjP PA


Primary Care Specialists




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SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 A5





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


'One Day At a Time' star dies


Associated Press

NEW YORK Bonnie Franklin,
the pert, redheaded actress whom
millions came to identify with for
her role as divorced mom Ann Ro-
mano on the long-running sitcom
"One Day at a Time," has died.
She died Friday at her home in
Los Angeles due to complications
from pancreatic cancer, family
members said. She was 69. Her fam-
ily had announced she was diag-
nosed with pancreatic cancer in
September.
Franklin was a veteran stage and
television performer before "One
Day At a Time" made her a star.
Developed by Norman Lear and
co-created by Whitney Blake her-
self a former sitcom star and single
mother raising future actress
Meredith Baxter the series was
groundbreaking for its focus on a
young divorced mother seeking in-
dependence from a suffocating
marriage.
It premiered on CBS in Decem-
ber 1975, just five years after the
network had balked at having Mary


Associated Press
Bonnie Franklin, of the 1970's sit-
com "One Day at a Time, is pic-
tured Feb. 26, 2008. The actress
died Friday at her home due to com-
plications from pancreatic cancer.
Tyler Moore play a divorced woman
on her own comedy series, insisting
that newly single Mary Richards be
portrayed as having ended her en-


gagement instead.
On her own in Indianapolis, Ann
Romano was raising two teenage
girls played by Mackenzie
Phillips, already famous for the film
"American Graffiti," and a previ-
ously unknown Valerie Bertinelli.
"One Day At a Time" ran on CBS
until 1984, by which time both
daughters had grown and married,
while Romano had remarried and
become a grandmother. During the
first seven of its nine seasons on the
air, the show was a Top 20 hit.
Like other Lear productions such
as 'All in the Family" and "Good
Times," "One Day at a Time" dealt
with contemporary issues once ab-
sent from TV comedies, such as pre-
marital sex, birth control, suicide and
sexual harassment issues that had
previously been overlooked by TV
comedies whose households were
usually headed by a husband and
wife or, rarely, a widowed parent
Meanwhile, the series weathered
its own crises as Phillips was twice
written out of the series to deal with
her drug abuse and other personal
problems.


State Dept: No major objections to oil pipeline


Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
State Department on Fri-
day raised no major ob-
jections to the Keystone
XL oil pipeline and said
other options to get the oil
from Canada to Gulf Coast
refineries are worse for
climate change.
But the latest environ-
mental review stops short
of recommending
whether the project
should be approved. State
Department approval of
the 1,700-mile pipeline is
needed because it crosses
a U.S. border
The lengthy report says
Canadian tar sands are
likely to be developed, re-
gardless of whether the
U.S. approves Keystone
XL, which would carry oil
from western Canada to
refineries in Texas. The
pipeline would also travel
through Montana, South
Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska
and Oklahoma.
The report acknowl-
edges that development of
tar sands in Alberta would
create greenhouse gases
but makes clear that other
methods to transport the
oil including rail, trucks
and barges also pose a
risk to the environment.
The State Department
analysis for the first time
evaluated two options
using rail: shipping the oil
on trains to existing
pipelines or to oil tankers.
The report shows that
those other methods
would release more
greenhouse gases that
contribute to global warm-



FULL
Continued from Page Al

couldn't talk Karyn out of
anything."
Full of vim, vigor and vi-
tality until Huntington's
disease slowly robbed her
of her life, Karyn Langer
was dearly loved through-
out the community.
"She was a hugger," said
Pati Smith, a friend for 30
years. "She loved people
and she had this wonder-
ful smile. Her sausage it
was disgusting, but she
loved it, so we'd all sit
there pretending it was
wonderful. We had so
much fun over that."
Karyn came to Inver-
ness after meeting and
marrying David Langer 30
years ago. They had met at
the wedding of a mutual
friend in Oklahoma.
"She came from Massa-
chusetts and I came from
here (Inverness) and we
just clicked," David
Langer said. "She was a
hot ticket, full of life. After
that, I made a lot of trips to
Massachusetts."
When Karyn was 17, her
father developed Hunting-
ton's disease and she cared
for him by herself for many
years until he died. Her
mother and brother had
left, Fallon said.
"She had a hysterectomy
about 20 years ago; that's
when I heard the story
She didn't know she had
the disease then, but she
knew there was a 50 per-
cent chance she would get
it and made the decision to
never have children. She


Keystone
XL pipeline
A new report by
the State
Department raises
no major
objections to the
proposed
Keystone XL oil
pipeline from
Canada and said
other options to
get the oil to
Texas refineries
are worse for
climate change.


Existing
pipeline
..... Proposed
extension

SOURCE: TransCanada


SHardisty
CANADA


I C.
*



rleb
NEB. ; N.
ILL
KAN.
SPatoka
I Cushing, Okl


TEXAS *

Houston *l- o6tr
ArthuF


MEXICO


ing than the pipeline. The
Keystone XL pipeline, ac-
cording to the report,
would release annually
the same amount of global
warming pollution as
626,000 passenger cars.
A scenario that would
move the oil on trains to
mostly existing pipelines
would release 8 percent
more greenhouse gases
such as carbon dioxide
than Keystone XL. That
scenario would not re-
quire State Department
approval because any new
pipelines would not cross
the U.S border.
Another alternative that
relies mostly on rail to
move the oil to the Cana-
dian west coast, where it
would be loaded onto oil


didn't want to risk the
chance of passing the dis-
ease on."
Although she never gave
birth to her own children,
she mothered many -
friends' children, her hus-
band's children and stu-
dents at school. For many
years, Karyn was a school
social worker in Citrus
County, mostly working at
Pleasant Grove Elemen-
tary School in Inverness.
"She loved the kids and
always brought her job
home," David Langer said.
"She'd come home and say,
'David, we're sending an-
other kid to camp,' and
every Christmas she'd load
up her car and take her
kids Christmas presents."
If there was a family in
need, she thought outside
the box, said Janet Mulli-
gan, friend and school sys-
tem colleague.
"She went to whatever
extent was necessary to
help a family," she said.
Mulligan said Karyn was
also known for the many
parties she threw and infa-
mous for her sing-alongs,
always pulling out the
sing-along books she
brought to Florida left
over from a job she had in
Massachusetts as a tour
guide to Bermuda.
"She was always in the
middle of things, making
good things happen," Mul-
ligan said.
She loved the Red Sox
and watching them play
during spring training. She
never met a stranger, she
wanted to help everybody
and anybody. She was
compassionate and loving
- and just an OK cook.


Gulf of
Mexico


tankers to the U.S. Gulf
Coast, would result in 17
percent more greenhouse
gas emissions, the report
said.
In both alternatives, the
oil would be shipped in
rail cars as bitumen, a
thick, tar-like substance,
rather than as a liquid.
The State Department
was required to conduct a
new environmental analy-
sis after the pipeline's op-
erator, Calgary-based
TransCanada, changed
the project's route though
Nebraska. The Obama ad-
ministration blocked the
project last year because
of concerns that the origi-
nal route would have
jeopardized environmen-
tally sensitive land in the


"She delegated," Fallon
said. "You'd run into some-
one at the market the day
before one of her parties
and say, 'Oh, she has you
making potato salad."'
She was a good friend -
she loved hard, Fallon
said.
Every Christmas, she
would send cards out
early, always with a note
written in her distinctive
handwriting.
"As her disease pro-
gressed, you'd see her
handwriting deteriorate
until eventually she had
them printed profession-
ally, but she still sent
them," Mulligan said.
"Even when she was sick
and in so much pain and
you couldn't understand
what she was saying, you
just knew what she was
thinking. She was still
Karyn."
After a long illness,
Karyn Langer died Feb.
21. She was 59.


To Place Your
"In Memory" ad,

Judy
Moseley
at 564-2917
jmoseley@chronicleonline.com

fil


Sand Hills region.
The administration
later approved a southern
section of the pipeline,
from Cushing, Okla., to the
Texas coast, as part of
what President Barack
Obama has called an "all
of the above" energy pol-
icy that embraces a wide
range of sources, from oil
and gas to renewables
such as wind and solar
The pipeline plan has
become a flashpoint in the
,111 U.S. debate over climate
a. change. Republicans and
business and labor groups
have urged the Obama ad-
ministration to approve
the pipeline as a source of
much-needed jobs and a
step toward North Ameri-
can energy independence.
Environmental groups
have been pressuring the
AP president to reject the
pipeline, saying it would


carry "dirty oil" that con-
tributes to global warm-
ing. They also worry about
a spill.


Obituaries


Andrew
Symbouras, 74
SPRING HILL
Andrew Nicholas Sym-
bouras, 74, Spring Hill, for-
merly of Beverly Hills,
died Feb. 27,2013 at Heart-
land of Brooksville Nurs-
ing. Andrew was born Dec.
24, 1938, in Brooklyn, N.Y,
to the late Mr. and Mrs.
Nicholas Symbouras.
Left to cherish his mem-
ory are two sons; a daugh-
ter; several grandchildren;
and his sisters, Rosemary
and husband Salvatore Zi-
cari, Agnes Maloney and
Gloria Frost.
The Mass of Christian
Burial will be offered at 9
a.m. Tuesday, March 5,
2013, from Our Lady of
Grace Catholic Church in
Beverly Hills. Burial will
follow at Fero Memorial
Gardens. Visitation at
Chas. E. Davis Funeral
Home from 3 to 5 p.m.
Monday. The family re-
quests donations in lieu of
flowers to HPH Hospice,
3545 N. Lecanto Highway,
Beverly Hills, FL 34465.
Sign the guest book at
www. chronicleonline. com.

John
Kowalewski,
63
INVERNESS
John W Kowalewski, 63,
of Inverness, died Feb. 26,
2013. Mass of Christian
Burial will be at 11 a.m.
Friday, March 8, 2013, at
Our Lady of Fatima
Catholic Church. There
will be no calling hours at
funeral home. Chas. E.
Davis Funeral Home with
Crematory






37YA Si 11


Kathleen
Fessel, 56
INVERNESS
Kathleen Fessel, 56, of
Inverness, died Feb. 27,
2013, at Hospice of Citrus
County in Lecanto.
Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.
Edward
Highstreet, 90
BEVERLY HILLS
Edward J. Highstreet,
90, of Beverly Hills, died
Feb. 27, 2013, at Hospice of
Citrus County in Lecanto.
Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.
Eric
Johnson, 53
INVERNESS
Eric Johnson, 53, of In-
verness, died Feb. 27,2013,
at Hospice of Citrus
County in Lecanto.
Arrangements are by
McGan Cremation Service
LLC, Hernando.

* Email obits@chroni
cleonline. com or
phone 352-563-5660.



"Your Trusted Family-Owned
Funeral Home for 50 Years"




Funeral Directors
C. Lyman Strickland & Tom L Pace
1901 SE Hwy. 19
CRYSTAL RIVER
352-795-2678
www.stricklandfuneralhome.com


dah.. E. !bavr
Funeral Home With Crematory
DOLORES AGEN
Service: Sat. 11:00 AM
JEFFREY PRICE
Service: Sat. 3:00 PM
LAURA ELLIS
Private Arrangements
ANDREW SYMBOURAS
Visitation: Mon. 3:00 5:00 PM
Mass: Tues. 9:00 AM
Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church
ROGER DAY
Services: Fenton, MI
Sharp Funeral Home
726-8323 ..


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Money&Markets
1,560 ................................. S& P 500
1,520 Close: 1,518.20
Change: 3.52 (0.2%)
1,48 10 DAYS
1 ,5 5 0 ..................................... .................................... .





1 ,4 0 0 ....... ........... ......... ...... ........ ............. .......... .

1,35 0o ........ .... .......... .. ..... ...... F .....


LOW
13937.60
5923.49
476.79
8779.84
3129.40
1501.53
1085.99
15844.93
899.31


CLOSE
14089.66
5984.90
481.39
8874.19
3169.74
1518.20
1098.15
16028.27
914.73


Dow Jones indus
Close: 14,089.66
Change: 35.17 (C


trials


i 0n n .................................


- ; -...j 10 DAYS
14,400 ........................
14,000
13,600.| ........
13.200-rf 1 .,
12,800 ............
12,400 ..... ..... ............


CHG.
+35.17
-8.45
+0.98
+5.48
+9.55
+3.52
-4.49
+34.56
+3.62


%CHG.
+0.25%
-0.14%
+0.20%
+0.06%
+0.30%
+0.23%
-0.41%
+0.22%
+0.40%


YTD
+7.52%
+12.78%
+6.25%
+5.10%
+4.98%
+6.45%
+7.62%
+6.89%
+7.70%


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV
AK Steel Hold AKS 3.42 0-- 8.65 3.61 -.14 -3.7 V V V -21.5 -52.9 dd
AT&T Inc T 29.95 38.58 36.01 +.10 +0.3 A A A +6.8 +23.4 29 1.80f
Ametek Inc AME 29.86 0 42.45 41.49 -.34 -0.8 V A +10.4 +32.3 22 0.24
Anheuser-Busch InBev BUD 64.99 0 94.49 94.54 +.55 +0.6 A A A +8.2 +42.6 1.57e
Bank of America BAC 6.72 12.42 11.34 +.11 +1.0 V V V -2.3 +38.9 44 0.04
Capital City Bank CCBG 6.35 12.23 11.37 -.08 -0.7 A V ... +41.2 cc
CenturyLink Inc CTL 32.05 -- 43.43 34.89 +.22 +0.6 A V V -10.8 -7.0 28 2.16m
Citigroup C 24.61 44.71 42.11 +.14 +0.3 V V A +6.4 +25.5 13 0.04
Commnwlth REIT CWH 13.46 25.25 23.77 -1.48 -5.9 A A A +50.1 +43.3 42 1.00
Disney DIS 40.88 0 55.95 55.33 +.74 +1.4 A A A +11.1 +32.0 18 0.75f
Duke Energy DUK 59.63 71.13 69.25 V A A +8.5 +14.7 19 3.06
EPR Properties EPR 40.04 50.19 48.63 -.16 -0.3 A A A +5.5 +13.3 25 3.16f
Exxon Mobil Corp XOM 77.13 93.67 89.43 -.12 -0.1 A V A +3.3 +5.4 9 2.28
Ford Motor F 8.82 --- 14.30 12.61 ... ...A V V -2.6 +5.0 9 0.40f
Gen Electric GE 18.02 23.75 23.19 -.03 -0.1 V A A +10.5 +24.9 18 0.76
Home Depot HD 46.12 0 69.19 69.03 +.53 +0.8 A A A +11.6 +47.5 23 1.56f
Intel Corp INTC 19.23 -0-- 29.27 21.03 +.15 +0.7 A V A +2.0 -20.1 10 0.90
IBM IBM 181.85 211.79 202.91 +2.08 +1.0 A V A +5.9 +3.2 14 3.40
LKQ Corporation LKQ 14.63 --0 23.99 20.43 -.76 -3.6 V V V -3.2 +31.2 23
Lowes Cos LOW 24.76 -- 39.98 38.38 +.23 +0.6 A V A +8.1 +39.9 23 0.64
McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 100.75 95.68 -.22 -0.2 A V A +8.5 -0.9 18 3.08
Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 -0-- 32.95 27.95 +.15 +0.5 A A A +4.6 -10.1 15 0.92
Motorola Solutions MSI 44.49 0 62.51 62.03 -.18 -0.3 A A A +11.4 +26.1 21 1.04
NextEra Energy NEE 59.10 0 73.50 72.36 +.49 +0.7 V A A +4.6 +23.9 16 2.64f
Penney JC Co Inc JCP 15.69 41.73 17.69 +.12 +0.7 V V V -10.2 -57.0 dd
Piedmont Office RT PDM 14.62 0 20.00 19.73 +.07 +0.4 V A A +9.3 +15.5 36 0.80
Regions Fncl RF 5.46 8.00 7.71 +.06 +0.8 V V A +8.1 +31.9 11 0.04
Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 -0-- 85.90 44.36 -.64 -1.4 V V A +7.3 -29.5 dd
Smucker, JM SJM 73.20 0 95.86 96.27 +.97 +1.0 A A A +11.6 +30.8 20 2.08
Sprint Nextel Corp S 2.30 0 6.04 5.80 ... ... V A A +2.3 +127.5 dd
Texas Instru TXN 26.06 0 34.66 34.52 +.09 +0.3 A A A +11.8 +4.4 22 1.12f
Time Warner TWX 33.62 0 53.90 53.62 +.45 +0.8 A A A +12.1 +43.3 17 1.60f
UniFirst Corp UNF 55.86 88.35 84.41 +.87 +1.0 V A A +15.1 +38.3 17 0.15
Verizon Comm VZ 36.80 48.77 46.72 +.19 +0.4 A A A +8.0 +27.3 cc 2.06
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 -0-- 30.07 25.41 +.27 +1.1 A V A +0.9 -3.2 1.53e
WalMart Strs WMT 57.18 77.60 71.74 +.96 +1.4 A A A +5.1 +22.8 14 1.88f
Walgreen Co WAG 28.53 0 42.00 41.32 +.38 +0.9 V A A +11.6 +25.7 19 1.10
Dividend Footnotes: a Extra dividends were paid but are not included b Annual rate plus stock c Liquidating dividend e Amount declared or paid in last
12 months i Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate I -
Sum of dividends paid this year Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears m -
Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement p Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown r Declared or
paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date
PE Footnotes: q Stock is a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown cc P/E exceeds 99 dd Loss in last 12 months


Interestrates





The yield on the
10-year Treasury
note fell to 1.84
percent Friday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Commodities
The price of oil
fell to its lowest
level of the year
amid worries
about weaken-
ing demand.
Manufacturing
growth in China,
the world's
second-largest
economy,
slowed last
month.




CO


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .10 0.10 ... .06
6-month T-bill .12 0.12 ... .11
52-wk T-bill .15 0.15 ... .15
2-year T-note .24 0.24 ... .29
5-year T-note .74 0.76 -0.02 .89
10-year T-note 1.84 1.88 -0.04 2.03
30-year T-bond 3.05 3.09 -0.04 3.15

NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 2.77 2.81 -0.04 2.67
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.03 4.03 ... 4.58
Barclays USAggregate 1.84 1.86 -0.02 2.10
Barclays US High Yield 5.78 5.85 -0.07 6.99
MoodysAAA Corp Idx 3.84 3.85 -0.01 3.80
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.04 1.05 -0.01 1.09
Barclays US Corp 2.74 2.75 -0.01 3.28


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 90.68
Ethanol (gal) 2.41
Heating Oil (gal) 2.93
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.46
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.13
METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1571.90
Silver (oz) 28.45
Platinum (oz) 1573.50
Copper (Ib) 3.48
Palladium (oz) 718.65
AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.30
Coffee (Ib) 1.43
Corn (bu) 7.24
Cotton (Ib) 0.84
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 395.40
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.21
Soybeans (bu) 14.65
Wheat (bu) 7.13


PVS.
92.05
2.40
2.97
3.49
2.91
PVS.
1577.70
28.40
1583.50
3.53
732.60
PVS.
1.28
1.43
7.20
0.84
380.30
1.27
14.74
7.08


%CHG
-1.49

-1.02
-0.86
+0.58
%CHG
-0.37
+0.20
-0.63
-1.30
-1.90
%CHG
+0.08
+0.18
+0.66
+0.14
+3.97
-5.03
-0.66
+0.78


MutualFunds
TOTAL RETURN
FAMILY FUND NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
American Funds BalA m 21.33 +.05 +4.6 +11.4 +11.5 +5.8
BondA m 12.90 +.01 0.0 +4.2 +5.8 +4.1
CaplncBuA m 54.29 ... +2.9 +9.8 +9.5 +3.1
CpWIdGrIA m 38.68 +.02 +4.0 +11.7 +8.9 +1.6
EurPacGrA m 42.15 -.02 +2.3 +7.6 +6.6 +0.5
FnlnvA m 43.12 +.09 +5.7 +12.4 +11.7 +3.6
GrthAmA m 36.21 +.12 +5.4 +12.7 +10.9 +3.6
IncAmerA m 18.76 +.01 +3.9 +11.2 +11.3 +5.5
InvCoAmA m 31.81 +.04 +5.5 +11.4 +10.2 +3.6
NewPerspA m 32.70 +.10 +4.6 +12.4 +10.4 +3.8
WAMutlnvA m 33.10 +.06 +6.1 +12.2 +13.3 +4.6
Dodge & Cox Income 13.92 +.01 +0.4 +5.3 +6.3 +6.9
IntlStk 35.70 -.01 +3.1 +9.8 +7.3 +0.6
Stock 130.75 +.41 +7.3 +17.7 +12.2 +3.1
Fidelity Contra 81.22 +.29 +5.7 +10.1 +13.0 +5.2
GrowCo 97.97 +.63 +5.1 +6.2 +14.7 +7.3
LowPriStk d 41.63 +.01 +5.4 +11.3 +13.5 +7.3
Fidelity Spartan 5001dxAdvtg 53.95 +.13 +6.9 +13.0 +13.1 +5.0
FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA x 2.27 -.01 +2.8 +11.3 +10.8 +5.9
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondA m 13.48 +.03 +1.3 +8.2 +7.9 +9.0
GIBondAdv 13.44 +.03 +1.4 +8.5 +8.1 +9.3
Harbor Intllnstl d 63.38 -.01 +2.0 +6.3 +8.8 +1.0
PIMCO TotRetA m 11.24 +.01 +0.3 +7.4 +6.6 +7.2
T Rowe Price GrowStk 39.79 +.16 +5.3 +9.2 +13.8 +6.1
Vanguard 500Adml 140.38 +.33 +6.9 +13.0 +13.2 +5.0
5001nv 140.35 +.33 +6.8 +12.9 +13.0 +4.9
GNMAAdml 10.88 +.02 +0.1 +2.3 +5.2 +5.6
MulntAdml 14.43 +.01 +0.8 +4.6 +5.6 +6.2
STGradeAd 10.84 +.01 +0.4 +3.5 +3.5 +3.8
TotBdAdml 11.04 +.01 -0.1 +3.4 +5.4 +5.5
Totlntl 15.30 +.01 +2.1 +6.1 +6.0 -0.9
TotStlAdm 38.17 +.08 +7.1 +13.0 +13.5 +5.7
TotStldx 38.15 +.07 +7.0 +12.9 +13.4 +5.5
Welltn 35.41 +.08 +4.6 +10.7 +10.6 +6.0
WelltnAdm 61.16 +.13 +4.6 +10.8 +10.7 +6.1
*-Annualized; d Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. m Multiple fees are charged, usually a
marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. x fund paid a distribution during the week.


Stocks
The Dow Jones industrial aver-
age inched closer to its record
high on Friday following encour-
aging economic reports. Manu-
facturing growth accelerated in
February, and consumer senti-
ment was healthier than econo-
mists expected.


Salesforce.com CRM
Close: $182.00A12.78 or 7.6%
The customer-management soft-
ware provider's fourth-quarter loss
widened to $20.8 million, but its re-
sults still beat expectations.
$200----
180
1.-:'
14 D J F
52-week range
$120.18 $183.24
Vol.: 6.7m (4.2x avg.) PE: ...
Mkt. Cap: $26.65 b Yield:...

Signet Jewelers SIG
Close: $59.69 V-1.53 or -2.5%
A Citi analyst downgraded shares of
the jewelry retailer, which operates
Kay Jewelers stores, to a "Neutral"
rating from "Buy."




D J F
52-week range
$40.74 $63.98
Vol.: 2.0m (2.6x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$5.2 b Yield: 0.8%

Best Buy BBY
Close: $17.16A0.75 or 4.6%
The electronics chain said that its
fourth-quarter loss narrowed on bet-
ter sales in the U.S. Its results beat
expectations.



D J F
52-week range
$11.20 $27.95
Vol.: 32.7m (3.2x avg.) PE:...
Mkt. Cap:$5.8 b Yield: 4.0%

Groupon GRPN
Close: $5.1OAO.57 or 12.6%
The online deals company said that
it fired Chief Executive Officer An-
drew Mason after it reported another
disappointing quarter.




3 D J F
52-week range
$2.60I $19.89


Vol.: 62.2m (3.8x avg.)
Mkt. Cap:$3.33 b


PE:
Yield:...


Deckers Outdoor DECK
Close: $46.62 A6.21 or 15.4%
The footwear maker said that its
fourth-quarter net income fell 23 per-
cent, but expects sales of its Ugg
boots to improve this year.




D J F
52-week range
$28.53 $80.88
Vol.: 9.3m (4.0x avg.) PE: 11.6
Mkt. Cap:$1.64 b Yield:...


Stocks close higher


.3%) Looming budget cuts

i .... don 't deter investors


........ 3..... ....... # .....
. . .

"J "' F "


head equity trader at The Williams Cap-
ital Group in New York.
"The lack of clarity is the problem," he
said. "I think it will be a positive for the
market just as long as there's concrete
news."
In other Friday trading, the Standard
& Poor's 500 index rose 3.52 points, or
0.2 percent, to 1,518.20. The Nasdaq com-
posite gained 9.55 points, 0.3 percent, to
3,169.74.
All three indexes ended higher for the
week: The Dow rose 0.6 percent, the
S&P 500 and Nasdaq each rose about
0.2 percent.
The Dow came within 15 points of its
record close of 14,164 on Thursday before
sliding back and ending the day lower.
Oil and gas companies fell Friday as
the price of crude sank to its lowest level
of the year. Halliburton, Peabody Energy
and other energy stocks were among the
biggest losers in the S&P 500. Benchmark
U.S. crude oil dropped below $91 a
barrel.
Americans' incomes fell 3.6 percent in
January, the worst one-month drop in 20
years, the Commerce Department said
Friday. U.S. consumers increased spend-
ing modestly in January but cut back on
major purchases. The report suggests the
expiration of tax cuts on Jan. 1 may have
made Americans more cautious.
Unemployment across the 17 Euro-
pean Union countries that use the euro
currency hit a record 11.9 percent during
January That drove money into U.S.
Treasurys, pushing their prices up and
their yields down.


Big swings return

As the Dow Jones industrial average flirts All told, the Dow has risen 0.8 percent over the
with setting a record, triple-digit swings have last two weeks and is up 7.5 percent year-to-date.
returned to the market. The index has The Dow is just 75 points below its record high of
notched eight moves of 100 points or greater this 14,164 set in October 2007.
year, and five have come over the past two weeks. The broader Standard & Poor s 500 index is up
Investors have balanced worrisome news 6.5 percent this year. Friday s close is 3 percent
about political gridlock in Italy with improving below its record close of
corporate earnings and further signs that the 1,565, also set in
housing recovery remains on track. October 2007.

The Dow's triple-digit moves
Mixed economic and company earnings reports have led to big moves in the Dow over the last two weeks.
14,100 -
A120 pts. 14.089
4:r.:?,. in ?.,,ir ?,, A 116 pts.
H I ln I- T ,,, 1 i.J_ II II

14,000 "" .' .
A175 pts.
I/ ._,,, ,i i:. r.

13,900 1 \...1 "'" '
w-

V108 pts. \,, I
Stocks drop after
the Federal
13,800 Reserve discloses V216 pts.
concerns about Election returns in
bond-buying Italy renew unease
program about Europe s
: : debt crisis
13,700* :
Feb. 15 Feb. 19 Feb. 20 Feb 21 Feb. 22 Feb. 25 Feb. 26 Feb. 27 Feb. 28 Mar. 01


SOURCE: FactSet *Market closed for Presidents Day (Feb. 18)


Mark Jewell, Jenni Sohn AP


US auto sales grow
in February
DETROIT Americans
want new cars and trucks,
and they're not letting higher
gas prices or political dysfunc-
tion stand in their way.
New car and truck sales
were up 4 percent in February
as rising home construction
and cheap financing kept the
U.S. auto recovery on track.
While the pace of growth is
slowing, industry analysts ex-
pect more gains, saying
there's little that could derail
demand for new cars.
Car buyers have already
shrugged off higher Social
Security taxes, which cut their
take-home pay starting in
January. Gas prices which
rose 36 cents to $3.78 per
gallon in February- didn't
change their habits, either.


US factories see
good growth
WASHINGTON U.S.
manufacturing expanded in
February at the fastest pace
since June 2011, buoyed by
increases in new orders and
production. The third straight
month of growth suggests fac-
tories may help the economy
this year after slumping
through most of 2012.
The Institute for Supply
Management said Friday its
index of factory activity rose
last month to 54.2, up from
January's reading of 53.1. A
reading above 50 indicates
expansion.
The pickup in factory activ-
ity in February was encourag-
ing because it showed
demand for goods is stronger
even as consumers have less
take-home pay.


US construction
spending declines
WASHINGTON Spend-
ing on U.S. construction proj-
ects fell in January by the
largest amount in 18 months
as home construction stalled
and spending on govern-
ment projects fell to the low-
est level in more than six
years.
The dip was viewed as
temporary, with construction
expected to keep moving
higher this year.
Construction spending fell
2.1 percent in January com-
pared with December, when
spending rose 1.1 percent.
It was the biggest one-
month decline since July
2011, the Commerce Depart-
ment said Friday.
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I T.PEERBUG TMP :BOOSVLL -BRDETO


Associated Press

NEW YORK -An encouraging manu-
facturing report nudged the stock market
higher Friday, giving it a slight gain for
the week, even as a deadline for avoiding
sweeping government spending cuts
loomed.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
35.17 points, or 0.3 percent, to close at
14,089.66.
It was down as much as 117 points in
early trading but recovered following news
U.S. manufacturing expanded in February
at the fastest pace since June 2011. The In-
stitute for Supply Management said its
manufacturing index reached 54.2, up
from January's reading of 53.1. Any read-
ing above 50 signals growth.
President Barack Obama summoned
congressional leaders to the White
House for a meeting aimed at avoiding
the $85 billion in across-the-board spend-
ing cuts set to kick in Friday The cuts are
part of a 10-year, $1.5 trillion deficit re-
duction plan designed to be so distaste-
ful to Democrats and Republicans that
they would be forced to drum up a
longer-term budget deal.
Any agreement between the White
House and Congress on the spending cuts
could drive the market up next week, re-
gardless of whether investors consider it
a good deal or not, said Stephen Carl,


StocksRecap


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


NYSE
3,607
3,689
1690
1320
162
45


NASD
1,826
1,903
1388
1045
107
36


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


HIGH
14107.09
6004.58
481.47
8881.09
3171.50
1519.99
1102.64
16040.28
915.72


Business BRIEFS


I !


BUSINESS


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 A7







Page A8 SATURDAY, MARCH 2,2013



PINION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE

EDITORIAL BOARD
Gerry Mulligan .........................publisher
Mike Arnold ................. .................. editor
Charlie Brennan.................. managing editor
Curt Ebitz .......................citizen member
M 00 Mac Harris ...........................citizen member
Founded Rebecca Martin ....................... guest member
by Albert M.
Williamson Brad Bautista .........................copy chief
"You may differ with my choice, but not my right to choose. "
David S. Arthurs publisher emeritus


GENEROSITY




Foundation



donates $1M



to charities


While there have been group 1
some tough head- United
lines in the Citrus CASA, 'W
County Chronicle recently, well-kno
we should not look past serve
some of the really good needs.
things that have happened. As gov
Just last week,
we published a THE ISSUE:
story in which
the Black Dia- Raising money for
mond Founda- good causes.
tion contributed
$28,000 to the OUR OPINION:
Withlacoochee
Technical Insti- Nice job.
tute in Inverness.
Funds will help students but itma
achieve program certifica- In Cit
tion so they can find mean- fortunate
ingful work in the county. these qu
The big-picture signifi- behind
chance of the contribution good th
was the Black Diamond Sugarmi
group passed the $1 million Club, t
level of donations it has Women's
made to educational and county's
nonprofit organizations in play sigr
Citrus County. ing fund
The Black Diamond Foun- Part o
dation is comprised of indi- rus Coui
vidual residents of the golf one anc
course community who are Black D
involved and concerned hitting t
about Citrus County. The with itse


Keeping doctor
appointments
I just want to put in a com-
plaint to all doctors out there
and I want to hear from people
out there also on this subject
of keeping appointments. I
happened to go and be late for
my doctor's appointment today
due to the Holder Post Office
being shut down. Their
electronics were down. 0
So I had to go across
to Beverly Hills to the
post office. I needed to
get a money order,
which was important. f
Something up North
had to be done or I
could lose something. CAL,
So they told me when I
called them, not past 563-
15 minutes. So I got
there a little past and
they kicked me out of there. So
I want to know, how could they
do that? You know, they have a
lot of nerve ... I haven't been in
your office where you haven't
made me wait past 40 min-
utes. I've waited 40 minutes
past for you in an examining
room.
Do not raise
Citrus County taxes
Just in case the county com-
missioners didn't see Feb. 21's
paper, the whole backside of it
is full of foreclosures and yet
they want to raise my taxes for
their agenda. I don't think so.
Donate gently used
items to thrift shops
If you have clothing, shoes
(and) handbags that no longer
fit or you are just plain tired of
them and have no one to give
them to, donate to one of the
county charity thrift shops.
That especially applies to chil-
dren's wear they have grown
out of, also books and toys.
Some also accept furniture in
good condition and will pick it


has supported the
Way, the YMCA,
TTI and other groups
own for helping to
the community's

ernment dollars for
community
needs dry up, it
is even more im-
portant organiza-
tions such as the
Black Diamond
Foundation step
forward and fill
the void. It does
its work quietly,
makes a big difference.
rus County, we are
te to have some of
Piet groups working
the scenes to make
lings happen. The
ill Woods Women's
he Crystal River
s Club and the
six Rotary Clubs all
lificant roles in rais-
s for worthy causes.
f the culture in Cit-
nty is to look out for
other. Kudos to the
)iamond group for
the $1 million mark
efforts.


up. This gives charities an op-
portunity to raise money and
people in a "money crunch" a
way to buy their own nice
things for real cheap. Look in
the phone book under thrift
shops.
Save money by cutting
number of members


0579


People in Citrus
County could save a lot
of money by reducing
the number of county
commissioners here
from five to three. Right
away that's $112,000 a
year that you could
save. And the school
board members could
serve free. At $32,500?
That's ridiculous. I
don't know how many


school board members
you have, but that's just an hon-
orary position. They shouldn't
draw any kind of a salary -
perhaps expenses of some kind
for gasoline. But beyond that,
you could save well over
$200,000 a year. Why don't you
look at that? In Summit County,
where I was a commissioner,
we had three county commis-
sioners running a county of
nearly a half million people.
Sending books
to troops overseas
To the man who had the
books that went to the troops: I
have been waiting for your call
back and never got one, but I
read the note in the paper
today (Feb. 21). I also have
been sending my books to the
troops in Afghanistan and I
must thank people who help
me. Mainly, I'd like to thank the
people in Inverness who just
got back from China who gave
me the names of five or six sol-
diers over there. That's where
I've sent mine to. So I'm glad
somebody else is helping me
send books to Afghanistan.
Thank you very much.


"Happiness depends upon ourselves."
Aristotle, "Nicomachean Ethics," 4th c. B.C.


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gun battle about business


here's a little known fact
about guns in America,
and it's one the firearms
industry and its political allies
don't like to dwell on: The rate
of gun ownership in America is
declining.
This has been the case for
decades. Rates peaked back in
the 1970s, the era of disco balls
and bell bottoms. In 1977, 54
percent of American house-
holds reported own-
ing guns. In 2010, the
last time the Gen-
eral Social Survey
data was compiled, ,
the percentage had
shrunken to 32.
The Violence Pol-
icy Center follows
such data, as ana-
lyzed by the Na- Mary S
tional Opinion OTH
Research Center
The center's last re- VOI
port was "A Shrink-
ing Minority: The Continuing
Decline of Gun Ownership in
America."
The trend is expected to con-
tinue. It seems counterintuitive,
given all the recent headlines
about people lining up at gun
stores and given the strangle-
hold the gun lobby has on
American politics. It raises all
sorts of questions. Who owns guns,
who doesn't and why? For the
nation to handle its problems
with gun violence effectively,
we need to grasp the nitty-gritty
realities of gun ownership.
First of all, whatever upticks
have been observed in the pur-
chases of guns and ammunition
seems to reflect stockpiling by
those who were already gun
owners. Gun manufacturing in-
creased dramatically between
2007 and 2011, from 3.7 million
weapons to 6.1 million being
produced. You have to wonder
if owning guns, for those who
still do, is a bit like buying cell


H
Ic


phones. Once you're hooked,
only the newest killer version
will do, prompting more fre-
quent purchases.
Meanwhile, the declining
overall trend in ownership
rates is largely explained by the
changing demographic compo-
sition of America.
Older white men, many of
whom grew up with hunting as
a part of their lifestyle, are in
decline relative to
other demographic
groups. Younger
people are more
d d likely to play soccer
than sit in a duck
S'J blind or deer stand.
C More and more
households are
headed by single
anchez women, and they are
IER less likely to have
guns than families
DES with a father in the
household. So the
swelling ranks of single moth-
ers, a topic of much hand-
wringing in other regards,
may actually help to reduce sui-
cides and accidental gunshot
injuries.
But what about all of those
news stories of women flocking
to shooting ranges, eagerly buy-
ing up pink-handled pistols and
bedazzled accessories to hold
extra clips? The rate of gun
ownership among women
peaked in 1982 at 14 percent. It
fluctuates more for women than
for other categories of people,
but it was under 10 percent in
2010.
What those news stories
about female gun fascination
reveal is not so much reality as
a gun industry fairy tale. It's
marketing. Gun manufacturers,
the National Rifle Association,
hunting organizations and
shooting ranges want to drum
up interest in guns that has
been slipping away for decades.


It's of a piece with the events
known as "zombie shoots,"
staged target practice encoun-
ters designed to lure in younger
people who aren't being taken
hunting by their parents.
A declining proportion of the
American public is getting in-
volved in gun culture that is,
the gun industry's customer
base is not growing and yet
business is booming. This
should lead us to an alarming
conclusion. The marketing of
more lethal forms of weaponry
and ammunition is how the gun
industry has decided to shore
up profits. The fierce resistance
to bans on assault weapons and
large ammo clips, as well as to
background checks and any
other hurdle put in the way of
those who want to arm them-
selves, is not about defending
the Second Amendment. It is
about defending a business
model a sick, cynical busi-
ness model.
If this weren't the case, the
gun industry would be engaging
with the general public in a
more benign and constructive
manner, committing itself to
protecting us from the harm its
products inflict. Instead, Amer-
icans have become fed up with
its paranoia and its rank influ-
ence peddling. It has lost its
credibility.
This much is clear. Gun own-
ership's place in American cul-
ture is withering on its own.
Industry and political efforts to
resuscitate it need to be under-
stood and, when appropriate,
challenged in that context.

Mary Sanchez is an opinion-
page columnist for The Kansas
City Star Readers may write to
her at: Kansas City Star, 1729
Grand Blvd., Kansas City Mo.
64108-1413, or via email at
msanchez@kcstarcom.


LETTERS X to the Editor


Smile, you're here
The caller (Feb. 13), "We
have rights," is obviously from
Mars or Jupiter, definitely not
Earth! In all my 60-plus years,
I've never seen anyone with a
handicap-placard around their
neck but maybe this idea would
start a new fashion sensation.
A vehicle, not a person, has
handicap placard privileges!
As a former over-the-road
truck driver, I traveled to 48
states and Canada, major cities
and little towns. Nowhere is
there a rule or law stating
"When you're handicapped
you always have the right-of-
way" absolutely not true.
Maybe on Mars. Also those
backing out of a parking space
or driveway, entering traffic,
never have a legal right in
reverse, whether handicapped
or not!
All parking spaces are for
those fortunate enough not to
need the convenience of hand-
icap ones. Why would anyone
believe going ahead of every-
one who has waited in a check-
out line is commonplace?
Being handicapped doesn't
make a person special; it
makes others more aware so
courteous precautions are
taken on their behalf.
"Hot Corner" comments
from various callers (Feb. 15)
depict an air of arrogance,
negating the "Southern hospi-
tality" idea. "You weren't in-


OPINIONS INVITED
The opinions expressed in
Chronicle editorials are the
opinions of the newspaper's
editorial board.
Viewpoints depicted in political
cartoons, columns or letters do
not necessarily represent the
opinion of the editorial board.
All letters must be signed and
include a phone number and
hometown, including letters
sent via email. Names and
hometowns will be printed;
phone numbers will not be
published or given out.
We reserve the right to edit
letters for length, libel, fairness
and good taste.
Letters must be no longer than
600 words, and writers will be
limited to four letters per
month.
SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor,
1624 N. Meadowcrest Blvd.,
Crystal River, FL 34429. Or, fax
to 352-563-3280, or email to
letters@chronicleonline.com.

vited," "Go back North," etc.,
gets old and tiring. I believe
everyone belongs everywhere.
This is America, land of the
free.
If you are a Florida native,
please note everyone who was-
n't born here is not a Yankee.
Statistics and percentages are
made up and thrown around as
facts. Perhaps those with the
attitude "85 percent to
90 percent of drivers in
Florida got their licenses north
of the Florida-Georgia line"
should take the advice from


fellow Floridians and become
informed. "Known for friendli-
ness?" OK, it's your story, tell it
however you want. There are
friendly people all over the
world, just as there are those
who barely force a grunt when
cheerfully greeted. Crabbiness,
misery, kindness and joy are
not exclusive anywhere ex-
cept maybe Mars or Jupiter.
Smile, you're on Earth and
able to Sound Off!
Joanie Welch
Inverness

Tell me about Florida
Dear Citrus County Chronicle,
My name is Abigail and I am
a sixth-grader at Faith Christian
School in Kearney, Neb. My
class is studying the 50 states,
and I have chosen Florida as
my state. Our assignment is to
find out as much about our
states as we can, and I was
wondering if you would help
me out. Would you be willing to
send me any information about
your state? Some examples
could be maps, brochures, sou-
venirs or anything else that
would be helpful. We will be
having a states' fair at the end
of the year to display all of our
information. Thank you!
Abigail
Mr. Van Winkle's fifth-/
sixth-grade class
Faith Christian School
P.O. Box 3048, Kearney, NE68848


THE CHRONICLE invites you to call "Sound Off" with your opinions about local or statewide subjects. You do not need to leave your name, and have less than a minute to record.
COMMENTS will be edited for length, libel, personal or political attacks and good taste. Editors will cut libelous material. OPINIONS expressed are purely those of the callers.


I





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Up, up and away


SpaceX

company fixes

Dragon

capsule glitch
MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL -
A commercial craft carry-
ing a ton of supplies for the
International Space Sta-
tion ran into thruster trou-
ble shortly after liftoff
Friday Flight controllers
managed to gain control,
but were forced to delay its
arrival at the orbiting lab.
The earliest the Dragon
capsule could show up is
Sunday, a full day late, said
top officials for NASA and
the private company
SpaceX.
"We're definitely not
going to rush it," said
SpaceX's billionaire
founder Elon Musk. "We
want to make sure first
and foremost that things
are safe before
proceeding."
The Dragon, owned and
operated by SpaceX, holds
considerable science ex-
periments for the space
station as well as food and
spare parts.
Musk said six hours into
the flight that all four sets
of thrusters finally were
working.
'All systems green," he
reported via Twitter
The problem may have
been caused by a stuck
valve or a line blockage.
The thrusters are small
rockets used for maneu-
vering the capsule.
An hour later, the
Dragon was raised with
the thrusters to a safe
altitude.
"Dragon back on track,"
he said in a tweet.
It was the first serious
trouble to strike a Dragon
in orbit. None of the four
previous unmanned flights
had any thruster issues,
Musk told reporters by
phone from company
headquarters in
Hawthorne, Calif.
He said it appeared to
be a glitch versus a major
concern.
SpaceX has a $1.6 bil-
lion contract with NASA to
make a dozen deliveries to
restock the space station.
This is the third trip by a
Dragon capsule to the sta-
tion; the first Dragon
flight, in 2010, was a solo
test.
NASA space station pro-
gram manager Mike Suf-
fredini said at least three
groups of thrusters on the
Dragon need to work be-
fore the capsule can come
close to the complex.
That's a safety rule that
will not be waived, Suffre-
dini said.
Engineers for both
SpaceX and NASA plan an
exhaustive study before al-
lowing the rendezvous to
take place. The Dragon
could hang around at least
a month before linking up
with the station, Musk
said. It's supposed to
spend more than three
weeks there, in large part
to accommodate science
samples that will be on the


,-- :: L- --- -._--_- -: --: : ---: _-
__ _

~LiL~I-i


Associated Press
People photograph the Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket as it lifts off Friday from launch
complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket is transporting the
Dragon capsule to the International Space Station, containing more than a ton of food,
tools, computer hardware and science experiments.


ON THE NET
* NASA: www.nasa.gov/missionpages/station/
structure/launch/index.html
* SpaceX: www.spacex.com/


return trip.
SpaceX is in charge of
the flight until it gets near
the space station. Then
NASA calls the shots.
"If we can convince our-
selves the data's good, I
suspect we can find an op-
portunity on Sunday, but
again, we have to go look at
it," Suffredini said.
The fresh apples aboard
Dragon straight from
the family orchard of a
SpaceX employee will
be applesauce or worse
the longer the delay
There's other fresh fruit as
well for the six station
astronauts.
Musk acknowledged it
was scary for a while.
"Yes, absolutely, it was a
little frightening there,"
said Musk, whose fortune
came from co-creating
PayPal.
He stressed that the
company's Falcon 9 rocket
performed "really per-
fectly" and the thruster
problem was isolated to
the Dragon.
On the previous flight in
October, one of nine first-
stage engines on the Fal-
con rocket shut down too
soon. A communication
satellite hitching a ride
was lost.
SpaceX hopes the re-
supply venture will lead to
transporting astronauts to
the space station in the
Dragon capsule in just a
couple years.
If thrusters stalled like
this on a manned mission,
Musk said, the outcome
wouldn't necessarily be
grim. The capsule is de-
signed to return to Earth
with just two good sets of
thrusters and, in "a super
worst case situation," con-
ceivably just one although
it would be "a bit of a wob-
bly trip."
The space station was
orbiting 250 miles above
the Atlantic, just off the
New England coast, when
the Falcon soared. Astro-
nauts will use a hefty robot
arm to draw the Dragon in
and dock it to the station.
Also on board with the
fruit: 640 seeds of a flower-
ing weed used for re-
search, mouse stem cells,
protein crystals, astronaut
meals and clothing, trash


Our Goal Is A


Healthier You

New Patients & Walk-Ins
Are Always Welcome
Humana, Freedom, Medicare, United Health Care assignment accepted


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Geriatrics
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Long-Term ('are (Nursing Homei
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Beverly Hills
3775 N. Lecanto Hwy.
Beverly Hills
(352) 746-0600


Inverness
308 S. Line Ave.
Inverness
(352) 344-5511


Homosassa
4363 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa Springs
(352) 503-2011


bags, air-purifying devices,
computer parts and other
gear.
NASAs deputy adminis-
trator, Lori Garver, said
using commercial
providers is more efficient
for the space agency It's
part of a long-term pro-
gram, she noted, that has
NASA spending less
money on low-Earth orbit
and investing more in
deep-space missions.
That's one reason why the
space shuttles were re-
tired in 2011 after the sta-
tion was completed.
The goal is to have
SpaceX, or Space Explo-
ration Technologies Corp.,
and other private firms
take over the job of ferry-
ing astronauts to and from
the space station. Russia
does that now for a
steep price.
Competitor Orbital Sci-
ences Corp. has yet to get
off its Virginia launch pad.
The company plans to
launch a free-flying test of
its Antares rocket and
Cygnus supply ship in
April, followed by a demo
run to the space station in
early summer
Russia, Japan and Eu-
rope regularly make sta-
tion deliveries as well. But
only the Dragon is de-
signed to bring back sub-
stantial amounts of
research and used goods.
The other supply ships
burn up upon re-entry
The newest Dragon is
scheduled to spend more
than three weeks at the
space station before being
cut loose by the crew. It
will parachute into the Pa-
cific with more than a ton
of medical samples, plant
and cell specimens, Japan-
ese fish and old machin-
ery, and used
spacewalking gloves and


The Falcon 9 SpaceX
rocket lifts off Friday from
launch complex 40 at the
Cape Canaveral Air Force
Station.

other items.
SpaceX plans to launch
its next Dragon to the sta-
tion in late fall.
More than 2,000 guests
jammed the Cape
Canaveral launch site Fri-
day morning to watch the
Falcon take flight. It wasn't
much of a show because of
all the clouds.
The successful separa-
tion of the Dragon from the
rocket was broadcast live
on NASA TV; on-board
cameras provided the
unique views nine minutes
into the flight.


Woman in line
to lead academy
AIR FORCE ACADEMY,
Colo. Maj. Gen. Michelle
Johnson has been ap-
pointed to be the next super-
intendent of the Air Force
Academy, the first woman to
hold the job.
Academy officials said Fri-
day the Senate must first ap-
prove Johnson's promotion
to a three-star lieutenant
general, the rank required to
become superintendent.
It wasn't immediately clear
when the Senate would take
up her promotion and
when she would assume
command.
Johnson would replace Lt.
Gen. Michael Gould, who
has been superintendent
since June 2009. An acad-
emy spokesman said
Gould's plans haven't been
announced.
Johnson is a 1981 gradu-
ate of the academy. She is
NATO's deputy chief of
staff for operations and
intelligence.
NASA Mars rover
in safe mode
PASADENA, Calif. Sci-
ence experiments by the
NASA Mars rover Curiosity
have been put on hold as
engineers troubleshoot a
problem with its computer.
NASA says the car-size
rover is in "safe mode." In
this state, Curiosity sus-
pends science activities but
is still in contact with Earth.
Engineers discovered a
problem with Curiosity's
flash memory earlier this
week and switched to its
backup computer.
Curiosity landed last sum-
mer in Gale Crater near the
Martian equator to examine
whether environmental con-
ditions were favorable for mi-
crobes. It recently drilled into
a rock and transferred a
pinch of powder to its on-
board laboratories to study
the chemical makeup. It
won't be able to finish the
analysis until its systems
are back to normal.
Telemarketer
pleads guilty
TROY, Ohio Authori-
ties say a former Ohioan
has pleaded guilty in a tele-
marketing fraud ring oper-
ated from Ohio and Florida
that stole $2.8 million from
people in 41 states.
Ohio's attorney general


and Miami County's prose-
cutor in Troy said Theodore
Thomas pleaded guilty Fri-
day to a charge of engaging
in a pattern of corrupt
activities.
They said the alleged ring-
leader, formerly of Huber
Heights, was one of 18 peo-
ple indicted on charges
stemming from United Prop-
erty Sales, World Wide Land
Marketing and Nationwide
Advertising and Marketing.
Authorities say some vic-
tims were told they had to
prepay closing costs for sale
of their land, but there were
never any sales.
Fort Hood suspect
may plead guilty
FORT HOOD, Texas -
An Army psychiatrist may
soon admit to and describe
the deadly
2009
shooting
rampage
at Fort
Hood.
Maj.
Nidal
Hasan's
attorneys Nidal
say he
suspect in
wants to Fort Hood
accept re- shootings.
sponsibility
in the attack that killed 13 on
the Texas Army post.
Hasan has indicated he
may plead guilty to lesser
charges of unpremeditated
murder.
If the judge, Col. Tara Os-
born, allows Hasan to plead
guilty to those charges, she'll
hold an inquiry in which he
must admit guilt and de-
scribe the events of Nov. 5,
2009.
Hasan's trial will still start
in May and he'll face the
death penalty if convicted of
premeditated murder.
Some military law experts
say it's a legal strategy de-
signed to gain sympathy
from jurors in an attempt to
avoid a death sentence.
-From wire reports


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Reading


Associated Press
Linda All, representing
the Williamson Road
Lions Club, reads the Dr.
Seuss book, "Mr. Brown
Can Moo," Friday to the
first-grade class at
Garden City Elementary
in Virginia, as reading
specialist Deborah
Graves dons a Dr. Seuss
hat for Read Across
America Day.


Pa. bee colony
getting new home
DURYEA, Pa. -A
colony of troublesome hon-
eybees will settle into new
digs in northeastern Penn-
sylvania after being re-
moved Friday from a back
alley in Duryea, where the
queen and thousands of
her loyal subjects had taken
up residence in an old tree
several years ago.
Duryea's streets supervi-
sor got a bee in his bonnet
to save the colony and its
10,000 to 20,000 occu-
pants. So on Friday, PPL
Electric Utilities, a tree-
trimming crew and several
bee experts converged on
the alley for a rescue
operation.
Once the 60-foot north-
ern catalpa tree was cut
down to size, a crane lifted
a 15-foot section of trunk
onto a trailer destined for
the Hershey area.
No parole for
Manson follower
LOS ANGELES Gov.
Jerry Brown on Friday re-
versed a parole board and
denied release of a former
Charles Manson follower
who has served more than
40 years in prison.
The board had recently
approved the release of 70-
year-old Bruce Davis but
left the final decision to the
governor.
Davis would have been
only the second Manson-
related murder defendant to
be granted parole since
Manson's killing spree
began in 1969.
Steve Grogan, another
participant in those mur-
ders, was released many
years ago after he agreed
to lead police to where the
bodies were buried on a re-
mote movie ranch in the
San Fernando Valley.
Brother pushed
for more tests


CHICAGO -
brother of a Ch
poisoned with
shortly after wi
tery said he is
member who a
ties to reconsid
finding his sibli
of natural caus
Imtiaz Kahn
nightmares abo
brother before
and his suspici
the death lead
coroner's office
duct more test
died July 20 as
about to collec
$425,000 in Illi
Lottery winning
Imtiaz Khan
telephone intei
day he began
more tests be
immediately af
officials said he
ural causes.
Further tests
November thai
had been poise
body was exhui
uary for more t


- The
hicago man
cyanide
nning the lot-
the family
isked authori-
der the initial
ng had died
3es.
said he had
out his
his death


&


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Gridlock in the nation's capitol


No budging at the

budget-cuts deadline


Associated Press

WASHINGTON Grid-
locked once more, Presi-
dent Barack Obama and
Republican congressional
leaders refused to budge in
their budget standoff Fri-
day as $85 billion in across-
the-board spending cuts
bore down on individual
Americans and the nation's
still-recovering economy
"None of this is neces-
sary," said the president
after a sterile White House
meeting that portended a


long standoff
Even before Obama for-
mally ordered the cuts re-
quired by midnight, their
impact was felt thousands
of miles away In Seattle,
the King County Housing
Authority announced it had
stopped issuing housing
vouchers under a federal
program that benefits "el-
derly or disabled house-
holds, veterans and
families with children."
The president met with
top lawmakers for less than
an hour at the White


House, then sought repeat-
edly to fix the blame on Re-
publicans for the broad
spending reductions and
any damage that they
inflict.
"They've allowed these
cuts to happen because
they refuse to budge on
closing a single wasteful
loophole to help reduce the
deficit," he said, renewing
his demand for a compre-
hensive deficit-cutting deal
that includes higher taxes.
Republicans said they
wanted deficit cuts, too, but
not tax increases.
"The president got his
tax hikes on Jan. 1," House
Speaker John Boehner told
reporters, a reference to a


$600 billion increase on
higher wage earners that
cleared Congress on the
first day of the year Now,
he said after the meeting, it
is time take on "the spend-
ing problem here in
Washington."
White House officials de-
clined to say precisely
when the president would
formally order the cuts.
Under the law, he had until
midnight
Neither the president
nor Republicans claimed
to like what was about to
happen. Obama called the
cuts "dumb," and GOP law-
makers have long said they
were his idea in the first
place.


Moving forward


Associated Press
Vatican personnel seal the apartment of Pope Benedict XVI on Thursday after he left the Vatican. Benedict
XVI became the first pope in 600 years to resign, ending an eight-year pontificate shaped by struggles to
move the church past sex abuse scandals and reawaken Christianity in an indifferent world.

Vatican takes first steps running pope-less church


Associated Press

VATICAN CITY The Vatican
took the first steps of governing a
Catholic Church without a pope
Friday, making some ceremonial
and practical moves to formalize
the end of one pontificate and pre-
pare for the conclave to start the
next
Benedict XVI's 8 p.m. resigna-
tion Thursday opened what is
known as the "sede vacant" or
"vacant see" the transition pe-
riod between papacies when a few
key Vatican officials take charge of
running the church.
The dean of the College of Car-
dinals formally summoned his fel-
low "princes" of the church to
Rome for an initial pre-conclave
meeting Monday something of a
formality given that many of them
are already here. But in a letter
Friday, Cardinal Angelo Sodano
also made clear the conclave date
won't be set until they have all ar-
rived, meaning it may still be some
time before a date is settled on.
Separately, the deputy to the
camerlengo who administers
the Vatican during the transition
- took symbolic possession of one
of the papal basilicas in Rome. For
obvious reasons, the camerlengo
will not take possession of the
main papal residence outside


Rome Castel Gandolfo since
that is Benedict's current retire-
ment home.
In one of his last acts as pope,
Benedict loosened the rules on the
timeframe for the camerlengo to
take possession of papal holdings,
precisely to allow him to live out
his first few months in retirement
in what is an official papal
residence.
Here are the top figures who
will run the church in the coming
days:
THE CAMERLENGO: Cardinal
Tarcisio Bertone.
The camerlengo, or chamber-
lain, takes over the day-to-day run-
ning of the Holy See as soon as the
papacy ends. He places the seal on
the pope's study and bedroom and
takes possession of the Apostolic
Palace, "safeguarding and admin-
istering the goods and temporal
rights of the Holy See" until a new
pope is elected. On Thursday
night, Bertone sealed the papal
apartment, which will not be re-
opened until a new pope is
elected.
THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE
OF CARDINALS: Cardinal Angelo
Sodano.
The dean is the senior member
of the College of Cardinals, the so-
called "princes" of the church
whose main task is to elect a pope.


The dean oversees the pre-
conclave meetings, at which the
problems of the church are dis-
cussed, and has duties inside the
conclave itself, including asking
the newly elected pontiff if he ac-
cepts the job. But Sodano is 85 and
cannot vote, so some of those du-
ties will shift to the sub-dean.
THE MASTER OF LITURGI-
CAL CEREMONIES: Monsignor
Guido Marini.
The master of liturgical cere-
monies runs the religious side of
the conclave and the installation
Mass for the new pope, all of them
carefully choreographed rituals.
He is by the side of the dean when
the newly elected pope is asked if
he accepts the election. And as the
main witness and notary, he draws
up the formal document certifying
the new pope's name and that he
has accepted the job.
THE PROTO-DEACON: Cardi-
nal Jean-Louis Tauran.
The proto-deacon's main task is
to announce to the world a pope
has been elected. He shouts
"Habemus Papam!" ("We have a
pope!") from the balcony over-
looking St Peter's Square after the
white smoke has snaked up from
the Sistine Chapel chimney He
then introduces the new pope -
in Latin along with the name
the pope has chosen.


Police in Minnesota town set up shop in schools


Associated Press


ions about JORDAN, Minn. One
him to push small-town Minnesota
als to con- school district is taking a
. Urooj Khan unique approach to keep-
s he was ing students safe: The po-
t his lice are moving in.
nois State In Jordan, south of Min-
gs. neapolis, officials looking
said in a at school security after the
review Mon- massacre at Sandy Hook
demanding Elementary School in Con-
conducted necticut decided the po-
ter coroner's lice would set up satellite
e died of nat offices in public schools.
diedofnat- Officers will conduct
some of their daily work
s revealed in from the schools, includ-
t Urooj Khan ing taking calls and filling
oned. His out paperwork, while still
umed in Jan- going out into the commu-
testing. nity to patrol or respond to
-From wire reports emergencies. The hope is


Associated Press
Police officer Jeff Strack looks into a classroom at
Jordan Elementary School in Jordan, Minn. The small city
is taking school security to a new level by setting up
satellite offices inside the public school buildings.
the armed officers, with would-be attackers.
their squad cars in school "Sandy Hook had every-
parking lots, will discour- thing in place security-
age or meet any wise, they really did. But


what they didn't have was
a trained, armed officer at
the front door," said Jor-
dan Elementary School
Principal Stacy DeCorsey
"We will have that the ma-
jority of the time."
Officials at the middle
and elementary schools
cleaned out storage areas
near their main entrances
and installed windows that
give a view of the entries.
One officer will make the
elementary school his
home base, and two offi-
cers will split time at the
middle school office. At
the high school, the princi-
pal is giving up her office
by the front door for the
police chief. The hope is to
have the officers in place
by early April.


World BRIEFS

Protests


Associated Press
A Palestinian protestor
argues with Israeli
soldiers during a rally in
the West Bank city of
Hebron to show solidarity
with prisoners on hunger
strike in Israeli jails.

AI-Qaida chief
killed in Mali
N'DJAMENA, Chad -A
presidential spokesman
said Chadian President
Idriss Deby announced
Chadian troops fighting to
dislodge an al-Qaida affiliate
in northern Mali killed one of
the group's leading com-
manders, Abou Zeid.
Officials in Mali and
France, which is leading an
international military inter-
vention in Mali against Is-
lamic extremists, could not
confirm reports of the death
of Abou Zeid. He is a leader
of al-Qaida in the Islamic
Maghreb and was behind
the kidnapping of several
Westerners.
The Chadian president's
spokesman said Deby an-
nounced the death of Abou
Zeid during a ceremony Fri-
day for Chad's fallen
soldiers.
The spokesman insisted
on anonymity because he
was not authorized to speak
ahead of an announcement
on state television.
China executes
four foreigners
BEIJING China exe-
cuted four foreigners Friday
for killing 13 Chinese sailors
in an attack on the Mekong
River, following a live na-
tionwide broadcast showing
them being led to their
deaths that harkened back
to the mass public execu-
tion rallies of past years.
The attack on the sailors
on the Mekong highlighted
drug smuggling and extor-
tion rackets along the vital
waterway and led to a
major expansion of Chinese
police powers in the region.
Accused ringleader Naw
Kham and accomplices
Hsang Kham, Yi Lai and
Zha Xiha were found guilty
of the killings. The four are
of Myanmar, Thai, Laotian
and unknown nationality.
The gang was accused
of ambushing two flat-bot-
tomed Chinese cargo ships
on the upper reaches of the
Mekong River on Oct. 5,
2011, in Myanmar waters
infested with gangs that
make their living from pro-
tection rackets and the pro-
duction and smuggling of
heroin, methamphetamine
and other drugs.
Rebel chief asks
for weapons
BEIRUT The chief of
Syrian rebel forces said his
fighters are in "desperate"
need of weapons rather
than food supplies and
bandages the U.S. now
plans to provide.
The Obama administra-
tion said it will for the first
time provide non-lethal
aid directly to rebels, and
announced an additional
$60 million in assistance to
the political opposition fight-
ing to topple President
Bashar Assad's regime.
But Gen. Salim Idris,
chief of staff of the Syrian
opposition's Supreme Mili-
tary Council, told The Asso-
ciated Press in a telephone
interview Friday the modest
package of aid to rebels -
comprising an undeter-
mined amount of food ra-
tions and medical supplies
- will not help them win
against Assad's forces who
have superior air power.
-From wire reports


WORLD











SPORTS


The Rays
couldn't solve
the Blue Jays
on Friday./B3



CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE -


0 Basketball, hockey/B2
0 Tennis, baseball/B2
0 Scoreboard/B4
Sports briefs/B4
0 TV, lottery/B4
7 Auto racing/B5
0 Entertainment/B6


High SchoolSOFTBALL


Pirates even up season series with 'Canes


Crystal River

nabs 3-1 victory

at rival Citrus
C.J. RISAK
Correspondent
INVERNESS Errors were
the difference when the Crystal
River and Citrus softball teams
clashed for the second time this
season. Crystal River made two
of them, one costing the Pirates
a run.
Citrus made three of them, all
in one inning, and that cost the


Crystal River 3
Citrus 1
U Both
teams' next
-...., game is
Tuesday: CR
plays at
) Tavares while
Citrus travels
to Lecanto.

Hurricanes a pair of runs,
which carried Crystal River to
a 3-1 victory Friday at Citrus.
"That was our best game, all-
around, this season," said Pi-
rates coach Lana Wentworth,


her team now 5-4 overall. "We
have struggled with making er-
rors all season. We'd focus on
what had happened before
(when we made the error) in-
stead of the next play, and that
would lead to more errors.
"But I think they're getting
tougher mentally I think they're
finally coming together"
Crystal River needed mental
toughness early in the game. An
error with the bases empty and
two out putAmyAbramowich at
second for Citrus in the first in-
ning; Erica Corlew's single de-
livered the run and gave Citrus
an early 1-0 lead.


Bishop Verot stymies Lecanto


STEVE MCGUNNIGLE
Correspondent
LECANTO The Lady Pan-
thers' downfall was defense,
as the Lecanto softball team
allowed 12 unearned runs on
nine errors to visiting Bishop
Verot of Fort Myers, falling
14-7 Friday night.
After holding leads of 2-1
and 7-5 in the early going,
Lecanto (2-4) succumbed to
defensive miscues to give it
back, while going silent from


the plate the rest of the way
Bishop Verot put four two-out
runs on the board in the sec-
ond inning to take a 5-2 lead,
as an error then a Jordan
Honch single started it off.
Krista Shula's base hit to cen-
terfield scored Morgan Cole,
then back to back errors
brought two more runs home
before Amber Plaza's RBI
double made it 5-2 before
Lecanto starting pitcher


Page B4


Page B4


Old man desert


Associated Press
Mark Martin drives his car for a top speed during qualifying for the Sprint Cup auto race Friday in Avondale, Ariz. With the fastest lap
time, Martin earned the pole position for Sunday's race.

Martin becomes oldest driver in 19 years to claim Sprint Cup pole position


Associated Press
AVONDALE, Ariz. Mark
Martin may be getting better
with age.
Coming off a third-place finish
at the Daytona 500, Martin be-
came the second-oldest driver to
win a Sprint Cup pole on Friday
by earning the top spot at
Phoenix International Raceway
for the second straight year.
"A lot of people describe Mark
by saying 'Mark's on it,"' Mar-
tin's crew chief Rodney
Childers said. "Well, for 2013,
Mark's on it squared."
Martin went around PIR's
mile oval with a speed of 138.074
mph for his 56th career pole,
passing Bill Elliott for seventh
all-time.
Martin turned 54 in January,
leaving him just a few months
behind Harry Gant, who was 54
years and 7 months when he won
his last pole at Bristol in 1994.
Martin will be joined on the
front row by Kasey Kahne for
Mark Martin poses for photog-
raphers with his pit crew after
winning the pole position after
qualifying Friday.


Sunday's 312-mile race, with
Daytona 500 winner Jimmie
Johnson and Kyle Busch in the
second row.
"I said it last week and had
some people make some snide
remarks about it, but at this
stage of the game it's pretty
amazing I get to drive something
like this," Martin said.
Martin started on the pole at
PIR last year before finishing
ninth and won from the pole in
2009. He had a solid opening to
the 2013 season, starting 14th at
Daytona last Sunday and work-
ing his way to the front to make
a big move on the final lap to
finish behind Johnson and Dale
Earnhardt Jr.
Martin followed it up with his
third pole at Phoenix to put
himself in position to win for the
first time since Loudon in 2009.
Not bad for a driver who's got
a part-time gig with Michael
Waltrip Racing this season.
"I deeply admire him and his
passion for the sport," said
Johnson, a five-time Sprint Cup
series champion and Martin's
former teammate. "He's tried to
See Page B4


Mcllroy


pulls out


of Honda

Woods barely

makes cut

Associated Press
PALM BEACH GARDENS -
Rory McIlroy left before his
round was even over. Tiger
Woods had to rally just to stick
around.
And with all that drama Fri-
day in the Honda Classic, hardly
anyone noticed Luke Guthrie
showed off his potential in a big
way with a 7-under 63 to take a
one-shot lead going into the
weekend at PGA National.
Guthrie, pegged by many of
his peers as a rookie worth
watching going into the year,
played bogey-free on another
cool, cloudy day
Of his seven birdies, perhaps
the most impressive for the Big
Ten champion from Illinois
came on the sixth hole when he
had mud on the side of his ball
and was able to work the shot in
from the right to about 10 feet
After finishing his round, he
walked into an interview room
when someone mentioned
McIlroy walked off the course
after being 7-over par through
eight holes.
"I had no clue," Guthrie said.
"I was just kind of going about
See Page B4


Associated Press
Tiger Woods hits off the 14th tee
Friday during the second round
of the Honda Classic in Palm
Beach Gardens.


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Yankees putting on Old-Timer's Day all season


PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

KISSIMMEE It's hard to bet
against the New York Yankees.
All the legends. All the history
All the championships.
But it's time to declare their
time has passed, at least for this
season.
All of a sudden, the Yankees
have grown old. Real old. So old
they should try to work out some
sort of sponsorship deal with
AARP Heck, it's going to seem
like old-timer's day all summer at
Yankee Stadium. The only way
you'll be able to tell any differ-
ence is when Yogi Berra rides out
in a car, which means it actually
is old-timer's day (Then again,
he's only 87; the Yanks might have
plans to put him behind the
plate.)
Sorry, there's just no way to see
this group of banged-up geezers
getting back to the playoffs, un-
less everyone else in the AL East
falls apart
"If we win, then we're experi-
enced," shortstop Derek Jeter
said the other day, still in the
midst of his comeback from a bro-
ken ankle. "If we lose, we're old."
We're betting on the latter
You can't ignore those numbers


on the birth certificates.
Closer Mariano Rivera is 43
and coming off major knee sur-
gery Starting pitcher Andy Pet-
titte is closing in on his 41st
birthday Outfielder Ichiro Suzuki
is 39. Jeter, the Yankees' shortstop
and captain, will turn 39 before
the All-Star break
"It makes me feel kind of
young," quipped outfielder Matt
Diaz, who'll turn 35 on Sunday
If there were a true mix of old
and young, that would be one
thing. Experience has its place, a
very valuable place. But the Yan-
kees, with their never-ending
quest to win yesterday, have
found themselves saddled with a
long-in-the-tooth roster that is
highly unlikely to hold up over
the grind of a 162-game schedule.
It's struggling just to answer the
bell for spring training the
Yanks lost their seventh straight
exhibition game on Friday
The opening-day lineup is ex-
pected to include only two play-
ers in their 20s outfielder Brett
Gardner (who will turn 30 before
the season ends) and catcher
Francisco Cervelli. The average
age of the regulars will be nearly
33, and that doesn't include Alex
Rodriguez, who's 37 but played
like he was 137 last October


Associated Press
New York Yankee shortstop Derek Jeter warms up Feb. 24 before a
game against the Toronto Blue Jays in Tampa. Jeter and several of his
teammates have yet to suit up for a game this spring.


A-Rod is still recovering from
hip surgery and not expected
back until around midseason,
though that's probably a Bronx
Blessing (other than having to pay
him all that money). Rodriguez
has grown old faster than anyone
on a team filled with aging stars,
perhaps because of all that junk
he was putting in his body years
ago.
The pitching staff is much the
same story
Ace CC Sabathia is a relative
youngster at 32, but he's still re-
covering from offseason surgery
to remove bone spurs from his
left elbow. Next up are 38-year-
old Hiroki Kuroda and Pettitte,


who's already retired once and
come back There's some kids at
the end of the rotation, but Phil
Hughes is sidelined with a
bulging disc, Ivan Nova pitched
poorly down the stretch last sea-
son, and David Phelps is
unproven.
After Rafael Soriano declined
an option to return, the Yankees
had little choice but to count on
Rivera handling the closer role
for another season, even though
he tore up a knee shagging flies in
batting practice less than a year
ago.
Rivera, like many of his team-
mates, has yet to take part in an
actual spring training game.


Many Bronx Bombers have yet to

play in a spring training game


agic fades


Rockets erase late

Orlando advantage

in 118-110 win

Associated Press

ORLANDO -James Harden had
24 points, and Chandler Parsons
and Carlos Delfino added 21 apiece
as the Houston Rockets rallied in
the fourth quarter for a
118-110 victory over the
Orlando Magic.
The Rockets stopped a two-game
skid and ended a five-game losing
streak to the Magic. Houston trailed
by two late in the game, before
using an 11-0 run to seize control.
The Rockets return home to host
Dallas on Sunday as they try to stay
in the Western Conference playoff
picture.
Tobias Harris scored a career-
high 27 points to lead Orlando, fol-
lowed by Arron Afflalo with 19 and
Niklola Vucevic with 18 points and
10 rebounds.
The Magic have dropped two in a
row and 30 of their last 34.
Heat 98, Grizzlies 91
MIAMI Dwyane Wade scored 22
points, LeBron James shook off his worst
shooting night of the season to hit a key
3-pointer in the final half-minute, and the
Miami Heat extended their winning streak
to 13 games by beating the Memphis
Grizzlies 98-91.
James scored 18 points on a season-
worst 4 for 14 shooting, plus added 10 as-
sists and eight rebounds. Shane Battier
scored 14, Chris Bosh added 13 and Ray
Allen had 10 for Miami, which snapped
Memphis' eight-game winning streak.
Marc Gasol scored 24 for the Grizzlies.
Knicks 96, Wizards 88
WASHINGTON Even if the New
York Knicks were looking ahead to their
game against the Miami Heat, Carmelo
Anthony made sure his team still picked
up a victory over the Washington Wiz-
ards along the way.
Anthony scored 30 points, Raymond
Felton added 23, J.R. Smith chipped in
with 13 points and 12 rebounds, and
some strong defense allowed the Knicks
to beat the Wizards 96-88.
Rookie Bradley Beal led the Wizards
with a career-high 29 points, falling just
short of giving the team its first 30-point
performance this season.
Pacers 93, Raptors 81
TORONTO Paul George had 22
points and 10 rebounds, David West
had 15 points and 11 rebounds, and the
Indiana Pacers beat the Toronto
Raptors 93-81.
Roy Hibbert returned from a one-
game suspension to score 18 points as
the Central Division leaders won for the
sixth time in seven games.
Rudy Gay scored 21 points and Alan
Anderson had 14 for the Raptors, who
have lost three straight and four of five.
George scored 11 points in the fourth
quarter, nine of them on 3-pointers, in-
cluding one with 9:56 left that put the
Pacers up 72-53.
Clippers 105,
Cavaliers 89
CLEVELAND Jamal Crawford
scored 24 points, making a pair of
3-pointers in the fourth quarter, and
Chris Paul had 15 assists as the Los An-


Associated Press
Orlando Magic forward Tobias Harris shoots Friday in front of Houston Rock-
ets forward Carlos Delfino during the second half in Orlando.


geles Clippers ran away in the final pe-
riod and beat the Cavaliers 105-89 for
their first win in Cleveland since 2002.
The Clippers had lost 10 straight at
Quicken Loans Arena.
Blake Griffin had 16 points and 11 re-
bounds as the Clippers, having their
best season in franchise history, won
their fourth in a row. After Griffin scored
on a monster dunk off a lob from
Crawford to put Los Angeles ahead
by 23, Clippers coach Vinny Del Negro
pulled his starters with 4:19 left.
Rookie Dion Waiters scored 17 for the
Cavs.
Hornets 100, Pistons 95
NEW ORLEANS Greivis Vasquez
capped a 25-point, nine-assist perform-
ance by hitting a running floater off the
backboard with 12 seconds left, and the
New Orleans Hornets beat the Detroit Pis-
tons 100-95 to snap a two-game skid.
Eric Gordon added 21 points and Ryan
Anderson 19 points and 13 rebounds for
the Hornets, who were short-handed in
the front court with starting forward An-
thony Davis sitting out his second straight
game because of a sprained left shoulder.
New Orleans native Greg Monroe had
27 points and 10 rebounds for Detroit,
while Brandon Knight added 22 points.
Vasquez's final basket made it 98-95,
and Rodney Stuckey missed a 3-point at-
tempt that could have tied it in the final
seconds.
Celtics 94, Warriors 86
BOSTON Paul Pierce had 26
points, Jeff Green scored 14 of his 18 in
the second half and the Boston Celtics
overcame foul trouble and some erratic
free throw shooting in a 94-86 victory
over the Golden State Warriors.


Golden State guard Stephen Curry,
coming off a 54-point performance
Wednesday in a loss at New York, was
held to 25 on 6-of-22 shooting.
Kevin Garnett pulled down 13 re-
bounds as the Celtics improved to 3-3
since the All-Star break.
Mavericks 98, Nets 90
NEW YORK Dirk Nowitzki and for-
mer Nets guard Vince Carter each
scored 20 points, and the Dallas Maver-
icks avoided another late collapse by
holding off Brooklyn 98-90.
Dallas led by as many as 20 points,
then looked as if it might repeat its per-
formance from its previous game, when
it blew a 25-point lead against Memphis.
But O.J. Mayo added 17 points as the
Mavericks ended their three-game los-
ing streak.
Deron Williams scored 17 of his 24
points in the first half.
Spurs 130, Kings 102
SAN ANTONIO DeJuan Blair
scored 16 points off the bench to pace
eight players in double figures, and the
San Antonio Spurs overcame the loss of
Tony Parker to beat the Sacramento
Kings 130-102 on Friday night.
The Spurs rebounded from their first
home loss in 18 games two nights ear-
lier against Phoenix, but it may have
been a costly victory. Parker, the Spurs'
leading scorer, went down with a left
ankle sprain with 4:40 left in the third
quarter after a drive to the basket and
scooping bucket. Parker immediately
fell to the ground grabbing his leg and
was helped off the court and straight to
the locker room. He did not return.
Parker finished with 13 points and
seven assists.


Associated Press
Tomas Berdych celebrates his win Friday against Roger
Federer in the semifinals of the Dubai Duty Free Tennis
Championships in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.


Berdych stuns


Federer at Dubai


Associated Press

DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates Tomas
Berdych saved three match
points before upsetting de-
fending champion Roger
Federer 3-6, 7-6 (8), 6-4 Fri-
day to earn a spot in the
final of the Dubai Champi-
onships against Novak
Djokovic.
Top-ranked Djokovic ral-
lied past fourth-seeded
Juan Martin del Potro 6-3,
7-6 (4) in the other
semifinal.
Berdych broke to go up 3-
2 in the third set, only for
Federer to save two match
points before holding for 5-
4. But the sixth-ranked
Berdych finished it off
when Federer hit a cross-
court forehand into the net.
"It feels really amazing,"
Berdych said. "It's really
just about one single point
that I was able to make bet-
ter than him. For me, it was
a celebration of tennis. I
like to play him so much be-
cause of what he has
achieved."
Djokovic prevailed in a


match that seemed to turn
after a time violation
warning.
The Serb, bidding for his
fourth Dubai title in five
years, made the only break
of the first set and won it
when del Potro hit a return
long. Del Potro took a 3-0
lead thanks to a much-im-
proved service game only
to unravel when he was
warned for taking too long
on his serve.
Puchkova upsets
Williams in Brazil
FLORIANOPOLIS, Brazil
- Top-seeded Venus
Williams was upset by Olga
Puchkova 4-6, 6-4, 7-5 at the
Brazil Tennis Cup.
The 109th-ranked Russian
will play in the final of the hard
court tournament in southern
Brazil against Monica
Niculescu of Romania, who
defeated seventh-seeded
Kristina Mladenovic of France
6-0, 6-2.
Puchkova broke Williams
late in the second and third
sets to close out the match in
2 hours, 31 minutes.


Blues 4, Oilers 2
ST. LOUIS Vladmir
Sobotka put St. Louis ahead
early in the third period and
added an assist for the Blues,
who rallied from two goals
down and beat the Edmonton
Oilers 4-2 on Friday night.
David Backes added an in-
surance tally with 5:20 to go,


and Jaroslav Halak was
strong throughout in net for
the Blues, who trailed 2-0
after the first period.
They had been 1-5-1 in
their previous seven at home
while getting outscored 26-11.
The Blues totaled just three
goals the previous four games
and were shut out twice.


- Women's basketball BRIEF =


UCLA 58,
Arizona St. 50
TEMPE, Ariz. Kari Ko-
rver scored a career-high 17
points including all five of
UCLA's 3-pointers and the
17th-ranked Bruins defeated
Arizona State 58-50 Friday
night.


The victory assured UCLA
(22-6, 13-4) of the No. 3 seed
in next week's Pac-12 tourna-
ment. The Bruins have won
three in a row.
Janae Fulcher led Arizona
State (13-16, 5-12) with 11
points. Micaela Pickens and
Haley Videckis scored 10
each.


A word of warning to Yankees
fans: If you're coming to Florida
anytime soon, count on paying
full price to watch a bunch of guys
who likely will be in Triple-A this
season. I caught the Bombers a
couple of times in the past week
and barely even recognized 'em.
Most of the important work is
going on in Tampa, where simu-
lated games and extended batting
practices are the order of the day
Yet, despite all evidence to the
contrary, Yankees owner Hal
Steinbrenner insisted he's ex-
cited about his team.
Maybe he's just in a state of
denial.
"I think we've got a good mix of
young players and veterans," he
said. "There's been a lot of talk
about our age, but I like having
those veterans. I like the age. I
like the experience, and I think
it's great for the young players to
have that around."
If only there were some actual
young players for all that experi-
ence to rub off on.
With Rodriguez's status in
doubt, the Yankees picked up 33-
year-old Kevin Youkilis to take
over at third base and 35-year-old
Travis Hafher to handle the des-
ignated hitter duties. That passes
for a youth movement in New
York
The top of the Yankees' Web
site declares, '"A Timeless
Legacy"
Only it looks like time has run
out


NHL BRIEF


B2 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


SPORTS


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Associated Press
Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco has agreed on
a new contract Friday with the Ravens. The agreement
has not officially been announced but ESPN reported the
pact was in excess of $120 million over six years.



Ravens lock


up Flacco to


long-term deal


Contract

will be for six

years, $120M

Associated Press

Joe Flacco and the Balti-
more Ravens reached a
tentative agreement Fri-
day on a new contract that
would make the Super
Bowl MVP the highest-
paid player in NFL history
If the deal is finalized, the
veteran quarterback would
receive in excess of $120
million over six years, ac-
cording to a person close to
the negotiations who spoke
on condition of anonymity
because the contract has
not yet been signed.
Flacco would earn more
than the $20 million aver-
age salary Drew Brees re-
ceives with the New
Orleans Saints.
Flacco played out his
rookie contract last season
for $6.76 million and led
Baltimore to the NFL
championship.
Ravens general manager
Ozzie Newsome said the
sides have settled on the
parameters of the deal, but
still have some language
and details to work out.
Fox Sports first reported
the new deal.
Reaching agreement
with Flacco before Mon-
day's 4 p.m. franchise
deadline means the
Ravens are assured of re-
taining their starting quar-
terback and don't have to
take a salary cap hit of ap-


proximately $19.5 million.
On Feb. 7, Newsome
said, "If we are able to get
a deal done, it will allow us
to participate more in the
(free agent) market, if we
so choose."
With Flacco's contract es-
sentially settled, Newsome
can turn his attention to-
ward re-signing free agents
Ed Reed, Paul Kruger and
Bryant McKinnie.
The 28-year-old Flacco
is the only quarterback to
win a postseason game in
each of his first five pro
seasons. He had a spectac-
ular playoffs and Super
Bowl this year, throwing
for 11 touchdowns with no
interceptions.
He also holds the record
for playoff road wins with
six.
Before the Super Bowl,
Ravens owner Steve Bis-
ciotti expressed confi-
dence Flacco would be the
Ravens' quarterback of the
future.
"We've never lost a
great, great franchise
player from the begin-
ning," Bisciotti said. "I'm
just very comfortable that
it will get done."
On Friday, it did.
Flacco was a first-round
draft pick in 2008 out of
Delaware and one of the
most consistent postseason
winners in NFL history
Flacco said after the
Super Bowl victory over
San Francisco he expected
to be back in Baltimore.
He made sure of that Fri-
day, coincidentally hours
after the franchise tag fig-
ures for 2013 became
known.


Broncos put franchise tag on LT Clady


ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
Peyton Manning's blindside
protector will get a big pay
raise next season.
The Denver Broncos
placed their franchise tag on
All-Pro left tackle Ryan Clady
on Friday, ensuring the three-
time Pro Bowler a salary of
$9.828 million in 2013.
That's almost triple the
$3.5 million Clady made last
season when he allowed
just one sack in more than
1,100 snaps during Man-
ning's bounce-back season


in Denver.
The Broncos are hoping
to work out a long-term deal
with Clady before training
camp, though. Last summer,
he rejected a five-year, $50
million offer that included
$28 million in guarantees.
Clady has started every
game in his five years with
the Broncos but will miss
offseason workouts while
recovering from surgery on
his right shoulder that kept
him out of the Pro Bowl.
From wire reports


Spring Training BASEBALL



Rays edged by Jays


Associated Press
Tampa Bay Ray Jake Odorizzi pitches against the Toronto Blue Jays during the second inning Friday in Dunedin.


Associated Press

DUNEDIN Brett
Lawrie and Ricardo
Nanita homered in the
second inning off Jake
Odorizzi, helping the
Toronto Blue Jays beat
the Tampa Bay Rays 5-4
Friday
Making his second start
of spring training, Mark
Buehrle allowed one run
and three hits in two in-
nings, struck out two and
walked two.
Desmond Jennings
reached base in each of
his three plate appear-
ances for Tampa Bay,
walking twice against
Buehrle.
Phillies 10,
Yankees 5
TAMPA- Roy Halladay
allowed one run and three
hits in 2 1/3 innings and the
Philadelphia Phillies beat the
Yankees 10-5, New York's
seventh straight spring loss.
The 35-year old Halladay
gave up one run in two in-
nings during his first spring
training start against Detroit.
In a 44-pitch outing Friday,
he struck out three and
walked one.
Twins 8, Marlins 7
JUPITER Minnesota
Twins right-hander Vance
Worley was satisfied with his
pitching but unhappy with the
results in his team's 8-7 vic-
tory over the Miami Marlins.
Making his second start,
Worley allowed four runs -
three earned and six hits in
two innings. He said he felt
good and threw the ball well,
but the Marlins kept finding
holes.
Giancarlo Stanton had a
sacrifice fly in his final game
before joining the U.S. team
for the WBC.
Mets 6, Tigers 2
PORT ST. LUCIE De-
troit ace Justin Verlander
pitched three perfect innings
in the Tigers' 6-2 loss to the
New York Mets.
Verlander fanned three, in-
cluding a three-pitch strikeout
of Mets star David Wright,
who never swung during the
at-bat.


Prince Fielder got two hits
for the Tigers and Avisail Gar-
cia hit a two-run homer.
Cardinals 8,
Astros 8
KISSIMMEE Joe Kelly
opened his bid for a spot in
the St. Louis Cardinals' start-
ing rotation with two hitless
innings, and Adron Cham-
bers hit a three-run homer in
an 8-8 tie against the Hous-
ton Astros.
Among three candidates to
replace the injured Chris Car-
penter in the Cards' rotation,
Kelly walked one hitter in
each inning.
Daniel Descalso and Pete
Kozma had two hits and
drove in two runs each for
the Cardinals.
Orioles 6,
Pirates (ss) 5
SARASOTA- Brian
Roberts had three hits and a
home run, and Nolan
Reimold and Wilson Betemit
hit consecutive home runs to
lead the Baltimore Orioles
over a Pittsburgh Pirates'
split squad 6-5.
Gaby Sanchez homered
twice for the Pirates.
Royals 3, Reds 2
SURPRISE, Ariz. Ervin
Santana pitched a pair of
scoreless innings in his Roy-
als debut, and Brett Hayes'
eighth-inning homer helped
Kansas City to a 3-2 victory
over the Cincinnati Reds.
Chris Getz also homered
for the Royals, who improved
to 7-0-1 and remain the only
team without a spring training
loss. Salvador Perez drove in
a run and also threw out two
base runners.
Mat Latos went two score-
less innings for Cincinnati in
his first spring start. Backup
catcher Devin Mesoraco and
reserve outfielder Kristopher
Negron hit solo homers.
Padres 7,
Dodgers (ss) 5
GLENDALE, Ariz. Zack
Greinke was hit hard in his
second spring training ap-
pearance, allowing three
doubles and a triple over
three innings as a Los Ange-
les Dodgers' split squad lost


to the San Diego Padres 7-5.
After pitching two scoreless
innings against the Chicago
White Sox in his first game
after signing a $147 million,
six-year contract, Greinke al-
lowed two runs and five hits,
avoiding more runs when a
runner was thrown out at the
plate in the first and he es-
caped a bases-loaded, no-out
jam in the third.
Rockies 5,
Brewers 2
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Carlos Gonzalez drove in his
first three runs with a homer
and double, leading the Col-
orado Rockies over the Mil-
waukee Brewers 5-2.
Gonzalez was 2 for 9
going into the game. He lined
a two-run double in the third
inning and homered off Ariel
Pena in the fifth.
The All-Star outfielder will
play one more game with
Colorado before joining Team
Venezuela for the World
Baseball Classic.
Mariners 8,
Rangers 6
PEORIA, Ariz. Jason
Bay, Michael Morse, Michael
Saunders and Carlos
Peguero homered and the
Seattle Mariners beat the
Texas Rangers 8-6.
The Mariners lead the ma-
jors in homers this spring.
They have connected for 18
in eight games.
Texas shortstop Elvis An-
drus doubled and walked in
his return to the lineup.
Diamondbacks 6,
Cubs 2
MESA, Ariz. Cubs right-
hander Jeff Samardzija, a
candidate to start opening
day at Pittsburgh, pitched out
of enough trouble to get
through three innings with the
lead in Chicago's 6-2 loss to
the Arizona Diamondbacks.
Samardzija walked three,
including two when he loaded
the bases with none out in
the second inning, made his
second spring start and be-
came the first Cubs pitcher to
get through three innings.
Indians 9,
White Sox 7
GOODYEAR, Ariz. -


Chris Sale struck out three
over 2 1/3 scoreless innings
in his spring training debut as
the Chicago White Sox lost to
the Cleveland Indians 9-7.
Sale, a 17-game winner
last year, allowed two hits -
both singles struck out
one and walked none.
Chicago took a 4-0 lead
against Justin Masterson,
Cleveland's opening-day
starter, who gave up six hits
in 2 2/3 innings.
Giants 13, A's 9
PHOENIX-- Jarrod
Parker pitched two scoreless
innings in his first spring start,
a 13-9 loss to the San Fran-
cisco Giants.
Brandon Belt had three
hits and drove in a run for the
Giants, who scored seven
times in sixth inning against
reliever Travis Blackley.
Chris Young, in his first ap-
pearance in a week, added
two hits for the Athletics.
Angels 16,
Dodgers (ss) 8
TEMPE, Ariz. Josh
Hamilton hit his first home
run in an Angels uniform,
connecting off Hyun-Jin Ryu
in a big-money Los Angeles
matchup during the first in-
ning of a 16-8 win over a
Dodgers' spilt squad.
Hamilton, the 2010 AL
MVP, left Texas to sign a
$125 million, five-year deal
with the Angels. After going 0
for 3 against Arizona on
Tuesday in his first spring
training game, he was 2 for 2
against the Dodgers, adding
a third-inning single against
Matt Palmer.
Nationals 6,
Braves 5
KISSIMMEE Bryce
Harper homered for Wash-
ington, Jason Heyward went
deep for Atlanta, and the Na-
tionals knocked off the
Braves 6-5 in a spring train-
ing game.
Harper hit his first homer of
the spring in the top of the
first. He finished 1 for 3, leav-
ing his exhibition average at
.538 (7 of 13).
Heyward hit his third spring
homer in the bottom half.


Abraham, Turner latest NFL stars now free


F~i~P'Kkf _


Associated Press

NEW YORK The free
agency frenzy doesn't
begin until March 12.
Tell that to general man-
agers who have begun
flooding the market with
veterans they have cut -
guys who can sign with any
team at any time.
Joining that group Fri-
day were former Pro Bowl
players John Abraham and
Michael Turner, released
by Atlanta along with cor-
nerback Dunta Robinson.
Also available is 2009
Defensive Player of the
Year Charles Woodson; the
Green Bay Packers let the
defensive back go last
month.
While players whose
contracts have expired
can't change addresses for
another 11 days, the so-
called "street free agents"
now out there can join
teams immediately That's
already happened with


Associated Press
Atlanta Falcons running back Michael Turner was
released Friday after five years in a Falcons uniform.


former Buffalo safety
George Wilson, who
signed with the Titans,
and it certainly could
occur again before the
likes of Mike Wallace, Jake
Long, Reggie Bush and
Greg Jennings on offense
or Dwight Freeney, An-
thony Spencer, Paul
Kruger and Cliff Avril on


defense become available.
Wilson was coveted by
Tennessee for reasons that
stretch beyond the field,
and Woodson also could fall
into that category. Listen to
what Titans general man-
ager Ruston Webster says
about Wilson, who twice
was Buffalo's Walter Payton
Man of the Year nominee:


"George is a quality vet-
eran player. He will con-
tribute for us on the field,
but his contributions also
will come off the field, in
the locker room and in the
meeting rooms. He was re-
spected as a football
player and a leader during
his career in Buffalo, and
he will bring that veteran
presence to our team."
The 36-year-old Woodson
would be a nice fit in a
young secondary needing a
boost of savvy and physical-
ity, most likely as a safety
Such landing spots as New
England, Cleveland and In-
dianapolis could work.
Abraham has a history of
nagging injuries and he'll
most likely be a situational
pass rusher at age 35 next
season. Still, any club look-
ing for such a boost could
do worse than Abraham,
who had 10 sacks as a part-
timer when the Falcons
went 13-3 last year


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SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 B3






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Kansa
Seattle
Baltim
Minne
Clevel
Houst
Tampa
Chica
Bosto
Toront
Detroi
Oakla
Los A
Texas
New Y

Color
St. Lo
Arizon
Chica
Los A
Miami
Philad
San F
San D
New Y
Washi
Atlant
Pittsbi
Milwa
Cincin


Spring training
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
as City 7 0
e 7 1
nore 6 1
sota 5 2
land 6 3
on 4 2
a Bay 5 3
go 3 2
n 4 4
to 4 4
t 3 4
nd 2 5
ngeles 1 5
1 6
'ork 1 7
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L
ado 5 2
uis 4 2
ia 4 3
go 4 3
ngeles 3 3
3 3
delphia 3 3
rancisco 2 2
Diego 4 5
'ork 2 3
ington 2 3
a 3 5
urgh 2 5
ukee 2 6
nnati 2 7


NOTE: Split-squad games count in the stand-
ings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
Friday's Games
Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 4
Baltimore 6, Pittsburgh (ss) 5
Philadelphia 10, N.Y Yankees 5
Minnesota 8, Miami 7
Houston 8, St. Louis 8, tie
N.Y Mets 6, Detroit 2
Kansas City 3, Cincinnati 2
San Diego 7, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 5
Arizona 6, Chicago Cubs 2
L.A. Angels 16, L.A. Dodgers (ss) 8
San Francisco 13, Oakland 9
Cleveland 9, Chicago White Sox 7
Seattle 8, Texas 6
Colorado 5, Milwaukee 2
Washington 6, Atlanta 5
Boston 5, Pittsburgh (ss) 2
Today's Games
Pittsburgh vs. Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (ss) vs. N.Y Yankees at Tampa, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Washington vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Atlanta vs. Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Baltimore vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Boston vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. N.Y Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla.,
1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco (ss) at
Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
San Francisco (ss) vs. Kansas City at Sur-
prise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati vs. Chicago White Sox at Glen-
dale, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05
p.m.
Colorado vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 3:05 p.m.
San Diego vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 3:05
p.m.
Texas vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10
p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia (ss) vs. Baltimore at Sarasota,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis vs. Washington at Viera, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Houston vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Philadelphia (ss) at Clearwater,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Detroit vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
N.Y Yankees vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. San Diego at Peoria,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Milwaukee vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Kansas City vs. Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Arizona vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz.,
3:05 p.m.
Seattle vs.Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Oakland vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
3:10 p.m.



Sprint Cup

Subway Fresh Fit
500 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale, Ariz.
Lap length: 1 miles
1. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 138.074 mph.
2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 137.862.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 137.804.
4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 137.673.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 137.164.
6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 137.143.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 137.075.
8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 136.924.
9. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 136.882.
10. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 136.861.
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 136.835.
12. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 136.731.
13. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 136.654.
14. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 136.602.
15. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 136.483.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 136.364.
17. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 136.291.
18. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 136.266.
19. (1) Jamie McMurray Chevrolet, 135.936.
20. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 135.89.
21. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 135.87.
22. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 135.44.
23. (51) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 135.44.
24. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 135.267.
25. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 135.247.
26. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 135.1.
27. (36) J.J.Yeley Chevrolet, 135.064.
28. (95) Scott Speed, Ford, 134.917.
29. (42) J. Montoya, Chevrolet, 134.821.
30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 134.705.
31. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 134.695.


OLD
Continued from Page B1l

walk away a few times I
think we had a farewell tour
for him once and he came
back. He couldn't do it. He
just loves driving his car and
is an inspiration for any team
he works for"
Johnson had a whirlwind
tour after winning his second
Daytona 500 last Sunday hit-


F Or Lthe' roard[


== Florida LOTTERY


Here are the winning numbers selected
Friday in the Florida Lottery:
CASH 3 (early)
2-0-4
CASH 3 (late)
8-1-0
'PLAY 4 (early)
S 1-8-6-9
PLAY 4 (late)
3-6-5-0
., FANTASY 5
13 16 23 25 27
MEGA MONEY
17 22 25 33
ida Lottery MEGA BALL
9



On the AIRWAVES


TODAY'S SPORTS
AUTO RACING
8 a.m. (ESPN2) NHRA Sportsman Series (taped)
4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Nationwide Series: Dollar General 200
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m. (SUN) Miami at Florida
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12 p.m. (CBS) Louisville at Syracuse
12 p.m. (CW) Maryland at Wake Forest
12 p.m. (ESPN) Alabama at Florida
12 p.m. (ESPN2) Butler at Virginia Commonwealth
1 p.m. (FSNFL) Memphis at Central Florida
1:30 p.m. (MNT) Tennessee at Georgia
2 p.m. (CBS) West Virginia at Kansas
2 p.m. (ESPN) Notre Dame at Marquette
2 p.m. (ESPN2) Wichita State at Creighton
2 p.m. (NBCSPT) George Mason at Delaware
3 p.m. (FSNFL) Arizona State at USC
4 p.m. (CBS) Kentucky at Arkansas
4 p.m. (MNT) LSU at Missouri
4 p.m. (ESPN) Texas at Oklahoma State
4 p.m. (NBCSPT) UNLV at Nevada
6 p.m. (ESPN) Miami at Duke
6 p.m. (NBCSPT) Harvard at Pennsylvania
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Kansas State at Baylor
9 p.m. (ESPN) Arizona at UCLA
9 p.m. (ESPN2) Vanderbilt at Auburn
NBA
8 p.m. (WGN-A) Brooklyn Nets at Chicago Bulls
BOXING
10 p.m. (FSNFL) Henry Aurad vs. Omar Figueroa
GOLF
9 a.m. (GOLF) European PGA Tour: Tshwane Open -
Third Round (same-day tape)
1 p.m. (GOLF) PGA Tour: Honda Classic Third Round
3 p.m. (NBC) PGATour: Honda Classic--Third Round
6:30 p.m. (GOLF) LPGA Tour: HSBC Women's Champions
Third Round (same-day tape)
GYMNASTICS
1 p.m. (NBC) AT&T American Cup
HOCKEY
1 p.m. (SUN) Tampa Bay Lightning at Boston Bruins
7 p.m. (FSNFL) Florida Panthers at Carolina Hurricanes
COLLEGE LACROSSE
5 p.m. (SUN) Orange Bowl Classic Florida vs. Syracuse
FISHING
9 a.m. (ESPN2) Bassmaster Classic Day 1 (taped)
SOCCER
9:55 a.m. (ESPN2) English Premier League: Manchester
United vs. Norwich City
8 p.m. (NBCSPT) MLS: D.C. United at Houston Dynamo
SNOWBOARDING
12:30 p.m. (NBCSPT) Burton U.S. Open 2013

Note: Times and channels are subject to change at the
discretion of the network. If you are unable to locate a game
on the listed channel, please contact your cable provider.



Prep CALENDAR


TODAY'S PREP SPORTS
TRACKAND FIELD
9 a.m. Crystal River at UNF Invitational in Jacksonville


32. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 134.373.
33. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 134.343.
34. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 133.81
35. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 133.774.
36. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 133.591.
37. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, Owner P
38. (33) L. Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Poin
39. (44) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (10) D. Patrick, Chevrolet, Owner Poin
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner P
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Point
43. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, Owner Point



NBA standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
New York 35 20 .636
Brooklyn 34 25 .576
Boston 31 27 .534
Philadelphia 22 34 .393
Toronto 23 36 .390
Southeast Division
W L Pct
Miami 42 14 .750
Atlanta 33 23 .589
Washington 18 39 .316
Orlando 16 43 .271
Charlotte 13 44 .228
Central Division
W L Pct
Indiana 37 22 .627
Chicago 33 25 .569
Milwaukee 28 28 .500
Detroit 23 38 .377
Cleveland 20 39 .339
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct
San Antonio 46 14 .767

ting eight states and Da
Letterman's guest chair
along with announcing a i
deal with primary spon
Lowe's in the four days
fore arriving at PIR.
"Five-Time" didn't hav
chance to debrief with
team and arrived in
desert exhausted. He w
get much of a break here
their, with Sprint Cup pi
tice and qualifying on Fri(
his second career Nati
wide Series race on Satur
and Sunday's race.


4.

points .
ts.


Memphis 38 19 .667
Houston 32 28 .533
Dallas 26 32 .448
New Orleans 21 39 .350
Northwest Division
W L Pct
Oklahoma City 42 15 .737


Denver 37 22 .627
nts. Utah 31 27 .534
points. Portland 26 31 .456
s. Minnesota 20 35 .364
s. Pacific Division
W L Pct
L.A. Clippers 43 18 .705
Golden State 33 26 .559
L.A. Lakers 29 30 .492
Phoenix 20 39 .339
Sacramento 20 40 .333
Friday's Games
GB Indiana 93, Toronto 81
Houston 118, Orlando 110
3 New York 96, Washington 88
5y2 Boston 94, Golden State 86
13y2 L.A. Clippers 105, Cleveland 89
14 New Orleans 100, Detroit 95
Dallas 98, Brooklyn 90
GB Miami 98, Memphis 91
San Antonio 130, Sacramento 102
9 Charlotte at Utah, late
24y2 Atlanta at Phoenix, late
27Y2 Oklahoma City at Denver, late
29Y2 Today's Games
Golden State at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
GB Brooklyn at Chicago, 8p.m.
Toronto at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
3Y2 Minnesota at Portland, 10 p.m.
7Y2 Sunday's Games
15 Miami at New York, 1 p.m.
17 Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Memphis at Orlando, 6 p.m.
GB Philadelphia at Washington, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 7 p.m.


avid
r-
new
isor
be-

ve a
his
the
don't
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HONDA
Continued from Page B1

my business out there."
He was at 9-under 131 and
had a one-shot lead over
Michael Thompson.
McIlroy, who missed the
cut in Abu Dhabi and lost in
the first round of the Match
Play Championship in his
previous two starts, made a
double bogey on his second
hole and rinsed two balls in


Detroit at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.



NHL standings
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 21 13 8 0 26 70 58
New Jersey 20 10 6 4 24 49 52
Philadelphia 22 1011 1 21 64 67
N.Y. Rangers 19 9 8 2 20 48 49
N.Y. Islanders 21 811 2 18 61 73
Northeast Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Montreal 20 13 4 3 29 58 43
Boston 17 13 2 2 28 51 36
Ottawa 21 12 6 3 27 49 39
Toronto 22 13 9 0 26 64 55
Buffalo 21 812 1 17 54 67
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 19 10 8 1 21 54 55
Winnipeg 210 9 1 21 55 61
Tampa Bay 20 910 1 19 71 64
Florida 20 6 9 5 17 51 73
Washington 19 711 1 15 52 59
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 21 18 0 3 39 68 40
St. Louis 20 11 7 2 24 59 57
Detroit 21 10 8 3 23 60 57
Nashville 21 9 7 5 23 45 52
Columbus 21 512 4 14 47 65
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 19 10 5 4 24 54 52
Minnesota 19 10 7 2 22 43 46
Edmonton 20 8 8 4 20 49 54
Colorado 19 8 8 3 19 49 58
Calgary 19 7 8 4 18 53 66
Pacific Division
GP W L OT PtsGF GA
Anaheim 18 14 3 1 29 64 48
Dallas 21 10 9 2 22 57 62
Los Angeles 18 10 6 2 22 47 42
San Jose 19 9 6 4 22 45 43
Phoenix 20 9 8 3 21 57 55
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Friday's Games
St. Louis 4, Edmonton 2
Chicago 4, Columbus 3, OT
Minnesota at Anaheim, late
Today's Games
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 12 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 1 p.m.
New Jersey at Buffalo, 3 p.m.
Washington at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Florida at Carolina, 7p.m.
Anaheim at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Nashville at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y Islanders, 3 p.m.
Colorado at Columbus, 3 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Calgary, 8 p.m.



Honda Classic
Friday, At PGA National (Champion
Course), Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.,
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 7,110, Par: 70
Second Round:
Luke Guthrie 68-63-131 -9
MichaelThompson 67-65-132 -8
Boo Weekley 66-67-133 -7
Graham DeLaet 65-68-133 -7
Lee Westwood 66-68 -134 -6
Geoff Ogilvy 68-66 -134 -6
Doug LaBelle II 66-68- 134 -6
Charles Howell III 67-67-134 -6
SeanrO'Hair 66-68-134 -6
Justin Rose 68-66- 134 -6
Graeme McDowell 67-68-135 -5
Robert Streb 65-70- 135 -5
Brian Stuard 66-69-135 -5
Nicholas Thompson 69-66- 135 -5
Lucas Glover 69-66- 135 -5
Tom Gillis 67-68-135 -5
Billy Horschel 66-69-135 -5
Daniel Summerhays 69-67- 136 -4
Chris Kirk 68-68- 136 -4
Keegan Bradley 68-68- 136 -4
Rickie Fowler 65-71 -136 -4
Jeff Klauk 67-69- 136 -4
Branden Grace 65-71-136 -4
James Driscoll 69-68-137 -3
Ross Fisher 71-66- 137 -3
Cameron Percy 71-66- 137 -3
Dustin Johnson 66-71 -137 -3
Martin Kaymer 71-66-137 -3
Chris Stroud 67-70- 137 -3
Erik Compton 69-68- 137 -3
Kevin Stadler 67-71-138 -2
Jeff Overton 67-71 -138 -2
Bob Estes 69-69-138 -2
Gary Woodland 68-70- 138 -2
MarkWilson 70-68-138 -2
Ryan Palmer 69-69-138 -2
D.A. Points 67-71 -138 -2
Brendon de Jonge 70-68- 138 -2
Charl Schwartzel 70-68- 138 -2
Marc Leishman 69-69-138 -2
Peter Hanson 71-67- 138 -2
Fabian Gomez 6672-138 2
Hank Kuehne 67-72-139 -1
Stewart Cink 68-71 -139 -1
Brian Gay 6772-139 1
Ernie Els 69-70- 139 -1
Freddie Jacobson 70-69- 139 -1
YE.Yang 67-72- 139 -1
Greg Chalmers 68-71 -139 -1
Jamie Donaldson 7366-139 1
Darron Stiles 71-68- 139 -1
Ben Kohles 66-73- 139 -1
VaughnTaylor 71-68- 139 -1
Kevin Streelman 71-68 -139 -1
Kyle Stanley 70-69 -139 -1
Jason Dufner 69-70- 139 1
Russell Henley 68-71 -139 -1
George McNeill 71-68- 139 -1
Brendan Steele 72-67- 139 -1
Ben Crane 70-69- 139 -1
Retief Goosen 7267-139 1
Jason Bohn 70-69- 139 -1
Justin Hicks 71-68- 139 -1
Steven Bowditch 70-69 -139 -1
Nicolas Colsaerts 69-71 140 E
BrandtJobe 69-71 -140 E
Scott Stallings 74-66 -140 E
Brad Fritsch 68-72 -140 E
Patrick Reed 67-73 -140 E
Steve Marino 71-69 -140 E
David Lynn 72-68 -140 E
Tiger Woods 70-70 -140 E
Trevor Immelman 73-67- 140 E


Matt Jones 67-73 -140 E
Matteo Manassero 73-67-140 E

the water on the 16th hole
on his way to a triple bogey
He hit his approach to the
18th in the water and never
finished the hole.
He shook hands with
Ernie Els and Mark Wilson
and was on his way, but not
before conflicting messages.
Mcllroy told three re-
porters who followed him to
his car that it was nothing
physical but that he was
"not in a good place
mentally"


Sports BRIEFS

Unearned runs doom Citrus
baseball team at Buchholz
The Citrus baseball team gave up five unearned
runs, including two in the bottom of the sixth, which
allowed host Gainesville Buchholz to take a late
lead en route to a 6-5 victory Friday night.
Offensively, Austin Bogart went 1 for 2 with a
home run while Brooks Brasher and Cody Bogart
each batted 2 for 4 with an RBI.
Citrus (3-3 overall) hosts Springstead on Tuesday.

Panthers baseball thwarted
by Bears in Brooksville
The Lecanto baseball team suffered a District
6A-6 loss to Central by a score of 10-9 in
Brooksville on Friday.
Offensively, the Panthers had 12 hits as a team.
Standouts included: Jacob Schenck (2 for 3, two
runs), Joey Spell (1 for 3, RBI, run), Levi O'Steen (1
for 2, three runs), Nathan Hines (1 for 3, two RBIs),
Jacob Tourbin (2 for 3, RBI) and Caleb Southey
(2 for 3, two runs, two SBs).
Lecanto (2-3 overall, 0-1 district) is at West Port
on Tuesday.
From staff reports



LECANTO
Continued from Page B1

Danielle Yant induced an Annette Castaldo
groundout to end it.
Yant set down the Vikings in order in the
third, and in the bottom half, Amber Atkinson
singled to right and later came home just under
the tag from a throw to the plate after a steal of
second base by Amber Russo. Breanna Martin
singled and Amber Hopkins walked to load the
bases, then Jordan Martin's line drive to left
scored Russo. Paige Richards walked with the
bags still full to make it 5-5, and Lily Parrish was
hit by a pitch, followed by another bases-loaded
walk to Atkinson to make it 7-5 Lecanto.
But the floodgates opened up in Bishop
Verot's favor from there, as the Vikings scored
three unearned runs in the fourth to take an 8-
7 lead, then added five in the fifth inning, the
big blow being a bases-clearing single but Jen-
nie Boisvert that was kicked around in the
Lecanto outfield to score three runs. Castaldo
added an RBI double to make it 13-7 before Bre-
anna Martin ending the inning in relief of Yant,
having walked into a bases-loaded, no-out jam
to start her night from the mound.
"You're not going to win many games com-
mitting six to nine to 11 errors," Lecanto head
coach Robert Dupler said. "We've got to do a
better job taking care of the ball, and if we can't
do that, we're in trouble."
Honch (4 for 5, RBI, two runs), Plaza (3 for 4,
RBI, three runs) and Castaldo (2 for 3, two dou-
bles, three RBI) led the way for Bishop Verot (7-
1), while Castaldo stifled Lecanto hitters the rest
of the way, as Panther bats went colder than the
brisk night air Castaldo pitched the final 4 1/3
innings, allowing only one hit while striking out
seven and walking none.
As far as the Lecanto performance from the
pitcher's circle was concerned, Dupler took no
issue with it
"I thought all three pitchers (Yant, Martin,
and Sidney Holstein) did a great job and did ex-
actly what they're supposed to do. All three
were in contention for shutting the game down,
and our defense didn't back them up," Dupler
said.
Atkinson finished 2 for 3 on the night, with an
RBI, a stolen base, and two runs for Lecanto.
Russo went 2 for 4 with a steal and a run, while
Kelsey Lilley and Jordan Martin each went 1 for
4 with an RBI.




SERIES
Continued from Page B1

It didn't last long. With one out in Crystal
River's second inning, Emily Laga nailed a
Kelly Abramowich hanging drop ball and sent
it deep over the left field fence for a home run
to knot the score at 1-1.
"I was behind on the count and getting scared
honestly," Laga said. "I was just trying to get a
good clean hit I knew I hit it well but I didn't
know it was over until I started rounding
second.
"It felt so good. It was my first real good hit
this season."
It also swung the momentum back toward
Crystal River, and in a matchup like this Cit-
rus (now 6-2 overall) won the first meeting, also
by two runs (2-0) that meant a lot. In the bot-
tom of the third, the Pirates took advantage of
the only fielding mistakes the Hurricanes made
in the game.
Tiffany MacDonald reached base on an error
with one out, and Laga walked. Another error
on Maegan McMichen's grounder loaded the
bases. Laynee Nadal followed by topping a ball
toward second base that could not be played, al-
lowing the go-ahead run to score. Chloe Lane
then topped a ball towards third that spun away
from April Desomma for another infield hit, al-
lowing another run to score.
"We had some defensive errors," said Citrus
coach Larry Bishop. "And we made some base
running mistakes. But that happens.
"I liked our aggressiveness. They're just a
well-coached team. Kudos to Crystal River.
They did a nice job, especially on defense."
McCale Wilson was particularly strong in the
mental toughness department for Crystal River


It was the junior pitcher's overthrow to first that
allowed the Citrus run to score in the opening
inning. But Wilson never gave in.
That was evident in the sixth. A one-out single
by Aaron McIntyre and an error on Emily Fer-
rera's grounder put runners on second and
third for the Hurricanes. Desomma followed
with a sharp bouncer to third that McMichen
fielded and fired to catcher Danielle Gomez,
who tagged McIntyre out at the plate. Rachel
Martin flew out to center field to end the threat.
Wilson worked all seven innings for Crystal
River, allowing one unearned run on six hits,
with no walks, one hit batsman and three strike-
outs. KellyAbramowich gave up one earned run
in seven innings on five hits and two walks,
striking out four. Lane had two hits for the
Pirates, while Desomma had two for Citrus.


B4 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


SCOREBOARD





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


QUESTIONS & ATTITUDE
Compelling questions...
and maybe a few actual answers


SPEED FREAKS
A couple of questions we


IHO TIIOP*IC:3ISSUESlENRA,1 INGABU:


just had to ask ourselves l


&a Playing the lottery


Ar/Juni RUUA
Trust us, his fellow drivers are
tired of seeing this.
Does a 500 win restore
Jimmie Johnson as
the man to beat?
GODSPEAK: Johnson left
Daytona turbocharged.
The only problem is, they
don't allow turbocharging in
NASCAR.
KEN'S CALL: He probably
didn't need a blast of
confidence, but he got one
anyway.

Will Danica now slip
back in the pack
until further notice?
GODSPEAK: Patrick's stock-
car inexperience will catch
up with her at Las Vegas. She
might do another top-10 at
Phoenix. Really, yes.
KEN'S CALL: Maybe not back
there with Joe Nemechek, but
at least toward the middle.

ONLINE EXTRAS

) I news-journalonline.
com/nascar

I facebook.com/
nascardaytona

C @nascardaytona

Do you have questions or com-
ments about NASCAR This Week?
Contact Godwin Kelly at godwin.
kelly@news-j rnl.com or Ken Willis
at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com

WHAT'S ON TAP?
(All Times Eastern)
SPRINT CUP: Subway Fresh Fit
500 K
SITE: Phoenix
SCHEDULE: Friday, qualifying
(6 p.m., Speed); Saturday,
final practice (3 p.m., Speed);
Sunday, race (2:30 p.m., Fox;
green flag at 3:14 p.m.).
TRACK: Phoenix International
Raceway (1-mile oval)
RACE DISTANCE: 500
kilometers (312 miles).


Jimmie Johnson's explanation of NASCAR restrictor-
plate racing is the best we've heard in a long time. After
winning the Daytona 500, he said there was an element of
luck involved.
"Man, it's like playing the lottery," he said. "Everybody's
got a ticket. When the No. 83 car (David Reutimann) is up
there running fifth or sixth in the closing laps, it
just shows you how equal the cars are and what -
the draft does. I've struck out a lot at these tracks; \
left with torn-up race cars.
"I didn't doubt our ability to
win. I was just frustrated with
circumstances and plate racing. This
will buy me a smile for I'm sure the
rest of the year on the plate tracks."
Don't ask, just drive
Brad Keselowski, the 2012 Sprint
Cup Series champion, finished fourth
in the Daytona 500 after dicing with
race winner Jimmie Johnson for the
last 20 laps.
Well, that looks OK on paper, but
the fact is Keselowski's No. 2 Penske
Racing Ford was involved in not
one, but two of those "big one"
accidents that sweep race cars
off Daytona's 2.5-mile tri-oval.
By the end of the 200 laps,
Keselowski's Ford was being
held together by Bondo,
duct tape and a little bit of
faith.
"You drive it,"
Keselowski answered
when asked about
wheeling his battered
machine to a top-
five finish at speeds
approaching 200 mph.
"You don't ask, you just
drive."


Danica's numbers
Danica Patrick shattered
the glass ceiling for female
NASCAR racers with her
Speedweeks performance.
The 30-year-old driver became
the first woman driver to win a Cup
Series pole.
In the Daytona 500, Patrick forged to the
lead on Lap 90, passing two-time 500 champ
Michael Waltrip. She became the first female
lead green-flag laps in Cup competition tha
stretches back to 1949.
When the race was over, Patrick scored eil
in the 43-car field, giving her the best finish o
female in the 55-year history of the Daytona 5
She zipped by Janet Guthrie's 11th-place finis


GO
L Godwin Kelly is the Daytona
SBeach News-Journal's motor-
sports editor and has covered
NASCAR for 30 years. Reach
him at godwin.kelly@news-
irnl.com


earned in 1980.
The stat that got Patrick excited? She became only the
13th driver to lead laps in both the Daytona 500 and the
Indianapolis 500. "These are things that happen along the
way," Patrick said. "I'm on the quest to be the best driver,
run up front and get to Victory Lane."


)DWIN'S PHOENIX PICKS
WINNER: Dale Earnhardt Jr.
REST OF THE TOP FIVE: Denny Hamlin,
Kasey Kahne, Tony Stewart, Brad Keselowski
DARK HORSE: David Ragan
BIGGEST DISAPPOINTMENT: Ricky
Stenhouse Jr.


FIRST ONE OUT: David Reutimann
DON'T BE SURPRISED IF: Danica
Patrick mania continues in Phoenix.
After setting all sorts of female
driver records at Daytona, she is the
hottest driver in the Cup Series.


Getty Images/JERRY MARKLAND
Yes, this picture was taken well before his
Daytona wreck.
Did Chad Knaus watch the same Day-
tona 500 we were watching?
He found it exciting and you didn't, but that's
no shocker. If you sat in the bleachers alongside
Tim McCarver for a 1-0 pitchers' duel, you
might be bored to death, but Timmy would find
plenty of excitement in it. Chad, as an extremely
interested onlooker, sees a lot of things most
fans don't. You watch a parade and only see a
parade; Chad watches a parade and hears every
sweet note from the brass section.

Will Tony Stewart ever
win a Daytona 500?
Maybe. Don't listen to the "smart folks" who
insist he'll eventually win one. I like his odds
better than Dave Blaney's. But face it, there's a
lot more that can go wrong than can go right.
As Bill Elliott liked to say, "You gotta be there
at the end." But a lot of guys are there at the
end; there's only one winner each year. It might
seem statistically odd that he's won 19 races at
Daytona without a 500, but Dale Earnhardt had
30 of his 34 Daytona wins before finally winning
the 500.

Should anything from Daytona change
our outlook for the season?
You should've learned by now, NOTHING
from Daytona means anything for the rest of
the year. It's such a different animal from the
rest of the season, it might as well be water
polo.

Ken Willis has been covering
NASCAR for The Daytona Beach
News-Journal for 27 years. Reach
him at ken.willis@news-jrnl.com



FEUD OF THE WEEK


Burton Reutimann
Jeff Burton vs. David Reutimann: Burton said
Reutimann put him into the wall in Daytona's
tri-oval on Lap 176 of the Daytona 500.

Godwin Kelly gives his take: "Burton said
Reutimann 'hung a right on me.' Expect Burton
to deliver a 'left' to Reutimann in the next week
or two."


SPRINT CUP
SCHEDULE
A look at the next
10 races of the season
(All Times Eastern)
MARCH 3: Phoenix International
Raceway, Fox, 3 p.m.

MARCH 10: Las Vegas Motor
Speedway, Fox, 3 p.m.

MARCH 17: Bristol Motor
Speedway, Fox, 1 p.m.

MARCH 24: Auto Club Speedway,
Fox, 3 p.m.

APRIL 7: Martinsville Speedway,
Fox, 1 p.m.

APRIL 13: Texas Motor Speedway,
Fox, 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 21: Kansas Speedway, Fox,
1p.m.

APRIL 27: Richmond International
Raceway, Fox,
7:30 p.m.

MAY 5: Talladega Superspeedway,
Fox, 1 p.m.

MAY 11: Darlington Raceway Fox,
6:45 p.m.


Patrick not content with piling up top-lOs


Danica Patrick had an exceptional
Speedweeks at Daytona International
Speedway. She won the pole for the
Daytona 500, led the race three times
for five laps and scored an eighth-
place finish. After the race, she fielded
questions from the media.

Danica, talk about your Daytona 500
run. You were always running up front.
"I wish I would have led at the very
beginning. I thought I was going to. So,
it was nice to lead later on in the race,
just to have done that, to lead laps. But
it was steady. I mean, I spent most of the
day half throttle, running behind people.
So, you know, when you get in that line,
that nice outside line where it's just
single-file, I didn't feel like it was a wise
idea to drop low and try to figure out how
to pass. You were going to probably find
yourself much further back. I suppose
that's the only downside to running in
that front group all day is that I never got
any practice passing, I never tried really
anything."


Will you ultimately view this day as
a success or will you be kicking yourself
over "would have, could have" because
you were third with a lap to go?
"I would imagine that pretty much
anyone would kick themselves and say
what could I have, should I have done
to give myself that opportunity to win.
I think that's what I was feeling, was
uncertainty as to how I was going to
accomplish that. There was plenty of
time while you were cruising along. I was
talking to my crew chief, Tony Gibson,
and my spotter on the radio: 'What do
you see people doing? What's working?
What is not?' I was thinking in the car,
'How am I going to do this?' I didn't know
what to do exactly.
"So, I feel like maybe that's just
my inexperience. Maybe that's me not
thinking hard enough. I don't know.
Getting creative enough. I'm not sure.
I definitely was a little uncertain how I
was going to be able to do it. I think Dale
(Earnhardt Jr.) did a nice job and shows
what happens when you plan it out, you


drop back, get that momentum and
you're able to go to the front. You know,
I think he taught me something, and I'm
sure I'll watch the race and there will be
other scenarios out there that I'll see that
can teach me, too."
You had a great run going at Phoenix
right to the very end (in 2012). After
such a great run (at Daytona), are you
excited to be going to Phoenix?
"Yeah. It was nice to run like we did
at the end of the year last year with Texas
and especially with Phoenix. I feel like it
will give us a good baseline idea of how
we need to set the car up. But it also is a
new car, so we'll have to adapt to that."
When you look at what you
accomplished here and what you did do
at Phoenix and Texas, do you now reset
your expectations for what you might be
able to accomplish as a rookie this year?
"No. I mean, I think that would be
unwise to sort of start telling myself
that top 10 is where we need to be every
week. I think that's setting up for failure."


AP/TERRY RENNA
Nope, it ain't your daddy's NASCAR
anymore.


SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 B5












ENTERTAINMENT
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Associated Press


Nicholas Hoult portrays Jack in the film "Jack the Giant Slayer." It opened Friday.


A lively, detailed Jack the Giant Slayer


CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP movie critic

A big-budget, effects-laden,
3-D retelling of the Jack and
the Beanstalk legend may
seem like the unlikeliest pair-
ing yet of director Bryan Singer
and writer Christopher Mc-
Quarrie, but '"Jack the Giant
Slayer" ends up being smart,
thrilling and a whole lot of fun.
Singer and McQuarrie's col-
laborations include, most fa-
mously, the twisty crime
mystery "The Usual Suspects"
(which earned McQuarrie an
original screenplay Oscar) and
the Hitler assassination drama
"Valkyrie," featuring an eye
patch-wearing Tom Cruise.
They've sort of been all over the
place together during the past
couple of decades why not
reinterpret a classic fairy tale?
This time, the screenwriter is
aided by Darren Lemke and
Dan Studney; nevertheless
there remains a sense of brisk-
ness and substance.
'"Jack the Giant Slayer" is
cheeky without being too ob-
noxiously cutesy While the
look of it is medieval, the vibe
seems more current, but it's not
so anachronistic as to be self-
referential and subversive
along the lines of a "Shrek," for
example. In that regard, it ac-
tually ends up being pleasingly
old-fashioned.
Shot in 3-D rather than
one of those muddled 2-D re-
dos the film looks crisp and
clean, much more so than the
trailers and ads might suggest
The action sequences are cut
in an unobtrusive way as to
allow the intricacy of what's
happening on screen to shine


through. And once it bursts
forth from the ground, the
beanstalk itself is magnificent;
enormous and richly detailed,
it feels like a living, breathing
and formidable thing.
Tasked with climbing up this
monstrosity is Nicholas Hoult,
hot off the zombie romantic
comedy "Warm Bodies," as the
title character
In staying mostly true to the
story's origins, Jack is a poor
farm boy whose uncle sends
him on an errand to sell the
family horse. Instead he comes
back with you guessed it -
beans. But they're magic
beans, so it's cool.
While visiting the kingdom
of Cloister that day, though, he
also locks eyes briefly with a
mysterious young woman.
Turns out she's the princess, Is-
abelle (Eleanor Tomlinson),
who has escaped her overpro-
tective father (Ian McShane) in
disguise to get a taste of what
the real world is like. Her se-
curity detail, led by the loyal
Elmont (Ewan McGregor),
quickly whisks her away from
Jack but they've clearly made a
connection.
A subsequent escape on a
rainy night throws these two to-
gether again but this time,
one of those magical beans gets
tragically wet. Boom -
beanstalk, one that sends the
princess high in the sky, all the
way up to a long-forgotten land
full of isolated and really angry
giants.
There aren't a whole lot of
surprises here if you know
the story, you know what hap-
pens although '"Jack the
Giant Slayer" features several
inspired visuals, including an


The character Cook, voiced by Philip Philmar, in a scene from
"Jack the Giant Slayer."


incredibly cool scene in which
several beanstalks sprout in an
unexpected direction. Hoult
and Tomlinson are fine to-
gether there's nothing out-
landish about either of their
performances but they do
have a nice chemistry with
each other
And they make room for
some of the showier perform-
ances amid the strong support-
ing cast, including Stanley
Tucci as the duplicitous Rod-
erick, whom the king initially
believes is an ideal husband
for his precious daughter but
who quickly reveals his un-
trustworthiness and hunger for
power


And speaking of scenery
chewing, these giants are fear-
some and fully realized crea-
tures with the help of
motion-capture technology, es-
pecially Bill Nighy as their
sadistic, two-headed leader
These are not bumbling behe-
moths but rather nimble war-
riors with a taste for blood who
put the fright back into fee-fi-
fo-fum.
'"Jack the Giant Slayer," a
New Line Cinema release, is
rated PG-13 for intense scenes
of fantasy action violence,
some frightening images and
brief language. Running time:
117 minutes. Three stars out of
four


Cinderella's slipper: the ultimate must-have shoe


Associated Press

NEW YORK There would be no "hap-
pily ever after" for Cinderella without her
glitzy glass slippers, so careful attention was
paid to the shoes for the princess-to-be's
Broadway opening this weekend.
For "Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cin-
derella," which officially opens Sunday at
the Broadway Theatre, costume designer
William Ivey Long and footwear designer
Stuart Weitzman created a pair of pumps so
sparkly they "light up the upper balcony,"
Weitzman said.
"The shoe is its own character in the show,
and it will inspire the dream for so many
other women," he said.
Shoe shopaholics and Carrie Bradshaw
types surely have been inspired by the Cin-
derella fashion fantasy, muses Weitzman, a
26-year industry veteran. How could they
not? After all, he said, Cinderella gets the
shoes flattering, delicate and powerful all
at once and then gets her Prince
Charming.



Birthday -Your possibilities for achieving success in
the year ahead will be greatly enhanced through proper
planning and the right colleagues. Before making any
major moves, establish what you want, how to do it and
with whom.
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) One of your greatest
assets is your ability to effectively communicate with
others regarding difficult subjects. You will be good at
disseminating information and retaining it.
Aries (March 21-April 19) It's good to be optimistic
about a joint endeavor you're considering, but keep
your expectations reasonable and realistic. Don't get
carried away by pie-in-the-sky prognostications.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) -You could badly need
some information from others today, so it pays to be a
good listener at all times. This is especially so when in
the presence of someone who gets around.
Gemini (May 21-June 20) When your intentions are


When people describe the stunning bride
or the prettiest red-carpet starlet, the com-
parison rarely- if ever is made to Sleep-
ing Beauty or Snow White.
It's always Cinderella, belle of the ball.
"Cinderella is the gold standard for aspi-
ration," Long said. "The slippers are so
iconic, and they are recognized worldwide."
He says their only rival might be
Dorothy's red ruby slippers in "The Wizard
of Oz."
Because the shoes are so famous, the de-
signers had to work with a certain set of ex-
pectations: The shoes had to be romantic
and sexy, have a sparkly fairy-dust touch -
and they had to be seen by everyone in the
theater.
Weitzman knows how to create shoes that
light up a room. For years, he made
"million-dollar Oscar shoes," diamond-cov-
ered footwear that a celebrity would wear to
the Academy Awards. He gave that up at the
height of the recession, but said he can do
pretty much the same dazzling look with
crystals.

Today's HOROSCOPE
in proportion to your abilities, success is likely to follow.
Don't place demands on yourself that you're not experi-
enced enough to fulfill.
Cancer (June 21-July 22) -You have what it takes to
be a good organizer. You will not only know what to do
and how to do it effectively, but you will be smart
enough to know which person should handle each
task.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Small details could take on
unusual significance, particularly when it comes to do-
mestic matters. Be sure each person involved in a proj-
ect pays appropriate attention to every tiny part.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Keep in mind friends
warmly welcome company when a person's visit is
brief. Remember this rule and follow it when putting in a
personal appearance or even talking on the telephone.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -A small but significantly
profitable development could open up, in conjunction


Associated Press
Laura Osnes as Cinderella, slips on glass
slippers designed by Stuart Weitzman during
a performance of "Rodgers & Hammerstein's
Cinderella on Broadway." For years,
Weitzman made the "million-dollar Oscar
shoes," diamond-covered footwear that a
celebrity would wear to the Academy Awards.



with an ongoing matter. However, first you must recog-
nize it and then be clever enough to carry it off.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be sure to devote some
time to a recreational activity you thoroughly enjoy. Get-
ting away from everyday happenings will refresh your
outlook and make you more industrious.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) If you're hoping to
gather some information about a matter that's none of
your business but you're curious about, it will pay to
ask indirect questions. Subtlety will pay off.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Quality, not quantity, is
what you should look for in your companions. Being
with a comfortable, compatible pal will be more enjoy-
able than hanging out with a large group.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) If you need to make a
choice between profit and accomplishment, you would
be smart to choose the latter. Self-esteem has greater
value than gold.


Florida
LOTTERIES

SO YOU KNOW
Last night's winning
numbers, Page B4.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28
Fantasy 5:5 6 17 24 30
5-of-5 5 winners $44,311.02
4-of-5 300 $119
3-of-5 9,759 $10
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27
Powerball: 3 14 20 34 48
Powerball: 21
5-of-5 PB No winner
No Florida winner
5-of-5 4 winners $1,000,000
1 Florida winner
Lotto: 15 28 34 40 48 50
6-of-6 No winner
5-of-6 16 $8,533.50
4-of-6 1,146 $90.50
3-of-6 23,507 $6
Fantasy 5:4 12 14 25 35
5-of-5 3 winners $82,403.27
4-of-5 311 $128
3-of-5 10,423 $10.50


INSIDE THE NUMBERS
To verify the accuracy of
winning lottery numbers,
players should double-check
the numbers printed above
with numbers officially
posted by the Florida
Lottery. Go to www.
flalottery.com, or call 850-
487-7777.


Today in
HISTORY

Today is Saturday, March 2, the
61st day of 2013. There are 304
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On March 2, 1943, the three-
day Battle of the Bismarck Sea
began in the southwest Pacific
during World War II; U.S. and Aus-
tralian warplanes were able to in-
flict heavy damage on an Imperial
Japanese convoy.
On this date:
In 1793, the first president of
the Republic of Texas, Sam Hous-
ton, was born near Lexington, Va.
In 1861, the state of Texas, hav-
ing seceded from the Union, was
admitted to the Confederacy.
In 1877, Republican Rutherford
B. Hayes was declared the winner
of the 1876 presidential election
over Democrat Samuel J. Tilden,
even though Tilden won the popu-
lar vote.
In 1933, the motion picture
"King Kong" had its world pre-
miere at New York's Radio City
Music Hall and the Roxy.
In 1939, Roman Catholic Cardi-
nal Eugenio Pacelli was elected
pope on his 63rd birthday; he took
the name Pius XII.
In 1951, the East beat the
West, 111-94, in the first NBAAII-
Star Game, which took place at
Boston Garden.
In 1962, Wilt Chamberlain
scored 100 points for the Philadel-
phia Warriors in a game against
the New York Knicks, an NBA
record that still stands.
In 1972, the United States
launched the Pioneer 10 space
probe, which flew past Jupiter in
late 1973, sending back images
and scientific data.
In 1989, representatives from
the 12 European Community na-
tions agreed to ban all production
of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) by
the end of the 20th century.
Ten years ago: Iraq crushed
another six Al Samoud II missiles,
as ordered by U.N. weapons
inspectors.
Five years ago: Dmitry
Medvedev, Vladimir Putin's hand-
picked successor, scored a crush-
ing victory in Russia's presidential
election.
One year ago: Some 40 peo-
ple were killed by tornadoes in Al-
abama, Georgia, Indiana,
Kentucky and Ohio. Major League
Baseball expanded its playoff for-
mat to 10 teams, adding a second
wild-card in each league.
Today's Birthdays: Actor John
Cullum is 83. Author Tom Wolfe is
83. Former Soviet President
Mikhail S. Gorbachev is 82. Au-
thor John Irving is 71. Singer Lou
Reed is 71. Actress Laraine New-
man is 61. Rock singer Jon Bon
Jovi is 51. Actor Daniel Craig is
45. NFL quarterback Ben Roeth-
lisberger is 31.


Thought for Today: "Just as
we are often moved to merriment
for no other reason than that the
occasion calls for seriousness, so
we are correspondingly serious
when invited too freely to be
amused." -Agnes Repplier,
American essayist (1858-1950).









SRELIGION2,
.L EIGION


CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


Making up for missions


Associated Press
Mormon missionaries walk through the halls at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Fewer students are enrolled at nearly all
of Utah's universities and colleges this semester as the institutions begin feeling the impacts of the Mormon church's recent lowering
of the missionary age. Enrollment is down by 1 percent to 7 percent compared to the same time last year except for the University of
Utah, where enrollment is up by less than 1 percent. Colleges and universities are expecting much larger drops in enrollment in the fall
semester.

Utah faces revenue gap as more Mormon students leave state for missions


BRADY MCCOMBS
Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY Utah
lawmakers moved one step
closer Monday to passing a
measure that would help fill a
revenue gap left by an un-
precedented exodus of students
on Mormon missions by allow-
ing public colleges and univer-
sities to offer in-state tuition to
high-performing students from
other states.
The Utah House education
committee unanimously passed


the measure, which would
allow school presidents to
waive the out-of-state portion of
tuition for "meritorious" stu-
dents. The Utah Senate ap-
proved the bill earlier this
month.
Enrollment is down this
spring at nearly all of Utah's
colleges and universities, and
they are expecting bigger dips
in the fall. Higher education of-
ficials are projecting losses in
the millions over the next 2 1/2
years because of the lost tuition.
Mission applications have


doubled since The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints announced in October it
was lowering the minimum age
for missionaries: from 21 to 19
for women; and from 19 to 18
for men. Now, new, younger
missionaries are preparing for
missions at the same time as
older missionaries who were
already planning to go.
The bill's sponsor, Sen.
Stephen Urquhart,
R-St. George, said the measure
gives university presidents a
tool to help them avoid having


to scrape the barrel to find re-
placement students.
"Let's go out and compete for
the best and brightest,"
Urquhart said. "They will stay,
they will create jobs, they will
help our economy."
The bill, as currently written,
would allow university presi-
dents to continue to give
in-state tuition to non-residents
students as long as they are en-
rolled in the school.
When questioned why the
See Page C6


Nancy Kennedy
GRACE
NOTES


Amazing

Grace,

how

sweet it is
If you want to experi-
ence "Amazing
Grace," you can buy
a 24-ounce bottle for $32
($17 for eight ounces) at
places like Ulta or
Sephora.
Made by a company
called philosophy, Amaz-
ing Grace is the name of
their shampoo. On the
bottle, philosophy writes
its philosophy on grace
as follows:
"Life is a classroom.
We are both student and
teacher Each day is a
test And each day we re-
ceive a passing or failing
grade in one particular
subject: grace. Grace is
compassion, gratitude,
surrender, faith, forgive-
ness, good manners, rev-
erence and the list goes
on. It's something money
can't buy and credentials
rarely produce. Being
the smartest, the pretti-
est, the most talented,
the richest or even the
poorest can't help. Being
a humble person can,
And being a helpful per-
son can guide you
through your days with
grace and gratitude."
See Page C6


Muslim women embrace new nail polish


'Breathable' mixture lets them mix cosmetics with requirements of faith

Associated Press -
PRZEMYSL, Poland For Zaida ,T
Saleh, like for many observant Muslim -
women, manicures have long posed a re-
ligious problem.
With prayers five times a day, and a
pre-prayer ritual that requires washing ,-
the hands and arms, traditional finger-' -
nail polish has been mostly off limits be-
cause it prevents water from making i -
contact with the nails.
A new "breathable" nail polish by a
Polish company, Inglot, is changing that. "
The company and some Muslims say g
the polish is the first of its kind because -
it lets air and moisture pass through to
the nail. A craze has built up around it I "j
with Muslim women in recent months
after an Islamic scholar in the United -
States tested its permeability and pub- -- -
lished an article saying that, in his view, "-
it complies with Muslim law. s
"It's huge," said Saleh, a 35-year-old -
who hadn't polished her nails in many INL '
years but immediately went out and L
bought the product in five colors, in- tt \
eluding a bright pink, a burgundy and a
mauve. "I am excited. I feel more femi-
nine and I just love it"
The news of Inglot's breathable polish
has in recent months spread quickly
from woman to woman and over the In-
ternet. It also has given Inglot a boost in -
sales of the product, called 02M, for oxy-
gen and moisture.
The nail polish now stands as one of -
the final life achievements of Wojciech -- -
Inglot, a Polish chemist and entrepre-
neur who developed it to create what
he billed as a healthier alternative to a j
See Page C6
An Inglot employee works in the produc-
tion facility for the cosmetics company
in Przemysl, Poland. Inglot and some
Muslims say the company's 02M breath-
able nail polish is the first of its kind be-
cause it lets air and moisture pass o
through to the nail. A craze has built up
around it with Muslim women in recent
months after an Islamic scholar in the
United States tested its permeability and
published an article saying that, in his ... "
view, it complies with Muslim law.
Associated Press -


Judi Siegal
JUDI'S
JOURNAL


Gemilut

Chasadim
Editor's note: This is
the third in a series of
Jewish Values
ne of the hall-
marks of Judaism
is the emphasis it
places on gemilut
chasadim, acts of loving-
kindness. From the very
beginning of Jewish his-
tory, there has always
been a role model and a
system of laws regulating
how Jews were to treat
their neighbors and
themselves in an ethical
and moral way, starting
with the burial of Moses
by God (Deut. 43:6) and
continuing down through
the ages with the pro-
phets of Israel crying out
against social injustice.
The performance of
gemilut chasadim is a
mitzvah without meas-
ure. No earthly reward
is promised, but the
more acts are per-
formed, the better the
world seems to be.
Some examples of this
commandment, or mitz-
vah, are: Clothing the
naked, feeding the hun-
gry, burying the dead
and visiting the sick. The
rabbis considered gemi-
lut chasadim to be an
even greater mitzvah
that tzedakah, charity,
because in gemilut
chasadim, the person is
actually giving not only
money but also of them-
selves and assistance to
the person in need.
The rabbis also felt
See Page C6


..- F -=





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


Religion NOTES


Worship
St. Raphael Orthodox
Church in America invites
the public to attend Great
Vespers at 5 p.m. today and
Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m. Sun-
day. Father David Balmer also
invites all to Bible study class
- "The Words of Christ" at
3:30 p.m. Saturday. The
church is at 1277 N. Paul
Drive, Inverness (off U.S. 41
North, across from Dollar
General).The Holy Myrrhbear-
ers ask attendees to bring a
box or can of food for distribu-
tion at Family Resource Cen-
ter in Hernando. The public is
also invited to attend Great
Vespers in at 6:30 p.m. Tues-
day at The Villages at St.
George Episcopal Church,
1250 Paige Place, Lady Lake.
Call 352-726-4777.
Shepherd of the Hills
Episcopal Church in
Lecanto will celebrate the
third Sunday of Lent with Holy
Eucharist services at 5 p.m.
today and 8 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. A nursery is provided
during the 10:30 a.m. service.
Christian Formation is at
9:15 a.m. Godly Play Sunday
school is at 10 a.m. There is a
healing service at 10 a.m.
Wednesday followed by Bible
study. SOS is from 9 a.m. to
noon Thursday at Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church.
Evening Bible study is at
7 p.m. Thursday.
Faith Lutheran Church,
in Crystal Glen Subdivision off
State Road 44 and County
Road 490 in Lecanto, invites
the public to services at
6 p.m. Saturday and 9:30
a.m. Sunday. This week,
"Hard Questions," from Luke
13:19, is the topic of Pastor
Stephen Lane's sermon. Fol-
lowing the Sunday service is
a time of fellowship. Chil-
dren's Sunday school and
adult Bible classes are at 11
a.m. Wednesday's Lenten


service theme is "Stray
Sheep." The service begins at
5 p.m. with a covered-dish
supper following in the fellow-
ship hall. Call 352-527-3325
or visit faith lecanto.com.
First Presbyterian
Church is at 206 Washington
Ave., Inverness. The Sunday
worship schedule includes
traditional services at 8 and
11 a.m., casual service at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school
hour at 9:30 a.m., and coffee
hour from 9 to 11 a.m. For the
third Sunday of Lent, the Rev.
Craig S. Davies will preach on
the topic, 'You Need Suste-
nance" with readings from
Psalm 119:104 and Matthew
4:4. The pastor's Lenten
study, "The Turbulent Waters
of Change," begins at 6 p.m.
Wednesday with a prepared
dinner followed by the study
topic, "As the World Turns:
Changes in our Culture." Meal
reservations are required. Call
352-637-0770.
St. Paul's Lutheran
Church, at 6150 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills, has
worship services at 8 and
10:30 a.m. Sunday school for
children is at 9:15 a.m. Adult
Bible class at 9:15 a.m. will
continue the study of Revela-
tions. Choir rehearsal is at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Ladies
Guild meets at 3:15 p.m.
Wednesday before the church
service. Midweek Lenten wor-
ship services are at 4 and
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. On
Thursday, "Bible Information
Class" is at 3:45 p.m. St.
Paul's School basketball game
is at 4 p.m. Precious Lambs
Preschool/Kindergarten plays
at 10:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Friday. St. Paul's Spring Break
Soccer Camp is from
8:30 a.m. to noon Monday
through Friday, March 25-29.
Camp is open to all students
ages 5 to 12 in the community.
For details and registration,
call 352-489-3027.


St. Anne's Episcopal
Church (a parish in the Angli-
can Communion) is on Fort
Island Trail North. The church
will celebrate the third Sunday
of Lent with services at 8 and
10:15 a.m. tomorrow. St.
Anne's will host Our Father's
Table from 11:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. today. A new
men's group modeled after
the Order of St. Andrews
meets in the church library.
Call the church for dates and
time. Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 8 p.m. Friday and
Monday in the parish library.
The young adults meet for a
light meal and Bible study the
first Friday monthly at one of
the group member's homes.
For details, call Dave or Kathy
Jackson at 352-344-1167.
The "Widows Network" meets
the fourth Monday monthly at
various locations. All widows
are invited. The monthly sing-
along is at 6 p.m. March 24.
Annie and Tim's United blue-
grass Gospel Band will lead
the singing.
St. Margaret's Episco-
pal Church will celebrate Holy
Eucharist Rite 1 at 8 a.m.
Sunday and Holy Eucharist
Rite 2 at 10:30 a.m. which in-
cludes children's church. Adult
Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m.
Youth Sunday school starts at
12:45 p.m. following lunch.
Bible study at the Radcliffes'
home is at 7:30 p.m. Monday.
Pastor Gene will continue his
Lenten Bible study on "Facing
the Cross" on Tuesday. Feed
My Sheep will provide a hot
lunch to those in need at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday fol-
lowed by a healing and Holy
Eucharist service celebrating
John and Charles Wesley at
12:30 p.m. Stations of the
Cross at noon Friday will be
followed by a "Souper" lunch.
The youth will attend a retreat
Friday and Saturday, March 8-
9, at the Webb's home, contin-
uing their program on purity


until marriage. The Men and
Women's club will meet for
breakfast and a workday Sat-
urday, March 8. Food pantry
hours are from 9:30 to
11:45 a.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Inverness Church of
God Sunday worship services
are at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Children's church is during the
10:30 a.m. service following
praise and worship on the
second, third and the fourth
Sunday monthly. Children re-
main in the sanctuary for fam-
ily worship the first Sunday
monthly. Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m. with classes
for everyone. Adult Bible class
is at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
rooms 105 and 106. The
youth group meets at 7 p.m.
Wednesday in the Youth
Ministries Building. K.I.D.
Zone (for children pre-k
through eighth grade) meets
from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday.
This includes K.I.D.'s choir
practice from 6 to 6:30;
K.I.D.'s dinner from 6:30 to 7;
and children's Bible study
classes from 7 to 8 p.m. The
church is at 416 U.S. 41 S.,
Inverness. Call 352-726-4524.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City, 8545 E. Magnolia
St., invites everyone to share
in Sunday's worship services
at the 8:30 a.m. blended serv-
ice and the 11 a.m. traditional
service. Coffee and dough-
nuts are served in the fellow-
ship hall from 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Sunday school classes for all
ages begin at 9:45 a.m. For
more information, www.fbc
floralcity.org or call 352-
726-4296.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church invites the
public to worship at 8:30 and
11 a.m. Sunday. A coffee hour
follows both services. The
church is barrier free and of-
fers a free CD ministry, large-
print service helps and
hearing devices. A nursery at-


tendant is available for pre-
school-age children. The
church is on County Road
486 opposite Citrus Hills
Boulevard in Hernando. Call
352-746-7161.
Hernando United
Methodist Church invites
everyone to its various activi-
ties. Adult Bible study with the
Rev. Bob Martin is at
8:45 a.m. Sunday followed by
the 10 a.m. worship service
with the Rev. "Jerry" Carris.
Children's church, a nursery,
and hearing devices for the
hearing impaired are pro-
vided. The Korean worship
service with the Rev. Yoon is
at 2 p.m. Mark Bodenheim
chairs the Men's Connection
at 7 p.m. Monday. Holidaze
Crafters invites all to come
and enjoy crafts and fellow-
ship at 9 a.m. Tuesday. The
HUMW choir meets for prac-
tice at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
under the direction of Darryl
Frenier. On Wednesdays,
Bible study with Pastor Jerry
Carris is at 1 p.m., Korean
Bible study with the Rev. Yoon
is at 4 p.m., and Bible study
with the Rev. Bob Martin is at
7 p.m. Cub Scouts Pack 452
meets at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The United Methodist Women
meet at 9:45 a.m. the second
Thursday monthly. The United
Methodist Men's breakfast
and meeting takes place the
fourth Saturday monthly.
Share Praise and Fellowship
meets at 6 p.m. the second
and fourth Sunday monthly.
The church is at 2125 E.
Norvell Bryant Highway, Her-
nando. Call 352-726-7245.
NorthRidge Church in-
vites the community to its new
location at the Realtors Asso-
ciation of Citrus County Build-
ing at 714 S. Scarboro Ave. in
Lecanto. The new worship
service time is at 10 a.m. Join
us at 9:30 a.m. for a coffee
fellowship, followed by the
worship service. Communion


will be observed Sunday and
nonperishables for the local
SOS food pantry will be col-
lected. Wednesday we meet
for weekly Bible study. Doors
open at 6:30 p.m. and study
begins at 7. The first Wednes-
day monthly is the Faith Jour-
ney video lessons that gives
insight and understanding to
the scriptures as related to
the culture and land of biblical
times. On subsequent
Wednesday, we are studying
the book of Galatians. Call
Pastor Kennie Berger at 352-
302-5813.
New Covenant Grace
Fellowship meets at 10 a.m.
Sunday in a member's pri-
vate home. There is also a
healing school on Tuesday
nights and a small group dis-
cussion on Wednesday nights.
The Rev. Larry Silverman lead
this ministry. Call Pastor Silver-
man at 616-291-9568.
The Nature Coast Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellow-
ship of Citrus County will
celebrate International
Women's Day at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Guest speaker is Jil-
lian Alpert, whose topic is,
"Planned Parenthood: What
We Do, Why It Matters, and
What's Ahead." Alpert works
in the development depart-
ment for Planned Parenthood
of Southwest and Central
Florida, and is a longtime sup-
porter and advocate of
women's health for the disad-
vantaged and underserved.
The NCUU meets at 7633 N.
Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Citrus
Springs. Call 352-465-4225.
First Christian Church
of Homosassa Springs will
serve a potluck dinner imme-
diately following the
10:30 a.m. Sunday worship
service. Saturday's contem-
porary service begins at 5:30
p.m. The Wednesday evening
fellowship meal is served at
See NOTES/Page C3


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CRYSTAL RIVER AND HOMOSASSA


4 Temple
Beth David
13158 Antelope St.
Spring Hill, FL 34609
352-686-7034
Rabbi
Lenny Sarko
Services
Friday 8PM
Saturday 10AM
Religious School
Sunday
9AM-Noon





"The
Church
in the
Heart
of the
Community
with a
Heart
fornthe
Community"














Adult & Children's Worship
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday

Kid (ages 4-63) 7:00 PM
2180 N.W Old Tallahassee Rd.,
SC(12thrAve.) er
Church Phone





Provided


t St. Timothy t
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Saturday Informal Worship
w/Communion 5:00 PM
Sunday Early Service
w/Communion 8:00 AM
Sunday School
All Ages 9:30 AM
(Coffee Fellowship hour@ 9:00 AM)
Sunday Traditional Service
w/Communion 10:30 AM
Special services are announced.
Nursery provided.
1070 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River
For more information call
795-5325
www.sttimothylutherancrystalriver.com
Rev. David S. Bradford, Pastor


ST. THOMAS

CATHOLIC
CHURCH


MASSES:
aturday.....4:30 P.M.
unday......8:00 A.M.
................10:30 A.M.

][ :ll 1 [ ] H ,. ., ., .,




ST. ANNE'S
CHURCH
A Parish in the
Anglican Communion
Rector: Fr. Kevin G. Holsapple
To be one in Christ in our
service,as His servants,
by proclaiming His love.
Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m.
10:15 a.m.
Morning Prayer & Daily Masses
4th Sunday 6:00p.m.
Gospel Sing Along
9870 West Fort Island Trail
Crystal River 1 mile west of Plantation hm
352-795-2176 ,
wwwstannescr.org


Crystal River
CHURCH OF

CHRIST
A Friendly Church
With A Bible Message.
Corner of U.S. 19 & 44 East
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M.' 11:00 A.M., 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday
7:00 P.M.
Come Worship With Us!
Bible Questions Please Call
Ev. George Hickman
795-8883 746-1239


THE
SALVATION
ARMY CITRUS COUN..
CORPS.
SUNDAY
Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Hour
11:00 AM.
TUESDAY:
Home League
11:30 A.M.
Lt. Vanessa Miller






Special

Event or

Weekly

Services

Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising

Information


E Crystal
IBI River
Foursquare
Gospel Church

1160 N. Dunkenfield Ave.
795-6720

A FULL GOSPEL
FELLOWSHIP
Sunday 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday "Christian Ed"
7:00 P.M.
Prayer Sat. 4-6pm
Pastor John Hager








IN CHKIST!

CKyTNL


VJNITCD
,A CTHOD 0 DI IT
CH UKCH
4801 N. Citrus Ave.
(2 Mi. N Of US 19)

795-3148
www.crumc.com
Rev. David Rawls, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:00 am Traditional Service
10:30 am Contemporary
Service with Praise Team
Bible Study
At 9:00 & 10:30 For all ages.
Wednesday 6:30
Nursery available at all services.
Youth Fellowship
Sunday 4:00
Wednesday 6:30
Bright Beginnings
Preschool
6 Weeks-VPK
Mon. Fri. 6:30a.m.-6pm.
795-1240
A Stephen Ministry Provider.:


St. Benedict
Catholic Church
U.S. 19 at Ozello Rd.
MASSES -
Vigil: 5:00pm
Sun.: 8:30 & 10:30am
DAILY MASSES
Mon. Fri.: 8:00am
HOLY DAYS
As Announced
CONFESSION
Sat.: 3:30 4:30pm
795-4479


West '

Citrus
Church of Christ
9592 W. Deep Woods Dr.
Crystal River, FL 34465
352-564-8565
www.westcitruscoc.com
W. Deep Woods Dr.






US Hwy. 19



SERVICES
Sunday AM
Bible Study 9:30
Worship 10:30
Sunday PM
Worship 6:00
Wednesday
PM
Bible Study 7:00

EVANGELIST
Bob Dickey


First Baptist
Church of
Homosassa
"Come Worship i lib Us"
10540 W. Yulee Drive Homosassa
628-3858
Rev. J. Alan Ritter
Troy Allen, Director of Student Ministries
Sunday
9:00 am Sunday School (AIIAge Groups)
10:30 am Worship Celebration
Choir / Special Music / "Kidz Worship"
Sunday Night
6 pm Worship Celebration
Wednesday Night
6:30 pm Worship Celebration
Children'sAwanas Group
Youth Activities
www.fbchomosassa.org



Homosassa
First United
Methodist
church

Everyone
Becoming
A Disciple
of Christ

Sunday Worship
8:00 am & 9:30 am
& 11:00 am
Sunday School
9:30 am
Reverend
Kip Younger
Pastor
8831 W. Bradshaw St.
Homosassa, FL 34448
352-628-4083
www.lumc.org
Office Hours:
8:30 4:30 M-F
Open Hearts
Open Minds
Open Doors
STIPIHN MINISTRY.


C2 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


RELIGION





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C2

6 followed by prayer and Bible
study at 7 p.m. Bill Twaddell
will be the guest speaker. Call
the church office at 352-628-
5556. The church is at 7030
W. Grover Cleveland Blvd.;
Dan Wagner is the minister.
First Presbyterian
Church at Crystal River
meets for worship at
10:30 a.m. Sunday with Bible
study starting at 9 a.m. The
Rev. Jack Alwood's sermon is
on "Still Time To Change."
The Lenten study meets at 6
p.m. Wednesday to discuss
and study "The Sermon on
the Mount." All are welcome
to attend. Call 352-795-2259
or visit www.fpccrflorida.org.
The church is at 1501 S.E.
U.S. 19, Crystal River.
E If you are looking for a
friend, then Abundant Life of
Crystal River is the church
for you. Abundant Life is a
growing church where you
can find a church home, as
well as a caring church family.
The Sunday morning service
is at 10:30 and the midweek
service is at 7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Both services have un-
compromised and
encouraging Bible-based


teachings that will build your
faith. Abundant Life is a full-
Gospel, nondenominational
church that believes in the
power of Pentecost. Come
and grow with us. Come as
you are and leave forever
changed by the presence of
the Lord. Abundant Life of
Crystal River is at 4515 N.
Tallahassee Road, Crystal
River. Visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org or call 352-
795-LIFE.
Mid-week Lenten service
themes at Peace Lutheran
Church include: March 6 -
"The Journey Ahead," Luke 9:
18-24; March 13- "The
Right Way to Pray," Luke
11:1-4; March 20 "(Un)fin-
ished Business," Luke 23: 34,
46. Lenten services at 4 p.m.
are followed by a potluck
meal. Maundy Thursday and
Good Friday services are at
7 p.m. Easter worship service
is at 10 a.m. Everyone is in-
vited to all services. The
church is at 7201 S. U.S. 41,
five miles north of Dunnellon.
Call the church office at 352-
489-5881 or visit www.Peace-
Lutheran Online.com.
North Oak Baptist
Church in Citrus Springs of-
fers a Saturday night worship
service at 7 p.m. A"come-as-
you-are" atmosphere com-
bined with timely messages


and contemporary praise and
worship makes this a positive
experience for people of all
ages. Childcare is provided
for birth through 4 years of
age and a children's group for
kids through third grade meet
at the same time. All are in-
vited to attend. The church is
at the intersection of North
Elkcam Boulevard and North
Citrus Springs Boulevard. Call
352-489-1688 or 352-746-
1500 for more information.
First Baptist Church of
Inverness, 550 Pleasant
Grove Road, offers the follow-
ing Sunday activities: SON-
rise Sunday school class at
7:45 a.m., blended worship
service at 9 a.m., "Kid's
Church" for ages 4 through
fourth grade during the 9 a.m.
service, Sunday school
classes for all ages at
10:30 a.m. A nursery is avail-
able for all services except
the 7:45 a.m. class. On Sun-
day evening, Connection
classes are offered and
AWANA begins at 5:15. Mid-
week worship service for
adults is at 6 p.m. Wednes-
days. For the youths, there is
"Ignite," and for children,
"Wednesday Worship Kids."
Call the office at 352-726-
1252 or visit www.fbc
inverness.com.
Peace Lutheran Church


has Sunday morning Bible
classes for children and
youths at 9. Adult Bible study
groups meet at 9 a.m. Sun-
day and 10 a.m. and
6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Sun-
day morning worship service
is at 10. The church is five
miles north of Dunnellon at
the junction of U.S. 41 and
State Road 40. Call the
church office at 352-489-5881
or visit www.PeaceLutheran
Online.org.
First Baptist Church of
Homosassa, 10540 WYulee
Drive, weekly schedule: Sun-
day school for all ages at
9 a.m. followed by morning
worship at 10:25. Youth Bible
study is at 4:30 p.m. in the fel-
lowship hall. Sunday evening
Bible study begins at 6. Life
Care Center is open (food and
clothing) from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m. Monday and Thursdays.
Call 352-628-3858.
First Christian Church
of Chassahowitzka, 11275
S. Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
meets at 9:30 a.m. Sunday for
Bible study and 10:30 for
morning worship. Call 352-
382-2557.
First Baptist Church of
Hernando Sunday school be-
gins at 9:30 a.m., following
fellowship, coffee and good-
ies. The morning service be-
gins at 10:45. The evening


service is at 6. Midweek serv-
ices are at 6:30 p.m. Wednes-
day. Young musicians/
puppeteers meet at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday. Youth Bible
study for ages 11 and older is
from 6 to 7:30 p.m. the sec-
ond and fourth Fridays
monthly in the fellowship hall.
The church is on East Par-
sons Point Road in Hernando.
Find a church home at
Faith Baptist Church at
6918 S. Spartan Ave. in Ho-
mosassa (one mile from U.S.
19, off Cardinal Street). Visit
comeandseefbc.org. Services
are interpreted for the deaf.
Sunday school classes at
9:45 a.m. with Sunday wor-
ship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.
"King's Kids" and "Flyers" for
K-5 grades from 6 to
7:15 p.m. Sunday. Wednes-
day Bible study and prayer
meeting at 7 p.m. with "War-
riors" for grades 6 through 12
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Call 352-
628-4793.
Beverly Hills Commu-
nity Church is nondenomina-
tional. Worship services are at
10 a.m. Sunday. Bible study
is at 6 p.m. Wednesday in
the chapel. Everyone is wel-
come. Call 352-746-3620.
Crystal River Church of
Christ meets for Bible study
at 10 a.m. Sunday, worship at
11, and evening service at 6.


RELIGION


IM Faith
Lutheran

ChurchMS.)
935 S. Crystal Glen Dr., Lecanto
Crystal Glen Subdivision
Hwy. 44 just E. of 490
527-3325
COME
WORSHIP
WITH US
Sunday Service
9:30 A.M.
Sunday Bible Study
& Children's Sunday
School 11 A.M.
Saturday Service
6:00 P.M.
Weekly Communion
Fellowship after Sunday Worship
Calendar of events Audio
of sermons available at
www.faithlecanto.com
9&"t --71n
artf,9; -or M ter&.


Hernando
TheNazarene
Place to Belong

2101 N. Florida Ave,
Hernando FL

726-6144
Nursery Provided

*CHILDREN

*YOUTH

*SENIORS

Sunday School
9:45 A.M.
Praise & Worship
10:40 A.M.
Praise Service
6:00 P.M.
Praise & Prayer
(Wed.) 7:00 P.M

Randy T. Hodges, Pastor
www.hernandonazarene.org


COME
Worship With The
Church of Christ
Floral City, Florida
Located at Marvin &
Church streets.
Established in 33 A.D. in
Jerusalem by Jesus Christ.
A warm welcome always
awaits you where we teach
the true New Testament
Christian Faith.
Sunday Bible Study
9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Wed./Eve. Bible Study
6:00 p.m.
Steve Heneghan, Minister
CHURCH OF CHRIST
000DJ8Y Floral City, FL.



S Shepherd

of the Hills
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Our mission is to be
a beacon of faith known
for engaging all persons
in the love and truth
of Jesus Christ.
Services:
Saturday
5:00 pm
Sunday
8:00 & 10:30 am
Sunday School
Adult 9:15
Child 10:00
Nursery 10:30 am
Healing Service
Wednesday
10:00 am
Bishop Jim Adams, Rector
527-0052
2540 W.Norvell Bryant Hwy.
(CR 486)
Lecanto, Florida
(4/10 mile east of CR 491)
\um. _.SOTHE' ,rp .


B"-".


First Baptist
Church
of Floral City
Lifting Up Jesus
8545 Magnolia
726-4296

Sunday Schedule
8:30 AM Blended Worship Service
9:45 AM Sunday School
11:00 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Worship
Wednesday
6:30 PM
Music, Youth, Fellowship
A warm, friendly Church
Nursery Available
www.fbcfloralcity.org


The New Church
Without Walls
"An Exciting & Growing
Multi-Cultural
Non-Denominational
Congregation Ministering to
the Heart of Citrus County"
Senior Pastors & Founders


Dr. Douglas Alexander Sr.
& Lady "T" Alexander

Sunday School 9:30 am
Sunday Service 11:00 am
Wednesday Bible Study 7pm

3962 N. Roscoe Rd.
Hemando, FL
Ph: 352-344-2425
www.newchurchwithoutwalls.com
Email:cwow@embarqmail.comr

"The perfect church for
people who aren't"


Floral City
United Methodist
Church
8478 East Marvin St.
(acrsross from Floral City School)
Sunday School
9:05 A.M.
Sunday Worship Service
10:30 A.M. Sanctuary
8:00 A.M. Service in the 1884 Church
Bible Study
Tuesday 10:00 A.M.
Wednesday 6:00 P.M.
"We strive to make
newcomers feel at home."
Wheel Chair Access
Nursery Available
Rev. Mary Gestrich
Church 344-1771
WEBSITE: floralcitychurch.com

HERNANDO
United
Methodist
Church

Opew



Op

Voor a h
... Chiren and Families"
2125ENorvell Bryant Hwy, (486)
(1 miles fromHwy.41)
For information call
(352) 726-7245
www.hernandoumcfl .org
Reverend
Jerome "Jerry" Carris
Sunday School
8:45 AM- 9:30 AM
Fellowship
9:30 AM
Worship Service
10:00 AM
Nursery is Provided.
F h h,, l ... .. ,i
(352) 726-7245,hI ,1


Grace Bible
Church


Sunday
9:30 AM.................... Discovery Time
11:00 AM..................Praise & Worship
6:00 PM.....................Evening Service
Monday
6:15PM.................Teens
Tuesday
6:15 PM.......Awana (Sept. Apr.)
Wednesday
7:00 PM.....................Bible Study &
Prayer Meeting
Pastor:
Rev. Ray Herriman
(352) 628-5631
Men & Ladies Bible Studies, TOPS,
Infant & Toddler Nursery
1 mi. east of US. 19
6382 W. Green Acres St.
P.O. Box 1067
Homosassa, FL. 34447-1067
www.gracebiblehomosassa.org
email: gbc@tampabay.rr.com


4301 W. Homosassa Trail
Lecanto, Florida
www.stscholastica.org
Sunday
Masses
9:00 am
11:30 am
Saturday
Vigil
4:00 pm
6:00 pm
Weekday
Masses
8:30 am
Confessions
Saturday
2:45 -3:30 pm
(352)746-9422


Homosassa Springs
X SEVEgm-DAYADVENTISfCHURCH






Come, Fellowship &
Grow With Us In Jesus
5863 W. Cardinal St.
Homosassa Springs, FL 34446
Telephone: (352) 628-7950
Pastor Dale Wolfe
Tuesday
Mid-Week Meeting 7:00 pm
Sabbath-Saturday Services
Sabbath School 9:30 am |
Worship 10:45 am
www.homosassaadventist.com


0


Good

Shepherd

Lutheran

Church
ELCA









Worship


8:30 am

11:00 am
* Fellowship After Worship
Weekly Communion
Sunday School 9:45 am
Nursery Provided

Reverend
Kenneth C. Blyth
Pastor
439 E. Norvell Bryant Hwy.
Hernando, Florida
Building is Barrier-Free
gshernando.org

3 6


Places of worship that


offer love, peace


and harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF HERNANDO, LECANTO, FLORAL CITY, HOMOSASSA SPRINGS


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 C3

Wednesday Bible study is at
7 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
The church is at the intersec-
tion of State Road 44 and
U.S. 19. Call Evangelist
George Hickman at 352-794-
3372 or 352-795-8883, or
email georgehickman
@yahoo.com.
Anglican Church of the
Holy Spirit offers a traditional
1928 BCP Communion serv-
ice at 10:15 a.m. Sunday.
Call for directions: 855-
426-4542.
First Church of God of
Inverness, 5510 E. Jasmine
Lane, invites the public to
Sunday morning worship
services at 10:30. Call 352-
344-3700.
Covenant Love Min-
istry meets in building 11 at
Shamrock Acres Industrial
Park, 6843 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. There is a
gospel sing at 7 p.m. Friday.
Regular church services are
at 10:30 a.m. Sunday. The
ministry website is Covenant-
Love.com. Call Pastor Brian
Kinker at 352-601-4868.
The public is invited to
worship at Trinity Independ-
ent Baptist Church, 2840 E.
Hayes St. (on the corner of
Croft and Hayes), Hernando.
Call 352-726-0100.
See NOTES/Page C4





C4 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


NOTES
Continued from Page C3

Sales & such
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women
will continue its "Annual Flea
Market" today at the
St. Scholastica Parish Hall,
4301 W. Homosassa Trail,
Lecanto. Doors open at 7
a.m. Refreshments are avail-
able with donation. The Coun-
cil of Catholic Women support
many charitable or-
ganizations.
First Christian Church of
Chassahowitzka, at 11275 S.
Riviera Drive, Homosassa,
will continue its annual rum-
mage sale from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. today.
The Ladies Guild of Bev-
erly Hills Community Church
will continue its annual rum-
mage sale from 9 a.m. to
noon today in the Jack Steele
Fellowship Hall, 82 Civic Cir-
cle. Items for sale include
white elephant, household,
men's and women's clothing,
toys, games, books and jew-
elry, plus bake sale and re-
freshments. Money earned by
the Guild goes to further the
work of the church. Call the
church office at 352-
746-3620.
St. Thomas the Apostle
Council of Catholic Women
will have its annual rum-
mage sale from 9:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Friday, March 15,
on the grounds of St. Thomas
the Apostle Catholic Church,
7040 S. Suncoast Blvd., Ho-
mosassa. Rain date is Friday,
March 22. Space rental are
available for $15. Call 352-
503-7172.
The Agape House
semiannual spring
fundraising sale will take
place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, March
22 and 23, at First Baptist
Church, 700 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River. Funds are used
to purchase Bibles, toiletries
and miscellaneous items.
Helping Hands Thrift
Store, a ministry of Our Lady
of Fatima Catholic Church, is
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Monday through Saturday at
604 U.S. 41 S. Proceeds fund
the food pantry. The store ac-
cepts donations of household
items, clothing and small ap-
pliances. Call 352-726-1707.
Food & fellowship
The Men's Ministry of
Abundant Life, Men of Pur-
pose, will meet at 8:30 a.m.
today at Oyster's Restaurant
on U.S. 19 in Crystal River.
The breakfast is open to all
men in the community. Men of


RELIGION


Purpose is focused on devel-
oping the whole man spirit,
soul and body while provid-
ing opportunities to fellowship
and participate in teachings
from the Scriptures. Call the
church at 352-795-LIFE or
visit www.abundant
lifecitrus.org.
The Homosassa First
United Methodist Church
pancake breakfast will take
place from 8 to 10 a.m. Satur-
day, March 9, at the church
fellowship hall, 8831 W. Brad-
shaw St., Homosassa. A do-
nation of $4 for all you can
eat. Come and enjoy.
The third Saturday sup-
per is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 16, in the
Dewain Farris fellowship hall
at the Community Congrega-
tional Christian Church, 9220
N. Citrus Springs Blvd. Menu
includes corned beef and cab-
bage, pie, coffee and tea.
Cost is $10 for adults and $5
for children. Tickets can be
purchased at the door. Take-
outs available. Call the church
at 352-489-1260.
The Ladies Auxiliary of
the Knights of Columbus
Council 6168 will host their
"Spring Fling Luncheon"
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues-
day, March 19, at the Knights
of Columbus Hall, 2389 W.
Norvell Bryant Highway,
Lecanto. Doors open at
10:30 a.m. The event includes
tricky tray baskets, money
trees, raffles and door prizes.
Bring a baby item or a mone-
tary donation for the Preg-
nancy and Family Life Center
and receive a free door prize
ticket. Tickets ($15 each) in-
clude the lunch buffet catered
by John Mason, coffee,
dessert and door prizes. For
information and/or tickets, call
Char Fontaine at 352-746-
9490, Pat Louque at 352-746-
7563 or Peggy Goss at
352-746-7942. Net proceeds
are donated to local nonprofit
organizations and a scholar-
ship fund to a Citrus County
high school graduate. Tickets
are limited to 160.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, on the cor-
ner of U.S. 41 and State Road
40 East in Dunnellon, hosts
its fish fry from 4 to 6 p.m.
Friday during lent through
March 22, in the church pavil-
ion. Cost is $7 for adults and
$3.50 for children. The fish fry
is open to the public.
Everyone is invited to the
annual "Breakfast with the
Easter Bunny and Easter
Egg Hunt" from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at
Crystal River United
Methodist Church, 4801 N.
Citrus Ave., Crystal River. The
all-you-can-eat pancake


breakfast with the Easter
bunny is from 9 to 11 a.m.
Cost is $6 for adults and $4
for children. For tickets, call
352-795-3148 or visit
www.crumc.com by March 20.
Free egg hunts for toddlers,
preschoolers and elementary
school-aged children every 30
minutes from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
There will be Easter bunny
photos, cupcake decorating,
inflatables, games and more.
Beverly Hills Community
Church spaghetti suppers
have resumed from 4 to
6 p.m. the third Friday
monthly through May 17 in
the Jack Steele Hall at 86
Civic Circle, Beverly Hills. A
donation of $8 per person or
two tickets for $15 includes
all-you-can-eat salad,
spaghetti with meat sauce,
Italian bread, dessert and cof-
fee or tea. Come and enjoy a
delicious meal. Tickets are
available at the door.
Music & more
First Baptist Church of
Beverly Hills will host a free
concert featuring Michael
James Facciani at 6 p.m.
today. Experience the thun-
derous, rich baritone voice
that has been compared to
the late Robert Goulet. A love
offering will be collected. The
church is at 4950 N. Lecanto
Highway, Beverly Hills. Call
352-746-2970 or visit
www.fbcbh.com.
The public is invited as
the Heirborne Drama Team
will present "Escaping Border-
land" at 6 p.m. Sunday at Red
Level Baptist Church, 11025
W. Dunnellon Road, Crystal
River. Heirborne is a group of
high school students from
North Oak Baptist Church in
Citrus Springs, who use sign
language and interpretive


mime set to contemporary
Christian music to deliver a
message for today's believers.
This year's nondenomina-
tional program, "Escaping Bor-
derland" will challenge
Christians to get out of their
comfort zone and be real in a
self-absorbed world.
First Christian Church of
Inverness will host a concert
by Bob and Marsha Grider at
6 p.m. Wednesday. The Grid-
ers are residents of Indiana
who come to visit each winter
to enjoy sunny Florida. Bob is
a minister and wife Marsha
has served with him for nearly
50 years. Afew years ago the
Lord inspired Marsha to begin
writing Christian music. She
has now written more than
100 songs. The majority of
their concert will be songs she
has written, so it will be new
and refreshing music in the
South Gospel style. The
church is at 2018 Colonade
St., behind the RaceTrac gas
station on State Road 44. Call
the church office at 352-
344-1908.
"Reflections of a Lovely
Lady," "Chosen by Grace,"
featuring Eva Kroon Pike in
concert, will be hosted by
First Baptist Church of Crystal
River at 6 p.m. Friday. Tickets
are $12 including dinner. Call
352-795-3657 for tickets and
information.
Hernando Church of the
Nazarene, 2101 N Florida
Ave, Hernando, will host The
Browns in concert Sunday,
March 10. It's truly a family af-
fair when The Browns hit the
stage. Their gospel music
styling exudes excitement and
offers a life-changing experi-
ence to all who hear them.
They deliver the powerful
message of the gospel


through word and song that
engages audiences of all
ages. Doors open at 5 p.m.
There is no cost to attend this
event, but a love offering will
be collected. Celebration
Sounds, the orchestra and
choir of Hernando Church of
the Nazarene, will open the
concert at 5:45 p.m.
Guy Penrod will be in
concert at 6 p.m. Saturday,
March 16, at Cornerstone
Baptist Church, 1100 W. High-
land Blvd., Inverness. Tickets
are on sale at the church of-
fice or can be purchased on-
line at www.itickets.com. Cost
is $10 general or $15 re-
served section. This concert
has sold out the last two
years, so tickets need to be
purchased in advanced. Pen-
rod's latest CD, titled
"Hymns," was the No. 1 sell-
ing CD in Southern Gospel
Music for 2012 and the No. 1
selling CD from all the
"Cracker Barrel" stores across
the country.
At the 8:30 and 11 a.m.
services Sunday, March 17,
the chancel choir of First
United Methodist Church of
Ocala and guest musicians
from the University of Florida
will perform Felix
Mendelssohn's cantata-length
setting of "Psalm 42: As the
Deer Thirsts for Water," fol-
lowed by his short setting of
"Luther's Grant Us Thy
Peace." The church is at 1126
E. Silver Springs Blvd. (State
Road 40), diagonally across
the boulevard from the old
Ritz Hotel. There is no admis-
sion charge and the public is
invited. Call 352-537-0203 or
email wayne@fumcocala.org.
Special events
First United Methodist
Church, at 21501 W. State


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE

Road 40 in Dunnellon, will
host a nine-week Dave Ram-
sey Financial Peace Uni-
versity seminar beginning
Sunday. Classes will take
place from 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Sunday in the fellowship hall
of the church. For more infor-
mation or to register, call Rick
DuCharme at 352-465-2142
or the church office at 352-
489-4026.
St. Benedict Council of
Catholic Women will host a
women's retreat with
nationally-known speaker and
award-winning author Patricia
Livingston from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Thursday in Hilgert Hall
at St. Benedict Catholic
Church, 455 S. Suncoast
Blvd., Crystal River. Liv-
ingston is best known for her
touching, storytelling style of
illuminating the presence of
God in everyday life. Cost to
attend the retreat is $10 per
person, including lunch. All
Catholic women are invited.
Seating is limited. For reser-
vations and payment, call
Jolinda at 352-503-6108.
Did you notice many
films on the "Best 10" lists or
nominated for Academy
Awards, never came to our
area? We noticed, and are
showing four recent but "for-
gotten films" at 3 p.m. Thurs-
days in March at the Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship, 7633
N. Florida Ave. (U.S. 41), Cit-
rus Springs. All are welcome
for a $3 donation. The first
film this Thursday is "The
Best Little Exotic Marigold
Hotel," led by Judi Dench,
Maggie Smith and six other
cash-strapped seniors decide
to outsource their retirement
in a colorful resort in India.
Friendship and romance

See Page C5


. .









VIGIL MASSES:
4:00 P.M. & 6:00 P.M.


SUNDAY MASSES:
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M


SPANISH MASS:
12:30 Pm.


CONFESSIONS:
2:30 P.. to 3:15 P.. Sat.
orByAppointment


WEEKDAY MASSES:
8:00 AM.

6 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Beverly Hills
746-2144
(1 Block East of S.R. 491)
www.ourladyofgracefl
. .catholicweb.com .:


Hwy.44 E @
Washington Ave., Inverness U
Sunday Services
* Traditional *
* 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM
* Casual Service
* 9:30 AM
S11:00 AM Service
S Tapes & CD's Available
" Sunday School for all ages
0 9:30 AM
" Nursery Provided
Fellowship & Youth Group'm
5 to 7 PM 0
Web Site: www.fpcinv.org
Podcast: FPC inv.com

* Church Office 637-0770
* Pastor Craig Davies U
Em


COMMUNITY
CONGREGATIONAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH


SUNDAY 10:00 AM
Dr. Jeff Timm
9220 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
352-489-1260



Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
ELCA
Pastor Lynn Fonfara
9425 N. Citrus Springs Blvd.
Citrus Springs
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 8:30 a.m.
Communion Every Sunday
Information:
489-5511
Go To Our Web Page
hopelutheranelca .comr


Redemption

Christian Church
SUNDAY
Bible School.............9:00
Worship................10:15
WEDNESDAY
Bible School.............6:30
Currently meeting at
East Citrus Community Center
9907 East Gulf-to-Lake Highway
(At The Ffathi.ei ,i ohl) _


352-422-655-

Todd d n
Langdon


Our Lady of

Fatima
CATHOLIC CHURCH
550 U.S. Hwy. 41 South,
Inverness, Florida
/ Weekday Mass: 8A.M.
Saturday Vigil Mass: 4 P.M.
Saturday Confessions:
2:30 3:30 P.M.
Sunday Masses: Winter Schedule
7:30, 9:00 & 11:00A.M.
Sunday Masses:
Summer Schedule (June -August)
9:00 and 11:00A.M. /
726-1670







Beverly Hills
Community Church
82 Civic Circle,
Beverly Hills, Florida
(352) 746-3620
Pastor Stewart R. Jamison III
Email: bhcchurch@embarqmail.com

Wednesday Bible Study 6 p.m.
Sunday Coffee/Conversation 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service 10a.m.
Communion- 1st Sunday, Monthly
Where Christ is Proclaimed!


At
Victory

Baptist Church
General Conference

Sunday School 9:45 AM


Worship


10:45 AM


Suid.i, Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Choir Practice 8:00 PM

Quality Child Care
Pastor Gary Beehler
352-465-8866
5040 N Shady Acres Dr.
726-9719
Highway 41 North, turn at
Sportsman Pt.
"A place to Io, i, ., 1 1" I,, .,',.


Free Strawberries!



SGet a half flat of strawberries with

a New Chronicle Subscription!

Drop by our booth at the

Strawberry Festival

IMarch 2nd & 3rd.



e www.chICr niceonline.com

Offer good March 2nd & 3rd 2013 at the Floral City Strawberry Festival. Can not have subscribed in the past 60 days. New 52 week, prepaid subscriptions only.


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted!!!

SERVICING THE COMMUNITIES OF CITRUS SPRINGS, BEVERLY HILLS, BROOKSVILLE, DUNNELLON, INVERNESS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


NOTES
Continued from Page C4

blossom in the most humor-
ous and unexpected ways, re-
minding us it is never too late
to find a fresh beginning. Call
352-465-4225 or visit
naturecoastuu.org.
The Women's Ministry of
Abundant Life, Mary and
Martha's, will meet at 6:30
p.m. Friday at the church at
4515 N. Tallahassee Road,
Crystal River. All women in
the community are invited to
attend this time with other
Christian women. Bring a cov-
ered dish and come out and
enjoy this time together. Mary
and Martha's helps women
grow spiritually and provides
opportunities for fellowship
with other women. Women's
groups from all churches in
the community are especially
invited. Call the church at
352-795-LIFE or visit
www.abundantlifecitrus.org.
Unity Mystery Dinner
Theater presents "Murder
Most Green," a St. Patrick's
Day mystery, at 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day and Saturday, March 15
and 16, at Unity of Citrus,
2628 W. Woodview Lane,
Lecanto. Tickets are $20. Call
352-746-1270 or email Unity
ofcitrus.org.
The next Blood Drive
sponsored by the joint min-
istries of Our Lady of Grace
Church and the Knights of
Columbus Council 6168 is
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day, March 16, at Our Lady of
Grace Parish Life Center, 6
Roosevelt Blvd., Beverly Hills.
A complimentary continental
breakfast will be available, as
well as other tokens of thanks
for donors.
Everyone is invited to a
"Tricky Tray Party (Basket
Bonanza)" sponsored by
Catholic Women's Club at 11
a.m. Saturday, March 16, in
the parish hall at Our Lady of
Fatima Catholic Church, 550
U.S. 41 S., Inverness. Dona-
tion of $5 includes 20 tickets.
Each extra 10 tickets costs
$1. Free coffee and dessert
provided. Lunch available.
First Baptist Church of
Floral City will celebrate
Maundy Thursday, March 28,
with its fifth annual presenta-
tion of the play "The Twelve
Soliloquies," written by the
Rev. Louis J. Kovar, at 7 p.m.
This drama is a look into the
lives of those participating in
Jesus' final meal. The scene
depicted on stage occurred in
an Upper Room in Jerusalem
the night before Christ was
crucified. Jesus and the
Twelve Apostles were eating
their Last Supper together be-
fore Jesus' death. The scene
is patterned after Leonardo
Da Vinci's famous painting,
"The Last Supper." Everyone
is welcome to begin Easter
weekend by attending this
historical portrayal of Jesus
with his disciples before his
death. Communion will be
served during the service.
Following the service, light re-
freshments will be served in
the fellowship hall. The church
is at 8545 E. Magnolia St.,
Floral City. Call the office 352-
726-4296 or visit www.fbc
floralcity.org.
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala is accepting reserva-
tions for its Passover Seder
to take place at 6 p.m. on the
second night of Passover,
Tuesday, March 26, at the
Stone Creek Country Club
and Grill in Ocala. The Seder
will feature a complete meal
with rituals with a liberal, con-
temporary feel. Most of the
Seder will be done in English.
The service will be facilitated
by Judi Siegal and Sonia Pe-
terson with those in atten-
dance as participants. The
cost is $30 for members, $35
for nonmembers and guests.
For reservations and more in-
formation, call Estelle at 352-
861-2542 or Sonia at
352-307-3662 by March 21.
Congregation Beth Israel is a
liberal, inclusive, contempo-


rary congregation affiliated
with the Jewish Reconstruc-
tionist Movement.
The St. Scholastica
Council of Catholic Women's
annual fashion show, "Fabu-
lous Fashions," is at 11 a.m.
Saturday, April 6, at Citrus
Golf and Country Club. Fash-
ions are from Bealls of Crystal
River. Lunch served for a do-
nation of $20. Entrees are
tilapia almondine, baked
stuffed chicken and London
broil. For tickets, call Joan at
352-563-2271.
For Feinstein's 16th An-
nual $1 Million Giveaway to


Fight Hunger, Alan Shawn
Feinstein will add money to
donations given to the Beverly
Hills Community Church's
Food Pantry. Donations must
be received by April 30, and
can include cash, checks
and/or food items. The more
donations made to the food
pantry, the more Feinstein
money will be added to the
donation.
The public is welcome to
Zen meditation sessions at
2:45 p.m. Sunday at Unity
Church, 2628 W. Woodview
Lane, Lecanto (off County
Road 491). Call 352-464-4955.
Reflections Church Stu-
dent Ministry for middle
school and high school-age
students meets from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Sunday at Citrus
Springs Middle School. Come
join us.
The ladies of Lecanto
Church of Christ meet for
Bible study at 10 a.m. the
second Tuesday monthly.
Bible study is followed by a
luncheon. Studies have in-
cluded such subjects as
prayer, love and patience. All
ladies are invited to attend
and enjoy Christian fellowship.
St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church announces
Bingo at 11:30 a.m. Tues-
days and 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days featuring regular, double
and special bingos, together
with a jackpot and "pickle"
game. Doors open at 10 a.m.
Tuesday and 4 p.m. Wednes-
day. Kitchen features "home-
made" soups and sand-
wiches. The church is on U.S.
41, three miles north of Dun-
nellon.
All widows in the com-
munity are invited to join the
Widows Ministry Group
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
days at Cornerstone Baptist
Church, 1100 W. Highland
Blvd., Inverness. "God isn't
finished with us yet!" Call
Darla at 352-270-8115.
Ladies, come to "The
Well" for refreshment and


INVERNESS
(I7 CHURCH
OF GOD
Rev. Larry Powers
Senior Pastor
Sunday Services:
Traditional Service ...........8:30
Sunday School.................9:30
Contemporary Service.. .10:30
Wednesday Night:
Adult Classes................7:00 PM
Boys and Girls Brigade....7:00 P
Teens ............................. 7:00 ~.
"Welcome Home"
Located at 416 Hwy.41 South
in Inverness Just Past Burger King
Church Office 726-4524
Also on Site "Little Friends Daycare
and Learning Center"










oad

tist


ch

5335 E. Jasmine Lane,
Inverness
V Miles North Of K-Mart Off 41
North (Formally Calvary Bible
Church Location)

You're invited
to our Services
Sunday School
10:00 AM
Sunday
10:45 AM & 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 PM
Independent
Fundamental
Pastor
Terry Roberts
Ph: 726-0201


prophetic prayer ministry at
7 p.m. the first Friday monthly
at FresHope Ministries, 2991
E. Thomas St., Inverness. If
you are hurting, need to hear
a word from God, and/or spiri-
tual growth and strength, then
this is the night just for you.
Come comfortable and come
expecting to receive. You will
not leave the same way you
came in. If you desire prayer
and can't come to "The Well,"
we will schedule a phone call
with you for prayer. Call 352-
341-4011 or visit
www.freshopeministries.com.
Announcements
A GriefShare seminar is
offered from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday through Nov. 14
at Seven Rivers Presbyterian
Church. Call 352-746.6200 or
visit www.sevenrivers.org.
Before- and after-
school care is available in
Citrus Springs for children
through fifth grade at North
Oak Baptist Church. Call 352-
489-3359.
The Sonshine Singles
group meets at 6 p.m. the first
and third Saturday monthly at
Trusting Heart Ministries, 176
N. Rooks Ave, Inverness. Call
352-860-0052 or 352-586-
5174 or email trustingheart
ministry@yahoocom.
A Bereavement support
group in Homosassa meets
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday
in the back hall at St. Thomas
Church, off U.S. 19, just south
of Cardinal. Call Anne at 352-
212-0632.
Celebrate recovery
Celebrate Recovery, a
Christ-centered 12-step fel-
lowship, meets at 6 p.m. Fri-
days at Seven Rivers
Presbyterian Church in
Lecanto. Call 352-453-5501.
Celebrate Recovery
meets at 7 p.m. Wednesday
and Fridays at Christian Re-
covery Fellowship Church,
2242 W. State Road 44. Call
352-726-2800.


S47 Years of
SIRST Bringing Christ
FIRS to Inverness

LUTHERAN

CHURCH
Holy Communion
Every Sunday at
7:45am & 10:00am

Sunday School
& Bible Class
9:00 A.M.
726-1637
I |r Missouri Synod
gt www.1stlutheran.net
1900 W. Hwy. 44, Inverness
The Rev. Thomas Beaverson




W First

Assembly

of God
4201 So. Pleasant Grove Rd.
(Hwy. 581 So.) Inverness, FL 34452


PPastor,
Dairold

Bettye
Rushing


















OFFICE: (352) 726-1107


Preacher pleads guilty to
illegally having snakes in car
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -A snake-handling
Kentucky preacher has gone back home
from a Tennessee courtroom without his ven-
omous serpents.
The Knoxville News Sentinel reported
Jamie Coots pleaded guilty Monday to ille-
gally having poisonous snakes that were
confiscated after a traffic stop in Knox
County, Tenn., on Jan. 31.
Prosecutors agreed to drop charges of
transporting the snakes and wildlife officials
agreed to give back the boxes Coots was
using to carry the snakes from Alabama to
his Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name
Church in Middlesboro, Ky.
Coots will be on unsupervised probation
for a year.
Coots' lawyer, Christopher H. Jones of
Chattanooga, said Coots wanted to avoid
going through a long legal process but still
believes Tennessee's law barring him from
transporting the snakes on his way back to
Middlesboro is unconstitutional.
"He legally acquired them in Alabama,"
Jones said. "He legally possessed them in
Kentucky."
Australian Muslim activists
lose free speech appeal
CANBERRA, Australia -Australia's high-
est court narrowly rejected the case of two
Muslim activists who argued they had a con-
stitutional free-speech right to send offensive
letters to families of Australian soldiers killed
in Afghanistan.
Iranian-born Man Horan Monis, a Sydney
cleric also known as Sheik Haron, was
charged with 12 counts of using a postal
service in an offensive way and one count of
using a postal service in a harassing way
over three years until 2009. Amirah Droudis
was charged with aiding and abetting the of-
fences. They face potential maximum prison
sentences of 26 years and 16 years respec-
tively if convicted.
The six judges of the High Court split on
whether the charges were compatible with
Australians' right to free speech. When the
nation's highest court is tied, an appeal is dis-
missed and the lower court decision stands.
That sends the charges to a lower court
where they will be heard on a date to be set.
Monis allegedly wrote letters critical of
Australia's military involvement in
Afghanistan and condemned the dead sol-


NORTHRIDGEI
CHURCH


"New Place New Time!"
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
Family Worship
(Coffee Fellowship 9:30-10:00)
WEDNESDAY
7:00 PM
Bible Study
(Fellowship 6:30-7:00pm)
We are a nondenominational church
meeting at the Realtor's Association Building.
714 S. Scarboro Ave.
(on the comer of SR 44 & Scarboro)
Pastor Kennie Berger
352-302-5813





First United

Methodist


(Church
of Inverness
3896 S. Pleasant Grove Rd.
Inverness, FL 34452
(2 mi. so. ofApplebee's)
Come as you are.
(352) 726-2522
TONY ROSENBERGER
Senior Pastor



8:30 AM
Traditional Worship
with Holy
Communion

9:45 AM
Sunday School

10:00 AM
Contemporary
SPraise & Worship


diers. He also allegedly wrote to the mother
of an Australian official killed in a terrorist
bomb blast in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 2009
and blamed Australian government foreign
policy for the tragedy.
His lawyer, David Bennett, argued in the
High Court last year the letters were "purely
political." He argued the charges were invalid
because they infringed on Australians' right to
freedom of political communication.
Explosion blows out wall at
Minn. church's day care
BROOKLYN CENTER, Minn. No one
was hurt when an explosion blew out a wall
in the day care wing of a church.
Police say the blast was reported about
4:15 p.m. Tuesday in a two-story classroom
wing of Brookdale Christian Center.
A CenterPoint Energy spokeswoman told
the Star Tribune the church's boiler appar-
ently exploded. She said the boiler has had
maintenance issues in the past.
Six preschoolers were in a nearby class-
room. A teacher escorted the children safely
outside. Medics checked the children and
found they were not hurt.
Brooklyn Center Fire Chief Lee Gatlin said
the blast partially collapsed the second floor
of the wing and caused about $200,000 in
damage.
Anchorage archdiocese
moves to defrock priest
ANCHORAGE, Alaska The Catholic
Archdiocese of Anchorage said it would take
steps to defrock a longtime priest suspected
of inappropriate behavior with women.
Father J. Michael Hornick resigned in
2009 as pastor of St. Nicholas of Myra
Byzantine Catholic Church after allegations
were made by three adult women he had en-
gaged in inappropriate not criminal -
behavior.
After the claims were made public, two
more adult women came forward and said
they had inappropriate contact with Hornick
decades before when they were minors, said
Father Thomas Brundage, a spokesman for
the archdiocese.
Hornick has been forbidden for more than
three years from identifying himself as a
priest, wearing priest garb or performing
sacraments, Brundage said. Only the Vatican
can laicize a priest and the process is in mo-
tion, Brundage said.
From wire reports


PRIMERA IGLESIA
HISPANA
DE CITRUS COUNTY
Asambleas de Dios
Inverness, Florida
ORDEN DE SERVICIOS:
DOMINGOS:
9:30 AM Escuela Biblica
Dominical
10:30 AM Adoraci6n y
Pr6dica
MARTES:
7:00 PM Culto de Oraci6n
JUEVES:
7:00 PM Estudios Bfblicos
es 'Eperamos!
David Pinero, Pastor
1370 N. Croft Ave. Inverness, FL 34451
Tel6fono: (352) 341-1711


All are invited to our

Healing

Services
First Church of Christ,
Scientist
Inverness
224 N. Osceola Ave.
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Sunday School 10:30 AM
Wed. Testimony Meeting 5:00 PM
352-726-4033


Special

Event or

Weekly

Services
Please Call

Beverly at

564-2912

For

Advertising
Information


Religion BRIEFS


Places of worship that


offer love, peace and


harmony to all.

Come on over to "His" house, your spirits will be lifted! A '

SERVICING THE CITY OF INVERNESS


Come To
ST.
MARGARET'S
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
where everyone is welcome!
In Historic Downtown Inverness
1 Block N.W. Of City Hall
114 N. Osceola Ave.
Inverness, FL 34450
726-3153
www.stmaggie.org
Services:
Sun. Worship 8 & 10:30 A.M.
Wednesday 12:30 P.M.
Morning Prayer
9:00 A.M. Mon- Fri
Fr Gene Reuman, Pastor


Pastor
Tom Walker


INVERNESS
First CHURCH OF GOD
5510 E. Jasmine Ln.
Non-denominational
Sunday: 10:30 AM & 6:00 PM
Wed: 6:00 Bible Study
Do you enjoy Bible Study, Gospel
s -.- i.. i-in Dinners, singing
the old hymns? Then you'll enjoy
this Church family.
4J Home of the I
"Saturday Nite GOSPEL
JUBILEE" A great Nite Out!
Last Saturday of the month 6:00
Fun, Food, Fellowship & Free!




"First For Christ"...John 1:41
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
INVERNESS I
We welcome you and invite you
to worship with our family.
Dr. Ray Kelley
Minister
Sunday:
9:00 A.M. Sunday School
10:15 A.M. Worship Service
Wednesday:
6:00 P M. Bible Study
344-1908
luxal~~t#JS


RELIGION


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 C5





C6 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


GRACE
Continued from Page C1

Now, what's wrong with
that picture?
Aside from a bottle of
shampoo costing $32, that
definition of grace is not
the biblical definition.
In a recent radio inter-
view, Justin Holcomb, a
pastor at Mars Hill Church
in Seattle, Wash., told of
finding a bottle of Amazing
Grace shampoo that be-
longed to his wife in their
shower and reading the
philosophy out loud. He
told the host, "They tried
to play off the hymn,
Amazing Grace,' but they
gutted and domesticated it
and turned grace into a
horrible chore."
Holcomb went on to say,
"That's how our culture
thinks about grace, that it's
a virtue you have to culti-
vate and then it becomes a
chore as opposed to a gift."
That's also how some
Christians view the grace
of God as well. They can
recite Ephesians 2:8-9 ver-
batim: "For by grace you
have been saved through
faith, and this is not of your
own doing; it is the gift of
God not the result of
works, so that no one may
boast."
However, silently they
add, "Yeah, but if I want to
stay in a state of grace I
better toe the line."
That's why Christian
self-help books sell thou-
sands of copies. Christians
love the grace of God, as
long as they have a check-
list of things they can do to
maintain it.
But grace you have to
work at and be tested on
isn't grace. Grace is amaz-
ing because it "saved a
wretch like me."
John Newton, who wrote
the hymn "Amazing
Grace," was a British slave
trader who, during a vio-
lent storm at sea, felt the
wretchedness of not just
his profession, but of his
humanity He cried out to
God, "Have mercy on us
all!" and God did have
mercy Because of grace,
Newton's life was forever
changed after that.
During the radio inter-
view, Holcomb told the
story of being baptized
when he was 7 and a week
later sneaking into his
neighbor's house and
flooding it, which caused
thousands of dollars in
damages and then he lied
about it.
He suffered with a guilty
conscience for several
weeks until his dad
learned the boy caused the
flood and confronted
him.
"My dad was furious and
I knew I was toast," he
said. "I told him, 'I did it
the week after I got bap-
tized why would I do
that? I've been asking God
to forgive me every night
when I say my prayers, and
I don't know what to do! I
don't even know if I'm re-
ally a Christian."'
Holcomb said when his
dad saw him quivering
under the fear and the
weight of God's wrath and
disappointment, his dad
did an amazing thing. He
said, "You've asked God to
forgive you? Then you're
forgiven, and I forgive you,
too and I'll pay for the
damages."
Then Holcomb's dad did
something even more
amazing. He told his guilty
(but forgiven) son, "Go out-
side and play"
"My dad gave me grace
as a gift, and that sent
shockwaves throughout
the rest of my life, and it
absolutely changed me,"
he said. "I am a gracious
person, because I've re-
ceived grace. I forgive oth-
ers, because I've been
forgiven."
Friends, that's the grace
of God. We are wretched,
but when we ask for for-


giveness and beg for mercy,
he gives it freely and
then sends us out to play
There are no daily tests,
no worrying about passing
or failing grades.
Pretty amazing, isn't it?
-0
Nancy Kennedy is the au-
thor of "Move Over, Victo-
ria I Know the Real
Secret," "Girl on a
Swing," and her latest
book, "Lipstick Grace."
She can be reached at
352-564-2927, Monday
through Thursday, or via
email atnkennedy
@chronicleonline. com.


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


UTAH
Continued from Page C1

bill doesn't sunset at any
point, Urquhart said
Monday he wants to see
how it plays out and if it
helps bring better out-of-
state students.
David Buhler, Utah
Commissioner of Higher
Education, told the com-
mittee all eight state uni-
versities and colleges
support the measure. He
called it a useful and
worthwhile tool, and
urged the committee's
support.
Enrollment is down 1
percent to 7 percent at
eight Utah universities
and colleges compared to
the same time last year,
show figures from the
Utah System of Higher
Education and the LDS-
owned and operated
BYU. The only school to
report an increase is the
University of Utah, where
enrollment is up by less
than 1 percent.
Spring enrollment is
down about 4 percent at
the LDS-owned Brigham
Young University. Utah
Valley University in Orem
and Utah State Univer-
sity, which has its main
campus in Logan, report
the biggest decreases in
spring enrollment at
7 percent.
Colleges and universi-
ties are expecting even
larger enrollment de-
creases in the fall semes-
ter. By that time, more
prospective missionaries


JUDI
Continued from Page C1

this was a very important
mitzvah because charity
can only be given to the
poor, but gemilut
chasadim can be ex-
tended to the rich and the
poor, wherever the need
is felt. And while charity
is given to the living, at-
tending a funeral service
is considered a true act of
gemilut chasadim, be-
cause the deceased can
never repay the person
attending the funeral.
Acts of gemilut
chasadim are acts of true
altruism and done to
make the world a better
place and to honor the
dignity and worth of each
individual. Because God
clothed the naked in
the Garden of Eden, the
Creator gave Adam and
Eve animal skins to cover
themselves so too do
Jews give assistance to or-
ganizations that provide
clothing to those in need.
By imitating the works of
God, Jews feel they are
following in a holy and
righteous path.
To this extent, many
Jewish congregations vol-
unteer their time to man
food pantries and soup
kitchens in their commu-
nities. Others help out in
shelters for battered
women and the homeless,
as well as acting as advo-
cates for children in our
court system through the
guardian ad litem pro-
gram. Many Jews also vol-
unteer in nursing homes
and retirement communi-
ties, working with the eld-
erly in many lay
capacities.
In the larger Jewish
communities, there is the
chevra kadisha, holy soci-
ety, a group of individuals
concerned with the burial
of the dead. Volunteers
from the synagogue wash,
wrap, and guard the body
until burial. In traditional


will have completed an
application process that
typically takes six
months.
Over the next 2 1/2
years, Utah State projects
losses of as much as $9.5
million in tuition rev-
enue; Weber State esti-
mates $18 million; and
Utah Valley University
anticipates losing be-
tween $14 million to $19
million.
"This is a significant
short term impact for the
university," said James
Morales, vice president
for student services at
Utah State University
He told the committee
the university anticipates
losing 1,900 students over
the next two years. The
school has a total of
26,500 students. A loss of
381 students this semes-
ter has already cost the
university $1.4 million in
revenues from tuition,
dining plans, book store
purchases and housing,
he said.
The concern about the
lost revenue is mainly for
the short term. The same
double dose of outgoing
missionaries are likely to
return to colleges and
universities in about two
years, bringing a surge in
enrollment and revenue.
Men serve two years on
Mormon missions;
women go for 18 months.
Urquhart told the com-
mittee the bill wouldn't
require university presi-
dents to give out-of-state
students breaks on tu-
ition, but rather serve as
an optional tool.

Judaism, the body is
wrapped in a shroud and
buried in a wooden coffin
so body may return to the
dust. There is much re-
spect paid to the dead,
because the person has a
soul and was made in the
image of God. It is be-
lieved the neshama, soul,
stays near the body until
burial and then returns to
God.
In recent times, in the
more liberal communi-
ties, the chevra kadisha
has taken on the tradi-
tions of Jewish burial, in-
stituting new rituals and
reinterpreting the older
ones. And like many ritu-
als in the Jewish faith,
burial and mourning
practices continue to
evolve through the years.
In response to the re-
cent attacks at the Sandy
Hook Elementary School
in Connecticut, the con-
gregation I belong to,
Congregation Beth Israel
of Ocala, has taken on the
mitzvah of gemilut
chasadim by performing
26 acts of random kind-
ness. We are answering
violence not with more
violence or with com-
plete pacifism, but with
social action. Our acts of
kindness include driving
members who are under-
going chemo treatments
to appointments, baking
cookies for our firefight-
ers, collecting paper-
backs for our troops
abroad and bringing in
canned goods for our
local food pantry. Indi-
viduals can do these
mitzvot or others as they
are able.
May we all perform acts
of loving-kindness, what-
ever our faith, thus mak-
ing our world a better
place to be.


Judi Siegal is a retired
teacher and Jewish edu-
cator She lives in Ocala
with her husband, Phil.
She can be reached at
niejudis@yahoo. corn.


Associated Press
Wojciech Inglot, late founder and president of the Polish cosmetics company Inglot,
stands in a room containing ingredients for his cosmetics in Przemysl, Poland.


POLISH
Continued from Page C1

traditional nail enamels,
which block the passage of
moisture and oxygen to the
nail. He died suddenly Sat-
urday at the age of 57 after
suffering internal hemor-
rhaging, and is being laid
to rest Wednesday in his
hometown of Przemysl.
Inglot has been the re-
cipient of several business
leadership awards for tak-
ing an enterprise that he
started in 1983, when
Poland was still under
communist rule, and turn-
ing it into an international
success. A Polish award he
received last year praised
him for "proving that
Poland is a country where
innovative technologies go
hand-in-hand with beauty."
Today his company has
shops in almost 50 coun-
tries, including one at
Times Square in New York
City and boutiques in malls
from Moscow to Istanbul to
Dubai.
Though the Muslim
holy book, the Quran,
does not specifically ad-
dress the issue of nail pol-
ish, some Islamic scholars
have said water must
touch the surface of the
nail for the washing ritual
to be done correctly
Some Muslim women
might put nail polish on
after finishing the last


prayer of the day before
going out, and then take it
off again before dawn
prayers. They can also
wear it during their peri-
ods, when they are ex-
cused from the prayers,
but some find it embar-
rassing to do so because it
could signal they are men-
struating. Some simply
don't want to take the
trouble of getting a mani-
cure that won't last long.
"It was a big headache
for me to put it on only for
five days, so I didn't wear
it for a long time," said
Saleh, who was born in Sri
Lanka but lives in Ana-
heim, Calif., where she is
a teacher of preschool and
kindergarten level chil-
dren. "This was a huge
breakthrough for me. We
are supposed to cover up,
but nowhere does it say
'don't be fashionable."'
Nobody was more sur-
prised by the splash it
made with Muslims than
Inglot himself.
"I don't think there is a
single Muslim living here,"
Inglot said in an interview
nine days before his death
at his factory in Przemysl.
"We didn't even think
about this."
Inglot began about four
years ago to develop the
formula for the breath-
able enamel, which uses a
polymer similar to that in
the newest generation of
contact lenses.
Inglot said the chemical


formula is "tricky" and
"quite expensive" to pro-
duce, and the profit mar-
gin on 02M is not high.
However, he said he was
determined to develop a
breathable polish knowing
consumers are ever more
focused on health and ex-
pecting them to welcome a
varnish that would let the
nail breathe.
He said the enthusiastic
Muslim reaction to the
product began after an Is-
lamic scholar, Mustafa
Umar, published an arti-
cle on his blog in Novem-
ber declaring it
permissible. The result
was a "serious increase in
the sale" of 02M. Inglot
said the company was un-
able to immediately meet
all requests for orders, but
the phenomenon was so
fresh he didn't yet have
any figures on sales.
Umar, director of educa-
tion and outreach with the
Islamic Institute of Orange
County in California, said
he decided to study the
matter because Muslim
women had already been
discussing the product in
online forums. There was
uncertainty over whether
it would be ritually com-
pliant, and they weren't
getting any answers.
"So I decided to go
ahead and write an article
on this because I know
how important it is for
Muslim women around
the world," Umar said.


2013



Strawberry Festival


March 2 & 3


We would like to thank

our 2013 Community Partners

for making the

Strawberry Festival Tab possible.


f Termite and Pest Control


PLANTATION
on Cstal River


SUPERIOR
RESIDENCES
of Lecanto
MEMORY CARE


oHome

Instead

Qo u- r a ern nal

" dI i ..S


LINCOLN


jioop r
FUNERAl'HOMES
& CREMATORY


*7
m:


CRYSTAL RIVER
Ml .A.L.L


ACE
The helpful place..


The Browns
will be in concert at
Hernando Church of the Nazarene
2101 N. Florida Ave., Hernando, FL
on Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 5:45 PM
for more information call 726-6144


RELIGION







Page C7 SATURDAY, MARCH 2,2013



COMMUNITY
CITRUS COUNTY CHRONICLE


News NOTES

Camera Club to
meet March 4
The Camera Club at Cit-
rus County Art Center, A
2644 N. Annapolis Ave. in
Hernando, will meet at S
6:30 p.m. Monday, March 4.
Guest speaker will be The
Jorge Blanco the owner of Band, 1
Cafe Impressions in the Hazzar
Crystal River Mall, which "Bri
specializes in canvas print- today, I
ing, image enlargements Commi
and more. Spring:
Blanco was born in Cuba day, M
and lives in Crystal River. Baptisi
His main interest has been Blvd, I
to capture nature in his Briti
photography. He visualizes influe
the subject matter as a ce c
work of art and combines and thc
multiple exposures to bring program
out colors and details that Ralph
often hide in the shadows. Graing
First-time visitors are Sousa,
welcome. derson
Quilters to get
together March 7
The Citrus Friendship
Quilters Guild will meet at 'C
1 p.m. Thursday, March 7,
at Lakes Regional Library,
1551 Druid Road, Specia
Inverness. The
Meetings are the first Netwo
and third Thursdays of will r
each month. In addition to meeting
the business sessions, Citrus,
there are show-and-tells, Copp
workshops and from 5:
demonstrations. day, Ma
Visitors are welcome. will h
For more information, call
Denise Helt at 352-344-
1675 or Shirley Gorsuch at
352-637-6838.
Sew-Ciety to
gather March 11
The Florida Sewing
Sew-Ciety will meet at
9 a.m. Monday, March 11,
at the Citrus County Can- a6
ning Facility, 3405 W
Southern St., Lecanto.
The program will be
"Wrapped Cord Place- -
mats," a technique with
many applications. All
sewing enthusiasts are
welcome.
For more information,
call Jan at 352-746-5380 or
Dee at 352-527-8229.
Boutique needs
donations to sell
The "Second to None"
Boutique at the Yankee-
town-Inglis Woman's Club
needs donations of house-
wares. Gently used men's
and women's clothing is
also always welcome. P
Donations can be P1
dropped by the clubhouse
at 5 56th St., Yankeetown,
or call Joan at 352- Specia
443-1125.
Seni
will w
Humanitarians guest
OF FLORIDA lunch


Bunny


montIII
Monday
vernes
Club, 3
Blvd.


concerts on tap


nature Coast Community Band to present 'British Accent'


Special to the Chronicle

Nature Coast Community
under the direction of Cindy
rd, will present two concerts
itish Accent" at 2:30 p.m.
March 2, at the Citrus Springs
unity Center, 1570 W. Citrus
s Blvd., and at 2:30 p.m. Sun-
arch 3, at the Cornerstone
t Church, 1100 W Highland
nverness.
sh composers have had great
ice on music written for con-
inds and these concerts are
ted to both British composers
ose they have influenced. The
m will include music by
Vaughn Williams, Percy
:er, the Beatles, John Philip
Richard Saucedo, Leroy An-
, Lerner and Lowe, Robert W


Smith and more. Featured on the
program will be classics in band lit-
erature: "Lincolnshire Posy," "Coun-
try Gardens," "Irish Tune" from
County Derry, selections from "My
Fair Lady" and "Along An English
Countryside."
The Nature Coast Community
Band is a 75-musician concert band
with members traveling from many
counties to participate in weekly re-
hearsals from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tues-
days at the First United Methodist
Church Fellowship Hall on County
Road 581 (Pleasant Grove) in Inver-
ness. All musicians are volunteers,
creating educational and enjoyable
concerts for the community. The in-
formative narration is presented by
Doreen Morgan.
All NCCB concerts are free of ad-
mission charge. The band is finan-


cially supported by NCCB Friends
with donations by individuals and
businesses who believe Citrus
County needs the symphonic expe-
rience. NCCB Friends are acknowl-
edged in all programs and at the
concerts, and are sent reminders of
upcoming concerts. This concert
season includes 12 concerts in vari-
ous locations around Citrus County.
The NCCB has five CDs available for
$15 each at the concerts.
NCCB concerts have become pop-
ular attractions, so it is advised to ar-
rive early to obtain a parking space
and seat. No tickets are necessary,
but the venue fills up quickly and
people have to be turned away For
more information on becoming a
band member, a Friend, or to check
the concert schedule, visit nature
coastcommunityband.com.


celebrate Citrus' at C.R. winery


al to the Chronicle

Women's Political
rk of Citrus County
place its March
rg with "Celebrate
" its third event at
Winery/Brewery
30 to 7:30 p.m. Tues-
arch 19. The WPNCC
onor four citizens


who, through their efforts,
make the community a bet-
ter place to live.
Those honored are: Art
Jones, 2012 Chronicle Citi-
zen of the Year for his "One
Rake at a Time" efforts to
clean King's Bay; Barbara
Mills, who welcomes re-
turning military and veter-
ans with "Operation


Welcome Home" and hon-
ors World War II veterans
with "Honor Flight" trips to
Washington, D.C.; DuWayne
Sipper, who through his
Path Rescue Mission helps
the homeless and hungry
with programs and assis-
tance; and Ginger West,
who with her continued ef-
forts supports families in


need, especially the "Sup-
port a Child at Christmas"
program.
Cost is $15 to the event,
which is open to the public
and includes a glass of wine
or beer and appetizers.
For more information,
email Jeanne McIntosh at
jeannemc@tampabay.
rr.com or call 352-484-9975.


'My Many
Colored Days'

Camp Good Hope and Teen Encounter will
be held Saturday, March 9, at Fort Cooper
State Park in Inverness. This is a daylong
camp which provides age-appropriate
activities for children and teens who have
experienced a loss. Volunteers and
professional staff guide the children
through team-building exercises, crafts,
games and discussions about feelings.
Carole Antis and Connie Milan who belong
to ASG, FSS and Cracker Quilters, make
the banner for the children's handprints.
This year's theme is "My Many Colored
Days" by Dr. Seuss. Pictured are: Carole
Antis and Marilyn Bloom, director of
Children's Services.
Special to the Chronicle


photographer to speak to Friends


al to the Chronicle

or Friends for Life
welcome a special
speaker following
at its regular
ly luncheon meeting
y, March 11, at In-
s Golf and Country
150 S Country Club


Fran Reisner is a na-
tional award-winning pho-
tographer known for an
innovative style, creating
storytelling images. Her
journeys have taken her to
many foreign countries.
Presently, she and her
dogs -Jazzy and Sadie -
are enjoying the Nature
Coast while shooting the


scenery here.
Reisner has won numer-
ous national and interna-
tional awards for her work
On three occasions, she
was the Dallas Photogra-
pher of the Year and has
had some of her speeches
noted in major books and
magazines.
Everyone is welcome to


the luncheon. Registration
will be at 11 a.m., with
lunch at 11:45 a.m. The en-
trees are vegetable
lasagna, or pork loin with
mango chutney
Reservations must be
made by Tuesday, March 5,
by calling Myrna Hocking
at 352-860-0819 or Teddie
Holler at 352-746-6518.


21 years of building great futures for kids


Special to the Chronicle
Adorable and sweet-
faced Bunny is year old,
fixed and ready for her
own home. All our adult
cat adoption fees are
presently half price at
$27.50. Visitors are wel-
come from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. and 2 and 4 p.m.
Monday through Satur-
day at the Humanitari-
ans' Manchester House
on the corner of State
Road 44 and Conant Av-
enue, east of Crystal
River. Please drop by and
enjoy our felines in their
cage-free, homestyle en-
vironment. Call the Hu-
manitarians at 352-613-
1629 for adoptions, or
view most of the Hardin
Haven's felines online at
www.petfinder.com/
shelters/fl186.html.

U Submit information at
event.


In March 1992, some very wise kids. Anne brought in other great
people got together and decided members like Bob Halleen, who has
there was a need for Citrus done so much for the clubs that the


County kids to have
someplace to go, to have
something worthwhile to
do and to have viable ex-
citing expectations in
their futures.
These wise people cre-
ated the Citrus County
Boys & Girls Clubs. The
clubs 21 years old this
month and the move-
ment is still strong, still
needed and still plays a
part in many children's
lives.
Many of those wonder-


ful, farsighted people who started
the clubs have moved on to other
ventures. Some, like Anne Pope,
have stayed with the clubs through
the years. Anne served on the board
as president for several years, as
vice president in other years, has
chaired committees and always
been an advocate for Citrus County


least two weeks before the


U Multiple publications cannot be guaranteed.


Homosassa club was re-
named in his honor Anne
was also part of the initia-
tive that brought in Har-
vey Gerber and created
the Central Ridge Boys &
Girls Clubs in Beverly
Hills.
Those people who cre-
ated the clubs and helped
them to grow were smart
because, 21 years later,
the need for Boys & Girls
Clubs is still just as com-
pelling today as it was at
its beginning.


The clubs have weathered eco-
nomic storms and recessions, busi-
nesses closing down, and people
moving in and out
Visit one of the three Boys & Girls
Clubs today to see for yourself what
we do for kids. We have before- and
after-school programs, holiday
camps and summer camps. We


* Submit material at Chronicle offices in Inverness or
Crystal River; by fax at 352-563-3280; or email to
community@chronicleonline.com.


stress academics, arts and crafts, be-
havior, sportsmanship, healthy
habits and leadership development.
The clubs are financed partially
by the United Way of Citrus County,
by grants from Kids Central Inc. and
the Florida Department of Educa-
tion and through other public and
private donations. Donations are in-
come tax deductible and the money
given stays in Citrus County helping
Citrus County youngsters.
Thank you, Citrus County, for
bringing us through the first 21
years. Please, help us to grow an-
other 21 years. The children need
and want your support.
Make a donation online at
www.citrusbgc.com or call 352-621-
9225 or put a check in the mail to PO.
Box 907, Lecanto, FL 34460.
Great futures start at the Boys &
Girls Clubs of Citrus County.

Lane Vick is grant coordinator
of the Boys & Girls Clubs
of Citrus County.


News NOTES

Teacher evals
to be discussed
Delta Kappa Gamma Ed-
ucational Society will spon-
sor an informational
meeting on "Changes in
Teacher Evaluation" at
4:30 p.m. Thursday, March
14, at the new Crystal River
High School Library.
Different perspectives on
the new evaluation stan-
dards will be delivered by
Jonny Bishop and/or Susie
Swain, Citrus County
Schools, and by Melissa
Pfeiffer-Hermann of the
Citrus County Teachers'
Association.
Interested members of
the public and Citrus
County teachers are invited
to attend. For more infor-
mation, call DKG President
Bonnie Ignico at 352-726-
4236 or go online to
www.dkg.org.
C.R. Garden Club
to meet March 11
The Garden Club of
Crystal River will meet at
1 p.m. Monday, March 11 at
the Crystal River Preserve
on Sate Park Road in
Crystal River.
Speaker will be Steven
Davis, who is the Florida
Yards & Neighborhood co-
ordinator in landscaping
conservation with the Citrus
County Extension Service.
All meetings are open to
the public. A business
meeting will take place after
the program. For more in-
formation, call club Presi-
dent Libby Wentzell at
352-257-1211.
Garden Club to
meet in F.C.
The March meeting of
the Floral City Garden Club
will be at noon Friday,
March 8, at the Community
Center, 8370 E. Orange
Ave, Floral City.
The program for March
will be about raising roses,
presented by Chris
McMillan. Program starts at
12:30 p.m. with a business
meeting following at
1:30 p.m. All meetings are
open to the public.
For more information,
call club President Christine
Harnden at 352-341-3247.
Civic group
slates festival
The Withlapopka Civic
Association will have its an-
nual Blue Ribbon Festival
on Saturday, March 9, at
the Withlapopka Commu-
nity Center, 11104 E. Floun-
der Drive, Floral City.
There will be a huge in-
door rummage sale (no
clothing), book sale and
bake sale. Outside the
building will be plant sales
and local private sales
(spaces available).
Sales run from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. A pancake breakfast
for $5 will be served from
8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Brats and
hot dogs will be available
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sodas and bottled water
will be available, as will a
free cup of coffee.
The American Legion
Auxiliary will have a yard
sale set up behind the
building at the same time.
Funds raised at the
event help support many
causes. For information,
call Mary at 352-344-2460.
Railroaders to
gather March 5
The Citrus Model Rail-
road Club will meets at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
March 5, in the Robinson
Horticulture Building of the
Citrus County Fairgrounds.
The program will be
speaker Tom Hancock, a
retired railroad employee
who will offer insights on
the life of a rail workman in
various jobs and locations.
For more information,


call Bob Penrod at 352-
797-6315.


* Notes tend to run one week prior to the date of an
event. Publication on a special day can't be
guaranteed.


Lane Vick
BOYS &
GIRLS CLUBS





CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


SATURDAY EVENING MARCH 2, 2013 C: Comcast, Citrus B: Bright House DI: Comcast, Dunnellon & Inglis F: Oak Forest H: Holiday Heights
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North
4AK
V 652
10 3
SK Q
West
A J 10 5
V K Q J 10 9
* -A
* A 6 5 4 2


03-02-13


J 10 9 8
East
Q 8 7 4 3 2
V83
SJ7 5 2
1 7


South
4 96
V A 7 4
+ AKQ9864
4 3


Dealer: West
Vulnerable: Both
South West North
1i 2*-
2 + Pass 3 -1
3 NT Pass Pass


East
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: V K


Bridge

PHILLIP ALDER
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

John Ruskin, who died in 1900, was an Eng-
lish art critic and philanthropist who also wrote
on a wide range of subjects. He said, "Sunshine
is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us
up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such
thing as bad weather, only different kinds of
good weather."
Some people would not agree with that, espe-
cially those who live year-round in a warm cli-
mate. But at the bridge table, sometimes the
weather looks inclement with bad suit breaks,
but occasionally the sun still shines. In today's
deal, how should South play in three no-trump
after West leads the heart king?
In this auction, South's two-diamond advance
was forcing for one round. (I like this agreement.
If two diamonds is nonforcing, South has to cue-
bid two hearts first with all good hands. I prefer
a cue-bid to promise support for partner's suit.)
On the second round, South took a shot at the
nine-trick game, hoping partner had something
in spades (or that West would not lead that suit).
Notice that five diamonds goes down on the
likely heart lead.
South, in a sunny mood, thought he could see
10 easy tricks: two spades, one heart and seven
diamonds. After taking his heart ace, declarer
cashed his diamond ace and saw scudding dark
clouds when West discarded a club.
However, he paused and realized that it
would not rain as long as he unblocked dummy's
10. Then South led a spade to dummy's king,
cashed the ace, played a diamond to his nine,
and claimed an overtrick.

WB i THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, I Do you need me to
one letter to each square, I]b;1 I'ib ."
to form four ordinary words. It Le I I
NCEFEtry II
I NCEFE .Ione l '-"lX"


ROPRAL
-r -- -l
k A. i


THEY NEEPVP ONE
WHEN THEY FILM P THE
MOVIE'S ANK


SYMCIT I ?oV N.
"- Z D" Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: A
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: VIXEN SWUNG FELONY MISHAP
I Answer: All the recent construction was turning the
street into AN "AVE-NEW"


ACROSS 41 Pizza Hut Answer to Previous Puzzle
1 Incite Rover alternative
4 Fuel 42"Diamond Lil 0" 0 S SPA
7 Foolhardy star WOO ABS. S P
11 Damorg. 43 Auction shout ADS IRAN ETON
12 Actress 45 Gold brick SOL SERA LOI N
Turner 48 Capital of S0 L A L01
13 Post- Peru P R CLAIM PI NA
kindergarten 49 Waterfalls P E T E X A CT
14 Got dingy 52 Two fives
16 Sulk for-- F- OUR H D S
17 Far from taut 53 "A Death in P T PEN B E L
18 Brown bird theFamily" BEALE GOA REP
19 Coral author L .
formation 54 Dit partner E A G R R K S
20 Eastern 55 Make one's N E A TO A W L
way way
21 Hotel patron 56 Cakelike NARD ROTAT I 6N
24 Quiver cookie E I RE EM I R SRO
contents 57 Pilot's milieu VEN DOOM I CE
27 Dugout VIP O A
28 Raisond'- DOWN NED ON.S SAL
30 Movie 1 Filthy place 6 Bummed out 12 Get the
32 Ad award 2 Singer Burl 7 Scolding coordinates
34 "You said it!" 3 Pay a visit 8 vera 15 Resinous
36 Sock part 4 Ungainly 9 Treat deposits
37 Annually 5 "Wheel of like a 18 Combat
39 Flashlight Fortune" buy pariah 20 Oak or elm
carrier (2 wds.) 10 Punch or jab 21 Truck mfr.
Want more puzzles? 22 Unsightly
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books 23 Buffalo's lake
at QuillDriverBooks.com 24 Roman legion
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 25 Including
26 gin fizz
12 13 29 Baby soother
EN MORE31 Debussy
15 16 subject
33 Raiders'
7 18 home
35 Subtle
S20 3Sdifference
38 Country addr.
21 22 23 24 25 26 40 Video game
maker
27 -- 29 30 31 42 Tightwad
-...143 Building lot
3233 34 35 36 44 Good or bad
37 4638 39 4 Likelihood
47 Salad bowl
41 wood
43 45 46 48 of averages
43 46 49 Taxi
49 50-1- 50Turkish
49 50 51 honorific
52 53 54 51 Not sociable


3-2 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

WANT MORE PUZZLES?
U Look for Sudoku and Wordy Gurdy puzzles in the Classified pages.


Dear Annie: I am 60
years old and have a
cousin the same age.
"Kevin's" conversations are
sexist, racist, immature and
extremely self-centered. He
mocks people who recycle and
told me helping oth-
ers is "a waste of
time." His takes on
current events and :.
politics sound like
drunken barroom
rants. I find myself
walking away from
him shell-shocked.
I know we are
supposed to keep
away from toxic
people, but Kevin
and I had many
wonderful adven- ANN
tures together when MA I
we were young. We
still have our past
memories and a few subjects
in common. But I'm afraid he
is taking my silence during
these rants for tacit approval.
Does he need to be chal-
lenged? Am I being idealistic
to think he might change, or
should I just try to keep my
distance? Florida Cousin
Dear Florida: Kevin may
never change his narrow-
minded views, but that doesn't
mean you have to sit in si-
lence. If you don't want to cut
him out of your life, under-
stand that he is going to say
things that bother you, and it's
perfectly fine to tell him so. It
doesn't require confrontation.
Simply say, "Kevin, I strongly
disagree with you and don't
wish to discuss it further," and
then change the subject. If he
persists, you have the option
of ending the conversation al-
together. In time, either Kevin
will understand which sub-
jects are off-limits, or you will


m

L


be spending a lot less time in
his company
Dear Annie: I am the
youngest of seven children
and the only one who didn't
marry young. I am also the
only one who attended col-
lege. I am graduat-
ing in May and
mentioned to my
parents that I
hoped to have a
small graduation
party with family
and close friends.
One friend already
offered to make my
cake.
You can imagine
my disappointment
when my parents
IE'S said it was silly to
.BOX have a graduation
party, and they'd
rather spend
money on a wedding when-
ever I get married. Annie, I
wasn't asking them to spend
money I just wanted to use the
hospitality of their home be-
cause my college apartment is
a few hours away I've worked
hard for my degree, and I'm
hurt by their lack of excite-
ment. I want to share my hap-
piness. I don't need gifts.
Would it be against etiquette
to throw myself a party? -
Puzzled
Dear Puzzled: It is OK to
give yourself a party, but
please don't mention your
graduation until after your
guests arrive. You don't want
to give the impression of, "I'm
so fantastic and accomplished
bring presents." Simply say
you want to have a party You
can then tell them during the
event that you are celebrating
your degree. Another option is
to get together with your class-
mates and have a group cele-


bration, whereby you are es-
sentially giving a graduation
party for one another
DearAnnie: I read the letter
from "Sickened on the East
Coast," the mom whose 8th-
grade child came home with a
questionable summer reading
list
As a teacher and a parent, I
know that schools are as re-
spectful as the people in
charge. Reading specialists
are highly trained profession-
als who choose books that will
help children understand that
there are many challenging
parts of life that are not pretty
But the responsibility of what
children read in their free
time still belongs to parents.
Without banning books,
"Sickened" can help her child
choose material that builds
character. Online, she can nar-
row her search for books that
promote specific traits, such
as gratitude, honesty, generos-
ity and courage. "Sickened"
also could do a web search on
"character education," where
she will find numerous books
written by authors who feel
the same way she does. A
Parent First


Annie's Mailbox is written by
Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie's Mailbox,
Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd
Street, Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more about
Annie's Mailbox and read
features by other Creators
Syndicate writers and
cartoonists, visit the Creators
Syndicate Web page at
www creators. com.


C8 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


ENTERTAINMENT






CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


MAYBE IF I BREATHE
TO THE TUNE OF BRAHM5'
LULLABY, THEY'LL 60
TO SLEEP..


\-^g-~-32


Pickles

HAVEE o EVfER GOT'TEM
PREGGSEV N "TE MORM-
IN& AAM REALIZE NOPE.
900 P Y OOR PAtWS









Sally Forth

YOU HEAR ME, RECCA?
NO MORE INSULTS ABOUT FAYE. GOT
NO MORE PASSIVE-AGGRESSIVE
REMARKS. NO MORE FRENEMY IT.
NONSENSE. YOU EITHER BE N CE
OR BE GONE. GOT IT?


Dilbert


The Born Loser


I 50A..T\tW\GTRFE ,FTR '7 W TUWAM RUKTS L WkS
0\G i\, I t -UPSU Nt4 .UST


Kit 'N' Carlyle Rubes


For Better or For Worse


Beetle Bailey


The Grizzwells


Blondie
I DON'T REMEMBER IF 1TU.;1ED !| JUST THE SAME, I' THE ONLY THING THAT'S GOING
OFF THE COMPUTER | TTE MAKE SURE: I TO BURN OUT DOWNSTAIRS IS
DOWNSTAIRS THE LIGHT IN THE REFRIGERATOR
"_~ ., .. ,' 'r







Dennis the Menace The Family Circus


'ITOL pHIM'PPLAM BALL
TOMORROW. THERE'S A
?100% CHANCE OF RAIN."


"Aw how can goin' outside to
play help Daddy get better?"


Doonesbury Flashback
HI, MY PHONE 15 TAPPFI. 50 1
H THIS IS yMACTM I CANT TELL YOU MY AAME. IBUT
mH^ 7' 3/c^/vPF4WI1W?' T-- Vi wvf fy PP?$/fij /
--'t\4,:: k T H FY- ,. -
;-,'. w ,, .. -':, -


Big Nate
INVENTING A NAME
FOR. OURSELVES WENT
OVER LIKE A LEAD
BALLOON. NOBoDY'S
ArLLo and JaU5OWnis
FIYEAH






Arlo and Janis


MAYBE WE SHOULD
JUST LET OTHER
PEOPLE DECIDE WHAT
TO CALL US.


I'M SORRY, SIR, BUT I'M
SHOWlAH6 OUR TRUTHER UNE
HAS BEE P(SCOTINULIEP. CAN
I INTRERST YOU IN ANOTHER
S/EABORATE
.- .'..~ I


WELL, IF IT ISN'T
THE THREE
DORKETEERS!


WO PA 1P OW ABOUT

----.,* I'
CHENEY W











OR IM
MAYBE JUST
N Or GOING
TO BE
ANONYMOUS.
F-[


TodasM MOVIES

Times provided by Regal Cinemas and are subject to change; call ahead.


Citrus Cinemas 6 Inverness; 637-3377
"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:10
p.m., 4:10 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"21 and Over" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:30 p.m., 10 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m.,
4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m., 7:20 p.m.,
10 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
9:50 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) ID required. 1:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Crystal River Mall 9; 564-6864
"21 and Over" (R) 1:45 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,
7:45 p.m., 10:05 p.m.
"The Last Exorcism, Part II" (PG-13) 1:55 p.m.,
4:55 p.m., 7:55 p.m., 10:15 p.m.


"Jack, The Giant Slayer" (PG-13) In 3D. 1:30
p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 10:10 p.m. No passes.
"Dark Skies" (PG-13) 1:15 p.m., 4:15 p.m.,
7:15 p.m., 9:55 p.m.
"Snitch" (PG-13) 1:40 p.m., 4:40 p.m., 7:40 p.m.,
10:15 p.m.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) In 3D.
1:10 p.m., 7:10 p.m. No passes.
"Escape from Planet Earth" (PG) 4:10 p.m.,
9:45 p.m.
"Safe Haven" (PG-13) 1 p.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.,
10 p.m.
"A Good Day to Die Hard" (R) 1:50 p.m.,
4:50 p.m., 7:50 p.m., 10:10 p.m.
"Identity Thief" (R) 1:20 p.m., 4:20 p.m.,
7:20 p.m., 9:50 p.m.

Visit www.chronicleonline.com for area movie list-
ings and entertainment information.


Betty


Frank & Ernest


IF $OA l FA TH$ FAULT I
so~af ACTIVITY 6 ',.-.-@,1$ IN OUR P
OA AP ACTIVITY iN 57op
lMOPA, A-t 01O.PTING NOT IN
PI ON6 PAON A0 O oL$I





WJUF-FM 90.1 National Public Local RADIO WYKE-FM 104.3 Sports Talk
WHGN-FM 91.9 Religious WDUV 105.5 FM Hudson
WXCV-FM 95.3 Adult Mix. WSKY 97.3 FM News lalk WJQB-FM 106.3 Oldies
WXOF-FM 96.3 Adult Mix WXJB 99.9 FM News Talk WFJV-FM 103.3 '50s to '70s
WEKJ FM 96.7, 103.9 Religious WRGO-FM 102.7 Oldies WRZN-AM 720 Adult Mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: d slenba q


"EYU EYMAIN KSD RS WSP G JSZGA


KSD JSDBRA'E RS WSP GAKEYMAI


UBNU. NGZU JMEY ZSAUK." BUPSK


"NGEOYUB" CGMIU

Previous Solution: "Men say they love independence in a woman, but they don't
waste a second demolishing it brick by brick." Candice Bergen
(c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-2


Peanuts


Garfield


I'M TELLINC-OO -
H _E.S WONPDERFUL '


1 ''


*JUTuKE -r'"N TOTAKSOA
'RUITNNA, TIME AWAY FROM
F(GHT? APSA NPPROGS


v^_. --7:


COMICS


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 C9














To place an ad, call 563-5966





Classifieds


In Print


and



Online


All


'Th e Tim e


Fax (52.53-66 1Tol Fee .(88 82-34 1Emal:clssfidschonclon ie om0 w-0 0 *chonclonlin 0


62845 1793

4 5 3 7 2 9 8 6 1:
91783 64 2 5:
381567249

265914387

794283156

132698574

879145632


2 8ft Kayak Calypso's
with 2 paddles,
& 2 life jackets,
Like New
$250 obo for Both
(352) 364-7057

3 16' CANOES
2, 2 Seaters, 1,3 Seater
on galvanized trailer
w/paddles & lifejackets
$1200 352-795-7335


must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1 Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.00Park Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Serious Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766

18HP, Evinrude
short shaft, manual,
good condition.
$460.
Crystal River
(513) 260-6410

CITRUS
SPRINGS, FL
Fri. and Sat. March 1
& 2 from 8:00-3:00.
Lawn furn. lawn
equip., John Deere rid-
ing mower, tools, teak
computer cabinet and
chair, cedar chest and
teak TV cabinet.
8225 N. Duval Drive

COACHMAN
30ft. Qn. Island bed, +
rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean
$9,500 (352) 621-0848

CORVETTE
2006 Victory Red
tan leather, Convertible.
LS2 400HP. 16K miles,
3LT Option Pkg.
$29,900(352)560-7247

CRYSTAL RIVER
SAT ONLY 9 TO 4
antiques, furn, boating
fishing, hshld, misc..
Apalachee Pt off
State Park

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 8a -2pm, Kings
Bay Self Storaae
Over 30 tenants
participating.
Everything from baby
clothes to collectibles.
7957 W Gulf to Lake
HWY/44
352-795-0313

Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932


Shepherd/Terrier Mix.
Great watch dog.
Needs either a farm or
fenced yard.
352 419 7428

FLORAL CITY
Yard Sale! 6 FAMILIES
SAT. 9A to 2P
Florence Terrace.

HOMOSASSA
2/1 CHA, No pets
$500. mo., 1st + sec
(352) 628-4210

Honda
Gold Wing 1984
Exec. Cond, 39k miles
$4200 OBO
352-746-0348

INSURANCE
AGENT

Looking for licensed
insurance agent with
experience.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

Non-Smoking Male
w/2 indoor cats,2 out-
door dogs, Ref. Avail.
352-697-9646

P/T CNA'S/HHA
Homemaker's
& Companions

Have level 2 bckgrnd
ck cpr certified &
prior employment
verification
(352) 597-4084


PARTY P NY
NEEDED
April 20th Crystal
River
**352-613-0592**



$$ CASH PAID $$
for junk vehicles.
352-634-5389
FREE REMOVAL
Appliances, Window
AC, Riding Mowers, &
Metals, 8' Satelite Dish
& MORE 352-270-4087
Marriages Performed,
Commitment Counts
Be Happily Married
352-257-5381



FREE
Older custom built
oak Bar with cabinet
& wine rack
AND Large Hot Tub w/
accessories, you dis-
mantle and move
(352) 794-3085
INVERNESS
Free Oak fire wood
parkside ave. on left at
power pole help yourself
Mix Pitts
Free Mom, Dad
or also have puppies
352-795-0898



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001lb,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077



BLACK WALLET
lost in the vicinity of
Wendy's & Outback
Steakhouse in
Inverness. Please Call
to verify important
cards inside
352-464-0852
CHIHUAHUA
his name is Bo
weighs approx 7 Ibs. Igt
Tan, lost in vicinity of
Fairview Estates,
missing since Saturday
Reward 352-697-1937
Lost
1 eyed black cat,short
haired, male
Between,
Dixie land/Highland,
Homosassa
352-201-4522
Mens Watch lost in the
vacinity of Bealls and
TJ Maxx in Inverness.
Reward offered (352)
270-8488
MIXED BREED HOUND
DOG, Mostly Black, little
bit of Brown,
35 TO 40 Ibs answers
to Daisy, dragging 4ft
red/white leash
352-270-0812



Found Yorkie
Female,
Pine Ridge Area
(352) 249-7454
Small Black and Tan
dog w/ collar. In Dun-
ellon Rainbow Lake
Estates Saturday Even-
ing. (352) 445-9564
Turn Signal Lens,
orange, from a Harley
Davidson. Found in
Inverness @ Pizza Hut.
(352) 419-6506



AVAILABLE
Pool Supply Store
W/Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100,000!! Call Pat
*(813) 230-7177"
PARTY PONY
NEEDED
April 20th Crystal
River
**352-613-0592**



FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.00lb
Delivered 352-795-0077




Adult Student
Looking for pt work
MWF & some Satur-
days can help with
driving,cooking, nanny,
elder assistance,
cleaning, office work
(office software certified)
Call Melissa
352-949-7033 with best
time to call.



Position Available
40 hr State Training
a must 352-302-4391
Wanted a
Mrs. Doubtfire

for 2 boys, ages 6& 10
352-527-9133


Tell that special
person
"Happy Birthday
"wth a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




Citrus Podiatry
Center, PA

Medical
Receptionist:
Part-time M, TU, W
8:30-5pm.
Two office locations.
$10.50/hr. Vacation,
holiday & uniform
benefits. Minimum
of 2 years exp. in
a medical office
setting.
Send Resume to:
P.O. Box 1120,
Lecanto, FL
34460-1120
No phone calls or
taxes accepted/
no exceptions.

DENTAL
RECEPTIONIST

For High Quality
Oral Surgery Office.
Springhill/Lecanto
Experience a must.
Email Resume To:
marvamoli@
.ahoo com

F/T DENTAL
FRONT DESK
RECEPTIONIST
Dental Exp. a must!!
Great Customer
Service, Telephone
Skills, Professional
Appearance Up Beat
Multi Task, Team
Player, Good Work
Ethics. FAX Resume
to 352-628-9199 OR
Drop off at office
Ledger Dentistry

P/T Activities
Director/
Caregiver

CNA/Caregiver
352-344-5555

P/T CNA'S/HHA
Homemaker's
& Companions

Have level 2 bckgrnd
ck cpr certified &
prior employment
verification
(352) 597-4084

PT Certified
Dental Assistant/
Front Office

Call 352-746-0330,
Ask for Vicki.

RN/LPN
CNA/HHAs

Needed for home
care. Make your own
schedule.
888/783-1133
csi.recruit@cgsl.cc
www.csicaregiver.
com





INSURANCE
AGENT

Looking for licensed
insurance agent with
experience.
email resume to:
david@birdinsurance
group.com

OFFICE
ASSISTANT

Needed M-F
8am to 4:30pm
Quickbooks, Word,
Excel Knowledge
helpful. Must be
self-motivated &
capable of working
independently
Email To:
sccmain@earthlink.
net





Exp. Breakfast
Cook

Must cook eggs in a
pan! Apply in person
or call between
2pm to 4pm
Shrimp Landing, Inglihs
352-447-5201

Skyview Restaurant
At Citrus Hills
Is Seeking
PExperienced
t- P/T Servers
et Cooks
" Bartender
a Hostess &
Dish Washer

Call 352-746-6727
Tue. Sat. 2p -4:30p
For Application
Appointment


P/T COOK

For Health Care
Facitly Backgroud
screening required.
352-344-555 ex 102






CH"kONICLE


ADVERTISING
INSIDE SALES
Representative

The Citrus County
Chronicle is now
accepting applications
for an
Advertising
Inside Sales
Representative.

w Must have mini-
mum of 2 years sales
experience with
proven sales results.
w Must be able to
maintain current
account base as well
as prospecting for
new clients over the
phone.
w Fast paced envi-
ronment that requires
ability to multi task
with ease.
w Computer profi-
ciency a must.
w Excellent organiza-
tional and customer
service skills.

Fax cover letter and
resume to HR at:
(352)564-2935
or email:
djkamlot@chronicle
online.com

Final applicant must
undergo a drug
screening. EOE

COMMERCIAL
INSURANCE CSR

Commercial Insurance
CSR and inside sales
position needed.
Knowledge of AMS360
preferred. Email
resume to Tracy Fero
at tfero(fero
insurance.com
or call 352-422-2160

Nick Nicholas
Ford Lincoln
In Crystal River

SALES
Good Benefits,
401 K,
& Medical Plans.
Retail sales exp.
helpful, will train.
We're looking for a
long term relation-
ship. Apply in person
Mon.- Sat. 9-5.
2440 US. 19 Crystal
River, Florida.
Just North Of The
Mall.
Drug Free Workplace





A/C Equipment
Installer &
Duct Mechanic

Must have valid
driver's license.
Mm. 3 yrs. Exp.
Aoolv in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W. Gulf to Lake
Hwy, Lecanto
DWFP

AUTO DETAILERS
& MANAGERS
Homosassa, Brooksville
& Inverness dealers.
Call 727-808-0341

AutoTechnician

Min. 5 years, exp.
with tools
Automotion,
Floral City
352-341-1881

Ex Residential
Electrician

Min. 4 yrs. exp.
Rough-ins and Trims.
Familiar with Citrus
County Codes,
needs valid DL, tools,
own transportation
Apply in Person
ONLY
H.E. SMITH CO.
1895 W.Gulf to Lake
Hwy. Lecanto
DWFP


LAWN
MAINTENANCE
Experienced only
need apply.
Must have valid
DL. and own
transportation
Please leave
experience history
on msg.
352-533-7536 or
email resume to:
LGS.Florida@gmail.c
om

REFACING
LAMINATOR

Cabinets &
Countertops,Top Pay,
352-503-7188

Roofers/Laborers

All Phases, Tile
(352) 564-1242


STEEL CUTTER /
WELDER

Inter County Recycling
in Lecanto, Fl. is looking
for an experienced Steel
Cutter, with Welding
Experience also.
Full time, Pays $13.50
per hour. Drug Free
Workplace.
E-mail resumes to
Resume 801 @yahoo
.com, No walk-in's or
phone calls

STUCCO
Mechanic Wanted

Crew leader
position
All inquiries
Please call:
(352) 746-5951





APPT. SETTERS
NEEDED

$500. Sign on Bonus.
Great Commission Pay
and weekly bonuses
Call Bob 352-628-3500

MARINA HELP

Part time Hours Vary.
Must be able To
work weekends.
Able To Lift 501bs.
Relate Well With
People. Boat
Experience Req.,
Accepting
Applications At The
Rainbow Rivers Club
20510 The Granada
Dunnellon

MARKETING REP

Calling clients
from established
database. Some
office / clerical
required as well.
Computer exp.
helpful. Personable,
motivated mature.
Salary discussed
at interview.
352-382-0770


NEWSPAPER
CARRIER
WANTED

Newspaper carrier
wanted for early
morning delivery of I
the Citrus County
Chronicle and
other newspapers
for home delivery
customers.
3 to 4 hours per
day.

Must have insured
and reliable
vehicle -
preferable a van
SUV or pick up
with a cap Large
Enough to hold our
Sunday product

Apply in Person
1624 N
Medowcrest Blvd,
Crystal River
Monday to Friday
8am 5pmr

Newspaper
carriers are
independent
contractors, not
employees of the
Citrus County
Chronicle


C- -- i J





AVAILABLE
Pool Supl Store
W/ Service and Repair!
Cash Flowing over a
$100.001! Call Pat
-(813) 230-7177"




ALL STEEL
BUILDINGS








130 MPH
25 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors,
1 Entry door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab.
$13.995. INSTALLED

30 x 30 x 9 (3:12 pitch)
2-9 x 7 Garage Doors

$15.995. INSTALLED

40x40x12 (3:12 pitch)
Roof w/Overhang,
2-10 x 10 Roll-up Doors
1 Entry Door, 2 G-vents
4" Concrete Slab
$27.995 Installed

* A local Fl. Manufact.
* We custom build-
We are the factory
* Meets & exceeds
2010 Fl. wind codes.
* Florida "Stamped"
engineered drawings
* All major credit
cards accepted
METAL Structures, LLC
866-624-9100
Lic # CBC1256991
State Certified
Building Contractor

structuresllc.com


Antique Wooded
Tool Box
Loaded with Machinist
tools $400
352-344-1713
VINTAGE CHINA
CLOSET 1040's
deco type glass door in
front nice cond. wood
$100.00 firm 513 4473



18 IN LARGE KNIFE
stainless steel
20.00 obo linda
341-2271
700 50's & 60's LP's
Record Player & CD
Recorder $350 for all
352-527-6955
1918 JENNY STAMP
Good condition
no marks
50.00 OBO linda
341-2271
RECORDS 3 Boxes of
Collectable 78 Records
$75.00 352-746-5421
SWORD the sword of
the holy grail 44" $100
352 447 4380 after
12PM
SWORD WITH CASE
50.00 obo linda
341-2271



NICE DARK GREEN
MARBLE SPA Needs
motor & frame work.
100.00 firm Linda
341-2271



2 FEDDER WINDOW
A/C UNITS Basically
NEW 5yrs old but only 2
weeks of use. 5k BTU
$75 each 352-634-1882
DISH WASHER GE
white, Energy Star,
good condition. $100.
352 382 0347
KENMORE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIDG
icemaker, ice & water
thru door, bisque you
pick up $200.00
352-746-0401
KENMORE SIDE BY
SIDE REFRIDG
icemaker, ice & water
thru door, bisque you
pick up $200.00
352-746-0401
SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179

SOLD
MAYTAG REFRIG.
w/Ice Maker, Top
Freezer, white, 21cu ft.
Less than 2yrs old.



TYPEWRITER Electric
Pansasonic R200
Typewriter $40.00
352-746-5421




DUDLEY'S






AUCTION
3/3: Antique &
Collectible 1pm Fur-
niture, Estate Jewels,
Sterling, art, coins
& more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.comrn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




12" CHOP SAW
BLADES
12x5/32x20mm arbor 3
metal 1 concrete $30.00
all 352-586-8657
BENCH GRINDER
ashland industrial 5"
bench grinder.
3450rpms.$35.00.
352-527-7840
ROUTER TABLE
STEEL LEGS FIBER-
GLASS TOP ONLY
45.00 464 0316
SHOPSMITH MARK V
is 5 TOOLS IN ONE-
SAW, DRILL PRESS,
DISC SANDER, BOR-
ING MACH, LATHE.
$1000. 352-527-6425
SMALL OLDER AIR
COMPRESSOR
CAMPEL HAUSFIELD
10 GALLON WORKS
OK 50.00 464 0316



2 BOXES OF TAPES 2
Large boxes of Reel to
Reel Tapes Mixed
$50.00 352-746-5421
CD HOLDER
Black Metal 48"H
Holds 80 cd's
$15.00
352-628-4210
SANYO 36" Color TV
with remote
works good
$50.00
352-628-4210
TAPE PLAYER &
RECORDER Ampex
Reel to Reel Player
Recorder $75.00
353-746-5421
VCR/DVD EMERSON
player/recorder
with remote
$25.00
352-628-4210


YAMAHA RECEIVER
GOOD CONDITION
$85 352-613-0529
YAMAHA SPEAKERS
SET OF 5 GOOD
CONDITION $100
352-613-0529




7 Windows 1 Door,
w/ upperslide/ open
window, all bronze in
color $250 obo
(352) 795-9187
LADDER 20 Foot
Extension Ladder
$50.00 352-746-5421




COMPUTER
Dell dimension 3000,
windows XP home,
15" flat screen, key-
board, printer, mouse,
speakers, $125. Com-
puter Desk $35. Both
for $150(352) 382-7074
COMPUTER HP
Windows 98
complete with
all accessories
$75.00 352-628-4210
Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/l MCard
352-637-5469
Wii
Original Wii with extra
numchuk, 2 games, 2
controllers $95 firm
352-205-7973/220-4483




DUDLEY'S






AUCTION

3/3: Antique
& Collectible 1pm
Furniture, Estate
Jewels, Sterling, art,
coins & more
*check website
www.dudleys
auction.corn
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667




2 Sets of heavy duty
lamps
$50.00
352-795-7254
3 pc. brown micro-
fiber couch, hasset &
dbl rocker recliner 10
mos. old. New cond.
$425.
Large coffee Table
$60. (352) 794-3085
4 pc Living Room Set
Tan Floral Pattern
good Cond. $300
352-302-7451
8 pc Oak King
Bedroom Suite, 10'
wall & Pier and two
etagere's, dresser, mir-
ror, chest & armoire, pd
$6000, sacrifice $1500
765-748-4334
48" Round Oak
Pedestal Tble $90
& 6 drawer wooden
desk $50
352-726-5159
5pc Bedroom Set
4 poster queen bed
Light colored wood, very
good cond. $450
352-527-7445
China Hutch 2 pc,
2 doors on hutch,
very good condition
$150; (352) 527-0137


China Hutch
Corner unitlike new
$400,triple dresser
w/mirror 12 draws $275
352-860-2792
COMFORTS OF HOME
USED FURNITURE
comfortsofhomeused
furniture.com.
795-0121
CORNER COMPUTER
DESK W/HUTCH in
great condition, office
quality $100 call
352-257-3870
DAY BED INCLUDING
TRUNDLE BED, WHITE
with decorative metal
frame, like new. $200
352 382 0347
Deacon's Bench
Made from Hatch Cover
of 1900 Sailing Vessel,
Originally sold at Aber-
crombie & Fitch in NYC
$300 352-746-0100
DINETTE SET 5 pcs
Marble Top table
w/glass insert, 4 floral
padded chairs
3 pc. 7ft Wall Unit
,mirror back w/lights,
shelves, 2 side beveled
doors, 3 Glass top ta-
bles, 1 oval coffee table,
2 round end tables.
$500 for all, pls call
(352) 527-9862
Dining Room Set w/4
upholstered chairs,
glass-top table, xtra top
exc. cond. $200 obo
352-527-3382

DUDLEY'S






AUCTION

3/3. Antique
& Collectible 1pm
Furniture, Estate
Jewels, Sterling, art,
coins & more
*check website*
www.dudleys
auction.com
637-9588 10%BP
Au2267 AB1667

Estate Sale
Whole house full of
Furn. and access.
Qu Bed Set $475
Call for appt. to view
352-794-3693
Glass
For Table top
1 3x5 1/4' thick
1 48" round1/2 thick
352-422-2164
GREEN BASSETT
SOFA in great condition
w/ throw pillows $100
call 352-257-3870
Large Armoire, like
new $160.
Rattan and glass
Armoire, 5 shelves
$100
(352) 794-3085
Large Coffee Table
$60.
Heavy Swann Mirror
$80
(352) 794-3085
Leather Couch
Navy Blue, exec. cond.
$125.00, Wht leather
love seat, good condi-
tion $75.00 (SMW)
352-503-7536

LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET
In Original Plastic,
Never Used, Org
$3000, sacrifice $975.
CHERRY BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes
Org. $6000, sacrifice
$1995. Can Deliver.
Bill (813)298-0221.


& BOXSPRINGS
ortho, like new
$100 set, 352-527-9218
LEATHER LIVING
ROOM SET, In Origi-
nal Plastic, Never
Used, Org $3000,
sacrifice $975.
CHERRY, BEDROOM
SET Solid Wood, new
in factory boxes Org.
$6000, sacrifice
$1995. Can Deliver.
Bill (813)298-0221.
Maple Rider Rocker
w/footstool, green
cushions $50
352-795-7254
Mattress Sets Beautiful
Factory Seconds
twin $99.95 full $129.95
qn $159.95, kg $249.95
352-621-4500
MATTRESS WITH BOX
SPRINGS Queen,firm,
non smokers, no pets.
$65 352 382 0347
Motorized Recliner
King size,black vinyl
rocker/recliner, 7 mo
old, $400
(352) 489-6341
OAK COMPUTER
DESK with hutch
58"wide 63"tall can text
picture call or text $100
352-746-0401
Preowned Mattress
Sets from Twin $30;
Full $40.Qn $50; Kg.
$75. 352-628-0808
Rocker Chairs
2 Heavy dark wood
rockers $50.00 pair,
Great cond.
352-201-4522
Sofa/Sleeper
Full size $175,
Broyhill 6ft Leather
couch dk maroo, like
new $500 860-2792
Swivel Barstools
set of 4, padded seats
$200,Cmplete
Bedroom QueenSet,
Serta Pedic Pillowtop,
$200 352-249-3259
TODDLER HEAD-
BOARD Brand New
Metal Headboard, spe
cial, asap. $15
(352)465-1616
TRUNDLE BED
w/ 2 mattress'
$195; double mattress
w/ box spring & frame.
Like new, $175
(352) 586-0493
Twin Hide-A-Bed
brown tweed
exc. cond. $100
765-748-4334
WICKER HEAD
BOARD KING SIZE
good condition, $100.00
5134473
WINE CABINET
WOOD, off white
EUC..Holds 20 bottles
of wine. $45.00
352-249-7212
Winged back Chair
Beige
$40.00
(SMW)
352-503-7536
X-wide cushioned
wicker chair & foot-
stool, 4 pillows, $125
(352) 425-0667



CRAFTSMAN RIDING
MOWER 42" Deck
16HP w/bagger New
Battery, Good Shape
$650, 717-574-1119
Craftsmen Riding
Mower, 42" deck
18% hsp engine
$450 352-746-7357
Roto-Tiller
Troy-Built Pony
rear tine, 5hsp, runs
good $200 firm
352-507-1490


Sudoku ****** 4puz.co





53


9 8 5


3 5 49


2 7


79 3 6


1 ___8 4


63


72 1

Fill in the squares so that each row, column, and
3-by-3 box contain the numbers 1 through 9.



44w Ced/4 withstand

Installations by Brian cC=h253853s.s wiJ

S352-628-7519




Permit And e
I Engineering Fees
\ Up to $200 value .. '

*Siding* Soffit *Fascia *Skirting *Roofovers Carports *Screen Rooms* Decks Windows *Doors *Additions
www.advancedaluminumofcitrus.com


C0O SATURDAY, IV[ARCH 2, 2013


CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED









CITRUS COUNTY (FL)




CAN NA BULBS
2 colors, $1 ea.
352-212-5244

Staghorn Fern
4 ft diameter
excellent condition
$125.00 firm
(352) 489-6212




BEVERLY HILLS
Fri 3/1 and Sat 3/2
8am to 1pm, saws
drills, Lots of Tools!
38 MeadowDale St

CITRUS
SPRINGS, FL
Fri. and Sat. March 1
& 2 from 8:00-3:00.
Lawn furn. lawn
equip., John Deere
riding mower, tools,
teak computer cabinet
and chair, cedar chest
and teak TV cabinet.
8225 N. Duval Drive

CITRUS
SPRINGS, FL
Fri. and Sat. March 1
& 2 from 8:00-3:00.
Lawn furn. lawn
equip., John Deere
riding mower, tools,
teak computer cabinet
and chair, cedar chest
and teak TV cabinet.
8225 N. Duval Drive

CRYSTAL RIVER
Fri & Sat. 7am-4p
9470 W. Greenbay Ln
corner Citrus Ave/495
Crystal River N
Sat. & Sun.9A-5P.M.
Play Station, small
generator, gas
scooter.
5597 Tirana Lane
Off Dunklin
CRYSTAL RIVER
SAT ONLY 9 TO 4
antiques, furn, boating
fishing, hshld, misc..
Apalachee Pt off
State Park

CRYSTAL RIVER
Sat. 8a -2pm, Kings
Bay Self Storage
Over 30 tenants
participating.
Everything from baby
clothes to collectibles.
7957 W Gulf to Lake
HWYI44
352-795-0313

CRYSTAL RIVER
SAT. MAR. 2, 8a-12N
8540 N. Maple Ave.

YARDSALE

FLORAL CITY
12292 S Aster PT
Saturday and Sunday
7am to 3pm
Collectibles, Antiques,
Furniture, Coins,
Gems and much
much more.

FLORAL CITY
Fri, Sat, 8am to ?
Tools, crystal, fine
collectibles, clothes,
Lots of Good Stuff
11593 E Salmon Dr


Leek
FLORAL CITY
Sat. 8am-lpm
Block Sale, S. Shore
Acres Point

FORESTVIEW
ESTATES
Community Wide
Flea Mkt/Craft Sale
960 Suncoast Blvd
Hwy 19, Homosassa
Sat Only. March 2nd
9a to 3o. In Club
House crafts, lunch
& face painting!
Items for sale in
many homes thru-
out the community,
"Look for Signs"t

HOMOSASSA
Fri. & Sat. 8:30a-3pm
3250 S. Calais Terr.
Off 490

HOMOSASSA
RV RESORT
Formally Turtle Crk
RV, SAT. 3/2, 8a-3p,
Many sites within
park are having
Sales, Crafts and
Wide assort of RV
related items.
10200 W Fishbowl Dr.

INVERNESS
Fri, Sat, 8a to 3p
hshld items, desk,
dressers, tables, tools,
stereo, laptop,
bunkbeds, bookshelves,
M/W, Nikon Digital
Camera, GPS, bikes,
guitar, boat, Lg Knapp
(piano box) tool chest
221 South Blvd


CHRONICLE




FLORAL CITY
Yard Sale! 6 FAMILIES
SATURDAY, 9A to 2P
Florence Terrace.

HOMOSASSA
Sat. 2 & Sun. 3 8a-?
NO EARLY BIRDS
3510 S. Lee Way
off Rosedale

INVERNESS
Frl, Sat, 8am to 2pm
4118 E. Sanders St.

INVERNESS
Saturday Only 8a-2p
Tools & household Items
1227 S. ESTATE POINT
INVERNESS
Thurs, Fri, Sat 8 to ?
508 Cabot St.
SAT. Mar 2 ONLY
7:30am-12pm,
No Earlier. Shelving
hshld, clothes & more.
6224 King, Inv. Hghlnds



2 MENS SPORTS
JACKETS SIZE 40R
VARIOUS COLORS
$25ea 352-613-0529
10 PAIR MENS JEANS
SIZE 32 / 5.00 EACH
LINDA 341-2271
BOYS WINTER
CLOTHING SIZES 5 &
6 SHIRTS, PANTS &
JACKETS $25
352-613-0529
CANOUFLAGE PANTS
/ LIKE NEW size 31
waist/ 15.00 obo Linda
341-2271
DEPMETED JEANS/
NEW Size 33 slim /
10.00 linda 341-2271
KIDS PINNED
STRIPPED SUIT size
16 husky/20.00 Linda
341-2271
Men's Durango Boots
111/2 D & Harley
Davidson Boots 91/2D
both pairs $150
352-795-7254
MEANS SUITS SIZES
34X30 & 36X30, $65
EACH 352-613-0529
PURPLE DRESSES
size 12 to 18 I have 6 ,
$60.00 for all. 513-4473



FAX AND COPIER
Panasonic excellent
condition $20
352-628-3418
HP COMPUTER
PRINTER SCANNER
excellent condition $25
352-628-3418



!!!!!225/60 R16!!!!!
Great.tread!! Only ask-
ing $70 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
*****295/40 R20*****
Good tread!! Only
asking $70 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
--~~~225/70 R19.5--~
Beautiful tread!! Only
asking $100 for the pair!
(352)857-9232
4 WHEEL WALKER-
seat, hand brakes,
basket, folds, Ex., $50.
352-628-0033
60 ft white wire closet
shelving & misc hdwr,
3ft to 1Oft lenghts, $30,
3/2HP Lawn Edger.
Needs tune-up. $90
(352) 382-7074
20" GIRLS BIKE
glamour girl
silver/blue,basket &
streamers $30.00
352-794-3020/586-4987
3ft Tall Pilsener
Glass Beer Bottle
Exact replica $100.00
352-628-1723
BENCH GRINDER
ashland industrial 5"
bench grinder.3450
rpm. $35.00.
352-527-7840
BENCH LIGHT
Florescent Bench Light
$10.00 352-746-5421
BICYCLES One 26"
Mens 15 speed $25
Two 20" boys w/helmets
$15. ea. 716/860-6715
BOX OF KIDS BOOKS
large box of books
and misc girls toys
$15.00 for all
352-794-3020/586-4987
Boys Bicycle
Spider man 12"
w/training wheels, good
cond. $30.00
352-613-0529
coleman 2 burnerdual
fuel camping
stove.new.never
used.$60.
FL. JUMBO SHRIMP
15ct @ $5.001b,
Stone Crabs@ $6.001b
Delivered 352-795-0077


ar en=racer,
Wheel Horse, 16hp
Hydrostatic dr, fresh
paint, smokes, $675
OBO. Unique signed
Young Hinkle, wood
desk ,1 drawer w/
chair 46x30 $125
(352) 341-5053
GENERATOR
portable, 5550 watts
8550 starting watts
never used $350
352-795-2399
GERBIL CAGE
$20 352-613-0529
Golf Cart Rear Seat
and frame $150
Riding lawn mower
attachments,
for JD, wheel horse,
craftsman $50
(315) 466-2268
GOODYEAR TIRE
REGATTA P225/60R16
ONLY 35.00 464 0316
Hand Craft Books
and Magazines
$100 for all
(over 300 items)
352-746-5974
Hitch bar w/ ball for
$15
352-341-1649
KIDS 8 + VOLCANO
KIT Smithsonian / 7.00
Linda 341-2271
leaning post with bases,
3 rod holders, clean,
$60.00 obo.
1-352-726-2350
LG OCTANE Venzon
CELL PHONE with case
and power cord
$40.00 call or text
352-746-0401
Lg Recliner/Rocker
brown, exc. cond.
$125obo NOOK
e-reader w/cover, $75
obo 352-527-3874
LIGHT HER FIRE
TAPES & BOOK By
Dr Kreidman NEW
25.00 OBO Linda
341-2271
Love Seat, White Bro-
cade chair, Taupe re-
dcliner, TV Sanyo, Misc.
Baby Items
Under $200 for all
(352) 403-7863
Mattress Trade In Sets
Clean and Very Nice
Fulls $50., Qn. $75.
Kings. $125,621-4500
MEGA BLOKS
DRAGON in box/cd
Havocfire #9693
$30.00
352-628-4210
Mossberg 715T,
22 Long Riffle AR look
alike, 25 round clip
almost new $500.
17HMR Taurus
Revolver 8 shot, super
clean, 400 round
$500. For revolver
must have concealed
weapons permit
(352) 563-0328
MOTORBIKE HELMET
Hardly used, good
condition, $30
(352)465-1616
NEW BATH TUBLIGHT
TAN / 75.00 OBO
LINDA 341-2271
Patio Table &
4 Chairs
$50.
Freezer, small $75.
352 726-8524
PRINT 1901 40x30 THE
ACCOLADE MEDIEVAL
FRAMED $100
352 447 4380
AFTER 12PM
RHEEM HOT WATER
HEATER 30 gal / needs
thermo
50.00 /OBO Linda
341-2271
ROUTER Black &
Decker Router 1 1/2
HP- Brand New $50.00
353-746-5421
SHOWER GLASS
DOORS NEVER USED
50.00/obo Linda
341-2271
SPREADER
SMALL MANUAL
GOOD CONDITION
$20 352-613-0529
TRUCK WINDOW
rear/solid
factory tint
for GMC $50.00
352-628-4210
TY MASTODONS
1/Colosso 2/Giganto
$4.00ea. $10.00 all
exclnt. cond/tagged
352-628-4210
UTILITY SINK
Like new, w/valve
ready to install
$30, 352-503-2959
Wacker GP 5600
Commercial
Generator 120/240V
Low Hrs. $600.
(352) 563-0328
WINDOWS
Wht vinyl, db sliding,
gas filled, (2) 90 x 58
$50.00 Pr. you remove
352-201-1735


2 POWER LIFT
CHAIR RECLINERS
I Med. size $250.
1 Large $325
Both excel., runs great
(352) 270-8475
4 WHEELED WALKER
WITH BRAKES AND
SEAT FOLDS UP
GREAT SHAPE 75.00
464 0316
4" TOILET SEAT
RISER NEW 25.00
464-0316
BEDSIDE COMMODE
& ALUMINUM
WALKER BOTH HAVE
ADJUSTABLE LEGS
20.00 EACH 464 0316
MANUAL WHEEL-
CHAIR WITH FOOT &
leg rests only 100.00
464 0316
TUB RAIL Medline
Bathtub Deluxe
Safety Rail
$30.00
352-628-4210
WALKER 4WHEEL
seat&basket hand brake
good condition
$50.00
352-628-4210




"FAT STRAT" STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS&SOUNDS
GREAT $45
352-601-6625
"FAT STRAT" STYLE
ELECTRIC GUITAR
PLAYS,SOUNDS,LOOKS
GREAT! ONLY $45
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
ELECTRIC GUITAR
BEAUTIFUL! BLACK
W/ABALONE $85
352-601-6625
"NEW" ACOUSTIC
GUITAR PACKAGE
DEAL W/EVERYTHING
YOU NEED, IN BOX
$60 352-601-6625
"NEW" EPIPHONE
ACOUSTIC ELECTRIC
W/AMRGIGBAQTUNER,ST
RAP & MORE $90
352-601-6625
8 STRING MORRELL
LAP STEEL PRO
MODEL W/LIPSTICK
PICKUP ONLY $100
352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR &
MANDOLIN Washburn
D25S w Hd cse &
Manzio pickup. Martini
mndln w sft cse. Both vy
gd cond. $225 obo.
352-341-0890
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
DREDNAUGHT LOOKS
NEW! PLAYS &
SOUNDS GREAT!
$45 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
PERFECT FOR
BEGINNERS PLAYS &
SOUNDS GOOD ONLY
$25 352-601-6625
ACOUSTIC GUITAR
W/GIGBAG &
ACCESSORIES PLAYS
& SOUNDS GREAT!
$50 352-601-6625
DEAN VENDETTA
ELECTRIC GUITAR,
PAULOWANA BODY
PLAYS GREAT $45
352-601-6625
FENDER MINI STRAT
ELECTRIC
GUITAR,BLACK,FOR
KIDS OR TRAVEL $50
352-601-6625
FENDER SQUIRE
AFFINITY PRECISION
BASS W/FREE 30W
AMP&GIGBAG $100
352-601-6625
Forming Country
Band.
(352) 527-1430
KEYBOARD YAMAHA
Model PSS-12
small portable
with adapter
$30.00 352-628-4210
RESOPHONIC
GUITAR(DOBRO)
ROUND NECK BLACK
& CHROME"NEW"
$100 352-601-6625
WASHBURN LYON
ELECTRIC GUITAR
BEAUTIFUL BLACK
FINISH LP STYLE $50
352-601-6625




BAVARIAN CHINA
SERVICE FOR 12+
DINNERWARE w/gold
trim. $200 OBO
(352) 746-3327
BREAD MAKER Good
condition, Breadman,
$15 (352)465-1616
KENMORE SEWING
MACHINE Portable
Free Arm Just Serviced
Sews Great $75.00
352 270 9254


CLASSIFIED



KIRBY CLASSIC
VACUM CLEANER with
many attachments
including rug renovator.
$75 352 382 0347
LAMPS 2 Threeway
Aztec Lamps with
Shades $25.00
352-746-5421
Used Moving Boxes
60 assorted sizes, 3
paks heavy white paper,
6 reg paper, 2 wardrobe
without rod, assorted
com. boxes. $100 cash
352-419-7376
VACUUM CLEANERS
Kenmore 12.0 Amps &
Eureka HZ 60 Quick UP
Uprights $50.00
352-746-5421




Bowflex Extreme
$600. obo
or Trade for hand guns
(352) 249-7221
ELECTRIC TREADMILL
VERY STABLE AND
SMALL ONLY 100.00
464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE (DP)
UPRIGHT TYPE IT
ALSO WORKS THE
ARMS ONLY 75.00
464 0316
EXERCISE BIKE Sears
Pro Form Stationary
Bike, eliptacle arms,
digital pulse monitor $80
352-212-5286
RECUMBANT EXER-
CISE BIKE GREAT
FOR THE BACK &
LEGS ONLY 95.00
464 0316
Treadmill Proform XP,
all electronics, includ-
ing power incline,
cost over $800 New
Asking $195.
(352) 464-0316




5 HP, Outboard,
by Force, with Tank
$395.
Will take Gun on trade
Also Remmington
7600 30-06 Pump, with
scope as new condition
$495. (906) 285-1696
AR 15, SIG Sauer
M400 Enhanced
5.56/223, MagPul
Acc. Sig Case, Iron
Sights & Red DotScope,
w/ammo $2300 Must
Have FL Carry Permit
352-746-6769
Beautiful Compact
Taurus 22 Caliber
New In Box
$400. obo
(352) 795-0088
After 11 am til 7p
BICYCLES Wildwood
Huffy & Iverson Bike
$30.00 352-746-5421
BIKE CARRIER Auto
Bell Delux Bike Carrier
for 2 $30.00
352-746-5421
BROWNING CITORI
Plus,12 gage, trap/skeet
Gun w/leather case
$1200 716-835-8084
CAMPING STOVE
coleman 2 burnerdual
fuel,camping stove.
new. never used.
$60.00. 352-527-7840
CLUB CAR
GOLF CART
Electric w/ charger,
refurbished, new
paint, 4 seater, $2000
(803) 842-3072
CLUB CAR. 2006
w/ Charger, good
tires, almost new bat-
teries, garage kept
$1500 must sell
352-527-3125
CONCEALED
WEAPONS CLASS
EVERY SATURDAY
11 am, $40
132 N. Florida Ave.
(352) 419-4800
Concealed Weapons
Permit Course
DAN'S GUN ROOM
(352) 726-5238
ECLIPSE ELLIPTICAL
space saver exercise
like new, $150
352-422-0311
EZ GO GOLF CART
Electric with charger,
2002,
Very good cond.
$1,500
352-564-2756
FISHING TACKLE
Rods/ Lures/Line
Hooks, Lead Weights
other Misc. Related
Items, $2. and up.
352-257-3288
PAINT BALL GUNS (2)
brass eagle .68 caliber
co2 powered
$45.00
352-794-3020/586-4987


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 CIA


Rawlings and Truline
9 Iron & 2 woods Golf
Clubs $15.00
352-628-1723
Schwinn Bicycle
Ladies Red 26 "
cruiser, Used once.
Asking $95
(352) 341-5053
Two Bikes
male & female
26" 18 spds, both
for $125
352-503-2959




2009 24 x 9 Trailer,
tandem axel, rear ramp,
side door, AC, 200 mi
$2750 (727) 207-1619
2013 ENCLOSED
TRAILERS, 6x12
with ramp, $1895
call 352-527-0555 "
CAR TOW DOLLY
new tires, $700
352-503-6972
ENCLOSED TRAILERS
6 X 10 $1,650
6X12 $1,750
7 x 14, Tandem $2,900
7 X 16 Tandem $3,000
8.5x18, Tandem $3,600
LIMITED QUANTITIES
352-564-1299
TRAILER
Former construction
site trailer, fully
insulated/wired.
28'l/7'h/8'w. Garage
door one end, fr door
other end. $1500 OBO
(352) 603-2761
Utility Trailer
4 x 8 ft, like new,
lots of extra's $500
352-527-3948
UTILITY/BOAT
TRAILER TIRES
4-trailer tires ST-205
175 D14 with galva-
nized rims tires are
about 70% $150.00
352-419-4187




PINK INFANT TO
TODDLER CARSEAT
$30, expires dec 2016
352 634 2122
ROCKING HORSE
Black-colored, rocks by
rubber, ok condition.,
$50 (352)465-1616

SelorS a


Tell that special
person
Hapy Birthday
"with a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492
WANT TO BUY HOUSE
or MOBILE Any Area,
Condition or Situation
Fred, 352-726-9369


Natalie Hill

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"


Specialty: Color,
Foils, Make-overs,
Up-do's, Perms,
Cutting and Styling

Redken Trained


S3-2 LaughingStock International Inc, Dist by Universal UClck for UFS, 2013

"I am stillwaiting for my 18 cents change!"







Thank You for 15 Years ofeVotes"
41H.,tA C


1 / g \/ B t- ri t fES ,LrT '


T WILL AN
CONSTRUCTION CORP
-'\Es 9 8 Aa


C atI I
li.miNia


Robbie Ray

Urban Suburban
Hair Studio
352-637-0777

"From Cutting Edge
to Care Free"

Make-overs,
Color, Foiling,
Precision Cuts,
Avant Garde
hairstyles and
updo's.

Paul Mitchell
Certified.


ANSLEY
Ansley is a very
beautiful and
unique Jack
Russell.Terrier mix.
She is so striking that
she attracts atten-
tion everywhere she
goes. She is 1 y.o.
and weighs 40
pounds. She is very
smart and a quick
learner. Knows basic
commands, is
housebroken, & gets
along with other
dogs. Seems OK
with cats. You
would be blessed to
add her to your
family.
ID # 17387903.
Call Victoria @
352-302-2838.




Your World

Ci I--pNe i




CI I ONCIIE


2 Maltese Puppies
Left, 1 female $650.
1 Male $600, CKC reg.
will have Fl. Health
Cert.. Call to come
play with them,
(352) 212-4504
or (352) 212-1258





.~. t





BUD
Striking! This is how
we describe Bud,
a very beautiful,
sweet, 2-y.o. black
& white American
Bulldog/Terrier mix.
Has beautiful eyes,
one blue & one
brown. Loves peo-
ple & other dogs,
has medium energy
level, settles down
nicely after exercise.
Walks well on a
leash & sits for treats.
Weighs 55 lbs.
Heartworm-negative. This
funbving boy
would make a
good family pet.
I D#: 17461796.
Visit or call Citrus
County Animal Shel-
ter @352-746-8400.


DOG Australian
Shepherd/Terrier Mix.
Great watch dog.
Needs either a farm or
fenced yard.
352 419 7428








Goofy & Midget, These
playful Pekinese cuddlers
get along famously, can be
adopted separately or as
father/son pair. Both are
neutered, mirco-chipped,
UTD on shots. They are
fostered in a cage free
home, are house trained &
they have been socialized
with other dogs and cats.
We do home & vet checks.
Call 352-419-0223 or visit
savingangelspetrescue.comn
to see more pets looking
for their forever homes.


Fish Tanks,
and stands,
352-447-1244











NICKY
Nicky is a beautiful
black lab/bulldog
mix male, a big,
sweet and loveable
guy. He is 2 y.o. and
is very intelligent, will
sit for treats. He
weighs about 75
pounds and is a
very strong dog,
needing a strong
handler. Would be
a good watchdog.
He is a good
hearted dog who
gets along well with
other dogs. As he is
very active, a
fenced yard is
recommended.
Call 352-746-8400

Shih-Tzu Pups, Males
Starting@ $400.
Registered
Lots of colors, Beverly
Hills, FL (352)270-8827
www.aceofpups.ne


Oparle, n rmngway
(polydactyl) (extra toes)
This young female kitten
sparkles with playfulness
& affection. INDOOR
ONLY. Spayed, UTD,
litter trained. We do home
& vet checks. Call
352419-0223wwwsavingmgel-
spetriscue comto see
more pets looking for
homes





FOR RENT
BARN & PASTURE
Approx. 10 acres
room for 2-4 horses
Lighted, security.
Water furnished
off Citrus Ave/ 495
(352) 628-0508

LIQUIDATION SALE
Horses & tack, new &
used. 352-873-6033


Dfr IM- ry04 m


SMITTYS APPLIANCE
REPAIR. Also wanted
dead or alive washers
& dryers. FREE
pick up 352-564-8179



Adult Family Care
Home Alzheimer
Dementia Incontinency
(SL 6906450) 503-7052
CNA, Seeking in home
position, female w/
refs. Inverness Area
desired 352-201-2120
HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199
0 Need Help!
Certified CNA avail for
priv duty in-home Health
Care. (352) 453-7255


SHADY VIEW
CANVAS
Awnings *Carports
*Boat Tops & Covers
upholst 352 613-2518





JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374

THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




Diestler Computer
New & Used systems
repairs. Visa/ MCard
352-637-5469




BIANCHI CONCRETE
INC.COM ins/lic #2579
Driveways-Patos-Sidewlk.
Pool deck repair
/stain. 352-257-0078

FATHER & SON
Decorative Concrete
Textures, Stamp,Spray
Crack repair, Staining,
driveways, pool decks,
Lic/Ins 352-527-1097

ROB'S MASONRY &
CONCRETE Driveways
tear outs, tractor work,
Lic. #1476, 726-6554


AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Land clearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
Lic/Ins 352-795-5755




HELPING HANDS
Transport, shopping Dr.
appts errands etc Hablo
Espanol 813-601-8199




COUNTY WIDE
DRY-WALL25 yrs exp.
lic.2875, all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn
Removal 352-302-6838




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic.#5863 352-746-3777
DUN-RITE ELECTRIC
Since '78/ Free Est.
lic EC 13002699
352- 726-2907




**BOB BROWN'S**
Fence & Landscaping
352-795-0188/220-3194
A 5 STAR COMPANY
GO OWENS FENCING
ALL TYPES. Free Est.
Comm/Res. 628-4002
ROCKY'S FENCING
FREE Est., Lic. & Insured
** 352 422-7279 ***


DRY OAK FIREWOOD
SPLIT, 4 X 8 STACK
$80 Delivered &
Stacked. 352-344-2696




Install, restretch, repair
Clean, Sales, Vinyl
Carpet, Laminent, Lic.
#4857 Mitch, 201-2245




#1 A+TECHNOLOGIES
All Home Repairs.
All TV's Installed
lic#5863 352-746-3777

ANDREW JOEHL
HANDYMAN.
Gen. Maint/Repairs
Pressure Cleaning.
0256271 352-465-9201

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
V RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *

Affordable Handyman
V*FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
I RELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *
Affordable Handyman
V FAST 100% Guar.
V AFFORDABLE
VeRELIABLE* Free Est
352-257-9508 *


* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
HONEY DO'S your
Honey's Don't Do!
Lic.& Ins., Comm/Res.
Jimmy 352-212-9067




**K&K Cleaningt*
**Good Ratest"
Residential, Free Est.
Kevin 352-364-6185
Marcia's Best Clean
Experienced Expert
lic+ref, Free Estimates
**call 352-560-7609**
NATURE COAST
CLEANING Res.
Rate $20 hr. No Time
Wasted! 352-564-3947
THE KLEEN TEAM
Residential/Comm.
Lic., Bonded, Insured
(352) 419-6557




All Tractor & Tree Work
Household, Equipment
& Machinery Moving
(352) 302-6955
AIIAROUND TRACTOR
Landclearing, Hauling
Site Prep, Driveways
LiclIns 352-795-5755




#1 Professional Leaf
vac system why rake?
wr FULL Lawn Service
Free Est 352-344-9273


BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
Helpin Hand Grass Man
Cut-Clean-Mulch-Edae
FREE ESTIMATES!
Russell 352-637-1363
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




AT YOUR HOME
Mower and small en-
gine It's Tune Up time.
352-220-4244




A-1 Hauling, Cleanups,
garage clean outs,
trash, furniture & misc.
Mark (352) 287-0767
ALL OF CITRUS
Clean Ups, Clean Outs
Everything from A to Z
352-628-6790
JEFF'S
Cleanup/Hauling
Clean outs/Dump Runs
Lawns/Brush Removal
Lic. (352) 584-5374
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570




30 yrs. Experience!
Int/Ext. Comm/Res.
Lic/Ins. Jimmy
"352-212-9067"*


CHRIS SATCHELL
PAINTING ASAP
30 yrs. Exp., Excel. Ref.
Insured 352-464-1397
CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR
& ODD JOBS. 30 yrs
J. Hupchick Lic./Ins.
(352) 726-9998




CALL STELLAR BLUE
All Int./ Ext. Painting
Needs. Lic. & Ins. FREE
EST (352) 586-2996
BEAT ANY PRICE
Paint & Power Wash
Lawn & Trees Trim
Jim (352) 246-2585
* HANDYMAN DAVE*
Pressure Wash homes
& drive-ways, Hauling,
Odd Jobs 352-726-9570
PIC PICARD'S
PRESSURE
CLEANING& PAINTING
352-341-3300




All phases of Tile |
Handicap Showers,
Safety Bars, Firs.
422-2019 Lic. #2713




MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.


Attention Consum-
ers!
Please make sure you
are using a licensed
and insured service
professional. Many
service advertisers
are required by state
law to include their
state
license number in all
advertisements. If
you don't see a li-
cense number in the
ad, you should inquire
about it and be suspi-
cious that you may be
contacting an unli-
censed
business. The Citrus
County Chronicle
wants to ensure that
our ads meet the re-
quirements of the law.
Beware of any service
advertiser that can not
provide proof that
they are licensed to do
business. For ques-
tions about business
licensing, please call
your city or county
government offices.
COUNTY WIDE
DRY- WALL 25 ys exp
lic2875,all your drywall
needs Ceiling & Wall
Repairs. Pop Corn Re-
moval 352-302-6838



A TREE SURGEON
Lic. & Ins. Lowest
Rates Free est.
(352)860-1452
All Tractor & Tree Work
Land Cleared, Hauling
1 time Cleanup, Drive-
ways (352) 302-6955


Davies Tree Service
Serving Area 15yrs.
Free Est. Lic & Ins
cell 727-239-5125
local 352-344-5932

DOUBLE J
Tree Service
Stump Grinding, bulk
mulch, lic/ins 302-8852
KING's LAND CLEAR-
ING & TREE SERVICE
Complete tree & stump
removal hauling, demo
& tractor work. 32 yrs.
exp. (352) 220-9819
LAWNCARE N MORE
Leaves, bushes, beds,
cleanup, hauling.
treework 352-726-9570
R WRIGHT TREE Service
Tree Removal &
Trimming. Ins. & Lic.#
0256879 352-341-6827

REAL TREE
SERVICE
(352) 220-7418
**Tax Specials"
RON ROBBINS Tree
Service Trim, Shape &
Remve, Li/dlns. Free
est. 352-628-2825




344-2556, Richard
Water Pump Service
& Repairs- all makes &
models. Call anytime!




ESTATE SALES
Pricing to Final Check
We Ease Stress! 352-
344-0333 or 422-2316









C12 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


IIIIIIII
Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
w a classi-
fied ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo
Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966





BRING YOUR
FISHING POLE!







INVERNESS, FL
55+ park on lake w/5
piers, clubhouse and
much more! Rent
includes grass cutting
and your water
S1 Bedroom, 1 bath
@$350 inc. H20
Pets considered and
section 8 accepted.
Call 352-476-4964
For Details!
HERNANDO
2/2 $450. mo. 1st last
+dep 352-201-2428
LECANTO 2/2
S/W, $450 Furn.
352-746-7595
OLD HOMOSASSA
2 bedroom. 1-1/2 bath.
$475/mo $400 dep pool
and clubhouse
3526284441




must sell!
2006 FLEETWOOD
ENTERTAINER. 32X66.
OWNER MUST SELL!
CALL (352) 795-1272

must sell!
4401 N SUNCOAST
BLVD LOT 19
bedroom 1 Bath Mobile
Home in Thunder Bird
Mobile home Park.
With Wheel Chair
Ramp, Covered Car-
port, Covered screen
Porch.Nice Home in
Quiet Community,
Centrally Located close
to Mall.Comes Partially
Furnished,With all
Appliances.Lot Rent
$235.OOPark Rules, 55
or Older, no Pets bigger
than 20 pounds.
Senous Buyers Only
ASKING $9100.00 OR
BEST OFFER
Toll free
1-877-351-8555 or
352-897-6766
43,900. 3/2,Dblewide.
Delivered & set up,
New Jacobsen. The
only home with a 5 yr.
warr. only $500 down
and $293.40/ mo.
P&l W.A.C. Must See
352-621-3807
2/1, DW, H/A, 12x20
glass porch Co. water
& sewer, paved rd.
No HOA $49,995 firm
$15,000 down, own fi-
nan. (352) 567-2031

V THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Single Wide
12years YOUNG.
14X66. Trade in.
WILL GO FAST!
$14,900 YOUR BABY
$19,900 Incis Delv,
Set, New A/C, skirt &
steps, Must See!
NO HIDDEN FEES.
CALL (352) 795-1272

THIS OUT!
2br 2ba Repo
2000 Fleetwood
SW 14 x 72 / $20K
Incis Delv, Set, A/C &
heat, skirt & steps
(NO HIDDEN FEES)
CALL (352) 795-1272
BIG
USED HOMES
32x80 H.O.M. $50,900
28x76 H.O.M. $43,500
28x70 ScotBilt $42,500
40x42 Palm Har. $65k
28X70 Live oak $52,500
We Sell Homes for
Hnder $10,000 Call &
View (352) 621-9183


I Livestoc


HERNANDO
3-2 Mobile
FHA Financing
$2500 Down
Town of Hernando
1.5 Acres
Call 1-727-967-4230
Homosassa
Dbl. Wide 3/2 95%
remodeled inside, 1.25
acres half-fenced, recent
roofing & siding, 16x16
workshop,must-see!
$69,900 (352) 621-0192
INVERNESS
2b/2'%2 ba, / acre
off Turner Camp Rd
a/c, heat pump 3yrs.
old, 30ft scn porch &
48'open porch on other
side, new septic, 18'x31'
building w/ 220 electric,
shed, fenced, on canal
$68,000 352-726-1791
INVERNESS
55+ Park 14 x 58,
2/11/2, furniture,
appliances, shed,
scrn. porch, $8,500.
(352) 419-5133





NEW !! 2011 Lot Model
Dealer must sell
30 x 76 (4/2) $69,900
NO HIDDEN FEES
Price incis: delv, set,
skirting, steps,
a/c/heat,upgraded
appliances,
furniture/decor, fo L.R.
& F.R. & kitchen
(NO HIDDEN FEES!!)
MUST SELL
CALL (352) 795-1272

NEW 3/2
JACOBSEN HOME
5Yr. Warranty $2,650
down, only $297.44/
mo., Fixed rate
W.A.C. Come and
View 352-621-9181




NO CREDIT
NO PROBLEM
(Everyone Financed
with 10K-40O% down
Private Financing Avail.
Call(352) 795-1272



WE WILL
BUY YOUR
MANUFACTURED
Home. from 1976-2013
CALL (352) 795-2377




For Salel"o.
FLORAL CITY
Exceptionally Nice
3/2 on Beautiful 1%AC,
treed lot, garage, shed,
dock, Ideal for Fishing/
Airboats $95,900
716-523-8730




CRYSTAL RIVER
Large 4br 2ba Foreclo-
sure
Great Condition
NEW ROOF
4Owner Fin. Avail. -
CALL (352) 795-2377
FLORAL CITY
By Owner, 14x 60 2/2
Split Plan w/dbl roof
over, w/ porch & carport
on fenced 1 acre, Very
Nice Quiet, Considering
ALL reasonable Cash
offers. 352-586-9498

HOME-ON-LAND
Only $59,900, 3/2
"like new" on 2 acre.
Tape-n-texture walls,
new carpet & appli-
ances, AC & heat!
Warranty, $2,350
dwon, $319.22/mo
P&I, W.A.C. Owner
can finance. Call
352-621-9182
Homosassa
3/2 owner Fin. Compl.
Remodeled, fenced
back yard, 1800+ sq. ft.
$5,000down $525mth
352-302-9217
Owner Finance/Lease
Opt. 2/2, 1978, SW MH,
14 x 20 block building,
New Septic, Handy
person, $28,900./Offer
352-422-1916




CRYSTAL RIVER
VILLAGE
*Winter Soecials *
2/2, $15,000. Furn.
2/2 New Model $59K
352-795-7161 or
352-586-4882


FLORAL CITY
DW, 2/2/2 carport
Screen room, shed,
all you need is a tooth-
brush to move in
$17,500. Lot Rent $183.
352-344-2420
HOMOSASSA'S
Best Housing Value
Modern homes from
$8,400 or Lease to Own
from $179/mo.
$1000.down + Lot rent at
Evanridge Community
an exceptional 55+-Park
352 628-5977
INVERNESS 55+
1/1 Fully Furnished,
Everything stays, Like
new furn., Washer/Dryer
2 sheds, Flat Scrn. TV's
$7,000. (708) 308-3138
LECANTO 55+ PK
1988 Oaks 3/2 DWMH,
40x20, shed, handicap
access. ramp and
shower $25,000.
352-212-6804
Sandy Oak 55+ RV PK
14x60 split 2/2, new
heat/ac, remodeled,
furn. Ig scnd in FL Rm.
55 ft crpt w/laundry
room, 989-858-0879
STONEBROOK, CR
Pondview/Gourmet
Kitch, 2Br, MSuite,
$51,900, Cridland RE,
Jackie 352-634-6340





ACTION t


352-795-7368
ww.(Citrus~ountyHomeRentals.com
HOMOSASSA
41 Birhree St........................5800
2/2/2 SMW,spacious rooms, anai
2278 Sandhurg Pt....................$500
2/1 duplex, incl. lawncare
HERNANDO
5164 Dewey Way ......... $775
3/2 DW newer mobile on 1/2ACRl i
6315 N. ShorewoodDr............$625
2/1,Floridnroorn
CRYSTAL RIVER
10350 Deepwoods .. ..... $5750
2/2/1 Close to mall, utity room nid shed
11280 ayshoreDr.............. 1,000
2/2 Furnished on canal, comm. pool
8520 N. ShannonAve...........$51,300
2/2/2 Newer home, nice neighborhood
CITRUS SPRINGS
9047 TraisDr........................$625
2/2 Duplex, newer home




At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio Apt.
$650. All Util. Included
(352) 422-1933
CRYSTAL RIVER
2/BR $550. 3BR $750
Near Town 563-9857
CRYSTAL RIVER
Fully furn. efficiency
w/ equipped kitchen.
All utilities, cable,
Internet, & cleaning
provided. $699/mo
352-586-1813
FLORAL CITY
LAKEFRONT 1 Bedrm.
AC, Clean, No Pets
(352) 344-1025
Inverness
2/1 on private estate, no
smoking,$650 monthly
Utilities included 1st,
last, sec. Req.
352-422-2393
Inverness South
Sm. Cottage furnished
all utilities included
$450 mo352-560-0370,
727-916-1119 Cell
N. CRYSTAL RIVER
800sq, ft. 1 Bdr
12mi. north of Seven
Rivers Hospital, w/d
Direct TV, non-smoker
(horse-stall available)
$650mo. 352-586-9598




ALEXANDER
REAL ESTATE
(352) 795-6633
Crystal River
Aps, 2 BRI 1 BA
$400-$500, ALSO
HOMES & MOBILES
AVAILABLE
CRYSTAL RIVER 1/1
Handicap Ramp, Small
Pet OK. (352) 628-2815
NICE
APARTMENTS
2 Bed / 1 Bath
& 2 Bed / 2 Bath
Furnished &
Unfurnished
Close to Progress
Energy & the
Hospital
1st and Secunty from
$575/month
Call 352-795-1795
for Appt.
www.ensing
properties.corn


At SM WOODS
Great Furn. Studio Apt.
$650. All Util. Included
(352) 422-1933
HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352) 726-2225



Beverly Hills
3/1 Carport and
A/C $550
352-422-2433
Beverly Hills Rental
1/1 with carport, $500
monthly and $500 Se-
curity deposit.
352-249-6098
BLACK DIAMOND
Homes for rent from
$1,100/mo. Bob
Coldwell Banker
634-4286
CITRUS COUNTY
Beautiful 3-4 Bedrm
Homes & Duplexes
w/1 car garage.
Starting@$433/mo
Inverness
352-726-3476
Lecanto
352-746-0373
Crystal River
352-563-0890






DUNNELLON
Rainbow Springs
Rent/Rent To own
Georgous, 2/2/2
Country Club Home
Fireplace, D Washer
Carpeted, lanai,
spotless 1/2 acre
quiet. Special $799.
352-527-0493
Floral City
immaculate 2/1
1 or 2 established adults
no pets or smokers
$550mo + deposit
352-860-1887
HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over fcAC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084
Hernando
Rentals
from $425.00 0 MO.
Call A.W.
'Skip' Craven
352-464-1515


LECANTO
Nice 1 Bdrm $500
352-216-0012/613-6000



CRYSTAL RIVER
** NICE** Secret
Harbour Apts. Newly
remodeled
2/1 starting @ $575
unfurn/furn. Incl Water,
garbage, W/D hook-up.
352-586-4037



CRYSTAL RIVER
Hwy 19 Downtown
Comm. Storefront, very
clean 1000 SF,exc. loc.
$795/mo 352-634-2528



HERNANDO
4 BR, 2 BA, Playroom &
office, fenc. yard, on
over ihAC, or Comm.
Office on Hwy 200
$875 + Sec. 344-3084
HERNANDO
APROX. 1100 SQ FT
OFFICE ON OVER 1/2
ACRE ON HWY 200
$625 mo.352-344-3084
LECANTO
Oak Tree Plaza,
Office/Retail, CR 486,
900 sf. @ $700+ util. &
sales tax. 1 mo. Free
w/12 mo. Lease
352-258-6801



HOMOSASSA
RIVERFRONT, 2/2/1,
Dock & Pool, H20 Incl
$900. mo. + $900. sec.
No pets 407-415-0622
www.moverightin.com
INVERNESS
Whispering Pines Villa
3/2/2 w/ enclosed patio,
$850 F/L/S, BK/CK req
321-303-0346
Meadowcrest CR
3bd/2ba Villa,
$900 mnth.unfurn.
$1000 month. furn.
352-563-1106

Eficin- l


CRYSTAL RIVER
Spacy/Private, Must
love big dogs. $750.
(352) 422-5735
CRYSTAL RIVER
Waterfront Pnriv.
Rm./Ba. share kit. $400
everything Included
352-875-5998
INVERNESS
$110wkly ncl. all, +
meals ,tv, Lk side,
no smoking/drinking,
background check
352-257-5795



CRYSTAL RIVER
Office & Warehouse
$300-$600, Plantation
Rentals 352-634-0129



Non-Smoking Male
w/2 indoor cats,2 out-
door dogs, Ref. Avail.
352-697-9646




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE:
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to Fair Hous-
ing Act which makes
it illegal to advertise
"any
preference, limita-
tion or discrimination
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status
or national origin, or
an intention, to make
such preference,
limitation or dis-
crimination. Famil-
ial status includes
children under the
age of 18 living with
parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant
women and people
securing
custody of children
under 18. This news-
paper will not know-
ingly accept any ad-
vertising for real es-
tate which is in viola-
tion of the law.
Our readers are
hereby
informed that all
dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD
toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free telephone
number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.




OPPORTUNITY


CITRus COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


CLASSIFIED




Water Incl. CHA $496.
220-2447 or 212-2051
Homosassa
Springs 3/2 ,c/h/a
$795/mo, + 850
sec.(352) 628-3696
INVERNESS
121 N. Seminole Ave.,
Downtown, CBD.
Charming 1600 + sq.
ft., 2BR, 2 n/BA CB
home. Zoned Com-
mercial, w/ formal
dining room, Ig. mast.
bdrm, utility, & solar-
ium, w/ appliances.
$800/ 1st, last, w/sec
dep. & ref. Available
Monday March 4,
726-3153, leave mesg
INVERNESS
bd/l ba Cottage
w/laundry facilities
$350m. (352) 212-3385
INVERNESS
Country Living on
Large 2 acre lot. 3 bd.,
2 ba. home. Garden
and fenced areas. Well
& septic, so no water
bill! $595. 352-476-4964
INVERNESS
Large furn. 1 BR home
in 55+ community,
Great location just off
the water. Bring boat &
fishing gear. $550
(352) 344-1380
Sugarmill Woods
2006,4/2/2, appl. inc.
$900, 319-371-9843
SUGARMILL
WOODS 4/2/2
1/3ac. $1100. mo.
727-919-0797



HERNANDO
Affordable Rentals
Watson's Fish Camp
(352)726-2225

RoIomsb' -
For entII^


"LET US FIND
YOU
A VIEW TO
LOVE"
WWW.
crosslandrealty.com
(352) 726-6644
Crossland Realty Inc.





HERNANDO
Building Off Hwy 200,
$800.mo 352-201-2428




4/3+/4 pool home w/
inlaw suite on 2'/ ac.
HW firs, granite cntrs.
2009 Custom Home
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE

PINE RIDGE
THIS IS THE
PROPERTY YOU'VE
BEEN LOOKING FOR!
Bring your boat, horses,
in-laws; there is room
for everything! 4/3 1
w/7 car
garage/workshop &
in-law suite on 5.83 ac-
res.
Mostly wooded w/large
backyard. Beautiful &
serene. High end
finishes; immaculate
home in equestrian
community.
www.centralflestate.com
for pictures/more info.
352-249-9164




Beverly Hills
2/1 family room and
carport, investment or
seasonal living $38,900
352-422-2433

HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2/1/1 needs paint &
cosmetics $23k
**cash only **
352-503-3245




Custom Home,
3 bedroom, 21/ bath,
w/Master w/DBL
walk-ins + bath +
den/off. 2+ car garage.
1 Acre. MUST SEE!
$249,900.
352-860-0444




Beautiful Whispering
Pines Villa $79,900
Managed, low Maint.
fee indowed for sudden
expenses, walk to park
352-341-0170
352-726-5263


20 DOCKABLE
ACRES: St. Lucie
Waterway. $189,500.
45mins boat Atlantic;
5mins boat Lake
Okeechobee.
Beautiful land,
abundant wildlife.
Gated/Privacy.
888-716-2259 Gulf
Atlantic Land, Broker.


Specializing in
Acreage,Farms
Ranches &
Commercial






A

Richard (Rick)
Couch, Broker
Couch Realty &
Investments, Inc.
(352) 212-3559
RCOUCH.com

TERRA VISTA GOLF
COURSE LOT on Red
Sox Path. Great vistas.
85 ft. frontage on golf
course $58,500. Call
352-638-0905

UNIQUE & HISTORIC
Homes, Commercial
Waterfront & Land
"Small Town
Country Lifestyle
OUR SPECIALTY
SINCE 1989"


FSBO 3/2/2 Scrn Porch,
metal roof, apples, CHA,
fans, verticals, shed,
fence, deck, spklrs, near
dog park. $120,000
(352) 586-0872

INVERNESS
Block home 2br, 1hba
w/ porches, oversized
gar. 1 cpt. on 1 + acres.
$110,000 Call Buzz
352-341-0224 or
Mary(607) 657-8379

NICE HOUSE on
Nice Street $69,000
2/1/1, Attached
carport w/ 12 x 32
scrn. por., built in '95
on 1/2 acre lot fenced
12 x14 matching out
building, New roof,
stucco paint, flooring,
upper line apple's,
irrigation & water
system.,
taxes & ins. $1,135 yr
606-425-7832




3BD, 2BA, 2Gar,
Gas fireplace, on
Water, Main Canal,
dock large lot with
fruit trees. $138,000
(321) 303-2875




3BR 2BA 1,500 sq. ft.,
6823 W. Merrivale Ln
Built 2006, Fully
Furnished, by Owner,
$77,000 obo
(260) 348-9667




4/2 BLOCK HOME,
mother in law apt,
nice home
$65,000.
(305) 619-0282, Cell


4/3/2, POOL HOME
3,000 sf, granite coun-
ters, SS appl's., wood
firs., Reduced $25,000
Asking $235,000
850-585-4026


Buying or Selling
REAL ESTATE,
Let Me Work
For You!

BETTY HUNT
REALTOR

ERA KEY 1
Realty, Inc.
352 586-0139
hunt4houses68
@yahoo.com
www.bettyhunts
homes.com.


Condo for Sale
Sugarmill Woods
2/2, 1,850 sq. ft.,
35 Beech Street
607-287-0473

Custom Built 3/2/2
Pool Home on 1.26
acres on Golf Course
2339 sq.ft. living area
3366 sq.ft. under roof
Many xtras, price
reduced. 352-382-1531

Golf Course Home
3/2/2/2. Update
throughout. Heated
pool; Many extra's.
By appointment
(352) 382-2475


I 'If





Phyllis
Strickland
Realtor
Best Time To Buy!
I have Owner
Financing
and Foreclosures
TROPIC SHORES
REALTY.
(352) 613-3503


GAIL STEARNS
your "Gale Force"
Realtor

TROPIC SHORES
Realty
352-422-4298
gail@citrusrealtor
.corn
www.citrusrealtor
.com
Low overhead
means
savings for you!
Waterfront,
Foreclosures &
Owner financing
available.


CAROLE LISTER
iii Multi-Million Dollar Realtor
Cell: 422-4620 ..E
Office: 382-1700


1 SHORTLEAF CT. 10 NORFOLK LANE W
- 3/2/2/3 -2825 sq. ft. living -3/2/3 -Heated pool
*Den + Family room -Golf course lot Family room Gas fireplace
SPool + summer kit *Island kitchen Deep estate lot Breakfast bar
| New Carpet *New tile -Wood, tile, carpet *Pavered drive
SNew interior paint $265,000 #355999 $249,900


20__00171 200017'SEAPRO
175 FIS
90 HP Mercury -Trolling Motor
Galvanized Trailer
w/New Bearings/Tires

THREE RIVERS MARINE CALLTODAY S0,995
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510



CALL FOR DETAILS

~563-3206





As lowAs $18 per ad



2007 DODGE RAM 1500
B LARAMIE CREW-CAB
Leather, Fully Loaded, Only
51,000 Miles
Call for Your Appt. Now!

CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO (352)5


17 FT. HURRICANE
FD170GS DECKBOAT
SYamaha C90TLRZ- Bimini Top GPS
Galvanized Trailer
SWas $S,995 NOW 7,995

THREE RIVERS MARINE
1038 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 563-5510


2012Xcursion121C
Pontoon Boat

P n o n -*25" Pontoons- Full Cover

Reainng $22,995
2012Price KK.p995
CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597



a- YOUR NEW HOME FOR
vi m PRE-OWNED TRUCKS
-o,- All Makes and Models!
mo ..... Come check us out today!
Call for Your Appt. Now!

CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO 1


2013 NAUTIC STAR
203 DECK BOAT
- Yamaha F115 Four Stroke Front/Rear Swim Ladders
Full Cover Aluminum
CALL FOR DETAILS I


CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River


795-2597


2005 G31860 TUNNEL
.. Yamaha 707TLRA oil injected
Flip back cooler seat
Built-in fuel tank Manual jack plate
"H REDUCED TO $10,500

CRYSTAL RIVER MARINE
990 N. Suncoast Blvd., Crystal River 795-2597


2005 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 XTRA CAB V-8
Clean, Loaded and
Only 55,000 Miles
Call for Your Appt. Now!


V..


CITRUS CYCLE CENTER (352) 527-0129
1581 W. GULF TO LAKE HWY., LECANTO 1


RealDEstaBLe
ForES:at.luce


WORDY GUARD BY TRICKY RICKY KANE
1. Ailing President Clinton (1) Every answer isa rhyming
pair of words (like FAT CAT
and DOUBLE TROUBLE), and
2. Barely nick blue birds (1) they will fit in the letter
squares. The number after the
definition tells you how many
3. Good-with-tools tennis ace Murray (2) syllables in each word.
@ 2013UFS, Dist. byUniv.Uclick for UFS
4. Noontime meal inkling (1)


5. Somewhat seasick Disney dwarf (2)


6. Increases tiny stones by threefold (2)


7. Snuck-aboard plane rider's disposables (3)


SAYVAMOIHI SAYMVAAOS 'L S'TiL H d S aIHS1IM '9 AZH3NS ASV 31b '9
HJNflH HONIlT' AIKNV A(IKVH'T SAXVP ZVH9'g TIiI TTI 1
3-2-13 SIAmSNV


! :J ; dI iIi;dI:l-









CITRUS COUNTY (FL)


MICHELE
ROSE
Realtor

Simply put
I 'II work harder
352-212-5097
isellcitruscounty@
yahoo.com
Craven Realty, Inc.
352-726-1515










SANDI

HART
Realtor

Listing and Selling
Real Estate
Is my Business
I put my heart into it!

352-476-9649
sandra.hart@
era.com

ERA American
Realty
352-726-5855



#1Employmentsource i







Iww chronlcleonllne cor


I NEED
LISTINGS!
I SOLD ALMOST
2-HOMES A MONTH
IN 2012
Let's BREAK that
record together!








DEB INFANTINE
Realtor
(352) 302-8046
Real Estate!...
it's what I do.

ERA American
Realty
Phone: 352-726-5855
Cell: 352-302-8046
Fax: 352-726-7386
Email:debinfantine@
yahoo.com


Office Open
7 Days a Week

LISA
VANDEBOE
Broker (R) Owner
Plantation Realty
352-634-0129
www.plantation
realtylistings.com

YOUR
"High-Tech"
Water Front
Realtor


SCAN OR GO
TO www.
BestNau-reCoast
Properties.com
"To view
great waterfront
properties"


CHRONICLE


IHome
3/2 pool home on 10
acres w/ FP, zoned
agriculture, walk to all
schools. $179,900
(727) 528-2803 or
727-698-0723




Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1 BR/1 BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime
HOME FOR SALE
NORTON, VA
5Bd/2%Ba inc. 3 lots
70miles from Bristol
Racetrack $69,000
276-393-0446 OR
276-679-1331




"FREE
Foreclosure and
Short Sale Lists


2BD 1%BA 2 Carport
on Lake Rousseau
Dunnellon 1.4 AC,
168 ft on lake, No flood
insurance completely
remodedled, Price
Reduced$169.000
Barney Chilton
352-563-0116
Gulf Prvt Island home
on 15 ac 80' dock. 4/2
All until. Mainland dock
& pkg. Jacuzzi house
S. McDermott (352)
697-1593 Cridland RE
INVERNESS
3/2/2 waterfront pool hm
on Lisa Ct, 1/2 acre lot
quiet St, whole house
generator $229,000
352-419-8337




CRYSTAL RIVER
3 Beautiful wooded acre
lots, high & dry, live
oaks, neighbors adj,
$7500ea Crystal Manor
229-377-9697




WINDSHIELD
Citabria, brand new
PMA part, $150 obo
352-419-6086




Ele. Trolling Motor
$75.00
352-527-3948




2 8ft Kayak Calypso's
with 2 paddles,
& 2 life jackets,
Like New
$250 obo for Both
(352) 364-7057




** BUY, SELLtt
& TRADE CLEAN
USED BOATS
THREE RIVERS
MARINE
US 19 Crystal River
*"352-563-5510"-

03 SEAPRO
17' 90 hp merc. vhf,
gps, trol mtr, fullcover,
bimini, alum trlr $7200
352-419-5363pm
3 16' CANOES
2, 2 Seaters, 1, 3 Seater
on galvanized trailer
w/paddles & lifejackets
$1200 352-795-7335











/J 17 ;SiEW W .1


18HP, Evinrude
short shaft, manual,
good condition.
$460.
Crystal River
(513) 260-6410
ALUMICRAFT
18 ft.,wide rhino lined
inside, 25HP Merc.,
boat mtr. & trailer in
great shape $3,700
(352) 563-0328
MONTEREY
07, 180 Bowrider
38hrs,mint,135hp.volvo
factory loaded, alum. trlr
orig. owner $14k obo
352-419-6086
PENN YAN
1979 27' Sports fisher-
man w/ trailer, needs
some work. $4000
OBO (352) 621-0192
TRI PONTOON
BOAT
27 Ft., Fiberglass
250 HP, T top, trailer
included $17,000.
352-613-8453
WE HAVE BOATS
GULF TO LAKE
MARINE
We Pay CASH For
Used Clean Boats
Pontoon, Deck &
Fishing Boats
(352)527-0555
boatsupercenter.com
Welcraft
16 Ft C. Console, boat,
motor,and trailer
352-746-0348




DUTCHMEN TRVL
TRAILER
2007 Ranier Model
R24Q. 25' with 1
slideout. Very good
cond. 7300 GVWR with
sway bar and wt disbn
hitch. $9900 obo. See at
Picard's Storage.
352-341-0890
ITASCA
2007 Navaron 23H
Mercedes Diesel, 2.7L,
17 mpg, generator, AC,
one slide out, sleeps 5,
excellent condition,
$50,000 make offer
352-422-1309
JAYCO
1996, Designer 5th
Wheel, 30 ft, slide out,
excellent condition At
Lake Rousseau RV PK
$7,500. obo
248-672-3452




'05 CAMPER
29' Holiday Rambler
Alum fr, Ig slide out.
great cond. $10,900
352-795-5310 or
410-474-3454
29FT TERRY
FLEETWOOD bunk
style camping trailer.
Tag Behind 96 model.
Good shape $3800
(352) 613-2944
Brooksville Deeded
spacious, shaded cnr
lot, 1BR/1BA, Large FL
room, Large storage
shed & patio. 55+ RV
Park w/ heated pool,
and music activities,
$36,000 352-848-0448,
352- 428-0462 anytime


SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 C13


CLASSIFIED



CAR/TOY HAULER
2007
32 ft Enclosed Goose-
neck w/liv qtrs. $11,900.
For more info call
352-560-7247
COACHMAN
30ft. Qn. Island bed, +
rear bunk beds, slide
out, ducted AC ready
to go. Very clean
$9,500 (352) 621-0848
FOREST RIVER
2010, Surveyor, Sport
189, 20 ft. Travel
Trailer,
1 slide, w/AC, qn. bed,
awning, pwr. tonque
jack, corner jacks,
microwave, equalizing
hitch, $9000
(352) 382-1826
KZ Toyhauler,07
32' like new, full slide
new tires, Owan Gen.,
gas tank, Lrg living
area separate cargo
$18,000. 352-795-2975
MAC'S MOBILE RV
REPAIR & MAINT.
RVTC Certified Tech.
352-613-0113, Lic/Ins.
POP-UP CAMPER
2002 Coleman
Tacoma, Exc Cond.
With add a room.
$4500
(352) 726-3919
SUNNYBROOK '05
36 ft. 5th wheel, 2
slides, kg bd,like new,
60amp serv. NADA
$29K asking $25K
obo 352-382-3298
WE BUY RV'S,
TRAVEL TRAILERS,
5TH WHEELS,
MOTOR HOMES
Call US 352-201-6945




LUGGAGE ROOF
CROSSRAILS
will fit any Chevy
Traverse $150
obo 352-503-6414
RV ROADMASTER
Hidden Face Plate
fits Dodge Ram 1500
asking $200,
727-251-7568




BUYING JUNK CARS
Running or Not *
CASH PAID-$300 & UP
(352) 771-6191
CASH BUYER'S
Buying Used Cars
Trucks & Vans, For
used car lot, Hwy 19
Larry's Auto Sales
352-564-8333

MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

WE BUY
ANY VEHICLE
In Any Condition,
Title, No Title, Bank
Lien, No Problem,
Don't Trade it in. We
Will Pay up to $25K
Any Make, Any Model.
813-335-3794
813-237-1892 Call AJ


-m-
BUICK
'00, Regal LS, 4 DR.
Loaded, 70K, 24 mpg,
leather, V6, auto clean
$4,475. 352-212-4882
Buick Century
Custom, 57k mi, extra
clean, full power. Runs
excellent $4500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
CADILLAC
1994 DEVILLE
79K MILES, CAR IS
PERFECT $4995
352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2005 STS
LOW MILES
NICE CAR
$9850, 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
2011 CTS, LOADED
ONLY 15K
MILES, SUNROOF
$27,850 352-628-5100
CADILLAC
97 Deville, 102k miles
clean, sharp, $2800
352-503-6972
CHEVROLET
1999, Camaro,
Convertible
$6,990.
352-341-0018
CHRYSLER
2006 PT Cruiser conv....
weather is getting
nice.. .time to drop the
top...call 352-628-4600
to set appointment
to see
CORVETTE
2006 Victory Red
tan leather, Convertible.
LS2 400HP. 16K miles,
3LT Option Pkg.
$29,900(352)560-7247
FORD
1995 Escort wagon
4cyl., Auto,
call 352-628-4600
for low price and
appointment
FORD
2005, Focus
$4,850.
352-341-0018
FORD
2010, Edge,
10k miles, Loaded,
exc. cond.$18,500 obo
352-400-6007
FORD
2010, Pruis,
$17,995.
352-341-0018
FORD
2011 FIESTA SDN
36K MILES, "S"
MODEL, ONE OWNER
$9950, 352-628-5100
FORD
98 Black Mustang
runs well! $3000
Iv msg 352-344-0093
HONDA
2010 ACCORD LX,
85K MILES, NICE,
$12,850 352-628-5110
LINCOLN
Towncar 2010
29,900mi, gold w/beige
vinyl top, white leather
asking, $24,900
352-476-5061
MERCURY
05 Grand Marquis Exc.
cond. 63.9kmi,leather,
smk free, ong. owner
$6900 352-746-3441


MINI COOPER
2008 2DR, HARDTOP
ONLY 20K MILES,
SUPER CLEAN
$13980, 352-628-5100
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440

NISSAN
2005, Altima
$5,895
352-341-0018
PONTIAC
2003 Bonneville, must
SE, V6, pw....pl....priced
to sell.....call jan at
352-628-4600 for
appointment
and pricing




2002 JAGUAR XJR
4 DR, $7200. Super
Charged 4.0 V-8,
exc cond, auto trans,
leather int, AC, power
sun roof, XJR Sport
Pkg, factory chrome
wheels (352) 637-6443

AUTO SWAP/
Corral CAR
Show
Sumter County
Fairgrounds
SUMTER
SWAP MEETS
SUN. MAR 3. '13
1-800-438-8559








Tell that special
person
Happy Birthday
"with a classi-
fled ad under
Happy Notes.
Only $28.50
includes a photo

Call our Classi-
fied Dept for de-
tails
352-563-5966
11111111




922-0322 DAILY CRN
Surplus Prop.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Citrus County Board
of County Commissioners


P NT.TransAm
Convt. BIk, auto, v8
69K miles $12,500
352-746-0348



2002 Ford F 50 Sport
4X4 Super Cab 4 Dr,
Auto, Black, 5.4 V8,
Runs Great. $5500
(352) 257-3894 Cell
(352) 794-6069 Office
DODGE
1996 Dakota Sport V6
50,300 actual miles.
Runs great, excellent
shape. $5,500 OBO
Sugarmill
740-705-9004
FORD
2004, Ranger
$7,990
352-341-0018
MONEY'S TIGHT!
PRICES R RIGHT!
BUY-SELL-RENT-
Car-Truck-Boat-RV
consianmentusa.ora
US 19 BY AIRPORT, CR
461-4518 & 795-4440




BUICK
2005 RANIER
46K MILES, CXL
LIKE NEW
$9850, 352-628-5100
HONDA
1997 CRV, priced to
sell....it's a honda
auto, pwr windows
call 352-628-4600 for
special newspaper
pricing
KIA
2012 SOUL
ONLY 7K MILES
$15,800 352-628-5100
SUBARU
2011 FORESTER
29K MILES
ONE OWNER
$17850, 352-628-5100
TOYOTA
1997 RAV4
ONLY 89K MILES,
NICE $5850,
352-628-5100



RV & BOAT STORAGE
@ $21.20. Per Month
352 422-6336 or
352-795-0150




will be selling surplus
p r o p -
erty and equipment via
the internet at
govdeals.com, March 4,


921-0302 WeekCRN
Twin Rivers 3-7 Bids
PUBLIC NOTICE
Twin Rivers Marina will be accepting bids for drive area resurfacing on or before
2:00pm, March 7, 2013 at the business office located at 2880 N. Seabreeze point,
Crystal River, Florida 34429. Plans and Specifications can be obtained during normal
weekday business hours from the Marina Manager on site. Twin Rivers Marina re-
serves the right to reject any and all bids. Only bids coming from qualified and li-
censed firms will be considered.
Scope is as follows: Regrade and compact existing surface area of approximately
1820 SY for positive drainage. Supply and install 3" of compacted fresh asphalt mill-
ings over entire area (1820 SY) to create new surface free of defects and grading in
such a way to create a positive drainage surface. Al completed, inspected and ex-
cepted by owners Rep.
February 25, 26, 27, 28 & March 1 & 2, 2013.


a*
E3ES OYOT


1 Lets G lcey s I^^


JEEP
2000, Grand
Cherokee 4x4, V8
pw, pl, priced to low
to list.....call adam at
352-628-4600 for
appointment



CHEVY CONV VAN
2007 Rocky Ridge Cony
1500 Chevy Exp. 5.3L
V8. Good cond.Leather.
TV, Tracvision, play sta.
96k mi. $14,900 obo.
352-341-0890
FORD
1994 AreoStar XLT
good cond, clean, cold
air, ready to roll
352-637-0441



CASH PAID FOR
JUNK MOTORCYCLES
352-942-3492








Harley Davidson
2009 Street Glide
Black, 20k, many extras
$18,500 firm, pls call
**352-422-5448**
HARLY DAVIDSON
08, 1200cc Sportster
classic 976mi. show-
roomcondition, $9250
obo (352) 447-1244
Honda
Gold Wing 1984
Exec. Cond, 39k miles
$4200 OBO
352-746-0348
KYMCO
2000 ZX 50 Scooter,
One owner, 268 miles,
windshield, luggage car-
rier, garage kept. $900
352-212-5286
SUZUKI
2005 Boulevard C90T
Runs, looks and sounds
good. 1500cc. 7700 mi.
Lots of extras. $4900
obo. 352-341-0890
Triumph
1971, Rebuilt upper end
of motor, runs like new,
reliable vintage bike,
$3,200 352-586-8396




until March 22,2013.
Pub: March 1 thru March
22,2013..



Bid Ntice




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


0A
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^:Jenkins Acura^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Safety Luxury Performance Engineering Service


Safest Vehicle Lineup In America!
with Highest Expected Residual Value Among Luxury Brandsit


APR
FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS
AVAILABLE ON NEW Acuras'


savings

* ZERO DOWN AVAILABLE
* ZERO PAYMENT FIRST MONTH
* ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT


IN"U1RAN(e ItyP TllcTk .
"Top Safety Picks"


Luxury Starts Here!
Lease $209 per
for 2 mo.
-^K-N -


Aggressive Yet Elegant!
Lease $349 per
for t mo.


Urban Achieverd
Lease $*Ql399 per
for mAF% J Mo.


State of The Art Togetherness!!
Lease $439 erm
for pe9 Mo.

j.11


$349
D3r


Thank you for reading this All prns are plus tax, tag & title Vehicles subject to pnor sale Limit 1 Ira de-in per purchase Cannot be ombied with any other advertised offers See dealer for cmplete delae Programs subject to change o l oul nont, ,With a purchase of a used vehicle Some re stricions may apply See dealer for details Star ratngs are part of the UUS Department of Transportation s afermr gay program (,wh safercar ga) Models tested wth
standard side-impact alrbags (SABs) t Based on ALG's 2009 2013 Residual Value Awards for a Luxury Brand Subect to Imed avalabilty Through March 4,2013 to approved lessees by Acura Financial Serices DBA of American -onda Finance Corp
se-end lease for 213 MX 6 Speed Aruomaic Model YD2H2DJNW) MRP44,75 Aual net a aled cst 4 Total monthly payments $15,04 Option to purchase at ease end 24736 Closed-end lease for 2013 TL 5 Speed Automatic (Model UFJW) MRP $36800 Atual net ptalzed cos $32.330 52 Total moonly payments $12,54 Option phase a ease en $21,712 Closed-end lease for 2013 RCX 5 Speed Automatic Model
,cr ..ed..it. .. .. . .. .. .... ,. ..


PRE-OWNED


VEHICLES


' -a-


~6,995


-02UOYT


Finance Included
l ad Vehicles

mi Ti i I i


-A351A
125,995



SP3845
$30,995


Thank you for reading this. All prices are plus tax, tag & title. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Limit
1 trade-in per purchase. Cannot be combined with any other advertised offers. See dealer for
complete details.Programs subject to change without notice. *With a purchase of a used vehicle.
Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details.


19,995




$22,995




$28,995




$33,995
Pre-Owned -
Vehicles JCM
Come With


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AT1T


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C14 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


"Five Stars"*


2008!;lM g
ACCOR


#TB3H3DJNW


#YD2H2DJNW


, i.


2012 DOG
RA 10


1-7


.. .. .. .




CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


-I /.


KIA MOTORS
The Power to Surprise


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OPTIMA/SOUL COUPON
TAKE AN $ A A OQ


EXTRA


ANY OPTIMA/SOUL IN
MUST PRESENT COUPON k


OFF
STOCK


.,APR
--=I

,i


FREE
WAI
GIFT
CARD


VALUED
UP TO $500
FOR
EVERYONE
WHO
COMES IN!


FAPR


LEAR "EM OUT
'RIDAY* SATURDAY* SUNDAY

Citrus
352-564-8668


AT CITRUS KIA,
"WE JUST
DON'T CLOSE
CAR DEALS,
WE OPEN
RELATIONSHIPS"


KIA


1850 S.E. Hwy. 19, Crystal River, FL
S .LL PRF I E.I PLLJ. T. i. ,G TITLE ii E LE I-'FEE I- -' LFI' F, ,I- 1. 1. .lOl TH 0 1 I rlT 0 iE'v Z'1 I ULJL
S LEA'E PA' ..1E T I' 0 ITH .}. -. D:.'I l I I .VITH PPPC' i EC ,: PEDiT I 0 11 ,. PEi E-P .lLE-GE
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SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 CIS


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


New 2013 Honda
ACCORD LX SEDAN
Model CR2F3DEW, Automatic Transmission!
Drive For m nly...

mL e"1


New 2012 Honda
CR-V LX 2WD
Model RM3H3CEW, Come See Why The Cr-V Is The Best
Selling Compact Suv In America! Save While They Last!
SAVWF JVotw Orn"y..


PrF
Drive For Only...


New 2013 Hon "r
ODYSSEY LX
Model RL5H2DEW
ZERO WLd'!!
Starting at On.
$.s27.060 ""


New 2012 Honda
RIDGELINE RT
Model YK1 F2CEW, 4Wd Wth The Trunk In The Bed, Power Pkg,
Cruise Control, V-6 Power And A Ride Like No Other.
SAVE' Now OnljA..
4s;27410 Iff


New 2012 Honda
CROSSTOUR 2WD 2.4 L4 EX
Model TF3H3CJW, Automatic Hatchback With Style And Comfort,
All The Luxury Ammenities And Room To Do What You Need.
SAVE.' Now OnlJ..


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17,01h
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C16 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


gEVE


I-


2013 Chevy Silverado
Crew Cab All Star Edition


6p


AND 0% APR for 72 Mo.
Over 75 Trucks to choose from! Accessorize your truck right on site!
TOP DOLLAR PAID FOR YOUR TRADE-INS!
2012 TRUCKS STARTING AT $17,995


All-New 2013 Chew Spaid 1 LS
Automatic Transmission


2012 Chevy Sonic 5 Dr. LS
MSRP: $15,560
$40NQjA


2013 Chevy Equinox LS
Stk. #C13135, Auto, 4cyl. MSRP: $25,030
$onooe


- 4_


2013 Chevy Avalanche
Black Diamond Edition, Personalized Coffee
Table Book, Own a Legend
MSRP: $37,115, Dealer Discount: $1,720
Rebate: $2,000, USAA Discount $750
....Your & A A A Am mi i


2013 Chew Tahoe
MSRP: $40.075, Dealer Discount: $3,250
Rebate: $750, USAA Discount $750
Bonus Cash: $750


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SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013 C17


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CITRUS COUNTY (FL) CHRONICLE


*-


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rwli


2007 HISSAN
ALTIMA


2008 FORD
ESCAPE


2008 CHEVY
MALIBU





CRYSTAL
AUTOMOTIVE


352-564-1971 WWW.CRYSTALAUTOS.COM
1035 S. Suncoast Blvd. 1005 S. Suncoast Blvd. 2077 Highway 44W 14358 Cortez Blvd. 937 S. Suncoast Blvd.
Homosassa, FL Homosassa, FL Inverness, FL Brooksville, FL Homosassa, FL

*BASED ON STOCK #113272A, 2003 FORD FOCUS-INCLUDES $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE, EXCLUDES TAX, TAG TITLE AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. +PRICES INCLUDE $1000 CRYSTAL TRADE ASSISTANCE. EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, TITLE
AND DEALER FEE $599.50. WITH APPROVED CREDIT PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY, PRIOR SALES MAY RESTRICT STOCK.


C18 SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2013


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